Barbie/60e: Les sionistes ont même inventé les poupées Barbie ! (From high-end German call girl to America’s iconic Barbie doll, sexist and anorexic scourge of the feminists or shameful Jewish symbol of decadence of the perverted West)

9 mars, 2019
lilivsbarbie
Ruth and Elliot Handler, both raised in Colorado, pose with an early version of Barbie. Photo courtesy of Mattel
barbie-museum-prague
lilliebarbie1
lillibarbie2
lilibarbie4
bbLilli
Image result for A Barbie for Every Body
A création 1959, poupée Barbie coûtait 3$. Aujourd’hui faut débourser, moyenne, dollars.
Image result for A Barbie for Every Body
Barbie (Andy Warhol, 1985)
https://file1.bibamagazine.fr/var/bibamagazine/storage/images/culture/evenements/une-exposition-sur-les-poupees-barbie-a-paris-53395/405188-1-fre-FR/Une-exposition-sur-les-poupees-Barbie-a-Paris_width1024.png

Checking out the barbies in Prague (Aug. 2013)Les poupées Barbie juives, avec leurs vêtements révélateurs, leurs postures, accessoires et outils honteux sont un symbole de la décadence de l’Occident perverti. Prenons garde à ces dangers et faisons très attention. Comité saoudien pour la promotion de la vertu et la prévention du vice
It is no problem that little girls play with dolls. But these dolls should not have the developed body of a woman and wear revealing clothes. These revealing clothes will be imprinted in their minds and they will refuse to wear the clothes we are used to as Muslims. Sheik Abdulla al-Merdas (Riyadh mosque preacher)
Saudi Arabia’s religious police have declared Barbie dolls a threat to morality, complaining that the revealing clothes of the « Jewish » toy — already banned in the kingdom — are offensive to Islam. The Committee for the Propagation of Virtue and Prevention of Vice, as the religious police are officially known, lists the dolls on a section of its Web site devoted to items deemed offensive to the conservative Saudi interpretation of Islam. « Jewish Barbie dolls, with their revealing clothes and shameful postures, accessories and tools are a symbol of decadence to the perverted West. Let us beware of her dangers and be careful, » said a message posted on the site. A spokesman for the Committee said the campaign against Barbie — banned for more than 10 years — coincides with the start of the school year to remind children and their parents of the doll’s negative qualities. Speaking to The Associated Press by telephone from the holy city of Medina, he claimed that Barbie was modeled after a real-life Jewish woman. Although illegal, Barbies are found on the black market, where a contraband doll could cost $27 or more. Sheik Abdulla al-Merdas, a preacher in a Riyadh mosque, said the muttawa, the committee’s enforcers, take their anti-Barbie campaign to the shops, confiscating dolls from sellers and imposing a fine. Fox news
Born a busty, bathing suit-clad  »teen-age fashion model » in the 1959 Mattel catalogue, Barbie in the book is shown dressed for success as  »Campus Belle, »  »Career Girl » and  »Student Teacher » in the mid-1960’s; as a nurse and a doctor by 1973, and, most recently, as a silver-gilded astronaut and glitter rock star. (…) While her critics may say she is no more than a mannequin, Billy Boy refers to Barbie as a  »life style. »  »Every woman has a Barbie quality about her, » he said. Marilyn Motz, a professor of popular culture at Bowling Green State, has a different view.  »The whole point of the Barbie doll is that she owns things and buys things, » said Professor Motz, who published a study of Barbie in 1983. She said that the doll, if copied to scale as a life-size woman, would have a torso measuring 33 inches at the bust, 18 inches at the waist and 28 inches at the hips – a feminine ideal that, she pointed out, is  »almost not possible anatomically. » NYT (1987)
Barbie, the fashion doll famous around the world, celebrates her 60th anniversary on Saturday with new collections honoring real-life role models and careers in which women remain under-represented. It is part of Barbie’s evolution over the decades since her debut at the New York Toy Fair on March 9, 1959. To mark the milestone, manufacturer Mattel Inc created Barbie versions of 20 inspirational women from Japanese tennis star Naomi Osaka to British model and activist Adwoa Aboah. The company also released six dolls representing the careers of astronaut, pilot, athlete, journalist, politician and firefighter, all fields in which Mattel said women are still under-represented. Barbie is a cultural icon celebrated by the likes of Andy Warhol, the Paris Louvre museum and the 1997 satirical song “Barbie Girl” by Scandinavian pop group Aqua. She was named after the daughter of creator Ruth Handler. Barbie has taken on more than 200 careers from surgeon to video game developer since her debut, when she wore a black-and-white striped swimsuit. After criticism that Barbie’s curvy body promoted an unrealistic image for young girls, Mattel added a wider variety of skin tones, body shapes, hijab-wearing dolls and science kits to make Barbie more educational. Barbie is also going glamorous for her six-decade milestone. A diamond-anniversary doll wears a sparkly silver ball gown. Reuters
Barbie Millicent Roberts, from Wisconsin US, is celebrating her 60th birthday. She is a toy. A doll. Yet she has grown into a phenomenon. An iconic figure, recognised by millions of children and adults worldwide, she has remained a popular choice for more than six decades – a somewhat unprecedented feat for a doll in the toy industry. She is also, arguably, the original “influencer” of young girls, pushing an image and lifestyle that can shape what they aspire to be like. (…) When Barbie was born many toys for young girls were of the baby doll variety; encouraging nurturing and motherhood and perpetuating the idea that a girl’s future role would be one of homemaker and mother. Thus Barbie was born out of a desire to give girls something more. Barbie was a fashion model with her own career. The idea that girls could play with her and imagine their future selves, whatever that may be, was central to the Barbie brand. However, the “something more” that was given fell short of empowering girls, by today’s standards. And Barbie has been described as “an agent of female oppression”. The focus on play that imagined being grown up, with perfect hair, a perfect body, a plethora of outfits, a sexualised physique, and a perfect first love (in the equally perfect Ken) has been criticised over the years for perpetuating a different kind of ideal – one centred around body image, with dangerous consequences for girls’ mental and physical health. (…) Exposure to unhealthy, unrealistic and unattainable body images is associated with eating disorder risk. Indeed, the increasing prevalence of eating disorder symptoms in non-Western cultures has been linked to exposure to Western ideals of beauty. Barbie’s original proportions gave her a body mass index (BMI) so low that she would be unlikely to menstruate and the probability of this body shape is less than one in 100,000 women. (…) With growing awareness of body image disturbances and cultural pressures on young girls, many parents have begun to look for more empowering toys for their daughters. Barbie’s manufacturer, Mattel, has been listening, possibly prompted by falling sales, and in 2016 a new range of Barbies was launched that celebrated different body shapes, sizes, hair types and skin tones. (…) If Barbie was about empowering girls to be anything that they want to be, then the Barbie brand has tried to move with the times by providing powerful role playing tools for girls. (…) Such changes can have a remarkable impact on how young girls imagine their career possibilities, potential futures, and the roles that they are expected to take. Mattel’s move to honour 20 women role models including Japanese Haitian tennis player Naomi Osaka – currently the world number one – with her own doll is a positive step in bringing empowering role models into the consciousness of young girls. Gemma Witcomb
Ruth Moskowicz was born into a family of Russian Jewish immigrants in Denver, Colorado in 1916. She married her high school boyfriend, an artistic young man named Elliot Handler, and they moved to Los Angeles in 1938. After her husband decided to make their furniture out of two new plastics, Lucite and Plexiglas, Ruth ambitiously suggested that he turn furniture making into a business. (…) During World War II, the Handlers started a company, Mattel, combining Elliot’s name with the last name of their partner, Harold Matson. On weekends home from wartime duties at Camp Robert, California, Elliot made toy furniture for Ruth to sell. (…) The Handlers took their two teenagers — Barbara and Ken — on a trip to Europe in 1956. There, they saw a doll that looked like an adult woman, vastly different from the baby dolls most little girls owned. Ruth was inspired. Three years later, Mattel’s version, Barbie, would debut, with a wardrobe of outfits that could be purchased separately. In 1960, the Handlers took Mattel public, with a valuation of $10 million ($60.3 million in 2003 dollars). It was on its way to the Fortune 500, and Barbie quickly became an icon, with ever-changing wardrobe and career options that mirrored women’s changing aspirations. PBS
Ruth Mosko (…) was born November 4, 1916, to Jacob Joseph Mosko (née Moskowicz), a blacksmith, and Ida Rubinstein, a housewife. Ruth was the youngest of 10 children. Her father arrived at Ellis Island in 1907. After telling immigration officials that he was a blacksmith, he was sent to Denver, the center of the railroad industry. In 1908, his wife, Ida, arrived in America with their six children and joined her husband in Colorado. (…) In 1941 Ruth left her secretarial job at Paramount to work with her husband, who was designing and making furniture and household accessories out of the new acrylic materials, Lucite and Plexiglas. Her husband produced the pieces and she did the selling. (…) In 1945, they (…) and Harold “Matt” Matson started Mattel Creations, joining elements of Matt’s and Elliot’s names. Under the Mattel moniker, the two partners began fabricating dollhouse furniture. Ruth continued to run the marketing department. Due to his poor health, Matt soon sold his share to Elliot. The company had its first hit toy in 1947 with a ukulele called Uke-A-Doodle. That proved such a success that Mattel switched to making nothing but toys. Ruth drove Mattel’s business decisions, while her husband nurtured new toys. (…) After watching her daughter, Barbara, ignore her baby dolls to play make-believe with paper dolls representing adult women, Ruth realized there may be a niche for a three-dimensional doll that encouraged girls to imagine the future. When visiting Germany in 1956, Ruth saw a doll that looked like a teenager, and this doll inspired her to follow her dream. Mattel’s designers spent several years creating Ruth’s doll using the German doll as an inspiration. Barbie Millicent Roberts debuted at the American Toy Fair in New York City in 1959. Ruth named the blond 11-and-a-half-inch doll for her daughter, who was a 17-year-old attending a local Los Angeles high school. Dressed in a black and white striped swimsuit with the necessary accessories of sunglasses, high-heeled shoes and gold-colored hoop earrings, Barbie’s body was not only shapely but also had a movable head, arms and legs. Barbie had a chic wardrobe that had to be purchased separately and updated regularly. Barbie was a marketing sensation. Within a year of her introduction in 1959, Barbie became the biggest selling fashion doll of all time. Sales increased with the introduction of different Barbie dolls and accessories. Barbie became a staple in the toy chests of little girls everywhere. It was Ruth’s marketing genius that changed toy marketing when she acquired the rights to produce the popular “Mickey Mouse Club” products in 1955. The cross-marketing promotion became common practice for future companies. Barbie made her first television appearance on the “The Mickey Mouse Club.” This marketing technique helped sell 351,000 Barbie dolls in the first year at $3 each. Barbie quickly became an icon, with her ever-changing wardrobe and career options that mirrored women’s changing aspirations. (…) Over the years, Barbie changed jobs more than 75 times, becoming a dentist, a paleontologist, an Air Force fighter pilot, a World Cup soccer competitor, a firefighter and a candidate for president. Even in demanding positions, though, Barbie retained her fashion sense. She was joined by friends and family over the years, including Ken, Midge, Skipper and Christie. Barbie kept up with current trends in hairstyles, makeup and clothing. (…) Barbie’s world is more than a doll and accessories. Kids today can use their high-tech gadgets and interactive smartphones and apps to personalize their Barbie doll experience. Other licensed products include books, apparel, home furnishings and home electronics. She even has a YouTube site and a Facebook page. But Barbie’s popularity doesn’t stop there. The Musée des Arts Décoratifs, which is affiliated with the Louvre in Paris, held a Barbie exhibit in 2016. The exhibit featured 700 Barbie dolls displayed on two floors, as well as works by contemporary artists and documents (newspapers, photos, video) representing Barbie. Barbie has become a popular collectible among adults. Collectors prize early numbered Barbie dolls from 1969 and the 1990’s, as well as a range of rare and special editions of the iconic toy. Over the past few years, Mattel transformed Barbie, and she now may look a bit more like those who play with her, curves and all. The new 2016 Barbie Fashionistas doll line includes four body types (the original and three new bodies), seven skin tones, 22 eye colors, 24 hairstyles and countless on-trend fashions and accessories. With these changes, Barbie added diversity and more variety in styles, fashions, shoes and accessories. Mattel claims girls everywhere will now have infinitely more ways to spark their imagination and play out their stories. Cyndy Thomas Klepinger
When Ruth Handler (formerly Moskowitz) traveled to Switzerland in 1956 with her family, her husband Elliot and their children Barbara and Kenneth, they came across a small figurine, blonde, thin, and tall at 11 inches (28 cm), whose name was Lilli. The Lilli doll was a novelty item for adults. The all-American Barbie doll, named for little Barbara Handler of course, which debuted in 1959 would become a mass-produced doll for young girls (and also boys, we don’t judge, and neither should you) and end up being the most popular doll in the history of toys. The Ken doll, which debuted a few years later, was named for Ruth Handler’s son Kenneth, of course. Ruth Handler’s story, and Barbie’s, is part and parcel of the American story. The daughter of Polish-Jewish immigrants, Ruth Moskowitz was born the youngest of 10 children in Denver, Colorado. As a teenager she was sent to be a shop-girl in her aunt’s store, where she not only learned the basics of running a business, but to love it. During her marriage to Elliot Handler, the two formed a business in plastic and wood, making props and toys for Hollywood studios and toy shops nationwide. Along with another business partner, the Handlers formed “Mattel”. In 1959, after three years of development, Barbie sprang fully formed into the world, bathing suit and all. Barbie was a child’s toy with adult outfits, accessories, and most importantly – a job. (…) The Barbie doll was the first doll aimed at girls that was an adult, not a doll in the shape of a baby or a doll that was a child, but a doll with which the young girl could play at being a grown up and dress up with her most loyal doll companion. The Barbie doll doesn’t “look” Jewish. But her heritage is Jewish and full of chutzpah. Ruth Handler was ambitious and held her own in the so-called man’s world of business. She thought of young girls not merely as consumers, but as the future generation of women in America and all around the world. Well, almost all. Back in 2003 Saudi officials declared the “Jewish Barbie Dolls” a threat to morality. Though Barbie’s Jewish roots are bleached blonde, Ruth Handler and consequently Barbie is particularly Jewish-American. Just by immigrating from Europe, changing her name and weaving herself into the very fabric of American life, the Barbie doll became international and a part of culture that is both inspired and inspirational. Melodie Barron
Ruth Handler (née le 4 novembre 1916, décédée le 27 avril 2002) est une femme d’affaires américaine qui a révolutionné l’industrie du jouet en 1959 en créant la poupée Barbie, du nom de sa fille Barbara, et la poupée Ken du nom de son fils Kenneth. La poitrine opulente, la taille fine et les longues jambes de Barbie allaient totalement à l’encontre du style rond et asexué des poupées de l’époque et firent date, par leur audace et leur réalisme, dans l’histoire du jouet pour petites filles. Née Ruth Mosko, Ruth Handler était la plus jeune des dix enfants d’une famille d’immigrants judéo-polonais. Avec son époux Elliot Handler et le designer Harold Mattson, elle avait créé Mattel en 1945, un nom formé du Matt de Mattson et du El d’Elliot. (…) Ruth Handler avait constaté que sa fille Barbara, une préado de 10 ans, préférait jouer avec ses poupées de papier qu’avec ses poupées de petite fille et qu’elle leur octroyait des rôles d’adultes. Forte de cette observation Ruth voulut produire une poupée en plastique d’apparence adulte, mais son mari et M. Matson ont pensé que le jouet serait invendable. Lors d’un voyage en Europe du couple, Ruth découvre la poupée allemande Bild Lilli (qui était en fait un jouet gag pour adultes créé d’après le personnage de BD Lilli qui paraissait dans le journal Bill Zeitung) dans un magasin suisse et la ramène à la maison. Une fois rentrée donc, Ruth Handler retravaille le design de la poupée et la baptise Barbie en référence à sa fille Barbara. Barbie fait ses débuts à la foire de jouet de New York, le 9 mars 1959. La poupée est vite devenue un immense succès, lançant les Handlers et leur société de jouets vers la gloire et la fortune. Par la suite ils ajouteraient un petit ami pour Barbie nommé Ken, en référence à Kenneth, leur fils. D’autres personnages viendront enrichir la gamme « des amis et de la famille ». Le monde de Barbie prenait forme. Ruth Handler a plus tard affirmé que, lorsqu’elle a acheté « Bild Lilli », elle ignorait que c’était un jouet pour adulte. Ruth Handler a expliqué qu’elle a pensé que cela « était important pour l’estime d’une fille qu’elle joue avec une poupée avec une poitrine adulte » et Barbie a été créée pour jouer ce rôle. Si la poupée commercialisée à l’origine était transposée à taille humaine, ses mensurations auraient été assez irréalistes et de nombreux critiques ont prétendu que les mesures ont été basées sur la fantaisie masculine plutôt que la métrique humaine réelle. Au fil des années les mensurations peu réalistes de Barbie ont continué à être controversées, avec beaucoup de théories qui expliquent que de jouer avec une poupée Barbie diminue l’estime de soi et complexe les petites filles. En réponse à ces critiques, à la fin des années 1990, Mattel a ajusté le tour de poitrine en le diminuant et a augmenté le tour de taille, même si ces nouvelles mensurations sont encore loin des femmes réelles. Wikipedia
Barbie est une poupée de 29 cm commercialisée depuis 1959 par Mattel, une société américaine de jouets et jeux. Elle reprenait la forme adulte, les cheveux blonds et le principe de Bild Lilli, première poupée mannequin lancée en Allemagne un peu plus tôt. Si la Barbie caractéristique est blonde aux cheveux longs et aux traits européens, sa couleur de cheveux varie en fait considérablement et son type ethnique s’est diversifié dès 1967 et plus systématiquement à partir de 1980, si bien qu’à ce jour il existe une Barbie pour à peu près tous les groupes ethniques du monde. Elle exerce de multiples métiers et professions tels que : docteur, enseignante, jockey, vétérinaire, hôtesse de l’air, Chevalier du Roi, Première-Dame (CNN) etc. En 1997, Mattel a vendu sa milliardième poupée Barbie. En 2009, et malgré une forte baisse des ventes due à la concurrence, la poupée a généré plus d’un milliard d’euros de chiffre d’affaires. En fin d’année 2015, un petit garçon apparait pour la 1re fois dans une des publicités de la marque, vantant les qualités de la Barbie habillée par l’entreprise de mode italienne Moschino3. Cette publicité qui a créé l’événement au niveau mondial, est alors acclamée par la critique, tandis que la Barbie Moschino, elle, se retrouve très vite en rupture de stock. En 2016, face à l’accélération de la chute des ventes de Barbie, Mattel va beaucoup plus loin dans sa démarche de diversification, en lançant trois nouvelles silhouettes de Barbie aux côtés de la Barbie traditionnelle ; l’une de ces nouvelles silhouettes, baptisée en anglais « Curvy » (« arrondie »), propose une Barbie bien en chair, presque dodue, assez éloignée de la Barbie d’origine. (…) Mattel est une société américaine de jouets et jeux fondée en 1945 par Harold Matson et Elliot Handler, d’où le nom de l’entreprise : Mat+Ell = Mattel. C’est la femme d’Elliot Handler, Ruth Handler, qui créa Barbie (diminutif de leur fille Barbara) en 1959 en reprenant les caractéristiques de Bild Lilli, une poupée allemande avec un corps d’adulte, des cheveux blonds et une garde-robe contemporaine, prototype de la poupée mannequin. La première poupée Barbie a été présentée à l’American International Toy Fair de New York le 9 mars 1959 par sa créatrice Ruth Handler. Le succès presque immédiat de ce nouveau genre de poupée poussa son époux et un associé à créer la société Mattel Creations. La poupée Barbie avec sa poitrine opulente, sa taille fine et ses longues jambes allaient, en effet, totalement à l’encontre du style rond et asexué des poupées de l’époque. En cela, elle fut la seconde poupée au corps adulte après la Bild Lilli. En effet, en 1951, le dessinateur Reinhard Beuthin crée pour une bande-dessinée dans le magazine allemand Bild Zeitung une poupée : la Bild Lilli. Quatre ans plus tard, l’entreprise Hauser commercialise la poupée. Lors d’un voyage en famille à Lucerne en Suisse en 1956, Barbara, la fille de Elliot et Ruth Handler, réclama à ses parents un jouet peu commun pour l’époque : une poupée mannequin du nom de Lilli. Ce jouet au regard taquin et à forte poitrine intrigua Ruth Handler, mais, ce n’est seulement qu’en observant sa fille jouer des heures durant avec la poupée Lilli que la directrice de Mattel décida de produire ce même jouet aux États-Unis. Ainsi, la famille Handler ramena Lilli dans ses valises sur le continent américain et trois ans plus tard, Mattel lança son nouveau jouet : la poupée Barbie, qui, excepté quelques modifications au niveau du maquillage, était la parfaite réplique de la poupée allemande Lilli. Le succès de Barbie se répand dans tous les États-Unis comme une trainée de poudre, et très vite, la nouvelle poupée de Mattel envahit les magasins de jouets européens. En 1963, Rolf Hausser, directeur de l’entreprise de jouets O&M Hausser et créateur de Lilli, découvre avec surprise sa poupée dans une vitrine de magasin de jouets à Nuremberg la copie parfaite de sa Lilli rebaptisée Barbie. Rolf, décida dans un premier temps de poursuivre le géant Mattel en justice, mais raisonné par son frère et compte tenu du peu de ressources financières de la petite entreprise allemande, les poursuites furent abandonnées. En 1964, Rolf Hausser vendit les droits de la poupée Lilli à Mattel pour sauver l’entreprise familiale qui fit faillite malgré tout quelques années plus tard. Barbie est le diminutif de Barbara, le prénom de la fille de Ruth Handler20. Ses mensurations, initialement hypertrophiées, sont ramenées à des proportions plus habituelles au fil des années. (…) En (…) 1986 (…) Des Barbie représentant le monde entier sont également commercialisées : la Barbie japonaise, la Barbie indienne, la Barbie hispanique (qui sera connue comme Theresa, une des amies de Barbie) la Barbie allemande, la Barbie irlandaise… (…) En 2016, la Barbie traditionnelle aux longues jambes, à la poitrine imposante et à la taille ultra-fine se voit concurrencée par trois Barbie nouvelles : « Tall » (grande et longiligne), « Petite » (toute menue), et « Curvy » (« bien en chair », avec moins de poitrine, mais un petit ventre rond, des hanches plus larges, ainsi que des fesses et des cuisses arrondies). Ces évolutions, qui constituent en fait une révolution de l’approche marketing de la marque au point que Barbie « Curvy » fait la couverture de Time Magazine, résultent d’une remise en cause rendue indispensable par la perte de part de marché des poupées Barbie (ventes en baisse de 16 % en 2014, après une chute de 6 % l’année précédente), accentuée encore par la perte de la licence Disney pour commercialiser la poupée Elsa tirée de La Reine des neiges, et récupérée par Hasbro ; cette perte représente pour Mattel une perte de chiffre d’affaires évaluée à 500 millions de dollars. Cependant, cet abandon de la silhouette traditionnelle de Barbie présente d’intéressantes possibilités de développement, dans la mesure où il entraînera un renouvellement accéléré de la garde-robe : Barbie « Curvy » ne peut en effet pas enfiler les vêtements de la Barbie traditionnelle. La nouvelle démarche de la marque vise à se rapprocher de la réalité de la population féminine américaine en abandonnant une partie des stéréotypes véhiculés par Barbie, au profit de nouveaux canons de beauté popularisés par des personnalités telles que Mariah Carey, Kim Kardashian, Beyoncé, Christina Hendricks31, Meghan Trainor, voire Melissa McCarthy et sa ligne de vêtements en « taille plus ».Développé dans le plus grand secret sous le nom de code de « Project Dawn »31, ce virage radical n’est pas sans risque : les clientes habituelles peuvent se sentir trahies, et les mères des petites filles à qui on offre une Barbie « Curvy » peuvent y voir une critique voilée de l’embonpoint de leur progéniture33. De plus, ce changement de stratégie va constituer un cauchemar logistique pour gérer dans la pratique ces nouvelles variantes, sans même parler des problèmes qu’il a fallu résoudre pour traduire les trois nouvelles appellations dans des douzaines de langues différentes. Face à la chute des ventes, cependant, Mattel n’avait plus le choix. Et les difficultés à affronter ne font que refléter le statut d’icône américaine qu’a atteint Barbie depuis bien des années, puisque 92 % des Américaines ont possédé une Barbie entre l’âge de 3 ans et l’âge de 12 ans. Toujours est-il que, selon Le Journal de Montréal qui publie les images de ces nouvelles « Barbie Fashionistas », « la nouvelle Barbie « Curvy » pourrait changer la façon dont les femmes se perçoivent ». Parallèlement aux poupées Barbie disponibles dans les grandes surfaces et à destination des enfants, la société Mattel commercialise depuis les années 1990 des poupées Barbie de collection. La marque s’inspire principalement de la culture populaire de masse telle que : le cinéma, la musique et la télévision, afin de créer une gamme exclusivement basée autour de ces disciplines. Ces poupées Barbie à tirage limité sont vendues dans des magasins spécialisés à un prix beaucoup plus élevé. (…) D’autres poupées Barbie sont habillées par de grands couturiers110, avec, entre autres, pour les cinquante ans de Barbie en 2009, cinquante créateurs qui ont participé au relooking de celle-ci. : Givenchy, Oscar de la Renta (1998), Karl Lagerfeld111 (2009), Calvin Klein, Versace, Vera Wang, Christian Dior (1995 et 1997), Louis Vuitton112 (2011), Yves Saint Laurent, Christian Louboutin, Jean Paul Gaultier (2 poupées), Robert Mackie, Chantal Thomass et plus récemment en 2014 : une « barbie » Karl Lagerfeld, etc. (…) Barbie est fréquemment associée au monde de la joaillerie, pour l’édition de poupées en éditions limitées. Ainsi, la poupée Barbie neuve la plus chère est celle créée par Stefano Canturi130 présentée en Australie en 2010, avec un tarif de 500 000 dollars. Le précédent record pour le prix unitaire datait de 2008 avec une poupée à 94 800 dollars présentée au Mexique. (…) En Arabie saoudite, pour justifier l’interdiction des poupées Barbie dans le royaume, le Comité pour la promotion de la vertu et la prévention du vice (organisme chargé de la police religieuse) déclara : « Les poupées Barbie juives, avec leurs vêtements révélateurs, leurs postures, accessoires et outils honteux sont un symbole de la décadence de l’Occident perverti. Prenons garde à ces dangers et faisons très attention. » Pour les psychiatres, Barbie est un fantasme d’adulte mais pas de petites filles. Dans un brûlot intitulé Toy-Monster : the Big Bad World of Mattel, le journaliste et essayiste américain Jerry Oppenheimer présente le designer de Barbie, Jack Ryan, comme un pervers sexuel. Pour l’essayiste, Barbie serait l’incarnation du fantasme ultime de son inventeur : une call-girl de luxe, à la taille ultrafine, aux seins en obus et au visage enfantin. Des parents l’accusent de fausser l’image de la femme et d’encourager notamment l’anorexie. La pédopsychiatre Gisèle George et la psychanalyste Claude Halmos rejettent l’idée que Barbie ait un quelconque pouvoir, cette dernière va plus loin en disant que la construction psychique d’un enfant dépend des adultes et non pas des objets qui l’entourent. Cette polémique persiste, et des chercheurs en médecine montrent que les mensurations de Barbie ne sont pas compatibles avec une vie normale, et qu’elle conduit à adopter des conduites alimentaires anorexiques. Fin 2013, une campagne est lancée en vue de promouvoir l’image d’une Barbie plus « ronde ». En 1992, Mattel commercialise la Teen Talk Barbie : elle peut émettre quelques phrases « comme les ados » à propos de shopping, vêtements, pizzas etc. La phrase : « Math class is tough! » (« Les maths, c’est dur ! ») attire la réprobation de l’Association américaine des femmes diplômées des universités (AAUW). Mattel retire rapidement la phrase du « répertoire » de Barbie. Par contre la phrase : « Allons faire les courses après l’école » ne fut jamais retirée de l’exemplaire français de la Teen Talk Barbie malgré les réticences de l’AAUW. Hugo Chávez, le président vénézuélien, a proposé de fabriquer des « poupées avec des visages d’Indiens » pour remplacer « la Barbie, qui n’a rien à voir avec notre culture »141. En 2010, la sortie de Barbie Vidéo Girl suscite l’inquiétude du FBI. Cette poupée équipée d’une caméra et d’un écran LCD pourrait être utilisée selon l’agence comme un moyen détourné de produire du contenu pédopornographique. Durant le premier semestre 2012, Barbie fait de la politique, mais sans prendre parti, avec la commercialisation de la poupée Yes She Can. La même année, Valeria Lukyanova se fait remarquer par les médias du monde entier en se faisant surnommer la « Barbie vivante ». À la suite de la publication d’un rapport en octobre 2013144, les associations Peuples Solidaires et China Labor Watch ont lancé une campagne pour dénoncer les conditions de travail des ouvrières et ouvriers chinois qui fabriquent les poupées Barbie. La campagne « Barbie ouvrière » a été lancée peu avant Noël 2013 afin de sensibiliser les consommateurs et de faire pression sur l’entreprise Mattel. Wikipedia
Lilli est une poupée mannequin produite de 1955 à 1961 par la société allemande O. & M. Hausser. Elle apparaît pour la première fois en 1952 dans une bande dessinée publiée dans le journal allemand Bild Zeitung. Sa morphologie adulte, ses cheveux implantés et sa fabrication en matière plastique avec plusieurs trousseaux de vêtements contemporains en tissus, ont été repris aux États-Unis pour devenir la poupée Barbie. À l’origine, Lilli est un personnage de bande dessinée créé par Reinhard Beuthien. Elle fait sa première apparition le 24 juin 1952 dans le journal Bild Zeitung. Devant le succès remporté par ce personnage, Bild décide d’en faire une poupée pour la commercialiser en tant que mascotte. Le journal fait alors appel à la société allemande O. & M. Hausser, un fabricant de jouets établi à Neustadt et dirigé par les frères Rolf et Kurt Hausser. Créée par Max Weissbrodt, la poupée Lilli est lancée le 12 août 1955. O. & M. Hausser lui adjoint des meubles ainsi qu’une garde-robe conséquente inspirée de la mode des années 50, dessinée par Martha Maar et confectionnée par la société 3M Puppenfabrik. Avec son corps de jeune femme sexy, sa bouche sensuelle, son maquillage et ses yeux « en coulisse », Lilli tranche avec les poupées-fillettes et les poupons joufflus. Elle promeut un nouveau modèle : la poupée mannequin. Des poupées-femmes existaient déjà avant l’apparition de Lilli mais dans la plupart des cas elles n’étaient pas considérées comme des jouets et n’étaient pas destinées aux enfants.L’arrivée de Barbie sur le marché du jouet va lui être fatale. Lors d’un séjour en Europe, Ruth Handler, co-fondatrice de la société Mattel avec son mari Elliot, découvre la poupée Lilli dans une boutique suisse. De retour aux États-Unis, Ruth Handler décide de s’en inspirer pour créer la poupée Barbie. Wikipedia
On s’en doutait, les mensurations de la poupée Barbie de Mattel sont inapplicables à un humain. Le site anglais rehabs.co a décidé de se pencher sur la question en comparant le corps de Barbie à celui d’une Américaine moyenne. Cette étude fait partie d’un rapport sur les désordres alimentaires et les problèmes des jeunes filles avec leur image. Le verdict est sans appel : si Barbie était en chair et en os, elle serait en très mauvaise santé. Son cou est beaucoup trop long et 15 cm plus fin que celui d’une femme normale. Sans ce soutien, sa tête tombe donc sur le côté. Avec une taille de 40 cm, impossible de loger tous les organes. Adieu l’estomac et une bonne partie de l’intestin. Sa taille est également trop fine puisqu’elle ne représenterait que 56% des hanches. Ses jambes, elles, sont anormalement longues et beaucoup trop maigres. Résultat, avec des chevilles de 15 cm, soit la même taille du pied d’un enfant de trois ans, elle ne tiendrait pas debout. Impossible de marcher donc, ni même de se soutenir avec les mains, car des poignets de 7,6 cm ne sont pas suffisants pour porter son corps. Si Barbie était vivante, elle serait donc constamment allongée, et ne pourrait pas survivre longtemps à cause de ses problèmes d’organes. Top santé
Mais vous ne vous rendez pas compte à quoi on s’est heurtés quand on a introduit Barbie en France il y a vingt-cinq ans. Aux mêmes comportements de refus que ceux qui avaient accueilli Barbie dix ans plus tôt aux Etats-Unis. Cette première poupée sexuée, en pleine Amérique puritaine, elle ne passait pas du tout. Nous avons mis dix ans à remonter la pente. Robert Gerson (Mattel France)
Certes, celui qui a conçu la Barbie n’avait pas une once de féminisme : il a projeté l’image d’un objet sexuel, d’après un prototype américain à la Jane Mansfield. En revanche, on ne peut pas donner à Barbie un pouvoir qu’elle n’a pas : une poupée ne peut pas influer sur l’orientation sexuelle, professionnelle, ou quoi que ce soit d’autre… Gisèle George (pédopsychiatre)
Il est devenu courant d’accuser les objets : la violence serait de la faute de la télé, l’anorexie, celle de Barbie… mais on oublie l’essentiel : la construction psychique d’un enfant dépend des adultes qui l’entourent. Une petite fille conçoit la féminité à travers ce que sa mère ressent et vit pour elle-même, et à travers la façon dont son père ou un compagnon masculin considère sa mère. Claude Halmos (psychanalyste)
Si Playmobil fait l’unanimité auprès des parents, ce n’est pas le cas de Barbie, la plus célèbre des poupées, qui a fêté ses 50 ans en 2009 et s’est retrouvée, cette année encore, parmi les cadeaux les plus offerts aux petites filles pour Noël. Avec ses mensurations improbables – soit 95-45-82 à l’échelle humaine -, Barbie est accusée de fausser l’image de la femme et d’encourager notamment l’anorexie. Dans l’Hexagone, de plus en plus de mamans répugnent à l’offrir à leurs filles. Avec 3 millions de poupées vendues par an en France sur une cible de… 3 millions de petites filles âgées de 2 à 9 ans, le fabricant Mattel n’est pourtant pas encore aux abois. « 80 % de l’offre Barbie et ses accessoires, château, voiture, chevaux… est renouvelé chaque année », explique Arnaud Roland-Gosselin, directeur marketing de Mattel France. De quoi entretenir l’intérêt des petites consommatrices, qui possèdent, chacune, une moyenne de douze poupées. Dernière excentricité marketing en date, la sortie, pour les fêtes de fin d’année, d’une Barbie chaussée par le créateur Christian Louboutin : 115 euros le modèle avec ses escarpins à semelle rouge. En 2009, Barbie aura été à l’honneur : les plus grands créateurs lui ont consacré un défilé en février lors de la semaine de la mode à New York, un livre-coffret luxueux retraçant sa saga a été édité chez Assouline et les studios Universal ont annoncé qu’elle allait bientôt être l’héroïne d’une superproduction hollywoodienne. Pour autant, la poupée n’a pas fêté son cinquantième anniversaire en toute sérénité. Dans un brûlot intitulé Toy-Monster : the Big Bad World of Mattel (« Jouet-Monstre : le grand méchant monde de Mattel ») et publié aux Etats-Unis chez Wiley-Blackwell, le journaliste et essayiste américain Jerry Oppenheimer écorne sérieusement le mythe. Auteur de la biographie non autorisée de Bill et Hillary Clinton, Jerry Oppenheimer présente dans son ouvrage le père de Barbie, Jack Ryan, comme un pervers sexuel. Pour l’essayiste, Barbie serait l’incarnation du fantasme ultime de son inventeur : une call-girl de luxe, à la taille ultrafine, aux seins en obus et au visage enfantin. De quoi effrayer encore davantage les mamans ? (…) Les enfants ne voient pas le jouet au premier degré, comme les adultes, assure pour sa part Patrice Huerre, chef du service de psychiatrie de l’enfant et de l’adolescent à l’hôpital d’Antony (Hauts-de-Seine) et auteur de Place au jeu : jouer pour apprendre à vivre (Nathan, 144 pages, 14,95 euros). « Les enfants ne sont pas empêchés de rêver par la forme d’un objet, la preuve : d’un caillou, ils font un bolide », précise Patrice Huerre. En revanche, certains jouets, en rupture avec leur époque, peuvent, selon le psychiatre, avoir un pouvoir d’anticipation, comme la littérature de fiction. « Barbie, ce fantasme d’adulte, anticipe sur la révolution sexuelle, Mai 68, la contraception, et l’émancipation des femmes…, estime-t-il. Elle est entrée en résonance avec une attente implicite des enfants, qui sont ensuite devenus les adolescents des années 1968 ». Le médecin a coorganisé cette année au Musée des arts décoratifs de Paris une exposition intitulée « Quand je serai grand, je serai… » Dans ce cadre, il avait été demandé à 600 enfants de dire ce qu’ils aimeraient faire plus tard, et de désigner les jouets symbolisant le mieux leurs aspirations. On y trouvait en bonne place la fameuse Barbie. Le Monde
La milliardième Barbie va être vendue cette année. La maison Mattel, qui fabrique la poupée mannequin, a annoncé cette nouvelle de poids la semaine dernière, en la lestant d’autres chiffres considérables: six millions de Barbie vendues chaque année en France, une progression de 20% entre 1995 et 1996, six poupées en moyenne entre les mains de chaque fillette de ce pays. Une affaire qui marche, en somme. Et pourtant, comme à chaque fois qu’elle convoque la presse pour parler de Barbie, la firme s’est armée d’une escouade de spécialistes de l’enfance: psychologue, sociologue, pédiatre, professeur » Pour dire quoi? Que Barbie est «un jeu de rêve pour une meilleure adaptation à la réalité» (Armelle Le Bigot, chargée d’études), qu’elle est un «facteur de structuration de la personnalité chez la petite fille» (Dominique Charton, psychothérapeute), que «l’intérêt de Barbie est d’être liée aux évolutions sociales de la deuxième moitié du XXe siècle» (Gilles Brougère, professeur de sciences de l’éducation à Paris-Nord). En résumé, parents, «ne vous inquiétez pas »» (Edwige Antier, pédiatre). S’inquiéter? Bigre » Il y aurait donc lieu de se faire du souci quand une gamine joue aux Barbie. C’est en tout cas ce que Mattel semble indiquer en s’évertuant ainsi à se justifier. (…) Dans le dossier de presse, Gilles Brougère rappelle qu’«à cette époque, Barbie, plus qu’aujourd’hui, sentait le soufre.» De son côté, Armelle Le Bigot, qui écoute depuis des années des mères pour le compte de Mattel, se souvient que «les premières réactions des mamans étaient plutôt musclées. Elles nous parlaient de « cette bonne femme, « cette Américaine, « cette pute» » Par bonheur pour Mattel, les premières utilisatrices de Barbie ont grandi, sont devenues parfois mères à leur tour et c’est cette génération-là qui cause aujourd’hui dans les panels d’Armelle Le Bigot. Désormais, c’est du tout-cuit. «Barbie est dédiabolisée», diagnostique la chargée d’études. Les mères seraient même rassurées de voir que leurs filles, même en caleçon et baskets, «rêvent de belles robes et de paillettes, comme elles au même âge». Ces changements n’ont pas bousculé l’approche prudente des dirigeants de Mattel France. Interrogé sur cette stratégie défensive, le PDG finit par admettre que «non, Barbie ne dérange plus». Et ajoute: «Je me demande si ce n’est pas moi qui me fais un peu de cinéma de temps en temps. » Sibylle Vincendon
Barbie idéalisée, un peu trop parfaite, a sans doute existé à une certaine époque mais elle appartient aujourd’hui au passé. Pour nous, toutes les filles sont belles, quelles que soient leur silhouette, leur taille, la couleur de leurs cheveux, et les poupées doivent être le reflet de cette diversité. Robert Best (designer en chef chez Mattel)
Barbie est bien plus qu’un simple jouet, elle est un personnage emblématique de notre culture et de notre société. L’engouement pour Barbie s’est appuyé sur l’univers très vite créé par Mattel autour du personnage, avec sa famille, ses amis, ses activités, une savante alchimie qui permet aux enfants de projeter leur imagination dans toutes les situations. Anne Monier (Musée des Arts Décoratifs)
C’est la poupée la plus célèbre du monde, et sans doute aussi la plus critiquée, pour ses mensurations improbables et son inatteignable perfection. Barbie se dévoile dans une exposition inédite à Paris qui raconte l’histoire de cette icône de beauté de 29 centimètres. « Barbie est bien plus qu’un simple jouet, elle est un personnage emblématique de notre culture et de notre société », explique à l’AFP Anne Monier, commissaire de l’exposition (jusqu’au 18 septembre au Musée des Arts Décoratifs), la première de cette ampleur dans un musée français. Quelque 700 poupées y sont présentées avec autant de tenues. Avec ses cheveux blond platine, ses jambes interminables et sa poitrine généreuse, Barbie s’est distinguée dès sa naissance, il y a 57 ans, par sa ressemblance avec une jeune femme adulte, une révolution dans le monde des poupons qui régnaient jusqu’alors en maîtres dans les coffres à jouets. Oeuvre de l’Américaine Ruth Handler, épouse du cofondateur de la société Mattel, qui lui donna le prénom de sa fille Barbara, elle fit sa première apparition publique le 9 mars 1959, à la foire du jouet de New York, avant de connaître un immense succès commercial, d’abord aux Etats-Unis puis en Europe. Le cap du milliard de Barbie vendues dans le monde a été franchi dans le monde en 1997. Au fil des années, la reine des poupées a élargi la palette de ses compétences, des plus classiques aux plus insolites: infirmière, top modèle, danseuse, gymnaste mais aussi astronaute (elle a posé le pied sur la Lune avant Neil Armstrong) ou encore présidente des Etats-Unis. Cette gloire planétaire va apporter à Barbie son lot de controverses, ses détracteurs lui reprochant de renvoyer une image trop stéréotypée de la femme, celle d’une européenne, active, blonde et mince. Des psychiatres ont affirmé qu’elle était un fantasme d’adulte avant d’être un jouet de petites filles. Des parents l’ont accusée d’encourager l’anorexie chez les adolescentes. Des scientifiques sont allés jusqu’à démontrer que si Barbie était une vraie femme, elle pèserait 49 kilos et mesurerait 175 cm, son tour de taille ferait 45 cm et ses pieds 21 cm. Ils en ont conclu que la pauvre créature serait alors obligée de marcher à quatre pattes car ses pieds et ses jambes ne pourraient pas la porter. En 2009, le journaliste américain Jerry Oppenheimer écorne sévèrement l’image de la belle – qui célébrait cette année-là son cinquantième anniversaire – en la décrivant comme l’incarnation du fantasme ultime de son designer: une call-girl de luxe, à la taille ultra fine, aux seins en obus et au visage enfantin. « La Barbie idéalisée, un peu trop parfaite, a sans doute existé à une certaine époque mais elle appartient aujourd’hui au passé », assure à l’AFP Robert Best, designer en chef chez Mattel. « Pour nous, toutes les filles sont belles, quelles que soient leur silhouette, leur taille, la couleur de leurs cheveux, et les poupées doivent être le reflet de cette diversité », poursuit-il. Témoin de cette volonté, les trois nouvelles versions lancées par Mattel en début d’année: la grande, la petite, et surtout la ronde, une Barbie potelée, tout en courbes, qui s’éloigne de la poupée d’origine pour s’approcher de Madame Tout Le Monde. Une stratégie visant aussi à endiguer l’érosion des ventes. L’enseigne américaine a déjà fait plusieurs tentatives pour ouvrir Barbie à la différence, sans pour autant faire évoluer ses mensurations. En 1980, elle avait commercialisé Black Barbie, une Barbie noire. L’arrivée des trois nouvelles silhouettes a été célébrée par l’hebdomadaire américain Time qui a mis Barbie en couverture en janvier avec cette question, posée par la poupée elle-même: « A présent, peut-on arrêter de parler de mon corps ? » Le Parisien
La poupée traverse les générations. Depuis sa création, 1 milliard de modèles ont été vendus dans le monde et chaque année, environ 58 millions de poupées sont achetées. En 1959, la poupée californienne, produite par Mattel, débarque dans les foyers comme un pavé dans la marre. Pour la première fois, une poupée type adulte et sexualisée vient casser les modèles traditionnels des poupées enfantines. Emerge alors un jouet aux allures de femme irréaliste : des jambes interminables, une poitrine pulpeuse et une taille de guêpe. Barbie a alors des proportions inhumaines. Face aux critiques récurrentes, et surtout à la chute des ventes, Mattel opère une petite révolution en 2015 : les premières poupées à corpulences dites “normales” sont commercialisées. Aujourd’hui, Barbie n’est plus seulement cette mannequin blonde californienne au teint hâlé. Moins stéréotypée, elle est blonde, brune, rousse, à la peau noire, blanche, métisse… Elle met des pantalons et des jupes, travaille au McDo, danse ou dirige une entreprise. Selon la marque, 55% des poupées vendues dans le monde n’auraient ni les cheveux blonds, ni les yeux bleus. La marque s’efforce de déconstruire les clichés sexistes de sa poupée, parfois non sans mal. En novembre 2014, Mattel sort Barbie, je peux être une ingénieure informatique, un livre qui dépeint une jeune femme nulle en informatique et incapable de faire quoique ce soit sans l’aide de ses amis masculins… Face à la polémique, Mattel présente ses excuses et retire le livre de la vente. Les Echos
Puisant dans les collections des Arts Décoratifs et dans les archives inédites de la maison Mattel®, l’exposition s’efforce d’offrir deux lectures possibles, pour les enfants en évoquant la pure jubilation d’un jouet universellement connu, et pour les adultes, en replaçant cette figure phare depuis 1959 dans une perspective historique et sociologique. 700 Barbies sont ainsi déployées sur 1500m2, aux côtés d’œuvres issues des collections du musée (poupées, tenues), mais également d’œuvres d’artistes contemporains, de documents (journaux, photographies, vidéo) qui contribuent à contextualiser les « vies de Barbie ». Au-delà d’être un jouet, Barbie est le reflet d’une culture et de son évolution. On l’a d’abord associée à l’American way of life avant d’incarner une dimension plus universelle, épousant les changements sociaux, politiques, culturels. Elle évolue dans le confort moderne tout en épousant de nouvelles causes, questionnant les stéréotypes, haïe pour ce qu’elle représenterait d’une femme idéalisée, et pourtant autonome et indépendante, adoptant toutes ambitions de l’époque contemporaine. Ses silhouettes, ses coiffures, ses costumes, sont le fruit de quelques secrets de fabrication dont certains sont révélés pour l’occasion à travers maquettes ou témoignages de ceux qui font le succès de Barbie. Un succès qui tient à la capacité de la poupée à suivre l’évolution de son époque pour se renouveler tout en restant la même. Un succès qui imprègne la culture populaire depuis sa création jusqu’à nos jours, mais qui inspire aussi les artistes. Certains, comme Andy Warhol, en ont fait le portrait quand d’autres l’ont largement détourné. Nombreux sont les créateurs qui ont croisé son chemin de passionnée de mode, pour laquelle chacun a déjà imaginé les tenues les plus extravagantes ou les plus élégantes. Quelques-unes de ses robes de collections sont ainsi signées par des couturiers, parmi lesquels Thierry Mugler, Christian Lacroix, Jean Paul Gaultier, Agnès B, Cacharel ou encore Christian Louboutin. Sa garde-robe déployée pour l’occasion sur plusieurs mètres de cimaises n’est autre que le reflet de la mode dont le musée sortira en contrepoint quelques-unes des pièces les plus parlantes. Musée des Arts décoratifs
When I set out to write about the fascinating behind-the-scenes story of the “doll wars”, at the centre of it was the doll that has dominated the pink toy shelves for three generations — Barbie. I wanted to uncover her secret history and how she has battled to keep her image and her near-monopoly market power for over five decades. The story of Barbie begins with Ruth Handler, born Ruth Moskowicz, the youngest of ten children, born in 1916 to a Jewish-Polish family in Colorado. Her father, a blacksmith, emigrated from Poland, finding work in Denver and sending for his wife and children two years later. The Moskowiczs were extremely poor and, when Ruth’s mother became ill, Ruth’s sister turned surrogate mother, which some people misinterpreted: “It has been suggested to me once or twice that this supposed ‘rejection’ by my mother may have been what spurred me to become the kind of person who always has to prove herself. This seems like utter nonsense.” Nonsense or not, the doll she claims to have invented would never become a mother. Rather, Barbie was destined to live the early dreams of Hertopia: a self-realised woman on her own. Ruth founded Mattel with her husband Elliot Handler, whom she had met at a Jewish youth dance in 1929. They married and had a daughter and a son, Barbara and Kenneth — the dolls Barbie and Ken were born later. In 1956, during a family trip to Switzerland, Handler came across a German doll called Bild Lilli. Lilli was a popular doll in post-war Germany but she was not a child’s plaything, she was an adult toy based on a cartoon. Bluntly, Lilli dolls were designed for sex-hungry German men who bought her for girlfriends and mistresses in lieu of flowers, or as a suggestive gift. Her promotional brochures had such phrases as “Gentlemen prefer Lilli. Whether more or less naked, Lilli is always discreet.” In Switzerland, Handler tucked Lilli in her suitcase, brought her back to the Mattel headquarters in California and launched Barbie based on her image. The story of Barbie’s success is inextricably tied to her secret past. A multimillion-dollar campaign began, led by another controversial Jewish immigrant, Ernst Ditcher, an Austrian psychologist turned American marketing guru. Dr Dichter used Freudian psychology to convince mothers to bring a hyper-sexualised adult doll into the hearts and minds of little girls. The Barbie campaign, along with many other consumer marketing campaigns he led, made him the nemesis of mid-century feminists. Dichter’s notorious reputation was based on his manipulation of human desire. He applied psychoanalysis to selling, forever shaping America’s consumption fetishism: a desire to own stuff — which has yet to subside. As Barbie’s sales soared, Lilli’s owners sued unsuccessfully for patent infringement. Until the early 2000s, Barbie reigned supreme. The challenge, when it came, was from a different doll, and another Jewish entrepreneur. In 1995, Islamic fundamentalists in Kuwait issued a fatwa against Barbie, a ruling under Islamic law prohibiting the buying or selling of this she-devil. In 2003, when Saudi Arabia outlawed the sale of Barbie dolls, the Committee for the Propagation of Virtue and Prevention of Vice announced that the “Jewish Barbie” is the symbol of decadence to the perverted West. Orly Lobel
So it turns out Barbie’s original design was based on a German adult gag-gift escort doll named Lilli. That’s right, she wasn’t a dentist or a surgeon, an Olympian gymnast, a pet stylist or an ambassador for world peace. And she certainly wasn’t a toy for little girls… Unbeknownst to most, Barbie actually started out life in the late 1940s as a German cartoon character created by artist Reinhard Beuthien for the Hamburg-based tabloid, Bild-Zeitung. The comic strip character was known as “Bild Lilli”, a post-war gold-digging buxom broad who got by in life seducing wealthy male suitors. She was famously quick-witted and known to talk back when it came to male authority. In one cartoon, Lilli is warned by a policeman for illegally wearing a bikini out on the sidewalk. Lilli responds, “Oh, and in your opinion, what part should I take off?” She became so popular that in 1953, the newspaper decided to market a three-dimensional version which was sold as an adult novelty toy, available to buy from bars, tobacco kiosks and adult toy stores. They were often given out as bachelor party gag gifts and dangled from a car’s rearview mirror. Parents considered the doll inappropriate for children and a German brochure from the 1950s described Lilli as “always discreet,” and with her impressive wardrobe, she was “the star of every bar”. She did indeed have such a wide range of outfits and accessories you could buy for her, that eventually little girls began wanting her as a playdoll too. While toy factories tried to cash in on her popularity with children, Lilli still remained a successful adult novelty, especially outside of Germany. A journalist for The New Yorker magazine, Ariel Levy, later referred to Lilli as a “sex doll”. In the 1950s, one of the founders of Mattel, Ruth Handler (pictured above), was travelling to Europe and bought a few Lilli dolls to take home. She re-worked the design of the doll and later debuted Barbie at the New York toy fair on March 9, 1959. Mattel acquired the rights to Bild Lilli in 1964, and production of the German doll ceased. (Funny how Barbie’s lighter skin tone was just about the only noticeable change in the early days). (…) So which version would you prefer? Barbie’s ballsy European precursor or Mattel’s squeaky clean lookalike? MessyNessy

Après l’école, Supermanl’humourla fête nationale, Thanksgiving, les droits civiques, les Harlem globetrotters et le panier à trois points, le soft power, l’Amérique, le génocide et même eux-mêmes  et sans parler des chansons de Noël et de la musique pop ou d’Hollywood, la littérature… les poupées Barbie  !

Corps de jeune femme sexy, bouche sensuelle, maquillage, yeux « en coulisse », silhouette élancée, poitrine pulpeuse, taille de guêpe, jambes interminables, pute, call-girl de luxe, seins en obus, visage enfantin, objet sexuel,  prototype américain à la Jane Mansfield, fantasme d’adulte, qui fausse l’image de la femme, encourage l’anorexie, mensurations improbables, proportions inhumaines, inatteignable perfection, icône de beauté, image trop stéréotypée de la femme, européenne, active, blonde et mince, vêtements révélateurs, postures, accessoires et outils honteux, menace morale, symbole de la décadence de l’Occident perverti, Américaine, juive …

Au lendemain de la fête des droits de la femme …

Et en ce 60e anniversaire de la poupée Barbie

Devinez par qui a été (re)créée …

A partir de la sulfureuse mascotte pour hommes tirée d’une bande dessinée du tabloid allemand Bild …

Et avant sa renaissance, politiquement correct et diversité obligent il y a trois ans, en modèle aux multiples professions, formes et tailles de la femme moderne aux 27 teints de peau, 22 couleurs d’yeux et 24 coiffures …

Comme, avant elle l’ultime repoussoir Disney, sa muséification française …

Cette ultime icône de la beauté américaine…

Devenue épouvantail préféré des féministes et des psys …

Et symbole juif, pour les diverses polices religieuses des Etats musulmans, de la « décadence de l’Occident perverti » ?

Saudi Religious Police Say Barbie Is a Moral Threat
Fox News
September 10, 2003

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates —  Saudi Arabia’s religious police have declared Barbie dolls a threat to morality, complaining that the revealing clothes of the « Jewish » toy — already banned in the kingdom — are offensive to Islam.

The Committee for the Propagation of Virtue and Prevention of Vice, as the religious police are officially known, lists the dolls on a section of its Web site devoted to items deemed offensive to the conservative Saudi interpretation of Islam.

« Jewish Barbie dolls, with their revealing clothes and shameful postures, accessories and tools are a symbol of decadence to the perverted West. Let us beware of her dangers and be careful, » said a message posted on the site.

A spokesman for the Committee said the campaign against Barbie — banned for more than 10 years — coincides with the start of the school year to remind children and their parents of the doll’s negative qualities.

Speaking to The Associated Press by telephone from the holy city of Medina (search), he claimed that Barbie was modeled after a real-life Jewish woman.

Although illegal, Barbies are found on the black market, where a contraband doll could cost $27 or more.

Sheik Abdulla al-Merdas, a preacher in a Riyadh mosque, said the muttawa, the committee’s enforcers, take their anti-Barbie campaign to the shops, confiscating dolls from sellers and imposing a fine.

« It is no problem that little girls play with dolls. But these dolls should not have the developed body of a woman and wear revealing clothes, » al-Merdas said.

« These revealing clothes will be imprinted in their minds and they will refuse to wear the clothes we are used to as Muslims. »

U.S.-based Mattel Inc. (search), which has been making the doll since 1959, did not immediately return a phone call seeking comment.

Women in Saudi Arabia must cover themselves from head to toe with a black cloak in public. They are not allowed to drive and cannot go out in public unaccompanied by a male family member.

Other items listed as violations on the site included Valentine’s Day gifts, perfume bottles in the shape of women’s bodies, clothing with logos that include a cross, and decorative copies of religious items or text — offensive because they could be damaged and thus insult Islam.

An exhibition of all the offensive items is found in Medina, and mobile tours go around to schools and other public areas in the kingdom.

The Committee acts as a monitoring and punishing agency, propagating conservative Islamic beliefs according to the teachings of the puritan Wahhabi (search) sect, adhered to the kingdom since the 18th century, and enforcing strict moral code.

Voir aussi:

Meet Lilli, the High-end German Call Girl Who Became America’s Iconic Barbie Doll

MessyNessy
January 29, 2016

So it turns out Barbie’s original design was based on a German adult gag-gift escort doll named Lilli. That’s right, she wasn’t a dentist or a surgeon, an Olympian gymnast, a pet stylist or an ambassador for world peace. And she certainly wasn’t a toy for little girls…

Unbeknownst to most, Barbie actually started out life in the late 1940s as a German cartoon character created by artist Reinhard Beuthien for the Hamburg-based tabloid, Bild-Zeitung. The comic strip character was known as “Bild Lilli”, a post-war gold-digging buxom broad who got by in life seducing wealthy male suitors.

She was famously quick-witted and known to talk back when it came to male authority. In one cartoon, Lilli is warned by a policeman for illegally wearing a bikini out on the sidewalk. Lilli responds, “Oh, and in your opinion, what part should I take off?”

She became so popular that in 1953, the newspaper decided to market a three-dimensional version which was sold as an adult novelty toy, available to buy from bars, tobacco kiosks and adult toy stores. They were often given out as bachelor party gag gifts and dangled from a car’s rearview mirror.

Parents considered the doll inappropriate for children and a German brochure from the 1950s described Lilli as “always discreet,” and with her impressive wardrobe, she was “the star of every bar”. She did indeed have such a wide range of outfits and accessories you could buy for her, that eventually little girls began wanting her as a playdoll too. While toy factories tried to cash in on her popularity with children, Lilli still remained a successful adult novelty, especially outside of Germany. A journalist for The New Yorker magazine, Ariel Levy, later referred to Lilli as a “sex doll”.

In the 1950s, one of the founders of Mattel, Ruth Handler (pictured above), was travelling to Europe and bought a few Lilli dolls to take home. She re-worked the design of the doll and later debuted Barbie at the New York toy fair on March 9, 1959.

Mattel acquired the rights to Bild Lilli in 1964, and production of the German doll ceased. (Funny how Barbie’s lighter skin tone was just about the only noticeable change in the early days).

And the rest is a history you’re a little more familiar with, and no doubt one Mattel is a little more comfortable with…

So which version would you prefer? Barbie’s ballsy European precursor or Mattel’s squeaky clean lookalike?

Voir également:

Barbie Millicent Roberts, from Wisconsin US, is celebrating her 60th birthday. She is a toy. A doll. Yet she has grown into a phenomenon. An iconic figure, recognised by millions of children and adults worldwide, she has remained a popular choice for more than six decades – a somewhat unprecedented feat for a doll in the toy industry.

She is also, arguably, the original “influencer” of young girls, pushing an image and lifestyle that can shape what they aspire to be like. So, at 60, how is the iconic Barbie stepping up to support her fellow women and girls?

When Barbie was born many toys for young girls were of the baby doll variety; encouraging nurturing and motherhood and perpetuating the idea that a girl’s future role would be one of homemaker and mother. Thus Barbie was born out of a desire to give girls something more. Barbie was a fashion model with her own career. The idea that girls could play with her and imagine their future selves, whatever that may be, was central to the Barbie brand.

However, the “something more” that was given fell short of empowering girls, by today’s standards. And Barbie has been described as “an agent of female oppression”. The focus on play that imagined being grown up, with perfect hair, a perfect body, a plethora of outfits, a sexualised physique, and a perfect first love (in the equally perfect Ken) has been criticised over the years for perpetuating a different kind of ideal – one centred around body image, with dangerous consequences for girls’ mental and physical health.

Body image

Toys have a significant influence on the development of children, far beyond innocent play. Through play, children mimic social norms and subtle messages regarding gender roles, and stereotypes can be transmitted by seemingly ubiquitous toys. Early studies in the 1930s by Kenneth and Mamie Clark showed how young black girls would more often choose to play with a white doll rather than a black doll, as the white doll was considered more beautiful – a reflection of internalised feelings as a result of racism.

The same supposition – that girls playing with Barbie may internalise the unrealistic body that she innocently promotes – has been the subject of research and what is clear is that parents are often unaware of the potential effects on body image when approving toys for their children.

A group of UK researchers in 2006 found that young girls aged between five-and-a-half and seven-and-a-half years old who were exposed to a story book with Barbie doll images had greater body dissatisfaction and lower body esteem at the end of the study compared to young girls who were shown the same story with an Emme doll (a fashion doll with a more average body shape) or a story with no images.

More worrying, there were no differences between groups of girls aged five-and-a half and eight-and-a-half years of age, with all girls showing heightened body dissatisfaction. Another study ten years later found that exposure to Barbie dolls led to a higher thin-ideal internalisation, supporting findings that girls exposed to thin dolls eat less in subsequent tests.

Exposure to unhealthy, unrealistic and unattainable body images is associated with eating disorder risk. Indeed, the increasing prevalence of eating disorder symptoms in non-Western cultures has been linked to exposure to Western ideals of beauty. Barbie’s original proportions gave her a body mass index (BMI) so low that she would be unlikely to menstruate and the probability of this body shape is less than one in 100,000 women.

Changing shape

With growing awareness of body image disturbances and cultural pressures on young girls, many parents have begun to look for more empowering toys for their daughters. Barbie’s manufacturer, Mattel, has been listening, possibly prompted by falling sales, and in 2016 a new range of Barbies was launched that celebrated different body shapes, sizes, hair types and skin tones.

These have not been without criticism; the naming of the dolls based on their significant body part (curvy, tall, petite) is questionable and again draws attention to the body, while “curvy” Barbie, with her wider hips and larger thighs, remains very thin. Despite this, these additions are a welcome step in the right direction in allowing girls to play with Barbie dolls that provide more diversity.

More than a body

If Barbie was about empowering girls to be anything that they want to be, then the Barbie brand has tried to move with the times by providing powerful role playing tools for girls. No longer is Barbie portrayed in roles such as the air hostess – or, when promoted to pilot, still dressed in a feminine and pink version of the uniform. Modern pilot Barbie is more appropriately dressed, with a male air steward as a sidekick.

Such changes can have a remarkable impact on how young girls imagine their career possibilities, potential futures, and the roles that they are expected to take. Mattel’s move to honour 20 women role models including Japanese Haitian tennis player Naomi Osaka – currently the world number one – with her own doll is a positive step in bringing empowering role models into the consciousness of young girls.

Children who are less stereotyped in their gender and play are less likely to be stereotyped in their occupations and are more creative. But of course, society needs to mirror this. In the week when Virgin Atlantic abolished the requirement to wear make up for female cabin crew, the arduous journey away from constraining female body and beauty ideals could slowly be taking off. But in a culture where female ageing is now an aesthetic pressure felt by many, perhaps Mattel will show us diversity in age and womanhood? Happy 60th birthday to the still 20-year-old looking Barbie.

Voir de même:

(Reuters) – Barbie, the fashion doll famous around the world, celebrates her 60th anniversary on Saturday with new collections honoring real-life role models and careers in which women remain under-represented.

It is part of Barbie’s evolution over the decades since her debut at the New York Toy Fair on March 9, 1959.

To mark the milestone, manufacturer Mattel Inc created Barbie versions of 20 inspirational women from Japanese tennis star Naomi Osaka to British model and activist Adwoa Aboah.

The company also released six dolls representing the careers of astronaut, pilot, athlete, journalist, politician and firefighter, all fields in which Mattel said women are still under-represented.

Barbie is a cultural icon celebrated by the likes of Andy Warhol, the Paris Louvre museum and the 1997 satirical song “Barbie Girl” by Scandinavian pop group Aqua. She was named after the daughter of creator Ruth Handler.

Barbie has taken on more than 200 careers from surgeon to video game developer since her debut, when she wore a black-and-white striped swimsuit. After criticism that Barbie’s curvy body promoted an unrealistic image for young girls, Mattel added a wider variety of skin tones, body shapes, hijab-wearing dolls and science kits to make Barbie more educational.

Barbie is also going glamorous for her six-decade milestone. A diamond-anniversary doll wears a sparkly silver ball gown.

Voir de plus:

Un milliard de Barbie adoptées. Mal acceptée il y a vingt-cinq ans, la poupée ne fait plus peur aux mères.
Sibylle Vincendon
Libération
28 juin 1997

La milliardième Barbie va être vendue cette année. La maison Mattel, qui fabrique la poupée mannequin, a annoncé cette nouvelle de poids la semaine dernière, en la lestant d’autres chiffres considérables: six millions de Barbie vendues chaque année en France, une progression de 20% entre 1995 et 1996, six poupées en moyenne entre les mains de chaque fillette de ce pays. Une affaire qui marche, en somme. Et pourtant, comme à chaque fois qu’elle convoque la presse pour parler de Barbie, la firme s’est armée d’une escouade de spécialistes de l’enfance: psychologue, sociologue, pédiatre, professeur » Pour dire quoi? Que Barbie est «un jeu de rêve pour une meilleure adaptation à la réalité» (Armelle Le Bigot, chargée d’études), qu’elle est un «facteur de structuration de la personnalité chez la petite fille» (Dominique Charton, psychothérapeute), que «l’intérêt de Barbie est d’être liée aux évolutions sociales de la deuxième moitié du XXe siècle» (Gilles Brougère, professeur de sciences de l’éducation à Paris-Nord). En résumé, parents, «ne vous inquiétez pas »» (Edwige Antier, pédiatre).

S’inquiéter?

Bigre » Il y aurait donc lieu de se faire du souci quand une gamine joue aux Barbie. C’est en tout cas ce que Mattel semble indiquer en s’évertuant ainsi à se justifier. «Mais vous ne vous rendez pas compte à quoi on s’est heurtés quand on a introduit Barbie en France il y a vingt-cinq ans», s’exclame Robert Gerson, le PDG de Mattel France. «Aux mêmes comportements de refus que ceux qui avaient accueilli Barbie dix ans plus tôt aux Etats-Unis. Cette première poupée sexuée, en pleine Amérique puritaine, elle ne passait pas du tout » Nous avons mis dix ans à remonter la pente.» Dans le dossier de presse, Gilles Brougère rappelle qu’«à cette époque, Barbie, plus qu’aujourd’hui, sentait le soufre.» De son côté, Armelle Le Bigot, qui écoute depuis des années des mères pour le compte de Mattel, se souvient que «les premières réactions des mamans étaient plutôt musclées. Elles nous parlaient de « cette bonne femme, « cette Américaine, « cette pute» » Par bonheur pour Mattel, les premières utilisatrices de Barbie ont grandi, sont devenues parfois mères à leur tour et c’est cette génération-là qui cause aujourd’hui dans les panels d’Armelle Le Bigot. Désormais, c’est du tout-cuit. «Barbie est dédiabolisée», diagnostique la chargée d’études. Les mères seraient même rassurées de voir que leurs filles, même en caleçon et baskets, «rêvent de belles robes et de paillettes, comme elles au même âge». Ces changements n’ont pas bousculé l’approche prudente des dirigeants de Mattel France. Interrogé sur cette stratégie défensive, le PDG finit par admettre que «non, Barbie ne dérange plus». Et ajoute: «Je me demande si ce n’est pas moi qui me fais un peu de cinéma de temps en temps»;

Voir de même:

Pour les psychiatres, Barbie est un fantasme d’adulte mais pas de petites filles
Si Barbie s’est retrouvée, cette année encore, parmi les cadeaux les plus offerts aux petites filles pour Noël, elle est accusée de fausser l’image de la femme et d’encourager notamment l’anorexie.
Véronique Lorelle
Le Monde
29 décembre 2009

Si Playmobil fait l’unanimité auprès des parents, ce n’est pas le cas de Barbie, la plus célèbre des poupées, qui a fêté ses 50 ans en 2009 et s’est retrouvée, cette année encore, parmi les cadeaux les plus offerts aux petites filles pour Noël. Avec ses mensurations improbables – soit 95-45-82 à l’échelle humaine -, Barbie est accusée de fausser l’image de la femme et d’encourager notamment l’anorexie. Dans l’Hexagone, de plus en plus de mamans répugnent à l’offrir à leurs filles.
Avec 3 millions de poupées vendues par an en France sur une cible de… 3 millions de petites filles âgées de 2 à 9 ans, le fabricant Mattel n’est pourtant pas encore aux abois. « 80 % de l’offre Barbie et ses accessoires, château, voiture, chevaux… est renouvelé chaque année », explique Arnaud Roland-Gosselin, directeur marketing de Mattel France.
De quoi entretenir l’intérêt des petites consommatrices, qui possèdent, chacune, une moyenne de douze poupées. Dernière excentricité marketing en date, la sortie, pour les fêtes de fin d’année, d’une Barbie chaussée par le créateur Christian Louboutin : 115 euros le modèle avec ses escarpins à semelle rouge.
En 2009, Barbie aura été à l’honneur : les plus grands créateurs lui ont consacré un défilé en février lors de la semaine de la mode à New York, un livre-coffret luxueux retraçant sa saga a été édité chez Assouline et les studios Universal ont annoncé qu’elle allait bientôt être l’héroïne d’une superproduction hollywoodienne. Pour autant, la poupée n’a pas fêté son cinquantième anniversaire en toute sérénité.
Dans un brûlot intitulé Toy-Monster : the Big Bad World of Mattel (« Jouet-Monstre : le grand méchant monde de Mattel ») et publié aux Etats-Unis chez Wiley-Blackwell, le journaliste et essayiste américain Jerry Oppenheimer écorne sérieusement le mythe. Auteur de la biographie non autorisée de Bill et Hillary Clinton, Jerry Oppenheimer présente dans son ouvrage le père de Barbie, Jack Ryan, comme un pervers sexuel. Pour l’essayiste, Barbie serait l’incarnation du fantasme ultime de son inventeur : une call-girl de luxe, à la taille ultrafine, aux seins en obus et au visage enfantin. De quoi effrayer encore davantage les mamans ?
« Certes, celui qui a conçu la Barbie n’avait pas une once de féminisme : il a projeté l’image d’un objet sexuel, d’après un prototype américain à la Jane Mansfield, estime Gisèle George, pédopsychiatre, auteur de La Confiance en soi de votre enfant (Odile Jacob, 2008, 227 p., 7,50 euros). En revanche, on ne peut pas donner à Barbie un pouvoir qu’elle n’a pas : une poupée ne peut pas influer sur l’orientation sexuelle, professionnelle, ou quoi que ce soit d’autre… »
Pouvoir d’anticipation
Un point de vue que partage Claude Halmos, psychanalyste et écrivain. « Il est devenu courant d’accuser les objets : la violence serait de la faute de la télé, l’anorexie, celle de Barbie… mais on oublie l’essentiel : la construction psychique d’un enfant dépend des adultes qui l’entourent. » Selon la psychanalyste, « une petite fille conçoit la féminité à travers ce que sa mère ressent et vit pour elle-même, et à travers la façon dont son père ou un compagnon masculin considère sa mère ».Les enfants ne voient pas le jouet au premier degré, comme les adultes, assure pour sa part Patrice Huerre, chef du service de psychiatrie de l’enfant et de l’adolescent à l’hôpital d’Antony (Hauts-de-Seine) et auteur de Place au jeu : jouer pour apprendre à vivre (Nathan, 144 pages, 14,95 euros).
« Les enfants ne sont pas empêchés de rêver par la forme d’un objet, la preuve : d’un caillou, ils font un bolide », précise Patrice Huerre.
En revanche, certains jouets, en rupture avec leur époque, peuvent, selon le psychiatre, avoir un pouvoir d’anticipation, comme la littérature de fiction. « Barbie, ce fantasme d’adulte, anticipe sur la révolution sexuelle, Mai 68, la contraception, et l’émancipation des femmes…, estime-t-il. Elle est entrée en résonance avec une attente implicite des enfants, qui sont ensuite devenus les adolescents des années 1968″.
Le médecin a coorganisé cette année au Musée des arts décoratifs de Paris une exposition intitulée « Quand je serai grand, je serai… » Dans ce cadre, il avait été demandé à 600 enfants de dire ce qu’ils aimeraient faire plus tard, et de désigner les jouets symbolisant le mieux leurs aspirations. On y trouvait en bonne place la fameuse Barbie.
Voir de plus:

On s’en doutait, les mensurations de la poupée Barbie de Mattel sont inapplicables à un humain. Le site anglais rehabs.co a décidé de se pencher sur la question en comparant le corps de Barbie à celui d’une Américaine moyenne. Cette étude fait partie d’un rapport sur les désordres alimentaires et les problèmes des jeunes filles avec leur image. Le verdict est sans appel : si Barbie était en chair et en os, elle serait en très mauvaise santé.

Son cou est beaucoup trop long et 15 cm plus fin que celui d’une femme normale. Sans ce soutient, sa tête tombe donc sur le côté. Avec une taille de 40 cm, impossible de loger tous les organes. Adieu l’estomac et une bonne partie de l’intestin. Sa taille est également trop fine puisqu’elle ne représenterait que 56% des hanches. Ses jambes, elles, sont anormalement longues et beaucoup trop maigres.

Résultat, avec des chevilles de 15 cm, soit la même taille du pied d’un enfant de trois ans, elle ne tiendrait pas debout. Impossible de marcher donc, ni même de se soutenir avec les mains, car des poignets de 7,6 cm ne sont pas suffisants pour porter son corps.

Si Barbie était vivante, elle serait donc constamment allongée, et ne pourrait pas survivre longtemps à cause de ses problèmes d’organes.

Voir encore:

Blonde et icône à la fois, la poupée Barbie entre au musée à Paris

Le Parisien
10 mars 2016

C’est la poupée la plus célèbre du monde, et sans doute aussi la plus critiquée, pour ses mensurations improbables et son inatteignable perfection. Barbie se dévoile dans une exposition inédite à Paris qui raconte l’histoire de cette icône de beauté de 29 centimètres.
« Barbie est bien plus qu’un simple jouet, elle est un personnage emblématique de notre culture et de notre société », explique à l’AFP Anne Monier, commissaire de l’exposition (jusqu’au 18 septembre au Musée des Arts Décoratifs), la première de cette ampleur dans un musée français. Quelque 700 poupées y sont présentées avec autant de tenues.
Avec ses cheveux blond platine, ses jambes interminables et sa poitrine généreuse, Barbie s’est distinguée dès sa naissance, il y a 57 ans, par sa ressemblance avec une jeune femme adulte, une révolution dans le monde des poupons qui régnaient jusqu’alors en maîtres dans les coffres à jouets.
Oeuvre de l’Américaine Ruth Handler, épouse du cofondateur de la société Mattel, qui lui donna le prénom de sa fille Barbara, elle fit sa première apparition publique le 9 mars 1959, à la foire du jouet de New York, avant de connaître un immense succès commercial, d’abord aux Etats-Unis puis en Europe. Le cap du milliard de Barbie vendues dans le monde a été franchi dans le monde en 1997.
« L’engouement pour Barbie s’est appuyé sur l’univers très vite créé par Mattel autour du personnage, avec sa famille, ses amis, ses activités, une savante alchimie qui permet aux enfants de projeter leur imagination dans toutes les situations », explique Anne Monier.
Au fil des années, la reine des poupées a élargi la palette de ses compétences, des plus classiques aux plus insolites: infirmière, top modèle, danseuse, gymnaste mais aussi astronaute (elle a posé le pied sur la Lune avant Neil Armstrong) ou encore présidente des Etats-Unis.
Cette gloire planétaire va apporter à Barbie son lot de controverses, ses détracteurs lui reprochant de renvoyer une image trop stéréotypée de la femme, celle d’une européenne, active, blonde et mince.
– Call-girl de luxe… –
Des psychiatres ont affirmé qu’elle était un fantasme d’adulte avant d’être un jouet de petites filles. Des parents l’ont accusée d’encourager l’anorexie chez les adolescentes.
Des scientifiques sont allés jusqu’à démontrer que si Barbie était une vraie femme, elle pèserait 49 kilos et mesurerait 175 cm, son tour de taille ferait 45 cm et ses pieds 21 cm.
Ils en ont conclu que la pauvre créature serait alors obligée de marcher à quatre pattes car ses pieds et ses jambes ne pourraient pas la porter.
En 2009, le journaliste américain Jerry Oppenheimer écorne sévèrement l’image de la belle – qui célébrait cette année-là son cinquantième anniversaire – en la décrivant comme l?incarnation du fantasme ultime de son designer: une call-girl de luxe, à la taille ultra fine, aux seins en obus et au visage enfantin.
« La Barbie idéalisée, un peu trop parfaite, a sans doute existé à une certaine époque mais elle appartient aujourd’hui au passé », assure à l’AFP Robert Best, designer en chef chez Mattel.
« Pour nous, toutes les filles sont belles, quelles que soient leur silhouette, leur taille, la couleur de leurs cheveux, et les poupées doivent être le reflet de cette diversité », poursuit-il.
Témoin de cette volonté, les trois nouvelles versions lancées par Mattel en début d’année: la grande, la petite, et surtout la ronde, une Barbie potelée, tout en courbes, qui s’éloigne de la poupée d’origine pour s’approcher de Madame Tout Le Monde. Une stratégie visant aussi à endiguer l’érosion des ventes.
Les nouvelles Barbie disposeront de 27 teints de peau, 22 couleurs d’yeux et 24 coiffures.
L’enseigne américaine a déjà fait plusieurs tentatives pour ouvrir Barbie à la différence, sans pour autant faire évoluer ses mensurations. En 1980, elle avait commercialisé Black Barbie, une Barbie noire.
L’arrivée des trois nouvelles silhouettes a été célébrée par l’hebdomadaire américain Time qui a mis Barbie en couverture en janvier avec cette question, posée par la poupée elle-même: « A présent, peut-on arrêter de parler de mon corps ? »

Voir aussi:

60 ans après, Barbie a bien changé

TIMELINE // Barbie célèbre ses 60 ans cette année. Si la poupée américaine n’a pas pris de ride, elle a néanmoins subi quelques modifications.

Camille Wong
Les Echos
03/01/2019

La poupée traverse les générations. Depuis sa création, 1 milliard de modèles ont été vendus dans le monde et chaque année, environ 58 millions de poupées sont achetées. En 1959, la poupée californienne, produite par Mattel, débarque dans les foyers comme un pavé dans la marre. Pour la première fois, une poupée type adulte et sexualisée vient casser les modèles traditionnels des poupées enfantines.

Emerge alors un jouet aux allures de femme irréaliste : des jambes interminables, une poitrine pulpeuse et une taille de guêpe. Barbie a alors des proportions inhumaines. Face aux critiques récurrentes, et surtout à la chute des ventes, Mattel opère une petite révolution en 2015 : les premières poupées à corpulences dites “normales” sont commercialisées.

Aujourd’hui, Barbie n’est plus seulement cette mannequin blonde californienne au teint hâlé. Moins stéréotypée, elle est blonde, brune, rousse, à la peau noire, blanche, métisse… Elle met des pantalons et des jupes, travaille au McDo, danse ou dirige une entreprise. Selon la marque, 55% des poupées vendues dans le monde n’auraient ni les cheveux blonds, ni les yeux bleus.

La marque s’efforce de déconstruire les clichés sexistes de sa poupée, parfois non sans mal. En novembre 2014, Mattel sort Barbie, je peux être une ingénieure informatique, un livre qui dépeint une jeune femme nulle en informatique et incapable de faire quoique ce soit sans l’aide de ses amis masculins… Face à la polémique, Mattel présente ses excuses et retire le livre de la vente.

Voir également:

How Jewish is Barbie?

Orly Lobel’s new book examines the doll’s history – and the many broiguses she’s been caught up in

April 5, 2018

When I was a little girl, my mother videotaped me playing with Barbie dolls and other toys. It was my short-lived acting career but it was a prelude to my real career: it was research.

My mother is a psychology professor at Tel-Aviv University and she ran studies all over the world showing me having fun with girl toys and boy toys. She then asked participants questions about my intellect, popularity, abilities and found that without exception whether she ran the study in Israel or Europe or Asia or North America, the result was the same. When I was shown playing with the boy toys I was perceived as more intelligent and more likely to be a leader in my social group. When I was playing with Barbies and other girly toys the subjects of her studies thought less of me.

Needless to say, a side-effect of her research was inadvertently turning her daughter into a critic of the toy industry and our gendered culture from a very early age. Years passed and I became a military commander in the IDF, a lawyer, a law professor, an author and a mother, and the insights I learned from those early psychology experiments persisted: how we play matters. Toys are a serious business.

When I set out to write about the fascinating behind-the-scenes story of the “doll wars”, at the centre of it was the doll that has dominated the pink toy shelves for three generations — Barbie. I wanted to uncover her secret history and how she has battled to keep her image and her near-monopoly market power for over five decades. The story of Barbie begins with Ruth Handler, born Ruth Moskowicz, the youngest of ten children, born in 1916 to a Jewish-Polish family in Colorado.

Her father, a blacksmith, emigrated from Poland, finding work in Denver and sending for his wife and children two years later. The Moskowiczs were extremely poor and, when Ruth’s mother became ill, Ruth’s sister turned surrogate mother, which some people misinterpreted: “It has been suggested to me once or twice that this supposed ‘rejection’ by my mother may have been what spurred me to become the kind of person who always has to prove herself. This seems like utter nonsense.” Nonsense or not, the doll she claims to have invented would never become a mother. Rather, Barbie was destined to live the early dreams of Hertopia: a self-realised woman on her own. Ruth founded Mattel with her husband Elliot Handler, whom she had met at a Jewish youth dance in 1929. They married and had a daughter and a son, Barbara and Kenneth the dolls Barbie and Ken were born later. In 1956, during a family trip to Switzerland, Handler came across a German doll called Bild Lilli. Lilli was a popular doll in post-war Germany but she was not a child’s plaything, she was an adult toy based on a cartoon. Bluntly, Lilli dolls were designed for sex-hungry German men who bought her for girlfriends and mistresses in lieu of flowers, or as a suggestive gift. Her promotional brochures had such phrases as “Gentlemen prefer Lilli. Whether more or less naked, Lilli is always discreet.”

In Switzerland, Handler tucked Lilli in her suitcase, brought her back to the Mattel headquarters in California and launched Barbie based on her image. The story of Barbie’s success is inextricably tied to her secret past. A multimillion-dollar campaign began, led by another controversial Jewish immigrant, Ernst Ditcher, an Austrian psychologist turned American marketing guru. Dr Dichter used Freudian psychology to convince mothers to bring a hyper-sexualised adult doll into the hearts and minds of little girls.

The Barbie campaign, along with many other consumer marketing campaigns he led, made him the nemesis of mid-century feminists. Dichter’s notorious reputation was based on his manipulation of human desire. He applied psychoanalysis to selling, forever shaping America’s consumption fetishism: a desire to own stuff — which has yet to subside.

As Barbie’s sales soared, Lilli’s owners sued unsuccessfully for patent infringement. Until the early 2000s, Barbie reigned supreme. The challenge, when it came, was from a different doll, and another Jewish entrepreneur.

When I first tried to interview Isaac Larian, the man who introduced Bratz to the world, I hit a wall. His company, MGA’s communications department told me that it had no obligation to talk about its affairs.

I continued trying to contact him when, one day, out of the blue, I received the following e-mail: “Dear Orly, I understand that you are writing a book about [Mattel/MGA] and have talked to some of the lawyers and jurors in this case. Mattel’s stated goal (since they aren’t able to compete and innovate) was to ‘litigate MGA to death.’ Mattel has a history of using litigation to stifle innovation. . . . This time they faced a persistent Iranian Jewish immigrant who stood up to them and prevailed. I would be happy to discuss further detail as I was personally involved from day 1 in this case. Thanks & Best Regards, Isaac Larian CEO MGA Entertainment”.

Larian was positioning himself in the battle against Mattel, now the largest toy-maker in the world, and in his correspondence with me, as the underdog Jewish immigrant entrepreneur.

His email signature ended with the mantra “Fortune Favors the Bold”. This is his favourite maxim, which he has also placed in strategic spots on MGA’s walls, such as the corporate boardroom where I interviewed him.

Boldness is at the heart of Larian’s personality. Nevertheless, along with his loudly defiant nature, Larian has a soft side, which he is confident enough to display. He weeps in public, writes poetry, enjoys fashion and, well, loves his dolls. Mattel’s early days parallel MGA’s — Ruth Handler’s immigrant rags-to-riches story and her statements about being bold shows that she had far more in common with Isaac Larian than with Robert Eckert, the CEO of Mattel during the Barbie-Bratz battles, which ended, after eight years, in a bitter and costly stalemate.

In 1995, Islamic fundamentalists in Kuwait issued a fatwa against Barbie, a ruling under Islamic law prohibiting the buying or selling of this she-devil.

In 2003, when Saudi Arabia outlawed the sale of Barbie dolls, the Committee for the Propagation of Virtue and Prevention of Vice announced that the “Jewish Barbie” is the symbol of decadence to the perverted West.

Voir de même:


Martin Luther King Day: Attention, un faux peut en cacher un autre ! (Fraud fit for a King: Israel, anti-zionism and the misuse of MLK)

21 janvier, 2019
Jews-and-Civil-RightsLe rabbin Abraham Joshua Heschel (deuxième à droite), lors de la marche à Selma avec le Révérend Martin Luther King, Jr., Ralph Bunche, le républicain John Lewis, le révérend Fred Shuttlesworth et le révérend CT Vivian. (Crédit : Autorisation de Susannah Heschel)
https://i.ytimg.com/vi/IWCYJpSJaQY/hqdefault.jpg

Image result for LETJUSTICE ROLLS DOWN LIKE WATERS AND RIGHTEOUSNESS LIKE A MIGHTY STREAM aMOS 5

Ne parlez pas comme ça. Quand des gens critiquent les sionistes ils veulent parler des Juifs. Ce que vous dites là, c’est de l’antisémitisme ! Martin Luther King
Je ne sais pas ce qui va arriver maintenant. Nous avons devant nous des journées difficiles. Mais peu m’importe ce qui va m’arriver, car je suis allé jusqu’au sommet de la montagne. Je ne m’inquiète plus. Comme tout le monde, je voudrais vivre longtemps. La longévité a son prix. Mais je ne m’en soucie guère. Je veux simplement que la volonté de Dieu soit faite. Et il m’a permis d’atteindre le sommet de la montagne. J’ai regardé autour de moi. Et j’ai vu la Terre promise. Il se peut que je n’y pénètre pas avec vous. Mais je veux vous faire savoir, ce soir, que notre peuple atteindra la Terre promise. Je suis heureux, ce soir. Je ne m’inquiète de rien. Je ne crains aucun homme. Mes yeux ont vu la gloire de la venue du Seigneur. Martin Luther King
Whenever I return to the New England states, I never feel like a stranger because I’ve spent some three or four years in this area attending Boston University and Harvard University, so I feel like I’m coming home when I come back this way. (..) Now tonight I would like to use as a subject the question of progress in the area of race relations for indeed that is a desperate question on the lips of  hundreds and thousands of people all over our nation, indeed, people all over the world. They’re asking from time to time whether there has been any real progress in the area of race relations in the United States. There are three possible answers to the question of progress in the area of race relations. First, that is the attitude of extreme optimism. The extreme optimist would contend that we have made marvelous strides in the area of race relations. He would point proudly to the gains that have been made in the area of civil rights over the last few decades. And from this, the extreme optimist would conclude that the problem is just about solved now and that we can sit down comfortably by the wayside and wait on the coming of the inevitable. The second attitude that can be taken is that of extreme pessimism. The extreme pessimist would contend that we have made only minor strides in the area of race relations. He would argue that the deep rumblings of discontent from the South, the resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan and the birth of white citizens councils and the presence of Federal troops in Little Rock, Arkansas are all indicative of the fact that we have retrogressed rather than progressed, that we have created many more problems than we have solved. At times, he would get a little intellectual in his analysis and in his pessimistic conclusions. He may for instance turn to the realms of theology and seek to argue that hovering over every man is the tragic taint of original sin and he would misuse this doctrine to argue that at bottom human nature cannot be changed. He may even move to the realms of psychology and seek to show the determinative effects of certain habit structures and attitudes once they have been molded. And from all of this he would conclude that there can be no progress in the area of race relations. Now what is interesting to notice is that the extreme optimist and the extreme pessimist agree on at least one point. They would both argue that we must sit down and do nothing in the area of race relations. The extreme optimist would say: ‘do nothing because integration is inevitable’. The extreme pessimist would say: ‘do nothing because integration is impossible’. But there is a third position that can be taken, namely the realistic position. The realist in this area seeks to combine the truths of two opposites while avoiding the extremes of both. So he would agree with the optimist that we have come a long, long way. But he would seek to balance that by agreeing with the pessimist that we have a long, long way to go. And it is this realistic position that I would like to use as a basis for our thinking together this evening. We have come a long, long way but realism impels us to admit that we have a long, long way to go. Martin Luther King
I think that the situation with the Negro people in this country is analogous to what happened with the Israelites in Egypt. They too had to wait for a leader, and I think all of us will agree that they have found this leader in Dr. Martin Luther King. Rabbi Klein (Temple Emanuel)
President Nasser of Egypt has initiated a blockade of an international waterway, the Straits of Tiran, Israel’s sea lane to Africa and Asia. This blockade may lead to a major conflagration. The Middle East has been an area of tension due to the threat of continuing terrorist attacks, as well as the recent Arab military mobilization along Israel’s borders. Let us recall that Israel is a new nation whose people are still recovering from the horror and decimation of the European holocaust. (…) We call on our fellow Americans of all persuasions and groupings and on the administration to support the independence, integrity, and freedom of Israel. Men of conscience all over the world bear a moral responsibility to support Israel’s right of passage through the Straits of Tiran. Pétition signée par Martin Luther King (The Moral Responsibility in the Middle East, NYT, 28.05.1967)
What is saddening is that respected public leaders like Martin Luther King who have courageously opposed American actions in Vietnam should now associate themselves with vague calls for American intervention on behalf of Israel. Letter to NYT (June 2, 1967)
Did you see the ad in the New York Times Sunday ? Th is was the ad they got me to sign with Bennett, etc. I really hadn’t seen the statement. I felt after seeing it, it was a little unbalanced and it is pro-Israel. It put us in the position almost of setting the turning-hawks on the Middle East while being doves in Vietnam and I wouldn’t have given a statement like that at all. Martin Luther King
The statement I signed in the N.Y. Times as you know was agree d with by a lot of people in the Jewish community. But there was those in the negro community [who] have been disappointed. SNCC for one has been very critical. The problem was that the N.Y. Times played it up as a total endorsement of Israel. What they printed up wasn’t the complete text, even the introduction wasn’t the text. I can’t back up on the statement now, my problem is whether I should make another statement, or maybe I could just avoid making a statement. I don’t want to make a statement that backs up on me; that wouldn’t be good. Well, what do you think? Martin Luther King
Well, I think these guarantees should all be worked out by the United Nations. I would hope that all of the nations, and particularly the Soviet Union and the United States, and I would say France and Great Britain, these four powers can really determine how that situation is going. I think the Israelis will have to have access to the Gulf of Aqaba. I mean the very survival of Israel may well depend on access to not only the Suez Canal, but the Gulf and the Strait of Tiran. These things are very important. But I think for the ultimate peace and security of the situation it will probably be necessary for Israel to give up this conquered territory because to hold on to it will only exacerbate the tensions and deepen the bitterness of the Arabs. Martin Luther King
I’d run into the situation where I’m damned if I say this and I’m damned if I say that no matter what I’d say, and I’ve already faced enough criticism including pro-Arab.(…) I just think that if I go, the Arab world, and of course Africa and Asia for that matter, would interpret this as endorsing everything that Israel has done, and I do have questions of doubt. (…) most of it [the pilgrimage] would be Jerusalem and they [the Israelis] have annexed Jerusalem, and any way you say it they don’t plan to give it up. (…) I frankly have to admit that my instincts, and when I follow my instincts so to speak I’m usually right. . . . I just think that this would be a great mistake. I don’t think I could come out unscathed. Martin Luther King
It is with the deepest regret that I cancel my proposed pilgrimage to the Holy Land for this year, but the constant turmoil in the Middle East makes it extremely difficult to conduct a religious pilgrimage free of both political overtones and the fear of danger to the participants. Actually, I am aware that the danger is almost non-existent, but to the ordinary citizen who seldom goes abroad, the daily headlines of border clashes and propaganda statements produces a fear of danger which is insurmountable on the American scene. Martin Luther King (Letter to Mordechai Ben-Ami, the president of the Israeli airline El Al)
That a man like Martin Luther King could stand so openly with Israel, despite his own private qualms and criticism by younger, more radical, black Americans who had discovered the plight of the Palestinians, indicated the degree to which Zionism was embraced by the American mainstream. . . . One of the ways [King] reciprocated Jewish American support for desegregation in the United States was by turning a blind eye to the plight of the Palestinians. Ussama Makdisi (2010)
Israel does many bad things but it does not get reprimanded. (…) Israel is very strong, [Malaysians] cannot do much against it, but they do not have to demonstrate affection to it. The world is talking about freedom of speech, but whenever we say anything against Israel and the Jews, it is considered antisemitism. It is my right to criticize Israel for its policy regarding the Palestinians and say they do many bad things. Mahathir Bin Mohamad
Every January, with the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday just around the corner, I have come to expect someone to misuse the good doctor’s words so as to push an agenda he would not likely have supported. (…) And yet (…) the one thing I never expected anyone to do would be to just make up a quote from King; a quote that he simply never said, and claim that it came from a letter that he never wrote, and was published in a collection of his essays that never existed. Frankly, this level of deception is something special. The hoax of which I speak is one currently making the rounds on the Internet, which claims to prove King’s steadfast support for Zionism. Indeed, it does more than that. In the item, entitled “Letter to an Anti-Zionist Friend,” King proclaims that criticism of Zionism is tantamount to anti-Semitism, and likens those who criticize Jewish nationalism as manifested in Israel, to those who would seek to trample the rights of blacks. Heady stuff indeed, and 100% bullshit, as any amateur fact checker could ascertain were they so inclined. But of course, the kinds of folks who push an ideology that required the expulsion of three-quarters-of-a-million Palestinians from their lands, and then lied about it, claiming there had been no such persons to begin with (as with Golda Meir’s infamous quip), can’t be expected to place a very high premium on truth. I learned this the hard way recently, when the Des Moines Jewish Federation succeeded in getting me yanked from the city’s MLK day events: two speeches I had been scheduled to give on behalf of the National Conference of Community and Justice (NCCJ). Because of my criticisms of Israel—and because I as a Jew am on record opposing Zionism philosophically—the Des Moines shtetl decided I was unfit to speak at an MLK event. After sending the supposed King quote around, and threatening to pull out all monies from the Jewish community for future NCCJ events, I was dropped. The attack of course was based on a distortion of my own beliefs as well. Federation principal Mark Finkelstein claimed I had shown a disregard for the well-being of Jews, despite the fact that my argument has long been that Zionism in practice has made world Jewry less safe than ever. But it was his duplicity on King’s views that was most disturbing. Though Finkelstein only recited one line from King’s supposed “letter” on Zionism, he lifted it from the larger letter, which appears to have originated with Rabbi Marc Schneier, who quotes from it in his 1999 book, “Shared Dreams: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Jewish Community.” Therein, one finds such over-the-top rhetoric as this: “I say, let the truth ring forth from the high mountain tops, let it echo through the valleys of God’s green earth: When people criticize Zionism, they mean Jews—this is God’s own truth.” The letter also was filled with grammatical errors that any halfway literate reader of King’s work should have known disqualified him from being its author, to wit: “Anti-Zionist is inherently anti Semitic, and ever will be so.” The treatise, it is claimed, was published on page 76 of the August, 1967 edition of Saturday Review, and supposedly can also be read in the collection of King’s work entitled, This I Believe: Selections from the Writings of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. That the claimants never mention the publisher of this collection should have been a clear tip-off that it might not be genuine, and indeed it isn’t. The book doesn’t exist. As for Saturday Review, there were four issues in August of 1967. Two of the four editions contained a page 76. One of the pages 76 contains classified ads and the other contained a review of the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s album. No King letter anywhere. Yet its lack of authenticity hasn’t prevented it from having a long shelf-life. Not only does it pop up in the Schneier book, but sections of it were read by the Anti-Defamation League’s Michael Salberg in testimony before a House Subcommittee in July of 2001, and all manner of pro-Israel groups (from traditional Zionists to right-wing Likudites, to Christians who support ingathering Jews to Israel so as to prompt Jesus’ return), have used the piece on their websites. In truth, King appears never to have made any public comment about Zionism per se; and the only known statement he ever made on the topic, made privately to a handful of people, is a far cry from what he is purported to have said in the so-called “Letter to an Anti-Zionist friend.” In 1968, according to Seymour Martin Lipset, King was in Boston and attended a dinner in Cambridge along with Lipset himself and a number of black students. After the dinner, a young man apparently made a fairly harsh remark attacking Zionists as people, to which King responded: “Don’t talk like that. When people criticize Zionists, they mean Jews. You’re talking Anti-Semitism.” Assuming this quote to be genuine, it is still far from the ideological endorsement of Zionism as theory or practice that was evidenced in the phony letter. After all, to respond to a harsh statement about individuals who are Zionists with the warning that such language is usually a cover for anti-Jewish bias is understandable. More than that, the comment was no doubt true for most, especially in 1968. It is a statement of opinion as to what people are thinking when they say a certain thing. It is not a statement as to the inherent validity or perfidy of a worldview or its effects. (…) So yes, King was quick to admonish one person who expressed hostility to Zionists as people. But he did not claim that opposition to Zionism was inherently anti-Semitic. And for those who criticize Zionism today and who like me are Jewish, to believe that we mean to attack Jews, as Jews, when we speak out against Israel and Zionism is absurd. As for King’s public position on Israel, it was quite limited and hardly formed a cornerstone of his worldview. In a meeting with Jewish leaders a few weeks before his death, King noted that peace for Israelis and Arabs were both important concerns. According to King, “peace for Israel means security, and we must stand with all our might to protect its right to exist, its territorial integrity.” But such a statement says nothing about how Israel should be constituted, nor addresses the Palestinians at all, whose lives and challenges were hardly on the world’s radar screen in 1968. At the time, Israel’s concern was hostility from Egypt; and of course all would agree that any nation has the right not to be attacked by a neighbor. The U.S. had a right not to be attacked by the Soviet Union too—as King would have no doubt agreed, thereby affirming the United States’ right to exist. But would anyone claim that such a sentiment would have implied the right of the U.S. to exist as it did, say in 1957 or 1961, under segregation? Of course not. So too Israel. Its right to exist in the sense of not being violently destroyed by hostile forces does not mean the right to exist as a Jewish state per se, as opposed to the state of all its citizens. It does not mean the right to laws granting special privileges to Jews from around the world, over indigenous Arabs. It should also be noted that in the same paragraph where King reiterated his support for Israel’s right to exist, he also proclaimed the importance of massive public assistance to Middle Eastern Arabs, in the form of a Marshall Plan, so as to counter the poverty and desperation that often leads to hostility and violence towards Israeli Jews. This part of King’s position is typically ignored by the organized Jewish community, of course, even though it was just as important to King as Israel’s territorial integrity. As for what King would say today about Israel, Zionism, and the Palestinian struggle, one can only speculate. (…) But one thing is for sure. While King would no doubt roundly condemn Palestinian violence against innocent civilians, he would also condemn the state violence of Israel. He would condemn launching missile attacks against entire neighborhoods in order to flush out a handful of wanted terrorists. He would oppose the handing out of machine guns to religious fanatics from Brooklyn who move to the territories and proclaim their God-given right to the land, and the right to run Arabs out of their neighborhoods, or fence them off, or discriminate against them in a multitude of ways. He would oppose the unequal rationing of water resources between Jews and Arabs that is Israeli policy. He would oppose the degrading checkpoints through which Palestinian workers must pass to get to their jobs, or back to their homes after a long day of work. He would oppose the policy which allows IDF officers to shoot children throwing rocks, as young as age twelve. In other words, he would likely criticize the working out of Zionism on the ground, as it has actually developed in the real world, as opposed to the world of theory and speculation. These things seem imminently clear from any honest reading of his work or examination of his life. He would be a broker for peace. And it is a tragedy that instead of King himself, we are burdened with charlatans like those at the ADL, or the Des Moines Jewish Federation, or Rabbis like Marc Schneier who think nothing of speaking for the genuine article, in a voice not his own. Tim Wise
Ils ont oublié quel pays ils représentent. Nous sommes aux Etats-Unis où le boycott est un droit et fait partie de notre combat historique pour la liberté et l’égalité. Rashida Tlaib
On April 4, 1967, exactly one year before his assassination, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. stepped up to the lectern at the Riverside Church in Manhattan. The United States had been in active combat in Vietnam for two years and tens of thousands of people had been killed, including some 10,000 American troops. The political establishment — from left to right — backed the war, and more than 400,000 American service members were in Vietnam, their lives on the line. Many of King’s strongest allies urged him to remain silent about the war or at least to soft-pedal any criticism. They knew that if he told the whole truth about the unjust and disastrous war he would be falsely labeled a Communist, suffer retaliation and severe backlash, alienate supporters and threaten the fragile progress of the civil rights movement. King rejected all the well-meaning advice and said, “I come to this magnificent house of worship tonight because my conscience leaves me no other choice.” Quoting a statement by the Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam, he said, “A time comes when silence is betrayal” and added, “that time has come for us in relation to Vietnam.” It was a lonely, moral stance. And it cost him. But it set an example of what is required of us if we are to honor our deepest values in times of crisis, even when silence would better serve our personal interests or the communities and causes we hold most dear. It’s what I think about when I go over the excuses and rationalizations that have kept me largely silent on one of the great moral challenges of our time: the crisis in Israel-Palestine. I have not been alone. Until very recently, the entire Congress has remained mostly silent on the human rights nightmare that has unfolded in the occupied territories. Our elected representatives, who operate in a political environment where Israel’s political lobby holds well-documented power, have consistently minimized and deflected criticism of the State of Israel, even as it has grown more emboldened in its occupation of Palestinian territory and adopted some practices reminiscent of apartheid in South Africa and Jim Crow segregation in the United States. Many civil rights activists and organizations have remained silent as well, not because they lack concern or sympathy for the Palestinian people, but because they fear loss of funding from foundations, and false charges of anti-Semitism. They worry, as I once did, that their important social justice work will be compromised or discredited by smear campaigns. Similarly, many students are fearful of expressing support for Palestinian rights because of the McCarthyite tactics of secret organizations like Canary Mission, which blacklists those who publicly dare to support boycotts against Israel, jeopardizing their employment prospects and future careers. Reading King’s speech at Riverside more than 50 years later, I am left with little doubt that his teachings and message require us to speak out passionately against the human rights crisis in Israel-Palestine, despite the risks and despite the complexity of the issues. King argued, when speaking of Vietnam, that even “when the issues at hand seem as perplexing as they often do in the case of this dreadful conflict,” we must not be mesmerized by uncertainty. “We must speak with all the humility that is appropriate to our limited vision, but we must speak.” And so, if we are to honor King’s message and not merely the man, we must condemn Israel’s actions: unrelenting violations of international law, continued occupation of the West Bank, East Jerusalem, and Gaza, home demolitions and land confiscations. We must cry out at the treatment of Palestinians at checkpoints, the routine searches of their homes and restrictions on their movements, and the severely limited access to decent housing, schools, food, hospitals and water that many of them face. We must not tolerate Israel’s refusal even to discuss the right of Palestinian refugees to return to their homes, as prescribed by United Nations resolutions, and we ought to question the U.S. government funds that have supported multiple hostilities and thousands of civilian casualties in Gaza, as well as the $38 billion the U.S. government has pledged in military support to Israel. And finally, we must, with as much courage and conviction as we can muster, speak out against the system of legal discrimination that exists inside Israel, a system complete with, according to Adalah, the Legal Center for Arab Minority Rights in Israel, more than 50 laws that discriminate against Palestinians — such as the new nation-state law that says explicitly that only Jewish Israelis have the right of self-determination in Israel, ignoring the rights of the Arab minority that makes up 21 percent of the population. Of course, there will be those who say that we can’t know for sure what King would do or think regarding Israel-Palestine today. That is true. The evidence regarding King’s views on Israel is complicated and contradictory. Although the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee denounced Israel’s actions against Palestinians, King found himself conflicted. Like many black leaders of the time, he recognized European Jewry as a persecuted, oppressed and homeless people striving to build a nation of their own, and he wanted to show solidarity with the Jewish community, which had been a critically important ally in the civil rights movement. Ultimately, King canceled a pilgrimage to Israel in 1967 after Israel captured the West Bank. During a phone call about the visit with his advisers, he said, “I just think that if I go, the Arab world, and of course Africa and Asia for that matter, would interpret this as endorsing everything that Israel has done, and I do have questions of doubt.” He continued to support Israel’s right to exist but also said on national television that it would be necessary for Israel to return parts of its conquered territory to achieve true peace and security and to avoid exacerbating the conflict. There was no way King could publicly reconcile his commitment to nonviolence and justice for all people, everywhere, with what had transpired after the 1967 war. Today, we can only speculate about where King would stand. Yet I find myself in agreement with the historian Robin D.G. Kelley, who concluded that, if King had the opportunity to study the current situation in the same way he had studied Vietnam, “his unequivocal opposition to violence, colonialism, racism and militarism would have made him an incisive critic of Israel’s current policies.” Indeed, King’s views may have evolved alongside many other spiritually grounded thinkers, like Rabbi Brian Walt, who has spoken publicly about the reasons that he abandoned his faith in what he viewed as political Zionism. (…) During more than 20 visits to the West Bank and Gaza, he saw horrific human rights abuses, including Palestinian homes being bulldozed while people cried — children’s toys strewn over one demolished site — and saw Palestinian lands being confiscated to make way for new illegal settlements subsidized by the Israeli government. He was forced to reckon with the reality that these demolitions, settlements and acts of violent dispossession were not rogue moves, but fully supported and enabled by the Israeli military. For him, the turning point was witnessing legalized discrimination against Palestinians — including streets for Jews only — which, he said, was worse in some ways than what he had witnessed as a boy in South Africa. (…) Jewish Voice for Peace, for example, aims to educate the American public about “the forced displacement of approximately 750,000 Palestinians that began with Israel’s establishment and that continues to this day.” (…) In view of these developments, it seems the days when critiques of Zionism and the actions of the State of Israel can be written off as anti-Semitism are coming to an end. There seems to be increased understanding that criticism of the policies and practices of the Israeli government is not, in itself, anti-Semitic. (…) the Rev. Dr. William J. Barber II (…) declared in a riveting speech last year that we cannot talk about justice without addressing the displacement of native peoples, the systemic racism of colonialism and the injustice of government repression. In the same breath he said: “I want to say, as clearly as I know how, that the humanity and the dignity of any person or people cannot in any way diminish the humanity and dignity of another person or another people. To hold fast to the image of God in every person is to insist that the Palestinian child is as precious as the Jewish child.” Guided by this kind of moral clarity, faith groups are taking action. In 2016, the pension board of the United Methodist Church excluded from its multibillion-dollar pension fund Israeli banks whose loans for settlement construction violate international law. Similarly, the United Church of Christ the year before passed a resolution calling for divestments and boycotts of companies that profit from Israel’s occupation of Palestinian territories. Even in Congress, change is on the horizon. For the first time, two sitting members, Representatives Ilhan Omar, Democrat of Minnesota, and Rashida Tlaib, Democrat of Michigan, publicly support the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement. In 2017, Representative Betty McCollum, Democrat of Minnesota, introduced a resolution to ensure that no U.S. military aid went to support Israel’s juvenile military detention system. Israel regularly prosecutes Palestinian children detainees in the occupied territories in military court. None of this is to say that the tide has turned entirely or that retaliation has ceased against those who express strong support for Palestinian rights. To the contrary, just as King received fierce, overwhelming criticism for his speech condemning the Vietnam War — 168 major newspapers, including The Times, denounced the address the following day — those who speak publicly in support of the liberation of the Palestinian people still risk condemnation and backlash. Bahia Amawi, an American speech pathologist of Palestinian descent, was recently terminated for refusing to sign a contract that contains an anti-boycott pledge stating that she does not, and will not, participate in boycotting the State of Israel. In November, Marc Lamont Hill was fired from CNN for giving a speech in support of Palestinian rights that was grossly misinterpreted as expressing support for violence. Canary Mission continues to pose a serious threat to student activists. And just over a week ago, the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute in Alabama, apparently under pressure mainly from segments of the Jewish community and others, rescinded an honor it bestowed upon the civil rights icon Angela Davis, who has been a vocal critic of Israel’s treatment of Palestinians and supports B.D.S. But that attack backfired. Within 48 hours, academics and activists had mobilized in response. The mayor of Birmingham, Randall Woodfin, as well as the Birmingham School Board and the City Council, expressed outrage at the institute’s decision. The council unanimously passed a resolution in Davis’ honor, and an alternative event is being organized to celebrate her decades-long commitment to liberation for all. I cannot say for certain that King would applaud Birmingham for its zealous defense of Angela Davis’s solidarity with Palestinian people. But I do. In this new year, I aim to speak with greater courage and conviction about injustices beyond our borders, particularly those that are funded by our government, and stand in solidarity with struggles for democracy and freedom. My conscience leaves me no other choice. Michelle Alexander
In the Israeli view, no peacemaker can bring the two sides together because there aren’t just two sides. There are many, many sides. Most of Israel’s wars haven’t been fought against Palestinians. Since the invasion of five Arab armies at the declaration of the State of Israel in May 1948, the Palestinians have made up a small number of the combatants facing the country. To someone here, zooming in to frame our problem as an Israeli-Palestinian conflict makes as much sense as describing the “America-Italy conflict” of 1944. American G.I.s were indeed dying in Italy that year, but an American instinctively knows that this can be understood only by seeing it as one small part of World War II. The actions of Americans in Italy can’t be explained without Japan, or without Germany, Russia, Britain and the numerous actors and sub-conflicts making up the larger war. Over the decades when Arab nationalism was the region’s dominant ideology, Israeli soldiers faced Egyptians, Syrians, Jordanians, Lebanese and Iraqis. Today Israel’s most potent enemy is the Shiite theocracy in Iran, which is more than 1,000 miles away and isn’t Palestinian (or Arab). The gravest threat to Israel at close range is Hezbollah on our northern border, an army of Lebanese Shiites founded and funded by the IraniansThe antiaircraft batteries of the Russians, Iran’s patrons, already cover much of our airspace from their new Syrian positions. A threat of a lesser order is posed by Hamas, which is Palestinian — but was founded as the local incarnation of Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood, affiliated with the regional wave of Sunni radicalism, kept afloat with . Qatari cash and backed by Iran. If you see only an “Israeli-Palestinian” conflict, then nothing that Israelis do makes sense. (That’s why Israel’s enemies prefer this framing.) In this tightly cropped frame, Israelis are stronger, more prosperous and more numerous. The fears affecting big decisions, like what to do about the military occupation in the West Bank, seem unwarranted if Israel is indeed the far more powerful party. That’s not the way Israelis see it. Many here believe that an agreement signed by a Western-backed Palestinian leader in the West Bank won’t end the conflict, because it will wind up creating not a state but a power vacuum destined to be filled by intra-Muslim chaos, or Iranian proxies, or some combination of both. That’s exactly what has happened around us in Gaza, Lebanon, Syria and Iraq. One of Israel’s nightmares is that the fragile monarchy in Jordan could follow its neighbors, Syria and Iraq, into dissolution and into Iran’s orbit, which would mean that if Israel doesn’t hold the West Bank, an Iranian tank will be able to drive directly from Tehran to the outskirts of Tel Aviv. When I look at the West Bank as an Israeli, I see 2.5 million Palestinian civilians living under military rule, with all the misery that entails. I’m seeing the many grave errors our governments have made in handling the territory and its residents, the construction of civilian settlements chief among them. But because I’m zoomed out, I’m also seeing Hezbollah (not Palestinian), and the Russians and Iranians (not Palestinian), and the Islamic State-affiliated insurgents (not Palestinian) on our border with Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula. I’m considering the disastrous result of the power vacuum in Syria, which is a 90-minute drive from the West Bank. In the “Israeli-Palestinian” framing, with all other regional components obscured, an Israeli withdrawal in the West Bank seems like a good idea — “like a real-estate deal,” in President Trump’s formulation — if not a moral imperative. And if the regional context were peace, as it was in Northern Ireland, for example, a power vacuum could indeed be filled by calm. But anyone using a wider lens sees that the actual context here is a complex, multifaceted war, or a set of linked wars, devastating this part of the world. The scope of this conflict is hard to grasp in fragmented news reports but easy to see if you pull out a map and look at Israel’s surroundings, from Libya through Syria and Iraq to Yemen. The fault lines have little to do with Israel. They run between dictators and the people they’ve been oppressing for generations; between progressives and medievalists; between Sunni and Shiite; between majority populations and minorities. If our small sub-war were somehow resolved, or even if Israel vanished tonight, the Middle East would remain the same volatile place it is now. Misunderstanding the predicament of Israelis and Palestinians as a problem that can be solved by an agreement between them means missing modest steps that might help people here. Could Israel, as some centrist strategists here recently suggested, freeze and shrink most civilian settlements while leaving the military in place for now? How can the greatest number of Palestinians be freed from friction with Israelis without creating a power vacuum that will bring the regional war to our doorstep? These questions can be addressed only if it’s clear what we’re talking about. Abandoning the pleasures of the simple story for the confusing realities of the bigger picture is emotionally unsatisfying. An observer is denied a clear villain or an ideal solution. But it does make events here comprehensible, and it will encourage Western policymakers to abandon fantastic visions in favor of a more reasonable grasp of what’s possible. And that, in turn, might lead to some tangible improvements in a world that could use fewer illusions and wiser leaders. Matti Friedman
In the past ten years, (…) we have seen an emerging new, new anti-Semitism. It is likely to become far more pernicious than both the old-right and new-left versions, because it is not just an insidiously progressive phenomenon. It has also become deeply embedded in popular culture and is now rebranded with acceptable cool among America’s historically ignorant youth. In particular, the new, new bigotry is “intersectional.” It serves as a unifying progressive bond among “marginalized” groups such as young Middle Easterners, Muslims, feminists, blacks, woke celebrities and entertainers, socialists, the “undocumented,” and student activists. Abroad, the new, new bigotry is fueled by British Labourites and anti-Israel EU grandees. Of course, the new, new anti-Semitism’s overt messages derive from both the old and the new. There is the same conspiratorial idea that the Jews covertly and underhandedly exert inordinate control over Americans (perhaps now as grasping sports-franchise owners or greedy hip-hop record executives). But the new, new anti-Semitism has added a number of subtler twists, namely that Jews are part of the old guard whose anachronistic standards of privilege block the emerging new constituency of woke Muslims, blacks, Latinos, and feminists. Within the Democratic party, such animus is manifested by young woke politicians facing an old white hierarchy. Progressive activist Linda Sarsour oddly singled out for censure Senate majority leader Charles Schumer, saying, “I’m talking to Chuck Schumer. I’m tired of white men negotiating on the backs of people of color and communities like ours.” In attacking Schumer, ostensibly a fellow progressive, Sarsour is claiming an intersectional bond forged in mutual victimization by whites — and thus older liberal Jews apparently either cannot conceive of such victimization or in fact are party to it. With a brief tweet, Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez dismissed former Democratic senator Joe Lieberman’s worry over the current leftward drift of the new Democratic party. “New party, who dis?” she mocked, apparently suggesting that the 76-year-old former Democratic vice-presidential candidate was irrelevant to the point of nonexistence for the new progressive generation. Likewise, the generic invective against Trump — perhaps the most pro-Israel and pro-Jewish president of the modern era — as an anti-Semite and racist provides additional cover. Hating the supposedly Jew-hating Trump implies that you are not a Jew-hater yourself. Rap and hip-hop music now routinely incorporate anti-Semitic lyrics and themes of Jews as oppressors — note the lyrics of rappers such as Malice, Pusha T, The Clipse, Ghostface Killah, Gunplay, Ice Cube, Jay-Z, Mos Def, and Scarface. More recently, LeBron James, the Los Angeles Lakers basketball legend, tweeted out the anti-Semitic lyrics of rapper 21 Savage: “We been getting that Jewish money, everything is Kosher.” LeBron was puzzled about why anyone would take offense, much less question him, a deified figure. He has a point, given that singling out Jews as money-grubbers, cheats, and conspirators has become a sort of rap brand, integral to the notion of the rapper as Everyman’s pushback against the universal oppressor. The music executive and franchise owner is the new Pawnbroker, and his demonization is often cast as no big deal at best and at worst as a sort of legitimate cry of the heart from the oppressed. Note that marquee black leaders — from Keith Ellison to Barack Obama to the grandees of the Congressional Black Caucus — have all had smiling photo-ops with the anti-Semite Louis Farrakhan, a contemporary black version of Richard Spencer or the 1980s David Duke. Appearing with Farrakhan, however, never became toxic, even after he once publicly warned Jews, “And don’t you forget, when it’s God who puts you in the ovens, it’s forever!” Temple professor, former CNN analyst, and self-described path-breaking intellectual Marc Lamont Hill recently parroted the Hamas slogan of “a free Palestine from the river to the sea” — boilerplate generally taken to mean that the goal is the destruction of the current nation of Israel. And here, too, it’s understandable that Hill was shocked at the ensuing outrage — talk of eliminating Israel is hardly controversial in hip left-wing culture. The Democratic party’s fresh crop of representatives likewise reflects the new, new and mainlined biases, camouflaged in virulent anti-Israeli sentiment. Or, as Princeton scholar Robert George recently put it: The Left calls the tune, and just as the Left settled in on abortion in the early 1970s and marriage redefinition in the ’90s, it has now settled in on opposition to Israel – not merely the policies of its government, but its very existence as a Jewish state and homeland of the Jewish people. In that vein, Michigan’s new congresswoman, Rashida Tlaib, assumed she’d face little pushback from her party when she tweeted out the old slur that Jewish supporters of Israel have dual loyalties: Opponents of the Boycott, Divest, and Sanctions movement, which targets Israel, “forgot what country they represent,” she said. Ironically, Tlaib is not shy about her own spirited support of the Palestinians: She earlier had won some attention for an eliminationist map in her office that had the label “Palestine” pasted onto the Middle East, with an arrow pointing to Israel. Similarly, Ilhan Omar (D., Minn.) — like Tlaib, a new female Muslim representative in the House — used to be candid in her views of Israel as an “apartheid regime”: “Israel has hypnotized the world, may Allah awaken the people and help them see the evil doings of Israel.” On matters of apartheid, one wonders whether Omar would prefer to be an Arab citizen inside “evil” Israel or an Israeli currently living in Saudi Arabia or Egypt. Sarsour defended Omar with the usual anti-Israel talking points, in her now obsessive fashion. Predictably, her targets were old-style Jewish Democrats. This criticism of Omar, Sarsour said, “is not only coming from the right-wing but [from] some folks who masquerade as progressives but always choose their allegiance to Israel over their commitment to democracy and free speech.” Again, note the anti-Semitic idea that support for the only functioning democracy in the Middle East is proof of lackluster support for democracy and free speech. Out on the barricades, some Democrats, feminists, and Muslim activists, such as the co-founders of the “Women’s March,” Tamika Mallory and the now familiar Sarsour, have been staunch supporters of Louis Farrakhan (Mallory, for example, called him “the greatest of all time”). The New York Times recently ran a story of rivalries within the Women’s March, reporting that Mallory and Carmen Perez, a Latina activist, lectured another would-be co-leader, Vanessa Wruble, about her Jewish burdens. Wruble later noted: “What I remember — and what I was taken aback by — was the idea that Jews were specifically involved, and predominantly involved, in the slave trade, and that Jews make a lot of money off of black and brown bodies.” Progressive icon Alice Walker was recently asked by the New York Times to cite her favorite bedtime reading. She enjoyed And the Truth Will Set You Free, by anti-Semite crackpot David Icke, she said, because the book was “brave enough to ask the questions others fear to ask” and was “a curious person’s dream come true.” One wonders which “questions” needed asking, and what exactly was Walker’s “dream” that had come “true.” When called out on Walker’s preference for Icke (who in the past has relied on the 19th-century Russian forgery The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, in part to construct an unhinged conspiracy about ruling “lizard people”), the Times demurred, with a shrug: It did not censor its respondents’ comments, it said, or editorialize about them. These examples from contemporary popular culture, sports, politics, music, and progressive activism could be easily multiplied. The new, new anti-Semites do not see themselves as giving new life to an ancient pathological hatred; they’re only voicing claims of the victims themselves against their supposed oppressors. The new, new anti-Semites’ venom is contextualized as an “intersectional” defense from the hip, the young, and the woke against a Jewish component of privileged white establishmentarians — which explains why the bigoted are so surprised that anyone would be offended by their slurs. In our illiterate and historically ignorant era, the new, new hip anti-Semitism becomes a more challenging menace than that posed by prior buffoons in bedsheets or the clownish demagogues of the 1980s such as the once-rotund Al Sharpton in sweatpants. And how weird that a growing trademark of the new path-breaking identity politics is the old stereotypical dislike of Jews and hatred of Israel. Victor Davis Hanson
Nous tenons à vous informer que la « Lettre à un Ami Antisioniste »… prétendument écrite par le Dr Martin Luther King Jr, est, selon toute vraisemblance, un faux, bien que le message qui est à la base de la lettre ait été indéniablement exprimé par Martin Luther King Jr, lors d’une intervention de 1968, à Harvard, au cours de laquelle il a dit: « Quand les gens critiquent les Sionistes, ils parlent des juifs. Votre propos est antisémite ». (…) A l’origine, nous avions de forts doutes concernant l’authenticité de la « Lettre à un Ami Antisioniste », parce que le style du premier paragraphe semblait presque un pastiche de celui du discours du Dr King, « J’ai fait un rêve… ». En outre, nous n’avons trouvé aucune référence à la lettre avant 1999, ce qui était bizarre, car ce texte est une dénonciation si sensationnelle de l’antisionisme, qu’il aurait dû être largement cité. Mais, ensuite, nous avons trouvé la « lettre » dans le livre respectable de Rabbi Marc Schneier, publié en 1999 (« Shared Dreams » [Rêves partagés]), dont la préface était écrite par Martin Luther III. Etant donné que la famille King a la réputation d’être extrêmement attentive à l’héritage du Dr King, nous supposions qu’elle avait vérifié la fiabilité du livre avant de l’approuver. En outre, nous avions découvert que des citations de la « lettre » avaient été faites, le 31 juillet 2001, par Michael Salberg, de l’Anti-Defamation League, lors d’un témoignage devant le sous-Comité des Opérations Internationales et des Droits de l’Homme de la Commission pour les Relations internationales de la Chambre des Représentants des Etats-Unis. La même « source » où il était question de cette « lettre » (Saturday Review, août 1967), mentionnée dans le livre de Schneier, était également citée dans le témoignage. Comme beaucoup de membres de l’Anti-Defamation League avaient effectivement collaboré avec Martin Luther King Jr dans la lutte pour les droits civils, nous avons à nouveau supposé qu’ils étaient très bien informés de l’ouvrage concernant King et qu’ils avaient vérifié de manière approfondie tout ce qu’ils avaient choisi d’exposer devant le Congrès. Néanmoins, comme nous ne nous fions pas, en règle générale, aux recherches effectuées par quelqu’un d’autre, nous avons décidé de procéder à une contre-vérification, en examinant les anciens numéros de Saturday Review (le livre de Rabbi Schneier indiquait que la « lettre » avait été publiée dans l’édition d’août 1967 de la revue). Mais voilà, cette lettre ne figure pas dans les numéros d’août, outre que la page et le numéro de volume cités ne correspondent pas à ceux qu’utilise cette publication. CAMERA a également effectué une vérification auprès de l’Université de Boston, qui conserve les archives de l’œuvre du Dr King. Les archivistes ne sont pas davantage parvenus à localiser cette lettre. Force nous est de conclure que la lettre en question n’a pas été écrite par le Dr King. (Veuillez noter que nous ne suggérons pas que la « lettre » contrefaite soit l’œuvre de Rabbi Schneier.) Du fait que le message de la lettre (l’antisionisme est de l’antisémitisme) était bien celui qu’avait exprimé Martin Luther King Jr, nous pouvons comprendre que la famille de King et l’anti-Defamation League, n’aient pas éprouvé le besoin de vérifier la « Lettre à un ami antisioniste ». Cet épisode nous rappelle qu’il est important de vérifier l’authenticité et l’exactitude des sources, même quand elles semblent solides. Ci-après, une libre opinion, en date du 21 janvier 2002, du député républicain John Lewis, qui a travaillé en contact étroit avec le Dr King. Dans son article, il partage le point de vue du Dr King sur Israël, insistant sur la nature démocratique d’Israël et son besoin de sécurité. Il rapporte également que le Dr King a dit : « Quand les gens critiquent les Sionistes, ils veulent dire les Juifs, votre propos est antisémite. » Lee Green
Shortly before he was assassinated, Martin Luther King, Jr. was in Boston on a fund-raising mission, and I had the good fortune to attend a dinner which was given for him in Cambridge. This was an experience which was at once fascinating and moving: one witnessed Dr. King in action in a way one never got to see in public. He wanted to find what the Negro students at Harvard and other parts of the Boston area were thinking about various issues, and he very subtly cross-examined them for well over an hour and a half. He asked questions, and said very little himself. One of the young men present happened to make some remark against the Zionists. Dr. King snapped at him and said, “Don’t talk like that! When people criticize Zionists, they mean Jews. You’re talking anti-Semitism!” Seymour Martin Lipset
In 1966, King entered an agreement to lead a Holy Land pilgrimage, in partnership with Sandy Ray, pastor of a Baptist church in Brooklyn, who took up the promotion of the trip. King’s assistant, Andrew Young, visited Israel and Jordan in late 1966 to do advance planning with Jordanian and Israeli authorities. The pilgrimage was rumored to be in the works from that time, and King received letters of encouragement and invitations from the prime ministers of Israel and Jordan, and from the Israeli and Jordanian mayors of divided Jerusalem. On May 16, 1967, King publicly announced the plan at a news conference, reported by the New York Times the following day. The pilgrimage would take place in November, and King insisted that it would have no political significance whatsoever. The organizers hoped to attract five thousand participants, with the aim of generating revenue for King’s Southern Christian Leadership Council (SCLC). King was slated to preach on the Mount of Olives in Jordanian East Jerusalem (November 14), and at a specially constructed amphitheater near Capernaum on the Sea of Galilee in Israel (November 16). The pilgrims would pass from Jordan to Israel through the Man – delbaum Gate in Jerusalem. King, who knew the situation on the ground, thought he could strike just the right balance between Israel and Jordan. The Six-Day War threw a wrench into the plan. (…) King’s careful maneuvering before, during, and after the Six-Day War demonstrated a much deeper understanding of the Arab-Israeli conflict than critics credit him with possessing. The two Palestinian-Americans who sought to dismiss the Cambridge quote suggested that the conflict “was probably not a subject he was well-versed on,” and that his public statements in praise of Israel “surely do not sound like the words of someone familiar with both sides of the story.” Not so. King had been to the Arab world, had a full grasp of the positions of the sides, and was wary of the possible pitfalls of favoring one over the other. He struck a delicate balance, speaking out or staying silent after careful assessments made in consultation with advisers who had their ears to the ground—Levison and Wachtel (both non-Zionists) in the Jewish community, and Andrew Young, whom King dispatched to the Middle East as his emissary. For this reason, it is an offense to history, if not to King’s memory, whenever someone today summons King’s ghost to offer unqualified support to Israel or the Palestinians. King understood moral complexity, he knew that millions waited upon his words, and he sought to resolve conflict, not accentuate it. The pursuit of an elusive balance marked his approach to the Arab-Israeli conflict while he lived. There is no obvious reason to presume he would have acted differently, had he lived longer. Martin Kramer
Aptly quoting Martin Luther King, Jr. is a common way to make a point or win an argument, and it’s no surprise that his new memorial in Washington includes an “Inscription Wall” of quotes carved in stone. It’s also no surprise that the quote about critics of Zionists didn’t make the cut for inclusion in the memorial. Still, it’s been put to use on many an occasion, most recently by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu last year, in his address to the Knesset on International Holocaust Remembrance Day. A few years back it even cropped up in a State Department report on antisemitism. So I was perplexed to see it categorized as “disputed” on the extensive page of King quotes at Wikiquote—for better or worse, the go-to place to verify quotes. Indeed, as of this writing, it’s the only King quote so listed. The attempt to discredit the quote has been driven by politics. In particular, it’s the work of Palestinians and their sympathizers, who resent the stigmatizing of anti-Zionism as a form of antisemitism. (…) King’s words were first reported by Seymour Martin Lipset, at that time the George D. Markham Professor of Government and Sociology at Harvard, in an article he published in the magazine Encounter in December 1969—that is, in the year following King’s assassination. (…) For the next three-plus decades, no one challenged the credibility of this account. No wonder: Lipset, author of the classic Political Man (1960), was an eminent authority on American politics and society, who later became the only scholar ever to preside over both the American Sociological Association and the American Political Science Association. Who if not Lipset could be counted upon to report an event accurately? Nor was he quoting something said in confidence only to him or far back in time. Others were present at the same dinner, and Lipset wrote about it not long after the fact. He also told the anecdote in a magazine that must have had many subscribers in Cambridge, some of whom might have shared his “fascinating and moving” experience. The idea that he would have fabricated or falsified any aspect of this account would have seemed preposterous. That is, until almost four decades later, when two Palestinian-American activists suggested just that. Lipset’s account, they wrote, “seems on its face… credible.” There are still, however, a few reasons for casting doubt on the authenticity of this statement. According to the Harvard Crimson, “The Rev. Martin Luther King was last in Cambridge almost exactly a year ago—April 23, 1967” (“While You Were Away” 4/8/68). If this is true, Dr. King could not have been in Cambridge in 1968. Lipset stated he was in the area for a “fund-raising mission,” which would seem to imply a high profile visit. Also, an intensive inventory of publications by Stanford University’s Martin Luther King Jr. Papers Project accounts for numerous speeches in 1968. None of them are for talks in Cambridge or Boston. The timing of this doubt-casting, in 2004, was opportune: Lipset was probably unaware of it and certainly unable to respond to it. He had suffered a debilitating stroke in 2001, which left him immobile and speech-impaired. (He died of another stroke in 2006, at the age of 84.) Since then, others have reinforced the doubt, noting that Lipset gave “what seemed to be a lot of information on the background to the King quote, but without providing a single concrete, verifiable detail.” For just these reasons, the quote reported by Lipset was demoted to “disputed” status on King’s entry at Wikiquote. (…) Bear in mind Lipset’s precise testimony: King rebuked the student at a dinner in Cambridge “shortly before” King’s assassination, during a fundraising mission to Boston. It’s important to note that Lipset didn’t place the dinner in 1968. King was assassinated on April 4, 1968, so “shortly before” could just as well have referred to the last months of 1967. In fact, King did come to Boston for the purposes of fundraising in late 1967—specifically, on Friday, October 27. Boston was the last stop in a week-long series of benefit concerts given by Harry Belafonte for King’s Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). Here’s an advertisement for that tour, from the magazine Jet. In the archives of NBC, there is a clip of King greeting the audience at the Boston concert. The Boston Globe also reported King’s remarks and the benefit concert on its front page the next morning. Greetings by Martin Luther King, Jr., sandwiched between an introduction by Sidney Poitier and an act by Harry Belafonte, before 9,000 people in Boston Garden—it’s difficult to imagine any appearance more “high profile” than that. And the dinner in Cambridge? When King was assassinated, the Crimson, Harvard’s student newspaper, did write that he “was last in Cambridge almost exactly a year ago—April 23, 1967.” That had been a very public visit, during which King and Dr. Benjamin Spock held a press conference to announce plans for a “Vietnam Summer.” War supporters picketed King. But in actual fact, that wasn’t King’s last visit to Cambridge. In early October 1967, when news spread that King would be coming to Boston for the Belafonte concert, a junior member of Harvard’s faculty wrote to King from Cambridge, to extend an invitation from the instructor and his wife (…) Two days later, King’s secretary, Dora McDonald, sent a reply accepting the invitation on King’s behalf: “Dr. King asked me to say that he would be happy to have dinner with you.” King would be arriving in Boston at 2:43 in the afternoon. “Accompanying Dr. King will be Rev. Andrew Young, Rev. Bernard Lee and I.” Who was this member of the Harvard faculty? Martin Peretz. (…) But as Peretz noted in his invitation, “much has happened in recent months,” necessitating “some honest and tough and friendly dialogue.” Peretz was then (as he is today) an ardent supporter of Israel. The Six-Day War, only four months earlier, threatened to drive a wedge between those Jews and African-Americans, allied in common causes, who differed profoundly over the Middle East. The culmination came in August, when the radical Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) issued a newsletter claiming that “Zionist terror gangs” had “deliberately slaughtered and mutilated women, children and men, thereby causing the unarmed Arabs to panic, flee and leave their homes in the hands of the Zionist-Israeli forces.” The newsletter also denounced “the Rothschilds, who have long controlled the wealth of many European nations, [who] were involved in the original conspiracy with the British to create the ‘State of Israel’ and [who] are still among Israel’s chief supporters.” Peretz, who a few years earlier had been a supporter of SNCC, condemned the newsletter as vicious antisemitism, and Jewish supporters of the civil rights movement looked to King and the SCLC to do the same. It was against this background that King came to dinner at the Peretz home at 20 Larchwood Drive, Cambridge, in the early evening of October 27, 1967. A few days later, King’s aide, Andrew Young, thanked the couple for the delightful evening last Friday. (…) In fact, the evening’s significance would only become evident later, after King’s death. For the dinner was attended by Peretz’s senior Harvard colleague, Seymour Martin Lipset, and it was then and there that Lipset heard King rebuke a student who echoed the SNCC line on “Zionists”: “When people criticize Zionists, they mean Jews. You’re talking anti-Semitism!” Peretz would later assert that King “grasped the identity between anti-Israel politics and anti-semitic ranting.” But it was Lipset who preserved King’s words to that effect, by publishing them soon after they were spoken. (And just to run the contemporary record against memory, I wrote to Peretz, to ask whether the much-quoted exchange did take place at his Cambridge home on that evening almost 45 years ago. His answer: “Absolutely.” I’ve written twice to Andrew Young to ask whether he has any recollection of the episode. I haven’t yet received a response.) Little more than five months after the Cambridge dinner, King lay dead, felled by an assassin in Memphis. (Peretz delivered a eulogy at the remembrance service in Harvard’s Memorial Church.) There’s plenty of room to debate the meaning of King’s words at the Cambridge dinner, and I’ve only hinted at their context. But the suggestion that King couldn’t possibly have spoken them, because he wasn’t in or near Cambridge when he was supposed to have said them, is now shown to be baseless. Lipset: “Shortly before he was assassinated, Martin Luther King, Jr. was in Boston on a fund-raising mission, and I had the good fortune to attend a dinner which was given for him in Cambridge.” Every particular of this statement is now corroborated by a wealth of detail. We now have a date, an approximate time of day, and a street address for the Cambridge dinner, all attested by contemporary documents. So will the guardians of Wikiquote redeem this quote from the purgatory of “disputed”? Let’s see if they have the decency to clear an eminent scholar of the suspicion of falsification, suggested by persons whose own sloppy inferences have been exposed as false. Martin Kramer

Attention: un faux peut en cacher un autre !

En ce nouveau Martin Luther King Day …

Qui aurait été son 90e anniversaire …

Et qui face à son lot habituel de reprises plus ou moins apocryphes de ses paroles …

Dont des citations bibliques sur des monuments publics mais aussi une prétendue Lettre à un ami antisioniste

Et entre une condamnation d’un chef d’Etat musulman et celle d’une membre musulmane du Congrès américain

Ne devrait pas manquer à l’instar de cette tribune du NYT il y a deux jours …

D’attribuer au vénéré pasteur de putatitves condamnations des prétendues exactions de l’Etat juif …

Qui se souvient …

Que suite à une tribune qu’il avait un peu rapidement signée avec ses nombreux soutiens juifs dans le NYT à la veille de la Guerre des Six jours il y a 50 ans …

Celui-ci se voyait accuser, comme le rappelait un historien palestino-américain il y a quelques années, de « soutenir si ouvertement Israël » ?

Mais surtout qui rappelle …

Avec l’historien américain Martin Kramer

Que jusqu’à annuler au dernier moment une visite en Terre sainte prévue de longue date …

Celui-ci avait en fait une position beaucoup plus équilibrée de la question ?

In the words of Martin Luther King…

Martin Kramer

Sandbox

March 12, 2012

“When people criticize Zionists, they mean Jews. You’re talking anti-Semitism!” —Martin Luther King, Jr.

Aptly quoting Martin Luther King, Jr. is a common way to make a point or win an argument, and it’s no surprise that his new memorial in Washington includes an “Inscription Wall” of quotes carved in stone. It’s also no surprise that the quote about critics of Zionists didn’t make the cut for inclusion in the memorial. Still, it’s been put to use on many an occasion, most recently by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu last year, in his address to the Knesset on International Holocaust Remembrance Day. A few years back it even cropped up in a State Department report on antisemitism. So I was perplexed to see it categorized as “disputed” on the extensive page of King quotes at Wikiquote—for better or worse, the go-to place to verify quotes. Indeed, as of this writing, it’s the only King quote so listed.

The attempt to discredit the quote has been driven by politics. In particular, it’s the work of Palestinians and their sympathizers, who resent the stigmatizing of anti-Zionism as a form of antisemitism. Just what sort of anti-Zionism crosses that fine line is a question beyond my scope here. But what of the quote itself? How was it first circulated? What is the evidence against it? And might some additional evidence resolve the question of its authenticity?

A repugnant suggestion

King’s words were first reported by Seymour Martin Lipset, at that time the George D. Markham Professor of Government and Sociology at Harvard, in an article he published in the magazine Encounter in December 1969—that is, in the year following King’s assassination. Lipset:

Shortly before he was assassinated, Martin Luther King, Jr. was in Boston on a fund-raising mission, and I had the good fortune to attend a dinner which was given for him in Cambridge. This was an experience which was at once fascinating and moving: one witnessed Dr. King in action in a way one never got to see in public. He wanted to find what the Negro students at Harvard and other parts of the Boston area were thinking about various issues, and he very subtly cross-examined them for well over an hour and a half. He asked questions, and said very little himself. One of the young men present happened to make some remark against the Zionists. Dr. King snapped at him and said, “Don’t talk like that! When people criticize Zionists, they mean Jews. You’re talking anti-Semitism!”

For the next three-plus decades, no one challenged the credibility of this account. No wonder: Lipset, author of the classic Political Man (1960), was an eminent authority on American politics and society, who later became the only scholar ever to preside over both the American Sociological Association and the American Political Science Association. Who if not Lipset could be counted upon to report an event accurately? Nor was he quoting something said in confidence only to him or far back in time. Others were present at the same dinner, and Lipset wrote about it not long after the fact. He also told the anecdote in a magazine that must have had many subscribers in Cambridge, some of whom might have shared his “fascinating and moving” experience. The idea that he would have fabricated or falsified any aspect of this account would have seemed preposterous.

That is, until almost four decades later, when two Palestinian-American activists suggested just that. Lipset’s account, they wrote, “seems on its face… credible.”

There are still, however, a few reasons for casting doubt on the authenticity of this statement. According to the Harvard Crimson, “The Rev. Martin Luther King was last in Cambridge almost exactly a year ago—April 23, 1967” (“While You Were Away” 4/8/68). If this is true, Dr. King could not have been in Cambridge in 1968. Lipset stated he was in the area for a “fund-raising mission,” which would seem to imply a high profile visit. Also, an intensive inventory of publications by Stanford University’s Martin Luther King Jr. Papers Project accounts for numerous speeches in 1968. None of them are for talks in Cambridge or Boston.

The timing of this doubt-casting, in 2004, was opportune: Lipset was probably unaware of it and certainly unable to respond to it. He had suffered a debilitating stroke in 2001, which left him immobile and speech-impaired. (He died of another stroke in 2006, at the age of 84.) Since then, others have reinforced the doubt, noting that Lipset gave “what seemed to be a lot of information on the background to the King quote, but without providing a single concrete, verifiable detail.” For just these reasons, the quote reported by Lipset was demoted to “disputed” status on King’s entry at Wikiquote.

To all intents and purposes, this constitutes an assertion that Lipset might have fabricated both the occasion and the quote. To Lipset’s many students and colleagues, the mere suggestion is undoubtedly repugnant and perhaps unworthy of a response. But I’m not a student or colleague, nor did I know Lipset personally, so it seemed to me a worthy challenge to see whether I could verify Lipset’s account. Here are the results.

One Friday evening

Bear in mind Lipset’s precise testimony: King rebuked the student at a dinner in Cambridge “shortly before” King’s assassination, during a fundraising mission to Boston. It’s important to note that Lipset didn’t place the dinner in 1968. King was assassinated on April 4, 1968, so “shortly before” could just as well have referred to the last months of 1967.

In fact, King did come to Boston for the purposes of fundraising in late 1967—specifically, on Friday, October 27. Boston was the last stop in a week-long series of benefit concerts given by Harry Belafonte for King’s Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). Here’s an advertisement for that tour, from the magazine Jet.

In the archives of NBC, there is a clip of King greeting the audience at the Boston concert. The Boston Globe also reported King’s remarks and the benefit concert on its front page the next morning. Greetings by Martin Luther King, Jr., sandwiched between an introduction by Sidney Poitier and an act by Harry Belafonte, before 9,000 people in Boston Garden—it’s difficult to imagine any appearance more “high profile” than that.

And the dinner in Cambridge? When King was assassinated, the Crimson, Harvard’s student newspaper, did write that he “was last in Cambridge almost exactly a year ago—April 23, 1967.” That had been a very public visit, during which King and Dr. Benjamin Spock held a press conference to announce plans for a “Vietnam Summer.” War supporters picketed King.

But in actual fact, that wasn’t King’s last visit to Cambridge. In early October 1967, when news spread that King would be coming to Boston for the Belafonte concert, a junior member of Harvard’s faculty wrote to King from Cambridge, to extend an invitation from the instructor and his wife:

We would be anxious to be able to sit down and have a somewhat leisured meal with you, and perhaps with some other few people from this area whom you might like to meet. So much has happened in recent months that we are both quite without bearings, and are in need of some honest and tough and friendly dialogue…. So if you can find some time for dinner on Friday or lunch on Saturday, we are delighted to extend an invitation. If, however, your schedules do not permit, we of course will understand that. In any case, we look forward to seeing you at the Belafonte Concert and the party afterwards.

Two days later, King’s secretary, Dora McDonald, sent a reply accepting the invitation on King’s behalf: “Dr. King asked me to say that he would be happy to have dinner with you.” King would be arriving in Boston at 2:43 in the afternoon. “Accompanying Dr. King will be Rev. Andrew Young, Rev. Bernard Lee and I.”

Who was this member of the Harvard faculty? Martin Peretz.

This requires a bit of a digression. In October 1967, Peretz was a 29-year-old instructor of Social Studies at Harvard and an antiwar New Leftist. Four months earlier, he had married Anne Farnsworth, heiress to a sewing machine fortune. (Here are the Peretzes in Harvard Yard, just a few years later.) Even before their marriage, the couple had made the civil rights movement one of their causes, and Farnsworth had become a top-tier donor to the SCLC. A year earlier, Peretz had informed King that a luncheon with him was “one of the high points of my life”—and that “arrangements for the transfer of securities are now being made.” As Peretz later wrote, “I knew Martin Luther King Jr. decently well, at least as much as one can know a person who had already become both prophet and hero. I fundraised for his Southern Christian Leadership Conference.” Much of that charity began in the Peretz home.

But as Peretz noted in his invitation, “much has happened in recent months,” necessitating “some honest and tough and friendly dialogue.” Peretz was then (as he is today) an ardent supporter of Israel. The Six-Day War, only four months earlier, threatened to drive a wedge between those Jews and African-Americans, allied in common causes, who differed profoundly over the Middle East. The culmination came in August, when the radical Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) issued a newsletter claiming that “Zionist terror gangs” had “deliberately slaughtered and mutilated women, children and men, thereby causing the unarmed Arabs to panic, flee and leave their homes in the hands of the Zionist-Israeli forces.” The newsletter also denounced “the Rothschilds, who have long controlled the wealth of many European nations, [who] were involved in the original conspiracy with the British to create the ‘State of Israel’ and [who] are still among Israel’s chief supporters.” Peretz, who a few years earlier had been a supporter of SNCC, condemned the newsletter as vicious antisemitism, and Jewish supporters of the civil rights movement looked to King and the SCLC to do the same.

It was against this background that King came to dinner at the Peretz home at 20 Larchwood Drive, Cambridge, in the early evening of October 27, 1967. A few days later, King’s aide, Andrew Young, thanked the couple

for the delightful evening last Friday. It is almost too bad we had to go to the concert, but I think you will agree that the concert, too, proved enjoyable but I am also sure a couple of hours conversing with the group gathered in your home would have been more productive.

In fact, the evening’s significance would only become evident later, after King’s death. For the dinner was attended by Peretz’s senior Harvard colleague, Seymour Martin Lipset, and it was then and there that Lipset heard King rebuke a student who echoed the SNCC line on “Zionists”: “When people criticize Zionists, they mean Jews. You’re talking anti-Semitism!” Peretz would later assert that King “grasped the identity between anti-Israel politics and anti-semitic ranting.” But it was Lipset who preserved King’s words to that effect, by publishing them soon after they were spoken. (And just to run the contemporary record against memory, I wrote to Peretz, to ask whether the much-quoted exchange did take place at his Cambridge home on that evening almost 45 years ago. His answer: “Absolutely.” I’ve written twice to Andrew Young to ask whether he has any recollection of the episode. I haven’t yet received a response.)

Corroborated

Little more than five months after the Cambridge dinner, King lay dead, felled by an assassin in Memphis. (Peretz delivered a eulogy at the remembrance service in Harvard’s Memorial Church.) There’s plenty of room to debate the meaning of King’s words at the Cambridge dinner, and I’ve only hinted at their context. But the suggestion that King couldn’t possibly have spoken them, because he wasn’t in or near Cambridge when he was supposed to have said them, is now shown to be baseless. Lipset: “Shortly before he was assassinated, Martin Luther King, Jr. was in Boston on a fund-raising mission, and I had the good fortune to attend a dinner which was given for him in Cambridge.” Every particular of this statement is now corroborated by a wealth of detail. We now have a date, an approximate time of day, and a street address for the Cambridge dinner, all attested by contemporary documents.

So will the guardians of Wikiquote redeem this quote from the purgatory of “disputed”? Let’s see if they have the decency to clear an eminent scholar of the suspicion of falsification, suggested by persons whose own sloppy inferences have been exposed as false.


Taxes du péché: Punir Billancourt pour ne pas désespérer Neuilly (Sin taxes: When the cigarette, diesel-driving poor end up subsidizing the rich’s electric cars and green refrigerators)

1 janvier, 2019

Image result for sin taxes

Related imageImage result for do sin taxes work ?
Je vais donc vous donner de quoi semer, et vous sèmerez vos champs, afin que vous puissiez recueillir des grains. Vous en donnerez la cinquième partie au roi ; et je vous abandonne les quatre autres pour semer les terres et pour nourrir vos familles et vos enfants. Genèse 47 : 24
Car on donnera à celui qui a; mais à celui qui n’a pas on ôtera même ce qu’il a. Jésus (Marc 4: 25)
Il y a autant de racismes qu’il y a de groupes qui ont besoin de se justifier d’exister comme ils existent, ce qui constitue la fonction invariante des racismes. Il me semble très important de porter l’analyse sur les formes du racisme qui sont sans doute les plus subtiles, les plus méconnaissables, donc les plus rarement dénoncées, peut-être parce que les dénonciateurs ordinaires du racisme possèdent certaines des propriétés qui inclinent à cette forme de racisme. Je pense au racisme de l’intelligence. (…) Ce racisme est propre à une classe dominante dont la reproduction dépend, pour une part, de la transmission du capital culturel, capital hérité qui a pour propriété d’être un capital incorporé, donc apparemment naturel, inné. Le racisme de l’intelligence est ce par quoi les dominants visent à produire une « théodicée de leur propre privilège », comme dit Weber, c’est-à-dire une justification de l’ordre social qu’ils dominent. (…) Tout racisme est un essentialisme et le racisme de l’intelligence est la forme de sociodicée caractéristique d’une classe dominante dont le pouvoir repose en partie sur la possession de titres qui, comme les titres scolaires, sont censés être des garanties d’intelligence et qui ont pris la place, dans beaucoup de sociétés, et pour l’accès même aux positions de pouvoir économique, des titres anciens comme les titres de propriété et les titres de noblesse. Pierre Bourdieu
Dans le débat sur la parité (…) on risque de remplacer des hommes bourgeois par des femmes encore plus bourgeoises. Si du moins on se dispense de faire ce qu’il faudrait pour que cela change vraiment : par exemple, un travail systématique, notamment à l’école, pour doter les femmes des instruments d’accès à la parole publique, aux postes d’autorité. Sinon, on aura les mêmes dirigeants politiques, avec seulement une différence de genre. Bourdieu
La Révolution abolit les privilèges et crée immédiatement ensuite l’Ecole polytechnique et l’Ecole normale supérieure, pour offrir à la nation ses cadres « naturels », en bref sa propre aristocratie. Daniel Cohen
Personne n’aspirerait à la culture si l’on savait à quel point le nombre des hommes cultivés est finalement et ne peut être qu’incroyablement petit; et cependant ce petit nombre vraiment cultivé n’est possible que si une grande masse, déterminée au fond contre sa nature et uniquement par des illusions séduisantes, s’adonne à la culture; on ne devrait rien trahir publiquement de cette ridicule disproportion entre le nombre d’hommes vraiment cultivés et l’énorme appareil de la culture; le vrai secret de la culture est là: des hommes innombrables luttent pour acquérir la culture, travaillent pour la culture, apparemment dans leur propre intérêt, mais au fond seulement pour permettre l’existence du petit nombre. Nietsche (Sur l’avenir de nos établissements d’enseignement)
En 2007, une étude menée par Richard Wiseman de l’Université de Bristol impliquant 3 000 personnes a montré que 88 % des résolutions de la nouvelle année échouaient. Concernant le taux de succès, il serait amélioré sensiblement lorsque les résolutions sont rendues publiques et qu’elles obtiennent le soutien des amis. Néanmoins, il est insensé d’essayer d’arrêter de fumer, de perdre du poids, de nettoyer son appartement et d’arrêter de boire du vin au cours du même mois : la volonté est une ressource mentale extrêmement limitée qui se travaille progressivement comme la musculation. Wikipedia
Les salles de sport sont des biens de club. Sous cette apparente tautologie se cache un concept économique qui signe un service partagé de façon exclusive par plusieurs personnes, à l’instar de la piscine ou du terrain de tennis privé d’une résidence collective. La particularité de ce type de bien est que les individus en retirent une satisfaction qui pend des autres. D’un côté, plus le nombre de membres est élevé, plus la contribution de chacun aux coûts fixes d’investissement et de maintenance peut-être faible. D’un autre côté, plus le nombre de membres est élevé, plus la congestion s’accroît. Accepter un nouveau membre permettra de diminuer l’abonnement annuel donnant accès à la piscine et au tennis, mais les nageurs risquent de se heurter dans le bassin et les joueurs de ne pas s’affronter à leur horaire préféré. Un club de sport est donc un bien de club au sens économique du terme : l’augmentation du nombre d’adhérents permettra de réduire le prix de l’abonnement, mais elle allongera la queue aux machines et aux douches. Un exercice classique, mais musclé pour économiste s’entraînant aux biens de club consiste à calculer la capacité optimale pour un nombre de membres donnés (par exemple la dimension appropriée de la piscine pour les 50 habitants de la résidence), le nombre optimal de membres pour une capacité donnée (le nombre ial pour un bassin de 8 mètres par 4) pour en duire la capacité optimale pour le nombre optimal. Le tout en spécifiant une fonction de coût qui tienne compte des économies d’échelle et une fonction de bénéfice qui tienne compte du fait qu’au bout d’un moment la congestion l’emporte sur la camaraderie : accepter un nouveau membre augmente la possibilité de se faire un nouvel ami, mais ce gain devient inférieur à la gêne de congestion qu’il occasionne. James M. Buchanan, lauréat du prix Nobel d’économie en 1986, est le premier à s’être livré à cet exercice théorique. Les propriétaires de salles de sport ont quant à eux trouvé un truc : faire signer un engagement d’un an aux abonnés qui n’utilisent pas, ou rarement, leurs équipements. Ces abonnés réduisent le montant individuel des cotisations sans embouteiller les installations. Aux États-Unis, près de la moitié des nouveaux inscrits aux premiers jours de janvier, la période de pointe des inscriptions, ne fréquente plus la salle de sport les mois suivants. Seul un nouvel abonné sur cinq continuera à s’y rendre après septembre. Les nouveaux inscrits se rendront en moyenne quatre fois dans la salle de sport dans l’année. Selon une étude de chercheurs québécois portant sur près de 1500 nouveaux inscrits dans des salles de Montréal, la fréquentation des salles de sport chute de près de moitié après quatre mois. Pourtant les nouveaux inscrits aux salles de sport signent de leur plein gré et sans barguigner, ni rechigner sur la durée contractuelle de l’engagement, contrairement à ce qu’ils feraient pour un abonnement de téléphonie mobile ou de télévision payante. Pourquoi donc payent-ils pour ne pas aller à la gym ? Deux économistes ont cherché à répondre à cette question dans un article paru en 2006 dans l’American Economic Review, l’une des publications d’économie les plus prestigieuses au monde. Ils ont calculé combien d’argent ces consommateurs perdaient. Réponse 600 dollars. C’est la différence de ce que paye un membre qui a choisi un contrat forfaitaire au lieu de payer à la séance en achetant 10 tickets d’entrée, autre option qu’il aurait pu choisir. Cet écart s’explique par l’optimisme ou la naïveté. Lorsqu’elles s’inscrivent, les personnes surestiment le nombre de fois où elles se rendront en salle. Dans l’étude québécoise jà citée, les nouveaux membres clarent, lorsqu’ils s’abonnent, le nombre de fois qu’ils comptent se rendre en salle. La fréquentation réelle observée par la suite est plus de deux fois inférieure. Les personnes croient à l’effet durable de leur bonne résolution de but d’année pour maigrir ou simplement entretenir leur forme. Peut-être certaines comptent-elles aussi sur l’effet incitatif du « J’ai payé donc il faut que j’amortisse mon forfait ». Quoi qu’il en soit c’est raté ! Les abonnés absents permettent à la salle de sport d’offrir un abonnement moins cher, ou bien… d’enrichir leur propriétaire. Tout pend de l’intensité de la concurrence. François Lévêque
Wauquiez, c’est le candidat des gars qui fument des clopes et qui roulent au diesel. Benjamin Griveaux
Taxer un individu ou une entreprise, c’est le contraindre à payer un montant en général proportionnel à un revenu ou à un actif. Tous les systèmes politiques ont recours à la taxation. (…) Si la taxation est ancienne, l’utilisation des taxes varie selon les systèmes politiques. En France en 2014 ces ressources (44,7% du PIB) sont utilisées pour les fonctions régaliennes de l’état et pour l’état-providence (31,9% du PIB). La notion de vice est intimement liée à la morale et renvoie aux interdits religieux. Ce que l’on appelait vice dans la perspective de la tentation du mal a été requalifié par la science en addiction. Addiction à des substances, par exemple la nicotine ou à des pratiques comme le jeu ou à des comportements comme la boulimie compulsive. La nicotine est un psychostimulant présent dans les feuilles de tabac dont les effets comme pour la feuille de coca sont connus depuis longtemps. Dès l’ère industrielle la consommation de tabac fumé s’est développée, la pyrolyse permettant la prise de plus de nicotine juste en inhalant. Du vice à l’addiction la transition n’est pas neutre. Dans le premier l’individu est tenu pour responsable de ses choix de vie, dans l’addiction la responsabilité de l’individu peut être atténuée au motif que nous ne sommes pas égaux face à la dépendance. Les penchants particuliers pour les addictions ou les comportements moralement condamnables sont l’objet d’une interdiction (prohibition) ou d’une taxation. L’histoire nous démontre que la prohibition ne supprime pas le vice. (…) Si la prohibition ne peut venir à bout des vices humains il est souvent avancé que la taxation le pourrait. Les intentions des états sont ici parfaitement illisibles. La taxation apparait comme un compromis entre des intérêts puissants et un affichage de prévention. Pour autant les avocats des taxes comportementales répondent par l’argument du niveau de taxation. Si la taxe était très élevée, disent ils, la consommation baisserait. C’est déjà une concession car personne ne s’aventure à pronostiquer une disparition du tabac fumé. Néanmoins ils ont de sérieux arguments en particulier l’expérience australienne. Un continent isolé par la mer, de culture anglo-saxonne a réussi à infléchir sérieusement la consommation en augmentant les taxes jusqu’à rendre le paquet de cigarettes très cher. Ce n’est pas du tout la situation de la France. Si bien qu’en Europe force est de constater que les taxes ne peuvent venir à bout des vices. En réalité la taxation supplémentaire des substances addictives a une base parfaitement légitime: celle des externalités. La consommation de tabac produit des effets que le marché n’internalise pas dans le prix, il s’agit du coût des soins induits par les différentes atteintes symptomatiques au niveau de l’organisme. La médecine connait avec précision les maladies induites par le tabac au niveau non seulement des artères et du poumon mais aussi ailleurs. Le coût des soins dus aux complications du tabac est payé par d’autres dans le cadre de la mutualisation de l’assurance maladie ou des impôts. Ces externalités négatives sont en partie seulement compensées par la moindre espérance de vie qui fait que les pensions ne sont plus versées. Grace à l’exhaustivité des données de soins et à leur précision nous pouvons calculer l’équation des externalités. C’est pourquoi la taxation pigouvienne (d’Arthur Cecil Pigou qui la décrivit dans son ouvrage de 1920: The Economics of Welfare, London: Macmillan.) est rationnelle. Elle permet de combiner liberté individuelle et conséquences économiques. Mais dans ce domaine et à supposer que la taxe supplementaire sur le tabac devienne pigouvienne, il y a en France une situation exceptionnelle. La taxation du tabac est loin de se faire au profit des soins ou de la prévention. L’état dispose à sa guise des taxes et elles ont servi et servent encore de bouche trous dans les budgets sociaux non financés que l’état invente au gré de nécessités souvent électorales. Car il s’agit d’octroyer des “droits à” sans en avoir le financement nécessaire. Ainsi en 2000 le FOREC (Fonds de financement de la réforme des cotisations sociales) a bénéficié des faveurs de l’état bien en mal de trouver le financement nécessaire: ce fonds se voit en effet attribuer 85,5 % du produit du “droit de consommation” sur les tabacs manufacturés. En 2012 ce n’est pas moins de 11 affectataires qui se partagés les 11,13 milliards d’euros du produit du “droit de consommation” du tabac, pour des fractions allant de 53,52 % pour la Cnam à 0,31 % pour le Fcaata (Fonds de cessation anticipée d’activité des travailleurs de l’amiante). Si la taxation n’est pas une solution aux vices des citoyens on s’aperçoit qu’elle peut être la porte ouverte au vice de l’état qui consiste à détourner l’argent prélevé sur la base de motifs bien intentionnés pour en faire des ressources fiscales pour sa politique. Guy-André Pelouze (Centre hospitalier Saint-Jean, Perpignan)
Many goverments use “sin taxes” to dissuade people from smoking and drinking alcohol. In recent years, some lawmakers have turned their cross-hairs to a different vice: sugar. Obesity is on the rise all across the world. Forty per cent of Americans today are obese, up from around 15% in 1980. Several countries, along with a handful of American cities, have introduced taxes on sugary drinks in recent years. Their governments hope that these levies will both raise revenues and reduce how much sugar people consume. (…) But if there is a problem with sin taxes, it is not that they are ineffective. Rather, it is that they are inefficient. Sin taxes are blunt policy instruments. People who only have the occasional drink are not taking on any great health risks, yet they are taxed no differently than serious alcoholics. A similar logic applies for sugar taxes. Tobacco presents a slightly different problem. Nicotine is highly addictive, meaning that there are relatively few people who smoke cigarettes only occasionally. It is easiest to justify taxes on particular goods when they present what economists call “negative externalities”. When a driver buys fuel for his car, both he and the petrol station benefit. Yet cars emit carbon dioxide in their wake, which suggests that it would be only fair for drivers to pay taxes to offset the environmental damage they cause. Some policymakers argue that people who engage in unhealthy habits also impose negative externalities, since they tend to present taxpayers with bigger medical bills. In practice, however, these costs tend to be overstated. While obese people probably do present net costs to governments, smokers tend to die earlier, meaning that they probably save governments money since they draw less from state pensions. Policymakers should still consider implementing sin taxes if they intend to intervene to change individuals’ behaviour. But they should be aware that the bulk of the damage that smokers, drinkers and the obese do is to themselves, and not to others. The Economist
Sugar taxes have returned to policy debates, this time as “sin taxes”—levies on socially harmful practices. These are seen as a double win—useful sources of revenue that also improve public health. Economists think it is not as easy as that. Governments hope that just as taxes on alcohol and tobacco both generate revenue and reduce smoking and drinking, so sugar taxes will help curb obesity. (…) Sin taxes do change behaviour. Alcohol and tobacco are addictive, so demand for them is not as responsive to price changes as, say, the demand for airline tickets to fly abroad. But it is still more responsive than for many common household goods. Estimates vary from study to study, but economists find that on average, a 1% increase in prices is associated with a decline of around 0.5% in sales of both alcohol and tobacco (…) Data on the efficacy of sugar taxes are scantier, but the available evidence shows that they, too, lower consumption. (…) [and] sales of bottled water rose after the fizzy-drinks tax came in. Nevertheless, as policy instruments, sin taxes are extremely blunt. People who only occasionally drink or smoke do their bodies little harm, yet are taxed no differently from heavy smokers and drinkers. A study published last year by the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), a think-tank, found that Britons who bought only a few drinks a week were far more sensitive to price fluctuations than heavy drinkers. The IFS suggests that it might make more sense to place higher levies on the tipples more in favour with heavy drinkers, such as spirits. It is fairly easy to blame particular diseases on tobacco and alcohol. For sugary drinks, which provide only part of consumers’ sugar intake, it is harder. Another IFS study finds that, though Britain’s new law will lower sales of fizzy drinks, it will have little effect on the behaviour of those who consume the most sugar. In Mexico the data show that the tax did lead poorer households to buy fewer sugar-sweetened drinks. But it had little impact on how much the rich consumed. John Cawley, an economist at Cornell University, points out that one flaw with many existing sugar taxes is that they are too local in scope. After Berkeley introduced its tax, sales of sugary drinks rose by 6.9% in neighbouring cities. Denmark, which instituted a tax on fat-laden foods in 2011, ran into similar problems. The government got rid of the tax a year later when it discovered that many shoppers were buying butter in neighbouring Germany and Sweden. Moreover, the impact on public health is unclear. Consumers might simply get their sugar from other sources. Shu Wen Ng, an economist at UNC who studied the taxes in both Berkeley and Mexico, says that one reason for hope is that many people form their dietary habits when they are young. And fizzy drinks are disproportionally drunk by teenagers, who are more sensitive to price changes. (…) The point of sin taxes is to make unhealthy goods more expensive on a relative basis, not to make the poor poorer. So a further concern is that they affect low-income households most. The poor spend a higher share of their income on consumption. So they are hit harder by any consumption tax, such as sales taxes in America or the European Union’s value-added taxes. Sin taxes are especially regressive, since poorer people are more likely to smoke and tend to drink more alcohol and sugary drinks. In theory, the sin taxes could be offset by earmarking any revenue from them for direct cash transfers or for social programmes aimed at reducing poverty. Philadelphia, for example, has earmarked the revenue from its sugar tax for schools, parks and libraries. Debate about sin taxes often tends to blur two distinct purposes. One is to deter people from behaviour that does them harm. Another is to pay for the cost to society as a whole of that harmful behaviour—what economists call its “negative externalities”. Some examples can be fairly clear-cut. When a driver buys fuel for his car, for example, society as a whole has to suffer the consequences of the higher levels of pollution. Banning fossil fuels is impractical, so economists recommend taxing carbon-dioxide emissions instead. Similar ideas underpin taxes on plastic bags to combat the growing problem of ocean pollution. In 2015 the British government passed a law forcing big retailers to charge 5p (6.6 cents) for every plastic bag. Use of plastic bags fell by 85%, though ecologists worry some consumers have switched to substitutes that are environmentally even more damaging. Cotton tote bags, for instance, have to be used 131 times to rank as greener than plastic alternatives. Advocates of taxes on vices such as smoking and obesity argue that they also impose negative externalities on the public, since governments have to spend more to take care of sick people. However, policy papers tend to overstate the economic costs of activities like smoking because they rarely account for what would happen without them. Although unhealthy people tend to cost governments more money while they are alive, this is at least partially offset by the morbid fact that they tend to die earlier, and so draw less from services like pensions. Different vices have different economic costs since they harm people in different ways. Save for the exceptionally overweight, most obese people do not die much earlier. But they do tend to require more medical attention than their healthier peers, often spanning the course of several decades. So obesity does impose net costs on taxpayers. The externalities from alcohol are less clear. Only a minority of drinkers are serious alcoholics, which limits the direct health-care costs from drinking. Excessive drinking, however, does cause significant crime. Around 30% of fatal car crashes in America involve a driver who has been drinking. Alcohol is also heavily linked to domestic violence. Smoking, in contrast, probably saves taxpayers money. Lifelong smoking will bring forward a person’s death by about ten years, which means that smokers tend to die just as they would start drawing from state pensions. (…) The Institute of Economic Affairs, a free-market think-tank, has produced a series of reports on the net fiscal costs of drinking, smoking and obesity to the British government (see chart 2). They estimate that, after accounting for sin taxes, welfare costs, crime and early death, tobacco and alcohol are worth £14.7bn ($19.3bn) and £6.5bn a year, respectively, to the Treasury. Obesity, in contrast, costs it £2.5bn a year. (…) The fizzy-drinks industry is fighting back. Cook County, which includes Chicago, repealed its sugar tax after just two months in part because of retailers’ complaints about falling sales. In June, after much lobbying from drinks firms, California’s state government passed a law preventing cities from taxing sugar until 2030. In America, heart disease is linked to one in four deaths, and smoking to one in five. Sin taxes can make people healthier. But since most of the damage smokers, drinkers and the obese do is to themselves, rather than to others, governments need to think carefully about how much they want to interfere. Moreover, any cost-benefit analysis on the social impact of these vices needs to take into account that people do find them enjoyable. There is more to life than living longer. The Economist
Sugary beverages (…) can give rise to things like diabetes or stroke or heart disease, and these are pretty big in magnitude. A couple of years ago, there was a study estimating that if people were to reduce their sugary beverage consumption by around 20%, then the health benefits that they would reap would be something akin to giving them each a check between $100 or $300 each year. (…) On the other hand (…) Things like rock climbing have negative health consequences, potentially. Driving a car has lots of negative health consequences. The key question from an economic policy perspective is whether people are taking into account these negative effects when they’re making their consumption decisions. In particular, a reason for concern about sugary beverages is that often the negative health consequences come a long time after the date of consumption. You get diabetes or heart disease much later in life. There’s a growing literature in behavioral economics that studies the tendency for people to underweigh distant consequences and overweigh the upfront benefits or costs of doing something. This can explain everything from why we save less for retirement than we should or intend to, or why we exercise less than we ought to. A reason for being interested in sugary soda and sugary beverages is that those [choices] also have this kind of discrepancy between the upfront joy of sipping a soda and this delayed health consequence that happens far down the road. (…) there is also concern about an unintended side effect of that kind of policy — that it tends to fall heavily on poorer consumers. We know that poorer consumers tend to consume things like cigarettes and soda at higher frequencies than richer consumers do. Survey evidence suggests that at the bottom of the income distribution, people drink about twice as much sugary soda than at the top of the income distribution. (…) One of the other questions about soda is the extent to which soda consumption is addictive in the same way that cigarette consumption is. We know from other research that people are much more responsive to cigarette taxes, to the decision to purchase cigarettes, before they start smoking or right when they’re starting, rather than after they’ve been smoking for many years. Then, if the price goes up, they’ll generally just pay the higher cost for it. (…) For soda, the question is whether people who are high soda consumers continue to consume soda at the same rates, like cigarette smokers — or whether they actually switch to other beverages or reduce consumption overall. Even if they’ve been consuming soda for a long time. One of the other policy ideas that we look at a little bit in this paper but don’t delve into too much — and I think there’s more interesting work to be done here — is other kinds of non-tax policies, like some of the advertising bans or pictures of blackened lungs on cigarette packages, for instance. These kinds of policies aren’t exactly taxes but are intended to reduce consumption of cigarettes. There’s been some discussion of similar kinds of policies for soda. (…) The idea is that less marketing would cause poorer consumers to drink less soda, without necessarily having to pay more for the soda they are drinking. (…) Just like you mentioned with the kinds of subsidies for energy-efficient appliances, you can reframe everything we’ve said about sodas in that context and think about the unintended regressivity costs of those kinds of policies. Often, the benefits are accruing precisely to folks in the population who have higher incomes, who aren’t necessarily the ones you’re trying to help out the most. (…) In Philadelphia, if it turns out that people basically don’t change their soda consumption because they instead just drive across the Ben Franklin Bridge and buy their soda in New Jersey, then you don’t actually get any of the health benefits that I was just talking about. People still consume the same amount. They get diabetes at the same rate. The only thing that happens is, they waste more gas driving across the bridge. That would be a downside of this kind of policy. (…) One of the interesting things that we saw with the Philadelphia mayor’s proposal is it was tightly tied to these spending programs on pre-K in a way that some of the previous Philadelphia soda tax proposals were not, the ones that actually ended up failing. This is something that other cities I think have taken note of — that sometimes in making the case for these kinds of things, it’s really helpful to show how those funds would be spent and how they can be retargeted to the affected classes. One of the key questions is whether it’s helpful to offset the regressivity costs of these kinds of taxes by targeting the revenues back toward poorer communities or poorer consumers. Whether that’s effective or not ends up being a pretty technical theoretical question that we get into a fair amount in the paper. The upshot is that if the reason that poorer consumers are drinking more soda than richer consumers is just a difference in preferences, then it’s not all that helpful to try to target those benefits back toward poorer consumers. There might be other arguments for why it’s really beneficial to support pre-K education. Benjamin Lockwood
Une ‘taxe sur le péché’ se définit comme une taxe sur un produit qui peut être nocif, telle que les cigarettes ou les boissons sucrées. Dans de nombreux cas, ces taxes sont une incitation à réduire la consommation et à améliorer la santé. Mais les taxes sur les péchés peuvent toucher de manière disproportionnée les consommateurs à faible revenu, tandis que les clients plus aisés bénéficient d’allégements fiscaux sur les articles qu’eux seuls peuvent se permettre, tels que les fenêtres et les appareils ménagers. éconergétiques. Wharton university

Après les grandes écoles, les opéras ou les concours de beauté, devinez ce que nos élites ont trouvé pour ne pas désespérer Neuilly !

En ce premier jour d’une nouvelle année …

Jour traditionnel à la fois des hausses et des bonnes résolutions

Et au terme de près de deux mois de « jacquerie fiscale » de la part des « gars qui fument des clopes et qui roulent au diesel » ….

Qui ont sérieusement mis à mal la légitimité d’un président qui il y a à peine 18 mois le monde entier nous enviait …

Alors que pour de simples raisons fiscales, l’on découvre que l’ex-doyenne de l’humanité aurait pu se faire passer pour sa mère …

Retour sur la face cachée de ces fameuses « taxes du péché » (dites comportementales sur tabac, diesel et à présent boissons sucrées) …

Qui censées préserver la santé des plus démunis qu’elle ciblent prioritairement …

Dans des domaines où la perception des bénéfices lointains justement suppose …

Des capacités qui, entre distance à la nécessité et capacité de se projeter dans l’avenir, ne sont pas données à tout le monde …

Et qui réussissent l’exploit au bout du compte …

Sans compter les réductions en retraites et pensions entrainées par leur décès plus précoce …

A l’instar de ces abonnés absents des clubs de sport ou des salles d’opéra qui par leur absence même subventionnent la pratique des plus assidus …

De faire subventionner par Billancourt…

Les voitures électriques et les frigos verts de Neuilly !

Do ‘Sin Taxes’ Really Change Consumer Behavior?
Benjamin Lockwood
Wharton
Feb 10, 2017

‘Sin tax’ is defined as a tax on a product that can be harmful to a person, such as cigarettes or sugary drinks. In many cases, these taxes are an incentive to lower consumption and improve health. But sin taxes can disproportionately hurt lower-income consumers, while wealthy shoppers enjoy tax breaks on items only they can afford, such as energy-efficient windows and appliances. A recent study by Benjamin Lockwood, a Wharton professor of business economics and public policy, and coauthor Dmitry Taubinsky from Dartmouth College examines the impact of sin taxes and whether there is a middle ground. The researchers also look at what is being called “revenue recycling,” where these taxes can be used to fund initiatives that benefit lower-income consumers. Lockwood recently spoke about their research on the Knowledge@Wharton show on Wharton Business Radio on SiriusXM channel 111. (Listen to the podcast at the top of this page.)

An edited transcript of the conversation follows.

Knowledge@Wharton: Sin taxes are an important topic here in Philadelphia, where there is a tax on sugary drinks.

Benjamin Lockwood: Absolutely. It’s been happening in Philadelphia, and we’ve also seen these implemented in Chicago, San Francisco, Berkeley, Oakland and Boulder, Colorado. There’s a growing policy wave in favor of these kinds of policies, so it seems like a good time to be looking at it and trying to understand some of these implications.

Knowledge@Wharton: What did you find in your research?

Lockwood: The way that economists generally think about these kinds of taxes is that sugary beverages have health consequences. They can give rise to things like diabetes or stroke or heart disease, and these are pretty big in magnitude. A couple of years ago, there was a study estimating that if people were to reduce their sugary beverage consumption by around 20%, then the health benefits that they would reap would be something akin to giving them each a check between $100 or $300 each year. These are pretty big numbers.

On the other hand, from an economist’s perspective, it’s not enough for something to have negative consequences to justify taxing it. Things like rock climbing have negative health consequences, potentially. Driving a car has lots of negative health consequences. The key question from an economic policy perspective is whether people are taking into account these negative effects when they’re making their consumption decisions. In particular, a reason for concern about sugary beverages is that often the negative health consequences come a long time after the date of consumption. You get diabetes or heart disease much later in life.

There’s a growing literature in behavioral economics that studies the tendency for people to underweigh distant consequences and overweigh the upfront benefits or costs of doing something. This can explain everything from why we save less for retirement than we should or intend to, or why we exercise less than we ought to. A reason for being interested in sugary soda and sugary beverages is that those [choices] also have this kind of discrepancy between the upfront joy of sipping a soda and this delayed health consequence that happens far down the road.

“From an economist’s perspective, it’s not enough for something to have negative consequences to justify taxing it.”

Knowledge@Wharton: In a lot of urban areas, people financially may not have another option in terms of drinking a soda, compared with drinking bottled water. It becomes a life issue that a lot of these people are not able to overcome.

Lockwood: Right. Part of what you’re bringing up here is the question of what people can afford and how these kinds of taxes hit poorer consumers versus richer consumers. This question is the fundamental one of our research. There have been studies of how these kinds of taxes can have beneficial health consequences by reducing consumption. But there is also concern about an unintended side effect of that kind of policy — that it tends to fall heavily on poorer consumers. We know that poorer consumers tend to consume things like cigarettes and soda at higher frequencies than richer consumers do. Survey evidence suggests that at the bottom of the income distribution, people drink about twice as much sugary soda than at the top of the income distribution.

This paper looks at the regressivity consequences of these kinds of taxes and tries to get a handle on them. How do we weigh those consequences against the potential health benefits from imposing these kinds of taxes?

Knowledge@Wharton: In your estimation, are sin taxes a good thing for the consumer in general?

Lockwood: This is the million-dollar question. What is the overall impact? And if we should have a soda tax, how big should it be? Philadelphia’s soda tax is 1.5 cents per ounce. I believe Boulder’s is 2 cents per ounce. Most of the others have been 1 cent per ounce. As cities go forward trying to weigh these policies, there is this question of what the magnitude should be and whether we should have this kind of tax at all.

The key thing that we explore in our paper is that what matters for these regressivity costs is how much people respond to these taxes when they are imposed. There’s often an initial intuition that these taxes must be really bad for poor consumers because then they have to pay more out of pocket. That’s exactly right, if people don’t respond to the tax at all — if they don’t reduce their consumption. Of course, poor people end up paying more.

On the other hand, if people end up reducing their consumption a lot in response to the tax, then things get a lot trickier and a lot more interesting. The people who get the greatest health benefits from that reduction are the people who were consuming the most sugar to begin with, which tends to be poorer consumers. So, if people are responding a lot to the tax, then these kinds of regressivity costs are actually a lot smaller. In fact, some of the health benefits can be really concentrated on poor consumers, which is something that the government is interested in.

To answer the question you raised — how should these taxes exist and how big should they be — the key question is how much people reduce consumption in response to the tax. Do they keep consuming the same amount and just pay more? Or do they actually reduce how much they’re consuming?

Knowledge@Wharton:  Are you able to glean enough from what has happened in places like Berkeley and Philadelphia to say, “Yes, absolutely, there’s no question that the economic and health benefits are there for people to stay away from sugary drinks?” And are they doing it?

Lockwood: Again, this is an insightful question that cuts to the heart of the issue. In many cases, we still need more evidence to know the optimal size of these taxes. There’s some initial evidence from the tax that was imposed in Mexico, and the one that was imposed in Berkeley a couple years ago, that does suggest people reduced consumption in response to these taxes. But the estimates of how much they reduced consumption are really wide.

Economists talk about that responsiveness in terms of elasticity. If you impose a 10% tax, then by what percentage do people reduce their consumption? Do they reduce their consumption by 1.5% or by 25%? It’s a huge range. If you take the middling estimates of those, and you think that it’s a 10% or so reduction, which is where a lot of economists at this stage think the value probably lies, then our initial estimates are that some positive tax, maybe even a little larger than the ones that have already been imposed, is probably optimal. But again, we’ll know more going forward when we see the effects of these bigger cities in the next few years.

Knowledge@Wharton: The taxes that have been put in place haven’t gone overboard, and they haven’t underdone it either. They’ve gotten it in the ballpark so that if there is any increase down the road, it may be a half-cent per ounce or so. The cities have done a pretty good job, for the most part.

Lockwood: I don’t want to go on record saying, “It should be exactly 3.25 cents per ounce,” because we’re still waiting to see the evidence come in. But [based on] the economic research so far, my guess is that somewhere in the range of 3 cents to 4 cents per ounce — rather than the 2 cents per ounce that we’re seeing now — would be in the ballpark. I would say cities, luckily, have been in the range of reasonable taxes so far, given the hazy nature of the estimates we have.

Knowledge@Wharton: In Philadelphia, it’s been well-noted that the mayor would like to use the money from the tax to help improve pre-K education. A big focus of your research is on the good that is potentially done by these taxes that goes back to the community.

Lockwood: One of the key questions is whether it’s helpful to offset the regressivity costs of these kinds of taxes by targeting the revenues back toward poorer communities or poorer consumers. Whether that’s effective or not ends up being a pretty technical theoretical question that we get into a fair amount in the paper. The upshot is that if the reason that poorer consumers are drinking more soda than richer consumers is just a difference in preferences, then it’s not all that helpful to try to target those benefits back toward poorer consumers. There might be other arguments for why it’s really beneficial to support pre-K education. But if that’s the case, then we should be doing it through income taxes or whatever, regardless. We shouldn’t necessarily tie it to the existence of a soda tax.

Knowledge@Wharton: The impact of higher prices and taxes on cigarettes to mitigate cancer and other diseases has been discussed for years. The fact that cigarettes have seen higher costs has slowed down some people, but it hasn’t stopped [people from purchasing them]. Part of this has to do with the attraction that people have to consuming these kind of products, correct?

Lockwood: I think that’s right. One of the other questions about soda is the extent to which soda consumption is addictive in the same way that cigarette consumption is. We know from other research that people are much more responsive to cigarette taxes, to the decision to purchase cigarettes, before they start smoking or right when they’re starting, rather than after they’ve been smoking for many years. Then, if the price goes up, they’ll generally just pay the higher cost for it.

For soda, the question is whether people who are high soda consumers continue to consume soda at the same rates, like cigarette smokers — or whether they actually switch to other beverages or reduce consumption overall. Even if they’ve been consuming soda for a long time.

Knowledge@Wharton: Not that it’s directly a part of your research, but part of the problem is the companies that are bringing these products forward and the impact they have through the marketing. To a degree, it’s an uphill battle for some of these people if they want to try to step away from soda. If you want to step away from cigarettes, it’s a much harder prospect.

“If the goal of a tax is to discourage consumption of something that’s unhealthy, then people will only reduce their consumption if they actually see that tax and feel it.”

Lockwood: One of the other policy ideas that we look at a little bit in this paper but don’t delve into too much — and I think there’s more interesting work to be done here — is other kinds of non-tax policies, like some of the advertising bans or pictures of blackened lungs on cigarette packages, for instance. These kinds of policies aren’t exactly taxes but are intended to reduce consumption of cigarettes. There’s been some discussion of similar kinds of policies for soda.

Those kinds of policies, too, can make more sense when you have these goods that are consumed more by poorer consumers. They can help dissuade people from consuming this stuff without actually taking money out of their pockets, right? The idea is that less marketing would cause poorer consumers to drink less soda, without necessarily having to pay more for the soda they are drinking.

Knowledge@Wharton: Is there bias in this process in general? You’re talking about more people of lower incomes being affected by sodas and cigarette tax, compared with people of higher incomes who have the ability to put in energy-efficient windows and refrigerators.

Lockwood: I think that’s right. Just like you mentioned with the kinds of subsidies for energy-efficient appliances, you can reframe everything we’ve said about sodas in that context and think about the unintended regressivity costs of those kinds of policies. Often, the benefits are accruing precisely to folks in the population who have higher incomes, who aren’t necessarily the ones you’re trying to help out the most.

You can do a similar kind of exercise where you say, “Well, this doesn’t necessarily have the redistributive benefits that we would otherwise hope for from a tax.” But it does have this corrective effect of getting people to consume more energy-efficient stuff, just like the soda taxes discourage people from consuming unhealthy stuff. And that corrective benefit has to be weighed against the regressivity cost.

Knowledge@Wharton: Going back to the soda issue, what really has been the impact from the tax? After it was implemented here in Philadelphia, there was a line item for it on your receipt so that it wasn’t just baked into the cost of a 20-ounce soda. That was an important piece to this.

Lockwood: Again, it’s too early to have much formal economic analysis out of this. We’ll see going forward what the overall effects on consumption and soda purchases actually are. But one of the interesting questions going into this was to what extent the soda tax — which is actually imposed on the distributors who supply sodas to grocery stores — would be passed on to consumers in the form of higher soda prices.

One of the interesting things we’ve seen so far is that it does look like stores are really trying to make a salient connection and say, “This is how much the cost of your soda has gone up because of this tax.” That’s pretty interesting. On the one hand, sometimes people are dismayed to see taxes being passed through to consumers. They’d like to see those taxes being borne by the firm or corporations. But on the other hand, if the goal of a tax is to discourage consumption of something that’s unhealthy, then people will only reduce their consumption if they actually see that tax and feel it. In this case, having that tax passed through to the consumer and being front-and-center on the receipt might be consistent with the apparent goals of the policy.

Knowledge@Wharton: With cigarettes, you’re not seeing that itemized receipt that says what you’re paying because of the tax. It could be a very important deterrent in this process.

Lockwood: It certainly could be. It’ll be interesting to see whether those line items persist going forward or whether that was a temporary move by the grocers to try to explain why we had this one-time cost increase. But if they stay there, and the tax ends up being fully passed on to consumers on into the future, I think it will be interesting to see if that actually helps with these benefits. Maybe this is the kind of thing that we should have been doing with cigarettes all along, really emphasizing how much the cost is increasing because of these taxes.

Knowledge@Wharton: How much interest in this research topic is there from the medical community?

Lockwood: I think the medical research community has a big part to play in this. Although this is mostly a theory paper, it identifies the key parameters or estimates that will govern what that optimal tax is. A lot of that research can beneficially come from the medical community. Things like, how much more does medical care cost when people consume more sugar versus less? How much do people seem to be taking those costs into account when they are making their consumption decisions?

Those are exactly the kinds of things that people are studying right now. And as I said, we have some initial estimates. But I think this is an exciting time both for economists and medical researchers because we will have better estimates of this shortly.

“What you’d like to do is to have people switch away from these sugary things toward other things.”

Knowledge@Wharton: We’ve seen growth in an area called behavioral economics. We want to understand the economic impact of our behaviors right now, whether they are positive or negative.

Lockwood: Exactly. This is a very exciting and vibrant area of economic research, where we relax the conventional economic model in which people are fully rational and fully take everything into account when they’re making every single decision they make all day. This area of behavioral economics allows for what many of us feel: That there are a lot of things going on. A lot of things are confusing, and you’re not always paying perfect attention to everything, including what the eventual health costs are of everything that you might engage in. When that’s the case, there are beneficial things that the government can do to help guide behavior or explain those costs.

Knowledge@Wharton: Starting to put these theories together, what potentially is the impact on the lower incomes in Philadelphia and Chicago and San Francisco, compared with where we will be going in the next five to 10 years?

Lockwood: I think a lot of it comes back to these empirical estimates of trying to see what the effects of these taxes actually are. In Philadelphia, if it turns out that people basically don’t change their soda consumption because they instead just drive across the Ben Franklin Bridge and buy their soda in New Jersey, then you don’t actually get any of the health benefits that I was just talking about. People still consume the same amount. They get diabetes at the same rate. The only thing that happens is, they waste more gas driving across the bridge. That would be a downside of this kind of policy.

Now, there are things you could potentially do to correct that, like cooperating with nearby localities and jointly setting taxes so there aren’t these big differences across local borders. But if it turns out that people just buy at their local store, and this has a big impact, then we’ll find out that this is a useful policy to be implemented at the city level.

Another question along these lines is how much people substitute other kinds of drinks or how their consumption behavior changes. One way in which Philly’s tax was distinctive is that it also extended to cover diet soda beverages. From the economic health perspective, that’s not obviously a great move in terms of policy design. Maybe there are some unintended health consequences of diet soda, too. But the estimates now suggest that those are miniscule relative to the negative consequences of sugar consumption.

What you’d like to do is to have people switch away from these sugary things toward other things — maybe toward diet soda, if that’s really what they want. Having a better sense of whether people just keep consuming their sugary soda because diet also went up [in price], or whether they instead switched to bottled water or something, will have an impact on whether other cities then think about imposing taxes across the board on diet beverages, too.

Similarly, there will be a benefit for other cities in understanding how to make the case for these policies to their constituents. One of the interesting things that we saw with the Philadelphia mayor’s proposal is it was tightly tied to these spending programs on pre-K in a way that some of the previous Philadelphia soda tax proposals were not, the ones that actually ended up failing. This is something that other cities I think have taken note of — that sometimes in making the case for these kinds of things, it’s really helpful to show how those funds would be spent and how they can be retargeted to the affected classes.

Voir aussi:

The price of vice“Sin” taxes—eg, on tobacco—are less efficient than they look

But they do help improve public health

The Economist

TOBACCO was new to England in the 17th century, but even then, smoking had plenty of critics. The most famous was King James I, who in 1604 described smoking as “a custome lothsome to the eye, hatefull to the Nose, harmful to the braine, dangerous to the Lungs, and in the blacke and stinking fume thereof, nearest resembling the Stigian smoke of the pit that is bottomless”. The king increased the import tax on the “noxious weed” by 4,000%.

Sometimes, governments have had compelling financial reasons to tax particular goods. In 1764, when the national finances were drained by wars in North America, Britain’s parliament began enforcing tariffs on sugar and molasses imported from outside the empire. In practice, these served as a consumption tax on colonists living in America and threatened to ruin their rum industry. Not long after, parliament also introduced heavy levies on tea. The colonists were not best pleased.

Two-and-a-half centuries later, sugar taxes have returned to policy debates, this time as “sin taxes”—levies on socially harmful practices. These are seen as a double win—useful sources of revenue that also improve public health. Economists think it is not as easy as that.

Governments hope that just as taxes on alcohol and tobacco both generate revenue and reduce smoking and drinking, so sugar taxes will help curb obesity. Hungary, which has the highest rate of obesity in Europe, imposed a tax on food with high levels of sugar and salt in 2011. France did the same for sugary drinks in 2012. Several American cities, Thailand, Britain, Ireland, South Africa and other countries have since followed suit.

Sin taxes do change behaviour. Alcohol and tobacco are addictive, so demand for them is not as responsive to price changes as, say, the demand for airline tickets to fly abroad. But it is still more responsive than for many common household goods. Estimates vary from study to study, but economists find that on average, a 1% increase in prices is associated with a decline of around 0.5% in sales of both alcohol and tobacco (see chart 1).

Clunky sin tax

Data on the efficacy of sugar taxes are scantier, but the available evidence shows that they, too, lower consumption. In March 2015 Berkeley, California, put a tax of one cent per ounce (28 grams) on sugary drinks. A study by researchers at the University of North Carolina (UNC) and the Public Health Institute in Oakland, California, found that sales of sugary drinks fell by 9.6% in a year. It was a similar story in Mexico, which in January 2014 slapped a nationwide tax of 1 peso (then 8 cents) a litre on sugar-sweetened beverages. Sales fell by 5.5% in the first year, and 9.7% in the next. In both places, sales of bottled water rose after the fizzy-drinks tax came in.

Nevertheless, as policy instruments, sin taxes are extremely blunt. People who only occasionally drink or smoke do their bodies little harm, yet are taxed no differently from heavy smokers and drinkers. A study published last year by the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), a think-tank, found that Britons who bought only a few drinks a week were far more sensitive to price fluctuations than heavy drinkers. The IFS suggests that it might make more sense to place higher levies on the tipples more in favour with heavy drinkers, such as spirits.

It is fairly easy to blame particular diseases on tobacco and alcohol. For sugary drinks, which provide only part of consumers’ sugar intake, it is harder. Another IFS study finds that, though Britain’s new law will lower sales of fizzy drinks, it will have little effect on the behaviour of those who consume the most sugar. In Mexico the data show that the tax did lead poorer households to buy fewer sugar-sweetened drinks. But it had little impact on how much the rich consumed.

John Cawley, an economist at Cornell University, points out that one flaw with many existing sugar taxes is that they are too local in scope. After Berkeley introduced its tax, sales of sugary drinks rose by 6.9% in neighbouring cities. Denmark, which instituted a tax on fat-laden foods in 2011, ran into similar problems. The government got rid of the tax a year later when it discovered that many shoppers were buying butter in neighbouring Germany and Sweden.

Moreover, the impact on public health is unclear. Consumers might simply get their sugar from other sources. Shu Wen Ng, an economist at UNC who studied the taxes in both Berkeley and Mexico, says that one reason for hope is that many people form their dietary habits when they are young. And fizzy drinks are disproportionally drunk by teenagers, who are more sensitive to price changes.

Jonathan Gruber, an economist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, points out that taxing foods like sugar and fat is in a different category from taxing tobacco and alcohol, because people need food to live. It presents public-health problems only when people eat too much. Mr Gruber says if he were king, he would target the problem more directly, by supplementing taxes on sugar and fat with a tax based on individuals’ body-mass indices.

The point of sin taxes is to make unhealthy goods more expensive on a relative basis, not to make the poor poorer. So a further concern is that they affect low-income households most. The poor spend a higher share of their income on consumption. So they are hit harder by any consumption tax, such as sales taxes in America or the European Union’s value-added taxes. Sin taxes are especially regressive, since poorer people are more likely to smoke and tend to drink more alcohol and sugary drinks. In theory, the sin taxes could be offset by earmarking any revenue from them for direct cash transfers or for social programmes aimed at reducing poverty. Philadelphia, for example, has earmarked the revenue from its sugar tax for schools, parks and libraries.

Double negatives

Debate about sin taxes often tends to blur two distinct purposes. One is to deter people from behaviour that does them harm. Another is to pay for the cost to society as a whole of that harmful behaviour—what economists call its “negative externalities”. Some examples can be fairly clear-cut. When a driver buys fuel for his car, for example, society as a whole has to suffer the consequences of the higher levels of pollution. Banning fossil fuels is impractical, so economists recommend taxing carbon-dioxide emissions instead.

Similar ideas underpin taxes on plastic bags to combat the growing problem of ocean pollution. In 2015 the British government passed a law forcing big retailers to charge 5p (6.6 cents) for every plastic bag. Use of plastic bags fell by 85%, though ecologists worry some consumers have switched to substitutes that are environmentally even more damaging. Cotton tote bags, for instance, have to be used 131 times to rank as greener than plastic alternatives.

Advocates of taxes on vices such as smoking and obesity argue that they also impose negative externalities on the public, since governments have to spend more to take care of sick people. However, policy papers tend to overstate the economic costs of activities like smoking because they rarely account for what would happen without them. Although unhealthy people tend to cost governments more money while they are alive, this is at least partially offset by the morbid fact that they tend to die earlier, and so draw less from services like pensions.

Different vices have different economic costs since they harm people in different ways. Save for the exceptionally overweight, most obese people do not die much earlier. But they do tend to require more medical attention than their healthier peers, often spanning the course of several decades. So obesity does impose net costs on taxpayers.

The externalities from alcohol are less clear. Only a minority of drinkers are serious alcoholics, which limits the direct health-care costs from drinking. Excessive drinking, however, does cause significant crime. Around 30% of fatal car crashes in America involve a driver who has been drinking. Alcohol is also heavily linked to domestic violence.

Smoking, in contrast, probably saves taxpayers money. Lifelong smoking will bring forward a person’s death by about ten years, which means that smokers tend to die just as they would start drawing from state pensions. In a study published in 2002 Kip Viscusi, an economist at Vanderbilt University who has served as an expert witness on behalf of tobacco companies, estimated that even if tobacco were untaxed, Americans could still expect to save the government an average of 32 cents for every pack of cigarettes they smoke.

The Institute of Economic Affairs, a free-market think-tank, has produced a series of reports on the net fiscal costs of drinking, smoking and obesity to the British government (see chart 2). They estimate that, after accounting for sin taxes, welfare costs, crime and early death, tobacco and alcohol are worth £14.7bn ($19.3bn) and £6.5bn a year, respectively, to the Treasury. Obesity, in contrast, costs it £2.5bn a year.

The best argument for sin taxes, however, is still the behavioural one. Economic models assume that people know what they are doing. Flesh-and-blood humans struggle with self-control. Most smokers are well aware of the health risks, but many still find it hard to quit. Tax policy can help. Mr Gruber argues that, once you allow for even a sliver of irrationality in human decision-making, the case for taxing addictive substances becomes clear.

The fizzy-drinks industry is fighting back. Cook County, which includes Chicago, repealed its sugar tax after just two months in part because of retailers’ complaints about falling sales. In June, after much lobbying from drinks firms, California’s state government passed a law preventing cities from taxing sugar until 2030.

In America, heart disease is linked to one in four deaths, and smoking to one in five. Sin taxes can make people healthier. But since most of the damage smokers, drinkers and the obese do is to themselves, rather than to others, governments need to think carefully about how much they want to interfere. Moreover, any cost-benefit analysis on the social impact of these vices needs to take into account that people do find them enjoyable. There is more to life than living longer.

Do “sin taxes” work?
And are they fair?
W.Z.
The Economist
Aug 10th 2018

MANY goverrments use “sin taxes” to dissuade people from smoking and drinking alcohol. In recent years, some lawmakers have turned their cross-hairs to a different vice: sugar. Obesity is on the rise all across the world. Forty per cent of Americans today are obese, up from around 15% in 1980. Several countries, along with a handful of American cities, have introduced taxes on sugary drinks in recent years. Their governments hope that these levies will both raise revenues and reduce how much sugar people consume. But do sin taxes even work?

Policymakers are right to think that sin taxes lead to lower consumption. The exact estimates vary from study to study, but economists have found that in general, a 1% increase in the price of tobacco or alcohol in America leads to a 0.5% decline in sales. In practical terms, this means that sales of tobacco and alcohol are more responsive overall to price changes than say, sales of many common household goods, such as coffee. Similarly, while it is still too early to determine whether these taxes will have any effect on obesity, studies have shown that they have at the very least reduced sales in Mexico, and the cities of Berkeley and Philadelphia.

But if there is a problem with sin taxes, it is not that they are ineffective. Rather, it is that they are inefficient. Sin taxes are blunt policy instruments. People who only have the occasional drink are not taking on any great health risks, yet they are taxed no differently than serious alcoholics. A similar logic applies for sugar taxes. Tobacco presents a slightly different problem. Nicotine is highly addictive, meaning that there are relatively few people who smoke cigarettes only occasionally.

It is easiest to justify taxes on particular goods when they present what economists call “negative externalities”. When a driver buys fuel for his car, both he and the petrol station benefit. Yet cars emit carbon dioxide in their wake, which suggests that it would be only fair for drivers to pay taxes to offset the environmental damage they cause. Some policymakers argue that people who engage in unhealthy habits also impose negative externalities, since they tend to present taxpayers with bigger medical bills. In practice, however, these costs tend to be overstated. While obese people probably do present net costs to governments, smokers tend to die earlier, meaning that they probably save governments money since they draw less from state pensions. Policymakers should still consider implementing sin taxes if they intend to intervene to change individuals’ behaviour. But they should be aware that the bulk of the damage that smokers, drinkers and the obese do is to themselves, and not to others.

Voir de même:

« La taxation n’est pas une solution aux vices des citoyens »

La théorie économique dit que la taxation compense les « externalités négatives » du marché des produits nocifs. A condition que l’Etat n’en détourne pas le produit, explique le chirurgien des hôpitaux Guy-André Pelouze.
Guy-André Pelouze, chirurgien des hôpitaux au Centre hospitalier Saint-Jean (Perpignan)
Le Monde
15 avril 2016

Taxer un individu ou une entreprise, c’est le contraindre à payer un montant en général proportionnel à un revenu ou à un actif. Tous les systèmes politiques ont recours à la taxation. « Je vais donc vous donner de quoi semer, et vous sèmerez vos champs, afin que vous puissiez recueillir des grains. Vous en donnerez la cinquième partie au roi ; et je vous abandonne les quatre autres pour semer les terres et pour nourrir vos familles et vos enfants » (Genèse 47 : 24), dit la Bible.Si la taxation est ancienne, l’utilisation des taxes varie selon les systèmes politiques. En France en 2014 ces ressources (44,7% du PIB) sont utilisées pour les fonctions régaliennes de l’état et pour l’état-providence (31,9% du PIB).La notion de vice est intimement liée à la morale et renvoie aux interdits religieux. Ce que l’on appelait vice dans la perspective de la tentation du mal a été requalifié par la science en addiction. Addiction à des substances, par exemple la nicotine ou à des pratiques comme le jeu ou à des comportements comme la boulimie compulsive. La nicotine est un psychostimulant présent dans les feuilles de tabac dont les effets comme pour la feuille de coca sont connus depuis longtemps. Dès l’ère industrielle la consommation de tabac fumé s’est développée, la pyrolyse permettant la prise de plus de nicotine juste en inhalant. Du vice à l’addiction la transition n’est pas neutre. Dans le premier l’individu est tenu pour responsable de ses choix de vie, dans l’addiction la responsabilité de l’individu peut être atténuée au motif que nous ne sommes pas égaux face à la dépendance.La prohibition encourage la contrebandeLes penchants particuliers pour les addictions ou les comportements moralement condamnables sont l’objet d’une interdiction (prohibition) ou d’une taxation. L’histoire nous démontre que la prohibition ne supprime pas le vice. En France le cannabis est interdit mais il est consommé par beaucoup de français y compris des adolescents. Comme l’héroïne, la cocaine est interdite mais la consommation n’a jamais été supprimée et si elle a baissé c’est en raison de l’apparition sur le marché d’autres drogues de synthèse toutes aussi interdites. Il est à cet égard surprenant que certains médecins demandentl’interdiction du tabac. Cette opinion formellement généreuse en dehors d’entraver dangereusement la liberté individuelle conduit en pratique au pire. La prohibition encourage la contrebande, la mauvaise qualité des produits consommés et d’autres activités criminelles. Mais de surcroît elle augmente la consommation, c’est le paradoxe de la prohibition.Si la prohibition ne peut venir à bout des vices humains il est souvent avancé que la taxation le pourrait. Les intentions des états sont ici parfaitement illisibles. La taxation apparait comme un compromis entre des intérêts puissants et un affichage de prévention. Pour autant les avocats des taxes comportementales répondent par l’argument du niveau de taxation. Si la taxe était très élevée, disent ils, la consommation baisserait. C’est déjà une concession car personne ne s’aventure à pronostiquer une disparition du tabac fumé. Néanmoins ils ont de sérieux arguments en particulier l’expérience australienne. Un continent isolé par la mer, de culture anglo-saxonne a réussi à infléchir sérieusement la consommation en augmentant les taxes jusqu’à rendre le paquet de cigarettes très cher. Ce n’est pas du tout la situation de la France. Si bien qu’en Europe force est de constater que les taxes ne peuvent venir à bout des vices.

En réalité la taxation supplémentaire des substances addictives a une base parfaitement légitime: celle des externalités. La consommation de tabac produit des effets que le marché n’internalise pas dans le prix, il s’agit du coût des soins induits par les différentes atteintes symptomatiques au niveau de l’organisme. La médecine connait avec précision les maladies induites par le tabac au niveau non seulement des artères et du poumon mais aussi ailleurs. Le coût des soins dus aux complications du tabac est payé par d’autres dans le cadre de la mutualisation de l’assurance maladie ou des impôts. Ces externalités négatives sont en partie seulement compensées par la moindre espérance de vie qui fait que les pensions ne sont plus versées. Grace à l’exhaustivité des données de soins et à leur précision nous pouvons calculer l’équation des externalités. C’est pourquoi la taxation pigouvienne (d’Arthur Cecil Pigou qui la décrivit dans son ouvrage de 1920: The Economics of Welfare, London: Macmillan.) est rationnelle. Elle permet de combiner liberté individuelle et conséquences économiques.

Mais dans ce domaine et à supposer que la taxe supplementaire sur le tabac devienne pigouvienne, il y a en France une situation exceptionnelle. La taxation du tabac est loin de se faire au profit des soins ou de la prévention. L’état dispose à sa guise des taxes et elles ont servi et servent encore de bouche trous dans les budgets sociaux non financés que l’état invente au gré de nécessités souvent électorales. Car il s’agit d’octroyer des “droits à” sans en avoir le financement nécessaire. Ainsi en 2000 le FOREC (Fonds de financement de la réforme des cotisations sociales) a bénéficié des faveurs de l’état bien en mal de trouver le financement nécéssaire: ce fonds se voit en effet attribuer 85,5 % du produit du “droit de consommation” sur les tabacs manufacturés. En 2012 ce n’est pas moins de 11 affectataires qui se partagés les 11,13 milliards d’euros du produit du “droit de consommation” du tabac, pour des fractions allant de 53,52 % pour la Cnam à 0,31 % pour le Fcaata (Fonds de cessation anticipée d’activité des travailleurs de l’amiante).

Si la taxation n’est pas une solution aux vices des citoyens on s’aperçoit qu’elle peut être la porte ouverte au vice de l’état qui consiste à détourner l’argent prélevé sur la base de motifs bien intentionnés pour en faire des ressources fiscales pour sa politique.

Voir également:

Voir par ailleurs:

Les abonnés absents des salles de sport

François Lévêque
The Conversation
21 juin 2016
Les salles de sport sont des biens de club. Sous cette apparente tautologie se cache un concept économique qui signe un service partagé de façon exclusive par plusieurs personnes, à l’instar de la piscine ou du terrain de tennis privé d’une résidence collective. La particularité de ce type de bien est que les individus en retirent une satisfaction qui pend des autres. D’un côté, plus le nombre de membres est élevé, plus la contribution de chacun aux coûts fixes d’investissement et de maintenance peut-être faible. D’un autre côté, plus le nombre de membres est élevé, plus la congestion s’accroît.
Accepter un nouveau membre permettra de diminuer l’abonnement annuel donnant accès à la piscine et au tennis, mais les nageurs risquent de se heurter dans le bassin et les joueurs de ne pas s’affronter à leur horaire préféré. Un club de sport est donc un bien de club au sens économique du terme : l’augmentation du nombre d’adhérents permettra de réduire le prix de l’abonnement, mais elle allongera la queue aux machines et aux douches.
Un exercice classique, mais musclé pour économiste s’entraînant aux biens de club consiste à calculer la capacité optimale pour un nombre de membres donnés (par exemple la dimension appropriée de la piscine pour les 50 habitants de la résidence), le nombre optimal de membres pour une capacité donnée (le nombre ial pour un bassin de 8 mètres par 4) pour en duire la capacité optimale pour le nombre optimal. Le tout en spécifiant une fonction de coût qui tienne compte des économies d’échelle et une fonction de bénéfice qui tienne compte du fait qu’au bout d’un moment la congestion l’emporte sur la camaraderie : accepter un nouveau membre augmente la possibilité de se faire un nouvel ami, mais ce gain devient inférieur à la gêne de congestion qu’il occasionne. James M. Buchanan, lauréat du prix Nobel d’économie en 1986, est le premier à s’être livré à cet exercice théorique.
Les propriétaires de salles de sport ont quant à eux trouvé un truc : faire signer un engagement d’un an aux abonnés qui n’utilisent pas, ou rarement, leurs équipements. Ces abonnés réduisent le montant individuel des cotisations sans embouteiller les installations. Aux États-Unis, près de la moitié des nouveaux inscrits aux premiers jours de janvier, la période de pointe des inscriptions, ne fréquente plus la salle de sport les mois suivants. Seul un nouvel abonné sur cinq continuera à s’y rendre après septembre. Les nouveaux inscrits se rendront en moyenne quatre fois dans la salle de sport dans l’année. Selon une étude de chercheurs québécois portant sur près de 1500 nouveaux inscrits dans des salles de Montréal, la fréquentation des salles de sport chute de près de moitié après quatre mois.
Pourtant les nouveaux inscrits aux salles de sport signent de leur plein gré et sans barguigner, ni rechigner sur la durée contractuelle de l’engagement, contrairement à ce qu’ils feraient pour un abonnement de téléphonie mobile ou de télévision payante. Pourquoi donc payent-ils pour ne pas aller à la gym ? Deux économistes ont cherché à répondre à cette question dans un article paru en 2006 dans l’American Economic Review, l’une des publications d’économie les plus prestigieuses au monde. Ils ont calculé combien d’argent ces consommateurs perdaient. Réponse 600 dollars. C’est la différence de ce que paye un membre qui a choisi un contrat forfaitaire au lieu de payer à la séance en achetant 10 tickets d’entrée, autre option qu’il aurait pu choisir. Cet écart s’explique par l’optimisme ou la naïveté. Lorsqu’elles s’inscrivent, les personnes surestiment le nombre de fois où elles se rendront en salle.
Dans l’étude québécoise jà citée, les nouveaux membres clarent, lorsqu’ils s’abonnent, le nombre de fois qu’ils comptent se rendre en salle. La fréquentation réelle observée par la suite est plus de deux fois inférieure. Les personnes croient à l’effet durable de leur bonne résolution de but d’année pour maigrir ou simplement entretenir leur forme. Peut-être certaines comptent-elles aussi sur l’effet incitatif du « J’ai payé donc il faut que j’amortisse mon forfait ». Quoi qu’il en soit c’est raté !
Les abonnés absents permettent à la salle de sport d’offrir un abonnement moins cher, ou bien… d’enrichir leur propriétaire. Tout pend de l’intensité de la concurrence. S’il n’y a pas d’autres clubs de gym à la ronde, le propriétaire conservera l’essentiel du profit tiré des absents. La concurrence est en effet d’abord locale. Les clients choisissent une salle proche de leur lieu de travail ou de résidence. À cette concurrence spatiale, s’ajoute une concurrence sur la qualité des services.
Le marché de la gym est coupé en trois segments. Les clubs de prestige proposent des abonnements à plus de 100 euros mensuels. Ils sont souvent associés à un droit d’entrée et à une obligation de parrainage. coration stylée (quoique parfois kitch), coach personnel, salle de relaxation, grande piscine en font des sortes de palace pour la gymnastique. Le Ritz Health Club est d’ailleurs ouvert aux sportifs extérieurs à l’hôtel (3 900 euros l’année ou 180 euros la journée, à vous de choisir).
Les salles de milieu de gamme qui proposent des abonnements compris entre 50 et 100 euros par mois sont le ventre mou du marché. Certes les clients auront droit à une serviette propre, pourront aussi transpirer dans un sauna ou un hammam et se saltérer au bar, mais tout a été calculé au plus près. Ce segment de marché est aujourd’hui fortement concurrencé par les salles à bas coûts.
Le low-cost de la gym est né aux États-Unis, l’espace n’y manque pas et les baux y sont bon marché depuis la crise financière. Il gagne l’Europe en passant d’abord par l’Angleterre où, grâce à son essor, l’adhésion aux salles progresse de plus de 10 % par an.
Que les chaînes low-cost se nomment Xercise4less, BudgetGym ou Fitness4less, le message est le même. Leur mole aussi : prix bas mensuel, ouverture 24 heures sur 24, et prestations réduites à l’essentiel. Vous n’y trouverez ni sauna ou hammam (des à-côtés dispendieux et peu utilisés), ni cours collectifs (ou alors en vio), ni personnel pour vous aider dans l’emploi des machines (sauf de 18h à 22h), ni miroirs à gogo (les mètres carrés de glace sont chers), ni serviette gratuite (n’oubliez pas d’apporter la vôtre), et parfois il vous faudra payer pour prendre une douche (un demi-euro chez Neoness).
En revanche, les tarifs sont hors concours. Les formules à 10 $, 10 £ ou 10 € par mois ont essaimé dans la plupart des métropoles, plutôt à leur périphérie, là où les loyers sont beaucoup moins chers. Les salles low-cost ne demandent aucun engagement contractuel. Pour faire des affaires, elles ne comptent pas sur l’absentéisme, mais sur la réduction des coûts et des tarifs. Elles attirent de nouveaux adeptes, mais aspirent aussi les clients des clubs du ventre mou sensibles au prix.
Ces clubs comptent en moyenne 5 000 membres contre 1 900 tous segments de marché confondus. En outre, ils conservent mieux leurs clients. Ne s’engageant pas de façon naïve ou optimiste sur le long terme, ils ne connaissent pas la sillusion du manque d’assiduité qui les conduit à ne pas renouveler leur abonnement en fin d’année.
Pris en étau entre les clubs de prestige et ceux à bas coût, les propriétaires des salles du milieu de gamme ont du souci à se faire. En 2014 au Canada, près de 300 gyms de ce segment ont fermé tandis que le nombre d’ouvertures de salles low-cost s’est élevé au double.
S’ils ne veulent pas disparaître, les clubs du ventre mou doivent réussir à proposer du haut de gamme à prix serré ou parvenir à réduire drastiquement leurs coûts, leur prix et la durée d’engagement contractuel. S’ensuivra aussi un changement du côté des membres : les absentéistes finalement peu sireux de soulever de la fonte ou de pratiquer du vélo elliptique cesseront de subventionner les assidus des salles de sport aux abdominaux en forme de tablette en chocolat ou au muscle cardiaque de danseuse de zumba.
Voir encore:

Fiscalité, consommation, revenus.. ce qui change au 1er janvier
Le Parisien

Tanguy de l’Espinay

30 décembre 2018

Prélèvement à la source, réforme du compte formation, interdiction du glyphosate, etc… De nombreux changements interviennent ce mardi, notamment dans le quotidien des Français.
Comme chaque année, tout un train de réformes et de mesures entre en vigueur le 1er janvier. Derrière la locomotive du prélèvement à la source, nous avons comptabilisé une cinquantaine de changements tous secteurs confondus, qui auront plus ou moins d’impact sur la vie quotidienne des Français.

FISCALITÉ DES MÉNAGES
Impôt à la source : c’est parti ! L’impôt se prélève désormais à la source, c’est-à-dire via une retenue sur le salaire mensuel (il faudra attendre encore un an pour les particuliers employeurs). Le 15 janvier, un acompte de 60 % sera versé aux contribuables bénéficiant de réductions et crédits d’impôts. Si vous êtes perdus, le numéro d’information (0809.401.401) n’est désormais plus surtaxé.

CSG : la hausse annulée pour les petites retraites.L’annulation de la hausse de la CSG pour les retraités touchant moins de 2000 euros par mois entre en vigueur. Mais dans l’immédiat, tous les bénéficiaires doivent continuer pendant quelques mois à payer la CSG augmentée (8,3 %). Ils seront remboursés rétroactivement au plus tard le 1er juillet. Les personnes déclarant moins de 14 548 € de revenu annuel bénéficient toujours du taux réduit de 3,8 %.

L’« exit tax » allégée. Le nouveau dispositif qui remplace l’« exit tax » cible désormais les cessions de patrimoine intervenant jusqu’à deux ans après un départ de France, contre 15 ans auparavant.

CONSOMMATION ET TARIFS RÉGLEMENTÉS
Baisse des tarifs du gaz. Dans la foulée d’une première baisse de 2,4 % en décembre, les tarifs réglementés du gaz, appliqués à près de 4,5 millions de foyers français par Engie, baissent de 1,9 %.

Chèque énergie augmenté. Il permet de s’acquitter des factures liées à une consommation énergétique, gaz, fioul, électricité…). Le montant maximal est revu à la hausse de 50 € au 1er janvier, il variera entre 76 € et 277 €. Ce chèque énergie va bénéficier cette année à 5,8 millions de ménages. Le plafond d’attribution s’élève désormais à 10 700 € pour une personne seule et 16 050 € pour un couple.

Tabac : 7e hausse en 18 mois. Si la majorité des références restent stables (ce qui signifie que les fabricants rognent sur leurs marges pour absorber la hausse des taxes), le Marlboro Red passe à 8,20 euros.

+10 % pour les timbres. Le timbre rouge passe de 0,95 € à 1,05 € et le vert de 0,80 € à 0,88 €.

Fini les promos Nutella !La loi EGAlim entre en vigueur. Les promotions sur les produits alimentaires ne pourront pas excéder 34 % du prix de vente au consommateur. Ce n’est que le premier étage de la fusée. Le 1er février, plus aucun produit alimentaire ne pourra être revendu à moins de 10 % du prix auquel il a été acheté, et le 1er mars, le volume global des promotions sera limité à 25 % du chiffre d’affaires ou du volume prévisionnel d’achat entre le fournisseur et le distributeur fixé par contrats.

REVENUS
Le Smic passe la barre des 10 € de l’heure (en brut).Le taux horaire du Smic est revalorisé mécaniquement de 1,5 % et passe de 9,88 à 10,03 euros en brut. Soit de 1 498,47 à 1 521,22 € mensuels bruts pour un temps plein.

+90 € de prime d’activité. C’est l’une des mesures d’urgence décidées pour enrayer la colère des Gilets jaunes : la prime d’activité pour les salariés autour du Smic va bondir de 90 €. Les bénéficiaires en verront la couleur le 5 février.

LIRE AUSSI >Mesures d’urgences : ce que prévoit vraiment le gouvernement

Les heures sup défiscalisées. Les heures supplémentaires sont désormais défiscalisées et déchargées, pour tous les salariés, dans le privé comme dans le public.

TRAVAIL
Réforme de l’apprentissage. La limite d’âge maximum passe de 26 à 29 ans. La durée du travail des apprentis est assouplie et une aide unique est créée pour les entreprises de moins de 250 salariés.

Un pas de plus vers le rattrapage salarial des femmes. Les entreprises ne doivent plus seulement mesurer les écarts de salaires existants, mais aussi rendre des comptes en matière d’augmentations et de promotions.

PROTECTION SOCIALE
Très légère hausse des retraites. Le gouvernement a décidé de limiter à 0,3 % la revalorisation des pensions de retraite. Pour rappel, l’inflation est estimée à 1,7 % pour 2019 par la Banque de France.

Complémentaires : fusion Agirc/Arrco. Avec le prélèvement à la source, c’est l’autre gros changement de ce 1er janvier : la fusion effective des régimes complémentaires de retraite des salariés du privé Agirc (les salariés cadres) et l’Arrco (pour les salariés non-cadres), décidée en 2015. Concrètement, à ce jour, les cotisations retraite des actifs seront affectées à un seul et même compte rassemblant les points Agirc-Arrco. Autre changement : la revalorisation annuelle des retraites complémentaires ne va plus se baser sur l’inflation, mais sur l’évolution moyenne des salaires.

Retraites : le dispositif de décote-surcote entre en application. Concrètement : tout salarié souhaitant prendre sa retraite à 62 ans, même s’il a tous ses droits et tous ses trimestres cotisés, subit une décote de 10 % sur sa pension durant trois ans. S’il travaille un an de plus jusqu’à 63 ans, le malus disparaît. Et au-delà, il bénéficie d’une surcote, avec un bonus durant un an de 10 % pour 2 ans de travail en plus, 20 % pour 3 ans, et 30 % pour 4 ans.

Demande unique de retraite en ligne. Même si vous avez cotisé à plusieurs régimes de retraite, il est désormais possible de faire une demande unique de retraite en ligne.

Le système de retraite des auteurs refondu. Tous les artistes-auteurs, quel que soit leur niveau de revenus, et même s’ils sont déjà retraités, sont désormais redevables d’une cotisation de 6,9 %, au titre de leur retraite de base, prélevée à la source sur leurs droits d’auteur.

Augmentation du minimum-vieillesse. Le minimum vieillesse augmente de 35 € par mois pour une personne seule (868 €), et de 54 € pour un couple (1 348 €).

Allocation adulte handicapé : des droits à vie. Les droits sont désormais attribués à vie pour les personnes dont le taux d’incapacité est supérieur à 80 % et dont l’état de santé ne peut s’améliorer. Concrètement, ces personnes n’auront plus à repasser des examens médicaux pour justifier la réalité de leur handicap pour bénéficier de l’AAH, ou encore d’une carte mobilité inclusion.

FISCALITÉ DES ENTREPRISES
Année blanche pour les créateurs et repreneurs d’entreprise. Les créateurs et repreneurs bénéficient, sous conditions de ressources, d’une année blanche de cotisations sociales, au titre de leur première année d’activité.

Les Gafa taxés. Sans attendre ses voisins européens, la France applique désormais la taxe sur les géants du numérique (Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon, etc.). Cette taxe ne se limitera pas au chiffre d’affaires mais s’étendra « aux revenus publicitaires, aux plateformes et à la revente de données personnelles ».

L’intéressement libéré dans les PME. Le forfait social sur l’intéressement pour toutes les entreprises de moins de 250 salariés est supprimé.

Ce qui va changer au 1er Janvier 2019

FINANCE
Facturation électronique obligatoire. La facturation électronique devient obligatoire pour les petites et moyennes entreprises (10 à 250 salariés). Encore un an et ce sera également le cas pour les TPE.

De la monnaie virtuelle chez les buralistes. La nouvelle a fait beaucoup de bruit lors de son annonce : les bureaux de tabac peuvent désormais délivrer des coupons de 50, 100 ou 250 € convertibles en bitcoin ou en ethereum. Sans l’aval de la Banque de France.

AGRICULTURE
L’épargne de précaution encouragée. Un nouveau dispositif d’épargne de prévention des aléas est mise en place pour les exploitants : moyennant une obligation d’épargne, ils pourront pratiquer une déduction fiscale sur leur résultat d’exploitation, laquelle sera proportionnée à leur bénéfice.

Une nouvelle carte pour les aides européennes. La nouvelle carte européenne des Zones défavorisées simples (ZDS) entre en application. Elle établit qui a le droit à l’indemnité compensatoire de handicaps naturels (ICHN), versée à 25 % par l’État et à 75 % par l’UE.

SANTÉ
Autisme : vers un forfait de remboursement du dépistage. Pour éviter d’avoir à payer plein pot les innombrables examens qui précèdent un diagnostic d’autisme, les parents d’enfants atteints jouissent désormais d’un forfait de remboursement des dépistages de la maladie.

Le prix de vente des prothèses auditives plafonné. Il sera plafonné à 1 300 euros. Le remboursement minimum par la Sécurité sociale et les mutuelles passera de 199,71 à 300 euros. Pour les enfants jusqu’à 20 ans révolus, ces deux montants seront alignés à 1 400 €.

Réforme des honoraires de dispensation. L’entrée en vigueur d’une réforme sur les « honoraires de dispensation » versés aux pharmaciens va provoquer l’augmentation du prix de certains médicaments comme les sirops pour la toux, les sprays nasaux ou les somnifères. En vertu de cette réforme votée en 2017, la commission que touchent les pharmaciens sur chaque boîte de médicaments depuis 2015 pour compenser la baisse de leurs marges, n’est plus fixe, mais varie en fonction du traitement.

Les médecins ne peuvent plus prescrire de traitement non-remboursable. Seuls les traitements anti-tabac remboursables peuvent désormais être prescrits par les médecins.

Certains actes moins remboursés, d’autres à 100 %. L’Assurance maladie remboursera 6 € de moins à partir du 1er janvier pour certains actes médicaux coûteux, pour lesquels la « participation forfaitaire » de l’assuré passera de 18 à 24 euros, sauf pour les personnes exonérées (invalides, femmes enceintes, malades chroniques…).

De nouveaux remboursements à 100 % sont créés, notamment pour les examens de santé obligatoires des enfants de moins de 6 ans et pour les honoraires perçus par les pharmaciens sur les « médicaments particulièrement coûteux et irremplaçables ». A partir du 1er juin, la consultation de prévention des cancers du sein et du col de l’utérus pour les femmes de 25 ans sera aussi intégralement remboursée.

ENVIRONNEMENT
Nouveau barème pour le bonus-malus automobile. Le malus auto ne coûte pas plus cher mais son seuil est abaissé de 3 g, passant ainsi de 120 à 117 g de CO2 rejetés par kilomètre.

Fini le glyphosate. La commercialisation et la détention de produits phytosanitaires à usage non professionnel sont interdites.

Les autocars polluants au garage. Les autocars aux normes Euro 4 et antérieurs, les plus polluants, n’ont plus le droit de circuler.

Extension de la prime à la conversion. Cette prime versée lors de la mise à la casse d’une ancienne voiture et de l’achat d’un nouveau véhicule peu polluant est reconduite et étendue aux véhicules hybrides et d’occasion. Elle est également doublée pour les 20 % des ménages les plus modestes et les actifs qui ne paient pas d’impôts et parcourent au moins 60 km chaque jour pour se rendre à leur travail.

TRANSPORTS
L’étau se resserre contre les conducteurs sans assurance. Les forces de l’ordre peuvent désormais utiliser un fichier national qui répertorie tous les véhicules assurés en France. Cette nouvelle base contient des informations sur l’immatriculation du véhicule, le nom de l’assureur et le numéro du contrat avec sa période de validité.

Nouvelle formation post-permis. Afin de réduire de trois à deux ans le délai probatoire pour obtenir 12 points, les jeunes conducteurs venant d’avoir le sésame peuvent prendre une formation « post-permis » de sept heures. Il faut pour y être éligible avoir eu le permis il y a plus de six mois mais moins d’un an.

500 € pour les apprentis qui passent le permis. France compétences finance une aide de 500 € aux apprentis pour qu’ils s’inscrivent au permis de conduire.

POLITIQUE
Les pensions de retraite des députés sont revalorisées.

Listes électorales : le délai pour s’inscrire est étendu. Pour la première fois, entrer dans une année électorale sans être inscrit n’est pas un souci : l’échéance pour s’inscrire sur les listes électorales est étendue. Pour les Européennes du printemps prochain, vous avez jusqu’au 31 mars.

TERRITOIRES
Paris : département et commune fusionnent. À cette occasion, l’État va transférer des compétences vers la nouvelle collectivité créée : « Ville de Paris ».

JUSTICE
Changement de ton dans les tribunaux. C’est une petite révolution : par souci de clarté, le Conseil d’État, les cours administratives d’appel et les tribunaux administratifs vont opter pour le style direct dans leur décision.

SÉCURITÉ/DÉFENSE
Une prime pour les généraux. Les hauts gradés bénéficient désormais d’une « indemnité spécifique de haute responsabilité » comme pour les cadres d’entreprises.

Coup de pouce pour les policiers. Les gardiens de la paix voient leur salaire augmenter de 40 €. Il sera encore revalorisé dans l’année.

TOURISME ET LOISIRS
Airbnb : les cartes prépayées interdites. On ne peut plus payer avec une carte prépayée sur des plateformes de location de meublés touristiques telles Airbnb.

Une taxe de séjour pour tous. Airbnb, Abritel-HomeAway, LeBonCoin, Tripadvisor, et les autres plateformes de location doivent désormais collecter la taxe de séjour.

DIPLOMATIE
Chaises musicales à l’Onu. Entrent en tant que membres non-permanents du Conseil de sécurité de l’ONU l’Allemagne, la Belgique, l’Afrique du Sud, l’Indonésie et la République dominicaine, pour deux ans.

La France prend la tête du G7.

La Roumanie prend la présidence de l’UE.

Voir enfin:

Cinq questions sur la théorie russe qui remet en cause l’âge record de Jeanne Calment

Des chercheurs russes pensent que Yvonne Calment, la fille de l’ancienne doyenne de l’humanité, aurait usurpé l’identité de sa mère. « Abracadabrantesque », juge Jean-Marie Robine, qui avait participé à la validation de la longévité de la Française.

Une vaste supercherie ? Des chercheurs russes affirment que le record de longévité de Jeanne Calment n’en est pas un. Leur théorie qui suscite l’intérêt et provoque la controverse au sein de la communauté scientifique soulève toutefois plusieurs questions.

Qui était Jeanne Calment ? 

Jeanne Calment aimait dire que « Dieu l’avait oubliée ». Cette Française, née le 21 février 1875, plus d’une décennie avant la construction de la tour Eiffel ou l’invention du cinéma, est morte le 4 août 1997, dans une maison de retraite d’Arles (Bouches-du-Rhône). Elle avait alors officiellement 122 ans et 164 jours. Cet âge exceptionnel fait d’elle la détentrice du record mondial de longévité, tous sexes confondus, homologué par le Guinness Book.

Quelle est cette théorie russe ? 

Le mathématicien russe Nikolaï Zak, membre de la Société des naturalistes de l’université de Moscou, doute de l’authenticité du record de longévité de Jeanne Calment. Soutenu par le gérontologue russe Valeri Novosselov, il a pendant des mois analysé les biographies, interviews et photos de Jeanne Calment, ainsi que des témoignages de ceux qui l’avaient connue et les archives d’Arles.

Nikolaï Zak est arrivé à la conclusion que la fille de Jeanne Calment, Yvonne, avait pris l’identité de sa mère. Le chercheur estime qu’en 1934, ce n’est pas l’unique fille de Jeanne Calment, Yvonne, qui est morte d’une pleurésie, comme le dit la version officielle, mais Jeanne Calment elle-même. Yvonne aurait alors emprunté l’identité de sa mère, ce qui aurait permis d’éviter de payer les droits de succession. C’est donc elle qui serait morte en 1997, à l’âge de 99 ans. Un incroyable tour de passe-passe.

Parmi les 17 éléments que présente le chercheur figure une copie de la carte d’identité de Jeanne Calment datant des années 1930 où la couleur de ses yeux (noirs), sa taille (1m52) et la forme de son front (bas) ne correspondent pas à celles de la doyenne française au cours de ces dernières années de vie. Alimentant les doutes, Jeanne Calment avait ordonné de brûler une partie de ses archives photos quand elle est devenue célèbre, selon les chercheurs russes.

« En tant que médecin, j’ai toujours eu des doutes sur son âge », abonde le gérontologue russe Valeri Novosselov, qui dirige la section gérontologique au sein de la Société des naturalistes de Moscou. « L’état de ses muscles était différent de celui des autres doyens. Elle se tenait assise sans aucun soutien. Elle n’avait aucun signe de démence. »

Nikolaï Zaka eu l’idée d’enquêter sur la vie de Jeanne Calment pendant la création d’un « modèle mathématique » de la durée de vie des supercentenaires. « Plus je fouillais, plus je découvrais de contradictions », souligne-t-il. Le mathématicien russe a publié récemment son étude sur le site ResearchGate, un réseau international pour chercheurs et scientifiques.

Existe-t-il d’autres soupçons ?

Nikolaï Zak mentionne un livre datant de 1997, L’Assurance et ses secrets, contenant un court passage consacré à Jeanne Calment, qui soulève l’hypothèse d’un échange d’identités entre la mère et la fille. L’auteur du livre, Jean-Pierre Daniel, raconte qu’un contrôleur des sociétés d’assurance, se penchant sur le viager signé par la centenaire, avait déjà conclu à une fraude. « Mais à l’époque, Jeanne Calment était déjà considérée comme une idole nationale. Ce fonctionnaire a interrogé son administration, qui a répondu qu’il fallait continuer à payer la rente. Il n’était pas question de faire un scandale avec la doyenne des Français », explique-t-il à l’AFP.

Les travaux du mathématicien russe sont jugés crédibles par certains scientifiques qui relèvent les limites des validations des records de longévité. « L’idée d’usurpation d’identité [de Jeanne Calment par sa fille] avait déjà été envisagée par les validateurs et j’invitais régulièrement les démographes à conserver cette hypothèse », confirme à l’AFP Nicolas Brouard, directeur de recherche à l’Institut national d’études démographiques (Ined). « C’est bien que Nikolaï Zak ait mené une recherche indépendante et sur le même terrain d’investigation. C’est un très bon travail », assure-t-il.

Quant au démographe belge Michel Poulain, professeur à l’université de Louvain, il salue une « investigation aussi détaillée » qui montre pour lui la nécessité de « réinvestir scientifiquement pour valider l’âge exceptionnel de ces supercentenaires ». « La probabilité d’un âge erroné augmente de façon exponentielle avec l’âge présumé », explique-t-il à l’AFP.

Pourquoi cette théorie est-elle contestée ?

Le démographe et gérontologue français Jean-Marie Robine, qui avait participé à la validation par le Guinness des records de l’âge de Jeanne Calment, assure n’avoir « jamais eu aucun doute sur l’authenticité des documents » de cette dernière. Il dénonce « un texte à charge, qui n’examine jamais les faits en faveur de l’authenticité de la longévité de Madame Calment ».

« Vous imaginez le nombre de personnes qui auraient menti », fait valoir l’expert dans Le Parisien. « Du jour au lendemain, Fernand Calment [le mari de Jeanne Calment mort en 1942] aurait fait passer sa fille pour son épouse et tout le monde aurait gardé le silence », pointe le spécialiste. Et de conclure : « C’est abracadabrantesque. »

« On n’a jamais autant fait pour prouver l’âge d’une personne », assure Jean-Marie Robine. « On n’a jamais rien trouvé qui nous permettait d’émettre le moindre soupçon sur son âge. On a eu accès à des informations qu’elle seule pouvait connaître, comme le nom de ses professeurs de mathématiques ou de bonnes passées par l’immeuble. On lui a posé des questions sur ces sujets. Soit elle ne se souvenait plus, soit elle a répondu juste. Sa fille n’aurait pas pu savoir ça. »

Le maire d’Arles à l’époque de la mort de Jeanne Calment, Michel Vauzelle, juge lui aussi que cette théorie est « complètement impossible et invraisemblable », parce que Jeanne Calment était suivie selon lui par de nombreux médecins.

Comment mettre fin au doute ?

« On pourrait procéder à une exhumation des cadavres », suggère à franceinfo Michel Allard, gérontologue qui a participé à la validation de l’âge de Jeanne Calment. Dans Le Parisien, Nicolas Brouard, l’expert de l’Ined, estime lui aussi que l’étude russe est « un argument en faveur de l’exhumation des corps de Jeanne et Yvonne Calment ». Une fois les corps exhumés, des prélèvements permettraient leur datation avec certitude.

Mais l’éventualité d’une exhumation est cependant très improbable, selon Michel Allard. D’abord, « il faudrait qu’un procureur de la République l’autorise ou le prescrive ». Ensuite, il faudrait que la famille de Jeanne Calment le demande, note le spécialiste. Or, pointe-t-il, « soit elle est au courant de la supercherie et donc ils ne vont pas demander l’exhumation, soit ils sont convaincus que c’est impossible, que c’est un scénario loufoque, donc ils ne vont pas demander non plus l’exhumation, en sachant que cette histoire a été montée de toute pièce ».


Réseaux sociaux: Facebook confirme Girard (Universal theater of envy: Welcome to the brave new world of mimetic desire that social media has now brought to our personal computers !)

31 décembre, 2018

https://www.digitaltrends.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/facebook-high-res-friendship-world-map-paul-butler.png

Tu ne convoiteras point la maison de ton prochain; tu ne convoiteras point la femme de ton prochain, ni son serviteur, ni sa servante, ni son boeuf, ni son âne, ni aucune chose qui appartienne à ton prochain. Exode 20: 17
Ne croyez pas que je sois venu apporter la paix sur la terre; je ne suis pas venu apporter la paix, mais l’épée. Car je suis venu mettre la division entre l’homme et son père, entre la fille et sa mère, entre la belle-fille et sa belle-mère; et l’homme aura pour ennemis les gens de sa maison. Jésus (Matthieu 10 : 34-36)
Je vous le dis en vérité, toutes les fois que vous avez fait ces choses à l’un de ces plus petits de mes frères, c’est à moi que vous les avez faites. Jésus (Matthieu 25: 40)
Comme par une seule offense la condamnation a atteint tous les hommes, de même par un seul acte de justice la justification qui donne la vie s’étend à tous les hommes. (…) Là où le péché abonde, la grâce surabonde. Paul (Romains 5 : 18-20)
Les envieux mourront, mais non jamais l’envie. Molière (Tartuffe, V, III)
Il ne faut pas dissimuler que les institutions démocratiques développent à un très haut niveau le sentiment de l’envie dans le coeur humain. Ce n’est point tant parce qu’elle offrent à chacun les moyens de s’égaler aux autres, mais parce que ces moyens défaillent sans cesse à ceux qui les emploient. Les institutions démocratiques réveillent et flattent la passion de l’égalité sans pouvoir jamais la satisfaire entièrement. Cette égalité complète s’échappe tous les jours des mains du peuples au moment où il croit la saisir, et fuit, comme dit Pascal, d’une fuite éternelle; le peuple s’échauffe à la recherche de ce bien d’autant plus précieux qu’il est assez proche pour être connu et assez loin pour ne pas être goûté. Tout ce qui le dépasse par quelque endroit lui paraît un obstacle à ses désirs, et il n’y a pas de supériorité si légitime dont la vue ne fatigue sas yeux. Tocqueville
Il y a en effet une passion mâle et légitime pour l’égalité qui excite les hommes à vouloir être tous forts et estimés. Cette passion tend à élever les petits au rang des grands ; mais il se rencontre aussi dans le cœur humain un goût dépravé pour l’égalité, qui porte les faibles à vouloir attirer les forts à leur niveau, et qui réduit les hommes à préférer l’égalité dans la servitude à l’inégalité dans la liberté. Tocqueville
La même force culturelle et spirituelle qui a joué un rôle si décisif dans la disparition du sacrifice humain est aujourd’hui en train de provoquer la disparition des rituels de sacrifice humain qui l’ont jadis remplacé. Tout cela semble être une bonne nouvelle, mais à condition que ceux qui comptaient sur ces ressources rituelles soient en mesure de les remplacer par des ressources religieuses durables d’un autre genre. Priver une société des ressources sacrificielles rudimentaires dont elle dépend sans lui proposer d’alternatives, c’est la plonger dans une crise qui la conduira presque certainement à la violence. Gil Bailie
Si le Décalogue consacre son commandement ultime à interdire le désir des biens du prochain, c’est parce qu’il reconnaît lucidement dans ce désir le responsable des violences interdites dans les quatre commandements qui le précèdent. Si on cessait de désirer les biens du prochain, on ne se rendrait jamais coupable ni de meurtre, ni d’adultère, ni de vol, ni de faux témoignage. Si le dixième commandement était respecté, il rendrait superflus les quatre commandements qui le précèdent. Au lieu de commencer par la cause et de poursuivre par les conséquences, comme ferait un exposé philosophique, le Décalogue suit l’ordre inverse. Il pare d’abord au plus pressé: pour écarter la violence, il interdit les actions violentes. Il se retourne ensuite vers la cause et découvre le désir inspiré par le prochain. René Girard
Si Jésus ne parle jamais en termes d’interdits et toujours en termes de modèles et d’imitation, c’est parce qu’il tire jusqu’au bout la leçon du dixième commandement. Ce n’est pas par narcissisme qu’il nous recommande de l’imiter lui-même, c’est pour nous détourner des rivalités mimétiques. Sur quoi exactement l’imitation de Jésus-Christ doit-elle porter ? Ce ne peut pas être sur ses façons d’être ou ses habitudes personnelles : il n’est jamais question de cela dans les Evangiles. Jésus ne propose pas non plus une règle de vie ascétique au sens de Thomas a Kempis et de sa célèbre Imitation de Jésus-Christ, si admirable que soit cet ouvrage. Ce que Jésus nous invite à imiter c’est son propre désir, c’est l’élan qui le dirige lui, Jésus, vers le but qu’il s’est fixé : ressembler le plus possible à Dieu le Père. L’invitation à imiter le désir de Jésus peut sembler paradoxale car Jésus ne prétend pas posséder de désir propre, de désir « bien à lui ». Contrairement à ce que nous prétendons nous-mêmes, il ne prétend pas « être lui-même », il ne se flatte pas de « n’obéir qu’à son propre désir ». Son but est de devenir l’image parfaite de Dieu. Il consacre donc toutes ses forces à imiter ce Père. En nous invitant à l’imiter lui, il nous invite à imiter sa propre imitation. Loin d’être paradoxale, cette invitation est plus raisonnable que celle de nos gourous modernes. Ceux-ci nous invitent tous à faire le contraire de ce qu’ils font eux-mêmes, ou tout au moins prétendent faire. Chacun d’eux demande à ses disciples d’imiter en lui le grand homme qui n’imite personne. Jésus, tout au contraire, nous invite à faire ce qu’il fait lui-même, à devenir tout comme lui un imitateur de Dieu le Père. Pourquoi Jésus regarde-t-il le Père et lui-même comme les meilleurs modèles pour tous les hommes ? Parce que ni le Père ni le Fils ne désirent avidement, égoïstement. Dieu « fait lever son soleil sur les méchants et sur les bons ». Il donne aux hommes sans compter, sans marquer entre eux la moindre différence. Il laisse les mauvaises herbes pousser avec les bonnes jusqu’au temps de la moisson. Si nous imitons le désintéressement divin, jamais le piège des rivalités mimétiques ne se refermera sur nous. C’est pourquoi Jésus dit aussi : « Demandez et l’on vous donnera… » Lorsque Jésus déclare que, loin d’abolir la Loi, il l’accomplit, il formule une conséquence logique de son enseignement. Le but de la Loi, c’est la paix entre les hommes. Jésus ne méprise jamais la Loi, même lorsqu’elle prend la forme des interdits. A la différence des penseurs modernes, il sait très bien que, pour empêcher les conflits, il faut commencer par les interdits. L’inconvénient des interdits, toutefois, c’est qu’ils ne jouent pas leur rôle de façon satisfaisante. Leur caractère surtout négatif, saint Paul l’a bien vu, chatouille en nous, forcément, la tendance mimétique à la transgression. La meilleure façon de prévenir la violence consiste non pas à interdire des objets, ou même le désir rivalitaire, comme fait le dixième commandement, mais à fournir aux hommes le modèle qui, au lieu de les entraîner dans les rivalités mimétiques, les en protégera. (…) Loin de surgir dans un univers exempt d’imitation, le commandement d’imiter Jésus s’adresse à des êtres pénétrés de mimétisme. Les non-chrétiens s’imaginent que, pour se convertir, il leur faudrait renoncer à une autonomie que tous les hommes possèdent naturellement, une autonomie dont Jésus voudrait les priver. En réalité, dès que nous imitons Jésus, nous nous découvrons imitateurs depuis toujours. Notre aspiration à l’autonomie nous agenouillait devant des êtres qui, même s’ils ne sont pas pires que nous, n’en sont pas moins de mauvais modèles en ceci que nous ne pouvons pas les imiter sans tomber avec eux dans le piège des rivalités inextricables. (…) Même si le mimétisme du désir humain est le grand responsable des violences qui nous accablent, il ne faut pas en conclure que le désir mimétique est mauvais. Si nos désirs n’étaient pas mimétiques, ils seraient à jamais fixés sur des objets prédéterminés, ils seraient une forme particulière d’instinct. Les hommes ne pourraient pas plus changer de désir que les vaches dans un pré. Sans désir mimétique il n’y aurait ni liberté ni humanité. Le désir mimétique est intrinsèquement bon. L’homme est cette créature qui a perdu une partie de son instinct animal pour accéder à ce qu’on appelle le désir. Une fois leurs besoins naturels assouvis, les hommes désirent intensément, mais ils ne savent pas exactement quoi car aucun instinct ne les guide. Ils n’ont pas de désir propre. Le propre du désir est de ne pas être propre. Pour désirer vraiment, nous devons recourir aux hommes qui nous entourent, nous devons leur emprunter leurs désirs. Cet emprunt se fait souvent sans que ni le prêteur ni l’emprunteur s’en aperçoivent. Ce n’est pas seulement leur désir qu’on emprunte à ceux qu’on prend pour modèles c’est une foule de comportements, d’attitudes, de savoirs, de préjugés, de préférences, etc., au sein desquels l’emprunt le plus lourd de conséquences, le désir, passe souvent inaperçu. La seule culture vraiment nôtre n’est pas celle où nous sommes nés, c’est la culture dont nous imitons les modèles à l’âge où notre puissance d’assimilation mimétique est la plus grande. Si leur désir n’était pas mimétique, si les enfants ne choisissaient pas pour modèles, forcément, les êtres humains qui les entourent, l’humanité n’aurait ni langage ni culture. Si le désir n’était pas mimétique, nous ne serions ouverts ni à l’humain ni au divin. C’est dans ce dernier domaine, nécessairement, que notre incertitude est la plus grande et notre besoin de modèles le plus intense. René Girard (Je vois Satan tomber comme l’éclair)
Nous sommes encore proches de cette période des grandes expositions internationales qui regardait de façon utopique la mondialisation comme l’Exposition de Londres – la « Fameuse » dont parle Dostoievski, les expositions de Paris… Plus on s’approche de la vraie mondialisation plus on s’aperçoit que la non-différence ce n’est pas du tout la paix parmi les hommes mais ce peut être la rivalité mimétique la plus extravagante. On était encore dans cette idée selon laquelle on vivait dans le même monde: on n’est plus séparé par rien de ce qui séparait les hommes auparavant donc c’est forcément le paradis. Ce que voulait la Révolution française. Après la nuit du 4 août, plus de problème ! René Girard
L’erreur est toujours de raisonner dans les catégories de la « différence », alors que la racine de tous les conflits, c’est plutôt la « concurrence », la rivalité mimétique entre des êtres, des pays, des cultures. La concurrence, c’est-à-dire le désir d’imiter l’autre pour obtenir la même chose que lui, au besoin par la violence. Sans doute le terrorisme est-il lié à un monde « différent » du nôtre, mais ce qui suscite le terrorisme n’est pas dans cette « différence » qui l’éloigne le plus de nous et nous le rend inconcevable. Il est au contraire dans un désir exacerbé de convergence et de ressemblance. (…) Ce qui se vit aujourd’hui est une forme de rivalité mimétique à l’échelle planétaire. Lorsque j’ai lu les premiers documents de Ben Laden, constaté ses allusions aux bombes américaines tombées sur le Japon, je me suis senti d’emblée à un niveau qui est au-delà de l’islam, celui de la planète entière. Sous l’étiquette de l’islam, on trouve une volonté de rallier et de mobiliser tout un tiers-monde de frustrés et de victimes dans leurs rapports de rivalité mimétique avec l’Occident. Mais les tours détruites occupaient autant d’étrangers que d’Américains. Et par leur efficacité, par la sophistication des moyens employés, par la connaissance qu’ils avaient des Etats-Unis, par leurs conditions d’entraînement, les auteurs des attentats n’étaient-ils pas un peu américains ? On est en plein mimétisme.Ce sentiment n’est pas vrai des masses, mais des dirigeants. Sur le plan de la fortune personnelle, on sait qu’un homme comme Ben Laden n’a rien à envier à personne. Et combien de chefs de parti ou de faction sont dans cette situation intermédiaire, identique à la sienne. Regardez un Mirabeau au début de la Révolution française : il a un pied dans un camp et un pied dans l’autre, et il n’en vit que de manière plus aiguë son ressentiment. Aux Etats-Unis, des immigrés s’intègrent avec facilité, alors que d’autres, même si leur réussite est éclatante, vivent aussi dans un déchirement et un ressentiment permanents. Parce qu’ils sont ramenés à leur enfance, à des frustrations et des humiliations héritées du passé. Cette dimension est essentielle, en particulier chez des musulmans qui ont des traditions de fierté et un style de rapports individuels encore proche de la féodalité. (…) Cette concurrence mimétique, quand elle est malheureuse, ressort toujours, à un moment donné, sous une forme violente. A cet égard, c’est l’islam qui fournit aujourd’hui le ciment qu’on trouvait autrefois dans le marxisme.  René Girard
Notre monde est de plus en plus imprégné par cette vérité évangélique de l’innocence des victimes. L’attention qu’on porte aux victimes a commencé au Moyen Age, avec l’invention de l’hôpital. L’Hôtel-Dieu, comme on disait, accueillait toutes les victimes, indépendamment de leur origine. Les sociétés primitives n’étaient pas inhumaines, mais elles n’avaient d’attention que pour leurs membres. Le monde moderne a inventé la « victime inconnue », comme on dirait aujourd’hui le « soldat inconnu ». Le christianisme peut maintenant continuer à s’étendre même sans la loi, car ses grandes percées intellectuelles et morales, notre souci des victimes et notre attention à ne pas nous fabriquer de boucs émissaires, ont fait de nous des chrétiens qui s’ignorent. René Girard
« Que celui qui se croit sans péché lui jette la première pierre ! » Pourquoi la première pierre ? Parce qu’elle est seule décisive. Celui qui la jette n’a personne à imiter. Rien de plus facile que d’imiter un exemple déjà donné. Donner soi-même l’exemple est tout autre chose. La foule est mimétiquement mobilisée, mais il lui reste un dernier seuil à franchir, celui de la violence réelle. Si quelqu’un jetait la première pierre, aussitôt les pierres pleuvraient. En attirant l’attention sur la première pierre, la parole de Jésus renforce cet obstacle ultime à la lapidation. Il donne aux meilleurs de cette foule le temps d’entendre sa parole et de s’examiner eux-mêmes. S’il est réel, cet examen ne peut manquer de découvrir le rapport circulaire de la victime et du bourreau. Le scandale qu’incarne cette femme à leurs yeux, ces hommes le portent déjà en eux-mêmes, et c’est pour s’en débarrasser qu’ils le projettent sur elle, d’autant plus aisément, bien sûr, qu’elle est vraiment coupable. Pour lapider une victime de bon coeur, il faut se croire différent d’elle, et la convergence mimétique, je le rappelle, s’accompagne d’une illusion de divergence. C’est la convergence réelle combinée avec l’illusion de divergence qui déclenche ce que Jésus cherche à prévenir, le mécanisme du bouc émissaire. La foule précède l’individu. Ne devient vraiment individu que celui qui, se détachant de la foule, échappe à l’unanimité violente. Tous ne sont pas capables d’autant d’initiative. Ceux qui en sont capables se détachent les premiers et, ce faisant, empêchent la lapidation. (…) A côté des temps individuels, donc, il y a toujours un temps social dans notre texte, mais il singe désormais les temps individuels, c’est le temps des modes et des engouements politiques, intellectuels, etc. Le temps reste ponctué par des mécanismes mimétiques. Sortir de la foule le premier, renoncer le premier à jeter des pierres, c’est prendre le risque d’en recevoir. La décision en sens inverse aurait été plus facile, car elle se situait dans le droit fil d’un emballement mimétique déjà amorcé. La première pierre est moins mimétique que les suivantes, mais elle n’en est pas moins portée par la vague de mimétisme qui a engendré la foule. Et les premiers à décider contre la lapidation ? Faut-il penser que chez eux au moins il n’y a aucune imitation ? Certainement pas. Même là il y en a, puisque c’est Jésus qui suggère à ces hommes d’agir comme ils le font. La décision contre la violence resterait impossible, nous dit le christianisme, sans cet Esprit divin qui s’appelle le Paraclet, c’est-à-dire, en grec ordinaire, « l’avocat de la défense » : c’est bien ici le rôle de Jésus lui-même. Il laisse d’ailleurs entendre qu’il est lui-même le premier Paraclet, le premier défenseur des victimes. Et il l’est surtout par la Passion qui est ici, bien sûr, sous-entendue. La théorie mimétique insiste sur le suivisme universel, sur l’impuissance des hommes à ne pas imiter les exemples les plus faciles, les plus suivis, parce que c’est cela qui prédomine dans toute société. Il ne faut pas en conclure qu’elle nie la liberté individuelle. En situant la décision véritable dans son contexte vrai, celui des contagions mimétiques partout présentes, cette théorie donne à ce qui n’est pas mécanique, et qui pourtant ne diffère pas du tout dans sa forme de ce qui l’est, un relief que la libre décision n’a pas chez les penseurs qui ont toujours la liberté à la bouche et de ce fait même, croyant l’exalter, la dévaluent complètement. Si on glorifie le décisif sans voir ce qui le rend très difficile, on ne sort jamais de la métaphysique la plus creuse. Même le renoncement au mimétisme violent ne peut pas se répandre sans se transformer en mécanisme social, en mimétisme aveugle. Il y a une lapidation à l’envers symétrique de la lapidation à l’endroit non dénuée de violence, elle aussi. C’est ce que montrent bien les parodies de notre temps. Tous ceux qui auraient jeté des pierres s’il s’était trouvé quelqu’un pour jeter la première sont mimétiquement amenés à n’en pas jeter. Pour la plupart d’entre eux, la vraie raison de la non-violence n’est pas la dure réflexion sur soi, le renoncement à la violence : c’est le mimétisme, comme d’habitude. Il y a toujours emballement mimétique dans une direction ou dans une autre. En s’engouffrant dans la direction déjà choisie par les premiers, les « mimic men » se félicitent de leur esprit de décision et de liberté. Il ne faut pas se leurrer. Dans une société qui ne lapide plus les femmes adultères, beaucoup d’hommes n’ont pas vraiment changé. La violence est moindre, mieux dissimulée, mais structurellement identique à ce qu’elle a toujours été. Il n’y a pas sortie authentique du mimétisme, mais soumission mimétique à une culture qui prône cette sortie. Dans toute aventure sociale, quelle qu’en soit la nature, la part d’individualisme authentique est forcément minime mais pas inexistante. Il ne faut pas oublier surtout que le mimétisme qui épargne les victimes est infiniment supérieur objectivement, moralement, à celui qui les tue à coups de pierres. Il faut laisser les fausses équivalences à Nietzsche et aux esthétismes décadents. Le récit de la femme adultère nous fait voir que des comportements sociaux identiques dans leur forme et même jusqu’à un certain point dans leur fond, puisqu’ils sont tous mimétiques, peuvent néanmoins différer les uns des autres à l’infini. La part de mécanisme et de liberté qu’ils comportent est infiniment variable. Mais cette inépuisable diversité ne prouve rien en faveur du nihilisme cognitif ; elle ne prouve pas que les comportements sont incomparables et inconnaissables. Tout ce que nous avons besoin de connaître pour résister aux automatismes sociaux, aux contagions mimétiques galopantes, est accessible à la connaissance. René Girard
Jésus s’appuie sur la Loi pour en transformer radicalement le sens. La femme adultère doit être lapidée : en cela la Loi d’Israël ne se distingue pas de celle des nations. La lapidation est à la fois une manière de reproduire et de contenir le processus de mise à mort de la victime dans des limites strictes. Rien n’est plus contagieux que la violence et il ne faut pas se tromper de victime. Parce qu’elle redoute les fausses dénonciations, la Loi, pour les rendre plus difficiles, oblige les délateurs, qui doivent être deux au minimum, à jeter eux-mêmes les deux premières pierres. Jésus s’appuie sur ce qu’il y a de plus humain dans la Loi, l’obligation faite aux deux premiers accusateurs de jeter les deux premières pierres ; il s’agit pour lui de transformer le mimétisme ritualisé pour une violence limitée en un mimétisme inverse. Si ceux qui doivent jeter » la première pierre » renoncent à leur geste, alors une réaction mimétique inverse s’enclenche, pour le pardon, pour l’amour. (…) Jésus sauve la femme accusée d’adultère. Mais il est périlleux de priver la violence mimétique de tout exutoire. Jésus sait bien qu’à dénoncer radicalement le mauvais mimétisme, il s’expose à devenir lui-même la cible des violences collectives. Nous voyons effectivement dans les Évangiles converger contre lui les ressentiments de ceux qu’ils privent de leur raison d’être, gardiens du Temple et de la Loi en particulier. » Les chefs des prêtres et les Pharisiens rassemblèrent donc le Sanhédrin et dirent : « Que ferons-nous ? Cet homme multiplie les signes. Si nous le laissons agir, tous croiront en lui ». » Le grand prêtre Caïphe leur révèle alors le mécanisme qui permet d’immoler Jésus et qui est au cœur de toute culture païenne : » Ne comprenez-vous pas ? Il est de votre intérêt qu’un seul homme meure pour tout le peuple plutôt que la nation périsse » (Jean XI, 47-50) (…) Livrée à elle-même, l’humanité ne peut pas sortir de la spirale infernale de la violence mimétique et des mythes qui en camouflent le dénouement sacrificiel. Pour rompre l’unanimité mimétique, il faut postuler une force supérieure à la contagion violente : l’Esprit de Dieu, que Jean appelle aussi le Paraclet, c’est-à-dire l’avocat de la défense des victimes. C’est aussi l’Esprit qui fait révéler aux persécuteurs la loi du meurtre réconciliateur dans toute sa nudité. (…) Ils utilisent une expression qui est l’équivalent de » bouc émissaire » mais qui fait mieux ressortir l’innocence foncière de celui contre qui tous se réconcilient : Jésus est désigné comme » Agneau de Dieu « . Cela veut dire qu’il est la victime émissaire par excellence, celle dont le sacrifice, parce qu’il est identifié comme le meurtre arbitraire d’un innocent — et parce que la victime n’a jamais succombé à aucune rivalité mimétique — rend inutile, comme le dit l’Épître aux Hébreux, tous les sacrifices sanglants, ritualisés ou non, sur lesquels est fondée la cohésion des communautés humaines. La mort et la Résurrection du Christ substituent une communion de paix et d’amour à l’unité fondée sur la contrainte des communautés païennes. L’Eucharistie, commémoration régulière du » sacrifice parfait » remplace la répétition stérile des sacrifices sanglants. (…) En même temps, le devoir du chrétien est de dénoncer le péché là où il se trouve. Le communisme a pu s’effondrer sans violence parce que le monde libre et le monde communiste avaient accepté de ne plus remettre en cause les frontières existantes ; à l’intérieur de ces frontières, des millions de chrétiens ont combattu sans violence pour la vérité, pour que la lumière soit faite sur le mensonge et la violence des régimes qui asservissaient leurs pays. Encore une fois, face au danger de mimétisme universel de la violence, vous n’avez qu’une réponse possible : le christianisme. René Girard
Our supposedly insatiable appetite for the forbidden stops short of envy. Primitive cultures fear and repress envy so much that they have no word for it; we hardly use the one we have, and this fact must be significant. We no longer prohibit many actions that generate envy, but silently ostracize whatever can remind us of its presence in our midst. Psychic phenomena, we are told, are important in proportion to the resistance they generate toward revelation. If we apply this yardstick to envy as well as to what psychoanalysis designates as repressed, which of the two will make the more plausible candidate for the role of best-defended secret? René Girard
In the affluent West, we live in a world where there is less and less need therefore and more and more desire…. One has today real possibilities of true autonomy, of individual judgments. However, those possibilities are more commonly sold down the river in favour of false individuality, of negative mimesis…. The only way modernity can be defined is the universalization of internal mediation, for one doesn’t have areas of life that would keep people apart from each other, and that would mean that the construction of our beliefs and identity cannot but have strong mimetic components. René Girard
Dans notre époque où il n’est plus indécent de se vanter de manipulations en tous genres, le marketing a franchi un pas décisif grâce à Internet et aux réseaux sociaux. Il avait compris depuis longtemps les mécanismes du mimétisme et le rôle des modèles dans les décisions d’achat : la publicité n’a cessé d’en jouer. Mais délibérément ou en suivant un mouvement dont il n’a pas eu l’initiative, le marketing vient de révéler le pot aux roses. Des modèles de consommation officiels ont désormais un nom : influenceuses ou influenceurs. Et les victimes du désir mimétique sont des « followers », autrement dit des suiveurs ou des suiveuses des conseils ainsi dispensés. Ces modèles ont le plus souvent des comptes Instagram ou des chaînes YouTube. Ils parlent de beauté, de mode, de voyages, de sport, de culture… bref interviennent dans autant de marchés sur lesquels ils sont susceptibles d’orienter des comportements de consommation. Du point de vue de la théorie mimétique, ils sont plutôt des médiateurs externes, insusceptibles d’entrer en rivalité avec la plupart de leurs suiveurs, si ce n’est certains d’entre eux mus par leur ressentiment et qui sont dénommés « haters », donc haineux. Nous retrouvons ici les passions stendhaliennes de l’envie, de la jalousie et de la haine impuissante ou encore la figure du narrateur des Carnets du sous-sol de Dostoïevski, cet homme du ressentiment par excellence. La puissance des influenceurs se mesure au volume et à la croissance du nombre de leurs suiveurs. En découle une valeur économique qui se traduit par les rémunérations que leur servent les marques promues. Mais la relation n’est pas si simple : elle suppose aussi que l’influenceur donne des gages d’indépendance à ceux qui suivent leurs conseils. L’influenceur ne peut étendre et maintenir son influence qu’en apparaissant comme souverain vis-à-vis de ses suiveurs mais aussi des marques qu’il promeut. Sinon, il serait lui-même considéré comme influençable par les entreprises dont il vante les qualités, du moins celles de leurs produits et services. Cette suprématie est obtenue par sa capacité à modeler les goûts de ses suiveurs. Il est en effet beaucoup plus efficace, efficient et pertinent qu’une campagne de publicité par voie de presse – écrite, radiophonique ou télévisuelle. Il regroupe une population rendue homogène par l’attraction commune que ses membres ressentent pour son «charisme». Des jeunes gens de moins de vingt peuvent ainsi devenir ce qu’on appelait autrefois des leaders d’opinion. Sans avoir fait autre chose que s’enregistrer en vidéo dans leur appartement en tenant des propos persuasifs, ils peuvent être suivis par des millions d’admirateurs qui attendent leurs avis pour faire leurs choix. Enjoy Phenix, Cyprien, Natoo, Caroline Receveur ou encore SqueeZie seraient-ils les nouveaux maîtres du désir mimétique ? Au moins sont-ils d’indéniables révélateurs de sa persistante actualité et de sa pertinence. Jean-Marc Bourdin
René Girard (1923–2015) was one of the last of that race of Titans who dominated the human sciences in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries with their grand, synthetic theories about history, society, psychology, and aesthetics. That race has since given way to a more cautious breed of “researchers” who prefer to look at things up close, to see their fine grain rather than their larger patterns. Yet the times certainly seem to attest to the enduring relevance of Girard’s thought to our social and political realities. Not only are his ideas about mimetic desire and human violence as far-reaching as Marx’s theories of political economy or Freud’s claims about the Oedipus complex, but the explosion of social media, the resurgence of populism, and the increasing virulence of reciprocal violence all suggest that the contemporary world is becoming more and more recognizably “Girardian” in its behavior. (…) Somewhat like Heinrich Schliemann, who discovered the site of ancient Troy by assuming that the Homeric epics contained a substrate of historical truth, Girard approached literary works as coffers containing the most fundamental truths about human desire, conflict, and self-deception. (…) For Girard there is no such thing as fullness of being among mortals. All of us—including the rich, the famous, the powerful, and the glamorous—have our mimetic models and suffer from a deficiency of being. That deficiency nourishes our desires, physical or metaphysical. (…)The common currency of mimetic desire is envy. Envy is a form of hostile worship. It turns admiration into resentment. Dante considered it radix malorum, the root of all evil, and Girard agreed. He claimed that envy is the one taboo that is alive and well in contemporary society—the vice that few will ever talk about or confess to (…) Since then social media has brought “the universalization of internal mediation” to a new level, while at the same time dramatically narrowing the “areas of life that would keep people apart from each other.” Social media is the miasma of mimetic desire. If you post pictures of your summer vacation in Greece, you can expect your “friends” to post pictures from some other desirable destination. The photos of your dinner party will be matched or outmatched by theirs. If you assure me through social media that you love your life, I will find a way to profess how much I love mine. When I post my pleasures, activities, and family news on a Facebook page, I am seeking to arouse my mediators’ desires. In that sense social media provides a hyperbolic platform for the promiscuous circulation of mediator-oriented desire. As it burrows into every aspect of everyday life, Facebook insinuates itself precisely into those areas of life that would keep people apart. Certainly the enormous market potential of Facebook was not lost on Girard’s student Peter Thiel, the venture capitalist who studied with him at Stanford in the late 1980s and early 1990s. A devoted Girardian who founded and funds an institute called Imitatio, whose goal is to “pursue research and application of mimetic theory across the social sciences and critical areas of human behavior,” Thiel was the first outside investor in Facebook, selling most of his shares in 2012 for over a billion dollars (they cost him $500,000 in 2004). It took a highly intelligent Girardian, well schooled in mimetic theory, to intuit early on that Facebook was about to open a worldwide theater of imitative desire on people’s personal computers. Robert Pogue Harrison
After a few minutes of rendering, the new plot appeared, and I was a bit taken aback by what I saw. The blob had turned into a surprisingly detailed map of the world. Not only were continents visible, certain international borders were apparent as well. What really struck me, though, was knowing that the lines didn’t represent coasts or rivers or political borders, but real human relationships. Each line might represent a friendship made while travelling, a family member abroad, or an old college friend pulled away by the various forces of life…When I shared the image with others within Facebook, it resonated with many people. It’s not just a pretty picture, it’s a reaffirmation of the impact we have in connecting people, even across oceans and borders. Paul Butler
Depuis lors, les médias sociaux ont porté « l’universalisation de la médiation interne » à un nouveau niveau, tout en réduisant considérablement les « domaines de la vie qui séparaient les gens les uns des autres ». Les médias sociaux sont le miasme du désir mimétique. Si vous publiez des photos de vos vacances d’été en Grèce, vous pouvez vous attendre à ce que vos « amis » publient des photos d’une autre destination attrayante. Les photos de votre dîner seront égalées ou surpassées par les leurs. Si vous m’assurez, par le biais des médias sociaux, que vous aimez votre vie, je trouverai un moyen de dire à quel point j’aime la mienne. Lorsque je publie mes plaisirs, mes activités et mes nouvelles familiales sur une page Facebook, je cherche à susciter le désir de mes médiateurs. En ce sens, les médias sociaux fournissent une plate-forme hyperbolique pour la circulation imprudente du désir axé sur le médiateur. Alors qu’il se cache dans tous les aspects de la vie quotidienne, Facebook s’insinue précisément dans les domaines de la vie qui sépareraient les gens. Très certainement, l’énorme potentiel commercial de Facebook n’a pas échappé à Peter Thiel, l’investisseur en capital-risque et l’un de ses étudiants à Stanford à la fin des années 80 et au début des années 90. Girardien dévoué qui a fondé et financé un institut appelé Imitatio, dont le but est de « poursuivre la recherche et l’application de la théorie mimétique dans les sciences sociales et les domaines critiques du comportement humain », Thiel a été le premier investisseur extérieur de Facebook, vendant la plupart de ses actions. en 2012 pour plus d’un milliard de dollars (elles lui avaient coûté 500 000 dollars en 2004). Seul un girardien très intelligent, bien initié à la théorie mimétique, pouvait comprendre aussi tôt que Facebook était sur le point d’ouvrir un théâtre mondial de désir mimétique sur les ordinateurs personnels de ses utilisateurs. Robert Pogue Harrison

Après la neuroscience et les djihadistesHarry Potter et Superman, devinez qui confirme René Girard ?

En ce nouveau et dernier réveillon de l’année 2018 …

Dont les meilleures photos ne devraient pas manquer pour bon nombre d’entre nous …

De faire les meilleures pages et les beaux jours de la formidable invention du docteur Frankenstein-Zuckerberg

Comme hélas depuis bientôt deux mois le déchainement auto-entretenu de la violence et de l’envie des casseurs aux gilets jaunes

Comment ne pas repenser avec la NY Review of books

Ou le girardien Jean-Marc Bourdin

 

Aux découvertes et analyses de René Girard sur « l’universalisation de la médiation interne » dont est faite notre modernité même …

Avec la réduction toujours plus implacable qu’elle implique …

Des « domaines de la vie qui séparaient les gens les uns des autres » …

Et qui avec les réseaux sociaux et ses « influenceurs » et « suiveurs » trouve sa confirmation la plus éclatante …

Ouvrant littéralement à la planète entière

Et pour le meilleur comme pour le pire

La scène sur laquelle chacun peut désormais s’exposer …

Au déchainement quasiment sans frein des « feux de l’envie »  ?

The Prophet of Envy
Robert Pogue Harrison
NY Review of Books
December 20, 2018

Violence and the Sacred

by René Girard, translated from the French by Patrick Gregory
Johns Hopkins University Press (1977)

Battling to the End: Conversations with Benoît Chantre

by René Girard, translated from the French by Mary Baker
Michigan State University Press (2010)

René Girard (1923–2015) was one of the last of that race of Titans who dominated the human sciences in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries with their grand, synthetic theories about history, society, psychology, and aesthetics. That race has since given way to a more cautious breed of “researchers” who prefer to look at things up close, to see their fine grain rather than their larger patterns. Yet the times certainly seem to attest to the enduring relevance of Girard’s thought to our social and political realities. Not only are his ideas about mimetic desire and human violence as far-reaching as Marx’s theories of political economy or Freud’s claims about the Oedipus complex, but the explosion of social media, the resurgence of populism, and the increasing virulence of reciprocal violence all suggest that the contemporary world is becoming more and more recognizably “Girardian” in its behavior.

In Evolution of Desire: A Life of René Girard, Cynthia Haven—a literary journalist and the author of books on Joseph Brodsky and Czesław Miłosz—offers a lively, well-documented, highly readable account of how Girard built up his grand “mimetic theory,” as it’s sometimes called, over time. Her decision to introduce his thought to a broader public by way of an intellectual biography was a good one. Girard was not a man of action—the most important events of his life took place inside his head—so for the most part she follows the winding path of his academic career, from its beginnings in France, where he studied medieval history at the École des Chartes, to his migration to the United States in 1947, to the various American universities at which he taught over the years: Indiana, Duke, Bryn Mawr, Johns Hopkins, SUNY Buffalo, and finally Stanford, where he retired in 1997.

Girard began and ended his career as a professor of French and comparative literature. That was as it should have been. Although he was never formally trained in literary studies (he received a Ph.D. in history from Indiana University in 1950), he effectively built his theory of mimetic desire, in all its expansive anthropological aspects, on literary foundations. Somewhat like Heinrich Schliemann, who discovered the site of ancient Troy by assuming that the Homeric epics contained a substrate of historical truth, Girard approached literary works as coffers containing the most fundamental truths about human desire, conflict, and self-deception.

His first book, Deceit, Desire, and the Novel, published in French in 1961 when he was a professor at Johns Hopkins, treated the novels of Cervantes, Stendhal, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, and Proust as forensic evidence of the essential structures of desire, not just of literary characters but of those who find themselves reflected in them. The prevailing modern belief that my desires are my own, that they arise from my autonomous inner self, is a “Romantic” falsehood that the novelistic tradition, according to Girard, exposes as a delusion (I’m echoing here the French title of the book: Mensonge romantique et vérité romanesque, literally “Romantic falsehood and novelistic truth”). Instead, he argues, my desires are mimetic: I want what others seem to want. Whether I am conscious of it or not (mostly not), I imitate their desires to such a degree that the object itself becomes secondary, and in some cases superfluous, to the rivalries that form around it.

Girard postulated that between a desiring subject and its object there is usually a “model” or “mediator,” who can be either “external” or “internal.” External mediators exist outside of my time and place, like Amadís de Gaule’s chivalric heroes, who impel Don Quixote’s desire to become a knight-errant; or Lancelot and Guinevere, whose adulterous kiss is imitated by Paolo and Francesca in Dante’s account in canto 5 of the Inferno; or the celebrities whom advertisers enlist to sell us products. The external mediator often figures as a hero or ego ideal, and there is typically no rivalry involved.

With internal mediators, however, we are in the realm of what Girard calls “interdividuals,” or people who interact with one another in the same social world. The internal mediator is my neighbor, so to speak, and is often a rival who arouses hatred or envy, or both at once. In the novels Girard dealt with, internal mediation often involves “triangulated desire” between three characters, two of whom vie for the other: Mathilde and Mme de Fervacques vying for Julien in Stendhal’s The Red and the Black, for instance, or Julien and Valenod vying for Mme de Rênal. Even when a character views the mediator as an enemy, the former often secretly envies and idolizes the latter, as in the case of Proust’s Mme Verdurin, who loathed the Guermantes family until she married into it.

A crucial concept in Deceit, Desire, and the Novel is that of “metaphysical desire,” a somewhat misleading term for a common sentiment. We tend to attribute to the mediator a “fullness of being” that he or she does not in fact enjoy. For Girard there is no such thing as fullness of being among mortals. All of us—including the rich, the famous, the powerful, and the glamorous—have our mimetic models and suffer from a deficiency of being. That deficiency nourishes our desires, physical or metaphysical.

The English translation of Deceit, Desire, and the Novel came out in 1965, two years before V.S. Naipaul published The Mimic Men, which seems like a ringing endorsement of Girard’s claims about deficiency. (I don’t know if he ever read Girard.) In the novel Naipaul probes the psychology of elite ex-colonial “mimic men” who, after decolonization, model their desires on their former British masters. The mimic man will never enjoy the “fullness of being” he ascribes to his model, who, in Girard’s words, “shows the disciple the gate of paradise and forbids him to enter with one and the same gesture.” Naipaul’s narrator, Ralph Singh, knows this, yet such knowledge does not alleviate his unhappy consciousness. “We become what we see of ourselves in the eyes of others,” he declares. Girard would most likely deny Singh his one consolation, namely his belief that he is different from, and superior to, the mimic men who lack his own heightened self-awareness.

Girard might go even further and ask whether Naipaul’s mimic men in fact imitate one another more than the British models they share. The whole business gets altogether murkier—and more Girardian—when one considers that Naipaul himself was the perfect expression of the mimic man he defined and despised. The writer’s bearing, speech, racism, and invectives betray an ex-colonial subject mimicking the habits of his masters and the class to which he desperately wanted to belong. In this Naipaul falls well short of the novelists Girard dealt with in Deceit, Desire, and the Novel, all of whom, Girard claims, ended up forswearing the mimetic mechanisms they so insightfully depicted in their work.

The common currency of mimetic desire is envy. Envy is a form of hostile worship. It turns admiration into resentment. Dante considered it radix malorum, the root of all evil, and Girard agreed. He claimed that envy is the one taboo that is alive and well in contemporary society—the vice that few will ever talk about or confess to:

Our supposedly insatiable appetite for the forbidden stops short of envy. Primitive cultures fear and repress envy so much that they have no word for it; we hardly use the one we have, and this fact must be significant. We no longer prohibit many actions that generate envy, but silently ostracize whatever can remind us of its presence in our midst. Psychic phenomena, we are told, are important in proportion to the resistance they generate toward revelation. If we apply this yardstick to envy as well as to what psychoanalysis designates as repressed, which of the two will make the more plausible candidate for the role of best-defended secret?

These sentences come from the introduction to the only book that Girard wrote in English, A Theater of Envy: William Shakespeare (1991), which is full of insights into the envy and imitative behavior of Shakespeare’s characters. Proceeding as incautiously as Schliemann did in his excavations, Girard bores through Shakespeare’s corpus to arrive at the substrate of mediated desire that he believed lies at its foundation. Girard plays by none of the rules of the tradition of commentary on Shakespeare, so it is not surprising that the book remains largely neglected, yet one day A Theater of Envy will likely be acknowledged as one of the most original, illuminating books on Shakespeare of its time, despite its speculative recklessness and relative ignorance of the vast body of secondary literature on Shakespeare’s works.

Speaking of “a theater of envy,” in Evolution and Conversion (in French, Les origines de la culture, 2004; the English translation was recently republished by Bloomsbury)—his conversations with Pierpaolo Antonello and João Cezar de Castro Rocha, which took place a couple of years before Facebook launched its website in 2004—Girard made some remarks that seem particularly resonant today:

In the affluent West, we live in a world where there is less and less need therefore and more and more desire…. One has today real possibilities of true autonomy, of individual judgments. However, those possibilities are more commonly sold down the river in favour of false individuality, of negative mimesis…. The only way modernity can be defined is the universalization of internal mediation, for one doesn’t have areas of life that would keep people apart from each other, and that would mean that the construction of our beliefs and identity cannot but have strong mimetic components.

Since then social media has brought “the universalization of internal mediation” to a new level, while at the same time dramatically narrowing the “areas of life that would keep people apart from each other.”

Social media is the miasma of mimetic desire. If you post pictures of your summer vacation in Greece, you can expect your “friends” to post pictures from some other desirable destination. The photos of your dinner party will be matched or outmatched by theirs. If you assure me through social media that you love your life, I will find a way to profess how much I love mine. When I post my pleasures, activities, and family news on a Facebook page, I am seeking to arouse my mediators’ desires. In that sense social media provides a hyperbolic platform for the promiscuous circulation of mediator-oriented desire. As it burrows into every aspect of everyday life, Facebook insinuates itself precisely into those areas of life that would keep people apart.

Certainly the enormous market potential of Facebook was not lost on Girard’s student Peter Thiel, the venture capitalist who studied with him at Stanford in the late 1980s and early 1990s. A devoted Girardian who founded and funds an institute called Imitatio, whose goal is to “pursue research and application of mimetic theory across the social sciences and critical areas of human behavior,” Thiel was the first outside investor in Facebook, selling most of his shares in 2012 for over a billion dollars (they cost him $500,000 in 2004). It took a highly intelligent Girardian, well schooled in mimetic theory, to intuit early on that Facebook was about to open a worldwide theater of imitative desire on people’s personal computers.

In 1972, eleven years after Deceit, Desire, and the Novel appeared, Girard published Violence and the Sacred. It came as a shock to those familiar with his previous work. Here the literary critic assumed the mantle of cultural anthropologist, moving from the triangular desire of fictional bourgeois characters to the group behavior of primitive societies. Having immersed himself during the intervening decade in the work of Alfred Radcliffe-Brown, Bronisław Malinowski, Claude Lévi-Strauss, Émile Durkheim, Gabriel Tarde, and Walter Burkert, Girard offered in Violence and the Sacred nothing less than an anthropogenic theory of mimetic violence.

I will not attempt to describe the theory in all its speculative complexity. Suffice it to say that the only thing more contagious than desire is violence. Girard postulates that, prior to the establishment of laws, prohibitions, and taboos, prehistoric societies would periodically succumb to “mimetic crises.” Usually brought on by a destabilizing event—be it drought, pestilence, or some other adversity—mimetic crises amount to mass panics in which communities become unnerved, impassioned, and crazed, as people imitate one another’s violence and hysteria rather than responding directly to the event itself. Distinctions disappear, members of the group become identical to one another in their vehemence, and a mob psychology takes over. In such moments the community’s very survival is threated by internecine strife and a Hobbesian war of all against all.

Girard interpreted archaic rituals, sacrifices, and myth as the symbolic traces or aftermath of prehistoric traumas brought on by mimetic crises. Those societies that saved themselves from self-immolation did so through what he called the scapegoat mechanism. Scapegoating begins with accusation and ends in collective murder. Singling out a random individual or subgroup of individuals as being responsible for the crisis, the community turns against the “guilty” victim (guilty in the eyes of the persecutors, that is, since according to Girard the victim is in fact innocent and chosen quite at random, although is frequently slightly different or distinct in some regard). A unanimous act of violence against the scapegoat miraculously restores peace and social cohesion (unum pro multis, “one for the sake of many,” as the Roman saying puts it).

The scapegoat’s murder has such healing power over the community that the victim retroactively assumes an aura of sacredness, and is sometimes even deified. Behind the practice of sacrifice in ancient societies Girard saw the spasmodic, scapegoat-directed violence of communities in the throes of mimetic crises—a primal murder, as it were, for which there exists no hard evidence but plenty of indirect evidence in ancient sacrificial practices, which he viewed as ritualized reenactments of the scapegoat mechanism that everywhere founded the archaic religions of humanity. (“Every observation suggests that, in human culture, sacrificial rites and the immolation of victims come first.”)

Violence and the Sacred deals almost exclusively with archaic religion. Its argument is more hypothetical and abstract, more remote and less intuitive, than what Girard put forward in Deceit, Desire, and the Novel. The same can be said for the main claims of his next major book, Things Hidden Since the Foundation of the World (1978; the title comes from Matthew 13:35). There he argued that the Hebrew Scriptures and the Christian Gospels expose the “scandal” of the violent foundations of archaic religions. By revealing the inherent innocence of the victim—Jesus—as well as the inherent guilt of those who persecute and put him to death, “Christianity truly demystifies religion because it points out the error on which archaic religion is based.”*

Girard’s anthropological interpretation of Christianity in Things Hidden is as original as it is unorthodox. It views the Crucifixion as a revelation in the profane sense, namely a bringing to light of the arbitrary nature of the scapegoat mechanism that underlies sacrificial religions. After publishing Things Hidden, Girard gained a devoted following among various Christian scholars, some of whom lobbied him hard to open his theory to a more traditional theological interpretation of the Cross as the crux of man’s deliverance from sin. Girard eventually (and somewhat reluctantly) made room for a redemptive understanding of the Crucifixion, yet in principle his theory posits only its revelatory, demystifying, and scandalous aspect.

Orthodox Girardians insist that his corpusfrom Deceit, Desire, and the Novel to his last worksforms a coherent, integrated system that must be accepted or rejected as a whole. In my view, that is far from the case. One need not buy into the entire système Girard to recognize that his most fundamental insights can stand on their own.

Some of Girard’s most acute ideas come from his psychology of accusation. He championed legal systems that protect the rights of the accused because he believed that impassioned accusation, especially when it gains momentum by wrapping itself in the mantle of indignation, has a potential for mimetic diffusion that disregards any considered distinction between guilt and innocence. The word “Satan” in Hebrew means “adversary” or “accuser,” and Girard insisted in his later work that there is a distinctly satanic element at work in the zeal for accusation and prosecution.

Girard’s most valuable insight is that rivalry and violence arise from sameness rather than difference. Where conflicts erupt between neighbors or ethnic groups, or even among nations, more often than not it’s because of what they have in common rather than what distinguishes them. In Girard’s words: “The error is always to reason within categories of ‘difference’ when the root of all conflicts is rather ‘competition,’ mimetic rivalry between persons, countries, cultures.” Often we fight or go to war to prove our difference from an enemy who in fact resembles us in ways we are all too eager to deny.

A related insight of equal importance concerns the deadly cycles of revenge and reciprocal violence. Girard taught that retaliation hardly ever limits itself to “an eye for an eye” but almost always escalates the level of violence. Every escalation is imitated in turn by the other party:

Clausewitz sees very clearly that modern wars are as violent as they are only because they are “reciprocal”: mobilization involves more and more people until it is “total,” as Ernst Junger wrote of the 1914 war…. It was because he was “responding” to the humiliations inflicted by the Treaty of Versailles and the occupation of the Rhineland that Hitler was able to mobilize a whole people. Likewise, it was because he was “responding” to the German invasion that Stalin achieved a decisive victory over Hitler. It was because he was “responding” to the United States that Bin Laden planned 9/11…. The one who believes he can control violence by setting up defenses is in fact controlled by violence.

Those remarks come from the last book Girard wrote, Battling to the End (2010). It is in many ways one of his most interesting, for here he leaves behind speculations about archaic origins and turns his attention to modern history. The book’s conversations with Benoît Chantre, an eminent French Girardian, feature a major discussion of the war theorist Carl von Clausewitz (1780–1831), whose ideas about the “escalation to extremes” in modern warfare converge uncannily with Girard’s ideas about the acceleration of mimetic violence.

Toward the end of his life, Girard did not harbor much hope for history in the short term. In the past, politics was able to restrain mass violence and prevent its tendency to escalate to extremes, but in our time, he believed, politics had lost its power of containment. “Violence is a terrible adversary,” he wrote in Battling to the End, “especially since it always wins.” Yet it is necessary to battle violence with a new “heroic attitude,” for “it alone can link violence and reconciliation…[and] make tangible both the possibility of the end of the world and reconciliation among all members of humanity.” To that statement he felt compelled to add: “More than ever, I am convinced that history has meaning, and that its meaning is terrifying.” That meaning has to do with the primacy of violence in human relations. And to that statement, in turn, he added some verses of Friedrich Hölderlin: “But where danger threatens/that which saves from it also grows.”

  • *Girard goes so far as to argue that “Christianity is not only one of the destroyed religions but it is the destroyer of all religions. The death of God is a Christian phenomenon. In its modern sense, atheism is a Christian invention.” The Italian philosopher Gianni Vattimo was very drawn to Girard’s understanding of Christianity as a secularizing religion, and the two collaborated on a fine book on the topic, Christianity, Truth, and Weakening Faith: A Dialogue (Columbia University Press, 2010). 

Voir aussi:

Influenceurs et «followers» : les nouveaux maîtres du désir mimétique

Jean-Marc Bourdin

Iphilo

17/12/2018

BILLET : Sur Instagram ou sur leur chaîne YouTube, les influenceurs médiatisent nos désirs dans une relation triangulaire qui est au cœur de la thèse du désir mimétique de René Girard, analyse Jean-Marc Bourdin dans iPhilo. 


Ancien élève de l’ENA, inspecteur général de la ville de Paris, Jean-Marc Bourdin a également soutenu en 2016 une thèse de doctorat en philosophie sur René Girard à l’Université Paris-VIII. Créateur du blog L’Emissaire et membre de l’Association Recherche Mimétique (ARM), il a publié René Girard philosophe malgré lui et René Girard promoteur d’une science des rapports humains chez L’Harmattan en 2018.


René Girard affirme en 1961 dans Mensonge romantique et vérité romanesqueque seuls les plus grands romanciers, à la liste desquels il ajoutera par la suite quelques dramaturges, ont la faculté de comprendre les mécanismes du désir mimétique. Ceux-ci resteraient inconnus non seulement du commun des mortels mais aussi d’écrivains moins doués qui se laissent duper par la prétention du désir à l’autonomie.

Cette affirmation radicale souffrirait-elle désormais d’au moins une exception de taille ? Dans notre époque où il n’est plus indécent de se vanter de manipulations en tous genres, le marketing a franchi un pas décisif grâce à Internet et aux réseaux sociaux. Il avait compris depuis longtemps les mécanismes du mimétisme et le rôle des modèles dans les décisions d’achat : la publicité n’a cessé d’en jouer. Mais délibérément ou en suivant un mouvement dont il n’a pas eu l’initiative, le marketing vient de révéler le pot aux roses. Des modèles de consommation officiels ont désormais un nom : influenceuses ou influenceurs. Et les victimes du désir mimétique sont des « followers », autrement dit des suiveurs ou des suiveuses des conseils ainsi dispensés.

Ces modèles ont le plus souvent des comptes Instagram ou des chaînes YouTube. Ils parlent de beauté, de mode, de voyages, de sport, de culture… bref interviennent dans autant de marchés sur lesquels ils sont susceptibles d’orienter des comportements de consommation.

Du point de vue de la théorie mimétique, ils sont plutôt des médiateurs externes, insusceptibles d’entrer en rivalité avec la plupart de leurs suiveurs, si ce n’est certains d’entre eux mus par leur ressentiment et qui sont dénommés « haters », donc haineux. Nous retrouvons ici les passions stendhaliennes de l’envie, de la jalousie et de la haine impuissante ou encore la figure du narrateur des Carnets du sous-sol de Dostoïevski, cet homme du ressentiment par excellence.

La puissance des influenceurs se mesure au volume et à la croissance du nombre de leurs suiveurs. En découle une valeur économique qui se traduit par les rémunérations que leur servent les marques promues. Mais la relation n’est pas si simple : elle suppose aussi que l’influenceur donne des gages d’indépendance à ceux qui suivent leurs conseils.

L’influenceur ne peut étendre et maintenir son influence qu’en apparaissant comme souverain vis-à-vis de ses suiveurs mais aussi des marques qu’il promeut. Sinon, il serait lui-même considéré comme influençable par les entreprises dont il vante les qualités, du moins celles de leurs produits et services. Cette suprématie est obtenue par sa capacité à modeler les goûts de ses suiveurs. Il est en effet beaucoup plus efficace, efficient et pertinent qu’une campagne de publicité par voie de presse – écrite, radiophonique ou télévisuelle. Il regroupe une population rendue homogène par l’attraction commune que ses membres ressentent pour son «charisme».

Des jeunes gens de moins de vingt peuvent ainsi devenir ce qu’on appelait autrefois des leaders d’opinion. Sans avoir fait autre chose que s’enregistrer en vidéo dans leur appartement en tenant des propos persuasifs, ils peuvent être suivis par des millions d’admirateurs qui attendent leurs avis pour faire leurs choix.

Enjoy Phenix, Cyprien, Natoo, Caroline Receveur ou encore SqueeZie seraient-ils les nouveaux maîtres du désir mimétique ? Au moins sont-ils d’indéniables révélateurs de sa persistante actualité et de sa pertinence.

Voir encore:

Visualizing Friendships
Paul Butler
Facebook
December 14, 2010

Visualizing data is like photography. Instead of starting with a blank canvas, you manipulate the lens used to present the data from a certain angle.

When the data is the social graph of 500 million people, there are a lot of lenses through which you can view it. One that piqued my curiosity was the locality of friendship. I was interested in seeing how geography and political borders affected where people lived relative to their friends. I wanted a visualization that would show which cities had a lot of friendships between them.

I began by taking a sample of about ten million pairs of friends from Apache Hive, our data warehouse. I combined that data with each user’s current city and summed the number of friends between each pair of cities. Then I merged the data with the longitude and latitude of each city.

At that point, I began exploring it in R, an open-source statistics environment. As a sanity check, I plotted points at some of the latitude and longitude coordinates. To my relief, what I saw was roughly an outline of the world. Next I erased the dots and plotted lines between the points. After a few minutes of rendering, a big white blob appeared in the center of the map. Some of the outer edges of the blob vaguely resembled the continents, but it was clear that I had too much data to get interesting results just by drawing lines. I thought that making the lines semi-transparent would do the trick, but I quickly realized that my graphing environment couldn’t handle enough shades of color for it to work the way I wanted.

Instead I found a way to simulate the effect I wanted. I defined weights for each pair of cities as a function of the Euclidean distance between them and the number of friends between them. Then I plotted lines between the pairs by weight, so that pairs of cities with the most friendships between them were drawn on top of the others. I used a color ramp from black to blue to white, with each line’s color depending on its weight. I also transformed some of the lines to wrap around the image, rather than spanning more than halfway around the world.

After a few minutes of rendering, the new plot appeared, and I was a bit taken aback by what I saw. The blob had turned into a surprisingly detailed map of the world. Not only were continents visible, certain international borders were apparent as well. What really struck me, though, was knowing that the lines didn’t represent coasts or rivers or political borders, but real human relationships. Each line might represent a friendship made while travelling, a family member abroad, or an old college friend pulled away by the various forces of life.

Later I replaced the lines with great circle arcs, which are the shortest routes between two points on the Earth. Because the Earth is a sphere, these are often not straight lines on the projection.

When I shared the image with others within Facebook, it resonated with many people. It’s not just a pretty picture, it’s a reaffirmation of the impact we have in connecting people, even across oceans and borders.

Paul is an intern on Facebook’s data infrastructure engineering team.

Voir également:

Check out this stunning Facebook world map

Jeffrey Van Camp

Digital trends

12.14.10

Have you ever wondered what 10 million friendships would look like on a world map? Well, a Facebook engineer has the answer for you. The map below was made by Paul Butler, an engineering intern at Facebook. In a blog post, he explains how he created this visualized representation of friendships. His quest began when he became curious as to whether country or physical location had a big impact on friendships. In other words, he wondered if people had a lot of friends who live far away from them, perhaps around the world. So he took a sample of 10 million friendship pairs from the Facebook database and made this image.

The results are fairly evident and we recommend you check it out in high resolution to fully understand what you’re looking at. This data was not graphed onto a map, by the way. Every lit up dot of land is the geo-location of a friend. The map formed itself by the sheer number of connections. The most lit areas–Europe and the United States–are bright because of the density of smaller range friendships inside them.

“After a few minutes of rendering, the new plot appeared, and I was a bit taken aback by what I saw,” said Butler. “The blob had turned into a surprisingly detailed map of the world. Not only were continents visible, certain international borders were apparent as well. What really struck me, though, was knowing that the lines didn’t represent coasts or rivers or political borders, but real human relationships. Each line might represent a friendship made while travelling, a family member abroad, or an old college friend pulled away by the various forces of life…When I shared the image with others within Facebook, it resonated with many people. It’s not just a pretty picture, it’s a reaffirmation of the impact we have in connecting people, even across oceans and borders.”

As much as we dog Facebook here and there, this perfectly shows the great qualities of social networking. With only 10 million of the 500 million connections, we are able to build a map of the world solely from our own personal connections. Very cool.


Noël/2018e: Attention à la marche ! (Like reading the Constitution today: Looking back at the 400-year intertestamental gap of Jewish writings and incredible religious change without which you can’t truly appreciate the break with the religion of the past that Jesus actually was)

25 décembre, 2018

La Cène, Léonard de Vinci, 1494 (Crédit : domaine public, via Wikipedia)

 
 
Image result for Mind the gap attention à la marche
 

Le salut vient des Juifs. Jésus (Jean 4:22)
On célébrait à Jérusalem la fête de la Dédicace. C’était l’hiver. Et Jésus se promenait dans le temple, sous le portique de Salomon. Jean (10: 22-23)
Jésus (…) enseignait dans les synagogues, et il était glorifié par tous. Il se rendit à Nazareth, où il avait été élevé, et, selon sa coutume, il entra dans la synagogue le jour du sabbat. Luc 4: 14-16
Pendant ce temps, les disciples le pressaient de manger, disant: Rabbi, mange… Jean 4: 31
J’éprouve une grande tristesse, et j’ai dans le coeur un chagrin continuel. Car je voudrais moi-même être anathème et séparé de Christ pour mes frères, mes parents selon la chair, qui sont Israélites, à qui appartiennent l’adoption, et la gloire, et les alliances, et la loi, et le culte, et les promesses, et les patriarches, et de qui est issu, selon la chair, le Christ, qui est au-dessus de toutes choses, Dieu béni éternellement. Amen! Ce n’est point à dire que la parole de Dieu soit restée sans effet. Car tous ceux qui descendent d’Israël ne sont pas Israël, et, pour être la postérité d’Abraham, ils ne sont pas tous ses enfants; mais il est dit: En Isaac sera nommée pour toi une postérité, c’est-à-dire que ce ne sont pas les enfants de la chair qui sont enfants de Dieu, mais que ce sont les enfants de la promesse qui sont regardés comme la postérité. Paul (Romans 9: 2-8)
Je dis donc: Dieu a-t-il rejeté son peuple? Loin de là! Car moi aussi je suis Israélite, de la postérité d’Abraham, de la tribu de Benjamin. Dieu n’a point rejeté son peuple, qu’il a connu d’avance. Ne savez-vous pas ce que l’Écriture rapporte d’Élie, comment il adresse à Dieu cette plainte contre Israël: Seigneur, ils ont tué tes prophètes, ils ont renversé tes autels; je suis resté moi seul, et ils cherchent à m’ôter la vie? Mais quelle réponse Dieu lui fait-il? Je me suis réservé sept mille hommes, qui n’ont point fléchi le genou devant Baal. De même aussi dans le temps présent il y a un reste, selon l’élection de la grâce. Or, si c’est par grâce, ce n’est plus par les oeuvres; autrement la grâce n’est plus une grâce. Et si c’est par les oeuvres, ce n’est plus une grâce; autrement l’oeuvre n’est plus une oeuvre. Quoi donc? Ce qu’Israël cherche, il ne l’a pas obtenu, mais l’élection l’a obtenu, tandis que les autres ont été endurcis, selon qu’il est écrit: Dieu leur a donné un esprit d’assoupissement, Des yeux pour ne point voir, Et des oreilles pour ne point entendre, Jusqu’à ce jour. Paul (Romans 11: 1-8)
Si le judaïsme n’avait qu’à résoudre la  question juive, il aurait beaucoup à faire, mais il serait peu de chose. Lévinas
Quand un Juif devient chrétien, on a un Chrétien de plus mais pas un Juif de moins. Edouard Drumont
La principale opposition de frères ennemis dans l’Histoire, c’est bien les juifs et les chrétiens. Mais le premier christianisme est dominé par l’Epître aux Romains qui dit : la faute des juifs est très réelle, mais elle est votre salut. N’allez surtout pas vous vanter vous chrétiens. Vous avez été greffés grâce à la faute des juifs. On voit l’idée que les chrétiens pourraient se révéler tout aussi indignes de la Révélation chrétienne que les juifs se sont révélés indignes de leur révélation. (…)  Il faut reconnaître que le christianisme n’a pas à se vanter. Les chrétiens héritent de Saint Paul et des Evangiles de la même façon que les Juifs héritaient de la Genèse et du Lévitique et de toute la Loi. Mais ils n’ont pas compris cela puisqu’ils ont continué à se battre et à mépriser les Juifs. (…) ils ont recréé de l’ordre sacrificiel. Ce qui est historiquement fatal et je dirais même nécessaire. Un passage trop brusque aurait été impossible et impensable. Nous avons eu deux mille ans d’histoire et cela est fondamental. (…) la religion doit être historicisée : elle fait des hommes des êtres qui restent toujours violents mais qui deviennent plus subtils, moins spectaculaires, moins proches de la bête et des formes sacrificielles comme le sacrifice humain. Il se pourrait qu’il y ait un christianisme historique qui soit une nécessité historique. Après deux mille ans de christianisme historique, il semble que nous soyons aujourd’hui à une période charnière – soit qui ouvre sur l’Apocalypse directement, soit qui nous prépare une période de compréhension plus grande et de trahison plus subtile du christianisme. René Girard
Il y a deux grandes attitudes à mon avis dans l’histoire humaine, il y a celle de la mythologie qui s’efforce de dissimuler la violence (…) la plus répandue, la plus normale, la plus naturelle à l’homme et (…) l ’autre (…) beaucoup plus rare et (…) même unique au monde (…) réservée tout entière aux grands moments de l’inspiration biblique et chrétienne [qui]  consiste non pas à pudiquement dissimuler mais, au contraire, à révéler la violence dans toute son injustice et son mensonge, partout où il est possible de la repérer. C’est l’attitude du Livre de Job et c’est l’attitude des Evangiles. […]. C’est l’attitude qui nous a permis de découvrir l’innocence de la plupart des victimes que même les hommes les plus religieux, au cours de leur histoire, n’ont jamais cessé de massacrer et de persécuter. C’est là qu’est l’inspiration commune au judaïsme et au christianisme, et c’est la clef, il faut l’espérer, de leur réconciliation future. C’est la tendance héroïque à mettre la vérité au-dessus même de l’ordre social. René Girard
Mais pourquoi donc le christianisme est-il devenu une religion non-juive ?  Gilles Bernheim
Les Juifs témoignent de l’absolue transcendance sur laquelle est fondée toute morale: la loi. Les chrétiens témoignent de l’incarnation de la Parole. deux voix pour le même Dieu! Deux voix différentes, dont  l’harmonie a été promise au-delà du temps. Mark Fressler
L’Histoire juive a été arrachée de son cadre étroit de la Palestine; par l’intermédiaire du christianisme, le Juif a cessé d’être un provincial insignifiant se pavanant sur l’étroite scène de la Judée; il a pénétré dans l’importance de la scène mondiale et est devenu une bénédiction pour toute l’humanité. Sans le christianisme, le judaïsme et le Juif auraient pu rester aussi insignifiants que l’ont été les disciples de Zoroastre. Maurice S. Eisendrath
Est-ce vraiment la volonté de Dieu qu’il n’existe plus aucun judaïsme dans le monde? Serait-ce vraiment le triomphe de Dieu si les rouleaux n’étaient plus sortis de l’arche  et si la Torah n’était plus lue dans les synagogues, si nos anciennes prières hébraïques, que Jésus lui-même utilisa pour adorer Dieu, n’étaient plus récitées, si le Seder de la Pâque n’était plus célébré dans nos vies, si la loi de Moïse n’était plus observée dans nos foyers?  Serait-ce vraiment ad majorem Dei gloriam d’avoir un monde sans Juifs? Abraham Heschel
Au travers des siècles, la communauté juive a interprété la décision de l’Eglise d’adorer Dieu le dimanche comme un rejet du coeur même de l’expérience juive: le rejet de la loi. Ce transfert du jour d’adoration au dimanche a rendu excessivement difficile, sinon virtuellement impossible, pour le juif, d’accorder une considération sérieuse au message chrétien. R. Marvin Wilson
Au IVe siècle, on disait aux Juifs; « Vous n’avez pas le droit de vivre parmi nous en tant que juifs ». A partir du Moyen-Age jusqu’au XIXe siècle, on disait aux Juifs; « Vous n’avez pas le droit de vivre parmi nous. » A l’époque nazie, on disait aux Juifs: « Vous n’avez pas le droit de vivre. » Paul Hillburg
Il a fallu la « solution finale » des nazis allemands pour que les chrétiens commencent à prendre conscience que le prétendu problème juif est en réalité un problème chrétien et qu’il l’a toujours été. Alice L. Eckardt
Après Auschwitz, (…) demander aux juifs de devenir chrétiens est une manière spirituelle de les effacer de l’existence et ne fait donc que renforcer les conséquences de l’Holocauste. (…)  Après Auschwitz et la participation des nations à ce massacre, c’est le monde chrétien qui a besoin de conversion. Gregory Baum
Tant que l’Eglise chrétienne se considère comme le successeur d’Israël, comme le nouveau peuple de Dieu, aucun espace théologique n’est laissé aux autres confessions et surtout à la religion juive. Gregory Baum
Si la loi du sabbat appartient au cérémoniel et n’est plus obligatoire, pourquoi remplacer le sabbat par un autre jour? Jacques Doukhan
Si la grâce chrétienne a mis fin à la loi juive, si le dimanche chrétien a abrogé le sabbat juif, si la notion d’un Dieu invisible indéfiniment suspendu à une croix a remplacé la notion du Tout-puissant invisible, si le salut et son emphase sur le spirituel l’a emporté sur la création, sur la nature et sur le corps, si le Nouveau Testament a supprimé l’Ancien, si les païens ont remplacé Israël; alors les juifs ont eu théologiquement raison, et ont encore raison aujourd’hui, de rejeter la religion chrétienne. Jacques Doukhan
Le Messie a été représenté dans les écritures hébraïques et dans la tradition juive comme une étoile, une étoile isolée, la dernière étoile qui annonce la venue du jour: l’étoile de David, celle-là même qui est représentée sur le drapeau israélien.  Les chrétiens ont si souvent mis l’accent sur l’événement passé de la crucifixion qu’ils se sont souvent arrêtés à la croix. Ils n’attendent plus. Ils sont déjà sauvés. La croix a éclipsé l’étoile. Jacques Doukhan
Because of the painful and shameful history (…), the name of Jesus has been associated in the Jewish consciousness with the memory of massacre, discrimination, and rejection for 2,000 years, the systematic « teaching of contempt » all climaxing at Auschwitz. Many Christians still do not realize the nature of that connection; and, consciously or not, they keep nurturing their mentalities with the old poison teaching and preaching the curse against the Jews who are charged with the most horrible crime of humanity, deicide: the killing of God. Meanwhile, there is the supersession theology, which denies the Jews and Israel the right even to be Israel, since the « true Israel » is another people. (This theory has been denounced as « a spiritual holocaust. ») This goes along with all kinds of strange ideas that Christians still entertain about the Jews: the myth of the Jewish plot, the association of the Jew with deception and money, etc. I am here referring to the old beast called « anti-Semitism. » You asked me if there is hope of reconciliation after Auschwitz. As long as Christians, whoever they are and whatever community they belong to, do not understand and recognize their responsibility at Auschwitz; as long as they are still fueling the fire and pushing in the same direction; as long as they keep in their heart anti-Semitic ideas and feelings there is no hope of reconciliation. With Auschwitz, Jewish-Christian history has reached a point of no return. After Auschwitz, it is no more decent to think or act or feel in the ways that have produced Auschwitz. To hope for a reconciliation after Auschwitz amounts then to hope in a genuine « conversion » on the part of the Christians. As long as Christians will not take this sin of anti-Semitism seriously, as long as they are not ready to turn back, repent, and recognize the Jewish roots that bear them, there is no hope for reconciliation. As a result, we can even say that there is no hope for any other reconciliation, and I mean here especially the Christian reconciliation with the God of Israel Himself. (..) According to the Jewish law (Halakhah), a Jew always remains a Jew whatever he does, even if he identifies himself as a Christian. Ironically, the Nazis have demonstrated the truth of this observation. The anti-Semite Drumont used to say, « When a Jew becomes Christian, we have one more Christian, but we don’t have one less Jew. » (…) Today, after the Holocaust and centuries of Christian effort to eliminate the Jews from the scene of history, any open at tempt to « convert » Jewish people will trigger strong reactions. Christians who want to share with Jews « the hope of Jesus » should, therefore, first of all ask themselves a question about their real motives. Why do they want to « convert » Jews? Do they intend to transform them into their image and thus erase their Jewish identity? (…) In other words, the conversion of the Christian is a prerequisite for the conversion of the Jew. (…) But in saying that, he does not imply that we have to change our identity in order to be able to reach out to Jews. A man does not need to become a woman in order to be able to reach out to women, and vice versa. (…) Paradoxically after the Holocaust and the creation of the State of Israel, more and more Jews are able to disassociate Jesus from the offensive Christian testimony. It is interesting that much more has been written about Jesus in Hebrew in the last thirty years than in the eighteen previous centuries. Along with Christians who begin to reconsider their Jewish roots and learn to love the law of the God of Israel, many Jews begin to realize that Jesus belongs to their Jewish heritage and as such deserves their attention. Jacques B. Doukhan
The festivals are nothing but a pedagogical or evangelistic tool to be used, just as we sometimes do when we use the model of the sanctuary to witness through this object lesson to our unique message. It should be descriptive and instructive, not prescriptive. If we desire to mark the festival, it would therefore be advisable to do it during its season, not because we want or need to be faithful to agricultural, ritualistic, and legalistic norms, but rather as an opportune moment when other people think about it, just as we traditionally do for Christmas, Easter, or Thanksgiving (although these festivals contain some elements of pagan origin, such as Santa Claus, the Christmas tree, and the Easter bunny). Jacques B. Doukhan
Juifs et chrétiens vont devoir à l’avenir changer ce qu’ils racontent les uns sur les autres. D’un côté, les chrétiens ne seront plus en mesure de prétendre que les juifs en tant que groupe ont consciemment rejeté Jésus comme Dieu. De telles croyances sur les juifs ont conduit à une histoire profonde, sanglante et douloureuse d’antijudaïsme et d’antisémitisme. […] De l’autre côté, les juifs vont devoir arrêter de railler les idées chrétiennes sur Dieu comme une simple collection d’idées fantaisistes “non juives”, peut-être païennes, et en tous les cas bizarres. Daniel Boyarin
Nous définissons habituellement les membres d’une religion en utilisant une sorte de check-list. Par exemple, on pourrait dire que si une personne croit en la Trinité et en l’incarnation, elle est un membre de la religion appelée christianisme, et que, si elle n’y croit pas, elle n’est pas un véritable membre de cette religion. Réciproquement, on pourrait dire que si quelqu’un ne croit pas en la Trinité et l’incarnation, alors il appartient à la religion appelée judaïsme mais que, s’il y croit, il n’y appartient pas. Quelqu’un pourrait aussi dire que, si une personne respecte le shabbat le samedi, ne mange que de la nourriture casher et fait circoncire ses fils, elle est un membre de la religion juive, et que, si elle ne le fait pas, elle ne l’est pas. Ou réciproquement, que, si un certain groupe croit que chacun doit respecter le shabbat, manger casher et circoncire ses fils, cela signifie qu’il n’est pas chrétien mais que, s’il croit que ces pratiques ont été remplacées, alors c’est un groupe chrétien. Comme je l’ai dit, voilà notre façon habituelle de considérer ces questions. (…) Un autre grand problème que ces check-lists ne peuvent pas gérer concerne les personnes dont les croyances et comportements sont un mélange de caractéristiques tirées de deux listes. Dans le cas des Juifs et des chrétiens, c’est un problème qui n’a tout simplement pas voulu disparaître. Des siècles après la mort de Jésus, certains croyaient en la divinité de Jésus, Messie incarné, mais insistaient également sur le fait que, pour être sauvés, ils devaient ne manger que de la nourriture casher, respecter le shabbat comme les autres Juifs et faire circoncire leurs fils. C’était un milieu où bien des personnes ne voyaient pas de contradiction, semble-t-il, à être à la fois juif et chrétien. En outre, beaucoup des éléments qui en sont venus à faire partie de la check-list éventuelle pour déterminer si l’on est juif ou si l’on est chrétien, ne déterminaient absolument pas à l’époque une ligne de frontière. Que devons-nous faire de ces gens là ? Pendant un grand nombre de générations après la venue du Christ, différents disciples, et groupes de disciples, de Jésus ont tenu des positions théologiques variées et se sont engagés dans une grande diversité d’observances relativement à la Loi juive de leurs ancêtres. L’un des débats les plus importants a porté sur la relation entre les deux entités qui allaient finir par former les deux premières personnes de la Trinité. Beaucoup de chrétiens croyaient que le Fils ou le Verbe (Logos) était subordonné à Dieu le Père voire même créé par lui. Pour d’autres, bien que le Fils soit incréé et ait existé dès avant le début du temps, il était seulement d’une substance similaire au Père. Un troisième groupe croyait qu’il n’y avait pas de différence du tout entre le Père et le Fils quant à la substance. Il existait aussi des différences très prononcées d’observances entre chrétien et chrétien : certains chrétiens conservaient une bonne part de la Loi juive (ou même la totalité), d’autres en avaient conservé certaines pratiques mais en avaient abandonné d’autres (par exemple, la règle apostolique d’Actes 15 5 ), et d’autres encore croyaient que la Loi entière devait être abolie et écartée pour les chrétiens (même pour ceux qui étaient nés juifs). Enfin, certains chrétiens étaient d’avis que la Pâque chrétienne était une forme de la Pâque juive, convenablement interprétée, avec Jésus comme agneau de Dieu et sacrifice pascal, tandis que d’autres niaient vigoureusement une telle relation. Cela avait également une portée pratique dans la mesure où le premier groupe célébrait Pâques le même jour où les Juifs célébraient Pessah tandis que le second insistait tout aussi fermement que Pâques ne devait pas tomber le jour de Pessah. Il y avait bien d’autres pommes de discorde. Jusqu’au début du quatrième siècle, tous ces groupes s’appelaient eux -mêmes chrétiens et un bon nombre d’entre eux se définissaient tout autant juifs que chrétiens. Selon cette vue, tenue par beaucoup de penseurs et d’exégètes, chrétiens aussi bien que juifs, après l’humiliation, la souffrance et la mort du Messie Jésus, la théologie de la souffrance vicaire rédemptrice aurait été découverte, apparemment en Is 53. On prétend alors que ce dernier texte a été réinterprété pour renvoyer non au peuple d’Israël persécuté mais au Messie souffrant. “ Le Seigneur a voulu l’écraser par la souffrance. S ’il fait de sa vie un sacrifice expiatoire, il verra une postérité, il prolongera ses jours ; par lui la volonté du Seigneur s’accomplira. A la suite de son épreuve, il verra la lumière ; il sera comblé par sa connaissance. Le juste, mon serviteur, justifiera des multitudes et il portera lui-même leurs fautes. C’est pourquoi je lui donnerai une part parmi les princes et il partagera le butin avec les puissants ; parce qu ’il s’est livré lui-même à la mort et qu’il a été compté parmi les criminels ; alors qu’il portait pourtant le péché des multitudes et intercédait pour les criminels” (Is 5 3,10-12). Si ces versets se réfèrent effectivement au Messie, ils prédisent clairement ses souffrances et sa mort pour expier les péchés des humains. Cependant, on nous affirme que les Juifs auraient toujours interprété ces versets comme une évocation des souffrances du peuple d’Israël lui-même et non du Messie, qui serait quant à lui uniquement triomphant. Résumons ainsi cette opinion communément reçue : la théologie des souffrances du Messie est une réponse apologétique a posteriori pour expliquer les souffrances et l’humiliation subies par Jésus puisque les ‘chrétiens’ le tenaient pour le Messie. Selon cette vue, le christianisme a été inauguré au moment de la crucifixion, qui aurait mis en branle la nouvelle religion. En outre, beaucoup de ceux qui défendent ce point de vue sont aussi d’avis que le sens original d’Isaïe 53 a été déformé par les chrétiens pour expliquer et rendre compte du fait choquant de la crucifixion du Messie, alors qu’il se référait initialement aux souffrances du peuple d’Israël. Ce lieu commun doit être entièrement rejeté. La notion d’un Messie humilié et souffrant n’était pas du tout étrangère au judaïsme avant la venue de Jésus et elle est demeurée courante chez les Juifs postérieurement, et ce jusque dans la première période moderne. C’est un fait fascinant (et sans doute inconfortable pour certains) que cette tradition a été bien établie par les Juifs messianiques modernes soucieux de démontrer que leur foi en Jésus ne les ‘déjudaïse’ pas. Que l’on accepte ou non leur théologie, il n’en demeure pas moins vrai qu’ils ont constitué un très fort dossier textuel à l’appui de l’idée que la conception d’un Messie souffrant est enracinée dans des écrits profondément juifs, tant anciens que plus récents. Les Juifs n’ont apparemment pas eu de difficulté à envisager un Messie qui offrirait sa souffrance pour racheter le monde. Redisons-le : ce qu’on aurait dit de Jésus soi-disant après coup est en fait un ensemble d’attentes et de spéculations messianiques bien établies qui étaient courantes avant même que Jésus ne vienne au monde. Des Juifs avaient appris par une lecture attentive de certains textes bibliques que le Messie souffrirait et serait humilié ; cette lecture assumait précisément la forme de l’interprétation rabbinique classique que nous connaissons sous le nom de midrash, une façon de faire se répondre des versets et des passages de l’Ecriture pour en tirer de nouveaux récits, de nouvelles images et idées théologiques. » Daniel Boyarin
Tout le monde sait bien que Jésus est juif, mais l’auteur affirme que le Christ l’est aussi. Les bases de la christologie chrétienne appartiennent à la pensée israélite du second Temple et les divergences invoquées pour justifier une rupture historique prétendument immédiate entre « judaïsme » et « christianisme » sont erronées. La notion d’un Messie humano-divin, la pensée qu’en Dieu réside une seconde figure divine, la conception d’un Messie qui porte les péchés et sauve par sa souffrance, entre autres, ne sont pas une réinterprétation chrétienne, rétrospective et abusive, du Fils de l’Homme de Daniel 7 et du Serviteur souffrant d’Isaïe 53, mais des interprétations largement attestées dans la littérature juive contemporaine (Hénoch, Esdras, etc.). La nouveauté chrétienne est de voir leur réalisation dans cet homme-là Jésus et tous les juifs ne vont pas l’accepter. Même la prétendue rupture de Jésus avec les observances de la Torah résulte d’une mauvaise lecture de Marc 7 Trinité, messie humano-divin, messie souffrant, lois alimentaires, sabbat, circoncision, Yavné et Nicée, Qumran et autres. Ces textes intertestamentaires sont des textes qui montrent la diversité de pensée qui était dans ce qu’on appelle le judaïsme des premiers siècles (avant Jésus). Sébastien Lapaque
In the Soviet Union, run as it was by the self-declared militant godless, Christmas was a secular holiday: It was called New Year’s. People had New Year’s trees, decorated with New Year’s ornaments, under which Father Frost would leave New Year’s gifts. These images are central, beloved memories of my childhood — waking up to a sparkling, decorated tree in my room, piled high with presents that, given that it was the Soviet Union, were often slightly defective. When we came to the United States, we brought ornaments, some of which have been in the family for generations. For the first few years in the States, we’d get a New Year’s tree on Dec. 26, decorate it, lay presents under it and celebrate the New Year as we had for as long as anyone could remember. But after a few years, we stopped. It was no longer a New Year’s tree in a Soviet house. It had become a Christian symbol in a Jewish house. Christmas was all around us, for nearly one-tenth of the year, every year. It began to feel deeply alien precisely because we were secular, but it was not. Despite the movies and the shopping, despite the Germanic decor, Christmas is still, at its core and by design, about the birth of Christ, a point that seems bizarre to argue. Just look at all those nativity scenes! And we don’t observe the holiday on just any day. Dec. 25 has Christian significance. Whenever I hear the name, I hear the “Christ” in it. To me, it’s strange that many of its celebrants do not. And despite its celebration of a Christian god, it is everywhere, for over a month, in a way no other holiday is — not even Easter. It is in every ad, in every window and doorway, and on everyone’s lips. If you’re not a part of the festivities, even its sparkling aesthetic can wear you down. When you are from a minority religion, you’re used to the fact that cabdrivers don’t wish you an easy fast on Yom Kippur. But it’s harder to get used to the oppressive ubiquity of a holiday like Christmas. “This is always the time of year I feel most excluded from society,” one Jewish friend told me. Another told me it made him feel “un-American.” To say it’s off-putting to be wished a merry holiday you don’t celebrate — like someone randomly wishing you a happy birthday when the actual date is months away — is not to say you hate Christmas. It is simply to say that, to me, Julia Ioffe, it is alienating and weird, even though I know that is not intended. I respond: “Thanks. You, too.” But that feels alienating and weird, too, because now I’m pretending to celebrate Christmas. It feels like I’ve verbally tripped, as when I reply “You, too!” to the airport employee wishing me a good flight. There’s nothing evil or mean-spirited about any of it; it’s just ill-fitting and uncomfortable. And that’s when it happens once. When it happens several times a day for a month, and is amplified by the audiovisual Christmas blanketing, it’s exhausting and isolating. It makes me feel like a stranger in my own land. Julia Ioffe
Christmas is basically a traditional Jewish way of life. We know Jesus Christ was Jewish, and that for centuries our people have been the targets of anti-Semitism because of it. However, this practicing Jew looks at Christmas and all the joy it brings as a sign of Jewish values and many, many successes. Look at the time spent on family gatherings. Waiting on crowded highways, sitting in airport lounges and spending hundreds of dollars to share a meal, an overnight stay, and to spend valuable time together. We observant Jews do it weekly. My non-Jewish friends often joke about wishing how they had the ability to turn off a phone, like we observant Jews all do every Shabbat. Some wonder how they will ever get everything together in time for a festive meal. My answer: You don’t have religious laws restricting your time, so just Go For It! I admit: I am a Christmas movie addict. What better way to spend quality family time than to watch the classics like “It’s a Wonderful Life” or the Hallmark Channels and their 24-hour features? Personally, I wish there were a Hanukkah story or two. Why not a movie called “Latkes Fried With Love” or “Dreidel Competition”? David Lehman, author of “A Fine Romance: Jewish Songwriters, American Songs”, from Nextbook Press, says that this Christmas phenomenon is just one example of his larger point: that the story of American popular music is massively a Jewish story. Tablet magazine asked Lehman to list his 10 favorite Christmas songs written by Jews. His only regret? “I really wish that ‘Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas’ was by Jews,” he says. “That would definitely be in the top five.” As we light our next Shabbos candles, let’s appreciate the feelings of love, the extra holiday greetings we share on the street with strangers and the sweetness of a simple cup of hot cocoa or a bite from a basic sugar cookie. Cindy Grosz
First of all, I love Christmas music. The innocent, hopeful melodies, the joyous diddies, the corny jingles — all of them bring smiles to my face. And when they become too cheesy or too much, I change the station. The fact that many of the most famous songs have Jewish composers only underscores the amazing cross-cultural pollination that is America at its best. Next, I think the decorations are wonderful. The lights are festive. The inflatables are mildly ridiculous — in a fun way. The projections on the houses get more and more colorful each year. I’ve inoculated my children against Christmas envy with a steady diet of Christmas house viewing and helping our Christian friends celebrate at their homes. Boring office building lobbies are filled with green and red, people try to be a bit more cheerful and friendly. Outside many local stores the Salvation Army stands asking for charity amid the rampant consumerism — and people give! Christmas has also boosted the profile of our minor festival of Hanukkah. Every Jew knows the story of the miraculous light burning for eight days, they know of the brave Maccabees standing up for their religious freedom, they celebrate with friends and family and synagogue communities. As a rabbi, I sincerely wish that we got the same enthusiasm for Sukkot or Shavuot, two traditionally major festivals on the Jewish calendar that do not get enough attention in the liberal Jewish world. But I’ll happily go along with the enthusiasm for Hanukkah and use it to offer Jewish teachings about appreciation for miraculous things in our lives and our ability to stand up for our values. I do not bemoan the popularity of a minor festival; I embrace it. Finally, I’m grateful that this time of years allows many of my friends, neighbors and Christian colleagues to embrace the highest and best values of their faith. The Christmas message of hope and the values of generosity, kindness, and joy are ideals that we share with Christians. In a world so torn by strife, how wonderful to have a time when our friends and neighbors can celebrate such goodness. The Christmas decorations we see all around remind me of this more than anything else. Each year at this season I see a lot of articles and blogs by my co-religionists worried about how the profusion of Christmas in public spaces impacts them and their children. I have a few suggestions for people who feel this way. First, recognize that we are, indeed, only one religious group in America and that the Christians should, by all means, be able to celebrate their most important holiday in a way that is meaningful to them. Most decorations in public spaces tend toward tinsel and lights rather than public Nativity Scenes — in other words, festive, not religious. Ironically, the menorah that many stores and office buildings put out is a religious ritual object — not just a fanciful symbol. Schools public and private recognize Christmas in myriad ways. If your children are forced to accept Jesus as their Lord and Savior in school, that is a problem. If they sing Frosty the Snowman or Jingle Bells in the school chorus, offer to teach the chorus some Hanukkah songs or Passover diddies — just make sure that they are innocuous like Jingle Bell Rock rather than holy like O Come, All Ye Faithful. If the chorus is singing explicitly religious Christian songs, use it as an opportunity to teach your children about multi-culturalism and then, based on your feelings and beliefs, ensure that your child can opt out of those songs. It is worth noting that much of the great art of Western Civilization depicts Christian themes — the Christmas Chorus Concert may be a perfect chance to introduce your children to this fact and how to appreciate the art without accepting its theology. On a public policy level, I am grateful that my children’s public school is closed on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. I am also sure that closing for those two days is a major inconvenience for the Christian parents. In financial terms, it must have a greater impact on them than the school Christmas celebrations have on my family. I think that a coherent argument could be made against closing on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur based the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment. I am eternally grateful that school does close and that my Christian friends and neighbors graciously enable me to celebrate my faith. I’m happy to offer the quid pro quo of gingerbread houses at the 2nd grade “Holiday” party. In the end, the best thing that any Jew can do to inoculate ourselves in this season (beside getting a flu shot — which you should get!), is to get involved in Jewish religious life. When we practice Judaism, embrace Jewish culture, and live out Jewish values in our day to day lives, it becomes much easier to celebrate the fact that our Christian neighbors are doing the same thing. Their celebration need not be a threat to our identity. Instead, their we can find joy and satisfaction in the meaning and spiritual uplift they experience during their most precious holiday. Rabbi Howard Goldsmith
Christmas fascinates me. I’m drawn to its history, its color, its atmosphere, its music. And, of course, I’m drawn to the fact that Jesus was a Jew. He was born a Jew, lived as a Jew and died a Jew. If for nothing else, I can appreciate Christmas as the celebration of one Jew’s epic birthday. . . . I am grateful to my Christian neighbors and friends. Through their religious holy day, I am better able to confront and clarify my own religious convictions and theological certitudes. Like a brightly lighted Christmas tree, Christianity dispels a lot of darkness, theological as well as moral. In its glow, it challenges Christians and non-Christians alike to consider that which is transcendent, eternal, and greater than us all. Rabbi Michael Gottlieb
As Jews I think we ought to recognize that today the greatest challenge to our faith is not another faith, but faithlessness. Our greatest fear should not be those who worship in a different way but those who mockingly reject the very idea of worship to a higher power. Our children today are threatened by the spirit of secularism more than by songs dedicated to proclaiming a holy night. Living among Christians who demonstrate commitment to their religious beliefs to my mind is a far better example to my coreligionists than a secular lifestyle determined solely by hedonistic choices. Surrounded by Christmas celebrations, I have never had difficulty explaining to my children and my students that although we share with Christians a belief in God we go our separate ways in observance. They are a religion of creed and we are a religion of deed. They believe God became man. We believe man must strive to become more and more like God. We differ in countless ways. Yet Christmas allows us to remember that we are not alone in our recognition of the Creator of the universe. We have faith in a higher power. Wondering why we don’t celebrate Christmas is the first step on the road to Jewish self-awareness. To be perfectly honest, Christmas season in America has been responsible for some very positive Jewish results. This is the time when many Jews, by dint of their neighbors’ concern with their religion, are motivated to ask themselves what they know of their own. To begin to wonder why we don’t celebrate Christmas is to take the first step on the road to Jewish self-awareness. My parents were « reminded » of being Jewish through the force of violence. Our reminders are much more subtle, yet present nonetheless. And when Jews take the trouble to look for the Jewish alternative to Christmas and perhaps for the first time discover the beautiful messages of Chanukah and of Judaism, their forced encounter with the holiday of another faith may end up granting them the holiness of a Jewish holiday of their own. So this Christmas, pick up a good Jewish book or attend a Jewish seminar. Or check out my online course, Deed and Creed at JewishPathways.com, which explores the key philosophical differences between Judaism and Christianity. Call me naïve, but nowadays I really love this season. Because together all people of goodwill are joined in the task to place the sacred above the profane. Rabbi Benjamin Bech
I’m an Orthodox Jew for whom Dec. 25 has zero theological significance. My family doesn’t put up a tree, my kids never wrote letters to Santa, and we don’t go to church for midnight Mass. But while I may not celebrate Christmas, I love seeing my Christian friends and neighbors celebrate it. I like living in a society that makes a big deal out of religious holidays. Far from feeling excluded or oppressed when the sights and sounds of Christmas return each December — OK, November — I find them reassuring. To my mind, they reaffirm the importance of the Judeo-Christian culture that has made America so exceptional — and such a safe and tolerant haven for a religious minority like mine. (…) As an observant Jew, I don’t celebrate Christmas and never have. Do the inescapable reminders at this time of year that hundreds of millions of my fellow Americans do celebrate it make me feel excluded or offended? Not in the least: They make me feel grateful — grateful to live in a land where freedom of religion shields the Chanukah menorah in my window no less than it shields the Christmas tree in my neighbor’s. That freedom is a reflection of America’s Judeo-Christian culture, and a central reason why, in this overwhelmingly Christian country, it isn’t only Christians for whom Christmas is a season of joy. And why it isn’t only Christians who should make a point of saying so. Jeff Jacoby
Comme tous les ans durant la période de Noël, des milliers de pèlerins et touristes du monde entier convergent vers la ville de Bethléem. Mais pour les chrétiens de Gaza, soumis à des restrictions de mouvements, cette possibilité semble désormais relever du privilège. L’accès au territoire palestinien est en effet rigoureusement contrôlé par les autorités militaires israéliennes qui délivrent des permis d’entrée et de sortie. Chaque année, un certain nombre d’entre eux est concédé aux chrétiens de Gaza souhaitant se rendre à Jérusalem ou en Cisjordanie pour les fêtes de Noël et de Pâques. Pour Noël 2018, 500 permis de sortie ont été promis par Israël, mais en pratique, seuls 220 ont été effectivement délivrés pour le moment à des personnes âgées entre 16 et 35 ans ou de plus de 55 ans, ce qui donne lieu à des situations problématiques au sein de plusieurs familles: le père obtenant un permis mais pas la mère et inversement, ou des permis accordés aux enfants mais pas aux parents et inversement. Mgr Giacinto Boulos Marcuzzo, vicaire patriarcal pour Jérusalem et la Palestine avoue ne pas saisir la politique choisie par Israël dans ce domaine. «C’est une logique d’occupation que nous ne comprenons pas, ni ne justifions», assène-t-il. Pouvoir se rendre à Bethléem pour fêter Noël devrait être un droit naturel pour un chrétien gazaoui et non pas un privilège, déplore l’évêque italien. Mgr Marcuzzo se trouvait d’ailleurs à Gaza dimanche dernier, en compagnie de l’administrateur apostolique du patriarcat latin de Jérusalem, Mgr Pierbattista Pizzaballa, pour célébrer Noël avec la petite communauté latine locale, selon une tradition désormais bien installée. Le vicaire patriarcal évoque une atmosphère générale empreinte de tristesse, même si la médiation égyptienne et qatarie entreprise ces derniers jours a fait baisser la tension dans le territoire palestinien, après des semaines de fièvre et d’affrontements liés aux «marches du retour». La présence chrétienne quant à elle s’amoindrit sensiblement. Face à des conditions de vie précaires et au manque évident de perspectives, l’émigration reste une tentation inexorable. On comptait il y a encore quelques années environ 3 000 chrétiens de toute confessions à Gaza; ils ne représentent aujourd’hui que 1 200 âmes, dont 120 catholiques latins. Vatican news
A Gaza également, l’ambiance est sombre (…) Une partie de la communauté chrétienne de la bande Gaza ne pourra pas se rendre dans la ville natale du Christ en raison des restrictions de circulation imposées par Israël qui comme chaque année n’a délivré des permis qu’au compte-gouttes. (…) Tous aimeraient être à Béthléem pour Noël, mais cette année seules 600 personnes ont reçu des permis, plus d’un tiers de la toute petite communauté chrétienne de l’enclave s’apprête donc à passer le réveillon sur place et sans grand enthousiasme.  (…) Un Noël maussade dans une bande de Gaza soumise à un sévère blocus israélien et ces restrictions de circulation concernent plus de deux millions de Palestiniens (…) Une situation qui a contribué à l’exode des chrétiens de Gaza. On en comptait 3.500 il y a 15 ans, selon les estimations, ils ne seraient plus qu’un millier aujourd’hui. France Inter
A la Maison de la Radio, les vieilles traditions de Noël ne se perdent pas. Dans les temps anciens, la fête de la nativité était l’occasion d’accabler les Juifs afin rappeler sa faute inexpiable au « peuple déicide ». Reprenant le flambeau, France Inter semble s’ingénier à diffuser tous les 24 décembre une petite perfidie anti-israélienne, afin de mieux stigmatiser ceux qui aux yeux de la station constituent les fauteurs de trouble dans la région. Cette année, dans la page consacrée aux préparatifs de Noël, nous avons ainsi eu droit à un reportage sur le triste sort des chrétiens de Gaza. Vivre dans l’enclave islamiste aux mains des terroristes du Hamas n’est certes pas une sinécure lorsque l’on n’est pas musulman. Mais à écouter le journal du matin, présenté par Agnès Soubiran, « l’ambiance sombre » qui affecte le petit territoire palestinien n’est due qu’à une cause : « Une partie de la communauté chrétienne de la bande Gaza ne pourra pas se rendre dans la ville natale du Christ en raison des restrictions de circulation imposées par Israël qui comme chaque année n’a délivré des permis qu’au compte-gouttes… » Suit le reportage à Gaza de la journaliste Marine Vlahovic. On y apprend que « seules 600 personnes ont reçu un permis » de la part des autorités israéliennes pour pouvoir quitter Gaza et se rendre à Bethléem. Les autres ont célébré la messe à Gaza. « On fait un petit dîner pour le réveillon et ensuite on assiste à la messe de minuit ici. A par ça, il n’y a rien à faire. Alors qu’ailleurs il y a plein de festivités. C’est vraiment très frustrant de rester ici. En fait c’est comme si ce n’était pas vraiment Noël », explique une jeune Gazaouite chrétienne au micro de France Inter. Les responsables de ce « Noël maussade » ? Les Israéliens bien sûr, en raison du « blocus sévère » qu’ils imposent à Gaza. Sur les conditions et les raisons de ce « blocus » (qui n’en est pas un puisque chaque jour des centaines de camions de marchandises pénètrent à Gaza et de très nombreux Gazaouites ont la possibilité de pénétrer en Israël ne serait-ce que pour aller se faire soigner dans les hôpitaux israéliens), on ne saura rien. Ni l’irrédentisme du Hamas, ni la violence qu’il dirige chaque jour contre Israël, ni les tirs de roquettes et de missiles sur les villes israéliennes ne sont évoqués dans ce reportage. Si les chrétiens souffrent à Gaza, c’est de la faute des Juifs, pas des milices islamistes qui ont imposé leur loi sur le territoire. Rien sur les discriminations, les menaces et les humiliations dont sont quotidiennement victimes les chrétiens (sans parler des conversions forcées). L’envoyée spéciale de France Inter à Gaza, Marine Vlahovic, n’a peut-être pas réussi à mettre la main sur le tract diffusé par les brigades al-Nasser al-Din, l’une des plus implacables milices islamiques à Gaza, intimant à la population de ne pas célébrer Noël ? Si la journaliste s’était donnée la peine de lire le Jerusalem Post, elle aurait pu apprendre que ce tract a été diffusé auprès des musulmans mais également des chrétiens auxquels on a bien fait comprendre qu’il leur est demandé d’adopter un profil bas en toutes circonstances. Le tract, qui a été distribué dans les jours précédant Noël, rappelle, versets du Coran à l’appui, la stricte interdiction de célébrer cette fête. « Dieu n’est pas pour le peuple du mal », peut-on y lire à gauche (juste au-dessus d’un sapin barré d’une croix rouge). (…) Dans son reportage radio, la journaliste de France Inter a aussi omis de préciser que les églises de Gaza étaient illuminées en vert, aux couleurs de l’islam ! La petite minorité chrétienne de l’enclave aux mains des islamistes a-t-elle manifesté son consentement pour ces illuminations de Noël d’un genre très particulier ? (…) Bien entendu, à aucun moment l’envoyée spéciale à Gaza n’a jugé utile de prendre contact avec les autorités israéliennes pour connaître leur position sur ce dossier. Le reportage en tout cas n’en parle pas. (…) Pareillement, le reportage rend les Israéliens responsables de l’exode des chrétiens dont une grande majorité a quitté Gaza ces dernières années. Pour la radio de service public, ce n’est certes pas l’instauration implacable de la charia – la loi islamique – qui a poussé ces chrétiens à fuir mais bien les « sionistes » qui auraient rendu l’atmosphère irrespirable. « Une situation qui a contribué à l’exode des chrétiens de Gaza. On en comptait 3.500 il y a 15 ans, selon les estimations, ils ne seraient plus qu’un millier aujourd’hui », conclut la journaliste. On sursaute un peu à la lecture de cette dernière information qui change un tantinet la donne (c’est à se demander si les journalistes et les présentateurs comprennent ce qu’ils disent à l’antenne). Les Israéliens ont donc distribué cette année 600 autorisations pour se rendre à la messe de minuit à Bethléem pour une population estimée à mille âmes ? Malgré le climat de violence que le Hamas fait régner depuis le printemps dernier à la frontière avec Israël, plus d’un chrétien sur deux s’est vu autorisé à la franchir ? Et c’est ce que la présentatrice appelle des autorisations délivrées « au compte-gouttes » ? (…) Cette enquête sur les tourments infligés par Israël aux chrétiens de Gaza est tellement bidon qu’aucun grand titre de la presse française ne l’a reprise. En cherchant bien, nous avons retrouvé l’info sur ce site turc francophone pro-Erdogan… accompagnée d’une photo de propagande qui relève plus de la mise en scène que de l’authentique reportage. InfoEquitable
Mind the gap. Annonce du métro londonien
La période intertestamentaire désigne, selon l’exégèse chrétienne, l’intervalle historique s’étendant entre la rédaction des textes canoniques de l’Ancien Testament et du Nouveau Testament. On considère généralement qu’elle s’étend sur environ quatre siècles, entre la mort de Malachie, dernier prophète vétérotestamentaire, autour du Ve siècle av. J.-C., et la prédication de Jean le Baptiste, bien que cette division soit discutée. L’adjectif intertestamentaire s’applique en particulier à certains écrits religieux issus du judaïsme au cours de cette période, rédigés en grec ou en langue hébraïque. Une grande partie de ces textes sont jugés apocryphes ou pseudépigraphes. Plusieurs Livres deutérocanoniques considérés comme canoniques par l’Église catholique et l’Église orthodoxe ont toutefois été rédigés au cours de cette période. Cette appellation est critiquée par certains spécialistes, d’une part parce que cette littérature s’est maintenue pendant et dans une certaine mesure après la prédication du Christ, et d’autre part parce que selon eux plusieurs livres du Tanakh, dont Daniel, Esdras/Néhémie et Chroniques, furent écrits au cours cette période dite « intertestamentaire ». Bon nombre d’écrits intertestamentaires relèvent de la littérature apocalyptique et furent rédigés entre le début du IIe siècle av. J.-C. et la fin du Ier siècle av. J.-C.. Certains textes furent réunis en collection avec d’autres plus anciens, comme le Livre d’Hénoch. Ces écrits étaient généralement attribués à des figures bibliques anciennes, peut-être dans le but d’échapper à la répression des autorités. Parmi ceux-ci on peut citer l’Apocalypse d’Esdras, l’Apocalypse de Baruch, l’Apocalypse d’Élie, le Livre des Jubilés, les Testaments des douze patriarches et les Psaumes de Salomon, entre autres. La littérature rabbinique fut abondante au cours de cette période, bien qu’on ne le classe généralement pas dans la littérature intertestamentaire, s’agissant dans bien des cas de transcriptions de règles orales plus anciennes. Les manuscrits de la mer Morte constituent un important échantillon de littérature intertestamentaire. Wikipedia
Une synagogue (du grec Συναγωγή / Sunagôgê, « assemblée » adapté de l’hébreu בית כנסת (Beit Knesset), « maison de l’assemblée ») est un lieu de culte juif. L’origine de la synagogue, c’est-à-dire d’un lieu de rassemblement des fidèles dissociés de l’ancien rituel de l’autel du Temple, remonte peut-être aux prophètes et à leurs disciples ; originellement elle ne possède pas un caractère sacré, mais l’acquiert au fil du temps. La synagogue en tant qu’institution caractéristique du judaïsme naquit avec l’œuvre d’Esdras. Elle y a depuis pris une telle importance que « la Synagogue » en vient à désigner figurativement le système du judaïsme, par opposition à « l’Église » (…) Ni le terme, ni le concept d’une synagogue ne se retrouvent dans le Pentateuque (bien que la tradition rabbinique ainsi que Philon d’Alexandrie et Flavius Josèphe affirment que l’institution remonte à Moïse). L’idée d’une prière collective n’y est pas davantage mentionnée, et le seul lieu du culte décrit est le Tabernacle, un sanctuaire transportable abritant en son Saint des Saints l’Arche d’alliance. Celle-ci se retrouve dans le Temple de Salomon, construit pour l’abriter de façon permanente. La première évocation d’un rassemblement hors du Temple est trouvée dans Isaïe 8:16 : il s’agit d’un cercle de disciples réunis autour d’Isaïe, afin d’entendre de lui la parole de Dieu et la Torah. C’est également le cas dans Ézéchiel 8:11, où les anciens de Juda se réunissent dans la maison d’Ezéchiel. Le psaume 74:8 probablement daté du premier exil, mentionne « les centres consacrés à Dieu dans le pays ». Il semblerait que les synagogues se soient multipliées après la destruction du premier et du second Temples : selon une tradition rabbinique consignée dans la Mishnah (laquelle fut compilée vers 200 EC, plus d’un siècle après la destruction du second Temple), une grande ville compte obligatoirement dix batlanim, sinon c’est un village ; un batlan étant défini comme un individu renonçant à son travail pour aller prier, la Mishna enseigne qu’il existe une synagogue en tout endroit où un minyan de dix hommes est capable, à n’importe quel moment, de se réunir pour prier. Les Actes des Apôtres indiquent également que les synagogues que l’on trouvait dans chaque ville existaient depuis de nombreuses années (Actes 15:21), et en citent plusieurs, dont celle des Affranchis, celle des Cyrénéens et celle des Alexandrins. Le Talmud mentionne de nombreuses synagogues en Mésopotamie, dont celle de Néhardéa, et plus de 400 synagogues à Jérusalem avant la destruction du second Temple (Keritot 105a), tandis que les Évangiles évoquent celles de Nazareth et de Capharnaüm. Paul prêche dans les synagogues de Damas, de Salamine en Chypre, d’Antioche, etc. La chute du second Temple amplifie l’importance de la synagogue, car c’est là que seront perpétués les rites du Temple à l’exception capitale du sacrifice et c’est dans les synagogues que pourra se réunir le minyan composé de 10 hommes. Les synagogues vont donc se multiplier dans la diaspora. Celle d’Alexandrie décrite dans le Talmud était énorme puisque le chantre y indiquait aux fidèles à l’aide de drapeaux quand dire Amen. Wikipedia
Dans la Bible, la racine śāṭan apparaît à la fois sous forme de nom et verbe. Sous la forme de verbe, śāṭan apparaît 6 fois dans le texte massorétique de la Bible hébraïque, principalement dans le livre des Psaumes (Psaumes 38, 71 et 109). En dehors des Psaumes, le verbe n’est attesté que dans le livre de Zacharie (3.1)3. Le texte grec de la Septante rend le verbe par endieballon. Sous forme de nom, le terme śāṭān n’existe presque exclusivement qu’en tant que nom commun, désignant une fonction qui peut s’appliquer à des êtres humains, des créatures célestes ou une allégorie. Le roi David est par exemple qualifié de śāṭān par les Philistins, c’est-à-dire d’adversaire militaire. Lui-même qualifie Abishaï, un membre de sa cour, de śāṭān pour avoir proposé de condamner à mort un ancien opposant au roi. Dans sa lettre à Hiram de Tyr, on voit le roi Salomon utiliser le terme śāṭān pour signifier qu’il n’a plus d’ennemi qui menace son royaume. Plus tard, lorsque Hadad d’Édom et Rezin de Syrie s’attaquent à son royaume, ils sont qualifiés de śāṭān. Dans quatre passages de la Bible, le nom śāṭan est utilisé pour désigner des créatures célestes : livre des Nombres 22.22 et 22.32, Premier livre des Chroniques 21.1, livre de Zacharie 3.1 et livre de Job, chapitre 1 et 2. Dans les Nombres et les Chroniques, śāṭān apparaît à la forme indéfinie (« un satan »). Dans les Nombres, il désigne un ange de Yahweh placé sur le chemin du prophète Balaam pour empêcher son ânesse d’avancer. Il est l’envoyé de Yahweh et n’a rien en commun avec Satan tel qu’on le concevra plus tard. Dans les deux premiers chapitres du livre de Job, où le terme revient 14 fois, il apparaît toujours à la forme définie (haśśāṭān « le satan »). Il ne s’agit donc pas d’un nom propre. Le satan a une fonction judiciaire, celle d’accusateur. Il assiste Yahweh dans le jugement de Job mais il n’est pas autonome. Même s’il s’en prend à Job, il est soumis à Yahweh et n’agit qu’avec sa permission. Certains chercheurs ont proposé de voir dans cette fonction d’accusateur le reflet d’une pratique du système légal dans l’Israël antique ou à l’époque perse. Même dans ce cas, il ne s’agit pas nécessairement d’une fonction officielle pour un accusateur professionnel, il peut s’agir d’un statut légal donné temporairement dans des circonstances appropriées. La forme définie utilisée dans le livre de Job est généralement comprise comme un exemple de détermination imparfaite où l’article n’insiste pas sur l’identité précise d’un personnage mais sur ce qui le caractérise dans les circonstances particulières du récit. Le satan apparaît également comme une figure allégorique dans le troisième chapitre du livre de Zacharie. Dans la quatrième vision de Zacharie, le grand prêtre Josué se tient devant l’ange de Yahweh avec le satan pour l’accuser. L’ange réprimande le satan et donne de nouveaux vêtements au grand prêtre. Cette vision peut être comprise comme le symbole d’une communauté juive nouvellement restaurée au retour de l’exil à Babylone à la fin du VIe siècle av. J.-C. et à qui Yahweh a pardonné ses péchés. Elle peut aussi être comprise comme une allégorie politique qui symbolise la lutte entre Néhémie (l’ange) et Sanballat le Horonite (le satan) pour l’influence sur le sacerdoce du petit-fils de Josué, Eliashiv. La communauté juive est alors profondément divisée sur les questions cultuelles et sur la grande prêtrise. L’intervention du satan contre le grand prêtre peut symboliser les divisions internes de la communauté. Dans le premier livre des Chroniques, le mot śāṭān apparaît à la forme indéfinie et c’est le seul endroit dans la Bible hébraïque où cette forme désigne peut-être un nom propre (« Satan ») et pas un nom commun (« un satan »). Ce passage indique que c’est Satan qui a incité David à recenser le peuple. Dans le passage parallèle du second livre de Samuel, c’est pourtant Yahweh qui est à l’origine de ce recensement. Différentes explications ont été proposées pour expliquer ce transfert de responsabilité de Yahweh à Satan. Lorsque l’auteur des Chroniques retravaille le livre de Samuel, il a pu vouloir exonérer Yahweh d’un acte manifestement condamnable. Une autre explication y voit une réflexion sur l’origine du mal dans la littérature biblique tardive. La littérature ancienne, dont Samuel, ne connaît qu’une seule cause dans l’histoire humaine : Yahweh. Le Chroniste semble proposer un nouveau développement en introduisant une cause secondaire, Satan. Dans la littérature juive de l’époque hellénistique, d’autres points de vue sur le satan commencent à circuler dans le judaïsme. La démonologie devient plus développée, peut-être sous l’influence de la religion perse et du dualisme zoroastrien. Dans cette littérature post-biblique, Satan apparaît comme le nom d’un démon. Il figure dans le Livre des Jubilés (23.29) et dans l’Assomption de Moïse (en) (10.1). Le texte pseudépigraphique de l’Apocalypse de Moïse contient une légende sur la façon dont Satan a été transformé en ange de lumière et a travaillé avec le serpent pour tromper Ève. La littérature de cette période cite aussi d’autres démons par leur nom, Asmodée dans le livre de Tobie, Azazel dans le livre d’Hénoch (8.1-2). Même si Satan figure dans les Jubilés, c’est surtout Mastema qui est à la tête des esprits démoniaques et qui se voit transférer la responsabilité des actions problématiques de Yahweh. Dans les manuscrits de Qumrân, les forces des ténèbres sont représentées par Belial. Dans la Bible, belial est un terme qui caractérise une personne « sans valeur » alors qu’à Qumrân, belial devient un nom propre. La prolifération des démons dans la littérature post-biblique reflète une évolution de la perception du monde. Alors que dans la Bible, le monde est régi par la seule volonté de Yahweh, le judaïsme post-biblique voit l’émergence d’une mythologie qui reprend des thèmes déjà présents dans la Bible, quoique rejetés par les prophètes4. Dans le Nouveau Testament, on voit Jésus de Nazareth utiliser le vocable de Satan comme un nom propre « diabolique ». Satan est connu par l’expression latine : Vade retro Satana (« Arrière, Satan ! ») extraite de l’Évangile selon Matthieu (4,10) selon la Vulgate de Jérôme de Stridon, lors de la tentation de Jésus dans le désert. Il est également cité dans le passage correspondant de l’évangile selon Marc : « Aussitôt, l’Esprit poussa Jésus dans le désert, Où il passa quarante jours, tenté par Satan » (Marc 1,11 et Marc 1,12), ainsi que dans un autre passage, dans l’évangile selon Luc : « Jésus leur dit : Je voyais Satan tomber du ciel comme l’éclair ! » (Luc 10,18). Les Sages de la Mishna mentionnent rarement Satan. Il y apparaît comme une force du mal impersonnelle. Chez les Amoraïm, Satan occupe une place plus importante. Il développe une identité propre. Il est identifié au yetser hara qui désigne le mauvais penchant, la tentation. Il est responsable de tous les péchés décrits dans la Bible. Les sources rabbiniques identifient Satan au serpent du Jardin d’Éden (Sanhédrin 29a). Elles le tiennent pour responsable de la faute du Veau d’or (Shabbat 89a) et de celle de David avec Bethsabée (Sanhédrin 107a). Une des fonctions du shofar pendant la célébration du Roch Hachana est de couvrir les accusations portées par Satan contre les Enfants d’Israël (Roch Hachana 16b). Satan est d’ailleurs sans pouvoir contre eux le jour du Yom Kippour (Yoma 20a). Tel que l’enseigne la Torah d’Israël, l’autorité divine ne se partage pas et en ce sens le « diable » n’existe pas : il existe une instance appelée « le satan », avec l’article défini parce que ce n’est pas un nom propre mais une fonction, dont l’objet est d’éprouver toute réussite afin de l’authentifier comme dans le livre de Job où le satan participe à l’assemblée des anges. Après la destruction du Second Temple en 70, et la révolte de Bar-Kokhba en 132, le judaïsme rabbinique a rejoint le point de vue strictement monothéiste de la Bible hébraïque. Par exemple, Tryphon le juif critiquait les idées de Justin le Martyr concernant les Nephilim du Genèse ch.6 comme blasphématoire, mais, en fait, les croyances de Justin trouvent leur source dans les mythes juifs, comme le Livre d’Hénoch. Wikipedia
There are three explicit examples in the Hebrew Bible of people being resurrected from the dead: The prophet Elijah prays and God raises a young boy from death (1 Kings 17:17-24) Elisha raises the son of the Shunammite woman (2 Kings 4:32-37); this was the very same child whose birth he previously foretold (2 Kings 4:8-16) A dead man’s body that was thrown into the dead Elisha’s tomb is resurrected when the body touches Elisha’s bones (2 Kings 13:21) During the period of the Second Temple, there developed a diversity of beliefs concerning the resurrection. The concept of resurrection of the physical body is found in 2 Maccabees, according to which it will happen through recreation of the flesh. Resurrection of the dead also appears in detail in the extra-canonical books of Enoch, in Apocalypse of Baruch, and 2 Esdras. According to the British scholar in ancient Judaism Philip R. Davies, there is “little or no clear reference … either to immortality or to resurrection from the dead” in the Dead Sea scrolls texts. Both Josephus and the New Testament record that the Sadducees did not believe in an afterlife, but the sources vary on the beliefs of the Pharisees. The New Testament claims that the Pharisees believed in the resurrection, but does not specify whether this included the flesh or not. According to Josephus, who himself was a Pharisee, the Pharisees held that only the soul was immortal and the souls of good people will “pass into other bodies,” while “the souls of the wicked will suffer eternal punishment.” Paul, who also was a Pharisee, said that at the resurrection what is « sown as a natural body is raised a spiritual body. » Jubilees seems to refer to the resurrection of the soul only, or to a more general idea of an immortal soul. Wikipedia
Jésus a maintenant un contexte. Nous l’avons mis là où il doit être. Il n’est plus un personnage tout seul, il n’est plus ponctuel. Et une fois que nous comprenons Jésus comme faisant partie d’un monde juif plus large, je pense que nous rendons beaucoup plus justice au Nouveau Testament. (…) Ma thèse est que pendant cet intervalle, les juifs se sont sentis libres d’écrire de nouveaux textes, de penser de nouvelles choses, de développer de nouvelles formes d’expression littéraire. (…) À la fin de cette période, les Juifs se sont courageusement essayés à de nouvelles idées, et le christianisme émerge … Jésus arrive, l’héritier de ces idées. (…) Nous ouvrons le Nouveau Testament et nous trouvons un Jésus qui faisait partie du judaïsme de son époque. Il était Juif, né en Israël de parents juifs, élevé là, présenté au Temple, et qui est mort juif. (…) Dans le Nouveau Testament, Jésus se rend à la synagogue dans le chapitre 4 de l’évangile de saint Luc, ‘suivant sa coutume’, le jour du Shabbat. Il n’y a pas de synagogue dans l’Ancien Testament et la Bible hébraïque. Jésus est appelé ‘rabbi’ par ses disciples. Il n’y a pas de rabbins dans le Tanakh. Jésus passe beaucoup de temps à discuter de la Torah et des Pharisiens, comme tout chrétien le sait. Il n’y a pas de Pharisiens dans le Tanakh. On dit que la résurrection est la fin de la vie. Ce n’est pas le cas dans la Bible hébraïque, sauf le Livre de Daniel, le dernier livre dans la Bible. (…) Oui, tout cela vient de l’Ancien Testament. Mais ils ne sont pas vraiment évoqués dans l’Ancien Testament. Ils étaient plus tirés de la littérature très riche qui suivait l’Ancien Testament et qui précède le Nouveau Testament, où ces thèmes étaient plus systématiques. (…) lorsque les chrétiens lisent ceci et se tournent vers l’Ancien Testament, et qu’il n’y a pas de textes qui l’expliquent, ils supposent que Jésus rompait vraiment avec tout. … L’argument du livre est que oui, c’est extraordinaire, mais seulement si tout ce que vous lisez est l’Ancien Testament. Nous négligeons le fait que Jésus faisait partie d’un judaïsme dérivé qui s’est écarté de la Bible hébraïque. (…) Je lance quelques défis aux lecteurs chrétiens. Comment notre compréhension de Jésus et du Nouveau Testament change-t-elle si nous prenons au sérieux le fait que Jésus était un juif ? (…) Beaucoup de chrétiens croient que Jésus était exactement comme eux, qu’il avait la même théologie, il vous ressemblait, il était de la même confession et vivait dans l’Israël du premier siècle. (…) Mon espoir pour le livre est qu’il va trouver un large public et les gens vont commencer à repenser ce qu’ils croyaient connaître. Matthias Henze
Lorsque Matthias Henze, professeur de religion à Rice University, se rend dans des églises et des synagogues locales de Houston pour promouvoir la compréhension interconfessionnelle entre le christianisme et le judaïsme, il aborde une période particulière : le fossé de quatre à cinq siècles qui existe entre l’Ancien et le Nouveau Testament. (…) Selon Henze, le « fossé de plusieurs siècles » entre le quatrième siècle avant notre ère et le premier siècle de notre ère est crucial pour comprendre que l’abîme entre les deux religions pourrait être beaucoup, beaucoup moins important qu’on ne le pense. Il soutient que les textes religieux hébraïques de cette période, y compris les manuscrits de la mer Morte, ont contribué à influencer Jésus, qu’il décrit comme un juif qui pratiquait le judaïsme de son époque. (…) Ces années d’intervalle ont commencé après que les derniers livres de l’Ancien Testament ont été écrits au quatrième siècle avant l’ère commune (la seule exception étant le Livre de Daniel, qui a été rédigé à partir du deuxième siècle avant l’ère commune) et prennent fin avec le Nouveau Testament, écrit dans la seconde moitié du premier siècle de l’ère commune. (…) C’était une époque où les royaumes d’Israël et de Judas étaient gouvernés, successivement, par les Perses, les Grecs, les Hasmonéens et les Romains. Seuls les Hasmonéens, de la dynastie des Maccabées, étaient une lignée locale. À la fin de cette période, déclare Henze, les juifs se sont courageusement essayés à de nouvelles idées, et « le christianisme émerge … Jésus arrive, l’héritier de ces idées. » Mais cette pensée nouvelle a été suivie par des actes punitifs — la crucifixion de Jésus et la destruction du Second Temple. La date généralement acceptée de la crucifixion de Jésus se situe entre 30 et 33 de l’ère commune. Le Second Temple est tombé en 70 de notre ère. Les manuscrits de la mer Morte, compilés par la communauté essénienne à Qumrân, font partie des textes religieux hébreux les plus connus de cette période de vide liturgique. Henze en cite d’autres également. La Septante, ou la traduction grecque du Tanakh, inclut les Apocryphes, que Henze a qualifiés de « liste bien définie de certains anciens livres juifs » non retrouvés dans la Bible hébraïque, tels que les livres de Tobith et Judith, et le livre 1 et 2 des Maccabées. D’autres textes juifs plus anciens datant de la même époque, ou d’un peu avant, ne faisaient pas partie d’une liste fixe et ont été désignés comme des pseudépigraphes, un terme grec signifiant « écrit sous un pseudonyme », déclare Henze. Dans ce cas, « ils ont été écrits sous le nom d’une ancienne figure biblique ». Il mentionne le livre d’Énoch, qui évoque « un personnage mentionné dans le 5e chapitre de la Genèse, une figure très importante pour les juifs aux troisième et deuxième siècles avant notre ère », ainsi que le Livre des Jubilés, « un livre juif du deuxième siècle avant notre ère qui racontait [les faits décrits dans] le Livre de la Genèse et de l’Exode. » Collectivement, explique Henze, ces œuvres éclairent sur le judaïsme de Jésus. (…) Mais le judaïsme de l’époque de Jésus diffère de celui de l’Ancien Testament. (…) Pour faire valoir son point de vue, Henze se concentre sur ce qu’il décrit comme les quatre grands thèmes du christianisme primitif : « le messianisme, les démons et esprits impurs — un monde vivant densément peuplé d’anges et de démons — la Torah, sa signification et son interprétation correcte, et la croyance en la résurrection ou la vie sur la mort, la vie avec les anges. (….) L’idée que Jésus était le Messie d’Israël est née de « l’attente d’un messie [qui viendrait] à la fin des temps, l’histoire telle que nous la connaissons, un agent de Dieu, moshiach [le Messie] », a-t-il expliqué. « C’est le genre de choses que l’on ne trouve pas dans le Tanakh en tant que tel. » Mais, nuance-t-il, « il existe un certain nombre de textes, principalement tirés des manuscrits de la mer Morte, sur les premières attentes messianiques juives comparables à la description de Jésus dans les Evangiles. Il est évident que l’écrivain évangélique essayait de prouver que Jésus était le messie qu’Israël attendait, en utilisant des termes que la population juive connaissait [à l’époque]. » Et, poursuit-il, bien que « la résurrection, était [un thème] si central au début du christianisme à l’époque, il n’y avait aucune croyance en la résurrection des morts dans le Tanakh », sauf dans le Livre de Daniel, qui date de la fin de la période du Second Temple. « Entre l’Ancien et le Nouveau Testament, un certain nombre de textes juifs parlent de la résurrection, de la vie en compagnie des anges. Nous devons l’étudier dans le contexte d’autres textes juifs », a déclaré Henze. (…) Les autres collègues de Henze trouvent ses arguments intrigants — mais mettent toutefois en garde. (…) Darrell L. Bock, professeur de recherche des études sur le Nouveau Testament au Dallas Theological Seminary, met en garde contre la surestimation de la signification de l’écart entre ces siècles. Par exemple, Bock disait que, ce n’est pas parce que les rabbins « n’émergent pas d’une manière significative jusqu’à ce que la centralité du Temple soit perdue, que la destruction du Temple signifie pour autant qu’il n’y avait pas de rabbins. » « Faites attention lorsque vous [qualifiez les rabbins] d’anachronisme », met-il en garde.  (…) Il a également noté que l’évolution pendant la période d’intervalle pourrait ne pas avoir été causée exclusivement par des facteurs religieux, mais aussi par des facteurs politiques et sociaux. L’Israël biblique « contrôlait la situation politique et sociale sur le territoire », explique Bock. « Ce n’était pas le cas du temps de Jésus. L’influence gréco-romaine était omnipotente, omniprésente. Ces différences sont importantes. Des concepts sont développés — le Messie, un espoir, un retour à la règle dynastique effective de l’Ancien Testament. (…) Bock précise pour le Times of Israël que Jésus finit par différer de tous les groupes de son époque : les Sadducéens, les Pharisiens, les Esséniens et les Zélotes. (…) Henze appelle les chrétiens à se familiariser avec le judaïsme — celui de leur voisin d’aujourd’hui, mais aussi avec la version vieille de 2 000 ans pratiquée par Jésus et d’autres juifs de son époque. Henze espère que tous les lecteurs, de toutes religions, « s’ouvriront à la possibilité d’un contexte historique et religieux » et « liront le Nouveau Testament d’une manière plus responsable et mieux informée. » The Times of Israël
Fortunately, there is a growing number of scholars and students who take the Jewish context of the New Testament seriously (even though I continue to be surprised how few New Testament scholars know the Jewish sources from the Second Temple period well and write about them in their work with authority). The book is intended primarily for the general public, but also as a first introduction for college students and seminarians to the Jewish world of the New Testament. To them, this is all new. The chapters of the book grew out of lectures I gave in various churches and synagogues. My experience has been that there is a significant divide: whereas an increasing number of scholars is well familiar with the Scrolls, the Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha, and is able to explain why these texts are significant for our understanding of the early Jesus movement, the same is not true for the general audience. Time and again my audiences have told me that everything I told them in my talks was completely new to them. In general, Christians know little about Judaism, of any period, and they certainly do not know the Judaism of the late Second Temple period. (…) My interest in Mind the Gap is in the worldview and theological concepts in general that are taken for granted in the New Testament but that are never explained, such as the expectation of the Messiah as a divine agent of the end-time, or the belief in demons and evil spirits and all they represent, to name only two examples. There is a risk that we are grossly anachronistic and read into the New Testament texts who we think the Messiah is or what demons are. (…) my argument is that there was a variety of different understandings of the Messiah and of demons and of many other issues in Early Judaism. The authors of the New Testament were well aware of, participated in, and contributed to this vigorous Jewish debate of the first century. (…) my basic claim is that the New Testament needs to be read within the context of early Jewish writings in general, with which it has so much in common. (…) The point I always emphasize in my book talks is that there is a significant historical divide between the Old and the New Testament. By turning the page, the reader of the Protestant Bible moves effortlessly from the prophet Malachi to Matthew’s Gospel. Theologically, the transition from the Old to the New Testament makes good sense. After all, Matthew goes to great lengths to claim that Jesus emerged straight out of Israel’s prophetic tradition. But the reader may not be aware that there is a gap of no less than half a millennium between these two books. Recognizing that there is a chronological gap between the Testaments, a period of at least four centuries that is simply glossed over in the Protestant Bible, is a first step. Realizing that this was a time of incredible literary creativity during which Jewish intellectuals thought new thoughts and wrote new texts is the next step. And becoming familiar with at least some of the Jewish texts from the gap years and learning what they can and cannot tell us about the Judaism we find in the New Testament is the third and most important step. That’s what I do in Mind the Gap. (…) few readers of the New Testament are aware of the gap between the Testaments, let alone that the gap years were a time of significant change in the religion of ancient Israel. (…) wfor most readers of the New Testament, the New Testament does not have a context, it is in a category by itself. If you do not realize that the Judaism of Jesus is no longer the religion of the Old Testament and that it has developed significantly, and if you do not realize that the issues Jesus debates with the Pharisees have been debated for centuries, and continue to be debated at the time, then Jesus must seem totally radical, a break with the religion of the past. In my talks, I invite my audience to engage in a thought experiment. Suppose you welcome a visitor to the U.S. who has never been here before. She marvels at the high risers, at the ethnic diversity in our society, at iPhones and the internet. “What is all this?,” she wonders, to which you answer: “ Don’t worry. Just read the U.S. Constitution and everything will become clear.” Reading the Old Testament at the time of Jesus must have been a bit like reading the Constitution today: it continues to be the fundamental text, but it cannot explain the changes in society in recent centuries. Matthias Henze

Attention à la marche en descendant… de l’Ancien testament !

En ce 2018e jour-anniversaire de notre ère commune que l’on n’ose même plus nommer (judéo-)chrétienne

Et probable 2011e anniversaire de l’incarnation de son Fondateur

Qui après l’abandon du sabbat et sur fond de rengaines d’auteurs plus américains que les Américains devrait plus que tout autre jour rapprocher mais souvent – sauf rares heureuses exceptions – continue à séparer Juifs et Chrétiens …

Pendant que dans l’antisémitisme vulgaire comme dans l’anti-israélisme prétendument savant et bienpensant et faisant opportunément oublier la vraie menace islamiste et tout simplement musulmane, nos quenellistes de caniveau comme nos beaux esprits des médias ou des arts, voire du Vatican lui-même, profitent du chaos ambiant pour rallumer les inimitiés entre nos deux peuples …

Mais qu’après l’épuration ethnique des deux tiers de ses chrétiens (cherchez l’erreur !), les Irakiens viennent officiellement de reconnaitre

Comment ne pas se réjouir …

De la place toujours plus grande qu’accorde à la judaïté enfin retrouvée du Jésus de nos évangiles tout un courant, tant du côté chrétien que juif, des recherches historiques et théologiques récentes …

Et avec des livres comme celui du bibliste germano-américain de Rice University Matthias Henze, du fait que les résultats desdites recherches atteignent enfin le grand public …

Concernant notamment les quelque 400 ans d’écart (jusque ici négligés, d’où le titre de l’ouvrage) de la période inter-testamentaire

Comme si autrement dit on n’avait à sa disposition pour expliquer l’ensemble des innovations actuelles (gratte-ciels, diversité ethnique, Iphones, internet) que le seul texte de la Constitution américaine !

Mais aussi une période qui par l’intensité de sa production littéraire (apocryphes, pseudépigraphes, littérature apocalyptique, textes esséniens de Qumran) …

Et de ses innovations théologiques et religieuses totalement ou presque absentes de la Bible hébraïque (synagogues, rabbins, pharisiens, anges, démons, Satan, résurrection – à un ou deux livres tardifs près, Daniel, Job) …

Permet d’enfin apprécier à leur juste valeur nombre de débats dont sont truffés les Evangiles …

Et partant, la véritable nouveauté et radicalité de l’apport du Christ … ?

Jésus était plus juif que vous ne le pensez, affirme un expert de la Bible
L’origine de la foi du Messie chrétien se comprend mieux après une plongée dans l’ère du Second Temple, où judaïsme et christianisme se mêlaient
Rich Tenorio
The Times of Israel
25 décembre 2018

Lorsque Matthias Henze, professeur de religion à Rice University, se rend dans des églises et des synagogues locales de Houston pour promouvoir la compréhension interconfessionnelle entre le christianisme et le judaïsme, il aborde une période particulière : le fossé de quatre à cinq siècles qui existe entre l’Ancien et le Nouveau Testament.

« Cela a été négligé pour un certain nombre de raisons », analyse Henze, érudit de la Bible hébraïque et du judaïsme, en mettant l’accent sur le Second Temple. « Les juifs et les chrétiens ne prêtent pas beaucoup attention à cette période. »

Selon Henze, le « fossé de plusieurs siècles » entre le quatrième siècle avant notre ère et le premier siècle de notre ère est crucial pour comprendre que l’abîme entre les deux religions pourrait être beaucoup, beaucoup moins important qu’on ne le pense. Il soutient que les textes religieux hébraïques de cette période, y compris les manuscrits de la mer Morte, ont contribué à influencer Jésus, qu’il décrit comme un juif qui pratiquait le judaïsme de son époque.

Cet argument est évoqué dans le sous-titre de son nouveau livre, « Attention à la différence : comment les écrits juifs entre l’Ancien et le Nouveau Testament nous aident à comprendre Jésus. »

Ayant connaissance des textes religieux hébraïques de ces années d’intervalle, « Jésus a maintenant un contexte », se félicite Henze. « Nous l’avons mis là où il doit être. Il n’est plus un personnage tout seul, il n’est plus ponctuel. »

Et, ajoute-t-il, « une fois que nous comprenons Jésus comme faisant partie d’un monde juif plus large, je pense que nous rendons beaucoup plus justice au Nouveau Testament. »

Le côté face de la pièce

Henze est un fervent partisan de la sensibilisation interconfessionnelle. Luthérien originaire de Hanovre, en Allemagne, il est le directeur du département des études juives de Rice University, qu’il a fondé en 2009.

« J’ai un profond intérêt pour le judaïsme et l’histoire de Jésus, et aussi pour l’hébreu », déclare Henze.

Des centres d’intérêt qui l’ont bien préparé pour ses séminaires sur le judaïsme et le christianisme dans les institutions religieuses locales.

« Je suis très à l’aise lorsque je fais des conférences dans les églises sur les questions juives et la construction de la communauté », s’est réjoui Henze. « Les gens veulent parler du christianisme, en particulier de Jésus. Ils ont un grand désir d’en apprendre plus sur les origines du christianisme, le mouvement du début de Jésus. »

Cela a été essentiel pour comprendre les années d’intervalle — en gros, « la dernière partie de la période du Second Temple », écrit Henze dans un courriel.

Ces années d’intervalle ont commencé après que les derniers livres de l’Ancien Testament ont été écrits au quatrième siècle avant l’ère commune (la seule exception étant le Livre de Daniel, qui a été rédigé à partir du deuxième siècle avant l’ère commune) et prennent fin avec le Nouveau Testament, écrit dans la seconde moitié du premier siècle de l’ère commune.

« Ma thèse est que pendant cet intervalle », analyse Henze, « les juifs se sont sentis libres d’écrire de nouveaux textes, de penser de nouvelles choses, de développer de nouvelles formes d’expression littéraire. »

C’était une époque où les royaumes d’Israël et de Judas étaient gouvernés, successivement, par les Perses, les Grecs, les Hasmonéens et les Romains. Seuls les Hasmonéens, de la dynastie des Maccabées, étaient une lignée locale.

À la fin de cette période, déclare Henze, les juifs se sont courageusement essayés à de nouvelles idées, et « le christianisme émerge … Jésus arrive, l’héritier de ces idées. »

Mais cette pensée nouvelle a été suivie par des actes punitifs — la crucifixion de Jésus et la destruction du Second Temple. La date généralement acceptée de la crucifixion de Jésus se situe entre 30 et 33 de l’ère commune. Le Second Temple est tombé en 70 de notre ère.

Les manuscrits de la mer Morte, compilés par la communauté essénienne à Qumrân, font partie des textes religieux hébreux les plus connus de cette période de vide liturgique. Henze en cite d’autres également.

La Septante, ou la traduction grecque du Tanakh, inclut les Apocryphes, que Henze a qualifiés de « liste bien définie de certains anciens livres juifs » non retrouvés dans la Bible hébraïque, tels que les livres de Tobith et Judith, et le livre 1 et 2 des Maccabées.

D’autres textes juifs plus anciens datant de la même époque, ou d’un peu avant, ne faisaient pas partie d’une liste fixe et ont été désignés comme des pseudépigraphes, un terme grec signifiant « écrit sous un pseudonyme », déclare Henze. Dans ce cas, « ils ont été écrits sous le nom d’une ancienne figure biblique ».

Il mentionne le livre d’Énoch, qui évoque « un personnage mentionné dans le 5e chapitre de la Genèse, une figure très importante pour les juifs aux troisième et deuxième siècles avant notre ère », ainsi que le Livre des Jubilés, « un livre juif du deuxième siècle avant notre ère qui racontait [les faits décrits dans] le Livre de la Genèse et de l’Exode. »

Un produit de son temps

Collectivement, explique Henze, ces œuvres éclairent sur le judaïsme de Jésus.

« Nous ouvrons le Nouveau Testament et nous trouvons un Jésus qui faisait partie du judaïsme de son époque », déclare Henze. « Il était Juif, né en Israël de parents juifs, élevé [là], présenté au Temple, et qui est mort juif. »

Mais le judaïsme de l’époque de Jésus diffère de celui de l’Ancien Testament.

« Dans le Nouveau Testament, Jésus se rend à la synagogue dans le chapitre 4 de l’évangile de saint Luc, ‘suivant sa coutume’, le jour du Shabbat. Il n’y a pas de synagogue dans l’Ancien Testament et la Bible hébraïque », déclare Henze.

« Jésus est appelé ‘rabbi’ par ses disciples. Il n’y a pas de rabbins dans le Tanakh. Jésus passe beaucoup de temps à discuter de la Torah et des Pharisiens, comme tout chrétien le sait. Il n’y a pas de Pharisiens dans le Tanakh. On dit que la résurrection est la fin de la vie. Ce n’est pas le cas dans la Bible hébraïque, sauf le Livre de Daniel, le dernier livre dans la Bible. »

Henze ajoute que « lorsque les chrétiens lisent ceci et se tournent vers l’Ancien Testament, et qu’il n’y a pas de textes qui l’expliquent, ils supposent que Jésus rompait vraiment avec tout. … L’argument du livre est que oui, c’est extraordinaire, mais seulement si tout ce que vous lisez est l’Ancien Testament. Nous négligeons le fait que Jésus faisait partie d’un judaïsme dérivé qui s’est écarté de la Bible hébraïque. »

Pour faire valoir son point de vue, Henze se concentre sur ce qu’il décrit comme les quatre grands thèmes du christianisme primitif : « le messianisme, les démons et esprits impurs — un monde vivant densément peuplé d’anges et de démons — la Torah, sa signification et son interprétation correcte, et la croyance en la résurrection ou la vie sur la mort, la vie avec les anges. »

« Oui, tout cela vient de l’Ancien Testament », opine-t-il. « Mais ils ne sont pas vraiment évoqués dans l’Ancien Testament. Ils étaient plus tirés de la littérature très riche qui suivait l’Ancien Testament et qui précède le Nouveau Testament, où ces thèmes étaient plus systématiques. »

L’idée que Jésus était le Messie d’Israël est née de « l’attente d’un messie [qui viendrait] à la fin des temps, l’histoire telle que nous la connaissons, un agent de Dieu, moshiach [le Messie] », a-t-il expliqué. « C’est le genre de choses que l’on ne trouve pas dans le Tanakh en tant que tel. »

Mais, nuance-t-il, « il existe un certain nombre de textes, principalement tirés des manuscrits de la mer Morte, sur les premières attentes messianiques juives comparables à la description de Jésus dans les Evangiles. Il est évident que l’écrivain évangélique essayait de prouver que Jésus était le messie qu’Israël attendait, en utilisant des termes que la population juive connaissait [à l’époque]. »

Et, poursuit-il, bien que « la résurrection, était [un thème] si central au début du christianisme à l’époque, il n’y avait aucune croyance en la résurrection des morts dans le Tanakh », sauf dans le Livre de Daniel, qui date de la fin de la période du Second Temple.

« Entre l’Ancien et le Nouveau Testament, un certain nombre de textes juifs parlent de la résurrection, de la vie en compagnie des anges. Nous devons l’étudier dans le contexte d’autres textes juifs », a déclaré Henze.

Une chronologie fascinante

Les autres collègues de Henze trouvent ses arguments intrigants — mais mettent toutefois en garde.

« Les sources de notre compréhension de Jésus sont complexes », déclare David Lincicum, professeur associé à l’université américaine Notre-Dame, qui s’intéresse aux études bibliques, au christianisme et au judaïsme dans l’Antiquité et qui collabore avec Henze sur un autre projet. « On ne sait pas quel genre d’éducation [Jésus] recevait. »

« Je pense qu’il est juste de dire que beaucoup de textes [hébraïques pendant cet intervalle] reflètent les discussions dans l’air au premier siècle. Les Apocryphes semblent avoir été répandus au début du judaïsme. Il y avait une connaissance en dehors des textes », déclare Lincicum.

Et « si la Bible hébraïque est relativement silencieuse sur le messie, [le sujet devient un thème familier plus tard], soudain tout le monde parle du messie. Il y a des fossés qui se creusent dans le judaïsme. Dans certaines branches, il y a une figure consacrée pour sauver Israël. Il se peut que Jésus ne connaisse pas de texte particulier, mais cela pourrait attester d’un courant dominant auquel il n’avait peut-être pas accès », estime-t-il.

Cependant, Darrell L. Bock, professeur de recherche des études sur le Nouveau Testament au Dallas Theological Seminary, met en garde contre la surestimation de la signification de l’écart entre ces siècles.

Par exemple, Bock disait que, ce n’est pas parce que les rabbins « n’émergent pas d’une manière significative jusqu’à ce que la centralité du Temple soit perdue, que la destruction du Temple signifie pour autant qu’il n’y avait pas de rabbins. »

« Faites attention lorsque vous [qualifiez les rabbins] d’anachronisme », met-il en garde. La connaissance de Bock sur Jésus est peut-être mieux résumée dans son best-seller de 2004 Briser le code Da Vinci: réponses aux questions que tout le monde se pose.

Il a également noté que l’évolution pendant la période d’intervalle pourrait ne pas avoir été causée exclusivement par des facteurs religieux, mais aussi par des facteurs politiques et sociaux.

L’Israël biblique « contrôlait la situation politique et sociale sur le territoire », explique Bock. « Ce n’était pas le cas du temps de Jésus. L’influence gréco-romaine était omnipotente, omniprésente. Ces différences sont importantes. Des concepts sont développés — le Messie, un espoir, un retour à la règle dynastique effective de l’Ancien Testament. »

« Dans le texte inter-testamentaire, on met l’accent sur le culte messianique, qui suscitera l’espoir et la justification. Jésus se présente comme le messie pas seulement pour Israël. Il se concentre également sur la façon dont les autres sont traités. C’est similaire d’un côté et distinct de l’autre », a déclaré Bock.

Bock précise pour le Times of Israël que Jésus finit par se différer de tous les groupes de son époque : les Sadducéens, les Pharisiens, les Esséniens et les Zélotes.

« Je pense que Jésus espérait qu’il se distinguerait quelque peu de la variété de ces approches », déclare Bock. « Il a développé une tradition qui réagissait dans une certaine mesure contre tous ces groupes. »

Bock convient que « Jésus n’a pas rempli un vide. Il ne l’a pas fait en tant que juif qui s’est éloigné de tout ce qui était juif. Clairement, Jésus pensait indépendamment les choses : la tradition juive, ce genre de chose. »

Qu’en penserait Jésus ?

Que l’on soit d’accord ou non avec Henze, l’auteur espère encourager la pensée indépendante avec son livre — y compris dans sa section finale.

« Je lance quelques défis aux lecteurs chrétiens », explique-t-il. « Comment notre compréhension de Jésus et du Nouveau Testament change-t-elle si nous prenons au sérieux le fait que Jésus était un juif ? ».

« Beaucoup de chrétiens croient que Jésus était exactement comme eux, qu’il avait la même théologie, il vous ressemblait, il était de la même confession et vivait dans l’Israël du premier siècle », a déclaré Henze.

Henze appelle les chrétiens à se familiariser avec le judaïsme — celui de leur voisin d’aujourd’hui, mais aussi avec la version vieille de 2 000 ans pratiquée par Jésus et d’autres juifs de son époque.

Henze espère que tous les lecteurs, de toutes religions, « s’ouvriront à la possibilité d’un contexte historique et religieux » et « liront le Nouveau Testament d’une manière plus responsable et mieux informée ».

« Mon espoir pour le livre est qu’il va trouver un large public et les gens vont commencer à repenser ce qu’ils croyaient connaître », a-t-il conclu.

Voir aussi:

Mind The Gap: An Interview with Matthias Henze
James F. McGrath
Patheos
December 12, 2017

I am ever so grateful to Matthias Henze for allowing me the opportunity to interview him about his new book, Mind the Gap. Here are the questions that I posed to him, followed by his answers:

JM: I saw an article in the Times of Israel about your book, the headline of which said that a Bible prof had said that Jesus is “more Jewish” than you think. How did you feel about that headline as a way of encapsulating the message of your book? Is it appropriate to talk about any particular Jew as “more Jewish” or “less Jewish”?

MH: The author of the Times article, Rich Tenorio, called me up out of nowhere and asked me whether I’d be willing to do an interview with him. When I spoke with him, it quickly became clear to me that he had not read the book, and that he knew very little about Early Judaism, the historical Jesus, or the early Jesus movement. The headline, “more Jewish than you think,” is certainly not taken from anything I write in the book. It is misleading to say that Jesus was “more Jewish” or “less Jewish.” I suspect the headline was intended to catch the attention of the Jewish readers and to suggest to them that they, too, should care about Jesus.

JM: When I shared that article (mentioned in my previous question) on social media, at least one scholar that I am connected with reshared it, adding the comment, “In other news, water is wet.” And in the book, you tell the story of a student who reacted similarly when you mentioned what you were writing on. How can the Jewish identity and heritage of Jesus be so widely accepted by scholars and students, and yet still insufficiently grasped by significant portions the general public?

This is an excellent question. Fortunately, there is a growing number of scholars and students who take the Jewish context of the New Testament seriously (even though I continue to be surprised how few New Testament scholars know the Jewish sources from the Second Temple period well and write about them in their work with authority). The book is intended primarily for the general public, but also as a first introduction for college students and seminarians to the Jewish world of the New Testament. To them, this is all new.

The chapters of the book grew out of lectures I gave in various churches and synagogues. My experience has been that there is a significant divide: whereas an increasing number of scholars is well familiar with the Scrolls, the Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha, and is able to explain why these texts are significant for our understanding of the early Jesus movement, the same is not true for the general audience. Time and again my audiences have told me that everything I told them in my talks was completely new to them. In general, Christians know little about Judaism, of any period, and they certainly do not know the Judaism of the late Second Temple period.

JM: Just as the “Jewishness of Jesus” is insufficiently known or appreciated in many circles, the value of and creative energy evidenced in first-century Jewish literature and thought is also underappreciated. Do you find that that is a harder case to make to Christian and Jewish audiences in our time than your point about Jesus?

MH: I think these two aspects are interrelated and cannot be separated from each other. To say that Jesus was a Jew remains an empty phrase, unless we can be more specific about the kind of Judaism Jesus practiced. And in order to be able to do that, we need to turn to the texts that describe the Jewish world of first century Israel. Reading only the New Testament will not do. My experience has been that so-called lay people are much more open to a comparative reading of New Testament and early Jewish texts than many of our colleagues. The responses to Mind the Gap from both Jewish and Christian readers have been overwhelmingly positive; people are eager to learn.

JM: The question of Jesus’ literacy has been debated much. Is there any work from before Jesus’ time, apart from those that became part of a Jewish or Christian Bible such as is known today, the influence of which seems so apparent in his words and teaching, you feel confident that Jesus had read it (as opposed to simply sharing a cultural and conceptual world of ideas with the author)?

MH: No. We have absolutely no idea what Jesus read, or whether he read at all. I am not making the case for a direct literary connection between any early Jewish texts and the New Testament. John J. Collins has wondered whether Luke knew the Son of God text from Qumran, but I am not willing to go that far. My interest in Mind the Gap is in the worldview and theological concepts in general that are taken for granted in the New Testament but that are never explained, such as the expectation of the Messiah as a divine agent of the end-time, or the belief in demons and evil spirits and all they represent, to name only two examples. There is a risk that we are grossly anachronistic and read into the New Testament texts who we think the Messiah is or what demons are.

Rather than pointing to connections between specific texts, which in my view would be difficult to prove, my argument is that there was a variety of different understandings of the Messiah and of demons and of many other issues in Early Judaism. The authors of the New Testament were well aware of, participated in, and contributed to this vigorous Jewish debate of the first century. Instead of postulating that Jesus, or the authors of the anew Testament, knew specific ancient Jewish texts, my basic claim is that the New Testament needs to be read within the context of early Jewish writings in general, with which it has so much in common.

JM: If you had to choose, what one point that you emphasize in your book would you consider it most important that readers learn and remember?

MH: The point I always emphasize in my book talks is that there is a significant historical divide between the Old and the New Testament. By turning the page, the reader of the Protestant Bible moves effortlessly from the prophet Malachi to Matthew’s Gospel. Theologically, the transition from the Old to the New Testament makes good sense. After all, Matthew goes to great lengths to claim that Jesus emerged straight out of Israel’s prophetic tradition. But the reader may not be aware that there is a gap of no less than half a millennium between these two books.

Recognizing that there is a chronological gap between the Testaments, a period of at least four centuries that is simply glossed over in the Protestant Bible, is a first step. Realizing that this was a time of incredible literary creativity during which Jewish intellectuals thought new thoughts and wrote new texts is the next step. And becoming familiar with at least some of the Jewish texts from the gap years and learning what they can and cannot tell us about the Judaism we find in the New Testament is the third and most important step. That’s what I do in Mind the Gap. This is, of course, much more than simply claiming that Jesus was Jewish.

JM: Was there anything that you learned about Jesus and his historical religious context, or came to appreciate in a new way, as a result of writing this book?

MH: Prior to writing the book, I had never quite understood why people are so eager to set Jesus apart from his contemporary Judaism and think of him as the one who radically broke with, and in the end overcame Judaism. Now I understand their reasoning much better.

I think there are two things coming together here. One is that few readers of the New Testament are aware of the gap between the Testaments, let alone that the gap years were a time of significant change in the religion of ancient Israel. The other is that for most readers of the New Testament, the New Testament does not have a context, it is in a category by itself. If you do not realize that the Judaism of Jesus is no longer the religion of the Old Testament and that it has developed significantly, and if you do not realize that the issues Jesus debates with the Pharisees have been debated for centuries, and continue to be debated at the time, then Jesus must seem totally radical, a break with the religion of the past.

In my talks, I invite my audience to engage in a thought experiment. Suppose you welcome a visitor to the U.S. who has never been here before. She marvels at the high risers, at the ethnic diversity in our society, at iPhons and the internet. “What is all this?,” she wonders, to which you answer: “ Don’t worry. Just read the U.S. Constitution and everything will become clear.” Reading the Old Testament at the time of Jesus must have been a bit like reading the Constitution today: it continues to be the fundamental text, but it cannot explain the changes in society in recent centuries.

JM:  Thank you for taking the time to talk with me about Mind the Gap. I hope it makes a lasting impact, and continues to generate useful conversations about Jesus, ancient Judaism, and the connection between the two!

Voir encore:

Christmas in America is good for the Jews
Jeff Jacoby
The Boston Globe
December 24, 2018

Liberals snicker at the idea that Americans are engaged in a “War on Christmas ,” and considering how robustly and pervasively the holiday is celebrated, it’s often hard to deny that they have a point. But then, just as the skirmishing over whether to say “Merry Christmas” or “Happy Holidays” seems to be finally fading away, along comes someone like Julia Ioffe — a widely-published journalist (The Atlantic, The New Republic, GQ) — to fire up the hostilities anew.

Please don’t wish me ‘Merry Christmas,’” admonished a cranky Ioffe in a Washington Post op-ed column on Friday. “It’s wonderful if you celebrate it, but I don’t — and I don’t feel like explaining that to you. It’s lonely to be reminded a thousand times every winter that the dominant American cultural event occurs without me.”

And why does it occur without her? Because, she says, she’s “a Jewish person” and Christmas is a Christian holiday. Or at least it is here in America. Ioffe didn’t mind Christmas as it was observed in the militantly anti-religious Soviet Union where she grew up. There it was a secular New Year’s celebration, and “waking up to a sparkling, decorated tree in my room, piled high with presents” remains one of the “central, beloved memories” of her childhood.

But everything changed, and Christmas became intolerable, after her family moved to America:

It was no longer a New Year’s tree in a Soviet house. It had become a Christian symbol in a Jewish house. Christmas was all around us, for nearly one-tenth of the year, every year. It began to feel deeply alien precisely because we were secular, but it was not . Despite the movies and the shopping, despite the Germanic decor, Christmas is still, at its core and by design, about the birth of Christ, a point that seems bizarre to argue. Just look at all those nativity scenes! And we don’t observe the holiday on just any day. Dec. 25 has Christian significance. Whenever I hear the name, I hear the “Christ” in it. To me, it’s strange that many of its celebrants do not.

And despite its celebration of a Christian god, it is everywhere, for over a month, in a way no other holiday is — not even Easter. It is in every ad, in every window and doorway, and on everyone’s lips. If you’re not a part of the festivities, even its sparkling aesthetic can wear you down. When you are from a minority religion, you’re used to the fact that cabdrivers don’t wish you an easy fast on Yom Kippur. But it’s harder to get used to the oppressive ubiquity of a holiday like Christmas. “This is always the time of year I feel most excluded from society,” one Jewish friend told me. Another told me it made him feel “un-American.”

Seriously? It doesn’t make me feel that way.

I’m an Orthodox Jew for whom Dec. 25 has zero theological significance. My family doesn’t put up a tree, my kids never wrote letters to Santa, and we don’t go to church for midnight Mass. But while I may not celebrate Christmas, I love seeing my Christian friends and neighbors celebrate it. I like living in a society that makes a big deal out of religious holidays. Far from feeling excluded or oppressed when the sights and sounds of Christmas return each December — OK, November — I find them reassuring. To my mind, they reaffirm the importance of the Judeo-Christian culture that has made America so exceptional — and such a safe and tolerant haven for a religious minority like mine.

Ioffe writes that being told “Merry Christmas,” even once, is “ill-fitting and uncomfortable.” Hearing it for weeks on end is almost more than she can bear. “It’s exhausting and isolating,” she writes. “It makes me feel like a stranger in my own land.”

Is it really the Christmas cheer that makes her feel so alienated? That certainly isn’t the reaction Christmas evoked in other Jewish immigrants and their children. Not only were many of the greatest Christmas songs composed by Jewish songwriters , but several of those songwriters were themselves first-generation Americans. Irving Berlin (“White Christmas”) was born in Russia. So were the parents of Mel Torme (“The Christmas Song”). Edward Pola (“It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year”) was the son of immigrants from Hungary. And the parents of Sammy Cahn (“The Christmas Waltz”) came to America from Galicia.

Granted, Berlin, Torme, and the others weren’t known for their Jewish scholarship or observance. But it isn’t only highly secularized Jews who appreciate Christmas. Rabbis do, too.

“Christmas fascinates me,” wrote Rabbi Michael Gottlieb in a Wall Street Journal column a couple years ago.
I’m drawn to its history, its color, its atmosphere, its music. And, of course, I’m drawn to the fact that Jesus was a Jew. He was born a Jew, lived as a Jew and died a Jew. If for nothing else, I can appreciate Christmas as the celebration of one Jew’s epic birthday. . . .

I am grateful to my Christian neighbors and friends. Through their religious holy day, I am better able to confront and clarify my own religious convictions and theological certitudes.

Like a brightly lighted Christmas tree, Christianity dispels a lot of darkness, theological as well as moral. In its glow, it challenges Christians and non-Christians alike to consider that which is transcendent, eternal, and greater than us all.”

If that seems too abstract, consider a different rabbi’s more concrete take on why Christmas in America should be meaningful even for those who aren’t Christian.

In a 2013 essay titled “Is Christmas Good for the Jews?” Rabbi Benjamin Blech, a widely admired Orthodox Jewish scholar, describes how Christmas was a season of fear and danger for his parents, who grew up in Poland a century ago, when Poles were steeped in anti-Semitic bigotry actively fueled by the Catholic Church. For Polish Jews of his parents’ generation, Blech writes, the advent of Christmas was “far too often filled with pogroms, beatings, and violent anti-Semitic demonstrations.”

But for Jews and other religious minorities in America, Christianity has shown a far more gentle and brotherly face. Here, non-Christians are not subjected to forced conversions or beaten because they don’t celebrate Christian holidays. Unlike the beleaguered Jewish minority in the Poland of his parents’ generation, members of the comparatively tiny Jewish minority in America — less than 1.5% of the population — are free to believe and worship as they please.

Surrounded by Christmas celebrations, I have never had difficulty explaining to my children and my students that although we share with Christians a belief in God, we go our separate ways in observance. They are a religion of creed and we are a religion of deed. They believe God became man. We believe man must strive to become more and more like God.

We differ in countless ways. Yet Christmas allows us to remember that we are not alone in our recognition of the Creator of the universe. [Christians and Jews alike] have faith in a higher power.

Indeed, Blech points out, the Christmas season in America has often motivated Jews, who see their neighbors’ concern with their religion, to ask themselves what they know of their own. “To begin to wonder why we don’t celebrate Christmas,” he suggests, “is to take the first step on the road to Jewish self-awareness.”

Unlike the Eastern European Jews of his parents’ generation a century ago — and unlike Julia Ioffe today — Blech doesn’t dread the yearly showering of Christmas spirit. “Call me naïve, but nowadays I really love this season,” he writes. “Because together all people of goodwill are joined in the task to place the sacred above the profane.”

As an observant Jew, I don’t celebrate Christmas and never have. Do the inescapable reminders at this time of year that hundreds of millions of my fellow Americans do celebrate it make me feel excluded or offended? Not in the least: They make me feel grateful — grateful to live in a land where freedom of religion shields the Chanukah menorah in my window no less than it shields the Christmas tree in my neighbor’s. That freedom is a reflection of America’s Judeo-Christian culture, and a central reason why, in this overwhelmingly Christian country, it isn’t only Christians for whom Christmas is a season of joy. And why it isn’t only Christians who should make a point of saying so.

Voir par ailleurs:

Noël à Gaza: toujours moins de permis pour les chrétiens
Vatican news
19 décembre 2018

Comme tous les ans durant la période de Noël, des milliers de pèlerins et touristes du monde entier convergent vers la ville de Bethléem. Mais pour les chrétiens de Gaza, soumis à des restrictions de mouvements, cette possibilité semble désormais relever du privilège.

Entretien réalisé par Manuella Affejee- Cité du Vatican

L’accès au territoire palestinien est en effet rigoureusement contrôlé par les autorités militaires israéliennes qui délivrent des permis d’entrée et de sortie. Chaque année, un certain nombre d’entre eux est concédé aux chrétiens de Gaza souhaitant se rendre à Jérusalem ou en Cisjordanie pour les fêtes de Noël et de Pâques.

Pour Noël 2018, 500 permis de sortie ont été promis par Israël, mais en pratique, seuls 220 ont été effectivement délivrés pour le moment à des personnes âgées entre 16 et 35 ans ou de plus de 55 ans, ce qui donne lieu à des situations problématiques au sein de plusieurs familles: le père obtenant un permis mais pas la mère et inversement, ou des permis accordés aux enfants mais pas aux parents et inversement. Mgr Giacinto Boulos Marcuzzo, vicaire patriarcal pour Jérusalem et la Palestine avoue ne pas saisir la politique choisie par Israël dans ce domaine. «C’est une logique d’occupation que nous ne comprenons pas, ni ne justifions», assène-t-il. Pouvoir se rendre à Bethléem pour fêter Noël devrait être un droit naturel pour un chrétien gazaoui et non pas un privilège, déplore l’évêque italien.

Mgr Marcuzzo se trouvait d’ailleurs à Gaza dimanche dernier, en compagnie de l’administrateur apostolique du patriarcat latin de Jérusalem, Mgr Pierbattista Pizzaballa, pour célébrer Noël avec la petite communauté latine locale, selon une tradition désormais bien installée. Le vicaire patriarcal évoque une atmosphère générale empreinte de tristesse, même si la médiation égyptienne et qatarie entreprise ces derniers jours a fait baisser la tension dans le territoire palestinien, après des semaines de fièvre et d’affrontements liés aux «marches du retour».

La présence chrétienne quant à elle s’amoindrit sensiblement. Face à des conditions de vie précaires et au manque évident de perspectives, l’émigration reste une tentation inexorable. On comptait il y a encore quelques années environ 3 000 chrétiens de toute confessions à Gaza; ils ne représentent aujourd’hui que 1 200 âmes, dont 120 catholiques latins.

Voir enfin:

Désinformation anti-israélienne: pas de trêve de Noël sur France Inter!

Selon la radio de service public, Israël serait responsable des malheurs des chrétiens de Gaza. Le reportage passe sous silence l’action des islamistes du Hamas.
InfoEquitable
25 décembre 2018

A la Maison de la Radio, les vieilles traditions de Noël ne se perdent pas. Dans les temps anciens, la fête de la nativité était l’occasion d’accabler les Juifs afin rappeler sa faute inexpiable au « peuple déicide ».

Reprenant le flambeau, France Inter semble s’ingénier à diffuser tous les 24 décembre une petite perfidie anti-israélienne, afin de mieux stigmatiser ceux qui aux yeux de la station constituent les fauteurs de trouble dans la région.

Cette année, dans la page consacrée aux préparatifs de Noël, nous avons ainsi eu droit à un reportage sur le triste sort des chrétiens de Gaza.

 

 

Vivre dans l’enclave islamiste aux mains des terroristes du Hamas n’est certes pas une sinécure lorsque l’on n’est pas musulman.

Mais à écouter le journal du matin, présenté par Agnès Soubiran, « l’ambiance sombre » qui affecte le petit territoire palestinien n’est due qu’à une cause : « Une partie de la communauté chrétienne de la bande Gaza ne pourra pas se rendre dans la ville natale du Christ en raison des restrictions de circulation imposées par Israël qui comme chaque année n’a délivré des permis qu’au compte-gouttes… »

Suit le reportage à Gaza de la journaliste Marine Vlahovic.

On y apprend que « seules 600 personnes ont reçu un permis » de la part des autorités israéliennes pour pouvoir quitter Gaza et se rendre à Bethléem.

Les autres ont célébré la messe à Gaza.

 

 

« On fait un petit dîner pour le réveillon et ensuite on assiste à la messe de minuit ici. A par ça, il n’y a rien à faire. Alors qu’ailleurs il y a plein de festivités. C’est vraiment très frustrant de rester ici. En fait c’est comme si ce n’était pas vraiment Noël », explique une jeune Gazaouite chrétienne au micro de France Inter.

Les responsables de ce « Noël maussade » ? Les Israéliens bien sûr, en raison du « blocus sévère » qu’ils imposent à Gaza.

Sur les conditions et les raisons de ce « blocus » (qui n’en est pas un puisque chaque jour des centaines de camions de marchandises pénètrent à Gaza et de très nombreux Gazaouites ont la possibilité de pénétrer en Israël ne serait-ce que pour aller se faire soigner dans les hôpitaux israéliens), on ne saura rien.

Ni l’irrédentisme du Hamas, ni la violence qu’il dirige chaque jour contre Israël, ni les tirs de roquettes et de missiles sur les villes israéliennes ne sont évoqués dans ce reportage.

Si les chrétiens souffrent à Gaza, c’est de la faute des Juifs, pas des milices islamistes qui ont imposé leur loi sur le territoire.

Rien sur les discriminations, les menaces et les humiliations dont sont quotidiennement victimes les chrétiens (sans parler des conversions forcées).

A Gaza, les islamistes distribuent des tracts pour interdire la célébration de Noël

L’envoyée spéciale de France Inter à Gaza, Marine Vlahovic, n’a peut-être pas réussi à mettre la main sur le tract diffusé par les brigades al-Nasser al-Din, l’une des plus implacables milices islamiques à Gaza, intimant à la population de ne pas célébrer Noël ?

Si la journaliste s’était donnée la peine de lire le Jerusalem Postelle aurait pu apprendre que ce tract a été diffusé auprès des musulmans mais également des chrétiens auxquels on a bien fait comprendre qu’il leur est demandé d’adopter un profil bas en toutes circonstances.

 

 

Voici le tract qui a échappé à la grande reporter de terrain envoyée par France Inter à Gaza :

 

 

Le tract, qui a été distribué dans les jours précédant Noël, rappelle, versets du Coran à l’appui, la stricte interdiction de célébrer cette fête. « Dieu n’est pas pour le peuple du mal », peut-on y lire à gauche (juste au-dessus d’un sapin barré d’une croix rouge).

Mais à France Inter, on ne lit pas le Jerusalem Post et on se méfie de la presse israélienne.

On préfère mettre en garde les auditeurs : ce sont les Juifs qui persécutent les chrétiens de Gaza. Pas les musulmans. Pas les islamistes.

 

Les églises de Gaza illuminées… aux couleurs de l’islam

Dans son reportage radio, la journaliste de France Inter a aussi omis de préciser que les églises de Gaza étaient illuminées en vert, aux couleurs de l’islam !

 

 

La petite minorité chrétienne de l’enclave aux mains des islamistes a-t-elle manifesté son consentement pour ces illuminations de Noël d’un genre très particulier ?

Nous sommes prêts à parier que non.

L’effet saisissant de cette déco gazaouite donne en tout cas une idée de l’état de soumission et de dhimmitude dans lequel les chrétiens sont cantonnés.

 

Le point de vue israélien n’est pas donné

Bien entendu, à aucun moment l’envoyée spéciale à Gaza n’a jugé utile de prendre contact avec les autorités israéliennes pour connaître leur position sur ce dossier.

Le reportage en tout cas n’en parle pas.

Mettre en cause une partie sans lui donner la parole, c’est presque une habitude sur France Inter lorsqu’il s’agit d’Israël.

Cette année, plus d’un chrétien sur deux a pu se rendre à Bethléem

Pareillement, le reportage rend les Israéliens responsables de l’exode des chrétiens dont une grande majorité a quitté Gaza ces dernières années.

Pour la radio de service public, ce n’est certes pas l’instauration implacable de la charia – la loi islamique – qui a poussé ces chrétiens à fuir mais bien les « sionistes » qui auraient rendu l’atmosphère irrespirable.

« Une situation qui a contribué à l’exode des chrétiens de Gaza. On en comptait 3.500 il y a 15 ans, selon les estimations, ils ne seraient plus qu’un millier aujourd’hui », conclut la journaliste.

 

 

On sursaute un peu à la lecture de cette dernière information qui change un tantinet la donne (c’est à se demander si les journalistes et les présentateurs comprennent ce qu’ils disent à l’antenne).

Les Israéliens ont donc distribué cette année 600 autorisations pour se rendre à la messe de minuit à Bethléem pour une population estimée à mille âmes ?

Malgré le climat de violence que le Hamas fait régner depuis le printemps dernier à la frontière avec Israël, plus d’un chrétien sur deux s’est vu autorisé à la franchir ? Et c’est ce que la présentatrice appelle des autorisations délivrées « au compte-gouttes » ?

On demeure pantois devant une telle présentation des faits qui relève de la malhonnêteté intellectuelle.

Cette enquête sur les tourments infligés par Israël aux chrétiens de Gaza est tellement bidon qu’aucun grand titre de la presse française ne l’a reprise.

En cherchant bien, nous avons retrouvé l’info sur ce site turc francophone pro-Erdogan…

 

 

 

… accompagnée d’une photo de propagande qui relève plus de la mise en scène que de l’authentique reportage.

Ce site Medyatürk ne bénéficie que d’une faible visibilité auprès de l’opinion publique française.

France Inter peut se féliciter d’avoir donné une plus grande audience à cette campagne de désinformation anti-israélienne.

Voir enfin:

Rice Jewish Studies head illuminates the world from which rabbinic Judaism emerged
Aaron Howard
JHV
Aug 17, 2017

2 Baruch is a Jewish text attributed to the biblical Baruch, Jeremiah’s scribe. Believed to have been written in the late first century C.E., in a style that is similar to the Book of Jeremiah, the text predicts the imminent destruction of Jerusalem and the coming messianic era, complete with resurrection of the dead.

Never heard of 2 Baruch? You’re not alone. The text was never recognized as Jewish scripture, although it was one of many Jewish religious texts written in the 500 years between the end of the writing of the books in the Tanach and the earliest rabbinic texts. That half-a-millennium time gap is the subject of Matthias Henze’s new book, “Mind The Gap” (Fortress Press).

Henze is professor of Hebrew Bible and Early Judaism and founding director of the Jewish Studies Program at Rice University.

The book is written for a general audience that is interested in ancient Judaism. For Jewish readers, the book argues that to understand the Jewish world from which rabbinic Judaism emerged, one needs to read ancient Jewish texts outside the Bible. For Christian readers, the book will inform them about the Jewish world of Jesus beyond what is read in the New Testament. The New Testament assumes that its readers are familiar with Jewish beliefs and practices of first century Israel. In fact, most Christians are not. But, if Jesus were a practicing Jew, and if one knows little about his Judaism, how can one understand Jesus, his life and message?

The gap, as Henze calls it, is the period between the canonized Hebrew Bible and the early writings that made up rabbinic Judaism.

“We’re talking about Second Temple period Jewish texts,” Henze told the JHV. “The books of the Tanach date as late as sixth to fifth centuries B.C.E.: Haggai, the end of Isaiah and Malachi. And, in the fourth century B.C.E.: First and Second Chronicles, Esther and Kohelet (Ecclesiastes). There is a consensus among biblical scholars that all the books of the Tanach were written with the exception of the Book Of Daniel, which comes from the second century B.C.E.

“The earliest rabbinic writing, which typically people say is the Mishnah, dates from the late second century C.E. If we can agree on those dates, then there’s a gap between the Tanakh and the rabbinic writings of about a of half a millennium.

“The rabbis claim that they stand in an unbroken chain going back to Moses. That is underscored in the chain of transmission of the Written and Oral Torahs that open the Pirkei Avot.

“Most of us are familiar with Tanach and with the Mishna. But, we will not be familiar with the literature written during those gap years. The reason for that is those books are not part of any corpus of texts that we usually study. They were simply forgotten for two millennia.”

They were forgotten because they never achieved the status of authority that the biblical and later Talmudic texts did. Or, to put it in other terms, these books were not canonized.


Yom Kippour/5779: Attention, un Grand Pardon peut en cacher un autre (Yokes and chains: How much more mass immigration will the West have to endure to atone for its historical wrongs ?)

19 septembre, 2018
Et le bouc sur lequel est tombé le sort pour Azazel sera placé vivant devant l’Éternel, afin qu’il serve à faire l’expiation et qu’il soit lâché dans le désert pour Azazel. (…) Car en ce jour on fera l’expiation pour vous, afin de vous purifier: vous serez purifiés de tous vos péchés devant l’Éternel. Ce sera pour vous un sabbat, un jour de repos, et vous humilierez vos âmes. C’est une loi perpétuelle. Lévitique 16:10-31
Parce qu’aujourd’hui, chez les juifs, c’est le Kippour. Aujourd’hui dans le monde entier, tous les juifs, ils pardonnent à ceux qui leur ont fait du mal. Tous les juifs, sauf un. Moi. Moi, je pardonne pas. Raymond Bettoun
Le monde moderne n’est pas mauvais : à certains égards, il est bien trop bon. Il est rempli de vertus féroces et gâchées. Lorsqu’un dispositif religieux est brisé (comme le fut le christianisme pendant la Réforme), ce ne sont pas seulement les vices qui sont libérés. Les vices sont en effet libérés, et ils errent de par le monde en faisant des ravages ; mais les vertus le sont aussi, et elles errent plus férocement encore en faisant des ravages plus terribles. Le monde moderne est saturé des vieilles vertus chrétiennes virant à la folie.  G.K. Chesterton
Aujourd’hui on repère les boucs émissaires dans l’Angleterre victorienne et on ne les repère plus dans les sociétés archaïques. C’est défendu. René Girard
L’inauguration majestueuse de l’ère « post-chrétienne » est une plaisanterie. Nous sommes dans un ultra-christianisme caricatural qui essaie d’échapper à l’orbite judéo-chrétienne en « radicalisant » le souci des victimes dans un sens antichrétien. (…) Jusqu’au nazisme, le judaïsme était la victime préférentielle de ce système de bouc émissaire. Le christianisme ne venait qu’en second lieu. Depuis l’Holocauste, en revanche, on n’ose plus s’en prendre au judaïsme, et le christianisme est promu au rang de bouc émissaire numéro un. René Girard
Nous sommes entrés dans un mouvement qui est de l’ordre du religieux. Entrés dans la mécanique du sacrilège : la victime, dans nos sociétés, est entourée de l’aura du sacré. Du coup, l’écriture de l’histoire, la recherche universitaire, se retrouvent soumises à l’appréciation du législateur et du juge comme, autrefois, à celle de la Sorbonne ecclésiastique. Françoise Chandernagor
Malgré le titre général, en effet, dès l’article 1, seules la traite transatlantique et la traite qui, dans l’océan Indien, amena des Africains à l’île Maurice et à la Réunion sont considérées comme « crime contre l’humanité ». Ni la traite et l’esclavage arabes, ni la traite interafricaine, pourtant très importants et plus étalés dans le temps puisque certains ont duré jusque dans les années 1980 (au Mali et en Mauritanie par exemple), ne sont concernés. Le crime contre l’humanité qu’est l’esclavage est réduit, par la loi Taubira, à l’esclavage imposé par les Européens et à la traite transatlantique. (…) Faute d’avoir le droit de voter, comme les Parlements étrangers, des « résolutions », des voeux, bref des bonnes paroles, le Parlement français, lorsqu’il veut consoler ou faire plaisir, ne peut le faire que par la loi. (…) On a l’impression que la France se pose en gardienne de la mémoire universelle et qu’elle se repent, même à la place d’autrui, de tous les péchés du passé. Je ne sais si c’est la marque d’un orgueil excessif ou d’une excessive humilité mais, en tout cas, c’est excessif ! […] Ces lois, déjà votées ou proposées au Parlement, sont dangereuses parce qu’elles violent le droit et, parfois, l’histoire. La plupart d’entre elles, déjà, violent délibérément la Constitution, en particulier ses articles 34 et 37. (…) les parlementaires savent qu’ils violent la Constitution mais ils n’en ont cure. Pourquoi ? Parce que l’organe chargé de veiller au respect de la Constitution par le Parlement, c’est le Conseil constitutionnel. Or, qui peut le saisir ? Ni vous, ni moi : aucun citoyen, ni groupe de citoyens, aucun juge même, ne peut saisir le Conseil constitutionnel, et lui-même ne peut pas s’autosaisir. Il ne peut être saisi que par le président de la République, le Premier ministre, les présidents des Assemblées ou 60 députés. (…) La liberté d’expression, c’est fragile, récent, et ce n’est pas total : il est nécessaire de pouvoir punir, le cas échéant, la diffamation et les injures raciales, les incitations à la haine, l’atteinte à la mémoire des morts, etc. Tout cela, dans la loi sur la presse de 1881 modifiée, était poursuivi et puni bien avant les lois mémorielles. Françoise Chandernagor
Les « traites d’exportation » des Noirs hors d’Afrique remontent au VIIe siècle de notre ère, avec la constitution d’un vaste empire musulman qui est esclavagiste, comme la plupart des sociétés de l’époque. Comme on ne peut réduire un musulman en servitude, on répond par l’importation d’esclaves venant d’Asie, d’Europe centrale et d’Afrique subsaharienne. Olivier Pétré-Grenouilleau
A la différence de l’islam, le christianisme n’a pas entériné l’esclavage. Mais, comme il ne comportait aucune règle d’organisation sociale, il ne l’a pas non plus interdit. Pourtant, l’idée d’une égalité de tous les hommes en Dieu dont était porteur le christianisme a joué contre l’esclavage, qui disparaît de France avant l’an mil. Cependant, il ressurgit au XVIIe siècle aux Antilles françaises, bien que la législation royale y prescrive l’emploi d’une main-d’oeuvre libre venue de France. L’importation des premiers esclaves noirs, achetés à des Hollandais, se fait illégalement. Jean-Louis Harouel
Jusqu’ici – mais la vulgate perdure – les synthèses à propos de l’Afrique se limitaient ordinairement à une seule traite: la traite européenne atlantique entre l’Afrique et les Amériques, du XVe siècle à la première partie du XIXe siècle. En fait, jusqu’à la seconde moitié du de ce siècle puisque l’abolition ne met pas fin à la traite qui se poursuit illégalement. Or, le trafic ne s’est borné ni à ces quatre siècles convenus ni à l’Atlantique. La traite des Africains noirs a été pratiquée dans l’Antiquité et au Moyen Age; elle s’est prolongée jusqu’au XXe siècle et se manifeste encore sous divers avatars en ce début de XXIe siècle; elle s’est étendue à l’océan indien et au-delà; elle a été le fait non seulement des Européens, mais des Arabes et des Africains eux-mêmes. Pourtant, le programme de « La Route de l’esclave », élaboré par l’UNESCO et qui visait à briser le silence historique et scientifique observé sur la traite, véhicule, pour des raisons idéologiques (sous la pression des représentants du monde et des états africains), les mêmes distorsions. En effet, l’emploi du singulier (« La Route ») exclut de la reconnaissance et de la construction mémorielle aussi bien la traite interne à l’Afrique, la plus occultée, que les routes transsaharienne et orientale et montre à quel point l’histoire des traites est aujourd’hui un enjeu politique, en raison principalement des réparations que seul le Nord, parmi les régions impliquées, se devrait de verser. Roger Botte
On peut parler aujourd’hui d’invasion arabe. C’est un fait social. Combien d’invasions l’Europe a connu tout au long de son histoire ! Elle a toujours su se surmonter elle-même, aller de l’avant pour se trouver ensuite comme agrandie par l’échange entre les cultures. Pape François
Le Parlement européen a approuvé, le 12 septembre 2018, par 448 contre 197 (avec 48 abstentions), le rapport de l’eurodéputée Sargentini constatant des « risques graves » de violation des « valeurs » de l’Union, selon les termes des articles 2 et 7 du Traité sur l’Union européenne. C’est le début d’une longue procédure qui pourrait, comme dans le cas de la Pologne le 20 décembre dernier, aboutir à l’adoption de sanctions (suspension des droits de vote) pour la Hongrie. (…) Toutefois (…) il est possible que les européistes aient remporté une victoire à la Pyrrhus. Au lendemain du vote, c’est toute l’Europe du groupe de Višegrad (V4) qui risque de se considérer comme mise à l’index. La Pologne, déjà visée en décembre dernier par la procédure de l’article 7, la Tchéquie et la Slovaquie ne peuvent que se solidariser avec la Hongrie au sein du V4. Et la coalition de gouvernement en Autriche ÖVP-FPÖ visée par l’article 7 en 1999 peut elle aussi, à terme, bloquer le processus. Mais surtout, ce revers au Parlement de Strasbourg consacre a contrario le leadership de la Hongrie en étendard d’un mouvement profond sur les échiquiers politiques nationaux qui dépasse le cadres de l’Europe centrale et orientale, comme en témoigne les convergences avec la Ligue de Salvini en Italie ou les Démocrates Suédois à Stockholm. (…) À Varsovie et à Rome, à Stockholm et à Athènes, la Hongrie peut maintenant fédérer tous ceux dénoncent les décisions de l’UE concernant la répartition obligatoire des réfugiés, tous ceux qui prétendent défendre l’identité de l’Europe contre l’islam et tous ceux qui promeuvent un retour des souverainetés nationales. Ce vote peut être le point de départ d’un nouvel élan pour la construction européenne. Il peut aussi devenir l’événement fondateur d’un leadership orbanien dans les opinions publiques des États membres. The Conversation
Dans ce livre, Douglas Murray analyse la situation actuelle de l’Europe dont son attitude à l’égard des migrations n’est que l’un des symptômes d’une fatigue d’être et d’un refus de persévérer dans son être. Advienne que pourra ! « Le Monde arrive en Europe précisément au moment où l’Europe a perdu de vue ce qu’elle est ». Ce qui aurait pu réussir dans une Europe sûre et fière d’elle-même, ne le peut pas dans une Europe blasée et finissante. L’Europe exalte aujourd’hui le respect, la tolérance et la diversité. Toutes les cultures sont les bienvenues sauf la sienne. « C’est comme si certains des fondements les plus indiscutables de la civilisation occidentale devenaient négociables… comme si le passé était à prendre », nous dit Douglas Murray. Seuls semblent échapper à celle langueur morbide et masochiste les anciens pays de la sphère soviétique. Peut-être que l’expérience totalitaire si proche les a vaccinés contre l’oubli de soi. Ils ont retrouvé leur identité et ne sont pas prêts à y renoncer. Peut-être gardent-ils le sens d’une cohésion nationale qui leur a permis d’émerger de la tutelle soviétique, dont les Européens de l’Ouest n’ont gardé qu’un vague souvenir. Peut-être ont-ils échappé au complexe de culpabilité dont l’Europe de l’Ouest se délecte et sont-ils trop contents d’avoir survécu au soviétisme pour se voir voler leur destin. Cette attitude classée à droite par l’Europe occidentale est vue, à l’Est, comme une attitude de survie, y compris à gauche comme en témoigne Robert Fico, le Premier ministre de gauche slovaque : «  j’ai le sentiment que, nous, en Europe, sommes en train de commettre un suicide rituel… L’islam n’a pas sa place en Slovaquie. Les migrants changent l’identité de notre pays. Nous ne voulons pas que l’identité de notre pays change. » (2016) Il y a un orgueil à se présenter comme les seuls vraiment méchants de la planète. Tout ce qui arrive, l’Europe en est responsable directement ou indirectement. Comme avant lui Pascal Bruckner, Douglas Murray brocarde l’auto-intoxication des Européens à la repentance. Les gens s’en imbibent, nous dit-il, parce qu’ils aiment ça. Ça leur procure élévation et exaltation. Ça leur donne de l’importance. Supportant tout le mal, la mission de rédemption de l’humanité leur revient. Ils s’autoproclament les représentants des vivants et des morts. Douglas Murray cite le cas d’Andrews Hawkins, un directeur de théâtre britannique qui, en 2006, au mi-temps de sa vie, se découvrit être le descendant d’un marchand d’esclaves du 16ème siècle. Pour se laver de la faute de son aïeul, il participa, avec d’autres dans le même cas originaires de divers pays, à une manifestation organisée dans le stade de Banjul en Gambie. Les participants enchainés, qui portaient des tee-shirts sur lesquels était inscrit « So Sorry », pleurèrent à genoux, s’excusèrent, avant d’être libérés de leurs chaines par  le Vice-Président  gambien. « Happy end », mais cette manie occidentale de l’auto-flagellation, si elle procure un sentiment pervers d’accomplissement, inspire du mépris à ceux qui n’en souffrent pas et les incitent à en jouer et à se dédouaner de leurs mauvaises actions. Pourquoi disputer aux Occidentaux ce mauvais rôle. Douglas Murray raconte une blague de Yasser Arafat qui fit bien rire l’assistance, alors qu’on lui annonçait l’arrivée d’une délégation américaine. Un journaliste présent lui demanda ce que venaient faire les Américains. Arafat lui répondit que la délégation américaine passait par là à l’occasion d’une tournée d’excuses à propos des croisades ! Cette attitude occidentale facilite le report sur les pays occidentaux de la responsabilité de crimes dont ils sont les victimes. Ce fut le cas avec le 11 septembre. Les thèses négationnistes fleurirent, alors qu’on se demandait aux États-Unis qu’est-ce qu’on avait bien pu faire pour mériter cela. Cette exclusivité dans le mal que les Occidentaux s’arrogent ruissèle jusques et y compris au niveau individuel. Après avoir été violé chez lui par un Somalien en avril 2016, un politicien norvégien, Karsten Nordal Hauken, exprima dans la presse la culpabilité qui était la sienne d’avoir privé ce pauvre Somalien, en le dénonçant, de sa vie en Norvège et renvoyé ainsi à un avenir incertain en Somalie. Comme l’explique Douglas Murray, si les masochistes ont toujours existé, célébrer une telle attitude comme une vertu est la recette pour fabriquer « une forte concentration de masochistes ». « Seuls les Européens sont contents de s’auto-dénigrer sur un marché international de sadiques ». Les dirigeants les moins fréquentables sont tellement habitués à notre autodénigrement qu’ils y voient un encouragement. En septembre 2015, le président Rouhani a eu le culot de faire la leçon aux Hongrois sur leur manque de générosité dans la crise des réfugiés. Que dire alors de la richissime Arabie saoudite qui a refusé de prêter les 100 000 tentes climatisées qui servent habituellement lors du pèlerinage et n’a accueilli aucun Syrien, alors qu’elle offrait de construire 200 mosquées en Allemagne ? La posture du salaud éternel, dans laquelle se complait l’Europe, la désarme complètement pour comprendre les assauts de violence dont elle fait l’objet et fonctionne comme une incitation. Beaucoup d’Européens, ce fut le cas d’Angela Merkel, ont cru voir, dans la crise migratoire de 2015, une mise au défi de laver le passé : « Le monde voit dans l’Allemagne une terre d’espoir et d’opportunités. Et ce ne fut pas toujours le cas » (A. Merkel, 31 août 2015). N’était-ce pas là l’occasion d’une rédemption de l’Allemagne qu’il ne fallait pas manquer ?  Douglas Murray décrit ces comités d’accueils enthousiastes qui ressemblaient à ceux que l’on réservait jusque là aux équipes de football victorieuses ou à des combattants rentrant de la guerre. Les analogies avec la période nazie fabriquent à peu de frais des héros. Lorsque la crise migratoire de 2015 survient il n’y a pas de frontière entre le Danemark et la Suède. Il suffisait donc de prendre le train pour passer d’un pays à l’autre. Pourtant, il s’est trouvé une jeune politicienne danoise de 24 ans – Annika Hom Nielsen – pour transporter à bord de son yacht, en écho à l’évacuation des juifs en 1943, des migrants qui préféraient la Suède au Danemark mais qui, pourtant, ne risquaient pas leur vie en restant au Danemark. Si beaucoup de pays expient l’expérience nazie, d’autres expient leur passé colonial. C’est ainsi que l’Australie a instauré le « National Sorry Day » en 1998. En 2008, les excuses du Premier ministre Kevin Rudd aux aborigènes furent suivies de celles du Premier ministre canadien aux peuples indigènes. Aux États-Unis, plusieurs villes américaines ont rebaptisé « Colombus Day » en « Indigenous People Day ». Comme l’écrit Douglas Murray, il n’y a rien de mal à faire des excuses, même si tous ceux à qui elles s’adressent sont morts. Mais, cette célébration de la culpabilité « transforme les sentiments patriotiques en honte ou à tout le moins, en sentiments profondément mitigés ». Si l’Europe doit expier ses crimes passés, pourquoi ne pas exiger de même de la Turquie ? Si la diversité est si extraordinaire, pourquoi la réserver à l’Europe et ne pas l’imposer à, disons, l’Arabie saoudite ? Où sont les démonstrations de culpabilité des Mongols pour la cruauté de leurs ascendants ? « il y a peu de crimes intellectuels en Europe pires que la généralisation et l’essentialisation d’un autre groupe dans le monde».  Mais le contraire n’est pas vrai. Il n’y a rien de mal à généraliser les pathologies européennes, et les Européens ne s’en privent pas eux-mêmes. Michèle Tribalat

Attention: un Grand Pardon peut en cacher un autre !

En cette journée pénitentielle de l’Expiation

Où pour s’assurer un bon nouveau départ dix jours après leur Nouvel An, nos amis juifs font en quelque sorte leur examen de conscience pour l’année précédente …

Comment ne pas repenser …

A cette institution qui donna au monde le terme et la théorie pour débusquer l’un des phénomènes les plus prégnants de notre modernité …

Mais aussi ne pas s’inquiéter …

De ces étranges perversions des vertus judéo-chrétiennes dont le monde moderne est décidément devenu si friand …

D’un Occcident et d’une Europe qui …

A l’image de ces processions de nouveaux flagellants

Qui des Etats-unis et du Royaume-Uni refont à l’envers le tristement fameux voyage de la seule traite atlantique

Pour, chaines aux pieds et jougs autour du cou, demander pardon – cherchez l’erreur ! – aux actuels descendants des esclavagistes africains

N’ont pas de mots assez durs pour fustiger les erreurs de leur propre passé …

Mais aussi, entre leurs classes populaires et les pays tout récemment délivrés du joug communiste, ces peuples …

Qui devant la véritable invasion migratoire qui leur est imposée, ne veulent tout simplement pas mourir ?

Film follows Camano Island family’s effort to atone
Krista J. Kapralos
Herald
February 19, 2008

“So sorry.”

Members of the Lienau family of Camano Island have walked hundreds of miles, over the course of four years and on four continents, to say those words.

Sometimes, there is more explanation:

“I want to apologize on behalf of the United States for the enslavement of African children,” Jacob Lienau said in 2006, when he was just 14 years old, in a stadium in Gambia.

“We’re apologizing for the legacy of the slave trade, particularly where Christians were involved,” Shari Lienau, mother of nine children, said at a Martin Luther King Jr. Day march in Everett that same year.

“I wanted to say I was sorry,” Anna Lienau said two years ago, when she was 12 years old and saving money to travel to Africa to apologize.

But most often, there are just the two simple words, and sometimes they’re not even spoken. When Michael and Shari Lienau and their children march, they wear black T-shirts with “So Sorry” emblazoned in white block letters.

It was in 2004 that filmmaker Michael Lienau and his family first joined Lifeline Expedition, an England-based organization dedicated, for the past seven years, to traveling the world and apologizing for the part of white Europeans and Americans in the African slave trade. The expedition has attracted a loyal group concerned with the long-term effects of slavery on relations among whites and blacks. In historic slave ports in the United States, South America, Caribbean islands, Great Britain and Africa, members of the group, including several Lienau children, allow themselves to be chained and yoked together in a jarring acknowledgment of the practice of human trade.

Michael Lienau documented many of the Lifeline Expedition’s trips and recently completed production on “Yokes and Chains: A Journey to Forgiveness and Freedom.”

The documentary will be shown Wednesday at Everett Community College as part of Black History Month.

Reporter Krista J. Kapralos: 425-339-3422 or kkapralos@heraldnet.com.

See the documentary

“Yokes and Chains: A Journey to Forgiveness and Freedom,” a documentary by Camano Island filmmaker Michael Lienau, is scheduled for 11 a.m. Wednesday at the Parks Building at Everett Community College, at 2000 Tower St., Everett.

To see a trailer for the documentary, go to http://www.yokesandchains.com. To read a 2006 Herald article on the Lienau family and the Lifeline Expedition and see photographs, go to http://www.heraldnet.com/article/20060521/NEWS01/605210777.

Voir aussi:

‘My ancestor traded in human misery’
Mario Cacciottolo
BBC News

Sorry is often said to be the hardest word but Andrew Hawkins felt compelled to apologise to a crowd of thousands of Africans.

His regret was not for his own actions but offered on behalf of his ancestor, who traded in African slaves 444 years ago.

Sir John Hawkins was a 16th Century English shipbuilder, merchant, pirate and slave trader.

He first captured natives of Sierra Leone in 1562 and sold them in the Caribbean. His cousin was Sir Francis Drake, who joined him on expeditions.

Hawkins is famed for reconstructing the design of English ships in the 1580s and commanded part of the fleet which repelled the Spanish Armada in 1588.

‘Family joke’

But it was his drive to acquire and sell African slaves which prompted Hawkins’s distant relation to take his own journey to that continent several centuries later.

Andrew Hawkins, of Liskeard, Cornwall, is a 37-year-old married father-of-three who runs a youth theatre company and claims to be the sailor’s descendant.

« It had always been part of the verbal history of our family, that we were related to Sir John Hawkins.

« It was a standing joke in the family that we had a pirate in the family.

« When I was a child I was quite pleased to learn of this family link and in Plymouth John Hawkins is a bit of a local hero.

« His picture used to be up in a subway there, along with Plymouth heroes. As a boy I used to be pleased to see it and to think I was related to him. »

‘Unjustifiable’

But in 2000 Andrew’s perspective was forever altered when he learned the truth about his ancestor.

« I heard David Pott, from the Lifeline Expedition, speak in 2000 and he mentioned how Hawkins was the first English slave trader.

« It was a bit of a shock and it really challenged me, particularly because Hawkins named his ships things like Jesus of Lubeck and the Grace of God.

SIR JOHN HAWKINS

Born Plymouth, 1535
Cousin of Sir Francis Drake
Famed for voyages to West Africa and South America
Trades slaves in the Caribbean in 1562, beginning England’s participation in slave trade
Helped fight the Spanish Armada in 1588 (Photo: National Maritime Museum)
« That really offended me, particularly the latter name. God’s grace has nothing to do with being chained up in the hold of a ship, lying in your own excrement for several months.

« So often things are done in the name of God that are horrific for mankind and I think God would consider what Sir John Hawkins did to be an abomination.

« It’s quite shocking that he could think it was justifiable. »

Andrew says slavery was never justifiable, even in the 16th Century, when people often say society « didn’t know any different ».

He says: « We don’t try to justify the Jewish Holocaust but this was an African Holocaust.

« We have to face our history and our own personal consequences. I went to show people that I didn’t think what happened was right and not everybody thought it was acceptable. »

Andrew and his fellow members from the Lifeline Expedition made their apology at The International Roots Festival, held in the Gambia in June.

This event, which runs for several weeks, encourages Africans to discover their ancestral identity.

Crowd hushed

The group of 27 spoke up at a football stadium in the capital Banjul, at the end of the festival’s opening ceremony.

They made their way to the stadium by walking through the streets laden in yokes and chains, before eventually speaking their words of atonement.

They included people from European nations such as England, France and Germany but there were also representatives from Jamaica, Barbados, Mali, the Ivory Coast and Sierra Leone.

The apologists walked to the stadium in chains and yokes
« Black people came to apologise because black people sold black people to Europeans, » Andrew said.

Andrew estimates the 25,000-capacity stadium was about two-thirds full, with delegates from African nations, Gambian vice-president, Isatou Njie-Saidy, and Rita Marley, widow of reggae legend Bob Marley, among the crowd.

He says: « The crowd died down to a hush. Some were looking at us, others were reading through their programmes to work out what we were doing.

« One lady at the front must have realised because she started applauding, then everyone did the same.

« That was a moving moment, because I wasn’t sure if they would be happy to see us. »

Multi-lingual apology

The group apologised in French, German and English – the languages of the nations responsible for much of the African slave trade.

It’s never too late to say you’re sorry

Andrew Hawkins
The apology had not been rehearsed. Andrew said: « It’s hard to remember what I said. I did say that as a member of the Hawkins family I did not accept what had happened was right.

« I said the slave trade was an abomination to God and I had come to ask the African people for their forgiveness. »

‘Emotional responses’

Vice-president Njie-Saidy joined them on stage and, in an impromptu speech, said she was « touched » by the apology before coming forward to help the group out of their chains.

Andrew says: « I was really overwhelmed with her generosity because she chose to forgive us, which is a very powerful thing.

« Afterwards people came on to the pitch to talk to us and there were some very emotional responses. »

But does Andrew really believe it was worth apologising for events that happened more than four centuries ago, on behalf of a relative who is so very distant?

« Yes. It’s never too late to say you’re sorry, » he said.

Voir également:

The March of the Abolitionists
Can reconciliation and forgiveness be achieved by wearing the yokes and chains of imprisonment? The abolition marchers believe their 250-mile walk will go at least some way toward promoting a greater understanding of our role in the slave trade.

Campaigners call it ‘an act of apology’ and as such, the March of the Abolitionists is being billed as the first major public event to mark the 200th anniversary of the Abolition of the Slave Trade Act.

Image: Lifeline Expedition website
Beginning in Hull on Friday 2nd March, hundreds of people will don yokes and chains and attempt the 250-mile journey from Humberside to London – the gruelling route taken by enslaved Africans during the period of the Atlantic Slave Trade.

Marching through the county
The abolition marchers’ route will link up sites throughout the country that played a significant role in the slave trade in the United Kingdom.

In Cambridgeshire, these include Wisbech, the birthplace of abolitionist Thomas Clarkson; Cambridge, where both Clarkson and William Wilberforce were educated; and Soham, where the African abolitionist Olaudah Equiano was married.

You’re welcome to walk with the marchers as they pass through your part of the county.

Route details
Monday 12th March – Holbeach to Wisbech
Tuesday 13th March – Wisbech to Wimblington
Wednesday 14th March – Wimblington to Sutton
Thursday 15th March – Sutton to Soham
Friday 16th March – Soham to Cambridge
Saturday 17th March – Cambridge to Royston
Sunday 18th March – Royston (rest day)
Monday 19th March – Royston to Buntingford
The march will culminate in an Anglican Apology event in Greenwich on Saturday 24th March.

Why and who?
The March of the Abolitionists is an initiative of the Lifeline Expedition in partnership with Anti-Slavery International, CARE, Church Mission Society, the Equiano Society, Northumbria Community, Peaceworks, USPG, Wilberforce 2007 (Hull) and Youth With A Mission. The march is also associated with the Set All Free and Stop the Traffik coalitions.

Image: Lifeline Expedition website
Marchers include a number of children aged between five and 15, two of whom will occasionally wear the yokes and chains.  The organisers stress that these children are aged 12 and 15 and have chosen to wear the yokes after seeing pictures of enslaved children.

The march of the Abolitionists aims to bring about an apology for the slave trade, and especially the role of the Church, and so help people deal with its legacy; to raise greater awareness of the true history of both slavery and abolition; remember and celebrate the work of both the black and white abolitionists; and promote greater understanding, reconciliation and forgiveness.


US Open/50e: Reviens, Arthur, ils sont devenus fous ! (Contrary to Ali or Kaepernick, the Jackie Robinson of tennis stayed committed to respectful dialogue knowing real change came from rational advocacy and hard work not emotional self-indulgence)

9 septembre, 2018

Arthur Ashe participates in a hearing on apartheid, at the United Nations in New York.

Segregation and racism had made me loathe aspects of the white South, but had scarcely left me less of a patriot. In fact, to me and my family, winning a place on our national team would mark my ultimate triumph over all those people who had opposed my career in the South in the name of segregation. (…) Despite segregation, I loved the United States. It thrilled me beyond measure to hear the umpire announce not my name but that of my country: ‘Game, United States,’ ‘Set, United States,’ ‘Game, Set, and Match, United States.’ (…) There were times when I felt a burning sense of shame that I was not with blacks—and whites—standing up to the fire hoses and police dogs. (…) I never went along with the pronouncements of Elijah Muhammad that the white man was the devil and that blacks should be striving for separate development—a sort of American apartheid. That never made sense to me. (…) Jesse, I’m just not arrogant, and I ain’t never going to be arrogant. I’m just going to do it my way. Arthur Ashe
I’ve always believed that every man is my brother. Clay will earn the public’s hatred because of his connections with the Black Muslims. Joe Louis
I’ve been told that Clay has every right to follow any religion he chooses and I agree. But, by the same token, I have every right to call the Black Muslims a menace to the United States and a menace to the Negro race. I do not believe God put us here to hate one another. Cassius Clay is disgracing himself and the Negro race. Floyd Patterson
Clay is so young and has been misled by the wrong people. He might as well have joined the Ku Klux Klan. Floyd Patterson
Bluebirds with bluebirds, red birds with red birds, pigeons with pigeons, eagles with eagles. God didn’t make no mistake! (…) I don’t hate rattlesnakes, I don’t hate tigers — I just know I can’t get along with them. I don’t want to try to eat with them or sleep with them. (…)  I know whites and blacks cannot get along; this is nature. (…) I like what he [George Wallace] says. He says Negroes shouldn’t force themselves in white neighborhoods, and white people shouldn’t have to move out of the neighborhood just because one Negro comes. Now that makes sense. Muhammed Ali
A black man should be killed if he’s messing with a white woman. (…) We’ll kill anybody who tries to mess around with our women. Muhammed Ali
Long before he died, Muhammad Ali had been extolled by many as the greatest boxer in history. Some called him the greatest athlete of the 20th century. Still others, like George W. Bush, when he bestowed the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2005, endorsed Ali’s description of himself as “the greatest of all time.” Ali’s death Friday night sent the paeans and panegyrics to even more exalted heights. Fox Sports went so far as to proclaim Muhammad Ali nothing less than “the greatest athlete the world will ever see.” As a champion in the ring, Ali may have been without equal. But when his idolizers go beyond boxing and sports, exalting him as a champion of civil rights and tolerance, they spout pernicious nonsense. There have been spouters aplenty in the last few days — everyone from the NBA commissioner (“Ali transcended sports with his outsized personality and dedication to civil rights”) to the British prime minister (“a champion of civil rights”) to the junior senator from Massachusetts (“Muhammad Ali fought for civil rights . . . for human rights . . . for peace”). Time for a reality check. It is true that in his later years, Ali lent his name and prestige to altruistic activities and worthy public appeals. By then he was suffering from Parkinson’s disease, a cruel affliction that robbed him of his mental and physical keenness and increasingly forced him to rely on aides to make decisions on his behalf. But when Ali was in his prime, the uninhibited “king of the world,” he was no expounder of brotherhood and racial broad-mindedness. On the contrary, he was an unabashed bigot and racial separatist and wasn’t shy about saying so. In a wide-ranging 1968 interview with Bud Collins, the storied Boston Globe sports reporter, Ali insisted that it was as unnatural to expect blacks and whites to live together as it would be to expect humans to live with wild animals. “I don’t hate rattlesnakes, I don’t hate tigers — I just know I can’t get along with them,” he said. “I don’t want to try to eat with them or sleep with them.” Collins asked: “You don’t think that we can ever get along?” “I know whites and blacks cannot get along; this is nature,” Ali replied. That was why he liked George Wallace, the segregationist Alabama governor who was then running for president. Collins wasn’t sure he’d heard right. “You like George Wallace?” “Yes, sir,” said Ali. “I like what he says. He says Negroes shouldn’t force themselves in white neighborhoods, and white people shouldn’t have to move out of the neighborhood just because one Negro comes. Now that makes sense.” This was not some inexplicable aberration. It reflected a hateful worldview that Ali, as a devotee of Elijah Muhammad and the segregationist Nation of Islam, espoused for years. At one point, he even appeared before a Ku Klux Klan rally. It was “a hell of a scene,” he later boasted — Klansmen with hoods, a burning cross, “and me on the platform,” preaching strict racial separation. “Black people should marry their own women,” Ali declaimed. “Bluebirds with bluebirds, red birds with red birds, pigeons with pigeons, eagles with eagles. God didn’t make no mistake!” In 1975, amid the frenzy over the impending “Thrilla in Manila,” his third title fight with Joe Frazier, Ali argued vehemently in a Playboy interview that interracial couples ought to be lynched. “A black man should be killed if he’s messing with a white woman,” he said. And it was the same for a white man making a pass at a black woman. “We’ll kill anybody who tries to mess around with our women.” But suppose the black woman wanted to be with the white man, the interviewer asked. “Then she dies,” Ali answered. “Kill her too.” Jeff Jacoby
Muhammad Ali was the most controversial boxer in the history of the sport, arguably the most gifted and certainly the best known. His ring glories and his life on the political and racial frontline combine to make him one of the most famous, infamous and discussed figures in modern history. During his life he stood next to Malcolm X at a fiery pulpit, dined with tyrants, kings, crooks, vagabonds, billionaires and from the shell of his awful stumbling silence during the last decade his deification was complete as he struggled with his troubled smile at each rich compliment. (…) He was a one-man revolution and that means he made enemies faster than any boy-fighter – which is what he was when he first became world heavyweight champion – could handle. (…) but (…) His best years as a prize-fighter were denied him and denied us by his refusal to be drafted into the American military system in 1967. At that time he was boxing’s finest fighter, a man so gifted with skills that he knew very little about what his body did in the ring; his instincts, his speed and his developing power at that point of his exile would have ended all arguments over his greatness forever had he been allowed to continue fighting. Ali was out of the ring for three years and seven months and the forced exile took away enough of his skills to deny us the Greatest at his greatest, but it made him the icon he became. “We never saw the best of my guy,” Angelo Dundee told me in Mexico City in 1993. Dundee should know. He had been collecting the fighter’s sweat as the chief trainer from 1960 and would until the ring end in 1981. (…) He had gained universal respect during the break because of his refusal to endorse the bloody conflict in Vietnam, but he often walked a thin line in the 70s with the very people that had been happy to back his cause. He was not as loved then as he is now, and there are some obvious reasons for that. In 1970 there were still papers in Britain that called him Cassius Clay, the birth name he had started to shred the day after beating Sonny Liston for the world title in 1964. In America he still divided the boxing press and the people. In the 70s he attended a Ku Klux Klan meeting, accepted their awards and talked openly and disturbingly about mixed race marriages and a stance he shared with the extremists. His harshest opinions are always overlooked, discarded like his excessive cruelty in the ring, and explained by a misguided concept that everything he said and did, that was either uncomfortable or just wrong, was justifiable under some type of Ali law that insisted there was a twinkle in his eye. There probably was a twinkle in his eye but he had some misguided racist ideas back then and celebrated them. In the ring he had hurt and made people suffer during one-sided fights and spat at the feet of one opponent. He was mean and there is nothing wrong with that in boxing, but he was also cruel to honest fighters, men that had very little of his talent and certainly none of his wealth. The way he treated Joe Frazier before and after their three fights remains a shameful blot on Ali’s legacy. I sat once in dwindling light with Frazier in Philadelphia at the end of three days of talking and listened to his words and watched his tears of hate and utter frustration as he outlined the harm Ali’s words had caused him and his family. Big soft Joe had no problem with the damage Ali’s fists had caused him, that was a fair fight but the verbal slaughter had been a mismatch and recordings of that still make me feel sick. I don’t laugh at that type of abuse. (…) Away from the ring excellence he went to cities in the Middle East to negotiate for the release of hostages and smiled easily when men in masks, carrying AK47s, put blindfolds on him and drove like the lunatics they were through bombed streets. “Hey man, you sure you know where you’re going?” he asked one driver. “I hope you do, coz I can’t see a thing.” He went on too many missions to too many countries for too long, his drive draining his life as he handed out Islamic leaflets. He was often exploited on his many trips, pulled every way and never refusing a request. On a trip to Britain in 2009 he was bussed all over the country for a series of bad-taste dinners that ended with people squatting down next to his wheelchair; Ali’s gaze was off in another realm, but the punters, who had paid hundreds for the sickening pleasure, stuck up their thumbs or made fists for the picture. The great twist in the abhorrent venture was that Ali’s face looked so bad that his head was photo-shopped for a more acceptable Ali face. Who could have possibly sanctioned that atrocity? During his fighting days he had men to protect him, men like Gene Kilroy, the man with the perm, that loved him and helped form a protective guard at his feet to keep the jackals from the meat. When he left the sport and was alone for the first time in the real world, there were people that fought each other to get close, close enough to insert their invisible transfusion tubes deep into his open heart. His daughters started to resurrect their own wall of protection the older they got, switching duties from sitting on Daddy’s lap to watching his back like the devoted sentinels they became. In the end it felt like the whole world was watching his back, watching the last moments under the neon of the King of the World. Steve Bunce
I think Ali is being done a disservice by the way in which he’s these days cast as benign. He was always a lot more complicated than that. (…) Ali has been post-rationalised as a champion of the civil rights movement. But far from promoting the idea of black and white together, his was a much more tricky, divisive politics. John Dower
Far from being embarrassed about sharing jaw-time with the Grand Chief Bigot or whatever the loon in the sheet called himself, Ali boasted about it. The revelation of his cosy chats with white supremacists comes in a television documentary screened on More4. As Ali finds himself overtaken as the most celebrated black American in history, True Stories: Thrilla In Manila provides a timely re-assessment of his politics. (…) Before his third fight with Frazier, Ali was at his most elevated, symbolically as well as in the ring. Hard to imagine when these days he elicits universal reverence, back then he was a figure who divided America, as loathed as he was admired. At the time he was taking his lead from the Nation of Islam, which, in its espousal of a black separatism, found its politics dovetailing with the cross-burning lynch mob out on the political boondocks. Ali was by far the organisation’s most prominent cipher. The film reminds us why. Back then, black sporting prowess reinforced many a prejudiced theory about the black man being good for nothing beyond physical activity. But here was Ali, as quick with his mind as with his fists. When he held court the world listened. Intriguingly, the film reveals, many of his better lines were scripted for him by his Nation of Islam minders. Ferdie Pacheco, the man who converted Ali to the bizarre cause which insisted that a spaceship would imminently arrive in the United States to take the black man to a better place, tells Dower’s cameras that it was he who came up with the line, « No Viet Cong ever called me nigger ». There was never a more succinct summary of America’s hypocrisy in forcing its beleaguered black citizenry to fight in Vietnam. (…) The film suggests it was his opponent who got the blunt end of Ali’s political bludgeon. The pair were once friends and Frazier had supported Ali’s stance on refusing the draft. But leading up to the fight Ali turned on his old mate with a ferocity which makes uncomfortable viewing even 30 years on. Viciously disparaging of Frazier, he calls him an Uncle Tom, a white man’s puppet. Ali riled Frazier to the point where he entered the ring so infuriated that he abandoned his game plan and blindly struck out. So distracted was he by Ali’s politically motivated jibes, he lost. Indeed, what we might be watching in Dower’s film is not so much the apex of Ali’s political potency as the birth of sporting mind games. Jim White
In 1974, in the middle of a Michael Parkinson interview, Muhammad Ali decided to dispense with all the safe conventions of chat show etiquette. “You say I got white friends,” he declared, “I say they are associates.” When his host dared to suggest that the boxer’s trainer of 14 years standing, Angelo Dundee, might be a friend, Ali insisted, gruffly: “He is an associate.” Within seconds, with Parkinson failing to get a word in edgeways, Ali had provided a detailed account of his reasoning. “Elijah Muhammad,” he told the TV viewers of 1970s Middle England, “Is the one who preached that the white man of America, number one, is the Devil!” The whites of America, said Ali, had “lynched us, raped us, castrated us, tarred and feathered us … Elijah Muhammad has been preaching that the white man of America – God taught him – is the blue-eyed, blond-headed Devil!  No good in him, no justice, he’s gonna be destroyed! “The white man is the Devil.  We do believe that.  We know it!” In one explosive, virtuoso performance, Ali had turned “this little TV show” into an exposition of his beliefs, and the beliefs of “two million five hundred” other followers of the radically – to some white minds, dangerously – black separatist religious movement, the Nation of Islam. At the height of his tirade, Ali drew slightly nervous laughter from the studio when he told Parkinson “You are too small mentally to tackle me on anything I represent.” (…) By the time he met Ali in 1962, Malcolm X was Elijah Muhammad’s chief spokesman and most prominent apostle. His belief that violence was sometimes necessary, and the Nation of Islam’s insistence that followers remain separate from and avoid participation in American politics meant that not every civil rights leader welcomed Muhammad Ali joining the movement. “When Cassius Clay joined the Black Muslims [The Nation of Islam],” said Martin Luther King, “he became a champion of racial segregation, and that is what we are fighting against.” The bitter irony is that soon after providing the Nation of Islam with its most famous convert, Malcolm X became disillusioned with the movement.  A trip to Mecca exposed him to white Muslims, shattering his belief that whites were inherently evil.  He broke from the Nation of Islam and toned down his speeches. Ali, though, remained faithful to Elijah Muhammad.  “Turning my back on Malcolm,” he admitted years later, “Was one of the mistakes that I regret most in my life.” (…) By then, though, Ali’s own attitudes to the « blue-eyed devils” had long since mellowed.  In 1975 he converted to the far more conventional Sunni Islam – possibly prompted by the fact that Elijah Muhammad had died of congestive heart failure in the same year, and his son Warith Deen Mohammad had moved the Nation of Islam towards inclusion in the mainstream Islamic community. He rebranded the movement the “World Community of Islam in the West”, only for Farrakhan to break away in 1978 and create a new Nation of Islam, which he claimed remained true to the teachings of “the Master” [Fard]. “The Nation of Islam taught that white people were devils,” he wrote in 2004.  “I don’t believe that now; in fact, I never really believed that. But when I was young, I had seen and heard so many horrible stories about the white man that this made me stop and listen. » The attentive listener to the 1974 interview, might, in fact, have sensed that even then Ali wasn’t entirely convinced about white men being blue-eyed devils. He had, after all, set the bar pretty high for “associates” like Angelo Dundee to become friends. “I don’t have one black friend hardly,” he had said.  “A friend is one who will not even consider [before] giving his life for you.” And, despite calling Parky “the biggest hypocrite in the world” and “a joke”, he could also get a laugh by reassuring the chat show host: “I know you [are] all right.” Adam Lusher
[want police to back off] No. That represented our progressive, our activists, our liberal journalists, our politicians. But it did not represent the overall community because we know for a fact that around the time that Freddie Gray was killed, we start to see homicides increase. We had five homicides in that neighborhood while we were protesting. What I wanted to see happen was that people would build a trust relationship with our police department so that they would feel more comfortable with having conversations with the police about crime in their neighborhood because they would feel safer. So we wanted the police there. We wanted them engaging the community. We didn’t want them there beating the hell out of us. We didn’t want that. (…) We’ve not seen any changes in those relationships. What we have seen was that the police has distanced themselves, and the community has distanced themselves even further. So there is – the divide has really intensified. It hasn’t decreased. And of course, we want to delineate the whole concept of the culture of bad policing that exists. Nobody denies that. But as a result of this, we don’t see the policing – the level of policing we need in our community to keep the crime down in these cities that we’re seeing bleed to death. Reverend Kinji Scott (Baltimore)
The crime victories of the last two decades, and the moral support on which law and order depends, are now in jeopardy thanks to the falsehoods of the Black Lives Matter movement. Police operating in inner-city neighborhoods now find themselves routinely surrounded by cursing, jeering crowds when they make a pedestrian stop or try to arrest a suspect. Sometimes bottles and rocks are thrown. Bystanders stick cell phones in the officers’ faces, daring them to proceed with their duties. Officers are worried about becoming the next racist cop of the week and possibly losing their livelihood thanks to an incomplete cell phone video that inevitably fails to show the antecedents to their use of force.  (…) As a result of the anti-cop campaign of the last two years and the resulting push-back in the streets, officers in urban areas are cutting back on precisely the kind of policing that led to the crime decline of the 1990s and 2000s. (…) On the other hand, the people demanding that the police back off are by no means representative of the entire black community. Go to any police-neighborhood meeting in Harlem, the South Bronx, or South Central Los Angeles, and you will invariably hear variants of the following: “We want the dealers off the corner.” “You arrest them and they’re back the next day.” “There are kids hanging out on my stoop. Why can’t you arrest them for loitering?” “I smell weed in my hallway. Can’t you do something?” I met an elderly cancer amputee in the Mount Hope section of the Bronx who was terrified to go to her lobby mailbox because of the young men trespassing there and selling drugs. The only time she felt safe was when the police were there. “Please, Jesus,” she said to me, “send more police!” The irony is that the police cannot respond to these heartfelt requests for order without generating the racially disproportionate statistics that will be used against them in an ACLU or Justice Department lawsuit. Unfortunately, when officers back off in high crime neighborhoods, crime shoots through the roof. Our country is in the midst of the first sustained violent crime spike in two decades. Murders rose nearly 17 percent in the nation’s 50 largest cities in 2015, and it was in cities with large black populations where the violence increased the most. (…) I first identified the increase in violent crime in May 2015 and dubbed it “the Ferguson effect.” (…) The number of police officers killed in shootings more than doubled during the first three months of 2016. In fact, officers are at much greater risk from blacks than unarmed blacks are from the police. Over the last decade, an officer’s chance of getting killed by a black has been 18.5 times higher than the chance of an unarmed black getting killed by a cop. (…) We have been here before. In the 1960s and early 1970s, black and white radicals directed hatred and occasional violence against the police. The difference today is that anti-cop ideology is embraced at the highest reaches of the establishment: by the President, by his Attorney General, by college presidents, by foundation heads, and by the press. The presidential candidates of one party are competing to see who can out-demagogue President Obama’s persistent race-based calumnies against the criminal justice system, while those of the other party have not emphasized the issue as they might have. I don’t know what will end the current frenzy against the police. What I do know is that we are playing with fire, and if it keeps spreading, it will be hard to put out. Heather Mac Donald
It’s ironic that Jerry’s longest-lasting legacy is that the big shoe company co-opted his slogan. Nike has Just Do It in all of their ad campaigns.
Sam Leff (Yippie, close friend of Hoffman’s)
Je ne vais pas afficher de fierté pour le drapeau d’un pays qui opprime les Noirs. Il y a des cadavres dans les rues et des meurtriers qui s’en tirent avec leurs congés payés. Colin Kaepernick
Je pense que tous les athlètes, tous les humains et tous les Afro-Américains devraient être totalement reconnaissants et honorés [par les manifestations lancées par les anciens joueurs de la NFL Colin Kaepernick et Eric Reid]. Serena Williams
Je ne suis pas une tricheuse! Vous me devez des excuses! (…) Je ne suis pas une tricheuse! Je suis mère de famille, je n’ai jamais triché de ma vie ! Serena Williams
For her country, Osaka has already succeeded in a major milestone: She is the first Japanese woman to reach the final of any Grand Slam. And she’s currently her country’s top-ranked player. Yet in Japan, where racial homogeneity is prized and ethnic background comprises a big part of cultural belonging, Osaka is considered hafu or half Japanese. Born to a Japanese mother and a Haitian father, Osaka grew up in New York. She holds dual American and Japanese passports, but plays under Japan’s flag. Some hafu, like Miss Universe Japan Ariana Miyamoto, have spoken publicly about the discrimination the term can confer. “I wonder how a hafu can represent Japan,” one Facebook user wrote of Miyamoto, according to Al Jazeera America’s translation. For her part, Osaka has spoken repeatedly about being proud to represent Japan, as well as Haiti. But in a 2016 USA Today interview she also noted, “When I go to Japan people are confused. From my name, they don’t expect to see a black girl.” On the court, Osaka has largely been embraced as one of her country’s rising stars. Off court, she says she’s still trying to learn the language. “I can understand way more Japanese than I can speak,” she said. (…) Earlier this year, Osaka reveled a four-word mantra keeps her steady through tough matches: “What would Serena do?” Her idolization of the 23 Grand Slam-winning titan is well-known. “She’s the main reason why I started playing tennis,” Osaka told the New York Times. Time
Des sportifs semblent désormais plus facilement se mettre en avant pour évoquer leurs convictions, que ce soient des championnes de tennis ou des footballeurs. Mais ces athlètes activistes restent encore minoritaires. Peu ont suivi Kaepernick lorsqu’il s’est agenouillé pendant l’hymne national. La plupart se focalisent sur leur sport, ils ne sont pas vraiment désireux de jouer les trouble-fête. Dans notre culture, ces sportifs sont des dieux, qui peuvent exercer une influence positive. Ils peuvent être un bon exemple d’engagement civique pour des jeunes. Et puis une bonne controverse comme l’affaire Kaepernick permet de pimenter un peu le sport et d’élargir le débat au-delà du jeu. Orin Starn (anthropologue)
Son genou droit posé à terre le 1er septembre 2016 a fait de lui un paria. Ce jour-là, Colin Kaepernick, quarterback des San Francisco 49ers, avait une nouvelle fois décidé de ne pas se lever pour l’hymne national. Coupe afro et regard grave, il était resté dans cette position pour protester contre les violences raciales et les bavures policières qui embrasaient les Etats-Unis. Plus d’un an après, la polémique reste vive. Son boycott lui vaut toujours d’être marginalisé et tenu à l’écart par la Ligue nationale de football américain (NFL). L’affaire rebondit ces jours, à l’occasion des débuts de la saison de la NFL. Sans contrat depuis mars, Colin Kaepernick est de facto un joueur sans équipe, à la recherche d’un nouvel employeur. (…) Plus surprenant, une centaine de policiers new-yorkais ont manifesté ensemble fin août à Brooklyn, tous affublés d’un t-shirt noir avec le hashtag #imwithkap. Le célèbre policier Frank Serpico, 81 ans, qui a dénoncé la corruption généralisée de la police dans les années 1960 et inspiré Al Pacino pour le film Serpico (1973), en faisait partie. Les sportifs américains sont nombreux à afficher leur soutien à Colin Kaepernick. C’est le cas notamment des basketteurs Kevin Durant ou Stephen Curry, des Golden State Warriors. (…) La légende du baseball Hank Aaron fait également partie des soutiens inconditionnels de Colin Kaepernick. Sans oublier Tommie Smith, qui lors des Jeux olympiques de Mexico en 1968 avait, sur le podium du 200 mètres, levé son poing ganté de noir contre la ségrégation raciale, avec son comparse John Carlos. Le geste militant à répétition de Colin Kaepernick, d’abord assis puis agenouillé, a eu un effet domino. Son coéquipier Eric Reid l’avait immédiatement imité la première fois qu’il a mis le genou à terre. Une partie des joueurs des Cleveland Browns continuent, en guise de solidarité, de boycotter l’hymne des Etats-Unis, joué avant chaque rencontre sportive professionnelle. La footballeuse homosexuelle Megan Rapinoe, championne olympique en 2012 et championne du monde en 2015, avait elle aussi suivi la voie de Colin Kaepernick et posé son genou à terre. Mais depuis que la Fédération américaine de football (US Soccer) a édicté un nouveau règlement, en mars 2017, qui oblige les internationaux à se tenir debout pendant l’hymne, elle est rentrée dans le rang. Colin Kaepernick lui-même s’était engagé à se lever pour l’hymne pour la saison 2017. Une promesse qui n’a pas pour autant convaincu la NFL de le réintégrer. Barack Obama avait pris sa défense; Donald Trump l’a enfoncé. En pleine campagne, le milliardaire new-yorkais avait qualifié son geste d’«exécrable», l’hymne et le drapeau étant sacro-saints aux Etats-Unis. Il a été jusqu’à lui conseiller de «chercher un pays mieux adapté». Les chaussettes à motifs de cochons habillés en policiers que Colin Kaepernick a portées pendant plusieurs entraînements – elles ont été très remarquées – n’ont visiblement pas contribué à le rendre plus sympathique à ses yeux. Mais ni les menaces de mort ni ses maillots brûlés n’ont calmé le militantisme de Colin Kaepernick. Un militantisme d’ailleurs un peu surprenant et parfois taxé d’opportunisme: métis, de mère blanche et élevé par des parents adoptifs blancs, Colin Kaepernick n’a rallié la cause noire, et le mouvement Black Lives Matter, que relativement tardivement. Avant Kaepernick, la star de la NBA LeBron James avait défrayé la chronique en portant un t-shirt noir avec en lettres blanches «Je ne peux pas respirer». Ce sont les derniers mots d’un jeune Noir américain asthmatique tué par un policier blanc. Par ailleurs, il avait ouvertement soutenu Hillary Clinton dans sa course à l’élection présidentielle. Timidement, d’autres ont affiché leurs convictions politiques sur des t-shirts, mais sans aller jusqu’au boycott de l’hymne national, un geste très contesté. L’élection de Donald Trump et le drame de Charlottesville provoqué par des suprémacistes blancs ont contribué à favoriser l’émergence de ce genre de protestations. Ces comportements signent un retour du sportif engagé, une espèce presque en voie de disparition depuis les années 1960-1970, où de grands noms comme Mohamed Ali, Billie Jean King ou John Carlos ont porté leur militantisme à bras-le-corps. Au cours des dernières décennies, l’heure n’était pas vraiment à la revendication politique, confirme Orin Starn, professeur d’anthropologie culturelle à l’Université Duke en Caroline du Nord. A partir des années 1980, c’est plutôt l’image du sportif businessman qui a primé, celui qui s’intéresse à ses sponsors, à devenir le meilleur possible, soucieux de ne déclencher aucune polémique. Un sportif lisse avant tout motivé par ses performances et sa carrière. Comme le basketteur Michael Jordan ou le golfeur Tiger Woods. Le Temps
It was an incredible match. I mean, Arthur was an innovator. It was the first time he sort of sat down at the side of the court in between — they didn’t have chairs at the side of the court for a long time; we sort of had to towel off and go on — but he would sit and cover his head with the towel and just think. It was the first time you were conscious of the mental side of tennis. Arthur was instrumental in that. . . . Arthur was a thinker. Virginia Wade
Arthur didn’t need Vietnam. Arthur had his own Vietnam right there in the United States in those days, and some of the things that I saw while I was there — he didn’t need that. The thing that I always think about, and this was always the most important thing in my mind, was that Arthur represented so many possibilities. Arthur was the first to do so much so often that those of us who knew him would say: ‘What’s next? What mountain was he going to climb next?’ Arthur was always different. (…) Growing up, Arthur was a sponge. . . . That was just his nature. He was a voracious reader, and he had to satisfy his intellect. I tell people if Arthur had concentrated on just tennis, he would have been the best in the world. But tennis was a vehicle. . . . He wanted to be able to take kids outside of their environs, outside of their element for a little while and expose them to what they can be. . . . And, let’s face it, most parents don’t have the wherewithal to do that. It’s not easy. What happens is you get somebody like Arthur — and following Arthur, LeBron James is starting to do things — to expose kids. It’s so important that that happens. (…) “Until Arthur came along and Althea came along, tennis was a sport of the elites. Then you get two playground children — one from Harlem, one from Richmond — to break into the bigs. People had to stop and think about that. It opened the doors for other people, and that’s what it was all about. That’s what it was all about for him. Johnnie Ashe
The Apollo program was a national effort that depended on American derring-do and sacrifice. History is usually airbrushed to remove a figure who has fallen out of favor with a dictatorship, or to hide away an episode of national shame. Leave it to Hollywood to erase from a national triumph its most iconic moment. The new movie First Man, a biopic about the Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, omits the planting of the American flag during his historic walk on the surface of the moon. Ryan Gosling, who plays Armstrong in the film, tried to explain the strange editing of his moonwalk: “This was widely regarded in the end as a human achievement. I don’t think that Neil viewed himself as an American hero.” Armstrong was a reticent man, but he surely considered himself an American, and everyone else considered him a hero. (“You’re a hero whether you like it or not,” one newspaper admonished him on the 10th anniversary of the landing.) Gosling added that Armstrong’s walk “transcended countries and borders,” which is literally true, since it occurred roughly 238,900 miles from Earth, although Armstrong got there on an American rocket, walked in an American spacesuit, and returned home to America. (…) It was a chapter in a space race between the United States and the Soviet Union that involved national prestige and the perceived worth of our respective economic and political systems. The Apollo program wasn’t about the brotherhood of man, but rather about achieving a national objective before a hated and feared adversary did. The mission of Apollo 11 was, appropriately, soaked in American symbolism. The lunar module was called Eagle, and the command module Columbia. There had been some consideration to putting up a U.N. flag, but it was scotched — it would be an American flag and only an American flag. (…) There may be a crass commercial motive in the omission — the Chinese, whose market is so important to big films, might not like overt American patriotic fanfare. Neither does much of our cultural elite. They may prefer not to plant the flag — but the heroes of Apollo 11 had no such compunction. National Review
Billed as being based on “a crazy, outrageous incredible true story” about how a black cop infiltrated the KKK, Spike Lee’s BlacKkKlansman would be more accurately described as the story of how a black cop in 1970s Colorado Springs spoke to the Klan on the phone. He pretended to be a white supremacist . . . on the phone. That isn’t infiltration, that’s prank-calling. A poster for the movie shows a black guy wearing a Klan hood. Great starting point for a comedy, but it didn’t happen. The cop who actually attended KKK meetings undercover was a white guy (played by Adam Driver). These led . . . well, nowhere in particular. No plot was foiled. Those meetups mainly revealed that Klansmen behave exactly how you’d expect Klansmen to behave. The movie is a typical Spike Lee joint: A thin story is told in painfully didactic style and runs on far too long. (…)  Washington (son of Denzel) has an easygoing charisma as the unflappable Ron Stallworth, a rookie cop in Colorado Springs who volunteers to go undercover as a detective in 1972, near the height of the Black Power movement and a moment when law enforcement was closely tracking the activities of radicals such as Stokely Carmichael, a.k.a. Kwame Ture, a speech of whose Stallworth says he attended while posing as an ordinary citizen. In the movie, Stallworth experiences an awakening of black pride and falls for a student leader, Patrice (a luminous Laura Harrier, who also played Peter Parker’s girlfriend in Spider-Man: Homecoming), inspiring in him the need to do something for his people. (…) The Klan also turn out to be grandstanders and blowhards given to Carmichael-style paranoid prophecies and seem to hope to troll their enemies into attacking them. When Lee realizes he needs something to actually happen besides racist talk, he turns to a subplot featuring a white-supremacist lady running around with a purse full of C-4 explosive with which she intends to blow up the black radicals. It’s so unconvincing that you watch it thinking, “I really doubt this happened.” It didn’t. The only other tense moment in the film, in which Driver’s undercover cop (who is Jewish) is nearly subjected to a lie-detector test about his religion by a suspicious Klansman, is also fabricated. Lee frames his two camps as opposites, but whether we’re with the black-power types or the white-power yokels, they’re equally wrong about the race war they seem to yearn for. The two sides are equally far from the stable center, the color-blind institution holding society together, which turns out to be . . . the police! After some talk from the radical Patrice (whose character is also a fabrication) about how the whole system is corrupt and she could never date a “pig,” and a scene in which Stallworth implies the police’s code of covering for one another reminds him of the Klan, Lee winds up having the police unite to fight racism, with one bad apple expunged and everybody else on the otherwise all-white force supporting Ron. That Spike Lee has turned in a pro-cop film has to be counted one of the stranger cultural developments of 2018, but Lee seems to have accidentally aligned with cops in the course of issuing an anti-Trump broadside. (…) (See also: an introduction in which Alec Baldwin plays a Southern cracker called Dr. Kennebrew Beauregard who rants about desegregation for several minutes, then is never seen again.) Lee’s other major goal is to link Stallworth’s story to Trumpism using David Duke. Duke, like Trump, said awful things at the time of the Charlottesville murder and played a part in the Stallworth story when the cop was assigned to protect the Klan leader (played by Topher Grace) on a visit to Colorado Springs and later threw his arm around him while posing for a picture. Saying Duke presaged Trump seems like a stretch, though. After all the nudge-nudge MAGA lines uttered by the Klansmen throughout the film, the let-me-spell-it-out-for-you finale, with footage from the Charlottesville white-supremacist rally, seems de trop. BlacKkKlansman was timed to hit theaters one year after the anniversary of the horror in Virginia. That Charlottesville II attracted only two dozen pathetic dorks to the cause of white supremacy would seem to undermine the coda. The Klan’s would-be successors, far from being more emboldened than they have been since Stallworth’s time, appear to be nearly extinct. National review
The all-seeing social-justice eye penetrates every aspect of our lives: sports, movies, public monuments, social media, funerals . . .A definition of totalitarianism might be the saturation of every facet of daily life by political agendas and social-justice messaging. At the present rate, America will soon resemble the dystopias of novels such as 1984 and Brave New World in which all aspects of life are warped by an all-encompassing ideology of coerced sameness. Or rather, the prevailing orthodoxy in America is the omnipresent attempt of an elite — exempt from the consequences of its own ideology thanks to its supposed superior virtue and intelligence — to mandate an equality of result. We expect their 24/7 political messaging on cable-channel news networks, talk radio, or print and online media. And we concede that long ago an NPR, CNN, MSNBC, or New York Times ceased being journalistic entities as much as obsequious megaphones of the progressive itinerary. But increasingly we cannot escape anywhere the lidless gaze of our progressive lords, all-seeing, all-knowing from high up in their dark towers. (…) Americans have long accepted that Hollywood movies no longer seek just to entertain or inform, but to indoctrinate audiences by pushing progressive agendas. That commandment also demands that America be portrayed negatively — or better yet simply written out of history. Take the new film First Man, about the first moon landing. Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong became famous when he emerged from The Eagle, the two-man lunar module, and planted an American flag on the moon’s surface. Yet that iconic act disappears from the movie version. (At least Ryan Gosling, who plays Armstrong, does not walk out of the space capsule to string up a U.N. banner.) Gosling claimed that the moon landing should not be seen as an American effort. Instead, he advised, it should be “widely regarded as a human achievement” — as if any nation’s efforts or the work of the United Nations in 1969 could have pulled off such an astounding and dangerous enterprise. I suppose we are to believe that Gosling’s Canada might just as well have built a Saturn V rocket. (…) Sports offers no relief. It is now no more a refuge from political indoctrination than is Hollywood. Yet it is about as difficult to find a jock who can pontificate about politics as it is to encounter a Ph.D. or politico who can pass or pitch. The National Football League, the National Basketball Association, and sports channels are now politicalized in a variety of ways, from not standing up or saluting the flag during the National Anthem to pushing social-justice issues as part of televised sports analysis. What a strange sight to see tough sportsmen of our Roman-style gladiatorial arenas become delicate souls who wilt on seeing a dreaded hand across the heart during the playing of the National Anthem. Even when we die, we do not escape politicization. At a recent eight-hour, televised funeral service for singer Aretha Franklin, politicos such as Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton went well beyond their homages into political harangues. Pericles or Lincoln they were not. (…) Politics likewise absorbed Senator John McCain’s funeral the next day. (…) Even the long-ago dead are fair game. Dark Age iconoclasm has returned to us with a fury. Any statue at any time might be toppled — if it is deemed to represent an idea or belief from the distant past now considered racist, sexist, or somehow illiberal. Representations of Columbus, the Founding Fathers, and Confederate soldiers have all been defaced, knocked down, or removed. The images of mass murderers on the left are exempt, on the theory that good ends always allow a few excessive means. So are the images and names of robber barons and old bad white guys, whose venerable eponymous institutions offer valuable brands that can be monetized. At least so far, we are not rebranding Stanford and Yale with indigenous names. Victor Davis Hanson
Johnnie Ashe, like Wade, remembers his brother as an intellectual and an innovator, as someone who was meant to change the world. That’s why, when Johnnie came to understand that the military wouldn’t send two brothers into active duty in a war zone at the same time, he volunteered for a second tour in Vietnam. He was three months away from coming home.Since Johnnie stayed on active duty, Arthur could compete for both the U.S. amateur and U.S. Open championships in 1968. He is the only person to have won both. Ashe had many projects that helped extend his legacy beyond that of a pioneering tennis player who won 33 career singles championships; ever the thinker, bringing tennis and educational opportunities to youths was Ashe’s passion. He helped found the National Junior Tennis & Learning network in 1968, a grass-roots organization designed to make tennis more accessible. Today, the NJTL receives significant funding from the USTA. The Washington Post
Arthur Ashe always had an exquisite sense of timing, whether he was striking a topspin backhand or choosing when to speak out for liberty and justice for all. So we shouldn’t be surprised that the 50th anniversary of his victory at the first U.S. Open — a milestone to be celebrated on Saturday at the grand stadium bearing his name — coincides with a national conversation on the First Amendment rights and responsibilities of professional athletes. Mr. Ashe has been gone for 25 years, struck down at the age of 49 by AIDS, inflicted by an H.I.V.-tainted blood transfusion. But the example he set as a champion on and off the court has never been more relevant. As Colin Kaepernick, LeBron James and others strive to use their athletic stardom as a platform for social justice activism, they might want to look back at what this soft-spoken African-American tennis star accomplished during the age of Jim Crow and apartheid. (…) He began his career as the Jackie Robinson of men’s tennis — a vulnerable and insecure racial pioneer instructed by his coaches to hold his tongue during a period when the success of desegregation was still in doubt. At the same time, Mr. Ashe’s natural shyness and deferential attitude toward his elders and other authority figures all but precluded involvement in the civil rights struggle and other political activities during his high school and college years. The calculus of risk and responsibility soon changed, however, as Mr. Ashe reinvented himself as a 25-year-old activist-in-training during the tumultuous year of 1968. With his stunning victory in September at the U.S. Open, where he overcame the best pros in the world as a fifth-seeded amateur, he gained a new confidence that affected all aspects of his life. Mr. Ashe’s political transformation had begun six months earlier when he gave his first public speech, a discourse on the potential importance of black athletes as community leaders, delivered at a Washington forum hosted by the Rev. Jefferson Rogers, a prominent black civil rights leader Mr. Ashe had known since childhood. Mr. Rogers had been urging Mr. Ashe to speak out on civil rights issues for some time, and when he finally did so, it released a spirit of civic engagement that enveloped his life. “This is the new Arthur Ashe,” the reporter Neil Amdur observed in this paper, “articulate, mature, no longer content to sit back and let his tennis racket do the talking.” In part, Mr. Ashe’s new attitude reflected a determination to make amends for his earlier inaction. “There were times, in fact,” he recalled years later, “when I felt a burning sense of shame that I was not with other blacks — and whites — standing up to the fire hoses and the police dogs, the truncheons, bullets and bombs.” He added: “As my fame increased, so did my anguish.” During the violent spring of 1968, the assassinations of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., whom Mr. Ashe had come to admire above all other black leaders, and Senator Robert F. Kennedy, whom he had supported as a presidential candidate, shook Mr. Ashe’s faith in America. But he refused to surrender to disillusionment. Instead he dedicated himself to active citizenship on a level rarely seen in the world of sports. His activism began with an effort to expand economic and educational opportunities for young urban blacks, but his primary focus soon turned to the liberation of black South Africans suffering under apartheid. Later he supported a wide variety of causes, playing an active role in campaigns for black political power, high educational standards for college athletes, criminal justice reform, equality of the sexes and AIDS awareness. He also became involved in numerous philanthropic enterprises. By the end of his life, Mr. Ashe’s success on the court was no longer the primary source of his celebrity. He had become, along with Muhammad Ali, a prime example of an athlete who transcended the world of sports. In 2016, President Barack Obama identified Mr. Ali and Mr. Ashe as the sports figures he admired above all others. While noting the sharp contrast in their personalities, he argued that both men were “transformational” activists who pushed the nation down the same path to freedom and democracy. Mr. Ashe practiced his own distinctive brand of activism, one based on unemotional appeals to common sense and enlightened philosophical principles as simple as the Golden Rule. He had no facility for, and little interest in, using agitation and drama to draw attention to causes, no matter how worthy they might be. A champion of civility, he always kept his cool and never raised his voice in anger or frustration. Viewing emotional appeals as self-defeating and even dangerous, he relied on reasoned persuasion derived from careful preparation and research. Mr. Ashe preferred to make a case in written form, or as a speaker on the college lecture circuit or as a witness before the United Nations. His periodic opinion pieces in The Washington Post and other newspapers tackled a number of thorny issues related to sports and the broader society, including upholding high academic standards for college athletic eligibility and the expulsion of South Africa from international athletic competition. In the 1980s, he devoted several years to researching and writing “A Hard Road to Glory,” a groundbreaking three-volume history of African-American athletes. In retirement Mr. Ashe became a popular tennis broadcaster known for his clever quips, yet as an activist he never resorted to sound bites that excited audiences with reductionist slogans. Often working behind the scenes, he engaged in high-profile public debate only when he felt there was no other way to advance his point of view. Suspicious of quick fixes, he advocated incremental and gradual change as the best guarantor of true progress. Yet he did not let this commitment to long-term solutions interfere with his determination to give voice to the voiceless. Known as a risk taker on the court, he was no less bold off the court, where he never shied away from speaking truth to power. He was arrested twice, in 1985 while participating in an anti-apartheid demonstration in front of the South African Embassy and in 1992 while picketing the White House in protest of the George H.W. Bush administration’s discriminatory policies toward Haitian refugees. The first arrest embarrassed the American tennis establishment, which soon removed him from his position as captain of the U.S. Davis Cup team, and the second occurred during the final months of his life as he struggled with the ravages of AIDS. In both cases he accepted the consequences of his principled activism with dignity. Mr. Ashe was a class act in every way, a man who practiced what he preached without being diverted by the temptations of power, fame or fortune. When we place his approach to dissent and public debate in a contemporary frame, it becomes obvious that his legacy is the antithesis of the scorched-earth politics of Trumpism. If Mr. Ashe were alive today, he would no doubt be appalled by the bullying tactics and insulting rhetoric of a president determined to punish athletes who have the courage and audacity to speak out against police brutality toward African-Americans. And yet we can be equally sure that Mr. Ashe would honor his commitment to respectful dialogue, refusing to lower himself to the president’s level of unrestrained invective. (…) Mr. Ashe would surely be gratified that to date, this high road has led to more protest, not less, confirming his belief that real change comes from rational advocacy and hard work, not emotional self-indulgence. As we celebrate his remarkable life and legacy a quarter-century after his death, we can be confident that Mr. Ashe would rush to join today’s activists in spirit and solidarity, solemnly but firmly taking a knee for social justice. Raymond Arsenault

Reviens, Arthur, Ils sont devenus fous !

En ces temps devenus fous …

Où après les médias et, enterrements compris, la haute fonction publique

Et, entre le négationnisme (pas de drapeau américain sur la lune) et la réécriture de l’histoire (les quelques mois d’infiltration du KKK par une équipe de policiers noir et blanc dans une petite ville du Colrado au début des années 70 transformés en film blaxploitation avec toute l’explosive subtilité d’un Spike Lee), Hollywood …

Comme au niveau des grosses multinationales du matériel de sport à l’occasion du 30e anniversaire d’un slogan de toute évidence fauché au yippie Jerry Rubin

Mais faussement attribué (droits obligent ?) aux dernière paroles du tristement célèbre premier exécuté (volontaire et déjà gratifié par Norman Mailer de son panégyrique littéraire) du retour de la peine de mort aux Etats-Unis …

La marchandisation d’un joueur (métis multimillionnaire abandonné par son père noir et adopté par des parents blancs) dont le seul titre de gloire est, outre ses chaussettes anti-policiers et ses tee-shirts à la gloire de Castro, son refus d’honorer le drapeau de son pays pour prétendument dénoncer les brutalités policières contre les noirs …

Tout semble dorénavant permis pour dénigrer l’actuel président américain et les forces de police …

Comment ne pas repenser …

En ce 50e anniversaire …

De la première victoire, dès la création du premier tournoi professionnel, d’un joueur de tennis noir à une épreuve de Grand chelem …

A la figure hélas oubliée d’un Arthur Ashe

Qui, de l’apartheid sud-africain à la défense des réfugiés haïtiens ou des enfants atteints du SIDA jusqu’à l’ONU …

Et loin des outrances racistes à l’époque d’un Mohamed Ali …

Ou de la violence actuelle (et surtout de ses conséquences sur les plus démunis quoi qu’en dise son biographe) du collectif Black lives matter que prétend défendre un Colin Kaeperinck …

Et sans parler du lamentable scandale, au nom d’un prétendu sexisme et face à une improbable nippo-haïtienne élevée aux Etats-Unis mais ne parlant pas japonais, de Serena Williams en finale du même US Open hier …

Avait toujours su joindre l’intelligence et le respect des autres comme de son propre pays à la plus redoutable des efficacités ?

What Arthur Ashe Knew About Protest

The tennis great was committed to respectful dialogue, refusing to lower himself to the level of invective

Raymond Arsenault
Mr. Arsenault is a biographer of Arthur Ashe.
The New York Times
Sept. 8, 2018

Arthur Ashe always had an exquisite sense of timing, whether he was striking a topspin backhand or choosing when to speak out for liberty and justice for all. So we shouldn’t be surprised that the 50th anniversary of his victory at the first U.S. Open — a milestone to be celebrated on Saturday at the grand stadium bearing his name — coincides with a national conversation on the First Amendment rights and responsibilities of professional athletes.

Mr. Ashe has been gone for 25 years, struck down at the age of 49 by AIDS, inflicted by an H.I.V.-tainted blood transfusion. But the example he set as a champion on and off the court has never been more relevant. As Colin Kaepernick, LeBron James and others strive to use their athletic stardom as a platform for social justice activism, they might want to look back at what this soft-spoken African-American tennis star accomplished during the age of Jim Crow and apartheid.

The first thing they will discover is that, like most politically motivated athletes, Mr. Ashe turned to activism only after his formative years as an emerging sports celebrity. He began his career as the Jackie Robinson of men’s tennis — a vulnerable and insecure racial pioneer instructed by his coaches to hold his tongue during a period when the success of desegregation was still in doubt. At the same time, Mr. Ashe’s natural shyness and deferential attitude toward his elders and other authority figures all but precluded involvement in the civil rights struggle and other political activities during his high school and college years.

The calculus of risk and responsibility soon changed, however, as Mr. Ashe reinvented himself as a 25-year-old activist-in-training during the tumultuous year of 1968. With his stunning victory in September at the U.S. Open, where he overcame the best pros in the world as a fifth-seeded amateur, he gained a new confidence that affected all aspects of his life.

Mr. Ashe’s political transformation had begun six months earlier when he gave his first public speech, a discourse on the potential importance of black athletes as community leaders, delivered at a Washington forum hosted by the Rev. Jefferson Rogers, a prominent black civil rights leader Mr. Ashe had known since childhood. Mr. Rogers had been urging Mr. Ashe to speak out on civil rights issues for some time, and when he finally did so, it released a spirit of civic engagement that enveloped his life. “This is the new Arthur Ashe,” the reporter Neil Amdur observed in this paper, “articulate, mature, no longer content to sit back and let his tennis racket do the talking.”

In part, Mr. Ashe’s new attitude reflected a determination to make amends for his earlier inaction. “There were times, in fact,” he recalled years later, “when I felt a burning sense of shame that I was not with other blacks — and whites — standing up to the fire hoses and the police dogs, the truncheons, bullets and bombs.” He added: “As my fame increased, so did my anguish.”

During the violent spring of 1968, the assassinations of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., whom Mr. Ashe had come to admire above all other black leaders, and Senator Robert F. Kennedy, whom he had supported as a presidential candidate, shook Mr. Ashe’s faith in America. But he refused to surrender to disillusionment. Instead he dedicated himself to active citizenship on a level rarely seen in the world of sports.

His activism began with an effort to expand economic and educational opportunities for young urban blacks, but his primary focus soon turned to the liberation of black South Africans suffering under apartheid. Later he supported a wide variety of causes, playing an active role in campaigns for black political power, high educational standards for college athletes, criminal justice reform, equality of the sexes and AIDS awareness. He also became involved in numerous philanthropic enterprises.

By the end of his life, Mr. Ashe’s success on the court was no longer the primary source of his celebrity. He had become, along with Muhammad Ali, a prime example of an athlete who transcended the world of sports. In 2016, President Barack Obama identified Mr. Ali and Mr. Ashe as the sports figures he admired above all others. While noting the sharp contrast in their personalities, he argued that both men were “transformational” activists who pushed the nation down the same path to freedom and democracy.

Mr. Ashe practiced his own distinctive brand of activism, one based on unemotional appeals to common sense and enlightened philosophical principles as simple as the Golden Rule. He had no facility for, and little interest in, using agitation and drama to draw attention to causes, no matter how worthy they might be. A champion of civility, he always kept his cool and never raised his voice in anger or frustration. Viewing emotional appeals as self-defeating and even dangerous, he relied on reasoned persuasion derived from careful preparation and research.

Mr. Ashe preferred to make a case in written form, or as a speaker on the college lecture circuit or as a witness before the United Nations. His periodic opinion pieces in The Washington Post and other newspapers tackled a number of thorny issues related to sports and the broader society, including upholding high academic standards for college athletic eligibility and the expulsion of South Africa from international athletic competition. In the 1980s, he devoted several years to researching and writing “A Hard Road to Glory,” a groundbreaking three-volume history of African-American athletes.

In retirement Mr. Ashe became a popular tennis broadcaster known for his clever quips, yet as an activist he never resorted to sound bites that excited audiences with reductionist slogans. Often working behind the scenes, he engaged in high-profile public debate only when he felt there was no other way to advance his point of view. Suspicious of quick fixes, he advocated incremental and gradual change as the best guarantor of true progress.

Yet he did not let this commitment to long-term solutions interfere with his determination to give voice to the voiceless. Known as a risk taker on the court, he was no less bold off the court, where he never shied away from speaking truth to power.

He was arrested twice, in 1985 while participating in an anti-apartheid demonstration in front of the South African Embassy and in 1992 while picketing the White House in protest of the George H.W. Bush administration’s discriminatory policies toward Haitian refugees. The first arrest embarrassed the American tennis establishment, which soon removed him from his position as captain of the U.S. Davis Cup team, and the second occurred during the final months of his life as he struggled with the ravages of AIDS. In both cases he accepted the consequences of his principled activism with dignity.

Mr. Ashe was a class act in every way, a man who practiced what he preached without being diverted by the temptations of power, fame or fortune. When we place his approach to dissent and public debate in a contemporary frame, it becomes obvious that his legacy is the antithesis of the scorched-earth politics of Trumpism. If Mr. Ashe were alive today, he would no doubt be appalled by the bullying tactics and insulting rhetoric of a president determined to punish athletes who have the courage and audacity to speak out against police brutality toward African-Americans. And yet we can be equally sure that Mr. Ashe would honor his commitment to respectful dialogue, refusing to lower himself to the president’s level of unrestrained invective.

Not all of the activist athletes involved in public protests during the past two years have followed Mr. Ashe’s model of restraint and civility. But many have made a good-faith effort to do so, resisting the temptation to respond in kind to Mr. Trump’s intemperate attacks on their personal integrity and patriotism. In particular, several of the most visible activists — including Mr. Kaepernick, Stephen Curry and Mr. James — have kept their composure and dignity even as they have borne the brunt of Mr. Trump’s racially charged Twitter storms and stump speeches. By and large, they have wisely taken the same high road that Mr. Ashe took two generations ago, eschewing the politics of character assassination while keeping their eyes on the prize.

Mr. Ashe would surely be gratified that to date, this high road has led to more protest, not less, confirming his belief that real change comes from rational advocacy and hard work, not emotional self-indulgence. As we celebrate his remarkable life and legacy a quarter-century after his death, we can be confident that Mr. Ashe would rush to join today’s activists in spirit and solidarity, solemnly but firmly taking a knee for social justice.

Raymond Arsenault is the author of “Arthur Ashe: A Life.”

Voir aussi:

Arthur Ashe’s real legacy was his activism, not his tennis
We remember Ashe for his electrifying talent. But he had a social conscience that was way ahead of its time
Raymond Arsenault
The Guardian
9 Sep 2018

No one had expected a fifth-seeded, 25-year-old amateur on temporary leave from the army to come out on top in a field that included the world’s best pro players. The era of Open tennis, in which both amateurs and professionals competed, was only four months old. Many feared that mixing the two groups was a mistake. Yet Ashe, with help from a string of upsets that eliminated the top four seeds, defeated the Dutchman Tom Okker in the championship match – in the process becoming the first black man to reach the highest echelon of amateur tennis.

As an amateur, Ashe could not accept the champion’s prize money of $14,000. But the lost income proved inconsequential in light of the other benefits that came in the wake of his historic performance. He became not only as a bona fide sports star but also a citizen activist with important things to contribute to society and a platform to do so. Ashe began to speak out on questions of social and economic justice.

Earlier in the year, the assassinations of Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy had shocked Ashe out of his youthful reticence to become involved in the struggle for civil rights. Over the next 25 years, he worked tirelessly as an advocate for civil and human rights, a role model for athletes interested in more than fame and fortune.

“From what we get, we can make a living,” he counseled. “What we give, however, makes a life.”

Ashe’s 1968 win was truly impressive but his finest moment at the Open came, arguably, in 1992, four and a half months after the public disclosure that he had Aids and nearly a decade after he contracted HIV during a blood transfusion. If we apply Ashe’s professed standard of success, which placed social and political reform well above athletic achievement, the 25th US Open, not the first, is the tournament most deserving of commemoration. Without picking up a racket, he managed to demonstrate a moral leadership that far transcended the world of sports.

On 30 August, on the eve of the first round, a substantial portion of the professional tennis community rallied behind the stricken champion’s effort to raise funds for the new Arthur Ashe Foundation for the Defeat of Aids (AAFDA). The celebrity-studded event, the Arthur Ashe Aids Tennis Challenge, drew a huge crowd and nine of the game’s biggest stars. The support was unprecedented, leading one reporter to marvel: “The tennis world is known by and large as a selfish, privileged world, one crammed with factions and egos. So what is happening at the Open is unthinkable: gender and nationality and politics will take a back seat to a full-fledged effort to support Ashe.”

Participants included CBS correspondent Mike Wallace, then New York City mayor David Dinkins and two of tennis’s biggest celebrities, the up-and-coming star Andre Agassi and the four-time Open champion John McEnroe, who entertained the crowd by clowning their way through a long set. To Ashe’s delight, McEnroe, once known as the “Superbrat” of tennis, even put on a joke tantrum against the umpire.

Several days earlier, on a more serious note, McEnroe had spoken for many of his peers in explaining why he felt passionate about Ashe’s cause.

“It’s not something you can even think twice about when you’re asked to help,” he insisted. “The fact that the disease has happened to a tennis player certainly strikes home with all of us. I’m just glad someone finally organized the tennis community like this, and obviously it took someone like Arthur to do it.”

Ashe was thrilled with the response to the Aids Challenge, which raised $114,000 for the AAFDA. One man walked up and casually handed him a personal check for $25,000. Later in the week the foundation received $30,000 from an anonymous donor in North Carolina. Such generosity was what Ashe had hoped to inspire, and when virtually all of the US Open players complied with the foundation’s request to attach a special patch – “a red ribbon centered by a tiny yellow tennis ball” – to their outfits as a symbolic show of support for Aids victims, he knew he had started something important.

This awakening of social responsibility – among a group of athletes not typically known for political courage – was deeply gratifying to a man whose previous calls to action had been largely ignored. Seven years earlier he was fired as captain of the US Davis Cup team in part because leaders were uncomfortable with his growing political activism, especially his arrest during an anti-apartheid demonstration outside a South African embassy. This rebuke did not shake his belief in active citizenship as a bedrock principle, however, and as the 1992 Open drew to a close he demonstrated just how seriously he regarded personal commitment to social justice.

When his lifelong friend and anti-apartheid ally Randall Robinson asked Ashe to come to Washington for a protest march he immediately said yes, even though the march was scheduled four days before the end of the Open. The march concerned an issue that had become deeply important to Ashe: the Bush administration’s discriminatory treatment of Haitian refugees seeking asylum in the US. With more than 2,000 other protesters, Ashe gathered in front of the White House to seek justice for the growing mass of Haitian “boat people” being forcibly repatriated without a hearing.

In stark contrast to the warm reception accorded Cuban refugees fleeing Castro’s communist regime, the dark-skinned boat people were denied refuge due to a blanket ruling that Haitians, unlike Cubans, were economic migrants undeserving of political asylum. To Ashe and the organizers of the White House protest, this double standard – which flew in the face of the political realities of both islands – smacked of racism.

“The argument incensed me,” Ashe wrote. “Undoubtedly, many of the people picked up were economic refugees, but many were not.”

Ashe knew a great deal about Haiti: he had read widely and deeply about the island’s troubled past; he had visited on several occasions; he and his wife had even honeymooned there in 1977. More recently, he had monitored the truncated career of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, a self-styled champion of the poor whose regime was toppled by a military coup with the tacit support of the Bush administration. Ashe felt compelled to speak out.

“I was prepared to be arrested to protest this injustice,” he said.

Considering his medical condition, he had no business being at a protest; certainly no one would have blamed him if he had begged off. No one, that is, but himself. At the appointed hour, he arrived at the protest site in jeans, T-shirt and straw hat, a human scarecrow reduced to 128lbs on his 6ft 1in frame, but resolute as ever. Big, bold letters on his shirt read: “Haitians Locked Out Because They’re Black.”

The throng included a handful of celebrities, but Ashe alone represented the sports world. He didn’t want to be treated as a celebrity, of course; he simply wanted to make a statement about the responsibilities of democratic citizenship. While he knew his presence was largely symbolic, he hoped to set an example.

Putting oneself at risk for a good cause, he assured one reporter, “does wonders for your outlook … Marching in a protest is a liberating experience. It’s cathartic. It’s one of the great moments you can have in your life.”

Since federal law prohibited large demonstrations close to the White House, the organizers expected arrests. The police did not disappoint: nearly 100 demonstrators, including Ashe, were arrested, handcuffed and carted away. Ashe, despite his physical condition, asked for and received no favors. After paying his fine and calling his wife Jeanne to assure her he was all right, he took the late afternoon train back to New York.

The next night, while sitting on his couch watching the nightly news, he felt a sharp pain in his sternum. Tests revealed he had suffered a mild heart attack, the second of his life. Prior to the trip to Washington, Jeanne had worried something like this might happen. But she knew her husband was never one to play it safe when something important was on the line.

On the tennis court, he had always been prone to fits of reckless play, going for broke with shots that defied logic or sense. Off the court, particularly in his later years, Arthur Ashe almost always went full-out. He did so not because he craved activity for its own sake but rather because he wanted to live a virtuous and productive life. Even near the end, weakened by disease, he still wanted to make a difference. And he did, as he always did.

      • Raymond Arsenault, the John Hope Franklin professor of southern history at the University of South Florida, St Petersburg, is the author of Arthur Ashe: A Life, recently published by Simon & Schuster

    Voir également:

    ‘Arthur was always different’: Reflecting on Ashe’s legacy, 50 years after U.S. Open win
    Ava Wallace
    The Washington Post
    September 3, 2018

    Virginia Wade has many memories of Arthur Ashe, but the one that sticks in her mind isn’t from 50 years ago in New York, when in 1968 they won the first U.S. Open singles titles and Ashe became the first African American man to win a Grand Slam championship. Her favorite memory is from seven years later at Wimbledon.

    Ashe claimed the last of his three major titles in England in 1975 in a match against heavy favorite Jimmy Connors. Wade remembers cool, unruffled Ashe’s daring tennis against the 22-year-old Connors, who hollered back at the crowd when it shouted encouragement. She also remembers the changeovers.

    “It was an incredible match. I mean, Arthur was an innovator,” Wade, 73, said last week. “It was the first time he sort of sat down at the side of the court in between — they didn’t have chairs at the side of the court for a long time; we sort of had to towel off and go on — but he would sit and cover his head with the towel and just think. It was the first time you were conscious of the mental side of tennis. Arthur was instrumental in that. . . . Arthur was a thinker.”

    As the U.S. Open celebrates its 50th anniversary, the U.S. Tennis Association is also honoring Ashe for all that he was: thinker, pioneer, activist, champion.

    The 1968 winner already has a significant presence at Billie Jean King National Tennis Center — the facility’s biggest and most prestigious stage is named for him — but this fortnight, his visage is inescapable. There is a special photo exhibit on the walkway between Court 17 and the Grandstand, and a special “Arthur Ashe legacy booth” decked out in the colors of UCLA, his alma mater. Fans can be seen walking around sporting white T-shirts featuring a picture of Ashe wearing sunglasses, cool as can be.

    At the start of Monday’s evening session, Lt. Gen. Darryl Williams gave Ashe’s younger brother Johnnie a folded American flag in honor of his brother, who died in 1993 from AIDS-related pneumonia after contracting the disease from a tainted blood transfusion. Ashe was an Army lieutenant when he won the U.S. Open as an amateur in 1968; Johnnie, 70, was in the Marine Corps for 20 years.

    Johnnie Ashe, like Wade, remembers his brother as an intellectual and an innovator, as someone who was meant to change the world. That’s why, when Johnnie came to understand that the military wouldn’t send two brothers into active duty in a war zone at the same time, he volunteered for a second tour in Vietnam. He was three months away from coming home.

    “Arthur didn’t need Vietnam. Arthur had his own Vietnam right there in the United States in those days, and some of the things that I saw while I was there — he didn’t need that,” Johnnie said Monday night. “The thing that I always think about, and this was always the most important thing in my mind, was that Arthur represented so many possibilities. Arthur was the first to do so much so often that those of us who knew him would say: ‘What’s next? What mountain was he going to climb next?’ Arthur was always different.”

    Since Johnnie stayed on active duty, Arthur could compete for both the U.S. amateur and U.S. Open championships in 1968. He is the only person to have won both.

    Ashe had many projects that helped extend his legacy beyond that of a pioneering tennis player who won 33 career singles championships; ever the thinker, bringing tennis and educational opportunities to youths was Ashe’s passion. He helped found the National Junior Tennis & Learning network in 1968, a grass-roots organization designed to make tennis more accessible. Today, the NJTL receives significant funding from the USTA.

    “Growing up, Arthur was a sponge. . . . That was just his nature,” Johnnie Ashe said. “He was a voracious reader, and he had to satisfy his intellect. I tell people if Arthur had concentrated on just tennis, he would have been the best in the world. But tennis was a vehicle. . . . He wanted to be able to take kids outside of their environs, outside of their element for a little while and expose them to what they can be. . . . And, let’s face it, most parents don’t have the wherewithal to do that. It’s not easy. What happens is you get somebody like Arthur — and following Arthur, LeBron James is starting to do things — to expose kids. It’s so important that that happens.”

    Billie Jean King called the NJTL one of the best things that ever happened to the sport.

    “Arthur and I had many conversations over the years about how to we make tennis better — for the players, the fans and the sport,” King said in an email Monday. “We both thought tennis needed to be more hospitable, and for Arthur a big part of that was improving access and opportunity to our sport for everyone. Arthur, and Althea Gibson before him, opened doors for people of color in our sport. And, from Venus and Serena [Williams] to Naomi Osaka and Frances Tiafoe, we are seeing the results of his efforts today.”

    Ashe’s efforts as a humanitarian inspired James Blake, who now chairs the USTA Foundation. Blake was growing up when Ashe’s humanitarian career was front and center, both as the leader of the group Artists and Athletes Against Apartheid and as a figure who spoke out to educate the nation about AIDS.

    “He never looked for sympathy,” Blake said. “Instead, he looked for a way to make life better for others that were struggling.”

    Blake counts himself as one who benefited from Ashe’s barrier-breaking career. It’s a legacy not lost on the USTA; Katrina Adams, its president and chief executive, is a black woman.

    But before Maria Sharapova lost in the fourth round to Carla Suarez Navarro and the riveted crowd turned its attention to Roger Federer’s match, Monday night was about Arthur Ashe. Johnnie’s flag came wrapped in a wooden display case.

    “I was thinking what I was going to design to keep it in, but I don’t have to. This is nice,” Johnnie said.

    “Until Arthur came along and Althea came along, tennis was a sport of the elites. Then you get two playground children — one from Harlem, one from Richmond — to break into the bigs. People had to stop and think about that. It opened the doors for other people, and that’s what it was all about. That’s what it was all about for him.”

    Voir de même:

    Waiting for the Next Arthur Ashe
    Harvey Araton
    NYT
    Sept. 7, 2018

    On the second of two occasions when he had the privilege of a conversation with Arthur Ashe, MaliVai Washington, having just become the country’s No. 1 college player as a Michigan sophomore in 1989, happened to mention that he was thinking of turning pro.

    Ashe did not exactly tell him what he wanted to hear.

    “I don’t think he thought it was a very good idea,” Washington said.

    Ashe won the first United States Open at the West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills 50 years ago to the day of Sunday’s men’s final, to be played in a stadium named for him. He also won the 1970 Australian Open and a third and final major in 1975 at Wimbledon.

    After all these years there are the formidable but not mutually exclusive legacies of Ashe: as the only African-American man to win a Grand Slam tournament and as a venerated humanitarian. Washington came tantalizingly close to living up to the former and has found a contextual purpose in the latter.

    Washington, who made it to the Wimbledon final in 1996, can recall some self-imposed pressure to hoist the trophy Ashe had claimed there 21 years earlier because “when you’re the No. 1 black player, you feel a sense of responsibility.”

    That said, Washington was admittedly more focused on the biggest payday of his career, potential lifetime membership in the All England Club and a permanent engraving on its champions wall.

    “I’m honestly not thinking then that much about history and social issues, about how this is going to impact on America, what impact is it going to have on kids,” he said of the final, which he lost to Richard Krajicek of the Netherlands in straight sets. “But at 35, 45, O.K., I can think more intelligently about it and understand the impact.”

    Washington is now 49, the age at which Ashe died in 1993 of AIDS after getting H.I.V. through a blood transfusion. Family life in northern Florida is good for Washington, with a wife, two teenage children, a real estate business and an eponymous foundation in an impoverished area of Jacksonville that for 22 years has provided a tennis introduction for children unlikely to find a private pathway into the sport.

    Washington’s program is affiliated with the National Junior Tennis League, which Ashe co-founded in 1969 to promote discipline and character through tennis among under-resourced youth. If, in the process, another Ashe happened to emerge, so much the better. But that was not the primary function, or point.

    “We’re not a pathway to pro tennis by any stretch of the imagination,” Washington said. “At my foundation, we don’t have that ability, that capacity, never had an interest in going in that direction. We highly encourage kids to play on their high school team, go on to play or try out for their college team.

    “But our biggest bang for our buck is teaching life skills. Stay in our program, and you’ll have a focus on high school education, be on a good track when you leave high school. You’re not going to leave high school with a criminal record, or with a son or daughter.”

    Why there was no African-American male Grand Slam champion successor to Ashe in the years soon after his trailblazing is no great mystery, Washington said.

    Fifty years ago, tennis was largely the province of the wealthy and white, lacking a foundational structure to facilitate such an occurrence. Which doesn’t mean that Ashe didn’t influence the rise of a Yannick Noah, the French Grand Slam champion whom Ashe himself discovered in Cameroon. Or the likes of Richard Williams and Oracene Price, whose parental vision birthed the careers of Venus and Serena Williams. They in turn have been followed by a raft of African-American female players, including the 2017 U.S. Open women’s champion, Sloane Stephens, and the runner-up, Madison Keys.

    This year’s women’s final, on Saturday afternoon, will feature Serena Williams and Naomi Osaka, a half-Japanese, half-Haitian player whose father used the Williams family as a model for his own daughters’ tennis ambitions.

    Looming over the lack of an African-American Grand Slam successor to Ashe is the vexing question of why the United States hasn’t produced a male champion since Andy Roddick won his only major title in New York in 2003. That most of the men’s titles have been claimed by a small handful of European players might be more of a tribute to them than a defining failure of the United States Tennis Association’s development capabilities.

    But on the home front, the issue is a pressing one, especially during America’s Grand Slam tournament, year after year.

    Washington retired in 1999 with four tour victories and a 1994 quarterfinal Australian Open result in addition to his Wimbledon run. He was followed by James Blake, who rose to No. 4 in the world during a 14-year career that included 10 tour titles and three Grand Slam quarterfinals, including two at the U.S. Open.

    Martin Blackman, the U.S.T.A.’s general manager for player development, agreed that a breakthrough by one or two young Americans — white or black — in the foreseeable future could help trigger a wave of next-generation stars from an expanding landscape of prospects at a time when African-American participation has significantly declined in baseball, and football is confronted with health concerns.

    “With tennis starting to be recognized as a really athletic sport, I think we do have a unique opportunity to pull some better athletes into the game,” said Blackman, an African-American man who played briefly on tour and once partnered with Washington to make the junior doubles semifinals of the 1986 Open. “So now it comes down to what can we do at the base to recruit and retain as many great young players as possible, make the game accessible and then get them into the system to stay.”

    Even with better intentions, and greater investment, it still took a set of circumstances worthy of a Disney script to land Frances Tiafoe, one of the more promising young American players, on tour.

    The son of immigrants from Sierra Leone, Tiafoe, 20, was introduced to the sport at a club in College Park, Md., where his father, Frances Sr., had found custodial work. Talent and a noticeable work ethic attracted well-heeled benefactors and helped Tiafoe climb to his current ranking of No. 44.

    He gained his first victory at the U.S. Open over France’s Adrian Mannarino, the 29th seed, in the first round before losing next time out. His father watched from the player’s box on the Grandstand court, high-fiving Frances’ coaches and trainer when the Mannarino match ended, and soon after contended that his son wasn’t all that unique.

    “There have to be thousands of kids like Frances out there, thousands who don’t have the same opportunities,” Frances Sr. said. “I’m not just talking about going to college, but going to the pro level, or just to have that chance, see if it’s possible.”

    This is where Washington holds up a metaphorical sign for caution, if not for an outright stop. Most people, he said, have little understanding of just how forbidding the odds are of becoming a pro, much less a champion.

    Like the Williams sisters, Washington — who was born in Glen Cove, N.Y., but grew up in Michigan — had the benefit of a tennis-driven father, William, who saw four of his five children play professionally. MaliVai, who typically goes by Mal, had by far the most success.

    “When I was a junior player, I was playing seven days a week and there were times when I was in high school where I was playing before school and after school,” he said. “It is so very difficult to win a major. I tried to win one, came close.”

    Then, speaking of Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal, he added: “Federer and Nadal, they’ve won 20 and 17. What makes them so great is hard to understand. You just can’t throw money at kids and think it’s going to happen.”

    So how is it done? Where does one start?

    With smaller social achievements, Washington said. With helping young people love the game recreationally, while pursuing a better life than those in less affluent African-American communities have been dealt.

    He talked of a young female graduate of his program who recently finished college without any debt, thanks to a tennis scholarship. And for the foundation’s head tennis pro, he hired Marc Atkinson, who began playing at Washington’s facility in sixth grade and walked onto the Florida A&M tennis team.

    “He’s married with three kids, and at some point, I imagine he’s going to introduce the sport to his kids,” Washington said. “You know, I often think back to my ancestors and the challenges they had, whether it’s my parents growing up in the Deep South in the 1940s and 1950s, or my great-great-grandpa who was born a slave. I can trace my lineage back to people who were getting up and getting after it, who were trying to make a better life for themselves and their kids.

    “So with the thousands of kids that we’re helping, that tennis champion may be part of that next generation, or the one after that. You don’t know, but maybe 20 years from now, or 50 years from now, you’ll be able to look at a kid and track back a lineage to my youth foundation and that would be really cool.”

    Told that he sounded more like Ashe the humanitarian than Ashe the Grand Slam champion, Washington nodded with approval. His two meetings with Ashe produced “no deep conversations,” he said, and he did not heed Ashe’s advice on staying in school, though he eventually earned a degree in finance from the University of North Florida.

    A voice was nonetheless heard, and still resounds.

    Voir encore:

    Etats-Unis
    Frédéric Potet

La Croix
28/04/1997

A trois reprises, et par la plus pure des coïncidences, la question du sportif noir dans la société américaine s’est retrouvée sur le devant de l’actualité, ces trois dernières semaines. Il y eut d’abord, le 25 mars à Hollywood, l’attribution de l’Oscar du meilleur documentaire à When we were kings, le film de Leon Gast, sorti en France depuis mercredi, et dont le personnage central est le boxeur Mohammed Ali. Vint ensuite, le 13 avril, la victoire au Master d’Augusta (Géorgie, Etats-Unis) de la nouvelle étoile du golf mondial, le jeune Tiger Woods. Deux jours plus tard, enfin, l’Amérique célébrait le 50e anniversaire de l’intégration du premier joueur noir dans une équipe de base-ball professionnel, Jackie Robinson.

Robinson-Ali-Woods. Ces trois noms résumeraient presque la longue marche de l’émancipation du sportif noir aux Etats-Unis. Chacun d’entre eux représente une période, elle-même synonyme d’idéaux et de quête vers la reconnaissance. Si le film de Leon Gast nous montre bien quel incomparable combattant de la cause black fut Mohammed Ali, gageons qu’Ali ne serait pas devenu Ali à l’époque de Woods et que Robinson serait resté un modeste anonyme s’il avait joué dans les années 60.

Nul ne l’ignore plus aujourd’hui : si Jackie Robinson a pu trouver place au sein des Brooklyn Dodgers en cette année 1947, ce fut principalement pour des raisons extrasportives. Ce petit-fils d’esclave était en effet d’un tempérament suffisamment doux et détaché pour ne pas répondre aux concerts d’insultes dont il allait être la cible durant toute sa carrière. A l’instar de son aîné Jesse Owens, sprinter quatre fois médaillé d’or à qui Hitler refusa de serrer la main aux Jeux Olympiques de 1936 à Berlin, Jackie Robinson ne devait jamais rejoindre d’organisation militante. Sa présence au sein d’une équipe de la Major League (première division) allait pouvoir permettre, sans heurt, l’arrivée d’une nouvelle population dans les stades : le public noir.

Le roi dollar fait taire les langues

Autre contexte et autre façon de voir les choses, vingt ans plus tard. En 1964, quelques jours après son premier titre mondial, Cassius Clay intègre le mouvement politico-religieux des Blacks Muslims et devient Mohammed Ali. Trois ans plus tard, il refuse de partir au Vietnam, arguant qu’aucun Vietcong ne l’a « jamais traité de négro ». Rien d’étonnant lorsqu’en 1974, sur une idée du promoteur Don King, il part affronter George Foreman au Zaïre. L’africanisme possède son meilleur apôtre. Dans le film de Leon Gast, le boxeur incarne une sorte de roi-sorcier revenant au pays après plusieurs siècles d’exil. Ali ne fait alors rien d’autre que de la politique. Comme en ont fait les sprinteurs Tommie Smith, John Carlos et Lee Evans (qui deviendra entraîneur en Afrique) le jour où ils brandirent leur poing sur le podium des Jeux de Mexico de 1968.

De cette corporation de champions engagés, Arthur Ashe, décédé en 1993 après une vie passée à lutter contre diverses injustices (apartheid, sida, sort des réfugiés haïtiens), sera le dernier. Les années 80 et 90 sont un tournant. Le basketteur Michael Jordan devient le sportif le mieux payé au monde. Le sprinteur Carl Lewis, le boxeur Mike Tyson et aujourd’hui le très politiquement correct Tiger Woods vont répéter tour à tour qu’« on ne mélange pas sport et politique ». Le roi dollar fait taire les langues alors que, curieusement, le militantisme noir connaît un regain d’intérêt aux Etats-Unis.

Le paradoxe est même total le 16 octobre 1995 quand Louis Farrakhan, leader de la Nation of Islam, réunit un million de personnes à Washington. Ce jour-là, des slogans proclamant l’innocence d’O.J. Simpson reviennent souvent dans la foule. L’ancienne vedette de football américain est suspecté d’avoir tué sa femme. L’affaire a rendu l’Amérique totalement zinzin. A telle enseigne qu’O.J. est devenu une icône pour la population noire. Plus personne, alors, ne se rappelle que du temps de sa splendeur au coeur de la jet-set de Los Angeles, Simpson s’était appliqué à faire oublier aux Blancs qu’il était noir, allant jusqu’à prendre des cours de diction pour changer son accent. La politique, lui aussi, O.J. le disait déjà : ce n’était pas son job.

Voir par ailleurs:

Neil Armstrong Didn’t Forget the Flag
Rich Lowry
National review
September 5, 2018

The Apollo program was a national effort that depended on American derring-do and sacrifice. History is usually airbrushed to remove a figure who has fallen out of favor with a dictatorship, or to hide away an episode of national shame. Leave it to Hollywood to erase from a national triumph its most iconic moment.

The new movie First Man, a biopic about the Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, omits the planting of the American flag during his historic walk on the surface of the moon.

Ryan Gosling, who plays Armstrong in the film, tried to explain the strange editing of his moonwalk: “This was widely regarded in the end as a human achievement. I don’t think that Neil viewed himself as an American hero.” Armstrong was a reticent man, but he surely considered himself an American, and everyone else considered him a hero. (“You’re a hero whether you like it or not,” one newspaper admonished him on the 10th anniversary of the landing.)

Gosling added that Armstrong’s walk “transcended countries and borders,” which is literally true, since it occurred roughly 238,900 miles from Earth, although Armstrong got there on an American rocket, walked in an American spacesuit, and returned home to America.

Apollo 11 was, without doubt, an extraordinary human achievement. Armstrong’s famous words upon descending the ladder to the moon were apt: “One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” A plaque left behind read: “HERE MEN FROM THE PLANET EARTH FIRST SET FOOT UPON THE MOON, JULY 1969 A.D. WE CAME IN PEACE FOR ALL MANKIND.”

But this was a national effort that depended on American derring-do, sacrifice, and treasure. It was a chapter in a space race between the United States and the Soviet Union that involved national prestige and the perceived worth of our respective economic and political systems. The Apollo program wasn’t about the brotherhood of man, but rather about achieving a national objective before a hated and feared adversary did.

The Soviets’ putting a satellite, Sputnik, into orbit first was a profound political and psychological shock. The historian Walter A. McDougall writes in his book on the space race, . . . The Heavens and the Earth:

In the weeks and months to come, Khrushchev and lesser spokesmen would point to the first Sputnik, “companion” or “fellow traveller,” as proof of the Soviet ability to deliver hydrogen bombs at will, proof of the inevitability of Soviet scientific and technological leadership, proof of the superiority of communism as a model for backwards nations, proof of the dynamic leadership of the Soviet premier.

The U.S. felt it had to rise to the challenge. As Vice President Lyndon Johnson put it, “Failure to master space means being second best in every aspect, in the crucial arena of our Cold War world. In the eyes of the world first in space means first, period; second in space is second in everything.”

VIEW SLIDESHOW: Apollo 11

The mission of Apollo 11 was, appropriately, soaked in American symbolism. The lunar module was called Eagle, and the command module Columbia. There had been some consideration to putting up a U.N. flag, but it was scotched — it would be an American flag and only an American flag.

The video of Armstrong and his partner Buzz Aldrin carefully working to set up the flag — fully extend it and sink the pole firmly enough in the lunar surface to stand — after their awe-inspiring journey hasn’t lost any of its power.

The director of First Man, Damien Chazelle, argues that the flag planting isn’t part of the movie because he wanted to focus on the inner Armstrong. But, surely, Armstrong, a former Eagle Scout, had feelings about putting the flag someplace it had never gone before?

There may be a crass commercial motive in the omission — the Chinese, whose market is so important to big films, might not like overt American patriotic fanfare. Neither does much of our cultural elite. They may prefer not to plant the flag — but the heroes of Apollo 11 had no such compunction.

Voir de plus:

What BlacKkKlansman Gets Wrong

It’s a slow, didactic film about a minor episode.

Kyle Smith
National Review
August 28, 2018

Billed as being based on “a crazy, outrageous incredible true story” about how a black cop infiltrated the KKK, Spike Lee’s BlacKkKlansman would be more accurately described as the story of how a black cop in 1970s Colorado Springs spoke to the Klan on the phone. He pretended to be a white supremacist . . . on the phone. That isn’t infiltration, that’s prank-calling. A poster for the movie shows a black guy wearing a Klan hood. Great starting point for a comedy, but it didn’t happen. The cop who actually attended KKK meetings undercover was a white guy (played by Adam Driver). These led . . . well, nowhere in particular. No plot was foiled. Those meetups mainly revealed that Klansmen behave exactly how you’d expect Klansmen to behave.The movie is a typical Spike Lee joint: A thin story is told in painfully didactic style and runs on far too long. Screenwriters ordinarily try to start every scene as late as possible and end it as early as possible; Lee just lets things roll. If the point is made, he keeps making it. If the plot tends toward inertia, that’s just Lee saying, “Don’t get distracted by the story, pay attention to the message I’m sending.” He’s a rule-breaker all right. The rules he breaks are “Don’t be boring,” “Don’t be obvious,” and “Don’t ramble.”

But! BlacKkKlansman keeps getting called spot-on, and (as Quentin Tarantino showed in Django Unchained) the moronic nature of the Klan and its beliefs makes it an excellent target for comedy. Lee doesn’t exactly wield an épée as a satirist, though: His idea of a top joke is having the redneck Klansman think “gooder” is a word. Most of the movie isn’t even attempted comedy.

Lee’s principal achievement here is in showcasing the talents of John David Washington, in the first of what promise to be many starring roles in movies. Washington (son of Denzel) has an easygoing charisma as the unflappable Ron Stallworth, a rookie cop in Colorado Springs who volunteers to go undercover as a detective in 1972, near the height of the Black Power movement and a moment when law enforcement was closely tracking the activities of radicals such as Stokely Carmichael, a.k.a. Kwame Ture, a speech of whose Stallworth says he attended while posing as an ordinary citizen. In the movie, Stallworth experiences an awakening of black pride and falls for a student leader, Patrice (a luminous Laura Harrier, who also played Peter Parker’s girlfriend in Spider-Man: Homecoming), inspiring in him the need to do something for his people. He dismisses Carmichael’s call for armed revolution as mere grandstanding, really just a means for drawing black people together. After the speech, the audience goes to a party instead of a riot.

The Klan also turn out to be grandstanders and blowhards given to Carmichael-style paranoid prophecies and seem to hope to troll their enemies into attacking them. When Lee realizes he needs something to actually happen besides racist talk, he turns to a subplot featuring a white-supremacist lady running around with a purse full of C-4 explosive with which she intends to blow up the black radicals. It’s so unconvincing that you watch it thinking, “I really doubt this happened.” It didn’t. The only other tense moment in the film, in which Driver’s undercover cop (who is Jewish) is nearly subjected to a lie-detector test about his religion by a suspicious Klansman, is also fabricated.

Lee frames his two camps as opposites, but whether we’re with the black-power types or the white-power yokels, they’re equally wrong about the race war they seem to yearn for. The two sides are equally far from the stable center, the color-blind institution holding society together, which turns out to be . . . the police! After some talk from the radical Patrice (whose character is also a fabrication) about how the whole system is corrupt and she could never date a “pig,” and a scene in which Stallworth implies the police’s code of covering for one another reminds him of the Klan, Lee winds up having the police unite to fight racism, with one bad apple expunged and everybody else on the otherwise all-white force supporting Ron.

That Spike Lee has turned in a pro-cop film has to be counted one of the stranger cultural developments of 2018, but Lee seems to have accidentally aligned with cops in the course of issuing an anti-Trump broadside. He has one cop tell us that anti-immigration rhetoric, opposition to affirmative action, “and tax reform” are the kinds of issues that white supremacists will use to snake their way into high office. Tax reform! If there has ever been a president, or indeed a politician, who failed to advocate “tax reform,” I guess I missed it. What candidate has ever said on the stump, “My fellow Americans, I propose no change to tax policy whatsoever!” If Lee grabbed us by the lapels just once per movie, it might be forgivable, but he does it all the time. (See also: an introduction in which Alec Baldwin plays a Southern cracker called Dr. Kennebrew Beauregard who rants about desegregation for several minutes, then is never seen again.)

Lee’s other major goal is to link Stallworth’s story to Trumpism using David Duke. Duke, like Trump, said awful things at the time of the Charlottesville murder and played a part in the Stallworth story when the cop was assigned to protect the Klan leader (played by Topher Grace) on a visit to Colorado Springs and later threw his arm around him while posing for a picture. Saying Duke presaged Trump seems like a stretch, though.

After all the nudge-nudge MAGA lines uttered by the Klansmen throughout the film, the let-me-spell-it-out-for-you finale, with footage from the Charlottesville white-supremacist rally, seems de trop. BlacKkKlansman was timed to hit theaters one year after the anniversary of the horror in Virginia. That Charlottesville II attracted only two dozen pathetic dorks to the cause of white supremacy would seem to undermine the coda. The Klan’s would-be successors, far from being more emboldened than they have been since Stallworth’s time, appear to be nearly extinct.

Voir encore:

US Open: furieuse, Serena Williams crie au scandale et se dit volée par l’arbitre

Cette finale en forme de choc des générations face à la Japonaise Naomi Osaka s’est transformée en véritable psychodrame ce samedi à l’US Open. Jamais entrée dans ce match qui était pour elle une vraie page d’histoire, Serena Williams a sombré dans la chasse à l’arbitre, s’estimant volée.
RMC
09/09/2018

« Je ne suis pas une tricheuse! Vous me devez des excuses! »: des phrases répétées à plusieurs reprises par Serena Williams à l’arbitre, soudainement propulsé en pleine lumière. C’est bien ce qui restera dans les livres d’histoire à propos de cette finale de l’US Open. Tant pis pour Naomi Osaka, impeccable pour remporter, en deux sets, ce choc face à son idole et le premier Grand Chelem de sa carrière (6-2, 6-4).

En cas de victoire ce samedi, l’Américaine pouvait entrer définitivement dans l’histoire en égalant le record de Margaret Court, détentrice de 24 Majeurs, record absolu. La géante de 36 ans a toujours eu du mal avec les moments d’histoire… Pour égaler Steffi Graf et ses 22 sacres en Grand Chelem, Serena Williams en était déjà passée par une demi-finale perdue à Flushing Meadows, deux finales perdues à Melbourne puis Roland-Garros avant le soulagement de Wimbledon 2016. Désillusion encore en demie de l’US Open la même année pour repousser d’un Majeur ce record de l’ère Open qu’elle détient désormais seule.

Williams et l’US Open, c’est compliqué…

Idole de tout un pays, l’Américaine aura également toujours eu du mal à jouer sur son sol. Pour des raisons diverses. Son boycott du tournoi d’Indian Wells durant 14 ans était dû à ces insultes racistes dont elle avait été victime. A l’US Open, où elle a conquis six trophées, la joueuse de 36 ans a connu des émotions contraires, entre ses sacres et ses désillusions. En 2011, face à Samantha Stosur, elle avait écopé d’une amende pour avoir explosé de colère contre l’arbitre, qui lui avait annulé un point pour cause de « come on » lâché avant la fin de l’échange.

Tiens, tiens, des problèmes avec l’arbitre… comme ce samedi. Rattrapée par la pression, Serena Williams a fini par exploser. La faute à son tennis, pas en place, malmené par une Naomi Osaka sans complexe et remarquable, qu’elle a d’ailleurs chaudement félicité à l’issue du match. La faute aussi à ce que l’Américaine a ressenti comme une injustice.

Après un premier set à sens unique, la joueuse de 36 ans a écopé d’un avertissement de la part de l’arbitre. Motif? Coaching. « Je ne suis pas une tricheuse! Je suis mère de famille, je n’ai jamais triché de ma vie », a-t-elle lancé, pleine de colère. Est-ce un quiproquo? Si son entraîneur a bien semblé lui faire un signe, la cadette des soeurs Williams assure ne pas avoir reçu de coaching. Difficile de trancher.

« Ai-je coaché? Oui, je l’ai coachée avec des gestes, a expliqué Patrick Mouratoglou sur Eurosport après la rencontre. Elle ne m’a pas vu. J’ajoute que dans 100% des cas, les joueuses bénéficient de coaching et normalement, surtout en finale d’un Grand Chelem, l’arbitre prévient la joueuse avant un éventuel avertissement. »

Raquette cassée et point perdu

La situation s’est envenimée tandis que la recordwoman de titre en Grand Chelem dans l’ère Open venait de se faire débreaker alors qu’elle semblait pourtant reprendre l’ascendant. Serena Williams en a fracassé sa raquette de rage – chose d’une extrême rareté pour elle – et a donc pris… un nouvel avertissement et un point de pénalité. Fureur.

Au changement de côté, l’arbitre en a fait les frais. « Vous m’avez volé un point! Je ne suis pas une tricheuse », a répété l’Américaine. Estimant que la joueuse était allée trop loin, l’arbitre a donc enchaîné avec un troisième avertissement, synonyme de jeu de pénalité. Derrière, après un jeu de service façon parpaings de Williams, Naomi Osaka a servi pour le match. Pour s’imposer.

Son coach crie au scandale

Pas de poignée de main à l’arbitre pour Serena Williams, qui avait bien tenté d’invoquer le superviseur pour faire annuler son jeu de pénalité… sans succès. « Une fois de plus, la star du show a été l’arbitre de chaise. Pour la deuxième fois dans cet US Open et la troisième fois pour Serena Williams en finale de l’US Open, s’est insurgé son coach Patrick Mouratoglou sur Twitter. Devraient-ils être autorisés à avoir une influence sur le résultat d’un match? Quand déciderons-nous que cela ne doit plus jamais arriver? » Une allusion à ce « coaching par l’arbitre » dont avait bénéficié Nick Kyrgios contre Pierre-Hugues Herbert au deuxième tour.

Une accolade chaleureuse avec son adversaire, des appels à la foule pour applaudir la Japonaise… Serena Williams, en larmes, aura tenté de faire bonne figure sur le podium, avant de s’éclipser. Dur pour son adversaire, presque honteuse d’avoir battu son idole dans de telles conditions. Avec le superviseur, l’Américaine estimait que les hommes n’étaient pas traités de la même manière qu’elle le fut ce samedi. Le débat est ouvert. Sans doute à raison.

Voir enfin:

Serena has mother of all meltdowns in US Open final loss
Brian Lewis
New York Post
September 8, 2018

What was supposed to be history descended into histrionics.

Serena Williams came into Saturday’s U.S. Open final looking for a record-setting title. What she got was a game penalty and an emotional meltdown.

It overshadowed Naomi Osaka’s 6-2, 6-4 win over her idol for her first Grand Slam title, and put a mark on the Open’s golden anniversary.

Though Williams repeatedly demanded an apology from chair umpire Carlos Ramos and got a game penalty after calling him a “liar” and a “thief,” she ended the match in tears. And Osaka — who sat in the stands at Arthur Ashe Stadium when she was 5, watching Williams play — was in tears herself as the pro-Williams crowd rained boos upon the victor’s stand, which included USTA officials.

All in all it was a pitiful scene, Williams actually getting her apology from Osaka instead of Ramos.

“I know everyone was cheering for her. I’m sorry it had to end like this,” said a tearful Osaka, 20, so shaken she nearly dropped her trophy. Meanwhile, Williams — who’d regained her composure — put her arm around her young foe and implored the crowd to stop booing.

“I felt bad because I’m crying and she’s crying,” said Williams. “She just won. I’m not sure if they were happy tears or they were sad tears because of the moment. I felt like, wow, this isn’t how I felt when I won my first Grand Slam. I was like, wow, I definitely don’t want her to feel like that. Maybe it was the mom in me that was like, ‘Listen, we got to pull ourselves together here.’ ”

Williams had come in seeking a milestone win, one that would’ve tied Margaret Court’s all-time record for Grand Slams (24). But Osaka — and Williams’ own temper tantrum — scuttled those plans.

In the second game of the second set, Ramos hit Williams with a code violation for receiving coaching from Patrick Mouratoglou from her player’s box.

“You owe me an apology,” Williams said. “I’ve never cheated in my life. I have a daughter and stand for what’s right for her.”

Still, Mouratoglou admitted he’d given her advice, though threw in the disclaimer she may not have seen it from the other end of the court.

“I just texted Patrick, like, what is he talking about? Because we don’t have signals, we’ve never discussed signals. I don’t even call for on-court coaching,” Williams said. “I’m trying to figure out why he would say that. I don’t understand. Maybe he said, ‘You can do it.’ I was on the far other end, so I’m not sure. I want to clarify myself what he’s talking about.”

Williams got a second code violation four games later, up 3-2. After Osaka broke her serve, Williams broke her racket in frustration and was assessed a point penalty.

“You will never, ever be on another court of mine as long as you live. You’re the liar. When are you going to give me my apology? Say it! Say you’re sorry!” Williams ranted, before ending with, “You’re a thief, too.”

That was the last straw, and Ramos hit her with a third code violation for verbal abuse, which cost Williams a game to put Osaka up 5-3. An irate Williams argued in vain to tournament referee Brian Earley and got closed out two games later.

The U.S. Open released a statement saying “the chair umpire’s decision was final and not reviewable by the Tournament Referee or the Grand Slam Supervisor who were called to the court at that time.” Williams contends that letter of the law wouldn’t have been followed if she’d been male.

“I’ve seen other men call other umpires several things. I’m here fighting for women’s rights and for women’s equality. For me to say ‘thief’ and for him to take a game, it made me feel like it was sexist,” Williams said. “He’s never taken a game from a man because they said ‘thief’. For me it blows my mind.”

Voir de plus:

Colin Kaepernick, ou le difficile retour du sportif engagé

L’ancien quarterback des San Francisco 49ers est toujours sans équipe, ostracisé pour avoir osé boycotter l’hymne national des Etats-Unis. D’autres sportifs le soutiennent dans son activisme politique

Valérie de Graffenried
Le Temps
15 septembre 2017

Son genou droit posé à terre le 1er septembre 2016 a fait de lui un paria. Ce jour-là, Colin Kaepernick, quarterback des San Francisco 49ers, avait une nouvelle fois décidé de ne pas se lever pour l’hymne national. Coupe afro et regard grave, il était resté dans cette position pour protester contre les violences raciales et les bavures policières qui embrasaient les Etats-Unis. «Je ne vais pas afficher de fierté pour le drapeau d’un pays qui opprime les Noirs. Il y a des cadavres dans les rues et des meurtriers qui s’en tirent avec leurs congés payés», avait-il déclaré.

Plus d’un an après, la polémique reste vive. Son boycott lui vaut toujours d’être marginalisé et tenu à l’écart par la Ligue nationale de football américain (NFL).

Des manifestations en sa faveur

L’affaire rebondit ces jours, à l’occasion des débuts de la saison de la NFL. Sans contrat depuis mars, Colin Kaepernick est de facto un joueur sans équipe, à la recherche d’un nouvel employeur. Un agent libre. Plusieurs manifestations de soutien ont eu lieu ces dernières semaines. Le 24 août dernier, c’est devant le siège de la NFL, à New York, que plusieurs centaines de personnes ont manifesté contre son ostracisme. La NAACP, une organisation de défense des Noirs américains, en était à l’origine. Le 10 septembre, une mobilisation similaire a eu lieu du côté de Chicago.

Plus surprenant, une centaine de policiers new-yorkais ont manifesté ensemble fin août à Brooklyn, tous affublés d’un t-shirt noir avec le hashtag #imwithkap. Le célèbre policier Frank Serpico, 81 ans, qui a dénoncé la corruption généralisée de la police dans les années 1960 et inspiré Al Pacino pour le film Serpico (1973), en faisait partie.

Le soutien de Tommie SmithLes sportifs américains sont nombreux à afficher leur soutien à Colin Kaepernick. C’est le cas notamment des basketteurs Kevin Durant ou Stephen Curry, des Golden State Warriors. «Sa posture et sa protestation ont secoué le pays dans le bon sens du terme. J’espère qu’il reviendra en NFL parce qu’il mérite d’y jouer. Il est au sommet de sa forme et peut rendre une équipe meilleure», vient de souligner Stephen Curry au Charlotte Observer.

La légende du baseball Hank Aaron fait également partie des soutiens inconditionnels de Colin Kaepernick. Sans oublier Tommie Smith, qui lors des Jeux olympiques de Mexico en 1968 avait, sur le podium du 200 mètres, levé son poing ganté de noir contre la ségrégation raciale, avec son comparse John Carlos.

Effet domino

Le geste militant à répétition de Colin Kaepernick, d’abord assis puis agenouillé, a eu un effet domino. Son coéquipier Eric Reid l’avait immédiatement imité la première fois qu’il a mis le genou à terre. Une partie des joueurs des Cleveland Browns continuent, en guise de solidarité, de boycotter l’hymne des Etats-Unis, joué avant chaque rencontre sportive professionnelle.

La footballeuse homosexuelle Megan Rapinoe, championne olympique en 2012 et championne du monde en 2015, avait elle aussi suivi la voie de Colin Kaepernick et posé son genou à terre. Mais depuis que la Fédération américaine de football (US Soccer) a édicté un nouveau règlement, en mars 2017, qui oblige les internationaux à se tenir debout pendant l’hymne, elle est rentrée dans le rang.

Colin Kaepernick lui-même s’était engagé à se lever pour l’hymne pour la saison 2017. Une promesse qui n’a pas pour autant convaincu la NFL de le réintégrer.

Des cochons habillés en policiers

Barack Obama avait pris sa défense; Donald Trump l’a enfoncé. En pleine campagne, le milliardaire new-yorkais avait qualifié son geste d’«exécrable», l’hymne et le drapeau étant sacro-saints aux Etats-Unis. Il a été jusqu’à lui conseiller de «chercher un pays mieux adapté». Les chaussettes à motifs de cochons habillés en policiers que Colin Kaepernick a portées pendant plusieurs entraînements – elles ont été très remarquées – n’ont visiblement pas contribué à le rendre plus sympathique à ses yeux.

Mais ni les menaces de mort ni ses maillots brûlés n’ont calmé le militantisme de Colin Kaepernick. Un militantisme d’ailleurs un peu surprenant et parfois taxé d’opportunisme: métis, de mère blanche et élevé par des parents adoptifs blancs, Colin Kaepernick n’a rallié la cause noire, et le mouvement Black Lives Matter, que relativement tardivement.

Avant Kaepernick, la star de la NBA LeBron James avait défrayé la chronique en portant un t-shirt noir avec en lettres blanches «Je ne peux pas respirer». Ce sont les derniers mots d’un jeune Noir américain asthmatique tué par un policier blanc. Par ailleurs, il avait ouvertement soutenu Hillary Clinton dans sa course à l’élection présidentielle. Timidement, d’autres ont affiché leurs convictions politiques sur des t-shirts, mais sans aller jusqu’au boycott de l’hymne national, un geste très contesté. L’élection de Donald Trump et le drame de Charlottesville provoqué par des suprémacistes blancs ont contribué à favoriser l’émergence de ce genre de protestations.

Le retour des athlètes activistes

Ces comportements signent un retour du sportif engagé, une espèce presque en voie de disparition depuis les années 1960-1970, où de grands noms comme Mohamed Ali, Billie Jean King ou John Carlos ont porté leur militantisme à bras-le-corps.

Au cours des dernières décennies, l’heure n’était pas vraiment à la revendication politique, confirme Orin Starn, professeur d’anthropologie culturelle à l’Université Duke en Caroline du Nord. A partir des années 1980, c’est plutôt l’image du sportif businessman qui a primé, celui qui s’intéresse à ses sponsors, à devenir le meilleur possible, soucieux de ne déclencher aucune polémique. Un sportif lisse avant tout motivé par ses performances et sa carrière. Comme le basketteur Michael Jordan ou le golfeur Tiger Woods.

Élargir le débat au-delà du jeu

«Des sportifs semblent désormais plus facilement se mettre en avant pour évoquer leurs convictions, que ce soient des championnes de tennis ou des footballeurs. Mais ces athlètes activistes restent encore minoritaires. Peu ont suivi Kaepernick lorsqu’il s’est agenouillé pendant l’hymne national. La plupart se focalisent sur leur sport, ils ne sont pas vraiment désireux de jouer les trouble-fête», précise l’anthropologue. Pour lui, ce nouvel activisme reste néanmoins réjouissant.

«Dans notre culture, ces sportifs sont des dieux, qui peuvent exercer une influence positive. Ils peuvent être un bon exemple d’engagement civique pour des jeunes.» Et puis, ajoute Orin Starn, une bonne controverse comme l’affaire Kaepernick permet de pimenter un peu le sport et d’élargir le débat au-delà du jeu. Colin Kaepernick ne commentera pas: il refuse les interviews. Mais il continue, sur Twitter, de faire vivre son militantisme et ses convictions. Egal à lui-même.

Voir de même:

Colin Kaepernick, le footballeur américain militant contre les violences policières, devient l’un des visages de Nike

En choisissant le joueur pour sa campagne publicitaire, l’équipementier prend parti dans la mobilisation contre les violences policières infligées aux Noirs américains, qui irrite au plus haut point Donald Trump.

Le Monde

Le joueur de football américain Colin Kaepernick, à l’origine en 2016 du mouvement de boycott de l’hymne américain, est devenu l’un des visages de la dernière campagne de publicité de l’équipementier sportif Nike. Il apparaît aux côtés de la reine du tennis féminin Serena Williams et de la mégastar de la NBA LeBron James dans cette campagne, qui coïncide avec le 30e anniversaire du célèbre slogan « Just do it » de la marque à la virgule.

Sur son compte Twitter, Colin Kaepernick a publié lundi 3 septembre le visuel montrant en gros plan son visage en noir et blanc avec le message « Croyez en quelque chose. Même si cela signifie tout sacrifier ».

Depuis qu’il a lancé son mouvement pour protester contre les violences policières exercées à l’encontre des Noirs américains en posant un genou à terre lors de l’hymne américain, Colin Kaepernick est devenu une personnalité controversée aux Etats-Unis, célébrée par les uns et détestée par les autres, notamment par le président américain Donald Trump, entré en guerre ouverte à l’automne dernier contre les joueurs protestataires.

Lire aussi :   La révolution Kaepernick, ou comment Black Lives Matter a fait école dans les stades américains

Entrée sur le terrain politique pour Nike

Colin Kaepernick n’a pas retrouvé d’équipe depuis l’expiration de son contrat avec San Francisco au début de 2017 et a attaqué en justice la Ligue nationale de football américain (NFL), qu’il accuse de collusion pour l’empêcher de poursuivre sa carrière.

Il est sous contrat depuis 2011 avec Nike qui, à la différence de la plupart de ses autres partenaires, n’a pas résilié son contrat de sponsoring. A trois jours du coup d’envoi de la saison 2018 de NFL, Nike frappe fort en termes de marketing. L’équipementier prend surtout clairement parti – et c’est une première pour une entreprise de cette taille – sur une question qui divise le pays depuis près de deux ans et qui irrite au plus haut point Donald Trump.

Sur le site Internet de la chaîne ESPN, Gino Fisanotti, dirigeant de Nike, a lancé :

« Nous croyons que Colin est l’un des sportifs les plus charismatiques de sa génération, qui utilise la puissance du sport pour faire bouger le monde. »

Le grand groupe américain qui fournit les équipements et les tenues des 32 équipes engagées en NFL et a renouvelé au mois de mars son partenariat pour huit ans avec l’association d’équipes professionnelles de football américain va encore plus loin. Il a prolongé son contrat de partenariat avec Colin Kaepernick et s’est engagé à créer une basket à son nom, honneur suprême pour un sportif professionnel, tout en finançant sa fondation d’aide à l’enfance.

Trump face à la fronde des sportifs

La marque connue pour ses campagnes de publicité novatrices s’expose aussi au courroux de Donald Trump. S’il n’a pas encore envoyé l’un de ses tweets assassins, le président américain mène depuis l’automne dernier une bataille personnelle contre ces joueurs de football américain qui, inspirés par Colin Kaepernick, posent un genou à terre ou lèvent un poing, tête baissée, durant l’hymne américain joué avant chaque match.

Pour Donald Trump et une partie de l’opinion publique américaine, ces gestes sont antipatriotiques, une insulte aux militaires qui ont servi et trouvé la mort sous le drapeau américain. Le président avait demandé aux propriétaires d’équipes de les sanctionner, voire de les licencier.

Lire aussi :   Après le boycott de l’hymne américain, la NFL décide d’obliger les joueurs à rester debout

La NFL pensait avoir désamorcé une réédition de la crise de 2017, qui a pénalisé ses recettes publicitaires et les audiences TV, en édictant au printemps dernier une réglementation autorisant les joueurs à protester à condition qu’ils restent dans les vestiaires pendant l’hymne. Mais cette réglementation a depuis été suspendue pour éviter les recours en justice. C’était avant que Nike ne fasse resurgir Kaepernick et son combat sur le devant de la scène et ne relance de plus belle la polémique.

« Je pense que tous les athlètes, tous les humains et tous les Afro-Américains devraient être totalement reconnaissants et honorés » par les manifestations lancées par les anciens joueurs de la NFL Colin Kaepernick et Eric Reid, a déclaré Serena Williams.

Lire aussi :   Donald Trump ouvre un nouveau front intérieur, cette fois-ci contre le monde du sport

Réplique sur les réseaux sociaux

Les réseaux sociaux n’ont pas tardé à réagir, les partisans de Donald Trump lançant une campagne appelant au boycottage ou à la destruction des produits de l’équipementier, avec l’apparition des hashtags #BoycottNike #JustBurnIt. L’ingénieur du son de John Rich, du duo de musique country Big and Rich, aurait ainsi découpé ses chaussettes Nike, alors qu’un certain Sean Clancy postait sur Twitter la vidéo de l’immolation par le feu d’une paire de chaussures de sport. « D’abord la NFL me force à choisir entre mon sport préféré et mon pays. J’ai choisi mon pays. Puis Nike me force à choisir entre mes chaussures préférées et mon pays », a-t-il écrit. Lydia Rodarte-Quayle invite, elle, à mettre à la poubelle les vêtements de la marque.

Des prises de position aussitôt tournées en ridicule par d’autres internautes, qui se moquent notamment du fait que les partisans du président détruisent des équipements qu’ils ont payés – souvent au prix fort. Ainsi Adolph Joseph DeLaGarza, joueur de football (soccer) du Dynamo de Houston, relève le manque de logique de la démarche : « Donc, en ne voulant pas soutenir ou promouvoir @Nike, vous découpez des chaussettes déjà payées et PUIS vous tweetez @Nike. Logique ! »

Voir enfin:

Nike’s « Just do it » slogan is based on a murderer’s last words, says Dan Wieden

Marcus Fairs
Deezen|
Design Indaba 2015: the advertising executive behind Nike‘s « Just do it » slogan has told Dezeen how he based one of the world’s most recognisable taglines on the words of a convict facing a firing squad (+ interview).Dan Wieden, co-founder of advertising agency Wieden+Kennedy, described the surprising genesis of the slogan in an interview at the Design Indaba conference in Cape Town last month. »I was recalling a man in Portland, » Wieden told Dezeen, remembering how in 1988 he was struggling to come up with a line that would tie together a number of different TV commercials the fledgling agency had created for the sportswear brand. »He grew up in Portland, and ran around doing criminal acts in the country, and was in Utah where he murdered a man and a woman, and was sent to jail and put before a firing squad. »Wieden continued: « They asked him if he had any final thoughts and he said: ‘Let’s do it’. I didn’t like ‘Let’s do it’ so I just changed it to ‘Just do it’. »The murderer was Gary Gilmore, who had grown up in Portland, Oregan – the city that is home to both Nike and Wieden+Kennedy. In 1976 Gilmore robbed and murdered two men in Utah and was executed by firing squad the following year (by some accounts Gilmore actually said « Let’s do this » just before he was shot).

Nike’s first commercial featuring the « Just do it » slogan

Nike co-founder Phil Knight, who was sceptical about the need for advertising, initially rejected the idea. « Phil Knight said, ‘We don’t need that shit’, » Wieden said. « I said ‘Just trust me on this one.’ So they trusted me and it went big pretty quickly. »

The slogan, together with Nike’s « Swoosh » logo, helped propel the sportswear brand into a global giant, overtaking then-rival Reebok, and is still in use almost three decades after it was coined.

Campaign magazine described it as « arguably the best tagline of the 20th century, » saying it « cut across age and class barriers, linked Nike with success – and made consumers believe they could be successful too just by wearing its products. »

The magazine continued: « Like all great taglines, it was both simple and memorable. It also suggested something more than its literal meaning, allowing people to interpret it as they wished and, in doing so, establish a personal connection with the brand. »

Dan Wieden

Born in 1945, Wieden formed Wieden+Kennedy in Portaland with co-founder David Kennedy in 1982. The company now has offices around the world and has « billings in excess of $3 billion, » Wieden said.

Wieden revealed in his lecture at Design Indaba that shares in the privately owned agency had recently been put into a trust, making it « impossible » for the firm to be sold.

« I’ve sworn in private and in public that we will never, ever sell the agency, » Wieden said. « It just isn’t fair that once sold, a handful of people will walk off with great gobs of money and those left behind will face salary cuts or be fired, and the culture will be destroyed. »

He added: « The partners and I got together a couple of years ago and put our shares in a trust, whose only obligation is to never ever, under no circumstances, sell the agency.”

Here is an edited transcript of our interview with Dan Wieden:


Marcus Fairs: You’re probably bored to death of this question but tell me how the Nike slogan came about.

Dan Wieden: So, it was the first television campaign we’d done with some money behind, so we actually came up with five different 30 second spots. The night before I got a little concerned because there were five different teams working, so there wasn’t an overlying sensibility to them all. Some were funny, some were solemn. So I thought you know, we need a tagline to pull this stuff together, which we didn’t really believe in at the time but I just felt it was going to be too fragmented.

So I stayed up that night before and I think I wrote about four or five ideas. I narrowed it down to the last one, which was « Just do it ». The reason I did that one was funny because I was recalling a man in Portland.

He grew up in Portland, and ran around doing criminal acts in the country, and was in Utah where he murdered a man and a woman, and was sent to jail and put before a firing squad. And they asked him if he had any final thoughts and he said: « Let’s do it ».

And for some reason I went: « Now damn. How do you do that? How do you ask for an ultimate challenge that you are probably going to lose, but you call it in? » So I thought, well, I didn’t like « Let’s do it » so I just changed it to « Just do it ».

I showed it to some of the folks in the agency before we went to present to Nike and they said « We don’t need that shit ». I went to Nike and [Nike co-founder] Phil Knight said, « We don’t need that shit ». I said « Just trust me on this one. » So they trusted me and it went big pretty quickly.

Marcus Fairs: Most of Dezeen’s audience is involved in making products, whether it’s trainers or cars or whatever. What is the relationship between what you do and the product?

Dan Wieden: Well if you notice in all the Nike work – I mean there is work that shows individual shoes, but a lot of the work that we do is more talking about the role of sports or athletics. And Nike became strong because it wasn’t just trying to peddle products; it was trying to peddle ideas and the mental and physical options you can take. So it was really unusual and it worked very well.

Marcus Fairs: And what about other clients? What do you do if the client just wants you to show the product?

Dan Wieden: Well, it depends on the client as well. But you have to be adding something to a product that is beyond just taste, or fit, or any of that kind of stuff. You have to have a sensibility about the product, a sort of spirit of the product almost.

Marcus Fairs: And do you turn down brands that have product which you don’t think is good enough?

Dan Wieden: Oh sure. And we fire clients!

Voir enfin:

September 7, 2018

Last year, Naomi Osaka commanded the world’s attention when she bested the U.S. Open’s defending champion Angelique Kerber in a stunning upset in the very first round. This year, the 20-year-old upstart has a shot at claiming the title herself as she challenges six-time champion Serena Williams in a historic final on Saturday.

In what Osaka termed her “dream match” against her idol, Saturday’s game pits tennis’ rising star against one of the game’s ultimate greats — if Williams wins she would tie Margaret Court for the overall record of 24 Grand Slam singles titles.

The two have competed only once before, and it’s the newcomer who holds the upper hand. As Serena herself put it, Osaka is “a really good, talented player. Very dangerous.”

Ahead of Saturday’s face off, here’s what to know about the new kid on the block.

A first for Japan

For her country, Osaka has already succeeded in a major milestone: She is the first Japanese woman to reach the final of any Grand Slam. And she’s currently her country’s top-ranked player.

Yet in Japan, where racial homogeneity is prized and ethnic background comprises a big part of cultural belonging, Osaka is considered hafu or half Japanese. Born to a Japanese mother and a Haitian father, Osaka grew up in New York. She holds dual American and Japanese passports, but plays under Japan’s flag.

Some hafu, like Miss Universe Japan Ariana Miyamoto, have spoken publicly about the discrimination the term can confer. “I wonder how a hafu can represent Japan,” one Facebook user wrote of Miyamoto, according to Al Jazeera America’s translation.

For her part, Osaka has spoken repeatedly about being proud to represent Japan, as well as Haiti. But in a 2016 USA Today interview she also noted, “When I go to Japan people are confused. From my name, they don’t expect to see a black girl.”

On the court, Osaka has largely been embraced as one of her country’s rising stars. Off court, she says she’s still trying to learn the language.

“I can understand way more Japanese than I can speak,” she said.

‘Like no one ever was’

In her press conferences, which for now are English only, Osaka has earned a reputation for her youthful candor and nerdy sense of humor.

In response to a reporter asking about her ambitions, she said, “to be the very best, like no one ever was.” After an awkward pause, she clarified, “I’m sorry; that’s the Pokémon theme song. But, yeah, to be the very best, and go as far as I can go.”

At Indian Wells this year, where Osaka stunned her higher-ranked opponents and claimed victory after searing past the world’s number one Simona Halep in the semis and besting Daria Kasatkina in the finals, she proved herself no longer just the underdog. She then proceeded to give what she described as “the worst acceptance speech of all time.”

“Hello, hi, I am—okay never mind,” it began, before a litany of thank you’s petered out into giggles.

But don’t let her soft-spoken persona or goofy interviews fool you. On court, Osaka brings the heat, uncorking both ferocious power and an aggressive baseline game.

W.W.S.D.

Earlier this year, Osaka reveled a four-word mantra keeps her steady through tough matches: “What would Serena do?”

Her idolization of the 23 Grand Slam-winning titan is well-known.

“She’s the main reason why I started playing tennis,” Osaka told the New York Times.

When the two played in Miami in March, six months after Serena nearly died giving birth, Osaka won. Then she Instagrammed a photo of her shaking hands with her idol, captioned only, “Omg.”

After Osaka cleared the U.S. Open semis on Thursday and it became clear she was not only headed to her first Grand Slam final but was also about to face her hero once more, she was asked if she had anything to say to Serena. Her message? “I love you.”

Voir par ailleurs:

Baltimore Residents Blame Record-High Murder Rate On Lower Police Presence
NPR
December 31, 2017

LAUREN FRAYER, HOST:

This year, Baltimore has had well over 300 murders for the third year in a row. Some activists say the high murder rate is because police have backed off and relaxed patrols in neighborhoods like the one where Freddie Gray was arrested. Gray was a black man who died while he was in the back of a Baltimore police van in 2015. Reverend Kenji Scott lives in Baltimore. He’s held positions in local city government and is a pastor and community activist.

KINJI SCOTT: When you think about young people who are out here facing these economic challenges and are homeless and live in places that are uncertain and you’re a parent, you’re scared, not just for yourself really but for your children. I mean, the average age of a homicide victim in Baltimore City right now is 31 years old. We had a young man who attended one of the prime high schools, Poly. His name was Jonathan Tobash, and he was 19 years old, was a Morgan student. And he was killed on his way to the store. That’s the state of Baltimore right now.

FRAYER: What do you see? Is this something that happens in the middle of the night, or is this something that when you live there you see this?

SCOTT: You see this all the time. You’re talking about homicides in the middle of the night. No. The average homicide in Baltimore happens during the day. We have broad daylight shootings all over the city. You’ve had shootings and people have been shot, gunned down and killed in front of the police station.

FRAYER: After the death of Freddie Gray, yourself, families of victims, didn’t you want police to back off?

SCOTT: No. That represented our progressive, our activists, our liberal journalists, our politicians. But it did not represent the overall community because we know for a fact that around the time that Freddie Gray was killed, we start to see homicides increase. We had five homicides in that neighborhood while we were protesting. What I wanted to see happen was that people would build a trust relationship with our police department so that they would feel more comfortable with having conversations with the police about crime in their neighborhood because they would feel safer. So we wanted the police there. We wanted them engaging the community. We didn’t want them there beating the hell out of us. We didn’t want that.

FRAYER: Do you think your experience with high murder rate in Baltimore is unique?

SCOTT: No, it’s not. It’s not. I lost my brother in St. Louis in 2004. I just lost my cousin in Chicago. No, it’s not unique, and that’s the horrible thing.

FRAYER: It’s been three and a half years since Ferguson, Mo., since the killing of Michael Brown, since the Black Lives Matter movement was born to demand reforms to policing. What did they put on the table, and has it worked?

SCOTT: The primary thrust nationwide is what President Obama wanted to do – focus on building relationships with police departments in major cities where there has been a history of conflict. That hasn’t happened. We don’t see that. I don’t know a city that I’ve heard of – Baltimore for certain. We’ve not seen any changes in those relationships. What we have seen was that the police has distanced themselves, and the community has distanced themselves even further. So there is – the divide has really intensified. It hasn’t decreased. And of course, we want to delineate the whole concept of the culture of bad policing that exists. Nobody denies that. But as a result of this, we don’t see the policing – the level of policing we need in our community to keep the crime down in these cities that we’re seeing bleed to death.

FRAYER: Are you optimistic for 2018?

SCOTT: I’m not because as I look at the conclusion of 2017, these same cities – St. Louis, Baltimore, New Orleans and Chicago – these same chocolate (ph), these same black cities are still bleeding to death, and we’re still burying young men in these cities. I want to be hopeful. I’m a preacher. I want to be hopeful. But as it stands, no, not until we really have a real conversation with our frontline officers in the heart of our black communities that does not involve people who are, quote, unquote, « leaders. » We need the frontline police officers, and we need the heart of the black community to step to the forefront of this discussion. That’s what’s important. And that’s when we’re going to see a decrease in crime.

FRAYER: Reverend Kinji Scott in Baltimore, thank you very much.

SCOTT: Thank you.


%d blogueurs aiment cette page :