Education: Trop intelligents pour être heureux (Harvard’s new Jews: How Ivy League schools’ fear of over-representation, stereotyping or preferences for athletes, large donors, alumni and under-represented groups sublty discriminate against Asian students)

17 décembre, 2017

The image of Asian-Americans as a homogeneous group of high achievers taking over the campuses of the nation’s most selective colleges came under assault in a report issued Monday.

The report, by New York University, the College Board and a commission of mostly Asian-American educators and community leaders, largely avoids the debates over both affirmative action and the heavy representation of Asian-Americans at the most selective colleges.

But it pokes holes in stereotypes about Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders, including the perception that they cluster in science, technology, engineering and math. And it points out that the term “Asian-American” is extraordinarily broad, embracing members of many ethnic groups.

“Certainly there’s a lot of Asians doing well, at the top of the curve, and that’s a point of pride, but there are just as many struggling at the bottom of the curve, and we wanted to draw attention to that,” said Robert T. Teranishi, the N.Y.U. education professor who wrote the report, “Facts, Not Fiction: Setting the Record Straight.”

“Our goal,” Professor Teranishi added, “is to have people understand that the population is very diverse.”

The report, based on federal education, immigration and census data, as well as statistics from the College Board, noted that the federally defined categories of Asian-American and Pacific Islander included dozens of groups, each with its own language and culture, as varied as the Hmong, Samoans, Bengalis and Sri Lankans.

Their educational backgrounds, the report said, vary widely: while most of the nation’s Hmong and Cambodian adults have never finished high school, most Pakistanis and Indians have at least a bachelor’s degree.

The SAT scores of Asian-Americans, it said, like those of other Americans, tend to correlate with the income and educational level of their parents.

“The notion of lumping all people into a single category and assuming they have no needs is wrong,” said Alma R. Clayton-Pederson, vice president of the Association of American Colleges and Universities, who was a member of the commission the College Board financed to produce the report.

“Our backgrounds are very different,” added Dr. Clayton-Pederson, who is black, “but it’s almost like the reverse of what happened to African-Americans.”

The report found that contrary to stereotype, most of the bachelor’s degrees that Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders received in 2003 were in business, management, social sciences or humanities, not in the STEM fields: science, technology, engineering or math. And while Asians earned 32 percent of the nation’s STEM doctorates that year, within that 32 percent more than four of five degree recipients were international students from Asia, not Asian-Americans.

The report also said that more Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders were enrolled in community colleges than in either public or private four-year colleges. But the idea that Asian-American “model minority” students are edging out all others is so ubiquitous that quips like “U.C.L.A. really stands for United Caucasians Lost Among Asians” or “M.I.T. means Made in Taiwan” have become common, the report said.

Asian-Americans make up about 5 percent of the nation’s population but 10 percent or more — considerably more in California — of the undergraduates at many of the most selective colleges, according to data reported by colleges. But the new report suggested that some such statistics combined campus populations of Asian-Americans with those of international students from Asian countries.

The report quotes the opening to W. E. B. Du Bois’s 1903 classic “The Souls of Black Folk” — “How does it feel to be a problem?” — and says that for Asian-Americans, seen as the “good minority that seeks advancement through quiet diligence in study and work and by not making waves,” the question is, “How does it feel to be a solution?”

That question, too, is problematic, the report said, because it diverts attention from systemic failings of K-to-12 schools, shifting responsibility for educational success to individual students. In addition, it said, lumping together all Asian groups masks the poverty and academic difficulties of some subgroups.

The report said the model-minority perception pitted Asian-Americans against African-Americans. With the drop in black and Latino enrollment at selective public universities that are not allowed to consider race in admissions, Asian-Americans have been turned into buffers, the report said, “middlemen in the cost-benefit analysis of wins and losses.”

Some have suggested that Asian-Americans are held to higher admissions standards at the most selective colleges. In 2006, Jian Li, the New Jersey-born son of Chinese immigrants, filed a complaint with the Office for Civil Rights at the Education Department, saying he had been rejected by Princeton because he is Asian. Princeton’s admission policies are under review, the department says.

The report also notes the underrepresentation of Asian-Americans in administrative jobs at colleges. Only 33 of the nation’s college presidents, fewer than 1 percent, are Asian-Americans or Pacific Islanders.

Voir aussi:

Data check: Why do Chinese and Indian students come to U.S. universities?

Two new reports document the continued growth in the overall number of students coming to the United States from other countries. Those pursuing undergraduate degrees in so-called STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) fields make up 45% of the undergraduate total, and their share of the graduate pool is even larger. But within that broad picture are some surprising trends involving China and India, the two countries that supply the largest number of students (see graphic, above).

One is that the flow of Chinese students into U.S. graduate programs is plateauing at the same time their pursuit of U.S. undergraduate degrees is soaring. Another is the recent spike in graduate students from India occurring despite a continuing small presence of Indian students at the undergraduate level.

In August, ScienceInsider wrote about a report from the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) on the most recent acceptance rates for foreign students at U.S. graduate programs. Last week the report was updated to reflect this fall’s actual first-time enrollment figures. And yesterday the Institute of International Education (IIE) issued its annual Open Doors report, which covers both undergraduate and graduate students from elsewhere enrolling in the United States as well as U.S. students studying abroad.

According to IIE, 42% of the 886,000 international students at U.S. universities in 2013 to 2014 hailed from China and India. China makes up nearly three-fourths of that subtotal. In fact, the number of Chinese students equals the total from the next 12 highest ranking countries after India.

This year’s IIE report also includes a look at 15-year trends. For example, foreign students compose only 8.1% of total U.S. enrollment, but their numbers have grown by 72% since 1999, making international students an increasingly important part of U.S. higher education.

Their presence has long been visible within graduate programs in science and engineering fields, of course. But the new Open Doors report documents a surge in undergraduate enrollment from China, to the point where it almost equals the number of graduate students in the country—110,550 versus 115,727. In 2000, the ratio was nearly 1-to-6.

Trying to understand such trends keeps university administrators up at night. And the more they know, the better they can be at anticipating the next trend. That’s why ScienceInsider turned to Peggy Blumenthal. She’s spent 30 years at IIE, most recently as senior counselor to its current president, Allan Goodman, and that longevity has given her a rich perspective on the ebb and flow of international students. Here is her perspective on what’s moving the needle for Chinese and Indian students.

An explosion of Chinese undergraduates

The numbers: Chinese undergraduate enrollment in the United States has grown from 8252 in 2000 to 110,550 last year. Almost all of that growth has occurred since 2007, and there has been a doubling since 2010.

The reasons: A high score on China’s national college entrance examination, called the gaokao, enables a Chinese student to attend a top university and can punch their ticket to a successful career. It requires years of high-stress preparation, however. A growing number of parents choose to remove their children from that pressure cooker, Blumenthal says, and look for alternatives abroad. The chance for a liberal arts education at a U.S. university is an attractive alternative to the rigid undergraduate training offered by most Chinese universities, she adds.

The U.S. system of higher education, Blumenthal says, offers Chinese families “a unique opportunity to shop” based on the price, quality, and reputation of the institution. The cost of out-of-state tuition at a top public U.S. university is a relative bargain for China’s growing middle class, she notes, and community colleges are dirt cheap.

Recent changes in immigration policies have made the United Kingdom and Australia less desirable destinations among English-speaking countries, according to Blumenthal. She also thinks that U.S. colleges have built a sturdy support system based on their decades of experience in hosting foreign students. “In Germany or France you’re pretty much on your own” in choosing classes, completing the work, and earning a degree, she says. “Nobody is there to help if you’re having trouble.”

Flat Chinese graduate enrollment

The numbers: The CGS report says that the number of first-time graduate students this fall from China fell by 1%, the first time in the decade that it has declined. Thanks to that dip, the growth in the overall number of Chinese graduate students on U.S. campuses slowed to just 3% this fall, compared with double-digit increases in recent years. U.S. academic scientists may not be aware of this emerging trend because of the sheer number of Chinese graduate students on U.S. campuses. IIE puts the number last year at 115,727, and the CGS report says they represent one-third of all foreign graduate students.

The reasons: Chinese graduate students have more options at home now. “China has pumped enormous resources into its graduate education capacity” across thousands of universities, Blumenthal says. An increasing proportion of the professors at those universities have been trained in the United States and Europe, she says, and upon their return they have implemented Western research practices. “They are beginning to teach more like we do, publish like we do, and operate their labs like we do.”

At the same time, she says, the added value of a U.S. graduate degree has shrunk in relation to a comparable Chinese degree. “That’s not true for MIT [the Massachusetts Institute of Technology] or [the University of California,] Berkeley, of course—those degrees still carry a premium in the job market,” she says. “But for the vast majority of Chinese students, it’s not clear that an investment in a U.S. degree is worth it, especially when the rapid growth of the Chinese economy has created such a great need for scientific and engineering talent.”

In the United States, a tight job market often translates into more students attending graduate school in the hope that it will give them an edge. But high unemployment rates among college graduates in China haven’t created a potentially larger pool of applicants to U.S. graduate programs, she says, because those students are not competitive with their U.S. peers.

“They are probably not English speakers and would have trouble passing the TOEFL [an assessment of English language skills],” she surmises. “So they might only get into a fourth-rate U.S. graduate program.” In contrast, she says, U.S. graduate programs have historically gotten “the cream of the crop” from China. And if a larger proportion of those students can build a career in China, fewer need apply to U.S. graduate programs.

Few Indian undergraduates

The numbers: India barely registers on a list of originating countries for U.S. undergraduates. Compared with China, home to 30% of all U.S. international undergrads, Indian students compose only 3% of the pool. And the overall total for 2013—12,677—actually reflects a drop of 0.5% from 2012.

The reasons: Top-performing Indian students are well-served at the undergraduate level by the country’s network of elite technology institutes, known as IITs. India has also never had a strong connection to the United States at the undergraduate level, according to Blumenthal. In addition, she says, “many Indian parents are reluctant to send their girls abroad, especially at the undergraduate level.” By contrast, she says, China’s one-child-per-family rule has meant that they have “one shot at success, male or female.”

Soaring graduate enrollment from India

The numbers: The incoming class of Indian students for U.S. graduate programs is 27% larger this year than in 2013, according to CGS’s annual survey. And that increase follows a 40% jump in 2013 over 2012. However, CGS officials note that the Indian numbers have historically been more volatile than those from China; the increases for 2011 and 2012 were 2% and 1%, respectively.

The reasons: U.S. graduate programs have benefited from several recent developments that, together, have opened the floodgates for Indian students. For starters, India’s investment in higher education hasn’t yet had much effect on graduate education, Blumenthal says. Unlike in China, she says, “in India there’s been very little effort to upgrade the quality of the faculty.”

At the same time, it’s becoming harder for graduates of India’s universities to follow the traditional path of doing their further training in Britain or Australia, as many of their professors had done in previous generations. For the United Kingdom, tuition increases, visa restrictions, and a tightening of rules for those seeking work permits after college have all created greater barriers to entry, Blumenthal says. “It sends a message from the U.K. government that [it’s] not really interested in international students,” she says. “They are now regarded as simply another category of immigrants” rather than a valuable future source of intellectual capital.

In Australia, Blumenthal notes, there’s a growing backlash against earlier government attempts to recruit more international students. “People think they let in too many,” she says. “They didn’t fit in, they didn’t speak English, and there was a perception that they were taking away jobs from Australians.”

A recent strengthening of the rupee against the U.S. dollar has made U.S. graduate education more affordable for the middle class, she adds. And sluggish economic growth in India has meant fewer jobs for recent college graduates.

Foreign Student Dependence

New report provides breakdown on international enrollments by discipline and institution, showing that there are graduate STEM programs in which more than 90 percent of students are from outside the U.S.

Elizabeth Redden
July 12, 2013

International students play a critical role in sustaining quality science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) graduate programs at U.S. universities, a new report from the National Foundation for American Policy (NFAP) argues.

It will come as no surprise to observers of graduate education that the report documents the fact that foreign students make up the majority of enrollments in U.S. graduate programs in many STEM fields, accounting for 70.3 percent of all full-time graduate students in electrical engineering, 63.2 percent in computer science, 60.4 percent in industrial engineering, and more than 50 percent in chemical, materials and mechanical engineering, as well as in economics (a non-STEM field). However, the report, which analyzes National Science Foundation enrollment data from 2010 by field and institution, also shows that these striking averages mask even higher proportions at many individual universities. For example, there are 36 graduate programs in electrical engineering where the proportion of international students exceeds 80 percent, including seven where it exceeds 90. (The analysis is limited to those programs with at least 30 full-time students.)

Graduate Electrical Engineering Programs With More Than 90 Percent International Enrollment

University Number of U.S. Citizens or Permanent Residents Enrolled Full-Time Number of International Students Enrolled Full-Time Percent International Enrollment
University of Texas at Arlington 16 229 93.5
Fairleigh Dickinson University 3 42 93.3
Illinois Institute of Technology 31 400 92.8
University of Houston 16 180 91.8
State University of New York at Buffalo 19 189 90.9
New Jersey Institute of Technology 21 201 90.5
Rochester Institute of Technology 11 105 90.5

    National Foundation for American Policy analysis of National Science Foundation data from 2010.

“International students help many universities have enough graduate students to support research programs that help attract top faculty and that also thereby help U.S. students by having a higher-quality program than they otherwise would have,” said Stuart Anderson, NFAP’s executive director and author of the report. Without them, he said, “you’d see a shrinking across the board where you’d have just certain schools that are able to support good programs. That would lead to a shrinking of U.S. leadership in education and technology if you have many fewer programs with high-quality research and top-level professors.”

“To some extent this reflects some of what’s going on in our society within the U.S. in terms of trying to push for more interest in STEM fields,” said Jonathan Bredow, professor and chair of the electrical engineering department at the University of Texas at Arlington, a program with more than 90 percent international enrollment.  “Domestic students tend to be more interested in going out and getting a job right after a bachelor’s degree. Some see a value of getting a master’s degree but in terms of the Ph.D., I think it’s largely seen as unnecessary.”

“There’s a relatively small number of high-quality domestic students who can be accepted into our master’s and Ph.D. programs,” said Leonid Tsybeskov, professor and chair of the electrical and computer engineering department at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. He added that those domestic students who are strong candidates typically apply to higher-ranked programs than NJIT’s.

Indeed, said Anderson, “You talk to the professors, they say, ‘O.K., if we were MIT or Stanford we could get all the top U.S. students,’ but by definition there are only a few of those schools. Obviously everyone can’t be MIT or Stanford. » At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the proportion of international students in graduate electrical engineering programs is 52.5 percent and, in computer science, 35.3 percent. At Stanford, 56 percent of graduate electrical engineering students and 43.7 percent of graduate computer science students are international.

The report also emphasizes the value that international students can bring to the U.S. economy after graduation as researchers and entrepreneurs. Measures that would make it easier for STEM graduate students to obtain visas to work in the U.S. after graduation – measures that many in higher education see as crucial to the U.S. maintaining its edge in attracting international graduate students — are pending in Congress (and are included in the comprehensive immigration bill recently passed by the Senate).

« This report is very well-timed,” said Julia Kent, director of communications and advancement for the Council of Graduate Schools. “Obviously, for the policy reasons — the pending legislation about STEM visas — and second because there is data out there right now which suggests that we have some cause for concern in this country about the flow of international graduate students to the United States which we have always counted on. There is now more competition for international graduate students. Other countries are developing policies to promote the influx of foreign students to their shores, and there are also ways in which the current economy in the United States has reduced funding support for graduate students, which makes it more difficult to attract students to U.S. programs with attractive funding packages.”

CGS data on applications to U.S. graduate schools released in April show that total international applications grew by a meager 1 percent this year and that there were actually drops in applications from certain key sending countries, including China (-5 percent), South Korea (-13 percent) and Taiwan (-13 percent). On the plus side, applications from India increased 20 percent.

« It’s too soon to know how this data will actually affect enrollments, but the preliminary data show that there is some cause for concern,” Kent said.

Graduate Computer Science Programs With More than 90 Percent International Enrollment

University Number of U.S. Citizens or Permanent Residents Enrolled Full-Time Number of International Students Enrolled Full-Time Percent International Enrollment
San Diego State University 13 160 92.5
Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi 6 70 92.1
Illinois Institute of Technology 35 392 91.8
University of Missouri at Kansas City 8 81 91
University of New Haven 5 49 90.7
San Jose State University 35 323 90.2
Fairleigh Dickinson University 6 55 90.2

     National Foundation for American Policy analysis of National Science Foundation data from 2010.

Voir par ailleurs:

The Chosen The Hidden History of Admission and Exclusion at Harvard, Yale and Princeton By Jerome Karabel Illustrated. 711 pages. Houghton Mifflin. $28.

Nick Carraway and Sherman McCoy went to Yale. Amory Blaine and Doogie Howser went to Princeton. Oliver Barrett IV and Thurston Howell III went to Harvard. Charles Foster Kane was thrown out of all three. What these fictional characters all have in common, of course, is that they are all white, privileged males — completely representative figures, until the late 1960’s and early 70’s, of the student population at those three Ivy League schools.

In his informative but often vexing new book, Jerome Karabel, a professor of sociology at the University of California, Berkeley, looks at the admissions process at the so-called Big Three and how the criteria governing that process have changed over the last century in response to changes in society at large. His book covers much of the same ground that Nicholas Lemann covered — a lot more incisively — in his 1999 book « The Big Test: The Secret History of the American Meritocracy, » and it also raises some of the same questions that Jacques Steinberg, a reporter for The New York Times, did in his 2002 book, « The Gatekeepers: Inside the Admissions Process of a Premier College. »

Mr. Karabel writes that until the 1920’s, Harvard, Yale and Princeton, « like the most prestigious universities of other nations, » admitted students « almost entirely on the basis of academic criteria. » Applicants « were required to take an examination, and those who passed were admitted. » Though the exams exhibited a distinct class bias (Latin and Greek, after all, were not taught at most public schools), he says that « the system was meritocratic in an elemental way: if you met the academic requirements, you were admitted, regardless of social background. »

This all changed after World War I, he argues, as it became « clear that a system of selection focused solely on scholastic performance would lead to the admission of increasing numbers of Jewish students, most of them of eastern European background. » This development, he notes, occurred « in the midst of one of the most reactionary moments in American history, » when « the nationwide movement to restrict immigration was gaining momentum » and anti-Semitism was on the rise, and the Big Three administrators began to worry that « the presence of ‘too many’ Jews would in fact lead to the departure of Gentiles. » Their conclusion, in Mr. Karabel’s words: « given the dependence of the Big Three on the Protestant upper class for both material resources and social prestige, the ‘Jewish problem’ was genuine, and the defense of institutional interests required a solution that would prevent ‘WASP flight.’ « 

The solution they devised was an admissions system that allowed the schools, as Mr. Karabel puts it, « to accept — and to reject — whomever they desired. » Instead of objective academic criteria, there would be a new emphasis on the intangibles of « character » — on qualities like « manliness, » « personality » and « leadership. » Many features of college admissions that students know today — including the widespread use of interviews and photos; the reliance on personal letters of recommendation; and the emphasis on extracurricular activities — have roots, Mr. Karabel says, in this period.

Despite the reformist talk of figures like the Harvard president James Bryant Conant, Mr. Karabel contends, the admissions policy of the Big Three remained beholden to « the wealthy and the powerful. » And despite changes wrought by the G.I. Bill and the growing influence of faculty members, the Big Three still looked in 1960 much as they had before World War II: « overwhelmingly white, exclusively male and largely Protestant. »

Mr. Karabel reports that on the eve of President John F. Kennedy’s election, the three schools were « still de facto segregated institutions — less than 1 percent black and, in the case of Princeton, enrolling just 1 African-American freshman in a class of 826. » And while anti-Semitism was officially taboo, he notes, « Harvard rejected three-quarters of the applicants from the Bronx High School of Science and Stuyvesant that year (compared to just 31 percent from Exeter and Andover) while Yale limited the Jewish presence in the freshman class to one student in eight. »

All that changed in the 1960’s and 70’s, with new admissions policies pioneered by reformers like the Yale president Kingman Brewster and his dean of admissions, R. Inslee Clark Jr., known as Inky. With federal research money and foundation grants pouring into the Big Three, the schools became less dependent on the largess of their alumni, and a radically altered social environment — galvanized by the civil rights and student protest movements — spurred the impetus for change.

« By the mid-1970’s, » Mr. Karabel writes, « the formula — that is, the new admissions criteria and practices — used by the Big Three had been fully institutionalized: need-blind admissions, no discrimination against women or Jews, and special consideration for historically underrepresented minorities as well as athletes and legacies. »

It is Mr. Karabel’s thesis that these sorts of changes were adopted by the Big Three out of a desire « to preserve and, when possible, to enhance their position in a highly stratified system of higher education. » The institutions were « often deeply conservative » and « intensely preoccupied with maintaining their close ties to the privileged, » he writes, arguing that when change did come it almost always derived from one of two sources: because « the continuation of existing policies was believed to pose a threat either to vital institutional interests » (i.e., Yale and Princeton decided to admit women when they realized that their all-male character was hobbling them in their efforts to compete with Harvard for the very best students) or « to the preservation of the larger social order of which they were an integral — and privileged — part » (i.e., the Big Three’s adoption of vigorous race-based affirmative action after the race riots of 1965-68).

Although Mr. Karabel’s narrative becomes mired, in its later pages, in a Marxist-flavored philosophical questioning of the very idea of meritocracy, his account of changing admissions policies at Yale, Harvard and Princeton serves a useful purpose. It puts each school’s actions in context with the others’ and situates those developments within a broader political and social context. While at the same time it shows, in minute detail, how the likes of Nick Carraway, Oliver Barrett IV and Amory Blaine went from being typical students at the Big Three to being members of just one segment of coed, multicultural and increasingly diverse student bodies — if, that is, they could even manage to be admitted today.

Les raisons du succès scolaire des jeunes d’origine asiatique

Lucile Quillet

Le Figaro étudiant

13/06/2013

La spectaculaire réussite des enfants d’immigrés asiatiques se confirme au bac. Et pourtant, leurs parents s’impliquent peu dans leurs devoirs, mais ils veillent à leurs horaires, les placent souvent dans le privé et jouent à fond la carte du bilinguisme.

À force d’entendre «si j’avais eu ta chance…», ils sont d’autant plus motivés. Leurs parents sont venus de loin et ont choisi la France pour offrir à leur progéniture un meilleur avenir.

Les jeunes Asiatiques ont particulièrement bien compris la leçon et fusent comme des comètes au-dessus du lot. Lycée, bac, études supérieures, ils se montrent performants à chaque étape. «Petits déjà, ils redoublent peu à l’école», assure Yaël Brinbaum, co-auteure de l’étude Trajectoires et Origines conduite par l’Insee et l’Ined. Plus de 60% d’entre eux seront orientés dans des filières généralistes. Plus que la moyenne nationale (50%).

Parmi les enfants de non bacheliers, les jeunes d’origine asiatiques se distinguent tout particulièrement. Ils seront encore 60% à décrocher le bac ,contre 50% pour les autres. Un quart iront jusqu’à bac+3 voire plus lorsque seulement 16,5% des descendants d’immigrés y accèdent.

Moins de télé, plus de bibliothèques

Paradoxalement, les familles d’origine asiatique sont celles qui s’impliquent le moins dans les devoirs, réunions de parents d’élèves et rencontres avec les professeurs. «Les mères ne parlent pas très bien français, les pères ont des métiers très prenants. Par contre, ces familles croient fortement à l’école et investissent énormément sur la scolarité de leur enfant. Ils sont très exigeants», explique Jean-Paul Caille, ingénieur de recherche au ministère de l’Enseignement supérieur.

Les parents ne se mettent pas au bureau de leur enfant, mais s’assurent qu’il est sérieux dans son travail. «Ils contrôlent plus le temps devant la télévision, les horaires du coucher. Il faut aussi que les loisirs soient compatibles avec l’école, comme des cours d’apprentissage de leur langue maternelle». Ce bilinguisme est un trésor qu’ils soignent. Les mères d’Asie du Sud-Est sont celles qui parlent le plus leur langue maternelle à la maison (57%). D’après Jean-Paul Caille, les jeunes d’origine asiatique fréquentent plus que les autres les bibliothèques et sont deux fois plus que la normale à prendre des cours particuliers à l’entrée en sixième.

Travail rigoureux et autorité parentale stricte et aussi une meilleure naissance. Les parents d’origine asiatique investissent plus sur la scolarité car ils en ont les moyens. Là où environ 75% des jeunes d’origine turque ou portugaise ont des parents ouvriers, employés de service ou inactifs, ceux d’origine asiatique ne sont que 58% à exercer dans ces fonctions. «Souvent, leurs parents sont artisans, commerçants, tiennent des bars tabac et gagnent bien leur vie. Ils sont les enfants d’immigrés qui bénéficient des conditions socio-économique et origines sociales les plus favorables». Ce portefeuille plus fourni leur permet d’être 15% à fréquenter un collège privé, soit deux fois plus que les enfants d’origine marocaine ou turque.

Pourtant moins d’un tiers des jeunes d’origine turque a le bac

Les autres enfants d’immigrés tentent aussi de se distinguer. À classe sociale équivalente, ils feront mieux que le reste des Français. Mais les parcours sont inégaux selon le pays d’origine des parents, tout comme le traitement des élèves à l’école. 14% des enfants d’immigrés -trois fois plus que la moyenne- déclarent «avoir été moins bien traités» lors des décisions d’orientation. Une discrimination dont ne semblent pas souffrir les jeunes originaires d’Asie du Sud-Est, qui s’en déclarent à peine plus victimes que la moyenne.

Les 10 raisons du succès des Chinois en France

Dans cet article je vais expliquer les principales raisons qui font que la communauté chinoise en France réussit mieux que les autres communautés immigrées d’une manière générale.

Le constat

Selon la seule étude disponible sur le sujet, publiée par l’Insee et l’Ined,

  • 27% des descendants de parents asiatiques occupent aujourd’hui un poste de cadre,
  • contre 14% en moyenne pour les Français toutes origines confondues,
  • 9% pour les fils de Maghrébins
  • 5% pour ceux d’Afrique subsaharienne.

48% des Français d’origine asiatique décrochent un diplôme du supérieur, contre 33% en moyenne en France. Enfin une autre statistique remarquable de l’étude : 27% des enfants d’immigrés chinois sont cadres, contre 14% en moyenne pour les Français

Cette réussite des asiatiques en France est particulièrement frappante pour la deuxième génération des 50 000 Indochinois arrivés dans les années 1950, au moment de l’indépendance, et des 250 000 « boat people » vietnamiens qui ont fui leurs pays dans les années 1970 et dont la majorité était en fait d’origine chinoise. Mais les fils de migrants venus de Chine populaire à partir des années 1980 s’en sortent plutôt bien aussi.

Comment expliquer une telle percée, alors que tant d’autres immigrés – et de Français de souche – peinent à gravir l’échelle sociale  ?

Les 10 facteurs clés de succès de la communauté chinoise en France :

  1. Le travail
  2. Une communauté soudée
  3. Un système de financement efficace
  4. Une hyperfocalisation sur la réussite scolaire des enfants
  5. L’enrichissement de la Chine
  6. La méconnaissance de la culture chinoise
  7. Une communauté peu politisée
  8. L’accent mis sur le pragmatisme dans la culture chinoise
  9. Une volonté de réussir (La « Face »)
  10. Le sens des affaires chinois

Le travail

C’est un peu le grand cliché : le chinois est bosseur. Un cliché qui comme tous devrait être sérieusement relativisé notamment par des français qui aiment à s’adonner à une forme d’auto critique. Mais comme tout cliché il y a peut être une part de vérité.

Aujourd’hui on compte 600 000 Français d’origine chinoise. Certes plusieurs dizaines de milliers d’entre eux travaillent encore sans papiers comme petites mains dans la confection, la maroquinerie ou le bâtiment, pour des salaires de misère. On a tous en tête le passage de la vérité si je mens dans la fabrique chinoise clandestine.

Mais, après des années de labeur, beaucoup ont fini par s’en sortir en reprenant un commerce – restaurants, épiceries, fleuristes ou bars-tabacs. Ils en détiendraient désormais près de 35 000 ! Certains commencent même à créer des chaînes de magasins (la plus connue d’entre elles, l’enseigne Miss Coquine, compte près de 80 boutiques en France), ou encore à lancer leurs propres marques (Miss Lucy, par exemple).

Une communauté soudée

Contrairement à la majorité des étrangers présents en France – et en particulier aux Maghrébins, dont les différentes nationalités et ethnies ne s’apprécient guère – la plupart des chinois peuvent compter sur le soutien de leurs compatriotes.

Un système de financement très efficace

Les Chinois pratiquent un système de prêts proche de la « tontine » Africaine  : les membres de la famille et les proches mettent une partie de leurs économies dans un pot commun, dans lequel les membres de la diaspora puisent pour monter leur affaire. Il n’y a pas d’intérêt ni même durée de remboursement fixe. La tontine repose sur la confiance, confortée par la réciprocité des dons  : ceux qui reçoivent doivent eux-mêmes offrir de l’argent aux autres, notamment à l’occasion de leur mariage. Ces prêts informels, qui peuvent facilement atteindre plusieurs dizaines de milliers d’euros, sont une clé essentielle dans la réussite de la diaspora chinoise.

Après avoir économisé en moyenne 160 000 euros pendant une dizaine d’années, de nombreuses familles chinoises peuvent s’acheter un commerce sans passer par la case prêt bancaire ce qui ne manque pas d’alimenter le débat sur l’origine des fonds.

Une hyperfocalisation sur la réussite scolaire des enfants

Depuis plus de mille ans, les élites de Chine sont recrutées par un système d’examen national accessible à tous, qui permet aux plus pauvres de se hisser tout en haut de la pyramide. Résultat  : même lorsqu’ils quittent leur patrie, les adultes s’échinent au turbin et ils poussent leur progéniture à en faire autant à l’école. La focalisation sur la réussite scolaire fait partie des valeurs familiales chinoises. Ceci est vrai pour l’ensemble des asiatiques en France :

L’enrichissement de la Chine

Si la Chine n’avait pas connu un boom économique depuis la fin des années 70, les migrants ne s’en sortiraient pas de façon aussi spectaculaire. La montée en puissance de l’empire du Milieu leur a en effet ouvert des opportunités immenses notamment dans l’import-export. En fait, les Chinois de France ont procédé exactement comme des multi­nationales  : ils ont créé des comptoirs commerciaux pour vendre les produits fabriqués en Chine.

La méconnaissance de la culture chinoise

Pour beaucoup de français la culture chinoise reste un mystère. L’ignorance est souvent totale vis-à-vis d’un peuple qui suscite autant d’intérêt que de craintes. Et cette ignorance est un atout sur lequel les chinois peuvent jouer. Il connaissent les codes des chinois avec qui ils négocient. Certains réseaux commerciaux à la limite de la mafia profitent de cette opacité de la communauté chinoise.

Une communauté peu politisée

Il y a une communauté assez puissante de français d’origine chinoise en France mais qui est très discrète et qui réussit. Le communautarisme chinois a longtemps été un communautarisme de séparation. Les chinois pour parler de façon brutale n’ont jamais emmerdé les français, jamais fait dans le communautarisme victimaire. Ils ne reprochent pas la colonisation à la France, ils réussissent économiquement ce qui fait qu’il y a très peu de racisme anti chinois.

En fait souvent les chinois en France ne prétendent pas vraiment être assimilés mais ne posant pas de problèmes finalement on ne leur demande que l’intégration. C’est le contraire du communautarisme victimaire des autres minorités avec des institutions politiques telles que le CRAN (Conseil Représentatif des Association Noires) ou encore le CRIF (Conseil Représentatif des Institutions Juives de France).

Néanmoins aujourd’hui avec la création du CRAF (Conseil Représentatif des Associations Asiatiques de France) ont peut s’interroger pour savoir si une forme de communautarisme victimaire asiatique ne va pas être mis en place.

Certains estiment à tort selon moi que le succès économique des chinois en France tire profit de leur retard dans leur reconnaissance politique. Ce serait un succès en trompe l’œil. Voici un exemple de revendications antiracistes qu’on peut entendre ces temps-ci provenant de représentant souvent auto-proclamé de la communauté asiatique :

L’accent mis sur le pragmatisme dans la culture chinoise

Les chinois contrairement à l’image de sagesse teinté d’exotisme de beaucoup de français sont sans doute le peuple le plus pragmatique du monde. L’accent est toujours mis sur le consensus et l’efficacité (le maximum d’effets pour un minimum de coût) ce qui facilite leur intégration. Ce pragmatisme chinois est selon moi tout entier contenu dans la phrase célèbre de Deng Xiaoping au moment du virage réformiste des années 80 : « peu importe que le chat soit gris ou noir pourvu qu’il attrape les souris ».

Une volonté de réussir (La « Face »)

Les chinois ont une volonté de réussir qui est d’abord assez matérialiste. Réussir c’est d’abord devenir riche. Mais cela renvoie aussi à la notion de « face  » en Asie. On peut le traduire par l’honneur, la volonté de ne pas déchoir. C’est particulièrement vrai pour les membres de la diaspora dont on attend qu’ils ramène le plus de devises étrangère possible. C’est l’oncle d’Amérique sauce chinoise…

Le sens des affaires chinois

Les chinois sont avant tout un peuple de commerçants. Leurs réseaux sont issus de la diaspora, forme de solidarité au fond assez proche de ce qu’a pu être la communauté juive dans la France d’avant guerre. Souvent les membres de la diaspora qui ont le mieux réussi sont approchées par de riches Chinois, désireux d’investir en France, notamment dans l’immobilier.

Alors les chinois : enfants modèles de l’intégration Républicaine à la française ? Le débat est ouvert

Publicités

Le Brio/Yvan Attal: En fait, cette histoire, c’est la mienne (It’s pure religion and culture, stupid !)

29 novembre, 2017

Image result for religion of nobel prize winners
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/14/PikiWiki_Israel_9696_jewish_laureates_promenade_in_rishon_lezion.jpg/1920px-PikiWiki_Israel_9696_jewish_laureates_promenade_in_rishon_lezion.jpg
Le salut vient des Juifs. Jésus (Jean 4:22)
Et ces commandements, que je te donne aujourd’hui, seront dans ton coeur. Tu les inculqueras à tes enfants. Deutéronome 6: 6-7
Fais de l’étude de la Torah ta principale occupation. Shammaï (10 avant JC)
Combattez ceux qui rejettent Allah et le jugement dernier et qui ne respectent pas Ses interdits ni ceux de Son messager, et qui ne suivent pas la vraie Religion quand le Livre leur a été apporté, (Combattez-les) jusqu’à ce qu’ils payent tribut de leurs mains et se considèrent infériorisés. Coran 9:29
Les musulmans n’en ont pas toujours conscience, mais ils se sont imposés les premiers en Europe comme concurrents, avec des aspirations dominatrices. La plupart des pays musulmans actuels étaient alors chrétiens – l’Egypte, la Syrie, la Turquie… Pendant longtemps, les musulmans ont été les plus forts, les plus riches, les plus civilisés. (…) L’Occident chrétien a définitivement emporté la partie quand, à partir des années 1800, sa domination technologique a été écrasante. En fait, quand les canons et les fusils occidentaux se sont mis à tirer plus vite. Maxime Rodinson
L’existence d’Israël pose le problème du droit de vivre en sujets libre et souverains des nations non musulmanes dans l’aire musulmane. L’extermination des Arméniens, d’abord par l’empire ottoman, puis par le nouvel Etat turc a représenté la première répression d’une population dhimmie en quête d’indépendance nationale. Il n’y a quasiment plus de Juifs aujourd’hui dans le monde arabo-islamique et les chrétiens y sont en voie de disparition. Shmuel Trigano
Les islamistes tentent de rallier tout un peuple de victimes et de frustrés dans un rapport mimétique à l’Occident. Les terroristes utilisent d’ailleurs à leurs fins la technologie occidentale : encore du mimétisme. Il y a du ressentiment là-dedans, au sens nietzschéen, réaction que l’Occident a favorisée par ses privilèges. René Girard
L’erreur est toujours de raisonner dans les catégories de la « différence », alors que la racine de tous les conflits, c’est plutôt la « concurrence », la rivalité mimétique entre des êtres, des pays,des cultures. La concurrence, c’est-à-dire le désir d’imiter l’autre pour obtenir la même chose que lui, au besoin par la violence. Sans doute le terrorisme est-il lié à un monde « différent » du nôtre, mais ce qui suscite le terrorisme n’est pas dans cette « différence » qui l’éloigne le plus de nous et nous le rend inconcevable. Il est au contraire dans un désir exacerbé de convergence et de ressemblance. (…) Ce qui se vit aujourd’hui est une forme de rivalité mimétique à l’échelle planétaire. Lorsque j’ai lu les premiers documents de Ben Laden, constaté ses allusions aux bombes américaines tombées sur le Japon, je me suis senti d’emblée à un niveau qui est au-delà de l’islam, celui de la planète entière. Sous l’étiquette de l’islam, on trouve une volonté de rallier et de mobiliser tout un tiers-monde de frustrés et de victimes dans leurs rapports de rivalité mimétique avec l’Occident. Mais les tours détruites occupaient autant d’étrangers que d’Américains. Et par leur efficacité, par la sophistication des moyens employés, par la connaissance qu’ils avaient des Etats-Unis, par leurs conditions d’entraînement, les auteurs des attentats n’étaient-ils pas un peu américains ? On est en plein mimétisme.Ce sentiment n’est pas vrai des masses, mais des dirigeants. Sur le plan de la fortune personnelle, on sait qu’un homme comme Ben Laden n’a rien à envier à personne. Et combien de chefs de parti ou de faction sont dans cette situation intermédiaire, identique à la sienne. Regardez un Mirabeau au début de la Révolution française : il a un pied dans un camp et un pied dans l’autre, et il n’en vit que de manière plus aiguë son ressentiment. Aux Etats-Unis, des immigrés s’intègrent avec facilité, alors que d’autres, même si leur réussite est éclatante, vivent aussi dans un déchirement et un ressentiment permanents. Parce qu’ils sont ramenés à leur enfance, à des frustrations et des humiliations héritées du passé. Cette dimension est essentielle, en particulier chez des musulmans qui ont des traditions de fierté et un style de rapports individuels encore proche de la féodalité. (…) Cette concurrence mimétique, quand elle est malheureuse, ressort toujours, à un moment donné, sous une forme violente. A cet égard, c’est l’islam qui fournit aujourd’hui le ciment qu’on trouvait autrefois dans le marxisme. René Girard
Les pays arabes enregistrent un retard par rapport aux autres régions en matière de gouvernance et de participation aux processus de décision. La vague de démocratisation, qui a transformé la gouvernance dans la plupart des pays d’Amérique latine et d’Asie orientale dans les années quatre-vingts, en Europe centrale et dans une bonne partie de l’Asie centrale à la fin des années quatre-vingt et au début des années quatre-vingt-dix, a à peine effleuré les États arabes. Ce déficit de liberté va à l’encontre du développement humain et constitue l’une des manifestations les plus douloureuses du retard enregistré en terme de développement politique. La démocratie et les droits de l’homme sont reconnus de droit, inscrits dans les constitutions, les codes et les déclarations gouvernementales, mais leur application est en réalité bien souvent négligée, voire délibérément ignorée. Le plus souvent, le mode de gouvernance dans le monde arabe se caractérise par un exécutif puissant exerçant un contrôle ferme sur toutes les branches de l’État, en l’absence parfois de garde-fous institutionnels. La démocratie représentative n’est pas toujours véritable, et fait même parfois défaut. Les libertés d’expression et d’association sont bien souvent limitées. Des modèles dépassés de légitimité prédominent.(…) La participation politique dans les pays arabes reste faible, ainsi qu’en témoignent l’absence de véritable démocratie représentative et les restrictions imposées aux libertés. Dans le même temps, les aspirations de la population à davantage de liberté et à une plus grande participation à la prise de décisions se font sentir, engendrées par l’augmentation des revenus, l’éducation et les flux d’information. La dichotomie entre les attentes et leur réalisation a parfois conduit à l’aliénation et à ses corollaires, l’apathie et le mécontentement. (…) Deux mécanismes parallèles sont en jeu. La position de l’État tutélaire va en s’amenuisant, en partie du fait de la réduction des avantages qu’il est en mesure d’offrir aujourd’hui sous forme de garantie de l’emploi, de subventions et autres mesures incitatives. Par contre, les citoyens se trouvent de plus en plus en position de force étant donné que l’État dépend d’eux de manière croissante pour se procurer des recettes fiscales, assurer l’investissement du secteur privé et couvrir d’autres besoins essentiels. Par ailleurs, les progrès du développement humain, en dotant les citoyens, en particulier ceux des classes moyennes, d’un nouvel éventail de ressources, les ont placés en meilleure position pour contester les politiques et négocier avec l’État. Rapport arabe sur le développement humain 2002
Les pays arabes doivent combler «l’écart croissant de connaissances» en investissant de manière significative dans l’éducation et en encourageant un débat intellectuel ouvert, indique le rapport arabe sur le développement humain pour l’année 2003, publié aujourd’hui par le Programme des Nations Unies pour le développement (PNUD). Selon le « Rapport arabe sur le développement humain 2003 » (RADH 2003), les États arabes devraient encourager une plus grande interaction avec d’autres pays, cultures et régions du monde. « L’ouverture, l’interaction, l’assimilation, l’absorption, la révision, la critique et l’examen ne peuvent que stimuler la production de connaissances créatives au sein des sociétés du Monde arabe », est-il indiqué. Centre d’actualités de l’ONU
C’est une expérience profondément émouvante d’être à Jérusalem, la capitale d’Israël. Nos deux nations sont séparées par plus de 5 000 miles. Mais pour un Américain à l’étranger, il n’est pas possible de ressentir un plus grande proximité avec les idéaux et les convictions de son propre pays qu’ici, en Israël. Nous faisons partie de la grande fraternité des démocraties. Nous parlons la même langue de liberté et de justice, et nous incarnons le droit de toute personne à vivre en paix. Nous servons la même cause et provoquons les mêmes haines chez les mêmes ennemis de la civilisation. C’est ma ferme conviction que la sécurité d’Israël est un intérêt vital de la sécurité nationale des États-Unis. Et notre alliance est une alliance fondée non seulement sur des intérêts communs, mais aussi sur des valeurs partagées. (…) Quand on vient ici en Israël et qu’on voit que le PIB par habitant est d’environ 21.000 dollars, alors qu’il est de l’ordre de 10.000 dollars tout juste de l’autre côté dans les secteurs gérés par l’Autorité palestinienne, on constate une différence énorme et dramatique de vitalité économique. (…) C’est la culture qui fait toute la différence. Et lorsque je regarde cette ville (Jérusalem) et tout ce que le peuple de cette nation (Israël) a accompli, je reconnais pour le moins la puissance de la culture et de quelques autres choses. Mitt Romney
 La vraie intégration, c’est quand des catholiques appelleront leur enfant Mohamed. Martin Hirsch
Un fort courant de pensée dénonce le mauvais accueil que l’Europe réserverait aux musulmans, contribuant aux difficultés d’intégration de ces derniers. Ce courant inspire nombre d’études affirmant que les musulmans sont victimes d’« islamophobie ». Une telle approche vient d’être illustrée par un rapport élaboré par l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne (FRA). Le texte, intitulé « Second European Union Minorities and Discrimination Survey. Muslims – Selected finding », (septembre 2017), analyse les réponses de 10 527 personnes qui s’identifient elles-mêmes comme musulmanes dans quinze pays de l’Union. Or, dès qu’on examine de près les données recueillies, on voit qu’elles conduisent à des conclusions bien différentes de ce que le rapport prétend démontrer. L’étude s’appuie uniquement sur des déclarations relatives à ce qui est ressenti par les personnes interrogées. Pourtant, ce qui est déclaré est identifié à ce qui advient effectivement. On trouve sans cesse des affirmations telles que : « Les musulmans ayant répondu rencontrent de hauts niveaux de discrimination », comme s’il s’agissait d’un fait avéré. Or, on trouve chez les personnes interrogées des conceptions très larges de ce qu’elles entendent par discrimination, en y incluant des différences de traitement conformes à la loi, liées à la nationalité. Rien n’est mis en œuvre dans l’étude pour savoir si une attitude globale plutôt hostile envers la société d’accueil pousserait certains à qualifier de discrimination des réactions fondées en réalité sur des raisons nullement discriminatoires, tel un déficit de compétence. De surcroît, ceux qui affirment que les musulmans en général sont discriminés sont beaucoup plus nombreux que ceux qui se déclarent discriminés personnellement. Dans cette étude, en France, 75 % des musulmans déclarent qu’il existe une discrimination sur la base de la religion alors que seulement 20 % déclarent s’être sentis personnellement discriminés sur cette base au cours des cinq dernières années. On trouve, en réponse aux mêmes questions, 72 % et 30 % en Suède, 59 % et 19 % en Belgique, 26 % et 10 % en Espagne, etc. La croyance, que l’on retrouve au sein de la population en général, selon laquelle les musulmans seraient discriminés en raison de leur religion outrepasse donc largement la réalité. (…) Ce n’est nullement l’ensemble, ni même la majorité des musulmans qui déclarent s’être sentis discriminés du fait de leur religion, mais une petite minorité : 17 % dans les cinq ans précédant l’enquête. On retrouve ce même caractère minoritaire quand il s’agit de harcèlement (du regard perçu comme hostile à l’acte de violence physique), ou encore des rapports avec la police. Dans ce dernier cas, parmi les personnes qui se déclarent musulmanes et qui ont été interrogées, seulement 16 % des hommes et 1,8 % des femmes indiquent se sentir discriminés. En fait, on a affaire à plusieurs sous-populations suscitant des réactions très contrastées. Tandis que la majorité ne se sent jamais discriminée, une minorité se sent discriminée à répétition – cinq fois par an en moyenne, jusqu’à quotidiennement pour une partie. Un tel contraste entre des groupes traités (ou qui se sentent traités) de manière aussi radicalement différente serait impossible si on avait affaire à une discrimination s’exerçant au hasard, liée au simple fait d’être musulman. Le rapport, en outre, fournit un ensemble de données distinguant les déclarations provenant de musulmans d’origines diverses (Afrique du Nord, Afrique subsaharienne, Turquie, Asie), hommes et femmes, et vivant dans les divers pays de l’Union étudiés. En moyenne, ceux qui viennent d’Afrique du Nord sont plus de deux fois plus nombreux que ceux venant d’Asie (21 %, contre 9 %) à se déclarer discriminés sur la base de la religion. On retrouve ces différences, encore plus amples, pour le harcèlement et les rapports avec la police. Or rien n’est dit sur ce que ces différences sont susceptibles de devoir à des divergences de manière d’être des personnes concernées. L’existence de limites au droit à l’expression des religions, spécialement dans l’entreprise, est bien notée. Mais il n’est jamais envisagé qu’une acceptation de ces limites chez les uns puisse coexister avec une rébellion à leur égard chez d’autres, cette différence d’attitude entraînant une différence de réactions des employeurs. Par ailleurs, les immigrés de seconde génération déclarent davantage rencontrer des réactions négatives du fait de leur religion que ceux de première génération (22 % contre 15 % pour les discriminations, 36 % contre 22 % pour le harcèlement). Mais il n’est jamais question, dans le rapport, de l’adoption, au sein de la seconde génération, d’une posture plus revendicative, susceptible de conduire à des comportements posant problème. En arrière-fond du rapport, la vision de l’intégration mise en avant est celle d’une « accommodation mutuelle ». Il est fait appel aux orientations du Conseil de l’Europe, « regardant l’intégration comme un processus dynamique à double sens d’accommodation mutuelle de tous les immigrants, y compris les musulmans, et des résidents » . Mais, en pratique, le rapport incite uniquement à réclamer une adaptation à la société d’accueil. Il est question de racisme, de xénophobie, de « crimes causés par la haine » . En réalité, l’interprétation qui paraît la plus sensée des données d’enquête est que la grande majorité des musulmans ne pose aucun problème à la société d’accueil ; et que, corrélativement, ses membres sont traités comme tout un chacun. C’est seulement une petite minorité qui est source de problèmes pour la société d’accueil et suscite, de ce fait, des réactions négatives. Il est vraisemblable que les membres de cette petite minorité, refusant de reconnaître ce qui est dû à leur manière d’être, se déclarent discriminés. En outre, l’interprétation, par le rapport, des sentiments à l’égard de la société d’accueil est toujours à sens unique. Les musulmans dans leur grande majorité déclarent se sentir à l’aise avec des voisins d’une religion différente ou prêts à voir leurs enfants épouser des non-musulmans. Selon le rapport, « presque tous (92 %) se sentent bien à l’idée d’avoir des voisins d’une autre religion » et presque un sur deux (48 %) n’aurait aucun problème « si un membre de sa famille épousait une personne non musulmane » . (…) Dans la comparaison ainsi faite, il n’est question que d’attitudes d’ouverture et de fermeture. L’étude ne porte aucune attention à la réalité des difficultés à vivre dans un univers où des personnes d’une autre culture peuvent tendre à imposer leurs mœurs. (…) l’intensité de la pression sociale dans certains quartiers où les musulmans tendent à régenter les tenues et les conduites n’est jamais évoquée. S’agissant du mariage, on ne trouve pas, dans l’étude, de questions séparées pour le mariage des filles et celui des garçons, alors que l’islam les distingue. On ne trouve pas davantage de mention des difficultés concrètes associées pour un non-musulman à un mariage avec un musulman : possibilité pour un conjoint musulman d’enlever les enfants en cas de séparation pour les amener dans un pays musulman, en étant protégé par la justice du pays en question ; pression à la conversion du conjoint non musulman. (…) La place que tient la haine envers l’Occident au sein du monde musulman n’est jamais évoquée. Le fait que ceux qui se déclarent le plus discriminés soient aussi ceux qui déclarent le moins d’attachement à la société d’accueil est interprété, comme si cela allait de soi, comme une relation de cause à effet. Ce serait ceux qui sont le plus discriminés qui, pour cette raison, s’attacheraient le moins à la société qui les accueille. Cette relation à sens unique est postulée, en particulier quand il s’agit de radicalisation islamiste. Il n’est pas envisagé qu’on ait affaire à un effet inverse : une attitude de rejet de la société d’accueil liée à une conception « dure » de l’islam, engendrant à la fois des comportements qui suscitent des réactions négatives et une tendance à interpréter ces réactions comme des discriminations. L’étude de l’Union européenne ne se demande jamais pourquoi il existe un tel contraste entre une grande majorité des musulmans qui déclare ne jamais se sentir discriminée et une petite minorité qui déclare l’être intensément. Ce contraste montre que l’on n’a pas affaire à des réactions globales à l’égard des musulmans en tant que tels, mais à des réactions différenciées, ce qui suggère que les manières d’être de chacun, considérées dans leur grande diversité, ont un rôle majeur. Pourtant l’étude affirme, comme si cela allait de soi, que les barrières à une pleine inclusion des musulmans dans les sociétés européennes ne sont imputables qu’à ces sociétés et sont exclusivement dues à « discrimination, harcèlement, violences motivées par la haine, fréquence des contrôles policiers ». Ce sont ces expériences qui peuvent à la longue réduire l’attachement des populations concernées au pays où elles résident, soutient l’étude. Le communiqué de presse diffusé à la suite de la parution de l’étude indique, comme première solution aux problèmes d’intégration des musulmans, « des sanctions efficaces contre les violations de la législation de lutte contre la discrimination » . Alors que l’intention affichée par l’étude, comme de manière générale à la famille d’études à laquelle elle appartient, est d’être au service d’une meilleure intégration des musulmans, son effet tend à être exactement inverse. Elle incite les musulmans à croire, à tort, que leurs efforts d’intégration sont vains et donc à nourrir du ressentiment et à les détourner d’accomplir de tels efforts. L’étude sert involontairement, par ailleurs, les stratégies des islamistes militants qui travaillent à la construction d’une contre-société islamique hostile aux pays d’accueil et plus généralement à l’Occident. Philippe d’Iribarne
Moi, j’ai eu envie de ce film parce qu’en fait cette histoire, c’est la mienne. J’ai grandi dans une famille – mes parents sont originaires d’Algérie aussi – où on m’a pas donné des livres, on m’a pas emmené à l’opéra. Et pour des raisons mystérieuses, j’ai eu envie d’être acteur et en allant dans un cours de théâtre, je suis tombé sur un professeur qui m’a fait découvrir des auteurs qui m’emmerdaient au lycée et qui tout d’un coup prenaient du sens. (…) C’était pas un Pierre Mazard. Il pouvait être humiliant, il pouvait être brutal. (…) Alors, on se protège de temps en temps et en même temps des fois on est bien obligé de se le prendre dans la figure et de se remettre en question parce que aussi les auteurs et les mots, c’est pas que les mots. Les mots, c’est aussi une façon de penser, une façon de comprendre. Yvan Attal
Cette histoire, c’est la mienne en fait. Je suis issu d’une famille d’Algérie, pas musulmane (de juifs séfarades, ndlr) qui arrive d’Algérie après l’indépendance avec rien. J’ai grandi dans une cité à Créteil à côte de la cité où on a tourné. Mes parents ne m’ont pas donné des livres à lire, ne m’ont pas amené à l’opéra et pour reprendre les dialogues du film, je n’ai pas eu la chance de faire du solfège et du char à voile à l’Ile de Ré. Pour des raisons mystérieuses j’ai eu envie d’être acteur, je me suis inscrit dans un cours de théâtre et là je suis tombé sur un professeur qui m’a fait découvrir Molière, Marivaux, Musset, Shakespeare et les autres. Et aujourd’hui, grâce à lui, je suis acteur et réalisateur. (…) Tout est possible, même si on est à une autre époque, qu’il y a des difficultés supplémentaires, même si on porte un nom qui est difficile à porter pour certains. On ne peut pas toujours brandir la carte de la discrimination toute la journée. Il faut se bouger le cul. (…)  Mazard n’est pas raciste, c’est un provocateur, c’est quelqu’un qui nous sort de notre zone de confort, même s’il dérape, évidemment, comme ces intellectuels qui pour nous démontrer une idée vont un peu trop loin mais peut-être que l’intention n’était pas mauvaise. (…) C’est un film chauvin, on fait référence au patrimoine culturel, à nos auteurs. Yvan Attal
Someone just wrote to me  » what did Jews bring to the world beside Palestinian holocaust ?… Well, maybe Jesus, Spinoza, Freud, Einstein and those guys… https://t.co/BTs9WdALwi Let’s not even account Whatsapp, Facebook, Google, Vibber, Fiverr, and everything in ur cellphone. Pierre Rehov
All the world’s Muslims have fewer Nobel Prizes than Trinity College, Cambridge. They did great things in the Middle Ages, though. Richard Dawkins
That was unfortunate. I should have compared religion with religion and compared Islam not with Trinity College but with Jews, because the number of Jews who have won Nobel Prizes is phenomenally high. Race does not come into it. It is pure religion and culture. Something about the cultural tradition of Jews is way, way more sympathetic to science and learning and intellectual pursuits than Islam. That would have been a fair comparison. Ironically, I originally wrote the tweet with Jews and thought, That might give offense. And so I thought I better change it. (…) I haven’t thought it through. I don’t know. But I don’t think it is a minor thing; it is colossal. I think more than 20 percent of Nobel Prizes have been won by Jews. And especially if you don’t count peace prizes, which I think don’t count actually (…) Most of the ones that have gone to Muslims have been peace prizes, and the [number of Muslims] who have gotten them for scientific work is exceedingly low. But in Jews, it is exceedingly high. That is a point that needs to be discussed. I don’t have the answer to it. I am intrigued by it. I didn’t even know this extraordinary effect until it was pointed out to me by the [former] chief rabbi of Britain, Jonathan Sacks. (…) He shared it with due modesty, but I thought it was astounding, and I am puzzled about it. Richard Dawkins
As of 2017, Nobel Prizes have been awarded to 892 individuals, of whom 201 or 22.5% were Jews, although the total Jewish population comprises less than 0.2% of the world’s population. This means the percentage of Jewish Nobel laureates is at least 112.5 times or 11250% above average. Wikipedia
Si les apôtres, qui aussi étaient juifs, s’étaient comportés avec nous, Gentils, comme nous Gentils nous nous comportons avec les Juifs, il n’y aurait eu aucun chrétien parmi les Gentils… Quand nous sommes enclins à nous vanter de notre situation de chrétiens, nous devons nous souvenir que nous ne sommes que des Gentils, alors que les Juifs sont de la lignée du Christ. Nous sommes des étrangers et de la famille par alliance; ils sont de la famille par le sang, des cousins et des frères de notre Seigneur. En conséquence, si on doit se vanter de la chair et du sang, les Juifs sont actuellement plus près du Christ que nous-mêmes… Si nous voulons réellement les aider, nous devons être guidés dans notre approche vers eux non par la loi papale, mais par la loi de l’amour chrétien. Nous devons les recevoir cordialement et leur permettre de commercer et de travailler avec nous, de façon qu’ils aient l’occasion et l’opportunité de s’associer à nous, d’apprendre notre enseignement chrétien et d’être témoins de notre vie chrétienne. Si certains d’entre eux se comportent de façon entêtée, où est le problème? Après tout, nous-mêmes, nous ne sommes pas tous de bons chrétiens. Luther (Que Jésus Christ est né Juif, 1523)
Les Juifs sont notre malheur (…) Les Juifs sont un peuple de débauche, et leur synagogue n’est qu’une putain incorrigible. On ne doit montrer à leur égard aucune pitié, ni aucune bonté. Nous sommes fautifs de ne pas les tuer! Luther
C’est à regret que je parle des Juifs : cette nation est, à bien des égards, la plus détestable qui ait jamais souillé la terre. Voltaire (Article « Tolérance »)
Juifs. Faire un article contre cette race qui envenime tout, en se fourrant partout, sans jamais se fondre avec aucun peuple. Demander son expulsion de France, à l’exception des individus mariés avec des Françaises ; abolir les synagogues, ne les admettre à aucun emploi, poursuivre enfin l’abolition de ce culte. Ce n’est pas pour rien que les chrétiens les ont appelés déicides. Le juif est l’ennemi du genre humain. Il faut renvoyer cette race en Asie, ou l’exterminer. Pierre-Joseph Proudhon (1849)
Observons le Juif de tous les jours, le Juif ordinaire et non celui du sabbat. Ne cherchons point le mystère du Juif dans sa religion, mais le mystère de sa religion dans le Juif réel. Quelle est donc la base mondaine du judaïsme ? C’est le besoin pratique, l’égoïsme. Quel est le culte mondain du Juif ? C’est le trafic. Quelle est la divinité mondaine du Juif ? C’est l’argent. Karl Marx
L’argent est le dieu jaloux d’Israël devant qui nul autre Dieu ne doit subsister. Karl Marx
Dans les villes, ce qui exaspère le gros de la population française contre les Juifs, c’est que, par l’usure, par l’infatigable activité commerciale et par l’abus des influences politiques, ils accaparent peu à peu la fortune, le commerce, les emplois lucratifs, les fonctions administratives, la puissance publique . […] En France, l’influence politique des Juifs est énorme mais elle est, si je puis dire, indirecte. Elle ne s’exerce pas par la puissance du nombre, mais par la puissance de l’argent. Ils tiennent une grande partie de la presse, les grandes institutions financières, et, quand ils n’ont pu agir sur les électeurs, ils agissent sur les élus. Ici, ils ont, en plus d’un point, la double force de l’argent et du nombre. Jean Jaurès (La question juive en Algérie, Dépêche de Toulouse, 1er mai 1895)
Nous savons bien que la race juive, concentrée, passionnée, subtile, toujours dévorée par une sorte de fièvre du gain quand ce n’est pas par la force du prophétisme, nous savons bien qu’elle manie avec une particulière habileté le mécanisme capitaliste, mécanisme de rapine, de mensonge, de corset, d’extorsion. Jean Jaurès (Discours au Tivoli, 1898)
Qu’ils s’en aillent! Car nous sommes en France et non en Allemagne!” … Notre République est menacée d’une invasion de protestants car on choisit volontiers des ministres parmi eux., … qui défrancise le pays et risque de le transformer en une grande Suisse, qui, avant dix ans, serait morte d’hypocrisie et d’ennui. Zola (Le Figaro, le 17/5/1881)
Ce projet a causé la désertion de 80 à 100 000 personnes de toutes conditions, qui ont emporté avec elles plus de trente millions de livres ; la mise à mal de nos arts et de nos manufactures. (…) Sire, la conversion des cœurs n’appartient qu’à Dieu …Vauban (« Mémoire pour le rappel des Huguenots », 1689)
Dans la dispute entre ces races pour savoir à laquelle revient le prix de l’avarice et de la cupidité, un protestant genevois vaut six juifs. A Toussenel (disciple de Fourier, 1845)
Qu’ils s’en aillent! Car nous sommes en France et non en Allemagne! … Notre République est menacée d’une invasion de protestants car on choisit volontiers des ministres parmi eux., … qui défrancise le pays et risque de le transformer en une grande Suisse, qui, avant dix ans, serait morte d’hypocrisie et d’ennui. Zola (Le Figaro, le 17/5/1881)
Luther rend nécessaire ce que Gutenberg a rendu possible : en plaçant l’Écriture au centre de l’eschatologie chrétienne, la Réforme fait d’une invention technique une obligation spirituelle. François Furet et Jacques Ozouf
On pouvait se demander, en effet, et on se demandait même chez beaucoup de Juifs, si l’implantation de cette communauté sur des terres qui avaient été acquises dans des conditions plus ou moins justifiables et au milieu des peuples arabes qui lui étaient foncièrement hostiles, n’allait pas entraîner d’incessants, d’interminables, frictions et conflits. Certains même redoutaient que les Juifs, jusqu’alors dispersés, mais qui étaient restés ce qu’ils avaient été de tous temps, c’est-à-dire un peuple d’élite, sûr de lui-même et dominateur, n’en viennent, une fois rassemblés dans le site de leur ancienne grandeur, à changer en ambition ardente et conquérante les souhaits très émouvants qu’ils formaient depuis dix-neuf siècles. De Gaulle (conférence de presse du 27 novembre 1967)
Tout ce qui se passe dans le monde aujourd’hui est la faute des sionistes. Les Juifs Américains sont derrière la crise économique mondiale qui a aussi frappé la Grèce. Mikis Theodorakis (2011)
Ils ont tout, c’est connu. Vous êtes passé par le centre-ville de Metz ? Toutes les bijouteries appartiennent aux juifs. On le sait, c’est tout. Vous n’avez qu’à lire les noms israéliens sur les enseignes. Vous avez regardé une ancienne carte de la Palestine et une d’aujourd’hui ? Ils ont tout colonisé. Maintenant c’est les bijouteries. Ils sont partout, sauf en Chine parce que c’est communiste. Tous les gouvernements sont juifs, même François Hollande. Le monde est dirigé par les francs-maçons et les francs-maçons sont tous juifs. Ce qui est certain c’est que l’argent injecté par les francs-maçons est donné à Israël. Sur le site des Illuminatis, le plus surveillé du monde, tout est écrit. (…) On se renseigne mais on ne trouve pas ces infos à la télévision parce qu’elle appartient aux juifs aussi. Si Patrick Poivre d’Arvor a été jeté de TF1 alors que tout le monde l’aimait bien, c’est parce qu’il a été critique envers Nicolas Sarkozy, qui est juif… (…)  Mais nous n’avons pas de potes juifs. Pourquoi ils viendraient ici ? Ils habitent tous dans des petits pavillons dans le centre, vers Queuleu. Ils ne naissent pas pauvres. Ici, pour eux, c’est un zoo, c’est pire que l’Irak. Peut-être que si j’habitais dans le centre, j’aurais des amis juifs, mais je ne crois pas, je n’ai pas envie. J’ai une haine profonde. Pour moi, c’est la pire des races. Je vous le dis du fond du cœur, mais je ne suis pas raciste, c’est un sentiment. Faut voir ce qu’ils font aux Palestiniens, les massacres et tout. Mais bon, on ne va pas dire que tous les juifs sont des monstres. Pourquoi vouloir réunir les juifs et les musulmans ? Tout ça c’est politique. Cela ne va rien changer. C’est en Palestine qu’il faut aller, pas en France. Karim
Ce sont les cerveaux du monde. Tous les tableaux qui sont exposés au centre Pompidou appartiennent à des juifs. A Metz, tous les avocats et les procureurs sont juifs. Ils sont tous hauts placés et ils ne nous laisseront jamais monter dans la société. « Ils ont aussi Coca-Cola. Regardez une bouteille de Coca-Cola, quand on met le logo à l’envers on peut lire : « Non à Allah, non au prophète ». C’est pour cela que les arabes ont inventé le « Mecca-cola ». Au McDo c’est pareil. Pour chaque menu acheté, un euro est reversé à l’armée israélienne. Les juifs, ils ont même coincé les Saoudiens. Ils ont inventé les voitures électriques pour éviter d’acheter leur pétrole. C’est connu. On se renseigne. (…) Si Mohamed Merah n’avait pas été tué par le Raid, le Mossad s’en serait chargé. Il serait venu avec des avions privés. Ali
Les enfants de Trump doivent reprendre l’entreprise avec le conflit d’intérêt, ils pourront vendre des gratte-ciels au gouvernement israélien. Des immeubles luxueux à construire dans les territoires occupés, que le Président des États-Unis les aidera à occuper et il leur enverra des Mexicains pour nettoyer les chiottes. Charline Vanhoenacker
I am aware than I incur the risk of being accused of Jewish pretentiousness when I emphasize the fact that so many of the Nobel prize winners have been jews, but a Jew cannot, nowadays, afford to be squeamish. Stephan Zweig (1937)
Certains trouvent encore intolérable d’admettre que le peuple juif se soit trouvé, à trois reprises, plus ou moins volontairement, un élément essentiel au patrimoine de l’humanité: le monothéisme, le marché et les lieux saints. Car il n’est pas faux de dire, même si c’est schématique, que les juifs ont été mis en situation d’avoir à prêter aux deux autres monothéismes, et à les partager avec eux, leur dieu, leur argent et leurs lieux saints. Et comme la meilleure façon de ne pas rembourser un créancier, c’est de le diaboliser et de l’éliminer, ceux qui, dans le christianisme et l’islam, n’acceptent toujours pas cette dette à l’égard du judaïsme, se sont, à intervalles réguliers, acharnés à le détruire, attendant pour recommencer que le souvenir de l’élimination précédente se soit estompé. Jacques Attali
L’Âge moderne est l’Âge des Juifs, et le XXe siècle est le Siècle des Juifs. La modernité signifie que chacun d’entre nous devient urbain, mobile, éduqué, professionnellement flexible. Il ne s’agit plus de cultiver les champs ou de surveiller les troupeaux, mais de cultiver les hommes et de veiller sur les symboles […] En d’autres termes, la modernité, c’est le fait que nous sommes tous devenus juifs. Yuri Slezkine
Written by economists Maristella Botticini and Zvi Eckstein, the paper explained Jewish success in terms of early literacy in the wake of Rome’s destruction of the Temple in 70 C.E. and the subsequent dispersion of Jews throughout the Roman empire – Jews who had to rely on their own rabbis and synagogues to sustain their religion instead of the high priests in Jerusalem. You may know a similar story about the Protestant Reformation: the bypassing of the Catholic clergy and their Latin liturgy for actual reading of Scripture in native languages and the eventual material benefits of doing so. Why is Northern Europe — Germany, Holland, England, Sweden — so much more prosperous than Southern Europe: Portugal, Italy, Greece, Spain? Why do the latter owe the former instead of the other way around? Might it have something to do with the Protestant legacy of the North, the Catholic legacy of the South? Paul Solman
The key message of “The Chosen Few” is that the literacy of the Jewish people, coupled with a set of contract-enforcement institutions developed during the five centuries after the destruction of the Second Temple, gave the Jews a comparative advantage in occupations such as crafts, trade, and moneylending — occupations that benefited from literacy, contract-enforcement mechanisms, and networking and provided high earnings. (…) the Jews in medieval Europe voluntarily entered and later specialized in moneylending and banking because they had the key assets for being successful players in credit markets: capital already accumulated as craftsmen and trade networking abilities because they lived in many locations, could easily communicate with and alert one another as to the best buying and selling opportunities, and literacy, numeracy, and contract-enforcement institutions — “gifts” that their religion has given them — gave them an advantage over competitors. Maristella Botticini and Zvi Eckstein
Wherever and whenever Jews lived among a population of mostly unschooled people, they had a comparative advantage. They could read and write contracts, business letters, and account books using a common [Hebrew] alphabet while learning the local languages of the different places they dwelled. These skills became valuable in the urban and commercially oriented economy that developed under Muslim rule in the area from the Iberian Peninsula to the Middle East. Maristella Botticini
En fait, ce que nous avons voulu démontrer, ma collègue Maristella Botticini, de la Bocconi, et moi, c’est que l’obligation d’étudier a un coût, et oblige donc l’individu rationnel à rechercher une compensation pour obtenir un retour sur investissement. Dans le cas des juifs, le problème se pose après la destruction du Temple de Jérusalem, en 70 de l’ère courante. La caste des prêtres qui constituait alors l’élite perd le pouvoir au profit de la secte des pharisiens, qui accorde une grande importance à l’étude. C’est de cette secte que vont sortir les grands rabbis, ceux qui vont pousser les juifs à se concentrer sur l’étude de la Torah, un texte dont la tradition veut qu’elle ait été écrite par Moïse sous la dictée de Dieu. Vers l’an 200, obligation est ainsi faite aux pères de famille d’envoyer leurs fils dès l’âge de 6 ans à l’école rabbinique pour apprendre à lire et étudier la fameuse Torah. Or l’essentiel des juifs sont des paysans, et pour les plus pauvres, cette obligation pèse très lourd car elle les prive de bras pour travailler aux champs. Beaucoup vont alors préférer se convertir au christianisme, d’où, on le voit dans les statistiques de l’époque, une baisse drastique de la population juive au Proche-Orient à partir du IIIe siècle alors que, jusqu’à la destruction du Temple, cette religion était en augmentation constante et multipliait les convertis. Pour ceux qui ont accepté le sacrifice financier que représente la dévotion, il va s’agir de valoriser leur effort. Or autour d’eux, ni les chrétiens ni, plus tard, les musulmans n’imposent à leurs enfants d’apprendre à lire et à écrire. Les juifs bénéficient donc d’un avantage compétitif important. C’est ainsi un juif converti à l’islam qui a servi de scribe à Mahomet et aurait mis par écrit pour la première fois le Coran. (…) Notre étude, fondée sur l’évolution économique et démographique du peuple juif, de l’Antiquité à la découverte de l’Amérique, remet en cause en fait la plupart des théories avancées jusqu’ici. Si les juifs sont médecins, juristes ou banquiers plus souvent qu’à leur tour, ce n’est pas parce qu’ils sont persécutés et condamnés à s’exiler régulièrement, comme l’a avancé l’économiste Gary Becker, ou parce qu’ils n’avaient pas le droit d’être agriculteurs, comme l’a soutenu Cecil Roth. Car si dans certains pays, on les a empêchés de posséder des terres, c’était bien après qu’ils aient massivement abandonné l’agriculture, et s’ils ont pu être persécutés, cela ne justifie pas qu’ils soient devenus médecins ou juristes : les Samaritains, très proches des juifs et eux aussi traités comme des parias, sont demeurés paysans. De même, contrairement à ce que dit Max Weber, ce n’est pas parce qu’un juif ne peut pas être paysan du fait des exigences de la Loi juive. Les juifs du temps du Christ la respectaient alors qu’ils étaient majoritairement occupés à des travaux agricoles et à la pêche. C’est dans l’Orient musulman, sous les Omeyyades et les Abbassides, à un moment où ils sont particulièrement valorisés, que les juifs s’installent massivement dans les villes et embrassent des carrières citadines. Pourquoi ? Parce qu’ils peuvent alors tirer parti du fait d’être lettrés. D’un point de vue purement économique, il est alors beaucoup plus rentable de devenir marchand ou scientifique que de labourer la terre. D’où notre théorie : si les juifs sont devenus citadins et ont occupé des emplois indépendants de l’agriculture, c’est d’abord parce qu’ils étaient formés. Et s’ils étaient formés, c’est que leur religion exigeait qu’ils le soient. (…) ces professions étaient beaucoup plus rentables que le travail de paysan. Pour un juif du Moyen Âge, l’apprentissage de la Torah allait de pair avec le fait de faire des affaires. Rachi, le grand commentateur du Talmud, était un entrepreneur qui possédait des vignes. Ses quatre fils, tous érudits, se sont installés dans quatre villes différentes où ils ont tous fait du business, notamment de prêts d’argent, tout en étant rabbins. Grâce à leur connaissance des langues et leurs réseaux familiaux, les juifs ont pu rentabiliser leur formation, le fait de savoir lire et écrire, mais aussi raisonner, plus aisément que d’autres communautés. (…) Il est essentiel que la culture fasse partie intégrante de l’éducation quotidienne. Et en cela, la mère joue un rôle essentiel, toutes les études le montrent. C’est elle qui transmet les valeurs fondamentales. La probabilité que vous alliez à l’université est plus importante si votre mère a été elle-même à l’université. Donc, le fait que la mère ait un minimum d’éducation a représenté très tôt un avantage compétitif par rapport aux autres communautés religieuses où la femme n’en recevait pas. Nous étudions actuellement la période allant de la Renaissance à l’Holocauste. Et nous avons déjà découvert ceci : en Pologne, au XVIIe siècle, la population juive a fortement progressé par rapport à la population chrétienne. Pourquoi ? Tout simplement parce que la mortalité infantile y était plus faible. Conformément à l’enseignement du Talmud, les enfants bénéficiaient en effet d’un soin tout particulier. Les femmes gardaient leur enfant au sein plus longtemps que les chrétiennes, et elles s’en occupaient elles-mêmes. Voilà un exemple tout simple des effets que peut avoir l’éducation. Zvi Eckstein
Pour faire face au danger que le christianisme et la romanisation faisaient courir à la survie du judaïsme, les Pharisiens imposèrent une nouvelle forme de dévotion. Tout chef de famille, pour rester fidèle à la foi judaïque, se devait d’envoyer ses fils à l’école talmudique, afin de perpétuer et d’approfondir, par un travail cumulatif de commentaire, la connaissance de la Torah. Cette nouvelle obligation religieuse a eu des répercussions socio-économiques considérables. Envoyer ses fils à l’école représentait un investissement coûteux qui n’était pas à la portée de la majorité des juifs, simples paysans comme les autres populations du Moyen-Orient au milieu desquelles ils vivaient. Ceux qui n’en avaient pas les moyens et restèrent paysans, s’éloignèrent du judaïsme. Ils  se convertirent souvent au christianisme.  C’est ce qui explique l’effondrement de la population juive durant l’Antiquité tardive. Ceux qui tenaient au contraire à remplir leurs obligations religieuses, durent choisir des métiers plus rémunérateurs. Ils devinrent commerçants, artisans, médecins et surtout financiers. Les juifs ne se sont pas tournés vers ces métiers urbains parce qu’on leur interdisait l’accès à la terre, comme on l’a dit souvent, mais pour pouvoir gagner plus d’argent et utiliser en même temps leurs compétences de lettrés. Ils étaient capables désormais de tenir des comptes, écrire des ordres de paiement, etc… (…) S’ils s’imposent partout dans le crédit, ce n’est pas parce que l’Eglise interdisait aux chrétiens le prêt à intérêt (en réalité l’islam et le judaïsme lui imposaient des restrictions comme le christianisme), mais parce qu’ils ont à la fois la compétence et le réseau pour assurer le crédit, faire circuler les ordres de paiements et les marchandises précieuses du fond du monde musulman aux confins de la chrétienté.  (…) c’est souvent à la demande des seigneurs ou évêques locaux qu’ils étaient venus s’installer dans les villes chrétiennes, parce qu’on recherchait leur savoir faire pour développer les échanges et l’activité bancaire. Les premières mesures d’expulsion des juifs par des princes chrétiens à la fin du XIII° siècle semblent avoir été guidées par la volonté de mettre la main sur leurs richesses beaucoup plus que par le désir de les convertir. (…) C’est pour des raisons religieuses que le judaïsme s’est imposé brusquement un investissement éducatif coûteux qui le singularise parmi les grandes religions du livre. Car ni le Christianisme qui  s’est donné une élite particulière, à l’écart du monde, vouée à la culture écrite, ni l’Islam n’ont imposé à leur peuple de croyants un tel investissement dans l’alphabétisation. Cet investissement a eu l’effet d’une véritable sélection darwinienne.  Il a provoqué une réorientation complète de l’activité économique du monde juif  en même temps  qu’il faisait fondre sa masse démographique. Il a surtout fait fleurir, par le miracle de l’éducation, des aptitudes intellectuelles précieuses qui en ont fait durablement une minorité recherchée et jalousée. André Burguière
A distinctively large proportion of Jewish youth go to college –  in the early 1970s, for example, 80 percent of American Jews of college age as compared with 40 percent for the college-age population as a whole (Lipset and Ladd
Protestants turn up among the the American-reared laureates in slightly greater proportion to their numbers in the general population. Thus 72 percent of the seventy-one laureates but about two thirds of the American population were reared in one or another Protestant denomination – mostly Presibterian, episcopalian, or lutheran, rather than Baptist or Fundamentalst. However, only I percent of the laureates came from a catholic background, one twenty-fifth the percentage of Americans counted as adherents to Roman catholicism (US bureau of the Census, 1958). jews, on the other hand, are overreprsented: comprising about 3 percent of the US population, they make up 27 percent of the Nobelists who were brought up in the United states. (…) These figures, it should be emphasized, refer to the religious origins of this scientific ultra-elite, not to their own religious preferences. Whatever those origins, laureates often describe themselves as agnostics, without formal religious affiliation or commitment to a body of religious doctrine. the large representation of Jews among laureates is by no means a uniquely American phenomenon. By rough estimates, Jews make up 19 percent of the 286 Nobelists of all natinalities named up to 1972, a percentage many times greater than than that found in the population of the countries from which they came and one that may be related to the often documented proclivity of jews for the leraned professions in general,and for science in particular. These data would begin to put in question the often expressed belief that the notable representation of jews among « American » laureates resulted from the great migration of talented young scientists in the wake of Hitler’s rise to power.. it is true that many scientists did escape to the United States where they significantly augmented the numbers of jews among the scientific elite as well as among the rank and file. but the refugees did not materially increase the proortion of Jews among the future laureates. Nineteen of the 71 laureates raised in the United States (27 percent) and seven of the 21 raised abroad (33 percent) were of Jewiish origin. The seven Jewish emigré laureates-to-be, though a substantial addition to the ultra-elite, raised the proportion of Jews among all ninety-two future laureates by only one percent. (…) Contributions by emigré scientists to the war effort and particularly to the development of the atom bomb have by now become the conventional measure of their first impact on American science. But (…) their influence was more farreaching. many made their mark not only by their own scintific work but also by training apprentices who would in turn make major scientific contributions. (…) Thus, gauge the true extent of « Hitler’s gift » requires that we take into account not only the scientific work of the emigrés themselves (during the war and afterward) but their multiplier effect as mentors to new generations of scientists, including a good many Nobelists. We should pause for a moment to consider how the same events can be considered from the complementary perspective of what the nazi hegemony meant for science in Germany. (…) Germany dominated the Nobel awards up to Worl War II. By 1933, the when the Nazis came to power, the combined total Nobels awarded to scientists who had done their prize-winning research in Germany came to thirty-one: 30 percent of the 103 prizes awarded since their founding in 1901. After 1934 and up to 1976, only nineteen who worked in Germany won prizes, or 9 percent of the total of 210 for the period. Part of this decline involves the drastic reduction in the number of Jewish laureates from nine to just two. in the number of Jewish laureates from nine to just two. Not even these two , max Borrn and Oto Stern, chose to ride out the strom in Germany. Born settled in Edinburgh in 1936, ten years after publishing his statistical interpretation of the wave function. Stern accepted a chair at Carnegie Institute of Technology  in the number of Jewish laureates from nine to just two. Not even these two , max Borrn and Oto Stern, chose to ride out the strom in Germany. Born settled in Edinburgh in 1936, ten years after publishing his statistical interpretation of the wave function. Stern accepted a chair at Carnegie Institute of technology and emigrated in 1933, having already developed the molecular beam method and mesaured the magnetic moment of the proton. While officially credited to both Great britain and the United states respectively, they should be counted as Germans since the research was done in Germany. More telling perhaps than the virtual elimination of Jewish laureates from Germany after 1933 is the fact that the number of Gentile laureates also declined by 20 percent. The Nazi effect on German science cannot be attributed exclusively to the persecution of Jews. The Nazis’ dismantling of much of the scietific establishment and the impoverished conditions prevailing after the war help to account for the decline in the numbers of German laureates. Harriet Zuckerman
Jews are a famously accomplished group. They make up 0.2 percent of the world population, but 54 percent of the world chess champions, 27 percent of the Nobel physics laureates and 31 percent of the medicine laureates. Jews make up 2 percent of the U.S. population, but 21 percent of the Ivy League student bodies, 26 percent of the Kennedy Center honorees, 37 percent of the Academy Award-winning directors, 38 percent of those on a recent Business Week list of leading philanthropists, 51 percent of the Pulitzer Prize winners for nonfiction. In his book, “The Golden Age of Jewish Achievement,” Steven L. Pease lists some of the explanations people have given for this record of achievement. The Jewish faith encourages a belief in progress and personal accountability. It is learning-based, not rite-based. Most Jews gave up or were forced to give up farming in the Middle Ages; their descendants have been living off of their wits ever since. They have often migrated, with a migrant’s ambition and drive. They have congregated around global crossroads and have benefited from the creative tension endemic in such places. No single explanation can account for the record of Jewish achievement. The odd thing is that Israel has not traditionally been strongest where the Jews in the Diaspora were strongest. Instead of research and commerce, Israelis were forced to devote their energies to fighting and politics. Milton Friedman used to joke that Israel disproved every Jewish stereotype. People used to think Jews were good cooks, good economic managers and bad soldiers; Israel proved them wrong. But that has changed. Benjamin Netanyahu’s economic reforms, the arrival of a million Russian immigrants and the stagnation of the peace process have produced a historic shift. The most resourceful Israelis are going into technology and commerce, not politics. This has had a desultory effect on the nation’s public life, but an invigorating one on its economy. Tel Aviv has become one of the world’s foremost entrepreneurial hot spots. Israel has more high-tech start-ups per capita than any other nation on earth, by far. It leads the world in civilian research-and-development spending per capita. It ranks second behind the U.S. in the number of companies listed on the Nasdaq. Israel, with seven million people, attracts as much venture capital as France and Germany combined. As Dan Senor and Saul Singer write in “Start-Up Nation: The Story of Israel’s Economic Miracle,” Israel now has a classic innovation cluster, a place where tech obsessives work in close proximity and feed off each other’s ideas. (…) Israel’s technological success is the fruition of the Zionist dream. The country was not founded so stray settlers could sit among thousands of angry Palestinians in Hebron. It was founded so Jews would have a safe place to come together and create things for the world. This shift in the Israeli identity has long-term implications. Netanyahu preaches the optimistic view: that Israel will become the Hong Kong of the Middle East, with economic benefits spilling over into the Arab world. And, in fact, there are strands of evidence to support that view in places like the West Bank and Jordan. But it’s more likely that Israel’s economic leap forward will widen the gap between it and its neighbors. All the countries in the region talk about encouraging innovation. Some oil-rich states spend billions trying to build science centers. But places like Silicon Valley and Tel Aviv are created by a confluence of cultural forces, not money. The surrounding nations do not have the tradition of free intellectual exchange and technical creativity. For example, between 1980 and 2000, Egyptians registered 77 patents in the U.S. Saudis registered 171. Israelis registered 7,652. The tech boom also creates a new vulnerability. As Jeffrey Goldberg of The Atlantic has argued, these innovators are the most mobile people on earth. To destroy Israel’s economy, Iran doesn’t actually have to lob a nuclear weapon into the country. It just has to foment enough instability so the entrepreneurs decide they had better move to Palo Alto, where many of them already have contacts and homes. American Jews used to keep a foothold in Israel in case things got bad here. Now Israelis keep a foothold in the U.S. David Brooks
Mais aussi derrière la remarquable ascension sociale de toute la génération qu’il incarne de juifs expulsés d’Algérie avec quasiment rien il y a plus de 50 ans …
L’incroyable aventure de ce petit peuple dont, à la suite de l’interminable liste d’antisémites de l’humanité et avant tout récemment le cadre du PS Gérard Filoche, de Gaulle lui-même avait perçu l’indiscutable domination intellectuelle …

Et qui à l’instar de leur surreprésentation dans la super élite des prix Nobel (plus de 20% pour moins de 0,2% de la population mondiale !) …

A contraint jusqu’au plus virulent des athées de la planète à avouer sa perplexité et à reconnaitre que cela ne pouvait être qu’une question de « pure religion et de culture » ?

Voir également:

A remarkable week for Jewish Nobel Prize winners

The Jewish chronicle

October 10, 2013

No less than six Jewish scientists were awarded Nobel Prizes this week, and two others came very close.

Belgian-born Francois Englert won the accolade in physics for his groundbreaking work on the origins of sub-atomic particles.

Prof Englert, 80, spent decades studying the Higgs boson particle, and was recognised “for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of the mass of subatomic particles”.

Prof Englert, who is a Holocaust survivor, shared the prize with Edinburgh University professor Peter Higgs, after whom the particle is named.

“At first I thought I didn’t have it because I didn’t see the announcement,” said a “very happy” Prof Englert.

The theoretical physicist teaches at Tel Aviv University and is emeritus professor at the Université libre de Bruxelles, where he graduated as an engineer and received a PhD in physical sciences in the 1950s.

Born into a Belgian Jewish family, Prof Englert survived the Nazi occupation by hiding in orphanages and children’s homes in Dinant, Lustin and Stoumont until Belgium was liberated by the US army.

Also this week, two American Jews were awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine, pipping two Israelis to the post.

James Rothman and Randy Schekman, together with German researcher Thomas Suedhof, were awarded the prize for their work on how proteins and other materials are transported within cells.

Hebrew University professors Aharon Razin and Howard Cedar were very close contenders.

Professor Rothman is based at Yale University and Professor Schekman teaches at the University of California.

The Nobel committee said their research on “traffic” within cell vesicles — bubbles within the cells — helped scientists understand how “cargo is delivered to the right place at the right time”.

Prof Schekman said he planned to celebrate the award with his colleagues. “I called my lab manager and I told him to go buy a couple bottles of Champagne and expect to have a celebration with my lab,” he said.

The trio have been working on cell transportation “over years, if not decades”, Prof Rothman told Associated Press.

Meanwhile, three Jewish-American scientists, Arieh Warshel, Michael Levitt and Martin Karplus, shared the Nobel Prize in chemistry.

The trio won the award for their work on computer simulations that enable the closer study of complex reactions such as photosynthesis and combustion, and the design of new drugs.

Prof Warshel, who has Israeli citizenship, studied at the Weizmann Institute in Rehovot. Prof Levitt also holds an Israeli passport and taught at the Weizmann Institute throughout the 1980s. Vienna-born Prof Karplus, who received his PhD from the California Institute of Technology, fled the Nazi occupation of Austria as a child in 1938.

IT’S A WIN-WIN SITUATION

An estimated 190 Jewish or half-Jewish people have received Nobel Prizes since they were first handed out in 1901.

Jews have won more than 20 per cent of the 850-plus prizes awarded, despite making up just 0.2 per cent of world’s population.

The first Jewish recipient was Adolf von Baeyer, who received the prize in chemistry in 1905.

Other notable recipients include writer and Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel, physicist Alfred Einstein, playwright Harold Pinter, novelist Saul Bellow and Israeli President Shimon Peres.

Jews have received awards in all six categories, with the most won in medicine.

Voir encore:

One-of-five Nobel Prize Laureates are Jewish
Israel High-Tech & Investment Report

December 2004

In the 20th century, Jews, more than any other minority, ethnic or cultural, have been recipients of the Nobel Prize, with almost one-fifth of all Nobel laureates being Jewish. Of the total Israel has six Nobel laureates.

In December 1902, the first Nobel Prize was awarded in Stockholm to Wilhelm Roentgen, the discoverer of X-rays. Alfred Nobel, 1833-1996, a Swedish industrialist and inventor of dynamite, bequeathed a $9 million endowment to fund prizes of $40,000 in 1901. Today the prize has grown to $1 million, to those individuals who have made the most important contributions in five areas. The sixth, « economic sciences, » was added in 1969.

Nobel could hardly have imagined the almost mythic status that would accrue to the laureates. From the start « The Prize » (as it was sensationalized in Irving Wallace’s 1960 novel) became one of the most sought-after awards in the world, and eventually the yardstick against which other prizes and recognition were to be measured.

A total of nearly 700 individuals and 20 organizations have been Nobel recipients, including two who refused the prize (Leo Tolstoy in 1902 and Jean-Paul Sartre in 1964.) Thirty women have won Nobels. The United States has about one-third of all winners. Also remarkable is the fact that 14 percent of all the laureates in a 100-year span have been Californians, most of them affiliated with one or more of the world-class higher education and research institutions in that state.

Jewish names appear 127 times on the list, about 18 percent of the total. This is an astonishing percentage for a group of people who add up to 1/24th of 1 percent of the world’s population. But this positive disproportion is echoed even further in the over-representation of Jews, compared to the general population, in such fields as the physical and social sciences, and in literature. An examination of the large professional communities from which Nobel laureates are selected would reveal an even more dominant disproportion. As an example, it is estimated that about one-third of the faculty at Harvard Medical School is Jewish.

The figure for the total number of Jewish nobel Prize winners varies slightly, depending on the strictness of the « Who’s a Jew? » definition. But the figure cited most frequently is 161, or 22 percent of Nobel Prizes in all categories awarded between 1901-2003. With the 2004 additions, the total stands at 166.

Voir de même:

As the Nobel Prize marks centennial, Jews constitute 1/5 of laureates

Throughout the 20th century, Jews, more so than any other minority, ethnic or cultural group, have been recipients of the Nobel Prize — perhaps the most distinguished award for human endeavor in the six fields for which it is given. Remarkably, Jews constitute almost one-fifth of all Nobel laureates. This, in a world in which Jews number just a fraction of 1 percent of the population.

This year’s winners for physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, economics and peace are being announced this week.

To mark the 100th anniversary of the Nobel Prize, an all-day California Nobel Prize Centennial Symposium will be held Friday, Oct. 26 at the Palace of Fine Arts Theatre in San Francisco. More than 12 Nobel laureates are expected to attend the event, which will include panel and roundtable discussions and excerpts from a documentary film in progress.

The event is presented by the Exploratorium and the Consulates General of Sweden in Los Angeles and San Francisco, in cooperation with several Bay Area universities, Lawrence Livermore Lab and KQED-TV.

Laureates will include economist Milton Friedman of the Hoover Institution, Stanford molecular biologist Paul Berg and U.C. Berkeley physicist Donald Glaser, among others.

It is ironic that this international recognition has rewarded Jewish accomplishment in the same century that witnessed pogroms, the Holocaust and wars that killed millions for no other reason than that they were Jewish. Certainly the Nobel Prize was not awarded to Jews because they were entitled to it, were smarter or better educated than everyone else, or because they were typically over-represented in the six fields honored by the award.

Rather, all Nobel laureates have earned their distinction in a traditionally fierce competition among the best and the brightest, although politics and controversy have not infrequently followed in the wake of the Nobel.

In December 1902, the first Nobel Prize was awarded in Stockholm to Wilhelm Roentgen, the discoverer of X-rays. Alfred Nobel (1833-96), a Swedish industrialist and inventor of dynamite, had bequeathed a $9 million endowment to fund significant cash prizes ($40,000 in 1901, about $1 million today) to those individuals who had made the most important contributions in five domains; the sixth, in « economic sciences, » was added in 1969.

Nobel could hardly have imagined the almost mythic status that would accrue to the laureates. From the start « The Prize » (as it was sensationalized in Irving Wallace’s 1960 novel) became one of the most sought-after awards in the world, and eventually the yardstick against which other prizes and recognition were to be measured.

Certainly the roster of Nobel laureates includes many of the most famous names of the 20th century: Marie Curie, Albert Einstein, Mother Teresa, Winston Churchill, Albert Camus, Boris Pasternak, Albert Schweitzer, the Dalai Lama and many others.

The list of American Nobel laureates in literature alone is a pantheon of our writers, including Sinclair Lewis, Eugene O’Neill, Pearl Buck, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, Saul Bellow, Isaac Bashevis Singer and Toni Morrison. American peace laureates include Presidents Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson, Jane Addams, Ralph Bunche, Linus Pauling (a two-time winner, also awarded a Nobel for chemistry), Martin Luther King Jr., Henry Kissinger and Jody Williams.

A total of nearly 700 individuals and 20 organizations have been Nobel recipients, including two who refused the prize (Leo Tolstoy in 1902 and Jean-Paul Sartre in 1964.) Thirty women have won Nobels. The United States has had about one-third of all winners. Also remarkable is the fact that 14 percent of all the laureates in a 100-year span have been Californians, most of them affiliated with one or more of the world-class higher education and research institutions in our state.

Jewish names appear 127 times on the list, about 18 percent of the total. This is an astonishing percentage for a group of people who add up to 1/24th of 1 percent of the world’s population. But this positive disproportion is echoed even further in the over-representation of Jews, compared to the general population, in such fields as the physical and social sciences, and in literature. An examination of the large professional communities from which Nobel laureates are selected would reveal an even more dominant disproportion. As an example, it is estimated that about one-third of the faculty at Harvard Medical School is Jewish.

How to account for Jewish proficiency at winning Nobels? It’s certainly not because Jews do the judging: All but one of the Nobels are awarded by Swedish institutions (the Peace Prize by Norway). The standard answer is that the premium placed on study and scholarship in Jewish culture inclines Jews toward more education, which in turn makes a higher proportion of them « Nobel-eligible » than in the larger population. There is no denying that as a rule the laureates in all six domains are highly educated, although there are notable exceptions, such as Mother Teresa. Nevertheless, in a world where so many millions have university degrees it is difficult to see why on that basis alone Jews should prevail in this high-level competition.

Another question is why the physical sciences admired by Alfred Nobel are so attractive to Jewish scientists. Albert Einstein, the successor to Newton, Galileo and Copernicus and the greatest name in modern science, was Jewish. This is more than a matter of historic pride; it is an enormous statistical improbability. And such achievements were not always attained on a level playing field. For example, the Nazis dismissed relativity as « Jewish physics » and caused the uprooting and exile (mostly to the United States) of a generation of German scientists who happened to be Jewish.

In literature and peace as well, Jews are disproportionately represented among the winners. Jewish writers honored include Henri Bergson, Boris Pasternak, S.Y. Agnon, Nelly Sachs, Saul Bellow, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Joseph Brodsky and Nadine Gordimer. Peace laureates include Henry Kissinger, Menachem Begin, Elie Wiesel, Yitzhak Rabin and Shimon Peres. In economics, for which the Nobel has been awarded for only the last 31 years, 13 laureates are Jewish, more than 40 percent of the total, including Paul Samuelson, Herbert Simon and Milton Friedman.

But it still seems insufficient to credit all this to reverence for education, skill at theoretical thinking or competitive instincts forged in a millennial-old struggle to survive and prosper.

Perhaps the desire to understand the world is also a strong or defining Jewish cultural trait, leading to education and careers suited to exploration and discovery. Science may have furnished an opportunity to not only understand but to lead, and to have one’s work judged without bias in collegial communities that have no use for religious intolerance.

Whatever the reasons, Jewish successes in the high-stakes world of the Nobel Prize are nothing short of astonishing, and a source of understandable pride to Jews throughout the world. Consider the scorecard: 37 awards in physics, 21 in chemistry, 39 in physiology and medicine, 10 in literature, seven in peace and 13 in economics.

Listings and descriptions of the contributions of the Jewish laureates may be found in Burton Feldman’s recently published book, « The Nobel Prize: A History of Genius, Controversy, and Prestige » (Arcade Publishing).

Other information about the Nobel Prize — its history, institutions, background on the winners and their work, acceptance speeches, etc. can be found on the Internet at www.nobel.se For California centennial activities, visit www.calnobel.org

 Voir enfin:
Hebrew University study reveals global Jewish population reached 13.75 million in past year; about 43% of world’s Jewish community lives in Israel

About 43% of the world’s Jewish community lives in Israel, making Israel the country with the largest Jewish population.

The Central Bureau of Statistics reported on the eve of Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year 5773, that the total population of Israel in 2012 grew to nearly 8 million. About 73% of the population is native born.

The Israeli Jewish population stands at 5,978,600, up 1.8%; the Arab population numbers at 1,636,600, up 2.4%; and the rest of the population including Christians and non-Jews reached 318,000 people, up 1.3%. Israel’s Jewish population makes up 75% of the state’s total people.

In all, the Jewish state’s population increased by 96,300 people in 2012, a growth rate that did not diverge from the average rate in the past eight years.

Part of Israel’s population increase comes in part of the new immigrants that have arrived to the country. In 2011, Israel welcomed 16,892 new immigrants as citizens, with the largest populations coming from Russia (3,678), followed by Ethiopia (2,666), United States (2,363), Ukraine (2,051) and France (1,775).Israel’s population is relatively young compared to populations in other western countries, with 28% of the population aged 0-14. Israel’s life expectancy is one of the highest of the international Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s (OECD) 34 member states, with Jewish males’ life expectancy 4.2 years higher than their Arab counterparts.

The Central Bureau of Statistics also found that 40% of Israel’s population lives in the center of the country, with Tel Aviv as Israel’s densest region, while 17 % lives in the north, 14% in the south, 12% in Jerusalem and Haifa, and 4% in Judea and Samaria.

Over 47,885 couples married in Israel in the past year, of which 75% were Jewish and 21% Muslim. In 2011, there were 166, 296 babies born in Israel.The world’s principal religious populations divide as follows according to the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) in 2012: Christians at 33% or 2.1 billion, Muslims at 24% or 1.65 billion, Hindus at 14% or 900 million, and Buddhists at 6% or 350 million. At least one billion people in the world do not ascribe to any religion at all.

Voir par ailleurs:

« Les musulmans sont-ils discriminés ? »
Philippe d’Iribarne
Le Figaro
26/11/2017

Un fort courant de pensée dénonce le mauvais accueil que l’Europe réserverait aux musulmans, contribuant aux difficultés d’intégration de ces derniers. Ce courant inspire nombre d’études affirmant que les musulmans sont victimes d’« islamophobie ». Une telle approche vient d’être illustrée par un rapport élaboré par l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne (FRA). Le texte, intitulé « Second European Union Minorities and Discrimination Survey. Muslims – Selected finding », (septembre 2017), analyse les réponses de 10 527 personnes qui s’identifient elles-mêmes comme musulmanes dans quinze pays de l’Union. Or, dès qu’on examine de près les données recueillies, on voit qu’elles conduisent à des conclusions bien différentes de ce que le rapport prétend démontrer. L’étude s’appuie uniquement sur des déclarations relatives à ce qui est ressenti par les personnes interrogées. Pourtant, ce qui est déclaré est identifié à ce qui advient effectivement. On trouve sans cesse des affirmations telles que : « Les musulmans ayant répondu rencontrent de hauts niveaux de discrimination », comme s’il s’agissait d’un fait avéré. Or, on trouve chez les personnes interrogées des conceptions très larges de ce qu’elles entendent par discrimination, en y incluant des différences de traitement conformes à la loi, liées à la nationalité. Rien n’est mis en œuvre dans l’étude pour savoir si une attitude globale plutôt hostile envers la société d’accueil pousserait certains à qualifier de discrimination des réactions fondées en réalité sur des raisons nullement discriminatoires, tel un déficit de compétence. De surcroît, ceux qui affirment que les musulmans en général sont discriminés sont beaucoup plus nombreux que ceux qui se déclarent discriminés personnellement. Dans cette étude, en France, 75 % des musulmans déclarent qu’il existe une discrimination sur la base de la religion alors que seulement 20 % déclarent s’être sentis personnellement discriminés sur cette base au cours des cinq dernières années.

On trouve, en réponse aux mêmes questions, 72 % et 30 % en Suède, 59 % et 19 % en Belgique, 26 % et 10 % en Espagne, etc. La croyance, que l’on retrouve au sein de la population en général, selon laquelle les musulmans seraient discriminés en raison de leur religion outrepasse donc largement la réalité. Par ailleurs, « les musulmans » en général sont supposés traités sans distinction par les sociétés d’accueil, en tant que musulmans ou vraisemblablement musulmans. L’état même de musulman est censé engendrer une réaction négative. Dès sa première phrase, le rapport annonce : « Vous souvenez-vous de la dernière fois où vous avez postulé pour un emploi ? Vous pouvez avoir craint que vos compétences informatiques soient insuffisantes, ou vous vous êtes tracassé à propos d’une faute d’orthographe dans votre CV. Mais, si vous êtes musulman ou d’origine musulmane et vivez dans l’Union européenne, votre nom peut suffire pour rendre certain que vous ne recevrez jamais d’invitation à un entretien d’embauche. » Or, en réalité, les données mêmes de l’enquête montrent qu’on observe, dans les pays de l’Union, des réactions très différenciées à l’égard de ceux qui se déclarent musulmans. Ce n’est nullement l’ensemble, ni même la majorité des musulmans qui déclarent s’être sentis discriminés du fait de leur religion, mais une petite minorité : 17 % dans les cinq ans précédant l’enquête. On retrouve ce même caractère minoritaire quand il s’agit de harcèlement (du regard perçu comme hostile à l’acte de violence physique), ou encore des rapports avec la police. Dans ce dernier cas, parmi les personnes qui se déclarent musulmanes et qui ont été interrogées, seulement 16 % des hommes et 1,8 % des femmes indiquent se sentir discriminés. En fait, on a affaire à plusieurs sous-populations suscitant des réactions très contrastées.

Tandis que la majorité ne se sent jamais discriminée, une minorité se sent discriminée à répétition – cinq fois par an en moyenne, jusqu’à quotidiennement pour une partie. Un tel contraste entre des groupes traités (ou qui se sentent traités) de manière aussi radicalement différente serait impossible si on avait affaire à une discrimination s’exerçant au hasard, liée au simple fait d’être musulman. Le rapport, en outre, fournit un ensemble de données distinguant les déclarations provenant de musulmans d’origines diverses (Afrique du Nord, Afrique subsaharienne, Turquie, Asie), hommes et femmes, et vivant dans les divers pays de l’Union étudiés. En moyenne, ceux qui viennent d’Afrique du Nord sont plus de deux fois plus nombreux que ceux venant d’Asie (21 %, contre 9 %) à se déclarer discriminés sur la base de la religion. On retrouve ces différences, encore plus amples, pour le harcèlement et les rapports avec la police. Or rien n’est dit sur ce que ces différences sont susceptibles de devoir à des divergences de manière d’être des personnes concernées. L’existence de limites au droit à l’expression des religions, spécialement dans l’entreprise, est bien notée. Mais il n’est jamais envisagé qu’une acceptation de ces limites chez les uns puisse coexister avec une rébellion à leur égard chez d’autres, cette différence d’attitude entraînant une différence de réactions des employeurs. Par ailleurs, les immigrés de seconde génération déclarent davantage rencontrer des réactions négatives du fait de leur religion que ceux de première génération (22 % contre 15 % pour les discriminations, 36 % contre 22 % pour le harcèlement). Mais il n’est jamais question, dans le rapport, de l’adoption, au sein de la seconde génération, d’une posture plus revendicative, susceptible de conduire à des comportements posant problème. En arrière-fond du rapport, la vision de l’intégration mise en avant est celle d’une « accommodation mutuelle » . Il est fait appel aux orientations du Conseil de l’Europe, « regardant l’intégration comme un processus dynamique à double sens d’accommodation mutuelle de tous les immigrants, y compris les musulmans, et des résidents » . Mais, en pratique, le rapport incite uniquement à réclamer une adaptation à la société d’accueil. Il est question de racisme, de xénophobie, de « crimes causés par la haine » . En réalité, l’interprétation qui paraît la plus sensée des données d’enquête est que la grande majorité des musulmans ne pose aucun problème à la société d’accueil ; et que, corrélativement, ses membres sont traités comme tout un chacun. C’est seulement une petite minorité qui est source de problèmes pour la société d’accueil et suscite, de ce fait, des réactions négatives. Il est vraisemblable que les membres de cette petite minorité, refusant de reconnaître ce qui est dû à leur manière d’être, se déclarent discriminés. En outre, l’interprétation, par le rapport, des sentiments à l’égard de la société d’accueil est toujours à sens unique. Les musulmans dans leur grande majorité déclarent se sentir à l’aise avec des voisins d’une religion différente ou prêts à voir leurs enfants épouser des non-musulmans. Selon le rapport, « presque tous (92 %) se sentent bien à l’idée d’avoir des voisins d’une autre religion » et presque un sur deux (48 %) n’aurait aucun problème « si un membre de sa famille épousait une personne non musulmane » . Ce fait est l’objet d’une interprétation laudative.

Le rapport dénonce, par contraste, les réactions peu favorables de l’ensemble de la population envers les musulmans, une personne sur cinq n’aimant pas avoir des musulmans parmi ses voisins et 30 % n’appréciant pas que son fils ou sa fille ait une relation amoureuse avec une personne musulmane. Selon le rapport, ces réponses prouvent que les musulmans sont plus ouverts et tolérants que les membres des sociétés d’accueil. Dans la comparaison ainsi faite, il n’est question que d’attitudes d’ouverture et de fermeture. L’étude ne porte aucune attention à la réalité des difficultés à vivre dans un univers où des personnes d’une autre culture peuvent tendre à imposer leurs mœurs. Il est bien noté, certes, que l’environnement institutionnel est sans doute meilleur dans les pays d’accueil que dans les pays d’origine et que cela peut intervenir dans le haut niveau de confiance que les personnes interrogées expriment envers les institutions du pays d’accueil. Mais l’intensité de la pression sociale dans certains quartiers où les musulmans tendent à régenter les tenues et les conduites n’est jamais évoquée. S’agissant du mariage, on ne trouve pas, dans l’étude, de questions séparées pour le mariage des filles et celui des garçons, alors que l’islam les distingue. On ne trouve pas davantage de mention des difficultés concrètes associées pour un non-musulman à un mariage avec un musulman : possibilité pour un conjoint musulman d’enlever les enfants en cas de séparation pour les amener dans un pays musulman, en étant protégé par la justice du pays en question ; pression à la conversion du conjoint non musulman. Quand des sentiments de haine sont évoqués par le rapport, c’est toujours envers les musulmans et jamais provenant d’eux. Il est question de « harcèlement provoqué par la haine » , de « harceleurs motivés par la haine » . La place que tient la haine envers l’Occident au sein du monde musulman n’est jamais évoquée. Le fait que ceux qui se déclarent le plus discriminés soient aussi ceux qui déclarent le moins d’attachement à la société d’accueil est interprété, comme si cela allait de soi, comme une relation de cause à effet. Ce serait ceux qui sont le plus discriminés qui, pour cette raison, s’attacheraient le moins à la société qui les accueille. Cette relation à sens unique est postulée, en particulier quand il s’agit de radicalisation islamiste. Il n’est pas envisagé qu’on ait affaire à un effet inverse : une attitude de rejet de la société d’accueil liée à une conception « dure » de l’islam, engendrant à la fois des comportements qui suscitent des réactions négatives et une tendance à interpréter ces réactions comme des discriminations. L’étude de l’Union européenne ne se demande jamais pourquoi il existe un tel contraste entre une grande majorité des musulmans qui déclare ne jamais se sentir discriminée et une petite minorité qui déclare l’être intensément. Ce contraste montre que l’on n’a pas affaire à des réactions globales à l’égard des musulmans en tant que tels, mais à des réactions différenciées, ce qui suggère que les manières d’être de chacun, considérées dans leur grande diversité, ont un rôle majeur. Pourtant l’étude affirme, comme si cela allait de soi, que les barrières à une pleine inclusion des musulmans dans les sociétés européennes ne sont imputables qu’à ces sociétés et sont exclusivement dues à « discrimination, harcèlement, violences motivées par la haine, fréquence des contrôles policiers ». Ce sont ces expériences qui peuvent à la longue réduire l’attachement des populations concernées au pays où elles résident, soutient l’étude. Le communiqué de presse diffusé à la suite de la parution de l’étude indique, comme première solution aux problèmes d’intégration des musulmans, « des sanctions efficaces contre les violations de la législation de lutte contre la discrimination » . Alors que l’intention affichée par l’étude, comme de manière générale à la famille d’études à laquelle elle appartient, est d’être au service d’une meilleure intégration des musulmans, son effet tend à être exactement inverse. Elle incite les musulmans à croire, à tort, que leurs efforts d’intégration sont vains et donc à nourrir du ressentiment et à les détourner d’accomplir de tels efforts. L’étude sert involontairement, par ailleurs, les stratégies des islamistes militants qui travaillent à la construction d’une contre-société islamique hostile aux pays d’accueil et plus généralement à l’Occident. *

Philippe d’Iribarne est l’auteur de nombreux ouvrages dont plusieurs sont devenus des classiques, tels « La Logique de l’honneur. Gestion des entreprises et traditions nationales » (1989) et « L’Étrangeté française » (2006).


Duneton: Attention, un appauvrissement peut en cacher un autre ! (Confessions of an oblate)

1 octobre, 2017
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/519Z9D1E93L._SX283_BO1,204,203,200_.jpgOn en a marre de parler français normal comme les riches, les petits bourges… parce que c’est la banlieue ici. Élève d’origine maghrébine (Pantin, TF1, 1996)
On parle en français, avec des mots rebeus, créoles, africains, portugais, ritals ou yougoslaves « , puisque  » blacks, gaulois, Chinois et Arabes  » y vivent ensemble.  Raja (21 ans)
Le bavardage grossier, loin de combler l’écart entre les rangs sociaux, le maintient et l’aggrave ; sous couleur d’irrévérence et de liberté, il abonde dans le sens de la dégradation, il est l’auto-confirmation de l’infériorité. Jean Starobinski
Les linguistes ont raison de dire que toutes les langues se valent linguistiquement; ils ont tort de croire qu’elles se valent socialement. P. Bourdieu (Ce que parler veut dire: l’économie des échanges linguistiques, 1982)
J’appelle stratégies de condescendance ces transgressions symboliques de la limite qui permettent d’avoir à la fois les profits de la conformité à la définition et les profits de la transgression : c’est le cas de l’aristocrate qui tape sur la croupe du palefrenier et dont on dira «II est simple», sous-entendu, pour un aristocrate, c’est-à-dire un homme d’essence supérieure, dont l’essence ne comporte pas en principe une telle conduite. En fait ce n’est pas si simple et il faudrait introduire une distinction : Schopenhauer parle quelque part du «comique pédant», c’est-à-dire du rire que provoque un personnage lorsqu’il produit une action qui n’est pas inscrite dans les limites de son concept, à la façon, dit-il, d’un cheval de théâtre qui se mettrait à faire du crottin, et il pense aux professeurs, aux professeurs allemands, du style du Professor Unrat de V Ange bleu, dont le concept est si fortement et si étroitement défini, que la transgression des limites se voit clairement. A la différence du professeur Unrat qui, emporté par la passion, perd tout sens du ridicule ou, ce qui revient au même, de la dignité, le consacré condescendant choisit délibérément de passer la ligne ; il a le privilège des privilèges, celui qui consiste à prendre des libertés avec son privilège. C’est ainsi qu’en matière d’usage de la langue, les bourgeois et surtout les intellectuels peuvent se permettre des formes d’hypocorrection, de relâchement, qui sont interdites aux petits-bourgeois, condamnés à l’hypercorrection. Bref, un des privilèges de la consécration réside dans le fait qu’en conférant aux consacrés une essence indiscutable et indélébile, elle autorise des transgressions autrement interdites : celui qui est sûr de son identité culturelle peut jouer avec la règle du jeu culturel, il peut jouer avec le feu, il peut dire qu’il aime Tchaikovsky ou Gershwin, ou même, question de «culot», Aznavour ou les films de série B. Pierre Bourdieu
 L’argot, dont on a fait la «langue populaire» par excellence, est le produit de ce redoublement qui porte à appliquer à la «langue populaire» elle-même les principes de division dont elle est le produit. Le sentiment obscur que la conformité linguistique enferme une forme de reconnaissance et de soumission, propre à faire douter de la virilité des hommes qui lui sacrifient, joint à la recherche active de l’écart distinctif, qui fait le style, conduisent au refus d’«en faire trop» qui porte à rejeter les aspects les plus fortement marqués du parler dominant, et notamment les prononciations ou les formes syntaxiques les plus tendues, en même temps qu’à une recherche de l’expressivité, fondée sur la transgression des censures dominantes — notamment en matière de sexualité — et sur une volonté de se distinguer des formes d’expression ordinaires. La transgression des normes officielles, linguistiques ou autres, est dirigée au moins autant contre les dominés «ordinaires», qui s’y soumettent, que contre les dominants ou, a fortiori, contre la domination en tant que telle. La licence linguistique fait partie du travail de représentation et de mise en scène que les «durs», surtout adolescents, doivent fournir pour imposer aux autres et à eux-mêmes l’image du «mec» revenu de tout et prêt à tout qui refuse de céder au sentiment et de sacrifier aux faiblesses de la sensibilité féminine. Et de fait, même si elle peut, en se divulguant, rencontrer la propension de tous les dominés à faire rentrer la distinction, c’est-à-dire la différence spécifique, dans le genre commun, c’est-à-dire dans l’universalité du biologique, par l’ironie, le sarcasme ou la parodie, la dégradation systématique des valeurs affectives, morales ou esthétiques, où tous les analystes ont reconnu «l’intention» profonde du lexique argotique, est d’abord une affirmation d’aristocratisme. Forme distinguée — aux yeux mêmes de certains des dominants — de la langue «vulgaire», l’argot est le produit d’une recherche de la distinction, mais dominée, et condamnée, de ce fait, à produire des effets paradoxaux, que l’on ne peut comprendre lorsqu’on veut les enfermer dans l’alternative de la résistance ou de la soumission, qui commande la réflexion ordinaire sur la «langue (ou la culture) populaire». Il suffit en effet de sortir de la logique de la vision mythique pour apercevoir les effets de contre-finalité qui sont inhérents à toute position dominée lorsque la recherche dominée de la distinction porte les dominés à affirmer ce qui les distingue, c’est-à-dire cela même au nom de quoi ils sont dominés et constitués comme vulgaires, selon une logique analogue à celle qui porte les groupes stigmatisés à revendiquer le stigmate comme principe de leur identité, faut-il parler de résistance ? Et quand, à l’inverse, ils travaillent à perdre ce qui les marque comme vulgaires, et à s’approprier ce qui leur permettrait de s’assimiler, faut-il parler de soumission ? (…) C’est évidemment chez les hommes et, parmi eux, chez les plus jeunes et les moins intégrés, actuellement et surtout potentiellement, à l’ordre économique et social, comme les adolescents issus de familles immigrées, que se rencontre le refus le plus marqué de la soumission et de la docilité qu’implique l’adoption des manières de parler légitimes. La morale de la force qui trouve son accomplissement dans le culte de la violence et des jeux quasi-suicidaires, moto, alcool ou drogues dures, où s’affirme le rapport à l’avenir de ceux qui n’ont rien à attendre de l’avenir, n’est sans doute qu’une des manières de faire de nécessité vertu. Le parti-pris affiché de réalisme et de cynisme, le refus du sentiment et de la sensibilité, identifiés à une sensiblerie féminine ou efféminée, cette sorte de devoir de dureté, pour soi comme pour les autres, qui conduit aux audaces désespérées de l’aristocratisme de paria, sont une façon de prendre son parti d’un monde sans issue, dominé par la misère et la loi de la jungle, la discrimination et la violence, où la moralité et la sensibilité ne sont d’aucun profit. La morale qui constitue la transgression en devoir impose une résistance affichée aux normes officielles, linguistiques ou autres, qui ne peut être soutenue en permanence qu’au prix d’une tension extraordinaire et, surtout pour les adolescents, avec le renfort constant du groupe. (…) L’argot, et c’est là, avec l’effet d’imposition symbolique, une des raisons de sa diffusion bien au-delà des limites du «milieu» proprement dit, constitue une des expressions exemplaires et, si l’on peut dire, idéales — avec laquelle l’expression proprement politique devra compter, voire composer — de la vision, pour l’essentiel édifiée contre la «faiblesse» et la «soumission» féminines (ou efféminées), que les hommes les plus dépourvus de capital économique et culturel ont de leur identité virile et d’un monde social tout entier placé sous le signe de la dureté. Il faut toutefois se garder d’ignorer les transformations profondes que subissent, dans leur fonction et leur signification, les mots ou les locutions empruntés lorsqu’ils passent dans le parler ordinaire des échanges quotidiens : c’est ainsi que certains des produits les plus typiques du cynisme aristocratique des «durs» peuvent, dans leur emploi commun, fonctionner comme des sortes de conventions neutralisées et neutralisantes qui permettent aux hommes de dire, dans les limites d’une très stricte pudeur, l’affection, l’amour, l’amitié, ou, tout simplement, de nommer les êtres aimés, les parents, le fils, l’épouse (l’emploi, plus ou moins ironique, de termes de référence comme «la patronne», la «reine-mère», ou «ma bourgeoise» permettant par exemple d’échapper à des tours tels que «ma femme» ou le simple prénom, ressentis comme trop familiers). (…) Nul ne peut ignorer complètement la loi linguistique ou culturelle et toutes les fois qu’ils entrent dans un échange avec des détenteurs de la compétence légitime et surtout lorsqu’ils se trouvent placés en situation officielle, les dominés sont condamnés à une reconnaissance pratique, corporelle, des lois de formation des prix les plus défavorables à leurs productions linguistiques qui les condamne à un effort plus ou moins désespéré vers la correction ou au silence. Il reste qu’on peut classer les marchés auxquels ils sont affrontés selon leur degré d’autonomie, depuis les plus complètement soumis aux normes dominantes (comme ceux qui s’instaurent dans les relations avec la justice, la médecine ou l’école) jusqu’aux plus complètement affranchis de ces lois (comme ceux qui se constituent dans les prisons ou les bandes de jeunes). L’affirmation d’une contre-légitimité linguistique et, du même coup, la production de discours fondée sur l’ignorance plus ou moins délibérée des conventions et des convenances caractéristiques des marchés dominants ne sont possibles que dans les limites des marchés francs, régis par des lois de formation des prix qui leur sont propres, c’est-à-dire dans des espaces propres aux classes dominées, repaires ou refuges des exclus dont les dominants sont de fait exclus, au moins symboliquement, et pour les détenteurs attitrés de la compétence sociale et linguistique qui est reconnue sur ces marchés. L’argot du «milieu», en tant que transgression réelle des principes fondamentaux de la légitimité culturelle, constitue une affirmation conséquente d’une identité sociale et culturelle non seulement différente mais opposée, et la vision du monde qui s’y exprime représente la limite vers laquelle tendent les membres (masculins) des classes dominées dans les échanges linguistiques internes à la classe et, plus spécialement, dans les plus contrôlés et soutenus de ces échanges, comme ceux du café, qui sont complètement dominés par les valeurs de force et de virilité, un des seuls principes de résistance efficace, avec la politique, contre les manières dominantes de parler et d’agir. (…) On comprend que le discours qui a cours sur ce marché ne donne les apparences de la liberté totale et du naturel absolu qu’à ceux qui en ignorent les règles ou les principes : ainsi l’éloquence que la perception étrangère appréhende comme une sorte de verve débridée, n’est ni plus ni moins libre en son genre que les improvisations de l’éloquence académique ; elle n’ignore ni la recherche de l’effet, ni l’attention au public et à ses réactions, ni les stratégies rhétoriques destinées à capter sa bienveillance ou sa complaisance ; elle s’appuie sur des schèmes d’invention et d’expression éprouvés mais propres à donner à ceux qui ne les possèdent pas le sentiment d’assister à des manifestations fulgurantes de la finesse d’analyse ou de la lucidité psychologique ou politique. Pierre Bourdieu
La France est une garce et on s’est fait trahir Le système, voilà ce qui nous pousse à les haïr La haine, c’est ce qui rend nos propos vulgaires On nique la France sous une tendance de musique populaire On est d’accord et on se moque des répressions On se fout de la République et de la liberté d’expression Faudrait changer les lois et pouvoir voir Bientôt à l’Elysée des arabes et des noirs au pouvoir (Nique la France, Sniper, 2010)
La lecture, c’est pour les pédés! Réponse de collégiens français
Le parler «caillera», ce «langage des exclus» longtemps vu comme une contre-culture «voyou», voire une sous-culture, serait-il devenu tendance chez les jeunes nantis ? Un langage pourtant ultra-code, qui mêle vieil argot et verlan, expressions arabes et africaines. Des mots cash, trash, parfois sexistes, souvent décriés parce qu’ils véhiculeraient la «haine» ? L’intéressée hausse les épaules. «Ca fait longtemps que le verlan a dépassé les limites de la cité», explique-t-elle. De la cour de récré aux boîtes de nuit branchées, il se répand comme une traînée de poudre. On ne rit plus, on s’tape des barres ou on s’charrie. En teuf on kiffe sa race sur de la bonne zik, du son chanmé en matant des meufs. Un vrai truc de ouf. Popularisé avec le «Nique ta mère» de Jamel Debbouze et le tube «Mets ta cagoule» de Michaël Youn, démocratisé par les animateurs radio Maurad et Difool, le verlan a définitivement passé le périph. Le Nouvel Observateur
Doit-on se satisfaire de l’affaiblissement du français ? Certainement pas. En même temps, la langue française n’est pas menacée à domicile, même si elle l’est à l’international. Que faire alors ? Pour être constructif, plusieurs idées peuvent être avancées. Il faut par exemple renouveler et redynamiser notre langue en s’appuyant sur le français des quartiers, source permanente d’invention linguistique. On compte aujourd’hui plusieurs milliers de mots en verlan qui enrichissent notre langue. Valorisons-les dans les dictionnaires et les écoles. Frédéric Martel
Les défenseurs de l’éducation bilingue disent qu’il est important d’ enseigner un enfant dans la langue de sa famille. Moi, je dis qu’on ne peut pas utiliser la langue familiale dans la classe – la nature même de la classe exige que vous vous serviez de la langue d’une manière publique. (…) L’intimité n’a rien à faire dans les salles de classe. Richard Rodriguez
Il n’y a rien de surprenant qu’au moment où les universités américaines se sont engagées sérieusement dans la diversité, elles soient devenues des prisons de la pensée. Personne ne parle de la diversité d’aucune manière véritable. On ne parle que de versions brune, noire et blanche de la même idéologie politique. Il est très curieux qu’aux Etats-Unis comme au Canada on réduit la diversité à la race et à l’appartenance ethnique. On ne pense jamais que ça pourrait aussi signifier plus de nazis ou plus de baptistes du sud. Ca aussi, c’est la diversité, vous savez. Pour moi, la diversité n’est pas une valeur. La diversité, c’est l’Irlande du Nord. La diversité, c’est Beyrouth. La diversité, c’est le frère qui massacre son frère. Là où la diversité est partagée – où je partage avec vous ma différence – celle-ci peut avoir une valeur. Mais le simple fait que nous sommes différents est une notion terrifiante. Richard Rodriguez
Par-delà les discours pétris de bonne conscience sur l’égale dignité de toutes les pratiques linguistiques, on oublie de préciser que les exclus de la langue de Molière ont toutes les chances de devenir des exclus tout court. Alain Bentolila
Il y a un réel engouement bourgeois pour cette culture. Mais c’est aussi la marque d’un encanaïllement un peu pervers. Car à la différence d’un jeune des cités, un «fils de» n’aura aucun mal à jongler avec un autre registre de langue lorsqu’il s’agira de reprendre la boîte de papa… (…) L’écrit que pratiquent ces jeunes aujourd’hui a changé de perspective et de nature. C’est un écrit de l’immédiateté, de la rapidité et de la connivence: réduit au minimum, il n’est destiné à être compris que par celui à qui on s’adresse. Or, la spécificité de l’écrit par rapport à l’oral est qu’il permet de communiquer en différé et sur la durée: il est arrivé dans la civilisation pour laisser des traces. (…) Ce qui a changé, c’est que nos enfants, qu’on a cru nourrir de nos mots, utilisent un vocabulaire très restreint, réduit à environ 1 500 mots quand ils parlent entre eux – et à 600 ou 800 mots dans les cités. » Les adolescents les plus privilégiés possèdent, certes, une « réserve » de vocabulaire qui peut être très importante et dans laquelle ils piochent en cas de nécessité (à l’école, avec des adultes, lors d’un entretien d’embauche…), ce qui leur permet une « socialisation » plus importante. Mais globalement, ce bagage de mots que possèdent les jeunes a tendance à s’appauvrir quel que soit leur milieu. (…) Il y a une loi simple en linguistique: moins on a de mots à sa disposition, plus on les utilise et plus ils perdent en précision. On a alors tendance à compenser l’imprécision de son vocabulaire par la connivence avec ses interlocuteurs, à ne plus communiquer qu’avec un nombre de gens restreint. La pauvreté linguistique favorise le ghetto; le ghetto conforte la pauvreté linguistique. En ce sens, l’insécurité linguistique engendre une sorte d’autisme social. Quand les gamins de banlieue ne maîtrisent que 800 mots, alors que les autres enfants français en possèdent plus de 2 500, il y a un déséquilibre énorme. Tout est «cool», tout est «grave», tout est «niqué», et plus rien n’a de sens. Ces mots sont des baudruches sémantiques: ils ont gonflé au point de dire tout et son contraire. «C’est grave» peut signifier «c’est merveilleux» comme «c’est épouvantable». (…) C’est de la démagogie! Ces néologismes sont spécifiques des banlieues et confortent le ghetto. L’effet est toujours centrifuge. Les enfants des milieux aisés vampirisent le vocabulaire des cités, mais ils disposent aussi du langage général qui leur permet d’affronter le monde. L’inverse n’est pas vrai. Arrêtons de nous ébahir devant ces groupes de rap et d’en faire de nouveaux Baudelaire! La spécificité culturelle ne justifie jamais que l’on renonce en son nom à des valeurs universelles. Cela est valable pour l’excision, la langue des sourds comme pour le langage des banlieues. Dans une étude récente en Seine-Saint-Denis, on a demandé à des collégiens ce que représentait pour eux la lecture. Plusieurs ont fait cette réponse surprenante: «La lecture, c’est pour les pédés!» Cela signifie que, pour eux, la lecture appartient à un monde efféminé, qui les exclut et qu’ils rejettent. Accepter le livre et la lecture serait passer dans le camp des autres, ce serait une trahison. (…) Même les aides jardiniers ou les mécaniciens auto doivent maîtriser des catalogues techniques, entrer des données, procéder à des actes de lecture et d’écriture complexes. Or 11,6% des jeunes Français entre 17 et 25 ans comprennent difficilement un texte court, un mode d’emploi ou un document administratif et ne savent pas utiliser un plan ou un tableau. (…) Il y a trente ans, l’école affichait cyniquement sa vocation à reproduire les inégalités sociales: l’examen de sixième éjectait du cursus scolaire deux tiers des enfants, en majorité issus des classes populaires, qui passaient alors leur certificat d’études primaires (avec d’ailleurs une orthographe très supérieure à celle des enfants du même âge aujourd’hui). Or on est passé de ce tri affiché à l’objectif de 80% d’élèves au bac, imposant à une population scolaire qui autrefois aurait suivi la filière courte du certificat d’études de rester au collège et au lycée jusqu’à 16 ans. (…) mais alors il fallait changer complètement les programmes, les méthodes, les structures, les rythmes! Cela n’a pas été fait. A part quelques morceaux de sparadrap appliqués ici et là, l’école est restée la même. Il faut comprendre que l’apprentissage du langage n’est pas aussi naturel qu’il y paraît. C’est un travail. Quand un enfant apprend à parler, il le fait d’abord dans la proximité, dans un cercle étroit de connivence: la langue confirme ce qu’il voit, avec peu de mots. Petit à petit, en élargissant son langage, il quitte ce cocon douillet pour passer à l’inconnu: il va s’adresser à des gens qu’il n’a jamais vus, pour dire des choses dont ces gens n’ont jamais entendu parler. Il faut avoir l’ambition d’élargir le monde pour s’emparer des mots, et il faut s’emparer des mots pour élargir le monde. Mais, pour cela, l’enfant a absolument besoin d’un médiateur adulte à la fois bienveillant et exigeant qui transforme ses échecs en conquêtes nouvelles – «Je n’ai pas compris ce que tu veux me dire; il est important pour moi de te comprendre» – quelqu’un qui manifeste cette dimension essentielle du langage: l’altérité. (…) A cause de l’évolution sociologique de ces trente dernières années, l’activité professionnelle des mères, l’éloignement des grands-parents, l’école a accepté des enfants de 2 ans sans rien changer à sa pratique: ces petits se retrouvent dans des classes de 30, avec une maîtresse et, au mieux, une aide maternelle, à un âge où le langage explose (on passe de 50 à 300 mots et on inaugure les premières combinaisons syntaxiques). Dans ce contexte, ils restent entre eux. Cette réponse de l’école maternelle n’est pas honorable. Elle creuse encore le fossé culturel. C’est une catastrophe pour l’épanouissement psycholinguistique de l’enfant! (…) Pour aggraver les choses, on enseigne le français dans les filières professionnelles comme en maîtrise de linguistique: on leur fait étudier le «schéma narratif», l’«arrière-plan» et l’«avant-plan», le «champ lexical» ou encore les «connecteurs d’argumentation», des concepts de pseudo-analyse sémiotique éloignés de l’univers du bon sens. C’est une forme de désespoir pédagogique qui révèle un vrai renoncement à faire partager à des élèves de culture populaire la vibration intime qu’engendre un beau texte. Alain Bentolila (linguiste et spécialiste de l’illettrisme)
Toute langue possède une dimension argotique ; en effet, toute société humaine fonctionne avec des interdits, des tabous, entre autres, d’ordre social, politique, religieux, moral, qui sont véhiculés par la (ou les) forme(s) légitimée(s) de la langue. Comment peut-il être dès lors imaginé une société au sein de laquelle aucune personne, aucun groupe ne chercherait à se doter de moyens pour contourner ces interdits et ces tabous, ne serait-ce que par transgression langagière ? De telles pratiques sociales et langagières constituent les foyers les plus actifs nécessaires à l’émergence de formes argotiques, qui sont elles-mêmes autant de preuves des stratégies d’évitement, de contournement des interdits et tabous sociaux mises en œuvre par les locuteurs, les groupes de locuteurs qui produisent de telles formes. Une contre-légitimité linguistique peut ainsi s’établir . La situation linguistique française n’échappe pas à ce schéma et des parlers argotiques, plus ou moins spécifiques à tel(s) ou tel(s) groupe(s) ont toujours existé de manière concomitante avec ce que l’on appelle par habitude  » langue populaire ».  (….) Toute langue a bel et bien toujours eu, génère continuellement et aura toujours un registre argotique, qui permet la mise en place de stratégies de contournement, voire aussi de cryptage, de masquage. Au XVe siècle, François Villon a rédigé ses fameuses ballades dans une langue de malfrats, le parler de la Coquille, un argot d’une confrérie de malandrins, qui livrèrent sous la torture une partie de leur vocabulaire. Si l’on considère ce qui s’est passé en France depuis environ cent ans pour l’argot traditionnel, qu’il s’agisse de ses manifestations de la fin du XIXe siècle et du début du XXe, de celles des années 1920-1930, d’après-guerre ou bien des années 1950-1960, une différence fondamentale doit être notée par rapport à ce que l’on constate aujourd’hui sur le terrain : de nos jours les épices apportées à la langue française sont de plus en plus empruntées à des langues étrangères. Même si l’argot traditionnel a su s’alimenter de termes étrangers, il le faisait à l’époque dans des proportions moindres. Un facteur déterminant est intervenu depuis et s’est amplifié : celui de l’immigration. Au temps de la Mouffe (rue Mouffetard), de la Butte (butte Montmartre), des Fortifs (Fortifications remplacées actuellement par le boulevard périphérique) un brassage de populations avait lieu dans Paris intra-muros, tout comme dans la majeure partie des grandes villes françaises. Les formes argotiques et les formes non légitimées dites  » populaires  » de la langue française se rejoignaient et c’est une des raisons qui ont permis alors aux mots des argotiers, des jargonneux de tel ou tel  » petit  » métier de passer du statut d’argot particulier à celui d’argot commun avant même de transiter par l’intermédiaire de la langue familière vers la langue française circulante, voire la langue académique, celle que l’on peut aussi écrire, y compris à l’école. Cambriole, cambriolage, cambrioler et cambrioleur ne sont plus du tout perçus de nos jours comme des mots d’origine argotique, ce qu’ils sont en réalité, puisque tous proviennent de l’argot cambriole qui désigne la chambre, la pièce que l’on peut voler. (…) Évolution rapide des formes de type argotique ? En voici un exemple : entrer dans un café et demander un casse-dalle avec une petite mousse  » un sandwich avec une bière  » appartient, d’un point de vue linguistique, à une autre époque, qui se termine à la fin des années 60-70 du siècle passé. Ce n’est plus le temps de la gapette  » casquette (à la mode ancienne)  » sur l’œil et de la cibiche  » cigarette  » au coin des lèvres. La casquette, aujourd?hui de marque Nike, est vissée sur le crâne, s’accompagne de baskets de même marque ou avec le logo Adidas aux pieds et les lascars  » jeunes des cités et quartiers français contemporains  » se désignent comme des casquettes-baskets par opposition aux costards-cravates, ceux qui sont en dehors de la cité, ceux qui sont en place, dans la place  » ont un travail, sont arrivés socialement « . De nos jours, au féca  » café, bistrot  » du coin on dame un dwich  » mange un sandwich  » et on tise une teillbou de 8.6  » boit une bouteille de bière titrant 8,6o d’alcool « . Il en va ainsi de l’évolution du lexique oral. Les personnes qui vivent dans des cités de banlieue ou dans des quartiers dits  » défavorisés  » – entre des tours et des barres – parlent de plus en plus fréquemment une forme de français que certaines d’entre elles nomment  » verlan « , d’autres  » argot « , voire  » racaille-mot  » (  » mots de la racaille « ). Cette variété de français, que l’on peut désigner par  » argot des cités  » ou  » argot de banlieue  » est en réalité la manifestation contemporaine la plus importante d’une variété de français, qui au cours des dernières décennies, tout comme les diverses populations qui l’ont parlée, a perdu tout d’abord son caractère rural, par la suite toute indexation ouvrière, voire prolétaire, pour devenir le mode d?expression de groupes sociaux insérés dans un processus d’urbanisation. Progressivement se sont alors développés les parlers urbains français, qui sont pratiqués de manière plus ou moins effective (usages actifs / passifs) par des millions de personnes en France, que celles-ci soient françaises d’origine ou non, issues de l’immigration ou étrangères. Pendant toutes les années 1990, cet argot de cités, désigné plus haut par français contemporain des cités (FCC en abrégé), est sorti d’entre les tours et les barres, qui l’ont vu naître, émerger, exploser au début des années 1980. Les formes lexicales du FCC sont puisées d’une part dans le vieux français et ses variétés régionales, d’autre part dans le vieil argot, celui de Mimile, mais aussi dans les multiples langues des communautés liées à l’immigration. Par ailleurs le FCC comporte aussi un nombre important de créations lexicales spécifiques, qui ne sont pas uniquement du verlan, comme on peut le croire communément. Étant donné les pratiques langagières des communautés d’origines diverses, de cultures et de langues non moins différentes, qui cohabitent dans les cités ou les quartiers des grandes villes françaises une interlangue émerge entre le français véhiculaire dominant, la langue circulante, et l’ensemble des vernaculaires qui compose la mosaïque linguistique des cités : arabe maghrébin, berbère, diverses langues africaines et asiatiques, langues de type tsigane, créoles antillais (à base lexicale française) pour ne citer que ces langues. (…) Dans ces variétés linguistiques se met alors en place un processus de déstructuration de la langue française circulante par ceux-là même qui l’utilisent et y introduisent leurs propres mots, ceux de leur origine, de leur culture. Les formes linguistiques ainsi créées et leurs diverses variantes régionales deviennent dès lors autant de marqueurs, voire des stéréotypes identitaires ; elles exercent de ce fait pleinement leurs fonctions d’indexation. L’instillation d’un grand nombre de traits spécifiques, qui proviennent du niveau identitaire, dans le système linguistique dominant correspond alors à une volonté permanente de créer une diglossie, qui devient la manifestation langagière d’une révolte avant tout sociale. (…) La déstructuration de la langue s’opère aussi par introduction dans les énoncés de formes parasitaires, ce qui constitue une procédure argotique bien connue des linguistes. Ceux et celles qui utilisent de telles formes linguistiques peuvent de ce fait s’approprier la langue française circulante, qui devient alors leur langue ; ils et elles peuvent grâce à elle non seulement se fédérer mais aussi et surtout espérer résister et échapper à toute tutelle en se donnant ainsi un outil de communication qui se différencie des différents parlers familiaux, qu’ils ou elles pratiquent, peu ou prou, par ailleurs mais aussi de la forme véhiculaire de la langue française dominante, par conséquent légitimée. Les normes linguistiques maternelles sont alors développées comme autant de  » contrenormes  » à la langue française, académique, ressentie comme langue  » étrangère  » par rapport à sa propre culture. L’École a une fonction primordiale : elle se doit de fournir aux enfants scolarisés les outils nécessaires pour parvenir à une maîtrise efficace de la langue française tant sous ses diverses manifestations orales que sous sa forme écrite, orthographique par conséquent. Dans le cas de groupes scolaires implantés dans des cités, la langue utilisée par les élèves est à bien des égards distante du français circulant, compte tenu de la multitude des éléments linguistiques identitaires qui y sont instillés. Ceci contribue aussi dans le cadre de l’école à la mise en place de la fracture linguistique. Le rôle des enseignants devient dès lors prépondérant ; il s’agit de pouvoir éviter l’instauration de rapports d’exclusion au nom des sacro-saints  » ils ne parlent pas français « ,  » ils n’expriment que de la violence, leur violence « ,  » il n’y a que des mots grossiers dans ces parlers  » et autres  » on ne sait plus parler français dans les banlieues « . Bien au contraire, c’est un réel foisonnement lexical que l’on constate lors de l’analyse des diverses variétés du FCC. En effet, si les anciens argots de métiers eux-mêmes et l’argot commun traditionnel reflétaient une véritable  » fécondité en matière lexicale « , une  » effervescence du vocabulaire… dans des groupes sociaux mal armés chez lesquels on s’attendrait à un stock lexical réduit »,  il en est de même pour ce qui est des formes langagières actuelles des cités. (…) Les pratiques argotiques contemporaines doivent être resituées dans le temps. En France au cours du XXe siècle les argots de métiers cèdent progressivement la place aux argots sociologiques. Ces deux types d’argots se différencient entre eux par l’importance relative des fonctions qu’ils exercent : pour les argots de métiers les fonctions sont essentiellement cryptiques, voire crypto-ludiques ; les fonctions identitaires, quant à elles, n’occupent qu’une place secondaire. Une inversion des rapports intervient dans le cas des argots sociologiques des cités. Les fonctions identitaires jouent pleinement leur rôle et la revendication langagière de jeunes et de moins jeunes qui  » se situent en marge des valeurs dites légitimes (…) est avant tout l’expression d’une jeunesse confrontée à un ordre socio-économique de plus en plus inégalitaire, notamment en matière d’accès au travail. Jean-Pierre Goudaillier
Duneton’s description of the paradox of working-class kids made good who enter the teaching profession has another echo in Bourdieu’s sociological writings. Bourdieu often uses the term oblate, a word which originated in the Middle Ages to describe a young man of modest means entrusted to a religious foundation to be trained for the priesthood. Bourdieu borrows the term to suggest the intensity of institutional loyalty felt by the teacher of humble origins who owes his whole education and culture to the state educational system. The oblates of the modern world are all teachers. An alternative title for Je suis comme une truie qui doute might be Confessions of an Ex-Oblate. (…) A teacher who becomes sceptical of the very value of schooling and the very value of the culture he is supposed to disseminate is about as much use as a farmyard sow who refuses to eat. This realization is at the heart of Je suis comme une truie qui doute and, of course, explains the text’s surreal title. Duneton doesn’t only stress the linguistic alienation of many working-class and predominantly rural kids. He also emphasises their very real linguistic abilities. These kids are not illiterate they are simply not in possession of the `right’ kind of French accepted within the school system. For Duneton it is important that children from rural areas are encouraged to learn and speak at school the kind of French spoken at home and with peers from their own region. For some children with knowledge of Occitan or other regional languages, this can benefit them in their learning of other foreign languages. Tony McNeill
Ça fausse un peu le jugement d’être une exception. On a tendance à croire que les autres, peuvent en faire autant … Mais ce qui fausse encore plus le jugement, c’est que, si nous avons réussi à sauter les barrières, c’est précisément parce que nous avons assimilé en profondeur les règles du jeu. Ces règles-là conditionnent aujourd’hui notre pensée. On nous a fait jouer aux échecs, blaque à part, et nous avons gagné. Alors nous continuons à faire jouer les autres en espérant que ça se passera bien aussi pour eux. (…) Ben oui. On ne nous avait pas dit que les littérateurs se foutaient de nous. On nous les faisait révérer comme nos grands frères, ces visages pâles! Claude Duneton
… les livres de classe présentent la société sous un angle bien détérminé; sous prétexte de vie quotidienne et de condition moyenne ils offrent aux enfants attentifs un univers essentiellement petit- bourgeois. (…) la langue française, c’était au début du siècle la langue d’une infime minorité de la population française. C’est curieux à dire, mais la France n’est francophone que depuis cinquante ans à peine! … La haute bourgeoisie de notre pays avait, depuis des siècles, une langue à elle, une belle langue, réputée, qu’elle s’était faite toute seule, en secret. Elle en avait déjà fait présent à plusieurs cours d’Europe, quand, tout d’un coup, au début de ce siècle, elle en a fait cadeau aux Français.
Pendant longtemps, lorsque j’entendais le mot culture, je pensais d’abord à un champ de pommes de terre … Oh c’était pas méchant! C’est pas comme l’autre avec son revolver! – Non, j’avais simplement la connotation rustique … Et puis je me rappelais bien vite que c’était pas ça: qu’il s’agissait de la Grande Culture, de l’unique, de la vaste, de la très belle, de la Culture aux grands pieds! `L’ensemble de connaissances acquises qui permettent à l’esprit de développer son sens critique, son goût, son jugement’, comme dit Robert. – Oui mais c’est très orienté tout ça, non? … Le goût, le jugement … L’ensemble de connaissances acquises peut-être, mais ça dépend tout de même lesquelles! On ne dit jamais de quelqu’un par exemple: `Cet homme est très cultivé, il connaît Marx et Lénine sur le bout du doigt.’ Hein? C’est vrai, ça fait curieux comme remarque … A l’oreille, ça ne passe pas. Pas plus que: `Cultivé? Vous pensez, il travaille sur les nouveaux ordinateurs Machin!’ Ce serait choquant à la limite … Non, un homme cultivé ce n’est pas ça. Il connaît d’abord ses classiques. Non pas pour en faire une critique historique circonstanciée, non, comme ça, pour l’ornement de ses pensées. Racine, il en cite deux ou trois vers … Mallarmé. Il sait reconnaître un Breughel, un Beethoven. Il a lu Proust en entier, Balzac … Bref il est cultivé quoi! On dit aussi que la culture c’est ce qui reste quand on a tout oublié. Ben oui. Ce qui reste c’est un sentiment, une impression, une manière de voir les choses – une vision. Comme on a oublié d’où elle vient cette vision, elle nous paraît naturelle, la seule qui soit. C’est comme celui qui porte des lunettes de soleil, il oublie ses verres teintés; ça lui colore l’existence, il cherche pas à en savoir plus long.
Que la manoeuvre de dépassement soit réussie ou non, pour quelqu’un qui fait des études, il reste tout de même une sérieuse dualité entre le parler familial et celui de l’école, du lycée, de l’université.
Combien j’en ai vu des petits garçons taciturnes, qui traînent à longueur de cours, de semaines, d’années scolaires, sans presque desserrer les dents! Et puis on les surprend, un soir du côté du garage à vélos, ou bien dehors, dans un groupe, près du portail. Le gosse est en discussion animée avec les copains. Il a la voix rapide, le geste sec, un vrai harangueur … Il ne vous a pas vu venir. Tout à coup il vous voit: ça s’arrête net dans sa gorge. Il rougit, sourit, gêné … Les autres rigolent. Ils savent, eux, qu’il parle autant qu’un autre. Et ça n’est pas parce que vous n’êtes pas gentil, parce que vous lui faites peur personnellement. C’est autre chose – qu’il ignore d’ailleurs – : c’est qu’il vit mal sa dualité.
Mais toutes les langues sont `de culture’ si on sait les prendre, et si l’on donne à ce mot un sens un peu plus profonde que `source inépuisable d’extraits de morceaux choisis’. A condition de dissocier culture et littérature de classe, sans jeu de mots.
Vieux con. Lui aussi, l’inspecteur, il est souvent l’enfant d’un tâcheron. Le petit fils d’un besogneux des terres occitanes, d’un haveur de charbon presque belge … Le descendant d’un ajusteur. Le fils de bourgeois ne font pas l’enseignement. Ils occupent les ministères. (…) Bref il n’a jamais été question de savoir si j’aimerais enseigner les gosses. La question aurait été aussi saugrenu que pour un prisonnier en cavale qui voit un train démarrer de demander si la direction du train est la bonne, et à quelle heure il arrive là où il va. Il saute dans le premier wagon le type, et voilà! – Vocation? … Vous voulez rire! La vocation générale des prolétaires occitans depuis un demi-siècle était de véhiculer des messages: dans les Postes, cela va de soi, les Chemins de Fer, ou alors le message culturel par excellence: l’Enseignement. Les classes laborieuses n’ont pas de vocation, elles prennent la porte qui se trouve ouverte devant leur nez. (…) Pour un enfant de prolétaire l’apprentissage du langage intellectuel constitue un pas important à franchir. Il n’y a pas que la vision qui doit changer. Ce langage non affectif, cultivé, à la musicalité plus `distinguée’ que la sienne, tend à le couper de son milieu familial. Toute une série de forces inconscientes s’opposent violemment à cette séparation, le retiennent. En fait il s’agit de dépasser le père, de le rejeter, avec la mère, en un mot, dans le symbolique freudienne, de le tuer. Même s’il n’est pas perçu en tant que tel, c’est un rude moment intérieur, souvent autour de la puberté. C’est quelquefois dur à crever un père travailleur manuel. `La rigidité particulière des tissus’, vous savez … Et puis on s’y attache. C’est dur de passer de l’autre bord, de mépriser. En plus de la combine oedipienne commune à tous, il faut renier toute une façon d’être, de sentir, une façon de rire et de pleurer. Certains ont de la peine, ils réussissent moins bien leur assassinat. Ça fait des cancres. Claude Duneton
Personne ne me contredira si j’affirme que le vocabulaire de la jeunesse s’est appauvri depuis trente ans. Et ce ne sont pas les quelques dizaines de mots arrachés par les médias dans les champs de sabir mythifiés appelés «banlieues» qui compensent les pertes. Contrairement à une idée reçue, le parler ordinaire des adolescents s’est rétréci non pas seulement parce que les termes convenus leur échappent (ne disons pas «littéraires») ; leur vocabulaire s’est allégé aussi parce que les mots vulgaires leur manquent! – Je m’entends. On l’ignore généralement, la phraséologie familière traditionnelle que tout Français et la plupart des Françaises utilisaient sans penser à mal au XXe siècle -, ce français d’entre soi, «bas» peut-être, mais rigolo, tellement rejeté par l’école de nos pères, cet «argot» enfin qui faisait la vie et la saveur des palabres, leur fait lui aussi défaut. (…) À quoi le phénomène est-il dû? J’aimerais bien le savoir. Plusieurs causes, dont probablement l’absence de vie familiale intime, absorbée qu’elle est par la télévision. Donc peu d’échanges avec les parents, moins encore avec les grands-parents, jadis gros transmetteurs, quand ce n’est pas avec toute catégorie d’adultes – cette tendance va s’affirmer avec la consommation de portables. La parole n’étant plus transmise, la pénurie s’installe – durablement. Claude Duneton

Attention: un appauvrissement peut en cacher un autre !

Alors que Le Figaro nous ressort une vielle chronique du célèbre défenseur de l’argot et des langues régionales Claude Duneton

Se lamentant de  l’appauvrissement, entre « calendos », « guincher » ou « radiner », non tant du français de nos adolescents …

Que de celui de leur argot …

Comment ne pas s’étonner …

De cette étrange conjonction de contresens et d’aveuglements …
Venant de quelqu’un qui à la fois issu des classes dominées (fils de paysans corréziens) et auteur reconnu (premier de la classe devenu professeur) a consacré sa vie à la question …
Et pourtant semble refuser le processus inexorable, via notamment le verlan, de l’argotisation …
Et ne pas voir que la multi-ethnisisation accrue en plus entre parlers arabe, berbère, africain, antillais ou gitan …
Le même phénomène est à l’oeuvre d’attachement identitaire aux racines qu’il avait voué sa vie à défendre …
Si bien décrit,  dans son livre le plus personnel, comme le « vivre mal de sa dualité » d’une « truie qui doute »
Et comment ne pas voir l’appauvrissement autrement plus conséquent …
Que serait l’apprentissage qu’il semble, à l’instar des impasses américaines de l’ebonics ou de l’enseignement bilingue, appeler de ses voeux …
D’un vocabulaire par définition dépassé …
Pour des jeunes dont le principal problème reste et a toujours été d’intégrer
Via justement la maitrise de la langue légitime
Le marché du travail dont à l’image de leurs quartiers en voie de ghettoïsation …
Ils sont souvent les premiers exclus ?

L’appauvrissement du français est en marche

Claude Duneton

Le Figaro

«Calendos», «guincher», «radiner»… Tous ces mots, jadis présents dans nos conversations ont disparu du langage de nos adolescents. Claude Duneton (1935-2012) notait ce rétrécissement de notre champ lexical il y a quelques années dans une chronique. La voici.

Personne ne me contredira si j’affirme que le vocabulaire de la jeunesse s’est appauvri depuis trente ans. Et ce ne sont pas les quelques dizaines de mots arrachés par les médias dans les champs de sabir mythifiés appelés «banlieues» qui compensent les pertes. Contrairement à une idée reçue, le parler ordinaire des adolescents s’est rétréci non pas seulement parce que les termes convenus leur échappent (ne disons pas «littéraires») ; leur vocabulaire s’est allégé aussi parce que les mots vulgaires leur manquent! – Je m’entends.

On l’ignore généralement, la phraséologie familière traditionnelle que tout Français et la plupart des Françaises utilisaient sans penser à mal au XXe siècle -, ce français d’entre soi, «bas» peut-être, mais rigolo, tellement rejeté par l’école de nos pères, cet «argot» enfin qui faisait la vie et la saveur des palabres, leur fait lui aussi défaut.

Calendos, confiote et burlingue

Voyons cela de près et non pas en rêve. Vous qui savez ce qu’est un calendos, coulant ou plâtreux, (Ah, les pique-niques sur l’herbe!), demandez voir à des gens qui ont entre 13 et 18 ans ce que ce mot veut dire: un seul questionné sur dix évoquera le fromage rond de Normandie ; les neuf autres répondront que c’est… un calendrier! Idem pour le compères auciflard… La même proportion de jeunes n’identifie pas un couteau dans un schlass, de même que le verbe se radiner (Radine-toi en vitesse!), sera plutôt associé à «se vanter, économiser, être radin avec soi-même», au choix. Un sur deux ne connaît pas le mot confiote, ou le mot caoua pour «café».

Neuf gamins sur dix (90 %) ignorent le mot burlingue– ils pensent qu’il s’agit d’une voiture – et bien que tous ces gens fument comme des pompiers, le même pourcentage ne sait pas ce qu’est une sèche (on confond avec «une question à laquelle on ne sait pas répondre», par extrapolation d’antisèche).

« La parole n’étant plus transmise, la pénurie s’installe – durablement »

Je tiens ces statistiques d’un professeur de français que la curiosité titille, Mme Yveline Couf, qui n’enseigne pas à Versailles mais dans une grande ville ouvrière (un peu sinistrée) de province. Cette prof a présenté des listes de mots familiers à des élèves de 4e et de 3e , en leur demandant de donner pour chacun une définition, comme dans le jeu du dictionnaire. Et cela, c’est du concret, pas du rêve bleu. Ce sondage recoupe exactement les observations que j’avais pu faire moi-même sur ce terrain il y a huit ou neuf ans.

Sur vingt-trois participants volontaires – donc intéressés par la langue (qu’eût-ce été sur un échantillon brut de brutes?) – cinq connaissaient le mot pèze ; il est vrai qu’on dit surtout fric, pognon, et thune. Cinq aussi savent le troquet, mais bistro domine. On remarquera que certains termes d’argot sont sortis aussi de l’usage des adultes ; on n’entend guère le mot greffier pour un chat: aucun ne le connaissait (Boileau serait content!). Mais sept seulement identifient le mot colback, ce qui paraît surprenant:«J’lai choppée par le colback, J’lui ai dit: «Tu m’fous les glandes»…» (Renaud, de Marche à l’ombre).

Une absence de vie intime et trop de télévision

Bon, que ce soit les gens d’un certain âge qui parlent de leur palpitant, je veux bien le croire (l’âge des artères), mais qu’il ne fasse sens que pour trois pelés, c’est peu – c’est la coupure avec les grands-pères… Entraver pour «comprendre» n’est saisi que par un seul élève sur vingt-trois – tous les autres pensant que le verbe signifie «passer au travers». Quant à la proportion de 1 sur 23 pour le verbe de joyeuse source populaire guincher, c’est raide! Autrement dit, la perte de vocabulaire par les nouvelles générations ne se limite pas au français châtié, comme on croit: le sens fuit également par le bout roturier.

À quoi le phénomène est-il dû? J’aimerais bien le savoir. Plusieurs causes, dont probablement l’absence de vie familiale intime, absorbée qu’elle est par la télévision. Donc peu d’échanges avec les parents, moins encore avec les grands-parents, jadis gros transmetteurs, quand ce n’est pas avec toute catégorie d’adultes – cette tendance va s’affirmer avec la consommation de portables. La parole n’étant plus transmise, la pénurie s’installe – durablement. Zut alors! C’est mauvais signe… Que veut dire «zut»? – Je parierais que la moitié des vingt-trois cobayes de Mme Yveline ne le sait plus… À vérifier autour de vous. Vous serez surpris, vous direz «Mince alors!» – Mince? Quel «mince»? – Oh flûte!

Retrouvez les chroniques de Claude Duneton (1935-2012) chaque semaine. Écrivain, comédien et grand défenseur de la langue française, il tenait avec gourmandise la rubrique Le plaisir des mots dans les pages du Figaro Littéraire.

Voir aussi:

La fin des truffes
Claude Duneton
On ne peut pas enseigner une chose dont on doute.
ENTREVUE AVEC CLAUDE DUNETON

Claude Duneton a un peu plus de quarante ans. Il a enseigné l’anglais pendant vingt ans. Avant d’apprendre l’anglais il avait dû apprendre le français, sa langue maternelle étant l’occitan. Il est né en Corrèze dans une famille paysanne très humble. Il s’en souvient. Son premier livre, Parler Croquant, a suscité beaucoup d’intérêt, notamment au Québec. Dans son dernier livre, Je suis comme une truie qui doute, il s’est vidé le coeur, sans savoir peut-être qu’il le faisait au nom de dizaines de milliers d’enseignants qui, depuis, lui ont manifesté leur solidarité, soit en lui écrivant, soit en lisant son livre, dont le titre insolite est expliqué ainsi:

Enseigner le doute est une bien cruelle entreprise. Apprendre à chercher la vérité c’est très joli, mais si on ne la trouve pas, ou alors chacun la sienne, parcimonieusement, c’est moins exaltant. Monter tout un système de recherche en ne sachant pas très bien ce que l’on cherche, et surtout ne jamais tomber sur un morceau de trouvaille pour s’encourager les méninges c’est vraiment ardu. C’est plus ardu que de dresser un cochon à chercher la truffe. Parce que le cochon d’abord on lui fait savoir ce qu’il cherche, clairement et sans ambiguïté. On lui fait goûter de la truffe au départ. Ensuite, de temps à autre, on lui en met des morceaux cachés qu’il a la joie de découvrir en poussant la terre du groin. Ça lui remet du coeur à l’ouvrage. Tandis que le môme à qui l’on dit: Cherche! Allez cherche! … sans jamais lui annoncer quoi – c’est peut-être çi, c’est peut-être ça … Il en perd l’allant et l’enthousiasme.

Claude Duneton. Je vous préviens tout de suite, puisque vous êtes venu de loin: je ne parle pas hélas! Comme j’écris. Je n’ai pas la même façon, j’écris pour me consoler de ne pas pouvoir parler comme je le voudrais.

CRITÈRE. Ce qui ne vous empêche pas de marquer des points dans les débats auxquels vous participez.

C.D. J’ai peut-être une supériorité sur les bien parleurs. Pendant qu’ils font de jolies phrases, je cherche péniblement mes mots, ce qui me donne le temps de réfléchir. La réflexion aidant, je pose souvent des questions qui font tout resurgir. Vous pouvez voir là une espèce de revanche sur ces Français dont j’ai dû apprendre la langue.

CRITÈRE. Quand je vous ai téléphoné pour prendre rendez-vous, vous m’avez dit que vous veniez de recevoir une lettre très intéressante d’une québécoise qui enseigne le français.

C.D. C’est ce que je dis sur l’embourgeoisement de la culture qui l’a surtout intéressée. Sa lettre m’a plu parce que j’attache beaucoup d’importance à cette question.

CRITÈRE. En tout cas, vous en parlez sur un ton qui tranche avec l’habituel ronron, comme dans cette réplique silencieuse à un parent d’élève, peiné à la pensée que sa fille n’apprendra pas les belles récitations d’autrefois:

Une société qui bouge tout le temps est une société sur laquelle on ne peut pas danser. C’est à vous donner le mal de mer, à dégueuler tripes et boyaux par-dessus bastingages. C’est vrai. On nous a fauché le petit Jésus, à présent voilà François Coppée qui se barre! Merde on nous prend tout! Les cerises n’ont plus le même goût … Et l’autre Einstein avec sa tête auréolée de frisettes, qui est allé baver de relativité. Que ce qu’on voit ce n’est pas exactement ce qu’on voit … Qu’on est mortel pour tout de bon sur une foutue planète de désespoir, voilà ce qu’il ressent le père au fond de la classe, la figure toute rouge d’émotion. Il en pleurerait que sa fille n’apprenne plus par coeur les belles litanies rassurantes, il en pleurerait comme s’il venait de toucher son cercueil, tout froid. Fossoyeur va! … A quoi ça sert de faire de la peine à ce monsieur? Pour initier sa fille à quoi finalement?

Devons-nous en conclure que vous accepteriez de mettre n’importe quoi au programme?

C.D. Je n’ai rien contre l’admiration. C’est à l’admiration inconditionnelle, à l’admiration sur commande que je m’attaque.

CRITÈRE. Sur commande depuis Paris surtout…

C.D. Nous reviendrons sur ce problème de la colonisation intérieure des Français par les Français. Pourquoi Racine, pourquoi Corneille plutôt que Chrétien de Troyes ou tel de nos auteurs occitans. On ne s’est jamais vraiment posé la question. La réponse est pourtant très simple: on en a décidé ainsi. Par «on», entendez la bourgeoisie française. Il s’agissait de raffiner une langue de classe complètement coupée de 90% des Français.

Croyez-bien que je n’aime pas les mots bourgeois, classes, dominés, dominants. Ils gênent. Je les utilise parce que je n’en connais pas qui conviennent mieux. J’étais récemment au milieu d’un groupe de jeunes qui avaient toujours à la bouche les mots discours dominants, discours dominés. Devant des exemples concrets que j’ai analysés avec eux, ils n’ont pas su comment réagir. Ils se sont trompés. lis avaient les yeux obstrués par les mots qui auraient dû les dessiller.

CRITERE. La pureté de la langue de Racine n’en fait-elle pas un modèle qui s’impose de lui-même, sans l’aide de Paris et de ses bourgeois?

C.D. La pureté pour qui? Pour la bourgeoisie qui a ses belles manières à elle et qui veut les conserver, soit! On est entre nous, si on me passe cette expression, à moi qui n’appartiens à ce monde que par une culture apprise tardivement dans les livres. Mais les règles du jeu ne sont plus du tout les mêmes depuis que les fils d’ouvriers ont commencé à envahir les lycées. Il faudrait des modèles qui ont un rapport direct avec leur vie à eux. Racine n’en a aucun. Je suppose que mes remarques valent aussi pour le Québec, que le peuple chez vous est moins touché par Racine que par Antonine Maillet. Antonine Maillet! Je l’ai vue à la télévision. Quelle admirable leçon d’authenticité et de français elle nous a donnée. Il y aura un texte d’elle dans l’antimanuel que je prépare avec un camarade. Même impression devant René Lévesque. Il parlait directement, sans détours, avec chaleur. Quel contraste avec la rhétorique répétitive de nos hommes politiques.

CRITÈRE. Ai-je bien compris votre position? Si on supprime les classiques, chaque professeur aura-t-il la possibilité de les remplacer par des auteurs dont il estimera qu’ils représentent bien le peuple auquel il s’adresse? Je parle pour la France, bien entendu, car au Québec il y a longtemps que tout est permis.

C.D. Ne vous méprenez pas. Je suis partisan d’une étude très rigoureuse de l’histoire de la littérature. L’auteur qui a eu le plus grand succès au XVIle siècle, c’est Sorel, non Racine. Il faut étudier aussi Sorel si l’on veut comprendre le XVIle siècle. Comprendre une autre époque, c’est l’essentiel.

Je m’intéresse surtout au moyen-âge. La connaissance de cette époque me paraît de première importance pour la compréhension de la nôtre. Les Xle et Xlie siècles furent une période de progrès. Il y eut ensuite stagnation, croissance zéro, bouleversement des mentalités. Où en sommes-nous maintenant? Vu depuis le Xlie, le XXe siècle n’est pas précisément ce qu’on avait pris l’habitude d’imaginer.

Il faut situer les auteurs dans leur siècle Il n’est pas nécessaire de les admirer et de les faire admirer pour cela.

CRITÈRE. Oui, je saisi Sous l’angle critique, tout peut devenir intéressant. Astérix devient l’égal d’Ulysse dans ces conditions. Mais est-ce ainsi qu’on se rapproche du peuple, comme vous le souhaitez. Vous parlez de Sorel. Par rapport au peuple actuel, il a tout de même l’inconvénient d’avoir vécu il y a 300 ans. Pourquoi pas Guy des Cars? Pour ce qui est de la popularité, il est à notre siècle ce que Sorel fut au sien. Au Québec, ce serait Claude-Henri Grignon, l’auteur de Séraphin Poudrier. Malheureusement, l’un et l’autre sont l’objet du mépris unanime des professeurs de français. Quand on parle d’une littérature qui doit être comprise du peuple, de quel peuple s’agit_il? Du peuple réel, dont les goûts sont parfois décevants, ou du peuple idéal, celui qui a été lavé de ses imperfections par des penseurs qui veulent son bien? Il faudrait s’entendre.

C.D. Je vous avouerai que je fais des choses interdites: je vais voir des films de Louis de Funès. Eh bien, à côté des conneries, de la multitude de conneries, il y a des trouvailles dans ses films. Je suis persuadé que, dans vingt ou trente ans, ceux qui feront l’histoire du cinéma compareront ces trouvailles à celles des plus grands cinéastes.

CRITÈRE. Permettez-moi de poursuivre ma chasse aux critères. Si j’avais le choix entre Séraphin et la Sagouine, qui parle aussi au peuple, je choisirais la Sagouine parce que la langue y est plus belle et le contenu plus humain.

C.D. J’admire beaucoup Céline, Voltaire, Chrétien de Troyes, ce qui ne veut pas dire qu’il ne serait pas intéressant d’étudier Guy Des Cars pour comprendre notre siècle.

CRITÈRE. Mais enfin, quel doit être notre premier objectif, rendre les gens plus critiques en leur faisant analyser le passé ou les rendre plus humains en les mettant en contact avec les plus belles oeuvres? Parmi les oeuvres qui font partie de l’arsenal bourgeois, n’y en a-t-il pas qui méritent notre attention parce qu’elles n’ont aucun lien trop étroit avec une époque donnée ou une classe sociale déterminée. Je pense, en particulier, à l’illiade et à l’Odyssée. Il y a aussi le problème du fond commun. Ces dernières années, pendant que les programmes de français achevaient de s’atomiser, de se dissoudre dans la subjectivité, le grand public regardait l’Odyssée à la télévision. Si bien que l’Odyssée est, encore aujourd’hui, l’une des seules oeuvres dans laquelle on puisse puiser des exemples en étant sûr d’être compris d’à peu près tout le monde.

C.D. Je suis d’accord avec vous au sujet d’Homère. On pourrait ajouter la Bible. Il faut lire la Bible, Jérémie, les jérémiades. Que peut-on comprendre de la littérature franaise si on n’a pas lu la Bible.

Mais le problème du fond commun est plus complexe. Le prétendu fond commun de la culture française présente deux inconvénients: il n’est pas commun et ce n’est pas un fond. J’ai déjà dit pourquoi, je vais le dire d’une autre manière. Imaginez un programme de littérature française qui aurait été conçu par et pour des marins pêcheurs de Bretagne. Homère s’il avait été à ce programme aurait sans doute convenu aux savoyards et aux bourguignons, mais sûrement pas la multitude d’histoires de pêche et de poissons qu’on y aurait trouvées. Et bien, l’imposition à toute la rance d’un programme élaboré dans et par la bourgeoisie parisienne est tout aussi insensée.

CRITÈRE. Croyez-vous qu’on pourrait régler le problème que vous soulevez en confiant la responsabilité des programmes à des gouvernements régionaux.

C.D. Sûrement pas à l’heure actuelle. Ce sont les harkis qui prendraient le pouvoir dans les régions. Ils s’empresseraient de refaire les erreurs du gouvernement central.

CRITÈRE. Les harkis?

C.D. Eh oui, les Français sont colonisés par les Français. Les harkis, ce sont les Algériens qui ont pris fait et cause pour la France lors de la guerre l’indépendance. L’élite régionale – je n’aime pas ce mot – est constituée en France de harkis, de notables qui se consolent par des abus de pouvoir de leur impuissance face à l’Etat central. La France, vous savez, n’est pas un pays démocratique.

CRITÈRE. Et si par impossible vous deveniez ministre de l’éducation en Occitanie, y aurait-il un programme? Par qui serait-il établi?

C.D. Il y aurait un programme, bien entendu. Pour l’établir, il faudrait interroger les gens, attendre qu’ils manifestent leurs désirs. L’enseignement de la langue et de la littérature occitane ne serait sûrement pas interdit. Mais je n’ai jamais beaucoup réfléchi à ces problèmes de pouvoir.

CRITÈRE. D’un côté donc, les choses les plus universelles, Homère, la Bible; de l’autre, les choses les plus particulières. Cette élimination de la culture nationale n’évoque-t-elle pas les thèses des fédéralistes européens qui, pour la plupart, sont en même temps régionalistes?

C.D. On peut faire ce rapprochement.

CRITÈRE. Etant donné vos idées sur la colonisation des Français par les Français et sur la démocratie, on s’attend à ce que vous dénonciez les examens qui sont, en France, la façon traditionnelle d’opérer la sélection. Vous écrivez pourtant:

par le respect de l’individu c’est peut-être bien après tout l’examen. Mais alors sérieux, approfondi, pas plie ou face! Pas laissé au hasard de dix minutes d’entretien avec le premier bizarre venu. Un examen qui n’ait pas honte de l’être, avec double et triple correction sur des épreuves très étudiées, et pas en forme de devinettes, qui permettent de dire simplement: un Tel a acquis dans tel domaine tel niveau de connaissance. Un point. Comment les a-t-il acquises? Ça le regarde. Qu’il ait bûché deux ans ou deux mois, selon ses goûts, son temps, ses possibilités, son âge, voire son métier, là n’est pas la question. La seule question est de savoir si oui ou non il faut les contrôler ces fameuses connaissances.

C.D. Le contrôle continu, qui est la solution de remplacement, me paraît dangereux pour la liberté et, par surcroît, plus injuste qu’un bon système d’examen. Etre fiché jour après jour, mois après mois, depuis la maternelle, ce n’est pas supportable. En deux mois de paresse ou d’égarement, vous pouvez compromettre toute une existence. J’aurais sûrement été tué par un tel système.

CRITÈRE. Et l’injustice?

C.D. On en mesure l’ampleur quand on veut bien se rendre à certaines évidences. Le rapport du maître à ses élèves ressemble à s’y méprendre au rapport de l’amant à sa maîtresse, aspects négatifs inclus, bien entendu. Parmi ces aspects négatifs, il y a la jalousie. Le professeur a besoin de penser que ses élèves ont tout appris de lui.

Tel professeur de mathématiques que j’ai très bien connu mettait zéro à tous ses étudiants quand il prenait une nouvelle classe. Comment, disait-il, vous n’avez rien fait dans le passé! Qui donc vous a déformés à ce point? Il les terrorisait de cette façon, puis il relevait leurs notes graduellement pour bien leur faire sentir qu’il était le seul responsable de leurs progrès. Or le collègue qui le précédait était un excellent professeur. La campagne de dénigrement dont il a été l’objet l’a tué littéralement. Hors de moi, point de salut!

Il s’agit d’un cas caricatural, mais l’attitude qu’il trahit est beaucoup plus répandue qu’on ne le croit généralement. Il y a encore beaucoup de salauds dans la profession. Il y a aussi, à l’autre extrême, le cas du professeur séducteur qui fausse tout lui aussi en suscitant chez ses élèves un enthousiasme tel que leur succès est dû plus à un mimétisme sans lendemain qu’à un solide apprentissage. Non vraiment, le professeur est trop engagé, trop amoureusement engagé.

Paradoxalement, il aurait été plus facile d’instaurer le contrôle continu il y a quarante ou cinquante ans, à l’époque où l’on savait ce qu’il fallait savoir.

CRITÈRE. Ne croyez-vous pas qu’en plus de permettre un plus grand respect de l’individu et une plus grande justice, l’examen, tel que vous le concevez, donnerait au professeur une occasion d’être reconnu a sa juste valeur et de prendre lui-même sa véritable mesure?

C.D. C’est vrai aussi pour l’institution à laquelle il appartient. Ce que vous dites est très intéressant. Je n’avais pas pensé à cet aspect de la question. Mais il y a aussi le danger du bachotage. Le baccalauréat dans sa forme actuelle forme des super-caméléons. Pour le réussir, il faut surtout apprendre à être hypocrite, à ruser avec le savoir et avec les examinateurs. Nos hommes politiques sont des produits typiques de ce système.

CRITÈRE. Que dites-vous de la solution qui consiste à séparer complètement les contrôles de la fréquentation de l’école? S’il faut des contrôles, et vous dites vous-mêmes qu’il en faut, cette solution n’est-elle pas celle qui est le plus en conformité avec le respect de l’individu tel que vous le concevez? Le professeur pourrait dans ces conditions devenir un artisan ou un professionnel comme les autres, c’est-à-dire un homme qui rend des services quand on lui en fait la demande.

C.D. Ce serait l’idéal, tout particulièrement pour l’enseignement des langues vivantes, où les voyages sont généralement plus instructifs que les cours. J’ai souvent rêvé de recevoir un à un mes élèves, de trouver avec eux des méthodes adaptées à leur situation.

On attache souvent trop d’importance à la relation maître-élève. J’ai eu au lycée un excellent professeur de physique. Nous n’existions pas pour lui. Il ne nous connaissait pas et ne voulait pas nous connaître. En retour, il ne nous demandait que deux choses: le laisser parler et passer l’examen. Il nous faisait de magnifiques conférences. C’était reposant. Je n’aimais pas les professeurs qui avaient besoin de se sentir aimés de nous, qui pour nous motiver, forçaient notre intimité, nous séduisaient un à un. Le professeur absent comme mon professeur de physique s, améliorait en vieillissant. Il connaissait de mieux en mieux sa matière. Sa tâche lui devenait de plus en plus facile. Pour les professeurs engagés que nous sommes, le vieillissement est devenu un cauchemar.

CRITÈRE. Est-ce la raison pour laquelle vous avez changé de métier?

C.D. Je suis resté dans le domaine de l’enseignement. J’aimais les mômes, je les aime encore. Si j’avais vingt ans je serais enthousiaste, aucun défi ne m’effraierait. Mais maintenant, je n’en puis plus. Des mômes j’en ai aimé trois mille. J’ai atteint mon point de saturation. Puis je me suis adapté à tant de vagues, à tant de nouvelles formes de sensibilité: rock, beattles, bandes dessinées!

CRITÈRE. À propos de la télévision, vous soulignez dans votre livre un phénomène qui, bien qu’il ait été remarqué par d’autres, n’a pas été suffisamment pris en considération. Etonné par l’indiscipline non violente de vos élèves, vous écrivez:

Après bien des récriminations je me suis aperçu qu’ils sont sincères. ils ne comprennent pas que leur bavardage puisse déranger. C’est que leurs habitudes ont changé: ils transportent en classe la manière dont ils regardent la télé … Attention: il ne s’agit pas d’accuser encore une fois la télévision mais d’observer un comportement pratiquement irréversible et le décalage qui en résulte avec nos façons de procéder. Nous avons à présent des générations pour lesquelles le discours plus ou moins continu est apparu pour la première fois de leur vie au petit écran, fût-ce sous la forme de Nounours. Il en résulte qu’ils ont grandi avec le sens de la parole différée et qu’ils n’ont pas acquis le même rapport de personne à personne que nous avions dans le déroulement du discours. Autrement dit, ils confondent quelque part la voix du prof avec celle du type qui cause dans la boîte.

C.D. J’ai moi-même vu la mutation s’opérer. J’enseignais en Corrèze quand la télévision est apparue. D’année en année, j’ai vu les changements S’opérer chez les mômes.

CRITÈRE. Cela n’a pas accru votre optimisme. Des dizaines de milliers d’enseignants vous ont lu. Plusieurs vous écrivent pour vous dire : Vous m’avez ouvert les yeux, j’ai donné ma démission. Partagez-vous les idées d’Illich?

C.D. Certaines. Pas toutes. Dans un pays comme la France, il est absolument nécessaire pour les enfants de travailleur.

CRITERE Vous continuez pourtant de l’attaquer. Avez-vous une solution de remplacement?

C.D. Nous en sommes à la phase du minage. Je ne sais ni quand ni comment la reconstruction se fera.

CRITÈRE. En attendant, le moral des enseignants continuera de se détériorer.

C.D. Les mômes je les adore! Il ne faut pas jouer avec les mômes, il ne faut pas faire semblant. Il ne faut pas être hypocrite. Si on ne croit plus en rien, si on ne sait plus où l’on va, il vaut mieux se l’avouer à soi-même. C’est plus sain et c’est plus respectueux pour les mômes.

CRITÈRE. Un de vos collègues de Bretagne s’apprête à publier un livre qui aura pour titre: Dieu est mort, Marx est mort et moi je ne me porte pas très bien. Vous, comment vous portez-vous?

C.D. Vous savez, je suis désespéré. Êtes-vous chrétien?

CRITÈRE. Il y a deux choses au monde dont je n’ai jamais douté:
Je suis la Vérité et la Vie, la Vérité vous délivrera. Douce ou amère, la vérité est toujours une nourriture. Si j’ai aimé votre livre, c’est parce que vous dites la vérité comme aucun enseignant, à ma connaissance, ne l’a dite avant vous. À l’exception de Simone Weil, il y a déjà quarante ans.

C.D. Tout ça, c’est parce que j’ai beaucoup aimé mon métier et que je l’aime encore. J’aime les mômes.

LE DÉRACINEMENT

Car le second facteur de déracinement est l’instruction telle qu’elle est conçue aujourd’hui. La Renaissance a partout provoqué une coupure entre les gens cultivés et la masse; mais en séparant la culture de la tradition nationale, elle la plongeait du moins dans la tradition grecque. Depuis, les liens avec les traditions nationales n’ont pas été renoués, mais la Grèce a été oubliée. Il en est résulté une culture qui s’est développée dans un milieu très restreint, séparé du monde, dans une atmosphère confinée, une culture considérablement orientée vers la technique et influencée par elle, très teintée de pragmatisme, extrêmement fragmentée par la spécialisation, tout à fait dénuée à la fois de contact avec cet univers-çi et d’ouverture vers l’autre monde.

De nos jours, un homme peut appartenir aux milieux dits cultivés, d’une part sans avoir aucune conception concernant la destinée humaine, d’autre part sans savoir par, exemple, que toutes les constellations ne sont pas visibles en toutes saisons. On croit couramment qu’un petit paysan d’aujourd’hui, élève de I’école primaire, en sait plus que Pythagore, parce qu’il répète docilement que la terre tourne autour soleil. Mais en fait il ne regarde plus les étoiles. Ce soleil ont on lui parle en classe n’a pour lui aucun rapport avec celui qu’il voit. On l’arrache à l’univers qui l’entoure, comme on arrache les petits polynésiens à leur passé en les forçant à répéter : Nos ancêtres Gaulois avaient les cheveux blonds.

Ce qu’on appelle aujourd’hui instruire les masses, c’est prendre cette culture moderne, élaborée dans un milieu tellement fermé, tellement taré, tellement indifférent à la vérité, en ôter tout ce qu’elle peut encore contenir d’or pur, opération qu’on nomme vulgarisation, et enfourner le résidu tel quel dans la mémoire des malheureux qui désirent apprendre, comme on donne la becquée à des oiseaux.

D’ailleurs le désir d’apprendre pour apprendre, le désir de vérité est devenu
très rare. Le prestige de la culture est devenu presque exclusivement social, aussi bien chez le paysan qui rêve d’avoir un fils instituteur ou l’instituteur qui rêve d’avoir un fils normalien, que chez les gens du monde qui flagornent les savants et les écrivains réputés.

Les examens exercent sur la jeunesse des écoles, le même pouvoir d’obsessions que les sous sur les ouvriers qui travaillent aux pièces. Un système social est profondément malade quand un paysan travaille la terre avec la pensée que, s’il est paysan, c’est parce qu’il n’était pas assez intelligent pour devenir instituteur.

Le mélange d’idées confuses et plus ou moins fausses connu sous le nom da marxisme, mélange auquel depuis Marx il n’y a guère eu que des intellectuels bourgeois médiocres qui aient eu part, est aussi pour les ouvriers un apport complètement étranger, inassimilable, et d’ailleurs en soi dénué de valeur nutritive, car on l’a vidé de presque toute la vérité contenue dans les écrits de Marx. On y ajoute parfois une vulgarisation scientifique de qualité encore inférieure. Le tout ne peut que porter le déracinement des ouvriers à son comble.

Simone Weil, L’enracinement, NRF, Gallimard, 1949, pp 64-65.

Voir également:

La linguistique

2002/1 (Vol. 38)

 


1

Toute langue possède une dimension argotique ; en effet, toute société humaine fonctionne avec des interdits, des tabous, entre autres, d’ordre social, politique, religieux, moral, qui sont véhiculés par la (ou les) forme(s) légitimée(s) de la langue. Comment peut-il être dès lors imaginé une société au sein de laquelle aucune personne, aucun groupe ne chercherait à se doter de moyens pour contourner ces interdits et ces tabous, ne serait-ce que par transgression langagière ? De telles pratiques sociales et langagières constituent les foyers les plus actifs nécessaires à l’émergence de formes argotiques, qui sont elles-mêmes autant de preuves des stratégies d’évitement, de contournement des interdits et tabous sociaux mises en œuvre par les locuteurs, les groupes de locuteurs qui produisent de telles formes. Une contre-légitimité linguistique peut ainsi s’établir [1][1]  Cette contre-légitimité linguistique ne peut s?affirmer,…. La situation linguistique française n’échappe pas à ce schéma et des parlers argotiques, plus ou moins spécifiques à tel(s) ou tel(s) groupe(s) ont toujours existé de manière concomitante avec ce que l’on appelle par habitude  » langue populaire «  [2][2]  Comme le rappelle Françoise Gadet,  » La notion de…. Le linguiste descriptiviste est intéressé par l’analyse de ces  » parlures argotiques «  [3][3]  On pourra se reporter, entre autres, à Denise François-Geiger…, qu?elles soient contemporaines ou non, car elles sont particulièrement révélatrices de pratiques linguistiques, qui relèvent de l’oral et sont soumises à des faits d?évolution particulièrement rapides. D’où la nécessité pour le linguiste d?en rendre compte de la manière la plus précise et la plus adéquate possible dans le cadre de l’argotologie définie comme l’étude des procédés linguistiques mis en œuvre pour faciliter l’expression des fonctions crypto-ludiques, conniventielles et identitaires, telles qu’elles peuvent s’exercer dans des groupes sociaux spécifiques qui ont leurs propres parlers, cette approche argotologique étant incluse dans une problématique de sociolinguistique urbaine.

2

À l’échelle du français en particulier et des langues du monde de manière plus générale, l’émergence de pratiques langagières argotiques n’est en aucune manière un phénomène récent. Toute langue a bel et bien toujours eu, génère continuellement et aura toujours un registre argotique, qui permet la mise en place de stratégies de contournement, voire aussi de cryptage, de masquage. Au XVe siècle, François Villon a rédigé ses fameuses ballades dans une langue de malfrats, le parler de la Coquille, un argot d’une confrérie de malandrins, qui livrèrent sous la torture une partie de leur vocabulaire. Plus près de nous, on peut, entre autres, rappeler que pendant le régime communiste pratiquement chaque goulag avait son argot. Univers carcéral oblige ! Il en est souvent ainsi dans de tels univers et on constate à maintes reprises, quelles que soient les langues considérées, l’existence d’argots de prisons, dans lesquels s’exerce pleinement la fonction cryptique du langage. En Tchécoslovaquie, plus particulièrement à partir du Printemps de Prague, certains groupes de dissidents, étudiants et intellectuels, qui constituèrent plus tard le groupe des  » chartistes « , avaient pour habitude de s’exprimer dans un langage crypté, codé donc, dans le seul but de ne pas être compris de la police politique ; ils pouvaient ainsi parler de sujets subversifs tels le voyage ou les pays extérieurs au bloc soviétique. La langue devenait de ce fait un magnifique moyen d?évasion au travers de ses représentations.

3

Si l’on considère ce qui s’est passé en France depuis environ cent ans pour l’argot traditionnel, qu’il s’agisse de ses manifestations de la fin du XIXe siècle et du début du XXe, de celles des années 1920-1930, d’après-guerre ou bien des années 1950-1960, une différence fondamentale doit être notée par rapport à ce que l’on constate aujourd’hui sur le terrain : de nos jours les épices apportées à la langue française sont de plus en plus empruntées à des langues étrangères. Même si l’argot traditionnel a su s’alimenter de termes étrangers, il le faisait à l’époque dans des proportions moindres [4][4]  Cf. ici-même l’article d’Estelle Liogier à propos…. Un facteur déterminant est intervenu depuis et s’est amplifié : celui de l’immigration. Au temps de la Mouffe (rue Mouffetard), de la Butte (butte Montmartre), des Fortifs (Fortifications remplacées actuellement par le boulevard périphérique) un brassage de populations avait lieu dans Paris intra-muros, tout comme dans la majeure partie des grandes villes françaises. Les formes argotiques et les formes non légitimées dites  » populaires  » de la langue française se rejoignaient et c’est une des raisons qui ont permis alors aux mots des argotiers, des jargonneux de tel ou tel  » petit  » métier de passer du statut d’argot particulier à celui d?argot commun avant même de transiter par l’intermédiaire de la langue familière vers la langue française circulante, voire la langue académique, celle que l’on peut aussi écrire, y compris à l’école. Cambriole, cambriolage, cambrioler et cambrioleur ne sont plus du tout perçus de nos jours comme des mots d’origine argotique, ce qu’ils sont en réalité, puisque tous proviennent de l’argot cambriole qui désigne la chambre, la pièce que l’on peut voler. Le cas de loufoque est tout aussi illustratif. Ce vocable est issu du largonji des loucherbems  » jargon des bouchers  » et correspond à un procédé de formation très caractéristique de ce parler, à savoir le remplacement de la première consonne du mot par un [l], cette première consonne étant déplacée en même temps à la fin du mot, auquel on ajoute un suffixe de type argotique, en -oque dans ce cas : [fu] [luf] [lufôk], lui-même tronqué par apocope en [luf].

4

Évolution rapide des formes de type argotique ? En voici un exemple : entrer dans un café et demander un casse-dalle avec une petite mousse  » un sandwich avec une bière  » appartient, d’un point de vue linguistique, à une autre époque, qui se termine à la fin des années 60-70 du siècle passé. Ce n’est plus le temps de la gapette  » casquette (à la mode ancienne)  » sur l’œil et de la cibiche  » cigarette  » au coin des lèvres. La casquette, aujourd?hui de marque Nike, est vissée sur le crâne, s’accompagne de baskets de même marque ou avec le logo Adidas aux pieds et les lascars  » jeunes des cités et quartiers français contemporains  » se désignent comme des casquettes-baskets par opposition aux costards-cravates, ceux qui sont en dehors de la cité, ceux qui sont en place, dans la place  » ont un travail, sont arrivés socialement « . De nos jours, au féca  » café, bistrot  » du coin on dame un dwich  » mange un sandwich  » et on tise une teillbou de 8.6  » boit une bouteille de bière titrant 8,6o d’alcool « . Il en va ainsi de l’évolution du lexique oral.

5

Suivent quelques exemples d’énoncés en français contemporain des cités (FCC en abrégé) avec leurs traductions en argot traditionnel (précédées de v.a. pour vieil argot) [5][5]  D?autres exemples sont présentés dans J.-P. Goudaillier,… ; il est intéressant de noter à partir de ces exemples l’évolution survenue en deux, trois décennies tant en ce qui concerne le lexique utilisé que le type de phraséologie mise en œuvre.

6

FCC : il a roulé à donf avec la seucai. L’est dangereux c’te keum ! L’est complètement ouf !

7

v.a. : y?est allé le champignon à fond avec la tire. Complètement louf le mec !

8

 » il est allé très vite avec la voiture. C’est un vrai danger public. Il est fou de rouler si vite ! « 

9

FCC : choume l’hamster, l’arrête pas de béflan d’vant les taspèches

10

v.a. : zyeute moi c’te mec qu?arrête pas d’rouler des biscotos d’vant les grognasses

11

 » regarde voir ce gars-là ; il n’arrête pas de faire le beau devant les filles « 

12

FCC : quand tu l’chouffes le luice, t’vois bien qu’il arrive direct d’son bled

13

v.a. : pas b’soin d’le mater cinq plombes pour voir qu’il débarque d’sa cambrouse

14

 » rien qu’à le voir, tu comprends qu?il arrive tout droit de son village natal « 

15

FCC : c’te keum, l’a qu’des blèmes !

16

v.a. : à croire qu’ce mec-là et les problocs ça ne fait qu’un !

17

 » c’est un gars, qui ne connaît que des problèmes « 

18

FCC : le patron, i capte qu?tchi à ma tchatche

19

v.a. : ma jactance, mon dab y entrave qu’dalle

20

 » mon père ne comprend pas du tout mon langage « 

21

FCC : plus de vailtra je deale le techi chanmé

22

v.a. : plus de turbin je fourgue du hasch à toute berzingue

23

 » plus de travail je passe tout mon temps à vendre du haschisch « 

24

FCC : quand les chtars raboulent, on s’nachave dans toute la téci

25

v.a. : qu’les bourres rappliquent et c?est la grand’ caval’ dans la cité

26

 » quand les policiers arrivent, on s?enfuit dans toute la cité « 

27

FCC : l’est chtarbé hypergrave !

28

v.a. : il est vraiment agité du bocal

29

 » il est complètement fou ! « 

30

FCC : on y va en caisse ou à iep ?

31

v.a. : on prend la bagnole ou on y va à pinces ?

32

 » nous y allons en voiture ou à pied ? « 

33

FCC : on galère à la téci ou on va au manès à Ripa

34

v.a. : on glandouille ici ou on va au cinoche à Pantruche

35

 » on reste à rien faire à la cité ou bien on va au cinéma à Paris « 

36

Les personnes qui vivent dans des cités de banlieue ou dans des quartiers dits  » défavorisés  » – entre des tours et des barres – parlent de plus en plus fréquemment une forme de français que certaines d’entre elles nomment  » verlan « , d’autres  » argot « , voire  » racaille-mot  » (  » mots de la racaille « ). Cette variété de français, que l’on peut désigner par  » argot des cités  » ou  » argot de banlieue  » est en réalité la manifestation contemporaine la plus importante d’une variété de français, qui au cours des dernières décennies, tout comme les diverses populations qui l’ont parlée, a perdu tout d’abord son caractère rural, par la suite toute indexation ouvrière, voire prolétaire, pour devenir le mode d?expression de groupes sociaux insérés dans un processus d’urbanisation [6][6]  Pour Pierre Guiraud (Argot, Encyclopedia Universalis,…. Progressivement se sont alors développés les parlers urbains français, qui sont pratiqués de manière plus ou moins effective (usages actifs / passifs) par des millions de personnes en France, que celles-ci soient françaises d’origine ou non, issues de l’immigration ou étrangères [7][7]  Pour P. Bourdieu  » … ce qui s?exprime avec l’habitus…. Bien souvent ces personnes subissent au quotidien une  » galère  » (ou violence) sociale, que reflète leur expression verbale, au même titre que leur  » violence réactive «  [8][8]   » … l’argot assume souvent une fonction expressive ;….

37

Pendant toutes les années 1990, cet argot de cités, désigné plus haut par français contemporain des cités (FCC en abrégé), est sorti d’entre les tours et les barres, qui l’ont vu naître, émerger, exploser au début des années 1980 [9][9]  Voir à ce sujet Christian Bachman et Luc Basier, 1984,…. Les formes lexicales du FCC sont puisées d’une part dans le vieux français et ses variétés régionales, d?autre part dans le vieil argot, celui de Mimile, mais aussi dans les multiples langues des communautés liées à l’immigration [10][10]  Geneviève Vermes et Josiane Boutet (sous la dir. de),…. Par ailleurs le FCC comporte aussi un nombre important de créations lexicales spécifiques, qui ne sont pas uniquement du verlan, comme on peut le croire communément.

38

Étant donné les pratiques langagières des communautés d’origines diverses, de cultures et de langues non moins différentes, qui cohabitent dans les cités ou les quartiers des grandes villes françaises une interlangue émerge entre le français véhiculaire dominant, la langue circulante, et l’ensemble des vernaculaires qui compose la mosa ïque linguistique des cités : arabe maghrébin, berbère, diverses langues africaines et asiatiques, langues de type tsigane, créoles antillais (à base lexicale française) pour ne citer que ces langues.

39

Dans Paroles de banlieues de Jean-Michel Décugis et Aziz Zemouri [11][11]  Jean-Michel Décugis et Aziz Zemouri, 1995, Paroles…, Raja (21 ans) précise que dans les cités  » on parle en français, avec des mots rebeus, créoles, africains, portugais, ritals ou yougoslaves « , puisque  » blacks, gaulois, Chinois et Arabes  » y vivent ensemble (p. 104). Des ressortissants de nationalités étrangères, des Français d’origine étrangère et des céfrans aussi appelés des de souches  » français de souche  » communiquent grâce à un parler véhiculaire interethnique [12][12]  Cf. Jacqueline Billiez, 1990, Le parler véhiculaire… et le brassage des communautés permet l’émergence de diverses formes de FCC.

40

Dans ces variétés linguistiques se met alors en place un processus de déstructuration de la langue française circulante par ceux-là même qui l’utilisent et y introduisent leurs propres mots, ceux de leur origine, de leur culture. Les formes linguistiques ainsi créées et leurs diverses variantes régionales deviennent dès lors autant de marqueurs, voire des stéréotypes [13][13]  Pour les notions de marqueurs, de stéréotypes (et… identitaires ; elles exercent de ce fait pleinement leurs fonctions d’indexation. L’instillation d’un grand nombre de traits spécifiques, qui proviennent du niveau identitaire, dans le système linguistique dominant correspond alors à une volonté permanente de créer une diglossie, qui devient la manifestation langagière d’une révolte avant tout sociale [14][14]  Voir aussi David Lepoutre, 1997, Cœur de banlieue….. L’environnement socio-économique immédiat des cités et autres quartiers vécu au quotidien est bien souvent défavorable et parallèlement à la fracture sociale une autre fracture est apparue : la fracture linguistique [15][15]  J.-P. Goudaillier, 1996, Les mots de la fracture linguistique,…. De nombreuses personnes se sentent de ce fait déphasées par rapport à l’univers de la langue circulante, d’autant que l’accès au monde du travail, qui utilise cette autre variété langagière, leur est barré. Elles en sont exclues. Le sentiment de déphasage, d’exclusion est d’autant plus fort, qu’une part importante de ces personnes subissent de véritables situations d’échec scolaire ; il ne leur reste plus qu?à faire usage d’une langue française qu’elles tordent dans tous les sens et dont elles modifient les mots en les coupant, en les renversant [16][16]  Il s?agit d?établir, ainsi que le rappelle Louis-Jean…. La déstructuration de la langue s’opère aussi par introduction dans les énoncés de formes parasitaires, ce qui constitue une procédure argotique bien connue des linguistes.

41

Ceux et celles qui utilisent de telles formes linguistiques peuvent de ce fait s’approprier la langue française circulante, qui devient alors leur langue ; ils et elles peuvent grâce à elle non seulement se fédérer mais aussi et surtout espérer résister et échapper à toute tutelle en se donnant ainsi un outil de communication qui se différencie des différents parlers familiaux, qu’ils ou elles pratiquent, peu ou prou, par ailleurs mais aussi de la forme véhiculaire de la langue française dominante, par conséquent légitimée [17][17]  Pour ce qui est des cas de déplacements en intercation,…. Les normes linguistiques maternelles sont alors développées comme autant de  » contrenormes  » à la langue française, académique, ressentie comme langue  » étrangère  » par rapport à sa propre culture [18][18]   » On en a marre de parler français normal comme les….

42

L’École a une fonction primordiale : elle se doit de fournir aux enfants scolarisés les outils nécessaires pour parvenir à une maîtrise efficace de la langue française tant sous ses diverses manifestations orales que sous sa forme écrite, orthographique par conséquent. Dans le cas de groupes scolaires implantés dans des cités, la langue utilisée par les élèves est à bien des égards distante du français circulant, compte tenu de la multitude des éléments linguistiques identitaires qui y sont instillés. Ceci contribue aussi dans le cadre de l’école à la mise en place de la fracture linguistique. Le rôle des enseignants devient dès lors prépondérant ; il s’agit de pouvoir éviter l’instauration de rapports d?exclusion au nom des sacro-saints  » ils ne parlent pas français « ,  » ils n’expriment que de la violence, leur violence « ,  » il n’y a que des mots grossiers dans ces parlers  » et autres  » on ne sait plus parler français dans les banlieues « .

43

Bien au contraire, c’est un réel foisonnement lexical que l’on constate lors de l’analyse des diverses variétés du FCC. En effet, si les anciens argots de métiers eux-mêmes et l’argot commun traditionnel reflétaient une véritable  » fécondité en matière lexicale « , une  » effervescence du vocabulaire… dans des groupes sociaux mal armés chez lesquels on s?attendrait à un stock lexical réduit «  [19][19]  Denise François-Geiger, 1988, Les paradoxes des argots,…, il en est de même pour ce qui est des formes langagières actuelles des cités.

44

L’émergence de rapports d?exclusion, qui permettent par ailleurs de refuser de manière systématique tout ce qui émane du quartier, de la cité dans lequel se trouve l’établissement scolaire, aurait pour seule conséquence l’effet contraire de celui qui est recherché. Or,  » la réussite scolaire des enfants de milieu populaire dépend de la nature des interactions entre l’école et le quartier. Le développement et l’image d’un quartier populaire dépendent de la qualité de ses établissements scolaires et des actions éducatives qui y sont menées «  [20][20]  Gérard Chauveau et Lucile Duro-Courdesses (sous la…. Ainsi, parmi d’autres, l’expérience qui a été menée par Boris Seguin et Frédéric Teillard [21][21]  Boris Seguin et Frédéric Teillard, 1996, Les céfrans… dans le collège de la Cité des Courtillères à Pantin (Seine-Saint-Denis) est à notre sentiment de ce point de vue exemplaire. Ces enseignants de français ont conduit leurs élèves à réfléchir sur leur propre variété de français, au travers de ses modes de fonctionnement. Ces élèves ont ainsi été à même d’analyser leur propre parler et de rendre compte des résultats de cette analyse dans un dictionnaire, qu’ils ont rédigé avec l’aide de leurs enseignants. C’est de toute évidence la meilleure façon possible d?apprendre à se servir du dictionnaire de langue, cet outil indispensable à toute progression scolaire.

45

L?erreur du début de ce siècle qui a consisté à mettre au ban de l’école mais aussi de la Cité, de la société tout enfant qui parlait une autre langue que le français, ne doit pas être répétée. Prendre en compte l’altérité de la langue de l’autre, par conséquent l’identité de celui-ci, doit être le maître mot. Si une telle prise en compte a lieu, l’accès à la langue circulante, celle du travail et de l’ascension sociale, peut dès lors être ouvert aux jeunes qui parlent tout autre chose qu’une langue normée, légitimée. C?est dans ce sens qu?un travail pédagogique important doit être non seulement initié mais véritablement mis en place. Au sein de l’école, les formes non légitimées du langage à l’école doivent être acceptées et il faut pouvoir les reconnaître, les analyser, d’autant plus que certains enfants et adolescents ne dominent bien souvent ni la langue française ni la langue de leurs parents, car l’insécurité sociale environnante vient renforcer leur insécurité linguistique.

46

Les pratiques argotiques contemporaines doivent être resituées dans le temps. En France au cours du XXe siècle les argots de métiers cèdent progressivement la place aux argots sociologiques. Ces deux types d’argots se différencient entre eux par l’importance relative des fonctions qu?ils exercent : pour les argots de métiers les fonctions sont essentiellement cryptiques, voire crypto-ludiques ; les fonctions identitaires, quant à elles, n’occupent qu’une place secondaire. Une inversion des rapports intervient dans le cas des argots sociologiques des cités. Les fonctions identitaires jouent pleinement leur rôle et la revendication langagière de jeunes et de moins jeunes qui  » se situent en marge des valeurs dites légitimes (…) est avant tout l’expression d’une jeunesse confrontée à un ordre socio-économique de plus en plus inégalitaire, notamment en matière d’accès au travail «  [22][22]  Fabienne Melliani, 2000, La langue du quartier. Appropriation…. Les fonctions crypto-ludiques n’occupent plus désormais la première place, ce que récapitule le tableau ci-après.

47

Importances des fonctions linguistiques exercées [23][23]  Cf. aussi à ce sujet J.-P. Goudaillier, 1997, Quelques… Argots de métiers / argots sociologiques contemporains

Tableau 1

48

D’un point de vue sociolinguistique, cette inversion de l’ordre d?importance des fonctions a lieu parallèlement à un phénomène qu’il convient de rappeler : la disparition progressive de toute référence d?appartenance à un groupe pratiquant la langue dite populaire. Lors des dernières décennies du XXe siècle, cette disparition est allée de paire avec l’émergence des classes moyennes au détriment de la classe ouvrière. Contrairement à ce que l’on peut constater aujourd?hui ces mutations ont abouti à une homogénéisation des comportements à la fois sociaux et linguistiques. L’argotier traditionnel se sentait lié au lieu où il vivait, travaillait, par voie de conséquence à la variété dite populaire – non légitimée de ce fait – de la langue française qui y était parlée ; les locuteurs des cités, banlieues et quartiers d’aujourd’hui ne peuvent trouver de refuge linguistique, identitaire que dans leurs propres productions linguistiques, coupées de toute référence à une langue française  » nationale  » qui vaudrait pour l’ensemble du territoire.

49

Compte tenu du caractère éphémère d’un grand nombre de mots, les personnes qui pratiquent le FCC font un usage important des multiples procédés de formation lexicale à leur disposition pour parvenir à un renouvellement constant des mots.

50

Parmi les procédés les plus productifs, que l’on peut relever, existent des procédés sémantiques tels que l’emprunt à diverses langues ou parlers, l’utilisation de mots issus du vieil argot français, le recours à la métaphore et à la métonymie et des procédés formels tels que la déformation de type verlanesque, la troncation avec ou sans resuffixation et le redoublement hypocoristique. Plusieurs de ces procédés peuvent bien entendu être utilisés à la fois pour la formation d?un seul et même mot.

51

Les procédés formels et sémantiques utilisés en FCC ne lui sont pas propres ; il s?agit en fait d’une accumulation – trait caractéristique de toute pratique argotique – de procédés relevés par ailleurs dans la langue française circulante et non de procédés particuliers à cette variété de français.

52

La déstructuration de la langue française circulante apparaît bien au travers des formes linguistiques de type verlanesque et de celles formées par troncation. Comme en argot traditionnel, beaucoup de mots du FCC sont construits par apocope, ce qu’illustrent les exemples ci-après :

53

brelic ( brelica, verlan de calibre  » revolver « ) ;

54

dèk ( dékis, verlan de kisdé  » policier, flic « ) ;

55

djig ( djiga, verlan de gadji  » fille, femme « ) ;

56

lique ( liquide abrév. d?argent liquide) ;

57

painc ( painco, verlan de copain) ;

58

pet ( pétard pour joint  » cigarette de haschisch « ) ;

59

pouc ( poucav  » indicateur de police, balance « ) ;

60

reuf ( reufré, verlan de frère) ;

61

séropo ( séropositif) ;

62

stonb ( stonba, verlan de baston  » bagarre « ) ;

63

tasse ( taspé, verlan de pétasse) ;

64

téç ( téci, verlan de cité) ;

65

teush ( teushi, verlan de shit  » haschisch « ) ;

66

tox ( toxicomane) ;

67

turve ( turvoi, verlan de voiture) ;

68

trom ( tromé, verlan de métro[politain]).

69

Fait nouveau et particulièrement notable : l’aphérèse prend de plus en plus d’importance par rapport à l’apocope ; sur ce point précis, le FCC se différencie très nettement du français circulant, comme le montrent les exemples suivants :

70

blème ( problème) ; caille ( racaille) ; cil ( facile) ;

71

dic ( indic[ateur de police]) dicdic (par redoublement) ;

72

dwich ( sandwich) ; fan ( enfant) fanfan ;

73

gen ( argent) gengen ; gine ( frangine  » sœur « ) ;

74

gol ( mongol) ; leur ( contrôleur) leurleur ;

75

pouiller ( dépouiller  » voler « ) ; tasse ( pétasse )  » fille  » [péjoratif]) ;

76

teur ( inspecteur de police) teurteur ;

77

vail ( travail) ; zic ( musique) ziczic ;

78

zesse ( gonzesse) ; zon ( prison) zonzon.

79

La resuffixation après troncation est un procédé formel typiquement argotique et l’argot traditionnel connaît des resuffixations en -asse (conasse, grognasse, etc.), -os (musicos, crados, etc.), -ard (nullard, conard, etc.), etc. En FCC on peut relever, entre autres, les cas de resuffixations suivants :

80

chichon (resuffixation en -on de chicha, verlan de haschisch)

81

[acic] [cica] (verlan) [cic] (troncation) [cic] (resuffixation) ;

82

bombax (resuffixation en -ax de bombe)  » très belle fille « )

83

[bbe] [bb] (troncation) [bbaks] (resuffixation) ;

84

couillav (resuffixation en -av de couillonner  » tromper quelqu?un « )

85

[kujone] [kuj] (troncation) [kujav] (resuffixation) ;

86

fillasse (resuffixation en -asse de fille)

87

[fije] [fij] (troncation) [[@ ijas](resuffixation) ;

88

pourav (resuffixation en -ave de pourri)

89

[pui] [pu] (troncation) [puav] (resuffixation) ;

90

rabzouille (resuffixation en -ouille de rabza, verlan de les arabes)

91

[abza] [abz] (troncation) [abzuj] (resuffixation) ;

92

reunous (resuffixation en -ous de reunoi, verlan de noir)

93

[nwa] [n] (troncation) [nus] (resuffixation) ;

94

taspèche (resuffixation en -èche de taspé, verlan de pétasse)

95

[taspe] [tasp] (troncation) [taspèc] (resuffixation).

96

Même si le procédé linguistique de verlanisation est très abondamment utilisé en langue des cités, tous les mots ne se prêtent pas à la verlanisation et aucun énoncé n’est construit avec la totalité des mots en verlan. Lorsque l’on transforme un mot monosyllabique en son correspondant verlanisé, le passage d?une structure de type C(C)V(C)C à sa forme verlanisée nécessite un passage obligé par un mot de type dissyllabique avant même que ce mot ne devienne à nouveau du fait d’une troncation (apocope) un monosyllabique, toujours de type C(C)V(C)C ; ainsi à partir des mots :

97

femme, flic, père, faire, nègre, mec, sac, mère,

98

on obtient respectivement :

99

meuf, keuf, reup, reuf, greun, keum, keuss, reum,

100

après être passé par deux mots dissyllabiques (attestés ou non), le premier avant que ne s’opère la verlanisation et le deuxième après verlanisation :

101

*fameu *meufa ; *flikeu *keufli ; *pèreu *reupé ;

102

*frèreu *reufré ; *nègreu *greuné ; mèkeu *keumé ;

103

*sakeu *keusa ; *mèreu *reumé.

104

* Indique que cette forme a pu ou peut être ou non attestée ; par exemple meufa et keufli sont des formes attestées, qui ont progressivement laissé la place à meuf et keuf.

105

Phonétiquement ces tranformations par le procédé du verlan peuvent être récapitulées comme suit :

106

femme [fam] [fam] [mfa] [mœf] meuf ;

107

flic [flik] [flik] [kfli] [kœf] keuf ;

108

père [pè] [pè] [pe] [œp] reup ;

109

frère [fè] [fè] [fE] [œf] reuf ;

110

nègre [nèg] [nèg] [gne] [gœn] greun ;

111

mec [mèk] [mèk] [kme] [kœm] keum ;

112

sac [sak] [sak] [ksa] [œs] keuss ;

113

mère [mè] [mè] [me] [œm] reum.

114

Ce procédé de verlanisation ne fonctionne pas, lorsque la structure syllabique du mot est de type CV, ce qui est par exemple le cas pour des mots tels là, ça, etc. Dans de tels cas on permute entre elles la voyelle et la consonne ; ce verlan de type  » monosyllabique  » ne nécessite pas de passage par une phase dissyllabique et occasionne par conséquent une modification de la structure syllabique du mot qui sert de base et qui est de structure de type CV ; le mot en verlan est, quant à lui, de structure de type VC. La structure syllabique du mot verlanisé est le  » miroir  » (VC) du mot de départ (CV). Variante de ce verlan : lorsque la structure est de type C1C2V, la forme qui est dérivée est de type C2VC1. Suivent quelques exemples de ce verlan de type  » monosyllabique  » :

115

 » ça  » ; ainf  » faim  » ; àl  » là  » ; ap  » pas  » ; auch  » chaud  » ;

116

dèp ( pèd pédéraste) ; eins  » sein  » ; iech  » chier  » ;

117

ienb  » bien  » ; iench  » chien  » ; ienv  » [je, tu] viens, [il] vient  » ; iep  » pied  » ; ieuv  » vieux, vieille  » ; ieuvs  » vieux, parents  » ;

118

og ( wollof go  » fille « ) ; oid  » doigt  » ; oilp  » poil  » à oilp  » à poil  » ; oinj  » joint  » ; onc  » con  » ; ouak  » quoi  » ; ouam  » moi  » ; ouat  » toi  » ; ouc  » coup  » ; ouf  » fou  » ; uc  » cul  » ; uil  » lui  » ; ur  » rue « .

119

Ces exemples peuvent être notés phonétiquement de la manière suivante :

120

[sa] [as] ; [f ï] [ ïf] ; [pa] [ap] ;

121

[co] [ôc] ; [pèd] [dèp] ; [ ïs] [s ï] ;

122

[cje] [jèc] ; [bj ï] [j ïb] ; [cj ï] [j ïc] ;

123

[vj ï] [j ïv] ; [pje] [jèp] ; [vj] [jœv] ;

124

[go] [ôg] ; [dwa] [wad] ; [pwal] [walp] ;

125

[apwal] [awalp] ; [jw ï] [w ïj] ; [k] [k] ;

126

[kwa] [wak] ; [mwa] [wam] ; [twa] [wat] ;

127

[ku] [uk] ; [fu] [uf] ; [l9i] [9il] ; [y] [y].

128

Les transformations de type verlanesque peuvent être opérées de manière intersyllabique et/ou intrasyllabique : lorsque l’on transforme chinois en noichi, il s’agit d’un changement de place des deux syllabes [ci] et [nwa]. Par contre, lorsque l’on forme oinich à partir de chinois, ceci nécessite non seulement le déplacement des syllabes [wa] et [nic] (verlan intersyllabique) mais aussi une interversion des deux consonnes de [cin] pour obtenir [nic] (verlan intrasyllabique). C?est ce même type de modification intrasyllabique qui fournit peuoch à partir de peucho ( verlan de v.a. choper  » attraper « ).

129

Il convient de mentionner, en plus de ces exemples de verlan  » phonétique « , une autre tendance dans le processus de verlanisation. Les cas suivants de verlan  » orthographique  » sont basés sur la graphie des mots et non pas sur leur phonie :

130

à donf  » à fond  » ; ulc  » cul  » ; zen  » nez « 

131

(prononcés respectivement : [adöf] ; [ylk] ; [zèn]).

132

L’utilisation importante du procédé de verlanisation est particulièrement caractéristique des types de pratiques linguistiques rencontrées dans les cités, plus précisément en région parisienne [24][24]   » … le Marseillais, il parle pas verlan, c?est le…. On peut supposer que le verlan est une pratique langagière qui vise à établir une distanciation effective par rapport à la dure réalité du quotidien, ceci dans le but de pouvoir mieux la supporter. Le lien au référent serait plus lâche et la prégnance de celui-ci moins forte, lorsque le signifiant est inversé, verlanisé : parler du togué, de la téci, du tierquar et non pas du ghetto, de la cité, du quartier, où l’on habite, serait un exemple parmi d’autres de cette pratique. Les situations relevées en région parisienne et à Marseille ne sont pas comparables. À Marseille, qui est une ville structurée en quartiers, une osmose peut s’opèrer entre d?une part des parlers liés à l’immigration la plus récente dans diverses parties de cette ville et d’autre part les langues romanes (italien, espagnol, portugais, etc.) des immigrés les plus anciens et ce qui reste des anciens parlers locaux et/ou régionaux (provençal, corse, etc.). Une telle situation liée à l’existence de quartiers populaires à forte concentration de personnes issues de l’immigration (le Panier en plein centre, la Savine au nord, etc.) est caractéristique de Marseille. Elle n?est en aucune manière comparable à ce qui peut se passer dans les grandes conurbations françaises et plus particulièrement dans la région parisienne, où la notion même de banlieues, dans lesquelles vivent des populations  » au ban du lieu  » est une réalité. Ceci n’est pas sans incidence sur les formes linguistiques et divers indices amènent à penser que les pratiques langagières faisant appel au verlan sont d?autant plus fortes qu’une fracture géographique importante existe par rapport aux espaces urbains extérieurs à celui, dans lequel on vit [25][25]  À propos des modes d?appropriation de l’espace, se….

133

Les divers types de formations linguistiques de type verlanesque présentés plus haut tendent à montrer que les variétés langagières relevées dans les cités françaises ont un mode de fonctionnement  » en miroir  » par rapport à ce que l’on constate généralement dans la langue française :

134

— le verlan  » monosyllabique  » permet de créer des mots qui, du point de vue syllabique, sont autant de miroirs (structure de type VC) des mots avant même que ne s’opère la verlanisation (structure de type CV) ;

135

— l’émergence de l’aphérèse au détriment de l’apocope est un autre exemple de ce fonctionnement  » en miroir  » ; la langue française procède en règle générale par apocope pour abréger les mots, ce qui est de moins en moins le cas pour le français contemporain des cités.

136

D’autres faits, qui n’ont pas été présentés ici même, viennent conforter l’hypothèse de ce fonctionnement  » en miroir  » :

137

— les mots verlanisés, surtout ceux qui sont formés par verlanisation avec phase dissyllabique (procédé le plus fréquent, qui est d?ailleurs employé pour la reverlanisation), ne présentent dans la majeure partie des cas qu?un seul timbre de voyelle, à savoir [œ]. Une neutralisation de l’ensemble des timbres vocaliques au bénéfice de cette voyelle [œ] s’opère dans de tels cas. Ceci ne correspond nullement aux règles habituelles du fonctionnement phonologique du français et met en valeur plutôt les schèmes consonantiques, de toute évidence au détriment des voyelles ;

138

— d’un point de vue accentuel, on note de plus en plus fréquemment un déplacement systématique de l’accent vers la première syllabe, ce qui ne correspond évidemment pas aux règles accentuelles communément utilisées en français.

139

L’identité linguistique affirmée (  » le français, c?est une langue, c’est pas la mienne « ,  » l’arabe c’est ma langue « ,  » l’espagnol c’est ma langue mais c’est pas ce que je parle  » ), elle-même corrélée de manière très forte à l’identité ethnique, va pouvoir être exprimée par les locuteurs qui pratiquent le FCC grâce à l’utilisation de termes empruntés aux langues de leur culture d?origine. Ceci peut s’opérer non seulement de manière intercommunautaire (étrangers et personnes issues de l’immigration / Français de souche ; Maghrébins/Africains/Antillais/Asiatiques, etc. ; strates d?immigration plus anciennes / nouveaux arrivants) mais aussi par rapport à l’extérieur de la cité, du quartier où l’on réside. On note ce type de comportements plus particulièrement chez les jeunes issus de l’immigration, qui tiennent à se distinguer de ceux qui ont un mode de socialisation lié au travail, alors qu’eux-mêmes se sentent exclus du monde du travail et marginalisés [26][26]  J.-P. Goudaillier, 1998, La langue des cités françaises…. Pour les jeunes issus de l’immigration  » la langue d?origine acquiert une valeur symbolique indéniable… cette représentation lignagière de la langue d’origine ne va pas obligatoirement de pair avec un usage intensif de cette langue ni même sa connaissance  » ainsi que le précisent Louise Dabène et Jacqueline Billiez [27][27]  Louise Dabène et Jacqueline Billiez, 1987, Le parler…, qui rappellent par ailleurs que les jeunes d »origine étrangère  » sont encore plus défavorisés que les jeunes de souche française, appartenant à la même couche sociale… Le déroulement de leur scolarité est marqué par l’échec scolaire… Ces jeunes en situation d’échec se retrouvent à l’adolescence massivement au chômage et sont confrontés à une véritable crise d’identité «  [28][28]  Louise Dabène et Jacqueline Billiez, 1987, Le parler….

140

Pour laisser leur marque identitaire dans la langue, les locuteurs des cités et quartiers vont utiliser des mots d’origine arabe (parlers maghrébins essentiellement) ou d’origine berbère, tels

141

ahchouma  » honte  » ( arabe hacma  » honte « ) ; arhnouch  » policier  » ( arabe hnaec  » serpent, policier « ) ; casbah  » maison  » ( arabe qasba ; maison) ; choune  » sexe féminin  » ( berbère haetcun / htun  » sexe féminin « ) ; haram  » péché  » ( arabe hraem  » péché « ) ; heps  » prison  » ( arabe haebs  » prison « ) ; hralouf  » porc  » ( arabe hluf  » porc « ) ; kif  » mélange de canabis et de tabac  » ; maboul  » fou, idiot  » ( arabe mahbûl  » fou « ) ; mesquin  » pauvre type, idiot  » ( arabe miskin  » pauvre « ) ; msrot  » fou, dingue  » ; roloto  » quelqu?un de nul  » ; roumi  » Français de souche  » ( arabe rumi  » homme européen « ) ; shitan  » diable  » ( arabe cetan ou citan  » diable « ) ; toubab  » Français de souche  » ( arabe tebib  » savant  » / arabe maghrébin algérien tbîb  » sorcier « ) ; zetla [29][29]  Il s?agit de la forme phonétique relevée, entre autres,…  » haschisch « .

142

Des mots d’origine tzigane tels :

143

bédo  » cigarette de haschisch  » ; bicrav  » vendre en participant à des actions illicites  » ; bouillav  » posséder sexuellement ; tromper quelqu?un  » ; chafrav  » travailler  » ; choucard  » bien, bon  » ; chourav  » voler  » ; craillav  » manger  » ; gadji  » fille, femme  » ; gadjo  » gars, homme  » ; gavali  » fille, femme  » ; marav  » battre, tuer  » ; minch  » petite amie  » ; racli  » fille, femme  » ; raclo  » gars, homme  » ; rodav  » regarder, repérer  » ; schmitt  » policier «  [30][30]  Les mots bédo, chafrav, choucard, chourav, gadjo,….

144

Voire des faux mots tziganes (les six verbes suivants, malgré leur terminaison verbale en -av(e) caractéristique des verbes d’origine tzigane, sont en fait des constructions ad hoc liées aux pratiques linguistiques des locuteurs de FCC et doivent être considérés comme des faux mots tziganes) :

145

bédav  » fumer  » ; carnav  » arnaquer  » ; couillav  » tromper quelqu?un  » ; graillav  » manger  » ; pourav  » puer  » ; tirav  » voler à la tire « .

146

Des mots d?origine africaine tels :

147

go  » fille, femme  » ; gorette  » fille, jeune femme  » (du wolof go:r  » homme « ).

148

Des mots d’origine antillaise tels :

149

maconmé  » homosexuel  » (français ma commère) ; timal  » homme, gars  » (français petit mâle).

150

Et des mots issus du vieil argot français tels :

151

artiche(s)  » argent  » ; baston  » bagarre  » ; bastos  » balle [arme à feu]  » ; biffeton  » billet  » ; blase  » nom  » ; caisse  » voiture  » ; calibre  » arme ([de poing]  » ; condé  » policier  » ; fafiot  » billet  » ; flag  » flagrant délit  » ; mastoc  » costaud, fort  » ; poudre (+ verlan dreupou)  » héro ïne, coca ïne  » ; serrer  » attraper, arrêter quelqu?un  » ; taf  » travail  » ; taule  » maison  » ; tune  » argent  » ; daron  » père  » ; taupe  » fille, femme  » ; tireur (+ verlan reurti)  » voleur à la tire « .

152

Compte tenu de l’importance sans cesse croissante de la part que représente en français l’ensemble des productions linguistiques élaborées en FCC, il importe que soient développées, dans une perspective de sociolinguistique urbaine, des études qui utilisent une approche argotologique. Il peut être ainsi rendu compte de pratiques langagières, qui nécessitent la mise en œuvre de divers procédés linguistiques permettant l’expression de fonctions essentiellement identitaires, tels que ceux-ci peuvent être mis au jour dans des groupes de locuteurs identifiés par ailleurs d?un point de vue sociologique. Le Centre de recherches argotologiques (CARGO) [31][31]  Directeur : Jean-Pierre Gouudaillier. de l’Université René-Descartes – Paris 5, produit des travaux de recherche qui s’inscrivent dans ce schéma et analysent non seulement les productions mais aussi les attitudes, les représentations des locuteurs pratiquant à des degrés divers le FCC [32][32]  On pourra se reporter, entre autres, à Alma Sokolija-Brouillard,…. L?époque qui voit l’argot perdre son individualité par rapport à la langue  » populaire  » en donnant ses épices à celle-ci, qui l’influence en retour, est révolue [33][33]   » … argot et langue populaire ont dû, à la fin du…. Les deux dernières décennies du siècle passé ont été celles de l’effondrement des formes  » traditionnelles  » du français dit populaire et de l’émergence d?un ensemble de parlers identitaires tout d?abord périurbains avant de devenir urbains. La situation actuelle, celle du français contemporain des cités (FCC) ou argot des banlieues, est bel et bien différente : les éléments linguistiques qui constituent ce type de français, essentiellement lexicaux mais appartenant aussi à d’autres niveaux tels que la phonologie, la morphologie et la syntaxe, sont le réservoir principal des formes linguistiques du français du XXIe siècle qui se construit à partir de formes argotiques, identitaires. Il convient par conséquent de rendre compte de cette situation par une analyse sociolinguistique des pratiques langagières et des procédés linguistiques qui les sous-tendent pour mieux apprécier les phénomènes d’ordre synchronique dynamique qui existent en français contemporain.

 

Notes

[1]

Cette contre-légitimité linguistique ne peut s?affirmer, conformément à ce qu’indique Pierre Bourdieu, que  » dans les limites des marchés francs, c’est-à-dire dans des espaces propres aux classes dominées, repères ou refuges des exclus dont les dominants sont de fait exclus, au moins symboliquement  » (P. Bourdieu, 1983, Vous avez dit  » populaire « , Actes de la recherche en sciences sociales, Paris, Minuit, no 46, p. 98-105, p. 103).

[2]

Comme le rappelle Françoise Gadet,  » La notion de français populaire est plus interprétative que descriptive : la qualification de « populaire » nous apprend davantage sur l’attitude envers un phénomène que sur le phénomène lui-même « , Le français populaire, 1992, Paris, PUF,  » Que sais-je ? « , no 1172, p. 122.

[3]

On pourra se reporter, entre autres, à Denise François-Geiger et J.-P. Goudaillier, 1991, Parlures argotiques, Langue française, Paris, Larousse, no 90, 125 p.

[4]

Cf. ici-même l’article d’Estelle Liogier à propos de la description du français parlé par les jeunes de cités, plus particulièrement le paragraphe intitulé  » Un mélange de codes « .

[5]

D’autres exemples sont présentés dans J.-P. Goudaillier, 2001, Comment tu tchatches ! Dictionnaire du français contemporain des cités, Paris, Maisonneuve & Larose (1re éd., 1997), 305 p.

[6]

Pour Pierre Guiraud (Argot, Encyclopedia Universalis, p. 934)  » … les parlers populaires des grandes villes… se muent en argots modernes soumis aux changements accélérés par la société « .

[7]

Pour P. Bourdieu  » … ce qui s’exprime avec l’habitus linguistique, c’est tout l’habitus de classe dont il est une dimension, c’est-à-dire, en fait, la position occupée, synchroniquement et diachroniquement, dans la structure sociale  » (P. Bourdieu, 1984, Ce que parler veut dire. L’économie des échanges linguistiques, Paris, Fayard, 1re éd., 1982, p. 85).

[8]

 » … l’argot assume souvent une fonction expressive ; il est le signe d’une révolte, un refus et une dérision de l’ordre établi incarné par l’homme que la société traque et censure. Non plus la simple peinture d’un milieu exotique et pittoresque, mais le mode d’expression d’une sensibilité  » (P. Guiraud, Argot, Encyclopedia Universalis, p. 934).

[9]

Voir à ce sujet Christian Bachman et Luc Basier, 1984, Le verlan : argot d’école ou langue des keums, Mots, no 8, p. 169-185.

[10]

Geneviève Vermes et Josiane Boutet (sous la dir. de), 1987, France, pays multilingue, Paris, L?Harmattan, coll.  » Logiques sociales « , t. I : Les langues en France, un enjeu historique et social, 204 p. et t. II : Pratiques des langues en France, 209 p.

[11]

Jean-Michel Décugis et Aziz Zemouri, 1995, Paroles de banlieues, Paris, Plon, 231 p.

[12]

Cf. Jacqueline Billiez, 1990, Le parler véhiculaire interethnique de groupes d’adolescents en milieu urbain, Actes du Colloque  » Des langues et des villes «  (Dakar, 15-17 décembre 1990, p. 117-126).

[13]

Pour les notions de marqueurs, de stéréotypes (et d?indicateurs) en sociolinguistique, on se reportera, entre autres, à William Labov, 1976, Sociolinguistique, Paris, Minuit.

[14]

Voir aussi David Lepoutre, 1997, Cœur de banlieue. Codes, rites et langages, Paris, Éditions Odile Jacob, 362 p.

[15]

J.-P. Goudaillier, 1996, Les mots de la fracture linguistique, La Revue des Deux-Mondes, mars 1996, p. 115-123.

[16]

Il s?agit d’établir, ainsi que le rappelle Louis-Jean Calvet  » si les langues des banlieues ne constituent que de la variation (…) ou si, au contraire, la cassure sociale est telle qu’elle produit sous nos yeux une cassure linguistique  » (Louis-Jean Calvet, 1997, Le langage des banlieues : une forme identitaire, Colloque Touche pas à ma langue ! [ ?] / Les langages des banlieues (Marseille, IUFM, 26-28 septembre 1996), Skholê (Cahiers de la recherche et du développement, IUFM de l’Académie d?Aix-Marseille, numéro hors série, p. 151-158, p. 157).

[17]

Pour ce qui est des cas de déplacements en intercation, cf. Caroline Juillard, 2001, Une ou deux langues ? Des positions et des faits, La Linguistique, Paris, PUF, vol. 37, fasc. 2, p. 3-31, p. 10-11 et s.

[18]

 » On en a marre de parler français normal comme les riches, les petits bourges… parce que c’est la banlieue ici  » (Élève d’origine maghrébine du Groupe scolaire Jean-Jaurès de Pantin dans un reportage diffusé lors du journal télévisé de 20 heures sur TF1 le 14 février 1996).

[19]

Denise François-Geiger, 1988, Les paradoxes des argots, Actes du Colloque  » Culture et pauvretés « , Tourette (L’Arbresle), 13-15 décembre 1985, édités par Antoine Lion et Pedro de Meca, La Documentation française, p. 17-24.

[20]

Gérard Chauveau et Lucile Duro-Courdesses (sous la dir. de), 1989, Écoles et quartiers ; des dynamiques éducatives locales, Paris, L?Harmattan, coll.  » Cresas « , no 8, p. 183.

[21]

Boris Seguin et Frédéric Teillard, 1996, Les céfrans parlent aux Français. Chronique de la langue des cités, Paris, Calmann-Lévy, 230 p.

[22]

Fabienne Melliani, 2000, La langue du quartier. Appropriation de l’espace et identités urbaines chez des jeunes issus de l’immigration maghrébine en banlieue rouennaise, Paris, L?Harmattan, coll.  » Espaces discursifs « , 220 p., p. 50. Ceci  » nécessite cependant des locuteurs qu’ils se situent sur un autre marché, plus restreint, que celui sur lequel évolue la variété légitime  » (p. 50).

[23]

Cf. aussi à ce sujet J.-P. Goudaillier, 1997, Quelques procédés de formation lexicale de la langue des banlieues (verlan monosyllabique, aphérèse, resuffixation), Colloque Touche pas à ma langue ! [ ?] / Les langages des banlieues, Marseille, IUFM, 26-28 septembre 1996, Skholê (Cahiers de la recherche et du développement, IUFM de l’Académie d?Aix-Marseille), numéro hors série, p. 75-86, p. 78. Divers cas d’alternances et de ruptures linguistiques en interaction sont analysés par Fabienne Melliani. De tels cas sont à différencier de ceux présentés par Caroline Juillard, cf. n. 17.

[24]

 » … le Marseillais, il parle pas verlan, c’est le Parisien qui parle verlan… Le Marseillais, il emprunte des mots dans certaines langues…  » (Ali Ibrahima du Groupe B-Vice, Émission La Grande Famille, Canal+, 24 janvier 1996 à propos de la langue de La Savine, quartier situé au nord de Marseille).

[25]

À propos des modes d?appropriation de l’espace, se reporter, entre autres, à D. Lepoutre, Cœur de banlieue…, chap. 1 et plus précisément p. 57-63. D. Lepoutre indique par ailleurs que  » les meilleurs locuteurs de verlan sont généralement les adolescents les plus intégrés au groupe des pairs et à sa culture  » (p. 122).

[26]

J.-P. Goudaillier, 1998, La langue des cités françaises comme facteur d?intégration ou de non-intégration, Rapport de la Commission nationale  » Culture, facteur d?intégration  » de la Fédération nationale des collectivités territoriales pour la culture, Paris, Conseil économique et social, 16 février 1996, in  » Culture et intégration : expériences et mode d?emploi « , Voiron, Éditions de  » La lettre du cadre territorial « , février 1998, p. 3-14.

[27]

Louise Dabène et Jacqueline Billiez, 1987, Le parler des jeunes issus de l’immigration, France, pays multilingue (sous la dir. de Geneviève Vermes et Josiane Boutet), Paris, L?Harmattan, t. II, p. 62-77, p. 65.

[28]

Louise Dabène et Jacqueline Billiez, 1987, Le parler des jeunes…, p. 63-64.

[29]

Il s?agit de la forme phonétique relevée, entre autres, à Tunis pour désigner la SEITA (Société des tabacs français) pendant la période de la colonisation française. Ce terme a successivement désigné le tabac à priser, le tabac à chiquer, avant même de désigner la cigarette de haschisch puis le haschisch lui-même.

[30]

Les mots bédo, chafrav, choucard, chourav, gadjo, gadji et gavali existent déjà en argot traditionnel.

[31]

Directeur : Jean-Pierre Gouudaillier.

[32]

On pourra se reporter, entre autres, à Alma Sokolija-Brouillard, 2001, Comparaison des argots de la région de Sarajevo et de la région parisienne, Thèse de doctorat de linguistique (sous la dir. de J.-P. Goudaillier), Université René-Descartes – Paris 5, 2 vol., 598 p. + annexe et plus particulièrement p. 58 et s., 160 et s.

[33]

 » … argot et langue populaire ont dû, à la fin du XIXe siècle et au début de ce siècle avoir des affinités qui ont peut-être disparu ou se sont atténuées aujourd?hui. Cela tient sans nul doute à un nivellement des couches sociales qui entraîne un relatif nivellement langagier  » (Denise François-Geiger, 1991, Panorama des argots contemporains, Parlures argotiques, Langue française, Paris, Larousse, no 90, p. 5-9, p. 6).

 

 


Hillbilly elegy: Attention, une relégation sociale peut en cacher une autre ! (It’s the culture, stupid !)

17 septembre, 2017

Aux États-Unis, les plus opulents citoyens ont bien soin de ne point s’isoler du peuple ; au contraire, ils s’en rapprochent sans cesse, ils l’écoutent volontiers et lui parlent tous les jours. Alexis de Tocqueville
Toutes les stratégies que les intellectuels et les artistes produisent contre les « bourgeois » tendent inévitablement, en dehors de toute intention expresse et en vertu même de la structure de l’espace dans lequel elles s’engendrent, à être à double effet et dirigées indistinctement contre toutes les formes de soumission aux intérêts matériels, populaires aussi bien que bourgeoises.  Bourdieu
If you’re not working, over time you’re much more likely to develop attitudes and orientations and behavior patterns that are associated with casual or infrequent work. And then when you open up opportunities for people, you notice that these attitudes, orientations, habits and styles also change. William Julius Wilson
Crime, family dissolution, welfare, and low levels of social organization are fundamentally a consequence of the disappearance of work. William Julius Wilson
Racism should be viewed as an intervening variable. You give me a set of conditions and I can produce racism in any society. You give me a different set of conditions and I can reduce racism. You give me a situation where there are a sufficient number of social resources so people don’t have to compete for those resources, and I will show you a society where racism is held in check. If we could create the conditions that make racism difficult, or discourage it, then there would be less stress and less need for affirmative action programs. One of those conditions would be an economic policy that would create tight labor markets over long periods of time. Now does that mean that affirmative action is here only temporarily? I think the ultimate goal should be to remove it. William Julius Wilson
On brode beaucoup sur la non intégration des jeunes de banlieue. En réalité, ils sont totalement intégrés culturellement. Leur culture, comme le rap, sert de référence à toute la jeunesse. Ils sont bien sûr confrontés à de nombreux problèmes mais sont dans une logique d’intégration culturelle à la société monde. Les jeunes ruraux, dont les loisirs se résument souvent à la bagnole, le foot et l’alcool, vivent dans une marginalité culturelle. En feignant de croire que l’immigration ne participe pas à la déstructuration des plus modestes (Français ou immigrés), la gauche accentue la fracture qui la sépare des catégories populaires. Fracture d’autant plus forte qu’une partie de la gauche continue d’associer cette France précarisée qui demande à être protégée de la mondialisation et de l’immigration à la « France raciste ». Dans le même temps, presque malgré elle, la gauche est de plus en plus plébiscitée par une « autre France », celle des grands centres urbains les plus actifs, les plus riches et les mieux intégrés à l’économie-monde ; sur ces territoires où se retrouvent les extrêmes de l’éventail social (du bobo à l’immigré), la mondialisation est une bénédiction. Christophe Guilluy
La focalisation sur le « problème des banlieues » fait oublier un fait majeur : 61 % de la population française vit aujourd’hui hors des grandes agglomérations. Les classes populaires se concentrent dorénavant dans les espaces périphériques : villes petites et moyennes, certains espaces périurbains et la France rurale. En outre, les banlieues sensibles ne sont nullement « abandonnées » par l’État. Comme l’a établi le sociologue Dominique Lorrain, les investissements publics dans le quartier des Hautes Noues à Villiers-sur-Marne (Val-de-Marne) sont mille fois supérieurs à ceux consentis en faveur d’un quartier modeste de la périphérie de Verdun (Meuse), qui n’a jamais attiré l’attention des médias. Pourtant, le revenu moyen par habitant de ce quartier de Villiers-sur-Marne est de 20 % supérieur à celui de Verdun. Bien sûr, c’est un exemple extrême. Il reste que, à l’échelle de la France, 85 % des ménages pauvres (qui gagnent moins de 993 € par mois, soit moins de 60 % du salaire médian, NDLR) ne vivent pas dans les quartiers « sensibles ». Si l’on retient le critère du PIB, la Seine-Saint-Denis est plus aisée que la Meuse ou l’Ariège. Le 93 n’est pas un espace de relégation, mais le cœur de l’aire parisienne. (…)  En se désindustrialisant, les grandes villes ont besoin de beaucoup moins d’employés et d’ouvriers mais de davantage de cadres. C’est ce qu’on appelle la gentrification des grandes villes, symbolisée par la figure du fameux « bobo », partisan de l’ouverture dans tous les domaines. Confrontées à la flambée des prix dans le parc privé, les catégories populaires, pour leur part, cherchent des logements en dehors des grandes agglomérations. En outre, l’immobilier social, dernier parc accessible aux catégories populaires de ces métropoles, s’est spécialisé dans l’accueil des populations immigrées. Les catégories populaires d’origine européenne et qui sont éligibles au parc social s’efforcent d’éviter les quartiers où les HLM sont nombreux. Elles préfèrent déménager en grande banlieue, dans les petites villes ou les zones rurales pour accéder à la propriété et acquérir un pavillon. On assiste ainsi à l’émergence de « villes monde » très inégalitaires où se concentrent à la fois cadres et catégories populaires issues de l’immigration récente. Ce phénomène n’est pas limité à Paris. Il se constate dans toutes les agglomérations de France (Lyon, Bordeaux, Nantes, Lille, Grenoble), hormis Marseille. (…) On a du mal à formuler certains faits en France. Dans le vocabulaire de la politique de la ville, « classes moyennes » signifie en réalité « population d’origine européenne ». Or les HLM ne font plus coexister ces deux populations. L’immigration récente, pour l’essentiel familiale, s’est concentrée dans les quartiers de logements sociaux des grandes agglomérations, notamment les moins valorisés. Les derniers rapports de l’observatoire national des zones urbaines sensibles (ZUS) montrent qu’aujourd’hui 52 % des habitants des ZUS sont immigrés, chiffre qui atteint 64 % en Île-de-France. Cette spécialisation tend à se renforcer. La fin de la mixité dans les HLM n’est pas imputable aux bailleurs sociaux, qui font souvent beaucoup d’efforts. Mais on ne peut pas forcer des personnes qui ne le souhaitent pas à vivre ensemble. L’étalement urbain se poursuit parce que les habitants veulent se séparer, même si ça les fragilise économiquement. Par ailleurs, dans les territoires où se côtoient populations d’origine européenne et populations d’immigration extra-européenne, la fin du modèle assimilationniste suscite beaucoup d’inquiétudes. L’autre ne devient plus soi. Une société multiculturelle émerge. Minorités et majorités sont désormais relatives. (…)  ces personnes habitent là où on produit les deux tiers du PIB du pays et où se crée l’essentiel des emplois, c’est-à-dire dans les métropoles. Une petite bourgeoisie issue de l’immigration maghrébine et africaine est ainsi apparue. Dans les ZUS, il existe une vraie mobilité géographique et sociale : les gens arrivent et partent. Ces quartiers servent de sas entre le Nord et le Sud. Ce constat ruine l’image misérabiliste d’une banlieue ghetto où seraient parqués des habitants condamnés à la pauvreté. À bien des égards, la politique de la ville est donc un grand succès. Les seuls phénomènes actuels d’ascension sociale dans les milieux populaires se constatent dans les catégories immigrées des métropoles. Cadres ou immigrés, tous les habitants des grandes agglomérations tirent bénéfice d’y vivre – chacun à leur échelle. En Grande-Bretagne, en 2013, le secrétaire d’État chargé des Universités et de la Science de l’époque, David Willetts, s’est même déclaré favorable à une politique de discrimination positive en faveur des jeunes hommes blancs de la « working class » car leur taux d’accès à l’université s’est effondré et est inférieur à celui des enfants d’immigrés. (…) Le problème social et politique majeur de la France, c’est que, pour la première fois depuis la révolution industrielle, la majeure partie des catégories populaires ne vit plus là où se crée la richesse. Au XIXe siècle, lors de la révolution industrielle, on a fait venir les paysans dans les grandes villes pour travailler en usine. Aujourd’hui, on les fait repartir à la « campagne ». C’est un retour en arrière de deux siècles. Le projet économique du pays, tourné vers la mondialisation, n’a plus besoin des catégories populaires, en quelque sorte. (…) L’absence d’intégration économique des catégories modestes explique le paradoxe français : un pays qui redistribue beaucoup de ses richesses mais dont une majorité d’habitants considèrent à juste titre qu’ils sont de plus en plus fragiles et déclassés. (…) Les catégories populaires qui vivent dans ces territoires sont d’autant plus attachées à leur environnement local qu’elles sont, en quelque sorte, assignées à résidence. Elles réagissent en portant une grande attention à ce que j’appelle le «village» : sa maison, son quartier, son territoire, son identité culturelle, qui représentent un capital social. La contre-société s’affirme aussi dans le domaine des valeurs. La France périphérique est attachée à l’ordre républicain, réservée envers les réformes de société et critique sur l’assistanat. L’accusation de «populisme» ne l’émeut guère. Elle ne supporte plus aucune forme de tutorat – ni politique, ni intellectuel – de la part de ceux qui se croient «éclairés». (…) Il devient très difficile de fédérer et de satisfaire tous les électorats à la fois. Dans un monde parfait, il faudrait pouvoir combiner le libéralisme économique et culturel dans les agglomérations et le protectionnisme, le refus du multiculturalisme et l’attachement aux valeurs traditionnelles dans la France périphérique. Mais c’est utopique. C’est pourquoi ces deux France décrivent les nouvelles fractures politiques, présentes et à venir. Christophe Guilluy
Parler de relégation sociale n’a pas grand sens quand on est à dix minutes du métro et au coeur d’un marché de l’emploi gigantesque. Christophe Guilluy
J’ai suivi cette campagne avec un sentiment de malaise franchement (…) qui s’est peu à peu transformé en honte.  (…) Malaise parce que la deuxième France, dont vous parlez, la France qui est périphérique, qui hésite entre Marine Le Pen et rien,  je me suis rendu compte que je ne la comprenais pas, que je ne la voyais pas, que j’avais perdu le contact. Et ça, quand on veut écrire des romans, je trouve que c’est une faute professionnelle assez lourde.  (….) Parce que je ne la vois plus, je fais partie de l’élite mondialisée, maintenant. (…) Et pourtant, je viens de cette France. (…) Elle habite pas dans les mêmes quartiers que moi. Elle habite pas à Paris. A Paris, Le Pen n’existe pas. Elle habite dans des zones périphériques décrites par Christophe Guilluy. Des zones mal connues. (…) Mais le fait est que j’ai perdu le contact. (…) Non, je la comprends pas suffisamment, je veux dire, je pourrais pas écrire dessus. C’est ça qui me gêne, c’est pour ça que suis mal à l’aise. (…) Non, je suis pas dans la même situation. Moi, je ne crois pas au vote idéologique, je crois au vote de classe. Bien que le mot est démodé. Il y a une classe qui vote Le Pen, une classe qui vote Macron, une classe qui vote Fillon. Facilement identifiables et on le voit tout de suite. Et que je le veuille ou non, je fais partie de la France qui vote Macron. Parce que je suis trop riche pour voter Le Pen ou Mélenchon. Et parce que je suis pas un hériter, donc je suis pas la classe qui vote Fillon. (…) Ce qui est apparu et qui est très surprenant – alors, ça, c’est vraiment un phénomène imprévu – c’est un véritable parti confessionnel, précisément catholique. Dans tout ce que j’ai suivi – et, je vous dis, j’ai tout suivi  – Jean-Frédéric Poisson était quand même le plus étonnant. (…) Une espèce d’impavidité et une défense des valeurs catholiques qui est inhabituelle pour un parti politique. (….) Ca m’a interloqué parce que je croyais le catholicisme mourant. (…) [Macron] L’axe de sa  campagne, j’ai l’impression que c’est une espèce de thérapie de groupe pour convertir les Français à l’optimisme. Michel Houellebecq
Marine Le Pen aurait pu être la porte-parole du parti de l’inquiétude, elle aurait pu faire venir sur le plateau l’humeur de cette partie du pays qui voit sa disparition programmée et s’en désole. Elle aurait pu évoquer le séparatisme islamiste et l’immense tâche qui nous attend consistant à convaincre des dizaines, peut-être des centaines, de milliers de jeunes Français de l’excellence de leur pays, de ses arts, ses armes et ses lois. Or, du début à la fin, elle a paru retourner à son adversaire le procès en légitimité dont elle est sans cesse l’objet. Incapable de lui concéder le moindre point, autant que de lui opposer une véritable vision, elle a ânonné des mots-clefs comme « UOIF » et « banquier », croyant sans doute que cela suffirait à faire pleuvoir les votes, ce qui laisse penser qu’elle tient ses électeurs en piètre estime. Les insinuations sur l’argent de son adversaire, sa façon de dire à demi-mot au téléspectateur « si vous êtes dans la mouise, c’est parce que lui et ses amis se goinfrent », m’ont rappelé les heures sombres de l’affaire Fillon, quand des journalistes répétaient en boucle le même appel au ressentiment. L’autre France, celle qui n’a pas envie de l’avenir mondialisé et multiculti qu’on lui promet, mérite mieux que ce populisme ras des pâquerettes. (…) On n’est pas obligé, cependant, de hurler avec les bisounours. Quoi que répètent fiévreusement ceux qui adorent voler au secours des victoires, un faux pas, même de taille, ne suffit pas à faire de Marine Le Pen quelqu’un d’infréquentable. À la différence de l’intégralité de mes confrères qui se frottent les mains sur l’air de « je vous l’avais bien dit ! », je ne suis pas sûre qu’elle ait « montré son vrai visage ». L’ayant interviewée à plusieurs reprises, nous avons eu avec elles des engueulades homériques : jamais je ne l’ai vue, dans ces circonstances, faire preuve de la mauvaise foi fielleuse qu’elle a opposée à son adversaire – et je ne lui avais jamais vu, même sur un plateau, ce masque sarcastique. Avait-elle en quelque sorte intégré sa propre illégitimité, a-t-elle été mal conseillée par son cher Florian Philippot ou était-elle décidément très mal préparée à la fonction qu’elle briguait ? Toujours est-il qu’elle a raté son rendez-vous avec le peuple français. (…) Il faudra bien résoudre un jour ce petit problème de logique : il existe chez nous un parti que les tribunaux ne peuvent pas interdire, qui a le droit de se présenter aux élections, mais les électeurs n’ont pas le droit de voter pour lui et ses dirigeants n’ont pas le droit de gagner. Ce qui, on en conviendra, est assez pratique pour ceux qui l’affrontent en duel. On me dit qu’il respecte le cadre de la République, mais pas ses fameuses valeurs. Sauf que, pardon, qui est arbitre des valeurs, Le Monde, les Inrocks, Jacques Attali ? N’est-ce pas une façon bien commode d’exclure de la compétition ceux qui vous déplaisent ? Je ne me résous pas à vivre dans un monde où il y a une seule politique possible, un seul vote raisonnable et un seul point de vue acceptable. (…) Post Scriptum : je viens d’entendre un bout de la chronique de François Morel, l’un des papes du comico-conformisme sur France Inter. Il comparait – ou assimilait je ne sais – Marine Le Pen à une primate: Taubira, c’était dégueulasse; mais pour une Le Pen, c’est normal. Digne conclusion de la quinzaine de la haine (et de l’antifascisme nigaud) que nous a offerte la radio publique. Elisabeth Lévy
The paradox of France is that it is desperate for reform — and desperate not to be reformed. It wants the benefits of a job-producing competitive economy but fears relinquishing a job-protecting uncompetitive one. A Macron presidency will have to devote its intellectual and rhetorical energies to explaining that it can be one or the other, but not both. I don’t want to close this column without allowing for the awful chance that Le Pen might win. That would be a moral tragedy for France and a probable disaster for Europe. But it would also be a reminder that chronic economic stagnation inevitably begets nationalist furies. In the United States, a complacent left acquits itself too easily of its role in paving the way to the Trump presidency. Many of Le Pen’s supporters might be bigots, but their case against the self-satisfaction, self-dealing, moral preening and economic incompetence of the French ruling classes is nearly impeccable. Bret Stephens
Nous qui vivons dans les régions côtières des villes bleues, nous lisons plus de livres et nous allons plus souvent au théâtre que ceux qui vivent au fin fond du pays. Nous sommes à la fois plus sophistiqués et plus cosmopolites – parlez-nous de nos voyages scolaires en Chine et en Provence ou, par exemple, de notre intérêt pour le bouddhisme. Mais par pitié, ne nous demandez pas à quoi ressemble la vie dans l’Amérique rouge. Nous n’en savons rien. Nous ne savons pas qui sont Tim LaHaye et Jerry B. Jenkins. […] Nous ne savons pas ce que peut bien dire James Dobson dans son émission de radio écoutée par des millions d’auditeurs. Nous ne savons rien de Reba et Travis. […] Nous sommes très peu nombreux à savoir ce qu’il se passe à Branson dans le Missouri, même si cette ville reçoit quelque sept millions de touristes par an; pas plus que nous ne pouvons nommer ne serait-ce que cinq pilotes de stock-car. […] Nous ne savons pas tirer au fusil ni même en nettoyer un, ni reconnaître le grade d’un officier rien qu’à son insigne. Quant à savoir à quoi ressemble une graine de soja poussée dans un champ… David Brooks
Vous allez dans certaines petites villes de Pennsylvanie où, comme ans beaucoup de petites villes du Middle West, les emplois ont disparu depuis maintenant 25 ans et n’ont été remplacés par rien d’autre (…) Et il n’est pas surprenant qu’ils deviennent pleins d’amertume, qu’ils s’accrochent aux armes à feu ou à la religion, ou à leur antipathie pour ceux qui ne sont pas comme eux, ou encore à un sentiment d’hostilité envers les immigrants. Barack Hussein Obama (2008)
Pour généraliser, en gros, vous pouvez placer la moitié des partisans de Trump dans ce que j’appelle le panier des pitoyables. Les racistes, sexistes, homophobes, xénophobes, islamophobes. A vous de choisir. Hillary Clinton
America is coming apart. For most of our nation’s history, whatever the inequality in wealth between the richest and poorest citizens, we maintained a cultural equality known nowhere else in the world—for whites, anyway. (…) But t’s not true anymore, and it has been progressively less true since the 1960s. People are starting to notice the great divide. The tea party sees the aloofness in a political elite that thinks it knows best and orders the rest of America to fall in line. The Occupy movement sees it in an economic elite that lives in mansions and flies on private jets. Each is right about an aspect of the problem, but that problem is more pervasive than either political or economic inequality. What we now face is a problem of cultural inequality. When Americans used to brag about « the American way of life »—a phrase still in common use in 1960—they were talking about a civic culture that swept an extremely large proportion of Americans of all classes into its embrace. It was a culture encompassing shared experiences of daily life and shared assumptions about central American values involving marriage, honesty, hard work and religiosity. Over the past 50 years, that common civic culture has unraveled. We have developed a new upper class with advanced educations, often obtained at elite schools, sharing tastes and preferences that set them apart from mainstream America. At the same time, we have developed a new lower class, characterized not by poverty but by withdrawal from America’s core cultural institutions. (…) Why have these new lower and upper classes emerged? For explaining the formation of the new lower class, the easy explanations from the left don’t withstand scrutiny. It’s not that white working class males can no longer make a « family wage » that enables them to marry. The average male employed in a working-class occupation earned as much in 2010 as he did in 1960. It’s not that a bad job market led discouraged men to drop out of the labor force. Labor-force dropout increased just as fast during the boom years of the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s as it did during bad years. (…) As I’ve argued in much of my previous work, I think that the reforms of the 1960s jump-started the deterioration. Changes in social policy during the 1960s made it economically more feasible to have a child without having a husband if you were a woman or to get along without a job if you were a man; safer to commit crimes without suffering consequences; and easier to let the government deal with problems in your community that you and your neighbors formerly had to take care of. But, for practical purposes, understanding why the new lower class got started isn’t especially important. Once the deterioration was under way, a self-reinforcing loop took hold as traditionally powerful social norms broke down. Because the process has become self-reinforcing, repealing the reforms of the 1960s (something that’s not going to happen) would change the trends slowly at best. Meanwhile, the formation of the new upper class has been driven by forces that are nobody’s fault and resist manipulation. The economic value of brains in the marketplace will continue to increase no matter what, and the most successful of each generation will tend to marry each other no matter what. As a result, the most successful Americans will continue to trend toward consolidation and isolation as a class. Changes in marginal tax rates on the wealthy won’t make a difference. Increasing scholarships for working-class children won’t make a difference. The only thing that can make a difference is the recognition among Americans of all classes that a problem of cultural inequality exists and that something has to be done about it. That « something » has nothing to do with new government programs or regulations. Public policy has certainly affected the culture, unfortunately, but unintended consequences have been as grimly inevitable for conservative social engineering as for liberal social engineering. The « something » that I have in mind has to be defined in terms of individual American families acting in their own interests and the interests of their children. Doing that in Fishtown requires support from outside. There remains a core of civic virtue and involvement in working-class America that could make headway against its problems if the people who are trying to do the right things get the reinforcement they need—not in the form of government assistance, but in validation of the values and standards they continue to uphold. The best thing that the new upper class can do to provide that reinforcement is to drop its condescending « nonjudgmentalism. » Married, educated people who work hard and conscientiously raise their kids shouldn’t hesitate to voice their disapproval of those who defy these norms. When it comes to marriage and the work ethic, the new upper class must start preaching what it practices. Charles Murray
Murray, the W.H. Brady Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, contends that before the 1960s, Americans of all classes participated in a traditional common culture of civic and social engagement that valued marriage, industriousness, honesty and religiosity — credited as « American exceptionalism » by Alexis de Tocqueville in his 19th century classic « Democracy in America. » Today, that culture persists among highly educated elites, winners in globalization’s economic redistribution, but those vigorous virtues are dissolving among globalization’s losers, the 21st century working class. Increased demographic segregation means that the elites who run the nation know little about the ominous cultural breakdown creeping up the socioeconomic ladder. Murray describes a new, highly educated upper class of the most successful 5% of professionals and managers who direct the nation’s major institutions. Most reside in high-income, socially homogeneous « super ZIP Codes » near urban power centers. Exclusivity is self-reinforcing: Elites socialize primarily with and marry one another (« homogamy »), ensuring their children’s future dominance based on genetic intelligence, other inherited talents and a high-achievement culture nourished by access to elite educational institutions. To emphasize that the new cultural divide is largely based on class, not race/ethnicity, Murray confines core sections of « Coming Apart » to comparing socio-cultural differences among middle-aged whites (age 30-49) in two communities: upper-middle-class Belmont, Mass., and working-class Fishtown, Pa. (Murray builds somewhat « fictionalized » versions of these communities through statistically adjusted models that control for age, race, income and occupation to heighten the contrasts between them.) Belmont represents perhaps 20% of the total U.S. population; Fishtown, about 30%. Murray reveals alarming levels of social isolation and disengagement among Fishtown’s working-class whites. By the early 2000s, only 48% were married, down from 84% in 1960; children living in households with both biological parents fell from 96% to 37%; the number of disabled quintupled from 2% to 10%; arrest rates for violent crime quadrupled from 125 to 592 per 100,000 people; and the percent attending church only once a year nearly doubled from 35% to 59%. In 2008, almost 12% of prime-age males with a high school diploma were « not in the labor force » — quadruple the percentage from the all-time low of 3% in 1968. The well-educated, upper-middle-class whites in Murray’s Belmont model fare far better: 83% are married; 84% of children reside in two-biological-parent homes; less than 1% are on disability, though nearly 40% attend church only once a year. Nearly all adult males are in the workforce. The primary problem with « Coming Apart » is that Murray’s focus on a cultural divide among whites obscures something else: The destruction of values, economic sectors and entire occupational classes by automation and outsourcing. And don’t forget the massive movements of cheap legal and illegal immigrant labor: This factor sets up a classic conflict, the ethnically split labor market, in which you find unionized working-class whites pitted against minority newcomers who are willing to work for less (sometimes « off the books » and under abysmal conditions). Frederick Lynch
Experts have warned for years now that our rates of geographic mobility have fallen to troubling lows. Given that some areas have unemployment rates around 2 percent and others many times that, this lack of movement may mean joblessness for those who could otherwise work. But from the community’s perspective, mobility can be a problem. The economist Matthew Kahn has shown that in Appalachia, for instance, the highly skilled are much likelier to leave not just their hometowns but also the region as a whole. This is the classic “brain drain” problem: Those who are able to leave very often do. The brain drain also encourages a uniquely modern form of cultural detachment. Eventually, the young people who’ve moved out marry — typically to partners with similar economic prospects. They raise children in increasingly segregated neighborhoods, giving rise to something the conservative scholar Charles Murray calls “super ZIPs.” These super ZIPs are veritable bastions of opportunity and optimism, places where divorce and joblessness are rare. As one of my college professors recently told me about higher education, “The sociological role we play is to suck talent out of small towns and redistribute it to big cities.” There have always been regional and class inequalities in our society, but the data tells us that we’re living through a unique period of segregation. This has consequences beyond the purely material. Jesse Sussell and James A. Thomson of the RAND Corporation argue that this geographic sorting has heightened the polarization that now animates politics. This polarization reflects itself not just in our voting patterns, but also in our political culture: Not long before the election, a friend forwarded me a conspiracy theory about Bill and Hillary Clinton’s involvement in a pedophilia ring and asked me whether it was true. It’s easy to dismiss these questions as the ramblings of “fake news” consumers. But the more difficult truth is that people naturally trust the people they know — their friend sharing a story on Facebook — more than strangers who work for faraway institutions. And when we’re surrounded by polarized, ideologically homogeneous crowds, whether online or off, it becomes easier to believe bizarre things about them. This problem runs in both directions: I’ve heard ugly words uttered about “flyover country” and some of its inhabitants from well-educated, generally well-meaning people. I’ve long worried whether I’ve become a part of this problem. For two years, I’d lived in Silicon Valley, surrounded by other highly educated transplants with seemingly perfect lives. It’s jarring to live in a world where every person feels his life will only get better when you came from a world where many rightfully believe that things have become worse. And I’ve suspected that this optimism blinds many in Silicon Valley to the real struggles in other parts of the country. So I decided to move home, to Ohio. (…) we often frame civic responsibility in terms of government taxes and transfer payments, so that our society’s least fortunate families are able to provide basic necessities. But this focus can miss something important: that what many communities need most is not just financial support, but talent and energy and committed citizens to build viable businesses and other civic institutions. Of course, not every town can or should be saved. Many people should leave struggling places in search of economic opportunity, and many of them won’t be able to return. Some people will move back to their hometowns; others, like me, will move back to their home state. The calculation will undoubtedly differ for each person, as it should. But those of us who are lucky enough to choose where we live would do well to ask ourselves, as part of that calculation, whether the choices we make for ourselves are necessarily the best for our home communities — and for the country. J. D. Vance
“ Hillbilly Elegy ” is a very important book and it also resonated with me in a very personal way because I also experienced the problems of rural poverty. I grew up in a small town in Western Pennsylvania. My father was a coal miner. He worked in these coal mines of Western Pennsylvania and occasionally he worked in steel mills in Western Pennsylvania. He died at the age of 39, with a lung disease. Left my mother with six kids and I was the oldest at 12 years of age. My father had a 10th grade education, my mother had a 10th grade education. My mother who lived to the ripe old age of 94, raised us by cleaning house occasionally. Initially we were on relief. We call it welfare now. She got off welfare and supported us by cleaning house; and what I distinctly remember about growing up in rural poverty is hunger. (…) Now, given my family background, black person, black family in rural poverty; as one of my colleagues at Harvard told me, the odds that I would end up at Harvard as a University professor and capital U on University, are very nearly zero. Like J.D. I’m an outlier. An outlier in — Malcolm Gladwell says in his book “ Outlier, The Study of Success. ” We are both outliers; but it’s interesting that J.D. never talks about holding himself up by his own bootstraps, and that’s something that I reject. I don’t refer to myself that way, because both J.D. and I, were in the right places at the right times, and we had significant individuals who were there to rescue us from poverty and enabled us to escape. We are the outliers being at the right place at the right time, and when I think about your question, that’s one thing I think about; how lucky I was. I had some significant individuals who helped me escape poverty. (…) ointing out some differences that I have with J.D. It’s really kind of a matter of emphasis. Not that we differ, it’s just a matter of emphasis. First of all, we both agree that too many liberal social scientists focus on social structure and ignore cultural conditions. You know, they talk about poverty, joblessness and discrimination, but they also don’t talk about some of the cultural conditions, that grow out of these situations, in response to these situations. Too many conservatives focus on cultural forces and ignore structural factors. Now J.D. has made the same point in “ Hillbilly Elegy ” and you also have made the same point in some subsequent interviews talking about the book. Now where we disagree and this relates back to your question, Camille, is in the interpretation of these cultural factors. J.D. places a lot of emphasis on agency. That people even in the most impoverished circumstances have choices that can either improve or exacerbate their situation, their predicaments. And I also think that a gency is important and should not be ignored, even in situations where individuals confront overwhelming structural impediments. But what J.D., and I’d like to hear your response to this J.D., wha t you don’t make explicit or emphasize enough from my point of view, is that agency is also constrained by these structural factors, even among people who you know, make positive choices to improve their lives, there are still constraints and I maintain th at the part of your book where you talking about agency, really cries out for a deeper interrogation. A deeper interrogation of how personal a gency is expanded or inhibited by the circumstance that the poor or working classes confront, including you know, their interactions and families, social networks , and institutions, in these distressed communities. In other words, what I’m trying to suggest is that personal agency is recursively associated with the structural forces within which it operates. And here you know, it’s sort of insightful to talk about intermediaries and insightful to talk about people who aid, who help you in making choices, and you do that well in the book. But here’s the point, given the American belief system on poverty and welfare in which Americans as you point out Camille, place far greater emphasis on personal shortcomings as opposed to structural barriers and especially when you’re talking about the behavior of African Americans. I believe that explanations that focus — don’t get me wrong, you don’t even talk about African Americans in the sense, I’m talking about people out there in the general public. Given this focus on personal shortcomings as opposed to structural barriers in a common for outcomes, I believe that explanations that focus on agency are likely to overshadow explanations that focus on structural impediments. Some people read a book, but they’re not that sophisticated, the take away will be those personal factors and you know, I would have liked to have seen you sort of try to put things in context you know. Talk about the constraints that people have. Now this relates to the second point I want to make. In addition, to feeling that they have little control over themselves, that is lack of agency. You point out that the individuals in these hillbilly communities tend to blame themselves — I’m sorry, blame everyone but themselves, and the term you used to explain this phenomenon is cognitive dissonance, when our beliefs are not consistent with our behaviors. And I agree, and many people often do tend to blame others and not themselves, but I think that when we talk about cognitive dissonance, we also have to recognize that individuals in these communities do indeed have some complaints, some justifiable complaints, including complaints about industries that have pulled off stakes and relocated to cheaper labor areas overseas and in the process, have devastated communities like Middletown, Ohio. Including complaints about automation replacing the jobs of cashiers and parking lot attendants. Including the complaints that government and corporate actions have undermined unions and therefore led to a decrease in the wages or workers in Middletown. (…) And let me also point out, here’s where we really do agree. We both agree that there are cultural practices within families and so on and in communities that reinforce problems created by the structural barriers. (…) Practiced behaviors that perpetuate poverty and disadvantage. So, this we agree. Too often liberals ignore the role of these cultural forces in perpetuating or reinforcing conditions associated with poverty or concentrated (inaudible). (…) even in extreme property, my mother kept telling me, you’re going to college. And my Aunt Janice also reinforced — my Aunt Janice was the first person in my extended family who got a college education, and I used to go to New York to visit her during the summer months, and I said you know, I want to be like Aunt Janice, you know? (…) you really see this when you look at neighborhoods. Neighborhoods in which an overwhelming majority of the population are poor, but employed are entirely different from neighborhoods in which people are poor but jobless. Jobless neighborhoods trigger all kinds of problems. Crime, drug addiction, gang behavior, violence. And one of the things that I had focused on when I wrote my book, When Work Disappears is what happens to intercity neighborhoods that experience increasing levels of joblessness. And we did some research in Chicago and it was really you know, sad, talking to some of the mothers who were just fearful about allowing their children to go outside because the neighborhood was so incredibly dangerous. And I remember talking with one woman and she says — who was obese and she says you know, I went to the doctor he said that I should go out and exercise. Can you imagine jogging in this neighborhood? Because the joblessness had created problems among young people who were trying to make ends meet and they’re involved in crime and drugs and so on. So, I would say that if you want to focus on improving neighborhoods, the first thing that I would do would try to increase or enhance employment opportunities. (…) I don’t know if the conditions have changed that much, since I wrote The Truly Disadvantaged. The one big difference is that I think there’s increasing technology and automation that has created problems for a lot of low skilled workers. You know, I mentioned automation replacing jobs that cashiers held, and parking lot attendants held. So, you have a combination not only of the relocation of industries overseas, that I talked about in The Truly Disadvantaged; but now you have increasing automation and technology replacing jobs, and this worries me because I think that people who have poor education are going to be in difficult situations increasingly down the road. You look at intercity schools, not only schools in intercities, but in many other neighborhoods, and kids are not being properly educated. So, they’re not being prepared for the changes that are occurring in the economy. I remember one social scientist saying that it’s as if — talking about the black population. It’s as if racism and racial discrimination put black people in their place only to watch increasing technology and automation destroy that place. So, the one significant difference from the time I wrote The Truly Disadvantaged in 1987, is the growing problems created by increasing technology for the poor.(…) it seems that poor whites right now are more pessimistic than any group, and the question is why. I was sort of impressed with your analysis of the white working class in the age of Trump. You know, you pointed out that when Barack Obama became president there were a lot of people in your community who were really struggling and who believe that the modern American meritocracy did not seem to apply to them. These people were not doing well, and then you have this black president who’s a successful product of meritocracy who has raised the hope of African Americans and he represented every positive thing that these working-class folks that you write about did not possess or lacked. And Trump emerged as candidate who sort of spoke to these people. What is interesting is that if you look at the Pew Research polls, recent Pew Research polls, I think you pointed this out in your book, the working-class whites right now are more pessimistic than any other group about their economic future and their children’s future. Now is that pessimism justified? I think they’re overly pessimistic. I still maintain that to be black, poor and jobless is worse than being white, poor and jobless, okay? But, for some reason, the white poor is more pessimistic. Now I think with respect to the black poor and working class has kind of an Obama effect you know. I think that may wear off and then blacks will become even more equally as pessimistic as whites in a few years. (this reminds me of your points J.D., reminds me of a paper that Robert Sampson, a colleague at Harvard and I wrote in 1995 entitled Toward a Theory of Race, Crime and Urban Inequality. A paper that has become a classic actually in the field of criminology because it’s generated dozens of research studies. Our basic thesis we were addressing you know, race and violent crime, is that racial disparities and violent crime are attributable in large part to the persistent structural disadvantages that are disproportionately concentrated in African American urban communities. Nonetheless, we argue that the ultimate cause of crime were similar for both whites and blacks, and we pose a central question. In American cities, it is possible to reproduce in white communities the structural circumstances under which many blacks live. You know, the whites haven’t fully experienced the structural reality that blacks have experienced does not negate the power of our theory because we argue had whites been exposed to the same structural conditions as blacks then white communities would behave – – the crime rate would be in the predicted direction. And then we had an epiphany. What about the rural white communities that you talk about. Where you’re not only talking about joblessness, you’re not only talking about poverty, but you’re also talking about family structure. So, here in Appalachia, you could reproduce some of the conditions that exist in intercity neighborhoods and therefore it would be good to test our theory in these areas because we’d be looking at the family structure. The rates of single parent families. We’d be looking at joblessness, we’d be loo king at poverty. So, we need to move beyond the urban areas and see if we can look at communities that come close to approximating or even worse in some cases, and some intercity neighborhoods. (…) Mark Lilla and a number of other post-election analysts observed that as you point out that the Democrats should not make the same mistake that they made in the last election, namely an attempt to mobilize people of color, women, immigrants and the LGBT community with identity politics. They tended to ignore the problems of poor white Americans. I was watching the Democratic convention with my wife on a cruise to Alaska, and one concern I had was there did not seem to be any representatives on the stage representing poor white America. I could just see some of these poor whites saying they don’t care about us. They’ve got all these blacks, they’ve got immigrants, they’ve got (inaudible), but you don’t have any of us on the stage. Maybe I’m overstating the point, but I was concerned about that. Now one notable exception, critics like Mark Lilla point out was Bernie Sanders. Bernie Sanders had a progressive and unifying populous economic message in the Democratic primaries. A message that resonated with a significant segment of the white lower-class population. Lower class, working class populations. Bernie Sanders was not the Democratic nominee and Donald Trump was able to, as we all know, capture notable support from these populations with a divisive not unifying populous message. I agree with Mark Lilla that we don’t want to make the same mistake again. We’ve go to reach out to all groups. We’ve got to start to focus on coalition politics. We have to develop a sense of interdependence where groups come to recognize that they can’t accomplish goals without the support of other groups. We have to frame issues differently. We can’t go the same route. We can’t give up on the white working class. (…) Addressing the question of increase in economic segregation. People don’t realize that racial segregation is on the decline, while economic segregation is a segregation of families by income is on the increase. William Julius Wilson
I’m a bit of a fan boy of William Julius Wilson as I wrote Hillbilly Elegy, so it was real exciting to be able to get him to sign this book.  (…) Culture (…) is a really, really, difficult and amorphous concept to define, and one of the things that I was trying to do with “ Hillbilly Elegy ” is try to in some ways draw the discussion away from this structure versus personal responsibility narrative and convince us to look at culture as a third and I think very important variable. I often think that the way that conservatives, and I’m a conservative, talk about culture is in some ways an excuse to end the conversation instead of starting a much more important conversation. It’s look at their bad culture, look at their deficient culture, we can’t do anything to help them; instead of trying to understand culture as this much bigger social and institutional force that really is important that some cases can come from problems related to poverty and some cases can come from a host of different factors that are difficult to understand. So, here’s what I mean by that. One of the most important I think cultural problems that I talk about is the prevalence of family and stability and family trauma in some of the communities that I write about; and I take it as a given that that trauma and that instability is really bad, that it has really negative downstream effects on whether children are able to get an education, whether their able to enter the workforce, whether they’re  able to raise and maintain successful families themselves. I think it’s tempting to sort of look at the problems of family instability and families like mine and say there’s a structural problem if only people had access to better economic opportunities, they wouldn’t have this problem. I think that’s partially true, but also consequently partially false. I think there’s a tendency on the right to look at that and say these parents need to take better care of their families and of their children, and unless they do it, there’s nothing that we can do. And I think again, that is maybe partially true, but it’s also very significantly false. What I’m trying to point to in this concept of culture, is we know that when children grow up in very unstable families that it has important cognitive effects, we know that it has important psychological effects, and unless we understand the problem of family instability and trauma, not just as a structural problem, or problem with personal responsibility, but as a long-term problem, in some cases inherited from multiple generations back, then we’re not going to be able to appreciate what’s really going on in some of these families and why family instability and trauma is so durable and so difficult to actually solve. So, I tend to think of culture as in some ways, this way to sum all of the things that are neither structural nor individual. What is it that’s going on in people’s environments good and bad that make it difficult for them to climb out of poverty. What are the things that they inherit. It’s not just from their own families, but from multiple generations back. Behaviors, expectations, environmental attitudes that make it really hard for them to succeed and do well. That’s the concept of culture that I think is most important, and also frankly that I think is missing a little bit from our political conversation when we talk about these questions of poverty, we’re really comfortable talking about personal responsibility, we’re really comfortable talking about structural problems. We don’t often talk about culture in this way that I’m trying to talk about it, in “ Hillbilly Elegy. ” (…) the second point that I wanted to make (…) is this question of Agency and whether I overemphasize the role of Agency. I think that for me, this is a really tough line to tow because I’m sort of writing about these problems you know, having in my personal memory, I’m not that far removed from a lot of them. I know that myself, one of the biggest problems that I faced was that I really did start to give up on myself early in high school, and I think that’s a really significant problem. At the same time, I understand and recognize the problem that Bill mentions which is that we have this tendency to sort of overemphasize Personal Agency and to proverbially blame the victim for a lot of these problems. So, what I was trying to do with this discussion of Personal Agency in the book, and I may have failed, but this is the effort, this is what I’m really trying to accomplish. Is that the first instance, I do think that it’s important for kids like me in circumstances like mine, to pick up the book and to have at least some reinforcement of the Agency that they have. I do think that’s a significant problem from the prospective of kids who grew up in communities like mine. The second thing that I’m trying to do, is talk about Personal Agency, not jus t from the prospective of individual poor people, but from the entire community that surrounds them. So, one of the things that I talk about is as religious communities in these areas, do they have the, as I say in the book, toughness to build Churches that encourage more social engagement as opposed to more social disaffection. I think that’s a question of Personal Agency, not from the perspective of the impoverished kid, but from a religious leader and community leaders that exist in their neighborhood. So, I think that sense of Personal Agency is really important. One of the worries that I have, is that when we talk about the problems of impoverished kids and this is especially true amongst sort of my generation, so this is — I’m a tail end of t he millennials here, is that we tend to think about helping people, 10 million people at a time a very superficial level, and one of the calls to action that I make in the book with this — by pointing out to Personal Agency is the idea that it can be really impactful to make a difference in 10 lives at a very deep level at the community level. And I think that sometimes is missing from these conversations. And then, the final point that I’ll make is that there’s a difference between recognizing the importance of Personal Agency and I think ignoring the role of structural factors in some of these problems, right? So, the example that I used to highlight this in the book is this question of addiction. So, there’s some interesting research that suggests that people who believe inherently that their addiction is a disease, show slightly less proclivity to actually fight that addiction and overcome that addiction. So, that creates sort of a catch 22, because we know there are biological components to addiction. We know that there are these sorts of structural non-personal decision-making drivers of addiction, and yet, if you totally buy in to the non-individual choice explanation for addiction, you show less of a proclivity to fight it. So, I think that there is this really tough under current to some of our discussions on these issues, where as a society we want to simultaneously recognize the barriers that people face, but also encourage them not to play a terrible hand in a terrible way, and that’s what I’m trying to do with this discussion of Personal Agency. The final point that I’ll make on that, is that the person who towed that line better than anyone I’ve ever known was my Grandma, my Ma’ma who I think is in some ways the hero of the book. She always told me. Look J.D., like is unfair for us, but don’t be like those people who think the deck is hopelessly stacked against them. I think that’s a sentiment that you hear far too infrequently among America’s elites. This simultaneous recognition that life is unfair for a lot of poor Americans, but that we still have to emphasize the role of individual agency in spite of that unfairness and I think that’s again a difficult balancing act. I may not have struck that balancing act perfectly in the book, but that was the intention. (…) the first thing is definitely you know, going back to my grandma. I think if anybody had a reason for pessimism and cynicism about the future, it was her. It’s sort of difficult to imagine a woman who had lived a more difficult life and yet ma’ma had this constant optimism about the future, in the sense that we had to do better because that was just the way that America worked. I mean I think that she was this woman who had this deep and abiding faith in the American dream in a way that is obviously disappearing And in fact, as I wrote about in the book, was I started to see disappearing even you know, when I was a young kid in my early 20’s. So, I think that my grandma was a huge part of that. I also think that the Marine Corp was a really huge part of that, and this is sort of a transformational experience that I write about in the book. The military is this really remarkable institution. It brings people from diverse backgrounds together, gets them on the same team. Gets them marching proverbially and literally towards the same goal, and for a kid who had grown up in a community that was starting to lose faith in that American dream, I think that the military was a really useful way to, as I say in the book, teach a certain amount of willfulness as opposed to despair and hopelessness. So, I think that was a really critical piece of it. (…) On the other hand, one thing I really worried about and one thing that I increasingly worried about as I actually did research for the book, is this idea of faith and religion, not just as something that people believe in, but as an actual positive institutional and social role player in their lives. And one of the things you do see, that this is something that Charles Murray’s written about, is that you see the institutions of faith declining in some of these lower income communities faster than you do in middle and upper income communities. I don’t think you have to be a person of faith to think that that’s worrisome. I think you can just read a paper by Jonathan Gruber that talks about all of these really positive social impacts of being a regular participatory Church member. So, you know, I think I was lucky in that sense, but a lot of folks, and when I look at the community right now, it worries me a little bit that you don’t see these robust social institutions in the same way that you certainly did 30, 40 years ago, and even when I was growing up in Middletown. The last point that I’ll make about that, is that (…) these trends often take half a century or more to really reveal themselves and I do sometimes see signs of resilience in some of these communities that I sort of didn’t fully anticipate and didn’t expect when the book was published. So, one of the things I’ve started to realize for example is when we talk about the decline of institutional faith, even though I continue to worry about that, one of the institutions that’s actually picked up the slack are groups like Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous. They almost have this faith effect. It brings people together. There’s even a sort of liturgical element to some of these meetings that I find really, really fascinating and interesting. So, people try to find and replace community when it’s lost but you know, clearly, they haven’t at least as of yet, replaced it even remotely to the degree that it has been lost which is why I think you see some of the issues that we do. (…) on this question of identity politics, I think that what worries me is that a lot — it’s not a recognition that there are disadvantaged non-white groups that need some help or there needs to be some closing of the gap you know. When I talk to folks back home, very conservative people, they’re actually pretty open-minded if you talk about the problems that exist in the black ghetto because of problems of concentrated poverty and the fact that the black ghetto was in some ways created by housing policy. It was the choice of black Americans. It was in some ways created by housing policy. I find actually a lot of openness when I talk to friends and family about that. What I find no openness about is when somebody who they don’t know, and who they think judges them, points at them and says you need to apologize for your white privilege. So, I think that in some ways making these questions of disadvantage zero sum, is really toxic, but I think that’s one way that the Democrats really lost the white working class in the 2016 election. The second piece that occurs to me, and this applies across the political spectrum, is that what we’re trying to do in the United States, it’s very easy to be cynical about American politics, but we’re rying to build a multi-racial, multi-ethnic, multi-religious nation, not just a conglomeration, an actual nation of people from all of these different tribes and unify them around a common creed. I think that’s really delicate. It’s basically never been done success fully over a long period in human history and I think it requires a certain amount of rhetorical finesse that we don’t see from many of our politicians on either side these days and that really, really worries me. (…) my general worry with the college education in the book at large is sort of two things. So, the first is that, I think we’ve constructed a society effectively in which a college education is now the only pathway to the middle class, and I think that’s a real failure on our part. It’s not something you see in every country, and I don’t think it necessarily has to be the case here. There are other ways to get post-secondary education and I absolutely think that we have to make that easier, and I really see this as sort of the defining policy challenge of the next 10 years is to create more of those pathways; because the second born on this is that college is a really, really culturally terrifying place for a lot of working class people. We can try to make it less culturally terrifying, we can try to make for the elites of our universities a little bit more welcoming to folks like me, and this is something that I wrote about in the book, really feeling like a true outsider at Yale for the first time, in an educational institution. I think that we also have to acknowledge that part of the reason that people feel like cultural outsiders is for reasons that aren’t necessarily going to be easy to fix, and if we don’t create more pathways for these folks, we shouldn’t be surprised that a lot of them aren’t going to take the one pathway that’s there, that effectively runs through a culturally alien institution.  (…) in certain areas, especially in Ohio, Kentucky, West Virginia and so forth. I think the biggest under reported problem for the baby boomers is the fact that they are taking care of children that they didn’t necessarily anticipate taking care of because of the opioid crisis. This is the biggest dr iver of elder poverty in the State of Ohio, is that you have entire families that have been transplanted from one generation to the next. They were planning for retirement based on one social security income, and now all of a sudden, they have two, three additional mouths to feed. I think my concern for the baby boom generation is especially those folks of course because it’s not just bad for them, it’s bad for these children who are all of a sudden thrown into poverty because of the opioid addition of that middle generation of the parents, of the kids and the sons and daughters of the grandkids. And then the very last question, culture, I think of as a way to understand the sum of the environmental impacts that you can’t necessarily define as structural rights, so the effects of family instability and trauma that exists in people, the effects of social capital and social networks in people’s lives, You know, all of these things I think add up to a broad set of variables that can either promote upward mobility or inhibit upward mobility; and again I think we very often talk about job opportunities and educational opportunities, we very often talk about individual responsibility and Personal Agency. We very rarely I think talk about those middle layers and those institutional factors that in a lot of ways are the real drivers of this problem. (…) on the inequality and concentration wealth, the top thing, I’ll say this one area where I actually think conservative senator Mike Leaf from Utah has had some really, really, interesting ideas. One of the tax reform proposals Senator Leaf has advocated for is actually setting the capital taxation rate at the same rate as the ordinary income rate. Because that’s what’s really driving this difference, right. It’s not ordinary income earners. It’s not salaried professionals. Those Richard Reeve says that’s a problem. It’s primarily actually that folks in the global economy, especially the ultra-elite, folks in the global economy have achieved some sort of economic lift off from the rest of the country and I think that in light of that, it doesn’t make a ton of sense that we continue to have the taxation policy that we do. Frankly, that’s one of the reasons why I am sort of so conflicted about President Trump because I think in some ways instinctively at least the President recognizes this, but we’ll see what actually happens with tax reform over the next few months. The question about job competition is absolutely correct. You can’t just have a better educated workforce but hold the number of workers constant. At the same time, I do think there’s a bit of a chicken and egg problem here right because you know, while the skills gap is overplayed and while it violates all of these rules of Econ 101, one of the things you hear pretty consistently from folks who would l ike to expand, would like to hire more, would like to produce more, is that there are real labor force constraints, especially in what might be called non-cognitive skills, right; and this is a thing that you hear a lot. In my home state if you really want to hire more, and you really want to produce more, and sell more, then the problem is the opioid epidemic has effectively thinned the pool of people who were even able to work. So, I do think that productivity is really important, but I also think that we tend to think of these things in too mathematical and sort of hyper-rational ways, but part of the reason productivity is held back, is because we have real problems in the labor market, and if you fix one, you could help another, and they may create a virtuous cycle. J.D. Vance
It is immoral because it perpetuates a lie: that the white working class that finds itself attracted to Trump has been victimized by outside forces. It hasn’t. The white middle class may like the idea of Trump as a giant pulsing humanoid middle finger held up in the face of the Cathedral, they may sing hymns to Trump the destroyer and whisper darkly about “globalists” and — odious, stupid term — “the Establishment,” but nobody did this to them. They failed themselves. If you spend time in hardscrabble, white upstate New York, or eastern Kentucky, or my own native West Texas, and you take an honest look at the welfare dependency, the drug and alcohol addiction, the family anarchy — which is to say, the whelping of human children with all the respect and wisdom of a stray dog — you will come to an awful realization. It wasn’t Beijing. It wasn’t even Washington, as bad as Washington can be. It wasn’t immigrants from Mexico, excessive and problematic as our current immigration levels are. It wasn’t any of that. Nothing happened to them. There wasn’t some awful disaster. There wasn’t a war or a famine or a plague or a foreign occupation. Even the economic changes of the past few decades do very little to explain the dysfunction and negligence — and the incomprehensible malice — of poor white America. So the gypsum business in Garbutt ain’t what it used to be. There is more to life in the 21st century than wallboard and cheap sentimentality about how the Man closed the factories down. The truth about these dysfunctional, downscale communities is that they deserve to die. Economically, they are negative assets. Morally, they are indefensible. Forget all your cheap theatrical Bruce Springsteen crap. Forget your sanctimony about struggling Rust Belt factory towns and your conspiracy theories about the wily Orientals stealing our jobs. Forget your goddamned gypsum, and, if he has a problem with that, forget Ed Burke, too. The white American underclass is in thrall to a vicious, selfish culture whose main products are misery and used heroin needles. Donald Trump’s speeches make them feel good. So does OxyContin. What they need isn’t analgesics, literal or political. They need real opportunity, which means that they need real change, which means that they need U-Haul. Williamson
This book is about (…) what goes on in the lives of real people when the industrial economy goes south. It’s about reacting to bad circumstances in the worst way possible. It’s about a culture that increasingly encourages social decay instead of counteracting it. The problems that I saw at the tile warehouse run far deeper than macroeconomic trends and policy. too many young men immune to hard work. Good jobs impossible to fill for any length of time. And a young man [one of Vance’s co-workers] with every reason to work — a wife-to-be to support and a baby on the way — carelessly tossing aside a good job with excellent health insurance. More troublingly, when it was all over, he thought something had been done to him. There is a lack of agency here — a feeling that you have little control over your life and a willingness to blame everyone but yourself. This is distinct from the larger economic landscape of modern America. (…) People talk about hard work all the time in places like Middletown [where Vance grew up]. You can walk through a town where 30 percent of the young men work fewer than twenty hours a week and find not a single person aware of his own laziness. (…) I learned little else about what masculinity required of me other than drinking beer and screaming at a woman when she screamed at you. In the end, the only lesson that took was that you can’t depend on people. “I learned that men will disappear at the drop of a hat,” Lindsay [his half-sister] once said. “They don’t care about their kids; they don’t provide; they just disappear, and it’s not that hard to make them go.” (…) Dad’s church offered something desperately needed by people like me. For alcoholics, it gave them a community of support and a sense that they weren’t fighting addiction alone. For expectant mothers, it offered a free home with job training and parenting classes. When someone needed a job, church friends could either provide one or make introductions. When Dad faced financial troubles, his church banded together and purchased a used car for the family. In the broken world I saw around me — and for the people struggling in that world — religion offered tangible assistance to keep the faithful on track. (…) Why didn’t our neighbor leave that abusive man? Why did she spend her money on drugs? Why couldn’t she see that her behavior was destroying her daughter? Why were all of these things happening not just to our neighbor but to my mom? It would be years before I learned that no single book, or expert, or field could fully explain the problems of hillbillies in modern America. Our elegy is a sociological one, yes, but it is also about psychology and community and culture and faith. During my junior year of high school, our neighbor Pattie called her landlord to report a leaky roof. The landlord arrived and found Pattie topless, stoned, and unconscious on her living room couch. Upstairs the bathtub was overflowing — hence, the leaking roof. Pattie had apparently drawn herself a bath, taken a few prescription painkillers, and passed out. The top floor of her home and many of her family’s possessions were ruined. This is the reality of our community. It’s about a naked druggie destroying what little of value exists in her life. It’s about children who lose their toys and clothes to a mother’s addiction. This was my world: a world of truly irrational behavior. We spend our way into the poorhouse. We buy giant TVs and iPads. Our children wear nice clothes thanks to high-interest credit cards and payday loans. We purchase homes we don’t need, refinance them for more spending money, and declare bankruptcy, often leaving them full of garbage in our wake. Thrift is inimical to our being. We spend to pretend that we’re upper class. And when the dust clears — when bankruptcy hits or a family member bails us out of our stupidity — there’s nothing left over. Nothing for the kids’ college tuition, no investment to grow our wealth, no rainy-day fund if someone loses her job. We know we shouldn’t spend like this. Sometimes we beat ourselves up over it, but we do it anyway. (…) Our homes are a chaotic mess. We scream and yell at each other like we’re spectators at a football game. At least one member of the family uses drugs — sometimes the father, sometimes both. At especially stressful times, we’ll hit and punch each other, all in front of the rest of the family, including young children; much of the time, the neighbors hear what’s happening. A bad day is when the neighbors call the police to stop the drama. Our kids go to foster care but never stay for long. We apologize to our kids. The kids believe we’re really sorry, and we are. But then we act just as mean a few days later. (…) I once ran into an old acquaintance at a Middletown bar who told me that he had recently quit his job because he was sick of waking up early I later saw him complaining on Facebook about the “Obama economy” and how it had affected his life. I don’t doubt that the Obama economy has affected many, but this man is assuredly not among them. His status in life is directly attributable to the choices he’s made, and his life will improve only through better decisions. But for him to make better choices, he needs to live in an environment that forces him to ask tough questions about himself. There is a cultural movement in the white working class to blame problems on society or the government, and that movement gains adherents by the day. (…) The wealthy and the powerful aren’t just wealthy and powerful; they follow a different set of norms and mores. … It was at this meal, on the first of five grueling days of [law school job] interviews, that I began to understand that I was seeing the inner workings of a system that lay hidden to most of my kind. … That week of interviews showed me that successful people are playing an entirely different game. (…) I believe we hillbillies are the toughest goddamned people on this earth. … But are we tough enough to do what needs to be done to help a kid like Brian? Are we tough enough to build a church that forces kids like me to engage with the world rather than withdraw from it? Are we tough enough to look ourselves in the mirror and admit that our conduct harms our children? Public policy can help, but there is no government that can fix these problems for us. These problems were not created by governments or corporations or anyone else. We created them, and only we can fix them. (…) I believe we hillbillies are the toughest god—-ed people on this earth. But are we tough enough to look ourselves in the mirror and admit that our conduct harms our children? Public policy can help, but there is no government that can fix these problems for us. . . . I don’t know what the answer is precisely, but I know it starts when we stop blaming Obama or Bush or faceless companies and ask ourselves what we can do to make things better.” J.D. Vance
This is the heart of Hillbilly Elegy: how hillbilly white culture fails its children, and how the greatest disadvantages it imparts to its youth are the life of violence and chaos in which they are raised, and the closely related problem of a lack of moral agency. Young Vance was on a road to ruin until certain people — including the US Marine Corps — showed him that his choices mattered, and that he had a lot more control over his fate than he thought. Vance talks about how, in his youth, there was a lot of hardscrabble poverty among his people, but nothing like today, dominated by the devastation of drug addiction. Everything we are accustomed to hearing about black inner city social dysfunction is fully present among these white hillbillies, as Vance documents in great detail. He writes that “hillbillies learn from an early age to deal with uncomfortable truths by avoiding them, or by pretending better truths exist. This tendency might make for psychological resilience, but it also makes it hard for Appalachians to look at themselves honestly.” (…) Vance talks about the hillbilly habit of stigmatizing people who leave the hollers as “too big for your britches” — meaning that you got above yourself. It doesn’t matter that they may have left to find work, and that they’re living a fairly poor life not too far away, in Ohio. The point is, they left, and that is a hard sin to forgive. What, we weren’t good enough for you?  This is the white-people version of “acting white,” if you follow me: the same stigma and shame that poor black people deploy against other poor black people who want to better themselves with education and so on. (…) Vance plainly loves his people, and because he loves them, he tells hard truths about them. He talks about how cultural fatalism destroys initiative. When hillbillies run up against adversity, they tend to assume that they can’t do anything about it. To the hillbilly mind, people who “make it” are either born to wealth, or were born with uncanny talent, winning the genetic lottery. The connection between self-discipline and hard work, and success, is invisible to them. (…) Vance was born into a world of chaos. It takes concentration to follow the trail of family connections. Women give birth out of wedlock, having children by different men. Marriages rarely last, and informal partnerings are more common. Vance has half-siblings by his mom’s different husbands (she has had five to date). In his generation, Vance says, grandparents are often having to raise their grandchildren, because those grandparents, however impoverished and messy their own lives may be, offer a more stable alternative than the incredible instability of the kids’ parents (or more likely, parent). (…) This is what happens in inner-city black culture, as has been exhaustively documented. But these are rural and small-town white people. This dysfunction is not color-based, but cultural. I could not do justice here to describe the violence, emotional and physical, that characterizes everyday life in Vance’s childhood culture, and the instability in people’s outer lives and inner lives. To read in such detail what life is like as a child formed by communities like that is to gain a sense of why it is so difficult to escape from the malign gravity of that way of life. You can’t imagine that life could be any different. Religion among the hillbillies is not much help. Vance says that hillbillies love to talk about Jesus, but they don’t go to church, and Christianity doesn’t seem to have much effect at all on their behavior. Vance’s biological father is an exception. He belonged to a strict fundamentalist church, one that helped him beat his alcoholism and gave him the severe structure he needed to keep his life from going off track. (…) Vance says the best thing about life in his dad’s house was how boring it was. It was predictable. It was a respite from the constant chaos. On the other hand, the religion most hillbillies espouse is a rusticated form of Moralistic Therapeutic Deism. God seems to exist only as a guarantor of ultimate order, and ultimate justice; Jesus is there to assuage one’s pain. Except for those who commit to churchgoing — and believe it or not, this is one of the least churched parts of the US — Christianity is a ghost. (…) One of the most important contributions Vance makes to our understanding of American poverty is how little public policy can affect the cultural habits that keep people poor. He talks about education policy, saying that the elite discussion of how to help schools focuses entirely on reforming institutions. “As a teacher at my old high school told me recently, ‘They want us to be shepherds to these kids. But no one wants to talk about the fact that many of them are raised by wolves.” (…) Vance says his people lie to themselves about the reality of their condition, and their own personal responsibility for their degradation. He says that not all working-class white hillbillies are like this. There are those who work hard, stay faithful, and are self-reliant — people like Mamaw and Papaw. Their kids stand a good chance of making it; in fact, Vance says friends of his who grew up like this are doing pretty well for themselves. Unfortunately, most of the people in Vance’s neighborhood were like his mom: “consumerist, isolated, angry, distrustful.” (…) As I said earlier, the two things that saved Vance were going to live full time with his Mamaw (therefore getting out of the insanity of his mom’s home), and later, going into the US Marine Corps. I’ve already written at too much length about Vance’s story, so I won’t belabor this much longer. Suffice it to say that as imperfect as she was, Mamaw gave young Vance the stability he needed to start succeeding in school. And she wouldn’t let him slack off on his studies. She taught him the value of hard work, and of moral agency. The Marine Corps remade J.D. Vance. It pulverized his inner hillbilly fatalism, and gave him a sense that he had control over his life, and that his choices mattered.  (…) Anyway, Vance talks about how the contemporary hillbilly mindset renders them unfit for participation in life outside their own ghetto. They don’t trust anybody, and are willing to believe outlandish conspiracy theories, particularly if those theories absolve them from responsibility. Hence the enormous popularity of Donald Trump among the white working class. Here’s a guy who will believe and say anything, and who blames Mexicans, Chinese, and Muslims for America’s problems. The elites hate him, so he’s made the right enemies, as far as the white working class is concerned. And his “Make America Great Again” slogan speaks to the deep patriotism that Vance says is virtually a religion among hillbillies. (…) The sense of inner order and discipline Vance learned in the Marine Corps allowed his natural intelligence to blossom. The poor hillbilly kid with the druggie mom ends up at Yale Law School. He says he felt like an outsider there, but it was a serious education in more than the law (…) What he’s talking about is social capital, and how critically important it is to success. Poor white kids don’t have it (neither do poor black or Hispanic kids). You’re never going to teach a kid from the trailer park or the housing project the secrets of the upper middle class, but you can give them what kids like me had: a basic understanding of work, discipline, confidence, good manners, and an eagerness to learn. A big part of the problem for his people, says Vance, is the shocking degree of family instability among the American poor. “Chaos begets chaos. Instability begets instability. Welcome to family life for the American hillbilly.” (…) The worst problems of his culture, the things that held kids like him back, are not things a government program can fix. For example, as a child, his culture taught him that doing well in school made you a “sissy.” Vance says the home is the source of the worst of these problems. There simply is not a policy fix for families and family systems that have collapsed. (…) Voting for Trump is not going to fix these problems. For the black community, protesting against police brutality on the streets is not going to fix their most pressing problems. It’s not that the problems Trump points to aren’t real, and it’s not that police brutality, especially towards minorities, isn’t a problem. It’s that these serve as distractions from the core realities that keep poor white and black people down. A missionary to inner-city Dallas once told me that the greatest obstacle the black and Latino kids he helped out had was their rock-solid conviction that nothing could change for them, and that people who succeeded got that way because they were born white, or rich, or just got lucky. Until these things are honestly and effectively addressed by families, communities, and their institutions, nothing will change. (…) If white lives matter — and they do, because all lives matter — then sentimentality and more government programs aren’t going to rescue these poor people. Vance puts it more delicately than Williamson, but getting a U-Haul and getting away from other poor people — or at least finding some way to get their kids out of there, to a place where people aren’t so fatalistic, lazy, and paranoid — is their best hope. And that is surely true no matter what your race. Rod Dreher
I believe, and so does J.D., that government really does have a meaningful role to play in ameliorating the problems of the poor. But there will never be a government program capable of compensating for the loss of stable family structures, the loss of community, the loss of a sense of moral agency, and the loss of a sense of meaning in the lives of the poor. The solution, insofar as there is a “solution,” is not an either-or (that is, either culture or government), but a both-and. (…) The loss of industrial jobs plays a big role in the catastrophe. J.D. Vance acknowledges that plainly in his book. But it’s not the whole story. The wounds are partly self-inflicted. The working class, he argues, has lost its sense of agency and taste for hard work. In one illuminating anecdote, he writes about his summer job at the local tile factory, lugging 60-pound pallets around. It paid $13 an hour with good benefits and opportunities for advancement. A full-time employee could earn a salary well above the poverty line. That should have made the gig an easy sell. Yet the factory’s owner had trouble filling jobs. During Vance’s summer stint, three people left, including a man he calls Bob, a 19-year-old with a pregnant girlfriend. Bob was chronically late to work, when he showed up at all. He frequently took 45-minute bathroom breaks. Still, when he got fired, he raged against the managers who did it, refusing to acknowledge the impact of his own bad choices. “He thought something had been done to him,” Vance writes. “There is a lack of agency here — a feeling that you have little control over your life and a willingness to blame everyone but yourself.” (…)  JDV openly credits his Mamaw and the Marine Corps with making him the man he is today. He does not claim he got there entirely on his own, by bootstrapping it. The American conservative
A harrowing portrait of the plight of the white working class J. D. Vance’s new book Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and a Culture in Crisis couldn’t have been better timed. For the past year, as Donald Trump has defied political gravity to seize the Republican nomination and transform American politics, those who are repelled by Trump have been accused of insensitivity to the concerns of the white working class. For Trump skeptics, this charge seems to come from left field, and I use that term advisedly. By declaring that a particular class and race has been “ignored” or “neglected,” the Right (or better “right”) has taken a momentous step in the Left’s direction. With the ease of a thrown switch, people once considered conservative have embraced the kind of interest-group politics they only yesterday rejected as a matter of principle. It was the Democrats who urged specific payoffs, er, policies to aid this or that constituency. Conservatives wanted government to withdraw from the redistribution and favor-conferring business to the greatest possible degree. If this was imperfectly achieved, it was still the goal — because it was just. Using government to benefit some groups comes at the expense of all. While not inevitably corrupt, the whole transactional nature of the business does easily tend toward corruption. Conservatives and Republicans understood, or seemed to, that in many cases, when government confers a benefit on one party, say sugar producers, in the form of a tariff on imported sugar, there’s a problem of concentrated benefits (sugar producers get a windfall) and dispersed costs (everyone pays more for sugar, but only a bit more, so they never complain). In the realm of race, sex, and class, the pandering to groups goes beyond bad economics and government waste — and even beyond the injustice of fleecing those who work to support those who choose not to — and into the dangerous territory of pitting Americans against one another. Democrats have mastered the art of sowing discord to reap votes. Powered by Now they have company in the Trumpites. Like Democrats who encourage their target constituencies to nurse grievances against “greedy” corporations, banks, Republicans, and government for their problems, Trump now encourages his voters to blame Mexicans, the Chinese, a “rigged system,” or stupid leaders for theirs. The problems of the white working class should concern every public-spirited American not because they’ve been forgotten or taken for granted — even those terms strike a false note for me — but because they are fellow Americans. How would one adjust public policy to benefit the white working class and not blacks, Hispanics, and others? How would that work? And who would shamelessly support policies based on tribal or regional loyalties and not the general welfare? As someone who has written — perhaps to the point of dull repetition — about the necessity for Republicans to focus less on entrepreneurs (as important as they are) and more on wage earners; as someone who has stressed the need for family-focused tax reform; as someone who has advocated education innovations that would reach beyond the traditional college customers and make education and training easier to obtain for struggling Americans; as someone who trumpeted the Reformicon proposals developed by a group of conservative intellectuals affiliated with the American Enterprise Institute and the Ethics and Public Policy Center; and finally, as someone who has shouted herself hoarse about the key role that family disintegration plays in many of our most pressing national problems, I cannot quite believe that I stand accused of indifference to the white working class. I said that Hillbilly Elegy could not have been better timed, and yes, that’s in part because it paints a picture of Americans who are certainly a key Trump constituency. Though the name Donald Trump is never mentioned, there is no doubt in the reader’s mind that the people who populate this book would be enthusiastic Trumpites. But the book is far deeper than an explanation of the Trump phenomenon (which it doesn’t, by the way, claim to be). It’s a harrowing portrait of much that has gone wrong in America over the past two generations. It’s Charles Murray’s “Fishtown” told in the first person. The community into which Vance was born — working-class whites from Kentucky (though transplanted to Ohio) — is more given over to drug abuse, welfare dependency, indifference to work, and utter hopelessness than statistics can fully convey. Vance’s mother was an addict who discarded husbands and boyfriends like Dixie cups, dragging her two children through endless screaming matches, bone-chilling threats, thrown plates and worse violence, and dizzying disorder. Every lapse was followed by abject apologies — and then the pattern repeated. His father gave him up for adoption (though that story is complicated), and social services would have removed him from his family entirely if he had not lied to a judge to avoid being parted from his grandmother, who provided the only stable presence in his life. Vance writes of his family and friends: “Nearly every person you will read about is deeply flawed. Some have tried to murder other people, and a few were successful. Some have abused their children, physically or emotionally.” His grandmother, the most vivid character in his tale (and, despite everything, a heroine) is as foul-mouthed as Tony Soprano and nearly as dangerous. She was the sort of woman who threatened to shoot strangers who placed a foot on her porch and meant it. Vance was battered and bruised by this rough start, but a combination of intellectual gifts — after a stint in the Marines he sailed through Ohio State in two years and then graduated from Yale Law — and the steady love of his grandparents helped him to leapfrog into America’s elite. This book is a memoir but also contains the sharp and unsentimental insights of a born sociologist. As André Malraux said to Whittaker Chambers under very different circumstances in 1952: “You have not come back from Hell with empty hands.” The troubles Vance depicts among the white working class, or at least that portion he calls “hillbillies,” are quite familiar to those who’ve followed the pathologies of the black poor, or Native Americans living on reservations. Disorganized family lives, multiple romantic partners, domestic violence and abuse, loose attachment to work, and drug and alcohol abuse. Children suffer from “Mountain Dew” mouth — severe tooth decay and loss because parents give their children, sometimes even infants with bottles, sugary sodas and fail to teach proper dental hygiene. “People talk about hard work all the time in places like Middletown [Ohio],” Vance writes. “You can walk through a town where 30 percent of the young men work fewer than 20 hours a week and find not a single person aware of his own laziness.” He worked in a floor-tile warehouse and witnessed the sort of shirking that is commonplace. One guy, I’ll call him Bob, joined the tile warehouse just a few months before I did. Bob was 19 with a pregnant girlfriend. The manager kindly offered the girlfriend a clerical position answering phones. Both of them were terrible workers. The girlfriend missed about every third day of work and never gave advance notice. Though warned to change her habits repeatedly, the girlfriend lasted no more than a few months. Bob missed work about once a week, and he was chronically late. On top of that, he often took three or four daily bathroom breaks, each over half an hour. . . . Eventually, Bob . . . was fired. When it happened, he lashed out at his manager: ‘How could you do this to me? Don’t you know I’ve a pregnant girlfriend?’ And he was not alone. . . . A young man with every reason to work . . . carelessly tossing aside a good job with excellent health insurance. More troublingly, when it was all over, he thought something had been done to him. The addiction, domestic violence, poverty, and ill health that plague these communities might be salved to some degree by active and vibrant churches. But as Vance notes, the attachment to church, like the attachment to work, is severely frayed. People say they are Christians. They even tell pollsters they attend church weekly. But “in the middle of the Bible belt, active church attendance is actually quite low.” After years of alcoholism, Vance’s biological father did join a serious church, and while Vance was skeptical about the church’s theology, he notes that membership did transform his father from a wastrel into a responsible father and husband to his new family. Teenaged Vance did a stint as a check-out clerk at a supermarket and kept his social-scientist eye peeled: I also learned how people gamed the welfare system. They’d buy two dozen packs of soda with food stamps and then sell them at a discount for cash. They’d ring up their orders separately, buying food with the food stamps, and beer, wine, and cigarettes with cash. They’d regularly go through the checkout line speaking on their cell phones. I could never understand why our lives felt like a struggle while those living off of government largesse enjoyed trinkets that I only dreamed about. . . . Perhaps if the schools were better, they would offer children from struggling families the leg up they so desperately need? Vance is unconvinced. The schools he attended were adequate, if not good, he recalls. But there were many times in his early life when his home was so chaotic — when he was kept awake all night by terrifying fights between his mother and her latest live-in boyfriend, for example — that he could not concentrate in school at all. For a while, he and his older sister lived by themselves while his mother underwent a stint in rehab. They concealed this embarrassing situation as best they could. But they were children. Alone. A teacher at his Ohio high school summed up the expectations imposed on teachers this way: “They want us to be shepherds to these kids. But no one wants to talk about the fact that many of them are raised by wolves.” Hillbilly Elegy is an honest look at the dysfunction that afflicts too many working-class Americans. But despite the foregoing, it isn’t an indictment. Vance loves his family and admires some of its strengths. Among these are fierce patriotism, loyalty, and toughness. But even regarding patriotism (his grandmother’s “two gods” were Jesus Christ and the United States of America), this former Marine strikes a melancholy note. His family and community have lost their heroes. We loved the military but had no George S. Patton figure in the modern army. . . . The space program, long a source of pride, had gone the way of the dodo, and with it the celebrity astronauts. Nothing united us with the core fabric of American society. Conspiracy theories abound in Appalachia. People do not believe anything the press reports: “We can’t trust the evening news. We can’t trust our politicians. Our universities, the gateway to a better life, are rigged against us. We can’t get jobs.” Conspiracy theories abound in Appalachia. Sound familiar? The white working class has followed the black underclass and Native Americans not just into family disintegration, addiction, and other pathologies, but also perhaps into the most important self-sabotage of all, the crippling delusion that they cannot improve their lot by their own effort. This is where the rise of Trump becomes both understandable and deeply destructive. He ratifies every conspiracy theory in circulation and adds news ones. He encourages the tribal grievances of the white working class and promises that salvation will come — not through their own agency and sensible government reforms — but only through his head-knocking leadership. He calls this greatness, but it’s the exact reverse. A great people does not turn to a strongman. The American character has been corrupted by multiple generations of government dependency and the loss of bourgeois virtues like self-control, delayed gratification, family stability, thrift, and industriousness. Vance has risen out of chaos to the heights of stability, success, and happiness. He is fundamentally optimistic about the chances for the nation to do the same. Whether his optimism is justified or not is unknowable, but his brilliant book is a signal flashing danger. Mona Charen
To further quell their culpability and show that the American Dream still functions as advertised, conservatives are fond of trotting out success stories — people who prove that pulling one’s self up by one’s bootstraps is still a possibility and, by extension, that those who don’t succeed must own their shortcomings. Lately, the right has found nobody more useful, both during the presidential election and after, than their modern-day Horatio Alger spokesperson, J. D. Vance, whose bestselling book “Hillbilly Elegy” chronicled his journey from Appalachia to the hallowed halls of the Ivy League, while championing the hard work necessary to overcome the pitfalls of poverty. Traditionally this would’ve been a Fox News kind of book — the network featured an excerpt on their site that focused on Vance’s introduction to “elite culture” during his time at Yale — but Vance’s glorified self-help tome was also forwarded by networks and pundits desperate to understand the Donald Trump phenomenon, and the author was essentially transformed into Privileged America’s Sherpa into the ravages of Post-Recession U.S.A. Trumpeted as a glimpse into an America elites have neglected for years, I first read “Hillbilly Elegy” with hope. I’d been told this might be the book that finally shed light on problems that’d been killing my family for generations. I’d watched my grandparents and parents, all of them factory workers, suffer backbreaking labor and then be virtually forgotten by the political establishment until the GOP needed their vote and stoked their social and racial anxieties to turn them into political pawns. In the beginning, I felt a kinship to Vance. His dysfunctional childhood looked a lot like my own. There was substance abuse. Knockdown, drag-out fights. A feeling that people just couldn’t get ahead no matter what they did. And then the narrative took a turn. Due to references he downplays, not to mention his middle-class grandmother’s shielding and encouragement, Vance was able to lift himself out of the despair of impoverishment and escaped to Yale and eventually Silicon Valley, where he was able to look back on his upbringing with a new perspective. (…) The thesis at the heart of “Hillbilly Elegy” is that anybody who isn’t able to escape the working class is essentially at fault. Sure, there’s a culture of fatalism and “learned helplessness,” but the onus falls on the individual. (…) Oh, the working class and their aversion to difficulty. If only they, like Vance, could take the challenge head on and rise above their circumstances. If only they, like Vance, weren’t so worried about material things like iPhones or the “giant TVs and iPads” the author says his people buy for themselves instead of saving for the future. This generalization is not the only problematic oversimplification in Vance’s book — he totally discounts the role racism played in the white working class’s opposition to President Obama and says, instead, it was because Obama dressed well, was a good father, and because Michelle Obama advocated eating healthy food — but it would be hard to understate what role Vance has played in reinvigorating the conservative bootstraps narrative for a new generation and, thus, emboldening Republican ideology. To Vance’s credit, he has been critical of Donald Trump, calling the working class’s support of the billionaire a result of a “false sense of purpose,” but Vance’s portrait of poor Americans is alarmingly in lockstep with the philosophy of Republicans who are shamefully using Trump’s presidency to forward their own agenda of economic warfare. (…) The message is loud and clear: Help is on the way, but only to those who “deserve” it. And how does one deserve it? By working hard. And the only metric to show that one has worked sufficiently hard enough is to look at their income, at how successful they are, because, in Vance’s and the Republican’s America, the only one to blame if you’re not wealthy is yourself. Never mind how legislation like this healthcare bill, cuts in education funding, continued decreases in after-school and school lunch programs, not to mention a lack of access to mental health care or career counseling, disadvantages the poor. Jared Yates Sexton (Assistant Professor of Creative Writing)
Hillbilly Elégie, qui vient de paraître aux éditions Globe traduit de l’anglais (américain) (…) est l’un des best-sellers de l’année aux Etats-Unis et son adaptation cinématographique est déjà en cours de tournage sous la direction de Ron Howard. Rien que ça ! Ensuite, c’est un livre hors du commun, qui a été salué avec un bel ensemble par la presse intellectuelle américaine, tant du côté conservateur que du côté libéral. On a beaucoup écrit qu’il constituait, en effet, l’une des clefs de cet événement tellement improbable : l’élection à la présidence des Etats-Unis « du Donald ». Ce n’est pourtant pas un essai politique. Il a été écrit avant que « le Donald » ne soit désigné comme candidat par les primaires républicaines. Et cependant, oui, il donne les clefs d’un facteur décisif ayant entraîné la victoire de Trump : le basculement de son côté de ces petits blancs, électeurs des Etats ravagés par le démantèlement des vieilles industries : Michigan, Pennsylvanie, Wisconsin, Ohio, ce qui reste de la Rust Belt, la ceinture de rouille. Rappelons que Trump a bénéficié massivement du « vote blanc ». Il est majoritaire dans cet électorat, même chez les femmes, alors qu’il affrontait, lui, le macho sans vergogne, la première candidate à la présidence de l’histoire des Etats-Unis. Mais ce qui est révélateur, c’est que Trump a obtenu ses meilleurs scores, chez les blancs qui n’ont pas fait d’études universitaires : 72 %, pour les hommes et 62 % chez les femmes. (…) Hillbilly Elégie est impressionnant parce que c’est un livre d’une rare honnêteté intellectuelle, alors qu’il est écrit depuis l’autre côté de la rive : son auteur, J.D. Vance s’est extrait de son milieu d’origine. Il a cessé d’être un hillbilly – autrement dit un crétin des collines, un plouc, un péquenaud – le vrai sens du mot hillbilly. Par un heureux concours de circonstances (son dressage chez les Marines) et grâce à une volonté de fer et une puissance de travail très américaines, il a intégré l’une des universités les plus prestigieuses du pays, Yale, et il est diplômé dans l’un des départements les plus prestigieux de cette université, son Ecole de droit. Né dans la classe ouvrière, il donc a rejoint les rangs de la grande bourgeoisie en devenant un avocat d’affaires renommé. (…) C’est un livre âpre, lucide, sans complaisance, écrit par un homme qui est, certes, passé de l’autre côté de la barrière des classes, mais qui garde une grande tendresse pour sa « communauté » d’origine. Et il se conclut par une série de recommandations sur la meilleure manière de remédier à la misère, tant matérielle que morale, où les siens se sont enfoncés. A travers son témoignage personnel, il nous livre une véritable enquête sur cette réalité sociale peu connue : le déclin de l’ancienne classe ouvrière blanche américaine. Son livre est d’un grand intérêt pour quiconque s’intéresse aux Etats-Unis ; mais il comporte aussi des leçons pour tous les pays anciennement industrialisés qui ont vu, comme le nôtre, fermer les usines et se désertifier certains territoires. Et d’abord son nom, Vance : il le porte par hasard. C’est celui de son géniteur, un chrétien évangéliste du Sud, alcoolique repenti, avec qui il n’a jamais eu le moindre contact avant son adolescence. Sa mère, en effet, est allée, durant toute sa vie d’homme en homme et de drogue en drogue. Comme beaucoup d’enfants de ce milieu, il a été traumatisé par la succession de ses « beaux-pères » de six mois ou d’un an. En quête d’un modèle masculin auquel s’identifier, il est passé de l’un à l’autre. Et l’instabilité à la fois géographique et affective de sa jeunesse en a fait un être angoissé. Première leçon de Hillbilly Elégie : être né dans une famille stable dont les membres adultes ne se hurlent pas après tous les soirs en se jetant à la figure tout ce qui leur tombe sous la main est un atout formidable pour réussir dans la vie…. La vraie famille de J.D., c’étaient ses grands-parents, d’authentiques hillbillies, eux, venus de leur Kentucky natal dans les années 1950 pour travailler dans l’Ohio voisin, où il y avait des mines et des aciéries. Mais Papaw et Mamaw (c’est comme ça qu’on dit Papy et Mamie chez les hillbillies) n’ont jamais oublié leur Kentucky natal, cette région des Appalaches connue pour la beauté de ses paysages… et l’arriération de ses habitants. Délivrance, le film de John Boorman, se passe, on s’en souvient, dans une région des Appalaches et donne de ses habitants une image assez peu flatteuse. Papaw et Mamaw, qui ne voyageaient jamais sans une arme à feu dans leur voiture, ont emporté dans leur Ohio d’adoption leur culture « hillbilly » des collines du Kentucky. Une culture que partageaient beaucoup de familles ouvrières originaires des Appalaches et qui imprègnent encore aujourd’hui les mentalités de leurs descendants. Papaw, ouvrier dans la grande aciérie locale et mécanicien apprécié, était un partisan du Parti démocrate, « le parti qui – je cite – défendait les travailleurs ». On était démocrate parce qu’on était ouvrier. Et c’est précisément cela qui a changé. Brice Couturier
En juin 2016, en pleine campagne présidentielle américaine, paraissait Hillbilly Elegy, un récit autobiographique signé d’un illustre inconnu. Il y racontait son enfance dans la « Rust Belt », cette large région industrielle du nord-est des Etats-Unis, touchée de plein fouet par les crises successives. Quelques semaines plus tard, un long entretien publié sur le site The American Conservative propulsait J.D. Vance au rang de phénomène : l’auteur y défendait la candidature de Trump, qui avait, selon lui, « le mérite d’essayer » de s’adresser aux Blancs les plus pauvres, d’en appeler à leur « fierté » et de vilipender cette « élite » honnie, incarnée par Barack Obama et par Hillary Clinton. Le discours frontal et brutal de la droite, la condescendance embarrassée de la gauche… Dans ce récit à la première personne, publié cette semaine en France (éditions Globe), l’écrivain pointait du doigt ce qui amènerait Donald Trump au pouvoir. (…) Hillbilly Elegy est une plongée dans ses racines, son enfance, son ascension sociale. Vance est né et a grandi entre le Kentucky et l’Ohio, dans cette région des Appalaches dont on entend régulièrement parler tantôt comme le siège de la pire épidémie d’addiction aux opiacés qu’ait connue le pays ces dernières années, tantôt comme cette zone dévastée par le chômage lié à la fermeture des mines de charbon. Vance, lui, s’en est tiré : après un passage dans les Marines, il a quitté son patelin pour partir étudier, d’abord à l’université d’Etat de l’Ohio, puis à la très réputée Yale, dans le Connecticut. A force de volonté, et avec le soutien d’une grand-mère exceptionnelle qui a pallié jusqu’à sa mort les manquements de ses parents (un père « qu’[il] connaissai [t] à peine » et une mère qu’il aurait « préféré ne pas connaître », écrit-il), Vance a réussi ce que peu parviennent à accomplir : il a changé de classe sociale. Il est, écrit-il, un « émigré culturel », qui affirme cependant être resté, au fond de lui, un « hillbilly », un Américain « qui [se] reconnaî [t] dans les millions de Blancs d’origine irlando-écossaise de la classe ouvrière américaine qui n’ont pas de diplôme universitaire ». Se réappropriant au passage ce terme popularisé pendant la grande dépression pour qualifier les migrants économiques venus de la campagne, et devenu depuis franchement péjoratif. Hillbilly Elegy se lit comme un document sur la pauvreté blanche en Amérique. Vance y décrit de l’intérieur une communauté qui vit d’aides alimentaires tout en se plaignant d’un Etat incompétent, passe « plus de temps à parler de travail qu’à travailler réellement », apprend à ses enfants « la valeur de la loyauté, de l’honneur, ainsi qu’à être dur au mal », mais persiste à confondre, chez ses petits, « intelligence et savoir », faisant passer pour idiots des gamins éduqués de manière inefficace. Parce qu’il parle des siens, le jeune homme dresse un constat très rude, dénonce la « fainéantise » de ses anciens semblables tout en appelant le monde politique à « juger moins et [à] comprendre plus ». En mars dernier, dans un éditorial du New York Times intitulé « Pourquoi je rentre chez moi », Vance annonçait sa décision de quitter la Californie pour retourner dans les Appalaches, où il a créé une association de lutte contre la conduite addictive aux opiacés et a participé, au cours des derniers mois, à de nombreux meetings du Parti républicain.M le magazine du Monde

Attention: une relégation sociale peut en cacher une autre ! (It’s the culture, stupid !)

« Amers, accros des armes et de la religion » (Obama), « pitoyables « Hillary Clinton), « sans-dents » (Hollande), « fainéants » (Macron) …

Quatre mois après l’élection volée que l’on sait …

Qui a vu suite à l’assassinat médiatico-politique du candidat de l’alternance …

Et au fourvoiement et auto-sabordement – jusqu’à en oublier son texte – de la candidate des victimes de l’immigration sauvage et de l’insécurité culturelle …

L’élection par défaut d’un candidat qui au-delà de sa réelle volonté de réformer une France jusqu’ici irréformable …

Ne prend même plus la peine, à l’instar de ses prédécesseurs américains ou français, de cacher son mépris pour les « gens qui ne sont rien » et autres « illettrés » ou « fainéants »  …

Et en ces temps où après la passion que l’on sait pour les immigrés et en gommant du coup toute la dimension délictuelle, nos belles âmes n’ont que le mot « migrant » à la bouche …

Comment ne pas voir …

Alors que sort la traduction française du livre de « l’auteur américain qui avait vu venir Trump » (Hillbilly elegy, J.D. Vance) …

Et après la revanche de ces véritables « immigrés de l’intérieur » …

Qui aux Etats-Unis ont largement contribué à la victoire de Trump

Celle qui pourrait bien venir

De tous ceux qui au-delà des cas extrêmes de familles déstructurées, de fatalisme social et d’addictions aux opiacés de la Rust belt américaine dont parle Vance …

Mais à l’instar des vraies victimes de la mondialisation de la « France périphérique » évoqués par le géographe Christophe Guilly …

Ne se résignent pas, face au rouleau compresseur de la prétendue « modernité » et du « progrès », à la disparition programmée de leur culture nationale ?

J.D. Vance, l’auteur américain qui avait vu venir Trump

Publié pendant la campagne présidentielle, « Hillbilly Elegy » est devenu un best-seller. J.D. Vance, 33 ans, y raconte cette Amérique blanche et pauvre dont il est issu. Et qui a porté Trump au pouvoir.

M le magazine du Monde

Clémentine Goldszal

04.09.2017

En juin 2016, en pleine campagne présidentielle américaine, paraissait Hillbilly Elegy, un récit autobiographique signé d’un illustre inconnu. Il y racontait son enfance dans la « Rust Belt », cette large région industrielle du nord-est des Etats-Unis, touchée de plein fouet par les crises successives. Quelques semaines plus tard, un long entretien publié sur le site The American Conservative propulsait J.D. Vance au rang de phénomène : l’auteur y défendait la candidature de Trump, qui avait, selon lui, « le mérite d’essayer » de s’adresser aux Blancs les plus pauvres, d’en appeler à leur « fierté » et de vilipender cette « élite » honnie, incarnée par Barack Obama et par Hillary Clinton.

Le discours frontal et brutal de la droite, la condescendance embarrassée de la gauche… Dans ce récit à la première personne, publié cette semaine en France (éditions Globe), l’écrivain pointait du doigt ce qui amènerait Donald Trump au pouvoir. En août 2016, Hillbilly Elegy entrait dans la liste des meilleures ventes du New York Times (il y figure encore aujourd’hui). Cinq mois plus tard, au lendemain de l’élection, les ventes faisaient un nouveau bond. Sous le choc, les progressistes américains cherchaient à comprendreceux qui avaient porté Trump au pouvoir : traditionnellement démocrates, les Etats de la Rust Belt avaient cette fois-ci largement soutenu le candidat républicain.

L’histoire d’une ascension sociale

J.D. Vance a 33 ans, le visage rond, la raie sur le côté, les yeux bleus. Il s’exprime bien, et son livre est remarquablement écrit. Pas de la grande littérature, mais un ton sans détour, qui lui permet d’exprimer avec une grande clarté sa pensée complexe. Il est marié – à une jeune femme rencontrée durant ses études de droit à Yale – et, à la sortie de son livre, vivait encore à San Francisco, où il gagnait très bien sa vie dans la finance.

Hillbilly Elegy est une plongée dans ses racines, son enfance, son ascension sociale. Vance est né et a grandi entre le Kentucky et l’Ohio, dans cette région des Appalaches dont on entend régulièrement parler tantôt comme le siège de la pire épidémie d’addiction aux opiacés qu’ait connue le pays ces dernières années, tantôt comme cette zone dévastée par le chômage lié à la fermeture des mines de charbon.

J.D. Vance parle de « la classe ouvrière américaine oubliée »

Vance, lui, s’en est tiré : après un passage dans les Marines, il a quitté son patelin pour partir étudier, d’abord à l’université d’Etat de l’Ohio, puis à la très réputée Yale, dans le Connecticut. A force de volonté, et avec le soutien d’une grand-mère exceptionnelle qui a pallié jusqu’à sa mort les manquements de ses parents (un père « qu’[il] connaissai [t] à peine » et une mère qu’il aurait « préféré ne pas connaître », écrit-il), Vance a réussi ce que peu parviennent à accomplir : il a changé de classe sociale.

Il est, écrit-il, un « émigré culturel », qui affirme cependant être resté, au fond de lui, un « hillbilly », un Américain « qui [se] reconnaî [t] dans les millions de Blancs d’origine irlando-écossaise de la classe ouvrière américaine qui n’ont pas de diplôme universitaire ». Se réappropriant au passage ce terme popularisé pendant la grande dépression pour qualifier les migrants économiques venus de la campagne, et devenu depuis franchement péjoratif.

Hillbilly Elegy se lit comme un document sur la pauvreté blanche en Amérique. Vance y décrit de l’intérieur une communauté qui vit d’aides alimentaires tout en se plaignant d’un Etat incompétent, passe « plus de temps à parler de travail qu’à travailler réellement », apprend à ses enfants « la valeur de la loyauté, de l’honneur, ainsi qu’à être dur au mal », mais persiste à confondre, chez ses petits, « intelligence et savoir », faisant passer pour idiots des gamins éduqués de manière inefficace. Parce qu’il parle des siens, le jeune homme dresse un constat très rude, dénonce la « fainéantise » de ses anciens semblables tout en appelant le monde politique à « juger moins et [à] comprendre plus ».

Une parole conservatrice audible

En mars dernier, dans un éditorial du New York Times intitulé « Pourquoi je rentre chez moi », Vance annonçait sa décision de quitter la Californie pour retourner dans les Appalaches, où il a créé une association de lutte contre la conduite addictive aux opiacés et a participé, au cours des derniers mois, à de nombreux meetings du Parti républicain.

Depuis le printemps, les ténors du parti ont d’ailleurs multiplié les appels du pied pour le convaincre de se présenter aux élections sénatoriales, qui se tiendront en novembre. Son nom est devenu familier des lecteurs de la presse quotidienne, son visage apparaît souvent à la télévision (il est devenu éditorialiste pour CNN, en janvier, et signe régulièrement dans les colonnes du New York Times). Plus d’un million d’exemplaires de son livre ont déjà été écoulés, et les droits ont été vendus à plus d’une dizaine de pays.

Les médias semblent avoir trouvé en J.D. Vance une parole conservatrice audible, reçue comme l’émanation articulée de la rage confusément exprimée par les Blancs les plus pauvres d’Amérique. En mai dernier, Bill Gates recommandait même sur son blog la lecture d’Hillbilly Elegy, affirmant y avoir trouvé « des informations nouvelles sur les facteurs culturels et familiaux qui contribuent à la pauvreté ».

 Voir aussi:

La grande colère des petits Blancs américains

Brice Coutourier
France Culture
15/09/2017

Voir de même:

Why I’m Moving Home

COLUMBUS, Ohio — In recent months, I’ve frequently found myself in places hit hard by manufacturing job losses, speaking to people affected in various ways. Sometimes, the conversation turns to the conflict people feel between the love of their home and the desire to leave in search of better work.

It’s a conflict I know well: I left my home state, Ohio, for the Marine Corps when I was 19. And while I’ve returned home for months or even years at a time, job opportunities often pull me away.

Experts have warned for years now that our rates of geographic mobility have fallen to troubling lows. Given that some areas have unemployment rates around 2 percent and others many times that, this lack of movement may mean joblessness for those who could otherwise work.

But from the community’s perspective, mobility can be a problem. The economist Matthew Kahn has shown that in Appalachia, for instance, the highly skilled are much likelier to leave not just their hometowns but also the region as a whole. This is the classic “brain drain” problem: Those who are able to leave very often do.

The brain drain also encourages a uniquely modern form of cultural detachment. Eventually, the young people who’ve moved out marry — typically to partners with similar economic prospects. They raise children in increasingly segregated neighborhoods, giving rise to something the conservative scholar Charles Murray calls “super ZIPs.” These super ZIPs are veritable bastions of opportunity and optimism, places where divorce and joblessness are rare.

As one of my college professors recently told me about higher education, “The sociological role we play is to suck talent out of small towns and redistribute it to big cities.” There have always been regional and class inequalities in our society, but the data tells us that we’re living through a unique period of segregation.

This has consequences beyond the purely material. Jesse Sussell and James A. Thomson of the RAND Corporation argue that this geographic sorting has heightened the polarization that now animates politics. This polarization reflects itself not just in our voting patterns, but also in our political culture: Not long before the election, a friend forwarded me a conspiracy theory about Bill and Hillary Clinton’s involvement in a pedophilia ring and asked me whether it was true.

It’s easy to dismiss these questions as the ramblings of “fake news” consumers. But the more difficult truth is that people naturally trust the people they know — their friend sharing a story on Facebook — more than strangers who work for faraway institutions. And when we’re surrounded by polarized, ideologically homogeneous crowds, whether online or off, it becomes easier to believe bizarre things about them. This problem runs in both directions: I’ve heard ugly words uttered about “flyover country” and some of its inhabitants from well-educated, generally well-meaning people.

I’ve long worried whether I’ve become a part of this problem. For two years, I’d lived in Silicon Valley, surrounded by other highly educated transplants with seemingly perfect lives. It’s jarring to live in a world where every person feels his life will only get better when you came from a world where many rightfully believe that things have become worse. And I’ve suspected that this optimism blinds many in Silicon Valley to the real struggles in other parts of the country. So I decided to move home, to Ohio.

It wasn’t an easy choice. I scaled back my commitments to a job I love because of the relocation. My wife and I worry about the quality of local public schools, and whether she (a San Diego native) could stand the unpredictable weather.

But there were practical reasons to move: I’m founding an organization to combat Ohio’s opioid epidemic. We chose Columbus because I travel a lot, and I need to be centrally located in the state and close to an airport. And the truth is that not every motivation is rational: Part of me loves Ohio simply because it’s home.

I recently asked a friend, Ami Vitori Kimener, how she thought about her own return home. A Georgetown graduate, Ami left a successful career in Washington to start new businesses in Middletown, Ohio. Middletown is in some ways a classic Midwestern city: Once thriving, it was hit hard by the decline of the region’s manufacturing base in recent decades. But the town is showing early signs of revitalization, thanks in part to the efforts of those like Ami.

Talking with Ami, I realized that we often frame civic responsibility in terms of government taxes and transfer payments, so that our society’s least fortunate families are able to provide basic necessities. But this focus can miss something important: that what many communities need most is not just financial support, but talent and energy and committed citizens to build viable businesses and other civic institutions.

Of course, not every town can or should be saved. Many people should leave struggling places in search of economic opportunity, and many of them won’t be able to return. Some people will move back to their hometowns; others, like me, will move back to their home state. The calculation will undoubtedly differ for each person, as it should. But those of us who are lucky enough to choose where we live would do well to ask ourselves, as part of that calculation, whether the choices we make for ourselves are necessarily the best for our home communities — and for the country.

 Voir encore:

Hillbilly America: Do White Lives Matter?

Yesterday I read J.D. Vance’s new book Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and a Culture In Crisis. Well, “read” is not quite the word. I devoured the thing in a single gulp. If you want to understand America in 2016, Hillbilly Elegy is a must-read. I will be thinking about this book for a long, long time. Here are my impressions.

The book is an autobiographical account by a lawyer (Yale Law School graduate) and sometime conservative writer who grew up in a poor and chaotic Appalachian household. He’s a hillbilly, in other words, and is not ashamed of the term. Vance reflects on his childhood, and how he escaped the miserable fate (broken families, drugs, etc) of so many white working class and poor people around whom he grew up. And he draws conclusions from it, conclusions that may be hard for some people to take. But Vance has earned the right to make those judgments. This was his life. He speaks with authority that has been extremely hard won.

Forgive the rambling nature of this post. I’m still trying to process this extraordinary book.

Vance’s people come from Kentucky and southern Ohio, a deeply depressed region filled with hard-bitten but proud Scots-Irish folks. He begins by talking about how, as a young man, he got a job working in a warehouse, doing hard work for extra money. He writes about how even though the work was physically demanding, the pay wasn’t bad, and it came with benefits. Yet the warehouse struggled to keep people employed. Vance says his book is about macroeconomic trends — outsourcing jobs overseas — but not only that:

But this book is about something else: what goes on in the lives of real people when the industrial economy goes south. It’s about reacting to bad circumstances in the worst way possible. It’s about a culture that increasingly encourages social decay instead of counteracting it. The problems that I saw at the tile warehouse run far deeper than macroeconomic trends and policy. too many young men immune to hard work. Good jobs impossible to fill for any length of time. And a young man [one of Vance’s co-workers] with every reason to work — a wife-to-be to support and a baby on the way — carelessly tossing aside a good job with excellent health insurance. More troublingly, when it was all over, he thought something had been done to him. There is a lack of agency here — a feeling that you have little control over your life and a willingness to blame everyone but yourself. This is distinct from the larger economic landscape of modern America.

This is the heart of Hillbilly Elegy: how hillbilly white culture fails its children, and how the greatest disadvantages it imparts to its youth are the life of violence and chaos in which they are raised, and the closely related problem of a lack of moral agency. Young Vance was on a road to ruin until certain people — including the US Marine Corps — showed him that his choices mattered, and that he had a lot more control over his fate than he thought.

Vance talks about how, in his youth, there was a lot of hardscrabble poverty among his people, but nothing like today, dominated by the devastation of drug addiction. Everything we are accustomed to hearing about black inner city social dysfunction is fully present among these white hillbillies, as Vance documents in great detail. He writes that “hillbillies learn from an early age to deal with uncomfortable truths by avoiding them, or by pretending better truths exist. This tendency might make for psychological resilience, but it also makes it hard for Appalachians to look at themselves honestly.”

This was one of many points at which Vance’s experience converged somewhat with mine. My people are not hillbillies per se, but I come from working-class Southern country white people. Many of the cultural traits Vance describes are present in a more diluted way in my own family. That fierce pride, a pride that would rather see everything go to hell than admit error. This, I think, has something to do with why Southern Protestant Christianity has traditionally been more Stoic than Christian. Real Christianity has as its heart humility. That’s not a characteristic Scots-Irish people hold dear.

Vance talks about the hillbilly habit of stigmatizing people who leave the hollers as “too big for your britches” — meaning that you got above yourself. It doesn’t matter that they may have left to find work, and that they’re living a fairly poor life not too far away, in Ohio. The point is, they left, and that is a hard sin to forgive. What, we weren’t good enough for you?

This is the white-people version of “acting white,” if you follow me: the same stigma and shame that poor black people deploy against other poor black people who want to better themselves with education and so on.

The most important figure in Vance’s life is his Mamaw (pron. “MAM-maw”), Bonnie Vance, a kind of hillbilly Catherine the Great. She was a phenomenally tough woman. She knew how to use a gun, she had a staggeringly foul mouth, she smoked menthols and stood ready to fight at the drop of a hat. And she saved Vance’s life.

Vance plainly loves his people, and because he loves them, he tells hard truths about them. He talks about how cultural fatalism destroys initiative. When hillbillies run up against adversity, they tend to assume that they can’t do anything about it. To the hillbilly mind, people who “make it” are either born to wealth, or were born with uncanny talent, winning the genetic lottery. The connection between self-discipline and hard work, and success, is invisible to them. Vance:

People talk about hard work all the time in places like Middletown [where Vance grew up]. You can walk through a town where 30 percent of the young men work fewer than twenty hours a week and find not a single person aware of his own laziness.

Vance was born into a world of chaos. It takes concentration to follow the trail of family connections. Women give birth out of wedlock, having children by different men. Marriages rarely last, and informal partnerings are more common. Vance has half-siblings by his mom’s different husbands (she has had five to date). In his generation, Vance says, grandparents are often having to raise their grandchildren, because those grandparents, however impoverished and messy their own lives may be, offer a more stable alternative than the incredible instability of the kids’ parents (or more likely, parent).

Vance scarcely knew his biological father until he was a bit older, and lived with his mom and her rotating cast of boyfriends and husbands. Here’s Vance on models of manhood:

I learned little else about what masculinity required of me other than drinking beer and screaming at a woman when she screamed at you. In the end, the only lesson that took was that you can’t depend on people. “I learned that men will disappear at the drop of a hat,” Lindsay [his half-sister] once said. “They don’t care about their kids; they don’t provide; they just disappear, and it’s not that hard to make them go.”

This is what happens in inner-city black culture, as has been exhaustively documented. But these are rural and small-town white people. This dysfunction is not color-based, but cultural.

I could not do justice here to describe the violence, emotional and physical, that characterizes everyday life in Vance’s childhood culture, and the instability in people’s outer lives and inner lives. To read in such detail what life is like as a child formed by communities like that is to gain a sense of why it is so difficult to escape from the malign gravity of that way of life. You can’t imagine that life could be any different.

Religion among the hillbillies is not much help. Vance says that hillbillies love to talk about Jesus, but they don’t go to church, and Christianity doesn’t seem to have much effect at all on their behavior. Vance’s biological father is an exception. He belonged to a strict fundamentalist church, one that helped him beat his alcoholism and gave him the severe structure he needed to keep his life from going off track. Vance:

Dad’s church offered something desperately needed by people like me. For alcoholics, it gave them a community of support and a sense that they weren’t fighting addiction alone. For expectant mothers, it offered a free home with job training and parenting classes. When someone needed a job, church friends could either provide one or make introductions. When Dad faced financial troubles, his church banded together and purchased a used car for the family. In the broken world I saw around me — and for the people struggling in that world — religion offered tangible assistance to keep the faithful on track.

Vance says the best thing about life in his dad’s house was how boring it was. It was predictable. It was a respite from the constant chaos.

On the other hand, the religion most hillbillies espouse is a rusticated form of Moralistic Therapeutic Deism. God seems to exist only as a guarantor of ultimate order, and ultimate justice; Jesus is there to assuage one’s pain. Except for those who commit to churchgoing — and believe it or not, this is one of the least churched parts of the US — Christianity is a ghost.

About Vance’s father’s fundamentalism, I got more details about what this blog’s reader Turmarion, who lives in Appalachia, keeps telling me about that region’s fundamentalism. Even though I live in the rural Deep South, this form of Christianity is alien to me. When he went to live with his dad for a time as an adolescent (if I have my chronology correct), Vance was exposed for the first time to church. He appreciated very much the structure, but noticed that the spirituality on offer was fear-based and paranoid. “[T]he deeper I immersed myself in evangelical theology, the more I felt compelled to mistrust many sectors of society. Evolution and the Big Bang became ideologies to confront, not theories to understand … In my new church … I heard more about the gay lobby and the war on Christmas than about any particular character trait that a Christian should aspire to have.”

This was yet another reminder of why so many Evangelicals react strongly against the Benedict Option. As I often say, I have no experience of this extreme siege mentality in Christianity. In fact, my experience is entirely the opposite. I believe that some Christians coming out of fundamentalism may react so strongly against their miserable, unhappy background that they don’t appreciate the extent to which there really are people and forces out to “get” them. When you have lived almost all your Christian life among highly assimilated Christians who generally don’t pay attention to these things, their complacency can drive you crazy. But Vance helps me to understand how someone who grew up in its opposite would find even the slightest hint of siege Christianity to be anathema.

One of the most important contributions Vance makes to our understanding of American poverty is how little public policy can affect the cultural habits that keep people poor. He talks about education policy, saying that the elite discussion of how to help schools focuses entirely on reforming institutions. “As a teacher at my old high school told me recently, ‘They want us to be shepherds to these kids. But no one wants to talk about the fact that many of them are raised by wolves.”

He continues:

Why didn’t our neighbor leave that abusive man? Why did she spend her money on drugs? Why couldn’t she see that her behavior was destroying her daughter? Why were all of these things happening not just to our neighbor but to my mom? It would be years before I learned that no single book, or expert, or field could fully explain the problems of hillbillies in modern America. Our elegy is a sociological one, yes, but it is also about psychology and community and culture and faith. During my junior year of high school, our neighbor Pattie called her landlord to report a leaky roof. The landlord arrived and found Pattie topless, stoned, and unconscious on her living room couch. Upstairs the bathtub was overflowing — hence, the leaking roof. Pattie had apparently drawn herself a bath, taken a few prescription painkillers, and passed out. The top floor of her home and many of her family’s possessions were ruined. This is the reality of our community. It’s about a naked druggie destroying what little of value exists in her life. It’s about children who lose their toys and clothes to a mother’s addiction.

This was my world: a world of truly irrational behavior. We spend our way into the poorhouse. We buy giant TVs and iPads. Our children wear nice clothes thanks to high-interest credit cards and payday loans. We purchase homes we don’t need, refinance them for more spending money, and declare bankruptcy, often leaving them full of garbage in our wake. Thrift is inimical to our being. We spend to pretend that we’re upper class. And when the dust clears — when bankruptcy hits or a family member bails us out of our stupidity — there’s nothing left over. Nothing for the kids’ college tuition, no investment to grow our wealth, no rainy-day fund if someone loses her job. We know we shouldn’t spend like this. Sometimes we beat ourselves up over it, but we do it anyway.

More:

Our homes are a chaotic mess. We scream and yell at each other like we’re spectators at a football game. At least one member of the family uses drugs — sometimes the father, sometimes both. At especially stressful times, we’ll hit and punch each other, all in front of the rest of the family, including young children; much of the time, the neighbors hear what’s happening. A bad day is when the neighbors call the police to stop the drama. Our kids go to foster care but never stay for long. We apologize to our kids. The kids believe we’re really sorry, and we are. But then we act just as mean a few days later.

And on and on. Vance says his people lie to themselves about the reality of their condition, and their own personal responsibility for their degradation. He says that not all working-class white hillbillies are like this. There are those who work hard, stay faithful, and are self-reliant — people like Mamaw and Papaw. Their kids stand a good chance of making it; in fact, Vance says friends of his who grew up like this are doing pretty well for themselves. Unfortunately, most of the people in Vance’s neighborhood were like his mom: “consumerist, isolated, angry, distrustful.”

As I said earlier, the two things that saved Vance were going to live full time with his Mamaw (therefore getting out of the insanity of his mom’s home), and later, going into the US Marine Corps. I’ve already written at too much length about Vance’s story, so I won’t belabor this much longer. Suffice it to say that as imperfect as she was, Mamaw gave young Vance the stability he needed to start succeeding in school. And she wouldn’t let him slack off on his studies. She taught him the value of hard work, and of moral agency.

The Marine Corps remade J.D. Vance. It pulverized his inner hillbilly fatalism, and gave him a sense that he had control over his life, and that his choices mattered. This was news to him. Reading this was a revelation to me. I was raised by parents who grew up poor, but who taught my sister and me from the very start that we were responsible for ourselves. Hard work, self-respect, and self-discipline were at the core of my dad’s ethic, for sure. There was no more despicable person in my dad’s way of seeing the world than the sumbitch who won’t work. I doubt that I’ve ever known a man more willing to do hard physical labor than my father was. Knowing what he came from, and knowing how any progress he made came from the sweat of his brow and self-discipline on spending, he had no tolerance for people who were lazy and blamed everybody else for their problems. This is true whether they were poor, middle class, or rich (but especially if they were rich).

Anyway, Vance talks about how the contemporary hillbilly mindset renders them unfit for participation in life outside their own ghetto. They don’t trust anybody, and are willing to believe outlandish conspiracy theories, particularly if those theories absolve them from responsibility.

I once ran into an old acquaintance at a Middletown bar who told me that he had recently quit his job because he was sick of waking up early I later saw him complaining on Facebook about the “Obama economy” and how it had affected his life. I don’t doubt that the Obama economy has affected many, but this man is assuredly not among them. His status in life is directly attributable to the choices he’s made, and his life will improve only through better decisions. But for him to make better choices, he needs to live in an environment that forces him to ask tough questions about himself. There is a cultural movement in the white working class to blame problems on society or the government, and that movement gains adherents by the day.

Hence the enormous popularity of Donald Trump among the white working class. Here’s a guy who will believe and say anything, and who blames Mexicans, Chinese, and Muslims for America’s problems. The elites hate him, so he’s made the right enemies, as far as the white working class is concerned. And his “Make America Great Again” slogan speaks to the deep patriotism that Vance says is virtually a religion among hillbillies.

Trump doesn’t come up in Vance’s narrative, but in truth, he’s all over it. Vance is telling his personal story, not analyzing US politics and culture broadly. It’s also true, however, that the GOP elites set themselves up for their current disaster, by listening to theories that absolved themselves of any responsibility for problems in this country from immigration and free trade (Trump is not all wrong about this).

The sense of inner order and discipline Vance learned in the Marine Corps allowed his natural intelligence to blossom. The poor hillbilly kid with the druggie mom ends up at Yale Law School. He says he felt like an outsider there, but it was a serious education in more than the law:

The wealthy and the powerful aren’t just wealthy and powerful; they follow a different set of norms and mores. … It was at this meal, on the first of five grueling days of [law school job] interviews, that I began to understand that I was seeing the inner workings of a system that lay hidden to most of my kind. … That week of interviews showed me that successful people are playing an entirely different game.

What he’s talking about is social capital, and how critically important it is to success. Poor white kids don’t have it (neither do poor black or Hispanic kids). You’re never going to teach a kid from the trailer park or the housing project the secrets of the upper middle class, but you can give them what kids like me had: a basic understanding of work, discipline, confidence, good manners, and an eagerness to learn. A big part of the problem for his people, says Vance, is the shocking degree of family instability among the American poor. “Chaos begets chaos. Instability begets instability. Welcome to family life for the American hillbilly.”

Vance is admirably humble about how the only reason he got out was because key people along the way helped him climb out of the hole his culture dug for him. When Vance talks about how to fix these problems, he strikes a strong skeptical note. The worst problems of his culture, the things that held kids like him back, are not things a government program can fix. For example, as a child, his culture taught him that doing well in school made you a “sissy.” Vance says the home is the source of the worst of these problems. There simply is not a policy fix for families and family systems that have collapsed.

I believe we hillbillies are the toughest goddamned people on this earth. … But are we tough enough to do what needs to be done to help a kid like Brian? Are we tough enough to build a church that forces kids like me to engage with the world rather than withdraw from it? Are we tough enough to look ourselves in the mirror and admit that our conduct harms our children? Public policy can help, but there is no government that can fix these problems for us. These problems were not created by governments or corporations or anyone else. We created them, and only we can fix them.

Voting for Trump is not going to fix these problems. For the black community, protesting against police brutality on the streets is not going to fix their most pressing problems. It’s not that the problems Trump points to aren’t real, and it’s not that police brutality, especially towards minorities, isn’t a problem. It’s that these serve as distractions from the core realities that keep poor white and black people down. A missionary to inner-city Dallas once told me that the greatest obstacle the black and Latino kids he helped out had was their rock-solid conviction that nothing could change for them, and that people who succeeded got that way because they were born white, or rich, or just got lucky.

Until these things are honestly and effectively addressed by families, communities, and their institutions, nothing will change.

Is there a black J.D. Vance? I wonder. I mean, I know there are African-Americans who have done what he has done. But are there any who will write about it? Clarence Thomas did, in his autobiography. Who else? Anybody know?

Vance’s book sends me back to Kevin D. Williamson’s stunning National Review piece on “The White Ghetto” — Appalachia, he means. This is the world J.D. Vance came out of, though he saw more good in it that Williams does in his journalistic tour. It also brings to mind Williamson’s highly controversial piece earlier this year (behind subscription paywall; David French excerpts the hottest part here) in which he said:

It is immoral because it perpetuates a lie: that the white working class that finds itself attracted to Trump has been victimized by outside forces. It hasn’t. The white middle class may like the idea of Trump as a giant pulsing humanoid middle finger held up in the face of the Cathedral, they may sing hymns to Trump the destroyer and whisper darkly about “globalists” and — odious, stupid term — “the Establishment,” but nobody did this to them. They failed themselves.

If you spend time in hardscrabble, white upstate New York, or eastern Kentucky, or my own native West Texas, and you take an honest look at the welfare dependency, the drug and alcohol addiction, the family anarchy — which is to say, the whelping of human children with all the respect and wisdom of a stray dog — you will come to an awful realization. It wasn’t Beijing. It wasn’t even Washington, as bad as Washington can be. It wasn’t immigrants from Mexico, excessive and problematic as our current immigration levels are. It wasn’t any of that. Nothing happened to them. There wasn’t some awful disaster. There wasn’t a war or a famine or a plague or a foreign occupation. Even the economic changes of the past few decades do very little to explain the dysfunction and negligence — and the incomprehensible malice — of poor white America. So the gypsum business in Garbutt ain’t what it used to be. There is more to life in the 21st century than wallboard and cheap sentimentality about how the Man closed the factories down. The truth about these dysfunctional, downscale communities is that they deserve to die.

Economically, they are negative assets. Morally, they are indefensible. Forget all your cheap theatrical Bruce Springsteen crap. Forget your sanctimony about struggling Rust Belt factory towns and your conspiracy theories about the wily Orientals stealing our jobs. Forget your goddamned gypsum, and, if he has a problem with that, forget Ed Burke, too. The white American underclass is in thrall to a vicious, selfish culture whose main products are misery and used heroin needles. Donald Trump’s speeches make them feel good. So does OxyContin. What they need isn’t analgesics, literal or political. They need real opportunity, which means that they need real change, which means that they need U-Haul.

I criticized Williamson at the time for his harshness. I still wouldn’t have put it the way he did, but reading Vance gives me reason to reconsider my earlier judgment. Vance writes from a much more loving and appreciative place than Williamson did (though I believe Williamson came from a similar rough background), but he affirms many of the same truths. If white lives matter — and they do, because all lives matter — then sentimentality and more government programs aren’t going to rescue these poor people. Vance puts it more delicately than Williamson, but getting a U-Haul and getting away from other poor people — or at least finding some way to get their kids out of there, to a place where people aren’t so fatalistic, lazy, and paranoid — is their best hope. And that is surely true no matter what your race.

The book is called Hillbilly Elegy, and I can’t recommend it to you strongly enough. It offers no easy answers. But it does tell the truth. I thank reader Surly Temple for giving it to me.

UPDATE: Hello Browser readers. Glad to see traffic from one of my favorite websites. If you found this piece interesting, I strongly encourage you to take a look at the subsequent interview I did with J.D. Vance about the book. I posted it last Friday, and it has gone viral. This past weekend was a record-setting one for TAC; Vance’s interview was so popular it crashed our server. Take a look at the piece and you’ll understand why. This extraordinary young writer is tapping into something very, very deep in American life right now. I’ve been getting plenty of e-mails from liberals saying how much they appreciated the piece, because Vance tells difficult truths that both liberals and conservatives need to hear.

Voir aussi:

Why Liberals Love ‘Hillbilly Elegy’

My friend Matt Sitman tweets:

Yes, but the more interesting question, at least to me, is why so many liberals like it — or at least why they are writing to me in droves saying how the interview J.D. Vance did with me deeply resonated with them, and inspired them to buy the book. (By the way, that interview was published two weeks ago today, and it’s still drawing so much web traffic to this site that our servers are struggling to handle it.) I’ll give you a sample below of the kind of correspondence I’m getting (with a couple of tweaks to protect privacy). There’s lots of it just like these below:

Mr. Dreher, this article was fantastic.

I grew up in rural Alabama, proudly declared myself “politically somewhere to the right of Attila the Hun”, and enlisted when I was 17. I had a difficult time getting out at 23 years old, several states away from my family, with a grownup’s bills to pay but an MOS that didn’t match the career I was suited for or needed as a civilian. I spent the next several years desperately poor but “self-sufficient” – as far as I knew, anyway.

In reality, of course, I had zero understanding of how taxes work. I saw about a 28% bite taken out of my paycheck, and didn’t understand that FICA/SS didn’t ultimately go to anybody but me, myself, and I, and that I wasn’t actually paying any income tax. I also had heard of but didn’t really understand or care about things like “every federal tax dollar that leaves SC has three federal tax dollars pass by it coming in.”

Truth be told, I wasn’t just unaware, I actively disbelieved that I wasn’t “self sufficient” at all, and I naively thought that I was paying for the “welfare” that the tiny, tiny portion of the population “poorer than me” was getting. I was also completely unaware that I was “desperately poor” at all. I was making $6/hr and I thought I was middle class! I knew people who made $10/hr, and I thought they were on the low end of upper class!
Eventually I made a real career for myself, started my own business, and spent less time scratching and kicking and fighting just to stay alive. The more time and resources I had, the more I learned about how the world, and politics, worked, and the more progressive I became. I am not, today, someone who would normally read articles from a site called “American Conservative”.

But I read yours, and I’m glad I did. What you and J.D. Vance had to say in that article are exactly what I want to hear from the conservative wing of American politics. Speaking candidly, I’m unlikely to be a “conservative” again – I’m a progressive, and likely to stay that way. But what you and Vance said was thoughtful, and reasonable, and – like I try to very publicly be myself, having “been there and done that” – understanding of the realities of the working poor. It’s the real and sensible ballast that even the best of real and sensible balloons (if you’ll permit the analogy between conservative and progressive, and we can both agree to handwave away the fact that the current DNC is neither as real or as sensible as it should be) needs.

That’s probably way too much to slog through, but seriously: thank you.

Another one:

I thoroughly enjoyed this article! The conversation is not one that I have witnessed anyone else having. It is so easy to dismiss people as racist without ever considering from where their views and positions are derived. I am certainly going to read Hillbilly Elegy and look forward to reading more of your articles, By the way I am black, liberal, I most often vote Democrat and I don’t like Trump (for Reasons too high in number to state). I enjoy intelligent conversation and debate and have learned to carefully listen to and understand those who I may disagree with, so I might be educated fully on the issue not just entrenched in my beliefs.

Thank you for a refreshing read in a sea partisan sludge.

Another one, this from a reader who mistakenly believed that J.D. Vance’s experiences were mine. Still, his letter is fascinating:

I wandered in on this article today… and couldn’t stop reading. I’m Californian, a progressive and a Sanders supporter, a former Nader supporter, a former UAW organizer, currently a medical
devices engineer in [state], and have a Ph.D. in engineering. I grew up in a town 5 miles north of the Mexican border in south San Diego, and grew up among Mexican immigrants, many of whom were undocumented… they were my neighbors, my friends, my elders. I myself am an immigrant, came here as a kid with my parents, who were liberals who wanted something better than that right-wing dictatorship in [another country].

But I did grow up around the poverty line. My parents fought hard to stay out of welfare, to stay together, and to teach us the value of work. At 43, I have always worked since I was 14, and have always associated these traits with working-class liberal values… and was quite surprised many election cycles ago to hear silver-spooned class enemies in the GOP pick that up. What did these bastards know about real work? But it also pains me to see the elites, especially the East Coast elites, take over the Democratic Party.

I’m sorry to hear about your experiences at Yale Law. And I’m glad that I didn’t go to a private school, or a school in the East Coast. After moving to [my current state] 3 years ago I’ve found that liberals “out east” (east of the Sierra Nevadas) seem to come from privilege, are more dogmatic, disconnected from the working class, and can be super competitive and vindictive. I even remember starting out as an undergrad and scholarship kid at UC San Diego, how I felt the sting of class. I felt disconnected culturally from the liberals. It wasn’t until friends from high school began shipping back from Desert Storm all crazy and screwed up that I found common cause with these liberals.

As with the folks of Appalachia (I was a member of the Southern Baptist Church… it was a big military town), the defense of our neighborhoods was also paramount to us. What south San Diegans were seeing during the 90s was an entire generation deployed to guard oil fields in Iraq while the princelings of Kuwait lived it up in night clubs, and folks in Sacramento setting up laws that attack immigrants as a cheap shot to get elected. Everything was fine at the border until these demagogues (Republicans in this case) started showing up in our town in staged photo-ops.

Trump does have that appeal of at least pretending to listen to the
broken and forgotten. But just as we were about to forget the vengeance we swore against those who hurt our town, Trump comes by and reopens all the wounds, reminding us that while we might hold some conservative values, Republicans will always see us as sub-human.

I do think dialog and empathy are something of a short supply in
American politics today. The neoliberal policies and unfair trade pacts supported by both parties have been crushing our respective beloved hometowns. And we have a lot more in common than what these entrenched political entities say that we do. I’ve read “Rivethead” and “Deer Hunting with Jesus” and felt this familiarity. I will look for your book.

And here’s another one:

I just wanted to write and tell you that I was fascinated by your interview with the author JD Vance, and I speak as a socialist, agnostic, gay white male who’s never voted Republican in all his years! As a lifelong resident of the suburbs of Houston, Texas, it’s long occurred to me how insulated I am from the struggles of poor and working-class folks today; however my family started out poor, with my parents divorcing when I was six. Luckily our mother was strong enough to help us make it out of the hole by excelling in her profession as a nurse. I remember her telling me that in the days when my sister and I were very young, for Christmas she’d spend $20 on each of us at the dollar store, and she always hoped that we enjoyed our presents. That made me love my mom so much more, and I realized how lucky we’d been to have her, given how things might have turned out. In Houston as you probably know there is a staggering number of people of every imaginable type, and my school years were spent among kids from every walk of life, of every ethnicity and persuasion you can imagine. As an outsider myself, being gay and openly agnostic in an environment where neither was considered acceptable (high school was in the late 90s), I can identify with the feeling of seeming hopelessness, isolation, and fear for the future that Mr Vance describes, though certainly on a different level and for different reasons. I also feel a greater understanding now of the appeal of Trump to certain strata within our society…along with a renewed sense of how dangerous he really is to all of us (not to mention the rest of the world)! I would like to feel as hopeful for the future as Mr Vance seems to, but I’m afraid that until November (though hopefully not after!) I’ll be suffering a case of non-stop indigestion. Maybe we could all use a touch of that hillbilly idealism in our lives.

Anyway, that’s enough rambling out of me. Cheers for an excellent interview, and congratulations for gaining a new reader of the blue persuasion!

I could go on and on. I’m getting so many e-mails like these above that I can’t begin to respond to them all. I’m passing every one of them on to J.D. Vance, though. Interestingly, if I’ve received a single e-mail from a conservative about the interview, I can’t remember it.

I’m genuinely surprised and grateful for all these generous e-mails, and I’m sure J.D. is too. What I find so hopeful about it is that someone has finally found a voice with which to talk substantively about an important economic and cultural issue, but without antagonizing the other side. JDV identifies as a conservative, but his story challenges right-wing free-market pieties. And I’ve gotten plenty of e-mails from liberals who either come from poverty or who work with poor people for a living, who praise JDV’s points about the poor needing to understand that whatever structural problems they face, they retain moral agency.

What do you think, readers? Do you think the runaway success of Hillbilly Elegy, and the powerfully positive response from liberals to a book about class written by a conservative, bodes well for the possibility of constructive engagement around issues of class and poverty? To be sure, I’ve received a handful of letters from angry liberal readers who reject the idea that there’s anything wrong with poor and working class white people that government action can’t solve. I believe, and so does J.D., that government really does have a meaningful role to play in ameliorating the problems of the poor. But there will never be a government program capable of compensating for the loss of stable family structures, the loss of community, the loss of a sense of moral agency, and the loss of a sense of meaning in the lives of the poor. The solution, insofar as there is a “solution,” is not an either-or (that is, either culture or government), but a both-and. From a Washington Post review of the book:

The wounds are partly self-inflicted. The working class, he argues, has lost its sense of agency and taste for hard work. In one illuminating anecdote, he writes about his summer job at the local tile factory, lugging 60-pound pallets around. It paid $13 an hour with good benefits and opportunities for advancement. A full-time employee could earn a salary well above the poverty line.

That should have made the gig an easy sell. Yet the factory’s owner had trouble filling jobs. During Vance’s summer stint, three people left, including a man he calls Bob, a 19-year-old with a pregnant girlfriend. Bob was chronically late to work, when he showed up at all. He frequently took 45-minute bathroom breaks. Still, when he got fired, he raged against the managers who did it, refusing to acknowledge the impact of his own bad choices.

“He thought something had been done to him,” Vance writes. “There is a lack of agency here — a feeling that you have little control over your life and a willingness to blame everyone but yourself.”

Perhaps Vance’s key to success is a simple one: that he just powered through his difficulties instead of giving up or blaming someone else.

“I believe we hillbillies are the toughest god—-ed people on this earth,” he concludes. “But are we tough enough to look ourselves in the mirror and admit that our conduct harms our children? Public policy can help, but there is no government that can fix these problems for us. . . . I don’t know what the answer is precisely, but I know it starts when we stop blaming Obama or Bush or faceless companies and ask ourselves what we can do to make things better.”

The loss of industrial jobs plays a big role in the catastrophe. J.D. Vance acknowledges that plainly in his book. But it’s not the whole story. Anybody who comes to Hillbilly Elegy thinking that it’s going to tell a story that affirms the pre-conceived beliefs of mainstream conservatives or liberals is going to be surprised and challenged — in a good way.

By the way, the viral nature of the TAC interview with J.D. Vance has pushed Hillbilly Elegy onto the bestseller list (more details of which will be available shortly). It’s No. 4 on Amazon’s own list as of this morning. They can barely keep enough in stock. It really is that good, folks. All this success could not have happened to a nicer man. Credit for this spark goes to reader Surly Temple, who gave me my copy of Hillbilly Elegy.

UPDATE: A reader writes to point out:

The Washington Post review you quote states, Perhaps Vance’s key to success is a simple one: that he just powered through his difficulties instead of giving up or blaming someone else.” I think that misses the point of the book. J.D. fully acknowledges the importance of his Mamaw, Marine Corps drill instructors, and wife in changing his outcomes.

My takeaway from the book is that we can help these communities and people, but not from a distance. It takes unconditional, sacrificial love.

He’s right about that, and I shouldn’t have posted that WaPo review without commenting. JDV openly credits his Mamaw and the Marine Corps with making him the man he is today. He does not claim he got there entirely on his own, by bootstrapping it.

Voir également:

RACE, CLASS, AND CULTURE: A CONVERSATION WITH WILLIAM JULIUS WILSON AND J.D. VANCE
THE BROOKINGS INSTITUTION
Washington, D.C.
Tuesday, September 5, 2017

MS. BUSETTE: Thanks Richard. I’m indebted to Richard who had the foresight to invite Bill and J.D. for this conversation well before I arrived at Brookings (…) Today we’re going to be covering some very timely and sensitive topics. Topics that explore who we are as Americans and why we are still struggling with entrenched poverty increasing in equality and the tragic waste of significant human potential; some 30 years after Bill Wilson first published his watershed book, “ The Truly Disadvantaged. ” As we begin this conversation, I want our audience to understand the personal experiences you both bring to your perspectives on poor Americans. Bill and J.D., I’d like each of you to share with us a personal experience from your childhood that had a profound impact on you and your perspectives on poverty, and Bill I’m going to ask you to go first.

MR. WILSON: Thank you. So, in answer to that challenging question, I should point out first of all that “ Hillbilly Elegy ” is a very important book and it also resonated with me in a very personal way because I also experienced the problems of rural poverty. I grew up in a small town in Western Pennsylvania. My father was a coal miner. He worked in these coal mines of Western Pennsylvania and oc casionally he worked in steel mills in Western Pennsylvania. He died at the age of 39, with a lung disease. Left my mother with six kids and I was the oldest at 12 years of age. My father had a 10 th grade education, my mother had a 10 th grade education. My mother who lived to the ripe old age of 94, raised us by cleaning house occasionally. Initially we were on r elief. We call it w elfare now. She got off w elfare and supported us by cleaning house; and what I distinctly remember about growing up in ru ral poverty is hunger. You know, I reviewed a book in the New York Times, Kathy Edin and Luke Shaefer’s book, “ Two Dollars a Day, Living on Almost Nothing in America. ” That book really captured my experiences, and I distinctly remember the times when we went hungry because my mother did not have any money and it was during the winter time and sometimes she had to use her own creativity in coming up with food because she couldn’t draw from the garden.

Now, given my family background, black person, black family in rural poverty; as one of my colleagues at Harvard told me, the odds that I would end up at Harvard as a University p rofessor and capital U on University, are very nearly zero. Like J.D. I’m an outlier. An outlier in — Malcolm Gladwell says in his book “ Outlier, The Study of Success. ” We are both outliers; but it’s interesting that J.D. never talks about holding himself up by his own bootstraps, and that’s something that I reject. I don’t refer to myself that way, because both J.D. and I, were in the right places at the right times, and we had significant individuals who were there to rescue us from poverty and enabled us to escape. We are the outliers being at the right place at the right time, and when I think about your question, that’s one thing I think about; how lucky I was. I had some significant individuals who helped me escape poverty.

MS. BUSETTE: Thank you Bill. J.D.?

MR. VANCE: Well first, thanks Camille, thanks Richard for hosting this. It’s really wonderful to be here and I’m a bit of a fan boy of William Julius Wilson as I wrote Hillbilly Elegy, so it was real exciting to be able to get him to sign this book. I think that the story that stands out to me is, and there’s a bit of a background here which is that you know, I was six or seven years old, and I remember my mom who was trying to get some sort of certification to become a nurse; and eventually after a couple of years, I remember being old enough that she sort of had to test how to draw blood on me, and that was sort of something I volunteered for because I thought it was really cool, because I was a weird kid; and I remember that eventually she made it and she was able to work as a nurse for a couple of years, and this just so happened to overlap with a period w here she was married to a truck driver. A guy who hadn’t graduated from high school, but was able to drive a truck and so you think about those two incomes together, there was this period where I felt like we had genuinely made it where we had this financial stability that was pretty remarkable given the history of my family. And I think the way that it fell apart so quickly and the way that even in the midst of that financial security, life was so chaotic and so unstable and eventually when that very precarious middle – class lifestyle fell apart economically, all of the instability that existed in our home sort of came crashing down upon us; and so, it felt like after this two-year period, we were in an even worse situation than we were going into it. I think you know, one of the things that taught me, and one of the ways I think it influenced the way that I think about poverty and inequality and upward mobility, is that the problems that a lot of poor families face aren’t purely income related. That some of the lessons that you learn, some of the things that you acquire when you are really struggling, they follow you even when you’re not struggling in a purely material sense. And then when a material sense returns, it can make all of those non-material things that much worse off, and I think that way of understanding these problems has really influenced the way that I think about a lot of the problems that I write about in the book.

MS. BUSETTE: Great, thank you very much. Thank you both very much. You know I want to talk a little bit about the place of poverty in the American narrative. And that narrative is complicated. In a recent survey conducted by The American Enterprise Institute and the Los Angeles Times, white Americans linked poverty with laziness and lack of ambition, and when we think of the welfare reform debates from the 1990’s, there were ungenerous terms used to describe the poor. The National Opinion Research Center also released a survey that shows that over the last two d ecades, there has never been such a bigger divide between white Republicans and white Democrats when it comes to the views of the intelligence and work ethic of African Americans. More generally, Americans think of poverty as an individual failure, and i ts opposite financial success is the result of hard work and smarts. I want each of you to reflect on these narratives of poverty and give us your perspective. Bill, I’m going to start with you.

MR. WILSON: Okay, that’s a very challenging question and I ‘m going to try to answer it by also pointing out some differences that I have with J.D. It’s really kind of a matter of emphasis. Not that we differ, it’s just a matter of emphasis. First of all, we both agree that too many liberal social scientists focus on social structure and ignore cultural conditions. You know, they talk about poverty, joblessness and discrimination, but they also don’t talk about some of the cultural conditions, that grow out of these situations, in response to these situations. Too many conservatives focus on cultural forces and ignore structural factors. Now J.D. has made the same point in “ Hillbilly Elegy ” and you also have made the same point in some subsequent interviews talking about the book. Now where we disagree and this relates back to your question, Camille, is in the interpretation of these cultural factors. J.D. places a lot of emphasis on agency. That people even in the most impoverished circumstances have choices that can either improve or exacerbate their situation, their predicaments. And I also think that a gency is important and should not be ignored, even in situations where individuals confront overwhelming structural impediments. But what J.D., and I’d like to hear your response to this J.D., wha t you don’t make explicit or emphasize enough from my point of view, is that agency is also constrained by these structural factors, even among people who you know, make positive choices to improve their lives, there are still constraints and I maintain th at the part of your book where you talking about agency, really cries out for a deeper interrogation. A deeper interrogation of how personal a gency is expanded or inhibited by the circumstance that the poor or working classes confront, including you know, their interactions and families, social networks , and institutions, in these distressed communities. In other words, what I’m trying to suggest is that personal agency is recursively associated with the structural forces within which it operates. And here you know, it’s sort of insightful to talk about intermediaries and insightful to talk about people who aid, who help you in making choices, and you do that well in the book. But here’s the point, given the American belief system on poverty and welfare in which Americans as you point out Camille, place far greater emphasis on personal shortcomings as opposed to structural barriers and especially when you’re talking about the behavior of African Americans. I believe that explanations that focus — don’t get me wrong, you don’t even talk about African Americans in the sense, I’m talking about people out there in the general public. Given this focus on personal shortcomings as opposed to structural barriers in a common for outcomes, I believe that explanations that focus on agency are likely to overshadow explanations that focus on structural impediments. Some people read a book, but they’re not that sophisticated, the take away will be those personal factors and you know, I would have liked to have seen you sort of try to put things in context you know. Talk about the constraints that people have. Now this relates to the second point I want to make. In addition, to feeling that they have little control over themselves, that is lack of agency. You point out that the individuals in these hillbilly communities tend to blame themselves — I’m sorry, blame everyone but themselves, and the term you used to explain this phenomenon is cognitive dissonance, when our beliefs are not consistent with our behaviors. And I agree, and many people often do tend to blame others and not themselves, but I think that when we talk about cognitive dissonance, we also have to recognize that individuals in these communities do indeed have some complaints, some justifiable complaints, including complaints about industries that have pulled off stakes and relocated to cheaper labor areas overseas and in the process, have devastated communities like Middletown, Ohio. Including complaints about automation replacing the jobs of cashiers and parking lot attendants. Including the complaints that government and corporate actions have undermined unions and therefore led to a decrease in the wages or workers in Middletown. You know, I just , I’m sorry, I’m going on too far, I’ll let you respond.

MS. BUSETTE: That was interesting. Now, here’s your chance.

MR. VANCE: Sure. So, I’ll make two broad points. One hopefully more responsive to your initial question, second more responsive to Bill’s concerns. So, first this point about culture, which is a really, really, difficult and amorphous concept to define, and one of the things that I was trying to do with “ Hillbilly Elegy ” is try to in some ways draw the discussion away from this structure versus personal responsibility narrative and convince us to look at culture as a third and I think very important variable. I often think that the way that conservatives, and I’m a conservative, talk about culture is in some ways an excuse to end the conversation instead of starti ng a much more important conversation. It’s look at their bad culture, look at their deficient culture, we can’t do anything to help them; instead of trying to understand culture as this much bigger social and institutional force that really is important that some cases can come from problems related to poverty and some cases can come from a host of different factors that are difficult to understand. So, here’s what I mean by that. One of the most important I think cultural problems that I talk about is the prevalence of family and stability and family trauma in some of the communities that I write about; and I take it as a given that that trauma and that instability is really bad, that it has really negative downstream effects on whether children are able to get an education, whether their able to enter the workforce, whether their able to raise and maintain successful families themselves. I think it’s tempting to sort of look at the problems of family instability and families like mine and say the re’s a structural problem if only people had access to better economic opportunities, they wouldn’t have this problem. I think that’s partially true, but also consequently partially false. I think there’s a tendency on the right to look at that and say these parents need to take better care of their families and of their children, and unless they do it, there’s nothing that we can do. And I think again, that is maybe partially true, but it’s also very significantly false. What I’m trying to point to in this concept of culture, is we know that when children grow up in very unstable families that it has important cognitive effects, we know that it has important psychological effects, and unless we understand the problem of family instability and trauma, not just as a structural problem, or problem with personal responsibility, but as a long – term problem, in some cases inherited from multiple generations back, then we’re not going to be able to appreciate what’s really going on in some of these families a nd why family instability and trauma is so durable and so difficult to actually solve. So, I tend to think of culture as in some ways, this way to sum all of the things that are neither structural nor individual. What is it that’s going on in people’s environments good and bad that make it difficult for them to climb out of poverty. What are the things that they inherit. It’s not just from their own families, but from multiple generations back. Behaviors, expectations, environmental attitudes that mak e is really hard for them to succeed and do well. That’s the concept of culture that I think is most important, and also frankly that I think is missing a little bit from our political conversation when we talk about these questions of poverty, we’re real ly comfortable talking about personal responsibility, we’re really comfortable talking about structural problems. We don’t often talk about culture in this way that I’m trying to talk about it, in “ Hillbilly Elegy. ”

MR. WILSON: Can I just —

MR. VANCE : Sure.

MR. WILSON: No, go ahead J.D.

MR. VANCE: (laughing)

MR. WILSON: No, no, I agree. It’s a matter of emphasis, that’s all I’m saying.

MR. VANCE: So this, yeah.

MR. WILSON: And let me also point out, here’s where we really do agree. We both agree that there are cultural practices within families and so on and in communities that reinforce problems created by the structural barriers.

MR. VANCE: Absolutely.

MR. WILSON: Reinforce. Practiced behaviors that perpetuate poverty and disadvantage. So, this we agree. Too often liberals ignore the role of these cultural forces in perpetuating or reinforcing conditions associated with poverty or concentrated (inaudible).

MS. BUSETTE: So —

MR. VANCE: Absolutely. So, the second point that I wanted to make, and I’ll try to be brief is this question of Agency and whether I overemphasize the role of Agency. I think that for me, this is a really tough line to tow because I’m sort of writing about these problems you know, having in my personal memory, I’m not that far removed from a lot of them. I know that myself, one of the biggest problems that I faced was that I really did start to give up on myself early in high school, and I think that’s a really significant problem. At the same time, I understand and recognize the problem that Bill mentions which is that we have this tendency to sort of overemphasize Personal Agency and to proverbially blame the victim for a lot of these problems. So, what I was trying to do with this discussion of Personal Agency in the book, and I may have failed, but this is the effort, this is what I’m really trying to accomplish. Is that the first instance, I do think that it’s important for kids like me in circumstances like mine, to pick up the book and to have at least some reinforcement of the Agency that they have. I do think that’s a significant problem from the prospective of kids who grew up in communities like mine. The second thing that I’m trying to do, is talk about Personal Agency, not jus t from the prospective of individual poor people, but from the entire community that surrounds them. So, one of the things that I talk about is as religious communities in these areas, do they have the, as I say in the book, toughness to build Churches that encourage more social engagement as opposed to more social disaffection. I think that’s a question of Personal Agency, not from the perspective of the impoverished kid, but from a religious leader and community leaders that exist in their neighborho od. So, I think that sense of Personal Agency is really important. One of the worries that I have, is that when we talk about the problems of impoverished kids and this is especially true amongst sort of my generation, so this is — I’m a tail end of t he millennials here, is that we tend to think about helping people, 10 million people at a time a very superficial level, and one of the calls to action that I make in the book with this — by pointing out to Personal Agency is the idea that it can be real ly impactful to make a difference in 10 lives at a very deep level at the community level. And I think that sometimes is missing from these conversations. And then, the final point that I’ll make is that there’s a difference between recognizing the impo rtance of Personal Agency and I think ignoring the role of structural factors in some of these problems, right? So, the example that I used to highlight this in the book is this question of addiction. So, there’s some interesting research that suggests t hat people who believe inherently that their addiction is a disease, show slightly less proclivity to actually fight that addiction and overcome that addiction. So, that creates sort of a catch 22, because we know there are biological components to add iction. We know that there are these sorts of structural non – personal decision – making drivers of addiction, and yet, if you totally buy in to the non – individual choice explanation for addiction, you show less of a proclivity to fight it. So, I think that there is this really tough under current to some of our discussions on these issues, where as a society we want to simultaneously recognize the barriers that people face, but also encourage them not to play a terrible hand in a terrible way, and that’s wh at I’m trying to do with this discussion of Personal Agency. The final point that I’ll make on that, is that the person who towed that line better than anyone I’ve ever known was my Grandma, my Ma’ma who I think is in some ways the hero of the book. She always told me. Look J.D., like is unfair for us, but don’t be like those people who think the deck is hopelessly stacked against them. I think that’s a sentiment that you hear far too infrequently among America’s elites. This simultaneous recogniti on that life is unfair for a lot of poor Americans, but that we still have to emphasize the role of individual agency in spite of that unfairness and I think that’s again a difficult balancing act. I may not have struck that balancing act perfectly in the book, but that was the intention.

MS. BUSETTE: Thank you.

MR. WILSON: Camille, do you mind if I follow – up because I mean this is an interesting conversation and you just raised a point there about optimism which I think is very, very important. Because you know, one point that resonated with me in your book is that you pointed out, I think it was 2010 – 2011, by the way, I read your book twice you know so (laughter) that’s how I remembered it, and I enjoyed it both times. I’m going to say —

MR. VANCE: That’s good.

MR. WILSON: — it’s a great book. You pointed out that in 2010 or 2011, you were overwhelmingly hopeful about the future, and that for the first time in your life, you felt like an outsider in Middletown, Ohio. And what made you feel like an alien as you put it, was your optimism. And I think that that’s the key. People who have some hope for the future behave differently. And I think that if there were some way to generate hope and optimism among people in Appalachia, or among the Appalachian transplants, you would see a change in their behavior, and this argument applies not only to those in distress rural communities, but also distressed urban communities. And I think immediately of the Harlem Children Zone. The kids who are lucky enough to be a part of — I assume all of you know about the Harlem Children’s Zone. The kids who are lucky enough to be a part of the Harlem Children’s Zone, are kids who develop in the process a hopeful feeling. A feeling that they have a future, and therefore they’re not going to do anything to jeopardize that future. You became optimistic. What factors led you to develop that optimism?

MR. VANCE: Yeah, that’s a good question. I might ask you the same question when I’m done answering —

MR. WILSON: Right.

MR. VANCE: — but you know, the first thing is definitely you know, going back to my grandma. I think if anybody had a reason for pessimism and cynicism about the future, it was her. It’s sort of difficult to imagine a woman who had lived a more difficult life and yet ma’ma had this constant optimism about the future, in the sense that we had to do better because that was just the way that America worked. I mean I think that she was this woman who had this deep and abiding faith in the American dream in a way that is obviously disappearing And in fact, as I wrote about in the book, was I started to see disappearing even you know, when I was a young kid in my early 20’s. So, I think that my grandma was a huge part of that. I also think that the Marine Corp was a really huge part of that, and this is sort of a transformational experience that I write about in the book. The military is this really remarkable institution. It brings people from diverse backgrounds together, gets them on the same team. Gets them marching proverbially and literally towards the same goal, and for a kid who had grown up in a community that was starting to lose faith in that American dream, I think that the military was a really useful way to, as I say in the book, teach a certain amount of willfulness as opposed to despair and hopelessness. So, I think that was a really critical piece of it. You know, at some level, in some cases I think it’s impossible to reconstruct that in the past. I knew that I was a really hopeless and in some cases detached kid early in high school. I knew that by 2010, I was feeling really optimistic about the future and I do sometimes wonder how easy it is to reconstruct what took me from point A to point B, but those two factors are my best guess.

MS. BUSETTE: Did you want to answer his question.

MR. WILSON: You know, even in extreme property, my mother kept telling me, you’re going to college. And my Aunt Janice also reinforced — my Aunt Janice was the first person in my extended family who got a college education, and I used to go to New York to visit her during the summer months, and I said you know, I want to be like Aunt Janice, you know?

MR. VANCE: Sure.

MR. WILSON: Key people in our lives —

MR. VANCE: Absolutely.

MR. WILSON: We are the outliers J.D.

MR. VANCE: Yep.

MR. WILSON: And Malcom Gladwell since.

MS. BUSETTE: Thank you both for that interchange. I think that was incredibly interesting and very illuminating. I want to go back to something you mentioned J.D., which is this question of culture. You know Bill, I know that the term cultural poverty has a very divisive history and still conjures up very vitriolic debates today. But Bill, you have over an extraordinary career, created meaningful distinctions about poverty and within that jargon of poverty and you’ve also situated jobless poverty in particular within changes in the economy. Could you tell us what the experiential differences are between jobless poverty and the employed poor?

MR. WILSON: Well you really see this when you look at neighborhoods. Neighborhoods in which an overwhelming majority of the population are poor, but employed is entirely different from neighborhoods in which people are poor but jobless. Jobless neighborhoods trigger all kinds of problems. Crime, drug addiction, gang behavior, violence. And one of the things that I had focused on when I wrote my book, When Work Disappears is what happens to intercity neighborhoods that experience increasing le vels of joblessness. And we did some research in Chicago and it was really you know, sad, talking to some of the mothers who were just fearful about allowing their children to go outside because the neighborhood was so incredibly dangerous. And I remember talking with one woman and she says — who was obese and she says you know, I went to the doctor he said that I should go out and exercise. Can you imagine jogging in this neighborhood? Because the joblessness had created problems among young people who were trying to make ends meet and they’re involved in crime and drugs and so on. So, I would say that if you want to focus on improving neighborhoods, the first thing that I would do would try to increase or enhance employment opportunities.

MS. BUSETTE: Great, thank you.

MR. WILSON: I have another story. This just reminds me. I was talking with a mother, young mother. Actually, she’s young now from my point of view, middle 30’s and her son had just been shot in the neighborhood, killed. Str ay bullet from a gang fight. She said her son was not a member of the gang, that’s one of the reasons why she was so fearful, so concerned about keeping her children indoors. She said you know Mr. Wilson, no one cared that my son died. His death was not reported in any of the newspapers. It wasn’t reported on the radio, TV. No one cared Mr. Wilson that my son died. And I just keep thinking about these families who live in these dangerous jobless neighborhoods and what they have to endure.

MS. BUSETTE: Thank you. One of the things that comes out clearly from your work Bill, and from your book J.D., is the erosion of social networks and social capital. J.D., your book is really an extended love letter to your grandparents who raised you. Can you tell us a little bit about how the social connections that they had were important to their resilience they showed as parents, as your parents?

MR. VANCE: Sure. So, my grandparents lived in, I think grew up in a little town that had much more robust communities than the town that I grew up in. And so, a lot of the relationships they developed, my grandfather was a 35-year union welder, at Armco. Later, A.K. Steel. My grandmother was a little bit more socially isolated than my grandfather but still had built up a network of friends over that time, and you know, going back to Bill’s point about having diverse networks of people who actually give you a sense of what’s possible and what’s out there, that was really, really, powerful for me, right. So, you know, of my grandparents three kids, one obviously is my mom, but my uncle and aunt were doing pretty well when I was a young kid, and so that gave me this sense of what’s out there, what’s possible. That’s really powerful. My grandfather had a number of friends most of whom were working class like him, but some of whom you know, owned the local businesses or owned local stores or mechanic shops, things like that. So that also gave me the sense of what was possible. And I think ultimately though I went to the Marine Corps and then off to college. I also think the obvious implication is that some of those social networks and connections would have had really powerful economic benefits if I had eventually tried to rely on them. I think that what was so wonderful about my grandparent’s social networks is that they were intact enough for me to still have relied upon them. On the other hand, one thing I really worried about and one thing that I increasingly worried about as I actually did research for the book, is this idea of faith and religion, not just as something that people believe in, but as an actual positive institutional and social role player in their lives. And one of the things you do see, that this is something that Charles Murray’s written about, is that you see the institutions of faith declining in some of these lower income communities faster than you do in middle and upper income communities. I don’t think you have to be a person of faith to think that that’s worrisome. I think you can just read a paper by Jonathan Gruber that talks about all of these really positive social impacts of being a regular participatory Church member. So, you know, I think I was lucky in that sense, but a lot of folks, and when I look at the community right now, it worries me a little bit that you don’t see these robust social institutions in the same way that you certainly did 30, 40 years ago, and even when I was growing up in Middletown. The last point that I’ll make about that, is that (…) these trends often take half a century or more to really reveal themselves and I do sometimes see signs of resilience in some of these communities that I sort of didn’t fully anticipate and didn’t expect when the book was published. So, one of the things I’ve started to realize for example is when we talk about the decline of institutional faith, even though I continue to worry about that, one of the institutions that’s actually picked up the slack are groups like Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous. They almost have this faith effect. It brings people together. There’s even a sort of liturgical element to some of these meetings that I find really, really fascinating and interesting. So, people try to find and replace community when it’s lost but you know, clearly, they haven’t at least as of yet, replaced it even remotely to the degree that it has been lost which is why I think you see some of the issues that we do.

MS. BUSETTE: Alright, thank you. Bill, I know you have something to say on that —

MR. WILSON: Sure.

MS. BUSETTE: — but I wanted to kind of position the question in a slightly different way than I did for J.D. The economy certainly became significantly since you first penned The Truly Disadvantaged. And what, from your perspective, what effects have those changes had on social organization and poverty?

MR. WILSON: Well, I don’t know if the conditions have changed that much, since I wrote The Truly Disadvantaged. The one big difference is that I think there’s increasing technology and automation that has created problems for a lot of low skilled workers. You know, I mentioned automation replacing jobs that cashiers held, and parking lot attendants held. So, you have a combination not only of the relocation of industries overseas, that I talked about in The Truly Disadvantaged; but now you have increasing automation and technology replacing jobs, and this worries me because I think that people who have poor education are going to be in difficult situations increasingly down the road. You look at intercity schools, not only schools in intercities, but in many other neighborhoods, and kids are not being properly educated. So, they’re not being prepared for the changes that are occurring in the economy. I remember one social scientist saying that it’s as if — talking about the black population. It’s as if racism and racial discrimination put black people in their place only to watch increasing technology and automation destroy that place. So, the one significant difference from the time I wrote The Truly Disadvantaged in 1987, is the growing problems created by increasing technology for the poor.

MR. VANCE: Bill, could I ask a question —

MR. WILSON: Sure.

MR. VANCE: — because this is something I was you know, looking through your book on my Kendall earlier today, and I kept on coming back to this question, and I’m curious what you think. Which is if the civil rights movement had happened in the early 20th century as opposed to the mid-20th century, do you think that black Americans would be more caught up than they are right now? In other words, do you think that it happened, the civil rights advancements happened at a time when technology was just really starting to hammer the economies that they relied on, and if it happened in an area where there weren’t quite the same premiums on human capital, that maybe they could have caught up a little bit better than they have over the past 50 years?

MR. WILSON: So what you’re saying is that if civil rights movement had happened at this time?

MR. VANCE: Sorry, the early 20th century?

MR. WILSON: Oh, the early 20th century

MR. VANCE: Yeah, that’s right.

MR. WILSON: Right.

MR. VANCE: So, if it had happened when we were just transitioning from the proverbial farm to the factory, do you think it would have had a significant difference?

MR. WILSON: I’m not sure.

MR. VANCE: Right, what else can you say.

MR. WILSON: What do you think?

MR. VANCE: — reading The Truly Disadvantaged today, I was thinking maybe the answer is yes, because part of what happened, with the civil rights movement is that the economy was rapidly changing just to some of these legal structures were you know, as black Americans were freed from some of these legal structures. And I do wonder if the economy — it was in some ways as these legal changes were happening in a very positive way, the economy hit black Americans super hard, and I wonder if those legal structures would have fallen at a time when the economy wasn’t changing so rapidly. Maybe things would be a little bit different today?

MR. WILSON: This reminds me of the point that Bayard Rustin raised in the early 1960’s. He said, you know, it’s great to outlaw discrimination and prejudice, but it’s also important to recognize that if you have a referee in the ring, and you say there will be no discrimination, but one fighter has had all of the training and the other fighter has not, which fighter is going to come out ahead? And so, he says much more emphasis has now got to be placed on dealing with these basic economic problems and he told Martin Luther King, Jr. he said look, he says what good is it to be allowed to eat in a restaurant if you can’t afford a hamburger; so, we’re going to have to address some of these fundamental economic problems —

MR. VANCE: Sure.

MR. WILSON: — that are devastating the community. So that reinforces your point too.

MS. BUSETTE: That is a perfect segue to a set of questions that I want to ask you both. It’s about the question of Race in America. We know that racism and discrimination have a long history in the U.S., and that the effects of that history are still experienced by individuals on a daily basis today. When those experiences are aggregated, we can see large mobility, wealth and income gaps between white Americans and African Americans. We are also hearing, and reading and seeing about the culture of the sphere, the opioid epidemic and the disability culture in rural and Rust belt America. So, I’m going to ask a sensitive question. Are there differences between being black, jobless and poor, and being white jobless and poor? And if so, what are they and why? Bill, I’m going to give you the honor of tackling that first (laughter).

MR. WILSON: You know, that’s a very interesting question because I was just — you know J.D. you wrote in your book about the problems of poor whites and it seems that poor whites right now are more pessimistic than any group, and the question is why. I was sort of impressed with your analysis of the white working class and the age of Trump. You know, you pointed out that when Barack Obama became president there were a lot of people in your community who were really struggling and who believe that the modern American meritocracy did not seem to apply to them. These people were not doing well, and then you have this black president who’s a successful product of meritocracy who has raised the hope of African Americans and he represented every positive thing that these working-class folks that you write about did not possess or lacked. And Trump emerged as candidate who sort of spoke to these people. What is interesting is that if you look at the Pew Research Polls, recent Pew Research polls, I think you pointed this out in your book, the working – class whites right now are more pessimistic than any other group about their economic future and their children’s future. Now is that pessimism justified? I think they’re overly pessimistic. I still maintain that to be black, poor and jobless is worse than being white, poor and jobless, okay? But, for some reason, the white poor is more pessimistic. Now I think with respect to the black poor and working class has kind of an Obama effect you kn ow. I think that may wear off and then blacks will become even more equally as pessimistic as whites in a few years.

MR. VANCE: I’d really like for you to run those numbers right now, and see if the rates among pessimism among working class blacks are changed or inverted relative to where they were a couple of years ago. You know, people ask me what I see as the similarities between working class blacks and working-class whites, and what the differences are, and whenever they ask me what the differences are I always say, talk to Bill Wilson, he’s a lot smarter about this stuff than I am. But the thing that jumps out to me most when I think about the differences, is that housing policy, especially housing policy back in the 50’s and 60’s affects modern day black Americans much more than it does modern day white Americans. Especially the working and non-working poor. What I mean by that is that I think that you know, partially because of research that Bill has done and partially for research that a lot of other folks have done. Concentrated poverty is really bad. It’s worse than just being poor. To be sort of socially isolated in these islands of all the other poor people and I think that’s a much more common experience among black Americans because of the residuals effects of housing policy in the 50’s and 60’s, so I think that to me, if I was going to pick one single factor, that was driving the continued difference, I would probably say housing policy. The sort of question of how to you know, is it better or worse to be working-class or sort of poor, jobless and white, versus poor, jobless and black. I think all things being equal certainly poor jobless and black is sort of worse off if you look at wealth numbers, if you look at income numbers, that’s still the case. I do worry a little bit that we don’t have the vocabulary to really talk about the full measure of disadvantage in the country right now. What I mean by that is that we’re pretty comfortable talking about class, we’re pretty comfortable talking about gender, we’re reasonably comfortable talking about race, but when we talk about things like single parent families, family trauma, concentrated poverty. All of these things that would go into what I would call the disadvantage bucket or the privileged bucket, it’s not those three factors, it’s probably two dozen or three dozen factors. We’re really bad about talking about everything except for race, class and gender. And I think that’s one way that the conversation has really broken down, especially in the past few years.

MS. BUSETTE: Alright, thank you.

MR. WILSON: So, this reminds me of your points J.D., reminds me of a paper that Robert Sampson, a colleague at Harvard and I wrote in 1995 entitled Toward a Theory of Race, Crime and Urban Inequality. A paper that has become a classic actually in the field of criminology because it’s generated dozens of research studies. Our basic thesis we were addressing you know, race and violent crime, is that racial disparities and violent crime are attributable in large part to the persistent structural disadvantages that are disproportionately concentrated in African American urban communities. Nonetheless, we argue that the ultimate cause of crime were similar for both whites and blacks, and we pose a central question. In American cities, it is possible to reproduce in white communities the structural circumstances under which many blacks live. You know, the whites haven’t fully experienced the structural reality that blacks have experienced does not negate the power of our theory because we argue had whites been exposed to the same structural conditions as blacks then white communities would behave – – the crime rate would be in the predicted direction. And then we had an epiphany. What about the rural white communities that you talk about. Where you’re not only talking about joblessness, you’re not only talking about poverty, but you’re also talking about family structure. So, here in Appalachia, you could reproduce some of the conditions that exist in intercity neighborhoods and therefore it would be good to test our theory in these areas because we’d be looking at the family structure. The rates of single parent families. We’d be looking at joblessness, we’d be loo king at poverty. So, we need to move beyond the urban areas and see if we can look at communities that come close to approximating or even worse in some cases, and some intercity neighborhoods. This reminds me, I was reading an interview, excellent interview. Remember I wrote to you that first time I read this interview, it was before I even read Hillbilly Elegy and I went and read the book after reading this interview; or maybe it was in Hillbilly Elegy where you refer to the research of the economist Raj Chetty who did some path breaking research on concentrated poverty, single parent families and mobility.

MR. VANCE: Yep.

MR. WILSON: And the reports in the newspapers focused on concentrated poverty and then talk about rates of single parent families which he also emphasized, you see.

MR. VANCE: Yep.

MR. WILSON: But if you want to capture both, it might be good to focus on rural areas like the ones you wrote about, and see if some of the same factors are reproduced that I read about in The Truly Disadvantaged.

MS. BUSETTE: Oh there’s no second book for you (laughter). So, my colleague Richard Reeves has recently published a piece that demonstrated that there’s a century economic mobility gap between black and white men. So, in a sense, the historically lower rates of upward mobility have delayed the economic ascent of black men by a century. Should we be concerned?

MR. WILSON: Could you repeat that?

MS. BUSETTE: Yeah. The historically lower rates of upward mobility have delayed for black men, have delayed the economic ascent of black men by a century compared to white men. So, the question is, should we be concerned, and do we need differentiated sets of policies to address black economic mobility and on the other hand, white economic mobility?

J.D., I’m going to give that to you first (laughter).

MR. WILSON: You should have sent these questions to us ahead of time (laughter) —

MS. BUSETTE: No, no.

MR. WILSON: — so we could have thought —

MS. BUSETTE: That’s the fun (laughter). Yeah, no fun in that.

MR. VANCE: Well, I think you asked two questions. The first was should we be concerned. My answer to that is yes, and I’ll let Bill take the second question (laughter). So, you know, this question of should we have differentiated policies. I think it depends on what we mean by differentiated right. So, to take Bill’s — something he said earlier, this question of technological change and the way that it’s impacting these communities, I think that requires us to fundamentally rethink the way that we approach higher education. That’s been my persistent frustration, thinking about policy over the past couple of years. Is we have this rapidly changing economy. We haven’t changed our institutions or even our institutional thinking to match up to that rapidly changing economy. But if you’re focused on sort of correcting those gaps or if you’re just basically focused on giving help to the people who need it, then you’re going to have a differentiated application of help because black Americans need it, you know, maybe on average more than white Americans. If we talk about sort of the negative effects for example of concentrated poverty, this is something that I really worry about, and back to Raj Chetty, a different paper that he published show that there are these really interesting positive effects of the Moving to Opportunity Study. But my guess is that concentrated poverty equally hurts black and white Americans, it’s just that black Americans experience it more. So, there’s going to be a differentiated effect if you try to rectify that problem, but not because you say we’re going to try to help black people more than white people, just because you’re going to say, I want to help the problem of concentrated poverty and because they’re suffering from it more. That effect will at least be differentiated. But I don’t know, I haven’t thought about sort of whether you should go into it sort of before the fact and try to apply these things differently. My guess is that that’s probably politically not a great idea, and may not be necessary from a moral perspective either, but I’m curious as to what Bill thinks.

MR. WILSON: I agree. Certainly, in this day and age it’s not a good idea. But, if you ask me, what am I most concerned about right now in addressing problems of poverty and so on. I’m concerned about jobs. Although I wouldn’t phrase it this way, I wouldn’t say that we need public sector jobs for black males, I would say we need public sector jobs for people who live in concentrated poverty and that would apply to white males, not only males, but females as well. As well as blacks. But which group would benefit disproportionately from a public sector’s jobs program. It would be black males, because black males have these high prison records; and therefore because of their prison records, many of them find it extremely difficult because of the incarceration rates, many of them find it extremely difficult to find jobs in the private sector. Therefore, at least as a temporary as opposed to a permanent solution, I would like to see public sector job creation for those who have difficulty finding employment in the private sector. When I speak of public sector jobs, I mean the type of jobs provided by the WPA during the Great Depression. Jobs that would improve the infrastructure in our communities, including the under-funded National Park Service, state and local park districts. I just feel that public sector jobs are very, very important particularly for black adults who have been stigmatized by prison records and who thus find it virtually impossible to find jobs in the private sector. Now, saying that. I’m on to no illusion that these programs and a program like public sector job program would garner widespread support in the current political climate, but I feel that we have to start thinking seriously, about what should be done when we have a more favorable political climate, and when people from both parties are willing to consider seriously policies that could make a difference.

MS. BUSETTE: We have time for one more question, and I’m going to start, J.D., with you. So, in a paper by Richard Reeves and another colleague of mine, Eleanor Krouse, that was released today, the evidence is that rural areas with the best rates of upward mobility are the ones with the highest rates of out migration, especially among young people. Should we just accept that some communities are essentially dying, and focus our efforts on helping people move on to other places with more opportunity, or should we be trying to turnaround these blighted areas?

MR. VANCE: That is a really tough one. So, I’m going to try to judicially split the baby here and I’ll probably fail but — (laughter). When I think about should we try to fix these blighted areas, I think that it depends on how we define area, right? Because my concern with some of these out-migration arguments is that we say, if you can’t find a good job in West Virginia, you should move to San Francisco, California, and they’re two concerns with that. The first is that try to convince somebody that they could afford a place in San Francisco, California when it’s a two-bedroom apartment costs you $4,500 a month. So, I think that again, going back to housing policy, that really makes this out migration pretty difficult. The second thing is that you really do — I think we have to understand there’s a difference between out migration from let’s say Eastern Kentucky to Southwestern Ohio verses Eastern Kentucky to San Diego, California, because the former allows you to preserve some important social contacts and social connections. It is cheaper to move there, it’s less culturally intimidating to move there. I mean I cannot imagine what my grandparents would have said if you would have told them in the 1940’s that they had to move to modern day San Francisco. It really would have been, you need to move to an entirely different country. Maybe an entirely different planet. And I think that’s important. So, the way that I think about this problem is that we have to accept that while out migration has to be a part of the solution, we can’t just say every single person in Breathitt County Kentucky has to leave, and Breathitt County Kentucky gets to close up shop. But if we can regionally develop big cities like Lexington, like Pittsburgh, like Columbus, Ohio, that obviously has downstream effects and that allows you to have out migration to places that isn’t so culturally foreign and enables people to maintain those social connections even as they move to areas with higher employment; and oh, by the way, still play a positive role in the communities back home. I think that’s the way that I approach that particular problem.

MS. BUSETTE: Alright, thank you.

MR. WILSON: You know my colleague at Harvard, Robert Sampson and former student Patrick Sharkey who is at NYU have argued for durable investments in disadvantaged neighborhoods to counter the persistent disinvestments in such neighborhoods, and I was wondering if you use that argument and focus on Appalachia for example, what would investments look like? And I’m going to put this question to you J.D., if you’re talking about investments in these communities, would it include such things as hospitals, clinics, road construction, shopping centers, daycare centers, these kinds of things. Would that be helpful? Would those things be helpful?

MR. VANCE: Yes, so I think it would definitely be helpful. One of the concerns I have with what we’ve seen with regional economic development is that it very often happens through the avenue of let me provide you tax credit so that you can open up new retail, right? I don’t think that’s especially durable economic development, right. I mean, I think we have to think of local economies as sort of a pyramid. You need real industries, manufacturing, then you have retail on top of it, but you can’t really rebuild some of these economic centers with just retail. There is actually an interesting bill that’s moving through Congress right now, that would in some ways place long-term capital investment at parity with short-term capital investment like tax credits. That would allow things like Venture Capital investment and much bigger longer – term patient capital to invest in some of these areas and create you know, more durable jobs in more durable sectors. But I also think, and my thinking honestly has probably changed in the past few years, though maybe change isn’t the right word, as I start to think about this a little bit more seriously. When I look at you know, some of the work David Autor has done about the China Shock and the way that it’s impacted some of these areas. I do think that we’ve been so caught up in thinking about long term well-being as purely as a function of consumption, that we haven’t thought about the fact that if you pay three cents less for a widget at Walmart, but half of your community just lost its job, your purchasing power is slightly greater, but your community has lost something really significant. I think that’s been missing from our conversations about economics in jobs, especially on the right, but I really think across the spectrum we focus too little on bringing good durable, high paying work into some of these areas. And consequently, if you look at just a policy across the board, we’ve congratulated ourselves, because purchasing power, even among the low income has gone up, not recognizing the purchasing power that comes from a government transfer is a lot different from purchasing power that comes from a good job.

MS. BUSETTE: Great. Thank you both very much. We are now going to take questions from the audience. So, (inaudible) from Brookings. So, I’d like everybody to be able to say who they are and the organization they’re coming from, and then ask your question please. Thank you. And I’ll take a couple of these. I’ll take yours first and then we’ll take a few more.

SPEAKER: First thing I want to do is thank both of you for such a thoughtful conversation. I mean Camille asked you really tough provocative questions, so it was a great conversation. I think I want to add to the provocative question list here. We haven’t talked much about our politics going forward and how they may play out in terms of things that you both might be in favor of. Bill, you say you’re for a public jobs program, but obviously that’s politically going to be extremely difficult to convince much of the public including many of the so-called white working class that J.D. has been studying. They don’t like government programs. They don’t like handouts. They want I think, as I read it, the literature, including your book, they want real jobs, not government jobs. In fact, they really dislike a lot that they see in first line government workers. With that background and thinking about you know, where does our politics go from here, I happened to have read this weekend, a new small essay by Mark Lilla who is arguing quite controversially that the Democratic party needs to put less emphasis on identity politics. That means staying away presumably from racial divides and culture and all of that. And, do you have any thoughts about generally how we bring the country back together again politically and specifically this notion that maybe the Democratic party is losing the white working-class by putting too much emphasis on immigrants, minorities, women etcetera?

MS. BUSETTE: I’ll let you Gabby — I’ll let you gather your thoughts there.

MR. WILSON: I’ll take a shot —

MS. BUSETTE: Wow, a brave man.

MR. VANCE: I hope that there’s vodka in this (laughter).

MR. WILSON: So you know, I blurbed Mark Lilla’s book.

SPEAKER: Oh, did you? That’s right, I remember.

MR. WILSON: I blurbed it. What’s the title of the book ?

SPEAKER: The Once in a Future Liberal.

SPEAKER: That’s right.

MR. WILSON: The Once in a Future Liberal. Yeah, I blurbed the book. You know, Mark Lilla and a number of other post-election analysts observed that as you point out that the Democrats should not make the same mistake that they made in the last election, namely an attempt to mobilize people of color, women, immigrants and the LGBT community with identity politics. They tended to ignore the problems of poor white Americans. I was watching the Democratic convention with my wife on a cruise to Alaska, and one concern I had was there did not seem to be any representatives on the stage representing poor white America. I could just see some of these poor whites saying they don’t care about us. They’ve got all these blacks, they’ve got immigrants, they’ve got (inaudible), but you don’t have any of us on the stage. Maybe I’m overstating the point, but I was concerned about that. Now one notable exception, critics like Mark Lilla point out was Bernie Sanders. Bernie Sanders had a progressive and unifying populous economic message in the Democratic primaries. A message that resonated with a significant segment of the white lower-class population. Lower class, working class populations. Bernie Sanders was not the Democratic nominee and Donald Trump was able to, as we all know, capture notable support from these populations with a divisive not unifying populous message. I agree with Mark Lilla that we don’t want to make the same mistake again. We’ve go to reach out to all groups. We’ve got to start to focus on coalition politics. We have to develop a sense of interdependence where groups come to recognize that they can’t accomplish goals without the support of other groups. We have to frame issues differently. We can’t go the same route. We can’t give up on the white working class.

MS. BUSETTE: Okay, J.D., did you want to tackle that or —

MR. VANCE: Yeah, sure I’ll —

MS. BUSETTE: — shall we go for other questions?

MR. VANCE: — I can briefly answer. I mean as a Republican who is deeply worried about the American right, this gives me a great chance to rift on the other side. So, just a couple of thoughts as you ask the question and as Bill was responding. The first is that on this question of identity politics, I think that what worries me is that a lot — it’s not a recognition that there are disadvantaged non-white groups that need some help or there needs to be some closing of the gap you know. When I talk to folks back home, very conservative people, they’re actually pretty open-minded if you talk about the problems that exist in the black ghetto because of problems of concentrated poverty and the fact that the black ghetto was in some ways created by housing policy. It was the choice of black Americans. It was in some ways created by housing policy. I find actually a lot of openness when I talk to friends and family about that. What I find no openness about is when somebody who they don’t know, and who they think judges them, points at them and says you need to apologize for your white privilege. So, I think that in some ways making these questions of disadvantage zero sum, is really toxic, but I think that’s one way that the Democrats really lost the white working class in the 2016 election. The second piece that occurs to me, and this applies across the political spectrum, is that what we’re trying to do in the United States, it’s very easy to be cynical about American politics, but we’re rying to build a multi-racial, multi-ethnic, multi-religious nation, not just a conglomeration, an actual nation of people from all of these different tribes and unify them around a common creed. I think that’s really delicate. It’s basically never been done success fully over a long period in human history and I think it requires a certain amount of rhetorical finesse that we don’t see from many of our politicians on either side these days and that really, really worries me.

MS. BUSETTE: Okay, thank you both. I ‘m going to take three other questions and then we can answer them. So, this gentleman here, young lady here with her hand up, and then I’ll take yeah, the person right in the back there. Okay, yeah, on this side first.

SPEAKER: Thank you very much. I’ve known Bill Wilson for years, I’ve known J.D. over the telephone (overlapping conversations) all over town.

MR. VANCE: A fellow Middletonian.

SPEAKER: Yes, I tried to catch you at the book fair on Saturday. The line, for those of you who weren ‘t there, stretched all the way out of the DC Convention Center and down (inaudible) Avenue. I’ve never seen anything like it since the Beatles came to town (laughter). But anyway, yes, I’m a fellow middie, and from class of 65, so I went there before you were born. We just had our 50th anniversary reunion here a couple of years ago. I’m delighted by your book. Folks ask me if I ever thought of writing a memoir, and I said my life was too dull, my (inaudible) was too quiet. When I grew up we were an all-American city. You may have read that in your history books. Back in the 50’s we were one of the all-American cities in America. A few years ago, Forbes chose Middletown as one of 10 fastest dying cities in America. This tells you what’s happened over time. So, I have a lot of things I’d love to inject, but I’m just going to ask one question. As you know I’ve talked before about when I came out of Middletown High in 65 I was able to work at the steel mill at Armco, and make enough money to pay my tuition at Ohio University, go Bobcats. For tuition in 1965 at Ohio U was $770. With room and board $1,240. It wasn’t hard for me, the son of a mother who was a cook and a father who was a factory worker to move up to the middle class, thanks to Ohio’s excellent higher education system. Years later of course you went to the Marines to get a scholarship to go to Ohio State —

MR. VANCE: True.

SPEAKER: — and so it was possible, but it certainly is tougher now to go from working class Middletown, we don’t have the steel mill jobs in the summer anymore. The five paper mills that we used to have are all gone. All the industries up and down I – 75, all the way to Detroit, General Motors, Frigidaire, GM, Delco Battery, Huffy Bicycle, National Cash Register, and I could go on and on and on, but what Bill Wilson writes about in the you know they’ve gone overseas or other types of chains have gone on. We were talking about automation back in the 50’s, and the 60’s and of course we see what has happened, and it’s still happening. But my question really is we haven’t talked much about those front row kids like yourself there who had a chance to go to college and found a way there. That route has gotten tougher. Do you think we need to do something to make it easier to get higher education? Some schooling beyond high school?

MS. BUSETTE: Okay great, thank you. This woman here with the red sweater. Please, thank you.

MS. RISER : Thank you gentleman, it’s extremely challenging —

MS. BUSETTE: Can you say your name please.

MS. RISER: I will say my name. It’s Mindy Riser and I have worked and continued to with a number of NGO’s across the world concerned with social justice. My question is about a segment of the American population, you haven’t talked about, and that is the aging baby boomers who come in all colors, shapes and sizes. Some of these folks will have social security, which isn’t very much, some will not at all. We’ve talked about the challenges of jobs. What is going to happen to these people, some of whom will not get jobs and will rely on diminishing social security and that is not exactly assured anymore either. So, I’d like you to address that part of the population whose future does not look all that bright.

MS. BUSETTE: Great, thank you. And then we have one way in the back there. She has her hand up. Thank you

MS. LEO: Hi, my name is Chin Leo and I’m a correspondent from China’s Nu Hahn News Agency. Actually, I have two questions for J.D. One is that you mentioned about (inaudible) which could be the third important element from the personal structural agencies to have those poverties. So, I just wanted to maybe categorize say more about this (inaudible) so what it could include. Because when I just read about your book, first I thought it maybe something related to the peace treaty of American, like those people who used to work in the hill. The mountain or the farmers, but it turns out, maybe there is something more or different from that, so can you just say more about it. And second question is about the globalization. I think both of the speakers just mentioned that the process of globalization just, the country being so large to the poverty or just make it a faster pace, for those working class in America no matter white or black to become obvious problem. So, do you think what could be the solution for this or is it really necessary just like President Trump said that anti-globalization could be one of the solutions or a necessary one. Thank you.

MS. BUSETTE: Thank you. So, we have a question on ways to make it easier to get a higher education, what about job opportunities for aging baby boomers and then a special set just for you, where you can you know, if you’d like to, maybe go into a little more about what you meant by culture, and then for both of you if you want to discussion globalization and its effect on poverty in the U.S.

MR. WILSON: Well I just — to answer your question very quickly, forget the political climate, but I’d like to see us increase the Pell Grants to make it possible for folks who don’t have much income, increase the Pell Grants.

MS. BUSETTE: Okay great. J.D., do you want to address any of these?

MR. VANCE: Yes, so my general worry with the college education in the book at large is sort of two things. So, the first is that, I think we’ve constructed a society effectively in which a college education is now the only pathway to the middle class, and I think that’s a real failure on our part. It’s not something you see in every country, and I don’t think it necessarily has to be the case here. There are other ways to get post-secondary education and I absolutely think that we have to make that easier, and I really see this as sort of the defining policy challenge of the next 10 years is to create more of those pathways; because the second born on this is that college is a really, really culturally terrifying place for a lot of working class people. We can try to make it less culturally terrifying, we can try to make for the elites of our universities a little bit more welcoming to folks like me, and this is something that I wrote about in the book, really feeling like a true outsider at Yale for the first time, in an educational institution. I think that we also have to acknowledge that part of the reason that people feel like cultural outsiders is for reasons that aren’t necessarily going to be easy to fix, and if we don’t create more pathways for these folks, we shouldn’t be surprised that a lot of them aren’t going to take the one pathway that’s there, that effectively runs through a culturally alien institution.

MS. BUSETTE: Thank you. Other questions.

MR. WILSON: Yeah, we have to —

MR. VANCE: Oh yeah sorry. There’s a couple of others so yeah, on the baby boomer question I’ll try to be very quick but I don’t necessarily have a fantastic answer to this, but let me add one thought that I had while you were asking that question, which is that in certain areas, especially in Ohio, Kentucky, West Virginia and so forth. I think the biggest under reported problem for the baby boomers is the fact that they are taking care of children that they didn’t necessarily anticipate taking care of because of the opioid crisis. This is the biggest dr iver of elder poverty in the State of Ohio, is that you have entire families that have been transplanted from one generation to the next. They were planning for retirement based on one social security income, and now all of a sudden, they have two, three additional mouths to feed. I think my concern for the baby boom generation is especially those folks of course because it’s not just bad for them, it’s bad for these children who are all of a sudden thrown into poverty because of the opioid addition of that middle generation of the parents, of the kids and the sons and daughters of the grandkids. And then the very last question, culture, I think of as a way to understand the sum of the environmental impacts that you can’t necessarily define as structural rights, so the effects of family instability and trauma that exists in people, the effects of social capital and social networks in people’s lives, You know, all of these things I think add up to a broad set of variables that can either promote upward mobility or inhibit upward mobility; and again I think we very often talk about job opportunities and educational opportunities, we very often talk about individual responsibility and Personal Agency. We very rarely I think talk about those middle layers and those institutional factors that in a lot of ways are the real drivers of this problem.

MR. WILSON: I just want to add just one point. I think that this is too radical to seriously consider right now, but at some point, I think we’re going to hav e to think about it, and that is to give cash assistance to reduce the tax rate for those who are experiencing compounded deprivation. At some point, we’re going to be faced with a problem. We’re going to have to rescue people and some economists are talking about the negative income tax and so on, but it’s something that we’re going to have to be thinking about.

MS. BUSETTE: Great. Thank you. I’m going to take three more. This gentleman here, this lady here. Ignacio?

MR. AARON: I’m Henry Aaron Brookings. My question is for J.D. Vance, I’ve heard in your comments what strikes me as a genuine and heartfelt sympathy for the economic and social circumstances, not only of blue whites in Appalachia, but also for the concentrated poverty in urban areas. You have a genuine sympathy for both. You also stated that you come to this concern as a conservative and as a Republican. Now, in looking at the current political environment, which is I think where we need to start rather that our aspirations for a different environment, we would really like it in the future. Starting from the current economic environment, I note that we’ve spent all of 2017 on a political debate which now seems, from my standpoint mercifully to be coming to an end about doing away with The Affordable Care Act. We are about to have a month long high stakes debate about the child health insurance program which President Trump’s budget proposes significantly to cut. We are confronting the possibility of a major fight over the national debt cap which at least some elements in Congress would like to use as a pressure tool to reduce the size and scope of the federal government. We are debating whether to reform entitlement programs and notably disability insurance, which if one looks at a map of where disability benefits are most received, looks like the map for your book actually. Kentucky, Arkansas, Alabama, Mississippi, Ohio, Pennsylvania. My question is, as a conservative Republican, how do you reconcile the concern you’ve expressed with the apparent agenda from those with whom you identify politically.

MS. BUSETTE: Okay, so we’re going to take two more questions (laughter) in this round. This lady right here and then Ignacio.

MS. DANIELS: Hello, my name is Samara Robard Daniels, I actually married into an Appalachian family myself, so I’ve had a close look at the situation myself. I’m wondering if you had to sort of envision of not being a political leader, but maybe a more philosophical substantive role model, what qualities aside from the typical like you know, honesty and so forth. I mean what would be the sort of gestalt of that leader that would perhaps you know, mobilize. I mean that can happen, but because of the technological age, we don’t have that sort of, you know, more renaissance minded philosophical temperament is not sort of percolating and I’m wondering if you had to envision it, what would be a role model, and similarly for you, what do you see? What would be the gestalt of that leader?

MS. BUSET TE: Alright, thank you. Ignacio?

MR. PESO: Hello, thank you the three of you for the discussion, it was very fascinating.

MS. BUSETTE: Can you say your name?

MR. PESO: My name is Ignacio Peso and my question actually starts with an article I read in the New York Times a few days ago. Maybe it was two days ago. It’s about like the role of private firms also. It was a comparison between the job conditions and years ago, with a lady from Kodak who was able to rise and get an opportune job, get an education, and then in the end the same private firm rising to her position, and right now janitor in Apple, right. I think in this conversation we talk a lot about like the power of stories and how they convey mobilities and talk about like more structural aspects. I was wondering, what is your opinion about like how — what’s the role of private firms in this discussion, and what sort of policies can you envision regarding that. Thank you.

MS. BUSETTE: Okay, thank you. So, we have a question about reconciling your concerns with concentrated poverty with the served agenda of the GOP. A question around what do role models who are sort of embodying you know an un-way out sort of; and when we think about the poverty debate what do those people look like. And then what’s the role of private firms in economic mobility for poor and low-income Americans.

MR. WILSON: Could you repeat the second question?

MS. BUSETTE: What does a leader look like who could possibly lead us towards a set of solutions when we think about poverty in the US ?

MR. VANCE: I guess I’ll start because the question about I think the GOP is directed specifically at me. The first thing that I’ll say about that is that I agree with many of the conservative critiques that are levied sort of against some Democratic policy. I very rarely, at least if we’re defining Republican policies or what comes out of Congress, I very rarely agree with Republican Congress about how to answer those critiques. The way that I broadly look at this philosophically is that there is a distinction and an important one between libertarianism and conservatism. So, I will partially try to answer your question about outsourcing. I think that for example on this question of labor unions, I think that the sort of classic libertarian answer to this question which is really dominant on the right for the past 30 years, is that effectively for a whole host of reasons, labor unions are anti-competitive, they’re bad for non – members and they’re bad for actual firms. Consequently, for cartel reasons, they’re sort of bad from a public policies perspective. I think a better conservative answer to the fact that we’ve gone from 35 percent private labor participation to 6 percent private labor participation, is to recognize that labor unions can be economically destructive to recognize that labor unions as Burke would say, could also be incredibly important social institutions that play a positive role in communities, and so the question is not how do we destroy labor unions, but it’s how do we reform labor unions so they actually work in the 21st century and I think that would answer partially your question about outsourcing. There’s a really fascinating article by Oren Cass of the Manhattan Institute of Conservative Think Tank about how we might reform labor unions so that they actually accomplish something economically important, so that they can rebuild themselves and increase private participation, but I think that’s a conservative idea. Has it come from a Republican Congress? No, it has not. Have I been a constant critic of Republican domestic policy for the past five years, because I think we’re not thinking about these issues; absolutely. The flip side of it, is that I think that much of what I see on the left is or at least sometimes thinks that these cultural problems that I write about and care about, are invisible and don’t actually exist. Now, does that mean that sort of very thoughtful left of center think tank fellows don’t care about these problems? Does that mean that Bill Wilson doesn’t think about these problems? No, but I certainly think that the Democratic party in some ways thinks that these questions of culture and long-term multi-generational environmental effects are sort of inv isible to a lot of their policy making. So, I agree with the conservative critique there and I think the conservatives have to offer some alternative vision which we have failed to do, for not just the past five years, but maybe for a little bit longer than that. So, you know my view of my role in this ecosystem is to try to take us from criticizing a lot of what’s been done in the past that’s wrong, and a lot of those criticisms I agree with, to actually doing something that’s different. But I do think, the last point I’ll make about this, the fundamental hell that we have to get over. The fundamental problem that conservatives have to accept is that sometimes you have to spend money to solve social problems. Not always does that mean that government is always the answer. Certainly, it doesn’t, but I think this sort of baseline constant refusal to accept that sometimes you have to spend money is at the core of our real problem, and if we can get past that, I actually think there might be some good ideas coming out of the right and hopefully I can be a part of that.

MR. WILSON: Let me address the question about the ideal leader. The leader (inaudible) move us forward. For me, a role model would be one who would use the bully pulpit to reinforce and promote the principle of equality of life chances. The philosopher James Fiscan coined the notion principle of equality of live chances, and according to this principle if we can predict with a high degree of accuracy, where individuals end up in the competition for preferred positions, merely by knowing, their race, class, gender and family background, then the conditions under which their motivations and talents have developed must be utterly unfair. Supporters of this principle believe that a person should not be able to enter a hospital ward of healthy newborn babies and predict with considerable accuracy where they will end up in life, simply by knowing their race, class, gender, family background, or the ecological areas where their parents reside. I repeat, for me, a rural ideal role model would be one who would use the bully pulpit to reinforce and promote the principle of equality of live chances.

MS. BUSETTE: Great. Thank you both. We’re going to take a few more questions. The gentleman in the back. The gentleman with the glasses and next to him the gentleman with the orange shirt.

MR. RAWLINS: Quincy Rawlins with the Institute for Educational Leadership here in Washington D.C. You’ve addressed this tangentially, but I wonder, it seems that this may be overly simplistic, by the flip side of extreme poverty seems to be extreme concentration of wealth. Not only in this country but obviously across the world, and I wonder if we can address any of the problems that you guys have talked about without directly addressing the concentration of wealth, and the fact that many corporations and super rich in this country are not paying their fair share of taxes in my view.

MS. BUSETTE: So, we have the gentleman in the glasses and the suit here, next to the gentleman with the orange T – shirt.

MR. COLLENBERG: Hi, Richard Collenberg with the Century Foundation. You both have talked about the effects of concentrated poverty, and I’m wondering what you would advocate in terms of public policy, and I’ll throw out one idea that Bill and I have talked about a little bit. You know, in 1968, 50 years ago, we saw the passage of the Fair Housing Act and since then, racial segregation has declined to a similarity index of 79 to 59. So, a hundred would be pure segregation, zero would be perfectly integrated. Meanwhile we’ve seen an increase in economic segregation, and I’m wondering what you all would think about an Economic Fair Housing Act that would go after the issue of concentrated poverty by addressing the discrimination that goes on in terms of exclusionary zoning, where certain neighborhoods are basically off limits for working class people because of apartment buildings or townhouses aren’t allowed to be built there.

MS. BUSETTE: Thank you.

MR. ASHANAGA: Michael Ashanaga Trans Union. Mr. Vance, you’ve put forward several different roads out of poverty. You know, better education, cultural change, job training, cheaper colleges I guess. But the problem is I see that that does not create jobs. That just creates competition for jobs, so at the end of the day, even if everyone is well educated, wouldn’t there still be a lot of poverty?

MS. BUSETTE: Okay, so we have our question on the concentration of wealth in the U.S., a question about an economic fair housing kind of policy to address concentrated poverty, and then finally, whether the policy prescriptions around creating a better and more educated — more skilled and education workforce actually addresses the true cause of poverty.

MR. WILSON: Let me just say that addressing the problem of concentration of wealth and inequality, that is a major problem that we have to confront. I would say yes, we have to deal with that problem. That has to be high on our agenda, on the public agenda. That’s all I want to say about that, because we could go on and on talking about that. Addressing the question of increase in economic segregation. People don’t realize that racial segregation is on the decline, while economic segregation is a segregation of families by income is on the increase. So yes, I would support your proposal of dealing with exclusivity zoning. Say a little bit more about that. I mean, you just probably said I’ll bet piece on that so we (laughter).

MR. COLLENBERG: Well the basic notion is that you know, here we had some success through a legal policy The Fair Housing Act where we’ve seen this decline in racial segregation, and yet what replaced kind of the old racial zoning from the 1920’s has been economic zoning, and so, it seems to me, that just as it should be shameful to exclude people from entire neighborhoods based on race, it ought to be as concerning to us in our culture and in our policy to have laws that in essence are excluding people based on class. In Montgomery County Maryland where I live, there is an alternative to that policy. It’s called Inclusionary Zoning, where the notion was that if people are good enough to, you know, take care of resident’s kids, if they’re able to teach the children, if they’re able to take care of the lawns, they ought to be good enough to live in these communities as well.

MR. WILSON: That’s why I wanted to give you the floor Rick (laughter).

MS. BUSETTE: Thank you very much. So, J.D., did you want to address any of these questions around concentrated poverty, the Economic Fair Housing kind of Act —

MR. VANCE: Sure.

MS. BUSETTE: — and creating a better skilled and you know, more education workforce, but whether or not that addresses the true cause of poverty in the US.

MR. VANCE: So, on the inequality and concentration wealth, the top thing, I’ll say this one area where I actually think conservative senator Mike Leaf from Utah has had some really, really, interesting ideas. One of the tax reform proposals Senator Leaf has advocated for is actually setting the capital taxation rate at the same rate as the ordinary income rate. Because that’s what’s really driving this difference, right. It’s not ordinary income earners. It’s not salaried professionals. Those Richard Reeve says that’s a problem. It’s primarily actually that folks in the global economy, especially the ultra-elite, folks in the global economy have achieved some sort of economic lift off from the rest of the country and I think that in light of that, it doesn’t make a ton of sense that we continue to have the taxation policy that we do. Frankly, that’s one of the reasons why I am sort of so conflicted about President Trump because I think in some ways instinctively at least the President recognizes this, but we’ll see what actually happens with tax reform over the next few months. The question about job competition is absolutely correct. You can’t just have a better educated workforce but hold the number of workers constant. At the same time, I do think there’s a bit of a chicken and egg problem here right because you know, while the skills gap is overplayed and while it violates all of these rules of Econ 101, one of the things you hear pretty consistently from folks who would l ike to expand, would like to hire more, would like to produce more, is that there are real labor force constraints, especially in what might be called non-cognitive skills, right; and this is a thing that you hear a lot. In my home state if you really want to hire more, and you really want to produce more, and sell more, then the problem is the opioid epidemic has effectively thinned the pool of people who were even able to work. So, I do think that productivity is really important, but I also think that we tend to think of these things in too mathematical and sort of hyper-rational ways, but part of the reason productivity is held back, is because we have real problems in the labor market, and if you fix one, you could help another, and they may create a virtuous cycle.

MS. BUSETTE: Thank you both …

Voir encore:

What Hillbilly Elegy Reveals About Trump and America

Mona Charen

July 28, 2016

A harrowing portrait of the plight of the white working class J. D. Vance’s new book Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and a Culture in Crisis couldn’t have been better timed. For the past year, as Donald Trump has defied political gravity to seize the Republican nomination and transform American politics, those who are repelled by Trump have been accused of insensitivity to the concerns of the white working class. For Trump skeptics, this charge seems to come from left field, and I use that term advisedly. By declaring that a particular class and race has been “ignored” or “neglected,” the Right (or better “right”) has taken a momentous step in the Left’s direction. With the ease of a thrown switch, people once considered conservative have embraced the kind of interest-group politics they only yesterday rejected as a matter of principle. It was the Democrats who urged specific payoffs, er, policies to aid this or that constituency. Conservatives wanted government to withdraw from the redistribution and favor-conferring business to the greatest possible degree. If this was imperfectly achieved, it was still the goal — because it was just. Using government to benefit some groups comes at the expense of all. While not inevitably corrupt, the whole transactional nature of the business does easily tend toward corruption.

Conservatives and Republicans understood, or seemed to, that in many cases, when government confers a benefit on one party, say sugar producers, in the form of a tariff on imported sugar, there’s a problem of concentrated benefits (sugar producers get a windfall) and dispersed costs (everyone pays more for sugar, but only a bit more, so they never complain). In the realm of race, sex, and class, the pandering to groups goes beyond bad economics and government waste — and even beyond the injustice of fleecing those who work to support those who choose not to — and into the dangerous territory of pitting Americans against one another. Democrats have mastered the art of sowing discord to reap votes. Powered by Now they have company in the Trumpites.

Like Democrats who encourage their target constituencies to nurse grievances against “greedy” corporations, banks, Republicans, and government for their problems, Trump now encourages his voters to blame Mexicans, the Chinese, a “rigged system,” or stupid leaders for theirs. The problems of the white working class should concern every public-spirited American not because they’ve been forgotten or taken for granted — even those terms strike a false note for me — but because they are fellow Americans. How would one adjust public policy to benefit the white working class and not blacks, Hispanics, and others? How would that work? And who would shamelessly support policies based on tribal or regional loyalties and not the general welfare?

As someone who has written — perhaps to the point of dull repetition — about the necessity for Republicans to focus less on entrepreneurs (as important as they are) and more on wage earners; as someone who has stressed the need for family-focused tax reform; as someone who has advocated education innovations that would reach beyond the traditional college customers and make education and training easier to obtain for struggling Americans; as someone who trumpeted the Reformicon proposals developed by a group of conservative intellectuals affiliated with the American Enterprise Institute and the Ethics and Public Policy Center; and finally, as someone who has shouted herself hoarse about the key role that family disintegration plays in many of our most pressing national problems, I cannot quite believe that I stand accused of indifference to the white working class.

I said that Hillbilly Elegy could not have been better timed, and yes, that’s in part because it paints a picture of Americans who are certainly a key Trump constituency. Though the name Donald Trump is never mentioned, there is no doubt in the reader’s mind that the people who populate this book would be enthusiastic Trumpites. But the book is far deeper than an explanation of the Trump phenomenon (which it doesn’t, by the way, claim to be). It’s a harrowing portrait of much that has gone wrong in America over the past two generations. It’s Charles Murray’s “Fishtown” told in the first person. The community into which Vance was born — working-class whites from Kentucky (though transplanted to Ohio) — is more given over to drug abuse, welfare dependency, indifference to work, and utter hopelessness than statistics can fully convey. Vance’s mother was an addict who discarded husbands and boyfriends like Dixie cups, dragging her two children through endless screaming matches, bone-chilling threats, thrown plates and worse violence, and dizzying disorder. Every lapse was followed by abject apologies — and then the pattern repeated. His father gave him up for adoption (though that story is complicated), and social services would have removed him from his family entirely if he had not lied to a judge to avoid being parted from his grandmother, who provided the only stable presence in his life.

Vance writes of his family and friends: “Nearly every person you will read about is deeply flawed. Some have tried to murder other people, and a few were successful. Some have abused their children, physically or emotionally.” His grandmother, the most vivid character in his tale (and, despite everything, a heroine) is as foul-mouthed as Tony Soprano and nearly as dangerous. She was the sort of woman who threatened to shoot strangers who placed a foot on her porch and meant it. Vance was battered and bruised by this rough start, but a combination of intellectual gifts — after a stint in the Marines he sailed through Ohio State in two years and then graduated from Yale Law — and the steady love of his grandparents helped him to leapfrog into America’s elite.

This book is a memoir but also contains the sharp and unsentimental insights of a born sociologist. As André Malraux said to Whittaker Chambers under very different circumstances in 1952: “You have not come back from Hell with empty hands.” The troubles Vance depicts among the white working class, or at least that portion he calls “hillbillies,” are quite familiar to those who’ve followed the pathologies of the black poor, or Native Americans living on reservations. Disorganized family lives, multiple romantic partners, domestic violence and abuse, loose attachment to work, and drug and alcohol abuse. Children suffer from “Mountain Dew” mouth — severe tooth decay and loss because parents give their children, sometimes even infants with bottles, sugary sodas and fail to teach proper dental hygiene.

“People talk about hard work all the time in places like Middletown [Ohio],” Vance writes. “You can walk through a town where 30 percent of the young men work fewer than 20 hours a week and find not a single person aware of his own laziness.” He worked in a floor-tile warehouse and witnessed the sort of shirking that is commonplace. One guy, I’ll call him Bob, joined the tile warehouse just a few months before I did. Bob was 19 with a pregnant girlfriend. The manager kindly offered the girlfriend a clerical position answering phones. Both of them were terrible workers. The girlfriend missed about every third day of work and never gave advance notice. Though warned to change her habits repeatedly, the girlfriend lasted no more than a few months. Bob missed work about once a week, and he was chronically late. On top of that, he often took three or four daily bathroom breaks, each over half an hour. . . . Eventually, Bob . . . was fired. When it happened, he lashed out at his manager: ‘How could you do this to me? Don’t you know I’ve a pregnant girlfriend?’ And he was not alone. . . . A young man with every reason to work . . . carelessly tossing aside a good job with excellent health insurance. More troublingly, when it was all over, he thought something had been done to him. The addiction, domestic violence, poverty, and ill health that plague these communities might be salved to some degree by active and vibrant churches.

But as Vance notes, the attachment to church, like the attachment to work, is severely frayed. People say they are Christians. They even tell pollsters they attend church weekly. But “in the middle of the Bible belt, active church attendance is actually quite low.” After years of alcoholism, Vance’s biological father did join a serious church, and while Vance was skeptical about the church’s theology, he notes that membership did transform his father from a wastrel into a responsible father and husband to his new family. Teenaged Vance did a stint as a check-out clerk at a supermarket and kept his social-scientist eye peeled: I also learned how people gamed the welfare system. They’d buy two dozen packs of soda with food stamps and then sell them at a discount for cash. They’d ring up their orders separately, buying food with the food stamps, and beer, wine, and cigarettes with cash. They’d regularly go through the checkout line speaking on their cell phones. I could never understand why our lives felt like a struggle while those living off of government largesse enjoyed trinkets that I only dreamed about. . . . Perhaps if the schools were better, they would offer children from struggling families the leg up they so desperately need?

Vance is unconvinced. The schools he attended were adequate, if not good, he recalls. But there were many times in his early life when his home was so chaotic — when he was kept awake all night by terrifying fights between his mother and her latest live-in boyfriend, for example — that he could not concentrate in school at all. For a while, he and his older sister lived by themselves while his mother underwent a stint in rehab. They concealed this embarrassing situation as best they could. But they were children. Alone. A teacher at his Ohio high school summed up the expectations imposed on teachers this way: “They want us to be shepherds to these kids. But no one wants to talk about the fact that many of them are raised by wolves.”

Hillbilly Elegy is an honest look at the dysfunction that afflicts too many working-class Americans. But despite the foregoing, it isn’t an indictment. Vance loves his family and admires some of its strengths. Among these are fierce patriotism, loyalty, and toughness. But even regarding patriotism (his grandmother’s “two gods” were Jesus Christ and the United States of America), this former Marine strikes a melancholy note. His family and community have lost their heroes. We loved the military but had no George S. Patton figure in the modern army. . . . The space program, long a source of pride, had gone the way of the dodo, and with it the celebrity astronauts. Nothing united us with the core fabric of American society. Conspiracy theories abound in Appalachia. People do not believe anything the press reports: “We can’t trust the evening news. We can’t trust our politicians. Our universities, the gateway to a better life, are rigged against us. We can’t get jobs.”

Conspiracy theories abound in Appalachia. Sound familiar? The white working class has followed the black underclass and Native Americans not just into family disintegration, addiction, and other pathologies, but also perhaps into the most important self-sabotage of all, the crippling delusion that they cannot improve their lot by their own effort. This is where the rise of Trump becomes both understandable and deeply destructive. He ratifies every conspiracy theory in circulation and adds new ones. He encourages the tribal grievances of the white working class and promises that salvation will come — not through their own agency and sensible government reforms — but only through his head-knocking leadership. He calls this greatness, but it’s the exact reverse. A great people does not turn to a strongman.

The American character has been corrupted by multiple generations of government dependency and the loss of bourgeois virtues like self-control, delayed gratification, family stability, thrift, and industriousness. Vance has risen out of chaos to the heights of stability, success, and happiness. He is fundamentally optimistic about the chances for the nation to do the same. Whether his optimism is justified or not is unknowable, but his brilliant book is a signal flashing danger.

— Mona Charen is a senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center.

Voir enfin:

Hillbilly sellout: The politics of J. D. Vance’s “Hillbilly Elegy” are already being used to gut the working poor

Conservatives and the media treated Vance’s memoir like « Poor People for Dummies. » Watch his damaging rhetoric work

When Republican Representative Jason Chaffetz took to the airwaves Tuesday to defend his party’s flailing Affordable Care Act replacement plan, he told CNN, “Americans have choices … so, maybe, rather than getting that new iPhone that they just love, and they want to go spend hundreds of dollars on that, maybe they should invest in their own healthcare.” Pushback was swift as many were quick to point out the Congressman was equating a $700 phone to healthcare costs that can often spiral into six figures, but some were equally shocked by the callousness of his remarks.

Was Chaffetz insinuating that the poor would rather spend money on frivolous things than their own self-care?

To people like myself, who grew up poor, this criticism is certainly nothing new. In conversations with Republicans about the challenges facing my working-class family, I’ve gotten used to being asked how many TVs my parents own, or what kind of cars they drive. At the heart of those questions is a lurking assumption that Chaffetz brought into the light: Maybe the poor deserve their lot in life.

This philosophy, while absurd on its face, effectively cripples any momentum toward helping suffering populations and is an old favorite of the Republican Party. It’s the same reasoning that led Ronald Reagan to decry “welfare queens” and Fox News to continually criticize people on assistance for buying shrimp, soft drinks, “junk food,” and crab legs. It gives those disinclined to part with their own money an excuse not to feel guilty about their own greed.

To further quell their culpability and show that the American Dream still functions as advertised, conservatives are fond of trotting out success stories — people who prove that pulling one’s self up by one’s bootstraps is still a possibility and, by extension, that those who don’t succeed must own their shortcomings. Lately, the right has found nobody more useful, both during the presidential election and after, than their modern-day Horatio Alger spokesperson, J. D. Vance, whose bestselling book “Hillbilly Elegy” chronicled his journey from Appalachia to the hallowed halls of the Ivy League, while championing the hard work necessary to overcome the pitfalls of poverty.
Report Advertisement

Traditionally this would’ve been a Fox News kind of book — the network featured an excerpt on their site that focused on Vance’s introduction to “elite culture” during his time at Yale — but Vance’s glorified self-help tome was also forwarded by networks and pundits desperate to understand the Donald Trump phenomenon, and the author was essentially transformed into Privileged America’s Sherpa into the ravages of Post-Recession U.S.A.

Trumpeted as a glimpse into an America elites have neglected for years, I first read “Hillbilly Elegy” with hope. I’d been told this might be the book that finally shed light on problems that’d been killing my family for generations. I’d watched my grandparents and parents, all of them factory workers, suffer backbreaking labor and then be virtually forgotten by the political establishment until the GOP needed their vote and stoked their social and racial anxieties to turn them into political pawns.

In the beginning, I felt a kinship to Vance. His dysfunctional childhood looked a lot like my own. There was substance abuse. Knockdown, drag-out fights. A feeling that people just couldn’t get ahead no matter what they did.

And then the narrative took a turn.

Due to references he downplays, not to mention his middle-class grandmother’s shielding and encouragement, Vance was able to lift himself out of the despair of impoverishment and escaped to Yale and eventually Silicon Valley, where he was able to look back on his upbringing with a new perspective.

“Whenever people ask me what I’d most like to change about the white working class,” he writes, “I say, ‘the feeling that our choices don’t matter.’”

The thesis at the heart of “Hillbilly Elegy” is that anybody who isn’t able to escape the working class is essentially at fault. Sure, there’s a culture of fatalism and “learned helplessness,” but the onus falls on the individual.

As Vance writes: “I’ve seen far too many people awash in genuine desire to change only to lose their mettle when they realized just how difficult change actually is.”

Oh, the working class and their aversion to difficulty.

If only they, like Vance, could take the challenge head on and rise above their circumstances. If only they, like Vance, weren’t so worried about material things like iPhones or the “giant TVs and iPads” the author says his people buy for themselves instead of saving for the future.

This generalization is not the only problematic oversimplification in Vance’s book — he totally discounts the role racism played in the white working class’s opposition to President Obama and says, instead, it was because Obama dressed well, was a good father, and because Michelle Obama advocated eating healthy food — but it would be hard to understate what role Vance has played in reinvigorating the conservative bootstraps narrative for a new generation and, thus, emboldening Republican ideology.

To Vance’s credit, he has been critical of Donald Trump, calling the working class’s support of the billionaire a result of a “false sense of purpose,” but Vance’s portrait of poor Americans is alarmingly in lockstep with the philosophy of Republicans who are shamefully using Trump’s presidency to forward their own agenda of economic warfare. Certainly Jason Chaffetz’s comments are fueled by the same low opinion of the poor as Vance’s, as is Speaker of the House Paul Ryan’s legislative agenda, which is focused on disabling the social safety net.

Though Vance’s name doesn’t appear in the Republican ACA replacement bill, the philosophy at the heart of it is certainly in tune. While the proposed bill would cost millions of Americans their access to care — Vance himself tweeted a link Tuesday to a Forbes article that stated as much while lauding the legislation — it makes sure to benefit the wealthy, gives a tax break to insurance CEOs and moves the focus of health care in America to an age-based model instead of income.

The message is loud and clear: Help is on the way, but only to those who “deserve” it.

And how does one deserve it?

By working hard. And the only metric to show that one has worked sufficiently hard enough is to look at their income, at how successful they are, because, in Vance’s and the Republican’s America, the only one to blame if you’re not wealthy is yourself. Never mind how legislation like this healthcare bill, cuts in education funding, continued decreases in after-school and school lunch programs, not to mention a lack of access to mental health care or career counseling, disadvantages the poor.

Of the problems facing working-class America, Vance writes in “Hillbilly Elegy,” “There is no government that can fix these problems for us.”

And, at least partially, one has to agree.

There is no government that can fix these problems, or at least, no government we have now.

Jared Yates Sexton is an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing. His campaign book « The People Are Going To Rise Like The Waters Upon Your Shore » is out now from Counterpoint Press.

Voir enfin:

J.D. Vance, the False Prophet of Blue America

The bestselling author of « Hillbilly Elegy » has emerged as the liberal media’s favorite white trash–splainer. But he is offering all the wrong lessons.

J.D. Vance is the man of the hour, maybe the year. His memoir Hillbilly Elegy is a New York Times bestseller, acclaimed for its colorful and at times moving account of life in a dysfunctional clan of eastern Kentucky natives. It has received positive reviews across the board, with the Times calling it “a compassionate, discerning sociological analysis of the white underclass.” In the rise of Donald Trump, it has become a kind of Rosetta Stone for blue America to interpret that most mysterious of species: the economically precarious white voter.

Vance’s influence has been everywhere this campaign season, shaping our conception of what motivates these voters. And it is already playing a role in how liberals are responding to Donald Trump’s victory in the presidential election, which was accomplished in part by a defection of downscale whites from the Democratic Party. Appalachia overwhelmingly voted for Trump, and Vance has since emerged as one of the media’s favorite Trump explainers. The problem is that he is a flawed guide to this world, and there is a danger that Democrats are learning all the wrong lessons from the election.

Elegy is little more than a list of myths about welfare queens repackaged as a primer on the white working class. Vance’s central argument is that hillbillies themselves are to blame for their troubles. “Our religion has changed,” he laments, to a version “heavy on emotional rhetoric” and “light on the kind of social support” that he needed as a child. He also faults “a peculiar crisis of masculinity.” This brave new world, in sore need of that old time religion and manly men, is apparently to blame for everything from his mother’s drug addiction to the region’s economic crisis.

“We spend our way to the poorhouse,” he writes. “We buy giant TVs and iPads. Our children wear nice clothes thanks to high-interest credit cards and payday loans. We purchase homes we don’t need, refinance them for more spending money, and declare bankruptcy, often leaving them full of garbage in our wake. Thrift is inimical to our being.”

And he isn’t interested in government solutions. All hillbillies need to do is work hard, maybe do a stint in the military, and they can end up at Yale Law School like he did. “Public policy can help,” he writes, “but there is no government that can fix these problems for us … it starts when we stop blaming Obama or Bush or faceless companies and ask ourselves what we can do to make things better.”

Set aside the anti-government bromides that could have been ripped from a random page of National Review, where Vance is a regular contributor. There is a more sinister thesis at work here, one that dovetails with many liberal views of Appalachia and its problems. Vance assures readers that an emphasis on Appalachia’s economic insecurity is “incomplete” without a critical examination of its culture. His great takeaway from life in America’s underclass is: Pull up those bootstraps. Don’t question elites. Don’t ask if they erred by granting people mortgages and lines of credit they couldn’t afford to repay. Don’t call it what it is—corporate deception—or admit that it plunged this country into one of the worst economic crises it’s ever experienced.

No wonder Peter Thiel, the almost comically evil Silicon Valley libertarian, endorsed the book. (Vance also works for Thiel’s Mithril Capital Management.) The question is why so many liberals are doing the same.


In many ways, I should appreciate Elegy. I grew up poor on the border of southwest Virginia and east Tennessee. My parents are the sort of god-fearing hard workers that conservatives like Vance fetishize. I attended an out-of-state Christian college thanks to scholarships, and had to raise money to even buy a plane ticket to attend grad school. My rare genetic disease didn’t get diagnosed until I was 21 because I lacked consistent access to health care. I’m one of the few members of my high school class who earned a bachelor’s degree, one of the fewer still who earned a master’s degree, and one of maybe three or four who left the area for good.

But unlike Vance, I look at my home and see a region abandoned by the government elected to serve it. My public high school didn’t have enough textbooks and half our science lab equipment didn’t work. Some of my classmates did not have enough to eat; others wore the same clothes every day. Sometimes this happened because their addict parents spent money on drugs. But the state was no help here either. Its solution to our opioid epidemic has been incarceration, not rehabilitation. Addicts with additional psychiatric conditions are particularly vulnerable. There aren’t enough beds in psychiatric hospitals to serve the region—the same reason Virginia State Sen. Creigh Deeds (D) nearly died at the hands of his mentally ill son in 2013.

And then there is welfare. In Elegy, Vance complains about hillbillies who he believes purchased cellphones with welfare funds. But data makes it clear that our current welfare system is too limited to lift depressed regions out of poverty.

Kathryn Edin and H. Luke Shaefer reported earlier this year that the number of families surviving on $2 a day grew by 130 percent between 1996 and 2011. Blacks and Latinos are still disproportionately more likely to live under the poverty line, but predominately white Appalachia hasn’t been spared the scourge either. And while Obamacare has significantly reduced the number of uninsured Americans, its premiums are still often expensive and are set to rise. Organizations like Remote Access Medical (RAM) have been forced to make up the difference: Back home, people start lining up at 4 a.m. for a chance to access RAM’s free healthcare clinics. From 2007 to 2011, the lifespans of eastern Kentucky women declined by 13 months even as they rose for women in the rest of the country.

According to the Economic Innovation Group, my home congressional district—Virginia’s Ninth—is one of the poorest in the country. Fifty-one percent of adults are unemployed; 19 percent lack a high school diploma. EIG estimates that fully half of its 722,810 residents are in economic distress.

As I noted in Scalawag earlier this year, the Ninth is not an outlier for the region. On EIG’s interactive map, central Appalachia is a sea of distress. If you are born where I grew up, you have to travel hundreds of miles to find a prosperous America. How do you get off the dole when there’s not enough work to go around? Frequently, you don’t. Until you lose your benefits entirely: The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program (TANF), passed by Bill Clinton and supported by Hillary Clinton, boots parents off welfare if they’re out of work.


At various points in this election cycle, liberal journalists have sounded quite a bit like Vance. “‘Economic anxiety’ as a campaign issue has always been a red herring,” Kevin Drum declared in Mother Jones. “If you want to get to the root of this white anxiety, you have to go to its roots. It’s cultural, not economic.”

At Vox, Dylan Matthews argued that while Trump voters deserved to be taken seriously, most were actually fairly well-off, with a median household income of $72,000. The influence of economic anxiety, he concluded, had been exaggerated.

Neither Drum or Matthews accounted for regional disparities in white poverty rates, and they failed to anticipate how those disparities would impact the election. Trump supporters were wealthier than Clinton supporters overall, but Trump’s victories in battleground states like Wisconsin, Michigan, and Ohio correlated to high foreclosure rates. In Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and Michigan, Trump outperformed Mitt Romney with the white working class and flipped certain strategic counties red.

But Matthews was right in at least one sense: Trump Country has always been bigger than Appalachia and the white working class itself. You just wouldn’t know this from reading the news.

In March, Trump won nearly 70 percent of the Republican primary vote in Virginia’s Buchanan County. At the time, it was his widest margin of victory, and no one seemed surprised that this deeply conservative and impoverished pocket in southwest Virginia’s coal country handed him such decisive success. And no one seemed to realize Buchanan County had once been a Democratic stronghold.

A glossy Wall Street Journal package labeled it “The Place That Wants Donald Trump The Most” and promised readers that understanding Buchanan County was key to understanding the “source” of Trump’s popularity. The Financial Times profiled a local young man who fled this dystopia for the University of Virginia; it titled the piece “The Boy Who Escaped Trump Country.” And then there was Bloomberg View: “Coal County is Desperate for Donald Trump.” (The same piece said the county seat, Grundy, “looks as if it fell into a crevice and got stuck.”)

And then Staten Island went to the polls. A full 82 percent of Staten Island Republicans voted to give Trump the party’s nomination, wresting the title of Trumpiest County away from Buchanan. The two locations have little in common aside from Trump. Staten Island, population 472,621, is New York City’s wealthiest borough. Its median household income is $70,295, a figure not far off from the figure Matthews cites as the median income of the average Trump supporter. Buchanan County, population 23,597, has a median household income of $27,328 and the highest unemployment rate in Virginia. Staten Island, then, tracks closer to the Trumpist norm, but it received a fraction of the coverage.

No one wrote escape narratives about Staten Island. Few plumbed the psyches of suburban Trumpists. And no one examined why Democratic Buchanan County had become Republican. Instead, the media class fixated on the spectacle of white trash Appalachia, with Vance as its representative-in-exile.


“A preoccupation with penalizing poor whites reveals an uneasy tension between what Americans are taught to think the country promises—the dream of upward mobility—and the less appealing truth that class barriers almost invariably make that dream unobtainable,” Nancy Isenberg wrote in the preface to her book White Trash. If the system worked for you, you’re not likely to blame it for the plight of poor whites. Far easier instead to believe that poor whites are poor because they deserve to be.

But now we see the consequences of this class blindness. The media and the establishment figures who run the Democratic Party both had a responsibility to properly identify and indict the system’s failures. They abdicated that responsibility. Donald Trump took it up—if not always in the form of policy, then in his burn-it-all-down posture.

No analysis of Trumpism is complete without a reckoning of its white supremacy and misogyny. Appalachia is, like so many other places, a deeply racist and sexist place. It is not a coincidence that Trumpist bastions, from Buchanan County to Staten Island, are predominately white, or that Trump rode a tide of xenophobia to power. Economic hardship isn’t unique to white members of the working class, either. Blacks, Latinos, and Natives occupy a far more precarious economic position overall. White supremacy is indeed the overarching theme of Trumpism.

But that doesn’t mean we should repeat the establishment failures of this election cycle and minimize the influence of economic precarity. Trump is a racist and a sexist, but his victory is not due only to racism or sexism any more than it is due only to classism: He still won white women and a number of counties that had voted for Obama twice. This is not a simple story, and it never really has been.

We don’t need to normalize Trumpism or empathize with white supremacy to reach these voters. They weren’t destined to vote for Trump; many were Democratic voters. They aren’t destined to stay loyal to him in the future. To win them back, we must address their material concerns, and we can do that without coddling their prejudices. After all, America’s most famous progressive populist—Bernie Sanders—won many of the counties Clinton lost to Trump.

There’s danger ahead if Democrats don’t act quickly. The Traditionalist Worker’s Party has already announced plans for an outreach push in greater Appalachia. The American Nazi Party promoted “free health care for the white working class” in literature it distributed in Missoula, Montana, last Friday. If Democrats have any hope of establishing themselves as the populist alternative to Trump, they can’t allow American Nazis to fall to their left on health care for any population.

By electing Trump, my community has condemned itself to further suffering. The lines for RAM will get longer. Our schools will get poorer and our children hungrier. It will be one catastrophic tragedy out of the many a Trump presidency will generate. So yes, be angry with the white working class’s political choices. I certainly am; home will never feel like home again.

But don’t emulate Vance in your rage. Give the white working class the progressive populism it needs to survive, and invest in the areas the Democratic Party has neglected. Remember that bootstraps are for people with boots. And elegies are no use to the living.


Tombeau des Patriarches: Vous avez dit orwellien ? (Between truthful lies and respectable murder, what first casualty of war ?)

12 juillet, 2017
firstmonument
https://i1.wp.com/s1.lprs1.fr/images/2017/03/23/6790170_361d2da0-0fd7-11e7-9596-a5ef1fbae542-1.jpghttps://i0.wp.com/www.francesoir.fr/sites/francesoir/files/images/36446d584304ecac68fc1702bb62d35214a98a6a_field_image_rdv_dossier.jpghttps://i0.wp.com/s1.lprs1.fr/images/2017/04/24/6885261_a92068b2-28f0-11e7-9cf1-79a722e2680f-1.jpghttps://i1.wp.com/www.contre-info.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/sondage.jpg https://www.les-crises.fr/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/1er-tour-2017-2.jpgMalheur à vous, scribes et pharisiens hypocrites! parce que vous ressemblez à des sépulcres blanchis, qui paraissent beaux au dehors, et qui, au dedans, sont pleins d’ossements de morts et de toute espèce d’impuretés. Jésus
Le tombeau, ce n’est jamais que le premier monument humain à s’élever autour de la victime émissaire, la première couche des significations, la plus élémentaire, la plus fondamentale, la première couche des significations, la plus élémentaire, la plus fondamentale. Pas de culture sans tombeau, pas de tombeau sans culture. A la limite, le tombeau est le premier et seul symbole culturel. René Girard
On ne veut pas savoir que l’humanité entière est fondée sur l’escamotage mythique de sa propre violence, toujours projetée sur de nouvelles victimes. Toutes les cultures, toutes les religions, s’édifient autour de ce fondement qu’elles dissimulent, de la même façon que le tombeau s’édifie autour du mort qu’il dissimule. Le meurtre appelle le tombeau et le tombeau n’est que le prolongement et la perpétuation du meurtre. La religion- tombeau n’est rien d’autre que le devenir invisible de son propre fondement, de son unique raison d’être. Autrement dit, l’homme tue pour ne pas savoir qu’il tue. (…) Les hommes tuent pour mentir aux autres et se mentir à eux-mêmes au sujet de la violence et de la mort. René Girard
Le monde moderne n’est pas mauvais : à certains égards, il est bien trop bon. Il est rempli de vertus féroces et gâchées. Lorsqu’un dispositif religieux est brisé (comme le fut le christianisme pendant la Réforme), ce ne sont pas seulement les vices qui sont libérés. Les vices sont en effet libérés, et ils errent de par le monde en faisant des ravages ; mais les vertus le sont aussi, et elles errent plus férocement encore en faisant des ravages plus terribles. Le monde moderne est saturé des vieilles vertus chrétiennes virant à la folie.  G.K. Chesterton
La première victime d’une guerre, c’est toujours la vérité. Eschyle
Comme une réponse, les trois slogans inscrits sur la façade blanche du ministère de la Vérité lui revinrent à l’esprit. La guerre, c’est la paix. La liberté, c’est l’esclavage. L’ignorance, c’est la force. 1984 (George Orwell)
La liberté, c’est la liberté de dire que deux et deux font quatre. Lorsque cela est accordé, le reste suit. George Orwell (1984)
Les intellectuels sont portés au totalitarisme bien plus que les gens ordinaires. George Orwell
Le langage politique est destiné à rendre vraisemblables les mensonges, respectables les meurtres, et à donner l’apparence de la solidité à ce qui n’est que vent. George Orwell
Parler de liberté n’a de sens qu’à condition que ce soit la liberté de dire aux gens ce qu’ils n’ont pas envie d’entendre. George Orwell
Une autre décision délirante de l’Unesco. Cette fois-ci, ils ont estimé que le tombeau des Patriarches à Hébron est un site palestinien, ce qui veut dire non juif, et que c’est un site en danger. Pas un site juif ? Qui est enterré là ? Abraham, Isaac et Jacob. Sarah, Rebecca, et Léa. Nos pères et nos mères (bibliques). Benjamin Netanyahou
Au nom du gouvernement du Canada, nous souhaitons présenter nos excuses à Omar Khadr pour tout rôle que les représentants canadiens pourraient avoir joué relativement à l’épreuve qu’il a subie à l’étranger ainsi que tout tort en résultant. Ralph Goodale et Chrystia Freeland
Ça n’a rien à voir avec ce que Khadr a fait, ou non. Lorsque le gouvernement viole les droits d’un Canadien, nous finissons tous par payer. La Charte protège tous les Canadiens, chacun d’entre nous, même quand c’est inconfortable. Justin Trudeau
Même si je vais devoir quitter mon poste, je ne compromettrai pas le salaire d’un martyr (Shahid) où d’un prisonnier, car je suis le président de l’ensemble du peuple palestinien, y compris les prisonniers, les martyrs, les blessés, les expulsés et les déracinés. Mahmoud Abbas
Je sais votre engagement constant en faveur de la non-violence. Emmanuel Macron
Voulez-vous devenir une vedette dans la presse algérienne arabophone? C’est facile. Prêchez la haine des Juifs […]. Je suis un rescapé de l’école algérienne. On m’y a enseigné à détester les Juifs. Hitler y était un héros. Des professeurs en faisaient l’éloge. Après le Coran, Mein Kampf et Les Protocoles des sages de Sion sont les livres les plus lus dans le monde musulman.  Karim Akouche
Après le mois sacré, les imams sont épuisés et doivent se reposer. Ils n’ont que le mois de juillet ou d’août pour le faire. Ce moment est très mal choisi pour la marche. Fathallah Abdessalam (conseiller islamique de prison belge)
65 % des Français estiment ainsi qu’« il y a trop d’étrangers en France », soit un niveau identique à 2016 et pratiquement constant depuis 2014. Sur ce point au moins, le clivage entre droites et gauches conserve toute sa pertinence : si 95 % des sympathisants du Front national partagent cette opinion, ils sont presque aussi nombreux chez ceux du parti Les Républicains (83 %, + 7 points en un an) ; à l’inverse, ce jugement est minoritaire chez les partisans de La France insoumise (30 %), du PS (46 %) et d’En marche ! (46 %). De même, les clivages sociaux restent un discriminant très net : 77 % des ouvriers jugent qu’il y a trop d’étrangers en France, contre 66 % des employés, 57 % des professions intermédiaires et 46 % des cadres. Dans des proportions quasiment identiques, 60 % des Français déclarent que, « aujourd’hui, on ne se sent plus chez soi comme avant ». Enfin, 61 % des personnes interrogées estiment que, « d’une manière générale, les immigrés ne font pas d’efforts pour s’intégrer en France », même si une majorité (54 %) admet que cette intégration est difficile pour un immigré. L’évolution du regard porté sur l’islam est tout aussi négative. Seulement 40 % des Français considèrent que la manière dont la religion musulmane est pratiquée en France est compatible avec les valeurs de la société française. Ce jugement était encore plus minoritaire en 2013 et 2014 (26 % et 37 %), mais, de manière contre-intuitive, il avait fortement progressé (47 %) au lendemain des attentats djihadistes de Paris en janvier 2015. Depuis, il s’est donc à nouveau dégradé. Le Monde
“Comme des millions de gens à travers le globe ces dernières années, les deux auteurs ont attaqué le colonialisme et le système capitaliste et impérialiste. Comme beaucoup d’entre nous, ils dénoncent une idéologie toujours très en vogue : le racisme, sous ses formes les plus courantes mais aussi les plus décomplexées”, expliquaient-ils, en exigeant l’abandon des poursuites engagées à la suite d’une plainte de l’Agrif. (…) Renaud, Saïdou et Saïd Bouamama ont choisi d’assumer leur “devoir d’insolence” afin d’interpeller et de faire entendre des opinions qui ont peu droit de cité au sein des grands canaux de diffusion médiatique.” Pétition signée par Danièle Obono (porte-parole de JL Mélenchon)
Faisons du défi migratoire une réussite pour la France. Anne Hidalgo
Aucun principe de droit international n’oblige les Français déjà surendettés, à hauteur de plus de 2000 milliards, à financer par leurs impôts et leurs cotisations sociales des soins gratuits pour tous les immigrés illégaux présents sur notre sol… en 2016, l’octroi du statut de demandeur d’asile est devenu un moyen couramment utilisé par des autorités dépassées pour vider les camps de migrants, à Paris bien sûr, mais aussi par exemple, à Calais, dans la fameuse «jungle» qui, avant son démantèlement, comptait environ 14 000 «habitants». Ces derniers, essentiellement des migrants économiques, ont été qualifiés de réfugiés politiques dans l’unique but de pouvoir les transférer vers d’autres centres, dénommés CAO ou CADA en province. De telles méthodes relèvent d’une stratégie digne du mythe de Sisyphe: plus ils sont vidés, plus ils se remplissent à nouveau… Pierre Lellouche
Madame Hidalgo prétend vouloir améliorer l’intégration des nouveaux migrants. Ses amis n’ont pas réussi en deux décennies à intégrer des populations culturellement et socialement plus aisément intégrables. À aucun moment Anne Hidalgo n’a eu le mauvais goût d’évoquer la question de l’islam. Madame Hidalgo n’aurait pas songé à demander aux riches monarques du golfe, à commencer par celui du Qatar, à qui elle tresse régulièrement des couronnes, de faire preuve de générosité à l’égard de leurs frères de langue, de culture et de religion. Madame le maire n’est pas très franche. Dans sa proposition, elle feint de séparer les réfugiés éligibles au droit d’asile et les migrants économiques soumis au droit commun. Elle fait semblant de ne pas savoir que ces derniers pour leur immense majorité ne sont pas raccompagnés et que dès lors qu’ils sont déboutés , ils se fondent dans la clandestinité la plus publique du monde. (…) À la vérité, c’est bien parce que les responsables français démissionnaires n’ont pas eu la volonté et l’intelligence de faire respecter les lois de la république souveraine sur le contrôle des flux migratoires , et ont maintenu illégalement sur le sol national des personnes non désirées, que la France ne peut plus se permettre d’accueillir des gens qui mériteraient parfois davantage de l’être. Qui veut faire l’ange fait la bête. Mais le premier Français, n’aura pas démérité non plus à ce concours de la soumission auquel il semble aussi avoir soumissionné. C’est ainsi que cette semaine encore, le président algérien a, de nouveau, réclamé avec insistance de la France qu’elle se soumette et fasse repentance . Cela tourne à la manie. La maladie chronique macronienne du ressentiment ressassé de l’Algérie faillie. À comparer avec l’ouverture d’esprit marocaine. En effet, Monsieur Bouteflika a des circonstances atténuantes. Son homologue français lui aura tendu la verge pour fouetter la France. On se souvient de ses propos sur cette colonisation française coupable de crimes contre l’humanité. Je n’ai pas noté que Monsieur Macron, le 5 juillet dernier, ait cru devoir commémorer le massacre d’Oran de 1962 et le classer dans la même catégorie juridique de droit pénal international. Il est vrai que ce ne sont que 2000 Français qui furent sauvagement assassinés après pourtant que l’indépendance ait été accordée. (…) Au demeurant, Monsieur Macron a depuis récidivé: accueillant cette semaine son homologue palestinien Abbou Abbas, il a trouvé subtil de déclarer: «l’absence d’horizon politique nourrit le désespoir et l’extrémisme» . Ce qui est la manière ordinaire un peu surfaite d’excuser le terrorisme. À dire le vrai, le président français, paraît-il moderne, n’a cessé de trouver de fausses causes sociales éculées à ce terrorisme islamiste qui massacre les Français depuis deux années. Gilles-William Goldnadel
L’indifférence apparente des Français à la situation peut sembler étrange, s’assimiler à du déni, à la volonté de ne pas voir. Elle peut aussi se comprendre comme une stratégie de survie analogue à ce qui se passe depuis de nombreuses années en Israël. Les terroristes et leurs alliés wahabites, salafistes ou frères musulmans espéraient non seulement semer la mort mais tétaniser les populations, tarir les foules dans les salles de spectacle, les restaurants, nous contraindre à vivre comme dans ces pays obscurantistes dont ils se réclament. Or c’est l’inverse : les Français continuent à vivre presque comme d’habitude, ils sortent, vont au café, partent en vacances, acceptent de se soumettre à des procédures de sécurité renforcées. (…) Depuis les attentats de 1995, chacun de nous devient malgré soi une sorte d’agent de sécurité : entrer dans une rame de métro nous contraint à regard circulaire pour détecter un suspect éventuel. Un colis abandonné nous effraie. Dans une salle de cinéma ou de musique, nous calculons la distance qui nous sépare de la sortie en cas d’attaques surprises. Nous nous mettons à la place d’un djihadiste éventuel pour déjouer ses plans. (…) Pour comprendre ce scandaleux silence [concernant le meurtre de Sarah Halimi], il faut partir d’un constat fait par un certain nombre de nos têtes pensantes de gauche et d’extrême gauche : l’antisémitisme, ça suffit. C’est une vieille rengaine qu’on ne veut plus entendre. Il faut s’attaquer maintenant au vrai racisme, l’islamophobie qui touche nos amis musulmans. Bref, comme le disent beaucoup, le musulman en 2017 est le Juif des années 30, 40. On oublie au passage que l’antisémitisme ne s’est jamais adressé à la religion juive en tant que telle mais au peuple juif coupable d’exister et qu’enfin dans les années 40 il n’y avait pas d’extrémistes juifs qui lançaient des bombes dans les gares ou les lieux de culte, allaient égorger les prêtres dans leurs églises. Juste une remarque statistique : depuis Ilan Halimi, kidnappé et torturé par le Gang des Barbares jusqu’à Mohammed Mehra, l’Hyper casher de Vincennes et Sarah Halimi, pas moins de dix Français juifs ont été tués ces dernières années parce que juifs par des extrémistes de l’islam. Cela n’empêche pas les radicaux du Coran de se plaindre de l’islamophobie officielle de l’Etat français. Ce serait à hurler de rire si ça n’était pas tragique ! Dans la doxa officielle de la gauche, seule l’extrême droite souffre d’antisémitisme. Que le monde arabo musulman soit, pour une large part, rongé par la haine des Juifs, ces inférieurs devenus des égaux, est impensable pour eux. (…) Soutenir les Indigènes de la République en 2017, ce Ku Klux Klan islamiste, antisémite et fascisant est pour le moins problématique. Beaucoup à gauche pensent que les anciens dominés ou colonisés ne peuvent être racistes puisqu’ils ont été eux-mêmes opprimés. C’est d’une naïveté confondante. Il y a même ce que j’avais appelé il y a dix ans “un racisme de l’antiracisme” où les nouvelles discriminations à l’égard des Juifs, des Blancs, des Européens s’expriment au nom d’un antiracisme farouche. Le suprématisme noir ou arabe n’est pas moins odieux que le suprématisme blanc dont ils ne sont que le simple décalque. Les déclarations de Madame Obono relèvent d’une stratégie de la provocation que le Front de gauche partage avec le Front national, ce qui est normal puisque ce sont des frères ennemis mais jumeaux. Lancer une polémique, c’est chercher la réprobation pour se poser en victimes. Multiplier les transgressions va constituer la ligne politique de ceux qui s’appellent “Les insoumis”, nom assez cocasse quand on connaît l’ancien notable socialiste, le paria pépère qui est à leur tête et dont le patrimoine déclaré se monte à 1 135 000 euros, somme coquette pour un ennemi des riches. Pascal Bruckner
Le sujet n’a pas été abordé pendant la campagne présidentielle, pas davantage que les enjeux, plus larges, du «commun», de ce que c’est aujourd’hui qu’être Français, des frontières du pays, de notre «identité nationale». Et que cette occultation n’a pas fait disparaître cet enjeu fondamental pour nos concitoyens, contrairement à ce qu’ont voulu croire certains observateurs ou certains responsables politiques. (…) il y a la crainte d’aborder des enjeux tels que l’immigration ou la place de la religion dans la société par exemple. Crainte de «faire le jeu du FN» dans le langage politique de ces 20 dernières années suivant un syllogisme impeccable: le FN est le seul parti qui parle de l’immigration dans le débat public, le FN explique que «l’immigration est une menace pour l’identité nationale», donc parler de l’immigration, c’est dire que «l’immigration est une menace pour l’identité nationale»! La seule forme acceptable d’aborder le sujet étant de «lutter contre le FN» en expliquant que «l’immigration est une chance pour la France» et non une menace. Ce qui interdit tout débat raisonnable et raisonné sur le sujet. Enfin, les partis et responsables politiques qui avaient prévu d’aborder la question ont été éliminés ou dans l’incapacité concrète de le faire: songeons ici à Manuel Valls et François Fillon. Et notons que le FN lui-même n’a pas joué son rôle pendant la campagne, en mettant de côté cette thématique de campagne pour se concentrer sur le souverainisme économique, notamment avec la proposition de sortie de l’euro. Tout ceci a déséquilibré le jeu politique et la campagne, et n’a pas réussi au FN d’ailleurs qui s’est coupé d’une partie de son électorat potentiel. (…) L’opinion majoritairement négative de l’islam de la part de nos compatriotes vient de l’accumulation de plusieurs éléments. Le premier, ce sont les attentats depuis le début 2015, à la fois sur le sol national et de manière plus générale. Les terroristes qui tuent au nom de l’islam comme la guerre en Syrie et en Irak ou les actions des groupes djihadistes en Afrique font de l’ensemble de l’islam une religion plus inquiétante que les autres. Même si nos compatriotes font la part des choses et distinguent bien malgré ce climat islamisme et islam. On n’a pas constaté une multiplication des actes antimusulmans depuis 2015 et les musulmans tués dans des attaques terroristes depuis cette date l’ont été par les islamistes. Un deuxième élément, qui date d’avant les attentats et s’enracine plus profondément dans la société, tient à la visibilité plus marquée de l’islam dans le paysage social et politique français, comme ailleurs en Europe. En raison essentiellement de la radicalisation religieuse (pratiques alimentaires et vestimentaires, prières, fêtes, ramadan…) d’une partie des musulmans qui vivent dans les sociétés européennes – l’enquête réalisée par l’Institut Montaigne l’avait bien montré. Enfin, troisième élément de crispation, de nombreuses controverses de nature très différentes mais toutes concernant la pratique visible de l’islam ont défrayé la chronique ces dernières années, faisant l’objet de manipulations politiques tant de la part de ceux qui veulent mettre en accusation l’islam, que d’islamistes ou de partisans de l’islam politique qui les transforment en combat pour leur cause. On peut citer la question des menus dans les cantines, celle du fait religieux en entreprise, le port du voile ou celui du burkini, la question des prières de rue, celle de la présence de partis islamistes lors des élections, les controverses sur le harcèlement et les agressions sexuelles de femmes lors d’événements ou dans des quartiers où sont concentrées des populations musulmanes, etc. (…) Aujourd’hui, cette défiance s’étend à de multiples sujets, notamment aux enjeux sur l’identité commune et à l’immigration. Et, de ce point de vue, l’occultation de ces enjeux à laquelle on a pu assister pendant ces derniers mois, pendant la campagne dont cela aurait dû être un des points essentiels, est une très mauvaise nouvelle. Cela va encore renforcer cette défiance aux yeux de nos concitoyens car non seulement les responsables politiques ne peuvent ou ne veulent plus agir sur l’économie mais en plus ils tournent la tête dès lors qu’il s’agit d’immigration ou de définition d’une identité commune pour le pays et ses citoyens. Laurent Bouvet
Une partie du pays a eu le sentiment que la campagne avait été détournée de son sens et accaparée, à dessein, par les «affaires» que l’on sait, la presse étant devenue en la matière moins un contre-pouvoir qu’un anti-pouvoir, selon le mot de Marcel Gauchet. Cette nouvelle force politique pêche par sa représentativité dérisoire, doublée d’un illusoire renouvellement sociologique, quand 75 % des candidats d’En marche appartiennent à la catégorie «cadres et professions intellectuelles supérieures». Le seul véritable renouvellement est générationnel, avec l’arrivée au pouvoir d’une tranche d’âge plus jeune évinçant les derniers tenants du «baby boom». Pour une «disparue», la lutte de classe se porte bien. Pour autant, elle a rarement été aussi occultée. Car cette victoire, c’est d’abord celle de l’entre-soi d’une bourgeoisie qui ne s’assume pas comme telle et se réfugie dans la posture morale (le fameux chantage au fascisme devenu, comme le dit Christophe Guilluy, une «arme de classe» contre les milieux populaires). Fracture sociale, fracture territoriale, fracture culturelle, désarroi identitaire, les questions qui nourrissent l’angoisse française ont été laissées de côté pour les mêmes raisons que l’antisémitisme, dit «nouveau», demeure indicible. C’est là qu’il faut voir l’une des causes de la dépression collective du pays, quand la majorité sent son destin confisqué par une oligarchie de naissance, de diplôme et d’argent. Une sorte de haut clergé médiatique, universitaire, technocratique et culturellement hors sol. Toutefois, le plus frappant demeure à mes yeux la façon dont le gauchisme culturel s’est fait l’allié d’une bourgeoisie financière qui a prôné l’homme sans racines, le nomade réduit à sa fonction de producteur et de consommateur. Un capitalisme financier mondialisé qui a besoin de frontières ouvertes mais dont ni lui ni les siens, toutefois, retranchés dans leur entre-soi, ne vivront les conséquences. (…) Dans un autre ordre d’idées, peut-on déconnecter la constante progression du taux d’abstention et l’évolution de notre société vers une forme d’anomie, de repli sur soi et d’individualisme triste? Comme si l’exaltation ressassée du «vivre-ensemble» disait précisément le contraire. Cette évolution, elle non plus, n’est pas sans lien à ce retournement du clivage de classe qui voit une partie de la gauche morale s’engouffrer dans un ethos méprisant à l’endroit des classes populaires, qu’elle relègue dans le domaine de la «beauferie» méchante des «Dupont Lajoie». Certains analystes ont déjà lumineusement montré (je pense à Julliard, Le Goff, Michéa, Guilluy, Bouvet et quelques autres), comment le mouvement social avait été progressivement abandonné par une gauche focalisée sur la transformation des mœurs. (…) Par le refus de la guerre qu’on nous fait dès lors que nous avons décidé qu’il n’y avait plus de guerre («Vous n’aurez pas ma haine» ) en oubliant, selon le mot de Julien Freund, que «c’est l’ennemi qui vous désigne». En privilégiant cette doxa habitée par le souci grégaire du «progrès» et le permanent désir d’«être de gauche», ce souci dont Charles Péguy disait qu’on ne mesurera jamais assez combien il nous a fait commettre de lâchetés. (…) Le magistère médiatico-universitaire de cette bourgeoisie morale (Jean-Claude Michéa parlait récemment dans la Revue des deux mondes, (avril 2017) d’une «représentation néocoloniale des classes populaires […] par les élites universitaires postmodernes», affadit les joutes intellectuelles. Chacun sait qu’il lui faudra rester dans les limites étroites de la doxa dite de l’«ouverture à l’Autre». De là une censure intérieure qui empêche nos doutes d’affleurer à la conscience et qui relègue les faits derrière les croyances. «Une grande quantité d’intelligence peut être investie dans l’ignorance lorsque le besoin d’illusion est profond», notait jadis l’écrivain américain Saul Bellow. (…) La chape de plomb qui pèse sur l’expression publique détourne le sens des mots pour nous faire entrer dans un univers orwellien où le blanc c’est le noir et la vérité le mensonge. (…) il s’agit aussi, et en partie, d’un antijudaïsme d’importation. Que l’on songe simplement au Maghreb, où il constitue un fond culturel ancien et antérieur à l’histoire coloniale. L’anthropologie culturelle permet le décryptage du soubassement symbolique de toute culture, la mise en lumière d’un imaginaire qui sous-tend une représentation du monde. (…) Mais, pour la doxa d’un antiracisme dévoyé, l’analyse culturelle ne serait qu’un racisme déguisé.En juillet 2016, Abdelghani Merah (le frère de Mohamed) confiait à la journaliste Isabelle Kersimon que lorsque le corps de Mohamed fut rendu à la famille, les voisins étaient venus en visite de deuil féliciter ses parents, regrettant seulement, disaient-ils, que Mohamed «n’ait pas tué plus d’enfants juifs»(sic). Cet antisémitisme est au mieux entouré de mythologies, au pire nié. Il serait, par exemple, corrélé à un faible niveau d’études alors qu’il demeure souvent élevé en dépit d’un haut niveau scolaire. On en fait, à tort, l’apanage de l’islamisme seul. Or, la Tunisie de Ben Ali, longtemps présentée comme un modèle d’«ouverture à l’autre», cultivait discrètement son antisémitisme sous couvert d’antisionisme (cfNotre ami Ben Ali, de Beau et Turquoi, Editions La Découverte). Et que dire de la Syrie de Bachar el-Assad, à la fois violemment anti-islamiste et antisémite, à l’image d’ailleurs du régime des généraux algériens? Ou, en France, de l’attitude pour le moins ambiguë des Indigènes de la République sur le sujet comme celle de ces autres groupuscules qui, sans lien direct à l’islamisme, racialisent le débat social et redonnent vie au racisme sous couvert de «déconstruction postcoloniale»? (…) Les universitaires et intellectuels signataires font dans l’indigénisme comme leurs prédécesseurs faisaient jadis dans l’ouvriérisme. Même mimétisme, même renoncement à la raison, même morgue au secours d’une logorrhée intellectuelle prétentieuse (c’est le parti de l’intelligence, à l’opposé des simplismes et des clichés de la «fachosphère»). Un discours qui fait fi de toute réalité, à l’instar du discours ouvriériste du PCF des années 1950, expliquant posément la «paupérisation de la classe ouvrière». De cette «parole raciste qui revendique l’apartheid», comme l’écrit le Comité laïcité république à propos de Houria Bouteldja, les auteurs de cette tribune en défense parlent sans ciller à son propos de «son attachement au Maghreb […] relié aux Juifs qui y vivaient, dont l’absence désormais créait un vide impossible à combler».Une absence, ajoutent-ils, qui rend l’auteur «inconsolable». Cette forme postcoloniale de la bêtise, entée par la culpabilité compassionnelle, donne raison à George Orwell, qui estimait que les intellectuels étaient ceux qui, demain, offriraient la plus faible résistance au totalitarisme, trop occupés à admirer la force qui les écrasera. Et à préférer leur vision du monde à la réalité qui désenchante. Nous y sommes. (…) L’islam radical use du droit pour imposer le silence. Cela, on le savait déjà. Mais mon procès a mis en évidence une autre force d’intimidation, celle de cette «gauche morale» qui voit dans tout contradicteur un ennemi contre lequel aucun procédé ne saurait être jugé indigne. Pas même l’appel au licenciement, comme dans mon cas. Un ordre moral qui traque les mauvaises pensées et les sentiments indignes, qui joue sur la mauvaise conscience et la culpabilité pour clouer au pilori. Et exigera (comme la Licra à mon endroit) repentance et «excuses publiques», à l’instar d’une cérémonie d’exorcisme comme dans une «chasse aux sorcières» du XVIIe siècle. (…)  En se montrant incapable de voir le danger qui vise les Juifs, une partie de l’opinion française se refuse à voir le danger qui la menace en propre. Georges Bensoussan

Attention: un tombeau peut en cacher un autre !

Président palestinien au mandat expiré depuis huit ans et financier revendiqué du terrorisme salué par son homologue français pour son « engagement en faveur de la non-violence »; terroriste notoire se voyant gratifié pour cause de détention d’excuses officielles et d’une dizaine de millions de dollars de compensation financière; pétition de la première lycéenne venue contre le racisme de Victor Hugo; associations humanitaires apportant leur soutien explicite à l’un des pires trafics d’êtres humains de l’histoire; ministres de la République française soutenant, entre deux frasques ou démissions pour affaires de corruption, le droit à « niquer » la France ou célébrant, via l’écriture anonyme de romans érotiques l’encanaillement des bourgeoises dans les  » banlieues chaudes »occultation du thème de l’immigration et du terrorisme islamique tout au long d’une campagne ayant abouti, via un véritable hold up et l’élimination ou la stigmatisation des principaux candidats de l’opposition à l’élection d’un président n’ayant recueilli que 17% des inscrits au premier tour, alors que le sujet est censé être une importante préoccupation des Français et qu’on en est à la 34e évacuation en deux ans de quelque 2 800 migrants clandestins en plein Paris, installation dans la quasi-indifférence générale depuis plus d’un an de quasi-favelas de gitans le long d’une route nationale à la sortie de Paris; dénonciation ou censure de ceux qui osent nommer, sur fond d’israélisation toujours plus grande, le nouvel antisémitisme d’origine musulmane ou d’extrême-gauche, marche d’imams européens contre le terrorisme peinant, pour cause de fatigue post-ramadan et malgré pourtant un bilan récent de quelque centaines de victimes, à réunir les participants; peuple américain contraint, après les huit années de l’accident industriel Obama, de se choisir un président américain issu du monde de l’immobilier et de la télé-réalité (monde du catch compris où le bougre a littéralement risqué sa peau sans répétitions !); informations sur la véritable cabale des services secrets comme des médias contre ledit président américain disponibles que sur le seul site d’un des plus grands complotistes de l’histoire

A l’heure où un  tombeau de 4 000 ans entouré d’une enceinte de 2 000 ans …

Se voit magiquement transmué après l’an dernier un Temple lui aussi bimillénaire …

En propriété d’une religion d’à peine 1 100 ans …

Comment ne pas repenser

Vieille comme le monde dans ce nouveau tombeau du politiquement correct …

A cette propension humaine dont parlaient Eschyle comme Orwell ou Girard …

A toujours ensevelir comme première victime de la violence et de la guerre…

La simple vérité ?

Georges Bensoussan : «Nous entrons dans un univers orwellien où la vérité c’est le mensonge»

Alexandre Devecchio
Le Figaro

07/07/2017

ENTRETIEN – L’auteur des Territoires perdus de la République (Fayard) et d’Une France soumise (Albin Michel) revisite la campagne présidentielle. Fracture sociale, fracture territoriale, fracture culturelle, désarroi identitaire : pour l’historien, les questions qui nourrissent l’angoisse française ont été laissées de côté.

En 2002, Georges Bensoussan publiait Les Territoires perdus de la République, un recueil de témoignages d’enseignants de banlieue qui faisait apparaître l’antisémitisme, la francophobie et le calvaire des femmes dans les quartiers dits sensibles.«Un livre qui faisait exploser le mur du déni de la réalité française», se souvient Alain Finkielkraut, l’un des rares défenseurs de l’ouvrage à l’époque.

Une France soumise, paru cette année, montrait que ces quinze dernières années tout s’était aggravé. L’élection présidentielle devait répondre à ce malaise. Mais, pour Georges Bensoussan, il n’en a rien été. Un voile a été jeté sur les questions qui fâchent. Un symbole de cet aveuglement? Le meurtre de Sarah Halimi, défenestrée durant la campagne aux cris d’«Allah Akbar» sans qu’aucun grand média ne s’en fasse l’écho. Une chape de plomb médiatique, intellectuelle et politique qui, selon l’historien, évoque de plus en plus l’univers du célèbre roman de George Orwell, 1984.
Selon un sondage du JDD paru cette semaine, le recul de l’islam radical est l’attente prioritaire des Français (61 %), loin devant les retraites (43 %), l’école (36 %), l’emploi (36 %) ou le pouvoir d’achat (30 %). D’après une autre étude, 65 % des sondés considèrent qu’«il y a trop d’étrangers en France» et 74 % que l’islam souhaite «imposer son mode de fonctionnement aux autres».

LE FIGARO. – Des résultats en décalage avec les priorités affichées par le nouveau pouvoir: moralisation de la vie politique, loi travail, construction européenne… Les grands enjeux de notre époque ont- ils été abordés durant la campagne présidentielle?

Georges BENSOUSSAN. – Une partie du pays a eu le sentiment que la campagne avait été détournée de son sens et accaparée, à dessein, par les «affaires» que l’on sait, la presse étant devenue en la matière moins un contre-pouvoir qu’un anti-pouvoir, selon le mot de Marcel Gauchet. Cette nouvelle force politique pêche par sa représentativité dérisoire, doublée d’un illusoire renouvellement sociologique, quand 75 % des candidats d’En marche appartiennent à la catégorie «cadres et professions intellectuelles supérieures». Le seul véritable renouvellement est générationnel, avec l’arrivée au pouvoir d’une tranche d’âge plus jeune évinçant les derniers tenants du «baby boom».

Fracture sociale, fracture territoriale, fracture culturelle, désarroi identitaire, les questions qui nourissent l’angoisse française ont été laissées de côté
Pour une «disparue», la lutte de classe se porte bien. Pour autant, elle a rarement été aussi occultée. Car cette victoire, c’est d’abord celle de l’entre-soi d’une bourgeoisie qui ne s’assume pas comme telle et se réfugie dans la posture morale (le fameux chantage au fascisme devenu, comme le dit Christophe Guilluy, une «arme de classe» contre les milieux populaires). Fracture sociale, fracture territoriale, fracture culturelle, désarroi identitaire, les questions qui nourrissent l’angoisse française ont été laissées de côté pour les mêmes raisons que l’antisémitisme, dit «nouveau», demeure indicible.
C’est là qu’il faut voir l’une des causes de la dépression collective du pays, quand la majorité sent son destin confisqué par une oligarchie de naissance, de diplôme et d’argent. Une sorte de haut clergé médiatique, universitaire, technocratique et culturellement hors sol.
Toutefois, le plus frappant demeure à mes yeux la façon dont le gauchisme culturel s’est fait l’allié d’une bourgeoisie financière qui a prôné l’homme sans racines, le nomade réduit à sa fonction de producteur et de consommateur. Un capitalisme financier mondialisé qui a besoin de frontières ouvertes mais dont ni lui ni les siens, toutefois, retranchés dans leur entre-soi, ne vivront les conséquences.

Ce gauchisme culturel est moins l’«idiot utile» de l’islamisme que celui de ce capitalisme déshumanisé qui, en faisant de l’intégration démocratique à la nation un impensé, empêche d’analyser l’affrontement qui agite souterrainement notre société. De surcroît, l’avenir de la nation France n’est pas sans lien à la démographie des mondes voisins quand la machine à assimiler, comme c’est le cas aujourd’hui, fonctionne moins bien.

Dans un autre ordre d’idées, peut-on déconnecter la constante progression du taux d’abstention et l’évolution de notre société vers une forme d’anomie, de repli sur soi et d’individualisme triste? Comme si l’exaltation ressassée du «vivre-ensemble» disait précisément le contraire. Cette évolution, elle non plus, n’est pas sans lien à ce retournement du clivage de classe qui voit une partie de la gauche morale s’engouffrer dans un ethos méprisant à l’endroit des classes populaires, qu’elle relègue dans le domaine de la «beauferie» méchante des «Dupont Lajoie».Certains analystes ont déjà lumineusement montré (je pense à Julliard, Le Goff, Michéa, Guilluy, Bouvet et quelques autres), comment le mouvement social avait été progressivement abandonné par une gauche focalisée sur la transformation des mœurs.

La France que vous décrivez semble au bord de l’explosion. Dès lors, comment expliquez-vous le déni persistant d’une partie des élites?

Par le refus de la guerre qu’on nous fait dès lors que nous avons décidé qu’il n’y avait plus de guerre («Vous n’aurez pas ma haine» ) en oubliant, selon le mot de Julien Freund, que «c’est l’ennemi qui vous désigne». En privilégiant cette doxa habitée par le souci grégaire du «progrès» et le permanent désir d’«être de gauche», ce souci dont Charles Péguy disait qu’on ne mesurera jamais assez combien il nous a fait commettre de lâchetés. Enfin, en éprouvant, c’est normal, toutes les difficultés du monde à reconnaître qu’on s’est trompé, parfois même tout au long d’une vie. Comment oublier à cet égard les communistes effondrés de 1956?
Quant à ceux qui jouent un rôle actif dans le maquillage de la réalité, ils ont, eux, prioritairement le souci de maintenir une position sociale privilégiée. La perpétuation de la doxa est inséparable de cet ordre social dont ils sont les bénéficiaires et qui leur vaut reconnaissance, considération et avantages matériels.
Le magistère médiatico-universitaire de cette bourgeoisie morale (Jean-Claude Michéa parlait récemment dans la Revue des deux mondes, (avril 2017) d’une «représentation néocoloniale des classes populaires […] par les élites universitaires postmodernes», affadit les joutes intellectuelles. Chacun sait qu’il lui faudra rester dans les limites étroites de la doxa dite de l’«ouverture à l’Autre». De là une censure intérieure qui empêche nos doutes d’affleurer à la conscience et qui relègue les faits derrière les croyances. «Une grande quantité d’intelligence peut être investie dans l’ignorance lorsque le besoin d’illusion est profond», notait jadis l’écrivain américain Saul Bellow.

Avec 16 autres intellectuels, dont Alain Finkielkraut, Jacques Julliard, Elisabeth Badinter, Michel Onfray ou encore Marcel Gauchet, vous avez signé une tribune pour que la vérité soit dite sur le meurtre de Sarah Halimi. Cette affaire est-elle un symptôme de ce déni que vous dénoncez?

La chape de plomb qui pèse sur l’expression publique détourne le sens des mots pour nous faire entrer dans un univers orwellien où le blanc c’est le noir et la vérité le mensonge. Nous avons signé cette tribune pour tenter de sortir cette affaire du silence qui l’entourait, comme celui qui avait accueilli, en 2002, la publication des Territoires perdus de la République.

C’était il y a quinze ans et vous alertiez déjà sur la montée d’un antisémitisme dit «nouveau»…

Faut-il parler d’un «antisémitisme nouveau»? Je ne le crois pas. Non seulement parce que les premiers signes en avaient été détectés dès la fin des années 1980. Mais plus encore parce qu’il s’agit aussi, et en partie, d’un antijudaïsme d’importation. Que l’on songe simplement au Maghreb, où il constitue un fond culturel ancien et antérieur à l’histoire coloniale. L’anthropologie culturelle permet le décryptage du soubassement symbolique de toute culture, la mise en lumière d’un imaginaire qui sous-tend une représentation du monde.

Mais, pour la doxa d’un antiracisme dévoyé, l’analyse culturelle ne serait qu’un racisme déguisé. En septembre 2016, le dramaturge algérien Karim Akouche déclarait: «Voulez-vous devenir une vedette dans la presse algérienne arabophone? C’est facile. Prêchez la haine des Juifs […]. Je suis un rescapé de l’école algérienne. On m’y a enseigné à détester les Juifs. Hitler y était un héros. Des professeurs en faisaient l’éloge. Après le Coran, Mein Kampf et Les Protocoles des sages de Sion sont les livres les plus lus dans le monde musulman.» En juillet 2016, Abdelghani Merah (le frère de Mohamed) confiait à la journaliste Isabelle Kersimon que lorsque le corps de Mohamed fut rendu à la famille, les voisins étaient venus en visite de deuil féliciter ses parents, regrettant seulement, disaient-ils, que Mohamed «n’ait pas tué plus d’enfants juifs»(sic).

Cet antisémitisme est au mieux entouré de mythologies, au pire nié. Il serait, par exemple, corrélé à un faible niveau d’études alors qu’il demeure souvent élevé en dépit d’un haut niveau scolaire. On en fait, à tort, l’apanage de l’islamisme seul. Or, la Tunisie de Ben Ali, longtemps présentée comme un modèle d’«ouverture à l’autre», cultivait discrètement son antisémitisme sous couvert d’antisionisme (cfNotre ami Ben Ali, de Beau et Turquoi, Editions La Découverte). Et que dire de la Syrie de Bachar el-Assad, à la fois violemment anti-islamiste et antisémite, à l’image d’ailleurs du régime des généraux algériens? Ou, en France, de l’attitude pour le moins ambiguë des Indigènes de la République sur le sujet comme celle de ces autres groupuscules qui, sans lien direct à l’islamisme, racialisent le débat social et redonnent vie au racisme sous couvert de «déconstruction postcoloniale»?

Justement, le 19 juin dernier, un collectif d’intellectuels a publié dans Le Monde un texte de soutien à Houria Bouteldja, la chef de file des Indigènes de la République.

Que penser de l’évolution sociétale d’une partie des élites françaises quand le même quotidien donne la parole aux détracteurs de Kamel Daoud, aux apologistes d’Houria Bouteldja et offre une tribune à Marwan Muhammad, du Collectif contre l’islamophobie en France (CCIF), qualifié par ailleurs de «porte-parole combatif des musulmans»?

Les universitaires et intellectuels signataires font dans l’indigénisme comme leurs prédécesseurs faisaient jadis dans l’ouvriérisme. Même mimétisme, même renoncement à la raison, même morgue au secours d’une logorrhée intellectuelle prétentieuse (c’est le parti de l’intelligence, à l’opposé des simplismes et des clichés de la «fachosphère»). Un discours qui fait fi de toute réalité, à l’instar du discours ouvriériste du PCF des années 1950, expliquant posément la «paupérisation de la classe ouvrière». De cette «parole raciste qui revendique l’apartheid», comme l’écrit le Comité laïcité république à propos de Houria Bouteldja, les auteurs de cette tribune en défense parlent sans ciller à son propos de «son attachement au Maghreb […] relié aux Juifs qui y vivaient, dont l’absence désormais créait un vide impossible à combler».Une absence, ajoutent-ils, qui rend l’auteur «inconsolable». Cette forme postcoloniale de la bêtise, entée par la culpabilité compassionnelle, donne raison à George Orwell, qui estimait que les intellectuels étaient ceux qui, demain, offriraient la plus faible résistance au totalitarisme, trop occupés à admirer la force qui les écrasera. Et à préférer leur vision du monde à la réalité qui désenchante. Nous y sommes.

Vous vous êtes retrouvé sur le banc des accusés pour avoir dénoncé l’antisémitisme des banlieues dans l’émission «Répliques» sur France Culture. Il a suffi d’un signalement du CCIF pour que le parquet décide de vous poursuivre cinq mois après les faits. Contre toute attente, SOS-Racisme, la LDH, le Mrap mais aussi la Licra s’étaient associés aux poursuites.

En dépit de la relaxe prononcée le 7 mars dernier, et brillamment prononcée même, le mal est fait: ce procès n’aurait jamais dû se tenir. Car, pour le CCIF, l’objectif est atteint: intimider et faire taire. Après mon affaire, comme après celle de tant d’autres, on peut parier que la volonté de parler ira s’atténuant.

A-t-on remarqué d’ailleurs que, depuis l’attentat de Charlie Hebdo, on n’a plus vu une seule caricature du Prophète dans la presse occidentale?

L’islam radical use du droit pour imposer le silence. Cela, on le savait déjà. Mais mon procès a mis en évidence une autre force d’intimidation, celle de cette «gauche morale» qui voit dans tout contradicteur un ennemi contre lequel aucun procédé ne saurait être jugé indigne. Pas même l’appel au licenciement, comme dans mon cas. Un ordre moral qui traque les mauvaises pensées et les sentiments indignes, qui joue sur la mauvaise conscience et la culpabilité pour clouer au pilori. Et exigera (comme la Licra à mon endroit) repentance et «excuses publiques», à l’instar d’une cérémonie d’exorcisme comme dans une «chasse aux sorcières» du XVIIe siècle.

Comment entendre la disproportion entre l’avalanche de condamnations qui m’a submergé et les mots que j’avais employés au micro de France Culture?

J’étais entré de plain-pied, je crois, dans le domaine d’un non-dit massif, celui d’un antisémitisme qui, en filigrane, pose la question de l’intégration et de l’assimilation. Voire, en arrière-plan, celle du rejet de la France. En se montrant incapable de voir le danger qui vise les Juifs, une partie de l’opinion française se refuse à voir le danger qui la menace en propre.

Une France soumise. Les voix du refus,collectif dirigé par Georges Bensoussan. Albin Michel, 672 p., 24,90 €. Préface d’Elisabeth Badinter

Voir aussi:

http://www.valeursactuelles.com/societe/pour-la-doxa-officielle-le-seul-antisemitisme-est-dextreme-droite-86190

“Pour la doxa officielle, le seul antisémitisme est d’extrême-droite”
Interview. Terrorisme, communautarisme, délires antiracistes : le philosophe et essayiste Pascal Bruckner décrypte les dernières polémiques et ce qu’elles disent de la société française.

Mickaël Fonton
Valeurs actuellles

10 juillet 2017

Le 19 juin dernier, une agression terroriste se produisait sur les Champs-Elysées. L’opinion s’en est trouvée agitée quelques heures, puis la vie a repris son cours. Alors qu’approche la commémoration de l’attentat du 14 juillet à Nice, croyez-vous que les Français aient pris la mesure exacte de la menace qui pèse sur le pays ?
L’indifférence apparente des Français à la situation peut sembler étrange, s’assimiler à du déni, à la volonté de ne pas voir. Elle peut aussi se comprendre comme une stratégie de survie analogue à ce qui se passe depuis de nombreuses années en Israël. Les terroristes et leurs alliés wahabites, salafistes ou frères musulmans espéraient non seulement semer la mort mais tétaniser les populations, tarir les foules dans les salles de spectacle, les restaurants, nous contraindre à vivre comme dans ces pays obscurantistes dont ils se réclament. Or c’est l’inverse : les Français continuent à vivre presque comme d’habitude, ils sortent, vont au café, partent en vacances, acceptent de se soumettre à des procédures de sécurité renforcées.

La présence de policiers armés les rassure. Mais la peur reste latente. Depuis les attentats de 1995, chacun de nous devient malgré soi une sorte d’agent de sécurité : entrer dans une rame de métro nous contraint à regard circulaire pour détecter un suspect éventuel. Un colis abandonné nous effraie. Dans une salle de cinéma ou de musique, nous calculons la distance qui nous sépare de la sortie en cas d’attaques surprises. Nous nous mettons à la place d’un djihadiste éventuel pour déjouer ses plans. Nous sommes devenus malgré nous la victime et le tueur. Nous sommes bien en guerre civile larvée mais avec un sang- froid étonnant dont ne font preuve ni les Nord-américains ni les Britanniques.
Sur le même sujet
Arte diffusera finalement le documentaire sur l’antisémitisme musulman

Comment expliquez-vous le silence médiatique qui a entouré le meurtre de Sarah Halimi ? Indifférence, lassitude, volonté de ne pas “faire le jeu” de tel ou tel parti à l’approche de la présidentielle ?
Pour comprendre ce scandaleux silence, il faut partir d’un constat fait par un certain nombre de nos têtes pensantes de gauche et d’extrême gauche : l’antisémitisme, ça suffit. C’est une vieille rengaine qu’on ne veut plus entendre. Il faut s’attaquer maintenant au vrai racisme, l’islamophobie qui touche nos amis musulmans. Bref, comme le disent beaucoup, le musulman en 2017 est le Juif des années 30, 40. On oublie au passage que l’antisémitisme ne s’est jamais adressé à la religion juive en tant que telle mais au peuple juif coupable d’exister et qu’enfin dans les années 40 il n’y avait pas d’extrémistes juifs qui lançaient des bombes dans les gares ou les lieux de culte, allaient égorger les prêtres dans leurs églises.

Juste une remarque statistique : depuis Ilan Halimi, kidnappé et torturé par le Gang des Barbares jusqu’à Mohammed Mehra, l’Hyper casher de Vincennes et Sarah Halimi, pas moins de dix Français juifs ont été tués ces dernières années parce que juifs par des extrémistes de l’islam. Cela n’empêche pas les radicaux du Coran de se plaindre de l’islamophobie officielle de l’Etat français. Ce serait à hurler de rire si ça n’était pas tragique ! Dans la doxa officielle de la gauche, seule l’extrême droite souffre d’antisémitisme. Que le monde arabo musulman soit, pour une large part, rongé par la haine des Juifs, ces inférieurs devenus des égaux, est impensable pour eux.

Que vous inspire la polémique autour de Danièle Obono, députée de la France insoumise qui réitère son soutien à des personnes qui insultent la France ?
Soutenir les Indigènes de la République en 2017, ce Ku Klux Klan islamiste, antisémite et fascisant est pour le moins problématique. Beaucoup à gauche pensent que les anciens dominés ou colonisés ne peuvent être racistes puisqu’ils ont été eux-mêmes opprimés. C’est d’une naïveté confondante. Il y a même ce que j’avais appelé il y a dix ans “un racisme de l’antiracisme” où les nouvelles discriminations à l’égard des Juifs, des Blancs, des Européens s’expriment au nom d’un antiracisme farouche. Le suprématisme noir ou arabe n’est pas moins odieux que le suprématisme blanc dont ils ne sont que le simple décalque. Les déclarations de Madame Obono relèvent d’une stratégie de la provocation que le Front de gauche partage avec le Front national, ce qui est normal puisque ce sont des frères ennemis mais jumeaux. Lancer une polémique, c’est chercher la réprobation pour se poser en victimes. Multiplier les transgressions va constituer la ligne politique de ceux qui s’appellent “Les insoumis”, nom assez cocasse quand on connaît l’ancien notable socialiste, le paria pépère qui est à leur tête et dont le patrimoine déclaré se monte à 1 135 000 euros, somme coquette pour un ennemi des riches.

Gilles-William Goldnadel : « Anne Hidalgo et les migrants, la grande hypocrisie »

  • Gilles William Goldnadel
  • Le Figaro
  • 10/07/2017

FIGAROVOX/CHRONIQUE – Dans sa chronique, l’avocat Gilles-William Goldnadel dénonce la mauvaise gestion d’Anne Hidalgo de l’afflux de migrants vers la capitale. Pour elle, en proposant une loi sur le sujet, la maire de Paris montre sa volonté de rejeter la responsabilité de cette catastrophe humaine et sécuritaire sur l’État.


Gilles-William Goldnadel est avocat et écrivain. Il est président de l’association France-Israël. Toutes les semaines, il décrypte l’actualité pour FigaroVox.


Je soumets cette question: y aurait-il une manière de concours de soumission entre la première magistrate de Paris et le premier magistrat de France? À celui ou celle qui aurait la soumission la plus soumise?

Ainsi, cette semaine, Madame Hidalgo a-t-elle proposé une loi sur les migrants qu’on ne lui demandait pas et pour laquelle on ne lui connaît aucune compétence particulière.

C’est le moins que l’on puisse écrire. En réalité, un esprit chagrin soupçonnerait l’édile municipal, dépassé par des événements migratoires dans sa ville qu’elle aura pourtant accueillis extatiquement, de vouloir faire porter le chapeau aux autres villes et à l’État.

Les responsables socialistes comme elle ont bien raison de ne pas être complexés. Personne ne leur a demandé raison d’une irresponsabilité qui aura accouché d’une catastrophe démographique et sécuritaire dont on ne perçoit pas encore toute la gravité. Dans un monde normal, ils devraient raser les murs, mais dans le monde virtuel ils peuvent se permettre de construire sur la comète des ponts suspendus. L’idéologie esthétique qui les porte et supporte considère la réalité comme une obscénité.

Et les arguments les plus gênants comme des grossièretés. C’est ainsi, que faire remarquer que toutes les belles âmes, les artistes généreux (pardon pour le pléonasme), les citoyens aériens du monde, prêts à accueillir l’humanité entière sans accueillir un seul enfant dans mille mètres au carré, relève d’une insupportable vulgarité.

Madame Hidalgo s’exclame: «faisons du défi migratoire une réussite pour la France» sur le même ton assuré que ses amis chantaient il y a 20 ans: «L’immigration, une chance pour la France». Décidément, ils ne manquent pas d’air.

Madame Hidalgo prétend vouloir améliorer l’intégration des nouveaux migrants. Ses amis n’ont pas réussi en deux décennies à intégrer des populations culturellement et socialement plus aisément intégrables. À aucun moment Anne Hidalgo n’a eu le mauvais goût d’évoquer la question de l’islam.

Madame Hidalgo n’aurait pas songé à demander aux riches monarques du golfe, à commencer par celui du Qatar, à qui elle tresse régulièrement des couronnes, de faire preuve de générosité à l’égard de leurs frères de langue, de culture et de religion.

Madame le maire n’est pas très franche. Dans sa proposition, elle feint de séparer les réfugiés éligibles au droit d’asile et les migrants économiques soumis au droit commun. Elle fait semblant de ne pas savoir que ces derniers pour leur immense majorité ne sont pas raccompagnés et que dès lors qu’ils sont déboutés , ils se fondent dans la clandestinité la plus publique du monde.

Comme l’écrit Pierre Lellouche dans Une guerre sans fin (Cerf) que je recommande: «Aucun principe de droit international n’oblige les Français déjà surendettés, à hauteur de plus de 2000 milliards, à financer par leurs impôts et leurs cotisations sociales des soins gratuits pour tous les immigrés illégaux présents sur notre sol… en 2016, l’octroi du statut de demandeur d’asile est devenu un moyen couramment utilisé par des autorités dépassées pour vider les camps de migrants, à Paris bien sûr, mais aussi par exemple, à Calais, dans la fameuse «jungle» qui, avant son démantèlement, comptait environ 14 000 «habitants». Ces derniers, essentiellement des migrants économiques, ont été qualifiés de réfugiés politiques dans l’unique but de pouvoir les transférer vers d’autres centres, dénommés CAO ou CADA en province. De telles méthodes relèvent d’une stratégie digne du mythe de Sisyphe: plus ils sont vidés, plus ils se remplissent à nouveau…»

Surtout, Madame Hidalgo n’est pas très courageuse: elle n’ose pas dire le fond de sa pensée: Que l’on ne saurait sans déchoir dire «Non» à l’Autre , «ici c’est chez moi, ce n’est pas chez toi».

J’ai moi-même posé la question, au micro de RMC, à son adjoint chargé du logement, le communiste Iann Brossat: «Oui ou non, faut-il expulser les déboutés du droit d’asile? Réponse du collaborateur: «non bien sûr».

Madame Hidalgo n’a pas le courage de dire le fond de sa pensée soumise .

À la vérité, c’est bien parce que les responsables français démissionnaires n’ont pas eu la volonté et l’intelligence de faire respecter les lois de la république souveraine sur le contrôle des flux migratoires , et ont maintenu illégalement sur le sol national des personnes non désirées, que la France ne peut plus se permettre d’accueillir des gens qui mériteraient parfois davantage de l’être. Qui veut faire l’ange fait la bête.

Mais le premier Français, n’aura pas démérité non plus à ce concours de la soumission auquel il semble aussi avoir soumissionné.

C’est ainsi que cette semaine encore, le président algérien a, de nouveau, réclamé avec insistance de la France qu’elle se soumette et fasse repentance .

Cela tourne à la manie. La maladie chronique macronienne du ressentiment ressassé de l’Algérie faillie. À comparer avec l’ouverture d’esprit marocaine.

En effet, Monsieur Bouteflika a des circonstances atténuantes. Son homologue français lui aura tendu la verge pour fouetter la France. On se souvient de ses propos sur cette colonisation française coupable de crimes contre l’humanité.

Je n’ai pas noté que Monsieur Macron, le 5 juillet dernier, ait cru devoir commémorer le massacre d’Oran de 1962 et le classer dans la même catégorie juridique de droit pénal international. Il est vrai que ce ne sont que 2000 Français qui furent sauvagement assassinés après pourtant que l’indépendance ait été accordée.

On serait injuste de penser que cette saillie un peu obscène n’aurait que des raisons bassement électoralistes. Je crains malheureusement que Jupiter ne soit sincère. Enfant de ce siècle névrotiquement culpabilisant , il a dans ses bagages tout un tas d’ustensiles usagés qui auront servi à tourmenter les Français depuis 30 ans et à inoculer dans les quartiers le bacille mortel de la détestation pathologique de l’autochtone.

Au demeurant, Monsieur Macron a depuis récidivé: accueillant cette semaine son homologue palestinien Abbou Abbas, il a trouvé subtil de déclarer: «l’absence d’horizon politique nourrit le désespoir et l’extrémisme» . Ce qui est la manière ordinaire un peu surfaite d’excuser le terrorisme.

À dire le vrai, le président français, paraît-il moderne, n’a cessé de trouver de fausses causes sociales éculées à ce terrorisme islamiste qui massacre les Français depuis deux années.

Pour vaincre l’islamisme radical, il préfère à présent soumettre le thermomètre.

C’est à se demander si la pensée complexe de Jupiter n’est pas un peu simpliste.

1er juillet 2017 

Le journaliste James O’Keffe (photo) réalise depuis plusieurs années des vidéos en caméra cachée. Il y filme les commentaires, voire les aveux, de personnalités politiques sur les scandales du moment. Proche de Breibart et du président Trump, il vient de réaliser trois vidéos sur le traitement par CNN des possibles ingérences russes dans la campagne présidentielle états-unienne.

La première partie, diffusée le 26 juin 2017, montre un producteur-en-chef de CNN, John Bonifield, responsable de séquences non-politiques, affirmer que les accusations de collusion entre la Russie et l’équipe Trump ne sont que « des conneries » diffusées « pour l’audience ».

La seconde partie, diffusée le 28 juin, montre le présentateur de CNN Anthony Van Jones (ancien collaborateur de Barack Obama licencié de la Maison-Blanche pour avoir publiquement mis en cause la version officielle des attentats du 11-Septembre) affirmant que cette histoire d’ingérence russe est une nullité.

La troisième partie, diffusée le 30 juin, montre le producteur associé de CNN, Jimmy Carr, déclarer que le président Donald Trump est un malade mental et que ses électeurs sont stupides comme de la merde.

CNN a accusé le Project Veritas de James O’Keefe d’avoir sorti ces déclarations de leur contexte plus général. Ses collaborateurs ont tenté de minimiser leurs propos enregistrés. Cependant, la porte-parole de la Maison-Blanche, Sarah Sanders, a souligné le caractère scandaleux de ces déclarations et appelé tous les États-uniens à voir ces vidéos et à en juger par eux-mêmes.

L’enquête de CNN sur la possible ingérence russe est devenue l’obsession de la chaîne. Elle l’a abordée plus de 1 500 fois au cours des deux derniers mois. Personne n’a à ce jour le moindre début de commencement de preuve pour étayer l’accusation de la chaîne d’information contre Moscou.

Voir également:

10 juillet 2017

La majorité républicaine de la Commission sénatoriale de la Sécurité de la patrie et des Affaires gouvernementales dénonce les conséquences désastreuses des fuites actuelles de l’Administration.

Ce phénomène, qui était très rare sous les présidences George Bush Jr. et Barack Obama, s’est soudain développé contre la présidence Donald Trump causant des dommages irréversibles à la Sécurité nationale.

Au cours des 126 premiers jours de la présidence Trump, 125 informations classifiées ont été illégalement transmises à 18 organes de presse (principalement CNN). Soit environ une par jour, c’est-à-dire 7 fois plus que durant la période équivalente des 4 précédents mandats. La majorité de ces fuites concernait l’enquête sur de possibles ingérences russes durant la campagne électorale présidentielle.

Le président de la Commission, Ron Johnson (Rep, Wisconsin) (photo) a saisi l’Attorney General, Jeff Sessions.

L’existence de ces fuites répétées laisse penser à un complot au sein de la haute administration dont 98% des fonctionnaires ont voté Clinton contre Trump.

Voir de plus:

10 juillet 2017

L’ex-directeur du FBI, James Comey, dont le témoignage devant le Congrès devait permettre de confondre le président Trump pour haute trahison au profit de la Russie, est désormais lui-même mis en cause.

James Comey avait indiqué par deux fois lors de son audition qu’il remettait au Congrès ses notes personnelles sur ses relations avec le président. Or, selon les parlementaires qui ont pu consulter ces neuf documents, ceux-ci contiennent des informations classifiées.

Dès lors se pose la question de savoir comment l’ex-directeur du FBI a pu violer son habilitation secret-défense et faire figurer des secrets d’État dans des notes personnelles, ou si ces notes sont des documents officiels qu’il aurait volés.

Comey’s private memos on Trump conversations contained classified material”, John Solomon, The Hill, July 9, 2017.

Voir encore:

En s’arrogeant le titre de « 4ème Pouvoir », la presse états-unienne s’est placée à égalité avec les trois Pouvoirs démocratiques, bien qu’elle soit dénuée de légitimité populaire. Elle mène une vaste campagne, à la fois chez elle et à l’étranger, pour dénigrer le président Trump et provoquer sa destitution ; une campagne qui a débuté le soir de son élection, c’est-à-dire bien avant son arrivée à la Maison-Blanche. Elle remporte un vif succès parmi l’électorat démocrate et dans les États alliés, dont la population est persuadée que le président des États-Unis est dérangé. Mais les électeurs de Donald Trump tiennent bon et il parvient efficacement à lutter contre la pauvreté.

Damas (Syrie)

4 juillet 2017

+
JPEG - 30.7 ko

La campagne de presse internationale visant à déstabiliser le président Trump se poursuit. La machine à médire, mise en place par David Brock durant la période de transition [1], souligne autant qu’elle le peut le caractère emporté et souvent grossier des Tweets présidentiels. L’Entente des médias, mise en place par la mystérieuse ONG First Draft [2], répète à l’envie que la Justice enquête sur les liens entre l’équipe de campagne du président et les sombres complots attribués au Kremlin.

Une étude du professeur Thomas E. Patterson de l’Harvard Kennedy School a montré que la presse US, britannique et allemande, a cité trois fois plus Donald Trump que les présidents précédents. Et que, au cours des 100 premiers jours de sa présidence, 80% des articles lui étaient clairement défavorables [3].

Durant la campagne du FBI [4] visant à contraindre le président Nixon à la démission, la presse états-unienne s’était attribuée le qualificatif de « 4ème Pouvoir », signifiant par là que leurs propriétaires avaient plus de légitimité que le Peuple. Loin de céder à la pression, Donald Trump, conscient du danger que représente l’alliance des médias et des 98% de hauts fonctionnaires qui ont voté contre lui, déclara « la guerre à la presse », lors de son discours du 22 janvier 2017, une semaine après son intronisation. Tandis que son conseiller spécial, Steve Bannon, déclarait au New York Times que, de fait, la presse était devenue « le nouveau parti d’opposition ».

Quoi qu’il en soit, les électeurs du président ne lui ont pas retiré leur confiance.

Rappelons ici comment cette affaire a débuté. C’était durant la période de transition, c’est-à-dire avant l’investiture de Donald Trump. Une ONG, Propaganda or Not ?, lança l’idée que la Russie avait imaginé des canulars durant la campagne présidentielle de manière à couler Hillary Clinton et à faire élire Donald Trump. À l’époque, nous avions souligné les liens de cette mystérieuse ONG avec Madeleine Albright et Zbigniew Brzeziński [5]. L’accusation, longuement reprise par le Washington Post, dénonçait une liste d’agents du Kremlin, dont le Réseau Voltaire. Cependant à ce jour, rien, absolument rien, n’est venu étayer cette thèse du complot russe.

Chacun a pu constater que les arguments utilisés contre Donald Trump ne sont pas uniquement ceux que l’on manie habituellement dans le combat politique, mais qu’ils ressortent clairement de la propagande de guerre [6].

La palme de la mauvaise foi revient à CNN qui traite cette affaire de manière obsessionnelle. La chaîne a été contrainte de présenter ses excuses à la suite d’un reportage accusant un des proches de Trump, le banquier Anthony Scaramucci, d’être indirectement payé par Moscou. Cette imputation étant inventée et Scaramucci étant suffisamment riche pour poursuivre la chaîne en justice, CNN présenta ses excuses et les trois journalistes de sa cellule d’enquête « démissionnèrent ».
Puis, le Project Veritas du journaliste James O’Keefe publia trois séquences vidéos tournées en caméra cachée [7]. Dans la première, l’on voit un superviseur de la chaîne rire dans un ascenseur en déclarant que ces accusations de collusion du président avec la Russie ne sont que « des conneries » diffusées « pour l’audience ». Dans la seconde, un présentateur vedette et ancien conseiller d’Obama affirme que ce sont des « nullités ». Tandis que dans la troisième, un producteur déclare que Donald Trump est un malade mental et que ses électeurs sont « stupides comme de la merde » (sic).
En réponse, le président posta une vidéo-montage réalisée à partir d’images, non pas extraites d’un western, mais datant de ses responsabilités à la Fédération états-unienne de catch, la WWE. On peut le voir mimer casser la figure de son ami Vince McMahon (l’époux de sa Secrétaire aux petites entreprises) dont le visage a été recouvert du logo de CNN. Le tout se termine avec un logo altéré de CNN en Fraud News Network, c’est-à-dire le Réseau escroc d’information.

Outre que cet événement montre qu’aux États-Unis le président n’a pas l’exclusivité de la grossièreté, il atteste que CNN —qui a abordé la question de l’ingérence russe plus de 1 500 fois en deux mois— ne fait pas de journalisme et se moque de la vérité. On le savait depuis longtemps pour ses sujets de politique internationale, on le découvre pour ceux de politique intérieure.

Bien que ce soit beaucoup moins significatif, une nouvelle polémique oppose les présentateurs de l’émission matinale de MSNBC, Morning Joe, au président. Ceux-ci le critiquent vertement depuis des mois. Il se trouve que Joe Scarborough est un ancien avocat et parlementaire de Floride qui lutte contre le droit à l’avortement et pour la dissolution des ministères « inutiles » que sont ceux du Commerce, de l’Éducation, de l’Énergie et du Logement. Au contraire, sa partenaire (au sens propre et figuré) Mika Brzeziński est une simple lectrice de prompteur qui soutenait Bernie Sanders. Dans un Tweet, le président les a insulté en parlant de « Joe le psychopathe » et de « Mika au petit quotient intellectuel ». Personne ne doute que ces qualificatifs ne sont pas loin de la vérité, mais les formuler de cette manière vise uniquement à blesser l’amour-propre des journalistes. Quoi qu’il en soit, les deux présentateurs rédigèrent une tribune libre dans le Washington Post pour mettre en doute la santé mentale du président.

Mika Brzeziński est la fille de Zbigniew Brzeziński, un des tireurs de ficelles de Propaganda or not ?, décédé il y a un mois.

La grossièreté des Tweets présidentiels n’a rien à voir avec de la folie. Dwight Eisenhower et surtout Richard Nixon étaient bien plus obscènes que lui, ils n’en furent pas moins de grands présidents.

De même leur caractère impulsif ne signifie pas que le président le soit. En réalité, sur chaque sujet, Donald Trump réagit immédiatement par des Tweets agressifs. Puis, il lance des idées dans tous les sens, n’hésitant pas à se contredire d’une déclaration à l’autre, et observe attentivement les réactions qu’elles suscitent. Enfin, s’étant forgé une opinion personnelle, il rencontre la partie opposée et trouve généralement un accord avec elle.

Donald Trump n’a certes pas la bonne éducation puritaine de Barack Obama ou d’Hillary Clinton, mais la rudesse du Nouveau Monde. Tout au long de sa campagne électorale, il n’a cessé de se présenter comme le nettoyeur des innombrables malhonnêtetés que cette bonne éducation permet de masquer à Washington. Il se trouve que c’est lui et non pas Madame Clinton que les États-uniens ont porté à la Maison-Blanche.

Bien sûr, on peut prendre au sérieux les déclarations polémiques du président, en trouver une choquante et ignorer celles qui disent le contraire. On ne doit pas confondre le style Trump avec sa politique. On doit au contraire examiner précisément ses décisions et leurs conséquences.

Par exemple, on a pris son décret visant à ne pas laisser entrer aux États-Unis des étrangers dont le secrétariat d’État n’a pas la possibilité de vérifier l’identité.

On a observé que la population des sept pays dont il limitait l’accès des ressortissants aux États-Unis est majoritairement musulmane. On a relié ce constat avec des déclarations du président lors de sa campagne électorale. Enfin, on a construit le mythe d’un Trump raciste. On a mis en scène des procès pour faire annuler le « décret islamophobe », jusqu’à ce que la Cour suprême confirme sa légalité. On a alors tourné la page en affirmant que la Cour s’était prononcée sur une seconde mouture du décret comportant divers assouplissements. C’est exact, sauf que ces assouplissement figuraient déjà dans la première mouture sous une autre rédaction.

Arrivant à la Maison-Blanche, Donald Trump n’a pas privé les États-uniens de leur assurance santé, ni déclaré la Troisième Guerre mondiale. Au contraire, il a ouvert de nombreux secteurs économiques qui avaient été étouffés au bénéfice de multinationales. En outre, on assiste à un reflux des groupes terroristes en Irak, en Syrie et au Liban, et à une baisse palpable de la tension dans l’ensemble du Moyen-Orient élargi, sauf au Yémen.

Jusqu’où ira cet affrontement entre la Maison-Blanche et les médias, entre Donald Trump et certaines puissances d’argent ?

[1] « Le dispositif Clinton pour discréditer Donald Trump », par Thierry Meyssan, Al-Watan (Syrie) , Réseau Voltaire, 28 février 2017.

[2] « Le nouvel Ordre Médiatique Mondial », par Thierry Meyssan, Réseau Voltaire, 7 mars 2017.

[3] « News Coverage of Donald Trump’s First 100 Days », Thomas E. Patterson, Harvard Kennedy School, May 18, 2017.

[4] On apprit trente ans plus tard que la mystérieuse « Gorge profonde » qui alimenta le scandale du Watergate n’était autre que W. Mark Felt, l’ancien adjoint de J. Edgard Hoover et lui-même numéro 2 du Bureau fédéral.

[5] « La campagne de l’Otan contre la liberté d’expression », par Thierry Meyssan, Réseau Voltaire, 5 décembre 2016.

[6] « Contre Donald Trump : la propagande de guerre », par Thierry Meyssan, Réseau Voltaire, 7 février 2017.

[7] « Project Veritas dévoile une campagne de mensonges de CNN », Réseau Voltaire, 1er juillet 2017.

Voir enfin:

The Definitive History Of That Time Donald Trump Took A Stone Cold Stunner

A decade ago, Trump literally tussled with a wrestling champ. The people who were there are still shocked he did it.

Photo illustration: Damon Dahlen/HuffPost; Photos: Getty/Reuters

Stone Cold Steve Austin was waiting calmly in the bowels of Detroit’s Ford Field when a frantic Vince McMahon turned the corner.

WrestleMania 23’s signature event was just minutes away. Austin and McMahon would soon bound into the stadium, where they’d be greeted by fireworks, their respective theme songs and 80,000 people pumped for “The Battle of the Billionaires,” a match between two wrestlers fighting on behalf of McMahon and real estate mogul Donald Trump.

McMahon, the founder and most prominent face of World Wrestling Entertainment, had spent months before the April 1, 2007, event putting the storyline in place. Trump, then known primarily as the bombastic host of “The Apprentice,” had appeared on a handful of WWE broadcasts to sell the idea that his two-decade friendship with McMahon had collapsed into a bitter “feud.” They had spent hours rehearsing a match with many moving parts: two professional wrestlers in the ring, two camera-thirsty characters outside it, and in the middle, former champ Stone Cold serving as the referee.

The selling point of The Battle of the Billionaires was the wager that Trump and McMahon had placed on its outcome a month earlier during “Monday Night Raw,” WWE’s signature prime time show. Both Trump and McMahon took great pride in their precious coifs, and so the winner of the match, they decided, would shave the loser’s head bald right there in the middle of the ring.

But now, at the last possible moment, McMahon wanted to add another wrinkle.

“Hey, Steve,” McMahon said, just out of Trump’s earshot. “I’m gonna see if I can get Donald to take the Stone Cold stunner.”

Austin’s signature move, a headlock takedown fueled by Stone Cold’s habit of chugging cheap American beer in the ring, was already part of the plan for the match. But Trump wasn’t the intended target.

Austin and McMahon approached Trump and pitched the idea.

“I briefly explained how the stunner works,” Austin said. “I’m gonna kick him in the stomach ― not very hard ― then I’m gonna put his head on my shoulder, and we’re gonna drop down. That’s the move. No rehearsal, [decided] right in the dressing room, 15 minutes before we’re gonna go out in front of 80,000 people.”

Trump’s handler was appalled, Austin said. Trump wasn’t a performer or even a natural athlete. Now, the baddest dude in wrestling, a former Division I college football defensive end with tree trunks for biceps, wanted to drop him with his signature move? With no time to even rehearse it? That seemed … dangerous.

“He tried to talk Donald out of it a million ways,” Austin said.

But Trump, without hesitation, agreed to do it.

The man who became the 45th president of the United States in January has a history with Vince McMahon and WWE that dates back more than two decades, to when his Trump Plaza hotel in Atlantic City hosted WrestleManias IV and V in 1988 and 1989. The relationship has continued into Trump’s presidency. On Tuesday, the Senate confirmed the nomination of Linda McMahon ― Vince’s wife, who helped co-found WWE and served as its president and chief executive for 12 years ― to head the Small Business Administration.

After Trump launched his presidential campaign with an escalator entrance straight out of the wrestling playbook, journalists began pointing to his two-decade WWE career to help explain his political appeal. WWE, in one telling, was where Trump first discovered populism. According to another theory, wrestling was where he learned to be a heel ― a villainous performer loved by just enough people to rise to the top, despite antics that make many people hate him.

To those who were present, though, The Battle of the Billionaires is more an outrageous moment in wrestling history than an explanation of anything that happened next. No one in the ring that night thought Trump would one day be president. But now that he is, they look back and laugh about the time the future commander-in-chief ended up on the wrong side of a Stone Cold stunner.

Jamie McCarthy/WireImage via Getty Images
Donald Trump, Stone Cold Steve Austin and Vince McMahon spent months promoting The Battle of the Billionaires.

‘To Get To The Crescendo, You’ve Got To Go On A Journey’

Professional wrestling is, at its core, a soap opera and a reality TV spectacle, and its best storylines follow the contours of both: A hero squares off with a heel as the masses hang on their fates.

The Battle of the Billionaires was the same tale, played out on wrestling’s biggest stage. WrestleMania is WWE’s annual mega-event. It commands the company’s largest pay-per-view audiences and biggest crowds. At WrestleMania, WWE’s stars compete in high-stakes matches ― including the WWE Championship ― and wrap up loose ends on stories developed during weekly broadcasts of “Monday Night Raw” and special events over the previous year. Even before Trump, WrestleMania had played host to a number of celebrity interlopers, including boxer Mike Tyson and NFL linebacker Lawrence Taylor.

Building a story ― and, for Trump, a character ― fit for that stage required months of work that started with Trump’s initial appearance on “Monday Night Raw” in January 2007. He would show up on “Raw” at least two more times over the next two months, with each appearance raising the stakes of his feud with McMahon and setting up their battle at WrestleMania on April 1.

“The Battle of the Billionaires, and all the hyperbole, was the crescendo,” said Jim Ross, the longtime voice of WWE television commentary. “But to get to the crescendo, you’ve got to go on a journey and tell an episodic story. That’s what we did with Donald.”

Creating a feud between Trump and McMahon, and getting wrestling fans to take Trump’s side, wasn’t actually a huge challenge. McMahon “was the big-shot boss lording over everybody,” said Jerry “The King” Lawler, a former wrestler and Ross’ sidekick in commentary. It was a role McMahon had long embraced: He was the dictator wrestling fans loved to hate.

Leon Halip/WireImage via Getty Images
Bobby Lashley, Trump’s wrestler in the match, was a rising star who’d go on to challenge for the WWE championship after The Battle of the Billionaires.

Trump was never going to pull off the sort of character that McMahon’s most popular foes had developed. He wasn’t Austin’s beer-chugging, south Texas everyman. And vain and cocky as he might be, he never possessed the sexy swagger that made Shawn Michaels one of the greatest in-ring performers in pro wrestling history.

But rain money on people’s heads, and they’ll probably love you no matter who you are. So that’s what Trump did.

Trump’s first appearance on “Monday Night Raw” came during an episode that centered on McMahon, who was throwing himself the sort of self-celebratory event that even The Donald might find overly brash. As McMahon showered the crowd with insults and they serenaded him with boos, Trump’s face appeared on the jumbotron and money began to fall from the sky.

“Look up at the ceiling, Vince,” Trump said as fans grasped at the falling cash. “Now that’s the way you show appreciation. Learn from it.”

In true Trump fashion, the money wasn’t actually his. It was McMahon’s. But the fans didn’t know that.

The folks with slightly fatter wallets than they’d had moments before loved the contrast between the two rich guys. One was the pompous tyrant. The other might have been even wealthier and just as prone to outlandish behavior, but Trump was positioned as the magnanimous billionaire, the one who understood what they wanted.

“That went over pretty well, as you can imagine, dropping money from the sky,” said Scott Beekman, a wrestling historian and author. “Trump was the good guy, and he got over because of how hated McMahon was. Vince McMahon played a fantastic evil boss and was absolutely hated by everyone. So anyone who stood up to McMahon at that point was going to get over well.”

The wrestlers that each billionaire chose to fight for them also bolstered the narrative. Umaga, McMahon’s representative, was an emerging heel who had gone undefeated for most of 2006. “A 400-pound carnivore,” as Ross described him on TV, he was a mountainous Samoan whose face bore war paint and who barely spoke except to scream at the crowd.

Trump’s guy, on the other hand, was Bobby Lashley, a former Army sergeant who might have been cut straight from a granite slab. Lashley was the good-looking, classically trained college wrestler, the reigning champion of ECW (a lower-level WWE property). Even his cue-ball head seemed to have muscles.

Another selling point for the match: the wrestler who won would likely emerge as a top contender to challenge for the WWE title.

Then McMahon added another twist ― as if the match needed it. He enlisted Austin, a multi-time champion who had retired in 2003, as a guest referee.

“It sounded like an easy gig, sounded like a fun gig,” Austin said. “It didn’t take a whole lot of convincing. The scope of Donald Trump … would bring a lot of eyeballs. A chance to do business with a high-profile guy like that sounded like a real fun deal.”

The minute Austin signed up, Trump should have known that despite his “good guy” posture, he, too, was in trouble. When Stone Cold entered the ring at “Raw” to promote the match, he introduced himself to The Donald with a stern warning.

“You piss me off,” Austin said, “I’ll open up an $8 billion can of whoop ass and serve it to ya, and that’s all I got to say about that.”

‘We Thought We Were Shittin’ The Bed’

The opening lines of the O’Jays’ 1973 hit “For the Love of Money” ― also the theme song for Trump’s “Celebrity Apprentice” ― rang out of Ford Field’s loudspeakers a few minutes after Trump and Austin’s impromptu meeting backstage. It was time for Trump to make his way to the ring.

“Money, money, money, money, money,” the speakers blared. Trump emerged. The crowd erupted, and cash, even more than had fallen during his previous appearances, cascaded from the ceiling like victory confetti.

“There was a ton of money that had been dropped during Donald Trump’s entrance,” said Haz Ali, who, under the name Armando Estrada, served as Umaga’s handler. “There was about $20, $25,000 that they’d dropped. … Every denomination ― 1s, 5s, 10s, 20s.”

Lashley appeared next, bounding into the ring without the help of the stairs the others had needed.

For months, McMahon and Trump had sold the story of this match. Now, as Umaga and Lashley stood face to face in the ring, it was time to deliver.

The match started fairly routinely, perhaps even a bit slowly.

“I’m seeing it the same as anyone else who’s watching it,” said Ross, the commentator, who regularly skipped rehearsals to ensure matches would surprise him. “The entire arena was emotionally invested in the storyline. Once they got hooked in it months earlier, now they want the payout.”

On the TV broadcast, it’s obvious that the crowd was hanging on every twist, eager to see which of the two billionaires would lose his hair and how Austin ― famous for intervening in matches and now at the dead center of this one ― might shape it.

But Ford Field, an NFL stadium, is massive compared to the arenas that had hosted previous WrestleManias. Even with 80,000 people packed in, it was difficult to read the crowd from inside the ring.

“Me and Vince keep looking back and forth at each other like, ‘Man, this match is not successful because the crowd is not reacting,’” Austin recalled. “We thought we were shittin’ the bed.”

Trump, for all his usual braggadocio, wasn’t helping.

From outside the ring, McMahon ― a professional performer if there ever was one ― was selling even the most minor details of the match. He was haranguing Austin, instructing Umaga and engaging the crowd all at once. Trump was stiff. His repeated cries of “Kick his ass, Bobby!” and “Come on, Bobby!” came across as stale and unconvincing.

“It’s very robotic, it’s very forced, and there’s no genuine emotion behind it,” said Ali, who had been power-slammed by Lashley early in the match and was watching from the dressing room. “He was just doing it to do it. Hearing him say, ‘Come on, Bobby!’ over and over again ― it didn’t seem like he cared whether Bobby won or lost. That’s the perspective of a former wrestler and entertainer.”

‘He Punched Me As Hard As He Could’

The match turned when Vince’s son, Shane McMahon, entered the fray. Shane and Umaga ganged up on Austin, knocking the guest ref from the ring. Then they turned their attention to Lashley, slamming his head with a metal trash can as he lay on the ground opposite Trump ― whose golden mane, it seemed, might soon be lying on the floor next to his wrestler.

But just as Umaga prepared to finish Lashley off, Austin rebounded, dragging Shane McMahon from the ring and slamming him into a set of metal stairs. Trump ― who moments before had offered only a wooden “What’s going on here?” ― sprang into action.

Out of nowhere, Trump clotheslined Vince McMahon to the ground and then sat on top of him, wailing away at his skull.

“[Ross] and I were sitting right there about four feet from where Vince landed,” Lawler said. “The back of Vince’s head hit the corner of the ring so hard that I thought he was gonna be knocked out for a week.”

Professional wrestling is fake. Trump’s punches weren’t.

Hours before the match, WWE officials had roped the participants into one final walk-through. Vince McMahon was busy handling the production preparations and didn’t attend. So when it came time to rehearse Trump’s attack on WWE’s top man, Ali stood in for McMahon.

Ali gave Trump instructions on how to hit him on the head to avoid actual injury. Because it was just a rehearsal, he figured Trump would go easy. He figured wrong.

“He proceeds to punch me in the top of the head as if he was hammering a nail in the wall. He punched me as hard as he could,” Ali said. “His knuckle caught me on the top of my head, and the next thing I know, I’ve got an egg-sized welt on the top of my head. He hit me as hard as he could, one, two, three. I was like, ‘Holy shit, this guy.’”

“He actually hit Vince, too,” Ali said. “Which made it even funnier. That’s how Vince would want it.”

Back in the ring, Austin ducked under a punch from Umaga and then made him the match’s first victim of a Stone Cold stunner. Umaga stumbled toward the center of the ring, where Lashley floored him with a move called a running spear. Lashley pinned Umaga, Austin counted him out, Trump declared victory, and McMahon began to cry as he ran his fingers through hair that would soon be gone.

“I don’t think Donald’s hair was ever truly in jeopardy,” Lawler said.

Bill Pugliano/Getty Images
Even as he was shaving McMahon’s head, Trump knew that he’d soon join the list of the match’s losers.

‘It May Be One Of The Uglier Stone Cold Stunners In History’

Moments after the match ended, before he raised Trump and Lashley’s arms in victory, Austin handed out his second stunner of the night to Shane McMahon. Vince McMahon tried to escape the same fate. But Lashley chased him down, threw him over his shoulder and hauled McMahon back to the ring, where he, too, faced the stunner.

Trump’s reaction in this moment was a little disappointing. He offered only the most rigid of celebrations, his feet nailed to the floor as his knees flexed and his arms flailed in excitement. It’s as if he knew his joy would be short-lived. He, too, would end up the one thing he never wants to be: a loser.

“Woo!” Trump yelled, before clapping in McMahon’s face while Austin and Lashley strapped their boss into a barber’s chair. “How ya doin’, man, how ya doin’?” he asked, taunting McMahon with a pair of clippers. Then he and Lashley shaved the WWE chairman bald.

As a suitably humiliated McMahon left the ring, Austin launched his typical celebration, raising his outstretched hands in a call for beers that someone ringside was supposed to toss his way. Trump is a famous teetotaler, but Aust