US Open/50e: Reviens, Arthur, ils sont devenus fous ! (Contrary to Ali or Kaepernick, the Jackie Robinson of tennis stayed committed to respectful dialogue knowing real change came from rational advocacy and hard work not emotional self-indulgence)

9 septembre, 2018

Arthur Ashe participates in a hearing on apartheid, at the United Nations in New York.

Segregation and racism had made me loathe aspects of the white South, but had scarcely left me less of a patriot. In fact, to me and my family, winning a place on our national team would mark my ultimate triumph over all those people who had opposed my career in the South in the name of segregation. (…) Despite segregation, I loved the United States. It thrilled me beyond measure to hear the umpire announce not my name but that of my country: ‘Game, United States,’ ‘Set, United States,’ ‘Game, Set, and Match, United States.’ (…) There were times when I felt a burning sense of shame that I was not with blacks—and whites—standing up to the fire hoses and police dogs. (…) I never went along with the pronouncements of Elijah Muhammad that the white man was the devil and that blacks should be striving for separate development—a sort of American apartheid. That never made sense to me. (…) Jesse, I’m just not arrogant, and I ain’t never going to be arrogant. I’m just going to do it my way. Arthur Ashe
I’ve always believed that every man is my brother. Clay will earn the public’s hatred because of his connections with the Black Muslims. Joe Louis
I’ve been told that Clay has every right to follow any religion he chooses and I agree. But, by the same token, I have every right to call the Black Muslims a menace to the United States and a menace to the Negro race. I do not believe God put us here to hate one another. Cassius Clay is disgracing himself and the Negro race. Floyd Patterson
Clay is so young and has been misled by the wrong people. He might as well have joined the Ku Klux Klan. Floyd Patterson
Bluebirds with bluebirds, red birds with red birds, pigeons with pigeons, eagles with eagles. God didn’t make no mistake! (…) I don’t hate rattlesnakes, I don’t hate tigers — I just know I can’t get along with them. I don’t want to try to eat with them or sleep with them. (…)  I know whites and blacks cannot get along; this is nature. (…) I like what he [George Wallace] says. He says Negroes shouldn’t force themselves in white neighborhoods, and white people shouldn’t have to move out of the neighborhood just because one Negro comes. Now that makes sense. Muhammed Ali
A black man should be killed if he’s messing with a white woman. (…) We’ll kill anybody who tries to mess around with our women. Muhammed Ali
Long before he died, Muhammad Ali had been extolled by many as the greatest boxer in history. Some called him the greatest athlete of the 20th century. Still others, like George W. Bush, when he bestowed the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2005, endorsed Ali’s description of himself as “the greatest of all time.” Ali’s death Friday night sent the paeans and panegyrics to even more exalted heights. Fox Sports went so far as to proclaim Muhammad Ali nothing less than “the greatest athlete the world will ever see.” As a champion in the ring, Ali may have been without equal. But when his idolizers go beyond boxing and sports, exalting him as a champion of civil rights and tolerance, they spout pernicious nonsense. There have been spouters aplenty in the last few days — everyone from the NBA commissioner (“Ali transcended sports with his outsized personality and dedication to civil rights”) to the British prime minister (“a champion of civil rights”) to the junior senator from Massachusetts (“Muhammad Ali fought for civil rights . . . for human rights . . . for peace”). Time for a reality check. It is true that in his later years, Ali lent his name and prestige to altruistic activities and worthy public appeals. By then he was suffering from Parkinson’s disease, a cruel affliction that robbed him of his mental and physical keenness and increasingly forced him to rely on aides to make decisions on his behalf. But when Ali was in his prime, the uninhibited “king of the world,” he was no expounder of brotherhood and racial broad-mindedness. On the contrary, he was an unabashed bigot and racial separatist and wasn’t shy about saying so. In a wide-ranging 1968 interview with Bud Collins, the storied Boston Globe sports reporter, Ali insisted that it was as unnatural to expect blacks and whites to live together as it would be to expect humans to live with wild animals. “I don’t hate rattlesnakes, I don’t hate tigers — I just know I can’t get along with them,” he said. “I don’t want to try to eat with them or sleep with them.” Collins asked: “You don’t think that we can ever get along?” “I know whites and blacks cannot get along; this is nature,” Ali replied. That was why he liked George Wallace, the segregationist Alabama governor who was then running for president. Collins wasn’t sure he’d heard right. “You like George Wallace?” “Yes, sir,” said Ali. “I like what he says. He says Negroes shouldn’t force themselves in white neighborhoods, and white people shouldn’t have to move out of the neighborhood just because one Negro comes. Now that makes sense.” This was not some inexplicable aberration. It reflected a hateful worldview that Ali, as a devotee of Elijah Muhammad and the segregationist Nation of Islam, espoused for years. At one point, he even appeared before a Ku Klux Klan rally. It was “a hell of a scene,” he later boasted — Klansmen with hoods, a burning cross, “and me on the platform,” preaching strict racial separation. “Black people should marry their own women,” Ali declaimed. “Bluebirds with bluebirds, red birds with red birds, pigeons with pigeons, eagles with eagles. God didn’t make no mistake!” In 1975, amid the frenzy over the impending “Thrilla in Manila,” his third title fight with Joe Frazier, Ali argued vehemently in a Playboy interview that interracial couples ought to be lynched. “A black man should be killed if he’s messing with a white woman,” he said. And it was the same for a white man making a pass at a black woman. “We’ll kill anybody who tries to mess around with our women.” But suppose the black woman wanted to be with the white man, the interviewer asked. “Then she dies,” Ali answered. “Kill her too.” Jeff Jacoby
Muhammad Ali was the most controversial boxer in the history of the sport, arguably the most gifted and certainly the best known. His ring glories and his life on the political and racial frontline combine to make him one of the most famous, infamous and discussed figures in modern history. During his life he stood next to Malcolm X at a fiery pulpit, dined with tyrants, kings, crooks, vagabonds, billionaires and from the shell of his awful stumbling silence during the last decade his deification was complete as he struggled with his troubled smile at each rich compliment. (…) He was a one-man revolution and that means he made enemies faster than any boy-fighter – which is what he was when he first became world heavyweight champion – could handle. (…) but (…) His best years as a prize-fighter were denied him and denied us by his refusal to be drafted into the American military system in 1967. At that time he was boxing’s finest fighter, a man so gifted with skills that he knew very little about what his body did in the ring; his instincts, his speed and his developing power at that point of his exile would have ended all arguments over his greatness forever had he been allowed to continue fighting. Ali was out of the ring for three years and seven months and the forced exile took away enough of his skills to deny us the Greatest at his greatest, but it made him the icon he became. “We never saw the best of my guy,” Angelo Dundee told me in Mexico City in 1993. Dundee should know. He had been collecting the fighter’s sweat as the chief trainer from 1960 and would until the ring end in 1981. (…) He had gained universal respect during the break because of his refusal to endorse the bloody conflict in Vietnam, but he often walked a thin line in the 70s with the very people that had been happy to back his cause. He was not as loved then as he is now, and there are some obvious reasons for that. In 1970 there were still papers in Britain that called him Cassius Clay, the birth name he had started to shred the day after beating Sonny Liston for the world title in 1964. In America he still divided the boxing press and the people. In the 70s he attended a Ku Klux Klan meeting, accepted their awards and talked openly and disturbingly about mixed race marriages and a stance he shared with the extremists. His harshest opinions are always overlooked, discarded like his excessive cruelty in the ring, and explained by a misguided concept that everything he said and did, that was either uncomfortable or just wrong, was justifiable under some type of Ali law that insisted there was a twinkle in his eye. There probably was a twinkle in his eye but he had some misguided racist ideas back then and celebrated them. In the ring he had hurt and made people suffer during one-sided fights and spat at the feet of one opponent. He was mean and there is nothing wrong with that in boxing, but he was also cruel to honest fighters, men that had very little of his talent and certainly none of his wealth. The way he treated Joe Frazier before and after their three fights remains a shameful blot on Ali’s legacy. I sat once in dwindling light with Frazier in Philadelphia at the end of three days of talking and listened to his words and watched his tears of hate and utter frustration as he outlined the harm Ali’s words had caused him and his family. Big soft Joe had no problem with the damage Ali’s fists had caused him, that was a fair fight but the verbal slaughter had been a mismatch and recordings of that still make me feel sick. I don’t laugh at that type of abuse. (…) Away from the ring excellence he went to cities in the Middle East to negotiate for the release of hostages and smiled easily when men in masks, carrying AK47s, put blindfolds on him and drove like the lunatics they were through bombed streets. “Hey man, you sure you know where you’re going?” he asked one driver. “I hope you do, coz I can’t see a thing.” He went on too many missions to too many countries for too long, his drive draining his life as he handed out Islamic leaflets. He was often exploited on his many trips, pulled every way and never refusing a request. On a trip to Britain in 2009 he was bussed all over the country for a series of bad-taste dinners that ended with people squatting down next to his wheelchair; Ali’s gaze was off in another realm, but the punters, who had paid hundreds for the sickening pleasure, stuck up their thumbs or made fists for the picture. The great twist in the abhorrent venture was that Ali’s face looked so bad that his head was photo-shopped for a more acceptable Ali face. Who could have possibly sanctioned that atrocity? During his fighting days he had men to protect him, men like Gene Kilroy, the man with the perm, that loved him and helped form a protective guard at his feet to keep the jackals from the meat. When he left the sport and was alone for the first time in the real world, there were people that fought each other to get close, close enough to insert their invisible transfusion tubes deep into his open heart. His daughters started to resurrect their own wall of protection the older they got, switching duties from sitting on Daddy’s lap to watching his back like the devoted sentinels they became. In the end it felt like the whole world was watching his back, watching the last moments under the neon of the King of the World. Steve Bunce
I think Ali is being done a disservice by the way in which he’s these days cast as benign. He was always a lot more complicated than that. (…) Ali has been post-rationalised as a champion of the civil rights movement. But far from promoting the idea of black and white together, his was a much more tricky, divisive politics. John Dower
Far from being embarrassed about sharing jaw-time with the Grand Chief Bigot or whatever the loon in the sheet called himself, Ali boasted about it. The revelation of his cosy chats with white supremacists comes in a television documentary screened on More4. As Ali finds himself overtaken as the most celebrated black American in history, True Stories: Thrilla In Manila provides a timely re-assessment of his politics. (…) Before his third fight with Frazier, Ali was at his most elevated, symbolically as well as in the ring. Hard to imagine when these days he elicits universal reverence, back then he was a figure who divided America, as loathed as he was admired. At the time he was taking his lead from the Nation of Islam, which, in its espousal of a black separatism, found its politics dovetailing with the cross-burning lynch mob out on the political boondocks. Ali was by far the organisation’s most prominent cipher. The film reminds us why. Back then, black sporting prowess reinforced many a prejudiced theory about the black man being good for nothing beyond physical activity. But here was Ali, as quick with his mind as with his fists. When he held court the world listened. Intriguingly, the film reveals, many of his better lines were scripted for him by his Nation of Islam minders. Ferdie Pacheco, the man who converted Ali to the bizarre cause which insisted that a spaceship would imminently arrive in the United States to take the black man to a better place, tells Dower’s cameras that it was he who came up with the line, « No Viet Cong ever called me nigger ». There was never a more succinct summary of America’s hypocrisy in forcing its beleaguered black citizenry to fight in Vietnam. (…) The film suggests it was his opponent who got the blunt end of Ali’s political bludgeon. The pair were once friends and Frazier had supported Ali’s stance on refusing the draft. But leading up to the fight Ali turned on his old mate with a ferocity which makes uncomfortable viewing even 30 years on. Viciously disparaging of Frazier, he calls him an Uncle Tom, a white man’s puppet. Ali riled Frazier to the point where he entered the ring so infuriated that he abandoned his game plan and blindly struck out. So distracted was he by Ali’s politically motivated jibes, he lost. Indeed, what we might be watching in Dower’s film is not so much the apex of Ali’s political potency as the birth of sporting mind games. Jim White
In 1974, in the middle of a Michael Parkinson interview, Muhammad Ali decided to dispense with all the safe conventions of chat show etiquette. “You say I got white friends,” he declared, “I say they are associates.” When his host dared to suggest that the boxer’s trainer of 14 years standing, Angelo Dundee, might be a friend, Ali insisted, gruffly: “He is an associate.” Within seconds, with Parkinson failing to get a word in edgeways, Ali had provided a detailed account of his reasoning. “Elijah Muhammad,” he told the TV viewers of 1970s Middle England, “Is the one who preached that the white man of America, number one, is the Devil!” The whites of America, said Ali, had “lynched us, raped us, castrated us, tarred and feathered us … Elijah Muhammad has been preaching that the white man of America – God taught him – is the blue-eyed, blond-headed Devil!  No good in him, no justice, he’s gonna be destroyed! “The white man is the Devil.  We do believe that.  We know it!” In one explosive, virtuoso performance, Ali had turned “this little TV show” into an exposition of his beliefs, and the beliefs of “two million five hundred” other followers of the radically – to some white minds, dangerously – black separatist religious movement, the Nation of Islam. At the height of his tirade, Ali drew slightly nervous laughter from the studio when he told Parkinson “You are too small mentally to tackle me on anything I represent.” (…) By the time he met Ali in 1962, Malcolm X was Elijah Muhammad’s chief spokesman and most prominent apostle. His belief that violence was sometimes necessary, and the Nation of Islam’s insistence that followers remain separate from and avoid participation in American politics meant that not every civil rights leader welcomed Muhammad Ali joining the movement. “When Cassius Clay joined the Black Muslims [The Nation of Islam],” said Martin Luther King, “he became a champion of racial segregation, and that is what we are fighting against.” The bitter irony is that soon after providing the Nation of Islam with its most famous convert, Malcolm X became disillusioned with the movement.  A trip to Mecca exposed him to white Muslims, shattering his belief that whites were inherently evil.  He broke from the Nation of Islam and toned down his speeches. Ali, though, remained faithful to Elijah Muhammad.  “Turning my back on Malcolm,” he admitted years later, “Was one of the mistakes that I regret most in my life.” (…) By then, though, Ali’s own attitudes to the « blue-eyed devils” had long since mellowed.  In 1975 he converted to the far more conventional Sunni Islam – possibly prompted by the fact that Elijah Muhammad had died of congestive heart failure in the same year, and his son Warith Deen Mohammad had moved the Nation of Islam towards inclusion in the mainstream Islamic community. He rebranded the movement the “World Community of Islam in the West”, only for Farrakhan to break away in 1978 and create a new Nation of Islam, which he claimed remained true to the teachings of “the Master” [Fard]. “The Nation of Islam taught that white people were devils,” he wrote in 2004.  “I don’t believe that now; in fact, I never really believed that. But when I was young, I had seen and heard so many horrible stories about the white man that this made me stop and listen. » The attentive listener to the 1974 interview, might, in fact, have sensed that even then Ali wasn’t entirely convinced about white men being blue-eyed devils. He had, after all, set the bar pretty high for “associates” like Angelo Dundee to become friends. “I don’t have one black friend hardly,” he had said.  “A friend is one who will not even consider [before] giving his life for you.” And, despite calling Parky “the biggest hypocrite in the world” and “a joke”, he could also get a laugh by reassuring the chat show host: “I know you [are] all right.” Adam Lusher
The crime victories of the last two decades, and the moral support on which law and order depends, are now in jeopardy thanks to the falsehoods of the Black Lives Matter movement. Police operating in inner-city neighborhoods now find themselves routinely surrounded by cursing, jeering crowds when they make a pedestrian stop or try to arrest a suspect. Sometimes bottles and rocks are thrown. Bystanders stick cell phones in the officers’ faces, daring them to proceed with their duties. Officers are worried about becoming the next racist cop of the week and possibly losing their livelihood thanks to an incomplete cell phone video that inevitably fails to show the antecedents to their use of force.  (…) As a result of the anti-cop campaign of the last two years and the resulting push-back in the streets, officers in urban areas are cutting back on precisely the kind of policing that led to the crime decline of the 1990s and 2000s. (…) On the other hand, the people demanding that the police back off are by no means representative of the entire black community. Go to any police-neighborhood meeting in Harlem, the South Bronx, or South Central Los Angeles, and you will invariably hear variants of the following: “We want the dealers off the corner.” “You arrest them and they’re back the next day.” “There are kids hanging out on my stoop. Why can’t you arrest them for loitering?” “I smell weed in my hallway. Can’t you do something?” I met an elderly cancer amputee in the Mount Hope section of the Bronx who was terrified to go to her lobby mailbox because of the young men trespassing there and selling drugs. The only time she felt safe was when the police were there. “Please, Jesus,” she said to me, “send more police!” The irony is that the police cannot respond to these heartfelt requests for order without generating the racially disproportionate statistics that will be used against them in an ACLU or Justice Department lawsuit. Unfortunately, when officers back off in high crime neighborhoods, crime shoots through the roof. Our country is in the midst of the first sustained violent crime spike in two decades. Murders rose nearly 17 percent in the nation’s 50 largest cities in 2015, and it was in cities with large black populations where the violence increased the most. (…) I first identified the increase in violent crime in May 2015 and dubbed it “the Ferguson effect.” (…) The number of police officers killed in shootings more than doubled during the first three months of 2016. In fact, officers are at much greater risk from blacks than unarmed blacks are from the police. Over the last decade, an officer’s chance of getting killed by a black has been 18.5 times higher than the chance of an unarmed black getting killed by a cop. (…) We have been here before. In the 1960s and early 1970s, black and white radicals directed hatred and occasional violence against the police. The difference today is that anti-cop ideology is embraced at the highest reaches of the establishment: by the President, by his Attorney General, by college presidents, by foundation heads, and by the press. The presidential candidates of one party are competing to see who can out-demagogue President Obama’s persistent race-based calumnies against the criminal justice system, while those of the other party have not emphasized the issue as they might have. I don’t know what will end the current frenzy against the police. What I do know is that we are playing with fire, and if it keeps spreading, it will be hard to put out. Heather Mac Donald
It’s ironic that Jerry’s longest-lasting legacy is that the big shoe company co-opted his slogan. Nike has Just Do It in all of their ad campaigns.
Sam Leff (Yippie, close friend of Hoffman’s)
Je ne vais pas afficher de fierté pour le drapeau d’un pays qui opprime les Noirs. Il y a des cadavres dans les rues et des meurtriers qui s’en tirent avec leurs congés payés. Colin Kaepernick
Je pense que tous les athlètes, tous les humains et tous les Afro-Américains devraient être totalement reconnaissants et honorés [par les manifestations lancées par les anciens joueurs de la NFL Colin Kaepernick et Eric Reid]. Serena Williams
Je ne suis pas une tricheuse! Vous me devez des excuses! (…) Je ne suis pas une tricheuse! Je suis mère de famille, je n’ai jamais triché de ma vie ! Serena Williams
For her country, Osaka has already succeeded in a major milestone: She is the first Japanese woman to reach the final of any Grand Slam. And she’s currently her country’s top-ranked player. Yet in Japan, where racial homogeneity is prized and ethnic background comprises a big part of cultural belonging, Osaka is considered hafu or half Japanese. Born to a Japanese mother and a Haitian father, Osaka grew up in New York. She holds dual American and Japanese passports, but plays under Japan’s flag. Some hafu, like Miss Universe Japan Ariana Miyamoto, have spoken publicly about the discrimination the term can confer. “I wonder how a hafu can represent Japan,” one Facebook user wrote of Miyamoto, according to Al Jazeera America’s translation. For her part, Osaka has spoken repeatedly about being proud to represent Japan, as well as Haiti. But in a 2016 USA Today interview she also noted, “When I go to Japan people are confused. From my name, they don’t expect to see a black girl.” On the court, Osaka has largely been embraced as one of her country’s rising stars. Off court, she says she’s still trying to learn the language. “I can understand way more Japanese than I can speak,” she said. (…) Earlier this year, Osaka reveled a four-word mantra keeps her steady through tough matches: “What would Serena do?” Her idolization of the 23 Grand Slam-winning titan is well-known. “She’s the main reason why I started playing tennis,” Osaka told the New York Times. Time
Des sportifs semblent désormais plus facilement se mettre en avant pour évoquer leurs convictions, que ce soient des championnes de tennis ou des footballeurs. Mais ces athlètes activistes restent encore minoritaires. Peu ont suivi Kaepernick lorsqu’il s’est agenouillé pendant l’hymne national. La plupart se focalisent sur leur sport, ils ne sont pas vraiment désireux de jouer les trouble-fête. Dans notre culture, ces sportifs sont des dieux, qui peuvent exercer une influence positive. Ils peuvent être un bon exemple d’engagement civique pour des jeunes. Et puis une bonne controverse comme l’affaire Kaepernick permet de pimenter un peu le sport et d’élargir le débat au-delà du jeu. Orin Starn (anthropologue)
Son genou droit posé à terre le 1er septembre 2016 a fait de lui un paria. Ce jour-là, Colin Kaepernick, quarterback des San Francisco 49ers, avait une nouvelle fois décidé de ne pas se lever pour l’hymne national. Coupe afro et regard grave, il était resté dans cette position pour protester contre les violences raciales et les bavures policières qui embrasaient les Etats-Unis. Plus d’un an après, la polémique reste vive. Son boycott lui vaut toujours d’être marginalisé et tenu à l’écart par la Ligue nationale de football américain (NFL). L’affaire rebondit ces jours, à l’occasion des débuts de la saison de la NFL. Sans contrat depuis mars, Colin Kaepernick est de facto un joueur sans équipe, à la recherche d’un nouvel employeur. (…) Plus surprenant, une centaine de policiers new-yorkais ont manifesté ensemble fin août à Brooklyn, tous affublés d’un t-shirt noir avec le hashtag #imwithkap. Le célèbre policier Frank Serpico, 81 ans, qui a dénoncé la corruption généralisée de la police dans les années 1960 et inspiré Al Pacino pour le film Serpico (1973), en faisait partie. Les sportifs américains sont nombreux à afficher leur soutien à Colin Kaepernick. C’est le cas notamment des basketteurs Kevin Durant ou Stephen Curry, des Golden State Warriors. (…) La légende du baseball Hank Aaron fait également partie des soutiens inconditionnels de Colin Kaepernick. Sans oublier Tommie Smith, qui lors des Jeux olympiques de Mexico en 1968 avait, sur le podium du 200 mètres, levé son poing ganté de noir contre la ségrégation raciale, avec son comparse John Carlos. Le geste militant à répétition de Colin Kaepernick, d’abord assis puis agenouillé, a eu un effet domino. Son coéquipier Eric Reid l’avait immédiatement imité la première fois qu’il a mis le genou à terre. Une partie des joueurs des Cleveland Browns continuent, en guise de solidarité, de boycotter l’hymne des Etats-Unis, joué avant chaque rencontre sportive professionnelle. La footballeuse homosexuelle Megan Rapinoe, championne olympique en 2012 et championne du monde en 2015, avait elle aussi suivi la voie de Colin Kaepernick et posé son genou à terre. Mais depuis que la Fédération américaine de football (US Soccer) a édicté un nouveau règlement, en mars 2017, qui oblige les internationaux à se tenir debout pendant l’hymne, elle est rentrée dans le rang. Colin Kaepernick lui-même s’était engagé à se lever pour l’hymne pour la saison 2017. Une promesse qui n’a pas pour autant convaincu la NFL de le réintégrer. Barack Obama avait pris sa défense; Donald Trump l’a enfoncé. En pleine campagne, le milliardaire new-yorkais avait qualifié son geste d’«exécrable», l’hymne et le drapeau étant sacro-saints aux Etats-Unis. Il a été jusqu’à lui conseiller de «chercher un pays mieux adapté». Les chaussettes à motifs de cochons habillés en policiers que Colin Kaepernick a portées pendant plusieurs entraînements – elles ont été très remarquées – n’ont visiblement pas contribué à le rendre plus sympathique à ses yeux. Mais ni les menaces de mort ni ses maillots brûlés n’ont calmé le militantisme de Colin Kaepernick. Un militantisme d’ailleurs un peu surprenant et parfois taxé d’opportunisme: métis, de mère blanche et élevé par des parents adoptifs blancs, Colin Kaepernick n’a rallié la cause noire, et le mouvement Black Lives Matter, que relativement tardivement. Avant Kaepernick, la star de la NBA LeBron James avait défrayé la chronique en portant un t-shirt noir avec en lettres blanches «Je ne peux pas respirer». Ce sont les derniers mots d’un jeune Noir américain asthmatique tué par un policier blanc. Par ailleurs, il avait ouvertement soutenu Hillary Clinton dans sa course à l’élection présidentielle. Timidement, d’autres ont affiché leurs convictions politiques sur des t-shirts, mais sans aller jusqu’au boycott de l’hymne national, un geste très contesté. L’élection de Donald Trump et le drame de Charlottesville provoqué par des suprémacistes blancs ont contribué à favoriser l’émergence de ce genre de protestations. Ces comportements signent un retour du sportif engagé, une espèce presque en voie de disparition depuis les années 1960-1970, où de grands noms comme Mohamed Ali, Billie Jean King ou John Carlos ont porté leur militantisme à bras-le-corps. Au cours des dernières décennies, l’heure n’était pas vraiment à la revendication politique, confirme Orin Starn, professeur d’anthropologie culturelle à l’Université Duke en Caroline du Nord. A partir des années 1980, c’est plutôt l’image du sportif businessman qui a primé, celui qui s’intéresse à ses sponsors, à devenir le meilleur possible, soucieux de ne déclencher aucune polémique. Un sportif lisse avant tout motivé par ses performances et sa carrière. Comme le basketteur Michael Jordan ou le golfeur Tiger Woods. Le Temps
It was an incredible match. I mean, Arthur was an innovator. It was the first time he sort of sat down at the side of the court in between — they didn’t have chairs at the side of the court for a long time; we sort of had to towel off and go on — but he would sit and cover his head with the towel and just think. It was the first time you were conscious of the mental side of tennis. Arthur was instrumental in that. . . . Arthur was a thinker. Virginia Wade
Arthur didn’t need Vietnam. Arthur had his own Vietnam right there in the United States in those days, and some of the things that I saw while I was there — he didn’t need that. The thing that I always think about, and this was always the most important thing in my mind, was that Arthur represented so many possibilities. Arthur was the first to do so much so often that those of us who knew him would say: ‘What’s next? What mountain was he going to climb next?’ Arthur was always different. (…) Growing up, Arthur was a sponge. . . . That was just his nature. He was a voracious reader, and he had to satisfy his intellect. I tell people if Arthur had concentrated on just tennis, he would have been the best in the world. But tennis was a vehicle. . . . He wanted to be able to take kids outside of their environs, outside of their element for a little while and expose them to what they can be. . . . And, let’s face it, most parents don’t have the wherewithal to do that. It’s not easy. What happens is you get somebody like Arthur — and following Arthur, LeBron James is starting to do things — to expose kids. It’s so important that that happens. (…) “Until Arthur came along and Althea came along, tennis was a sport of the elites. Then you get two playground children — one from Harlem, one from Richmond — to break into the bigs. People had to stop and think about that. It opened the doors for other people, and that’s what it was all about. That’s what it was all about for him. Johnnie Ashe
The Apollo program was a national effort that depended on American derring-do and sacrifice. History is usually airbrushed to remove a figure who has fallen out of favor with a dictatorship, or to hide away an episode of national shame. Leave it to Hollywood to erase from a national triumph its most iconic moment. The new movie First Man, a biopic about the Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, omits the planting of the American flag during his historic walk on the surface of the moon. Ryan Gosling, who plays Armstrong in the film, tried to explain the strange editing of his moonwalk: “This was widely regarded in the end as a human achievement. I don’t think that Neil viewed himself as an American hero.” Armstrong was a reticent man, but he surely considered himself an American, and everyone else considered him a hero. (“You’re a hero whether you like it or not,” one newspaper admonished him on the 10th anniversary of the landing.) Gosling added that Armstrong’s walk “transcended countries and borders,” which is literally true, since it occurred roughly 238,900 miles from Earth, although Armstrong got there on an American rocket, walked in an American spacesuit, and returned home to America. (…) It was a chapter in a space race between the United States and the Soviet Union that involved national prestige and the perceived worth of our respective economic and political systems. The Apollo program wasn’t about the brotherhood of man, but rather about achieving a national objective before a hated and feared adversary did. The mission of Apollo 11 was, appropriately, soaked in American symbolism. The lunar module was called Eagle, and the command module Columbia. There had been some consideration to putting up a U.N. flag, but it was scotched — it would be an American flag and only an American flag. (…) There may be a crass commercial motive in the omission — the Chinese, whose market is so important to big films, might not like overt American patriotic fanfare. Neither does much of our cultural elite. They may prefer not to plant the flag — but the heroes of Apollo 11 had no such compunction. National Review
Billed as being based on “a crazy, outrageous incredible true story” about how a black cop infiltrated the KKK, Spike Lee’s BlacKkKlansman would be more accurately described as the story of how a black cop in 1970s Colorado Springs spoke to the Klan on the phone. He pretended to be a white supremacist . . . on the phone. That isn’t infiltration, that’s prank-calling. A poster for the movie shows a black guy wearing a Klan hood. Great starting point for a comedy, but it didn’t happen. The cop who actually attended KKK meetings undercover was a white guy (played by Adam Driver). These led . . . well, nowhere in particular. No plot was foiled. Those meetups mainly revealed that Klansmen behave exactly how you’d expect Klansmen to behave. The movie is a typical Spike Lee joint: A thin story is told in painfully didactic style and runs on far too long. (…)  Washington (son of Denzel) has an easygoing charisma as the unflappable Ron Stallworth, a rookie cop in Colorado Springs who volunteers to go undercover as a detective in 1972, near the height of the Black Power movement and a moment when law enforcement was closely tracking the activities of radicals such as Stokely Carmichael, a.k.a. Kwame Ture, a speech of whose Stallworth says he attended while posing as an ordinary citizen. In the movie, Stallworth experiences an awakening of black pride and falls for a student leader, Patrice (a luminous Laura Harrier, who also played Peter Parker’s girlfriend in Spider-Man: Homecoming), inspiring in him the need to do something for his people. (…) The Klan also turn out to be grandstanders and blowhards given to Carmichael-style paranoid prophecies and seem to hope to troll their enemies into attacking them. When Lee realizes he needs something to actually happen besides racist talk, he turns to a subplot featuring a white-supremacist lady running around with a purse full of C-4 explosive with which she intends to blow up the black radicals. It’s so unconvincing that you watch it thinking, “I really doubt this happened.” It didn’t. The only other tense moment in the film, in which Driver’s undercover cop (who is Jewish) is nearly subjected to a lie-detector test about his religion by a suspicious Klansman, is also fabricated. Lee frames his two camps as opposites, but whether we’re with the black-power types or the white-power yokels, they’re equally wrong about the race war they seem to yearn for. The two sides are equally far from the stable center, the color-blind institution holding society together, which turns out to be . . . the police! After some talk from the radical Patrice (whose character is also a fabrication) about how the whole system is corrupt and she could never date a “pig,” and a scene in which Stallworth implies the police’s code of covering for one another reminds him of the Klan, Lee winds up having the police unite to fight racism, with one bad apple expunged and everybody else on the otherwise all-white force supporting Ron. That Spike Lee has turned in a pro-cop film has to be counted one of the stranger cultural developments of 2018, but Lee seems to have accidentally aligned with cops in the course of issuing an anti-Trump broadside. (…) (See also: an introduction in which Alec Baldwin plays a Southern cracker called Dr. Kennebrew Beauregard who rants about desegregation for several minutes, then is never seen again.) Lee’s other major goal is to link Stallworth’s story to Trumpism using David Duke. Duke, like Trump, said awful things at the time of the Charlottesville murder and played a part in the Stallworth story when the cop was assigned to protect the Klan leader (played by Topher Grace) on a visit to Colorado Springs and later threw his arm around him while posing for a picture. Saying Duke presaged Trump seems like a stretch, though. After all the nudge-nudge MAGA lines uttered by the Klansmen throughout the film, the let-me-spell-it-out-for-you finale, with footage from the Charlottesville white-supremacist rally, seems de trop. BlacKkKlansman was timed to hit theaters one year after the anniversary of the horror in Virginia. That Charlottesville II attracted only two dozen pathetic dorks to the cause of white supremacy would seem to undermine the coda. The Klan’s would-be successors, far from being more emboldened than they have been since Stallworth’s time, appear to be nearly extinct. National review
The all-seeing social-justice eye penetrates every aspect of our lives: sports, movies, public monuments, social media, funerals . . .A definition of totalitarianism might be the saturation of every facet of daily life by political agendas and social-justice messaging. At the present rate, America will soon resemble the dystopias of novels such as 1984 and Brave New World in which all aspects of life are warped by an all-encompassing ideology of coerced sameness. Or rather, the prevailing orthodoxy in America is the omnipresent attempt of an elite — exempt from the consequences of its own ideology thanks to its supposed superior virtue and intelligence — to mandate an equality of result. We expect their 24/7 political messaging on cable-channel news networks, talk radio, or print and online media. And we concede that long ago an NPR, CNN, MSNBC, or New York Times ceased being journalistic entities as much as obsequious megaphones of the progressive itinerary. But increasingly we cannot escape anywhere the lidless gaze of our progressive lords, all-seeing, all-knowing from high up in their dark towers. (…) Americans have long accepted that Hollywood movies no longer seek just to entertain or inform, but to indoctrinate audiences by pushing progressive agendas. That commandment also demands that America be portrayed negatively — or better yet simply written out of history. Take the new film First Man, about the first moon landing. Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong became famous when he emerged from The Eagle, the two-man lunar module, and planted an American flag on the moon’s surface. Yet that iconic act disappears from the movie version. (At least Ryan Gosling, who plays Armstrong, does not walk out of the space capsule to string up a U.N. banner.) Gosling claimed that the moon landing should not be seen as an American effort. Instead, he advised, it should be “widely regarded as a human achievement” — as if any nation’s efforts or the work of the United Nations in 1969 could have pulled off such an astounding and dangerous enterprise. I suppose we are to believe that Gosling’s Canada might just as well have built a Saturn V rocket. (…) Sports offers no relief. It is now no more a refuge from political indoctrination than is Hollywood. Yet it is about as difficult to find a jock who can pontificate about politics as it is to encounter a Ph.D. or politico who can pass or pitch. The National Football League, the National Basketball Association, and sports channels are now politicalized in a variety of ways, from not standing up or saluting the flag during the National Anthem to pushing social-justice issues as part of televised sports analysis. What a strange sight to see tough sportsmen of our Roman-style gladiatorial arenas become delicate souls who wilt on seeing a dreaded hand across the heart during the playing of the National Anthem. Even when we die, we do not escape politicization. At a recent eight-hour, televised funeral service for singer Aretha Franklin, politicos such as Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton went well beyond their homages into political harangues. Pericles or Lincoln they were not. (…) Politics likewise absorbed Senator John McCain’s funeral the next day. (…) Even the long-ago dead are fair game. Dark Age iconoclasm has returned to us with a fury. Any statue at any time might be toppled — if it is deemed to represent an idea or belief from the distant past now considered racist, sexist, or somehow illiberal. Representations of Columbus, the Founding Fathers, and Confederate soldiers have all been defaced, knocked down, or removed. The images of mass murderers on the left are exempt, on the theory that good ends always allow a few excessive means. So are the images and names of robber barons and old bad white guys, whose venerable eponymous institutions offer valuable brands that can be monetized. At least so far, we are not rebranding Stanford and Yale with indigenous names. Victor Davis Hanson
Johnnie Ashe, like Wade, remembers his brother as an intellectual and an innovator, as someone who was meant to change the world. That’s why, when Johnnie came to understand that the military wouldn’t send two brothers into active duty in a war zone at the same time, he volunteered for a second tour in Vietnam. He was three months away from coming home.Since Johnnie stayed on active duty, Arthur could compete for both the U.S. amateur and U.S. Open championships in 1968. He is the only person to have won both. Ashe had many projects that helped extend his legacy beyond that of a pioneering tennis player who won 33 career singles championships; ever the thinker, bringing tennis and educational opportunities to youths was Ashe’s passion. He helped found the National Junior Tennis & Learning network in 1968, a grass-roots organization designed to make tennis more accessible. Today, the NJTL receives significant funding from the USTA. The Washington Post
Arthur Ashe always had an exquisite sense of timing, whether he was striking a topspin backhand or choosing when to speak out for liberty and justice for all. So we shouldn’t be surprised that the 50th anniversary of his victory at the first U.S. Open — a milestone to be celebrated on Saturday at the grand stadium bearing his name — coincides with a national conversation on the First Amendment rights and responsibilities of professional athletes. Mr. Ashe has been gone for 25 years, struck down at the age of 49 by AIDS, inflicted by an H.I.V.-tainted blood transfusion. But the example he set as a champion on and off the court has never been more relevant. As Colin Kaepernick, LeBron James and others strive to use their athletic stardom as a platform for social justice activism, they might want to look back at what this soft-spoken African-American tennis star accomplished during the age of Jim Crow and apartheid. (…) He began his career as the Jackie Robinson of men’s tennis — a vulnerable and insecure racial pioneer instructed by his coaches to hold his tongue during a period when the success of desegregation was still in doubt. At the same time, Mr. Ashe’s natural shyness and deferential attitude toward his elders and other authority figures all but precluded involvement in the civil rights struggle and other political activities during his high school and college years. The calculus of risk and responsibility soon changed, however, as Mr. Ashe reinvented himself as a 25-year-old activist-in-training during the tumultuous year of 1968. With his stunning victory in September at the U.S. Open, where he overcame the best pros in the world as a fifth-seeded amateur, he gained a new confidence that affected all aspects of his life. Mr. Ashe’s political transformation had begun six months earlier when he gave his first public speech, a discourse on the potential importance of black athletes as community leaders, delivered at a Washington forum hosted by the Rev. Jefferson Rogers, a prominent black civil rights leader Mr. Ashe had known since childhood. Mr. Rogers had been urging Mr. Ashe to speak out on civil rights issues for some time, and when he finally did so, it released a spirit of civic engagement that enveloped his life. “This is the new Arthur Ashe,” the reporter Neil Amdur observed in this paper, “articulate, mature, no longer content to sit back and let his tennis racket do the talking.” In part, Mr. Ashe’s new attitude reflected a determination to make amends for his earlier inaction. “There were times, in fact,” he recalled years later, “when I felt a burning sense of shame that I was not with other blacks — and whites — standing up to the fire hoses and the police dogs, the truncheons, bullets and bombs.” He added: “As my fame increased, so did my anguish.” During the violent spring of 1968, the assassinations of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., whom Mr. Ashe had come to admire above all other black leaders, and Senator Robert F. Kennedy, whom he had supported as a presidential candidate, shook Mr. Ashe’s faith in America. But he refused to surrender to disillusionment. Instead he dedicated himself to active citizenship on a level rarely seen in the world of sports. His activism began with an effort to expand economic and educational opportunities for young urban blacks, but his primary focus soon turned to the liberation of black South Africans suffering under apartheid. Later he supported a wide variety of causes, playing an active role in campaigns for black political power, high educational standards for college athletes, criminal justice reform, equality of the sexes and AIDS awareness. He also became involved in numerous philanthropic enterprises. By the end of his life, Mr. Ashe’s success on the court was no longer the primary source of his celebrity. He had become, along with Muhammad Ali, a prime example of an athlete who transcended the world of sports. In 2016, President Barack Obama identified Mr. Ali and Mr. Ashe as the sports figures he admired above all others. While noting the sharp contrast in their personalities, he argued that both men were “transformational” activists who pushed the nation down the same path to freedom and democracy. Mr. Ashe practiced his own distinctive brand of activism, one based on unemotional appeals to common sense and enlightened philosophical principles as simple as the Golden Rule. He had no facility for, and little interest in, using agitation and drama to draw attention to causes, no matter how worthy they might be. A champion of civility, he always kept his cool and never raised his voice in anger or frustration. Viewing emotional appeals as self-defeating and even dangerous, he relied on reasoned persuasion derived from careful preparation and research. Mr. Ashe preferred to make a case in written form, or as a speaker on the college lecture circuit or as a witness before the United Nations. His periodic opinion pieces in The Washington Post and other newspapers tackled a number of thorny issues related to sports and the broader society, including upholding high academic standards for college athletic eligibility and the expulsion of South Africa from international athletic competition. In the 1980s, he devoted several years to researching and writing “A Hard Road to Glory,” a groundbreaking three-volume history of African-American athletes. In retirement Mr. Ashe became a popular tennis broadcaster known for his clever quips, yet as an activist he never resorted to sound bites that excited audiences with reductionist slogans. Often working behind the scenes, he engaged in high-profile public debate only when he felt there was no other way to advance his point of view. Suspicious of quick fixes, he advocated incremental and gradual change as the best guarantor of true progress. Yet he did not let this commitment to long-term solutions interfere with his determination to give voice to the voiceless. Known as a risk taker on the court, he was no less bold off the court, where he never shied away from speaking truth to power. He was arrested twice, in 1985 while participating in an anti-apartheid demonstration in front of the South African Embassy and in 1992 while picketing the White House in protest of the George H.W. Bush administration’s discriminatory policies toward Haitian refugees. The first arrest embarrassed the American tennis establishment, which soon removed him from his position as captain of the U.S. Davis Cup team, and the second occurred during the final months of his life as he struggled with the ravages of AIDS. In both cases he accepted the consequences of his principled activism with dignity. Mr. Ashe was a class act in every way, a man who practiced what he preached without being diverted by the temptations of power, fame or fortune. When we place his approach to dissent and public debate in a contemporary frame, it becomes obvious that his legacy is the antithesis of the scorched-earth politics of Trumpism. If Mr. Ashe were alive today, he would no doubt be appalled by the bullying tactics and insulting rhetoric of a president determined to punish athletes who have the courage and audacity to speak out against police brutality toward African-Americans. And yet we can be equally sure that Mr. Ashe would honor his commitment to respectful dialogue, refusing to lower himself to the president’s level of unrestrained invective. (…) Mr. Ashe would surely be gratified that to date, this high road has led to more protest, not less, confirming his belief that real change comes from rational advocacy and hard work, not emotional self-indulgence. As we celebrate his remarkable life and legacy a quarter-century after his death, we can be confident that Mr. Ashe would rush to join today’s activists in spirit and solidarity, solemnly but firmly taking a knee for social justice. Raymond Arsenault

Reviens, Arthur, Ils sont devenus fous !

En ces temps devenus fous …

Où après les médias et, enterrements compris, la haute fonction publique

Et, entre le négationnisme (pas de drapeau américain sur la lune) et la réécriture de l’histoire (les quelques mois d’infiltration du KKK par une équipe de policiers noir et blanc dans une petite ville du Colrado au début des années 70 transformés en film blaxploitation avec toute l’explosive subtilité d’un Spike Lee), Hollywood …

Comme au niveau des grosses multinationales du matériel de sport à l’occasion du 30e anniversaire d’un slogan de toute évidence fauché au yippie Jerry Rubin

Mais faussement attribué (droits obligent ?) aux dernière paroles du tristement célèbre premier exécuté (volontaire et déjà gratifié par Norman Mailer de son panégyrique littéraire) du retour de la peine de mort aux Etats-Unis …

La marchandisation d’un joueur (métis multimillionnaire abandonné par son père noir et adopté par des parents blancs) dont le seul titre de gloire est, outre ses chaussettes anti-policiers et ses tee-shirts à la gloire de Castro, son refus d’honorer le drapeau de son pays pour prétendument dénoncer les brutalités policières contre les noirs …

Tout semble dorénavant permis pour dénigrer l’actuel président américain et les forces de police …

Comment ne pas repenser …

En ce 50e anniversaire …

De la première victoire, dès la création du premier tournoi professionnel, d’un joueur de tennis noir à une épreuve de Grand chelem …

A la figure hélas oubliée d’un Arthur Ashe

Qui, de l’apartheid sud-africain à la défense des réfugiés haïtiens ou des enfants atteints du SIDA jusqu’à l’ONU …

Et loin des outrances racistes à l’époque d’un Mohamed Ali …

Ou de la violence actuelle (et surtout de ses conséquences sur les plus démunis quoi qu’en dise son biographe) du collectif Black lives matter que prétend défendre un Colin Kaeperinck …

Et sans parler du lamentable scandale, au nom d’un prétendu sexisme et face à une improbable nippo-haïtienne élevée aux Etats-Unis mais ne parlant pas japonais, de Serena Williams en finale du même US Open hier …

Avait toujours su joindre l’intelligence et le respect des autres comme de son propre pays à la plus redoutable des efficacités ?

What Arthur Ashe Knew About Protest

The tennis great was committed to respectful dialogue, refusing to lower himself to the level of invective

Raymond Arsenault

Mr. Arsenault is a biographer of Arthur Ashe.

Arthur Ashe always had an exquisite sense of timing, whether he was striking a topspin backhand or choosing when to speak out for liberty and justice for all. So we shouldn’t be surprised that the 50th anniversary of his victory at the first U.S. Open — a milestone to be celebrated on Saturday at the grand stadium bearing his name — coincides with a national conversation on the First Amendment rights and responsibilities of professional athletes.

Mr. Ashe has been gone for 25 years, struck down at the age of 49 by AIDS, inflicted by an H.I.V.-tainted blood transfusion. But the example he set as a champion on and off the court has never been more relevant. As Colin Kaepernick, LeBron James and others strive to use their athletic stardom as a platform for social justice activism, they might want to look back at what this soft-spoken African-American tennis star accomplished during the age of Jim Crow and apartheid.

The first thing they will discover is that, like most politically motivated athletes, Mr. Ashe turned to activism only after his formative years as an emerging sports celebrity. He began his career as the Jackie Robinson of men’s tennis — a vulnerable and insecure racial pioneer instructed by his coaches to hold his tongue during a period when the success of desegregation was still in doubt. At the same time, Mr. Ashe’s natural shyness and deferential attitude toward his elders and other authority figures all but precluded involvement in the civil rights struggle and other political activities during his high school and college years.

The calculus of risk and responsibility soon changed, however, as Mr. Ashe reinvented himself as a 25-year-old activist-in-training during the tumultuous year of 1968. With his stunning victory in September at the U.S. Open, where he overcame the best pros in the world as a fifth-seeded amateur, he gained a new confidence that affected all aspects of his life.

Mr. Ashe’s political transformation had begun six months earlier when he gave his first public speech, a discourse on the potential importance of black athletes as community leaders, delivered at a Washington forum hosted by the Rev. Jefferson Rogers, a prominent black civil rights leader Mr. Ashe had known since childhood. Mr. Rogers had been urging Mr. Ashe to speak out on civil rights issues for some time, and when he finally did so, it released a spirit of civic engagement that enveloped his life. “This is the new Arthur Ashe,” the reporter Neil Amdur observed in this paper, “articulate, mature, no longer content to sit back and let his tennis racket do the talking.”

In part, Mr. Ashe’s new attitude reflected a determination to make amends for his earlier inaction. “There were times, in fact,” he recalled years later, “when I felt a burning sense of shame that I was not with other blacks — and whites — standing up to the fire hoses and the police dogs, the truncheons, bullets and bombs.” He added: “As my fame increased, so did my anguish.”

During the violent spring of 1968, the assassinations of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., whom Mr. Ashe had come to admire above all other black leaders, and Senator Robert F. Kennedy, whom he had supported as a presidential candidate, shook Mr. Ashe’s faith in America. But he refused to surrender to disillusionment. Instead he dedicated himself to active citizenship on a level rarely seen in the world of sports.

His activism began with an effort to expand economic and educational opportunities for young urban blacks, but his primary focus soon turned to the liberation of black South Africans suffering under apartheid. Later he supported a wide variety of causes, playing an active role in campaigns for black political power, high educational standards for college athletes, criminal justice reform, equality of the sexes and AIDS awareness. He also became involved in numerous philanthropic enterprises.

By the end of his life, Mr. Ashe’s success on the court was no longer the primary source of his celebrity. He had become, along with Muhammad Ali, a prime example of an athlete who transcended the world of sports. In 2016, President Barack Obama identified Mr. Ali and Mr. Ashe as the sports figures he admired above all others. While noting the sharp contrast in their personalities, he argued that both men were “transformational” activists who pushed the nation down the same path to freedom and democracy.

Mr. Ashe practiced his own distinctive brand of activism, one based on unemotional appeals to common sense and enlightened philosophical principles as simple as the Golden Rule. He had no facility for, and little interest in, using agitation and drama to draw attention to causes, no matter how worthy they might be. A champion of civility, he always kept his cool and never raised his voice in anger or frustration. Viewing emotional appeals as self-defeating and even dangerous, he relied on reasoned persuasion derived from careful preparation and research.

Mr. Ashe preferred to make a case in written form, or as a speaker on the college lecture circuit or as a witness before the United Nations. His periodic opinion pieces in The Washington Post and other newspapers tackled a number of thorny issues related to sports and the broader society, including upholding high academic standards for college athletic eligibility and the expulsion of South Africa from international athletic competition. In the 1980s, he devoted several years to researching and writing “A Hard Road to Glory,” a groundbreaking three-volume history of African-American athletes.

In retirement Mr. Ashe became a popular tennis broadcaster known for his clever quips, yet as an activist he never resorted to sound bites that excited audiences with reductionist slogans. Often working behind the scenes, he engaged in high-profile public debate only when he felt there was no other way to advance his point of view. Suspicious of quick fixes, he advocated incremental and gradual change as the best guarantor of true progress.

Yet he did not let this commitment to long-term solutions interfere with his determination to give voice to the voiceless. Known as a risk taker on the court, he was no less bold off the court, where he never shied away from speaking truth to power.

He was arrested twice, in 1985 while participating in an anti-apartheid demonstration in front of the South African Embassy and in 1992 while picketing the White House in protest of the George H.W. Bush administration’s discriminatory policies toward Haitian refugees. The first arrest embarrassed the American tennis establishment, which soon removed him from his position as captain of the U.S. Davis Cup team, and the second occurred during the final months of his life as he struggled with the ravages of AIDS. In both cases he accepted the consequences of his principled activism with dignity.

Mr. Ashe was a class act in every way, a man who practiced what he preached without being diverted by the temptations of power, fame or fortune. When we place his approach to dissent and public debate in a contemporary frame, it becomes obvious that his legacy is the antithesis of the scorched-earth politics of Trumpism. If Mr. Ashe were alive today, he would no doubt be appalled by the bullying tactics and insulting rhetoric of a president determined to punish athletes who have the courage and audacity to speak out against police brutality toward African-Americans. And yet we can be equally sure that Mr. Ashe would honor his commitment to respectful dialogue, refusing to lower himself to the president’s level of unrestrained invective.

Not all of the activist athletes involved in public protests during the past two years have followed Mr. Ashe’s model of restraint and civility. But many have made a good-faith effort to do so, resisting the temptation to respond in kind to Mr. Trump’s intemperate attacks on their personal integrity and patriotism. In particular, several of the most visible activists — including Mr. Kaepernick, Stephen Curry and Mr. James — have kept their composure and dignity even as they have borne the brunt of Mr. Trump’s racially charged Twitter storms and stump speeches. By and large, they have wisely taken the same high road that Mr. Ashe took two generations ago, eschewing the politics of character assassination while keeping their eyes on the prize.

Mr. Ashe would surely be gratified that to date, this high road has led to more protest, not less, confirming his belief that real change comes from rational advocacy and hard work, not emotional self-indulgence. As we celebrate his remarkable life and legacy a quarter-century after his death, we can be confident that Mr. Ashe would rush to join today’s activists in spirit and solidarity, solemnly but firmly taking a knee for social justice.

Raymond Arsenault is the author of “Arthur Ashe: A Life.”

Voir aussi:

We remember Ashe for his electrifying talent. But he had a social conscience that was way ahead of its time

No one had expected a fifth-seeded, 25-year-old amateur on temporary leave from the army to come out on top in a field that included the world’s best pro players. The era of Open tennis, in which both amateurs and professionals competed, was only four months old. Many feared that mixing the two groups was a mistake. Yet Ashe, with help from a string of upsets that eliminated the top four seeds, defeated the Dutchman Tom Okker in the championship match – in the process becoming the first black man to reach the highest echelon of amateur tennis.

As an amateur, Ashe could not accept the champion’s prize money of $14,000. But the lost income proved inconsequential in light of the other benefits that came in the wake of his historic performance. He became not only as a bona fide sports star but also a citizen activist with important things to contribute to society and a platform to do so. Ashe began to speak out on questions of social and economic justice.

Earlier in the year, the assassinations of Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy had shocked Ashe out of his youthful reticence to become involved in the struggle for civil rights. Over the next 25 years, he worked tirelessly as an advocate for civil and human rights, a role model for athletes interested in more than fame and fortune.

“From what we get, we can make a living,” he counseled. “What we give, however, makes a life.”

Ashe’s 1968 win was truly impressive but his finest moment at the Open came, arguably, in 1992, four and a half months after the public disclosure that he had Aids and nearly a decade after he contracted HIV during a blood transfusion. If we apply Ashe’s professed standard of success, which placed social and political reform well above athletic achievement, the 25th US Open, not the first, is the tournament most deserving of commemoration. Without picking up a racket, he managed to demonstrate a moral leadership that far transcended the world of sports.

On 30 August, on the eve of the first round, a substantial portion of the professional tennis community rallied behind the stricken champion’s effort to raise funds for the new Arthur Ashe Foundation for the Defeat of Aids (AAFDA). The celebrity-studded event, the Arthur Ashe Aids Tennis Challenge, drew a huge crowd and nine of the game’s biggest stars. The support was unprecedented, leading one reporter to marvel: “The tennis world is known by and large as a selfish, privileged world, one crammed with factions and egos. So what is happening at the Open is unthinkable: gender and nationality and politics will take a back seat to a full-fledged effort to support Ashe.”

Participants included CBS correspondent Mike Wallace, then New York City mayor David Dinkins and two of tennis’s biggest celebrities, the up-and-coming star Andre Agassi and the four-time Open champion John McEnroe, who entertained the crowd by clowning their way through a long set. To Ashe’s delight, McEnroe, once known as the “Superbrat” of tennis, even put on a joke tantrum against the umpire.

Several days earlier, on a more serious note, McEnroe had spoken for many of his peers in explaining why he felt passionate about Ashe’s cause.

“It’s not something you can even think twice about when you’re asked to help,” he insisted. “The fact that the disease has happened to a tennis player certainly strikes home with all of us. I’m just glad someone finally organized the tennis community like this, and obviously it took someone like Arthur to do it.”

Ashe was thrilled with the response to the Aids Challenge, which raised $114,000 for the AAFDA. One man walked up and casually handed him a personal check for $25,000. Later in the week the foundation received $30,000 from an anonymous donor in North Carolina. Such generosity was what Ashe had hoped to inspire, and when virtually all of the US Open players complied with the foundation’s request to attach a special patch – “a red ribbon centered by a tiny yellow tennis ball” – to their outfits as a symbolic show of support for Aids victims, he knew he had started something important.

This awakening of social responsibility – among a group of athletes not typically known for political courage – was deeply gratifying to a man whose previous calls to action had been largely ignored. Seven years earlier he was fired as captain of the US Davis Cup team in part because leaders were uncomfortable with his growing political activism, especially his arrest during an anti-apartheid demonstration outside a South African embassy. This rebuke did not shake his belief in active citizenship as a bedrock principle, however, and as the 1992 Open drew to a close he demonstrated just how seriously he regarded personal commitment to social justice.

When his lifelong friend and anti-apartheid ally Randall Robinson asked Ashe to come to Washington for a protest march he immediately said yes, even though the march was scheduled four days before the end of the Open. The march concerned an issue that had become deeply important to Ashe: the Bush administration’s discriminatory treatment of Haitian refugees seeking asylum in the US. With more than 2,000 other protesters, Ashe gathered in front of the White House to seek justice for the growing mass of Haitian “boat people” being forcibly repatriated without a hearing.

In stark contrast to the warm reception accorded Cuban refugees fleeing Castro’s communist regime, the dark-skinned boat people were denied refuge due to a blanket ruling that Haitians, unlike Cubans, were economic migrants undeserving of political asylum. To Ashe and the organizers of the White House protest, this double standard – which flew in the face of the political realities of both islands – smacked of racism.

“The argument incensed me,” Ashe wrote. “Undoubtedly, many of the people picked up were economic refugees, but many were not.”

Ashe knew a great deal about Haiti: he had read widely and deeply about the island’s troubled past; he had visited on several occasions; he and his wife had even honeymooned there in 1977. More recently, he had monitored the truncated career of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, a self-styled champion of the poor whose regime was toppled by a military coup with the tacit support of the Bush administration. Ashe felt compelled to speak out.

“I was prepared to be arrested to protest this injustice,” he said.

Considering his medical condition, he had no business being at a protest; certainly no one would have blamed him if he had begged off. No one, that is, but himself. At the appointed hour, he arrived at the protest site in jeans, T-shirt and straw hat, a human scarecrow reduced to 128lbs on his 6ft 1in frame, but resolute as ever. Big, bold letters on his shirt read: “Haitians Locked Out Because They’re Black.”

The throng included a handful of celebrities, but Ashe alone represented the sports world. He didn’t want to be treated as a celebrity, of course; he simply wanted to make a statement about the responsibilities of democratic citizenship. While he knew his presence was largely symbolic, he hoped to set an example.

Putting oneself at risk for a good cause, he assured one reporter, “does wonders for your outlook … Marching in a protest is a liberating experience. It’s cathartic. It’s one of the great moments you can have in your life.”

Since federal law prohibited large demonstrations close to the White House, the organizers expected arrests. The police did not disappoint: nearly 100 demonstrators, including Ashe, were arrested, handcuffed and carted away. Ashe, despite his physical condition, asked for and received no favors. After paying his fine and calling his wife Jeanne to assure her he was all right, he took the late afternoon train back to New York.

The next night, while sitting on his couch watching the nightly news, he felt a sharp pain in his sternum. Tests revealed he had suffered a mild heart attack, the second of his life. Prior to the trip to Washington, Jeanne had worried something like this might happen. But she knew her husband was never one to play it safe when something important was on the line.

On the tennis court, he had always been prone to fits of reckless play, going for broke with shots that defied logic or sense. Off the court, particularly in his later years, Arthur Ashe almost always went full-out. He did so not because he craved activity for its own sake but rather because he wanted to live a virtuous and productive life. Even near the end, weakened by disease, he still wanted to make a difference. And he did, as he always did.

    • Raymond Arsenault, the John Hope Franklin professor of southern history at the University of South Florida, St Petersburg, is the author of Arthur Ashe: A Life, recently published by Simon & Schuster

Voir également:

‘Arthur was always different’: Reflecting on Ashe’s legacy, 50 years after U.S. Open win

September 3, 2018

Virginia Wade has many memories of Arthur Ashe, but the one that sticks in her mind isn’t from 50 years ago in New York, when in 1968 they won the first U.S. Open singles titles and Ashe became the first African American man to win a Grand Slam championship. Her favorite memory is from seven years later at Wimbledon.

Ashe claimed the last of his three major titles in England in 1975 in a match against heavy favorite Jimmy Connors. Wade remembers cool, unruffled Ashe’s daring tennis against the 22-year-old Connors, who hollered back at the crowd when it shouted encouragement. She also remembers the changeovers.

“It was an incredible match. I mean, Arthur was an innovator,” Wade, 73, said last week. “It was the first time he sort of sat down at the side of the court in between — they didn’t have chairs at the side of the court for a long time; we sort of had to towel off and go on — but he would sit and cover his head with the towel and just think. It was the first time you were conscious of the mental side of tennis. Arthur was instrumental in that. . . . Arthur was a thinker.”

As the U.S. Open celebrates its 50th anniversary, the U.S. Tennis Association is also honoring Ashe for all that he was: thinker, pioneer, activist, champion.

The 1968 winner already has a significant presence at Billie Jean King National Tennis Center — the facility’s biggest and most prestigious stage is named for him — but this fortnight, his visage is inescapable. There is a special photo exhibit on the walkway between Court 17 and the Grandstand, and a special “Arthur Ashe legacy booth” decked out in the colors of UCLA, his alma mater. Fans can be seen walking around sporting white T-shirts featuring a picture of Ashe wearing sunglasses, cool as can be.

At the start of Monday’s evening session, Lt. Gen. Darryl Williams gave Ashe’s younger brother Johnnie a folded American flag in honor of his brother, who died in 1993 from AIDS-related pneumonia after contracting the disease from a tainted blood transfusion. Ashe was an Army lieutenant when he won the U.S. Open as an amateur in 1968; Johnnie, 70, was in the Marine Corps for 20 years.

Johnnie Ashe, like Wade, remembers his brother as an intellectual and an innovator, as someone who was meant to change the world. That’s why, when Johnnie came to understand that the military wouldn’t send two brothers into active duty in a war zone at the same time, he volunteered for a second tour in Vietnam. He was three months away from coming home.

“Arthur didn’t need Vietnam. Arthur had his own Vietnam right there in the United States in those days, and some of the things that I saw while I was there — he didn’t need that,” Johnnie said Monday night. “The thing that I always think about, and this was always the most important thing in my mind, was that Arthur represented so many possibilities. Arthur was the first to do so much so often that those of us who knew him would say: ‘What’s next? What mountain was he going to climb next?’ Arthur was always different.”

Since Johnnie stayed on active duty, Arthur could compete for both the U.S. amateur and U.S. Open championships in 1968. He is the only person to have won both.

Ashe had many projects that helped extend his legacy beyond that of a pioneering tennis player who won 33 career singles championships; ever the thinker, bringing tennis and educational opportunities to youths was Ashe’s passion. He helped found the National Junior Tennis & Learning network in 1968, a grass-roots organization designed to make tennis more accessible. Today, the NJTL receives significant funding from the USTA.

“Growing up, Arthur was a sponge. . . . That was just his nature,” Johnnie Ashe said. “He was a voracious reader, and he had to satisfy his intellect. I tell people if Arthur had concentrated on just tennis, he would have been the best in the world. But tennis was a vehicle. . . . He wanted to be able to take kids outside of their environs, outside of their element for a little while and expose them to what they can be. . . . And, let’s face it, most parents don’t have the wherewithal to do that. It’s not easy. What happens is you get somebody like Arthur — and following Arthur, LeBron James is starting to do things — to expose kids. It’s so important that that happens.”

Billie Jean King called the NJTL one of the best things that ever happened to the sport.

“Arthur and I had many conversations over the years about how to we make tennis better — for the players, the fans and the sport,” King said in an email Monday. “We both thought tennis needed to be more hospitable, and for Arthur a big part of that was improving access and opportunity to our sport for everyone. Arthur, and Althea Gibson before him, opened doors for people of color in our sport. And, from Venus and Serena [Williams] to Naomi Osaka and Frances Tiafoe, we are seeing the results of his efforts today.”

Ashe’s efforts as a humanitarian inspired James Blake, who now chairs the USTA Foundation. Blake was growing up when Ashe’s humanitarian career was front and center, both as the leader of the group Artists and Athletes Against Apartheid and as a figure who spoke out to educate the nation about AIDS.

“He never looked for sympathy,” Blake said. “Instead, he looked for a way to make life better for others that were struggling.”

Blake counts himself as one who benefited from Ashe’s barrier-breaking career. It’s a legacy not lost on the USTA; Katrina Adams, its president and chief executive, is a black woman.

But before Maria Sharapova lost in the fourth round to Carla Suarez Navarro and the riveted crowd turned its attention to Roger Federer’s match, Monday night was about Arthur Ashe. Johnnie’s flag came wrapped in a wooden display case.

“I was thinking what I was going to design to keep it in, but I don’t have to. This is nice,” Johnnie said.

“Until Arthur came along and Althea came along, tennis was a sport of the elites. Then you get two playground children — one from Harlem, one from Richmond — to break into the bigs. People had to stop and think about that. It opened the doors for other people, and that’s what it was all about. That’s what it was all about for him.”

Voir de même:

Waiting for the Next Arthur Ashe

Harvey Araton

NYT
Sept. 7, 2018

On the second of two occasions when he had the privilege of a conversation with Arthur Ashe, MaliVai Washington, having just become the country’s No. 1 college player as a Michigan sophomore in 1989, happened to mention that he was thinking of turning pro.

Ashe did not exactly tell him what he wanted to hear.

“I don’t think he thought it was a very good idea,” Washington said.

Ashe won the first United States Open at the West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills 50 years ago to the day of Sunday’s men’s final, to be played in a stadium named for him. He also won the 1970 Australian Open and a third and final major in 1975 at Wimbledon.

After all these years there are the formidable but not mutually exclusive legacies of Ashe: as the only African-American man to win a Grand Slam tournament and as a venerated humanitarian. Washington came tantalizingly close to living up to the former and has found a contextual purpose in the latter.

Washington, who made it to the Wimbledon final in 1996, can recall some self-imposed pressure to hoist the trophy Ashe had claimed there 21 years earlier because “when you’re the No. 1 black player, you feel a sense of responsibility.”

That said, Washington was admittedly more focused on the biggest payday of his career, potential lifetime membership in the All England Club and a permanent engraving on its champions wall.

“I’m honestly not thinking then that much about history and social issues, about how this is going to impact on America, what impact is it going to have on kids,” he said of the final, which he lost to Richard Krajicek of the Netherlands in straight sets. “But at 35, 45, O.K., I can think more intelligently about it and understand the impact.”

Washington is now 49, the age at which Ashe died in 1993 of AIDS after getting H.I.V. through a blood transfusion. Family life in northern Florida is good for Washington, with a wife, two teenage children, a real estate business and an eponymous foundation in an impoverished area of Jacksonville that for 22 years has provided a tennis introduction for children unlikely to find a private pathway into the sport.

Washington’s program is affiliated with the National Junior Tennis League, which Ashe co-founded in 1969 to promote discipline and character through tennis among under-resourced youth. If, in the process, another Ashe happened to emerge, so much the better. But that was not the primary function, or point.

“We’re not a pathway to pro tennis by any stretch of the imagination,” Washington said. “At my foundation, we don’t have that ability, that capacity, never had an interest in going in that direction. We highly encourage kids to play on their high school team, go on to play or try out for their college team.

“But our biggest bang for our buck is teaching life skills. Stay in our program, and you’ll have a focus on high school education, be on a good track when you leave high school. You’re not going to leave high school with a criminal record, or with a son or daughter.”

Why there was no African-American male Grand Slam champion successor to Ashe in the years soon after his trailblazing is no great mystery, Washington said.

Fifty years ago, tennis was largely the province of the wealthy and white, lacking a foundational structure to facilitate such an occurrence. Which doesn’t mean that Ashe didn’t influence the rise of a Yannick Noah, the French Grand Slam champion whom Ashe himself discovered in Cameroon. Or the likes of Richard Williams and Oracene Price, whose parental vision birthed the careers of Venus and Serena Williams. They in turn have been followed by a raft of African-American female players, including the 2017 U.S. Open women’s champion, Sloane Stephens, and the runner-up, Madison Keys.

This year’s women’s final, on Saturday afternoon, will feature Serena Williams and Naomi Osaka, a half-Japanese, half-Haitian player whose father used the Williams family as a model for his own daughters’ tennis ambitions.

Looming over the lack of an African-American Grand Slam successor to Ashe is the vexing question of why the United States hasn’t produced a male champion since Andy Roddick won his only major title in New York in 2003. That most of the men’s titles have been claimed by a small handful of European players might be more of a tribute to them than a defining failure of the United States Tennis Association’s development capabilities.

But on the home front, the issue is a pressing one, especially during America’s Grand Slam tournament, year after year.

Washington retired in 1999 with four tour victories and a 1994 quarterfinal Australian Open result in addition to his Wimbledon run. He was followed by James Blake, who rose to No. 4 in the world during a 14-year career that included 10 tour titles and three Grand Slam quarterfinals, including two at the U.S. Open.

Martin Blackman, the U.S.T.A.’s general manager for player development, agreed that a breakthrough by one or two young Americans — white or black — in the foreseeable future could help trigger a wave of next-generation stars from an expanding landscape of prospects at a time when African-American participation has significantly declined in baseball, and football is confronted with health concerns.

“With tennis starting to be recognized as a really athletic sport, I think we do have a unique opportunity to pull some better athletes into the game,” said Blackman, an African-American man who played briefly on tour and once partnered with Washington to make the junior doubles semifinals of the 1986 Open. “So now it comes down to what can we do at the base to recruit and retain as many great young players as possible, make the game accessible and then get them into the system to stay.”

Even with better intentions, and greater investment, it still took a set of circumstances worthy of a Disney script to land Frances Tiafoe, one of the more promising young American players, on tour.

The son of immigrants from Sierra Leone, Tiafoe, 20, was introduced to the sport at a club in College Park, Md., where his father, Frances Sr., had found custodial work. Talent and a noticeable work ethic attracted well-heeled benefactors and helped Tiafoe climb to his current ranking of No. 44.

He gained his first victory at the U.S. Open over France’s Adrian Mannarino, the 29th seed, in the first round before losing next time out. His father watched from the player’s box on the Grandstand court, high-fiving Frances’ coaches and trainer when the Mannarino match ended, and soon after contended that his son wasn’t all that unique.

“There have to be thousands of kids like Frances out there, thousands who don’t have the same opportunities,” Frances Sr. said. “I’m not just talking about going to college, but going to the pro level, or just to have that chance, see if it’s possible.”

This is where Washington holds up a metaphorical sign for caution, if not for an outright stop. Most people, he said, have little understanding of just how forbidding the odds are of becoming a pro, much less a champion.

Like the Williams sisters, Washington — who was born in Glen Cove, N.Y., but grew up in Michigan — had the benefit of a tennis-driven father, William, who saw four of his five children play professionally. MaliVai, who typically goes by Mal, had by far the most success.

“When I was a junior player, I was playing seven days a week and there were times when I was in high school where I was playing before school and after school,” he said. “It is so very difficult to win a major. I tried to win one, came close.”

Then, speaking of Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal, he added: “Federer and Nadal, they’ve won 20 and 17. What makes them so great is hard to understand. You just can’t throw money at kids and think it’s going to happen.”

So how is it done? Where does one start?

With smaller social achievements, Washington said. With helping young people love the game recreationally, while pursuing a better life than those in less affluent African-American communities have been dealt.

He talked of a young female graduate of his program who recently finished college without any debt, thanks to a tennis scholarship. And for the foundation’s head tennis pro, he hired Marc Atkinson, who began playing at Washington’s facility in sixth grade and walked onto the Florida A&M tennis team.

“He’s married with three kids, and at some point, I imagine he’s going to introduce the sport to his kids,” Washington said. “You know, I often think back to my ancestors and the challenges they had, whether it’s my parents growing up in the Deep South in the 1940s and 1950s, or my great-great-grandpa who was born a slave. I can trace my lineage back to people who were getting up and getting after it, who were trying to make a better life for themselves and their kids.

“So with the thousands of kids that we’re helping, that tennis champion may be part of that next generation, or the one after that. You don’t know, but maybe 20 years from now, or 50 years from now, you’ll be able to look at a kid and track back a lineage to my youth foundation and that would be really cool.”

Told that he sounded more like Ashe the humanitarian than Ashe the Grand Slam champion, Washington nodded with approval. His two meetings with Ashe produced “no deep conversations,” he said, and he did not heed Ashe’s advice on staying in school, though he eventually earned a degree in finance from the University of North Florida.

A voice was nonetheless heard, and still resounds.

Voir encore:

A trois reprises, et par la plus pure des coïncidences, la question du sportif noir dans la société américaine s’est retrouvée sur le devant de l’actualité, ces trois dernières semaines. Il y eut d’abord, le 25 mars à Hollywood, l’attribution de l’Oscar du meilleur documentaire à When we were kings, le film de Leon Gast, sorti en France depuis mercredi, et dont le personnage central est le boxeur Mohammed Ali. Vint ensuite, le 13 avril, la victoire au Master d’Augusta (Géorgie, Etats-Unis) de la nouvelle étoile du golf mondial, le jeune Tiger Woods. Deux jours plus tard, enfin, l’Amérique célébrait le 50e anniversaire de l’intégration du premier joueur noir dans une équipe de base-ball professionnel, Jackie Robinson.

Robinson-Ali-Woods. Ces trois noms résumeraient presque la longue marche de l’émancipation du sportif noir aux Etats-Unis. Chacun d’entre eux représente une période, elle-même synonyme d’idéaux et de quête vers la reconnaissance. Si le film de Leon Gast nous montre bien quel incomparable combattant de la cause black fut Mohammed Ali, gageons qu’Ali ne serait pas devenu Ali à l’époque de Woods et que Robinson serait resté un modeste anonyme s’il avait joué dans les années 60.

Nul ne l’ignore plus aujourd’hui : si Jackie Robinson a pu trouver place au sein des Brooklyn Dodgers en cette année 1947, ce fut principalement pour des raisons extrasportives. Ce petit-fils d’esclave était en effet d’un tempérament suffisamment doux et détaché pour ne pas répondre aux concerts d’insultes dont il allait être la cible durant toute sa carrière. A l’instar de son aîné Jesse Owens, sprinter quatre fois médaillé d’or à qui Hitler refusa de serrer la main aux Jeux Olympiques de 1936 à Berlin, Jackie Robinson ne devait jamais rejoindre d’organisation militante. Sa présence au sein d’une équipe de la Major League (première division) allait pouvoir permettre, sans heurt, l’arrivée d’une nouvelle population dans les stades : le public noir.

Le roi dollar fait taire les langues

Autre contexte et autre façon de voir les choses, vingt ans plus tard. En 1964, quelques jours après son premier titre mondial, Cassius Clay intègre le mouvement politico-religieux des Blacks Muslims et devient Mohammed Ali. Trois ans plus tard, il refuse de partir au Vietnam, arguant qu’aucun Vietcong ne l’a « jamais traité de négro ». Rien d’étonnant lorsqu’en 1974, sur une idée du promoteur Don King, il part affronter George Foreman au Zaïre. L’africanisme possède son meilleur apôtre. Dans le film de Leon Gast, le boxeur incarne une sorte de roi-sorcier revenant au pays après plusieurs siècles d’exil. Ali ne fait alors rien d’autre que de la politique. Comme en ont fait les sprinteurs Tommie Smith, John Carlos et Lee Evans (qui deviendra entraîneur en Afrique) le jour où ils brandirent leur poing sur le podium des Jeux de Mexico de 1968.

De cette corporation de champions engagés, Arthur Ashe, décédé en 1993 après une vie passée à lutter contre diverses injustices (apartheid, sida, sort des réfugiés haïtiens), sera le dernier. Les années 80 et 90 sont un tournant. Le basketteur Michael Jordan devient le sportif le mieux payé au monde. Le sprinteur Carl Lewis, le boxeur Mike Tyson et aujourd’hui le très politiquement correct Tiger Woods vont répéter tour à tour qu’« on ne mélange pas sport et politique ». Le roi dollar fait taire les langues alors que, curieusement, le militantisme noir connaît un regain d’intérêt aux Etats-Unis.

Le paradoxe est même total le 16 octobre 1995 quand Louis Farrakhan, leader de la Nation of Islam, réunit un million de personnes à Washington. Ce jour-là, des slogans proclamant l’innocence d’O.J. Simpson reviennent souvent dans la foule. L’ancienne vedette de football américain est suspecté d’avoir tué sa femme. L’affaire a rendu l’Amérique totalement zinzin. A telle enseigne qu’O.J. est devenu une icône pour la population noire. Plus personne, alors, ne se rappelle que du temps de sa splendeur au coeur de la jet-set de Los Angeles, Simpson s’était appliqué à faire oublier aux Blancs qu’il était noir, allant jusqu’à prendre des cours de diction pour changer son accent. La politique, lui aussi, O.J. le disait déjà : ce n’était pas son job.

Voir par ailleurs:

Neil Armstrong Didn’t Forget the Flag

The Apollo program was a national effort that depended on American derring-do and sacrifice. History is usually airbrushed to remove a figure who has fallen out of favor with a dictatorship, or to hide away an episode of national shame. Leave it to Hollywood to erase from a national triumph its most iconic moment.

The new movie First Man, a biopic about the Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, omits the planting of the American flag during his historic walk on the surface of the moon.

Ryan Gosling, who plays Armstrong in the film, tried to explain the strange editing of his moonwalk: “This was widely regarded in the end as a human achievement. I don’t think that Neil viewed himself as an American hero.” Armstrong was a reticent man, but he surely considered himself an American, and everyone else considered him a hero. (“You’re a hero whether you like it or not,” one newspaper admonished him on the 10th anniversary of the landing.)

Gosling added that Armstrong’s walk “transcended countries and borders,” which is literally true, since it occurred roughly 238,900 miles from Earth, although Armstrong got there on an American rocket, walked in an American spacesuit, and returned home to America.

Apollo 11 was, without doubt, an extraordinary human achievement. Armstrong’s famous words upon descending the ladder to the moon were apt: “One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” A plaque left behind read: “HERE MEN FROM THE PLANET EARTH FIRST SET FOOT UPON THE MOON, JULY 1969 A.D. WE CAME IN PEACE FOR ALL MANKIND.”

But this was a national effort that depended on American derring-do, sacrifice, and treasure. It was a chapter in a space race between the United States and the Soviet Union that involved national prestige and the perceived worth of our respective economic and political systems. The Apollo program wasn’t about the brotherhood of man, but rather about achieving a national objective before a hated and feared adversary did.

The Soviets’ putting a satellite, Sputnik, into orbit first was a profound political and psychological shock. The historian Walter A. McDougall writes in his book on the space race, . . . The Heavens and the Earth:

In the weeks and months to come, Khrushchev and lesser spokesmen would point to the first Sputnik, “companion” or “fellow traveller,” as proof of the Soviet ability to deliver hydrogen bombs at will, proof of the inevitability of Soviet scientific and technological leadership, proof of the superiority of communism as a model for backwards nations, proof of the dynamic leadership of the Soviet premier.

The U.S. felt it had to rise to the challenge. As Vice President Lyndon Johnson put it, “Failure to master space means being second best in every aspect, in the crucial arena of our Cold War world. In the eyes of the world first in space means first, period; second in space is second in everything.”

VIEW SLIDESHOW: Apollo 11

The mission of Apollo 11 was, appropriately, soaked in American symbolism. The lunar module was called Eagle, and the command module Columbia. There had been some consideration to putting up a U.N. flag, but it was scotched — it would be an American flag and only an American flag.

The video of Armstrong and his partner Buzz Aldrin carefully working to set up the flag — fully extend it and sink the pole firmly enough in the lunar surface to stand — after their awe-inspiring journey hasn’t lost any of its power.

The director of First Man, Damien Chazelle, argues that the flag planting isn’t part of the movie because he wanted to focus on the inner Armstrong. But, surely, Armstrong, a former Eagle Scout, had feelings about putting the flag someplace it had never gone before?

There may be a crass commercial motive in the omission — the Chinese, whose market is so important to big films, might not like overt American patriotic fanfare. Neither does much of our cultural elite. They may prefer not to plant the flag — but the heroes of Apollo 11 had no such compunction.

Voir de plus:

What BlacKkKlansman Gets Wrong

Billed as being based on “a crazy, outrageous incredible true story” about how a black cop infiltrated the KKK, Spike Lee’s BlacKkKlansman would be more accurately described as the story of how a black cop in 1970s Colorado Springs spoke to the Klan on the phone. He pretended to be a white supremacist . . . on the phone. That isn’t infiltration, that’s prank-calling. A poster for the movie shows a black guy wearing a Klan hood. Great starting point for a comedy, but it didn’t happen. The cop who actually attended KKK meetings undercover was a white guy (played by Adam Driver). These led . . . well, nowhere in particular. No plot was foiled. Those meetups mainly revealed that Klansmen behave exactly how you’d expect Klansmen to behave.The movie is a typical Spike Lee joint: A thin story is told in painfully didactic style and runs on far too long. Screenwriters ordinarily try to start every scene as late as possible and end it as early as possible; Lee just lets things roll. If the point is made, he keeps making it. If the plot tends toward inertia, that’s just Lee saying, “Don’t get distracted by the story, pay attention to the message I’m sending.” He’s a rule-breaker all right. The rules he breaks are “Don’t be boring,” “Don’t be obvious,” and “Don’t ramble.”

But! BlacKkKlansman keeps getting called spot-on, and (as Quentin Tarantino showed in Django Unchained) the moronic nature of the Klan and its beliefs makes it an excellent target for comedy. Lee doesn’t exactly wield an épée as a satirist, though: His idea of a top joke is having the redneck Klansman think “gooder” is a word. Most of the movie isn’t even attempted comedy.

Lee’s principal achievement here is in showcasing the talents of John David Washington, in the first of what promise to be many starring roles in movies. Washington (son of Denzel) has an easygoing charisma as the unflappable Ron Stallworth, a rookie cop in Colorado Springs who volunteers to go undercover as a detective in 1972, near the height of the Black Power movement and a moment when law enforcement was closely tracking the activities of radicals such as Stokely Carmichael, a.k.a. Kwame Ture, a speech of whose Stallworth says he attended while posing as an ordinary citizen. In the movie, Stallworth experiences an awakening of black pride and falls for a student leader, Patrice (a luminous Laura Harrier, who also played Peter Parker’s girlfriend in Spider-Man: Homecoming), inspiring in him the need to do something for his people. He dismisses Carmichael’s call for armed revolution as mere grandstanding, really just a means for drawing black people together. After the speech, the audience goes to a party instead of a riot.

The Klan also turn out to be grandstanders and blowhards given to Carmichael-style paranoid prophecies and seem to hope to troll their enemies into attacking them. When Lee realizes he needs something to actually happen besides racist talk, he turns to a subplot featuring a white-supremacist lady running around with a purse full of C-4 explosive with which she intends to blow up the black radicals. It’s so unconvincing that you watch it thinking, “I really doubt this happened.” It didn’t. The only other tense moment in the film, in which Driver’s undercover cop (who is Jewish) is nearly subjected to a lie-detector test about his religion by a suspicious Klansman, is also fabricated.

Lee frames his two camps as opposites, but whether we’re with the black-power types or the white-power yokels, they’re equally wrong about the race war they seem to yearn for. The two sides are equally far from the stable center, the color-blind institution holding society together, which turns out to be . . . the police! After some talk from the radical Patrice (whose character is also a fabrication) about how the whole system is corrupt and she could never date a “pig,” and a scene in which Stallworth implies the police’s code of covering for one another reminds him of the Klan, Lee winds up having the police unite to fight racism, with one bad apple expunged and everybody else on the otherwise all-white force supporting Ron.

That Spike Lee has turned in a pro-cop film has to be counted one of the stranger cultural developments of 2018, but Lee seems to have accidentally aligned with cops in the course of issuing an anti-Trump broadside. He has one cop tell us that anti-immigration rhetoric, opposition to affirmative action, “and tax reform” are the kinds of issues that white supremacists will use to snake their way into high office. Tax reform! If there has ever been a president, or indeed a politician, who failed to advocate “tax reform,” I guess I missed it. What candidate has ever said on the stump, “My fellow Americans, I propose no change to tax policy whatsoever!” If Lee grabbed us by the lapels just once per movie, it might be forgivable, but he does it all the time. (See also: an introduction in which Alec Baldwin plays a Southern cracker called Dr. Kennebrew Beauregard who rants about desegregation for several minutes, then is never seen again.)

Lee’s other major goal is to link Stallworth’s story to Trumpism using David Duke. Duke, like Trump, said awful things at the time of the Charlottesville murder and played a part in the Stallworth story when the cop was assigned to protect the Klan leader (played by Topher Grace) on a visit to Colorado Springs and later threw his arm around him while posing for a picture. Saying Duke presaged Trump seems like a stretch, though.

After all the nudge-nudge MAGA lines uttered by the Klansmen throughout the film, the let-me-spell-it-out-for-you finale, with footage from the Charlottesville white-supremacist rally, seems de trop. BlacKkKlansman was timed to hit theaters one year after the anniversary of the horror in Virginia. That Charlottesville II attracted only two dozen pathetic dorks to the cause of white supremacy would seem to undermine the coda. The Klan’s would-be successors, far from being more emboldened than they have been since Stallworth’s time, appear to be nearly extinct.

Voir encore:

Publicités

Mondial 2018: A l’italienne (With the death of Spain’s sterile tiki-taka passing for passing’s sake and France’s final catenaccio win, will the 2018 World Cup also mark the end of beautiful football as we knew it ?)

16 juillet, 2018
Au coup d’envoi de France-Belgique, à Saint-Pétersbourg, le 10  juillet.
Le football est un sport simple : 22 hommes courent après un ballon pendant 90 minutes et à la fin, c’est l’Italie qui gagne. D’après Gary Linaker
La défense dicte ses lois à la guerre. Carl von Clausewitz
Pratiqué avec sérieux, le sport n’a rien à voir avec le fair-play. il déborde de jalousie haineuse, de bestialité, du mépris de toute règle, de plaisir sadique et de violence; en d’autres mots, c’est la guerre, les fusils en moins. George Orwell
La main de Thierry Henry, c’est le summum de la chance. Il a fait son job, c’est l’arbitre qui aurait dû voir la main. Ce n’est pas de la tricherie, le football c’est comme ça. Daniel Cohn-Bendit (Europe-Ecologie)
La morale de ce match, c’est que l’on peut tricher du moment qu’on n’est pas pris. L’équipe de France va traîner pendant des années cette image d’équipe de tricheurs. Philippe de Villiers (Mouvement pour la France)
Si nous avons le ballon, les autres ne peuvent pas marquer. Johan Cruyff
On peut avoir le contrôle sans avoir le ballon. José Mourinho
Je préfère perdre avec la Belgique que gagner avec la France. On a le plus beau jeu, c’est plus mon style. Eden Hazard
Il n’y a pas eu beaucoup de mots dans le vestiaire après la défaite car il y avait beaucoup de tristesse. On méritait mieux sur ce match même si on s’attendait à une rencontre de la sorte avec une équipe qui défend bien et qui joue en contre. Le petit point noir, c’est évidemment ce but sur phase arrêtée. Mais on connaît la France de Deschamps, on s’attendait à cela et on n’a pas trouvé la petite étincelle pour marquer ce but. Je ne l’ai pas trouvée. La France a marqué en premier et cela devenait compliqué. Nous sommes tombés sur plus costauds. On aurait pu faire mieux mais on ne l’a pas fait. On aurait pu jouer 120 minutes s’il le fallait. On avait le ballon et tout le monde était à 100 %. Mais je suis très fier d’avoir fait partie de cette équipe. On a montré qu’en Belgique, on savait jouer au football. On est tous déçus mais heureux de ce qu’on a fait. En tant que capitaine, je suis fier. Eden Hazard
Trouvez-vous son comportement normal lorsqu’il prend son carton jaune? Mbappé doit faire attention car il a un capital sympathie très important, mais cela peut vite basculer. Malgré l’image de groupe sympathique que dégage l’équipe de France, je suis révolté devant autant de simulateurs, menteurs et tricheurs sur tous les matchs. Johnny Blanc
Je préfère gagner en étant beau. Il y a plus d’équipes qui ont gagné en étant belles que moches. Gagner en étant moche, c’est une exception. Et si la France devient championne du monde, ce sera le champion du monde le plus moche de l’histoire. Daniel Riolo
La France a été la meilleure équipe, cela ne fait aucun doute. Mais si vous n’êtes pas français, les émotions suscitées par cette finale sont davantage de l’ordre du peu mémorable que de l’inoubliable. (…) On peut dire que si la France n’a pas eu vraiment à se dépasser pendant cette Coupe du monde, c’est parce qu’elle était tout simplement trop forte. Mais si la plus prestigieuse compétition footballistique peut être gagnée au petit galop, c’est qu’il y a peut-être un problème avec la course. The Irish Times
L’arbitrage vidéo a détruit la finale. Les Croates sont en droit de se demander comment la VAR, un système créé pour éliminer les erreurs d’arbitrage, a pu, en moins de dix-huit minutes, se tromper de la sorte. D’abord en validant un but entaché d’une probable position de hors-jeu, et ensuite en accordant un penalty extrêmement douteux. (…) ces Bleus-là “ne seront certainement pas appréciés au-delà des frontières du pays. The Scotsman
 La main d’Ivan Perisic dans la surface de réparation était “un cas limite”, et c’est ce “penalty discutable qui a fait basculer la finale. Volé’, c’est sans doute un peu fort, écrit le journal, mais en tout cas on ne peut pas dire que le titre de champion du monde de la France est vraiment mérité. De Standaard
Nous pourrions le considérer comme l’un des nôtres, assure le journal sportif, si on garde à l’esprit les cinq saisons qu’il a passées au sein de la Juventus, en tant que joueur, et le passage de série B en série A. Corriere dello Sport
Le sélectionneur des Bleus n’a jamais accordé d’importance à l’esthétique, et si l’Italie ne s’est pas qualifiée pour ce Mondial, la France nous la rappelle match après match. El Pais
Allons enfants de l’Italie, pourrait-on dire, pas seulement pour forcer la rime, mais car il y a beaucoup plus d’Italie que vous ne l’imaginez dans cette France qui pour la deuxième fois en vingt ans est championne du monde. La Gazzetta dello sport
Le sacre mondial de l’équipe de France de Didier Deschamps est salué par la presse internationale et européenne, pendant que les Bleus sont en train de rentrer en France. Les medias du monde entier ne manquent pas de souligner le style défensif de la formation de Didier Deschamps. Aux premiers rangs, les quotidiens italiens, et particulièrement la Gazzetta dello Sport, qui n’hésite pas à titrer «France championne à l’italienne». «Allons enfants de l’Italie, pourrait-on dire, pas seulement pour forcer la rime, mais car il y a beaucoup plus d’Italie que vous ne l’imaginez dans cette France qui pour la deuxième fois en vingt ans est championne du monde», débute le quotidien au papier rose sur sa deuxième page. «Souffrir, défendre, créer un groupe, voire devenir «uni», presque comme un bloc unique à la manière des Azzurri de Bearzot et de Lippi», décrit Fabio Licari, qui voit dans cette équipe de France un air d’Italie 2006. Mais ce qui sonne comme un compliment de l’autre côté des Alpes ne l’est pas forcément au-delà du Rhin. Pour le grand quotidien allemand die Welt, qui titre pourtant «Vive la France», une question se pose : «pourquoi le sélectionneur français s’est-il contenté d’un football cynique ?» «L’équipe de l’entraîneur Didier Deschamps a brillé au cours du tournoi avec un pragmatisme froid, malgré des footballeurs très talentueux comme Kylian Mbappé, Antoine Griezmann ou Paul Pogba, en laissant généralement le jeu à l’adversaire pour contre-attaquer au moment décisif», décrypte Christoph Cöln, pour qui «la finale 2018 n’était pas un feu d’artifice footballistique, malgré les nombreux buts». Un avis qui diffère de celui de la presse britannique. «Les meilleurs depuis 1966», titre le Daily Mail, quand le Mirror s’essaye aux jeux de mots : «Déjà Blue». Pour le Telegraph, qui n’hésite pas à dire que «la France règne en maître», «cette Coupe du Monde nous manquera comme aucune autre». «Le lendemain de la fête nationale, la France est championne et à juste titre. Mais seulement après la rencontre la plus remarquable, folle et controversée, contre une Croatie courageuse, lors de laquelle il y eut la VAR, une véritable tempête dans le ciel au-dessus de Moscou, un premier but contre son camp en finale de Coupe du Monde, une superbe frappe d’une nouvelle superstar mondiale, une horrible gaffe de gardien de but par l’homme qui a soulevé le trophée», narre Jason Burt. Le Figaro
Dans de nombreux journaux étrangers, la victoire des Bleus fait grincer des dents. “La France a été la meilleure équipe, cela ne fait aucun doute”, admet du bout des lèvres The Irish Times. “Mais si vous n’êtes pas français, les émotions suscitées par cette finale sont davantage de l’ordre du peu mémorable que de l’inoubliable. » (…)  De l’autre côté de la mer d’Irlande, l’emballement n’est pas non plus de mise. “L’arbitrage vidéo a détruit la finale”, se morfond The Scotsman. “Les Croates sont en droit de se demander comment la VAR, un système créé pour éliminer les erreurs d’arbitrage, a pu, en moins de dix-huit minutes, se tromper de la sorte. D’abord en validant un but entaché d’une probable position de hors-jeu, et ensuite en accordant un penalty extrêmement douteux.” (…) Même analyse en Belgique : pour De Standaard, le quotidien de référence néerlandophone, la main d’Ivan Perisic dans la surface de réparation était “un cas limite”, et c’est ce “penalty discutable qui a fait basculer la finale”. “‘Volé’, c’est sans doute un peu fort, écrit le journal, mais en tout cas on ne peut pas dire que le titre de champion du monde de la France est vraiment mérité.” (…) Bon joueur, le Corriere dello Sport salue les prouesses de Didier Deschamps, tout en précisant que le héros du jour est un sélectionneur “à l’italienne”. “Nous pourrions le considérer comme l’un des nôtres, assure le journal sportif, si on garde à l’esprit les cinq saisons qu’il a passées au sein de la Juventus, en tant que joueur, et le passage de série B en série A [qu’il a accompagné en tant qu’entraîneur, lors de la saison 2006-2007]”. Pour La Gazzetta dello Sport, c’est carrément toute la victoire qui est “à l’italienne”, puisque c’est indubitablement la carrière transalpine de Didier Deschamps qui lui a permis d’acquérir “l’art italien de la défense et de la tactique”. Courrier international
During the course of these four matches, they have completed an inherently unbelievable 3129 passes, an average of 782 passes per game. Argentina have the second most passes in the tournament, with some 800 passes less than what Spain has managed. The ‘Tiki-taka’ system came to prominence when Johann Cruyff took over the reigns of Barcelona during the late 80s and the early 90s. It continued to gain momentum even after his departure, with Van Gaal and Rijkaard following the same system. It reached its zenith at Barcelona when Pep Guardiola came to the fore – and arguably the greatest team in club football completed a sextuple of trophies playing some of the best football the world had ever seen. And then, it caught on to the Spanish national team. A major portion of that Barcelona team played for La Furia Roja, and when then manager Vincent Del Bosque integrated the style into the team’s play, it instantly paid dividends. Spain went on to win the 2008 Euros, the 2010 World Cup in South Africa, and the 2012 Euros, combining the tiki-taka with more direct football when the style suited them. This bastardized version was the brain child of Luis Aragones – the manager who led Spain to the 2008 Euros. Del Bosque’s system was more focused on the Barcelona style of the tiki-taka, a return to the basics that saw small, physically suspect players go toe to toe against the bigger, more physically endowed players. After Spain’s exit in Brazil, the system came under attack. The Netherlands had taken apart everything Spain stood for, and Van Persie’s soaring header was the cherry on top of a performance that showed the world that direct football could beat the slow build-up if done well. Then came Barcelona’s slight falling out with the system as well. Luis Enrique’s system at Barcelona invited contempt and concern from many a fan who had watched the beautiful passing from the years gone by. It was considered too direct to be played by Barcelona, and despite a treble in his first season and a double in the second, Enrique was shown the door after his third season at the club. Bayern Munich shifted to a form of tiki-taka when Guardiola took over at the club, but after his departure they have returned back to their original blitzkrieg style of play. Arsenal have lost all semblance of proper tactics during the last year of Wenger, and at present only Manchester City, under the tutelage of Pep Guardiola, are the last proponents of the system. (…) Spain’s newer system saw passes, but no urgency. It was possession for the sake of possession, and not possession that has the intent to score. At times, it was more boring than the ‘bus-parking’ by Mourinho, and that is saying a lot. Most of the time, the ball remained in the Spanish half – with the defenders passing the ball over and over to each other, while the Russians stayed back and bided their time.The reason the plan failed was because tiki-taka in its basic form is designed to sandbag the opponent. It aims to hit the opponent with a continuous flow of attack and tire out the defenders. It operates with the assumption that the ball should be regained within the opposition half, and never let them have a moment of respite. The initial success of tiki-taka happened because the teams were not used to it, and got tired from chasing the ball for too long. Against a Russian team that did not fall into their trap, Spain was all bark and no bite. And when the plan failed, Spain did not have a fail-safe. Putting crosses into the box after taking out Diego Costa, unsurprisingly, did not work. All the players on the field tried to pass themselves into a corner, before switching the ball to the other wing – rinsing and repeating till the final whistle. Maybe Lopetegui’s Spain would have done better, but that is not a question we can know the answer to. The fact is that Spain’s tiki-taka failed, and rather spectacularly considering how well their opponents exposed a critical flaw in its design. Football evolves with time. Just like how ‘total football’ came into praise and then disappeared from the limelight, it is time for tiki-taka to take a step back. As teams get more and more defensive when playing against the possession based sides, they should at least temper their football with a good plan B if they want to get anywhere near a trophy again. Sportskeeda
Le football français est longtemps passé pour un indécrottable romantique, dont on célébrait les glorieuses défaites, Séville 1982 par exemple, tandis que les autres nations accumulaient les titres. Fidèle à ce qu’il était sur le terrain, un travailleur de l’ombre et un apôtre de la victoire avant tout, Didier Deschamps a transformé son équipe de France en une terrible machine à gagner. (…) A défaut d’être impressionnante par son niveau de jeu, cette finale, décousue, a été la plus prolifique depuis l’unique sacre anglais à domicile face à la RFA en 1966 (4-2). Qu’importe la manière, dans dix ans, seule cette deuxième étoile ajoutée au maillot tricolore pendant l’été moscovite restera. La leçon de l’Euro 2016 a été bien apprise. Deschamps n’aime pas perdre et c’est certainement pour cela qu’il a presque tout gagné dans sa carrière : notamment deux Ligues des champions, un Euro et, désormais, deux Coupes du monde… (…) Pourtant, cette finale, spécialement la première période, aura été paradoxalement l’un des matchs les moins aboutis des Bleus, depuis l’entame contre l’Australie, le 16 juin. Une ouverture du score contre son camp de Mario Mandzukic et un penalty contestable (une main d’Ivan Perisic qui semblait non intentionnelle) obtenu grâce à la VAR (arbitrage vidéo), voilà les deux maigres coups d’éclat qui ont permis aux Français de faire basculer la rencontre. Le troisième but tricolore, inscrit par Paul Pogba, au terme d’une contre-attaque, et la frappe chirurgicale de Kylian Mbappé pour le quatrième, n’ont été que la punition attendue et infligée à un adversaire qui, mené et épuisé par ses trois prolongations successives, devait dès lors se découvrir. En capitaine fair-play, le gardien Hugo Lloris a offert aux Croates, d’une relance calamiteuse, la réduction du score. Pas certain que cela suffise à les consoler, pas plus que le titre de meilleur joueur de la Coupe du monde attribué au capitaine Luka Modric. Le Monde
Revers de la médaille : le temps de jeu, beaucoup plus important pour les Croates, est devenu le principal désavantage de la sélection au damier – les Bleus ont donc l’avantage, ayant également profité d’une journée supplémentaire de repos. La solidité de la défense française, verrouillée autour de Rafael Varane et N’Golo Kanté, scellée par l’efficacité d’Hugo Lloris dans les buts, permet aux Bleus de garder un bloc bas et d’attendre les offensives de leurs adversaires. Les deux équipes se complètent à ce stade, puisque pour la Croatie, c’est l’inverse : le sélectionneur Zlatko Dalic encourage ses joueurs à garder le ballon le plus loin de leur but – et donc de maintenir un bloc haut. Luka Modrić se charge de l’animation offensive, permettant aux Croates de déclencher rapidement leurs actions vers l’avant. Comme face à l’Argentine et à l’Uruguay, les défenseurs français pourraient donc profiter d’un coup de pied arrêté dans la surface adverse pour exploiter les failles de la Croatie. Les courses de Kylian Mbappé vers l’avant, précieuses pour percer le premier rideau croate, vont constituer une des clefs de la rencontre. Le Monde
Largement favoris, les Bleus s’appuient sur une ossature défensive ultrasolide, autour d’une charnière centrale dominatrice dans les airs et protégée par un N’Golo Kanté qui ratisse tous les ballons. Si l’on ajoute un Hugo Lloris en grande forme dans les buts, cela donne le cocktail idéal pour jouer très bas : domination physique, grande discipline (seulement six fautes commises face à la Belgique) et pensée collective. (…) A l’inverse, la Croatie, positionnée en moyenne beaucoup plus haut sur le terrain, se protège en éloignant au maximum le ballon de sa cage. En multipliant les passes, elle élabore certes des offensives qui doivent déstabiliser l’adversaire, mais elle impose surtout son propre tempo à la partie. A la façon de l’Espagne 2010, elle endort parfois plus qu’elle ne crée. (…) Le symbole de cette philosophie ambivalente se nomme Luka Modric, génial milieu du Real Madrid, dont la candidature au prochain Ballon d’or prend chaque jour un peu plus d’épaisseur. Au cœur du jeu, il est le baromètre, tantôt devant la défense comme pendant une heure face à la Russie, tantôt relayeur voire numéro 10. A travers Modric, ce sont bien sûr les forces mais aussi, et peut-être surtout, toutes les faiblesses croates qui apparaissent au grand jour. Car si son importance dans l’orientation et la gestion du jeu est cruciale, il doit être mis dans les bonnes conditions pour briller et déchargé d’une partie du travail défensif. D’où le recours au pressing, stratégie peu utilisée dans cette Coupe du monde qui, bien appliquée, oblige l’adversaire à se précipiter et à rendre le ballon. (…) Le football est imprévisible, mais le rapport de force semble jusqu’ici nettement à l’avantage des Bleus : pourquoi Samuel Umtiti et Raphaël Varane, impeccables face aux grands gabarits belges et uruguayens lors des deux derniers matchs et même buteurs de la tête, ne pourraient-ils pas réitérer la performance contre un adversaire qui peine à défendre dans sa surface ? C’est cette question, et l’évidence de la réponse malgré la taille de l’attaquant Mario Mandzukic, qui laisse imaginer un match à la physionomie similaire à ceux contre la Belgique et l’Argentine. Un adversaire qui veut le ballon, une équipe de France très contente de le laisser, et une grosse bataille au milieu pour rendre les attaques croates les plus inoffensives possibles. Si l’Angleterre, qui défendait à huit en laissant deux attaquants prêts à contre-attaquer, a été trahie par son infériorité numérique au milieu (un 5-3-2 où la ligne de trois doit couvrir toute la largeur), la France a prouvé qu’elle n’avait pas peur de mettre dix joueurs dans son camp, la vitesse de Kylian Mbappé suffisant à se montrer dangereux une fois le ballon récupéré. Tout le monde, à l’exception parfois du Parisien, est donc concerné par cette récupération, avec une stratégie simple : Antoine Griezmann et Olivier Giroud empêchent les milieux d’être trouvés dans de bonnes conditions, Paul Pogba se charge de marquer le passeur et N’Golo Kanté se concentre sur la cible. Contre l’Argentine, ce n’est pas tant en défendant bien sur Lionel Messi qu’en le coupant d’Ever Banega, son principal pourvoyeur de ballons, que la France avait tué la menace dans l’œuf. Si Marouane Fellaini fut également géré facilement, Pogba, qui est le plus apte à remplir le rôle à condition de permuter avec Blaise Matuidi au milieu, pourrait trouver en Modric son adversaire le plus coriace… Car la Croatie, dont le jeu peut vite devenir stéréotypé, entre actions individuelles des ailiers Ivan Perisic et Ante Rebic et multiples centres des latéraux Vrsaljko et Strinic, est jusqu’ici animée d’une force qui dépasse la tactique – là où la France, qui adapte la sienne à l’adversaire, n’a jamais eu besoin d’exploits. Christophe Kuchly

Et à la fin, c’est l’Italie qui gagne !

Entre le tika-taka démonétisé et stérile de l’Espagne ….
Le catenaccio « pas emballant et cynique » mais finalement victorieux de la France …
Et le beau jeu, finalement défait, quelque part entre la Belgique et la Croatie …
Comment ne pas voir …
Bien cachée sous les tombereaux d’hagiographies dont nous bassinent nos médias hexagonaux …
Mais s’étalant pourtant en grosses lettres – et en français, s’il vous plait ! – en une de la Gazzetta dello sport
La vérité de cette improbable victoire des Bleus à Moscou …
Orchestrée avec certes un petit coup de pouce tant de la chance que de la bienveillance de l’arbitrage
Par l’un des plus italiens, entre trois saisons comme joueur et une saison comme entraineur à la Juventus, des sélectionneurs français ?

Non, le monde entier ne se réjouit pas de la victoire des Bleus

Carole Lyon et Sasha Mitchell

Courrier international
16/07/2018

D’accord, d’accord, la France a gagné. Mais était-ce bien mérité ? N’est-ce pas un peu grâce à nous ? Et d’ailleurs, est-ce si important ? Dans de nombreux journaux étrangers, la victoire des Bleus fait grincer des dents.

“La France a été la meilleure équipe, cela ne fait aucun doute”, admet du bout des lèvres The Irish Times. “Mais si vous n’êtes pas français, les émotions suscitées par cette finale sont davantage de l’ordre du peu mémorable que de l’inoubliable.”

Pour le quotidien de Dublin, la sélection de Didier Deschamps inspire, “avec réticence”, “du respect plutôt que de l’admiration, de la stupéfaction et de la tendresse”. Et le journal irlandais d’enfoncer le clou, en usant d’une métaphore équestre : “On peut dire que si la France n’a pas eu vraiment à se dépasser pendant cette Coupe du monde, c’est parce qu’elle était tout simplement trop forte. Mais si la plus prestigieuse compétition footballistique peut être gagnée au petit galop, c’est qu’il y a peut-être un problème avec la course.”

“Un penalty discutable a fait basculer la finale”

De l’autre côté de la mer d’Irlande, l’emballement n’est pas non plus de mise. “L’arbitrage vidéo a détruit la finale”, se morfond The Scotsman. “Les Croates sont en droit de se demander comment la VAR, un système créé pour éliminer les erreurs d’arbitrage, a pu, en moins de dix-huit minutes, se tromper de la sorte. D’abord en validant un but entaché d’une probable position de hors-jeu, et ensuite en accordant un penalty extrêmement douteux.” Le journal d’Edimbourg, s’il salue une équipe solide dotée de fabuleux (jeunes) joueurs, assure dans la foulée que ces Bleus-là “ne seront certainement pas appréciés au-delà des frontières du pays”.
Même analyse en Belgique : pour De Standaard, le quotidien de référence néerlandophone, la main d’Ivan Perisic dans la surface de réparation était “un cas limite”, et c’est ce “penalty discutable qui a fait basculer la finale”. “‘Volé’, c’est sans doute un peu fort, écrit le journal, mais en tout cas on ne peut pas dire que le titre de champion du monde de la France est vraiment mérité.”

La France n’a clairement pas donné le meilleur d’elle-même, ajoute La Libre Belgique, qui a vu des Bleus “pas emballants, cyniques”, et glisse :

Les plus caustiques diront que les Français n’ont jamais autant couru vers l’avant qu’au moment d’aller embrasser l’un des quatre buteurs de l’après-midi”.

Plus généralement, la presse belge a surtout choisi de parler d’autre chose. Fait assez rare dans le pays, les quotidiens francophones et flamands consacrent leurs unes à un même sujet : l’accueil triomphal des Diables rouges sur la Grand-Place de Bruxelles, au lendemain de leur victoire en petite finale.

“La très grande majorité des Italiens soutenait le camp adverse”

C’est d’ailleurs aussi ce que fait le journal italien Tuttosport, qui titre, pour le sixième jour consécutif, sur le transfert de Cristiano Ronaldo à la Juventus de Turin.

Bon joueur, le Corriere dello Sport salue les prouesses de Didier Deschamps, tout en précisant que le héros du jour est un sélectionneur à l’italienne”. “Nous pourrions le considérer comme l’un des nôtres, assure le journal sportif, si on garde à l’esprit les cinq saisons qu’il a passées au sein de la Juventus, en tant que joueur, et le passage de série B en série A [qu’il a accompagné en tant qu’entraîneur, lors de la saison 2006-2007]”.

Pour La Gazzetta dello Sport, c’est carrément toute la victoire qui est “à l’italienne”, puisque c’est indubitablement la carrière transalpine de Didier Deschamps qui lui a permis d’acquérir “l’art italien de la défense et de la tactique”.

Enfin, dans son éditorial, le directeur du Corriere dello Sport tâche de prendre acte.

La France est donc championne du monde pour la deuxième fois en vingt ans. Le grand rêve d’un petit pays [la Croatie] ne s’est pas réalisé. Mauvaise pioche également pour une très large majorité des Italiens – dont votre serviteur –, qui, au cours de cette finale pauvre en tactique et déterminée par les circonstances, soutenait le camp adverse.”

Mais “il faut tout de même admettre que le succès des Français est mérité”.

Voir aussi:

Un sacre «à l’italienne» : la presse étrangère salue, ou regrette, la victoire des Bleus
Romain Bougourd
Le Figaro
16/07/2018

Le titre de l’équipe de France ne laisse pas insensible la presse internationale, qui salue Didier Deschamps ou regrette son jeu défensif.

Le sacre mondial de l’équipe de France de Didier Deschamps est salué par la presse internationale et européenne, pendant que les Bleus sont en train de rentrer en France. Les medias du monde entier ne manquent pas de souligner le style défensif de la formation de Didier Deschamps. Aux premiers rangs, les quotidiens italiens, et particulièrement la Gazzetta dello Sport, qui n’hésite pas à titrer «France championne à l’italienne». «Allons enfants de l’Italie, pourrait-on dire, pas seulement pour forcer la rime, mais car il y a beaucoup plus d’Italie que vous ne l’imaginez dans cette France qui pour la deuxième fois en vingt ans est championne du monde», débute le quotidien au papier rose sur sa deuxième page.

«Souffrir, défendre, créer un groupe, voire devenir «uni», presque comme un bloc unique à la manière des Azzurri de Bearzot et de Lippi», décrit Fabio Licari, qui voit dans cette équipe de France un air d’Italie 2006. Mais ce qui sonne comme un compliment de l’autre côté des Alpes ne l’est pas forcément au-delà du Rhin. Pour le grand quotidien allemand die Welt, qui titre pourtant «Vive la France», une question se pose : «pourquoi le sélectionneur français s’est-il contenté d’un football cynique ?» «L’équipe de l’entraîneur Didier Deschamps a brillé au cours du tournoi avec un pragmatisme froid, malgré des footballeurs très talentueux comme Kylian Mbappé, Antoine Griezmann ou Paul Pogba, en laissant généralement le jeu à l’adversaire pour contre-attaquer au moment décisif», décrypte Christoph Cöln, pour qui «la finale 2018 n’était pas un feu d’artifice footballistique, malgré les nombreux buts».

«La France règne en maître»

Un avis qui diffère de celui de la presse britannique. «Les meilleurs depuis 1966», titre le Daily Mail, quand le Mirror s’essaye aux jeux de mots : «Déjà Blue». Pour le Telegraph, qui n’hésite pas à dire que «la France règne en maître», «cette Coupe du Monde nous manquera comme aucune autre». «Le lendemain de la fête nationale, la France est championne et à juste titre. Mais seulement après la rencontre la plus remarquable, folle et controversée, contre une Croatie courageuse, lors de laquelle il y eut la VAR, une véritable tempête dans le ciel au-dessus de Moscou, un premier but contre son camp en finale de Coupe du Monde, une superbe frappe d’une nouvelle superstar mondiale, une horrible gaffe de gardien de but par l’homme qui a soulevé le trophée», narre Jason Burt.

Mais les médias étrangers mettent particulièrement en avant le sélectionneur des Bleus Didier Deschamps. Le Corrierre dello Sport, en premier lieu, l’affiche en Une : «Deschamps Elysées». «Au-delà de la ligne d’arrivée, il y a la Coupe du Monde remportée grâce à la qualité de ses talents mais aussi grâce à l’ingéniosité de Deschamps. Il a relevé son équipe nationale après la défaite contre le Portugal en finale des derniers Championnats d’Europe, en faisant confiance à ces garçons qui, en moyenne 26 ans, garantissent un avenir glorieux pour la France», avance le quotidien sportif italien.

La victoire de Didier Deschamps

Même son de cloche chez les Catalans de Mundo Deportivo. «Il (Deschamps) a établi un plan pour gagner la Coupe du monde, qu’il avait déjà emporté comme joueur en 1998 (…). Ses joueurs ont cru au plan de son entraîneur et cela a été remarqué sur le terrain. Didier Deschamps n’a trompé personne. La liste des 23 qu’il a choisi annonçait déjà ses plans», raconte le quotidien sportif. Un deuxième sacre de champion du monde, comme joueur puis comme entraîneur, qui n’empêche pas la presse croate d’encenser ses «héros». «Merci héros! Vous nous avez tout donné», titre le quotidien sportif Sportske Novosti. «’Flamboyants’, vous êtes les plus grands, vous êtes notre fierté, vos noms seront écrits à jamais en lettres d’or!», commente Sportske Novosti.

Voir également:

Vu de l’étranger. Les “Terminators” français s’offrent une finale de Coupe du monde

Corentin Pennarguear

Courrier international
11/07/2018

Les Bleus ont battu la Belgique 1-0, mardi 10 juillet, et se qualifient pour la finale de la Coupe du monde. Qu’elle affronte la Croatie ou l’Angleterre dimanche, la France sera favorite, s’accorde à dire la presse étrangère.

Pendant le match, les supporters des deux camps ont régulièrement oublié de chanter et d’encourager leur sélection. “Parfois, on avait l’impression de se trouver au beau milieu d’un tournoi d’échecs”, relate la Süddeutsche Zeitung. Mais ce n’était pas par manque de spectacles ou d’émotions, pointe le quotidien allemand. Car entre la France et la Belgique ce mardi 10 juillet, “il s’agissait plutôt d’un match de boxe étincelant”.

“Les yeux dans les yeux, les deux camps se sont fixés tout le long du match, prêts à asséner à l’autre le coup de poing décisif, raconte la SZ. À chaque action, chaque ballon distribué, on approchait le KO, l’échec et mat. Haletant.”

“Ce duel était ce qu’a offert de mieux la Coupe du monde jusqu’à présent”, enchaîne la Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung de l’autre côté du Rhin. Le journal de Francfort estime avoir assisté à “une demi-finale palpitante entre les deux équipes les plus complètes au monde”.

Une équipe “impossible à briser”

Dans ce match serré, tendu à l’extrême, c’est la France qui l’a emporté grâce à une tête rageuse du défenseur Samuel Umtiti et à un combat des Bleus sur chaque ballon. “La France a été tellement forte, tellement impossible à briser…”, reconnaît The Independent. Pour le quotidien britannique en ligne, “les Bleus ont réduit en miettes la confiance et la verve de cette équipe belge”.

Si Kylian Mbappé, le numéro 10 français, “est encore celui qui a attiré tous les regards”, explique la publication de Londres, “il a été soutenu par énormément de joueurs français déterminés à se battre pour gagner le ballon”. À tel point, selon The Independent, que “même N’Golo Kanté n’est pas sorti du lot sur ce point”.

Avec cette bataille physique et malgré le potentiel offensif des joueurs sur le terrain, “on a eu droit à un match tactique, fermé, cloisonné par une formation hexagonale pas forcément chatoyante mais très impressionnante d’organisation, de maîtrise et d’efficacité”, admet Le Soir. D’après le journal belge, “cette équipe de France est plus que jamais à l’image de son entraîneur, Didier Deschamps. L’homme qui contrôle tout et qui s’adapte à toutes les oppositions a créé un collectif prêt à mettre le talent individuel au service de l’intérêt général et de la roublardise.” Et le quotidien de Bruxelles de plier genou : “Chapeau.”

Avec ce parcours qui la conduit en finale du Mondial 2018, un aspect de cette équipe de France devient de plus en plus évident, souligne The Wall Street Journal: “un nouveau sentiment de sérénité.” Si les Bleus gardent “des joueurs d’instinct comme Mbappé”, les hommes de Deschamps sont avant tout destinés à la contre-attaque, juge le quotidien américain. Et par conséquent, “dès que la France a pris l’avantage, la panique s’est doucement répandue dans les rangs belges”.

Et au final, “c’est la France qui a imposé sa loi”, titre le quotidien espagnol El País après le match. “Brillante, juste et efficace dès qu’elle le peut” : pour le journal de Madrid, cette sélection a la patte de l’influence italienne de Didier Deschamps.

Le sélectionneur des Bleus n’a jamais accordé d’importance à l’esthétique, et si l’Italie ne s’est pas qualifiée pour ce Mondial, la France nous la rappelle match après match.”

Résultat, “les Bleus jouent le genre de football qui inspire davantage le respect que l’amour”, considère The Irish Times, qui a vu des “Terminators” sur le terrain face aux Belges. Le journal irlandais focalise son analyse sur Kylian Mbappé, “la différence majeure par rapport à la France de 2016”, qui a perdu la finale de l’Euro face au Portugal : “Il peut détruire les défenseurs adverses comme aucun autre footballeur sur la planète à l’heure actuelle ; il peut les dribbler, tourner autour d’eux, les battre à la course sur cinq mètres ou cinquante mètres ; il peut réaliser une passe parfaite à son coéquipier sans que vous-même n’ayez vu qu’il était là.”

Des revanches à prendre

Avec cette équipe, dimanche, la France peut prendre deux revanches. D’abord, “celle qui résulte de cette finale frustrante de l’Euro 2016 contre le Portugal”, se souvient The Independent. Ensuite, “refermer une blessure de 12 ans qui n’a toujours pas cicatrisé, quand elle tenait la finale de la Coupe du monde face à l’Italie entre ses mains et que la tête de Zinédine Zidane s’est abattue sur le torse de Marco Materazzi”, écrit La Nación, en Argentine.

“Les Bleus sont favoris pour soulever le trophée, que ce soit l’Angleterre ou la Croatie en face”, assure The Guardian depuis Londres. Même sentiment à Madrid, El Mundo voit “une France tout en muscles qui sent bon la coupe du monde”.

“L’équipe de Deschamps a atteint une troisième finale de championnat du monde sans passer par les prolongations, avec une solidité de champion”, apprécie également La Vanguardia, avant de lancer un rappel tranchant : “Il y a deux ans, avant la finale de l’Euro, cette même équipe avait crié victoire trop tôt. Elle sera son pire ennemi dimanche prochain.”

Voir également:

Gary Neville: France deserved World Cup win despite VAR ‘Middleweight versus heavyweight in Moscow’
Skysport
16/07/18

Gary Neville paid tribute to France after their World Cup triumph, declaring that the best team had prevailed at Russia 2018.

In an incident-packed showpiece, France led 2-1 at half-time after a Mario Mandzukic own goal and an Antoine Griezmann penalty controversially awarded via VAR, with Ivan Perisic briefly bringing Croatia level.

But quickfire strikes by Paul Pogba and Kylian Mbappe midway through the second half put France on course for glory, and rendered a Hugo Lloris error academic.

Neville admitted the penalty call left « a bit of a cloud » over the result but was in no doubt that France deserved their second World Cup crown.

« There’s a little bit of a cloud because of the penalty decision in the first half but the best team won, » Neville said.

« To beat an Argentina team with Lionel Messi, a Uruguay side with Luis Suarez, with Diego Godin that also does the horrible stuff, to beat a Belgium side with Eden Hazard, Kevin De Bruyne, Romelu Lukaku… they’ve come through everything.

« They can win all types of games. They haven’t got just good, skilful players in Kylian Mbappe and Antoine Griezmann – players who’ve lit up this World Cup in moments – they’re also tough and resilient. »

Neville conceded Zlatko Dalic’s side had a right to feel aggrieved but said the final felt like a mismatch in the end.

« The Croatians will be upset – they’ll say they were hard done-by but you felt whatever happened, France would step up a gear and get through it, » Neville told ITV.

« Croatia deserve all the respect in the world but it felt like middleweight versus heavyweight. France were able to land the blows. They were more powerful.

« We’ve become accustomed to thinking possession is the dominating factor in the game because of what Spain and Pep Guardiola have done but it’s changed a bit in this World Cup. France counter-attacked, punched them and knocked them out.

« Don’t let Croatia’s possession convince you that France weren’t in control of that game. They were the best team in the competition. They deserved it. »

Voir de même:

World Cup final VAR: BBC pundits slam referee over France vs Croatia decisionsVAR took centre stage in the first half of the World Cup final – but not everyone agreed with the decisions that went France’s way.
Aaron Stokes
Daily Express
Jul 15, 2018

Didier Deschamps’ men went in front thanks to a Mario Mandzukic own goal in the first half.

But Antoine Griezmann has been criticised for diving to earn a free-kick before the Croatia striker headed into his own net.

After conceding an Ivan Perisic goal moments later, France looked to regain the lead.

And when the Inter Milan forward handled in his own area, the referee pointed to spot, allowing Griezmann to slot home his fourth of the tournament.

But BBC pundits Alan Shearer and Rio Ferdinand were not happy with the referee or VAR in the first period

« Two bad decisions have turned the game on its head, » said Ferdinand.

« The character the players have shown has been phenomenal.

« They have got around this French team, got in their faces and shown their experience and guile.

« Croatia are the team who have come out and said ‘we’re going to win this World Cup.’ And yet they’re behind. »

Shearer then added: « It will be such a shame if this game is decided on that decision.

« That is not a deliberate handball and it shouldn’t be a penalty.

« The referee didn’t give it initially, but then he is certain he has made an error after going to the VAR?

« I don’t agree with it. »

Voir encore:

Fans fume over ‘absolute amateur’ refereeing decision
7Sport
11 Jul. 2018

Belgium fans were left fuming during their World Cup semi-final loss to France when a blatant foul on Eden Hazard went unpunished.

The Belgian star was hacked down by Olivier Giroud on the edge of the area in the 79th minute of France’s 1-0 victory on Wednesday morning.

The ensuing foul would have given Belgium a golden opportunity to equalise from the set piece, but the referee inexplicably allowed play to continue.

Belgian players were gobsmacked, and fans took to social media to vent.

One social media user even labelled the referee an ‘absolute amateur’ over the bizarre call.

Samuel Umtiti was the unlikely hero as France reached the World Cup final for the third time in 20 years.

Defender Umtiti headed home a corner from Antoine Griezmann in the 51st minute to settle the all-European tie, booking Les Bleus a trip to Moscow and a clash against either Croatia or England.

Goalkeepers Hugo Lloris and Thibaut Courtois both made smart saves to make sure an intriguing game remained scoreless at the interval.

However, Umtiti popped up with the game’s telling moment early in the second half, nodding the ball home to score his third international goal.

Belgium pushed hard for an equaliser but Roberto Martinez watched on as his team suffered their first defeat in 25 outings, ending their hopes of winning the tournament for the first time in history as their so-called golden generation came up short.

Voir par ailleurs:

Coupe du monde 2018 : France-Croatie, bataille d’idées pour un trophée
La Croatie et la France, qui partira favorite de ce match, ont des approches tactiques opposées, liées aux caractéristiques de leur défense.
Christophe Kuchly
Le Monde
13.07.2018

Analyse tactique. « La défense dicte ses lois à la guerre. » La maxime est de Carl von Clausewitz, théoricien militaire prussien et auteur du traité fondateur De la guerre, dans lequel les partisans du catenaccio (« verrou ») se retrouvent sans doute beaucoup plus que ceux du football total. Près de deux siècles plus tard, cette phrase apparemment sans rapport avec la finale de la Coupe du monde, qui opposera la France à la Croatie dimanche 15 juillet à Moscou, résume pourtant l’un des enjeux tactiques de cette rencontre. C’est en effet la protection de son propre but, plus que l’attaque de celui de l’adversaire, qui dictera le comportement des deux équipes.

Est-ce à dire que Croates et Français passeront le match repliés dans leur camp et que personne ne prendra l’initiative ? Pas vraiment. Car les deux formations ont des approches opposées, liées aux caractéristiques de leur arrière-garde. Largement favoris, les Bleus s’appuient sur une ossature défensive ultrasolide, autour d’une charnière centrale dominatrice dans les airs et protégée par un N’Golo Kanté qui ratisse tous les ballons. Si l’on ajoute un Hugo Lloris en grande forme dans les buts, cela donne le cocktail idéal pour jouer très bas : domination physique, grande discipline (seulement six fautes commises face à la Belgique) et pensée collective. De quoi suivre José Mourinho, quand il assure : « On peut avoir le contrôle sans avoir le ballon. »

Philosophie ambivalente

A l’inverse, la Croatie, positionnée en moyenne beaucoup plus haut sur le terrain, se protège en éloignant au maximum le ballon de sa cage. En multipliant les passes, elle élabore certes des offensives qui doivent déstabiliser l’adversaire, mais elle impose surtout son propre tempo à la partie. A la façon de l’Espagne 2010, elle endort parfois plus qu’elle ne crée. Et rappelle la fameuse phrase de Johan Cruyff, dont le romantisme n’était pas toujours téméraire : « Si nous avons le ballon, les autres ne peuvent pas marquer. » Le symbole de cette philosophie ambivalente se nomme Luka Modric, génial milieu du Real Madrid, dont la candidature au prochain Ballon d’or prend chaque jour un peu plus d’épaisseur. Au cœur du jeu, il est le baromètre, tantôt devant la défense comme pendant une heure face à la Russie, tantôt relayeur voire numéro 10.

A travers Modric, ce sont bien sûr les forces mais aussi, et peut-être surtout, toutes les faiblesses croates qui apparaissent au grand jour. Car si son importance dans l’orientation et la gestion du jeu est cruciale, il doit être mis dans les bonnes conditions pour briller et déchargé d’une partie du travail défensif. D’où le recours au pressing, stratégie peu utilisée dans cette Coupe du monde qui, bien appliquée, oblige l’adversaire à se précipiter et à rendre le ballon.

Face à la Russie, en quarts de finale, Modric n’avait pas suivi le déplacement de Denis Cheryshev, bien content alors de profiter d’un peu d’espace pour frapper en lucarne. Contre l’Angleterre, mercredi soir, un retour en catastrophe mais mal maîtrisé lui avait fait commettre une faute à l’entrée de la surface, convertie directement par Kieran Trippier. Les autres buts concédés par la Croatie ? Un penalty à la suite d’une main du défenseur Dejan Lovren contre l’Islande, une touche mal défendue face au Danemark et une tête russe sur coup franc. Et qui sait quelle serait l’affiche de la finale si, en début de prolongation, Sime Vrsaljko n’avait pas sauvé sur la ligne une tête de l’Anglais John Stones sur… corner, la seule phase arrêtée où la Croatie n’a pas encore été battue.

Le football est imprévisible, mais le rapport de force semble jusqu’ici nettement à l’avantage des Bleus : pourquoi Samuel Umtiti et Raphaël Varane, impeccables face aux grands gabarits belges et uruguayens lors des deux derniers matchs et même buteurs de la tête, ne pourraient-ils pas réitérer la performance contre un adversaire qui peine à défendre dans sa surface ? C’est cette question, et l’évidence de la réponse malgré la taille de l’attaquant Mario Mandzukic, qui laisse imaginer un match à la physionomie similaire à ceux contre la Belgique et l’Argentine. Un adversaire qui veut le ballon, une équipe de France très contente de le laisser, et une grosse bataille au milieu pour rendre les attaques croates les plus inoffensives possibles.

La défense française dicte ses lois

Si l’Angleterre, qui défendait à huit en laissant deux attaquants prêts à contre-attaquer, a été trahie par son infériorité numérique au milieu (un 5-3-2 où la ligne de trois doit couvrir toute la largeur), la France a prouvé qu’elle n’avait pas peur de mettre dix joueurs dans son camp, la vitesse de Kylian Mbappé suffisant à se montrer dangereux une fois le ballon récupéré. Tout le monde, à l’exception parfois du Parisien, est donc concerné par cette récupération, avec une stratégie simple : Antoine Griezmann et Olivier Giroud empêchent les milieux d’être trouvés dans de bonnes conditions, Paul Pogba se charge de marquer le passeur et N’Golo Kanté se concentre sur la cible. Contre l’Argentine, ce n’est pas tant en défendant bien sur Lionel Messi qu’en le coupant d’Ever Banega, son principal pourvoyeur de ballons, que la France avait tué la menace dans l’œuf. Si Marouane Fellaini fut également géré facilement, Pogba, qui est le plus apte à remplir le rôle à condition de permuter avec Blaise Matuidi au milieu, pourrait trouver en Modric son adversaire le plus coriace…

Car la Croatie, dont le jeu peut vite devenir stéréotypé, entre actions individuelles des ailiers Ivan Perisic et Ante Rebic et multiples centres des latéraux Vrsaljko et Strinic, est jusqu’ici animée d’une force qui dépasse la tactique – là où la France, qui adapte la sienne à l’adversaire, n’a jamais eu besoin d’exploits. Ni un penalty raté en fin de prolongation en huitième de finale, ni une égalisation concédée sur le fil en quart, ni la fatigue accumulée, n’ont empêché les hommes de Zlatko Dalic, menés lors de leurs trois dernières rencontres, de poursuivre l’aventure. Et si Lovren a échoué cette année en finale de Ligue des champions, les titres européens accumulés par Rakitic, Modric, Mandzukic, Kovacic (huit C1 et une C3 à eux quatre) et Vrsaljko (une C3), font plus qu’équilibrer la balance de l’expérience des grands rendez-vous.

D’autant qu’il reste une variable de taille : comment la France, qui devrait être capable de provoquer des déséquilibres partout sur le terrain, réagirait-elle en cas de scénario défavorable ? Menée presque par hasard par l’Argentine, elle était partie à l’attaque, les boulevards défensifs de l’Albiceleste et une volée de Benjamin Pavard inversant immédiatement la dynamique. Neuf minutes de course-poursuite suffisent-elles à juger de la percussion d’une équipe qui semblait presque inoffensive sur attaque placée il y a de cela un mois ? Si la défense française dicte ses lois dans ce Mondial, la puissance de son attaque n’a pas encore été inscrite dans les textes.

Voir aussi:

Finale France-Croatie : le pragmatisme des Bleus face à l’héroïsme des « Vatreni »
Lors d’une finale inédite, des Croates fatigués mais galvanisés tenteront de renverser l’équipe de France, favorite au terme d’une Coupe du monde maîtrisée.
Le Monde
15.07.2018

Dimanche 15 juillet, à partir de 17 heures, l’équipe de France de football tentera d’inscrire sur son maillot une deuxième étoile de champion du monde, vingt ans après le sacre à domicile des Bleus d’Aimé Jacquet.

Face à une sélection croate héroïque – les joueurs de Zlatko Dalic ont été menés dans deux des trois rencontres de la phase à élimination directe, sont allés trois fois en prolongation et ont remporté deux séances de tirs au but – les Français restent favoris, mais attention : forts de leurs stars européennes et poussés par 4 millions de supporters, les Croates ont de légitimes chances de croire en leur victoire dans le stade Loujniki de Moscou, pour ce qui serait un succès inédit en cinq participations à la Coupe du monde.

Léger avantage statistique aux Français

Depuis le début de la Coupe du monde, les Bleus n’ont encaissé que quatre buts – dont trois contre l’Argentine, en huitième de finale – contre cinq pour les Croates, sans compter les penaltys encaissés par ceux-ci lors des deux séances de tirs au but.

Les Croates ont, cependant, l’avantage côté offensif : douze buts inscrits, contre huit seulement pour la France en six matchs. Ils ont aussi mieux réussi leur phase de poule, avec trois victoires en trois matchs, dont une de prestige face à l’Argentine (3-0).

Les « Vatreni » entre fougue et fatigue

C’est l’une des principales certitudes avant la rencontre de dimanche : les Croates ne lâcheront rien. Extrêmement soudé, le collectif guidé par Luka Modrić a montré une grande ténacité depuis le début de la phase finale : face au Danemark, « les Enflammés », leur surnom, ont subi le score avant de remporter la rencontre aux tirs au but – la première de l’histoire de la Coupe du monde avec cinq arrêts de la part des gardiens, dont trois pour le portier de Monaco, Danijel Subašić.

Face à la Russie, l’histoire se répète : à égalité à la fin des prolongations, après avoir été menés, les Croates l’emportent aux tirs au but. En demi-finale, cette fois face à l’Angleterre, l’attaquant Mario Mandžukić libère ses coéquipiers en inscrivant, une nouvelle fois en prolongation, le but qualifiant son équipe pour la finale face à la France.

Revers de la médaille : le temps de jeu, beaucoup plus important pour les Croates, est devenu le principal désavantage de la sélection au damier – les Bleus ont donc l’avantage, ayant également profité d’une journée supplémentaire de repos.

L’opposition de style défensif, enjeu central de la finale

La solidité de la défense française, verrouillée autour de Rafael Varane et N’Golo Kanté, scellée par l’efficacité d’Hugo Lloris dans les buts, permet aux Bleus de garder un bloc bas et d’attendre les offensives de leurs adversaires.

Les deux équipes se complètent à ce stade, puisque pour la Croatie, c’est l’inverse : le sélectionneur Zlatko Dalic encourage ses joueurs à garder le ballon le plus loin de leur but – et donc de maintenir un bloc haut. Luka Modrić se charge de l’animation offensive, permettant aux Croates de déclencher rapidement leurs actions vers l’avant.

Comme face à l’Argentine et à l’Uruguay, les défenseurs français pourraient donc profiter d’un coup de pied arrêté dans la surface adverse pour exploiter les failles de la Croatie. Les courses de Kylian Mbappé vers l’avant, précieuses pour percer le premier rideau croate, vont constituer une des clefs de la rencontre.

L’espoir du Ballon d’or pour Luka Modrić

Vainqueur de la Ligue des Champions avec le Real Madrid, véritable star dans son pays et grand animateur du jeu croate, le milieu de terrain pourrait, en ramenant chez lui la première Coupe du monde de l’histoire de sa sélection, décrocher dans quelque mois le Ballon d’Or.

« Quand on parle de toi sur ce genre de sujet c’est super et agréable, mais je ne me préoccupe pas de cela, préfère-t-il répondre face à la presse. Je veux que mon équipe gagne, que, si Dieu veut, on remporte la Coupe »

Côté français, malgré les bonnes saisons d’Antoine Griezmann à l’Atlético Madrid et de Kylian Mbappé au Paris-Saint-Germain, une victoire en Coupe du monde ne suffirait pas à espérer le titre de meilleur joueur de la planète.

Voir encore:

World Cup 2018: Time for Spain to move away from tiki-taka
Shyam Kamal
Sportskeeda
2 Jul, 2018

Spain’s famed Tiki-taka system failed to match against some astute defending
If there was one thing that Vincent Del Bosque’s Spain was known for, other than their 2010 World Cup win – it was their style of play. It was Spain’s greatest ever team playing one of the most attractive styles of football, and it looked set for Spain to dominate football like Brazil had done in the past.

Oh, how the mighty have fallen!

In the 2018 World Cup, Spain ended the tournament with just one win to their name – a sluggish win against Iran in the second round of the group stage, and 3 draws (losing the last one to penalties against Russia).

In the process, they have conceded 6 goals, and scored 7; 3-3 against Portugal, 1-0 against Iran, 2-2 against Morocco and finally, 1-1 against Russia.

During the course of these four matches, they have completed an inherently unbelievable 3129 passes, an average of 782 passes per game. Argentina have the second most passes in the tournament, with some 800 passes less than what Spain has managed.

The origin
Without the very best players, Tiki-taka as a system has its downfalls

The ‘Tiki-taka’ system came to prominence when Johann Cruyff took over the reigns of Barcelona during the late 80s and the early 90s. It continued to gain momentum even after his departure, with Van Gaal and Rijkaard following the same system.

It reached its zenith at Barcelona when Pep Guardiola came to the fore – and arguably the greatest team in club football completed a sextuple of trophies playing some of the best football the world had ever seen.

And then, it caught on to the Spanish national team. A major portion of that Barcelona team played for La Furia Roja, and when then manager Vincent Del Bosque integrated the style into the team’s play, it instantly paid dividends.

Spain went on to win the 2008 Euros, the 2010 World Cup in South Africa, and the 2012 Euros, combining the tiki-taka with more direct football when the style suited them. This bastardized version was the brain child of Luis Aragones – the manager who led Spain to the 2008 Euros.

Del Bosque’s system was more focused on the Barcelona style of the tiki-taka, a return to the basics that saw small, physically suspect players go toe to toe against the bigger, more physically endowed players.

After Spain’s exit in Brazil, the system came under attack. The Netherlands had taken apart everything Spain stood for, and Van Persie’s soaring header was the cherry on top of a performance that showed the world that direct football could beat the slow build-up if done well.

The Nadir
Then came Barcelona’s slight falling out with the system as well.

Luis Enrique’s system at Barcelona invited contempt and concern from many a fan who had watched the beautiful passing from the years gone by. It was considered too direct to be played by Barcelona, and despite a treble in his first season and a double in the second, Enrique was shown the door after his third season at the club.

Bayern Munich shifted to a form of tiki-taka when Guardiola took over at the club, but after his departure they have returned back to their original blitzkrieg style of play.

Arsenal have lost all semblance of proper tactics during the last year of Wenger, and at present only Manchester City, under the tutelage of Pep Guardiola, are the last proponents of the system.

Spain came into the World Cup armed by only one established striker in Diego Costa, and a midfield that is enough to make any team envious. It did not feel the need for them to have another striker, considering that their midfield would be holding the ball most of the time anyway.

As it turns out, holding the ball is the only thing they know to do. Against Russia, Spain kept passing the ball with nothing coming out of it, and their play had no urgency whatsoever. They recorded their first shot on target only after Russia scored the equalizer, and even then it was too late.

The reason the plan failed was because tiki-taka in its basic form is designed to sandbag the opponent.

It aims to hit the opponent with a continuous flow of attack and tire out the defenders. It operates with the assumption that the ball should be regained within the opposition half, and never let them have a moment of respite.

That is where Spain failed.

Spain’s newer system saw passes, but no urgency. It was possession for the sake of possession, and not possession that has the intent to score. At times, it was more boring than the ‘bus-parking’ by Mourinho, and that is saying a lot.

Most of the time, the ball remained in the Spanish half – with the defenders passing the ball over and over to each other, while the Russians stayed back and bided their time. The initial success of tiki-taka happened because the teams were not used to it, and got tired from chasing the ball for too long.

Against a Russian team that did not fall into their trap, Spain was all bark and no bite
And when the plan failed, Spain did not have a fail-safe. Putting crosses into the box after taking out Diego Costa, unsurprisingly, did not work.

All the players on the field tried to pass themselves into a corner, before switching the ball to the other wing – rinsing and repeating till the final whistle.

Maybe Lopetegui’s Spain would have done better, but that is not a question we can know the answer to. The fact is that Spain’s tiki-taka failed, and rather spectacularly considering how well their opponents exposed a critical flaw in its design.

Football evolves with time. Just like how ‘total football’ came into praise and then disappeared from the limelight, it is time for tiki-taka to take a step back.

As teams get more and more defensive when playing against the possession based sides, they should at least temper their football with a good plan B if they want to get anywhere near a trophy again.

Voir enfin:

La France remporte la Coupe du monde : vingt ans après, les Bleus de nouveau sur le toit du monde
Les Bleus ont montré, dimanche à Moscou, une impressionnante détermination pour battre la Croatie (4-2) et ainsi remporter leur deuxième titre de champion du monde.
Anthony Hernandez (envoyé spécial à Moscou)
Le Monde
15.07.2018

Le football français est longtemps passé pour un indécrottable romantique, dont on célébrait les glorieuses défaites, Séville 1982 par exemple, tandis que les autres nations accumulaient les titres. Fidèle à ce qu’il était sur le terrain, un travailleur de l’ombre et un apôtre de la victoire avant tout, Didier Deschamps a transformé son équipe de France en une terrible machine à gagner. Ironie de l’histoire, pour quelqu’un qui était surnommé « la Dèche » et a connu le cauchemar bulgare de 1993.

Dimanche 15 juillet, au stade Loujniki de Moscou, les Tricolores se sont montrés impitoyables (4-2) face à des Croates méritants, pour remporter le Mondial 2018. Pendant que le président russe Vladimir Poutine, enfin sorti de sa tanière, s’éloignait sous le déluge moscovite comme étranger à la joie tricolore, les joueurs français pouvaient brandir un trophée historique, vingt ans après les deux coups de tête victorieux de Zinédine Zidane au Stade de France. 1998-2018, le lien est tout trouvé : le capitaine Didier Deschamps devenu le sélectionneur Didier Deschamps.

La leçon de l’Euro 2016 a été bien apprise
A défaut d’être impressionnante par son niveau de jeu, cette finale, décousue, a été la plus prolifique depuis l’unique sacre anglais à domicile face à la RFA en 1966 (4-2). Qu’importe la manière, dans dix ans, seule cette deuxième étoile ajoutée au maillot tricolore pendant l’été moscovite restera. La leçon de l’Euro 2016 a été bien apprise. Deschamps n’aime pas perdre et c’est certainement pour cela qu’il a presque tout gagné dans sa carrière : notamment deux Ligues des champions, un Euro et, désormais, deux Coupes du monde… « Une finale, cela se gagne, oui. Parce que celle qu’on a perdue il y a deux ans, on ne l’a toujours pas digérée », avait-il dit mardi soir.

Les bras tendus vers le ciel et le poing rageur, le sélectionneur tricolore pouvait laisser exploser une joie mêlée à sa légendaire rage de vaincre. Après le Brésilien Mario Zagallo et l’Allemand Franz Beckenbauer, il peut désormais s’enorgueillir d’être le troisième à avoir gagné la Coupe du monde à la fois en tant que joueur et en tant qu’entraîneur.

Une performance inimaginable pour celui qui, au départ, n’était jamais le meilleur footballeur, ni le meilleur entraîneur, mais qui a toujours su transmettre sa hargne et sa détermination à un groupe. « C’est tellement beau, tellement merveilleux, a-t-il exulté, Je suis super heureux pour ce groupe-là, car on est partis de loin quand même. Cela n’a pas été toujours simple, mais à force de travail, d’écoute… Là, ils sont sur le toit du monde pour quatre ans. »

Solidité défensive
Kylian Mbappé poursuit, lui, sa quête de records : à 19 ans, il est le deuxième plus jeune buteur en finale d’une Coupe du monde, derrière le Brésilien Pelé (en 1958). Sans forcément en être conscient, le Parisien, désigné meilleur jeune du tournoi, restera sur l’une des images fortes de ce mois de compétition, l’unique accroc à l’opération de communication maîtrisée du Kremlin : son high five avec l’une des quatre Pussy Riot, affublées d’un costume policier, et dont le mouvement a revendiqué l’envahissement de la pelouse en deuxième période.

Elu homme du match, parfois éclipsé par son jeune coéquipier, Antoine Griezmann a, lui, répondu présent au meilleur moment d’un coup franc précis sur le premier but, d’un penalty plein de sang-froid sur le deuxième et grâce, en général, à une performance éclatante tout au long des quatre-vingt-dix minutes.

Plus globalement, comme sa devancière de 1998, cette équipe de France aura bâti son succès sur une solidité défensive insoupçonnée avant la compétition, à laquelle elle aura ajouté un jeu ultra-direct et rapide, redoutable pour forcer les défenses adverses.

Un mur de damiers rouge et blanc
Pourtant, cette finale, spécialement la première période, aura été paradoxalement l’un des matchs les moins aboutis des Bleus, depuis l’entame contre l’Australie, le 16 juin. Une ouverture du score contre son camp de Mario Mandzukic et un penalty contestable (une main d’Ivan Perisic qui semblait non intentionnelle) obtenu grâce à la VAR (arbitrage vidéo), voilà les deux maigres coups d’éclat qui ont permis aux Français de faire basculer la rencontre.

Le troisième but tricolore, inscrit par Paul Pogba, au terme d’une contre-attaque, et la frappe chirurgicale de Kylian Mbappé pour le quatrième, n’ont été que la punition attendue et infligée à un adversaire qui, mené et épuisé par ses trois prolongations successives, devait dès lors se découvrir. En capitaine fair-play, le gardien Hugo Lloris a offert aux Croates, d’une relance calamiteuse, la réduction du score. Pas certain que cela suffise à les consoler, pas plus que le titre de meilleur joueur de la Coupe du monde attribué au capitaine Luka Modric.

Aux abords du stade Loujniki, comme à l’intérieur des tribunes de ce gigantesque stade, théâtre des Jeux de Moscou en 1980, les Français ont dû faire face à une forte adversité. Tout d’abord à la forte supériorité numérique des supporteurs croates, 10 000 balkaniques qui ont constitué un véritable mur de damiers rouge et blanc. Puis au soutien massif des autres spectateurs à l’outsider. Brésiliens, qui se voyaient en finale, Colombiens, Sud-Coréens ou Mexicains, beaucoup avouaient soutenir la Croatie.

L’égale de l’Argentine et de l’Uruguay
« Elle joue avec le cœur, avec plus de passion. Pour clôturer cette Coupe du monde folle, la victoire d’une équipe inattendue serait idéale. Mais je pense que la France va gagner, vous avez les meilleurs joueurs », prophétisait Leandro, venu de Rio avec ses amis. Les Bleus pouvaient tout de même compter sur quelques soutiens éparpillés, à l’image de Munzi, un Malaisien fanatique de Mbappé, ou de Kensuke, un Japonais qui arborait le maillot d’un certain Lilian Thuram, double buteur lors de la demi-finale du Mondial 1998 contre… la Croatie.

Avec ce deuxième succès sur les six dernières Coupes du monde, l’équipe de France distance l’Angleterre et l’Espagne. Surtout, elle égale des nations de football telles que l’Uruguay et l’Argentine. Devant, il ne reste plus que l’Italie et l’Allemagne (quatre titres) et le Brésil (cinq titres). Nantis d’une moyenne d’âge de 25 ans et 10 mois, ces Bleus paraissent armés pour continuer à gagner.

Didier Deschamps sera normalement encore aux commandes jusqu’à l’Euro 2020, au moins. Quoi de plus logique pour ce père la victoire, qui a su s’adapter à une jeune génération qui le lui rend à merveille, comme le prouve l’intrusion joyeuse et festive de ses joueurs en conférence de presse. « Excusez-les, ils sont jeunes et heureux », a résumé Deschamps, arrosé d’eau des pieds à la tête.


Soft power: Vous avez dit nation de boutiquiers ? (How Britain became a soft power superpower)

12 septembre, 2016

unnamed1unnamed2 https://i2.wp.com/cdn.static-economist.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/original-size/images/2015/07/articles/body/20150718_woc000.png

Great Britain’s medal tally at the Summer Olympics
Gold  Silver Bronze
gbmedals riomedals britmedals rio-qui-paye-le-mieux-ses-athletes-web-tete-0211186866405 unnamed3 unnamed4 unnamed5 unnamed7 unnamed6 unnamed9Aller fonder un vaste empire dans la vue seulement de créer un peuple d’acheteurs et de chalands semble, au premier coup d’oeil, un projet qui ne pourrait convenir qu’à une nation de boutiquiers. C’est cependant un projet qui accomoderait extrêmement mal une nation toute composée de gens de boutique mais qui convient parfaitement bien à une nation dont le gouvernement est sous l’influence des boutiquiers. Adam Smith
L’ Angleterre est une nation de boutiquiers.
Napoléon
Les Anglais ont toujours quelque chose de nouveau que nous, on n’a pas ! Michaël D’Almeida
De l’Australie jusqu’à Trinidad et Tobago, le portrait de la reine Elisabeth II a orné les monnaies de 33 pays différents – plus que n’importe qui au monde. Le Canada fut le premier a utiliser l’image de la monarque britannique, en 1935, quand il a imprimé le portrait de la princesse, agée de 9 ans, sur son billet de 20 dollars. Au fil des années, 26 portraits d’Elisabeth II seront utilisés dans le Royaume-Uni et dans ses colonies, anciennes et actuelles et territoires – la plupart one été commandés dans le but express d’apparaitre sur des billets de banque. Toutefois, certains pays, comme la Rhodésie (aujourd’hui le Zimbabwe), Malte ou les Fidji, se sont servis de portraits déjà existants. La Reine est souvent montrée dans une attitude formelle, avec sa couronne et son spectre, bien que le Canada ou l’Australie préfère la représenter dans une simple robe et un collier de perles. Et alors que de nombreux pays mettent à jour leurs devises afin de refléter l’âge de la Reine, d’autres aiment la garder jeune. Lorsque le Belize a redessiné sa monnaie en 1980, il a choisi un portrait qui avait déjà 20 ans. Time
Un grand nombre de nations a conservé la reine comme chef d’Etat et elle est donc toujours représentée sur les billets de banques de nombreux pays. La Reine est présente sur les billets de 33 pays. Peter Symes
Of 31 sports, GB finished on the podium in 19 – a strike rate of just over 61%. That percentage is even better if you remove the six sports – basketball, football, handball, volleyball, water polo and wrestling – Britain were not represented in. Then it jumps to 76%. The United States won medals in 22 sports, including 16 swimming golds. In terms of golds, GB were way ahead of the pack, finishing with at least one in 15 sports, more than any other country, even the United States. GB dominated track cycling, winning six of 10 disciplines and collecting 11 medals in total, nine more than the Dutch and Germans in joint second. GB also topped the rowing table, with three golds – one more than Germany and New Zealand – and were third in gymnastics, behind the US and Russia. BBC
On July 14th an index of “soft power”—the ability to coax and persuade—ranked Britain as the mightiest country on Earth. If that was unexpected, there was another surprise in store at the foot of the 30-country index: China, four times as wealthy as Britain, 20 times as populous and 40 times as large, came dead last. (…) Britain scored highly in its “engagement” with the world, its citizens enjoying visa-free travel to 174 countries—the joint-highest of any nation—and its diplomats staffing the largest number of permanent missions to multilateral organisations, tied with France. Britain’s cultural power was also highly rated: though its tally of 29 UNESCO World Heritage sites is fairly ordinary, Britain produces more internationally chart-topping music albums than any other country, and the foreign following of its football is in a league of its own (even if its national teams are not). It did well in education, too—not because of its schools, which are fairly mediocre, but because its universities are second only to America’s, attracting vast numbers of foreign students.(…) Governance was the category that sank undemocratic China, whose last place was sealed by a section dedicated to digital soft-power—tricky to cultivate in a country that restricts access to the web. (…) But many of the assets that pushed Britain to the top of the soft-power table are in play. In the next couple of years the country faces a referendum on its membership of the EU; a slimmer role for the BBC, its prolific public broadcaster; and a continuing squeeze on immigration, which has already made its universities less attractive to foreign students. Much of Britain’s hard power was long ago given up. Its soft power endures—for now. The Economist
Although beaten to the top spot in this year’s index, the UK continues to boast significant advantages in its soft power resources. These include the significant role that continues to be played by both state-backed assets (i.e. BBC World Service, DfID, FCO and British Council) and private assets and global brands (e.g. Burberry and British Airways). Additionally, the British Council, institutions like the British Museum, and the UK’s higher education system are all pillars of British soft power. The UK’s rich civil society and charitable sector further contribute to British soft power. Major global organisations that contribute to development, disaster relief, and human rights reforms like Oxfam, Save the Children, and Amnesty International are key components in the UK’s overall ability to contribute to the global good – whether through the state, private citizens, or a network of diverse actors. The UK’s unique and enviable position at the heart of a number of important global networks and multi-lateral organisations continues to confer a significant soft power advantage. As a member of the G-7, G-20, UN Security Council, European Union, and the Commonwealth, Britain has a seat at virtually every international table of consequence. No other country rivals the UK’s diverse range of memberships in the world’s most influential organisations. In this context, a risk exists that the UK’s considerable soft power clout would be significantly diminished should it vote to leave the European Union. The soft power 30
The United States takes the top spot of the 2016 Soft Power 30, beating out last year’s first-place finisher, the United Kingdom. America topping the rankings this year is perhaps a strange juxtaposition to Donald Trump, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, currently threatening to tear up long-held, bi-partisan principles of American foreign policy – like ending the US’s stated commitment to nuclear non-proliferation. On the other hand, President Obama’s final year as Commander-in-Chief has been a busy one for diplomatic initiatives. The President managed to complete his long-sought Iran Nuclear Deal, made progress on negotiating free trade agreements with partners across the Oceans Atlantic and Pacific, and re-established diplomatic relations with Cuba after decades of trying to isolate the Communist Caribbean Island. These major soft power plays have paid dividends for perceptions of the US abroad, as it finished higher in the international polling this year, compared to 2015. Perhaps not dragged down as much by attitudes to its foreign policy, the US’s major pillars of soft power have been free to shine, as measured in our Digital, Education, and Culture sub-indices. The US is home to the biggest digital platforms in the world, including Facebook, Twitter, and WhatsApp, and the US State Department sets the global pace on digital diplomacy. Likewise, the US maintains its top ranking in the Culture and Education sub-indices this year. The US welcomed over 74 million international tourists last year, many of whom are attracted by America’s cultural outputs that are seemingly omnipresent around the globe. In terms of education, the US has more universities in the global top 200 than any other country in the world, which allows it to attract more international students than any other country – by some margin as well. (…) Home to many of the biggest tech brands in the world, the US is the global leader in digital technology and innovation. The Obama Administration and State Department developed the theory and practice of online-driven campaigning and ‘digital diplomacy’. The way the US has developed and leveraged digital diplomacy, gives the nation a significant soft power boost. (…) It’s not just foreign policy that can drag down the image of America. Regular news stories of police brutality, racial tension, gun violence, and a high homicide rate (compared to other developed countries) all remind the world that America has its faults on the home front too. Speaking of which, the forthcoming Presidential election will have leaders in a lot of world capitals nervous at prospect of a Trump presidency. The soft power 30
With nearly 84 million tourists arriving annually, France maintains the title of the world’s most visited country. Yet while the strength of its cultural assets – the Louvre, its cuisine, the Riviera – have helped it hold onto this title, the country remains vulnerable. In the last year, France made headlines for the horrific terror attacks that shook its capital. Since the beginning of his mandate, President François Hollande has struggled to revitalise the French economy. Unemployment has risen steadily, and businesses are weary of France’s seemingly over-regulated and overprotective market. Its “new-blood” Minister of the Economy, Emmanuel Macron, is labouring to shake things up. His newly announced political movement, En Marche! (Forward) hopes to break party lines and revive the Eurozone’s second largest economy. Only time can tell if the initiative will pay dividends. Until then, France can still count on its unequalled diplomatic prowess to safeguard its position near the top of the Soft Power 30. It remains a global diplomatic force, asserting its presence through one of the most extensive Embassy networks. (…) France’s soft power strengths lie in a unique blend of culture and diplomacy. It enjoys, for historic reasons, links to territories across the planet, making it the only nation with 12 time zones. Its network of cultural institutions, linguistic union “la Francophonie” and network of embassies allow it to engage like no other. Its top rank in the Engagement sub-index comes as no surprise. (…) France continues to struggle as a result of the global financial crisis and President Hollande’s failure to lift the nation’s economic competitiveness has delayed its full recovery. Germany’s economy, in comparison, makes France look in need of reform. The soft power 30
Le secret de la réussite made in Britain ? « C’est simple : l’argent », répond Steve Haake, le directeur du Advanced Wellbeing Research Centre à l’université de Sheffield Hallam. Depuis une vingtaine d’années, le Royaume-Uni a investi massivement dans le sport de haut niveau : 274 millions de livres (316 millions d’euros) rien que sur ces quatre dernières années pour les sports olympiques. C’est cinq fois plus qu’il y a vingt ans. Il faut remonter à l’humiliation des Jeux d’Atlanta en 1996 pour comprendre. Cette année-là, le pays termine 37e au tableau des médailles avec un seul titre olympique. Le premier ministre d’alors, John Major, décide d’intervenir. Ordre est donné d’investir dans le sport de haut niveau une large part de l’argent de la National Lottery, qui sert normalement à financer des actions caritatives ou culturelles. L’effet se fait sentir rapidement et le Royaume-Uni passe au dixième rang aux Jeux de Sydney en 2000. « Mais ça s’est vraiment accéléré en 2007, quand Londres a obtenu l’organisation des Jeux de 2012 », explique Steven Haake. Le financement a soudain triplé, avec une approche ultra-compétitive. Pas question de s’intéresser au développement du sport pour tous ou amateur. Chaque discipline financée reçoit un objectif chiffré de médailles olympiques. Les résultats sont immédiats : le Royaume-Uni finit quatrième à Pékin en 2008 (47 médailles) et troisième de « ses » Jeux, quatre ans plus tard, avec un record de 65 récompenses, dont 29 titres. Le système mis en place est ultra-élitiste. En cas d’échec d’une discipline, le financement est retiré. Ainsi, pour les Jeux de Londres, UK Sport, l’organisme qui supervise le haut niveau, finançait 27 sports différents. A une exception près, tous ceux qui n’ont pas eu de médaille ont vu leur enveloppe supprimée pour les quatre années suivantes. Le basket-ball, le handball, le volley-ball, l’haltérophilie masculine l’ont appris à leurs dépens… Seuls les résultats comptent. (…)« Le ratio de médailles par rapport au nombre de sports financés a augmenté, de 62 % à Londres à 80 % à Rio » Pour les Jeux de Rio, le Royaume-Uni a maintenu son soutien financier, contrairement à beaucoup de nations, qui ont relâché leurs efforts une fois les Jeux organisés chez elles. Mais l’aide a été encore plus ciblée : seules vingt disciplines ont reçu de l’argent, alors que l’enveloppe totale a augmenté de 3 %. « C’est un système impitoyable, reconnaît Girish Ramchandani, également de l’université Sheffield Hallam, spécialiste du financement dans le sport. Mais ça marche. Le ratio de médailles par rapport au nombre de sports financés a augmenté, de 62 % à Londres à 80 % à Rio. » (…) Cet argent qui coule à flots a permis aux athlètes de haut niveau de se concentrer uniquement sur leur sport. Les plus prometteurs touchent jusqu’à 28 000 livres (32 000 euros) par an, sans compter l’enveloppe que reçoit leur fédération pour payer les entraîneurs et les équipements. Qu’elle parait loin, l’époque où Daley Thompson, l’un des meilleurs décathloniens de tous les temps, devait rendre son survêtement aux couleurs britanniques après les Jeux de Los Angeles en 1984. Reste que l’argent n’explique pas tout. A Rio, nombre d’athlètes s’étonnent des succès britanniques et expriment des doutes quant à l’intégrité de certaines performances. Les prouesses de Mo Farah, qui a remporté la médaille d’or du 10 000 mètres, et espère décrocher celle du 5 000 mètres, dimanche 21 août, interrogent. Son entraîneur, Alberto Salazar, n’a-t-il pas été accusé lui-même de dopage par une enquête de la BBC, il y a un an ? La domination sans partage de l’équipe de cyclisme sur piste, avec douze médailles, dont six en or, fait aussi grincer des dents, alors que celle-ci avait été médiocre aux Championnats du monde organisés à Londres en mars. « Il faudrait demander la recette à nos voisins, car je n’arrive pas à comprendre. Ce sont des équipes qui ne font rien d’extraordinaire pendant quatre ans et, arrivées aux Jeux, elles surclassent tout le monde. C’est la première fois que je vis les Jeux en tant qu’entraîneur et je vois des choses… », s’interrogeait Laurent Gané, l’entraîneur de l’équipe de France, après le bronze de ses hommes dans une épreuve de vitesse dont ils étaient les rois il n’y a encore pas si longtemps. Off the record, on évoque un autre type de dopage, technologique, avec des hypothèses comme un engrenage dans les roues. Un bruit de moteur qui avait aussi parcouru les routes du Tour de France, dominé par Chris Froome (troisième de l’épreuve sur route à Rio) ces dernières années. Pour Steve Haake, de l’université de Sheffield Hallam, ces doutes sont compréhensibles dans le climat de scandales de dopage permanent. Mais il estime que l’explication est plus prosaïque : « Les équipes britanniques se concentrent sur les Jeux olympiques, qui sont la clé de leur financement. Alors, c’est normal qu’elles n’impressionnent pas aux Championnats du monde, qui ne sont pas leur priorité. » Et surtout, il estime que le système actuel, avec des financements garantis sur une, voire deux olympiades, permet de travailler dans la durée. « Ce qu’il se passe actuellement ne va pas s’arrêter à Rio. » Il y a de fortes chances que les concurrents des Britanniques jalousent encore leurs performances aux Jeux de Tokyo en 2020. Le Monde
Avec 66 médailles (dont 27 en or !), la Grande-Bretagne s’est hissée avec brio à la deuxième place du classement général des Jeux olympiques, dimanche 21 août. Elle a ainsi surclassé la Chine et la Russie, qui jouent habituellement des coudes avec les Etats-Unis. Cette performance des Britanniques n’est pas une parfaite surprise. Quatrième en 2008 à Pékin puis troisième en 2012 à domicile, la Grande-Bretagne compte désormais parmi les meilleures nations olympiques. Mais comment ses athlètes, arrivés dixièmes à Athènes en 2004, ont-ils réussi cette folle ascension ? La débâcle des Jeux d’Atlanta, en 1996, a créé un électrochoc. Cette année-là, la Team GB termine 36e, avec une seule médaille d’or. Le Premier ministre conservateur, John Major, décide de mettre un terme à cette humiliation sportive. Désormais, le sport de haut niveau britannique est financé par la Loterie nationale, qui lui reverse une partie de ses profits. Le programme s’est intensifié progressivement, pour atteindre 75% du budget total du sport britannique. Cette enveloppe s’élève ainsi à plus de 400 millions d’euros pour la période 2013-2017, afin de préparer les Jeux olympiques et paralympiques de Rio (…) En plus de la grosse cagnotte de la loterie, UK Sport, l’organisme qui gère la Team GB, a fait un choix « brutal mais efficace », explique encore le Guardian. Les fonds sont attribués en fonction des résultats. Les sports qui gagnent touchent plus que les autres, ce qui explique pourquoi l’aviron et le cyclisme, qui ont rapporté chacun quatre médailles d’or en 2012, ont depuis reçu respectivement 37 et 35 millions d’euros. L’haltérophilie, en revanche, a reçu un peu moins de 2 millions, selon le budget présenté par UK Sport. Les Britanniques appellent cela la « no compromise culture » (culture de l’intransigeance). « Les millions investis dans le sport olympique et paralympique ont un seul objectif : gagner des médailles », explique le Guardian. UK Sport investit dans les sports « en fonction de leur potentiel podium lors des deux prochains Jeux ». Ces sommes ont permis de professionnaliser des athlètes, qui peuvent donc se consacrer entièrement à leur discipline, mais aussi leurs entraîneurs. L’argent a également été investi dans la recherche et les équipements de pointe, pour le cyclisme notamment, dans lequel le matériel est particulièrement important. Le bureau des chercheurs de la Fédération britannique de cyclisme a même un nom : le « Secret Squirrel Club », chargé de mettre au point les guidons moulés, les peintures ultra-fines et les casques aérodynamiques qui peuvent offrir aux pistards quelques centièmes de seconde d’avance. Ces équipements peuvent faire la différence, ne serait-ce qu’en en mettant plein la vue aux adversaires. En envoyant une délégation très étoffée (…) c’est tout de même mathématique. Davantage de compétiteurs, c’est davantage de chances de médailles, surtout pour les pays riches. (…) Message reçu à Londres, qui a envoyé 366 athlètes à Rio. C’est moins que les 542 sportifs présentés en 2012, mais la Team GB jouait alors à domicile, bénéficiant de qualifications automatiques. Ils étaient 313 à Pékin en 2008, 271 à Athènes en 2004, 310 à Sydney en 2000, et 300 à Atlanta en 1996. A l’exception des Jeux de Londres, donc, la délégation de Grande-Bretagne-Irlande du Nord – sa dénomination officielle – présentée à Rio est la plus importante depuis les Jeux olympiques de Barcelone en 1992 (371 athlètes). En préparant en priorité les JO La stratégie britannique est bien différente de celle des Français. Francetv sport la résume ainsi : « Contrairement à la France qui entend jouer toutes les compétitions [championnats du monde, championnats d’Europe, JO…] à fond, les Britanniques sont prêts à en sacrifier certaines (…) La méthode agace et suscite la jalousie, de la part des Français notamment, qui ont dominé le classement en 1996 et 2000, et dont le bilan est, cette année, famélique (une seule médaille, en bronze). L’entraîneur Laurent Gané semble surpris de voir les Britanniques survoler les épreuves sur piste. « Ce sont des équipes qui ne font rien d’extraordinaire pendant quatre ans et, arrivées aux Jeux, elles surclassent tout le monde », s’étonne-t-il dans Le Monde. France infos

Vous avez dit nation de boutiquiers ?

Investissement massif issu de la loterie (400 millions), quasi-salarisation des athlètes (mais pas de primes individuelles),  mise exclusive et sans concession sur les seules disciplines gagnantes (35 millions d’euros pour le cyclisme,  1,5 million pour un tennis de table sans résultat), investissement dans la technologie de pointe et approche scientifique de la performance,  délégation très étoffée, priorité absolue aux JO (quitte à faire l’impasse sur les championnats du monde ou d’Europe) et concentration sur les sports les plus « payants »…

A l’heure où un pays à l’économie, la population et la superficie respectivement huit fois, cinq fois et 35 fois moindre fait quasiment jeu égal et avait même dépassé en influence ces deux dernières années la première puissance mondiale …

Et où avec l’auto-effacement  de ladite première puissance mondiale, le Moyen-Orient est à feu et à sang et une Russie et une Chine assoiffées de revanche menacent impunément les frontières de leurs voisins …

Comment ne pas voir l’ironie de la reprise et de la domination par l’ancienne puissance coloniale d’un concept (« sof power ») créé à l’origine par un Américain (Joseph Nye) en réponse à un historien britannique (Paul Kennedy) qui prédisait à la fin des années 80 l’inéluctabilité du déclin américain ?

Mais surtout le redoutable pragmatisme d’un pays qui il y a vingt ans ne finissait que 36e (pour une seule misérable médaille d’or) …

Et qui non content de laisser loin derrière (avec un avantage – excusez du peu – de pas moins de 18 médailles d’or !) une France au même poids démographique et économique …

Dépasse aujourd’hui en médailles la première population et la 2e puissance économique mondiales ?

Millions de la Loterie, choix drastiques et coups de chance : comment la Grande-Bretagne a raflé tant de médailles à RioLes Britanniques se sont hissés à la deuxième place du tableau des médailles, devant la Chine et la Russie. Mais comment ont-ils fait ?
Camille Caldini
France Tvinfos
21/08/2016Avec 66 médailles (dont 27 en or !), la Grande-Bretagne s’est hissée avec brio à la deuxième place du classement général des Jeux olympiques, dimanche 21 août. Elle a ainsi surclassé la Chine et la Russie, qui jouent habituellement des coudes avec les Etats-Unis. Cette performance des Britanniques n’est pas une parfaite surprise. Quatrième en 2008 à Pékin puis troisième en 2012 à domicile, la Grande-Bretagne compte désormais parmi les meilleures nations olympiques. Mais comment ses athlètes, arrivés dixièmes à Athènes en 2004, ont-ils réussi cette folle ascension ?En collectant des millions grâce à la Loterie
La débâcle des Jeux d’Atlanta, en 1996, a créé un électrochoc. Cette année-là, la Team GB termine 36e, avec une seule médaille d’or. Le Premier ministre conservateur, John Major, décide de mettre un terme à cette humiliation sportive. Désormais, le sport de haut niveau britannique est financé par la Loterie nationale, qui lui reverse une partie de ses profits.Le programme s’est intensifié progressivement, pour atteindre 75% du budget total du sport britannique. Cette enveloppe s’élève ainsi à plus de 400 millions d’euros pour la période 2013-2017, afin de préparer les Jeux olympiques et paralympiques de Rio, détaille le Guardian (en anglais). Les athlètes britanniques ont d’ailleurs été invités à dire tout le bien qu’ils pensaient de la Loterie nationale, « en insistant sur le lien entre l’achat d’un ticket et les chances de médailles », ajoute le quotidien.

En misant tout sur les gagnants

En plus de la grosse cagnotte de la loterie, UK Sport, l’organisme qui gère la Team GB, a fait un choix « brutal mais efficace », explique encore le Guardian. Les fonds sont attribués en fonction des résultats. Les sports qui gagnent touchent plus que les autres, ce qui explique pourquoi l’aviron et le cyclisme, qui ont rapporté chacun quatre médailles d’or en 2012, ont depuis reçu respectivement 37 et 35 millions d’euros. L’haltérophilie, en revanche, a reçu un peu moins de 2 millions, selon le budget présenté par UK Sport.

Les Britanniques appellent cela la « no compromise culture » (culture de l’intransigeance). « Les millions investis dans le sport olympique et paralympique ont un seul objectif : gagner des médailles », explique le Guardian. UK Sport investit dans les sports « en fonction de leur potentiel podium lors des deux prochains Jeux ».

En investissant dans la technologie de pointe

Ces sommes ont permis de professionnaliser des athlètes, qui peuvent donc se consacrer entièrement à leur discipline, mais aussi leurs entraîneurs. L’argent a également été investi dans la recherche et les équipements de pointe, pour le cyclisme notamment, dans lequel le matériel est particulièrement important. Le bureau des chercheurs de la Fédération britannique de cyclisme a même un nom : le « Secret Squirrel Club« , chargé de mettre au point les guidons moulés, les peintures ultra-fines et les casques aérodynamiques qui peuvent offrir aux pistards quelques centièmes de seconde d’avance.

Ces équipements peuvent faire la différence, ne serait-ce qu’en en mettant plein la vue aux adversaires. « Tout le monde regarde les vélos des autres », raconte en effet Laurent Gané, entraîneur de l’équipe de France de vitesse sur piste, au Monde. Et le relayeur Michaël D’Almeida le concède, dans le même quotidien : « Les Anglais ont toujours quelque chose de nouveau que nous, on n’a pas ! »

En envoyant une délégation très étoffée

La Chine le prouve à Rio, cela ne suffit pas. Mais c’est tout de même mathématique. Davantage de compétiteurs, c’est davantage de chances de médailles, surtout pour les pays riches. « Les pays les plus riches ont tendance à mieux réussir, non seulement parce qu’ils envoient davantage d’athlètes, mais aussi parce qu’ils sont mieux préparés », explique le journal canadien Toronto Star (article en anglais).

Message reçu à Londres, qui a envoyé 366 athlètes à Rio. C’est moins que les 542 sportifs présentés en 2012, mais la Team GB jouait alors à domicile, bénéficiant de qualifications automatiques. Ils étaient 313 à Pékin en 2008, 271 à Athènes en 2004, 310 à Sydney en 2000, et 300 à Atlanta en 1996. A l’exception des Jeux de Londres, donc, la délégation de Grande-Bretagne-Irlande du Nord – sa dénomination officielle – présentée à Rio est la plus importante depuis les Jeux olympiques de Barcelone en 1992 (371 athlètes).

En préparant en priorité les JO

La stratégie britannique est bien différente de celle des Français. Francetv sport la résume ainsi : « Contrairement à la France qui entend jouer toutes les compétitions [championnats du monde, championnats d’Europe, JO…] à fond, les Britanniques sont prêts à en sacrifier certaines (…) Et si le Royaume-Uni est aussi haut placé, c’est peut-être tout simplement grâce à cette stratégie du ‘tout pour les JO’. »  Cela semble payer. A Rio, le cyclisme a rapporté 12 médailles à la Team GB : 11 sur piste dont 6 en or, et une sur route. En 2008 et 2012, ils avaient déjà glané 8 médailles d’or.

La méthode agace et suscite la jalousie, de la part des Français notamment, qui ont dominé le classement en 1996 et 2000, et dont le bilan est, cette année, famélique (une seule médaille, en bronze). L’entraîneur Laurent Gané semble surpris de voir les Britanniques survoler les épreuves sur piste. « Ce sont des équipes qui ne font rien d’extraordinaire pendant quatre ans et, arrivées aux Jeux, elles surclassent tout le monde », s’étonne-t-il dans Le Monde. De là aux soupçons de dopage ou de tricherie technologique, il n’y a qu’un petit pas, que le coach français s’est retenu de faire, s’interrompant au milieu d’une phrase : « C’est la première fois que je vis les Jeux en tant qu’entraîneur et je vois des choses… »

En profitant des exclusions russes et des ratés chinois

Il faut bien l’admettre, il y a aussi une petite part de chance dans le succès de la Team GB, qui peut remercier la Russie et la Chine.

En 2012, la Russie talonnait la Grande-Bretagne, avec ses 81 médailles dont 23 en or. Pour Rio, le scandale du dopage organisé par l’Etat a contraint Moscou a réduire sa délégation : seulement 271 athlètes au lieu de 389 et aucun athlète paralympique. Conséquence directe : le compteur de médailles d’or russe s’est arrêté à 17. En athlétisme en particulier, cette absence russe a été une bénédiction pour la Team GB, qui avait terminé quatrième en 2012, derrière les Américains, les Russes et les Jamaïcains.

Un autre géant a trébuché à Rio, laissant à la Grande-Bretagne une chance de se hisser sur le podium final : la Chine. Le bilan mitigé de ses athlètes a presque tourné à l’affaire d’Etat à Pékin. La Chine a multiplié les contre-performances, au badminton, au plongeon et en gymnastique, des disciplines où elle a pourtant l’habitude de s’illustrer. L’équipe chinoise de gymnastique quitte Rio sans aucune médaille d’or, du jamais-vu depuis les JO de Los Angeles en 1984.

Voir aussi:

JO 2016 : comment les Britanniques ont acheté leurs médailles
Eric Albert

Le Monde

20.08.2016

La BBC est passée en mode surchauffe depuis une semaine. Sa « Team GB » réussit des Jeux olympiques impressionnants, engrange médaille après médaille, et les commentateurs de la chaîne publique se perdent en superlatifs et en compliments.
Avec 67 médailles, dont 27 en or, le Royaume-Uni a pris une surprenante deuxième place au tableau des nations, derrière les Etats-Unis (105 breloques) et loin devant la France – même population, même poids économique –, septième avec neuf médailles d’or.

Le secret de la réussite made in Britain ? « C’est simple : l’argent », répond Steve Haake, le directeur du Advanced Wellbeing Research Centre à l’université de Sheffield Hallam. Depuis une vingtaine d’années, le Royaume-Uni a investi massivement dans le sport de haut niveau : 274 millions de livres (316 millions d’euros) rien que sur ces quatre dernières années pour les sports olympiques. C’est cinq fois plus qu’il y a vingt ans.

Système ultra-élitiste
Il faut remonter à l’humiliation des Jeux d’Atlanta en 1996 pour comprendre. Cette année-là, le pays termine 37e au tableau des médailles avec un seul titre olympique. Le premier ministre d’alors, John Major, décide d’intervenir. Ordre est donné d’investir dans le sport de haut niveau une large part de l’argent de la National Lottery, qui sert normalement à financer des actions caritatives ou culturelles. L’effet se fait sentir rapidement et le Royaume-Uni passe au dixième rang aux Jeux de Sydney en 2000.

« Mais ça s’est vraiment accéléré en 2007, quand Londres a obtenu l’organisation des Jeux de 2012 », explique Steven Haake. Le financement a soudain triplé, avec une approche ultra-compétitive. Pas question de s’intéresser au développement du sport pour tous ou amateur. Chaque discipline financée reçoit un objectif chiffré de médailles olympiques. Les résultats sont immédiats : le Royaume-Uni finit quatrième à Pékin en 2008 (47 médailles) et troisième de « ses » Jeux, quatre ans plus tard, avec un record de 65 récompenses, dont 29 titres.

Le système mis en place est ultra-élitiste. En cas d’échec d’une discipline, le financement est retiré. Ainsi, pour les Jeux de Londres, UK Sport, l’organisme qui supervise le haut niveau, finançait 27 sports différents. A une exception près, tous ceux qui n’ont pas eu de médaille ont vu leur enveloppe supprimée pour les quatre années suivantes. Le basket-ball, le handball, le volley-ball, l’haltérophilie masculine l’ont appris à leurs dépens… Seuls les résultats comptent. Le mythique fair-play britannique appartient au passé.

« Le ratio de médailles par rapport au nombre de sports financés a augmenté, de 62 % à Londres à 80 % à Rio »
Pour les Jeux de Rio, le Royaume-Uni a maintenu son soutien financier, contrairement à beaucoup de nations, qui ont relâché leurs efforts une fois les Jeux organisés chez elles. Mais l’aide a été encore plus ciblée : seules vingt disciplines ont reçu de l’argent, alors que l’enveloppe totale a augmenté de 3 %. « C’est un système impitoyable, reconnaît Girish Ramchandani, également de l’université Sheffield Hallam, spécialiste du financement dans le sport. Mais ça marche. Le ratio de médailles par rapport au nombre de sports financés a augmenté, de 62 % à Londres à 80 % à Rio. »

L’équipe de plongeon britannique doit ainsi une fière chandelle à Tom Daley, médaillé de bronze à Londres. Grâce à ce succès sur le fil, la discipline a conservé son financement. Aujourd’hui, elle en récolte les fruits : à Rio, elle a déjà obtenu trois médailles, une de chaque couleur.

Cet argent qui coule à flots a permis aux athlètes de haut niveau de se concentrer uniquement sur leur sport. Les plus prometteurs touchent jusqu’à 28 000 livres (32 000 euros) par an, sans compter l’enveloppe que reçoit leur fédération pour payer les entraîneurs et les équipements. Qu’elle parait loin, l’époque où Daley Thompson, l’un des meilleurs décathloniens de tous les temps, devait rendre son survêtement aux couleurs britanniques après les Jeux de Los Angeles en 1984.

Scandales de dopage
Reste que l’argent n’explique pas tout. A Rio, nombre d’athlètes s’étonnent des succès britanniques et expriment des doutes quant à l’intégrité de certaines performances. Les prouesses de Mo Farah, qui a remporté la médaille d’or du 10 000 mètres, et espère décrocher celle du 5 000 mètres, dimanche 21 août, interrogent. Son entraîneur, Alberto Salazar, n’a-t-il pas été accusé lui-même de dopage par une enquête de la BBC, il y a un an ?

La domination sans partage de l’équipe de cyclisme sur piste, avec douze médailles, dont six en or, fait aussi grincer des dents, alors que celle-ci avait été médiocre aux Championnats du monde organisés à Londres en mars. « Il faudrait demander la recette à nos voisins, car je n’arrive pas à comprendre. Ce sont des équipes qui ne font rien d’extraordinaire pendant quatre ans et, arrivées aux Jeux, elles surclassent tout le monde. C’est la première fois que je vis les Jeux en tant qu’entraîneur et je vois des choses… », s’interrogeait Laurent Gané, l’entraîneur de l’équipe de France, après le bronze de ses hommes dans une épreuve de vitesse dont ils étaient les rois il n’y a encore pas si longtemps.

Off the record, on évoque un autre type de dopage, technologique, avec des hypothèses comme un engrenage dans les roues. Un bruit de moteur qui avait aussi parcouru les routes du Tour de France, dominé par Chris Froome (troisième de l’épreuve sur route à Rio) ces dernières années.

Pour Steve Haake, de l’université de Sheffield Hallam, ces doutes sont compréhensibles dans le climat de scandales de dopage permanent. Mais il estime que l’explication est plus prosaïque :

« Les équipes britanniques se concentrent sur les Jeux olympiques, qui sont la clé de leur financement. Alors, c’est normal qu’elles n’impressionnent pas aux Championnats du monde, qui ne sont pas leur priorité. »
Et surtout, il estime que le système actuel, avec des financements garantis sur une, voire deux olympiades, permet de travailler dans la durée. « Ce qu’il se passe actuellement ne va pas s’arrêter à Rio. » Il y a de fortes chances que les concurrents des Britanniques jalousent encore leurs performances aux Jeux de Tokyo en 2020.

Voir également:

Rio Olympics 2016: Team GB medal haul makes them a ‘superpower of sport’

Great Britain’s Olympic review

Great Britain is « one of the superpowers of Olympic sport » after its performance in Rio, according to UK Sport chief executive Liz Nicholl.

A total of 67 medals with 27 golds put Team GB second in the medal table – above China for the first time since it returned to the Games in 1984.

« It shows we are a force to be reckoned with in world sport, » Nicholl said.

Britain is the first country to improve on a home medal haul at the next Games, beating the 65 medals from London 2012.

They won gold medals across more sports than any other nation – 15 – and improved on their medal haul for the fifth consecutive Olympics.

The Queen offered her « warmest congratulations » for an « outstanding performance » in Rio, while the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry said the team were an « inspiration to us all, young and old ».

The money behind the medals

UK Sport is the body responsible for distributing funds from national government to Olympic sports.

Team GB’s 67 medals in Brazil cost an average of just over £4m per medal in lottery and exchequer funding over the past four years – a reported cost of £1.09 per year for each Briton.

Nicholl added: « Half of the investment that we’re putting into Rio success also feeds into Tokyo [2020 Olympics]. We’re very confident that we’ve got a system here that’s working and that’s quite exceptional around the world. »

Chief executive of British Gymnastics Jane Allen told BBC Radio 5 live: « You wouldn’t want to be in some of the other countries at the moment, who are examining themselves.

« UK Sport has made those sports that receive the funding be accountable for their results. This is the end result in Rio – the country should expect a return for their investment, it is incredible. »

« It’s tough to imagine a stronger performance, » said Bill Sweeney, chief executive of the BOA.

« When you get into the [Olympic] village there’s been a real collective team spirit around Team GB – you just got a sense that this was a team that wanted to do something really special. »

Britain had been set a target by UK Sport to make Rio its most successful ‘away’ Olympics by beating the 47 medals from Beijing in 2008, but Nicholl said there had been an « aspirational » aim to surpass the achievements of London 2012.

Sweeney said he « wasn’t surprised » by the extent of the success, but that beating China « wasn’t on the radar » before the Games.

« China are a massive nation, aren’t they? Goodness knows how much money they spend on it, » he said.

« To be able to beat them is absolutely fantastic.

Sweeney said it would be difficult for Britain to replicate their position in the medal table at Tokyo 2020, at which he predicted hosts Japan, China, Russia and Australia would all improve.

How has China reacted?

China did top one table in Rio – that of fourth-place finishes, according to data from Gracenote Sports.

They had 25, with the US next on 20 and Britain third on 16.

Gracenote head of analysis Simon Gleave said China’s decline in medals from London 2012 « has been primarily due to the sports of badminton, artistic gymnastics and swimming ».

China Daily said: « In contrast with China’s previous obsession with gold medals, the general public is learning to enjoy the sports themselves rather than focusing on the medal count. Winning gold medals does not mean everything anymore in China. »

Swimmer Fu Yuanhui’s enthusiasm at winning a bronze medal « took Chinese viewers by surprise », said Global Times. « They are used to their athletes focusing in interviews on their desire to win glory for the country. »

Many users of the Chinese social media site Weibo posted messages using the hashtag #ThisTimeTheChinaTeamAreGolden, saying their athletes were still « the best » irrespective of their placing in their events.

Voir encore:

Rio Olympics 2016: How did Team GB make history?

Tom Fordyce

BBC

22 August 2016

It has been an Olympic fiesta like never before for Britain: their best medal haul in 108 years, second in the medal table, the only host nation to go on to win more medals at the next Olympics.

Never before has a Briton won a diving gold. Never before has a Briton won a gymnastics gold. There have been champions across 15 different sports, a spread no other country can get close to touching.

It enabled Liz Nicholl, chief executive of UK Sport, the body responsible for distributing funds from national government to Olympic sports, to declare on the final day of competition in Rio that Britain was now a « sporting superpower ».

Only 20 years ago, GB were languishing 36th in the Atlanta Olympics medal table, their entire team securing only a single gold between them. This is the story of a remarkable transformation.

Biased judges or gracious defeat? What China thinks of GB going second
‘Superpower’ Team GB a ‘world force’

Money talks

As that nadir was being reached back in 1996, the most pivotal change of all had already taken place.

The advent of the National Lottery in 1994, and the decision of John Major’s struggling government to allocate significant streams of its revenue to elite Olympic sport, set in motion a funding spree unprecedented in British sport.

From just £5m per year before Atlanta, UK Sport’s spending leapt to £54m by Sydney 2000, where Britain won 28 medals to leap to 10th on the medal table. By the time of London 2012 – third in the medal table, 65 medals – that had climbed to £264m. Between 2013 and 2017, almost £350m in public funds will have been lavished on Olympic and Paralympic sports.

It has reinvigorated some sports and altered others beyond recognition.

Gymnastics, given nothing at all before Atlanta, received £5.9m for Sydney and £14.6m in the current cycle. In Rio, Max Whitlock won two gymnastics golds; his team-mates delivered another silver and three bronzes.

As a talented teenage swimmer, Adam Peaty relied on fundraising events laid on by family and friends to pay for his travel and training costs. That changed in 2012, when he was awarded a grant of £15,000 and his coach placed on an elite coaching programme. In Rio he became the first British male to win a swimming gold in 28 years.

There are ethical and economic debates raised by this maximum sum game. Team GB’s 67 medals won here in Brazil cost an average of £4,096,500 each in lottery and exchequer funding over the past four years.
Average cost of Games to each Briton
As determined by the Sport Industry Research Centre

At a time of austerity, that is profligate to some. To others, the average cost of this Olympic programme to each Briton – a reported £1.09 per year – represents extraordinary financial and emotional value. Joe Joyce’s super-heavyweight silver medal on Sunday was the 700th Olympic and Paralympic medal won by his nation since lottery funding came on tap.

« The funding is worth its weight in gold, » says Nicholl.

« It enables us to strategically plan for the next Games even before this one has started and makes sure we don’t lose any time. We can maintain the momentum of success for every athlete with medal potential through to the next Games. »

All in the detail

The idea of marginal gains has gone from novelty to cliche over the past three Olympic cycles, but three examples from Rio underline how essential to British success it remains.

In the build-up to these Olympics, a PhD student at the English Institute of Sport named Luke Gupta examined the sleep quality of more than 400 elite GB athletes, looking at the duration of their average sleep, issues around deprivation and then individual athletes’ perception of their sleep quality.

His findings resulted in an upgrading of the ‘sleep environment’ in the Team GB boxing training base in Sheffield – 37 single beds replaced by 33 double and four extra-long singles; sheets, duvets and pillows switched to breathable, quick drying fabrics; materials selected to create a hypo-allergenic barrier to allergens in each bedroom.

« On average, the boxers are sleeping for 24 minutes longer each night, » says former Olympic bronze medallist and now consultant coach Richie Woodhall.

« When you add it up over the course of a cycle it could be as much as 29 or 30 days’ extra sleep. That can be the difference between winning a medal or going out in the first round. »

In track cycling, GB physio Phil Burt and team doctor Richard Freeman realised saddle sores were keeping some female riders out of training.

Their response? To bring together a panel of experts – friction specialist, reconstructive surgeons, a consultant in vulval health – to advise on the waxing and shaving of pubic hair. In the six months before Rio not a single rider complained of saddle sores.

Then there is the lateral thinking of Danny Kerry, performance director to the Great Britain women’s hockey team that won gold in such spectacular fashion on Friday.

« Everyone puts a lot of time into the physiological effects of hockey, but what we’ve done in this Olympic cycle is put our players in an extremely fatigued state, and then ask them to think very hard at the same time, » Kerry told BBC Sport.

« We call that Thinking Thursday – forcing them to consistently make excellent decisions under that fatigue. We’ve done that every Thursday for a year. »

Britain won that gold on a penalty shootout, standing firm as their Dutch opponents, clear favourites for gold, missed every one of their four attempts.
Virtuous circles

Success has bred British success.

That hockey team featured Helen and Kate Richardson-Walsh, in their fifth Olympic cycle, mentoring 21-year-old Lily Owsley, who scored the first goal in the final. A squad that won bronze in London were ready to go two better in Brazil.

« We’ve retained eight players who had medals around their necks already, » says Kerry. « We added another eight who have no fear.

« It gave us a great combination of those who know what it’s all about, and those who have no concept at all of what it’s all about, and have just gone out and played in ruthless fashion.

« We get carried away with some of the hard science around sport, but there’s so much value in how you use characters and how you bring those qualities and traits to the fore. You see that on the pitch. Leverage on the human beings as much as the science. »

In the velodrome, experience and expertise is being recycled with each successive Games.

Paul Manning was part of the team pursuit quartet that won bronze in Sydney, silver in Athens and gold in Beijing. As his riding career came towards the end, he was one of the first to graduate through the Elite Coaching Apprenticeship Programme, a two-year scheme that offered an accelerated route into high-performance coaching for athletes already in British Cycling’s system.

In Rio he coached the women’s pursuit team to their second gold in two Olympics, his young charge Laura Trott also winning omnium gold for the second Games in a row.

Then there is Heiko Salzwedel, head of the men’s endurance squad, back for his third spell with British Cycling having worked under the visionary Peter Keen from 2000 to 2002 and then Sir Dave Brailsford between 2008 and 2010.

Expertise developed, expertise retained. A culture where winning is expected, not just hoped for.

« We have got the talent in this country and we know that we can recruit and keep the very best coaches, sports scientists and sports medics, » says Nicholl.

« It is now a system that provides the very best support for that talent. »

Competitive advantages

Funding has not flowed to all British sports equally, because in some there is a greater chance of success than others.

On Lagoa Rodrigo de Freitas, Britain’s rowers dominated the regatta, winning three gold medals and two silvers.

With 43 athletes they also had the biggest team of any nation there. Forty-nine of the nations there qualified teams of fewer than 10 athletes. Thirty-two had a team of just one or two rowers.

Only nine other nations won gold. In comparison, 204 nations were represented in track and field competition at Rio’s Estadio Olimpico, and 47 nations won medals.

British efforts in the velodrome, where for the third Olympics on the bounce they ruled the boards, were fuelled by a budget over the four years from London of £30.2m, up even from the £26m they received in funding up to 2012.

In comparison, the US track cycling team – which won team pursuit silver behind Britain’s women, and saw Sarah Hammer once again push Trott hard for omnium gold, has only one full-time staff member, director Andy Sparks.

Then there is the decline of other nations who once battled with Britain for the upper reaches of the medal table, and frequently sat far higher.

In 2012, Russia finished fourth with 22 golds. They were third in 2008 and third again in 2004.

This summer, despite escaping a total ban on their athletes in the wake of the World Anti-Doping Agency’s McLaren Report, they finished with 19 golds for fourth, permitted to enter only one track and field athlete, Darya Klishina.

Australia, Britain’s traditional great rivals? Eighth in 2012, sixth in Beijing, fourth in Athens, 10th here in Brazil.

In Rio, 129 different British athletes have won an Olympic medal.

It is a remarkable depth and breadth of talent – a Games where 58-year-old Nick Skelton won a gold and 16-year-old gymnast Amy Tinkler grabbed a bronze, a fortnight where Jason Kenny won his sixth gold at the age of 28 and Mo Farah won his ninth successive global track title.

The abilities of those men and women has been backed up by similar aptitude in coaching and support.

In swimming there is Rebecca Adlington’s former mentor, Bill Furniss, who has taken a programme that won just one silver and two bronzes in London and, with a no-compromise strategy, taken them to their best haul at an Olympics since 1908.

In cycling, there has been the key hire of New Zealand sprint specialist Justin Grace, the coach behind Francois Pervis’ domination at the World Championships, a critical influence on Kenny, Callum Skinner, Becky James and Katy Marchant.

« We have got the talent in this country, and we know we can recruit and keep the very best coaches, sports scientists and sports medics, » says Nicholl.

« It is a system that provides the very best support for that talent. We do a lot in terms of people development. We are conscious when people are recruited to key positions as coaches they are not necessarily the finished article in their broader skills.

« We provide support so that coaches across sports can network and learn from each other. That improves their knowledge expertise and the support systems they’ve got. »

It is an intimidating thought for Britain’s competitors. After two decades of consistent improvement, Rio may not even represent the peak.

Voir encore:

‘Brutal but effective’: why Team GB has won so many Olympic medals

Sports that have propelled Britain up the medal table have received extra investment while others have had their funding cut altogether
Josh Halliday

15 August 2016

In the past 24 hours Team GB have rewritten their Olympic history, moving ahead of China into second place in the Rio 2016 medals table after winning a record-breaking five gold medals in a single day.
Team GB’s Olympic success: five factors behind their Rio medal rush

With Olympic champions in tennis, golf, gymnastics and cycling – and another assured in sailing – the team’s directors hailed national lottery funding and the legacy of London 2012 for the Rio goldrush. So how has funding in British sport changed in the run-up to Super Sunday?

UK Sport, which determines how public funds raised via the national lottery and tax are allocated to elite-level sport, has pledged almost £350m to Olympic and Paralympic sports between 2013 and 2017, up 11% on the run-up to London 2012.

Those sports that have fuelled the rise in Britain’s medal-table positions over the past eight years – athletics, boxing and cycling, for example – were rewarded with increased investment. “It’s a brutal regime, but it’s as crude as it is effective,” said Dr Borja Garcia, a senior lecturer in sports management and policy at Loughborough University.

Sports that failed to hit their 2012 medal target – including crowd-pleasers such as wrestling, table tennis and volleyball – either had their funding reduced or cut altogether. Has that affected their prospects in Rio? It may be too soon to tell, but so far swimming is the only sport that has won medals at this Olympics after having it funding cut post-2012.

The aim is quite simple: to ensure Great Britain becomes the first home nation to deliver more medals at the following away Games. As it stands after day nine on Sunday, Team GB has one more medal than at the equivalent stage in London – their most successful ever Games.

Swimming

Spearheaded by the gold medal-winning Adam Peaty, Team GB has already secured its biggest Olympic medal haul in the pool since 1984, but it was one of the elite sports to have its funding slashed from £25.1m to £20.8m after a disappointing London 2012, when its three medals missed the target of between five and seven.

With six medals so far in Rio – one gold and five silvers – it has already passed its target of five for this Olympic Games. Its national governing body, British Swimming, will hope to be rewarded for this success with an increase in funding before Tokyo 2020.

UK Sport funding for medal-winning Olympians is assured, but some of the clubs where they spend long hours training are struggling to survive. Peaty’s City of Derby swimming club was almost forced to close last year when two pools in the city shut down for nearly three months, its chairman, Peter Spink, said.

“If we hadn’t got the focus of the council back on to swimming, things would have got a lot worse for us,” he said. “Worst case, closure could have happened. I don’t think I felt we got that close fortunately but unless we did something drastic and worked our way through it then, if not closed, we would have been a very much diminished club.”

Steve Layton, the club’s secretary, credited the local authority for fixing a roof at one pool and reopening another that had previously been closed, but added that it was only a matter of time before one of the “not fit for purpose” facilities was permanently closed down.

The club is trying to raise sponsorship money through partnerships with local companies, he said, but has so far been unable to raise enough money to pay for coaches rather than rely on volunteers. The ultimate aim is to raise enough investment for an Olympic-standard 50m pool in Derby, so that the Adam Peatys of tomorrow are not confined to the city’s 25m pools.

“Swimming is not like football. It doesn’t draw the crowds and we are in times of austerity. We understand all that, but we are trying to get sponsorship to give us some support,” Layton said.

The grand rhetoric of an Olympic legacy after London 2012 did not add up to much for cities such as Derby, but Spink said he was hopeful now of more investment in swimming following Team GB’s success in Rio. “The legacy of the London Olympics was always a big thing. We saw that a little bit, but of late that has dwindled a bit. The issues we have in Derby demonstrate that there really wasn’t the appetite either in local or national government to fund sport in that way,” he said.

Cycling
Along with a knighthood for Bradley Wiggins, an increase in funding followed Team GB’s cycling success in London 2012. Their final tally of 12 medals exceeded the target of between six and 10, resulting in a boost to British Cycling’s coffers from £26m to £30.2m.

In Rio, Team GB has secured six medals – four gold and two silver – and smashed two world records, with both the women’s and men’s team pursuit taking gold. It is well on the way to reaching its final Rio target of between eight and 10 medals.

Gymnastics
Max Whitlock competes in the men’s pommel horse event final.

Max Whitlock’s heroics in the Olympics arena on Super Sunday ended a 116-year wait for a British gymnastics Olympic champion.

His double gold also boosted Team GB’s medal count in the sport to four, with Louis Smith winning silver in the pommel horse and Bryony Page becoming the first British woman to win an Olympic trampoline medal by claiming silver in Rio.

Having previously lost all of its elite-level funding, British gymnastics has experienced a steady increase in public investment over the past 20 years, from £5.9m at Sydney 2000 to £14.6m in the current cycle, after it benefited from a 36% funding increase after beating its medal target in London 2012.
Funding for individual athletes
Advertisement

In addition to the funding given to each sport’s governing body, some elite stars – described by UK Sport as “podium-level athletes – also qualify for individual funding to help with living costs.

Medallists at the Olympic Games, senior world championships and Paralympics gold medallists can receive up to £28,000 a year in athlete performance awards funded by the national lottery.

Sportsmen and women who finish in the top eight in the Olympics can receive up to £21,500 a year. Future stars, those expected to win medals on the world or Olympic stage within four years, can get up to £15,000 a year.
Has it worked?

Most experts agree that UK Sports “no compromise” funding approach has underpinned Great Britain’s rise from 36th in the medal table in Atlanta in 1996 to third at London 2012.

“It’s a very rational, cold approach. Medals have gone up. British elite sport is certainly booming. The returns of medals per pound is there,” said Garcia.

Some critics, however, say UK Sport’s approach has gone too far and is damaging grassroots sport. They have argued that focusing disproportionately on sports such as cycling, sailing and rowing has meant those such as basketball risk withering because they were unable to demonstrate they would win a medal at either of the next two Olympics.
Advertisement

“We can ask all the philosophical questions, which are valid. What about basketball, which has a lot of social potential in the inner cities? What about volleyball? What about fencing? Why focus on specific sports?” said Garcia.

“Participation is going down. Why do we invest all this money in all those medals? Just to get the medals? To get people active? To make Great Britain’s name known around the world? With a cold analysis of the objectives and the money invested, yes it has worked.

“I have some sympathy for UK Sport as an organisation. They were given the objectives and they delivered.”

In May, Sport England, which focuses on grassroots sport, unveiled a four-year strategy to target inactivity. More than a quarter of the population is officially defined as inactive because they do less than 30 minutes of activity a week, including walking.

The move is a lurch away from the earlier strategy, which was set before London 2012 and focused on getting more people to play more sport with only mixed results.

Severe cuts to local authority budgets are also squeezing resources at the grassroots level. Councils across England have been forced to make cuts since 2010, when grant funding for local authorities was cut by a fifth, more than twice the level of cuts to the rest of the UK public sector
Jazz Carlin celebrates after winning silver in the women’s 800m freestyle final.

Jazz Carlin celebrates winning silver in the women’s 800m freestyle final. Photograph: Ryan Pierse/Getty Images

Many smaller, older swimming pools are being closed at a time when more people are being inspired to get in the water, thanks in part to Team GB medal winners Jazz Carlin, Siobhan-Marie O’Connor and Peaty.

The Amateur Swimming Association (ASA) said this weekend that there had been a huge jump in the number of people searching online for their nearest leisure pool during the first few days of the Games.
Advertisement

Alison Clowes, the ASA’s head of media, said 80,000 people had used its “poolfinder” app between 5 and 11 August – almost double the rate for the same period in July – and the ASA was getting dozens of phone inquiries too. “We’ve already seen a boost from our Olympic successes, which is great,” she said.

Meanwhile, the average level of swimming proficiency among schoolchildren requires improvement. ASA research shows that 52% of children leave school unable to swim 25 metres unaided.

Jennie Price, the chief executive of Sport England, said: “Watching our athletes achieving great things in Rio is truly inspirational, particularly for young people. Whether it encourages them to get more active, try something new or even strive for gold themselves one day, Team GB is making a massive contribution to sport back home.

“A relatively small number of sports feature regularly on prime-time TV, so for many the Olympic Games is the moment that catapults them onto the screens of the nation. We need to capitalise on that, for example with programmes like Backing the Best where Sport England supports young talented athletes at the beginning of their sporting careers.

“There will be new Max Whitlocks and Kath Graingers out there who Sport England will support through our funding of the talent system, but most won’t reach those heights. Our main aim is making sure all young people get a positive experience when they try a sport and whatever they choose to do, come away with the good basic skills and having had a great time.”

Soft power, hard power et smart power: le pouvoir selon Joseph Nye

Avec ce nouvel ouvrage, l’internationaliste américain poursuit sa réflexion sur la notion du pouvoir étatique au XXIe siècle. Après avoir défini le soft et le smart power, comment Joseph Nye voit-il le futur du pouvoir?

En Relations Internationales, rien n’exprime mieux le succès d’une théorie que sa reprise par la sphère politique. Au XXIe siècle, seuls deux exemples ont atteint cet état: le choc des civilisations de Samuel Huntington et le soft power de Joseph Nye. Deux théories américaines, reprises par des administrations américaines. Deux théories qui, de même, ont d’abord été commentées dans les cercles internationalistes, avant de s’ouvrir aux sphères politiques et médiatiques.

Le soft power comme réponse au déclinisme

Joseph Nye, sous-secrétaire d’Etat sous l’administration Carter, puis secrétaire adjoint à la Défense sous celle de Bill Clinton, avance la notion de soft power dès 1990 dans son ouvrage Bound to Lead. Depuis, il ne cesse de l’affiner, en particulier en 2004 avec Soft Power: The Means to Success in World Politics. Initialement, le soft power, tel que pensé par Nye, est une réponse à l’historien britannique Paul Kennedy qui, en 1987, avance que le déclin américain est inéluctable[1]. Pour Nye, la thèse de Kennedy est erronée ne serait-ce que pour une raison conceptuelle: le pouvoir, en cette fin du XXe siècle, a muté. Et il ne peut être analysé de la même manière aujourd’hui qu’en 1500, date choisie par Robert Kennedy comme point de départ de sa réflexion. En forçant le trait, on pourrait dire que l’Etat qui aligne le plus de divisions blindées ou de têtes nucléaires n’est pas forcément le plus puissant. Aucun déclin donc pour le penseur américain, mais plus simplement un changement de paradigme.

Ce basculement de la notion de puissance est rendu possible grâce au concept même de soft power. Le soft, par définition, s’oppose au hard, la force coercitive, militaire le plus généralement, mais aussi économique, qui comprend la détention de ressources naturelles. Le soft, lui, ne se mesure ni en « carottes » ni en « bâtons », pour reprendre une image chère à l’auteur. Stricto sensu, le soft power est la capacité d’un Etat à obtenir ce qu’il souhaite de la part d’un autre Etat sans que celui-ci n’en soit même conscient « Co-opt people rather than coerce them »[2].

Time to get smart ?

Face aux (très nombreuses) critiques, en particulier sur l’efficacité concrète du soft power, mais aussi sur son évaluation, Joseph Nye va faire le choix d’introduire un nouveau concept: le smart power. La puissance étatique ne peut être que soft ou que hard. Théoriquement, un Etat au soft power développé sans capacité de se défendre militairement au besoin ne peut être considéré comme puissant. Tout au plus influent, et encore dans des limites évidentes. A l’inverse, un Etat au hard power important pourra réussir des opérations militaires, éviter certains conflits ou imposer ses vues sur la scène internationale pour un temps, mais aura du mal à capitaliser politiquement sur ces «victoires». L’idéal selon Nye ? Assez logiquement, un (savant) mélange de soft et de hard. Du pouvoir « intelligent »: le smart power.

Avec son dernier ouvrage, The Future of Power, Joseph Nye ne révolutionne pas sa réflexion sur le pouvoir. On pourrait même dire qu’il se contente de la récapituler et de se livrer à un (intéressant) exercice de prospective… Dans une première partie, il exprime longuement sa vision du pouvoir dans les relations internationales (chapitre 1) et s’attache ensuite à différencier pouvoir militaire (chapitre 2), économique (chapitre 3) et, bien sûr, soft power (chapitre 4). La seconde partie de l’ouvrage porte quant à elle sur le futur du pouvoir (chapitre 5), en particulier à l’aune du «cyber» (internet, cyber war et cyber attaques étatiques ou provenant de la société civile, etc.). Dans son 6e chapitre, Joseph Nye en revient, une fois encore, à la question, obsédante, du déclin américain. La littérature qu’il a déjà rédigée sur le sujet ne lui semblant sûrement pas suffisante, Joseph Nye reprend donc son bâton de pèlerin pour nous expliquer que non, décidément, les Etats-Unis sont loin d’être en déclin.

Vers la fin des hégémonies

Et il n’y va pas par quatre chemins: la fin de l’hégémonie américaine ne signifie en rien l’abrupte déclin de cette grande puissance qui s’affaisserait sous propre poids, voire même chuterait brutalement. La fin de l’hégémonie des Etats-Unis est tout simplement celle du principe hégémonique, même s’il reste mal défini. Il n’y aura plus de Rome, c’est un fait. Cette disparation de ce principe structurant des relations internationales est la conséquence de la revitalisation de la sphère internationale qui a fait émerger de nouveaux pôles de puissance concurrents des Etats-Unis. De puissants Etats commencent désormais à faire entendre leur voix sur la scène mondiale, à l’image du Brésil, du Nigeria ou encore de la Corée du sud, quand d’autres continuent leur marche forcée vers la puissance comme la Chine, le Japon et l’Inde. Malgré cette multipolarité, le statut prééminent des Etats-Unis n’est pas en danger. Pour Joseph Nye, un déclassement sur l’échiquier n’est même pas une possibilité envisageable et les différentes théories du déclin américain nous apprendraient davantage sur la psychologie collective que sur des faits tangibles à venir. «Un brin de pessimisme est simplement très américain»[3] ose même ironiser l’auteur.

Même la Chine ne semble pas, selon lui, en mesure d’inquiéter réellement les Etats-Unis. L’Empire du milieu ne s’édifiera pas en puissance hégémonique, à l’instar des immenses empires des siècles passés. Selon lui, la raison principale en est la compétition asiatique interne, principalement avec le Japon. Ainsi, « une Asie unie n’est pas un challenger plausible pour détrôner les Etats-Unis »[4] affirme-t-ilLes intérêts chinois et japonais, s’ils se recoupent finalement entre les ennemis intimes, ne dépasseront pas les antagonismes historiques entre les deux pays et la Chine ne pourra projeter l’intégralité de sa puissance sur le Pacifique, laissant ainsi une marge de manœuvre aux Etats-Unis.

Cette réflexion ne prend cependant pas en compte la dimension involontaire d’une union, par exemple culturelle à travers les cycles d’influence mis en place par la culture mondialisée[5]. Enfin, la Chine devra composer avec d’autres puissances galopantes, telle l’Inde. Et tous ces facteurs ne permettront pas à la Chine, selon Joseph Nye, d’assurer une transition hégémonique à son profit. Elle défiera les Etats-Unis sur le Pacifique, mais ne pourra prétendre porter l’opposition sur la scène internationale.

De la stratégie de puissance au XXIe siècle

Si la fin des alternances hégémoniques, et tout simplement de l’hégémonie, devrait s’affirmer comme une constante nouvelle des relations internationales, le XXIe siècle ne modifiera pas complètement la donne en termes des ressources et formes de la puissance. La fin du XXe siècle a déjà montré la pluralité de ses formes, comme avec le développement considérable du soft power via la culture mondialisée, et les ressources, exceptées énergétiques, sont pour la plupart connues. Désormais, une grande puissance sera de plus en plus définie comme telle par la bonne utilisation, et non la simple possession, de ses ressources et vecteurs d’influence. En effet, «trop de puissance, en termes de ressources, peut être une malédiction plus qu’un bénéfice, si cela mène à une confiance excessive et des stratégies inappropriées de conversion de la puissance».[6]

De là naît la nécessité pour les Etats, et principalement les Etats-Unis, de définir une véritable stratégie de puissance, de smart power. En effet, un Etat ne doit pas faire le choix d’une puissance, mais celui de la puissance dans sa globalité, sous tous ses aspects et englobant l’intégralité de ses vecteurs. Ce choix de maîtriser sa puissance n’exclue pas le recours aux autres nations. L’heure est à la coopération, voire à la copétition, et non plus au raid solitaire sur la sphère internationale. Même les Etats-Unis ne pourront plus projeter pleinement leur puissance sans maîtriser les organisations internationales et régionales, ni même sans recourir aux alliances bilatérales ou multilatérales. Ils sont voués à montrer l’exemple en assurant l’articulation politique de la multipolarité. Pour ce faire, les Etats-Unis devront aller de l’avant en conservant une cohésion nationale, malgré les déboires de la guerre en Irak, et en améliorant le niveau de vie de leur population, notamment par la réduction de la mortalité infantile. Cohésion et niveau de vie sont respectivement vus par l’auteur comme les garants d’un hard et d’un soft power durables. A contrario, l’immigration, décriée par différents observateurs comme une faiblesse américaine, serait une chance pour l’auteur car elle est permettrait à la fois une mixité culturelle et la propagation de l’american dream auprès des populations démunies du monde entier.

En face, la Chine, malgré sa forte population, n’a pas la chance d’avoir de multiples cultures qui s’influencent les unes les autres pour soutenir son influence culturelle. Le soft power américain, lui, a une capacité de renouvellement inhérente à l’immigration de populations, tout en s’appuyant sur «[des] valeurs [qui] sont une part intrinsèque de la politique étrangère américaine»[7].

Ces valeurs serviront notamment à convaincre les « Musulmans mondialisés » («Mainstream Muslims») de se ranger du côté de la démocratie, plutôt que d’Etats islamistes. De même, malgré les crises économiques et les ralentissements, l’économie américaine, si elle ne sert pas de modèle, devra rester stable au niveau de sa production, de l’essor de l’esprit d’entreprise et surtout améliorer la redistribution des richesses sur le territoire. Ces enjeux amèneront «les Etats-Unis [à]redécouvrir comment être une puissance intelligente»(p.234).

Le futur du pouvoir selon Joseph Nye

L’ouvrage de Joseph Nye, s’il apporte des éléments nouveaux dans la définition contemporaine de la puissance, permet également d’entrevoir le point de vue d’un Américain -et pas n’importe lequel…- sur le futur des relations internationales. L’auteur a conscience que:

«Le XXIe siècle débute avec une distribution très inégale [et bien évidemment favorable aux Etats-Unis] des ressources de la puissance»[8]

Pour autant, il se montre critique envers la volonté permanente de contrôle du géant américain. Certes, les forces armées et l’économie restent une nécessité pour la projection du hard power, mais l’époque est à l’influence. Et cette influence, si elle est en partie culturelle, s’avère être aussi politique et multilatérale. Le soft power prend du temps dans sa mise-en-œuvre, notamment lorsqu’il touche aux valeurs politiques, telle la démocratie. Ce temps long est gage de réussite, pour Joseph Nye, à l’inverse des tentatives d’imposition par Georges Bush Junior, qui n’avait pas compris que  les nobles causes peuvent avoir de terribles conséquences.

Dans cette quête pour la démocratisation et le partage des valeurs américaines, la coopération interétatique jouera un rôle central. Pour lui, les Etats-Unis sont non seulement un acteur majeur, mais ont surtout une responsabilité directe dans le développement du monde. La puissance doit, en effet, permettre de lutter pour ses intérêts, tout en relevant les grands défis du XXIe siècle communs à tous, comme la gestion de l’islam politique et la prévention des catastrophes économiques, sanitaires et écologiques. Les Etats-Unis vont ainsi demeurer le coeur du système international et, Joseph Nye d’ajouter:

«penser la transition de puissance au XXIe siècle comme la conséquence d’un déclin des Etats-unis est inexact et trompeur […] L’Amérique n’est pas en absolu déclin, et est vouée à rester plus puissant que n’importe quel autre Etat dans les décennies à venir»[9]

Comment dès lors résumer le futur des relations internationales selon Joseph Nye? Les Etats-Unis ne déclineront pas, la Chine ne les dépassera pas, des Etats s’affirmeront sur la scène mondiale et le XXIe siècle apportera son lot d’enjeux sans pour autant mettre à mal le statut central des Etats-Unis dans la coopération internationale. Dès lors, à en croire l’auteur, le futur de la puissance ne serait-il pas déjà derrière nous?

1 — Naissance et déclin des grandes puissances, Payot, 1989

2 — Soft Power: The Means to Success in World Politics, Public Affairs, 2004, p. 5

3 — « A strand of cultural pessimism is simply very American » (p.156)

4 — « an allied Asia is not a plausible candidate to be the challenger that displaces the United-States » (p.166)

5 — Fregonese, Pierre-William, La hallyu coréenne ou l’opportunité d’un soft power asiatique, La Nouvelle Revue Géopolitique, n.122, août 2013

6 — « too much power (in terms of resources) can be a curse, rather than a benefit, if it leads to overconfidence and inappropriate strategies for power conversion » (p.207)

7 —« values are an intrinsic part of American foreign policy » (p.218)

8 — « The twenty-firt century began with a very unequal distribution of power resources » (p.157)

9 — « describing power transition in the twenty-first century as an issue of American decline is inaccurate and misleading […] America is not in absolute decline, and it is likely to remain more powerful than any single state in the coming decades ». (p.203)

 Voir aussi:

Power

Softly does it

The awesome influence of Oxbridge, One Direction and the Premier League

The Economist

Jul 18th 2015

HOW many rankings of global power have put Britain at the top and China at the bottom? Not many, at least this century. But on July 14th an index of “soft power”—the ability to coax and persuade—ranked Britain as the mightiest country on Earth. If that was unexpected, there was another surprise in store at the foot of the 30-country index: China, four times as wealthy as Britain, 20 times as populous and 40 times as large, came dead last.

Diplomats in Beijing won’t lose too much sleep over the index, compiled by Portland, a London-based PR firm, together with Facebook, which provided data on governments’ online impact, and ComRes, which ran opinion polls on international attitudes to different countries. But the ranking gathered some useful data showing where Britain still has outsized global clout.

Britain scored highly in its “engagement” with the world, its citizens enjoying visa-free travel to 174 countries—the joint-highest of any nation—and its diplomats staffing the largest number of permanent missions to multilateral organisations, tied with France. Britain’s cultural power was also highly rated: though its tally of 29 UNESCO World Heritage sites is fairly ordinary, Britain produces more internationally chart-topping music albums than any other country, and the foreign following of its football is in a league of its own (even if its national teams are not). It did well in education, too—not because of its schools, which are fairly mediocre, but because its universities are second only to America’s, attracting vast numbers of foreign students.

Britain fared least well on enterprise, mainly because it spends a feeble 1.7% of GDP on research and development (South Korea, which came top, spends 4%). And the quality of its governance was deemed ordinary, partly because of a gender gap that is wider than that of most developed countries, as measured by the UN. Governance was the category that sank undemocratic China, whose last place was sealed by a section dedicated to digital soft-power—tricky to cultivate in a country that restricts access to the web. The political star of social media, according to the index, is Narendra Modi, India’s prime minister, whose Facebook page generates twice as many comments, shares and thumbs-ups as that of Barack Obama.

The index will cheer up Britain’s government, which has lately been accused of withdrawing from the world. But many of the assets that pushed Britain to the top of the soft-power table are in play. In the next couple of years the country faces a referendum on its membership of the EU; a slimmer role for the BBC, its prolific public broadcaster; and a continuing squeeze on immigration, which has already made its universities less attractive to foreign students. Much of Britain’s hard power was long ago given up. Its soft power endures—for now.

Voir également:

The U.S. Jumps to the Top of the World’s ‘Soft Power’ Index

Fortune

June 14, 2016

In an interview on Fox News on Monday, Donald Trump suggested that President Barack Obama was either weak, dumb, or nefarious, saying, “Look, we’re led by a man that either is not tough, not smart, or he’s got something else in mind.”

But President Obama’s work over the last eight years to reposition the U.S. as more diplomatic and less belligerent seems to be paying some dividends, at least according to a survey released today by the London PR firm Portland in partnership with Facebook.

In the Soft Power 30 report, an annual ranking of countries on their ability to achieve objectives through attraction and persuasion instead of coercion, the U.S. leapfrogged the U.K. and Germany to claim the top spot, while Canada, under its popular and photogenic new Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, jumped France to claim fourth place.

Based on a theory of global political power developed by Joseph Nye, a Harvard political science professor, the survey uses both polling and digital data to rank countries on more than 75 metrics gathered under the three pillars of soft power: political values, culture, and foreign policy.

According to survey author Jonathan McClory, the U.S.’s jump to the top spot had a lot to do with the fact that President Obama’s last year as Commander-in-Chief was “a busy one for diplomatic initiatives.”

“The President managed to complete his long-sought Iran Nuclear Deal, made progress on negotiating free trade agreements with partners across the Oceans Atlantic and Pacific, and re-established diplomatic relations with Cuba after decades of trying to isolate the Communist Caribbean Island. These major soft power plays have paid dividends for perceptions of the U.S. abroad,” the author wrote.

The report also praised U.S. contributions in the digital world, via Facebook FB 0.81% , Twitter TWTR 0.11% , and the like, and the fact that it has more universities in the global top 200 than any other country.

The report did admit that U.S.’s rise was a bit odd, though, at least under current circumstances.

“America topping the rankings this year is perhaps a strange juxtaposition to Donald Trump, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, currently threatening to tear up long-held, bi-partisan principles of American foreign policy—like ending the U.S.’s stated commitment to nuclear non-proliferation,” the author wrote.

The U.K.’s slip from the top spot seemed to have more to do with U.S. strength than its own weakness. “The U.K. continues to boast significant advantages in its soft power resources,” the report notes. Indeed, U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron cited last year’s No. 1 ranking in the report as proof of his country’s international influence, the Financial Times reports.

But, the survey adds, Brexit could have devastating effects: “No other country rivals the U.K.’s diverse range of memberships in the world’s most influential organisations. In this context, a risk exists that the U.K.’s considerable soft power clout would be significantly diminished should it vote to leave the European Union.”

The ranking includes several surprising countries, like Russia (27th place). “With its annual military parades and occasional encroachments into European air and naval space, soft power might not spring to mind when thinking about the Russian Federation,” McClory writes. But, the report notes, Russia’s investment in the global, multilingual TV channel RT, as well as its diplomatic work in Syria, seem to be paying dividends.

Argentina climbed onto the list in the 30th and final spot, spurred by optimism that new, reform-minded President Mauricio Macri would further integrate it into the global diplomatic community. It was the only Latin American country other than Brazil to make the list.

 

It’s All About the Elizabeths

TIME

From Australia to Trinidad and Tobago, Queen Elizabeth II’s portrait has graced the currencies of 33 different countries — more than that of any other individual. Canada was the first to use the British monarch’s image, in 1935, when it printed the 9-year-old Princess on its $20 notes. Over the years, 26 different portraits of Elizabeth have been used in the U.K. and its current and former colonies, dominions and territories — most of which were commissioned with the direct purpose of putting them on banknotes. However, some countries, such as Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), Malta and Fiji, used already existing portraits. The Queen is frequently shown in formal crown-and-scepter attire, although Canada and Australia prefer to depict her in a plain dress and pearls. And while many countries update their currencies to reflect the Queen’s advancing age, others enjoy keeping her young. When Belize redesigned its currency in 1980, it selected a portrait that was already 20 years old.

Voir de même:

The Portraits of Queen Elizabeth II
… as they appear on World Banknotes
Elizabeth Alexandra Mary of the House of Windsor has been Queen of the United Kingdom since 1952, when she succeeded her father, King George VI, to the throne. Queen Elizabeth II, as the head of the Commonwealth of Nations, is also Head of State to many countries in the Commonwealth. Although She remains Head of State to many countries, over the years many member nations of the Commonwealth have adopted constitutions whereby The Queen is no longer Head of State.

Queen Elizabeth’s portrait undoubtedly appeared more often on the banknotes of Great Britain’s colonies, prior to the colonies gaining independence and the use of her portrait is not as common as it once was. However, there are a number of nations who retain her as Head of State and she is still portrayed on the banknotes of numerous countries. The Queen has been depicted on the banknotes of thirty-three issuing authorities, as well as on an essay prepared for Zambia. The countries and issuing authorities that have used portraits of The Queen are (in alphabetical order):Australia
Bahamas
Belize
Bermuda
British Caribbean Territories
British Honduras
Canada
Cayman Islands
Ceylon
Cyprus
East African Currency Board
East Caribbean States
Falkland Islands
Fiji
Gibraltar
Great Britain (Bank of England)
Guernsey
Hong Kong
Isle of Man
Jamaica
Jersey
Malaya and North Borneo
Malta
Mauritius
New Zealand
Rhodesia and Nyasaland
Rhodesia
Saint Helena
Scotland (Royal Bank of Scotland)
Seychelles
Solomon Islands
Southern Rhodesia
Trinidad and Tobago
Zambia (essay only)

Arguably, there is some duplication in this list, depending on how it is viewed. Should British Honduras and Belize be counted as one issuing authority? If not, then perhaps Belize should be broken into ‘Government of Belize’, ‘Monetary Authority of Belize’ and ‘Central Bank of Belize’. Similar arguments can be made for the amalgamation of British Caribbean Territories and the East Caribbean States, or for splitting Southern Rhodesia into ‘Southern Rhodesia Currency Board’ and ‘Central Africa Currency Board’. Such decisions can be made by collectors for their own reference, but this list of countries should satisfy most collectors.

In total, there have been twenty-six portraits used on the various banknotes bearing the likeness of Queen Elizabeth. This study identifies the twenty-six individual portraits that have been used and also identifies the numerous varieties of the engravings, which are based on the portraits. The varieties of portraits on the banknotes are due, in the main, to different engravers, but there are some varieties due to different photographs from a photographic session being selected by different printers or issuing authorities.

The list that follows this commentary identifies the twenty-six portraits, the photographer or artist responsible for the portrait (where possible), and the date the portrait was executed. Portraits used on the banknotes come from one of several sources. Most are official photographs that are distributed regularly by Buckingham Palace for use in the media and in public places. Some of the portraits have been especially commissioned, usually by the issuing authority, although, in the case of the two paintings adapted for use on the notes (Portraits 9 and 19), it was not the issuing authority that commissioned the paintings. In the case of the portraits used by the Bank of England, a number of the portraits have been drawn by artists without specific reference to any single portrait.

It is interesting to observe that many portraits of Her Majesty have been used some years after they were originally executed. There is often a delay in presenting a portrait on a banknote that is to be issued to the public, because of the time required to produce a note from the design stage. Therefore, it is unusual to see a portrait appear on a banknote in less than two years after the original portrait was executed.

However, some portraits are introduced onto banknotes many years after they were taken. Portrait 9, which is based on the famous painting by Pietro Annigoni, was completed in 1955 but did not appear on a banknote until 1961. The last countries to introduce this portrait to their notes were the Seychelles and Fiji, who placed the portrait on their 1968 issues. Similarly, Portrait 17 was taken at the time of Her Majesty’s Silver Jubilee in 1977 and made its first appearance on the notes of New Zealand in 1981, but it was only introduced to the notes of the Cayman Islands in 1991. Perhaps the longest delay in using a portrait belongs to Belize. Portrait 13 was taken in 1960 and first used on the New Zealand banknotes in 1967, which is in itself a reasonable delay. Belize introduced the image to its banknotes in 1980, some twenty years after the portrait was taken.

Apart from the portrait of Queen Elizabeth as a young girl on the Canadian 20-dollar notes of 1935, the earliest portrait used on the banknotes is Portrait 6, which appears on the Canadian notes issued in 1954. The portrait used for the Canadian notes was taken in 1951 when Elizabeth was yet to accede to the throne. Undoubtedly there was a touch of nationalism is the choice of the portrait, as the photographer, Yousuf Karsh, was a Canadian. Karsh was born in Turkish Armenia but found himself working in Quebec at the age of sixteen for his uncle, who was a portrait photographer. Karsh became one of the great portrait photographers of the twentieth century and took numerous photographs of The Queen, although this is his only portrait of Her Majesty to appear on a banknote.

Portrait 6 is particularly famous because the original engraving of The Queen, which appeared on the 1954 Canadian issues, showed a ‘devil’s head’ in her hair. After causing some embarrassment to the Bank of Canada, the image was re-engraved and the notes reprinted. Notes with the modified portrait appeared from 1955.

While there have been some very famous photographers to have taken The Queen’s portrait, Dorothy Wilding is the photographer to have taken most portraits for use on world banknotes. Wilding had been a court photographer for King George VI and many of the images of the King that can be found on banknotes, coins and postage stamps throughout the Commonwealth were copied from her photographs. On the accession of Queen Elizabeth, Wilding was granted the same duty by the new monarch. Shortly after Elizabeth became Queen many photographs of the new monarch were taken by Wilding. These photographs were required for images that could be used on coins, stamps, banknotes and for official portraits that could be hung in offices and public places.

In her autobiography, In Pursuit of Perfection, Wilding says of the images she created:
‘Of all the stamps of Queen Elizabeth II reproduced from my photographs, I think the two most outstanding are the one-cent North Borneo, and our own little everyday 2½d. It is interesting to see that the Group of Fiji Islanders have chosen to use for some of their stamps the head taken from the full length portrait of Annigoni … and for the others, one of my standard portraits which have been commonly used throughout the Colonial stamp issue of the present reign.’
From her description of the postage stamps, it is possible that Wilding was unaware her images were also being used on banknotes. The image on the North Borneo stamp, preferred by Wilding, is very similar to Portrait 3 but taken at a slightly different angle. The image on the English 2½d stamp is similarly akin to Portrait 4.

Anthony Buckley was another prolific photographer of The Queen, and his work is well represented in the engravings of Her Majesty on the banknotes. An English photographer, most of Buckley’s portraits were taken in the 1960s and 1970s. His work has also been adapted for use on numerous postage stamps throughout the world.

One of the interesting aspects to the portraits of Queen Elizabeth, which appear on world banknotes, is the style of portrait chosen by each issuing authority. How does each issuing authority wish to portray The Queen? Some of the portraits are formal, showing The Queen as a regal person, and some show her in relatively informal dress. While most issuing authorities have chosen to show The Queen in formal attire, the Bank of Canada has always shown The Queen without any formal regalia and always without a tiara. It has been suggested that this may be due to a desire to appease the French elements of Canada.

Australia originally opted to show Her Majesty in formal attire. Portrait 5 shows a profile of The Queen wearing the State Diadem and Portrait 12 shows Her Majesty in the Regalia of the Order of the Garter. When preparations were being made to commission a portrait for the introduction of decimal currency into Australia, the Chairman of the Currency Note Design Group advised that, for the illustration of The Queen (Portrait 12), the ‘General effect [is] to be regal, rather than « domestic » …’ However, the most recent portrait used on Australian banknotes (Portrait 21) shows The Queen in informal attire, perhaps even displaying a touch of ‘domesticity’. This is possibly a reflection of changing attitudes to the monarchy in Australia.

While Canada and Australia may opt to use informal images of The Queen, most issuing authorities continue to depict Her Majesty regally. In many portraits she is depicted wearing the Regalia of the Order of the Garter. In other portraits she is often dressed formally, wearing Her Royal Family Orders. In most portraits she is wearing some of her famous jewellery. In the following descriptions of the portraits, various tiaras, diadems, necklaces and jewellery worn by Her Majesty are described, although not all items have been identified.

Of interest, in the following descriptions, are the differences observed in the same portraits engraved by different security printers. In several instances the same portrait has been use by different security printers and the rendition of the portrait is noticeably variant for the notes prepared by the different companies. Portrait 4 gives a good example of the different renditions of the Dorothy Wilding portrait by Bradbury Wilkinson, Thomas De La Rue, Waterlow and Sons, and Harrisons.

Another example can be seen in Portrait 16, which is used on banknotes issued by Canada and the Solomon Islands. In the engraving used by the Solomon Islands, prepared by Thomas De La Rue, The Queen looks severe, but on the Canadian notes prepared by the British American Bank Note Company and by the Canadian Bank Note Company there is a suggestion of a smile. The Canadian notes achieve the difference by including a subtle shaded area on Her Majesty’s left cheek, just to the right of her mouth.

While there have been thirty-three issuing authorities to have prepared banknotes bearing The Queen’s portrait (excluding the Zambian essay), Fiji has used the most number of portraits, being six in total. Three issuing authorities have used five portraits: the Bank of England, Bermuda, and Canada.

The following list of portraits is ordered by the date on which the banknotes, on which the portraits appear, were first released into circulation, rather than the date on which the portraits were executed. Where the portrait was used by more than one issuing authority, the list of issuing authorities is ordered by the date on which the authority first used the portrait. Next to each issuing authority are the reference numbers from the Standard Catalog of World Paper Money (SCWPM, Volume 2, Ninth Edition and Volume 3, Eighth Edition) that indicate those notes of the issuing authority which bear the portrait.

Voir de plus:

Queen Elizabeth II has, of course, been pictured on British currency for much of her reign, but she has also appeared on the money of various British Commonwealth states and Crown dependencies. With such a long reign and so many nations issuing money with her image on it over the years, there are enough banknote portraits to construct a sort of aging timeline for the Queen. The age given below for each portrait is her age when the picture was made, which is not always the same as the year the banknote was issued (more information can be found at this interesting site maintained by international banknote expert Peter Symes). Here is Elizabeth through the years, on money.

1. Canada, 20 dollars, age 8

Navonanumis

She was just a princess then. Her picture appeared on Canadian banknotes long before anything issued by the Bank of England.

2. Canada, 1 dollar, age 25

Lithograving

From a portrait taken by a Canadian photographer the year before she ascended the throne.

3.  Jamaica, 1 pound, age 26

Numismondo

Newly queen.

4. Mauritius, 5 rupees, age 29

CollectionPpyowb

From a painting commissioned in the 1950s by the Worshipful Company of Fishmongers, for Fishmongers’ Hall in London.

5. Cayman Islands, 100 dollars, age 34

Downies

Here she’s wearing the Russian style Kokoshnik tiara.

6. Australia, 1 dollar, age 38

Leftover Currency

Not long after this portrait was taken, she would meet the Beatles.

7. St. Helena, 5 pounds, age 40

MeBankNotes

Perfecting the art of looking casual while wearing bling.

8. Isle of Man, 50 pounds, age 51

Leftover Currency

More bling for this portrait from her Silver Jubilee.

9. Jersey, 1 pound, age 52

Leftover Currency

Wisdom, experience, soulful eyes.

10. Australia 5 dollars, age 58

Currency Guide

The confidence to go casual.

11. New Zealand, 20 dollars, age 60

1kpmr.com

Not the most flattering one. The green tint doesn’t help.

12. Gibraltar, 50 pounds, age 66

Leftover Currency

Silver hair and shiny diamonds. From a photograph taken at Buckingham Palace.

13. Fiji, 5 dollars, age 73

BanknoteWorld

More silver hair, more shiny diamonds, and not so much smoothing of the wrinkles.

14. Jersey, 100 pounds, age 78

Downies

Face lined, eyes sparkly. She is looking right at you, and she looks good.

15. Canada, 20 dollars, age 85

GDC.net

Back to Canada, where it all began, and where they like their Queen a bit laid back.


RIO 2016: L’athlétisme va-t-il rejoindre les sports pharmacologiques ? (There’s more than the stride, stupid ! – The wierd science behind Usain Bolt’s speed)

20 août, 2016
crouch1887-Bobby-McDonald-kangoroo-start-Aborigines-in-Sport-Tatz-1987-p12boltBolt-ischio cupping_treatment cupping-therapy2On ne peut pas réécrire les livres d’histoire. Lamine Diack (ancien président de la Fédération Internationale des Associations d’Athlétisme)
Sacré dimanche lors du relais 4×100 mètres masculin, le nageur américain Michael Phelps a depuis remporté la médaille d’or du 200 mètres papillon mardi 9 août. Puis, quelques dizaines de minutes plus tard, c’est avec l’équipe américaine que le champion olympique a remporté l’or du relais 4×200 mètres nage libre. Celui qui a désormais 21 titres olympiques et quelque 25 médailles à son compteur, tous métaux confondus, semble désormais inarrêtable. Mais quel est son secret ? Il se pourrait bien que la recette de son succès réside dans un autre mystère : celui de ces énormes tâches, le long de son épaule notamment. À quoi peuvent-elles bien correspondre ? Elles sont tout simplement les marques laissées par la « cupping therapy », en français, la médecine dite des ventouses. Cette médecine n’est autre qu’un mélange de kinésithérapie, d’ostéopathie et de médecine chinoise dont le but est d’éliminer les toxines. Les ventouses, généralement en verre, sont chauffées puis appliquées sur le corps dans des zones stratégiques. Une fois refroidies, elles exercent ainsi une pression sur des points précis. Le tout élimine donc les toxines, mais améliore également la circulation du sang et supprime le stress et autres tensions rendant alors le sportif plus performant. L’internaute
Bolt isn’t kicking into another gear and running away from the field. Instead, he’s slowing down at a slower rate than anyone else. … Bolt is significantly taller than the competition, and his ability to take quick steps, known as stride frequency, is about as good as anyone else’s. He can cover more ground with fewer steps, allowing him to complete 100 meters with just 41 strides, while his opponents average about 45. If the muscles are becoming less powerful with each step, then by taking fewer steps, Bolt’s muscles are becoming less fatigued. That would explain why in the final 20 meters he essentially is slowing down slower than everyone else. So, take fewer steps and you can beat Bolt, right? Well, no. Sprinting effectively means finding the right balance between stride length and stride frequency. Long strides that stretch too far beyond a sprinter’s center of gravity act like a jab to the chin. Each too-long stride breaksforward momentum. However, strides that are too short don’t cover enough ground, and human legs can only turn over so quickly… The WSJ
Bolt invente le triple triplé (…) Et de trois qui font neuf. En l’emportant en finale du relais 4x100m (37 »27), les Jamaïcains (Asafa Powell, Yohan Blake, Nick Ashmeade et Usain Bolt) ont donné à Bolt son troisième titre olympique à Rio, et sa neuvième médaille d’or en trois olympiades (3 sur 100m, 3 sur 200m et 3 sur le relais 4x100m). Les Japonais, à la faveur d’un nouveau record d’Asie (37 »60), finissent surprenants deuxièmes, les Etats-Unis ont terminé troisièmes (37 »62) avant d’être disqualifiés pour mauvais passage de témoin, offrant le bronze au Canada. Usain Bolt n’aura donc perdu dans toute sa carrière qu’une seule des courses olympiques auxquelles il aura participé, à 17 ans en série du 200m des Jeux d’Athènes (2004). Les sprinters américains verront partir Bolt à la retraite avec plaisir. Depuis l’avènement de la star jamaïcaine à Pékin en 2008, et jusqu’à la victoire du relais jamaïcain hier sur 4x100m, les Américains n’ont plus gagné un seul titre olympique ou mondial en sprint. Que ce soit sur 100m, 200m ou le relais 4x100m, la Jamaïque a tout raflé. Sur 100m et 200m, Usain Bolt a quasiment tout emporté (6 titres olympiques, 5 titres aux championnats du monde). Sa seule fausse note date de la finale du 100m aux Mondiaux de 2011, où il avait été disqualifié pour un faux départ. Mais la victoire était revenue à son compatriote Yoann Blake. En relais 4×100, la Jamaïque s’est imposé à chaque échéance mondiale, en 2009, 2011, 2013 et 2015 aux mondiaux. En 2008, 2012 et donc 2016 aux JO. Libération
In 1887 at the Carrington Ground in Sydney, the Aboriginal sprinter Bobby McDonald from Cummeragunga Mission surprised everybody by starting from the crouch position, also known as the kangaroo or the Australian start. McDonald later described this in a letter to the Referee sporting journal in July 1913 as a position he had developed in at least 1884, because it was more efficient and also to ward off the cold when he was waiting on the track. This position was first seen in America at Long Island New York when it was demonstrated by C H Sherrill of Yale in 1888. Australia.gov
In 1887 Bobby McDonald, a talented young indigenous runner from Cummeragunga Mission in northern Victoria, became the first person to officially begin a running race using a crouch-start. He later explained that he’d been using position for a while. He talked of discovering its advantage by accident when a starter began a race while he was crouched down to avoid the cold wind while waiting at the start line. This start position was adopted by many competitive runners and is still used today, although the competitive advantage of starting from this position is debated. Australian geographic
Another aboriginal athlete highlighted is Bobby McDonald, who is said to have invented the 100-metre crouch in 1887, when he was cold before a race start. « Many believed it was modelled on the stance of the kangaroo, » writes Mr. Weller. The Globe and Mail
Qui, à rebours de l’évolution de l’espèce humaine, a un jour osé se mettre à quatre pattes au lieu de se redresser afin de mieux s’élancer ? Quel est le Fosbury du sprint, à l’instar de l’américain qui se mit dos à la barre pour remporter le concours du saut en hauteur aux Jeux de Mexico en 1968 ? De même que Dick Fosbury est resté dans la postérité pour son « flop », Thomas Burke, le champion des Jeux rénovés de 1896 est souvent associé au départ accroupi, alors qu’en fait, aucun des deux n’est l’inventeur de ces techniques. L’histoire du « crouch start » se perd entre les chroniques anglophones du XIXè siècle et les revendications d’invention, parfois sincères, de coachs ou d’athlètes. Le plus ancien document photographique attestant de cette pratique date du 12 mai 1888. Il montre quatre concurrents alignés lors d’un meeting amateur à Cedarhurst (New York). Charles Hitchcock Sherrill, longiligne athlète d’1 m 82 pour 59 kg, est le seul à ne pas partir debout et gagne, coïncidence ou pas, le 100 yards en 10 sec ½. Cet étudiant de Yale à l’éphémère parcours athlétique fera carrière en politique en tant qu’ambassadeur, avec une certaine fascination pour les dictateurs européens… Parmi les plus crédibles auto-attributions de découverte, il y a celle de Bobby McDonald. En 1887 au Carrington Ground à Sydney, le sprinteur aborigène fait sensation en partant les mains au sol… et l’emporte. Son auteur expliquera quelques années plus tard qu’il avait adopté ce « départ kangourou » dès 1884 après avoir observé l’animal. Le fléchissement des jambes induit une sorte de bondissement avant de se mettre en course. La technique a mis quelques années avant de se répandre, le temps que les athlètes perdent l’habitude d’utiliser à l’envi toutes les variantes possibles de départ : debout, fléchi, une main au sol, bras ouverts ou serrés… Jusqu’alors, la plupart des courses étaient des duels, fortement récompensés par des parieurs. Le départ était le plus souvent donné par consentement mutuel, qui était répété jusqu’à ce que les deux professionnels s’élancent enfin simultanément. Le nombre de faux-départ, parfois vingt à la suite, bien que permettant de faire durer le spectacle, était une épreuve pour les nerfs autant pour les concurrents que pour le public… Le show proposait parfois des courses à handicap, déjà en vogue au XVIIIe siècle, attribuant une avance de plusieurs mètres au moins côté, ou encore, à partir des années 1840, en pénalisant le favori par une position désavantageuse. Parmi elles : le départ accroupi ! La rumeur de son efficacité tient paradoxalement à des victoires inattendues, et certainement à un effet de mode suscité par les victoires telles que celles de Sherrill aux USA ou McDonald en Australie. L’avènement du sport universitaire et amateur déplace les compétitions des voies publiques vers les stades et va accélérer le processus d’adoption du départ accroupi. Les diverses positions des concurrents, de plus en plus nombreux, brouille en effet la lisibilité du départ. Les juges veillant à l’équité de la compétition plébiscitent cette méthode, où l’athlète peut rester stable et immobile en attendant le signal. Selon le décompte de l’entraîneur de Harvard J.G. Lathrop, sur 150 départs, aucun ne fut anticipé durant hiver 1891-92, et seulement un l’année suivante. Pierre-Jean Vazel
Avec un taux de 18 % de blessés, les athlètes sont souvent victimes de lésions musculaire et tendineuses. 61 % des problèmes surviennent à l’entraînement, une statistique qui devrait inciter à revoir les pratiques de préparation à l’effort. Le fait que les champions olympiques en titre (Usain Bolt, Shelly-Ann Fraser, Aries Merritt et Sally Pearson) des courses les plus courtes du programme (100 m, 100 m haies et 110 m haies), ainsi que les champions du monde en titre du 100 m (Yohan Blake et Carmelita Jeter) soient actuellement tous blessés aux ischio-jambiers et indisponibles pour la compétition montre bien la spécificité d’un sport où l’entraînement et la fréquence des compétitions poussent les organismes à leur extrême limite. Tous sports confondus, le maillon faible des sportifs semble d’ailleurs être la cuisse. Le rapport de 2008 montrait que 147 des 1108 blessures comptabilisées à Pékin se produisaient sur cette partie du corps, le plus souvent par des contractions ou ruptures musculaires. Suivie de près par le genou (12 %) et la tête (9 %). Pierre-Jean Vazel
Tyson Gay (…) explique ses blessures chroniques par le fait qu’il « court trop vite pour (son) corps ». C’est peut-être aussi le cas d’Usain Bolt, pour son anatomie hors norme : une taille d’1,96 m avec une scoliose (colonne vertébrale déformée dans les trois plans de l’espace) et une jambe droite plus courte d’1,5 cm que la gauche. Quand il court à près de 45 km/h, le Jamaïcain doit supporter lors de chaque appui une force verticale au sol équivalente à 4,5 fois le poids de son corps, d’après des mesures effectuées en Slovénie en 2011. Lors de son record du monde à Berlin en 2009, sa jambe droite produisait des foulées environ 20 cm plus petites que sa jambe gauche, ce qui a été confirmé en conditions expérimentales lors de tests réalisés en Grande-Bretagne avant les Jeux Olympiques (2 m 59 pour la jambe droite contre 2 m 79 pour la gauche). Ces asymétries ne sont pas évidentes lorsqu’on voit les foulées apparemment harmonieuses de l’homme le plus rapide du monde, pourtant, elles ont martyrisé ses ischios du côté gauche – le plus sollicité – depuis le début de sa carrière. D’avril à juillet 2004, le jeune Bolt, alors âgé de 17 ans, ne parvient pas à guérir cette cuisse qui l’empêche de participer aux Championnats du Monde Juniors. Il est alors envoyé à Munich dans la clinique du Dr Hans-Wilhelm Müller-Wohlfahrt. Le médecin de l’équipe allemande de football, et particulièrement du Bayern Munich, était déjà réputé à l’époque pour avoir soigné les trois derniers champions olympique du 100m, Linford Christie, Donovan Bailey et Maurice Greene. Lors du Mondial 2006 en Allemagne, une polémique avait éclaté au sein de l’équipe de France quand Bixente Lizarazu, alors au Bayern Munich, avait conseillé à Patrick Vieira, blessé, de consulter le docteur Müller-Wohlfahrt pour se faire injecter de l’Actovegin. Le médecin des Bleus s’y était alors opposé. Car si l’Actovegin, une substance à base de sang de veau, ne figure pas sur la liste des produits interdits de l’Agence mondiale antidopage, sa vente est interdite en France et aux Etats-Unis, notamment. En 2000, l’Actovegin avait été au coeur de l’enquête judiciaire qui avait visé l’US Postal de Lance Armstrong après le Tour de France. Au moins, de ce côté de Munich, les meilleurs sprinteurs de la planète sont depuis longtemps sur un pied d’égalité puisque les convalescents Powell, Blake, Jeter et Gay sont aussi des clients réguliers du guérisseur controversé. (…) Müller-Wohlfahrt a observé empiriquement que la colonne vertébrale est impliquée dans 90 % des cas de problèmes musculaire, et on voit bien que la scoliose de l’homme le plus rapide du monde a fait l’objet de toutes les attentions. Comme il n’est pas possible de changer la forme de sa colonne, Bolt doit vivre et s’entrainer avec. Depuis deux olympiades, il s’astreint donc à des exercices spécifiques trois fois par semaine, il est suivi en permanence par un masseur et doit se rendre en moyenne trois fais par an à la clinique. Pierre-Jean Vazel

Après la natation qui avait failli rejoindre les sports mécaniques …

Au lendemain du triple triplé historique du sprinter jamaïcain Usain Bolt …

En une compétition qui nous a aussi fait découvrir outre des équipes mystérieusement qualifiées malgré les preuves massives de dopage d’Etat …

Des extraterrestres aux 31 ans et 25 médailles tout aussi mystérieusement tuméfiés pour cause de traitement à base de ventouses censées éliminer toxines, stress et autres tensions …

Retour sur cette étrange discipline où, « à rebours de l’évolution de l’espèce humaine », on « se met à quatre pattes au lieu de se redresser afin de mieux s’élancer » …

Où l’on est contraint à la redistribution des médailles et à la réécriture régulières de l’histoire ….

Et où quand ils n’ont pas purgé dix ans de suspension pour dopage, ses meilleurs champions « courent trop vite pour leur corps » …

Et ne peuvent en fait survivre qu’à coup de doses massives et régulières d’anesthésiants, acides aminés et anti-inflammatoires dans le dos pour « bloquer les fonctions nerveuses et améliorer le métabolisme » …

Pourquoi les sprinteurs partent accroupis ?
Pierre-Jean Vazel
Vazel blog
14 août 2016

Ils sont huit à s’agenouiller aux ordres du starter, prêts à bondir derrière la ligne de départ du 100 m olympique. Mais pourquoi ?

Départ kangourou

Qui, à rebours de l’évolution de l’espèce humaine, a un jour osé se mettre à quatre pattes au lieu de se redresser afin de mieux s’élancer ? Quel est le Fosbury du sprint, à l’instar de l’américain qui se mit dos à la barre pour remporter le concours du saut en hauteur aux Jeux de Mexico en 1968 ? De même que Dick Fosbury est resté dans la postérité pour son « flop », Thomas Burke, le champion des Jeux rénovés de 1896 est souvent associé au départ accroupi, alors qu’en fait, aucun des deux n’est l’inventeur de ces techniques.

L’histoire du « crouch start » se perd entre les chroniques anglophones du XIXè siècle et les revendications d’invention, parfois sincères, de coachs ou d’athlètes. Le plus ancien document photographique attestant de cette pratique date du 12 mai 1888. Il montre quatre concurrents alignés lors d’un meeting amateur à Cedarhurst (New York). Charles Hitchcock Sherrill, longiligne athlète d’1 m 82 pour 59 kg, est le seul à ne pas partir debout et gagne, coïncidence ou pas, le 100 yards en 10 sec ½. Cet étudiant de Yale à l’éphémère parcours athlétique fera carrière en politique en tant qu’ambassadeur, avec une certaine fascination pour les dictateurs européens…

Parmi les plus crédibles auto-attributions de découverte, il y a celle de Bobby McDonald. En 1887 au Carrington Ground à Sydney, le sprinteur aborigène fait sensation en partant les mains au sol… et l’emporte. Son auteur expliquera quelques années plus tard qu’il avait adopté ce « départ kangourou » dès 1884 après avoir observé l’animal. Le fléchissement des jambes induit une sorte de bondissement avant de se mettre en course.

Handicap

La technique a mis quelques années avant de se répandre, le temps que les athlètes perdent l’habitude d’utiliser à l’envi toutes les variantes possibles de départ : debout, fléchi, une main au sol, bras ouverts ou serrés… Jusqu’alors, la plupart des courses étaient des duels, fortement récompensés par des parieurs. Le départ était le plus souvent donné par consentement mutuel, qui était répété jusqu’à ce que les deux professionnels s’élancent enfin simultanément. Le nombre de faux-départ, parfois vingt à la suite, bien que permettant de faire durer le spectacle, était une épreuve pour les nerfs autant pour les concurrents que pour le public… Le show proposait parfois des courses à handicap, déjà en vogue au XVIIIe siècle, attribuant une avance de plusieurs mètres au moins côté, ou encore, à partir des années 1840, en pénalisant le favori par une position désavantageuse. Parmi elles : le départ accroupi ! La rumeur de son efficacité tient paradoxalement à des victoires inattendues, et certainement à un effet de mode suscité par les victoires telles que celles de Sherrill aux USA ou McDonald en Australie.

L’avènement du sport universitaire et amateur déplace les compétitions des voies publiques vers les stades et va accélérer le processus d’adoption du départ accroupi. Les diverses positions des concurrents, de plus en plus nombreux, brouille en effet la lisibilité du départ. Les juges veillant à l’équité de la compétition plébiscitent cette méthode, où l’athlète peut rester stable et immobile en attendant le signal. Selon le décompte de l’entraîneur de Harvard J.G. Lathrop, sur 150 départs, aucun ne fut anticipé durant hiver 1891-92, et seulement un l’année suivante.

Très bien, mais les sprinteurs partent-ils plus vite pour autant ? Même au sein de l’Université de Harvard, où la technique du crouch start est enseignée avec des consignes précises d’écart de pied et de répartitions de masses sur les appuis, la réponse n’est pas évidente: au début des années 1890, Edward Bloss, détenteur du record mondial du triple saut (14 m 78), possède aussi les meilleures références connues de l’époque sur 15, 20, 30, 40, 50 et 75 yards en salle grâce à son départ debout et certainement à son gabarit explosif (1 m 63 pour 62 kg).

Départs à bloc

Cette incertitude quant à l’efficacité de la station basse a-t-elle changé avec les starting-blocks ? Contrairement à l’idée reçue, il n’ont jamais fait l’unanimité : malgré le gain de 0 s 034 vendu par George Bresnahan, l’inventeur du « support de pied » dont il a déposé le brevet en 1927, de prestigieux sprinteurs s’en sont longtemps passé, malgré l’autorisation un peu tardive de l’appareil par la Fédération internationale d’athlétisme (IAAF) en 1937. Le record du monde du 100 yards de Georges Simpson en 1932 (de Ohio State, comme Jesse Owens) avait bien donné quelques idées au champion américain de l’époque Frank Wykoff, mais des essais infructueux l’ont reconduits à ses habitudes.

Le Britannique Allan Wells adepte du départ sans blocs, a dû s’y adapter pour remporter le titre olympique en 1980, forcé par un tout nouveau règlement de l’IAAF imposant dans chaque couloir un appareil de détection de faux-départ niché dans les starts. Est-ce un hasard si en passant de 10 s 15 en 1978 à 10 s 11 en ¼ de finale des JO, il s’est amélioré de la marge prévue par Bresnahan ?

Le départ accroupi a aussi connu une déclinaison, le trépied, osé par Valeri Borzov en 1974 lors des championnats d’Europe en salle et en plein air. Technique issue de tests secrets réalisés en URSS ? Blessure à la main ? Le champion olympique avait laissé malicieusement planer le doute sur ses réelles motivations face aux questions des curieux. En 2012, il m’a finalement expliqué avoir expérimenté toutes sortes de figures durant sa carrière, y compris le trépied, rapidement interdit par l’IAAF pour obliger de poser les deux mains au sol, mais rien ne lui avait permis de mieux jaillir et accélérer que le traditionnel « crouch start ».

À Rio, tous les concurrents du 100 m seront égaux sous les ordres du starter. Mais l’œil aiguisé décèlera quelques subtiles variantes : bassin plus ou moins élevé, espacement des bras et des jambes, orteils calés à l’extrémité haute des blocs, mains posées légèrement en décalage pour synchroniser leur premier mouvement avec celui des jambes… La médaille d’or se joue peut-être dans ces détails, avant même le coup de feu du starter !

Voir aussi:

Docteur Müller, plus fort que la douleur des sprinteurs
Pierre-Jean Vazel
Vazel blog
02 mai 2013

Les meilleurs sprinteurs mondiaux rendent régulièrement visite à Hans-Wilhelm Müller-Wohlfahrt, le médecin des footballeurs du Bayern Munich, aux méthodes non conventionnelles. La plupart viennent consulter le « Docteur Müller » pour des douleurs aux ischio-jambiers. C’est le cas d’Usain Bolt, qui a annoncé ce mardi son forfait pour le 200 m du meeting de Kingston en raison d’une « légère contracture ». Éclairage sur le traitement atypique de la blessure typique des sprinteurs par l’homéopathe bavarois.

Trop vite pour leurs corps

Lors des Jeux Olympiques de Londres l’an passé, tous sports confondus, six blessures musculaires sur dix étaient localisées sur les cuisses. Chez les spécialistes du sprint, le maillon faible des chaines musculaires est la partie postérieure de la cuisse, où s’insèrent les ischio-jambiers. Leur fonction est de fléchir le genou, et en course de vitesse, ils contribuent, avec les fessiers notamment, à étendre la hanche. Alors que la saison d’athlétisme ne fait que commencer, Usain Bolt est la dernière victime en date de l’épidémie de blessures aux ischios qui perturbe les rentrées des stars du sprint. Le 30 mars, Asafa Powell, l’ancien détenteur du record du monde du 100 m, déclarait forfait pour la finale d’une compétition en Australie après avoir ressenti une gêne aux ischios gauches lors des séries. Puis ce fut au tour des champions du monde en titre du 100 m : Yohan Blake le 13 avril à Kingston, fauché en pleine course par ses ischios droits, et Carmelita Jeter sept jours plus tard à Walnut, forcée de ralentir alors qu’elle était sur la voie d’une meilleure performance mondiale de l’année.

Tyson Gay, lui, touche du bois. Épargné cette saison alors que son bilan médical est aussi long que son palmarès, il explique ses blessures chroniques par le fait qu’il « court trop vite pour (son) corps ». C’est peut-être aussi le cas d’Usain Bolt, pour son anatomie hors norme : une taille d’1,96 m avec une scoliose (colonne vertébrale déformée dans les trois plans de l’espace) et une jambe droite plus courte d’1,5 cm que la gauche. Quand il court à près de 45 km/h, le Jamaïcain doit supporter lors de chaque appui une force verticale au sol équivalente à 4,5 fois le poids de son corps, d’après des mesures effectuées en Slovénie en 2011. Lors de son record du monde à Berlin en 2009, sa jambe droite produisait des foulées environ 20 cm plus petites que sa jambe gauche, ce qui a été confirmé en conditions expérimentales lors de tests réalisés en Grande-Bretagne avant les Jeux Olympiques (2 m 59 pour la jambe droite contre 2 m 79 pour la gauche). Ces asymétries ne sont pas évidentes lorsqu’on voit les foulées apparemment harmonieuses de l’homme le plus rapide du monde, pourtant, elles ont martyrisé ses ischios du côté gauche – le plus sollicité – depuis le début de sa carrière.

D’avril à juillet 2004, le jeune Bolt, alors âgé de 17 ans, ne parvient pas à guérir cette cuisse qui l’empêche de participer aux Championnats du Monde Juniors. Il est alors envoyé à Munich dans la clinique du Dr Hans-Wilhelm Müller-Wohlfahrt. Le médecin de l’équipe allemande de football, et particulièrement du Bayern Munich, était déjà réputé à l’époque pour avoir soigné les trois derniers champions olympique du 100m, Linford Christie, Donovan Bailey et Maurice Greene.

Lors du Mondial 2006 en Allemagne, une polémique avait éclaté au sein de l’équipe de France quand Bixente Lizarazu, alors au Bayern Munich, avait conseillé à Patrick Vieira, blessé, de consulter le docteur Müller-Wohlfahrt pour se faire injecter de l’Actovegin. Le médecin des Bleus s’y était alors opposé. Car si l’Actovegin, une substance à base de sang de veau, ne figure pas sur la liste des produits interdits de l’Agence mondiale antidopage, sa vente est interdite en France et aux Etats-Unis, notamment. En 2000, l’Actovegin avait été au coeur de l’enquête judiciaire qui avait visé l’US Postal de Lance Armstrong après le Tour de France.

Au moins, de ce côté de Munich, les meilleurs sprinteurs de la planète sont depuis longtemps sur un pied d’égalité puisque les convalescents Powell, Blake, Jeter et Gay sont aussi des clients réguliers du guérisseur controversé. Tous sont sans doute repartis avec la liste d’exercices de renforcement musculaire que m’avait donné le docteur pour le champion de France Ronald Pognon, lors de notre première visite chez lui en 2007 sur les conseils de footballeurs. Il m’avait aussi remis un rapport de trente-cinq pages intitulé « diagnostic et traitement des contractures et ruptures de fibres musculaires chez les athlètes de haut niveau ». Un document intéressant puisqu’il n’a jamais été publié et qu’il donne un éclairage sur la blessure chronique dont Usain Bolt, en raison de sa scoliose, ne parviendra jamais à se débarrasser.

Les secrets du médecin du Bayern Munich

Dans son communiqué, Bolt fait état d’une « légère contracture (slight strain) » de « grade 1 », d’après le diagnostic effectué sur son lieu d’entrainement. Ce n’est pas exactement la terminologie utilisée par Müller-Wohlfahrt. Pas question non plus d’élongation, de claquage ou de déchirure. Pour lui, la distinction des blessures « ne peut pas se baser sur leur sévérité et leur grade ». La différence n’est donc pas quantitative mais qualitative et il ne voit que deux natures : les « contractures » et les « ruptures de fibres ». Une contracture est caractérisée par une détérioration neuromusculaire plutôt qu’une perturbation des fibres musculaires, elle altère la fonction de l’organe mais laisse l’anatomie intacte. « Chez les footballers, les contractures arrivent en général en première mi-temps ou dès les premières minutes, tandis que les ruptures interviennent en fin de match. » Müller-Wohlfahrt a observé empiriquement que la colonne vertébrale est impliquée dans 90 % des cas de problèmes musculaire, et on voit bien que la scoliose de l’homme le plus rapide du monde a fait l’objet de toutes les attentions. Comme il n’est pas possible de changer la forme de sa colonne, Bolt doit vivre et s’entrainer avec. Depuis deux olympiades, il s’astreint donc à des exercices spécifiques trois fois par semaine, il est suivi en permanence par un masseur et doit se rendre en moyenne trois fais par an à la clinique.

L’originalité de cette méthode repose moins sur le diagnostic que sur le traitement. Faire en sorte de réduire l’hypertonicité musculaire causée par des mauvais alignements du squelette, des amplitudes articulaires réduites, des rigidités causées par la fatigue et le stress émotionnel. Vous souffrez des ischios ? Pas de repos, le docteur vous met au boulot. Il passe une éponge glacée, masse, étire, puis vous allonge sur le ventre.  Les yeux fermés pour mieux palper l’épiderme du dos, il plante d’une main ferme et sûre six, sept, huit seringues, longues comme des couteaux de cuisine, de part et d’autre de la colonne. Les produits injectés, Meaverin, Actovegin et Traumeel (anesthésiants, acides aminés et anti-inflammatoires), sont censés bloquer les fonctions nerveuses et améliorer le métabolisme. La pharmacopée munichoise est en principe homéopathique, naturelle et non synthétique. Et dès le premier jour, il faut s’entrainer. Jogging ou vélo, « la course fait partie des modalités du traitement » pour stimuler l’organisme. Le lendemain et le surlendemain, deux entrainements d’endurance de 20 min et de nouvelles infiltrations, dans un protocole qui inclut kinésithérapie, électrothérapie et thermothérapie. Au 4ème jour, l’entrainement peut reprendre là où l’athlète l’avait laissé. En cas de rupture de fibres, le délai est de dix à quatorze jours minimum, si le patient est immédiatement pris en charge. Sinon, « chaque minute perdue dans les dix premières minutes suivant la blessure peut-être un jour de perdu ».

La contracture ayant eu lieu le week-end dernier, Bolt peut en théorie s’aligner sur le 100m du meeting des îles Caïman le 8 mai. La douleur, réveillée à la fin des championnats jamaïquains en juillet dernier, s’était tue jusqu’à ce printemps, et le dernier détour par Munich début avril n’a manifestement pas été suffisant. On pourrait donc ne pas revoir les foulées asymétriques de « la Foudre » avant le 6 Juin lors du meeting Rome. Il lui reste encore suffisamment de temps – 100 jours exactement – pour préparer les Mondiaux de Moscou (du 10 au 18 août) où il remerciera peut-être encore publiquement le Docteur Müller, comme il l’avait fait à Londres après ses trois titres olympiques.

Voir également:

La qualification de Bolt à Rio, quels scénarios ?

Pierre-Jean Vazel

02 juillet 2016

Un ischio (encore) récalcitrant lors des sélections jamaïcaines a contraint la nuit dernière Usain Bolt, champion olympique des 100 m, 200 m et relais 4×100 m en 2008 et 2012, au forfait pour la finale du 100 m, ainsi que pour l’épreuve du 200 m à Kingston. En théorie, seuls les 3 premiers sont qualifiés pour les Jeux, remplissant le quota autorisé de 3 athlètes par discipline et par pays. Et contrairement aux championnats du monde, les tenants du titre ne sont pas invités aux JO. Alors, depuis, la question agite les réseaux sociaux : Rio ne verrait donc pas la star du sprint tenter de tripler son triplé ?

Selon les règles jamaïcaines…

En pratique, des subtilités réglementaires permettent en fait au sprinteur, nonobstant l’évolution de sa blessure, d’être sélectionné dans les épreuves individuelles, sous certaines conditions. Tout d’abord, les modalités de sélections de l’Association administrative d’athlétisme jamaïcaine (JAAA) prévoient de sauver une star en difficulté : « Les athlètes classés/listés dans le top 3 mondial de leur épreuve qui sont malades ou blessés au moment des Championnats Nationaux et bénéficient d’une dispense de concourir aux championnats peuvent encore être sélectionnables, pourvu qu’ils soient capables de prouver l’état de forme de leur classement mondial avant la soumission finale des inscriptions pour la compétition. »

Bolt répond à ces critères sur 100 m puisqu’avec ses 9 s 88, il possède le 2e chrono de l’année derrière le Français Jimmy Vicaut (9 s 86). Par contre, il n’a pas encore couru de 200 m en 2016. Mais étant donné que les performances qualificatives pour Rio, selon le système fixé par la Fédération Internationale des Associations d’Athlétisme (IAAF), doivent être réalisées entre le 1er mai 2015 et le 11 juillet 2016, on peut imaginer que la JAAA inclura la notion de classement mondial dans cette période. Cette interprétation permettrait à Bolt d’être sélectionnable sur la base de sa victoire en août dernier lors des championnats du monde en 19 s 55, meilleur chrono de 2015.

Pour autant, Bolt n’est pas tiré d’affaire. Si sa sélection dans l’équipe du relais 4×100 m jamaïcain, invaincu en grands championnats depuis sa 2e place aux mondiaux de 2007 ne fait de doute pour personne, il reste que les athlètes qui constitueront les podiums des 100 m et des 200 m à Kingston prétendront légitimement à une sélection pour Rio en individuel. Et, second problème, Bolt ne pourra pas « prouver l’état de forme de son classement mondial » avant que sa cuisse ne guérisse et sa prochaine compétition à Londres prévue le 22 juillet, après la clôture des inscriptions olympiques fixée le 18 juillet. Quels scénarios s’offrent à Bolt pour que la JAAA inscrive sa star à Rio sans éliminer les médaillés de ses championnats nationaux ?

Selon les règles internationales…

Carole Fuchs, Administratrice aux Inscriptions Sportives lors des Jeux de Londres 2012, spécialiste d’athlétisme et rompue aux méandres des règlements, va nous aider à y voir plus clair en décrivant trois possibilités. Le texte qui suit est ce qu’elle nous écrit au sujet du cas de Bolt, d’après les procédures usuelles d’accréditation des athlètes :

Pour les championnats du monde il est possible d’engager 4 athlètes et de décider à la dernière minute quels sont les 3 engagés définitifs. Aux Jeux Olympiques, ça ne marche pas tout à fait de la même manière car le CIO ne peut pas se permettre d’accréditer des athlètes en catégorie AA (athlètes participants) si en fin de compte ils ne participent pas (question de la maîtrise du nombre final d’athlètes qui est un problème sensible pour la gestion des Jeux). En même temps, il y a un délai d’environ 4 semaines entre la clôture des inscriptions et le début des épreuves, donc plein de choses peuvent se passer dans cette période… En 2012, il y a eu presque 80 athlètes qui ont été engagés à la date limite des inscriptions des JO et qui n’ont finalement pas pris part à la compétition principalement pour blessure et dopage. Par conséquent, il y existe 3 manières de gérer les réserves :

N’ inscrire que 3 athlètes et le 4e n’a pas d’accréditation. Le remplacement se fait par la procédure du « remplacement tardif des athlètes«  en fournissant documents médicaux ou justificatifs, le remplacement doit être validé par le CIO et l’IAAF. Dernier délai: la réunion technique. L’athlète retiré perd son accréditation et son droit de concourir dans d’autres épreuves.
En inscrire 3 et inscrire la réserve pour « Athlètes remplaçants avec une accréditation P ». C’est une accréditation réduite qui permet d’accéder aux stades d’entraînement mais pas de dormir au village par exemple. L’athlète n’est pas dans le quota de la délégation. Tous les frais sont à la charge du comité olympique national. Là encore, le remplacement se fait par la procédure du « remplacement tardif des athlètes » en fournissant documents médicaux ou justificatifs, le remplacement doit être validé par le CIO et l’IAAF. Dernier délai: 24 heures avant la confirmation finale des participants pour l’épreuve. L’athlète retiré perd son accréditation et son droit de concourir dans d’autres épreuves.
Une réserve participant dans une autre épreuve. L’athlète a déjà une accréditation AA du fait qu’il participe dans une épreuve. Il peut être inscrit comme réserve dans une autre. Dans ce cas, du fait qu’il n’y a pas de changement d’accréditation à faire, la décision des 3 participants peut se faire au moment de la confirmation finale des participants pour l’épreuve, sans avoir à passer par le processus de « remplacement tardif des athlètes » .
Pour Bolt, on se retrouverait dans le cas 3, car à moins d’une blessure qui mette un terme à sa saison, il aura au minimum une inscription au 4×100 m. Donc la Jamaïque peut décider ce qu’elle veut à la dernière minute pour le 100 m et le 200 m. Le reste, c’est finalement une question de communication publique.

Voir encore:

Dopage : les records d’Europe d’athlétisme bientôt revus et corrigés
Pierre-Jean Vazel
19 mai 2016

Dans le sillage des derniers scandales de dopage, l’Association européenne d’athlétisme a pris une décision inédite : évaluer la crédibilité de chacun de ses records. Svein Arne Hansen, élu l’an dernier à la présidence de la fédération continentale, avait réagit mercredi à l’annonce des 31 nouveaux cas positifs des JO de Pékin 2008 par un message sur twitter:

A statement from our @SvenPres on @iocmedia & @Olympics findings following retesting of Beijing 2008 samples. pic.twitter.com/C0Mm5GhqtT

— European Athletics (@EuroAthletics) 17 mai 2016
« Suite aux résultats du CIO d’après les retests des échantillons des JO de Pékin 2008, je veux réaffirmer ma position qu’il n’est jamais trop tard pour corriger les erreurs du passé et de s’assurer que les athlètes propres soient légitimement récompensés ». Pour se faire, le président de l’AEA précise qu’il « supporte pleinement le retrait de tous les tricheurs des livres d’histoire, peu importe combien de temps après les dates originales des compétitions ».

Groupe de travail à l’étude

L’entraîneur américain Dan Pfaff (coach de champions olympiques et du monde dont le sprinteur Donovan Bailey et du sauteur en longueur Greg Rutherford) a alors interpelé Hansen sur l’acceptation des records établis par les Allemands de l’Est « faciles à corriger ». De nombreux documents et témoignages attestent l’existence d’un programme de dopage en RDA appelé plan d’État 14.25, l’administration de stéroïdes anabolisants à près de 10 000 sportifs – menée clandestinement pendant un quart de siècle jusqu’en 1989. Hansen a répondu que le Conseil de l’AEA vient tout juste d’approuver « un Groupe de travail chargé d’étudier la validité et la crédibilité de tous les records d’Europe. » Il s’agit de passer au crible les records des 41 épreuves masculines et 43 féminines, sans compter les records en salle et par catégorie d’âge.

@PfaffSC @EuroAthletics Council has just approved Working Group 2 study validity & credibility of all Euro Recs.Names to be announced in Jun

— Svein Arne Hansen (@SvenPres) 18 mai 2016
Pour le blog Plus vite, plus haut, plus fort, Svein Arne Hansen donne quelques précisions sur ce projet :

Le Président est en train de finaliser avec le Conseil exécutif de l’AEA la liste des personnes qui travailleront dans le Groupe de travail.
Les noms seront rendus publics courant juin 2016.
Le Groupe sera composé d’un large panel de gens représentant différents secteurs du sport.
Il décidera sur quels documents, témoignages ou preuves s’appuyer pour évaluer la probité de chaque record et communiquera les résultats de son travail au Conseil exécutif.
Il est encore trop tôt pour annoncer une date de publication de la nouvelle liste des Records d’Europe. (Toutefois, selon les Règlements des records continentaux, l’AEA doit publier la liste de ses record à chaque 1er janvier).
La position du président Svein Arne Hansen est à l’opposé de celle de son ancien homologue à la Fédération Internationale des Associations d’Athlétisme Lamine Diack qui avait déclaré qu’on ne pouvait pas « réécrire les livres d’histoire ». Pas très raccord non plus avec la prescription de l’Agence Mondiale Antidopage dans l’Article 17 de son Code mondial antidopage : « Aucune procédure pour violation des règles antidopage ne peut être engagée contre un sportif ou une autre personne sans que la violation des règles antidopage n’ait été notifiée conformément à l’article 7 ou qu’une tentative de notification n’ait été dument entreprise, dans les dix ans à compter de la date de la violation alléguée. »

Des aveux de dopage athlètes permettraient de supprimer leurs records, d’après la Condition 7 des Règlements des records continentaux, sans prescription. Les auteurs de certaines performances jugées imbattables, comme Marita Koch et ses 47 s 60 au 400 m qui ont fêté leurs 30 ans, ont toujours farouchement nié et il est peu probable que d’autres anciennes gloires se mettent à table.

Par où commencer ?

Une manière de se débarrasser de records gênants se trouve peut-être dans cette Condition du règlement : « Les tests (antidopage) doivent être en accord avec les Règles des Compétitions de l’IAAF en cours et des règlements antidopage concernant les Records du Monde. » En l’élargissant, on pourrait se servir de dates à partir desquelles les techniques de contrôles antidopage ont changé et considérer que les records établis auparavant ne correspondent plus aux critères actuels d’homologation. Un peu comme lorsqu’en 1977, les chronos manuels n’ont plus été reconnus comme records et ont été remplacés par les chronos électriques. De la même façon qu’un anémomètre est nécessaire pour valider une performance, l’AEA pourrait statuer que des contrôles antidopage utilisant des techniques modernes le sont aussi, et ne plus reconnaitre les records antérieurs à ces quatre dates, au choix :

1984 : décision que chaque record du monde devra être accompagné d’un certificat de contrôle antidopage, prise lors du Conseil de l’IAAF à Manille du 16-18 décembre 1983. 5 records d’Europe masculins et 5 féminins ont été établis sans ce certificat.

1986 : interdiction du dopage sanguin par le Code antidopage du Comité International Olympique, décidée lors de la 90ème Session du CIO à Berlin les 4 et 5 juin 1985. Cette pratique concernant surtout les épreuves de longue durée, 7 records d’Europe masculins et 5 féminins ont été établis avant que ne soient formellement interdites les transfusions sanguines.

1990 : introduction des contrôles antidopage hors compétitions dans les Règles de l’IAAF en 1989 ; le programme est défini lors de la Commission Dopage de l’IAAF à Londres les 6 et 7 janvier 1990. 14 records d’Europe masculins et 15 féminins ont été établis à une époque où les athlètes n’étaient pas contrôlés en dehors des compétitions.

2009 : amendement du Code mondial antidopage pour autoriser à partir du 1er janvier l’utilisation du profil longitudinal afin d’établir une violation des règles antidopage, sur la base du Passeport Biologique des Athlètes. 31 records d’Europe masculins et 39 féminins ont été établis avant que les athlètes ne soient contrôlés par cette méthode de contrôle antidopage dite indirecte.

Si ces considérations historiques devraient être évoquées par le Groupe de travail, les plus vieux records ne sont pas les plus en danger : le cas le plus évident est celui du 10000 m féminin détenu depuis 2008 par la Turque Elvan Abeylegesse, suspendue pour deux ans par sa fédération nationale en mars 2015 après le retest positif de son échantillon des championnats du monde 2007. Cette sanction devrait entraîner l’annulation de son record, mais l’athlète a entamé une action légale contre l’IAAF devant le Tribunal Abitral du Sport pour des erreurs techniques dans les procédures de son contrôle. Les retests des JO de 2008 et 2012 pourraient apporter d’autres éléments au dossier Abeylegesse et peut-être confondre d’autres détentrices de records, notamment des coureuses et marcheuses russes qui ont brillé lors ces des compétitions.

Un obstacle demeure à la destitution de certains records : dans la forme actuelle des Régulations de l’AEA, la Condition 2 impose qu’une performance ratifiée par l’IAAF soit automatiquement reconnue comme Record continental. On en trouve 28 chez les femmes contre 8 chez les hommes. Interpelé sur ce cas de figure, Svein Arne Hansen a répondu en mettant Sebastian Coe, actuel président de l’IAAF et toujours détenteur de 2 Records d’Europe (1000 m depuis 1981 et 4×800 m depuis 1982), face ses responsabilités : « Mon but est de restaurer un maximum de crédibilité et Seb Coe fera de même à l’IAAF ».

@pahunt1978 @PfaffSC My goal is to restore maximum credibility 2 @EuroAthletics & @sebcoe will do likewise @IAAF. #takestime #wewillgetthere

— Svein Arne Hansen (@SvenPres) 18 mai 2016
La France détient actuellement 10 records d’Europe senior en plein air :

Hommes

100 m 9 s 86 Jimmy Vicaut, Paris Saint-Denis, 2015
3000 m steeple 8 min 0 s 09 Mahiedine Mekhissi-Benabbad, Paris Saint-Denis, 2013
400 m haies 47 s 37 Stéphane Diagana, Lausanne, 1995
Perche 6 m 16 Renaud Lavillenie, Donetsk, 2014
Relais 4×200 m Equipe de France, Nassau, 2014
Marathon 2 h 06 s 36 Benoit Zwierchlewski, Paris, 2003
50,000 m marche (piste) 3 h 35 min 27 s 2 Yohann Diniz, Reims, 2011
20 km marche (route) 1 h 17 min 02 Yohann Diniz, Arles, 2015
50 km marche (route) 3 h 32 min 33 Yohann Diniz, Zurich, 2014

Femmes

100 m 10.73 Christine Arron, Budapest, 1998

(Les performances de Diniz sur 50,000 m  et 50 km et de Lavillenie sont aussi des Records du Monde)

Voir par ailleurs:

Schwazer: le module stéroïdien du passeport biologique en est marche

Pierre-Jean Vazel

24 juin 2016

Exemple de module stéroïdien typique (à gauche) et atypique (à droite) par le Laboratoire Suisse d’Analyse du Dopage
Le marcheur italien Alex Schwazer pourrait bien entrer dans l’histoire. Non pas comme un énième dopé repenti repris une nouvelle fois par la patrouille antidopage, mais comme le premier sportif confondu par le module stéroïdien du Passeport Biologique des Athlètes.
Le conditionnel s’impose tant que la procédure n’est pas terminée – l’athlète clame son innocence et évoque un complot – mais cette information publiée hier par le Corriere Della Sera indique que le passeport stéroïdien apporte enfin ses premiers résultats deux ans et demi après son instauration. Et qu’il va être fatal à de nombreux sportifs…

Sang, urine et hormones

On connaissait le module hématologique du Passeport, opérationnel depuis 2009, qui consiste à observer les variations de paramètres sanguins dans le temps chez un même sportif (hémoglobine, hématocrite, réticulocytes…) pour détecter les effets indirects de dopage sanguin, tel que transfusions sanguines ou prises d’EPO, souvent indétectables par les techniques d’analyses directes d’échantillons de sang. Sa première « prise » fut le marathonien portugais Hélder Ornelas en Mai 2012. Ce module concerne surtout les sportifs d’endurance bien qu’il ait aussi piégé des spécialistes de force-vitesse, tels que la double championne d’Europe du 100 m haies Nevin Yanit (Turquie). Or pour ces derniers, des scientifiques allemands, belges et suisses ont travaillé depuis plus de 10 ans sur l’élaboration de protocoles d’analyses permettant à l’Agence Mondiale Antidopage de valider la mise en place, officielle et légale depuis janvier 2014, d’un deuxième module, dit stéroïdien.

Depuis les années 80 et les travaux du Dr Donike, pour détecter un dopage à la testostérone, les laboratoires antidopage mesurent dans les échantillons urinaires le ratio entre la testostérone et une molécule quasi-jumelle, l’épitestostérone. Étant donné que le ratio naturel T/E est de 1.0 et qu’en cas de dopage stéroïdien, seule la part de testostérone augmente, un résultat supérieur à 4.0 – plafond statistique adopté par les autorités antidopage – est considéré comme une preuve. Preuve toute relative puisque les chercheurs savent que la concentration de ces marqueurs biologiques dans les urines diffèrent d’une personne à l’autre, selon ses conditions génétiques et ethniques (par exemple, la majorité de la population asiatique possède un ratio de 0.1). Or, les contrôles étant anonymes, il n’est pas possible de tenir compte de ces paramètres individuels et vire souvent au casse-tête, aux doutes bénéficiant au sportif voire aux joutes judiciaires.

C’est encore l’équipe du Dr Donike de Cologne qui a publié en 1994 une évaluation longitudinale et individuelle du ratio T/E, première étude scientifique sur le sujet (1). Vingt-deux ans plus tard, le labo allemand a pu passer de la théorie à la pratique avec le cas Schwazer. Selon Corriere, le ratio du marcheur a été mis en graphique à chaque contrôle de 2016 : les 1er et 24 janvier, le 2 février, le 27 avril, un autre en mars, jusqu’au dernier réalisé en compétition lors de son retour victorieux à la Coupe du Monde de marche à Rome le 8 mai afin de valider la procédure du passeport. C’est ce dernier qui a fait pencher la courbe et mis en évidence celui du 1er janvier, le rejetant hors de la variation physiologique naturelle tolérée. À la demande du laboratoire de Montréal, celui de Cologne a donc retesté l’échantillon en question par une procédure longue (48 heures) et coûteuse (environ 400 euro), l’analyse par « spectrométrie de masse de rapport isotopique » (SMRI), qui a révélé la présence de testostérone synthétique. Cette « prise » – si la procédure aboutit à une sanction – montre à nouveau que le dopage stéroïdien n’est pas plus le domaine des sportifs de force-vitesse que le dopage hématologique n’est celui des spécialistes d’endurance.

Le dopage favori

Le dopage stéroïdien est apparu selon certains témoignages vers la fin des années 50 aux États-Unis, probablement plus tard en URSS en raison de la répression politique stalinienne exercée sur les travaux scientifiques portant sur les hormones à partir de 1950 et qui s’est prolongée pendant une dizaine d’années. En Allemagne de l’Est, le Plan d’État 14.25 consistant en l’administration systématique de stéroïdes anabolisants, a permis des progressions de performances spectaculaires chez ses athlètes en l’espace d’une olympiade, selon les estimations d’un rapport de la Stasi de 1977 (2) :

400 m féminin : progrès de 4 à 5 sec
800 m féminin : 5 à 10 sec
1500 m féminin : 7 à 10 sec
Lancer du poids masculin : 2,5 m à 4 m ; féminin : 4,5 à 5m
Lancer du disque masculin : 10 à 12 m ; féminin : 11 à 20 m
Lancer du marteau masculin : 6 à 10 m
Lancer du javelot féminin : 8 à 15 m
Pentathlon féminin : 20 % de points

Les agents anabolisants sont encore les dopants « favoris » des tricheurs – et manifestement pas que des spécialistes de force-vitesse – si l’on croit le dernier Rapport de l’Agence Mondiale Antidopage. Il comptabilise 1479 résultats d’analyses anormaux, soit 48 % du total rapporté par le logiciel ADAMS en 2014, tous sports confondus. Mais après 217 762 contrôles effectués, cela représente 0,68 % de positifs, un taux qui reflète moins la réalité des pratiques dopantes que l’inefficacité de la méthode de contrôle analytique classique… Il n’existe pas d’étude évaluant la prévalence du dopage stéroïdien chez les athlètes, mais la Fédération Internationale des Associations d’Athlétisme avait estimé dans un article scientifique de 2011 (3) qu’une moyenne de 14 % d’athlètes élites avait eu recours au dopage sanguin sur la population étudiée durant la période 2001-2009 d’après les données du module hématologique. Le Passeport Biologique des Athlète n’était alors pas légalement approuvé, et donc ne pouvait être utilisé pour suspendre les athlètes.

Néanmoins, depuis sa mise en place, son taux de réussite en matière de contrôles pour le dopage sanguin n’a toujours pas dépassé le 1 %, et il s’est avéré être manipulable par ceux qui avaient la gestion des résultats. Malgré des « prises » prestigieuses qui auraient été impossibles sans le passeport, le bilan du module hématologique est loin d’être satisfaisant. L’Agence Mondiale Antidopage compte bien sur son nouveau module stéroïdien, resté au stade expérimental pendant 20 ans, pour inverser la tendance. Un troisième, l’endocrinien qui devra s’attaquer aux facteurs de croissance, est encore dans les cartons.

1) Donike M Évaluation d’études longitudinales, détermination des variations de références par sujets du ratio testostérone/épitestostérone. In Avancée récentes d’analyses de dopage, Actes du 11e Séminaire de Cologne sur les analyses de dopage. Sport und Buch Strausse Edition Sport, Cologne (1994).

2) Höppner M Rapport Technique du 3.3.1977, BStU, ZA, MfS, A/637/79, partie II, volume 2, p. 243-244.

3) Sottas P Prévalence du dopage sanguin dans les échantillons collectés sur des athlètes élite, f Clinical Chemistry, 57:5 p. 762-769 (2011)

Voir encore:

The Science Behind Sprinter Usain Bolt’s Speed
Usain Bolt, the fastest-ever human, appears to have an extra gear that propels him ahead of other sprinters. But that’s not what’s going on.
Matthew Futterman
July 28, 2016
Sprinters who have taken on Usain Bolt in the 100-meter dash often describe a moment in the second half of the race when the world’s fastest-ever human just runs away from them.

One minute they are shoulder-to-shoulder with Bolt, believing that this will be the night the legend will be toppled. The next they are staring at his back, watching him raise his hands in triumph, sometimes many meters before he crosses the finish line.

Last week Bolt expressed his usual, unflappable confidence, even though a hamstring injury kept him from Jamaica’s track and field trials. Granted a medical exemption by the country’s athletics federation, he was named to the team even though he couldn’t qualify at the national trials.

“My chances are always the same: Great!” he said. “If everything goes smoothly the rest of the time and the training goes well, I’m going to be really confident going to the championship.”

Rio Olympics 2016
Fans have grown familiar with his methods, too. Bolt, who is 6 feet, 5 inches tall, has won all but one Olympic and World Championship 100-meter race since 2008. The lone exception is the 2011 World Championships, where a false start got him disqualified.
“Anybody can be beaten, but he is a crazy talent and something that we have never seen in the sport,” said Lance Brauman, who has coached many of the world’s top sprinters, including Tyson Gay, who won the 100 at the 2007 World Championships, right before Bolt’s era of dominance began. “You are hoping you have your best day and hope he doesn’t have his.”

Bolt seems to have another gear that no one else does. He accelerates, and no one can keep up. At least that’s what our eyes tell us is happening—but it’s not so.

Bolt is no different from every other incredibly fast man, hitting his top speed of about 27 miles per hour at about the 70-meter mark. From there, his speed drops, if only by a few hundredths of a second for each 10 meters, but in a race that is determined by whiskers, every fraction of a second is vital.

What this means is that Bolt isn’t kicking into another gear and running away from the field. Instead, he’s slowing down at a slower rate than anyone else.

So, beating him should be simple, right? Just don’t slow down. Of course it’s not that easy, and scientists are still figuring out why humans—and cheetahs and pronghorns and other fast mammals—slow down so quickly.
Bolt crossed the finish line to win the final of the men’s 4×100 meter relay for the Jamaican team at the 2015 IAAF World Championships in Beijing in August 2015. Photo: FRANCK FIFE/AFP/Getty Images
For decades, researchers have theorized that deceleration starts as energy stored in the muscles is used up. “All mammals engaged in intense exercise, be it a human marathoner, a cheetah trying to catch prey or the prey trying to avoid becoming a meal, rely on energy stored in the body, usually as glycogen,” said Karen Steudel, a professor of zoology at the University of Wisconsin. “Once this is depleted, the human or cheetah is basically out of gas.”

However, a 2012 study by Matthew Bundle of the University of Montana in Missoula and Peter Weyand at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, showed that the greatest decrease in muscular performance occurs within the first seconds of a sprint when runners are still accelerating, which would suggest that deceleration in a race as short as 100 meters may not be related to how sprinters metabolize glycogen.

“Muscle fatigue happens contraction by contraction,” Weyand said. He argues that the biological process that causes the fatigue is still a mystery. It also is very hard to measure, because it is difficult to examine what is happening to an incredibly fast person’s muscles when he can only run at full speed for roughly three seconds.

Still, the idea that muscle fatigue begins instantaneously and with each muscle contraction may say plenty about why Bolt is so hard to beat.

Bolt is significantly taller than the competition, and his ability to take quick steps, known as stride frequency, is about as good as anyone else’s. He can cover more ground with fewer steps, allowing him to complete 100 meters with just 41 strides, while his opponents average about 45.

If the muscles are becoming less powerful with each step, then by taking fewer steps, Bolt’s muscles are becoming less fatigued. That would explain why in the final 20 meters he essentially is slowing down slower than everyone else.

So, take fewer steps and you can beat Bolt, right? Well, no. Sprinting effectively means finding the right balance between stride length and stride frequency. Long strides that stretch too far beyond a sprinter’s center of gravity act like a jab to the chin. Each too-long stride breaksforward momentum. However, strides that are too short don’t cover enough ground, and human legs can only turn over so quickly.

“You’re always asking, ‘How can I get a little stronger, have a little more finesse, have a little more patience and run faster?’ ” said John Smith, considered by many to be the top sprint coach in the U.S.

Every sprinter says the key to winning is to pay attention only to what is happening in one’s own lane, because that is all that can be controlled. Bolt is trying for an unprecedented “triple-triple”—gold medals in the 100, 200 and 400-by-100 meter relay. If he pulls it off, he will surely be considered the greatest track and field athlete of all time.

Go ahead, try not paying attention to that.

Voir enfin:

Athlétisme

Une nuit au stade: Bolt invente le triple triplé

Retour sur les temps forts d’une soirée qui a vu le Jamaïcain réussir son pari historique de gagner à nouveau le 4×100 m après le 100 et le 200m

Bolt, un 5000 mètres et une première pour le Tadjikistan : retour sur les temps fort de la soirée d’athlétisme de vendredi.

Cédric Mathiot, (à Rio)

20 août 2016

4x100m hommes : Bolt réussit son pari, le Japon créé la surprise

Et de trois qui font neuf. En l’emportant en finale du relais 4x100m (37 »27), les Jamaïcains (Asafa Powell, Yohan Blake, Nick Ashmeade et Usain Bolt) ont donné à Bolt son troisième titre olympique à Rio, et sa neuvième médaille d’or en trois olympiades (3 sur 100m, 3 sur 200m et 3 sur le relais 4x100m). Les Japonais, à la faveur d’un nouveau record d’Asie (37 »60), finissent surprenants deuxièmes, les Etats-Unis ont terminé troisièmes (37 »62) avant d’être disqualifiés pour mauvais passage de témoin, offrant le bronze au Canada.

Usain Bolt n’aura donc perdu dans toute sa carrière qu’une seule des courses olympiques auxquelles il aura participé, à 17 ans en série du 200m des Jeux d’Athènes (2004).  (Photo Reuters)

Bon débarras

Les sprinters américains verront partir Bolt à la retraite avec plaisir. Depuis l’avènement de la star jamaïcaine à Pékin en 2008, et jusqu’à la victoire du relais jamaïcain hier sur 4x100m, les Américains n’ont plus gagné un seul titre olympique ou mondial en sprint.

Que ce soit sur 100m, 200m ou le relais 4x100m, la Jamaïque a tout raflé. Sur 100m et 200m, Usain Bolt a quasiment tout emporté (6 titres olympiques, 5 titres aux championnats du monde). Sa seule fausse note date de la finale du 100m aux Mondiaux de 2011, où il avait été disqualifié pour un faux départ. Mais la victoire était revenue à son compatriote Yoann Blake. En relais 4×100, la Jamaïque s’est imposé à chaque échéance mondiale, en 2009, 2011, 2013 et 2015 aux mondiaux. En 2008, 2012 et donc 2016 aux JO.

Les filles du relais 4×100 américain doublent l’or

Les Américaines ont vengé les Américains. Le relais féminin 4x100m l’a emporté sur les Jamaïcaines en 41 »01 et conserve son titre olympique de Londres. Sur les quatre partantes du relais américain, trois avaient déjà gagné un médaille à Rio, mais aucune sur 100m. Tianna Bartoletta avait pris l’or à la longueur, Allyson Felix l’argent sur 400m et Tori Bowie le bronze sur 200m. (photo AFP)

Voir par ailleurs:

Sport
Michael Phelps : qu’est-ce que la Cupping therapy, à l’origine des grosses tâches sur son épaule ?

La Rédaction (La Rédaction), Mis à jour le 10/08/16 15:19

Sous le feu des projecteurs, Michael Phelps bat tous les records aux JO de Rio. Mais qu’en est-il de ces inquiétantes tâches sur son corps ?

[Mis à jour le 10 août 2016 à 15h19] Sacré dimanche lors du relais 4×100 mètres masculin, le nageur américain Michael Phelps a depuis remporté la médaille d’or du 200 mètres papillon mardi 9 août. Puis, quelques dizaines de minutes plus tard, c’est avec l’équipe américaine que le champion olympique a remporté l’or du relais 4×200 mètres nage libre. Celui qui a désormais 21 titres olympiques et quelque 25 médailles à son compteur, tous métaux confondus, semble désormais inarrêtable. Mais quel est son secret ?

Il se pourrait bien que la recette de son succès réside dans un autre mystère : celui de ces énormes tâches, le long de son épaule notamment. À quoi peuvent-elles bien correspondre ? Elles sont tout simplement les marques laissées par la « cupping therapy », en français, la médecine dite des ventouses. Cette médecine n’est autre qu’un mélange de kinésithérapie, d’ostéopathie et de médecine chinoise dont le but est d’éliminer les toxines. Les ventouses, généralement en verre, sont chauffées puis appliquées sur le corps dans des zones stratégiques. Une fois refroidies, elles exercent ainsi une pression sur des points précis. Le tout élimine donc les toxines, mais améliore également la circulation du sang et supprime le stress et autres tensions rendant alors le sportif plus performant.
« Selon l’endroit où est posée la ventouse, il est possible d’améliorer l’action par voie réflexe et l’action antalgique évite l’apparition de douleurs dues à l’effort. La méthode permet aussi de décongestionner certaines zones inflammatoires, redoutables donc pour prévenir les crampes. Enfin, en stimulant certains points [tirés de la médecine chinoise], la ventouse peut aider à mieux gérer ses émotions. Une sorte de ‘dopage soft physiologique' », comme le détaille Daniel Henry, spécialiste interviewé sur la question par Metronews. Et bonne nouvelle ! La cupping therapy n’est pas un art exclusivement réservé aux sportifs de haut niveau. Il existe d’ailleurs peut de contre-indications, hormis peut-être pour certaines personnes qui prennent des médicaments tels que des anticoagulants. Chacun est donc libre de s’offrir une petite séance revigorante !

 

 

 

 


Rio 2016: Attention, un berlinisme peut en cacher un autre (The Games must go on: From Berlin to Munich and Rio, it’s all about appeasement)

7 août, 2016
index sohn
Putin-BachL’attentat de Nice est le premier attentat en France au cours duquel des enfants ont été tués. Najat Vallaud-Belkacem (ministre de l’Education nationale)
Le 19 mars 2012, ce qui n’est quand même pas si vieux, Mohamed Merah se plaça devant l’école Ozar Hatorah de Toulouse. D’une balle dans la tête, il tua trois enfants juifs. Un crime abject qui horrifia la France. Toute la France et donc vraisemblablement,  un peu Najat Vallaud-Belkacem qui n’était pas encore ministre. La ministre de l’Éducation nationale est un être humain. Et comme tous les êtres humains, elle a la mémoire sélective. Pas besoin de convoquer des sommités de la psychanalyse pour savoir que, le plus souvent inconsciemment, notre cerveau fait le tri entre ce qu’il a envie de retenir et ce qui est voué par lui à l’oubli. Le cerveau de la ministre de l’Éducation nationale a donc fait normalement son travail. Il y a en France quelques personnes pour lesquelles les enfants juifs de Toulouse ne sont que des victimes collatérales, et donc de peu d’importance, du conflit israélo-palestinien. Najat Vallaud-Belkacem en fait-elle partie ? Pour Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, voici les prénoms des enfants assassinés à Toulouse : Myriam, 8 ans, Gabriel, 6 ans, Arieh, 5 ans. Benoît Rayski
Après l’assassinat de caricaturistes, après l’assassinat de jeunes écoutant de la musique, après l’assassinat d’un couple de policiers, après l’assassinat d’enfants, de femmes et d’hommes assistant à la célébration de la fête nationale, aujourd’hui l’assassinat d’un prêtre célébrant la messe…. Collectif franco-musulman
Jusqu’au dernier moment, le Führer et moi-même avons terriblement redouté […] que les trois grandes démocraties de l’Ouest ordonnent à leurs délégations de se retirer […] Vous vous rendez compte: quel coup!… Goebbels
On m’a assuré par écrit […] qu’il n’y aura pas de discrimination envers les Juifs. Vous ne pouvez pas demander plus que ça et je pense que cette promesse sera tenue. Avery Brundage (Berlin, 1936)
Les Jeux doivent continuer. Avery Brundage (Münich, 1972)
Les cérémonies d’ouverture n’ont pas une atmosphère qui se prête aux commémorations de ce genre. Jacques Rogge (Londres, 2012)
Le CIO n’est pas responsable du fait que différentes informations qui ont été offertes à l’Agence mondiale antidopage (AMA) il y a quelques années n’ont pas été suivies d’effets. Le CIO n’est pas non plus « responsable de l’accréditation ou de la supervision des laboratoires antidopage. Donc le CIO ne peut être tenu responsable ni du timing ni des raisons des incidents auxquels nous devons faire face à seulement quelques jours des Jeux. Thomas Bach (président du CIO, Rio, 2016)
Ce rapport parle d’un dopage d’Etat, de manipulation des résultats, de permutations d’échantillons avant Londres 2012. C’est ça le rapport et les gens semblent avoir complètement raté ça. Richard Mclaren
On est face à un système généralisé de dopage dans ce pays. On l’a vu avec l’athlétisme, mais avec le rapport McLaren, on le voit avec tous les autres sports. Je ne comprends pas cette décision. Le CIO avait là l’occasion d’être ferme, de donner un vrai signal. Parce qu’aujourd’hui, le dopage gangrène tous les sports. Et finalement, il s’en remet aux fédérations internationales (elles devront décider au cas par cas de la participation des athlètes russes, ndlr). C’est un manque de responsabilité. C’est dommage parce que les valeurs de l’olympisme et du sport ne sont pas défendues. (…) Il faudrait peut-être plus de courage. Je crois que c’est ce qui a manqué au CIO aujourd’hui. C’est dramatique pour le sport, pour l’image du sport, pour l’image des Jeux olympiques. Je ne comprends pas ce qu’il faut faire de plus ! On ne peut rien faire de plus ! Ce rapport était excellent, l’enquête a été longue et donnait un certain nombre de preuves du dopage organisé. (…) Finalement, la seule fédération courageuse a été la nôtre, la fédération internationale d’athlétisme, qui a réussi à le faire à l’unanimité de ses membres et qui a exclu les Russes de ces Jeux olympiques. On ne pourra pas rester seuls longtemps. Il faudra un jour que le mouvement olympique, peut-être les autres fédérations internationales, se mobilisent aussi contre ce poison qu’est devenu aujourd’hui le dopage. Bernard Amsalem (président de la Fédération française d’athlétisme et vice-président du Comité national olympique et sportif)
Richard McLaren, juriste canadien, avait été chargé d’une enquête en mai par l’Agence mondiale antidopage (AMA), suite aux accusations de Grigori Rodtchenkov, l’ancien patron du laboratoire antidopage russe, portant sur les Jeux olympiques d’hiver de Sotchi. Selon ce rapport, rendu public ce lundi, la Russie a mis en place un «système de dopage d’état». Un «système d’escamotage des échantillons positifs» a été élaboré par le laboratoire de Sotchi, toujours selon ce rapport. Le ministère des sports russe est en outre accusé d’avoir «contrôlé, dirigé et supervisé les manipulations, avec l’aide active des services secrets russes». Ce rapport ajoute même que des échantillons des Mondiaux de Moscou 2013 ont été échangés… Reste à savoir quelles incidences ces révélations pourraient avoir sur l’engagement des Russes aux Jeux olympiques de Rio, l’été prochain. Les athlètes russes ont déjà été écartés des Jo de Rio, sous réserve de la décision du TAS en fin de semaine. Mais, les Etats-Unis et le Canada réclament désormais l’exclusion totale des sportifs russes pour les JO de Rio dans trois semaines. Le Figaro
A moins de deux semaines du début des JO de Rio (5 au 21 août), on ne pourra pas décerner la médaille du courage au Comité international olympique (CIO). Dimanche 24 juillet, le CIO a estimé que le rapport de Richard McLaren, publié le 18 juillet, qui accusait la Russie d’avoir mis en œuvre un « système de dopage d’Etat », n’apportait « aucune preuve » contre le Comité national olympique russe (COR). Le CIO a donc décidé de ne pas suspendre le COR. Mettant en avant le respect de la charte olympique et de la « justice individuelle », il laisse le soin à chaque fédération internationale sportive de juger quels athlètes russes sont éligibles ou non. (…) Une autre aberration est le sort réservé à Ioulia Stepanova, cette athlète russe spécialiste du 800 m, qui se voit interdire de participer aux Jeux de Rio. Aujourd’hui exilée aux Etats-Unis, elle a permis, avec son mari Vitali, de mettre au jour, dès 2014, l’existence d’un dopage institutionnalisé en Russie. Le signal envoyé par le CIO ne manquera pas d’inquiéter les lanceurs d’alerte potentiels comme ceux qui luttent pour un sport plus propre. Il en a fallu des contorsions à la commission exécutive du CIO pour reconnaître que « le témoignage et les déclarations publiques de Mme Stepanova ont apporté une contribution à la protection et à la promotion des athlètes propres, au fair-play, à l’intégrité et à l’authenticité du sport », tout en refusant d’accéder à sa demande, appuyée par la Fédération internationale d’athlétisme, de concourir comme athlète neutre. Arguant du fait qu’elle est une ancienne dopée, le CIO lui a refusé ce droit. Mais, pour lui « exprimer sa reconnaissance », il l’invite à assister à la compétition depuis les tribunes… Elle pourra admirer la foulée du sprinteur américain Justin Gatlin, épinglé deux fois pour prise de produits interdits et qui a toujours nié la moindre faute. Comprenne qui pourra. (…) La situation est ubuesque. Le CIO a fait preuve d’une passivité confinant à la lâcheté vis-à-vis de la Russie. Il est de notoriété publique que M. Bach et Vladimir Poutine entretiennent de bonnes relations. Le chef d’Etat russe a été un des premiers à féliciter M. Bach de son élection en 2013. On peut s’interroger sur le fait que le CIO n’a pas ouvert d’enquête sur le COR alors que les scandales de dopage autour de la Russie se sont multipliés. Le ministre russe des sports, Vitali Moutko, ne s’y est pas trompé en saluant une décision « objective ». La fête olympique a déjà perdu une grande partie de son crédit. Le Monde (Rio 2016 : les coupables lâchetés du CIO, 25.07.2016)
En mai 2012, Jacques Rogge président du Comité international olympique s’oppose à la commémoration, par une minute de silence durant la cérémonie d’ouverture des Jeux olympiques d’été de 2012 des 40 ans de l’assassinat de onze athlètes israéliens. Le rejet de cette demande de commémoration formulée par Israël, la Maison-Blanche, le ministre allemand des Affaires étrangères, Guido Westerwelle, et de nombreux parlements et personnalités à travers le monde a suscité une vive polémique et de nombreuses critiques. Wikipedia
Après la controverse suite au refus du Comité international olympique (CIO) de faire respecter une minute de silence en souvenir de l’attentat des JO de Munich en 1972, un incident a semé l’émoi autour de la délégation de l’État hébreu. Vendredi , un article du quotidien britannique The Telegraph (l’article a été supprimé le 1er août, ndlr) relatait la façon dont s’était déroulé l’entraînement entre des judokas libanais et israéliens. Dans cet article, le porte-parole du comité olympique israélien Nitzan Ferraro décrivait ainsi la séance: «Nous commencions à nous entraîner quand ils [la délégation libanaise de judo] sont arrivés et nous ont vus. Ils n’ont pas apprécié et sont allés voir les organisateurs qui ont placé une sorte de mur entre nous». Selon l’agence de presse Reuters, la délégation libanaise n’avait pas donné d’explication à cette demande. Depuis, la fédération internationale de judo a donné sa version des faits: «Cela est tout simplement faux. Ce qui s’est réellement passé c’est qu’une des deux équipes s’entraînait déjà lorsque la deuxième est arrivée. La première équipe avait tout simplement oublié de réserver la salle. En voyant cela, les deux équipes se sont mises d’accord pour partager la salle afin qu’elles puissent toutes les deux s’entraîner et se préparer en même temps. Tout s’est déroulé le plus simplement et le plus naturellement du monde, sans refus quel qu’il soit» a expliqué Nicolas Messner, le directeur médias de la FIJ . La question du boycott des sportifs israéliens, plusieurs fois évoqué lors de compétitions internationales, est une question ultra-sensible. Avant le début de la compétition olympique, elle avait été été soulevée en Algérie, qui ne reconnaît pas l’État juif. En juin, Rachid Hanifi, président du comité olympique algérien déclarait au Times qu’il ne pouvait garantir que ses athlètes acceptent de combattre un Israélien, soulignant qu’il s’agissait d’une décision sportive et politique. Il faisait référence à deux athlètes qui devaient affronter des Israéliens: le kayakiste Nassredine Bagdhadi s’est retiré d’une course un mois plus tôt en Allemagne, sous la pression du ministre algérien des Sports et la judokate Meriem Moussa a déclaré forfait lors de la Coupe du monde de judo féminin en octobre 2011.  Le 26 juillet, le judoka iranien Javad Mahjoub a invoqué une indisponibilité de 10 jours pour cause de douleurs intestinales alors qu’il devait affronter le plus titré des judokas israéliens Ariel Ze’evi à Londres. Selon le Washington Post , l’Iranien avait admis en 2011 au quotidien national Shargh avoir délibérément perdu face à un adversaire lors d’une compétition pour ne pas rencontrer un Israélien au tour suivant: «Si j’avais gagné, j’aurai dû combattre contre un athlète d’Israël. Et si j’avais refusé de concourir, on aurait suspendu ma fédération de judo pour quatre ans», avait-il déclaré. Une situation que le CIO prend très sérieusement, mettant en garde le comité algérien et les autres délégations contre ces pratiques aux Jeux de Londres. Quatre jours avant la cérémonie d’ouverture, Denis Oswald, le président de la commission de coordination des JO a déclaré: «C’est quelque chose qui s’est déjà produit. Pas officiellement, mais des athlètes se sont retirés soi-disant sur blessures alors qu’ils devaient affronter des athlètes israéliens. Si ce genre de comportements était avéré, des sanctions seraient prises contre l’athlète mais aussi contre le comité national olympique (CNO) et le gouvernement [du pays concerné], car le plus souvent ce ne sont pas des décisions individuelles. Nous aurons un comité d’experts médicaux indépendants qui s’assurera qu’il s’agit bien de blessures.» Selon le journal israélien Yediot Aharonot , après la déclaration polémique en juillet d’un représentant du football égyptien selon lequel «aucun Egyptien ou arabe ne voudra défier Israël, même s’il existe des accords internationaux», le comité national égyptien a voulu couper court au débat. Et de rappeler qu’il respecterait la charte olympique qui stipule que «toute forme de discrimination à l’égard d’un pays ou d’une personne fondée sur des considérations de race, de religion, de politique, de sexe ou autres est incompatible avec l’appartenance au Mouvement olympique.» Par le passé, plusieurs athlètes d’Iran, ennemi revendiqué d’Israël, ont déjà été soupçonnés de boycott. Aux jeux d’Athènes en 2004, le judoka iranien Arash Miresmaeili avait été disqualifié pour avoir dépassé de cinq kilos la limite de poids autorisée alors qu’il devait affronter l’Israélien Ehoud Vaks. Soupçonné d’avoir voulu masquer un boycott par ce surpoids – il avait évoqué une indisposition – il n’a finalement pas été sanctionné par les instances officielles qui ont considéré suffisant le certificat médical avancé, conformément au règlement. Son pays lui a versé 115.000 dollars de prime selon le Washington Post , somme normalement remise aux vainqueurs. À Pékin en 2008, le nageur iranien Mohamed Alirezaei s’était senti malade avant son 100m brasse disputé également par l’Israélien Tom Be’eri. Après avoir fait un court passage à l’hôpital de Pékin, il n’avait pas été sanctionné par le comité olympique. Le sportif, coutumier du fait, avait déjà déclaré forfait aux championnats du monde de natation de Rome en 2009 face à l’Israélien Michael Malul et à Shanghai en 2011 face à Gal Nevo. Le Figaro
Avery Brundage (…) est le cinquième président du Comité international olympique (CIO), en fonction de 1952 à 1972. (…) En tant que dirigeant sportif aux États-Unis, il combat fortement le boycott des Jeux olympiques d’été de 1936 organisés en Allemagne dans le contexte du nazisme et de la persécution des Juifs. Brundage amène avec succès une équipe américaine aux Jeux, mais la participation de cette dernière est controversée. Il est élu membre du CIO cette année-là et devient rapidement une figure majeure du mouvement olympique. Il devient le premier président non-européen du CIO en 1952. Au poste de président, Brundage défend l’amateurisme et combat la commercialisation des Jeux olympiques, bien que ses positions soient vues comme déconnectées du sport moderne. Ses derniers Jeux en tant que président, organisés à Munich en 1972, sont marqués par la polémique : à la cérémonie commémorative suivant le meurtre de onze athlètes israéliens par des terroristes, Brundage décrie la politisation du sport et, refusant d’annuler les épreuves restantes, déclare que « les Jeux doivent continuer ». Cette phrase est applaudie par le public, mais la décision de poursuivre les Jeux sera fortement critiquée par la suite. Ses actions en 1936 et 1972 seront vues comme des marques d’antisémitisme. (…) Des appels à déplacer ou boycotter les Jeux sont lancés pour protester contre la persécution des Juifs. En tant que chef du mouvement olympique aux États-Unis, Brundage reçoit des lettres et des télégrammes lui demandant d’agir en ce sens. En 1933 et 1934, le CIO agit pour garantir des Jeux ouverts à tous et sans discrimination raciale ou religieuse. Le président du CIO, le comte Henri de Baillet-Latour, écrit à Brundage en 1933 : « Je n’affectionne pas personnellement les Juifs, mais je ne les importunerai d’aucune façon». (…) Baillet-Latour s’oppose au boycott, tout comme Brundage, qui a appris en 1933 qu’on envisageait de l’élire au CIO. (…) Les Nazis ne respectent pas leurs engagements de non-discrimination dans le sport puisque des Juifs sont expulsés de leurs clubs sportifs. En septembre 1934, Brundage se déplace en Allemagne pour s’en rendre compte personnellement. Il rencontre des officiels du gouvernement, mais il n’a pas l’autorisation de rencontrer individuellement des responsables sportifs juifs. À son retour, il déclare : « On m’a assuré par écrit […] qu’il n’y aura pas de discrimination envers les Juifs. Vous ne pouvez pas demander plus que ça et je pense que cette promesse sera tenue».  (…) L’athlète afro-américain Jesse Owens, quatre fois champion olympique, est une des sensations des Jeux. D’après certains articles de presse américains, Hitler a quitté le stade au lieu de lui serrer la main. Ce n’est pas vrai : Hitler a été conseillé par le président du CIO Baillet-Latour de ne pas serrer les mains des vainqueurs s’il n’était pas prêt à le faire avec tous les médaillés d’or. (…) L’équipe américaine du relais 4 × 100 mètres provoque une autre controverse qui implique peut-être Brundage. L’équipe prévue comprend Sam Stoller et Marty Glickman, tous deux juifs. Après la troisième médaille d’or d’Owens, ils sont écartés de l’équipe en faveur d’Owens et de Ralph Metcalfe, également afro-américain. L’entraîneur américain pour la piste, Lawson Robertson de l’université de Pennsylvanie, annonce à Stoller et Glickman que les Allemands ont amélioré leur équipe et qu’il est important d’avoir l’équipe la plus rapide possible. Les Américains battent le record du monde dans les séries et la finale pour s’adjuger la médaille d’or. Les Italiens sont deuxièmes et les Allemands troisièmes. Ni Stoller ni Glickman (qui étaient les seuls Juifs de l’équipe américaine sur piste et les seuls athlètes de l’équipe envoyée à Berlin à ne pas concourir) ne croit à la raison indiquée pour leur remplacement ; Stoller écrit dans son journal qu’ils ont été éliminés du relais car deux autres participants, Foy Draper et Frank Wykoff, ont été entraînés par un des assistants de Robertson à l’université de Californie du Sud. Glickman concède que le favoritisme en fonction du collège est une raison possible, mais pense que l’antisémitisme est plus probable. Il durcit sa position dans les années à venir : d’après lui, ils ont été remplacés pour ne pas embarrasser Hitler qui aurait vu des Juifs, en plus des Afro-Américains, remporter des médailles d’or pour l’équipe américaine sur piste. Il pense que Brundage était derrière ce remplacement. Celui-ci nie toute implication dans la décision, ce qui reste controversé. Glickman effectue une longue carrière de commentateur sportif, et reçoit le premier prix Douglas MacArthur (pour l’ensemble de ses actions dans le domaine du sport) en 1998, après la mort de Stoller, du comité olympique des États-Unis (successeur de l’AOC). Dans son compte-rendu publié après les Jeux, Brundage qualifie la controverse d’« absurde » : il remarque que Glickman et Stoller ont terminé cinquième et sixième des qualifications olympiques à New York et que la victoire américaine a confirmé la légitimité de la décision de les avoir exclus de l’équipe. Wikipedia
Son Ki-chong remporte le marathon en 2 heures 29 min 19 s, nouveau record olympique, avec deux minutes d’avance sur le Britannique Harper. Son compatriote Nam Seung-yong, lui aussi avec un nom japonisé (Nan Shoryu), finit troisième, après une dure lutte contre la course d’équipe des Finlandais, qui firent tout pour le déstabiliser. Le premier Allemand, qui figurait pourtant parmi les favoris de la course, finit 29e. Sur le podium, les deux Coréens ont la tête baissée lorsque l’hymne japonais est joué. Son Ki-chong a toujours dit avoir porté le maillot du Japon, mais avoir remporté le marathon pour la Corée. Dès le lendemain, le quotidien de Séoul Dong-a Ilbo (동아일보, Le quotidien d’Extrême-Orient en caractères hangul) titre : « Victoire coréenne à Berlin », ce qui lui vaut neuf mois de suspension par l’occupant japonais. Le quotidien avait illustré son article d’une photo des deux Coréens sur le podium, médaillés mais tête baissée, et avec le drapeau japonais effacé sur leur survêtement. Dix responsables du journal furent également arrêtés. Son arrête sa carrière au lendemain des JO de 1936, refusant de courir sous les couleurs japonaises, et préférant lutter pour l’indépendance de son pays. Il eut ensuite une carrière d’entraîneur de l’équipe nationale. En 1948, aux JO de Londres, il est porte-drapeau de la délégation coréenne. Wikipedia
Glickman et Stoller sont les deux seuls membres de l’équipe américaine olympique n’ayant pas concouru après être arrivés à Berlin ; dans l’histoire des États-Unis aux Jeux olympiques, il est extrêmement rare que des athlètes non blessés ne participent à aucune course. Wikipedia
Glickman a reçu de son vivant, en 1998, un prix du comité olympique américain, une sorte de repentance pour l’affront de 1936. Le prix a été décerné à titre posthume à Stoller. La mort de Glickman en janvier 2001 lui a épargné un chagrin bien plus colossal, précise sa fille : son petit-fils, Peter Alderman, 25 ans, travaillait dans le World Trade Center et a trouvé la mort lors des attaques terroristes du 11 Septembre. The Times of Israel
Jesse Owens est entré dans l’histoire en remportant 4 médailles d’or aux Jeux Olympiques de Berlin, en 1936. Pourtant, il ne devait participer qu’à 3 épreuves: 100 mètres, 200 mètres, saut en longueur. En effet, depuis 1924, les États-Unis alignaient traditionnellement leurs 3 meilleurs représentants sur 100 mètres, les 4 suivants disputant le relais 4 fois 100 mètres. Associés à Foy Draper et Frank Wykoff, Sam Stoller et Marty Glickman devaient disputer cette épreuve. Or ces deux derniers étaient juifs. Certains dirigeants américains, dont Avery Brundage, le futur président du Comité international olympique (C.I.O.), jugèrent bon, pour des raisons non avouables, de les exclure et de les remplacer par Jesse Owens et Ralph Metcalfe. Owens intercéda en faveur de ses camarades, demanda, en vain, que Marty Glickman et Sam Stoller soient réintégrés. Mais, malgré ses récriminations, les dirigeants américains demeurèrent inflexibles. Jesse Owens s’adjugea donc contre son gré une quatrième médaille d’or dans ce relais 4 fois 100 mètres. Avec ses coéquipiers, il établit un record du monde qui allait tenir 20 ans (39,8 s). Mais cette médaille avait un goût amer pour Jesse Owens. Pierre Lagrue
Ils lui ont coupé les parties génitales à travers ses sous-vêtements et ont abusé de lui. Pouvez-vous imaginer les neuf autres assis autour de lui, ligotés, contraints à voir cela? Ilana Romano 
Plus de 40 ans après l’assassinat de 11 athlètes israéliens aux Jeux d’été à Munich, un nouveau film documentaire et un article du New York Times exposent la torture brutale que les victimes ont enduré avant leur décès tragiques. La terrible cruauté avec laquelle les terroristes de Septembre Noir traitaient les athlètes israéliens qu’ils avaient kidnappés aux Jeux olympiques de Munich en 1972 a été dévoilée, dans un nouveau long métrage documentaire et dans un article du New York Times, présentant des interviews avec les épouses de deux des victimes. Le film, « Munich 72 et au-delà », et les interviews, donnent lieu à d’horribles détails sur les derniers moments qu’ont vécu les athlètes, inconnus du public jusqu’à maintenant. Ilana Romano, veuve de l’haltérophile Yossef Romano, et Ankie Spitzer, veuve de l’entraîneur d’escrime Andre Spitzer, ont parlé de la torture qu’on enduré les athlètes, des détails qui n’ont pas été connus auparavant. Elles ont affirmé que les familles des athlètes n’ont eu connaissance des détails seulement 20 ans après le massacre, quand l’Allemagne communiqua des centaines de pages de détails sur ce qui s’était passé. (…) Yossef Romano a été abattu alors qu’il tentait de combattre les terroristes au début de leur attaque. Ils l’ont laissé saigner devant les yeux de ses collègues athlètes, et l’ont castré. Les autres ont été brutalement battus. Ils ont été tués lors d’un raid raté par les forces allemandes près de l’aéroport de Munich, où les ravisseurs ont emmené les victimes. (…) Les familles ont tout mis en oeuvre pour que les victimes soient commémorées lors de tous les Jeux Olympiques. Leurs requêtes ont été rejetées par le Comité international olympique (CIO), mais maintenant, avec l’aide de son nouveau président, Thomas Bach (un homme allemand), les athlètes israéliens seront commémorés grâce à un mémorial de Munich. Leurs noms seront également cités pendant les Jeux olympiques d’été 2016 à Rio de Janeiro, au Brésil. Eretz aujourd’hui
Le massacre de la jeunesse chinoise sur Tiananmen était vieux d’à peine douze ans quand le Comité international olympique, en juillet 2001, attribua à Pékin l’organisation des Jeux de la XXIXe olympiade. Pourquoi s’embarrasser de souvenirs désagréables quand il s’agit de faire «toujours plus fort»? 1 Les droits de l’homme grossièrement bafoués? La misère abjecte des paysans chinois de l’intérieur? Les déplacements de population campagnarde suite au barrage des Trois-Gorges? Et dans la capitale, la destruction de pans entiers de quartiers historiques au nom des jeux «Le CIO ne se préoccupe que de sport et les Jeux de Beijing en seront l’apothéose!» Ainsi se dérobent les instances olympiques devant les questions embarrassantes de l’heure. Un précédent bien plus lourd de sens cependant entache de manière indélébile le drapeau blanc frappé des cinq anneaux. Celui des Jeux olympiques de 1936, accordés à l’Allemagne en 1931, puis encouragés et défendus contre vents et marées, malgré l’installation du régime nazi d’Adolf Hitler en 1933. Des jeux célébrés avec la bénédiction des hautes instances olympiques et hélés comme des jeux exemplaires. La Française Monique Berlioux (…) a pris ses premières fonctions au Comité international olympique en 1967. Elle en devint directeur 2 de fin 1968 à 1985 au siège de Lausanne. (…) Un différend majeur autour du pouvoir réel l’opposa au président élu en 1980 Juan Antonio Samaranch et conduisit à sa démission de ce poste éminent. (…)  La redoutable ancienne journaliste a ainsi entrepris de relater comment le Comité international olympique s’est compromis honteusement devant l’Histoire avec les Jeux olympiques de 1936. Elle vient de publier deux tomes volumineux intitulés Des Jeux et des Crimes, 1936. Le piège blanc olympique).  La thèse de l’auteur tient en peu de mots: si les puissances victorieuses de la Première Guerre mondiale, la Grande-Bretagne, la France et surtout les Etats-Unis, avaient boycotté les Jeux d’hiver de Garmisch-Partenkirchen, compromettant ainsi les Jeux de Berlin 4 l’été suivant, le régime hitlérien en aurait été ébranlé assez pour retarder, sinon éviter les horreurs de la Seconde Guerre mondiale. «Pour la première fois dans l’histoire de l’humanité, écrit-elle, le sport aurait été la plus grande des forces politiques internationales, la plus efficace des armes humaines ». (…) Vingt-sept délégations participent à ces jeux hivernaux, prélude fastueux, organisé de main de maître, aux jeux de la XIe Olympiade qui se tiendront au mois d’août à Berlin. Toutes les équipes, qui défilent devant le chancelier nazi, inclinent leur drapeau national devant lui et lèvent le bras dans un «salut olympique» moins à l’équerre qu’oblique, et parfois franchement nazi. Toutes sauf trois: la Suisse, la Grande-Bretagne, et les Etats-Unis. La France, elle, s’est exécutée comme les autres. «Les Français déclenchèrent un enthousiasme surprenant et assourdissant lorsqu’ils saluèrent le chancelier Hitler en levant le bras à la manière fasciste», écrit alors Associated Press. (…) Qu’importe à Hitler. Ceux qui font mal, ce sont les Américains. Emmenée par son chef de délégation, Avery Brundage (…), alors président du Comité olympique américain, l’équipe de joyeux Yankees n’a pas salué le Führer. Elle a simplement tourné brièvement la tête vers la tribune officielle. Pis, la bannière étoilée n’a pas viré, ni ne s’est abaissée d’un pouce. Depuis l’origine de l’Union, le drapeau américain est sacré, il ne s’incline jamais. Adolf Hitler n’a pourtant pas à se plaindre de Brundage, qui sera coopté membre du CIO à Berlin. Sans ce dernier, il y a fort à parier que les Etats-Unis n’auraient pas été présents à Ga-Pa, comme on dit alors. L’énorme retentissement de ces jeux hivernaux allait en fait donner à l’Américain des arguments forts pour affronter les opposants à la participation des Etats-Unis aux Jeux de Berlin imminents. L’ordre réinstauré en Allemagne depuis 1933 ne lui déplaisait pas, au contraire. Mieux, «Mr.Hitler» lui paraissait être un homme parfaitement fréquentable. Relevant qu’il n’avait jamais été hypnotisé par quiconque, le futur président du CIO (de 1952 à 1972) ne devait-il pas convenir du Führer «que son regard était inoubliable»? Inoubliable en effet. L’aveuglement, la complaisance, voire la sympathie active des maîtres de l’olympisme d’alors a contribué à asseoir la toute-puissance du chancelier allemand. Un boycott américain à Ga-Pa et à Berlin, aurait entraîné, comme par un effet domino, l’abstention de nombreux autres pays. Faute d’un affront majeur sur la scène internationale, les grandioses démonstrations assirent encore davantage l’aura d’Adolf Hitler, urbi et orbi. Ses appétits de conquête trouvèrent donc un vrai «tremplin olympique» dans les jeux de 1936. C’est ce que relate dans le détail l’histoire patiemment recomposée par l’auteur de Des Jeux et des Crimes. (…) L’Américain Avery Brundage* a trop marqué l’histoire des Jeux olympiques d’après la Deuxième Guerre mondiale pour qu’on ne rende pas compte ici du rôle déterminant qu’il joua dans la tenue des joutes allemandes de 1936 et que Monique Berlioux relate dans le détail de son livre. «De 1933 à la clôture des Jeux de Berlin, écrit-elle, son activité infatigable, ses dons de tacticien, sa persuasion d’incarner la vérité et la sagesse, lui assurèrent une influence démesurée, difficilement croyable, sur les enchaînements qui aboutirent en février, puis en août 1936, à la plus grande victoire de propagande du IIIe Reich.» Le Temps

Vous avez dit esprit berlinois ?

En cette ouverture des Jeux Olympiques de Rio …

Où, face aux preuves massives de dopage des sportifs russes, le Comité olympique a encore brillé par son courage …

Et où la planète entière se voit à nouveau confrontée …

Au plus barbare des totalitarismes …

Comme, entre le président américain, chancelière allemande ou autorités françaises, au plus funeste et catastrophique des munichismes …

Comment ne pas repenser …

Sans parler du lâche abandon des athlètes israéliens assassinés (et torturés jusqu’à la profanation de leurs cadavres – castration comprise ! ) par des terroristes palestiniens à Munich il y a 44 ans …

Ou même des deux médaillés coréens du marathon contraints de courir sous le drapeau occupant du Japon …

A ces tristement fameux jeux de Berlin il y a exactement 80 ans …

Et à un autre enfumage souvent oublié …

Derrière le mythe du prétendu refus d’Hitler de serrer la main du sprinter noir-américain Jesse Owens …

Et sous la pression du chef du mouvement olympique américain et futur président du CIO qui devait s’illustrer 36 ans plus tard en refusant tant le boycott avant que l’annulation pendant Münich …

De l’éviction de dernière minute des deux seuls membres de l’équipe américaine olympique à n’avoir jamais participé à aucune course alors qu’ils étaient qualifiés …

Mais qui avaient pour seul malheur de s’appeler Glickman et Stoller ?

Hitler et Jesse Owens aux Jeux olympiques
Retour sur un mythe du XXe siècle
Thierry Lentz est historien spécialiste du Consulat et du Premier Empire, et auteur de nombreux livres sur ces périodes. Il est également directeur de la fondation Napoléon.
Causeur

05 août 2016

Une légende tenace veut qu’aux JO de 1936, Hitler ait quitté le stade olympique de Berlin pour éviter de serrer la main au quadruple champion noir. C’est faux. Ce qui est vrai, en revanche, c’est que le fabuleux Jesse Owens ne fut guère honoré en son propre pays.

Organisés du 1er au 16 août 1936, les JO de Berlin ont fait couler des flots d’encre. Avant même leur ouverture, la presse du monde entier s’était interrogée sur la nécessité de participer à une fête confiée à un pays qui, depuis sa désignation en 1931, avait nettement viré à la dictature. On avait malgré tout décidé d’y aller et ce furent presque 4 000 athlètes de 49 pays qui participèrent aux épreuves. Seule l’Espagne républicaine avait formellement boycotté ces XIe Olympiades auxquelles l’URSS n’était pas invitée. Dans la capitale du Reich, Goebbels avait donné de fermes instructions pour que l’accueil des visiteurs étrangers soit parfait et que tout signe d’antisémitisme soit gommé. Les organisateurs teutons avaient veillé à ce qu’il ne manque pas un seul bouton de guêtre, ajoutant même quelques belles trouvailles dont la principale fut l’introduction de la flamme olympique, transportée en relais depuis la Grèce. Pendant les compétitions elles-mêmes, les controverses reprirent cependant, avec en point d’orgue la décision de la délégation américaine de modifier son équipe de relais en remplaçant deux athlètes juifs, Marty Glickman et Sam Stoller, par leurs coéquipiers noirs Jesse Owens et Ralph Metcalfe. Les responsables de ce faux pas ont toujours nié avoir voulu complaire à leurs hôtes, ce qui n’a pas empêché le Comité olympique américain de « réhabiliter » et de présenter ses excuses à Glickmann et Stoller, en 1998. Cela fit une belle jambe au second : il était mort depuis treize ans.

Quoi qu’il en soit, au soir du 16 août, rares furent ceux qui trouvèrent à redire sur la réussite de l’événement, encore rehaussée aux yeux du gouvernement du Reich par la victoire de ses sportifs qui remportèrent 89 médailles, loin devant les États-Unis (56) et l’Italie (22). C’est bien après la cérémonie de clôture que s’imposa un autre scandale : Hitler aurait quitté le stade et refusé de serrer la main à Jesse Owens après sa victoire au saut en longueur (4 août), venant après celles du 100 mètres (3 août), en attendant celles du 200 m (5 août) et du relais 4 x 100 m (9 août).

Qu’Hitler ait été raciste ne fait pas le moindre doute. Qu’il n’ait guère goûté qu’un athlète noir domine ses compétiteurs blancs non plus. Mais il semble bien que « l’épisode Owens » soit une légende.

[…]

Mischner le prétend dans son livre Arbeitsplatz Olympia-Stadion : Erinnerungen 1936-1972, paru en 2004. Il ajoute même qu’Owens possédait une photo de sa poignée de main avec Hitler. Ladite photo n’a jamais été retrouvée. ↩

Voir aussi:

Les Jeux nazis de 1936, ou l’olympisme complice

Un livre, véritable somme, raconte comment les successeurs et amis de Pierre de Coubertin voulurent le premier triomphe international d’Adolf Hitler. L’auteure, Monique Berlioux, a puisé aux meilleures sources, écrites et orales, pour livrer ce document honteux de l’histoire du CIO.

Le massacre de la jeunesse chinoise sur Tiananmen était vieux d’à peine douze ans quand le Comité international olympique, en juillet 2001, attribua à Pékin l’organisation des Jeux de la XXIXe olympiade.

Pourquoi s’embarrasser de souvenirs désagréables quand il s’agit de faire «toujours plus fort»? 1 Les droits de l’homme grossièrement bafoués? La misère abjecte des paysans chinois de l’intérieur? Les déplacements de population campagnarde suite au barrage des Trois-Gorges? Et dans la capitale, la destruction de pans entiers de quartiers historiques au nom des jeux?

«Le CIO ne se préoccupe que de sport et les Jeux de Beijing en seront l’apothéose!» Ainsi se dérobent les instances olympiques devant les questions embarrassantes de l’heure.

Un précédent bien plus lourd de sens cependant entache de manière indélébile le drapeau blanc frappé des cinq anneaux. Celui des Jeux olympiques de 1936, accordés à l’Allemagne en 1931, puis encouragés et défendus contre vents et marées, malgré l’installation du régime nazi d’Adolf Hitler en 1933. Des jeux célébrés avec la bénédiction des hautes instances olympiques et hélés comme des jeux exemplaires.

La Française Monique Berlioux (photo ci-contre) a pris ses premières fonctions au Comité international olympique en 1967. Elle en devint directeur 2 de fin 1968 à 1985 au siège de Lausanne. Elle en développa considérablement les bureaux et leur fonctionnement, en même temps que la puissance financière. Un différend majeur autour du pouvoir réel l’opposa au président élu en 1980 Juan Antonio Samaranch et conduisit à sa démission de ce poste éminent. Des services aussi remarquables méritaient d’importants dédommagements. Une restriction: Mme Berlioux s’engageait à ne pas écrire sur ses années au château de Vidy, donc sur les secrets de l’olympisme de cette fin de siècle. Ce diktat ne couvrait pas l’histoire antérieure à son passage.

La redoutable ancienne journaliste a ainsi entrepris de relater comment le Comité international olympique s’est compromis honteusement devant l’Histoire avec les Jeux olympiques de 1936. Elle vient de publier deux tomes volumineux intitulés Des Jeux et des Crimes, 1936. Le piège blanc olympique). 3

La thèse de l’auteur tient en peu de mots: si les puissances victorieuses de la Première Guerre mondiale, la Grande-Bretagne, la France et surtout les Etats-Unis, avaient boycotté les Jeux d’hiver de Garmisch-Partenkirchen, compromettant ainsi les Jeux de Berlin 4 l’été suivant, le régime hitlérien en aurait été ébranlé assez pour retarder, sinon éviter les horreurs de la Seconde Guerre mondiale. «Pour la première fois dans l’histoire de l’humanité, écrit-elle, le sport aurait été la plus grande des forces politiques internationales, la plus efficace des armes humaines ».

Le 6 février 1936, il neige à gros flocons sur Garmisch, la petite ville bavaroise qui, avec sa voisine, Partenkirchen, s’est vu confier l’organisation des IVes Jeux olympiques d’hiver. Adolf Hitler, le chancelier du IIIe Reich, est arrivé le matin pour présider la cérémonie d’ouverture.

L’homme qu’acclament les foules enfiévrées détient tous les pouvoirs – sur le pays, sur l’économie, sur les esprits… et sur les conditions atmosphériques! Deux jours plus tôt, raconte Monique Berlioux, la piste de bobsleigh fondait «comme un sorbet». Et soudain, précédant de peu l’arrivée du Führer, la neige!

Vingt-sept délégations participent à ces jeux hivernaux, prélude fastueux, organisé de main de maître, aux jeux de la XIe Olympiade qui se tiendront au mois d’août à Berlin. Toutes les équipes, qui défilent devant le chancelier nazi, inclinent leur drapeau national devant lui et lèvent le bras dans un «salut olympique» moins à l’équerre qu’oblique, et parfois franchement nazi. Toutes sauf trois: la Suisse, la Grande-Bretagne, et les Etats-Unis. La France, elle, s’est exécutée comme les autres. «Les Français déclenchèrent un enthousiasme surprenant et assourdissant lorsqu’ils saluèrent le chancelier Hitler en levant le bras à la manière fasciste», écrit alors Associated Press.

«Les Suisses, comme on le fait chez nous, tournent simplement la tête vers les autorités», relève de son côté le journaliste Marcel André Burgi à Radio-Genève.

Qu’importe à Hitler. Ceux qui font mal, ce sont les Américains. Emmenée par son chef de délégation, Avery Brundage (photo ci-contre), alors président du Comité olympique américain, l’équipe de joyeux Yankees n’a pas salué le Führer. Elle a simplement tourné brièvement la tête vers la tribune officielle. Pis, la bannière étoilée n’a pas viré, ni ne s’est abaissée d’un pouce. Depuis l’origine de l’Union, le drapeau américain est sacré, il ne s’incline jamais.

Adolf Hitler n’a pourtant pas à se plaindre de Brundage, qui sera coopté membre du CIO à Berlin. Sans ce dernier, il y a fort à parier que les Etats-Unis n’auraient pas été présents à Ga-Pa, comme on dit alors.

L’énorme retentissement de ces jeux hivernaux allait en fait donner à l’Américain des arguments forts pour affronter les opposants à la participation des Etats-Unis aux Jeux de Berlin imminents. L’ordre réinstauré en Allemagne depuis 1933 ne lui déplaisait pas, au contraire. Mieux, «Mr.Hitler» lui paraissait être un homme parfaitement fréquentable. Relevant qu’il n’avait jamais été hypnotisé par quiconque, le futur président du CIO (de 1952 à 1972) ne devait-il pas convenir du Führer «que son regard était inoubliable»?

Inoubliable en effet. L’aveuglement, la complaisance, voire la sympathie active des maîtres de l’olympisme d’alors a contribué à asseoir la toute-puissance du chancelier allemand. Un boycott américain à Ga-Pa et à Berlin, aurait entraîné, comme par un effet domino, l’abstention de nombreux autres pays. Faute d’un affront majeur sur la scène internationale, les grandioses démonstrations assirent encore davantage l’aura d’Adolf Hitler, urbi et orbi. Ses appétits de conquête trouvèrent donc un vrai «tremplin olympique» dans les jeux de 1936. C’est ce que relate dans le détail l’histoire patiemment recomposée par l’auteur de Des Jeux et des Crimes.

Le rénovateur des Jeux olympiques modernes et de la devise «mens sana in corpore sano», le baron Pierre de Coubertin, ne songeait pas à des jeux populaires quand il invita quelques amis titrés ou solidement établis à restaurer les antiques joutes en 1894. A haut niveau, le sport alors était le fait des élites qui en avaient le loisir. Bon point pour Coubertin, il croyait fermement que la compétition des meilleurs pouvait encourager chez les masses le développement des activités physiques. Aristocrate, il fréquentait des aristocrates. Les bouleversements politiques et sociaux du premier tiers du XXe siècle le conduisirent tout naturellement «à se prendre les pieds dans le national-socialisme», avec ses idéaux de culture du corps, d’école de courage, de jeunesse disciplinée, etc., indique Monique Berlioux.

Quand Coubertin quitte la présidence du CIO en 1925, il se remplace lui-même par son ami, le comte Henri de Baillet-Latour (photo ci-contre). D’extrême droite, Belge proche de la Couronne, le nouveau président partage entièrement les vues du patriarche. On va le voir à l’œuvre dès la candidature de Berlin pour les JO de 1936.

Le choix de la ville hôte doit se faire à Barcelone, en avril 1931. On compte 11candidatures. La République de Weimar présente quatre prétendantes: Berlin, Cologne, Francfort et Nuremberg. La cité catalane est favorite. Une affaire de météo va cependant infléchir dramatiquement la balance en faveur de l’Allemagne

En effet, le baron de Güell, membre du CIO pour l’Espagne, a proposé de recevoir la session décisive au tout début avril. Le conseil municipal de Barcelone souhaite cependant que le temps soit beau pour accueillir ces messieurs. On repousse la date au 25 avril. Las, les élections législatives espagnoles ont lieu le 12, entraînant l’effondrement de la monarchie.

Pas trop téméraires, nombre de membres du CIO se trouvent soudain d’autres projets pour la fin du mois. Ils ne sont que 20sur 67 à venir braver la République à Barcelone. Même le baron de Güell, hôte de la session, a préféré les pluies de sa ville de Bilbao au soleil catalan! Comment voter pour une ville candidate ou l’autre dans ces conditions?

Un vote par correspondance est organisé, et le dépouillement final prévu à Lausanne en mai 1931. La monarchie n’avait pas repris le dessus entre-temps, Berlin l’emporte par 43 voix sur 16 à Barcelone. Avec ce vote, écrit Berlioux, «les membres du CIO se retrouvaient avec leur monde, leurs conceptions de la vie. Plus tard, l’hitlérisme venu, ils demeurèrent en concordance avec l’ordre rigoureux qui les rassurait, leur classe sociale, le respect des positions-clés de l’industrie, la majorité aristocratique dans les sommités de l’armée.»

Détail pittoresque que note l’auteur, Adolf Hitler non encore chancelier était alors, semble-t-il, hostile à la tenue des JO de 1936 en Allemagne. Karl Ritter Von Halt (photo ci-contre), membre du CIO, n’eut plus de mal à convaincre son Führer, deux années plus tard, que le spectacle vaudrait son adhésion.

Les Juifs d’Allemagne n’eurent pas à attendre longtemps avant de sentir passer le vent meurtrier du national-socialisme hitlérien. Très vite, la communauté juive des Etats-Unis eut vent de persécutions contre ses coreligionnaires allemands et entreprit de dénoncer les premiers crimes du régime – pour qui avait alors des oreilles.

Monique Berlioux n’a pu appuyer son livre fleuve sur des procès-verbaux détaillés du Comité international olympique pour documenter sa démonstration. On siégeait alors entre soi et on ne consignait au papier que les décisions importantes. Outre des mémoires, des biographies et de nombreux ouvrages historiques sur cette funeste époque, elle a en revanche pu parler avec des témoins encore vivants pendant les douze années qu’elle a consacrées à ce travail.

Elle n’a pas connu Siegfried Edström, le membre du CIO pour la Suède, si respecté jusqu’à sa mort dans les années 50, et au-delà. Un écrit de lui est là, cependant, adressé au colonel Albert Berdez, le Suisse qui servait alors de secrétaire permanent au CIO: «Le trouble causé (par des) Juifs internationaux embarrasse beaucoup le travail pour la préparation des Jeux olympiques de 1936, écrit l’honorable Suédois, et il faut que nous tous aidions à les faire taire.» On ne sait rien de la réponse du colonel Berdez.

Le CIO entreprit-il une action «pour faire taire» ces trublions? On l’ignore. On sait en revanche que son président, Baillet-Latour, – qui parle la langue de Goethe comme le français – accorde son soutien absolu aux Allemands. Il va peser de tout son poids sur ses collègues au cours des sessions olympiques de 1934 et 1935. «Sans sa détermination d’assurer la célébration des Jeux de Berlin envers et contre tout, aurait déclaré Avery Brundage, mes batailles en Amérique, en Europe et au sein du CIO auraient été perdues.»

Le rôle du Belge en faveur de l’hitlérisme et ses pompes olympiques fut tel qu’à sa mort en Belgique occupée, en janvier 1942, le maître de l’Allemagne nazie fit déposer au domicile du défunt, par Karl Ritter von Halt, «blond prototype de la meilleure race nordique», assisté de deux SS casqués et bottés, «une énorme couronne de fleurs, ceintes des couleurs allemandes et de la svastika, portant le nom d’Adolf Hitler».

Déjà à la session de Vienne en 1933, l’Allemand Theodor Lewald, membre de la «Compagnie» comme disait Coubertin du CIO, et président du comité d’organisation des JO de Berlin, affirmait à ses collègues que, «avec le consentement du gouvernement, tous les règlements olympiques seraient observés (et) qu’en principe les Juifs allemands ne seraient pas exclus des équipes allemandes aux Jeux». Tout allait donc pour le mieux.

Une année plus tard à Athènes, à propos du «problème juif» inscrit à l’ordre du jour de la session, on lit au procès-verbal que le président Baillet-Latour «a l’impression que les partis politiques hostiles à l’Allemagne actuelle cherchent à s’appuyer sur l’olympisme pour déclencher leurs attaques».

Quant à lui, le Belge se disait «personnellement satisfait». Il l’est encore plus après sa visite à Adolf Hitler en novembre 1935. «A ma demande, déclare-t-il, et après une longue discussion, M.Hitler a promis que toutes les affiches qui pourraient choquer les visiteurs étrangers disparaîtraient de Berlin […] et Garmisch. Tout le monde admettra que c’est un joli geste de sa part.»

La perfidie anglaise est pour sa part illustrée dans cette histoire par le futur marquis d’Exeter, lord Burghley, coopté par le CIO en 1933. C’était là sa récompense pour avoir défendu les JO allemands auprès du parlement britannique et des grands patrons de presse de son pays. Il faut dire que son futur roi et ami, EdouardVIII, – plus tard duc de Windsor et espion pour l’armée allemande lors de son avance sur la ligne nord – se montrait ouvertement germanophile. De même qu’une frange non négligeable de l’aristocratie anglaise. Quel que fut son sentiment profond, Burghley eut l’habileté de ne pas apparaître aux sessions du CIO suivantes, ni à Garmisch. Le terrain assuré, il ne se montra qu’à Berlin, pour enfin prêter son serment de membre de la Compagnie…

Quant aux Français… Malgré son patriotisme inconditionnel, Monique Berlioux ne trouve rien de substantiel à relater en faveur des deux membres du CIO pour son pays, sinon des exclamations dérisoires. Comme ce «J’étais contre!» du petit Corse réactionnaire François Piétri. Contre? Il s’agissait d’un collier d’honneur qu’on fit porter à Berlin aux membres du CIO! Pour le reste, ce ministre remercié par le Front populaire en 1936 reprit du service pour la France de Vichy auprès du général Franco jusqu’à la fin. Quant au dérisoire Armand Massard, tout aussi rouspéteur que Piétri, il déplorait que ses affaires eussent été fouillées dans sa chambre de Berlin. Mais l’essentiel pour ce furieux réfractaire à toute autre langue que la sienne était là: «Les hôtesses hitlériennes au moins étaient bilingues.»

Commentant cette sombre période, lord Killanin, qui fut correspondant de guerre et présida le CIO entre 1972 et 1980, releva un jour que, de tous les membres de la «Compagnie» d’alors, le Britannique Aberdare fut «un des seuls à voir clair. […] A l’époque, le CIO, c’était un club. Entre gentlemen, on s’incline devant la majorité, tout en pensant que rien n’est irréversible. Jusqu’au jour où c’est trop tard.»

Quand est-il trop tard? On peut se poser la question quand on (re) découvre que le futur général Henri Guisan ne dédaigna pas d’être coopté membre du CIO pour la Suisse en 1937. Seule la guerre entraîna sa démission.

L’Américain Avery Brundage* a trop marqué l’histoire des Jeux olympiques d’après la Deuxième Guerre mondiale pour qu’on ne rende pas compte ici du rôle déterminant qu’il joua dans la tenue des joutes allemandes de 1936 et que Monique Berlioux relate dans le détail de son livre. «De 1933 à la clôture des Jeux de Berlin, écrit-elle, son activité infatigable, ses dons de tacticien, sa persuasion d’incarner la vérité et la sagesse, lui assurèrent une influence démesurée, difficilement croyable, sur les enchaînements qui aboutirent en février, puis en août 1936, à la plus grande victoire de propagande du IIIe Reich.»

Ce self-made-manné à Chicago, ingénieur civil qui a fait et refait fortune dans la construction et les investissements judicieux, est décathlonien. Il a été médaille d’argent aux Jeux d’Amsterdam en 1912. Dès que, en 1934, l’opinion américaine s’émeut à la perspective de jeux olympiques en Allemagne, président du Comité olympique des Etats-Unis (USOC), il va mener avec fracas et tous ses talents de tacticien pour y assurer la participation de ses athlètes. Envoyer des jeunes sportifs à travers l’Atlantique, les vêtir, les accompagner de coaches et d’officiels coûte fort cher. L’amateurisme est alors chose réelle.

Il faut réunir des fonds importants. Or, un grand nombre d’Américains sont hostiles au régime hitlérien dont on leur rapporte les premiers méfaits. Brundage fait appel à ses compatriotes d’origine allemande. La publication de Mein Kampf, qui prône l’élimination «de la race juive» a remporté un succès sans égal à l’étranger. Le programme que s’est fixé Adolf Hitler ne paraît pas intolérable à ses lecteurs de manière égale.

Le président Roosevelt n’est pas chaud. Il regrettera de n’avoir pas pesé sur les dirigeants sportifs de son pays pour qu’ils renoncent à envoyer une délégation aux JO de 1936. Cependant le Neutrality Act a été bien accueilli par les Américains las d’avoir toujours à intervenir dans les querelles de «la vieille Europe».

Avery Brundage est ardemment de ce camp-là. Ainsi, écrira-t-il dans des «mémoires» cités par Berlioux: «Si l’USOC avait eu à affronter les mêmes intérêts politiques et financiers qui finalement réussirent à impliquer les Etats-Unis dans la Seconde Guerre, nous n’aurions jamais réussi à réunir les fonds nécessaires à envoyer nos athlètes aux Jeux de 1936.»

L’auteur des Jeux et des crimes ne le dit pas explicitement, mais le fait est avéré: Avery Brundage est résolument hostile aux Juifs. Il ne s’émeut donc pas quand interviennent auprès de lui les représentants d’organisations juives américaines: «Vous estimez qu’il faut retirer les Jeux aux Allemands parce que les Juifs ne sont pas admis dans tous les clubs sportifs? Ils ne le sont pas davantage ici, à mon club…»

Et voilà qu’il risque soudain de perdre la bataille. Brundage est en effet également président du comité directeur de l’American Athletic Union (AAU), qui réunit toutes les fédérations sportives du pays. Comme il est surchargé par son combat pour Garmisch et Berlin, il démissionne de cette fonction et pressent un remplaçant sûr en la personne de Jeremiah T.Mahoney, ancien magistrat catholique.

Or Mahoney s’est porté – sans en avertir Brundage – candidat à la mairie de New York. Qui dit New York dit puissance financière juive, dont l’appui est primordial pour la conquête de City Hall. Le postulant tout naturellement se déclare donc opposé à la participation américaine aux prochains Jeux. «Un coup bas», écrira Brundage. Pis, Mahoney obtient du comité directeur de l’AAU un vote contre la participation américaine à Ga-Pa comme à Berlin. Aussitôt Brundage revient sur sa démission et se porte à nouveau candidat. Au congrès de décembre 1935, à deux mois Jes jeux de Garmisch, il est réélu, ce qui équivaut à un vote en faveur de «sa» cause, par tout juste deux voix de majorité sur 220 votants, relate Monique Berlioux.

Le futur président du CIO commentera cette élection plus tard, sans regretter, semble-t-il, son poids tragique sur les événements ultérieurs: «Alors que, précédemment, j’avais été choisi presque à l’unanimité, le résultat de cette élection âprement disputée fut douteux jusqu’à la dernière minute. L’affaire était suivie par nombre de pays. Un échec aurait sans doute amené le retrait de nombreuses équipes et la ruine des Jeux de la XIe olympiade.» Ainsi, devait conclure Avery Brundage: «Le succès des jeux fut assuré grâce aux résultats de cette élection acharnée à l’AAU, à New York.»

Et la cinéaste favorite d’Adolf Hitler, Leni Riefenstahl, qui parvint à conquérir l’amitié de Monique Berlioux, de confier à cette dernière lors d’une ultime rencontre peu avant sa mort à 101 ans en 2003: «Goebbels m’avoua, au soir de la cérémonie de clôture des jeux de Berlin: «Jusqu’au dernier moment, le Führer et moi-même avons terriblement redouté […] que les trois grandes démocraties de l’Ouest ordonnent à leurs délégations de se retirer […] Vous vous rendez compte: quel coup!…»

Le Japon devait organiser les jeux de l’olympiade suivante, en 1940. Son offensive de 1937 en Chine rendait naturellement l’entreprise impossible. Pour remplacer Sapporo pour les jeux d’hiver, le CIO pressentit Saint-Moritz. Une querelle purement technique amena la station suisse à se dédire, après avoir accepté le mandat.

Décidément incorrigible, le Comité international olympique se tourna alors vers ses amis nazis et, en juin 1939 par la voix de son président Baillet-Latour, demanda à Garmisch de reprendre le flambeau l’année suivante. Garmisch accepta. Trois mois plus tard, Adolf Hitler en décidait autrement et, le 22 novembre 1939, Karl Ritter Von Halt envoyait une dédite pour cause de guerre.

Le comte Baillet-Latour, qui décidément était déterminé à gagner sa couronne mortuaire de fleurs nazies au jour prochain de ses obsèques, exprima aussitôt sa tristesse. «Puissent ces belles installations (à Garmisch) profiter au développement physique de votre jeunesse et lui conserver l’esprit olympique, auquel je sais qu’elle demeure fidèle.»

C’était, conclut Monique Berlioux, «au lendemain de l’écrasement de la Pologne».

* Les Combats d’Avery Brundage ont porté, contre vents et marées, sur la défense de l’amateurisme. Il obtint la réadmission dans le monde olympique de l’Afrique du Sud dans les années 60, et travailla ardemment à la formation d’une équipe unie entre les Allemagnes de l’Ouest et de l’Est. Il échoua par contre à réunir les deux Corées dans un stade. Auparavant, en 1952, année de son élection pour vingt ans à la présidence du CIO, il fut l’artisan de l’entrée des pays de l’Est au CIO. De même, il favorisa le prompt retour des Allemands et des Japonais dans les compétitions olympiques.

Voir également:

Berlin, 1936-2015 : l’hommage posthume à deux athlètes olympiques juifs
Humiliés aux Jeux olympiques de 1936, les sprinters juifs américains Marty Glickman et Sam Stoller seront honorés l’an prochain lors des Maccabiades européennes à Berlin
The Times of Israel

25 avril 2014

BALTIMORE — Nancy Glickman était adolescente quand elle a appris l’histoire de son père aux Jeux olympiques de Berlin en 1936 : Marty Glickman et un autre sprinter, Sam Stoller, furent remplacés au sein de l’équipe américaine du relais 4 × 400 mètres, le matin même de l’épreuve.

Un soir, interrogeant son père sur cet affront, ce dernier tira son uniforme, rangé dans le tiroir du bas d’une grande armoire, et le lui présenta. À ce moment, Nancy Glickman demanda à ce que le vêtement lui soit légué à son décès.

« Bien avant » sa mort en 2001, à l’âge de 83 ans, Marty Glickman lui offra l’uniforme, raconte Nancy. Elle le garde aujourd’hui dans un sac en toile dans son appartement de Washington.

« Je suis la gardienne de cet uniforme », affirme-t-elle.

Maccabi USA, la branche de Philadelphie de la fédération sportive Maccabi World Union, espère que les membres des familles Glickman et Stoller se rendront à Berlin, en juin 2015, pour les Maccabiades européennes, qui rendront hommage aux deux athlètes.

Ce sera la première fois que la ville allemande accueillera l’événement, dont la première édition a eu lieu en 1929. L’organisation ne savait pas où se trouvaient exactement les familles Glickman et Stoller, mais JTA a pu les retrouver.

Le directeur exécutif de Maccabi USA Jed Margolis a affirmé qu’il contacterait bientôt les proches et espère qu’ils accepteront d’être capitaines honoraires ou porte-drapeaux de la délégation américaine, qui devrait compter environ 150 membres.

Nancy, 60 ans, est la plus jeune des quatre enfants de Marty Glickman. Elle a confié la semaine dernière que l’intérêt manifesté par Maccabi USA était « un geste très aimable. »

Les organisateurs n’ont pas encore choisi le lieu de la cérémonie d’ouverture, mais l’une des possibilités est l’Olympiastadion. C’est là que le sprinteur afro-américain Jesse Owens remporta quatre médailles d’or il y a 78 ans, sous les yeux d’Adolf Hitler.

C’est aussi là que les coéquipiers juifs d’Owens ont concouru.

Marty Glickman estimait que l’antisémitisme et les affinités de plusieurs responsables de la fédération américaine avec les nazis avaient conduit à son éviction et à celle de Stoller de l’équipe de relais.

« Nous sommes navrés que Stoller et Glickman aient été empêchés de courir à cause de leur religion », affirme Margolis.

« Une grande injustice leur a été faite en 1936. Ce serait merveilleux que quelqu’un de leur famille défile avec nous. »

Originaire de New York, Marty Glickman est devenu plus tard un célèbre commentateur sportif, son nom figurant dans plusieurs « halls of fame » (mémorial en hommage à des personnes ayant marqué leur discipline, généralement dans le domaine sportif).

La Newhouse School of Public Communications de l’université de Syracuse a lancé l’année dernière le prix Marty Glickman, qui récompense l’esprit d’initiative des journalistes sportifs.

Le premier lauréat fut Bob Costas, un éminent commentateur sportif, diplômé de Syracuse. Costas, qui a présenté les Jeux olympiques sur NBC, a joué un rôle essentiel pour permettre à JTA de retrouver la famille de Glickman.

Costas se souvient que Glickman, qu’il admirait énormément, évoquait l’affront berlinois chaque fois qu’on l’interrogeait.

« Il vivait dans le présent, mais était très attaché au passé », raconte Costas. « Il n’était pas rancunier, mais il n’oubliait pas non plus. » Alors qu’il était jeune commentateur, il se souvient avoir été « l’une des personnes qu’il a prises sous son aile », ajoute Costas.

En 2013, Costas fut l’un des nombreux protagonistes du documentaire Glickman, réalisé par Jim Freedman, qui a lui aussi grandi à New York en écoutant les commentaires footballistiques de l’ancien athlète.

À 17 ans, Freedman a travaillé comme producteur pour une émission de radio présentée par Glickman. « Ça a été le boulot le plus excitant que j’aie jamais exercé », se rappelle-t-il.

Stoller, de son côté, renonça à courir après l’affront berlinois, mais revint sur sa décision en entrant à l’université du Michigan et fut sélectionné dans l’équipe All-America de 1937.

La même année, il entama une carrière d’acteur et de chanteur. Lors d’une tournée aux Philippines en 1938, il aurait rencontré sa femme Violet, originaire de Chine. Le couple s’installa à Cincinnati, la ville natale de Stoller.

Le reste de sa vie est moins connu. Mais Pat Vasillaros, un passionné de généalogie, a conduit des recherches qui ont permis de retrouver les proches de Stoller, mort à 69 ans à Fort Lauderdale (Floride) en 1985.

Grâce aux données du recensement américain, Vasillaros a appris que Stoller avait eu deux frères, David and Daniel, ainsi qu’une sœur Tillie. Leur mère, Sophia Katz, est probablement décédée tandis que leur père, Morris (qui apparaît aussi sous le nom de Maurice), originaire de Russie, s’est remarié avec une dénommée Martha, originaire du Kentucky. Ils ont eu un fils, Harry.

Une nécrologie, publiée à la mort de Harry à Cincinnati en septembre dernier, mentionne les membres de sa famille encore vivants. L’une de ses filles, Kathy Kaplan, a indiqué que Sam Stoller n’avait pas eu d’enfants.

Pour Bill Mallon, ancien président de la société internationale des historiens olympiques, l’événement programmé en 2015 à Berlin, auquel seront présents les familles de Stoller et de Glickman, promet d’être significatif et émouvant.

« Pour des sportifs juifs, entrer dans le stade de Berlin, en sachant ce qu’il s’y est produit en 1936 et ce qu’il s’est produit par la suite – ce qu’Hitler a fait au monde et en particulier aux Juifs lors de la Seconde Guerre mondiale ; et ce qui a eu lieu en 1972 à Munich [11 athlètes olympiques israéliens ont été assassinés par des terroristes palestiniens]… Je ne suis pas juif, mais si vous avez le sens de l’Histoire, cela devrait être un sentiment étrange et particulier », confie Mallon.

Glickman a reçu de son vivant, en 1998, un prix du comité olympique américain, une sorte de repentance pour l’affront de 1936. Le prix a été décerné à titre posthume à Stoller.

La mort de Glickman en janvier 2001 lui a épargné un chagrin bien plus colossal, précise sa fille : son petit-fils, Peter Alderman, 25 ans, travaillait dans le World Trade Center et a trouvé la mort lors des attaques terroristes du 11 Septembre.

« Honnêtement, c’était une bonne chose », estime Nancy au sujet de la date du décès de son père.

« Apprendre la mort de son petit-fils l’aurait dévasté. »

Voir de même:

De nouveaux détails horribles sur le massacre de Munich en 1972 émergent

Eretz

Plus de 40 ans après l’assassinat de 11 athlètes israéliens aux Jeux d’été à Munich, un nouveau film documentaire et un article du New York Times exposent la torture brutale que les victimes ont enduré avant leur décès tragiques.

La terrible cruauté avec laquelle les terroristes de Septembre Noir traitaient les athlètes israéliens qu’ils avaient kidnappés aux Jeux olympiques de Munich en 1972 a été dévoilée, dans un nouveau long métrage documentaire et dans un article du New York Times, présentant des interviews avec les épouses de deux des victimes. Le film, « Munich 72 et au-delà », et les interviews, donnent lieu à d’horribles détails sur les derniers moments qu’ont vécu les athlètes, inconnus du public jusqu’à maintenant.

Ilana Romano, veuve de l’haltérophile Yossef Romano, et Ankie Spitzer, veuve de l’entraîneur d’escrime Andre Spitzer, ont parlé de la torture qu’on enduré les athlètes, des détails qui n’ont pas été connus auparavant. Elles ont affirmé que les familles des athlètes n’ont eu connaissance des détails seulement 20 ans après le massacre, quand l’Allemagne communiqua des centaines de pages de détails sur ce qui s’était passé.

« Ils lui ont coupé ses parties génitales à travers ses sous-vêtements et ont abusé de lui », affirme Mme Romano. « Pouvez-vous imaginer les neuf autres assis autour de lui, ligotés, contraints à voir cela? »

Les deux veuves, en tant que représentantes des familles des victimes, ont été exposées à des photos des athlètes abattus particulièrement dures. Mme Romano a déclaré au New York Times que les photos étaient « aussi violentes que je pouvais l’imaginer. » Les rédacteurs de l’article ont également vu les photos, qu’ils ont considérées comme étant trop choquantes pour être publiées.

Yossef Romano a été abattu alors qu’il tentait de combattre les terroristes au début de leur attaque. Ils l’ont laissé saigner devant les yeux de ses collègues athlètes, et l’ont castré. Les autres ont été brutalement battus. Ils ont été tués lors d’un raid raté par les forces allemandes près de l’aéroport de Munich, où les ravisseurs ont emmené les victimes.

« Quand j’ai découvert les photos, c’était très douloureux », a déclaré Ilana Romano. « Je me souvenais, jusqu’à ce jour, de Yossef comme un jeune homme avec un grand sourire. Je me souvenais de ses fossettes jusqu’à ce moment. »
 
« A ce moment, cela a effacé tout du Yossi que je connaissais », poursuit-elle. 

Les familles ont tout mis en oeuvre pour que les victimes soient commémorées lors de tous les Jeux Olympiques. Leurs requêtes ont été rejetées par le Comité international olympique (CIO), mais maintenant, avec l’aide de son nouveau président, Thomas Bach (un homme allemand), les athlètes israéliens seront commémorés grâce à un mémorial de Munich. Leurs noms seront également cités pendant les Jeux olympiques d’été 2016 à Rio de Janeiro, au Brésil.

Le massacre de Munich a eu lieu les 5 et 6 septembre 1972. Les membres de l’organisation terroriste palestinienne Septembre Noir ont attaqué et kidnappé les membres de l’équipe olympique israélienne, pour conduire finalement à la mort de onze d’entre eux: Moshe Weinberg, Yossef Romano, Ze’ev Friedman, David Berger, Yakov Springer, Eliezer Halfin, Yossef Gutfreund, Kehat Shorr, Mark Slavin, Andre Spitzer, et Amitzour Shapira. En outre, Anton Fliegerbauer, un officier de police de l’Allemagne de l’ouest, est décédé au cours de sa tentative ratée de sauvetage des athlètes.

Voir de plus:

Jeux olympiques de Berlin (1936) : quand le vainqueur du marathon Sohn Ki-jung affirmait l’identité coréenne

Amitié FranceCorée

8 août 2012

Lors des Jeux olympiques de Berlin, deux Coréens montèrent sur le podium de l’épreuve de marathon, il y a 76 ans, le 9 août 1936 : Sohn Ki-jung décrocha la médaille d’or, et Nam Sung-yong la médaille de bronze. Toutefois, la Corée étant alors occupée par le Japon, les deux athlètes furent enregistrés comme membres de l’équipe japonaise – et Sohn Ki-jung dut ainsi utiliser le nom japonais Son Kitei. Pendant la cérémonie de remise de sa médaille d’or, Sohn Ki-jung eut le courage de cacher par un chêne le drapeau japonais figurant sur son maillot (photo à gauche) et répéta aux journalistes présents qu’il n’était pas japonais mais coréen, tandis que Nam Sung-yong baissait également  la tête. Sohn Ki-jung est  devenu une figure de la résistance coréenne à l’occupation japonaise.

Né à Sinuiju dans le Nord de la Corée le 29 août 1912, deux ans après le début de la colonisation de la péninsule par l’empire nippon, Sohn Ki-jung a été un athlète prodige : il a remporté dix des treize marathons qu’il a courus entre 1933 et 1936, enregistrant un record du monde le 3 novembre 1935 à Tokyo dans un temps de 2h26:42. Douze ans plus tard, en 1947, son élève et compatriote Suh Yun-bok devait battre ce record en remportant le marathon de Boston.

Mais Sohn Ki-jung est aussi entré dans l’histoire de la Corée après sa médaille d’or aux Jeux olympiques de Berlin en 1936 où il a établi un nouveau record olympique du marathon (2h29:19), en cachant le drapeau japonais qui figurait sur son maillot lors de la cérémonie de remise des médailles, et en répétant aux journalistes présents qu’il n’était pas japonais, mais coréen en signant de son véritable nom et en adjoignant une petite carte de la Corée – en vain. Son compatriote Nam Sung-yong, médaille de bronze, déclara plus tard qu’il enviait Sohn Ki-jung non pour sa première place, mais pour avoir ainsi affirmé son identité coréenne sur la plus haute marche du podium. Après les Jeux de 1936, Sohn Ki-jung refusa désormais de courir sur les couleurs japonaises.

Un quotidien coréen, le Dong-a Ilbo, suscita la fureur des autorités d’occupation en publiant une photo retouchée faisant disparaître le drapeau japonais, sous le titre « Victoire coréenne à Berlin » : la police militaire japonaise arrêta huit responsables du journal, dont la publication fut suspendue pendant neuf mois.

Les entraîneurs japonais bloquèrent la remise d’un prix qui devait revenir à Sohn Ki-jung en tant que vainqueur du marathon : un casque grec découvert à Olympie en 1875 par l’archéologue allemand Ernst Curtius, et qui ne sera finalement remis au champion olympique coréen qu’en 1986 (photo à droite), après une campagne de presse en Grèce.

Après la Libération, Sohn Ki-jung devint président de l’Association sportive (sud-)coréenne et forma plusieurs champions de marathon, dont Suh Yun-bok et Ham Kee-yong, vainqueurs du marathon de Boston respectivement en 1947 et 1950, ainsi que Hwang Young-cho, médaillé d’or aux Jeux olympiques de 1992. Il a allumé la flamme olympique lors des Jeux de Séoul en 1988.

Sohn Ki-jung est décédé le 15 novembre 2002, à l’âge de 90 ans.

Sources :

– Andy Bull, « The Forgotten Story of Sohn Kee-chung, Korea’s Olympic Hero », article publié le 27 août 1911 dans The Guardian ;

– Encyclopedia Universalis ;

– Andrei Lankov, « Sohn Kee-chung : 1936 Berlin Olympic Marathon Winner », article publié le 8 août 2010 dans The Korea Times ;

– wikipedia (dont photos) ;

– youtube (dont vidéo).

PS : deux dates sont données pour la date de naissance (1912 ou 1914), l’année 1912 étant la plus souvent retenue par les sources coréennes.

Voir encore:

JO : des athlètes israéliens dans la crainte d’un boycott

Gary Assouline
Le Figaro
01/08/2012

Vendredi, des judokas libanais et israéliens se sont entraînés dans une même salle mais séparés par une sorte de cloison. Le comité olympique israélien s’en est ému, mais la fédération internationale de judo dément tout incident.

[Cet article a été modifié le 1er août après le démenti apporté par la fédération internationale de judo]

Après la controverse suite au refus du Comité international olympique (CIO) de faire respecter une minute de silence en souvenir de l’attentat des JO de Munich en 1972, un incident a semé l’émoi autour de la délégation de l’État hébreu.

Vendredi , un article du quotidien britannique The Telegraph (l’article a été supprimé le 1er août, ndlr) relatait la façon dont s’était déroulé l’entraînement entre des judokas libanais et israéliens. Dans cet article, le porte-parole du comité olympique israélien Nitzan Ferraro décrivait ainsi la séance: «Nous commencions à nous entraîner quand ils [la délégation libanaise de judo] sont arrivés et nous ont vus. Ils n’ont pas apprécié et sont allés voir les organisateurs qui ont placé une sorte de mur entre nous». Selon l’agence de presse Reuters, la délégation libanaise n’avait pas donné d’explication à cette demande.

Depuis, la fédération internationale de judo a donné sa version des faits: «Cela est tout simplement faux. Ce qui s’est réellement passé c’est qu’une des deux équipes s’entraînait déjà lorsque la deuxième est arrivée. La première équipe avait tout simplement oublié de réserver la salle. En voyant cela, les deux équipes se sont mises d’accord pour partager la salle afin qu’elles puissent toutes les deux s’entraîner et se préparer en même temps. Tout s’est déroulé le plus simplement et le plus naturellement du monde, sans refus quel qu’il soit» a expliqué Nicolas Messner, le directeur médias de la FIJ .

Mise en garde du CIO
La question du boycott des sportifs israéliens, plusieurs fois évoqué lors de compétitions internationales, est une question ultra-sensible. Avant le début de la compétition olympique, elle avait été été soulevée en Algérie, qui ne reconnaît pas l’État juif. En juin, Rachid Hanifi, président du comité olympique algérien déclarait au Times qu’il ne pouvait garantir que ses athlètes acceptent de combattre un Israélien, soulignant qu’il s’agissait d’une décision sportive et politique. Il faisait référence à deux athlètes qui devaient affronter des Israéliens: le kayakiste Nassredine Bagdhadi s’est retiré d’une course un mois plus tôt en Allemagne, sous la pression du ministre algérien des Sports et la judokate Meriem Moussa a déclaré forfait lors de la Coupe du monde de judo féminin en octobre 2011.

Le 26 juillet, le judoka iranien Javad Mahjoub a invoqué une indisponibilité de 10 jours pour cause de douleurs intestinales alors qu’il devait affronter le plus titré des judokas israéliens Ariel Ze’evi à Londres. Selon le Washington Post , l’Iranien avait admis en 2011 au quotidien national Shargh avoir délibérément perdu face à un adversaire lors d’une compétition pour ne pas rencontrer un Israélien au tour suivant: «Si j’avais gagné, j’aurai dû combattre contre un athlète d’Israël. Et si j’avais refusé de concourir, on aurait suspendu ma fédération de judo pour quatre ans», avait-il déclaré.

Une situation que le CIO prend très sérieusement, mettant en garde le comité algérien et les autres délégations contre ces pratiques aux Jeux de Londres. Quatre jours avant la cérémonie d’ouverture, Denis Oswald, le président de la commission de coordination des JO a déclaré: «C’est quelque chose qui s’est déjà produit. Pas officiellement, mais des athlètes se sont retirés soi-disant sur blessures alors qu’ils devaient affronter des athlètes israéliens. Si ce genre de comportements était avéré, des sanctions seraient prises contre l’athlète mais aussi contre le comité national olympique (CNO) et le gouvernement [du pays concerné], car le plus souvent ce ne sont pas des décisions individuelles. Nous aurons un comité d’experts médicaux indépendants qui s’assurera qu’il s’agit bien de blessures.»

Selon le journal israélien Yediot Aharonot , après la déclaration polémique en juillet d’un représentant du football égyptien selon lequel «aucun Egyptien ou arabe ne voudra défier Israël, même s’il existe des accords internationaux», le comité national égyptien a voulu couper court au débat. Et de rappeler qu’il respecterait la charte olympique qui stipule que «toute forme de discrimination à l’égard d’un pays ou d’une personne fondée sur des considérations de race, de religion, de politique, de sexe ou autres est incompatible avec l’appartenance au Mouvement olympique.»

Les forfaits des sportifs iraniens
Par le passé, plusieurs athlètes d’Iran, ennemi revendiqué d’Israël, ont déjà été soupçonnés de boycott. Aux jeux d’Athènes en 2004, le judoka iranien Arash Miresmaeili avait été disqualifié pour avoir dépassé de cinq kilos la limite de poids autorisée alors qu’il devait affronter l’Israélien Ehoud Vaks. Soupçonné d’avoir voulu masquer un boycott par ce surpoids – il avait évoqué une indisposition – il n’a finalement pas été sanctionné par les instances officielles qui ont considéré suffisant le certificat médical avancé, conformément au règlement. Son pays lui a versé 115.000 dollars de prime selon le Washington Post , somme normalement remise aux vainqueurs. À Pékin en 2008, le nageur iranien Mohamed Alirezaei s’était senti malade avant son 100m brasse disputé également par l’Israélien Tom Be’eri. Après avoir fait un court passage à l’hôpital de Pékin, il n’avait pas été sanctionné par le comité olympique. Le sportif, coutumier du fait, avait déjà déclaré forfait aux championnats du monde de natation de Rome en 2009 face à l’Israélien Michael Malul et à Shanghai en 2011 face à Gal Nevo.

Voir de plus:

Rio 2016 : les coupables lâchetés du CIO
Le Monde

25.07.2016

Editorial du « Monde ». A moins de deux semaines du début des JO de Rio (5 au 21 août), on ne pourra pas décerner la médaille du courage au Comité international olympique (CIO). Dimanche 24 juillet, le CIO a estimé que le rapport de Richard McLaren, publié le 18 juillet, qui accusait la Russie d’avoir mis en œuvre un « système de dopage d’Etat », n’apportait « aucune preuve » contre le Comité national olympique russe (COR). Le CIO a donc décidé de ne pas suspendre le COR. Mettant en avant le respect de la charte olympique et de la « justice individuelle », il laisse le soin à chaque fédération internationale sportive de juger quels athlètes russes sont éligibles ou non.

Thomas Bach, le président du CIO, sait que cette décision divisera le mouvement sportif. A l’origine du rapport McLaren, l’Agence mondiale antidopage s’est déclarée « déçue ». Pour son président, Craig Reedie, si le CIO avait suivi sa recommandation d’exclure la Russie des JO, « cela aurait assuré une approche claire, forte et harmonisée ».

Une autre aberration est le sort réservé à Ioulia Stepanova, cette athlète russe spécialiste du 800 m, qui se voit interdire de participer aux Jeux de Rio. Aujourd’hui exilée aux Etats-Unis, elle a permis, avec son mari Vitali, de mettre au jour, dès 2014, l’existence d’un dopage institutionnalisé en Russie. Le signal envoyé par le CIO ne manquera pas d’inquiéter les lanceurs d’alerte potentiels comme ceux qui luttent pour un sport plus propre.

Comprenne qui pourra
Il en a fallu des contorsions à la commission exécutive du CIO pour reconnaître que « le témoignage et les déclarations publiques de Mme Stepanova ont apporté une contribution à la protection et à la promotion des athlètes propres, au fair-play, à l’intégrité et à l’authenticité du sport », tout en refusant d’accéder à sa demande, appuyée par la Fédération internationale d’athlétisme, de concourir comme athlète neutre.

Arguant du fait qu’elle est une ancienne dopée, le CIO lui a refusé ce droit. Mais, pour lui « exprimer sa reconnaissance », il l’invite à assister à la compétition depuis les tribunes… Elle pourra admirer la foulée du sprinteur américain Justin Gatlin, épinglé deux fois pour prise de produits interdits et qui a toujours nié la moindre faute. Comprenne qui pourra.

Le Comité international olympique s’était pourtant doté, fin 2014, d’un « Agenda 2020 » censé renouveler les pratiques de l’olympisme. Ce document souligne que « protéger et soutenir les athlètes intègres aussi bien sur l’aire de compétition qu’en dehors demeurent la priorité du CIO. Cela signifie que tout investissement dans la lutte contre le dopage et contre le trucage des matchs et la manipulation des compétitions ainsi que la corruption associée (…) ne peut être considéré comme un coût, mais bien comme un investissement au profit des athlètes intègres ».

La situation est ubuesque. Le CIO a fait preuve d’une passivité confinant à la lâcheté vis-à-vis de la Russie. Il est de notoriété publique que M. Bach et Vladimir Poutine entretiennent de bonnes relations. Le chef d’Etat russe a été un des premiers à féliciter M. Bach de son élection en 2013. On peut s’interroger sur le fait que le CIO n’a pas ouvert d’enquête sur le COR alors que les scandales de dopage autour de la Russie se sont multipliés. Le ministre russe des sports, Vitali Moutko, ne s’y est pas trompé en saluant une décision « objective ». La fête olympique a déjà perdu une grande partie de son crédit.

Voir enfin:

JO 2016 – Amsalem : « La décision du CIO est dramatique pour le sport »

BFM

24/07/2016

Au micro de BFM TV, Bernard Amsalem, président de la Fédération française d’athlétisme et vice-président du Comité national olympique et sportif (CNOSF) a vivement critiqué la décision du Comité internationale olympique (CIO) de ne pas suspendre la Russie en dépit du rapport McLaren, dénonçant un « dopage d’État » entre 2011 et 2015.
Bernard Amsalem, quelle est votre réaction après ce choix du CIO de ne pas exclure la Russie des Jeux de Rio ?
Je suis surpris et très déçu. On est face à un système généralisé de dopage dans ce pays. On l’a vu avec l’athlétisme, mais avec le rapport McLaren, on le voit avec tous les autres sports. Je ne comprends pas cette décision. Le CIO avait là l’occasion d’être ferme, de donner un vrai signal. Parce qu’aujourd’hui, le dopage gangrène tous les sports. Et finalement, il s’en remet aux fédérations internationales (elles devront décider au cas par cas de la participation des athlètes russes, ndlr). C’est un manque de responsabilité. C’est dommage parce que les valeurs de l’olympisme et du sport ne sont pas défendues.

Que cela veut-il dire ? Que même un rapport aussi accablant ne suffit pas pour aller au bout et prendre des décisions telles qu’interdire toute une délégation ?
Je ne comprends pas. Il faudrait peut-être plus de courage. Je crois que c’est ce qui a manqué au CIO aujourd’hui. C’est dramatique pour le sport, pour l’image du sport, pour l’image des Jeux olympiques. Je ne comprends pas ce qu’il faut faire de plus ! On ne peut rien faire de plus ! Ce rapport était excellent, l’enquête a été longue et donnait un certain nombre de preuves du dopage organisé.

Que faut-il faire ?
Finalement, la seule fédération courageuse a été la nôtre, la fédération internationale d’athlétisme, qui a réussi à le faire à l’unanimité de ses membres et qui a exclu les Russes de ces Jeux olympiques. On ne pourra pas rester seuls longtemps. Il faudra un jour que le mouvement olympique, peut-être les autres fédérations internationales, se mobilisent aussi contre ce poison qu’est devenu aujourd’hui le dopage.

Voir enfin:

Dopage : le rapport de Richard McLaren est accablant pour la Russie

Richard McLaren a rendu public lundi son rapport sur le trucage des tests antidopage lors des Jeux Olympiques d’hiver de Sotchi en 2014. Il en ressort que l’Etat russe est bel et bien impliqué dans cette affaire.
L’Equipe
18/07/2016
En conférence de presse à Toronto, le juriste Richard McLaren a déclaré que la Russie a mis en place un «système de dopage d’Etat» et que le laboratoire de Sotchi a utilisé un «système d’escamotage des échantillons positifs» pendant les Jeux Olympiques d’hiver il y a deux ans et demi. Le ministère des sports russe a «contrôlé, dirigé et supervisé les manipulations, avec l’aide active des services secrets russes», a poursuivi McLaren. Ainsi Yuri Nagornykh, le sous-ministre, a eu accès aux tests positifs de chaque athlète russe et «a décidé qui serait protégé et qui ne le serait pas». Pour Richard McLaren, il est «inconcevable» que Vitaly Mutko, le ministre des Sports, n’ait pas été au courant de la situation. En revanche, «nous n’avons pas relevé un rôle actif» de la part du Comité olympique russe (dont fait partie Yuri Nagornykh). Le juriste canadien a précisé que les conclusions du rapport ont été prouvées «au-delà de tout doute raisonnable» et que les preuves sont «vérifiables».
Le système de dopage d’Etat aurait duré quatre ans

Des échantillons, prélevés lors des Championnats du monde 2013 d’athlétisme, qui étaient organisés à Moscou, ont aussi été échangés, avant que la Fédération internationale d’athlétisme (IAAF) ne les récupère pour les analyser. «Le laboratoire (de Moscou) a mis de côté des échantillons positifs, qui devaient être échangés, en enlevant les bouchons et en remplaçant l’urine sale, avant que les échantillons ne soient envoyés à un autre laboratoire sur instruction de l’IAAF.» Richard McLaren a déclaré que «le personnel du laboratoire de Moscou n’avait pas le choix quant à son implication dans ce système».

Ledit système aurait été instauré dès 2011 et aurait duré jusqu’en août 2015, au bénéfice d’athlètes russes de nombreux sports olympiques d’été et d’hiver lors de compétitions internationales organisées en Russie (Mondiaux de natation en 2011, d’athlétisme en 2013, d’escrime en 2014 et 2015…). Le rapport de Richard McLaren avait été commandé au mois de mai dernier par l’Agence mondiale antidopage (AMA), après les accusations de Grigori Rodtchenkov, l’ancien patron du laboratoire russe antidopage, sur un système de dopage organisé lors des Jeux de Sotchi. Une commission indépendante s’était alors chargée de l’enquête. Richard McLaren a déclaré qu’il aurait aimé continuer ses investigations, mais il savait qu’il devait présenter ses conclusions cet été à cause des Jeux Olympiques qui sont sur le point de commencer.

Education: C’est le syndrome du vestiaire, imbécile ! (Harvard to outraise Stanford in new 6.5 billion fundraising drive)

23 septembre, 2013
https://i1.wp.com/www.smallworldbeauty.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/11/jla_lockerroom.jpgJ’ai travaillé avec Freud à Vienne. On s’est brouillé sur le concept d’envie du pénis. Il voulait le limiter aux femmes. Leonard Zelig
La taille du pénis chez des hommes a souvent fait l’objet de fantasme. Toutefois, le contenu de ces fantasmes varie selon des époques. En effet, durant la période dite de l’Antiquité, c’était la petite taille du pénis qui fut valorisée, alors que dans la période actuelle c’est plutôt la grande taille qui se trouve être prisée. Pour les Grecs de l’Antiquité, un homme viril devait être doté d’un petit sexe. Ainsi, pour Aristote, un pénis trop long était signe de stérilité. Les travaux notamment de l’historien Thierry Eloi ont montrés que chez les Romains la grosse taille d’un pénis était considérée comme à la fois une vulgarité au niveau social et une disharmonie au niveau esthétique. Aujourd’hui encore, dans certaines tribus amérindiennes, le statut social est dicté par la taille du sexe masculin, seuls les hommes ayant un petit pénis sont amenés à occuper les places les plus hautes de la structure sociale. Wikipedia
Harvard, the richest university in the United States (about $30.7 billion, roughly the size of the annual gross domestic product of the Baltic nation of Latvia), said on Saturday it would seek to raise some $6.5 billion in donations to fund new academic initiatives and bolster its financial aid program. The fundraising drive by the Cambridge, Massachusetts, institution is believed to be the most ambitious ever undertaken by a university, ahead of one concluded last year by Stanford University in California that raised $6.2 billion. Reuters
Australian researchers found even men who feel secure when they’re alone or in the bedroom fall prey to “locker room syndrome”—wishing for larger muscles or penises when comparing themselves to other men. “It’s not always a bad thing to be competitive, as a slight push for improvement can do everyone good,” says study author Annabel Chan Feng Yi, Psy.D., of Victoria University ... Men’s health
‘Locker room syndrome’ drives men to think big … We have relatively little data about the body image of men because most of the research in this area concentrates on women, » Ms Chan says. « It means men don’t really get much help in terms of therapy, and options out there to get help. » Stuff
“Men’s preoccupation with size was rarely to do with pleasing sexual partners or even appearing as a better sexual partner, […] It was often more about competition with other men. Many felt most insecure about their size in environments where other men might see them, such as gym change rooms.” (…) all of which goes to show that it isn’t just women who suffer from appearance issues … Inquisitr

Attention: un syndrome peut en cacher un autre !

A l’heure où la plus riche université du monde (30 milliards de dollars: le PIB de la Lituanie ou le budget annuel des Instituts nationaux de la santé !) se lance dans une levée de fonds de 6, 5 milliards de dollars …

Alors que sa rivale de la côte ouest vient de lever 6, 2 milliards …

Et que Polytechnique se félicite de lever 35 millions d’euros …

Comment ne pas y voir l’évident effet, bien connu des sportifs (au grand bonheur des sites et officines d’allongement pennal), du syndrome du vestiaire ?

Harvard asks donors for $6.5 billion

Reuters

Sep 21 2013

BOSTON (Reuters) – Harvard, the richest university in the United States, said on Saturday it would seek to raise some $6.5 billion in donations to fund new academic initiatives and bolster its financial aid program.

The fundraising drive by the Cambridge, Massachusetts, institution is believed to be the most ambitious ever undertaken by a university, ahead of one concluded last year by Stanford University in California that raised $6.2 billion.

Harvard unveiled its campaign at an event featuring Bill Gates, who spent three years at the school in the 1970s before dropping out to co-found Microsoft Corp.

Gates, who was ranked by Forbes magazine this year as the world’s second-richest person behind Mexico’s Carlos Slim, joked about his decision to leave the university during a talk before alumni and donors.

« You never say that you are ‘dropping out’ of Harvard. I ‘went on leave’ from Harvard, » he said. « If things hadn’t worked out for my company, Microsoft, I could have come back. »

The university has already raised $2.8 billion from more than 90,000 donors during the pre-launch phase of the campaign, its first major fundraising drive in more than a decade, it said in a press release.

Harvard’s investment portfolio is worth about $30.7 billion, roughly the size of the annual gross domestic product of the Baltic nation of Latvia.

That endowment shrank 0.05 percent in the fiscal year ended in 2012, after double-digit gains the previous year, according to the most recent figures from the university.

« The endowment is meant to last forever. … It enables our faculty to do groundbreaking research and supports financial aid for our students, » Vice President for Alumni Affairs & Development Tamara Rogers said in a statement. « In order to undertake new activities, we are going to have to raise new funds. »

Nearly half of the money raised in the new campaign will support teaching and research, while a quarter will go for financial aid and related programs. The rest will go toward capital improvements and a flexible fund, according to Harvard, recently ranked America’s No. 2 university behind Princeton by U.S. News & World Report.

Four years ago, Harvard was forced to suspend its campus expansion and put the construction of a $1 billion science complex on hold after its endowment lost 27.3 percent during the financial crisis.

The science building was slated to be the cornerstone of an ambitious 50-year expansion plan designed to increase the campus size by 50 percent.

(Reporting by Richard Valdmanis; Additional reporting by Jim Finkle; Editing by Leslie Gevirtz and Peter Cooney)

Voir aussi:

‘Locker Room Syndrome’ Has Men Bothered About Penis Size

The Inquisitr

June 15, 2013

Australian researchers have discovered that men are more bothered about their penis size when they’re in the locker room.

The traditional view that men are bothered about their penis size and whether they’re good in bed because of it, isn’t actually what bothers them the most, according to clinical psychology doctoral graduate, Annabel Chan Feng Yi.

The study, carried out by Victoria University, has surveyed over 700 men between the ages of 18 and 76 in order to come to the conclusion that ‘locker room syndrome’ affects men more than size worries in the bedroom.

This is apparently because, in the locker room, men have other men to compare themselves with, while at home they only have their partners to pass judgement (normally).

Yi and her fellow researchers have discovered that, while penis size is important, it’s not how their partners perceive it that has men on edge:

“Men’s preoccupation with size was rarely to do with pleasing sexual partners or even appearing as a better sexual partner, […] It was often more about competition with other men. Many felt most insecure about their size in environments where other men might see them, such as gym change rooms.”

No doubt French men at the gym will be more concerned about their penis size than other men, if a penis size survey from 2012 is accurate.

Furthermore, men who revealed their locker room syndrome, actually felt more than comfortable when they were intimate with their partners, which seems evident in how successful the ‘condom size’ app has been since its launch; there’s no need to worry when it’s only you judging your member.

In addition to penis size worries, the men surveyed also held strong worries regarding their body size, with gay participants statistically more concerned with their muscle size than straight men; all of which goes to show that it isn’t just women who suffer from appearance issues.

The researchers concluded that, while their study on locker room syndrome was a breakthrough in bringing men’s body issues to light, more studies are needed if men’s overall experiences and concerns are to be fully understood.

Voir enfin:

Syndrome du vestiaire

Vulgaris médical

Définition

Le syndrome du vestiaire, appelé autrefois dysmorphophobie génitale et actuellement dénommé BDD (Penile Body Dysmorphic Disorder), est un trouble de la dysmorphie corporelle pénienne, et un ensemble de symptômes caractérisant les réactions de certains hommes convaincus de posséder un pénis (verge) trop petit et pour lequel ils éprouvent un sentiment d’incomplétude, d’infériorité voire de gène ou de honte. C’est essentiellement dans les lieux publics où il est nécessaire de se déshabiller comme cela se conçoit dans les vestiaires, que le syndrome du vestiaire apparaît. Les douches publiques, les gymnases, les piscines sont ces lieux où certains individus sont persuadés de souffrir d’un sexe trop petit par rapport aux autres hommes.

Le syndrome du vestiaire engendre une certitude d’être plus mal loti que les autres et cela même sous les sous-vêtements. La petitesse supposée du sexe engendre chez ces patients une impression d’être exposé constamment à de la raillerie de la part des autres hommes et des femmes.

Il s’agit d’une perception anormale du corps qui est ici centré sur le pénis et qui traduit un trouble psychologique avec préoccupation trop importante, presque permanente qui s’explique par un manque d’estime et de confiance en soi. Pour ces individus qui ont du mal à s’aimer et à être aimés, tout est centré sur le pénis et ce trouble qui engendre des problèmes de sexualité, et aggravé durant certaines périodes, en particulier au cours du syndrome dépressif dont il constitue un symptôme.

Le syndrome du vestiaire ne doit pas être confondu avec les troubles concernant également le pénis mais survenant durant l’adolescence et qui se caractérise par l’absence de rumination permanente et de conviction négative.

La cause, s’il est possible d’en avancer une ou plusieurs, et sans doute la recherche au sein de la société, la surestimation croissante de la nécessité de performances sexuelles liée à la taille du pénis surtout en ce qui concerne l’obtention du plaisir chez la femme. Les films pornographiques ainsi que le manque d’information en ce qui concerne la taille réelle du pénis qui est d’environ 13 cm + ou – 4 cm au cours de l’érection (phallus) aggravent la survenue du syndrome du vestiaire. Signalons que la taille du sexe à l’état flacide (mou) est le plus souvent, chez la majorité des hommes, inférieur à 4 à 6 cm.


Football: La continuation de la guerre par d’autres moyens ? (Is sport war minus the shooting ?)

8 juillet, 2013
https://i2.wp.com/data2.collectionscanada.ca/e/e428/e010696733-v8.jpghttps://i2.wp.com/www.nam.ac.uk/images/online/sporting-soldiers/images/1011959.jpg
https://i0.wp.com/www.sofoot.com/IMG/img-supporters-militaires-1372978046_620_400_crop_articles-170818.jpghttps://jcdurbant.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/c6dda-ww1-sport.jpgle football est un sport de gentlemen pratiqué par des voyous. Anonyme
Le concept de fair-play est totalement étranger à la mentalité des Français ; un peuple qui a produit des générations d’aristocrates, mais pas un seul gentleman; une culture où le droit remplace la justice; une langue où l’unique mot pour désigner le fair-play est emprunté à l’anglais. Trevanian
Who’s for the game, the biggest that’s played, the red crashing game of a fight?  Jessie Pope
One day, when the Yankees accept peaceful coexistence with our country, we shall beat them at baseball, too, and the advantages of revolutionary over capitalist sport will become clear to all. Fidel Castro (1974)
Pratiqué avec sérieux, le sport n’a rien à voir avec le fair-play. il déborde de jalousie haineuse, de bestialité, du mépris de toute règle, de plaisir sadique et de violence; en d’autres mots, c’est la guerre, les fusils en moins. George Orwell
Inévitablement, nous considérons la société comme un lieu de conspiration qui engloutit le frère que beaucoup d’entre nous ont des raisons de respecter dans la vie privée, et qui impose à sa place un mâle monstrueux, à la voix tonitruante, au poing dur, qui, d’une façon puérile, inscrit dans le sol des signes à la craie, ces lignes de démarcation mystiques entre lesquelles sont fixés, rigides, séparés, artificiels, les êtres humains. Ces lieux où, paré d’or et de pourpre, décoré de plumes comme un sauvage, il poursuit ses rites mystiques et jouit des plaisirs suspects du pouvoir et de la domination, tandis que nous, »ses« femmes, nous sommes enfermées dans la maison de famille sans qu’il nous soit permis de participer à aucune des nombreuses sociétés dont est composée sa société. Virginia Woolf (1938)
Le privilège masculin est aussi un piège et il trouve sa contrepartie  dans la tension et la contention permanentes, parfois poussées jusqu’à l’absurde, qu’impose à chaque homme le devoir d’affirmer en toute circonstance sa virilité. (…) Tout concourt ainsi à faire de l’idéal impossible de virilité le principe d’une immense vulnérabilité. C’est elle qui conduit, paradoxalement, à l’investissement, parfois forcené, dans tous les jeux de violence masculins, tels dans nos sociétés les sports, et tout spécialement ceux qui sont les mieux faits pour produire les signes visibles de la masculinité, et pour manifester et aussi éprouver les qualités dites viriles, comme les sports de combat. Pierre Bourdieu (1998)
Sporting myths (…) thankfully survive close scrutiny. Captain Nevill did encourage his troops over the top in the First World War by kicking a football into no-man’s land, and the heavy, quartered leather football remains; there were countless ad hoc matches between British and German troops, normally on Christmas Day or New Year’s Day, and their details are faithfully recorded. One German captain presented a splendid bierstein to his opposite number after a hard-fought game. Brendan Gallagher
Les bidasses aussi jouent au football. Depuis 1948, le Conseil international du sport militaire organise en effet tous les deux ans sa Coupe du monde de football. Une épreuve intégrée depuis 1995 aux Jeux mondiaux militaires, juste entre le saut en parachute et le lancer de grenades. (…) 1946. Au lendemain de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, quelques militaires amateurs de sport se disent qu’il serait sympa d’organiser une compétition entre les différentes armées du monde. Apres tout, le football est bien la continuation de la guerre par d’autres moyens et, les massacres terminés, autant se mettre à jouer au ballon. C’est donc en 1948 que naît le Conseil international du sport militaire. Le Français Henri Debrus, ancien résistant et vice-président du Conseil des sports des forces alliées, crée l’institution et en devient le premier président. Le conseil crée très vite des championnats du monde de plusieurs disciplines et, évidemment, le football n’échappe pas à la règle. Le premier tournoi disputé en 1946 (avant la création du CISM) est remporté par l’Angleterre à Prague. Pendant près de 20 ans, l’Europe aura ensuite une hégémonie totale sur le football militaire, ne laissant aucun titre aux autres continents. D’ailleurs, l’Italie mène la danse, et d’assez loin, avec 8 titres. La France, avec cinq victoires, n’est pas ridicule. Mais comment s’explique ce talent des troufions français pour le ballon rond ? En fait, si les Bleus ont gagné 5 fois le titre mondial, c’est avant tout grâce au Bataillon de Joinville. En 1956, alors que tout un chacun doit effectuer son service militaire, l’armée crée une entité spéciale pour les sportifs de renom : le fameux BJ qui a vu passer dans ses rangs Platini, Bossis, Lizarazu ou Djorkaeff. Durant leur année de conscription, les heureux élus du Bataillon sont intégrés à l’équipe de France militaire. Un privilège qui leur permet d’éviter le récurage de chiottes et la plupart des autres corvées généralement réservées aux bidasses. Les joueurs ont aussi la permission de rejoindre leurs clubs dès le jeudi. En échange de ça, ils doivent représenter la France lors du championnat du monde militaire. Grâce à cet échange de bons procédés, la France aligne tous les 2 ans une équipe compétitive lors de la compétition. En 1995, les Coqs, drivés par Roger Lemerre, remportent leur dernier titre mondial à Rome. En finale, Dhorasoo, Sommeil, Dacourt, Maurice et les autres tapent l’Iran 1-0 devant un Stade olympique vide grâce à un but de Wagneau Eloi, héros bleu de la compétition. Mais l’âge d’or du football militaire français a fait son temps. En 1997, la fin de la conscription obligatoire entraîne dans sa chute le Bataillon de Joinville dissous en 2002. Dès lors, la France, privée de ses footballeurs professionnels, décline. (…) Désormais, ce sont les pays qui ont les armées les plus importantes en nombre d’hommes qui dominent, et armée nombreuse rime souvent avec régime autoritaire. D’ailleurs, le championnat du monde militaire dans l’histoire, c’est un peu la coupe du monde des dictateurs. À ce niveau-là, le palmarès est éloquent. En 1969, pendant le régime des colonels, la Grèce est championne du monde. Dix ans plus tard, c’est l’Irak de Saddam qui remporte le Graal. Les années 2000, elles, seront dominées par l’armée égyptienne, à l’exception de l’édition 2004 remportée par la Corée du Nord. Le football militaire, c’est aussi cette opportunité formidable d’être champion du monde pour des pays qui n’ont jamais rien gagné au niveau mondial « dans la vraie vie ». L’Algérie le sait bien, elle défendra chèrement son premier titre acquis en 2011, lors de la compétition qui débute le 2 juillet en Azerbaïdjan. So foot
Ils voulaient en découdre. Moi, j’ai couru me mettre à l’abri et, heureusement, certains de mes joueurs ont eu le réflexe de protéger les arbitres pour qu’ils ne soient pas pris à partie. On aurait dit la guerre! Alain Borel (président de club amateur, Val de Fontenay)
C’est à ce moment qu’ont débarqué une cinquantaine de jeunes, surtout des petits de 14-15 ans, tous avec des capuches et des objets en main, allant du couteau, à la batte de base-ball en passant par des sabres et même une pelle de chantier. Joueur amateur
Aujourd’hui, le niveau des violences et des incivilités recensées dans le foot amateur a tendance à se stabiliser. Lors de la saison 2011-2012, sur 1000 rencontres de foot amateur disputées, en moyenne 18,2 matchs ont été entachés d’au moins un incident. « Et pour la saison qui vient de s’écouler, nous devrions connaître une stabilité, voire même une légère baisse », confie Patrick Wincke, directeur de l’Observatoire des comportements à la Fédération française de football. Les remontées du terrain permettent pourtant de nuancer ces chiffres, et certains dirigeants évoquent une réalité plus sombre. « C’est plus tendu cette saison, raconte le président du District de Belfort-Montbéliard. Nous sommes entre 2,2 et 2,3% de matchs avec des incidents, soit plus que la moyenne nationale. Et les clubs où certains ne veulent plus aller jouer augmentent. Le foot n’est que le reflet du climat social ambiant, et les matchs où ça dérape sont souvent le fait de clubs qui sont en souffrance de dirigeants. Le taux d’encadrement est faible. Le Parisien

Comment dit-on fair play en anglais ? (ou même en portugais ?)

Stades vandalisés, bagarres dégénérant en batailles rangées, arbitres agressés, à moitié étranglés, bousculés, battus à mort, lynchés …

A l’heure où, entre la violence urbaine et la violence politique, le Brésil semble s’acheminer vers une tenue de la Coupe du monde de football problématique …

Et où justement un arbitre vient de subir un véritable dépeçage...

Pendant que d’Afrique du sud à la France, on ne compte plus les incidents …

Retour, avec un vieux texte polémique de George Orwell, sur la question du sport en général et du football en particulier (dont les armées ont d’ailleurs aussi leur propre coupe du monde) comme moyen de rapprochement des peuples …

The Sporting Spirit

George Orwell

Now that the brief visit of the Dynamo football team has come to an end, it is possible to say publicly what many thinking people were saying privately before the Dynamos ever arrived. That is, that sport is an unfailing cause of ill-will, and that if such a visit as this had any effect at all on Anglo-Soviet relations, it could only be to make them slightly worse than before.

Even the newspapers have been unable to conceal the fact that at least two of the four matches played led to much bad feeling. At the Arsenal match, I am told by someone who was there, a British and a Russian player came to blows and the crowd booed the referee. The Glasgow match, someone else informs me, was simply a free-for-all from the start. And then there was the controversy, typical of our nationalistic age, about the composition of the Arsenal team. Was it really an all-England team, as claimed by the Russians, or merely a league team, as claimed by the British? And did the Dynamos end their tour abruptly in order to avoid playing an all-England team? As usual, everyone answers these questions according to his political predilections. Not quite everyone, however. I noted with interest, as an instance of the vicious passions that football provokes, that the sporting correspondent of the russophile News Chronicle took the anti-Russian line and maintained that Arsenal was not an all-England team. No doubt the controversy will continue to echo for years in the footnotes of history books. Meanwhile the result of the Dynamos’ tour, in so far as it has had any result, will have been to create fresh animosity on both sides.

And how could it be otherwise? I am always amazed when I hear people saying that sport creates goodwill between the nations, and that if only the common peoples of the world could meet one another at football or cricket, they would have no inclination to meet on the battlefield. Even if one didn’t know from concrete examples (the 1936 Olympic Games, for instance) that international sporting contests lead to orgies of hatred, one could deduce it from general principles.

Nearly all the sports practised nowadays are competitive. You play to win, and the game has little meaning unless you do your utmost to win. On the village green, where you pick up sides and no feeling of local patriotism is involved. it is possible to play simply for the fun and exercise: but as soon as the question of prestige arises, as soon as you feel that you and some larger unit will be disgraced if you lose, the most savage combative instincts are aroused. Anyone who has played even in a school football match knows this. At the international level sport is frankly mimic warfare. But the significant thing is not the behaviour of the players but the attitude of the spectators: and, behind the spectators, of the nations who work themselves into furies over these absurd contests, and seriously believe — at any rate for short periods — that running, jumping and kicking a ball are tests of national virtue.

Even a leisurely game like cricket, demanding grace rather than strength, can cause much ill-will, as we saw in the controversy over body-line bowling and over the rough tactics of the Australian team that visited England in 1921. Football, a game in which everyone gets hurt and every nation has its own style of play which seems unfair to foreigners, is far worse. Worst of all is boxing. One of the most horrible sights in the world is a fight between white and coloured boxers before a mixed audience. But a boxing audience is always disgusting, and the behaviour of the women, in particular, is such that the army, I believe, does not allow them to attend its contests. At any rate, two or three years ago, when Home Guards and regular troops were holding a boxing tournament, I was placed on guard at the door of the hall, with orders to keep the women out.

In England, the obsession with sport is bad enough, but even fiercer passions are aroused in young countries where games playing and nationalism are both recent developments. In countries like India or Burma, it is necessary at football matches to have strong cordons of police to keep the crowd from invading the field. In Burma, I have seen the supporters of one side break through the police and disable the goalkeeper of the opposing side at a critical moment. The first big football match that was played in Spain about fifteen years ago led to an uncontrollable riot. As soon as strong feelings of rivalry are aroused, the notion of playing the game according to the rules always vanishes. People want to see one side on top and the other side humiliated, and they forget that victory gained through cheating or through the intervention of the crowd is meaningless. Even when the spectators don’t intervene physically they try to influence the game by cheering their own side and “rattling” opposing players with boos and insults. Serious sport has nothing to do with fair play. It is bound up with hatred, jealousy, boastfulness, disregard of all rules and sadistic pleasure in witnessing violence: in other words it is war minus the shooting.

Instead of blah-blahing about the clean, healthy rivalry of the football field and the great part played by the Olympic Games in bringing the nations together, it is more useful to inquire how and why this modern cult of sport arose. Most of the games we now play are of ancient origin, but sport does not seem to have been taken very seriously between Roman times and the nineteenth century. Even in the English public schools the games cult did not start till the later part of the last century. Dr Arnold, generally regarded as the founder of the modern public school, looked on games as simply a waste of time. Then, chiefly in England and the United States, games were built up into a heavily-financed activity, capable of attracting vast crowds and rousing savage passions, and the infection spread from country to country. It is the most violently combative sports, football and boxing, that have spread the widest. There cannot be much doubt that the whole thing is bound up with the rise of nationalism — that is, with the lunatic modern habit of identifying oneself with large power units and seeing everything in terms of competitive prestige. Also, organised games are more likely to flourish in urban communities where the average human being lives a sedentary or at least a confined life, and does not get much opportunity for creative labour. In a rustic community a boy or young man works off a good deal of his surplus energy by walking, swimming, snowballing, climbing trees, riding horses, and by various sports involving cruelty to animals, such as fishing, cock-fighting and ferreting for rats. In a big town one must indulge in group activities if one wants an outlet for one’s physical strength or for one’s sadistic impulses. Games are taken seriously in London and New York, and they were taken seriously in Rome and Byzantium: in the Middle Ages they were played, and probably played with much physical brutality, but they were not mixed up with politics nor a cause of group hatreds.

If you wanted to add to the vast fund of ill-will existing in the world at this moment, you could hardly do it better than by a series of football matches between Jews and Arabs, Germans and Czechs, Indians and British, Russians and Poles, and Italians and Jugoslavs, each match to be watched by a mixed audience of 100,000 spectators. I do not, of course, suggest that sport is one of the main causes of international rivalry; big-scale sport is itself, I think, merely another effect of the causes that have produced nationalism. Still, you do make things worse by sending forth a team of eleven men, labelled as national champions, to do battle against some rival team, and allowing it to be felt on all sides that whichever nation is defeated will “lose face”.

I hope, therefore, that we shan’t follow up the visit of the Dynamos by sending a British team to the USSR. If we must do so, then let us send a second-rate team which is sure to be beaten and cannot be claimed to represent Britain as a whole. There are quite enough real causes of trouble already, and we need not add to them by encouraging young men to kick each other on the shins amid the roars of infuriated spectators.

1945

George Orwell: ‘The Sporting Spirit’

First published: Tribune. — GB, London. — December 1945.

Reprinted:

— ‘Shooting an Elephant and Other Essays’. — 1950.

— ‘The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of George Orwell’. — 1968.

Voir aussi:

Brésil : un arbitre poignarde un joueur et est décapité

N.H

Le Parisien

 07.07.2013

Scène d’horreur sur un terrain de foot. Un arbitre de football amateur brésilien d’à peine 20 ans a été décapité après avoir lui-même poignardé un joueur qui n’acceptait pas son carton rouge, dimanche 30 juin, dans le nord du Brésil, à Pio XII dans l’Etat du Maranhão.

Le joueur, Josenir dos Santos Abreu (31 ans), aurait donné un coup de pied à l’arbitre, Otávio Jordão da Silva Cantanhede, qui aurait sorti un couteau de poche et frappé à la poitrine le jeune homme, décédé sur le chemin de l’hôpital.

Décapité, la tête au bout d’une perche

Les supporters révoltés sont ensuite descendus agresser l’arbitre, dès lors ligoté, lapidé puis décapité, pour enfin planter sa tête au bout d’une perche.

Ce lynchage a été filmé par portable et les vidéos amateurs se sont retrouvées sur les réseaux sociaux. Elles ont par ailleurs permis l’arrestation, mardi, de Luís Moraes Sousa, 27 ans, un des suspects. Deux autres suspects ont également été identifiés : son frère, Francisco Moraes Sousa, et le surnommé «Pirolo», Josimar de Sousa. Tous deux sont recherchés par la police.

Le premier aurait frappé Cantanhede au visage avec une bouteille et son frère aurait coupé la tête, les jambes et les bras de la victime à la faucille après que Pirolo a poignardé dans la nuque l’arbitre.

L’explication donnée par Luis, affirmant que Pirolo appartenait à la famille du joueur décédé, est contestée par le commissaire en charge de l’enquête, Válter Costa dos Santos. Le policier a souligné : «Un crime ne peut jamais en justifier un autre.»

Du déjà-vu dans le football brésilien

En 2010, un arbitre avait poignardé à mort un joueur lors d’un match amateur au nord-est du pays, à Barreira.

VIDEO. Agression d’un arbitre brésilien en février 2012. Moins tragique mais tout aussi choquant.

Un arbitre violemment agressé au Brésil par evidenceprod

Dans un an, le mondial de football se tiendra au Brésil alors que le pays enregistre presque 50 000 homicides par an.

Voir également:

Exclusif.

VIDEO. L’incroyable vidéo qui ébranle le foot amateur

L’irruption filmée de jeunes armés pendant un match dans le Val-de-Marne désole le monde du foot, qui tente d’éradiquer la violence.

Frédéric Gouaillard

Le Parisien

15.06.2013

C’est une vidéo de 7’38 qui témoigne de la violence qui gangrène encore et toujours le football amateur. Ce document, que nous nous sommes procuré, et dont les principaux extraits sont à voir sur notre site, reflète la triste réalité des terrains de foot du dimanche

Ce match en date du 2 juin, où les spectateurs s’affrontent à coups de batte de base-ball, de barre de fer ou de bombe lacrymogène, se déroulait à Ivry-sur-Seine, en banlieue parisienne. Toutefois, il aurait bien pu se tenir dans le Doubs, où un arbitre a manqué d’être étranglé récemment, ou dans une autre région de France. « Et, pourtant, c’était un match à enjeu mais qui n’était pas classé à risque, témoigne Thierry Mercier, le président du District du Val-de-Marne où se sont déroulés les faits. Mais on n’est pas à l’abri, tout peut arriver. »

La Fédération cherche de nouvelles solutions

Aujourd’hui, le niveau des violences et des incivilités recensées dans le foot amateur a tendance à se stabiliser. Lors de la saison 2011-2012, sur 1000 rencontres de foot amateur disputées, en moyenne 18,2 matchs ont été entachés d’au moins un incident. « Et pour la saison qui vient de s’écouler, nous devrions connaître une stabilité, voire même une légère baisse », confie Patrick Wincke, directeur de l’Observatoire des comportements à la Fédération française de football. Les remontées du terrain permettent pourtant de nuancer ces chiffres, et certains dirigeants évoquent une réalité plus sombre.

« C’est plus tendu cette saison, raconte le président du District de Belfort-Montbéliard. Nous sommes entre 2,2 et 2,3% de matchs avec des incidents, soit plus que la moyenne nationale. Et les clubs où certains ne veulent plus aller jouer augmentent. Le foot n’est que le reflet du climat social ambiant, et les matchs où ça dérape sont souvent le fait de clubs qui sont en souffrance de dirigeants. Le taux d’encadrement est faible. » Sans nier ces faits, la FFF cherche de nouvelles solutions qui vont au-delà de la simple répression, pas toujours efficace. Dès la saison prochaine, des mesures visant à faire disparaître la compétition chez les enfants vont être mises en œuvre pour renforcer le foot éducatif. « Cela va concerner les jeunes jusqu’à 13, voire 15 ans. Les joueurs auront aussi tous les mêmes temps de jeu et ils pourront aussi arbitrer », détaille Patrick Wincke.

Voir encore:

Le jour où un arbitre s’est vu « mourir »

Frédéric Gouaillard

Le Parisien

15 juin 2013

Le 2 avril dernier, l’arbitre Nathanaël Pinel (33 ans) a été étranglé par un joueur lors d’un match départemental. Son agresseur a été suspendu vingt ans par le District de Belfort-Montbéliard (Doubs). Son club a fait appel. Lundi, c’est le tribunal correctionnel de Montbéliard qui doit se prononcer sur cette affaire et les dommages et intérêts éventuels après la plainte de l’arbitre pour coups et blessures. L’homme en noir livre un récit édifiant du moment où il a bien cru « y passer ».

Le match. « C’était une action banale, un contact entre deux footballeurs. J’ai arrêté le jeu, un autre joueur est arrivé et a dit à un de ses coéquipiers : Nique-le, à propos d’un des deux à terre. J’ai sorti un carton rouge, et je me suis retrouvé avec cinq ou six joueurs devant moi. L’un d’entre eux n’était pas dans son état normal. Il n’arrêtait pas de dire : Y a qu’à moi que tu parles. »

Son agression. « Ensuite il m’a bousculé, je lui ai aussi donné un rouge et c’est là qu’il m’a étranglé jusqu’au moment où j’ai perdu ma respiration. Je me suis retrouvé par terre et j’ai reçu un coup de poing sur ma pommette gauche. J’ai fait une crise d’épilepsie et ensuite, je ne me souviens de rien. Je suis sujet à ce type de crises. J’ai repris connaissance dans le couloir des vestiaires vingt minutes après, avant d’être transporté à l’hôpital. »

Les blessures. « J’ai eu 3 jours d’ITT et un arrêt maladie du 7 avril au 23 mai. J’étais choqué et démoralisé. Heureusement, j’ai eu le soutien de beaucoup de monde à commencer par mes collègues arbitres. Aujourd’hui encore, je ne suis pas à 100%, il y a encore des soirs où j’y pense et où je me demande ce qui s’est passé dans leur tête. »

La peur. « J’ai cru que j’allais mourir. Quand je me suis retrouvé par terre et que j’ai reçu le coup de poing, je me suis dit : Je vais y passer. Il y avait une vingtaine de gars autour de moi, j’étais recroquevillé en position fœtale avec les bras devant la tête. »

Son agresseur suspendu vingt ans. « On dit toujours que ce n’est pas assez, mais personnellement je trouve que c’est pas mal. Ça va lui permettre de réfléchir, en plus cette sanction s’étend aux autres sports en compétition.

Son avenir. « Le lendemain, je voulais rendre ma licence. Après je me suis dit : Réfléchis, ne fais pas de bêtises. Je pense que je vais continuer, car c’est ma passion et en général, tous les dimanches, ça se passait bien avec les clubs. »

Les mauvais exemples. « Quand on voit comment les joueurs s’en prennent aux arbitres… Et puis Leonardo (NDLR : directeur sportif du PSG) qui ose nier avoir bousculé M. Castro alors que tout le monde l’a vu… Comment voulez-vous ensuite que ça se passe bien dans un match de District? »

Voir de plus:

VIDEOS. Italie : fous de rage, les supporteurs vandalisent leur stade

A.C.

Le Parisien

17.06.2013

Envahissement de terrain, joueurs menacés, bancs de touche vandalisés, vitres explosées… Après le match nul de leur équipe (1-1) contre Carpi, les supporteurs de Lecce ont laissé exploser leur rage dimanche, transformant leur stade en terrain d’affrontements et de pillage.

La raison de leur colère ? Ce résultat prive leur équipe d’une montée en deuxième division.

Selon La Stampa, un journal italien, les ultras de Lecce ont également mis le feu à un véhicule de police. Selon les secours, plusieurs personnes ont été blessées légèrement, certains pour des contusions, d’autres pour des intoxications dues à la fumée. Les policiers, qui ont répliqué avec des tirs de gaz lacrymogènes, compteraient plusieurs blessés dans les rangs à cause de jets de pierre, selon un autre média italien.

VIDEO. Les supporteurs de Lecce détruisent leur propre stade

En France, le week-end a été marqué par la diffusion sur notre site d’une vidéo d’une rare violence faisant état d’affrontements début juin après un match amateur à Ivry-sur-Seine (Val-de-Marne). Samedi, deux arbitres ont été frappés par des spectateurs en colère au Plessis-Trévise (Val-de-Marne) après un match entre équipes de jeunes. Trois suspects ont été placés en garde à vue. Après ces événements, la ministre des Sports Valérie Fourneyron a condamné samedi ces agressions, rappelant que «le sport (ne devait pas) être pris en otage par la violence».

Aux Pays-bas cette fois, huit personnes ont été condamnés ce lundi à de la prison ferme pour avoir battu à mort un arbitre.

Voir par ailleurs:

Mais qui es-tu, le football militaire ?

So foot

5 Juillet 2013

Les bidasses aussi jouent au football. Depuis 1948, le Conseil international du sport militaire organise en effet tous les deux ans sa Coupe du monde de football. Une épreuve intégrée depuis 1995 aux Jeux mondiaux militaires, juste entre le saut en parachute et le lancer de grenades. Et devinez quoi ? La France est quintuple championne du monde.

1946. Au lendemain de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, quelques militaires amateurs de sport se disent qu’il serait sympa d’organiser une compétition entre les différentes armées du monde. Apres tout, le football est bien la continuation de la guerre par d’autres moyens et, les massacres terminés, autant se mettre à jouer au ballon. C’est donc en 1948 que naît le Conseil international du sport militaire. Le Français Henri Debrus, ancien résistant et vice-président du Conseil des sports des forces alliées, crée l’institution et en devient le premier président. Le conseil crée très vite des championnats du monde de plusieurs disciplines et, évidemment, le football n’échappe pas à la règle. Le premier tournoi disputé en 1946 (avant la création du CISM) est remporté par l’Angleterre à Prague. Pendant près de 20 ans, l’Europe aura ensuite une hégémonie totale sur le football militaire, ne laissant aucun titre aux autres continents. D’ailleurs, l’Italie mène la danse, et d’assez loin, avec 8 titres. La France, avec cinq victoires, n’est pas ridicule. Mais comment s’explique ce talent des troufions français pour le ballon rond ?

Le récurage de chiottes

En fait, si les Bleus ont gagné 5 fois le titre mondial, c’est avant tout grâce au Bataillon de Joinville. En 1956, alors que tout un chacun doit effectuer son service militaire, l’armée crée une entité spéciale pour les sportifs de renom : le fameux BJ qui a vu passer dans ses rangs Platini, Bossis, Lizarazu ou Djorkaeff. Durant leur année de conscription, les heureux élus du Bataillon sont intégrés à l’équipe de France militaire. Un privilège qui leur permet d’éviter le récurage de chiottes et la plupart des autres corvées généralement réservées aux bidasses. Les joueurs ont aussi la permission de rejoindre leurs clubs dès le jeudi. En échange de ça, ils doivent représenter la France lors du championnat du monde militaire. Grâce à cet échange de bons procédés, la France aligne tous les 2 ans une équipe compétitive lors de la compétition. En 1995, les Coqs, drivés par Roger Lemerre, remportent leur dernier titre mondial à Rome. En finale, Dhorasoo, Sommeil, Dacourt, Maurice et les autres tapent l’Iran 1-0 devant un Stade olympique vide grâce à un but de Wagneau Eloi, héros bleu de la compétition.

La coupe du monde des dictateurs

Mais l’âge d’or du football militaire français a fait son temps. En 1997, la fin de la conscription obligatoire entraîne dans sa chute le Bataillon de Joinville dissous en 2002. Dès lors, la France, privée de ses footballeurs professionnels, décline. L’Italie, qui avait adopté un système similaire et alignait dans ses équipes des joueurs tels que Del Piero ou Delvecchio, ne gagne plus non plus. Désormais, ce sont les pays qui ont les armées les plus importantes en nombre d’hommes qui dominent, et armée nombreuse rime souvent avec régime autoritaire. D’ailleurs, le championnat du monde militaire dans l’histoire, c’est un peu la coupe du monde des dictateurs. À ce niveau-là, le palmarès est éloquent. En 1969, pendant le régime des colonels, la Grèce est championne du monde. Dix ans plus tard, c’est l’Irak de Saddam qui remporte le Graal. Les années 2000, elles, seront dominées par l’armée égyptienne, à l’exception de l’édition 2004 remportée par la Corée du Nord. Le football militaire, c’est aussi cette opportunité formidable d’être champion du monde pour des pays qui n’ont jamais rien gagné au niveau mondial « dans la vraie vie ». L’Algérie le sait bien, elle défendra chèrement son premier titre acquis en 2011, lors de la compétition qui débute le 2 juillet en Azerbaïdjan.

Voir enfin:

How Orwell misread the sporting spirit

Christmas bonus: Army officers play an impromptu game of football in 1918

Brendan Gallagher

30 Jul 2004

George Orwell wasn’t wrong about much but he was way off beam with his famously jaundiced view of sport. In 1941, with war waging and Britain contemplating a grim future, he wrote: « Serious sport has nothing to do with fair play, it is bound up with hatred and jealousy, boastfulness, disregard of all the rules and sadistic pleasure in unnecessary violence. In other words it is war minus the shooting. »

The words of a man who never played competitive sport – a perplexed observer. A solitary, introvert man who had no concept of teamwork and no comprehension of the passion which motivates sportsmen and women. No wonder his Big Brother vision of the future in 1984 was bleak and soulless.

Those able to visit the Imperial War Museum (North) in Manchester over the coming months can make their own judgment about sport’s relationship with war. The museum is staging a stunning exhibition entitled « The Greater Game » which tells the story of sportsmen in war and examines sport’s relationship with politics.

It sounds dry and serious; in reality it is fascinating, humorous and moving. How could sport be otherwise? Make a weekend of it because you will want to pop in more than once. That I can guarantee.

Sporting myths are examined and thankfully survive close scrutiny. Captain Nevill did encourage his troops over the top in the First World War by kicking a football into no-man’s land, and the heavy, quartered leather football remains; there were countless ad hoc matches between British and German troops, normally on Christmas Day or New Year’s Day, and their details are faithfully recorded. One German captain presented a splendid bierstein to his opposite number after a hard-fought game.

There is a wonderful collection of War Office recruitment posters which cynically exploit the common man’s close affinity with sport; another striking image is German prisoners of war peering over the stable doors at Newbury racecourse where they were incarcerated. Most cricket fans have read of E W Swanton’s 1939 Wisden which gave solace to many Allied soldiers in Japanese prisoner of war camps. To see its dog-eared, yellow pages is thought-provoking in the extreme.

You can learn about truly exceptional individuals. There are the stories, in minute detail, of 11 sportsmen, a randomly selected First XI of sporting heroes. Some you will have heard of, like rugby’s Edgar Mobbs who formed his own First World War regiment, and former England cricket captain Lionel Tennyson, who was wounded three times and twice mentioned in dispatches at Loos, Ypres, the Somme and Cambrai. After surviving those battles, batting one-handed against the Australian fast bowlers, as he did in a Test in 1921, was a doddle.

Maurice Turnbull, Hedley Verity and Learie Constantine are also well known, but football’s Walter Tull, Donald Bell and Jimmy Spiers, rugby league forward and world wrestling champion Douglas Clark, Australian Test cricketer Ross Gregory and jockey Frank Furlong may be new names to you. Their stories are extraordinary and inspiring and we offer just a taste on these pages.

Sportsmen make great soldiers because they are generally fit, courageous, aggressive, skilled, self-sacrificing and disciplined. What Orwell overlooked is that most sportsmen bring a generosity of spirit, dignity and integrity to everything they do, including going to war. With few exceptions, they behave better on the sporting field than the rest of mankind do in their everyday lives and over the years they have taken those qualities into the battlefield. They raise the bar, especially when the going gets tough.

Politicians and political commentators will never understand sport. In 1974, Cuba’s Fidel Castro started getting on his high horse: « One day, when the Yankees accept peaceful coexistence with our country, we shall beat them at baseball, too, and the advantages of revolutionary over capitalist sport will become clear to all. » Only somebody who knew nothing of sport and human nature would say that.


%d blogueurs aiment cette page :