Environnement: Comme les Aztèques qui tuaient toujours plus de victimes (While climate change turns into cargo cult science, what of our quasi-religious addiction to growth as the rest of the world demands its own American dream and our finite planet eventually runs out of resources ?)

2 mai, 2021

Cargo Cult Agile. Fred: Are you in a Cargo Cult? | by Tomas Kejzlar | Skeptical Agile

PageCommuniqués de Presse Archives - Page 4 sur 16 - Alternatiba

Socialter N°34 Fin du monde, fin du mois, même combat ? - avril/mai 2019 - POLLEN DIFPOP
Students at the International School of Beijing playing in one of two domes with air-filtration systems for when smog is severeChinese millionaire and philanthropist Chen Guangbiao hands out cans of air during a publicity stunt on a day of heavy air pollution last week at a financial district in Beijing.DIEU EST AMERICAIN
Unsettled - BenBella Books
Une nation s’élèvera contre une nation, et un royaume contre un royaume; il y aura de grands tremblements de terre, et, en divers lieux, des pestes et des famines; il y aura des phénomènes terribles, et de grands signes dans le ciel. (…) Il y aura des signes dans le soleil, dans la lune et dans les étoiles. Et sur la terre, il y aura de l’angoisse chez les nations qui ne sauront que faire, au bruit de la mer et des flots. Jésus (Luc 21: 10-25)
Où est Dieu? cria-t-il, je vais vous le dire! Nous l’avons tué – vous et moi! Nous tous sommes ses meurtriers! Mais comment avons-nous fait cela? Comment avons-nous pu vider la mer? Qui nous a donné l’éponge pour effacer l’horizon tout entier? Dieu est mort! (…) Et c’est nous qui l’avons tué ! (…) Ce que le monde avait possédé jusqu’alors de plus sacré et de plus puissant a perdu son sang sous nos couteaux (…) Quelles solennités expiatoires, quels jeux sacrés nous faudra-t-il inventer? Nietzsche
Ce sont les enjeux ! Pour faire un monde où chaque enfant de Dieu puisse vivre, ou entrer dans l’obscurité, nous devons soit nous aimer l’un l’autre, soit mourir. Lyndon Johnson (1964)
Interdire le DDT a tué plus de personnes qu’Hitler. Personnage d’un roman de  Michael Crichton (State of Fear, 2004)
Parents have scrambled to buy air purifiers. IQAir, a Swiss company, makes purifiers that cost up to $3,000 here and are displayed in shiny showrooms. Mike Murphy, the chief executive of IQAir China, said sales had tripled in the first three months of 2013 over the same period last year. Face masks are now part of the urban dress code. Ms. Zhang laid out half a dozen masks on her dining room table and held up one with a picture of a teddy bear that fits Xiaotian. Schools are adopting emergency measures. Xiaotian’s private kindergarten used to take the children on a field trip once a week, but it has canceled most of those this year. At the prestigious Beijing No. 4 High School, which has long trained Chinese leaders and their children, outdoor physical education classes are now canceled when the pollution index is high. (…) Elite schools are investing in infrastructure to keep children active. Among them are Dulwich College Beijing and the International School of Beijing, which in January completed two large white sports domes of synthetic fabric that cover athletic fields and tennis courts. The construction of the domes and an accompanying building began a year ago, to give the 1,900 students a place to exercise in both bad weather and high pollution, said Jeff Johanson, director of student activities. The project cost $5.7 million and includes hospital-grade air-filtration systems. Teachers check the hourly air ratings from the United States Embassy to determine whether children should play outside or beneath the domes. NYT
From gigantic domes that keep out pollution to face masks with fancy fiber filters, purifiers and even canned air, Chinese businesses are trying to find a way to market that most elusive commodity: clean air. An unprecedented wave of pollution throughout China (dubbed the “airpocalypse” or “airmageddon” by headline writers) has spawned an almost entirely new industry. The biggest ticket item is a huge dome that looks like a cross between the Biosphere and an overgrown wedding tent. Two of them recently went up at the International School of Beijing, one with six tennis courts, another large enough to harbor kids playing soccer and badminton and shooting hoops simultaneously Friday afternoon. The contraptions are held up with pressure from the system pumping in fresh air. Your ears pop when you go in through one of three revolving doors that maintain a tight air lock. The anti-pollution dome is the joint creation of a Shenzhen-based manufacturer of outdoor enclosures and a California company, Valencia-based UVDI, that makes air filtration and disinfection systems for hospitals, schools, museums and airports, including the new international terminal at Los Angeles International Airport. Although the technologies aren’t new, this is the first time they’ve been put together specifically to keep out pollution, the manufacturers say. (…) Since air pollution skyrocketed in mid-January, Xiao said, orders for domes were pouring in from schools, government sports facilities and wealthy individuals who want them in their backyards. He said domes measuring more than 54,000 square feet each cost more than $1 million. (…) Because it’s not possible to put a dome over all of Beijing, where air quality is the worst, people are taking matters into their own hands. Not since the 2003 epidemic of SARS have face masks been such hot sellers. Many manufacturers are reporting record sales of devices varying from high-tech neoprene masks with exhalation valves, designed for urban bicyclists, that cost up to $50 each, to cheap cloth masks (some in stripes, polka dots, paisley and some emulating animal faces). (…) In mid-January, measurements of particulate matter reached more than 1,000 micrograms per cubic meter in some parts of northeast China. Anything above 300 is considered “hazardous” and the index stops at 500. By comparison, the U.S. has seen readings of 1,000 only in areas downwind of forest fires. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported last year that the average particulate matter reading from 16 airport smokers’ lounges was 166.6. The Chinese government has been experimenting with various emergency measures, curtailing the use of official cars and ordering factories and construction sites to shut down. Some cities are even considering curbs on fireworks during the upcoming Chinese New Year holiday, interfering with an almost sacred tradition. In the meantime, home air filters have joined the new must-have appliances for middle class Chinese. (…) Many distributors report panic buying of air purifiers. In China, home air purifiers range from $15 gizmos that look like night lights to handsome $6,000 wood-finished models that are supplied to Zhongnanhai, the headquarters of the Chinese Communist Party and to other leadership facilities. One model is advertised as emitting vitamin C to build immunity and to prevent skin aging. In a more tongue in cheek approach to the problem, a self-promoting Chinese millionaire has been selling soda-sized cans of, you guessed it, air. (…) “I want to tell mayors, county chiefs and heads of big companies,” Chen told reporters Wednesday, while giving out free cans of air on a Beijing sidewalk as a publicity stunt. “Don’t just chase GDP growth, don’t chase the biggest profits at the expense of our children and grandchildren. » LA Times
Plus la guerre froide s’éloigne, plus le nombre de conflits diminue. (…) il n’y a eu ainsi en 2010 que 15 conflits d’ampleur significative, tous internes. (…)  Grosso modo, le nombre de conflits d’importance a diminué de 60% depuis la fin de la guerre froide (…) outre le fait que les guerres sont plutôt moins meurtrières, en moyenne, qu’elles ne l’étaient jusque dans les années 1960, cette réduction trouve sa source essentiellement dans la diminution spectaculaire du nombre de guerres civiles. La fin des conflits indirects entre l’Est et l’Ouest, l’intervention croissante des organisations internationales et des médiateurs externes, et dans une certaine mesure le développement économique et social des États, sont les causes principales de cette tendance. S’y ajoutent sans doute (…) des évolutions démographiques favorables. Bruno Tertrais
Imaginez que [Fukushima] se soit produit dans un pays non-développé: le nombre de morts aurait été de 200 000. Le développement et la croissance nous protègent des catastrophes naturelles. Bruno Tertrais
Longtemps, les divinités représentèrent le lieu de cette extériorité. Les sociétés modernes ont voulu s’en affranchir: mais cette désacralisation peut nous laisser sans protection aucune face à notre violence et nous mener à la catastrophe finale. Jean-Pierre Dupuy
Nous vivons à la fois dans le meilleur et le pire des mondes. Les progrès de l’humanité sont réels. Nos lois sont meilleures et nous nous tuons moins les uns les autres. En même temps, nous ne voulons pas voir notre responsabilité dans les menaces et les possibilités de destruction qui pèsent sur nous. René Girard
Les événements qui se déroulent sous nos yeux sont à la fois naturels et culturels, c’est-à-dire qu’ils sont apocalyptiques. Jusqu’à présent, les textes de l’Apocalypse faisaient rire. Tout l’effort de la pensée moderne a été de séparer le culturel du naturel. La science consiste à montrer que les phénomènes culturels ne sont pas naturels et qu’on se trompe forcément si on mélange les tremblements de terre et les rumeurs de guerre, comme le fait le texte de l’Apocalypse. Mais, tout à coup, la science prend conscience que les activités de l’homme sont en train de détruire la nature. C’est la science qui revient à l’Apocalypse. René Girard
L’interprétation que Dupuy et Dumouchel donnent de notre société me paraît juste, seulement un peu trop optimiste. D’après eux, la société de consommation constitue une façon de désamorcer la rivalité mimétique, de réduire sa puissance conflictuelle. C’est vrai. S’arranger pour que les mêmes objets, les mêmes marchandises soient accessibles à tout le monde, c’est réduire les occasions de conflit et de rivalité entre les individus. Lorsque ce système devient permanent, toutefois, les individus finissent par se désintéresser de ces objets trop accessibles et identiques. Il faut du temps pour que cette « usure » se produise, mais elle se produit toujours. Parce qu’elle rend les objets trop faciles à acquérir, la société de consommation travaille à sa propre destruction. Comme tout mécanisme sacrificiel, cette société a besoin de se réinventer de temps à autre. Pour survivre, elle doit inventer des gadgets toujours nouveaux. Et la société de marché engloutit les ressources de la terre, un peu comme les Aztèques qui tuaient toujours plus de victimes. Tout remède sacrificiel perd son efficacité avec le temps. René Girard
Certains spécialistes avancent le chiffre de vingt mille victimes par an au moment de la conquête de Cortès. Même s’il y avait beaucoup d’exagération, le sacrifice humain n’en jouerait pas moins chez les Aztèques un rôle proprement monstrueux. Ce peuple était constamment occupé à guerroyer, non pour étendre son territoire, mais pour se procurer les victimes nécessaires aux innombrables sacrifices recensés par Bernardino de Sahagun. Les ethnologues possèdent toutes ces données depuis des siècles, depuis l’époque, en vérité, qui effectua les premiers déchiffrements de la représentation persécutrice dans le monde occidental. Mais ils ne tirent pas les mêmes conclusions dans les deux cas. Aujourd’hui moins que jamais. Ils passent le plus clair de leur temps à minimiser, sinon à justifier entièrement, chez les Aztèques, ce qu’ils condamnent à juste titre dans leur propre univers. Une fois de plus nous retrouvons les deux poids et les deux mesures qui caractérisent les sciences de l’homme dans leur traitement des sociétés historiques et des sociétés ethnologiques. Notre impuissance à repérer dans les mythes une représentation persécutrice plus mystifiée encore que la nôtre ne tient pas seulement à la difficulté plus grande de l’entreprise, à la transfiguration plus extrême des données, elle relève “modernes sont surtout obsédés par le mépris et ils s’efforcent de présenter ces univers disparus sous les couleurs les plus favorables. (…) Les ethnologues décrivent avec gourmandise le sort enviable de ces victimes. Pendant la période qui précède leur sacrifice, elles jouissent de privilèges extraordinaires et c’est sereinement, peut-être même joyeusement, qu’elles s’avancent vers la mort. Jacques Soustelle, entre autres, recommande à ses lecteurs de ne pas interpréter ces boucheries religieuses à la lumière de nos concepts. L’affreux péché d’ethnocentrisme nous guette et, quoi que fassent les sociétés exotiques, il faut se garder du moindre jugement négatif. Si louable que soit le souci de « réhabiliter » des mondes méconnus, il faut y mettre du discernement. Les excès actuels rivalisent de ridicule avec l’enflure orgueilleuse de naguère, mais en sens contraire. Au fond, c’est toujours la même condescendance : nous n’appliquons pas à ces sociétés les critères que nous appliquons à nous-mêmes, mais à la suite, cette fois, d’une inversion démagogique bien caractéristique de notre fin de siècle. Ou bien nos sources ne valent rien et nous n’avons plus qu’à nous taire : nous ne saurons jamais rien de certain sur les Aztèques, ou bien nos sources valent quelque chose, et l’honnêteté oblige à conclure que la religion de ce peuple n’a pas usurpé sa place au musée planétaire de l’horreur humaine. Le zèle antiethnocentrique s’égare quand il justifie les orgies sanglantes de l’image visiblement trompeuse qu’elles donnent d’elles-mêmes. Bien que pénétré d’idéologie sacrificielle, le mythe atroce et magnifique de Teotihuacan porte sourdement témoignage contre cette vision mystificatrice. Si quelque chose humanise ce texte, ce n’est pas la fausse idylle des victimes et des bourreaux qu’épousent fâcheusement le néo-rousseauisme et le néo-nietzschéisme de nos deux après-guerres, c’est ce qui s’oppose à cette hypocrite vision, sans aller jusqu’à la contredire ouvertement, ce sont les hésitations que j’ai notées face aux fausses évidences qui les entourent. René Girard
Cargo cult: any of the religious movements chiefly, but not solely, in Melanesia that exhibit belief in the imminence of a new age of blessing, to be initiated by the arrival of a special “cargo” of goods from supernatural sources—based on the observation by local residents of the delivery of supplies to colonial officials. Tribal divinities, culture heroes, or ancestors may be expected to return with the cargo, or the goods may be expected to come through foreigners, who are sometimes accused of having intercepted material goods intended for the native peoples. If the cargo is expected by ship or plane, symbolic wharves or landing strips and warehouses are sometimes built in preparation, and traditional material resources are abandoned—gardening ceases, and pigs and foodstocks are destroyed. Former customs may be revived or current practices drastically changed, and new social organizations, sometimes imitative of the colonial police or armed forces, initiated. Encyclopaedia Britannica
Pur produit des sociétés dans lesquelles les élites ignorent que les processus culturels précèdent le succès, le Culte du Cargo, qui consiste à investir dans une infrastructure dont est dotée une société prospère en espérant que cette acquisition produise les mêmes effets pour soi, fut l’un des moteurs des emprunts toxiques des collectivités locales. L’expression a été popularisée lors de la seconde guerre mondiale, quand elle s’est exprimée par de fausses infrastructures créées par les insulaires et destinées à attirer les cargos.(…) Les collectivités ont développé une addiction à la dépense et, comme les ménages victimes plus ou moins conscientes des subprimes, elles ont facilement trouvé un dealer pour leur répondre. Les causes en sont assez évidentes : multiplication des élus locaux n’ayant pas toujours de compétences techniques et encore moins financières, peu ou pas formés, tenus parfois par leur administration devenue maîtresse des lieux, et engagés dans une concurrence à la visibilité entre la ville, l’agglomération, le département à qui voudra montrer qu’il construit ou qu’il anime plus et mieux que l’autre, dans une relation finalement assez féodale. (…) Il serait sans doute erroné de porter l’opprobre sur les élus locaux ou même sur les banques, car il s’agit là de la manifestation d’une tendance de fond très profonde et très simple qui a à faire avec le désir mimétique et le Culte du Cargo. Ce dernier fut particulièrement évident en Océanie pendant la seconde guerre mondiale, où des habitants des îles observant une corrélation entre l’appel du radio et l’arrivée d’un cargo de vivres, ou bien entre l’existence d’une piste et l’arrivée d’avions, se mirent à construire un culte fait de simulacre de radio et de fausses pistes d’atterrissage, espérant ainsi que l’existence de moyens ferait venir l’objet désiré. Il s’agit d’un phénomène général, comme par exemple en informatique lorsque l’on recopie une procédure que l’on ne comprend pas dans son propre programme, en espérant qu’elle y produise le même effet que dans son programme d’origine. (…) Bien que paradoxale, l’addiction à la dette est synchrone avec les difficultés financières et correspond peut-être inconsciemment à l’instinct du joueur à se “refaire”. Ce qui est toutefois plus grave est, d’une part, l’hallucination collective qui permet le phénomène de Culte du Cargo, mais aussi l’absence totale de contre-pouvoir à cette pensée devenue unique, voire magique. Le Culte du Cargo aggrave toujours la situation. La raison est aussi simple que diabolique : les prêtres du Culte du Cargo dépensent pour acheter des infrastructures similaires à ce qu’ils ont vu ailleurs dans l’espoir d’attirer la fortune sur leur tribu. Malheureusement, dans le même temps, les “esprits” qui restaient dans la tribu se sont enfuis ou se taisent devant la pression de la foule en attente de miracle. Alors, les élites, qui ignorent totalement que derrière l’apparent résultat se cachent des processus culturels complexes qu’ils ne comprennent pas, se dotent d’un faux aéroport ou d’une fausse radio et dilapident ainsi, en pure perte, leurs dernières ressources. Il serait injuste de penser que ce phénomène ne concerne que des populations peu avancées. En 1974, Richard Feynman dénonça la “Cargo Cult Science” lors d’un discours à Caltech. Les collectivités confrontées à une concurrence pour la population organisent agendas et ateliers (en fait des brainstormings) pour évoquer les raisons de leurs handicaps par rapport à d’autres. Il suit généralement une liste de solutions précédées de “Il faut” : de la Recherche, des Jeunes, des Cadres, une communauté homosexuelle, une patinoire, une piscine, le TGV, un festival, une équipe sportive onéreuse, son gymnase…Tout cela est peut-être vrai, mais cela revient à confondre les effets avec les processus requis pour les obtenir. Comme nul ne comprend les processus culturels qui ont conduit à ce qu’une collectivité réussisse, il est plus facile de croire que boire le café de George Clooney vous apportera le même succès. Rien de nouveau ici : la publicité et ses 700 milliards de dollars de budget mondial annuel manipule cela depuis le début de la société de consommation. Routes menant à des plateformes logistiques ou des zones industrielles jamais construites, bureaux vides, duplication des infrastructures (piscines, technopoles, pépinières…) à quelques mètres les unes des autres, le Culte du Cargo nous coûte cher : il faut que cela se voit, même si cela ne sert à rien. Malheureusement, les vraies actions de création des processus culturels et sociaux ne se voient généralement pas aussi bien qu’un beau bâtiment tout neuf. (…) Ainsi, les pôles de compétitivité marchent d’autant mieux qu’ils viennent seulement labelliser un système culturel déjà préexistant. Lorsqu’ils sont des créations dans l’urgence, en hydroponique, par la volonté rituelle de reproduire, leurs effets relèvent de l’espoir, non d’une stratégie. (…) Ainsi, la tentation française de copier les mesures allemandes qui ont conduit au succès, sans que les dirigeants français aient vraiment compris pourquoi, mais en espérant les mêmes bénéfices, peut être considérée comme une expression du Culte du Cargo. C’est en effet faire fi des processus culturels engagés depuis des décennies en Allemagne et qui ont conduit à une culture de la négociation sociale et à des syndicats représentatifs. (…) Contrairement à ce que veulent faire croire les prêtres du Culte du Cargo, les danses de la pluie ne marchent pas, il faut réfléchir. Luc Brunet
Je crois qu’il y a  quelque chose qui se passe. Il y a quelque chose qui est en train de changer et cela va changer à nouveau. Je ne pense pas que ce soit un canular, je pense qu’il y a probablement une différence. Mais je ne sais pas si c’est à cause de l’homme. (…) Je ne veux pas donner des trillions et des trillions de dollars. Je ne veux pas perdre des millions et des millions d’emplois. Je ne veux pas qu’on y perde au change. (…) Et on ne sait pas si ça se serait passé avec ou sans l’homme. On ne sait pas. (…) Il y a des scientifiques qui ne sont pas d’accord avec ça. (…) Je ne nie pas le changement climatique. Mais cela pourrait très bien repartir dans l’autre sens. Vous savez, on parle de plus de millions d’années. Il y en a qui disent que nous avons eu des ouragans qui étaient bien pires que ce que nous venons d’avoir avec Michael. (…) Vous savez, les scientifiques aussi ont leurs visées politiques. Président Trump (15.10.2018)
La « fin du monde » contre la « fin du mois ». L’expression, supposée avoir été employée initialement par un gilet jaune, a fait florès : comment concilier les impératifs de pouvoir d’achat à court terme, et les exigences écologiques vitales pour la survie de la planète ? La formule a même été reprise ce mardi par Emmanuel Macron, dans son discours sur la transition énergétique. « On l’entend, le président, le gouvernement, a-t-il expliqué, en paraphrasant les requêtes supposées des contestataires. Ils évoquent la fin du monde, nous on parle de la fin du mois. Nous allons traiter les deux, et nous devons traiter les deux. » (…) C’est dire que l’expression – si elle a pu être reprise ponctuellement par tel ou tel manifestant – émane en fait de nos élites boboïsantes. Elle correspond bien à la vision méprisante qu’elles ont d’une France périphérique aux idées étriquées, obsédée par le « pognon » indifférente au bien commun, là où nos dirigeants auraient la capacité à embrasser plus large, et à voir plus loin. Or, la réalité est toute autre : quand on prend le temps de parler à ces gilets jaunes, on constate qu’ils sont parfaitement conscients de la problématique écologique. Parmi leurs revendications, dévoilées ces derniers jours, il y a ainsi l’interdiction immédiate du glyphosate, cancérogène probable que le gouvernement a en revanche autorisé pour encore au moins trois ans. Mais, s’ils se sentent concernés par l’avenir de la planète, les représentants de cette France rurale et périurbaine refusent de payer pour les turpitudes d’un système économique qui détruit l’environnement. D’autant que c’est ce même système qui est à l’origine de la désindustrialisation et de la dévitalisation des territoires, dont ils subissent depuis trente ans les conséquences en première ligne. A l’inverse, nos grandes consciences donneuses de leçon sont bien souvent les principaux bénéficiaires de cette économie mondialisée. Qui est égoïste, et qui est altruiste ? Parmi les doléances des gilets jaunes, on trouve d’ailleurs aussi nombre de revendications politiques : comptabilisation du vote blanc, présence obligatoire des députés à l’Assemblée nationale, promulgation des lois par les citoyens eux-mêmes. Des revendications qu’on peut bien moquer, ou balayer d’un revers de manche en estimant qu’elles ne sont pas de leur ressort. Elles n’en témoignent pas moins d’un souci du politique, au sens le plus noble du terme, celui du devenir de la Cité. A l’inverse, en se repaissant d’une figure rhétorique caricaturale, reprise comme un « gimmick » de communication, nos élites démontrent leur goût pour le paraître et la superficialité, ainsi que la facilité avec laquelle elles s’entichent de clichés qui ne font que conforter leurs préjugés. Alors, qui est ouvert, et qui est étriqué ? Qui voit loin, et qui est replié sur lui-même ? Qui pense à ses fins de mois, et qui, à la fin du monde ? Benjamin Masse-Stamberger
In the South Seas there is a Cargo Cult of people. During the war they saw airplanes land with lots of good materials, and they want the same thing to happen now. So they’ve arranged to make things like runways, to put fires along the sides of the runways, to make a wooden hut for a man to sit in, with two wooden pieces on his head like headphones and bars of bamboo sticking out like antennas—he’s the controller—and they wait for the airplanes to land. They’re doing everything right. The form is perfect. It looks exactly the way it looked before. But it doesn’t work. No airplanes land. So I call these things Cargo Cult Science, because they follow all the apparent precepts and forms of scientific investigation, but they’re missing something essential, because the planes don’t land. Now it behooves me, of course, to tell you what they’re missing. But it would he just about as difficult to explain to the South Sea Islanders how they have to arrange things so that they get some wealth in their system. It is not something simple like telling them how to improve the shapes of the earphones. But there is one feature I notice that is generally missing in Cargo Cult Science. That is the idea that we all hope you have learned in studying science in school (…) It’s a kind of scientific integrity, a principle of scientific thought that corresponds to a kind of utter honesty—a kind of leaning over backwards. For example, if you’re doing an experiment, you should report everything that you think might make it invalid—not only what you think is right about it: other causes that could possibly explain your results; and things you thought of that you’ve eliminated by some other experiment, and how they worked—to make sure the other fellow can tell they have been eliminated. Details that could throw doubt on your interpretation must be given, if you know them. You must do the best you can—if you know anything at all wrong, or possibly wrong—to explain it. If you make a theory, for example, and advertise it, or put it out, then you must also put down all the facts that disagree with it, as well as those that agree with it. There is also a more subtle problem. When you have put a lot of ideas together to make an elaborate theory, you want to make sure, when explaining what it fits, that those things it fits are not just the things that gave you the idea for the theory; but that the finished theory makes something else come out right, in addition. In summary, the idea is to try to give all of the information to help others to judge the value of your contribution; not just the information that leads to judgment in one particular direction or another. The first principle is that you must not fool yourself—and you are the easiest person to fool. So you have to be very careful about that. After you’ve not fooled yourself, it’s easy not to fool other scientists… You just have to be honest in a conventional way after that. Richard Feynman (1974)
If it’s consensus, it isn’t science. If it’s science, it isn’t consensus. Period. Michael Crichton (2013)
Humans exert a growing, but physically small, warming influence on the climate. The results from many different climate models disagree with, or even contradict, each other and many kinds of observations. In short, the science is insufficient to make useful predictions about how the climate will change over the coming decades, much less what effect our actions will have on it. Dr. Steven E. Koonin
‘The Science,” we’re told, is settled. How many times have you heard it? Humans have broken the earth’s climate. Temperatures are rising, sea level is surging, ice is disappearing, and heat waves, storms, droughts, floods, and wildfires are an ever-worsening scourge on the world. Greenhouse gas emissions are causing all of this. And unless they’re eliminated promptly by radical changes to society and its energy systems, “The Science” says Earth is doomed.  Yes, it’s true that the globe is warming, and that humans are exerting a warming influence upon it. But beyond that — to paraphrase the classic movie “The Princess Bride” — “I do not think ‘The Science’ says what you think it says.”  For example, both research literature and government reports state clearly that heat waves in the US are now no more common than they were in 1900, and that the warmest temperatures in the US have not risen in the past fifty years. When I tell people this, most are incredulous. Some gasp. And some get downright hostile.  These are almost certainly not the only climate facts you haven’t heard. Here are three more that might surprise you, drawn from recent published research or assessments of climate science published by the US government and the UN:   Humans have had no detectable impact on hurricanes over the past century. Greenland’s ice sheet isn’t shrinking any more rapidly today than it was 80 years ago. The global area burned by wildfires has declined more than 25 percent since 2003 and 2020 was one of the lowest years on record.  Why haven’t you heard these facts before?  Most of the disconnect comes from the long game of telephone that starts with the research literature and runs through the assessment reports to the summaries of the assessment reports and on to the media coverage. There are abundant opportunities to get things wrong — both accidentally and on purpose — as the information goes through filter after filter to be packaged for various audiences. The public gets their climate information almost exclusively from the media; very few people actually read the assessment summaries, let alone the reports and research papers themselves. That’s perfectly understandable — the data and analyses are nearly impenetrable for non-experts, and the writing is not exactly gripping. As a result, most people don’t get the whole story. Policymakers, too, have to rely on information that’s been put through several different wringers by the time it gets to them. Because most government officials are not themselves scientists, it’s up to scientists to make sure that those who make key policy decisions get an accurate, complete and transparent picture of what’s known (and unknown) about the changing climate, one undistorted by “agenda” or “narrative.” Unfortunately, getting that story straight isn’t as easy as it sounds. (…) the public discussions of climate and energy [have become] increasingly distant from the science. Phrases like “climate emergency,” “climate crisis” and “climate disaster” are now routinely bandied about to support sweeping policy proposals to “fight climate change” with government interventions and subsidies. Not surprisingly, the Biden administration has made climate and energy a major priority infused throughout the government, with the appointment of John Kerry as climate envoy and proposed spending of almost $2 trillion dollars to fight this “existential threat to humanity.” Trillion-dollar decisions about reducing human influences on the climate should be informed by an accurate understanding of scientific certainties and uncertainties. My late Nobel-prizewinning Caltech colleague Richard Feynman was one of the greatest physicists of the 20th century. At the 1974 Caltech commencement, he gave a now famous address titled “Cargo Cult Science” about the rigor scientists must adopt to avoid fooling not only themselves. “Give all of the information to help others to judge the value of your contribution; not just the information that leads to judgment in one particular direction or another,” he implored.  Much of the public portrayal of climate science ignores the great late physicist’s advice. It is an effort to persuade rather than inform, and the information presented withholds either essential context or what doesn’t “fit.” Scientists write and too-casually review the reports, reporters uncritically repeat them, editors allow that to happen, activists and their organizations fan the fires of alarm, and experts endorse the deception by keeping silent.  As a result, the constant repetition of these and many other climate fallacies are turned into accepted truths known as “The Science.” Dr. Steven E. Koonin
Physicist Steven Koonin kicks the hornet’s nest right out of the gate in “Unsettled.” In the book’s first sentences he asserts that “the Science” about our planet’s climate is anything but “settled.” Mr. Koonin knows well that it is nonetheless a settled subject in the minds of most pundits and politicians and most of the population. Further proof of the public’s sentiment: Earlier this year the United Nations Development Programme published the mother of all climate surveys, titled “The Peoples’ Climate Vote.” With more than a million respondents from 50 countries, the survey, unsurprisingly, found “64% of people said that climate change was an emergency.” But science itself is not conducted by polls, regardless of how often we are urged to heed a “scientific consensus” on climate. As the science-trained novelist Michael Crichton summarized in a famous 2003 lecture at Caltech: “If it’s consensus, it isn’t science. If it’s science, it isn’t consensus. Period.” Mr. Koonin says much the same in “Unsettled.” The book is no polemic. It’s a plea for understanding how scientists extract clarity from complexity. And, as Mr. Koonin makes clear, few areas of science are as complex and multidisciplinary as the planet’s climate. (…) But Mr. Koonin is no “climate denier,” to use the concocted phrase used to shut down debate. The word “denier” is of course meant to associate skeptics of climate alarmism with Holocaust deniers. (…) Mr. Koonin makes it clear, on the book’s first page, that “it’s true that the globe is warming, and that humans are exerting a warming influence upon it.” The heart of the science debate, however, isn’t about whether the globe is warmer or whether humanity contributed. The important questions are about the magnitude of civilization’s contribution and the speed of changes; and, derivatively, about the urgency and scale of governmental response. (…) As Mr Koonin illustrates, tornado frequency and severity are also not trending up; nor are the number and severity of droughts. The extent of global fires has been trending significantly downward. The rate of sea-level rise has not accelerated. Global crop yields are rising, not falling. And while global atmospheric CO2 levels are obviously higher now than two centuries ago, they’re not at any record planetary high—they’re at a low that has only been seen once before in the past 500 million years. Mr. Koonin laments the sloppiness of those using local weather “events” to make claims about long-cycle planetary phenomena. He chastises not so much local news media as journalists with prestigious national media who should know better. (…) When it comes to the vaunted computer models, Mr. Koonin is persuasively skeptical. It’s a big problem, he says, when models can’t retroactively “predict” events that have already happened. And he notes that some of the “tuning” done to models so that they work better amounts to “cooking the books.” (…) Since all the data that Mr. Koonin uses are available to others, he poses the obvious question: “Why haven’t you heard these facts before?” (…) He points to such things as incentives to invoke alarm for fundraising purposes and official reports that “mislead by omission.” Many of the primary scientific reports, he observes repeatedly, are factual. Still, “the public gets their climate information almost exclusively from the media; very few people actually read the assessment summaries.” (…) But even if one remains unconvinced by his arguments, the right response is to debate the science. We’ll see if that happens in a world in which politicians assert the science is settled and plan astronomical levels of spending to replace the nation’s massive infrastructures with “green” alternatives. Never have so many spent so much public money on the basis of claims that are so unsettled. The prospects for a reasoned debate are not good. Mark P. Mills
La prophétie de malheur est faite pour éviter qu’elle ne se réalise; et se gausser ultérieurement d’éventuels sonneurs d’alarme en leur rappelant que le pire ne s’est pas réalisé serait le comble de l’injustice: il se peut que leur impair soit leur mérite. Hans Jonas
(Noah was tired of playing the prophet of doom and of always foretelling a catastrophe that would not occur and that no one would take seriously. One day,) he clothed himself in sackcloth and put ashes on his head. This act was only permitted to someone lamenting the loss of his dear child or his wife. Clothed in the habit of truth, acting sorrowful, he went back to the city, intent on using to his advantage the curiosity, malignity and superstition of its people. Within a short time, he had gathered around him a small crowd, and the questions began to surface. He was asked if someone was dead and who the dead person was. Noah answered them that many were dead and, much to the amusement of those who were listening, that they themselves were dead. Asked when this catastrophe had taken place, he answered: tomorrow. Seizing this moment of attention and disarray, Noah stood up to his full height and began to speak: the day after tomorrow, the flood will be something that will have been. And when the flood will have been, all that is will never have existed. When the flood will have carried away all that is, all that will have been, it will be too late to remember, for there will be no one left. So there will no longer be any difference between the dead and those who weep for them. If I have come before you, it is to reverse time, it is to weep today for tomorrow’s dead. The day after tomorrow, it will be too late. Upon this, he went back home, took his clothes off, removed the ashes covering his face, and went to his workshop. In the evening, a carpenter knocked on his door and said to him: let me help you build an ark, so that this may become false. Later, a roofer joined with them and said: it is raining over the mountains, let me help you, so that this may become false. Günther Anders
Si nous nous distinguons des apocalypticiens judéo-chrétiens classiques, ce n’est pas seulement parce que nous craignons la fin (qu’ils ont, eux, espérée), mais surtout parce que notre passion apocalyptique n’a pas d’autre objectif que celui d’empêcher l’apocalypse. Nous ne sommes apocalypticiens que pour avoir tort. Que pour jouir chaque jour à nouveau de la chance d’être là, ridicules mais toujours debout. Günther Anders
Quiconque tient une guerre imminente pour certaine contribue à son déclenchement, précisément par la certitude qu’il en a. Quiconque tient la paix pour certaine se conduit avec insouciance et nous mène sans le vouloir à la guerre. Seul celui qui voit le péril et ne l’oublie pas un seul instant se montre capable de se comporter rationnellement et de faire tout le possible pour l’exorciser. Karl Jaspers
To make the prospect of a catastrophe credible, one must increase the ontological force of its inscription in the future. But to do this with too much success would be to lose sight of the goal, which is precisely to raise awareness and spur action so that the catastrophe does not take place. Jean-Pierre Dupuy (The Paradox of Enlightened Doomsaying/The Jonah Paradox]
Annoncer que la catastrophe est certaine, c’est contribuer à la rendre telle. La passer sous silence ou en minimiser l’importance, à la façon des optimistes béats, conduit au même résultat. Ce qu’il faudrait, c’est combiner les deux démarches : annoncer un avenir destinal qui superposerait l’occurrence de la catastrophe, pour qu’elle puisse faire office de dissuasion, et sa non-occurrence, pour préserver l’espoir. C’est parce que la catastrophe constitue un destin détestable dont nous devons dire que nous n’en voulons pas qu’il faut garder les yeux fixés sur elle, sans jamais la perdre de vue. Jean-Pierre Dupuy
La modernité (…) repose sur la conviction que la croissance économique n’est pas seulement possible mais absolument essentielle. Prières, bonnes actions et méditation pourraient bien être une source de consolation et d’inspiration, mais des problèmes tels que la famine, les épidémies et la guerre ne sauraient être résolus que par la croissance. Ce dogme fondamental se laisse résumer par une idée simple : « Si tu as un problème, tu as probablement besoin de plus, et pour avoir plus, il faut produire plus ! » Les responsables politiques et les économistes modernes insistent : la croissance est vitale pour trois grandes raisons. Premièrement, quand nous produisons plus, nous pouvons consommer plus, accroître notre niveau de vie et, prétendument, jouir d’une vie plus heureuse. Deuxièmement, tant que l’espèce humaine se multiplie, la croissance économique est nécessaire à seule fin de rester où nous en sommes. (…) La modernité a fait du « toujours plus » une panacée applicable à la quasi-totalité des problèmes publics et privés – du fondamentalisme religieux au mariage raté, en passant par l’autoritarisme dans le tiers-monde. (…) La croissance économique est ainsi devenue le carrefour où se rejoignent la quasi-totalité des religions, idéologies et mouvements modernes. L’Union soviétique, avec ses plans quinquennaux mégalomaniaques, n’était pas moins obsédée par la croissance que l’impitoyable requin de la finance américain. De même que chrétiens et musulmans croient tous au ciel et ne divergent que sur le moyen d’y parvenir, au cours de la guerre froide, capitalistes et communistes imaginaient créer le paradis sur terre par la croissance économique et ne se disputaient que sur la méthode exacte. (…) De fait, on n’a sans doute pas tort de parler de religion lorsqu’il s’agit de la croyance dans la croissance économique : elle prétend aujourd’hui résoudre nombre de nos problèmes éthiques, sinon la plupart. La croissance économique étant prétendument la source de toutes les bonnes choses, elle encourage les gens à enterrer leurs désaccords éthiques pour adopter la ligne d’action qui maximise la croissance à long terme. Le credo du « toujours plus » presse en conséquence les individus, les entreprises et les gouvernements de mépriser tout ce qui pourrait entraver la croissance économique : par exemple, préserver l’égalité sociale, assurer l’harmonie écologique ou honorer ses parents. En Union soviétique, les dirigeants pensaient que le communisme étatique était la voie de la croissance la plus rapide : tout ce qui se mettait en travers de la collectivisation fut donc passé au bulldozer, y compris des millions de koulaks, la liberté d’expression et la mer d’Aral. De nos jours, il est généralement admis qu’une forme de capitalisme de marché est une manière beaucoup plus efficace d’assurer la croissance à long terme : on protège donc les magnats cupides, les paysans riches et la liberté d’expression, tout en démantelant et détruisant les habitats écologiques, les structures sociales et les valeurs traditionnelles qui gênent le capitalisme de marché. (….) Le capitalisme de marché a une réponse sans appel. Si la croissance économique exige que nous relâchions les liens familiaux, encouragions les gens à vivre loin de leurs parents, et importions des aides de l’autre bout du monde, ainsi soit-il. Cette réponse implique cependant un jugement éthique, plutôt qu’un énoncé factuel. Lorsque certains se spécialisent dans les logiciels quand d’autres consacrent leur temps à soigner les aînés, on peut sans nul doute produire plus de logiciels et assurer aux personnes âgées des soins plus professionnels. Mais la croissance économique est-elle plus importante que les liens familiaux ? En se permettant de porter des jugements éthiques de ce type, le capitalisme de marché a franchi la frontière qui séparait le champ de la science de celui de la religion. L’étiquette de « religion » déplairait probablement à la plupart des capitalistes, mais, pour ce qui est des religions, le capitalisme peut au moins tenir la tête haute. À la différence des autres religions qui nous promettent un gâteau au ciel, le capitalisme promet des miracles ici, sur terre… et parfois même en accomplit. Le capitalisme mérite même des lauriers pour avoir réduit la violence humaine et accru la tolérance et la coopération. (…) La croissance économique peut-elle cependant se poursuivre éternellement ? L’économie ne finira-t-elle pas par être à court de ressources et par s’arrêter ? Pour assurer une croissance perpétuelle, il nous faut découvrir un stock de ressources inépuisable. Une solution consiste à explorer et à conquérir de nouvelles terres. Des siècles durant, la croissance de l’économie européenne et l’expansion du système capitaliste se sont largement nourries de conquêtes impériales outre-mer. Or le nombre d’îles et de continents est limité. Certains entrepreneurs espèrent finalement explorer et conquérir de nouvelles planètes, voire de nouvelles galaxies, mais, en attendant, l’économie moderne doit trouver une meilleure méthode pour poursuivre son expansion. (…) La véritable némésis de l’économie moderne est l’effondrement écologique. Le progrès scientifique et la croissance économique prennent place dans une biosphère fragile et, à mesure qu’ils prennent de l’ampleur, les ondes de choc déstabilisent l’écologie. Pour assurer à chaque personne dans le monde le même niveau de vie que dans la société d’abondance américaine, il faudrait quelques planètes de plus ; or nous n’avons que celle-ci. (…) Une débâcle écologique provoquera une ruine économique, des troubles politiques et une chute du niveau de vie. Elle pourrait bien menacer l’existence même de la civilisation humaine. (…) Nous pourrions amoindrir le danger en ralentissant le rythme du progrès et de la croissance. Si cette année les investisseurs attendent un retour de 6 % sur leurs portefeuilles, dans dix ans ils pourraient apprendre à se satisfaire de 3 %, puis de 1 % dans vingt ans ; dans trente ans, l’économie cessera de croître et nous nous contenterons de ce que nous avons déjà. Le credo de la croissance s’oppose pourtant fermement à cette idée hérétique et il suggère plutôt d’aller encore plus vite. Si nos découvertes déstabilisent l’écosystème et menacent l’humanité, il nous faut découvrir quelque chose qui nous protège. Si la couche d’ozone s’amenuise et nous expose au cancer de la peau, à nous d’inventer un meilleur écran solaire et de meilleurs traitements contre le cancer, favorisant ainsi l’essor de nouvelles usines de crèmes solaires et de centres anticancéreux. Si les nouvelles industries polluent l’atmosphère et les océans, provoquant un réchauffement général et des extinctions massives, il nous appartient de construire des mondes virtuels et des sanctuaires high-tech qui nous offriront toutes les bonnes choses de la vie, même si la planète devient aussi chaude, morne et polluée que l’enfer. (…) L’humanité se trouve coincée dans une course double. D’un côté, nous nous sentons obligés d’accélérer le rythme du progrès scientifique et de la croissance économique. Un milliard de Chinois et un milliard d’Indiens aspirent au niveau de vie de la classe moyenne américaine, et ils ne voient aucune raison de brider leurs rêves quand les Américains ne sont pas disposés à renoncer à leurs 4×4 et à leurs centres commerciaux. D’un autre côté, nous devons garder au moins une longueur d’avance sur l’Armageddon écologique. Mener de front cette double course devient chaque année plus difficile, parce que chaque pas qui rapproche l’habitant des bidonvilles de Delhi du rêve américain rapproche aussi la planète du gouffre. (…) Qui sait si la science sera toujours capable de sauver simultanément l’économie du gel et l’écologie du point d’ébullition. Et puisque le rythme continue de s’accélérer, les marges d’erreur ne cessent de se rétrécir. Si, précédemment, il suffisait d’une invention stupéfiante une fois par siècle, nous avons aujourd’hui besoin d’un miracle tous les deux ans. (…) Paradoxalement, le pouvoir même de la science peut accroître ledanger, en rendant les plus riches complaisants. (…) Trop de politiciens et d’électeurs pensent que, tant que l’économie poursuit sa croissance, les ingénieurs et les hommes de science pourront toujours la sauver du jugement dernier. S’agissant du changement climatique, beaucoup de défenseurs de la croissance ne se contentent pas d’espérer des miracles : ils tiennent pour acquis que les miracles se produiront. (…) Même si les choses tournent au pire, et que la science ne peut empêcher le déluge, les ingénieurs pourraient encore construire une arche de Noé high-tech pour la caste supérieure, et laisser les milliards d’autres hommes se noyer. La croyance en cette arche high-tech est actuellement une des plus grosses menaces sur l’avenir de l’humanité et de tout l’écosystème. (…) Et les plus pauvres ? Pourquoi ne protestent-ils pas ? Si le déluge survient un jour, ils en supporteront le coût, mais ils seront aussi les premiers à faire les frais de la stagnation économique. Dans un monde capitaliste, leur vie s’améliore uniquement quand l’économie croît. Aussi est-il peu probable qu’ils soutiennent des mesures pour réduire les menaces écologiques futures fondées sur le ralentissement de la croissance économique actuelle. Protéger l’environnement est une très belle idée, mais ceux qui n’arrivent pas à payer leur loyer s’inquiètent bien davantage de leur découvert bancaire que de la fonte de la calotte glaciaire. (…) Même si nous continuons de courir assez vite et parvenons à parer à la foi l’effondrement économique et la débâcle écologique, la course elle-même crée d’immenses problèmes. (…) Sur un plan collectif, les gouvernements, les entreprises et les organismes sont encouragés à mesurer leur succès en termes de croissance et à craindre l’équilibre comme le diable. Sur le plan individuel, nous sommes constamment poussés à accroître nos revenus et notre niveau de vie. Même si vous êtes satisfait de votre situation actuelle, vous devez rechercher toujours plus. Le luxe d’hier devient nécessité d’aujourd’hui. (…) Le deal moderne nous promettait un pouvoir sans précédent. La promesse a été tenue. Mais à quel prix ? Yuval Harari
Les outils dont l’homme dispose aujourd’hui sont infiniment plus puissants que tous ceux qu’il a connus auparavant. Ces outils, l’homme est parfaitement capable de les utiliser de façon égoïste et rivalitaire. Ce qui m’intéresse, c’est cet accroissement de la puissance de l’homme sur le réel. Les statistiques de production et de consommation d’énergie sont en progrès constant, et la rapidité d’augmentation de ce progrès augmente elle aussi constamment, dessinant une courbe parfaite, presque verticale. C’est pour moi une immense source d’effroi tant les hommes, essentiellement, restent des rivaux, rivalisant pour le même objet ou la même gloire – ce qui est la même chose. Nous sommes arrivés à un stade où le milieu humain est menacé par la puissance même de l’homme. Il s’agit avant tout de la menace écologique, des armes et des manipulations biologiques. (…) Loin d’être absurdes ou impensables, les grands textes eschatologiques – ceux des Évangiles synoptiques, en particulier Matthieu, chapitre 24, et Marc, chapitre 13 –, sont d’une actualité saisissante. La science moderne a séparé la nature et la culture, alors qu’on avait défini la religion comme le tonnerre de Zeus, etc. Dans les textes apocalyptiques, ce qui frappe, c’est ce mélange de nature et de culture ; les guerres et rumeurs de guerre, le fracas de la mer et des flots ne forment qu’un. Or si nous regardons ce qui se passe autour de nous, si nous nous interrogeons sur l’action des hommes sur le réel, le réchauffement global, la montée du niveau la mer, nous nous retrouvons face à un univers où les choses naturelles et culturelles sont confondues. La science elle-même le reconnaît. J’ai voulu radicaliser cet aspect apocalyptique. Je pense que les gens sont trop rassurés. Ils se rassurent eux-mêmes. L’homme est comme un insecte qui fait son nid ; il fait confiance à l’environnement. La créature fait toujours confiance à l’environnement… Le rationalisme issu des Lumières continue aussi à rassurer. (…) La Chine a favorisé le développement de l’automobile. Cette priorité dénote une rivalité avec les Américains sur un terrain très redoutable ; la pollution dans la région de Shanghai est effrayante. Mais avoir autant d’automobiles que l’Amérique est un but dont il est, semble-t-il, impossible de priver les hommes. L’Occident conseille aux pays en voie de développement et aux pays les plus peuplés du globe, comme la Chine et l’Inde, de ne pas faire la même chose que lui ! Il y a là quelque chose de paradoxal et de scandaleux pour ceux auxquels ces conseils s’adressent. Aux États-Unis, les politiciens vous diront tous qu’ils sont d’accord pour prendre des mesures écologiques si elles ne touchent pas les accroissements de production. Or, s’il y a une partie du monde qui n’a pas besoin d’accroissement de production, c’est bien les États-Unis ; le profit individuel et les rivalités, qui ne sont pas immédiatement guerrières et destructrices mais qui le seront peut-être indirectement, et de façon plus massive encore, sont sacrées ; pas question de les toucher. Que faut-il pour qu’elles cessent d’être sacrées ? Il n’est pas certain que la situation actuelle, notamment la disparition croissante des espèces, soit menaçante pour la vie sur la planète, mais il y a une possibilité très forte qu’elle le soit. Ne pas prendre de précaution, alors qu’on est dans le doute, est dément. Des mesures écologiques sérieuses impliqueraient des diminutions de production. Mais ce raisonnement ne joue pas dans l’écologie, l’humanité étant follement attachée à ce type de concurrence qui structure en particulier la réalité occidentale, les habitudes de vie, de goût de l’humanité dite « développée ». René Girard

Attention: un culte du cargo peut en cacher un autre !

A l’heure où au nom d’une prétendue science hautement selective et de plus en plus douteuse

Et où après avoir ruiné, à coup de délocalisations et d’immigration sauvages,  leurs emplois et leurs vies …

Entre deux petites virées à l’autre bout du monde et des annonces de centaines de milliards de dépenses pour reverdir nos économies …

Nos ayatollahs du climat et intermittents du jetset « de la fin  du monde » font feu de tout bois contre la France ou l’Amérique « de la fin du mois » qui « fume des clopes et roule en diesel » …

Pendant que pour rattraper tant d’injustices face à l’inextricable dilemme entre environnement et emplois, nos populistes tentent de relancer encore plus fort la folle machine de la croissance à tout prix …

Ou nos nouveaux prêtres du transhumanisme multiplient littéralement les promesses en l’air sur l’éventuelle colonisation de l’une ou l’autre des autres planètes de notre système solaire …

Comment ne pas repenser …

Après le feu prix Nobel de physique américain Richard Feynman

Qui dès les années 70 nous en avait averti …

A la pseudoscience ou nouvelle pensée magique qu’est en train de devenir la science dont nos sociétés ont fait rien de moins qu’une nouvelle religion …

Qu’il avait en son temps qualifiée de « science du culte cargo » (improprement dit « culte du cargo » en français, en référence aux bateaux du même nom, alors que le mot anglais, proche du français « cargaison », fait en réalité référence aux marchandises ou aux biens matériels) …

Car ayant quitté, dans une approche non réfléchie et ritualiste, son enracinement dans l’expérience et de plus en plus tentée, sous la pression politique et médiatique, de ne garder que le nom et l’apparence de la méthode scientifique …

A la manière de ces sortes de versions modernisées des antiques danses de la pluie des habitants de certaines petites iles mélanésiennes de la seconde guerre mondiale…

Où observant une corrélation entre l’appel du radio et l’arrivée d’une cargaison de vivres et d’objets manufacturés ou entre l’existence d’une piste et l’arrivée d’avions …

Ces derniers s’étaient mis, on le sait, à construire un culte fait de simulacre de radio et de fausses pistes d’atterrissage, espérant ainsi que l’existence de moyens ferait venir les biens matériels occidentaux désirés tout en dilapidant, en pure perte, leurs propres maigres ressources ?

Mais comment ne pas voir aussi …

Avec de Jonas, Anders, Jaspers à Dupuy, nos penseurs du dilemme du prophète de malheur dont « l’impair pourrait être le mérite » …

Et notre regretté anthropologue français René Girard

Ou plus récemment l’historien israélien Yuval Harari

A la fois fascinés par la formidable capacité de notre monde moderne à désamorcer la puissance conflictuelle de la rivalité mimétique en rendant les mêmes marchandises accessibles à tous …

Et effrayés par la tout aussi formidable puissance des outils dont nous disposons …

Qui entre menace écologique, armes et manipulations biologiques proprement apocalyptiques

Menacent notre propre milieu naturel avec l’entrée dans la danse, mimétisme planétaire oblige, des milliards de Chinois, Indiens ou autres jusque là laissés pour compte  …

Dans une fuite en avant que suppose notre système même puisqu’il ne vit que par l’innovation et la croissance perpétuelles …

Et qui à terme, au nom de la désormais sacro-sainte croissance mais aussi du fait de la simple accoutumance poussant comme pour les drogues à toujours plus de consommation pour conserver les mêmes effets, ne peut qu’engloutir les ressources de la terre …

A la manière de ces Aztèques qui à la veille de leur inévitable défaite devant Cortès…

Multipliaient, jusqu’à des dizaines de milliers par an, le nombre des victimes de leurs sacrifices humains ?

Obama administration scientist says climate ‘emergency’ is based on fallacy

‘The Science,” we’re told, is settled. How many times have you heard it?

Humans have broken the earth’s climate. Temperatures are rising, sea level is surging, ice is disappearing, and heat waves, storms, droughts, floods, and wildfires are an ever-worsening scourge on the world. Greenhouse gas emissions are causing all of this. And unless they’re eliminated promptly by radical changes to society and its energy systems, “The Science” says Earth is doomed. 

Yes, it’s true that the globe is warming, and that humans are exerting a warming influence upon it. But beyond that — to paraphrase the classic movie “The Princess Bride” — “I do not think ‘The Science’ says what you think it says.”

For example, both research literature and government reports state clearly that heat waves in the US are now no more common than they were in 1900, and that the warmest temperatures in the US have not risen in the past fifty years. When I tell people this, most are incredulous. Some gasp. And some get downright hostile.

These are almost certainly not the only climate facts you haven’t heard. Here are three more that might surprise you, drawn from recent published research or assessments of climate science published by the US government and the UN:

  •  Humans have had no detectable impact on hurricanes over the past century.
  • Greenland’s ice sheet isn’t shrinking any more rapidly today than it was 80 years ago.
  • The global area burned by wildfires has declined more than 25 percent since 2003 and 2020 was one of the lowest years on record.

Why haven’t you heard these facts before?

Most of the disconnect comes from the long game of telephone that starts with the research literature and runs through the assessment reports to the summaries of the assessment reports and on to the media coverage. There are abundant opportunities to get things wrong — both accidentally and on purpose — as the information goes through filter after filter to be packaged for various audiences. The public gets their climate information almost exclusively from the media; very few people actually read the assessment summaries, let alone the reports and research papers themselves. That’s perfectly understandable — the data and analyses are nearly impenetrable for non-experts, and the writing is not exactly gripping. As a result, most people don’t get the whole story.

Policymakers, too, have to rely on information that’s been put through several different wringers by the time it gets to them. Because most government officials are not themselves scientists, it’s up to scientists to make sure that those who make key policy decisions get an accurate, complete and transparent picture of what’s known (and unknown) about the changing climate, one undistorted by “agenda” or “narrative.” Unfortunately, getting that story straight isn’t as easy as it sounds.

I should know. That used to be my job.

I’m a scientist — I work to understand the world through measurements and observations, and then to communicate clearly both the excitement and the implications of that understanding. Early in my career, I had great fun doing this for esoteric phenomena in the realm of atoms and nuclei using high-performance computer modeling (which is also an important tool for much of climate science). But beginning in 2004, I spent about a decade turning those same methods to the subject of climate and its implications for energy technologies. I did this first as chief scientist for the oil company BP, where I focused on advancing renewable energy, and then as undersecretary for science in the Obama administration’s Department of Energy, where I helped guide the government’s investments in energy technologies and climate science. I found great satisfaction in these roles, helping to define and catalyze actions that would reduce carbon dioxide emissions, the agreed-upon imperative that would “save the planet.”

But doubts began in late 2013 when I was asked by the American Physical Society to lead an update of its public statement on climate. As part of that effort, in January 2014 I convened a workshop with a specific objective: to “stress test” the state of climate science.

I came away from the APS workshop not only surprised, but shaken by the realization that climate science was far less mature than I had supposed. Here’s what I discovered:

Humans exert a growing, but physically small, warming influence on the climate. The results from many different climate models disagree with, or even contradict, each other and many kinds of observations. In short, the science is insufficient to make useful predictions about how the climate will change over the coming decades, much less what effect our actions will have on it. 

In the seven years since that workshop, I watched with dismay as the public discussions of climate and energy became increasingly distant from the science. Phrases like “climate emergency,” “climate crisis” and “climate disaster” are now routinely bandied about to support sweeping policy proposals to “fight climate change” with government interventions and subsidies. Not surprisingly, the Biden administration has made climate and energy a major priority infused throughout the government, with the appointment of John Kerry as climate envoy and proposed spending of almost $2 trillion dollars to fight this “existential threat to humanity.”

Trillion-dollar decisions about reducing human influences on the climate should be informed by an accurate understanding of scientific certainties and uncertainties. My late Nobel-prizewinning Caltech colleague Richard Feynman was one of the greatest physicists of the 20th century. At the 1974 Caltech commencement, he gave a now famous address titled “Cargo Cult Science” about the rigor scientists must adopt to avoid fooling not only themselves. “Give all of the information to help others to judge the value of your contribution; not just the information that leads to judgment in one particular direction or another,” he implored.

Much of the public portrayal of climate science ignores the great late physicist’s advice. It is an effort to persuade rather than inform, and the information presented withholds either essential context or what doesn’t “fit.” Scientists write and too-casually review the reports, reporters uncritically repeat them, editors allow that to happen, activists and their organizations fan the fires of alarm, and experts endorse the deception by keeping silent.

As a result, the constant repetition of these and many other climate fallacies are turned into accepted truths known as “The Science.”

This article is an adapted excerpt from Dr. Koonin’s book, “Unsettled: What Climate Science Tells Us, What It Doesn’t, and Why It Matters” (BenBella Books), out May 4.

Voir aussi:

‘Unsettled’ Review: The ‘Consensus’ On Climate
A top Obama scientist looks at the evidence on warming and CO2 emissions and rebuts much of the dominant political narrative.
Mark P. Mills
The Wall Street Journal
April 25, 2021

Physicist Steven Koonin kicks the hornet’s nest right out of the gate in “Unsettled.” In the book’s first sentences he asserts that “the Science” about our planet’s climate is anything but “settled.” Mr. Koonin knows well that it is nonetheless a settled subject in the minds of most pundits and politicians and most of the population.

Further proof of the public’s sentiment: Earlier this year the United Nations Development Programme published the mother of all climate surveys, titled “The Peoples’ Climate Vote.” With more than a million respondents from 50 countries, the survey, unsurprisingly, found “64% of people said that climate change was an emergency.”

But science itself is not conducted by polls, regardless of how often we are urged to heed a “scientific consensus” on climate. As the science-trained novelist Michael Crichton summarized in a famous 2003 lecture at Caltech: “If it’s consensus, it isn’t science. If it’s science, it isn’t consensus. Period.” Mr. Koonin says much the same in “Unsettled.”

The book is no polemic. It’s a plea for understanding how scientists extract clarity from complexity. And, as Mr. Koonin makes clear, few areas of science are as complex and multidisciplinary as the planet’s climate.

But Mr. Koonin is no “climate denier,” to use the concocted phrase used to shut down debate. The word “denier” is of course meant to associate skeptics of climate alarmism with Holocaust deniers. Mr. Koonin finds this label particularly abhorrent, since “the Nazis killed more than two hundred of my relatives in Eastern Europe.” As for “denying,” Mr. Koonin makes it clear, on the book’s first page, that “it’s true that the globe is warming, and that humans are exerting a warming influence upon it.”

The heart of the science debate, however, isn’t about whether the globe is warmer or whether humanity contributed. The important questions are about the magnitude of civilization’s contribution and the speed of changes; and, derivatively, about the urgency and scale of governmental response. Mr. Koonin thinks most readers will be surprised at what the data show. I dare say they will.

As Mr Koonin illustrates, tornado frequency and severity are also not trending up; nor are the number and severity of droughts. The extent of global fires has been trending significantly downward. The rate of sea-level rise has not accelerated. Global crop yields are rising, not falling. And while global atmospheric CO2 levels are obviously higher now than two centuries ago, they’re not at any record planetary high—they’re at a low that has only been seen once before in the past 500 million years.

Mr. Koonin laments the sloppiness of those using local weather “events” to make claims about long-cycle planetary phenomena. He chastises not so much local news media as journalists with prestigious national media who should know better. This attribution error evokes one of Mr. Koonin’s rare rebukes: “Pointing to hurricanes as an example of the ravages of human-caused climate change is at best unconvincing, and at worst plainly dishonest.”

When it comes to the vaunted computer models, Mr. Koonin is persuasively skeptical. It’s a big problem, he says, when models can’t retroactively “predict” events that have already happened. And he notes that some of the “tuning” done to models so that they work better amounts to “cooking the books.” He should know, having written one of the first textbooks on using computers to model physics phenomena.

Mr. Koonin’s science credentials are impeccable—unlike, say, those of one well-known Swedish teenager to whom the media affords great attention on climate matters. He has been a professor of physics at Caltech and served as the top scientist in Barack Obama’s Energy Department. The book is copiously referenced and relies on widely accepted government documents.

Since all the data that Mr. Koonin uses are available to others, he poses the obvious question: “Why haven’t you heard these facts before?” He is cautious, perhaps overly so, in proposing the causes for so much misinformation. He points to such things as incentives to invoke alarm for fundraising purposes and official reports that “mislead by omission.” Many of the primary scientific reports, he observes repeatedly, are factual. Still, “the public gets their climate information almost exclusively from the media; very few people actually read the assessment summaries.”

Mr. Koonin says that he knows he’ll be criticized, even “attacked.” You can’t blame him for taking a few pages to shadow box with his critics. But even if one remains unconvinced by his arguments, the right response is to debate the science. We’ll see if that happens in a world in which politicians assert the science is settled and plan astronomical levels of spending to replace the nation’s massive infrastructures with “green” alternatives. Never have so many spent so much public money on the basis of claims that are so unsettled. The prospects for a reasoned debate are not good. Good luck, Mr. Koonin.

Mr. Mills, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, is the author of “Digital Cathedrals” and a forthcoming book on how the cloud and new technologies will create an economic boom.

Voir également:

ANTICIPATION

Culte du Cargo : contagion des collectivités aux Etats

Luc Brunet

MAP

Mars 2012

Pur produit des sociétés dans lesquelles les élites ignorent que les processus culturels précèdent le succès, le Culte du Cargo, qui consiste à investir dans une infrastructure dont est dotée une société prospère en espérant que cette acquisition produise les mêmes effets pour soi, fut l’un des moteurs des emprunts toxiques des collectivités locales. L’expression a été popularisée lors de la seconde guerre mondiale, quand elle s’est exprimée par de fausses infrastructures créées par les insulaires et destinées à attirer les cargos. En 2012, le Culte du Cargo tendra à se généraliser au niveau des Etats.

En septembre 2011, dans l’orbite des difficultés de DEXIA, les personnes qui ne lisent pas le GEAB découvraient avec stupéfaction que des milliers de collectivités locales étaient exposées à des emprunts toxiques1. En décembre, un rapport parlementaire français2 évalue le désastre à 19 Milliards d’euros, près du double de ce qu’estimait la Cours des Comptes six mois plus tôt. Les collectivités représentent, en France par exemple, 70% de l’investissement public3, soit 51,7 milliards d’euros en 2010 (-2,1% par rapport à 2009).

Les collectivités ont développé une addiction à la dépense4 et, comme les ménages victimes plus ou moins conscientes des subprimes, elles ont facilement trouvé un dealer pour leur répondre5. Les causes en sont assez évidentes : multiplication des élus locaux n’ayant pas toujours de compétences techniques et encore moins financières, peu ou pas formés, tenus parfois par leur administration devenue maîtresse des lieux, et engagés dans une concurrence à la visibilité entre la ville, l’agglomération, le département à qui voudra montrer qu’il construit ou qu’il anime plus et mieux que l’autre, dans une relation finalement assez féodale. L’Italie a prévu une baisse de 3 milliards d’euros des subventions aux collectivités, la Suède et le Royaume-Uni6(dont les collectivités avaient par ailleurs été exposées aux faillites des institutions financières islandaises7) s’engagent aussi dans un douloureux sevrage, dans l’optique de gagner en stabilité financière ce qui risque fort d’être perdu en autonomie.

Il serait sans doute erroné de porter l’opprobre sur les élus locaux ou même sur les banques, car il s’agit là de la manifestation d’une tendance de fond très profonde et très simple qui a à faire avec le désir mimétique et le Culte du Cargo. Ce dernier fut particulièrement évident en Océanie pendant la seconde guerre mondiale, où des habitants des îles observant une corrélation entre l’appel du radio et l’arrivée d’un cargo de vivres, ou bien entre l’existence d’une piste et l’arrivée d’avions, se mirent à construire un culte fait de simulacre de radio et de fausses pistes d’atterrissage, espérant ainsi que l’existence de moyens ferait venir l’objet désiré.

Il s’agit d’un phénomène général, comme par exemple en informatique lorsque l’on recopie une procédure que l’on ne comprend pas dans son propre programme, en espérant qu’elle y produise le même effet que dans son programme d’origine.

Un exemple emblématique est celui de Flint, Michigan. La fermeture brutale des usines General Motors a vu la patrie de Michael Moore perdre 25.000 habitants et se paupériser, la population étant pratiquement divisée par deux entre 1960 et 2010. Il s’agit évidemment là d’une distillation : la crise provoque l’évaporation de l’esprit (c’est-à-dire des talents) qui s’envole vers d’autres lieux plus prospères tandis que se concentrent les problèmes et la pauvreté dans la cité autrefois bénie par son parrain industriel. C’est alors que la bénédiction devient un baiser de la mort puisque, dans leur prospérité, ses élus n’ont pas réfléchi ni vu les tendances de fond pourtant évidentes de la mondialisation. C’est alors qu’arrive l’idée de Six Flags Autoworld. Ce parc d’attraction automobile, supposé être “La renaissance de la Grande Cité de Flint” selon le gouverneur du Michigan J. Blanchard, ouvre en 1984. Un an et 80 millions de dollars plus loin, le parc ferme et il sera finalement détruit en 1997.8

Bien que paradoxale, l’addiction à la dette est synchrone avec les difficultés financières et correspond peut-être inconsciemment à l’instinct du joueur à se “refaire”9. Ce qui est toutefois plus grave est, d’une part, l’hallucination collective qui permet le phénomène de Culte du Cargo, mais aussi l’absence totale de contre-pouvoir à cette pensée devenue unique, voire magique. Le Culte du Cargo aggrave toujours la situation.
La raison est aussi simple que diabolique : les prêtres du Culte du Cargo dépensent pour acheter des infrastructures similaires à ce qu’ils ont vu ailleurs dans l’espoir d’attirer la fortune sur leur tribu. Malheureusement, dans le même temps, les “esprits” qui restaient dans la tribu se sont enfuis ou se taisent devant la pression de la foule en attente de miracle. Alors, les élites, qui ignorent totalement que derrière l’apparent résultat se cachent des processus culturels complexes qu’ils ne comprennent pas, se dotent d’un faux aéroport ou d’une fausse radio et dilapident ainsi, en pure perte, leurs dernières ressources.
Il serait injuste de penser que ce phénomène ne concerne que des populations peu avancées. En 1974, Richard Feynman dénonça la “Cargo Cult Science” lors d’un discours à Caltech10.
Les collectivités confrontées à une concurrence pour la population organisent agendas et ateliers (en fait des brainstormings) pour évoquer les raisons de leurs handicaps par rapport à d’autres. Il suit généralement une liste de solutions précédées de “Il faut” : de la Recherche, des Jeunes, des Cadres, une communauté homosexuelle, une patinoire, une piscine, le TGV, un festival, une équipe sportive onéreuse, son gymnase…Tout cela est peut-être vrai, mais cela revient à confondre les effets avec les processus requis pour les obtenir.
Comme nul ne comprend les processus culturels qui ont conduit à ce qu’une collectivité réussisse, il est plus facile de croire que boire le café de Georges Clooney vous apportera le même succès. Rien de nouveau ici : la publicité et ses 700 milliards de dollars de budget mondial annuel manipule cela depuis le début de la société de consommation.
Routes menant à des plateformes logistiques ou des zones industrielles jamais construites, bureaux vides, duplication des infrastructures (piscines, technopoles, pépinières…) à quelques mètres les unes des autres, le Culte du Cargo nous coûte cher : il faut que cela se voit, même si cela ne sert à rien. Malheureusement, les vraies actions de création des processus culturels et sociaux ne se voient généralement pas aussi bien qu’un beau bâtiment tout neuf.
Le processus suit trois étapes et retour : crise, fuite ou éviction des rationnels, rituel de brainstorming puis Culte du Cargo et investissement, qui conduisent enfin à une aggravation de la crise.
Ainsi, les pôles de compétitivité marchent d’autant mieux qu’ils viennent seulement labelliser un système culturel déjà préexistant. Lorsqu’ils sont des créations dans l’urgence, en hydroponique, par la volonté rituelle de reproduire, leurs effets relèvent de l’espoir, non d’une stratégie. Le culte du Cargo est une façon pour les collectivités prises au sens large de ne pas se poser la question véritable : Est-ce que chacune d’entre elles peut de manière identique accéder au même destin dans la société de la connaissance ?
2012 : les Indiens fuient-ils les Amériques ?
Le monde occidental est, contrairement à l’idée reçue, une société dont le moteur est l’inégalité. La compétition pour l’attractivité de la “meilleure” population fait rage et elle a été, tout le XXème siècle, à l’avantage des Etats-Unis. Une des raisons profondes à l’étrange résilience du dollar et à la curieuse faiblesse de l’Euro est l’irrationnel pari de la plus grande attractivité des Etats-Unis pour les compétences.
Depuis la création du G20, il y a au moins quatre “New kids in Town”, les BRICs. Si l’un des révélateurs d’un engrenage de type cargo est la fuite des cerveaux, alors, même si elle ne bat pas encore son plein, l’Occident, et particulièrement les Etats-Unis, risque fort de perdre une part de ses élites asiatiques. La multiplication des études, notamment de la part des institutions académiques indiennes, est révélatrice quant à elle d’une actualité
Si beaucoup des informaticiens des Etats-Unis sont Indiens, parfois mal dans leur peau aux USA11, et qu’une part croissante est maintenant attirée par un retour121314 dans une Inde démocratique et en train de gérer son problème de corruption, les deux premières phases du processus sont déjà bien engagées.
Il reste l’étape du rituel de brainstorming visant à étudier les conditions du succès Suisse, Chinois ou autre, pour que les idées de dépenses les plus incohérentes soient lancées
2012 : Contagion du Culte du Cargo aux Etats
Les campagnes électorales de 2012 seront un révélateur. S’il reste encore quelques esprits pour dire que la mise en place, coûteuse et dérangeante, des actions visant à rétablir les processus culturels conduisant à la création de richesse concrète, c’est-à-dire vendables à d’autres, alors l’Occident aura vécu un de ses énièmes rebonds civilisationnels. Si nous observons des investissements déraisonnables d’un point de vue thermodynamique, dans des infrastructures énergétiques décoratives mais inefficaces, ou bien dans de faux projets d’apparat visant à renforcer l’attractivité perdue, il faudra boire jusqu’à la lie le jus amer de la crise.
Ainsi, la tentation française de copier les mesures allemandes qui ont conduit au succès, sans que les dirigeants français aient vraiment compris pourquoi, mais en espérant les mêmes bénéfices, peut être considérée comme une expression du Culte du Cargo. C’est en effet faire fi des processus culturels engagés depuis des décennies en Allemagne et qui ont conduit à une culture de la négociation sociale et à des syndicats représentatifs.
En période de crise, il faudrait toujours prouver l’utilité des actions, pas le caractère publicitaire qu’elles pourraient avoir. En 2012, il faudra sans doute, dans les pays où des élections vont avoir lieu, poser la question du pourquoi des investissements. Les candidats proposant de séduisants mais coûteux gadgets devront être questionnés par les journalistes sur leur analyse.15
Dernières nouvelles de Flint, en novembre 2011, le gouverneur confirme l’état d’urgence financière de la ville15. Contrairement à ce que veulent faire croire les prêtres du Culte du Cargo, les danses de la pluie ne marchent pas, il faut réfléchir.13
Voir de même:

Cargo Cult Science

Richard P. Feynman

Caltech

1974

Some remarks on science, pseudoscience, and learning how to not fool yourself. Caltech’s 1974 commencement address.

During the Middle Ages there were all kinds of crazy ideas, such as that a piece of rhinoceros horn would increase potency. (Another crazy idea of the Middle Ages is these hats we have on today—which is too loose in my case.) Then a method was discovered for separating the ideas—which was to try one to see if it worked, and if it didn’t work, to eliminate it. This method became organized, of course, into science. And it developed very well, so that we are now in the scientific age. It is such a scientific age, in fact, that we have difficulty in understanding how­ witch doctors could ever have existed, when nothing that they proposed ever really worked—or very little of it did.

But even today I meet lots of people who sooner or later get me into a conversation about UFO’s, or astrology, or some form of mysticism, expanded consciousness, new types of awareness, ESP, and so forth. And I’ve concluded that it’s not a scientific world.

Most people believe so many wonderful things that I decided to investigate why they did. And what has been referred to as my curiosity for investigation has landed me in a difficulty where I found so much junk to talk about that I can’t do it in this talk. I’m overwhelmed. First I started out by investigating various ideas of mysticism, and mystic experiences. I went into isolation tanks (they’re dark and quiet and you float in Epsom salts) and got many hours of hallucinations, so I know something about that. Then I went to Esalen, which is a hotbed of this kind of thought (it’s a wonderful place; you should go visit there). Then I became overwhelmed. I didn’t realize how much there was.

I was sitting, for example, in a hot bath and there’s another guy and a girl in the bath. He says to the girl, “I’m learning massage and I wonder if I could practice on you?” She says OK, so she gets up on a table and he starts off on her foot—working on her big toe and pushing it around. Then he turns to what is apparently his instructor, and says, “I feel a kind of dent. Is that the pituitary?” And she says, “No, that’s not the way it feels.” I say, “You’re a hell of a long way from the pituitary, man.” And they both looked at me—I had blown my cover, you see—and she said, “It’s reflexology.” So I closed my eyes and appeared to be meditating.

That’s just an example of the kind of things that overwhelm me. I also looked into extrasensory perception and PSI phenomena, and the latest craze there was Uri Geller, a man who is supposed to be able to bend keys by rubbing them with his finger. So I went to his hotel room, on his invitation, to see a demonstration of both mind reading and bending keys. He didn’t do any mind reading that succeeded; nobody can read my mind, I guess. And my boy held a key and Geller rubbed it, and nothing happened. Then he told us it works better under water, and so you can picture all of us standing in the bathroom with the water turned on and the key under it, and him rubbing the key with his finger. Nothing happened. So I was unable to investigate that phenomenon.

But then I began to think, what else is there that we believe? (And I thought then about the witch doctors, and how easy it would have been to check on them by noticing that nothing really worked.) So I found things that even more people believe, such as that we have some knowledge of how to educate. There are big schools of reading methods and mathematics methods, and so forth, but if you notice, you’ll see the reading scores keep going down—or hardly going up—in spite of the fact that we continually use these same people to improve the methods. There’s a witch doctor remedy that doesn’t work. It ought to be looked into: how do they know that their method should work? Another example is how to treat criminals. We obviously have made no progress—lots of theory, but no progress—in decreasing the amount of crime by the method that we use to handle criminals.

Yet these things are said to be scientific. We study them. And I think ordinary people with commonsense ideas are intimidated by this pseudoscience. A teacher who has some good idea of how to teach her children to read is forced by the school system to do it some other way—or is even fooled by the school system into thinking that her method is not necessarily a good one. Or a parent of bad boys, after disciplining them in one way or another, feels guilty for the rest of her life because she didn’t do “the right thing,” according to the experts.

So we really ought to look into theories that don’t work, and science that isn’t science.

I tried to find a principle for discovering more of these kinds of things, and came up with the following system. Any time you find yourself in a conversation at a cocktail party—in which you do not feel uncomfortable that the hostess might come around and say, “Why are you fellows talking shop?’’ or that your wife will come around and say, “Why are you flirting again?”—then you can be sure you are talking about something about which nobody knows anything.

Using this method, I discovered a few more topics that I had forgotten—among them the efficacy of various forms of psychotherapy. So I began to investigate through the library, and so on, and I have so much to tell you that I can’t do it at all. I will have to limit myself to just a few little things. I’ll concentrate on the things more people believe in. Maybe I will give a series of speeches next year on all these subjects. It will take a long time.

I think the educational and psychological studies I mentioned are examples of what I would like to call Cargo Cult Science. In the South Seas there is a Cargo Cult of people. During the war they saw airplanes land with lots of good materials, and they want the same thing to happen now. So they’ve arranged to make things like runways, to put fires along the sides of the runways, to make a wooden hut for a man to sit in, with two wooden pieces on his head like headphones and bars of bamboo sticking out like antennas—he’s the controller—and they wait for the airplanes to land. They’re doing everything right. The form is perfect. It looks exactly the way it looked before. But it doesn’t work. No airplanes land. So I call these things Cargo Cult Science, because they follow all the apparent precepts and forms of scientific investigation, but they’re missing something essential, because the planes don’t land.

Now it behooves me, of course, to tell you what they’re missing. But it would he just about as difficult to explain to the South Sea Islanders how they have to arrange things so that they get some wealth in their system. It is not something simple like telling them how to improve the shapes of the earphones. But there is one feature I notice that is generally missing in Cargo Cult Science. That is the idea that we all hope you have learned in studying science in school—we never explicitly say what this is, but just hope that you catch on by all the examples of scientific investigation. It is interesting, therefore, to bring it out now and speak of it explicitly. It’s a kind of scientific integrity, a principle of scientific thought that corresponds to a kind of utter honesty—a kind of leaning over backwards. For example, if you’re doing an experiment, you should report everything that you think might make it invalid—not only what you think is right about it: other causes that could possibly explain your results; and things you thought of that you’ve eliminated by some other experiment, and how they worked—to make sure the other fellow can tell they have been eliminated.

Details that could throw doubt on your interpretation must be given, if you know them. You must do the best you can—if you know anything at all wrong, or possibly wrong—to explain it. If you make a theory, for example, and advertise it, or put it out, then you must also put down all the facts that disagree with it, as well as those that agree with it. There is also a more subtle problem. When you have put a lot of ideas together to make an elaborate theory, you want to make sure, when explaining what it fits, that those things it fits are not just the things that gave you the idea for the theory; but that the finished theory makes something else come out right, in addition.

In summary, the idea is to try to give all of the information to help others to judge the value of your contribution; not just the information that leads to judgment in one particular direction or another.

The easiest way to explain this idea is to contrast it, for example, with advertising. Last night I heard that Wesson Oil doesn’t soak through food. Well, that’s true. It’s not dishonest; but the thing I’m talking about is not just a matter of not being dishonest, it’s a matter of scientific integrity, which is another level. The fact that should be added to that advertising statement is that no oils soak through food, if operated at a certain temperature. If operated at another temperature, they all will—including Wesson Oil. So it’s the implication which has been conveyed, not the fact, which is true, and the difference is what we have to deal with.

We’ve learned from experience that the truth will out. Other experimenters will repeat your experiment and find out whether you were wrong or right. Nature’s phenomena will agree or they’ll disagree with your theory. And, although you may gain some temporary fame and excitement, you will not gain a good reputation as a scientist if you haven’t tried to be very careful in this kind of work. And it’s this type of integrity, this kind of care not to fool yourself, that is missing to a large extent in much of the research in Cargo Cult Science.

A great deal of their difficulty is, of course, the difficulty of the subject and the inapplicability of the scientific method to the subject. Nevertheless, it should be remarked that this is not the only difficulty. That’s why the planes don’t land—but they don’t land.

We have learned a lot from experience about how to handle some of the ways we fool ourselves. One example: Millikan measured the charge on an electron by an experiment with falling oil drops and got an answer which we now know not to be quite right. It’s a little bit off, because he had the incorrect value for the viscosity of air. It’s interesting to look at the history of measurements of the charge of the electron, after Millikan. If you plot them as a function of time, you find that one is a little bigger than Millikan’s, and the next one’s a little bit bigger than that, and the next one’s a little bit bigger than that, until finally they settle down to a number which is higher.

Why didn’t they discover that the new number was higher right away? It’s a thing that scientists are ashamed of—this history—because it’s apparent that people did things like this: When they got a number that was too high above Millikan’s, they thought something must be wrong—and they would look for and find a reason why something might be wrong. When they got a number closer to Millikan’s value they didn’t look so hard. And so they eliminated the numbers that were too far off, and did other things like that. We’ve learned those tricks nowadays, and now we don’t have that kind of a disease.

But this long history of learning how to not fool ourselves—of having utter scientific integrity—is, I’m sorry to say, something that we haven’t specifically included in any particular course that I know of. We just hope you’ve caught on by osmosis.

The first principle is that you must not fool yourself—and you are the easiest person to fool. So you have to be very careful about that. After you’ve not fooled yourself, it’s easy not to fool other scientists. You just have to be honest in a conventional way after that.

I would like to add something that’s not essential to the science, but something I kind of believe, which is that you should not fool the layman when you’re talking as a scientist. I’m not trying to tell you what to do about cheating on your wife, or fooling your girlfriend, or something like that, when you’re not trying to be a scientist, but just trying to be an ordinary human being. We’ll leave those problems up to you and your rabbi. I’m talking about a specific, extra type of integrity that is not lying, but bending over backwards to show how you’re maybe wrong, that you ought to do when acting as a scientist. And this is our responsibility as scientists, certainly to other scientists, and I think to laymen.

For example, I was a little surprised when I was talking to a friend who was going to go on the radio. He does work on cosmology and astronomy, and he wondered how he would explain what the applications of this work were. “Well,” I said, “there aren’t any.” He said, “Yes, but then we won’t get support for more research of this kind.” I think that’s kind of dishonest. If you’re representing yourself as a scientist, then you should explain to the layman what you’re doing—and if they don’t want to support you under those circumstances, then that’s their decision.

One example of the principle is this: If you’ve made up your mind to test a theory, or you want to explain some idea, you should always decide to publish it whichever way it comes out. If we only publish results of a certain kind, we can make the argument look good. We must publish both kinds of result. For example—let’s take advertising again—suppose some particular cigarette has some particular property, like low nicotine. It’s published widely by the company that this means it is good for you—they don’t say, for instance, that the tars are a different proportion, or that something else is the matter with the cigarette. In other words, publication probability depends upon the answer. That should not be done.

I say that’s also important in giving certain types of government advice. Supposing a senator asked you for advice about whether drilling a hole should be done in his state; and you decide it would he better in some other state. If you don’t publish such a result, it seems to me you’re not giving scientific advice. You’re being used. If your answer happens to come out in the direction the government or the politicians like, they can use it as an argument in their favor; if it comes out the other way, they don’t publish it at all. That’s not giving scientific advice.

Other kinds of errors are more characteristic of poor science. When I was at Cornell. I often talked to the people in the psychology department. One of the students told me she wanted to do an experiment that went something like this—I don’t remember it in detail, but it had been found by others that under certain circumstances, X, rats did something, A. She was curious as to whether, if she changed the circumstances to Y, they would still do, A. So her proposal was to do the experiment under circumstances Y and see if they still did A.

I explained to her that it was necessary first to repeat in her laboratory the experiment of the other person—to do it under condition X to see if she could also get result A—and then change to Y and see if A changed. Then she would know that the real difference was the thing she thought she had under control.

She was very delighted with this new idea, and went to her professor. And his reply was, no, you cannot do that, because the experiment has already been done and you would be wasting time. This was in about 1935 or so, and it seems to have been the general policy then to not try to repeat psychological experiments, but only to change the conditions and see what happens.

Nowadays there’s a certain danger of the same thing happening, even in the famous field of physics. I was shocked to hear of an experiment done at the big accelerator at the National Accelerator Laboratory, where a person used deuterium. In order to compare his heavy hydrogen results to what might happen to light hydrogen he had to use data from someone else’s experiment on light hydrogen, which was done on different apparatus. When asked he said it was because he couldn’t get time on the program (because there’s so little time and it’s such expensive apparatus) to do the experiment with light hydrogen on this apparatus because there wouldn’t be any new result. And so the men in charge of programs at NAL are so anxious for new results, in order to get more money to keep the thing going for public relations purposes, they are destroying—possibly—the value of the experiments themselves, which is the whole purpose of the thing. It is often hard for the experimenters there to complete their work as their scientific integrity demands.

All experiments in psychology are not of this type, however. For example, there have been many experiments running rats through all kinds of mazes, and so on—with little clear result. But in 1937 a man named Young did a very interesting one. He had a long corridor with doors all along one side where the rats came in, and doors along the other side where the food was. He wanted to see if he could train the rats to go in at the third door down from wherever he started them off. No. The rats went immediately to the door where the food had been the time before.

The question was, how did the rats know, because the corridor was so beautifully built and so uniform, that this was the same door as before? Obviously there was something about the door that was different from the other doors. So he painted the doors very carefully, arranging the textures on the faces of the doors exactly the same. Still the rats could tell. Then he thought maybe the rats were smelling the food, so he used chemicals to change the smell after each run. Still the rats could tell. Then he realized the rats might be able to tell by seeing the lights and the arrangement in the laboratory like any commonsense person. So he covered the corridor, and, still the rats could tell.

He finally found that they could tell by the way the floor sounded when they ran over it. And he could only fix that by putting his corridor in sand. So he covered one after another of all possible clues and finally was able to fool the rats so that they had to learn to go in the third door. If he relaxed any of his conditions, the rats could tell.

Now, from a scientific standpoint, that is an A‑Number‑l experiment. That is the experiment that makes rat‑running experiments sensible, because it uncovers the clues that the rat is really using—not what you think it’s using. And that is the experiment that tells exactly what conditions you have to use in order to be careful and control everything in an experiment with rat‑running.

I looked into the subsequent history of this research. The subsequent experiment, and the one after that, never referred to Mr. Young. They never used any of his criteria of putting the corridor on sand, or being very careful. They just went right on running rats in the same old way, and paid no attention to the great discoveries of Mr. Young, and his papers are not referred to, because he didn’t discover anything about the rats. In fact, he discovered all the things you have to do to discover something about rats. But not paying attention to experiments like that is a characteristic of Cargo Cult Science.

Another example is the ESP experiments of Mr. Rhine, and other people. As various people have made criticisms—and they themselves have made criticisms of their own experiments—they improve the techniques so that the effects are smaller, and smaller, and smaller until they gradually disappear. All the parapsychologists are looking for some experiment that can be repeated—that you can do again and get the same effect—statistically, even. They run a million rats—no, it’s people this time—they do a lot of things and get a certain statistical effect. Next time they try it they don’t get it any more. And now you find a man saying that it is an irrelevant demand to expect a repeatable experiment. This is science?

This man also speaks about a new institution, in a talk in which he was resigning as Director of the Institute of Parapsychology. And, in telling people what to do next, he says that one of the things they have to do is be sure they only train students who have shown their ability to get PSI results to an acceptable extent—not to waste their time on those ambitious and interested students who get only chance results. It is very dangerous to have such a policy in teaching—to teach students only how to get certain results, rather than how to do an experiment with scientific integrity.

So I wish to you—I have no more time, so I have just one wish for you—the good luck to be somewhere where you are free to maintain the kind of integrity I have described, and where you do not feel forced by a need to maintain your position in the organization, or financial support, or so on, to lose your integrity. May you have that freedom. May I also give you one last bit of advice: Never say that you’ll give a talk unless you know clearly what you’re going to talk about and more or less what you’re going to say.

Voir de plus:

René Girard. « L’accroissement de la puissance de l’homme sur le réel m’effraie »

René Girard, propos recueillis par Juliette Cerf publié le 11 min

[Actualisation: René Girard est mort mercredi 4 novembre 2015, à l’âge de 91 ans] Auteur d’une théorie fertile et discutée, René Girard est un penseur inclassable qui vit aux Etats-Unis depuis 1947. Entre critique littéraire, théologie et anthropologie, il révèle les liens unissant la violence et le religieux, et construit une « science des rapports humains ».

Transdisciplinaire, la théorie du désir mimétique de René Girard repose sur l’idée que l’homme ne désire jamais par lui-même sinon en imitant les désirs d’un tiers pris pour modèle, le médiateur. Aux concepts abstraits et à la fixité, il a toujours préféré la matière des œuvres et le dynamisme des mécanismes, comme celui du bouc émissaire et du sacrifice. Né le 25 décembre 1923 à Avignon, ancien élève de l’École des chartes, venu « de nulle part » comme il aime à le dire, René Girard s’est d’abord intéressé au désir mimétique à travers la littérature (Mensonge romantique et vérité romanesque) avant de prendre pour objet les religions archaïques (La Violence et le Sacré) puis la Bible et le christianisme (Des choses cachées depuis la fondation du monde). Anthropologue autodidacte élu à l’Académie française en 2005, penseur chrétien converti par sa théorie – « Ce n’est pas parce je suis chrétien que je pense comme je le fais ; c’est parce que mes recherches m’ont amené à penser ce que je pense, que je suis devenu chrétien », a-t-il écrit –, René Girard a bâti une anthropologie du phénomène religieux. En insistant sur le passage des religions mythiques au christianisme, il invente une genèse de la culture.

Philosophie magazine : Votre parcours est atypique. Votre position  extérieure à l’université vous a-t-elle permis d’élaborer votre théorie transversale ?

René Girard : Oui, sans conteste, et cela remonte très tôt dans mon enfance. Je n’ai jamais rien appris dans les établissements d’enseignement. J’ai des souvenirs de mon entrée en classe de dixième à Avignon. Je vois encore la maîtresse, aussi peu terrifiante que possible. Elle m’a pourtant causé une véritable panique… Ma mère m’a retiré du lycée et j’ai passé mes premières années d’enseignement dans ce que mon père appelait une école de gâtés. Je suis retourné au lycée en sixième et je suis devenu terriblement chahuteur, si bien que je me suis fait renvoyer de l’année de philo. J’avais passé mon premier bac très médiocrement et j’ai fait ma classe de philo seul. J’ai obtenu une mention bien. À partir de là, mon père a considéré que j’étais le meilleur professeur de moi-même… En 1941, je suis parti pour la khâgne de Lyon. La situation était difficile, il y avait déjà des restrictions alimentaires, et je suis rentré chez mes parents. Mon père, qui était conservateur de la bibliothèque et du musée d’Avignon, m’a suggéré de préparer seul l’École des chartes. J’ai été reçu en 1943. Mais j’ai trouvé cela ennuyeux et suis parti pour les États-Unis en 1947, répondant à une offre d’assistant de français.

C’est la littérature qui est à la source de votre théorie.

«Le christianisme est, selon moi, à la source du scepticisme moderne, il est démystification»

Aux États-Unis, j’ai commencé à enseigner la littérature française. Mon idée première a été de me demander comment enseigner ces romans que, pour beaucoup, je n’avais pas lus. La critique littéraire était déjà très différentialiste ; il fallait découvrir dans les œuvres ce qui les rendait exceptionnelles, différentes les unes des autres. En lisant ces romans, ce qui m’a frappé au contraire, c’est la substance très analogue qui en émanait, de Stendhal à Proust par exemple. La même problématique sociale reparaissait sous un jour différent, mais avec des différences liées à la période plutôt qu’à la personnalité du romancier. Je suis arrivé à l’idée que s’il y a des modes et de l’Histoire, c’est parce que les hommes ont tendance à désirer la même chose. Ils imitent le désir les uns des autres. L’imitation, pour cette raison, est source de conflits. Désirer la même chose, c’est s’opposer à son modèle, c’est essayer de lui enlever l’objet qu’il désire. Le modèle se change en rival. Ces allers-retours accélèrent les échanges hostiles et la puissance du désir ; il y a donc chez l’homme une espèce de spirale ascendante de rivalité, de concurrence et de violence. Si la littérature a été un point de départ pour moi, c’est que le roman ne parle que des rapports concrets, des vraies relations humaines ; il ne monologue pas. C’est à partir de trois personnages que l’on peut parler correctement des rapports humains et jamais à partir d’un sujet seul. C’est la rivalité mimétique qui est première pour moi, non l’individu.

Vous reprochez à la philosophie de ne pas penser assez la relation. Que faire de l’intersubjectivité ?

L’intersubjectivité est la bonne direction mais elle est récente. Lévinas a bien compris le mimétisme ; il cite toujours cette parole talmudique formidable : si tout le monde est d’accord pour condamner un individu, libérez-le, il doit être innocent. L’accord contre lui est un accord mimétique. Dans le Talmud, il y a une conscience du mimétisme, de l’influence réciproque des hommes les uns sur les autres qui tranche complètement sur les religions antiques et en particulier sur la religion grecque. Cette dernière voit les individus comme des boules de billard, isolées les unes des autres. Nous avons vécu une longue période où la philosophie ne voyait que des différences ; la déconstruction et le structuralisme ont alors joué un rôle important. Pour moi, au fond, il n’y a que des identités méconnues. La méconnaissance que l’Amérique a de l’Europe est à cet égard frappante ; les Américains imaginent qu’il y a quelque chose de spécifiquement européen qu’ils n’ont pas et ne comprennent pas. En réalité, ils ne comprennent pas l’identité des réactions de part et d’autre ; les différences ne sont que des différences de situation, de pouvoir relatif. L’Europe fait la même chose vis-à-vis de l’Amérique : elle ne voit pas à quel point l’Amérique est la même chose que l’Europe. Chez les Américains, il y a quand même cette idée qu’on a immigré parce qu’on est des Européens ratés ; par conséquent, l’Amérique est en rivalité permanente, toujours en train de prouver à l’Europe qu’elle peut faire mieux qu’elle.

La violence est au cœur de votre anthropologie mimétique. Cet aspect conflictuel de l’imitation, la philosophie ne l’avait-elle pas déjà mis en lumière ?

Platon est le premier à avoir parlé de l’imitation. Il lui a accordé un rôle prodigieux : l’imitation, pour lui, est essentielle et dangereuse. Il la redoute. L’imitation, c’est le passage de l’essence à l’existence. Dans La République, il y a des textes extraordinaires sur les dangers des gardiens de la cité idéale s’imitant les uns les autres. L’hostilité de Platon envers la foule, qui est dans une imitation déréglée, déchaînée, est impressionnante. Platon est l’un des précurseurs de cette vision conflictuelle de l’imitation, mais il n’en révèle pas vraiment le mécanisme. Tout ceci disparaît avec Aristote qui rend l’imitation anodine et docile ; pour lui, l’imitation, c’est le peintre du dimanche voulant être aussi réaliste que possible ! Depuis Aristote, l’imitation est considérée comme une faculté, une technique assez stupide et dérisoire, qui joue un rôle dans l’éducation élémentaire.

Selon vous, la philosophie est idéaliste, essentialiste. Est-ce votre réalisme qui vous en éloigne ?

Oui, je pense que l’accent mis sur l’observation du réel dans le monde moderne a été quelque chose de très efficace, autant dans le danger que dans le bénéfice. Les outils dont l’homme dispose aujourd’hui sont infiniment plus puissants que tous ceux qu’il a connus auparavant. Ces outils, l’homme est parfaitement capable de les utiliser de façon égoïste et rivalitaire. Ce qui m’intéresse, c’est cet accroissement de la puissance de l’homme sur le réel. Les statistiques de production et de consommation d’énergie sont en progrès constant, et la rapidité d’augmentation de ce progrès augmente elle aussi constamment, dessinant une courbe parfaite, presque verticale. C’est pour moi une immense source d’effroi tant les hommes, essentiellement, restent des rivaux, rivalisant pour le même objet ou la même gloire – ce qui est la même chose. Nous sommes arrivés à un stade où le milieu humain est menacé par la puissance même de l’homme. Il s’agit avant tout de la menace écologique, des armes et des manipulations biologiques.

Dans Achever Clausewitz, vous ne cachez pas votre inquiétude face à ce climat « apocalyptique ».

«L’humanisme occidental ne voit pas que la violence se développe spontanément quand les hommes rivalisent pour un objet»

Loin d’être absurdes ou impensables, les grands textes eschatologiques – ceux des Évangiles synoptiques, en particulier Matthieu, chapitre 24, et Marc, chapitre 13 –, sont d’une actualité saisissante. La science moderne a séparé la nature et la culture, alors qu’on avait défini la religion comme le tonnerre de Zeus, etc. Dans les textes apocalyptiques, ce qui frappe, c’est ce mélange de nature et de culture ; les guerres et rumeurs de guerre, le fracas de la mer et des flots ne forment qu’un. Or si nous regardons ce qui se passe autour de nous, si nous nous interrogeons sur l’action des hommes sur le réel, le réchauffement global, la montée du niveau la mer, nous nous retrouvons face à un univers où les choses naturelles et culturelles sont confondues. La science elle-même le reconnaît. J’ai voulu radicaliser cet aspect apocalyptique. Je pense que les gens sont trop rassurés. Ils se rassurent eux-mêmes. L’homme est comme un insecte qui fait son nid ; il fait confiance à l’environnement. La créature fait toujours confiance à l’environnement… Le rationalisme issu des Lumières continue aussi à rassurer. Les rapports humains, l’humanisme des Lumières les juge stables ; il considère que les rapports hostiles entre individus sont exactement comme ces boules de billard qui s’entrechoquent : c’est la plus grosse ou la plus rapide qui l’emporte sur les autres. L’humanisme occidental ne voit pas que la violence est ce qui se développe spontanément entre les hommes lorsqu’ils rivalisent pour un objet. Clausewitz était un homme des Lumières, et ce n’est, à mon avis, que parce qu’il parle de la guerre qu’il saisit les rapports humains véritables ; libéré, il peut parler de la violence. Quand Clausewitz définit la guerre comme une montée aux extrêmes, il décrit un mécanisme très simple : lorsque nous nous bagarrons avec quelqu’un, nous allons toujours vers le pire, nos injures seront toujours plus violentes. Il se produit ce que nous appelons aujourd’hui une « escalade », escalation en anglais, une montée par échelle d’intensité.

Certains phénomènes contemporains relèvent-ils, pour vous, du mécanisme mimétique ?

La Chine a favorisé le développement de l’automobile. Cette priorité dénote une rivalité avec les Américains sur un terrain très redoutable ; la pollution dans la région de Shanghai est effrayante. Mais avoir autant d’automobiles que l’Amérique est un but dont il est, semble-t-il, impossible de priver les hommes. L’Occident conseille aux pays en voie de développement et aux pays les plus peuplés du globe, comme la Chine et l’Inde, de ne pas faire la même chose que lui ! Il y a là quelque chose de paradoxal et de scandaleux pour ceux auxquels ces conseils s’adressent. Aux États-Unis, les politiciens vous diront tous qu’ils sont d’accord pour prendre des mesures écologiques si elles ne touchent pas les accroissements de production. Or, s’il y a une partie du monde qui n’a pas besoin d’accroissement de production, c’est bien les États-Unis ; le profit individuel et les rivalités, qui ne sont pas immédiatement guerrières et destructrices mais qui le seront peut-être indirectement, et de façon plus massive encore, sont sacrées ; pas question de les toucher. Que faut-il pour qu’elles cessent d’être sacrées ? Il n’est pas certain que la situation actuelle, notamment la disparition croissante des espèces, soit menaçante pour la vie sur la planète, mais il y a une possibilité très forte qu’elle le soit. Ne pas prendre de précaution, alors qu’on est dans le doute, est dément. Des mesures écologiques sérieuses impliqueraient des diminutions de production. Mais ce raisonnement ne joue pas dans l’écologie, l’humanité étant follement attachée à ce type de concurrence qui structure en particulier la réalité occidentale, les habitudes de vie, de goût de l’humanité dite « développée ».

Vivons-nous dans une société de victimes ? Ce processus actuel de victimisation ressemble-t-il à celui que vous avez analysé dans Le Bouc émissaire ?

Notre société s’intéresse aux victimes et dénonce la victimisation collective d’individus innocents. Le besoin de bouc émissaire est si puissant que nous accusons toujours les gens de faire des boucs émissaires. Aujourd’hui, nous victimisons les victimisateurs ou ceux que nous jugeons comme tels. Dès que nous sommes hostiles à quelqu’un, nous l’accusons de faire des victimes, ce qui est très différent de l’hostilité qui structure les sociétés archaïques. Dans mon système, il y a deux types de religions. D’abord, les religions archaïques, qui sont fondées sur des crises de violence se résolvant par des phénomènes de bouc émissaire, c’est-à-dire par le choix d’une victime insignifiante mais dont on comprend, au regard des mythes, qu’elle n’est pas choisie au hasard : Œdipe est boiteux, il a attiré l’attention pour des raisons qui n’ont rien à voir avec le parricide et l’inceste. Le fait religieux, c’est un bouc émissaire qui rassemble contre lui une communauté troublée et qui fait cesser ce trouble. Ce bouc émissaire apparaît très méchant, dangereux, mais aussi très bon et secourable puisqu’il ressoude la communauté et purge la violence. Il faut l’apaiser. Pour cela, on recommence prudemment sur des victimes désignées à l’avance qui n’appartiennent pas à la communauté, qui lui sont un peu extérieures ; c’est-à-dire qu’on fait des sacrifices, des moments de violence contrôlés, ritualisés. La religion protège ainsi les sociétés de la violence mimétique. Ensuite, le judaïque et le chrétien révèlent la vérité du système. Dans les sociétés archaïques, le système fonctionne parce qu’on ne le comprend pas. C’est ce que j’appelle la méconnaissance : avoir un bouc émissaire, c’est ne pas savoir qu’on l’a ; apprendre qu’on en a un, c’est le perdre. L’anthropologie moderne a compris que, d’une certaine manière, le drame dans le judaïque et le chrétien, et en particulier la crucifixion du Christ, a la même structure que les mythes. Mais ce que les antropologues n’ont pas vu, c’est que dans les mythes, la victime apparaît comme coupable, tandis que les Évangiles reconnaissent l’innocence de la victime sacrificielle. On peut les considérer comme une explication de la religion archaïque : mieux on comprend les Évangiles, plus on comprend qu’ils suppriment les religions. J’exalte le christianisme d’une façon paradoxale. Selon moi, il est à la source du scepticisme moderne. Il est révélation des boucs émissaires. Il est démystification.

Voir encore:

« Fin du monde » contre « fin du mois », la rhétorique méprisante de nos élites

En reprenant à son compte cette expression, Emmanuel Macron a illustré la vision caricaturale qu’ont nos dirigeants de la France périphérique.

Benjamin Masse-Stamberger

Marianne

La « fin du monde » contre la « fin du mois ». L’expression, supposée avoir été employée initialement par un gilet jaune, a fait florès : comment concilier les impératifs de pouvoir d’achat à court terme, et les exigences écologiques vitales pour la survie de la planète ? La formule a même été reprise ce mardi par Emmanuel Macron, dans son discours sur la transition énergétique. « On l’entend, le président, le gouvernement, a-t-il expliqué, en paraphrasant les requêtes supposées des contestataires. Ils évoquent la fin du monde, nous on parle de la fin du mois. Nous allons traiter les deux, et nous devons traiter les deux. »

L’expression a-t-elle effectivement été employée par des gilets jaunes ? Peut-être. Mais le moins qu’on puisse dire, c’est que nos élites se sont saisies avec gourmandise de cette dialectique rassurante, reprise comme une antienne sur tous les plateaux de télévision pour résumer la problématique soulevée par ce mouvement sans précédent. Les politiques eux-mêmes en ont fait leurs choux gras : l’expression avait déjà été employée par Nicolas Hulot le 22 novembre, lors de l’Emission politique sur France 2, puis par Emmanuelle Wargon, la secrétaire d’Etat à l’Ecologie, le 24 novembre sur LCI enfin par Ségolène Royal le 25 novembre dernier, sur France 3. A vrai dire, elle avait même été utilisée par David Cormand, le secrétaire national d’Europe-Ecologie-Les Verts, sur France Info… dès le 4 septembre !

Quand on prend le temps de parler à ces gilets jaunes, on constate qu’ils sont parfaitement conscients de la problématique écologique

C’est dire que l’expression – si elle a pu être reprise ponctuellement par tel ou tel manifestant – émane en fait de nos élites boboïsantes. Elle correspond bien à la vision méprisante qu’elles ont d’une France périphérique aux idées étriquées, obsédée par le « pognon » indifférente au bien commun, là où nos dirigeants auraient la capacité à embrasser plus large, et à voir plus loin.

Or, la réalité est toute autre : quand on prend le temps de parler à ces gilets jaunes, on constate qu’ils sont parfaitement conscients de la problématique écologique. Parmi leurs revendications, dévoilées ces derniers jours, il y a ainsi l’interdiction immédiate du glyphosate, cancérogène probable que le gouvernement a en revanche autorisé pour encore au moins trois ans. Mais, s’ils se sentent concernés par l’avenir de la planète, les représentants de cette France rurale et périurbaine refusent de payer pour les turpitudes d’un système économique qui détruit l’environnement. D’autant que c’est ce même système qui est à l’origine de la désindustrialisation et de la dévitalisation des territoires, dont ils subissent depuis trente ans les conséquences en première ligne. A l’inverse, nos grandes consciences donneuses de leçon sont bien souvent les principaux bénéficiaires de cette économie mondialisée. Qui est égoïste, et qui est altruiste ?

Parmi les doléances des gilets jaunes, on trouve d’ailleurs aussi nombre de revendications politiques : comptabilisation du vote blanc, présence obligatoire des députés à l’Assemblée nationale, promulgation des lois par les citoyens eux-mêmes. Des revendications qu’on peut bien moquer, ou balayer d’un revers de manche en estimant qu’elles ne sont pas de leur ressort. Elles n’en témoignent pas moins d’un souci du politique, au sens le plus noble du terme, celui du devenir de la Cité. A l’inverse, en se repaissant d’une figure rhétorique caricaturale, reprise comme un « gimmick » de communication, nos élites démontrent leur goût pour le paraître et la superficialité, ainsi que la facilité avec laquelle elles s’entichent de clichés qui ne font que conforter leurs préjugés. Alors, qui est ouvert, et qui est étriqué ? Qui voit loin, et qui est replié sur lui-même ? Qui pense à ses fins de mois, et qui, à la fin du monde ?

Voir enfin:

LE GATEAU MIRACLE

Homo deus

Yuval Noah Harari

2015

/…/ La modernité (…) repose sur la conviction que la croissance économique n’est pas seulement possible mais absolument essentielle. Prières, bonnes actions et méditation pourraient bien être une source de consolation et d’inspiration, mais des problèmes tels que la famine, les épidémies et la guerre ne sauraient être résolus que par la croissance. Ce dogme fondamental se laisse résumer par une idée simple : « Si tu as un problème, tu as probablement besoin de plus, et pour avoir plus, il faut produire plus ! »

Les responsables politiques et les économistes modernes insistent : la croissance est vitale pour trois grandes raisons. Premièrement, quand nous produisons plus, nous pouvons consommer plus, accroître notre niveau de vie et, prétendument, jouir d’une vie plus heureuse. Deuxièmement, tant que l’espèce humaine se multiplie, la croissance économique est nécessaire à seule fin de rester où nous en sommes. En Inde, par exemple, la croissance démographique est de 1,2 % par an. Cela signifie que, si l’économie indienne n’enregistre pas une croissance annuelle d’au moins 1,2 %, le chômage augmentera, les salaires diminueront et le niveau de vie moyen déclinera. Troisièmement, même si les Indiens cessent de se multiplier, et si la classe moyenne indienne peut secontenter de son niveau de vie actuel, que devrait faire l’Inde de ses centaines demillions de citoyens frappés par la pauvreté ? Sans croissance, le gâteau reste dela même taille ; on ne saurait par conséquent donner plus aux pauvres qu’en prenant aux riches. Cela obligera à des choix très difficiles, et causera probablement beaucoup de rancœur, voire de violence. Si vous souhaitez éviter des choix douloureux, le ressentiment et les violences, il vous faut un gâteau plus gros.

La modernité a fait du « toujours plus » une panacée applicable à la quasi-totalité des problèmes publics et privés – du fondamentalisme religieux au mariage raté, en passant par l’autoritarisme dans le tiers-monde. Si seulement des pays comme le Pakistan et l’Égypte pouvaient soutenir une croissance régulière, leurs citoyens profiteraient des avantages que constituent voitures individuelles et réfrigérateurs pleins à craquer ; dès lors, ils suivraient la voie dela prospérité ici-bas au lieu d’emboîter le pas au joueur de pipeau fondamentaliste. De même, dans des pays comme le Congo et la Birmanie, lacroissance économique produirait une classe moyenne prospère, qui est le socle de la démocratie libérale. Quant au couple qui traverse une mauvaise passe, il serait sauvé si seulement il pouvait acquérir une maison plus grande (que mari et femme n’aient pas à partager un bureau encombré), acheter un lave-vaisselle (qu’ils cessent de se disputer pour savoir à qui le tour de faire la vaisselle) et suivre de coûteuses séances de thérapie deux fois par semaine.

La croissance économique est ainsi devenue le carrefour où se rejoignent la quasi-totalité des religions, idéologies et mouvements modernes. L’Union soviétique, avec ses plans quinquennaux mégalomaniaques, n’était pas moins obsédée par la croissance que l’impitoyable requin de la finance américain. De même que chrétiens et musulmans croient tous au ciel et ne divergent que sur le moyen d’y parvenir, au cours de la guerre froide, capitalistes et communistes imaginaient créer le paradis sur terre par la croissance économique et ne sedisputaient que sur la méthode exacte.

Aujourd’hui, les revivalistes hindous, les musulmans pieux, les nationalistes japonais et les communistes chinois peuvent bien proclamer leur adhésion à de valeurs et objectifs très différents : tous ont cependant fini par croire que la croissance économique est la clé pour atteindre leurs buts disparates. En 2014, Narendra Modi, hindou fervent, a ainsi été élu Premier ministre de l’Inde ; sonélection a largement été due au fait qu’il a su stimuler la croissance économiquedans son État du Gujarât et à l’idée largement partagée que lui seul pourrait ranimer une économie nationale léthargique. En Turquie, des vues analogues ontpermis à l’islamiste Recep Tayyip Erdoğan de conserver le pouvoir depuis 2003. Le nom de son parti – Parti de la justice et du développement – souligne sonattachement au développement économique ; de fait, le gouvernement Erdoğan aréussi à obtenir des taux de croissance impressionnants depuis plus de dix ans.

En 2012, le Premier ministre japonais, le nationaliste Shinzō Abe, est arrivé au pouvoir en promettant d’arracher l’économie japonaise à deux décennies de stagnation. À cette fin, il a recouru à des mesures si agressives et inhabituellesqu’on a parlé d’ « abenomie ». Dans le même temps, en Chine, le particommuniste a rendu hommage du bout des lèvres aux idéaux marxistes-léninistes traditionnels ; dans les faits, cependant, il s’en tient aux célèbresmaximes de Deng Xiaoping : « le développement est la seule vérité tangible » et « qu’importe que le chat soit noir ou blanc, pourvu qu’il attrape les souris ». Ce qui veut dire en clair : faites tout ce qui sert la croissance économique, même sicela aurait déplu à Marx et à Lénine.

À Singapour, comme il sied à cet État-cité qui va droit au but, cet axe de réflexion est poussé encore plus loin, au point que les salaires des ministres sontindexés sur le PIB. Quand l’économie croît, le salaire des ministres estaugmenté, comme si leur mission se réduisait à cela. Cette obsession de la croissance pourrait sembler aller de soi, mais c’est uniquement parce que nous vivons dans le monde moderne. Les maharajas indiens, les sultans ottomans, les shoguns de Kamakura et les empereurs Han fondaient rarement leur destin politique sur la croissance économique. Que Modi, Erdoğan, Abe et le président chinois Xi Jinping aient tous misé leur carrière sur la croissance atteste le statut quasi religieux que la croissance a fini par acquérir à travers le monde. De fait, on n’a sans doute pas tort de parler de religion lorsqu’il s’agit de la croyance dans la croissance économique : elle prétend aujourd’hui résoudre nombre de nos problèmes éthiques, sinon la plupart. La croissance économique étant prétendument la source de toutes les bonnes choses, elle encourage les gens à enterrer leurs désaccords éthiques pour adopter la ligne d’action qui maximise la croissance à long terme. L’Inde de Modi abrite des milliers de sectes, de partis, de mouvements et de gourous : bien que leurs objectifs ultimes puissent diverger, tous doivent passer par le même goulet d’étranglement de la croissance économique. Alors, en attendant, pourquoi ne pas tous se serrer les coudes ?

Le credo du « toujours plus » presse en conséquence les individus, les entreprises et les gouvernements de mépriser tout ce qui pourrait entraver la croissance économique : par exemple, préserver l’égalité sociale, assurer l’harmonie écologique ou honorer ses parents. En Union soviétique, lesdirigeants pensaient que le communisme étatique était la voie de la croissance laplus rapide : tout ce qui se mettait en travers de la collectivisation fut donc passé au bulldozer, y compris des millions de koulaks, la liberté d’expression et la mer d’Aral. De nos jours, il est généralement admis qu’une forme de capitalisme de marché est une manière beaucoup plus efficace d’assurer la croissance à long terme : on protège donc les magnats cupides, les paysans riches et la liberté d’expression, tout en démantelant et détruisant les habitats écologiques, les structures sociales et les valeurs traditionnelles qui gênent le capitalisme de marché.

Prenez, par exemple, une ingénieure logiciel qui touche 100 dollars par heure de travail dans une start-up de high-tech. Un jour, son vieux père fait un AVC. Il a besoin d’aide pour faire ses courses, la cuisine et même sa toilette. Elle pourrait installer son père chez elle, partir plus tard au travail le matin, rentrer plus tôt le soir et prendre soin personnellement de son père. Ses revenus et la productivité de la start-up en souffriraient, mais son père profiterait des soins d’une fille dévouée et aimante. Inversement, elle pourrait faire appel à une aide mexicaine qui, pour 12 dollars de l’heure, vivrait avec son père et pourvoirait à tous ses besoins. Cela ne changerait rien à sa vie d’ingénieure et à la start-up, et cela profiterait à l’aide et l’économie mexicaines. Que doit faire notre ingénieure ?

Le capitalisme de marché a une réponse sans appel. Si la croissance économique exige que nous relâchions les liens familiaux, encouragions les gens à vivre loin de leurs parents, et importions des aides de l’autre bout du monde, ainsi soit-il. Cette réponse implique cependant un jugement éthique, plutôt qu’unénoncé factuel. Lorsque certains se spécialisent dans les logiciels quand d’autresconsacrent leur temps à soigner les aînés, on peut sans nul doute produire plus de logiciels et assurer aux personnes âgées des soins plus professionnels. Mais la croissance économique est-elle plus importante que les liens familiaux ? En sepermettant de porter des jugements éthiques de ce type, le capitalisme de marchéa franchi la frontière qui séparait le champ de la science de celui de la religion.

L’étiquette de « religion » déplairait probablement à la plupart des capitalistes, mais, pour ce qui est des religions, le capitalisme peut au moins tenir la tête haute. À la différence des autres religions qui nous promettent un gâteau au ciel, le capitalisme promet des miracles ici, sur terre… et parfois même en accomplit. Le capitalisme mérite même des lauriers pour avoir réduit la violence humaine etaccru la tolérance et la coopération. Ainsi que l’explique le chapitre suivant, d’autres facteurs entrent ici en jeu, mais le capitalisme a amplement contribué à l’harmonie mondiale en encourageant les hommes à cesser de voir l’économie comme un jeu à somme nulle, où votre profit est ma perte, pour y voir plutôt une situation gagnant-gagnant, où votre profit est aussi le mien. Cette approche dubénéfice mutuel a probablement bien plus contribué à l’harmonie générale quedes siècles de prédication chrétienne sur le thème du « aime ton prochain » et « tends l’autre joue ».

De sa croyance en la valeur suprême de la croissance, le capitalisme déduit son commandement numéro un : tu investiras tes profits pour augmenter la croissance. Pendant le plus clair de l’histoire, les princes et les prêtres ont dilapidé leurs profits en carnavals flamboyants, somptueux palais et guerres inutiles. Inversement, ils ont placé leurs pièces d’or dans des coffres de fer, scellés et enfermés dans un donjon. Aujourd’hui, les fervents capitalistes se servent de leurs profits pour embaucher, développer leur usine ou mettre au point un nouveau produit.

S’ils ne savent comment faire, ils confient leur argent à quelqu’un qui saura : un banquier ou un spécialiste du capital-risque. Ce dernier prête de l’argent à divers entrepreneurs. Des paysans empruntent pour planter de nouveaux champs de blé ; des sous-traitants, pour construire de nouvelles maisons, des compagniesénergétiques, pour explorer de nouveaux champs de pétrole et les usinesd’armement, pour mettre au point de nouvelles armes. Les profits de toutes cesactivités permettent aux entrepreneurs de rembourser avec intérêts. Non seulement nous avons maintenant plus de blé, de maisons, de pétrole et d’armes, mais nous avons aussi plus d’argent, que les banques et les fonds peuvent denouveau prêter. Cette roue ne cessera jamais de tourner, du moins pas selon le capitalisme. Jamais n’arrivera un moment où le capitalisme dira : « Ça suffit. Il y a assez de croissance ! On peut se la couler douce. » Si vous voulez savoir pourquoi la roue capitaliste a peu de chance de s’arrêter un jour de tourner, discutez donc une heure avec un ami qui a accumulé 100 000 dollars et se demande qu’en faire.

« Les banques offrent des taux d’intérêt si bas, déplore-t-il. Je ne veux pasmettre mon argent sur un compte d’épargne qui rapporte à peine 0,5 % par an. Peut-être puis-je obtenir 2 % en bons du Trésor. L’an dernier, mon cousin Richie a acheté un appartement à Seattle, et son investissement lui a déjà rapporté 20 % ! Peut-être devrais-je me lancer dans l’immobilier, mais tout le monde parle d’une nouvelle bulle spéculative. Alors que penses-tu de la Bourse ? Un ami m’a dit que le bon plan, ces derniers temps, c’est d’acheter un fonds négocié en Bourse qui suit les économies émergentes comme le Brésil ou la Chine. » Il s’arrête un moment pour reprendre son souffle, et vous lui posez la questionsuivante : « Eh bien, pourquoi ne pas te contenter de tes 100 000 dollars ? » Il vous expliquera mieux que je ne saurais le faire pourquoi le capitalisme nes’arrêtera jamais.

On apprend même cette leçon aux enfants et aux adolescents à travers des jeux capitalistes omniprésents. Les jeux prémodernes, comme les échecs, supposaient une économie stagnante. Vous commencez une partie d’échecs avec seize pièces et, à la fin, vous n’en avez plus. Dans de rares cas, un pion peut être transformé en reine, mais vous ne pouvez produire de nouveaux pions ni métamorphoser vos cavaliers en chars. Les joueurs d’échecs n’ont donc jamais à  penser investissement. À l’opposé, beaucoup de jeux de société modernes et de jeux vidéo se focalisent sur l’investissement et la croissance.

Particulièrement révélateurs sont les jeux de stratégie du genre de Minecraft,Les Colons de Catane ou Civilizationde Sid Meier. Le jeu peut avoir pour cadre le Moyen Âge, l’âge de pierre ou quelque pays imaginaire, mais les principes restent les mêmes – et sont toujours capitalistes. Votre but est d’établir une ville,un royaume, voire toute une civilisation. Vous partez d’une base très modeste : juste un village, peut-être, avec les champs voisins. Vos actifs vous assurent un revenu initial sous forme de blé, de bois, de fer ou d’or. À vous d’investir ce revenu à bon escient. Il vous faut choisir entre des outils improductifs mais encore nécessaires, comme les soldats, et des actifs productifs, tels que des villages, des mines et des champs supplémentaires. La stratégie gagnante consiste habituellement à investir le strict minimum dans des produits de première nécessité improductifs, tout en maximisant vos actifs productifs. Aménager des villages supplémentaires signifie qu’au prochain tour vous disposerez d’un revenu plus important qui pourrait vous permettre non seulement d’acheter d’autres soldats, si besoin, mais aussi d’augmenter vos investissements productifs. Bientôt vous pourrez ainsi transformer vos villages en villes, bâtir des universités, des ports et des usines, explorer les mers et les océans, créer votre civilisation et gagner la partie.

LE SYNDROME DE L’ARCHE

La croissance économique peut-elle cependant se poursuivre éternellement ? L’économie ne finira-t-elle pas par être à court de ressources et par s’arrêter ? Pour assurer une croissance perpétuelle, il nous faut découvrir un stock de ressources inépuisable. Une solution consiste à explorer et à conquérir de nouvelles terres. Des siècles durant, la croissance de l’économie européenne et l’expansion du système capitaliste se sont largement nourries de conquêtes impériales outre-mer. Or le nombre d’îles et de continents est limité. Certains entrepreneurs espèrent finalement explorer et conquérir de nouvelles planètes, voire de nouvelles galaxies, mais, en attendant, l’économie moderne doit trouver une meilleure méthode pour poursuivre son expansion.

C’est la science qui a fourni la solution à la modernité. L’économie des renards ne saurait croître, parce qu’ils ne savent pas produire plus de lapins. L’économie des lapins stagne, parce qu’ils ne peuvent faire pousser l’herbe plus vite. Mais l’économie humaine peut croître, parce que les hommes peuvent découvrir des sources d’énergie et des matériaux nouveaux.

La vision traditionnelle du monde comme un gâteau de taille fixe présuppose qu’il n’y a que deux types de ressources : les matières premières et l’énergie. En vérité, cependant, il y en a trois : les matières premières, l’énergie et la connaissance. Les matières premières et l’énergie sont épuisables : plus vous les utilisez, moins vous en avez. Le savoir, en revanche, est une ressource en perpétuelle croissance : plus vous l’utilisez, plus vous en possédez. En fait,quand vous augmentez votre stock de connaissances, il peut vous faire accéder aussi à plus de matières premières et d’énergie. Si j’investis 100 millions de dollars dans la recherche de pétrole en Alaska et si j’en trouve, j’ai plus de pétrole, mais mes petits-enfants en auront moins. En revanche, si j’investis la même somme dans la recherche sur l’énergie solaire et que je découvre une nouvelle façon plus efficace de la domestiquer, mes petits-enfants et moi aurons davantage d’énergie.

Pendant des millénaires, la route scientifique de la croissance est restée bloquée parce que les gens croyaient que les Saintes Écritures et les anciennes traditions contenaient tout ce que le monde avait à offrir en connaissances importantes. Une société convaincue que tous les gisements de pétrole ont déjà été découverts ne perdrait pas de temps ni d’argent à chercher du pétrole. De même, une culture humaine persuadée de savoir déjà tout ce qui vaut la peine d’être su ne ferait pas l’effort de se mettre en quête de nouvelles connaissances. Telle était la position de la plupart des civilisations humaines prémodernes. La révolution scientifique a cependant libéré l’humanité de cette conviction naïve. La plus grande découverte scientifique a été la découverte de l’ignorance. Du jour où les hommes ont compris à quel point ils en savaient peu sur le monde, ils ont eu soudain une excellente raison de rechercher des connaissances nouvelles, ce qui a ouvert la voie scientifique du progrès.

À chaque génération, la science a contribué à découvrir de nouvelles sources d’énergie, de nouvelles matières premières, des machines plus performantes et des méthodes de production inédites. En 2017, l’humanité dispose donc de bien plus d’énergie et de matières premières que jamais, et la production s’envole. Des inventions comme la machine à vapeur, le moteur à combustion interne et l’ordinateur ont créé de toutes pièces des industries nouvelles. Si nous nous projetons dans vingt ans, en 2037, nous produirons et consommerons beaucoup plus qu’en 2017. Nous faisons confiance aux nanotechnologies, au géniegénétique et à l’intelligence artificielle pour révolutionner encore la production et ouvrir de nouveaux rayons dans nos supermarchés en perpétuelle expansion.

Nous avons donc de bonnes chances de triompher du problème de la rareté des ressources. La véritable némésis de l’économie moderne est l’effondrement écologique. Le progrès scientifique et la croissance économique prennent place dans une biosphère fragile et, à mesure qu’ils prennent de l’ampleur, les ondes de choc déstabilisent l’écologie. Pour assurer à chaque personne dans le mondele même niveau de vie que dans la société d’abondance américaine, il faudrait quelques planètes de plus ; or nous n’avons que celle-ci. Si le progrès et la croissance finissent par détruire l’écosystème, cela n’en coûtera pas seulement aux chauves-souris vampires, aux renards et aux lapins. Mais aussi à Sapiens. Une débâcle écologique provoquera une ruine économique, des troubles politiques et une chute du niveau de vie. Elle pourrait bien menacer l’existence même de la civilisation humaine.

Nous pourrions amoindrir le danger en ralentissant le rythme du progrès et de la croissance. Si cette année les investisseurs attendent un retour de 6 % sur leursportefeuilles, dans dix ans ils pourraient apprendre à se satisfaire de 3 %, puis de 1 % dans vingt ans ; dans trente ans, l’économie cessera de croître et nous nous contenterons de ce que nous avons déjà. Le credo de la croissance s’oppose pourtant fermement à cette idée hérétique et il suggère plutôt d’aller encore plus vite. Si nos découvertes déstabilisent l’écosystème et menacent l’humanité, il nous faut découvrir quelque chose qui nous protège. Si la couche d’ozone s’amenuise et nous expose au cancer de la peau, à nous d’inventer un meilleur écran solaire et de meilleurs traitements contre le cancer, favorisant ainsi l’essor de nouvelles usines de crèmes solaires et de centres anticancéreux. Si les nouvelles industries polluent l’atmosphère et les océans, provoquant un réchauffement général et des extinctions massives, il nous appartient de construire des mondes virtuels et des sanctuaires high-tech qui nous offriront toutes les bonnes choses de la vie, même si la planète devient aussi chaude, morne et polluée que l’enfer.

Pékin est déjà tellement polluée que la population évite de sortir, et que les riches Chinois dépensent des milliers de dollars en purificateurs d’air intérieur. Les super-riches construisent même des protections au-dessus de leur cour. En 2013, l’École internationale de Pékin, destinée aux enfants de diplomatesétrangers et de la haute société chinoise, est allée encore plus loin et a construitune immense coupole de 5 millions de dollars au-dessus de ses six courts detennis et de ses terrains de jeux. D’autres écoles suivent le mouvement, et le marché chinois des purificateurs d’air explose. Bien entendu, la plupart des Pékinois ne peuvent s’offrir pareil luxe, ni envoyer leurs enfants à l’École internationale.

L’humanité se trouve coincée dans une course double. D’un côté, nous nous sentons obligés d’accélérer le rythme du progrès scientifique et de la croissance économique. Un milliard de Chinois et un milliard d’Indiens aspirent au niveau de vie de la classe moyenne américaine, et ils ne voient aucune raison de brider leurs rêves quand les Américains ne sont pas disposés à renoncer à leurs 4×4 et à leurs centres commerciaux. D’un autre côté, nous devons garder au moins une longueur d’avance sur l’Armageddon écologique. Mener de front cette double course devient chaque année plus difficile, parce que chaque pas qui rapproche l’habitant des bidonvilles de Delhi du rêve américain rapproche aussi la planète du gouffre.

La bonne nouvelle, c’est que l’humanité jouit depuis des siècles de la croissance économique sans pour autant être victime de la débâcle écologique. Bien d’autres espèces ont péri en cours de route, et les hommes se sont aussi retrouvés face à un certain nombre de crises économiques et de désastres écologiques, mais jusqu’ici nous avons toujours réussi à nous en tirer. Reste qu’aucune loi de la nature ne garantit le succès futur. Qui sait si la science sera toujours capable de sauver simultanément l’économie du gel et l’écologie du point d’ébullition. Et puisque le rythme continue de s’accélérer, les marges d’erreur ne cessent de se rétrécir. Si, précédemment, il suffisait d’une invention stupéfiante une fois par siècle, nous avons aujourd’hui besoin d’un miracle tous les deux ans.

Nous devrions aussi nous inquiéter qu’une apocalypse écologique puisse avoirdes conséquences différentes en fonction des différentes castes humaines. Il n’ya pas de justice dans l’histoire. Quand une catastrophe s’abat, les pauvressouffrent toujours bien plus que les riches, même si ce sont ces derniers qui sontresponsables de la tragédie. Le réchauffement climatique affecte déjà la vie desplus pauvres dans les pays arides d’Afrique bien plus que la vie des Occidentauxplus aisés. Paradoxalement, le pouvoir même de la science peut accroître ledanger, en rendant les plus riches complaisants.

Prenez les émissions de gaz à effet de serre. La plupart des savants et un nombre croissant de responsables politiques reconnaissent la réalité du réchauffement climatique et l’ampleur du danger. Jusqu’ici, pourtant, cette reconnaissance n’a pas suffi à changer sensiblement notre comportement. Nous parlons beaucoup du réchauffement, mais, en pratique, l’humanité n’est pas prête aux sérieux sacrifices économiques, sociaux ou politiques nécessaires pour arrêter la catastrophe. Les émissions n’ont pas du tout diminué entre 2000 et 2010. Elles ont au contraire augmenté de 2,2 % par an, contre un taux annuel de 1,3 % entre 1970 et 2000(4). Signé en 1997, le protocole de Kyoto sur la réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre visait à ralentir le réchauffement plutôt qu’à l’arrêter, mais le pollueur numéro un du monde, les États-Unis, a refusé de le ratifier et n’a fait aucun effort pour essayer de réduire de manière notable ses émissions, de peur de gêner sa croissance économique.

En décembre 2015, l’accord de Paris a fixé des objectifs plus ambitieux, appelant à limiter l’augmentation de la température moyenne à 1,5 degré au-dessus des niveaux préindustriels. Toutefois, nombre des douloureuses mesures nécessaires pour atteindre ce but ont été comme par hasard différées après 2030, ce qui revient de fait à passer la patate chaude à la génération suivante. Les administrations actuelles peuvent ainsi récolter les avantages politiques immédiats de leur apparent engagement vert, tandis que le lourd prix politique de la réduction des émissions (et du ralentissement de la croissance) est légué aux administrations futures. Malgré tout, au moment où j’écris (janvier 2016), il est loin d’être certain que les États-Unis et d’autres grands pollueurs ratifieront et mettront en œuvre l’accord de Paris. Trop de politiciens et d’électeurs pensent que, tant que l’économie poursuit sa croissance, les ingénieurs et les hommes de science pourront toujours la sauver du jugement dernier. S’agissant du changement climatique, beaucoup de défenseurs de la croissance ne se contentent pas d’espérer des miracles : ils tiennent pour acquis que les miracles se produiront.

À quel point est-il rationnel de risquer l’avenir de l’humanité en supposant que les futurs chercheurs feront des découvertes insoupçonnées qui sauveront la planète ? La plupart des présidents, ministres et PDG qui dirigent le monde sont des gens très rationnels. Pourquoi sont-ils disposés à faire un tel pari ? Peut-être parce qu’ils ne pensent pas parier sur leur avenir personnel. Même si les choses tournent au pire, et que la science ne peut empêcher le déluge, les ingénieurs pourraient encore construire une arche de Noé high-tech pour la caste supérieure, et laisser les milliards d’autres hommes se noyer. La croyance en cette arche high-tech est actuellement une des plus grosses menaces sur l’avenir de l’humanité et de tout l’écosystème. Les gens qui croient à l’arche high-tech ne devraient pas être en charge de l’écologie mondiale, pour la même raison qu’ilne faut pas confier les armes nucléaires à ceux qui croient à un au-delà céleste.

Et les plus pauvres ? Pourquoi ne protestent-ils pas ? Si le déluge survient un jour, ils en supporteront le coût, mais ils seront aussi les premiers à faire les frais de la stagnation économique. Dans un monde capitaliste, leur vie s’améliore uniquement quand l’économie croît. Aussi est-il peu probable qu’ils soutiennent des mesures pour réduire les menaces écologiques futures fondées sur le ralentissement de la croissance économique actuelle. Protéger l’environnement est une très belle idée, mais ceux qui n’arrivent pas à payer leur loyer s’inquiètent bien davantage de leur découvert bancaire que de la fonte de la calotte glaciaire.

FOIRE D’EMPOIGNE

Même si nous continuons de courir assez vite et parvenons à parer à la foi ’effondrement économique et la débâcle écologique, la course elle-même créed’immenses problèmes. Pour l’individu, elle se traduit par de hauts niveaux destress et de tension. Après des siècles de croissance économique et de progrèsscientifique, la vie aurait dû devenir calme et paisible, tout au moins dans lespays les plus avancés. Si nos ancêtres avaient eu un aperçu des outils et desressources dont nous disposons, ils auraient conjecturé que nous jouissons d’unetranquillité céleste, débarrassés de tout tracas et de tout souci. La vérité est trèsdifférente. Malgré toutes nos réalisations, nous sommes constamment pressés defaire et produire toujours plus.

Nous nous en prenons à nous-mêmes, au patron, à l’hypothèque, au gouvernement, au système scolaire. Mais ce n’est pas vraiment leur faute. C’est le deal moderne, que nous avons tous souscrit le jour de notre naissance. Dans le monde prémoderne, les gens étaient proches des modestes employés d’une bureaucratie socialiste. Ils pointaient et attendaient qu’un autre fasse quelque chose. Dans le monde moderne, c’est nous, les hommes, qui avons les choses en main, et nous sommes soumis jour et nuit à une pression constante.

Sur le plan collectif, la course se manifeste par des chambardements incessants. Alors que les systèmes politiques et sociaux duraient autrefois des siècles, aujourd’hui chaque génération détruit le vieux monde pour en construire un nouveau à la place. Comme le Manifeste communiste le montre brillamment,le monde moderne a absolument besoin d’incertitude et de perturbation. Toutes les relations fixes, tous les vieux préjugés sont balayés, les nouvelles structures deviennent archaïques avant même de pouvoir faire de vieux os. Tout ce qui est solide se dissipe dans l’air. Il n’est pas facile de vivre dans un monde aussi chaotique, et encore moins de le gouverner.

La modernité doit donc travailler dur pour s’assurer que ni les individus ni le collectif n’essaient de se retirer de la course, malgré la tension et le chaos qu’elle crée. À cette fin, elle brandit la croissance comme la valeur suprême au nom de laquelle on devrait tout sacrifier et braver tous les dangers. Sur un plan collectif, les gouvernements, les entreprises et les organismes sont encouragés à mesurer leur succès en termes de croissance et à craindre l’équilibre comme le diable. Sur le plan individuel, nous sommes constamment poussés à accroître nos revenus et notre niveau de vie. Même si vous êtes satisfait de votre situation actuelle, vous devez rechercher toujours plus. Le luxe d’hier devient nécessité d’aujourd’hui. Si autrefois vous viviez bien dans un appartement avec trois chambres, une voiture et un ordinateur fixe, aujourd’hui il vous faut une maison de cinq chambres, avec deux voitures et une nuée d’iPods, de tablettes et de smartphones.

Il n’était pas très difficile de convaincre les individus de vouloir plus. La cupidité vient facilement aux êtres humains. Le gros problème a été de convaincre les institutions collectives comme les États et les Églises d’accompagner le nouvel idéal. Des millénaires durant, les sociétés se sont efforcées de freiner les désirs individuels et de promouvoir une sorte d’équilibre. Il était notoire que les gens voulaient toujours plus pour eux-mêmes, mais le gâteau étant d’une taille fixe, l’harmonie sociale dépendait de la retenue. L’avarice était mauvaise. La modernité a mis le monde sens dessus dessous. Elle a convaincu les instances collectives que l’équilibre est bien plus effrayant que le chaos, et que comme l’avarice nourrit la croissance, c’est une force du bien. Dès lors, la modernité a incité les gens à vouloir plus, et a démantelé les disciplines séculaires qui tempéraient la cupidité.

Les angoisses qui en résultèrent furent largement apaisées par le capitalisme de marché : c’est une des raisons de la popularité de cette idéologie. Les penseurs capitalistes ne cessent de nous calmer : « Ne vous inquiétez pas, tout ira bien. Du moment que l’économie croît, la main invisible du marché pourvoira à tout. » Le capitalisme a donc sanctifié un système vorace et chaotique qui croît à pas de géant, sans que personne comprenne ce qui se passe et où nous courons. (Le communisme, qui croyait aussi à la croissance, pensait pouvoir empêcher le chaos et orchestrer la croissance par la planification. Après ses premiers succès, cependant, il s’est laissé largement distancer par la cavalcade désordonnée du marché.)

Il est de bon ton aujourd’hui, chez les intellectuels, de dénigrer le capitalisme. Puisqu’il domine le monde, nous ne devons rien négliger pour en saisir les insuffisances avant qu’elles ne produisent des catastrophes apocalyptiques. La critique du capitalisme ne doit pourtant pas nous aveugler sur ses avantages et ses réalisations. Il a été jusqu’ici un succès stupéfiant, du moins si nous ignorons les risques de débâcle écologique future, et si nous mesurons la réussite à l’aune de la production et de la croissance. Sans doute vivons-nous en 2017 dans un monde de stress et de chaos, mais les sombres prophéties d’effondrement et de violence ne se sont pas matérialisées, tandis que les scandaleuses promesses de croissance perpétuelle et de coopération mondiale s’accomplissent. Nous connaissons certes des crises économiques épisodiques et des guerres internationales, mais, à long terme, le capitalisme ne s’est pas seulement imposé, il a aussi réussi à surmonter la famine, les épidémies et la guerre. Des millénaires durant, prêtres, rabbins et muftis nous avaient expliqué que les hommes n’y parviendraient pas par leurs propres efforts. Puis sont venus les banquiers, les investisseurs et les industriels : en deux siècles, ils y sont arrivés !

Le deal moderne nous promettait un pouvoir sans précédent. La promesse a été tenue. Mais à quel prix ? En échange du pouvoir, le deal moderne attend de nous que nous renoncions au sens. Comment les hommes ont-ils accueilli cette exigence glaçante ? Obtempérer aurait pu aisément se traduire par un monde sinistre, dénué d’éthique, d’esthétique et de compassion. Il n’en reste pas moins vrai que l’humanité est aujourd’hui non seulement bien plus puissante que jamais, mais aussi beaucoup plus paisible et coopérative. Comment y sommes-nous parvenus ? Comment la morale, la beauté et même la compassion ont-elles survécu et fleuri dans un monde sans dieux, ni ciel, ni enfer ?

Une fois encore, les capitalistes sont prompts à en créditer la main invisible du marché. Pourtant, celle-ci n’est pas seulement invisible, elle est aussi aveugle : toute seule, jamais elle n’aurait pu sauver la société humaine. En vérité, même une foire d’empoigne générale ne saurait se passer de la main secourable d’un dieu, d’un roi ou d’une Église. Si tout est à vendre, y compris les tribunaux et la police, la confiance s’évapore, le crédit se dissipe et les affaires périclitent. Qu’est-ce qui a sauvé la société moderne de l’effondrement ? L’espèce humaine n’a pas été sauvée par la loi de l’offre et de la demande, mais par l’essor d’une nouvelle religion révolutionnaire : l’humanisme.

Voir par ailleurs:

In China, Breathing Becomes a Childhood Risk
Edward Wong
The New York Times
April 22, 2013

BEIJING — The boy’s chronic cough and stuffy nose began last year at the age of 3. His symptoms worsened this winter, when smog across northern China surged to record levels. Now he needs his sinuses cleared every night with saltwater piped through a machine’s tubes.

The boy’s mother, Zhang Zixuan, said she almost never lets him go outside, and when she does she usually makes him wear a face mask. The difference between Britain, where she once studied, and China is “heaven and hell,” she said.

Levels of deadly pollutants up to 40 times the recommended exposure limit in Beijing and other cities have struck fear into parents and led them to take steps that are radically altering the nature of urban life for their children.

Parents are confining sons and daughters to their homes, even if it means keeping them away from friends. Schools are canceling outdoor activities and field trips. Parents with means are choosing schools based on air-filtration systems, and some international schools have built gigantic, futuristic-looking domes over sports fields to ensure healthy breathing.

“I hope in the future we’ll move to a foreign country,” Ms. Zhang, a lawyer, said as her ailing son, Wu Xiaotian, played on a mat in their apartment, near a new air purifier. “Otherwise we’ll choke to death.”

She is not alone in looking to leave. Some middle- and upper-class Chinese parents and expatriates have already begun leaving China, a trend that executives say could result in a huge loss of talent and experience. Foreign parents are also turning down prestigious jobs or negotiating for hardship pay from their employers, citing the pollution.

There are no statistics for the flight, and many people are still eager to come work in Beijing, but talk of leaving is gaining urgency around the capital and on Chinese microblogs and parenting forums. Chinese are also discussing holidays to what they call the “clean-air destinations” of Tibet, Hainan and Fujian.

“I’ve been here for six years and I’ve never seen anxiety levels the way they are now,” said Dr. Richard Saint Cyr, a new father and a family health doctor at Beijing United Family Hospital, whose patients are half Chinese and half foreigners. “Even for me, I’ve never been as anxious as I am now. It has been extraordinarily bad.”

He added: “Many mothers, especially, have been second-guessing their living in Beijing. I think many mothers are fed up with keeping their children inside.”

Few developments have eroded trust in the Communist Party as quickly as the realization that the leaders have failed to rein in threats to children’s health and safety. There was national outrage in 2008 after more than 5,000 children were killed when their schools collapsed in an earthquake, and hundreds of thousands were sickened and six infants died in a tainted-formula scandal. Officials tried to suppress angry parents, sometimes by force or with payoffs.

But the fury over air pollution is much more widespread and is just beginning to gain momentum.

“I don’t trust the pollution measurements of the Beijing government,” said Ms. Zhang’s father, Zhang Xiaochuan, a retired newspaper administrator.

Scientific studies justify fears of long-term damage to children and fetuses. A study published by The New England Journal of Medicine showed that children exposed to high levels of air pollution can suffer permanent lung damage. The research was done in the 1990s in Los Angeles, where levels of pollution were much lower than those in Chinese cities today.

A study by California researchers published last month suggested a link between autism in children and the exposure of pregnant women to traffic-related air pollution. Columbia University researchers, in a study done in New York, found that prenatal exposure to air pollutants could result in children with anxiety, depression and attention-span problems. Some of the same researchers found in an earlier study that children in Chongqing, China, who had prenatal exposure to high levels of air pollutants from a coal-fired plant were born with smaller head circumferences, showed slower growth and performed less well on cognitive development tests at age 2. The shutdown of the plant resulted in children born with fewer difficulties.

Analyses show little relief ahead if China does not change growth policies and strengthen environmental regulation. A Deutsche Bank report released in February said the current trends of coal use and automobile emissions meant air pollution was expected to worsen by an additional 70 percent by 2025.

Some children’s hospitals in northern China reported a large number of patients with respiratory illnesses this winter, when the air pollution soared. During one bad week in January, Beijing Children’s Hospital admitted up to 9,000 patients a day for emergency visits, half of them for respiratory problems, according to a report by Xinhua, the state news agency.

Parents have scrambled to buy air purifiers. IQAir, a Swiss company, makes purifiers that cost up to $3,000 here and are displayed in shiny showrooms. Mike Murphy, the chief executive of IQAir China, said sales had tripled in the first three months of 2013 over the same period last year.

Face masks are now part of the urban dress code. Ms. Zhang laid out half a dozen masks on her dining room table and held up one with a picture of a teddy bear that fits Xiaotian. Schools are adopting emergency measures. Xiaotian’s private kindergarten used to take the children on a field trip once a week, but it has canceled most of those this year.

At the prestigious Beijing No. 4 High School, which has long trained Chinese leaders and their children, outdoor physical education classes are now canceled when the pollution index is high.

“The days with blue sky and seemingly clean air are treasured, and I usually go out and do exercise,” said Dong Yifu, a senior there who was just accepted to Yale University.

Elite schools are investing in infrastructure to keep children active. Among them are Dulwich College Beijing and the International School of Beijing, which in January completed two large white sports domes of synthetic fabric that cover athletic fields and tennis courts.

The construction of the domes and an accompanying building began a year ago, to give the 1,900 students a place to exercise in both bad weather and high pollution, said Jeff Johanson, director of student activities. The project cost $5.7 million and includes hospital-grade air-filtration systems.

Teachers check the hourly air ratings from the United States Embassy to determine whether children should play outside or beneath the domes. “The elementary schoolchildren don’t miss recess anymore,” Mr. Johanson said.

One American mother, Tara Duffy, said she had chosen a prekindergarten school for her daughter in part because the school had air filters in the classrooms. The school, called the 3e International School, also brings in doctors to talk about pollution and bars the children from playing outdoors during increases in smog levels. “In the past six months, there have been a lot more ‘red flag’ days, and they keep the kids inside,” said Ms. Duffy, a writer and former foundation consultant.

Ms. Duffy said she also checked the daily air quality index to decide whether to take her daughter to an outdoor picnic or an indoor play space.

Now, after nine years here, Ms. Duffy is leaving China, and she cites the pollution and traffic as major factors.

That calculus is playing out with expatriates across Beijing, and even with foreigners outside China. One American couple with a young child discussed the pollution when considering a prestigious foundation job in Beijing, and it was among the reasons they turned down the offer.

James McGregor, a senior counselor in the Beijing office of APCO Worldwide, a consulting company, said he had heard of an American diplomat with young children who had turned down a posting here. That was despite the fact that the State Department provides a 15 percent salary bonus for Beijing that exists partly because of the pollution. The hardship bonus for other Chinese cities, which also suffer from awful air, ranges from 20 percent to 30 percent, except for Shanghai, where it is 10 percent.

“I’ve lived in Beijing 23 years, and my children were brought up here, but if I had young children I’d have to leave,” Mr. McGregor said. “A lot of people have started exit plans.”

Voir aussi:

China entrepreneurs cash in on air pollution

 

BEIJING — Bad air is good news for many Chinese entrepreneurs.

From gigantic domes that keep out pollution to face masks with fancy fiber filters, purifiers and even canned air, Chinese businesses are trying to find a way to market that most elusive commodity: clean air.

An unprecedented wave of pollution throughout China (dubbed the “airpocalypse” or “airmageddon” by headline writers) has spawned an almost entirely new industry.

The biggest ticket item is a huge dome that looks like a cross between the Biosphere and an overgrown wedding tent. Two of them recently went up at the International School of Beijing, one with six tennis courts, another large enough to harbor kids playing soccer and badminton and shooting hoops simultaneously Friday afternoon.

The contraptions are held up with pressure from the system pumping in fresh air. Your ears pop when you go in through one of three revolving doors that maintain a tight air lock.

The anti-pollution dome is the joint creation of a Shenzhen-based manufacturer of outdoor enclosures and a California company, Valencia-based UVDI, that makes air filtration and disinfection systems for hospitals, schools, museums and airports, including the new international terminal at Los Angeles International Airport.

Although the technologies aren’t new, this is the first time they’ve been put together specifically to keep out pollution, the manufacturers say.

“So far there is no better way to solve the pollution problem,” said Xiao Long, the head of the Shenzhen company, Broadwell Technologies.

On a recent day when the fine particulate matter in the air reached 650 micrograms per cubic meter, well into the hazardous range, the measurement inside was 25. Before the dome, the international school, like many others, had to suspend outdoor activities on high pollution days. By U.S. standards, readings below 50 are considered “good” and those below 100 are considered “moderate.”

Since air pollution skyrocketed in mid-January, Xiao said, orders for domes were pouring in from schools, government sports facilities and wealthy individuals who want them in their backyards. He said domes measuring more than 54,000 square feet each cost more than $1 million.

“This is a product only for China. You don’t have pollution this bad in California,” Xiao said.

Because it’s not possible to put a dome over all of Beijing, where air quality is the worst, people are taking matters into their own hands.

Not since the 2003 epidemic of SARS have face masks been such hot sellers. Many manufacturers are reporting record sales of devices varying from high-tech neoprene masks with exhalation valves, designed for urban bicyclists, that cost up to $50 each, to cheap cloth masks (some in stripes, polka dots, paisley and some emulating animal faces).

“Practically speaking, people have no other options,” said Zhao Danqing, head of a Shanghai-based mask manufacturer that registered its name as PM 2.5, referring to particulate matter smaller than 2.5 micrograms.

The term, virtually unknown in China a few years ago, is now as much a feature of daily weather chitchat as temperature and humidity, and Zhao’s company has sold 1 million masks at $5 each since the summer.

Having China clean up the air would be preferable to making a profit from the crisis, Zhao said.

“When people ask me what is the future of our product, I tell them I hope it will be retired soon,” Zhao said.

A combination of windless weather, rising temperatures and emissions from coal heating has created some of the worst air pollution on record in the country.

In mid-January, measurements of particulate matter reached more than 1,000 micrograms per cubic meter in some parts of northeast China. Anything above 300 is considered “hazardous” and the index stops at 500. By comparison, the U.S. has seen readings of 1,000 only in areas downwind of forest fires. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported last year that the average particulate matter reading from 16 airport smokers’ lounges was 166.6.

The Chinese government has been experimenting with various emergency measures, curtailing the use of official cars and ordering factories and construction sites to shut down. Some cities are even considering curbs on fireworks during the upcoming Chinese New Year holiday, interfering with an almost sacred tradition.

In the meantime, home air filters have joined the new must-have appliances for middle class Chinese.

“Our customers used to be all foreigners. Now they are mostly Chinese,” said Cathy Liu, a sales manager at a branch of Villa Lifestyles, a distributor of Swiss IQAir purifiers, which start at $1,600 here for a machine large enough for a bedroom. The weekend of Jan. 12, when the poor air quality hit unprecedented levels, the stock sold out, she said.

Many distributors report panic buying of air purifiers. In China, home air purifiers range from $15 gizmos that look like night lights to handsome $6,000 wood-finished models that are supplied to Zhongnanhai, the headquarters of the Chinese Communist Party and to other leadership facilities. One model is advertised as emitting vitamin C to build immunity and to prevent skin aging.

In a more tongue in cheek approach to the problem, a self-promoting Chinese millionaire has been selling soda-sized cans of, you guessed it, air.

Chen Guangbiao, a relentless self-promoter who made his fortune in the recycling business, claims to have collected the air from remote parts of western China and Taiwan. The cans, which are emblazoned with Chen’s name and labeled “fresh air,” sell for 80 cents each, with proceeds going to charity, he said.

“I want to tell mayors, county chiefs and heads of big companies,” Chen told reporters Wednesday, while giving out free cans of air on a Beijing sidewalk as a publicity stunt. “Don’t just chase GDP growth, don’t chase the biggest profits at the expense of our children and grandchild. »

 


Nostalgie: Quand la pierre qui roule n’amassait pas mousse (But that’s not how it used to be: looking back at Don McLean’s classic song about America’s loss of innocence)

3 octobre, 2020


Rebel Without a Cause R2005 U.S. One Sheet Poster | Posteritati Movie Poster Gallery | New YorkThe Rolling Stones - Altamont Raceway - Livermore, - Catawiki10+ Best Funny Ads images | funny ads, copywriting ads, ads

Mais, quand le Fils de l’homme viendra, trouvera-t-il la foi sur la terre? Jésus (Luc 18: 8)
Christianity will go. It will vanish and shrink. I needn’t argue about that; I’m right and I’ll be proved right. We’re more popular than Jesus now; I don’t know which will go first – rock ‘n’ roll or Christianity. Jesus was all right but his disciples were thick and ordinary. It’s them twisting it that ruins it for me. John Lennon (1966)
Who wrote the book of love? Tell me, tell me… I wonder, wonder who … Was it someone from above? The Monotones (1958)
Well, that’ll be the day, when you say goodbye Yes, that’ll be the day, when you make me cry You say you’re gonna leave, you know it’s a lie ‘Cause that’ll be the day when I die. Buddy Holly (1957)
Well, ya know a rolling stone don’t gather no moss. Buddy Holly (1958)
Now, for ten years we’ve been on our own And moss grows fat on a rolling stone But, that’s not how it used to be. (…) The Father, Son, and the Holy Ghost, they caught the last train for the coast, the day the music died. Don McLean
C’était une sorte de Woodstock, le genre de truc qui marchait à l’époque, mais cette mode allait sur sa fin. Si Woodstock a lancé la mode, elle a pris fin ce jour-là. Charlie Watts
Ça a été horrible, vraiment horrible. Tu te sens responsable. Comment cela a-t-il pu déraper de la sorte ? Mais je n’ai pas pensé à tous ces trucs auxquels les journalistes ont pensé : la grande perte de l’innocence, la fin d’une ère… C’était davantage le côté effroyable de la situation, le fait horrible que quelqu’un soit tué pendant un concert, combien c’était triste pour sa famille, mais aussi le comportement flippant des Hell’s Angels. Mick Jagger
J’y suis pas allé pour faire la police. J’suis pas flic. Je ne prétendrai jamais être flic. Ce Mick Jagger, il met tout sur le dos des Angels. Il nous prend pour des nazes. En ce qui me concerne, on s’est vraiment fait entuber par cet abruti. On m’a dit que si je m’asseyais sur le bord de la scène, pour bloquer les gens, je pourrais boire de la bière jusqu’à la fin du concert. C’est pour ça que j’y suis allé. Et tu sais quoi ? Quand ils ont commencé à toucher nos motos, tout a dérapé. Je sais pas si vous pensez qu’on les paie 50 $ ou qu’on les vole, ou que ça coûte cher ou quoi. Personne ne touche à ma moto. Juste parce qu’il y a une foule de 300 000 personnes ils pensent pouvoir s’en sortir. Mais quand je vois quelque chose qui est toute ma vie, avec tout ce que j’y ai investi, la chose que j’aime le plus au monde, et qu’un type lui donne des coups de pied, on va le choper. Et tu sais quoi ? On les a eus. Je ne suis pas un pacifiste minable, en aucun cas. Et c’est peut-être des hippies à fleurs et tout ça. Certains étaient bourrés de drogue, et c’est dommage qu’on ne l’ait pas été, ils descendaient la colline en courant et en hurlant et en sautant sur les gens. Et pas toujours sur des Angels, mais quand ils ont sauté sur un Angel, ils se sont fait mal.  Sonny Barger
SOS Racisme. SOS Baleines. Ambiguïté : dans un cas, c’est pour dénoncer le racisme ; dans l’autre, c’est pour sauver les baleines. Et si dans le premier cas, c’était aussi un appel subliminal à sauver le racisme, et donc l’enjeu de la lutte antiraciste comme dernier vestige des passions politiques, et donc une espèce virtuellement condamnée. Jean Baudrillard (1987)
I had an idea for a big song about America, and I didn’t want to write that this land is your land or some song like that. And I came up with this notion that politics and music flow parallel together forward through history. So the music you get is related somehow to the political environment that’s going on. And in the song, « American Pie, » the verses get somewhat more dire each time until you get to the end, but the good old boys are always there singing and singing, « Bye-bye Miss American Pie » almost like fiddling while Rome is burning. This was all in my head, and it sort of turned out to be true because, you now have a kind of music in America that’s really more spectacle, it owes more to Liberace than it does to Elvis Presley. And it’s somewhat meaningless and loud and bloviating and, and yet — and then we have this sort of spectacle in Washington, this kind of politics, which has gotten so out of control. And so the theory seems to hold up, but again, it was only my theory, and that’s how I wrote the song. That was the principle behind it. Don McLean
For some reason I wanted to write a big song about America and about politics, but I wanted to do it in a different way. As I was fiddling around, I started singing this thing about the Buddy Holly crash, the thing that came out (singing), ‘Long, long time ago, I can still remember how that music used to make me smile.’ I thought, Whoa, what’s that? And then the day the music died, it just came out. And I said, Oh, that is such a great idea. And so that’s all I had. And then I thought, I can’t have another slow song on this record. I’ve got to speed this up. I came up with this chorus, crazy chorus. And then one time about a month later I just woke up and wrote the other five verses. Because I realized what it was, I knew what I had. And basically, all I had to do was speed up the slow verse with the chorus and then slow down the last verse so it was like the first verse, and then tell the story, which was a dream. It is from all these fantasies, all these memories that I made personal. Buddy Holly’s death to me was a personal tragedy. As a child, a 15-year-old, I had no idea that nobody else felt that way much. I mean, I went to school and mentioned it and they said, ‘So what?’ So I carried this yearning and longing, if you will, this weird sadness that would overtake me when I would look at this album, The Buddy Holly Story, because that was my last Buddy record before he passed away. Don McLean
I was headed on a certain course, and the success I got with ‘American Pie’ really threw me off. It just shattered my lifestyle and made me quite neurotic and extremely petulant. I was really prickly for a long time. If the things you’re doing aren’t increasing your energy and awareness and clarity and enjoyment, then you feel as though you’re moving blindly. That’s what happened to me. I seemed to be in a place where nothing felt like anything, and nothing meant anything. Literally nothing mattered. It was very hard for me to wake up in the morning and decide why it was I wanted to get up. Don McLean
I’m very proud of the song. It is biographical in nature and I don’t think anyone has ever picked up on that. The song starts off with my memories of the death of Buddy Holly. But it moves on to describe America as I was seeing it and how I was fantasizing it might become, so it’s part reality and part fantasy but I’m always in the song as a witness or as even the subject sometimes in some of the verses. You know how when you dream something you can see something change into something else and it’s illogical when you examine it in the morning but when you’re dreaming it seems perfectly logical. So it’s perfectly okay for me to talk about being in the gym and seeing this girl dancing with someone else and suddenly have this become this other thing that this verse becomes and moving on just like that. That’s why I’ve never analyzed the lyrics to the song. They’re beyond analysis. They’re poetry. Don McLean
By 1964, you didn’t hear anything about Buddy Holly. He was completely forgotten. But I didn’t forget him, and I think this song helped make people aware that Buddy’s legitimate musical contribution had been overlooked. When I first heard ‘American Pie’ on the radio, I was playing a gig somewhere, and it was immediately followed by ‘Peggy Sue.’ They caught right on to the Holly connection, and that made me very happy. I realized that it was actually gonna perform some good works. Don McLean
It means never having to work again for the rest of my life. Don McLean (1991)
A month or so later I was in Philadelphia and I wrote the rest of the song. I was trying to figure out what this song was trying to tell me and where it was supposed to go. That’s when I realized it had to go forward from 1957 and it had to take in everything that has happened. I had to be a witness to the things going on, kind of like Mickey Mouse in Fantasia. I didn’t know anything about hit records. I was just trying to make the most interesting and exciting record that I could. Once the song was written, there was no doubt that it was the whole enchilada. It was clearly a very interesting, wonderful thing and everybody knew it. Don McLean (2003)
Basically in ‘American Pie’ things are heading in the wrong direction… It is becoming less idyllic. I don’t know whether you consider that wrong or right but it is a morality song in a sense. I was around in 1970 and now I am around in 2015… there is no poetry and very little romance in anything anymore, so it is really like the last phase of ‘American Pie’. Don McLean (2015)
The song has nostalgic themes, stretching from the late 1950s until the late 1960s. Except to acknowledge that he first learned about Buddy Holly’s death on February 3, 1959—McLean was age 13—when he was folding newspapers for his paper route on the morning of February 4, 1959 (hence the line « February made me shiver/with every paper I’d deliver »), McLean has generally avoided responding to direct questions about the song’s lyrics; he has said: « They’re beyond analysis. They’re poetry. » He also stated in an editorial published in 2009, on the 50th anniversary of the crash that killed Holly, Ritchie Valens, and J. P. « The Big Bopper » Richardson (who are alluded to in the final verse in a comparison with the Christian Holy Trinity), that writing the first verse of the song exorcised his long-running grief over Holly’s death and that he considers the song to be « a big song … that summed up the world known as America ». McLean dedicated the American Pie album to Holly. It was also speculated that the song contains numerous references to post-World War II American events (such as the murders of civil rights workers Chaney, Goodman, and Schwerner), and elements of culture, including 1960s culture (e.g. sock hops, cruising, Bob Dylan, The Beatles, Charles Manson, and much more). When asked what « American Pie » meant, McLean jokingly replied, « It means I don’t ever have to work again if I don’t want to. » Later, he stated, « You will find many interpretations of my lyrics but none of them by me … Sorry to leave you all on your own like this but long ago I realized that songwriters should make their statements and move on, maintaining a dignified silence. » He also commented on the popularity of his music, « I didn’t write songs that were just catchy, but with a point of view, or songs about the environment. In February 2015, McLean announced he would reveal the meaning of the lyrics to the song when the original manuscript went for auction in New York City, in April 2015. The lyrics and notes were auctioned on April 7, and sold for $1.2 million. In the sale catalogue notes, McLean revealed the meaning in the song’s lyrics: « Basically in American Pie things are heading in the wrong direction. … It [life] is becoming less idyllic. I don’t know whether you consider that wrong or right but it is a morality song in a sense. » The catalogue confirmed some of the better known references in the song’s lyrics, including mentions of Elvis Presley (« the king ») and Bob Dylan (« the jester »), and confirmed that the song culminates with a near-verbatim description of the death of Meredith Hunter at the Altamont Free Concert, ten years after the plane crash that killed Holly, Valens, and Richardson. Wikipedia
« The Jester » is probably Bob Dylan. It refers to him wearing « A coat he borrowed from James Dean, » and being « On the sidelines in a cast. » Dylan wore a red jacket similar to James Dean’s on the cover of The Freewheeling Bob Dylan, and got in a motorcycle accident in 1966 which put him out of service for most of that year. Dylan also made frequent use of jokers, jesters or clowns in his lyrics. The line, « And a voice that came from you and me » could refer to the folk style he sings, and the line, « And while the king was looking down the jester stole his thorny crown » could be about how Dylan took Elvis Presley’s place as the number one performer. The line, « Eight miles high and falling fast » is likely a reference to The Byrds’ hit « Eight Miles High. » Regarding the line, « The birds (Byrds) flew off from a fallout shelter, » a fallout shelter is a ’60s term for a drug rehabilitation facility, which one of the band members of The Byrds checked into after being caught with drugs. The section with the line, « The flames climbed high into the night, » is probably about the Altamont Speedway concert in 1969. While the Rolling Stones were playing, a fan was stabbed to death by a member of The Hells Angels who was hired for security. The line, « Sergeants played a marching tune, » is likely a reference to The Beatles’ album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. The line, « I met a girl who sang the blues and I asked her for some happy news, but she just smiled and turned away, » is probably about Janis Joplin. She died of a drug overdose in 1970. The lyric, « And while Lenin/Lennon read a book on Marx, » has been interpreted different ways. Some view it as a reference to Vladimir Lenin, the communist dictator who led the Russian Revolution in 1917 and who built the USSR, which was later ruled by Josef Stalin. The « Marx » referred to here would be the socialist philosopher Karl Marx. Others believe it is about John Lennon, whose songs often reflected a very communistic theology (particularly « Imagine »). Some have even suggested that in the latter case, « Marx » is actually Groucho Marx, another cynical entertainer who was suspected of being a socialist, and whose wordplay was often similar to Lennon’s lyrics. « Did you write the book of love » is probably a reference to the 1958 hit « Book Of Love » by the Monotones. The chorus for that song is « Who wrote the book of love? Tell me, tell me… I wonder, wonder who » etc. One of the lines asks, « Was it someone from above? » Don McLean was a practicing Catholic, and believed in the depravity of ’60s music, hence the closing lyric: « The Father, Son, and the Holy Ghost, they caught the last train for the coast, the day the music died. » Some, have postulated that in this line, the Trinity represents Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and the Big Bopper. « And moss grows fat on our rolling stone » – Mick Jagger’s appearance at a concert in skin-tight outfits, displaying a roll of fat, unusual for the skinny Stones frontman. Also, the words, « You know a rolling stone don’t gather no moss » appear in the Buddy Holly song « Early in the Morning, » which is about his ex missing him early in the morning when he’s gone. « The quartet practiced in the park » – The Beatles performing at Shea Stadium. « And we sang dirges in the dark, the day the music died » – The ’60s peace marches. « Helter Skelter in a summer swelter » – The Manson Family’s attack on Sharon Tate and others in California. « We all got up to dance, Oh, but we never got the chance, ’cause the players tried to take the field, the marching band refused to yield » – The huge numbers of young people who went to Chicago for the 1968 Democratic Party National Convention, and who thought they would be part of the process (« the players tried to take the field »), only to receive a violently rude awakening by the Chicago Police Department nightsticks (the commissions who studied the violence after-the-fact would later term the Chicago PD as « conducting a full-scale police riot ») or as McLean calls the police « the marching band. » (…)The line « Jack be nimble, Jack be quick, Jack Flash sat on a candle stick » is taken from a nursery rhyme that goes « Jack be nimble, Jack be quick, Jack jump over the candlestick. » Jumping over the candlestick comes from a game where people would jump over fires. « Jumpin’ Jack Flash » is a Rolling Stones song. Another possible reference to The Stones can be found in the line, « Fire is the devils only friend, » which could be The Rolling Stones « Sympathy For The Devil, » which is on the same Rolling Stones album. (…) McLean wrote the opening verse first, then came up with the chorus, including the famous title. The phrase « as American as apple pie » was part of the lexicon, but « American Pie » was not. When McLean came up with those two words, he says « a light went off in my head. » (…) Regarding the lyrics, « Jack Flash sat on a candlestick, ’cause fire is the devil’s only friend, » this could be a reference to the space program, and to the role it played in the Cold War between America and Russia throughout the ’60s. It is central to McLean’s theme of the blending of the political turmoil and musical protest as they intertwined through our lives during this remarkable point in history. Thus, the reference incorporates Jack Flash (the Rolling Stones), with our first astronaut to orbit the earth, John (common nickname for John is Jack) Glenn, paired with « Flash » (an allusion to fire), with another image for a rocket launch, « candlestick, » then pulls the whole theme together with « ’cause fire is the Devil’s (Russia’s) only friend, » as Russia had beaten America to manned orbital flight. At 8 minutes 32 seconds, this is the longest song in length to hit #1 on the Hot 100. The single was split in two parts because the 45 did not have enough room for the whole song on one side. The A-side ran 4:11 and the B-side was 4:31 – you had to flip the record in the middle to hear all of it. Disc jockeys usually played the album version at full length, which was to their benefit because it gave them time for a snack, a cigarette or a bathroom break. (…) When the original was released at a whopping 8:32, some radio stations in the United States refused to play it because of a policy limiting airplay to 3:30. Some interpret the song as a protest against this policy. When Madonna covered the song many years later, she cut huge swathes of the song, ironically to make it more radio friendly, to 4:34 on the album and under 4 minutes for the radio edit. In 1971, a singer named Lori Lieberman saw McLean perform this at the Troubadour theater in Los Angeles. She claimed that she was so moved by the concert that her experience became the basis for her song « Killing Me Softly With His Song, » which was a huge hit for Roberta Flack in 1973. When we spoke with Charles Fox, who wrote « Killing Me Softly » with Norman Gimbel, he explained that when Lieberman heard their song, it reminded her of the show, and she had nothing to do with writing the song. This song did a great deal to revive interest in Buddy Holly. Says McLean: « By 1964, you didn’t hear anything about Buddy Holly. He was completely forgotten. But I didn’t forget him, and I think this song helped make people aware that Buddy’s legitimate musical contribution had been overlooked. When I first heard ‘American Pie’ on the radio, I was playing a gig somewhere, and it was immediately followed by ‘Peggy Sue.’ They caught right on to the Holly connection, and that made me very happy. I realized that it was actually gonna perform some good works. » In 2002, this was featured in a Chevrolet ad. It showed a guy in his Chevy singing along to the end of this song. At the end, he gets out and it is clear that he was not going to leave the car until the song was over. The ad played up the heritage of Chevrolet, which has a history of being mentioned in famous songs (the line in this one is « Drove my Chevy to the levee »). Chevy used the same idea a year earlier when it ran billboards of a red Corvette that said, « They don’t write songs about Volvos. » Weird Al Yankovic did a parody of this song for his 1999 album Running With Scissors. It was called « The Saga Begins » and was about Star Wars: The Phantom Menace written from the point of view of Obi-Wan Kenobi. Sample lyric: « Bye, bye this here Anakin guy, maybe Vader someday later but now just a small fry. » It was the second Star Wars themed parody for Weird Al – his first being « Yoda, » which is a takeoff on « Lola » by The Kinks. Al admitted that he wrote « The Saga Begins » before the movie came out, entirely based on Internet rumors. (…) This song was enshrined in the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2002, 29 years after it was snubbed for the four categories it was nominated in. At the 1973 ceremony, « American Pie » lost both Song of the Year and Record of the year to « First Time Ever I Saw Your Face. » (…) Fans still make the occasional pilgrimage to the spot of the plane crash that inspired this song. It’s in a location so remote that tourists are few. The song starts in mono, and gradually goes to stereo over its eight-and-a-half minutes. This was done to represent going from the monaural era into the age of stereo. This song was a forebear to the ’50s nostalgia the became popular later in the decade. A year after it was released, Elton John scored a ’50s-themed hit with « Crocodile Rock; in 1973 the George Lucas movie American Graffiti harkened back to that decade, and in 1978 the movie The Buddy Holly Story hit theaters. One of the more bizarre covers of this song came in 1972, when it appeared on the album Meet The Brady Bunch, performed by the cast of the TV show. This version runs just 3:39. This song appears in the films Born on the Fourth of July (1989), Celebrity (1998) and Josie and the Pussycats (2001). Don McLean’s original manuscript of « American Pie » was sold for $1.2 million at a Christie’s New York auction on April 7, 2015. Songfacts

Nostalgie quand tu nous tiens !

En ces jours étranges ….

Où, à l’instar d’une espèce condamnée comme l’avait bien vu Baudrillard …

Le racisme devient « l’enjeu de la lutte antiraciste comme dernier vestige des passions politiques » …

Et SOS racisme attaque à nouveau Eric Zemmour en justice …

Pendant qu’au Sénat ou dans les beaux quartiers parisiens, ses notables de créateurs coulent des jours paisibles …

Comment ne pas repenser …

A la fameuse phrase de la célébrissime chanson de Don McLean …

Qui  entre la mort de Buddy Holly et celle, quatre mois après Woodstock, d’un fan au festival d’Altamont pendant le passage des Rolling Stones ….

Revenait, il y a 50 ans sur la perte d’innocence du rock et de l’Amérique de son adolescence …

Regrettant le temps proverbial …

Où « la pierre qui roule n’amassait pas mousse » ?

What is Don McLean’s song “American Pie” all about?

Dear Cecil:

I’ve been listening to Don McLean sing « American Pie » for twenty years now and I still don’t know what the hell he’s talking about. I know, I know, the « day the music died » is a reference to the Buddy Holly/Ritchie Valens/Big Bopper plane crash, but the rest of the song seems to be chock full of musical symbolism that I’ve never been able to decipher. There are clear references to the Byrds ( » … eight miles high and fallin’ fast … ») and the Rolling Stones (« … Jack Flash sat on a candlestick … »), but the song also mentions the « King and Queen, » the « Jester » (I’ve heard this is either Mick Jagger or Bob Dylan), a « girl who sang the blues » (Janis Joplin?), and the Devil himself. I’ve heard there is an answer key that explains all the symbols. Is there? Even if there isn’t, can you give me a line on who’s who and what’s what in this mediocre but firmly-entrenched-in-my-mind piece of music?

Scott McGough, Baltimore

Cecil replies:

Now, now, Scott. If you can’t clarify the confused, certainly the pinnacle of literary achievement in my mind, history (e.g., the towering rep of James Joyce) instructs us that your next best bet is to obfuscate the obvious. Don McLean has never issued an “answer key” for “American Pie,” undoubtedly on the theory that as long as you can keep ’em guessing, your legend will never die.

He’s probably right. Still, he’s dropped a few hints. Straight Dope musicologist Stefan Daystrom taped the following intro from Casey Kasem’s American Top 40 radio show circa January 1972: “A few days ago we phoned Don McLean for a little help in interpreting his great hit ‘American Pie.’ He was pretty reluctant to give us a straight interpretation of his work; he’d rather let it speak for itself. But he explained some of the specific references that he makes. The most important one is the death of rockabilly singer Buddy Holly in 1959; for McLean, that’s when the music died. The court jester he refers to is Bob Dylan. The Stones and the flames in the sky refer to the concert at Altamont, California. And McLean goes on, painting his picture,” blah blah, segue to record.

Not much to go on, but at least it rules out the Christ imagery. For the rest we turn to the song’s legion of freelance interpreters, whose thoughts were most recently compiled by Rich Kulawiec into a file that I plucked from the Internet. (I love the Internet.) No room to reprint all the lyrics, which you probably haven’t been able to forget anyway, but herewith the high points:

February made me shiver: Holly’s plane crashed February 3, 1959.

Them good ole boys were singing “This’ll be the day that I die”: Holly’s hit “That’ll Be the Day” had a similar line.

The Jester sang for the King and Queen in a coat he borrowed from James Dean: ID of K and Q obscure. Elvis and Connie Francis (or Little Richard)? John and Jackie Kennedy? Or Queen Elizabeth and consort, for whom Dylan apparently did play once? Dean’s coat is the famous red windbreaker he wore in Rebel Without a Cause; Dylan wore a similar one on “The Freewheeling Bob Dylan” album cover.

With the Jester on the sidelines in a cast: On July 29, 1966 Dylan had a motorcycle accident that kept him laid up for nine months.

While sergeants played a marching tune: The Beatles’ “Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.”

And as I watched him on the stage/ my hands were clenched in fists of rage/ No angel born in hell/ Could break that Satan’s spell/ And as the flames climbed high into the night: Mick Jagger, Altamont.

I met a girl who sang the blues/ And I asked her for some happy news/ But she just smiled and turned away: Janis Joplin OD’d October 4, 1970.

The three men I admire most/ The Father, Son, and Holy Ghost/ They caught the last train for the coast: Major mystery. Holly, Bopper, Valens? Hank Williams, Elvis, Holly? JFK, RFK, ML King? The literal tripartite deity? As for the coast, could be the departure of the music biz for California. Or it simply rhymes, a big determinant of plot direction in pop music lyrics (which may also explain “drove my Chevy to the levee”). Best I can do for now. Just don’t ask me to explain “Stairway to Heaven.”

The last word (probably) on “American Pie”

Dear Cecil:

As you can imagine, over the years I have been asked many times to discuss and explain my song “American Pie.” I have never discussed the lyrics, but have admitted to the Holly reference in the opening stanzas. I dedicated the album American Pie to Buddy Holly as well in order to connect the entire statement to Holly in hopes of bringing about an interest in him, which subsequently did occur.

This brings me to my point. Casey Kasem never spoke to me and none of the references he confirms my making were made by me. You will find many “interpretations” of my lyrics but none of them by me. Isn’t this fun?

Sorry to leave you all on your own like this but long ago I realized that songwriters should make their statements and move on, maintaining a dignified silence.

— Don McLean, Castine, Maine

Cecil Adams

Voir aussi:

It had been a while since I’d seen “Gimme Shelter,” one of the early classics of the Maysles brothers, Albert and David, and I watched it again on the occasion of the passing of Albert Maysles last Thursday. To my surprise, I found that a big part of the story of “Gimme Shelter” is in the end credits, which say that the movie was filmed by “the Maysles Brothers and (in alphabetical order)” the names of twenty-two more camera operators. By way of contrast, the brothers’ previous feature, “Salesman,” credited “photography” solely to Albert Maysles, and “Grey Gardens,” from 1976, was “filmed by” Albert Maysles and David Maysles. The difference is drastic: it’s the distinction between newsgathering and relationships, and relationships are what the Maysleses built their films on.

The Maysleses virtually lived with the Bible peddlers on the road, they virtually inhabited Grey Gardens with Big Edie and Little Edie, but—as Michael Sragow reports in this superb study, from 2000, on the making of “Gimme Shelter”—the Maysleses didn’t and couldn’t move in with the Rolling Stones. Stan Goldstein, a Maysles associate, told Sragow, “In the film there are virtually no personal moments with the Stones—the Maysles were not involved with the Stones’ lives. They did not have unlimited access. It was an outside view.”

It’s a commonplace to consider the documentary filmmaker Frederick Wiseman’s films to be centered on the lives of institutions and those of the Maysleses to be centered on the lives of people, but “Gimme Shelter” does both. Though it’s replete with some exhilarating concert footage—notably, of the Stones performing on the concert tour that led up to the Altamont disaster—its central subject is how the Altamont concert came into being. “Gimme Shelter” is a film about a concert that is only incidentally a concert film. Yet the Maysleses’ vision of the unfolding events is distinctive—and, for that matter, historic—by virtue of their distinctive directorial procedure.

Early on, Charlie Watts, the Stones drummer, is seen in the editing room, watching footage with David Maysles, who tells him that it will take eight weeks to edit the film. Watts asks whether Maysles thinks he can do it in that time, and Maysles answers, waving his arm to indicate the editing room, “This gives us the freedom, you guys watching it.”

Filming in the editing room (which, Sragow reports, was the idea of Charlotte Zwerin, one of the film’s editors and directors, who had joined the project after the rest of the shoot) gave them the freedom to break from the strict chronology of the concert season that went from New York to Altamont while staying within the participatory logic of their direct-cinema program. It’s easy to imagine another filmmaker using a voice-over and a montage to introduce, at the start, the fatal outcome of the Altamont concert and portentously declare the intention to follow the band on their American tour to see how they reached that calamitous result. The Maysleses, repudiating such ex-cathedra interventions, instead create a new, and newly personal, sphere of action for the Stones and themselves that the filmmakers can use to frame the concert footage.

The editing-room sequences render the concert footage archival, making it look like what it is—in effect, found footage of a historical event. The result is to turn the impersonal archive personal and to give the Maysles brothers, as well as the Rolling Stones, a personal implication in even the documentary images that they themselves didn’t film.

Among those images are those of a press conference where Mick Jagger announced his plans for a free concert and his intentions in holding it, which are of a worthy and progressive cast: “It’s creating a microcosmic society which sets examples for the rest of America as to how one can behave at large gatherings.” (Later, though, he frames it in more demotic terms: “The concert is an excuse for everyone to talk to each other, get together, sleep with each other, hold each other, and get very stoned.”)

A strange convergence of interests appears in negotiations filmed by the Maysleses between the attorney Melvin Belli, acting on the Stones’ behalf; Dick Carter, the owner of the Altamont Speedway; and other local authorities. The intense pressure to make the concert happen is suggested in a radio broadcast from the day before the concert, during which the announcer Frank Terry snarks that “apparently it’s one of the most difficult things in the world to give a free concert.” The Stones want to perform; their fans want to see them perform a free concert; the local government wants to deliver that show and not to stand in its way; Belli wants to facilitate it; and the Stones don’t exactly renounce their authority in the process but do, in revealing moments, lay bare to the Maysleses’ cameras their readiness to engage with a mighty system of which they themselves aren’t quite the masters.

Within this convergence of rational interests, one element is overlooked: madness. Jagger approaches the concert with constructive purpose and festive enthusiasm, but he performs like a man possessed, singing with fury of a crossfire hurricane and warning his listeners that to play with him is to play with fire. No, what happened at Altamont is not the music’s fault. Celebrity was already a scene of madness in Frank Sinatra’s first flush of fame and when the Beatles were chased through the train station in “A Hard Day’s Night.” But the Beatles’ celebrity was, almost from the start, their subject as well as their object, and they approached it and managed it with a Warholian consciousness, as in their movies; they managed their music in the same way and became, like Glenn Gould, concert dropouts. By contrast, the Stones were primal and natural performers, whose music seemed to thrive, even to exist, in contact with the audience. That contact becomes the movie’s subject—a subject that surpasses the Rolling Stones and enters into history at large.

The Maysleses and Zwerin intercut the discussions between Belli, Carter, and the authorities with concert footage from the Stones’ other venues along the way. The effect—the music running as the nighttime preparations for the Altamont concert occur, with fires and headlights, a swirling tumult—suggests the forces about to be unleashed on the world at large. A cut from a moment in concert to a helicopter shot of an apocalyptic line of cars winding through the hills toward Altamont and of the crowd already gathered there suggests that something wild has escaped from the closed confines of the Garden and other halls. The Maysleses’ enduring theme of the absent boundary between theatre and life, between show and reality, is stood on its head: art as great as that of the Stones is destined to have a mighty real-world effect. There’s a reason why the crucial adjective for art is “powerful”; it’s ultimately forced to engage with power as such.

What died at Altamont was the notion of spontaneity, of the sense that things could happen on their own and that benevolent spirits would prevail. What ended was the idea of the unproduced. What was born there was infrastructure—the physical infrastructure of facilities, the abstract one of authority. From that point on, concerts were the tip of the iceberg, the superstructure, the mere public face and shining aftermath of elaborate planning. The lawyers and the insurers, the politicians and the police, security consultants and fire-safety experts—the masters and mistresses of management—would be running the show.

The movie ends with concertgoers the morning after, walking away, their backs to the viewer, leaving a blank natural realm of earth and sky; they’re leaving the state of nature and heading back to the city, from which they’ll never be able to leave innocently again. What emerges accursed is the very idea of nature, of the idea that, left to their own inclinations and stripped of the trappings of the wider social order, the young people of the new generation will somehow spontaneously create a higher, gentler, more loving grassroots order. What died at Altamont is the Rousseauian dream itself. What was envisioned in “Lord of the Flies” and subsequently dramatized in such films as “Straw Dogs” and “Deliverance” was presented in reality in “Gimme Shelter.” The haunting freeze-frame on Jagger staring into the camera, at the end of the film, after his forensic examination of the footage of the killing of Meredith Hunter at the concert, reveals not the filmmakers’ accusation or his own sense of guilt but lost illusions.


Guerres culturelles: La ‘wokeité’ serait-elle le christianisme des imbéciles ? (Purer-than-thou: Behind the fourth Great Awakening we now see taking to our streets once again is nothing but the Girardian escalation of mimetic rivalry, former Weekly Standard literary editor Joseph Bottum says)

26 septembre, 2020
Classic Lincoln & Hamlin Wide Awakes 1860 Campaign Ribbon, white | Lot #25784 | Heritage Auctions
Woke | Know Your MemeDictionary.com Adds Words: 'Woke,' 'Butthurt' and 'Pokemon' | Time
PNG - 393.4 koL’antisémitisme est le socialisme des imbéciles. Ferdinand Kronawetter ? (attribué à August Bebel)
Je les ai foulés dans ma colère, Je les ai écrasés dans ma fureur; Leur sang a jailli sur mes vêtements, Et j’ai souillé tous mes habits. Car un jour de vengeance était dans mon coeur (…) J’ai foulé des peuples dans ma colère, Je les ai rendus ivres dans ma fureur, Et j’ai répandu leur sang sur la terre. Esaïe 63: 3-6
Et l’ange jeta sa faucille sur la terre. Et il vendangea la vigne de la terre, et jeta la vendange dans la grande cuve de la colère de Dieu. Et la cuve fut foulée hors de la ville; et du sang sortit de la cuve, jusqu’aux mors des chevaux, sur une étendue de mille six cents stades. Apocalypse 14: 19-20
Mes yeux ont vu la gloire de la venue du Seigneur; Il piétine le vignoble où sont gardés les raisins de la colère; Il a libéré la foudre fatidique de sa terrible et rapide épée; Sa vérité est en marche. (…) Dans la beauté des lys Christ est né de l’autre côté de l’océan, Avec dans sa poitrine la gloire qui nous transfigure vous et moi; Comme il est mort pour rendre les hommes saints, mourons pour rendre les hommes libres; Tandis que Dieu est en marche. Julia Ward Howe (1861)
La colère commence à luire dans les yeux de ceux qui ont faim. Dans l’âme des gens, les raisins de la colère se gonflent et mûrissent, annonçant les vendanges prochaines. John Steinbeck (1939)
La civilisation atteindra la perfection le jour où la dernière pierre de la dernière église aura assommé le dernier prêtre. Attribué à Zola
Le monde moderne n’est pas mauvais : à certains égards, il est bien trop bon. Il est rempli de vertus féroces et gâchées. Lorsqu’un dispositif religieux est brisé (comme le fut le christianisme pendant la Réforme), ce ne sont pas seulement les vices qui sont libérés. Les vices sont en effet libérés, et ils errent de par le monde en faisant des ravages ; mais les vertus le sont aussi, et elles errent plus férocement encore en faisant des ravages plus terribles. Le monde moderne est saturé des vieilles vertus chrétiennes virant à la folie.  G.K. Chesterton
La nature d’une civilisation, c’est ce qui s’agrège autour d’une religion. Notre civilisation est incapable de construire un temple ou un tombeau. Elle sera contrainte de trouver sa valeur fondamentale, ou elle se décomposera. C’est le grand phénomène de notre époque que la violence de la poussée islamique. Sous-estimée par la plupart de nos contemporains, cette montée de l’islam est analogiquement comparable aux débuts du communisme du temps de Lénine. Les conséquences de ce phénomène sont encore imprévisibles. A l’origine de la révolution marxiste, on croyait pouvoir endiguer le courant par des solutions partielles. Ni le christianisme, ni les organisations patronales ou ouvrières n’ont trouvé la réponse. De même aujourd’hui, le monde occidental ne semble guère préparé à affronter le problème de l’islam. En théorie, la solution paraît d’ailleurs extrêmement difficile. Peut-être serait-elle possible en pratique si, pour nous borner à l’aspect français de la question, celle-ci était pensée et appliquée par un véritable homme d’Etat. Les données actuelles du problème portent à croire que des formes variées de dictature musulmane vont s’établir successivement à travers le monde arabe. Quand je dis «musulmane» je pense moins aux structures religieuses qu’aux structures temporelles découlant de la doctrine de Mahomet. Dès maintenant, le sultan du Maroc est dépassé et Bourguiba ne conservera le pouvoir qu’en devenant une sorte de dictateur. Peut-être des solutions partielles auraient-elles suffi à endiguer le courant de l’islam, si elles avaient été appliquées à temps. Actuellement, il est trop tard ! Les «misérables» ont d’ailleurs peu à perdre. Ils préféreront conserver leur misère à l’intérieur d’une communauté musulmane. Leur sort sans doute restera inchangé. Nous avons d’eux une conception trop occidentale. Aux bienfaits que nous prétendons pouvoir leur apporter, ils préféreront l’avenir de leur race. L’Afrique noire ne restera pas longtemps insensible à ce processus. Tout ce que nous pouvons faire, c’est prendre conscience de la gravité du phénomène et tenter d’en retarder l’évolution. André Malraux (1956)
Nous sommes encore proches de cette période des grandes expositions internationales qui regardait de façon utopique la mondialisation comme l’Exposition de Londres – la « Fameuse » dont parle Dostoievski, les expositions de Paris… Plus on s’approche de la vraie mondialisation plus on s’aperçoit que la non-différence ce n’est pas du tout la paix parmi les hommes mais ce peut être la rivalité mimétique la plus extravagante. On était encore dans cette idée selon laquelle on vivait dans le même monde: on n’est plus séparé par rien de ce qui séparait les hommes auparavant donc c’est forcément le paradis. Ce que voulait la Révolution française. Après la nuit du 4 août, plus de problème ! René Girard
L’inauguration majestueuse de l’ère « post-chrétienne » est une plaisanterie. Nous sommes dans un ultra-christianisme caricatural qui essaie d’échapper à l’orbite judéo-chrétienne en « radicalisant » le souci des victimes dans un sens antichrétien. (…) Jusqu’au nazisme, le judaïsme était la victime préférentielle de ce système de bouc émissaire. Le christianisme ne venait qu’en second lieu. Depuis l’Holocauste, en revanche, on n’ose plus s’en prendre au judaïsme, et le christianisme est promu au rang de bouc émissaire numéro un. René Girard
Nous sommes entrés dans un mouvement qui est de l’ordre du religieux. Entrés dans la mécanique du sacrilège: la victime, dans nos sociétés, est entourée de l’aura du sacré. Du coup, l’écriture de l’histoire, la recherche universitaire, se retrouvent soumises à l’appréciation du législateur et du juge comme, autrefois, à celle de la Sorbonne ecclésiastique. Françoise Chandernagor
Nous sommes une société qui, tous les cinquante ans ou presque, est prise d’une sorte de paroxysme de vertu – une orgie d’auto-purification à travers laquelle le mal d’une forme ou d’une autre doit être chassé. De la chasse aux sorcières de Salem aux chasses aux communistes de l’ère McCarthy à la violente fixation actuelle sur la maltraitance des enfants, on retrouve le même fil conducteur d’hystérie morale. Après la période du maccarthisme, les gens demandaient : mais comment cela a-t-il pu arriver ? Comment la présomption d’innocence a-t-elle pu être abandonnée aussi systématiquement ? Comment de grandes et puissantes institutions ont-elles pu accepté que des enquêteurs du Congrès aient fait si peu de cas des libertés civiles – tout cela au nom d’une guerre contre les communistes ? Comment était-il possible de croire que des subversifs se cachaient derrière chaque porte de bibliothèque, dans chaque station de radio, que chaque acteur de troisième zone qui avait appartenu à la mauvaise organisation politique constituait une menace pour la sécurité de la nation ? Dans quelques décennies peut-être les gens ne manqueront pas de se poser les mêmes questions sur notre époque actuelle; une époque où les accusations de sévices les plus improbables trouvent des oreilles bienveillantes; une époque où il suffit d’être accusé par des sources anonymes pour être jeté en pâture à la justice; une époque où la chasse à ceux qui maltraitent les enfants est devenu une pathologie nationale. Dorothy Rabinowitz
La glorification d’une race et le dénigrement corollaire d’une autre ou d’autres a toujours été et sera une recette de meurtre. Ceci est une loi absolue. Si on laisse quelqu’un subir un traitement particulièrement défavorable à un groupe quelconque d’individus en raison de leur race ou de leur couleur de peau, on ne saurait fixer de limites aux mauvais traitements dont ils seront l’objet et puisque la race entière a été condamnée pour des raisons mystérieuses il n’y a aucune raison pour ne pas essayer de la détruire dans son intégralité. C’est précisément ce que les nazis auraient voulu accomplir (…) J’ai beaucoup à cœur de voir les noirs conquérir leur liberté aux Etats Unis. Mais leur dignité et leur santé spirituelle me tiennent également à cœur et je me dois de m’opposer à toutes tentatives des noirs de faire à d’autres ce qu’on leur a fait. James Baldwin
The recent flurry of marches, demonstrations and even riots, along with the Democratic Party’s spiteful reaction to the Trump presidency, exposes what modern liberalism has become: a politics shrouded in pathos. Unlike the civil-rights movement of the 1950s and ’60s, when protesters wore their Sunday best and carried themselves with heroic dignity, today’s liberal marches are marked by incoherence and downright lunacy—hats designed to evoke sexual organs, poems that scream in anger yet have no point to make, and an hysterical anti-Americanism. All this suggests lostness, the end of something rather than the beginning. (…) America, since the ’60s, has lived through what might be called an age of white guilt. We may still be in this age, but the Trump election suggests an exhaustion with the idea of white guilt, and with the drama of culpability, innocence and correctness in which it mires us. White guilt (…) is the terror of being stigmatized with America’s old bigotries—racism, sexism, homophobia and xenophobia. To be stigmatized as a fellow traveler with any of these bigotries is to be utterly stripped of moral authority and made into a pariah. The terror of this, of having “no name in the street” as the Bible puts it, pressures whites to act guiltily even when they feel no actual guilt. (…) It is also the heart and soul of contemporary liberalism. This liberalism is the politics given to us by white guilt, and it shares white guilt’s central corruption. It is not real liberalism, in the classic sense. It is a mock liberalism. Freedom is not its raison d’être; moral authority is. (…) Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton, good liberals both, pursued power by offering their candidacies as opportunities for Americans to document their innocence of the nation’s past. “I had to vote for Obama,” a rock-ribbed Republican said to me. “I couldn’t tell my grandson that I didn’t vote for the first black president.” For this man liberalism was a moral vaccine that immunized him against stigmatization. For Mr. Obama it was raw political power in the real world, enough to lift him—unknown and untested—into the presidency. But for Mrs. Clinton, liberalism was not enough. The white guilt that lifted Mr. Obama did not carry her into office—even though her opponent was soundly stigmatized as an iconic racist and sexist. Perhaps the Obama presidency was the culmination of the age of white guilt, so that this guiltiness has entered its denouement. (…) Our new conservative president rolls his eyes when he is called a racist, and we all—liberal and conservative alike—know that he isn’t one. The jig is up. Bigotry exists, but it is far down on the list of problems that minorities now face. (…) Today’s liberalism is an anachronism. It has no understanding, really, of what poverty is and how it has to be overcome. (…) Four thousand shootings in Chicago last year, and the mayor announces that his will be a sanctuary city. This is moral esteem over reality; the self-congratulation of idealism. Liberalism is exhausted because it has become a corruption. Shelby Steele
For over forty years the left has been successfully reshaping American culture. Social mores and government policies about sexuality, marriage, the sexes, race relations, morality, and ethics have changed radically. The collective wisdom of the human race that we call tradition has been marginalized or discarded completely. The role of religion in public life has been reduced to a private preference. And politics has been increasingly driven by the assumptions of progressivism: internationalism privileged over nationalism, centralization of power over its dispersal in federalism, elitist technocracy over democratic republicanism, “human sciences” over common sense, and dependent clients over autonomous citizens. But the election of Donald Trump, and the overreach of the left’s response to that victory, suggest that we may be seeing the beginning of the end of the left’s cultural, social, and political dominance. The two terms of Barack Obama seemed to be the crowning validation of the left’s victory. Despite Obama’s “no blue state, no red state” campaign rhetoric, he governed as the most leftist––and ineffectual–– president in history. Deficits exploded, taxes were raised, new entitlements created, and government expanded far beyond the dreams of center-left Democrats. Marriage and sex identities were redefined. The narrative of permanent white racism was endorsed and promoted. Tradition-minded Americans were scorned as “bitter clingers to guns and religion.” Hollywood and Silicon Valley became even more powerful cultural arbiters and left-wing publicists. And cosmopolitan internationalism was privileged over patriotic nationalism, while American exceptionalism was reduced to an irrational parochial prejudice. The shocking repudiation of the establishment left’s anointed successor, Hillary Clinton, was the first sign that perhaps the hubristic left had overreached, and summoned nemesis in the form of a vulgar, braggadocios reality television star and casino developer who scorned the hypocritical rules of decorum and political correctness that even many Republicans adopted to avoid censure and calumny. Yet rather than learning the tragic self-knowledge that Aristotle says compensates the victim of nemesis, the left overreached yet again with its outlandish, hysterical tantrums over Trump’s victory. The result has been a stark exposure of the left’s incoherence and hypocrisy so graphic and preposterous that they can no longer be ignored. First, the now decidedly leftist Democrats refused to acknowledge their political miscalculations. Rather than admit that their party has drifted too far left beyond the beliefs of the bulk of the states’ citizens, they shifted blame onto a whole catalogue of miscreants: Russian meddling, a careerist FBI director, their own lap-dog media, endemic sexism, an out-of-date Electoral College, FOX News, and irredeemable “deplorables” were just a few. Still high on the “permanent majority” Kool-Aid they drank during the Obama years, they pitched a fit and called it “resistance,” as though comfortably preaching to the media, university, and entertainment choirs was like fighting Nazis in occupied France. (…) in colleges and universities. Normal people watched as some of the most privileged young people in history turned their subjective slights and bathetic discontents into weapons of tyranny, shouting down or driving away speakers they didn’t like, and calling for “muscle” to enforce their assault on the First Amendment. Relentlessly repeated on FOX News and on the Drudge Report, these antics galvanized large swaths of American voters who used to be amused, but now were disgusted by such displays of rank ingratitude and arrogant dismissal of Constitutional rights. And voters could see that the Democrats encouraged and enabled this nonsense. The prestige of America’s best universities, where most of these rites of passage for the scions of the well-heeled occurred, was even more damaged than it had been in the previous decades. So too with the world of entertainment. Badly educated actors, musicians, and entertainers, those glorified jugglers, jesters, and sword-swallowers who fancy themselves “artists,” have let loose an endless stream of dull leftwing clichés and bromides that were in their dotage fifty years ago. The spectacle of moral preening coming from the entertainment industry––one that trades in vulgarity, misogyny, sexual exploitation, the glorification of violence, and, worst of all, the production of banal, mindless movies and television shows recycling predictable plots, villains, and heroes––has disgusted millions of voters, who are sick of being lectured to by overpaid carnies. So they vote with their feet for the alternatives, while movie grosses and television ratings decline. As for the media, their long-time habit of substituting political activism for journalism, unleashed during the Obama years, has been freed from its last restraints while covering Trump. The contrast between the “slobbering love affair,” as Bernie Goldberg described the media’s coverage of Obama, and the obsessive Javert-like hounding of Trump has stripped the last veil of objectivity from the media. They’ve been exposed as flacks no longer seeking the truth, but manufacturing partisan narratives. The long cover-up of the Weinstein scandal is further confirmation of the media’s amoral principles and selective outrage. With numerous alternatives to the activism of the mainstream media now available, the legacy media that once dominated the reporting of news and political commentary are now shrinking in influence and lashing out in fury at their diminished prestige and profits. Two recent events have focused this turn against the sixties’ hijacking of the culture. The preposterous “protests” by NFL players disrespecting the flag during pregame ceremonies has angered large numbers of Americans and hit the League in the wallet. The race card that always has trumped every political or social conflict has perhaps lost its power. The spectacle of rich one-percenters recycling lies about police encounters with blacks and the endemic racism of American society has discredited the decades-long racial narrative constantly peddled by Democrats, movies, television shows, and school curricula from grade-school to university. The endless scolding of white people by blacks more privileged than the majority of human beings who ever existed has lost its credibility. The racial good will that got a polished mediocrity like Barack Obama twice elected president perhaps has been squandered in this attempt of rich people who play games to pose as perpetual victims. These supposed victims appear more interested in camouflaging their privilege than improving the lives of their so-called “brothers” and “sisters.” The second is the Harvey Weinstein scandal. A lavish donor to Democrats––praised by Hillary Clinton and the Obamas, given standing ovations at awards shows by the politically correct, slavishly courted and feted by progressive actors and entertainers, and long known to be a vicious sexual predator by these same progressive “feminists” supposedly anguished by the plight of women––perhaps will become the straw that breaks the back of progressive ideology. (…) The spectacle of a rich feminist and progressive icon like Jane Fonda whimpering about her own moral cowardice has destroyed the credibility we foolishly gave to Hollywood’s dunces and poltroons. Bruce Thornton
We disrupt the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure requirement by supporting each other as extended families and “villages” that collectively care for one another, especially our children, to the degree that mothers, parents, and children are comfortable.We foster a queer‐affirming network. When we gather, we do so with the intention of freeing ourselves from the tight grip of heteronormative thinking, or rather, the belief that all in the world are heterosexual (unless s/he or they disclose otherwise). Black Lives Matter
BLM’s « what we believe » page, calling for the destruction of the nuclear family among many other radical left wing agenda items, has been deleted » pic.twitter.com/qCZxUFMZH4 Matt Walsh
Correction: This article’s headline originally stated that People of Praise inspired ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’. The book’s author, Margaret Atwood, has never specifically mentioned the group as being the inspiration for her work. A New Yorker profile of the author from 2017 mentions a newspaper clipping as part of her research for the book of a different charismatic Catholic group, People of Hope. Newsweek regrets the error. Newsweek
Je conseille à tout le monde d’être un peu prudent quand ils passent par là, rester éveillé, garder les yeux ouverts. Leadbelly (« Scottsboro Boys », 1938)
If You’re Woke You Dig It. William Melvin Kelley (1962)
I been sleeping all my life. And now that Mr. Garvey done woke me up, I’m gon’ stay woke. And I’m gon help him wake up other black folk. Barry Beckham (1972)
I am known to stay awake A beautiful world I’m trying to find I’ve been in search of myself (…) I am in the search of something new (A beautiful world I’m trying to find) Searchin’ me Searching inside of you And that’s fo’ real What if it were no niggas Only master teachers? I stay woke. Erykah Badu (2008)
La vérité ne nécessite aucune croyance. / Restez réveillé. Regardez attentivement. / #FreePussyRiot. Erykah Badu
Wikipédia est-il  assez woke ? Bloomberg Businessweek
L’énigme est intégrée. Lorsque les Blancs aspirent à obtenir des points pour la conscience, ils marchent directement dans la ligne de mire entre l’alliance et l’appropriation. Amanda Hess
WOKE: Adjectif dérivé du verbe anglais awake (« s’éveiller »), il désigne un membre d’un groupe dominant, conscient du système oppressant les minorités et n’hésitant pas à dénoncer les discriminations en utilisant le vocabulaire intersectionnel. Marianne
Le grand réveil (Great Awakening) correspond à une vague de réveils religieux dans le Royaume de Grande-Bretagne et ses colonies américaines au milieu du XVIIIe siècle. Le terme de Great Awakening est apparu vers 1842. On le retrouve dans le titre de l’ouvrage consacré par Joseph Tracy au renouveau religieux qui débuta en Grande-Bretagne et dans ses colonies américaines dans les années 1720, progressa considérablement dans les années 1740 pour s’atténuer dans les années 1760 voire 1770. Il sera suivi de nouvelles vagues de réveil, le second grand réveil (1790-1840) et une troisième vague de réveils entre 1855 et les premières décennies du XXe siècle. Ces réveils religieux dans la tradition protestante et surtout dans le contexte américain sont compris comme une période de redynamisation de la vie religieuse. Le Great Awakening toucha des églises protestantes et des églises chrétiennes évangéliques et contribua à la formation de nouvelles Églises. Wikipedia
Woke est un terme apparu durant les années 2010 aux États-Unis, pour décrire un état d’esprit militant et combatif pour la protection des minorités et contre le racisme. Il dérive du verbe wake (réveiller), pour décrire un état d’éveil face à l’injustice. Il est dans un premier temps utilisé dans le mouvement de Black Lives Matter, avant d’être repris plus largement. Depuis la fin des années 2010, le terme Woke s’est déployé et aujourd’hui une personne « woke » se définit comme étant consciente de toutes les injustices et de toutes les formes d’inégalités, d’oppression qui pèsent sur les minorités, du racisme au sexisme en passant par les préoccupations environnementales et utilisant généralement un vocabulaire intersectionnel. Son usage répandu serait dû au mouvement Black Lives Matter. Le terme Woke est non seulement associé aux militantismes antiraciste, féministe et LGBT mais aussi à une politique de gauche dite progressiste et à certaines réflexions face aux problèmes socioculturels (les termes culture Woke et politique Woke sont également utilisés). (…) Les termes Woke et wide awake (complètement éveillé) sont apparus pour la première fois dans la culture politique et les annonces politiques lors de l’ élection présidentielle américaine de 1860 pour soutenir Abraham Lincoln. Le Parti républicain a cultivé le mouvement pour s’opposer principalement à la propagation de l’esclavage, comme décrit dans le mouvement Wide Awakes. Les dictionnaires d’Oxford enregistrent  une utilisation politiquement consciente précoce en 1962 dans l’article « If You’re Woke You Dig It » de William Melvin Kelley dans le New York Times et dans la pièce de 1971 Garvey Lives! de Barry Beckham (« I been sleeping all my life. And now that Mr. Garvey done woke me up, I’m gon’ stay woke. And I’m gon help him wake up other black folk. »). Garvey avait lui-même exhorté ses auditoires du début du XXe siècle, « Wake up Ethiopia! Wake up Africa! » (« Réveillez-vous Éthiopie! Réveillez-vous Afrique! »en français). Auparavant, Jay Saunders Redding avait enregistré un commentaire d’un employé afro-américain du syndicat United Mine Workers of America en 1940 (« Laissez-moi vous dire, mon ami. Se réveiller est beaucoup plus difficile que de dormir, mais nous resterons éveillés plus longtemps. »). Leadbelly utilise la phrase vers la fin de l’enregistrement de sa chanson de 1938 « Scottsboro Boys », tout en expliquant l’incident du même nom, en disant « Je conseille à tout le monde d’être un peu prudent quand ils passent par là, rester éveillé, garder les yeux ouverts ». La première utilisation moderne du terme « Woke » apparaît dans la chanson « Master Teacher » de l’album New Amerykah Part One (4th World War) (2008) de la chanteuse de soul Erykah Badu. Tout au long de la chanson, Badu chante la phrase: « I stay woke ». Bien que la phrase n’ait pas encore de lien avec les problèmes de justice, la chanson de Badu est créditée du lien ultérieur avec ces problèmes. To « stay woke » (Rester éveillé) dans ce sens exprime l’aspect grammatical continu et habituel intensifié de l’anglais vernaculaire afro-américain : en substance, être toujours éveillé, ou être toujours vigilant. David Stovall a dit: « Erykah l’a amené vivant dans la culture populaire. Elle veut dire ne pas être apaisée, ne pas être anesthésiée. » Le concept d’être Woke (réveillé en anglais) soutient l’idée que ce type de prise de conscience doit être acquise. Le rappeur Earl Sweatshirt se souvient d’avoir chanté « I stay woke » sur la chanson et sa mère a refusé la chanson et a répondu: « Non, tu ne l’es pas. » En 2012, les utilisateurs de Twitter, y compris Erykah Badu, ont commencé à utiliser « Woke » et « stay Woke » en relation avec des questions de justice sociale et raciale et #StayWoke est devenu un mot-dièse largement utilisé. Badu a incité ceci avec la première utilisation politiquement chargée de l’expression sur Twitter. Elle a tweeté pour soutenir le groupe de musique féministe russe Pussy Riot : « La vérité ne nécessite aucune croyance. / Restez réveillé. Regardez attentivement. / #FreePussyRiot. » Le terme Woke s’est répandu dans un usage courant dans le monde anglo-saxon par les médias sociaux et des cercles militants. Par exemple, en 2016, le titre d’un article de Bloomberg Businessweek demandait « Is Wikipedia Woke? » (« Est-ce que Wikipédia est Woke ? »), en faisant référence à la base de contributeurs largement blancs de l’encyclopédie en ligne. Enfin, le terme Woke s’est étendu à d’autres causes et d’autres usages, plus mondains. Car, en effet, tout semble maintenant ainsi « éveillé » : la 75ème cérémonie des Golden Globes, marquée par l’affaire Weinstein et la volonté d’en finir avec le harcèlement sexuel, était en partie Woke, selon le New York Times. Le magazine London Review of Books affirme même que la famille royale britannique est désormais Woke d’après les récentes fiançailles du prince Harry avec l’actrice métisse Meghan Markle, dont les positions anti-Donald Trump sont bien connues. À la fin des années 2010, le terme « Woke » avait pris pour indiquer « une paranoïa saine, en particulier sur les questions de justice raciale et politique » et a été adopté comme un terme d’argot plus générique et a fait l’objet de mèmes. Par exemple, MTV News l’a identifié comme un mot-clé d’argot adolescent pour 2016. Dans le New York Times, Amanda Hess a exprimé des inquiétudes quant au fait que le mot Woke a été culturellement approprié, écrivant: « L’énigme est intégrée. Lorsque les Blancs aspirent à obtenir des points pour la conscience, ils marchent directement dans la ligne de mire entre l’alliance et l’appropriation. Wikipedia
On ne peut comprendre la gauche si on ne comprend pas que le gauchisme est une religion. Dennis Prager
You cannot understand the Left if you do not understand that leftism is a religion. It is not God-based (some left-wing Christians’ and Jews’ claims notwithstanding), but otherwise it has every characteristic of a religion. The most blatant of those characteristics is dogma. People who believe in leftism have as many dogmas as the most fundamentalist Christian. One of them is material equality as the preeminent moral goal. Another is the villainy of corporations. The bigger the corporation, the greater the villainy. Thus, instead of the devil, the Left has Big Pharma, Big Tobacco, Big Oil, the “military-industrial complex,” and the like. Meanwhile, Big Labor, Big Trial Lawyers, and — of course — Big Government are left-wing angels. And why is that? Why, to be specific, does the Left fear big corporations but not big government? The answer is dogma — a belief system that transcends reason. No rational person can deny that big governments have caused almost all the great evils of the last century, arguably the bloodiest in history. Who killed the 20 to 30 million Soviet citizens in the Gulag Archipelago — big government or big business? Hint: There were no private businesses in the Soviet Union. Who deliberately caused 75 million Chinese to starve to death — big government or big business? Hint: See previous hint. Did Coca-Cola kill 5 million Ukrainians? Did Big Oil slaughter a quarter of the Cambodian population? Would there have been a Holocaust without the huge Nazi state? Whatever bad things big corporations have done is dwarfed by the monstrous crimes — the mass enslavement of people, the deprivation of the most basic human rights, not to mention the mass murder and torture and genocide — committed by big governments. (…) Religious Christians and Jews also have some irrational beliefs, but their irrationality is overwhelmingly confined to theological matters; and these theological irrationalities have no deleterious impact on religious Jews’ and Christians’ ability to see the world rationally and morally. Few religious Jews or Christians believe that big corporations are in any way analogous to big government in terms of evil done. And the few who do are leftists. That the Left demonizes Big Pharma, for instance, is an example of this dogmatism. America’s pharmaceutical companies have saved millions of lives, including millions of leftists’ lives. And I do not doubt that in order to increase profits they have not always played by the rules. But to demonize big pharmaceutical companies while lionizing big government, big labor unions, and big tort-law firms is to stand morality on its head. There is yet another reason to fear big government far more than big corporations. ExxonMobil has no police force, no IRS, no ability to arrest you, no ability to shut you up, and certainly no ability to kill you. ExxonMobil can’t knock on your door in the middle of the night and legally take you away. Apple Computer cannot take your money away without your consent, and it runs no prisons. The government does all of these things. Of course, the Left will respond that government also does good and that corporations and capitalists are, by their very nature, “greedy.” To which the rational response is that, of course, government also does good. But so do the vast majority of corporations, private citizens, church groups, and myriad voluntary associations. On the other hand, only big government can do anything approaching the monstrous evils of the last century. As for greed: Between hunger for money and hunger for power, the latter is incomparably more frightening. It is noteworthy that none of the twentieth century’s monsters — Lenin, Hitler, Stalin, Mao — were preoccupied with material gain. They loved power much more than money. And that is why the Left is much more frightening than the Right. It craves power.  Dennis Prager
What I found most interesting and provocative is Bottum’s thesis that although it seems that the moral core of modern American society has been entirely secularized, and religion and religious institutions play little role in shaping those views, in fact the watered-down gruel of moral views served up by elite establishment opinion (recycling, multiculturalism, and the like) is a remnant of the old collection of Protestant mainline views that dominated American society for decades or even centuries. To highlight the important sociological importance of religion in American society, Bottum uses the now-familiar metaphor of a three-legged stool in describing American society (one that I and others have used as well): a balance between constitutional democracy, free market capitalism, and a strong and vibrant web of civil society institutions where moral lessons are taught and social capital is built. In the United States, the most important civil society organizations traditionally have been family and churches. And, among the churches, by far the most important were those that Bottum deems as the “Protestant Mainline” — Episcopalian, Lutheran, Baptist (Northern), Methodist, Presbyterian, Congregationalist/United Church of Christ, etc. The data on changing membership in these churches is jaw-dropping. In 1965, for example, over half of the United States population claimed membership in one of the Protestant mainline churches. Today, by contrast, less than 10 percent of the population belongs to one of these churches. Moreover, those numbers are likely to continue to decline — the Protestant Mainline (“PM”) churches also sport the highest average age of any church group. Why does the suicide of the Protestant Mainline matter? Because for Bottum, these churches are what provided the sturdy third leg to balance politics and markets in making a good society. Indeed, Bottum sees the PM churches as the heart of American Exceptionalism — they provided the moral code of Americanism. Probity, responsibility, honesty, integrity — all the moral virtues that provided the bedrock of American society and also constrained the hydraulic and leveling tendencies of the state and market to devour spheres of private life. The collapse of this religious-moral consensus has been most pronounced among American elites, who have turned largely indifferent to formal religious belief. And in some leftist elite circles it has turned to outright hostility toward religion — Bottum reminds us of Barack Obama’s observation that rural Americans today cling to their “guns and Bibles” out of bitterness about changes in the world. Perhaps most striking is that anti-Catholic bigotry today is almost exclusively found on “the political Left, as it members rage about insidious Roman influence on the nation: the Catholic justices on the Supreme Court plotting to undo the abortion license, and the Catholic racists of the old rust belt states turning their backs on Obama to vote for Hillary Clinton in the 2008 Democratic primaries. Why is it no surprise that one of the last places in American Christianity to find good, old-fashioned anti-Catholicism is among the administrators of the dying Mainline…. They must be anti-Catholics precisely to the extent that they are also political leftists.” As the recent squabbles over compelling practicing Catholics to toe the new cultural line on same-sex marriage at the risk of losing their jobs or businesses, the political Left today is increasingly intolerant of recognizing a private sphere of belief outside of the crushing hand of political orthodoxy. Yet as Bottum notes, the traditional elite consensus has been replaced by a new spiritual orthodoxy of “morality.” The American elite (however defined) today does subscribe to a set of orthodoxies of what constitutes “proper” behavior: proper views on the environment, feminism, gay rights, etc. Thus, Bottum provocatively argues, the PM hasn’t gone away, it has simply evolved into a new form, a religion without God as it were, in which the Sierra club, universities, and Democratic Party have supplanted the Methodists and Presbyterians as the teachers of proper values. (…) Bottum points to the key moment as the emergence of the Social Gospel movement in the early 20th Century. Led by Walter Rauschenbusch, the Social Gospel movement reached beyond the traditional view that Christianity spoke to personal failings such as sin, but instead reached “the social sin of all mankind, to which all who ever lived have contributed, and under which all who ever lived have suffered.” As Bottum summarizes it, Rauschenbusch identified six social sins: “bigotry, the arrogance of power, the corruption of justice for personal ends, the madness [and groupthink] of the mob, militarism, and class contempt.” As religious belief moved from the pulpit and pew to the voting booth and activism, the role of Jesus and any religious belief became increasingly attenuated. And eventually, Bottum suggests, the political agenda itself came to overwhelm the increasingly irrelevant religious beliefs that initially supported it. Indeed, to again consider contemporary debates, what matters most is outward conformity to orthodox opinion, not persuasion and inward acceptance of a set of particular views–as best illustrated by the lynch mobs that attacked Brendan Eich for his political donations (his outward behavior) and to compel conformity of behavior among wedding cake bakers and the like, all of which bears little relation to (and in fact is likely counterproductive) to changing personal belief. (Of course, that too is an unstable equilibrium–in the future it won’t be sufficient to not merely not be politically opposed to same-sex marriage, it will be a litmus test to be affirmatively in favor of it.). Thus, while the modern elite appears to be largely non-religious, Bottum argues that they are the subconscious heirs to the old Protestant Mainline, but are merely Post-Protestant — the same demographic group of people holding more or less the same views and fighting the same battles as the advocates of the social gospel. In the second part of the book, Bottum turns to his second theme — the effort beginning around 2000 of Catholics and Evangelical Christians to form an alliance to create a new moral consensus to replace the void left by the collapse Protestant Mainline churches. Oversimplified, Bottum’s basic point is that this was an effort to marry the zeal and energy of Evangelical churches to the long, well-developed natural law theory of Catholicism, including Catholic social teaching. Again oversimplified, Bottum’s argument is that this effort was doomed on both sides of the equation–first, Catholicism is simply too dense and “foreign” to ever be a majoritarian church in the United States; and second, because evangelical Christianity itself has lost much of its vibrant nature. Bottum notes, which I hadn’t realized, that after years of rapid growth, evangelical Christianity appears to be in some decline in membership. Thus, the religious void remains. The obvious question with which one is left is if Bottum is correct that religious institutions uphold the third leg of the American stool, and if (as he claims) religion is the key to American exceptionalism, can America survive without a continued vibrant religious tradition? (…) Campus protests today, for example, often seem to be sort of a form of performance art, where the gestures of protest and being seen to “care” are ends in themselves, as often the protests themselves have goals that are somewhat incoherent (compared to, say, protests against the Vietnam War). Bottum describes this as a sort of spirtual angst, a vague discomfort with the way things are and an even vaguer desire for change. On this point I wonder whether he is being too generous to their motives. (…) But there is one thesis that he doesn’t consider that I think contributes much of the explanation of the decline of the importance of the Protestant Mainline, which is the thesis developed by Shelby Steele is his great book “White Guilt.” I think Steele’s argument provides the key to unlocking not only the decline of the Protestant Mainline but also the timing, and why the decline of the Protestant Mainline has been so much more precipitous than Evangelicals and Catholics, as well as why anti-Evangelical and anti-Catholic bigotry is so socially acceptable among liberal elites. Steele’s thesis, oversimplified, is that the elite institutions of American society for many years were complicit in a system that perpetrated injustices on many Americans. The government, large corporations, major universities, white-show law firms, fraternal organizations, etc.–the military being somewhat of an exception to this–all conspired explicitly or tacitly in a social system that supported first slavery then racial discrimination, inequality toward women, anti-Semitism, and other real injustices. Moreover, all of this came to a head in the 1960s, when these long-held and legitimate grievances bubbled to the surface and were finally recognized and acknowledged by those who ran these elite institutions and efforts were taken to remediate their harms. This complicity in America’s evils, Steele argues, discredited the moral authority of these institutions, leaving not only a vacuum at the heart of American society but an ongoing effort at their redemption. But, Steele argues, this is where things have become somewhat perverse. It wasn’t enough for, say, Coca-Cola to actually take steps to remediate its past sins, it was crucial for Coca-Cola to show that it was acknowledging its guilty legacy and, in particular, to demonstrate that it was now truly enlightened. But how to do that? Steele argues that this is the pivotal role played by hustlers like Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton — they can sell the indulgences to corporations, universities, and the other guilty institutions to allow them to demonstrate that they “understand” and accept their guilt and through bowing to Jackson’s demands, Jackson can give them a clean bill of moral health. Thus, Steele says that what is really going on is an effort by the leaders of these institutions to “dissociate” themselves from their troubled past and peer institutions today that lack the same degree of enlightenment. Moreover, it is crucially important that the Jackson’s of the world set the terms–indeed, the more absurd and ridiculous the penance the better from this perspective, because more ridiculous penances make it easier to demonstrate your acceptance of your guilt. One set of institutions that Steele does not address, but which fits perfectly into his thesis, is the Protestant Mainline churches that Bottum is describing. It is precisely because the Protestant Mainline churches were the moral backbone of American society that they were in need of the same sort of moral redemption that universities, corporations, and the government. Indeed, because of their claim to be the moral exemplar, their complicity in real injustice was especially bad. Much of the goofiness of the Mainline Protestant churches over the past couple of decades can be well-understood, I think, through this lens of efforts to dissociate themselves from their legacy and other less-enlightened churches. In short, it seems that often their religious dogma is reverse-engineered–they start from wanting to make sure that they hold the correct cutting-edge political and social views, then they retrofit a thin veil of religious belief over those social and political opinions. Such that their religious beliefs today, as far as one ever hears about them at all, differ little from the views of The New York Times editorial page. This also explains why Catholics and Evangelicals are so maddening, and threatening, to the modern elites. Unlike the Protestant Mainline churches that were the moral voice of the American establishment, Catholicism and Evangelicals have always been outsiders to the American establishment. Thus they bear none of the guilt of having supported unjust political and social systems and refuse to act like they do. They have no reason to kowtow to elite opinion and, indeed, are often quite populist in their worldview (consider the respect that Justices Scalia or Thomas have for the moral judgments of ordinary Americans on issues like abortion or same-sex marriage vs. the views of elites). Given the sorry record of American elites for decades, there is actually a dividing line between two world views. Modern elites believe that the entire American society was to blame, thus we all share guilt and must all seek forgiveness through affirmative action, compulsory sensitivity training, and recycling mandates. Others, notably Catholics and Evangelicals, refuse to accept blame for a social system that they played no role in creating or maintaining and which, in fact, they were excluded themselves. To some extent, therefore, I think that the often-remarked political fault line in American society along religious lines (which Bottum discusses extensively), is as much cultural and historical (in Steele’s sense) as disagreements over religion per se. At the same time, the decline of its moral authority hit the Protestant Mainline churches harder than well-entrenched universities, corporations, or the government, in part because the embrace of the Social Gospel had laid the foundations for their own obsolescence years before. This also explains why if a religious revival is to occur, it would come from the alliance of Catholics and Evangelicals that he describes in the second half of the book. Mainline Protestantism seems to simply lack the moral authority to revive itself and has essentially made itself obsolete. There appears to be little market for religions without God.
In the end, Bottum leaves us with no answer to his central question–can America, which for so long relied on the Protestant Mainline churches to provide a moral and institutional third leg to the country, survive without it. Can the thin gruel of the post-Protestant New York Times elite consensus provide the moral glue that used to hold the country together? Perhaps, or perhaps not — that is the question we are left with after reading Bottum’s fascinating book. Finally, (…) I wanted to call attention to Jody’s new essay at the Weekly Standard “The Spiritual Shape of Political Ideas” that touches on many of the themes of the book and develops them in light of ongoing controversies, especially on the parallels between the new moral consensus and traditional religious thinking (and, in fact, his comments on “original sin” strike me as similar to the points about Shelby Steele that I raised above).
Todd Zywicki
I was simply going to take up the fact that America was in essence a Protestant nation from its founding, from the arrival of the Puritans—and well, it’s a little more sophisticated than that, really from William and Mary on this was a Protestant country—and that we needed to sort of describe what Tocqueville called the main current of that. Now mainline is a word from much later, from the 1930s, but there always was a kind of main current of a general Protestantism. And I wanted to look at its political consequences and cultural consequences. However much the rival Protestant denominations feuded with one another, disagreed with one another, I thought they gave a tone to the nation. And one of the things that they did particularly from the Civil War on was constrain social and political demons. They corralled them. They gave a shape to America, which was the marriage culture, the shape of funerals, life and death, birth, the family. They gave a shape to the cultural and sociological condition of America. And it struck me at the time, so I followed up that essay on the death of Protestant America with a whole book. And then subsequently applying it to the political situation that I saw emerging then in a big cover story for The Weekly Standard, called “The Spiritual Shape of Political Ideas.” And in that kind of threefold push, I thought, “No one that I know is taking seriously the massive sociological change, perhaps the biggest in American history.” From 1965 when the Protestant churches, the mainline churches, by which I mean the founding churches in the National Council of Churches and the God box up on Riverside Drive—those churches, and their affiliated black churches, constituted or had membership that was just over fifty percent of America, as late as 1965. Today that number is well under 10 percent and that’s a huge sociological change that nobody to me seems to be paying sufficient attention to. (…) in (…) mainstream sociological discussions of America that just was not appearing as anything significant, and I thought it was profoundly significant and that the attempt of some of our neoconservative Catholic friends—and I was in the belly of that beast in those days—to substitute Catholicism for the failed American cultural pillar of the mainline Protestant churches—that project, interesting as it was, failed, and that consequently, I predicted, we were going to see ever-larger sociological and cultural and political upset. Because there was no turning these demons of the human condition into an understanding of their personal application. Instead they just became cultural. And I trace this move, perhaps unfairly, but I traced it to Rauschenbusch. And said when you say that it’s not individual sin, it’s social sin. And he lists six of them and they are exactly what the protestors are out in the street against right now. It’s what he called bigotry, which we used the word racism for, its militarism, its authoritarianism, and he names these six social sins and they are exactly the ones that the protesters are out against. But I said the trouble with Rauschenbusch, who was a believer—I think he was a serious Christian and profoundly biblically educated so that his speech was just ripe with biblical quotations—the problem with him is the subsequent generations don’t need the church anymore. They don’t need Jesus anymore. He thinks of Jesus—in the metaphor I use—for the social gospel movement as it developed into just the social movement. Christ is the ladder by which we climb to the new ledge of understanding, but once we’re on that ledge, we don’t need the ladder anymore. The logic of it is quite clear. We’ve reached this new height of moral and ethical understanding. Yes, thank you, Jesus Christ and the revelations taught it to us, but we’re there now. What need have we for a personal relationship with Jesus, what we need have we for a church? Having achieved this sentiment that knows that sin is these social constructs of destructiveness and our anxiety, the spiritual anxiety that human beings always feel, just by being human, is here answered. How do you know that you are saved today? You know that you are saved because you have the right attitude toward social sins. That’s how you know. Now they wouldn’t say saved; they would say, “How do you know you’re a good person?” But that’s just the logic. The logical pattern is the same. And I develop that in the essay, “The Spiritual Shape of Political Ideas” by analyzing as tightly as I could the way in which white guilt is original sin. It’s original sin divorced from the theology that let it make sense. But the pattern of internal logic is exactly the same. It produces the same need to find salvation. It produces the same need to know that you are good by knowing that you are bad. It produces the same logic by which Paul would say, “Before the law there was no sin.” It has all of the same patterns of reason, except as you pointed out in your introduction, there’s no atonement. It’s as though (…) we’re living in St. Augustine’s metaphysics, but with all the Christ stuff stripped out. It’s a dark world; it’s a grim world. We’re inherently guilty and there’s no salvation. There’s no escape from it. Except for the destruction of all. Which is why I then moved in that essay to talk about shunning in its modern forms, again divorced from the structures that once made it make sense, and apocalypse. The sense that we’re living at the end of the world and things are so terrible and so destructive that all the ordinary niceties of manners, of balancing judgment and so on, those are—if someone says, “We are destroying the planet and we’re all going to die unless you do what I want,” if I say, “Well we need to hear other voices,” they say, “That’s complicity with evil.” Right? The end of the world is coming; this is this apocalyptic imagination. Now all of that I think was once upon a time in America—and I’m speaking only politically and sociologically—all of that was corralled, or much of it was corralled in the churches. You were taught a frame to understand your dissatisfactions with the world. You were taught a frame to understand the horror, the metaphysical horror that is the fact (…) that you and I are going to die. You were taught this frame that made it bearable and made it possible to move somewhere with it. With the breaking of that, these demons are let loose and now they’re out there. I’ve often said (…) that the history of America since World War II is a history of a fourth Great Awakening that never quite happened. In a sense what I’ve seen for some years building and is now taking to the streets once again is the fourth Great Awakening except without the Christianity. I see in other words what’s happening out there as spiritual anxiety. But spiritual anxiety occurring in a world in which these people have no answer. They just have outrage. And it’s an escalating outrage. This is where the single most influential thinker in my thought—a modern thinker—is Rene Girard, and Rene Girard’s idea of the escalation of mimetic rivalry. The ways in which we get ever purer and we seek ever more tiny examples of evil that we can scapegoat and we enter into competition, this rivalry, to see who is more pure. This is exactly the motor, the Girardian motor, on which my idea of the spiritual anxiety runs. And so, statues of George Washington are coming down now. And once upon a time, in the generation that I grew up in, and the generation that you grew up in, George Washington was—there were things bad things to say about him—but this was tantamount to saying America was a mistake. And of course these people think America was a mistake, because they think the whole history of the world is a mistake. There’s this outrage. And the outrage I think is spiritual. And that’s why it doesn’t get answered when voices of calm reason say, “Well, let’s consider all sides. Yes, there were mistakes that were made and evils that were done, but let’s try to fix them.” Spiritual anxiety doesn’t get answered by, “Oh well, let’s fix something.” It gets answered by the flame. It gets answered by the looting. It gets answered by the tearing down. (…) But creation appears to us in concrete guises, and the concrete guise right now is America. So, this is why you’ll get praise of ancient civilizations. Or you get the historical insanity of a US senator standing up on the well of the Senate and saying America invented slavery, that there was no slavery before the United States. That’s historically insane, but it’s not unlearned because we’ve passed beyond ignorance here. There’s something willful about it. And that’s what’s extraordinary, I think. And yeah, I’m glad you look back to my 10-year-old book now because I think I did predict some of this, although obviously not in its particulars. But there was a warning there that the collapse of the mainline Protestant churches was going to introduce a demonic element into American life. And lo and behold, it has. (…) there are multiple questions there (…). Why Catholicism failed, why the evangelicals and Catholics together failed. So Catholicism by itself failed. The evangelicals and Catholics together project failed to provide this moral pillar to American discourse. And then there are a variety of reasons for that, beginning with the fact that Catholicism is an alien religion, alien to America. Jews and Catholics were more or less welcome to live here, but we understood that we lived on the banks of a great Mississippi of Protestantism that poured down the center of this country. But the question of why it failed is one thing. The question of why the mainline Protestant churches failed is yet another part of your question. And although I list several examples that people have offered, I don’t make a decision about that in part because I am a Catholic. I have a suspicion that Protestantism with a higher sense of personal salvation, but a less thick metaphysics, was more susceptible to the line of the social gospel movement. But I don’t know that for certain so in the book I’m merely presenting these possibilities. And then evangelicalism, Catholicism, was under attack for wounds, some of which it committed itself. Evangelicalism is in decline in America. The statistics show that this period when it seemed to be going from strength to strength may have been fueled most of all by the death of the mainline churches. They were just picking up those members. Instead of going to the Methodist Church, they were going to the Bible church out on the prairie. But regardless, that Christian discourse, that slightly secularized Christian discourse, that would allow Abraham Lincoln to make his speeches, that would provide the background to political rhetoric and so on, that’s all gone. And as a consequence, it seems to me we don’t have a shared culture and that’s part of what allows these protests. But also I think (…) a culture that no longer believes in itself, that no longer has horizons, and targets, and goals, that no longer has even the vaguest sense of a telos towards which we ought to move, a culture like that, if we look at it, we no longer have a measure of progress. We can’t say what an advance is along the way. All we can do is look at our history and see it as a catalog of crimes that we perpetrated in order to reach this point that we’re at. And we can’t see the good that came out of it. Because we don’t know what the good is, we don’t know what the telos is, the target, so we have no measure for that. So, we can’t celebrate the Civil War victory that ended slavery. All we can do is condemn slavery. We can’t celebrate the victory over the Nazis. We have to end World War II; all we can do is decry militarism and the crimes we committed to win that war, like the firebombing of Dresden, or  Hiroshima. And I think that that reasoning is quite exact because the young people that I hear speak—now I haven’t spent as much time on this as I perhaps should have, following the ins and outs of every protestor alive today—but what I’ve heard suggests that they condemn America to the core—the whole of America, of American history. There is nothing good about this nation. And there it seems to me the reasoning is quite exact. Unable to see a point to America, unable to see a goal. They are quite right that all they can see are the crimes. Whereas you and I are capable of saying, yes slavery was a great sin, and we got over it, and then the post-reconstruction settlement of Jim Crow was a great sin, but we got over it, and we still are committing sins to this day but the optimism of America is that we’ll get over it, we will find solutions to these because we feel that we are a city on a hill. We feel that we are heading somewhere. The telos may be vague, maybe inchoate, but its pull is real for people like you and me, Mark. These young people—who, I think partly because they’ve been systematically miss-educated—don’t have any feeling for that at all. And because they don’t, I think they are actually being quite rational in saying America is just evil, it’s a history of sin. (…) I think it’ll pass. These things pass. There are various rages that take to the streets, but they are to some degree victims of their own energy. They burn out, and I think this one will burn out. The thing that we are not seeing now—in fact we’re seeing the opposite—is someone standing up to them. The New York Times firing of its op-ed page editor over publication of an op-ed from a sitting US senator is really quite extraordinary if we think about it. But I don’t believe institutions can survive if they pander in this way. And I think eventually we’ll get one standing up. I haven’t heard yet from the publisher of J.K. Rowling, the Harry Potter author, who the staff of her publishing house has declared themselves unwilling to work at a publisher that would publish a woman with such reprobate views of transgenderism. If the publisher doesn’t stand up to her, I think we may be in for another year of this. But I have a feeling she sells so well, that I don’t believe the publisher is going to give in. And if we have one person saying “That’s interesting, but if you can’t work here, you can’t work here, goodbye.” The first time we see that and they survived the subsequent Twitter outrage, I think we’ll see an end to the current cancel culture, which is of course the most insidious of the general social—the burning and the breaking of statues is physical, but the most destructive cultural thing right now is the cancel culture that gets people fired and their relatives fired and the rest of it. I think that has to end and I imagine it will, the first time somebody stands up to them and survives. Joseph Bottum
Quand j’ai écrit mon livre, je suis retourné à Max Weber et à Alexis de Tocqueville, car tous deux avaient identifié l’importance fondamentale de l’anxiété spirituelle que nous éprouvons tous. Il me semble qu’à la fin du XXe siècle et au début du XXIe siècle, nous avons oublié la centralité de cette anxiété, de ces démons ou anges spirituels qui nous habitent. Ils nous gouvernent de manière profondément dangereuse. Norman Mailer a dit un jour que toute la sociologie américaine avait été un effort désespéré pour essayer de dire quelque chose sur l’Amérique que Tocqueville n’avait pas dit! C’est vrai! Tocqueville avait saisi l’importance du fait religieux et de la panoplie des Églises protestantes qui ont défini la nation américaine. Il a montré que malgré leur nombre innombrable et leurs querelles, elles étaient parvenues à s’unir pour être ce qu’il appelait joliment «le courant central des manières et de la morale». Quelles que soient les empoignades entre anglicans épiscopaliens et congrégationalistes, entre congrégationalistes et presbytériens, entre presbytériens et baptistes, les protestants se sont combinés pour donner une forme à nos vies: celle des mariages, des baptêmes et des funérailles ; des familles, et même de la politique, en cela même que le protestantisme ne cesse d’affirmer qu’il y a quelque chose de plus important que la politique. Ce modèle a perduré jusqu’au milieu des années 1960. (…) Pour moi, c’est avant tout le mouvement de l’Évangile social qui a gagné les Églises protestantes, qui est à la racine de l’effondrement. Dans mon livre, je consacre deux chapitres à Walter Rauschenbusch, la figure clé. Mais il faut comprendre que le déclin des Églises européennes a aussi joué. L’une des sources d’autorité des Églises américaines venait de l’influence de théologiens européens éminents comme Wolfhart Pannenberg ou l’ancien premier ministre néerlandais Abraham Kuyper, esprit d’une grande profondeur qui venait souvent à Princeton donner des conférences devant des milliers de participants! Mais ils n’ont pas été remplacés. Le résultat de tout cela, c’est que l’Église protestante américaine a connu un déclin catastrophique. En 1965, 50 % des Américains appartenaient à l’une des 8 Églises protestantes dominantes. Aujourd’hui, ce chiffre s’établit à 4 %! Cet effondrement est le changement sociologique le plus fondamental des 50 dernières années, mais personne n’en parle. Une partie de ces protestants ont migré vers les Églises chrétiennes évangéliques, qui dans les années 1970, sous Jimmy Carter, ont émergé comme force politique. On a vu également un nombre surprenant de conversions au catholicisme, surtout chez les intellectuels. Mais la majorité sont devenus ce que j’appelle dans mon livre des «post-protestants», ce qui nous amène au décryptage des événements d’aujourd’hui. Ces post-protestants se sont approprié une série de thèmes empruntés à l’Évangile social de Walter Rauschenbusch. Quand vous reprenez les péchés sociaux qu’il faut selon lui rejeter pour accéder à une forme de rédemption – l’intolérance, le pouvoir, le militarisme, l’oppression de classe… vous retrouvez exactement les thèmes que brandissent les gens qui mettent aujourd’hui le feu à Portland et d’autres villes. Ce sont les post-protestants. Ils se sont juste débarrassés de Dieu! Quand je dis à mes étudiants qu’ils sont les héritiers de leurs grands-parents protestants, ils sont offensés. Mais ils ont exactement la même approche moralisatrice et le même sens exacerbé de leur importance, la même condescendance et le même sentiment de supériorité exaspérante et ridicule, que les protestants exprimaient notamment vis-à-vis des catholiques. (…) Mais ils ne le savent pas. En fait, l’état de l’Amérique a été toujours lié à l’état de la religion protestante. Les catholiques se sont fait une place mais le protestantisme a été le Mississippi qui a arrosé le pays. Et c’est toujours le cas! C’est juste que nous avons maintenant une Église du Christ sans le Christ. Cela veut dire qu’il n’y a pas de pardon possible. Dans la religion chrétienne, le péché originel est l’idée que vous êtes né coupable, que l’humanité hérite d’une tache qui corrompt nos désirs et nos actions. Mais le Christ paie les dettes du péché originel, nous en libérant. Si vous enlevez le Christ du tableau en revanche, vous obtenez… la culpabilité blanche et le racisme systémique. Bien sûr, les jeunes radicaux n’utilisent pas le mot «péché originel». Mais ils utilisent exactement les termes qui s’y appliquent. (…) Ils parlent d’«une tache reçue en héritage» qui «infecte votre esprit». C’est une idée très dangereuse, que les Églises canalisaient autrefois. Mais aujourd’hui que cette idée s’est échappée de l’Église, elle a gagné la rue et vous avez des meutes de post-protestants qui parcourent Washington DC, en s’en prenant à des gens dans des restaurants pour exiger d’eux qu’ils lèvent le poing. Leur conviction que l’Amérique est intrinsèquement corrompue par l’esclavage et n’a réalisé que le Mal, n’est pas enracinée dans des faits que l’on pourrait discuter, elle relève de la croyance religieuse. On exclut ceux qui ne se soumettent pas. On dérive vers une vision apocalyptique du monde qui n’est plus équilibrée par rien d’autre. Cela peut donner la pire forme d’environnementalisme, par exemple, parce que toutes les autres dimensions sont disqualifiées au nom de «la fin du monde». C’est l’idée chrétienne de l’apocalypse, mais dégagée du christianisme. Il y a des douzaines d’exemples de religiosité visibles dans le comportement des protestataires: ils s’allongent par terre face au sol et gémissent, comme des prêtres que l’on consacre dans l’Église catholique. Ils ont organisé une cérémonie à Portland durant laquelle ils ont lavé les pieds de personnes noires pour montrer leur repentir pour la culpabilité blanche. Ils s’agenouillent. Tout cela sans savoir que c’est religieux! C’est religieux parce que l’humanité est religieuse. Il y a une faim spirituelle à l’intérieur de nous, qui se manifeste de différentes manières, y compris la violence! Ces gens veulent un monde qui ait un sens, et ils ne l’ont pas. (…) Le marxisme est une religion par analogie. Certes, il porte cette idée d’une nouvelle naissance. Certaines personnes voulaient des certitudes et ne les trouvant plus dans leurs Églises, ils sont allés vers le marxisme. Mais en Amérique, c’est différent, car tout est centré sur le protestantisme. Dans L’Éthique protestante et l’esprit du capitalisme, Max Weber, avec génie et insolence, prend Marx et le met cul par-dessus tête. Marx avait dit que le protestantisme avait émergé à la faveur de changements économiques. Weber dit l’inverse. Ce n’est pas l’économie qui a transformé la religion, c’est la religion qui a transformé l’économie. Le protestantisme nous a donné le capitalisme, pas l’inverse! Parce que les puritains devaient épargner de l’argent pour assurer leur salut. Le ressort principal n’était pas l’économie mais la faim spirituelle, ce sentiment beaucoup plus profond, selon Weber. Une faim spirituelle a mené les gens vers le marxisme, et c’est la même faim spirituelle qui fait qu’ils sont dans les rues d’Amérique aujourd’hui. (…) Je n’ai pas voté pour Trump. Bien que conservateur, je fais partie des «Never Trumpers». Mais je vois potentiellement une guerre civile à feu doux éclater si Trump gagne cette élection! Car les parties sont polarisées sur le plan spirituel. Si Trump gagne, pour les gens qui sont dans la rue, ce ne sera pas le triomphe des républicains, mais celui du mal. Rauschenbusch, dans son Évangile, dit que nous devons accomplir la rédemption de notre personnalité. Ces gens-là veulent être sûrs d’être de «bonnes personnes». Ils savent qu’ils sont de bonnes personnes s’ils sont opposés au racisme. Ils pensent être de bonnes personnes parce qu’ils sont opposés à la destruction de l’environnement. Ils veulent avoir la bonne «attitude», c’est la raison pour laquelle ceux qui n’ont pas la bonne attitude sont expulsés de leurs universités ou de leur travail pour des raisons dérisoires. Avant, on était exclu de l’Église, aujourd’hui, on est exclu de la vie publique… C’est pour cela que les gens qui soutiennent Trump, sont vus comme des «déplorables», comme disait Hillary Clinton, c’est-à-dire des gens qui ne peuvent être rachetés. Ils ont leur bible et leur fusil et ne suivent pas les commandements de la justice sociale. (…) Avant même que Trump ne surgisse, avec Sarah Palin, et même sous Reagan, on a vu émerger à droite le sentiment que tout ce que faisaient les républicains pour l’Amérique traditionnelle, c’était ralentir sa disparition. Il y avait une immense exaspération car toute cette Amérique avait le sentiment que son mode de vie était fondamentalement menacé par les démocrates. Reagan est arrivé et a dit: «Je vais m’y opposer». Et voilà que Trump arrive et dit à son tour qu’il va dire non à tout ça. Je déteste le fait que Trump occupe cet espace, parce qu’il est vulgaire et insupportable. Mais il est vrai que tous ceux qui s’étaient sentis marginalisés ont voté pour Trump parce qu’il s’est mis en travers de la route. C’est d’ailleurs ce que leur dit Trump: «Ils n’en ont pas après moi, mais après vous.» Il faut comprendre que l’idéologie «woke» de la justice sociale a pénétré les institutions américaines à un point incroyable. Je n’imagine pas qu’un professeur ayant une chaire à la Sorbonne soit forcé d’assister à des classes obligatoires organisées pour le corps professoral sur leur «culpabilité blanche», et enseignées par des gens qui viennent à peine de finir le collège. Mais c’est la réalité des universités américaines. Un sondage récent a montré que la majorité des professeurs d’université ne disent rien. Ils abandonnent plutôt toute mention de tout sujet controversé. Pourtant, des études ont montré que la foule des vigies de Twitter qui obtient la tête des professeurs excommuniés, remplirait à peine la moitié d’un terrain de football universitaire! Il y a un manque de courage. (…) La France a fait beaucoup de choses bonnes et glorieuses pour faire avancer la civilisation, mais elle a fait du mal. Si on croit au projet historique français, on peut démêler le bien du mal. Mais mes étudiants, et tous ces post-protestants dont je vous parle, sont absolument convaincus que tous les gens qui ont précédé, étaient stupides et sans doute maléfiques. Ils ne croient plus au projet historique américain. Ils sont contre les «affinités électives» qui, selon Weber, nous ont donné la modernité: la science, le capitalisme, l’État-nation. Si la théorie de la physique de Newton, Principia, est un manuel de viol, comme l’a dit une universitaire féministe, si sa physique est l’invention d’un moyen de violer le monde, cela veut dire que la science est mauvaise. Si vous êtes soupçonneux de la science, du capitalisme, du protestantisme, si vous rejetez tous les moteurs de la modernité la seule chose qui reste, ce sont les péchés qui nous ont menés là où nous sommes. Pour sûr, nous en avons commis. Mais si on ne voit pas que ça, il n’y a plus d’échappatoire, plus de projet. Ce qui passe aujourd’hui est différent de 1968 en France, quand la remise en cause a finalement été absorbée dans quelque chose de plus large. Le mouvement actuel ne peut être absorbé car il vise à défaire les États-Unis dans ses fondements: l’État-nation, le capitalisme et la religion protestante. Mais comme les États-Unis n’ont pas d’histoire prémoderne, nous ne pouvons absorber un mouvement vraiment antimoderne. (…) Il y a une phrase de Heidegger qui dit que «seulement un Dieu pourrait nous sauver»! On a le sentiment qu’on est aux prémices d’une apocalypse, d’une guerre civile, d’une grande destruction de la modernité. Est-ce à cause de la trahison des clercs? Pour moi, l’incapacité des vieux libéraux à faire rempart contre les jeunes radicaux, est aujourd’hui le grand danger. Quand j’ai vu que de jeunes journalistes du New York Times avaient menacé de partir, parce qu’un responsable éditorial avait publié une tribune d’un sénateur américain qui leur déplaisait, j’ai été stupéfait. Je suis assez vieux pour savoir que dans le passé, la direction aurait immédiatement dit à ces jeunes journalistes de prendre la porte s’ils n’étaient pas contents. Mais ce qui s’est passé, c’est que le rédacteur en chef a été limogé. Joseph Bottum

C’est ce qui reste du christianisme quand on a tout oublié, imbécile !

Racisme d’état, racisé, cisgenre/cishet, blantriarcat, privilège blanc, appropriation culturelle, larmes blanches, larmes males, biais de confirmation, woke…

A l’heure où après des mois d’émeutes et de casse et l’inévitable retour de bâton et remontée de leur Trump honni dans les sondages …

Les nouveaux protestants de Black lives matter en sont, signe des temps, à effacer leur profession de foi sur leur site …

Mais où leur vocabulaire semble en train d’entrer dans la langue courante …

Tandis que, de la part des médias dits sérieux, tout est bon pour discréditer le catholicisme de la candidate du président Tump pour remplacer une juge de la Cour suprême récemment décédée …

Comment ne pas voir …

Avec le spécialiste du phénomène religieux en politique et girardien Joseph Bottum

Entre iconoclasme, génuflexions, auto-flagellations, lavements des pieds, liturgie, procession, croisades, inquisition, textes sacrés, tabous, catéchisme, dogmatisme, moralisme, excommunications, saints, martyrs…

La dimension proprement religieuse de, pour reprendre le mot attribué à Bebel pour l’antisémitisme en ces temps de décérébration universitaire, cette sorte de « christianisme des imbéciles » …

Suite au fait sociologique central mais sous-estimé des 50 dernières années …

De l’effondrement, à partir du milieu des années 1960, du modèle et socle commun fait de mariages, baptêmes, funérailles, familles et politique, que leur avaient légué les églises protestantes américaines …

Et son remplacement, à partir du mouvement de l’Évangile social d’un Walter Rauschenbusch, par une sorte de version sécularisée que n’ont que compensé partiellement les églises évangéliques et catholique…

Avec ses péchés sociaux à rejeter pour accéder à la rédemption que seraient l’intolérance, le pouvoir, le militarisme, l’oppression de classe…

Sauf que derrière ce « Mississippi protestant qui avait arrosé le pays’, c’est en fait de Dieu qu’ils se sont  débarrassés …

Via la sanctification de l’ultime victime du péché originel de l’esclavage, à savoir les noirs …

D’où leur reprise – ô combien transparente et significative – du terme d’argot noir « woke » …

Pour apporter à l’Amérique et au monde une sorte de quatrième Grand Réveil comme l’Amérique les multiplie depuis le milieu du 19e siècle …

Sauf que derrière cette nouvelle église du Christ sans le Christ, il n’y a plus de pardon possible …

Que l’indécrottable péché originel, derrière l’impardonnable privilège blanc, de la culpabilité blanche et du racisme systémique…

Et in fine, libérée du cadre des églises qui avaient autrefois canalisé cette sainte colère, que l’escalade, proprement mimétique, de la course à la pureté idéologique que l’on voit actuellment dans leurs rues et déjà en partie dans les nôtres …

Autrement dit, jusqu’à ce que pourrait peut-être y mettre fin la réaction de la majorité silencieuse que comme nombre de Never-Trumpers, Bottum se refuse à voir derrière la vulgarité d’un Trump …

La démolition pure et simple, entrevue déjà par Malraux comme Girard, de l’essentiel de la culture et du projet non seulement américain mais occidental …

Et donc l’ouverture, derrière cette remise en cause de toutes valeurs partagées et but commun, à la guerre civile  ?

« La passion religieuse a échappé au protestantisme et met le feu à la politique »

GRAND ENTRETIEN – Professeur à l’université du Dakota du Sud, Joseph Bottum est essayiste et spécialiste du phénomène religieux en politique. Il offre un éclairage saisissant sur les élections américaines, dont il craint qu’elles ne dégénèrent en guerre civile si Trump est réélu.
Laure Mandeville
Le Figaro
24 septembre 2020

Dans son livre An Anxious Rage, the Post-Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of America, écrit il y a six ans, il explique qu’on ne peut comprendre la fureur idéologique qui s’est emparée de l’Amérique, si on ne s’intéresse pas à la centralité du fait religieux et à l’effondrement du protestantisme, «ce Mississippi» qui a arrosé et façonné si longtemps la culture américaine et ses mœurs.

Bottum décrit la marque laissée par le protestantisme à travers l’émergence de ce qu’il appelle les «post-protestants», ces nouveaux puritains sans Dieu qui pratiquent la religion de la culture «woke» et de la justice sociale, et rejettent le projet américain dans son intégralité. Il voit à l’œuvre une entreprise de «destruction de la modernité» sur laquelle sont fondés les États-Unis.

LE FIGARO. – Dans votre livre An Anxious Age, vous revenez sur l’importance fondamentale du protestantisme pour comprendre les États-Unis et vous expliquez que son effondrement a été le fait sociologique central, mais sous-estimé, des 50 dernières années. Vous dites que ce déclin a débouché sur l’émergence d’un post-protestantisme qui est un nouveau puritanisme sans Dieu, qui explique la rage quasi-religieuse qui s’exprime dans les rues du pays. De quoi s’agit-il?

Joseph BOTTUM. –Quand j’ai écrit mon livre, je suis retourné à Max Weber et à Alexis de Tocqueville, car tous deux avaient identifié l’importance fondamentale de l’anxiété spirituelle que nous éprouvons tous. Il me semble qu’à la fin du XXe siècle et au début du XXIe siècle, nous avons oublié la centralité de cette anxiété, de ces démons ou anges spirituels qui nous habitent. Ils nous gouvernent de manière profondément dangereuse. Norman Mailer a dit un jour que toute la sociologie américaine avait été un effort désespéré pour essayer de dire quelque chose sur l’Amérique que Tocqueville n’avait pas dit! C’est vrai! Tocqueville avait saisi l’importance du fait religieux et de la panoplie des Églises protestantes qui ont défini la nation américaine. Il a montré que malgré leur nombre innombrable et leurs querelles, elles étaient parvenues à s’unir pour être ce qu’il appelait joliment «le courant central des manières et de la morale». Quelles que soient les empoignades entre anglicans épiscopaliens et congrégationalistes, entre congrégationalistes et presbytériens, entre presbytériens et baptistes, les protestants se sont combinés pour donner une forme à nos vies: celle des mariages, des baptêmes et des funérailles ; des familles, et même de la politique, en cela même que le protestantisme ne cesse d’affirmer qu’il y a quelque chose de plus important que la politique. Ce modèle a perduré jusqu’au milieu des années 1960.

Qu’est-ce qui a précipité le déclin du protestantisme? La libération des mœurs des années 1960, l’émergence de la théologie de la justice sociale?

Pour moi, c’est avant tout le mouvement de l’Évangile social qui a gagné les Églises protestantes, qui est à la racine de l’effondrement. Dans mon livre, je consacre deux chapitres à Walter Rauschenbusch, la figure clé. Mais il faut comprendre que le déclin des Églises européennes a aussi joué. L’une des sources d’autorité des Églises américaines venait de l’influence de théologiens européens éminents comme Wolfhart Pannenberg ou l’ancien premier ministre néerlandais Abraham Kuyper, esprit d’une grande profondeur qui venait souvent à Princeton donner des conférences devant des milliers de participants! Mais ils n’ont pas été remplacés. Le résultat de tout cela, c’est que l’Église protestante américaine a connu un déclin catastrophique. En 1965, 50 % des Américains appartenaient à l’une des 8 Églises protestantes dominantes. Aujourd’hui, ce chiffre s’établit à 4 %! Cet effondrement est le changement sociologique le plus fondamental des 50 dernières années, mais personne n’en parle.

Une partie de ces protestants ont migré vers les Églises chrétiennes évangéliques, qui dans les années 1970, sous Jimmy Carter, ont émergé comme force politique. On a vu également un nombre surprenant de conversions au catholicisme, surtout chez les intellectuels. Mais la majorité sont devenus ce que j’appelle dans mon livre des «post-protestants», ce qui nous amène au décryptage des événements d’aujourd’hui. Ces post-protestants se sont approprié une série de thèmes empruntés à l’Évangile social de Walter Rauschenbusch. Quand vous reprenez les péchés sociaux qu’il faut selon lui rejeter pour accéder à une forme de rédemption – l’intolérance, le pouvoir, le militarisme, l’oppression de classe… vous retrouvez exactement les thèmes que brandissent les gens qui mettent aujourd’hui le feu à Portland et d’autres villes. Ce sont les post-protestants. Ils se sont juste débarrassés de Dieu! Quand je dis à mes étudiants qu’ils sont les héritiers de leurs grands-parents protestants, ils sont offensés. Mais ils ont exactement la même approche moralisatrice et le même sens exacerbé de leur importance, la même condescendance et le même sentiment de supériorité exaspérante et ridicule, que les protestants exprimaient notamment vis-à-vis des catholiques.

La génération «woke» est une nouvelle version du puritanisme?

Absolument! Mais ils ne le savent pas. En fait, l’état de l’Amérique a été toujours lié à l’état de la religion protestante. Les catholiques se sont fait une place mais le protestantisme a été le Mississippi qui a arrosé le pays. Et c’est toujours le cas! C’est juste que nous avons maintenant une Église du Christ sans le Christ. Cela veut dire qu’il n’y a pas de pardon possible. Dans la religion chrétienne, le péché originel est l’idée que vous êtes né coupable, que l’humanité hérite d’une tache qui corrompt nos désirs et nos actions. Mais le Christ paie les dettes du péché originel, nous en libérant. Si vous enlevez le Christ du tableau en revanche, vous obtenez… la culpabilité blanche et le racisme systémique. Bien sûr, les jeunes radicaux n’utilisent pas le mot «péché originel». Mais ils utilisent exactement les termes qui s’y appliquent.

Ils parlent d’«une tache reçue en héritage» qui «infecte votre esprit». C’est une idée très dangereuse, que les Églises canalisaient autrefois. Mais aujourd’hui que cette idée s’est échappée de l’Église, elle a gagné la rue et vous avez des meutes de post-protestants qui parcourent Washington DC, en s’en prenant à des gens dans des restaurants pour exiger d’eux qu’ils lèvent le poing. Leur conviction que l’Amérique est intrinsèquement corrompue par l’esclavage et n’a réalisé que le Mal, n’est pas enracinée dans des faits que l’on pourrait discuter, elle relève de la croyance religieuse. On exclut ceux qui ne se soumettent pas. On dérive vers une vision apocalyptique du monde qui n’est plus équilibrée par rien d’autre. Cela peut donner la pire forme d’environnementalisme, par exemple, parce que toutes les autres dimensions sont disqualifiées au nom de «la fin du monde».

C’est l’idée chrétienne de l’apocalypse, mais dégagée du christianisme. Il y a des douzaines d’exemples de religiosité visibles dans le comportement des protestataires: ils s’allongent par terre face au sol et gémissent, comme des prêtres que l’on consacre dans l’Église catholique. Ils ont organisé une cérémonie à Portland durant laquelle ils ont lavé les pieds de personnes noires pour montrer leur repentir pour la culpabilité blanche. Ils s’agenouillent. Tout cela sans savoir que c’est religieux! C’est religieux parce que l’humanité est religieuse. Il y a une faim spirituelle à l’intérieur de nous, qui se manifeste de différentes manières, y compris la violence! Ces gens veulent un monde qui ait un sens, et ils ne l’ont pas.

Les post-protestants peuvent-ils être comparés aux nihilistes russes qui cherchaient aussi un sens dans la lutte révolutionnaire et le marxisme?

Oui et non. Le marxisme est une religion par analogie. Certes, il porte cette idée d’une nouvelle naissance. Certaines personnes voulaient des certitudes et ne les trouvant plus dans leurs Églises, ils sont allés vers le marxisme. Mais en Amérique, c’est différent, car tout est centré sur le protestantisme. Dans L’Éthique protestante et l’esprit du capitalisme, Max Weber, avec génie et insolence, prend Marx et le met cul par-dessus tête. Marx avait dit que le protestantisme avait émergé à la faveur de changements économiques. Weber dit l’inverse. Ce n’est pas l’économie qui a transformé la religion, c’est la religion qui a transformé l’économie. Le protestantisme nous a donné le capitalisme, pas l’inverse! Parce que les puritains devaient épargner de l’argent pour assurer leur salut. Le ressort principal n’était pas l’économie mais la faim spirituelle, ce sentiment beaucoup plus profond, selon Weber. Une faim spirituelle a mené les gens vers le marxisme, et c’est la même faim spirituelle qui fait qu’ils sont dans les rues d’Amérique aujourd’hui.

Une faim spirituelle a mené les gens vers le marxisme, et c’est la même faim spirituelle qui fait qu’ils sont dans les rues d’Amérique aujourd’hui.

Trump se présente comme le protecteur du projet américain, ses adversaires le diabolisent… Comment jugez-vous la tournure religieuse prise par la campagne?

Je n’ai pas voté pour Trump. Bien que conservateur, je fais partie des «Never Trumpers». Mais je vois potentiellement une guerre civile à feu doux éclater si Trump gagne cette élection! Car les parties sont polarisées sur le plan spirituel. Si Trump gagne, pour les gens qui sont dans la rue, ce ne sera pas le triomphe des républicains, mais celui du mal. Rauschenbusch, dans son Évangile, dit que nous devons accomplir la rédemption de notre personnalité. Ces gens-là veulent être sûrs d’être de «bonnes personnes». Ils savent qu’ils sont de bonnes personnes s’ils sont opposés au racisme. Ils pensent être de bonnes personnes parce qu’ils sont opposés à la destruction de l’environnement. Ils veulent avoir la bonne «attitude», c’est la raison pour laquelle ceux qui n’ont pas la bonne attitude sont expulsés de leurs universités ou de leur travail pour des raisons dérisoires. Avant, on était exclu de l’Église, aujourd’hui, on est exclu de la vie publique… C’est pour cela que les gens qui soutiennent Trump, sont vus comme des «déplorables», comme disait Hillary Clinton, c’est-à-dire des gens qui ne peuvent être rachetés. Ils ont leur bible et leur fusil et ne suivent pas les commandements de la justice sociale.

Trump a-t-il gagné en 2016 parce qu’il s’est dressé contre ce nouveau catéchisme?

Avant même que Trump ne surgisse, avec Sarah Palin, et même sous Reagan, on a vu émerger à droite le sentiment que tout ce que faisaient les républicains pour l’Amérique traditionnelle, c’était ralentir sa disparition. Il y avait une immense exaspération car toute cette Amérique avait le sentiment que son mode de vie était fondamentalement menacé par les démocrates. Reagan est arrivé et a dit: «Je vais m’y opposer». Et voilà que Trump arrive et dit à son tour qu’il va dire non à tout ça. Je déteste le fait que Trump occupe cet espace, parce qu’il est vulgaire et insupportable. Mais il est vrai que tous ceux qui s’étaient sentis marginalisés ont voté pour Trump parce qu’il s’est mis en travers de la route. C’est d’ailleurs ce que leur dit Trump: «Ils n’en ont pas après moi, mais après vous.» Il faut comprendre que l’idéologie «woke» de la justice sociale a pénétré les institutions américaines à un point incroyable. Je n’imagine pas qu’un professeur ayant une chaire à la Sorbonne soit forcé d’assister à des classes obligatoires organisées pour le corps professoral sur leur «culpabilité blanche», et enseignées par des gens qui viennent à peine de finir le collège. Mais c’est la réalité des universités américaines.

Un sondage récent a montré que la majorité des professeurs d’université ne disent rien. Ils abandonnent plutôt toute mention de tout sujet controversé. Pourtant, des études ont montré que la foule des vigies de Twitter qui obtient la tête des professeurs excommuniés, remplirait à peine la moitié d’un terrain de football universitaire! Il y a un manque de courage.

Vous dites qu’à cause de la disparition des Églises, il n’y a plus de valeurs partagées et donc plus de but commun. Cela explique-t-il la remise en cause du projet américain lui-même?

La France a fait beaucoup de choses bonnes et glorieuses pour faire avancer la civilisation, mais elle a fait du mal. Si on croit au projet historique français, on peut démêler le bien du mal. Mais mes étudiants, et tous ces post-protestants dont je vous parle, sont absolument convaincus que tous les gens qui ont précédé, étaient stupides et sans doute maléfiques. Ils ne croient plus au projet historique américain. Ils sont contre les «affinités électives» qui, selon Weber, nous ont donné la modernité: la science, le capitalisme, l’État-nation. Si la théorie de la physique de Newton, Principia, est un manuel de viol, comme l’a dit une universitaire féministe, si sa physique est l’invention d’un moyen de violer le monde, cela veut dire que la science est mauvaise. Si vous êtes soupçonneux de la science, du capitalisme, du protestantisme, si vous rejetez tous les moteurs de la modernité la seule chose qui reste, ce sont les péchés qui nous ont menés là où nous sommes. Pour sûr, nous en avons commis. Mais si on ne voit pas que ça, il n’y a plus d’échappatoire, plus de projet. Ce qui passe aujourd’hui est différent de 1968 en France, quand la remise en cause a finalement été absorbée dans quelque chose de plus large. Le mouvement actuel ne peut être absorbé car il vise à défaire les États-Unis dans ses fondements: l’État-nation, le capitalisme et la religion protestante. Mais comme les États-Unis n’ont pas d’histoire prémoderne, nous ne pouvons absorber un mouvement vraiment antimoderne.

Comment sort-on de cette impasse?

Je n’en sais rien. Il y a une phrase de Heidegger qui dit que «seulement un Dieu pourrait nous sauver»! On a le sentiment qu’on est aux prémices d’une apocalypse, d’une guerre civile, d’une grande destruction de la modernité. Est-ce à cause de la trahison des clercs? Pour moi, l’incapacité des vieux libéraux à faire rempart contre les jeunes radicaux, est aujourd’hui le grand danger. Quand j’ai vu que de jeunes journalistes du New York Times avaient menacé de partir, parce qu’un responsable éditorial avait publié une tribune d’un sénateur américain qui leur déplaisait, j’ai été stupéfait. Je suis assez vieux pour savoir que dans le passé, la direction aurait immédiatement dit à ces jeunes journalistes de prendre la porte s’ils n’étaient pas contents. Mais ce qui s’est passé, c’est que le rédacteur en chef a été limogé.

Voir aussi:

America amid Spiritual Anxiety: A Conversation with Joseph Bottum
Mark Tooley & Joseph Bottum
Providence
June 19, 2020

Here’s my interview with Jody Bottum, author of An Anxious Age: The Post-Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of America, who applies his insights about post-Protestant America to contemporary protests.

Bottum theorizes that Mainline Protestantism’s collapse left a spiritual vacuum in American culture that loosed myriad social demons. Post-Protestantism wants to wage war on social sins, but not personal sins. It identifies redemption with having politically correct opinions. And it finds sanctification in denouncing others who lack its spiritual and political insights.

Of course, the post-Protestant theory of salvation is not satisfying, which leads to despair and deconstruction. From its perspective, absent Providence and eschatology, there is no destination, which potentially leads to destruction and nihilism. Bottum warns that a society without a shared culture cannot measure progress or purpose and no longer believes in itself, causing it to see its history as a long list of crimes.

Bottum published his book six years ago, yet its message is so timely today.


Rough Transcript of the Conversation:

TOOLEY: Hello, this is Mark Tooley, president of the Institute on Religion and Democracy here in Washington, DC, and also editor of Providence, a journal of Christianity and American foreign policy. Today I have the great pleasure of conversing with Jody Bottum, whose important book, of, I believe six years ago, called An Anxious Age, has a great application to contemporary events in terms of where America is spiritually and how we’re responding to today’s protests. So, I’m going to ask Jody to expound on that topic. But it’s a great pleasure to talk with you again, Jody.

BOTTUM: Thanks for having me, Mark.

TOOLEY: Well as I mentioned, your book An Anxious Age—and I need to recall the full title of it, it was An Anxious Age: The Post Protestant Ethic and The Spirit of America, quite a mouthful and a mindful. But you address the post-Protestant culture that has become paramount in American culture which continues the habits of the old wasp elite without the core theology of course. And it seems to pertain to contemporary events, among other reasons, and that these post Protestant elites want to contend against sinful forces which in their mind are almost amorphous and impersonal. And certainly, institutional and systemic racism would have ranked among them. They went to atone for this sense of guilt, but they really have no definition of atonement, so they seem to be trapped in a cycle without any conclusion. Do you think I’m understanding your thesis correctly?

BOTTUM: Yeah… now the direction I took that was not theological, but sociological and political. Because it struck me at the time that I wrote the first essay of what would become the book, which was a political theory of the Protestant mainline. And I meant the words political theory quite deliberately—that I wasn’t going to take up the question of a Christian metaphysics and who has a better account of it, whether Protestants or Catholics. I wasn’t going to do that. I was simply going to take up the fact that America was in essence a Protestant nation from its founding, from the arrival of the Puritans—and well, it’s a little more sophisticated than that, really from William and Mary on this was a Protestant country—and that we needed to sort of describe what Tocqueville called the main current of that. Now mainline is a word from much later, from the 1930s, but there always was a kind of main current of a general Protestantism. And I wanted to look at its political consequences and cultural consequences.

However much the rival Protestant denominations feuded with one another, disagreed with one another, I thought they gave a tone to the nation. And one of the things that they did particularly from the Civil War on was constrain social and political demons. They corralled them. They gave a shape to America, which was the marriage culture, the shape of funerals, life and death, birth, the family. They gave a shape to the cultural and sociological condition of America. And it struck me at the time, so I followed up that essay on the death of Protestant America with a whole book. And then subsequently applying it to the political situation that I saw emerging then in a big cover story for The Weekly Standard, called “The Spiritual Shape of Political Ideas.”

And in that kind of threefold push, I thought, “No one that I know is taking seriously the massive sociological change, perhaps the biggest in American history.” From 1965 when the Protestant churches, the mainline churches, by which I mean the founding churches in the National Council of Churches and the God box up on Riverside Drive—those churches, and their affiliated black churches, constituted or had membership that was just over fifty percent of America, as late as 1965. Today that number is well under 10 percent and that’s a huge sociological change that nobody to me seems to be paying sufficient attention to.

Now of course for someone like you, Mark, this is old news. You’ve been following this story for decades. But in kind of mainstream sociological discussions of America that just was not appearing as anything significant, and I thought it was profoundly significant and that the attempt of some of our neoconservative Catholic friends—and I was in the belly of that beast in those days—to substitute Catholicism for the failed American cultural pillar of the mainline Protestant churches—that that project, interesting as it was, failed, and that consequently, I predicted, we were going to see ever-larger sociological and cultural and political upset. Because there was no turning these demons of the human condition into an understanding of their personal application. Instead they just became cultural.

And I trace this move, perhaps unfairly, but I traced it to Rauschenbusch. And said when you say that it’s not individual sin, it’s social sin. And he lists six of them and they are exactly what the protestors are out in the street against right now. It’s what he called bigotry, which we used the word racism for, its militarism, its authoritarianism, and he names these six social sins and they are exactly the ones that the protesters are out against.

But I said the trouble with Rauschenbusch, who was a believer—I think he was a serious Christian and profoundly biblically educated so that his speech was just ripe with biblical quotations—the problem with him is the subsequent generations don’t need the church anymore. They don’t need Jesus anymore. He thinks of Jesus—in the metaphor I use—for the social gospel movement as it developed into just the social movement. Christ is the ladder by which we climb to the new ledge of understanding, but once we’re on that ledge, we don’t need the ladder anymore.

The logic of it is quite clear. We’ve reached this new height of moral and ethical understanding. Yes, thank you, Jesus Christ and the revelations taught it to us, but we’re there now. What need have we for a personal relationship with Jesus, what we need have we for a church? Having achieved this sentiment that knows that sin is these social constructs of destructiveness and our anxiety, the spiritual anxiety that human beings always feel, just by being human, is here answered. How do you know that you are saved today? You know that you are saved because you have the right attitude toward social sins. That’s how you know. Now they wouldn’t say saved; they would say, “How do you know you’re a good person?” But that’s just the logic. The logical pattern is the same.

And I develop that in the essay, “The Spiritual Shape of Political Ideas” by analyzing as tightly as I could the way in which white guilt is original sin. It’s original sin divorced from the theology that let it make sense. But the pattern of internal logic is exactly the same. It produces the same need to find salvation. It produces the same need to know that you are good by knowing that you are bad. It produces the same logic by which Paul would say, “Before the law there was no sin.” It has all of the same patterns of reason, except as you pointed out in your introduction, there’s no atonement. It’s as though, Mark, we’re living in St. Augustine’s metaphysics, but with all the Christ stuff stripped out. It’s a dark world; it’s a grim world. We’re inherently guilty and there’s no salvation. There’s no escape from it.

Except for the destruction of all. Which is why I then moved in that essay to talk about shunning in its modern forms, again divorced from the structures that once made it make sense, and apocalypse. The sense that we’re living at the end of the world and things are so terrible and so destructive that all the ordinary niceties of manners, of balancing judgment and so on, those are—if someone says, “We are destroying the planet and we’re all going to die unless you do what I want,” if I say, “Well we need to hear other voices,” they say, “That’s complicity with evil.” Right? The end of the world is coming; this is this apocalyptic imagination.

Now all of that I think was once upon a time in America—and I’m speaking only politically and sociologically—all of that was corralled, or much of it was corralled in the churches. You were taught a frame to understand your dissatisfactions with the world. You were taught a frame to understand the horror, the metaphysical horror that is the fact, Mark, that you and I are going to die. You were taught this frame that made it bearable and made it possible to move somewhere with it. With the breaking of that, these demons are let loose and now they’re out there.

I’ve often said, Mark, that the history of America since World War II is a history of a fourth Great Awakening that never quite happened. In a sense what I’ve seen for some years building and is now taking to the streets once again is the fourth Great Awakening except without the Christianity. I see in other words what’s happening out there as spiritual anxiety. But spiritual anxiety occurring in a world in which these people have no answer. They just have outrage. And it’s an escalating outrage.

This is where the single most influential thinker in my thought—a modern thinker—is Rene Girard, and Rene Girard’s idea of the escalation of memetic rivalry. The ways in which we get ever purer and we seek ever more tiny examples of evil that we can scapegoat and we enter into competition, this rivalry, to see who is more pure. This is exactly the motor, the Girardian motor, on which my idea of the spiritual anxiety runs.

And so, statues of George Washington are coming down now. And once upon a time, in the generation that I grew up in, and the generation that you grew up in, George Washington was—there were things bad things to say about him—but this was tantamount to saying America was a mistake. And of course these people think America was a mistake, because they think the whole history of the world is a mistake. There’s this outrage. And the outrage I think is spiritual. And that’s why it doesn’t get answered when voices of calm reason say, “Well let’s consider all sides. Yes, there were mistakes that were made and evils that were done, but let’s try to fix them.” Spiritual anxiety doesn’t get answered by, “Oh well let’s fix something.” It gets answered by the flame. It gets answered by the looting. It gets answered by the tearing down.

TOOLEY: So, it’s not just America that’s the mistake or Western civilization, its creation itself that’s the mistake.

BOTTUM: I think so. But creation appears to us in concrete guises, and the concrete guise right now is America. So, this is why you’ll get praise of ancient civilizations. Or you get the historical insanity of a US senator standing up on the well of the Senate and saying America invented slavery, that there was no slavery before the United States. That’s historically insane, but it’s not unlearned because we’ve passed beyond ignorance here. There’s something willful about it. And that’s what’s extraordinary, I think.

And yeah, I’m glad you look back to my 10-year-old book now because I think I did predict some of this, although obviously not in its particulars. But there was a warning there that the collapse of the mainline Protestant churches was going to introduce a demonic element into American life. And lo and behold, it has.

TOOLEY: Now it’s interesting what you described—the collapse in the mainline churches and the social consequences—the inability of Catholicism or evangelicals to fill that social and cultural vacuum and the inability of evangelicals and Catholics, seemingly, to diagnose our current crisis in the way that you just described. Why is that do you think?

BOTTUM: Well there are multiple questions there, Mark. Why Catholicism failed, why the evangelicals and Catholics together failed. So Catholicism by itself failed. The evangelicals and Catholics together project failed to provide this moral pillar to American discourse. And then there are a variety of reasons for that, beginning with the fact that Catholicism is an alien religion, alien to America. Jews and Catholics were more or less welcome to live here, but we understood that we lived on the banks of a great Mississippi of Protestantism that poured down the center of this country.

But the question of why it failed is one thing. The question of why the mainline Protestant churches failed is yet another part of your question. And although I list several examples that people have offered, I don’t make a decision about that in part because I am a Catholic. I have a suspicion that Protestantism with a higher sense of personal salvation, but a less thick metaphysics, was more susceptible to the line of the social gospel movement. But I don’t know that for certain so in the book I’m merely presenting these possibilities.

And then evangelicalism, Catholicism, was under attack for wounds, some of which it committed itself. Evangelicalism is in decline in America. The statistics show that this period when it seemed to be going from strength to strength may have been fueled most of all by the death of the mainline churches. They were just picking up those members. Instead of going to the Methodist Church, they were going to the Bible church out on the prairie.

But regardless, that Christian discourse, that slightly secularized Christian discourse, that would allow Abraham Lincoln to make his speeches, that would provide the background to political rhetoric and so on, that’s all gone. And as a consequence, it seems to me we don’t have a shared culture and that’s part of what allows these protests. But also I think, if there’s a way to put this, a culture that no longer believes in itself, that no longer has horizons, and targets, and goals, that no longer has even the vaguest sense of a telos towards which we ought to move, a culture like that, if we look at it, we no longer have a measure of progress. We can’t say what an advance is along the way. All we can do is look at our history and see it as a catalog of crimes that we perpetrated in order to reach this point that we’re at. And we can’t see the good that came out of it. Because we don’t know what the good is, we don’t know what the telos is, the target, so we have no measure for that.

So, we can’t celebrate the Civil War victory that ended slavery. All we can do is condemn slavery. We can’t celebrate the victory over the Nazis. We have to end World War II; all we can do is decry militarism and the crimes we committed to win that war, like the firebombing of Dresden, or the Hiroshima.

And I think that that reasoning is quite exact because the young people that I hear speak—now I haven’t spent as much time on this as I perhaps should have, following the ins and outs of every protestor alive today—but what I’ve heard suggests that they condemn America to the core—the whole of America, of American history. There is nothing good about this nation. And there it seems to me the reasoning is quite exact. Unable to see a point to America, unable to see a goal. They are quite right that all they can see are the crimes. Whereas you and I are capable of saying, yes slavery was a great sin, and we got over it, and then the post-reconstruction settlement of Jim Crow was a great sin, but we got over it, and we still are committing sins to this day but the optimism of America is that we’ll get over it, we will find solutions to these because we feel that we are a city on a hill. We feel that we are heading somewhere. The telos may be vague, maybe inchoate, but its pull is real for people like you and me, Mark. These young people—who, I think partly because they’ve been systematically miss-educated—don’t have any feeling for that at all. And because they don’t, I think they are actually being quite rational in saying America is just evil, it’s a history of sin.

TOOLEY: So these protests seem to lack any sense of redemption, personal or social, and no sense of providence, there is no historical destination for them. You and I do believe in redemption and in providence, so in conclusion, what words of hope would you have in terms of surviving and coming out of the present moment?

BOTTUM: I think it’ll pass. These things pass. There are various rages that take to the streets, but they are to some degree victims of their own energy. They burn out, and I think this one will burn out. The thing that we are not seeing now—in fact we’re seeing the opposite—is someone standing up to them. The New York Times firing of its op-ed page editor over publication of an op-ed from a sitting US senator is really quite extraordinary if we think about it. But I don’t believe institutions can survive if they pander in this way. And I think eventually we’ll get one standing up. I haven’t heard yet from the publisher of J.K. Rowling, the Harry Potter author, who the staff of her publishing house has declared themselves unwilling to work at a publisher that would publish a woman with such reprobate views of transgenderism. If the publisher doesn’t stand up to her, I think we may be in for another year of this. But I have a feeling she sells so well, that I don’t believe the publisher is going to give in. And if we have one person saying “That’s interesting, but if you can’t work here, you can’t work here, goodbye.” The first time we see that and they survived the subsequent Twitter outrage, I think we’ll see an end to the current cancel culture, which is of course the most insidious of the general social—the burning and the breaking of statues is physical, but the most destructive cultural thing right now is the cancel culture that gets people fired and their relatives fired and the rest of it. I think that has to end and I imagine it will, the first time somebody stands up to them and survives.

TOOLEY: Jody Bottum, author and commentator, thank you for a fascinating conversation about our current anxious age.

BOTTUM: Thanks Mark.

Voir également:
Dec. 2, 2014

I recently read Joseph Bottum’s marvelous book, “An Anxious Age: The Post-Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of America.” This is one of the most fascinating books I’ve read in some time.

Bottum will be familiar to many readers through his many essays in the Weekly Standard and elsewhere (this one is one of my favorites, which anticipates some of the ideas in this book) and his term at the helm of First Things. In fact, the prototype for “An Anxious Age” was a First Things cover story that Bottum wrote in 2008, “The Death of Protestant America: A Political Theory of the Protestant Mainline.” That article made a large impression on me when it first came out, and I was happy to learn that Bottum was planning to develop those ideas into a book.

“An Anxious Age” is probably best described as a work of religious sociology — both how society impacts religious practice (and how religious views evolve over time) as well as how religious views impact society. But it is written as an extended essay, not a data-focused academic tome, as is, for example, Charles Murray’s “Coming Apart,” to which the themes of “An Anxious Age” bear a good deal of resemblance.

The book is actually two relatively distinct essays, which bear a somewhat loose but useful connection. Part I of the book deals with the formal decline of the Protestant mainline churches as the moral center of American society, but also the continued rump effect those churches have on American society’s subconscious (if society can have a subconscious). Part II of the book addresses what Bottum characterizes as an effort — ultimately unsuccessful — by Catholics and evangelicals beginning in the mid-2000s to form a sort of alliance to try to create a new moral code and religious institutional ballast to fill the void left in American society by the decline of the Protestant mainline churches that he describes in the first part of the book. What I found most interesting and provocative is Bottum’s thesis that although it seems that the moral core of modern American society has been entirely secularized, and religion and religious institutions play little role in shaping those views, in fact the watered-down gruel of moral views served up by elite establishment opinion (recycling, multiculturalism, and the like) is a remnant of the old collection of Protestant mainline views that dominated American society for decades or even centuries.

To highlight the important sociological importance of religion in American society, Bottum uses the now-familiar metaphor of a three-legged stool in describing American society (one that I and others have used as well): a balance between constitutional democracy, free market capitalism, and a strong and vibrant web of civil society institutions where moral lessons are taught and social capital is built. In the United States, the most important civil society organizations traditionally have been family and churches. And, among the churches, by far the most important were those that Bottum deems as the “Protestant Mainline” — Episcopalian, Lutheran, Baptist (Northern), Methodist, Presbyterian, Congregationalist/United Church of Christ, etc.

The data on changing membership in these churches is jaw-dropping. In 1965, for example, over half of the United States population claimed membership in one of the Protestant mainline churches. Today, by contrast, less than 10 percent of the population belongs to one of these churches. Moreover, those numbers are likely to continue to decline — the Protestant Mainline (“PM”) churches also sport the highest average age of any church group.

Why does the suicide of the Protestant Mainline matter? Because for Bottum, these churches are what provided the sturdy third leg to balance politics and markets in making a good society. Indeed, Bottum sees the PM churches as the heart of American Exceptionalism — they provided the moral code of Americanism. Probity, responsibility, honesty, integrity — all the moral virtues that provided the bedrock of American society and also constrained the hydraulic and leveling tendencies of the state and market to devour spheres of private life.

The collapse of this religious-moral consensus has been most pronounced among American elites, who have turned largely indifferent to formal religious belief. And in some leftist elite circles it has turned to outright hostility toward religion — Bottum reminds us of Barack Obama’s observation that rural Americans today cling to their “guns and Bibles” out of bitterness about changes in the world. Perhaps most striking is that anti-Catholic bigotry today is almost exclusively found on “the political Left, as it members rage about insidious Roman influence on the nation: the Catholic justices on the Supreme Court plotting to undo the abortion license, and the Catholic racists of the old rust belt states turning their backs on Obama to vote for Hillary Clinton in the 2008 Democratic primaries. Why is it no surprise that one of the last places in American Christianity to find good, old-fashioned anti-Catholicism is among the administrators of the dying Mainline…. They must be anti-Catholics precisely to the extent that they are also political leftists.” As the recent squabbles over compelling practicing Catholics to toe the new cultural line on same-sex marriage at the risk of losing their jobs or businesses, the political Left today is increasingly intolerant of recognizing a private sphere of belief outside of the crushing hand of political orthodoxy.

Yet as Bottum notes, the traditional elite consensus has been replaced by a new spiritual orthodoxy of “morality.” The American elite (however defined) today does subscribe to a set of orthodoxies of what constitutes “proper” behavior: proper views on the environment, feminism, gay rights, etc. Thus, Bottum provocatively argues, the PM hasn’t gone away, it has simply evolved into a new form, a religion without God as it were, in which the Sierra club, universities, and Democratic Party have supplanted the Methodists and Presbyterians as the teachers of proper values.

How did this occur? I am Catholic, so this part of the story was one of the elements of the book that struck me as particularly interesting, as much of the history was new to me. Bottum points to the key moment as the emergence of the Social Gospel movement in the early 20th Century. Led by Walter Rauschenbusch, the Social Gospel movement reached beyond the traditional view that Christianity spoke to personal failings such as sin, but instead reached “the social sin of all mankind, to which all who ever lived have contributed, and under which all who ever lived have suffered.” As Bottum summarizes it, Rauschenbusch identified six social sins: “bigotry, the arrogance of power, the corruption of justice for personal ends, the madness [and groupthink] of the mob, militarism, and class contempt.” As religious belief moved from the pulpit and pew to the voting booth and activism, the role of Jesus and any religious belief became increasingly attenuated. And eventually, Bottum suggests, the political agenda itself came to overwhelm the increasingly irrelevant religious beliefs that initially supported it. Indeed, to again consider contemporary debates, what matters most is outward conformity to orthodox opinion, not persuasion and inward acceptance of a set of particular views–as best illustrated by the lynch mobs that attacked Brendan Eich for his political donations (his outward behavior) and to compel conformity of behavior among wedding cake bakers and the like, all of which bears little relation to (and in fact is likely counterproductive) to changing personal belief. (Of course, that too is an unstable equilibrium–in the future it won’t be sufficient to not merely not be politically opposed to same-sex marriage, it will be a litmus test to be affirmatively in favor of it.).

Thus, while the modern elite appears to be largely non-religious, Bottum argues that they are the subconscious heirs to the old Protestant Mainline, but are merely Post-Protestant — the same demographic group of people holding more or less the same views and fighting the same battles as the advocates of the social gospel.

In the second part of the book, Bottum turns to his second theme — the effort beginning around 2000 of Catholics and Evangelical Christians to form an alliance to create a new moral consensus to replace the void left by the collapse Protestant Mainline churches. Oversimplified, Bottum’s basic point is that this was an effort to marry the zeal and energy of Evangelical churches to the long, well-developed natural law theory of Catholicism, including Catholic social teaching. Again oversimplified, Bottum’s argument is that this effort was doomed on both sides of the equation–first, Catholicism is simply too dense and “foreign” to ever be a majoritarian church in the United States; and second, because evangelical Christianity itself has lost much of its vibrant nature. Bottum notes, which I hadn’t realized, that after years of rapid growth, evangelical Christianity appears to be in some decline in membership. Thus, the religious void remains. The obvious question with which one is left is if Bottum is correct that religious institutions uphold the third leg of the American stool, and if (as he claims) religion is the key to American exceptionalism, can America survive without a continued vibrant religious tradition?

Herewith a few of my own thoughts after reading the book:

The first is simply that this is an immensely interesting and readable book. I read almost the whole thing on a plane trip from California and Jody’s writing style just carries you along effortlessly. His writing is high stylistic without be overstylized and is just an absolute joy to read. He has a gift for weaving together larger ideas with anecdotes and exemplars of his point. He has a light touch in making his point that rarely offends (even on controversial issues) and always illuminates.

Second, is that I largely find Bottum’s argument persuasive. The absence of the Protestant Mainline as a central moral force in American society today is largely taken for granted, such that the implications are largely ignored–as if it has always been this way. To the extent that leaders of Mainline Protestant churches are ever noticed in public, my impression is they are viewed as somewhat buffoonish figures trotted out occasionally to add a veneer of religious window-dressing to the elite’s preexisting views on various political issues such as same-sex marriage and the size of the welfare state. I say “buffoonish” because they often seem to come across as intellectual lightweights, to shallow intellectually to be taken seriously by secular analysts and too shallow theologically to be taken seriously by religious analysts. As a result, they seem to have little influence over public life today. They’ve essentially made themselves irrelevant. (My apologies for painting with an overly-broad brush, and I realize that this is a contestable assertion. It just reflects my impression of how leaders of the Mainline Protestant churches are often treated in news coverage and the like).

Third, one  aspect of the modern post-Protestant morality that struck me after reading the book is its ostentatious and somewhat self-congratulatory nature. In the Preface to the book, Bottum explains that the proximate genesis of the book was an experience he had in 2011 when he was commissioned to write an article about the Occupy Wall Street protest movement. Bottum sensed in these young and clueless youth a deep spiritual anxiety. But it was not linked to any coherent political platform or reform agenda–instead, the goal was “change” of some sort and an assertion of the protesters moral rectitude; and, perhaps equally important (as Bottum describes it), an anxiety to be publicly congratulated for their moral rectitude. Campus protests today, for example, often seem to be sort of a form of performance art, where the gestures of protest and being seen to “care” are ends in themselves, as often the protests themselves have goals that are somewhat incoherent (compared to, say, protests against the Vietnam War). Bottum describes this as a sort of spirtual angst, a vague discomfort with the way things are and an even vaguer desire for change. On this point I wonder whether he is being too generous to their motives.

Fourth, and to my mind the most important thought I had while reading it, was that I found Bottum’s description of the causal decline of the Protestant Mainline incomplete. He briefly pauses to address the question: “The question, of course, is why it happened–this sudden decline of the Mainline, this collapse of the Great Church of America, this dwindling of American Protestantism even as it has now found the unity that it always lacked before.” He discusses a few of the hypotheses (at pages 104-107) but simply defers to the work of others.

But there is one thesis that he doesn’t consider that I think contributes much of the explanation of the decline of the importance of the Protestant Mainline, which is the thesis developed by Shelby Steele is his great book “White Guilt.” I think Steele’s argument provides the key to unlocking not only the decline of the Protestant Mainline but also the timing, and why the decline of the Protestant Mainline has been so much more precipitous than Evangelicals and Catholics, as well as why anti-Evangelical and anti-Catholic bigotry is so socially acceptable among liberal elites.

Steele’s thesis, oversimplified, is that the elite institutions of American society for many years were complicit in a system that perpetrated injustices on many Americans. The government, large corporations, major universities, white-show law firms, fraternal organizations, etc.–the military being somewhat of an exception to this–all conspired explicitly or tacitly in a social system that supported first slavery then racial discrimination, inequality toward women, anti-Semitism, and other real injustices. Moreover, all of this came to a head in the 1960s, when these long-held and legitimate grievances bubbled to the surface and were finally recognized and acknowledged by those who ran these elite institutions and efforts were taken to remediate their harms. This complicity in America’s evils, Steele argues, discredited the moral authority of these institutions, leaving not only a vacuum at the heart of American society but an ongoing effort at their redemption.

But, Steele argues, this is where things have become somewhat perverse. It wasn’t enough for, say, Coca-Cola to actually take steps to remediate its past sins, it was crucial for Coca-Cola to show that it was acknowledging its guilty legacy and, in particular, to demonstrate that it was now truly enlightened. But how to do that? Steele argues that this is the pivotal role played by hustlers like Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton — they can sell the indulgences to corporations, universities, and the other guilty institutions to allow them to demonstrate that they “understand” and accept their guilt and through bowing to Jackson’s demands, Jackson can give them a clean bill of moral health.

Thus, Steele says that what is really going on is an effort by the leaders of these institutions to “dissociate” themselves from their troubled past and peer institutions today that lack the same degree of enlightenment. Moreover, it is crucially important that the Jackson’s of the world set the terms–indeed, the more absurd and ridiculous the penance the better from this perspective, because more ridiculous penances make it easier to demonstrate your acceptance of your guilt.

One set of institutions that Steele does not address, but which fits perfectly into his thesis, is the Protestant Mainline churches that Bottum is describing. It is precisely because the Protestant Mainline churches were the moral backbone of American society that they were in need of the same sort of moral redemption that universities, corporations, and the government. Indeed, because of their claim to be the moral exemplar, their complicity in real injustice was especially bad. Much of the goofiness of the Mainline Protestant churches over the past couple of decades can be well-understood, I think, through this lens of efforts to dissociate themselves from their legacy and other less-enlightened churches. In short, it seems that often their religious dogma is reverse-engineered–they start from wanting to make sure that they hold the correct cutting-edge political and social views, then they retrofit a thin veil of religious belief over those social and political opinions. Such that their religious beliefs today, as far as one ever hears about them at all, differ little from the views of The New York Times editorial page.

This also explains why Catholics and Evangelicals are so maddening, and threatening, to the modern elites. Unlike the Protestant Mainline churches that were the moral voice of the American establishment, Catholicism and Evangelicals have always been outsiders to the American establishment. Thus they bear none of the guilt of having supported unjust political and social systems and refuse to act like they do. They have no reason to kowtow to elite opinion and, indeed, are often quite populist in their worldview (consider the respect that Justices Scalia or Thomas have for the moral judgments of ordinary Americans on issues like abortion or same-sex marriage vs. the views of elites). Given the sorry record of American elites for decades, there is actually a dividing line between two world views. Modern elites believe that the entire American society was to blame, thus we all share guilt and must all seek forgiveness through affirmative action, compulsory sensitivity training, and recycling mandates. Others, notably Catholics and Evangelicals, refuse to accept blame for a social system that they played no role in creating or maintaining and which, in fact, they were excluded themselves. To some extent, therefore, I think that the often-remarked political fault line in American society along religious lines (which Bottum discusses extensively), is as much cultural and historical (in Steele’s sense) as disagreements over religion per se. At the same time, the decline of its moral authority hit the Protestant Mainline churches harder than well-entrenched universities, corporations, or the government, in part because the embrace of the Social Gospel had laid the foundations for their own obsolescence years before.

This also explains why if a religious revival is to occur, it would come from the alliance of Catholics and Evangelicals that he describes in the second half of the book. Mainline Protestantism seems to simply lack the moral authority to revive itself and has essentially made itself obsolete. There appears to be little market for religions without God.

In the end, Bottum leaves us with no answer to his central question–can America, which for so long relied on the Protestant Mainline churches to provide a moral and institutional third leg to the country, survive without it. Can the thin gruel of the post-Protestant New York Times elite consensus provide the moral glue that used to hold the country together? Perhaps, or perhaps not — that is the question we are left with after reading Bottum’s fascinating book.

Finally, I drafted this over the weekend, but I wanted to call attention to Jody’s new essay at the Weekly Standard “The Spiritual Shape of Political Ideas” that touches on many of the themes of the book and develops them in light of ongoing controversies, especially on the parallels between the new moral consensus and traditional religious thinking (and, in fact, his comments on “original sin” strike me as similar to the points about Shelby Steele that I raised above).

He traces this to the early 20th-century Social Gospel movement and the Protestant writer Walter Rauschenbusch. This movement has created a post-Protestant class: “Christian in the righteous timbre of its moral judgments, without any actual Christianity; middle class in social flavor, while ostensibly despising middle-class norms; American in cultural setting, even as [they believe] American history is a tale of tyranny.”

Voir de plus:

« An Anxious Age: The Post-Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of America »


An Anxious Age: The Post-Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of America, by Joseph Bottum. Image Books (February 11, 2014)

We live in a profoundly spiritual age–but in a very strange way, different from every other moment of our history. Huge swaths of American culture are driven by manic spiritual anxiety and relentless supernatural worry. Radicals and traditionalists, liberals and conservatives, together with politicians, artists, environmentalists, followers of food fads, and the chattering classes of television commentators: America is filled with people frantically seeking confirmation of their own essential goodness. We are a nation desperate to stand on the side of morality–to know that we are righteous and dwell in the light.

Or so Joseph Bottum argues in An Anxious Age, an account of modern America as a morality tale, formed by its spiritual disturbances. And the cause, he claims, is the most significant and least noticed historical fact of the last fifty years: the collapse of the Mainline Protestant churches that were the source of social consensus and cultural unity. Our dangerous spiritual anxieties, broken loose from the churches that once contained them, now madden everything in American life.

Updating The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, Max Weber’s sociological classic, An Anxious Age undertakes two case studies in contemporary social class, adrift in a nation without the religious understandings that gave it meaning. Looking at the college-educated elite he calls “The Poster Children,” Bottum sees the post-Protestant heirs of the old Mainline Protestant domination of culture: dutiful descendants who claim the high social position of their Christian ancestors even while they reject their ancestors’ Christianity. Turning to “The Swallows of Capistrano,” the Catholics formed by the pontificate of John Paul II, Bottum evaluates the early victories–and later defeats–of the attempt to substitute Catholicism for the dying Mainline voice in public life.

Sweeping across American intellectual and cultural history, An Anxious Age traces the course of national religion and warns about the strange angels and even stranger demons with which we now wrestle. Insightful and contrarian, wise and unexpected, An Anxious Age ranks among the great modern accounts of American culture.

Voir encore:

The New York Times magazine

There is a strange little cultural feedback loop that’s playing out again and again on social media. It begins with, say, a white American man who becomes interested in taking an outspoken stand against racism or misogyny. Maybe he starts by attending a Black Lives Matter demonstration. Or by reading the novels of Elena Ferrante. At some point, he might be asked to “check his privilege,” to acknowledge the benefits that accrue to him as a white man. At first, it’s humiliating — there’s no script for taking responsibility for advantages that he never asked for and that he can’t actually revoke. But soon, his discomfort is followed by an urge to announce his newfound self-­awareness to the world. He might even want some public recognition, a social affirmation of the work he has done on himself.

These days, it has become almost fashionable for people to telegraph just how aware they have become. And this uneasy performance has increasingly been advertised with one word: “woke.” Think of “woke” as the inverse of “politically correct.” If “P.C.” is a taunt from the right, a way of calling out hypersensitivity in political discourse, then “woke” is a back-pat from the left, a way of affirming the sensitive. It means wanting to be considered correct, and wanting everyone to know just how correct you are.

In the ’70s, Americans who styled themselves as “radical chic” communicated their social commitments by going to cocktail parties with Black Panthers. Now they photograph themselves reading the right books and tweet well-­tuned platitudes in an effort to cultivate an image of themselves as politically engaged. Matt McGorry, the actor who plays a sweetly doofy prison guard in “Orange Is the New Black,” is a helpful case study of this phenomenon. McGorry’s Instagram presence was once blithely ­bro-ey — yacht shots, tank tops, a tribute to coconut water. Then he watched the actress Emma Watson brief the United Nations on the importance of men’s involvement in the feminist movement, and he took it to heart. Now he presents his muscular selfies and butt jokes alongside iconography of feminism and anti-­racism. In one snap, he holds a copy of “The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness,” in bed, shirtless. In December, BuzzFeed nodded at McGorry with a listicle titled: “Can We Talk About How Woke Matt McGorry Was in 2015?”

Earning the “woke” badge is a particularly tantalizing prospect because it implies that you’re down with the historical fight against prejudice. It’s a word that arose from a specific context of black struggle and has recently assumed a new sense of urgency among activists fighting against racial injustices in Ferguson, Sanford, Baltimore and Flint. When Black Lives Matter activists started a website to help recruit volunteers to the cause, they called it StayWoke.org. “Woke” denotes awareness, but it also connotes blackness. It suggests to white allies that if they walk the walk, they get to talk the talk.

The most prominent pop touchstone for “stay woke” is Erykah Badu’s 2008 track “Master Teacher,” in which she sings the refrain “I stay woke.” “Erykah brought it alive in popular culture,” says David Stovall, a professor of African-­American studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago. “She means not being placated, not being anesthetized. She brought out what her elders and my elders had been saying for hundreds of years.” In turn, the track has helped shepherd the next generation into its own political consciousness. In an interview with NPR last year, the rapper Earl Sweatshirt described listening to “Master Teacher” in the car with his mother as a teenager. “I was singing the hook, like, ‘I stay woke,’ ” he said. His mother turned down the music, and “she was like, ‘No you’re not.’ ”

Earl Sweatshirt’s mom was cautioning her son against brandishing a word without understanding its history and power. He got the message years later, he said, and called her up and announced: “I’m grown.” Such reflectiveness is often absent from the promiscuous spread of “woke” online. The word has now been recycled by people hoping to add splashes of drama to their own inconsequential obsessions, tweeting “Raptors will win it all #STAYWOKE” or “new bio … #staywoke.” The new iteration of radical chic is the guy on Tinder who calls himself a “feminist artist in Brooklyn” and then says he’s “looking for the you-know-what in the you-know-where” — the performance of “wokeness” is so conspicuous that it breeds distrust.

In a 2012 paper about race relations on Twitter, Dr. André Brock, a University of Michigan communications professor, wrote about how the surfacing of popular hashtags and trending topics “brought the activities of tech-­literate blacks to mainstream attention,” creating a space where the expressions of black identity are subject to “intense monitoring” by white people — a kind of accelerator for cultural appropriation. When black activists used “stay woke” in their Twitter campaigns against police violence, the term appeared alongside a host of trending hashtags — #ICantBreathe, #IfTheyGunnedMeDown — and was thus flagged for white people who have never listened to a Badu album or joined the crowd at a rally.

Defanged of its political connotations, “stay woke” is the new “plugged in.” In January, MTV announced “woke” as a trendy new slice of teen slang. As Brock said, “The original cultural meaning of ‘stay woke’ gets lost in the shuffle.”

And so those who try to signal their wokeness by saying “woke” have revealed themselves to be very unwoke indeed. Now black cultural critics have retooled “woke” yet again, adding a third layer that claps back at the appropriators. “Woke” now works as a dig against those who claim to be culturally aware and yet are, sadly, lacking in self-awareness. In a sharp essay for The Awl, Maya Binyam coined the term “Woke Olympics,” a “kind of contest” in which white players compete to “name racism when it appears” or condemn “fellow white folk who are lagging behind.”

The latest revolution of “woke” doesn’t roll its eyes at white people who care about racial injustice, but it does narrow them at those who seem overeager to identify with the emblems and vernacular of the struggle. For black activists, there is a certain practicality in publicly naming white allies. Being woke, Stovall says, means being “aware of the real issues” and willing to speak of them “in ways that are uncomfortable for other white folks.” But identifying allies poses risks, too. “There are times when people have been given the ‘black pass,’ and it hasn’t worked out so well,” Stovall says. “Like Clinton in the ’90s.” A white person who gains a kind of license to use power on behalf of black people can easily wield that power on behalf of themselves.

“Woke” feels a little bit like Macklemore rapping in one of his latest tracks about how his whiteness makes his rap music more acceptable to other white people. The conundrum is built in. When white people aspire to get points for consciousness, they walk right into the cross hairs between allyship and appropriation. These two concepts seem at odds with each other, but they’re inextricable. Being an ally means speaking up on behalf of others — but it often means amplifying the ally’s own voice, or centering a white person in a movement created by black activists, or celebrating a man who supports women’s rights when feminists themselves are attacked as man-haters. Wokeness has currency, but it’s all too easy to spend it.

The Puritans Among Us

Mary Eberstadt

National Review

April 21, 2014

Review of An Anxious Age: The Post-Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of America, by Joseph Bottum (Image, 320 pp., $25).

Some writers are “Catholic writers” in the sense that they do their work qua Catholics, and their main subject is the immense intellectual, social, and aesthetic patrimony of the Catholic Church. But there also exists a rarer kind of Catholic writer: the one who is multilingual in secular as well as religious tongues, whose Catholicism nonetheless runs so deep that it cannot help but shape and suffuse his every line.

Joseph Bottum, fortunately for American letters, is an example of the latter sort. In fact, it’s safe to say that if Mr. Bottum were anything but a writer who is also known to be Catholic, his name would be mandatory on any objective short list of public intellectuals, if there were such a thing. He is the author of several books, including a volume of poetry (The Fall & Other Poems), a work of verse set to music (The Second Spring), a bestselling memoir (The Christmas Plains), and now, with An Anxious Age, an immensely ambitious work of sociological criticism. His essays have garnered awards and are included in notable collections. He has also worn the hats of literary critic, columnist, editor, books editor, short-story writer, autobiographer, eulogist, public speaker, television pundit, Amazon author (via the groundbreaking Kindle Singles series), and visiting professor. If there were milliners for intellectuals, his would be the busiest in town.

Yet, as is not widely understood despite this prodigious body of work, Bottum is also, at heart, a storyteller — meaning that he is preoccupied not only with syllogism and validity but also with literary characters and creations. Once in a while, this absorption with dramatis personae ends up confounding readers — as happened just last year, when a long essay of his, published in Commonweal, arguing the futility of continuing Church opposition to same-sex marriage, combusted as instantly and widely as a summer brushfire. That piece, too, as was perhaps insufficiently noted at the time, began with and meandered around a literarycharacter: a former friend and foil with whom the piece amounts to an imaginary conversation.

To observe as much isn’t to say that fiction always trumps. It’s rather to note that with poets and poetry, for better or worse, comes license — including license to chase arguments into places where other people, rightly or wrongly, fear to tread.

That same singular gift is now turned to brilliant advantage in Bottum’s new book. A strikingly original diagnosis of the national moral condition, An Anxious Age bears comparison for significance and scope to only a handful of recent seminal works. Deftly analytical and also beautifully written, it has the head of Christopher Lasch and the heart of Flannery O’Connor. Anyone wishing to chart the deeper intellectual and religious currents of this American time, let alone anyone who purports to navigate them for the rest of the public, must first read and reckon withAn Anxious Age.

The book begins in territory that’s familiar enough: the well-known and ongoing collapse of the Protestant mainline churches, whose floor-by-floor implosion the author traced first in a seminal 2008 essay for First Things on “The Death of Protestant America.” This starting point soon widens dramatically onto a 180-degree view of the national milieu. Contrary to the widely held secularization thesis, according to which the decline of Christianity is inevitable, Bottum argues instead that the Puritans and Protestants of yesteryear still walk the country in new and rarely recognized “secular” guises. Bonnie Paisley of Oregon, Gil Winslow of upstate New York, Ellen Doorn of Texas — these and other characters conjured as the “Poster Children of Post-Protestantism” illustrate via their individual stories the author’s central point: The mainline hasn’t so much vanished as gone underground to become what O’Connor once derisively called “the Church without Christ.”

To be sure, the idea that secularization has not so much killed God as repurposed Him into seemingly secular shapes is not in itself new. It’s the key point in philosopher Charles Taylor’s work, especially in his prodigious book A Secular Age. No author, however, has brought this idea to life as Bottum does in An Anxious Age — whose very title, obviously, suggests the amendment that it is to Taylor’s thesis. Throughout, the Poster Children spring from the pages like so many impish holograms, turning two-dimensional arguments over “believing” and “belonging” into recognizable and ultimately persuasive companions at the reader’s elbow.

These Poster Children, the author argues, are direct descendants of the “social gospel” of Protestant theologian Walter Rauschenbusch: the notion that sin has a social and not merely individual dimension. “Social nature abhors a vacuum,” notes Bottum in a key passage,

and the past thirty years have seen many attempts to fill the space where Protestantism used to stand. Feminism in the 1980s, homosexuality in the 1990s, environmentalism in the 2000s, the quadrennial presidential campaigns that promise to reunify the nation . . . [these] movements have all posed themselves as partial Protestantisms, bastard Christianities, determined not merely to win elections but to be the platform by which all other platforms are judged.

Once again, the millenarian character of contemporary politics — particularly today’s politics of the Left — has been noted before. But once again, Bottum digs deeper here to yield truths not hitherto inspected.Partial Protestantisms, bastard Christianities: It isn’tonly that ostensibly secular leftism is Christianity in some unexpected, other guise. It’s rather that ostensibly secular leftism is a particular kind of truncated Christianity: the theological and sociological equivalent of the fatherless home.

And so, for example, Occupy Wall Street, for all its grubby pretension, is in essence just one more “protest against the continuing reign of Satan and a plea for the coming of the Kingdom of God, with a new heaven and a new earth.” Related yearnings for personal redemption, the author argues, also unite certain ardent young Catholics drawn to “lifeboat theology, escaping the rising sea of evil on small arks of the saved.” These groups are joined, he argues, at the sociological root — proof of what, in a bow to Max Weber, the book calls our “Anxious Age” created by “the catastrophic decline of the mainline Protestant churches that had once been central institutions in public life.”

In a curious way, An Anxious Age also amounts to a limited reenchantment of the intellectual world. When conservatives in particular attack “the elites,” Bottum argues, they “focus entirely on non-spiritual causes.” In this they overlook the essential link between these “elites” and their Puritan forebears, for “the one social ascendency they truly feel, the one deepest in their souls, is the superiority of the spiritually enlightened to those still lost in darkness.” Contrary to what both the Poster Children and their religious critics seem to think, all are leaning toward the same end: a sense of redemption. “Elite or not,” he observes, “they are the elect — people who understand themselves primarily in spiritual terms,” whether they darken the doors of churches or not.

An Anxious Age abounds in logic and clarification (and for that reason among others, it was derelict of the book’s publisher to omit footnotes and an index, both of which would have helped to signal its scholarly nature). Even so, it is the book’s metaphors that will haunt the reader after he puts it down. Who else would describe Protestantism in the United States as “our cultural Mississippi, rolling through the center of the American landscape”? Likely no one — but the image brings to vivid and unexpected life a thousand Pew Research reports on declining attendance and the rise in “nones.” Similarly, the author’s unspooling of the story of the swallows of San Juan Capistrano as a metaphor for explaining what has happened to Catholicism in America is not only arresting but convincing, succeeding both as religious sociology and as literary trope.

None of which is to say that the book’s every fillip and expostulation amounts to the last word. Like any serious work, this one excites demurrals, objections, and second and third thoughts. In particular, one wants to hear more about the other and less cerebral forces that were obviously at work in the implosion of mainline Protestantism and its fallout.

After all, not every religious movement emerging from the “burned-over district” in upstate New York suffered the same communal fate. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, to take one salient example, went on to become one of the most ascendant faiths of the next century. Why did mainline Presbyterianism, say, fall one way on history’s divide, while Protestant evangelicalism and Mormonism, say, fell another? One likely answer is that the mainline’s doctrinal neglect and practical abandonment of the family led eventually to demographic disaster in the pews. In similar fashion, one can argue, Catholics who have behaved like Catholics have seen their own corners of the religious world prosper — and Catholics who have behaved like mainline Protestants have not.

Other points invite similar friendly debate, including the author’s claim that tomorrow’s Catholicism is necessarily less robust than yesterday’s because it is no longer as “inherited.” And of course one can also question ad infinitum why Bottum chose to discuss some of the thinkers in these pages, and not others. But no shortcomings gainsay the superb achievement here. As his friend and sometime collaborator, the author David P. Goldman, once put it, “One often learns more about the underlying issues from Jody Bottum’s mistakes than from the dutiful plodding of many of his peers.”

Readers who find the Poster Children stalking their imaginations might also hope to see more overt works of fiction from the talented Mr. Bottum down the road. Meanwhile, the daring achievement of the author of An Anxious Age — bringing sociology to unique fictional life — is something that the rest of us will be thinking about for a long time to come.

– Mary Eberstadt is a senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center and the author of How the West Really Lost God: A New Theory of Secularization.

Voir enfin:
Delphine Le Goff
Stratégies
16/12/2019

C’est le nouveau buzzword, une nouvelle forme de coolitude : être « woke » ou ne pas être. Le terme, dérivé de l’argot afro-américain, désigne l’état d’éveil aux injustices de la société au sens large. Une nouvelle forme de bien-pensance ?

Tenez-vous prêts. Il paraît que dans les mois à venir, on n’aura que ce mot à la bouche. Ringardisée, la bienveillance, mot de l’année 2018 selon Le Robert, utilisée jusqu’à l’écœurement – d’ailleurs bien souvent par des personnes en réalité tout sauf bienveillantes. 2019, paraît-il, sera l’année du « woke ». Même Le Monde, il y a quelques mois, donnait en avant-première ce sage conseil : « Ne soyez plus cool, soyez woke. » Voilà autre chose !
« Woke, c’est le nouveau buzzword, reconnaît Martin Lagache, planneur stratégique chez BETC, qui se lance dans une exégèse du terme, issu de l’argot afro-américain. C’est la chanteuse Erykah Badu qui l’a popularisé il y a une dizaine d’années, avec sa chanson “Master Teacher (I stay woke)”, puis en 2012, en utilisant la phrase “Stay woke” dans un message public de soutien aux Pussy Riot [groupe de rock féministe russe dissident]. » Woke, comme « éveillé », un terme repris à l’envi pendant le mouvement #Blacklivesmatter en 2013. Le terme s’est déployé et désigne aujourd’hui le fait d’être conscient de toutes les formes d’inégalités, du racisme au sexisme en passant par les préoccupations environnementales. En somme, résume Martin Lagache, « le “woke” est le terme étendard de la bien-pensance libérale [au sens anglo-saxon] américaine de gauche. Est-ce que les Gilets jaunes sont woke ? Tout le monde peut être woke. »

Atout séduction

Le terme infuse irrésistiblement, y compris dans les replis de la vie privée. À telle enseigne qu’être « woke » peut même faire de vous un prince ou une princesse de l’amour. Il est désormais de bon ton, dans les pays anglo-saxons, de proclamer que l’on est un « woke bae », c’est-à-dire un(e) petit(e) ami(e) progressiste et averti(e) des injustices de notre triste monde. Pour certains, il ne s’agit plus de débusquer Mr Right, mais Mr Woke : une journaliste du Guardian relatait ainsi, en août dernier, sa recherche éperdue de ce nouveau spécimen hautement désirable dans un déchirant article titré « My search for Mr Woke : a dating diary. » La rédactrice confie gentiment aux lecteurs ses trucs et astuces pour draguer « woke ». À faire : prononcer des phrases comme « la pauvreté n’est pas de la faute des pauvres ». À éviter : la complainte du « on ne peut plus rien dire ». C’est noté.

Grande recycleuse devant l’éternel, la publicité ne pouvait rester immune aux charmes du « woke ». Avec la récente campagne Gillette, « We believe : The best men can be », galerie d’hommes qui expriment leur aversion du sexisme ordinaire, des violences faites aux femmes, du mansplaining, du harcèlement scolaire – en bref, de ce que la marque désigne comme « la masculinité toxique » –, n’atteindrait-on pas un sommet de « wokeité » ? Sans l’ombre d’un doute, selon Olivier et Hervé Bienaimé, directeurs de la création de 84.Paris : « Pour ce qui est du combat contre le machisme et le patriarcat, le message est ultra-positif. » Et archi-opportuniste, aussi ? « Gillette change tout à coup de braquet, après nous avoir vendu pendant des années le modèle de l’homme blanc musclé en pleine réussite sociale », soulignent les créatifs.

Plus engagé que le cool

C’est bien d’être éveillé. Mais trop le faire savoir, ne serait-ce pas suspect ? « Le cool était une attitude anti-mainstream, un peu rebelle mais farouchement individualiste, souligne Martin Lagache. Avec le “woke”, on se situe dans une posture plus engagée. Mais bien souvent, c’est plus une posture qu’autre chose. Et dans la plupart des cas, une posture paresseuse de valorisation personnelle… » Dans une tribune pour le New York Times titrée « The Problem With Wokeness », l’éditorialiste David Brooks pointe les dérives du phénomène : « Le plus grand danger de la “wokeness” extrême est qu’elle rend plus difficile de pratiquer la dextérité nécessaire à toute vie en société, c’est-à-dire la faculté à appréhender deux vérités dans le même temps. »
Marie Nossereau, directrice du planning stratégique de Publicis Sapient, affiche carrément de la défiance par rapport à tout ce qui se prétend « woke ». « Les gens qui se disent plus éveillés que les autres, ça a toujours existé. C’est assez méprisant, cela sous-entend que tous les autres dorment, sont aux mains des multinationales… Le terme “woke” m’évoque aussi le discours de l’Église de Scientologie, dont les adeptes se disent “clear” [clairs]. Selon moi, cela fait partie de la même dialectique, je n’aime pas trop ça. In fine, ça ne me paraît pas très clean. »

Un brin hypocrite

Pas clean, peut-être pas, mais hypocrite, sans doute un peu trop souvent. On revient à Gillette : « Dans les faits, la marque continue à vendre des rasoirs pour les femmes plus chers que les rasoirs pour les hommes… », grince Martin Lagache. Gillette, au passage, s’est félicitée publiquement d’avoir vu les ventes de ses rasoirs bondir après sa campagne… Les frères Bienaimé de l’agence 84.Paris rappellent quant à eux « le film “The Talk” de Procter & Gamble qui a raflé des tonnes de prix, pour une marque qui n’a pas vraiment été “woke” pendant des décennies. Une conscience éveillée, OK, si les produits suivent. »
Et si, malgré tout, l’éveil n’en était qu’à ses prémices ? La sociologue Irène Pereira et l’historienne Laurence De Cock ont publié en janvier un ouvrage, Les pédagogies critiques (Éd. Agone contre-feux), qui prône une éducation inspirée des travaux du pédagogue brésilien Paulo Freire et du pédagogue français Célestin Freinet. Il s’agirait non pas de préparer les élèves à devenir des bêtes à concours ou de futurs soldats des entreprises, mais plutôt de leur enseigner les rapports de domination qui régissent le monde pour mieux les réduire à néant. Pour une future génération woke ?

Voir enfin:

Against Moralistic Therapeutic Totalitarianism

 

I have received some of the best comments from readers about retired Catholic theologian Larry Chapp’s short essays, which I’ve published in this space. I was pleased to wake up this morning and find another one from him in my in-box. I count myself fortunate to be in a position of publishing them in this space.

Below is an essay Larry titles “The Collective Of Concupiscence.” In it, he pretty much sums up my take on the current political and social situation, though I have some post-election thoughts to add at the end. First, here’s Larry:

There is talk in some quarters of Oprah Winfrey running for President in 2020. My response to this is, why not? If Donald Trump can be President ­ a man whose only qualification for the job seems to be that he is a rich celebrity, then any rich celebrity can be President I guess.

What all of this probably points to, sadly, is how utterly exhausted and bankrupt our politics has become, with Americans by the millions turning away from the more experienced political insiders in favor of outsiders who promise us that they alone can provide the radical change that is needed. And everyone seems to agree that radical change is indeed needed, so long as “radical change” means ripping the Band-Aids off of everyone else’s scabs but mine. Radical change can also mean, rather simply, that you want the power that the ruling party possesses transferred to your party. Which is to say, no change at all, which is why you have to lie about it.

For example, in our last election, “Drain the swamp!” was the mantra of the Trump supporters. But did anyone really expect that the man we elected, a swamp creature if ever there were one, would be able to do this? And what, exactly, does one do with a drained swamp anyway? Probably sell it to developers who would build overpriced, poorly made, beige and boring condos, nicely accessorized with a strip mall complete with a Dunkin Donuts and a Vape shop. In other words, just a different kind of swamp. The Democrats prefer the fevered swamp of coercive governmental power, whereas the Republicans prefer the fetid swamp of corporate greed. So all we have really done is trade Lenin for Bezos.

Oh, I can hear people now… “Damn it Chapp, you are always so negative about politics and America. You have to live in the real world and the real world is never perfect!” If you are in that cloud of critics, then I can say to you that you are correct about one thing: nothing in this world is wholly perfect. But that does not mean that there aren’t degrees of imperfection. To deny this is to deny that there is such a thing as truth ­ ­– a truth that acts as the barometer for all of our actions, political or otherwise.

Therefore, my claim is this, a claim that you can take or leave as you see fit, but a claim I stand by with full conviction: the contemporary American socio­ economic­-political system is predicated in a foundational way on a profound and tragic falsehood. It is a false first principle shared by every major governmental and economic institution in this country and it stands in total contradiction to the Christian faith.

This false first principle can be stated simply and then its logical conclusions can be teased out as follows: God is irrelevant to the construction of government and our public life together, which is to say, God does not exist, which is to say, nothing spiritual or supernatural exists, which is to say that we are all purely material beings with no purpose or goal or end beyond the satisfaction of our individual desires, which is to say that pleasure (the satisfaction of our base desires) is more rooted in reality than happiness (the joy and peace that comes from pursuing the higher spiritual realities like the moral good). Indeed, according to this false principle, the spiritual dimension of life and the moral good are, at best, “noble lies,” and at worst repressive illusions ­­– repressive, since their pursuit often inhibits the attainment of pleasure.

The late Italian philosopher Augusto del Noce, building on this same insight (that our culture is founded on a false first principle: God does not matter), points out that the ruling philosophy that our culture has adopted as a replacement for God and religion is the philosophy known as “scientism”. In a nutshell, scientism is the belief that only the hard, empirical sciences give us access to truth. Everything else is an illusion. Therefore, when it comes to our common life together as a people ­ — a life that comes to be defined, regulated and controlled by government and corporate elites — there is only one form of reason that is “allowed in” as proper public discourse. And that is the language of science.

Furthermore, given our reduction of life to economics, what the elevation of science really means is the ascendency of “applied science” (technology) to pride of place. Every aspect of our social life thus comes under the purview of governmental control, and all culture and every form of reason becomes a function of politics. And this final step, the submission of culture to politics, is the very heart of totalitarianism. Only, in this case, it is not the totalitarianism of the Nazis or the Stalinists or the Maoists ­– ­brutal, bloody, and quite vulgar in its unsubtle use of blunt violence ­– but rather the much more seductive totalitarianism of techno-­nihilism, where our base bodily desires form what I call a “Collective of Concupiscence” which the government regulates, and the economy inflames.

Our future is thus most likely to be a dystopian one. But it won’t be the dystopia of the concentration camp. Rather, it will be Huxley’s Brave New World with a Disneyland aesthetic. Because… you know… “family values”.

You might think this is an exaggeration. I don’t think it is. It is the logical conclusion of scientism no matter what our elites might say about our bold new future. Because, despite what scientism’s popularizers (such as Carl Sagan and Richard Dawkins) might say in their more poetic moments when speaking about the “beauty” of the cosmos and of science, the fact is, if I am just an ape with a big brain, and an accidental byproduct of the cosmic chemistry of stardust remnants, then I really don’t give a shit about some gaseous blob, or even a vast number of “billions and billions” of gaseous blobs, ten million light years away; or the “fascinating” mating rituals of fruit bats; or the “poetry” of soil regeneration through dung beetle digestive cycles. In other words, when you are told endlessly that there is no meaning to existence, then guess what? You actually start to think that way. And then everything loses its flavor. Everything starts to taste like rice cakes.

Therefore, you cannot have it both ways. You cannot bleach divinity and Transcendence out of the cosmos and tell everyone that the whole affair is just an aimless and pointless accident, and then turn around and talk to us about the “moral necessity” of this or that urgent social cause. Why should I even care about the future of humanity itself? Why should I care about the ultimate destiny of ambulatory, bipedal, chemistry sets?

So really, it doesn’t matter who is in power … Democrats or Republicans, Trump or Oprah, and it does not matter if we place more emphasis on the government to solve our problems or free enterprise economics. Because our entire society operates according to the false premise I articulated above. In that sense we are all Marxists now, insofar as Marx’s controlling idea was the notion that the material world is all that exists and that economics drives everything.

And try as we might to deny that this materialistic view of existence is death to the higher functions of our soul, there is no escaping the fact that fewer and fewer people will devote themselves to higher pursuits, once the notions of God, Transcendence, purpose, meaning, the Good, and so on, are banished from our lexicon of acceptable ideas. We will increasingly privilege pleasure over happiness, which is to say, we will privilege opioids, techno gadgets, virtual reality stimulation, porn, and various other forms of addiction. We will be, if we aren’t already, a nation of addicts. Because if there is one thing we know about our bodily appetites it is that they are insatiable, requiring ever more of the same things to slake our rapacious desires. But partaking of the same thing, addictively, over and over and over, is boring. It crushes and kills the soul. And so what we will really end up with is not a society of liberated selves, but a society of bored, libidinous, pleasure addicts trending toward suicidal despair.

Furthermore, the fact of the matter is that we all share the same basic bodily appetites. It does not matter if you are rich or poor, gay or straight, fat or skinny, old or young, or what race you are, or your ethnicity, or your political party, or if you prefer the vapid and brain-dead banter of “Fox and Friends” over the vicious and pompous self­-importance of the moronic ladies on “The View”. Once you take away the idea that human nature has a spiritual side that, you know, “trends upward”, you are left with staring at your crotch or your gut or your veins. This is, of course, absolutely true, but we ignore the downward spiral of our culture into techno­pagan bacchanalia because our affluent elites, the poor dears, have confused despairing addiction and the “dark” view of life it spawns, with sophistication, and count as “enlightenment” a cultivated anti-intellectual stupidity.

I am struck, for example, by how many of the lead characters in shows made by Netflix or Amazon (especially detective shows) are depressive and “dark” souls, haunted by some hidden pain in their past that is the irritant in the oyster that creates the pearl of their genius. So far so good, since we all have hidden pain in our lives, and the various things we all suffer from really are, quite often, the genesis of much depth and creativity.

But these characters are different. They are nihilistic, often cruel, morally ambiguous, irreligious of course (duh), self­-destructive, and live as radically atomized, alienated and isolated individuals devoid of love or meaningful relationships. And if they do develop a relationship, it usually flounders on the shoals of the lead character’s unfathomably dark pain. Or worse, the love interest is killed off, with a hefty dose of complicit guilt on the part of the lead character, further adding to his or her morose self-­immolation. And all of this is portrayed as “sophisticated”. (There are exceptions of course, but this is just an anecdotal and subjective impression I have of many of these shows).

The irritating thing about all of this, of course, is that it is just so puerile and shallow, with little justification for its pretentious dismissal of “God” or “the Good”. And it is unbearably boring and drab. Is there anything more pitifully awful than being forced to listen to someone drone on and on about their “sexuality”?

By contrast, people only really become interesting when they differentiate themselves from one another, as true individuals, by cultivating the higher levels of the soul. And this is done in many ways, even still today, because the fact is we ARE spiritual beings and the spiritual dimension of our existence cannot be snuffed out. But those among us who still seek these things are becoming ever rarer and are being forced into ghettos or isolated enclaves of activity, and frequently branded as bigots because we adhere to traditional religious views about God and such things. It does appear, in other words, that the Collective of Concupiscence has fangs and claws, because at the end of the day, we are all “God haunted”, which is why members of the Collective view traditional religious believers as their tormentors

However, sadly, gradually the creative power of the majority of people is being perverted and bent to serve the needs of the emerging political and economic collective ­ ­– the Collective of Concupiscence ­ — wherein the true “liberation” of your “identity” can only come about when all of those institutions that represent the values of the Spirit are branded as oppressors. We WILL be liberated, and we WILL use government to enforce that liberation, and we WILL demand that the economy provide us with the means to enjoy the fruits of that liberation. Indeed, we will demand that the economy provide us with all of the gadgets and accouterments that we need to enhance our pleasures to unimaginable heights. Welcome to the wacky, upside down world of the new “sophistication”: mass ­produced individualism where radical “nonconformity” means all public and, increasingly, private speech, will be policed, looking for any sign that someone has breached the canons of non­conforming orthodoxy. So “individualism” here appears to mean its exact opposite.

But that is what you get in the Collective of Concupiscence. Somewhere Orwell is smiling.

Peter Maurin lived before all of this technological wizardry was real. But he lived in an age of totalitarianisms. And he was a thinking Catholic. Which means he had a deep prophetic insight into what was around the corner, so to speak. And just as Rod Dreher, in his wonderful book, The Benedict Option, calls orthodox Christians to a deeper awareness of the profoundly anti­ Christian challenges our culture is putting before us, so too did Peter Maurin warn us that the only way we will endure the coming storm of cultural barbarity is to form deeply intentional communities of Christian intellectual discourse, moral ecology, and liturgical practice. Not so that we can “escape” the world and shun our brothers and sisters who remain within it. But so that we can know ourselves better and come closer to God so as to be better able to serve our neighbor in love.

The members of the Collective of Concupiscence are not our “enemies”. Indeed, we are, if we are honest, infected with the same bacillus as everyone else. We are all in the Collective in one­ way or another. And so there is no question of abandoning the culture because that is, quite simply, neither desirable nor possible.

But we cannot drink from the same poisonous well and so we must cultivate new sources of “living water” in order to share it with everyone. And “everyone” means, literally, “everyone”. So please do not accuse me of “us vs. them” thinking. That kind of approach is not an option for a Christian. But if you do not “have” a Christian sensibility of the big questions of life, then by default you will “have” the template provided by our culture. I will end therefore with an old Latin phrase: “Nemo dat quod non habet”: You cannot give what you do not have.

Larry Chapp writes from the Dorothy Day Catholic Worker Farm in rural Pennyslvania that he runs with his wife, Carmina. You can visit the farm; follow the link for more information.

Larry’s essay made me reflect on why the only thing in politics that seriously engages my interest these days is the appointment of federal judges. I believe that the dystopia Larry Chapp envisions in this essay — this present dystopia, and the dystopia to come — is unstoppable in the short run. The question is only whether or not we will have a right-wing or a left-wing version of it. I care so much about federal judges because I see them as the only institution that can protect the rights of dissenters to be left alone in this new America.

Don’t get me wrong. Leaving aside the courts, it’s not a matter of total indifference whether or not there’s an R or a D sitting in the White House. Despite all his sins and failings, President Trump is not going to sic the Justice Department on Christian schools that fail to Celebrate Diversity — Or Else™. A Democratic president almost certainly would — and almost certainly will. As America secularizes, though — a process that includes professing Christians changing their minds on moral issues that conflict with liberalism — people will cease to understand why the trad holdouts believe what they believe, and do what they do. It is possible that there will be enough libertarian sentiment left in the country to leave us alone — but I very much doubt that. The only exterior protection we can rely on will be a federal judiciary, especially the Supreme Court — that holds strong First Amendment convictions about protecting religious minorities.

Some Benedict Option critics think they’re making a meaningful argument against it when they say some version of, “Ah ha, what do you think is going to happen to your little communities when the State decides they are a public danger, huh?” It’s a reasonable point, but a weak one. It is precisely when the State decides that traditional Christians are a danger to it that the Benedict Option is going to be most needed. But it is still needed up until that time — which may never come — because our faith is not being taken away from us by the State; it is being dissolved by the ambient culture. For example, Washington is not compelling Christian parents to let their children be absorbed by social media and catechized by the Internet.

I see getting good federal judges in place to be an entirely defensive political act, designed to gain more time for religious minorities to develop resilient practices and institutions capable of enduring what’s to come, and keeping the faith alive.

I also see nothing at all wrong with traditional Christians engaging in politics for other reasons. My only caution — and it’s a strong caution — is that they not fool themselves into thinking that by doing so, they are meaningfully addressing the most severe crisis upon us. Let me put it like this: in the Book of Daniel, the Hebrew captives Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego served the King in high positions of state. You could say that they worked in politics, though they were outsiders. But when it came down to it, those men chose the prospect of martyrdom to the apostasy the King demanded of them. What practices did the three Hebrew men live by in their everyday lives as Jews in Babylon that gave them the presence of mind, and the strength, to choose God over Nebuchadnezzar? That’s the question that ought to be first on the minds of every traditional Christian thinking of going into public service. It’s the same with Sir Thomas More, who went to his martyrdom proclaiming that he was the King’s good servant — but God’s first.

One of the most important lines in Larry Chapp’s essay is his point that we traditional Christians “are infected with the same bacillus as everyone else.” It brought to mind the insufficiency of institutions and habits to protect us fully from the malaise of the broader culture. To be clear: these things are necessary, but not sufficient.

An example: at the Notre Dame conference, I spoke with an academic from a conservative Christian college. He told me that the student body there is quite conservative and observant. They are overwhelmingly pro-life. But they also do not understand at all what’s wrong with gay marriage. There are strong arguments from Scripture and from the authoritative Christian tradition, but these make no sense to them. Mind you, most of these young people were raised in optimal environments for the passing down of the faith and its teachings, and yet, on the key matter of the meaning of sex, marriage, and family, they … don’t get it.

I asked my interlocutor why. He shrugged, and said, “The culture is just too powerful.”

The problem with this is that in order to arrive at the point where one, as a Christian, rejects the Church’s teaching on the interrelated meaning of sex, marriage, and family, one has to reject both the authority of Scripture (and, for Catholics, the Church), and the anthropological core of Christianity — that is, the Biblical model of what man is. Ultimately, you have to reject traditional Christian metaphysics. I cover this all in my Sex and Sexuality chapter of The Benedict Option, but the heart of it is in this 2013 essay, “Sex After Christianity.” The gist of it is that the gay marriage revolution is really a cosmological revolution, and that to affirm gay marriage, as a Christian, means surrendering far more than many Christians think. It means, ultimately, that you see the world through the post-Christian culture’s template, not Christianity’s. What is likely happening with these young people is that they’re pro-life because they see the unborn child as a bearer of rights, including the right to life. And they’re not wrong! But that’s essentially a liberal position, one that is entirely amenable to gay marriage and the rest. The “bacillus” of materialism and radical individualism may find more resistance within the Body of Christ, but it still compromises its health.

Here’s another reason to be concerned, and to resist hoping in politics. It’s from an interview with Sir Roger Scruton:

How do current right-wing populist politics fit (or not) into your conception of conservative thought and conservative politics?

Well, I’m not a populist. I’m a believer in institutions. I think that institutions are the only guarantee we have of continuity and freedom. If you make direct appeals to the people all the time, the result is totally unstable and unpredictable, like the French Revolution. The revolutionaries made direct appeal to the people, and then discovered that they hated the people. So, they cut off their heads.

I believe [British historian] Simon Schama wrote a book on the topic…

Yes, Simon Schama’s book on the French Revolution is very revealing about this. The attempts to get rid of all mediating institutions just leaves the people in a dangerous condition, and a demagogue in charge. You can see this in Robespierre and Saint Just. And the only good thing about the French Revolution is that the demagogue gets his head chopped off as well.

So, I believe in institutions, and in using institutions to direct the people towards the kind of continuity and stability that they actually need, but doing it with their consent, obviously. That’s where the democratic process comes in.

What are your thoughts on the balance between consent and stability?

Well, first of all, stability requires legitimacy of opposition. There has to be a discussion of all the issues. That means that there must be a voice for the opponent, that’s what Congress and Parliament are about. And the first victim of real populism is the opponent, who is shut up. The press is taken away from him, parliamentary positions are taken away from him, so that the leading power has no voice opposed to it. …

It is no secret now that Americans have lost faith in institutions across the board. As Bill Bishop puts it, this is not Trump’s fault; the way we live in modernity all but guarantees it. Trump is not the cause of this, but rather an effect — though of course he also serves as a cause. The fact that a man can be elected President of the United States despite having violated so many institutional norms tells us something about the presidency, and the American people today. We are losing, and in many cases have already lost, mediating institutions. America is quite vulnerable to a demagogue — and there’s no guarantee that the demagogue will always be from the political right. Huey P. Long, for example, was a very effective left-wing demagogue — and he emerged almost a century ago, when the power of American institutions was much, much stronger than it is today.

We see in Trump a desire to delegitimize the opposition. For example, the media isn’t simply biased — a standard conservative politician’s critique, because it’s usually true — but is illegitimate. That’s what “fake news” means. The thing is, on college campuses, the urge to delegitimize opposition as racist, sexist, homophobic, and so forth, is exactly the same thing. Ultimately it will become more powerful, because this mentality is conquering the hearts and minds of the kind of people who will be running the institutions that, however attenuated their influence, will be shaping the perceptions and beliefs of Americans.

The power of Google and Facebook to determine which opinions are legitimate and which ones are not is going to be massively important. And I would be shocked if some form of the Chinese “social credit” system were not introduced into this country. What does that mean? From the National Interest:

The Chinese government has  unveiled a new program that it dubbed the “social credit system.” The system won’t be fully operational until 2020, but already it has generated as many as  7 million  punishments.

The system would rate the “trustworthiness” of Chinese citizens according to a wide variety of factors, such as what they buy, how they spend their time, and who their friends are, just to name a few.

The government would then take those deemed untrustworthy and punish them by not letting their children attend prestigious private schools, not allowing them to travel, and shutting down their internet presence.

The Chinese Communist government  promises that the social credit system will “allow the trustworthy to roam freely under heaven while making it hard for the discredited to take a single step.”

However, one must ask what it means to be “untrustworthy.”

In the  case of journalist Liu Hu, it could mean trying to expose government corruption. Other offenses could be things such as jaywalking, smoking on a train, criticizing the government, or having friends or family that speak ill of the government, all things that can lower one’s score.

In a future America in which opposition is deemed illegitimate, and in which personal data is widely available, how long do you think we can hold out against the temptation to institute a social credit score system? In China, it is being imposed from the top. In the US, our population is being acculturated by online norms, as well by an ethos that regards opponents not simply as wrong, but evil. We are being conditioned to accept this, and even, within the next couple of generations, to demand it.

It might come from the right, in which case I believe conservatives would bear a special responsibility for fighting it. But looking at the demographic data about the political and cultural beliefs of younger Americans, I think it is far, far more likely that it will come from the left — and that it will primarily be directed towards thought criminals like traditional Christians and social conservatives.

In that case, the best chance we have to protect ourselves from that all-encompassing tyranny would be a Supreme Court that defends the First Amendment. The greater concern for us, however, is that there would be no need for traditional Christians to be protected from a tyrannical social-credit-score government, because all Christians will have conformed internally, like so many “good German Christians” of the 1930s, to the regime — in our case, a regime of Moralistic Therapeutic Totalitarianism.

Larry Chapp:

…so too did Peter Maurin warn us that the only way we will endure the coming storm of cultural barbarity is to form deeply intentional communities of Christian intellectual discourse, moral ecology, and liturgical practice. Not so that we can “escape” the world and shun our brothers and sisters who remain within it. But so that we can know ourselves better and come closer to God so as to be better able to serve our neighbor in love.

We have to build this now — while there is still time.

UPDATE: Former San Francisco mayor Gavin Newsom was elected Governor of California last night. Note this:

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

The old liberals — Jerry Brown, say — who respected institutions are dying out. Newsom is the next generation. Damon Linker is right to point to Newsom’s willingness to openly defy the law to achieve a liberal goal as a harbinger of what’s to come from the left. He was eager to cut down the law to get to the devil of homophobia. This kind of thing is coming.


Pâques/2020e: Si le grain ne meurt (Ou la longue histoire, d’Isaac à Moïse et de la circoncision à l’eucharistie comme de l’avortement à la contraception et de la vaccination au confinement, de l’abandon comme des substituts et survivances du sacrifice d’enfants)

10 avril, 2020

The sacrifice of Isaac - collection of Marc Chagall Museum… | Flickr

The First mourning (William-Adolphe Bouguereau, 1888)Death of the Pharaoh Firstborn son (Lawrence Alma-Tadema, 1872)Lamentations over the Death of the First-Born of Egypt (Charles Sprague Pearce, 1877)La Fille de Jephté (Alexandre Cabanel, 1879)Vincent van Gogh Four Sunflowers Gone to Seed Cool Wall Decor Art ...En vérité, en vérité, je vous le dis, si le grain de blé qui est tombé en terre ne meurt, il reste seul; mais, s’il meurt, il porte beaucoup de fruit. Jésus (Jean 12: 24)
Tu me donneras le premier-né de tes fils. Tu me donneras aussi le premier-né de ta vache et de ta brebis; il restera sept jours avec sa mère; le huitième jour, tu me le donneras. Exode 22: 29-30
Tout premier-né m’appartient (…) tu rachèteras tout premier-né de tes fils; et l’on ne se présentera point à vide devant ma face. Exode 34: 19-20
Lorsqu’une femme deviendra enceinte, et qu’elle enfantera un mâle, elle sera impure pendant sept jours; elle sera impure comme au temps de son indisposition menstruelle. Le huitième jour, l’enfant sera circoncis. Elle restera encore trente-trois jours à se purifier de son sang; elle ne touchera aucune chose sainte, et elle n’ira point au sanctuaire, jusqu’à ce que les jours de sa purification soient accomplis. (…) Lorsque les jours de sa purification seront accomplis, pour un fils ou pour une fille, elle apportera au sacrificateur, à l’entrée de la tente d’assignation, un agneau d’un an pour l’holocauste, et un jeune pigeon ou une tourterelle pour le sacrifice d’expiation. Lévitique 12: 2-6
S’il n’a pas de quoi se procurer une brebis ou une chèvre, il offrira en sacrifice de culpabilité à l’Éternel pour son péché deux tourterelles ou deux jeunes pigeons, l’un comme victime expiatoire, l’autre comme holocauste. Lévitique 5: 7
Qu’on ne trouve chez toi personne qui fasse passer son fils ou sa fille par le feu. Deutéronome 18: 10
Et, quand les jours de leur purification furent accomplis, selon la loi de Moïse, Joseph et Marie le portèrent à Jérusalem, pour le présenter au Seigneur, – suivant ce qui est écrit dans la loi du Seigneur: Tout mâle premier-né sera consacré au Seigneur, – et pour offrir en sacrifice deux tourterelles ou deux jeunes pigeons, comme cela est prescrit dans la loi du Seigneur. Luc 2: 22-24
Au bout de quelque temps, Caïn fit à l’Éternel une offrande des fruits de la terre; et Abel, de son côté, en fit une des premiers-nés de son troupeau et de leur graisse. L’Éternel porta un regard favorable sur Abel et sur son offrande; mais il ne porta pas un regard favorable sur Caïn et sur son offrande. (…) Caïn se jeta sur son frère Abel, et le tua. (…) L’Éternel lui dit: Si quelqu’un tuait Caïn, Caïn serait vengé sept fois. Et l’Éternel mit un signe sur Caïn pour que quiconque le trouverait ne le tuât point. Genèse 4: 3-15
Dieu dit à Abraham: Toi, tu garderas mon alliance, toi et tes descendants après toi, selon leurs générations. C’est ici mon alliance, que vous garderez entre moi et vous, et ta postérité après toi: tout mâle parmi vous sera circoncis. Vous vous circoncirez; et ce sera un signe d’alliance entre moi et vous. A l’âge de huit jours, tout mâle parmi vous sera circoncis, selon vos générations, qu’il soit né dans la maison, ou qu’il soit acquis à prix d’argent de tout fils d’étranger, sans appartenir à ta race.  On devra circoncire celui qui est né dans la maison et celui qui est acquis à prix d’argent; et mon alliance sera dans votre chair une alliance perpétuelle. Un mâle incirconcis, qui n’aura pas été circoncis dans sa chair, sera exterminé du milieu de son peuple: il aura violé mon alliance. Genèse 17: 9-14
Abraham circoncit son fils Isaac, âgé de huit jours, comme Dieu le lui avait ordonné. Genèse 21: 4
Dieu dit: Prends ton fils, ton unique, celui que tu aimes, Isaac; va-t’en au pays de Morija, et là offre-le en holocauste sur l’une des montagnes que je te dirai. (…) Puis Abraham étendit la main, et prit le couteau, pour égorger son fils. Alors l’ange de l’Éternel (…) dit: N’avance pas ta main sur l’enfant, et ne lui fais rien; car je sais maintenant que tu crains Dieu, et que tu ne m’as pas refusé ton fils, ton unique. Abraham leva les yeux, et vit derrière lui un bélier retenu dans un buisson par les cornes; et Abraham alla prendre le bélier, et l’offrit en holocauste à la place de son fils. Genèse 22: 2-13
Pendant le voyage, en un lieu où Moïse passa la nuit, l’Éternel l’attaqua et voulut le faire mourir. Séphora prit une pierre aiguë, coupa le prépuce de son fils, et le jeta aux pieds de Moïse, en disant: Tu es pour moi un époux de sang! Et l’Éternel le laissa. C’est alors qu’elle dit: Époux de sang! à cause de la circoncision. Exode 4: 24-26
Parlez à toute l’assemblée d’Israël, et dites: Le dixième jour de ce mois, on prendra un agneau pour chaque famille, un agneau pour chaque maison. (…) On prendra de son sang, et on en mettra sur les deux poteaux et sur le linteau de la porte des maisons où on le mangera. (…) Cette nuit-là, je passerai dans le pays d’Égypte, et je frapperai tous les premiers-nés du pays d’Égypte, depuis les hommes jusqu’aux animaux, et j’exercerai des jugements contre tous les dieux de l’Égypte. (…) Le sang vous servira de signe sur les maisons où vous serez; je verrai le sang, et je passerai par-dessus vous, et il n’y aura point de plaie qui vous détruise, quand je frapperai le pays d’Égypte. Vous conserverez le souvenir de ce jour, et vous le célébrerez par une fête en l’honneur de l’Éternel; vous le célébrerez comme une loi perpétuelle pour vos descendants. Exode 12: 3-14
Maudit soit devant l’Éternel l’homme qui se lèvera pour rebâtir cette ville de Jéricho! Il en jettera les fondements au prix de son premier-né, et il en posera les portes au prix de son plus jeune fils. Josué 6: 26
De son temps, Hiel de Béthel bâtit Jéricho; il en jeta les fondements au prix d’Abiram, son premier-né, et il en posa les portes aux prix de Segub, son plus jeune fils, selon la parole que l’Éternel avait dite par Josué, fils de Nun. I Rois 16: 34
Jephthé fit un voeu à l’Éternel, et dit: Si tu livres entre mes mains les fils d’Ammon, quiconque sortira des portes de ma maison au-devant de moi, à mon heureux retour de chez les fils d’Ammon, sera consacré à l’Éternel, et je l’offrirai en holocauste. Jephthé marcha contre les fils d’Ammon, et l’Éternel les livra entre ses mains. (…) Jephthé retourna dans sa maison à Mitspa. Et voici, sa fille sortit au-devant de lui avec des tambourins et des danses. C’était son unique enfant; il n’avait point de fils et point d’autre fille. Dès qu’il la vit, il déchira ses vêtements, et dit: Ah! ma fille! tu me jettes dans l’abattement, tu es au nombre de ceux qui me troublent! J’ai fait un voeu à l’Éternel, et je ne puis le révoquer. Elle lui dit: Mon père, si tu as fait un voeu à l’Éternel, traite-moi selon ce qui est sorti de ta bouche, maintenant que l’Éternel t’a vengé de tes ennemis, des fils d’Ammon. (…) Au bout des deux mois, elle revint vers son père, et il accomplit sur elle le voeu qu’il avait fait. Juges 11: 30-40
Et Saül dit: Que Dieu me traite dans toute sa rigueur, si tu ne meurs pas, Jonathan! Le peuple dit à Saül: Quoi! Jonathan mourrait, lui qui a opéré cette grande délivrance en Israël! Loin de là! L’Éternel est vivant! il ne tombera pas à terre un cheveu de sa tête, car c’est avec Dieu qu’il a agi dans cette journée. Ainsi le peuple sauva Jonathan, et il ne mourut point. I Samuel 14: 44-45
Alors Salomon bâtit sur la montagne qui est en face de Jérusalem un haut lieu pour Kemosch, l’abomination de Moab, et pour Moloc, l’abomination des fils d’Ammon. I Rois 11: 7
Achaz (…) marcha dans la voie des rois d’Israël; et même il fit passer son fils par le feu, suivant les abominations des nations que l’Éternel avait chassées devant les enfants d’Israël. II Rois 16: 2-3
Manassé (…) fit passer son fils par le feu. II Rois 21: 1-6
Le roi Josias (…) souilla Topheth dans la vallée des fils de Hinnom, afin que personne ne fît plus passer son fils ou sa fille par le feu en l’honneur de Moloc. 2 Rois 23: 1-10
Et il s’éleva sur la mer une grande tempête. Le navire menaçait de faire naufrage. Les mariniers eurent peur, ils implorèrent chacun leur dieu, et ils jetèrent dans la mer les objets qui étaient sur le navire, afin de le rendre plus léger. (…) Et il se rendirent l’un à l’autre: Venez, et tirons au sort, pour savoir qui nous attire ce malheur. Ils tirèrent au sort, et le sort tomba sur Jonas. Alors ils lui dirent: Dis-nous qui nous attire ce malheur. (…) Ils lui dirent: Que te ferons-nous, pour que la mer se calme envers nous? Car la mer était de plus en plus orageuse. Il leur répondit: Prenez-moi, et jetez-moi dans la mer, et la mer se calmera envers vous; car je sais que c’est moi qui attire sur vous cette grande tempête. (…) Puis ils prirent Jonas, et le jetèrent dans la mer. Et la fureur de la mer s’apaisa. Jonas 1: 15
Ils ont rempli ce lieu de sang innocent; Ils ont bâti des hauts lieux à Baal, Pour brûler leurs enfants au feu en holocaustes à Baal: Ce que je n’avais ni ordonné ni prescrit, Ce qui ne m’était point venu à la pensée. C’est pourquoi voici, les jours viennent, dit l’Éternel, Où ce lieu ne sera plus appelé Topheth et vallée de Ben Hinnom, Mais où on l’appellera vallée du carnage. Jérémie 19: 4-6
Je leur donnai aussi des préceptes qui n’étaient pas bons, et des ordonnances par lesquelles ils ne pouvaient vivre.Je les souillai par leurs offrandes, quand ils faisaient passer par le feu tous leurs premiers-nés; je voulus ainsi les punir, et leur faire connaître que je suis l’Éternel. Ezéchiel 20: 25-26
Avec quoi me présenterai-je devant l’Éternel, Pour m’humilier devant le Dieu Très Haut? Me présenterai-je avec des holocaustes, Avec des veaux d’un an? L’Éternel agréera-t-il des milliers de béliers, Des myriades de torrents d’huile? Donnerai-je pour mes transgressions mon premier-né, Pour le péché de mon âme le fruit de mes entrailles? – On t’a fait connaître, ô homme, ce qui est bien; Et ce que l’Éternel demande de toi, C’est que tu pratiques la justice, Que tu aimes la miséricorde, Et que tu marches humblement avec ton Dieu. Michée 6: 6-8
Tu n’as voulu ni sacrifice ni oblation… Donc j’ai dit: Voici, je viens. Psaume 40: 7-8
Le roi dit: Coupez en deux l’enfant qui vit, et donnez-en la moitié à l’une et la moitié à l’autre. Alors la femme dont le fils était vivant sentit ses entrailles s’émouvoir pour son fils, et elle dit au roi: Ah! mon seigneur, donnez-lui l’enfant qui vit, et ne le faites point mourir. Jugement de Salomon (I Rois 3: 25-26)
Il ne lui sera donné d’autre miracle que celui du prophète Jonas. Jésus (Matthieu 12: 39)
Il n’y a pas de plus grand amour que de donner sa vie pour ses amis. Jésus (Jean 15: 13)
Gardez-vous de mépriser un seul de ces petits; car je vous dis que leurs anges dans les cieux voient continuellement la face de mon Père qui est dans les cieux. Car le Fils de l’homme est venu sauver ce qui était perdu. Que vous en semble? Si un homme a cent brebis, et que l’une d’elles s’égare, ne laisse-t-il pas les quatre-vingt-dix-neuf autres sur les montagnes, pour aller chercher celle qui s’est égarée Et, s’il la trouve, je vous le dis en vérité, elle lui cause plus de joie que les quatre-vingt-dix-neuf qui ne se sont pas égarées. De même, ce n’est pas la volonté de votre Père qui est dans les cieux qu’il se perde un seul de ces petits. Jésus (Matthieu 18: 10-14)
Vous ne réfléchissez pas qu’il est dans votre intérêt qu’un seul homme meure pour le peuple, et que la nation entière ne périsse pas. Caïphe (Jean 11: 50)
Nul ne peut ne pas mourir, mais l’homme seul peut donner sa vie. André Malraux
Après ce, vint une merdaille Fausse, traître et renoïe : Ce fu Judée la honnie, La mauvaise, la desloyal, Qui bien het et aimme tout mal, Qui tant donna d’or et d’argent Et promist a crestienne gent, Que puis, rivieres et fonteinnes Qui estoient cleres et seinnes En plusieurs lieus empoisonnerent, Dont pluseurs leurs vies finerent ; Car trestuit cil qui en usoient Assez soudeinnement moroient. Dont, certes, par dis fois cent mille En morurent, qu’a champ, qu’a ville. Einsois que fust aperceuë Ceste mortel deconvenue. Mais cils qui haut siet et louing voit, Qui tout gouverne et tout pourvoit, Ceste traïson plus celer Ne volt, enis la fist reveler Et si generalement savoir Qu’ils perdirent corps et avoir. Car tuit Juif furent destruit, Li uns pendus, li autres cuit, L’autre noié, l’autre ot copée La teste de hache ou d’espée. Et maint crestien ensement En morurent honteusement.  Guillaume de Machaut (Jugement du Roy de Navarre, v. 1349
Une nation ne se régénère que sur un monceau de cadavres. Saint-Just
Qu’un sang impur abreuve nos sillons! Air connu
L’arbre de la liberté doit être revivifié de temps en temps par le sang des patriotes et des tyrans. Jefferson
Dionysos contre le ‘crucifié’ : la voici bien l’opposition. Ce n’est pas une différence quant au martyre – mais celui-ci a un sens différent. La vie même, son éternelle fécondité, son éternel retour, détermine le tourment, la destruction, la volonté d’anéantir pour Dionysos. Dans l’autre cas, la souffrance, le ‘crucifié’ en tant qu’il est ‘innocent’, sert d’argument contre cette vie, de formulation de sa condamnation. (…) L’individu a été si bien pris au sérieux, si bien posé comme un absolu par le christianisme, qu’on ne pouvait plus le sacrifier : mais l’espèce ne survit que grâce aux sacrifices humains… La véritable philanthropie exige le sacrifice pour le bien de l’espèce – elle est dure, elle oblige à se dominer soi-même, parce qu’elle a besoin du sacrifice humain. Et cette pseudo-humanité qui s’institue christianisme, veut précisément imposer que personne ne soit sacrifié. Nietzsche
Le christianisme est une rébellion contre la loi naturelle, une protestation contre la nature. Poussé à sa logique extrême, le christianisme signifierait la culture systématique de l’échec humain. Adolf Hitler
Les catholiques et les orthodoxes décrivent l’Eucharistie comme une véritable « actualisation », non sanglante, du sacrifice du Christ en vue du salut, par le ministère du prêtre. De leur côté, les protestants s’y refusent, considérant que cela diminue la dignité du sacrifice de la Croix et affirmant que le texte biblique ne soutient pas la théorie de la transsubstantiation enseignée par l’Église catholique. Les luthériens emploient le terme de consubstantiation. Chez les chrétiens évangéliques, on parle d’un mémorial du sacrifice de Jésus-Christ et d’une annonce de son retour. Wikipedia
Un homme pur recueillera la cendre de la vache, et la déposera hors du camp, dans un lieu pur; on la conservera pour l’assemblée des enfants d’Israël, afin d’en faire l’eau de purification. C’est une eau expiatoire. Nombres 19: 9
Le baptême ou baptême d’eau est un rite ou un sacrement symbolisant la nouvelle vie du croyant chrétien. Il est partagé par la quasi-totalité des Églises chrétiennes, étant donné son importance dans les textes bibliques. L’eau symbolise à la fois la mort par noyade des baptisés dans leur ancienne vie caractérisée par le péché, et leur nouvelle naissance dans une vie nouvelle et éternelle. (…) Dans le judaïsme, le mikvé est un bain rituel utilisé pour l’ablution nécessaire aux rites de pureté. L’immersion totale du corps dans l’eau du mikvé fait partie du processus de conversion au judaïsme. On y voit généralement l’ancêtre du baptême chrétien. Dans l’esprit de la Torah et dans les rites d’immersion juifs demandés à Moïse par YHWH, l’immersion représente l’engloutissement dans l’eau d’un corps qui a été touché par l’impur. Wikipedia
L’histoire de Caïn et Abel, rapportée dans le chapitre IV du livre de la Genèse (…) soulève la question de savoir si l’auto-domestication sacrificielle est une tâche dont les hommes peuvent venir à bout ou un travail sans cesse à reprendre pour ne pas retomber dans la barbarie. Des deux fils d’Adam et Ève, nous savons seulement que l’un et l’autre font des offrandes à Dieu. Abel, qui est éleveur, sacrifie les premiers-nés de son troupeau, Caïn, qui est agriculteur, fait des offrandes végétales. Or, Dieu accepte les offrandes d’Abel, mais refuse celles de Caïn, sans qu’on sache pourquoi. (…) Dieu n’agit pas de façon arbitraire, car il y a bien une différence cruciale entre les sacrifices offerts par les deux frères. Il accepte le sacrifice d’Abel, parce qu’il est sanglant, il refuse celui de Caïn, parce qu’il n’est pas sanglant. Dire qu’il accepte le premier est une manière théologique de dire que celui-ci est approprié et efficace, dire que le second est refusé, de laisser entendre qu’il est inapproprié et inefficace. La suite de l’histoire montre aussitôt en quoi consiste l’efficacité du sacrifice. Abel met à mort les premiers-nés de son troupeau et, pour cette raison, ne devient pas meurtrier, alors que Caïn, ne faisant pas de sacrifice animal, devient homicide. Il s’agit là, en quelque sorte, d’une loi naturelle, qui s’impose à Dieu lui-même, et qui explique la protection accordée à Caïn. Au fond, tout se passe comme si, faute de victime animale, la mise à mort d’Abel était ou valait un sacrifice, et donc comme si Caïn était une sorte de sacrificateur (…) Pour saisir toute la porté de ce passage de la Genèse, il faut le rapprocher de l’épisode non moins célèbre du sacrifice, ou de la «ligature », comme dit la tradition juive, d’Isaac. Cet épisode, ainsi que le thème récurrent du rachat des premiers-nés, montrent que chez les Hébreux, comme ailleurs, la victime sacrificielle idéale est un être humain, mais aussi qu’il est possible de détourner la violence rituelle et, avec elle, toute la violence humaine, sur une victime animale. En revanche, l’histoire de Caïn et Abel laisse entendre qu’il serait dangereux, ou du moins prématuré, de vouloir se soustraire totalement de l’ordre sacrificiel et s’affranchir de toute violence. Qui veut faire l’ange fait la bête. On peut sacrifier un animal à la place d’un homme, mais en voulant remplacer le sacrifice animal par des offrandes végétales, on prend le risque de retomber dans la violence même que l’on voulait éviter. Bref, le sacrifice est un moyen violent de tromper la violence, de lui céder localement du terrain pour mieux la dominer globalement et la contenir dans les limites les plus étroites possibles. Mais, sans que cette violence rituelle, on peut le craindre, puisse être réduite à zéro. Telle est la conjecture qui ressort de nos exemples. Jusqu’à preuve du contraire, elle semble corroborée par l’histoire, pleine de bruit et de fureur, des sociétés humaines. (…) si la théologie chrétienne traditionnelle a pu permettre à ses adversaires de lui imputer une réhabilitation du sacrifice humain et d’assimiler la communion à une nouvelle forme de cannibalisme, il est patent que le rituel chrétien, qui ici comme ailleurs constitue le noyau dur d’une religion, est, depuis toujours, et à l’instar, pourrait-on dire, du sacrifice de Caïn, aux antipodes du sacrifice humain. Ou plutôt, à l’instar de celui de Melchisédech, auquel il se réfère expressément, et qui est à peine un sacrifice, puisqu’il consiste en une simple offrande de pain et de vin. Le protestantisme a d’ailleurs rejeté, de longue date, toute interprétation sacrificielle du culte, et, cinq siècles plus tard, on s’aperçoit que, sans vraiment se l’avouer, le rituel catholique lui emboîte le pas. La «célébration eucharistique » tend à remplacer le «sacrifice de la messe », mettant l’accent sur le partage du pain et du vin, «fruit de la terre et du travail des hommes », entre les membres de la communauté, plutôt que sur le sacrifice du dieu ou au dieu. Mais, si cette sortie du sacrifice est indéniable, il est plus difficile de savoir s’il s’agit bien d’un progrès, comme le croient spontanément nos contemporains, chrétiens, irréligieux ou agnostiques, d’accord en cela avec Girard. (…) là aussi, l’acte central est un sacrifice, indéfiniment répété dans le repas de communion, pour la rémission des péchés, c’est-à-dire pour atténuer le mal sans pouvoir jamais s’y soustraire définitivement (…). Pour établir la supériorité du judaïsme sur le christianisme, certains auteurs juifs, tels que Hyam Maccoby, ont fait grief au second de retomber dans le sacrifice humain dont le premier avait su sortir depuis Abraham. Pour les raisons déjà dites, cet argument nous semble irrecevable. C’est un moyen maladroit de masquer le fait, apparemment difficile à assumer de nos jours, que le judaïsme est beaucoup plus sacrificiel que son rejeton chrétien. C’est, en effet, seulement à un accident historique, la destruction du Temple par les Romains, que le judaïsme doit d’avoir abandonné, ou plutôt interrompu, l’usage des sacrifices sanglants. Comme le rappellent les juifs orthodoxes, dès que le Temple sera reconstruit, il faudra y reprendre les sacrifices. Quant à la circoncision, qui se rattache au rachat des premiers-nés, et, en dernière instance, au sacrifice des enfants que pratiquaient les anciens Hébreux, elle est manifestement plus sacrificielle et sanglante que le baptême chrétien. Lucien Scubla
Du point de vue égyptien, le départ des Hébreux d’Egypte était en fait une expulsion justifiable. Les principales sources sont les écrits de Manéthon et Apion, qui sont résumés et réfutés dans l’ouvrage de Josephus contre Apion. . . Manetho était un prêtre égyptien à Héliopolis. Apion était un Égyptien qui écrivait en grec et qui joua un rôle de premier plan dans la vie culturelle et politique égyptienne. Son récit de l’Exode a été utilisé dans une attaque contre les revendications et les droits des Juifs d’Alexandrie. . . La version hellénistique-égyptienne de l’Exode peut être résumée comme suit: les Egyptiens faisaient face à une crise importante précipitée par une population souffrant de diverses maladies. Par crainte de voir la maladie se répandre ou que quelque chose de plus grave encore ne se produise, cette bande a été rassemblée et expulsée du pays. Sous la conduite d’un certain Moïse, ces personnes ont été renvoyées; puis elles se sont constituées en unité religieuse et nationale. Et elles se sont finalement établies à Jérusalem et sont devenues les ancêtres des juifs. James G. Williams
L’accusation de crime rituel à l’encontre des Juifs est l’une des plus anciennes allégations antijuives et antisémites de l’Histoire. En effet, bien que l’accusation de crime de sang ait touché d’autres groupes que les Juifs, dont les premiers chrétiens, certains détails, parmi lesquels l’allégation que les Juifs utilisaient du sang humain pour certains de leurs rituels religieux, principalement la confection de pains azymes (matza) lors de la Pâque, leur furent spécifiques. (…) Le premier exemple connu d’accusation de ce type précède le christianisme, puisqu’il est fourni, selon Flavius Josèphe, par Apion, un écrivain sophiste égyptien hellénisé ayant vécu au Ier siècle. (…) Après la première affaire à Norwich (Angleterre) en 1144, les accusations se multiplient dans l’Europe catholique. De nombreuses disparitions inexpliquées d’enfants et de nombreux meurtres sont expliqués par ce biais. Wikipedia
Le poète et musicien Guillaume de Machaut écrivait au milieu du XIVe siècle. Son Jugement du Roy de Navarre mériterait d’être mieux connu. La partie principale de l’œuvre, certes, n’est qu’un long poème de style courtois, conventionnel de style et de sujet. Mais le début a quelque chose de saisissant. C’est une suite confuse d’événements catastrophiques auxquels Guillaume prétend avoir assisté avant de s’enfermer, finalement, de terreur dans sa maison pour y attendre la mort ou la fin de l’indicible épreuve. Certains événements sont tout à fait invraisemblables, d’autres ne le sont qu’à demi. Et pourtant de ce récit une impression se dégage : il a dû se passer quelque chose de réel. Il y a des signes dans le ciel. Les pierres pleuvent et assomment les vivants. Des villes entières sont détruites par la foudre. Dans celle où résidait Guillaume – il ne dit pas laquelle – les hommes meurent en grand nombre. Certaines de ces morts sont dues à la méchanceté des juifs et de leurs complices parmi les chrétiens. Comment ces gens-là s’y prenaient-ils pour causer de vastes pertes dans la population locale? Ils empoisonnaient les rivières, les sources d’approvisionnement en eau potable. La justice céleste a mis bon ordre à ces méfaits en révélant leurs auteurs à la population qui les a tous massacrés. Et pourtant les gens n’ont pas cessé de mourir, de plus en plus nombreux, jusqu’à un certain jour de printemps où Guillaume entendit de la musique dans la rue, des hommes et des femmes qui riaient. Tout était fini et la poésie courtoise pouvait recommencer. (…) aujourd’hui, les lecteurs repèrent des événements réels à travers les invraisemblances du récit. Ils ne croient ni aux signes dans le ciel ni aux accusations contre les juifs mais ils ne traitent pas tous les thèmes incroyables de la même façon; ils ne les mettent pas tous sur le même plan. Guillaume n’a rien inventé. C’est un homme crédule, certes, et il reflète une opinion publique hystérique. Les innombrables morts dont il fait état n’en sont pas moins réelles, causées de toute évidence par la fameuse peste noire qui ravagea la France en 1349 et 1350. Le massacre des juifs est également réel, justifié aux yeux des foules meurtrières par les rumeurs d’empoisonnement qui circulent un peu partout. C’est la terreur universelle de la maladie qui donne un poids suffisant à ces rumeurs pour déclencher lesdits massacres. (…) Mais les nombreuses morts attribuées par l’auteur au poison judaïque suggèrent une autre explication. Si ces morts sont réelles – et il n’y a pas de raison de les tenir pour imaginaires – elles pourraient bien être les premières victimes d’un seul et même fléau. Mais Guillaume ne s’en doute pas, même rétrospectivement. A ses yeux les boucs émissaires traditionnels conservent leur puissance explicatrice pour les premiers stades de l’épidémie. Pour les stades ultérieurs, seulement, l’auteur reconnaît la présence d’un phénomène proprement pathologique. L’étendue du désastre finit par décourager la seule explication par le complot des empoisonneurs, mais Guillaume ne réinterprète pas la suite entière des événements en fonction de leur raison d’être véritable. (…) Même rétrospectivement, tous les boucs émissaires collectifs réels et imaginaires, les juifs et les flagellants, les pluies de pierre et l’epydimie, continuent à jouer leur rôle si efficacement dans le récit de Guillaume que celui-ci ne voit jamais l’unité du fléau désigné par nous comme la « peste noire ». L’auteur continue à percevoir une multiplicité de désastres plus ou moins indépendants ou reliés les uns aux autres seulement par leur signification religieuse, un peu comme les dix plaies d’Egypte. René Girard
Le passage du sacrifice humain au sacrifice animal (…) représente un progrès immense (…) que le judaïsme est le seul à interpréter dans le sacrifice d’Isaac. Le seul à le symboliser dans une grande scène qui est une des premières scènes de l’Ancien Testament. Il ne faut pas oublier ce dont ce texte tient compte et dont la tradition n’a pas assez tenu compte : tout l’Ancien Testament  se situe dans le contexte du sacrifice du premier né. Rattacher le christianisme au sacrifice du premier né est absurde, mais derrière le judaïsme se trouve ce qu’il y a dans toutes les civilisations moyen-orientales, en particulier chez les Phéniciens : le sacrifice des enfants. Lorsque Flaubert le représente dans  Salambo, Sainte-Beuve avait bien tort de se moquer de lui parce que ce dont parle Flaubert est très réel. Les chercheurs ont découvert dans les cimetières de Carthage des tombes qui étaient des mélanges d’animaux à demi-brulés et d’enfants à la naissance à demi-brulés. Il a beaucoup été reproché à Flaubert la scène du dieu Moloch où les parents carthaginois jettent leurs enfants dans la fournaise. Or, les dernières recherches lui donnent raison contre Sainte-Beuve. En définitive, c’est le romancier qui a raison : cette scène est l’un des éléments les plus terrifiants et magnifiques de  Salambo. La mode intellectuelle de ces dernières années selon laquelle la violence a été inventée par le monde occidental à l’époque du colonialisme est une véritable absurdité et les archéologues n’en ont pas tenu compte. Aux Etats-Unis, des programmes de recherche se mettent en place notamment sur les Mayas. Ces derniers ont souvent été considérés comme des « anti-Aztèques » : ils n’auraient pas pratiqué de sacrifices humains. Pourtant, dès que l’on fait la moindre fouille, on découvre des choses extraordinaires : chez les Mayas, il y a des kilomètres carrés de villes enfouies. C’est une population formidable avec de nombreux temples et les traces du sacrifice humain y sont partout : des crânes de petits-enfants mêlés à des crânes d’animaux. René Girard
Dans le christianisme, on ne se martyrise pas soi-même. On n’est pas volontaire pour se faire tuer. On se met dans une situation où le respect des préceptes de Dieu (tendre l’autre joue, etc.) peut nous faire tuer. Cela dit, on se fera tuer parce que les hommes veulent nous tuer, non pas parce qu’on s’est porté volontaire. Ce n’est pas comme la notion japonaise de kamikaze. La notion chrétienne signifie que l’on est prêt à mourir plutôt qu’à tuer. C’est bien l’attitude de la bonne prostituée face au jugement de Salomon. Elle dit : « Donnez l’enfant à mon ennemi plutôt que de le tuer. » Sacrifier son enfant serait comme se sacrifier elle-même, car en acceptant une sorte de mort, elle se sacrifie elle-même. Et lorsque Salomon dit qu’elle est la vraie mère, cela ne signifie pas qu’elle est la mère biologique, mais la mère selon l’esprit. Cette histoire se trouve dans le Premier Livre des Rois (3, 16-28), qui est, à certains égards, un livre assez violent. Mais il me semble qu’il n’y a pas de meilleur symbole préchrétien du sacrifice de soi par le Christ. René Girard
‘Ils m’ont haï sans cause’ (…) ‘Il faut que s’accomplisse en moi ce texte de l’Écriture’, ‘On l’a compté parmi les criminels [ou les transgresseurs]’ (…) C’est tout simplement le refus de la causalité magique, et le refus des accusations stéréotypées qui s’énonce dans ces phrases apparemment trop banales pour tirer à conséquence. C’est le refus de tout ce que les foules persécutrices acceptent les yeux fermés. C’est ainsi que les Thébains adoptent tous sans hésiter l’hypothèse d’un Oedipe responsable de la peste, parce qu’incestueux ; c’est ainsi que les Égyptiens font enfermer le malheureux Joseph, sur la foi des racontars d’une Vénus provinciale, tout entière à sa proie attachée. Les Égyptiens n’en font jamais d’autres. Nous restons très égyptiens sous le rapport mythologique, avec Freud en particulier qui demande à l’Égypte la vérité du judaïsme. Les théories à la mode restent toutes païennes dans leur attachement au parricide, à l’inceste, etc., dans leur aveuglement au caractère mensonger des accusations stéréotypées. Nous sommes très en retard sur les Évangiles et même sur la Genèse. René Girard
Les banlieues ont inventé une nouvelle forme de sacrifice : la destruction de l’objet symbolique fondamental de la société de consommation qu’est l’automobile. On se passe les nerfs en détruisant des automobiles. C’est très mauvais. Je ne suis pas du tout partisan de cela, mais on ne s’en prend pas aux personnes. René Girard
Voici quelques semaines, nous connûmes en France, pour la seconde fois, des révoltes sans morts, des violences déchaînées sans victimes humaines. Avons-nous vu, nous, vieillards, témoins des horreurs de la guerre et à qui l’histoire enseigna, contre le message d’Abraham et de Jésus, le bûcher de Jeanne d’Arc ou celui de Giordano Bruno ; avons-nous vu les révoltés en question ne brûler, par mimétisme, que des automobiles ; avons-nous observé la police, postée devant eux, épargner aussi les vies humaines ? Je vois ici une suite immanquable de votre anthropologie, où la violence collective passa, jadis, de l’homme à l’animal et, maintenant, de la bête, absente de nos villes, à des objets techniques. Parmi ces révoltes fument des chevaux-vapeur. Michel Serres
Nous vivons dans un monde, je l’ai dit, qui se reproche sa propre violence constamment, systématiquement, rituellement. Nous nous arrangeons pour transposer tous nos conflits, même ceux qui se prêtent le moins à cette transposition, dans le langage des victimes innocentes. Le débat sur l’avortement par exemple : qu’on soit pour ou contre, c’est toujours dans l’intérêt des « vraies victimes », à nous en croire, que nous choisissons notre camp. Qui mérite le plus nos lamentations, les mères qui se sacrifient pour leurs enfants ou les enfants sacrifiés à l’hédonisme contemporain. Voilà la question. (…) Contrairement au totalitarisme d’extrême droite – celui qui est ouvertement païen, comme le nazisme, dont on parle plus que jamais, et qui est, je pense, complètement fini -, le totalitarisme d’extrême gauche a de l’avenir. Des deux totalitarismes c’est le plus malin, parce qu’il est le rival du christianisme, comme l’était déjà le marxisme. Au lieu de s’opposer franchement au christianisme, il le déborde sur sa gauche. Le mouvement antichrétien le plus puissant est celui qui prend en compte et radicalise le souci des victimes, pour le paganiser. Ainsi, les puissances et les principautés reprochent au christianisme de ne pas défendre les victimes avec assez d’ardeur. Dans le passé chrétien elles ne voient que persécutions, oppressions, inquisitions. L’Antéchrist, lui, se flatte d’apporter aux hommes la paix et la tolérance que le christianisme leur promet et ne leur apporte pas. En réalité, c’est un retour très effectif à toutes sortes d’habitudes païennes : l’avortement, l’euthanasie, l’indifférenciation sexuelle, les jeux du cirque à gogo, mais sans victimes réelles, grâce aux simulations électroniques, etc. Le néo-paganisme veut faire du Décalogue et de toute la morale judéo-chrétienne une violence intolérable, et leur abolition complète est le premier de ses objectifs. Ce néo-paganisme situe le bonheur dans l’assouvissement illimité des désirs et, par conséquent, dans la suppression de tous les interdits. René Girard
Le christianisme (…) nous a fait passer de l’archaïsme à la modernité, en nous aidant à canaliser la violence autrement que par la mort.(…) En faisant d’un supplicié son Dieu, le christianisme va dénoncer le caractère inacceptable du sacrifice. Le Christ, fils de Dieu, innocent par essence, n’a-t-il pas dit – avec les prophètes juifs : « Je veux la miséricorde et non le sacrifice » ? En échange, il a promis le royaume de Dieu qui doit inaugurer l’ère de la réconciliation et la fin de la violence. La Passion inaugure ainsi un ordre inédit qui fonde les droits de l’homme, absolument inaliénables. (…) l’islam (…) ne supporte pas l’idée d’un Dieu crucifié, et donc le sacrifice ultime. Il prône la violence au nom de la guerre sainte et certains de ses fidèles recherchent le martyre en son nom. Archaïque ? Peut-être, mais l’est-il plus que notre société moderne hostile aux rites et de plus en plus soumise à la violence ? Jésus a-t-il échoué ? L’humanité a conservé de nombreux mécanismes sacrificiels. Il lui faut toujours tuer pour fonder, détruire pour créer, ce qui explique pour une part les génocides, les goulags et les holocaustes, le recours à l’arme nucléaire, et aujourd’hui le terrorisme. René Girard
Jésus s’appuie sur la Loi pour en transformer radicalement le sens. La femme adultère doit être lapidée : en cela la Loi d’Israël ne se distingue pas de celle des nations. La lapidation est à la fois une manière de reproduire et de contenir le processus de mise à mort de la victime dans des limites strictes. Rien n’est plus contagieux que la violence et il ne faut pas se tromper de victime. Parce qu’elle redoute les fausses dénonciations, la Loi, pour les rendre plus difficiles, oblige les délateurs, qui doivent être deux au minimum, à jeter eux-mêmes les deux premières pierres. Jésus s’appuie sur ce qu’il y a de plus humain dans la Loi, l’obligation faite aux deux premiers accusateurs de jeter les deux premières pierres ; il s’agit pour lui de transformer le mimétisme ritualisé pour une violence limitée en un mimétisme inverse. Si ceux qui doivent jeter » la première pierre » renoncent à leur geste, alors une réaction mimétique inverse s’enclenche, pour le pardon, pour l’amour. (…) Jésus sauve la femme accusée d’adultère. Mais il est périlleux de priver la violence mimétique de tout exutoire. Jésus sait bien qu’à dénoncer radicalement le mauvais mimétisme, il s’expose à devenir lui-même la cible des violences collectives. Nous voyons effectivement dans les Évangiles converger contre lui les ressentiments de ceux qu’ils privent de leur raison d’être, gardiens du Temple et de la Loi en particulier. » Les chefs des prêtres et les Pharisiens rassemblèrent donc le Sanhédrin et dirent : « Que ferons-nous ? Cet homme multiplie les signes. Si nous le laissons agir, tous croiront en lui ». » Le grand prêtre Caïphe leur révèle alors le mécanisme qui permet d’immoler Jésus et qui est au cœur de toute culture païenne : » Ne comprenez-vous pas ? Il est de votre intérêt qu’un seul homme meure pour tout le peuple plutôt que la nation périsse » (Jean XI, 47-50) (…) Livrée à elle-même, l’humanité ne peut pas sortir de la spirale infernale de la violence mimétique et des mythes qui en camouflent le dénouement sacrificiel. Pour rompre l’unanimité mimétique, il faut postuler une force supérieure à la contagion violente : l’Esprit de Dieu, que Jean appelle aussi le Paraclet, c’est-à-dire l’avocat de la défense des victimes. C’est aussi l’Esprit qui fait révéler aux persécuteurs la loi du meurtre réconciliateur dans toute sa nudité. (…) Ils utilisent une expression qui est l’équivalent de » bouc émissaire » mais qui fait mieux ressortir l’innocence foncière de celui contre qui tous se réconcilient : Jésus est désigné comme » Agneau de Dieu « . Cela veut dire qu’il est la victime émissaire par excellence, celle dont le sacrifice, parce qu’il est identifié comme le meurtre arbitraire d’un innocent — et parce que la victime n’a jamais succombé à aucune rivalité mimétique — rend inutile, comme le dit l’Épître aux Hébreux, tous les sacrifices sanglants, ritualisés ou non, sur lesquels est fondée la cohésion des communautés humaines. La mort et la Résurrection du Christ substituent une communion de paix et d’amour à l’unité fondée sur la contrainte des communautés païennes. L’Eucharistie, commémoration régulière du » sacrifice parfait » remplace la répétition stérile des sacrifices sanglants. René Girard
Ce que dit le texte, c’est qu’on ne peut renoncer au sacrifice première manière, qui est sacrifice d’autrui, violence contre l’autre, qu’en assumant le risque du sacrifice deuxième manière, le sacrifice du Christ qui meurt pour ses amis. Le recours au même mot coupe court à l’illusion d’un terrain neutre complètement étranger à la violence. René Girard
Ce que nous vivons n’est pas simplement une pandémie mondiale, mais une pandémie numérique, où les effets du virus sont relayés par une information dite virale. Nous sommes confinés comme des poissons rouges, mais sur les parois de notre bocal nous n’arrêtons pas de consulter les chiffres de la surmortalité, en attendant que l’hameçon de la maladie vienne nous attraper et nous fasse basculer dans un autre monde. On s’aperçoit soudain que ce qui n’était qu’une unité dans un compte est un nom propre avec un visage. On passe d’un coup de la prophylaxie à l’asphyxie, du statistique au dramatique. Dans la Bible, la peste s’abat sur Israël parce que David a voulu recenser son peuple, c’est-à-dire ne plus le considérer dans la singularité de ses personnes, de ses familles et de ses tribus, mais comme un grand ensemble manipulable. Aujourd’hui, c’est la peste elle-même qui induit des recensements sans fin, à la fois hypnotiques et anxiogènes. Pendant ce temps, du fait de l’isolement des personnes âgées et des consignes de distanciation sociale, le mourant se voit dépouillé de son entourage au profit de l’assistance de la chimie et des machines, et le mort, privé de rites funéraires au profit du four crématoire. Sous ce rapport, l’épidémie ne fait qu’intensifier et dévoiler une structure qui était déjà là, et que l’on pourrait qualifier de structure techno-émotionnelle: face à la mort, on ne sait plus rien faire d’autre que de passer d’une gestion technologique qui nous permet de surnager, à une émotion qui brusquement nous noie. (…) Une crise ne produit pas des effets univoques. En termes de médecine, elle est état transitoire du patient, et peut être heureuse ou funeste, parce qu’elle débouche soit sur la guérison soit sur la mort. Les geeks vivaient déjà confinés derrière leurs écrans. Est-ce leur victoire, ou la preuve qu’ils vivaient déjà comme des malades? L’industrie des applications mobiles est en pleine forme, et le patron de Netflix peut se frotter les mains, mais on découvre aussi, avec les problèmes de ravitaillement, que l’agriculture est plus fondamentale que la haute finance, et l’œuvre des soignants plus essentielle que celle des winners. Hier, on parlait beaucoup de transhumanisme. L’épidémie nous ramène à la condition humaine, à notre mortalité, à la précarité de nos existences. Soudain Thucydide redevient notre contemporain, puisqu’il a traversé la peste d’Athènes. Sophocle, Bocacce, Manzoni, Giono ou Camus se révèlent plus actuels que nos actualités, parce qu’ils témoignent de ce qui appartient de manière indépassable à la chair de l’homme. Le confinement peut nous perdre dans nos tablettes, mais il est aussi l’occasion de réinventer la table familiale, et de retrouver le sens d’une culture toujours plus neuve que nos innovations – de même que le printemps restera toujours plus neuf que nos derniers gadgets. (…) S’il y a quelque chose qu’on ne peut virtualiser, c’est le rite chrétien. Les sacrements exigent une proximité physique. Ils communiquent la grâce par mode de contagion, de proche en proche, parce que l’amour de Dieu est inséparable de l’amour du prochain. C’est pourquoi, l’épidémie se propageant de la même façon, les fidèles ont été privés de l’eucharistie… Comme l’Église fait normalement obligation de communier au moins à Pâques, certains ont jugé bon de discuter cette mesure, voire de la braver. Je préfère la penser. Vivre la Pâque dans cette privation, c’est aussi reconnaître que le christianisme n’est pas un spiritualisme, mais une religion de l’Incarnation, où le plus spirituel rejoint le plus charnel, où le don de la grâce passe par un prêtre balourd, près d’un voisin antipathique, en mastiquant un insipide bout de pain. L’an dernier, au début de la semaine sainte, c’était l’incendie de Notre-Dame: l’édifice incomparable brûlait, mais le rituel était intact. À présent, sans rien de spectaculaire, mais de manière plus profonde, c’est le rituel lui-même qui est atteint. Le drame est plus grand, même s’il se voit moins. Mais si grand que soit le drame, c’est encore de cela que parle le sacrifice de la Croix. Sous le rapport, non pas du rite, mais de ce à quoi il renvoie, en cette heure où l’ange de la mort passe à travers les villes, la Pâque nous rejoint dans toute sa force. Judas transmet la mort par un baiser. Pilate se lave les mains avec du gel hydroalcoolique. Jésus demande: Mon Dieu, pourquoi? Et il ne lui est pas répondu. Mais si nous crions ainsi sous le mal, c’est que nous avons d’abord vu la bonté de la vie. Comme le dit Rilke dans ce vers que je ne me lasse pas de répéter: «Seule la louange ouvre un espace à la plainte». Nous ne pouvons gémir devant ce qui nous détruit que parce que nous célébrons ce qui nous porte. L’envers du cri, si désespéré soit-il, est encore un appel à l’espérance. La nuit nous fait horreur parce que nous avons goûté à la beauté du jour, mais la perte de cette lumière, qui nous fait si mal, nous suggère aussi qu’au bout de la nuit noire l’aurore finit par poindre, plus poignante que jamais. Fabrice Hadjadj
What a tragedy that the 100,000 pangolins that are purged every year are sacrificed over the false belief that their scales can aid in blood circulation and cure rheumatism! Melissa Chen
Given China’s relatively limited medical resources – its per capita number of intensive care beds and ventilators is far too small – Beijing can’t afford to fight a prolonged battle with the coronavirus. The county can only concentrate its fight on one front, and thus is transporting all the medical equipment it can there, and sending all the medical personnel it can as well. China can only mobilize its national medical resources to tackle the virus head-on in Wuhan. If this battle fails, the fate of the country is at stake. People in Wuhan and Hubei had no choice but to sacrifice themselves. This is the luck of the Chinese people and the misfortune of the people of Wuhan and Hubei. People blessed with luck need to be grateful. Wang Shuo
Epidémie de grippe saisonnière: une surmortalité de 21.000 décès cet hiver. France Soir (01/03/2017)
En dépit d’une loi qui l’interdit, la Cour constitutionnelle a décrété mercredi que le suicide assisté peut être jugé licite en Italie si une série de conditions sont réunies, une décision qualifiée de « victoire » par les partisans de l’euthanasie. Dans une sentence très attendue, la haute cour a estimé que l’aide au suicide « n’est pas punissable » quand sont respectés « le consentement éclairé » de la personne, « les soins palliatifs », « la sédation profonde » ainsi qu’un contrôle (« vérification de ces conditions et des modalités d’exécution » du suicide assisté) effectué par les autorités de santé publique après « avis du comité éthique » local. La Cour a souligné que l’aide au suicide ne peut concerner que des patients « maintenus en vie par des traitements vitaux et atteints d’une pathologie irréversible, source de souffrances physiques et psychologiques jugées insupportables, mais pleinement en mesure de prendre des décisions libres et conscientes ». La Cour a aussi précisé que sa décision était prise « dans l’attente d’une intervention indispensable du législateur », demandant donc au parlement de modifier la législation en vigueur. En Italie, pays à forte tradition catholique, l’euthanasie est interdite et le code pénal punit « l’instigation ou l’aide au suicide » avec des peines comprises entre 5 ans et 12 ans de prison. Les juges constitutionnels étaient saisis du cas de Marco Cappato, un responsable du Parti radical (historiquement favorable à l’avortement et à l’euthanasie), qui avait conduit un célèbre DJ italien en Suisse en 2017 pour un suicide assisté. Fabiano Antoniani, dit DJ Fabo, grand voyageur, pilote de moto-cross et musicien, était resté tétraplégique et aveugle après un accident de la route en 2014. « A partir d’aujourd’hui nous sommes tous plus libres, y compris ceux qui ne sont pas d’accord » avec l’euthanasie, s’est félicité M. Cappato sur Facebook, évoquant une « victoire de la désobéissance civile ». « Pour moi aider DJ Fabo était un devoir, la Cour a établi que c’était son droit », a-t-il ajouté. Beppino Englaro, papa d’Eluana, plongée dans un état végétatif et qui fut entre 2008 et sa mort en 2009 un symbole de la lutte pour l’euthanasie, a salué en M. Cappato « un pionnier qui a ouvert la voie vers l’établissement d’un droit ». Le Point
Nous, les ouvriers, on nous dit : ‘Allez travailler !’ Alors que les cadres travaillent depuis chez eux. M. Leroy (élu CGT, Wattrelos)
« Quarantaine à deux vitesses : repos et loisirs pour les uns, précarité et risque sanitaire pour les autres. » « Le confinement, c’est pour les riches. » « On est 300 à bosser sur le site et les cadres sont en télétravail. Nous, qu’on se mette en danger, tout le monde s’en fout. » Les riches à l’abri, les pauvres au turbin ? Les aisés, en télétravail depuis leur maison secondaire du bord de mer, les précaires à l’usine ?  La formule est caricaturale, mais illustre ce sentiment diffus qui pointe, depuis quelques jours, chez certains travailleurs de terrain : deux salles, deux ambiances. Ou plutôt, deux poids, deux mesures. Car si Bruno Le Maire a appelé ce mardi, sur BFMTV, « tous les salariés des entreprises qui sont encore ouvertes, des activités qui sont indispensables au fonctionnement du pays, à se rendre sur leurs lieux de travail », pointe parfois, chez ceux qui sont mobilisés sur le terrain, l’impression d’être « envoyé au front », dans les usines, les bureaux, pour faire tourner la machine, et s’exposer, pendant que les autres, les confinés, préservent, au chaud et en télétravail, leur santé. Et tout ça pour très peu de reconnaissance. Ils sont caissiers, ouvriers, préparateur de commandes, logisticien, travaillent dans les transports, le commerce, ce sont les invisibles, ceux qui travaillent dans les tréfonds des usines, ceux qui ont les mains dans le cambouis. D’après le ministère du Travail, c’est un peu plus de quatre emplois sur dix qui peuvent être exercés à distance. Mais dans la conjoncture actuelle, les remarques fusent : « On ne peut pas aller voir la grand-mère, ni la famille, mais par contre, vous pouvez aller bosser. Et empilés les uns sur les autres », dit un salarié. Lâchés seuls en première ligne ? (…) Ce qui entretient encore plus particulièrement le sentiment d’injustice, c’est qu’on « laisse ouvrir des activités qui devraient être fermées », souligne Laurent Degousée.  « Le 14 mars, on a un arrêté qui indique la fermeture des commerces non utiles. Le 15, un autre arrêté liste les exceptions : les magasins de vapotage ont le droit d’être ouvert, la jardinerie, animalerie, la téléphonie mobile… On  se moque de qui ? » Qu’est-ce qui est utile, qu’est-ce qui ne l’est pas ? Pour certains salariés ou travailleurs, la réponse est toute trouvée : ils sont sacrifiés pour des besoins non-utiles. Les livreurs de plateformes se considèrent ainsi comme des « travailleurs sacrifiables pour du récréatif ».  LCI
Il ne faudrait pas qu’en gagnant la bataille sanitaire, on se dirige vers un drame économique. Or, d’ores et déjà, le sort à moyen terme d’environ 20 à 30% de la population, entrepreneurs, personnes à leur compte, est très délicat. João Miguel Tavares
L’idéologie de la peur est devenue extrêmement présente dans l’esprit de nos concitoyens. On trouve notamment des traces de cette idéologie dans les fictions hollywoodiennes qui nous décrivent des apocalypses écologiques. A la différence des années 50 où les apocalypses étaient fondées sur l’imaginaire des soucoupes volantes ou de la guerre thermonucléaire, aujourd’hui la fin des temps viendra de l’action de l’homme et des conséquences désastreuses de cette action. La caractéristique de cette idéologie de la peur, c’est la crainte a priori que l’action de l’homme puisse conduire à des déséquilibres de la nature. Cette crainte peut se muer en une détestation de l’homme, vu comme « vorace », et de son action, ce que j’appelle « l’anthrophobie ». (…) La loi sur la transition énergétique s’inscrit dans un fait historique qui est celui de la question climatique. Une question réelle, qu’il faut prendre au sérieux, mais qui sert en quelque sorte d’otage à cette idéologie de la peur. Sur la base des dérèglements climatiques, et des conséquences désastreuses qui ne manqueront pas de survenir, on en infère des scénarios apocalyptiques qui devraient suspendre toutes nos actions y compris nos actions technologiques. Or, je pense qu’il y a un grand danger à suspendre nos actions : c’est celui de ne pas penser les conséquences catastrophiques de notre inaction. En ce sens, la loi sur la transition énergétique tient compte d’un certain nombre d’enjeux idéologiques qui cherchent à regrouper des considérations opportunistes et qui n’ont pas grand-chose à faire ensemble. Par exemple, plafonner la production nucléaire en France est problématique si on considère que le but est de lutter contre les énergies émettrices de gaz à effet de serre. Dans ce cas, pourquoi ne pas plus se préoccuper d’autres énergies comme le gaz ou le pétrole ? [réenchanter le risque] C’est non seulement possible mais c’est absolument nécessaire. Je suis assez préoccupé du fait que toute l’idéologie contemporaine nous oriente vers les conséquences possibles de notre action. Si nous devons être comptables des conséquences de notre action, cette idéologie nous rend totalement aveugle quant aux conséquences possibles de notre inaction. Celle-ci pourrait avoir des coûts cataclysmiques. Par exemple, pour le vaccin, on constate que la couverture maximale baisse y compris dans notre pays et qu’augmentent les craintes concernant le vaccin. En 2000, 9 % des Français se méfiaient des vaccins, ils sont près de 40 % en 2010. Cette méfiance aura des conséquences terribles sur les générations futures. (…) Ces questions ne peuvent avoir que des réponses technologiques. Or, ces réponses technologiques, nous ne les avons pas encore. Toute tentative d’enfermement des technologies du présent pourrait constituer un drame pour les générations futures. En d’autres termes, bâillonner le présent, c’est désespérer le futur. Le réenchantement du risque passe par une première étape celui de la conscience que le risque zéro n’existe pas. En effet, chacune de nos actions charrie une part incompressible de risque. La seconde étape consiste à dire que nous ne pouvons pas ne pas prendre de risque et qu’il n’y a pas de plus grand risque que celui de ne pas en prendre. A partir de là, il nous faut gérer de manière beaucoup plus raisonnable le rapport des coûts et des bénéfices de toute innovation technologique. Gérald Bronner
Êtes-vous prêt à prendre le risque afin de conserver l’Amérique que tout le monde aime pour vos enfants et petits-enfants ? Si c’est le deal, je suis prêt à me lancer. Je ne veux pas que tout le pays soit sacrifié. Dan Patrick (vice-gouverneur du Texas)
Coronavirus : sacrifier les personnes âgées pour sauver l’économie ? Les propos chocs du vice-gouverneur du Texas La Dépêche
Selon Trump et ses amis, qui veulent remettre les travailleurs au boulot dès avril, le ralentissement de l’économie américaine est aussi dangereuse que le coronavirus. C’est aussi ce que pense Dan Patrick, le vice-gouverneur du Texas, qui a appelé les personnes âgées à aller travailler. Autrement dit, se sacrifier pour « conserver l’Amérique que tout le monde aime ». C’est vrai que les plus âgés sont aussi les plus susceptibles d’être touchée par le virus, alors foutu pour foutu, autant qu’ils aillent se tuer à la tâche ! « L’Amérique qu’on aime » : celle où les plus faibles sont sacrifiés sur l’autel des profits ? Convergences révolutionnaires
Covid-19: les grands parents prêts à «se sacrifier» afin de sauver l’économie, affirme un vice-gouverneur du Texas Le vice-gouverneur du Texas s’est déclaré prêt à donner sa vie plutôt que de voir l’économie américaine sombrer à cause des mesures sanitaires liées à la pandémie de Covid-19. Selon lui, «beaucoup de grands-parents» à travers le pays partagent cette position. Nombreux sont les Américains âgés qui sont prêts à «se sacrifier» afin d’empêcher la pandémie de coronavirus de porter un grave préjudice à l’économie nationale et par conséquent au bien-être de leurs petits-enfants, estime le vice-gouverneur du Texas Dan Patrick. «Mon message est le suivant: reprenons le travail, reprenons la vie normale, soyons intelligents, et ceux d’entre nous qui ont plus de 70 ans, nous nous occuperons de nous», a confié le responsable dans un entretien avec un journaliste de la chaîne Fox News. Lui-même âgé de 69 ans, il s’est dit prêt à mourir plutôt que de voir l’économie américaine détruite par les mesures sanitaires décrétées sur fond de pandémie. D’après lui, cette position est partagée par «beaucoup de grands-parents» à travers le pays. Sputnik
Lorsqu’une question se pose, il faut toujours avoir la prudence de considérer attentivement la question qui est posée et le contexte dans lequel elle est posée. Très souvent, c’est là que se trouve la réponse. On s’interroge il est vrai à propos de la question de savoir ce qu’il faut sauver en priorité : l’économie ou les vies humaines ? Cette question appelle quatre remarques. – En premier lieu, formulée telle quelle, cette question date. Donald Trump aux États Unis et Boris Johnson en Angleterre se la sont posée il y a plus d’une semaine déjà en clamant haut et fort qu’il fallait penser avant tout à sauver l’économie. La réalité s’est chargée d’apporter elle même la réponse. Face à l’afflux des malades dans les hôpitaux, face à l’inquiétude des populations, face au fait pour Boris Johnson d’avoir été testé comme étant positif au virus du Covid 19, que ce soit Donald Trump ou bien encore Boris Johnson, tous deux ont fait machine arrière en décidant 1). de s’occuper des vies humaines en mettant les moyens pour cela, 2). de sauver l’économie autrement, par une intervention de l’État allant contre le dogme libéral de sa non intervention dans l’économie.- Par ailleurs, il importe de ne pas oublier le contexte. Qui pose la question de savoir ce qu’il faut sauver ? Les plus grands dirigeants de la planète à savoir le Président des Etats-Unis et le Premier Ministre de Grande Bretagne. Quand ils se posent cette question, comment le font ils ? Sous la forme d’une grande annonce extrêmement médiatisée. Pour qui ? Pour rassurer les milieux financiers. Sur le moment, ce coup d’éclat a l’effet de communication escompté. Il crée un choc psychologique qui rassure les milieux économiques avant de paniquer l’opinion publique. Moralité : la question de savoir s’il faut sauver les vies humaines ou l’économie est un coup politique qui commence sur le ton grandiloquent d’une tragédie cornélienne avant de s’effondrer lamentablement. On veut nous faire croire que certaines questions sont essentielles. Vu ceux qui la posent et le ridicule des réponses qui lui sont apportées qu’il soit permis d’en douter – Dans la façon dont la question et posée, quelque chose ne va pas. On oublie le temps. Lorsque l’épidémie du Corona virus a commencé, désireux de ne pas freiner l’économie, les autorités françaises ont reculé le plus possible la décision du confinement avant de ne pas pouvoir faire autrement. La nécessité économique a alors précédé l’urgence sanitaire. Aujourd’hui, l’urgence sanitaire est devenue première et l’urgence économique a été placée en second. Jusqu’au pic de l’épidémie cela va être le cas. Le temps sanitaire va l’emporter sur le temps économique. Dès que la décrue épidémiologique commencera, le temps économique va reprendre ses droits. En conséquence de quoi, qui décide de ce qui doit se faire ou pas ? Ce n’est pas l’économie ni la vie, mais l’opportunité et, derrière elle, c’est l’être humain capable de juger et d’avoir de la sagesse. – On oublie enfin les hommes. Dans le Cid de Corneille, Rodrigue le héros, se demande s’il doit choisir son amour contre l’honneur de sa famille ou l’honneur de sa famille contre son amour. Au théâtre, cette alternative est admirable. Elle crée le spectacle. Avec l’épreuve que l’humanité endure, on fera du bien à tout le monde en évitant de basculer dans le théâtre. Si on ne s’occupe pas des vies humaines, il y aura des morts et avec eux une inquiétude collective ainsi qu’un drame social qui pèsera sur l’économie. Si on ne s’occupe pas d’économie, il y aura des morts et un drame économique qui pèsera sur les vivants. Si on choisit l’économie contre la santé, il y aura des morts. Si on choisit la santé contre l’économie, il y aura des morts. De toute façon quoi que l’on choisisse et que l’on sacrifie, ne croyons pas qu’il n’y aura pas de morts. Il y en aura. Il est possible toutefois de limiter la casse. Entre la richesse et la mort, on oublie quelque chose d’énorme qui est plus riche que la richesse et plus vivant que la mort : il s’agit de nous. Il s’agit des hommes. Il s’agit des vivants. Si nous avons la volonté chevillée au corps de nous en sortir et si nous sommes solidaires, nous serons capables de surmonter cette crise. Nous devons être humains et forts comme jamais nous ne l’avons été. Nous avons la possibilité de l’être. La solidarité avec le personnel soignant tous les soirs à 20h montre que nous sommes capables de solidarité. L’humour qui circule montre que nous sommes capables de créativité. En ces temps de distanciation sociale, nous sommes en train de fabriquer des proximités inédites, totalement nouvelles et créatrices. Notre instinct de vie a parfaitement compris le message qui est lancé par ce qui se passe : soyez proches autrement. Là se trouve la richesse et la vie qui permettront de relever le défi économique et sanitaire qui est lancé. (…) Il y a deux façons de mesurer. La première se fait par le calcul et les mathématiques en appliquant des chiffres et des courbes à la réalité. La seconde se fait par l’émotion, la sensation, la sensibilité. Quand quelque chose plaît, je n’ai pas besoin de chiffres et de courbes pour savoir que cela plaît. Quand cela déplaît également. Lorsque Donald Trump a compris qu’il fallait s’occuper de la question sanitaire aux États-Unis et pas simplement d’économie, il n’a pas eu cette révélation à la suite d’un sondage. Il n’a pas utilisé les compétences d’instituts spécialisés. La réaction ne se faisant pas attendre, il a été plus rapide que les chiffres, les courbes et les sondages en changeant immédiatement son discours. Il a été découvert récemment que l’intelligence émotionnelle est infiniment plus rapide que l’intelligence mathématique, abstraite et calculatrice. On peut sur le papier démontrer que l’humain coûte trop cher. Lorsque dans la réalité concrète on ne s’en occupe pas assez et mal, on a immédiatement la réponse. Donald Trump s’en est très vite aperçu. (…) On veut des règles pour répondre à la question de savoir comment décider qui doit vivre ou pas et qui doit mourir ou pas. Les règles en la matière sont au nombre de deux : la première qui fonde toute notre civilisation consiste à dire que, par principe, on soigne tout le monde et on sauve tout le monde. Pour éviter la folie monstrueuse des régimes qui décident que telle classe de la population a le droit de vivre et pas telle autre, on n’a pas trouvé autre chose. La seconde règle est empirique. Tout médecin vous dira qu’en matière de vie et de mort aucun médecin ne sait. Ce qu’il faut faire est dicté par chaque malade, jour après jour. A priori, un médecin sauve tout le monde et soigne tout le monde, jusqu’au moment où, basculant du soin et du sauvetage dans l’acharnement et de l’acharnement dans l’absurde, il décide d’arrêter de soigner et de sauver. Ainsi, un médecin aujourd’hui soigne une vielle dame de quatre-vingt cinq ans grabataire et atteinte d’Alzheimer. Maintenant si dans une situation d’extrême urgence il faut choisir entre un jeune de vingt ans et cette vieille dame, le médecin choisira le jeune en plaçant la vie qui commence avant celle qui se termine. Il fera comme les médecins faisaient au XIXème siècle quand il s’agissait de savoir si, lors d’un accouchement qui se passe mal, il faut choisir la mère ou l’enfant. Il choisira l’enfant. Choix déchirant, tragique, insupportable, n’ayant aucune valeur de règle, la responsabilité face à la vie étant la règle. Et ce, parce qu’il ne faut jamais l’oublier : on choisit toujours la vie deux fois : la première contre la mort et la seconde contre la folie. D’où la complexité du choix, choisir la vie contre la folie n’allant jamais de soi. Relever la complexité de ce choix est risqué. On l’a par exemple vu sur tweeter, où de tels commentaires ont déchaîné la colère des internautes. Pourtant si la population grogne lorsqu’elle voit la courbe du chômage monter et les premières conséquences d’une économie au ralenti se concrétiser, n’est-ce pas également parce qu’elle est consciente que équation est impossible ? (…) L’expérience ne se transmet pas. Pour une raison très simple : c’est en ne se transmettant pas qu’elle transmet le message le plus essentiel qui soit afin de surmonter les crises : aucune crise ne ressemble à une autre. Chaque crise étant singulière, chaque crise a un mode de résolution qui lui est propre et qu’elle doit inventer. Quand une crise est résolue, cela vient de ce que ceux qui la traversent ont su inventer la solution qu’il faut pour cette crise précise. Le message des crises est de ce fait clair. Il convient de les étudier afin de comprendre l’originalité qui a été déployée pour sortir de la crise afin de cultiver sa propre originalité. Pour sortir de la crise que nous endurons, nous allons inventer une solution inédite et c’est cette invention qui nous permettra de sortir de cette crise. Bertrand Vergely
Et tout cela aura pour conséquence, dans l’année 2020 et aussi dans les années à venir, d’exclure certains travailleurs, de les marginaliser, de les contraindre à une misère sociale accrue. La France des « gilets jaunes », des zones périphériques, des précaires, des auto-entrepreneurs, des indépendants, va trinquer plus que celle des grands groupes ou de la fonction publique. Si nous étions cyniques (ou d’une lucidité froide), (mais nos sociétés ne le sont plus), nous aurions pu, collectivement, examiner le « coût » de deux stratégies : le confinement avec une décroissance massive et des conséquences négatives en chaîne sur les années à venir ; le maintien au ralenti de l’économie avec des mesures de protection individuelle massive. Une question n’est jamais posée, quand on compare la stratégie du Japon et celle de l’Europe : les choix faits l’ont-ils été par souci des populations et de la pandémie (avec un virus que nous ne connaissons pas et qui évolue d’une manière plus incontrôlée que ce que nous pouvions penser au début) ou pour suppléer l’incurie des politiques de santé publiques qui n’ont pas prévu ce genre de situation et n’ont rien fait pour nous donner les moyens d’y faire face. Damien Le Guay
Rappelons-nous tout d’abord que nous abordons la pandémie avec le regard d’une société individualiste. Nos ancêtres de 1914 ont accepté la mort pour la défense de la patrie parce qu’ils avaient le sentiment d’être un chaînon dans une lignée. Ils défendaient la terre de leurs ancêtres et ils la défendaient pour leurs enfants. Quelques générations plus tôt, quand il y avait encore des épidémies régulières, on prenait des mesures de précaution, on soignait, mais on acceptait la mort éventuelle parce qu’on avait le sentiment d’appartenir à une société. Aujourd’hui, il n’y a plus qu’un tout petit nombre de nos concitoyens qui a l’expérience de la guerre. Nous avons derrière nous 60 ans d’individualisme absolu. Le christianisme est devenu ultraminoritaire. Il s’agit donc, dans l’absolu, d’avoir « zéro mort ». Effectivement notre société semble prête à sacrifier l’économie. Sans se rendre compte que ce genre de mentalités n’amène pas le « zéro mort » mais une catastrophe sanitaire. Et qu’une crise économique aussi fait des morts. (…) L’une des leçons de la crise du COVID 19, c’est que nous avons sous nos yeux la preuve expérimentale des ravages causés par l’effondrement de l’Education Nationale. En particulier, l’enseignement de l’économie tel qu’il est dispensé dans nos lycées, depuis des années, très hostile à l’entreprise et incapable de faire comprendre la dynamique du capitalisme, aboutit aux discours que nous entendons aujourd’hui. Il y aurait des activités indispensables et d’autres qui ne le seraient pas ! En fait, une économie moderne repose sur un fonctionnement très complexe. Les fonctionnaires du Ministère de l’Economie ont pris peur quand ils ont vu le nombre de demandes de mise au chômage partiel ! Dans un Etat qui prélève et redistribue 57% du PIB, on redécouvre qu’il y a beaucoup plus d’emplois utiles que ce qu’on pensait ! Et l’on risque de découvrir, à ce rythme, qu’il y aura encore plus de personnes mourant du fait du ralentissement de l’économie qu’à cause de l’épidémie. On ne peut pas dire que l’histoire des crises et leur taux de mortalité ne soit pas connu: de la crise de 1929 à l’asphyxie de la Grèce par l’Eurogroupe depuis 2015, tout est documenté. (…) Nos gouvernants ne feront pas un choix, s’ils arbitrent entre deux maux. Actuellement, ils sont dans l’incapacité de choisir entre les personnes qu’ils doivent soigner quand elles arrivent à l’hôpital et qu’ils n’ont pas assez de lit. Donc ils appliquent une règle mécanique: au-dessus d’un certain âge, on n’est plus soigné. Ce n’est pas un choix, car choisir c’est faire exercice de sa liberté, c’est pouvoir se déterminer entre deux options. Pour pouvoir choisir, il faut « avoir le choix ». Nous pourrions choisir un type d’équilibre entre la lutte contre la pandémie et la protection de notre économie si nous avions agi en amont. Si nous avions fermé nos frontières, testé largement, distribué massivement des masques etc…Il ne peut pas y avoir, en bonne philosophie, de choix entre des catégories de morts qui seraient préférables. Quand on en est arrivé là c’est qu’on subit. En revanche, aujourd’hui, le gouvernement pourrait choisir d’autoriser la généralisation du traitement du Professeur Raoult. (…) En fait, je pense que le dilemme est entre le fatalisme et le désir d’échapper à un destin tracé. Rappelez-vous, il y a quelques semaines, Emmanuel Macron parlait des progrès « inexorables » de l’épidémie. Au contraire, Boris Johnson et Donald Trump, qui sont des lutteurs, des battants, des hommes de liberté, ont commencé par penser qu’il fallait laisser passer l’épidémie, en faisant confiance aux capacités d’immunisation de la population. Puis, ils ont compris que toutes les grippes ne se ressemblent pas et qu’il fallait prendre des mesures. Ils font passer leur société aux tests massifs et au confinement partiel. Le redémarrage de l’économie apparaîtra d’autant plus souhaitable à leurs concitoyens que l’épidémie aura été jugulée. Ce qui est à craindre en France, comme en Italie, c’est qu’on ait deux crises, sanitaire et économique, qui s’éternisent. (…) Si l’on se réfère à la tradition occidentale, née entre Jérusalem, Athènes et Rome, l’être humain est appelé à se libérer des déterminismes naturels ou sociaux. L’homme occidental est celui qui propose à toute l’humanité d’apprendre la liberté, c’est-à-dire le choix. De la Genèse, où l’homme se voit enjoindre de dominer la Création, à René Descartes (il nous faut devenir « comme maîtres et possesseurs de la nature »), on s’est efforcé d’émanciper l’individu. Le grand paradoxe du dernier demi-siècle a consisté dans l’introduction en Occident de philosophies profondément étrangères à la tradition de l’émancipation individuelle, des sagesses orientales à la vénération de la Terre-Mère. La crise du Coronavirus vient nous rappeler que la nature n’est pas cette force bienveillante envers l’humanité que décrivent les écologistes. Et le yoga et le New Age sont de peu de secours pour lutter contre la pandémie. Si j’avais à me tourner vers la théologie, pour dire la même pensée de l’émancipation individuelle, je citerais Saint Ignace: « Agis comme si tout dépendait de toi, en sachant qu’en réalité tout dépend de Dieu ». Quand on voit nos dirigeants avoir comme premier mouvement l’interdiction de la participation à un enterrement mais aussi la fermeture des églises, on se dit que ceux qui ne savent plus agir ne savent plus croire. (…) Tout doit être fait pour sortir du fatalisme ! C’est la seule possibilité de se garder une marge de manoeuvre. Le scénario le plus probable, actuellement dans notre pays est au contraire le cumul des crises, du fait de la passivité des gouvernants, qui prennent des décisions toujours trop tardives. Nous en revenons à la complexité des sociétés modernes. Elle peut être maîtrisée à condition, d’une part, de savoir traiter les innombrables données générées par chaque individu, chaque secteur d’activité; à condition, d’autre part, d’intégrer toutes les dimensions du problème à résoudre dans une stratégie unifiée. Réunir ces deux conditions, c’est commencer à pouvoir choisir ce qui servira le mieux la société et l’économie. Edouard Husson
Les hommes au paléolithique pratiquaient certainement la contraception. Déjà chez les Mésopotamiens (1600 av. J.-C.), les femmes utilisent des pierres pour ne pas concevoir: elles choisissent des pierres ovales ou arrondies qu’elles s’introduisent dans le vagin, le plus loin possible ; c’est la méthode intra-utérine. En Égypte, le Papyrus Ebers et Kahun prescrivent plusieurs recettes contraceptives, composées d’excréments de crocodile, de natron, de miel et de gomme arabique. Les remèdes de contraception dans l’Égypte antique sont des produits d’origine végétale, minérale ou animale. Certains sont aujourd’hui reconnus comme efficaces et utilisés dans les spermicides modernes.On dit aussi que les premiers préservatifs masculins seraient égyptiens, confectionnés avec des intestins de petits animaux (chats…). Selon certains auteurs5, il existerait aussi, dans les papyrus égyptiens, des écrits disant que Ramsès aurait fait distribuer à la population des contraceptifs pour limiter la surpopulation et les risques de famine. La sexualité dans le judaïsme se fonde sur la Bible et les Mishnas. La contraception n’est tolérée que dans certains cas et pour une durée définie. Le contrôle des naissances va à l’encontre de deux fondements du judaïsme, l’obligation de concevoir et l’interdiction d’onanisme. Néanmoins, selon le commentaire de la Bible du rabbin Raschi, Onan aurait été puni pour avoir transgressé les lois du lévirat, plus que « pour avoir gaspillé sa semence ». Les anciens Hébreux, qui pratiquaient la polygamie, étaient parfois autorisés des moyens contraceptifs si la grossesse risquait de mettre en danger la vie de la mère. Le droit talmudique, tiré de la Halakha admet la prévention mais en laisse uniquement l’initiative à la femme. De leur côté, les Araméennes de confession hébraïque utilisent, sur le conseil du rabbin (IIe siècle apr. J.-C.), le moukh, une éponge placée dans le vagin qui empêche le sperme d’atteindre l’utérus. (…) Les Grecs et les Romains ont quant à eux utilisé l’avortement et l’infanticide en cas d’échec des drogues et des amulettes, notamment pour éviter un enfant issu d’un riche citoyen et de son esclave. (…) Quant aux femmes, puisque l’allaitement arrête l’ovulation, la façon la plus naturelle pour elles de se protéger d’une éventuelle nouvelle grossesse était de prolonger la période pendant laquelle elles nourrissaient au sein leur enfant. Par ailleurs, le calcul des cycles menstruels devait leur permettre de savoir à quelles périodes elles étaient les plus fécondes ; on estimait alors qu’il s’agit de celles survenant juste avant ou juste après les menstruations. (…) Les études démographiques, telles celles de Louis Henry montrent que la fécondité diminue au sein de la bourgeoisie au XVIIe siècle. Cela va de pair avec la perte des recettes contraceptives des sorcières et sages-femmes. Au XVIIe siècle, la fécondité naturelle reprend. Les villes européennes croissent plus rapidement et apparaît alors des discussions et des controverses portant sur les avantages et les inconvénients de cette croissance. Nicolas Machiavel, un philosophe italien de la renaissance écrit alors que « Lorsque toutes les provinces du monde se seront remplies d’habitants tel qu’ils ne pourront plus subsister où ils sont ni se déplacer quelque part d’autre…alors le monde se purgera lui-même grâce à une de ces trois méthodes » en parlant des inondations, de la peste et des famines. Martin Luther affirme à cette époque que « Dieu fait les enfants. Il va aussi les nourrir ». (…) Les registres paroissiaux du XVIIIe siècle montrent un contrôle actif des naissances par la contraception, la continence ou le coït interrompu. Wikipedia
L’histoire de l’avortement remonte selon l’anthropologie à l’Antiquité. Pratiqué dans toutes les sociétés, les techniques (herbes abortives, utilisation d’objets tranchants, curetage, application d’une forte pression abdominale) et les conditions dans lesquelles l’avortement a été réalisé ont changé dans les pays où est reconnu le droit à l’avortement mais il demeure un fait de société. Le Code de Hammurabi daté d’environ 1750 av. J.-C. interdit l’avortement1. Le papyrus Ebers contient des prescriptions pour faire avorter les femmes. Ainsi, dès l’Antiquité, des politiques ont tenté de contrôler la fécondité. L’avortement est poursuivi très strictement chez les Hébreux. Dans la Grèce classique et la Rome antique, l’avortement est une pratique réprouvée (car elle prive le père de son droit de disposer de sa progéniture comme il l’entend) mais non interdite par un texte législatif. Ce n’est qu’avec l’expansion du christianisme et le besoin de gérer l’équilibre démographique que les empereurs romains Septime Sévère et Caracalla punissent dans des rescrits l’avortement au IIIe siècle. À cette époque, une plante (le silphium) servait principalement comme abortif et contraceptif. La très grande majorité des Églises chrétiennes condamnent fermement l’avortement mais au Moyen Âge, la sanction est différente selon que l’avortement est pratiqué avant ou après l’animation du fœtus. Au XIIIe siècle, les théologiens chrétiens optent pour une animation différenciée entre garçons et filles : ils fixent l’apparition d’une âme chez les fœtus à 40 jours pour les garçons et à 80 jours pour les filles. La Constitutio Criminalis Carolina, édictée par Charles Quint en 1532, fixe au milieu de la grossesse le moment de l’animation du fœtus, c’est-à-dire dès que la mère perçoit ses mouvements. Néanmoins, le pape Sixte Quint condamne de façon formelle l’avortement, quel qu’en soit le terme. Des femmes, au péril de leur vie en raison des techniques utilisées et du manque d’hygiène, s’avortent alors elles-mêmes, font appel à leur entourage ou recourent alors à un tiers. (…) Dès la fin du XVIIIe siècle en France et au XIXe siècle dans les autres pays d’Europe occidentale, les femmes mariées y recourent de plus en plus souvent afin de limiter la taille de leur famille. Elles font appel à des femmes sans qualification, surnommées « faiseuses d’anges », parmi lesquelles les « tricoteuses », célèbres pour leurs aiguilles à tricoter, qu’elles utilisent pour percer la poche des eaux ou ouvrir le col de l’utérus, et entraîner une fausse-couche. L’avortement dans ce contexte se pratique toujours dans la clandestinité, notamment par l’intervention appelée « dilatation et curetage ». La médecine du XIXe siècle voit des progrès dans les domaines de la chirurgie, de l’anesthésie et de l’hygiène. À la même époque, des médecins associés à l’Association médicale américaine font pression pour l’interdiction de l’avortement aux États-Unis alors que les interruptions de grossesse sont de plus en plus punies, comme en attestent en France l’article 317 du code pénal de 1810 qui punit de la réclusion d’un an à cinq ans aussi bien la femme qui avorte que le tiers avorteur, ou les articles 58 et 59 du Offences against the Person Act 1861 adoptés par le Parlement du Royaume-Uni qui criminalise l’avortement. Dans les années 1970, des féministes américaines développent la méthode de Karman qui permet d’avorter de manière sécuritaire. En Angleterre et aux États-Unis, cet avortement par aspiration se pratique en consultation externe, c’est ce que l’on appelle le « lunch-time abortion » (avortement pratiqué à l’heure du déjeuner). L’avortement devient plus sûr, ne nécessite aucun cadre hospitalier et peut même être réalisée par des non-médecins. Wikipedia
Des méthodes empiriques de variolisation sont apparues très tôt dans l’histoire de l’humanité, grâce à l’observation du fait qu’une personne qui survit à la maladie est épargnée lors des épidémies suivantes. L’idée de prévenir le mal par le mal se concrétise dans des pratiques populaires sur les continents asiatique et africain. La pratique de l’inoculation était en tout cas connue en Afrique depuis plusieurs siècles et c’est de son esclave Onésime que l’apprit le pasteur américain Cotton Mather. La première mention indiscutable de la variolisation apparaît en Chine au XVIe siècle. Il s’agissait d’inoculer une forme qu’on espérait peu virulente de la variole en mettant en contact la personne à immuniser avec le contenu de la substance qui suppure des vésicules d’un malade (le pus). Le risque n’était cependant pas négligeable : le taux de mortalité pouvait atteindre 1 ou 2 %. (…) Dans de très rares cas, la vaccination peut entraîner des effets indésirables sérieux et, exceptionnellement, fatals. Un choc anaphylactique, extrêmement rare, peut par exemple s’observer chez des personnes susceptibles avec certains vaccins (incidence de 0,65 par million, voir 10 par million pour le vaccin rougeole-rubéole-oreillons (RRO). En France, la loi prévoit le remboursement des dommages et intérêts par l’Office national d’indemnisation des accidents médicaux lorsqu’il s’agit de vaccins obligatoires. Wikipedia
La politique de vaccination française contre la grippe est de vacciner les personnes qui ont des risques de faire des complications suite à une grippe, des complications qui vont les emmener à l’hôpital, voire qui peuvent évoluer vers le décès [9 900 décès ont été attribués à la grippe en France pendant l’hiver 2018-2019]. Donc les gens à risque sont les personnes les plus âgées, à partir de 65 ans, les personnes qui ont un déficit de l’immunité, celles qui ont des maladies cardiaques, pulmonaires, respiratoires, rénales, hépatiques, neurologiques, et puis également les femmes enceintes. Il faut savoir que vacciner la femme enceinte protège aussi son bébé pour les 6 premiers mois de sa vie. Les personnes obèses sont également concernées. L’intérêt c’est de protéger toutes ces personnes-là. (…) Les personnes âgées (…) le vaccin marche moins bien chez elles, mais il y a aussi les adultes plus jeunes qui ont des complications, des maladies respiratoires, cardiaques… Ces personnes-là peuvent être protégées par la vaccination et puis on a aussi la possibilité de vacciner l’entourage, les gens qui vivent à proximité, en particulier les professionnels de santé, mais également l’entourage des petits nourrissons qu’on ne peut pas vacciner avant 6 mois. Dans ce cas, pour un nourrisson qui a des facteurs de risque, on va recommander la vaccination à son entourage. (…) On rencontre des difficultés à faire vacciner les professionnels de santé, d’abord parce que le vaccin de la grippe a lieu tous les ans, donc c’est relativement contraignant. Ensuite, parce que de façon générale le vaccin est responsable d’une réticence de la part des professionnels de santé, peut-être à cause de la vaccination hépatite B et des potentiels effets secondaires qui avaient été mis en doute à l’époque et qui depuis ont été infirmés. Aujourd’hui, on a une bonne couverture vaccinale chez les médecins et les étudiants en médecine, globalement on arrive à 60 -70% de couverture vaccinale, mais ça reste encore difficile chez les infirmières ou les aides soignantes. (…) Le vaccin antigrippal actuellement disponible en France ne comporte pas d’adjuvants, c’est peut-être aussi pour ça qu’il n’est pas aussi efficace que d’autres vaccins pour lesquels on a des adjuvants efficaces. Et les principaux effets secondaires, se font au moment de la vaccination donc soit au site d’injection, soit de la fièvre, un peu de fatigue et des douleurs articulaires et musculaires. Ensuite, il existe un effet secondaire, plus spécifique de la vaccination antigrippale, qui est lié au virus lui-même, une complication neurologique mais assez exceptionnelle avec le virus et encore plus exceptionnelle avec le vaccin, donc qui ne remet pas en cause l’intérêt même de ce vaccin. (…) Si vous n’êtes pas dans les populations à risque, vous pouvez vous faire vacciner d’une part pour protéger votre entourage éventuellement, et d’autre part pour vous protéger, vous. Il faut savoir que dans certains pays, pas très loin de chez nous au Royaume-Uni, la politique vaccinale est différente. On vaccine les enfants de façon généralisée pour qu’ils limitent la transmission de la grippe aux personnes fragiles, puisqu’on estime que pendant une épidémie de grippe environ 20% des enfants vont être affectés et seront donc le réservoir principal du virus. Dr. Odile Launay (Université de Paris, Centre d’Investigation Clinique Cochin-Pasteur)
Le saviez-vous ? 900 000 Juifs ont été exclus ou expulsés des Etats arabo-musulmans entre 1940 et 1970. L’histoire de la disparition du judaïsme en terres d’islam est la clef d’une mystification politique de grande ampleur qui a fini par gagner toutes les consciences. Elle fonde le récit qui accable la légitimité et la moralité d’Israël en l’accusant d’un pseudo « péché originel ». La fable est simpliste : le martyre des Juifs européens sous le nazisme serait la seule justification de l’État d’Israël. Sa « création » par les Nations Unies aurait été une forme de compensation au lendemain de la guerre. Cependant, elle aurait entraîné une autre tragédie, la « Nakba », en dépossédant les Palestiniens de leur propre territoire. Dans le meilleur des cas, ce récit autorise à tolérer que cet État subsiste pour des causes humanitaires, malgré sa culpabilité congénitale. Cette narration a, de fait, tout pour sembler réaliste. Elle surfe sur le sentiment de culpabilité d’une Europe doublement responsable : de la Shoah et de l’imposition coloniale d’Israël à un monde arabe innocent.  Dans le pire des cas, cette narration ne voit en Israël qu’une puissance colonialiste qui doit disparaître. Ce qui explique l’intérêt d’accuser sans cesse Israël de génocide et de nazisme : sa seule « raison d’être » (la Shoah) est ainsi sapée dans son fondement. La « Nakba » est le pendant de la Shoah. La synthèse politiquement correcte de ces deux positions extrêmes est trouvée dans la doctrine de l’État bi-national ou du « retour » des « réfugiés » qui implique que les Juifs d’Israël mettent en oeuvre leur propre destruction en disparaissant dans une masse démographique arabo-musulmane. Shmuel Trigano
Hors du sacrifice point de salut !
En ce 2020e vendredi saint …
Et premier jour de la Pâque juive …
Où nous chrétiens nous remémorons, à travers le don suprême de la vie du Christ, le sacrifice qui devait mettre fin à tous les sacrifices …
Et nos amis juifs, à travers leur expulsion pour crime rituel évidemment mythique mais contre-factuellement attribué à leur propre dieu des premiers nés égyptiens, le salut et la fondation de leur peuple …
Et où pour préserver aujourd’hui en une sorte de peur panique du risque, ses membres les plus vulnérables du virus chinois …
L’Humanité entière semble prête au sacrifice de l’avenir de ses propres enfants …
Comment ne pas voir à nouveau …
Derrière la longue histoire …
D’Isaac à Moïse et de la circoncision à l’eucharistie et au baptême comme de l’avortement à la contraception et de la vaccination à l’actuel confinement
De l’abandon comme de ses substituts et survivances …
L’ inévitable nécessité, jusqu’aux animaux eux-mêmes, du sacrifice
Comme à la Nietzsche, élimination de l’autre …
Ou préfiguré par la bonne prostituée du jugement de Salomon …
Ou incarné par le Christ lui-même…
Du don ultime de soi ?

Contempler.
Le fils unique, le fils aimé
Le ciel s’ouvre devant le père brisé. Mais le fils seul entrevoit, au-delà, la splendeur de Dieu et la douleur humaine.
Gérard Billon
La Croix
24/02/2018

Le Sacrifice d’Isaac (1960-1966), peint par Marc Chagall, est conservé au Musée national Marc- Chagall à Nice. Adagp, Paris 2018

Nous percevons d’abord les couleurs : rouge, jaune, bleu. Claires, elles débordent le dessin, enveloppent les personnages, les recouvrent. Rouge pour Abraham hébété, jaune pour Isaac offert, bleu pour l’ange secourable. Couleurs premières d’une histoire qui nous défie.

Du ciel, un cri…
« C’est l’ange du Seigneur qui appelle : Abraham ! Abraham ! Réponse : Oui, je suis là. – Arrête-toi, dit-il, ne fais rien à l’enfant. Je sais. Tu crains Dieu… » (Gn 22,11-12). Privilège de la peinture : arrêter le flot narratif pour explorer une phrase et discerner l’indiscernable, ce qui est écrit mais que l’on ne voit pas, que l’on n’entend pas encore.

Dieu a parlé. Abraham est à l’épreuve : prendre son fils unique, son fils aimé, le rire de sa vieillesse touchée par la mort, et l’offrir en holocauste. Offrir, donner sans retour ce qui lui a été donné. L’obéissance peut-elle aller jusqu’à répandre le sang et brûler la chair ? Le père et le fils ont gravi ensemble la montagne. L’autel est dressé, et les bûches, le feu bientôt. Lentement, le père prend le couteau. Le fils, lui, se tait.

Le tableau, grand, presque carré (230 x 235 cm), s’insère dans les silences du récit. Marc Chagall, rêveur juif de Vitebsk exilé en France (1887-1985), l’a conçu comme partie d’un cycle de douze toiles intitulé Message biblique (1960-1966). Grâce à Adam, Noé, Abraham et Moïse, Dieu y dialogue avec nous. En contrepoint, cinq autres toiles chantent le Cantique des Cantiques.

Invisible, Dieu parle. Ses mots sont dans le geste de l’ange recouvert d’azur, bras tendus pour consoler après l’épreuve. Car l’épreuve s’achève. Au loin mais face à son mari, Sara angoissée respire et le bélier attend au pied d’un arbre. Abraham avait repoussé jusqu’à l’ultime instant le coup fatal. Son couteau, sa bouche se figent. Le couteau, serré entre les doigts multipliés, n’a pu encore se retourner vers l’enfant. Le sang qu’il n’a pas versé coule en pluie libératrice sur le père, atteint le fils mais ne peut entacher le soleil du corps offert.

La vision du fils
Isaac s’est abandonné. Librement. Dos sur le bûcher, il n’est pas lié, contrairement au récit biblique. Nu, il se sépare de son père pour contempler le ciel, un œil ouvert, l’autre fermé, encore ici, déjà ailleurs. Indifférent à l’ange consolateur, lui seul voit un deuxième ange, d’un blanc radieux, en haut à gauche. Fugitive gloire divine. Le bras pointe d’autres drames au-dessus du drame, en haut à droite. Au jeune et lumineux Isaac, au bel Isaac, est accordée une vision d’avenir, d’incendies et de pogroms : une mère serre son enfant, un homme porte sa croix – Jésus le juif solidaire des Juifs persécutés –, un rabbin fuit, on s’affole. Viendra un temps déraisonnable où l’homme, au contraire d’Abraham, agira vite, sauvage, et l’ange ne pourra suspendre son geste meurtrier. Un temps où la crainte de Dieu aura disparu.

Isaac voit. Contre l’inéluctable, il s’offre en victime innocente, pure et sans péché. Son offrande et l’épreuve de son père peuvent-elles changer l’avenir ? Pour le XXe siècle, il est trop tard, nous dit Chagall. Pour le XXIe, pour notre siècle, rien n’est perdu.

Voir par ailleurs:

Re-visions of Sacrifice

Abraham in Art and Interfaith Dialogue

Aaron Rosen reflects on the manifold ways in which  Abrahams near-sacrifice of Isaac has been portrayed in the ‘Abrahamic’ religions and in art and literature

In a poignant episode in his bestseller, Abraham: A Journey to the Heart of Three Faiths, Bruce Feiler relates a conversation in Jerusalem with Petra Heldt, a Lutheran minister. Despite witnessing the power of religious intolerance firsthand, Heldt – who suffered severe burns during a suicide bombing in 1997 – sketches an optimistic vision for interfaith dialogue. Like Feiler, she sees the greatest source of conversation and consensus between Jews, Christians, and Muslims in the shared figured of Abraham. If we can learn to alter our “exclusivist thinking”, she tells the author, we can “sit down and begin to draw a picture of Abraham”. The resulting image, she muses, will be a figure capable of “representing the best of ourselves. It’s beautiful,” she adds, “and it can happen.” Heldt no doubt intended this image metaphorically. But what if we take her words literally? What would happen if we really put Jews, Christians, and Muslims around a table together and asked them to sketch a portrait of this ancient forefather? Would all those invited even agree to such an exercise? And where would they even begin? One can only imagine the tricky task of drafting a patriarchal proboscis that appealed to all parties. While this thought experiment might seem a bit frivolous at first glance, looking closely at how we picture Abraham can disclose tensions which are often left unexamined when we engage in interfaith dialogue. Heldt’s vision is indeed a beautiful one, but it is stilmportant to identify the impediments to imagining a shared Abraham. This task is especially critical at a time when references to ‘the Abrahamic faiths’ have become seemingly indispensable when talking about relations between Jews, Christians, and Muslims. Numerous interfaith organisations have taken Abraham as a figurehead, including Abraham’s Vision and the Abrahamic Alliance International in the United States, Abraham House in the United Kingdom, and the Abraham Fund in Israel. Universities have followed suit, with Oxford and Cambridge respectively establishing professorships in “The Study of the Abrahamic Religions” and “Abrahamic Faiths and Shared Values The proliferation of such gatherings, institutions, and lectureships is certainly a boon to interfaith dialogue and academic study. The more traction the idea of the ‘Abrahamic’ has attained, however – the more it has solidified its place within our vocabulary – the less attentive we have become to what this label might obscure or ignore. If we are really aiming at an informed practice of interfaith dialogue, one of our first steps must be to reflect rigorously on the language we employ. If we are going to call for interfaith dialogue under the banner of ‘the Abrahamic’, we need to wrestle first of all with the legacy of Abraham himself. By looking at how artists from different backgrounds depict Abraham, I hope to show that the ways we imagine Abraham today are at once more promising and more problematic for interfaith dialogue than we usually recognise. There is no single Abraham whose dignified portrait we can hang above the mantle, expecting him to gaze down approvingly on our interfaith salons and seminars. What visual art can show us, more palpably than any other medium, is a multiplicity of Abrahams, figures who embrace and exclude each other at the same time. Seen in this light, what constitutes ‘the Abrahamic’ is not any immutable bond over a common forefather, but rather a fraternal tension; a spiritual tug-of-war which draws the participants closer, even as they struggle with one another. I want to explore this tension through works of art which depict Abraham’s near sacrifice of his son, understood as Isaac in Judaism and Christianity, and usually as Ishmael in Islam. This traumatic event, known to Jews as the Akedah , to Christians as the Sacrifice of Isaac, and to Muslims as the Dhabih , is a major theme in the scriptures, interpretive traditions, and practices of all three faiths. Indeed, for each religion – albeit in distinct ways – Abraham’s willingness to slaughter his son has come to be seen as the defining moment in the patriarch’s spiritual life. After familiarising ourselves with interpretations of this event in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, we will turn our attention to revealing examples of modern art. By providing embodied visions of the characters in question, these works force us to examine possibilities for interfaith dialogue which we might otherwise pass over.At the core of this story is a terrible divine demand, and a horrifying human willingness to execute it. Even the notion that this sequence of events constitutes a test for the patriarch – a major theme in each of the Abrahamic religions – leaves faith and obedience worryingly entwined with violence and bloodshed. For some commentators, this is compelling evidence of the “violent legacy of monotheism”. While it is reductive to read the Akedah as a cause of contemporary violence, the story does reinforce a logic which values religious commitment above the preservation of human life; a hierarchy with a dubious historical track record. Yet rather than throwing the baby – or in this case Isaac – Jewish Quarterly — Summer 2014 11 The proliferation of such gatherings, institutions, and lectureships is certainly a boon to interfaith dialogue and academic study. The more traction the idea of the ‘Abrahamic’ has attained, however – the more it has solidified its place within our vocabulary – the less attentive we have become to what this label might obscure or ignore. If we are really aiming at an informed practice of interfaith dialogue, one of our first steps must be to reflect rigorously on the language we employ. If we are going to call for interfaith dialogue under the banner of ‘the Abrahamic’, we need to wrestle first of all with the legacy of Abraham himself. By looking at how artists from different backgrounds depict Abraham, I hope to show that the ways we imagine Abraham today are at once more promising and more problematic for interfaith dialogue than we usually recognise. There is no single Abraham whose dignified portrait we can hang above the mantle, expecting him to gaze down approvingly on our interfaith salons and seminars. What visual art can show us, more palpably than any other medium, is a multiplicity of Abrahams, figures who embrace and exclude each other at the same time. Seen in this light, what constitutes ‘the Abrahamic’ is not any immutable bond over a common forefather, but rather a fraternal tension; a spiritual tug-of-war which draws the participants closer, even as they struggle with one another. I want to explore this tension through works of art which depict Abraham’s near sacrifice of his son, understood as Isaac in Judaism and Christianity, and usually as Ishmael in Islam. This traumatic event, known to Jews as the Akedah , to Christians as the Sacrifice of Isaac, and to Muslims as the Dhabih , is a major theme in the scriptures, interpretive traditions, and practices of all three faiths. Indeed, for each religion – albeit in distinct ways – Abraham’s willingness to slaughter his son has come to be seen as the defining moment in the patriarch’s spiritual life. After familiarising ourselves with interpretations of this event in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, we will turn our attention to revealing examples of modern art. By providing embodied visions of the characters in question, these works force us to examine possibilities for interfaith dialogue which we might otherwise pass over.At the core of this story is a terrible divine demand, and a horrifying human willingness to execute it. Even the notion that this sequence of events constitutes a test for the patriarch – a major theme in each of the Abrahamic religions – leaves faith and obedience worryingly entwined with violence and bloodshed. For some commentators, this is compelling evidence of the “violent legacy of monotheism”. While it is reductive to read the Akedah as a cause of contemporary violence, the story does reinforce a logic which values religious commitment above the preservation of human life; a hierarchy with a dubious historical track record. Yet rather than throwing the baby – or in this case Isaac – ‘What would happen if we put Jews, Christians, and Muslims around a table together and asked them to sketch a portrait of this ancient forefather?’ he boy or do anything to him; for now I know that you fear God, since you have not withheld your son, your only son, from me” (Gen. 22.12). Glancing up, Abraham spies a ram caught in a thicket, which he slaughters instead. After a second encomium booms down from heaven, the story concludes on a seemingly prosaic note. “Abraham returned to his young men” and journeys back to Beer-sheba (Gen. 22.19). Surprisingly, the Akedah barely features in the remainder of the Hebrew Bible. Coupled with the episode’s sparse and cryptic narration, the narrative absolutely clamors for interpretation. The rabbis were happy to oblige. Even the opening words: “After these things”, suggested a whole scene in which Satan baits God into testing Abraham, à la Job (1.6-12). In another tradition, of central importance in Islam, a devil appears to Abraham, Isaac, and Sarah, arguing that such a monstrous demand transgresses moral law; precisely the argument later made by Immanuel Kant! Some midrashim fly in the face of the text’s plain sense, claiming that Abraham had wounded or even slaughtered his son. In one version Isaac is whisked away to the Garden of Eden for three years to rehabilitate, presumably mentally as well as physically. According to another, “When Father Isaac was bound on the altar and reduced to ashes… [God] immediately brought upon him dew and revived him.” The site of Isaac’s sacrifice became identified with the Temple in Jerusalem and Isaac himself came to be construed as a willing adult, an exemplar for martyrs (e.g. 4 Macc. 13.12), especially during the persecution of Jews during the Crusades. While many of these associations have become muted for contemporary Jews, the blast of the shofar on High Holidays, continues to recall Isaac’s miraculous deliverance. The early followers of Jesus quickly recognised a powerful affinity between Abraham’s offering of Isaac and God’s sacrifice of his own beloved son. When Paul asserted in his Letter to the Romans that God “did not withhold his own Son, but gave him up for all of us” (8.32), he directly echoed the language of the Hebrew Bible, which praises Abraham for not withholding his son (Genesis 22.12, 16). The Letter to the Hebrews develops another influential line of thought: By faith Abraham, when put to the test, offered up Isaac. He who had received the promises was ready to offer up his only son, of whom he had been told, “It is through Isaac that descendants shall be named for you.” He considered the fact that God is able even to raise someone from the dead—and figuratively speaking, he did receive him back (11.17-19) Abraham’s deed became – first and foremost – a measure of faith; a familiar touchstone in Christian interpretations from Paul to Søren Kierkegaard. While Hebrews does not explicitly link the sacrifice of Isaac to Christ’s resurrection, later interpreters soon cemented this connection. Over the next several centuries, the Church Fathers wrote extensively on Genesis 22, frequently reading it as a prototype for the perfected sacrifice of Christ. Thus, for Saint Augustine, Isaac carrying the wood for the burnt offering anticipated Jesus shouldering the cross on his way to Golgotha. And the ram caught in thicket also became a symbol for the Saviour, “crowned with Jewish thorns before he was offered in sacrifice.” Taking their cue from such typologies, many churches today read Genesis 22 during the Easter Holy Week, when Christians remember Jesus’ sacrifice as the Paschal Lamb. If Genesis 22 is laconic, the Qur’anic rendering of this story is downright hermetic. Here it is in its entirety: And when (his son) was old enough to walk with him, (Abraham) said: O my dear son, I have seen in a dream that I must sacrifice thee. So look, what thinkest thou? He said: O my father! Do that which thou art commanded. Allah willing, thou shalt find me steadfast. Then, when they had both surrendered (to Allah), and he had flung him down upon his face, we called unto him: O Abraham! Thou hast already fulfilled the vision. Lo! Thus do we reward the good. Lo! that verily was a clear test. Then we ransomed him with a tremendous victim (q37.102-107) Certain elements are familiar, but the differences are crucial. Abraham receives God’s call in a dream, and rather than deliberately keeping his son in the dark, he immediately asks his opinion. For his part, the son is less like the naïve Isaac of Genesis and more like the steadfast martyr of midrash. It is not even clear which son is the protagonist. Early Islamic interpreters leaned towards Isaac and imagined the events transpiring near Jerusalem, while later interpreters favored Ishmael, and the Muslim holy city of Mecca as the setting. Although overall Ishmael features as the hero in only slightly more authoritative texts than Isaac, he is the overwhelming consensus among Muslims today. Picking up elements from both Jewish exegesis and pre-Islamic traditions, numerous sources describe Abraham and Isaac or Ishmael stoning Satan as he attempts to dissuade them from their sacrifice. This is the basis for the Hajj ritual in which pilgrims hurl pebbles at stone pillars representing the devil. The pilgrimage culminates with the Eid al- Adha , the Feast of the Sacrifice, in which an animal is slaughtered in memory of Abraham’s trial. While the texts and traditions of the Abrahamic faiths frequently intersect, this trend is even more pronounced when we turn to the visual arts. The binding or sacrifice has featured prominently in ancient synagogue mosaics and Christian funerary art, medieval Hebrews does not explicitly link the sacrifice of Isaac to Christ’s resurrection, later interpreters soon cemented this connection. Over the next several centuries, the Church Fathers wrote extensively on Genesis 22, frequently reading it as a prototype for the perfected sacrifice of Christ. Thus, for Saint Augustine, Isaac carrying the wood for the burnt offering anticipated Jesus shouldering the cross on his way to Golgotha. And the ram caught in thicket also became a symbol for the Saviour, “crowned with Jewish thorns before he was offered in sacrifice.” Taking their cue from such typologies, many churches today read Genesis 22 during the Easter Holy Week, when Christians remember Jesus’ sacrifice as the Paschal Lamb. If Genesis 22 is laconic, the Qur’anic rendering of this story is downright hermetic. Here it is in its entirety: And when (his son) was old enough to walk with him, (Abraham) said: O my dear son, I have seen in a dream that I must sacrifice thee. So look, what thinkest thou? He said: O my father! Do that which thou art commanded. Allah willing, thou shalt find me steadfast. Then, when they had both surrendered (to Allah), and he had flung him down upon his face, we called unto him: O Abraham! Thou hast already fulfilled the vision. Lo! Thus do we reward the good. Lo! that verily was a clear test. Then we ransomed him with a tremendous victim (q37.102-107) Certain elements are familiar, but the differences are crucial. Abraham receives God’s call in a dream, and rather than deliberately keeping his son in the dark, he immediately asks his opinion. For his part, the son is less like the naïve Isaac of Genesis and more like the steadfast martyr of midrash. It is not even clear which son is the protagonist. Early Islamic interpreters leaned towards Isaac and imagined the events transpiring near Jerusalem, while later interpreters favored Ishmael, and the Muslim holy city of Mecca as the setting. Although overall Ishmael features as the hero in only slightly more authoritative texts than Isaac, he is the overwhelming consensus among Muslims today. Picking up elements from both Jewish exegesis and pre-Islamic traditions, numerous sources describe Abraham and Isaac or Ishmael stoning Satan as he attempts to dissuade them from their sacrifice. This is the basis for the Hajj ritual in which pilgrims hurl pebbles at stone pillars representing the devil. The pilgrimage culminates with the Eid al- Adha , the Feast of the Sacrifice, in which an animal is slaughtered in memory of Abraham’s trial. While the texts and traditions of the Abrahamic faiths frequently intersect, this trend is even more pronounced when we turn to the visual arts. The binding or sacrifice has featured prominently in ancient synagogue mosaics and Christian funerary art, medieval Hebrews does not explicitly link the sacrifice of Isaac to Christ’s resurrection, later interpreters soon cemented this connection. Over the next several centuries, the Church Fathers wrote extensively on Genesis 22, frequently reading it as a prototype for the perfected sacrifice of Christ. Thus, for Saint Augustine, Isaac carrying the wood for the burnt offering anticipated Jesus shouldering the cross on his way to Golgotha. And the ram caught in thicket also became a symbol for the Saviour, “crowned with Jewish thorns before he was offered in sacrifice.” Taking their cue from such typologies, many churches today read Genesis 22 during the Easter Holy Week, when Christians remember Jesus’ sacrifice as the Paschal Lamb. If Genesis 22 is laconic, the Qur’anic rendering of this story is downright hermetic. Here it is in its entirety: And when (his son) was old enough to walk with him, (Abraham) said: O my dear son, I have seen in a dream that I must sacrifice thee. So look, what thinkest thou? He said: O my father! Do that which thou art commanded. Allah willing, thou shalt find me steadfast. Then, when they had both surrendered (to Allah), and he had flung him down upon his face, we called unto him: O Abraham! Thou hast already fulfilled the vision. Lo! Thus do we reward the good. Lo! that verily was a clear test. Then we ransomed him with a tremendous victim (q37.102-107) Certain elements are familiar, but the differences are crucial. Abraham receives God’s call in a dream, and rather than deliberately keeping his son in the dark, he immediately asks his opinion. For his part, the son is less like the naïve Isaac of Genesis and more like the steadfast martyr of midrash. It is not even clear which son is the protagonist. Early Islamic interpreters leaned towards Isaac and imagined the events transpiring near Jerusalem, while later interpreters favored Ishmael, and the Muslim holy city of Mecca as the setting. Although overall Ishmael features as the hero in only slightly more authoritative texts than Isaac, he is the overwhelming consensus among Muslims today. Picking up elements from both Jewish exegesis and pre-Islamic traditions, numerous sources describe Abraham and Isaac or Ishmael stoning Satan as he attempts to dissuade them from their sacrifice. This is the basis for the Hajj ritual in which pilgrims hurl pebbles at stone pillars representing the devil. The pilgrimage culminates with the Eid al- Adha , the Feast of the Sacrifice, in which an animal is slaughtered in memory of Abraham’s trial. While the texts and traditions of the Abrahamic faiths frequently intersect, this trend is even more pronounced when we turn to the visual arts. The binding or sacrifice has featured prominently in ancient synagogue mosaics and Christian funerary art, medieval Hebrews does not explicitly link the sacrifice of Isaac to Christ’s resurrection, later interpreters soon cemented this connection. Over the next several centuries, the Church Fathers wrote extensively on Genesis 22, frequently reading it as a prototype for the perfected sacrifice of Christ. Thus, for Saint Augustine, Isaac carrying the wood for the burnt offering anticipated Jesus shouldering the cross on his way to Golgotha. And the ram caught in thicket also became a symbol for the Saviour, “crowned with Jewish thorns before he was offered in sacrifice.” Taking their cue from such typologies, many churches today read Genesis 22 during the Easter Holy Week, when Christians remember Jesus’ sacrifice as the Paschal Lamb. If Genesis 22 is laconic, the Qur’anic rendering of this story is downright hermetic. Here it is in its entirety: And when (his son) was old enough to walk with him, (Abraham) said: O my dear son, I have seen in a dream that I must sacrifice thee. So look, what thinkest thou? He said: O my father! Do that which thou art commanded. Allah willing, thou shalt find me steadfast. Then, when they had both surrendered (to Allah), and he had flung him down upon his face, we called unto him: O Abraham! Thou hast already fulfilled the vision. Lo! Thus do we reward the good. Lo! that verily was a clear test. Then we ransomed him with a tremendous victim (q37.102-107) Certain elements are familiar, but the differences are crucial. Abraham receives God’s call in a dream, and rather than deliberately keeping his son in the dark, he immediately asks his opinion. For his part, the son is less like the naïve Isaac of Genesis and more like the steadfast martyr of midrash. It is not even clear which son is the protagonist. Early Islamic interpreters leaned towards Isaac and imagined the events transpiring near Jerusalem, while later interpreters favored Ishmael, and the Muslim holy city of Mecca as the setting. Although overall Ishmael features as the hero in only slightly more authoritative texts than Isaac, he is the overwhelming consensus among Muslims today. Picking up elements from both Jewish exegesis and pre-Islamic traditions, numerous sources describe Abraham and Isaac or Ishmael stoning Satan as he attempts to dissuade them from their sacrifice. This is the basis for the Hajj ritual in which pilgrims hurl pebbles at stone pillars representing the devil. The pilgrimage culminates with the Eid al- Adha , the Feast of the Sacrifice, in which an animal is slaughtered in memory of Abraham’s trial. While the texts and traditions of the Abrahamic faiths frequently intersect, this trend is even more pronounced when we turn to the visual arts. The binding or sacrifice has featured prominently in ancient synagogue mosaics and Christian funerary art, medieval Hebrews does not explicitly link the sacrifice of Isaac to Christ’s resurrection, later interpreters soon cemented this connection. Over the next several centuries, the Church Fathers wrote extensively on Genesis 22, frequently reading it as a prototype for the perfected sacrifice of Christ. Thus, for Saint Augustine, Isaac carrying the wood for the burnt offering anticipated Jesus shouldering the cross on his way to Golgotha. And the ram caught in thicket also became a symbol for the Saviour, “crowned with Jewish thorns before he was offered in sacrifice.” Taking their cue from such typologies, many churches today read Genesis 22 during the Easter Holy Week, when Christians remember Jesus’ sacrifice as the Paschal Lamb. If Genesis 22 is laconic, the Qur’anic rendering of this story is downright hermetic. Here it is in its entirety: And when (his son) was old enough to walk with him, (Abraham) said: O my dear son, I have seen in a dream that I must sacrifice thee. So look, what thinkest thou? He said: O my father! Do that which thou art commanded. Allah willing, thou shalt find me steadfast. Then, when they had both surrendered (to Allah), and he had flung him down upon his face, we called unto him: O Abraham! Thou hast already fulfilled the vision. Lo! Thus do we reward the good. Lo! that verily was a clear test. Then we ransomed him with a tremendous victim (q37.102-107) Certain elements are familiar, but the differences are crucial. Abraham receives God’s call in a dream, and rather than deliberately keeping his son in the dark, he immediately asks his opinion. For his part, the son is less like the naïve Isaac of Genesis and more like the steadfast martyr of midrash. It is not even clear which son is the protagonist. Early Islamic interpreters leaned towards Isaac and imagined the events transpiring near Jerusalem, while later interpreters favored Ishmael, and the Muslim holy city of Mecca as the setting. Although overall Ishmael features as the hero in only slightly more authoritative texts than Isaac, he is the overwhelming consensus among Muslims today. Picking up elements from both Jewish exegesis and pre-Islamic traditions, numerous sources describe Abraham and Isaac or Ishmael stoning Satan as he attempts to dissuade them from their sacrifice. This is the basis for the Hajj ritual in which pilgrims hurl pebbles at stone pillars representing the devil. The pilgrimage culminates with the Eid al- Adha , the Feast of the Sacrifice, in which an animal is slaughtered in memory of Abraham’s trial. While the texts and traditions of the Abrahamic faiths frequently intersect, this trend is even more pronounced when we turn to the visual arts. The binding or sacrifice has featured prominently in ancient synagogue mosaics and Christian funerary art, medieval over a bolster. Compared to the hand of Rembrandt’s Abraham, clamped like an octopus over Isaac’s face, the executioner’s hand rests almost gingerly across her victim’s throat. The young women in this tableau may be acting out the patriarchal roles assigned to them, but they do so dispassionately, rather than fired by religious fervor, like Rembrandt’s Abraham. And instead of the knife that plummets towards Isaac in Rembrandt, in Topçuoğlu the executioner brandishes the sharp edge of a book. But is the book ultimately any less dangerous? Is it any less of a weapon? The real violence, Topçuoğlu suggests, is hermeneutic: the way in which we interpret our holy books. As disturbing as Abraham’s readiness to sacrifice his son may be, his most dubious and enduring legacy may be his literalism.Perhaps it is fitting that we should look to an image to show us what is at stake in the relations between the “People of the Book”. Calls for dialogue between the Abrahamic faiths frequently begin with the assertion that what binds together Jews, Christians, and Muslims is, above all, their scriptural heritage. This emphasis has yielded some valuable insights into the intersecting traditions and practices of these religions, and stimulated interfaith exchange. Despite this rich textual legacy, however, these faiths are also people of the image . If we are willing to open our eyes to this fact, we will discover that visual art has an essential role to play in inter-religious dialogue. Art has the capacity to challenge fundamental preconceptions about the sacrifice of Isaac and Ishmael as a paradigm of faith and obedience. Together, Chagall, Kadishman, Mansour, and Topçuoğlu encourage us to pry open new spaces within accepted narratives, inhabiting received texts and traditions from different positions. If Abraham might look askance at such endeavors, perhaps his sons, and their mothers, would see things differently. The poet Eleanor Wilner imagines Sarah asking Isaac to run away with her on the eve of the Akedah, to join Hagar and Ishmael in exile, far away from Abraham. “But Ishmael,” said Isaac, “How should I greet him?” “As you greet yourself,” she said, “when you bend over the well to draw water and see your image, not knowing it reversed. You must know your brother now, or you will see your own face looking back the day you’re at each other’s throats.” The act of looking, as Sarah intuitively understands, is not merely incidental to dialogue, it is at its very heart. For Isaac and Ishmael – and their latter day descendants – the consequences of dis- regarding the Other can be fatal. Art may not be able to present us with a portrait of Abraham we can all agree on, but it can train us to see difference in a new light. —

Voir encore:

Le sociologue Gerald Bronner : notre société doit accepter le risque

Déjà auteur d’un livre remarqué sur la dérégulation des médias, « La démocratie des crédules », le sociologue Gérald Bronner s’interroge dans un nouvel ouvrage, « La planète des hommes », sur le rejet par la société moderne de l’idée de risque et l’excès du principe de précaution.

Boris Le Ngoc

Energie/Expansion

-SFEN
22 octobre 2014

Voir son interview intégrale sur le blog de la SFEN

Extraits :

Notre société est-elle gouvernée par « l’idéologie de la peur » ?

L’idéologie de la peur est devenue extrêmement présente dans l’esprit de nos concitoyens. On trouve notamment des traces de cette idéologie dans les fictions hollywoodiennes qui nous décrivent des apocalypses écologiques. A la différence des années 50 où les apocalypses étaient fondées sur l’imaginaire des soucoupes volantes ou de la guerre thermonucléaire, aujourd’hui la fin des temps viendra de l’action de l’homme et des conséquences désastreuses de cette action.

La caractéristique de cette idéologie de la peur, c’est la crainte a priori que l’action de l’homme puisse conduire à des déséquilibres de la nature. Cette crainte peut se muer en une détestation de l’homme, vu comme « vorace », et de son action, ce que j’appelle « l’anthrophobie ».

La loi sur la transition énergétique s’inscrit-elle dans cette idéologie ?

La loi sur la transition énergétique s’inscrit dans un fait historique qui est celui de la question climatique. Une question réelle, qu’il faut prendre au sérieux, mais qui sert en quelque sorte d’otage à cette idéologie de la peur. Sur la base des dérèglements climatiques, et des conséquences désastreuses qui ne manqueront pas de survenir, on en infère des scénarios apocalyptiques qui devraient suspendre toutes nos actions y compris nos actions technologiques.

Or, je pense qu’il y a un grand danger à suspendre nos actions : c’est celui de ne pas penser les conséquences catastrophiques de notre inaction. En ce sens, la loi sur la transition énergétique tient compte d’un certain nombre d’enjeux idéologiques qui cherchent à regrouper des considérations opportunistes et qui n’ont pas grand-chose à faire ensemble. Par exemple, plafonner la production nucléaire en France est problématique si on considère que le but est de lutter contre les énergies émettrices de gaz à effet de serre. Dans ce cas, pourquoi ne pas plus se préoccuper d’autres énergies comme le gaz ou le pétrole ?
(…)

Est-il possible de réenchanter le risque ?

C’est non seulement possible mais c’est absolument nécessaire. Je suis assez préoccupé du fait que toute l’idéologie contemporaine nous oriente vers les conséquences possibles de notre action. Si nous devons être comptables des conséquences de notre action, cette idéologie nous rend totalement aveugle quant aux conséquences possibles de notre inaction. Celle-ci pourrait avoir des coûts cataclysmiques.

Par exemple, pour le vaccin, on constate que la couverture maximale baisse y compris dans notre pays et qu’augmentent les craintes concernant le vaccin. En 2000, 9 % des français se méfiaient des vaccins, ils sont près de 40 % en 2010. Cette méfiance aura des conséquences terribles sur les générations futures.

(…) Ces questions ne peuvent avoir que des réponses technologiques. Or, ces réponses technologiques, nous ne les avons pas encore. Toute tentative d’enfermement des technologies du présent pourrait constituer un drame pour les générations futures. En d’autres termes, bâillonner le présent, c’est désespérer le futur.

Le réenchantement du risque passe par une première étape celui de la conscience que le risque zéro n’existe pas. En effet, chacune de nos actions charrie une part incompressible de risque. La seconde étape consiste à dire que nous ne pouvons pas ne pas prendre de risque et qu’il n’y a pas de plus grand risque que celui de ne pas en prendre. A partir de là, il nous faut gérer de manière beaucoup plus raisonnable le rapport des coûts et des bénéfices de toute innovation technologique.
(…)

Gérald Bronner est professeur de sociologie à l’université Paris Diderot.
« La planète des hommes » (réenchanter le risque) est publié aux PUF.

Voir de plus:

Fabrice Hadjadj: « À l’heure où l’ange de la mort passe dans les villes, Pâques prend toute sa force »

ENTRETIEN – Tandis que les chrétiens vont vivre Pâques confinés et sans sacrements, le philosophe voit dans la privation de rites religieux l’occasion de redécouvrir leur prix.

Eugénie Bastié
Le Figaro

Fabrice Hadjadj est philosophe, directeur de l’Institut Philanthropos, lieu de formation à l’anthropologie chrétienne situé à Fribourg, en Suisse.

Dernier ouvrage paru: À moi la gloire (Éditions Salvator, 2019, 160 pages, 15 €).


Comme la peste chez Sophocle, l’épidémie de coronavirus nous ramène à la dimension tragique de notre condition: la confrontation avec un mal irréductible, explique avec élévation le philosophe. Tandis que les chrétiens vont vivre Pâques confinés et sans sacrements, comment éviter la victoire du virtuel sur le charnel?

«Le confinement peut nous perdre dans nos tablettes, mais il est aussi l’occasion de réinventer la table familiale et de retrouver le sens d’une culture toujours plus neuve que nos innovations», observe Fabrice Hadjadj. Et le penseur voit dans la privation de rites pour les chrétiens l’occasion de redécouvrir leur prix.

LE FIGARO. – L’une des premières représentations de la peste se trouve dans Œdipe roi de Sophocle. L’Occident voit-il avec le coronavirus le « retour du tragique », comme on l’entend beaucoup?

Fabrice HADJADJ. – Œdipe roi s’ouvre en effet sur la peste de Thèbes. Le peuple meurt, et l’oracle déclare que ce fléau a été envoyé parce que le meurtrier de Laïos court toujours. Œdipe va donc mener l’enquête pour découvrir qui a tué son prédécesseur sur le trône. Dès l’Antiquité, Sophocle invente une «detective story» ultramoderne, où l’enquêteur découvre qu’il est lui-même l’assassin, et que l’assassin est pire qu’on ne l’imagine au départ, puisqu’il s’avère parricide et incestueux. Cela ne suffit pas, cependant, à faire entrer dans le tragique.

Une telle histoire pourrait aussi bien relever de l’absurde ou du méchant fait divers. Ce qui fait le tragique d’une situation, ce ne sont pas les faits comme tels, mais la manière dont nous les lisons. L’épidémie peut être traitée de manière statistique – ou mélodramatique. C’est ce que l’on entend le plus souvent: un discours qui oscille entre le calcul et l’émotion. Il y a bien sûr aussi les vidéo-gags sur le confinement, qui tournent la chose à la farce, ou encore, à l’extrême opposé, le travail des microbiologistes, pour qui c’est un défi thérapeutique. Je ne méprise pas ces perspectives, qui ont chacune leur temps et leur nécessité.

La tragédie, ultimement, nous dit que la plus grande dignité de l’homme est dans ce déchirement vertical, qui vient questionner jusqu’aux sources de la vie

Je dis seulement que le tragique implique autre chose, et, d’abord, un cheminement de l’extérieur vers l’intérieur: Œdipe essaie de remédier à la peste, mais il ne se contente pas de prendre des mesures sanitaires, il rentre en lui-même, il médite sur sa propre destinée. Ensuite, le tragique suppose la confrontation à un mal irréductible: il ne suffit pas de désigner les coupables, car le coupable, ici, est aussi une victime, la peste frappe tout le monde, et ceux qui en sont préservés, comme Œdipe, découvrent en eux un mal encore plus grand.

Enfin, et c’est le point le plus important, puisque le roi se montre ici à jamais fragile et qu’aucun progrès ne pourra en finir avec le drame, il n’y a pas de solution définitive, il ne nous reste qu’une supplication sans réponse, une interpellation du ciel et des dieux, à la limite de la révolte et de l’abandon. La tragédie, ultimement, nous dit que la plus grande dignité de l’homme est dans ce déchirement vertical, qui vient questionner jusqu’aux sources de la vie.

Vous venez d’évoquer la lecture statistique. Chaque fin de journée, nous avons droit au décompte macabre des morts dans le monde entier. Que penser de cette épidémie des chiffres et du rapport à la mort qu’elle institue?

Ce que nous vivons n’est pas simplement une pandémie mondiale, mais une pandémie numérique, où les effets du virus sont relayés par une information dite virale. Nous sommes confinés comme des poissons rouges, mais sur les parois de notre bocal nous n’arrêtons pas de consulter les chiffres de la surmortalité, en attendant que l’hameçon de la maladie vienne nous attraper et nous fasse basculer dans un autre monde.

On découvre, avec les problèmes de ravitaillement, que l’agriculture est plus fondamentale que la haute finance, et l’œuvre des soignants plus essentielle que celle des winners

On s’aperçoit soudain que ce qui n’était qu’une unité dans un compte est un nom propre avec un visage. On passe d’un coup de la prophylaxie à l’asphyxie, du statistique au dramatique. Dans la Bible, la peste s’abat sur Israël parce que David a voulu recenser son peuple, c’est-à-dire ne plus le considérer dans la singularité de ses personnes, de ses familles et de ses tribus, mais comme un grand ensemble manipulable. Aujourd’hui, c’est la peste elle-même qui induit des recensements sans fin, à la fois hypnotiques et anxiogènes.

Pendant ce temps, du fait de l’isolement des personnes âgées et des consignes de distanciation sociale, le mourant se voit dépouillé de son entourage au profit de l’assistance de la chimie et des machines, et le mort, privé de rites funéraires au profit du four crématoire. Sous ce rapport, l’épidémie ne fait qu’intensifier et dévoiler une structure qui était déjà là, et que l’on pourrait qualifier de structure techno-émotionnelle: face à la mort, on ne sait plus rien faire d’autre que de passer d’une gestion technologique qui nous permet de surnager, à une émotion qui brusquement nous noie.

Nous sommes confinés et, en même temps, nous n’avons jamais été aussi connectés. Cette crise signe-t-elle le triomphe du virtuel sur le charnel?

Une crise ne produit pas des effets univoques. En termes de médecine, elle est état transitoire du patient, et peut être heureuse ou funeste, parce qu’elle débouche soit sur la guérison soit sur la mort. Les geeks vivaient déjà confinés derrière leurs écrans. Est-ce leur victoire, ou la preuve qu’ils vivaient déjà comme des malades? L’industrie des applications mobiles est en pleine forme, et le patron de Netflix peut se frotter les mains, mais on découvre aussi, avec les problèmes de ravitaillement, que l’agriculture est plus fondamentale que la haute finance, et l’œuvre des soignants plus essentielle que celle des winners. Hier, on parlait beaucoup de transhumanisme.

Vivre la Pâque dans cette privation, c’est aussi reconnaître que le christianisme n’est pas un spiritualisme, mais une religion de l’Incarnation, où le plus spirituel rejoint le plus charnel

L’épidémie nous ramène à la condition humaine, à notre mortalité, à la précarité de nos existences. Soudain Thucydide redevient notre contemporain, puisqu’il a traversé la peste d’Athènes. Sophocle, Bocacce, Manzoni, Giono ou Camus se révèlent plus actuels que nos actualités, parce qu’ils témoignent de ce qui appartient de manière indépassable à la chair de l’homme. Le confinement peut nous perdre dans nos tablettes, mais il est aussi l’occasion de réinventer la table familiale, et de retrouver le sens d’une culture toujours plus neuve que nos innovations – de même que le printemps restera toujours plus neuf que nos derniers gadgets.

Nous entrons dans le triduum pascal, ces trois jours qui vont de la messe du soir le Jeudi saint (la Cène) au dimanche de Pâques (la Résurrection). La virtualisation des rites ne nous fait-elle pas mieux sentir le prix de la communion et des églises?

S’il y a quelque chose qu’on ne peut virtualiser, c’est le rite chrétien. Les sacrements exigent une proximité physique. Ils communiquent la grâce par mode de contagion, de proche en proche, parce que l’amour de Dieu est inséparable de l’amour du prochain. C’est pourquoi, l’épidémie se propageant de la même façon, les fidèles ont été privés de l’eucharistie…

L’an dernier, au début de la semaine sainte, c’était l’incendie de Notre-Dame : l’édifice incomparable brûlait, mais le rituel était intact

Comme l’Église fait normalement obligation de communier au moins à Pâques, certains ont jugé bon de discuter cette mesure, voire de la braver. Je préfère la penser. Vivre la Pâque dans cette privation, c’est aussi reconnaître que le christianisme n’est pas un spiritualisme, mais une religion de l’Incarnation, où le plus spirituel rejoint le plus charnel, où le don de la grâce passe par un prêtre balourd, près d’un voisin antipathique, en mastiquant un insipide bout de pain.

L’an dernier, au début de la semaine sainte, c’était l’incendie de Notre-Dame: l’édifice incomparable brûlait, mais le rituel était intact. À présent, sans rien de spectaculaire, mais de manière plus profonde, c’est le rituel lui-même qui est atteint. Le drame est plus grand, même s’il se voit moins. Mais si grand que soit le drame, c’est encore de cela que parle le sacrifice de la Croix. Sous le rapport, non pas du rite, mais de ce à quoi il renvoie, en cette heure où l’ange de la mort passe à travers les villes, la Pâque nous rejoint dans toute sa force. Judas transmet la mort par un baiser. Pilate se lave les mains avec du gel hydroalcoolique. Jésus demande: Mon Dieu, pourquoi? Et il ne lui est pas répondu.

Mais si nous crions ainsi sous le mal, c’est que nous avons d’abord vu la bonté de la vie. Comme le dit Rilke dans ce vers que je ne me lasse pas de répéter: «Seule la louange ouvre un espace à la plainte». Nous ne pouvons gémir devant ce qui nous détruit que parce que nous célébrons ce qui nous porte. L’envers du cri, si désespéré soit-il, est encore un appel à l’espérance. La nuit nous fait horreur parce que nous avons goûté à la beauté du jour, mais la perte de cette lumière, qui nous fait si mal, nous suggère aussi qu’au bout de la nuit noire l’aurore finit par poindre, plus poignante que jamais.

Voir enfin:

Les animaux aussi se sacrifient

Réformés
1 mars 2018
ALTRUISME
Chez certaines espèces de fourmis, d’abeilles, d’oiseaux ou de mammifères, on observe des comportements altruistes qui ressemblent à des sacrifices personnels. Mais il est délicat de comparer ces actes avec les attitudes humaines.

Nous les êtres humains n’avons pas le monopole des comportements de sacrifice. Au contraire, les attitudes altruistes sont très prononcées chez certaines espèces d’insectes, dont les hyménoptères sociaux. Fourmis, abeilles et termites forment des colonies gigantesques au sein desquelles certains individus se sacrifient pour la survie de la communauté. L’abeille ouvrière, par exemple, meurt en piquant un intrus dans la ruche, car elle ne peut retirer son dard cranté planté dans la chair de son adversaire.

Apparente moralité

Faut-il dès lors supposer qu’il existe une morale chez les insectes? Ces derniers sont-ils doués d’une volonté généreuse envers leur prochain? Ni Christine Clavien, philosophe des sciences à l’Université de Genève, ni Laurent Keller, spécialiste mondialement connu des insectes sociaux à l’Université de Lausanne, ne le croient une seule seconde! «Un comportement semblable chez les humains et les insectes n’appelle pas la même explication dans les deux cas», précise d’emblée Christine Clavien.

«L’explication des attitudes sacrificielles chez les insectes est d’ordre génétique», explique Laurent Keller, «elle ne suppose aucune décision libre de la part des individus. Le comportement altruiste de ces animaux est déterminé par leurs gènes en raison de l’avantage reproductif qu’il confère à l’ensemble de la colonie. Derrière ces comportements d’apparence altruiste se cache la logique implacable de la transmission des gènes, commandée par la sélection naturelle».

Oiseaux, mammifères et humains

L’attitude des oiseaux et des mammifères, qui prennent soin de leurs petits parfois jusqu’à l’épuisement et en prenant des risques énormes, fonctionne différemment de celle des insectes. Ces animaux sont dotés d’une intelligence qui leur permet de faire des choix plus complexes, et les mammifères sont, comme les humains, doués d’émotions. Pourtant, Laurent Keller souligne qu’en biologie, on ne parle pas d’altruisme lorsqu’il s’agit d’un sacrifice réalisé en faveur de ses petits. Tout ce qui permet d’augmenter sa «fitness reproductive», c’est-à-dire la transmission de ses gènes à sa descendance directe, n’est pas réellement altruiste. Un comportement est appelé altruiste en biologie «uniquement lorsqu’il diminue le nombre de bébés qu’un individu va générer, à la faveur d’un autre», clarifie le biologiste.

Même ainsi définis, les comportements altruistes concernent des milliers d’espèces animales, dont… l’être humain. Selon Laurent Keller, «nous sommes le produit de nos gènes comme les autres espèces animales», mais le chercheur reconnaît que «nous devons être responsables de nos actes». Christine Clavien considère aussi que nos sentiments d’empathie ont une base génétique, mais à ses yeux «nos choix conscients nous permettent de dépasser nos pulsions biologiques, pour le meilleur et pour le pire».


Messianisme homosexuel: Quand le cannibalisme n’est plus qu’une affaire de goût (What moral depravities can not be excused by the sole criterion of « warm, meaningful human relations » or « fulfillment », the newest semantic heirs to « love »?)

11 février, 2020

Image may contain: 2 people, people standing

Si toutes les valeurs sont relatives, alors le cannibalisme n’est plus qu’une affaire de goût. Leo Strauss (?)
Tu ne coucheras pas avec un homme comme on couche avec une femme. C’est une abomination. Lévitique 18:22
Il n’y aura aucune prostituée parmi les filles d’Israël, et il n’y aura aucun prostitué parmi les fils d’Israël. Tu n’apporteras point dans la maison de l’Éternel, ton Dieu, le salaire d’une prostituée ni le prix d’un chien, pour l’accomplissement d’un voeu quelconque; car l’un et l’autre sont en abomination à l’Éternel, ton Dieu. Deutéronome 23: 17-18
La vertu même devient vice, étant mal appliquée, et le vice est parfois ennobli par l’action. Frère Laurent (Roméo et Juliette, Shakespeare)
Le monde moderne n’est pas mauvais : à certains égards, il est bien trop bon. Il est rempli de vertus féroces et gâchées. Lorsqu’un dispositif religieux est brisé (comme le fut le christianisme pendant la Réforme), ce ne sont pas seulement les vices qui sont libérés. Les vices sont en effet libérés, et ils errent de par le monde en faisant des ravages ; mais les vertus le sont aussi, et elles errent plus férocement encore en faisant des ravages plus terribles. Le monde moderne est saturé des vieilles vertus chrétiennes virant à la folie.  G.K. Chesterton
La liberté, c’est la liberté de dire que deux et deux font quatre. Lorsque cela est accordé, le reste suit. George Orwell (1984)
Parler de liberté n’a de sens qu’à condition que ce soit la liberté de dire aux gens ce qu’ils n’ont pas envie d’entendre. George Orwell
Il faut constamment se battre pour voir ce qui se trouve au bout de son nez. Orwell
Le plus difficile n’est pas de dire ce que l’on voit mais d’accepter de voir ce que l’on voit. Péguy
Si vous admettez qu’un homme revêtu de la toute-puissance peut en abuser contre ses adversaires, pourquoi n’admettez-vous pas la même chose pour une majorité?  (…) Le pouvoir de tout faire, que je refuse à un seul de mes semblables, je ne l’accorderai jamais à plusieurs. Tocqueville
Si j’étais législateur, je proposerais tout simplement la disparition du mot et du concept de “mariage” dans un code civil et laïque. Le “mariage”, valeur religieuse, sacrale, hétérosexuelle – avec voeu de procréation, de fidélité éternelle, etc. -, c’est une concession de l’Etat laïque à l’Eglise chrétienne – en particulier dans son monogamisme qui n’est ni juif (il ne fut imposé aux juifs par les Européens qu’au siècle dernier et ne constituait pas une obligation il y a quelques générations au Maghreb juif) ni, cela on le sait bien, musulman. En supprimant le mot et le concept de “mariage”, cette équivoque ou cette hypocrisie religieuse et sacrale, qui n’a aucune place dans une constitution laïque, on les remplacerait par une “union civile” contractuelle, une sorte de pacs généralisé, amélioré, raffiné, souple et ajusté entre des partenaires de sexe ou de nombre non imposé.(…) C’est une utopie mais je prends date. Jacques Derrida
C’est le sens de l’histoire (…) Pour la première fois en Occident, des hommes et des femmes homosexuels prétendent se passer de l’acte sexuel pour fonder une famille. Ils transgressent un ordre procréatif qui a reposé, depuis 2000 ans, sur le principe de la différence sexuelle. Evelyne Roudinesco
Les enfants adoptés ou nés sous X revendiquent aujourd’hui le droit de connaître leur histoire. Nul n’échappe à son destin, l’inconscient vous rattrape toujours. (…)  les enfants adoptés ou issus de la PMA ne sortent jamais indemnes des perturbations liées à leur naissance. Il faut rester ouvert, être attentif à leurs questions, s’ils en posent, et surtout ne pas chercher à cacher la vérité. L’idéal serait de trouver une position équilibrée entre le système de transparence absolue à l’américaine et le système de dissimulation à la française, lequel, ne l’oublions pas, reposait autrefois sur une intention généreuse d’égalité des droits entre les enfants issus de différentes filiations. Evelyne Roudinesco
1936, dans les quartiers bourgeois de Tokyo. Sada Abe, ancienne prostituée devenue domestique, aime épier les ébats amoureux de ses maîtres et soulager de temps à autre les vieillards vicieux. Son patron Kichizo, bien que marié, va bientôt manifester son attirance pour elle et va l’entraîner dans une escalade érotique qui ne connaîtra plus de bornes. Kichizo a désormais deux maisons : celle qu’il partage avec son épouse et celle qu’il partage avec Sada. Les rapports amoureux et sexuels entre Sada et Kichizo sont désormais épicés par des relations annexes, qui sont pour eux autant de célébrations initiatiques. Progressivement, ils vont avoir de plus en plus de mal à se passer l’un de l’autre, et Sada va de moins en moins tolérer l’idée qu’il puisse y avoir une autre femme dans la vie de son compagnon. Kichizo demande finalement à Sada, pendant un de leurs rapports sexuels, de l’étrangler sans s’arrêter, quitte à le tuer. Sada accepte, l’étrangle jusqu’à ce qu’il meure, avant de l’émasculer, dans un geste ultime de mortification ; puis elle écrit sur la poitrine de Kichizo, avec le sang de ce dernier : ‘Sada et Kichi, maintenant unis’. Wikipedia
Il nous arriverait, si nous savions mieux analyser nos amours, de voir que souvent les femmes ne nous plaisent qu’à cause du contrepoids d’hommes à qui nous avons à les disputer (…) ce contrepoids supprimé, le charme de la femme tombe. On en a un exemple dans l’homme qui, sentant s’affaiblir son goût pour la femme qu’il aime, applique spontanément les règles qu’il a dégagées, et pour être sûr qu’il ne cesse pas d’aimer la femme, la met dans un milieu dangereux où il faut la protéger chaque jour. Proust (La Prisonnière)
C’est déjà ou presque de l’homosexualité, en vérité, que nous parlons puisque le modèle-rival se trouve normalement un individu du même sexe, du fait même que l’objet est hétérosexuel. Toute rivalité sexuelle est donc structurellement homosexuelle. Ce que nous appelons homosexualité, c’est la subordination complète, cette fois, de l’appétit sexuel aux effets du jeu mimétique qui concentre toutes les puissances d’attention et d’absorption du sujet sur l’individu responsable du double bind, le modèle en tant que rival, le rival en tant que modèle. Pour rendre cette genèse plus évidente, il faut évoquer ici un fait curieux observé par l’éthologie. Chez certains singes, quand un mâle se reconnaît battu par un rival et renonce à la femelle qu’il lui disputait, il se met, vis à vis de ce vainqueur, en position, nous dit-on, d’ ‘offre homosexuelle’. (…) S’il n’y a pas d’homosexualité ‘véritable’ chez les animaux, c’est parce que le mimétisme, chez eux, n’est pas assez intense pour infléchir durablement l’appétit sexuel vers le rival. Il est déjà assez intense, pourtant, au paroxysme des rivalités mimétiques, pour ébaucher cet infléchissement. Si j’ai raison, on devrait trouver dans les formes rituelles, le chaînon manquant entre la vague ébauche animale et l’homosexualité proprement dite. Et effectivement, l’homosexualité rituelle est un phénomène assez fréquent; elle se situe au paroxysme de la crise et on la trouve dans des cultures qui ne font aucune place, semble-t-il, à l’homosexualité, en dehors des rites religieux. Une fois de plus, en somme, c’est dans un contexte de rivalité aigüe qu’apparait l’homosexualité. Une comparaison du phénomène animal, de l’homosexualité rituelle, et de l’homosexualité moderne ne peut manquer de signaler que c’est le mimétisme qui entraine la sexualité et non l’inverse. De cette l’homosexualité rituelle, il faut rapprocher, je pense, un certain cannibalisme rituel qui se pratique dans des cultures , également, où le cannibalisme n’existe pas en temps ordinaire. Dans ce cas comme dans l’autre, il me semble, l’appétit instinctuel, alimentaire ou sexuel, se détache de l’objet que les hommes se disputent pour se fixer sur celui ou ceux qui nous le disputent. (…) Un des avantages de la genèse par la rivalité, c’est qu’elle se présente de façon absolument symétrique chez les deux sexes. Autrement dit, toute rivalité sexuelle est de structure homosexuelle chez la femme comme chez l’homme, aussi longtemps toutefois que l’objet reste hétérosexuel, c’est-à-dire qu’il reste l’objet prescrit par le montage instinctuel hérité de la vie animale. (…) C’est sur ce parallélisme que se base Proust pour affirmer qu’on peut transcrire une expérience homosexuelle en termes hétérosexuels sans jamais trahir la vérité de l’un ou l’autre désir. René Girard
On a commencé avec la déconstruction du langage et on finit avec la déconstruction de l’être humain dans le laboratoire. (…) Elle est proposée par les mêmes qui d’un côté veulent prolonger la vie indéfiniment et nous disent de l’autre que le monde est surpeuplé. René Girard
En conclusion, nous devons nous demander pourquoi le principe de précaution si souvent mis en avant et dans tous les domaines, y compris à propos du maïs transgénique, ne devrait pas s’appliquer au projet de loi actuel. Maurice Berger
La lisibilité de la filiation, qui est dans l’intérêt de l’enfant, est sacrifiée au profit du bon vouloir des adultes et la loi finit par mentir sur l’origine de la vieConférence des évêques
C’est au nom de l’égalité, de l’ouverture d’esprit, de la modernité et de la bien-pensance dominante qu’il nous est demandé d’accepter la mise en cause de l’un des fondements de notre société. (…) Ce n’est pas parce que des gens s’aiment qu’ils ont systématiquement le droit de se marier. Des règles strictes délimitent et continueront de délimiter les alliances interdites au mariage. Un homme ne peut pas se marier avec une femme déjà mariée, même s’ils s’aiment. De même, une femme ne peut pas se marier avec deux hommes. (…) « le mariage pour tous est uniquement un slogan car l’autorisation du mariage homosexuel maintiendrait des inégalités et des discriminations à l’encontre de tous ceux qui s’aiment, mais dont le mariage continuerait d’être interdit. (…) L’enjeu n’est pas ici l’homosexualité qui est un fait, une réalité, quelle que soit mon appréciation de Rabbin à ce sujet (…)  c’est l’institution qui articule l’alliance de l’homme et de la femme avec la succession des générations. C’est l’institution d’une famille, c’est-à-dire d’une cellule qui crée une relation de filiation directe entre ses membres. C’est un acte fondamental dans la construction et dans la stabilité tant des individus que de la société. (…) résumer le lien parental aux facettes affectives et éducatives, c’est méconnaître que le lien de filiation est un vecteur psychique et qu’il est fondateur pour le sentiment d’identité de l’enfant. (…) l’enfant ne se construit qu’en se différenciant, ce qui suppose d’abord qu’il sache à qui il ressemble. Il a besoin, de ce fait, de savoir qu’il est issu de l’amour et de l’union entre un homme, son père, et une femme, sa mère, grâce à la différence sexuelle de ses parents. (…) Le droit à l’enfant n’existe ni pour les hétérosexuels ni pour les homosexuels. Aucun couple n’a droit à l’enfant qu’il désire, au seul motif qu’il le désire. L’enfant n’est pas un objet de droit mais un sujet de droit. Gilles Bernheim
Ce qui pose problème dans la loi envisagée, c’est le préjudice qu’elle causerait à l’ensemble de notre société au seul profit d’une infime minorité, une fois que l’on aurait brouillé de façon irréversible trois choses:  les généalogies en substituant la parentalité à la paternité et à la maternité;  le statut de l’enfant, passant de sujet à celui d’un objet auquel chacun aurait droit; les identités où la sexuation comme donnée naturelle serait dans l’obligation de s’effacer devant l’orientation exprimée par chacun, au nom d’une lutte contre les inégalités, pervertie en éradication des différences. Ces enjeux doivent être clairement posés dans le débat sur le mariage homosexuel et l’homoparentalité. Ils renvoient aux fondamentaux de la société dans laquelle chacun d’entre nous a envie de vivre. Gilles Bernheim (Grand rabbin de France)
He said, ‘Look Juan Carlos, the pope loves you this way. God made you like this and he loves you. Juan Carlos Cruz
The pope is saying what every reputable biologist and psychologist will tell you, which is that people do not choose their sexual orientation. A great failing of the church is that many Catholics have been reluctant to say so, which then “makes people feel guilty about something they have no control over. Rev. James Martin (Jesuit)
The Vatican declined to confirm or deny the remarks in keeping with its policy not to comment on the pope’s private conversations. The comments first were reported by Spain’s El Pais newspaper. Official church teaching calls for gay men and lesbians to be respected and loved, but considers homosexual activity “intrinsically disordered.” Francis, though, has sought to make the church more welcoming to gays, most famously with his 2013 comment “Who am I to judge?” He also has spoken of his own ministry to gay and transgender people, insisting they are children of God, loved by God and deserving of accompaniment by the church. As a result, some sought to downplay the significance of the comments as merely being in line with Francis’ pastoral-minded attitude. In addition, there was a time not so long ago when the Catholic Church officially taught that sexual orientation was not something people choose, the implication being it was how God made them. The first edition of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, the dense summary of Catholic teaching published by St. John Paul II in 1992, said gay individuals “do not choose their homosexual condition; for most of them it is a trial.” The updated edition, which is the only edition available online and on the Vatican website, was revised to remove the reference to homosexuality not being a choice. The revised edition says: “This inclination, which is objectively disordered, constitutes for most of them a trial.” Francis DeBernardo, executive director of New Ways Ministry, which advocates for equality for LGBTQ Catholics, said the pope’s comments were “tremendous” and would do a lot of good. “It would do a lot better if he would make these statements publicly, because LGBT people need to hear that message from religious leaders, from Catholic leaders,” he said. The Rev. James Martin, a Jesuit whose book “Building a Bridge” called for the church to find new pastoral ways of ministering to gays, noted that the pope’s comments were in a private conversation, not a public pronouncement or document. But citing the original version of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Martin said they were nevertheless significant. Martin’s book is being published this week in Italian, with a preface by the Francis-appointed bishop of Bologna, Monsignor Matteo Zuppi, a sign that the message of acceptance is being embraced even in traditionally conservative Italy. NBC news
Why did god make me this way? Why did god make me wrong? Mia Lamay
The doctor said that we had a girl coming, so we started thinking of girl names. » « ‘Mia’ was born in 2010. » « Mia constantly wanted to change her clothes, like 12 times a day. » »Then the dog sweater came and she became obsessed with wearing one garment for six months straight. In hindsight I think she was trying to dispel a sense of discomfort in her image that was being shown to the world. » »She would take on boy personas and always want to play with boy things, we thought we had a tomboy on our hands. » « She didn’t fit in with the boys and she didn’t fit in with the girls. It was obvious to her and to the other kids. » « Her need to play boy roles and to be seen or spoken to as a boy at home became very persistent, and very consistent. Those are the hallmarks of a possibly transgender child — consistence, persistence, and insistence. And she was meeting all of those markers. » « A mother’s heart knows when her child is suffering, » says Jacob’s mom. « He was talking about hating his body, I found him angrily poking at himself one day, wanting to be something different. He would say ‘Why did god make me this way? Why did god make me wrong?' »One day after a near car accident, Jacob’s mom realized that if something were to happen, she didn’t want to « force her to be Mia for that one last day. At that point, my mind was made up. » In April of last year, the family took a trip and bought Jacob a Prince Charming costume. « We hadn’t yet transitioned Jacob, but he had short hair and was wearing almost entirely boy clothes… and he just glowed. Something clicked. » « There had been a video that had gone viral of an adorable little boy in California, Ryland Whittington, and his parents had made a video of him explaining transitioning and clearly this boy is so happy now. We were struck by that. » Jacob’s parents showed him the video of the boy, asking if he wanted to be like Ryland, but he said: « I can’t, I can be what I like at home, but I have to be Mia at school. » Jacob’s parents explained that he could start at a new school where everyone would know him as a boy from the beginning, and he immediately said « That’s what I want. I want to be a boy always. I want to be a boy named Jacob. » « Before the transition, he didn’t smile a lot. I had never seen him throw his head back and laugh. He’s a different person, he’s becoming himself. » »He started looking people in the eye, talking to people, and striking up conversations. I realized how much he had come out of his shell and how much being Jacob suited him. » »I couldn’t ask for a better son, » concludes Jacob’s dad. His mom agrees: « I want him to know how proud of him I am, how brave I believe he is, how no matter what I am in his corner, and I will always love him — because he’s my son. » Business insider
It’s not how you act, or what you wear, or anything like that. It’s just how you really are inside. … You just feel like you just got put in the wrong body. Jacob Lemay
Fourth grader Jacob Lemay knew he was a boy before he could properly pronounce the word “transgender.” His whole family now advocates for trans rights. Now, Mimi Lemay has written a memoir titled “What We Will Become” about love, acceptance and change. Jacob is now in fourth grade. He has a pet hedgehog named Trinket, and he loves hockey, jumping on his backyard trampoline and playing with his sisters. He is a typical 9-year-old boy in every way, except for being transgender. He said some of his friends know and some don’t. But to most kids, it’s just not that big a deal. Over the last five years, he has grown and matured, and he is more sophisticated now when he talks about what it means to him to be transgender. And since he has reached the early stages of puberty, Jacob has opted to take a puberty blocker. This is a completely reversible step endorsed by the medical community. It is also the very kind of treatment that some state lawmakers are looking to stop. More than half a dozen states, most recently Ohio, have introduced bills seeking to ban gender-affirming health care for minors. This type of care, Mimi Lemay said, will save the lives of children like Jacob. More than half a dozen states, most recently Ohio, have introduced bills seeking to ban gender-affirming health care for minors. This type of care, Mimi Lemay said, will save the lives of children like Jacob. Mimi and Joe Lemay said their entire family now advocates for transgender rights. In fact, Jacob recently asked presidential hopeful Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., a question at a televised town hall. The Lemays said they want to keep sharing their story to help other families with trans kids. “Your child will be OK as long as you support them,” Mimi Lemay said. “There is no harm in saying to your child, ‘I see you … and believe you, and you are who you say you are.’ NBC news
Je suis un prêtre clandestin. (…) À 18 ans, j’ai fait mon coming-out. Cela ne s’est pas bien passé. Au point que j’en suis venu à cette alternative : le suicide ou l’exil. (…) J’ai été accusé d’être un activiste homosexuel infiltré dans l’Église. Tout récemment, un archevêque a même voulu me défroquer. (…) Le point de départ a été la découverte de l’œuvre de René Girard. Avec sa lecture rigoureusement anthropologique du texte biblique, il a montré que l’on n’est face ni à une mythologie ni même à une théologie humaine mais, au contraire, à une anthropologie divine. (…) René Girard m’a aidé à prendre conscience que ce n’est pas Dieu qui est violent mais l’homme. Par exemple, le Christ n’est pas sacrifié par les hommes pour payer le prix exigé par un dieu sanguinaire. Que signifie alors la mort de Jésus ? Que les hommes sont violents. Et, ne se rebellant pas, Jésus s’est donné au milieu d’un de nos typiques épisodes de lynchage comme incarnant le pardon en tant que valeur divine. (…) La haine des autres est réelle mais je n’ai pas à me laisser définir par elle. Je cherche toujours à enseigner comment vivre au-delà du ressentiment. Devenir soi et pardonner, voici quelque chose au cœur de la foi chrétienne. (…) Si le rejet de l’homosexualité au sein de l’Église est si fort, c’est aussi parce qu’il y a tellement de gays mal à l’aise au sein du clergé (…) Cette parole est trop rare et pourtant indispensable pour que les positions dogmatiques sur la famille ou sur l’homosexualité évoluent au sein de l’Église et de la société. James Alison
In general, despite what those who try to conflate “gay” with “paedophile” would have you believe, a knowing clerical gay milieu is genuinely shocked and baffled when minors are involved. In all these cases, in as far as the behaviour was adult-related, plenty of people in authority sort-of-knew what was going on, and had known throughout the clerics’ respective careers. However the informal rule among the Catholic Clergy – the last remaining outpost of enforced homosociality in the Western world – is strictly “don’t ask, don’t tell.” Typically, blind eyes are turned to the active sex lives of those clerics who have them, only two things being beyond the pale: whistle-blowing on the sex lives of others, or public suggestions that the Church’s teaching in this area is wrong. These lead to marginalisation, whether formal or informal. Given all this, it seems to me entirely reasonable that people should now be asking “How deep does this go?” If such careers were the result of blind eyes being turned, legal settlements made, and these clerics themselves were in positions of influence and authority, how much more are we going to learn about those who promoted and protected them? Or about those whom they promoted? So it is that voices like Rod Dreher – keenly followed blogger at The American Conservative – are resuscitating talk of the “Lavender Mafia”, and the demand, which became popular in conservative circles from 2002 onwards, that the priesthood be purged of gay men. Investigative journalists are being encouraged to lay bare the informal gay networks of friendship, patronage, and potential for blackmail which structure clerical life (or are being excoriated for their politically correct cowardice in failing to do so). The aim is to weed out the gays, especially the treasonous bishops who have perpetuated the system. Ross Douthat – the New York Times columnist – has called for a papally mandated investigation into the American Church (I guess along the lines of Mgr Charles Scicluna’s in Chile) in order to restore its moral authority. Others, like Robert Mickens, The Tablet’s Rome correspondent for many years, are equally aware of the “elephant in the sacristy” which is the massively disproportionate number of gay men in the clergy, but highlight the refusal of the Roman authorities to engage in any kind of publicly accountable, adult discussion about this fact. Their refusal reinforces collective dishonesty and perpetuates the psychosexual immaturity of all gay clergy, whether celibate, partnered or practitioners of so-called “serial celibacy”. How to approach this issue in a healthy way? As a gay priest myself I am obviously more in agreement with Mickens than with Dreher or Douthat. However I would like to record my complete sympathy with the passion of the latter two as well as with their rage at a collective clerical dishonesty which renders farcical the claim to be teachers of anything at all, let alone divine truth. Jesus becomes credible through witnesses, not corrupt party-line pontificators. Having said that, I suspect that particular interventions, whether by civil authority or Papal mandate, are always going to run aground on the fact that they can only deal with, and bring to light specific bad acts, usually ones that rise to the level of criminality. I cannot imagine a one-off legal intervention in this sphere that would be able to make appropriate distinctions where there are so many fine lines: between innocent friendship, sexually charged admiration, abusive sexual suggestion, emotional blackmail, financial blackmail, recognition of genuine talent, genuine love lived platonically, genuine love lived with sexual intimacy, sexual favours granted with genuine freedom, sexual favours granted out of fear or in exchange for promotion, covering peccadillos for a friend, covering graver matters for a rival in exchange for some benefit, not wanting to know too much about other people’s lives, or obsessively wanting to know too much about them. Let alone the usual rancours of break-ups, career disappointments, petty jealousies, bitterness, revenge and so on. All of these tend to shade into or out of each other over time, making effective outside assessment, even if it were desirable, impossible. (…) An anecdotal illustration: a few years ago, I found myself leading a retreat for Italian gay priests in Rome. Of the nearly fifty participants some were single, some partnered, for others it was the first time they had ever been able to talk honestly with other priests outside the confessional. Among them there were seven or eight mid-level Vatican officials. I asked one from the Congregation for the Clergy what he made of those attending with their partners. He smiled and said, “Of course, we know that the partnered ones are the healthy ones.” Let that sink in. In the clerical closet, dishonesty is functional, honesty is dysfunctional, and the absence or presence of circumspect sexual practice between adult males is irrelevant. And so to some systemic dimensions of “The elephant in the sacristy”. The first is its size. A far, far greater proportion of the clergy, particularly the senior clergy, is gay than anyone has been allowed to understand, even the bishops and cardinals themselves. Harvard Professor Mark Jordan’s phrase “a honeycomb of closets”, in which each enclosed participant has very little access to the overall picture, is exactly right. But the proportion is going to become more and more self-evident thanks to social media and the generalized expectations of gay honesty and visibility in the civil sphere. This despite many years of bishops resisting accurate sociological clergy surveys. At the time of the last papal election in 2013 we did have hints that the Vatican and the cardinal electors were shocked at discovering from reports commissioned by Benedict how many of them were gay. Part of their shock has to have been their fear at how the faithful would be scandalized if they had any idea. They were right to be afraid, and the faithful are going to have an idea as the implosion of the closet accelerates. (…) A second dimension is grasped when you understand the general rule that the heterosexuality of a cleric is inversely proportional to the stridency of his homophobia. This is one of the reasons why I am sceptical of all attempts to “weed out the gays”. The principal clerical crusaders in this area turn out to be gay themselves – in some cases, so deeply in denial that they don’t know it. And in some cases knowingly so. My own experience, which has since been confirmed by hundreds of echoes worldwide, is that there are proportionately few straight men in the clergy (leaving aside rural dioceses in some countries, where heterosexual concubinage is the customary norm) and they do not, as a rule, persecute gay men. It is closeted men who are the worst persecutors. Some are very sadly disturbed souls who cannot but try to clean outwardly what they cannot admit to being inwardly. These can’t be helped since Church teaching reinforces their hell. For others the lure of upward mobility leads them to strategic displays of enthusiasm for the enforcement of the house rules. A third dimension is that banning gay men from the seminary never works. In practise, the ban means that those “tempted” by honesty will be weeded out, or will weed themselves out, uncomfortable with the inducements to a double life. Those unconcerned by honesty, and happy to swim in the wake of the double lives of those doing the weeding, will learn how to look the part. The only seminaries that might avoid this are those that differentiate on the basis not of sexual orientation, but of honesty, which is a primary requisite for any form of psycho-sexual maturity. And there are some that do, presumably with the permission of wise Bishops, but in quiet contravention of the official line. These of course are instantly vulnerable to accusations of being liberal, of promoting homosexuality or whatever, when in practical terms, the reverse is true. For honesty is effectively forbidden by a Church teaching, which tells you that you are an intrinsically heterosexual person who is inexplicably suffering from a grave objective disorder called “same-sex attraction”. And so we get seminaries in which there are no gay seminarians, but whose rectors nevertheless push programmes like those of “Courage” on their oh-so-non-gay-but-transitorily-same-sex-attracted charges. A fourth dimension: no attempt to view this issue through culture war lenses will be helpful. The clerical closet is not the result of some 1960s liberal conspiracy. It is a systemic structure in which, absent scandal, all of its survivors are functional. (…) This is not a matter of left or right, traditional or progressive, good or bad, chaste or practising; nor even a matter of twenty five years of Karol Wojtyla’s notoriously poor judgment of character, though all these feed into it. It is a systemic structural trap, and if we are to get out of it, it must be described in such a way as to recognise that unknowing innocence as much as knowing guilt, well-meaning error as well as malice, has been, and is, involved in both its constitution and its maintenance. (…) What is to be done, and what is quietly happening? In my view the first thing is for the laity to be encouraged in their fast growing majority acceptance of being gay as a normal part of life. This, despite fierce resistence from elements of the clerical closet. Pope Francis’ reported conversation with Juan Carlos Cruz (a gay man abused in his youth by the Chilean priest, Fr Karadima) is a gem in this area: “Look Juan Carlos, the pope loves you this way. God made you like this and he loves you”. This remark led to much spluttering and explaining away from those who realise that the moment you say “God made you like this” then the game is up as regards the “intrinsic evil” of the acts. Nevertheless, it is only when straightforward, and obviously true, Christian messaging like Francis’ becomes normal among the laity themselves that honesty can become the norm among the clergy. Otherwise we will continue with the absurd and pharisaical current situation in which there is one rule for the clergy (“doesn’t matter what you do so long as you don’t say so in public or challenge the teaching”) and another for the laity, passed off as “the teaching of the Church”, and brutally enforced, for instance, among employees of Catholic schools, parish organists, softball coaches and the like. Only when it is clear (as it is increasingly) that the laity are quite confident in the (obviously true) view that “if you are this way, then learning to love appropriately is going to flow from, not despite, this” will it be possible to change, without scandal, the formal rules regarding the clergy. I bring this out since much was made of Francis’ reported answer to the Italian Bishops when asked if they should admit gay men to the seminary: “if you are in any doubt, no”. This was read as Francis being against gay men. I read the remark differently: that of a wise and merciful man addressing a group of men, a significant proportion of whom are gay, and telling them, in effect, that only those among them who are capable of honesty in dealing with their future charges should induct people like themselves into the clergy. “Are you yourself going to vacillate in standing up publicly for the honesty of the young man? If so, don’t make his future dependent on your cowardice”. James Alison
Aucune religion n’interdit le cannibalisme. Je ne trouve pas non plus de loi qui nous empêche de manger des gens. J’ai profité de l’espace entre la morale et la loi et c’est là-dessus que j’ai basé mon travail. Zhu Yu 
Sur internet : les gens racontent beaucoup de choses. Des choses pour se faire peur, ou pour se faire jouir, et parfois les deux se confondent. Il suffit de fouiller un peu sur le web pour s’en rendre compte. Commençons par le vore, une « paraphilie » (ce qu’on appelait autrefois « perversion », une pratique ou attirance considérée comme « anormale ») qui consiste à avaler ou être avalé par un animal ou un individu, sans effusion de sang ni violence. On se fait engloutir d’un coup, gloups, comme le Petit Chaperon rouge, fantasme du retour au ventre de la mère, avant de ressortir indemne. La plupart des sites pornos en proposent quelques vidéos, souvent une mauvaise 3D, le reste se passe dans la tête. Variantes : les giant vore, où des hommes minuscules se font ingurgiter par d’immenses maîtresses plantureuses ; ou le cock vore, lorsque la proie se fait avaler par un urètre géant, souvent à grands traits de style manga et avec des personnages indéterminés, quelque part entre l’humain et l’animal. Loin de ces supports masturbatoires, d’autres préfèrent une version plus réaliste : des vidéos façon snuff movies, où des membres plus vrais que nature grillent sur des barbecues. Devant lesquelles on se demande si c’est pour de faux, ou pas. Ils ont un rapport sexuel, puis décident ensemble de couper le pénis de Bernd, de le faire flamber, de le goûter. Puis ils le font sauter à la poêle avant de le terminer. Dans les Google Groupes, des topics spécialisés recensent les annonces de milliers de personnes « sérieuses » qui veulent manger, ou se faire manger, au milieu de dessins et montages grossiers de femmes avec une pomme dans la bouche et d’hommes avec une broche dans le derrière. Mais pour remonter à la source de l’imaginaire cannibale, il faut se rendre sur le forum DolcettGirls : fondé par un dessinateur canadien sous le pseudo de Perro Loco, il rassemble une communauté qui s’échange bons plans pornos, nouvelles érotiques, comics mordants et recettes. C’est à Perro Loco, aussi, qu’on doit le Cannibal Cafe Forum, institution fermée après un « terrible fait divers » : c’est là que l’informaticien allemand Armin Meiwes (aka le cannibale de Rotenbourg) a posté ses annonces pour trouver sa victime. En 2001, il reçoit la réponse de Bernd Jürgen Brandes, un Berlinois de 43 ans à la recherche de « l’excitation ultime ». Armin, qui rêve de « quelqu’un qui serait pour toujours avec lui », le reçoit. Ils ont un rapport sexuel, puis décident ensemble de couper le pénis de Bernd, de le faire flamber, de le goûter. Puis ils le font sauter à la poêle avant de le terminer. Armin tue ensuite Bernd de plusieurs coups de couteau, en découpe 30 kg et met « les meilleurs morceaux » au congélateur. « Ce qui a le plus choqué n’est pas le fait que Meiwes ait mangé une partie de Brandes, mais que Brandes ait consenti à être mangé », note le psychologue Mark Grifths, de la Nottingham Trent University : « On connaît peu la prévalence de ce type de comportements, bien que Meiwes affirme qu’au moins 800 personnes partageaient sa passion. » Alors Perro Loco a fermé le Cannibal Cafe et ouvert DolcettGirls, spécialisé dans les trips trash. Depuis cette affaire, il affirme que son site n’est qu’une plate-forme d’échanges de fantasmes, pas de rencontres meurtrières. Condamné à perpétuité, Armin est aujourd’hui en prison. Et végétarien. (…) Comme l’explique Bill Schutt dans son livre Cannibalism, a Perfectly Natural History, la nature abonde de cas de cannibalisme. Les araignées Amaurobius ferox pondent dans l’unique but de nourrir leur portée. Quand les bébés deviennent trop gros et que les œufs viennent à manquer, maman se laisse dévorer, dernière étape avant que sa progéniture, une fois adulte, puisse reproduire le schéma. En se faisant cannibaliser, les mantes religieuses produisent plus de sperme. Et on ne vous parle pas des requins : les fœtus s’entredévorent dans l’utérus de la mère et seul naît le plus fort, ragaillardi par toutes ces protéines avalées. Difficile pourtant de généraliser : d’une région à une autre, ou même d’un groupe à un autre au sein d’une même espèce, le cannibalisme apparaît ou disparaît. Pas de déterminisme, simplement une stratégie contingente de survie et d’évolution. Il en fut de même chez les humains : chez nous non plus, le cannibalisme n’a jamais été ancré, jamais des « sauvages » n’ont mangé leur prochain comme ils auraient savouré un steak d’élan. Chez nos ancêtres préhistoriques, on ne soupçonne que des cas isolés ; d’ailleurs l’espèce n’aurait pas survécu à un cannibalisme généralisé. Partout où l’anthropophagie s’est développée, elle était encadrée et liée à un contexte précis. Plus souvent, elle ne se résumait en réalité qu’à des fantasmes d’Occidentaux ou à des arguments inventés pour mieux éradiquer des populations (coucou Christophe Colomb). « Le cannibalisme survient toujours dans des sociétés en proie à des crises historiques, démographiques ou écologiques terribles. En plus, dès que les Européens arrivaient, ils décuplaient les crises, et vingt ans après les premiers contacts, le phénomène avait pris des proportions monumentales », explique l’anthropologue et chercheur au CNRS Georges Guille-Escuret. Parfois autorisé, voire valorisé (pour honorer un ancêtre ou saluer le courage d’un ennemi), le cannibalisme a très vite été rejeté par ceux qui ne le pratiquaient pas. « Nous vivons dans des sociétés qui ont décrété une rupture entre le monde de la nature et celui de la culture, analyse l’anthropologue. Dans la vision chinoise par exemple, cette césure n’existe pas : le cannibalisme va être progressivement prohibé pour maintenir les rapports sociaux, mais une anthropophagie pour raisons médicales ou sexuelles perdure encore, ce n’est pas un tabou ultime. » Chez nous, si. La faute aux Grecs, tout d’abord, qui jugeaient le cannibalisme incompatible avec le fonctionnement d’une cité, au même titre qu’un gouvernement de femmes. « Deux sociétés les effrayaient : les cannibales et les Amazones. D’ailleurs, partout où on a trouvé les premiers, on a subodoré les secondes. » Plus tard vient s’ajouter la phobie chrétienne : le fait de consommer de la chair humaine devient un sacrilège, l’homme ayant été créé « à l’image de Dieu ». « Il y a aussi la règle de l’interdiction du “redoublement du même” : on ne peut pas mettre l’identique sur l’identique », développe l’anthropologue. En clair : on ne couche pas avec sa sœur car c’est le même sang, on ne mange pas un membre de notre espèce car c’est la même chair. « En Polynésie, on considère même que le cannibalisme est un inceste alimentaire. Mais le double tabou, la phobie politique grecque et la phobie cosmogonique chrétienne, peut créer une double fascination. Toute prohibition implique une contestation fantasmatique. On n’interdit pas sans provoquer le désir de transgression. » Alors, dès qu’un cas est connu, tout le monde fait « beurk », mais tout le monde veut savoir. L’histoire du vol 571, où les survivants du crash ont dû manger leurs congénères pendant les deux mois qu’ont duré les recherches dans les Andes, a été adaptée au cinéma. Luka Rocco Magnotta, le dépeceur de Montréal, a son fan-club et va bientôt se marier. Issei Sagawa, l’étudiant japonais qui a mangé une Néerlandaise à Paris en 1981 (jugé irresponsable et libéré depuis), a écrit une douzaine de livres et tourné des pubs pour des restaurants de viande. Il a même participé à quelques pornos. « Il n’y a rien de plus excitant qu’une jolie fille en train de manger, quoi qu’elle mange. » Au restaurant, si Appetizing Kid en voit une en train de ronger une cuisse de poulet « ou une saucisse » avec les mains, le Croate de 28 ans reconnaît qu’il doit masquer son trouble avec sa serviette. « Je suis sûr que beaucoup imaginent pire, mais ils ne l’admettront jamais. » « La sexualité et l’alimentation sont des zones de métaphore l’une pour l’autre : c’est universel, comme Levi-Strauss l’avait remarqué, confirme Georges Guille-Escuret. Dans le cannibalisme, beaucoup de métaphores sexuelles s’expriment. Le va-et-vient est permanent. » Ne dit-on pas qu’il/elle est « à croquer » ? Au lit, qui ne s’est jamais fait mordiller une oreille ou un téton ? Et ce bébé joufflu, pourquoi mémé dit-elle qu’« on le mangerait » en embrassant ses petits petons ? « Bien sûr, je trouve excitant une cannibale qui mange une jambe ou la masculinité d’un mec, mais je préfère encore plus le vore classique, précise Appetizing Kid : un requin qui avale un surfeur, une géante qui mange un homme… » Alors quand Dinoshark ou Shark Attack passe à la télé, il sort le Sopalin. Des cannibales, des vrais, il affirme en avoir croisé. Il a vu des photos (je recevrai moi-même quelques images où le montage est difficile à prouver). Des gens dont il se tient éloigné. « J’aime l’art, l’imaginaire du cannibalisme, mais ça reste virtuel pour la plupart d’entre nous. On estime plus nos vies que nos fantasmes. » Ce désir, le psychologue américain Steven J. Scher et son équipe l’ont analysé. Résultat : le degré d’horreur que nous ressentons vis-à-vis de l’anthropophagie dépend de notre attirance pour la victime. En demandant à leurs cobayes de choisir, parmi plusieurs personnes, qui ils embrasseraient et qui ils mangeraient, ils ont remarqué qu’on trouve moins dégoûtant de manger une personne de l’autre sexe, soit un potentiel partenaire. On trouve aussi moins répugnant de manger une personne « sexuellement attirante » qu’une moche, un adulte qu’un enfant. « La corrélation [entre désir et cannibalisme] est proche de 90 %, écrivent-ils dans leur étude. En général, ce qui provoque le dégoût à l’idée de manger une personne est aussi ce qui provoque le dégoût lorsqu’il s’agit de choisir un partenaire sexuel. » A quel moment peut-on switcher de « tiens, si on faisait l’amour » à « tiens, si on se grignotait l’oignon » ? D’un point de vue purement sadomasochiste, on peut imaginer le fait de cannibaliser comme l’acte ultime de domination, et le fait d’être mangé comme celui de la soumission. Neon
L’oppression mentale totalitaire est faite de piqûres de moustiques et non de grands coups sur la tête. (…) Quel fut le moyen de propagande le plus puissant de l’hitlérisme? Etaient-ce les discours isolés de Hitler et de Goebbels, leurs déclarations à tel ou tel sujet, leurs propos haineux sur le judaïsme, sur le bolchevisme? Non, incontestablement, car beaucoup de choses demeuraient incomprises par la masse ou l’ennuyaient, du fait de leur éternelle répétition.[…] Non, l’effet le plus puissant ne fut pas produit par des discours isolés, ni par des articles ou des tracts, ni par des affiches ou des drapeaux, il ne fut obtenu par rien de ce qu’on était forcé d’enregistrer par la pensée ou la perception. Le nazisme s’insinua dans la chair et le sang du grand nombre à travers des expressions isolées, des tournures, des formes syntaxiques qui s’imposaient à des millions d’exemplaires et qui furent adoptées de façon mécanique et inconsciente. Victor Klemperer (LTI, la langue du IIIe Reich)
Il m’était arrivé plusieurs fois que certains gosses ouvrent ma braguette et commencent à me chatouiller. Je réagissais de manière différente selon les circonstances, mais leur désir me posait un problème. Je leur demandais : « Pourquoi ne jouez-vous pas ensemble, pourquoi m’avez-vous choisi, moi, et pas d’autres gosses? » Mais s’ils insistaient, je les caressais quand même ». Daniel Cohn-Bendit (Grand Bazar, 1975)
Dénoncé en direct comme un quasi-pédophile appelé à répondre de ses actes devant la justice pour les outrages imposés à des  jeunes filles flétries», «Gab’la rafale» tint le choc, mais ce lynchage télévisuel laissa des traces. En avouant son penchant pour des jouvencelles, Matzneff fut la proie d’un néopuritanisme conquérant qui, paradoxalement, accompagnerait, les années suivantes, le déferlement d’une pornographie «chic» sévissant aussi bien dans le cinéma, la publicité que la littératureLe Figaro (2009)
 Matzneff est un personnage public. Lui permettre d’exprimer au grand jour ses viols d’enfants sans prendre les mesures nécessaires pour que cela cesse, c’est donner à la pédophilie une tribune, c’est permettre à des adultes malades de violenter des enfants au nom de la littérature. Marie-France Botte et Jean-Paul Mari
Un écrivain comme Gabriel Matzneff n’hésite pas à faire du prosélytisme. Il est pédophile et s’en vante dans des récits qui ressemblent à des modes d’emploi. Or cet écrivain bénéficie d’une immunité qui constitue un fait nouveau dans notre société. Il est relayé par les médias, invité sur les plateaux de télévision, soutenu dans le milieu littéraire. Souvenez-vous, lorsque la Canadienne Denise Bombardier l’a interpellé publiquement chez Pivot, c’est elle qui, dès le lendemain, essuya l’indignation des intellectuels. Lui passa pour une victime : un comble ! (…) Je ne dis pas que ce type d’écrits sème la pédophilie. Mais il la cautionne et facilite le passage du fantasme à l’acte chez des pédophiles latents. Ces écrits rassurent et encouragent ceux qui souffrent de leur préférence sexuelle, en leur suggérant qu’ils ne sont pas les seuls de leur espèce. D’ailleurs, les pédophiles sont très attentifs aux réactions de la société française à l’égard du cas Matzneff. Les intellectuels complaisants leur fournissent un alibi et des arguments: si des gens éclairés défendent cet écrivain, n’est-ce pas la preuve que les adversaires des pédophiles sont des coincés, menant des combats d’arrière-garde? Bernard Cordier (psychiatre, 1995)
Nous considérons qu’il y a une disproportion manifeste entre la qualification de ‘crime’ qui justifie une telle sévérité, et la nature des faits reprochés; d’autre part, entre le caractère désuet de la loi et la réalité quotidienne d’une société qui tend à reconnaître chez les enfants et les adolescents l’existence d’une vie sexuelle (si une fille de 13 ans a droit à la pilule, c’est pour quoi faire ?), TROIS ANS DE PRISON POUR DES CARESSES ET DES BAISERS, CELA SUFFIT !” Nous ne comprendrions pas que, le 29 janvier, Dejager, Gallien et Bruckardt ne retrouvent pas la liberté.  Aragon, Ponge, Barthes, Beauvoir, Deleuze, Glucksmann,  Hocquenghem, Kouchner, Lang, Gabriel Matzneff, Catherine Millet,  Sartre, Schérer et Sollers (Pétition de soutien à trois accusés de pédophilie, Le Monde, 1977)
Presidents run for re-election against real opponents, not public perceptions. For all the media hype, voters often pick the lesser of two evils, not their ideals of a perfect candidate. Victor Davis Hanson
How can evangelicals support Donald Trump? That question continues to befuddle and exasperate liberals. How, they wonder, can a man who is twice divorced, a serial liar, a shameless boaster (including about alleged sexual assault) and an unrepentant xenophobe earn the enthusiastic backing of so many devout Christians? About 80% of evangelicals voted for Trump in 2016; according to a recent poll, almost 70% of white evangelicals approve of how he has handled the presidency – far more than any other religious group. To most Democrats, such support seems a case of blatant hypocrisy and political cynicism. Since Trump is delivering on matters such as abortion, the supreme court and moving the US embassy in Israel to Jerusalem, conservative Christians are evidently willing to overlook the president’s moral failings. In embracing such a one-dimensional explanation, however, liberals risk falling into the same trap as they did in 2016, when their scorn for evangelicals fed evangelicals’ anger and resentment, contributing to Trump’s huge margin among this group. Bill Maher fell into this trap during a biting six-minute polemic he delivered on his television show in early March. Evangelicals, he said, “needed to solve this little problem” – they want to support a Republican president, but this particular one “happens to be the least Christian person ever”. “How to square the circle?” he asked. “Say that Trump is like King Cyrus.” According to Isaiah 45, God used the non-believer Cyrus as a vessel for his will; many evangelicals today believe that God is similarly using the less-than-perfect Trump to achieve Christian aims. But Trump isn’t a vessel for God’s will, Maher said, and Cyrus “wasn’t a fat, orange-haired, conscience-less scumbag”. Trump’s supporters “don’t care”, he ventured, because “that’s religion. The more it doesn’t make sense the better, because it proves your faith.” Maher portrayed evangelical Christians as a dim-witted group willing to make the most ludicrous theological leaps to advance their agenda. As I watched, I tried to imagine how evangelicals would view this routine. I think they would see a secular elitist eager to assert what he considers his superior intelligence. They would certainly sense his contempt for the many millions of Americans who believe fervently in God, revere the Bible and see Trump as representing their interests. Maher’s diatribe reminded me of a pro-Trump acquaintance from Ohio who now lives in Manhattan and who says that New York liberals are among the most intolerant people he has ever met. Liberals have good cause to decry the ideology of conservative Christians, given their relentless assault on abortion rights, same-sex marriage, transgender rights and climate science. But the disdain for Christians common among the credentialed class can only add to the sense of alienation and marginalization among evangelicals. Many evangelicals feel themselves to be under siege. In a 2016 survey, 41% said it was becoming more difficult to be an evangelical. And many conservative Christians see the national news media as unrelievedly hostile to them. Most media coverage of evangelicals falls into a few predictable categories. One is the exotic and titillating – stories of ministers who come out as transgender, or stories of evangelical sexual hypocrisies. Another favorite subject is progressive evangelicals who challenge the Christian establishment. (…) In 2016, [ the Times’ Nicholas Kristof,] wrote a column criticizing the pervasive discrimination toward Christians in liberal circles. He quoted Jonathan Walton, a black evangelical and professor of Christian morals at Harvard, who compared the common condescension toward evangelicals to that directed at racial minorities, with both seen as “politically unsophisticated, lacking education, angry, bitter, emotional, poor”. Strangely, the group most overlooked by the press is the people in the pews. It would be refreshing for more reporters to travel through the Bible belt and talk to ordinary churchgoers about their faith and values, hopes and struggles. Such reporting would no doubt show that the world of American Christianity is far more varied and complex than is generally thought. It would reveal, for instance, a subtle but important distinction between the Christian right and evangelicals in general, who tend to be less political (though still largely conservative). This kind of deep reporting would probably also highlight the enduring power of a key tenet of the founder of Protestantism. “Faith, not works,” was Martin Luther’s watchword. In his view, it is faith in Christ that truly matters. If one believes in Christ, then one will feel driven to do good works, but such works are always secondary. Trump’s own misdeeds are thus not central; what he stands for – the defense of Christian interests and values – is. Luther also preached the doctrine of original sin, which holds that all humans are tainted by Adam’s transgression in the Garden of Eden and so remain innately prone to pride, anger, lust, vengeance and other failings. Many evangelicals have themselves struggled with divorce, broken families, addiction and abuse. We are thus all sinners – the president included. (…) I can hear the reactions of some readers to this column: Enough! Enough trying to understand a group that helped put such a noxious man in the White House. Yet such a reaction is both ungenerous and shortsighted. Liberals take pride in their empathy for “the other” and their efforts to understand the perspective of groups different from themselves. They should apply that principle to evangelicals. If liberals continue to scoff, they risk reinforcing the rage of evangelicals – and their support for Trump. Michael Massing
Comment les évangéliques peuvent-ils soutenir Donald Trump? Cette question continue de brouiller et d’exaspérer les progressistes. Comment, se demandent-ils, un homme qui est divorcé deux fois, un menteur en série, un fanfaron éhonté (y compris au sujet d’une agression sexuelle présumée) et un xénophobe impénitent peut-il obtenir le soutien enthousiaste de tant de chrétiens dévots? Environ 80% des évangéliques ont voté pour Trump en 2016; selon un récent sondage, près de 70% des évangéliques blancs approuvent la façon dont il a géré la présidence – bien plus que tout autre groupe religieux. Pour la plupart des démocrates, un tel soutien semble être un cas d’hypocrisie flagrante et de cynisme politique. Étant donné que Trump se prononce sur des questions telles que l’avortement, la Cour suprême et le déplacement de l’ambassade américaine en Israël à Jérusalem, les chrétiens conservateurs sont évidemment prêts à ignorer les défauts moraux du président. Cependant, en adoptant une telle explication unidimensionnelle, les libéraux risquent de tomber dans le même piège qu’en 2016, lorsque leur mépris pour les évangéliques a nourri la colère et le ressentiment des évangéliques, contribuant à l’énorme marge de Trump parmi ce groupe. Bill Maher est tombé dans ce piège dans la diatribe mordante de six minutes qu’il a prononcée lors de son émission de télévision début mars. Les évangéliques, a-t-il dit, « devaient résoudre ce petit problème » – ils veulent soutenir un président républicain, mais celui-ci « se trouve être le moins chrétien de tous les temps ». « Comment résoudre cette quadrature du cercle? », a-t-il demandé. « Dire que Trump est comme le roi Cyrus. » Selon Ésaïe 45, Dieu a utilisé le non-croyant Cyrus comme véhicule de sa volonté; de nombreux évangéliques croient aujourd’hui que Dieu utilise de la même manière un Trump moins que parfait pour atteindre les objectifs chrétiens. Mais Trump n’est pas un vaisseau pour la volonté de Dieu, a déclaré Maher, et Cyrus « n’était pas un nul gras, aux cheveux orange et sans conscience ». Les partisans de Trump « ne s’en soucient pas », s’est-il aventuré, parce que « c’est la religion. Moins cela a de sens, mieux c’est, car cela prouve votre foi. »Maher a dépeint les chrétiens évangéliques comme un groupe humble disposé à faire les sauts théologiques les plus ridicules pour faire avancer leur programme. Pendant que je regardais, j’ai essayé d’imaginer comment les évangéliques verraient cette routine. Je pense qu’ils verraient un élitiste laïc désireux d’affirmer ce qu’il considère comme son intelligence supérieure. Ils ressentiraient certainement son mépris pour les millions d’Américains qui croient ardemment en Dieu, vénèrent la Bible et considèrent Trump comme représentant leurs intérêts. La diatribe de Maher m’a rappelé une connaissance pro-Trump de l’Ohio qui vit maintenant à Manhattan et qui dit que les libéraux de New York sont parmi les personnes les plus intolérantes qu’il ait jamais rencontrées. Les libéraux ont de bonnes raisons de dénoncer l’idéologie des chrétiens conservateurs, étant donné leur assaut incessant contre les droits à l’avortement, le mariage homosexuel, les droits des transgenres et la science du climat. Mais le mépris pour les chrétiens, commun à la classe diplômée, ne peut qu’ajouter au sentiment d’aliénation et de marginalisation des évangéliques. De nombreux évangéliques se sentent assiégés. Dans une enquête de 2016, 41% ont déclaré qu’il devenait plus difficile d’être évangélique. Et de nombreux chrétiens conservateurs considèrent les médias nationaux comme hostiles à leur égard. La plupart des reportages médiatiques sur les évangéliques se répartissent en quelques catégories prévisibles. L’une est les histoires exotiques et émouvantes – des histoires de pasteurs qui se révèlent transgenres, ou des histoires d’hypocrisies sexuelles évangéliques. Un autre sujet de prédilection est celui des évangélistes progressistes qui défient l’establishment chrétien. (…) En 2016, [léditorialiste du NYT Nicholas Kristof] a écrit une chronique critiquant la discrimination omniprésente envers les chrétiens dans les milieux de gauche. Il a cité Jonathan Walton, un évangélique noir et professeur de morale chrétienne à Harvard, qui a comparé la condescendance commune envers les évangéliques à celle dirigée contre les minorités raciales, les deux étant considérées comme «politiquement peu sophistiquées, manquant d’éducation, en colère, amères, émotionnelles, pauvres». Étrangement, le groupe le plus négligé par la presse est celui des blancs. Il serait rafraîchissant que davantage de journalistes parcourent la « Bible belt » et parlent aux fidèles ordinaires de leur foi et de leurs valeurs, de leurs espoirs et de leurs luttes. De tels reportages montreraient sans aucun doute que le monde du christianisme américain est beaucoup plus varié et complexe qu’on ne le pense généralement. Cela révélerait, par exemple, une distinction subtile mais importante entre la droite chrétienne et les évangéliques en général, qui ont tendance à être moins politiques (quoique encore largement conservateurs). Ce genre de reportage approfondi mettrait probablement également en évidence le pouvoir durable d’un principe clé du fondateur du protestantisme.«La foi, pas les œuvres», était le mot d’ordre de Martin Luther. Selon lui, c’est la foi en Christ qui compte vraiment. Si l’on croit en Christ, on se sent poussé à faire de bonnes œuvres, mais ces œuvres sont toujours secondaires. Les propres manquements de Trump ne sont donc pas centraux; mais c’est ce qu’il représente – la défense des intérêts et des valeurs chrétiennes – qui l’est. Luther a également prêché la doctrine du péché originel, selon laquelle tous les humains sont entachés par la transgression d’Adam dans le jardin d’Eden et restent donc naturellement enclins à l’orgueil, la colère, la luxure, la vengeance et d’autres défauts. De nombreux évangéliques ont eux-mêmes lutté contre le divorce, la rupture dans leurs familles, la toxicomanie et les abus. Nous sommes donc tous pécheurs – y compris le président. (…) J’entends les réactions de certains lecteurs à cette chronique: Il y en assez d’essayer de comprendre un groupe qui a permis l’arrivée d’un homme aussi nocif à la Maison Blanche. Pourtant, une telle réaction est à la fois peu généreuse et à courte vue. Les libéraux sont fiers de leur empathie pour ‘l’autre’ et de leurs efforts pour comprendre la perspective de groupes différents d’eux. Ils devraient appliquer ce principe aux évangéliques. Si la gauche continue ses moqueries, elle risque de renforcer la rage des évangéliques – et leur soutien à Trump. » Michael Massing
C’est au nom de la liberté, bien entendu, mais aussi au nom de l’ « amour, de la fidélité, du dévouement » et de la nécessité de « ne pas condamner des personnes à la solitude » que la Cour suprême des Etats-Unis a finalement validé le mariage entre personnes de même sexe. Tels furent en tout cas les mots employés au terme de cette longue décision rédigée par le Juge Kennedy au nom de la Cour. (…) Le mariage gay est entré dans le droit américain non par la loi, librement débattue et votée au niveau de chaque Etat, mais par la jurisprudence de la plus haute juridiction du pays, laquelle s’impose à tous les Etats américains. Mais c’est une décision politique. Eminemment politique à l’instar de celle qui valida l’Obamacare, sécurité sociale à l’américaine, reforme phare du Président Obama, à une petite voix près. On se souviendra en effet que cette Cour a ceci de particulier qu’elle prétend être totalement transparente. Elle est composée de neuf juges, savants juristes, et rend ses décisions à la suite d’un vote. Point de bulletins secrets dans cette enceinte ; les votants sont connus. A se fier à sa composition, la Cour n’aurait jamais dû valider le mariage homosexuel : cinq juges conservateurs, quatre progressistes. Cinq a priori hostiles, quatre a priori favorables. Mais le sort en a décidé autrement ; le juge Kennedy, le plus modéré des conservateurs, fit bloc avec les progressistes, basculant ainsi la majorité en faveur de ces derniers. C’est un deuxième coup dur pour les conservateurs de la Cour en quelques mois : l’Obamacare bénéficia également de ce même coup du sort ; à l’époque ce fut le président, le Juge John Roberts, qui permit aux progressistes de l’emporter et de valider le système. (…) La spécificité de l’évènement est que ce sont des juges qui, forçant l’interprétation d’une Constitution qui ne dit rien du mariage homosexuel, ont estimé que cette union découlait ou résultait de la notion de « liberté ». C’est un « putsch judiciaire » selon l’emblématique juge Antonin Scalia, le doyen de la Cour. Un pays qui permet à un « comité de neuf juges non-élus » de modifier le droit sur une question qui relève du législateur et non du pouvoir judiciaire, ne mérite pas d’être considéré comme une « démocratie ». Mais l’autre basculement désormais acté, c’est celui d’une argumentation dont le centre de gravité s’est déplacé de la raison vers l’émotion, de la ratio vers l’affectus. La Cour Suprême des Etats-Unis s’est en cela bien inscrite dans une tendance incontestable au sein de la quasi-totalité des juridictions occidentales. L’idée même de raisonnement perd du terrain : énième avatar de la civilisation de l’individu, les juges éprouvent de plus en plus de mal à apprécier les arguments en dehors de la chaleur des émotions. Cette décision fait en effet la part belle à la médiatisation des revendications individualistes, rejouées depuis plusieurs mois sur le modèle de la « lutte pour les droits civiques ». Ainsi la Cour n’hésite pas à comparer les lois traditionnelles du mariage à celles qui, à une autre époque, furent discriminatoires à l’égard des afro-américains et des femmes. (…) La Maison Blanche s’est instantanément baignée des couleurs de l’arc-en-ciel, symbole de la « gay pride ». Les réseaux sociaux ont été inondés de ces mêmes couleurs en soutien à ce qui est maintenant connu sous le nom de la cause gay. (…) Comme le relève un autre juge de la Cour ayant voté contre cette décision, il est fort dommage que cela se fasse au détriment du droit et de la Constitution des Etats-Unis d’Amérique. Yohann Rimokh
Le droit a pour rôle d’instituer et d’assurer les personnes de leur identité. Il faudrait se demander si reporter sur les individus, et en particulier sur les jeunes, le poids de devoir définir et (ré)affirmer eux-mêmes à tout moment les éléments de leur identité sans jamais pouvoir rien tenir pour acquis est vraiment libérateur. Muriel Fabre-Magnan
Une des raisons qui m’ont poussée à écrire ce livre était la lassitude de voir des termes juridiques employés à contresens, comme le contrat ou le consentement, qu’on associe toujours à la liberté dans le grand public, alors qu’en réalité, pour un juriste, qui dit contrat et consentement dit au contraire que l’on renonce à une partie de sa liberté ; le contrat n’est pas le mode normal de l’exercice des libertés. Je voulais alors souligner le risque de retournement de la liberté qui en résulte. Le lexique utilisé dans le cadre de débats de société conduit en outre souvent à polariser les opinions. La question de la Cour européenne des droits de l’homme (CEDH) est un excellent exemple. On trouve un camp qui pousse à une interprétation toujours plus individualiste des droits de l’homme par la CEDH et un autre qui condamne de façon générale les droits de l’homme. Le Royaume-Uni, par exemple, avait menacé de dénoncer la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme avant même le Brexit. Il me semble possible et préférable de trouver une voie alternative : il faut en effet défendre les droits de l’homme, qui sont une avancée démocratique essentielle, et la CEDH a ainsi rendu une série d’arrêts extrêmement précieux, par exemple pour condamner l’état des prisons, garantir le respect des droits de la défense ou encore dénoncer des pays qui se livrent à des traitements inhumains ou dégradants. Et, en même temps, la CEDH dérape parfois dans ses arrêts et abuse de ses prérogatives. Seule une analyse juridique précise permet de démonter les rouages, comprendre à quel endroit exact se fait ce dérapage et d’essayer d’y remédier. Sinon, on est inévitablement conduit à adopter une position excessive dans un sens ou dans un autre. (…) C’est effectivement très récemment que ce terme de liberté a pris un sens général, et presque philosophique, qui est celui du droit pour les individus de mener leur vie comme ils l’entendent. La liberté est devenue la faculté de pouvoir faire tous les choix pour soi-même, ce qu’on appelle aujourd’hui un droit à l’autonomie personnelle. Cet énoncé peut certes sembler satisfaisant dans un cadre autre que juridique, mais demander au droit de garantir que les personnes puissent faire ce qu’elles veulent quand elles veulent conduit à l’effet inverse et à un risque de retournement de cette liberté. Si, en effet, le droit doit garantir à toute personne la possibilité de faire ce qu’elle veut, y compris de renoncer à sa liberté, on finit évidemment par détruire le concept même de liberté. (…) Et, comme le soulignent plusieurs auteurs, l’ultralibéralisme économique ou sociétal sont les deux faces d’une même médaille. La liberté est souvent revendiquée pour que les autres puissent se mettre à notre disposition. La faculté de renoncer à sa liberté n’est cependant pas la liberté. Plus généralement, ce qu’on appelle une protection des personnes contre elles-mêmes, et qui est dénoncé comme une forme de paternalisme étatique, est en réalité toujours une protection des personnes contre autrui. L’exemple de la prostitution est assez typique, et il illustre aussi un des autres points que je voulais souligner dans ce livre, à savoir que tous les débats contemporains, sociétaux ou économiques qui posent la question de la licéité sont toujours appréciés par rapport au seul critère du consentement. Cela signifie que l’on ramène tout à un débat interindividuel quand il serait plus pertinent de s’interroger, par exemple, sur les politiques économiques et sociales donnant aux personnes une plus grande faculté de choix de vie. Que signifie le consentement d’une prostituée si elle n’a pas d’autre choix que de consentir ? (…) La liberté sexuelle implique la faculté pour chacun d’avoir la sexualité de son choix sans avoir à subir aucune discrimination. Mais pourquoi l’État devrait-il donner sa bénédiction à chaque nouvelle pratique ? De même, la contractualisation des relations sexuelles n’est pas la meilleure façon de protéger juridiquement contre les agressions sexuelles ni de respecter le consentement des personnes. Si on contractualise, on s’oblige à ces pratiques. Or la liberté consiste en la capacité de pouvoir refuser un rapport initialement consenti. (…) Le droit doit tenir compte des évolutions sociales, mais il est aussi un horizon tracé pour une société. Il est en effet de l’ordre du devoir-être. Les juristes opposent toujours le fait et le droit, donc le réel et ce qui doit être. Le droit est, dans une société, les valeurs et les objectifs sur lesquels les personnes s’accordent. Pour vivre ensemble, il est nécessaire de définir un projet commun, lequel peut évidemment évoluer dans le temps. Le terme d’institution de la liberté cherche à exprimer l’aspect dynamique de cette liberté et le rôle que le droit doit jouer pour la garantir. On ne naît pas libre, on le devient, et c’est ce processus d’émancipation que doit soutenir le droit. Muriel Fabre-Magnan
Nine in 10 Americans are satisfied with the way things are going in their personal life, a new high in Gallup’s four-decade trend. The latest figure bests the previous high of 88% recorded in 2003. Gallup
The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Monday shows that 50% of Likely U.S. Voters approve of President Trump’s job performance. Forty-eight percent (48%) disapprove. Rasmussen (Feb. 10, 2020)
The turnout in the Iowa caucus was below what we expected, what we wanted. Trump’s approval rating is probably as high as it’s been. This is very bad. And now it appears the party can’t even count votes. (…) We have candidates on the debate stage talking about open borders and decriminalizing illegal immigration. They’re talking about doing away with nuclear energy and fracking. You’ve got Bernie Sanders talking about letting criminals and terrorists vote from jail cells. It doesn’t matter what you think about any of that, or if there are good arguments — talking about that is not how you win a national election. It’s not how you become a majoritarian party. For fuck’s sake, we’ve got Trump at Davos talking about cutting Medicare and no one in the party has the sense to plaster a picture of him up there sucking up to the global elites, talking about cutting taxes for them while he’s talking about cutting Medicare back home. Jesus, this is so obvious and so easy and I don’t see any of the candidates taking advantage of it. The Republicans have destroyed their party and turned it into a personality cult, but if anyone thinks they can’t win, they’re out of their damn minds. (…) Bernie Sanders isn’t a Democrat. He’s never been a Democrat. He’s an ideologue. And I’ve been clear about this: If Bernie is the nominee, I’ll vote for him. No question. I’ll take an ideological fanatic over a career criminal any day. But he’s not a Democrat. (…) what I’m saying is the Democratic Party isn’t Bernie Sanders, whatever you think about Sanders. (…) First, a lot of people don’t trust the Democratic Party, don’t believe in the party, for reasons you’ve already mentioned, and so they just don’t care about that. They want change. And I guess the other thing I’d say is, 2016 scrambled our understanding of what’s possible in American politics. (…) Sanders might get 280 electoral votes and win the presidency and maybe we keep the House. But there’s no chance in hell we’ll ever win the Senate with Sanders at the top of the party defining it for the public. Eighteen percent of the country elects more than half of our senators. That’s the deal, fair or not. So long as McConnell runs the Senate, it’s game over. There’s no chance we’ll change the courts, and nothing will happen, and he’ll just be sitting up there screaming in the microphone about the revolution. The purpose of a political party is to acquire power. All right? Without power, nothing matters. (…) [The answer is] framing, repeating, and delivering a coherent, meaningful message that is relevant to people’s lives and having the political skill not to be sucked into every rabbit hole that somebody puts in front of you. The Democratic Party is the party of African Americans. It’s becoming a party of educated suburbanites, particularly women. It’s the party of Latinos. We’re a party of immigrants. Most of the people aren’t into all this distracting shit about open borders and letting prisoners vote. They don’t care. They have lives to lead. They have kids. They have parents that are sick. That’s what we have to talk about. That’s all we should talk about. It’s not that this stuff doesn’t matter. And it’s not that we shouldn’t talk about race. We have to talk about race. It’s about how you deliver and frame the message. (…) They’ve tacked off the damn radar screen. And look, I don’t consider myself a moderate or a centrist. I’m a liberal. But not everything has to be on the left-right continuum. (…) Here’s another stupid thing: Democrats talking about free college tuition or debt forgiveness. I’m not here to debate the idea. What I can tell you is that people all over this country worked their way through school, sent their kids to school, paid off student loans. They don’t want to hear this shit. And you saw Warren confronted by an angry voter over this. It’s just not a winning message. The real argument here is that some people think there’s a real yearning for a left-wing revolution in this country, and if we just appeal to the people who feel that, we’ll grow and excite them and we’ll win. But there’s a word a lot of people hate that I love: politics. It means building coalitions to win elections. It means sometimes having to sit back and listen to what people think and framing your message accordingly. That’s all I care about. (…) We can’t win the Senate by looking down at people. The Democratic Party has to drive a narrative that doesn’t give off vapors that we’re smarter than everyone or culturally arrogant. (…) With a lot of these candidates, their consultants are telling them, “If you doubt it, just go left. We got to get the nomination.” (…) I’m hoping that someone gets knocked off their horse on the road to Damascus. (…) Mayor Pete has to demonstrate over the course of a campaign that he can excite and motivate arguably the most important constituents in the Democratic Party: African Americans. These voters are a hell of a lot more important than a bunch of 25-year-olds shouting everyone down on Twitter. James Carville
Progressive candidates and new Democratic representatives have offered lots of radical new proposals lately about voting and voters. They include scrapping the 215-year-old Electoral College. Progressives also talk of extending the vote to 16- or 17-year-olds and ex-felons. They wish to further relax requirements for voter identification, same-day registration and voting, and undocumented immigrants voting in local elections.The 2016 victory of Donald Trump shocked the left. It was entirely unexpected, given that experts had all but assured a Hillary Clinton landslide. Worse still for those on the left, Trump, like George W. Bush in 2000 and three earlier winning presidential candidates, lost the popular vote.  From 2017 on, Trump has sought to systematically dismantle the progressive agenda that had been established by his predecessor, Barack Obama — often in a controversial and unapologetic style. The furor over the 2016 Clinton loss and thenew Trump agenda, the fear that Trump could be re-elected, and anger about the Electoral College have mobilized progressives to demand changes to the hallowed traditions of electing presidents. (…) Most Americans are skeptical of reparations. They do not favor legalizing infanticide. They do not want open borders, sanctuary cities, or blanket amnesties. They are troubled by the idea of wealth taxes and top marginal tax rates of 70 percent or higher. Many Americans certainly fear the Green New Deal. Many do not favor abolishing all student debt, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or the Electoral College. Nor do many Americans believe in costly ideas such as Medicare for All and free college tuition. The masses do not unanimously want to stop pipeline construction or scale back America’s booming natural gas and oil production. A cynic might suggest that had Hillary Clinton actually won the 2016 Electoral College vote but lost the popular vote to Trump, progressives would now be praising our long-established system of voting. Had current undocumented immigrants proved as conservative as past waves of legal immigrants from Hungary and Cuba, progressives would now likely wish to close the southern border and perhaps even build a wall. If same-day registration and voting meant that millions of new conservatives without voter IDs were suddenly showing their Trump support at the polls, progressives would insist on bringing back old laws that required voters to have previously registered and to show valid identification at voting precincts. If felons or 16-year-old kids polled conservative, then certainly there would be no progressive push to let members of these groups vote. Expanding and changing the present voter base and altering how we vote is mostly about power, not principles. Without these radical changes, a majority of American voters, in traditional and time-honored elections, will likely not vote for the unpopular progressive agenda. Victor Davis Hanson
When candidate Donald Trump campaigned on calling China to account for its trade piracy, observers thought he was either crazy or dangerous. Conventional Washington wisdom had assumed that an ascendant Beijing was almost preordained to world hegemony. Trump’s tariffs and polarization of China were considered about the worst thing an American president could do. The accepted bipartisan strategy was to accommodate, not oppose, China’s growing power. The hope was that its newfound wealth and global influence would liberalize the ruling communist government. Four years later, only a naif believes that. Instead, there is an emerging consensus that China’s cutthroat violations of international norms were long ago overdue for an accounting. China’s re-education camps, its Orwellian internal surveillance, its crackdown on Hong Kong democracy activists and its secrecy about the deadly coronavirus outbreak have all convinced the world that China has now become a dangerous international outlier. Trump courted moderate Arab nations in forming an anti-Iranian coalition opposed to Iran’s terrorist and nuclear agendas. His policies utterly reversed the Obama administration’s estrangement from Israel and outreach to Tehran. Last week, Trump nonchalantly offered the Palestinians a take-it-or-leave-it independent state on the West Bank, but without believing that a West Bank settlement was the key to peace in the entire Middle East. Trump’s cancellation of the Iran deal, in particular, was met with international outrage. More global anger followed after the targeted killing of Iranian terrorist leader Gen. Qassem Soleimani. In short, Trump’s Middle East recalibrations won few supporters among the bipartisan establishment. But recently, Europeans have privately started to agree that more sanctions are needed on Iran, that the world is better off with Soleimani gone, and that the West Bank is not central to regional peace. Iran has now become a pariah. U.S.-sponsored sanctions have reduced the theocracy to near-bankruptcy. Most nations understand that if Iran kills Americans or openly starts up its nuclear program, the U.S. will inflict disproportional damage on its infrastructure — a warning that at first baffled, then angered and now has humiliated Iran. In other words, there is now an entirely new Middle East orthodoxy that was unimaginable just three years ago. Suddenly the pro-Iranian, anti-Western Palestinians have few supporters. Israel and a number of prominent Arab nations are unspoken allies of convenience against Iran. And Iran itself is seemingly weaker than at any other time in the theocracy’s history. Stranger still, instead of demanding that the U.S. leave the region, many Middle Eastern nations privately seem eager for more of a now-reluctant U.S. presence. (…) Trump got little credit for these revolutionary changes because he is, after all, Trump — a wheeler-dealer, an ostentatious outsider, unpredictable in action and not shy about rude talk. But his paradoxical and successful policies — the product of conservative, antiwar and pro-worker agendas — are gradually winning supporters and uniting disparate groups. (…) The result of the new orthodoxy is that the U.S. has become no better friend to an increasing number of allies and neutrals, and no worse an adversary to a shrinking group of enemies. And yet Trump’s paradox is that America’s successful new foreign policy is as praised privately as it is caricatured publicly — at least for now. Victor Davis Hanson
Une cote de popularité au plus bas, des cafouillages dans la majorité, une étude qui remet en question sa politique économique… Les obstacles se multiplient pour le président de la République française. Cela pourrait avoir des conséquences désastreuses pour la suite, explique la presse étrangère. “Pas de repos pour Emmanuel Macron”, souligne le quotidien espagnol El País. En effet, si “le président a survécu à la plus longue grève de ces dernières décennies en France, il ne cesse d’accumuler les problèmes”. Le conflit autour des retraites, d’une part, n’est pas totalement réglé. Certes, les transports ont repris et les dernières manifestations ont rassemblé moins de monde qu’au début du mouvement. Mais “les ennuis de Macron ne sont pas terminés”, prévient le site britannique The Article. “Beaucoup s’attendent à ce que le printemps à Paris soit, eh bien, le printemps à Paris.” D’autant que de nombreux secteurs, habituellement peu prompts à protester, ont rejoint la grogne. Aujourd’hui, avec les 22 000 amendements déposés en parallèle au projet de réforme, le processus législatif est encore loin d’être terminé. Des journées de mobilisations sont d’ailleurs déjà prévues à la RATP le 17 février et partout en France le 20 février. Dans sa majorité aussi, Emmanuel Macron rencontre des difficultés. À un mois des municipales, La République en marche multiplie les faux pas et fait preuve de division. Avec bien sûr, le duel fraticide entre les candidats, Benjamin Griveaux (tête d’affiche officielle) et Cédric Villani (dissident qui refuse de reculer) pour la mairie de Paris. Mais les récents cafouillages des ministres macronistes, au sujet du droit au blasphème ou de la durée d’allongement du congé en cas de perte d’un enfant, n’arrangent pas non plus les choses pour Macron. Résultat ? Le gouvernement est “qualifié d’amateur” et l’image du président se retrouve toujours plus entachée, relate ABC. Au point que le jeune chef d’État rivalise désormais avec “François Hollande pour le titre de président le plus impopulaire de l’histoire de la Vème République”. Selon les derniers sondages, 73 % des Français auraient une mauvaise opinion d’Emmanuel Macron. Ce n’est assurément pas le rapport publié le 5 février par l’OFCE [Observatoire français des conjonctures économiques] qui va changer la donne. Après l’abrogation partielle de l’impôt de solidarité sur la fortune (ISF), le chef d’État avait très vite “hérité du surnom de ‘président des riches’”, rappelle le quotidien Suisse Le Temps. Or, la récente publication des économistes “juge qu’il correspond à la réalité”. Plus aucun doute : “La théorie macronienne du ‘ruissellement’ – selon laquelle l’attractivité fiscale conçue pour inciter les entreprises et les ménages les plus aisés à investir engendre à terme une hausse de revenus pour tous – ne fonctionne pas.” Pire encore, ajoute le quotidien suisse, “l’OFCE souligne une détérioration de la fracture sociale” puisque, assurent les experts : Les ménages appartenant aux 20 % les plus modestes, c’est-à-dire ceux ayant un niveau de vie individuel inférieur à 1 315 euros par mois, devraient perdre en 2020.” Ces difficultés pourraient avoir de lourdes conséquences sur l’avenir politique de Macron, prévient donc The Financial Times. Un an à peine après le “grand débat national”, “son attitude hautaine et son manque de finesse psychologique le rendent vulnérable”, et Marine Le Pen entend profiter de la situation pour la prochaine présidentielle. Or, sa potentielle arrivée à l’Élysée, en 2022, incarnerait un “séisme politique” dont les “ondes de choc seraient ressenties bien au-delà des frontières de la France”. Toutefois, si “le ciel s’assombrit pour le Roi Soleil français, il est beaucoup trop tôt pour affirmer que c’en est fait des espoirs de Macron”, rassure le FT. Ceux qui prédisent aujourd’hui sa chute, sont les mêmes qui se sont souvent trompés en 2017 sur sa capacité à briser l’ancien système” du bipartisme français. En somme, personne n’est capable de dire si la crise actuelle que rencontre le chef de l’État s’envenimera pour le reste de son quinquennat, conclut El País.“Mais en tout cas, elle envoie un signal inquiétant pour le président.” Courrier international
La dauphine désignée d’Angela Merkel en Allemagne, Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, a décidé de renoncer à lui succéder et va abandonner la présidence du parti conservateur, a indiqué à l’AFP ce lundi 10 février une source proche du mouvement. Lors d’une réunion ce matin de la direction du parti démocrate-chrétien CDU de la chancelière, Kramp-Karrenbauer a notamment justifié sa décision par les événements de Thuringe et la tentation d’une frange du parti de s’allier avec le mouvement d’extrême droite Alternative pour l’Allemagne (AfD). Elle a expliqué qu’«une partie de la CDU a une relation non clarifiée avec l’AfD» mais aussi avec le parti de gauche radicale Die Linke, alors qu’elle même rejette clairement toute alliance avec l’une ou l’autre de ces formations, a indiqué à l’AFP une source proche du mouvement. Dans la mesure où la candidature à la chancellerie doit aller de pair avec la présidence du parti à ses yeux, AKK a en conséquence décidé de renoncer dans les mois qui viennent à cette présidence. «AKK va organiser cet été le processus de sélection de la candidature à la chancellerie» pour succéder à Angela Merkel au plus tard fin 2021, a indiqué cette source. «Elle va continuer à préparer le parti pour affronter l’avenir et ensuite abandonner la présidence», a-t-elle ajouté. Elle doit en revanche conserver son poste de ministre de la Défense. AKK avait été élue en décembre 2018 à la présidence de la CDU, en remplacement d’Angela Merkel qui avait à l’époque renoncé en raison de son impopularité croissante après une série de revers électoraux et la poussée dans les urnes de l’extrême droite. AKK n’a toutefois jamais réussi à s’imposer à la présidence de la CDU. Elle a été en particulier très critiquée après l’alliance surprise nouée la semaine dernière entre des élus CDU de Thuringe et l’extrême droite pour élire un nouveau dirigeant pour cet Etat régional. AKK s’est vu reprocher de ne pas tenir son parti, tiraillé entre adversaires et partisans d’une coopération avec l’AfD, surtout dans les Etats de l’ex-RDA, où l’extrême droite est très puissante et complique la formation des majorités régionales. Le Figaro
Buttigieg is a gay Episcopalian veteran in a party torn between identity politics and heartland appeals. He’s also a fresh face in a year when millennials are poised to become the largest eligible voting bloc. Many Democrats are hungry for generational change, and the two front runners are more than twice his age. (…) In many ways, Buttigieg is Trump’s polar opposite: younger, dorkier, shorter, calmer and married to a man. His success may depend on whether Democrats want a fighter to match Trump, or whether Americans want to ‘change the channel,’ as Buttigieg puts it. ‘People already have a leader who screams and yells,’ he says. ‘How do you think that’s working out for us?’Time
Le 16 juin 2015, Buttigieg annonce dans une publication qu’il est homosexuel. Il est le premier homme politique ouvertement gay de l’Indiana. Le 28 décembre 2017, Buttigieg annonce ses fiançailles avec Chasten Glezman (né en 1989), professeur de pédagogie Montessori dans un collège privé de l’Indiana. Le couple se marie le 16 juin 2018 lors d’une cérémonie à la cathédrale de Saint-James de South Bend et fait en 2019 la couverture du magazine Time. En plus de l’anglais, Pete Buttigieg parle le norvégien, le français, l’espagnol, l’italien, le maltais, l’arabe et le dari, soit un total de huit langues. Buttigieg est chrétien et a déclaré que sa foi avait fortement influencé sa vie. Wikipedia
Va-t-il transformer l’essai? Après ses résultats inespérés dans l’Iowa (toujours contestés par Bernie Sanders), Pete Buttigieg espère bien récolter les fruits de l’énorme coup de pouce médiatique dont il a bénéficié tout au long de cette semaine chaotique. Le jeune candidat, encore inconnu il y a un an, croise donc les doigts ce mardi 11 février pour à nouveau s’imposer -ou du moins décrocher un score plus qu’honorable- dans le New Hampshire, deuxième État à voter aux primaires démocrates.  Si créer la surprise au cours des prochains scrutins et finir par décrocher la nomination du parti cet été est actuellement le rêve de tous les candidats, la seule vraie prouesse sera la suivante: battre Donald Trump lors de l’élection générale du 3 novembre et le sortir de la Maison Blanche. Pete Buttigieg est-il le meilleur candidat pour cette périlleuse mission? Le HuffPost a rassemblé plusieurs forces (et faiblesses) du candidat pour tenter d’y voir plus clair. Comme il aime souvent le rappeler en campagne, Pete Buttigieg a un atout majeur face à Donald Trump: son CV. Il faut dire qu’on pourrait difficilement imaginer un curriculum plus à l’opposé de celui du président républicain. Contrairement à l’occupant actuel de la Maison Blanche, le démocrate a tout d’abord de l’expérience politique. Alors que le magnat de l’immobilier était l’hôte d’une téléréalité avant de se présenter à la présidence, Pete Buttigieg vient lui de terminer son 2e mandat de maire. Trump s’est construit dans la plus grande ville du pays qu’est New York, Buttiegieg a fait décoller sa carrière à South Bend, 100.000 habitants, dans l’État de l’Indiana. Buttigieg met aussi régulièrement en avant son expérience dans l’armée. Il a passé sept mois en Afghanistan, un avantage sur tous ses concurrents démocrates et surtout sur Trump. Ce dernier a en effet réussi à échapper pas mois de cinq fois à la guerre du Vietnam: quatre reports grâce aux études qu’il suivait puis une dispense médicale pour une excroissance osseuse au pied dont les médias n’ont jamais retrouvé de trace. Diplômé de grandes universités, le candidat a aussi montré qu’il était polyglotte. En plus de l’anglais, il peut parler en norvégien, espagnol, italien, arabe, dari ou encore français comme il l’a montré en commentant l’incendie de Notre-Dame. Face à un président qui est parfois pointé du doigt pour la faiblesse du vocabulaire qu’il emploie dans son anglais natal. Pete Buttigieg se présente aussi aux antipodes de Donald Trump sur des aspects plus personnels. Là où Trump s’emporte et est devenu le roi du surnom mesquin, Buttigieg apparaît dans ses interventions comme calme, confiant et au point sur ses dossiers. Alors que les Américains LGBT ont vu leurs droits régresser sous la présidence républicaine, Buttigieg est le premier candidat démocrate ouvertement gay et apparaît régulièrement au bras de son mari Chasten. Âgé de seulement 38 ans, il est de loin le plus jeune de la course. Il n’hésite pas non plus à mettre l’accent sur sa foi chrétienne, un sujet généralement accaparé par les républicains. Quant à son programme, il ne renferme pas (encore?) de mesure phare, mais sa position modérée sur les impôts et la couverture santé pourrait bien attirer de précieux électeurs indépendants qui avaient penché pour Donald Trump en 2016. Au sein de ce groupe-clé pour départager une élection, la question du système de santé sera en effet la priorité numéro un pour faire son choix en novembre 2020, selon un sondage Gallup paru en janvier. Si la réussite de Pete Buttigieg dans l’Iowa et un très bon score dans le New Hampshire ce mardi serait un énorme tremplin, le candidat traîne cependant un énorme problème de popularité auprès d’électorats-clés pour un démocrate dans une élection présidentielle. Comme le montrent de nombreux sondages, l’ancien maire n’enregistre pour l’heure qu’un soutien très faible auprès des deux minorités ethniques principales aux États-Unis: les électeurs afro-américains et hispaniques. La présence de ces derniers, qui ont peu voté républicain en 2016, sera cruciale dans les bureaux de vote en novembre 2020 face à Trump. Les difficultés ne s’arrêtent pas là. Buttigieg pourrait aussi avoir une mauvaise surprise avec les jeunes, potentiel sous-exploité en 2016. Bien qu’il se vante d’incarner le renouveau politique du haut de ses 38 ans, le candidat n’est à l’heure actuelle pas très populaire avec les démocrates de moins de 38 ans, un groupe d’âge qui englobera 25% des électeurs en novembre. Son approche trop modérée ne fait pas le poids face à la politique autrement plus radicale de Sanders, qui lui a gagné le soutien massif des générations Y et Z. Buttigieg pourrait donc avoir bien du mal à donner envie à ce réservoir de voix démocrates de participer au scrutin. Reste enfin la faible notoriété de l’ancien maire de South Bend. The Huffington post
Il est déjà assez sûr de déduire des recherches en laboratoire et des parallèles éthologiques que les différentes manières dont les hommes et les femmes sont câblés sont directement liées à nos rôles sexuels traditionnels … Freud a dramatiquement déclaré que notre anatomie est notre destinée. Les scientifiques qui frémissent devant une formulation aussi dramatique, quelle que soit sa justesse, pourraient le reformuler ainsi: l’anatomie est fonctionnelle, les fonctions corporelles ont des significations psychologiques profondes pour les gens, et l’anatomie et la fonction sont souvent élaborées socialement. Arno Karlen
Les questions morales nous entraînent dans le bourbier de perpétuelles recherches philosophiques de nature fondamentale. D’une certaine manière, cela facilite le problème pour celui qui cherche une opinion juive. Le judaïsme n’accepte pas le type de relativisme poussé utilisé pour justifier le mode de vie homosexuel comme un simple mode de vie alternatif. Et tandis que la question de l’autonomie humaine mérite certainement d’être prise en considération dans le domaine de la sexualité, il faut se méfier des conséquences de tout argument quand il est poussé jusqu’à sa logique extrême. Le judaïsme chérit clairement la sainteté comme une valeur supérieure à la liberté ou à la santé. De plus, si l’autonomie de chaque individu nous amène à conférer une légitimité morale à toute forme d’expression sexuelle que celui-ci désire, nous devons être prêts à tirer la couverture de cette validité morale sur presque tout le catalogue de la perversion décrit par Krafft-Ebing, puis, par le tour de passe-passe consistant à accorder des droits civiques aux pratiques moralement non répréhensibles ou à autoriser le prosélytisme public aux défenseurs de la sodomie, du fétichisme ou de n’importe autre pratique. Dans ce cas, pourquoi pas dans le système scolaire? Et si le consentement est obtenu avant la mort d’un partenaire, pourquoi pas la nécrophilie ou le cannibalisme? Sûrement, si nous déclarons que la pédérastie est simplement idiosyncrasique et non une « abomination », quel droit avons-nous de condamner le cannibalisme sexuel – simplement parce que la plupart des gens réagiraient avec répulsion et dégoût? «L’affection aimante et désintéressée» et les «relations personnelles significatives» – les grands slogans de la Nouvelle Moralité et les représentants de l’éthique de la situation – sont devenus la litanie de la sodomie à notre époque. Une logique simple devrait nous permettre d’utiliser les mêmes critères pour excuser l’adultère ou tout autre acte considéré jusqu’ici comme immoral: et c’est exactement ce qui a été fait, et il a reçu la sanction non seulement des progressistes et des humanistes, mais de certains les religieux aussi. « Amour », « épanouissement », « exploiteur », « significatif » – la liste elle-même ressemble à un lexique de termes chargés d’émotions tirés au hasard des sources disparates des cercles agnostiques à la fois chrétiens et psychologiquement orientés. Logiquement, nous devons nous poser la question suivante: quelles dépravations morales ne peuvent pas être excusées par le seul critère des «relations humaines chaleureuses et significatives» ou de «l’accomplissement», les nouveaux héritiers sémantiques de «l’amour»? L’amour, l’épanouissement et le bonheur peuvent également être atteints dans les contacts incestueux – et certainement dans les relations polygames. N’y a-t-il plus rien qui soit « pécheur », « contre nature » ou « immoral » s’il est pratiqué « entre deux adultes consentants? » Pour les groupes religieux, établir qu’une relation homosexuelle doit être jugée selon les mêmes critères qu’une relation hétérosexuelle – c’est-à-dire «si elle vise à entretenir une relation d’amour permanente» – revient à abandonner la dernière prétention de représenter le « judéo-chrétien ». Dr. Norman Lamm
The moral issues lead us into the quagmire of perennial philosophical disquisitions of a fundamental nature. In a way, this facilitates the problem for one seeking a Jewish view. Judaism does not accept the kind of thoroughgoing relativism used to justify the gay life as merely an alternate lifestyle And while the question of human autonomy is certainly worthy of consideration in the area of sexuality, one must beware of the consequences of taking the argument to its logical extreme. Judaism clearly cherishes holiness as a greater value than either freedom or health. Furthermore, if every individual’s autonomy leads us to lend moral legitimacy to any form of sexual expression he may desire, we must be ready to pull the blanket of this moral validity over almost the whole catalogue of perversion described by Krafft-Ebing, and then, by the legerdemain of granting civil rights to the morally non-objectionable, permit the advocates of buggery, fetishism, or whatever to proselytize in public. In that case, why not in the school system? And if consent is obtained before the death of one partner, why not necrophilia or cannibalism? Surely, if we declare pederasty to be merely idiosyncratic and not an « abomination, » what right have we to condemn sexually motivated cannibalism – merely because most people would react with revulsion and disgust? « Loving, selfless concern » and « meaningful personal relationships » – the great slogans of the New Morality and the exponents of situation ethics – have become the litany of sodomy in our times. Simple logic should permit us to use the same criteria for excusing adultery or any other act heretofore held to be immoral: and indeed, that is just what has been done, and it has received the sanction not only of liberals and humanists, but of certain religionists as well. « Love, » « fulfillment, » « exploitative, » « meaningful » – the list itself sounds like a lexicon of emotionally charged terms drawn at random from the disparate sources of both Christian and psychologically-orientated agnostic circles. Logically, we must ask the next question: what moral depravities can not be excused by the sole criterion of « warm, meaningful human relations » or « fulfillment, » the newest semantic heirs to « love »? Love, fulfillment, and happiness can also be attained in incestuous contacts -and certainly in polygamous relationships. Is there nothing at all left that is « sinful, » « unnatural, » or « immoral » if it is practiced « between two consenting adults? » For religious groups to aver that a homosexual relationship should be judged by the same criteria as a heterosexual one – i.e., « whether it is intended to foster a permanent relationship of love » – is to abandon the last claim of representing the « Judeo-Christian tradition. »Clearly, while Judaism needs no defense or apology in regard to its esteem for neighborly love and compassion for the individual sufferer, it cannot possibly abide a wholesale dismissal of its most basic moral principles on the grounds that those subject to its judgments find them repressive. All laws are repressive to some extent -they repress illegal activities- and all morality is concerned with changing man and improving him and his society. Homosexuality imposes on one an intolerable burden of differentness, of absurdity, and of loneliness, but the Biblical commandment outlawing pederasty cannot be put aside solely on the basis of sympathy for the victim of these feelings. Morality, too, is an element which each of us, given his sensuality, his own idiosyncracies, and his immoral proclivities, must take into serious consideration before acting out his impulses. Several years ago I recommended that Jews regard homosexual deviance as a pathology, thus reconciling the insights of Jewish tradition with the exigencies of contemporary life and scientific information, such as it is, on the nature of homosexuality. (…) The proposal that homosexuality be viewed as an illness will immediately be denied by three groups of people. Gay militants object to this view as an instance of heterosexual condescension. Evelyn Hooker and her group of psychologists maintain that homosexuals are no more pathological in their personality structures than heterosexuals. And psychiatrists Thomas Szasz in the U.S. and Ronald Laing in England reject all traditional ideas of mental sickness and health as tools of social repressiveness or, at best, narrow conventionalism. While granting that there are indeed unfortunate instances where the category of mental disease is exploited for social or political reasons, we part company with all three groups and assume that there are significant number of pederasts and lesbians who, by the criteria accepted by most psychologists and psychiatrists, can indeed be termed pathological. (…) Of course, one cannot say categorically that all homosexuals are sick – any more than one can casually define all thieves as kleptomaniacs. In order to develop a reasonable Jewish approach to the problem and to seek in the concept of illness some mitigating factor, it is necessary first to establish the main types of homosexuals. Dr. Judd Marmor speaks of four categories. « Genuine homosexuality » is based on strong preferential erotic feelings for members of the same sex. « Transitory homosexual behavior » occurs among adolescents who would prefer heterosexual experiences but are denied such opportunities because of the social, cultural, or psychological reasons. « Situational homosexual exchanges » are characteristic of prisoners, soldiers and others who are heterosexual but are denied access to women for long periods of time. « Transitory and opportunistic homosexuality » is that of delinquent young men who permit themselves to be used by pederasts in order to make money or win other favors, although their primary erotic interests are exclusively heterosexual. To these may be added, for purposes of our analysis, two other types. The first category, that of genuine homosexuals, may be said to comprehend two sub-categories: those who experience their condition as one of duress or uncontrollable passion which they would rid themselves of if they could, and those who transform their idiosyncrasy into an ideology, i.e., the gay militants who assert the legitimacy and validity of homosexuality as an alternative way to heterosexuality. The sixth category is based on what Dr. Rollo May has called « the New Puritanism », the peculiarly modern notion that one must experience all sexual pleasures, whether or not one feels inclined to them, as if the failure to taste every cup passed at the sumptuous banquet of carnal life means that one has not truly lived. Thus, we have transitory homosexual behavior not of adolescents, but of adults who feel that: they must « try everything » at least once or more than once in their lives. (…) Clearly, genuine homosexuality experienced under duress (Hebrew: ones) most obviously lends itself to being termed pathological especially where dysfunction appears in other aspects of personality. Opportunistic homosexuality, ideological homosexuality, and transitory adult homosexuality are at the other end of the spectrum, and appear most reprehensible. As for the intermediate categories, while they cannot be called illness, they do have a greater claim on our sympathy than the three types mentioned above. (…) To apply the Halakhah strictly in this case is obviously impossible; to ignore it entirely is undesirable, and tantamount to regarding Halakhah as a purely abstract, legalistic system which can safely be dismissed where its norms and prescriptions do not allow full formal implementation. Admittedly, the method is not rigorous, and leaves room to varying interpretations as well as exegetical abuse, but it is the best we can do. Hence there are types of homosexuality that do not warrant any special considerateness, because the notion of ones or duress (i.e., disease) in no way applies. Where the category of mental illness does apply, the act itself remains to´evah (an abomination), but the fact of illness lays upon us the obligation of pastoral compassion, psychological understanding, and social sympathy. In these senses, homosexuality is no different from any other social or anti-halakhic act, where it is legitimate to distinguish between the objective itself including its social and moral consequences, and the mentality and inner development of the person who perpetrates the act. For instance, if a man murders in a cold and calculating fashion for reasons of profit, the act is criminal and the transgressor is criminal. If, however, a psychotic murders, the transgressor is diseased rather than criminal, but the objective act itself remains a criminal one. The courts may therefore treat the perpetrator of the crime as they would a patient, with all the concomitant compassion and concern for therapy, without condoning the act as being morally neutral. To use halakhic terminology, the objective crime remains a ma´aseh averah, whereas a person who transgresses is considered innocent on the grounds of ones. In such case, the transgressor is spared the full legal consequences of his culpable act, although the degree to which he may be held responsible varies from case to case. (…) By the same token, in orienting ourselves to certain types of homosexuals as patients rather than criminals, we do not condone the act but attempt to help the homosexual. Under no circumstances can Judaism suffer homosexuality to become respectable. Were society to give its open or even tacit approval to homosexuality, it would invite more aggressiveness on the part of adult pederasts toward young people. Indeed, in the currently permissive atmosphere, the Jewish view would summon us to the semantic courage of referring to homosexuality not as « deviance » with the implication of moral neutrality and non-judgmental idiosyncrasy, but as « perversion » – a less clinical and more old-fashioned word, perhaps, but one that is more in keeping with the Biblical to´evah. (…) There is nothing in the Jewish law’s letter or spirit that should incline us toward advocacy of imprisonment for homosexuals. The Halakhah did not, by and large, encourage the denial of freedom as a recommended form of punishment. Flogging is, from a certain perspective, far less cruel and far more enlightened. Since capital punishment is out of the question, and since incarceration is not an advisable substitute, we are left with one absolute minimum: strong disapproval of the proscribed act. But we are not bound to any specific penological instrument that has no basis in Jewish law or tradition. (…) As long as violence and the seduction of children are not involved, it would best to abandon all laws on homosexuality and leave it to the inevitable social sanctions to control, informally,what can be controlled. However, this approach is not consonant with Jewish tradition. The repeal of anti-homosexual laws implies the removal of the stigma from homosexuality, and this diminution of social censure weakens society in its training of the young toward acceptable patterns of conduct. The absence of adequate social reproach may well encourage the expression of homosexual tendencies by those in whom they might otherwise be suppressed. Law itself has an educative function, and the repeal of laws, no matter how justifiable such repeal may be from one point of view, does have the effect of signaling the acceptability of greater permissiveness. Perhaps all that has been said above can best be expressed in the proposals that follow. First, society and government must recognize the distinctions between the various categories enumerated earlier in this essay. We must offer medical and psychological assistance to those whose homosexuality is an expression of pathology, who recognize it as such, and are willing to seek help. We must be no less generous to the homosexual than to the drug addict, to whom the government extends various forms of therapy upon request. Second, jail sentences must be abolished for all homosexuals, save those who are guilty of violence, seduction of the young, or public solicitation. Third, the laws must remain on the books, but by mutual consent of judiciary and police, be unenforced. This approximates to what lawyers call « the chilling effect », and is the nearest one can come to the category so well known in the Halakhah, whereby strong disapproval is expressed by affirming a halakhic prohibition, yet no punishment is mandated. It is a category that bridges the gap between morality and law. In a society where homosexuality is so rampant, and where incarceration is so counterproductive, the hortatory approach may well be a way of formalizing society’s revulsion while avoiding the pitfalls in our accepted penology. (…) Regular congregations and other Jewish groups should not hesitate to accord hospitality and membership, on an individual basis, to those « visible » homosexuals who qualify for the category of the ill. Homosexuals are no less in violation of Jewish norms than Sabbath desecrators or those who disregard the laws of kashrut. But to assent to the organization of separate « gay » groups under Jewish auspices makes no more sense, Jewishly, than to suffer the formation of synagogues that care exclusively to idol worshipers, adulterers, gossipers, tax evaders, or Sabbath violators. Indeed, it makes less sense, because it provides, under religious auspices, a ready-made clientele from which the homosexual can more easily choose his partners. In remaining true to the sources of Jewish tradition. Jews are commanded to avoid the madness that seizes society at various times and in many forms, while yet retaining a moral composure and psychological equilibrium sufficient to exercise that combination of discipline and charity that is the hallmark of Judaism. Dr. Norman Lamm

Quand le cannibalisme n’est plus qu’une affaire de goût…

A l’heure où l’actualité se charge de nous rappeler chaque jour …

Les ravages dans tous les secteurs de la société, entre « mariage » et « enfants pour tous », du dérèglement des moeurs que nous vivons …

Pendant que devant le retour du réel le costume messianique de nos Obama français ou allemand semble lui aussi sérieusement prendre l’eau …

Et où face à l’insubmersible Donald Trump …

Et la confirmation de plus en plus éclatante par la réalité et les faits  …

De la justesse, face aux tigres de papier iraniens, chinois ou palestiniens, de nombre de ses intuitions et décisions …

Les Démocrates et progressistes américains semblent au contraire redoubler dans la caricature et dans l’aberration

Entre soutien aux villes-sanctuaire et appels à l’extension du droit de vote aux mineurs, repris de justice et immigrés illégaux comme à la suppression du collège électoral, des contrôles d’identité pour les électeurs et des frontières …

Et où profitant de la campagne présidentielle américaine …

Les lobbies homosexuels et leur claque médiatique …

Tentent contre toute évidence …

De nous imposer la candidature de ce qui serait …

Jeune, ancien militaire, surdiplômé d’Harvard, malto-américain, polyglotte, dûment marié à l’église et revendiquant sa foi chrétienne, s’il vous plait !

Le premier président ouvertement homosexuel et, putsch judiciaire et couverture de Time aidant, de son éventuelle « première famille » …

Petit retour avec le président de la Yeshiva university, le Dr. Norman Lamm

Et contre les nouveaux diktats de la pensée unique et du politiquement correct …

A la réalité non seulement biblique mais concrète de tous les jours …

Des nombreux problèmes moraux et sociaux que, sauf rares exceptions, posent …

Le véritable messianisme homosexuel qui, par médias et show biz interposés, nous est actuellement imposé …

Et qui au nom des nouveaux impératifs catégoriques de l »amour », de « l’épanouissement » et du « bonheur » …

Pourrait en arriver à nous faire avaliser …

A condition bien sûr d’être pratiqué « entre deux adultes consentants » et avec la « visée d’une relation d’amour permanente »…

Sans compter, dès l’âge de deux ans, le choix de sa propre assignation sexuelle …

Tant les contacts incestueux que les relations polygames …

Voire la nécrophilie ou le cannibalisme sexuel ?

Judaism and the Modern Attitude to Homosexuality
Dr. Norman Lamm
Jonah web
March 30, 2007

Dr. Norman Lamm presently serves as President of Yeshiva University.

Popular wisdom has it that our society is wildly hedonistic, with the breakdown of family life, rampant immorality, and the world, led by the United States, in the throes of a sexual revolution. The impetus of this latest revolution is such that new ground is constantly being broken, while bold deviations barely noticed one year are glaringly more evident the year following and become the norm for the « younger generation » the year after that.

Some sex researchers accept this portrait of a steady deterioration in sex inhibitions and of increasing permissiveness. Opposed to them are the « debunkers » who hold that this view is mere fantasy and that, while there may have been a significant leap in verbal sophistication, there has probably been only a short hop in actual behavior. They point to statistics which confirm that now, as in Kinsey’s day, there has been no reported increase in sexual frequencies along with alleged de-inhibition to rhetoric and dress. The « sexual revolution » is, for them, largely a myth. Yet others maintain that there is in Western society a permanent revolution against moral standards, but that the form and style of the revolt keeps changing.

The determination of which view is correct will have to be left to the sociologists and statisticians -or, better, to historians of the future who will have the benefit of hindsight. But certain facts are quite clear. First, the complaint that moral restraints are crumbling has a two or three thousand year history in Jewish tradition and in continuous history of Western civilization. Second, there has been a decided increase at least in the area of sexual attitudes, speech, and expectations, if not in practice. Third, such social and psychological phenomena must sooner or later beget changes in mores and conduct. And finally, it is indisputable that most current attitudes are profoundly at variance with traditional Jewish views on sex and sex morality.

Of all the current sexual fashions, the one most notable for its militancy, and which most conspicuously requires illumination from the sources of Jewish tradition, is that of sexual deviancy. This refers primarily to homosexuality, male or female, along with a host of other phenomena such as transvestism and transexualism. They all form part of the newly approved theory of idiosyncratic character of sexuality. Homosexuals have demanded acceptance in society, and this demand has taken various forms -from a plea that they should not be liable to criminal prosecution, to a demand that they should not be subjected to social sanctions, and then to a strident assertion that they represent an « alternative life-style » no less legitimate that « straight heterosexuality. The various forms of homosexual apologetics appear largely in contemporary literature and theater, as well as in the daily press. In the United States, « gay » activists have become increasingly and progressively more vocal and militant.

Legal Position

Homosexuals have, indeed, been suppressed by the law. For instance, the Emperor Valentinian, in 390 C.E., decreed that pederasty be punished by burning at the stake. The sixth-century Code of Justinian ordained that homosexuals be tortured, mutilated, paraded in public, and executed. A thousand years later, Gibbon said of the penalty the Code decreed that « pederasty became the crime of those to whom no crime could be imputed ». In more modern times, however, the Napoleonic Code declared consensual homosexuality legal in France. A century ago, anti-homosexual laws were repealed in Belgium and Holland. In this century, Denmark, Sweden and Switzerland followed suit and, more recently, Czechoslovakia and England. The most severe laws in the West are found in the United States, where they come under the jurisdiction of the various states and are known by a variety of names, usually as « sodomy laws ». Punishment may range from light fines to five or more years in prison (in some cases even life imprisonment), indeterminate detention to a mental hospital, and even to compulsory sterilization. Moreover, homosexuals are, in various states, barred from licensed professions, from many professional societies, from teaching, and from the civil service -to mention only a few of the sanctions encountered by the known homosexual.

More recently, a new tendency has been developing in the United States and elsewhere with regard to homosexuals. Thus, in 1969, the National Institute of Mental Health issued a majority report advocating that adult consensual homosexuality be declared legal. The American Civil Liberties Union concurred. Earlier, Illinois had done so in 1962, and in 1971 the state of Connecticut revised its laws accordingly. Yet despite the increasing legal and social tolerance of deviance, basic feelings toward homosexuals have not really changed. The most obvious example is France, where although legal restraints were abandoned over 150 years ago, the homosexual of today continues to live in shame and secrecy.

Statistics

Statistically, the proportion the proportion of homosexuals in society does not seem to have changed much since Professor Kinsey’s day (his book, Sexual Behavior in the Human Male, was published in 1948, and his volume on the human female in 1953). Kinsey’s studies revealed that hard-core male homosexuals constituted about 4-6% of the population: 10% experienced « problem » behavior during a part of their lives. One man out of three indulges in some form of homosexual behavior from puberty until his early twenties. The dimensions of the problem become quite overwhelming when it is realized that, according to these figures, of 200 million people in the United States some ten million will become or are predominant or exclusive homosexuals, and over 25 million will have at least a few years of significant homosexual experience.

The New Permissiveness

The most dramatic change in our attitudes to homosexuality has taken place in the new mass adolescent subculture -the first such in history- where it is part of the whole new outlook on sexual restraints in general. It is here that the fashionable Sexual Left has had its greatest success on a wide scale, appealing especially to the rejection of Western traditions of sex roles and sex typing. A number of different streams feed into this ideological reservoir from which the new sympathy for homosexuality flows. Freud and his disciples began the modern protest against traditional restraints, and blamed the guilt that follows transgression for the neuroses that plague man. Many psychoanalysts began to overemphasize the importance of sexuality in human life, and this ultimately gave birth to a kind of sexual messianism. Thus, in our own day Wilhelm Reich identifies sexual energy as « vital energy per se » and, in conformity with his Marxist ideology, seeks to harmonize Marx and Freud. For Reich and his followers, the sexual revolution is a machina ultima for the whole Leninist liberation in all spheres of life and society. Rebellion against restrictive moral codes has become, for them, not merely a way to hedonism but a form of sexual mysticism: orgasm is seem not only as the pleasurable climatic release of internal sexual pressure, but as a means to individual creativity and insight as well as to the reconstruction and liberation of society. Finally, the emphasis on freedom and sexual autonomy derives from the Sartrean version of Kant’s view of human autonomy.

It is in this atmosphere that pro-deviationist sentiments have proliferated, reaching into many strata of society. Significantly, religious groups have joined the sociologists and ideologists of deviance to affirm what has been called « man’s birthright of unbounded ambisexuality. » A number of Protestant churches in America, and an occasional Catholic clergyman, have plead for more sympathetic attitudes toward homosexuals. Following the new Christian permissiveness espoused in Sex and Morality (1966), the report of a working party of the British Council of Churches, a group of American Episcopalian clergymen in November 1967 concluded that homosexual acts ought not to be considered wrong, per se. A homosexual relationship is, they implied, no different from a heterosexual marriage: but must be judged by one criterion -« whether it is intended to foster a permanent relation of love. » Jewish apologists for deviationism have been prominent in the Gay Liberation movement and have not hesitated to advocate their position in American journals and in the press. Christian groups began to emerge which catered to a homosexual clientele, and Jews were not too far behind. This latest Jewish exemplification of the principle of wie es sich christelt, so juedelt es sich will be discussed at the end of this essay.

Homosexual militants are satisfied neither with a « mental health » approach nor with demanding civil rights. They are clear in insisting on society’s recognition of sexual deviance as an « alternative lifestyle, » morally legitimate and socially acceptable.
Such are the basic facts and theories of the current advocacy of sexual deviance. What is the classical Jewish attitude to sodomy, and what suggestions may be made to develop a Jewish approach to the complex problem of the homosexual in contemporary society?

Biblical View

The Bible prohibits homosexual intercourse and labels it an abomination: « Thou shalt not lie with a man as one lies with a woman: it is an abomination » (Lev. 18:22). Capital punishment is ordained for both transgressors in Lev. 20:13. In the first passage, sodomy is linked with buggery, and in the second with incest and buggery. (There is considerable terminological confusion with regard to these words. We shall here use « sodomy » as a synonym for homosexuality and « buggery » for sexual relations with animals.)

The city of Sodom had the questionable honor of lending its name to homosexuality because of the notorious attempt at homosexual rape, when the entire population -« both young and old, all the people from every quarter »- surrounded the home of Lot, the nephew of Abraham, and demanded that he surrender his guests to them « that we may know them » (Gen. 19:5). The decimation of the tribe of Benjamin resulted from the notorious incident, recorded in Judges 19, of a group of Benjamites in Gibeah who sought to commit homosexual rape.

Scholars have identified the kadesh proscribed by the Torah (Deut. 23:18) as a ritual male homosexual prostitute. This form of healthen cult penetrated Judea from the Canaanite surroundings in the period of the early monarchy. So Rehoboam, probably under the influence of his Ammonite mother, tolerated this cultic sodomy during his reign (I Kings 14:24). His grandson Asa tried to cleanse the Temple in Jerusalem of the practice (I Kings 15:12), as did his great-grandson Jehoshaphat. But it was not until the days of Josiah and the vigorous reforms he introduced that the kadesh was finally removed from the Temple and the land (II Kings 23:7). The Talmund too (Sanhedrin, 24b) holds that the kadesh was a homosexual functionary. (However, it is possible that the term also alludes to a heterosexual male prostitute. Thus, in II kings 23:7, women are described as weaving garments for the idols in the batei ha-kedeshim (houses of the kadesh): the presence of women may imply that the kadesh was not necessarily homosexual. The Talmudic opinion identifying the kadesh as a homosexual prostitute may be only an asmakhta. Moreover, there are other opinions in Talmudic literature as to the meaning of the verse: see Onkelos, Lev. 23:18, and Nachmanides and Torah Temimah, ad loc.)

Talmudic Approach

Rabbinic exegesis of the Bible finds several other homosexual references in the scriptural narratives. The generation of Noah was condemned to eradication by the Flood because they had sunk so low morally that, according to Midrashic teaching, they wrote out formal marriage contracts for sodomy and buggery -a possible cryptic reference to such practices in the Rome of Nero and Hadrian (Lev. R. 18:13).

Of Ham, the son of Noah, we are told that « he saw the nakedness of his father » and told his two brothers (Gen. 9:22). Why should this act have warranted the harsh imprecation hurled at Ham by his father? The Rabbis offer two answers: one, that the text implied that Ham castrated Noah: second, that the Biblical expression is an idiom for homosexual intercourse (see Rashi, ad loc.). On the scriptural story of Potiphar’s purchase of Joseph as a slave (Gen. 39:1), the Talmund comments that he acquired him for homosexual purposes, but that a miracle occurred and God sent the angel Gabriel to castrate Potiphar (Sotah 13b).

Post-Biblical literature records remarkably few incidents of homosexuality. Herod’s son Alexander, according to Josephus (Wars, I, 24:7), had homosexual contact with a young eunuch. Very few reports of homosexuality have come to us from the Talmudic era (TJ Sanhedrin 6:6, 23c: Jos. Ant., 15:25-30).

The incidence of sodomy among Jews is interestingly reflected in the Halakhah on mishkav zakhur (the Talmudic term for homosexuality: the Bible uses various terms- thus the same term in Num. 31:17 and 35 refers to heterosexual intercourse by a woman, whereas the expression for male homosexual intercourse in Lev. 18:22 and 20:13 is mishkevei ishah). The Mishnah teaches that R. Judah forbade two bachelors from sleeping under the same blanket, for fear that this would lead to homosexual temptation (Kiddushin 4:14). However, the Sages permitted it (ibid.) because homosexuality was so rare among Jews that such preventive legislation was considered unnecessary (Kiddushin 82a). This latter view is codified as Halakhah by Malmonides (Yad, Issurei Bi’ah 22:2). Some 400 years later R. Joseph Caro , who did not codify the law against sodomy proper, nevertheless cautioned against being alone with another male because of the lewdness prevalent « in our times » (Even ha-Ezer 24). About a hundred years later, R. Joel Sirkes reverted to the original ruling, and suspended the prohibition because such obscene acts were unheard of amongst Polish Jewry (Bayit Hadash to Tur, Even ha-Ezer 24). Indeed, a distinguished contemporary of R. Joseph Caro, R. Solomon Luria, went even further and declared homosexuality so very rare that, if one refrains from sharing a blanket with another male as a special act of piety, one is guilty of self-righteous pride or religious snobbism (for the above and additional authorities, see Ozar ha-Posekim, IX, 236-238).

Responsa

As is to be expected, the responsa literature is also very scant in discussions of homosexuality. One of the few such responsa is by the late R. Abraham Isaac Ha-Kohen Kook, when he was still the rabbi of Jaffa. In 1912 he was asked about a ritual slaughterer who had come under suspicion of homosexuality. After weighing all aspects of the case, R. Kook dismissed the charges against the accused, considering them unsupported hearsay. Furthermore, he maintained the man might have repented and therefore could not be subject to sanctions at the present time.

The very scarcity of halakhic deliberations on homosexuality, and the quite explicit insistence of various halakhic authorities, provide sufficient evidence of the relative absence of this practice among Jews from ancient times down to the present. Indeed, Prof. Kinsey found that, while religion was usually an influence of secondary importance on the number of homosexual as well as heterosexual acts by males. Orthodox Jews proved an exception, homosexuality being phenomenally rare among them.

Jewish laws treated the female homosexual more leniently than the male. It considered lesbianism as issur, an ordinary religious violation, rather than arayot, a specifically sexual infraction, regarded much more severely than issur. R. Huna held that lesbianism is the equivalent of harlotry and disqualified the woman from marrying a priest. The Halakhah is, however, more lenient, and decides that while the act is prohibited, the lesbian is not punished and is permitted to marry a priest (Sifra 9:8: Shab. 65a: Yev. 76a). However, the transgression does warrant disciplinary flagellation (Maimonides, Yad, Issurei Bi’ah 21:8). The less punitive attitude of the Halakhah to the female homosexual than to the male does not reflect any intrinsic judgment on one as opposed to the other, but is rather the result of a halakhic technicality: there is no explicit Biblical proscription of lesbianism, and the act does not entail genital intercourse (Maimonides, loc. cit.).

The Halakhah holds that the ban on homosexuality applies universally, to non-Jew as well as to Jew (Sanh 58a: Maimonides, Melakhim 9:5, 6). It is one of the six instances of arayot (sexual transgressions) forbidden to the Noachide (Maimonides, ibid).

Most halakhic authorities – such as Rashba and Ritba – agree with Maimonides. A minority opinion holds that pederasty and buggery are « ordinary » prohibitions rather than arayot – specifically sexual infractions which demand that one submit to martyrdom rather than violate the law – but the Jerusalem Talmud supports the majority opinion. (See D. M. Krozer, Devar Ha-Melekh, I, 22, 23 (1962), who also suggests that Maimonides may support a distinction whereby the « male » or active homosexual partner is held in violation of arayot whereas the passive or « female » partner transgresses issur, an ordinary prohibition.)

Reasons of Prohibition

Why does the Torah forbids homosexuality? Bearing in mind that reasons proferred for the various commandments are not to be accepted as determinative, but as human efforts to explain immutable divine law, the rabbis of the Talmud and later Talmudists did offer a number of illuminating rationales for the law.

As stated, the Torah condemns homosexuality as to’evah, an abomination. The Talmud records the interpretation of Bar Kapparah who, in a play on words, defined to’evah as to’eh attah bah. « You are going astray because of it » (Nedarim 51a). The exact meaning of this passage is unclear, and various explanations have been put forward.

The Pesikta (Zutarta) explains the statement of Bar Kapparah as referring to the impossibility of such a sexual resulting in procreation. One of the major functions (if not the major purpose) of sexuality is reproduction, and this reason for man’s sexual endowment is frustrated by mishkav zakhur (so too Sefer ha-Hinnukh, no. 209).

Another interpretation is that of the Tosafot and R. Asher ben Jehiel (in their commentaries to Ned. 51a) which applies the « going astray » or wandering to the homosexual’s abandoning his wife. In other words, the abomination consists of the danger that a married man with homosexual tendencies may disrupt his family life in order to indulge his perversions. Saadiah Gaon holds the rational basis of most of the Bible’s moral legislation to be the preservation of the family structure (Emunot ve-De’ot 3:1: cf. Yoma 9a). (This argument assumes contemporary cogency in the light of the avowed aim of some gay militants to destroy the family, which they consider an « oppressive institution. »)

A third explanation is given by a modern scholar, Rabbi Baruch Ha-Levi Epstein (Torah Temimah to Lev. 18:22), who emphasizes the unnaturalness of the homosexual liaison: « You are going astray from the foundations of the creation. » Mishkav zakhur defies the very structure of the anatomy of the sexes, which quite obviously was designed for heterosexual relationships.

It may be, however, that the very variety of interpretations of to’evah points to a far more fundamental meaning, namely, that an act characterized as an « abomination » is prima facie disgusting and cannot be further defined or explained. Certain acts are considered to’evah by the Torah, and there the matter rests. It is, as it were, a visceral reaction, an intuitive disqualification of the act, and we run the risk of distorting the Biblical judgment if we rationalize it. To’evah constitutes a category of objectionableness sui generis: it is a primary phenomenon. (This lends additional force to Rabbi David Z. Hoffmann’s contention that to’evah is used by the Torah to indicate the repulsiveness of a proscribed act, no matter how much it may be in vogue among advanced and sophisticated cultures: see his Sefer Va-yikra, II, p. 54.).

Jewish Attitudes

It is on the basis of the above that an effort must be made to formulate a Jewish response to the problems of homosexuality in the conditions under which most Jews live today, namely, those of free and democratic societies and, with the exception of Israel, non-Jewish lands and traditions.

Four general approaches may be adopted:1) Repressive: No leniency toward the homosexual, lest the moral fiber of the rest of society be weakened.2) Practical: Dispense with imprisonment and all forms of social harassment, for eminently practical and prudent reasons.3) Permissive: The same as the above, but for the ideological reasons, viz., the acceptance of homosexuality as a legitimate alternative « lifestyle »4) Psychological: Homosexuality, in at least some forms, should be recognized as a disease and this recognition must determine our attitude toward the homosexual.
Let us consider each of these critically.

Repressive Attitude

Exponents of the most stringent approach hold that pederasts are the vanguard of moral malaise, especially in our society. For on thing, they are dangerous to children. According to a recent work, one third of the homosexuals in the study were seduced in their adolescence by adults. It is best for society that they be imprisoned, and if our present penal institutions are faulty, let them be improved. Homosexuals should certainly not be permitted to function as teachers, group leaders, rabbis, or in any other capacity where they might be models for, and come into close contact with, young people. Homosexuality must not be excused as a sickness. A sane society assumes that its members have free choice, and are therefore responsible for their conduct. Sex offenders, including homosexuals, according to another recent study, operate « at a primate level with the philosophy that necessity is the mother of improvisation. » As Jews who believe that the Torah legislated certain moral laws for all mankind, it is incumbent upon us to encourage all societies, including non-Jewish ones, to implement the Noachide laws. And since, according to the halakhah, homosexuality is prohibited to Noachides as well as to Jews, we must seek to strengthen the moral quality of society by encouraging more restrictive laws against homosexuals. Moreover, if we are loyal to the teachings of Judaism, we cannot distinguish between « victimless » crimes and crimes of violence. Hence, if our concern for the murder, racial oppression, or robbery, we must do no less with regard to sodomy.

This argument is, however, weak on a number of grounds. Practically, it fails to take into cognizance the number of homosexuals of all categories, which, as we have pointed out, is vast. We cannot possibly imprison all offenders, and it is a manifest miscarriage of justice to vent our spleen only on the few unfortunates who are caught by the police. It is inconsistent because there has been no comparable outcry for harsh sentencing of other transgressors of sexual morality, such as those who indulge in adultery or incest. To take consistency to its logical conclusion, this hard line on homosexuality should not stop with imprisonment but demand the death sentence, as is Biblically prescribed. And why not the same death sentence for blasphemy, eating a limb torn from a live animal, idolatry, robbery -all of which are Noachide commandments? And why not capital punishment for Sabbath transgressors in the State of Israel? Why should the pederast be singled out for opprobrium and be made an object lesson while all others escape?

Those who might seriously consider such logically consistent, but socially destructive, strategies had best think back to the fate of that Dominican reformer, the monk Girolamo Savonarola, who in 15th-century Florence undertook a fanatical campaign against vice and all suspected of venal sin, with emphasis on pederasty. The society of that time and place, much like ours, could stand vast improvement. But too much medicine in too strong doses was the monk’s prescription, whereupon the population rioted and the zealot was hanged.

Finally, there is indeed some halakhic warrant for distinguishing between violent and victimless (or consensual and non-consensual) crimes. Thus, the Talmud permits a passer-by to kill a man in pursuit of another man or of a woman when the pursuer is attempting homosexual or heterosexual rape, as the case may be, whereas this is not permitted in the case of a transgressor pursuing an animal to commit buggery or on his way to worship an idol or to violate the Sabbath, (Sanh. 8:7, and v. Rashi to Sanh. 73a, s.v. al ha-behemah).

Practical Attitude

The practical approach is completely pragmatic and attempts to steer clear of any ideology in its judgments and recommendations. It is, according to its advocates, eminently reasonable. Criminal laws requiring punishment for homosexuals are simply unenforceable in society at the present day. We have previously cited the statistics on the extremely high incidence of pederasty in our society. Kinsey once said of the many sexual acts outlawed by the various states, that, were they all enforced, some 95% of men in the United States would be in jail. Furthermore, the special prejudice of law enforcement authorities against homosexuals – rarely does one hear of police entrapment or of jail sentences for non-violent heterosexuals – breeds a grave injustice: namely, it is an invitation to blackmail. The law concerning sodomy has been called « the blackmailer’s charter. » It is universally agreed that prison does little to help the homosexual rid himself of his peculiarity. Certainly, the failure of rehabilitation ought to be of concern to civilized men. But even if it is not, and the crime be considered so serious that incarceration is deemed advisable even in the absence of any real chances of rehabilitation, the casual pederast almost always leaves prison as a confirmed criminal. He has been denied the company of women and forced into society of those whose sexual expression is almost always channeled to pederasty. The casual pederast has become a habitual one: his homosexuality has now been ingrained in him. Is society any safer for having taken an errant man and, in the course of a few years, for having taught him to transform his deviancy into a hard and fast perversion, then turning him loose on the community? Finally, from a Jewish point of view, since it is obviously impossible for us to impose the death penalty for sodomy, we may as well act on purely practical grounds and do away with all legislation and punishment in this area of personal conduct.

This reasoning is tempting precisely because it focuses directly on the problem and is free of any ideological commitments. But the problem with it is that it is too smooth, too easy. By the same reasoning one might, in a reductio ad absurdum do away with all laws on income tax evasion, or forgive, and dispense with all punishment of Nazi murders. Furthermore, the last element leaves us with a novel view of the Halakhah: if it cannot be implemented in its entirely, it ought to be abandoned completely. Surely the Noachide laws, perhaps above all others, place us under clear moral imperatives, over and above purely penological instructions? The very practicality of this position leaves it open to the charge of evading the very real moral issues, and for Jews the halakhic principles, entailed in any discussion of homosexuality.

Permissive Attitude

The ideological advocacy of a completely permissive attitude toward consensual homosexuality and the acceptance of its moral legitimacy is, of course, the « in » fashion in sophisticated liberal circles. Legally, it holds that deviancy is none of the law’s business; the homosexual’s civil rights are as sacred as those of any other « minority group. » From the psychological angle, sexuality must be emancipated from the fetters of guilt induced by religion and code-morality, and its idiosyncratic nature must be confirmed.

Gay Liberationists aver that the usual « straight » attitude toward homosexuality is based on three fallacies or myths: that homosexuality is an illness; that it is unnatural; and that it is immoral. They argue that it cannot be considered an illness, because so many people have been shown to practice it. It is not unnatural, because its alleged unnaturalness derives from the impossibility of sodomy leading to reproduction, whereas our overpopulated society no longer needs to breed workers, soldiers, farmers, or hunters. And it is not immoral, first, because morality is relative, and secondly, because moral behavior is that characterized by « selfless, loving concern. »

Now, we are here concerned with the sexual problem as such, and not with homosexuality as a symbol of the whole contemporary ideological polemic against restraint and tradition. Homosexuality is too important – and too agonizing – a human problem to allow it to be exploited for political aims or entertainment or shock value.

The bland assumption that pederasty cannot be considered an illness because of the large number of people who have or express homosexual tendencies cannot stand up under criticism. No less an authority than Freud taught that a whole civilization can be neurotic. Erich Fromm appeals for the establishment of The Sane Society – because ours is not. If the majority of a nation are struck down by typhoid fever, does this condition, by so curious a calculus of semantics, become healthy? Whether or not homosexuality can be considered an illness is a serious question, and it does depend on one’s definition of health and illness. But mere statistics are certainly not the coup de grâce to the psychological argument, which will be discussed shortly.

The validation of gay life as « natural » on the basis of changing social and economic conditions is an act of verbal obfuscation. Even if we were to concur with the widely held feeling that the world’s population is dangerously large, and that Zero Population Growth is now a desideratum, the anatomical fact remains unchanged: the generative organs are structured for generation. If the words « natural » and « unnatural » have any meaning at all, they must be rooted in the unchanging reality of man’s sexual apparatus rather than in his ephmeral social configurations.

Militant feminists along with the gay activists react vigorously against the implication that natural structure implies the naturalness or unnaturalness of certain acts, but this very view has recently been confirmed by one of the most informed writers on the subject. « It is already pretty safe to infer from laboratory research and ethological parallels that male and female are wired in ways that relate to our traditional sex roles… Freud dramatically said that anatomy is destiny. Scientists who shudder at the dramatic, no matter how accurate, could rephrase this: anatomy is functional, body functions have profound psychological meanings to people, and anatomy and function are often socially elaborated » (Arno Karlen, Sexuality and Homosexuality, p. 501).

The moral issues lead us into the quagmire of perennial philosophical disquisitions of a fundamental nature. In a way, this facilitates the problem for one seeking a Jewish view. Judaism does not accept the kind of thoroughgoing relativism used to justify the gay life as merely an alternate lifestyle And while the question of human autonomy is certainly worthy of consideration in the area of sexuality, one must beware of the consequences of taking the argument to its logical extreme. Judaism clearly cherishes holiness as a greater value than either freedom or health. Furthermore, if every individual’s autonomy leads us to lend moral legitimacy to any form of sexual expression he may desire, we must be ready to pull the blanket of this moral validity over almost the whole catalogue of perversion described by Krafft-Ebing, and then, by the legerdemain of granting civil rights to the morally non-objectionable, permit the advocates of buggery, fetishism, or whatever to proselytize in public. In that case, why not in the school system? And if consent is obtained before the death of one partner, why not necrophilia or cannibalism? Surely, if we declare pederasty to be merely idiosyncratic and not an « abomination, » what right have we to condemn sexually motivated cannibalism – merely because most people would react with revulsion and disgust?

« Loving, selfless concern » and « meaningful personal relationships » – the great slogans of the New Morality and the exponents of situation ethics – have become the litany of sodomy in our times. Simple logic should permit us to use the same criteria for excusing adultery or any other act heretofore held to be immoral: and indeed, that is just what has been done, and it has received the sanction not only of liberals and humanists, but of certain religionists as well. « Love, » « fulfillment, » « exploitative, » « meaningful » – the list itself sounds like a lexicon of emotionally charged terms drawn at random from the disparate sources of both Christian and psychologically-orientated agnostic circles. Logically, we must ask the next question: what moral depravities can not be excused by the sole criterion of « warm, meaningful human relations » or « fulfillment, » the newest semantic heirs to « love »?

Love, fulfillment, and happiness can also be attained in incestuous contacts -and certainly in polygamous relationships. Is there nothing at all left that is « sinful, » « unnatural, » or « immoral » if it is practiced « between two consenting adults? » For religious groups to aver that a homosexual relationship should be judged by the same criteria as a heterosexual one – i.e., « whether it is intended to foster a permanent relationship of love » – is to abandon the last claim of representing the « Judeo-Christian tradition. »

I have elsewhere essayed a criticism of the situationalists, their use of the term « love, » and their objections to traditional morality as exemplified by the Halakhah as « mere legalism » (see my Faith and Doubt, chapter IX, p. 249 ff). Situationalists, such as Joseph Fletcher, have especially attacked « pilpolistic Rabbis » for remaining entangled in the coils of statutory and legalistic hairsplitting. Among the other things this typically Christian polemic reveals is an ignorance of the nature of Halakhah and its place in Judaism, which never held that law was totality of life, pleaded again and again for supererogatory conduct, recognized that individuals may be disadvantaged by the law, and which strove to rectify what could be rectified without abandoning the large majority to legal and moral chaos simply because of the discomfiture of the few.

Clearly, while Judaism needs no defense or apology in regard to its esteem for neighborly love and compassion for the individual sufferer, it cannot possibly abide a wholesale dismissal of its most basic moral principles on the grounds that those subject to its judgments find them repressive. All laws are repressive to some extent -they repress illegal activities- and all morality is concerned with changing man and improving him and his society. Homosexuality imposes on one an intolerable burden of differentness, of absurdity, and of loneliness, but the Biblical commandment outlawing pederasty cannot be put aside solely on the basis of sympathy for the victim of these feelings. Morality, too, is an element which each of us, given his sensuality, his own idiosyncracies, and his immoral proclivities, must take into serious consideration before acting out his impulses.

Psychological Attitudes

Several years ago I recommended that Jews regard homosexual deviance as a pathology, thus reconciling the insights of Jewish tradition with the exigencies of contemporary life and scientific information, such as it is, on the nature of homosexuality (Jewish Life, Jan-Feb. 1968). The remarks that follow are an expansion and modification of that position, together with some new data and notions.

The proposal that homosexuality be viewed as an illness will immediately be denied by three groups of people. Gay militants object to this view as an instance of heterosexual condescension. Evelyn Hooker and her group of psychologists maintain that homosexuals are no more pathological in their personality structures than heterosexuals. And psychiatrists Thomas Szasz in the U.S. and Ronald Laing in England reject all traditional ideas of mental sickness and health as tools of social repressiveness or, at best, narrow conventionalism. While granting that there are indeed unfortunate instances where the category of mental disease is exploited for social or political reasons, we part company with all three groups and assume that there are significant number of pederasts and lesbians who, by the criteria accepted by most psychologists and psychiatrists, can indeed be termed pathological. Thus, for instance, Dr. Albert Ellis, an ardent advocate of the right to deviancy, denies there is such a thing as a well-adjusted homosexual. In an interview, he has stated that whereas he used to believe that most homosexuals were neurotic, he is now convinced that about 50% are borderline psychotics, that the usual fixed male homosexual is a severe phobic, and that lesbians are even more disturbed than male homosexuals (see Karlem, op. cit., p. 223ff.).

No single cause of homosexuality has been established. In all probability, it is based on a conglomeration of a number of factors. There is overwhelming evidence that the condition is developmental, not constitutional. Despite all efforts to discover something genetic in homosexuality, no proof has been adduced, and researchers incline more and more to reject the Freudian concept of fundamental human biological bisexuality and its corollary of homosexual latency. It is now widely believed that homosexuality is the result of a whole family constellation. The passive, dependent, phobic male homosexual is usually the product of an aggressive, covertly seductive mother who is overly rigid and puritanical with her son – thus forcing him into a bond where he is sexually aroused, yet forbidden to express himself in any heterosexual way – and of a father who is absent, remote, emotionally detached, or hostile (I. Bieber et al. Homosexuality, 1962).

Can the homosexual be cured? There is a tradition of therapeutic pessimism that goes back to Freud but a number of psychoanalysis, including Freud’s daughter Anna, have reported successes in treating homosexuals as any other phobics (in this case, fear of the female genitals). It is generally accepted that about a third of all homosexuals can be completely cured: behavioral therapists report an even larger number of cures.

Of course, one cannot say categorically that all homosexuals are sick – any more than one can casually define all thieves as kleptomaniacs. In order to develop a reasonable Jewish approach to the problem and to seek in the concept of illness some mitigating factor, it is necessary first to establish the main types of homosexuals. Dr. Judd Marmor speaks of four categories. « Genuine homosexuality » is based on strong preferential erotic feelings for members of the same sex. « Transitory homosexual behavior » occurs among adolescents who would prefer heterosexual experiences but are denied such opportunities because of the social, cultural, or psychological reasons. « Situational homosexual exchanges » are characteristic of prisoners, soldiers and others who are heterosexual but are denied access to women for long periods of time. « Transitory and opportunistic homosexuality » is that of delinquent young men who permit themselves to be used by pederasts in order to make money or win other favors, although their primary erotic interests are exclusively heterosexual. To these may be added, for purposes of our analysis, two other types. The first category, that of genuine homosexuals, me be said to comprehend two sub-categories: those who experience their condition as one of duress or uncontrollable passion which they would rid themselves of if they could, and those who transform their idiosyncrasy into an ideology, i.e., the gay militants who assert the legitimacy and validity of homosexuality as an alternative way to heterosexuality. The sixth category is based on what Dr. Rollo May has called « the New Puritanism », the peculiarly modern notion that one must experience all sexual pleasures, whether or not one feels inclined to them, as if the failure to taste every cup passed at the sumptuous banquet of carnal life means that one has not truly lived. Thus, we have transitory homosexual behavior not of adolescents, but of adults who feel that: they must « try everything » at least once or more than once in their lives.

A Possible Halakhic Solution

This rubric will now permit us to apply the notion of disease (and, from the halakhic point of view, of its opposite, moral culpability) to the various types of sodomy. Clearly, genuine homosexuality experienced under duress (Hebrew: ones) most obviously lends itself to being termed pathological especially where dysfunction appears in other aspects of personality. Opportunistic homosexuality, ideological homosexuality, and transitory adult homosexuality are at the other end of the spectrum, and appear most reprehensible. As for the intermediate categories, while they cannot be called illness, they do have a greater claim on our sympathy than the three types mentioned above.

In formulating the notion of homosexuality as a disease, we are not asserting the formal halakhic definition of mental illness as mental incompetence, as described in TB Hag. 3b, 4a, and elsewhere. Furthermore, the categorization of a prohibited sex act as ones (duress) because of uncontrolled passions is valid, in a technical halakhic sense, only for a married woman who was ravished and who, in the course of the act, became a willing participant. The Halakhah decides with Rava, against the father of Samuel, that her consent is considered duress because of the passions aroused in her (Ket, 51b). However, this holds true only if the act was initially entered into under physical compulsion (Kesef Mishneh to Yad, Sanh. 20:3). Moreover, the claim of compulsion by one’s erotic passions is not valid for a male, for any erection is considered a token of his willingness (Yev, 53b; Maimonides, Yad, Sanh, 20:3). In the case of a male who was forced to cohabit with a woman forbidden to him, some authorities consider him guilty and punishable, while others hold him guilty but not subject to punishment by the courts (Tos., Yev, 53b; Hinnukh, 556; Kesef Mishneh, loc. cit.: Maggid Mishneh to Issurei Bi´ah, 1:9). Where a male is sexually aroused in a permissible manner, as to begin coitus with his wife and is then forced to conclude the act with another woman, most authorities exonerate him (Rabad and Maggid Mishned, to Issurei Bi´ah, in loc). If, now, the warped family background of the genuine homosexual is considered ones, the homosexual act may possibly lay claim to some mitigation by the Halakhah. (However, see Minhat Hinnukh, 556, end; and M. Feinstein, Iggerot Moshe (1973) on YD, no. 59, who holds, in a different context, that any pleasure derived from a forbidden act performed under duress increases the level of prohibition. This was anticipated by R. Joseph Engel, Atvan de-Oraita, 24). These latter sources indicate the difficulty of exonerating sexual transgressors because of psycho-pathological reasons under the technical rules of the Halakhah.

However, in the absence of a Sanhedrin and since it is impossible to implement the whole halakhic penal system, including capital punishment, such strict applications are unnecessary. What we are attempting is to develop guidelines, based on the Halakhah, which will allow contemporary Jews to orient themselves to the current problems of homosexuality in a manner articulating with the most fundamental insights of the Halakhah in a general sense, and consistent with the broadest world-view that the halakhic commitment instills in its followers. Thus, the aggadic statement that « no man sins unless he is overcome by a spirit of madness » (Sot. 3a) is not an operative halakhic rule, but does offer guidance on public policy and individual pastoral compassion. So in the present case, the formal halakhic strictures do not in any case apply nowadays, and it is our contention that the aggadic principle must lead us to seek out the mitigating halakhic elements so as to guide us in our orientation to homosexuals who, by the standards of modern psychology, may be regarded as acting under compulsion.

To apply the Halakhah strictly in this case is obviously impossible; to ignore it entirely is undesirable, and tantamount to regarding Halakhah as a purely abstract, legalistic system which can safely be dismissed where its norms and prescriptions do not allow full formal implementation. Admittedly, the method is not rigorous, and leaves room to varying interpretations as well as exegetical abuse, but it is the best we can do.

Hence there are types of homosexuality that do not warrant any special considerateness, because the notion of ones or duress (i.e., disease) in no way applies. Where the category of mental illness does apply, the act itself remains to´evah (an abomination), but the fact of illness lays upon us the obligation of pastoral compassion, psychological understanding, and social sympathy. In these sense, homosexuality is no different from any other social or anti-halakhic act, where it is legitimate to distinguish between the objective itself including its social and moral consequences, and the mentality and inner development of the person who perpetrates the act. For instance, if a man murders in a cold and calculating fashion for reasons of profit, the act is criminal and the transgressor is criminal. If, however, a psychotic murders, the transgressor is diseased rather than criminal, but the objective act itself remains a criminal one. The courts may therefore treat the perpetrator of the crime as they would a patient, with all the concomitant compassion and concern for therapy, without condoning the act as being morally neutral. To use halakhic terminology, the objective crime remains a ma´aseh averah, whereas a person who transgresses is considered innocent on the grounds of ones. In such case, the transgressor is spared the full legal consequences of his culpable act, although the degree to which he may be held responsible varies from case to case.

An example of a criminal act that is treated with compassion by the Halakhah, which in practice considers the act pathological rather than criminal, is suicide. Technically, the suicide or attempted suicide is in violation of the law. The Halakhah denies to the suicide the honor of a eulogy, the rending of the garments by relatives or witnesses to the death, and (according to Maimonides) insist that the relatives are not to observe the usual mourning period for the suicide. Yet, in the course of time, the tendency has been to remove the stigma from the suicide on the basis of mental disease. Thus, halakhic scholars do not apply the technical category of intentional (la-da´at) suicide to one who did not clearly demonstrate before performing the act, that he knew what he was doing and was of sound mind, to the extent that there was no hiatus between the act of self-destruction and actual death. If these conditions are not present, we assume that it was an insane act or that between the act and death he experienced pangs of contrition and is therefore repentant, hence excused before the law. There is even one opinion which exonerates the suicide unless he received adequate warning (hatra´ah) before performing the act, and responded in a manner indicating that he was fully aware of what he was doing and that he was lucid (J.M Tykocinski, Gesher ha-Hayyim, I, ch. 25, and Encyclopaedia Judaica, 15:490).

Admittedly, there are differences between the two cases: pederasty is clearly a severe violation of Biblical law, whereas the stricture against suicide is derived exegetically from a verse in the Genesis. Nevertheless, the principle operative in the one is applicable to the other: where one can attribute an act to mental illness, it is done out of simple humanitarian considerations.

The suicide analogy should not, of course, lead one to conclude that there are grounds for a blanket exculpation of homosexuality as mental illness. Not all forms of homosexuality can be so termed, as indicated above, and the act itself remains an « abomination ». With few exceptions, most people do not ordinarily propose that suicide be considered an acceptable and legitimate alternative to the rigors of daily life. No sane and moral person sits passively and watches a fellow man attempt suicide because he « understands » him and because it has been decided that suicide is a « morally neutral » act. By the same token, in orienting ourselves to certain types of homosexuals as patients rather than criminals, we do not condone the act but attempt to help the homosexual. Under no circumstances can Judaism suffer homosexuality to become respectable. Were society to give its open or even tacit approval to homosexuality, it would invite more aggressiveness on the part of adult pederasts toward young people. Indeed, in the currently permissive atmosphere, the Jewish view would summon us to the semantic courage of referring to homosexuality not as « deviance » with the implication of moral neutrality and non-judgmental idiosyncrasy, but as « perversion » – a less clinical and more old-fashioned word, perhaps, but one that is more in keeping with the Biblical to´evah.

Yet, having passed this moral judgment, we cannot in the name of Judaism necessarily demand that we strive for the harshest possible punishment. Even where it was halakhically feasible to execute capital punishment, we have a tradition of leniency. Thus, R. Akiva and R. Tarfon declared that had they lived during the time of the Sanhedrin, they never would have executed a man. Although the Halakhah does not decide in their favor (Mak., end of ch. I), it was rare indeed that the death penalty was actually imposed. Usually, the Biblically mandated penalty was regarded as an index of the severity of the transgression, and the actual execution was avoided by strict insistence upon all technical requirements – such al hatra´ah (forewarning the potential criminal) and rigorous cross-examination of witnesses, etc. In the same spirit, we are not bound to press for the most punitive policy toward contemporary lawbreakers. We are required to lead them to rehabilitation (teshuva). The Halakhah sees no contradiction between condemning a man to death and exercising compassion, even love, toward him (Sanh. 52a). Even a man on the way to his execution was encouraged to repent (Sanh. 6:2). In the absence of a death penalty, the tradition of teshuva and pastoral compassion to the sinner continues.

I do not find any warrant in the Jewish tradition for insisting on prison sentences for homosexuals. The singling-out of homosexuals as victims of society’s righteous indignation is patently unfair. In Western history, anti-homosexual crusades have too often been marked by cruelty, destruction, and bigotry. Imprisonment in modern times has proven to be extremely haphazard. The number of homosexuals unfortunate enough to be apprehended is infinitesimal as compared to the number of known homosexuals; estimates vary from one to 300.000 to one to 6.000.000!. For homosexuals to be singled out for special punishment while all the rest of society indulges itself in every other form of sexual malfeasance (using the definitions of Halakhah, not the New Morality) is a species of double-standard morality that the spirit of Halakhah cannot abide. Thus, the Mishnah declares that the « scroll of the suspected adulteress » (megillat sotah) – whereby a wife suspected of adultery was forced to undergo the test of « bitter waters » – was cancelled when the Sages became aware of the ever-larger number of adulterers in general (Sot. 9:9). The Talmud bases this decision on an aversion to the double standard: if the husband is himself an adulterer, the « bitter waters » will have no effect on his wife, even though she too be guilty of the offense (Sot. 47b). By the same token, a society in which heterosexual immorality is not conspicuously absent has no moral right to sit in stern judgment and mete out harsh penalties to homosexuals.

Furthermore, sending a homosexual to prison is counterproductive if punishment is to contain any element of rehabilitation or teshuva. It has rightly been compared to sending an alcoholic to a distillery. The Talmud records that the Sanhedrin was unwilling to apply the full force of the law where punishment had lost its quality of deterrence; thus, 40 (or four) years before the destruction of the Temple, the Sanhedrin voluntarily left the precincts of the Temple so as not to be able, technically, to impose the death sentence, because it had noticed the increasing rate of homicide (Sanh. 41a, and elsewhere).

There is nothing in the Jewish law’s letter or spirit that should incline us toward advocacy of imprisonment for homosexuals. The Halakhah did not, by and large, encourage the denial of freedom as a recommended form of punishment. Flogging is, from a certain perspective, far less cruel and far more enlightened. Since capital punishment is out of the question, and since incarceration is not an advisable substitute, we are left with one absolute minimum: strong disapproval of the proscribed act. But we are not bound to any specific penological instrument that has no basis in Jewish law or tradition.

How shall this disapproval be expressed? It has been suggested that, since homosexuality will never attain acceptance anyway, society can afford to be humane. As long as violence and the seduction of children are not involved, it would best to abandon all laws on homosexuality and leave it to the inevitable social sanctions to control, informally,what can be controlled.

However, this approach is not consonant with Jewish tradition. The repeal of anti-homosexual laws implies the removal of the stigma from homosexuality, and this diminution of social censure weakens society in its training of the young toward acceptable patterns of conduct. The absence of adequate social reproach may well encourage the expression of homosexual tendencies by those in whom they might otherwise be suppressed. Law itself has an educative function, and the repeal of laws, no matter how justifiable such repeal may be from one point of view, does have the effect of signaling the acceptability of greater permissiveness.

Some New Proposals

Perhaps all that has been said above can best be expressed in the proposals that follow.

First, society and government must recognize the distinctions between the various categories enumerated earlier in this essay. We must offer medical and psychological assistance to those whose homosexuality is an expression of pathology, who recognize it as such, and are willing to seek help. We must be no less generous to the homosexual than to the drug addict, to whom the government extends various forms of therapy upon request.

Second, jail sentences must be abolished for all homosexuals, save those who are guilty of violence, seduction of the young, or public solicitation.

Third, the laws must remain on the books, but by mutual consent of judiciary and police, be unenforced. This approximates to what lawyers call « the chilling effect », and is the nearest one can come to the category so well known in the Halakhah, whereby strong disapproval is expressed by affirming a halakhic prohibition, yet no punishment is mandated. It is a category that bridges the gap between morality and law. In a society where homosexuality is so rampant, and where incarceration is so counterproductive, the hortatory approach may well be a way of formalizing society’s revulsion while avoiding the pitfalls in our accepted penology.

For the Jewish community as such, the same principles, derived from the tradition, may serve as guidelines. Judaism allows for no compromise in its abhorrence of sodomy, but encourages both compassion and efforts at rehabilitation. Certainly, there must be no acceptance of separate Jewish homosexual societies, such as – or specially – synagogues set aside as homosexual congregations. The first such « gay synagogue », apparently, was the « Beth Chayim Chadashim » in Los Angeles. Spawned by that city’s Metropolitan Community Church in March 1972, the founding group constituted itself as a Reform congregation with the help of the Pacific Southwest Council of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations some time in early 1973. Thereafter, similar groups surfaced in New York City and elsewhere. The original group meets on Friday evenings in the Leo Baeck Temple and is searching for a rabbi – who must himself be « gay ». The membership sees itself as justified by « the Philosophy of Reform Judaism ». The Temple president declared that God is « more concerned in our finding a sense of peace in which to make a better world, than He is in whom someone sleeps with » (cited in « Judaism and Homosexuality » C.C.A.R. Journal, summer 1973, p. 38; five articles in this issue of the Reform group’s rabbinic journal are devoted to the same theme, and most of them approve of the Gay Synagogue).

But such reasoning is specious, to say the least. Regular congregations and other Jewish groups should not hesitate to accord hospitality and membership, on an individual basis, to those « visible » homosexuals who qualify for the category of the ill. Homosexuals are no less in violation of Jewish norms than Sabbath desecrators or those who disregard the laws of kashrut. But to assent to the organization of separate « gay » groups under Jewish auspices makes no more sense, Jewishly, than to suffer the formation of synagogues that care exclusively to idol worshipers, adulterers, gossipers, tax evaders, or Sabbath violators. Indeed, it makes less sense, because it provides, under religious auspices, a ready-made clientele from which the homosexual can more easily choose his partners.

In remaining true to the sources of Jewish tradition. Jews are commanded to avoid the madness that seizes society at various times and in many forms, while yet retaining a moral composure and psychological equilibrium sufficient to exercise that combination of discipline and charity that is the hallmark of Judaism.

Voir aussi:

Buttigieg en tête des démocrates dans l’Iowa, une première

Métro

12 novembre 2018

Le jeune maire américain modéré Pete Buttigieg a dépassé pour la première fois les poids lourds de la primaire démocrate dans un sondage publié mardi portant sur l’Iowa, un État-clé dans la course à la Maison-Blanche car il sera le premier à voter.

C’est la première fois que Pete Buttigieg, 37 ans, arrive en tête d’un sondage dans la campagne pour la primaire démocrate.

Le maire enregistre 22% des intentions de vote dans l’Iowa selon un sondage de l’institut de Monmouth University, devant les grands favoris jusqu’ici: l’ancien vice-président de Barack Obama, Joe Biden (19%), la sénatrice progressiste Elizabeth Warren (18%) et le sénateur indépendant Bernie Sanders (13%).

Encore inconnu du grand public il y a un an, le maire de South Bend, dans l’Indiana, s’est depuis forgé un nom en se posant en modéré capable de rassembler l’Amérique pour battre le républicain Donald Trump en novembre 2020.

Ancien militaire, polyglotte et utra-diplômé, il est le premier grand candidat ouvertement homosexuel à la Maison-Blanche, marié depuis 2018 à un enseignant, Chasten.

Dans l’Iowa, où la primaire sera organisée le 3 février, «Buttigieg émerge comme un choix de premier plan pour un large éventail de démocrates», quel que soit leur niveau d’«éducation ou leur idéologie», a écrit mardi Patrick Murray, directeur de l’institut de sondage Monmouth University, dans un communiqué.

Plus de deux tiers des 451 personnes interrogées –du 7 au 11 novembre– disent pouvoir encore changer d’avis, précise l’institut. La marge d’erreur est importante, à 4,6 points, mais ce nouveau sondage vient confirmer l’ascension de M. Buttigieg dans l’Iowa depuis plusieurs semaines.

Sur les 17 candidats encore en lice pour l’investiture démocrate, Joe Biden reste favori au niveau national mais est en perte de vitesse (26,8%), suivi par Elizabeth Warren (20,8%), Bernie Sanders (17%), avec, loin derrière, Pete Buttigieg (7,5%).

Voir également:

Pete Buttigieg, meilleur candidat pour battre Trump à l’élection présidentielle?

Après avoir brillé dans l’Iowa, l’ancien maire mise sur la primaire dans le New Hampshire pour affronter Donald Trump à l’élection présidentielle américaine.

PRÉSIDENTIELLE AMÉRICAINE – Va-t-il transformer l’essai? Après ses résultats inespérés dans l’Iowa (toujours contestés par Bernie Sanders), Pete Buttigieg espère bien récolter les fruits de l’énorme coup de pouce médiatique dont il a bénéficié tout au long de cette semaine chaotique.

Le jeune candidat, encore inconnu il y a un an, croise donc les doigts ce mardi 11 février pour à nouveau s’imposer -ou du moins décrocher un score plus qu’honorable- dans le New Hampshire, deuxième État à voter aux primaires démocrates.

Si créer la surprise au cours des prochains scrutins et finir par décrocher la nomination du parti cet été est actuellement le rêve de tous les candidats, la seule vraie prouesse sera la suivante: battre Donald Trump lors de l’élection générale du 3 novembre et le sortir de la Maison Blanche.

Pete Buttigieg est-il le meilleur candidat pour cette périlleuse mission? Le HuffPost a rassemblé plusieurs forces (et faiblesses) du candidat pour tenter d’y voir plus clair.

Aux antipodes de Trump

Comme il aime souvent le rappeler en campagne, Pete Buttigieg a un atout majeur face à Donald Trump: son CV. Il faut dire qu’on pourrait difficilement imaginer un curriculum plus à l’opposé de celui du président républicain.

Contrairement à l’occupant actuel de la Maison Blanche, le démocrate a tout d’abord de l’expérience politique. Alors que le magnat de l’immobilier était l’hôte d’une téléréalité avant de se présenter à la présidence, Pete Buttigieg vient lui de terminer son 2e mandat de maire. Trump s’est construit dans la plus grande ville du pays qu’est New York, Buttiegieg a fait décoller sa carrière à South Bend, 100.000 habitants, dans l’État de l’Indiana.

Buttigieg met aussi régulièrement en avant son expérience dans l’armée. Il a passé sept mois en Afghanistan, un avantage sur tous ses concurrents démocrates et surtout sur Trump. Ce dernier a en effet réussi à échapper pas mois de cinq fois à la guerre du Vietnam: quatre reports grâce aux études qu’il suivait puis une dispense médicale pour une excroissance osseuse au pied dont les médias n’ont jamais retrouvé de trace.

Diplômé de grandes universités, le candidat a aussi montré qu’il était polyglotte(vidéo ci-dessous). En plus de l’anglais, il peut parler en norvégien, espagnol, italien, arabe, dari ou encore français comme il l’a montré en commentant l’incendie de Notre-Dame. Face à un président qui est parfois pointé du doigt pour la faiblesse du vocabulaire qu’il emploie dans son anglais natal.

 


Journée internationale de commémoration des victimes de l’Holocauste/75e: Détacher le judaïsme d’Israël, c’est en faire un cadavre sans vie dépourvu d’âme (After the Holocaust, any argument that Jews can survive as a religion without a state is profoundly ridiculous)

27 janvier, 2020
Image may contain: 1 person, text

Vous qui aimez l’Éternel, haïssez le mal! Psaume 97: 10
Celui qui est sans foyer n’est pas une personne. Le Talmud
Vers l’Orient compliqué, je volais avec des idées simples. Je savais que, au milieu de facteurs enchevêtrés, une partie essentielle s’y jouait. Il fallait donc en être. Charles de Gaulle (avril 1941)
99% des migrants non européens s’intègrent parfaitement à la nation française (…) l’islam n’est pas une menace pour la France, il est une composante depuis le VIIIe siècle. (…) ce qui se cache aujourd’hui derrière le « souverainisme » désigne en fait la même xénophobie, la même fermeture, la même absence de confiance en soi que les idéologies anti-italienne, antipolonaise, antiarménienne, et antisémites des siècles passés. Jacques Attali
Le souverainisme n’est que le nouveau nom de l’antisémitisme. Jacques Attali
Ecoutez-les : ils se lamentent cette semaine sur la montée de l’antisémitisme ; mais ils s’arrangent pour ne pas désigner les coupables. Ainsi font les faux-culs de l’antiracisme. Leur silence vaut camouflage. Ce qu’ils cherchent à taire est, il est vrai, le résultat de leur idéologie. Car ils savent, ces prétendues belles âmes, que la haine du juif a muté avec leur consentement tacite. Elle n’est plus tant dans la vieille extrême droite nostalgique de fantômes vichyssois qu’au cœur de la nouvelle société arabo-musulmane issue de l’immigration. Un rapport de l’Ifop confirme ces jours-ci qu’un Français juif sur trois se sent menacé au quotidien. 84% des juifs âgés entre 18 et 24 ans disent avoir été victimes d’actes antisémites. Ce mercredi, Emmanuel Macron entame en Israël un court séjour à l’occasion du 75e anniversaire de la libération d’Auschwitz. Mais les nazis d’aujourd’hui n’ont plus rien à voir avec ceux d’hier. Certes, certains attentats commis à l’étranger contre des musulmans par des suprémacistes blancs – notamment ceux de Christchurch (Nouvelle Zélande) le 15 mars 2019 – permettent aux faussaires d’alerter sur le danger d’une renaissance de l’extrême droite. En France, Jacques Attali est de ces intellectuels qui s’emploient à brouiller les réalités. C’est lui qui a déclaré, le 3 octobre 2019 : « 99% des migrants non européens s’intègrent parfaitement à la nation française (…) l’islam n’est pas une menace pour la France, il est une composante depuis le VIIIe siècle ». Dans un tweet du 4 octobre, il a aussi assuré : « Le souverainisme n’est que le nouveau nom de l’antisémitisme ». Mais ceux qui n’osent nommer les ennemis des Juifs avalisent une ignominie. Ils sont les traîtres. Oui, les Français juifs ont été trahis par la République capitularde. Ils ont été trahis par ceux qui avaient pour mission de protéger la nation de cette authentique « lèpre qui monte » qu’est l’antisémitisme. Or, quand Macron emploie cette expression, c’est pour dénoncer les peuples qui se réveillent. Le président porte une lourde responsabilité dans l’occultation des sources. Dans mon essai – Les Traîtres – je rappelle les procédés ignobles qui furent ceux du chef de l’Etat quand il laissa croire, à l’instar de Bernard-Henri Lévy, que l’antisémitisme était porté par les Gilets jaunes et plus généralement par les populistes. Je reprends ici quelques lignes de mon livre : « Quand Macron rend hommage à Simone Veil devant le Panthéon, en juillet 2018, il évoque « les vents mauvais qui à nouveau se lèvent ». Mais il ne vise pas là, comme on pourrait s’y attendre vu les circonstances, la judéophobie islamique qui massacre des innocents en France et ailleurs. Non, il vise les populistes, les eurosceptiques, tous ceux qui ne le suivent pas. Pour la Macronie et ses désinformateurs agréés, l’antisémitisme est, forcément, au centre du mouvement des Gilets jaunes. Le chercheur Jean-Yves Camus a beau objecter : « Le mouvement des Gilets jaunes en tant que tel n’est pas antisémite », le bourrage de crâne élyséen ne changera rien à son réquisitoire hystérique. Voici dont un chef d’Etat qui accuse une partie de son peuple d’être porteur d’une maladie de l’esprit qui touche, en réalité, ceux qui se sont soumis à l’islam le plus rétrograde mais que Macron, en revanche, choisit d’épargner. ». Comment respecter un pouvoir qui démissionne, toute honte bue ? Ivan Rioufol
La participation de Donald Trump [à la ‘Marche pour la vie’] est entièrement opportuniste. Il ne me semble pas qu’il ait des convictions morales solides. Il a découvert que les chrétiens conservateurs évangéliques le soutiennent, ils sont eux-mêmes pro-vie donc finalement il leur donne ce qu’ils veulent. Il est peut-être hypocrite à propos du droit à l’avortement, mais ce qu’il faut retenir, c’est qu’il a nommé des juges pro-vie à la Cour Suprême. Et je préfère avoir un président hypocrite qui reste constant dans sa politique sur l’avortement, qu’un président qui soit sincèrement pro-vie mais qui ne soit pas suffisamment engagé pour cette cause… George W. Bush était fermement engagé pour la vie également. Il ne faut pas oublier que les alliés de Trump comme ses ennemis adorent les exagérations pour parler de lui… Et encore une fois, l’essentiel est dans ce qu’il fait et non pas dans la sincérité de ses actions. (…) l’avortement n’est pas une nouvelle fracture, c’est une ligne de clivage depuis les années 1980 lors de la première campagne électorale de Ronald Reagan. Le fait que l’avortement demeure une fracture depuis toutes ces années est particulièrement intéressant: le pays a beaucoup évolué, même au sujet de la libération sexuelle. Un rapport de 2003 publié dans The Atlantic par Thomas B. Edsall intitulé «Blue Movie» montre de manière éloquente comment les questions de sexualité, incluant l’avortement, permettent de prédire avec précision le parti pour lequel les personnes interrogées vont voter. Depuis, les États-Unis sont devenus plus libéraux sur ces questions. La pornographie s’est répandue et est devenue largement accessible. Le mariage homosexuel a gagné un soutien majoritaire à une vitesse fulgurante et particulièrement auprès des jeunes. Après l’arrêt Obergefell qui déclare le droit constitutionnel du mariage homosexuel, pour les chrétiens la question des droits des homosexuels n’est plus centrée sur l’homosexualité elle-même mais sur la confrontation entre les droits LGBT et la liberté de conscience des croyants. Tous les vieux combats culturels concernant les questions de sexualité ont été perdus par la droite… à l’exception de l’avortement. Étrangement, l’opinion publique à propos de l’avortement n’a pas véritablement évolué depuis 1973. La plupart des Américains sont favorables à l’avortement, qui est légalisé, mais en y appliquant des restrictions. Alors qu’en 1973 l’arrêt Roe v. Wade prévoit un avortement sans restrictions. Ce qui est particulièrement intéressant, c’est que même si les «millennials» sont bien plus libres sur les questions de sexualité que les générations précédentes, et malgré le fait qu’ils sont la génération la plus laïque de l’histoire des États-Unis, l’opposition à un avortement sans restriction demeure forte parmi eux. Je ne suis pas certain d’avoir la clef d’explication de ce phénomène mais je pense que la technologie est un élément de compréhension. Les avancées des échographies ont permis aux gens de véritablement voir pour la première fois ce qui se passe dans l’utérus et de prendre conscience qu’ils n’y voient pas qu’un morceau de chair mais un être humain en train de se développer. Les miracles de la médecine actuelle qui sauve la vie de bébés nés grands prématurés sont plus parlants pour cette génération que les sermons des prêtres. (…) La probabilité de la réélection de Donald Trump dépend de sa capacité à rallier sa base et à convaincre les conservateurs qui rechignent à voter démocrate, mais qui n’avaient pas voté pour lui en 2016 à cause de doutes profonds sur sa personne. Trump n’a pas été aussi mauvais que ce que je craignais. Pour autant je ne crois pas qu’il a été un bon président. Néanmoins, je vais sûrement voter pour lui en 2020, et ce pour une bonne raison: le parti démocrate est extrêmement hostile envers les conservateurs religieux et sociétaux mais aussi envers nos libertés fondamentales. Leur combat pour la théorie du genre et l’extension maximale des droits de la communauté LGBT sont les principaux piliers du programme démocrate. Les activistes progressistes ont désigné les chrétiens conservateurs comme leur principal ennemi. Sur ces questions et sur la protection de la liberté d’expression, on ne peut pas leur faire confiance. Ils sont devenus les ennemis de la liberté. Il est clair que le nombre d’Américains qui est d’accord avec les traditionalistes sur ces questions diminue. Je crois que dans les mois et les décennies à venir, les juges fédéraux conservateurs que Trump a nommés seront les seuls à offrir une véritable sauvegarde de la liberté religieuse aux États-Unis. Les Républicains au Congrès et à la Maison Blanche n’ont pas vraiment agi en faveur du renforcement de la liberté religieuse contre les revendications des droits LGBT. Ils sont terrifiés à l’idée de passer pour bigots. Malheureusement, beaucoup de chrétiens américains ont eu des faux espoirs avec le Grand Old Party, en pensant qu’il suffisait de voter républicain pour gagner sur ces questions. En réalité, dans tous les domaines, académiques, médicaux, juridiques, dans les entreprises, les droits LGBT et l’idéologie du genre sont triomphants. Voter républicain est le seul moyen de ralentir cette «Blitzkrieg» progressiste et peut être à travers des biais juridiques y mettre fin dans le futur. Ce n’est pas grand-chose, mais c’est tout ce que nous pouvons faire pour le moment sur le front politique. (…) Il est vrai que Trump a la présidence, les Républicains tiennent la majorité au Congrès et pour ces deux raisons les Républicains nomment un certain nombre de juges fédéraux. C’est un élément important mais ce n’est pas suffisant face au pouvoir culturel immense que les progressistes détiennent de leur côté. Ils contrôlent les plus grands médias d’information et de divertissement, ils contrôlent les écoles et les universités, la médecine et le droit et aussi de manière assez improbable, les grandes entreprises. L’émergence d’un «woke capitalism», un capitalisme progressiste, est un des faits politiques les plus significatifs de la décennie. La majorité des conservateurs n’a pas conscience de leur puissance ni de la manière dont ils se sont clairement positionnés contre le conservatisme social. Ils sont encore attachés à l’ère reaganienne et à illusion que le monde des affaires est conservateur. Quand Ronald Reagan a été élu président en 1980, il a ouvert une nouvelle ère dans la politique américaine, dominée par la droite, plus précisément par les néolibéraux de la droite. Cette ère s’est achevée avec Obama et Trump, mais l’avenir n’est pas écrit. Si on avait dit à un électeur conservateur au moment de l’investiture de Reagan que 30 ans plus tard le christianisme serait déclinant en Amérique, que le mariage homosexuel et l’adoption seraient légaux, que la pornographie violente serait uniformément répandue et accessible à tous y compris aux enfants grâce aux smartphones, que les médecins seraient autorisés à retirer des poitrines féminines à des jeunes filles pour devenir des hommes transgenres, je pense que cet électeur ne croirait pas une seconde qu’un pays qui autorise cela puisse être véritablement conservateur. Et pourtant c’est la réalité de l’Amérique d’aujourd’hui. Si nous sommes un pays conservateur, pourquoi n’avons-nous pas eu un mouvement comme celui de la Manif pour tous, qui pourtant en France, au pays de la laïcité, a conduit des centaines de milliers de personnes dans les rues de Paris pour manifester? J’ai le sentiment que nous sommes plus un pays houllebecquien, même si les conservateurs ne veulent pas l’admettre. Les chrétiens traditionnels, catholiques, protestants, orthodoxes, ont perdu la guerre culturelle. Nous devons nous préparer à une longue période d’occupation et de résistance. C’est ce que j’appelle choisir l’option bénédictine. Même si mon livre s’est bien vendu aux États-Unis, proportionnellement il a eu plus de succès en Europe. En France, en Italie, en Espagne et dans d’autres pays européens mes lecteurs sont des catholiques de moins de 40 ans. Lorsque vous êtes aussi jeune et que vous allez encore à la messe, vous n’avez pas à être convaincu de la vérité du diagnostic que je porte sur le malaise culturel actuel. De même, vous n’avez pas besoin d’être convaincu de l’impuissance de l’église post-soixante-huitarde dans cette crise. En Amérique, les chrétiens n’ont pas encore vu pleinement cette vérité. Cela nous attend dans cette nouvelle décennie. Ce sera un choc douloureux mais nous ne serons pas en mesure de constituer une vraie résistance tant que nous n’accepterons pas cette réalité. Après Trump, le déluge. Rod Dreher
Le voyage de milliers de réfugiés juifs, en 1947, sur le vieux navire « Exodus » en direction de la Palestine. Otto Preminger retrace la naissance de l’État d’Israël dans une fresque majestueuse portée par Paul Newman et Eva Marie Saint. En 1947, des réfugiés juifs européens en partance pour la Palestine mandataire sont refoulés par les autorités britanniques et placés dans des camps d’internement sur l’île de Chypre. Alors que les Nations unies s’apprêtent à se prononcer sur le plan de partage de la Palestine, Ari ben Canaan, un agent de la Haganah, une organisation paramilitaire sioniste, se fait passer pour un officier anglais et embarque des centaines de réfugiés sur un vieux navire rebaptisé Exodus. Lorsque le subterfuge est découvert, Canaan menace de faire sauter le bateau et obtient ainsi du général Sutherland la levée du blocus britannique. L’infirmière américaine Kitty Fremont, qui s’est prise d’affection pour Karen, une jeune passagère à la recherche de son père biologique, fait partie du voyage vers Haïfa. Tandis que Kitty se rapproche d’Ari, sa protégée s’éprend de Dov, un rescapé d’Auschwitz qui, une fois à terre, s’engage dans les rangs de l’Irgoun, une organisation clandestine aux méthodes violentes… Fondée sur le best-seller de Leon Uris, dont Otto Preminger a confié l’adaptation – créditée – à Dalton Trumbo, scénariste inscrit sur la liste noire d’Hollywood, cette fresque de plus de trois heures entrelace destins individuels et grande histoire, amours contrariées et soubresauts politiques avec une fluidité époustouflante, dénuée de tout effet démonstratif. Si elle s’autorise quelques libertés avec les faits et dédaigne le point de vue des Arabes, cette épopée, tournée dans des décors naturels à Chypre et en Israël, dépeint avec finesse le traumatisme des rescapés de l’Holocauste – personnifié par Dov, interprété par Sal Mineo, dans une bouleversante séquence d’interrogatoire. Elle met aussi l’accent sur la confusion des autorités britanniques, les dissensions entre factions sionistes, les germes du conflit israélo-palestinien… Rythmé par la partition exaltée d’Ernest Gold et magnifiquement interprété par Paul Newman et Eva Maria Saint, l’un des chefs-d’œuvre d’Otto Preminger. Arte
Dans la réalité, le navire fut intercepté en 1947 au large de Haïfa par les autorités britanniques, et ses passagers furent tout d’abord transférés à Port-de-Bouc en France, puis redéployés dans des camps de déportés en Allemagne. Ce n’est qu’en 1948, après l’établissement de l’État d’Israël, qu’une première partie des réfugiés de l’Exodus parvint en Palestine. L’attentat de l’hôtel King David eut lieu avant l’affaire de l’Exodus, en juillet 1946, et non en juillet 1947 comme montré dans le film. Il causa notamment la fin du « Mouvement de la révolte hébraïque », réunion de la Haganah, de l’Irgoun, et du Lehi : la Haganah quitta ce mouvement après l’attentat, en protestation contre cette action. De même, l’attaque de la prison d’Acre eut lieu en mai 1947, toujours avant l’affaire de l’Exodus, et fut montée entièrement par l’Irgoun. La tentative de prise de Safed est montrée comme une attaque arabe alors que la ville a été prise par les forces juives en mai 1947 et sa population arabe expulsée. La principale critique de l’historien Larry Portis est que ce film ne présente qu’un côté du conflit, en nous montrant comment quelques rares membres de la Haganah, peu armés mais courageux et unis, parviennent à empêcher l’attaque d’un kibboutz par des Arabes fanatisés et encadrés par d’anciens soldats du Troisième Reich, alors que les Britanniques refusent d’intervenir. Les Arabes ne tueront que deux personnes autour du camp : l’innocente et très blonde Karen, tuée dans la nuit, et le mukhtar du village arabe voisin, Taha, ami d’enfance d’Ari Ben Canaan. Le village arabe est d’ailleurs mystérieusement abandonné, ce qui permet aux jeunes sionistes de se lancer à la défense de Safed dont on entend l’attaque dans le lointain. Wikipedia
Not only were both film and novel tremendous commercial successes, but they were conceived of as the two axes of a single, mutually reinforcing project.* The idea for the book was suggested to Leon Uris by Dore Schary, a top executive at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM). The motivation behind the project is described by Kathleen Christison. « The idea for the book » she says, « began with a prominent public-relations consultant who in the early 1950s decided that the United States was too apathetic about Israel’s struggle for survival and recognition. » Uris received a contract from Doubleday and went to Israel and Cyprus where he carried out extensive research. The book was published in September, 1958. It was first re-printed in October the following year. By 1964, it had gone through 30 re-printings. This success was undoubtedly helped by the film’s release in 1960, but not entirely, as Uris’s novel was a book-of-the-month club selection in September, 1959 (which perhaps explains the first re-printing). The film was to be made by MGM. But when the time came, the studio hesitated. The project was perhaps too political for the big producers. At this moment Otto Preminger bought the screen rights from MGM. He then produced and directed the film, featuring an all-star cast including Paul Newman, Eva Marie-Saint, Lee J. Cobb, Sal Mineo, Peter Lawford and other box-office draws of the moment. The film also benefited from a lavish production in “superpanavision 70” after having been filmed on location. The music was composed by Ernest Gold, for which he received an Academy Award for the best music score of 1960. The screenplay was written by Dalton Trumbo. In spite of its length—three and a half hours—the film was a tremendous popular and critical success. It is noteworthy that the release of “Exodus” the film in 1960 indicates that its production began upon Exodus the book’s publication. It is reasonable, therefore, to suppose a degree of coordination, in keeping with the origins of the project. In short, it was a major operation which brilliantly succeeded. It has been estimated that in excess of 20 million people have read the novel, and that hundreds of millions have seen the film. Not only was this success a financial bonanza, but its political impact has been equally considerable. There can be little doubt that “Exodus” the film has been one of the most important influences on US perceptions and understanding of the hostilities between the Israeli state and the Palestinian people. It is thusly illuminating to return to the message communicated by this film, in attempting to gage its role in ideological formation. “Exodus” is the story of the Exodus 1947, a ship purchased in the United States and used to transport 4,500 Jewish refugees to Palestine. In reality, the novel and film take great liberties with the original story. Intercepted by the British authorities in the port of Haïfa, the real-life refugees were taken to the French port of Sête, where they were held, becoming the object of intense Zionist agitation and propaganda. Eventually they were transported to Germany and held temporarily in transit camps. Although this incident was used by Uris as the point of departure for his novel, the book is a work of fiction. Not only were the characters invented, but the events did not correspond to reality except in the most general way. In Uris’s narrative, an intercepted ship (not named “Exodus”) is intercepted on the high sea and taken to Cyprus where the passengers are put in camps. Representatives of the Haganah, the secret Jewish army in Palestine, arrive secretly in Cyprus in order to care for, educate and mobilize the refugees. The agent-in-chief is Ari Ben Canaan, played by Paul Newman. Ben Canaan is the son of Barak Ben Canaan, prominent leader of the Yishuv, the Jewish, Zionist community in Palestine. Tricking the British with great intelligence and audacity, Ari Ben Canaan arranges for the arrival of a ship purchased in the United States, on which he places 600 Jewish refugee children—orphans from the Nazi extermination camps and elsewhere. Once the children are on the ship, Ben Canaan names the ship the “Exodus”, and runs up the Zionist flag. He then informs the British authorities that, if the ship is not allowed to depart for Palestine, it will be blown up with all aboard. Before having organized this potential suicide bombing (of himself, the Haganah agents and the 600 children), Ben Canaan has met Kitty Fremont, an American nurse who has become fond of the children and, it must be said, of Ari Ben Canaan. This love interest is carefully intertwined with the major theme: the inexorable need and will of the Jewish people to occupy the soil of Palestine. As it might be expected, the British give in. After some discussion between a clearly anti-semitic officer and those more troubled by the plight of the refugees, the ship is allowed to depart for Palestine. It arrives just before the vote of the United Nations Organization recommending the partition of Palestine between the Jewish and non-Jewish populations. As the partition is refused by the Palestinians and the neighbouring Arab states, war breaks out and the characters all join the ultimately successful effort against what are described as over-whelming odds. Even Kitty and Major Sutherland, the British officer who tipped the balance in favour of releasing the “Exodus,” join the fight. Sutherland’s participation, representing the defection of a British imperialist to the zionist cause, if particularly symbolic. Why did Sutherland jeopardize his position and reputation, and then resign from the army? His humanitarian was forged by the fact that he had seen the Nazi extermination camps when Germany was liberated and, more troubling, his mother was Jewish, although converted to the Church of England. Sutherland has a belated identity crisis which led him, too, to establish himself in the naitive Israel. The other major characters is the film similarly represent the “return” of Jewish people to their “promised land.” For example, Karen, the young girl who Kitty would like to adopt and take to the United States, is a German Jew who was saved by placement in a Danish family during the war. Karen will elect to stay with her people, in spite of her affection for Kitty. Karen is also attached to Dov Landau, a fellow refugee, 17 year-old survivor of the Warsaw ghetto and death camps. Once in Palestine, Dov joins a Zionist terrorist organization (based on the Irgun) and, in the book and film (but not, of course, in reality), places a bomb in the wing of King David Hotel housing the British Command, causing considerable loss of life. The role of human agency, leadership and the nature of decision-making, are a dimension of “Exodus” that is particularly revealing of the propagandistic intent of the film. Most noteworthy is the fact that all the major characters are presented as exceptional people, and all are Jewish, with the exception of Kitty. However, it is not as individuals that the protagonists of the film are important, but rather as representatives of the Jewish people. In this respect, in its effort to portray Jewishness as a special human condition distinguishing Jews and Jewish culture from others, that “Exodus” is most didactic. Ari Ben Canaan is clearly a superior being, but he merely represents the Jewish people. They are, collectively, just as strong, resourceful and determined as Ari. This positive image is highlighted by the portrayal of other ethnic groupings present in the film. The British, for example, are seen, at best, as divided and, at their worst, as degenerate products of national decay and imperialistic racism. The most striking contrast to the collective solidarity, intellectual brilliance, and awesome courage of the Jews is, with the “Arabs.” In spite of their greater numbers, the culture and character of the Arabs show them to be clearly inferior. Ari, who is a “sabra”—a Jewish person born in Palestine—and, as a consequence, understands the Arab character, knows that they are no match for determined Jews. “You turn 400 Arabs loose,” he says, and “they will run in 400 different directions.” This assessment of the motional and intellectual self-possession of the Arabs was made prior to the spectacular jail break at Acre prison. The very indiscipline of the Arabs would cover the escape of the determined Zionists. The Arab leaders are equally incapable of effective action, as they are essentially self-interested and uncaring about their own people. In the end, it is this lack of tolerance and human sympathy in the non Jews that most distinguishes Jews and Arabs. In Exodus the novel, Arabs are constantly, explicitly, and exclusively, described as lazy and shiftless, dirty and deceitful. They have become dependant upon the Jews, and hate them for it. In “Exodus” the film, however, this characterization is not nearly as insisted upon, at least not in the dialogue. Still, way they are portrayed on the screen inspires fear and distrust. (…) What is absent from Preminger’s film—the moral misery, the existential despair, the doubts and confusion of the survivors of the Judeocide—is focused upon in Gitaï’s film. Conversely, what is absent from Gitaï’s film—the expression of Zionist ideals, aspirations and dogma, the glorifications of one ethnic group at the expense of others—is the very point of Preminger’s. This thematic inversion is particularly evident in reference to two aspect of the films: firstly, in the use of names and, secondly, in the dramatic monologues or soliloquies which end both films. In “Exodus”, the use of names for symbolic purposes is immediately evident. “Exodus” refers to the biblical return of the Jews from slavery to the Holy Land—their god-given territory, a sacred site. This sacred site is necessary to Jewish religious observance and identity. Only here, it is explained in “Exodus,” can Jews be safe. Only here, it is asserted, can they throw-off invidious self-perceptions, imposed by antisemitism and assimilation pressures, and become the strong, self-reliant and confident people they really are. This vision of Jewish identity propagated by Zionism is implicitly challenged in Kedma. Again, the title of the film is symbolically significant. “Kedma” means the “East” or “Orient”, or “going towards the East.” The people on the Kedma—Jewish refugees from Europe, speaking European languages and Yiddish—were arriving in another cultural world an alien one, in the East. The result would be more existential disorientation and another ethnically conflictual environment. The difference in perspective manifest in the two films is found also in the names given to the protagonists. In Kedma, an example is given of the abrupt Hebrewization of names as the passengers arrived in the new land, thus highlighting the cultural transformation central to the Zionist project. In “Exodus,” there is much explicit discussion of this aspect of Zionism, and some of the names given to central characters reveal the heavy-handedness of its message. It is, of course, a well-established convention to give evocative names to the protagonists of a literary or cinematographic work. Where would be, for example, Jack London’s The Iron Hell, without his hero, Ernest Everhard? The answer is that the novel might be more impressive without such readily apparent propagandistic trappings. And the same is true for Exodus. Leon Uris’s chief protagonist is Ari Ben Canaan, Hebrew for “Lion, son of Canaan.” This role model for Jewish people everywhere is thusly the direct heir of the ancient Canaanites, precursors of the Jewish community in the land of Palestine. This historical legacy and patrimony established, Paul Newman had only to play the strong fighter—ferocious, hard and wily—with his blond mane cut short, in the military style. The object of Ari’s affections, however ambivalent they may be, is Kitty Fremont, played by Eva Marie Saint. Not only does the pairing of the earnest and ever-hard Ari, the “Lion,” and the compliant but faithful “Kitty” imply a classic gender relationship, but the coupling of this prickly Sabra and the cuddly American symbolizes the special relationship between the United States and native state of Israel that has come to be called the “fifty-first state” of the union. The other major character, played by the baby-faced Sal Mineo, is “Dov Landau,” the 17-year-old survivor of the Warsaw ghetto and Auschwitz. This name evokes the dove of peace and the infancy indirectly evoked by the term “landau” (baby carriage?). The irony is that the angelic Dov, alights on Palestinian soil with the fury of a maddened bird of prey. He is the consummate terrorist—angry and bloodthirsty. Dov’s conversion to Zionism as a collective project, as opposed to a vehicle for his personal vengeance, comes at the end of the story when peace has been (temporarily) achieved through unrelenting combat. Dov then leaves Israel for MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) where h