Elections américaines/2012: Et si finalement c’était la tortue Romney qui battait le lièvre Obama? (Can statist Obama win against the 54% of Americans who want government “to get out of the way”?)

28 septembre, 2012
L’art du gouvernement consiste à organiser l’idolâtrie. George Bernard Shaw
We loved your vocal performance so much we’d love to invite you on to American Idol this Season for a duet with Al Green. Nigel Lythgoe
If it were an election based on vocal talent @barackobama would beat Romney hands down. Mitt was very flat singing « America the Beautiful ».  Lythgoe
Barring any debate debacle, Romney will win by 4 or 5 points and will win Florida, Ohio, Nevada, Virginia and Pennsylvania. Dick Morris (former strategist for Bill Clinton)
After all, polls reveal that 41% of Americans identify themselves as conservative, while only 23% choose liberal. A recent Rasmussen poll found that 66% of likely voters believe the government has too much power. In another poll, 51% of Americans believe the government is more a threat to individual rights rather than a protector of them. In still another poll, 54% of Americans wanted government “to get out of the way” rather than “lend a hand,” the choice of only 35%. As Dick Morris put it, “It was odd to watch a president commit political suicide by so brazen and overt an embrace of the 35% and a repudiation of the 54%.” Bruce Thornton

Effet de sur- ou sous-déclaration des sondés ayant peur de passer pour racistes (dit Bradley aux Etats-Unis, Le Pen en VF), suréchantillonage de sondages prenant comme référence l’année de mobilisation démocrate exceptionnelle de 2008, désaffection de plus en plus claire de nombres d’anciens électeurs démocrates pour leur champion de 2008, basculement toujours plus prononcé  de l’électorat vers le conservatisme et la méfiance vis-à-vis de l’Etat …

Et si, contrairement à ce que nous serinent à longueur de journée nos médias moutonniers, c’était la tortue Romney qui battait sur le fil en novembre le lièvre Obama?

Obama the Hare, Romney the Tortoise

Victor Davis Hanson

Tribune Media Services

September 10, 2012

The 2012 race has turned into one of Aesop’s classic fables. After each new media blitz against the no-frills Mitt Romney, a far cooler President Obama races ahead three or four points in the polls — only to fall back to about even as the attention fades.

Meanwhile, the Romney tortoise, head down on the campaign trail, keeps lumbering along toward the November finish. There is nothing fancy day in and day out — only the steady plod of a good enough convention, workmanlike speeches that pass muster, a Midwestern vice president nominee who is informed and reliable, and the standard conservative correctives offered to liberal excesses.

We have now gone through Obama’s various caricatures of a scary Mitt Romney — the financial buccaneer who outsources his wealth abroad, the misogynist who wages a war on women, the veritable racist whose proposed budget cuts and nativism are aimed mostly at the nonwhite, the ageist bent on dismantling Social Security, and the near killer who cares little when the innocent die in the wreckage of his Bain profit-making. At each juncture, President Obama gains some traction, picks up a few points, and then slowly slides back to even.

How does Romney’s thick tortoise shell withstand these frenetic assaults as he keeps trudging back to even in the polls?

Barack Obama does not do well as Richard Nixon. Four years ago, he ran on a new civility, an end to name-calling and an abhorrence of partisan bickering. And an unknown Obama without a record was largely able to abide by his professed ethos in 2008. After all, it was easy to as donations poured in, the McCain campaign was as polite as it was timid, and the banalities of untried hope and change mesmerized millions.

But now, all the new negative advertising just cloaks Obama in hypocrisy. By the same token, Romney’s challenge has always been that he is blandly and predictably straight-arrow. If that normalcy means he cannot give soaring hope and change speeches, it also ensures that casting him as a multifarious sinner is preposterous, and reflects more poorly on the accuser than the intended target.

Obama cannot run on his record of Obamacare, reset foreign policy, Keynesian deficit priming, and wind and solar power in preference to developing fully vast new finds of oil and gas. What ultimately doomed incumbents Jerry Ford in 1976, Jimmy Carter in 1980 and George H.W. Bush in 1992 was that they likewise did not wish to talk about the economy under their respective watches, but instead alleged that their opponents would be far worse to the point of being unfit. Such tactics usually don’t work.

In Obama’s case, 42 months of 8-percent-plus unemployment, laggard GDP growth, $4-a-gallon gas, a precipitous drop in average family income, record numbers on food stamps, serial $1 trillion budget deficits and $5 trillion in new national debt can no longer be packaged as either a « summer of recovery » or George Bush’s legacy — and so are left unmentioned

The current presidential race remains a seesaw battle because for all the advantages of incumbency and the president’s charisma, the public is not happy with the Obama administration’s record on the economy. And it does not believe — at least at this juncture — that Romney is the villain that the Obama campaign has portrayed.

Yet Romney trudges rather than sprints ahead because he is no glib Ronald Reagan. He is also the first Mormon candidate in the general election and a very rich man at a time when Americans are growing angrier by the day that they are far poorer than they were four years ago.

The country is also not quite ready to confess that it went a little crazy in 2008 and voted for the embarrassing banalities of « hope and change » offered by a little known senator with a thin resume and little national experience. Again, no voter likes to admit that he was led to the polls in a trance by the mellifluous music of a pied piper.

Obama’s present paradox is that the more he goes negative against Romney, the less the slurs seem to stick, and the less presidential the self-avowed ethical reformer appears. Yet because the economy is not going to noticeably improve by November, Obama believes he must continue in hopes of discovering a bona fide Romney scandal, or that he must claim the country is threatened abroad and in need of national unity.

Barring a real recovery or a sudden war, the steady, plodding Romney tortoise is ever so slowly winning the race against the flashier — surging, yet always fading — Obama hare.

 Voir aussi:

Why Is Obama Still Likable?

Bruce Thornton

Frontpage Magazine

September 10, 2012

The Democrats’ convention was the public coming-out bash for the party whose political clock stopped in 1972. Every speaker and speech celebrated the musty left-wing ideology and smug arrogance of those who idolize big government because it gives them the power to tell everybody else what to do and how to live — exactly what most Americans say they don’t like and don’t want. Then why are Obama’s poll numbers still so high?

The Dems’ whole production was an in-your-face spectacle of cobwebbed radical chic, spurious “diversity,” and Nurse Ratched’s totalitarian iron fist wrapped in a therapeutic velvet glove. Speech after speech peddled blatant lies, including Bill Clinton’s folksy, mendacious repudiation of every policy and principle that made his own presidency a success until it went up in intern-scented cigar smoke. God and Jerusalem were booed, and a rabbi Eastwooded thousands of empty chairs with a benediction that was careful not to mention God. In the midst of economic disaster, the heads of abortion lobbies like NARAL and Planned Parenthood, and federal functionaries like abortion fundamentalist Kathleen Sebelius, were given ample time to rant and rave about protecting a “woman’s right” to kill the unborn without any limitations. And of course, plagiarist Joe Biden blustered his way through a whole catalogue of lies, claiming Obama “saved the auto industry” when in fact what he saved was the Auto Workers Union, and pronouncing “America has turned a corner!” almost to the day that the national debt hit $16 trillion and the latest jobs report showed paltry job growth and worsening unemployment.

Such a public show of leftist arrogance, coming on the heels of 4 years of incompetence, monstrous deficits, billions of dollars squandered on pork for political clients and cronies, and scorched-earth partisan attacks, should spell doom for Obama and the Democrats. After all, polls reveal that 41% of Americans identify themselves as conservative, while only 23% choose liberal. A recent Rasmussen poll found that 66% of likely voters believe the government has too much power. In another poll, 51% of Americans believe the government is more a threat to individual rights rather than a protector of them. In still another poll, 54% of Americans wanted government “to get out of the way” rather than “lend a hand,” the choice of only 35%. As Dick Morris put it, “It was odd to watch a president commit political suicide by so brazen and overt an embrace of the 35% and a repudiation of the 54%.”

So we should be expecting a landslide somewhere between Nixon’s 23-point drubbing of George McGovern and Reagan’s 10-point whipping of Jimmy Carter, two other big-government progressive Democrats who believed that the limited government, individual rights, and personal freedom bestowed by the Constitution weren’t as important as creating the brave new world of absolute equality and “social justice.” And yet, Obama and Romney are tied in the polls. That per se is not unusual. In June of 1980, Carter led Reagan 39% to 32%, and Carter was still leading in early September. Much can happen between now and November. Just ask John McCain, who was leading Obama by 5 points in early September, only to have the economy implode later that month. What is more mystifying is Obama’s high personal approval numbers, which were up to 54% immediately after his tedious, vacuous convention speech. This number partly reflects something even more curious: his consistently high “likability” numbers, also at 54% according to Gallup. Only 31% find Mitt Romney likable.

The whole notion of “likability” is dubious on its face. What really is being measured is not the actual personality or character of Obama, but the perceptions of an ever-changing image, which is what most of us encounter. Thus subjectivity and duplicity are built into “likability,” particularly when lapdog media relentlessly accentuate and fabricate the positive, and ignore or cover up the negative, as they have done with Obama.

Even so, based on the image of Obama that comes across in his television appearances and statements, it’s hard to see what anyone can find so likable about him. Yes, he has a nice family, and seems to be a good father and husband, but so what? What has that to do with being President? And anyway, no one would label serial philanderer Bill Clinton a good family man, yet his likability numbers are still high.

Unlike Clinton, however, who seems sincerely to be an affable good-ol’-boy who obviously likes people, Obama comes across as quite different. What the media and even some conservatives laughably call his “cool” is actually an arrogant disdain for other people, particularly those who refuse to worship at his shrine. His narcissism is monumental, as when last month he told a group of NBA players, “It’s very rare that I come to an event where I’m like the fifth- or sixth-most interesting person.” This self-regard is made even more distasteful by the gap between it and his obvious incompetence daily revealed in everything from verbal gaffes to ignorance of basic economics, not to mention his utter failure to turn the economy around. He has arrogant mannerisms, such as lifting his chin when he lectures, his addiction to the first-person pronoun, and his verbal tics like “Let me be perfectly clear,” as though he were speaking to incompetent underlings rather than the citizens he supposedly serves. His claims to be “post-racial” have been belied by his incessant dealing of the race card to deflect criticism, as when he called his grandmother a “typical white person” for fearing the statistically factual probability of being the victim of a black criminal.

His nice-guy persona is also belied by his political minions’ vicious ad hominem attacks on Romney and the Republicans, and by his fondness for using scorched-earth tactics against his political enemies. Witness the coarse, unnecessary attack on the Catholic Church over the contraception mandate, or his last minute demand for another $400 billion of tax increases in his negotiations with John Boehner over raising the debt ceiling last year. And let’s not forget his juvenile penchant for blaming others for his own mistakes, particularly his ungracious treatment of his predecessor, made all the more glaring by George Bush’s classy restraint. Finally, there are the numerous unsavory details from his past, such as palling around with terrorist Bill Ayers, getting his political opponents’ sealed divorces record unsealed, spending 20 years in racist Reverend Wright’s church, and profiting from his association with convicted real estate operator Tony Rezko. What’s so “likable” about all that?

The obvious answer, as Rush Limbaugh has argued, is the “Bradley Effect.” In 1982, Los Angeles’s black mayor Tom Bradley had a significant lead over George Deukmejian in the race for California governor, but ended up losing. Some argued that voters lied to pollsters about their support for Bradley because they feared being seen as racist or prejudiced, thus creating the discrepancy between pre-election polls and the final result. Other elections that seemed to reflect this phenomenon were the 1989 New York mayor’s race between Rudy Giuliani and David Dinkins, and the 1989 Virginia governor’s race between Douglas Wilder and Marshall Coleman. Dinkins and Wilder both won their elections, but by margins much narrower than predicted by pre-election polls.

If the “Bradley Effect” is at work in the polls measuring Obama’s likability, then the dysfunction of America’s race relations is even worse than we thought. Obama has governed not as a centrist like Clinton or even a conventional liberal like Bradley or Wilder, but as a doctrinaire progressive who is way out of touch with the center-right American political majority. Nor does his arrogant public personality soften the extremism of his politics. If a significant number of Americans are telling pollsters that they find someone so out of touch with their political beliefs “likable,” just because they’re afraid of appearing “racist” by criticizing a black man, then the race card remains a powerful trump. Whether it’s powerful enough to return a manifest failure to the White House remains to be seen.

Voir enfin:

Romney Pulls Ahead

Dick Morris

September 25, 2012

The published polling in this year’s presidential race is unusually inaccurate because this is the first election in which who votes determines how they vote. Obama’s massive leads among blacks, Latinos, young people, and single women vie with Romney’s margin among the elderly, married white women, and white men. Tell me your demographic and I’ll tell you who you’re voting for and I’ll be right at least two times out of three!

Most pollsters are weighting their data on the assumption that the 2012 electorate will turn out in the same proportion as the 2008 voters did. But polling indicates a distinct lack of enthusiasm for the president among his core constituency. He’ll still carry them by heavy margins, but the turnout will likely lag behind the 2008 stats. (The 2008 turnout was totally unlike that in other years with all-time historic high turnouts among Obama’s main demographic groups).

Specifically, most pollsters are using 2008 party preferences to weight their 2012 survey samples, reflecting a much larger Democratic preference than is now really the case.

In my own polling, I found a lurch to the Democrats right after their convention, but subsequent research indicates that it has since petered out. Indeed, when one compares party identification in the August and September polls of this year in swing states, the Democratic Party identification is flat while the ranks of Republicans rose by an average of two points per state.

Pollster Scott Rasmussen has the best solution to the party id problem. He weights his polls to reflect the unweighted party identification of the previous three weeks, so he has a dynamic model which adjusts for sampling error but still takes account of gradual changes in the electorate’s partisan preferences.

Finally, with Obama below 50% of the vote in most swing states, he is hitting up against a glass ceiling in the high 40s. He can’t get past it except in heavily Democratic states like New York or California. The first time Obama breaks 50 will not be on Election Day. Either he consistently polls above 50% of the vote or he won’t ever get there in the actual vote.

So here’s where the race really stands today based on Rasmussen’s polling:

• Romney leads decisively in all states McCain carried (173 electoral votes).

• Romney is more than ten points ahead in Indiana – which Obama carried. (11 electoral votes)

• Romney leads Obama in the following states the president carried in 2008: Iowa (44-47) North Carolina (45-51), Colorado (45-47), and New Hampshire (45-48). He’ll probably win them all. (34 electoral votes).

This comes to 218 of the 270 Romney needs. But…

• Obama is below 50% of the vote in a handful of key swing states and leads Romney by razor thin margins in each one. All these states will go for Romney unless and until Obama can show polling support of 50% of the vote:

• Obama leads in Ohio (47-46) and Virginia (49-48) by only 1 point (31 electoral votes)

• Obama leads in Florida (48-46) and Nevada (47-45) by only 2 points (35 electoral votes)

If Romney carries Ohio, Virginia, and Florida, he wins. And other states are in play.

• Obama leads in Wisconsin (49-46) by only 3 points (10 electoral votes)

• Obama’s lead in Michigan is down to four points according to a recent statewide poll

• Obama is only getting 51% of the vote in Pennsylvania and 53% in New Jersey. And don’t count out New Mexico.

It would be accurate to describe the race now as tied. But Romney has the edge because:

• The incumbent is under 50% in key states and nationally. He will probably lose any state where he is below 50% of the vote.

• The Republican enthusiasm and likelihood of voting is higher

• The GOP field organization is better.

That’s the real state of play today

Publicités

Cartographie mobile: La géographie, ça sert aussi à faire la guerre! (From paper towns to paper countries: Apple joins Google’s brave new imaginary world)

27 septembre, 2012
Les serviteurs du maître de la maison vinrent lui dire: Seigneur (…) D’où vient donc qu’il y a de l’ivraie? Il leur répondit: C’est un ennemi qui a fait cela. Et les serviteurs lui dirent: Veux-tu que nous allions l’arracher? Non, dit-il, de peur qu’en arrachant l’ivraie, vous ne déraciniez en même temps le blé. Laissez croître ensemble l’un et l’autre jusqu’à la moisson. Jésus (Matt. 13: 27-30)
Voici, je vous envoie comme des brebis au milieu des loups. Soyez donc rusés comme les serpents et candides comme les colombes. Jésus (Matt. 10: 16)
Dans un monde de conspirations de haut niveau complètement imaginaires, quel soulagement d’en découvrir enfin une qui ne l’est pas! Straight dope
I grew up in Aughton – that’s the bit stuck on the bottom of Ormskirk. I lived there for most of my life but Google wants to wipe it off the face of the planet! Okay, it probably doesn’t – their motto is “Do No Evil” after all – but the power of Google has renamed Aughton to Argleton. I’m not sure which gazetteer they use but either other people use it too, or other sites are using the Google geocoder as the basis of their site because you can do all sorts of things in Argleton! From jobs, to hotels – even my old primary school! As more and more “Web 2.0″ services make use APIs, we’re placing our trust into a small number of services to provide good data with no clear way of challenging the accuracy of it. Please Google, don’t take away my childhood! Mike Nohan
Agloe began as a paper town created to protect against copyright infringement. But then people with these old Esso maps kept looking for it, and so someone built a store, making Agloe real. John Green
Les entrées fictives, également connues sous le nom de fausses entrées, Mountweazels, mots fantômes et articles bidons, sont des entrées ou des articles délibérément incorrects dans les ouvrages de référence tels que les dictionnaires, les encyclopédies, les cartes et les annuaires. Les entrées dans les ouvrages de référence sont normalement issues d’une source externe fiable, mais les entrées fictives ne disposent d’aucune source. Le piège à plagiaires est un cas spécifique où l’objectif est de débusquer le plagiat ou la violation du droit d’auteur.(…) On peut qualifier d’entrées fictives les cartes de villages fantômes, rues piège, rues ou villes de papier ou d’autres noms. Ils servent à piéger les responsables de violations du droit d’auteur. (…) En 1978, les villes fictives d’Ohio de Goblu (Allez les Bleus!) et de Beatosu (Battez l’OSU!) ont été insérées dans les cartes officielles du Michigan de cette année comme des clins d’oeil à l’université du Michigan et à sa rivale traditionnelle, l’université d’état d’Ohio. Les cartes trafiquées ont été retirées et se revendent aujourd’hui neuves à 150$. La ville fictive d’Agloe, dans l’état de New York a été inventée par les fabricants de carte, mais a fini par être reconnue par l’administration du comté comme un endroit réel du fait de l’érection à cet endroit originellent fictif d’un bâtiment réel, l’épicerie Agloe. Wikipedia
Un « œuf de Pâques » (Easter egg) (est) une rue surprise (parfois connue sous le nom de « rue piège » (trap street) (qui) a été insérée de telle manière que si vous essayez de copier la carte, le détenteur des droits peut prouver le plagiat. Sinon, pourquoi auriez-vous mis cette rue inexistante si vous ne l’aviez pas prise chez eux ?  (…) Une autre catégorie d’œufs de Pâques vient des fournisseurs de cartes numériques qui ne veulent pas voir leurs données copiées. Les bits les plus faibles sur les coordonnées géographiques sont systématiquement déformés de telle manière qu’il n’y a rien de visible pour l’utilisateur de la carte mais cela pourrait démontrer la copie lors d’une poursuite pour plagiat. Par exemple, si toutes les coordonnées ont un reste de 3 quand elles sont divisées par 7, ou sont déplacées d’une légère différence constante par rapport à leurs valeurs réelles. C’est pourquoi, n’utilisez pas de coordonnées de cartes numériques propriétaires même si vous comparez toutes les intersections et formes sur la cartes ! Les œufs de Pâques sur les cartes ont été découvertes et publiées à l’origine par Heath Bunting. Wiki

Depuis le temps qu’on vous que l’intéressant dans les scandales ou les controverses, c’est ce qu’ils révèlent sur ce qui jusque là passait pour normal!

Entrées fictives, fausses entrées, mountweazels, mots fantômes, articles bidons, oeufs de Pâques, fausses rues, rues piège, rues ou villes de papier, erreurs d’orthographes intentionnelles, facéties de cartographes, églises fantômes, reprises de phases d’étude préliminaire jamais réalisée ou non terminées, méga-plantages, panneaux routiers erronés …

Où l’on (re)découvre …

A l’heure où, avec ses autoroutes en tôle ondulée, ses montagnes manquantes, ses transformations de fermes en aéroports ou son escamotage de monuments, routes ou pays entiers, l’application Cartes du tout nouvel iphone 5 d’Apple fait les gorges chaudes des sites spécialisés …

Mais où il est si facile d’oublier qu’un Google maps qui en est à présent à la couverture des fonds marins et se vante d’une avance sur son concurrent de Palo Alto estimé à 400 ans, a lui aussi eu droit à ses méga-plantages …

Le monde impitoyable de la cartographie

Mais aussi, de plus en plus avec les progrès de la géolocalisation et les nouvelles générations de téléphones portables, celui de la cartographie mobile ou en ligne où les enjeux se comptent à présent en centaines de millions de dollars …

Un monde où, pour piéger ou se protéger de ses contrefacteurs mais aussi de ses concurrents, tous les coups ou presque semblent permis …

Et même… les plus monumentaux plantages!

Mystery of Argleton, the ‘Google’ town that only exists online

Argleton, a ‘phantom town’ in Lancashire that appears on Google Maps and online directories but doesn’t actually exist, has puzzled internet experts.

Mystery of Argleton, the ‘Google’ town that only exists online

Google and the company that supplies its mapping data are unable to explain the presence of the phantom town and are investigating Photo: GOOGLE

Rebecca Lefort

31 Oct 2009

The town appears on Google Maps in the middle of fields close to the M58 motorway, just south of Ormskirk.

Its ‘presence’ means that online businesses that use data from the software have detected it and automatically treated it as a real town in the L39 postcode area.

An internet search for the town now brings up a series of home, job and dating listings for people and places « in Argleton », as well as websites which help people find its nearest chiropractor and even plan jogging or hiking routes through it. The businesses, people and services listed are real, but are actually based elsewhere in the same postcode area.

Google and the company that supplies its mapping data are unable to explain the presence of the phantom town and are investigating.

Tantalisingly, “Argle” echoes the word “Google”, while the phantom town’s name is also an anagram of “Not Real G”, and “Not Large”.

One theory is that Argleton could have been deliberately added, as a trap to catch companies that violate the map’s copyright.

So-called « trap streets » are often inserted by cartographers but are, as their name suggests, usually far more minor and indiscreet that bogus towns.

Roy Bayfield, head of corporate marketing at what would be Argleton’s closest university, Edge Hill, in Ormskirk, was so intrigued by the mystery that he walked to the where the internet indicated was the centre of Argleton to check that there was definitely nothing there.

« A colleague of mine spotted the anomaly on Google Maps, and I thought ‘I’ve got to go there’, » he said.

« I started to weave this amazing fantasy about the place, an alternative universe, a Narnia-like world. I was really fascinated by the appearance of a non-existent place that the internet had the power to make real and give a semi-existence. »

When Mr Bayfield reached Argleton – which appears on Google Maps between Aughton and Aughton Park – he found just acres of green, empty fields.

Joe Moran, an academic at Liverpool John Moores University and map expert, said: « It could be a deliberate error so people can’t copy maps. Sometimes they put in fictional streets as the errors would prove they were stolen. I haven’t heard of it before on Google Maps. »

A spokesman for Google said: « While the vast majority of this information is correct there are occasional errors. We’re constantly working to improve the quality and accuracy of the information available in Google Maps and appreciate our users’ feedback in helping us do so. People can report an issue to the data provider directly and this will be updated at a later date. »

The data for the programme was provided by Dutch company Tele Atlas. A spokesman said it would now wipe the non-existent town from the map.

He added: « Mistakes like this are not common, and I really can’t explain why these anomalies get into our database. »

Voir aussi:

Welcome to Argleton, the town that doesn’t exist

If you used Google maps to try to go there, you’d find yourself in an otherwise empty field. So what’s going on?

Share 143

Leo Hickman

The Guardian, Tuesday 3 November 2009

View Larger Map Argleton on Google Maps

The world’s eyes are focused on a small village called Argleton just off the A59 near Ormskirk, Lancashire. Camera crews have been dispatched. « Argleton » is fast becoming a popular hashtag on Twitter. There is even talk of merchandising opportunities.

The reason for all the interest is simple: Argleton doesn’t actually exist. It is a phantom village that appears on Google Maps. You can search online for Argleton’s local weather forecast (10C yesterday), property prices (not much for sale at the moment) or for the number of a local plumber, but in reality the village’s coordinates point to little more than a muddy field. However, just a few hundred metres away stands the very real village of Aughton. So, is this a case of a simple spelling mistake by a cartographer? Or is Argleton evidence of something more conspiratorial afoot in the county? After all, the Ormskirk and Skelmersdale Advertiser has already posed the question of whether the Argleton mystery might indicate the presence of a « Bermuda triangle of West Lancashire ».

The man who originally noticed Argleton on Google Maps holds a somewhat more rational view. Mike Nolan works as head of web services at Edge Hill University in Ormskirk and posted on his blog more than a year ago that he’d noticed the anomaly.

« I grew up in the area and spotted on the map one day that it said ‘Argleton’, » he says. « But it’s just a farmer’s field close to the village hall and playing fields. I think a footpath goes across the field, but that’s all. The name ‘Argleton’ is similar to ‘Aughton’. Maybe someone made a mistake when keying in the name? »

It’s a plausible explanation, and one supported by Professor Danny Dorling, the president of the Society of Cartographers: « I would bet that this is an innocent mistake. In other words, it was not intentionally inserted to catch out anyone infringing the map’s copyright, as some are saying. But the bottom line is that we don’t know what mapping companies do to protect their maps or to hide secret locations, as some are obligated to do. » Dorling says that there is still even confusion about what constitutes a place: « Usually, a place is defined as anywhere mentioned three or more times on a 1-25,000 scale map. But if I was inventing a new place name I would have a bit more fun. For example, in Yorkshire there’s the area known by locals as Cleckuddersfax, which is a place name made from the nearby names of Cleckheaton, Huddersfield and Halifax. »

All Google is saying on the matter is that it does experience « occasional errors » and that the mapping information was provided by a Dutch company called Tele Atlas. And all Tele Atlas’s spokesperson will add is that « I really can’t explain why these anomalies get into our database. »

Voir encore:

Destination: Argleton! Visiting an imaginary place

walkinghometo50

February 22, 2009

Google Maps show an imaginary place near to where I live: a town with the ugly name of Argleton. This has been commented on elsewhere, with theories that they have simply got the name Aughton wrong (though Aughton appears as well), or that it is a deliberate mistake, designed to catch out unauthorised users of the maps, like a ‘trap street’ inserted in an A-Z map. However, Argleton does more than just sit there as a hidden feature: it shoves its way into people’s attention in many ways. Various software packages use Google’s geographical information, and Argleton seems to have primary claim on the surrounding postcodes – one can rent property there, or read inspection reports for its nurseries, at least according to the internet.

The possibility of actually visiting an imaginary place seemed irresistible. In terms of my journey, not to go there would be a dereliction of duty, like saying ‘I could have made a detour to Rock Candy Mountain’ or ‘Tir-nan-Og’, ‘but I decided to press on directly to Maghull instead’. So today I decided to make the expedition – from the world we know to a fictitious and uncertain place.

Reaching non-existent lands can be accomplished in many ways, but I decided to use Google itself to navigate to this one. After all, they invented it. I summoned up a route, which turned out to be a straightforward hike along the A59, rather than, say, a trip through the back of a wardrobe. Mundane as this may seem, I kept my eyes peeled for signs and portents – not knowing what relevance a strange map created from a faded planning notice, a partial alphabet tool in a closed-down garage, some broken fencing in the shape of a rune or a burning web may have in later stages of the journey. It pays to be prepared.

If Argleton were to feature in The Dictionary of Imaginary Places, it would have good company in the A section, such as Amazonia, Averoigne and Atlantis. Specifically it would nestle between Argia (which ‘has earth instead of air’ and where ‘the streets are completely filled with dirt…over the roofs of houses hang layers of rocky terrain like skies with clouds’) and Argyanna (‘a strategically important town in southern Rerek’).

I think what’s offensive about ‘Argleton’ is that it sounds like a mockery of Aughton. Perhaps it is like the Hellmouth in Sunnydale, except rather than being a portal for evil beings, it acts as the doorway for forces of debasement, parody, travesty and corruption; forces of error that subtly undermine and distort…

So I approached cautiously, peering towards it across innocent seeming fields,

finding the ‘place’ to be protected by various walls, broken fences (perhaps magically stronger in their broken-ness), wards and charms.

I moved towards the epicentre. I paused before passing beyond the realm of true names to that of the unashamedly fictional.

You have to take care at these times. It is all about detail… I had come equipped, with apparatus to protect me from any strangeness that might occur. I didn’t want to come out the other side reduced to a parody of myself, shambling out transformed into, say, Ray Byfield, Marketing Director of Argleton University. So I had with these items with me:

1. A Wonder Woman comic. I thought the Lasso of Truth, wielded by a character created by one of the inventors of the lie-detector, would provide some symbolic defence against irreality.

2. A bad copy of something else: Kyrik: Warlock Warrior (Gardner F. Fox, 1975) is a pastiche of Conan the Barbarian – a piece of entertaining but unoriginal hackwork; Kyrik is to Conan as Argleton is to Aughton. I thought a bit of this would be a kind of inoculation, passages like ‘The outlaws stared at that darkness, saw it shot through with streaks of vivid lightnings, red as the fires of Haderon’ acting as antigens against any reality-dissolving effects that might be encountered.

3. A toy tapir, bought recently at Transreal Fiction. I figured this little guy must be steeped in alternate worlds, having lived in a science fiction shop for a while – s/he could help navigate back to the real world if some compromised reality became confusing.

The time had come to walk in to Argleton itself. A small copse of trees, with a stream and a tumbledown kissing gate, seemed appropriately fairylandish. I paused to photograph the sky, a dim gesture towards Google’s Brother Eye satellites – watching, distorting, from above the bright skies.

A few more metres took me beyond the ‘argleton’ zone to Aughton itself, described in Arthur Mee’s Lancashire as ‘A Patchwork of the Centuries’. This description could lead a fancifully-minded person to expect some collage of time, with biplanes and pterodactyls flying above people hovering to the post office on their anti-gravity discs. However Mee was really just talking about the church, which unfortunately was locked. But, like Kyrik (p.79) I had ‘Enough [coins] for a wineskin and a leathern jack or two of ale’, so I visited the Stanley Arms. I ordered a pint of Clark‘s Classic Blonde, reflecting as I drank the pleasant hoppy beer (3.9% ABV) that I could construct the whole remaining journey around beer with risque names, and how my feminist pals of the late 70s would have boycotted pubs and breweries for this kind of thing. Guess I’ll be visiting our old haunts when I get to Brighton…

Then I began to think, had I actually left ‘Argleton’? Or was I still in some kind of alternate universe? The differences could be minor. Perhaps, in one of the decorative books arranged in an alcove in the pub, one word would be different. Or maybe when I left and peered back towards Liverpool, I would see Lutyens vast, never-built cathedral dominating the skyline, instead of the familiar wigwam.

And I was right to be concerned. As I left, I found the evidence: a discarded, new Woodbine packet in a hedgerow. I’m convinced that Woodbines don’t exist anymore, or rather that they hadn’t when I left home. It’s been a long time since Van Morrison ‘Bought five Woodbines at the shop on the corner’…

A pack with the health/death notice on it would be anachronistic, like a horsedrawn carriage with a CD player. But in this world, people still buy and smoke them. So here we are, through the looking glass. Argleton, and all unexisting paces, have become a tiny bit more real.

Voir de même:

Beatosu and Goblu, Ohio

-Bob Garrett, Archivist

We cropped the above image from a 1978 Michigan Department of Transportation highway map. The red arrow points to the town of Goblu, Ohio, seemingly located just south of Bono. Don’t look for « Goblu » on any Ohio road sign, however. It doesn’t actually exist!

Beatosu, Ohio 1978″Goblu » references a popular University of Michigan football cheer – « Go blue! » It’s not the only U of M cheer on this map. Look at the next county to the West, and you’ll find « Beatosu. » « Beatosu » divides into « Beat OSU!, » a reference to University of Michigan archrival Ohio State University. On the image to the right, you will find « Beatosu » between the real Ohio towns of Elmira and Burlington. Scroll down this page to see a « zoomed out » view of the map, allowing one to place the locations of « Goblu » and « Beatosu » in a wider context. Click 1978 Highway Map – Large Image to view a larger version of this image.

How could fictitious towns have been placed on a state highway map? Peter Fletcher, then Chairman of the Michigan State Highway Commission, admitted responsibility. To learn more, this author went directly to the source. I spoke to Peter Fletcher himself on October 24, 2008.

Mr. Fletcher told me the story behind this infamous map. He explained that a fellow University of Michigan alumnus had been teasing him about the Mackinac Bridge colors. According to Fletcher, this man wondered how Fletcher, as State Highway Commission Chairman, could allow the Bridge to be painted green and white. Those were the colors of Michigan State University! Mr. Fletcher noted that the bridge colors were in compliance with federal highway regulations, so he had no choice in that matter. He did, however, have more control over the state highway map. Mr. Fletcher said that he thus ordered a cartographer to insert the two fictitious towns. These towns displayed his loyalty to his alma mater.

Mr. Fletcher noted that the map accurately depicted the area within Michigan state lines. His imaginary towns were placed in Ohio, outside the map’s focus. « We have no legal liability for anything taking place in that intellectual swamp south of Monroe, » Mr. Fletcher jokingly told me. He added that he had never forgiven Ohio for the Toledo War of 1835!

I asked Mr. Fletcher about the public response. He noted that some University of Michigan alumni enjoyed the incident and that some people complained about wasting tax money. Mr. Fletcher said that then-Governor William Milliken had told him about complaints and that he had suggested a response: He said that Governor Milliken could tell objecting parties that Fletcher, as State Highway Commission Chairman, had been entitled to a $60,000 annual salary that he never collected. In contrast, Mr. Fletcher said, the ink for the errant maps cost about $6.00! Mr. Fletcher told me that Governor Milliken did not mention the incident to him again. Nonetheless, a revised 1978 map – one omitting « Goblu » and « Beatosu » – was soon issued. Le Roy Barnett, in his Michigan History magazine article « Paper Trails: The Michigan Highway Map » (November/December 1999 issue) states that only a limited number of maps containing the imaginary towns were printed. (Click Michigan History Magazine to order back issues.) Mr. Fletcher notes that the surviving copies have become coveted collector’s items.

Peter Fletcher currently serves as President of the Ypsilanti Credit Bureau. He states that his father started this business in 1924 and that he has been working there since he was eleven years old (He said that he began by emptying waste baskets.).

Regarding his Wolverine loyalty, Mr. Fletcher stated that he is « now a man of divided allegiance. » He explained that after leaving the State Highway Commission, he was elected a Michigan State University Trustee. Our interview occurred one day before the 2008 Michigan vs. Michigan State game, so I asked him about his game plans. « Some of my friends will be cheering for the Spartans, » he said, « and others for the Maize and Blue. I’ll be cheering along with my friends. »

The Archives of Michigan houses a number of official Michigan state highway maps, dating from 1912-2007. A copy of the original 1978 map – with the towns of « Goblu » and « Beatosu » included – is among these. Researchers can find these in the Department of Transportation records, Record Group #89-11. For more information, e-mail the Archives at archives@michigan.gov or call 517-373-1408. For visitor information (including hours and operation and parking), click Archives of Michigan Visitor Information.

The Martha W. Griffiths Rare Book Room, located on the Library of Michigan’s fourth floor, also houses a collection of Michigan state highway maps, dating from 1927 to the present. For more information on the Martha W. Griffiths Rare Book Room, click http://www.michigan.gov/rarebooks.

Voir ensuite:

A Straight Dope Classic from Cecil’s Storehouse of Human Knowledge

Do maps have « copyright traps » to permit detection of unauthorized copies?

— Cecil Adams

Straight dope

August 16, 1991

Dear Cecil:

Is it true that, as my father says, companies that produced maps (Rand McNally, etc.) make up some little bitty towns and dot them around their map design so they can tell if anyone copies it? Has anyone ever gotten lost trying to find one of those made-up towns?

— Susan Owen, College Station, Texas

Dear Susan:

You are talking about « copyright traps. » They are devious. They exist. In a world of high-level conspiracies that are completely imaginary, it’s a relief to discover one that’s not.

For the record, the folks at Rand McNally swear on a stack of road atlases that they would never use copyright traps. However, they admit a small regional map company called Champion they bought a while back did put a copyright trap into a map on at least one occasion. The trap consisted of a nonexistent street stuck into a map of a medium-sized city in New York state–a fact that was gleefully revealed on a network news show.

On investigating, Rand McNally found some smart-aleck cartographer (and you know what a wild and crazy bunch they are) had gone ahead and done the wicked deed on his own. Whether the guy committed other cartographic sabotage I don’t know. But the possibility of additional fakery does exist–and may for a while, since checking every detail of a map is a huge job. Not that I’d get into a panic about it, but on your next road trip you might want to bring a flashlight just in case.

NOWHERESVILLE

I thought you’d like to know a little more about the often-discussed but never officially acknowledged practice of putting copyright traps on commercial maps. The closest I’ve ever come to finding such a trap is the fictional town of Westdale, which appears on the 1982 Rand McNally Road Atlas map of metro Chicago. By 1986 it had disappeared. I also enclose some illustrations from Mark Monmonier’s book How to Lie with Maps, which show some phony towns added to a map of Ohio as a prank. –Dennis McClendon, Chicago

It happened to Brigadoon, why not Westdale? Although I have to say the industrial suburbs west of Chicago seem like an unpromising locale for an enchanted vanishing village. Actually, the folks at Rand McNally claim it was all an honest mistake. They say a real estate developer submitted a plan for a community called Westdale that was approved but never built. Somehow this found its way into the Rand McNally road atlas and years went by before anybody noticed.

This story is slightly fishy; the area in question, though unincorporated, was built up decades ago. But a Rand McNally spokesman reasonably inquires, « Why would we put in copyright traps and then not tell anybody they were there? » If one assumes the main value of traps is deterrence, good question.

Errors of this sort apparently happen fairly often. In his book Mark Monmonier shows several « paper streets »–planned but not built–on an official map of Syracuse, New York.

Of course, when it comes to map errors, you can’t overlook the possibility of a little good-natured sabotage. Monmonier mentions two prank towns appearing in an official map of Michigan, the edge of which showed portions of the neighboring state of Ohio. Some diehard Wolverine fan in the mapmaking department decided that would be a good place to put the nonexistent towns of « goblu » (Go Blue, get it?) and « beatosu, » referring to the University of Michigan’s traditional rival Ohio State. If you had to spend all day staring at squiggly lines and benday dots, you’d need some way to let off steam, too.

MAP TRAPS: THE SMOKING GUN AT LAST

Perhaps the enclosed clipping will put an end to your agnosticism about map companies inventing fictitious geographic detail for copyright purposes. –Robert Carlson, Los Angeles

Reader Carlson encloses a clipping from the March 22, 1981 Los Angeles Times about the Thomas Brothers map company, which publishes maps of southern California. The article says:

« [Thomas Brothers vice president Barry Elias admits] that the company sprinkles fictitious names throughout its guides…. `We put them in for copyright reasons,’ he said. `If someone is reproducing one of our maps (as with a photocopier) and selling them, we can prove an infringement.’

« Of course, the make-believe streets are little ones. The mythical avenues normally run no longer than a block, dead end, and are shown with broken lines (as though they are under construction).

« Elias revealed that the guides for San Bernadino and Riverside counties have the heaviest concentration of fictitious streets–`between 100 and 200. . . . We try to come up with names that would fit in with the area [such as La Taza Drive and Loma Drive]. . . . Spanish sounding names are very big now.' »

So that accounts for all those lost-looking folks you see around LA. The grim effects of drugs? Naah, they just have Thomas maps.

COME TO THINK OF IT, THEY LOOK PRETTY LOST IN WISCONSIN, TOO

Looking at a recent map of Madison I noticed that it showed a friend’s house was located in a city park, and didn’t show another park at all. So I called the map company [Badger Map, Wonder Lake, Illinois], and they were quite straightforward in pointing out that errors are intentionally introduced to protect the copyright on their maps. –Dennis W. Gordon, Madison, Wisconsin

So there we have it. And now I may as well come clean. Every time I publish a book, a few subverters of public order write in to point out what they claim are mistakes. Mistakes, my arse. Copyright traps.

— Cecil Adams

Voir par ailleurs:

Le flop mondial et désastreux d’Apple Maps

Olivier Perrin

Le Temps

26 septembre 2012

Bourrée de bugs et incomplète, la comique solution de cartographie Maps d’Apple est une énorme déception. Depuis quelques jours, elle est la risée du Web

Dans un vaisseau de Star Wars en hyper-progression dans l’hyper-­espace, un personnage scrutant l’horizon infini constate: «Ce n’est par une lune, c’est une station spatiale.» Et Han Solo, sous les traits d’Harrison Ford, de lui répondre: «Mais Apple Maps assure que c’est une lune.» Ce gag posté sous la forme d’une photo retouchée sur le compte Twitter de ppgarcia75 dit bien à quel point, depuis quelques jours, la Toile entière se marre de la nouvelle application Apple Maps.

A tel point que le site Business Insider n’hésite pas à parler de «désastre». «Dans l’histoire de l’iPhone et d’iOS, on n’a pas souvenir d’un tel ratage», confirme Le Nouvel Observateur. Comme le résume un esprit mutin: «Je viens de voir Maps. J’apprécie les efforts d’Apple pour pousser les gens à choisir Android.» Conclusion: «En choisissant de se séparer de ­Google Maps, et d’opter pour sa propre solution, Apple prenait un risque, et malheureusement, c’est un échec pour l’instant.»

Tout un poème, selon la Tribune de Genève, qui parle de «grandes villes introuvables» de «ponts et routes déformés»: bref, «Apple a énervé ses fans en leur imposant son nouveau système de cartes rempli de bugs et a peut-être fait une erreur stratégique en voulant évincer de ses iPhone l’application très populaire de son grand rival Google».

Vienne ou Nuremberg?

Et d’en citer, via Tumblr, toute une série sur une page spéciale, dont une au Tessin. Mais encore: «En Suède, un célèbre voilier-auberge de jeunesse «a coulé», et la deuxième ville du pays, ­Göteborg, semble avoir disparu, rapportent des utilisateurs, photo à l’appui. En Autriche, le Palais de justice de Vienne est présenté comme celui de Nuremberg, une ville allemande située à des centaines de kilomètres de là.»

«Apple le reconnaît lui-même, lit-on sur le site Atlantico: son service de cartes sur l’iOS6 n’est pas au point. […] Twitter et Facebook débordent de plaisanteries et de critiques sur les monumentales ou hilarantes erreurs relevées par les utilisateurs dans ses fonds de cartes. Qu’est-il arrivé à la fameuse perfection des produits Apple?» Le site Mashable en a publié un best of, où il repère «les trous noirs, les autoroutes en tôle ondulée et les montagnes manquantes». Tandis que pour Fortune, qui raisonne évidemment plutôt en termes de management, «le divorce et la rupture du contrat de cinq ans avec les fonds de cartes de Google Maps a été l’erreur monumentale commise […] avant le décès de Steve Jobs, car rien ne peut actuellement se mesurer à la qualité» de ses cartes et résultats de recherche, fruit «des données de géolocalisation engrangées depuis une décennie».

Les utilisateurs peuvent aussi s’apercevoir «que de nombreuses prises de vue en trois dimensions ne sont pas au point», précisent Les Echos. Parmi «les clichés les plus insolites: la tour Eiffel écrasée, le pont de Brooklyn coupé, des routes s’enfonçant dans le sol… La couche d’informations venant compléter les cartes (noms des magasins, des bâtiments ou des rues) semble, elle aussi, aléatoire.» Au point qu’Apple chercherait à recruter du côté de Google afin de perfectionner son application cartographique et de faire oublier ce que Le Vif belge appelle «le premier bug de l’après-Steve Jobs».

Il existe même un faux compte Twitter sur ces fameuses cartes, indique 20 Minutes France, qui parle assez joliment de «mapocalypse» en citant aussi Gizmodo, site horrifié par une carte certes esthétique de Manhattan, mais d’où a simplement disparu… la statue de la Liberté! D’ailleurs, ­Nokia n’a pas manqué de sauter sur l’occasion pour se moquer de son rival. Son blogueur, Pino Bonetti, rappelle «que joli n’est pas suffisant: il faut de l’excellence».

Crime de lèse-majesté

Dans la foulée, Le Monde indique que «le système de cartographie tant attendu semble loin d’être à la hauteur». Et de citer la BBC, qui recense aussi toute «une série d’erreurs», dont celle qui touche le «légendaire club de football de Manchester United, remplacé dans la recherche par le club football Sale United, destiné aux enfants dès 5 ans. On frôle le crime de lèse-majesté, à ce niveau-là.»

Encore plus instructif, le site de l’audiovisuel public britannique propose également un article rapprochant les mêmes cartes, version Google et version Apple, qui met en scène cette «guerre» des cartes. Qui fait rire au bout du compte une catégorie d’utilisateurs: ceux qui ne s’en servent pas, et qui préfèrent encore ce bon vieux papier.

Apple : véritable flop sur son service iOS 6 Maps

Apple le reconnait lui-même : son service de cartes sur l’iOS6 n’est pas au point. Depuis quelques jours, Twitter et Facebook débordent de plaisanteries et de critiques sur les monumentales ou hilarantes erreurs relevées par les utilisateurs dans ses fonds de cartes. Qu’est-il arrivé à la fameuse perfection des produits Apple ? Les analystes se sont penchés sur un monumental ratage.

Apple et ses nouveaux joujoux

Les premiers testeurs de l’iOS6 d’Apple étrenné avec le nouvel iPhone5 s’amusent à relever tous ses défauts.

Depuis mercredi dernier, les premiers testeurs de l’iOS6 d’Apple étrenné avec le nouvel iPhone5 s’amusent beaucoup à relever tous ses défauts ou à pointer les déceptions qu’ils réservent, et le nouveau service de cartographie, en particulier, fait l’unanimité contre lui. Les cartes d’Apple, qui souhaitait divorcer de Google et de ses Maps, ne sont pas au point… c’est le moins que l’on puisse dire. Un Américain a même ouvert un blog pour compiler les captures d’écran des plus étranges des résultats de recherche : The amazing iOS6 maps (les incroyables cartes iOS6).

Le site Mashable a publié un best-off, « Le monde selon les cartes d’Apple », et sur Twitter comme Facebook, les trous noirs, les autoroutes en tôle ondulée et les montagnes manquantes font la joie des internautes. Que s’est-il passé ? Apple étant un grand de la bourse et du secteur tech, une marque misant tout sur la « perfection » de ses produits (chers), un échec aussi cuisant a bien sûr été analysé par tous les spécialistes de la cartographie, de la géolocalisation et de la bourse.

Pour Fortune, le divorce et la rupture du contrat de 5 ans avec les fonds de cartes de Google Maps a été l’erreur monumentale commise par le management (avant le décès de Steve Jobs), car rien ne peut actuellement se mesurer à la qualité des cartes et résultats de recherche de Google Maps, fruits des données de géolocalisation engrangées depuis une décennie par Google.

« Les célèbres voitures Google qui vont et viennent dans les rues du monde entier pour compiler les images de Street View sont ce qui attire le plus d’attention, mais ce sont les milliards de milliards de données, fournies par des millions d’utilisateurs, qui font que Google Maps semblent si intelligentes, et les nouvelles cartes de l’iOS6 stupides à en mourir de rire ».

« 400 ans de retard » sur Google Maps?

Un consultant en technologies de cartographie a analysé ce qui a manqué à Apple sur le site Telemapics, et sur ce qui provoque les remarques actuelles, que Google Maps aurait « 400 ans d’avance ».

« Peut être l’erreur la plus énorme est que l’équipe Apple s’est appuyée sur un contrôle de qualité par algorithmes et non via un processus partiellement validé par l’analyse humaine. Vous ne pouvez pas voir les erreurs de Apple Maps sans réaliser que ces cartes ont été examinées visuellement et utilisées pour la première fois par les clients de Apple, et non par l’équipe QC de Apple. Quand (…) Google a initialement tenté de développer un service de cartes de qualité, vous noterez qu’il ont d’abord essayé d’automatiser tout le processus, et ont misérablement échoué, comme Apple. Google a appris que vous ne pouvez pas enlever l’humain de l’équation. Même si les mathématiques derrière la cartographie semblent relativement basiques, je peux vous assurer que si vous ôtez de l’équation l’observateur humain qui possède une connaissance locale et cartographique vous allez produire exactement ce que Apple a produit : un système qui foire ».

Apple n’avait pas le choix

C’est la conclusion d’après-désastre de Countermotions dans une Foire aux questions élaborée sur le « plantage » de Apple maps.

Q: Alors, pourquoi Apple a-t-il chassé Google Maps de la plateforme iOS ? Est-ce que Apple n’aurait pas mieux fait de proposer Google Maps, pendant qu’il construisait sa propre application de fonds de cartes ? Apple n’aurait il pas mieux fait d’attendre ?

R: Attendre quoi ? Que Google renforce son emprise sur un service clé de l’iOS? Apple a compris l’importance de la cartographie mobile et acquis plusieurs sociétés de cartographie, des participations et des talents, au cours des dernières années. La cartographie est en effet l’un des services les plus compliqués sur mobile, elle implique d’avoir des données physique, terrestres, et aériennes, un système de collecte de données, de correction, l’élaboration de couches et de couches d’informations contextuelles mariées aux données sous-jacentes, et tout cela optimisé pour être interrogé fréquemment dans des conditions de connexion et de réseaux souvent difficiles. Malheureusement, comme la numérotation sur ordre vocal ou la synthèse vocale (rappelez-vous Siri), la cartographie est l’une de ces technologies qui ne peuvent pas être totalement incubée en laboratoire pendant quelques années et jetées à la face de plusieurs centaines de millions d’utilisateurs dans plus de 100 pays à un stade ‘mature ». . Les millions de signalements des individus autour du monde, par exemple, ont aidé Google a corriger d’innombrables erreurs au cours de la dernière décennie. Sans cette exposition aux utilisateurs et sans aide « du terrain », une solution de cartographie sur téléphone mobile comme celle d’Apple n’a aucune chance ».

Reste la question, « comment Apple a-t-il pu si mal manager et les cartes et la mini crise qui s’en est ensuivie », ou beaucoup, voit des signes d’effritement du géant Apple à l’ère de l’après Steve Jobs. Le site de tech Monday Note revient sur l’arrogance d’Apple et son mépris pour les plus simples et fondamentales des règles de relations avec les clients.

 » Je n’arrive pas à comprendre pourquoi les cadres d’Apple ont ignoré cette simple règle de relations saines avec des clients. Au lieu de cela, nous recevons des déclarations fatigantes de suffisance.…Apple dessine les Macs, les meilleurs ordinateurs personnels au monde…Nous (fabriquons) les meilleurs produits au monde. Cette auto-promotion viole une autre règle. N’allez pas crier sur les toits à quel point vous êtes bon dans le, disons en cuisine, laissez ceux qui ont profité de votre talent culinaire faire vos éloges.

L’épisode ridiculisant que Apple a essuyé après le lancement de l’application Cartes dans iOS 6 est en grande partie sa propre faute. La démo était impeccable, des cartes 2D et 3D, des navigations en survol spectaculaires…mais pas un mot sur le podium sur les limites de l’application, pas de clin d’œil pour rire de soi, pas d’aveux que les cartes iOS sont un bébé qui doit apprendre à marcher à quatre pattes avant de marcher, de courir, et en temps voulu, de dépasser le champion, Google Maps. Au lieu de cela, on nous dit que les cartes d’Apple pourraient bien être “le plus beau et le puissant des services de cartographie jamais créé.”

Il donne aussi un ‘tip » pour sortir de l’enfer des cartes Apple et retrouver le confort des cartes google maps sur un iphone ou ipad.

« C’est simple comme bonjour. Ajoutez maps.google.com en tant qu’application web à votre écran d’accueil, et voilà. Google Maps, sans attendre que Google rende disponible une application iOS ou que Apple l’approuve. Ou alors, vous pouvez passer à des applis de cartographie telles que Navigon. »

Voir aussi:

Why Apple pulled the plug on Google Maps

Philip Elmer-DeWitt

September 23, 2012

The company’s real mistake may have been not doing it years ago

FORTUNE — Unbeknownst to me, I’ve been feeding geographical information into Google’s (GOOG) mapping database for years — searching for addresses, sharing my location, checking for traffic jams on Google Maps. Google, for its part, has been scraping that data for every nugget of intelligence its computers can extract. Without consciously volunteering, I’ve been participating in a massive crowdsourcing experiment — perhaps the largest the world has ever seen. Who knows what I might have been teaching Google Maps if I’d been navigating the surface of the planet with an Android phone in my pocket?

Apple (AAPL), by building its much-loved (and now much-missed) iPhone Maps app on Google’s mapping database, has been complicit in this Herculean data collection exercise since the launch of the first iPhone in 2007. The famous Google cars that drive up and down the byways of the world collecting Street View images get most of the attention, but it’s the billions upon billions of data points supplied by hundreds of millions of users that make Google Maps seem so smart and iOS 6’s new Maps app seem so laughably stupid.

In Saturday’s New York Times, Op Ed columnist Joe Nocera asks: « If Steve Jobs were still alive, would the new map application on the iPhone 5 be such an unmitigated disaster? Interesting question, isn’t it? »

No Joe, it’s not an interesting question. It’s the No. 1 cliché of the post-Jobsian era.

Besides, the decision to pull the plug on Google’s mapping database at the end of what was probably a five-year contract had to have been made while Jobs was running the company.

« Not doing its own Maps would be a far bigger mistake, » says Asymco’s Horace Dediu, who addressed the issue at length in last week’s Critical Path podcast. « The mistake was not getting involved in maps sooner, which was on Jobs’ watch. Nokia saw the writing on the wall five years ago and burned $8 billion to get in front of the problem. The pain Apple feels now is deferred from when they decided to hand over that franchise to Google at the beginning of iPhone. »

It’s easy to poke fun at Apple’s Maps app in its current state. I’ve had my share of laughs, starting last June (see here and here), and now everybody is piling on.

But the fact is, the company found itself in the position of feeding its customers’ priceless location information into the mapping database of its mortal enemy. That couldn’t go on forever.

Weaning itself from Google Maps will not be easy. It may be one of the hardest things Apple has ever tried to do.

If you’ve seen enough examples of the boneheaded mistakes Apple Maps is making and want to get a sense of what’s involved in correcting them, I recommend Mike Dobson’s Google Maps announces a 400 year advantage over Apple Maps.

Dobson, a former professor of geography at SUNY Albany, was Rand McNally’s chief cartographer from 1986 to 2000 and now runs a consulting service called TeleMapics.

« Perhaps the most egregious error, » he writes, « is that Apple’s team relied on quality control by algorithm and not a process partially vetted by informed human analysis. You cannot read about the errors in Apple Maps without realizing that these maps were being visually examined and used for the first time by Apple’s customers and not by Apple’s QC teams. If Apple thought that the results were going to be any different than they are, I would be surprised. Of course, hubris is a powerful emotion. »

Dobson has been fielding and answering questions from readers in the comment stream of his Exploring Local blog. It’s like a graduate seminar in cartography. I hope someone at Apple is auditing it.

UPDATE: Jean-Louis Gassée’s Monday Note has, as usual, a sensible take on the issue:

The ridicule that Apple has suffered following the introduction of the Maps application in iOS 6 is largely self-inflicted. The demo was flawless, 2D and 3D maps, turn-by-turn navigation, spectacular flyovers…but not a word from the stage about the app’s limitations, no self-deprecating wink, no admission that iOS Maps is an infant that needs to learn to crawl before walking, running, and ultimately lapping the frontrunner, Google Maps. Instead, we’re told that Apple’s Maps may be « the most beautiful, powerful mapping service ever. »

Voir également:

Apple Maps: Damned If You Do, Googled If You Don’t

Jean-Louis Gassée

September 23, 2012

While still a teenager, my youngest daughter was determined to take on the role of used car salesperson when we sold our old Chevy Tahoe. Her approach was impeccable: Before letting the prospective buyer so much as touch the car, she gave him a tour of its defects, the dent in the rear left fender, the slight tear in the passenger seat, the fussy rear window control. Only then did she lift the hood to reveal the pristine engine bay. She knew the old rule: Don’t let the customer discover the defects.

Pointing out the limitations of your product is a sign of strength, not weakness. I can’t fathom why Apple execs keep ignoring this simple prescription for a healthy relationship with their customers. Instead, we get tiresome boasting: …Apple designs Macs, the best personal computers in the world…we [make] the best products on earth. This self-promotion violates another rule: Don’t go around telling everyone how good you are in the, uhm…kitchen; let those who have experienced your cookmanship do the bragging for you.

The ridicule that Apple has suffered following the introduction of the Maps application in iOS 6 is largely self-inflicted. The demo was flawless, 2D and 3D maps, turn-by-turn navigation, spectacular flyovers…but not a word from the stage about the app’s limitations, no self-deprecating wink, no admission that iOS Maps is an infant that needs to learn to crawl before walking, running, and ultimately lapping the frontrunner, Google Maps. Instead, we’re told that Apple’s Maps may be “the most beautiful, powerful mapping service ever.”

After the polished demo, the released product gets a good drubbing: the Falkland Islands are stripped of roads and towns, bridges and façades are bizarrely rendered, an imaginary airport is discovered in a field near Dublin.

Pageview-driven commenters do the expected. After having slammed the “boring” iPhone 5, they reversed course when preorders exceed previous records, and now they reverse course again when Maps shows a few warts.

Even Joe Nocera, an illustrious NYT writer, joins the chorus with a piece titled Has Apple Peaked? Note the question mark, a tired churnalistic device, the author hedging his bet in case the peak is higher still, lost in the clouds. The piece is worth reading for its clichés, hyperbole, and statements of the obvious: “unmitigated disaster”, “the canary in the coal mine”, and “Jobs isn’t there anymore”, tropes that appear in many Maps reviews.

(The implication that Jobs would have squelched Maps is misguided. I greatly miss Dear Leader but my admiration for his unsurpassed successes doesn’t obscure my recollection of his mistakes. The Cube, antennagate, Exchange For The Rest of Us [a.k.a MobileMe], the capricious skeuomorphic shelves and leather stitches… Both Siri — still far from reliable — and Maps were decisions Jobs made or endorsed.)

The hue and cry moved me to give iOS 6 Maps a try. Mercifully, my iPad updated by itself (or very nearly so) while I was busy untangling family affairs in Palma de Mallorca. A break in the action, I opened the Maps app and found old searches already in memory. The area around my Palma hotel was clean and detailed:

Similarly for my old Paris haunts:

The directions for my trip from the D10 Conference to my home in Palo Alto were accurate, and offered a choice of routes:

Yes, there are flaws. Deep inside rural France, iOS Maps is clearly lacking. Here’s Apple’s impression of the countryside:

…and Google’s:

Still, the problems didn’t seem that bad. Of course, the old YMMV saying applies: Your experience might be much worse than mine.

Re-reading Joe Nocera’s piece, I get the impression that he hasn’t actually tried Maps himself. Nor does he point out that you can still use Google Maps on an iPhone or iPad:

The process is dead-simple: Add maps.google.com as a Web App on your Home Screen and voilà, Google Maps without waiting for Google to come up with a native iOS app, or for Apple to approve it. Or you can try other mapping apps such as Navigon. Actually, I’m surprised to see so few people rejoice at the prospect of a challenger to Google’s de facto maps monopoly.

Not all bloggers have fallen for the “disaster” hysteria. In this Counternotions blog post,”Kontra”, who is also a learned and sardonic Twitterer, sees a measure of common sense and strategy on Apple’s part:

Q: Then why did Apple kick Google Maps off the iOS platform? Wouldn’t Apple have been better off offering Google Maps even while it was building its own map app? Shouldn’t Apple have waited?

A: Waited for what? For Google to strengthen its chokehold on a key iOS service? Apple has recognized the significance of mobile mapping and acquired several mapping companies, IP assets and talent in the last few years. Mapping is indeed one of the hardest of mobile services, involving physical terrestrial and aerial surveying, data acquisition, correction, tile making and layer upon layer of contextual info married to underlying data, all optimized to serve often under trying network conditions. Unfortunately, like dialect recognition or speech synthesis (think Siri), mapping is one of those technologies that can’t be fully incubated in a lab for a few years and unleashed on several hundred million users in more than a 100 countries in a “mature” state. Thousands of reports from individuals around the world, for example, have helped Google correct countless mapping failures over the last half decade. Without this public exposure and help in the field, a mobile mapping solution like Apple’s stands no chance.

And he makes a swipe at the handwringers:

Q: Does Apple have nothing but contempt for its users?

A: Yes, Apple’s evil. When Apple barred Flash from iOS, Flash was the best and only way to play .swf files. Apple’s video alternative, H.264, wasn’t nearly as widely used. Thus Apple’s solution was “inferior” and appeared to be against its own users’ interests. Sheer corporate greed! Trillion words have been written about just how misguided Apple was in denying its users the glory of Flash on iOS. Well, Flash is now dead on mobile. And yet the Earth’s obliquity of the ecliptic is still about 23.4°. We seemed to have survived that one.

For Apple, Maps is a strategic move. The Cupertino company doesn’t want to depend on a competitor for something as important as maps. The road (pardon the pun) will be long and tortuous, and it’s unfortunate that Apple has made the chase that much harder by failing to modulate its self-praise. but think of the number of times the company has been told You Have No Right To Do This…think smartphones, stores, processors, refusing to depend on Adobe’s Flash…

(As I finished writing this note, I found out Philip Ellmer-DeWitt also takes issue with Joe Nocera’s position and bromides in his Apple 2.0 post. And Brian Hall, in his trademark colorful style, also strongly disagrees with the NYT writer.)

Let’s just hope a fully mature Maps won’t take as long as it took to transform MobileMe into iCloud.

Voir encore:

Has Apple Peaked?

Joe Nocera

The New York Times

September 21, 2012

If Steve Jobs were still alive, would the new map application on the iPhone 5 be such an unmitigated disaster? Interesting question, isn’t it?

As Apple’s chief executive, Jobs was a perfectionist. He had no tolerance for corner-cutting or mediocre products. The last time Apple released a truly substandard product — MobileMe, in 2008 — Jobs gathered the team into an auditorium, berated them mercilessly and then got rid of the team leader in front of everybody, according to Walter Isaacson’s biography of Jobs. The three devices that made Apple the most valuable company in America — the iPod, the iPhone and the iPad — were all genuine innovations that forced every other technology company to play catch-up.

No doubt, the iPhone 5, which went on sale on Friday, will be another hit. Apple’s halo remains powerful. But there is nothing about it that is especially innovative. Plus, of course, it has that nasty glitch. In rolling out a new operating system for the iPhone 5, Apple replaced Google’s map application — the mapping gold standard — with its own, vastly inferior, application, which has infuriated its customers. With maps now such a critical feature of smartphones, it seems to be an inexplicable mistake.

And maybe that’s all it is — a mistake, soon to be fixed. But it is just as likely to turn out to be the canary in the coal mine. Though Apple will remain a highly profitable company for years to come, I would be surprised if it ever gives us another product as transformative as the iPhone or the iPad.

Part of the reason is obvious: Jobs isn’t there anymore. It is rare that a company is so completely an extension of one man’s brain as Apple was an extension of Jobs. While he was alive, that was a strength; now it’s a weakness. Apple’s current executive team is no doubt trying to maintain the same demanding, innovative culture, but it’s just not the same without the man himself looking over everybody’s shoulder. If the map glitch tells us anything, it is that.

But there is also a less obvious — yet possibly more important — reason that Apple’s best days may soon be behind it. When Jobs returned to the company in 1997, after 12 years in exile, Apple was in deep trouble. It could afford to take big risks and, indeed, to search for a new business model, because it had nothing to lose.

Fifteen years later, Apple has a hugely profitable business model to defend — and a lot to lose. Companies change when that happens. “The business model becomes a gilded cage, and management won’t do anything to challenge it, while doing everything they can to protect it,” says Larry Keeley, an innovation strategist at Doblin, a consulting firm.

It happens in every industry, but it is especially easy to see in technology because things move so quickly. It was less than 15 years ago that Microsoft appeared to be invincible. But once its Windows operating system and Office applications became giant moneymakers, Microsoft’s entire strategy became geared toward protecting its two cash cows. It ruthlessly used its Windows platform to promote its own products at the expense of rivals. (The Microsoft antitrust trial took dead aim at that behavior.) Although Microsoft still makes billions, its new products are mainly “me-too” versions of innovations made by other companies.

Now it is Apple’s turn to be king of the hill — and, not surprisingly, it has begun to behave in a very similar fashion. You can see it in the patent litigation against Samsung, a costly and counterproductive exercise that has nothing to do with innovation and everything to do with protecting its turf.

And you can see it in the decision to replace Google’s map application. Once an ally, Google is now a rival, and the thought of allowing Google to promote its maps on Apple’s platform had become anathema. More to the point, Apple wants to force its customers to use its own products, even when they are not as good as those from rivals. Once companies start acting that way, they become vulnerable to newer, nimbler competitors that are trying to create something new, instead of milking the old. Just ask BlackBerry, which once reigned supreme in the smartphone market but is now roadkill for Apple and Samsung.

Even before Jobs died, Apple was becoming a company whose main goal was to defend its business model. Yes, he would never have allowed his minions to ship such an embarrassing application. But despite his genius, it is unlikely he could have kept Apple from eventually lapsing into the ordinary. It is the nature of capitalism that big companies become defensive, while newer rivals emerge with better, smarter ideas.

“Oh my god,” read one Twitter message I saw. “Apple maps is the worst ever. It is like using MapQuest on a BlackBerry.”

MapQuest and BlackBerry.

Exactly.


Violences islamiques: C’est le principe du cheval fort, imbécile! (When weakness becomes provocative)

22 septembre, 2012
Vous avez appris qu’il a été dit: oeil pour oeil, et dent pour dent. Mais moi, je vous dis de ne pas résister au méchant. Si quelqu’un te frappe sur la joue droite, présente-lui aussi l’autre. (…) Vous avez appris qu’il a été dit: Tu aimeras ton prochain, et tu haïras ton ennemi. Mais moi, je vous dis: Aimez vos ennemis, bénissez ceux qui vous maudissent, faites du bien à ceux qui vous haïssent, et priez pour ceux qui vous maltraitent et qui vous persécutent, afin que vous soyez fils de votre Père qui est dans les cieux; car il fait lever son soleil sur les méchants et sur les bons, et il fait pleuvoir sur les justes et sur les injustes. Jésus
Ne croyez pas que je sois venu apporter la paix sur la terre; je ne suis pas venu apporter la paix, mais l’épée. Car je suis venu mettre la division entre l’homme et son père, entre la fille et sa mère, entre la belle-fille et sa belle-mère; et l’homme aura pour ennemis les gens de sa maison. Jésus
C’est une règle générale de la nature humaine : les gens méprisent ceux qui les traitent bien et regardent vers ceux qui ne leur font pas de concessions.
Le fort fait ce qu’il peut faire et le faible subit ce qu’il doit subir.
Il est dans la nature de l’homme d’opprimer ceux qui cèdent et de respecter ceux qui résistent Thucydide (Ve siècle avant JC)
Quand les gens voient un cheval fort et un cheval faible, par nature, ils aimeront le cheval fort. Osama Ben Laden (2001 après JC)
Tous les efforts de la violence ne peuvent affaiblir la vérité, et ne servent qu’à la relever davantage. Toutes les lumières de la vérité ne peuvent rien pour arrêter la violence, et ne font que l’irriter encore plus. Pascal
L’individu a été si bien pris au sérieux, si bien posé comme un absolu par le christianisme, qu’on ne pouvait plus le sacrifier : mais l’espèce ne survit que grâce aux sacrifices humains… La véritable philanthropie exige le sacrifice pour le bien de l’espèce – elle est dure, elle oblige à se dominer soi-même, parce qu’elle a besoin du sacrifice humain. Et cette pseudo-humanité qui s’institue christianisme, veut précisément imposer que personne ne soit sacrifié. Nietzsche
Le christianisme est une rébellion contre la loi naturelle, une protestation contre la nature. Poussé à sa logique extrême, le christianisme signifierait la culture systématique de l’échec humain. Hitler
Nous ne savons pas si Hitler est sur le point de fonder un nouvel islam. Il est d’ores et déjà sur la voie; il ressemble à Mahomet. L’émotion en Allemagne est islamique, guerrière et islamique. Ils sont tous ivres d’un dieu farouche. Jung (1939)
Mein Kampf (…) Tel était le nouveau Coran de la foi et de la guerre: emphatique, fastidieux, sans forme, mais empli de son propre message. Churchill
Tout que je peux dire, c’est que si l’histoire a enseigné quelque chose, c’est que la faiblesse est provocatrice. Elle incite les gens à faire des choses qu’ils ne feraient pas autrement. Le plan d’action qui dit: « Ne faites rien pour  mécontenter ou irriter Saddam Hussein parce qu’il pourrait faire quelque chose » est un peu comme nourrir un alligator en espérant qu’il ne vous mange pas après. Donald Rumsfeld (2002)
We live in an age of inversely proportional deterrence, the more militarily powerful a western cicvilised nation is, the less its enemies have to feel the full force of that power ever being unleashed. Mark Steyn
L’ancien Premier ministre britannique Margaret Thatcher avait été informée des dangers de réduire la flotte britannique un an avant l’invasion en avril 1982 des îles Malouines par l’Argentine, selon des documents secrets déclassifiés vendredi. Son ministre des affaires étrangères de l’époque Lord Peter Carrington avait également mis en garde le ministre de la défense de l’époque John Nott contre le fait qu’une réduction de la flotte britannique n’enverrait que des mauvais signaux sur la volonté de Londres de défendre les Malouines. Selon ces documents des archives nationales britannique rendus publics 30 ans plus tard, l’Etat major de la Royal Navy avait alors exprimé son vif mécontentement au sujet des projets de réductions de la défense navale. Le Figaro
La politique d’apaisement vis-à-vis de l’Iran d’Ahmadinejad est fondée sur la même incompréhension que celle qui fut menée face à Hitler à la fin des années 1930, par l’Angleterre et la France. Ce prétendu réalisme, au nom duquel il faut faire des concessions et pratiquer l’ouverture, procède certes d’un réflexe très humain. Mais il témoigne d’une méconnaissance profonde de l’adversaire. On est en face, dans les deux cas, d’une machine de guerre très habile et très bien organisée, qui connaît et qui exploite fort bien les faiblesses de l’Occident démocratique. Il faut laisser Obama tendre la main à l’Iran, mais il comprendra vite – s’il est intelligent, et je crois qu’il l’est -, à qui il a affaire. Simon Epstein
Dans toute guerre entre le colonisateur et le colonisé, soutenez l’oppressé. Soutenez le droit des Palestiniens au retour. Rejetez le racisme. Autocollant propalestinien (San Francisco)
Dans toute guerre entre l’homme civilisé et le sauvage, soutenez l’homme civilisé. Soutenez Israël. Rejetez le djihad. Autocollant de l’association American Freedom Defense Initiative (l’Initiative pour la défense de la liberté américaine)
Je ne céderai pas devant l’intimidation, je ne vais pas arrêter de dire la vérité parce que c’est dangereux. La liberté doit être vigoureusement défendue. (…) Si quelqu’un commet un acte de violence, c’est sa responsabilité, ce n’est la responsabilité de personne d’autre. Pam Geller
Je suis islamophobe, et phobie veut dire peur. Donc oui, peut-être oui, probablement, je suis islamophobe comme beaucoup de Français. J’ai peur de l’islam comme on a peur d’une chose que l’on ne connaît pas. (…) L’islam est dangereux pour la démocratie et en fait la démonstration tous les jours. (…) Il est temps que les Français de toutes confessions se lèvent ensemble contre l’intégrisme. (…) J’ai lu le Coran. Je n’ai pas été plus rassurée. Ce que l’on voit autour de nous fait que la phobie existe car on voit des choses qui font peur (…) Pourquoi on veut nier les choses ? Ce n’est par parce que j’ai peur que je déteste. (…) J’ai lu que 53 pays musumlans voulaient inclure la charia dans les Droits de l’Homme (…) J’aurais été ‘christianophobe’ au temps de l’Inquisition. (…) Je suis en France, pays de liberté (…) J’ai autant droit de m’exprimer que tout ceux qui s’expriment. Véronique Genest
Civilisation requires a modicum of material prosperity—

enough to provide a little leisure. But far more, it requires confidence: 

confidence in the society in which one lives, belief in its philosophy, belief in its laws, and confidence in one’s own mental powers. (…) Vigour, energy, vitality: all the civilisations—or civilising epochs—have had a weight of energy behind them. People sometimes think that civilisation consists in fine sensibilities and good conversations and all that. These can be among the agreeable results of civilisation, but they are not what make a civilisation, and a society can have these amenities and yet be dead and rigid. Kenneth Clark
In the consensus view of modern American liberalism, it is hilarious to mock Mormons and Mormonism but outrageous to mock Muslims and Islam. Why? Maybe it’s because nobody has ever been harmed, much less killed, making fun of Mormons.
Here’s what else we learned this week about the emerging liberal consensus: That it’s okay to denounce a movie you haven’t seen, which is like trashing a book you haven’t read. That it’s okay to give perp-walk treatment to the alleged—and no doubt terrified—maker of the film on legally flimsy and politically motivated grounds of parole violation. That it’s okay for the federal government publicly to call on Google to pull the video clip from YouTube in an attempt to mollify rampaging Islamists. That it’s okay to concede the fundamentalist premise that religious belief ought to be entitled to the highest possible degree of social deference—except when Mormons and sundry Christian rubes are concerned. (…) Finally, it need be said that the whole purpose of free speech is to protect unpopular, heretical, vulgar and stupid views. So far, the Obama administration’s approach to free speech is that it’s fine so long as it’s cheap and exacts no political price. This is free speech as pizza. President Obama came to office promising that he would start a new conversation with the Muslim world, one that lectured less and listened more. After nearly four years of listening, we can now hear more clearly where the U.S. stands in the estimation of that world: equally despised but considerably less feared. Just imagine what four more years of instinctive deference will do. On the bright side, dear liberals, you’ll still be able to mock Mormons. They tend not to punch back, which is part of what makes so many of them so successful in life. Bret Stephens
Thomas Cahill, in his riveting book « The Gifts of the Jews, » underscores the point: « For the ancients, nothing new ever did happen, except for the occasional monstrosity. Life on Earth followed the course of the stars. And what had been would, in due course, come around again. . . . The future was always to be a replay of the past, as the past was simply an earthly replay of the drama of the heavens. » Perhaps the most profound gift of the Jews is that they broke down this fatalistic notion of the world, in which people were trapped on a great spinning wheel, with no future or past. In this way, the ancient Jews invented the concept of history in which the future was not an endless cycle but could be steered by our actions in the present. They inserted the individual, and individual responsibility and justice, into the equation. This ancient Jewish view was a massive shift in how people viewed mankind’s relationship to a deity—and it put responsibility squarely on the shoulders of men and women for their own destiny. This was the end of predetermination and the beginning of personal choice, justice and the quest for liberty. (…) Democracy, Mr. Cahill says, « grows directly out of the Israelite vision of individuals—subjects of value because they are images of God, each with a unique and personal destiny. Eric Rosenberg
Il y a deux grandes attitudes à mon avis dans l’histoire humaine, il y a celle de la mythologie qui s’efforce de dissimuler la violence, car, en dernière analyse, c’est sur la violence injuste que les communautés humaines reposent. (…) Cette attitude est trop universelle pour être condamnée. C’est l’attitude d’ailleurs des plus grands philosophes grecs et en particulier de Platon, qui condamne Homère et tous les poètes parce qu’ils se permettent de décrire dans leurs oeuvres les violences attribuées par les mythes aux dieux de la cité. Le grand philosophe voit dans cette audacieuse révélation une source de désordre, un péril majeur pour toute la société. Cette attitude est certainement l’attitude religieuse la plus répandue, la plus normale, la plus naturelle à l’homme et, de nos jours, elle est plus universelle que jamais, car les croyants modernisés, aussi bien les chrétiens que les juifs, l’ont au moins partiellement adoptée. L’autre attitude est beaucoup plus rare et elle est même unique au monde. Elle est réservée tout entière aux grands moments de l’inspiration biblique et chrétienne. Elle consiste non pas à pudiquement dissimuler mais, au contraire, à révéler la violence dans toute son injustice et son mensonge, partout où il est possible de la repérer. C’est l’attitude du Livre de Job et c’est l’attitude des Evangiles. C’est la plus audacieuse des deux et, à mon avis, c’est la plus grande. C’est l’attitude qui nous a permis de découvrir l’innocence de la plupart des victimes que même les hommes les plus religieux, au cours de leur histoire, n’ont jamais cessé de massacrer et de persécuter. C’est là qu’est l’inspiration commune au judaïsme et au christianisme, et c’est la clef, il faut l’espérer, de leur réconciliation future. C’est la tendance héroïque à mettre la vérité au-dessus même de l’ordre social. René Girard
Notre monde est de plus en plus imprégné par cette vérité évangélique de l’innocence des victimes. L’attention qu’on porte aux victimes a commencé au Moyen Age, avec l’invention de l’hôpital. L’Hôtel-Dieu, comme on disait, accueillait toutes les victimes, indépendamment de leur origine. Les sociétés primitives n’étaient pas inhumaines, mais elles n’avaient d’attention que pour leurs membres. Le monde moderne a inventé la “victime inconnue”, comme on dirait aujourd’hui le “soldat inconnu”. Le christianisme peut maintenant continuer à s’étendre même sans la loi, car ses grandes percées intellectuelles et morales, notre souci des victimes et notre attention à ne pas nous fabriquer de boucs émissaires, ont fait de nous des chrétiens qui s’ignorent. René Girard
Dans la foi musulmane, il y a un aspect simple, brut, pratique qui a facilité sa diffusion et transformé la vie d’un grand nombre de peuples à l’état tribal en les ouvrant au monothéisme juif modifié par le christianisme. Mais il lui manque l’essentiel du christianisme : la croix. Comme le christianisme, l’islam réhabilite la victime innocente, mais il le fait de manière guerrière. La croix, c’est le contraire, c’est la fin des mythes violents et archaïques. René Girard

C’est le principe du cheval fort, imbécile!

Alors que se multiplient les preuves de l’origine clairement jihadiste des nouvelles violences qui secouent actuellement le monde musulman suite à la mise en ligne délibérée (les caricatures de Charlie Hebdo n’étant que la cerise sur le gâteau) de la bande annonce d’un jusque-là obscur navet anti-islam concocté un an plus tôt et dans l’indifférence qu’il méritait par un encore plus obscur escroc égypto-américain …

Comment ne pas s’étonner, sans parler du toujours plus criant fiasco de la Doctrine Obama, de l’incroyable contresens du choeur des pleureuses occidentales, politiques comme médiatiques, qui, fidèle à lui-même, a repris comme un seul homme le discours de l’autoflagellation et, jusqu’à Marine Le Pen, de l’équivalence morale?

Oubliant, comme l’avait pourtant rappelé il y a deux ans le correspondant au Moyen-Orient pour le Weekly Standard Lee Smith (« The Strong Horse : Power, Politics and the Clash of Arab Civilizations/Le cheval fort : le pouvoir, la politique et le choc des civilisations arabes ») et confirmé entre temps l’ancien ambassadeur américain au Pakistan Husain Haqqani et le chercheur libano-américain Fouad Ajami …

Le fameux et vieux comme le monde « principe élémentaire et quasi-universel » de Thucydide, repris par Osama lui-même au lendemain de son forfait du 11/9, tant du respect de la seule force que, corollairement, de la dimension provocatrice de la faiblesse, sans lesquels on ne peut comprendre nombre des réactions actuelles des masses fanatisées d’un monde islamique …

Qui, entre culte de la mort, crimes d’honneur, attaques terroristes et guerres, se voit durablement embourbé dans le pire sous-développement par son incapacité – nul doute entretenue par ses propres despotes inquiets à juste titre pour leur pouvoir-, à faire sien à son tour la formidable et corrosive radicalité du souci judéo-chrétien de l’autre et du plus faible …

Au Moyen-Orient, on mise sur le cheval fort

(In Mideast, Bet on a Strong Horse)

Daniel Pipes

National Review Online

16 février 2010

Adaptation française: Johan Bourlard

La violence et la cruauté des Arabes troublent souvent les Occidentaux.

Ce n’est pas seulement le leader du Hezbollah qui proclame « Nous aimons la mort », mais également, pour ne prendre qu’un exemple, un homme de 24 ans qui, le mois dernier, hurlait « Nous aimons la mort plus que vous n’aimez la vie » quand il a percuté avec sa voiture le Bronx-Whitestone Bridge, un pont de New York. Quand, dans la ville de Saint-Louis, deux parents ont commis un crime d’honneur sur leur fille adolescente en la poignardant à treize reprises au moyen d’un couteau de boucher, le père palestinien criait : « Meurs ! Meurs vite ! Meurs vite !… Silence, petite ! Meurs, ma fille, meurs ! » et la communauté arabe locale de le soutenir ensuite face aux accusations d’assassinat. Récemment, un prince d’Abu Dhabi a torturé un marchand de grain qu’il accusait de fraude ; en dépit de la vidéo atroce diffusée sur les chaînes de télévision du monde entier, le prince a été acquitté tandis que ses accusateurs ont été condamnés.

Sur une échelle plus large, on a dénombré 15 000 attaques terroristes depuis le 11 Septembre. Dans l’ensemble du monde arabophone, les gouvernements s’appuient davantage sur la brutalité que sur l’autorité de la loi. Le désir ardent d’éliminer Israël persiste encore et toujours même quand sévissent les insurrections, dont la dernière en date a éclaté au Yémen.

À propos de la pathologie qui touche la politique arabe, il existe plusieurs excellents essais d’explication dont certains ont ma préférence : les études réalisées par David Pryce-Jones et Philip Salzman auxquelles il faut désormais ajouter The Strong Horse : Power, Politics and the Clash of Arab Civilizations (Le cheval fort : le pouvoir, la politique et le choc des civilisations arabes), une analyse captivante et néanmoins fouillée et remarquable de Lee Smith, correspondant au Moyen-Orient pour le Weekly Standard.

Smith s’inspire d’une parole prononcée par Oussama Ben Laden en 2001 : « Quand les gens voient un cheval fort et un cheval faible, par nature, ils aimeront le cheval fort. » Ce que Smith appelle le principe du cheval fort consiste en deux éléments simples : la prise du pouvoir et la conservation de celui-ci. Ce principe est prédominant car, dans le monde arabe, la vie publique n’a « aucun mécanisme de transition pacifique ni de partage du pouvoir, raison pour laquelle les conflits politiques sont vus comme un combat à mort entre des chevaux forts ». La violence, constate Smith, est « au cœur de la vie politique, sociale et culturelle du Moyen-Orient arabophone ». Plus subtilement cela implique de garder un œil vigilant sur le prochain cheval fort par rapport auquel il faut se positionner et peser le pour et le contre.

Selon Smith, c’est ce principe du cheval fort, et non l’impérialisme occidental ou le sionisme, « qui a déterminé le caractère fondamental du Moyen-Orient arabophone ». La religion islamique elle-même s’est coulée dans le moule ancien de l’autoritarisme, celui du cheval fort, qu’elle a promu. Mahomet, le prophète de l’islam, était un homme fort en plus d’être une personnalité religieuse. Les musulmans sunnites ont régné pendant des siècles « par la violence, la répression et la contrainte ». La célèbre théorie de l’histoire formulée par Ibn Khaldun se résume à un cycle de violence dans lequel les chevaux forts remplacent les chevaux faibles. L’humiliation subie par les dhimmis rappelle chaque jour aux non-musulmans que ce n’est pas eux qui font la loi.

L’angle d’approche adopté par Smith donne des éclairages sur l’histoire moderne du Moyen-Orient. Il présente d’une part le nationalisme panarabe comme un effort de transformation des petits chevaux constitués par les États nationaux en un seul grand cheval et d’autre part l’islamisme comme un effort destiné à faire retrouver aux musulmans leur puissance. Quant à Israël, il fait office de « cheval fort par procuration » à la fois pour les États-Unis et le bloc égypto-saoudien dans le bras de fer, véritable guerre froide, qui oppose ce dernier au bloc iranien. Dans un univers marqué par le principe du cheval fort, la loi des armes séduit davantage que celle des urnes. Dépourvus de cheval fort, les Arabes libéraux avancent peu. En tant qu’État non arabe et non musulman le plus puissant, les Etats-Unis rendent l’anti-américanisme à la fois inévitable et endémique.

Ceci nous amène aux politiques menées par les pays non arabes : ceux-ci, malgré leur puissance et leur réelle endurance, échouent, souligne Smith. Être gentil – c’est-à-dire, se retirer unilatéralement du Sud-Liban et de Gaza – conduit inévitablement à l’échec. L’administration de George W. Bush a lancé, à juste titre, un projet de démocratisation porteur de grands espoirs, pour ensuite trahir les Arabes libéraux en ne menant pas ce projet à bien. En Irak, l’administration a négligé la recommandation d’installer au pouvoir un homme fort favorable à la démocratie.

Le Druze Walid Joumblatt, chef politique libanais, avance l’idée d’attaques américaines à la voiture piégée à Damas.

Plus largement, quand le gouvernement américain recule, d’autres (par exemple les dirigeants iraniens) ont l’opportunité « d’imposer leur loi dans la région ». Walid Joumblatt, un leader politique libanais, a suggéré, plus ou moins sérieusement, que Washington « fasse sauter des voitures piégées à Damas » de façon à faire passer son message et à montrer que l’Amérique a compris comment les Arabes s’y prennent.

Le principe élémentaire et quasi-universel formulé par Smith constitue un outil pour comprendre bien des aspects du monde arabe, notamment le culte de la mort, les crimes d’honneur, les attaques terroristes, le despotisme, la guerre… Tout en admettant que le principe du cheval fort peut choquer les Occidentaux et leur apparaître comme terriblement cruel, Smith insiste très justement sur l’existence de cette froide réalité que ceux qui ne sont pas avertis doivent reconnaître, prendre en compte et face à laquelle ils doivent réagir.

Voir aussi:

Manipulated Outrage and Misplaced Fury

Husain Haq

The WSJ

September 17, 2012

The attacks on U.S. diplomatic missions last week—beginning in Egypt and Libya, and moving to Yemen and other Muslim countries—came under cover of riots against an obscure online video insulting Islam and the Prophet Muhammad. But the mob violence and assaults should be seen for what they really are: an effort by Islamists to garner support and mobilize their base by exacerbating anti-Western sentiments.

When Secretary of State Hillary Clinton tried to calm Muslims Thursday by denouncing the video, she was unwittingly playing along with the ruse the radicals set up. The United States would have been better off focusing on the only outrage that was of legitimate interest to the American government: the lack of respect—shown by a complaisant Egyptian government and other Islamists—for U.S. diplomatic missions.

Protests orchestrated on the pretext of slights and offenses against Islam have been part of Islamist strategy for decades. Iran’s ayatollahs built an entire revolution around anti-Americanism. While the Iranian revolution was underway in 1979, Pakistan’s Islamists whipped up crowds by spreading rumors that the Americans had forcibly occupied Islam’s most sacred site, the Ka’aba or the Grand Mosque in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. Pakistani protesters burned the U.S. Embassy in Islamabad.

Violent demonstrations in many parts of the Muslim world after the 1989 fatwa—or religious condemnation—of a novel by Salman Rushdie, or after the Danish daily Jyllands-Posten published cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad in 2005, also did not represent spontaneous outrage. In each case, the insult to Islam or its prophet was first publicized by Islamists themselves so they could use it as justification for planned violence.

Once mourning over the death of the U.S. ambassador to Libya and others subsides, we will hear familiar arguments in the West. Some will rightly say that Islamist sensibilities cannot and should not lead to self- censorship here. Others will point out that freedom of expression should not be equated with a freedom to offend. They will say: Just as a non-Jew, out of respect for other religious beliefs, does not exercise his freedom to desecrate a Torah scroll, similar respect should be extended to Muslims and what they deem sacred.

But this debate, as thoughtful as it may be, is a distraction from what is really going on. It ignores the political intent of Islamists for whom every perceived affront to Islam is an opportunity to exploit a wedge issue for their own empowerment.

As for affronts, the Western mainstream is, by and large, quite respectful toward Muslims, millions of whom have adopted Europe and North America as their home and enjoy all the freedoms the West has to offer, including the freedom to worship. Insignificant or unnoticed videos and publications would have no impact on anyone, anywhere, if the Islamists did not choose to publicize them for radical effect.

And insults, real or hyped, are not the problem. At the heart of Muslim street violence is the frustration of the world’s Muslims over their steady decline for three centuries, a decline that has coincided with the rise and spread of the West’s military, economic and intellectual prowess.

During the 800 years of Muslim ascendancy beginning in the eighth century—in Southern Europe, North Africa and much of Western Asia—Muslims did not riot to protest non-Muslim insults against Islam or its prophet. There is no historic record of random attacks against non-Muslim targets in retaliation for a non-Muslim insulting Prophet Muhammad, though there are many books derogatory toward Islam’s prophet that were written in the era of Islam’s great empires. Muslims under Turkey’s Ottomans, for example, did not attack non-Muslim envoys (the medieval equivalent of today’s embassies) or churches upon hearing of real or rumored European sacrilege against their religion.

Clearly, then, violent responses to perceived injury are not integral to Islam. A religion is what its followers make it, and Muslims opting for violence have chosen to paint their faith as one that is prone to anger. Frustration with their inability to succeed in the competition between nations also has led some Muslims to seek symbolic victories.

Yet the momentary triumph of burning another country’s flag or setting on fire a Western business or embassy building is a poor but widespread substitute for global success that eludes the modern world’s 1.5 billion Muslims. Violent protest represents the lower rung of the ladder of rage; terrorism is its higher form.

Islamists almost by definition have a vested interest in continuously fanning the flames of Muslim victimhood. For Islamists, wrath against the West is the basis for their claim to the support of Muslim masses, taking attention away from societal political and economic failures. For example, the 57 member states of the Organization of Islamic Conference account for one-fifth of the world’s population but their combined gross domestic product is less than 7% of global output—a harsh reality for which Islamists offer no solution.

Even after recent developments that were labeled the Arab Spring, few Muslim-majority countries either fulfill— or look likely to—the criteria for freedom set by the independent group Freedom House. Mainstream discourse among Muslims blames everyone but themselves for this situation. The image of an ascendant West belittling Islam with the view to eliminate it serves as a convenient explanation for Muslim weakness.

Once the Muslim world embraces freedom of expression, it will be able to recognize the value of that freedom even for those who offend Muslim sensibilities. More important: Only in a free democratic environment will the world’s Muslims be able to debate the causes of their powerlessness, which stirs in them greater anger than any specific action on the part of Islam’s Western detractors.

Until then, the U.S. would do well to remember Osama bin Laden’s comment not long after the Sept. 11 attacks: « When people see a strong horse and a weak horse, by nature they will like the strong horse. » America should do nothing that enables Islamists to portray the nation as the weak horse.

Mr. Haqqani is professor of international relations at Boston University and senior fellow at the Hudson Institute. He served as Pakistan’s ambassador to the U.S. in 2008-11.

 Voir également:

The Strong Horse

A journalist argues that inter-Arab conflict is the central crisis of the Middle East.

Jackson Holahan

The Christian Science Monitor

January 27, 2010

With fists raised and mouths agape in apparent discontent, the several men gathering outside a mosque compose just a fraction of the unruly mass mobbing the local streets. Are they protesting or rejoicing? Either way their strained looks and fist-pumping fervor do not bode well for the photographer snapping this image only a few feet away.

This scene is the cover photo of Lee Smith’s The Strong Horse: Power, Politics, and the Clash of Arab Civilizations. After eight-plus years of United States military involvement in the Middle East, this snapshot might seem accurate enough to the casual book browser. Disgruntled demonstrators nestled below minarets, protesting some injustice unbeknownst to the viewer, may seem to standard fare to some American readers, many of whom are tired of hearing about soldiers from Kentucky, Vermont, Texas, and California being bloodied and maimed on the other side of the world.

But just pages into the introduction, Smith, who is the Middle East correspondent for the Weekly Standard, shatters the stereotype evoked in the jacket’s photograph by stating that, “I give no credence to the idea that the Arab-Israeli crisis is the [Middle East’s] central issue.” Just one of a number of provocative assertions, Smith wastes little time in introducing a reexamination of Middle Eastern history that calls into question even the most conventional of American and Western beliefs.

To begin with, he argues that 9/11 was not an attack on America but rather the extension of an inter-Arab fight exported to the new battleground of lower Manhattan. “Bin Ladenism is not drawn from the extremist fringe but represents the political and social norm [of the Arabic-speaking Middle East].” Smith explains these two conclusions, as he does the Middle East’s political philosophy writ large, using the “strong horse” principle.

Borrowed from an Osama bin Laden quote, Smith’s strong horse theory is grounded upon the conviction that, “[V]iolence is central to the politics, society and culture of the Arabic-speaking Middle East.” The strong horse is the person, tribe, country, or nation that is best able to impose its will upon others, the weaker horses, through the use of force.

Smith’s conclusion here is hardly novel. It is a reapplication of Thucydides’ famous aphorism from “The History of the Peloponnesian War”: “The strong do what they will and the weak suffer what they must.” However, Smith’s use of this age-old doctrine to better understand US-Arab relations is far from conventional.

In a climate increasingly attuned to avoid offense, Smith’s strident declarations are bound to attract significant criticism. Despite this, Smith never wavers in his bold thesis that the Arab world has long been at war with itself and is currently on a path toward certain self-destruction.

“The Strong Horse” is both succinct and accessible. Smith’s conclusions are introduced early, restated often, and buttressed by both history and the author’s personal encounters during his travels throughout the region. His willingness to venture into the provocative sometimes has the effect of making his suppositions less sound. After rightly calling the rising epidemic of suicide bombing what it is – a death cult – he concludes that the Arabs as a people are, “losing their will to live.” His induction here is overblown, as no sweeping conclusion can accurately describe the mental state of hundreds of millions of the world’s people.

Intermittent inaccuracies aside, “The Strong Horse” is an important read for anyone interested in the Middle East, and particularly in the involvement of the United States in the region since 2001. Some will cast Smith’s zealous diagnosis of the cradle of civilization’s ills as ethnocentric jingoism. As harsh as his conclusions may be, they certainly are not unfair.

Smith is equally critical of a US foreign policy that has been shortsighted, inconsistent, and ill-informed. He is rightly wary of US alliances with regimes that at best pay lip service to our antiterror aims and at worst overtly support the very groups and individuals we are trying to target. Just as the American experiment with democracy in Iraq was an endeavor rich in optimism and egregious in miscalculation, so too, Smith argues, are US alliances with certain countries in the Middle East.

Smith advocates a US diplomatic and military approach to the Middle East that mirrors the nuance and complexity characteristic of the region’s numerous ethnicities, languages, histories, and competing claims to power. It is clear the US will need a large measure of Smith’s willingness to call the shortcomings, successes, and lies of the Middle East what they actually are if anything beneficial is to result from our activities in the region.

Jackson Holahan is a freelance writer in East Haddam, Ct.

Voir encore:

Muslim Rage and the Obama Retreat

We can’t declare a unilateral end to our troubles, or avert our gaze from the disorder that afflicts the societies of the Greater Middle East.

Fouad Ajami

The WSJ

September 20, 2012

This is not a Jimmy Carter moment—a U.S. Embassy and its staff seized and held hostage for 444 days, America’s enemies taking stock of its weakness, its allies running for cover. But the anti-American protests that broke upon 20 nations this past week must be reckoned a grand personal failure for Barack Obama, and a case of hubris undone.

No American president before this one had proclaimed such intimacy with a world that stretches from Morocco to Indonesia. From the start of his administration, Mr. Obama put forth his own biography as a bridge to those aggrieved nations. He would be a « different president, » he promised, and the years he lived among Muslims would acquit him—and thus America itself. He was the un-Bush.

And so, in June 2009, Mr. Obama descended on Cairo. He had opposed the Iraq war, he had Muslim relatives, and he would offer Egyptians, and by extension other Arabs, the promise of a « new beginning. » They told their history as a tale of victimization at the hands of outsiders, and he empathized with that narrative.

He spoke of « colonialism that denied rights and opportunities to many Muslims, and a Cold War in which Muslim -majority countries were too often treated as proxies without regard to their own aspirations. »

Without knowing it, he had broken a time-honored maxim of that world: Never speak ill of your own people when in the company of strangers. There was too little recognition of the malignant trilogy—anti-Americanism, anti- Semitism and anti-modernism—that had poisoned the life of Egypt and much of the region.

The crowd took in what this stranger had to say, and some were flattered by his embrace of their culture. But ever since its encounter with the guns and ideas of the West in the opening years of the 19th century, the region had seen conquerors come and go. Its people have an unfailing eye for the promises and predilections of outsiders.

I t didn’t take long for this new American leader to come down to earth. In the summer of 2009, Iran erupted in rebellion against its theocratic rulers. That upheaval exposed the contradictions at the heart of the Obama approach. At his core, he was a hyper- realist: The call of freedom did not tug at him. He was certain that the theocracy would respond to his outreach, resulting in a diplomatic breakthrough. But Iran’s clerical rulers had no interest in a breakthrough. We are the Great Satan, and they need their foreign demons to maintain their grip on power.

The embattled « liberals » in the region were awakened to the truth of Mr. Obama. He was a man of the status quo, with a superficial knowledge of lands beyond. In Cairo, he had described himself as a « student of history. » But in his first foreign television interview, he declared his intention to restore U.S. relations with the Islamic world to « the same respect and partnership that America had with the Muslim world as recently as 20 or 30 years ago. »

This coincided, almost to the day, with the 30th anniversary of the Ayatollah Khomeini’s rise to power in Iran. That « golden age » he sought to restore covered the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, the fall of Beirut to the forces of terror, deadly attacks on our embassies, the downing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, and more. A trail of terror had shadowed the American presence.

Yet here was a president who would end this history, who would withdraw from both the « good war » in Afghanistan and the bad one in Iraq. Here was a president who would target America’s real enemy—al Qaeda. « Osama bin Laden is dead, » we’ve been told time and again, and good riddance to him. But those attacking our embassies last week had a disturbing rebuttal: « Obama, we are Osama! » they chanted, some brandishing al Qaeda flags.

Until last Tuesday’s deadly attack on our consulate in Benghazi, it was the fashion of Mr. Obama and his lieutenants to proclaim that the tide of war is receding. But we can’t declare a unilateral end to our troubles, nor can we avert our gaze from the disorder that afflicts the societies of the Greater Middle East.

A Muslim world that can take to the streets, as far away as Jakarta, in protest against a vulgar film depiction of the Prophet Muhammad—yet barely call up a crowd on behalf of a Syrian population that has endured unspeakable hell at the hands of the dictator Bashar al-Assad—is in need of self-criticism and repair. We do these societies no favor if we leave them to the illusion that they can pass through the gates of the modern world carrying those ruinous ideas.

Yet the word in Washington is that we must pull back from those troubled Arab and Muslim lands. The grand expectations that Mr. Obama had for Afghanistan have largely been forgotten. The Taliban are content to wait us out, secure in the knowledge that, come 2014, we and our allies will have quit the place. And neighboring Pakistan, a nuclear-armed country with 170 million people, is written off as a hotbed of extremism.

Meanwhile, Syria burns and calls for help, but the call goes unanswered. The civil war there has become a great Sunni-Shiite schism. Lebanon teeters on the edge. More important, trouble has spilled into Turkey. The Turks have come to resent the American abdication and the heavy burden the Syrian struggle has imposed on them. In contrast, the mullahs in Iran have read the landscape well and are determined to sustain the Assad dictatorship.

Our foreign policy has been altered, as never before, to fit one man’s electoral needs. We hear from the presidential handlers only what they want us to believe about the temper of distant lands. It was only yesterday that our leader, we are told, had solved the riddle of our position in the world.

Give him your warrant, the palace guard intone, at least until the next election. In tales of charismatic, chosen leaders, it is always, and only, about the man at the helm.

Mr. Ajami is a senior fellow at Stanford’s Hoover Institution and the author most recently of « The Syrian Rebellion » (Hoover Press, 2012).

Voir de même:

Muslims, Mormons and Liberals

Why is it OK to mock one religion but not another?

Bret Stephens

September 19, 2012

‘Hasa Diga Eebowai » is the hit number in Broadway’s hit musical « The Book of Mormon, » which won nine Tony awards last year. What does the phrase mean? I can’t tell you, because it’s unprintable in a family newspaper.

On the other hand, if you can afford to shell out several hundred bucks for a seat, then you can watch a Mormon missionary get his holy book stuffed—well, I can’t tell you about that, either. Let’s just say it has New York City audiences roaring with laughter.

Why is it OK to mock one religion but not another? Columnist Bret Stephens joins Opinion Journal.

The « Book of Mormon »—a performance of which Hillary Clinton attended last year, without registering a complaint—comes to mind as the administration falls over itself denouncing « Innocence of Muslims. » This is a film that may or may not exist; whose makers are likely not who they say they are; whose actors claim to have known neither the plot nor purpose of the film; and which has never been seen by any member of the public except as a video clip on the Internet.

No matter. The film, the administration says, is « hateful and offensive » (Susan Rice), « reprehensible and disgusting » (Jay Carney) and, in a twist, « disgusting and reprehensible » (Hillary Clinton). Mr. Carney, the White House spokesman, also lays sole blame on the film for inciting the riots that have swept the Muslim world and claimed the lives of Ambassador Chris Stevens and three of his staff in Libya.

So let’s get this straight: In the consensus view of modern American liberalism, it is hilarious to mock Mormons and Mormonism but outrageous to mock Muslims and Islam. Why? Maybe it’s because nobody has ever been harmed, much less killed, making fun of Mormons.

Here’s what else we learned this week about the emerging liberal consensus: That it’s okay to denounce a movie you haven’t seen, which is like trashing a book you haven’t read. That it’s okay to give perp-walk treatment to the alleged—and no doubt terrified—maker of the film on legally flimsy and politically motivated grounds of parole violation. That it’s okay for the federal government publicly to call on Google to pull the video clip from YouTube in an attempt to mollify rampaging Islamists. That it’s okay to concede the fundamentalist premise that religious belief ought to be entitled to the highest possible degree of social deference—except when Mormons and sundry Christian rubes are concerned.

And, finally, this: That the most « progressive » administration in recent U.S. history will make no principled defense of free speech to a Muslim world that could stand hearing such a defense. After the debut of « The Book of Mormon » musical, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints responded with this statement: « The production may attempt to entertain audiences for an evening but the Book of Mormon as a volume of scripture will change people’s lives forever by bringing them closer to Christ. »

That was it. The People’s Front for the Liberation of Provo will not be gunning for a theater near you. Is it asking too much of religious and political leaders in Muslim communities to adopt a similar attitude?

It needn’t be. A principled defense of free speech could start by quoting the Quran: « And it has already come down to you in the Book that when you hear the verses of Allah [recited], they are denied [by them] and ridiculed; so do not sit with them until they enter into another conversation. » In this light, the true test of religious conviction is indifference, not susceptibility, to mockery.

The defense could add that a great religion surely cannot be goaded into frenetic mob violence on the slimmest provocation. Yet to watch the images coming out of Benghazi, Cairo, Tunis and Sana’a is to witness some significant portion of a civilization being transformed into Travis Bickle, the character Robert De Niro made unforgettable in Taxi Driver. « You talkin’ to me? »

A defense would also point out that an Islamic world that insists on a measure of religious respect needs also to offer that respect in turn. When Sheikh Yusuf Qaradawi—the closest thing Sunni Islam has to a pope—praises Hitler for exacting « divine punishment » on the Jews, that respect isn’t exactly apparent. Nor has it been especially apparent in the waves of Islamist-instigated pogroms that have swept Egypt’s Coptic community in recent years.

Finally, it need be said that the whole purpose of free speech is to protect unpopular, heretical, vulgar and stupid views. So far, the Obama administration’s approach to free speech is that it’s fine so long as it’s cheap and exacts no political price. This is free speech as pizza.

President Obama came to office promising that he would start a new conversation with the Muslim world, one that lectured less and listened more. After nearly four years of listening, we can now hear more clearly where the U.S. stands in the estimation of that world: equally despised but considerably less feared. Just imagine what four more years of instinctive deference will do.

On the bright side, dear liberals, you’ll still be able to mock Mormons. They tend not to punch back, which is part of what makes so many of them so successful in life.

Voir enfin:

The Whispers of Democracy in Ancient Judaism

The prayers of the High Holidays rest on personal responsibility—the basis of self-government.

Eric Rosenberg

September 20, 2012

Jews are in the midst of a period known as the Days of Awe, which began on Sunday night with Rosh Hashanah and culminates next Wednesday with Yom Kippur. It seems almost a misnomer to call them « holidays, » though the first marks the Jewish New Year. Rather, they are deeply personal events whose aim is self-reflection, self-improvement and repairing what is broken in daily relationships.

It’s striking how much this most important period on the Jewish calendar shares with that most essential exercise in American democracy. Walt Whitman wrote in the late 1800s that « a well-contested American national election » was « the triumphant result of faith in human kind. » This country’s unique sense of optimism—the view that the future is unwritten and full of possibility, that anything can be achieved—is also the sensibility underpinning the Days of Awe.

On a cosmic level, Rosh Hashanah commemorates the birth of the world. On an individual level, it marks the rebirth of the soul as Jews examine their faults and ask forgiveness from those they have wronged. At heart, Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are deeply optimistic events. A major theme in the prayers Jews recite on the High Holidays is the striving to be a better person, with the understanding that we are in control of our future.

As moderns, we take for granted how fundamentally revolutionary the Jews were in arriving at this novel concept about time, destiny and personal responsibility. Until their call to monotheism nearly four millennia ago, the worldview in the Levant was very different. Life was an endless cycle devoted to agrarian pursuits and appeasing warring gods in aid of those pursuits.

Thomas Cahill, in his riveting book « The Gifts of the Jews, » underscores the point: « For the ancients, nothing new ever did happen, except for the occasional monstrosity. Life on Earth followed the course of the stars. And what had been would, in due course, come around again. . . . The future was always to be a replay of the past, as the past was simply an earthly replay of the drama of the heavens. »

Perhaps the most profound gift of the Jews is that they broke down this fatalistic notion of the world, in which people were trapped on a great spinning wheel, with no future or past. In this way, the ancient Jews invented the concept of history in which the future was not an endless cycle but could be steered by our actions in the present. They inserted the individual, and individual responsibility and justice, into the equation.

This ancient Jewish view was a massive shift in how people viewed mankind’s relationship to a deity—and it put responsibility squarely on the shoulders of men and women for their own destiny. This was the end of predetermination and the beginning of personal choice, justice and the quest for liberty. These themes, prevalent in the Jewish liturgy, are on display among the candidates competing for the White House, whatever the political party.

Democracy, Mr. Cahill says, « grows directly out of the Israelite vision of individuals—subjects of value because they are images of God, each with a unique and personal destiny. »

Similarly, the University of Chicago historian William F. Irwin lectured in the 1940s that it was the ancient Jewish prophets and their advocacy of freedom that would find an early expression in the Magna Carta and later in the American Bill of Rights. Perhaps that is partly because the ancient Jews had such terrible experiences with monarchs.

Before the Jews swapped their political system—one of a collection of judges—for a monarchy, to be like other Near Eastern governments, the prophet Samuel warned of the predilection of kings for tyranny and over-taxation. A people will buckle under a king, Samuel warned to no avail. « He will take your best fields, vineyards, and olive groves, and give them to his servants. He will tithe your crops and grape harvests to give to his officials and his servants. He will take your male and female slaves. . . . As for you, you will become his slaves. »

One can hear, without too much strain, the distant echoes of Samuel’s admonitions in Thomas Jefferson’s catalog against King George in the Declaration of Independence.

Mr. Rosenberg, a former national correspondent for Hearst Newspapers, is a vice president for Ogilvy Washington.


Caricatures de Charlie Hebdo: Attention, une imposture peut en cacher une autre (French satirical weekly caught again playing the dubious game of moral equivalence)

20 septembre, 2012

NYDailyNewsNe croyez pas que je sois venu apporter la paix sur la terre; je ne suis pas venu apporter la paix, mais l’épée. Car je suis venu mettre la division entre l’homme et son père, entre la fille et sa mère, entre la belle-fille et sa belle-mère; et l’homme aura pour ennemis les gens de sa maison. Jésus
« Le coup de génie, c’est vraiment d’avoir orchestré la concurrence entre les filiales », répéta Dieu pour la millième fois. « Le jour où j’ai trouvé ça…  » Le directeur de la com’ approuva, d’un discret signe de tête. Ne jamais contrarier les accès d’autosatisfaction du Patron. Daniel Schneidermann
« Tout est parti d’une inquiétude des services français qui craignaient dans le contexte que Charlie fasse sa couverture avec une caricature de Mahomet. Il n’en est rien », a expliqué Charb à l’AFP. La couverture, qu’il signe, représente un musulman dans un fauteuil roulant poussé par un juif orthodoxe, avec chapeau et papillote, sous le titre « Intouchables 2 », allusion au film éponyme. « Je leur ai dit qu’il n’y avait rien en couverture, le soufflé est retombé et je pense que M. Fabius n’avait pas vu la Une quand il a parlé en Egypte », a estimé Charb. Libération
Nous sommes entrés dans un mouvement qui est de l’ordre du religieux. Entrés dans la mécanique du sacrilège : la victime, dans nos sociétés, est entourée de l’aura du sacré. Du coup, l’écriture de l’histoire, la recherche universitaire, se retrouvent soumises à l’appréciation du législateur et du juge comme, autrefois, à celle de la Sorbonne ecclésiastique. Françoise Chandernagor
L’image correspondait à la réalité de la situation, non seulement à Gaza, mais en Cisjordanie. Charles Enderlin (Le Figaro, 27/01/05)
A Gaza et dans les territoires occupés (…) les femmes palestiniennes violées par les soldats israéliens sont systématiquement tuées par leur propre famille. Ici, le viol devient un crime de guerre, car les soldats israéliens agissent en parfaite connaissance de cause. Sara Daniel (Le Nouvel Observateur, le 8 novembre 2001, démenti par la suite)
Le fait est que nous savons qu’il y a un trafic d’organes en Israël. Et nous savons aussi qu’il y a des familles qui affirment que les organes de leurs enfants ont été prélevés. Ces deux faits mis ensemble suscitent le besoin d’une enquête plus élaborée. David Boström (journaliste suédois)
Si on ajoute à cela l’importante pénurie d’organes et de donneurs en Israël, l’affaire de Brooklyn, les témoignages des familles palestiniennes, tout ces éléments rassemblés font qu’il est tout à fait vraisemblable qu’un tel vol et trafic d’organes de Palestiniens aient pu avoir lieu. Alexandra Sandels
Nous avons commis une terrible erreur, un texte malencontreux sur l’une de nos photos du jour du 18 avril dernier (à gauche), mal traduit de la légende, tout ce qu’il y a de plus circonstanciée, elle, que nous avait fournie l’AFP*: sur la « reconstitution », dans un camp de réfugiés au Liban, de l’arrestation par de faux militaires israéliens d’un Palestinien, nous avons omis d’indiquer qu’il s’agissait d’une mise en scène, que ces « soldats » jouaient un rôle et que tout ça relevait de la pure et simple propagande. C’est une faute – qu’atténuent à peine la précipitation et la mauvaise relecture qui l’ont provoquée. C’en serait une dans tous les cas, ça l’est plus encore dans celui-là: laisser planer la moindre ambiguïté sur un sujet aussi sensible, quand on sait que les images peuvent être utilisées comme des armes de guerre, donner du crédit à un stratagème aussi grossier, qui peut contribuer à alimenter l’exaspération antisioniste là où elle s’enflamme sans besoin de combustible, n’appelle aucun excuse. Nous avons déconné, gravement. J’ai déconné, gravement: je suis responsable du site de L’Express, et donc du dérapage. A ce titre, je fais amende honorable, la queue basse, auprès des internautes qui ont été abusés, de tous ceux que cette supercherie a pu blesser et de l’AFP, qui n’est EN AUCUN CAS comptable de nos propres bêtises. Eric Mettout (L’Express)
Oui, c’est une évidence flagrante qu’il y a des risques liés aux infibulations. Mais il est tout aussi évident qu’une petite entaille, pratique qui ne comporte aucune ablation de tissu ou d’altération définitive des organes génitaux féminins, n’est pas plus risquée que les formes de circoncision masculine ou de piercing qui sont largement (bien qu’évidemment pas uniformément) admises dans la société occidentale. (…) La recherche épidémiologique nous renseigne sur le degré de risque de divers types associé à différentes formes de pratiques. Elle ne nous dit pas quand le risque est trop grand. Et qui décide quand le risque devient trop important ? Cela doit-il être décidé par des organismes internationaux? Des gouvernements ? Quand cela devient-il une nouvelle forme d’impérialisme culturel? Bettina Coquille-Duncan (anthropologue, université de Washington, 28.02.08)
Il serait peut-être plus efficace, en guise de compromis, pour éviter un mal plus grand, que les lois fédérales et les états autorisent les pédiatres à pratiquer une entaille rituelle pour satisfaire la demande des familles. Académie de Pédiatrie Américaine (06.05.10)
Dans le contexte actuel – des manifestations dans le monde musulman contre un film anti-islam, une ambassade américaine incendiée et des diplomates tués –, « Charlie Hebdo » fait de la pure provocation. Il joue à la fois sur la peur des Français non musulmans et sur celle des musulmans, qui craignent la stigmatisation et la prise à partie. Il est important de préciser que les récentes manifestations violentes ne concernent que quelques centaines d’individus et sont condamnées par les gouvernements, y compris ceux issus des Frères musulmans. Elles sont le fruit d’une minorité d’excités, qui ne représentent en rien l’ensemble des musulmans. Il faut se garder de tout amalgame entre cette image minoritaire et déformée de l’islam et la réalité. Or le numéro de « Charlie Hebdo » de cette semaine fait tout l’inverse et participe à l’amalgame. Le moment me semble donc particulièrement mal choisi, « Charlie Hebdo » aurait pu faire ce type de numéro dans une période plus calme. Tout ça ne va pas faciliter la tâche de nos diplomates à l’étranger et il faut souhaiter que nos ambassades ne soient pas prises à partie. Si le moment est mal choisi, il est bien sûr très opportun pour l’intérêt commercial de « Charlie Hebdo ». Ce journal sait que quand on tape sur l’islam, on vend du papier. L’intérêt est donc bien plus commercial qu’une recherche de liberté. Il est très différent de se moquer de la mort de De Gaulle dans une France gaulliste, où l’opposition était faible et la liberté de la presse pas aussi conséquente qu’aujourd’hui, et se moquer de nos jours des musulmans, qui ne sont pas en position de pouvoir en France, n’ont pas d’appuis dans la presse, sont montrés du doigt et connaissent des difficultés d’intégration. Autrement dit, ce n’est pas la même chose de taper sur le fort ou sur le faible. Le premier cas de figure relève du courage, pas le second. Les vrais dissidents ne tapent pas sur les faibles, mais sur les puissants. Là est le courage. (…) La tradition libertaire de « Charlie Hebdo » appartient depuis plusieurs années déjà au passé du journal, qui joue maintenant à fond la carte « beauf-raciste ». Il ratisse ainsi un nouveau type de lectorat, bien éloigné à mon avis des libertaires du début. (…) Il faut faire tomber les masques et dire que « Charlie Hebdo » est devenu journal populiste et non plus libertaire. Il n’y a rien de courageux à taper sur les musulmans en France à notre époque. Pascal Boniface
Il y a un an déjà, les invocations de « blasphème » avaient fait une percée remarquée en France avec la condamnation par les catholiques de deux pièces de théâtre et celle par les musulmans de caricatures du prophète Mahomet publiées, déjà, par Charlie Hebdo. Or, cette notion apparaît anachronique, incompréhensible même pour nombre de contemporains détachés de toute croyance ou d’affinités avec le « sacré ». D’autant que, historiquement, accuser un non-croyant ou le croyant d’une autre religion de « blasphème » n’a guère de sens : les provocations venues de l’extérieur d’une communauté devraient donc être considérées comme insignifiantes par les croyants de la confession visée. Le Monde
La circoncision (…) est aujourd’hui une intervention chirurgicale bénigne, mais dont les complications peuvent être sérieuses si l’acte chirurgical est réalisé par des praticiens peu qualifiés ou mal équipés. La circoncision est créditée d’un certain nombre d’effets bénéfiques : limitation du risque de transmission hétérosexuelle de l’infection par le VIH chez l’homme (Organisation mondiale de la santé, 2007), prévention des fréquents paraphimosis (inflammation du prépuce) de l’enfance ; prévention de certains problèmes sexuels chez les jeunes hommes en rapport avec les fréquents prépuces serrés. (…) Cette analyse montre aussi qu’il n’est pas possible de comparer la circoncision à l’excision clitoridienne dont les bénéfices sanitaires sont nuls face aux risques hémorragiques, infectieux mais surtout sexuels. Cette mutilation, car c’en est une, limite en effet pour sa vie entière le plaisir sexuel de la petite fille qui en est l’objet. Sur les plans religieux et culturel, (…) [b]ien que n’étant pas mentionnée dans le Coran, la circoncision est pratiquée dans l’ensemble du monde musulman, où elle est considérée comme une prescription de la tradition de l’islam, et la plupart des familles y sont très attachées. Elle revêt un caractère central dans la culture, la religion et l’identité juives, dont elle constitue l’un des principaux marqueurs. Rappelons que des milliers d’hommes juifs ont payé de leur vie l’existence de cette scarification reconnaissable entre toutes, qui témoigne de l’alliance avec Dieu. Si les familles juives ont continué à marquer ainsi leurs garçons, malgré les risques mortels, c’est pour que chaque juif soit reconnu comme tel par les juifs comme par les non-juifs. La mise en cause de la liberté de faire circoncire leurs garçons par les familles juives est une remise en question de leur identité la plus intime, la plus mémorielle, alors même que s’éteignent peu à peu les regards qui ont vu la Shoah. (…) Vouloir limiter la discussion sur la circoncision à sa seule dimension sanitaire aboutit à nier a priori son rôle dans la transmission de l’identité religieuse et à une remise en cause majeure de celle-ci. C’est comme si on réduisait la question du voile islamique à un débat sur la santé des cheveux, le débat sur la burqa au rapport bénéfices-risques du soleil sur la peau, vitamine D d’un côté, mélanome de l’autre, ou encore, comme si on remettait en question la pratique du carême, de la cacherout ou du ramadan pour des raisons nutritionnelles. Ce type de raisonnement, qui met en avant des arguments sanitaires aux dépens des pratiques religieuses et culturelles, pour le bien des populations, sonne de façon familière aux oreilles de ceux qui connaissent les rhétoriques totalitaires : élimination des malades mentaux sous couvert d’eugénisme dans l’Allemagne nazie, rhétorique sur la « régénération » des citadins par l’hygiène du travail de la terre chez les massacreurs khmers rouges, reprise en main des jeunes Français par l’hygiénisme des chantiers de jeunesse sous le régime de Vichy, les exemples ne manquent pas. Loin de moi l’idée d’assimiler à des adeptes du totalitarisme tous ceux qui seraient prêts à interdire la circoncision avant la majorité des garçons, mais ont-ils pesé toutes les dimensions du problème ? Et que savent-ils des motivations profondes des leaders, Michel Onfray par exemple, qui accompagnent les campagnes militantes visant à cette interdiction, dont on peut parfois se demander jusqu’où peut conduire leur haine des « monothéismes » ? Richard Guédon
Peu de juifs sont susceptibles de venir s’installer en France, l’assimilation par les mariages mixtes se poursuit, l’aliya [le départ en Israël] aussi, à raison de 1 500 à 2 000 personnes par an. Dans vingt ans, il y aura probablement moins de juifs en France. La question est : veut-on qu’il y en ait un peu moins ou beaucoup moins ? C’est la responsabilité de la France de maintenir une communauté vivante et active. (…) Ces tentatives de remise en cause d’une pratique religieuse ne sont pas des accidents de parcours mais le signe que nos sociétés s’arc-boutent contre le fait religieux. Nous venons d’en avoir une autre illustration en Allemagne avec le débat sur la circoncision. Ce jugement [qui a remis en cause le droit de circoncire un enfant pour des raisons religieuses sans son accord] montre que l’on a atteint un point extrême dans les atteintes à la liberté de culte. Pour nous, l’abattage rituel ou la circoncision sont des pratiques qui ne sont pas négociables. Sinon, cela signifie pour les juifs d’Europe qu’ils doivent partir. La maladresse de François Fillon au printemps [l’ex-premier ministre avait laissé entendre que juifs et musulmans devaient revoir leurs « traditions ancestrales »] montre qu’il faut être vigilant. Il ne faudrait pas entériner le projet d’une société qui accepte toutes les libertés sauf celle de pratiquer une religion. Joël Mergui (président du Consistoire central israélite de France)
Muslim immigration is nurturing European anti-Semitism in more surprising ways as well. One unintended and ironic consequence of European Islam’s demographic growth is that Jews are frequently amalgamated with Muslims. Many people use a widespread concern about a growing influence of Islam in Europe as a way to hurt Jews as well, or to hit them first. (…)  to wrest Europe or any historically Christian part of the world from Christianity; recognizes the supremacy of state law over religious law in non-ritual matters; and sees Western democracy — a polity based on the rule of law — as the most legitimate political system. But Europeans are not culturally equipped to understand such nuances or to keep them in mind (far less than the Americans, who are more religious-minded, more conversant in Biblical matters, and more familiar with the Jewish way of life). (…) And what usually originates as a reaction against difficulties linked to radical brands of Islam quickly evolves into a primarily anti-Jewish business. (…) Earlier this year in France, during the last months of the conservative Sarkozy administration, a debate about the rapidly growing halal meat industry led to attacks against the kosher meat industry as well, complete with uncomely remarks about “old-fashioned rituals” by then-Prime Minister François Fillon. While Fillon subsequently “clarified” his views, the Sarkozy administration upheld its support for some kind of “tagging” of “ritually slaughtered meat,” a European Union-promoted practice that would prompt commercial boycott of such food and thus make it financially unaffordable for most prospective buyers. Since kosher meat regulations are much stricter than halal meat regulations, religious Jews would be more hurt at the end of the day than religious Muslims. (…) In Germany, a rare case of malpractice by a German Muslim doctor in a Muslim circumcision led a court in Cologne to ban circumcision on children all over Germany on June 19, on the quite extravagant grounds that only legal adults may decide on issues irreversibly affecting their body, except for purely medical reasons. Which is tantamount, in the considered issue, to denying parents the right to pass their religion to their children. Conservative Chancellor Angela Merkel immediately filled a bill to make religious circumcision legal in Germany, and it was passed on July 19 by the Bundestag (somehow, German conservatives are nowadays more genuinely conservative than, say, their French counterparts). But according to a YouGov poll for the DPA news agency released at about the same moment, 45% of Germans support the ban, while only 42% oppose it. In an even more ominous instance, Judaism has been singled out in a protracted intellectual debate in France since early June, as the fountainhead, past and present, of totalitarianism and political violence and thus as a more dangerous religion than radical Islam. (…) The second half of the 20th century was a golden age for French Jews, both in terms of numbers (from 250,000 souls in 1945 to 700,000 in 1970 due to population transfers and natural growth) and in terms of religious and cultural revival. There was only one shadow: the French government’s anti-Israel switch engineered by Charles de Gaulle in 1966, in part as a consequence of a more global anti-American switch. The 21st century may however be a much darker age. After a first wave of anti-Jewish violence in the early 2000s, some Jews left for Israel or North America. Emigration never really ceased since then, and may soon reach much more important proportions. Michel Gurfinkiel
Il est coutumier, en Occident, dans les médias, chez les universitaires s’affichant experts et dans la classe politique, de pratiquer, à l’égard du conflit israélo-arabe, ce qu’on peut appeler l’«imposture de l’équivalence morale». (…) Concrètement, l’équivalence morale signifie une culpabilité également partagée, une mauvaise foi également répartie, une intransigeance également intraitable. Vous voyez le topo: Israéliens et Palestiniens, tous dans le même sac! Ils sont tous fautifs, pleins de haine. C’est là, reconnaissez-le, une posture facile et combien rassurante puisque ça vous dispense de prendre parti. (…) Convenons, toutefois, que la pratique de l’équivalence morale n’est pas un phénomène récent. Il est sans cesse présent dans l’Histoire. En 1938, à Munich, la France et l’Angleterre se sont déshonorées en mettant justement sur le même pied, d’une part, le régime nazi, raciste, totalitaire, militariste, fourbe et, d’autre part, les États démocratiques. On sait fort bien ce qu’il advint: la Tchécoslovaquie fut avalée par le Reich et la Paix rata son rendez-vous. Jacques Brassard
Depuis 10 ans, depuis l’avènement du « communautarisme musulman », quand un juif se fait agresser en France, les médias titrent spontanément l’évènement sous la pudique formule de « tensions inter-communautaires » éloignant ainsi les juifs de la communauté nationale, les relayant au statut de néo immigrants. (…) Il n’y a pas de tensions inter communautaires en France, comme il n’y a aucune comparaison à faire entre Israël état démocratique et les salafistes transnationaux qui brûlent, assassinent, violent des membres des services diplomatiques occidentaux. (…) Le judaisme n’a jamais souffert de ses caricatures, ni Rabbi Jacob, ni la Vérité si je Mens, ni des sorties acerbes de Coluche ou caustiques de Desproges. Aucun de ces caricatures n’ont engendré d’explosions ou de massacres de masses. Axel Rehouv
Le nouveau scandale lancé par Charlie Hebdo est aussi significatif de l’idéologie dominante. En portraiturant un Juif orthodoxe poussant la chaise roulante d’un musulman (et donc la dirigeant), il « justifie » la provocation anti-musulmane en « l’équilibrant » par une comparaison de l’intolérance islamique avec une pseudo-intolérance judaïque. J’aimerais que l’on nous donne des exemples de l’intolérance des Juifs sur le plan français et que l’on nous montre son caractère meurtrier dans le monde entier. Nous observons ainsi comment les critiques de l’islam instrumentalisent l’antijudaïsme pour éviter d’être taxés de racistes et dire en même temps leur critique des Juifs. C’est d’autant plus odieux que ces mêmes juifs, eux, n’ont jamais bronché devant les énormités que les médias débitent depuis 10 ans sur la communauté juive et Israël. Shmuel Trigano

Attention: une imposture peut en cacher une autre!

Obligation de protection policière pour les lieux de culte ou d’enseignement, non-condamnation ou non-application des peines pour les auteurs d’actes antisémites ou d’incitation au meurtre, difficulté d’obtention de menus casher pour les détenus, calendrier des concours et examens ne tenant pas toujours compte du shabbat et des fêtes, manque de carrés confessionnels, mise en cause de l’abattage rituel, de la circoncision (jusqu’à New York!) et du soutien à Israël, parti-pris systématique pro-palestinien ou anti-israélien  de la plupart des médias (on floute l’imam mais pas le rabbin) …

A l’heure où, sur fond de récupération jihadiste, une France largement désarmée par son état de déchristianisation avancée mais prête par ailleurs à baillonner sa recherche par les lois mémorielles les plus liberticides, redécouvre avec le reste d’un Occident où l’on manifeste ou scie des croix seins nus ou déguisées en « salopes » contre le patriarcat les questions que l’on croyait oubliées de loyauté religieuse, comme pour le lieu de repos ultime de l’animateur de télévision récemment décédé Jean-Claude Delarue (le choix, potentiellement déchirant pour les familles, du cimetière si vous voulez reposer auprès de la femme de votre vie et que celle-ci est d‘origine musulmane)

Et où, après les affaires de la viande halal et de la circoncision (les mêmes qui étaient hier prêts à composer avec le prétendu besoin d’excision des nouveaux damnés de la terre vont-ils à présent exiger, pour une population déjà contrainte de pratiquer sa religion ou d’acheter sa viande sous protection policière, l’interdiction d’un des rites fondamentaux du judaïsme avec à terme la réalisation du vieux rêve nazi d’une Europe enfin judenfrei?) …

Et à l’instar d’un Charlie hebdo se croyant obligé d’amalgamer la prétendue susceptibilité juive à la caricature à celle des foules de sauvages vandalisant actuellement les représentations diplomatiques occidentales dans les pays musulmans, nos médias comme nos politiques multiplient les gestes de contrition (puisqu’on vous dit que tous les fondamentalismes se valent et que le Grand Satan occidental et américain est bien naturellement responsable de l’obscur torchon de 3e zone faussement attribué à un « Israélo-américain, marchand de biens et financé par des Juifs » mais concocté en fait par des Egyptiens sur son sol et qui sert actuellement de prétexte, pour déchainer leur violence et leur haine de l’Occident, aux jihadistes de la planète entière) et de noyage de poisson (faisant par exemple mine de s’inquiéter d’une éventuelle réaction d' »intégristes » catholiques à une énième annonce sensationnaliste sur la prétendue « femme de Jésus« ) …

Retour, avec Jacques Brassard, sur l’ « imposture de l’équivalence morale ».

Cette forme particulière de bienpensance de l’intelligentsia occidentale qui, derrière la prétendue neutralité ou équité affichée, revient en fait à l’amalgame le plus mensonger quand ce n’est pas à l’inversion pure et simple des rôles (l’agressé devenant l’agresseur) …

Et pourrait déboucher à terme, si l’on n’y prête attention, sur la continuation de la solution finale par d’autre moyens

L’équivalence morale, ou l’hypocrisie occidentale

Jacques Brassard

Le Quotidien

12 août 2009

Il est coutumier, en Occident, dans les médias, chez les universitaires s’affichant experts et dans la classe politique, de pratiquer, à l’égard du conflit israélo-arabe, ce qu’on peut appeler l’«imposture de l’équivalence morale». Un exemple récent: l’opinion d’un ancien Premier ministre du Québec, Bernard Landry, dans sa chronique publiée par la revue La Semaine.

Concrètement, l’équivalence morale signifie une culpabilité également partagée, une mauvaise foi également répartie, une intransigeance également intraitable. Vous voyez le topo: Israéliens et Palestiniens, tous dans le même sac! Ils sont tous fautifs, pleins de haine. C’est là, reconnaissez-le, une posture facile et combien rassurante puisque ça vous dispense de prendre parti. C’est cependant une attitude parfaitement odieuse et méprisable.

Négociations

De plus, Bernard Landry se félicite de la «providentielle élection d’Obama». Le nouveau Président, il en est convaincu, va offrir en cadeau la paix au Moyen-Orient. Voilà un optimisme qui confine à l’angélisme. Parce qu’aucune paix ne saurait surgir de l’équivalence morale. Or, le Président américain a justement fondé sa politique sur l’équivalence morale entre Juifs et Palestiniens.

Convenons, toutefois, que la pratique de l’équivalence morale n’est pas un phénomène récent. Il est sans cesse présent dans l’Histoire. En 1938, à Munich, la France et l’Angleterre se sont déshonorées en mettant justement sur le même pied, d’une part, le régime nazi, raciste, totalitaire, militariste, fourbe et, d’autre part, les États démocratiques. On sait fort bien ce qu’il advint: la Tchécoslovaquie fut avalée par le Reich et la Paix rata son rendez-vous.

Obama, lui, n’hésite pas, pour asseoir son équivalence morale, à dénaturer l’Histoire en adhérant au mensonge arabe sur Israël. Pour les Arabes, Israël est, en quelque sorte, le fruit de l’Holocauste. L’Occident, se sentant coupable du génocide de 6 millions de Juifs, aurait cherché l’apaisement de sa conscience en créant l’État d’Israël. Les Juifs n’auraient donc aucun droit sur la terre d’Israël du point de vue légal, historique et moral. Obama, dans son discours du Caire (une inconvenante et fantaisiste louange de l’islam) légitime cette mystification comme, d’ailleurs, tous les antisionistes et antisémites occidentaux.

Foyer national juif

Pourtant, comme l’écrit Caroline Glick, la «communauté internationale a reconnu les droits légaux, historiques et moraux, du peuple juif bien avant que quiconque n’ait jamais entendu parler d’Adolf Hitler. En 1922, la Société des Nations avait mandaté la «reconstruction» et non la création du foyer national juif sur la terre d’Israël dans ses frontières historiques.»

L’autre volet de l’équivalence morale consiste à se focaliser, de façon quasi exclusive, sur la question des implantations juives en Judée-Samarie tout en occultant pudiquement le refus systématique, depuis 60 ans, des Palestiniens de reconnaître à Israël le droit à une existence légitime.

Enfin, les adeptes de l’équivalence morale mettent sur le même pied les actions et les opérations de défense d’une population agressée et le terrorisme aveugle et barbare des phalanges islamistes. Pire, écrit Caroline Glick, «de façon odieuse et mensongère, Obama a allègrement comparé la manière dont Israël traite les Palestiniens à celle dont les esclavagistes blancs en Amérique traitaient leurs esclaves noirs. De façon plus ignoble encore, en utilisant le terme de «résistance», euphémisme arabe pour désigner le terrorisme palestinien, Obama a conféré à celui-ci la grandeur morale des révoltes des esclaves et du mouvement des Droits civiques.»

Spectateur euphorique

Face à ce triste spectacle, quelle est, pensez-vous, la stratégie de Mahmoud Abbas, le chef du Fatah et président de l’Autorité palestinienne? Ne pas bouger! Se mettre en attente! Ne rien donner. Se faire spectateur euphorique de la manoeuvre du Président américain installant Israël, comme l’écrit Guy Millière, «en position de bouc-émissaire, puis de victime expiatoire». Inutile de vous dire qu’une telle politique est vouée, dès le départ, à l’échec. À moins que l’État hébreu soit devenu subitement suicidaire…

Ceux qui, tel Obama (et Bernard Landry), adoptent la posture de l’équivalence morale dans le conflit israélo-palestinien sont convaincus de choisir la sagesse, la neutralité, l’équité. En fait, ils prennent parti pour les Palestiniens; ils inversent les rôles, l’agressé devenant l’agresseur.

L’écrivain Pierre Jourde a sans doute raison d’écrire qu’au fond, trop d’Occidentaux perçoivent comme un scandale insupportable le fait qu’«une poignée de Juifs transforment un désert en pays prospère et démocratique au milieu d’un océan de dictatures arabes sanglantes, de misère, d’islamisme et de corruption». C’est trop contraire à la réconfortante équivalence morale.

Voir aussi:

Caricatures : les juifs ne sont pas des musulmans

Axel Rehouv

Europe-Israel

19 septembre, 2012

Comment calmer la colère de musulmans fanatisés ? Il suffit de les caricaturer à coté d’un juif bien évidemment.

Ainsi transpire, sur la prochaine couverture de Charlie Hebdo, le réflexe pavlovien hérité de 30 ans de propagandes sur le conflit israélo-arabe. La mise dos à dos systématique des intégristes musulmans, responsables de centaines de milliers de morts en 30 années de Jihad, et d’un religieux juif pour le coup, totalement inoffensif. Ce type de réflexe souligne combien, l’un ne peut aller sans l’autre, dans l’esprit tétanisé par la peur, des professionnels de l’information.

Depuis 10 ans, depuis l’avènement du « communautarisme musulman », quand un juif se fait agresser en France, les médias titrent spontanément l’évènement sous la pudique formule de « tensions inter-communautaires » éloignant ainsi les juifs de la communauté nationale, les relayant au statut de néo immigrants. Cette exclusion sournoise des juifs de la sphère républicaine renforce le sentiment d’abandon et d’insécurité et incite certains juifs à émigrer ou à assurer leur propre protection.

Il n’y a pas de tensions inter communautaires en France, comme il n’y a aucune comparaison à faire entre Israël état démocratique et les salafistes transnationaux qui brûlent, assassinent, violent des membres des services diplomatiques occidentaux.

Second point, la caricature ci dessus produit un autre effet, celui de faire croire que caricaturer le judaïsme ou de la religion juive engendre exactement les mêmes conséquences matérielles et sociales, que caricaturer la religion musulmane. (les deux religieux étant désignés comme « Intouchables » sous entendu incritiquables, non caricaturables).

Les juifs ne sont pas des musulmans, n’en déplaisent aux frileux journalistes de Charlie Hebdo, lesquels espèrent sans doute apaiser les musulmans fanatisés en leurs jetant l’image d’un juif à rogner. Le judaisme n’a jamais souffert de ses caricatures, ni Rabbi Jacob, ni la Vérité si je Mens, ni des sorties acerbes de Coluche ou caustiques de Déproges. Aucun de ces caricatures n’ont engendré d’explosions ou de massacres de masses. L’incendie de leurs locaux suite aux caricatures de Mahomet, semble les avoir poussé à faire, consciemment ou inconsciemment, d’étranges concessions.

 Voir également:

ANTISÉMITISME : LE RETOUR DU SYNDROME SOCIALISTE ?

Shmuel Trigano

Lessakele

19 septembre 2012

Nous venons d’assister ces derniers jours à une nouvelle étape de la crise antisémite française qui nous remémore la politique erronée du parti socialiste, sous le gouvernement Jospin, quand Daniel Vaillant était au ministère de l’intérieur. Les deux événements qui nous donnent à le penser sont en lien évidemment avec le contre-coup en France de ce « film » minable sur le prophète Mahomet, avec la manifestation qui s’est improvisée sur les Champs Élysées.

C’est dans le discours des médias que je décèle le dispositif que je me propose d’analyser, en mettant deux choses en parallèle : la promptitude avec laquelle les télévisions et la presse se sont faites l’écho d’un mensonge en annonçant que le film était l’œuvre d’un Israélo-américain, marchand de biens et financé par des Juifs ainsi que l’omission dans tous les reportages et rapports de l’unique slogan des manifestants des Champs Élysées : « Etbabkh el yahoud/égorge les Juifs » que tout le monde peut voir et entendre sur internet.

Il y a d’abord beaucoup à dire sur chacun de ces événements. Les médias n’ont jamais statué devant le public sur la désinformation à laquelle ils se sont livrés. On est passé au complot copte sans aucune transition. Or, c’est la première information qui compte et qui reste marquée dans l’esprit. En l’occurrence elle témoignait d’un grave préjugé raciste : la volonté de provocation et la violence des Juifs, majorés du coefficient des « deux satans » chers aux Iraniens, les États-Unis et Israël, de la richesse des Juifs (Israélo-américain était crédité d’être un « marchand de biens » dans l’immobilier), et du complot juif impliqué dans la notion de financement multiple, tout cela indiquant en filigrane l’innocence des musulmans dont, on suppose, de facto, la colère.

C’est aussi inquiétant de voir comment les journalistes, pour introduire jour après jour à toutes les violences odieuses qui se sont produites de par le monde les expliquent toujours en relation avec ce film, alors que tous les analystes savent pertinemment qu’il n’était qu’un prétexte pour « fêter » le 11 septembre en le cachant dans une réaction indignée et victimaire. Ils accréditent ainsi la manipulation des islamistes qui prétendent agir en victimes d’une agression et qui appellent à manifester sur cette base.

Nous nous retrouvons dans une situation semblable à celle du meurtre de Toulouse, lorsque les médias avaient sans réfléchir accusé l’extrême droite, et c’est à nouveau l’illustration que les faiseurs d’opinion ont un scénario tout fait des événements avant même qu’ils se produisent et qui fait écran à la réalité et impose au grand public une version mensongère, à la source de malentendus appelés à aller en s’approfondissant et en s’enroulant l’un sur l’autre. Le principe de ces préjugés consiste toujours à accuser les Juifs et à innocenter les milieux islamiques. L’accusation, en l’occurrence, atteint des proportions énormes : tout y est possible sans que personne ne bronche, au point que la violence d’Israël et des Juifs est devenue un fait d’évidence.

Qui remarque qu’elle est criminogène ? Les « jeunes » qui ont manifesté et qui appelaient au meurtre des Juifs réagissaient peut-être à ce mensonge des médias, ou en tout cas à une précipitation informative qui n’a pris aucun soin de vérification parce qu’elle est inspirée par l’idée de la culpabilité permanente des Juifs. Car c’est des Juifs qu’il est question : le slogan des manifestants sont clairs. Et qui sont les Juifs que l’on conspue sur les Champs Élysées sinon les Juifs français ?

C’est là qu’est tout le problème : pourquoi la séquence en question a-t-elle été censurée par tous les médias ? Tous les médias ! Ce qui suppose qu’il y a un donneur d’ordres à l’ensemble de la presse ? C’est presque inconcevable. Mais c’est pourtant ce qui s’est passé en 2001-2002 lorsque l’information sur 450 agressions antisémites a été durant de très longs mois censurée par l’information publique, le gouvernement et les institutions juives parce que le gouvernement en avait décidé ainsi, on l’a su plus tard « pour ne pas jeter de l’huile sur le feu » si bien que les alertes des Juifs à l’opinion se voyaient taxées de racisme et d’agressivité. C’est cette erreur politique fondamentale qui a ouvert la voie au nouvel antisémitisme et à l’ère de troubles de masse dans laquelle la France ne fait qu’entrer.

Dès le départ on a pu observer la gêne de la TV à rendre compte de cet événement, très parcimonieuse en images et commentaires, avant que Manuel Valls n’intervienne sur FR2 puis que commence la valse des critiques partisanes. Mais les Français n’ont jamais entendu « égorgez les Juifs » sur « la plus belle avenue du monde ». Au point que leur connaissance de la situation est profondément biaisée et faussée et au désavantage des Juifs, dans la perspective de ce qui risque de se produire par la suite.

Nous savions déjà depuis 2001 comment les médias prompts à accuser Israël cachaient de façon préméditée et méthodique les aspects négatifs et compromettants des Palestiniens ou de tout autre acteur arabe, tout en surexposant de façon obsessionnelle les pseudo défaillances d’Israël. Regardez bien la télévision quand on interroge un Palestinien quand il dit « Yahoud » la traduction dit « Israéliens ». C’est une réécriture totale de la réalité qui se produit depuis maintenant 12 ans. Ainsi les Français n’ont jamais rien entendu de l’antisémitisme et du racisme qui se donnent libre cours dans le mode arabo-islamique où les appels au meurtre des Juifs sont permanents et d’abord chez les chers Palestiniens, oui, mais eux, ils sont « autorisés » puisqu’Israël est coupable. On les « comprend » ( ce que disait Védrine en 2001).

En l’occurrence, dans le cas qui nous préoccupe maintenant, la réécriture est scandaleuse, car en écartant les appels au meurtre du reportage, on nous a montré des manifestants, des « jeunes » des banlieues, qui protestaient de leur bonne foi et disaient leur indignation, demandant le respect. On a vu une « nourrice assermentée » en voile hurler contre la violence des policiers. On a parlé de 4 policiers blessés mais on n’a vu aucune scène de confrontation. De même on a qualifié les jeunes venus des banlieues, de jeunes comme les autres « en baskets », qui subissent la crise économique. Or ce sont les mêmes qui hurlaient « mort aux Juifs ». En somme, malgré la condamnation de la manifestation, le schéma victimaire habituel fut reconduit. « L’information » qui arrive au public est ainsi le résultat d’une totale réécriture de l’événement. Tout comme dans la propagation du mensonge sur les origines du film, le résultat est globalement défavorable aux Juifs dont personne ne saura qu’ils sont exposés à la haine antisémite de façon courante. Bien au contraire, on retiendra qu’Israël est coupable. Et on sera étonné quand un Merah tuera des Juifs. Comment le pourrait-il ? Il n’y a pas d’antisémitisme dans le monde musulman ! Ce fut bien là l’essentiel du débat journalistique sur le massacre de Toulouse : les journalistes ont cherché longtemps toutes les explications possibles, toujours victimaires et sociologiques, sauf la motivation de l’islam. Aujourd’hui confirmée.

Le hasard a fait que deux jours après le président de la République inaugurant l’exposition d’art islamique au Louvre se livre à un discours incroyable, fustigeant les extrémistes mais nous disant ce qu’est le véritable islam et affirmant que la violence des intégristes déformait le véritable islam. Discours très étonnant, qu’on n’imagine pas possible au profit d’une autre religion et qui surenchérit sur l’innocentement. La République sait ce qu’est l’islam ! C’est plutôt aux musulmans de dénoncer ce qu’ils pensent être une falsification de leur religion. Pas au président de la République. Sur ce plan-là le recteur de la mosquée de Paris a été autrement plus sérieux en lançant un grave avertissement à la société, en affirmant avec toute la gravité que ce qui s’était passé constituait un grave tournant, très dangereux, augurant de lendemains violents. Dommage qu’une semblable condamnation claire et musclée ne soit jamais venue de sa part pour condamner la haine des Juifs qui fait rage dans le monde musulman et dans la bouche de ses plus hautes autorités, je pense à l’imam Qaradawi, entre autres, chef du conseil de la fatwa pour l’Europe, un personnage décisif donc pour les musulmans français, qui avait appelé il y a quelques mois au Caire au meurtre des Juifs, devant un million de personnes. Personne n’a entendu cela en France au moment où on célébrait le « printemps ». La nouvelle fut censurée, alors que les caméras de la TV vivaient au rythme de la place Tahrir. Pour que Qaradawi ne représente pas l’islam, et il le représente officiellement et institutionnellement, il faudrait qu’il soit formellement désavoué et combattu par d’autres autorités instituées. Nous n’en avons eu aucune jusqu’à ce jour et il y a de quoi être choqué des réactions courroucées du CFCM. On ne l’a jamais entendu se démarquer de ce discours on ne peut plus officiel pour l’islam.

La case manquante de l’information finit toujours par se retourner contre les Juifs et renforcer le discours victimaire auto-complaisant des activistes islamiques. C’est ce que nous avons vu à l’œuvre, documenté et démontré depuis 12 ans. Ce n’est pas pour la sauvegarde de « la paix publique ».

PS : le nouveau scandale lancé par Charlie Hebdo est aussi significatif de l’idéologie dominante. En portraiturant un Juif orthodoxe poussant la chaise roulante d’un musulman (et donc la dirigeant), il « justifie » la provocation anti-musulmane en « l’équilibrant » par une comparaison de l’intolérance islamique avec une pseudo-intolérance judaïque. J’aimerais que l’on nous donne des exemples de l’intolérance des Juifs sur le plan français et que l’on nous montre son caractère meurtrier dans le monde entier. Nous observons ainsi comment les critiques de l’islam instrumentalisent l’antijudaïsme pour éviter d’être taxés de racistes et dire en même temps leur critique des Juifs. C’est d’autant plus odieux que ces mêmes juifs, eux, n’ont jamais bronché devant les énormités que les médias débitent depuis 10 ans sur la communauté juive et Israël.

Voir encore:

Il ne faut pas interdire la circoncision

Richard Guédon, docteur en médecine

Le Monde

29.08.12

Les religions doivent être respectées

Un tribunal allemand a condamné fin juin un médecin et des parents musulmans pour la circoncision de leur enfant, estimant que ceux-ci avaient enfreint le droit de l’enfant à une éducation sans « violence ». Cette décision vient renforcer la position de ceux qui militent pour que la loi interdise aux parents de procéder à la circoncision de leurs garçons avant leur majorité. Cette position est fondée sur l’idée que la circoncision est une mutilation comparable à l’excision chez la petite fille.

Ni juif ni musulman, mais agnostique de famille catholique, je pense qu’il s’agit d’une question grave dont on doit penser les différentes dimensions. La dimension sanitaire : qu’est-ce que la circoncision ? Quel est son rapport bénéfices-risques ?

La circoncision consiste en l’excision du prépuce, petit repli cutané qui recouvre le gland. C’est aujourd’hui une intervention chirurgicale bénigne, mais dont les complications peuvent être sérieuses si l’acte chirurgical est réalisé par des praticiens peu qualifiés ou mal équipés. La circoncision est créditée d’un certain nombre d’effets bénéfiques : limitation du risque de transmission hétérosexuelle de l’infection par le VIH chez l’homme (Organisation mondiale de la santé, 2007), prévention des fréquents paraphimosis (inflammation du prépuce) de l’enfance ; prévention de certains problèmes sexuels chez les jeunes hommes en rapport avec les fréquents prépuces serrés.

De surcroît, jamais depuis le début de l’ère de la médecine scientifique la pratique de la circoncision par le corps médical n’a été contestée par lui comme non éthique. Tâchons néanmoins de répondre à certaines questions que pourrait soulever cette pratique.

Tout d’abord, sur le plan sémantique : la circoncision est-elle une mutilation ? Selon la définition du dictionnaire « mutilation : retranchement d’un membre ou d’une autre partie du corps », il s’agit bien d’une mutilation mineure. Mais ce terme comporte une forte connotation péjorative, évoquant un univers de tortures et de blessures de guerre, de douleurs et de séquelles, sans aucun bénéfice. L’utiliser dans une discussion sur la circoncision, qui comporte indéniablement certains bénéfices, apparaît déjà comme un jugement de valeur.

Cette analyse montre aussi qu’il n’est pas possible de comparer la circoncision à l’excision clitoridienne dont les bénéfices sanitaires sont nuls face aux risques hémorragiques, infectieux mais surtout sexuels. Cette mutilation, car c’en est une, limite en effet pour sa vie entière le plaisir sexuel de la petite fille qui en est l’objet.

Sur les plans religieux et culturel, quelle est la place de la circoncision dans l’islam et le judaïsme ? Bien que n’étant pas mentionnée dans le Coran, la circoncision est pratiquée dans l’ensemble du monde musulman, où elle est considérée comme une prescription de la tradition de l’islam, et la plupart des familles y sont très attachées.

Elle revêt un caractère central dans la culture, la religion et l’identité juives, dont elle constitue l’un des principaux marqueurs. Rappelons que des milliers d’hommes juifs ont payé de leur vie l’existence de cette scarification reconnaissable entre toutes, qui témoigne de l’alliance avec Dieu. Si les familles juives ont continué à marquer ainsi leurs garçons, malgré les risques mortels, c’est pour que chaque juif soit reconnu comme tel par les juifs comme par les non-juifs. La mise en cause de la liberté de faire circoncire leurs garçons par les familles juives est une remise en question de leur identité la plus intime, la plus mémorielle, alors même que s’éteignent peu à peu les regards qui ont vu la Shoah.

Enfin, la dimension familiale : a-t-on le droit de décider de circoncire ses enfants à leur place ? Tout parent sait que l’éducation des enfants est une perpétuelle tentative d’évaluation angoissée du rapport entre les bénéfices et les risques de ce qu’on leur commande, laisse faire ou interdit. Elever un enfant, c’est réfléchir en permanence à ce qu’on peut et à ce qu’on doit lui transmettre, en pesant chaque jour sa liberté d’aujourd’hui à l’aune de celle de demain. Les parents décident, en faisant circoncire leurs garçons, d’inscrire dans leur corps la marque d’une identité plurimillénaire, considérant sans doute que la dimension sanitaire du problème, qu’ils ne méconnaissent pas, est très secondaire par rapport à cette transmission religieuse et culturelle. Veut-on vraiment que la loi décide à leur place ?

Pour se faire une opinion, il faut intégrer toutes ces dimensions. Vouloir limiter la discussion sur la circoncision à sa seule dimension sanitaire aboutit à nier a priori son rôle dans la transmission de l’identité religieuse et à une remise en cause majeure de celle-ci. C’est comme si on réduisait la question du voile islamique à un débat sur la santé des cheveux, le débat sur la burqa au rapport bénéfices-risques du soleil sur la peau, vitamine D d’un côté, mélanome de l’autre, ou encore, comme si on remettait en question la pratique du carême, de la cacherout ou du ramadan pour des raisons nutritionnelles.

Ce type de raisonnement, qui met en avant des arguments sanitaires aux dépens des pratiques religieuses et culturelles, pour le bien des populations, sonne de façon familière aux oreilles de ceux qui connaissent les rhétoriques totalitaires : élimination des malades mentaux sous couvert d’eugénisme dans l’Allemagne nazie, rhétorique sur la « régénération » des citadins par l’hygiène du travail de la terre chez les massacreurs khmers rouges, reprise en main des jeunes Français par l’hygiénisme des chantiers de jeunesse sous le régime de Vichy, les exemples ne manquent pas.

Loin de moi l’idée d’assimiler à des adeptes du totalitarisme tous ceux qui seraient prêts à interdire la circoncision avant la majorité des garçons, mais ont-ils pesé toutes les dimensions du problème ? Et que savent-ils des motivations profondes des leaders, Michel Onfray par exemple, qui accompagnent les campagnes militantes visant à cette interdiction, dont on peut parfois se demander jusqu’où peut conduire leur haine des « monothéismes » ?

Voir enfin:

ENTRETIEN

Joël Mergui : « La société s’arc-boute contre le fait religieux »

Le Monde

16.09.12

A la veille du Nouvel An juif, le président du Consistoire central s’inquiète des atteintes à la liberté de culte

A la veille du Nouvel An juif, Joël Mergui, président du Consistoire central israélite de France, s’inquiète des tentatives de remises en cause, par la société, de « rites fondamentaux ».

Le chef de l’Etat et le premier ministre ont inauguré des lieux de mémoire importants pour la communauté juive, un plan d’action contre le racisme et l’antisémitisme a été annoncé et le ministre de l’intérieur devrait adresser ses voeux aux juifs de France pour Roch Hachana (le Nouvel An juif). Les inquiétudes d’une partie de la communauté juive après l’élection de M. Hollande sont-elles levées ?

Certains se demandaient effectivement si la communauté juive serait aussi entendue que sous le gouvernement précédent. Nous attendions des signaux pour que la confiance ne soit pas perdue. D’autant qu’après la tuerie de Toulouse [au cours de laquelle Mohamed Merah a tué trois enfants et un père de famille juifs], alors que nous nous attendions à une diminution des actes antisémites, nous avons au contraire constaté une sorte de libération de pulsions. Cette affaire a toutefois fait prendre conscience à tous les partis politiques que nous étions arrivés à un point extrême de haine antisémite et antisioniste dans notre société.

Aujourd’hui, dans les échanges que j’ai eus avec le président de la République, le premier ministre et de nombreux ministres, je peux dire que l’écoute et la réactivité sont là, l’expérience dira comment les choses évolueront concrètement.

Quels dossiers abordez-vous avec les ministres ?

Ils touchent à tous les aspects de la vie juive en France, car beaucoup ont le sentiment qu’il devient de plus en plus « pesant » d’y être pratiquant. J’ai abordé des questions liées à la liberté religieuse, à la sécurité des bâtiments, à l’application de peines pour les auteurs d’actes antisémites, aux menus casher pour les détenus juifs, au calendrier des concours et examens pour préserver le shabbat et les fêtes juives, aux carrés confessionnels, au rapport des juifs de France avec Israël et Jérusalem, et bien entendu à l’abattage rituel…

Je leur fais aussi toucher du doigt la réalité préoccupante de la démographie juive en France, aujourd’hui à son maximum. Peu de juifs sont susceptibles de venir s’installer en France, l’assimilation par les mariages mixtes se poursuit, l’aliya [le départ en Israël] aussi, à raison de 1 500 à 2 000 personnes par an. Dans vingt ans, il y aura probablement moins de juifs en France. La question est : veut-on qu’il y en ait un peu moins ou beaucoup moins ? C’est la responsabilité de la France de maintenir une communauté vivante et active.

Sur le dossier de l’abattage rituel, les polémiques qui ont éclaté durant la campagne présidentielle ont-elles fait long feu ?

Je ne pense pas que ces questions soient derrière nous ; les coups peuvent venir de partout, d’autant qu’il s’agit d’un enjeu de niveau européen. Nous attendons que la France joue un rôle moteur en Europe dans la défense de cette pratique millénaire.

Ces tentatives de remise en cause d’une pratique religieuse ne sont pas des accidents de parcours mais le signe que nos sociétés s’arc-boutent contre le fait religieux. Nous venons d’en avoir une autre illustration en Allemagne avec le débat sur la circoncision. Ce jugement [qui a remis en cause le droit de circoncire un enfant pour des raisons religieuses sans son accord] montre que l’on a atteint un point extrême dans les atteintes à la liberté de culte.

Pour nous, l’abattage rituel ou la circoncision sont des pratiques qui ne sont pas négociables. Sinon, cela signifie pour les juifs d’Europe qu’ils doivent partir. La maladresse de François Fillon au printemps [l’ex-premier ministre avait laissé entendre que juifs et musulmans devaient revoir leurs « traditions ancestrales »] montre qu’il faut être vigilant. Il ne faudrait pas entériner le projet d’une société qui accepte toutes les libertés sauf celle de pratiquer une religion.

Une alliance avec les autres religions, et notamment l’islam, peut-elle être efficace ?

Certains sujets sont déjà traités ensemble. Mais je ne veux pas que les juifs subissent des dommages collatéraux parce que la laïcité se durcit ou à cause des difficultés d’installation de l’islam en France. Il faut cesser de s’attaquer à des rites fondamentaux et accepter l’idée que l’islam modéré peut être intégré en France.

Les pratiques cultuelles du judaïsme n’ont jamais été en contradiction avec la République. Il faut continuer de faire confiance au Consistoire pour porter ces pratiques. Plus on est à l’aise dans son identité, mieux on s’intègre. Notre institution sert fréquemment de référence pour l’organisation du culte musulman en France, dont le principal enjeu, à mon sens, consiste à se démarquer de l’islam radical et pas seulement après un événement comme celui de Toulouse.

Contrairement aux catholiques, les religieux juifs n’ont pas pris position sur le mariage ouvert aux homosexuels. Pourquoi ?

C’est un sujet de société compliqué. La religion juive ne reconnaît évidemment pas le mariage homosexuel. Mais, au-delà de l’interdit religieux, je m’interroge sur le sens d’une société qui accorderait la même normalité à des familles où l’enfant aurait deux pères ou deux mères au lieu d’un père et d’une mère, le modèle traditionnel. Le « mariage homosexuel » changerait le modèle naturel de la famille ; c’est une lourde responsabilité. C’est pourquoi il ne faut pas se focaliser sur la religion comme un obstacle, mais voir tout ce que cette question remet en cause dans nos repères, nos rapports à la parenté, à la famille, nos modes d’organisation sociale, avant de se prononcer.

Propos recueillis par Stéphanie Le Bars


Election américaine/2012: Vers un retour aux années Carter? (Can we really afford another Jimmy Hussein Carter term?)

13 septembre, 2012
Le pacifisme est objectivement pro-fasciste. C’est du bon sens élémentaire. George Orwell
The real conundrum is why the president seems so compelled to take both sides of every issue, encouraging voters to project whatever they want on him, and hoping they won’t realize which hand is holding the rabbit. That a large section of the country views him as a socialist while many in his own party are concluding that he does not share their values speaks volumes — but not the volumes his advisers are selling: that if you make both the right and left mad, you must be doing something right. As a practicing psychologist with more than 25 years of experience, I will resist the temptation to diagnose at a distance, but as a scientist and strategic consultant I will venture some hypotheses. The most charitable explanation is that he and his advisers have succumbed to a view of electoral success to which many Democrats succumb — that “centrist” voters like “centrist” politicians. Unfortunately, reality is more complicated. Centrist voters prefer honest politicians who help them solve their problems. A second possibility is that he is simply not up to the task by virtue of his lack of experience and a character defect that might not have been so debilitating at some other time in history. Those of us who were bewitched by his eloquence on the campaign trail chose to ignore some disquieting aspects of his biography: that he had accomplished very little before he ran for president, having never run a business or a state; that he had a singularly unremarkable career as a law professor, publishing nothing in 12 years at the University of Chicago other than an autobiography; and that, before joining the United States Senate, he had voted « present » (instead of « yea » or « nay ») 130 times, sometimes dodging difficult issues. Drew Westen (Emory university, Aug. 2011)
Les démocrates, voici trois décennies, ont réussi à faire élire Jimmy Carter après avoir organisé une débâcle au Vietnam. On pourrait voir survenir, je n’ai pas été le seul à le dire, le second mandat de Jimmy Carter – voire pire encore, car Obama est nettement plus à gauche que Carter : la débâcle que souhaitaient ardemment les démocrates cette année pour parvenir à leurs fins n’a pas eu lieu en Irak, mais au New York Stock Exchange. La brève ère Carter avait apporté la stagflation, les files d’attente devant les stations services, la plus grande avancée soviétique sur la planète depuis 1945, et l’arrivée au pouvoir de Khomeyni. Que réserveraient de nouvelles années Carter ? Je préfère n’y pas songer… Guy Millière (octobre 2008)
L’ambassade des Etats-Unis au Caire condamne les efforts déployés par des individus malavisés consistant à blesser les sentiments religieux des musulmans, comme nous condamnons les efforts visant à offenser les croyants de toutes les religions.(…) Nous rejetons fermement les actions de ceux qui abusent de la liberté d’expression pour blesser les convictions religieuses d’autrui. Communiqué de l’ambassade américaine au Caire
Je condamne fermement cette attaque scandaleuse contre notre mission diplomatique à Benghazi qui a coûté la vie à quatre Américains, dont l’ambassadeur Chris Stevens […] Les Etats-Unis rejettent les efforts visant à dénigrer les croyances religieuses des autres, et nous devons tous, de façon non équivoque, nous opposer à ce genre de violence insensée qui coûte la vie à des fonctionnaires. Barack Obama
Je suis scandalisé par les attaques contre les missions diplomatiques américaines en Libye et en Egypte et par la mort d’un agent du consulat américain à Benghazi. (…) Il est scandaleux que la première réponse de l’administration Obama n’ait pas consisté à condamner les attaques mais plutôt à sympathiser avec ceux qui ont les ont menés. (…) S’excuser des valeurs américaines n’est jamais la chose à faire. Mitt Romney
La déclaration de l’ambassade américaine du Caire n’avait pas reçu l’agrément de Washington et ne reflétait pas l’opinion du gouvernement américain. Membre de l’Administration Obama
Cela montre les signaux ambigus que cette administration envoie au monde (…) Il n’est jamais trop tôt pour l’administration américaine de condamner des attaques menées contre des Américains et de défendre nos valeurs. Mitt Romney
Il y a une leçon à tirer de cette affaire : on dirait que le gouverneur Romney a tendance à tirer d’abord et viser ensuite. En tant que président, l’une des choses que j’ai apprises est que l’on ne peut pas faire cela. Il est important de s’assurer que les déclarations que vous effectuez sont soutenues par les faits, et que vous avez pensé à toutes les conséquences avant de les prononcer. Président Obama
It’s a make believe world. A world of good guys and bad guys, where some politicians shoot first and ask questions later. No hard choices. No sacrifice. No tough decisions. It sounds too good to be true – and it is. The path of fantasy leads to irresponsibility. The path of reality leads to hope and peace. President Jimmy Carter (about Reagan, Democratic National Convention, 1980)
Pour la Fondation Quilliam, un cercle de réflexion londonien présidé par Noman Benotman, ex-chef de file d’un mouvement islamiste armé qui combattait le régime de Kadhafi, l’opération pourrait avoir été organisée pour venger la mort du numéro deux d’Al-Qaida, Abou Yahya Al-Libi, tué par un drone américain au Pakistan. La veille de l’attaque de Benghazi, une vidéo dans laquelle Ayman Al-Zaouahri, chef de file du mouvement, confirme sa mort et invite les Libyens à la venger avait été diffusée sur internet. Noman Benotman précise que, d’après ses sources, une vingtaine d’activistes ont pris part aux préparatifs de l’attaque. Le Monde

Détention pendant neufs mois de membres d’ONG occidentaux dont 16 Américains et le fils du Secrétaire américain aux transports au Caire, profanation d’un cimetière militaire britannique en mars, attaque à la bombe artisanale contre la mission diplomatique américaine et tir de roquette sur  le convoi de l’ambassadeur britannique en juin à Benghazi …

 A l’heure où, avec la commémoration musclée (avec  lance-roquettes et mortiers, s’il vous plait!) des attentats du 11 septembre qui a vu, sous prétexte d’un film anti-islam d’origine apparemment plutôt douteuse, le sac de l’ambassade américaine au Caire et l’assassinat de quatre diplomates américains dont l’ambassadeur à Benghazi …

Et les habituelles réactions d’auto-flagellation de l’Administration Obama qui, après avoir aidé les islamistes libyens à se débarrasser de Khaddafi, continue à plus d’un milliard de dollars par an à financer un gouvernement islamique toujours plus radical au Caire …

Nos médias à la mémoire courte se réjouissent déjà, à deux mois de la présidentielle de novembre, du « nouveau faux pas » du candidat républicain Mitt Romney qui a eu le malheur de vouloir pointer l’évidence …

Remise des pendules à l’heure, avec l’analyste militaire Victor Davis Hanson, qui rappelle que l’actuelle administration américaine ne fait en fait que récolter les fruits d’une politique systématique d’apaisement face à la violence islamique …

Ressemblant étrangement, à une trentaine d’années de distan

ce, à celle qui avait marqué la fin du mandat d’un certain Jimmy Carter

Storming Embassies, Killing Ambassadors, and ‘Smart’ Diplomacy

Victor Davis Hanson

National Review

September 12, 2012

The attacks on the U.S. embassy yesterday in Cairo and the storming of the American consulate in Libya, where the U.S. ambassador was murdered along with three staff members — and the initial official American reaction to the mayhem — are all reprehensible, each in their own way. Let us sort out this terrible chain of events.

Timing: The assaults came exactly on the eleventh anniversary of bin Laden’s and al-Qaeda’s attack on America. If there was any doubt about the intent of the timing, the appearance of black al-Qaedist flags among the mobs removed it. The chanting of Osama bin Laden’s name made it doubly clear who were the heroes of the Egyptian mob. Why should we be surprised by the lackluster response of the Egyptian and Libyan “authorities” to protect diplomatic sanctuaries, given the nature of the “governments” in both countries? One of the Egyptian demonstration’s organizers was Mohamed al-Zawahiri, the brother of the top deputy to Osama bin Laden, and a planner of the 9/11 attacks, which were led by Mohamed Atta, an Egyptian citizen. In Libya, the sick violence is reminding the world that the problem in the Middle East is not dictators propped up by the U.S. — Qaddafi was an archenemy of the U.S. — but the proverbial Arab Street that can blame everything and everyone, from a cartoon to a video, for the wages of its own self-induced pathologies. So far, all the Arab Spring is accomplishing is removing the dictatorial props and authoritarian excuses for grass roots Middle East madness.

Ingratitude: Egypt is currently a beneficiary of more than $1 billion in annual American aid, and its new Muslim Brotherhood–led government is negotiating to have much of its sizable U.S. debt forgiven. Libya, remember, was the recipient of the Obama administration’s “lead from behind” intervention that led to the removal of Moammar Qaddafi — and apparently gave the present demonstrators the freedom to kill Americans. This is all called “smart” diplomacy.

Appeasement: Here are a few sentences from the statement issued by the Cairo embassy before it was attacked: “The Embassy of the United States in Cairo condemns the continuing efforts by misguided individuals to hurt the religious feelings of Muslims — as we condemn efforts to offend believers of all religions. . . .We firmly reject the actions by those who abuse the universal right of free speech to hurt the religious beliefs of others.”

The Problem? The embassy was condemning not those zealots who then stormed their own grounds, but some eccentric private citizens back home who made a movie.

One would have thought that the Obama administration had learned something from the Rushdie fatwa and prophet cartoon incidents. This initial official American diplomatic reaction — to condemn the supposed excess of free speech in the United States, as if the government is responsible for the constitutionally-protected expression of a few private American citizens, while the Egyptian government is not responsible for a mass demonstration and violence against an embassy of the United States — is not just shameful, but absurd. The author of this American diplomatic statement should be fired immediately — as well as any diplomatic personnel who approved it. Obviously our official representatives overseas do not understand, or have not read, the U.S. Constitution. And if the administration claims the embassy that issued the appeasing statement did so without authority, then we have a larger problem with freelancing diplomats who across the globe weigh in with statements that supposedly do not reflect official policy. Note, however, that the initial diplomatic communiqué is the logical extension of this administration’s rhetoric (see below).

Shame: As gratitude for our overthrowing a cruel despot in Libya, Libyan extremists have murdered the American ambassador and his staffers. The Libyan government, such as it is there, either cannot or will not protect U.S. diplomatic personnel. And the world wonders why last year the U.S. bombed one group of Libyan cutthroats only to aid another.

The attacks in Egypt come a little over three years after the embarrassing Obama Cairo speech, in which the president created an entire mythology about the history of Islam, in vain hopes of appeasing his Egyptian hosts. The violence also follows ongoing comical efforts of the administration to assure us that the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt is not an extremist Islamic organization bent on turning Egypt into a theocratic state. And the attacks are simultaneous with President Obama’s ongoing and crude efforts to embarrass Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu.

The future. Expect more violence. The Libyan murderers are now empowered, and, like the infamous Iranian hostage-takers, feel their government either supports them or can’t stop them. The crowd in Egypt knew what it was doing when it chanted Obama’s name juxtaposed to Osama’s.

Obama’s effort to appease Islam is an utter failure, as we see in various polls that show no change in anti-American attitudes in the Middle East — despite the president’s initial al Arabiya interview (“We sometimes make mistakes. We have not been perfect.”); the rantings of National Intelligence Director James Clapper (e.g., “The term ‘Muslim Brotherhood’ . . . is an umbrella term for a variety of movements, in the case of Egypt, a very heterogeneous group, largely secular, which has eschewed violence and has decried al-Qaeda as a perversion of Islam.”); and the absurdities of our NASA director (“When I became the NASA administrator . . . perhaps foremost, he [President Obama] wanted me to find a way to reach out to the Muslim world and engage much more with dominantly Muslim nations to help them feel good about their historic contribution to science.”) — to cite only a few examples from many.

At some point, someone in the administration is going to fathom that the more one seeks to appease radical Islam, the more the latter despises the appeaser.

These terrible attacks on the anniversary of 9/11 are extremely significant. They come right at a time when we are considering an aggregate $1 trillion cutback in defense over the next decade. They should give make us cautious about proposed intervention in Syria. They leave our Arab Spring policy in tatters, and the whole “reset” approach to the Middle East incoherent. They embarrass any who continue to contextualize radical Islamic violence. The juxtaposed chants of “Osama” and “Obama” in Egypt make a mockery of the recent “We killed Osama” spiking the football at the Democratic convention. And they remind us why 2012 is sadly looking a lot like 1980 — when in a similar election year, in a similarly minded administration, the proverbial chickens of four years of “smart” diplomacy tragically came home to roost.

Voir aussi:

1980 Redux

Victor Davis Hanson

National Review

September 12, 2012

We are in scary times. The horrific photos of Ambassador Stevens bring to mind memories of Mogadishu or Fallujah, and make us ask why were there not dozens, if not vastly more, Marines around him in his hour of need. By preemptively caving into radical Islam and not defending the U.S. Constitution and our traditions of protecting even uncouth expression, the Cairo embassy’s shameful communiqué only invited greater hostility by such manifest appeasement.

I’m afraid that a number of hostile entities abroad will be reviewing all this in the context of the last four years and surmising that this may be the best time, as in 1979–1980 (e.g., Russians in Afghanistan, Communist take-overs in Central America, the Chinese invading Vietnam, hostages in Tehran, etc.), to cash in their chips. Radical Islamists knew that their governments in Egypt and Libya either would not, or could not, do anything when they went after Americans; talk of radical defense cuts and American financial implosion may encourage others to take chances when in the past they would not have; there is trouble brewing in Asian waters over disputed territories and perceptions that the U.S., whether conventionally or even in the nuclear sense, is not quite the strong ally of Japan, Taiwan, South Korea, and the Philippines that it once was; when we snub the Israeli prime minister, after a long series of earlier slights, the message goes out to Tehran that the U.S. is not entirely sure that it will aid Israel in its coming time of crisis. And by now we have heard enough Cairo-like speeches, al Arabiya interviews, and seen enough bows to know that we can always find yet a new way to be culpable even for self-induced Middle East pathologies.

Note the recurrent theme: We always blame the wrong entities. We fault Netanyahu for making a supposed pest of himself for reminding us of Tehran’s nuclear progress. We go after the nuts who made the anti-Muslim movie rather than the far greater danger of bloodthirsty Islamists who would murder to deny all free speech. When a Major Hasan goes on his rampage, our chief of staff of the army immediately laments the danger to our diversity program. We fret that KSM might not get his civil trial, or a Mutallab his Miranda rights. As Coptics are targeted, we assure ourselves that the Muslim Brotherhood is secular, and on and on.

Voir encore:

Libye: l’examen manqué de Romney en politique étrangère

Hélène Sallon

Le Monde

12.09.2012

Le candidat républicain a-t-il fait un nouveau faux pas en s’attaquant directement au président Obama sur sa gestion des incidents meurtriers en Libye ? Mitt Romney n’a-t-il pas pris un trop grand risque en sortant de sa réserve et en quittant son terrain favori, l’économie, pour s’engouffrer tête baissée sur celui de la politique étrangère ? C’est ce que tend à croire une majorité de la presse américaine qui, mercredi 12 septembre, titrait de concert sur « l’isolement » de Romney.

« Après une flambée de critiques, la plupart des républicains à Washington, même parmi les critiques les plus virulents de Barack Obama, se sont joints aux démocrates pour dénoncer les violentes attaques contre les ambassades américaines en Egypte et en Libye, tout en résistant à la tentation de critiquer la réponse qu’y a apportée l’administration Obama », rapporte le New York Times. A l’instar du sénateur républicain du Kentucky, Mitch McConnell, qui a déclaré mercredi : « Nous rendons hommage aux Américains qui ont perdu la vie en Libye et affichons notre unité dans la réponse qu’il faut y apporter. »

Ce message d’unité qu’est venu délivrer un parterre de républicains au Sénat est apparu en parfait contraste avec la ligne adoptée par leur candidat à la présidentielle, Mitt Romney. Dès mardi soir, sans attendre la fin de la trêve partisane imposée par les commémorations du 11-Septembre, le candidat républicain a qualifié de « honteuse » la réaction du gouvernement de Barack Obama aux attaques anti-américaines en Egypte et en Libye et l’a accusé de sympathies pour les extrémistes musulmans. « S’excuser des valeurs américaines n’est jamais la chose à faire », a-t-il ajouté, en référence à la condamnation par l’ambassade américaine au Caire du film à l’origine de ces violences. Sans se formaliser toutefois que le communiqué ait été publié avant même l’irruption des violences pour apaiser la rue égyptienne.

A lire en anglais sur la BBC, les réactions aux attaques des ambassades américaines au Caire et à Benghazi.

« DES ATTAQUES POLITICIENNES »

L’équipe de campagne de M. Obama a rapidement riposté aux critiques de M. Romney, son porte-parole Ben LaBolt lui reprochant de lancer des « attaques politiciennes » le jour d’un pareil drame, rapporte le site Politico. Le sénateur démocrate du Massachusetts, John Kerry, a appelé Mitt Romney à s’excuser pour ses commentaires qu’il a qualifiés d’irresponsables et insensibles. Pourtant, dans un nouveau message mercredi, le candidat républicain a réitéré ses attaques contre l’administration Obama, tout en se défendant des critiques exprimées par les démocrates. « La Maison Blanche a pris ses distances hier soir avec le communiqué [publié par l’ambassade américaine au Caire], assurant qu’il n’avait pas été validé à Washington. Cela montre les signaux ambigus que cette administration envoie au monde », a jugé M. Romney.

Lire : Aux Etats-Unis, les républicains exploitent l’attaque de Benghazi

La critique faite à Mitt Romney par les démocrates a été largement partagée par la presse américaine, qui a tiré à boulets rouges sur le candidat républicain, indique le Huffington Post. Sur la chaîne de télévision NBC, le journaliste Chuck Todd a qualifié ses déclarations d » »irresponsables » et d' »erreur », rapporte le site Internet The Raw Story. Un autre journaliste de la chaîne, Lawrence O’Donnell, avait plus tôt estimé que le camp Romney aurait mieux fait de « ne rien dire car dans ces cas-là (…), la seule chose qui va attirer l’attention est de dire une chose stupide, ce qu’ils ont réussi à faire ». Le journaliste du National Journal Ron Fournier a également qualifié ces attaques de « maladroites » et « inexactes ». L’expert conservateur Erick Ericson, bien qu’en désaccord avec la réponse de Chuck Tood, a lui aussi appelé Mitt Romney à la prudence. Aux yeux de tous, le candidat Romney a parlé un peu trop vite.

« LE TEST DU CHEF DES ARMÉES »

« Le va-et-vient entre les camps Obama et Romney a constitué un rare échange partisan sur une crise de politique étrangère sur fond d’événements en cours et a mis en lumière l’intensité et les enjeux de la campagne à moins de deux mois du jour de l’élection », commente le New York Times. Cette crise intervient, en effet, à brule-pourpoint pour Mitt Romney, qui s’évertue à défendre son programme de politique étrangère, sérieusement attaqué par le camp démocrate, note encore le quotidien américain.

Il avait fait l’objet de virulentes critiques dans le camp démocrate, mais aussi de certains dans son camp, pour n’avoir pas fait mention de la guerre en Afghanistan ou des troupes américaines à l’étranger durant son discours à la convention républicaine de Tampa. Une occasion qu’avait saisie le camp Obama pour le présenter comme un candidat inexpérimenté et mal préparé pour devenir chef des armées.

« TIRER D’ABORD ET VISER ENSUITE »

Le candidat démocrate a d’ailleurs rapidement profité de la situation, estimant mercredi qu' »il y a une leçon à tirer de cette affaire : on dirait que le gouverneur Romney a tendance à tirer d’abord et viser ensuite ». « En tant que président, l’une des choses que j’ai apprises est que l’on ne peut pas faire cela. Il est important de s’assurer que les déclarations que vous effectuez sont soutenues par les faits, et que vous avez pensé à toutes les conséquences avant de les prononcer », a poursuivi M. Obama dans un entretien à la chaîne CBS.

Pour le camp Obama, les attaques de Mitt Romney sont une nouvelle occasion de lui faire passer « le test du chef des armées », indique le Washington Post. Même si cette joute verbale en matière de politique étrangère ne devrait pas changer fondamentalement la donne d’une élection qui se joue sur le terrain économique. « Si les gens ne s’intéressent pas à la politique étrangère en tant que telle, ils veulent/ont besoin de voir que la personne qu’ils mettent à la Maison Blanche a le leadership pour représenter son pays sur la scène internationale », indique le quotidien.

Or, par ses attaques « empressées » et « hors-propos », Mitt Romney vient de se tirer une balle dans le pied, estime le site Buzzfeed. Les pontes républicains de la politique étrangère ont multiplié les critiques, rapporte le site américain. « C’est un désastre absolu, a ainsi commenté l’un d’entre eux. Nous voyons maintenant que c’est parce qu’ils sont incapables de parler efficacement de politique étrangère. C’est incroyable : quand ils décident de jouer sur ce terrain, ils bousillent tout. »

Ne reste plus au camp Obama qu’à faire en sorte que tous gardent en mémoire une réaction qui n’a rien de « présidentielle », ajoute le Washington Post. Et de démontrer que, sur cette affaire comme en politique étrangère, Barack Obama demeure la personne la mieux placée. Comme le pensent déjà 51 % des électeurs sondés récemment par le Washington Post-ABC News.

Voir de même:

What Happened to Obama?

Drew Westen

 The New York Times

August 6, 2011

Drew Westen is a professor of psychology at Emory University and the author of “The Political Brain: The Role of Emotion in Deciding the Fate of the Nation.”

Atlanta

It was a blustery day in Washington on Jan. 20, 2009, as it often seems to be on the day of a presidential inauguration. As I stood with my 8-year-old daughter, watching the president deliver his inaugural address, I had a feeling of unease. It wasn’t just that the man who could be so eloquent had seemingly chosen not to be on this auspicious occasion, although that turned out to be a troubling harbinger of things to come. It was that there was a story the American people were waiting to hear — and needed to hear — but he didn’t tell it. And in the ensuing months he continued not to tell it, no matter how outrageous the slings and arrows his opponents threw at him.

The stories our leaders tell us matter, probably almost as much as the stories our parents tell us as children, because they orient us to what is, what could be, and what should be; to the worldviews they hold and to the values they hold sacred. Our brains evolved to “expect” stories with a particular structure, with protagonists and villains, a hill to be climbed or a battle to be fought. Our species existed for more than 100,000 years before the earliest signs of literacy, and another 5,000 years would pass before the majority of humans would know how to read and write.

Stories were the primary way our ancestors transmitted knowledge and values. Today we seek movies, novels and “news stories” that put the events of the day in a form that our brains evolved to find compelling and memorable. Children crave bedtime stories; the holy books of the three great monotheistic religions are written in parables; and as research in cognitive science has shown, lawyers whose closing arguments tell a story win jury trials against their legal adversaries who just lay out “the facts of the case.”

When Barack Obama rose to the lectern on Inauguration Day, the nation was in tatters. Americans were scared and angry. The economy was spinning in reverse. Three-quarters of a million people lost their jobs that month. Many had lost their homes, and with them the only nest eggs they had. Even the usually impervious upper middle class had seen a decade of stagnant or declining investment, with the stock market dropping in value with no end in sight. Hope was as scarce as credit.

In that context, Americans needed their president to tell them a story that made sense of what they had just been through, what caused it, and how it was going to end. They needed to hear that he understood what they were feeling, that he would track down those responsible for their pain and suffering, and that he would restore order and safety. What they were waiting for, in broad strokes, was a story something like this:

“I know you’re scared and angry. Many of you have lost your jobs, your homes, your hope. This was a disaster, but it was not a natural disaster. It was made by Wall Street gamblers who speculated with your lives and futures. It was made by conservative extremists who told us that if we just eliminated regulations and rewarded greed and recklessness, it would all work out. But it didn’t work out. And it didn’t work out 80 years ago, when the same people sold our grandparents the same bill of goods, with the same results. But we learned something from our grandparents about how to fix it, and we will draw on their wisdom. We will restore business confidence the old-fashioned way: by putting money back in the pockets of working Americans by putting them back to work, and by restoring integrity to our financial markets and demanding it of those who want to run them. I can’t promise that we won’t make mistakes along the way. But I can promise you that they will be honest mistakes, and that your government has your back again.” A story isn’t a policy. But that simple narrative — and the policies that would naturally have flowed from it — would have inoculated against much of what was to come in the intervening two and a half years of failed government, idled factories and idled hands. That story would have made clear that the president understood that the American people had given Democrats the presidency and majorities in both houses of Congress to fix the mess the Republicans and Wall Street had made of the country, and that this would not be a power-sharing arrangement. It would have made clear that the problem wasn’t tax-and-spend liberalism or the deficit — a deficit that didn’t exist until George W. Bush gave nearly $2 trillion in tax breaks largely to the wealthiest Americans and squandered $1 trillion in two wars.

And perhaps most important, it would have offered a clear, compelling alternative to the dominant narrative of the right, that our problem is not due to spending on things like the pensions of firefighters, but to the fact that those who can afford to buy influence are rewriting the rules so they can cut themselves progressively larger slices of the American pie while paying less of their fair share for it.

But there was no story — and there has been none since.

In similar circumstances, Franklin D. Roosevelt offered Americans a promise to use the power of his office to make their lives better and to keep trying until he got it right. Beginning in his first inaugural address, and in the fireside chats that followed, he explained how the crash had happened, and he minced no words about those who had caused it. He promised to do something no president had done before: to use the resources of the United States to put Americans directly to work, building the infrastructure we still rely on today. He swore to keep the people who had caused the crisis out of the halls of power, and he made good on that promise. In a 1936 speech at Madison Square Garden, he thundered, “Never before in all our history have these forces been so united against one candidate as they stand today. They are unanimous in their hate for me — and I welcome their hatred.”

When Barack Obama stepped into the Oval Office, he stepped into a cycle of American history, best exemplified by F.D.R. and his distant cousin, Teddy. After a great technological revolution or a major economic transition, as when America changed from a nation of farmers to an urban industrial one, there is often a period of great concentration of wealth, and with it, a concentration of power in the wealthy. That’s what we saw in 1928, and that’s what we see today. At some point that power is exercised so injudiciously, and the lives of so many become so unbearable, that a period of reform ensues — and a charismatic reformer emerges to lead that renewal. In that sense, Teddy Roosevelt started the cycle of reform his cousin picked up 30 years later, as he began efforts to bust the trusts and regulate the railroads, exercise federal power over the banks and the nation’s food supply, and protect America’s land and wildlife, creating the modern environmental movement.

Those were the shoes — that was the historic role — that Americans elected Barack Obama to fill. The president is fond of referring to “the arc of history,” paraphrasing the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous statement that “the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.” But with his deep-seated aversion to conflict and his profound failure to understand bully dynamics — in which conciliation is always the wrong course of action, because bullies perceive it as weakness and just punch harder the next time — he has broken that arc and has likely bent it backward for at least a generation.

When Dr. King spoke of the great arc bending toward justice, he did not mean that we should wait for it to bend. He exhorted others to put their full weight behind it, and he gave his life speaking with a voice that cut through the blistering force of water cannons and the gnashing teeth of police dogs. He preached the gospel of nonviolence, but he knew that whether a bully hid behind a club or a poll tax, the only effective response was to face the bully down, and to make the bully show his true and repugnant face in public.

In contrast, when faced with the greatest economic crisis, the greatest levels of economic inequality, and the greatest levels of corporate influence on politics since the Depression, Barack Obama stared into the eyes of history and chose to avert his gaze. Instead of indicting the people whose recklessness wrecked the economy, he put them in charge of it. He never explained that decision to the public — a failure in storytelling as extraordinary as the failure in judgment behind it. Had the president chosen to bend the arc of history, he would have told the public the story of the destruction wrought by the dismantling of the New Deal regulations that had protected them for more than half a century. He would have offered them a counternarrative of how to fix the problem other than the politics of appeasement, one that emphasized creating economic demand and consumer confidence by putting consumers back to work. He would have had to stare down those who had wrecked the economy, and he would have had to tolerate their hatred if not welcome it. But the arc of his temperament just didn’t bend that far.

The truly decisive move that broke the arc of history was his handling of the stimulus. The public was desperate for a leader who would speak with confidence, and they were ready to follow wherever the president led. Yet instead of indicting the economic policies and principles that had just eliminated eight million jobs, in the most damaging of the tic-like gestures of compromise that have become the hallmark of his presidency — and against the advice of multiple Nobel-Prize-winning economists — he backed away from his advisers who proposed a big stimulus, and then diluted it with tax cuts that had already been shown to be inert. The result, as predicted in advance, was a half-stimulus that half-stimulated the economy. That, in turn, led the White House to feel rightly unappreciated for having saved the country from another Great Depression but in the unenviable position of having to argue a counterfactual — that something terrible might have happened had it not half-acted.

To the average American, who was still staring into the abyss, the half-stimulus did nothing but prove that Ronald Reagan was right, that government is the problem. In fact, the average American had no idea what Democrats were trying to accomplish by deficit spending because no one bothered to explain it to them with the repetition and evocative imagery that our brains require to make an idea, particularly a paradoxical one, “stick.” Nor did anyone explain what health care reform was supposed to accomplish (other than the unbelievable and even more uninspiring claim that it would “bend the cost curve”), or why “credit card reform” had led to an increase in the interest rates they were already struggling to pay. Nor did anyone explain why saving the banks was such a priority, when saving the homes the banks were foreclosing didn’t seem to be. All Americans knew, and all they know today, is that they’re still unemployed, they’re still worried about how they’re going to pay their bills at the end of the month and their kids still can’t get a job. And now the Republicans are chipping away at unemployment insurance, and the president is making his usual impotent verbal exhortations after bargaining it away.

What makes the “deficit debate” we just experienced seem so surreal is how divorced the conversation in Washington has been from conversations around the kitchen table everywhere else in America. Although I am a scientist by training, over the last several years, as a messaging consultant to nonprofit groups and Democratic leaders, I have studied the way voters think and feel, talking to them in plain language. At this point, I have interacted in person or virtually with more than 50,000 Americans on a range of issues, from taxes and deficits to abortion and immigration.

The average voter is far more worried about jobs than about the deficit, which few were talking about while Bush and the Republican Congress were running it up. The conventional wisdom is that Americans hate government, and if you ask the question in the abstract, people will certainly give you an earful about what government does wrong. But if you give them the choice between cutting the deficit and putting Americans back to work, it isn’t even close. But it’s not just jobs. Americans don’t share the priorities of either party on taxes, budgets or any of the things Congress and the president have just agreed to slash — or failed to slash, like subsidies to oil companies. When it comes to tax cuts for the wealthy, Americans are united across the political spectrum, supporting a message that says, “In times like these, millionaires ought to be giving to charity, not getting it.”

When pitted against a tough budget-cutting message straight from the mouth of its strongest advocates, swing voters vastly preferred a message that began, “The best way to reduce the deficit is to put Americans back to work.” This statement is far more consistent with what many economists are saying publicly — and what investors apparently believe, as evident in the nosedive the stock market took after the president and Congress “saved” the economy.

So where does that leave us?

Like most Americans, at this point, I have no idea what Barack Obama — and by extension the party he leads — believes on virtually any issue. The president tells us he prefers a “balanced” approach to deficit reduction, one that weds “revenue enhancements” (a weak way of describing popular taxes on the rich and big corporations that are evading them) with “entitlement cuts” (an equally poor choice of words that implies that people who’ve worked their whole lives are looking for handouts). But the law he just signed includes only the cuts. This pattern of presenting inconsistent positions with no apparent recognition of their incoherence is another hallmark of this president’s storytelling. He announces in a speech on energy and climate change that we need to expand offshore oil drilling and coal production — two methods of obtaining fuels that contribute to the extreme weather Americans are now seeing. He supports a health care law that will use Medicaid to insure about 15 million more Americans and then endorses a budget plan that, through cuts to state budgets, will most likely decimate Medicaid and other essential programs for children, senior citizens and people who are vulnerable by virtue of disabilities or an economy that is getting weaker by the day. He gives a major speech on immigration reform after deporting more than 700,000 immigrants in two years, a pace faster than nearly any other period in American history.

The real conundrum is why the president seems so compelled to take both sides of every issue, encouraging voters to project whatever they want on him, and hoping they won’t realize which hand is holding the rabbit. That a large section of the country views him as a socialist while many in his own party are concluding that he does not share their values speaks volumes — but not the volumes his advisers are selling: that if you make both the right and left mad, you must be doing something right.

As a practicing psychologist with more than 25 years of experience, I will resist the temptation to diagnose at a distance, but as a scientist and strategic consultant I will venture some hypotheses.

The most charitable explanation is that he and his advisers have succumbed to a view of electoral success to which many Democrats succumb — that “centrist” voters like “centrist” politicians. Unfortunately, reality is more complicated. Centrist voters prefer honest politicians who help them solve their problems. A second possibility is that he is simply not up to the task by virtue of his lack of experience and a character defect that might not have been so debilitating at some other time in history. Those of us who were bewitched by his eloquence on the campaign trail chose to ignore some disquieting aspects of his biography: that he had accomplished very little before he ran for president, having never run a business or a state; that he had a singularly unremarkable career as a law professor, publishing nothing in 12 years at the University of Chicago other than an autobiography; and that, before joining the United States Senate, he had voted « present » (instead of « yea » or « nay ») 130 times, sometimes dodging difficult issues.

A somewhat less charitable explanation is that we are a nation that is being held hostage not just by an extremist Republican Party but also by a president who either does not know what he believes or is willing to take whatever position he thinks will lead to his re-election. Perhaps those of us who were so enthralled with the magnificent story he told in “Dreams From My Father” appended a chapter at the end that wasn’t there — the chapter in which he resolves his identity and comes to know who he is and what he believes in.

Or perhaps, like so many politicians who come to Washington, he has already been consciously or unconsciously corrupted by a system that tests the souls even of people of tremendous integrity, by forcing them to dial for dollars — in the case of the modern presidency, for hundreds of millions of dollars. When he wants to be, the president is a brilliant and moving speaker, but his stories virtually always lack one element: the villain who caused the problem, who is always left out, described in impersonal terms, or described in passive voice, as if the cause of others’ misery has no agency and hence no culpability. Whether that reflects his aversion to conflict, an aversion to conflict with potential campaign donors that today cripples both parties’ ability to govern and threatens our democracy, or both, is unclear.

A final explanation is that he ran for president on two contradictory platforms: as a reformer who would clean up the system, and as a unity candidate who would transcend the lines of red and blue. He has pursued the one with which he is most comfortable given the constraints of his character, consistently choosing the message of bipartisanship over the message of confrontation.

But the arc of history does not bend toward justice through capitulation cast as compromise. It does not bend when 400 people control more of the wealth than 150 million of their fellow Americans. It does not bend when the average middle-class family has seen its income stagnate over the last 30 years while the richest 1 percent has seen its income rise astronomically. It does not bend when we cut the fixed incomes of our parents and grandparents so hedge fund managers can keep their 15 percent tax rates. It does not bend when only one side in negotiations between workers and their bosses is allowed representation. And it does not bend when, as political scientists have shown, it is not public opinion but the opinions of the wealthy that predict the votes of the Senate. The arc of history can bend only so far before it breaks.

This article has been revised to reflect the following correction:

Correction: August 14, 2011

An opinion essay on Aug. 7 about President Obama’s leadership and principles referred incorrectly to the number of deportations under his presidency. More than 700,000 immigrants were deported during Mr. Obama’s first two years in office; it is not the case that a million immigrants were deported in 2010, the year Mr. Obama gave a speech on immigration reform. Also, a larger number of deportations occurred over the two terms of George W. Bush, Mr. Obama’s predecessor; Mr. Obama has not overseen more deportations than any other president.

Voir enfin:

Pacifism and the War

 George Orwell

Partisan Review

August-September 1942

About a year ago I and a number of others were engaged in broadcasting literary programmes to India, and among other things we broadcast a good deal of verse by contemporary and near-contemporary English writers — for example, Eliot, Herbert Read, Auden, Spender, Dylan Thomas, Henry Treece, Alex Comfort, Robert Bridges, Edmund Blunden, D. H. Lawrence. Whenever it was possible we had poems broadcast by the people who wrote them. Just why these particular programmes (a small and remote out-flanking movement in the radio war) were instituted there is no need to explain here, but I should add that the fact that we were broadcasting to an Indian audience dictated our technique to some extent. The essential point was that our literary broadcasts were aimed at the Indian university students, a small and hostile audience, unapproachable by anything that could be described as British propaganda. It was known in advance that we could not hope for more than a few thousand listeners at the most, and this gave us an excuse to be more ‘highbrow’ than is generally possible on the air.

Since I don’t suppose you want to fill an entire number of P.R. (Partisan Review) with squalid controversies imported from across the Atlantic, I will lump together the various letters you have sent on to me (from Messrs Savage, Woodcock and Comfort), as the central issue in all of them is the same. But I must afterwards deal separately with some points of fact raised in various of the letters.

Pacifism. Pacifism is objectively pro-Fascist. This is elementary common sense. If you hamper the war effort of one side you automatically help that of the other. Nor is there any real way of remaining outside such a war as the present one. In practice, ‘he that is not with me is against me’. The idea that you can somehow remain aloof from and superior to the struggle, while living on food which British sailors have to risk their lives to bring you, is a bourgeois illusion bred of money and security. Mr Savage remarks that ‘according to this type of reasoning, a German or Japanese pacifist would be “objectively pro-British”.’ But of course he would be! That is why pacifist activities are not permitted in those countries (in both of them the penalty is, or can be, beheading) while both the Germans and the Japanese do all they can to encourage the spread of pacifism in British and American territories. The Germans even run a spurious ‘freedom’ station which serves out pacifist propaganda indistinguishable from that of the P.P.U. They would stimulate pacifism in Russia as well if they could, but in that case they have tougher babies to deal with. In so far as it takes effect at all, pacifist propaganda can only be effective against those countries where a certain amount of freedom of speech is still permitted; in other words it is helpful to totalitarianism.

I am not interested in pacifism as a ‘moral phenomenon’. If Mr Savage and others imagine that one can somehow ‘overcome’ the German army by lying on one’s back, let them go on imagining it, but let them also wonder occasionally whether this is not an illusion due to security, too much money and a simple ignorance of the way in which things actually happen. As an ex-Indian civil servant, it always makes me shout with laughter to hear, for instance, Gandhi named as an example of the success of non-violence. As long as twenty years ago it was cynically admitted in Anglo-Indian circles that Gandhi was very useful to the British government. So he will be to the Japanese if they get there. Despotic governments can stand ‘moral force’ till the cows come home; what they fear is physical force. But though not much interested in the ‘theory’ of pacifism, I am interested in the psychological processes by which pacifists who have started out with an alleged horror of violence end up with a marked tendency to be fascinated by the success and power of Nazism. Even pacifists who wouldn’t own to any such fascination are beginning to claim that a Nazi victory is desirable in itself. In the letter you sent on to me, Mr Comfort considers that an artist in occupied territory ought to ‘protest against such evils as he sees’, but considers that this is best done by ‘temporarily accepting the status quo’ (like Déat or Bergery, for instance?). a few weeks back he was hoping for a Nazi victory because of the stimulating effect it would have upon the arts:

As far as I can see, no therapy short of complete military defeat has any chance of re-establishing the common stability of literature and of the man in the street. One can imagine the greater the adversity the greater the sudden realization of a stream of imaginative work, and the greater the sudden katharsis of poetry, from the isolated interpretation of war as calamity to the realization of the imaginative and actual tragedy of Man. When we have access again to the literature of the war years in France, Poland and Czechoslovakia, I am confident that that is what we shall fined. (From a letter to Horizon.)

I pass over the money-sheltered ignorance capable of believing that literary life is still going on in, for instance, Poland, and remark merely that statements like this justify me in saying that our English pacifists are tending towards active pro-Fascism. But I don’t particularly object to that. What I object to is the intellectual cowardice of people who are objectively and to some extent emotionally pro-Fascist, but who don’t care to say so and take refuge behind the formula ‘I am just as anti-fascist as anyone, but—’. The result of this is that so-called peace propaganda is just as dishonest and intellectually disgusting as war propaganda. Like war propaganda, it concentrates on putting forward a ‘case’, obscuring the opponent’s point of view and avoiding awkward questions. The line normally followed is ‘Those who fight against Fascism go Fascist themselves.’ In order to evade the quite obvious objections that can be raised to this, the following propaganda-tricks are used:

The Fascizing processes occurring in Britain as a result of war are systematically exaggerated.

The actual record of Fascism, especially its pre-war history, is ignored or pooh-poohed as ‘propaganda’. Discussion of what the world would actually be like if the Axis dominated it is evaded.

Those who want to struggle against Fascism are accused of being wholehearted defenders of capitalist ‘democracy’. The fact that the rich everywhere tend to be pro-Fascist and the working class are nearly always anti-Fascist is hushed up.

It is tacitly pretended that the war is only between Britain and Germany. Mention of Russia and China, and their fate if Fascism is permitted to win, is avoided. (You won’t find one word about Russia or China in the three letters you sent to me.)

Now as to one or two points of fact which I must deal with if your correspondents’ letters are to be printed in full.

My past and present. Mr Woodcock tries to discredit me by saying that (a) I once served in the Indian Imperial Police, (b) I have written article for the Adelphi and was mixed up with the Trotskyists in Spain, and (c) that I am at the B.B.C. ‘conducting British propaganda to fox the Indian masses’. With regard to (a), it is quite true that I served five years in the Indian Police. It is also true that I gave up that job, partly because it didn’t suit me but mainly because I would not any longer be a servant of imperialism. I am against imperialism because I know something about it from the inside. The whole history of this is to be found in my writings, including a novel (Burmese Days) which I think I can claim was a kind of prophecy of what happened this year in Burma. (b) Of course I have written for the Adelphi. Why not? I once wrote an article for a vegetarian paper. Does that make me a vegetarian? I was associated with the Trotskyists in Spain. It was chance that I was serving in the P.O.U.M. militia and not another, and I largely disagreed with the P.O.U. M. ‘line’ and told its leaders so freely, but when they were afterwards accused of pro-Fascist activities I defended them as best it could. How does this contradict my present anti-Hitler attitude? It is news to me that Trotskyists are either pacifists or pro-Fascists. (c) Does Mr Woodcock really know what kind of stuff I put out in the Indian broadcasts? He does not — though I would be quite glad to tell him about it. He is careful not to mention what other people are associated with these Indian broadcasts. One for instance is Herbert Read, whom he mentions with approval. Others are T. S. Eliot, E. M. Forster, Reginald Reynolds, Stephen Spender, J. B. S. Haldane, Tom Wintringham. Most of our broadcasters are Indian left-wing intellectual, from Liberals to Trotskyists, some of them bitterly anti-British. They don’t do it to ‘fox the Indian masses’ but because they know what a Fascist victory would mean to the chances of India’s independence. Why not try to find out what I am doing before accusing my good faith?

‘Mr Orwell is intellectual-hunting again’ (Mr Comfort). I have never attacked ‘the intellectuals’ or ‘the intelligentsia’ en bloc. I have used a lot of ink and done myself a lot of harm by attacking the successive literary cliques which have infested this country, not because they were intellectuals but precisely because they were not what I mean by true intellectuals. The life of a clique is about five years and I have been writing long enough to see three of them come and two go — the Catholic gang, the Stalinist gang, and the present pacifist or, as they are sometimes nicknamed, Fascifist gang. My case against all of them is that they write mentally dishonest propaganda and degrade literary criticism to mutual arse-licking. But even with these various schools I would differentiate between individuals. I would never think of coupling Christopher Dawson with Arnold Lunn, or Malraux with Palme Dutt, or Max Plowman with the Duke of Bedford. And even the work of one individual can exist at very different levels. For instance Mr Comfort himself wrote one poem I value greatly (‘The Atoll in the Mind’), and I wish he would write more of them instead of lifeless propaganda tracts dressed up as novels. But his letter he has chosen to send you is a different matter. Instead of answering what I have said he tries to prejudice an audience to whom I am little known by a misrepresentation of my general line and sneers about my ‘status’ in England. (A writer isn’t judged by his ‘status’, he is judged by his work.) That is on a par with ‘peace’ propaganda which has to avoid mention of Hitler’s invasion of Russian, and it is not what I mean by intellectual honesty. It is just because I do take the function of the intelligentsia seriously that I don’t like the sneers, libels, parrot phrased and financially profitable back-scratching which flourish in our English literary world, and perhaps in yours also.

1942

THE END

____BD____

George Orwell: ‘Pacifism and the War’

First published: Partisan Review. — GB, London. — August-September 1942.

Reprinted:

— ‘The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of George Orwell’. — 1968.


Géopolitique: La géographie, ça sert aussi à faire la paix! (It’s the geography, stupid!)

12 septembre, 2012
Ne croyez pas que je sois venu apporter la paix sur la terre; je ne suis pas venu apporter la paix, mais l’épée. Car je suis venu mettre la division entre l’homme et son père, entre la fille et sa mère, entre la belle-fille et sa belle-mère; et l’homme aura pour ennemis les gens de sa maison. Jésus (Matthieu 10: 34-36)
Vous entendrez parler de guerres et de bruits de guerres: gardez-vous d’être troublés, car il faut que ces choses arrivent. Mais ce ne sera pas encore la fin.Une nation s’élèvera contre une nation, et un royaume contre un royaume, et il y aura, en divers lieux, des famines et des tremblements de terre. Tout cela ne sera que le commencement des douleurs.Alors on vous livrera aux tourments, et l’on vous fera mourir; et vous serez haïs de toutes les nations, à cause de mon nom. Jésus (Matthieu 24: 6-9)
Il faut allier le pessimisme de l’intelligence à l’optimisme de la volonté. Antonio Gramsci (inspiré de Romain Rolland)
Cet indice synthétique tente de mesurer les efforts menés par les États (121 en 2007, 140 en 2008) pour promouvoir la paix dans le monde. Les pays les plus riches semblent les mieux classés, leur administration disposant de moyens suffisants pour mettre en place des politiques de prévention des tensions sociales. À PIB/habitant équivalent, il existe néanmoins d’amples variations (Portugal/Israël ou Uruguay/Liban). (…)  En revanche, la prise en compte du poids des dépenses militaires dans le PIB favorise les États isolationnistes peu impliqués dans la résolution des crises internationales. Cette conception angélique de la paix valorise souvent des pays (Islande, Norvège) plaçant leur défense sous le contrôle des États-Unis grâce à des accords de protection militaire. Arnaud Brennetot
Geography is common sense, but it is not fate. Individual choice operates within a certain geographical and historical context, which affects decisions but leaves many possibilities open. The French philosopher Raymond Aron captured this spirit with his notion of « probabilistic determinism, » which leaves ample room for human agency. But before geography can be overcome, it must be respected. Our own foreign-policy elites are too enamored of beautiful ideas and too dismissive of physical facts-on-the-ground and the cultural differences that emanate from them. Successfully navigating today’s world demands that we focus first on constraints, and that means paying attention to maps. Only then can noble solutions follow. The art of statesmanship is about working just at the edge of what is possible, without ever stepping over the brink. Robert Kaplan

Paranoia d’un régime chinois littéralement encerclé par les hauts plateaux de ses minorités lui fournissant l’essentiel de ses ressources naturelles …

Insécurité chronique d’un néo-impérialisme russe à la tête du plus grand mais aussi du plus indéfendable des territoires …

Ingouvernabilité multi-séculaire d’un Afghanistan coupé en deux tant par un quasi infranchissable Hindu Kush que l’impossibillité de priver de leurs bases arrières pakistanaises des talibans eux aussi avant tout pachtounes …

Instabilité multimillénaire d’un Irak divisé  entre ses montagnes du nord et ses plaines fluviales du centre et du sud …

Imprenabilité d’un plateau iranien étouffant sous un régime proprement totalitaire mais stratégiquement à cheval non seulement sur les pompe à essence du monde du golfe persique et de la mer caspienne mais sur les frontières hautement combustibles de ses voisins irakiens et afghans …

Friabilité yougoslavesque d’une Syrie désormais privée par les prétendus « printemps arabes »  de ses béquilles panarabistes et antisionistes …

Au lendemain d’un11e anniversaire de la pire attaque qu’ai jamais connu les Etats-Unis sur leur propre territoire continental …

Où nos médias à la mémoire courte n’ont pas manqué de charger le cowboy Bush honni (cette fois pour ne pas avoir anticipé la menace) …

Pendant que dans les pays de la religion d’amour de paix et de tolérance brûlent à nouveau nos représentations diplomatiques occidentales et que, sous couvert du parapluie protecteur de Washington, nos propres pacifistes de service n’ont pas de mots assez durs pour dénoncer le bellicisme américain …

Petit rappel, avec le dernier livre du géopolitologue américain Robert Kaplan, des fondamentaux de la bonne vieille géographie physique, « science des lieux »  jadis cantonnée, hors des sciences sociales et des enjeux politiques par sa grande rivale l’Histoire, à la simple étude du relief et du climat…

Dure réalité d’une géographie qui, ce que ne semble toujours pas avoir compris l’actuel Carter noir de la Maison Blanche, demande à être « respectée » avant d’être « surmontée » …

Geography Strikes Back

To understand today’s global conflicts, forget economics and technology and take a hard look at a map, writes Robert D. Kaplan

Robert D. Kaplan

The WSJ

September 7, 2012

If you want to know what Russia, China or Iran will do next, don’t read their newspapers or ask what our spies have dug up—consult a map. Geography can reveal as much about a government’s aims as its secret councils. More than ideology or domestic politics, what fundamentally defines a state is its place on the globe. Maps capture the key facts of history, culture and natural resources. With upheaval in the Middle East and a tumultuous political transition in China, look to geography to make sense of it all.

As a way of explaining world politics, geography has supposedly been eclipsed by economics, globalization and electronic communications. It has a decidedly musty aura, like a one-room schoolhouse. Indeed, those who think of foreign policy as an opportunity to transform the world for the better tend to equate any consideration of geography with fatalism, a failure of imagination.

Want to understand the political insecurity of China’s leaders or Iran’s resilience in the face of Western sanctions? The best place to start is with a map, says Robert D. Kaplan, discussing his new book with WSJ’s Gary Rosen.

But this is nonsense. Elite molders of public opinion may be able to dash across oceans and continents in hours, allowing them to talk glibly of the « flat » world below. But while cyberspace and financial markets know no boundaries, the Carpathian Mountains still separate Central Europe from the Balkans, helping to create two vastly different patterns of development, and the Himalayas still stand between India and China, a towering reminder of two vastly different civilizations.

Technology has collapsed distance, but it has hardly negated geography. Rather, it has increased the preciousness of disputed territory. As the Yale scholar Paul Bracken observes, the « finite size of the earth » is now itself a force for instability: The Eurasian land mass has become a string of overlapping missile ranges, with crowds in megacities inflamed by mass media about patches of ground in Palestine and Kashmir. Counterintuitive though it may seem, the way to grasp what is happening in this world of instantaneous news is to rediscover something basic: the spatial representation of humanity’s divisions, possibilities and—most important—constraints. The map leads us to the right sorts of questions.

Why, for example, are headlines screaming about the islands of the South China Sea? As the Pacific antechamber to the Indian Ocean, this sea connects the energy-rich Middle East and the emerging middle-class fleshpots of East Asia. It is also thought to contain significant stores of hydrocarbons. China thinks of the South China Sea much as the U.S. thinks of the Caribbean: as a blue-water extension of its mainland. Vietnam and the Philippines also abut this crucial body of water, which is why we are seeing maritime brinkmanship on all sides. It is a battle not of ideas but of physical space. The same can be said of the continuing dispute between Japan and Russia over the South Kuril Islands.

Global Conflicts

Why does President Vladimir Putin covet buffer zones in Eastern Europe and the Caucasus, just as the czars and commissars did before him? Because Russia still constitutes a vast, continental space that is unprotected by mountains and rivers. Putin’s neo-imperialism is the expression of a deep geographical insecurity.

Or consider the decade since 9/11, which can’t be understood apart from the mountains and deserts of Afghanistan and Iraq. The mountains of the Hindu Kush separate northern Afghanistan, populated by Tajiks and Uzbeks, from southern and eastern Afghanistan, populated by Pushtuns. The Taliban are Sunni extremists like al Qaeda, to whom they gave refuge in the days before 9/11, but more than that, they are a Pushtun national movement, a product of Afghanistan’s harsh geographic divide.

Moving eastward, we descend from Afghanistan’s high tableland to Pakistan’s steamy Indus River Valley. But the change of terrain is so gradual that, rather than being effectively separated by an international border, Afghanistan and Pakistan comprise the same Indo-Islamic world. From a geographical view, it seems naive to think that American diplomacy or military activity alone could divide these long-interconnected lands into two well-functioning states.

As for Iraq, ever since antiquity, the mountainous north and the riverine south and center have usually been in pitched battle. It started in the ancient world with conflict among Sumerians, Akkadians and Assyrians. Today the antagonists are Shiites, Sunnis, and Kurds. The names of the groups have changed but not the cartography of war.

The U.S. itself is no exception to this sort of analysis. Why are we the world’s pre-eminent power? Americans tend to think that it is because of who we are. I would suggest that it is also because of where we live: in the last resource-rich part of the temperate zone settled by Europeans at the time of the Enlightenment, with more miles of navigable, inland waterways than the rest of the world combined, and protected by oceans and the Canadian Arctic.

Even so seemingly modern a crisis as Europe’s financial woes is an expression of timeless geography. It is no accident that the capital cities of today’s European Union (Brussels, Maastricht, Strasbourg, The Hague) helped to form the heart of Charlemagne’s ninth-century empire. With the end of the classical world of Greece and Rome, history moved north. There, in the rich soils of protected forest clearings and along a shattered coastline open to the Atlantic, medieval Europe developed the informal power relations of feudalism and learned to take advantage of technologies like movable type.

Indeed, there are several Europes, each with different patterns of economic development that have been influenced by geography. In addition to Charlemagne’s realm, there is also Mitteleuropa, now dominated by a united Germany, which boasts few physical barriers to the former communist east. The economic legacies of the Prussian, Habsburg and Ottoman empires still influence this Europe, and they, too, were shaped by a distinctive terrain.

Nor is it an accident that Greece, in Europe’s southeastern corner, is the most troubled member of the EU. Greece is where the Balkans and the Mediterranean world overlap. It was an underprivileged stepchild of Byzantine and then Turkish despotism, and the consequences of this unhappy geographic fate echo to this day in the form of rampant tax evasion, a fundamental lack of competitiveness, and paternalistic coffeehouse politics.

As for the strategic challenge posed to the West by China, we would do well not to focus too single-mindedly on economics and politics. Geography provides a wider lens. China is big in one sense: its population, its commercial and energy enterprises and its economy as a whole are creating zones of influence in contiguous parts of the Russian Far East, Central Asia and Southeast Asia. But Chinese leaders themselves often see their country as relatively small and fragile: within its borders are sizable minority populations of Tibetans in the southwest, Uighur Turks in the west and ethnic-Mongolians in the north.

It is these minority areas—high plateaus virtually encircling the ethnic core of Han Chinese—where much of China’s fresh water, hydrocarbons and other natural resources come from. The West blithely tells the Chinese leadership to liberalize their political system. But the Chinese leaders know their own geography. They know that democratization in even the mildest form threatens to unleash ethnic fury.

Because ethnic minorities in China live in specific regions, the prospect of China breaking apart is not out of the question. That is why Beijing pours Han immigrants into the big cities of Tibet and western Xinjiang province, even as it hands out small doses of autonomy to the periphery and continues to artificially stimulate the economies there. These policies may be unsustainable, but they emanate ultimately from a vast and varied continental geography, which extends into the Western Pacific, where China finds itself boxed in by a chain of U. S. naval allies from Japan to Australia. It is for reasons of geographic realpolitik that China is determined to incorporate Taiwan into its dominion.

In no part of the world is it more urgent for geography to inform American policy than in the Middle East, where our various ideological reflexes have gotten the better of us in recent years.

As advocates continue to urge intervention in Syria, it is useful to recall that the modern state of that name is a geographic ghost of its post-Ottoman self, which included what are now Lebanon, Jordan and Israel. Even that larger entity was less a well-defined place than a vague geographical expression. Still, the truncated modern state of Syria contains all the communal divides of the old Ottoman region. Its ethno-religious makeup since independence in 1944—Alawites in the northwest, Sunnis in the central corridor, Druze in the south—make it an Arab Yugoslavia in the making. These divisions are what long made Syria the throbbing heart of pan-Arabism and the ultimate rejectionist state vis-à-vis Israel. Only by appealing to a radical Arab identity beyond the call of sect could Syria assuage the forces that have always threatened to tear the country apart.

But this does not mean that Syria must now descend into anarchy, for geography has many stories to tell. Syria and Iraq both have deep roots in specific agricultural terrains that hark back millennia, making them less artificial than is supposed. Syria could yet survive as a 21st-century equivalent of early 20th-century Beirut, Alexandria and Smyrna: a Levantine world of multiple identities united by commerce and anchored to the Mediterranean. Ethnic divisions based on geography can be overcome, but only if we first recognize how formidable they are.

Finally, there is the problem of Iran, which has vexed American policy makers since the Islamic Revolution of 1979. The U.S. tends to see Iranian power in ideological terms, but a good deal can be learned from the country’s formidable geographic advantages.

The state of Iran conforms with the Iranian plateau, an impregnable natural fortress that straddles both oil-producing regions of the Middle East: the Persian Gulf and the Caspian Sea. Moreover, from the western side of the Iranian plateau, all roads are open to Iraq down below. And from the Iranian plateau’s eastern and northeastern sides, all roads are open to Central Asia, where Iran is building roads and pipelines to several former Soviet republics.

Geography puts Iran in a favored position to dominate both Iraq and western Afghanistan, which it does nicely at the moment. Iran’s coastline in the Persian Gulf’s Strait of Hormuz is a vast 1,356 nautical miles long, with inlets perfect for hiding swarms of small suicide-attack boats. But for the presence of the U.S. Navy, this would allow Iran to rule the Persian Gulf. Iran also has 300 miles of Arabian Sea frontage, making it vital for Central Asia’s future access to international waters. India has been helping Iran develop the port of Chah Bahar in Iranian Baluchistan, which will one day be linked to the gas and oil fields of the Caspian basin.

Iran is the geographic pivot state of the Greater Middle East, and it is essential for the United States to reach an accommodation with it. The regime of the ayatollahs descends from the Medes, Parthians, Achaemenids and Sassanids of yore—Iranian peoples all—whose sphere of influence from the Syrian desert to the Indian subcontinent was built on a clearly defined geography.

There is one crucial difference, however: Iran’s current quasi-empire is built on fear and suffocating clerical rule, both of which greatly limit its appeal and point to its eventual downfall. Under this regime, the Technicolor has disappeared from the Iranian landscape, replaced by a grainy black-and-white. The West should be less concerned with stopping Iran’s nuclear program than with developing a grand strategy for transforming the regime.

In this very brief survey of the world as seen from the standpoint of geography, I don’t wish to be misunderstood: Geography is common sense, but it is not fate. Individual choice operates within a certain geographical and historical context, which affects decisions but leaves many possibilities open. The French philosopher Raymond Aron captured this spirit with his notion of « probabilistic determinism, » which leaves ample room for human agency.

But before geography can be overcome, it must be respected. Our own foreign-policy elites are too enamored of beautiful ideas and too dismissive of physical facts-on-the-ground and the cultural differences that emanate from them. Successfully navigating today’s world demands that we focus first on constraints, and that means paying attention to maps. Only then can noble solutions follow. The art of statesmanship is about working just at the edge of what is possible, without ever stepping over the brink.

—Mr. Kaplan is chief geopolitical analyst for Stratfor, a private global intelligence firm. This article is adapted from his book, « The Revenge of Geography: What the Map Tells Us About Coming Conflicts and the Battle Against Fate, » which will be published Tuesday by Random House.

Voir aussi:

La géographie, ça sert, d’abord, à faire la guerre d’Yves Lacoste

Olivier Kempf

5 novembre  2009

Relire ce livre quinze ans après est chose passionnante. Je l’avais lu en 1984, dans de tout autres conditions et un tout autre projet, plus utilitaire. Plus jeune, aussi…. Le relire avec un œil de géopolitologue apporte énormément.

Tout d’abord, il faut donner une précision qui est rarement soulignée : attention aux virgules du titre. Elles sont souvent omises alors qu’elles signifient un cheminement intellectuel, et le vrai propos de l’auteur. Il s’agit en effet de montrer que la géographie, ça sert : c’est utile ! même si cette utilité a d’abord été fondée sur des considérations étatiques, puisqu’il s’agit de la souveraineté, et de la défense de celle-ci. La géographie est science étatique, au moins autant que l’histoire. D’ailleurs, remarquons que la géographie moderne (la carte de Cassini) est contemporaine de l’ordre westphalien…. Donc si ça sert à faire la guerre, ça ne sert pas qu’à ça. Or, beaucoup comprennent le livre comme un plaidoyer expliquant que la géographie ne sert qu’à faire la guerre…

La date du livre, ensuite : 1976. A l’époque, l’histoire est encore dominatrice, elle règne sur les esprits. La géographie est complexée, subordonnée. L’histoire est majestueuse, quand la géographie est servile. Dans le même temps, l’époque est au post-mai 1968, avec plein de relents marxisants sur la conscience politique des sciences humaines. Ce livre se situe au carrefour de ces deux influences : Y. Lacoste se rebiffe contre l’abaissement de la géographie, considérant que cela favorise en fait « les puissants » qui « eux », s’en servent ; il prône donc une géographie politique, qui n’est pas marxiste (même s’il a lu Marx, comme tout intellectuel de son époque) : il prend soin en effet d’expliquer pourquoi sa géographie politique va plus profondément que la géographie marxiste. Ou plutôt, il explique que la géographie étant politique, il ne faut pas la laisser au seul(s) pouvoir(s) mais qu’elle devienne un instrument de la conscience politique des masses, etc…

Tout cela paraît donc, à bien des égards, daté : pourtant, une lecture contemporaine n’est pas gênée par cette désuétude apparente. Car derrière les fadaises sur la conscience politique populaire, il y a du fond, beaucoup de fond. Et si on écarte, assez facilement, les oripeaux militants, on trouve un argumentaire qui est passionnant pour le géopolitologue. Et toujours actuel. En clair, il faut continuer de lire ce livre, même aujourd’hui, en 2009.

Le mot géopolitique, d’abord : il apparaît certes dès la page 9, mais accolé de l’adjectif « hitlérien » : Lacoste n’a pas encore vraiment adopté le mot en 1976. Il s’est beaucoup plus détaché du contexte dans la postface de 1982, où il adopte le mot qui représente justement son évolution, et son projet. Il est intéressant d’ailleurs de noter cette évolution d’une géographie politique, vieille tradition de la géographie française (cf. les Ancel, les Demangeon,…) vers une géopolitique, qui est le moyen par lequel la même université française a transformé sa géographie politique. Au point qu’aujourd’hui, la plupart des « géopolitologues » sont des géographes, ce qui pose problème, mais c’est un autre débat.

Que montre Lacoste ?

Que la géographie, celle qu’on apprenait en classe (cf. la géographie de nos grands-mères) est un formidable outil de construction de l’identité nationale, au moins aussi puissant que le discours historié de Mallet et Isaac.

Que la géographie française a été organisée autour de l’école vidalienne (Tableau de la géographie de la France, récemment réédité) qui éclipse la nature politique des choses. On notera d’ailleurs la très intéressante comparaison entre Vidal, qui invente le concept de « région », moyen « géographique » permettant d’oublier la dimension politique, et un Elysée Reclus qui étatise la géographie, assumant la dimension politique de celle-ci, quelque utopiste que soit son approche (il faut, évidemment, réhabiliter E. Reclus qui a été oublié).

Que l’approche multiscalaire (plusieurs échelles d’analyse) permet seule de décrire une réalité qu’on représenterait autrement de manière trop uniforme, et donc peu pertinente.

Que la carte, outil de « représentation » est rien moins que neutre et qu’elle doit être « lue » (on décèle là le futur apport Lacostien, qui inventera plus tard le concept géopolitique de « représentation », dans un sens non pas cartographique mais identitaire)

Qu’il faut conduire une réflexion épistémologique sur la géographie, sans tomber dans la fascination d’une approche quantitative, à la mode de la New Geography américaine (tient, un débat fort similaire de celui qui existe en économie !)

Et plein d’autres choses encore…

On lira avec le plus grand intérêt la postface de 1982, qui apporte des éléments nouveaux, outre que le mot géopolitique soit désormais assumé : C’est en effet un excellent tableau de la lutte épistémologique entre géographie et histoire entre les deux guerres, puis la déréliction géographique après la deuxième guerre mondiale.

le repentir vidalien (La France de l’est, 1916), écrit dans le traumatisme de la guerre et négligé à l’issue (on cite le « géopolitique et géostratégie » de l’amiral Célérier, en Que sais-je, que je ne connaissais pas) ;

le maintien de la suprématie historique dans l’entre deux guerres, avec Lucien Fèbvre (introduction géographique à l’histoire, 1922) et l’école des Annales (voir billet), malgré les quelques tentatives d’émancipation de la géographie (J. Brunhes, ‘Géographie de l’histoire », 1921).

Cette formule heureuse : « cette exclusion du politique (je dis bien le politique et non la politique) a eu pour effet… » (p. 213).

La volonté de prétendre que « le monde est beaucoup plus compliqué qu’on n’a voulu le croire » (p. 220), qui résume l’ambition géopolitique.

Car au fond, c’est LE politique qui permet de lier la géographie à l’histoire.

Un livre engagé, mais passionnant, par celui qui animera la naissance de l’école géopolitique française contemporaine. Que celle-ci s’endorme un peu et retombe dans une géographie « classique » est un autre débat : il faut pour l’instant apprécier ce livre, toujours intéressant à double titre :

Parce qu’il marque une rupture épistémologique essentielle (or, il n’y a pas de géopolitique sans réflexion épistémologique sur la discipline), même si on ne sait toujours pas aujourd’hui si la géopolitique est une géographie réinventée, ou si elle est une autre discipline…. (vous devinez que je prône la deuxième approche.. débat à ouvrir avec B. Tratnjek)

Parce que les instruments d’analyse qu’il propose demeurent pertinents, quelle que soit la réponse qu’on apporte à la question précédente.

Est-il besoin de vous conseiller vigoureusement de le lire..? Indispensable, je vous dis….

Voir également:

The Deafness Before the Storm

Kurt Eichenwald

The New York Times

September 10, 2012

It was perhaps the most famous presidential briefing in history.

On Aug. 6, 2001, President George W. Bush received a classified review of the threats posed by Osama bin Laden and his terrorist network, Al Qaeda. That morning’s “presidential daily brief” — the top-secret document prepared by America’s intelligence agencies — featured the now-infamous heading: “Bin Laden Determined to Strike in U.S.” A few weeks later, on 9/11, Al Qaeda accomplished that goal.

On April 10, 2004, the Bush White House declassified that daily brief — and only that daily brief — in response to pressure from the 9/11 Commission, which was investigating the events leading to the attack. Administration officials dismissed the document’s significance, saying that, despite the jaw-dropping headline, it was only an assessment of Al Qaeda’s history, not a warning of the impending attack. While some critics considered that claim absurd, a close reading of the brief showed that the argument had some validity.

That is, unless it was read in conjunction with the daily briefs preceding Aug. 6, the ones the Bush administration would not release. While those documents are still not public, I have read excerpts from many of them, along with other recently declassified records, and come to an inescapable conclusion: the administration’s reaction to what Mr. Bush was told in the weeks before that infamous briefing reflected significantly more negligence than has been disclosed. In other words, the Aug. 6 document, for all of the controversy it provoked, is not nearly as shocking as the briefs that came before it.

The direct warnings to Mr. Bush about the possibility of a Qaeda attack began in the spring of 2001. By May 1, the Central Intelligence Agency told the White House of a report that “a group presently in the United States” was planning a terrorist operation. Weeks later, on June 22, the daily brief reported that Qaeda strikes could be “imminent,” although intelligence suggested the time frame was flexible.

But some in the administration considered the warning to be just bluster. An intelligence official and a member of the Bush administration both told me in interviews that the neoconservative leaders who had recently assumed power at the Pentagon were warning the White House that the C.I.A. had been fooled; according to this theory, Bin Laden was merely pretending to be planning an attack to distract the administration from Saddam Hussein, whom the neoconservatives saw as a greater threat. Intelligence officials, these sources said, protested that the idea of Bin Laden, an Islamic fundamentalist, conspiring with Mr. Hussein, an Iraqi secularist, was ridiculous, but the neoconservatives’ suspicions were nevertheless carrying the day.

In response, the C.I.A. prepared an analysis that all but pleaded with the White House to accept that the danger from Bin Laden was real.

“The U.S. is not the target of a disinformation campaign by Usama Bin Laden,” the daily brief of June 29 read, using the government’s transliteration of Bin Laden’s first name. Going on for more than a page, the document recited much of the evidence, including an interview that month with a Middle Eastern journalist in which Bin Laden aides warned of a coming attack, as well as competitive pressures that the terrorist leader was feeling, given the number of Islamists being recruited for the separatist Russian region of Chechnya.

And the C.I.A. repeated the warnings in the briefs that followed. Operatives connected to Bin Laden, one reported on June 29, expected the planned near-term attacks to have “dramatic consequences,” including major casualties. On July 1, the brief stated that the operation had been delayed, but “will occur soon.” Some of the briefs again reminded Mr. Bush that the attack timing was flexible, and that, despite any perceived delay, the planned assault was on track.

Yet, the White House failed to take significant action. Officials at the Counterterrorism Center of the C.I.A. grew apoplectic. On July 9, at a meeting of the counterterrorism group, one official suggested that the staff put in for a transfer so that somebody else would be responsible when the attack took place, two people who were there told me in interviews. The suggestion was batted down, they said, because there would be no time to train anyone else.

That same day in Chechnya, according to intelligence I reviewed, Ibn Al-Khattab, an extremist who was known for his brutality and his links to Al Qaeda, told his followers that there would soon be very big news. Within 48 hours, an intelligence official told me, that information was conveyed to the White House, providing more data supporting the C.I.A.’s warnings. Still, the alarm bells didn’t sound.

On July 24, Mr. Bush was notified that the attack was still being readied, but that it had been postponed, perhaps by a few months. But the president did not feel the briefings on potential attacks were sufficient, one intelligence official told me, and instead asked for a broader analysis on Al Qaeda, its aspirations and its history. In response, the C.I.A. set to work on the Aug. 6 brief.

In the aftermath of 9/11, Bush officials attempted to deflect criticism that they had ignored C.I.A. warnings by saying they had not been told when and where the attack would occur. That is true, as far as it goes, but it misses the point. Throughout that summer, there were events that might have exposed the plans, had the government been on high alert. Indeed, even as the Aug. 6 brief was being prepared, Mohamed al-Kahtani, a Saudi believed to have been assigned a role in the 9/11 attacks, was stopped at an airport in Orlando, Fla., by a suspicious customs agent and sent back overseas on Aug. 4. Two weeks later, another co-conspirator, Zacarias Moussaoui, was arrested on immigration charges in Minnesota after arousing suspicions at a flight school. But the dots were not connected, and Washington did not react.

Could the 9/11 attack have been stopped, had the Bush team reacted with urgency to the warnings contained in all of those daily briefs? We can’t ever know. And that may be the most agonizing reality of all.

Kurt Eichenwald, a contributing editor at Vanity Fair and a former reporter for The New York Times, is the author of “500 Days: Secrets and Lies in the Terror Wars.”

Voir encore:

Evidence piles up that Bush administration got many pre-9/11 warnings

Author Kurt Eichenwald talks about what the White House knew leading up to the attacks and how they used the intelligence information in the months after.

Robert Windrem

NBC News

On the 11th anniversary of the worst terrorist attack on U.S. soil, there is mounting evidence that the Bush administration received more intelligence warnings than previously known prior to the Sept. 11 attacks that killed nearly 3,000.

Kurt Eichenwald, a former New York Times reporter, wrote in an op-ed piece in Tuesday’s newspaper about a number of previously unknown warnings relayed to the White House by U.S. intelligence in the weeks and months prior to the attacks. Eichenwald wrote of the warnings in his new book, “500 Days: Secrets and Lies in the Terror Wars.”

And former US intelligence officials say there were even more warnings, pointing to a little noticed section of George Tenet’s memoir, “At the Center of the Storm.”

In it, Tenet describes a July 10, 2001, meeting at the White House in the office of Condoleezza Rice, then President George W. Bush’s national security adviser. The meeting was not discussed in the 9-11 Commission’s final report on the attacks, although Tenet wrote that he provided information on it to the commission.

What’s critical to understanding the difference between this meeting and others, says one former senior U.S. intelligence official who spoke with NBC News on condition of anonymity, is that the intelligence provided that day was fresh, some of it having been collected the previous day. And other intelligence and national security officials, also speaking on condition of anonymity, say the briefings make clear that, while Bush administration officials understood the nature of the threat, they didn’t understand its magnitude and urgency.

“This intelligence delivered on July 10 was specific and was generated within 24 hours of the meeting,” said the first official, who pointed out the text in the Tenet memoir.

Tenet wrote about how after being briefed by his counterterrorism team on July 10 — two months prior to the attacks — “I picked up the big white secure phone on the left side of my desk — the one with a direct line to Condi Rice — and told her that I needed to see her immediately to provide an update on the al-Qaida threat.”

Tenet said he could not recall another time in his seven years as director of the CIA that he sought such an urgent meeting at the White House. Rice agreed to the meeting immediately, and 15 minutes later, he was in Rice’s office.

An analyst handed out the briefing packages Tenet had just seen and began to speak. “His opening line got everyone’s attention,” Tenet wrote, “in part because it left no room for misunderstanding: ‘There will be a significant terrorist attack in the coming weeks or months!’”

The team laid out in a series of slides its concerns, based on intelligence that included information “from the past 24 hours.”

Citing his notes on the briefing, Tenet wrote, “A chart displayed seven specific pieces of intelligence gathered over the past twenty-four hours, all of them predicting an imminent attack. Among the items: Islamic extremists were traveling to Afghanistan in greater numbers, and there had been significant departures of extremist families from Yemen. Other signs pointed to new threats against U.S. interests in Lebanon, Morocco, and Mauritania.”

A second chart followed, listing a summation of the most chilling comments by al-Qaida. According to Tenet, they were:

• A mid-June statement from Osama bin Laden to trainees that there will be an attack in the near future.

• Information that talked about moving toward decisive acts.

• Late June information that cited a “big event” that was forthcoming.

• “Two separate bits of information collected only a few days before our meeting in which people were predicting a stunning turn of events in the weeks ahead.”

Another slide detailed how Chechen Islamic terrorist leader Ibn Kattab had promised some “very big news” to his troops.

There were more details, as laid out by one of Tenet’s top analysts, known in the book as “Rich B.” Tenet recounts his aide telling Rice and others, “The attack will be ‘spectacular.’ and designed to inflict mass casualties against U.S. facilities and interests. ‘Attack preparations have been made,’ he said. ‘Multiple and simultaneous attacks are possible, and they will occur with little or no warning. Al-Qaida is waiting us out and looking for vulnerability.”

Rice, Tenet wrote, reacted positively to the briefing and asked her counter terrorism adviser, Richard Clarke, if he agreed with the assessment. Clarke said he did, and Tenet said he and his aides left the meeting feeling that Rice understood the threat. However, he wrote, the White House never followed up on the presidential finding that Tenet had been asking for since March, authorizing broader covert action against al-Qaida. That finding was signed by President Bush on Sept. 17, six days after the attacks.

Roger Cressey, who was Clarke’s deputy and is now an NBC News counter terrorism analyst, says one thing that is missing from Tenet’s description of the events is that the intelligence pointed to overseas attacks. although CIA did tell officials that they couldn’t discount an attack on the US homeland.

“Everything we had (from US intelligence) pointed overseas, specifically to the Gulf,” he said. “There was no actionable intelligence that pointed to the homeland. What we did know, and what we told domestic agencies, was there was « a disturbance in the force” and we were very worried about an attack.

Still, Cressey remains critical of the lack of a response going back to the first week of the administration, saying the counterterrorism team at the National Security Council and experts elsewhere in the government were “butting our heads against the wall” in an effort to get a meaningful response from the White House.

Would action by the White House have helped? Like Eichenwald, Cressey says he isn’t sure, but notes that when similar intelligence pointed to attacks on Jan. 1, 2000, “Sandy Berger (Rice’s predecessor) and (President Bill) Clinton went to battle stations.” Did warnings prior to the millennium help thwart a number of attacks back then? Cressey believes they did.

One intelligence official also noted that after the interception of the July intelligence, there was little conversation on the al-Qaida communications network prior to Sept. 11. It wasn’t until much later U.S. intelligence understood why: With the plans and operational personnel in place, the plotters were simply waiting for an opportune time to strike.

“They laid low because they were waiting for Congress to come back in session,” the official said.

The reason, he said: United Flight 93 was headed for the U.S. Capitol, where Congress was in session, when passengers overpowered the hijackers, causing the plane to crash in a field near Shanksville, Pa.

Robert Windrem is a senior investigative producer for NBC News.

Voir enfin:

Will Geography Decide Our Destiny?

The NY Review of Books

February 21, 2013

Malise Ruthven

The Revenge of Geography: What the Map Tells Us About Coming Conflicts and the Battle Against Fate

Robert D. Kaplan

Random House, 403 pp., $28.00

When maps were introduced into Ottoman schools in the 1860s, conservative Muslims—people we would now call Salafists—were so outraged that they ripped them off classroom walls and threw them down the latrines. Though Muslim geographers such as Muhammad al-Idrisi (1099–1166) had produced serviceable maps, they were not widely available and for most of Ottoman history the spatial configuration of territory in two dimensions had been largely restricted to military specialists.

The images available to the sultan’s subjects and to others pondering his domains were for the most part verbal, with reference to imprecise formulas such as Memaliki Mahrusi Shahane—“divinely protected imperial possessions.” The imaginary—the different ways of conceiving the world—was human-centered rather than territorially based. Political power was not perceived as distributed spatially over a homogenous, two-dimensional field, but vertically through a hierarchy of human filters emanating from the sultan via his suzerains. As Albert Hourani pointed out in his History of the Arab Peoples, in the arid zones of North Africa and the Middle East where pastoralists ranged over frontierless deserts and steppes, power tended to radiate out of urban centers, weakening with distance.

For the most of the world, boundaries between states were not fixed until Europeans arranged treaties between themselves or with local rulers. From the late nineteenth century, however, the map was essential to this process. As Benedict Anderson noted in Imagined Communities, one of the map’s effects was to compel citizens to identify with a specific territorial entity. According to the historian Benjamin Fortna, the Ottoman rulers deliberately used schoolroom maps to promote loyalty to the state: “The map insists on the importance of the shape of the territory and this shape begins to assume tremendous political importance as emblematic for the territory in question.”1

Maps came to be used polemically to assert political sovereignty—or to deny political realities. Fortna notes that the “pink” of Ottoman sovereignty used in maps approved by the Ottoman ministry of education in 1906 showed Tunis—occupied by France since 1881—as still part of the Ottoman Empire while Bulgaria, independent from the 1870s, was still shown as an imperial province.

More recently, maps used throughout the Arab world routinely denied the existence of Israel, while Palestinian activists show the map of the whole of Palestine (to the exclusion of the Jewish state or “Zionist entity”) as their national logos. Yasser Arafat deliberately folded his headdress, or kaffiyeh, to resemble the whole of Palestine. In South Asia it would be hard to conceive of an Indian government ceding any part of the disputed territory of Kashmir (the only state with a Muslim majority) when every Indian schoolchild grows up with a diamond-shaped image of the country with its apex far in the Himalayan north. Maps have been agents of political homogenization, an essential part of what the anthropologist Ernest Gellner called the “universal conceptual currency …


Islam: Le Coran est-il autre chose qu’un palimpseste plus ou moins falsifié de la Bible? (Looking back at the less than immaculate conception of Islam’s sacred text)

9 septembre, 2012
https://i0.wp.com/www.causeur.fr/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/affiches-campagnes.jpgQu’est-ce que le cerveau humain, sinon un palimpseste immense et naturel ? Mon cerveau est un palimpseste et le vôtre aussi, lecteur. Des couches innombrables d’idées, d’images, de sentiments sont tombées successivement sur votre cerveau, aussi doucement que la lumière. Il a semblé que chacune ensevelissait la précédente. Mais aucune en réalité n’a péri. » Toutefois, entre le palimpseste qui porte, superposées l’une sur l’autre, une tragédie grecque, une légende monacale, et une histoire de chevalerie, et le palimpseste divin créé par Dieu, qui est notre incommensurable mémoire, se présente cette différence, que dans le premier il y a comme un chaos fantastique, grotesque, une collision entre des éléments hétérogènes ; tandis que dans le second la fatalité du tempérament met forcément une harmonie parmi les éléments les plus disparates. Quelque incohérente que soit une existence, l’unité humaine n’en est pas troublée. Tous les échos de la mémoire, si on pouvait les réveiller simultanément, formeraient un concert, agréable ou douloureux, mais logique et sans dissonances. Souvent des êtres, surpris par un accident subit, suffoqués brusquement par l’eau, et en danger de mort, ont vu s’allumer dans leur cerveau tout le théâtre de leur vie passée. Le temps a été annihilé, et quelques secondes ont suffi à contenir une quantité de sentiments et d’images équivalente à des années. Et ce qu’il y a de plus singulier dans cette expérience, que le hasard a amenée plus d’une fois, ce n’est pas la simultanéité de tant d’éléments qui furent successifs, c’est la réapparition de tout ce que l’être lui même ne connaissait plus, mais qu’il est cependant forcé de reconnaître comme lui étant propre. L’oubli n’est donc que momentané ; et dans telles circonstances solennelles, dans la mort peut-être, et généralement dans les excitations intenses créées par l’opium, tout l’immense et compliqué palimpseste de la mémoire se déroule d’un seul coup, avec toutes ses couches superposées de sentiments défunts, mystérieusement embaumés dans ce que nous appelons l’oubli. (…) Dans le spirituel non plus que dans le matériel, rien ne se perd. De même que toute action, lancée dans le tourbillon de l’action universelle, est en soi irrévocable et irréparable, abstraction faite de ses résultats possibles, de même toute pensée est ineffaçable. Le palimpseste de la mémoire est indestructible. (…)  On croit que la tragédie grecque a été chassée et remplacée par la légende du moine, la légende du moine par le roman de chevalerie ; mais cela n’est pas. A mesure que l’être humain avance dans la vie, le roman qui, jeune homme, l’éblouissait, la légende fabuleuse qui, enfant, le séduisait, se fanent et s’obscurcissent d’eux-mêmes. Mais les profondes tragédies de l’enfance, – bras d’enfants arrachés à tout jamais du cou de leurs mères, lèvres d’enfants séparées à jamais des baisers de leurs soeurs, – vivent toujours cachées, sous les autres légendes du palimpseste. La passion et la maladie n’ont pas de chimie assez puissante pour brûler ces immortelles empreintes. Charles Baudelaire
Après ces choses, Dieu mit Abraham à l’épreuve, et lui dit: Abraham! Et il répondit: Me voici! Dieu dit: Prends ton fils, ton unique, celui que tu aimes, Isaac; va-t’en au pays de Morija, et là offre-le en holocauste sur l’une des montagnes que je te dirai. Genèse 22 :1-2
Nous lui fîmes donc la bonne annonce d’un garçon (Ismaïl) longanime. Puis quand celui-ci fut en âge de l’accompagner, [Abraham] dit: ‹Ô mon fils, je me vois en songe en train de t’immoler. Vois donc ce que tu en penses›. (Ismaël) dit: ‹Ô mon cher père, fais ce qui t’es commandé: tu me trouveras, s’il plaît à Allah, du nombre des endurants› (…) Nous lui fîmes la bonne annonce d’Isaac comme prophète d’entre les gens vertueux. Le Coran, 37, 101-102 & 112
Le Coran partage avec les apocryphes chrétiens de nombreuses scènes de vie de Marie et d’enfance de Jésus : la consécration de Marie dans la Sourate III, La famille de ‘Îmran, 31 et le Proto-évangile de Jacques, la vie de Marie au Temple dans la Sourate III, La famille de ‘Îmran, 32 et la Sourate XIX, Marie, 16 et le Proto-évangile de Jacques, le tirage au sort pour la prise en charge de Marie dans la Sourate III, La famille de ‘Imran, 39 et le Proto-évangile de Jacques, la station sous un palmier dans la Sourate XIX, Marie, 23 et l’Évangile du pseudo-Matthieu, Jésus parle au berceau dans la Sourate III, La famille de ‘Imran, 41 et la Sourate XIX, Marie, 30 et l’Évangile arabe de l’enfance, Jésus anime des oiseaux en argile dans la Sourate III, La famille de ‘Imran, 43 et la Sourate V, La Table, 110 et l’Évangile de l’enfance selon Thomas… Wikipedia
La condition préalable à tout dialogue est que chacun soit honnête avec sa tradition. (…) les chrétiens ont repris tel quel le corpus de la Bible hébraïque. Saint Paul parle de ” greffe” du christianisme sur le judaïsme, ce qui est une façon de ne pas nier celui-ci . (…) Dans l’islam, le corpus biblique est, au contraire, totalement remanié pour lui faire dire tout autre chose que son sens initial (…) La récupération sous forme de torsion ne respecte pas le texte originel sur lequel, malgré tout, le Coran s’appuie. René Girard
Dans la foi musulmane, il y a un aspect simple, brut, pratique qui a facilité sa diffusion et transformé la vie d’un grand nombre de peuples à l’état tribal en les ouvrant au monothéisme juif modifié par le christianisme. Mais il lui manque l’essentiel du christianisme : la croix. Comme le christianisme, l’islam réhabilite la victime innocente, mais il le fait de manière guerrière. La croix, c’est le contraire, c’est la fin des mythes violents et archaïques. René Girard
D’après les théologiens musulmans, le Coran vient directement d’Allah, il n’a pas changé d’une seule lettre depuis qu’il a été mis par écrit, et sa langue est si somptueusement poétique qu’elle est inimitable par aucun humain. Mohammed l’a récité alors qu’il était analphabète. Avant que le monde ne soit créé, le Coran était déjà présent, ce que la théologie musulmane exprime en disant que le Coran est incréé. Le Coran est en arabe depuis avant la fondation du monde parce qu’Allah parle arabe avec les anges. (…) L’alphabet arabe ne comportait à l’époque de Mohammed que trois voyelles longues : a, i, u, et ne faisait pas la différence entre certaines consonnes. Cette écriture, nommée scriptio defectiva, est indéchiffrable, et ne peut servir que d’aide mémoire à ceux qui connaissent déjà le texte. (…) C’est vers 650, que des collectes ont été faites pour constituer le Coran. Le Coran a donc été primitivement écrit en scriptio defectiva. Vers 850, deux siècles après les collectes, des grammairiens perses qui ignoraient la culture arabe ont fait des conjectures pour passer en scriptio plena, afin de rendre le Coran compréhensible. Cela n’a pas suffi. Il a fallu y ajouter d’autres conjectures sur le sens des passages obscurs, qui concernent environ 30% du Coran. L’édition actuelle du Coran est celle du Caire, faite en 1926. Il a donc fallu 1 300 ans pour la mettre au point. C’est une traduction en arabe classique d’un texte qui est incompréhensible sous sa forme originale. (…) À l’époque de Mohammed, l’arabe n’était pas une langue de culture, ni une langue internationale. Depuis plus de mille ans, dans tout le Proche Orient, la langue de culture était l’araméen. Les lettrés arabes, peu nombreux, parlaient en arabe et écrivaient en araméen. La situation était comparable à celle de l’Europe de la même époque, où les lettrés parlaient dans leur langue locale et écrivaient en latin. Les difficultés du Coran s’éclairent si on cherche le sens à partir de l’araméen. Le Coran n’est pas écrit en arabe pur, mais en un arabe aussi chargé d’araméen que, par exemple, l’allemand est chargé de latin. André Frament
D’après la théologie musulmane, Mohammed, venant à la suite d’une longue suite de prophètes, n’aurait fait qu’un « rappel », rendu nécessaire parce que les hommes oublient. On peut donc penser que des révélations faites aux prophètes prédécesseurs de Mohammed ont du laisser des traces. D’autre part, des historiens pensent que les nouveaux systèmes d’idées se développent à partir d’ébauches antécédentes. Quelle que soit l’hypothèse choisie, il a dû exister une sorte de pré-islam qu’il est intéressant de rechercher. (…) De fait,certaines idées présentes dans l’islam d’aujourd’hui sont également présentes dans les sectes millénaristes et messianiques du Proche Orient, aux premier et deuxième siècles de notre ère. Voir comment ces idées ont cheminé dans cette région du monde a donné un éclairage supplémentaire. Dans le Coran, Myriam, sœur d’Aaron, et Marie, mère du Christ, est une seule et même personne, alors que 1.200 ans les séparent. La Trinité, formée pour les chrétiens du Père, du Christ et du Saint-Esprit, est déclarée dans le Coran formée, du Père, du Christ, et de Marie. Ces éléments, et d’autres de la sorte, font penser que le Coran est formé de plusieurs traditions différentes, comme on peut l’observer pour d’autres livres anciens. (…) Les messianismes juifs se sont formés en trois siècles, de 180 avant notre ère à 150 après. Leur théologie présente cinq idées centrales qui, durent encore de nos jours: · La première est celle d’une guerre menée pour des raisons théologiques. · La seconde est celle d’émigration : les Justes devaient d’abord aller au désert, reproduisant l’Exode de Moïse au Néguev-Sinaï. · La troisième idée était la conquête de Jérusalem. · La quatrième était la libération complète de la Palestine juive. · La cinquième était la conquête du monde entier. Alors que les quatre premières étaient tout à fait générales dans les mouvements messianiques juifs, la dernière n’était acceptée que par une partie des adeptes. Les deux premières idées sont proches de celles de l’islam, et la cinquième reste un rêve que les musulmans ont poursuivi pendant quatorze siècles. (…) Les nazaréens pratiquaient la circoncision, la polygamie limitée à 4 épouses, décrivaient un paradis où les élus trouveraient des aliments délicieux, des boissons agréables et des femmes. Toutes ces idées sont présentes dans l’islam. De plus, un grand nombre de thèses, de conceptions, de dogmes nazaréens se retrouvent à l’identique dans l’islam d’aujourd’hui : ‘Îsâ, le nom de Jésus, le statut du Christ, les récits de l’enfance de Marie, la confusion entre Marie et Myriam, le statut des femmes, la Trinité formée du Père, du Christ et de Marie, la conception du paradis, le vin, interdit sur terre mais présent en fleuves entiers au paradis… (…) Le mot musulman apparaît pour la première fois sur le Dôme du roc, en 691, il entre dans l’usage officiel vers 720, il est utilisé sur une monnaie pour la première fois en 768, et sur papyrus en 775 seulement. La recherche linguistique montre que les mots islam et musulman ne viennent pas de l’arabe, mais de l’araméen, la langue des nazaréens. (…) Le nom de Médine, d’après les documents musulmans, viendrait de madina ar-rasul Allah, la ville du messager d’Allah. Cette étymologie en langue arabe est proposée par l’islam plus de 200 ans après les faits. Or, à l’époque, madina ne signifiait pas ville, mais région. Ville se disait qura. Des textes datant de 30 ans après les faits indiquent une autre étymologie, à partir de l’araméen, impliquant les nazaréens. (…) Il est très douteux que les Arabes du VIIe siècle soient des polythéistes étrangers aux traditions biblique ou chrétienne. Par leur commerce, ils sont, en effet, depuis plus de six siècles en contact avec des juifs et depuis six siècles en contact avec des chrétiens. Ils ne pouvaient pas ignorer la révélation judéo-chrétienne. André Frament
La question de l’Hégire permet d’entrevoir immédiatement ce qui s’est passé. L’Hégire ou Émigration à l’oasis de Yathrib situé en plein désert est un événement très significatif de la vie du Mahomet historique. On sait que, très rapidement, cette année-là – 622 semble-t-il – a été tenue pour l’an 1 du calendrier du groupe formé autour de Mahomet (ou plutôt du groupe dont il était lui-même un membre). Or, la fondation d’un nouveau calendrier absolu ne s’explique jamais que par la conscience de commencer une Ère Nouvelle, et cela dans le cadre d’une vision de l’Histoire. Quelle ère nouvelle ? D’après les explications musulmanes actuelles, cette année 1 se fonderait sur une défaite et une fuite de Mahomet, parti se réfugier loin de La Mecque. Mais comment une fuite peut-elle être sacralisée jusqu’à devenir la base de tout un édifice chronologique et religieux ? Cela n’a pas de sens. Si Mahomet est bien arrivé à Yathrib – qui sera renommé plus tard Médine – en 622, ce ne fut pas seulement avec une partie de la tribu des Qoréchites, mais avec ceux pour qui le repli au désert rappelait justement un glorieux passé et surtout la figure de la promesse divine. Alors, le puzzle des données apparemment incohérentes prend forme, ainsi que Michaël Cook et d’autres l’on entrevu. Le désert est le lieu où Dieu forme le peuple qui doit aller libérer la terre, au sens de ce verset : « Ô mon peuple, entrez dans la terre que Dieu vous a destinée » (Coran V, 21). Nous sommes ici dans la vision de l’histoire dont le modèle de base est constitué par le récit biblique de l’Exode, lorsque le petit reste d’Israël préparé par Dieu au désert est appelé à conquérir la terre, c’est-à-dire la Palestine selon la vision biblique. Telle est la vision qu’avaient ceux qui accompagnaient et en fait qui dirigeaient Mahomet et les autres Arabes vers Yathrib en 622. Et voilà pourquoi une année 1 y est décrétée : le salut est en marche. Dans l’oasis de Yathrib d’ailleurs, la plupart des sédentaires sont des « juifs » aux dires mêmes des traditions islamiques. Et pourtant les traditions rabbiniques ne les ont jamais reconnus comme des leurs : ces « juifs » et ceux qui y conduisirent leurs amis arabes sont en réalité ces “judéochrétiens” hérétiques, qui vous évoquiez à l’instant. Ils appartenaient à la secte de « nazaréens » dont on a déjà parlé à propos de la sourate 5, verset 82. E.-M. Gallez
C’est à la suite de la destruction du Temple de 70 que l’idéologie judéo-nazaréenne se structura en vision cohérente du Monde et de l’Histoire, construite sous l’angle de l’affrontement des « bons » et des « méchants », les premiers devant être les instruments de la libération de la Terre. Le recoupement des données indique que c’est en Syrie, chez les judéo-chrétiens qui refusèrent de rentrer en Judée après 70 et réinterprétèrent leur foi, que cette idéologie de salut – la première de l’Histoire – s’est explicitée. (…) Pour en revenir à l’attente judéonazaréenne du Messie-Jésus, je ne vous apprendrai rien en disant qu’il n’est pas redescendu du Ciel en 638. En 639 non plus. En 640, l’espérance de le voir redescendre du Ciel apparut clairement être une chimère. C’est la crise. (…) Il est invraisemblable que Mahomet ait massacré des juifs rabbanites (orthodoxes ndlr), dont les judéo-nazaréens aussi bien que leurs alliés Arabes avaient besoin de la neutralité, au moins. Mais après 640, on imagine aisément que Umar puis son successeur Uthman aient voulu se défaire d’alliés devenus encombrants. Ironie de l’histoire : les « fils d’Israël » – au moins leurs chefs – sont massacrés par ceux qu’ils avaient eux-mêmes convaincus d’être les « fils d’Ismaël » ! En fait, le problème se posait aux Arabes de justifier d’une manière nouvelle le pouvoir qu’ils avaient pris sur le Proche-Orient. C’est dans ce cadre qu’apparut la nécessité d’avoir un livre propre à eux, opposable à la Bible des juifs et des chrétiens, et qui consacrerait la domination arabe sur le monde… et qui contribuerait à occulter le passé judéo-nazaréen. EM Gellez
Le Calife basé à l’oasis de Médine ne disposait, en fait de « textes » en arabe, que des papiers que les judéo-nazaréens y avaient laissés. Même si l’on y ajoute les textes plus anciens laissés en Syrie, cela ne fait pas encore un choix énorme. Et il fallait choisir, dans la hâte, des textes répondant aux attentes des nouveaux maîtres du Proche-Orient ! Autant dire que, quel qu’il fût, le résultat du choix ne pouvait guère être satisfaisant, même si on choisissait les textes présentant le moins d’allusions au passé judéonazaréen. C’est ainsi que les traditions musulmanes ont gardé le souvenir de « collectes » ou assemblages du Coran divergents entre eux et concurrents – parce qu’ils fournirent évidemment à des ambitieux l’occasion de se pousser au pouvoir. Umar fut assassiné. Son successeur également, et il s’ensuivit une véritable guerre intra-musulmane, aboutissant au schisme entre « chiites » et « sunnites ». Quant aux textes assemblés dans ce qu’on nomma le « Coran », ils continuèrent d’être adaptés à ce qu’on attendait d’eux, dans une suite de fuites en avant : apporter des modifications à un texte, c’est souvent se condamner à introduire de nouvelles pour pallier les difficultés ou les incohérences induites par les premières, etc. Un texte ne se laisse pas si facilement manipuler. Surtout qu’il faut chaque fois rappeler les exemplaires en circulation,les détruire et les remplacer par des nouveaux – ce dont les traditions musulmanes ont gardé le souvenir et situent jusqu’à l’époque du gouverneur Hajjaj, au début du VIIIe siècle encore ! Quand il devint trop tard pour le modifier encore en ses consonnes, sa voyellisation puis son interprétation furent à leur tour l’objet d’élaborations (parfois assez savantes). Ainsi, à force d’être manipulé, le texte coranique devint de plus en plus obscur, ce qu’il est aujoAurd’hui. Mais il était tout à fait clair en ces divers feuillets primitifs c’est-à-dire avant que ceux-ci aient été choisis pour constituer un recueil de 114 parties – le même nombre que de logia de l’évangile de Thomas, nombre lié aux besoins liturgiques selon Pierre Perrier. EM Gellez
Du fait de l’hyperspécialisation, très peu d’islamologues s’étaient intéressés aux textes de la mer Morte qui, particulièrement dans leur version la plus récente, reflètent une parenté avec le texte coranique ; et, en sens inverse, tout aussi peu de qoumranologues, d’exégètes ou de patrologues avaient porté de l’intérêt au Coran et à l’Islam. Or ces deux côtés de la recherche s’éclairent mutuellement, ils constituent en quelque sorte le terminus a quo et le terminus ad quem de celle-ci, renvoyant à une même mouvance religieuse : celle que des ex-judéo-chrétiens ont structurée vers la fin du Ier siècle. On la connaît surtout sous la qualification de “nazaréenne” ; les membres de cette secte apocalyptico-messianiste avaient en effet gardé l’appellation de nazaréens que les premiers judéo-chrétiens avaient portée (durant très peu d’années) avant de s’appeler précisément chrétiens d’après le terme de Messie (c’est-à-dire christianoï ou Mesihayé). Il s’agit évidemment des naçârâ du texte coranique selon le sens qu’y avait encore ce mot avant le VIIIe siècle et selon le sens qu’indiquent certains traducteurs à propos de passages où l’actuelle signification de chrétiens ne convient visiblement pas ; au reste, à propos de ces nazaréens, même certains sites musulmans libéraux en viennent aujourd’hui à se demander si leur doctrine n’était pas celle de Mahomet. À la suite de Ray A. Pritz, l’auteur préconise l’appellation de judéo-nazaréens pour éviter toute ambiguïté ; l’avantage est également de rappeler l’origine judéenne (ainsi qu’un lien primitif avec la communauté de Jacques de Jérusalem, selon les témoignages patristiques). Signalons en passant que l’auteur établit un parallélisme avec une autre mouvance qui prend sa source dans les mêmes années, le gnosticisme ; ceci offre un certain intérêt car les deux mouvances partent dans des directions qu’il présente comme radicalement opposées. L’apparition de l’islam tel qu’il se présente aujourd’hui s’explique de manière tout à fait cohérente dans le cadre de cette synthèse. À la suite de la rupture bien compréhensible avec les judéonazaréens, les nouveaux maîtres arabes du Proche-Orient ont été obligés d’inventer des références exclusivement arabes pour justifier leur pouvoir, explique l’auteur. Ceci rend compte en particulier d’une difficulté à laquelle tout islamologue est confronté, à savoir la question du polythéisme mecquois. Comment les Mecquois pouvaient-ils être convaincus par une Révélation qui leur aurait été impossible à comprendre ? Le détail du texte coranique ne s’accorde pas avec un tel présupposé. À supposer justement que Mahomet ait vécu à La Mecque avant que l’Hégire le conduise à Yathrib-Médine (en 622) : la convergence de nombreuses études, généralement récentes, oriente dans une autre direction. Le travail de recoupement et de recherche effectué par l’auteur débouche sur un tableau d’ensemble ; celui-ci fait saisir pourquoi la biographie du Prophète de l’Islam, telle qu’elle s’est élaborée et imposée deux siècles après sa mort, présente le contenu que nous lui connaissons. M.-Th. Urvoy
Christoph Luxenberg considère (…) que des pans entiers du Coran mecquois seraient un palimpseste d’hymnes chrétiennes. Avant lui, Günter Lüling avait tenté d’établir qu’une partie du Coran provenait d’hymnes chrétiennes répondant à une christologie angélique. Cela me paraît trop automatique et trop rapide. En revanche, Christoph Luxenberg m’a convaincu sur l’influence syriaque dans plusieurs passages du Coran, notamment dans la sourate 100 dans laquelle il voit une réécriture de la première épître de saint Pierre (5,8-9). On reconnaît dans le Coran des traces évidentes de syriaque. À commencer par le mot Qur’an qui, en syriaque, signifie «recueil» ou «lectionnaire». Cette influence me semble fondamentale. D’autre part, Angelika Neuwirth [NDLR spécialiste du Coran, université de Berlin] a bien souligné la forme liturgique du Coran. Et des chercheurs allemands juifs ont noté une ressemblance forte entre le Coran mecquois et les psaumes bibliques. Serait-il un lectionnaire, ou contiendrait-il les éléments d’un lectionnaire? Je suis enclin à le penser. Sans l’influence syriaque comment comprendre que le Coran ait pu reprendre le thème des sept dormants d’Éphèse qui sont d’origine chrétienne? De plus, la christologie du Coran est influencée par le Diatessaron de Tatien et par certains évangiles apocryphes. On peut penser que le groupe dans lequel le Coran primitif a vu le jour était l’un des rejetons de groupes judéo-chrétiens attachés à une christologie pré-nicéenne, avec aussi quelques accents manichéens. Claude Gilliot

L’islam ne serait-il finalement qu’une secte judéo-messianique qui aurait mal tourné?

Appris par coeur par les compagnons du Prophète, recopié en bribes sur des feuilles de palmier ou des omoplates de chameaux, collationné non chronologiquement mais suivant la longueur des sourates par des califes qui firent détruire les versions divergentes ou condamner les exégètes non conformes, objet de différentes lectures et interprétations du fait  du manque de transcription des voyelles ou de l’ambiguïté des consonnes mais aussi de controverses théologiques et éthiques ou d’accusations de falsification, doutes même sur la langue utilisée, réécriture de passages entiers de la Bible …

Où l’on découvre que le texte prétendument incréé écrit dans l’arabe le plus pur (la « langue de Dieu ») se trouve être un amalgame longtemps controversé de psaumes bibliques et d’hymnes chrétiens, apocryphes ou manichéens écrit dans un mauvais arabe imprégné de syro-araméen …

A l’heure où l’on apprend que la jeune chrétienne récemment condamnée pour blasphème au Pakistan aurait pu être victime d’un coup monté (l’imam qui l’accusait aurait lui-même rajouté les pages de Coran que la jeune trisomique était censée avoir brûlées) …

Et qu’à l’Université islamique d’Al Azhar du Caire, une fatwa proposerait d’interdire aux Juifs de visiter leurs lieux saints dans les pays arabes …

Retour, avec un intéressant entretien de l’islamologue Claude Gilliot paru dans le Monde de la Bible et repris par le site Hérodote et contre la légende dorée d’un texte immuable fixé une fois pour toutes, sur les dernières découvertes issues de l’application au Coran des méthodes d’analyse critique déjà utilisées sur la Bible et les textes chrétiens et notamment sur le long processus de canonisation du texte sacré de l’islam …

Aux origines du Coran

Comment est né le texte sacré de l’islam

Hérodote

Jusqu’aux alentours de l’An Mil, les commentaires autour du Coran furent innombrables, en liaison avec une grande effervescence intellectuelle. Une école réformiste proposa en particulier de distinguer le Coran incréé, parole de Dieu, restée près de Dieu, dénuée de toute équivoque, et le Coran créé, celui-là même qui est sorti de la bouche de Mahomet et se doit d’être analysé et interprété.

En l’an 1019, le calife Al Qadir, craignant que la libre discussion ne mène à de nouvelles scissions, fit lire au palais et dans les mosquées une épître dite «épître de Qadir» (Risala al-qâdiriya) par laquelle il interdit toute exégèse nouvelle et ferma la porte à l’effort de recherche personnel des musulmans (l’ijithad).

Aujourd’hui, à la lumière des travaux accomplis sur les textes chrétiens, des chercheurs abordent l’étude du Coran avec un regard historique, archéologique et philologique. Le magazine Le Monde de la Bible fait le point sur ces travaux d’une grande portée scientifique et nous offre ci-après un entretien passionnant et lumineux avec l’islamologue Claude Gilliot.

«Aux origines du Coran» en kiosque et en librairie

Est-il possible d’appliquer au Coran les méthodes d’analyse critique déjà utilisées sur la Bible et les textes chrétiens depuis plus d’un siècle?

Que sait-on de l’Arabie préislamique et de Mahomet lui-même ? Que peut-on dire du processus de mise par écrit du Coran et des plus anciens textes connus ?

Quels rôles ont pu jouer des juifs et des chrétiens dans ce processus ? Existe-il un Coran des origines différent de celui que nous connaissons aujourd’hui ? Que dit le Coran des pierres, ces graffiti laissés par les pèlerins vers La Mecque, dès les premiers temps de l’islam?

C’est à toutes ces questions que répond ce numéro du Monde de la Bible (été 2012, en kiosque et en librairie, 10 €), en bousculant un certain nombre d’idées. Un magazine très richement illustré et d’une lecture agréable.

Comment et dans quelles circonstances le Coran fut-il mis par écrit? C’est à cette question que répond Claude Gilliot, professeur émérite à l’université de Provence, a bien voulu répondre en sa qualité de spécialiste d’études arabes et d’islamologie.

Il nous précise, entre tradition musulmane et recherche historique, le long processus de la canonisation des textes coraniques aux premiers siècles de l’Hégire. Nous l’avons également interrogé sur les questions linguistiques que posent les plus anciens documents connus du Livre saint des musulmans.

Entretien de Claude Gilliot avec Le Monde de la Bible

Le Monde de la Bible: Existe-il un Coran originel contemporain du Prophète?

Claude Gilliot: Selon la tradition musulmane, à la mort de Muhammad [Mahomet] en 632 de notre ère, il n’existait pas d’édition complète et définitive des révélations que le Prophète avait livrées. Des sources arabo-musulmanes nombreuses l’attestent. Il est dit que ses Compagnons les avaient mémorisées, en les apprenant et en les récitant par cœur. Certaines, toutefois, avaient été transcrites sur divers matériaux, telles des feuilles de palme ou des omoplates de chameaux. Une première mise par écrit «complète» aurait été faite à l’instigation d’Omar qui craignait que le Coran ne disparût parce que ses mémorisateurs mouraient au combat. Il convainquit le calife Abû Bakr (632-634) de faire consigner par écrit ce que les gens en savaient et ce qui en avait été écrit sur divers matériaux. Ce travail de collecte fut dirigé par l’un des scribes de Muhammad, ?le Médinois Zaïd b. Thâbit. À la mort d’Abû Bakr, ces premiers feuillets du Coran furent transmis à Omar, devenu calife (634-644), puis à sa fille Hafsa, l’une des veuves de Muhammad.

MdB : Et c’est ce recueil des versets coraniques qui s’imposa d’emblée?

C. G.: Non, on ne peut pas dire cela. D’abord parce que nous n’avons pas de traces matérielles de cette collecte. Ensuite parce que l’objectif d’Omar était probablement de disposer d’un corpus et non de faire une «édition» définitive. C’est sous le califat suivant, celui d’Othman (644-656), qu’on prit conscience de divergences dans la façon de réciter le Coran. Othman reprit le corpus détenu par Hafsa et le fit compléter par d’autres personnages, toujours sous la direction de Zaïd b. Thâbit. Il fit ensuite détruire tous les matériaux originels, imposa une première version «canonique» du Coran en l’adressant aux métropoles les plus importantes du jeune Empire. Mais s’imposa-t-il à tous? La tradition musulmane affirme que oui, mais nous observons que l’idée même de collecte avait rencontré des oppositions dont celle d’Ibn Mas’ûd, compagnon du Prophète (m. 633), et que, d’autre part, les récits sur la collecte du Coran comportent de nombreuses contradictions qui contestent cette affirmation.

MdB : Cela signifie-t-il que d’autres variantes du Coran aient pu subsister et êtres récitées à cette époque?

C. G.: La tradition musulmane reconnaît une quinzaine de textes pré-othmaniens principaux et une douzaine de textes secondaires. Nous ne possédons aujourd’hui aucune de ces variantes de la «vulgate» othmanienne. Mais nous savons par ailleurs qu’en 934 et en 935, les exégètes Ibn Miqsam et Ibn Shannabûdh furent condamnés pour avoir récité des variantes non approuvées. Ce qui montre que celles-ci ont circulé longtemps.

Il convient également de remarquer que le texte diffusé par Othman pouvait lui-même susciter différentes lectures et interprétations. Et cela pour deux raisons. La première est que le texte ne comportait pas de voyelles brèves et pas toujours les longues, ce qui induit des choix dans l’interprétation des mots. Deuxièmement, l’écriture arabe primitive n’était pas dotée des points diacritiques qui fixent la valeur exacte des signes et qui distinguent une consonne d’une autre. Des vingt-huit lettres de l’alphabet arabe, seules sept ne sont pas ambiguës et dans les plus anciens fragments du Coran, les lettres ambiguës constituent plus de la moitié du texte.

C’est sous la période omeyyade, et le règne d’Abd al-Malik (685-705) plus précisément, que l’on peut placer la troisième phase de l’histoire du Coran. Certains attribuent au redoutable gouverneur de l’Irak, al-Hajjâj b. Yûsûf (714), plusieurs modifications apportées au texte coranique, mais à ce propos, les sources sont contradictoires. Pour les uns, il aurait seulement remis en ordre les versets et des sourates et rectifié des lectures déficientes; pour les autres, il aurait précisé l’orthographe en introduisant des points. En dépit des contradictions, le califat d’Abd al-Malik constitua un moment déterminant pour la constitution des textes qui nous sont parvenus.

MdB: Sur quels points portaient principalement les oppositions musulmanes à la version othmanienne que vous évoquiez précédemment?

C. G.: Ces critiques viennent de savants musulmans qui soulevèrent des objections durant les trois premiers siècles de l’islam. Cela commença avec des compagnons du Prophète qui avaient leur propre texte, nous dit-on. D’autres sont allés jusqu’à considérer certains textes comme inauthentiques pour des raisons théologiques et éthiques. Ils visaient notamment les versets 111,1-3 contre Abu Lahab, l’un des grands adversaires de Muhammad; et 74,11-26. Des théologiens de Bassora mirent en doute l’authenticité de ces passages, tout comme certains kharijites pensaient que la sourate 12 (sourate de Joseph) ne faisait pas partie du Coran, car, selon eux, ce conte profane ne pouvait avoir sa place dans le Coran.

On trouve les accusations les plus vigoureuses de falsification du Coran dans les sources chiites avant le milieu du Xe siècle. Pour ces derniers, seul Ali, successeur légitime de Muhammad, détenait les authentiques révélations faites au Prophète. Cette version avait été rejetée par les ennemis d’Ali, Abû Bakr et Omar notamment, parce qu’elle contenait des hommages explicites à Ali et à ses partisans et des attaques contre leurs adversaires.

MdB: De quels textes anciens disposons-nous aujourd’hui?

C. G.: Nous ne possédons aucun autographe du Prophète ni de ses scribes. Les plus anciennes versions complètes du Coran dateraient du IXe siècle. Des fragments, très rares, pourraient remonter à la fin VIIe siècle ou du début du VIIIe. L’un des plus anciens, daté du VIIe siècle, est conservé à la Bibliothèque nationale de France (voir p. 32). Mais, en l’absence d’autres manuscrits antérieurs au IXe siècle, la datation de ce recueil d’une soixantaine de feuillets ne peut être estimée que par des critères paléographiques.

MdB: Il existe une forte controverse sur la langue originelle du Coran. En quoi consiste-t-elle?

C. G.: Selon la tradition musulmane, le Coran a été écrit dans la langue de Dieu, autrement dit dans l’arabe le plus clair. Hors pour les chercheurs occidentaux, y compris pour ceux qui reprennent la thèse théologique musulmane, les particularités linguistiques du texte coranique font problème et entrent mal dans le système de la langue arabe. Afin de surmonter cette difficulté, plusieurs hypothèses furent proposées, selon lesquelles l’origine de la langue coranique se trouverait dans un dialecte – disons plutôt une «koinè (langue commune) vernaculaire» – de l’Arabie occidentale marqué par l’influence du syriaque, et donc de l’araméen. Le Coran est une production de l’Antiquité tardive. Qui dit Antiquité tardive, dit époque de syncrétisme. La péninsule arabique, où le Coran est censé être né, n’était pas fermée aux idées véhiculées dans la région. Les historiographes arabes musulmans les plus anciens, soit de la première ou de la deuxième génération de l’islam, disent que La Mecque avait des relations en particulier avec la ville d’al-Hira, capitale de la tribu arabe des Lakhmides, où vivaient des païens, des chrétiens monophysites et des manichéens. Elle aurait été un des lieux de passage pour l’apprentissage de l’écriture de l’arabe primitif. Quand Muhammad livrait ses premières prédications, un de ses premiers opposants objectait qu’il avait déjà entendu cela à al-Hira. Dans un autre passage du Coran, il est reproché à Muhammad de se faire enseigner par un étranger qui parlait soit un mauvais arabe soit une autre langue.

Il est vrai qu’un grand nombre d’expressions réputées obscures du Coran s’éclairent si l’on retraduit certains mots apparemment arabes à partir du syro-araméen, la langue de culture dominante au temps du Prophète.

MdB: Vous rejoignez ainsi les thèses de Christoph Luxenberg qui, par ailleurs, ne fait pas l’unanimité chez nombre d’islamologues?

C. G.: Christoph Luxenberg considère en effet que des pans entiers du Coran mecquois seraient un palimpseste d’hymnes chrétiennes. Avant lui, Günter Lüling avait tenté d’établir qu’une partie du Coran provenait d’hymnes chrétiennes répondant à une christologie angélique. Cela me paraît trop automatique et trop rapide. En revanche, Christoph Luxenberg m’a convaincu sur l’influence syriaque dans plusieurs passages du Coran, notamment dans la sourate 100 dans laquelle il voit une réécriture de la première épître de saint Pierre (5,8-9). On reconnaît dans le Coran des traces évidentes de syriaque. À commencer par le mot Qur’an qui, en syriaque, signifie «recueil» ou «lectionnaire». Cette influence me semble fondamentale. D’autre part, Angelika Neuwirth [NDLR spécialiste du Coran, université de Berlin] a bien souligné la forme liturgique du Coran. Et des chercheurs allemands juifs ont noté une ressemblance forte entre le Coran mecquois et les psaumes bibliques. Serait-il un lectionnaire, ou contiendrait-il les éléments d’un lectionnaire? Je suis enclin à le penser. Sans l’influence syriaque comment comprendre que le Coran ait pu reprendre le thème des sept dormants d’Éphèse qui sont d’origine chrétienne? De plus, la christologie du Coran est influencée par le Diatessaron de Tatien et par certains évangiles apocryphes. On peut penser que le groupe dans lequel le Coran primitif a vu le jour était l’un des rejetons de groupes judéo-chrétiens attachés à une christologie pré-nicéenne, avec aussi quelques accents manichéens. l

Propos recueillis par Benoît de Sagazan, pour Le Monde de la Bible

Voir aussi:

Origines et fixation du texte coranique

Claude Gilliot

Dominicain. Professeur à l’Université de Provence.

Loin d’être un texte fixé une fois pour toutes, le Coran a une histoire faite d’évolutions, de relectures et de corrections. Il convient de présenter séparément la conception musulmane de la façon dont le Coran a vu le jour, et les manières dont la recherche critique occidentale la conçoit.

La collecte du Coran selon les sources musulmanes[1] [1] R. Blachère, Introduction au Coran, 1947, p. 18-102 ;…

2 Selon l’opinion musulmane courante, à la mort de Mahomet (632), il n’existait pas d’édition complète et définitive des révélations qu’il avait délivrées. Toutefois, des portions plus ou moins grandes en avaient été mémorisées par ses compagnons, ou avaient été écrites sur divers matériaux. Certains musulmans qui savaient du Coran par cœur furent tués au combat, ce qui fit craindre que les révélations ne disparussent. Omar parvint à persuader le calife Abu Bakr (632-634) de les faire consigner par écrit. L’un des scribes de Mahomet, le jeune Médinois Zayd b. Thabit, se vit confier cette mission ; il transcrivit les matériaux collectés sur des « feuillets » qu’il remit au calife.

3 A la mort de ce dernier, ils passèrent au calife Omar (634-644), puis à sa fille Hafsa, l’une des veuves de Mahomet. Cette recension, si elle a bien existé, correspondait à la volonté du chef de la communauté de posséder un corpus coranique, tout comme d’autres compagnons en avaient eu ; il ne s’agissait pas d’imposer une version particulière à l’ensemble des fidèles.

4 Sous le calife Othman (644-656), on prit conscience des divergences dans la façon de réciter le Coran. Le calife demanda à Hafsa de lui prêter son texte du Coran pour en faire une recension complète. Après le lui avoir rendu, le calife ordonna que l’on détruise tous les autres documents contenant du Coran qui avaient pu être utilisés pour l’établissement de ce texte. Ce travail aboutit à la « vulgate othmanienne[2]

. Quatre ou sept copies furent envoyées dans plusieurs métropoles de l’empire naissant.

5 Cette collecte du texte ne fut pas sans rencontrer des oppositions[3] [3] Le refus le plus affirmé vint du compagnon Ibn Mas’ud…. Pourtant la tradition musulmane tend à soutenir l’idée que cette version du Coran a été acceptée partout. Les récits sur la collecte du Coran comportent de nombreuses contradictions qui conduisent à se poser des questions sur la véracité de la version musulmane des faits.

6 Les modifications apportées au texte collecté. – Des problèmes subsistaient dans la lecture de cette version othmanienne. D’une part, elle ne comportait pas les voyelles brèves, et pas toujours les voyelles longues, ce qui pouvait donner lieu à des confusions dans la lecture de certains mots, même si certains choix de lecture sont éliminés par le contexte. Plus grave encore, l’écriture arabe primitive n’était pas pourvue des points dont sont maintenant marquées certaines consonnes de l’alphabet pour fixer la valeur exacte des signes qui prêtent à confusion[4]

7 C’est sous les Omeyyades, sous ‘Abd al-Malik (685-705) plus particulièrement, que l’on peut placer la troisième phase de l’histoire du Coran. Mais les informations fournies par les sources sont contradictoires. Plusieurs modifications importantes faites sur le texte sont attribuées à l’homme fort du régime omeyyade de cette période, al-Hajjaj b. Yusuf (714). Pour les uns, les améliorations qu’il aurait fait apporter au texte coranique se seraient limitées à rectifier des lectures déficientes ou à y mettre en ordre les versets, voire les sourates. Pour d’autres, il en aurait perfectionné l’orthographe en introduisant des points[5].

Des réformes semblables sont également attribuées à d’autres personnages par les sources musulmanes. En dépit des contradictions, le règne de Abd al-Malik, fut un moment déterminant pour la constitution des textes coraniques qui nous sont parvenus. Le texte final ne s’imposa que très lentement.

8 Les textes des compagnons et les variantes coraniques. – La tradition musulmane mentionne quelque quinze textes pré-othmaniens principaux et une douzaine de textes secondaires[6]  Jusqu’à ce jour, aucun manuscrit de ces textes n’a été retrouvé. Les variantes des textes pré-othmaniens qui diffèrent de la Vulgate ont disparu de la récitation du Coran. Néanmoins, il arrive que des exégètes anciens qualifient d’erroné ou de « faute de scribe » un mot du texte othmanien, lui préférant celui d’un autre texte. Lorsque le texte « othmanien », ou supposé tel, fut universellement reconnu par les savants musulmans, vers le milieu du ixe siècle, se constitua une hiérarchie parmi les systèmes de lectures qui aboutit à une liste de sept lectures (ou lecteurs)[7]

canoniques, les savants désignant de façon consensuelle les chefs d’école en fonction de leur valeur. Cette liste fut déclarée canonique. Durant cette même période, deux exégètes furent condamnés : Ibn Miqsam, en 934, et Ibn Shannabûdh, en 935, parce qu’ils récitaient des variantes non approuvées.

9 Le critère de « transmission ininterrompue », et par conséquent « authentique » étant très fluide, on a rajouté des lecteurs à la liste des sept déjà approuvés pour arriver au système des « dix lecteurs », puis à celui des « quatorze lecteurs ». Un grand changement se produisit au xvie siècle, lorsque l’empire ottoman adopta la lecture de Asim dans la transmission de Hafs (796). Progressivement, ce système de lecture devint le plus répandu ; il le demeure d’ailleurs. L’édition du Coran qui parut en Egypte en 1923 est conforme à cette lecture, ce qui a encore augmenté sa diffusion. Cela dit, la lecture la plus répandue en Afrique septentrionale et occidentale est celle Nafi’, dans la transmission de Warsh (812). La prépondérance du système des sept lectures dans la récitation du Coran n’a pas pour autant plongé les autres systèmes dans l’oubli. En effet, le système des dix et des quatorze, et même les lectures – variantes – « irrégulières », continuent à être étudiés, notamment pour des raisons exégétiques et grammaticales. La littérature qui porte sur les variantes coraniques est énorme ; elle a engendré une foule de commentaires[8]

Critiques musulmanes contre la version commune du Coran

10 Un certain nombre de savants musulmans ont violemment critiqué la version othmanienne durant les trois premiers siècles de l’islam. Cela commença avec des compagnons de Mahomet, lesquels avaient leur propre texte, nous dit-on. Certains musulmans ont considéré inauthentiques quelques passages du Coran pour des raisons théologiques et éthiques. Ainsi Coran, 111,1-3, contre Abu Lahab, l’un des grands adversaires de Mahomet, et 74,11-26 : Dieu, comme à tous les hommes, lui ordonne de croire, mais le voue expressément à l’enfer, ce qui le place dans l’obligation de croire qu’il ne croira pas ! Quelques théologiens de Bassora mirent en doute l’authenticité de ces passages. Ils considéraient que la sourate 12 (sourate de Joseph) ne faisait pas partie du Coran, qu’il s’agissait d’un conte profane, avec une histoire d’amour, qui ne saurait avoir de place dans le Coran.

11 Les accusations de falsification du Coran les plus vigoureuses et les plus nombreuses se trouvent toutefois dans des sources chiites avant le milieu du xe siècle. Pour les chiites, Ali, successeur légitime de Mahomet, était l’unique détenteur de la recension complète des révélations faites au Prophète. Après la mort du Prophète et la prise du pouvoir par les « ennemis de Ali » (Abu Bakr, Omar, etc.), cette version fut rejetée, principalement parce qu’elle contenait des hommages explicites à Ali et à ses partisans, et des attaques contre leurs adversaires[9]

12 La tradition musulmane majoritaire insiste sur la grande ancienneté de la mise en place de la Vulgate, et ce afin de faire oublier les accusations de falsification du texte coranique. Cependant, les contradictions et les hésitations que véhiculent les sources musulmanes sur l’authenticité du Coran ont été et sont toujours pour les chercheurs occidentaux l’occasion de proposer une « autre histoire du Coran ».

La critique historique du Coran par les Occidentaux

13 La tradition manuscrite du Coran ne nous est pas d’une grande aide pour établir son histoire. Nous n’avons aucun autographe de Mahomet (on sait maintenant qu’il n’était probablement pas illettré), non plus que de ses scribes. Les plus anciennes versions complètes du texte dateraient du ixe siècle. Des fragments, très rares, seraient de la fin du viie ou du début du viiie siècle, mais les datations sont souvent conjecturales. Les études se sont donc concentrées sur la philologie historique du texte coranique et sur la critique des sources musulmanes. En simplifiant, on peut distinguer deux courants, l’un « critique », l’autre « sceptique ».

14 Le courant critique et les partisans de « l’historiographie optimiste ». – Tout en relevant des contradictions dans les récits musulmans sur sa collecte, ce courant adopte en gros le récit traditionnel de l’histoire du Coran, quitte à le corriger sur plusieurs points. Nombreux sont, d’autre part, les chercheurs qui ont souligné les particularités, voire les bizarreries de la langue coranique, dont certaines entrent difficilement dans le système général de l’arabe, à tel point que Nöldeke a pu écrire : « Le bon sens linguistique des Arabes les a presque entièrement préservés de l’imitation des étrangetés et faiblesses propres à la langue du Coran. » Pourtant, il maintint que, en dépit d’occurrences dialectales, la langue du Coran était « l’arabe classique ».

15 D’autres chercheurs vont dans une direction opposée : pour K. Vollers, l’origine de la langue coranique se trouverait dans un dialecte de l’Arabie occidentale, de La Mecque ou de Médine, qui fut revu pour être adapté à la langue de la poésie arabe ancienne qui, elle, était plus attrayante[10] Plusieurs tentatives de reclassement chronologique des sourates ont également vu le jour.

16 A partir d’une analyse littéraire des sourates mecquoises, A. Neuwirth a essayé de prouver la composition pré-rédactionnelle de ces sourates, et par là « leur authenticité en tant qu’unités solidement délimitées[11] Cette analyse présuppose tacitement un seul individu, transmetteur des différents textes particuliers. Il en résulte que nous avons ici affaire « à un document réunissant les récitations faites par Mahomet lui-même ». Même si ce document a été affecté par le processus de transmission et de rédaction, il serait « substantiellement authentique ».

17 Si l’on prend en compte la composition du Coran tel qu’il est aujourd’hui, une distinction s’impose entre la rédaction du texte et son processus de canonisation, qui a été progressif. Il n’a pas été établi pour être étudié, mais pour être récité. Dans les sourates courtes de la période mecquoise, on constate un lien entre la récitation et le culte (la prière publique). Dans ce Coran pré-canonique, une « publication » et une première étape de canonisation sont déjà à l’œuvre. Progressivement, notamment dans les « sourates historiques », la conscience de participer à un « livre » se fait jour dans le texte. Il convient donc de parler de diverses étapes de la canonisation, avant d’en venir au « corpus clos ».

18 Le courant sceptique. – Le courant « sceptique » a eu des représentants dès la fin du xixe siècle, mais il se manifesta surtout à partir du dernier quart du xxe siècle. C’est à P. Casanova que revient le mérite d’avoir mis en valeur le travail d’unification du Coran fait sous les Omeyyades par al-Hajjaj ; il considérait la version othmanienne comme une fable, disant qu’elle n’avait qu’une « filiation fantaisiste[12]  Le grand sémitisant Alphonse Mingana a considérablement développé les thèses de Casanova sur le rôle fondamental des Omeyyades dans la mise en place de la version finale du Coran, et il a souligné le caractère peu crédible des sources islamiques concernant l’histoire de la rédaction du Coran. A.L. de Prémare reprit cette thèse en la développant beaucoup plus[13]

19 Avec les méthodes de la critique biblique et littéraire, J. Wansbrough va encore plus loin. Il conteste fondamentalement le caractère historique des récits musulmans sur le Coran. Pour lui, le texte coranique n’a pu prendre sa forme définitive qu’à la fin du viiie siècle, voire au début du ixe siècle. Cette datation est jugée trop tardive par la majorité des chercheurs, dont certains ont appelé cette orientation le courant « révisionniste ».

20 A l’opposé, J. Burton[14] veut montrer que le Coran, tel qu’il nous est parvenu, est celui que Mahomet a laissé à sa mort. Pour lui, ni la collecte attribuée à Abu Bakr, ni celle attribuée à Othman n’ont eu lieu. Les lettrés juristes musulmans auraient eu besoin de s’appuyer sur l’idée d’un Coran incomplet parce que des pratiques légales en vigueur n’avaient aucune base dans le Coran, ce qui donnait matière à discussion. L’une des façons d’y mettre un terme consistait à montrer que Mahomet n’avait pas laissé de collecte définitive de ses révélations.

21 Un autre voie, dans un sens très critique, est représentée par deux chercheurs qui ont tenté de retourner en amont du Coran dit othmanien, autrement dit au Coran avant le Coran. Frappés, tout comme nous le sommes, par le fait que de nombreux passages ne font guère sens, et s’appuyant notamment sur l’embarras des exégètes du Coran face à certains passages ou mots de ce texte, ils ont tenté de retrouver le Coran « primitif », avant les modifications qui y ont été faites par des scribes, des grammairiens et des juristes- théologiens. C’est ainsi que G. Lüling[15] a pensé pouvoir établir qu’une partie du Coran provenait d’hymnes chrétiens dont l’orientation était celle d’une christologie angélique. Certains des motifs y ont été remaniés, et des motifs arabes y ont été intégrés. Son ouvrage contient des reconstructions de nombreux passages du Coran. Mahomet serait parti d’un « Islam abrahamique, chrétien primitif », c’est-à-dire judéo-chrétien, qu’il aurait associé à « un paganisme arabe ancien, ismaélite et dépourvu de représentations iconiques », combattant ainsi « le christianisme hellénistique ». Les thèses de Lüling ont été largement passées sous silence, notamment en Allemagne[16] Dans sa tentative d’élucider les passages linguistiquement controversés du Coran, Ch. Luxenberg (pseudonyme)[17]  quant à lui, procède par étapes. Il vérifie d’abord si les traducteurs occidentaux du Coran n’ont pas omis de tenir compte de l’une ou l’autre explication plausible proposée par des commentateurs ou des philologues arabes. Il cherche ensuite à lire sous la structure arabe un homonyme syro-araméen qui aurait un sens différent, mais qui conviendrait mieux au contexte. Si cela n’aboutit pas, il déchiffre enfin la vraie signification du mot apparemment arabe, mais incohérent dans son contexte, en la retraduisant en syro-araméen, pour déduire le sens le mieux adapté au contexte coranique. Ch. Luxenberg est ainsi parvenu dans bien des cas à des résultat intéressants, par exemple pour la sourate 100, dans laquelle il voit une sorte de réécriture de la première Epître de saint Pierre 5, 8-9. L’entreprise de Luxenberg a été rejetée par un très grand nombre d’arabisants et d’islamologues. Elle nous paraît, quant à nous, intéressante, mais chacun des cas qui y est traité doit être examiné de près et mis à l’épreuve de la critique. Elle a reçu un bon accueil de plusieurs syriacisants, dont J.M. F. Van Reeth de Louvain, qui a tenté de démontrer que le Coran cite les Evangiles sous la forme du Diatessaron (« les quatre évangiles en un ») de Tatien (m. 173), suivant ainsi une tradition marcionite, plus spécifiquement dans l’interprétation qu’en a donné Mani[18]

Il convient de mentionner ici également le livre clair et abordable du Tunisien Mondher Sfar[19] qui donne une excellente introduction aux recherches actuelles sur le Coran, et pour qui la distinction entre le Coran lui-même et la « Mère du Livre » (établie dans Coran 43, 2-4), prouve que ces deux versions ne peuvent être authentiques.

24 Pour E.-M. Gallez[20], le « proto-islam » doit être placé au terme d’un très long processus, qui plonge ses racines dans les mouvements messianiques et apocalyptiques des derniers siècles du judaïsme et passe ensuite à travers le mouvement du judéo-christianisme, ici celui des « judéo-nazaréens ». En fait, l’islam « officiel » naît de l’idéologie califale du viiie siècle, après une série de transpositions de sens, historiques, géographiques, et théologiques.

25 Une historienne et anthropologue, Jacqueline Chabbi[21] fait une distinction entre l’islam de Mahomet et l’islam de la tradition musulmane. Ce n’est que sous les Omeyyades que la religion de Mahomet a basculé dans un autre monde, dans lequel l’écriture est devenue prédominante. Le Coran a alors été mis par écrit, certainement à partir de fragments d’oralité conservés dans les mémoires. Dans les siècles suivants, la tradition islamique a couvert d’un luxe de détails les origines de l’islam et reconstitué un passé fictif : « Il est probable que cet homme, qui prêchait pour un dieu unique tel qu’il existait déjà chez les juifs et les chrétiens, souhaitait rétablir des valeurs de solidarité dans sa tribu, dont certains membres s’étaient trop enrichis. […] Il trouve refuge à Médine, vraisemblablement chez un clan apparenté. Là, brûlant d’être reconnu, il entre en politique. Il monte une confédération tribale sur un modèle traditionnel, proposant aux tribus sédentaires et nomades de passer une alliance avec son dieu. » Selon Jacqueline Chabbi, l’islam de Mahomet ne peut-être compris en dehors de la croyance au « Seigneur des tribus ». Les nomades croient à un « Seigneur », une puissance (masculine ou féminine) de protection et de recours, liée à un territoire tribal et y possédant un lieu de résidence, le plus souvent autour des pierres sacrées ou bétyles, telle la pierre noire scellée à la Mecque, un objet de culte datant sans doute de l’époque de Mahomet. Les razzias qu’il organise ont un tel succès que les « conversions » (soumissions) se multiplient. Au cours d’un conflit avec les juifs de Médine, il s’approprie la figure d’Abraham, et les juifs sont vus désormais comme des rivaux monothéistes « déviants ».

26 Pour une reconstruction critique du Coran. – Comme on l’a vu, les deux positions (critique et sceptique) sur la naissance et la transmission du Coran sont difficilement réconciliables. Pour introduire plus de clarté dans le débat, on pourrait distinguer deux types de reconstruction historique, l’une en aval et l’autre en amont. La reconstruction en aval se baserait sur le Coran dit othmanien et sur les variantes non othmaniennes du texte. La reconstruction en amont tenterait de reconstituer « un texte » avant le texte. La première reconstruction correspond peu ou prou à l’orientation de la critique historique, enrichie par les travaux plus récents sur la composition du Coran (Neuwirth) tel qu’il est maintenant. La seconde reconstruction se situe plutôt dans la ligne du courant « sceptique ».

27 La première entreprise consiste à reconstruire la forme la plus ancienne du texte qui nous soit accessible en se basant sur la version othmanienne, avec un appareil critique qui comporte les lectures diverses que l’on trouve dans les sources musulmanes spécialisées, voire dans les manuscrits ou fragments de manuscrits du Coran les plus anciens.

28 Un tel projet avait vu le jour en Allemagne dans la première moitié du xxe siècle[22] Vers 1934, quelque 9 000 photos de manuscrits anciens du Coran et environ 11 000 photos de manuscrits d’ouvrages des cinq premiers siècles de l’hégire sur les disciplines coraniques avaient été rassemblées par la Commission du Coran de l’Académie bavaroise des sciences. Puis Spitaler prétendit qu’ils avaient été détruits pendant la guerre. En fait, on sait maintenant qu’ils sont entreposés dans le département d’arabe de l’Université libre de Berlin et que A. Neuwirth, par un contrat dûment signé, en avait reçu livraison dès 1992[23] Depuis, de nombreux manuscrits sur les disciplines coraniques ont été édités, mais tous ne le sont pas. Il y a là un immense champ de travail pour une véritable édition critique du Coran. En novembre 2005, Angelika Neuwirth et son équipe ont repris le projet du Corpus coranicum. On attend les premiers résultats de cette entreprise vers 2009, pour voir si elle est aussi critique qu’il pourrait paraître, vu l’orientation très « classique », assez fidèle à la tradition musulmane, de A. Neuwirth.

29 Quant à la seconde entreprise, la reconstruction du Coran en amont, elle pourrait s’appuyer, d’une part, sur les sources musulmanes et les nombreuses contradictions qu’elles renferment sur la façon dont le Coran est venu au jour, puis a été transmis, rédigé, collecté et publié, et d’autre part, sur plusieurs études récentes. La piste syro-araméenne esquissée par A. Mingana pour une reconstruction critique du Coran en amont a repris de l’actualité ces dernières années. Cela dit : « Il y a un certain danger herméneutique dans l’approche purement linguistique et philologique dans la recherche de l’influence syriaque dans le Coran arabe », dans la mesure où il y manque une mise en contexte « thématique » et historique. Il en résulte que Luxenberg devrait également prendre en considération la dette de Mahomet et du Coran à l’endroit d’expressions syriaques du christianisme[24]

30 On en trouve l’incitation dans une lecture critique des sources musulmanes qui renvoie à un « lectionnaire » en constante évolution, peut-être jusqu’à l’époque omeyyade : informateurs de Mahomet[25], réception par Mahomet et par ses collaborateurs, son scribe et collecteur du Coran, Zayd, qui connaissait l’araméen, abrogation, « oubli » de versets, voire de sourates, versets ou sourates manquants (ou tombés dans l’oubli)[26], collectes plus ou moins complètes, correction partielle des fautes contenues dans le texte[27], émendations linguistiques diverses, etc. Un « prophète » ne se crée pas en un seul jour, un « livre saint » non plus !

31 Ces approches très critiques ne sont pas nouvelles. Des recherches audacieuses sur l’histoire du Coran et des débuts de l’islam existaient dès la deuxième moitié du xixe siècle. Comme on peut le constater, les divergences sont grandes entre les spécialistes sur l’origine du Coran et sur sa fixation.

32 Un fossé semble séparer la thèse (théologique) musulmane sur l’histoire du Coran et les hypothèses des chercheurs occidentaux. Ces derniers sont le plus souvent considérés comme des « impies » par les musulmans qui répugnent, en général, à appliquer au Coran les règles de la critique textuelle utilisées pour l’histoire des livres bibliques. Pourtant, les sources musulmanes anciennes traitant du Coran comportent de nombreuses traditions qui laissent apparaître aux yeux du chercheur critique une « autre histoire du Coran » que celle qui s’est imposée au nom de critères essentiellement théologiques.

Notes

[ 1] R. Blachère, Introduction au Coran, 1947, p. 18-102 ; A.L. de Prémare, Les Fondations de l’islam. Entre écriture et histoire, Seuil, 2002, p. 278-302 et 444-468 ; Fr. Déroche, Le Coran, 2005, p. 71-76 ; Gilliot, Exégèse, langue et théologie en islam. L’exégèse coranique de Tabari, 1990, p. 135-164 (sur les variantes).Retour

[ 2] Version (canonique) définitive du texte.Retour

[ 3] Le refus le plus affirmé vint du compagnon Ibn Mas’ud (m. 653).Retour

[ 4] Pour ne donner qu’un exemple, le même ductus consonantique peut se lire : b, t, th (fricative interdentale sourde), n, ou î long ; d (occlusive dentale sono-re, comme notre d) ou dh (fricative interdentale sonore). Des vingt-huit lettres de l’alphabet arabe, seules sept ne sont pas ambiguës. Dans les plus anciens fragments du Coran, les lettres ambiguës constituent plus de la moitié du texte.Retour

[ 5] La scriptio plena, soit les « points-voyelles », soit les points diacritiques (du ductus consonantique).Retour

[ 6] A. Jeffery, Materials for the History of the Text of the Qur’ān, Leyde, 1937, p. V-VI.Retour

[ 7] Dans ce contexte, « lecteur » s’entend d’un spécialiste reconnu des variantes du texte.Retour

[ 8] Gilliot, « Une reconstruction critique du Coran, ou comment en finir avec les merveilles de la lampe d’Aladin ?», dans Kropp M. (éd.), Results of Contemporary Research on the Qur’an. The question of a historico-critical text, Beyrouth/Würzburg, 2007, p. 35-55.Retour

[ 9] M.A Amir-Moezzi et E. Kohlberg, « Révélation et falsification. Introduction à l’édition du Kitab al-qira’at d’al-Sayyāri », Journal Asiatique, 293 (2005/2), p. 663-722.Retour

[ 10] Sur les problèmes que pose la langue du Coran, cf. Gilliot et Larcher P., «Language and style of the Qur’an», dans Encyclo-paedia of the Qur’an [EQ], III, Leyde, Brill, 2003, p. 109-135 ; l’excellente mise au point critique de Larcher, « Qu’est-ce que l’arabe du Coran ? Réflexions d’un linguiste », Cahiers de linguistique de l’INALCO, 5 (2003-2005) [années de tomaison], 2008, p. 27-47.Retour

[ 11] Neuwirth, « Du texte de récitation au canon en passant par la liturgie. A propos de la genèse de la composition des sourates et de sa redissolution au cours du développement du culte islamique», Arabica XLVII, 2 (2000), p. 194-196 (en allemand, 1996).Retour

[ 12] P. Casanova, Mohammed et la fin du monde. Etude critique sur l’islam primitif, I-II/1-2, 1911-1913, p. 127 et 141-142.Retour

[ 13] A.L. De Prémare, Fondations, op. cit., p. 292-300 ; Id., Aux origines du Coran, 2004, p. 98.Retour

[ 14] J. Burton, The Collection of the Qur’an, Cambridge, 1977.Retour

[ 15] Cf. Gilliot, « Deux études sur le Coran », Arabica, XXX (1983), p. 16-37.Retour

[ 16] Gilliot, « Le Coran, fruit d’un travail collectif ? », dans De Smet D., et al. (éd.), Al-Kitab. La sacralité du texte dans le monde de l’Islam, Bruxelles, 2004, p. 217-218 ; Id., « Reconstruction », art. cit., p. 88-89.Retour

[ 17] Cf. Gilliot, « Langue et Coran : une lecture syro-araméenne du Coran », Arabica, L (2003/3), p. 381-393 ; Id., « Reconstru-ction », op. cit., p. 89-102.Retour

[ 18] J.M. F. Van Reeth, « L’Evangile du Prophète », dans De Smet D. et al. (éd.), Al-Kitab, op. cit., p. 155-174.Retour

[ 19] M. Sfar, Le Coran est-il authentique ?, 2000.Retour

[ 20] E.M. Gallez, Le Messie et son prophète. Aux origines de l’islam, I-II, 2005.Retour

[ 21] J. Chabbi, Le Seigneur des tribus. L’islam de Mahomet, Paris, 1997 ; Id., Le Coran décrypté. Figures bibliques en Arabie, Paris, 2008.Retour

[ 22] Sous le nom de « Corpus coranicum », sous la direction de G. Bergsträßer (m.1933) et de O. Pretzl (m. 1941), rejoints ensuite par A. Spitaler (m. 2003), qui collaborèrent aussi avec l’Australien A. Jeffery (m.1959).Retour

[ 23] Gilliot, « Reconstru-ction », art. cit., p. 35-44.Retour

[ 24] T.J.E. Andrae, Les Origines de l’islam et le christianisme, traduit de l’allemand par J. Roche, 1955 [1926].Retour

[ 25] Gilliot, « Les “informateurs” juifs et chrétiens de Muhammad », Jerusalem Studies on Arabic an Islam, 22 (1998), p. 84-126.Retour

[ 26] Nöldeke, Geschichte des Qorans, I, Leipzig, 19092, p. 234-61 ; Gilliot, « Un verset manquant du Coran ou réputé tel », M-T Urvoy (éd.), En hommage au Père Jacques Jomier, o.p., Paris, 2002, p. 73-10 ; Sfar, op. cit., p. 41-44.Retour

[ 27] Nöldeke, Remarques critiques sur le style du Coran, Paris (traduction), 1953 ; J. Burton, « Lin-guistics errors in the Qur’ān », JSS, 33 (1988), p. 181-196 ; Larcher, « Qu’est-ce que l’arabe du Coran ? », art. cit., p. 39-40.Retour

Résumé

Loin d’être un texte fixé une fois pour toute, le Coran a une histoire faite d’évolutions, de relectures et de corrections. L’auteur présente séparément la conception musulmane de la façon dont le Coran est venu au jour, et les manières dont la critique occidentale la conçoit.

Voir également:

Entretien avec Edouard-Marie Gallez sur les origines de l’Islam

23 novembre 2006

Q; La question des origines de l’islam est une question tabou. Aussi curieux que cela puisse paraître, les chercheurs occidentaux, même marxistes ou athées, s’en sont tenus souvent à la légende musulmane d’un Mahomet, qui, partant de Jérusalem, est monté au ciel. Edouard-Marie Gallez vient de soutenir une longue thèse (1000 pages) où il fait le point de tout ce que la recherche vraiment scientifique sait des origines de l’Islam mais aussi sur les textes de la mer Morte (Le Messie et son prophète. Aux origines de l’Islam, 2 tomes, éditions de Paris, 2005, tome 1 : De Qumrân à Muhammad, 524 pages/tome 2 : du Muhammad des Califes au Muhammad de l’histoire, 582 pages). Il propose, après plusieurs grands chercheurs, d’explorer de manière systématique la piste de l’origine judéo-chrétienne de l’Islam. De recoupements en découvertes, on peut dire que son travail s’impose à la considération de toute la communauté scientifique.

Plusieurs chercheurs évoquent les origines judéo-chrétiennes de l’islam…

R; La qualification de « judéo-chrétienne » pour cette « secte » est abusive : il faudrait parler d’une « secte ex-judéo-chrétienne », car c’est dans un contexte de rupture que se situe son rapport avec le judéo-christianisme originel. J’ai tenté de décrire le mieux possible cette secte, qui, depuis des siècles, axait sa vision du monde et du salut sur le retour du Messie ; les textes trouvés dans les grottes de la mer Morte contribuent fortement à cette compréhension. Il s’agissait d’un retour matériel, d’un avènement politique du Messie, non d’une Venue dans la gloire comme la foi chrétienne l’enseigne…

Q; Nous allons revenir tout à l’heure sur cette secte apocalyptique, à laquelle votre travail confère, patiemment, sa véritable physionomie, pour mieux éclairer l’origine de l’Islam. Mais quel est le but de celui que nous appelons Mahomet, déformation de l’arabe Muhammad en passant par le turc ? Est-il vraiment conscient de fonder une religion ?

R; Pour cela, il aurait fallu qu’une religion nouvelle ait été fondée ! La question de l’Hégire permet d’entrevoir immédiatement ce qui s’est passé. L’Hégire ou Émigration à l’oasis de Yathrib situé en plein désert est un événement très significatif de la vie du Mahomet historique. On sait que, très rapidement, cette année-là – 622 semble-t-il – a été tenue pour l’an 1 du calendrier du groupe formé autour de Mahomet (ou plutôt du groupe dont il était lui-même un membre). Or, la fondation d’un nouveau calendrier absolu ne s’explique jamais que par la conscience de commencer une Ère Nouvelle, et cela dans le cadre d’une vision de l’Histoire. Quelle ère nouvelle ? D’après les explications musulmanes actuelles, cette année 1 se fonderait sur une défaite et une fuite de Mahomet, parti se réfugier loin de La Mecque. Mais comment une fuite peut-elle être sacralisée jusqu’à devenir la base de tout un édifice chronologique et religieux ? Cela n’a pas de sens. Si Mahomet est bien arrivé à Yathrib – qui sera renommé plus tard Médine – en 622, ce ne fut pas seulement avec une partie de la tribu des Qoréchites, mais avec ceux pour qui le repli au désert rappelait justement un glorieux passé et surtout la figure de la promesse divine. Alors, le puzzle des données apparemment incohérentes prend forme, ainsi que Michaël Cook et d’autres l’on entrevu. Le désert est le lieu où Dieu forme le peuple qui doit aller libérer la terre, au sens de ce verset : « Ô mon peuple, entrez dans la terre que Dieu vous a destinée » (Coran V, 21). Nous sommes ici dans la vision de l’histoire dont le modèle de base est constitué par le récit biblique de l’Exode, lorsque le petit reste d’Israël préparé par Dieu au désert est appelé à conquérir la terre, c’est-à-dire la Palestine selon la vision biblique. Telle est la vision qu’avaient ceux qui accompagnaient et en fait qui dirigeaient Mahomet et les autres Arabes vers Yathrib en 622. Et voilà pourquoi une année 1 y est décrétée : le salut est en marche. Dans l’oasis de Yathrib d’ailleurs, la plupart des sédentaires sont des « juifs » aux dires mêmes des traditions islamiques. Et pourtant les traditions rabbiniques ne les ont jamais reconnus comme des leurs : ces « juifs » et ceux qui y conduisirent leurs amis arabes sont en réalité ces “judéochrétiens” hérétiques, qui vous évoquiez à l’instant. Ils appartenaient à la secte de « nazaréens » dont on a déjà parlé à propos de la sourate 5, verset 82.

Q; Je ne saisis pas encore l’ampleur de cette question d’un judéo-christianisme sectaire ou hérétique à l’origine de l’islam. Les traditions musulmanes ne présentent pas du tout La Mecque comme une ville ayant abrité une communauté juive.

R; Effectivement. Ils n’en venaient justement pas, pour plusieurs raisons péremptoires dont la plus immédiate est qu’ils venaient d’ailleurs : de Syrie. Car c’est là qu’avant l’Hégire, s’était jouée “la première partie de la carrière de Mahomet”, comme l’écrit si joliment Patricia Crone, qui démontre également et surtout beaucoup d’autres choses concernant La Mecque. Mais pour nous en tenir à la Syrie, c’est bien là qu’ont commencé l’endoctrinement et l’enrôlement des premiers Arabes, au cours de la génération qui a précédé Mahomet, c’est-à-dire au temps de son enfance. On pourrait encore aller voir les lieux où Mahomet a vécu, ils sont connus des géographes modernes et même de certains anciens, comme par exemple le lieu-dit “caravansérail des Qoréchites”, c’est-à-dire rien de moins que la base arrière de sa tribu, adonnée au commerce caravanier – Mahomet lui-même participa à ces caravanes, dans sa jeunesse, ainsi que les traditions nous l’indiquent sans qu’il existe la moindre raison d’en douter. Et sur une carte toponymique (voir à la page 278 du volume deux de mon ouvrage), vous pouvez repérer d’autres noms de lieux très significatifs également puisqu’on les retrouve à La Mecque : ce même nom, La Mecque justement, se trouve en Syrie ; de même Kaaba, ou encore Abou Qoubays – qui est le nom de la montagne renommée jouxtant La Mecque en Arabie -…

Q; Est-ce que vous voulez dire qu’il y a eu plus tard un transfert vers La Mecque de ces appellations syriennes, dont le but aurait été d’occulter ce passé syrien et « juif » de la tribu de Mahomet, les Qoréchites ?

R; Oui, c’est bien ce qui est advenu plus tard ; Antoine Moussali avait déjà observé ce phénomène à propos du Coran, en parlant des manipulations subies par son texte et destinées elles aussi à effacer le passé.

Nous y reviendrons, mais restons-en à l’Hégire de 622 et à l’année 1 de l’entrée dans une ère qui, en toute logique, doit être nouvelle pour toute l’Humanité. Ce que la Bible appelle la « terre » et invite à conquérir, c’est seulement la Palestine. Quel rapport y a-t-il alors avec un programme de conquête qui viserait le monde entier ? Ce rapport tient précisément à l’idéologie des « nazaréens ». Ces derniers ne sont pas des « juifs » de l’Ancien Testament (qui auraient alors sept siècles de retard), mais d’ex-judéo-chrétiens bien de leur temps. Dans leur vision de l’Histoire, la reconquête de la Terre d’Israël est liée à la venue de l’Ère Nouvelle. Elle est une étape. Une étape indispensable au Salut. Régis Blachère a bien compris que cette « terre que Dieu vous a destinée » (S. V, 21) désigne la Palestine, et il en est ainsi 18 autres fois du mot « terre » dans le Coran. Et tel fut bien le but poursuivi par l’expédition des guerriers de Mahomet dès l’année 629, un fait connu des historiens mais habituellement passé sous silence dans les articles pour le grand public, alors qu’il s’agit de la seule donnée de la vie de Mahomet qui soit à la fois totalement sûre et bien datée. En cette année-là, à la tête de ses troupes, Mahomet est battu par les Byzantins (qui s’appelaient encore Romains) à l’est du Jourdain, à Mouta. C’est évidemment là qu’on l’attendait, puisque selon l’image biblique de la libération de la Terre, il faut nécessairement passer le Jourdain. C’est après sa mort c’est-à-dire seulement neuf ans plus tard que ‘Oumar entrera finalement dans Jérusalem, alors que le pays était déjà sous contrôle depuis quatre années – seule Jérusalem résistait encore. Pour tous ces gens, la prise de la Palestine et de la Ville apparaît alors comme le gage de la conquête du monde. Sophrone, le Patriarche de Jérusalem, l’avait bien compris puisqu’il écrivit en 634 déjà dans un sermon sur le baptême que les Arabes « se vantent de dominer le monde entier, en imitant leur chef continûment et sans retenue ». C’est une telle perspective, beaucoup plus large que celle de la seule Terre d’Israël, qui est exprimée dans la Sourate VII : « la terre appartient à Dieu, il en fait hériter qui il veut parmi ses créatures et le résultat appartient aux pieux » (v. 128)

Q; Comment des Arabes ont-ils été entraînés dans ce long effort de guerre ? On peut penser que l’appât du butin, dont parle par exemple le verset 20 de la sourate 48, ait constitué un motif, mais était-ce suffisant ? Comment pouvaient-ils entrer dans des visions religieuses de l’Histoire ?

R; Il s’agit au départ lorsque commence l’aventure de Mahomet, d’Arabes chrétiens – ils sont, vous ai-je dit, ces « associateurs » dont parle le texte coranique -, même s’ils sont baptisés depuis peu. Leur conversion au christianisme fut en particulier le fruit des efforts de l’Église jacobite qui va même aménager pour eux des lieux-églises en plein air. Un signe de cette conversion ? Au début du VIe siècle, les Qoréchites étaient encore connus pour être d’abominables pillards sévissant du côté de la Mésopotamie ; et voilà qu’à la fin de ce même VIe siècle, au temps de l’enfance de Mahomet, ce sont de pacifiques caravaniers, spécialistes du transport depuis la façade syrienne de la Méditerranée vers la Mésopotamie et l’Asie. Entre-temps, ils étaient devenus chrétiens, et c’est bien à des chrétiens que s’adressent les harangues de l’auteur des feuillets coraniques primitifs.

Q; Comme chrétiens, ils étaient donc déjà habitués à une certaine vision de l’Histoire…

R; Oui, ils avaient conscience que le Salut a une histoire, racontée dans la Bible. Avec la prédication protoislamique, ils découvrent qu’ils sont des fils d’Abraham selon les commentaires juifs du chapitre 25 de la Genèse. Il n’est même pas écrit dans la Bible qu’Ismaël est leur ancêtre ! René Dagorn a bien montré que cette légende des apocryphes juifs était inconnue ou, du moins, indifférente aux Arabes chrétiens de l’époque de Mahomet. Or c’est là-dessus que les « nazaréens » vont jouer. À la suite de Ray A. Pritz qui a formé le néologisme, appelons cette secte judéo-chrétienne autour de laquelle nous tournons, par la dénomination non équivoque de « judéo-nazaréens ». L’appellation simple de « nazaréens » porte à équivoque nous l’avons vu tout à l’heure puisque c’est d’abord la première appellation des chrétiens, vite abandonnée. Ces judéo-nazaréens sont habiles. Ils ont compris que sans l’aide d’Arabes, qui forment la réserve militaire d’appoint, autant pour l’Empire byzantin que pour celui des Perses, ils ne parviendraient jamais à prendre et garder Jérusalem. Pour faire advenir l’Ère messianique qu’ils attendaient, ils eurent l’idée de circonvenir les Arabes au nom de la descendance d’Ismaël, en étendant à eux les promesses de domination universelle que l’on trouve dans leurs livres apocalyptiques, par exemple dans le IVe livre d’Esdras où l’on peut lire : « Seigneur, tu as déclaré que c’est pour nous que tu as créé le monde. Quant aux autres nations, qui sont nées d’Adam, tu as dit qu’elles ne sont rien (…) Si le monde a été créé pour nous, pourquoi n’entrons-nous pas en possession de ce monde qui est notre héritage ? » (VI, 55 sq). Et plus loin, dans le même texte, voici une formule qui nous renvoie tout naturellement au texte de la Sourate VII que nous venons de citer, sur la terre qui appartient aux pieux : « Cherche à savoir comment seront sauvés les justes, à qui appartient le monde et pour qui il existe, et à quelle époque ils le seront » (IX, 13b).

Q; Il y a un drôle de mélange entre religion et stratégie politique…

R; Et plutôt payant. Les deux Empires de l’époque, les Grecs byzantins et les Perses sassanides, sont épuisés par des querelles internes et par les campagnes militaires montées l’un contre l’autre. C’est d’ailleurs dans ce cadre que se comprend l’Hégire, selon l’année probable : ceux qui quittent la Syrie en 622 pour le désert n’avaient sans doute pas envie de rencontrer les armées d’Héraclius, qui commençait la reconquête de l’Est de son Empire pris huit ans plus tôt par les Perses. Les campagnes avaient alors lieu l’été, puis on se donnait rendez-vous pour l’année suivante. En 628, les Perses finissent par être complètement battus, et l’on peut penser que certains stratèges liés aux Perses, arabes ou non, rejoignirent alors Yathrib pour se mettre au service du projet que montent les judéo-nazaréens et leurs alliés arabes autour de Mahomet. Mais l’expédition de 629 est un échec, comme on l’a vu. Manifestement, certains passages du Coran témoignent du souci que l’auteur eut alors de remonter le moral des troupes, et l’un d’eux évoque clairement cet épisode (S. XXX, 1-5 selon la voyellisation correcte rétablie par Blachère).

Q; Plus encore que les circonstances favorables, ce qui est important, dites-vous, c’est la vision de l’Histoire et du salut qui fit l’unité entre les différents partenaires du projet. Nous n’en avons pas encore beaucoup parlé. Cette vision présente certains aspects intemporels que l’on pourrait retrouver aujourd’hui…

R; Il faut en dire un peu plus en effet. Dans cette vision, le salut n’est pas spirituel, il ne passe pas par une réforme intérieure que l’on nomme conversion. C’est un salut qui doit se réaliser au niveau de la société. Là où Jésus a parlé (rarement) de l’opposition entre les fils de ténèbre et les fils de lumière, ils imaginent une vision du monde où des appartenances communautaires distinguent et séparent ces deux groupes. D’un côté, il y a le Parti de Dieu, et de l’autre le reste de ceux qui, forcément, sont contre Dieu, ne serait-ce qu’à cause de leur ignorance. Cette manière de voir est toujours fondamentalement celle de l’Islam, qui ne peut concevoir le monde autrement que comme un affrontement du Dâr al-islâm, le domaine où l’Islam est instauré comme loi du pays et où les non musulmans sont soumis, et le Dâr al-harb ou domaine de la guerre c’est-à-dire les pays et institutions à conquérir puisque Dieu les a donnés aux musulmans. Mais ce furent d’abord les judéo-nazaréens qui cultivèrent cette idéologie en nourrissant ces prétentions conformément à ce qu’on lit dans leurs livres, on l’a vu précédemment. Notons que, au temps du communisme, les sectateurs de cette idéologie avaient une vision très semblable du monde, divisé dialectiquement entre monde socialiste et monde à conquérir. Le pire, c’est que tous ces gens croient sincèrement sauver le monde puisqu’ils pensent détenir la recette de son salut. Or, l’importance d’une telle fin justifie les moyens : que vaut la vie d’un homme, ou celle de quelques millions d’hommes, si le salut du monde est en jeu ? C’est là où se trouve la perversion totale de ces idéologies capables de transformer des hommes paisibles et pacifiques en assassins, comme on le voit toujours en de nombreux pays. Cette perversion tire sa force du christianisme. Simplement, celui-ci est contrefait. C’est le petit détail qui change tout, et qui passe parfois inaperçu du plus grand nombre (et par fois aussi de certains intellectuels). On connaît mal les guerres que firent Mahomet et Umar au départ de Yathrib pour soumettre toutes les tribus arabes à leur portée, mais les traditions musulmanes évoquent la ruse, la férocité, les meurtres. Les Arabes sont unis dans le projet de prendre Jérusalem et d’y reconstruire le Temple, qui sera « le Troisième », ainsi qu’il est annoncé dans les apocryphes messianistes des judéo-nazaréens. Ce qu’on appelle « le deuxième Temple » est celui qui avait suivi l’exil et qui, en fait, a été rebâti par Hérode le Grand et détruit en 70 par les Romains de Titus alors même qu’il était enfin terminé.

Q; Vous n’êtes pas en train de me dire que les Arabes ont reconstruit le Temple juif à Jérusalem ?

R; Les sources que nous possédons s’accordent pour dire que, dès que Jérusalem est prise, « la Maison » est relevée ; et qu’il s’agit d’un cube ! Selon certains témoignages que je reprends dans mon livre, cette reconstruction aurait d’abord été le fait de « juifs » avant d’être celui des Arabes. On peut comprendre que les observateurs non avertis ne comprenaient bien ni ce qui se passait, ni qui exactement tirait les ficelles. En fait, c’est une espérance exprimée dans la sourate II qui, pour ainsi dire, se réalisait là : « Abraham (figurant les juifs et les Arabes unis) relèvera les assises (qui restent) de la Maison avec [l’aide d’]Ismaël. (figurant les Arabes) » (II, 127). Personne ne sera étonné d’apprendre que le cube hâtivement élevé avait les dimensions exactes du cœur du temple d’Hérode – il constitue la véritable « mosquée de Umar », l’octogone que l’on voit aujourd’hui l’ayant remplacée à la fin du VIIe siècle tout en gardant une dimension extérieure égale à celle du cube. Une source dit que Umar fit un sacrifice devant cette Maison relevée, ce qui nous renvoie évidemment aux sacrifices anciens faits au Temple, mais sans doute aussi aux pratiques judéo-nazaréennes dont l’Islam a d’ailleurs hérité vaguement au moins dans le rite du sacrifice du mouton lors de l’aïd el-kébîr ou dans l’interdiction du vin et de l’alcool en général.

Q; Justement, existe-t-il des données permettant d’établir, au-delà des similitudes doctrinales entre le proto-islam et le judéo-nazaréisme, le sens de la collaboration de ces deux forces au moment de la prise de Jérusalem en 638 ? Quelle idée peut-on avoir des relations qui avaient existé entre Mahomet et ces judéo-nazaréens nourris de pensée eschatologique et apocalyptique ?

R; Il est clair que les juifs qui entouraient Mahomet n’étaient pas des Juifs rabbanites. À ce sujet, il suffit d’entendre attentivement ce que les traditions islamiques ont à nous dire sur le personnage de Waraqa. J’en profite pour dire que son rôle a dû être si important qu’il n’a pas pu être effacé, alors que tant de témoignages islamiques anciens, écrits ou non, disparaissaient – en fait tous ceux qui sont antérieurs à la biographie normative de Ibn Hichâm, composée et imposée deux siècles après la mort de Mahomet : c’est seulement par des citations que l’on connaît quelque chose des écrits antérieurs, qui furent systématiquement détruits. Or, ce qui est dit de ce Waraqa est hautement révélateur, comme l’indique le dossier quasiment exhaustif réuni par Joseph Azzi sur ce personnage. On le présente comme un cousin de Khadidja, la première femme de Mahomet, ou parfois comme un cousin de celui-ci. Il pourrait être les deux, ce qui est même très vraisemblable. Il bénit leur mariage, et pour cause : il est dit « prêtre nasraniyy », ce qu’il ne faut pas traduire par prêtre chrétien mais bien par prêtre nazaréen. Nous l’avons vu, les judéo-nazaréens comptaient des prêtres parmi eux, très probablement des descendants de la tribu de Lévi ; et il y avait des consacrés hommes – ceux que le Coran nomme “moines” et qui sont dits se lever la nuit pour réciter des psaumes (III, 113 ; IV, 163 ; V, 82 ; XVII, 55.78 ; LXX, 20) -, ce qui est à comprendre dans une perspective eschatologique et guerrière : le salut du monde vaut que l’on s’y consacre totalement. De Waraqa, le commentateur Al-Buhari (mort en 870) donne la présentation suivante : « Cet homme, qui était cousin de Hadidja du côté de son père avait embrassé le nazaréisme avant l’apparition de l’islam. Il savait écrire l’hébreu et avait copié en hébreu toute la partie de l’Évangile que Dieu avait voulu qu’il transcrivît ». Il est de la tribu arabe des Qoréchites, mais « il est devenu nazaréen ». Il constitue donc un pont entre les deux peuples. Al Buhari a encore cette parole à la fois énigmatique et révélatrice : « Lorsque Waraqa est décédé, la révélation s’est tarie ». À l’époque, il n’est pas question du tout de « révélation », sinon de traductions en arabe des écrits judéo-nazaréens (comme par exemple quand le texte coranique évoque les « feuilles d’Abraham » – celles de Moïse étant tout simplement la Torah c’est-à-dire les cinq premiers livres de la Bible). Les feuillets coraniques les plus anciens seraient-ils de lui ? Pas nécessairement, car les feuillets sont des écrits de circonstance – essentiellement de propagande -, alors qu’il est plutôt dit le traducteur de textes beaucoup plus important. Dans l’avenir, la recherche y verra sans doute plus clair sur ces points. En tout cas, il ne dut pas être le seul à écrire pour les Arabes « devenus nazaréens »… ou à convaincre de le devenir ! Christoph Luxenberg a montré le substrat araméen qu’il fallait quelquefois supposer pour lire correctement – c’est-à-dire en corrigeant parfois le diacritisme – certains versets coraniques particulièrement obscurs ; il n’y a là rien d’étonnant si l’on pense que la langue maternelle du ou des auteurs est le syro-araméen, la langue habituelle des judéonazaréens. Ce qui est dit également dans les traditions islamiques de Zayd, qui aurait appris l’hébreu et l’écriture dans les écoles juives, est également très révélateur, même si c’est approximatif : ce « juif » de Yathrib a joué un certain rôle dans l’élaboration du proto-islam, qui était encore le pendant arabe très peu autonome du judéonazaréisme. Il faudrait mentionner encore les inscriptions qu’on dit, faute de mieux, « judéoarabes » et que l’on a trouvées il y a quelques années dans le désert du Neguev (sud d’Israël) ; Alfred-Louis de Prémare les a finement analysées. Il s’agit d’invocations en arabe adressées par exemple au Dieu de Moïse et de Jésus, et elles datent de l’enfance de Mahomet. Par comparaison, rien de tel n’existe dans la région mecquoise, et d’autant moins que ni cette écriture ni cette langue arabe n’y étaient employées.

Q; Il est impossible d’évoquer tout ce que l’on trouve dans votre livre. Il révèle la figure historique de Mahomet, il montre qu’il faut le considérer surtout comme celui qui a réussi à unir plusieurs tribus arabes autour du projet judéo-nazaréen de la « conquête de la terre ». Pouvez-vous préciser davantage encore quelle était la croyance de ces judéo-nazaréens ?

R; Les judéo-nazaréens reconnaissaient Jésus non pas comme le Fils de Dieu venu visiter son peuple – pour reprendre une manière de parler très primitive -, mais seulement comme le Messie suscité par Dieu. Ce n’est pas de sa faute si ce dernier n’a pu établir le Royaume de Dieu : les Grands-Prêtres se sont opposés à lui et vont même vouloir le tuer. Mais Dieu ne pouvait permettre que son Messie fût crucifié, Il l’enlève donc à temps au Ciel, et c’est une apparence – un autre homme ou une illusion – qui est clouée sur la croix à sa place. Divers textes apocryphes disent cela bien avant le Coran (IV, 157), et certains imaginent même que c’est Simon de Cyrène, celui qui avait aidé Jésus à porter sa croix, qui se retrouve dessus par erreur. L’important, c’est que Jésus, lui, soit gardé “en réserve” au Ciel. Mais il ne peut redescendre que lorsque le Pays sera débarrassé de la présence étrangère et que le Temple sera rebâti par les vrais croyants. Pour que le salut du monde advienne, la recette est donc évidente : il suffira de prendre Jérusalem – qui doit devenir la capitale du monde – et de reconstruire le Temple. Le « Messie-Jésus » – une expression gardée dans le Coran que nous avons – imposera alors le Royaume de Dieu sur toute la terre. Là, on est loin des messianismes antérieurs à notre ère, qui étaient simplement nationalistes et religieux.

Q; Dans le premier volume de votre ouvrage, vous écrivez comme une histoire de ce messianisme politique, qui change de nature au début de l’Ère chrétienne…

R; L’insurrection de 66 qui conduisit à la ruine du Temple en 70 n’était plus simplement nationaliste, quoique son idéologie soit mal connue : Flavius Josèphe est la seule source qui aurait pu nous l’expliciter mais il glisse sur le sujet (il y a été impliqué lui-même). Cependant, on peut penser à un mélange de messianisme nationaliste et d’eschatologie « mondialiste » où le message judéo-chrétien, déformé, n’est pas étranger. Les sources sont plus claires à propos de la seconde insurrection judéenne, qui s’étendit de 132 à 135 ; celle-là est explicitement messianiste, et inspirée par un certain Aqiba qui est en fait un ex-judéo-chrétien devenu « Rabbi », et qui est connu pour son anti-christianisme. On voit bien à quel courant de pensée il puise ses délires destructeurs. On en a parlé précédemment, c’est à la suite de la destruction du Temple de 70 que l’idéologie judéo-nazaréenne se structura en vision cohérente du Monde et de l’Histoire, construite sous l’angle de l’affrontement des « bons » et des « méchants », les premiers devant être les instruments de la libération de la Terre. Le recoupement des données indique que c’est en Syrie, chez les judéo-chrétiens qui refusèrent de rentrer en Judée après 70 et réinterprétèrent leur foi, que cette idéologie de salut – la première de l’Histoire – s’est explicitée.

Q; Vous ne vous contentez pas de collationner les événements, vous proposez une histoire des doctrines, ou plutôt un schéma explicatif, qui s’applique de manière pertinente jusqu’à nos jours ou presque ?

R; Je crois pouvoir dire en effet que cette manière de réinterpréter l’attente de la manifestation glorieuse du Messie est à l’origine de tous les messianismes « modernes » même s’ils l’ont oublié depuis longtemps ; car il s’agit d’une explication de l’Histoire où l’initiative n’appartient plus vraiment à Dieu mais à l’homme. La recette de l’accomplissement de l’Histoire est fournie : « La Terre appartient aux pieux ». Ceux qui la possèdent sont donc les sauveurs du monde, et Dieu n’a plus grand-chose à faire dans cette Histoire où la victoire finale des « bons » est pour ainsi dire programmée et inscrite : les explications déterministes modernes trouvent là leur source. Ce que d’aucuns appellent le fatalisme musulman est un autre aspect de ce déterminisme, mektoub. Mais attention : la « foi » – religieuse ou non – en ce déterminisme n’entraîne pas nécessairement la passivité ; elle peut entraîner aussi bien l’activisme, au sens où l’on se croit investi d’une mission de Dieu qui place au-dessus des autres hommes ; le Coran expose cette idée (par exemple III, 110) mais, « Dieu » mis à part, elle a également été celle des militants marxistes. Pour en revenir à l’attente judéonazaréenne du Messie-Jésus, je ne vous apprendrai rien en disant qu’il n’est pas redescendu du Ciel en 638. En 639 non plus. En 640, l’espérance de le voir redescendre du Ciel apparut clairement être une chimère. C’est la crise.

Q; Est-ce lorsque cette espérance est déçue que Umar et ses Arabes se retournèrent contre les judéonazaréens ? Je pense aux massacres de juifs que la biographie officielle de Mahomet lui attribue : n’est-ce pas un exemple de la tendance à faire endosser à la figure du Prophète de l’Islam des actes ou des décrets postérieurs que l’on veut légitimer ?

R; Je le pense également. Il est invraisemblable que Mahomet ait massacré des juifs rabbanites (orthodoxes ndlr), dont les judéo-nazaréens aussi bien que leurs alliés Arabes avaient besoin de la neutralité, au moins. Mais après 640, on imagine aisément que Umar puis son successeur Uthman aient voulu se défaire d’alliés devenus encombrants. Ironie de l’histoire : les « fils d’Israël » – au moins leurs chefs – sont massacrés par ceux qu’ils avaient eux-mêmes convaincus d’être les « fils d’Ismaël » ! En fait, le problème se posait aux Arabes de justifier d’une manière nouvelle le pouvoir qu’ils avaient pris sur le Proche-Orient. C’est dans ce cadre qu’apparut la nécessité d’avoir un livre propre à eux, opposable à la Bible des juifs et des chrétiens, et qui consacrerait la domination arabe sur le monde… et qui contribuerait à occulter le passé judéo-nazaréen.

Q; Parlez-nous un peu des origines du Coran…

R; Le Calife basé à l’oasis de Médine ne disposait, en fait de « textes » en arabe, que des papiers que les judéo-nazaréens y avaient laissés. Même si l’on y ajoute les textes plus anciens laissés en Syrie, cela ne fait pas encore un choix énorme. Et il fallait choisir, dans la hâte, des textes répondant aux attentes des nouveaux maîtres du Proche-Orient ! Autant dire que, quel qu’il fût, le résultat du choix ne pouvait guère être satisfaisant, même si on choisissait les textes présentant le moins d’allusions au passé judéonazaréen. C’est ainsi que les traditions musulmanes ont gardé le souvenir de « collectes » ou assemblages du Coran divergents entre eux et concurrents – parce qu’ils fournirent évidemment à des ambitieux l’occasion de se pousser au pouvoir. Umar fut assassiné. Son successeur également, et il s’ensuivit une véritable guerre intra-musulmane, aboutissant au schisme entre « chiites » et « sunnites ». Quant aux textes assemblés dans ce qu’on nomma le « Coran », ils continuèrent d’être adaptés à ce qu’on attendait d’eux, dans une suite de fuites en avant : apporter des modifications à un texte, c’est souvent se condamner à introduire de nouvelles pour pallier les difficultés ou les incohérences induites par les premières, etc. Un texte ne se laisse pas si facilement manipuler. Surtout qu’il faut chaque fois rappeler les exemplaires en circulation,les détruire et les remplacer par des nouveaux – ce dont les traditions musulmanes ont gardé le souvenir et situent jusqu’à l’époque du gouverneur Hajjaj, au début du VIIIe siècle encore ! Quand il devint trop tard pour le modifier encore en ses consonnes, sa voyellisation puis son interprétation furent à leur tour l’objet d’élaborations (parfois assez savantes). Ainsi, à force d’être manipulé, le texte coranique devint de plus en plus obscur, ce qu’il est aujourd’hui. Mais il était tout à fait clair en ces divers feuillets primitifs c’est-à-dire avant que ceux-ci aient été choisis pour constituer un recueil de 114 parties – le même nombre que de logia de l’évangile de Thomas, nombre lié aux besoins liturgiques selon Pierre Perrier.

Voir encore:

Les origines de l’Islam

Idéologies Erreurs – Fausses mystiques

André Frament

04 Octobre 2011

L’AFS va rééditer l’étude remarquable faite par Édouard Pertus : Connaissance élémentaire de l’islam. Ce document donne dans son chapitre III, l’origine de l’islam telle que la légende musulmane l’a inventée. En l’écrivant, l’auteur était conscient de ce que les travaux des chercheurs donneraient ultérieurement une histoire différente de la légende. Il avait dit

Les conclusions de ces recherches ne sont pas encore fermes ; de plus il est nécessaire de faire connaître ce que les musulmans croient, si l’on veut les comprendre et éventuellement leur parler.

Nous pensons utile de donner aujourd’hui un résumé des résultats obtenus depuis par la recherche historique.

Le résultat des études sur l’origine de l’islam

Les résultats des études récentes sur l’origine de l’islam ont été remarquablement complétées et synthétisées dans la thèse monumentale du P. Édouard Gallez : Le messie et son prophète. Aux origines de l’islam,[1] qui est devenue une référence incontournable. Ceux qui la liront auront intérêt et plaisir à lire ce livre, très accessible bien que scientifique.

I – Une histoire difficile à établir [2]

L’islam s’est répandu par des guerres de conquête victorieuses. Les écrits historiques musulmans, rédigés par des vainqueurs, présentent une vue partiale.

a) Les systèmes politiques fondés sur un corps d’idées ont utilisé leur pouvoir pour contrôler les idées et les écrits. L’empire islamique n’a pas échappé à cette règle.

b) De plus, les documents islamiques sur lesquels se fondent jusqu’ici la connaissance du premier islam et de la vie de Mohammed[3] ont été mis par écrit plus de deux siècles après la mort de Mohammed, et les documents antérieurs ont tous disparu.[4]

Comment faire pour surmonter cette difficulté ?

Les méthodes de l’exégèse se sont développées, la découverte de nouvelles sources de documentation écrite et l’utilisation de nouveaux outils ont permis de surmonter cette difficulté.

a) Les méthodes d’analyse des textes anciens, développées depuis 1850 en Europe, ont été appliquées aux écrits juifs et chrétiens, elles le sont maintenant aux écrits musulmans.

b) Des textes en grec, latin, hébreu, arménien, géorgien, syriaque et persan ont été recherchés, retrouvés et traduits. Ils donnent, sur les débuts de l’islam, des informations datant de 10 à 30 ans après les faits, et parfois même sont contemporains des faits décrits.

c) Les outils historiques ont été développés, ou ont connu un usage plus large. Ils permettent de compléter les documents historiques quand ils sont peu nombreux. Ce sont l’onomastique[5], la toponymie[6], l’épigraphie[7], la linguistique[8], la numismatique[9] et l’archéologie. Ils ont apporté une moisson de résultats qui éclairent l’histoire de Mohammed et celle du premier islam.

Considérons donc d’abord ce qui a précédé l’islam, avant de voir ce qui a pu être historiquement établi sur la vie de Mohammed et enfin ce qui semble avoir suivi sa mort.

II – La recherche d’un pré-islam

D’après la théologie musulmane, Mohammed, venant à la suite d’une longue suite de prophètes, n’aurait fait qu’un « rappel », rendu nécessaire parce que les hommes oublient. On peut donc penser que des révélations faites aux prophètes prédécesseurs de Mohammed ont du laisser des traces. D’autre part, des historiens pensent que les nouveaux systèmes d’idées se développent à partir d’ébauches antécédentes.

Quelle que soit l’hypothèse choisie, il a dû exister une sorte de pré-islam qu’il est intéressant de rechercher.

La trace des apports antérieurs

De fait, certaines idées présentes dans l’islam d’aujourd’hui sont également présentes dans les sectes millénaristes et messianiques du Proche Orient, aux premier et deuxième siècles de notre ère. Voir comment ces idées ont cheminé dans cette région du monde a donné un éclairage supplémentaire.

Dans le Coran, Myriam, sœur d’Aaron, et Marie, mère du Christ, est une seule et même personne, alors que 1.200 ans les séparent. La Trinité, formée pour les chrétiens du Père, du Christ et du Saint-Esprit, est déclarée dans le Coran formée, du Père, du Christ, et de Marie. Ces éléments, et d’autres de la sorte, font penser que le Coran est formé de plusieurs traditions différentes, comme on peut l’observer pour d’autres livres anciens.[10]

Le messianisme s’est formé dans la Palestine antique

Les messianismes juifs se sont formés en trois siècles, de 180 avant notre ère à 150 après. Leur théologie présente cinq idées centrales qui, durent encore de nos jours[11] :

· La première est celle d’une guerre menée pour des raisons théologiques.

· La seconde est celle d’émigration : les Justes devaient d’abord aller au désert, reproduisant l’Exode de Moïse au Néguev-Sinaï.

· La troisième idée était la conquête de Jérusalem.

· La quatrième était la libération complète de la Palestine juive.

· La cinquième était la conquête du monde entier.

Alors que les quatre premières étaient tout à fait générales dans les mouvements messianiques juifs, la dernière n’était acceptée que par une partie des adeptes. Les deux premières idées sont proches de celles de l’islam, et la cinquième reste un rêve que les musulmans ont poursuivi pendant quatorze siècles.

Les judéo-chrétiens

Le mot « judéo-chrétiens » ne veut pas désigner l’ensemble des juifs et des chrétiens, mais les membres de sectes nées dans les deux premiers siècles de notre ère. Ayant transformé des idées juives et des idées chrétiennes, ils ne sont plus ni juifs ni chrétiens. Pour eux, le Christ est un grand prophète, mais non un Dieu. Après avoir échappé à la crucifixion, il aurait été placé au ciel, en attendant de revenir pour mener une guerre de conquête mondiale, pour établir une société parfaite, où tous les justes seraient heureux, tandis que les injustes seraient esclaves ou serviteurs au service des justes.[12]

Le nazaréisme

La secte des nazaréens a concentré les adeptes et les idées des judéo-chrétiens. On la trouve attestée épisodiquement un peu avant le début de notre ère jusqu’à 80 ans après la naissance de l’islam[13]. Leur nom, araméen, signifie les aides (de Dieu : racine NZR), très proche de celui d’ansar qui signifie, en arabe (racine NSR), les aides (d’Allah).

Ils enseignaient qu’après avoir émigré au désert, conquis Jérusalem et reconstruit le Temple, le Christ reviendrait du ciel pour prendre la tête des armées nazaréennes et conquérir le monde.

Ils nommaient le Christ : « ‘Îsâ ». En dehors d’eux, seuls les musulmans le font.

· Waraqa [14]

Waraqa était un Koreichite de la tribu de Mohammed, devenu prêtre nazaréen un peu avant le début de l’islam. Il est décrit par les documents musulmans comme « un des chef et des guides des Koreichites ».

Quand il est mort, « la révélation s’est arrêtée »,[15] ce qui signifie pour un musulman que Mohammed n’a plus reçu de « communications de l’ange Gabriel ».

Mohammed a déclaré avoir vu Waraqa au paradis. Pour l’islam, seuls les musulmans vont au paradis. Or, Waraqa était nazaréen, Mohammed musulman, et Mohammed disait que tous deux étaient de l’unique bonne religion.

· Le nom des premiers disciples de Mohammed

Du vivant de Mohammed, et 15 ans après sa mort, les fidèles de Mohammed se donnaient le nom de mahgrâyê. Ce mot n’est pas un mot arabe mais araméen qui signifie les émigrés ; il n’a de sens que dans la théologie des nazaréens.

Dix à quinze ans après la mort de Mohammed, mahgrâyê a été traduit par muhâjirûn, (émigrés en arabe), et pour le demi-siècle suivant, dans l’usage courant, les convertis de Mohammed ont porté les deux noms.[16] Le terme « musulman » est apparu, vers 720 dans l’usage officiel, mais dans l’usage courant le mot araméen initial a longtemps été utilisé.

· Un émir nazaréen

En 644 eut lieu une controverse entre le patriarche jacobite Jean 1er et l’émir Amru bar Sa’d, [17] gouverneur de Homs, en Syrie, ancien compagnon de Mohammed. Le patriarche a rédigé leur discussion, et cet écrit nous est parvenu. [18]

L’émir, violemment anti-chrétien, s’efforça de convaincre le patriarche de se rallier à la religion de l’armée arabe, et d’entraîner avec lui ses ouailles. Il est remarquable que, dans tout le cours de la controverse, pas une fois l’émir ne mentionne ni le Coran, ni Mohammed, ni l’islam. Son but fut de convaincre le patriarche que le Christ était certes un prophète, mais pas Dieu. Il utilise les arguments des nazaréens, non ceux des musulmans.

· La chahada[19]

Sa forme première a pu être reconstituée à partir de graffiti et d’épigraphies arabes non officielles, presque toujours gravées sur pierre. Voici le texte : [20]

« Je témoigne qu’il n’y a de dieu que Dieu, pas d’associé à lui. »

Cette forme est nazaréenne. Entre 690 et 740, il y a deux attestations :

Mohammed est son prophète, et, le Christ est son prophète.

La forme actuelle de la chahada, il n’y a de dieu que Dieu, et Mohammed est son prophète ne devient exclusive que vers 735-740.

· Le nazaréisme est un pré-islam

Les nazaréens pratiquaient la circoncision, la polygamie limitée à 4 épouses, décrivaient un paradis où les élus trouveraient des aliments délicieux, des boissons agréables et des femmes. Toutes ces idées sont présentes dans l’islam.

De plus, un grand nombre de thèses, de conceptions, de dogmes nazaréens se retrouvent à l’identique dans l’islam d’aujourd’hui : ‘Îsâ, le nom de Jésus, le statut du Christ, les récits de l’enfance de Marie, la confusion entre Marie et Myriam, le statut des femmes, la Trinité formée du Père, du Christ et de Marie, la conception du paradis, le vin, interdit sur terre mais présent en fleuves entiers au paradis…

· Le mot « musulman »

Le mot musulman apparaît pour la première fois sur le Dôme du roc, en 691, il entre dans l’usage officiel vers 720, il est utilisé sur une monnaie pour la première fois en 768, et sur papyrus en 775 seulement. La recherche linguistique montre que les mots islam et musulman ne viennent pas de l’arabe, mais de l’araméen, la langue des nazaréens.

· L’origine du nom de Médine

Le nom de Médine, d’après les documents musulmans, viendrait de madina ar-rasul Allah, la ville du messager d’Allah. Cette étymologie en langue arabe est proposée par l’islam plus de 200 ans après les faits. Or, à l’époque, madina ne signifiait pas ville, mais région. Ville se disait qura. Des textes datant de 30 ans après les faits indiquent une autre étymologie, à partir de l’araméen, impliquant les nazaréens. Comme le relève Maxime Lenôtre [21] :

Edouard Marie Gallez … donne une raison … de l’opération du changement de nom de Yathrib en Médine. Mohammed n’a jamais prétendu être un prophète, mais un prédicateur… Aucun texte ni aucune inscription ne le désigne comme prophète avant l’extrême fin du VIIe siècle. La première attestation connue et fiable est une monnaie de 685. Or Médine signifierait « ville du Prophète » (Madinât al-nabî). Puisqu’il n’est pas question de « prophète » et qu’on ne débaptise pas une ville pour l’appeler ville tout court, il faut penser que les trois consonnes mdn, si elles ont parfois la signification de région … ne signifieraient pas « ville » en tant que nouveau nom de Yathrib. L’allusion biblique est alors évidente : il s’agit du nom de Modin – mdn – le lieu où prit naissance la révolte victorieuse des Macchabées contre l’occupant grec de la Palestine (Antiochus IV Epiphane) ; celle-ci aboutit à l’instauration d’un … royaume juif asmonéen (automne 134 à 63 avant notre ère), c’est-à-dire jusqu’à l’arrivée des Romains.

III – Mohammed

Les sources documentaires islamiques sont rares.

L’existence du Coran est attestée pour la première fois soixante-dix ans après la mort de Mohammed, et les traditions, qui décrivent la collecte et l’histoire des Corans, ne sont attestées que vers 750.

Comme dit précédemment, l’histoire personnelle de Mohammed a été rédigée deux siècles après sa mort, sur ordre califal, mais tous les documents qui ont servi de sources ont disparu. Pendant les deux premiers siècles de l’islam, la destruction des documents originaux relatifs au Coran a été faite ouvertement par les califes : les tout premiers documents originaux sur des supports de fortune, les notes d’Hafça, une des épouses de Mohammed, les Corans dissidents détruits par Hajjâj en 692, etc. Les notes de Fatima, la fille de Mohammed, ont disparu, ainsi que de nombreux documents cités dans des documents ultérieurs, mais dont on ne retrouve rien.

Les hadiths, (paroles ou actes de Mohammed), sont consignés dans des recueils mis par écrit deux siècles et demi après sa mort. Cinq recueils sont tenus pour authentiques par les érudits de l’islam.[22] Ils contiennent ensemble environ 20.000 hadiths.[23]

L’environnement

Les documents de la recherche historique sur Mohammed apportent des renseignements intéressants.

· La Mecque

L’ouvrage de référence sur l’origine de La Mecque est celui de Patricia Crone,[24] une islamologue danoise. Selon ses travaux :

a) Avant l’islam, aucun géographe de l’antiquité ne mentionne La Mecque, ni directement, ni indirectement, ni sous le nom de La Mecque, ni même sous un nom vaguement ressemblant.

b) D’après l’histoire califale, elle tirait sa subsistance du commerce international et des pèlerinages. Le commerce allégué n’est mentionné que dans les documents califaux. S’agissant d’un commerce international, on devrait en parler aussi dans les pays de destination, ce qui n’est jamais le cas.

Cela met gravement en doute l’existence même de La Mecque au temps de Mohammed et donc que ce soit là le lieu de sa naissance.

· Les Koreichites : toponymie et documents écrits

D’après les sources musulmanes sans divergence entre elles, et d’après les sources des peuples voisins, les Koreichites avaient leur commerce et leurs propriétés agricoles en Syrie et en Palestine. Il n’existe aucune attestation non musulmane, ni aucun ensemble d’attestations musulmanes sans divergences, indiquant une localisation dans la région de La Mecque actuelle.

La toponymie indique que les Koreichites vivaient en Syrie. On pourrait encore aller voir les lieux où Mahomet a vécu, ils sont connus des géographes modernes et même de certains anciens, comme par exemple le lieu-dit “caravansérail des Koreichites ”, c’est-à-dire rien de moins que la base arrière de sa tribu, adonnée au commerce caravanier – Mahomet lui-même participa à ces caravanes, dans sa jeunesse, ainsi que les traditions nous l’indiquent sans qu’il existe la moindre raison d’en douter. Et sur une carte toponymique,[25] on peut également repérer en Syrie d’autres noms de lieux très significatifs qu’on retrouve aujourd’hui autour de La Mecque actuelle : ainsi Kaaba, ou encore Abou Qoubays – qui est le nom de la montagne renommée jouxtant La Mecque actuelle en Arabie. De plus, même le nom de La Mecque, se trouve en Syrie…

Ces faits renforcent le doute précédent concernant l’existence de la Mecque actuelle lors de la naissance et de l’enfance de Mohammed.

· La culture religieuse

Il est très douteux que les Arabes du VIIe siècle soient des polythéistes étrangers aux traditions biblique ou chrétienne. Par leur commerce, ils sont, en effet, depuis plus de six siècles en contact avec des juifs et depuis six siècles en contact avec des chrétiens. Ils ne pouvaient pas ignorer la révélation judéo-chrétienne.

Dans le Coran, le terme censé désigner des polythéistes est celui de muškirûn qui, selon tous les auteurs des VIIIe et IXe siècles, signifie associateurs, (reproche sans cesse adressé aux chrétiens). Mais plusieurs versets attestent expressément la foi monothéiste de ces muškirûn supposés être des polythéistes.

· Le massacre des juifs

Aux dires des traditions islamiques, dans l’oasis de Yathrib, la plupart des sédentaires sont des « juifs ». D’après la Sira d’Ibn Hichâm, Mohammed aurait massacré une tribu juive de Yathrib, les Qorayza, expulsé et dépouillé deux autres, les Banou Nadir et les Qaynoqa.

Il n’existe aucune source non musulmane, ni littéraire, ni archéologique, ni épigraphique qui fasse état de ces trois tribus ; et les documents judaïques de l’époque qui détaillent les implantations juives au Proche-Orient ne mentionnent jamais Yathrib.

Les traditions rabbiniques ne les auraient donc jamais reconnues comme des leurs ? Alors ces « juifs » et ceux qui y conduisirent leurs amis arabes seraient alors probablement des “judéo-chrétiens” hérétiques, appartenant à la secte des «nazaréens» (cités dans la sourate 5, verset 82).

Les documents historiques sur Mohammed

D’après Théophile d’Edesse,[26] Mohammed est né et a vécu à Yathrib, plus tard renommé Médine par les musulmans.

De 614 à 622, Mohammed se joignit aux Perses qui avaient envahi la Palestine et battu les armées byzantines de l’empereur Héraclius.

· L’hégire

On sait que le calendrier des musulmans numérote les années à partir de l’hégire. Pourtant la fondation d’un nouveau calendrier absolu ne peut s’expliquer qu’avec la conscience de commencer une Ère Nouvelle, dans le cadre d’une vision de l’Histoire.[27] Quelle est cette ère nouvelle ? D’après les explications musulmanes, cette année 1 se fonderait sur une défaite et une fuite de Mohammed, parti se réfugier loin de La Mecque. Mais une fuite ne peut être sacralisée jusqu’à devenir la base d’un édifice chronologique et religieux.

Si Mohammed est bien arrivé à Yathrib – qui sera renommé plus tard Médine – en 622, ce ne fut pas seulement avec une partie de la tribu des Koraïchites, mais avec ceux pour qui le repli au désert rappelait justement un glorieux passé et surtout la figure de la promesse divine. Alors, le puzzle prend forme, ainsi que Michaël Cook et d’autres l’ont entrevu. Le désert est le lieu où Dieu forme le peuple qui doit aller libérer la terre, au sens de ce verset : « Ô mon peuple, entrez dans la terre que Dieu vous a destinée » (Coran V, 21). Nous sommes ici dans la vision de l’histoire dont le modèle de base est constitué par le récit biblique de l’Exode, lorsque le petit reste d’Israël, préparé par Dieu au désert, est appelé à conquérir la « terre », c’est-à-dire la Palestine selon la vision biblique. Telle est la vision qui dirigeait Mohammed et les autres Arabes vers Yathrib en 622. Et voilà pourquoi une année «1» y est décrétée.

Des documents contemporains de Mohammed indiquent qu’en 622 ce dernier disposait d’armées nombreuses, et non de quelques convertis désarmés. En cette même année, Héraclius revenait en vainqueur, et commençait la reconquête de la région. Les adeptes armés de Mohammed durent se replier pour éviter les représailles qu’Héraclius appliqua aux alliés locaux des Perses. Les troupes de Mohammed se rassemblèrent à Médine, la ville de leur chef.

L’hégire concernait non 70 convertis fuyant les Mecquois, mais plusieurs milliers de combattants évitant les armées d’Héraclius.

· Après l’hégire

Après 622, Mohammed continua à rallier les tribus arabes du nord et non celles de la région de La Mecque.

Le Pseudo-Sébéos[28], dix ans après les faits, indique que Mohammed ne parlait ni de l’ange Gabriel, ni de révélation, mais uniquement de la Tora telle que l’interprétaient les nazaréens.

En 629, les armées de Mohammed, cherchant à s’emparer de Jérusalem, furent battues à Muta, près de la pointe sud de la Mer Morte.

D’après une attestation de Jacob d’Edesse,[29] datant de 640, dix ans après les faits, (et non plus de 200 ans après, selon les attestations musulmanes), Mohammed effectuait à cette époque (630 donc) des raids dans la Palestine, et non une guerre contre les Mecquois.

En 634[30], quatre attestations différentes indiquent que Mohammed commandait en chef lors de la bataille de Gaza, où ses fidèles battirent les Byzantins. Avec Omar, les Arabes s’emparèrent de Jérusalem vers 637.

Il nous paraît incroyable aujourd’hui que des juifs et des musulmans aient pu collaborer pour rebâtir ensemble le Temple de Salomon sur l’Esplanade de Jérusalem. Pourtant, il y eut une époque, où pendant une quinzaine d’années environ, de 634 à 650, des Juifs et des Arabes collaborèrent, et construisirent ensemble un nouveau Saint des Saints du Temple de Salomon.

Pour Edouard-Marie Gallez, la séparation de ceux qui allaient devenir des musulmans d’avec les judéo-nazaréens surviendra après cette conquête de Jérusalem par Omar, et après la reconstruction d’un temple.

En effet, contrairement à l’attente judéo nazaréenne, le Messie-Jésus n’est pas redescendu du Ciel en 638. En 639 non plus. Et en 640, l’espérance de le voir redescendre du Ciel apparut clairement être une chimère. Au terme des quatre ans qui devaient le voir revenir, Jésus n’est pas revenu. C’est la crise. Les judéo-nazaréens, ou tout au moins leurs chefs devenus gênants, sont massacrés. S’impose alors la nécessité pour les Arabes de justifier leur action dans l’Orient et, selon le P. Gallez :

C’est dans ce cadre qu’apparut la nécessité d’avoir un livre propre à eux, opposable à la Bible des juifs et des chrétiens, qui consacrerait la domination arabe sur le monde… et qui contribuerait à occulter le passé judéo-nazaréen.

IV – La naissance de l’islam

Le changement de qibla

La « qibla » désigne la direction vers laquelle se fait la prière. Les adeptes de Mohammed prièrent d’abord en direction de Jérusalem, direction de la prière pour les juifs et pour les nazaréens. Ensuite ils prièrent en direction de la Mecque actuelle. L’usage initial de la direction vers Jérusalem fut expliqué par l’histoire de « Bouraq », [31] laquelle fait intervenir l’Esplanade du Temple. Or le Dôme du Rocher[32], bâti en 691 sur cette Esplanade, porte une inscription qui ne fait pas état de cette histoire.

Le changement de « qibla » s’est fait quand l’histoire « explicative » est apparue, après 691, et non du vivant de Mohammed.

Le mot musulman

Comme nous l’avons dit ci-dessus, le mot « musulman » apparaît sur le Dôme du Rocher en 691. Il n’entre dans l’usage officiel que vers 720 et est utilisé sur une monnaie en 768.

Ces signes, et quelques autres, manifestent un changement dans la religion des adeptes de Mohammed. Selon Gallez, ce changement est dû à la formation de l’islam.

Mohammed considéré comme prophète

Une pièce de monnaie frappée en 685 à Bishapur[33], représente la plus ancienne attestation disponible de Mohammed comme prophète. Pourtant le papyrus de Khirbet el Mird, vers 720, montre qu’à cette époque Mohammed n’inspirait aucun respect particulier.

Mohammed n’a été considéré comme le prophète fondateur que plus d’un siècle après sa mort.

V – La fixation des textes du Coran

Le Coran selon l’islam

D’après les théologiens musulmans, le Coran vient directement d’Allah, il n’a pas changé d’une seule lettre depuis qu’il a été mis par écrit, et sa langue est si somptueusement poétique qu’elle est inimitable par aucun humain. Mohammed l’a récité alors qu’il était analphabète. Avant que le monde ne soit créé, le Coran était déjà présent, ce que la théologie musulmane exprime en disant que le Coran est incréé.

Le Coran est en arabe depuis avant la fondation du monde parce qu’Allah parle arabe avec les anges.

Les difficultés de l’histoire califale du Coran

L’alphabet arabe ne comportait à l’époque de Mohammed que trois voyelles longues : a, i, u, et ne faisait pas la différence entre certaines consonnes. Cette écriture, nommée scriptio defectiva, est indéchiffrable, et ne peut servir que d’aide mémoire à ceux qui connaissent déjà le texte.

· La collecte des documents

C’est vers 650, que des collectes ont été faites pour constituer le Coran.

Le Coran a donc été primitivement écrit en scriptio defectiva. Vers 850, deux siècles après les collectes, des grammairiens perses qui ignoraient la culture arabe ont fait des conjectures pour passer en scriptio plena, afin de rendre le Coran compréhensible.

Cela n’a pas suffi. Il a fallu y ajouter d’autres conjectures sur le sens des passages obscurs, qui concernent environ 30% du Coran.

L’édition actuelle du Coran est celle du Caire, faite en 1926. Il a donc fallu 1 300 ans pour la mettre au point. C’est une traduction en arabe classique d’un texte qui est incompréhensible sous sa forme originale.

· Le Coran et l’araméen

À l’époque de Mohammed, l’arabe n’était pas une langue de culture, ni une langue internationale. Depuis plus de mille ans, dans tout le Proche Orient, la langue de culture était l’araméen. Les lettrés arabes, peu nombreux, parlaient en arabe et écrivaient en araméen. La situation était comparable à celle de l’Europe de la même époque, où les lettrés parlaient dans leur langue locale et écrivaient en latin.

Les difficultés du Coran s’éclairent si on cherche le sens à partir de l’araméen. Le Coran n’est pas écrit en arabe pur, mais en un arabe aussi chargé d’araméen que, par exemple, l’allemand est chargé de latin.

Les strates successives

· Des idées antérieures à l’islam sont dans le Coran.

Le manichéisme, religion née au troisième siècle, a fourni de nombreux concepts que l’on retrouve dans l’islam.

D’autres idées, la Table Gardée, le Coran incréé, Allah parlant arabe aux anges avant la fondation du monde, se trouvent dans des légendes populaires juives ou chrétiennes selon lesquelles, en particulier, Dieu parlerait aux anges dans un langage humain.

· Des textes ont été ajoutés au Coran primitif

Le plus ancien texte qui décrit la foi musulmane est le Fiqh Akbar 1, écrit vers 750, plus d’un siècle après la mort de Mohammed. Il présente les vues de l’orthodoxie islamique sur les questions qui se posaient alors en matière juridique. Il ne fait aucune allusion au Coran. Cela signifie que les 800 versets fixant des règles juridiques, qui se trouvent dans les Corans d’aujourd’hui, étaient absents des Corans de 750. [34]

Dans son livre au chapitre 4, A. de Prémare[35], après avoir signalé les enseignements qu’on peut tirer des plus anciens fragments de manuscrits coraniques actuellement connus (…), parle des divers akhbâr (recueils utilisés pour constituer le Coran) qui, à partir du VIIIe siècle, circulaient dans l’Islam et :

« … témoignent du fait que l’on avait conscience que le Coran, « Livre de Dieu », avait été, dans sa réalité observable, le résultat d’un travail effectué par des personnes dont on citait les noms, la généalogie, les activités spécifiques, les rapports qu’ils avaient entretenu avec les Califes, et, éventuellement, avec le fondateur de l’islam lui-même » (p. 61 de son livre).

Cet auteur analyse la tradition canonique, rédigée au IXe siècle par Bukharî (…), tradition devenue la base de l’enseignement officiel sur la constitution du Coran. Puis (…) il remonte en deçà du récit orthodoxe mis en place par Bukharî et aboutit à la conclusion suivante :

« L’histoire du Coran ne peut être étudiée qu’en la considérant dans un cadre spatial et temporel élargi. » (p. 97) Autrement dit, (…), l’historien est amené à considérer que non seulement la collecte, mais la rédaction même des textes coraniques ont duré jusqu’au début du VIIIe siècle, que les califes omeyyades y ont joué un rôle important et que cette activité s’est déroulée dans tous les centres importants de l’Empire, dans toutes les villes garnisons (…) où circulaient des recensions concurrentes avant que le calife Abd al-Malik et son gouverneur Hajjâj imposent un texte officiel unique aux grandes capitales de l’Empire.[36]

Bien des éléments indiquent une rédaction du Coran étalée sur deux siècles environ.

· Facilités offertes par certains versets du Coran

Les califes Omeyyades, les Abbassides et leur cour pratiquaient ce que le Coran attribue à Mohammed : l’accaparement du butin, d’innombrables concubines, des épouses impubères, et même des épouses de leurs propres fils. Il est significatif que les versets qui ordonnent à Mohammed de prendre pour lui Zaynab, l’épouse de son fils adoptif Zaïd, déclarent que Mohammed doit se saisir de cette femme afin que les générations futures sachent qu’un tel acte est permis. [37]

L’écriture du Coran sous le contrôle des califes leur offrait la possibilité d’y placer d’abord un verset déclarant que Mohammed est un modèle pour tous les temps et tous les hommes, puis des versets attribuant à Mohammed les actes qu’ils voulaient pratiquer.

En conclusion

L’abondance des résultats ne permet pas de tout dire. De plus, selon le P. Edouard-Marie Gallez, le travail scientifique sur ces questions n’est pas terminé ; il y a encore des précisions à apporter. Mais d’ores et déjà l’aspect légendaire de la Sira est nettement établi. Et les faits apportés permettent de mieux situer les lieux et de comprendre certains passages du Coran quelquefois obscurs. Le lecteur qui voudrait approfondir sa connaissance de l’Islam se référera aux ouvrages donnés dans la bibliographie,

Pour présenter son étude, E. Pertus avait été obligé de prendre comme « références historiques » les textes du Coran et de la Sira (la vie de Mohammed selon la version musulmane). Ces textes narrent, on l’a vu, des faits qui ne sont pas historiquement fondés. Certains contredisent des témoignages historiques plus fiables parce que plus proches dans le temps, voire quasi contemporains des événements rapportés.

Par conséquent, la vie de Mohammed à La Mecque, l’activité commerçante de cette ville, et même l’existence de cette ville à cette époque, ne sont pas historiquement établies.

Aucune source contemporaine n’indique la présence de Juifs (trois tribus, dit la Sira) à Médine. Le massacre d’une de ces tribus et la réduction en esclavage des deux autres n’a pas laissé de traces historiques à l’époque.

En gardant présent à l’esprit ces considérations, il sera possible de lire le livret, Connaissance élémentaire de l’Islam, pour apprendre ce que croient les musulmans tout en ayant les notions de base qui commencent à pénétrer leur esprit s’ils veulent chercher à comprendre leur croyance.

BIBLIOGRAPHIE

Anonyme. Mahomet et l’origine de l’islam : Mieux connaître Mahomet et le premier islam grâce aux méthodes historiques modernes Version 3. Knol. 2008 juil. 27. à l’adresse Internet : http://knol.google.com/k/anonyme/mahomet-et-l-origine-de-l-islam/2ixhf6fwz08az/2

Patricia Crone & Michael Cook, Hagarism. The Making of the Islamic World, Cambridge University Press, 1977.

E.-M. Gallez : Le messie et son prophète. Aux origines de l’islam, thèse de doctorat en théologie / Histoire des religions (Univ. de Strasbourg II, 2004-2005).

· Tome I Le messie et son prophète, aux origines de l’Islam, De Qumran à Muhammad. 524 pages, 35€ Éditions de Paris 2005

· Tome II Le messie et son prophète, aux origines de l’Islam, Du Muhammad des Califes au Muhammad de l’histoire. 582 pages, 39€ Éditions de Paris 2005.

E-M. Gallez, in Entretien avec Edouard-Marie Gallez sur les origines de l’Islam jeudi 23 novembre 2006, sur le site : http://www.missa.org/forum/showthread.php?668-Les-vrai-origines-de-l-islam-et-du-Coran.

Robert G. Hoyland, Seeing Islam as others saw it. A survey and evaluation of Christian, Jewish and Zoroastrian writing on early Islam, Princeton, the Darwin Press. 1998.

Maxime Lenôtre, Mohammed fondateur de l’Islam, Publications MC, B.P. 16 – 34270 – LES MATELLES. p. : 37

Maxime Lenôtre, le mystère des origines de l’Islam enfin éclairci, in AFS n° 184, p. : 3 à 20.

François Nau, Un colloque du Patriarche Jean, in Journal Asiatique, 1915.

Solange Ory, Aspect religieux des textes épigraphiques du début de l’islam, in REMMM, Aix en Provence, N° 58, Edisud, 1990.

Alfred-Louis de Prémare Aux origines du Coran, questions d’hier, approches d’aujourd’hui, Téraèdre, L’Islam en débats, 144 p. Paris, 2004

Alfred-Louis de Prémare, Les Fondations de l’islam. Entre écriture et histoire, Paris 2002, Seuil, collection L’Univers historique

[1] Il s’agit d’une thèse de doctorat en théologie / Histoire des religions (Univ. de Strasbourg II, 2004-2005). Thèse en 2 tomes. D’autres auteurs ont apporté une contribution importante, ils sont cités en notes et dans la bibliographie finale de ce texte.

[2] Cf. : Anonyme. Mahomet et l’origine de l’islam : Mieux connaître Mahomet et le premier islam grâce aux méthodes historiques modernes [Internet]. Version 3. Knol. 2008 juil. 27. Disponible à l’adresse Internet : http://knol.google. com/k/ anonyme/mahomet-et-l-origine-de-l-islam/2ixhf6fwz08az/2

[3] Mohammed est la transcription choisie par E. Pertus parce que plus proche de l’arabe. Mahomet est la forme francisée de ce nom. Nous gardons l’orthographe de Pertus.

[4] La biographie de Mohammed par Ibn Hicham date de plus de deux cents ans après les faits, et la biographie par Ibn Ishaq, qui lui a servi de matériau, a disparu. Les cinq recueils de hadiths (paroles ou actes de Mohammed) principaux ont été mis par écrit plus de deux cent cinquante ans après les faits, alors que le premier recueil de hadiths, fait en 712 sur ordre califal, a disparu.

[5] Onomastique : étude des noms propres.

[6] Toponymie : étude linguistique et historique des noms de lieux.

[7] Épigraphie : Science qui a pour objet l’étude des inscriptions.

[8] Linguistique : Science des langages humains, elle étudie en particulier les phénomènes intéressant l’évolution des langues et leurs rapports entre elles.

[9] Numismatique : étude des médailles et pièces de monnaies.

[10] Exemple : dans la Bible, l’exégèse fait apparaître deux « traditions » en ce qui concerne la Genèse : yawhiste ou élohiste suivant le nom utilisé pour désigner le Créateur. Ces deux traditions, loin de se contredire, se confortent.

[11] Comme l’explique Gallez, dans l’avant propos du Tome 2, pages 8-9, cela se retrouve dans toutes les visions idéologiques ultérieures du monde, et jusqu’à nos jours. Pour de tels idéologues, tous les moyens sont justifiés « au nom de Dieu ». Cette référence « au nom de Dieu » pouvant devenir selon le cas, au nom de la Raison, du Sens de l’Histoire, de la Race supérieure, au nom de tout ce qu’on voudra… ce qui importe c’est que le discours fonctionne, c’est-à-dire qu’il emporte l’adhésion et fasse espérer le salut.

[12] Dans l’islam, le statut du Christ, le djihad (ou jihad) c’est-à-dire la guerre sainte) et la situation des dhimmis (non musulmans sous le pouvoir des musulmans) ayant des droits restreints, sont très proches de ces idées.

[13] C’est-à-dire au VIIIe siècle.

[14] E-M. Gallez, in Entretien avec Edouard-Marie Gallez sur les origines de l’Islam jeudi 23 novembre 2006, accessible sur le site : http://www.missa.org/ forum/showthread.php?668-Les-vrai-origines-de-l-islam-et-du-Coran : « J’en profite pour dire que son rôle a dû être si important qu’il n’a pas pu être effacé, alors que tant de témoignages islamiques anciens, écrits ou non, disparaissaient, en fait tous ceux qui sont antérieurs à la biographie normative de Ibn Hichâm, composée et imposée deux siècles après la mort de Mahomet : c’est seulement par des citations que l’on connaît quelque chose des écrits antérieurs, qui furent systématiquement détruits. »

[15] Sahih al-Bokhari, Hadiths, tome 1, Révélation, n°3.

[16] Robert G. Hoyland, Seeing Islam as others saw it. A survey and evaluation of Christian, Jewish and Zoroastrian writing on early Islam, Princeton, the Darwin Press. 1998.

[17] D’après Tabari, cité par Crone Patricia & Cook Michael, Hagarism. The Making of the Islamic World, Cambridge University Press, 1977. C’est le même personnage que Umayr Ibn Sa’d al-Ansari ; tout deux étaient gouver-neurs à la fois d’Homs et de Damas, ce qui est très inhabituel, et ils l’étaient dans la même période.

[18]François Nau, Un colloque du Patriarche Jean, in Journal Asiatique, 1915.

[19] La Chahada est la formule de la profession de foi des musulmans.

[20] Solange Ory, Aspect religieux des textes épigraphiques du début de l’islam, in REMMM, Aix en Provence, N° 58, Edisud, 1990.

[21]Maxime Lenôtre, Mohammed fondateur de l’Islam, Publications MC,

B.P. 16 – 34270 – Les Matelles. p. 37.

[22] Certaines traditions califales joignent un sixième recueil à ces cinq.

[23] Cf. : Dans son étude « On the Development of hadith », Goldziher a démontré qu’un grand nombre de hadiths, acceptés même dans les recueils musulmans les plus rigoureusement critiques, étaient des faux complets de la fin du 8ème et du 9ème siècle et, en conséquence, que les chaînes de transmission (isnad) qui les étayaient étaient totalement fictives.

http://www.encyclomancie.com/index.php?&ext=page&dossier=77&inc=287

[24] Crone Patricia & Cook Michael, Hagarism. The Making of the Islamic World, Cambridge University Press, 1977.

[25] Cf. : Page 278 du volume 2 de la thèse du P. Gallez.

[26] Le maronite Théophile d’Edesse (+ 785) devient l’astronome distingué du calife al_Madhi. Il traduisit en syriaque l’Iliade et l’Odyssée.

Cf.: http://islamineurope.unblog.fr/2010/11/03/le-mythe-de-la-transmission-arabe-du-savoir-antique.

[27] Exemple le calendrier républicain à l’époque de la Révolution dite française.

[28] L’évêque Sébéos est un écrivain arménien du viie siècle qui raconte les premières invasions des Arabes en Arménie. Contemporain de la chute des Sassanides – la dynastie perse vaincue et renversée par les Arabes – il en trace le tableau comme un témoin qui a assisté à la plupart des événements qu’il relate; il les expose sans examen critique, selon l’usage des byzantins ou des annalistes arabes de son temps. Une partie des documents qui nous sont parvenus ne sont pas unanimement reconnus comme de lui. D’où : « pseudo-Sébéos ».

[29] Jacques d’Édesse, né vers 633, mort le 5 juin 708 un des plus éminents écrivains religieux de langue syriaque. Élève de Sévère Sobkhôt évêque et savant syrien (575 -… 667), il fut à la fois théologien, philosophe, géographe, naturaliste, historien, grammairien et traducteur. Il est l’auteur d’une Chronique historique qui part du règne de Constantin (mort en 337) jusqu’en 692.

[30] Ces attestations datent d’une dizaine d’années après les faits, et ne sont pas compatibles avec l’histoire musulmane traditionnelle, fondée sur des documents datant de plus de deux siècles après les faits. D’après la « Sira », en effet, Mohammed serait mort en 632.

[31] Le Bouraq ou Burak est, selon l’islam, un coursier fantastique venu du paradis, qui, après avoir transporté Mohammed de l’Arabie à Jérusalem, sur le Rocher, l’aurait mené au paradis et retour. (Ce dernier voyage est appelé « miraj » par les musulmans). Ce n’est que vers le XIIe – XIIIe siècle que les sources islamiques mentionnent le Rocher comme point de départ du « miraj ».

[32] Mosquée bâtie au centre de l’esplanade du Temple de Jérusalem. Elle comporte une coupole (le Dôme) à la base de laquelle est gravée une inscription en caractères « coufiques », écriture arabe très ancienne, avec laquelle a été calligraphié le Coran.

[33] Bishapour est une ancienne cité sassanide, à 23 km de Kazerun, dans le Fars, en Iran. La ville se trouvait sur la route reliant les villes d’Istakhr et Ctésiphon.

[34] Comme nous l’avons dit plus haut, d’après les musulmans, le Coran viendrait directement d’Allah, pas une lettre n’aurait été changée depuis.

[35] Alfred-Louis de Prémare Aux origines du Coran, questions d’hier, approches d’aujourd’hui, Tétraèdre, Paris, 2004.

[36] Alors que les musulmans modernes peuvent être liés par une position conservatrice intenable, les érudits musulmans des premières années étaient bien plus flexibles, réalisant que des parties du Coran étaient perdues, perverties, et qu’il y avait plusieurs milliers de variantes qui rendaient impossible le fait de parler du Coran unique.

[37] Sourate 33, verset 37.

Voir enfin:

Pakistan : la jeune chrétienne victime d’un coup monté ?

Le Figaro

02/09/2012

«Ils ont commis ce blasphème afin de nous provoquer encore davantage. Tout ça est arrivé parce que nous n’avons pas mis fin plus tôt à leurs activités antimusulmanes», avait déclaré récemment à l’AFP l’imam Chishti au sujet de l’affaire.

La police a arrêté samedi l’imam à l’origine de la plainte contre Rimsha, cette fillette trisomique accusée d’avoir brûlé des pages du Coran. Plusieurs témoins affirment que le religieux a ajouté ces pages lui-même.

Rebondissement de taille dans l’affaire Rimsha, l’adolescente chrétienne accusée au Pakistan de blasphème pour avoir brûlé des versets du Coran. La police a arrêté, samedi, l’imam à l’origine de la plainte la visant. Le responsable de la mosquée est soupçonné d’avoir falsifié les preuves à charge contre Rimsha. Son assistant et plusieurs témoins affirment que l’imam Hafiz Mohammed Khalid Chishti a ajouté des pages du Coran aux feuilles brûlées par Rimsha. Tout a commencé quand un voisin de Rimsha a apporté à l’imam les sacs contenant les papiers calcinés par la jeune fille. Malgré les protestations des témoins, Chishti aurait déchiré des pages du livre saint et placé les morceaux dans le sac.

L’imam, désormais également arrêté en vertu de la loi sur le blasphème, aurait expliqué à ses compagnons que c’était la seule façon d’expulser les chrétiens de Mehrabad, un quartier à la périphérie d’Islamabad. L’imam avait ensuite mobilisé ses fidèles et fait pression sur la police pour qu’elle arrête la jeune chrétienne. Les relations entre communautés se sont dégradées dans le quartier populaire. Des musulmans reprochaient aux chrétiens de jouer de la musique, qui était entendue dans le quartier au moment de la prière musulmane, et souhaitaient reprendre les terrains qu’ils occupaient. À la suite de l’interpellation de Rimsha à la mi-août, plusieurs familles chrétiennes ont fui tandis que les parents de la jeune fille ont dû être placés sous protection policière.

Des pressions politiques et policières?

L’affaire Rimsha est devenue une polémique nationale. Elle a ravivé les tensions entourant la loi sur le blasphème et mis Islamabad en mauvaise posture face à la communauté internationale. Au Pakistan, insulter le prophète Mahomet est passible de la peine de mort et brûler un verset du Coran, de la prison à vie. La législation est soutenue par les islamistes radicaux mais décriée par les libéraux. Signe du malaise, le Conseil des oulémas du Pakistan, un organisme représentant des dizaines d’associations musulmanes, a, fait inédit, réclamé une enquête «impartiale et approfondie» concernant Rimsha. L’appel des oulémas doublé de l’arrestation de l’imam Chishti semblent traduire la volonté d’apaisement des autorités.

Et pour certains, l’arrestation de Chishti ne doit rien au hasard. L’avocat du voisin ayant accusé Rimsha a dénoncé samedi d’énormes pressions policières sur les témoins et affirme que la police a fabriqué les preuves ayant servi à arrêter l’imam Chishti. L’interpellation du religieux survient alors qu’une audience sur une éventuelle libération conditionnelle de Rimsha est prévue lundi. L’âge et la responsabilité de la jeune fille sont un point crucial. Certains médias affirment qu’elle a 11 ans et est trisomique. Un hôpital a de son côté déclaré qu’elle était âgée de 14 ans mais que ses capacités mentales étaient inférieures à son âge et qu’elle était analphabète. L’âge compte car ses avocats souhaitent qu’elle soit déférée devant un tribunal pour enfant, qui inflige des peines généralement plus clémentes.

(Avec agences)


%d blogueurs aiment cette page :