Elimination du général Soleimani: Attention, une décision irresponsable peut en cacher une autre ! (Guess who just pulled another decisive blow against Iran’s rogue adventurism ?)

3 janvier, 2020

CA502K5W8AAepmb"Soleimani is my commander" says the lower graffiti on the U.S. embassy in Baghdad at the very end of 2019LONG LIVE TRUMP ! (On Tehran streets after Soleimani's elimination, Jan. 3, 2019)
Image result for damet garm poeticPersian is a beautifully lyrical and highly emotional language, one that adds a touch of poetry to everyday phrases. Discover these 18 poetic Persian phrases you'll wish English had.

3 a.m. There is a phone in the White House and it’s ringing. Who do you want answering the phone? Hillary Clinton ad (2008)
The assassination of Iran Quds Force chief Qassem Soleimani is an extremely dangerous and foolish escalation. The US bears responsibility for all consequences of its rogue adventurism.  Mohammad Javad Zarif (Iranian Foreign Minister)
Le président Trump vient de jeter un bâton de dynamite dans une poudrière, et il doit au peuple américain une explication. C’est une énorme escalade dans une région déjà dangereuse. Joe Biden
Iraqis — Iraqis — dancing in the street for freedom; thankful that General Soleimani is no more. Mike Pompeo
Qassem Soleimani was an arch terrorist with American blood on his hands. His demise should be applauded by all who seek peace and justice. Proud of President Trump for doing the strong and right thing. Nikki Haley
To Iran and its proxy militias: We will not accept the continued attacks against our personnel and forces in the region. Attacks against us will be met with responses in the time, manner and place of our choosing. We urge the Iranian regime to end malign activities. Mark Esper (US Defense Secretary)
At the direction of the President, the U.S. military has taken decisive defensive action to protect U.S. personnel abroad by killing Qasem Soleimani, the head of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps-Quds Force, a U.S.-designated Foreign Terrorist Organization. General Soleimani was actively developing plans to attack American diplomats and service members in Iraq and throughout the region. General Soleimani and his Quds Force were responsible for the deaths of hundreds of American and coalition service members and the wounding of thousands more. He had orchestrated attacks on coalition bases in Iraq over the last several months – including the attack on December 27th – culminating in the death and wounding of additional American and Iraqi personnel. General Soleimani also approved the attacks on the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad that took place this week. This strike was aimed at deterring future Iranian attack plans. The United States will continue to take all necessary action to protect our people and our interests wherever they are around the world. US state department
In March 2007, Soleimani was included on a list of Iranian individuals targeted with sanctions in United Nations Security Council Resolution 1747. On 18 May 2011, he was sanctioned again by the U.S. along with Syrian president Bashar al-Assad and other senior Syrian officials due to his alleged involvement in providing material support to the Syrian government. On 24 June 2011, the Official Journal of the European Union said the three Iranian Revolutionary Guard members now subject to sanctions had been « providing equipment and support to help the Syrian government suppress protests in Syria ». The Iranians added to the EU sanctions list were two Revolutionary Guard commanders, Soleimani, Mohammad Ali Jafari, and the Guard’s deputy commander for intelligence, Hossein Taeb. Soleimani was also sanctioned by the Swiss government in September 2011 on the same grounds cited by the European Union. In 2007, the U.S. included him in a « Designation of Iranian Entities and Individuals for Proliferation Activities and Support for Terrorism », which forbade U.S. citizens from doing business with him. The list, published in the EU’s Official Journal on 24 June 2011, also included a Syrian property firm, an investment fund and two other enterprises accused of funding the Syrian government. The list also included Mohammad Ali Jafari and Hossein Taeb. On 13 November 2018, the U.S. sanctioned an Iraqi military leader named Shibl Muhsin ‘Ubayd Al-Zaydi and others who allegedly were acting on Soleimani’s behalf in financing military actions in Syria or otherwise providing support for terrorism in the region. Wikipedia
The historic nuclear accord between a US-led group of countries and Iran was good news for a man who some consider to be the Middle East’s most effective covert operative. As a result of the deal, Qasem Suleimani, the commander of the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Qods Force and the general responsible for overseeing Iran’s network of proxy organizations, will be removed from European Union sanctions lists once the agreement is implemented, and taken off a UN sanctions list after eight or fewer years. Iran obtained some key concessions as a result of the nuclear agreement, including access to an estimated $150 billion in frozen assets; the lifting of a UN arms embargo, the eventual end to sanctions related to the country’s ballistic missile program; the ability to operate over 5,000 uranium enrichment centrifuges and to run stable elements through centrifuges at the once-clandestine and heavily guarded Fordow facility; nuclear assistance from the US and its partners; and the ability to stall inspections of sensitive sites for as long as 24 days. In light of these accomplishments, the de-listing of a general responsible for coordinating anti-US militia groups in Iraq — someone who may be responsible for the deaths of US soldiers — almost seems gratuitous. It’s unlikely that the entire deal hinged on a single Iranian officer’s ability to open bank accounts in EU states or travel within Europe. But it got into the deal anyway. So did a reprieve for Bank Saderat, which the US sanctioned in 2006 for facilitating money transfers to Iranian regime-supported terror groups like Hezbollah and Islamic Jihad. As part of the deal, Bank Saderat will leave the EU sanctions list on the same timetable as Suleimani, although it will remain under US designation. Like Suleimani’s removal, Bank Saderat’s apparent legalization in Europe suggests that for the purposes of the deal, the US and its partners lumped a broad range of restrictions under the heading of « nuclear-related » sanctions. Suleimani and Bank Saderat are still going to remain under US sanctions related to the Iranian regime’s human rights abuses and support for terrorism. US sanctions have broad extraterritorial reach, and the US Treasury Department has turned into the scourge of compliance desks at banks around the world. But that matters to a somewhat lesser degree inside of the EU, where companies have actually been exempted from complying with certain US « secondary sanctions » on Iran since the mid-1990s. (…) Some time in the next few years, Qasem Suleimani will be able to travel and do business inside the EU, while a bank that’s facilitated the funding of US-listed terror group’s will be allowed to enter the European market. As part of the nuclear deal, the US and its partners bargained away much of the international leverage against some of the more problematic sectors in the Iranian regime, including entities whose wrongdoing went well beyond the nuclear realm. The result is the almost complete reversal of the sanctions regime in Europe. Iran successfully pushed for a broad definition of « nuclear-related sanctions, » and bargained hard — and effectively — for a maximal degree of sanctions relief. And the de-listing of Bank Saderat and Qasem Suleimani, along with the late-breaking effort to classify arms trade restrictions as purely nuclear-related, demonstrates just how far the US and its partners were willing to go to close a historic nuclear deal. Armin Rosen
This was a combatant. There’s no doubt that he fit the description of ‘combatant.’ He was a uniformed member of an enemy military who was actively planning to kill Americans; American soldiers and probably, as well, American civilians. It was the right thing to do. It was legally justified, and I think we should applaud the president for his decision. We send a very powerful message to the Iranian government that we will not stand by as the American embassy is attacked — which is an act of war — and we will not stand by as plans are being made to attack and kill American soldiers. I think every president who had any degree of courage would do the same thing, and I applaud our president for doing it, and the members of the military who carried it out, risking their own lives and safety. I think this is an action that will have saved lives in the end.  The president doesn’t need congressional authorization, or any legal authorization … The president, as the commander-in-chief of the army is entitled to take preventive actions to save the lives of the American military. This is very similar to what Barack Obama did with Ben Rhodes’s authorization and approval — without Congress’s authorization — in killing Osama bin Laden. In fact, that was worse, in some ways, because that was a revenge act. There was no real threat that Osama bin Laden would carry out any future terrorist acts. Moreover, he was not a member of an official armed forces in uniform, so it’s a fortiori from what Obama did and Rhodes did that President Trump has complete legal authority in a much more compelling way to have taken the military action that was taken today. Alan Dershowitz
Trump in full fascist 101 mode-,steal and lie – untill there’s nothing left and start a war – He’s so idiotic he doesn’t know he just attacked Iran And that’s not like anywhere else. John Cusak
Dear , The USA has disrespected your country, your flag, your people. 52% of us humbly apologize. We want peace with your nation. We are being held hostage by a terrorist regime. We do not know how to escape. Please do not kill us. . Rose McGowan
On se réveille dans un monde plus dangereux (…) et l’escalade militaire est toujours dangereuse. Amélie de Montchalin (secrétaire d’État française aux Affaires européennes)
C’est d’abord l’Iranienne qui va vous répondre et celle-là ne peut que se réjouir de ce qui s’est passé. Je parle en mon nom mais je peux vous l’assurer aussi au nom de millions d’Iraniens, probablement la majorité d’entre eux : cet homme était haï, il incarnait le mal absolu ! Je suis révoltée par les commentaires que j’ai entendus venant de certains pseudo-spécialistes de l’Iran, le présentant sur une chaîne de télévision comme un individu charismatique et populaire. Il faut ne rien connaître et ne rien comprendre à ce pays pour tenir ce genre de sottises. Pour l’Iranien lambda, Soleimani était un monstre, ce qui se fait de pire dans la République islamique. (…) Soleimani en était un élément essentiel, aussi puissant que Khameini et ce n’est pas de la propagande que d’affirmer que sa mort ne choque presque personne. (…) Je ne suis pas dans le secret des généraux iraniens mais une simple observatrice informée. Le régime est aux abois depuis des mois, totalement isolé. Ils savent qu’ils n’ont pas d’avenir, la rue et le peuple n’en veulent plus, ils ne peuvent pas vraiment compter sur l’Union européenne et pas plus sur la Chine. Ils n’ont aucun avenir et c’est ce qui rend la situation particulièrement dangereuse car ils sont dans une logique suicidaire. (…) En réalité, ils ont tout perdu et ne peuvent plus sortir du pays pour s’installer à l’étranger car des mandats ont été lancés contre la plupart d’entre eux. Les sanctions ont asséché la manne des pétrodollars et c’est essentiel car il n’y avait pas d’adhésion idéologique à ce régime. (…) Donald Trump (…) a considérablement affaibli ce régime, comme jamais auparavant, et peut-être même a-t-il signé leur arrêt de mort. Nous verrons. Lors des manifestations populaires, à Téhéran et dans d’autre villes, les noms de Khameini, de Rohani, de Soleimani étaient hués. Il n’y a jamais eu de slogans anti-Trump ou contre les Etats-Unis. (…) [Mais] hélas ils n’abandonneront pas le pouvoir tranquillement, j’en suis convaincue. Mahnaz Shirali
The whole “protest” against the United States Embassy compound in Baghdad last week was almost certainly a Suleimani-staged operation to make it look as if Iraqis wanted America out when in fact it was the other way around. The protesters were paid pro-Iranian militiamen. No one in Baghdad was fooled by this. In a way, it’s what got Suleimani killed. He so wanted to cover his failures in Iraq he decided to start provoking the Americans there by shelling their forces, hoping they would overreact, kill Iraqis and turn them against the United States. Trump, rather than taking the bait, killed Suleimani instead. I have no idea whether this was wise or what will be the long-term implications. But (…) Suleimani is part of a system called the Islamic Revolution in Iran. That revolution has managed to use oil money and violence to stay in power since 1979 — and that is Iran’s tragedy, a tragedy that the death of one Iranian general will not change. Today’s Iran is the heir to a great civilization and the home of an enormously talented people and significant culture. Wherever Iranians go in the world today, they thrive as scientists, doctors, artists, writers and filmmakers — except in the Islamic Republic of Iran, whose most famous exports are suicide bombing, cyberterrorism and proxy militia leaders. The very fact that Suleimani was probably the most famous Iranian in the region speaks to the utter emptiness of this regime, and how it has wasted the lives of two generations of Iranians by looking for dignity in all the wrong places and in all the wrong ways. (…) in the coming days there will be noisy protests in Iran, the burning of American flags and much crying for the “martyr.” The morning after the morning after? There will be a thousand quiet conversations inside Iran that won’t get reported. They will be about the travesty that is their own government and how it has squandered so much of Iran’s wealth and talent on an imperial project that has made Iran hated in the Middle East. And yes, the morning after, America’s Sunni Arab allies will quietly celebrate Suleimani’s death, but we must never forget that it is the dysfunction of many of the Sunni Arab regimes — their lack of freedom, modern education and women’s empowerment — that made them so weak that Iran was able to take them over from the inside with its proxies. (…) the Middle East, particularly Iran, is becoming an environmental disaster area — running out of water, with rising desertification and overpopulation. If governments there don’t stop fighting and come together to build resilience against climate change — rather than celebrating self-promoting military frauds who conquer failed states and make them fail even more — they’re all doomed. Thomas L. Friedman
It is impossible to overstate the importance of this particular action. It is more significant than the killing of Osama bin Laden or even the death of [Islamic State leader Abu Bakr] al-Baghdadi. Suleimani was the architect and operational commander of the Iranian effort to solidify control of the so-called Shia crescent, stretching from Iran to Iraq through Syria into southern Lebanon. He is responsible for providing explosives, projectiles, and arms and other munitions that killed well over 600 American soldiers and many more of our coalition and Iraqi partners just in Iraq, as well as in many other countries such as Syria. So his death is of enormous significance. The question of course is how does Iran respond in terms of direct action by its military and Revolutionary Guard Corps forces? And how does it direct its proxies—the Iranian-supported Shia militia in Iraq and Syria and southern Lebanon, and throughout the world? (…) The reasoning seems to be to show in the most significant way possible that the U.S. is just not going to allow the continued violence—the rocketing of our bases, the killing of an American contractor, the attacks on shipping, on unarmed drones—without a very significant response. Many people had rightly questioned whether American deterrence had eroded somewhat because of the relatively insignificant responses to the earlier actions. This clearly was of vastly greater importance. Of course it also, per the Defense Department statement, was a defensive action given the reported planning and contingencies that Suleimani was going to Iraq to discuss and presumably approve. This was in response to the killing of an American contractor, the wounding of American forces, and just a sense of how this could go downhill from here if the Iranians don’t realize that this cannot continue. (…) Iran is in a very precarious economic situation, it is very fragile domestically—they’ve killed many, many hundreds if not thousands of Iranian citizens who were demonstrating on the streets of Iran in response to the dismal economic situation and the mismanagement and corruption. I just don’t see the Iranians as anywhere near as supportive of the regime at this point as they were decades ago during the Iran-Iraq War. Clearly the supreme leader has to consider that as Iran considers the potential responses to what the U.S. has done. It will be interesting now to see if there is a U.S. diplomatic initiative to reach out to Iran and to say, “Okay, the next move could be strikes against your oil infrastructure and your forces in your country—where does that end?” (…) We haven’t declared war, but we have taken a very, very significant action. (…) We’ve taken numerous actions to augment our air defenses in the region, our offensive capabilities in the region, in terms of general purpose and special operations forces and air assets. The Pentagon has considered the implications, the potential consequences and has done a great deal to mitigate the risks—although you can’t fully mitigate the potential risks.  (…) Again what was the alternative? Do it in Iran? Think of the implications of that. This is the most formidable adversary that we have faced for decades. He is a combination of CIA director, JSOC [Joint Special Operations Command] commander, and special presidential envoy for the region. This is a very significant effort to reestablish deterrence, which obviously had not been shored up by the relatively insignificant responses up until now. (…) Obviously all sides will suffer if this becomes a wider war, but Iran has to be very worried that—in the state of its economy, the significant popular unrest and demonstrations against the regime—that this is a real threat to the regime in a way that we have not seen prior to this. (…) The incentive would be to get out from under the sanctions, which are crippling. Could we get back to the Iran nuclear deal plus some additional actions that could address the shortcomings of the agreement? This is a very significant escalation, and they don’t know where this goes any more than anyone else does. Yes, they can respond and they can retaliate, and that can lead to further retaliation—and that it is clear now that the administration is willing to take very substantial action. This is a pretty clarifying moment in that regard. (…) Right now they are probably doing what anyone does in this situation: considering the menu of options. There could be actions in the gulf, in the Strait of Hormuz by proxies in the regional countries, and in other continents where the Quds Force have activities. There’s a very considerable number of potential responses by Iran, and then there’s any number of potential U.S. responses to those actions. Given the state of their economy, I think they have to be very leery, very concerned that that could actually result in the first real challenge to the regime certainly since the Iran-Iraq War. (…) The [Iraqi] prime minister has said that he would put forward legislation to [kick the U.S. military out of Iraq], although I don’t think that the majority of Iraqi leaders want to see that given that ISIS is still a significant threat. They are keenly aware that it was not the Iranian supported militias that defeated the Islamic State, it was U.S.-enabled Iraqi armed forces and special forces that really fought the decisive battles. Gen. David Petraeus
[Qasem Soleimani] was our most significant Iranian adversary during my four years in Iraq, [and] certainly when I was the Central Command commander, and very much so when I was the director of the CIA. He is unquestionably the most significant and important — or was the most significant and important — Iranian figure in the region, the most important architect of the effort by Iran to solidify control of the Shia crescent, and the operational commander of the various initiatives that were part of that effort. (…)  He sent a message to me through the president of Iraq in late March of 2008, during the battle of Basra, when we were supporting the Iraqi army forces that were battling the Shia militias in Basra that were supported, of course, by Qasem Soleimani and the Quds Force. He sent a message through the president that said, « General Petraeus, you should know that I, Qasem Soleimani, control the policy of Iran for Iraq, and also for Syria, Lebanon, Gaza and Afghanistan. » And the implication of that was, « If you want to deal with Iran to resolve this situation in Basra, you should deal with me, not with the Iranian diplomats. » And his power only grew from that point in time. By the way, I did not — I actually told the president to tell Qasem Soleimani to pound sand. (…) I suspect that the leaders in Washington were seeking to reestablish deterrence, which clearly had eroded to some degree, perhaps by the relatively insignificant actions in response to these strikes on the Abqaiq oil facility in Saudi Arabia, shipping in the Gulf and our $130 million dollar drone that was shot down. And we had seen increased numbers of attacks against US forces in Iraq. So I’m sure that there was a lot of discussion about what could show the Iranians most significantly that we are really serious, that they should not continue to escalate. Now, obviously, there is a menu of options that they have now and not just in terms of direct Iranian action against perhaps our large bases in the various Gulf states, shipping in the Gulf, but also through proxy actions — and not just in the region, but even in places such as Latin America and Africa and Europe. (…) I am not privy to the intelligence that was the foundation for the decision, which clearly was, as was announced, this was a defensive action, that Soleimani was going into the country to presumably approve further attacks. Without really being in the inner circle on that, I think it’s very difficult to either second-guess or to even think through what the recommendation might have been. Again, it is impossible to overstate the significance of this action. This is much more substantial than the killing of Osama bin Laden. It’s even more substantial than the killing of Baghdadi. (…) my understanding is that we have significantly shored up our air defenses, our air assets, our ground defenses and so forth. There’s been the movement of a lot of forces into the region in months, not just in the past days. So there’s been a very substantial augmentation of our defensive capabilities and also our offensive capabilities.  And (…) the question Iran has to ask itself is, « Where does this end? » If they now retaliate in a significant way — and considering how vulnerable their infrastructure and forces are at a time when their economy is in dismal shape because of the sanctions. So Iran is not in a position of strength, although it clearly has many, many options available to it, as I mentioned, not just with their armed forces and the Revolutionary Guards Corps, but also with these Quds Force-supported proxy elements throughout the region in the world. (…) I think one of the questions is, « What will the diplomatic ramifications of this be? » And again, there have been celebrations in some places in Iraq at the loss of Qasem Soleimani. So, again, there’s no tears being shed in certain parts of the country. And one has to ask what happens in the wake of the killing of the individual who had a veto, virtually, over the leadership of Iraq. What transpires now depends on the calculations of all these different elements. And certainly the US, I would assume, is considering diplomatic initiatives as well, reaching out and saying, « Okay. Does that send a sufficient message of our seriousness? Now, would you like to return to the table? » Or does Iran accelerate the nuclear program, which would, of course, precipitate something further from the United States? Very likely. So lots of calculations here. And I think we’re still very early in the deliberations on all the different ramifications of this very significant action. (…) I think that this particular episode has been fairly impressively handled. There’s been restraint in some of the communications methods from the White House. The Department of Defense put out, I think, a solid statement. It has taken significant actions, again, to shore up our defenses and our offensive capabilities. The question now, I think, is what is the diplomatic initiative that follows this? What will the State Department and the Secretary of State do now to try to get back to the table and reduce or end the battlefield consequences? [The flag that Donald Trump posted last night, no words] (…) I think relative to some of his tweets that was quite restrained. Gen. David Petraeus
Washington gave Israel a green light to assassinate Qassem Soleimani, the commander of the Quds Force, the overseas arm of Iran’s Revolutionary Guard, Kuwaiti newspaper Al-Jarida reported on Monday. Al-Jarida, which in recent years had broken exclusive stories from Israel, quoted a source in Jerusalem as saying that « there is an American-Israeli agreement » that Soleimani is a « threat to the two countries’ interests in the region. » It is generally assumed in the Arab world that the paper is used as an Israeli platform for conveying messages to other countries in the Middle East. (…) The agreement between Israel and the United States, according to the report, comes three years after Washington thwarted an Israeli attempt to kill the general. The report says Israel was « on the verge » of assassinating Soleimani three years ago, near Damascus, but the United States warned the Iranian leadership of the plan, revealing that Israel was closely tracking the Iranian general. Haaretz (2018)
Most revered military leader’ now joins ‘austere religious scholar’ and ‘mourners’ trying to storm our embassy as word choices that make normal people wonder whose side the American mainstream media is on. Buck Sexton
Make no mistake – this is bigger than taking out Osama Bin Laden. Ranj Alaaldin
The reported deaths of Iranian General Qassem Suleimani and the Iraqi commander of the militia that killed an American last week was a bold and decisive military action made possible by excellent intelligence and the courage of America’s service members. His death is a huge loss for Iran’s regime and its Iraqi proxies, and a major operational and psychological victory for the United States. The Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), led by Suleimani, was responsible for the deaths of more than 600 Americans in Iraq between 2003-2011, and countless more injured. He was a chief architect behind Iran’s continuing reign of terror in the region. This strike against one of the world’s most odious terrorists is no different than the mission which took out Osama bin Laden – it is, in fact, even more justifiable since he was in a foreign country directing terrorist attacks against Americans. Lt. Col. (Ret.) James Carafano (Heritage Foundation)
This is a major blow. I would argue that this is probably the most major decapitation strike the United States has ever carried out. … This is a man who controlled a transnational foreign legion that was controlling governments in numerous different countries. He had a hell of a lot of power and a hell of a lot of control. You have to be a strong leader in order to get these people to work with you, know how and when to play them off one another, and also know which Iranians do I need within the IRGC-QF, which Lebanese do I need, which Iraqis do I need … that’s not something you can just pick up at a local five and dime. It takes decades of experience. (…) It’s an incredible two-fer. This is another one of those old hands. These guys don’t grow on trees. It takes time. Iran has been at war with the United States since the Islamic Revolutionary regime took power in Tehran in 1979. To say that we are going to war or that this is yet another American escalation — I think we need to be a little more detailed. Over the past year, Kata’ib Hizballah, was launching rockets and mortars at Americans in Iraq and eventually killed one. Over the past couple of years we’ve had a number of issues in the Gulf, we’ve had a number of issues in different countries, we’ve had international terrorism issues, you name it, you can throw everything at the wall, and the Iranians have in some way been behind some of it. Even arm supplies to the Taliban … so this didn’t just appear in a vacuum because ‘we didn’t like the Iranians. What the administration must offer now is firm diplomacy backed by the continuing, credible threat of the use of military force. President Trump has wisely shown that he will act with the full powers of his office when American interests are threatened, and the extremist regime in Tehran would be wise to take notice. Phillip Smyth (Washington Institute)
From a military and diplomatic perspective, Soleimani was Iran’s David Petraeus and Stan McChrystal and Brett McGurk all rolled into one. And that’s now the problem Iran faces. I do not know of a single Iranian who was more indispensable to his government’s ambitions in the Middle East. From 2015 to 2017, when we were in the heat of the fighting against the Islamic State in both Syria and Iraq, I would watch Soleimani shuttle back and forth between Syria and Iraq. When the war to prop up Bashar al-Assad was going poorly, Soleimani would leave Iraq for Syria. And when Iranian-backed militias in Iraq began to struggle against the Islamic State, Soleimani would leave Syria for Iraq. That’s now a problem for Iran. Just as the United States often faces a shortage of human capital—not all general officers and diplomats are created equal, sadly, and we are not exactly blessed with a surplus of Arabic speakers in our government—Iran also doesn’t have a lot of talent to go around. One of the reasons I thought Iran erred so often in Yemen—giving strategic weapons such as anti-ship cruise missiles to a bunch of undertrained Houthi yahoos, for example—was a lack of adult supervision. Qassem Soleimani was the adult supervision. He was spread thin over the past decade, but he was nonetheless a serious if nefarious adversary of the United States and its partners in the region. And Iran and its partners will now feel his loss greatly. Soleimani was at least partially, and in many cases directly, responsible for dozens if not hundreds of attacks on U.S. forces in Iraq going back to the height of the Iraq War. Andrew Exum
Soleimani is responsible for the Iranian military terror reign across the Middle East. Many Arab Muslims across the region are celebrating today. Unfortunately, many US Democrats are not. Instead, they are criticizing President Trump. If the death of Soleimani leads to any escalation, it is the Islamic regime of Iran that is to blame. The same Islamic terror regime that past President Obama wanted to align as the US closest ally in the Middle East, handing them the disastrous nuclear deal, as well as billions of dollars in cash. As Iran considers the US “big satan” and Israel as “little satan”, Israel is on high alert for any Iranian attacks in retaliation. Iran has always viewed an attack on Israeli interests as an attack on the USA. Avi Abelow
The successful operation against Qassem Suleimani, head of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, is a stunning blow to international terrorism and a reassertion of American might. (…) President Trump has conditioned his policies on Iranian behavior. When Iran spread its malign influence, Trump acted to check it. When Iran struck, Trump hit back: never disproportionately, never definitively. He left open the possibility of negotiations. He doesn’t want to have the greater Middle East — whether Libya, Syria, Iraq, Iran, Yemen, or Afghanistan — dominate his presidency the way it dominated those of Barack Obama and George W. Bush. America no longer needs Middle Eastern oil. Best to keep the region on the back burner and watch it so it doesn’t boil over. Do not overcommit resources to this underdeveloped, war-torn, sectarian land. The result was reciprocal antagonism. In 2018, Trump withdrew the United States from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action negotiated by his predecessor. He began jacking up sanctions. The Iranian economy turned to a shambles. This “maximum pressure” campaign of economic warfare deprived the Iranian war machine of revenue and drove a wedge between the Iranian public and the Iranian government. Trump offered the opportunity to negotiate a new agreement. Iran refused. And began to lash out. Last June, Iran’s fingerprints were all over two oil tankers that exploded in the Persian Gulf. Trump tightened the screws. Iran downed a U.S. drone. Trump called off a military strike at the last minute and responded indirectly, with more sanctions, cyber attacks, and additional troop deployments to the region. Last September a drone fleet launched by Iranian proxies in Yemen devastated the Aramco oil facility in Abqaiq, Saudi Arabia. Trump responded as he had to previous incidents: nonviolently. Iran slowly brought the region to a boil. First it hit boats, then drones, then the key infrastructure of a critical ally. On December 27 it went further: Members of the Kataib Hezbollah militia launched rockets at a U.S. installation near Kirkuk, Iraq. Four U.S. soldiers were wounded. An American contractor was killed. Destroying physical objects merited economic sanctions and cyber intrusions. Ending lives required a lethal response. It arrived on December 29 when F-15s pounded five Kataib Hezbollah facilities across Iraq and Syria. At least 25 militiamen were killed. Then, when Kataib Hezbollah and other Iran-backed militias organized a mob to storm the U.S. embassy in Baghdad, setting fire to the grounds, America made a show of force and threatened severe reprisals. The angry crowd melted away. The risk to the U.S. embassy — and the possibility of another Benghazi — must have angered Trump. “The game has changed,” Secretary of Defense Mark Esper said hours before the assassination of Soleimani at Baghdad airport. (…) Deterrence, says Fred Kagan of the American Enterprise Institute, is credibly holding at risk something your adversary holds dear. If the reports out of Iraq are true, President Trump has put at risk the entirety of the Iranian imperial enterprise even as his maximum-pressure campaign strangles the Iranian economy and fosters domestic unrest. That will get the ayatollah’s attention. And now the United States must prepare for his answer. The bombs over Baghdad? That was Trump calling Khamenei’s bluff. The game has changed. But it isn’t over. Matthew Continetti
D’un point de vue fonctionnel, [Soleimani] était responsable de la force al-Qods des Gardiens de la Révolution, c’est-à-dire de l’ensemble des opérations menées par l’Iran dans toute la région. Cet homme avait beaucoup de secrets. Il était l’un des vecteurs, sinon le vecteur principal, du déploiement de l’influence de l’Iran. Je ne suis pas de ceux qui pensent qu’il y a une volonté expansionniste de l’Iran, mais Téhéran a développé des réseaux d’influence et c’est probablement Soleimani qui avait la haute main sur ceux-ci. Sur tous les terrains chauds de la région où l’Iran a une influence, on retrouve le général Soleimani. Il avait été localisé en Syrie ces dernières années, ce qui indique que la coordination des opérations des milices chiites dans le pays était sous sa responsabilité. Le fait qu’il ait été assassiné à Bagdad cette nuit prouve qu’il avait une importance logistique sur la coordination des milices en Irak. (…) Il ne faut pas sous-estimer l’importance de cette décision irresponsable de Donald Trump. Depuis le retrait unilatéral des Etats-Unis de l’accord sur le nucléaire, en mai 2018, les tensions avec l’Iran se sont accrues. Ce qui était très important, c’est que ces tensions étaient mesurées, sous contrôle. Elles avaient un fort impact sur la vie quotidienne des Iraniens. Pour autant, il n’y avait pas beaucoup de dérapages militaires : quelques incidents dans le golfe, le bombardement de sites pétroliers en Arabie-Saoudite. C’était un combat à fleuret moucheté. Personne ne franchissait la ligne rouge. Je crains fort qu’elle ait été franchie par cette décision, en raison de la qualité de la cible et de son importance dans le dispositif régional iranien. Les tensions s’étaient ravivées au cours des dernières heures, avec le siège de l’ambassade américaine à Bagdad, sans nul doute mené par les milices iraniennes. Il est évident que Soleimani a tenu un rôle. Cette prise d’assaut venait à la suite d’attaques ciblées des Etats-Unis. (…) Cela s’explique par le manque de sang-froid de Donald Trump. Ce matin, les démocrates s’insurgent, car cette décision a été prise sans concertation. C’est une décision à l’emporte-pièce, il a été sans doute un peu excité par les va-t-en-guerre de son camp, comme le secrétaire d’Etat Mike Pompeo, qui prône une ligne dure contre l’Iran. On y est presque. (…) Les Iraniens ne vont pas rester les deux pieds dans le même sabot. Je ne sais pas de quelles manières ils réagiront, ni où et quand. Ce ne sera sans doute pas tout de suite, mais nul doute qu’ils réagiront. Nous sommes dans une nouvelle séquence, ouverte par cet assassinat ciblé, réalisé au mépris de toutes les conventions internationales. Je ne maîtrise pas tous les paramètres, mais, à chaud, je peux imaginer qu’il y aura une recrudescence d’action militaire contre des objectifs américains, des bases militaires, des ambassades ou des intérêts sur place. Il y a également des risques pour Israël, qui sera peut-être une cible. Les milices pro-iraniennes déployées en Syrie ont une capacité de feu contre des villes israéliennes. Dans la région, il va y avoir un regain de mobilisation de toutes les forces proches de l’Iran, en Irak, au Liban et en Syrie. Je ne veux pas dire qu’il y a un risque d’embrasement général, je n’en sais rien, ce n’est pas la peine d’alimenter le fantasme. Mais la situation est infiniment préoccupante. Il y aura des conséquences, même si on ne sait pas bien les mesurer. (…) Une action sur le détroit d’Ormuz [où transitent de nombreux pétroliers] peut faire partie des mesures mises en œuvre par les Iraniens. Ils peuvent bloquer ou menacer de bloquer. Je ne pense pas qu’ils feront un blocage complet : les Iraniens font de la politique et ils savent que cela se retournerait contre eux. Mais il peut y avoir quelques arraisonnements de navires pétroliers et les cours du pétrole pourraient monter, même si cela n’avait pas été le cas après les incidents de l’été dernier dans le détroit. Didier Billion

Attention: une décision irresponsable peut en cacher une autre !

A l’heure où …

Après les attaques de pétroliers, la destruction d’installations pétrolières saoudiennes et les roquettes sur des bases américaines ayant entrainé la mort d’un citoyen américain …

Et avant sa brillante élimination par les forces américaines …

Le cerveau du dispositif terroriste des mollahs au Moyen-Orient préparait une possible deuxième attaque de l’ambassade américaine à Bagdad …

Pendant que la rue arabe comme la rue iranienne peinent à cacher leur joie …

Devinez quelle « décision irresponsable » dénoncent le parti démocrate américain, nos médias ou nos prétendus spécialistes ?

Mort du général Soleimani : « C’est une décision irresponsable de Donald Trump », estime un spécialiste de la région
Interrogé par franceinfo, Didier Billion, directeur adjoint de l’Institut de relations internationales et stratégique (Iris), spécialiste du Moyen-Orient, redoute qu’une « ligne rouge » ait été franchie.
Propos recueillis par Thomas Baïetto
France Télévisions
03/01/202

Qassem Soleimani est mort. Cet influent général iranien a été tué, vendredi 3 janvier, par une frappe américaine contre son convoi qui circulait sur l’aéroport de Bagdad (Irak). Cette élimination, ordonnée par le président américain Donald Trump, fait craindre une nouvelle escalade militaire dans la région.

Pour franceinfo, Didier Billion, directeur adjoint de l’Institut de relations internationales et stratégiques (Iris) et spécialiste du Moyen-Orient, analyse les possibles conséquences de cette mort.

Franceinfo : Pouvez-vous nous rappeler le rôle de Qassem Soleimani dans le régime iranien ?

Didier Billion : D’un point de vue fonctionnel, il était responsable de la force al-Qods des Gardiens de la Révolution, c’est-à-dire de l’ensemble des opérations menées par l’Iran dans toute la région. Cet homme avait beaucoup de secrets. Il était l’un des vecteurs, sinon le vecteur principal, du déploiement de l’influence de l’Iran. Je ne suis pas de ceux qui pensent qu’il y a une volonté expansionniste de l’Iran, mais Téhéran a développé des réseaux d’influence et c’est probablement Soleimani qui avait la haute main sur ceux-ci.

Sur tous les terrains chauds de la région où l’Iran a une influence, on retrouve le général Soleimani.Didier Billion à franceinfo

Il avait été localisé en Syrie ces dernières années, ce qui indique que la coordination des opérations des milices chiites dans le pays était sous sa responsabilité. Le fait qu’il ait été assassiné à Bagdad cette nuit prouve qu’il avait une importance logistique sur la coordination des milices en Irak.

Comment analysez-vous la décision des Etats-Unis de le tuer ?

Il ne faut pas sous-estimer l’importance de cette décision irresponsable de Donald Trump. Depuis le retrait unilatéral des Etats-Unis de l’accord sur le nucléaire, en mai 2018, les tensions avec l’Iran se sont accrues. Ce qui était très important, c’est que ces tensions étaient mesurées, sous contrôle. Elles avaient un fort impact sur la vie quotidienne des Iraniens. Pour autant, il n’y avait pas beaucoup de dérapages militaires : quelques incidents dans le golfe, le bombardement de sites pétroliers en Arabie-Saoudite. C’était un combat à fleuret moucheté. Personne ne franchissait la ligne rouge.

Je crains fort qu’elle ait été franchie par cette décision, en raison de la qualité de la cible et de son importance dans le dispositif régional iranien. Les tensions s’étaient ravivées au cours des dernières heures, avec le siège de l’ambassade américaine à Bagdad, sans nul doute mené par les milices iraniennes. Il est évident que Soleimani a tenu un rôle. Cette prise d’assaut venait à la suite d’attaques ciblées des Etats-Unis.

Tout indiquait une montée en tension, mais là, ce n’est pas seulement un mort de plus, c’est très important.Didier Billionà franceinfo

Cela s’explique par le manque de sang-froid de Donald Trump. Ce matin, les démocrates s’insurgent, car cette décision a été prise sans concertation. C’est une décision à l’emporte-pièce, il a été sans doute un peu excité par les va-t-en-guerre de son camp, comme le secrétaire d’Etat Mike Pompeo, qui prône une ligne dure contre l’Iran. On y est presque.

A quelles réactions peut-on s’attendre de la part de l’Iran ?

Les Iraniens ne vont pas rester les deux pieds dans le même sabot. Je ne sais pas de quelles manières ils réagiront, ni où et quand. Ce ne sera sans doute pas tout de suite, mais nul doute qu’ils réagiront. Nous sommes dans une nouvelle séquence, ouverte par cet assassinat ciblé, réalisé au mépris de toutes les conventions internationales. Je ne maîtrise pas tous les paramètres, mais, à chaud, je peux imaginer qu’il y aura une recrudescence d’action militaire contre des objectifs américains, des bases militaires, des ambassades ou des intérêts sur place.

Il y a également des risques pour Israël, qui sera peut-être une cible. Les milices pro-iraniennes déployées en Syrie ont une capacité de feu contre des villes israéliennes. Dans la région, il va y avoir un regain de mobilisation de toutes les forces proches de l’Iran, en Irak, au Liban et en Syrie. Je ne veux pas dire qu’il y a un risque d’embrasement général, je n’en sais rien, ce n’est pas la peine d’alimenter le fantasme. Mais la situation est infiniment préoccupante. Il y aura des conséquences, même si on ne sait pas bien les mesurer.

Peut-on s’attendre à des conséquences économiques ?

Une action sur le détroit d’Ormuz [où transitent de nombreux pétroliers] peut faire partie des mesures mises en œuvre par les Iraniens. Ils peuvent bloquer ou menacer de bloquer. Je ne pense pas qu’ils feront un blocage complet : les Iraniens font de la politique et ils savent que cela se retournerait contre eux. Mais il peut y avoir quelques arraisonnements de navires pétroliers et les cours du pétrole pourraient monter, même si cela n’avait pas été le cas après les incidents de l’été dernier dans le détroit.

Voir aussi:

Mort de Soleimani : l’Iran menace, la scène internationale s’inquiète
Le puissant général Qassem Soleimani a été tué à Bagdad. L’ambassade américaine à Bagdad a appelé ses ressortissants à quitter l’Irak « immédiatement ».
Le Point/AFP
03/01/2020

C’est certainement un moment clé du conflit qui oppose les États-Unis à l’Iran. Le puissant général Qassem Soleimani a été tué, jeudi 2 janvier, dans un raid américain à Bagdad, trois jours après une attaque inédite contre l’ambassade américaine. Le général Soleimani « n’a eu que ce qu’il méritait », a abondé le sénateur républicain Tom Cotton. Rapidement, des ténors républicains se sont félicités de ce raid ordonné par Trump. Une attaque dénoncée par ses adversaires démocrates, dont son potentiel rival à la présidentielle, Joe Biden.

Le Premier ministre israélien, Benyamin Netanyahou, a interrompu vendredi son voyage officiel en Grèce afin de rentrer en Israël, a indiqué son bureau à l’Agence France-Presse. Benyamin Netanyahou, arrivé à Athènes jeudi où il a signé un accord avec Chypre et la Grèce en faveur d’un projet de gazoduc, devait rester dans ce pays jusqu’à samedi, mais il a écourté son voyage après l’annonce du décès de Qassem Soleimani, chef des forces iraniennes al-Qods souvent accusées par Israël de préparer des attaques contre l’État hébreu.

La France a plaidé pour la « stabilité »

Le chef du mouvement chiite libanais Hezbollah, grand allié de l’Iran, a promis « le juste châtiment » aux « assassins criminels » responsables de la mort du général iranien Qassem Soleimani. « Apporter le juste châtiment aux assassins criminels […] sera la responsabilité et la tâche de tous les résistants et combattants à travers le monde », a promis dans un communiqué le chef du Hezbollah, Hassan Nasrallah, qui utilise généralement le terme de « Résistance » pour désigner son organisation et ses alliés.

De son côté, la France a plaidé pour la « stabilité » au Moyen-Orient estimant, par la voix d’Amélie de Montchalin, secrétaire d’État aux Affaires européennes, que « l’escalade militaire [était] toujours dangereuse ». « On se réveille dans un monde plus dangereux. L’escalade militaire est toujours dangereuse », a-t-elle déclaré au micro de RTL. « Quand de telles opérations ont lieu, on voit bien que l’escalade est en marche alors que nous souhaitons avant tout la stabilité et la désescalade », a-t-elle ajouté.

Le ministre britannique des Affaires étrangères, Dominic Raab, a appelé « toutes les parties à la désescalade ». « Nous avons toujours reconnu la menace agressive posée par la force iranienne Qods dirigée par Qassem Soleimani. Après sa mort, nous exhortons toutes les parties à la désescalade. Un autre conflit n’est aucunement dans notre intérêt », a déclaré le chef de la diplomatie britannique dans un communiqué.

Éviter une « escalade des tensions »

La Chine a fait part de sa « préoccupation » et a appelé au « calme ». La Chine est l’un des pays signataires de l’accord sur le nucléaire iranien, dont les États-Unis se sont retirés unilatéralement en 2018, et l’un des principaux importateurs de brut iranien. « Nous demandons instamment à toutes les parties concernées, en particulier aux États-Unis, de garder leur calme et de faire preuve de retenue afin d’éviter une nouvelle escalade des tensions », a indiqué devant la presse un porte-parole de la diplomatie chinoise, Geng Shuang.

La Russie a mis en garde contre les conséquences de l’assassinat ciblé à Bagdad du général iranien Qassem Soleimani, une frappe américaine « hasardeuse » qui va se traduire par un « accroissement des tensions dans la région ». « L’assassinat de Soleimani […] est un palier hasardeux qui va mener à l’accroissement des tensions dans la région », a déclaré le ministère russe des Affaires étrangères, cité par les agences RIA Novosti et TASS. « Soleimani servait fidèlement les intérêts de l’Iran. Nous présentons nos sincères condoléances au peuple iranien », a-t-il ajouté.

Les ressortissants américains en Irak appelés à fuir

L’assassinat ciblé du général iranien Qassem Soleimani représente « une escalade dangereuse dans la violence », a déclaré, vendredi, la présidente de la Chambre des représentants, la démocrate Nancy Pelosi. « L’Amérique et le monde ne peuvent pas se permettre une escalade des tensions qui atteigne un point de non-retour », a estimé Nancy Pelosi dans un communiqué.

Le pouvoir syrien a dénoncé la « lâche agression américaine » y voyant une « grave escalade » pour le Moyen-Orient, a rapporté l’agence officielle Sana. La Syrie est certaine que cette « lâche agression américaine […] ne fera que renforcer la détermination à suivre le modèle de ces chefs de la résistance », souligne une source du ministère des Affaires étrangères à Damas citée par Sana.

L’ambassade américaine à Bagdad a appelé ses ressortissants à quitter l’Irak « immédiatement ». La chancellerie conseille vivement aux Américains en Irak de partir « par avion tant que cela est possible », alors que le raid a eu lieu dans l’enceinte même de l’aéroport de Bagdad, « sinon vers d’autres pays par voie terrestre ». Les principaux postes-frontières de l’Irak mènent vers l’Iran et la Syrie en guerre, alors que d’autres points de passage existent vers l’Arabie saoudite et la Turquie.

« Une guerre dévastatrice en Irak »

Le Premier ministre démissionnaire irakien Adel Abdel Mahdi a estimé que le raid allait « déclencher une guerre dévastatrice en Irak ». « L’assassinat d’un commandant militaire irakien occupant un poste officiel est une agression contre l’Irak, son État, son gouvernement et son peuple », affirme Adel Abdel Mahdi dans un communiqué, alors qu’Abou Mehdi al-Mouhandis est le numéro deux du Hachd al-Chaabi, une coalition de paramilitaires pro-Iran intégrée à l’État. « Régler ses comptes contre des personnalités dirigeantes irakiennes ou d’un pays ami sur le sol irakien […] constitue une violation flagrante des conditions autorisant la présence des troupes américaines », ajoute le texte.

Le guide suprême iranien, l’ayatollah Ali Khamenei, s’est engagé vendredi à « venger » la mort du puissant général iranien Qassem Soleimani, tué plus tôt dans un raid américain à Bagdad, et a décrété un deuil national de trois jours dans son pays. « Le martyre est la récompense de son inlassable travail durant toutes ces années. […] Si Dieu le veut, son œuvre et son chemin ne s’arrêteront pas là, et une vengeance implacable attend les criminels qui ont empli leurs mains de son sang et de celui des autres martyrs », a dit l’ayatollah Khamenei sur son compte Twitter en farsi.

L’Iran promet une vengeance

L’Iran et les « nations libres de la région » se vengeront des États-Unis après la mort du puissant général iranien Qassem Soleimani, a promis le président Hassan Rohani. « Il n’y a aucun doute sur le fait que la grande nation d’Iran et les autres nations libres de la région prendront leur revanche sur l’Amérique criminelle pour cet horrible meurtre », a déclaré Hassan Rohani dans un communiqué publié sur le site du gouvernement.

Qaïs al-Khazali, un commandant de la coalition pro-iranienne en Irak, a appelé « tous les combattants » à se « tenir prêts », quelques heures après l’assassinat par les Américains du général iranien Qassem Soleimani à Bagdad. « Que tous les combattants résistants se tiennent prêts, car ce qui nous attend, c’est une conquête proche et une grande victoire », a écrit Qaïs al-Khazali, chef d’Assaïb Ahl al-Haq, l’une des plus importantes factions du Hachd al-Chaabi qui regroupe les paramilitaires pro-Iran sous la tutelle de l’État irakien, dans une lettre manuscrite dont l’Agence France-Presse a pu consulter une copie.

Les républicains serrent les rangs

« J’apprécie l’action courageuse du président Donald Trump contre l’agression iranienne », a salué sur Twitter l’influent sénateur républicain Lindsey Graham, proche allié du président peu après la confirmation par le Pentagone que le locataire de la Maison-Blanche avait donné l’ordre de tuer le général iranien Qassem Soleimani, dans un raid à Bagdad. « Au gouvernement iranien : si vous en voulez plus, vous en aurez plus », a-t-il menacé, avant d’ajouter : « Si l’agression iranienne se poursuit et que je travaillais dans une raffinerie iranienne de pétrole, je songerais à une reconversion. »

Comme cet élu de Caroline du Sud, les républicains serraient les rangs jeudi soir derrière la stratégie du président américain. « Les actions défensives que les États-Unis ont prises contre l’Iran et ses mandataires sont conformes aux avertissements clairs qu’ils ont reçus. Ils ont choisi d’ignorer ces avertissements parce qu’ils croyaient que le président des États-Unis était empêché d’agir en raison de nos divisions politiques internes. Ils ont extrêmement mal évalué », a également salué le sénateur républicain Marco Rubio.

« Un bâton de dynamite »

Dans l’autre camp, les adversaires démocrates du président qui ont approuvé le mois dernier à la Chambre basse du Congrès son renvoi en procès pour destitution ont dénoncé le bombardement et les risques d’escalade avec l’Iran. « Le président Trump vient de jeter un bâton de dynamite dans une poudrière, et il doit au peuple américain une explication », a dénoncé l’ancien vice-président Joe Biden, en lice pour la primaire démocrate en vue de l’élection présidentielle de novembre. « C’est une énorme escalade dans une région déjà dangereuse », a-t-il insisté, dans un communiqué.

« La dangereuse escalade de Trump nous amène plus près d’une autre guerre désastreuse au Moyen-Orient », a dénoncé Bernie Sanders, autre favori de la primaire démocrate. « Trump a promis de terminer les guerres sans fin, mais cette action nous met sur le chemin d’une autre », a poursuivi le sénateur indépendant.

« Un affront aux pouvoirs du Congrès »

Le chef démocrate de la commission des Affaires étrangères de la Chambre des représentants a déploré que Donald Trump n’ait pas notifié le Congrès américain du raid mené en Irak. « Mener une action de cette gravité sans impliquer le Congrès soulève de graves problèmes légaux et constitue un affront aux pouvoirs du Congrès », a écrit dans un communiqué Eliot Engel.

« D’accord, il ne fait aucun doute que Soleimani a beaucoup de sang sur les mains. Mais c’est un moment vraiment effrayant. L’Iran va réagir et probablement à différents endroits. Pensée à tout le personnel américain dans la région en ce moment », a, quant à lui, estimé Ben Rhodes, ancien proche conseiller de Barack Obama. « Un président qui a juré de tenir les États-Unis à l’écart d’une autre guerre au Moyen-Orient vient dans les faits de faire une déclaration de guerre », a réagi le président de l’organisation International Crisis Group Robert Malley.

Voir également:

Frappe américaine : « Pour l’Iranien lambda, le général Soleimani était un monstre »
Propos recueillis par Alain Léauthier
Marianne
03/01/2020

Le puissant général iranien Qassem Soleimani a été éliminé ce vendredi 3 janvier, dans un raid américain sur l’aéroport de Bagdad. Y’a-t-il un risque d’escalade et de guerre ouverte avec les Etats-Unis ? Décryptage avec Mahnaz Shirali, chercheuse iranienne à Sciences Po.

Au fou ! Quelques heures après l’élimination spectaculaire, tôt dans la matinée de ce vendredi 3 janvier, du général Qassem Soleimani, le chef des opérations extérieures (la force al-Qods) des Gardiens de la Révolution iranienne et pilier du régime des mollahs, nombre de chancelleries étrangères condamnaient à demi-mot le raid aérien ciblé ordonné par Donald Trump. « On se réveille dans un monde plus dangereux (…) et l’escalade militaire est toujours dangereuse », a ainsi benoitement déclaré Amélie de Montchalin, la secrétaire d’État française aux Affaires européennes.

En Irak même, l’ex Premier ministre Adel Abdoul Mahdi, proche de Téhéran et obligé de démissionner en décembre sous la pression de la rue, a dénoncé une « atteinte aux conditions de la présence américaine en Irak et atteinte à la souveraineté du pays », allant jusqu’à qualifier d’ « assassinat » la frappe qui a également coûté la vie à Abou Mehdi al-Mouhandis, le numéro deux du Hachd al-Chaabi, une coalition de paramilitaires pro-Iran, désormais intégrés à l’Etat irakien et très actifs dans la tentative d’assaut de l’ambassade américaine à Bagdad il y a trois jours. Dans un tweet musclé, le secrétaire d’État Mike Pompéo l’avait clairement désigné comme un des responsables des évènements ainsi que Qaïs al-Khazali, fondateur de la milice chiite Assaïb Ahl al-Haq, une des factions du Hachd al-Chaabi.

Les mollahs disposent d’une grande variété de relais pour semer le chaos dans la région

Ce dernier ne se trouvait pas dans le convoi visé par la frappe létale et a lancé un appel au djihad – « Que tous les combattants résistants se tiennent prêts car ce qui nous attend, c’est une conquête proche et une grande victoire » – relayant une déclaration tonitruante de l’ayatollah Ali Khamenei. Dans un tweet, le guide suprême iranien a promis une « vengeance implacable » aux « criminels qui ont empli leurs mains de son sang et de celui des autres martyrs », menace sur laquelle s’est aussitôt calé le président Hassan Rohani, longtemps présenté comme le chef de file des « modérés » et réformateurs.

Les dignitaires de la République islamique ne pouvaient guère faire moins à l’issue de plusieurs mois de tensions et d’accrochages indirects qui ont culminé vendredi 27 décembre avec la mort d’un sous-traitant américain lors d’une énième attaque à la roquette contre une base militaire, située cette fois à Kirkouk, dans le nord de l’Irak, en pleine zone pétrolière.

Deux jours plus tard, les avions américains avaient répliqué en bombardant des garnisons des brigades du Hezbollah, autre faction pro-iranienne à la solde de Qassem Soleimani, et c’est autour du cortège funéraire des vingt-cinq « martyrs » tombés ce jour-là qu’avait débuté l’assaut contre l’ambassade des Etats-Unis à Bagdad. En attendant les éventuelles représailles iraniennes, les Etats-Unis ont encouragé leurs ressortissants à quitter au plus vite le sol irakien, tâche qui ne sera pas forcément des plus aisées, et les forces israéliennes ont été placées en état d’alerte maximal. Si une confrontation directe semble pour l’heure exclue, du Yemen au Liban en passant par la Syrie et bien sûr l’Irak, les mollahs disposent d’une grande variété de relais pour semer le chaos dans la région, à l’image du bombardement téléguidé d’installations pétrolières dans l’est de l’Arabie saoudite en septembre dernier.

Aux Etats-Unis, à en croire les commentaires alarmistes de Nancy Pelosi, la présidente démocrate de la Chambre des représentants, et ceux d’une presse lui reprochant déjà des vacances prolongées en Floride alors qu’il met le feu aux poudres, Donald Trump aurait montré une fois de plus l’incohérence de sa politique étrangère. Traître à la cause des Kurdes un jour mais jouant les apprentis sorciers un autre. Tel n’est pourtant pas tout à fait le sentiment de la chercheuse iranienne Mahnaz Shirali, enseignante à Science-Po, dans l’entretien qu’elle nous accorde ce vendredi.


Marianne : Quelle est votre première réaction après la mort de Qassem Soleimani ?

Mahnaz Shirali : C’est d’abord l’Iranienne qui va vous répondre et celle-là ne peut que se réjouir de ce qui s’est passé. Je parle en mon nom mais je peux vous l’assurer aussi au nom de millions d’Iraniens, probablement la majorité d’entre eux : cet homme était haï, il incarnait le mal absolu ! Je suis révoltée par les commentaires que j’ai entendus venant de certains pseudo-spécialistes de l’Iran, le présentant sur une chaîne de télévision comme un individu charismatique et populaire. Il faut ne rien connaître et ne rien comprendre à ce pays pour tenir ce genre de sottises. Pour l’Iranien lambda, Soleimani était un monstre, ce qui se fait de pire dans la République islamique.

C’est un coup dur pour le régime ?

Évidemment, Soleimani en était un élément essentiel, aussi puissant que Khameini et ce n’est pas de la propagande que d’affirmer que sa mort ne choque presque personne.

A quoi peut-on s’attendre ?

Je ne suis pas dans le secret des généraux iraniens mais une simple observatrice informée. Le régime est aux abois depuis des mois, totalement isolé. Ils savent qu’ils n’ont pas d’avenir, la rue et le peuple n’en veulent plus, ils ne peuvent pas vraiment compter sur l’Union européenne et pas plus sur la Chine. Ils n’ont aucun avenir et c’est ce qui rend la situation particulièrement dangereuse car ils sont dans une logique suicidaire.

Les mollahs ont accumulé des fortunes à l’étranger. Ne voudront-ils pas préserver leurs acquis financiers ?

En réalité, ils ont tout perdu et ne peuvent plus sortir du pays pour s’installer à l’étranger car des mandats ont été lancés contre la plupart d’entre eux. Les sanctions ont asséché la manne des pétrodollars et c’est essentiel car il n’y avait pas d’adhésion idéologique à ce régime.

Est-ce à dire que ligne suivi par Trump sur la question iranienne et durement critiquée par de nombreux experts, peut se révéler positive ?

Je ne suis pas compétente pour juger de la politique de Donald Trump. Je peux juste faire quelques observations. Il a considérablement affaibli ce régime, comme jamais auparavant, et peut-être même a-t-il signé leur arrêt de mort. Nous verrons. Lors des manifestations populaires, à Téhéran et dans d’autre villes, les noms de Khameini, de Rohani, de Soleimani étaient hués. Il n’y a jamais eu de slogans anti-Trump ou contre les Etats-Unis.

Mais la situation désormais est explosive…

Probablement oui, hélas, ils n’abandonneront pas le pouvoir tranquillement, j’en suis convaincue.

Voir de même:

Soleimani : La rue iranienne félicite Trump
Iran Resist
03.01.2020

Trump dit avoir mis à mort le Vador immortel des mollahs, Qassem Soleimani. Les adversaires de Trump le blâment. La France s’est jointe à eux par l’intermédiaire de Malbrunot. Mais les Iraniens sont heureux et se félicitent de cette mort et félicitent Trump comme le montre ce slogan écrit dans un quartier chic de Téhéran : Trump Damet garm ! Trump ! Reste en forme !

PNG - 639.5 ko

© IRAN-RESIST.ORG

Par ailleurs, à Kermanshâh (Kurdistan iranien), les gens ont fait un gâteau pour une fête en honneur de l’élimination de Hadj Ghassem Soleimani. Dans une vidéo faisant part de cette initiative, un homme qui partage le gâteau fait référence à Soleimani en utilisant son sobriquet de Shash Ghassem (pisseux Ghassem) !

© IRAN-RESIST.ORG


© IRAN-RESIST. ORG

JPEG - 232.9 ko
JPEG - 36 ko

Il y a d’autres vidéos ou images du même genre.

© IRAN-RESIST.ORG


© IRAN-RESIST. RG

PNG - 430.5 ko
JPEG - 56.1 ko

© IRAN-RESIST.ORG

D’autres opposants en exil appellent aussi les ambassades du régime pour faire part de leur joie et leurs interlocuteurs ne prennent pas la peine de protester !

© IRAN-RESIST.ORG


© IRAN-RESIST. ORG

Il y a aussi des scènes de joie en Irak et en Syrie !

© IRAN-RESIST.ORG


© IRAN-RESIST.ORG

© IRAN-RESIST.ORG


© IRAN-RESIST.ORG

Contrairement aux prédictions des Malbrunot & co (voix du Quai d’Orsay), le Moyen-Orient ne va pas basculer dans le chaos pro-mollahs ! Les Français feraient mieux de changer de discours et suivre les peuples de la région au lieu de suivre leurs ennemis par aversion pour Trump ou par jalousie pour ses succès.

Trump Damet garm !

Voir de plus:

Petraeus Says Trump May Have Helped ‘Reestablish Deterrence’ by Killing Suleimani
The former U.S. commander and CIA director says Iran’s “very fragile” situation may limit its response.
Lara Seligman
Foreign policy
January 3, 2020

As a former commander of U.S. forces in Iraq and Afghanistan and a former CIA director, retired Gen. David Petraeus is keenly familiar with Qassem Suleimani, the powerful chief of Iran’s Quds Force, who was killed in a U.S. airstrike in Baghdad Friday morning.

After months of a muted U.S. response to Tehran’s repeated lashing out—the downing of a U.S. military drone, a devastating attack on Saudi oil infrastructure, and more—Suleimani’s killing was designed to send a pointed message to the regime that the United States will not tolerate continued provocation, he said.

Petraeus spoke to Foreign Policy on Friday about the implications of an action he called “more significant than the killing of Osama bin Laden.” This interview has been edited for clarity and length.

Foreign Policy: What impact will the killing of Gen. Suleimani have on regional tensions?

David Petraeus: It is impossible to overstate the importance of this particular action. It is more significant than the killing of Osama bin Laden or even the death of [Islamic State leader Abu Bakr] al-Baghdadi. Suleimani was the architect and operational commander of the Iranian effort to solidify control of the so-called Shia crescent, stretching from Iran to Iraq through Syria into southern Lebanon. He is responsible for providing explosives, projectiles, and arms and other munitions that killed well over 600 American soldiers and many more of our coalition and Iraqi partners just in Iraq, as well as in many other countries such as Syria. So his death is of enormous significance.

The question of course is how does Iran respond in terms of direct action by its military and Revolutionary Guard Corps forces? And how does it direct its proxies—the Iranian-supported Shia militia in Iraq and Syria and southern Lebanon, and throughout the world?

FP: Two previous administrations have reportedly considered this course of action and dismissed it. Why did Trump act now?

DP: The reasoning seems to be to show in the most significant way possible that the U.S. is just not going to allow the continued violence—the rocketing of our bases, the killing of an American contractor, the attacks on shipping, on unarmed drones—without a very significant response.

Many people had rightly questioned whether American deterrence had eroded somewhat because of the relatively insignificant responses to the earlier actions. This clearly was of vastly greater importance. Of course it also, per the Defense Department statement, was a defensive action given the reported planning and contingencies that Suleimani was going to Iraq to discuss and presumably approve.

This was in response to the killing of an American contractor, the wounding of American forces, and just a sense of how this could go downhill from here if the Iranians don’t realize that this cannot continue.

FP: Do you think this response was proportionate?

DP: It was a defensive response and this is, again, of enormous consequence and significance. But now the question is: How does Iran respond with its own forces and its proxies, and then what does that lead the U.S. to do?

Iran is in a very precarious economic situation, it is very fragile domestically—they’ve killed many, many hundreds if not thousands of Iranian citizens who were demonstrating on the streets of Iran in response to the dismal economic situation and the mismanagement and corruption. I just don’t see the Iranians as anywhere near as supportive of the regime at this point as they were decades ago during the Iran-Iraq War. Clearly the supreme leader has to consider that as Iran considers the potential responses to what the U.S. has done.

It will be interesting now to see if there is a U.S. diplomatic initiative to reach out to Iran and to say, “Okay, the next move could be strikes against your oil infrastructure and your forces in your country—where does that end?”

FP: Will Iran consider this an act of war?

DP: I don’t know what that means, to be truthful. They clearly recognize how very significant it was. But as to the definition—is a cyberattack an act of war? No one can ever answer that. We haven’t declared war, but we have taken a very, very significant action.

FP: How prepared is the U.S. to protect its forces in the region?

DP: We’ve taken numerous actions to augment our air defenses in the region, our offensive capabilities in the region, in terms of general purpose and special operations forces and air assets. The Pentagon has considered the implications the potential consequences and has done a great deal to mitigate the risks—although you can’t fully mitigate the potential risks.

FP: Do you think the decision to conduct this attack on Iraqi soil was overly provocative?

DP: Again what was the alternative? Do it in Iran? Think of the implications of that. This is the most formidable adversary that we have faced for decades. He is a combination of CIA director, JSOC [Joint Special Operations Command] commander, and special presidential envoy for the region. This is a very significant effort to reestablish deterrence, which obviously had not been shored up by the relatively insignificant responses up until now.

FP: What is the likelihood that there will be an all-out war?

DP: Obviously all sides will suffer if this becomes a wider war, but Iran has to be very worried that—in the state of its economy, the significant popular unrest and demonstrations against the regime—that this is a real threat to the regime in a way that we have not seen prior to this.

FP: Given the maximum pressure campaign that has crippled its economy, the designation of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps as a terrorist organization, and now this assassination, what incentive does Iran have to negotiate now?

DP: The incentive would be to get out from under the sanctions, which are crippling. Could we get back to the Iran nuclear deal plus some additional actions that could address the shortcomings of the agreement?

This is a very significant escalation, and they don’t know where this goes any more than anyone else does. Yes, they can respond and they can retaliate, and that can lead to further retaliation—and that it is clear now that the administration is willing to take very substantial action. This is a pretty clarifying moment in that regard.

FP: What will Iran do to retaliate?

DP: Right now they are probably doing what anyone does in this situation: considering the menu of options. There could be actions in the gulf, in the Strait of Hormuz by proxies in the regional countries, and in other continents where the Quds Force have activities. There’s a very considerable number of potential responses by Iran, and then there’s any number of potential U.S. responses to those actions

Given the state of their economy, I think they have to be very leery, very concerned that that could actually result in the first real challenge to the regime certainly since the Iran-Iraq War.

FP: Will the Iraqi government kick the U.S. military out of Iraq?

DP: The prime minister has said that he would put forward legislation to do that, although I don’t think that the majority of Iraqi leaders want to see that given that ISIS is still a significant threat. They are keenly aware that it was not the Iranian supported militias that defeated the Islamic State, it was U.S.-enabled Iraqi armed forces and special forces that really fought the decisive battles.

Lara Seligman is a staff writer at Foreign Policy.

Voir encore:

Gen. Petraeus on Qasem Soleimani’s killing: ‘It’s impossible to overstate the significance’
The World
January 03, 2020

The United States is sending nearly 3,000 additional troops to the Middle East from the 82nd Airborne Division as a precaution amid rising threats to American forces in the region, the Pentagon said on Friday.

Iran promised vengeance after a US airstrike in Baghdad on Friday killed Qasem Soleimani, Tehran’s most prominent military commander and the architect of its growing influence in the Middle East.

The overnight attack, authorized by US President Donald Trump, was a dramatic escalation in the « shadow war » in the Middle East between Iran and the United States and its allies, principally Israel and Saudi Arabia.

As former commander of US forces in Iraq and Afghanistan and a former CIA director, retired Gen. David Petraeus is very familiar with Soleimani. He spoke to The World’s host Marco Werman about what could happen next.

Marco Werman: How did you know Qasem Soleimani?

Gen. David Petraeus: Well, he was our most significant Iranian adversary during my four years in Iraq, [and] certainly when I was the Central Command commander, and very much so when I was the director of the CIA. He is unquestionably the most significant and important — or was the most significant and important — Iranian figure in the region, the most important architect of the effort by Iran to solidify control of the Shia crescent, and the operational commander of the various initiatives that were part of that effort.

General Petraeus, did you ever interact directly or indirectly with him?

Indirectly. He sent a message to me through the president of Iraq in late March of 2008, during the battle of Basra, when we were supporting the Iraqi army forces that were battling the Shia militias in Basra that were supported, of course, by Qasem Soleimani and the Quds Force. He sent a message through the president that said, « General Petraeus, you should know that I, Qasem Soleimani, control the policy of Iran for Iraq, and also for Syria, Lebanon, Gaza and Afghanistan. »

And the implication of that was, « If you want to deal with Iran to resolve this situation in Basra, you should deal with me, not with the Iranian diplomats. » And his power only grew from that point in time. By the way, I did not — I actually told the president to tell Qasem Soleimani to pound sand.

So why do you suppose this happened now, though?

Well, I suspect that the leaders in Washington were seeking to reestablish deterrence, which clearly had eroded to some degree, perhaps by the relatively insignificant actions in response to these strikes on the Abqaiq oil facility in Saudi Arabia, shipping in the Gulf and our $130 million dollar drone that was shot down. And we had seen increased numbers of attacks against US forces in Iraq. So I’m sure that there was a lot of discussion about what could show the Iranians most significantly that we are really serious, that they should not continue to escalate.

Now, obviously, there is a menu of options that they have now and not just in terms of direct Iranian action against perhaps our large bases in the various Gulf states, shipping in the Gulf, but also through proxy actions — and not just in the region, but even in places such as Latin America and Africa and Europe.

Would you have recommended this course of action right now?

I’d hesitate to answer that just because I am not privy to the intelligence that was the foundation for the decision, which clearly was, as was announced, this was a defensive action, that Soleimani was going into the country to presumably approve further attacks. Without really being in the inner circle on that, I think it’s very difficult to either second-guess or to even think through what the recommendation might have been.

Again, it is impossible to overstate the significance of this action. This is much more substantial than the killing of Osama bin Laden. It’s even more substantial than the killing of Baghdadi.

Final question, General Petraeus, how vulnerable are US military and civilian personnel in the Middle East right now as a result of what happened last night?

Well, my understanding is that we have significantly shored up our air defenses, our air assets, our ground defenses and so forth. There’s been the movement of a lot of forces into the region in months, not just in the past days. So there’s been a very substantial augmentation of our defensive capabilities and also our offensive capabilities.

And, you know, the question Iran has to ask itself is, « Where does this end? » If they now retaliate in a significant way — and considering how vulnerable their infrastructure and forces are at a time when their economy is in dismal shape because of the sanctions. So Iran is not in a position of strength, although it clearly has many, many options available to it, as I mentioned, not just with their armed forces and the Revolutionary Guards Corps, but also with these Quds Force-supported proxy elements throughout the region in the world.

Two short questions for what’s next, Gen. Petraeus — US remaining in Iraq, and war with Iran. What’s your best guess?

Well, I think one of the questions is, « What will the diplomatic ramifications of this be? » And again, there have been celebrations in some places in Iraq at the loss of Qasem Soleimani. So, again, there’s no tears being shed in certain parts of the country. And one has to ask what happens in the wake of the killing of the individual who had a veto, virtually, over the leadership of Iraq. What transpires now depends on the calculations of all these different elements. And certainly the US, I would assume, is considering diplomatic initiatives as well, reaching out and saying, « Okay. Does that send a sufficient message of our seriousness? Now, would you like to return to the table? » Or does Iran accelerate the nuclear program, which would, of course, precipitate something further from the United States? Very likely. So lots of calculations here. And I think we’re still very early in the deliberations on all the different ramifications of this very significant action.

Do you have confidence in this administration to kind of navigate all those calculations?

Well, I think that this particular episode has been fairly impressively handled. There’s been restraint in some of the communications methods from the White House. The Department of Defense put out, I think, a solid statement. It has taken significant actions, again, to shore up our defenses and our offensive capabilities. The question now, I think, is what is the diplomatic initiative that follows this? What will the State Department and the Secretary of State do now to try to get back to the table and reduce or end the battlefield consequences?

The flag that Donald Trump posted last night, no words. Was that restraint, do you think?

I think it was. Certainly all things are relative. And I think relative to some of his tweets that was quite restrained.

Voir enfin:

Iran’s strategic mastermind got a huge boost from the nuclear deal

The historic nuclear accord between a US-led group of countries and Iran was good news for a man who some consider to be the Middle East’s most effective covert operative.As a result of the deal, Qasem Suleimani, the commander of the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Qods Force and the general responsible for overseeing Iran’s network of proxy organizations, will be removed from European Union sanctions lists once the agreement is implemented, and taken off a UN sanctions list after eight or fewer years.

Iran obtained some key concessions as a result of the nuclear agreement, including access to an estimated $150 billion in frozen assets; the lifting of a UN arms embargo, the eventual end to sanctions related to the country’s ballistic missile program; the ability to operate over 5,000 uranium enrichment centrifuges and to run stable elements through centrifuges at the once-clandestine and heavily guarded Fordow facility; nuclear assistance from the US and its partners; and the ability to stall inspections of sensitive sites for as long as 24 days. In light of these accomplishments, the de-listing of a general responsible for coordinating anti-US militia groups in Iraq — someone who may be responsible for the deaths of US soldiers — almost seems gratuitous.

It’s unlikely that the entire deal hinged on a single Iranian officer’s ability to open bank accounts in EU states or travel within Europe. But it got into the deal anyway. So did a reprieve for Bank Saderat, which the US sanctioned in 2006 for facilitating money transfers to Iranian regime-supported terror groups like Hezbollah and Islamic Jihad. As part of the deal, Bank Saderat will leave the EU sanctions list on the same timetable as Suleimani, although it will remain under US designation.

Like Suleimani’s removal, Bank Saderat’s apparent legalization in Europe suggests that for the purposes of the deal, the US and its partners lumped a broad range of restrictions under the heading of « nuclear-related » sanctions.

Suleimani and Bank Saderat are still going to remain under US sanctions related to the Iranian regime’s human rights abuses and support for terrorism. US sanctions have broad extraterritorial reach, and the US Treasury Department has turned into the scourge of compliance desks at banks around the world. But that matters to a somewhat lesser degree inside of the EU, where companies have actually been exempted from complying with certain US « secondary sanctions » on Iran since the mid-1990s.

Any company that transacts with a US-designated individual takes on a certain degree of US legal exposure. That actually creates problem for US allies whose companies operate under less restrictive legal regimes. It’s perfectly legal under domestic law for companies in many EU countries — among the US’s closest allies — to perform transactions for certain US-listed individuals and entities. This has been the cause of some trans-Atlantic tensions in the past, with an upshot that’s of immediate relevance to the nuclear deal reached Tuesday.In 1996, the US Congress passed the Iran-Libya Sanctions Act, targeting entities in two longstanding opponents of the US. But these were countries where European companies had routinely invested. The law didn’t just sanction two unfriendly regimes — it effectively sanctioned US allies where business with both countries was legally tolerated.

The law triggered consultations between the US and the EU under the World Trade Organization’s various dispute mechanisms. Diplomatic protests forced the US and and its European allies to figure out a compromise that wouldn’t expose their companies to additional legal scrutiny or lead to an unnecessary escalation in trans-Atlantic trade barriers.

The result is that the US kept the law on the books, but scaled back their implementation in Europe. Then-President Bill Clinton « negotiated an agreement under which the United States would not impose any ISLA sanctions
on European firms – much to Congress’ dismay. »

And in November 1996, the Council of Europe adopted a resolution protecting European companies from the reach of US law. The resolution authorized « blocking recognition or enforcement of decisions or judgments giving effect to the covered laws, » effectively canceling the extraterritoriality of certain US sanctions on European soil (although legal exposure continued for European companies with enough of a US presence to put them under American jurisdiction). In past disputes, companies inside of Europe have had an EU-authorized waiver for complying with US secondary sanctions.

In a post-deal environment in which European companies are eager investors in a far less diplomatically isolated Iran, the 1996 spat could be a sign of things to come, as well as a guideline for smoothing out disputes over US sanctions enforcement in Europe.

Some time in the next few years, Qasem Suleimani will be able to travel and do business inside the EU, while a bank that’s facilitated the funding of US-listed terror group’s will be allowed to enter the European market. As part of the nuclear deal, the US and its partners bargained away much of the international leverage against some of the more problematic sectors in the Iranian regime, including entities whose wrongdoing went well beyond the nuclear realm.The result is the almost complete reversal of the sanctions regime in Europe. « If you look at the competing annexes, the European list is much more comprehensive and there are going to be significant differences between the designation lists that are maintained, » Jonathan Schanzer, vice president for research at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, told Business Insider. « The Europeans look as if they’re about to just open up entirely to Iran. »

Iran successfully pushed for a broad definition of « nuclear-related sanctions, » and bargained hard — and effectively — for a maximal degree of sanctions relief.

And the de-listing of Bank Saderat and Qasem Suleimani, along with the late-breaking effort to classify arms trade restrictions as purely nuclear-related, demonstrates just how far the US and its partners were willing to go to close a historic nuclear deal.

Voir par ailleurs:

Iran: le général Soleimani raconte sa guerre israélo-libanaise de 2006
Le Point/AFP
01/10/2019

La télévision d’Etat iranienne a diffusé mardi soir un entretien exclusif avec le général de division Ghassem Soleimani, un haut commandant des Gardiens de la Révolution, consacré à sa présence au Liban lors du conflit israélo-libanais de l’été 2006.

L’entretien est présenté comme la première interview du général Soleimani, homme de l’ombre à la tête de la force Qods, chargée des opérations extérieures –notamment en Irak et en Syrie— des Gardiens, l’armée idéologique de la République islamique.

Au cours des quelque 90 minutes d’entretien diffusées sur la première chaîne de la télévision d’Etat, le général Soleimani explique avoir passé au Liban, avec le Hezbollah chiite libanais, l’essentiel de ce conflit ayant duré 34 jours.

Le général dit être entré au pays du Cèdre au tout début de la guerre à partir de la Syrie avec Imad Moughnieh, haut commandant militaire du Hezbollah (tué en 2008) considéré par le mouvement chiite comme l’artisan de la « victoire » contre Israël lors de ce conflit ayant fait 1.200 morts côté libanais et 160 côté israélien.

Il revient sur l’élément déclencheur de la guerre: l’attaque, le 12 juillet, d’un commando du Hezbollah parvenu « à entrer en Palestine occupée (Israël, NDLR), attaquer un (blindé) sioniste et capturer deux soldats blessés ».

Mis à part une courte mission au bout « d’une semaine » pour rendre compte de la situation au guide suprême iranien, l’ayatollah Ali Khamenei, et revenir au Liban le jour-même avec un message de sa part pour Hassan Nasrallah, le chef du Hezbollah, le général dit être resté au Liban pour aider ses compagnons d’armes chiites.

Dans l’entretien, l’officier ne mentionne pas la présence d’autres Iraniens. Il livre le récit d’une expérience avant tout personnelle, au contact de Moughnieh et de M. Nasrallah.

Il raconte comment, pris sous des bombardements israéliens sur la banlieue sud de Beyrouth, bastion du Hezbollah, il évacue avec Moughniyeh le cheikh Nasrallah de la « chambre d’opérations » où il se trouve.

Selon son récit, lui et Moughniyeh font passer le chef du Hezbollah cette nuit-là d’abri en cachette avant de revenir tous deux à leur centre de commandement.

La publication de l’interview, réalisée par le bureau de l’ayatollah Khamenei, survient quelques jours après la publication, par ce même bureau, d’une photo inédite montrant Hassan Nasrallah « au-côté » de M. Khamenei et du général Soleimani et accréditant l’idée d’une rencontre récente entre les trois hommes à Téhéran.

Voir aussi:

Trump Calls the Ayatollah’s Bluff

And scores a victory against terrorism
Matthew Continetti
National review
January 3, 2020

The successful operation against Qassem Suleimani, head of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, is a stunning blow to international terrorism and a reassertion of American might. It will also test President Trump’s Iran strategy. It is now Trump, not Ayatollah Khamenei, who has ascended a rung on the ladder of escalation by killing the military architect of Iran’s Shiite empire. For years, Iran has set the rules. It was Iran that picked the time and place of confrontation. No more.

Reciprocity has been the key to understanding Donald Trump. Whether you are a media figure or a mullah, a prime minister or a pope, he will be good to you if you are good to him. Say something mean, though, or work against his interests, and he will respond in force. It won’t be pretty. It won’t be polite. There will be fallout. But you may think twice before crossing him again.

That has been the case with Iran. President Trump has conditioned his policies on Iranian behavior. When Iran spread its malign influence, Trump acted to check it. When Iran struck, Trump hit back: never disproportionately, never definitively. He left open the possibility of negotiations. He doesn’t want to have the greater Middle East — whether Libya, Syria, Iraq, Iran, Yemen, or Afghanistan — dominate his presidency the way it dominated those of Barack Obama and George W. Bush. America no longer needs Middle Eastern oil. Best to keep the region on the back burner and watch it so it doesn’t boil over. Do not overcommit resources to this underdeveloped, war-torn, sectarian land.

The result was reciprocal antagonism. In 2018, Trump withdrew the United States from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action negotiated by his predecessor. He began jacking up sanctions. The Iranian economy turned to a shambles. This “maximum pressure” campaign of economic warfare deprived the Iranian war machine of revenue and drove a wedge between the Iranian public and the Iranian government. Trump offered the opportunity to negotiate a new agreement. Iran refused.

And began to lash out. Last June, Iran’s fingerprints were all over two oil tankers that exploded in the Persian Gulf. Trump tightened the screws. Iran downed a U.S. drone. Trump called off a military strike at the last minute and responded indirectly, with more sanctions, cyber attacks, and additional troop deployments to the region. Last September a drone fleet launched by Iranian proxies in Yemen devastated the Aramco oil facility in Abqaiq, Saudi Arabia. Trump responded as he had to previous incidents: nonviolently.

Iran slowly brought the region to a boil. First it hit boats, then drones, then the key infrastructure of a critical ally. On December 27 it went further: Members of the Kataib Hezbollah militia launched rockets at a U.S. installation near Kirkuk, Iraq. Four U.S. soldiers were wounded. An American contractor was killed.

Destroying physical objects merited economic sanctions and cyber intrusions. Ending lives required a lethal response. It arrived on December 29 when F-15s pounded five Kataib Hezbollah facilities across Iraq and Syria. At least 25 militiamen were killed. Then, when Kataib Hezbollah and other Iran-backed militias organized a mob to storm the U.S. embassy in Baghdad, setting fire to the grounds, America made a show of force and threatened severe reprisals. The angry crowd melted away.

The risk to the U.S. embassy — and the possibility of another Benghazi — must have angered Trump. “The game has changed,” Secretary of Defense Mark Esper said hours before the assassination of Soleimani at Baghdad airport. Indeed it has. The decades-long gray-zone conflict between Iran and the United States manifested itself in subterfuge, terrorism, technological combat, financial chicanery, and proxy forces. Throughout it all, the two sides confronted each other directly only once: in the second half of Ronald Reagan’s presidency. That is about to change.

Deterrence, says Fred Kagan of the American Enterprise Institute, is credibly holding at risk something your adversary holds dear. If the reports out of Iraq are true, President Trump has put at risk the entirety of the Iranian imperial enterprise even as his maximum-pressure campaign strangles the Iranian economy and fosters domestic unrest. That will get the ayatollah’s attention. And now the United States must prepare for his answer.

The bombs over Baghdad? That was Trump calling Khamenei’s bluff. The game has changed. But it isn’t over.

Voir également:

The Shadow Commander
Qassem Suleimani is the Iranian operative who has been reshaping the Middle East. Now he’s directing Assad’s war in Syria.
The New Yorker
September 23, 2013

Last February, some of Iran’s most influential leaders gathered at the Amir al-Momenin Mosque, in northeast Tehran, inside a gated community reserved for officers of the Revolutionary Guard. They had come to pay their last respects to a fallen comrade. Hassan Shateri, a veteran of Iran’s covert wars throughout the Middle East and South Asia, was a senior commander in a powerful, élite branch of the Revolutionary Guard called the Quds Force. The force is the sharp instrument of Iranian foreign policy, roughly analogous to a combined C.I.A. and Special Forces; its name comes from the Persian word for Jerusalem, which its fighters have promised to liberate. Since 1979, its goal has been to subvert Iran’s enemies and extend the country’s influence across the Middle East. Shateri had spent much of his career abroad, first in Afghanistan and then in Iraq, where the Quds Force helped Shiite militias kill American soldiers.

Shateri had been killed two days before, on the road that runs between Damascus and Beirut. He had gone to Syria, along with thousands of other members of the Quds Force, to rescue the country’s besieged President, Bashar al-Assad, a crucial ally of Iran. In the past few years, Shateri had worked under an alias as the Quds Force’s chief in Lebanon; there he had helped sustain the armed group Hezbollah, which at the time of the funeral had begun to pour men into Syria to fight for the regime. The circumstances of his death were unclear: one Iranian official said that Shateri had been “directly targeted” by “the Zionist regime,” as Iranians habitually refer to Israel.

At the funeral, the mourners sobbed, and some beat their chests in the Shiite way. Shateri’s casket was wrapped in an Iranian flag, and gathered around it were the commander of the Revolutionary Guard, dressed in green fatigues; a member of the plot to murder four exiled opposition leaders in a Berlin restaurant in 1992; and the father of Imad Mughniyeh, the Hezbollah commander believed to be responsible for the bombings that killed more than two hundred and fifty Americans in Beirut in 1983. Mughniyeh was assassinated in 2008, purportedly by Israeli agents. In the ethos of the Iranian revolution, to die was to serve. Before Shateri’s funeral, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the country’s Supreme Leader, released a note of praise: “In the end, he drank the sweet syrup of martyrdom.”

Kneeling in the second row on the mosque’s carpeted floor was Major General Qassem Suleimani, the Quds Force’s leader: a small man of fifty-six, with silver hair, a close-cropped beard, and a look of intense self-containment. It was Suleimani who had sent Shateri, an old and trusted friend, to his death. As Revolutionary Guard commanders, he and Shateri belonged to a small fraternity formed during the Sacred Defense, the name given to the Iran-Iraq War, which lasted from 1980 to 1988 and left as many as a million people dead. It was a catastrophic fight, but for Iran it was the beginning of a three-decade project to build a Shiite sphere of influence, stretching across Iraq and Syria to the Mediterranean. Along with its allies in Syria and Lebanon, Iran forms an Axis of Resistance, arrayed against the region’s dominant Sunni powers and the West. In Syria, the project hung in the balance, and Suleimani was mounting a desperate fight, even if the price of victory was a sectarian conflict that engulfed the region for years.

Suleimani took command of the Quds Force fifteen years ago, and in that time he has sought to reshape the Middle East in Iran’s favor, working as a power broker and as a military force: assassinating rivals, arming allies, and, for most of a decade, directing a network of militant groups that killed hundreds of Americans in Iraq. The U.S. Department of the Treasury has sanctioned Suleimani for his role in supporting the Assad regime, and for abetting terrorism. And yet he has remained mostly invisible to the outside world, even as he runs agents and directs operations. “Suleimani is the single most powerful operative in the Middle East today,” John Maguire, a former C.I.A. officer in Iraq, told me, “and no one’s ever heard of him.”

When Suleimani appears in public—often to speak at veterans’ events or to meet with Khamenei—he carries himself inconspicuously and rarely raises his voice, exhibiting a trait that Arabs call khilib, or understated charisma. “He is so short, but he has this presence,” a former senior Iraqi official told me. “There will be ten people in a room, and when Suleimani walks in he doesn’t come and sit with you. He sits over there on the other side of room, by himself, in a very quiet way. Doesn’t speak, doesn’t comment, just sits and listens. And so of course everyone is thinking only about him.”

At the funeral, Suleimani was dressed in a black jacket and a black shirt with no tie, in the Iranian style; his long, angular face and his arched eyebrows were twisted with pain. The Quds Force had never lost such a high-ranking officer abroad. The day before the funeral, Suleimani had travelled to Shateri’s home to offer condolences to his family. He has a fierce attachment to martyred soldiers, and often visits their families; in a recent interview with Iranian media, he said, “When I see the children of the martyrs, I want to smell their scent, and I lose myself.” As the funeral continued, he and the other mourners bent forward to pray, pressing their foreheads to the carpet. “One of the rarest people, who brought the revolution and the whole world to you, is gone,” Alireza Panahian, the imam, told the mourners. Suleimani cradled his head in his palm and began to weep.

The early months of 2013, around the time of Shateri’s death, marked a low point for the Iranian intervention in Syria. Assad was steadily losing ground to the rebels, who are dominated by Sunnis, Iran’s rivals. If Assad fell, the Iranian regime would lose its link to Hezbollah, its forward base against Israel. In a speech, one Iranian cleric said, “If we lose Syria, we cannot keep Tehran.”

Although the Iranians were severely strained by American sanctions, imposed to stop the regime from developing a nuclear weapon, they were unstinting in their efforts to save Assad. Among other things, they extended a seven-billion-dollar loan to shore up the Syrian economy. “I don’t think the Iranians are calculating this in terms of dollars,” a Middle Eastern security official told me. “They regard the loss of Assad as an existential threat.” For Suleimani, saving Assad seemed a matter of pride, especially if it meant distinguishing himself from the Americans. “Suleimani told us the Iranians would do whatever was necessary,” a former Iraqi leader told me. “He said, ‘We’re not like the Americans. We don’t abandon our friends.’ ”

Last year, Suleimani asked Kurdish leaders in Iraq to allow him to open a supply route across northern Iraq and into Syria. For years, he had bullied and bribed the Kurds into coöperating with his plans, but this time they rebuffed him. Worse, Assad’s soldiers wouldn’t fight—or, when they did, they mostly butchered civilians, driving the populace to the rebels. “The Syrian Army is useless!” Suleimani told an Iraqi politician. He longed for the Basij, the Iranian militia whose fighters crushed the popular uprisings against the regime in 2009. “Give me one brigade of the Basij, and I could conquer the whole country,” he said. In August, 2012, anti-Assad rebels captured forty-eight Iranians inside Syria. Iranian leaders protested that they were pilgrims, come to pray at a holy Shiite shrine, but the rebels, as well as Western intelligence agencies, said that they were members of the Quds Force. In any case, they were valuable enough so that Assad agreed to release more than two thousand captured rebels to have them freed. And then Shateri was killed.

Finally, Suleimani began flying into Damascus frequently so that he could assume personal control of the Iranian intervention. “He’s running the war himself,” an American defense official told me. In Damascus, he is said to work out of a heavily fortified command post in a nondescript building, where he has installed a multinational array of officers: the heads of the Syrian military, a Hezbollah commander, and a coördinator of Iraqi Shiite militias, which Suleimani mobilized and brought to the fight. If Suleimani couldn’t have the Basij, he settled for the next best thing: Brigadier General Hossein Hamedani, the Basij’s former deputy commander. Hamedani, another comrade from the Iran-Iraq War, was experienced in running the kind of irregular militias that the Iranians were assembling, in order to keep on fighting if Assad fell.

Late last year, Western officials began to notice a sharp increase in Iranian supply flights into the Damascus airport. Instead of a handful a week, planes were coming every day, carrying weapons and ammunition—“tons of it,” the Middle Eastern security official told me—along with officers from the Quds Force. According to American officials, the officers coördinated attacks, trained militias, and set up an elaborate system to monitor rebel communications. They also forced the various branches of Assad’s security services—designed to spy on one another—to work together. The Middle Eastern security official said that the number of Quds Force operatives, along with the Iraqi Shiite militiamen they brought with them, reached into the thousands. “They’re spread out across the entire country,” he told me.

A turning point came in April, after rebels captured the Syrian town of Qusayr, near the Lebanese border. To retake the town, Suleimani called on Hassan Nasrallah, Hezbollah’s leader, to send in more than two thousand fighters. It wasn’t a difficult sell. Qusayr sits at the entrance to the Bekaa Valley, the main conduit for missiles and other matériel to Hezbollah; if it was closed, Hezbollah would find it difficult to survive. Suleimani and Nasrallah are old friends, having coöperated for years in Lebanon and in the many places around the world where Hezbollah operatives have performed terrorist missions at the Iranians’ behest. According to Will Fulton, an Iran expert at the American Enterprise Institute, Hezbollah fighters encircled Qusayr, cutting off the roads, then moved in. Dozens of them were killed, as were at least eight Iranian officers. On June 5th, the town fell. “The whole operation was orchestrated by Suleimani,” Maguire, who is still active in the region, said. “It was a great victory for him.”

Despite all of Suleimani’s rough work, his image among Iran’s faithful is that of an irreproachable war hero—a decorated veteran of the Iran-Iraq War, in which he became a division commander while still in his twenties. In public, he is almost theatrically modest. During a recent appearance, he described himself as “the smallest soldier,” and, according to the Iranian press, rebuffed members of the audience who tried to kiss his hand. His power comes mostly from his close relationship with Khamenei, who provides the guiding vision for Iranian society. The Supreme Leader, who usually reserves his highest praise for fallen soldiers, has referred to Suleimani as “a living martyr of the revolution.” Suleimani is a hard-line supporter of Iran’s authoritarian system. In July, 1999, at the height of student protests, he signed, with other Revolutionary Guard commanders, a letter warning the reformist President Mohammad Khatami that if he didn’t put down the revolt the military would—perhaps deposing Khatami in the process. “Our patience has run out,” the generals wrote. The police crushed the demonstrators, as they did again, a decade later.

Iran’s government is intensely fractious, and there are many figures around Khamenei who help shape foreign policy, including Revolutionary Guard commanders, senior clerics, and Foreign Ministry officials. But Suleimani has been given a remarkably free hand in implementing Khamenei’s vision. “He has ties to every corner of the system,” Meir Dagan, the former head of Mossad, told me. “He is what I call politically clever. He has a relationship with everyone.” Officials describe him as a believer in Islam and in the revolution; while many senior figures in the Revolutionary Guard have grown wealthy through the Guard’s control over key Iranian industries, Suleimani has been endowed with a personal fortune by the Supreme Leader. “He’s well taken care of,” Maguire said.

Suleimani lives in Tehran, and appears to lead the home life of a bureaucrat in middle age. “He gets up at four every morning, and he’s in bed by nine-thirty every night,” the Iraqi politician, who has known him for many years, told me, shaking his head in disbelief. Suleimani has a bad prostate and recurring back pain. He’s “respectful of his wife,” the Middle Eastern security official told me, sometimes taking her along on trips. He has three sons and two daughters, and is evidently a strict but loving father. He is said to be especially worried about his daughter Nargis, who lives in Malaysia. “She is deviating from the ways of Islam,” the Middle Eastern official said.

Maguire told me, “Suleimani is a far more polished guy than most. He can move in political circles, but he’s also got the substance to be intimidating.” Although he is widely read, his aesthetic tastes appear to be strictly traditional. “I don’t think he’d listen to classical music,” the Middle Eastern official told me. “The European thing—I don’t think that’s his vibe, basically.” Suleimani has little formal education, but, the former senior Iraqi official told me, “he is a very shrewd, frighteningly intelligent strategist.” His tools include payoffs for politicians across the Middle East, intimidation when it is needed, and murder as a last resort. Over the years, the Quds Force has built an international network of assets, some of them drawn from the Iranian diaspora, who can be called on to support missions. “They’re everywhere,” a second Middle Eastern security official said. In 2010, according to Western officials, the Quds Force and Hezbollah launched a new campaign against American and Israeli targets—in apparent retaliation for the covert effort to slow down the Iranian nuclear program, which has included cyber attacks and assassinations of Iranian nuclear scientists.

Since then, Suleimani has orchestrated attacks in places as far flung as Thailand, New Delhi, Lagos, and Nairobi—at least thirty attempts in the past two years alone. The most notorious was a scheme, in 2011, to hire a Mexican drug cartel to blow up the Saudi Ambassador to the United States as he sat down to eat at a restaurant a few miles from the White House. The cartel member approached by Suleimani’s agent turned out to be an informant for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. (The Quds Force appears to be more effective close to home, and a number of the remote plans have gone awry.) Still, after the plot collapsed, two former American officials told a congressional committee that Suleimani should be assassinated. “Suleimani travels a lot,” one said. “He is all over the place. Go get him. Either try to capture him or kill him.” In Iran, more than two hundred dignitaries signed an outraged letter in his defense; a social-media campaign proclaimed, “We are all Qassem Suleimani.”

Several Middle Eastern officials, some of whom I have known for a decade, stopped talking the moment I brought up Suleimani. “We don’t want to have any part of this,” a Kurdish official in Iraq said. Among spies in the West, he appears to exist in a special category, an enemy both hated and admired: a Middle Eastern equivalent of Karla, the elusive Soviet master spy in John le Carré’s novels. When I called Dagan, the former Mossad chief, and mentioned Suleimani’s name, there was a long pause on the line. “Ah,” he said, in a tone of weary irony, “a very good friend.”

In March, 2009, on the eve of the Iranian New Year, Suleimani led a group of Iran-Iraq War veterans to the Paa-Alam Heights, a barren, rocky promontory on the Iraqi border. In 1986, Paa-Alam was the scene of one of the terrible battles over the Faw Peninsula, where tens of thousands of men died while hardly advancing a step. A video recording from the visit shows Suleimani standing on a mountaintop, recounting the battle to his old comrades. In a gentle voice, he speaks over a soundtrack of music and prayers.

“This is the Dasht-e-Abbas Road,” Suleimani says, pointing into the valley below. “This area stood between us and the enemy.” Later, Suleimani and the group stand on the banks of a creek, where he reads aloud the names of fallen Iranian soldiers, his voice trembling with emotion. During a break, he speaks with an interviewer, and describes the fighting in near-mystical terms. “The battlefield is mankind’s lost paradise—the paradise in which morality and human conduct are at their highest,” he says. “One type of paradise that men imagine is about streams, beautiful maidens, and lush landscape. But there is another kind of paradise—the battlefield.”

Suleimani was born in Rabor, an impoverished mountain village in eastern Iran. When he was a boy, his father, like many other farmers, took out an agricultural loan from the government of the Shah. He owed nine hundred toman—about a hundred dollars at the time—and couldn’t pay it back. In a brief memoir, Suleimani wrote of leaving home with a young relative named Ahmad Suleimani, who was in a similar situation. “At night, we couldn’t fall asleep with the sadness of thinking that government agents were coming to arrest our fathers,” he wrote. Together, they travelled to Kerman, the nearest city, to try to clear their family’s debt. The place was unwelcoming. “We were only thirteen, and our bodies were so tiny, wherever we went, they wouldn’t hire us,” he wrote. “Until one day, when we were hired as laborers at a school construction site on Khajoo Street, which was where the city ended. They paid us two toman per day.” After eight months, they had saved enough money to bring home, but the winter snow was too deep. They were told to seek out a local driver named Pahlavan—“Champion”—who was a “strong man who could lift up a cow or a donkey with his teeth.” During the drive, whenever the car got stuck, “he would lift up the Jeep and put it aside!” In Suleimani’s telling, Pahlavan is an ardent detractor of the Shah. He says of the two boys, “This is the time for them to rest and play, not work as a laborer in a strange city. I spit on the life they have made for us!” They arrived home, Suleimani writes, “just as the lights were coming on in the village homes. When the news travelled in our village, there was pandemonium.”

As a young man, Suleimani gave few signs of greater ambition. According to Ali Alfoneh, an Iran expert at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, he had only a high-school education, and worked for Kerman’s municipal water department. But it was a revolutionary time, and the country’s gathering unrest was making itself felt. Away from work, Suleimani spent hours lifting weights in local gyms, which, like many in the Middle East, offered physical training and inspiration for the warrior spirit. During Ramadan, he attended sermons by a travelling preacher named Hojjat Kamyab—a protégé of Khamenei’s—and it was there that he became inspired by the possibility of Islamic revolution.

In 1979, when Suleimani was twenty-two, the Shah fell to a popular uprising led by Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini in the name of Islam. Swept up in the fervor, Suleimani joined the Revolutionary Guard, a force established by Iran’s new clerical leadership to prevent the military from mounting a coup. Though he received little training—perhaps only a forty-five-day course—he advanced rapidly. As a young guardsman, Suleimani was dispatched to northwestern Iran, where he helped crush an uprising by ethnic Kurds.

When the revolution was eighteen months old, Saddam Hussein sent the Iraqi Army sweeping across the border, hoping to take advantage of the internal chaos. Instead, the invasion solidified Khomeini’s leadership and unified the country in resistance, starting a brutal, entrenched war. Suleimani was sent to the front with a simple task, to supply water to the soldiers there, and he never left. “I entered the war on a fifteen-day mission, and ended up staying until the end,” he has said. A photograph from that time shows the young Suleimani dressed in green fatigues, with no insignia of rank, his black eyes focussed on a far horizon. “We were all young and wanted to serve the revolution,” he told an interviewer in 2005.

Suleimani earned a reputation for bravery and élan, especially as a result of reconnaissance missions he undertook behind Iraqi lines. He returned from several missions bearing a goat, which his soldiers slaughtered and grilled. “Even the Iraqis, our enemy, admired him for this,” a former Revolutionary Guard officer who defected to the United States told me. On Iraqi radio, Suleimani became known as “the goat thief.” In recognition of his effectiveness, Alfoneh said, he was put in charge of a brigade from Kerman, with men from the gyms where he lifted weights.

The Iranian Army was badly overmatched, and its commanders resorted to crude and costly tactics. In “human wave” assaults, they sent thousands of young men directly into the Iraqi lines, often to clear minefields, and soldiers died at a precipitous rate. Suleimani seemed distressed by the loss of life. Before sending his men into battle, he would embrace each one and bid him goodbye; in speeches, he praised martyred soldiers and begged their forgiveness for not being martyred himself. When Suleimani’s superiors announced plans to attack the Faw Peninsula, he dismissed them as wasteful and foolhardy. The former Revolutionary Guard officer recalled seeing Suleimani in 1985, after a battle in which his brigade had suffered many dead and wounded. He was sitting alone in a corner of a tent. “He was very silent, thinking about the people he’d lost,” the officer said.

Ahmad, the young relative who travelled with Suleimani to Kerman, was killed in 1984. On at least one occasion, Suleimani himself was wounded. Still, he didn’t lose enthusiasm for his work. In the nineteen-eighties, Reuel Marc Gerecht was a young C.I.A. officer posted to Istanbul, where he recruited from the thousands of Iranian soldiers who went there to recuperate. “You’d get a whole variety of guardsmen,” Gerecht, who has written extensively on Iran, told me. “You’d get clerics, you’d get people who came to breathe and whore and drink.” Gerecht divided the veterans into two groups. “There were the broken and the burned out, the hollow-eyed—the guys who had been destroyed,” he said. “And then there were the bright-eyed guys who just couldn’t wait to get back to the front. I’d put Suleimani in the latter category.”

Ryan Crocker, the American Ambassador to Iraq from 2007 to 2009, got a similar feeling. During the Iraq War, Crocker sometimes dealt with Suleimani indirectly, through Iraqi leaders who shuttled in and out of Tehran. Once, he asked one of the Iraqis if Suleimani was especially religious. The answer was “Not really,” Crocker told me. “He attends mosque periodically. Religion doesn’t drive him. Nationalism drives him, and the love of the fight.”

Iran’s leaders took two lessons from the Iran-Iraq War. The first was that Iran was surrounded by enemies, near and far. To the regime, the invasion was not so much an Iraqi plot as a Western one. American officials were aware of Saddam’s preparations to invade Iran in 1980, and they later provided him with targeting information used in chemical-weapons attacks; the weapons themselves were built with the help of Western European firms. The memory of these attacks is an especially bitter one. “Do you know how many people are still suffering from the effects of chemical weapons?” Mehdi Khalaji, a fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, said. “Thousands of former soldiers. They believe these were Western weapons given to Saddam.” In 1987, during a battle with the Iraqi Army, a division under Suleimani’s command was attacked by artillery shells containing chemical weapons. More than a hundred of his men suffered the effects.

The other lesson drawn from the Iran-Iraq War was the futility of fighting a head-to-head confrontation. In 1982, after the Iranians expelled the Iraqi forces, Khomeini ordered his men to keep going, to “liberate” Iraq and push on to Jerusalem. Six years and hundreds of thousands of lives later, he agreed to a ceasefire. According to Alfoneh, many of the generals of Suleimani’s generation believe they could have succeeded had the clerics not flinched. “Many of them feel like they were stabbed in the back,” he said. “They have nurtured this myth for nearly thirty years.” But Iran’s leaders did not want another bloodbath. Instead, they had to build the capacity to wage asymmetrical warfare—attacking stronger powers indirectly, outside of Iran.

The Quds Force was an ideal tool. Khomeini had created the prototype for the force in 1979, with the goal of protecting Iran and exporting the Islamic Revolution. The first big opportunity came in Lebanon, where Revolutionary Guard officers were dispatched in 1982 to help organize Shiite militias in the many-sided Lebanese civil war. Those efforts resulted in the creation of Hezbollah, which developed under Iranian guidance. Hezbollah’s military commander, the brilliant and murderous Imad Mughniyeh, helped form what became known as the Special Security Apparatus, a wing of Hezbollah that works closely with the Quds Force. With assistance from Iran, Hezbollah helped orchestrate attacks on the American Embassy and on French and American military barracks. “In the early days, when Hezbollah was totally dependent on Iranian help, Mughniyeh and others were basically willing Iranian assets,” David Crist, a historian for the U.S. military and the author of “The Twilight War,” says.

For all of the Iranian regime’s aggressiveness, some of its religious zeal seemed to burn out. In 1989, Khomeini stopped urging Iranians to spread the revolution, and called instead for expediency to preserve its gains. Persian self-interest was the order of the day, even if it was indistinguishable from revolutionary fervor. In those years, Suleimani worked along Iran’s eastern frontier, aiding Afghan rebels who were holding out against the Taliban. The Iranian regime regarded the Taliban with intense hostility, in large part because of their persecution of Afghanistan’s minority Shiite population. (At one point, the two countries nearly went to war; Iran mobilized a quarter of a million troops, and its leaders denounced the Taliban as an affront to Islam.) In an area that breeds corruption, Suleimani made a name for himself battling opium smugglers along the Afghan border.

In 1998, Suleimani was named the head of the Quds Force, taking over an agency that had already built a lethal résumé: American and Argentine officials believe that the Iranian regime helped Hezbollah orchestrate the bombing of the Israeli Embassy in Buenos Aires in 1992, which killed twenty-nine people, and the attack on the Jewish center in the same city two years later, which killed eighty-five. Suleimani has built the Quds Force into an organization with extraordinary reach, with branches focussed on intelligence, finance, politics, sabotage, and special operations. With a base in the former U.S. Embassy compound in Tehran, the force has between ten thousand and twenty thousand members, divided between combatants and those who train and oversee foreign assets. Its members are picked for their skill and their allegiance to the doctrine of the Islamic Revolution (as well as, in some cases, their family connections). According to the Israeli newspaper Israel Hayom, fighters are recruited throughout the region, trained in Shiraz and Tehran, indoctrinated at the Jerusalem Operation College, in Qom, and then “sent on months-long missions to Afghanistan and Iraq to gain experience in field operational work. They usually travel under the guise of Iranian construction workers.”

After taking command, Suleimani strengthened relationships in Lebanon, with Mughniyeh and with Hassan Nasrallah, Hezbollah’s chief. By then, the Israeli military had occupied southern Lebanon for sixteen years, and Hezbollah was eager to take control of the country, so Suleimani sent in Quds Force operatives to help. “They had a huge presence—training, advising, planning,” Crocker said. In 2000, the Israelis withdrew, exhausted by relentless Hezbollah attacks. It was a signal victory for the Shiites, and, Crocker said, “another example of how countries like Syria and Iran can play a long game, knowing that we can’t.”

Since then, the regime has given aid to a variety of militant Islamist groups opposed to America’s allies in the region, such as Saudi Arabia and Bahrain. The help has gone not only to Shiites but also to Sunni groups like Hamas—helping to form an archipelago of alliances that stretches from Baghdad to Beirut. “No one in Tehran started out with a master plan to build the Axis of Resistance, but opportunities presented themselves,” a Western diplomat in Baghdad told me. “In each case, Suleimani was smarter, faster, and better resourced than anyone else in the region. By grasping at opportunities as they came, he built the thing, slowly but surely.”

In the chaotic days after the attacks of September 11th, Ryan Crocker, then a senior State Department official, flew discreetly to Geneva to meet a group of Iranian diplomats. “I’d fly out on a Friday and then back on Sunday, so nobody in the office knew where I’d been,” Crocker told me. “We’d stay up all night in those meetings.” It seemed clear to Crocker that the Iranians were answering to Suleimani, whom they referred to as “Haji Qassem,” and that they were eager to help the United States destroy their mutual enemy, the Taliban. Although the United States and Iran broke off diplomatic relations in 1980, after American diplomats in Tehran were taken hostage, Crocker wasn’t surprised to find that Suleimani was flexible. “You don’t live through eight years of brutal war without being pretty pragmatic,” he said. Sometimes Suleimani passed messages to Crocker, but he avoided putting anything in writing. “Haji Qassem’s way too smart for that,” Crocker said. “He’s not going to leave paper trails for the Americans.”

Before the bombing began, Crocker sensed that the Iranians were growing impatient with the Bush Administration, thinking that it was taking too long to attack the Taliban. At a meeting in early October, 2001, the lead Iranian negotiator stood up and slammed a sheaf of papers on the table. “If you guys don’t stop building these fairy-tale governments in the sky, and actually start doing some shooting on the ground, none of this is ever going to happen!” he shouted. “When you’re ready to talk about serious fighting, you know where to find me.” He stomped out of the room. “It was a great moment,” Crocker said.

The coöperation between the two countries lasted through the initial phase of the war. At one point, the lead negotiator handed Crocker a map detailing the disposition of Taliban forces. “Here’s our advice: hit them here first, and then hit them over here. And here’s the logic.” Stunned, Crocker asked, “Can I take notes?” The negotiator replied, “You can keep the map.” The flow of information went both ways. On one occasion, Crocker said, he gave his counterparts the location of an Al Qaeda facilitator living in the eastern city of Mashhad. The Iranians detained him and brought him to Afghanistan’s new leaders, who, Crocker believes, turned him over to the U.S. The negotiator told Crocker, “Haji Qassem is very pleased with our coöperation.”

The good will didn’t last. In January, 2002, Crocker, who was by then the deputy chief of the American Embassy in Kabul, was awakened one night by aides, who told him that President George W. Bush, in his State of the Union Address, had named Iran as part of an “Axis of Evil.” Like many senior diplomats, Crocker was caught off guard. He saw the negotiator the next day at the U.N. compound in Kabul, and he was furious. “You completely damaged me,” Crocker recalled him saying. “Suleimani is in a tearing rage. He feels compromised.” The negotiator told Crocker that, at great political risk, Suleimani had been contemplating a complete reëvaluation of the United States, saying, “Maybe it’s time to rethink our relationship with the Americans.” The Axis of Evil speech brought the meetings to an end. Reformers inside the government, who had advocated a rapprochement with the United States, were put on the defensive. Recalling that time, Crocker shook his head. “We were just that close,” he said. “One word in one speech changed history.”

Before the meetings fell apart, Crocker talked with the lead negotiator about the possibility of war in Iraq. “Look,” Crocker said, “I don’t know what’s going to happen, but I do have some responsibility for Iraq—it’s my portfolio—and I can read the signs, and I think we’re going to go in.” He saw an enormous opportunity. The Iranians despised Saddam, and Crocker figured that they would be willing to work with the U.S. “I was not a fan of the invasion,” he told me. “But I was thinking, If we’re going to do it, let’s see if we can flip an enemy into a friend—at least tactically for this, and then let’s see where we can take it.” The negotiator indicated that the Iranians were willing to talk, and that Iraq, like Afghanistan, was part of Suleimani’s brief: “It’s one guy running both shows.”

After the invasion began, in March, 2003, Iranian officials were frantic to let the Americans know that they wanted peace. Many of them watched the regimes topple in Afghanistan and Iraq and were convinced that they were next. “They were scared shitless,” Maguire, the former C.I.A. officer in Baghdad, told me. “They were sending runners across the border to our élite elements saying, ‘Look, we don’t want any trouble with you.’ We had an enormous upper hand.” That same year, American officials determined that Iran had reconfigured its plans to develop a nuclear weapon to proceed more slowly and covertly, lest it invite a Western attack.

After Saddam’s regime collapsed, Crocker was dispatched to Baghdad to organize a fledgling government, called the Iraqi Governing Council. He realized that many Iraqi politicians were flying to Tehran for consultations, and he jumped at the chance to negotiate indirectly with Suleimani. In the course of the summer, Crocker passed him the names of prospective Shiite candidates, and the two men vetted each one. Crocker did not offer veto power, but he abandoned candidates whom Suleimani found especially objectionable. “The formation of the governing council was in its essence a negotiation between Tehran and Washington,” he said.

Voir de même:

Gen. Soleimani: A new brand of Iranian hero for nationalist times
Not a Shiite religious figure and not a martyr, Qassem Soleimani, the living commander of Iran’s elite Qods Force, has been elevated to hero status.
Scott Peterson
The Christian Science Monitor
February 15, 2016

Tehran, Iran
For years the commander of Iran’s elite Qods Force worked from the shadows, conducting the nation’s battles from Afghanistan to Lebanon.

But today Qassem Soleimani is Iran’s celebrity general, a man elevated to hero status by a social media machine that has at least 10 Instagram accounts and spreads photographs and selfies of him at the front lines in Syria and Iraq.

The Islamic Republic long ago turned hero worship into an art form, with its devotion to Shiite religious figures and war martyrs. But the growing personality cult that halos Maj. Gen. Soleimani is different: The gray-haired servant of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) is very much alive, and his ascent to stardom coincides with a growing nationalist trend in Iran.

“Propaganda in Iran is changing, and every nation needs a live hero,” says a conservative analyst in Qom, who asked not to be named.

“The dead heroes now are not useful; we need a live hero now. Iranian people like great commanders, military heroes in history,” he says, ticking off a string of names. “I think Qassem Soleimani is the right person for our new propaganda policy – the right person at the right time.”

Soleimani’s face surged into public view after the self-described Islamic State (IS) swept from Syria into Iraq in June 2014. Frontline photographs of the general mingling with Iranian fighters went viral.

Iranians cite many reasons for his rise, from “saving” Baghdad from IS jihadists and reactivating Shiite militias in Iraq to preserving the rule of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad during nearly six years of war.

Never mind that some analysts suggest that earlier failures to prevent internal upheaval in Iraq and Syria – for years those countries were part of Soleimani’s responsibility – are the reason for Iran’s deep involvement today.

For his part, Soleimani attributes the “collapse of American power in the region” to Iran’s “spiritual influence” in bolstering resistance against the United States, Israel, and their allies.

“It is very extraordinary. Who else can come close?” says a veteran observer in Tehran, Iran, who asked not to be named. “I don’t know how intentional this is; you see people in all walks of life respect him. It shows we can have a very popular hero who is not a cleric.”

“There is no stain on his image,” says the observer.

Indeed, Soleimani has become a source of pride and a symbol for Iranians of all stripes of their nation’s power abroad. At a pro-regime rally, even young Westernized women in makeup pledge to be “soldiers” of Soleimani. At a bodybuilding championship held in his honor, bare-chested men flaunted their muscles beside a huge portrait of him.

Among the Islamic Revolution’s true believers, Soleimani’s exploits are sung by religious storytellers and posted online. His writings about the Iran-Iraq War are steeped in religious language.

In a video from the Syrian front line broadcast on state TV last month, he addressed fighters, saying, of an Iranian volunteer who was killed, “God loves the person who makes holy war his path.”

When erroneous reports of Soleimani’s death recently emerged (Iran has lost dozens of senior IRGC commanders in Syria and Iraq and hundreds of “advisers”), he laughed and said, “This [martyrdom] is something that I have climbed mountains and crossed plains to find.

Some say the hero worship has gone too far; months ago the IRGC ordered Iranian media not to publish frontline selfies. When a young director wanted to make a film inspired by his hero, the general said he was against it and was embarrassed.

Yet Soleimani appears to have relented for Ebrahim Hatamikia, a renowned director of war films.

“Bodyguard” is now premièring at a festival in Tehran. “I made this film for the love of Haj Qassem Soleimani,” the director told an Iranian website, adding that he is “the earth beneath Soleimani’s feet.”

Voir de plus:

The war on ISIS is getting weird in Iraq
Michael B Kelley
Business insider
Mar 25, 2015

The US has started providing « air strikes, airborne intelligence, and Advise & Assist support to Iraqi security forces headquarters » as Baghdad struggles to drive ISIS militants out of Saddam Hussein’s hometown of Tikrit.

The Iraqi assault has heretofore been spearheaded by Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, the head of Iran’s Quds Force, the foreign arm of the Iran Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC), and most of the Iraqi forces are members of Shiite militias beholden to Tehran.

The British magazine The Week features Suleimani in bed with Uncle Sam, which is quite striking given that Suleimani directed « a network of militant groups that killed hundreds of Americans in Iraq, » as detailed by Dexter Filkins in The New Yorker.The notion of the US working on the same side Suleimani is confounding to those who consider him a formidable adversary.

« There’s just no way that the US military can actively support an offensive led by Suleimani, » Christopher Harmer, a former aviator in the United States Navy in the Persian Gulf who is now an analyst with the Institute for the Study of War, told Helene Cooper of The New York Times recently. « He’s a more stately version of Osama bin Laden. »

Suleimani’s Iraqi allies — such as the powerful Badr militia — are known for allegedly burning down Sunni villages and using power drills on enemies.

« It’s a little hard for us to be allied on the battlefield with groups of individuals who are unrepentantly covered in American blood, » Ryan Crocker, a career diplomat who served as the US ambassador to Iraq from 2007 to 2009, told US News.

Nevertheless, American warplanes have provided support for the so-called special groups over the past few months.

Badr commander Hadi al-Ameri recently told Eli Lake of Bloomberg that the US ambassador to Iraq offered airstrikes to support the Iraqi army and the Badr ground forces. Ameri added that Suleimani « advises us. He offers us information, we respect him very much. »

The Wall Street Journal noted that « U.S. officials want to ensure that Iran doesn’t play a central role in the fight ahead. U.S. officials want to be certain that the Iraqi military provides strong oversight of the Shiite militias. »

The question is who tells Suleimani to get out of the way but leave his militias behind.

Voir de plus:

Trump Kills Iran’s Most Overrated Warrior
Suleimani pushed his country to build an empire, but drove it into the ground instead.
Thomas L. Friedman
NYT
Jan. 3, 2020

One day they may name a street after President Trump in Tehran. Why? Because Trump just ordered the assassination of possibly the dumbest man in Iran and the most overrated strategist in the Middle East: Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani.

Think of the miscalculations this guy made. In 2015, the United States and the major European powers agreed to lift virtually all their sanctions on Iran, many dating back to 1979, in return for Iran halting its nuclear weapons program for a mere 15 years, but still maintaining the right to have a peaceful nuclear program. It was a great deal for Iran. Its economy grew by over 12 percent the next year. And what did Suleimani do with that windfall?

He and Iran’s supreme leader launched an aggressive regional imperial project that made Iran and its proxies the de facto controlling power in Beirut, Damascus, Baghdad and Sana. This freaked out U.S. allies in the Sunni Arab world and Israel — and they pressed the Trump administration to respond. Trump himself was eager to tear up any treaty forged by President Obama, so he exited the nuclear deal and imposed oil sanctions on Iran that have now shrunk the Iranian economy by almost 10 percent and sent unemployment over 16 percent.

All that for the pleasure of saying that Tehran can call the shots in Beirut, Damascus, Baghdad and Sana. What exactly was second prize?

With the Tehran regime severely deprived of funds, the ayatollahs had to raise gasoline prices at home, triggering massive domestic protests. That required a harsh crackdown by Iran’s clerics against their own people that left thousands jailed and killed, further weakening the legitimacy of the regime.

Then Mr. “Military Genius” Suleimani decided that, having propped up the regime of President Bashar al-Assad in Syria, and helping to kill 500,000 Syrians in the process, he would overreach again and try to put direct pressure on Israel. He would do this by trying to transfer precision-guided rockets from Iran to Iranian proxy forces in Lebanon and Syria.

Alas, Suleimani discovered that fighting Israel — specifically, its combined air force, special forces, intelligence and cyber — is not like fighting the Nusra front or the Islamic State. The Israelis hit back hard, sending a whole bunch of Iranians home from Syria in caskets and hammering their proxies as far away as Western Iraq.

Indeed, Israeli intelligence had so penetrated Suleimani’s Quds Force and its proxies that Suleimani would land a plane with precision munitions in Syria at 5 p.m., and the Israeli air force would blow it up by 5:30 p.m. Suleimani’s men were like fish in a barrel. If Iran had a free press and a real parliament, he would have been fired for colossal mismanagement.

But it gets better, or actually worse, for Suleimani. Many of his obituaries say that he led the fight against the Islamic State in Iraq, in tacit alliance with America. Well, that’s true. But what they omit is that Suleimani’s, and Iran’s, overreaching in Iraq helped to produce the Islamic State in the first place.

It was Suleimani and his Quds Force pals who pushed Iraq’s Shiite prime minister, Nuri Kamal al-Maliki, to push Sunnis out of the Iraqi government and army, stop paying salaries to Sunni soldiers, kill and arrest large numbers of peaceful Sunni protesters and generally turn Iraq into a Shiite-dominated sectarian state. The Islamic State was the counterreaction.

Finally, it was Suleimani’s project of making Iran the imperial power in the Middle East that turned Iran into the most hated power in the Middle East for many of the young, rising pro-democracy forces — both Sunnis and Shiites — in Lebanon, Syria and Iraq.

As the Iranian-American scholar Ray Takeyh pointed out in a wise essay in Politico, in recent years “Soleimani began expanding Iran’s imperial frontiers. For the first time in its history, Iran became a true regional power, stretching its influence from the banks of the Mediterranean to the Persian Gulf. Soleimani understood that Persians would not be willing to die in distant battlefields for the sake of Arabs, so he focused on recruiting Arabs and Afghans as an auxiliary force. He often boasted that he could create a militia in little time and deploy it against Iran’s various enemies.”

It was precisely those Suleimani proxies — Hezbollah in Lebanon and Syria, the Popular Mobilization Forces in Iraq, and the Houthis in Yemen — that created pro-Iranian Shiite states-within-states in all of these countries. And it was precisely these states-within-states that helped to prevent any of these countries from cohering, fostered massive corruption and kept these countries from developing infrastructure — schools, roads, electricity.

And therefore it was Suleimani and his proxies — his “kingmakers” in Lebanon, Syria and Iraq — who increasingly came to be seen, and hated, as imperial powers in the region, even more so than Trump’s America. This triggered popular, authentic, bottom-up democracy movements in Lebanon and Iraq that involved Sunnis and Shiites locking arms together to demand noncorrupt, nonsectarian democratic governance.

On Nov. 27, Iraqi Shiites — yes, Iraqi Shiites — burned down the Iranian consulate in Najaf, Iraq, removing the Iranian flag from the building and putting an Iraqi flag in its place. That was after Iraqi Shiites, in September 2018, set the Iranian consulate in Basra ablaze, shouting condemnations of Iran’s interference in Iraqi politics.

The whole “protest” against the United States Embassy compound in Baghdad last week was almost certainly a Suleimani-staged operation to make it look as if Iraqis wanted America out when in fact it was the other way around. The protesters were paid pro-Iranian militiamen. No one in Baghdad was fooled by this.

In a way, it’s what got Suleimani killed. He so wanted to cover his failures in Iraq he decided to start provoking the Americans there by shelling their forces, hoping they would overreact, kill Iraqis and turn them against the United States. Trump, rather than taking the bait, killed Suleimani instead.

I have no idea whether this was wise or what will be the long-term implications. But here are two things I do know about the Middle East.

First, often in the Middle East the opposite of “bad” is not “good.” The opposite of bad often turns out to be “disorder.” Just because you take out a really bad actor like Suleimani doesn’t mean a good actor, or a good change in policy, comes in his wake. Suleimani is part of a system called the Islamic Revolution in Iran. That revolution has managed to use oil money and violence to stay in power since 1979 — and that is Iran’s tragedy, a tragedy that the death of one Iranian general will not change.

Today’s Iran is the heir to a great civilization and the home of an enormously talented people and significant culture. Wherever Iranians go in the world today, they thrive as scientists, doctors, artists, writers and filmmakers — except in the Islamic Republic of Iran, whose most famous exports are suicide bombing, cyberterrorism and proxy militia leaders. The very fact that Suleimani was probably the most famous Iranian in the region speaks to the utter emptiness of this regime, and how it has wasted the lives of two generations of Iranians by looking for dignity in all the wrong places and in all the wrong ways.

The other thing I know is that in the Middle East all important politics happens the morning after the morning after.

Yes, in the coming days there will be noisy protests in Iran, the burning of American flags and much crying for the “martyr.” The morning after the morning after? There will be a thousand quiet conversations inside Iran that won’t get reported. They will be about the travesty that is their own government and how it has squandered so much of Iran’s wealth and talent on an imperial project that has made Iran hated in the Middle East.

And yes, the morning after, America’s Sunni Arab allies will quietly celebrate Suleimani’s death, but we must never forget that it is the dysfunction of many of the Sunni Arab regimes — their lack of freedom, modern education and women’s empowerment — that made them so weak that Iran was able to take them over from the inside with its proxies.

I write these lines while flying over New Zealand, where the smoke from forest fires 2,500 miles away over eastern Australia can be seen and felt. Mother Nature doesn’t know Suleimani’s name, but everyone in the Arab world is going to know her name. Because the Middle East, particularly Iran, is becoming an environmental disaster area — running out of water, with rising desertification and overpopulation. If governments there don’t stop fighting and come together to build resilience against climate change — rather than celebrating self-promoting military frauds who conquer failed states and make them fail even more — they’re all doomed.

Voir encore:

Love is a Battlefield
Jon Stewart takes the U.S.-Iran ‘strange bedfellows’ line literally, imagines Iraq as a love triangle
Peter Weber
The Week
June 17, 2014

Yes, Jon Stewart is a comedian, and no, The Daily Show isn’t a hard news-and-analysis show. But on Monday night’s show, Stewart gave a remarkably cogent and creative explanation of the geopolitical situation in Iraq. The U.S. and Iran are discussing coordinating their efforts in Iraq to defeat a common enemy, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) militia. Meanwhile, ISIS is getting financial support from one of America’s biggest Arab allies, and Iran’s biggest Muslim enemy, Saudi Arabia.

Forget « strange bedfellows » — this is a romantic Gordian knot. But it makes a lot of sense when Stewart presents the situation as a love triangle. « Sure, you say ‘Death to America’ and burn our flags, but you do it to our face, » Stewart tells Iran. Meanwhile, Saudi Arabia has been funding America’s enemies behind our backs — but what about its sweet, sweet crude oil? Like all good love triangles, this one has a soundtrack — Stewart draws on the hits of the 1980s to great effect. In fact, the only ’80s song Stewart left out that would have tied this all together: « Love Bites. » –Peter Weber

State Department urges U.S. citizens to ‘depart Iraq immediately’ due to ‘heightened tensions’

4:37 a.m.

The State Department on Friday urged « U.S. citizens to depart Iraq immediately, » citing unspecified « heightened tensions in Iraq and the region » and the « Iranian-backed militia attacks at the U.S. Embassy compound. »

Iranian officials have vowed « harsh » retaliation for America’s assassination Friday of Iran’s top regional military commander, Gen. Qassem Soleimani, outside Baghdad International Airport. Syria similarly criticized the « treacherous American criminal aggression » and warned of a « dangerous escalation » in the region.

Iraq’s outgoing prime minister, Adel Abdul-Mahdi, also slammed the the « liquidation operations » against Soleimani and half a dozen Iraqi militiamen killed in the drone strikes as an « aggression against Iraq, » a « brazen violation of Iraq’s sovereignty and blatant attack on the nation’s dignity, » and an « obvious violation of the conditions of U.S. troop presence in Iraq, which is limited to training Iraqi forces. » A senior Iraqi official said Parliament must take « necessary and appropriate measures to protect Iraq’s dignity, security, and sovereignty. »

The Pentagon said President Trump ordered the assassination of Soleimani as a « defensive action to protect U.S. personnel abroad, » claiming the Quds Force commander was « actively developing plans to attack American diplomats and service members in Iraq and throughout the region. » Peter Weber

If President Trump was watching Fox News at Mar-a-Lago on Thursday night, he got a violently mixed messages on his order to assassinate Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani, head of the elite Quds Force, national hero, and scourge of U.S. forces.

Sean Hannity called into his own show to tell guest host Josh Chaffetz that the killing of Soleimani was « a huge victory and total leadership by the president » and « the opposite of what happened in Benghazi. » Rep. Michael Waltz (R-Fla.) channeled Ronald Reagan and praised Trump’s « peace through strength. » Oliver North, Karl Rove, and Ari Flesischer also lauded Trump’s decision.

Earlier, fellow host Tucker Carlson saw neither peace nor strength in Trump’s actions. He blamed « official Washington, » though, and suggested Trump had been « out-maneuvered » by more hawkish advisers who might be pushing America « toward war despite what the president wants. »

« There’s been virtually no debate or even discussion about this, but America appears to be lumbering toward a new Middle East war, » Carlson said. « The very people demanding action against Iran tonight » are « liars, and they don’t care about you, they don’t care about your kids, they’re reckless and incompetent. And you should keep all of that in mind as war with Iran looms closer tonight. » Trump, he added, « doesn’t seek war and he’s wary of it, particularly in an election year. » When his guest, Curt Mills of The American Conservative, said war with Iran « would be twice as bad » as the Iraq War and « if Trump does this, he’s cooked, » Carlson sadly concurred: « I think that’s right. »

Media Matters’ Matt Gertz pointed out that Hannity has always been more « bellicose » than Carlson on Iran, and both men informally advise Trump off-air as well as on-air. And « if you pay attention to the impact the Fox News Cabinet has on the president, » he tweeted Thursday night, « Tucker Carlson has been off for the holidays the past few days as tensions with Iran mounted. » Coincidence? Maybe. But on such twists does the fate of our world turn.

Voir enfin:

Le massacre des prisonniers politiques de 1988 en Iran : une mobilisation forclose ?
Henry Sorg
Raisons politiques
2008/2 (n° 30), pages 59 à 87

« Au nom de Dieu clément et miséricordieux. J’ai décidé afin de me distraire et me calmer l’esprit, sachant qu’il n’y a pas d’issue pour me sauver de cette douleur, de présenter [mes filles] disparues, Leili et Shirine, dans une note pour mes chers petits-enfants qui ignoreront cette histoire et comment elle est arrivée ­ spécialement les enfants de Shirine. D’abord je dois dire que je n’ai pas de savoir pour exprimer correctement tous mes souvenirs et mes observations sur ce qui s’est passé pour moi et mes enfants durant cette période funeste de la Révolution [en Iran]. Je n’ai pris un crayon et une feuille de papier qu’en de rares occasions de ma vie, alors que dire maintenant que je suis un vieillard de 70 ans aux mains tremblantes, aux yeux plein de sang (…). Mais que faire puisque je suis en conflit avec moi-même. Mon appel intérieur m’a tout pris et me crie : â?œnote ce que tu as vu, ce que tu as entendu et ce que tu as vécuâ?. Mon appel intérieur me crie : â?œpuisque c’est vrai, rapporte que Leili était enceinte de huit mois lorsqu’ils l’ont exécutéeâ?Â ; il me crie : â?œEcris au moins que Shirine, après six ans et neuf mois de prison, et après avoir supporté les tortures les plus sauvages et les plus modernes a finalement été exécutée, et ils n’ont pas rendu son corpsâ?. Si ces souvenirs comportent des erreurs d’écriture, on en comprendra l’essentiel du propos à un certain point. Certainement, les enfants de Shirine veulent savoir qui était leur mère et pourquoi elle a été exécutée. »
Carnet de notes retrouvé à T., Iran

1LA RÉVOLUTION IRANIENNE s’est instituée sur la double violence d’une « guerre sainte [2][2]L’ayatollah Khomeini qualifie la guerre de Jihad défensif et… » contre un ennemi extérieur, l’Irak, et d’une élimination physique des opposants intérieurs, celle notamment des prisonniers politiques en 1988 [3][3]L’auteur remercie Sandrine Lefranc pour sa lecture attentive et…. Durant l’été 1988, après que l’ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini eut accepté de mauvaise grâce la résolution 598 de l’ONU mettant fin à la longue guerre contre l’Irak, les prisons du pays ont été purgées de leurs prisonniers politiques. Le nombre exact de prisonniers exécutés et enterrés dans des fosses communes ou des sections de cimetière reste jusqu’à ce jour inconnu. Les rares recherches menées sur la question, les organisations qui ont capitalisé les témoignages de survivants, les groupes politiques dont les membres ont été exécutés, les témoignages individuels, mais aussi certains anciens responsables de l’État islamique s’accordent pour reconnaître que ce bilan se chiffre en plusieurs milliers [4][4]Voir notamment Ervand Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions. Prisons…. Cet événement a non seulement fait l’objet de la part des autorités publiques iraniennes d’un silence orchestré et d’un déni, mais il n’a pas non plus été documenté ou analysé de façon exhaustive. Vingt ans après les faits, on peine encore à mettre au jour cette réalité qui existe de façon fragmentaire, par assemblage d’ouï-dire et de témoignages : matrice à mythes pour certains acteurs politiques exclus du champ national (tel le Parti des Moudjahidines du Peuple dont les membres furent les principales victimes [5][5]Voir E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 215 ;…), drames familiaux couverts d’un silence gêné pour une population iranienne qui ne souhaite pas vraiment connaître ce qu’elle appelle, pudiquement, « ces histoires-là ».

2 Dans le contexte d’une « démocratisation » de la vie sociale et politique [6][6]Farhad Khosrokhavar, « L’Iran, la démocratie et la nouvelle… à partir des années 1990, les exécutions de 1988 sont absentes du débat initié sur les libertés publiques et, notamment, des revendications exprimées en faveur d’un État de droit et d’une nouvelle société civile [7][7]Ibid., p. 309 et Nouchine Yavari d’Hellencourt, « Islam et…. En effet, le contexte politique autoritaire dans lequel se sont perpétrées les violences d’État ­ de 1979, juste après la Révolution, jusqu’aux massacres de 1988 ­ évolue dans la décennie suivante vers une demande de « réforme » et de libéralisation du régime islamique. Cette transformation procède principalement autour de trois mouvements : d’une part, la réflexion théorique (à la fois politique et théologique) qui occupe le débat publique sur les rapports entre islam et droits de l’homme [8][8]Ibid. ; d’autre part, une série de changements politiques au sein des institutions suite à l’élection du président Khatami en 1997, aux élections municipales de 1999 et celles du 6e Parlement en 2000 ; enfin, l’apparition d’un nouveau rapport au politique dans la société avec l’émergence d’une culture politique qui, en rupture avec l’islamisme révolutionnaire des deux décennies précédentes, se détourne des « concepts identitaires classiques comme “peuple” ou “nation” [vers ceux, nouveaux] de société civile (jâme’e madani), de citoyenneté (shahrvandi) et d’individu (fard)  [9][9]Ibid. ». Ces nouveaux mouvements, s’ils mentionnent éventuellement et discrètement les « événements » de 1988, le font sur le mode de l’allusion et non pas sur celui de la mobilisation.

3 L’étoffe du silence qui entoure les exécutions massives de l’été 1988 est complexe : Qui sont les victimes ? Quelles en sont les raisons ? Quelles en sont les conditions et qui en sont les responsables ? Il s’agit d’abord, en s’appuyant sur la littérature existante ainsi que sur les sources premières accessibles, d’exposer quelques éléments de réponses à ces questions, sur un sujet d’étude inédit en France. D’autre part, il s’agit de réfléchir autour de ces faits connus, mais non reconnus ­ selon la définition que Cohen propose du « déni [10][10]Stanley Cohen, States of Denial, Knowing about Atrocities and… » ­ en se demandant comment fonctionnent les dispositifs d’invisibilisation mis en place par le pouvoir et comment y répondent des pratiques de souvenir. Le massacre de 1988 est l’enjeu d’une mémoire dont il s’agit pour le pouvoir d’effacer la trace, d’abord, de façon à la fois concrète et symbolique, à travers l’interdit du rituel funéraire pour les victimes. Cette tension mémorielle travaille la société iranienne et oppose depuis deux décennies un passé non « commémorable » à un travail de mémoire qui se cristallise autour des sépultures.

4 Peu de matériaux empiriques et d’analyses sont disponibles sur l’exécution en masse des prisonniers politiques qui a clos la période de consolidation du pouvoir et de suppression de l’opposition au Parti républicain islamique de 1981 à 1988. Les sources, disponibles en persan et en anglais, se composent principalement de témoignages et de quelques travaux d’investigation historiques [11][11]E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 209-229 ;…, sociologiques [12][12]Maziar Behrooz, « Reflections on Iran’s Prison System During… et juridiques ­ ces derniers s’intéressant à la qualification des exécutions de masse comme « crime contre l’humanité [13][13]Reza Afshari, Human Rights in Iran : The Abuse of Cultural… ». Les rapports non-gouvernementaux et internationaux [14][14]Conseil Économique et Social des Nations Unies (ECOSOC),… constituent une autre source, qui, tout comme les travaux scientifiques, se fondent principalement sur des entretiens avec de rares prisonniers témoins exilés à l’étranger et avec les proches des victimes, ainsi que sur des témoignages écrits [15][15]Un impressionnant travail a été accompli sur ce point par E.…. À cet égard, les Mémoires de l’ayatollah Montazeri documentent les faits du point de vue de l’organisation politique et, dans une certaine mesure, de l’organisation administrative. D’un autre côté, plusieurs témoignages ont été publiés sous forme de romans, de lettres écrites depuis la prison ou de mémoires [16][16]Notamment Nima Parvaresh, Nabardi nabarabar : gozareshi az haft…. D’autres témoignages, nombreux, restent encore à découvrir et assembler, comme celui que nous nous proposons d’explorer dans cet article.

5 Lors d’un séjour dans la ville de T. en 2004, nous avons pu prendre connaissance d’un carnet de notes d’une cinquantaine de pages écrites entre 1989 et 1990 par un homme âgé. Ce cahier a été trouvé à sa mort par ses proches dans ses effets personnels. Javad L., retraité d’une compagnie publique résidant à T., était père de six enfants dont les cinq aînés, qui avaient suivi de solides formations universitaires, commençaient leur vie adulte à la fin des années 1970. Dans ces pages, il racontait dans le détail les circonstances de l’arrestation et de l’exécution de ses deux filles à la suite de la Révolution de 1978. Celles-ci avaient pris part de façon active au mouvement d’opposition des Moudjahidines du Peuple [17][17]Nous reprenons, parmi les différentes transcriptions possibles,…, au cours de la révolution iranienne et dans les premières années de la nouvelle République islamique. Elles ont été arrêtées dans le cadre de la répression politique mise en place à partir de 1980. Le carnet de notes relate des faits qui s’étendent de 1980 à 1988 et détaille l’arrestation, l’emprisonnement et l’exécution des deux jeunes femmes, la première en 1982 et la seconde en 1988. Les destinataires étant de jeunes enfants au moment des faits, l’écriture cherche à faire passer une mémoire qui imbrique généalogie familiale et histoire nationale : « Certainement, les enfants de Shirine veulent savoir qui était leur mère et pourquoi elle a été exécutée. » Le texte poursuit : « Peut-être qu’il leur sera intéressant de connaître les moudjahidines, de quelles franges de la société ils étaient issus, quels étaient leurs buts et leurs intentions et pourquoi ils ont été massacrés sans merci. Je reprends donc depuis le début, du plus loin que vont mes souvenirs. Inhcha’Allah. »

Les moudjahidines : de la révolution à la répression

6 Les membres, et de façon bien plus déterminante en nombre, les proches et sympathisants du Parti des Moudjahidines du peuple (Moudjahidine-e Khalq) sont les principales cibles des vagues de répression successives entre 1981 et 1988 et forment une large majorité des prisonniers exécutés en 1988. Ce parti politique, dont la formation remonte au lendemain des mouvements de mai 1968 dans le monde, se fonde sur une synthèse entre islamisme, gauche radicale et nationalisme anti-impérialiste. À l’origine, le mouvement revendique l’inspiration du Front National (Jebhe-ye Melli) de Mossadeq et Fatemi [18][18]Mohammad Mossadeq a été Premier ministre de 1951 à 1953. Ayant…. Fortement influencés par les écrits de Shariati [19][19]Ervand Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, New Haven/Londres,…, sociologue des religions et figure intellectuelle de l’opposition à la monarchie pahlavie, les moudjahidines articulent la pensée d’un islam chiite politique à une approche socio-économique marxiste et la revendication d’une société sans classe (nezam-e bi tabaghe-ye tawhidi), ainsi qu’une critique de la domination occidentale et un nationalisme révolutionnaire proche des mouvements de libération nationale du Tiers-monde [20][20]Ibid., p. 100-102.. « Quel était leur programme ? écrit Javad, je ne le sais pas. Ce que je sais, c’est que comme la peste et le choléra, en un clin d’ il, tous les jeunes éduqués, engagés et pieux, filles ou garçons, ont commencé à soutenir le programme des moudjahidines, grisés par leur enthousiasme, comme s’ils avaient trouvé réponse à tous leurs manques dans cette école de pensée. (…) Au début, ils se comptaient parmi les partisans de l’ayatolla Khomeini et de feu l’ayatollah Taleghani, et ils considéraient ceux-ci comme les symboles de leur salut. De jour en jour, le nombre de leurs partisans augmentait. Surtout chez les gens éduqués, des professeurs de lycée aux lycéens. » À la différence des autres partis de gauche, et particulièrement l’historique parti communiste (le Tudeh) dirigé par l’élite intellectuelle et bénéficiant d’une certaine base populaire, le parti mobilise une nombreuse population étudiante et lycéenne issue d’une jeunesse non fortunée, mais qui a eu accès à l’éducation [21][21]Ibid., p. 229 ; voir également A. Matin-Asgari, « Twentieth…. « Les moudjahidines, avec leur combinaison de chiisme, de modernisme et de radicalisme social exerçaient une évidente séduction sur la jeune intelligentsia, composée de plus en plus par les enfants, non pas de l’élite aisée ou des laïques éduqués, mais de la classe moyenne traditionnelle [22][22]E. Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, op. cit., p. 229 (notre… », rappelle Abrahamian, qui insiste d’autre part sur l’extrême jeunesse de sa base. Alors que les cadres du parti ont été politisés dans les mouvements étudiants de la fin des années 1960, la base militante a été socialisée et politisée en 1977-79. En 1981, elle se compose principalement de lycéens et d’étudiants radicalisés par l’expérience de la révolution, vivant encore pour la plupart dans le foyer familial.
Présentés comme « islamo-marxistes » et poursuivis dans les dernières années de la monarchie, les moudjahidines prennent une part active au mouvement qui initie la révolution de 1979. Accueillant avec enthousiasme le retour de l’ayatollah Khomeini de son exil français en 1978, les moudjahidines s’opposent pourtant au principe du Velayat-e Faghih (gouvernement du docteur de la loi islamique) [23][23]Appliqué dans la Constitution iranienne de 1979, ce principe…, qui est au fondement constitutionnel de la nouvelle République islamique, et soutiennent le président de la République laïque Bani Sadr. Mobilisant d’importantes manifestations d’opposition dans les principales villes, les moudjahidines sont un des seuls partis politiques à présenter des candidats dans tout le pays en vue des élections législatives de 1981. Le mouvement et ses membres sont violemment écartés de la vie publique à partir de l’attentat du 28 juin 1981 au siège du Parti républicain islamiste : officiellement attribué aux moudjahidines, cet attentat à la bombe fait 71 morts parmi les hauts responsables de ce parti qui amorce à cette époque son appropriation exclusive du pouvoir [24][24]Haleh Afshar (dir.), Iran : A Revolution in Turmoil, Albany,…. Une Fatwa énoncée par Khomeini rend alors les moudjahidines illégaux, en les identifiant comme monafeghins, « hypocrites en matière de religion ». Cette étiquette, télescopant encore une fois l’actualité politique et la tradition musulmane, reprend le nom donné aux polythéistes de Médine qui s’étaient déclarés du côté de Mahommet et ses premiers fidèles, tout en vendant la ville aux assiégeants de la Mecque : le couperet distingue le chiisme « vrai », en condamnant et en discréditant définitivement l’islamisme révolutionnaire inspiré par Chariati. Le 29 juillet 1981, le dirigeant des Moudjahidine-e Kalq, Massoud Rajavi quitte clandestinement le pays en compagnie du président Bani Sadr pour former, en France, le Conseil National de la Résistance. Par la suite, l’ex-président se distancie du mouvement pris en main par le dirigeant moudjahidine qui recompose une structure politique fermée en recrutant de nouveaux sympathisants dans les villes européennes et américaines. Pour les moudjahidines, l’opposition au régime post-révolutionnaire s’est traduite par un anti-patriotisme stratégique qui les a amenés à s’allier avec l’Irak durant le conflit des années 1980 [25][25]Connie Bruck, « Exiles : How Iran’s Expatriates Are Gaming the…. C’est à cette évolution qu’Abrahamian attribue l’évolution sectaire du parti [26][26]E. Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, op. cit., p. 260-261. et sa rupture avec la société iranienne dans les années 1980. L’isolement du parti et de ses membres, ses pratiques hiérarchiques, ses prises de position ambiguës depuis 2001 sont dénoncées [27][27]C. Bruck, « Exiles… », art. cité ; Human Rights Watch, No… et semblent l’avoir marginalisé comme acteur politique dans l’espace iranien [28][28]Elizabeth Rubin, « The Cult of Rajavi », New York Times….

7 « Pourquoi les moudjahidines ont-ils réussi à élargir la base de la mobilisation politique [dans les années 1970 et 1980], mais échoué à accéder au pouvoir [29][29]E. Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, op. cit., p. 3 (notre… ? » Cette question, qui guide la recherche historique d’Abrahamian sur le mouvement [30][30]Ibid., Javad cherche lui aussi à l’éclaircir quand il évoque les élections de 1981 : « En fait dans beaucoup de villes iraniennes, les moudjahidines avaient la majorité des voix [31][31]Le mouvement était le seul à présenter des candidats partout en…. Malheureusement, après le décompte des votes, la situation a changé, et la raison en était que les jeunes moudjahidines n’étaient pas faits pour la politique. Ils n’avaient pas commencé la lutte pour avoir des postes de pouvoir et du prestige. Ils pensaient établir une société pieuse [32][32]Le manuscrit dit : « une société Tohidie  », d’après le Tohid… et sans classe (…) Quel qu’aient été ces idées en tous cas, elles ont été étouffées dans l’ uf. Par ceux qui s’étaient cachés derrière la Révolution et qui sont apparus tout à coup. »

Le massacre de l’été 1988

8 L’institution d’un État islamique en Iran s’est fondée, à partir de 1981, sur un « régime de terreur » qui a duré aussi longtemps que la guerre contre l’Irak, et s’est traduit concrètement par une élimination physique des opposants politiques potentiels, le recours à la torture et une grande publicité de ces deux pratiques afin de « tenir » la population [33][33]E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confession, op. cit., p. 210.. C’est dans ce contexte que vient en 1988, de l’ayatollah Khomeini, l’ordre de purger les prisons en éliminant les opposants politiques. Les membres les plus actifs de l’opposition au régime islamiste ont déjà été éliminés entre 1981 et 1985 (environ 15 000 exécutions) [34][34]Nader Vahabi, « L’obstacle structurel à l’abolition de la peine… ou se sont exilés à cette même époque. Les prisonniers politiques et d’opinion en 1988 sont des (ex-)sympathisants ou des membres des moudjahidines pour la grande majorité, du Tudeh (PC), de partis d’extrême gauche minoritaires, du PDKI (parti indépendantiste kurde), ou encore sans affiliation. Cette purge a lieu au terme de procès spéciaux : d’une part, une condamnation à mort doit être signée par le Vali-e Faghih, mais Khomeini donne procuration à une équipe composée de membres du clergé et de divers corps administratifs (Information, Intérieur, autorités pénitentiaires) pour mener ces procès qui prennent en réalité la forme de brefs interrogatoires à la chaîne. D’autre part, l’ayatollah Montazeri, alors numéro deux du régime, cite une Fatwa énoncée par Khomeini à propos des moudjahidines : « Ceux qui sont dans des prisons du pays et restent engagés dans leur soutien aux Monafeghin [Moujahidines], sont en guerre contre Dieu et condamnés à mort (…) Annihilez les ennemis de l’Islam immédiatement. Dans cette affaire, utilisez tous les critères qui accélèrent l’application du verdict [35][35]H.-A. Montazeri, Khaterat, op. cit.. » Des témoignages de prisonniers acquittés d’Evin et de Gohar Dasht, à Téhéran, ont été par la suite diffusés dans certains journaux libres de langue iranienne et sur les sites Internet d’ONG iraniennes. Celui de Javad est l’un des rares qui évoque l’événement en province, dans la ville de T. Cet épisode, qui clôt son carnet, commence quand il reçoit un appel le 30 juillet 1988 à 22 h 00, de la prison de D. où sa fille est détenue depuis 1981, lui demandant de venir immédiatement la voir car elle « va partir en voyage demain ». Il est surpris : on est dimanche, or personne ne lui a rien dit lors de la visite hebdomadaire du samedi, qui s’est déroulée normalement la veille. Il se rend à la prison où il rencontre sa fille et lui demande des explications. Shirine raconte : « “Hier soir à 23 heures, alors que tout le monde dormait et que la prison était totalement silencieuse, ils sont venus me chercher, ils m’ont bandé les yeux sans expliquer de quoi il s’agissait et ils m’ont emmenée dans une salle où se tenaient un grand nombre de responsables : le gouverneur municipal, le directeur de la prison, le procureur, le chef du département exécutif et quelques membres [du ministère] de l’Information ainsi que quelques personnes que je n’avais jamais vues auparavant. D’abord, le gouverneur municipal se tourne vers moi et me dit : `D’après ce que nous savons, tu es encore partisane des Monafeghins‘. Je réponds : `S’il n’a pas encore été prouvé pour vous que je ne suis plus dans aucune action et que je n’en soutiens aucune, que faut-il faire pour vous convaincre ?’ Ensuite il demande : `Que penses-tu de la République islamique ?’ Je réponds : `Depuis que la République islamique a vu le jour, il y a de cela sept ans et quelques mois, je suis quant à moi en prison. Je n’ai pas eu de contact avec la société pour pouvoir avoir quelconque aperçu des façons de faire de la République islamique.’ Le gouverneur municipal a ordonné `Emmenez-la’. Il était alors minuit environ. Je ne sais pas quel est le but de cet événement.” Le gardien de prison intervient : “Le but est celui que nous avons dit : ils veulent vous envoyer en voyage, mais j’ignore où”. Moi qui étais le père de la prisonnière, je demande : “Quelle somme d’argent peut-elle avoir avec elle dans ce voyage ?” Il me répond : “Elle peut avoir la somme qu’elle veut”. J’ai donc donné 500 tomans que j’avais sur moi à Shirine. Sa mère lui a donné les habits qu’elle avait apportés. (…) Ensuite, j’ai demandé au responsable de la prison : “Quand pourrons-nous avoir des nouvelles de Shirine et savoir où elle est ?” Il répond “Revenez ici dans quinze jours, peut-être qu’on en saura plus d’ici là.” »
À partir du 19 juillet 1988 à Téhéran, et quelques jours plus tard dans les autres villes, les autorités pénitentiaires isolent les prisons. « Quinze jours plus tard, sa mère et moi nous sommes rendus à la prison. Un grand nombre de proches de prisonniers s’étaient regroupés là, même ceux dont les enfants avaient été libérés il y a un ou deux ans ou quelques mois. Nous leur avons demandé ce qu’ils faisaient là. Ils nous ont répondu qu’ils ne savaient pas eux-mêmes. “Tout ce qu’on sait, c’est que nos enfants sont venus pour leur feuille de présence et ils ne sont pas encore ressortis.” Car la règle était que chaque prisonnier libéré devait se présenter une à deux fois par semaine pour signer une feuille de présence. Des gardiens armés postés sur le trottoir devant la prison ne laissaient personne s’approcher et, de la même façon, des gardiens armés étaient postés devant la porte du tribunal révolutionnaire, situé un peu plus loin, pour empêcher les gens d’approcher. Une grande affiche était placardée au mur : “Pour raison de surcharge de travail, nous ne pouvons accueillir les visiteurs.” » Dans les prisons, les détenus sont isolés par groupes d’affiliation politique et par durée de peine ; les espaces communs sont fermés. À l’extérieur, aucune nouvelle des prisons ne paraît plus dans la presse du pays qui, pour des raisons d’intimidation et de propagande, en est très friande en temps normal : c’est le huis-clos dans lequel s’organisent les exécutions, dont le plus gros se déroule en quelques semaines à la fin août 1988. Selon un prisonnier qui se trouvait alors dans la principale prison d’Evin : « À partir de juillet 1988, pas de journaux, pas de télévision, pas de douche, pas de visite des familles et souvent, pas de nourriture. Dans chaque pièce (d’environ 24 mètres carrés) il y avait plus de 45 prisonniers. Finalement, le 29 ou le 30 juillet, ils ont commencé le massacre [36][36]Hossein Mokhtar, Testimony at the September 1st Conference,….  » Les exécutions ont donc lieu à la suite des « procès » spéciaux menés en quelques jours à l’encontre de milliers de prisonniers. Alors que les questions posées à Shirine sont d’ordre politique et interrogent sa loyauté envers le régime en place, les interrogatoires cités par de nombreuses sources, notamment pour les prisons d’Evin et de Gohar Dasht, indiquent l’usage d’une grammaire religieuse, d’une forme « inquisitoire [37][37]E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 209 et… » et d’une certaine vision politique de l’islam qui cherche, à la surprise des prisonniers, non plus à connaître leurs opinions, mais à déterminer s’ils sont de bons musulmans. Au cours d’un échange de quelques minutes, un jury d’autorités religieuses demandait ainsi aux prisonniers communistes s’ils priaient et si leurs parents priaient : en cas de double réponse négative, les prisonniers étaient acquittés (une personne élevée dans l’athéisme ne peut être un « apostat »), si par contre ils étaient athées de parents religieux, ils étaient alors condamnés à mort pour apostasie. Les moudjahidines quant à eux devaient, pour avoir la vie sauve, prouver qu’ils étaient repentants (et donc s’affirmer prêts à étrangler un autre moudjahidine) et loyaux (prêts à nettoyer les champs de mine de l’armée iranienne avec leur corps) : ceux qui répondaient par la négative à ces questions, et ils furent nombreux, étaient condamnés à mort pour « hypocrisie » [38][38]Ibid.. Le processus, qui se déroule de mi-juillet à début septembre, est orchestré dans la discrétion, notamment par le recours aux pendaisons, qui correspondent par ailleurs à l’exécution appropriée pour les non-musulmans (les Kafer, dont il est interdit de faire couler le sang). D’après témoignages, des prisonniers ignoraient que leurs co-détenus étaient en train d’être exécutés par centaines et pensaient qu’ils étaient « transférés ailleurs [39][39]Témoignage cité dans E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…,… ». La forme de ces procès, menés par des autorités ad hoc pour des prisonniers qui ont déjà été jugés une première fois (parfois rejugés plusieurs fois lors de leur peine ou qui l’ont parfois déjà purgée) soulève la question de savoir si l’on doit parler d’« exécution ». Abrahamian parle des « exécutions de masse de 1988 » [40][40]E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 209. ; le mot avancé par ceux qui ont travaillé sur la qualification juridique des événements comme « crimes contre l’humanité » est celui de « massacre » [41][41]K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art.….

Pratiques d’invisibilisation

9 À partir du mois de novembre 1988, la nouvelle des exécutions est annoncée aux familles lors de la visite hebdomadaire ; très vite, l’émotion gagne la foule qui se rassemble devant la prison. Face à la volonté de discrétion du pouvoir, d’autres méthodes sont adoptées. « C’est en âbân [octobre-novembre] qu’un jour, contre toute attente, la porte de la prison s’ouvrit et on nous dit d’entrer. Nous ne tenions plus en place de joie, et nous nous reprochions de ne pas avoir amené quelques fruits avec nous au cas où, ou d’avoir pris quelques vêtements. Mais après un moment d’attente et d’impatience, ils nous ont distribué des formulaires en nous ordonnant de les remplir, afin de consigner tous renseignements concernant les prisonniers et leur famille : domicile, lieu de travail, salaire, activités quotidiennes, connaissances. Ceux qui pouvaient remplir ce formulaire le faisaient eux-mêmes, et ceux qui ne savaient pas écrire se faisaient aider. Quand les formulaires ont été remplis, ils ont été collectés un par un (…) puis la porte s’est ouverte et on nous a dit : “C’est bon, vous pouvez partir” (…) Cette situation incertaine se poursuivait. Les jours de visite, nous nous réunissions comme d’habitude devant la prison, et finalement, comme d’habitude, nous nous dispersions bredouille. Jusqu’à un samedi, au début du mois d’âzar [novembre] : j’étais moi-même parti à la prison quand on a appelé à la maison en disant : “Dites au père de Shirine L. de se rendre demain matin à D.” (…) Le jour suivant, comme indiqué, nous nous sommes rendus devant la prison de D. à 9 heures. Il y avait d’autres personnes attroupées qui avaient reçu le même appel. Quand je les ai vues, je me suis un peu apaisé.(…) Nous étions une centaine ce jour-là, car ils avaient déjà rendu les affaires personnelles d’une trentaine de prisonnières à leur famille. Après un moment d’attente, ils ont appelé la première personne, qui était un vieillard de 60 à 70 ans, comme moi. Tous, nous retenions notre souffle : pourquoi ont-ils appelé cette seule personne ? Nous attendions tous que le vieil homme ressorte afin de lui demander de quoi il retournait. Cela ne dura pas longtemps, peut-être dix minutes, avant que l’on revoie de loin le vieillard, tenant un bout de papier dans la main. Nous nous sommes rués sur lui, mais il était analphabète et ne savait pas de quoi il s’agissait : “Ils m’ont donné ce papier et m’ont dit de partir, et de me le faire lire dehors. Ensuite ils m’ont présenté une lettre et m’ont dit de mettre mes empreintes au bas. Ils m’ont prévenu de ne pas faire le moindre bruit, sans quoi ils viendraient arrêter toute la famille. Ils m’ont recommandé de ne pas perdre le bout de papier.” Ce bout de papier que le vieillard tenait à la main (…) disait ceci : “telle section, tel rang, tel numéro”. Le vieillard s’est assis dans un coin et s’est mis à pleurer. La deuxième et la troisième personne s’en vont et reviennent de la même manière. J’étais le quatrième : un responsable de l’Information venait devant la porte, appelait la personne, l’accompagnait dans le couloir de la prison. Là-bas, on nous faisait entrer dans une pièce pour une fouille complète ; ensuite on entrait dans une deuxième pièce où un jeune de 25 à 30 ans était assis sur une chaise, entouré de deux pasdars[42][42]Les pasdaran-e Sepah, gardiens de la Révolution, sont la milice…. Après des salutations mielleuses, celui-ci nous demandait : “Que pensez-vous de la République islamique ? Quel souvenir gardez-vous du martyre des 72 compagnons de l’Imam [43][43]Expression désignant l’attentat terroriste de juin 1981 où… ?” Je ne sais pas ce qu’on répondait d’habitude ; quant à moi, j’ai exprimé clairement ma pensée. Puis il me tendit un morceau de papier imprimé en disant : “Lis-le, c’est l’accord qui stipule que vous n’avez aucun droit d’organiser une cérémonie de mise en terre, vous n’avez pas le droit d’organiser de cérémonie religieuse privée, ni dans une mosquée, ni à domicile, ni au cimetière, vous devez vous garder de pleurer à haute voix ou faire réciter le Coran pour les défunts.” Puis il lut lui-même la lettre (…) et me demanda de signer. J’ai déchiré la lettre en morceaux sur sa table. Deux personnes sont entrées dans la pièce et m’ont pris ; elles m’ont emmené par la porte de derrière de la prison et m’ont mis dans une voiture. Elles m’ont conduit jusqu’au carrefour de l’aéroport [à une autre extrémité de la ville] et m’ont fait descendre là-bas, en me mettant dans la poche le bout de papier où était écrit : Cimetière X, section 22, rang 3, tombe no 4. Mais dans cette section du cimetière, il y a beaucoup de tombes recouvertes d’une simple dalle de ciment. Des gens trop curieux ont démontré que ces tombes sont anciennes et ne portent pas de nom ; ou bien c’est en recouvrant la dalle en pierre d’une couche de béton qu’ils les présentaient aux familles comme la tombe des êtres chers qu’ils venaient de perdre. On nous disait : “Ce n’est pas la peine d’aller pleurer sur une tombe vide.” Selon un des gardiens de la prison, il restait 400 prisonniers moudjahidines dans les prisons de D. et du Sepah à T. qui ont été emmenés de nuit avec plusieurs camions spéciaux accompagnés d’un groupe de garde, entre 1 et 3 heures du matin. Ils les ont tous emmenés les yeux bandés, et aucun gardien ordinaire de la prison n’a été engagé pour cette affaire. Où ils les ont emmené et ce qu’ils leur ont fait, Dieu seul le sait. »
Les recherches de Shahrooz [44][44]K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art.… sur la façon dont les familles ont été averties des exécutions confirment le récit de Javad : l’isolement des prisons durant l’été, l’usage du téléphone et l’annonce individuelle des exécutions, la demande d’un engagement écrit au silence, mais aussi la surveillance des familles qui se rendent au cimetière et des interrogatoires hebdomadaires au Komité[45][45]Du français « comité » : désigne les cellules informelles… sur le chemin du retour. Ces stratégies s’inscrivent dans un ensemble de pratiques élaborées par le pouvoir depuis 1981 pour « tenir » les familles, dans un contexte où la grande majorité des prisonniers et des condamnés à mort sont des adolescents ou de jeunes adultes. C’est au niveau de la parenté immédiate qu’agit la répression : les frères et s urs, voisins proches et parents sont souvent incarcérés, pour quelques mois, en même temps que les opposants. Si les parents inquiets parlent trop, s’agitent ou se conduisent de façon bruyante dans les différentes situations administratives (devant le procureur révolutionnaire, le tribunal, etc.) où ils viennent s’enquérir du sort de leurs enfants détenus, une pratique courante du Sepah, d’après Javad, est d’emmener les enfants restant de la famille en représailles. Face aux pratiques de terreur qui prennent appui dans le tissu social immédiat (voisinage, parenté), « personne n’osait respirer fort » remarque Javad, qui se souvient avoir perdu son calme un jour, dans le tribunal, alors qu’on l’y avait envoyé pour demander des nouvelles de sa fille. Quinze jours plus tard, une voiture du Sepah s’arrête chez Javad à minuit et vient chercher la jeune s ur de Shirine « pour un interrogatoire ».

10 Les pratiques d’invisibilisation semblent s’organiser en couches successives : si du cercle témoin de la répression, la famille, peu d’information et d’agitation doit filtrer au-dehors, vers des relais sociaux plus larges, les gardiens s’assurent quant à eux que certaines pratiques de gestion des centres de détention ne soient pas connues des familles. Javad identifie ainsi « trois sortes de morts. Ceux qui meurent sous la torture : leur corps ne sont pas rendus et ils ne disent pas aux proches où ils se trouvent ; ceux qui sont pendus : ils donnent un bout de papier disant qu’ils sont enterrés à tel endroit, mais interdisent les cérémonies et les regroupements autour de la tombe ; ceux qui sont fusillés : ils peuvent rendre le corps à la famille contre une somme de 7 à 10 000 tomans ». Cette distinction s’explique peut-être du fait que la pendaison est réservée aux Kafer, aux non-musulmans, et en l’occurrence aux moudjahidines qui sont considérés tels depuis la Fatwa de 1981. Dès lors, les sépultures doivent être dans les carrés non-musulmans des cimetières, ce qui ne serait pas forcément respecté si le corps était rendu aux familles. En 1988, les corps des victimes ne sont pas rendus aux familles qui refusent de leur côté de reconnaître comme authentiques les tombes indiquées par le pouvoir, en particulier depuis la découverte de charniers qui laissent penser que les prisonniers exécutés ont été enterrés dans des fosses communes [46][46]AI, « Mass Executions of Political Prisoners », Amnesty….

11 Le gouvernement dénie les rumeurs d’exécution massive. Le président de la République, aujourd’hui « Guide suprême de la Révolution », Ali Khamenei, reconnaît que quelques Monafeghins ont été exécutés durant l’été, mais justifie cette action au nom de la sûreté d’État et de la préservation du territoire national [47][47]Ibid.. En 1989, une lettre ouverte de la mission permanente de la République islamique d’Iran à l’ONU répond de manière ambiguë au communiqué d’Amnesty International : « Les autorités de la République islamique d’Iran ont toujours nié l’existence d’exécutions politiques, mais cela ne contredit pas d’autres déclarations postérieures confirmant que des espions et des terroristes ont été exécutés [48][48]UN document A/44/153, ZB février 1989, cité dans AI, Iran :…. » En effet, le 5 juillet 1988, peu après la signature du cessez-le-feu entre l’Iran et l’Irak, l’Organisation des moudjahidines exilée dans une base militaire en Irak lance une offensive armée à la frontière iranienne et pénètre brièvement sur le territoire iranien, avant d’être sévèrement défaite par l’armée adverse. Shahrooz réfute l’idée selon laquelle les exécutions massives de 1988, dont les analystes peinent à saisir clairement l’objectif ou le mobile, seraient une riposte à cette tentative d’attaque militaire, en s’appuyant sur plusieurs témoignages individuels et le rapport du représentant spécial auprès de la Commission des Droits de l’Homme des Nations Unies, selon lesquels les procès et les exécutions de 1988 commencent à partir du mois d’avril, soit avant l’attaque du 5 juillet [49][49]Final Report on the situation of human rights in the Islamic….

12 Il faut mentionner que le pouvoir impliqué dans les violences d’État de 1988, comme dans la gestion de leur héritage, est un corps hétérogène, parcouru de divisions d’au moins deux sortes. D’une part, il comprend des acteurs gouvernementaux, officiels, et différents groupes privés ou paramilitaires liés au Parti républicain islamique (le Hezbollah, le Sepah). D’autre part, le dispositif de répression et l’évolution des pratiques carcérales dans les années 1980 s’inscrivent, au sein même du parti au pouvoir, dans des jeux d’influences et des luttes politiques dont l’enjeu est la succession de Khomeini [50][50]M. Behrooz, « Reflections on Iran’s Prison System… », art.…. Une analyse des ordres mettant en place le massacre et des réponses aux réticences exprimées dans les rangs du Parti républicain islamique montre que cet événement est l’occasion pour le pouvoir de faire « le tri entre les mitigés et les vrais croyants parmi [l]es partisans [du régime], leur imposant par ailleurs le silence au sujet des droits humains [51][51]E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 221 (notre…  » : les exécutions de masse auraient servi à verrouiller et à assurer la continuité du gouvernement mis en place par Khomeini, qui s’éteint en 1989. L’ayatollah Montazeri ­ dauphin et successeur pressenti de Khomeini à la fonction de Guide suprême de la Révolution depuis 1979 ­ est ainsi écarté de la scène publique et placé en résidence surveillée à partir de 1988, suite à ses prises de positions critiques au sujet des exécutions [52][52]Ibid., p. 221-222 ; Azadeh Kian-Thiébaut, « La révolution….

13 À défaut de pouvoir s’appuyer sur un recensement officiel ou encore sur des investigations auprès des familles et dans les fosses présumées ­ les gouvernements successifs rendant risquée les mentions ou recherches sur le sujet ­ il est difficile d’estimer le nombre de victimes du massacre. Pour Amnesty International, elles étaient 2 500 en 1990, soit quelques mois après les événements. Depuis, la collecte d’informations auprès des familles, que ce soit par les partis politiques dont les membres étaient concernés ou par des initiatives de droits de l’homme [53][53]H. Mokhtar, Testimony at the September 1 Conference, op. cit…, dresse une liste nominative de 4 000 à 5 000 victimes. Le Parti des Moudjahidine-e Kalq chiffre le massacre à 30 000 [54][54]Christina Lamb, The Telegraph, « Khomeini fatwa “led to killing…, ce qui est bien supérieur aux chiffres avancés ailleurs. Une récente étude qui tente de rassembler les données dans les différentes provinces conclue au chiffre de 12 000 [55][55]Nasser Mohajer, « The Mass Killings in Iran », Aresh, no 57,…. Aux pratiques violentes du pouvoir répond le souci de mettre au jour des faits précis et de prendre la mesure de l’ampleur de l’événement.

14 Face à cela, les analyses juridiques du « crime contre l’humanité » de 1988 s’interrogent sur l’impossibilité ou l’absence de volonté politique actuelle en ce qui concerne la mobilisation sur le terrain du droit, et en particulier du droit pénal international [56][56]K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art.…. Il serait fort utile de confronter les mobilisations du droit dans l’espace publique en Iran depuis la « démocratisation » des années 1990, et les essais de reformulation des exécutions massives de 1988 en un enjeu des droits de l’homme qui n’ont paradoxalement pas connu de relais effectif et de réalisation concrète [57][57]K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art.…. Ce décalage, ou cette absence, se comprend notamment par le passé révolutionnaire, nezami, et l’implication plus ou moins directe de certains responsables du mouvement réformateur dans les violences d’État durant la mise en place du régime islamique, et, notamment, dans le massacre de 1988. Ainsi, Akbar Ganji, journaliste d’opposition connu pour ses engagements en faveur des libertés civiles, plusieurs fois emprisonné depuis 2000, est-il un ancien commandant des Pasdaran-e Sepah[58][58]Voir par exemple N. Yavari d’Hellencourt, « Islam et…. Saïd Hajarian, autre figure de l’opposition démocrate et directeur du journal réformateur Sobh-e Emrooz, était adjoint du ministre de l’Information Reyshahri 1984 à 1989 [59][59]Voir par exemple Ahmed Vahdat, « The Spectre of Montazeri »,…. Abdullah Nouri, qui s’impose à la fin des années 1990 comme la figure principale du parti réformateur, était ministre de l’Intérieur en 1988 et a fait des déclarations niant les allégations d’exécutions, qu’il attribuait à « une campagne organisée à l’étranger  » tout en affirmant que « la loi islamique et le gouvernement de la République islamique d’Iran respectent la dignité humaine et ont organisé les institutions de la République islamique sur ce principe essentiel [60][60]Cité dans K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and… ». Si l’évocation des événements de l’été 1988 a été une ligne rouge à ne pas franchir sous les mandats réformateurs des années 1990-2000, les élections présidentielles de 2005 et les cadres conservateurs au pouvoir sous le mandat d’Ahmadinejad éloignent d’autant plus une perspective de reconnaissance ou de publicisation que la responsabilité pénale individuelle des membres actuels du gouvernement est engagée dans les exécutions de 1988 ­ et, plus généralement, dans le système pénitentiaire des années 1980. Selon plusieurs sources, l’actuel ministre de l’Intérieur, Mostafa Pour-Mohammadi, a siégé au sein de la commission chargée des procès-minute de l’été 1988, en tant que représentant du ministère de l’Information [61][61]E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 210 ;….

La commémoration

15 Ainsi, en dehors des témoignages mentionnés, les faits dont nous parlons n’ont jamais été évoqués dans l’espace public à un niveau politique ou juridique [62][62]E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit. ; R. Afshari,…. Il s’agit alors de regarder du côté des pratiques mémorielles ­ comme nous le suggère la démarche de Javad. Comment la mémoire intime et familiale acquiert-elle une dimension politique ? Face aux pratiques d’invisibilisation (gestion du deuil, confiscation funéraire, etc.), les rites et les lieux funéraires sont travaillés par l’enjeu d’une commémoration dont il s’agit de saisir la porté et les limites, politiques. Ce mouvement se noue d’abord autour de la référence au « martyre » autour de laquelle s’organise l’Islam révolutionnaire. Face aux exécutions de masse, de 1981 à 1988, la réalité des victimes est revisitée à travers la notion de martyre. L’idée du martyre est présente dans la pensée politique de Chariati [63][63]Paul Vieille, « L’institution shi’ite, la religiosité…, et participe à configurer l’action politique des Moujahidines, qu’il s’agisse de l’engagement révolutionnaire ou, plus tard, de la résistance [64][64]Voir par exemple E. Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, op.…. Principal ressort du discours public et de la communication pour l’engagement populaire dans la guerre contre l’Irak, elle est davantage encore une pierre de touche de l’islam chiite à l’aune de l’idéologie révolutionnaire du Parti républicain islamique [65][65]F. Khosrokhavar, L’islamisme et la mort : le martyre…. Autour de ce « culte du martyre », relayé par un art mural prolifique, s’organise la mobilisation nationale, puis la mémoire officielle du conflit [66][66]Ulrich Marzolph, « The Martyr’s Way to Paradise. Shiite Mural…. Entre 1981 et 1988, les jeunes bassidjis révolutionnaires ont nettoyé par centaines de milliers les champs de mines de l’armée, dans une utopie mortifère et salvatrice qui les érigeait en nouveaux « martyrs » de l’Islam. Dans le contexte d’une guerre qui laisse la société iranienne exsangue de 600 000 à un million d’hommes, la sépulture chiite, l’anonymat, la célébration du martyr et de la nation sont fondus dans des offices religieux publiques et médiatisés pour les combattants victimes [67][67]Ali Reza Sheikholeslami, « The Transformation of Iran’s…. Comme l’illustrent la production et le souvenir des martyrs, et le rapport qu’ils instituent à la mort et au corps, à la colère et à la vengeance, la République islamique s’appuie sur une idéologie « martyropathe [68][68]F. Khosrokhavar, L’islamisme et la mort…, op. cit. », née d’un effondrement de l’utopie révolutionnaire, qui s’impose comme la clé de voûte de l’action politique et de la raison d’État. Or, tandis qu’elle enserre l’espace public dans un réseau de passions orchestré par un dispositif rhétorique et institutionnel, elle verrouille toute possibilité de saisir le souvenir et l’émotion collective hors de cette grille logique étroite. C’est dans cette canalisation politique et totalitaire de l’émotion et du deuil que va s’inscrire, de manière subvertie et discrète, une mémoire émotive du massacre de 1988.
Le vendredi matin, dans les cimetières de province, dans le carré des promis au paradis, les mères des enfants « martyrs » de la guerre pleurent ensemble leurs morts, alors que dans le carré d’à côté, sur des tombes sans inscriptions, d’autres mères, dans une même sociabilité et un même rituel, pleurent leurs « martyrs » à elles : ceux de 1988. Un jeune bassidji écrit ainsi à ses parents depuis le front : « Jusqu’à présent, on n’a pas trouvé le corps de certains martyrs. Si cela se produit dans mon cas, n’en soyez pas tristes [mes parents] : vous n’avez pas épargné ma vie et vous l’avez donné pour Dieu, alors renoncez à mon corps et quand vous en ressentez le besoin, rendez-vous sur la tombe des autres martyrs [69][69]Témoignage paru dans le journal islamiste Keyhan en 1984, cité… ! » Le corps dérobé, disparu, du martyr, qui est une constante de l’idéologie islamique révolutionnaire, se réalise paradoxalement dans le cimetière de Khavaran, dans les fosses communes où ont été enterrés les prisonniers de la prison d’Evin exécutés en 1988. Pour les journalistes de la BBC : « Le cimetière de Khavaran n’est rien d’autre qu’un terrain vague terreux où, ça et là, des familles ont démarqué au hasard et de façon symbolique des tombes à l’aide de pierres. Il y a aussi quelques vraies pierres tombales et les familles affirment les y avoir mises car elles disent que leurs proches exécutés ont été enterrés à cet endroit [70][70]BBC Persia, « Le cimetière de Khavaran : des sépultures sans…. » Les cadres religieux où s’ancre le travail du deuil dessinent un espace de négociation, de répression et de détournement pour les acteurs : l’État en joue pour étouffer la possibilité d’une mémoire du massacre, les familles les détournent pour pleurer et se souvenir, malgré tout. Dès lors, la mémoire des exécutés de l’été 1988 flotte silencieusement dans l’imaginaire « martyropathe » de la République islamique ­ qui a assis sa domination précisément sur ces morts politiques. La mère d’un prisonnier exécuté écrit à sa fille exilée à l’étranger : « Le vendredi, toutes les mères et d’autres membres de la famille sont allés au cimetière. Quelle journée de deuil ! C’était comme l’Ashura. Des mères sont venues avec des portraits de leurs fils ; l’une d’elles avait perdu cinq fils et belles-filles. Finalement, le Komité est venu et nous a dispersé [71][71]AI, Iran : Violations of Human Rights 1987-1990, p. 3. Notre…. »

16 L’Ashura, dans la tradition chiite, est un moment de socialisation et de deuil où chacun pleure pour ses morts et ses peines dans le cadre de la commémoration religieuse du « martyr » d’Hussein. La référence à l’Ashura, et l’idée d’une communauté du deuil qui transparaît dans le témoignage, renvoie à une certaine socialité entre les familles de prisonniers comme le noyau autour duquel s’embraient les pratiques de souvenir. Les exécutions ne sont pas pensées dans le cadre préexistant des partis politiques auxquels appartenaient les victimes, mais à un niveau familial et intime. Toutefois, à partir des proches liés par une communauté d’expérience s’élaborent des pratiques de souvenir à un niveau collectif. Cette socialité est nouée dans l’épreuve qu’a été pour les familles de soutenir les prisonniers durant leur peine et de se tenir informées de leur sort. On trouve la trace de ce lien entre les familles, dans le témoignage de Javad. Ainsi commence le récit de l’annonce des exécutions en automne 1988 : « Le jour suivant, comme indiqué, nous nous sommes rendus devant la prison de D. à 9 heures. Il y avait d’autres personnes attroupées qui avaient reçu le même appel. Quand je les ai vus, je me suis un peu apaisé. Nous nous demandions les uns aux autres : “Et vous, qu’en pensez-vous ?” Chacun donnait son avis, l’un disait : “Ils veulent sûrement accorder une visite”, l’autre : “Ils veulent expliquer pourquoi ils ont interdit les visites”. Bref, dans ce brouhaha, nous étions tous d’accord pour dire que nous allions enfin connaître la fin de cette angoissante incertitude. » Ces moments de rencontre et de socialité jouent une fonction essentielle dans la circulation de l’information. Dans le témoignage de Javad, ce sont les nouvelles données par les familles dont les proches sont transférés d’une ville à l’autre, ou qui ont plusieurs proches prisonniers dans plusieurs villes différentes, qui permettent d’avoir une appréhension plus générale de l’échelle et des procédés de répression politique à un niveau national. La sociabilité des proches apparaît ainsi comme le lieu d’une résistance face aux pratiques du pouvoir, à travers une circulation de l’information qui répond aux stratégies de secret, mais aussi à travers la constitution de solidarités ponctuelles. Après 1988, cette socialité des proches de prisonniers semble avoir été une ressource à partir de laquelle des pratiques collectives de souvenir ont peu à peu vu le jour. La mère d’un prisonnier exécuté à Téhéran et enterré dans le cimetière de Khavaran explique dans un entretien : « Quand nous voulions aller sur sa tombe, on nous emmenait au Komité : “Pourquoi êtes-vous venus ? Et les gens avec qui vous parliez, qui était-ce ?” Un jour par semaine, le Komité nous attendait en chemin et nous emmenait là-bas. Jusqu’en 1989, quand on a organisé une cérémonie avec quelques autres mères pour nos enfants. Le soir, ils sont venus et nous ont dit « Venez à [la prison d’] Evin demain. Le lendemain matin de bonne heure nous sommes allés à Evin. Ils nous ont gardés jusqu’à 14 heures les yeux bandés, puis ils nous ont mis dans une voiture et nous ont emmenés au Komité. Ils nous ont gardés trois jours, et nous ont interrogés individuellement pour savoir comment nous nous connaissions. “Ça fait huit ans que nous allons en visite ensemble, nous avons appris à nous connaître ; ça fait un an que vous avez tué nos enfants, nous avons appris à nous connaître. C’est comme dire bonjour à ses voisins : à force d’aller à Evin, aux Komités, nous avons fini par nous connaître.” Ils ont demandé les noms de famille de toutes les mères. “Je ne les connais pas, ai-je répondu. Je connais leur prénom, c’est tout [72][72]Entretien filmé reproduit sur le site internet de l’ONG de….” » La réponse qui semble émerger dans les décennies suivant l’exécution des prisonniers est celle de pratiques mémorielles qui s’organisent autour de deux choses : la commémoration collective des morts dans le cadre d’une cérémonie rituelle qui est celle du bozorgdasht, et l’identification du massacre de 1988 à un lieu spécifique, qui est le cimetière de Khavaran. Ce dernier point renvoie en effet à l’émergence progressive d’un lieu-symbole, investi d’une mémoire presque narrative de l’événement et des pratiques qui ont orchestré les procès et les exécutions collectives, la confiscation des corps, le silence public. La place qu’a progressivement acquise cet endroit dans la commémoration des exécutions, alors qu’il n’est qu’un lieu parmi les cimetières municipaux et les charniers (dont 21 seraient localisés à ce jour [73][73]Entretien télévisé disponible sur internet : Mosahebe-ye…) où les dépouilles ont été enfouies en 1988, semble indiquer qu’au-delà des souvenirs individuels, les pratiques mémorielles tendent à se ressaisir à un niveau collectif. « Khavaran est un nom qui signifie “ne pas oublier” » titrait ainsi un article consacré à une cérémonie de commémoration dans le cimetière en septembre 2005 [74][74]Mohammad Reza Mohini, « Khavaran est un nom qui signifie “ne…. Pourquoi et comment ce mot-symbole a-t-il émergé ? Qu’indique-t-il sur la façon dont les enjeux de non-oubli se saisissent en termes collectifs, et éventuellement politiques ?

« Khavaran : un nom qui signifie “ne pas oublier” »

17 Les procès orchestrant le massacre de 1988 témoignent de cet Islam politique particulier réintroduit par Khomeini, qui repose notamment sur le réinvestissement politique des mythes fondateurs et de la tradition historique du chiisme. Les condamnés le sont pour « hypocrisie » ou pour « apostasie » ; c’est donc en « damnés », et en vue d’assurer cette damnation, que leur passage de ce monde à l’autre sera organisé. On enterre les victimes avec leurs habits et même leurs chaussures (le rituel exige un linceul blanc) dans des fosses communes très peu profondes, à fleur de terre (l’islam exige une profondeur minimum de 1,5 mètre) [75][75]E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confession…, op. cit., p. 218 ; K.…. Le deuil s’organise dans la société chiite autour de plusieurs étapes de commémoration collectives et de rassemblements funéraires : le troisième jour, le septième jour, le quarantième jour, qui marque la fin officielle des funérailles. En 1988, le quarantième jour était passé lorsque les familles furent informées de la mort de leurs proches. La majorité des exécutions eurent lieu à Téhéran et la gestion des corps semble s’être organisée dans l’obsession des règles du najes (la séparation des musulmans et des non-musulmans, du pur et de l’impur) : des fosses sont apparues, non pas dans le cimetière musulman de Behesht-e-Zara (où même des opposants politiques marxistes exécutés par l’ancien régime furent exhumés et déplacés), mais dans un carré situé dans le cimetière de Khavaran perdu sur une route à 16 km au sud-est de Téhéran, qui est un lieu d’inhumation ba’haie [76][76]Communauté religieuse persécutée.. Le lieu a été renommé Kaferestan (la terre des Kafer, des incroyants) ou encore Lanatabad (le lieu des damnés) ; les familles s’y réfèrent comme Golzar-e Khavaran (le champ de fleurs de Khavaran) car elles y ont planté des fleurs, et qu’une fois par an, à la date anniversaire du massacre, la terre du terrain vague est recouverte de bouquets. Le lieu est même parfois désigné comme golestan (le champ de fleurs), par analogie phonique et retournement du mot gourestan (le cimetière). La guerre des noms en fait en tous cas le lieu d’une mémoire laborieuse, tendue.
C’est dans ce contexte que se sont mises en place à Khavaran des cérémonies de commémoration des morts de 1988, inscrites dans la tradition ritualisée du bozorgdasht, qui est celle d’une visite au cimetière à la date anniversaire de la mort, donnant lieu à un rassemblement laïque des proches pour évoquer le souvenir du défunt. Progressivement, ces visites se sont transformées en cérémonies de commémoration du massacre de 1988. Une fois par an, lors du bozorgdasht, « le cimetière de Khavaran, rapportent les observateurs, est transformé en champs de fleurs et des opposants au régime islamique se mêlent aux familles : on récite des poèmes et on lit des textes sur la vie des disparus, de petites marches de protestation s’organisent même dans le cimetière [77][77]BBC Persia, « Le cimetière de Khavaran… », art. cité ; voir…. » Cependant, deux décennies après les faits, les enjeux de visibilisation du massacre, qui engage la responsabilité individuelle de membres de certaines administrations encore en fonction, restent sensibles. En novembre 2005, une radio américaine en langue persane, Radio Farda, annonce que des pierres tombales du cimetière de Khavaran sont détruites par « des individus non-identifiés [78][78]Nouvelles radiophonique du 19 novembre 2005, Radio Farda,… ». En automne 2007, sept personnes ayant participé au bozorgdasht de proches à Khavaran sont arrêtées et détenues dans la « section 209 » de la prison d’Evin à Téhéran, sous autorité du ministère de l’Information [79][79]AI, Action Urgente, « Iran : Craintes de mauvais traitements/…. Un rapport de Human Rights Watch avance des témoignages de familles de victimes selon lesquels « des tombes improvisées, placées par les familles ont été détruites. On dit que le gouvernement prépare une intervention importante à [Khavaran] afin de supprimer les traces d’inhumation [80][80]Human Rights Watch, Minister of murders, op. cit. Notre…. »

18 Lors des commémorations, la présence d’« opposants du régime » aux côtés des familles des victimes ­ la manifestation regroupait 2 000 personnes en 2005 ­ et de « petites marches de protestations » semble témoigner d’une politisation des rites mortuaires autour desquels se sont cristallisés les enjeux d’oubli et de souvenir liés à l’événement. Ce qu’on constate, c’est la fonction de catalyse du lieu dans l’organisation d’une action collective qui dépasserait le cercle des intimes. Ainsi, les membres de Kanoon-e Khavaran (l’Association Khavaran) fondée en 1996 par les sympathisants d’un groupe politique marxiste exilés en Europe et Amérique du Nord, s’organisent-ils en un réseau d’information qui a pour objet la constitution d’archives relatives aux exécutions, la production d’une liste nominale des victimes ainsi que la localisation de charniers à travers le pays [81][81]Kanoon-e Khavaran, op. cit. (site internet).. D’autre part, dans les différents textes lus lors des commémorations, le nom propre, Khavaran, émerge comme une synthèse des événements de 1988 et de leur mémoire. Ainsi de cette chanson qui commence par : « Khavaran ! Khavaran ! Terre des souvenirs. Il y vient parfois des mères… », ou encore de ce poème lu lors d’un bozorgdasht : « Je suis le cri rouge de la liberté / Lis mon nom, ma mère, dans le ciel de Khavaran / Je suis le drapeau sanglant de la liberté / Lis mon nom, mon épouse, dans le ciel de Khavaran / Je suis la bannière rouge de la liberté / Lis mon nom, mon enfant, dans le ciel de Khavaran / Je suis prisonnier sous la terre sèche de Khavaran / Lis mon nom, peuple courageux, dans le ciel de Khavaran [82][82]M. R. Mohini, « Khavaran est un nom qui signifie “ne pas… ». Si les trois premiers vers opposent le parcours politique des victimes (« le cri rouge de la liberté ») à un lien familial autour duquel se noue le souvenir (la mère, l’épouse, l’enfant), le dernier vers propose la mémoire de l’événement non-publicisé (« prisonnier sous la terre sèche de Khavaran ») comme le levier d’une appropriation politique, et presque la condition de reformation du « peuple courageux », en s’insérant ainsi dans un schème essentiel du discours post-révolutionnaire qui est l’invitation au peuple à réitérer la mobilisation héroïque de la révolution. Or, la difficulté d’une politisation de cette histoire alternative que propose Khavaran se négocie précisément autour de cette référence à l’histoire et la grammaire révolutionnaires, et à son « anachronisme » par rapport à un répertoire contemporain de discours et d’actions centré autour de la revendication de libertés civiles [83][83]F. Khosrokhavar, « L’Iran, la démocratie et la nouvelle…. En effet, la charge mémorielle attribuée à ce charnier signifie-t-elle pour autant la formation d’une mémoire collective à partir de laquelle se reconstruit, dans le contexte iranien actuel, l’enjeu politique des exécutions de masse ? Mais alors, quelle identité se cristallise autour de cette mémoire commune ? C’est avec cette question qu’apparaissent les limites et les tensions liées à la possibilité de « se mobiliser » autour de la constitution des exécutions comme une cause publique.

19 Les enjeux de mémoire et d’identité sont pris dans une relation plastique de réciprocité, rappelle Gillis : « Une dimension fondamentale de toute identité individuelle ou collective, à savoir un sentiment de communauté [a sense of sameness] dans le temps et l’espace, s’élabore à partir du souvenir ; et ce dont on se souvient ainsi est défini par l’identité revendiquée [84][84]John R. Gillis (dir.), Commemorations : The Politics of…. » Or il y a une tension entre les pratiques mémorielles qui émergent sur des sites comme Khavaran, et l’identification des victimes du massacre au mouvement des moudjahidines (auquel plus de 70 % des prisonniers exécutés étaient en effet affiliés). Si les exécutions de 1988 ne sont pas vraiment un secret au sein de la population iranienne, elles sont directement rapportées à la trajectoire politique des moudjahidines qui semblent avoir été exclus des revendications et des références par lesquelles une identité nationale iranienne s’est négociée dans les pays depuis la Révolution. De leur côté, les moudjahidines entretiennent une mémoire des « martyrs » de 1988 liée aux narrations et aux symboles qui construisent l’identité forte et exclusive du groupe en exil, et pour ce faire relisent l’événement comme une confrontation entre le pouvoir et la résistance (c’est-à-dire les moudjahidines) ; cette interprétation laisse de côté la diversité des appartenances politiques des victimes en 1988, comme le fait que de nombreux prisonniers d’opinion s’étaient, au cours de leur détention, détachés de toute étiquette politique ou militante. Pour Shahrooz, c’est là le principal obstacle politique à une mobilisation par le droit faisant du massacre de 1988 un « crime contre l’humanité [85][85]K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art.… ».

Un enjeu actuel

20 Dans ses analyses sur la non-commémoration et l’oubli dans la cité athénienne, Nicole Loraux identifiait le « deuil inoublieux [86][86]Nicole Loraux, La cité divisée. L’oubli dans la mémoire… » comme une passion politique qui lie le familial et la vie de la cité. À l’image de Javad qui a décidé de consigner ses mémoires pour ses petits-enfants, on peut observer que l’enjeu d’une résistance mémorielle face aux événements de 1988 engage les notions d’oubli et de déni face à un silence orchestré du pouvoir. Orchestré, et non total, ni effectif. Cette orchestration, c’est cette attitude ambivalente du pouvoir qui enterre en secret les victimes à fleur de terre, tout en faisant de l’odeur putride qui se dégage du charnier la preuve que ces personnes (qui ne sont officiellement pas là) étaient des non-musulmans ; c’est aussi annoncer la mort des prisonniers aux familles, mais en organisant un dispositif de mise sous silence du deuil (contrats de non-sépulture, annonces différées et au téléphone) ; c’est encore l’énonciation d’une Fatwa de mort de la part du Guide suprême, mais la négation d’exécutions de masse, puisque si l’exécution de prisonniers est reconnue, leur échelle niée. L’émergence d’une commémoration esquisse un réinvestissement politique des rites et des lieux de sépulture là où l’invisibilisation du massacre se fondait sur leur confiscation. Il faudrait pouvoir mener une observation interne, comparée, des structures de mobilisation que révèlent ces commémorations, même si une telle étude s’avère difficile dans le contexte actuel marqué par une nouvelle surveillance du pouvoir, comme le montrent les interventions de 2005 à 2007 sur le site de Khavaran, auprès des familles engagées ou de chercheurs souhaitant explorer le sujet [87][87]Nathalie Nougayrède, « Une chercheuse franco-iranienne empêchée…. En se fondant sur les articles scientifiques, les sources médiatiques, les différents témoignages publiés et les sites associatifs consacrés à ce sujet, il apparaît toutefois que les enjeux du non-oubli restent pris dans une tension mémorielle qui enserre les possibilités de mobilisation [88][88]Nader Khoshdel, « Marasem-e bozorgdasht-e zendanian-e siasi :…. Cette tension ne concerne pas uniquement les écarts entre le travail de commémoration initié par les familles et l’investissement politique et identitaire de l’événement parmi les groupes qui se sont, dans une faible mesure, réorganisés en exil. Elle concerne également l’impossibilité paradoxale de constituer la demande de reconnaissance et de justice comme une cause commune, dans un espace public marqué par la revendication de libertés civiles. L’extériorité des événements de 1988 par rapport à la vie politique et l’étanchéité des revendications civiles face à cette réalité invitent à penser la place singulière qu’occupe le massacre de 1988 dans la complexité des jeux de rupture et de continuité qui tissent l’histoire iranienne contemporaine ­ et donc, les enjeux politiques actuels dont est chargée sa mémoire.

Notes

  • [1]
    Notre traduction.
  • [2]
    L’ayatollah Khomeini qualifie la guerre de Jihad défensif et l’appelle « Défense Sacrée » (Def¯a’e moghaddas) ; au sujet des offensives iraniennes il parle de « Kerbala » en référence à la bataille qui, dans cette ville irakienne, marque en 680 le début de la rupture entre les Chiites et les Sunnites ; la guerre en Irak est appelée « Qadisiyya de Sadam » par référence, ici encore religieuse, à la bataille al-Qadisiyya de Sa’d qui eut lieu en Mésopotamie en 636 entre Musulmans et Perses sassanides, dans le cadre de la conquête musulmane de la Perse (voir à ce sujet Sinan Antoon, « Monumental Disrespect », Middle East Report, no 228, automne 2003, p. 28-30).
  • [3]
    L’auteur remercie Sandrine Lefranc pour sa lecture attentive et ses commentaires.
  • [4]
    Voir notamment Ervand Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions. Prisons and Public Recantations in Modern Iran, Berkeley, University of California Press, 1999 ; Amnesty International (AI), « Iran : Violations of Human Rights 1987-1990  », décembre 1990 ; AI, « Iran : Political Executions », décembre 1988 ; anonyme, « Man shahede ghatle ame zendanyane siyasi boodam » (« J’ai été témoin du massacre des prisonniers politiques »), Cheshmandaz, no 14, hiver 1995 ; Hossein-Ali Montazeri, Khaterat (Mémoires), hhhhttp:// wwww. amontazeri. com(consulté le 7 avril 2008).
  • [5]
    Voir E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 215 ; AI, « Iran : Violations of Human Rights 1987-1990  » ; Kaveh Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor : A Preliminary Report on The 1988 Massacre of Iran’s Political Prisoners », Harvard Human Rights Journal, vol. 20, 2007, p. 227-261, p. 228.
  • [6]
    Farhad Khosrokhavar, « L’Iran, la démocratie et la nouvelle citoyenneté », Cahiers internationaux de sociologie, no 111, 2001/2, p. 291-317.
  • [7]
    Ibid., p. 309 et Nouchine Yavari d’Hellencourt, « Islam et démocratie : de la nécessité d’une contextualisation  », Cemoti, no spécial, La question démocratique et les sociétés musulmanes. Le militaire, l’entrepreneur et le paysan, no 27, hhhhttp:// cemoti. revues. org/ document656. html(consulté le 20 avril 2008).
  • [8]
    Ibid.
  • [9]
    Ibid.
  • [10]
    Stanley Cohen, States of Denial, Knowing about Atrocities and Suffering, Cambridge, Polity Press, 2001.
  • [11]
    E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 209-229 ; Afshin Matin-Asgari, « Twentieth Century Iran’s Political Prisoners », Middle Eastern Studies, vol. 42, no 5, 2006, p. 689-707.
  • [12]
    Maziar Behrooz, « Reflections on Iran’s Prison System During the Montazeri Years (1985­1988)  », Iran Analysis Quarterly, vol. 2, no 3, 2005, p. 11-24.
  • [13]
    Reza Afshari, Human Rights in Iran : The Abuse of Cultural Relativism, Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2001 ; K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 243-257 ; Raluca Mihaila, « Political Considerations in Accountability for Crimes Against Humanity : An Iranian Case Study », Hemispheres : The Tufts University Journal of International Affairs, no spécial, State-Building : Risks and Consequences, 2002, hhhhttp:// ase. tufts. edu/ hemispheres/ (consulté le 7 avril 2008).
  • [14]
    Conseil Économique et Social des Nations Unies (ECOSOC), Commission sur les droits humains, « On the Situation of Human Rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran », Situation of Human Rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran, 27, U.N. Doc. A/44/620 (2 novembre 1989) ; Final Report on the situation of human rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran by the Special Representative of the Commission on Human Rights, Mr. Reynaldo Galindo Pohl, pursuant to Commission resolution 1992/67 of 4 March 1992, E/CN.4/1993/41 ; Human Rights Watch, « Pour-Mohammadi and the 1988 Prison Massacres », Ministers of Murder : Iran’s New Security Cabinet, hhhhttp:// wwww. hrw. org/ backgrounder/ mena/ iran1205/ 2. htm#_Toc121896787(consulté le 7 avril 2008).
  • [15]
    Un impressionnant travail a été accompli sur ce point par E. Abrahambian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 209-229, qui reste la principale référence à ce jour.
  • [16]
    Notamment Nima Parvaresh, Nabardi nabarabar : gozareshi az haft sal zendan 1361­68 (Une bataille inégale : rapport de sept ans en prison 1982­1989), Andeesheh va Peykar Publications, 1995 ; Reza Ghaffari, Khaterate yek zendani az zendanhaye jomhuriyeh islami (Les mémoires d’un prisonnier dans les prisons de la République Islamique), Stockholm, Arash Forlag, 1998 ; anonyme, « Man shahede ghatle ame zendanyane siyasi boodam », op. cit.
  • [17]
    Nous reprenons, parmi les différentes transcriptions possibles, l’orthographe adoptée par l’organisation aujourd’hui [[[[http:// wwww. maryam-rajavi. com/ fr/ content/ view/ 300/ 66/ (consulté le 7 avril 2008). « Moudjahidines » est le pluriel de « moudjahed ».
  • [18]
    Mohammad Mossadeq a été Premier ministre de 1951 à 1953. Ayant nationalisé l’industrie pétrolière iranienne en 1951, il est renversé en 1953 suite à l’opération « TP-Ajax » (menée par la CIA), condamné à trois ans d’emprisonnement, puis assigné à résidence jusqu’à sa mort en 1967. Hosein Fatemi est le fondateur du Front de Libération exécuté en 1955.
  • [19]
    Ervand Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, New Haven/Londres, Yale University Press, 1992, p. 115-125.
  • [20]
    Ibid., p. 100-102.
  • [21]
    Ibid., p. 229 ; voir également A. Matin-Asgari, « Twentieth Century Iran’s Political Prisoners », art. cité, p. 690.
  • [22]
    E. Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, op. cit., p. 229 (notre traduction).
  • [23]
    Appliqué dans la Constitution iranienne de 1979, ce principe théologique confère aux religieux la primauté sur le pouvoir politique et assure une gestion réelle du pouvoir par le Guide de la Révolution (Vali-e Faghih) qui détermine la direction politique générale du pays, arbitre les conflits entre pouvoirs législatif, exécutif et judiciaire et est chef des armées (régulières et paramilitaires).
  • [24]
    Haleh Afshar (dir.), Iran : A Revolution in Turmoil, Albany, SUNY Press, 1985 ; Shaul Bakhash, The Reign of the ayatollahs : Iran and the Islamic Revolution, New York, Basic Books, 1984.
  • [25]
    Connie Bruck, « Exiles : How Iran’s Expatriates Are Gaming the Nuclear Threat », The New Yorker, 6 Mars 2006, p. 48.
  • [26]
    E. Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, op. cit., p. 260-261.
  • [27]
    C. Bruck, « Exiles… », art. cité ; Human Rights Watch, No exit : human rights abuses inside the MKO camps, 2005, [[[http:// hrw. org/ backgrounder/ mena/ iran0505/ ?iran0505.pdf, consulté le 7 avril 2008] ; Human Rights Watch, Statement on Responses to Human Rights Watch Report on Abuses by the Mujahedin-e Khalq Organization (MKO), 15 février 2006, [[[[http:// hrw. org/ mideast/ pdf/ iran021506. pdf(consulté le 7 avril 2008).
  • [28]
    Elizabeth Rubin, « The Cult of Rajavi », New York Times Magazine, 13 juillet 2003, p. 26.
  • [29]
    E. Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, op. cit., p. 3 (notre traduction).
  • [30]
    Ibid.
  • [31]
    Le mouvement était le seul à présenter des candidats partout en Iran.
  • [32]
    Le manuscrit dit : « une société Tohidie  », d’après le Tohid qui est le premier principe d’Islam (« Je dis qu’il y a un seul Dieu ») : une société islamique selon la perspective d’Ali Chariati.
  • [33]
    E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confession, op. cit., p. 210.
  • [34]
    Nader Vahabi, « L’obstacle structurel à l’abolition de la peine de mort en Iran », Panagea, « Diritti umani », mars 2007, hhhttp:// wwww. panagea. eu/ web/ index. php? ?option=com_content&task=view&id=150&Itemid=99999999 (consulté le 28 avril 2008).
  • [35]
    H.-A. Montazeri, Khaterat, op. cit.
  • [36]
    Hossein Mokhtar, Testimony at the September 1st Conference, Mission for Establishment of Human Rights in Iran (MEHR), 1998, en ligne, hhhhttp:// wwww. mehr. org/ massacre_1988. htm(consulté le 7 avril 2008). Notre traduction.
  • [37]
    E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 209 et suiv.
  • [38]
    Ibid.
  • [39]
    Témoignage cité dans E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 214 ; K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 238.
  • [40]
    E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 209.
  • [41]
    K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 227 ; R. Mihaila, « Political Considerations in Accountability for Crimes Against Humanity… », art. cité. Ces travaux prolongent une recherche initiale d’Amnesty International qui a produit plusieurs rapports quasi contemporains aux événements (« Iran : Violations of Human Rights 1987-1990  », art. cité ; « Iran : Political Executions », art. cité) et adopte aujourd’hui la définition de crime contre l’humanité : « Aux termes du droit international en vigueur en 1988, on entend par crimes contre l’humanité des attaques généralisées ou systématiques dirigées contre des civils et fondées sur des motifs discriminatoires, y compris d’ordre politique. » (AI, Action Urgente, « Iran : Craintes de mauvais traitements/ Prisonniers d’opinion présumés », 2 novembre 2007, [en ligne hhhhttp:// asiapacific. amnesty. org/ library/ Index/ FRAMDE131282007,consulté le 7 avril 2008]).
  • [42]
    Les pasdaran-e Sepah, gardiens de la Révolution, sont la milice paramilitaire de la République islamique.
  • [43]
    Expression désignant l’attentat terroriste de juin 1981 où 72 cadres du Parti républicain islamique sont morts : le terme renvoie aux « compagnons l’Imam de Hussein » dans la tradition chiite ; l’« Imam » désigne ici Khomeini.
  • [44]
    K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 240-241.
  • [45]
    Du français « comité » : désigne les cellules informelles d’ordre public mises en place par le Hezbollah au début de la Révolution, et qui se solidifient peu à peu en para-forces de l’ordre, surveillant notamment les m urs islamiques.
  • [46]
    AI, « Mass Executions of Political Prisoners », Amnesty International’s Newsletter, février 1989 ; K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 239.
  • [47]
    Ibid.
  • [48]
    UN document A/44/153, ZB février 1989, cité dans AI, Iran : Violations of Human Rights 1987-1990. Notre traduction.
  • [49]
    Final Report on the situation of human rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran by the Special Representative of the Commission on Human Rights.
  • [50]
    M. Behrooz, « Reflections on Iran’s Prison System… », art. cité.
  • [51]
    E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 221 (notre traduction).
  • [52]
    Ibid., p. 221-222 ; Azadeh Kian-Thiébaut, « La révolution iranienne à l’heure des réformes », Le Monde diplomatique, janvier 1998 : hhhhttp:// wwww. monde-diplomatique. fr/ 1998/ 01/ KIAN_THIEBAUT/ 9782. html#nh1(consulté le 20 avril 2008).
  • [53]
    H. Mokhtar, Testimony at the September 1 Conference, op. cit (notre traduction) ; Kanoon-e Khavaran hhhhttp:// wwww. khavaran. com/ HTMLs/ Fraxan-Zendanian-Jan3008. htm(consulté le 7 avril 2008) ; Bidaran, hhhhttp:// wwww. bidaran. net/ (consulté le 7 avril 2008) ; OMID, A Memorial in Defense of Human Rights in Iran, [en llllignehttp:// wwww. abfiran. org/ english/ memorial. php,consulté le 7 avril 2008].
  • [54]
    Christina Lamb, The Telegraph, « Khomeini fatwa “led to killing of 30,000 in Iran” », 19 juin 2001 ; Conseil National de la Résistance Iranienne, site des moudjahidines du Peuple en exil, hhhhttp:// wwww. ncr-iran. org/ fr/ content/ view/ 3966/ 89/ ,(consulté le 7 avril 2008).
  • [55]
    Nasser Mohajer, « The Mass Killings in Iran », Aresh, no 57, août 1996, p. 7, cité in E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 212.
  • [56]
    K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 257 ; R. Mihaila, « Political Considerations in Accountability for Crimes Against Humanity… », art. cité.
  • [57]
    K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 243-257 ; R. Mihaila, « Political Considerations in Accountability for Crimes Against Humanity… », art. cité.
  • [58]
    Voir par exemple N. Yavari d’Hellencourt, « Islam et démocratie… », art. cité.
  • [59]
    Voir par exemple Ahmed Vahdat, « The Spectre of Montazeri », Rouzegar-e-Now, no 8, janvier-février 2003, p. 48.
  • [60]
    Cité dans K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 241.
  • [61]
    E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 210 ; R. Ghaffari, Khaterate yek zendani az zendanhaye jomhuriyeh islami, op. cit., note 23, p. 248 ; HRW, « Pour-Mohammadi and the 1988 Prison Massacres », op. cit. ; H.-A. Montazeri, Khaterat, op. cit.
  • [62]
    E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit. ; R. Afshari, Human Rights in Iran, op. cit.  ; H.-A. Montazeri, Khaterat , op. cit.
  • [63]
    Paul Vieille, « L’institution shi’ite, la religiosité populaire, le martyre et la révolution », Peuples Méditerranéens, no 16, 1981, p. 77-92.
  • [64]
    Voir par exemple E. Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, op. cit., p. 206 et 243.
  • [65]
    F. Khosrokhavar, L’islamisme et la mort : le martyre révolutionnaire en Iran, Paris, l’Harmattan, 1995 ; F. Khosrokhavar, Anthropologie de la révolution iranienne. Le rêve impossible, Paris, l’Harmattan, 1997.
  • [66]
    Ulrich Marzolph, « The Martyr’s Way to Paradise. Shiite Mural Art in the Urban Context  », Ethnologia Europaea, vol. 33, no 2, 2003, p. 87-98.
  • [67]
    Ali Reza Sheikholeslami, « The Transformation of Iran’s Political Culture », Critique : Critical Middle Eastern Studies, vol. 17, no 9, 2000, p.105-133.
  • [68]
    F. Khosrokhavar, L’islamisme et la mort…, op. cit.
  • [69]
    Témoignage paru dans le journal islamiste Keyhan en 1984, cité par F. Khosrokhavar, L’islamisme et la mort…, op. cit., p. 92.
  • [70]
    BBC Persia, « Le cimetière de Khavaran : des sépultures sans nom, et la mise au jour des exécutés », 1er septembre 2005, hhhhttp:// wwww. bbc. co. uk/ persian/ iran/ story/ 2005/ 09/ 050902_mf_cemetery. shtml(notre traduction, consulté le 7 avril 2007).
  • [71]
    AI, Iran : Violations of Human Rights 1987-1990, p. 3. Notre traduction.
  • [72]
    Entretien filmé reproduit sur le site internet de l’ONG de défense des droits humains : hhhhttp:// wwww. bidaran. net/ (consulté le 7 avril 2008).
  • [73]
    Entretien télévisé disponible sur internet : Mosahebe-ye Televisione Internasional ba Babake Yazdi Dar Morede Koshtare Tabestane 67 (interview de la chaîne télévisée Internationale avec Babak Yazdi, concernant les massacres de l’été 88), hhhhttp:// khavaran. com/ Ghatleam(consulté le 7 avril 2007).
  • [74]
    Mohammad Reza Mohini, « Khavaran est un nom qui signifie “ne pas oublier” », Bidaran, hhhhttp:// wwww. bidaran. net/ spip. php? article48(consulté le 7 avril 2008).
  • [75]
    E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confession…, op. cit., p. 218 ; K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 282 ; AI, « Mass Executions of Political Prisoners », art. cité.
  • [76]
    Communauté religieuse persécutée.
  • [77]
    BBC Persia, « Le cimetière de Khavaran… », art. cité ; voir aussi M. R Mohini, « Khavaran est un nom qui signifie “ne pas oublier” », art. cité.
  • [78]
    Nouvelles radiophonique du 19 novembre 2005, Radio Farda, Afrade Nashenas Ghabrhaye Edamyane Siyasiye Daheye 60 ra dar Goorestane Khavaran Takhreeb Kardand (« Des individus non identifiés ont détruit les tombes des prisonniers politiques exécutés dans les années 1980 dans le cimetière de Khavaran »).
  • [79]
    AI, Action Urgente, « Iran : Craintes de mauvais traitements/ Prisonniers d’opinion présumés », op. cit.
  • [80]
    Human Rights Watch, Minister of murders, op. cit. Notre traduction.
  • [81]
    Kanoon-e Khavaran, op. cit. (site internet).
  • [82]
    M. R. Mohini, « Khavaran est un nom qui signifie “ne pas oublier” », art. cité.
  • [83]
    F. Khosrokhavar, « L’Iran, la démocratie et la nouvelle citoyenneté », art. cité.
  • [84]
    John R. Gillis (dir.), Commemorations : The Politics of National Identity, Princeton, Princeton University Press, 1994, p. 3 (notre traduction).
  • [85]
    K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 259 ; voir aussi R. Mihaila, « Political Considerations in Accountability for Crimes Against Humanity… », art. cité, en ligne.
  • [86]
    Nicole Loraux, La cité divisée. L’oubli dans la mémoire d’Athène, Paris, Payot-Rivages, 2005, p. 164.
  • [87]
    Nathalie Nougayrède, « Une chercheuse franco-iranienne empêchée de quitter Téhéran », Le Monde, 6 septembre 2007.
  • [88]
    Nader Khoshdel, « Marasem-e bozorgdasht-e zendanian-e siasi : goft-o-gou ba Mihan Rousta » (« La cérémonie de bozorgdasht des prisonniers politiques : entretien avec Mihan Rousta »), Sedaye-ma, 13 octobre 2004, hhhhttp:// wwww. sedaye-ma. org/ web/ show_article. php? file= src/ didgah/ mihanrousta_10132006_1. htm(consulté le 7 avril 2008).

Livres: Pourquoi les riches n’aiment pas leur pays (Francesco Duina’s unasked question: Why rich Americans don’t like their country)

23 novembre, 2019
https://www.une.edu/sites/default/files/styles/une_content_medium/public/events/broke-patriotic-america.jpghttps://www.sup.org/img/covers/large/pid_27272.jpg
NationalitésToi qui as fixé les frontières, dressé les bornes de la terre, tu as créé l’été, l’hiver !  Psaumes 74: 17
The little man loves his country because it’s all he’s got. Sergeant Leroy Taylor
Look at the rest of the world: they keep trying to come to America. This must be the place to be. Respondents to Francesco Duina
For me to give up hope on the country in which I live in is almost to give up hope for self. So I gotta keep the light burning for me and for my country or I’m gonna be in the dark. 46-year-old unemployed black woman in Birmingham with plans to become a chef)
For me, yeah, it starts with the individual, naturally. And according to our constitution, rules and rights, you know … everybody is afforded that without question … I believe, right, that I can have a conversation not just with you; I could sit down, talk with the President of the United States … you know? Older African American Birmingham resident
You have to have some shred of dignity. Even the bottom-of the-barrel person has to have some shred of dignity … and so when we’re struggling and we’re super poor and broke and going through all these things, you almost have to believe in something better or higher … and the Americans’ ideals ring on that level because they’re a lot different than maybe other countries’ because the American ideals are supposed to embody those things that are, are like good for humanity, you know … and it’s true. Middle-aged white man living out of a car in Billings, Montana, with his young and pregnant wife
Tout racisme est un essentialisme et le racisme de l’intelligence est la forme de sociodicée caractéristique d’une classe dominante dont le pouvoir repose en partie sur la possession de titres qui, comme les titres scolaires, sont censés être des garanties d’intelligence et qui ont pris la place, dans beaucoup de sociétés, et pour l’accès même aux positions de pouvoir économique, des titres anciens comme les titres de propriété et les titres de noblesse. Pierre Bourdieu
Un peuple connait, aime et défend toujours plus ses moeurs que ses lois. Montesquieu
Aux États-Unis, les plus opulents citoyens ont bien soin de ne point s’isoler du peuple ; au contraire, ils s’en rapprochent sans cesse, ils l’écoutent volontiers et lui parlent tous les jours. Ils savent que les riches des démocraties ont toujours besoin des pauvres et que, dans les temps démocratiques, on s’attache le pauvre par les manières plus que par les bienfaits. La grandeur même des bienfaits, qui met en lumière la différence des conditions, cause une irritation secrète à ceux qui en profitent; mais la simplicité des manières a des charmes presque irrésistibles : leur familiarité entraîne et leur grossièreté même ne déplaît pas toujours. Ce n’est pas du premier coup que cette vérité pénètre dans l’esprit des riches. Ils y résistent d’ordinaire tant que dure la révolution démocratique, et ils ne l’abandonnent même point aussitôt après que cette révolution est accomplie. Ils consentent volontiers à faire du bien au peuple ; mais ils veulent continuer à le tenir à distance. Ils croient que cela suffit ; ils se trompent. Ils se ruineraient ainsi sans réchauffer le coeur de la population qui les environne. Ce n’est pas le sacrifice de leur argent qu’elle leur demande; c’est celui de leur orgueil. Tocqueville
Le monde moderne n’est pas mauvais : à certains égards, il est bien trop bon. Il est rempli de vertus féroces et gâchées. Lorsqu’un dispositif religieux est brisé (comme le fut le christianisme pendant la Réforme), ce ne sont pas seulement les vices qui sont libérés. Les vices sont en effet libérés, et ils errent de par le monde en faisant des ravages ; mais les vertus le sont aussi, et elles errent plus férocement encore en faisant des ravages plus terribles. Le monde moderne est saturé des vieilles vertus chrétiennes virant à la folie.  G.K. Chesterton
Condamner le nationalisme parce qu’il peut mener à la guerre, c’est comme condamner l’amour parce qu’il peut conduire au meurtre. C.K. Chesterton
Il faut constamment se battre pour voir ce qui se trouve au bout de son nez. George Orwell
Le plus difficile n’est pas de dire ce que l’on voit mais d’accepter de voir ce que l’on voit. Charles Péguy
Nous apprenons à nous sentir responsable d’autrui parce que nous partageons avec eux une histoire commune, un destin commun. Robert Reich
Vous allez dans certaines petites villes de Pennsylvanie où, comme ans beaucoup de petites villes du Middle West, les emplois ont disparu depuis maintenant 25 ans et n’ont été remplacés par rien d’autre (…) Et il n’est pas surprenant qu’ils deviennent pleins d’amertume, qu’ils s’accrochent aux armes à feu ou à la religion, ou à leur antipathie pour ceux qui ne sont pas comme eux, ou encore à un sentiment d’hostilité envers les immigrants. Barack Hussein Obama (2008)
Pour la première fois de ma vie d’adulte, je suis fière de mon pays. Michelle Obama
Pour généraliser, en gros, vous pouvez placer la moitié des partisans de Trump dans ce que j’appelle le panier des pitoyables. Les racistes, sexistes, homophobes, xénophobes, islamophobes. A vous de choisir. Hillary Clinton (2016)
Il n’y a pas d’identité fondamentale, pas de courant dominant, au Canada. Il y a des valeurs partagées — ouverture, compassion, la volonté de travailler fort, d’être là l’un pour l’autre, de chercher l’égalité et la justice. Ces qualités sont ce qui fait de nous le premier État postnational. Justin Trudeau
Nous qui vivons dans les régions côtières des villes bleues, nous lisons plus de livres et nous allons plus souvent au théâtre que ceux qui vivent au fin fond du pays. Nous sommes à la fois plus sophistiqués et plus cosmopolites – parlez-nous de nos voyages scolaires en Chine et en Provence ou, par exemple, de notre intérêt pour le bouddhisme. Mais par pitié, ne nous demandez pas à quoi ressemble la vie dans l’Amérique rouge. Nous n’en savons rien. Nous ne savons pas qui sont Tim LaHaye et Jerry B. Jenkins. […] Nous ne savons pas ce que peut bien dire James Dobson dans son émission de radio écoutée par des millions d’auditeurs. Nous ne savons rien de Reba et Travis. […] Nous sommes très peu nombreux à savoir ce qu’il se passe à Branson dans le Missouri, même si cette ville reçoit quelque sept millions de touristes par an; pas plus que nous ne pouvons nommer ne serait-ce que cinq pilotes de stock-car. […] Nous ne savons pas tirer au fusil ni même en nettoyer un, ni reconnaître le grade d’un officier rien qu’à son insigne. Quant à savoir à quoi ressemble une graine de soja poussée dans un champ… David Brooks
Pour généraliser, en gros, vous pouvez placer la moitié des partisans de Trump dans ce que j’appelle le panier des pitoyables. Les racistes, sexistes, homophobes, xénophobes, islamophobes. A vous de choisir. Hillary Clinton
J’entends les voix apeurées qui nous appellent à construire des murs. Plutôt que des murs, nous voulons aider les gens à construire des ponts. Mark Zuckerberg
Mes arrière-grands-parents sont venus d’Allemagne, d’Autriche et de Pologne. Les parents de [mon épouse] Priscilla étaient des réfugiés venant de Chine et du Vietnam. Les Etats-Unis sont une nation d’immigrants, et nous devrions en être fiers. Comme beaucoup d’entre vous, je suis inquiet de l’impact des récents décrets signés par le président Trump. Nous devons faire en sorte que ce pays reste en sécurité, mais pour y parvenir, nous devrions nous concentrer sur les personnes qui représentent vraiment une menace. Etendre l’attention des forces de l’ordre au-delà des personnes qui représentent de vraies menaces va nuire à la sécurité des Américains, en dispersant les ressources, tandis que des millions de sans-papiers qui ne représentent aucune menace vivront dans la peur d’être expulsés. Mark Zuckerberg
We can suggest what you should do next, what you care about. Imagine: We know where you are, we know what you like. A near-term future in which you don’t forget anything, because the computer remembers. You’re never lost. Eric Schmidt (Google)
I don’t believe society understands what happens when everything is available, knowable and recorded by everyone all the time. (…) Let’s say you’re walking down the street. Because of the info Google has collected about you, we know roughly who you are, roughly what you care about, roughly who your friends are. (…) I actually think most people don’t want Google to answer their questions. They want Google to tell them what they should be doing next. Eric Schmidt
The average American doesn’t realize how much of the laws are written by lobbyists (…) Washington is an incumbent protection machine. Technology is fundamentally disruptive. (…) Google policy is to get right up to the creepy line and not cross it. Google implants, he added, probably crosses that line. (…) With your permission you give us more information about you, about your friends, and we can improve the quality of our searches. We don’t need you to type at all. We know where you are. We know where you’ve been. We can more or less now what you’re thinking about. Eric Schmidt
There’s such an overwhelming amount of information now, we can search where you are, see what you’re looking at if you take a picture with your camera. One way to think about this is, we’re trying to make people better people, literally give them better ideas—augmenting their experience. Think of it as augmented humanity. Eric Schmidt
Les démocrates radicaux veulent remonter le temps, rendre de nouveau le pouvoir aux mondialistes corrompus et avides de pouvoir. Vous savez qui sont les mondialistes? Le mondialiste est un homme qui veut qu’il soit bon de vivre dans le monde entier sans, pour dire le vrai, se soucier de notre pays. Cela ne nous convient pas. (…) Vous savez, il y a un terme devenu démodé dans un certain sens, ce terme est « nationaliste ». Mais vous savez qui je suis? Je suis un nationaliste. OK? Je suis nationaliste. Saisissez-vous de ce terme! Donald Trump
I think it’s very unfortunate. (…) it’s almost like they’re embarrassed at the achievement coming from America. I think it’s a terrible thing. (…) because when you think of Neil Armstrong and when you think about the landing on the moon, you think about the American flag. And I understand they don’t do it. So for that reason I wouldn’t even want to watch the movie. (…) I don’t want to get into the world of boycotts. Same thing with Nike. I wouldn’t say you don’t buy Nike because of the Colin Kaepernick. I mean, look, as much as I disagree, as an example, with the Colin Kaepernick endorsement, in another way, I wouldn’t have done it. In another way, it is what this country is all about, that you have certain freedoms to do things that other people may think you shouldn’t do. So you know, I personally am on a different side of it, you guys are probably too, I’m on a different side of it. Donald Trump
Très intéressant de voir des élues démocrates du Congrès, “progressistes”, qui viennent originellement de pays dont les gouvernements sont des catastrophes complètes et absolues, les pires, les plus corrompus et les plus ineptes du monde (si tant est qu’on puisse parler de gouvernement) et qui maintenant clament férocement au peuple des États-Unis, la plus grande et la plus puissante nation du monde, comment notre gouvernement doit être dirigé. Pourquoi ne retournent-elles pas d’où elles viennent, pour aider à réparer ces lieux totalement dévastés et infestés par le crime ? Puis, qu’elles reviennent et qu’elles nous montrent comment elles ont fait. Ces endroits ont bigrement besoin de votre aide, vous n’y partirez jamais trop vite. Je suis sûr que Nancy Pelosi serait très heureuse d’organiser rapidement un voyage gratuit ! Donald Trump
Ces idées ont un nom : nationalisme, identitarisme, protectionnisme, souverainisme de repli. Ces idées qui, tant de fois, ont allumé les brasiers où l’Europe aurait pu périr, les revoici sous des habits neufs encore ces derniers jours. Elles se disent légitimes parce qu’elles exploitent avec cynisme la peur des peuples. (…) Je ne laisserai rien, rien à toutes celles et ceux qui promettent la haine, la division ou le repli national. Je ne leur laisserai aucune proposition. C’est à l’Europe de les faire, c’est à nous de les porter, aujourd’hui et maintenant (…) Et nous n’avons qu’un choix, qu’une alternative : le repli sur nous frontières, qui serait à la fois illusoire et inefficace, ou la construction d’un espace commun des frontières, de l’asile et de (…) faire une place aux réfugiés qui ont risqué leur vie, chez eux et sur leur chemin, c’est notre devoir commun d’Européen et nous ne devons pas le perdre de vue. (…) C’est pourquoi j’ai engagé en France un vaste travail de réforme pour mieux accueillir les réfugiés, augmenter les relocalisations dans notre pays, accélérer les procédures d’asile en nous inspirant du modèle allemand, être plus efficaces dans les reconduites indispensables. Ce que je souhaite pour l’Europe, la France commence dès à présent à le faire elle-même. Emmanuel Macron
On vous demande une carte blanche, et vous salissez l’adversaire, et vous proférez des mensonges. Votre projet, c’est de salir, c’est de mener une campagne de falsifications, de vivre de la peur et des mensonges. La France que je veux vaut beaucoup mieux que ça. Il faut sortir d’un système qui vous a coproduit. Vous en vivez. Vous êtes son parasite. L’inefficacité des politiques de droite et de gauche, c’est l’extrême droite qui s’en nourrit. Je veux mener la politique qui n’a jamais été menée ces trente dernières années. Emmanuel Macron (2017)
Le patriotisme est l’exact contraire du nationalisme. Le nationalisme en est sa trahison. Emmanuel Macron
Nous n’avons pas besoin de visages basanés qui ne veulent pas être une voix basanée. Nous n’avons pas besoin de visages noirs qui ne veulent pas être une voix noire. Nous n’avons pas besoin de musulmans qui ne veulent pas être une voix musulmane. Nous n’avons pas besoin d’homos qui ne veulent pas être une voix homo. Si vous craignez d’être marginalisé et stéréotypé, ne vous présentez même pas, nous n’avons pas besoin de vous pour représenter cette voix. Ayanna Pressley (représentante démocrate, Massachusetts)
So apparently Donald Trump wants to make this an election about what it means to be American. He’s got his vision of what it means to be American, and he’s challenging the rest of us to come up with a better one. In Trump’s version, “American” is defined by three propositions. First, to be American is to be xenophobic. The basic narrative he tells is that the good people of the heartland are under assault from aliens, elitists and outsiders. Second, to be American is to be nostalgic. America’s values were better during some golden past. Third, a true American is white. White Protestants created this country; everybody else is here on their sufferance. When you look at Trump’s American idea you realize that it contradicts the traditional American idea in every particular. In fact, Trump’s national story is much closer to the Russian national story than it is toward our own. It’s an alien ideology he’s trying to plant on our soil. ​ Trump’s vision is radically anti-American.​ The real American idea is not xenophobic, nostalgic or racist; it is pluralistic, future-oriented and universal. America is exceptional precisely because it is the only nation on earth that defines itself by its future, not its past. America is exceptional because from the first its citizens saw themselves in a project that would have implications for all humankind. America is exceptional because it was launched with a dream to take the diverse many and make them one — e pluribus unum.​ (…) Trump’s campaign is an attack on that dream. The right response is to double down on that ideal. The task before us is to create the most diverse mass democracy in the history of the planet — a true universal nation. It is precisely to weave the social fissures that Trump is inclined to tear. David Brooks
In the matter of immigration, mark this conservative columnist down as strongly pro-deportation. The United States has too many people who don’t work hard, don’t believe in God, don’t contribute much to society and don’t appreciate the greatness of the American system. They need to return whence they came. I speak of Americans whose families have been in this country for a few generations. Complacent, entitled and often shockingly ignorant on basic points of American law and history, they are the stagnant pool in which our national prospects risk drowning.​ (…) Bottom line: So-called real Americans are screwing up America. Maybe they should leave, so that we can replace them with new and better ones: newcomers who are more appreciative of what the United States has to offer, more ambitious for themselves and their children, and more willing to sacrifice for the future. In other words, just the kind of people we used to be — when “we” had just come off the boat.​ O.K., so I’m jesting about deporting “real Americans” en masse. (Who would take them in, anyway?) But then the threat of mass deportations has been no joke with this administration.​ On Thursday, the Department of Homeland Security seemed prepared to extend an Obama administration program known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, which allows the children of illegal immigrants — some 800,000 people in all — to continue to study and work in the United States. The decision would have reversed one of Donald Trump’s ugly campaign threats to deport these kids, whose only crime was to have been brought to the United States by their parents. Yet the administration is still committed to deporting their parents, and on Friday the D.H.S. announced that even DACA remains under review — another cruel twist for young immigrants wondering if they’ll be sent back to “home” countries they hardly ever knew, and whose language they might barely even speak.​ Beyond the inhumanity of toying with people’s lives this way, there’s also the shortsightedness of it. We do not usually find happiness by driving away those who would love us. Businesses do not often prosper by firing their better employees and discouraging job applications. So how does America become great again by berating and evicting its most energetic, enterprising, law-abiding, job-creating, idea-generating, self-multiplying and God-fearing people?​ Because I’m the child of immigrants and grew up abroad, I have always thought of the United States as a country that belongs first to its newcomers — the people who strain hardest to become a part of it because they realize that it’s precious; and who do the most to remake it so that our ideas, and our appeal, may stay fresh.​ That used to be a cliché, but in the Age of Trump it needs to be explained all over again. We’re a country of immigrants — by and for them, too. Americans who don’t get it should get out.​ Bret Stephens
N’en déplaise aux chiens de garde de la pensée unique, il n’y a rien de choquant dans ce texte. Trump ne critique ni des peuples ni des cultures, mais des gouvernements. Il mentionne des « élues démocrates », mais sans les citer nommément. Quant à ce qu’elles partent à l’étranger redresser ces pays qui sont à les entendre tellement mieux que les États-Unis, il ne s’agit pas d’un exil, puisqu’il mentionne explicitement qu’elles en reviennent. La seule flèche réelle est à l’encontre de Mme Pelosi, qui a le plus grand mal à tenir les rênes de ses troupes démocrates à la Chambre des Représentants. (…) Quatre élues démocrates se sentirent donc indignées par ces tweets: Ilhan Omar (Minnesota), Ayanna Pressley (Massachusetts) et Rashida Tlaib (Michigan), et Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (New York). Trois d’entre elles ne correspondent même pas au portrait brossé par Trump puisqu’elles sont nées aux États-Unis, mais qu’importe, les médias se chargent de tous les raccourcis. (…) Ayanna Pressley déclencha une polémique il y a quelques jours par une vision de la société uniquement basée sur l’appartenance raciale, religieuse ou sexuelle, soit l’exact opposé du melting pot américain (…) Pour Mme Pressley, quelqu’un est blanc ou noir avant d’être Américain. Rashida Tlaib, qui grandit dans le paradis socialiste du Nicaragua, devint la première élue musulmane du Michigan. Ce qui n’est pas en soi un problème, si ce n’est qu’elle se fit remarquer dès son arrivée au Congrès par de nombreuses attaques antisémites. Elle traita également Trump de « fils de pute » dans sa première déclaration officielle, ce qui donne le niveau de finesse de la dame. Sur la carte du monde dans son bureau, elle recouvrit Israël avec un Post-It sur lequel il était marqué « Palestine ». Elle soutient l’organisation de promotion de l’islam CAIR, proche des Frères Musulmans. Bref, elle affiche clairement son allégeance (…) Ilhan Omar est née en Somalie et avoua en public son allégeance somalienne. Son statut civil est délicat: des rumeurs persistantes affirme qu’aurait pu être mariée à son propre frère pour s’installer aux États-Unis. Elle est en délicatesse avec le fisc américain pour de fausses déclarations fiscales. Politiquement, elle se fit remarquer par son indifférence à l’égard des attentats du 11 septembre 2001 (rien de plus pour elle que « des gens ont fait quelque chose ») mais surjoua son émotion à l’évocation de l’opération de secours « Black Hawk Down » où des soldats américains virent libérer un des leurs dans un hélicoptère abattu dans une mission de maintien de la paix. Enfin, elle refuse toujours de condamner publiquement Al-Qaeda (…) Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez est la plus souvent mise en avant par les médias, au point d’avoir son abréviation AOC. Issue d’une riche famille de New-York, elle travailla brièvement comme serveuse (permettant de donner corps à ses « humbles débuts » dans son récit personnel) avant d’embrasser la carrière politique. Depuis son élection, son radicalisme de gauche et ses délires utopiques montrent à quel point elle est coupée de la réalité. Ses sorties plongent régulièrement les responsables démocrates dans l’embarras. Elle réussit à faire fuir Amazon qui envisageait de s’installer à New York, perdant ainsi l’opportunité de créer 25’000 emplois, un exploit remarqué. Sans-frontiériste convaincue et imbue de son image, elle se fit aussi photographier dans une poignante séquence où elle pleure face à une clôture grillagée… Le tout étant en fait une mise en scène dans un parking vide. (…) Avec des rivales comme celles-ci, Trump pourrait dormir sur ses deux oreilles pour 2020. Leur bêtise et leur extrémisme fait fuir les électeurs centristes et provoque des remous jusque dans le camp démocrate. (…) Trump n’a que faire des accusations de racisme ; il est traité de raciste cent fois par semaine depuis qu’il est Président. De leur côté, les stratèges démocrates sont on ne peut plus embarrassés par leurs « étoiles montantes ». Nancy Pelosi essayait depuis plusieurs semaines de diminuer leur exposition médiatique dans l’espoir de restaurer un semblant de crédibilité au Parti Démocrate pour l’échéance de 2020 ; tout vient de voler en éclat. Les médias ne s’intéressent même plus aux candidats à l’investiture présidentielle. Seules comptent les réactions et les invectives des élues d’extrême-gauche. Pire encore, par réaction, les autres Démocrates ont été contraints de s’aligner avec elles pour prendre leur défense – augmentant encore l’alignement du parti avec ces extrémistes repoussantes pour qui n’est pas un militant d’extrême-gauche. En poussant le Parti Démocrate dans les cordes de l’extrême-gauche comme il le fait, Trump s’assure que les Démocrates passent pour des fous et des illuminés sans la moindre crédibilité. Les glapissements hystériques d’AOC, la vulgarité antisémite de Rashida Tlaib, l’obsession raciale de Ayanna Pressley et la sympathie affichée d’Ilhan Omar pour les islamistes auront tôt fait de détourner les Américains modérés de se rendre aux urnes pour chasser « l’ignoble Trump » du pouvoir – lui sur lequel il n’y a plus grand-chose à ajouter tant les médias lui envoient quotidiennement du fumier depuis trois ans. Stéphane Montabert
Obama est le premier président américain élevé sans attaches culturelles, affectives ou intellectuelles avec la Grande-Bretagne ou l’Europe. Les Anglais et les Européens ont été tellement enchantés par le premier président américain noir qu’ils n’ont pu voir ce qu’il est vraiment: le premier président américain du Tiers-Monde. The Daily Mail
Culturellement, Obama déteste la Grande-Bretagne. Il a renvoyé le buste de Churchill sans la moindre feuille de vigne d’une excuse. Il a insulté la Reine et le Premier ministre en leur offrant les plus insignifiants des cadeaux. A un moment, il a même refusé de rencontrer le Premier ministre. Dr James Lucier (ancien directeur du comité des Affaire étrangères du sénat américain)
We want our country back ! Marion Maréchal
La jeune génération n’est pas encouragée à aimer notre héritage. On leur lave le cerveau en leur faisant honte de leur pays. (…) Nous, Français, devons nous battre pour notre indépendance. Nous ne pouvons plus choisir notre politique économique ou notre politique d’immigration et même notre diplomatie. Notre liberté est entre les mains de l’Union européenne. (…) Notre liberté est maintenant entre les mains de cette institution qui est en train de tuer des nations millénaires. Je vis dans un pays où 80%, vous m’avez bien entendu, 80% des lois sont imposées par l’Union européenne. Après 40 ans d’immigration massive, de lobbyisme islamique et de politiquement correct, la France est en train de passer de fille aînée de l’Eglise à petite nièce de l’islam. On entend maintenant dans le débat public qu’on a le droit de commander un enfant sur catalogue, qu’on a le droit de louer le ventre d’une femme, qu’on a le droit de priver un enfant d’une mère ou d’un père. (…) Aujourd’hui, même les enfants sont devenus des marchandises (…) Un enfant n’est pas un droit (…) Nous ne voulons pas de ce monde atomisé, individualiste, sans sexe, sans père, sans mère et sans nation. (…) Nous devons faire connaitre nos idées aux médias et notre culture, pour stopper la domination des libéraux et des socialistes. C’est la raison pour laquelle j’ai lancé une école de sciences politiques. (…) Nous devons faire connaitre nos idées aux médias et notre culture, pour stopper la domination des libéraux et des socialistes. C’est la raison pour laquelle j’ai lancé une école de sciences politiques. (…) La Tradition n’est pas la vénération des cendres, elle est la passation du feu. (…)Je ne suis pas offensée lorsque j’entends le président Donald Trump dire ‘l’Amérique d’abord’. En fait, je veux l’Amérique d’abord pour le peuple américain, je veux la Grande-Bretagne d’abord pour le peuple britannique et je veux la France d’abord pour le peuple français. Comme vous, nous voulons reprendre le contrôle de notre pays. Vous avez été l’étincelle, il nous appartient désormais de nourrir la flamme conservatrice. Marion Maréchal
« Pourquoi la Suède est-elle devenue la Corée du Nord de l’Europe ? » C’est la question qu’un Danois avait posée sous forme de demi-boutade au caricaturiste suédois Lars Vilks lors d’une conférence à laquelle j’ai participé en 2014. En guise de réponse qui n’avait d’ailleurs pas convaincu, Vilks avait marmonné en disant que la Suède avait une prédilection pour le consensus. Aujourd’hui, il existe à cette question une réponse plus convaincante qui nous est donnée par Ryszard Legutko, professeur de philosophie et homme politique polonais influent. Traduit en anglais par Teresa Adelson sous le titre The Demon in Democracy: Totalitarian Temptations in Free Societies (Le démon de la démocratie : les tentations totalitaires au sein des sociétés libres), son livre paru chez Encounter montre de façon méthodique les similitudes surprenantes mais réelles entre le communisme de type soviétique et le libéralisme moderne tel qu’il est conçu par la Suède, l’Union européenne ou Barack Obama. (Avant d’analyser son argumentation, je tiens toutefois à préciser que là où Legutko parle de démocratie libérale, un concept trop complexe selon moi, je préfère parler de libéralisme.) Legutko ne prétend pas que le libéralisme ressemble au communisme dans ce que celui-ci a de monstrueux et encore moins que les deux idéologies sont identiques. Il reconnaît pleinement le caractère démocratique du libéralisme d’une part et la nature brutale et tyrannique du communisme d’autre part. Mais une fois établie cette distinction nette, il met le doigt sur le point sensible commun aux deux idéologies. C’est dans les années 1970 au cours d’un voyage effectué en Occident qu’il s’est rendu compte pour la première fois de ces similarités. Il s’est alors aperçu que les libéraux préféraient les communistes aux anti-communistes. Par après, avec la chute du bloc soviétique, il a vu les libéraux accueillir chaleureusement les communistes mais pas leurs opposants anticommunistes. Pourquoi ? Car selon lui le libéralisme partage avec le communisme une foi puissante en l’esprit rationnel propre à trouver des solutions. Cela se traduit par une propension à améliorer le citoyen, à le moderniser et à le façonner pour en faire un être supérieur, une propension qui conduit les deux idéologies à politiser, et donc à dévaloriser, tous les aspects de la vie dont la sexualité, la famille, la religion, les sports, les loisirs et les arts. (…) Les deux idéologies recourent à l’ingénierie sociale de façon à créer une société dont les membres seraient « identiques dans les mots, les pensées et les actes ». L’objectif serait d’obtenir une population en grande partie interchangeable et dépourvue de tout esprit dissident susceptible de causer des ennuis. Chacune des deux idéologies assume complètement le fait que sa vision particulière constitue le plus grand espoir pour l’humanité et représente la fin de l’histoire, l’étape finale de l’évolution de l’humanité. Le problème, c’est que de tels plans d’amélioration de l’humanité conduisent inévitablement à de terribles déceptions. En réalité, les êtres humains sont bien plus têtus et moins malléables que ne le souhaitent les rêveurs. Quand les choses vont mal (disons la production alimentaire pour les communistes, l’immigration sans entraves pour les libéraux), apparaissent deux conséquences néfastes. La première est le repli des idéologues dans un monde virtuel qu’ils cherchent ardemment à imposer à des sujets réfractaires. Les communistes déploient des efforts colossaux pour convaincre leurs vassaux qu’ils prospéreront bien plus que ces misérables vivant dans des pays capitalistes. Les libéraux transforment les deux genres – masculin et féminin – en 71 genres différents ou font disparaître la criminalité des migrants. Quand leurs projets tournent au vinaigre, les uns et les autres répondent non pas en repensant leurs principes mais, contre toute logique, en exigeant l’application d’un communisme ou d’un libéralisme plus pur et en s’appuyant fortement sur le complotisme : les communistes blâment les capitalistes et les libéraux blâment les entreprises pour expliquer par exemple pourquoi San Francisco détient aux États-Unis le record d’atteintes à la propriété ou pourquoi la ville de Seattle est gangrenée par une mendicité épidémique. La deuxième conséquence survient quand les dissidents apparaissent immanquablement. C’est alors que les communistes comme les libéraux font tout ce qu’ils peuvent pour étouffer les opinions divergentes. Autrement dit, les uns comme les autres sont prêts à forcer leurs populations ignorantes « à la liberté » selon les termes de Legutko. Ce qui signifie, bien entendu, le contrôle voire, la suppression de la liberté d’expression. Dans le cas du communisme, les bureaux de la censure du gouvernement excluent toute opinion négative vis-à-vis du socialisme et les conséquences sont fâcheuses pour quiconque ose persister. Dans le cas du libéralisme, les fournisseurs d’accès à Internet, les grands réseaux sociaux, les écoles, les banques, les services de covoiturage, les hôtels et les lignes de croisière font le sale boulot consistant à mettre hors-jeu les détracteurs qui tiennent ce qui est appelé un discours de haine consistant notamment à affirmer l’idée scandaleuse selon laquelle il n’y a que deux genres. Bien entendu l’islam est un sujet insidieux : ainsi le fait de se demander si Mahomet était un pédophile, est passible d’une amende, et une caricature, d’une peine de prison. Résultat : en Allemagne à peine 19% des citoyens ont l’impression qu’ils peuvent exprimer leur opinion librement en public. Daniel Pipes
Ce qui est nouveau, c’est d’abord que la bourgeoisie a le visage de l’ouverture et de la bienveillance. Elle a trouvé un truc génial : plutôt que de parler de « loi du marché », elle dit « société ouverte », « ouverture à l’Autre » et liberté de choisir… Les Rougon-Macquart sont déguisés en hipsters. Ils sont tous très cools, ils aiment l’Autre. Mieux : ils ne cessent de critiquer le système, « la finance », les « paradis fiscaux ». On appelle cela la rebellocratie. C’est un discours imparable : on ne peut pas s’opposer à des gens bienveillants et ouverts aux autres ! Mais derrière cette posture, il y a le brouillage de classes, et la fin de la classe moyenne. La classe moyenne telle qu’on l’a connue, celle des Trente Glorieuses, qui a profité de l’intégration économique, d’une ascension sociale conjuguée à une intégration politique et culturelle, n’existe plus même si, pour des raisons politiques, culturelles et anthropologiques, on continue de la faire vivre par le discours et les représentations. (…) C’est aussi une conséquence de la non-intégration économique. Aujourd’hui, quand on regarde les chiffres – notamment le dernier rapport sur les inégalités territoriales publié en juillet dernier –, on constate une hyper-concentration de l’emploi dans les grands centres urbains et une désertification de ce même emploi partout ailleurs. Et cette tendance ne cesse de s’accélérer ! Or, face à cette situation, ce même rapport préconise seulement de continuer vers encore plus de métropolisation et de mondialisation pour permettre un peu de redistribution. Aujourd’hui, et c’est une grande nouveauté, il y a une majorité qui, sans être « pauvre » ni faire les poubelles, n’est plus intégrée à la machine économique et ne vit plus là où se crée la richesse. Notre système économique nécessite essentiellement des cadres et n’a donc plus besoin de ces millions d’ouvriers, d’employés et de paysans. La mondialisation aboutit à une division internationale du travail : cadres, ingénieurs et bac+5 dans les pays du Nord, ouvriers, contremaîtres et employés là où le coût du travail est moindre. La mondialisation s’est donc faite sur le dos des anciennes classes moyennes, sans qu’on le leur dise ! Ces catégories sociales sont éjectées du marché du travail et éloignées des poumons économiques. Cependant, cette« France périphérique » représente quand même 60 % de la population. (…) Ce phénomène présent en France, en Europe et aux États-Unis a des répercussions politiques : les scores du FN se gonflent à mesure que la classe moyenne décroît car il est aujourd’hui le parti de ces « superflus invisibles » déclassés de l’ancienne classe moyenne. (…) Toucher 100 % d’un groupe ou d’un territoire est impossible. Mais j’insiste sur le fait que les classes populaires (jeunes, actifs, retraités) restent majoritaires en France. La France périphérique, c’est 60 % de la population. Elle ne se résume pas aux zones rurales identifiées par l’Insee, qui représentent 20 %. Je décris un continuum entre les habitants des petites villes et des zones rurales qui vivent avec en moyenne au maximum le revenu médian et n’arrivent pas à boucler leurs fins de mois. Face à eux, et sans eux, dans les quinze plus grandes aires urbaines, le système marche parfaitement. Le marché de l’emploi y est désormais polarisé. Dans les grandes métropoles il faut d’une part beaucoup de cadres, de travailleurs très qualifiés, et de l’autre des immigrés pour les emplois subalternes dans le BTP, la restauration ou le ménage. Ainsi les immigrés permettent-ils à la nouvelle bourgeoisie de maintenir son niveau de vie en ayant une nounou et des restaurants pas trop chers. (…) Il n’y a aucun complot mais le fait, logique, que la classe supérieure soutient un système dont elle bénéficie – c’est ça, la « main invisible du marché» ! Et aujourd’hui, elle a un nom plus sympathique : la « société ouverte ». Mais je ne pense pas qu’aux bobos. Globalement, on trouve dans les métropoles tous ceux qui profitent de la mondialisation, qu’ils votent Mélenchon ou Juppé ! D’ailleurs, la gauche votera Juppé. C’est pour cela que je ne parle ni de gauche, ni de droite, ni d’élites, mais de « la France d’en haut », de tous ceux qui bénéficient peu ou prou du système et y sont intégrés, ainsi que des gens aux statuts protégés : les cadres de la fonction publique ou les retraités aisés. Tout ce monde fait un bloc d’environ 30 ou 35 %, qui vit là où la richesse se crée. Et c’est la raison pour laquelle le système tient si bien. (…) La France périphérique connaît une phase de sédentarisation. Aujourd’hui, la majorité des Français vivent dans le département où ils sont nés, dans les territoires de la France périphérique il s’agit de plus de 60 % de la population. C’est pourquoi quand une usine ferme – comme Alstom à Belfort –, une espèce de rage désespérée s’empare des habitants. Les gens deviennent dingues parce qu’ils savent que pour eux « il n’y a pas d’alternative » ! Le discours libéral répond : « Il n’y a qu’à bouger ! » Mais pour aller où ? Vous allez vendre votre baraque et déménager à Paris ou à Bordeaux quand vous êtes licencié par ArcelorMittal ou par les abattoirs Gad ? Avec quel argent ? Des logiques foncières, sociales, culturelles et économiques se superposent pour rendre cette mobilité quasi impossible. Et on le voit : autrefois, les vieux restaient ou revenaient au village pour leur retraite. Aujourd’hui, la pyramide des âges de la France périphérique se normalise. Jeunes, actifs, retraités, tous sont logés à la même enseigne. La mobilité pour tous est un mythe. Les jeunes qui bougent, vont dans les métropoles et à l’étranger sont en majorité issus des couches supérieures. Pour les autres ce sera la sédentarisation. Autrefois, les emplois publics permettaient de maintenir un semblant d’équilibre économique et proposaient quelques débouchés aux populations. Seulement, en plus de la mondialisation et donc de la désindustrialisation, ces territoires ont subi la retraite de l’État. (…) Même si l’on installe 20 % de logements sociaux partout dans les grandes métropoles, cela reste une goutte d’eau par rapport au parc privé « social de fait » qui existait à une époque. Les ouvriers, autrefois, n’habitaient pas dans des bâtiments sociaux, mais dans de petits logements, ils étaient locataires, voire propriétaires, dans le parc privé à Paris ou à Lyon. C’est le marché qui crée les conditions de la présence des gens et non pas le logement social. Aujourd’hui, ce parc privé « social de fait » s’est gentrifié et accueille des catégories supérieures. Quant au parc social, il est devenu la piste d’atterrissage des flux migratoires. Si l’on regarde la carte de l’immigration, la dynamique principale se situe dans le Grand Ouest, et ce n’est pas dans les villages que les immigrés s’installent, mais dans les quartiers de logements sociaux de Rennes, de Brest ou de Nantes. (…) In fine, il y a aussi un rejet du multiculturalisme. Les gens n’ont pas envie d’aller vivre dans les derniers territoires des grandes villes ouverts aux catégories populaires : les banlieues et les quartiers à logements sociaux qui accueillent et concentrent les flux migratoires. Christophe Guilluy
Comment expliquer que les ouvriers constituent toujours le groupe social le plus important de la société française et que leur existence passe de plus en plus inaperçue ? Stéphane Beaud et Michel Pialoux (Retour sur la condition ouvrière, 1999)
J’ai regardé les premières cartes qui avaient été faites par l’IFOP concernant les ronds-points occupés par les Gilets jaunes. Ce qui était frappant, c’était la parfaite corrélation avec celle de la France périphérique, développée autour d’un indicateur de fragilité sociale. Ce qui est très intéressant c’est que cette carte fait exploser toutes les typologies traditionnelles : la division est-ouest entre la France industrielle et la France rurale par exemple. En réalité, le mouvement est parti de partout, aussi bien dans le sud-ouest que dans le nord-est, on voit donc quelque chose qui correspond exactement à la France périphérique, c’est-à-dire à la répartition des catégories modestes et populaires dans l’espace. Cette typologie casse celle de la France du vide qui n’est plus pertinente et cela nous montre bien les effets d’un modèle économique nouveau qui est celui de la mondialisation. C’est pour cela que je dis que le mouvement des Gilets jaunes n’est pas une résurgence de la révolution française ou de mai 68, cela est au contraire quelque chose de très nouveau : cela correspond à l’impact de la mondialisation sur la classe moyenne au sens large : de l’ouvrier au cadre supérieur. La classe moyenne, ce ne sont pas seulement les professions intermédiaires, c’est un ensemble, ce sont les gens qui travaillent et qui ont l’impression de faire partie d’un tout, peu importe qu’il y ait des inégalités de salaires. (…) Ce qui était malsain dans l’analyse qui en a été fait, cela a été le moment ou l’on a dit « en réalité, ils ne sont pas pauvres ». On opposait une nouvelle fois les pauvres aux classes populaires alors que la presque totalité des pauvres sont issus des classes populaires. Il y a un lien organique entre eux. Quand on prend ces catégories, ouvriers, employés, paysans etc.…ils peuvent être pauvres, au chômage, et même quand ils ont un emploi, ils savent très bien que la case pauvreté est toute proche sur l’échiquier.  Surtout, ils ont un frère, un cousin, un grand parent, un ami, un voisin qui est pauvre. On oublie toujours de dire que la pauvreté n’est pas un état permanent, il y a un échange constant entre classes populaires et pauvreté. Opposer ces catégories, c’est refuser ce lien organique entre pauvres et travailleurs modestes. C’est donc ne rien comprendre à ce qui se joue actuellement. (…) Ce que nous constatons aujourd’hui, c’est une dysfonction entre l’économie et la société. Et cela est la première fois. Avant, l’économie faisait société, c’était les 30 glorieuses avec un modèle économique qui intègre tout le monde et qui bénéficie à l’ensemble de la société. Là, nous avons un modèle qui peut créer de la richesse mais qui ne fait pas société. Le modèle économique mondialisé, parce qu’il n’a pas de limites, frappe les catégories sociales les unes après les autres. Après les employés, il y a les professions intermédiaires, les jeunes diplômés, et après nous aurons les catégories supérieures. La seule chose qui protège les catégories supérieures est qu’elles vivent aujourd’hui dans des citadelles. C’est ce qui fait aussi que la baisse du soutien des Français au mouvement des Gilets jaunes touche ces catégories-là. Mais cela n’empêche pas que le socle électoral d’Emmanuel Macron se restreint comme peau de chagrin, cela est mécanique. Depuis les années 80, on a souvent compensé ces destructions d’emplois sur ces territoires par des emplois publics, mais les gens ont parfaitement compris que ce modèle était à bout de souffle. Les fonctionnaires de catégorie B et C, qui sont présents dans le mouvement, ont compris que cela était fini, qu’ils n’auraient plus d’augmentations de salaires ou que leurs enfants ne pourront plus en profiter. On a bien là une angoisse d’insécurité sociale qui s’est généralisée à l’ensemble de ces catégories qui étaient, hier, totalement intégrées à la classe moyenne, et cela démontre bien comment un mouvement parti des marges est devenu majoritaire. Cela est la limite du modèle économique néolibéral. Je n’aurais aucun problème à adhérer au modèle néolibéral, s’il fonctionnait. On a vu comment cela avait commencé, ouvriers d’abord, paysans etc.. Et aujourd’hui, des gens que l’on pensait finalement sécurisés sont touchés ; petite fonction publique et retraités. Or, ce sont les gens qui ont, in fine, élu Emmanuel Macron. Son effondrement vient de ces catégories-là. Mais les classes populaires n’ont rien contre les riches, ils jouent au loto pour devenir riches, la question est simplement de pouvoir vivre décemment avec son salaire et d’être respecté culturellement. Nous payons réellement 30 années de mépris de classe, d’ostracisation, d’insultes en direction du peuple. (…) C’est ce que ne comprennent pas les libéraux. Je crois que le débat –libéral-pas libéral- est vain. Si je dis qu’il y a un problème avec ce modèle dans ces territoires, alors on me dit que je suis pour la suppression des métropoles ou que je suis favorable à un retour à une économie administrée. Et surtout, ce qui est intolérable, c’est que je cliverais la société en termes de classes sociales. En relisant récemment une biographie de Margaret Thatcher, je me suis rendu compte que le plus gros reproche fait aux travaillistes et aux syndicats dans les années 70 était justement de cliver la société à partir des classes sociales. L’argument était de dire qu’ils sont de mauvais Anglais parce qu’ils fracturent l’unité nationale. Ce qui est génial, c’est que nous voyons aujourd’hui exactement les mêmes réactions avec la France périphérique. Une arme sur la tempe, on vous dit d’arrêter de parler des inégalités. Ils veulent bien que l’on parle de pauvres mais cela ne va pas plus loin. Mais quand on regarde finement les choses, Emmanuel Macron n’aurait pas pu être élu sans le niveau de l’État providence français. À la fin il passe, évidemment parce qu’il fait le front des bourgeoisies et des catégories supérieures, des scores soviétiques dans les grandes métropoles mais aussi et surtout parce que la majorité de la fonction publique a voté pour lui, tout comme la majorité des retraités a voté pour lui. C’est-à-dire les héritiers des 30 glorieuses et surtout le cœur de la redistribution française. Emmanuel Macron se tire deux balles dans le pied en attaquant la fonction publique et les retraités. Nous assistons à un suicide en direct. C’est ce qui explique qu’il soit très vite passé de 65 à 25%. Finalement, et paradoxalement, le modèle français ne résiste au populisme et perdure dans le sens de la dérégulation néolibérale que grâce à un État providence fort. Mais en l’absence d’un État providence- ce que veulent les libéraux- nous aurons alors le populisme. (…) J’en veux à la production intellectuelle et universitaire parce qu’à partir du moment ou on met les marges en avant, les journalistes vont suivre cette représentation en allant voir une femme isolée dans la Creuse qui vit avec 500 euros, en se disant qu’elle est Gilet jaune, tout cela pour se rendre finalement compte qu’elle ne manifeste pas. Parce que quand on est pauvre, on n’a même pas l’énergie de se mobiliser, le but est de boucler la journée. Historiquement, les mouvements sociaux n’ont jamais été portés par les pauvres, et cela ne veut pas dire qu’ils ne soutiennent pas le mouvement. Ce que nous voyons aujourd’hui, ce sont des journalistes qui vont dans les salons des Gilets jaunes pour vérifier s’ils ont un écran plat, un abonnement Netflix, ou un IPhone. Ils sont prêts à les fouiller, cela est dingue. Lors des manifestations de 1995, les journalistes ne sont pas allés vérifier si les cheminots avaient un écran 16/9e chez eux, ou quand il y a eu les émeutes des banlieues, de vérifier si le mec qui brule une voiture vit chez lui avec une grande télé ou pas. Cette façon de délégitimer un mouvement est une grande première. C’est la première fois que l’on fait les poches des manifestants pour savoir s’ils ont de l’argent ou pas, et s’il y en a, on considère que cela n’est pas légitime. Ce qu’ils n’ont pas compris, c’est que si on gagne le revenu médian à 1700 euros, la perspective est que, même si cela va aujourd’hui, cela ne va pas aller demain. L’élite n’a toujours pas compris que les gens étaient parfaitement capables de faire un diagnostic de leurs propres vies. Cette condescendance dit un gigantesque mépris de classe. J’ai moi-même été surpris, je ne pensais pas que cela irait si vite. En quelques heures, les Gilets jaunes sont devenus antisémites, homophobes, racistes, beaufs… Et là encore, on voit bien que l’antiracisme et l’antifascisme sont devenus une arme de classe. (…) Nicolas Mathieu vient d’avoir le prix Goncourt avec son livre « Leurs enfants après eux », dont il dit qu’il s’agissait du roman de la France périphérique. Le combat culturel est en cours. Cela gagne le champ littéraire, culturel et médiatique. Les Gilets jaunes ont gagné l’essentiel, ils ont gagné la bataille de la représentation. On ne pourra plus faire comme si cette France n’existait pas, comme si la France périphérique était un concept qui ne pouvait pas être incarné par des gens. Si nous sommes encore démocrates nous sommes obligés de le prendre en compte. Ce qu’il faut espérer, c’est que les élites se rendent compte que les peuples occidentaux sont encore relativement paisibles. Le mouvement réel de la société, que nous constatons partout dans le monde occidental, et que nous ne pourrons pas arrêter, continue d’avancer, de se structurer, et que cela est de la responsabilité des élites d’y répondre. Ils n’ont pas d’autre choix, celui de l’atterrissage en douceur. Je crois que ce qui vient d’arriver, c’est que le rapport de force vient de changer, la peur a changé de camp. Aux Etats-Unis, au Royaume Uni, en Europe, maintenant, ils ont le peuple sur le dos. Et puis il y a une vertu à tout cela, prendre en compte les aspirations des plus modestes, c’est pour moi le fondement de la démocratie, c’est-à-dire donner du pouvoir à ceux qui n’en ont pas plutôt que de renforcer le pouvoir de ceux qui l’ont déjà. (…) Nous avons eu en direct ce qui essentiel pour moi ; la fracture culturelle gigantesque entre tout le monde d’en haut au sens large et la France périphérique. Ce qui s’est déployé sous nos yeux, ce n’est pas seulement la fracture sociale et territoriale mais plus encore cette fracture culturelle. L’état de sidération de l’intelligentsia française rappelle clairement celle de l’intelligentsia britannique face au Brexit, et cela est la même chose aux Etats-Unis avec l’élection de Donald Trump. Cette sidération a déclenché immédiatement l’emploi des armes de l’antifascisme, parce qu’ils n’ont rien d’autre. Ils ont découvert la dernière tribu d’Amazonie et – incroyable -elle est potentiellement majoritaire. C’est un mouvement très positif, contraire à toute l’analyse intellectuelle qui voit le peuple dans le repli individualiste, qui refuse le collectif, ou dans des termes comme celui de la « droitisation de la société française » alors que les gens demandent des services publics et un État providence. Après, on pointe le fait qu’ils sont contre l’immigration, ce à quoi on peut répondre « comme tout le monde », soit une très large majorité de Français. Le plus important est que nous avons sous les yeux un peuple qui veut faire société et des élites qui ne veulent plus faire société, comme je le disais dans « No Society » (Flammarion). C’est un moment de rupture historique entre un monde d’en haut, intellectuels, politiques, showbiz etc.… qui a peur de son propre peuple. Ils ne veulent plus faire société avec un peuple qu’ils méprisent. C’est la thèse de Christopher Lasch de la « sécession des élites ». On le voit aussi avec le discours anti-média des Gilets jaunes qui ne fait que répondre à 30 ans d’invisibilisation de ces catégories. Les classes populaires n’étaient traitées qu’au travers des banlieues et ils payent aujourd’hui ce positionnement. C’est un mouvement fondamentalement collectif et du XXI siècle. Ce qui est très nouveau, c’est que c’est un mouvement social du « No Society », c’est-à-dire sans représentants, sans intellectuels, sans syndicats, etc. Cela n’est jamais arrivé. Tout mouvement social est accompagné par des intellectuels mais pour la première fois nous ne voyons personne parler en leur nom. Cela révèle 30 ans de sécession du monde d’en haut. Le peuple dit « votre modèle ne fait pas société », tout en disant « nous, majorité, avec un large soutien de l’opinion malgré les violences, voulons faire société ». Et en face, le monde d’en haut, après le mépris, prend peur. Alors que les gens ne font que demander du collectif. (…) Les politiques pensent qu’en agglomérant des minorités ils font disparaître une majorité. Or, les minorités restent des minorités, on peut essayer de les agglomérer, mais cela ne fait pas un tout. Il est très intéressant de suivre l’évolution de la popularité de Donald Trump et d’Emmanuel Macron à ce titre. Trump garde son socle électoral alors que Macron s’est effondré, comme Hollande s’est effondré avant lui. Cela veut dire que l’on peut être élu avec un agglomérat de minorités, cadres supérieurs, minorités ethniques ou sexuelles -c’est à dire la stratégie Terra Nova – et cela peut éventuellement passer avec un bon candidat d’extrême droite en face. Mais cela ne suffit pas. Cela est extrêmement fragile. Quel rapport entre les catégories supérieures boboïsées de Paris et les banlieues précarisées et islamisées qui portent un discours traditionnel sur la société ? Quel rapport entre LGBT et Islam ? Et cela, c’est pour longtemps. Ils n’ont pas compris que les pays occidentaux, précisément parce qu’ils sont devenus multiculturels, vont de plus en plus s’appuyer sur un socle qui va être celui de la majorité relative. L’électorat de Donald Trump est une majorité relative mais cela est malgré tout ce que l’on appelait la classe moyenne dans laquelle des minorités peuvent aussi se reconnaitre. On a présenté les Gilets jaunes comme étant un mouvement de blancs « Ah..ils sont blancs », comme si cela était une surprise de voir des blancs dans les zones rurales françaises. Mais ce que l’on ne voit pas, c’est que beaucoup de Français issus de l’immigration participent à ce mouvement et qu’ils ne revendiquent aucune identité, ils sont totalement dans l’assimilation. Ils font partie d’un tout qui s’appelle la classe moyenne, ou l’ancienne classe moyenne. Le mouvement a été très fort à la Réunion, on voit donc bien que cela n’est pas ethnique. Mais cela a été présenté comme cela parce que cela permettait d’avoir le discours sur l’antiracisme et l’antifascisme. Il y a eu une ostracisation des Gilets jaunes par la gauche bienpensante parce que trop blancs, mais il y aussi eu une mise à l’écart et un mépris très fort de la part de la bourgeoisie de droite. C’est la même posture que vis-à-vis du White Trash américain : ils sont pauvres et ils sont blancs, c’est la honte de la société. (…) La question culturelle et ethnique existe, je veux bien que l’on clive, mais ce qui est intéressant c’est de voir que par exemple qu’un juif de Sarcelles rejette le CRIF ou Bernard-Henri Levy. C’est fondamental parce que cela dé-essentialise la communauté juive. C’est la même fracture que l’on retrouve dans toute la société. De la même manière, les musulmans ne se retrouvent absolument pas plus dans les instances musulmanes que dans Jamel Debbouze. Et à ce propos, ce que l’on voit le plus souvent, c’est que le destin des gens issus des classes populaires qui parviennent à s’élever, c’est de trahir. C’est banalement ce qui se passe parce que cette trahison permet l’adoubement. Edouard Louis fait son livre en ciblant sa propre famille, alors il fait la une des magazines. On a vu le même phénomène aux Etats-Unis avec le livre de J.D. Vance (Hillbilly Elegy), qui est quand même plus intéressant, mais il décrit aussi le « White Trash » en disant que la classe ouvrière américaine n’est quand même pas terrible, qu’ils sont fainéants, qu’ils boivent et qu’ils se droguent, et cela lui a permis d’accéder au New York Times. En rejetant son propre milieu. Je n’ai pas de jugement moral sur les classes populaires, je prends les Français tels qu’ils sont. Je ne demande à personne d’arrêter de penser ce qu’il pense, notamment sur l’immigration. De toute façon cette question va être réglée parce que 80% des Français veulent une régulation, et qu’on ne peut pas penser cette question comme on le faisait dans les années 60, parce que les mobilités ont évolué. La question n’est même plus à débattre. Les gens que je rencontre en Seine Saint Denis qui sont majoritairement d’origine maghrébine ou sub-saharienne veulent l’arrêt de l’immigration dans leurs quartiers. C’est une évidence. Il ne faut pas oublier que les deux candidats de 2017 rejetaient le clivage gauche droite. Les gens se positionnent par rapport à des thématiques comme la mondialisation ou l’État providence, et de moins en moins sur un clivage gauche droite. Aujourd’hui, des gens comme ceux qui sont avec Jean-Luc Mélenchon ou avec Laurent Wauquiez veulent réactiver ce clivage. En faisant cela, ils se mettent dans un angle mort. Gauche et droite sont minoritaires. Jean-Luc Mélenchon a derrière lui la gauche identitaire qui dit – »nous sommes de gauche »- mais cela lui interdit de rayonner sur ce monde populaire. La question est donc celle du débouché politique, mais tout peut aller très vite. L’Italie a basculé en 6 mois. (…) À la fin des années 90, j’avais fait une analyse croisée sur la relance de politique de la ville et les émeutes urbaines. On voyait bien que toutes les émeutes urbaines génèrent une relance des politiques de la ville. La réalité est ce que cela marche. Et surtout, le mouvement des Gilets jaunes n’existerait pas en France et dans le monde sans les violences aux Champs-Élysées. Le New York Times a fait sa Une parce qu’il y avait cela, parce que cela est parfaitement corrélé à ce qu’est la communication aujourd’hui. Il y a cette violence et il faut la condamner. Mais cela veut aussi dire que nous ne sommes plus au XXe siècle. C’est tout le mythe du mouvement social qui est ringardisé. Réunir des gens à République et les faire manifester jusqu’à Bastille avant qu’ils ne rentrent chez eux, c’est fini. C’est aussi une réécriture du mouvement social qui est en train de se réaliser. Christophe Guilluy
La Corse est un territoire assez emblématique de la France périphérique. Son organisation économique est caractéristique de cette France-là. Il n’y a pas de grande métropole mondialisée sur l’île, mais uniquement des villes moyennes ou petites et des zones rurales. Le dynamisme économique est donc très faible, mis à part dans le tourisme ou le BTP, qui sont des industries dépendantes de l’extérieur. Cela se traduit par une importante insécurité sociale : précarité, taux de pauvreté gigantesque, chômage des jeunes, surreprésentation des retraités modestes. L’insécurité culturelle est également très forte. Avant de tomber dans le préjugé qui voudrait que « les Corses soient racistes », il convient de dire qu’il s’agit d’une des régions (avec la PACA et après l’Ile-de-France) où le taux de population immigrée est le plus élevé. Il ne faut pas l’oublier. La sensibilité des Corses à la question identitaire est liée à leur histoire et leur culture, mais aussi à des fondamentaux démographiques. D’un côté, un hiver démographique, c’est-à-dire un taux de natalité des autochtones très bas, et, de l’autre, une poussée de l’immigration notamment maghrébine depuis trente ans conjuguée à une natalité plus forte des nouveaux arrivants. Cette instabilité démographique est le principal générateur de l’insécurité culturelle sur l’île. La question qui obsède les Corses aujourd’hui est la question qui hante toute la France périphérique et toutes les classes moyennes et populaires occidentales au XXIe siècle : « Vais-je devenir minoritaire dans mon île, mon village, mon quartier ? » C’est à la lumière de cette angoisse existentielle qu’il faut comprendre l’affaire du burkini sur la plage de Sisco, en juillet 2016, ou encore les tensions dans le quartier des Jardins de l’Empereur, à Ajaccio, en décembre 2015. C’est aussi à l’aune de cette interrogation qu’il faut évaluer le vote « populiste » lors de la présidentielle ou nationaliste aujourd’hui. En Corse, il y a encore une culture très forte et des solidarités profondes. À travers ce vote, les Corses disent : « Nous allons préserver ce que nous sommes. » Il faut ajouter à cela l’achat par les continentaux de résidences secondaires qui participe de l’insécurité économique en faisant augmenter les prix de l’immobilier. Cette question se pose dans de nombreuses zones touristiques en France : littoral atlantique ou méditerranéen, Bretagne, beaux villages du Sud-Est et même dans les DOM-TOM. En Martinique aussi, les jeunes locaux ont de plus en plus de difficultés à se loger à cause de l’arrivée des métropolitains. La question du « jeune prolo » qui ne peut plus vivre là où il est né est fondamentale. Tous les jeunes prolos qui sont nés hier dans les grandes métropoles ont dû se délocaliser. Ils sont les pots cassés du rouleau compresseur de la mondialisation. La violence du marché de l’immobilier est toujours traitée par le petit bout de la lorgnette comme une question comptable. C’est aussi une question existentielle ! En Corse, elle est exacerbée par le contexte insulaire. Cela explique que, lorsqu’ils proposent la corsisation des emplois, les nationalistes font carton plein chez les jeunes. C’est leur préférence nationale à eux. (…) La condition de ce vote, comme de tous les votes populistes, est la réunion de l’insécurité sociale et culturelle. Les électeurs de Fillon, qui se sont majoritairement reportés sur Macron au second tour, étaient sensibles à la question de l’insécurité culturelle, mais étaient épargnés par l’insécurité sociale. À l’inverse, les électeurs de Mélenchon étaient sensibles à la question sociale, mais pas touchés par l’insécurité culturelle. C’est pourquoi le débat sur la ligne que doit tenir le FN, sociale ou identitaire, est stérile. De même, à droite, sur la ligne dite Buisson. L’insécurité culturelle de la bourgeoisie de droite, bien que très forte sur la question de l’islam et de l’immigration, ne débouchera jamais sur un vote « populiste » car cette bourgeoisie estime que sa meilleure protection reste son capital social et patrimonial et ne prendra pas le risque de l’entamer dans une aventure incertaine. Le ressort du vote populiste est double et mêlé. Il est à la fois social et identitaire. De ce point de vue, la Corse est un laboratoire. L’offre politique des nationalistes est pertinente car elle n’est pas seulement identitaire. Elle prend en compte la condition des plus modestes et leur propose des solutions pour rester au pays et y vivre. Au-delà de l’effacement du clivage droite/gauche et d’un rejet du clanisme historique, leur force vient du fait qu’ils représentent une élite et qu’ils prennent en charge cette double insécurité. Cette offre politique n’a jamais existé sur le continent car le FN n’a pas intégré une fraction de l’élite. C’est même tout le contraire. Ce parti n’est jamais parvenu à faire le lien entre l’électorat populaire et le monde intellectuel, médiatique ou économique. Une société, c’est une élite et un peuple, un monde d’en bas et un monde d’en haut, qui prend en charge le bien commun. Ce n’est plus le cas aujourd’hui. Le vote nationaliste et/ou populiste arrive à un moment où la classe politique traditionnelle a déserté, aussi bien en Corse que sur le continent. L’erreur de la plupart des observateurs est de présenter Trump comme un outsider. Ce n’est pas vrai. S’il a pu gagner, c’est justement parce qu’il vient de l’élite. C’est un membre de la haute bourgeoisie new-yorkaise. Il fait partie du monde économique, médiatique et culturel depuis toujours, et il avait un pied dans le monde politique depuis des années. Il a gagné car il faisait le lien entre l’Amérique d’en haut et l’Amérique périphérique. Pour sortir de la crise, les sociétés occidentales auront besoin d’élites économiques et politiques qui voudront prendre en charge la double insécurité de ce qu’était hier la classe moyenne. C’est ce qui s’est passé en Angleterre après le Brexit, ce qui s’est passé aux Etats-Unis avec Trump, ce qui se passe en Corse avec les nationalistes. Il y a aujourd’hui, partout dans le monde occidental, un problème de représentation politique. Les électeurs se servent des indépendantismes, comme de Trump ou du Brexit, pour dire autre chose. En Corse, le vote nationaliste ne dit pas l’envie d’être indépendant par rapport à la France. C’est une lecture beaucoup trop simpliste. Si, demain, il y a un référendum, les nationalistes le perdront nettement. D’ailleurs, c’est simple, ils ne le demandent pas. (…) [Avec la Catalogne] Le point commun, c’est l’usure des vieux partis, un système représentatif qui ne l’est plus et l’implosion du clivage droite/gauche. Pour le reste, la Catalogne, c’est l’exact inverse de la Corse. Il ne s’agit pas de prendre en charge le bien commun d’une population fragilisée socialement, mais de renforcer des positions de classes et territoriales dans la mondialisation. La Catalogne n’est pas l’Espagne périphérique, mais tout au contraire une région métropole. Barcelone représente ainsi plus de la moitié de la région catalane. C’est une grande métropole qui absorbe l’essentiel de l’emploi, de l’économie et des richesses. Le vote indépendantiste est cette fois le résultat de la gentrification de toute la région. Les plus modestes sont peu à peu évincés d’un territoire qui s’organise autour d’une société totalement en prise avec les fondamentaux de la bourgeoisie mondialisée. Ce qui porte le nationalisme catalan, c’est l’idéologie libérale libertaire métropolitaine, avec son corollaire : le gauchisme culturel et l’« antifascisme » d’opérette. Dans la rhétorique nationaliste, Madrid est ainsi présentée comme une « capitale franquiste » tandis que Barcelone incarnerait l’« ouverture aux autres ». La jeunesse, moteur du nationalisme catalan, s’identifie à la gauche radicale. Le paradoxe, c’est que nous assistons en réalité à une sécession des riches, qui ont choisi de s’affranchir totalement des solidarités nationales, notamment envers les régions pauvres. C’est la « révolte des élites » de Christopher Lasch appliquée aux territoires. L’indépendance nationale est un prétexte à l’indépendance fiscale. L’indépendantisme, un faux nez pour renforcer une position économique dominante. Dans Le Crépuscule de la France d’en haut (*), j’ironisais sur les Rougon-Macquart déguisés en hipsters. Là, on pourrait parler de Rougon-Macquart déguisés en « natios ». Derrière les nationalistes, il y a les lib-lib. (…) L’exemple de la Catalogne préfigure peut-être, en effet, un futur pas si lointain où le processus de métropolisation conduira à l’avènement de cités-Etats. En face, les défenseurs de la nation apparaîtront comme les défenseurs du bien commun. Aujourd’hui, la seule critique des hyperriches est une posture trop facile qui permet de ne pas voir ce que nous sommes devenus, nous : les intellectuels, les politiques, les journalistes, les acteurs économiques, et on pourrait y ajouter les cadres supérieurs. Nous avons abandonné le bien commun au profit de nos intérêts particuliers. Hormis quelques individus isolés, je ne vois pas quelle fraction du monde d’en haut au sens large aspire aujourd’hui à défendre l’intérêt général. (…) [Pour Macron] Le point le plus intéressant, c’est qu’il s’est dégagé du clivage droite/gauche. La comparaison avec Trump n’est ainsi pas absurde. Tous les deux ont l’avantage d’être désinhibés. Mais il faut aussi tenir à l’esprit que, dans un monde globalisé dominé par la finance et les multinationales, le pouvoir du politique reste très limité. Je crois davantage aux petites révolutions culturelles qu’au grand soir. Trump va nous montrer que le grand retournement ne peut pas se produire du jour au lendemain mais peut se faire par petites touches, par transgressions successives. Trump a amené l’idée de contestation du libre-échange et mis sur la table la question du protectionnisme. Cela n’aura pas d’effets à court terme. Ce n’est pas grave car cela annonce peut-être une mutation à long terme, un changement de paradigme. La question est maintenant de savoir qui viendra après Trump. La disparition de la classe moyenne occidentale, c’est-à-dire de la société elle-même, est l’enjeu fondamental du XXIe siècle, le défi auquel devront répondre ses successeurs. (…) On peut cependant rappeler le mépris de classe qui a entouré le personnage de Johnny, notamment via « Les Guignols de l’info ». Il ne faut pas oublier que ce chanteur, icône absolue de la culture populaire, a été dénigré pendant des décennies par l’intelligentsia, qui voyait en lui une espèce d’abruti, chantant pour des « déplorables », pour reprendre la formule de Hillary Clinton. L’engouement pour Johnny rappelle l’enthousiasme des bobos et de Canal+ pour le ballon rond au moment de la Coupe du monde 1998. Le foot est soudainement devenu hype. Jusque-là, il était vu par eux comme un sport d’ « ouvriers buveurs de bière ». On retrouve le même phénomène aux États-Unis avec le dénigrement de la figure du white trash ou du redneck. Malgré quarante ans d’éreintement de Johnny, les classes populaires ont continué à l’aimer. Le virage à 180 degrés de l’intelligentsia ces derniers jours n’est pas anodin. Il démontre qu’il existe un soft power des classes populaires. L’hommage presque contraint du monde d’en haut à ce chanteur révèle en creux l’importance d’un socle populaire encore majoritaire. C’est aussi un signe supplémentaire de l’effritement de l’hégémonie culturelle de la France d’en haut. Les classes populaires n’écoutent plus les leçons de morale. Pas plus en politique qu’en chanson. Christophe Guilluy
En Europe comme aux Etats-Unis, la contestation émerge sur les territoires les plus éloignés des métropoles mondialisées. La « France périphérique » est celle des petites villes, des villes moyennes et des zones rurales. En Grande-Bretagne, c’est aussi la « Grande-Bretagne périphérique » qui a voté pour le Brexit. Attention : il ne s’agit pas d’un rapport entre « urbains » et « ruraux ». La question est avant tout sociale, économique et culturelle. Ces territoires illustrent la sortie de la classe moyenne des catégories qui en constituaient hier le socle : ouvriers, employés, petits paysans, petits indépendants. Ces catégories ont joué le jeu de la mondialisation, elles ont même au départ soutenu le projet européen. Cependant, après plusieurs décennies d’adaptation aux normes de l’économie-monde, elles font le constat d’une baisse ou d’une stagnation de leur niveau de vie, de la précarisation des conditions de travail, du chômage de masse et, in fine, du blocage de l’ascenseur social. Sans régulation d’un libre-échange qui défavorise prioritairement ces catégories et ces territoires, le processus va se poursuivre. C’est pourquoi la priorité est de favoriser le développement d’un modèle économique complémentaire (et non alternatif) sur ces territoires qui cumulent fragilités socio-économiques et sédentarisation des populations. Cela suppose de donner du pouvoir et des compétences aux élus et collectivités de ces territoires. En adoptant le système économique mondialisé, les pays développés ont accouché de son modèle sociétal : le multiculturalisme. En la matière, la France n’a pas fait mieux (ni pire) que les autres pays développés. Elle est devenue une société américaine comme les autres, avec ses tensions et ses paranoïas identitaires. Il faut insister sur le fait que sur ces sujets, il n’y a pas d’un côté ceux qui seraient dans l’ouverture et de l’autre ceux qui seraient dans le rejet. Si les catégories supérieures et éduquées ne basculent pas dans le populisme, c’est parce qu’elles ont les moyens de la frontière invisible avec l’Autre. Ce sont d’ailleurs elles qui pratiquent le plus l’évitement scolaire et résidentiel. La question du rapport à l’autre n’est donc pas seulement posée pour les catégories populaires. Poser cette question comme universelle – et qui touche toutes les catégories sociales – est un préalable si l’on souhaite faire baisser les tensions. Cela implique de sortir de la posture de supériorité morale que les gens ne supportent plus. J’avais justement conçu la notion d’insécurité culturelle pour montrer que, notamment en milieu populaire, ce n’est pas tant le rapport à l’autre qui pose problème qu’une instabilité démographique qui induit la peur de devenir minoritaire et de perdre un capital social et culturel très important. Une peur qui concerne tous les milieux populaires, quelles que soient leurs origines. C’est en partant de cette réalité qu’il convient de penser la question du multiculturalisme. Christophe Guilluy
Pour la première fois, le modèle mondialisé des classes dominantes, dont Hillary Clinton était le parangon, a été rejeté dans le pays qui l’a vu naître. Fidèles à leurs habitudes, les élites dirigeantes déprécient l’expression de la volonté populaire quand elles en perdent le contrôle. Ainsi, les médias, à travers le cas de la Pennsylvanie – l’un des swing states qui ont fait le succès de Trump -, ont mis l’accent sur le refus de mobilité de la working class blanche, les fameux « petits Blancs », comme cause principale de la précarité et du déclassement. Le « bougisme », qui est la maladie de Parkinson de la mondialisation, confond les causes et les conséquences. Il est incapable de comprendre que, selon la formule de Christopher Lasch, « le déracinement déracine tout, sauf le besoin de racines ». L’élection de Trump, c’est le cri de révolte des enracinés du local contre les agités du global. (…) La gauche progressiste n’a eu de cesse, depuis les années 1980, que d’évacuer la question sociale en posant comme postulat que ce n’est pas la pauvreté qui interdit d’accéder à la réussite ou à l’emploi, mais uniquement l’origine ethnique. Pourtant, l’actuelle dynamique des populismes ne se réduit pas à la seule révolte identitaire. En contrepoint de la protestation du peuple-ethnos, il y a la revendication du peuple-démos, qui aspire à être rétabli dans ses prérogatives de sujet politique et d’acteur souverain de son destin. Le populisme est aussi et peut-être d’abord un hyperdémocratisme, selon le mot de Taguieff, une demande de démocratie par quoi le peuple manifeste sa volonté d’être représenté et gouverné selon ses propres intérêts. Or notre postdémocratie oscille entre le déni et le détournement de la volonté populaire. (…) Au XIXe siècle, la bourgeoisie a eu recours à la loi pour imposer le suffrage censitaire. Aujourd’hui, les classes dominantes n’en éprouvent plus la nécessité, elles l’obtiennent de facto : il leur suffit de neutraliser le vote populiste en l’excluant de toute représentation par le mode de scrutin et de provoquer l’abstention massive de l’électorat populaire, qui, convaincu de l’inutilité du vote, se met volontairement hors jeu. Ne vont voter lors des élections intermédiaires que les inclus, des fonctionnaires aux cadres supérieurs, et surtout les plus de 60 ans, qui, dans ce type de scrutin, représentent autour de 35 % des suffrages exprimés, alors qu’ils ne sont que 22 % de la population. Ainsi, l’écosystème de la génération de 68 s’est peu à peu transformé en un egosystème imposé à l’ensemble de la société. Dans notre postdémocratie, c’est le cens qui fait sens et se traduit par une surreprésentation des classes favorisées aux dépens de la France périphérique, de la France des invisibles. (…) On est arrivé à une situation où la majorité n’est plus une réalité arithmétique, mais un concept politique résultant d’une application tronquée du principe majoritaire. Dans l’Assemblée élue en 2012 avec une participation de 55 %, la majorité parlementaire socialiste ne représente qu’un peu plus de 16 % des inscrits. La majorité qui fait et défait les lois agit au nom d’à peine plus de 1 Français sur 6 ! Nous vivons sous le régime de ce qu’André Tardieu appelait déjà avant-guerre le « despotisme d’une minorité légale ». On assiste, avec le système de l’alternance unique entre les deux partis de gouvernement, à une privatisation du pouvoir au bénéfice d’une partitocratie dont la légitimité ne cesse de s’éroder. (…) Plus les partis ont perdu en légitimité, plus s’est imposée à eux l’obligation de verrouiller le système de crainte que la sélection des candidats à l’élection présidentielle ne leur échappe. Avec la crise de la représentation, le système partisan n’a plus ni l’autorité ni la légitimité suffisante pour imposer ses choix sans un simulacre de démocratie. Les primaires n’ont pas d’autre fonction que de produire une nouvelle forme procédurale de légitimation. En pratique, cela revient à remettre à une minorité partisane le pouvoir de construire l’offre politique soumise à l’ensemble du corps électoral. Entre 3 et 4 millions de citoyens vont préorienter le choix des 46 millions de Français en âge de voter. Or la sociologie des électeurs des primaires à droite comme à gauche ne fait guère de doute : il s’agit des catégories supérieures ou moyennes, qui entretiennent avec la classe politique un rapport de proximité. Les primaires auront donc pour effet d’aggraver la crise de représentation en renforçant le poids politique des inclus au moment même où il faudrait rouvrir le jeu démocratique. (…) D’un tel processus de sélection ne peuvent sortir que des produits de l’endogamie partisane, des candidats façonnés par le conformisme de la doxa et gouvernés par l’économisme. Des candidats inaccessibles à la dimension symbolique du pouvoir et imperméables aux legs de la tradition et de l’Histoire nationale. Sarkozy et Hollande ont illustré l’inaptitude profonde des candidats sélectionnés par le système à se hisser à la hauteur de la fonction. Dans ces conditions, il est à craindre que, quel que soit l’élu, l’élection de 2017 ne soit un coup à blanc, un coup pour rien. D’autant que les hommes de la classe dirigeante n’ont ni les repères historiques ni les bases culturelles pour défendre les sociabilités protectrices face aux ravages de la mondialisation. En somme, ils ne savent pas ce qu’ils font parce qu’ils ne savent pas ce qu’ils défont. Quant au FN, privé de toute espérance du pouvoir, contrairement à ce qu’on voudrait nous faire croire, il offre un repoussoir utile à la classe dirigeante, qui lui permet de se survivre à bon compte. Il est à ce jour encore la meilleure assurance-vie du système. Patrick Buisson
Les «élites» françaises, sous l’inspiration et la domination intellectuelle de François Mitterrand, on voulu faire jouer au Front National depuis 30 ans, le rôle, non simplement du diable en politique, mais de l’Apocalypse. Le Front National représentait l’imminence et le danger de la fin des Temps. L’épée de Damoclès que se devait de neutraliser toute politique «républicaine». Cet imaginaire de la fin, incarné dans l’anti-frontisme, arrive lui-même à sa fin. Pourquoi? Parce qu’il est devenu impossible de masquer aux Français que la fin est désormais derrière nous. La fin est consommée, la France en pleine décomposition, et la république agonisante, d’avoir voulu devenir trop bonne fille de l’Empire multiculturel européen. Or tout le monde comprend bien qu’il n’a nullement été besoin du Front national pour cela. Plus rien ou presque n’est à sauver, et c’est pourquoi le Front national fait de moins en moins peur, même si, pour cette fois encore, la manœuvre du «front républicain», orchestrée par Manuel Valls, a été efficace sur les électeurs socialistes. Les Français ont compris que la fin qu’on faisait incarner au Front national ayant déjà eu lieu, il avait joué, comme rôle dans le dispositif du mensonge généralisé, celui du bouc émissaire, vers lequel on détourne la violence sociale, afin qu’elle ne détruise pas tout sur son passage. Remarquons que le Front national s’était volontiers prêté à ce dispositif aussi longtemps que cela lui profitait, c’est-à-dire jusqu’à aujourd’hui. Le parti anti-système a besoin du système dans un premier temps pour se légitimer. Nous approchons du point où la fonction de bouc émissaire, théorisée par René Girard  va être entièrement dévoilée et où la violence ne pourra plus se déchaîner vers une victime extérieure. Il faut bien mesurer le danger social d’une telle situation, et la haute probabilité de renversement qu’elle secrète: le moment approche pour ceux qui ont désigné la victime émissaire à la vindicte du peuple, de voir refluer sur eux, avec la vitesse et la violence d’un tsunami politique, la frustration sociale qu’ils avaient cherché à détourner. Les élections régionales sont sans doute un des derniers avertissements en ce sens. Les élites devraient anticiper la colère d’un peuple qui se découvre de plus en plus floué, et admettre qu’elles ont produit le système de la victime émissaire, afin de détourner la violence et la critique à l’égard de leur propre action. Pour cela, elles devraient cesser d’ostraciser le Front national, et accepter pleinement le débat avec lui, en le réintégrant sans réserve dans la vie politique républicaine française. Y-a-t-il une solution pour échapper à une telle issue? Avouons que cette responsabilité est celle des élites en place, ayant entonné depuis 30 ans le même refrain. A supposer cependant que nous voulions les sauver, nous pourrions leur donner le conseil suivant: leur seule possibilité de survivre serait d’anticiper la violence refluant sur elles en faisant le sacrifice de leur innocence. Elles devraient anticiper la colère d’un peuple qui se découvre de plus en plus floué, et admettre qu’elles ont produit le système de la victime émissaire, afin de détourner la violence et la critique à l’égard de leur propre action. Pour cela, elles devraient cesser d’ostraciser le Front national, et accepter pleinement le débat avec lui, en le réintégrant sans réserve dans la vie politique républicaine française. Pour cela, elles devraient admettre de déconstruire la gigantesque hallucination collective produite autour du Front national, hallucination revenant aujourd’hui sous la forme inversée du Sauveur. Ce faisant, elles auraient tort de se priver au passage de souligner la participation du Front national au dispositif, ce dernier s’étant prêté de bonne grâce, sous la houlette du Père, à l’incarnation de la victime émissaire. Il faut bien avouer que nos élites du PS comme des Républicains ne prennent pas ce chemin, démontrant soit qu’elles n’ont strictement rien compris à ce qui se passe dans ce pays depuis 30 ans, soit qu’elles l’ont au contraire trop bien compris, et ne peuvent plus en assumer le dévoilement, soit qu’elles espèrent encore prospérer ainsi. Il n’est pas sûr non plus que le Front national soit prêt à reconnaître sa participation au dispositif. Il y aurait intérêt pourtant pour pouvoir accéder un jour à la magistrature suprême. Car si un tel aveu pourrait lui faire perdre d’un côté son «aura» anti-système, elle pourrait lui permettre de l’autre, une alliance indispensable pour dépasser au deuxième tour des présidentielles le fameux «plafond de verre». Il semble au contraire après ces régionales que tout changera pour que rien ne change. Deux solutions qui ne modifient en rien le dispositif mais le durcissent au contraire se réaffirment. La première solution, empruntée par le PS et désirée par une partie des Républicains, consiste à maintenir coûte que coûte le discours du front républicain en recherchant un dépassement du clivage gauche/droite. Une telle solution consiste à aller plus loin encore dans la désignation de la victime émissaire, et à s’exposer à un retournement encore plus dévastateur. (…) Car sans même parler des effets dévastateurs que pourrait avoir, a posteriori, un nouvel attentat, sur une telle déclaration, comment ne pas remarquer que les dernières décisions du gouvernement sur la lutte anti-terroriste ont donné rétrospectivement raison à certaines propositions du Front national? On voit mal alors comment on pourrait désormais lui faire porter le chapeau de ce dont il n’est pas responsable, tout en lui ôtant le mérite des solutions qu’il avait proposées, et qu’on n’a pas hésité à lui emprunter! La deuxième solution, défendue par une partie des Républicains suivant en cela Nicolas Sarkozy, consiste à assumer des préoccupations communes avec le Front national, tout en cherchant à se démarquer un peu par les solutions proposées. Mais comment faire comprendre aux électeurs un tel changement de cap et éviter que ceux-ci ne préfèrent l’original à la copie? Comment les électeurs ne remarqueraient-ils pas que le Front national, lui, n’a pas changé de discours, et surtout, qu’il a précédé tout le monde, et a eu le mérite d’avoir raison avant les autres, puisque ceux-ci viennent maintenant sur son propre terrain? Comment d’autre part concilier une telle proximité avec un discours diabolisant le Front national et cherchant l’alliance au centre? Curieuses élites, qui ne comprennent pas que la posture «républicaine», initiée par Mitterrand, menace désormais de revenir comme un boomerang les détruire. Christopher Lasch avait écrit La révolte des élites, pour pointer leur sécession d’avec le peuple, c’est aujourd’hui le suicide de celles-ci qu’il faudrait expliquer, dernière conséquence peut-être de cette sécession. Vincent Coussedière
With their politicization of their victory, their expletive-filled speech, and their publicly expressed contempt for half their fellow citizens, the women of the U.S. women’s soccer team succeeded in endearing themselves to America’s left. But they earned the rest of the country’s disdain, which is sad. We really wanted to love the team. What we have here is yet another example of perhaps the most important fact in the contemporary world: Everything the left touches, it ruins. Dennis Prager
The San Francisco Board of Education recently voted to paint over, and thus destroy, a 1,600-square-foot mural of George Washington’s life in San Francisco’s George Washington High School. Victor Arnautoff, a communist Russian-American artist and Stanford University art professor, had painted “Life of Washington” in 1936, commissioned by the New Deal’s Works Progress Administration. A community task force appointed by the school district had recommended that the board address student and parent objections to the 83-year-old mural, which some viewed as racist for its depiction of black slaves and Native Americans. Nike pitchman and former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick recently objected to the company’s release of a special Fourth of July sneaker emblazoned with a 13-star Betsy Ross flag. The terrified Nike immediately pulled the shoe off the market. The New York Times opinion team issued a Fourth of July video about “the myth of America as the greatest nation on earth.” The Times’ journalists conceded that the United States is “just OK.” During a recent speech to students at a Minnesota high school, Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) offered a scathing appraisal of her adopted country, which she depicted as a disappointment whose racism and inequality did not meet her expectations as an idealistic refugee. Omar’s family had fled worn-torn Somalia and spent four-years in a Kenyan refugee camp before reaching Minnesota, where Omar received a subsidized education and ended up a congresswoman. The U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team won the World Cup earlier this month. Team stalwart Megan Rapinoe refused to put her hand over heart during the playing of the national anthem, boasted that she would never visit the “f—ing White House” and, with others, nonchalantly let the American flag fall to the ground during the victory celebration. The city council in St. Louis Park, a suburb of Minneapolis, voted to stop reciting the Pledge of Allegiance before its meeting on the rationale that it wished not to offend a “diverse community.” The list of these public pushbacks at traditional American patriotic customs and rituals could be multiplied. They follow the recent frequent toppling of statues of 19th-century American figures, many of them from the South, and the renaming of streets and buildings to blot out mention of famous men and women from the past now deemed illiberal enemies of the people. Such theater is the street version of what candidates in the Democratic presidential primary have been saying for months. They want to disband border enforcement, issue blanket amnesties, demand reparations for descendants of slaves, issue formal apologies to groups perceived to be the subjects of discrimination, and rail against American unfairness, inequality, and a racist and sexist past. In their radical progressive view — shared by billionaires from Silicon Valley, recent immigrants and the new Democratic Party — America was flawed, perhaps fatally, at its origins. Things have not gotten much better in the country’s subsequent 243 years, nor will they get any better — at least not until America as we know it is dismantled and replaced by a new nation predicated on race, class and gender identity-politics agendas. In this view, an “OK” America is no better than other countries. As Barack Obama once bluntly put it, America is only exceptional in relative terms, given that citizens of Greece and the United Kingdom believe their own countries are just as exceptional. In other words, there is no absolute standard to judge a nation’s excellence. About half the country disagrees. It insists that America’s sins, past and present, are those of mankind. But only in America were human failings constantly critiqued and addressed. (…) The traditionalists see American history as a unique effort to overcome human weakness, bias and sin. That effort is unmatched by other cultures and nations, and explains why millions of foreign nationals swarm into the United States, both legally and illegally. (…) If progressives and socialists can at last convince the American public that their country was always hopelessly flawed, they can gain power to remake it based on their own interests. These elites see Americans not as unique individuals but as race, class and gender collectives, with shared grievances from the past that must be paid out in the present and the future. Victor Davis Hanson
There is a ‘try a hijab on’ booth at my college campus. So you’re telling me that it’s now just a fashion accessory and not a religious thing? Or are you just trying to get women used to being oppressed under Islam? I said that it was (getting women used to) being oppressed because there are so many women in Middle Eastern countries that are being punished and stoned for refusing to wear a hijab. Nobody is talking about that in the West because all they see is everyone being at peace, but that is the beauty of America. Kathy Zhu
Did you know the majority of black deaths are caused by other blacks? Fix problems within your own community before blaming others. (…) This applies for every community. If there is a problem, fix things in your own community before lashing out at others and trying to find an issue there. That is all I wanted to say. It is not a problem against black people. Obviously I am not racist or stuff like that. Kathy Zhu
My first act will be to ask Megan Rapinoe to be my secretary of State and thus return “love rather than hate” to the center of America’s foreign policy. Jay Inslee (Washington governor)
The progressive agenda is America’s agenda, and we need to get out there and fight for it! Elizabeth Warren
America is changing. By 2043, we’ll be a nation [that’s] majority people of color, and that’s — that is the game here — that’s what folks don’t want to understand what’s happening in this country. Roland Martin (African-American journalist)
How’d we lose the working class? Ask yourself, what did we do for them? You called them stupid. You marginalized them, took them for granted and you didn’t talk to them. For 20 years, the right wing has invested tremendous amounts of money in talk radio, in television, in every possible platform to be in their ears, before their eyes, and on their minds. And they don’t call them stupid. Rick Smith (talk-show host)
On several polarizing issues, Democrats are refusing to offer the reassurances to moderate opinion that they once did. They’re not saying: We will secure the border and insist on an orderly asylum process, but do it in a humane way; we will protect the right to abortion while working to make it less common; we will protect gun rights while setting sensible limits on them. The old rhetorical guardrails — trust us, there’s a hard stop on how far left we’ll go — are gone. Ramesh Ponnuru
This month, Netroots Nation met in Philadelphia. The choice was no accident. Pennsylvania will probably be the key swing state in 2020. Donald Trump won it by only 44,000 votes or seven-tenths of a percentage point. He lost the prosperous Philadelphia suburbs by more than Mitt Romney did in 2012 but more than made up for it with new support in “left behind” blue-collar areas such as Erie and Wilkes-Barre. You’d think that this history would inform activists at Netroots Nation about the best strategy to follow in 2020. Not really. Instead, Netroots events seemed to alternate between pandering presentations by presidential candidates and a bewildering array of “intersectionality” and identity-politics seminars. Senator Elizabeth Warren pledged that, if elected, she would immediately investigate crimes committed by border-control agents. Julian Castro, a former Obama-administration cabinet member, called for decriminalizing illegal border crossings. But everyone was topped by Washington governor Jay Inslee. “My first act will be to ask Megan Rapinoe to be my secretary of State,” he promised. Naming the woke, purple-haired star of the championship U.S. Women’s Soccer team, he said, would return “love rather than hate” to the center of America’s foreign policy. It is true that a couple of panels tried to address how the Left could appeal to voters who cast their ballots for Barack Obama in 2012 but switched to Trump in 2016. (…)  But that kind of introspection was rare at Netroots Nation. Elizabeth Warren explicitly rejected calls to keep Democrats from moving too far to the left in the next campaign (…) Warren and her supporters point to polls showing that an increasing number of Americans are worried about income inequality, climate change, and America’s image around the world. But are those the issues that actually motivate people to vote, or are they peripheral issues that aren’t central to the decision most voters make? Consider a Pew Research poll taken last year that asked respondents to rank 23 “policy priorities” from terrorism to global trade in order of importance. Climate change came in 22nd out of 23. There is a stronger argument that Democrats will have trouble winning over independent voters if they sprinting so far to the left that they go over a political cliff. (…) Many leftists acknowledge that Democrats are less interested than they used to be in trimming their sails to appeal to moderates. Such trimming is no longer necessary, as they see it, because the changing demographics of the country give them a built-in advantage. Almost everyone I encountered at Netroots Nation was convinced that President Trump would lose in 2020. (…) It’s a common mistake on both the right and the left to assume that minority voters will a) always vote in large numbers and b) will vote automatically for Democrats. Hillary Clinton lost in 2016 in part because black turnout fell below what Barack Obama was able to generate. There is no assurance that black turnout can be restored in 2020. As for other ethnic groups, a new poll by Politico/Morning Consult this month found that Trump’s approval among Hispanics is at 42 percent. An Economist/YouGov poll showed Trump at 32 percent among Hispanics; another poll from The Hill newspaper and HarrisX has it at 35 percent. In 2016, Trump won only 29 to 32 percent of the Hispanic vote. Netroots Nation convinced me that progressive activists are self-confident, optimistic about the chances for a progressive triumph, and assured that a Trump victory was a freakish “black swan” event. But they are also deaf to any suggestion that their PC excesses had anything to do with Trump’s being in the White House. That is apt to be the progressive blind spot going into the 2020 election. John Fund
The immigrant is the pawn of Latin American governments who view him as inanimate capital, someone who represents thousands of dollars in future foreign-exchange remittances, as well as one less mouth to feed at home — if he crosses the border, legality be damned. If that sounds a cruel or cynical appraisal, then why would the Mexican government in 2005 print a comic booklet (“Guide for the Mexican Migrant”) with instructions to its citizens on how best to cross into the United States — urging them to break American law and assuming that they could not read? Yet for all the savagery dealt out to the immigrant — the callousness of his government, the shakedowns of the coyotes and cartels, the exploitation of his labor by new American employers — the immigrant himself is not entirely innocent. He knows — or does not care to know — that by entering the U.S., he has taken a slot from a would-be legal immigrant, one, unlike himself, who played by the rules and waited years in line for his chance to become an American. He knowingly violates U.S. immigration law. And when the first act of an immigrant is to enter the U.S. illegally, the second to reside there unlawfully, and the third so often to adopt false identities, he undermines American law on the expectation that he will receive exemptions not accorded to U.S. citizens, much less to other legal immigrants. In terms of violations of federal law, and crimes such as hit-and-run accidents and identity theft, the illegal immigrant is overrepresented in the criminal-justice system, and indeed in federal penitentiaries. Certainly, no Latin American government would allow foreigners to enter, reside, and work in their own country in the manner that they expect their own citizens to do so in America. Historically, the Mexican constitution, to take one example, discriminates in racial terms against both the legal and illegal immigrants, in medieval terms of ethnic essence. Some $30 billion in remittances are sent back by mostly illegal aliens to Central American governments and roughly another $30 billion to Mexico. But the full implications of that exploitation are rarely appreciated. Most impoverished illegal aliens who send such staggering sums back not only entered the United States illegally and live here illegally, but they often enjoy some sort of local, state, or federal subsidy. They work at entry-level jobs with the understanding that they are to scrimp and save, with the assistance of the American taxpayer, whose laws they have shredded, so that they can send cash to their relatives and friends back home. In other words, the remitters are like modern indentured servants, helots in hock to their governments that either will not or cannot help their families and are excused from doing so thanks to such massive remittances. In sum, they promote illegal immigration to earn such foreign exchange, to create an expatriate community in the United States that will romanticize a Guatemala or Oaxaca — all the more so,  the longer and farther they are away from it. Few of the impoverished in Mexico paste a Mexican-flag sticker on their window shield; many do so upon arrival in the United States. Illegal immigration is a safety valve, by which dissidents are thanked for marching north rather than on their own nations’ capitals. Latin American governments really do not care that much that their poor are raped while crossing the Mexican desert, or sold off by the drug cartels, or that they drown in the Rio Grande, but they suddenly weep when they reach American detention centers — a cynicism that literally cost hundreds their lives. America is increasingly becoming not so much a nonwhite nation as an assimilated, integrated, and intermarried country. Race, skin color, and appearance, if you will, are becoming irrelevant. The construct of “Latino” — Mexican-American? Portuguese? Spanish? Brazilian? — is becoming immaterial as diverse immigrants soon cannot speak Spanish, lose all knowledge of Latin America, and become indistinguishable in America from the descendants of southern Europeans, Armenians, or any other Mediterranean immigrant group. In other words, a Lopez or Martinez was rapidly becoming as relevant or irrelevant in terms of grievance politics, or perceived class, as a Pelosi, Scalise, De Niro, or Pacino. If Pelosi was named “Ocasio-Cortez” and AOC “Pelosi,” then no one would know, or much care, from their respective superficial appearance, who was of Puerto Rican background and who of Italian ancestry. Such a melting-pot future terrifies the ethnic activists in politics, academia, and the media who count on replenishing the numbers of unassimilated “Latinos,” in order to announce themselves the champions of collective grievance and disparity and thereby find careerist advantage. When 1 million of some of the most impoverished people on the planet arrive without legality, a high-school diploma, capital, or English, then they are likely to remain poor for a generation. And their poverty then offers supposed proof that America is a nativist or racist society for allowing such asymmetry to occur — a social-justice crime remedied best the by Latino caucus, the Chicano-studies department, the La Raza lawyers association, or the former National Council of La Raza. Yet, curb illegal immigration, and the entire Latino race industry goes the way of the Greek-, Armenian-, or Portuguese-American communities that have all found parity once massive immigration of their impoverished countrymen ceased and the formidable powers of the melting pot were uninterrupted. Democrats once were exclusionists — largely because they feared that illegal immigration eroded unionization and overtaxed the social-service resources of their poor citizen constituents. Cesar Chavez, for example, sent his thugs to the border to club illegal aliens and drive them back into Mexico, as if they were future strike breakers. Until recently, Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton called for strict border enforcement, worried that the wages of illegal workers were driving down those of inner-city or barrio American youth. What changed? Numbers. Once the pool of illegal aliens reached a likely 20 million, and once their second-generation citizen offspring won anchor-baby legality and registered to vote, a huge new progressive constituency rose in the American Southwest — one that was targeted by Democrats, who alternately promised permanent government subsidies and sowed fears with constant charges that right-wing Republicans were abject racists, nativists, and xenophobes. Due to massive influxes of immigrants, and the flight of middle-class citizens, the California of Ronald Reagan, George Deukmejian, and Pete Wilson long ago ceased to exist. Indeed, there are currently no statewide Republican office-holders in California, which has liberal supermajorities in both state legislatures and a mere seven Republicans out of 53 congressional representatives. Nevada, New Mexico, and Colorado are becoming Californized. Soon open borders will do the same to Arizona and Texas. No wonder that the Democratic party has been willing to do almost anything to become the enabler of open borders, whether that is setting up over 500 sanctuary-city jurisdictions, suing to block border enforcement in the courts, or extending in-state tuition, free medical care, and driver’s licenses to those who entered and reside in America illegally. If most immigrants were right-wing, middle-class, Latino anti-Communists fleeing Venezuela or Cuba, or Eastern European rightists sick of the EU, or angry French and Germans who were tired of their failed socialist governments, the Democratic party would be the party of closed borders and the enemy of legal, meritocratic, diverse, and measured immigration. Employers over the past 50 years learned fundamental truths about illegal immigrants. The impoverished young male immigrant, arriving without English, money, education, and legality, will take almost any job to survive, and so he will work all the harder once he’s employed. For 20 years or so, young immigrant workers remain relatively healthy. But once physical labor takes its toll on the middle-aged immigrant worker, the state always was expected to step in to assume the health care, housing, and sustenance cost of the injured, ill, and aging worker — thereby empowering the employer’s revolving-door use of a new generation of young workers. Illegality — at least until recently, with the advent of sanctuary jurisdictions — was seen as convenient, ensuring asymmetry between the employee and the employer, who could always exercise the threat of deportation for any perceived shortcoming in his alien work force. Note that those who hire illegal aliens claim that no Americans will do such work, at least at the wages they are willing to, or can, pay. That is the mea culpa that employers voice when accused of lacking empathy for out-of-work Americans. If employers were fined for hiring illegal aliens, or held financially responsible for their immigrant workers’ health care and retirements, or if they found that such workers were not very industrious and made poor entry-level laborers, then both the Wall Street Journal and the Chamber of Commerce would be apt to favor strict enforcement of immigration laws.  Wealthy progressives favor open borders and illegal immigration for a variety of reasons. The more immigrants, the cheaper, more available, and more industrious are nannies, housekeepers, caregivers, and gardeners — the silent army that fuels the contemporary, two-high-income, powerhouse household. Championing the immigrant poor, without living among them and without schooling one’s children with them or socializing among them, is the affluent progressive’s brand. And to the degree that the paradox causes any guilt, the progressive virtue-signals his loud outrage at border detentions, at separations between parents in court and children in custody, and at the contrast between the burly ICE officers and vulnerable border crossers. In medieval fashion, the farther the liberal advocate of open borders is from the objects of his moral concern, the louder and more empathetic he becomes. Most progressives also enjoy a twofer: inexpensive immigrant “help” and thereby enough brief exposure to the Other to authenticate their 8-to-5 caring. If border crossers were temporarily housed in vacant summer dorms at Stanford, Harvard, or Yale, or were accorded affordable-housing tracts for immigrant communities in the vast open spaces of Portola Valley and the Boulder suburbs, or if immigrant children were sent en masse to language-immersion programs at St. Paul’s, Sidwell Friends, or the Menlo School, then the progressive social-justice warrior would probably go mute. Victor Davis Hanson
Libéralisme économique et libéralisme culturel sont les deux faces d’une même monnaie. Les libertaires favorables à l’extension infinie des droits individuels et à la destruction des « structures » traditionnelles (famille, nation) font le jeu du libéralisme économique, puisque celui-ci se déploie sur et par la dilution des sentiments d’appartenances (nation, famille, corporations) qui laisse l’individu isolé. À l’inverse, la recherche permanente du profit amène à marchandiser ce qui, dans la philosophie kantienne, ne devait pas l’être dans la mesure où l’objet avait une dignité – Pour Emmanuel Kant, « tout a un prix ou une dignité » alors que pour Adam Smith « tout a un prix ». Le marché, quand il n’est pas contenu, fait partout son intrusion et remodèle les structures selon ses besoins. Dans leurs livres, Christopher Lasch et, après lui, Jean-Claude Michéa – s’en sont donc logiquement pris à la gauche, et à la matrice dont elle est issue, la philosophie des Lumières dont le programme d’émancipation individuelle par la Raison universelle se fait au mépris de la tradition. (…) Le détachement aussi bien social, économique que géographique, qui est aujourd’hui celui des élites par rapport aux modes de vie et aux préoccupations populaires, met en péril la démocratie américaine. La méritocratie leur sert à justifier leur pouvoir et leur isolement. Le populisme, au contraire, offre selon Christopher Lasch une alternative à la fois à l’État-providence et au Marché. Il s’appuie sur les communautés, fondements de la démocratie américaine, plutôt que sur les individus. (…) La vie civique est détériorée parce que l’ »art de la controverse » a été perdu : le journalisme est devenu « objectif », le milieu universitaire s’est coupé du réel et l’école a été isolée de ce qui enflamme les imaginations (religion, politique). Les lieux-tiers comme les quartiers, situés entre la famille et le monde extérieur, ont subi les assauts du marché et les intrusions de l’État. (…) La religion est reléguée dans la « coulisse du débat public », ce qui signifie pour Christopher Lasch la sécularisation des États-Unis. Les élites américaines estiment que notre époque est sortie de l’enfance de l’humanité, associée à la religion – elle-même confondue avec la superstition. Elles se signalent par leur refus des limites. Elles vivent dans l’ »illusion de la maîtrise » de son destin et du monde. Substituts à la religion, la psychanalyse – bien qu’utilisée par Christopher Lasch dans ses travaux -, la médecine contemporaine qui promet de guérir tous les maux, ou encore la politique multiculturaliste, souhaitent toutes en finir avec la honte et la culpabilité au nom de « l’estime de soi ». La maladie a remplacé le péché dans la nouvelle « religion » des élites qui ne mérite pas ce nom. Christopher Lasch préfère la désigner comme un « pharisianisme laïc » (…) Comme Christopher Lasch l’écrit lui-même : « d’une façon ou d’une autre, l’essentiel de mes travaux récents tourne autour de la question de l’avenir possible de la démocratie ». La parution de La révolte des élites est postérieure à la théorie de Francis Fukuyama selon laquelle la chute de l’URSS acte la fin de l’Histoire et provoquerait l’extension du modèle de la démocratie libérale au monde. Plutôt que de réfléchir à l’extension ou non de ce modèle, Christopher Lasch interroge cette démocratie américaine telle qu’elle est ou, plutôt, telle qu’elle est dévoyée à ses yeux, en s’appuyant sur la tradition états-unienne (les Pères fondateurs, le populisme, Abraham Lincoln etc.). La thèse de Christopher Lasch – le lecteur s’en rend très rapidement compte – s’applique aussi à l’Europe occidentale. Le constat fait par l’historien au début de son essai nous est familier : « le déclin de l’activité industrielle et la perte d’emplois qui en résulte ; le recul de la classe moyenne ; l’augmentation du nombre des pauvres ; le taux de criminalité qui monte en flèche ; le trafic de stupéfiants en plein essor ; la crise urbaine ». Il n’est pas anodin que l’on ait parlé de révolte des peuples contre les élites quand les partisans du Brexit ont gagné le référendum, et après l’élection de Donald Trump – la géographie électorale a alors montré combien les votes étaient corrélés au niveau de diplômes. La trahison des élites est une expression qui a aussi servi à qualifier la ratification en 2007 par les parlementaires français du traité de Lisbonne, alors que le projet pour une Constitution européenne (TCE) avait été rejeté par référendum en 2005. Le taux d’abstention aux élections est aussi compris comme un détachement des élites des préoccupations des gens ordinaires, soit exactement l’analyse faite par Christopher Lasch dans son livre. « Jamais, selon lui, la classe privilégiée n’a été aussi dangereusement isolée de son environnement ». Il décrit le « fatal éloignement du côté physique de la vie » des classes intellectuelles. « Leur seul rapport avec le travail productif, déplore Christopher Lasch, est en tant que consommateur ». L’historien et sociologue définit ces élites comme les personnes qui « contrôlent les flux internationaux d’argent et d’informations, président aux fondations philanthropiques et aux institutions d’enseignements supérieurs (…) gèrent les instruments de la production culturelle et fixent ainsi les termes du débat public » (directeurs de journaux, hommes politiques, dirigeants de grandes entreprises, universitaires etc.). Elles travaillent aussi bien dans le public que dans le privé et concentrent les avantages financiers, d’éducation et de pouvoir. La bourgeoisie aisée constitue le cœur de ces élites. Pour l’ancien marxiste qu’est Christopher Lasch, la lutte des classes est encore une réalité. L’ambition politique défendue dans son livre correspond à ce qui est d‘après lui l’idéal originel américain d’une société sans classe. Il est étonnant, néanmoins, de ne pas trouver dans cet essai un long développement sur ce que Jacques Ellul, l’un des « maîtres » de Christopher Lasch, appelait le « système technicien »¹¹. L’historien et sociologue, dans son analyse, met bien plus l’accent sur les modes de vie et les évolutions urbaines. (…) Les élites américaines ciblées par Christopher Lasch se définissent moins par leur idéologie, que par leur mode de vie distinctif. Sans vision politique commune, elles ne peuvent pas, d’après lui, être qualifiées de « classe dirigeante ». Elles cherchent moins à commander qu’à « échapper au sort commun » et à la « vie commune ». Elles vivent repliées sur elles-mêmes. Alors qu’ils contribuaient auparavant – souvent de façon intéressée, certes- au financement des équipements de la communauté (bibliothèques, hôpitaux, universités etc.), les 20% les plus riches de la population se rendent aujourd’hui indépendants « non seulement des grandes villes industrielles en pleine déconfiture », du fait notamment de la globalisation, « mais des services publics en général », qu’ils n’utilisent plus. Ils investissent en masse dans l’éducation et l’information plutôt que dans la propriété. Leur argent leur permet de se constituer des ghettos volontaires : ils monopolisent les collèges et universités les plus célèbres où est encore transmise la culture humaniste et ils ont recours à des services de ramassage de déchets ainsi qu’à des sociétés de sécurité privées. Coupées de la solidarité nationale économique (la fraude fiscale des entreprises dites « multinationales » en est un exemple), les élites le sont aussi de la solidarité politique. La plupart des personnes qui font partie des élites ont « cessé de se penser américains » ou de se sentir « impliquées dans le destin de l’Amérique pour le meilleur et pour le pire ». Le sujet central du livre de Christopher Lasch, la démocratie, se confond en fait en bonne partie avec celui de la nation, dont les élites pensent qu’elle est un cadre obsolète et contraignant. Un tel détachement des élites, de la nation et du peuple, implique une dangereuse déresponsabilisation. Il en est la cause directe. (…) Comme l’homme-masse de Ortega y Gasset, les élites sont inconséquentes à l’égard des générations futures, elles exigent des droits plutôt que d’être exigeantes envers elles-mêmes. En se disant « citoyens du monde », elles séparent la citoyenneté de la nationalité et se déchargent donc de leurs obligations civiques. La fracture sociale décrite et analysée par l’auteur est aussi une fracture géographique. Aux yeux des élites, qui vivent majoritairement sur les côtes du pays, l’« Amérique du milieu », est un fardeau obscurantiste, rétrograde car rétif à l’esprit émancipateur des Lumières, en tout cas à l’idée qu’elles s’en font. (…) Si les élites s’emploient à « créer des institutions parallèles ou alternatives », c’est parce qu’elles ne cherchent pas à « imposer leurs valeurs à la majorité (qu’elles perçoivent comme incorrigiblement raciste, sexiste, provinciale et xénophobe) » et « encore moins à (la) persuader au moyen d’un débat public rationnel » (puisque la majorité, selon les élites, n’est pas raisonnable ni rationnelle). Ici est la limite de leur optimisme progressiste. La vie de la majorité n’en est pas moins, évidemment, bouleversée par les décisions prises par les élites politique, médiatique, universitaire et économique. Christopher Lasch qualifie de « touristique » la vision du monde des élites qu’il décrit. « Ce qui, ajoute-t-il, a peu de chances d’encourager un amour passionné pour la démocratie ». Leur idéal est celui de la mobilité. Elles se meuvent dans les réseaux internationaux, plutôt qu’elles ne s’inscrivent dans des lieux. « Jamais, souligne l’auteur, la réussite n’a été plus étroitement associée à la mobilité ». Elles participent ainsi, malgré elles, à faire surgir en réaction ce que Christopher Lasch appelle un nouveau « tribalisme ». Vingt ans après la parution de la Révolte des élites, ce constat est plus vrai que jamais. Les infra-nationalismes, dont la Catalogne est une des illustrations, relèvent de ce même processus de fragmentation. (…) S’il relativise exagérément le danger islamiste, Christopher Lasch s’inquiète cependant du multiculturalisme promu par les élites. Elles en ont une image là aussi touristique, celle du « bazar » qui met à leur portée les vêtements et cuisines les plus diverses du monde. Une telle conception biaise leur approche de la démocratie. L’État, selon les élites, a pour mission de démocratiser « l’estime de soi ». Des mesures dites « tolérantes », comme la discrimination positive, sont prises au nom de la diversité pour réparer le préjudice qu’auraient subi dans l’histoire les minorités, qu’elles soient ethniques ou sexuelles. Le « sociétal » efface les rapports de classe. Selon Christopher Lasch, une telle politique déresponsabilise et assiste ces minorités au lieu de les inciter à gagner « le respect ». Elle favorise la formation de parodies de communautés, caractérisées par un « entre-soi » sectaire. Des critères comme l’ethnie et le sexe y conditionnent les opinions. Si une personne en dévie, elle devient un traître à sa cause – elle est par exemple accusée de « penser blanc ». Christopher Lasch a ce mot terrible : « nous sommes devenus aujourd’hui une nation de minorités ». Il note très justement que ces communautés, substituts pour la gauche à la classe ouvrière, « ne cherchent plus à transformer révolutionnairement les rapports sociaux mais à intégrer les structures dominantes ». Ladite classe ouvrière a été sacrifiée sur l’autel du libéralisme promu par les élites américaines. Elles sont libérales, dans les deux sens du mot : pour la marchandisation croissante du monde et pour une prétendue « libération » sur le plan des mœurs. Un tel programme idéologique affaiblit l’État-nation « par le haut », au sens où par exemple la globalisation transfère le pouvoir du politique vers les multinationales, et par « le bas », les discours différentialistes générant du communautarisme. La fragilisation de l’État-nation provoque, d’une part, une unification du monde par le marché et le droit, et, d’autre part, une fragmentation identitaire et ethnique. Christopher Lasch estime qu’elle est profondément liée à l’effondrement de la classe moyenne sans laquelle il n’y aurait pas eu d’État-nation. C’est pourquoi ce qui reste de la classe moyenne aux États-Unis, au moment où Christopher Lasch écrit, est l’ « élément le plus patriote, pour ne pas dire chauvin et militariste de la société ». Laurent Ottavi
Lasch n’a jamais fait mystère de sa dette envers l’héritage protestant et l’étude de la théologie protestante dans la formulation de sa philosophie de l’espérance. Ce que lui ont apporté des théologiens comme Jonathan Edwards ou Reinhold Niebuhr, et des penseurs comme Emerson ou William James peut être résumé dans l’idée que l’espérance est la prédisposition mentale de ceux qui persistent à vouloir croire, envers et contre tout, dans l’infinie bonté de la vie, même en présence des preuves du contraire, et «dans la justice, la conviction que l’homme mauvais souffrira, que les hommes mauvais retrouveront le droit chemin, que l’ordre qui sous-tend le cours des évènements n’a rien à voir avec l’impunité». Et il n’est pas anodin que, se sachant condamné, Lasch ait consacré les deux derniers chapitres de son dernier livre à la religion dans lesquels il rappelle que, face à l’hybris technologique et l’illusion de la maîtrise totale, seule une vision religieuse de l’existence nous rappelle à notre nature divisée d’être «dépendant de la nature et en même temps incapable de la transcender», d’ «humanité oscill[ant] entre une fierté transcendante et un sentiment humiliant de faiblesse et de dépendance». À l’opposé de l’obsession de la certitude au détriment de la réalité du monde des démiurges de la Silicon Valley ou des gnostiques New Age, Lasch écrit que c’est «à la croyance douillette d’une coïncidence entre les fins du Tout-Puissant et nos fins purement humaines que la foi religieuse nous demande de renoncer». Seul ce sens des limites peut nous amener à réinvestir le monde par une «activité pratique qui lie l’homme à la nature en qualité de cultivateur soigneux». En d’autres termes, en fondant une éthique de l’attention au monde, comme nous y exhorte Matthew Crawford, sans doute le continuateur le plus juste de l’œuvre de Lasch. (…) Lasch avait très bien analysé avant la lettre le phénomène Trump au travers de la nouvelle droite, ou conservatisme de mouvement, incarnés successivement par Barry Goldwater ou Reagan. Tout comme ces derniers, Trump est parvenu à formuler un récit bien plus cohérent qu’il n’y paraît à partir de questions comme la crise des opiacés, les délocalisations, l’immigration, la menace chinoise et à s’en servir pour «diriger le ressentiment “petit bourgeois” à l’endroit des riches vers une “nouvelle classe” parasitaire constituée par des spécialistes de la résolution des problèmes et des relativistes moraux», afin d’en appeler aux «producteurs de l’Amérique» à se mobiliser autour de leur «intérêt économique commun» pour «limiter le développement de cette nouvelle classe non productive, rapace». Ainsi, concluait Lasch, le grand génie de la nouvelle droite était d’avoir retourné à son profit «les classifications sociales imprégnées de la tradition populiste – producteurs et parasitaires- et à les mettre au service de programmes sociaux et politiques directement opposés à tout ce que le Populisme avait toujours signifié». La différence est que Reagan est arrivé à la Maison Blanche au début de la contre-révolution monétariste, qui inaugurait la spécialisation de l’économie US dans le recyclage des surplus de la planète, alors que Trump arrive à un moment ou cette politique ininterrompue depuis la fin des années 1970 ne laisse qu’un champ de ruines, ce qui explique leurs divergences sur la question du commerce international. L’élection de Reagan était concomitante de l’entrée des États-Unis dans la période d’exubérance financière que connaissent tous les centres de l’économie-monde lorsqu’ils entament une phase de financiarisation, alors que celle de Trump est intervenue près de 10 ans après le début de la crise terminale de ce que Giovanni Arrighi appelait le long vingtième siècle ou siècle américain. Mais sur le fond, Trump n’est qu’un avatar actualisé de Reagan, allant d’ailleurs jusqu’à reprendre exactement le même slogan que ce dernier dans sa campagne victorieuse de 1980. (..) Récupéré sélectivement par des idéologues aux marges du parti républicain, comme Steve Bannon, qui a fait de La révolte des élites un de ses livres de chevet, Lasch est pour l’essentiel absent du paysage intellectuel engagé à gauche, à l’exception de The Baffler dans lequel officient des auteurs comme George Scialabba ou Thomas Frank. Il est tout aussi ignoré par les mouvements regroupés autour de Sanders, en raison de sa critique du progrès, qui le rend inaudible à leurs oreilles, et de leur tropisme en faveur d’une social-démocratie scandinave. C’est regrettable, car Lasch incarne un vrai socialisme à l’américaine, une sorte de proudhonisme américain, qui exhorte la gauche à chercher à s’allier, non pas avec les «médias de masse et les autres entreprises d’homogénéisation culturelle, ni avec la vision d’une société sans pères, et sans passé […] mais avec les forces qui, dans la vie moderne, résistent à l’assimilation, au déracinement et à la “modernisation forcée”». Mais, paraphrasant Simon Leys à propos d’Orwell, la gauche américaine, en persistant dans sa béatitude progressiste et sa perception simpliste et commode du capitalisme comme un système patriarcal, vertical et autoritaire, ne fait au fond que reproduire avec Lasch les mêmes erreurs qui l’ont poussée régulièrement à se laisser scandaleusement confisquer ses plus puissants penseurs. Renaud Beauchard
Naguère, c’était “la révolte des masses” qui était considérée comme la menace contre l’ordre social et la tradition civilisatrice de la culture occidentale. De nos jours, cependant, la menace principale semble provenir de ceux qui sont au sommet de la hiérarchie sociale et non pas des masses. Christopher Lasch
Many of the more privileged Americans who frequent fancy restaurants, stay in hotels and depend on hired help for lawn and pool maintenance, home repair and childcare don’t think illegal immigration is that big of a deal. Those in the higher-paid professions do not fear low-wage competition for their jobs in law, medicine, academia, the media, government or the arts. And many who have no problem with the present influx live in affluent communities with good schools insulated from the immediate budgetary consequences of meeting the needs of the offspring of the 11 million here illegally. These wealthier people aren’t so much liberal in their tolerance of illegal immigration as they are self-interested and cynical. In contrast, the far more numerous poor and lower middle classes of America, especially in the Southwest, are sincerely worried — and angry. (…) For the broad middle class, the poor and minorities — people who dine mostly at home, travel infrequently, mow their own lawns and change their children’s diapers — inexpensive service labor is not seen as much of a boon to them. Plus, lower- and middle-class Americans live in communities where schools are more impacted by an influx of Spanish-only speakers. And as janitors, maids, groundskeepers, carpenters, factory workers and truckers, they fear competition from lower-wage illegal alien laborers. Legal immigrants who wait years in line to enter the United States legally can be particularly unsympathetic to others who cut in front — in violation of the law. Victor Davis Hanson (October 6, 2006)
The furor of ignored Europeans against their union is not just directed against rich and powerful government elites per se, or against the flood of mostly young male migrants from the war-torn Middle East. The rage also arises from the hypocrisy of a governing elite that never seems to be subject to the ramifications of its own top-down policies. The bureaucratic class that runs Europe from Brussels and Strasbourg too often lectures European voters on climate change, immigration, politically correct attitudes about diversity, and the constant need for more bureaucracy, more regulations, and more redistributive taxes. But Euro-managers are able to navigate around their own injunctions, enjoying private schools for their children; generous public pay, retirement packages and perks; frequent carbon-spewing jet travel; homes in non-diverse neighborhoods; and profitable revolving-door careers between government and business. The Western elite classes, both professedly liberal and conservative, square the circle of their privilege with politically correct sermonizing. They romanticize the distant “other” — usually immigrants and minorities — while condescendingly lecturing the middle and working classes, often the losers in globalization, about their lack of sensitivity. On this side of the Atlantic, President Obama has developed a curious habit of talking down to Americans about their supposedly reactionary opposition to rampant immigration, affirmative action, multiculturalism, and political correctness — most notably in his caricatures of the purported “clingers” of Pennsylvania. Yet Obama seems uncomfortable when confronted with the prospect of living out what he envisions for others. He prefers golfing with celebrities to bowling. He vacations in tony Martha’s Vineyard rather than returning home to his Chicago mansion. His travel entourage is royal and hardly green. And he insists on private prep schools for his children rather than enrolling them in the public schools of Washington, D.C., whose educators he so often shields from long-needed reform. In similar fashion, grandees such as Facebook billionaire Mark Zuckerberg and Univision anchorman Jorge Ramos do not live what they profess. They often lecture supposedly less sophisticated Americans on their backward opposition to illegal immigration. But both live in communities segregated from those they champion in the abstract. The Clintons often pontificate about “fairness” but somehow managed to amass a personal fortune of more than $100 million by speaking to and lobbying banks, Wall Street profiteers, and foreign entities. The pay-to-play rich were willing to brush aside the insincere, pro forma social-justice talk of the Clintons and reward Hillary and Bill with obscene fees that would presumably result in lucrative government attention. Consider the recent Orlando tragedy for more of the same paradoxes. The terrorist killer, Omar Mateen — a registered Democrat, proud radical Muslim, and occasional patron of gay dating sites — murdered 49 people and wounded even more in a gay nightclub. His profile and motive certainly did not fit the elite narrative that unsophisticated right-wing American gun owners were responsible because of their support for gun rights. No matter. The Obama administration and much of the media refused to attribute the horror in Orlando to Mateen’s self-confessed radical Islamist agenda. Instead, they blamed the shooter’s semi-automatic .223 caliber rifle and a purported climate of hate toward gays. (…) In sum, elites ignored the likely causes of the Orlando shooting: the appeal of ISIS-generated hatred to some young, second-generation radical Muslim men living in Western societies, and the politically correct inability of Western authorities to short-circuit that clear-cut connection. Instead, the establishment all but blamed Middle America for supposedly being anti-gay and pro-gun. In both the U.S. and Britain, such politically correct hypocrisy is superimposed on highly regulated, highly taxed, and highly governmentalized economies that are becoming ossified and stagnant. The tax-paying middle classes, who lack the romance of the poor and the connections of the elite, have become convenient whipping boys of both in order to leverage more government social programs and to assuage the guilt of the elites who have no desire to live out their utopian theories in the flesh. Victor Davis Hanson
Illegal and illiberal immigration exists and will continue to expand because too many special interests are invested in it. It is one of those rare anomalies — the farm bill is another — that crosses political party lines and instead unites disparate elites through their diverse but shared self-interests: live-and-let-live profits for some and raw political power for others. For corporate employers, millions of poor foreign nationals ensure cheap labor, with the state picking up the eventual social costs. For Democratic politicos, illegal immigration translates into continued expansion of favorable political demography in the American Southwest. For ethnic activists, huge annual influxes of unassimilated minorities subvert the odious melting pot and mean continuance of their own self-appointed guardianship of salad-bowl multiculturalism. Meanwhile, the upper middle classes in coastal cocoons enjoy the aristocratic privileges of having plenty of cheap household help, while having enough wealth not to worry about the social costs of illegal immigration in terms of higher taxes or the problems in public education, law enforcement, and entitlements. No wonder our elites wink and nod at the supposed realities in the current immigration bill, while selling fantasies to the majority of skeptical Americans. Victor Davis Hanson
Who are the bigots — the rude and unruly protestors who scream and swarm drop-off points and angrily block immigration authority buses to prevent the release of children into their communities, or the shrill counter-protestors who chant back “Viva La Raza” (“Long Live the Race”)? For that matter, how does the racialist term “La Raza” survive as an acceptable title of a national lobby group in this politically correct age of anger at the Washington Redskins football brand? How can American immigration authorities simply send immigrant kids all over the United States and drop them into communities without firm guarantees of waiting sponsors or family? If private charities did that, would the operators be jailed? Would American parents be arrested for putting their unescorted kids on buses headed out of state? Liberal elites talk down to the cash-strapped middle class about their illiberal anger over the current immigration crisis. But most sermonizers are hypocritical. Take Nancy Pelosi, former speaker of the House. She lectures about the need for near-instant amnesty for thousands streaming across the border. But Pelosi is a multimillionaire, and thus rich enough not to worry about the increased costs and higher taxes needed to offer instant social services to the new arrivals. Progressives and ethnic activists see in open borders extralegal ways to gain future constituents dependent on an ever-growing government, with instilled grudges against any who might not welcome their flouting of U.S. laws. How moral is that? Likewise, the CEOs of Silicon Valley and Wall Street who want cheap labor from south of the border assume that their own offspring’s private academies will not be affected by thousands of undocumented immigrants, that their own neighborhoods will remain non-integrated, and that their own medical services and specialists’ waiting rooms will not be made available to the poor arrivals. … What a strange, selfish, and callous alliance of rich corporate grandees, cynical left-wing politicians, and ethnic chauvinists who have conspired to erode U.S. law for their own narrow interests, all the while smearing those who object as xenophobes, racists, and nativists. Victor Davis Hanson
For the last two decades, Apple, Google, Amazon and other West Coast tech corporations have been untouchable icons. They piled up astronomical profits while hypnotizing both left-wing and right-wing politicians. (…) If the left feared that the tech billionaires were becoming robber barons, they also delighted in the fact that they were at least left-wing robber barons. Unlike the steel, oil and coal monopolies of the 19th century that out of grime and smoke created the sinews of a growing America, Silicon Valley gave us shiny, clean, green and fun pods, pads and phones. As a result, social media, internet searches, texts, email and other computer communications were exempt from interstate regulatory oversight. Big Tech certainly was not subject to the rules that governed railroads, power companies, trucking industries, Wall Street, and television and radio. But attitudes about hip high-tech corporations have now changed on both the left and right. Liberals are under pressure from their progressive base to make Silicon Valley hire more minorities and women. Progressives wonder why West Coast techies cannot unionize and sit down for tough bargaining with their progressive billionaire bosses. Local community groups resent the tech giants driving up housing prices and zoning out the poor from cities such as Seattle and San Francisco. Behind the veneer of a cool Apple logo or multicolored Google trademark are scores of multimillionaires who live one-percenter lifestyles quite at odds with the soft socialism espoused by their corporate megaphones. (…) Instead of acting like laissez-faire capitalists, the entrenched captains of high-tech industry seem more like government colluders and manipulators. Regarding the high-tech leaders’ efforts to rig their industries and strangle dissent, think of conniving Jay Gould or Jim Fisk rather than the wizard Thomas Edison. (…) The public so far has welcomed the unregulated freedom of Silicon Valley — as long as it was truly free. But now computer users are discovering that social media and web searches seem highly controlled and manipulated — by the whims of billionaires rather than federal regulators. (…) For years, high-tech grandees dressed all in hip black while prancing around the stage, enthralling stockholders as if they were rock stars performing with wireless mics. Some wore jeans, sneakers, and T-shirts, making it seem like being worth $50 billion was hipster cool. But the billionaire-as-everyman shtick has lost his groove, especially when such zillionaires lavish their pet political candidates with huge donations, seed lobbying groups and demand regulatory loopholes. Ten years ago, a carefree Mark Zuckerberg seemed cool. Now, his T-shirt get-up seems phony and incongruous with his walled estates and unregulated profiteering. (…) Why are high-tech profits hidden in offshore accounts? Why is production outsourced to impoverished countries, sometimes in workplaces that are deplorable and cruel? Why does texting while driving not earn a product liability suit? Victor Davis Hanson
Tout ce que demande aujourd’hui le Kansas, c’est qu’on lui donne un petit coup de main pour se clouer à sa croix d’or.(…) Votez pour interdire l’avortement et vous aurez une bonne réduction de l’impôt sur le capital (…). Votez pour faire la nique à ces universitaires politiquement corrects et vous aurez la déréglementation de l’électricité (…). Votez pour résister au terrorisme et vous aurez la privatisation de la sécurité sociale. Thomas Frank
One of the reasons that inequality has probably gone up in our society is that people are being treated closer to the way that they’re supposed to be treated. Larry Summers
Purity of thought — mental cleansing of all possible bias — is demanded of the populace. (…) We were living in a form of dictatorship without knowing it . . . a dictatorship of elite moral narcissists who decided between right and wrong . . . before we could even begin to evaluate the facts for ourselves. Roger L. Simon
Tout ce que demande aujourd’hui le Kansas, c’est qu’on lui donne un petit coup de main pour se clouer à sa croix d’or.(…) Votez pour interdire l’avortement et vous aurez une bonne réduction de l’impôt sur le capital (…). Votez pour faire la nique à ces universitaires politiquement corrects et vous aurez la déréglementation de l’électricité (…). Votez pour résister au terrorisme et vous aurez la privatisation de la sécurité sociale. Thomas Frank
Nothing is more characteristic of the liberal class than its members’ sense of their own elevated goodness.” The liberals’ need to repeatedly signal their virtue has become ever more tortured, as with the “civil rights” struggle for gender-neutral bathrooms. Thomas Frank
In his new book, the social critic Thomas Frank ­poses another possibility: that liberals in general — and the Democratic Party in particular — should look inward to understand the sorry state of American politics. Too busy attending TED talks and ­vacationing in Martha’s Vineyard, Frank argues, the Democratic elite has abandoned the party’s traditional commitments to the working class. In the process, they have helped to create the political despair and anger at the heart of today’s right-wing insurgencies. They may also have sown the seeds of their own demise. (…) Frank has been delivering some version of this message for the past two decades as a political essayist and a founding editor of The Baffler magazine. “Listen, Liberal” is the thoroughly entertaining if rather gloomy work of a man who feels that nobody has been paying attention. Frank’s most famous book, “What’s the Matter With Kansas?” (2004), argued that Republicans had duped the white working class by pounding the table on social issues while delivering tax cuts for the rich. He focused on Kansas as the reddest of red states (and, not incidentally, the place of his birth). This time Frank is coming for the Ivy League blue-state liberals, that “tight little network of enlightened strivers” who have allegedly been running the country into the ground. Think of it as “What’s the Matter With Massachusetts?” Frank’s book is an unabashed polemic, not a studious examination of policy or polling trends. In Frank’s view, liberal policy wonks are part of the problem, members of a well-educated elite that massages its own technocratic vanities while utterly missing the big question of the day.  (…) As Frank notes, today some people are living much better than others — and many of those people are not Republicans. Frank delights in skewering the sacred cows of coastal liberalism, including private universities, bike paths, microfinance, the Clinton Foundation, “well-meaning billionaires” and any public policy offering “innovation” or “education” as a solution to inequality. He spends almost an entire chapter mocking the true-blue city of Boston, with its “lab-coat and starched-shirt” economy and its “well-graduated” population of overconfident collegians. Behind all of this nasty fun is a serious political critique. Echoing the historian Lily Geismer, Frank argues that the Democratic Party — once “the Party of the People” — now caters to the interests of a “professional-managerial class” consisting of lawyers, doctors, professors, scientists, programmers, even investment bankers. These affluent city dwellers and suburbanites believe firmly in meritocracy and individual opportunity, but shun the kind of social policies that once gave a real leg up to the working class. In the book, Frank points to the Democrats’ neglect of organized labor and support for Nafta as examples of this sensibility, in which “you get what you deserve, and what you deserve is defined by how you did in school.”  (…) The problem, in Frank’s view, is not simply that mainstream Democrats have failed to address growing inequality. Instead, he suggests something more sinister: Today’s leading Democrats actually don’t want to reduce inequality because they believe that inequality is the normal and righteous order of things. As proof, he points to the famously impolitic Larry Summers, whose background as a former president of Harvard, former Treasury secretary and former chief economist of the World Bank embodies all that Frank abhors about modern Democrats. (…) No surprise, under the circumstances, that the working class might look elsewhere for satisfying political options. (…) Frank gives Obama a middling-to-poor grade — something in the D range, let’s say — for what he deems to be the president’s vague and rambling answer to the “social question.” Frank compares Obama unfavorably with Franklin Roose­velt, another Democratic president who inherited an economic crisis from his Republican predecessor. Roosevelt took advantage of the Great Depression to reshape American society in fundamental ways, introducing social welfare and labor protections that shifted real power into the hands of the middle and working classes. (Frank largely gives Roosevelt a pass on the New Deal’s own structural inequalities, including its exclusions of women and nonwhite workers.) Obama, by contrast, let the crisis go “to waste,” according to Frank, tweaking around the regulatory edges without doing anything significant to change the economic balance of power. (…) Frank sees this uneven recovery as a tragedy rather than a triumph, in which Obama “saved a bankrupt system that by all rights should have met its end.” He says little, however, about what sort of system might have replaced it, or about what working-class voters themselves might say that they want or need. In a book urging Democrats to pay attention to working-class concerns, there are decidedly few interviews with working people, and a lot of time spent on tech conferences and think tanks and fancy universities. Beverly Gage
Thomas Frank, who wrote the bestselling What’s the Matter with Kansas? (2004), admonishes the Democratic party for its residual moderation, and Roger L. Simon, a playwright and novelist and one of the founders of PJ Media, writes from a conservative perspective. They come at the issue from different angles but reach surprisingly congruent conclusions. “Today,” notes Frank, “liberalism is the philosophy not of the sons of toil” but of the winners in the “knowledge economy”: “Silicon Valley chieftains, the big university systems, and the Wall Street titans who gave so much to Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign.” Similarly, Simon shows how “moral narcissism has allowed the Democratic party to become a hidden party of the rich, thus wounding the middle class.” Frank traces the origins of today’s liberal elitism back to the McGovern years and the influential arguments of Washington lobbyist Fred Dutton. Dutton’s book The Changing Sources of Power (1971) showed that the professional upper middle class, once a mainstay of the GOP, had in the Nixon years migrated to the anti-war wing of the Democratic party. Contemptuous of blue-collar America, the upper-end professionals wanted to become the party of the “aristocrats — en masse.” Likewise, Simon reflects on the ways in which liberal “compassion” became a “masquerade for selfishness, a way for elites to feel good about themselves” while insulating themselves from accountability. Simon describes this masquerade as a form of narcissism in which “what you believe, or claim to believe or say you believe — not what you do or how you act or what the results of your actions may be — [determine] how your life will be judged.” Kim Holmes of the Heritage Foundation, in his new book, describes the same disconnect, in which words are judged independently of actions, but he calls it “postmodernism.” “The postmodernist Left,” he writes, “is radically subjective, arguing that all truth is merely a matter of interpretation.” And liberals, because they hold largely uncontested power in Hollywood, Silicon Valley, and most of the media, generally get to decide which interpretation shall prevail. Liberalism’s dreams of an American aristocracy, as I explained in my 2014 book The Revolt against the Masses, were integral to the modern ideology from its very inception in the aftermath of World War I. High-toned New Deal liberals looked down on Harry Truman, the Kansas City haberdasher, but liberal social snobbery emerged with full force in the Kennedyites’ open disdain for Lyndon Johnson. LBJ biographer Robert Caro described the denizens of Camelot as people who were “in love with their own sophistication”: They were “such an in-group, and they let you know they were in, and you were not.” “Think of the snotty arrogance displayed,” Caro continued, “as these people laughed at LBJ’s accent, his mispronunciations, his clothes, his wife.” In the years since Kennedy, liberal politics has been driven by an alliance of the top and the bottom, the over-credentialed and the under-credentialed, against the middle. Liberals, notes the American-born British journalist Janet Daley, have taken on the pseudo-aristocratic tone of disdain for the aspiring, struggling middle class that is such a familiar part of the British scene. Rather than face up to the failures of the Great Society to fully incorporate African Americans into the general American prosperity, liberals have lost interest in social mobility: The aim now is to make the marginal more comfortable. (The problem is not solely with liberals: Social snobbery blinded most politicians to the rumblings that emerged as Trumpism.) Bill Clinton, explains Kim Holmes, was strongly influenced by the political philosophy of John Rawls. When President Clinton criticized the welfare system as “trapping” people in poverty, he was, says Holmes, “trying to find a balance,” as Rawls did, “between liberty and the welfare state.” Thomas Frank will have none of it: Against those Democratic-party moderates who found Clinton preferable to the Republicans, he thunders: “Bill Clinton was not the lesser of two evils. . . . He was the greater of the two.” Frank denounces both the 1994 crime bill and welfare reform as perfidious acts, without providing empirical evidence to support his assertions. Holmes points out that, in recent years, liberals have jettisoned any affection for the evidence-based arguments of the Clinton years and adopted instead an “epistemic relativism” that assumes that “all knowledge is expedient and politicized.” Holmes describes postmodern liberalism as “schizophrenic”: In the name of an identity politics advancing the interest of putative victims, it marries epistemological skepticism and the absolute certainties of politically correct posturing. Obama exemplifies this double game. Obama the cultural relativist, who is not a Muslim but has a strong affinity for Islam, insists that the Islam he encountered as a young boy in Indonesia was a religion of peace (even as he asserts that Western civilization should still be doing penance for the Crusades). At the same time, notes Roger Simon, Obama can say with great confidence that ISIS — the Islamic State — is not Islamic. Frank has a point when he notes that the incestuous relationships among Hollywood, Washington, Wall Street, and Silicon Valley that define the Obama years had already blossomed in the Clinton era. But with Obama, the ties have grown even tighter. Ninety percent of the first Obama administration’s staffers had a professional degree of some kind; some 25 percent had either graduated from Harvard or taught there. The situation Frank describes is a government of, by, and for the increasingly self-interested professionals. When the Russians recently invaded parts of Syria, the worst thing the Obama administration could think to say about them was that their actions were “unprofessional.” Fred Siegel
Une vague d’optimisme a balayé le monde des affaires américaines… De France on ne se rend pas compte a quel point la baisse du chômage dans ce pays est spectaculaire. De nouvelles usines, de nouveaux équipements et des mises à niveau d’usines qui stimulent la croissance économique, stimulent la création d’emplois et augmentent les salaires de manière significative. (…) Le taux de chômage nominal officiel est descendu à 4,1%. Il a diminué de 2% au cours de la seule dernière année. C’est le plus bas depuis 17 ans. (…) Le chômage a diminué pour les travailleurs dans tous les niveaux d’éducation. Parmi les diplômés du secondaire qui n’ont jamais fréquenté l’université et qui ont 25 ans et plus, il a atteint son plus bas niveau. Le Bureau of Labor Statistics indique que le taux de chômage des travailleurs noirs et hispaniques a chuté au plus bas depuis 1972. C’était il y a 45 ans ! Des générations complètes de défavorisés n’avaient jamais connu une telle demande d’embauche et le plein emploi. Les personnes dépendantes de « food stamps » ont diminué de plus de 2 millions en 2017. Les « food Stamp » sont des bons d’achat à échanger dans les commerces alimentaires pour les personnes et familles à faible ou aucun revenu, les migrants et les étudiants vivant dans le pays pour se nourrir. L’économie, revitalisée par l’enthousiasme des perspectives d’avenir, se développe à nouveau. L’indice de confiance des consommateurs du Conference Board est à son plus haut niveau depuis 17 ans et l’Indice des perspectives de l’Association nationale des manufacturiers est à sa moyenne annuelle la plus élevée de son histoire. La Federal Reserve Bank d’Atlanta a publié une estimation de la croissance du PIB 2018 d’un taux de 5,4%. Comme dans les années glorieuses. Même le journal expert en misérabilisme, de gauche, le New York Times a dû admettre : « Une vague d’optimisme a balayé les chefs d’entreprise américains et commence à se traduire par des investissements dans de nouvelles usines, équipements et mises à niveau d’usines qui stimulent la croissance économique, stimulent la création d’emplois. et peut enfin augmenter les salaires de manière significative. « (…) Selon les estimations les plus récentes du Département du Trésor, 90% des personnes verront, dès février 2018 une augmentation de leur salaire net. Une autre étude conclut que plus d’un million de travailleurs recevront des augmentations de salaire en 2018. Les entreprises ont commencé à anticiper la baisse de l’impôt sur les sociétés de 38 à 21%. 300 entreprises ont annoncé des augmentations de salaire et des primes. (…) Le PIB a atteint 3% au cours des deux derniers trimestres de 2017. (Au cours des 32 trimestres de la « reprise » d’Obama, il n’a enregistré que deux fois un PIB de plus de 3%). Les entreprises américaines ont créé plus de 1,7 million de nouveaux emplois, dont près de 160 000 emplois manufacturiers et 58 000 autres emplois dans l’exploitation minière et l’exploitation forestière. L’extraction de pétrole et de gaz dont la réglementation anti-libérale interdisait l’exportation a été ouverte. En décembre, 1,5 million de barils ont été exportés hors des États-Unis. La guerre des prix avec les pays producteurs de l’OPEP qui devait mettre l’industrie pétrolière des gaz de schiste américaine à genoux a fait l’inverse. Elle a stimulé l’innovation, les embauches et les seuils de rentabilité ont étés abaissés. Le tribulations à la baisse de l’OPEP, n’ont servi qu’a mettre les pays de l’OPEP dans la difficulté. Les salaires ont progressé en taux annualisé de 2,9%, soit le rythme le plus rapide en plus de huit ans. (…) Au 1er janvier, les accords patronaux devant l’embellie du marché ont augmenté le salaire minimum dans 18 états. Agoravox
Harvey Weinstein (…) était aussi, et surtout, un partisan inconditionnel de M. Barack Obama et de Mme Hillary Clinton. Nul n’incarnait mieux que lui les ambiguïtés de ce gratin démocrate représenté par la Fondation Clinton. Les soirées caritatives qu’elle organisait assuraient la même fonction que les bonnes œuvres passées de M. Weinstein : celle d’une chambre de compensation sociale où les nouveaux entrants dans le beau monde reçoivent leurs lettres de noblesse — en France, autrefois, on appelait cela une « savonnette à vilain ». Participer à un événement de la Fondation Clinton revient à faire un plein de bonté à gros indice d’octane. Vous y rencontrez une ribambelle de célébrités, un éventail de personnages glorifiés pour leur altruisme et leur infaillible valeur morale et qui, bien souvent, portent un nom simple, comme le chanteur Bono ou la jeune Pakistanaise Malala, Prix Nobel de la paix. Des personnages sanctifiés, béatifiés, au contact desquels s’opère un échange de bons procédés qui permet aux gros poissons du monde des affaires de se procurer à coups de contributions financières un brevet de bon Samaritain. Au centre de ce jeu de passe-passe, les Clinton jouent les maîtres de cérémonie. Ils ont un pied dans chaque camp, celui des grandes âmes vertueuses et celui, moins reluisant, de l’affairisme entrepreneurial. M. Weinstein personnifiait mieux que quiconque cette Bourse des valeurs morales. (…) Le progressisme de M. Weinstein se mesurait en lauriers au moins autant qu’en dollars. Le prodige de Hollywood siégeait au conseil d’administration de divers organismes à but non lucratif ; les films de sa société, Miramax, récoltaient Oscars et Golden Globes à foison ; en France, il a même reçu la Légion d’honneur. En juin 2017, quatre mois avant qu’éclate le scandale de ses agressions et de ses manœuvres pour réduire au silence les victimes de sa tyrannie sexuelle, le club de la presse de Los Angeles lui décernait encore le Truthteller Award, le prix du « diseur de vérité ». (…) Dans le monde de M. Weinstein, l’engagement politique se place sous le patronage de l’industrie du luxe, à Martha’s Vineyard comme dans les Hamptons — deux hauts lieux de la jet-set américaine —, au gala de soutien d’un candidat comme à une soirée de bienfaisance. (…) Dans le monde des grandes fortunes, le progressisme fait office de machine à laver pour rendre sa rapacité plus présentable. (…) Bien des gens de gauche se perçoivent comme des résistants à l’autorité. Mais, aux yeux de certains de ses dirigeants, la gauche moderne est un moyen de justifier et d’asseoir un pouvoir de classe — celui notamment de la « classe créative », comme certains aiment à désigner la crème de Wall Street, de la Silicon Valley et de Hollywood. L’idolâtrie dont font l’objet ces icônes du capitalisme découle d’une doctrine politique qui a permis aux démocrates de récolter presque autant d’argent que leurs rivaux républicains et de s’imposer comme les représentants naturels des quartiers résidentiels aisés. Que cette gauche néolibérale mondaine attire des personnages comme M. Weinstein, avec leur capacité prodigieuse à lever des fonds et leur révérence pour les « grands artistes », n’a rien pour nous surprendre. Dans ces cercles qui mêlent bonne conscience et sentiment de supériorité sociale, où se cultive la fiction d’un rapport intime entre classes populaires et célébrités du showbiz, le cofondateur de Miramax était comme un poisson dans l’eau. Ils sont légion, les habitués de ce milieu qui, sachant parfaitement à quoi s’en tenir, prennent à présent de grands airs scandalisés devant les turpitudes d’un des leurs. Leur aveuglement est à la mesure de leur puissance. Ces temps-ci, les voici qui errent dans un labyrinthe de miroirs moraux déformants en versant des larmes d’attendrissement sur leurs vertus et sur leur bon goût. Thomas Frank
Pour la huitième année consécutive, la nationalité française vient d’être désignée meilleure nationalité du monde selon l’Indice de qualité de la nationalité de Kälin et Kochenov (QNI). Pour établir ce constat, les auteurs de cette évaluation s’appuient sur plusieurs critères internes et externes aux pays étudiés tels que la paix et la stabilité, la puissance économique, le développement humain, la liberté de voyager ou de travailler à l’étranger… La nationalité française arrive ainsi en tête du classement avec un score de 83,5%, juste devant la nationalité allemande et néerlandaise à égalité avec 82,8%. Le Danemark complète le podium (81,7%). D’autres grands pays sont loin derrière. Ainsi, le Royaume-Uni arrive huitième (80,3%). Et la nationalité britannique devrait dégringoler dans les prochaines années avec le Brexit, selon l’étude de Kälin et Kochenov. La nationalité américaine se classe pour sa part 25e (70%), la nationalité chinoise 56e (44,3%) et la russe 62e (42%). BFMTV
Nous devrions être très reconnaissants à Francesco Duina pour son nouveau livre, Broke and Patriotic: Pourquoi les Américains pauvres aiment leur pays. Il commence par le dilemme suivant. Les pauvres aux États-Unis sont à bien des égards moins bien lotis que dans les autres pays riches, mais ils sont plus patriotes que les pauvres de ces autres pays et encore plus patriotes que les riches de leur propre pays. Leur pays est (parmi les pays riches) au sommet en termes d’inégalité et de soutien social, et pourtant ils croient de manière écrasante que les États-Unis sont «fondamentalement meilleurs que les autres pays». Pourquoi? Duina n’essaya pas de résoudre ce problème pour lui-même. Il est sorti et a enquêté sur les pauvres patriotes en Alabama et au Montana. Il a trouvé des variations entre ces deux endroits, par exemple des personnes aimant le gouvernement pour les avoir un peu aidées et des personnes aimant le gouvernement pour ne pas les aider du tout. Il a trouvé des variations entre les hommes et les femmes et les groupes raciaux, mais surtout un intense patriotisme construit autour de mythes et de phrases identiques. (…) Duina est très respectueux de tous ceux à qui il a parlé et très académique dans sa prose. Mais il cite suffisamment de déclarations de ses interlocuteurs pour indiquer clairement, à mon sens, que leur patriotisme est en grande partie une foi religieuse délibérément délirante basée sur l’ignorance et l’évitement des faits. Tout comme les moins fortunés sont un peu plus religieux, ils sont aussi un peu plus patriotes et ne font aucune distinction entre les deux. Duina rapporte que beaucoup des personnes avec qui il s’est entretenu l’ont assuré que Dieu favorisait les États-Unis au détriment de tous les autres pays. Un homme a même expliqué son extrême patriotisme et celui des autres comme un besoin religieux de croire en quelque chose qui donne la «dignité». Il existe bien sûr un parallèle avec le racisme américain, comme beaucoup de pauvres Américains de race blanche s’y sont depuis des siècles à la notion qu’au moins ils sont meilleurs que les non-blancs. La croyance qu’au moins un est meilleur que les non-Américains est répandue dans toutes les couches de la population. Duina note que même pour ceux qui luttent le plus désespérément, il peut être plus facile de penser que tout va bien et que le système qui les entoure est plus facile que de reconnaître l’injustice. Paradoxalement, si les gens étaient mieux lotis, leur patriotisme pourrait diminuer. Le patriotisme décline également à mesure que l’éducation augmente. Et il semble que le nombre de types d’informations et d’attitudes données sera réduit. Tout comme on a constaté que les gens préféraient bombarder un pays en proportion inverse de leur capacité à le localiser correctement sur une carte, je suppose qu’ils seraient un peu moins susceptibles de croire que les États-Unis les traitent mieux que les pays scandinaves s’ils connaissaient les faits. sur les pays scandinaves. Actuellement, ils ne le décident pas. Duina cite des personnes qui lui ont assuré que tous les Suédois fuient la Suède dès qu’ils ont terminé leurs études universitaires gratuites, que le Canada peut avoir des soins de santé, mais qu’il est une dictature, qu’en Allemagne ou en Russie ils vous couperont la main ou la langue, que au Japon communiste, on vous coupera la tête pour avoir parlé contre le président, etc. Toutes ces croyances, toutes dans le même sens (dénigrer les autres nations), sont-elles des erreurs innocentes? Un homme assure à Duina que les autres nations sont inférieures parce qu’elles se livrent à des exécutions publiques, puis plaide en faveur de telles exécutions aux États-Unis. Un certain nombre de personnes déclarent supérieur aux États-Unis parce qu’il jouit de la liberté de religion et rejettent ensuite l’idée qu’un non-chrétien puisse jamais être président des États-Unis. Les sans-abri lui assurent que les États-Unis sont le pays par excellence des opportunités. Beaucoup parlent de «liberté» et dans de nombreux cas, ils désignent les libertés énumérées dans le Bill of Rights, mais dans d’autres, ils désignent la liberté de marcher et de conduire. Ils opposent cette liberté de circuler avec les dictatures, bien qu’ils n’aient que peu ou pas d’expérience, bien que cela semble mieux contraster avec ce que les Américains pauvres connaissent probablement davantage: l’incarcération de masse. La conviction que les guerres sur des nations étrangères sont bénéfiques pour leurs victimes et constituent des actes de générosité semble presque universelle, et les nations étrangères sont souvent décriées pour la présence de guerres (sans se rendre compte que nombre de ces guerres impliquent l’armée américaine, qui est financée des millions de fois. financement nécessaire pour éliminer la pauvreté aux États-Unis). Un homme croit que le Vietnam est toujours divisé en deux comme la Corée. Un autre estime que le président irakien a invité les États-Unis à l’attaquer. Un autre est tout simplement fier du fait que les États-Unis ont «la meilleure armée». Interrogés sur le drapeau des États-Unis, beaucoup expriment immédiatement leur fierté concernant la «liberté» et les «guerres». Quelques libertaires ont exprimé leur soutien à l’idée de ramener des troupes à la maison, accusant ainsi d’autres nations réticence à être civilisé – y compris ceux du Moyen-Orient, qui «n’a jamais été civilisé». (…)  L’existence même de pays moins bien lotis et d’immigrants fuyant vers les États-Unis est généralement considérée comme la preuve du statut de plus grande nation sur Terre, même si d’autres pays riches sont mieux lotis et plus désirés par les immigrants. Les résultats incluent un public passif prêt à absorber d’énormes injustices, un public disposé à suivre les politiciens qui promettent de les tromper mais à le faire patriquement, un public favorable aux guerres et au mépris du droit international et de la coopération, et un public disposé à rejeter les avancées dans les lois sur les soins de santé ou les armes à feu, les politiques climatiques ou les systèmes éducatifs s’ils sont élaborés dans d’autres pays. Ce livre nous en dit plus sur les origines de Trump que sur les 18 derniers mois de Fox news, mais c’est le moins que l’on puisse dire. David Swanson
As long as they remain deeply patriotic, America’s poor won’t rise up. Indeed, they’ll continue to fill the ranks of the military, strive and sacrifice to help America assert itself in the world, and even feed into and support the slogans and successes of the country’s political leaders – starting with Donald Trump. So, a pressing question arises: why are America’s poor so patriotic? Francesco Duina
I could understand why those Americans who were well-off would be patriotic. But I wanted to understand why low-income Americans are so patriotic when there are reasons to think that they would have issues with their country or its underlying social contract, considering their personal circumstances. (….) What I thought to be a puzzle is, for them, not a puzzle at all. First, they don’t attribute their situation to their country — they don’t say, “I’m in this situation because of the society I live in.” They take ownership of their life histories. And so why would they be resentful toward their country? Also — and this is one of the most moving things that I discovered — if anything, the idea of the greatness of America actually gives them something to hang onto, despite everything. “Everything else has gone poorly for me. Don’t take my being an American away from me, because it’s the one thing that I can still hang onto with pride.” I would push them by saying, “Well, what about rich people? Do you think it’s unfair that they have what they have?” They’d say, “No, they’ve earned everything they’ve made.” (…) One of the interviewees that really struck me was Marshall, in Montana, who chose to be homeless, in a way. He said, “Look, I am so free. I can be homeless, and they don’t force me to go anywhere. I live on the prairie, I’m working on an app right now, and I’m taking a sabbatical from life. What other country would allow me to just do my thing?” That is really a trait of American society in many ways: “We’re all equal and therefore this equality guarantees me some sense of freedom. I may have nothing, but I have that freedom. I can come and go, do whatever I want, and say whatever I want. This country guarantees that.” And the fact that they would recognize and hold onto that was really moving. What I heard satisfied my curiosity. Culturally, the United States is very free — freedom of religion, freedom of thought, freedom of saying and doing whatever you want to do. And they’re accurately describing that. There’s certainly more conformity in many countries, a lot more pressure to do things in certain ways. (…) Many of the people I spoke with perceive the country to be a special project designed to give deliverance, to free humanity from problems that have plagued people throughout history. The hope that the U.S. represents for humanity is what gives them hope and dignity as well, and what makes them continue, despite the odds. Many of them were very optimistic as a result. Something I heard a lot was, “Tomorrow something is going to change. I’m poised for a change.” (…) Yeah, despite all of the data that suggests that, in fact, there’s less social mobility nowadays in the United States than in many other advanced countries, and your personal financial success is tied to contextual and structural things, not personal qualities — there’s clearly a sense that this is a place of enormous wealth, and that the American Dream is still alive. I would say, “But you know, you don’t get as much as other people in other countries.” And they would say, “Well, I don’t know what other people get, but I get a lot. I’m not going to go hungry tonight. There will be kitchens and shelters that I can go to and churches that will help me. So the wealth will reach me. And if I have a problem, it’s my problem, not the system’s problem.” (…) I think this discourse of American greatness is something that Trump tapped into very, very much. To the extent that one wonders why “Make America great again” resonated so well, you have elements of the answer in this book, whether with low-income people or middle-class people. I would think that Bernie Sanders also tapped into it a bit, but in a very different way. (…) My respondents have a genuine attachment to the idea of America, and I think that’s because, in the end, what one discovers is that America is for the people and the people own it. We should all try and understand their patriotism. Much depends on it. They contribute heavily to the military — their investment in the country, in a way, contributes to stability and social peace. As long as they believe in the American Dream and in the United States as a country they are unlikely to demand fundamental changes of society. And so, if we want to understand why the United States is a stable country, we have to understand why people latch on so tightly to it, even though they appear to be suffering and getting a lot less than the poor elsewhere. Francesco Duina
[how Donald Trump was able to win the 2016 presidential election] I think there are two or three reasons. One is nationalism. National identity is especially important to certain sections of the population, but I think that the Democratic Party has assumed a type of « global elite, » East Coast-West Coast mentality. In so doing, I think it has forgotten a bit about national identity. For those who feel like many other things in their lives have fallen by the wayside, such a person could hear “Make America Great Again » and it would resonate. I also think that people who voted for Trump were, as he said, « not interested in that P.C. stuff. » Sociologists and others would rephrase « political correctness » as « collective demands for equality. » This is a way of saying that these collective identities — whether it’s blacks, gays, women, etc. — demand things from the government as a matter of right. To be clear, I would agree that those demands are legitimate. In a way this is, historically speaking, a non-American thing. It goes against the tradition of individualism. You have certain basic rights as an individual, not as a group. I think the people who voted for Trump by and large could be characterized as more individualistic-oriented. They lack interest in the government providing things for them and are more interested in the government getting out of their way. His voters and other supporters also feel that the government is corrupt and catering to all sorts of people instead of them. (…) I think the Trump supporters were, in a way, reacting against identity politics. (…) His voters and other supporters wouldn’t say that they are embracing white supremacy at all. They would say, « I’m embracing true American values that are values of individualism and civic nationalism based on certain principles. » They would also say, like Trump, “I am not racist. I don’t hate anybody. I love women, I love gays and I love everybody. » (…) That goes back to this sense of individual self-determination. They feel that they are unable to determine their own future as hard-working individuals, which should be the key to success in America. They think to themselves, “Well we do work hard, yet we’re unable to be successful because the government has been helping ‘special interests’ but also corporate America. » As you said, these people also don’t want to be told what to do. (….) Another way of thinking about it that I find useful is to differentiate between the nation and the state. I think that Trump ran a campaign that was based on the nation, not the state. The state was made the culprit, almost. It was a partner in crime. It’s a swamp. The state has not done its job. It has, over the decades, done the wrong things — gone against the fundamental American values of individual self-determination and colorblindness and all of these things. On the other hand, I think Trump has said we need to go back to the nation. The nation is good. We need to rescue it. He played the « nation card, » and it worked fantastically. We also need to define terms. The nation is the fundamental social contract, which in every country is a bit different. In the American case, it is civic individualism, based on certain civic values such as self-determination and freedom and the like. That’s what is celebrated. That’s the key to how Trump won. That’s why it doesn’t matter what you throw at him and his supporters. It can be logic, it can be fact. It doesn’t matter whether Trump contradicts himself one moment or the other because that’s not what they’re listening to. He is just a provocateur, as a revolutionary agent against the status quo. (…) Symbols of patriotism are everywhere in America. National anthems at major sport events, the Pledge of Allegiance in schools, flags everywhere. Then you see those flags outside of homes which are not well kept, but somebody with barely any means has a flag pole with a big American flag. Over the years I started wondering about that: It just doesn’t make sense to me. The poor in America are actually worse off by most measures than the poor in other advanced countries. Whether it’s the number of hours worked, the social safety net, intergenerational mobility, you name it. But by most measures, the American poor are the most patriotic, compared to the poor elsewhere, and certainly relative to rich Americans. (…) What is a puzzle for you and me is actually not a puzzle for them at all. It is, in fact, the opposite. It is precisely because so many things have gone wrong for them that they get so much mileage out of being an American, which still happens to be a very prestigious national identity. One could argue that in a way it gives them a sense of identity like nothing else. They’re hanging on to it precisely because they have nothing else to hang on to. Saying they are possessed by false consciousness is actually a condescending take. Because when you talk to these people they are quite knowledgeable about American history. They are quite knowledgeable about the American social contract. They don’t have their history wrong. I think they’re being too harsh on themselves. They also differentiate between themselves and the government and say, “What happened to me is my responsibility.” In the end, they hang onto this idea. They feel motivated to continue and to do better the next morning. Many of them said that. I would push back and ask, « Have you reconciled what happened to you with your love of country? Didn’t you get screwed? » They would respond, “No, what happened to me is my thing.” This is not false consciousness. This is a true sense of dignity that they get from the social contract as they perceive it. (…) The God thing, I should say, was also very prevalent. This sense that they’re walking with God and that America is God’s country. God loves America more than he loves other countries. This sense, still, of walking with God in God’s country, trying to do the right thing. (…) Why don’t the poor rise up and rebel in America? Well, I think I discovered that part of the reason is that they still believe in the nation. Not necessarily the state, but the nation. They still believe in it. Well, if they do, then they’re not going to ask for a major rewrite of the social contract. Maybe, if you want to be cynical about it, it is a way of perpetuating the inequality and the status quo. At the same time, I felt enormous power and self-determination and hope and knowledge. (…) One fellow said to me, « It’s got to be choices. It’s got be bad choices or good choices, but it’s got to be choices. It comes down to choices. » But this same man had just told me how his father had beaten him up all his life. He was 14 years old and homeless; he ran away. Those are not choices. It was very difficult to get them away from that type of thinking. They thought that the rich essentially deserved it. The rich were generous. They get a lot of things as a result of that. (…) Now, I also spoke to a few people — out of the 90 total, three or four — who were not so patriotic. They would talk about feeling that the system has duped us. They want to rip up the American flag. We are invaders of other countries. There’s imperialism. The rich don’t care for us. The government doesn’t care for us. One guy told me that American nationalism and the American flag reminded him of a bunch of preppy boys at a fraternity party at some university. But no matter how you measure it, the poor in America are very patriotic. Francesco Duina
Why do the worst-off American citizens love their country so much? Patriotism may be defined as a belief in the greatness, if not superiority, of one’s country relative to others. Depending on how one defines the term exactly, somewhere between 85 to 90% of America’s poor are “patriotic.” They would rather be citizens of their country, for instance, than of any other country on Earth, and they think America is a better place than most other places in the world. This is striking for at least three reasons. First, those are very high figures in absolute terms. Secondly, the corresponding figures for working class, middle class, and upper class Americans are generally lower. And, thirdly, the worst-off in most other advanced nations are also less patriotic than America’s—even in countries where people receive better social benefits from their government, work fewer hours, and have better chances of upward intergenerational mobility than their counterparts in the United States. Why are America’s poor so patriotic? The short answer is: We don’t know for sure. And we should, because so much depends on the patriotism of poor Americans. Their love of country contributes to social stability, informs and supports America’s understanding of itself as a special place, and is essential for military recruitment. It is also a force that can be tapped into by politicians eager to rally a large contingent of voters. (…) I came away with three overarching insights. First, many view the United States as the “last hope”—for themselves and the world. Their strong sense is that the country offers its people a sense of dignity, a closeness to God, and answers to most of humanity’s problems. Deprive us of our country, the people I met told me, and you deprive us of the only thing that is left for us to hang on to. (…) In my interviews, people separated the country’s possibilities from their own frustrations; many took full responsibility for their own troubles in life. That comment connected to a second insight. America appeals to the poor because it is rich. “The land of milk and honey” was a phrase I heard often. The poor see it as a place where those who work hard have a chance to succeed. In my interviews, people separated the country’s possibilities from their own frustrations; many took full responsibility for their own troubles in life. “People make their own life, make their own money the way that they wanna make it and however much they wanna make it,” said Jeff, a white man in a bus station in Billings, Montana. Many saw this as an American virtue. Here, at least, your failures belong to you. Your chances aren’t taken away by others. “If you fail,” said Harley, a vet now on food stamps, “gotta be bad choices.” This sentiment was articulated with particular frequency by African American interviewees in Alabama—something that particularly struck me, given the legacies of slavery and segregation in that part of the country. For the same reason, many were confident that the future was about to bring them better things. Several felt that they had just turned a corner—perhaps with God on their side. Rich Americans, they told me, deserve what they have. Besides, they added, look at the rest of the world: They keep trying to come to America. This must be the place to be. That related to a third source of pride in the nation: America is the freest country on earth. Many of the people I met spoke of feeling very free to come and go from different places, and to think as they wish. America allows people to be as they want, with few preconceived notions about what the good life should look like. Such a narrative took on libertarian tones in Montana. For some, this included the freedom to be homeless, if they choose. As Marshall, a young, white homeless man, told me in Billings, “it’s a very free country. I mean, I’m actually, I live on the streets, I’m kinda choosing to do that … sabbatical. Nobody bothers me for it; I’m not bothering anybody. I got my own little nook. There are other places in the world where I’d be forced into some place to shelter up or, you know, herded off or … jailed.” When conversations turned to freedom, guns were often mentioned. Guns give one security and make hunting possible—enabling one to feed one’s self and family. I was accordingly often reminded that Americans rebelled against the English by making guns. Guns equal freedom. And America, thankfully, ensures gun ownership. Taken together, these conversations helped me understand that the patriotism of the poor is rooted in a widespread belief that America belongs to its people. There is a bottom-up, instinctive, protective, and intense identification with the country. This is a people’s country. Of course, some of this patriotism is clearly grounded in misconceptions about other countries. One person told me that there are only two democracies in the world: Israel and the United States. Another told me that Japan is a communist country. Yet another that in Germany one’s tongue can get cut off for a minor crime. Many also assumed that other countries are poorer than they really are. But these were almost tangential reflections that further justified—rather than drive—their commitment to the country. They seldom came up on their own unless I asked about the limitations of other countries. As I completed my interviews and reflected on what I heard from these patriots, I realized that their beliefs about America are not a puzzle to be solved. In America, there is no contradiction between one’s difficult life trajectories and one’s love of country. If anything, those in difficulty have more reasons than most of us to believe in the promise of America. Francesco Duina
Being poor in America is terrible in a lot of ways. But even the poorest American is ensured a vote upon turning 18, their day in court if charged with a crime with a jury of their peers, a right to a public defender, their right to speak their mind and criticize anyone in government without the state prosecuting him, their right to assemble and protest, the right to own a firearm if they have no mental impairment or criminal record, no search or seizure of their property without a warrant, rights against self-incrimination, the right to believe whatever religion they want or none at all, and the right to be free from cruel and unusual punishment. There are wealthy moguls in China who don’t have half those rights I’d argue the more interesting question is not why do the poor assess living the United States so positively, but why the wealthy assess living the United States so negatively? (And why is there often an implicit assumption that the wealthy see their country clearly and accurately, while the poor do not?) Perhaps the remarkable opportunities of the wealthy give them a skewed view of life at home and abroad. Yes, a wealthy person is more likely to have traveled to more foreign countries, and have more firsthand experience with life in other countries. But what do they see in their encounters with other countries? The life of a wealthy person in New York is not all that different from the life of a wealthy person in London or Paris or Dubai or Tokyo or Shanghai. It’s not surprising that almost everyone at the Davos conference gets along well. They’ve all been to the best schools, they all enjoyed enormous opportunities in their careers, they all dress in similar tailored suits, live well, eat well, enjoy the finer things in life . . . It is unsurprising that a CEO from Silicon Valley meets a CEO from Switzerland and, after chatting over a tray of canapes, concludes they’re not so different after all.If you have been lucky enough to stay or even just step inside more than one luxury hotel in more than one world capital, you’ll realize they all look more or less the same. The lobby of the Four Seasons doesn’t look all that different from one in the Mandarin Oriental, which doesn’t look all that different from the one in Ritz-Carlton, and most of us would be stumped if we had to pick out which one was which, and in which city. There’s a worldwide homogeny to the signifiers of the luxury lifestyle. While there’s a lot of overwrought denunciation of “globalists” out there these days, it’s safe to conclude that most of the wealthy elite in any given nation have more in common with other countries’ wealthy elites than with their own countrymen. (…) You’re more likely to spot symbols of religious faith, flags, sports team paraphernalia — all kinds of displays that declare, ‘this is where we come from, this is who we are, this is why we’re proud to be who we are.’ It is not surprising that poor and middle-class citizens would find “globalism” as an odd and not-that-appealing prospect, and express patriotism (and perhaps nationalism) in ways that wealthier, more cosmopolitan citizens find naive and parochial. Jim Geraghty

Attention: une question peut en cacher une autre !

En ces temps d’inversions généralisées …

Où il faut à présent construire des murs

Pour empêcher d’entrer des gens qui, nous dit-on, ne veulent même plus de l’Amérique …

Où non seulement les pauvres ne votent plus à gauche

Mais les riches ne votent plus à droite

Comment à la lecture des propos du sociologue  américain Francesco Duina …

Sur son livre « Pourquoi les Américains pauvres aiment leur pays » …

Ne pas voir en creux l’incroyable meilleur des mondes où vivent tant de nos intellectuels …

Où l’on se paie le luxe non seulement du meilleur du confort matériel …

Mais, entre condescendance et pur mépris social, de la tranquille inconscience

De sa propre contribution et responsabilité personnelle et collective …

Dans l’origine, entre délocalisations et immigration sauvage, des difficiles conditions de vie que l’on fait semblant de déplorer …

Chez ces « déplorables accrochés à leurs armes et à leur religion » …

A qui il ne reste plus, incarné par le Trump honni, que leur identité nationale ?

Mais surtout comment ne pas se poser …

Sur ces gens qui après leur avoir pris tout le reste voudraient en plus leur prendre l’amour de leur pays …

La pourtant évidente question – et seule en fait véritable surprise – que suppose cette énième recherche …

Dont parlait déjà il y a plus de 30 ans l’historien américain Christopher Lasch

A savoir pourquoi cette « sécession des élites » …

Qui pousse ces Américains si (culturellement) riches

A tant détester leur propre pays ?

Pourquoi les pauvres patriotes?
David Swanson
World beyond war
Juin 15, 2018

Nous devrions être très reconnaissants à Francesco Duina pour son nouveau livre, Broke and Patriotic: Pourquoi les Américains pauvres aiment leur pays. Il commence par le dilemme suivant. Les pauvres aux États-Unis sont à bien des égards moins bien lotis que dans les autres pays riches, mais ils sont plus patriotes que les pauvres de ces autres pays et encore plus patriotes que les riches de leur propre pays. Leur pays est (parmi les pays riches) au sommet en termes d’inégalité et de soutien social, et pourtant ils croient de manière écrasante que les États-Unis sont «fondamentalement meilleurs que les autres pays». Pourquoi?

Duina n’essaya pas de résoudre ce problème pour lui-même. Il est sorti et a enquêté sur les pauvres patriotes en Alabama et au Montana. Il a trouvé des variations entre ces deux endroits, par exemple des personnes aimant le gouvernement pour les avoir un peu aidées et des personnes aimant le gouvernement pour ne pas les aider du tout. Il a trouvé des variations entre les hommes et les femmes et les groupes raciaux, mais surtout un intense patriotisme construit autour de mythes et de phrases identiques.

Je pense qu’il convient de souligner que les Américains les plus riches ne sont que légèrement moins patriotes que les Américains pauvres, et que la question morale de savoir pourquoi on devrait aimer une institution qui cause de grandes souffrances aux autres est identique à celle de pourquoi on devrait aimer une institution qui crée de grandes choses. souffrance personnelle (et que la plus grande souffrance créée par le gouvernement des États-Unis se situe en dehors des États-Unis). Je soupçonne qu’une grande partie de ce que Duina a trouvé parmi les pauvres pourrait se retrouver dans certaines variations parmi les moins pauvres.

Duina est très respectueux de tous ceux à qui il a parlé et très académique dans sa prose. Mais il cite suffisamment de déclarations de ses interlocuteurs pour indiquer clairement, à mon sens, que leur patriotisme est en grande partie une foi religieuse délibérément délirante basée sur l’ignorance et l’évitement des faits. Tout comme les moins fortunés sont un peu plus religieux, ils sont aussi un peu plus patriotes et ne font aucune distinction entre les deux. Duina rapporte que beaucoup des personnes avec qui il s’est entretenu l’ont assuré que Dieu favorisait les États-Unis au détriment de tous les autres pays. Un homme a même expliqué son extrême patriotisme et celui des autres comme un besoin religieux de croire en quelque chose qui donne la «dignité». Il existe bien sûr un parallèle avec le racisme américain, comme beaucoup de pauvres Américains de race blanche s’y sont depuis des siècles à la notion qu’au moins ils sont meilleurs que les non-blancs. La croyance qu’au moins un est meilleur que les non-Américains est répandue dans toutes les couches de la population.

Duina note que même pour ceux qui luttent le plus désespérément, il peut être plus facile de penser que tout va bien et que le système qui les entoure est plus facile que de reconnaître l’injustice. Paradoxalement, si les gens étaient mieux lotis, leur patriotisme pourrait diminuer. Le patriotisme décline également à mesure que l’éducation augmente. Et il semble que le nombre de types d’informations et d’attitudes données sera réduit. Tout comme on a constaté que les gens préféraient bombarder un pays en proportion inverse de leur capacité à le localiser correctement sur une carte, je suppose qu’ils seraient un peu moins susceptibles de croire que les États-Unis les traitent mieux que les pays scandinaves s’ils connaissaient les faits. sur les pays scandinaves. Actuellement, ils ne le décident pas.

Duina cite des personnes qui lui ont assuré que tous les Suédois fuient la Suède dès qu’ils ont terminé leurs études universitaires gratuites, que le Canada peut avoir des soins de santé, mais qu’il est une dictature, qu’en Allemagne ou en Russie ils vous couperont la main ou la langue, que au Japon communiste, on vous coupera la tête pour avoir parlé contre le président, etc. Toutes ces croyances, toutes dans le même sens (dénigrer les autres nations), sont-elles des erreurs innocentes? Un homme assure à Duina que les autres nations sont inférieures parce qu’elles se livrent à des exécutions publiques, puis plaide en faveur de telles exécutions aux États-Unis. Un certain nombre de personnes déclarent supérieur aux États-Unis parce qu’il jouit de la liberté de religion et rejettent ensuite l’idée qu’un non-chrétien puisse jamais être président des États-Unis. Les sans-abri lui assurent que les États-Unis sont le pays par excellence des opportunités.

Beaucoup parlent de «liberté» et dans de nombreux cas, ils désignent les libertés énumérées dans le Bill of Rights, mais dans d’autres, ils désignent la liberté de marcher et de conduire. Ils opposent cette liberté de circuler avec les dictatures, bien qu’ils n’aient que peu ou pas d’expérience, bien que cela semble mieux contraster avec ce que les Américains pauvres connaissent probablement davantage: l’incarcération de masse.

La conviction que les guerres sur des nations étrangères sont bénéfiques pour leurs victimes et constituent des actes de générosité semble presque universelle, et les nations étrangères sont souvent décriées pour la présence de guerres (sans se rendre compte que nombre de ces guerres impliquent l’armée américaine, qui est financée des millions de fois. financement nécessaire pour éliminer la pauvreté aux États-Unis). Un homme croit que le Vietnam est toujours divisé en deux comme la Corée. Un autre estime que le président irakien a invité les États-Unis à l’attaquer. Un autre est tout simplement fier du fait que les États-Unis ont «la meilleure armée». Interrogés sur le drapeau des États-Unis, beaucoup expriment immédiatement leur fierté concernant la «liberté» et les «guerres». Quelques libertaires ont exprimé leur soutien à l’idée de ramener des troupes à la maison, accusant ainsi d’autres nations réticence à être civilisé – y compris ceux du Moyen-Orient, qui «n’a jamais été civilisé».

Il existe un soutien similaire similaire à la prolifération incroyablement destructrice d’armes à feu aux États-Unis, qui contribue à la supériorité de ce pays.

Une faute attribuée à d’autres pays est de priver les enfants de leurs parents. Pourtant, on suppose au moins que certains condamnant cette pratique ont trouvé un moyen de s’excuser ou de ne pas en prendre conscience dans les nouvelles récentes aux États-Unis.

L’un des défauts les plus communs, cependant, est de couper la tête des gens. Cela semble être une vision si commune de ce qui ne va pas avec les pays étrangers, que je me demande même si le soutien des États-Unis à l’Arabie saoudite est en partie motivé par un moyen aussi efficace de garder la population américaine sous sédation.

D’une manière ou d’une autre, le public américain a été persuadé de toujours comparer les États-Unis avec les pays pauvres, y compris ceux dans lesquels le gouvernement américain soutient des dictateurs brutaux ou impose des souffrances économiques, et jamais avec les pays riches. L’existence même de pays moins bien lotis et d’immigrants fuyant vers les États-Unis est généralement considérée comme la preuve du statut de plus grande nation sur Terre, même si d’autres pays riches sont mieux lotis et plus désirés par les immigrants.

Les résultats incluent un public passif prêt à absorber d’énormes injustices, un public disposé à suivre les politiciens qui promettent de les tromper mais à le faire patriquement, un public favorable aux guerres et au mépris du droit international et de la coopération, et un public disposé à rejeter les avancées dans les lois sur les soins de santé ou les armes à feu, les politiques climatiques ou les systèmes éducatifs s’ils sont élaborés dans d’autres pays.

Ce livre nous en dit plus sur les origines de Trump que sur les 18 derniers mois de Foxnews, mais c’est le moins que l’on puisse dire.

##

Les livres de David Swanson incluent Guérir l’exceptionnalisme.

Voir aussi:

Why Are the Poor Patriotic?
David Swanson

Peaceworker

We should be very grateful to Francesco Duina for his new book, Broke and Patriotic: Why Poor Americans Love Their Country. He begins with the following dilemma. The poor in the United States are in many ways worse off than in other wealthy countries, but they are more patriotic than are the poor in those other countries and even more patriotic than are wealthier people in their own country. Their country is (among wealthy countries) tops in inequality, and bottoms in social support, and yet they overwhelmingly believe that the United States is “fundamentally better than other countries.” Why?

Duina didn’t try to puzzle this one out for himself. He went out and surveyed patriotic poor people in Alabama and Montana. He found variations between those two places, such as people loving the government for helping them a little bit and people loving the government for not helping them at all. He found variations between men and women and racial groups, but mostly he found intense patriotism built around identical myths and phrases.

I think it’s worth pointing out that wealthier Americans are only slightly less patriotic than poor Americans, and that the moral question of why one should love an institution that creates great suffering for others is identical to that of why one should love an institution that creates great suffering for oneself (and that the greatest suffering the United States government creates is outside the United States). I suspect that much of what Duina found among the poor could be found in some variation among the less poor.

Duina is very respectful of everyone he spoke with, and very academic in his prose. But he quotes enough of his interviewees’ statements to make it quite clear, I think, that their patriotism is largely a willfully delusional religious faith based on ignorance of and avoidance of facts. Just as the less wealthy are a bit more religious, they are also a bit more patriotic, and they draw no clear line between the two. Duina reports that many of the people he spoke with assured him that God favored the United States above all other nations. One man even explained his own and others’ extreme patriotism as a religious need to believe in something when struggling, something to provide “dignity.” There is, of course, a parallel to U.S. racism, as many poor white Americans for centuries have clung to the notion that at least they are better than non-whites. The belief that at least one is better than non-Americans is widespread across every demographic.

Duina notes that even for those struggling most desperately a belief that all is right and just with the system around them can be easier on the mind than recognizing injustice. If people were better off, paradoxically, their patriotism might decrease. Patriotism also declines as education increases. And it seems likely to decline as particular types of information and attitudes are conveyed. Just as people have been found to favor bombing a nation in inverse proportion to their ability to correctly locate it on a map, I suspect people would be marginally less likely to believe the United States treats them better than a Scandinavian country would if they knew facts about Scandinavian countries. They currently decidedly do not.

Duina quotes people who assured him that every Swede flees Sweden as soon as they’ve completed their free college education, that Canada may have healthcare but is a dictatorship, that in Germany or Russia they’ll cut off your hand or your tongue, that in communist Japan they’ll cut off your head for speaking against the president, etc. Can all of these beliefs, all in the same direction (that of disparaging other nations) be innocent errors? One man assures Duina that other nations are inferior because they engage in public executions, and then advocates for public executions in the United States. A number of people declare the United States superior because it has freedom of religion, and then reject the idea that any non-Christian can ever be U.S. president. Homeless people assure him that the United States is the quintessential land of opportunity.

Many speak of “freedom,” and in many cases they mean the freedoms listed in the Bill of Rights, but in others they mean the freedom to walk or drive. They contrast this freedom to move about with dictatorships, despite having little or no experience with dictatorships, although it seems best contrasted with something poor Americans are likely to have a lot more familiarity with: mass incarceration.

The belief that wars on foreign nations benefit their victims and are acts of generosity seems nearly universal, and foreign nations are often disparaged for having wars present (with no apparent awareness that many of those wars involve the U.S. military which is funded with millions of times the funding that would be required to eliminate poverty in the United States). One man believes that Vietnam is still divided in half like Korea. Another believes the president of Iraq invited the United States to attack it. Another simply takes pride in the United States having “the best military.” When asked about the U.S. flag, many immediately express pride in “freedom” and “wars.” A few libertarians expressed support for bringing troops home, blaming other nations for their unwillingness to be civilized — including those of the Middle East, which has “never been civilized.”

There is similar strong support for the incredibly destructive proliferation of guns in the United States as something that makes the United States superior.

One fault attributed to other countries is taking children away from parents, yet one assumes that at least some who condemn that practice have found a way to excuse it or not become aware of it in recent news from the United States.

One of the more common faults, though, is chopping people’s heads off. This seems such a common view of what is wrong with foreign countries, that I almost wonder if U.S. support for Saudi Arabia is in part motivated by such an effective means of keeping the U.S. population sedated.

Somehow, the U.S. public has been persuaded to always compare the United States with poor countries, including countries where the U.S. government supports brutal dictators or imposes economic suffering, and never with wealthy countries. The very existence of countries that are worse off, and from which immigrants flee to the United States is generally taken as proof of Greatest Nation on Earth status, even though other wealthy nations are better off and more desired by immigrants.

The results include a passive public willing to absorb huge injustices, a public willing to follow politicians who promise to screw them but to do so patriotically, a public supportive of wars and dismissive of international law and cooperation, and a public willing to reject advances in healthcare or gun laws or climate policies or education systems if they are made in other countries.

This book tells us more about where Trump came from than the past 18 months of cable news, but Trump is the least of it.Φ

David Swanson is an author, activist, journalist, and radio host. He is director of WorldBeyondWar.org and campaign coordinator for RootsAction.org. Swanson’s books include War Is A Lie and Curing Exceptionalism. He blogs at DavidSwanson.org and WarIsACrime.org. He hosts Talk Nation Radio.

Voir également:

The Patriotism of the Poor Isn’t So Mysterious
Jim Geraghty
National Review
November 21, 2019

Francesco Duina is professor of sociology at Bates College and author of Broke and Patriotic: Why Poor Americans Love Their Country. Over in the Guardian, he grapples with what strikes him as a surprising and troubling phenomenon:

The World Values Survey indicate that 100% of Americans who belong to the lowest income group are either “very” or “quite” proud of their country. This isn’t the case for any other major advanced country in the world. These positive feelings are also resilient: they intensified, in fact, during the Great Recession of the late 2000s.

As long as they remain deeply patriotic, America’s poor won’t rise up. Indeed, they’ll continue to fill the ranks of the military, strive and sacrifice to help America assert itself in the world, and even feed into and support the slogans and successes of the country’s political leaders.

I realize that these days, MSNBC’s Chris Matthews is now the subject of jokes about unregulated methane emissions, but way back in 2002 he wrote a book, Now Let Me Tell You What I Really Think that included a clarifying anecdote from Matthews’ days as an armed officer of the U.S. Capitol Police in the 1960s.

But the core of the force was made up of “lifers” from the military, enlisted guys who’d done long hitches with the Army, Navy, or Marines. I’d spend hours hanging out with these guys. My favorite was Sergeant Leroy Taylor. He was one of those citizen-philosophers who instinctively grasped this country’s real politics, the kind that people live and are ready to die for. He and the other country boys would talk about how they would do anything to defend the Capitol. More than some of the big-shot elected officials, my colleagues in blue revered the place and what it meant to the republic. It wasn’t about them, but about something much bigger.

I will never forget what Leroy once told me and the wisdom it contained: “The little man loves his country, Chris, because it’s all he’s got.”

Being poor in America is terrible in a lot of ways. But even the poorest American is ensured a vote upon turning 18, their day in court if charged with a crime with a jury of their peers, a right to a public defender, their right to speak their mind and criticize anyone in government without the state prosecuting him, their right to assemble and protest, the right to own a firearm if they have no mental impairment or criminal record, no search or seizure of their property without a warrant, rights against self-incrimination, the right to believe whatever religion they want or none at all, and the right to be free from cruel and unusual punishment. There are wealthy moguls in China who don’t have half those rights.

I’d argue the more interesting question is not why do the poor assess living the United States so positively, but why the wealthy assess living the United States so negatively? (And why is there often an implicit assumption that the wealthy see their country clearly and accurately, while the poor do not?)

Perhaps the remarkable opportunities of the wealthy give them a skewed view of life at home and abroad.

Yes, a wealthy person is more likely to have traveled to more foreign countries, and have more firsthand experience with life in other countries. But what do they see in their encounters with other countries? The life of a wealthy person in New York is not all that different from the life of a wealthy person in London or Paris or Dubai or Tokyo or Shanghai. It’s not surprising that almost everyone at the Davos conference gets along well. They’ve all been to the best schools, they all enjoyed enormous opportunities in their careers, they all dress in similar tailored suits, live well, eat well, enjoy the finer things in life . . . It is unsurprising that a CEO from Silicon Valley meets a CEO from Switzerland and, after chatting over a tray of canapes, concludes they’re not so different after all.

If you have been lucky enough to stay or even just step inside more than one luxury hotel in more than one world capital, you’ll realize they all look more or less the same. The lobby of the Four Seasons doesn’t look all that different from one in the Mandarin Oriental, which doesn’t look all that different from the one in Ritz-Carlton, and most of us would be stumped if we had to pick out which one was which, and in which city. There’s a worldwide homogeny to the signifiers of the luxury lifestyle. While there’s a lot of overwrought denunciation of “globalists” out there these days, it’s safe to conclude that most of the wealthy elite in any given nation have more in common with other countries’ wealthy elites than with their own countrymen.

If you step into lower-class or middle-class person’s house in “flyover country” in the United States, or Morocco, or Israel, or France, or Brazil, you will much more likely to immediately spot distinctions and differences. Even something as simple as tea with grandma is going to be immediately distinctive from country to country — the Japanese tea set is going to look different from the English tea set, and different from the Turkish tea set, and if you see a samovar, there’s a good chance you’re in Russia. If there is Frida Kahlo or Diego Rivera art on the walls, there’s a really good chance the inhabitants are Mexican or have Mexican heritage. You’re more likely to spot symbols of religious faith, flags, sports team paraphernalia — all kinds of displays that declare, ‘this is where we come from, this is who we are, this is why we’re proud to be who we are.’ It is not surprising that poor and middle-class citizens would find “globalism” as an odd and not-that-appealing prospect, and express patriotism (and perhaps nationalism) in ways that wealthier, more cosmopolitan citizens find naive and parochial.

Voir de même:

Data indicates that 100% of Americans who belong to the lowest income group are either ‘very’ or ‘quite’ proud of their country. Why is that?

To be poor anywhere in the world is hard, but being poor in America is especially difficult. While the income of wealthier Americans has grown significantly in the recent decades, the wages of the country’s worst-off have stagnated. The available social benefits (for unemployment, illness or old age, for instance) pale in comparison with those enjoyed by poor people in other advanced countries. America’s poor also work longer hours than their counterparts elsewhere, while their children have less opportunity to escape poverty than if they lived in Europe.

On these and other fronts America has let them down. From time to time, observers, like Thomas Edsall of the New York Times and the former United States secretary of labor Robert Reich, have asked why the poor don’t rebel despite these stark inequities. As the Economist recently put it, “Why aren’t the poor storming the barricades?” For answers, we have to take into account the intensity of their patriotic feelings.

If we define patriotism not only as an attachment to country but also as a belief in its greatness, if not superiority – the brand of patriotism expressed by America’s poor is extraordinary. Data analysis from the authoritative General Social Survey (run by the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago) shows that over 90% of America’s poorest would rather be citizens of the United States than of any other nation. The figure is higher than that for working-class, middle-class and upper-class Americans. About 80% also believe that America is a “better” country than most other countries.

In parallel, data from the World Values Survey indicate that 100% of Americans who belong to the lowest income group are either “very” or “quite” proud of their country. This isn’t the case for any other major advanced country in the world. These positive feelings are also resilient: they intensified, in fact, during the Great Recession of the late 2000s.

As long as they remain deeply patriotic, America’s poor won’t rise up. Indeed, they’ll continue to fill the ranks of the military, strive and sacrifice to help America assert itself in the world, and even feed into and support the slogans and successes of the country’s political leaders – starting with Donald Trump. So, a pressing question arises: why are America’s poor so patriotic?

To find out, I spent time in Alabama and Montana, two “hotbeds” of patriotism among the poor as measured with data from the General Social Survey. I headed to urban and rural settings in both states, and spoke to people in bus stations, laundromats, homeless shelters, used clothing stores, senior citizen centers, public libraries and other places. I talked with people of different races, genders, religious and political orientations, histories of military service and ages. The findings were at once striking and humbling.

First, America’s poor still see their country as the “last hope” for themselves specifically and for humanity more generally. Because of its foundational social contract, the country offers each citizen a sense of dignity. As Ray (all names have been disguised), an older African American man in Birmingham, Alabama, told me, only in America is everybody equal in principle to everyone else:

“For me, yeah, it starts with the individual, naturally. And according to our constitution, rules and rights, you know … everybody is afforded that without question … I believe, right, that I can have a conversation not just with you; I could sit down, talk with the President of the United States … you know?” Add to this the lingering traces of Manifest Destiny, the long-held belief that America is God’s country, and why would anyone – especially someone poor – not want to live here? God, I was told by many, loves all of humanity – but God loves America best of all.

Certainly, as one man told me, the government or some leaders have at times gone astray from the country’s promises. But the essence of the nation is pure and unique. And this serves as a lifeline for those who struggle financially. Thus, as Darrius, a middle-aged white man living out of a car in Billings, Montana, with his young and pregnant wife, stated:

“You have to have some shred of dignity. Even the bottom-of the-barrel person has to have some shred of dignity … and so when we’re struggling and we’re super poor and broke and going through all these things, you almost have to believe in something better or higher … and the Americans’ ideals ring on that level because they’re a lot different than maybe other countries’ because the American ideals are supposed to embody those things that are, are like good for humanity, you know … and it’s true.”

Second, to many, America is seen as the land of “milk and honey”. It’s perceived as a rich and generous place, where those who work hard can achieve much. The people I spoke with took personal responsibility for the difficult trajectories they had experienced, even if in fact all odds were stacked against them. As Kysha, an African American woman in her 60s in a shelter in Birmingham, told me, “It’s on you … you got a chance like anyone else … everybody got a chance. Some people don’t wanna do right. You gotta realize that.” America, moreover, gives money to countries all over the world: it’s a place of abundance, that attracts people from all over the world. Under this reasoning, anyone who’s poor in America should be thankful to be here.

Third, the US is seen as the land of freedom – in the physical, spiritual and mental senses. Marshall, a young man from Montana, told me he was homeless by choice because he wanted a “sabbatical” from life. “Nobody bothers me for it, if I am not bothering anybody.” Where else, he asked me, could he be left alone and not be, “you know, herded off or … jailed”? America is seen as a place of self-determination and choice. Guns came up often in my conversations with people. People mentioned them for the very practical reason that they’re needed to hunt for food. How else to put meat on the table or in the freezer? The constitution grants the right to bear arms, and guns are perceived as essential symbols of freedom. Just think back to the American Revolution, when the settlers had to make their own weapons to fight British oppression.

In Montana, these thoughts often took on libertarian tones, while in Alabama they often connected to the civil rights movement. Some variations could also be seen across racial and other dimensions. But, on the whole, they amounted to a surprisingly consistent and strong perspective shared by most of the people I met.

What at first looks like a puzzle may not be a puzzle at all. America’s poor hang on fiercely to the ideals of freedom, dignity, abundance, and self determination that America has long represented precisely because they have so little else to depend on. Is this a kind of delusion on the part of poor Americans? Is there cynicism or exploitation in the country’s continued promotion of those ideals? Or is there nothing negative or sinister about it? Is it merely an example of what’s beautiful and inspiring about the strength and perseverance of the human spirit and, yes, America itself? I leave the answer to you.

  • Francesco Duina is professor of sociology at Bates College. His most recent book is Broke and Patriotic: Why Poor Americans Love Their Country
  • Voir de plus:

The bottom line for impoverished Americans is, of course, that they have less money than their fellow citizens.

Which leads to other things they likely have less of: nutritious food, personal safety, health benefits, vacation time, career opportunities, child care, retirement funds, peace of mind. And the list goes on.

Still, there’s one thing the poorest Americans do possess a lot of: patriotism. It’s a fact: By many measures, the Americans who have the least nevertheless love their country the most, despite ample cause for feeling the opposite.

Paradoxical, no? It struck Professor of Sociology Francesco Duina that way, too. But, as he learned in researching his latest book, it isn’t really a paradox after all.


From his research, Francesco Duina offers three possible reasons why the poorest Americans love their country the most.

New from Stanford University Press, Broke and Patriotic: Why Poor Americans Love Their Country lets economically disadvantaged people explain their devotion to the United States. It’s a collection of views that may move readers to think again about America’s poorest citizens — whose patriotism, as Duina suggests, fueled the White House aspirations of both Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders.

+An excerpt from Broke and Patriotic

Visiting four municipalities in Alabama and Montana, Duina interviewed more than 60 subjects who had poverty in common but were otherwise quite diverse. The book is his third study of American culture, after Winning: Reflections on an American Obsession, from 2011, and 2014’s Life Transitions in America.

Duina notes that while social scientists have studied the patriotism of many groups, this is the first research to look specifically at the patriotism of low-income Americans.

What led you to write Broke and Patriotic?

I could understand why those Americans who were well-off would be patriotic. But I wanted to understand why low-income Americans are so patriotic when there are reasons to think that they would have issues with their country or its underlying social contract, considering their personal circumstances.

As you point out, worse-off folks in places like Sweden and France typically enjoy greater public benefits than America’s poor. And yet poor Americans are more patriotic than their counterparts in other wealthy countries.

What I thought to be a puzzle is, for them, not a puzzle at all. First, they don’t attribute their situation to their country — they don’t say, “I’m in this situation because of the society I live in.” They take ownership of their life histories. And so why would they be resentful toward their country?

Also — and this is one of the most moving things that I discovered — if anything, the idea of the greatness of America actually gives them something to hang onto, despite everything. “Everything else has gone poorly for me. Don’t take my being an American away from me, because it’s the one thing that I can still hang onto with pride.”

I would push them by saying, “Well, what about rich people? Do you think it’s unfair that they have what they have?” They’d say, “No, they’ve earned everything they’ve made.”

You describe three common elements, broadly speaking, within your respondents’ love of country. They feel that America represents an exceptional promise of hope, and also that the U.S. is both wealthy and generous — the land of milk and honey. But what hit home for me was how they explained America’s greatness in terms of American freedoms.

One of the interviewees that really struck me was Marshall, in Montana, who chose to be homeless, in a way. He said, “Look, I am so free. I can be homeless, and they don’t force me to go anywhere. I live on the prairie, I’m working on an app right now, and I’m taking a sabbatical from life. What other country would allow me to just do my thing?”

That is really a trait of American society in many ways: “We’re all equal and therefore this equality guarantees me some sense of freedom. I may have nothing, but I have that freedom. I can come and go, do whatever I want, and say whatever I want. This country guarantees that.” And the fact that they would recognize and hold onto that was really moving. What I heard satisfied my curiosity.

Culturally, the United States is very free — freedom of religion, freedom of thought, freedom of saying and doing whatever you want to do. And they’re accurately describing that. There’s certainly more conformity in many countries, a lot more pressure to do things in certain ways.

Many of Duina’s interviewees felt that that social equality helps to guarantee their freedom. (Theophil Syslo/Bates College)

A respondent that you call Eddie said the U.S. is “the last best hope of man on earth.” That’s quite a sentiment.

Great guy, very talented. Many of the people I spoke with perceive the country to be a special project designed to give deliverance, to free humanity from problems that have plagued people throughout history. The hope that the U.S. represents for humanity is what gives them hope and dignity as well, and what makes them continue, despite the odds.

Many of them were very optimistic as a result. Something I heard a lot was, “Tomorrow something is going to change. I’m poised for a change.”

And then there’s the American Dream, the U.S. as the land of milk and honey.

Yeah, despite all of the data that suggests that, in fact, there’s less social mobility nowadays in the United States than in many other advanced countries, and your personal financial success is tied to contextual and structural things, not personal qualities — there’s clearly a sense that this is a place of enormous wealth, and that the American Dream is still alive.

I would say, “But you know, you don’t get as much as other people in other countries.” And they would say, “Well, I don’t know what other people get, but I get a lot. I’m not going to go hungry tonight. There will be kitchens and shelters that I can go to and churches that will help me. So the wealth will reach me. And if I have a problem, it’s my problem, not the system’s problem.”

How is this book relevant to our current politics?

I think this discourse of American greatness is something that Trump tapped into very, very much. To the extent that one wonders why “Make America great again” resonated so well, you have elements of the answer in this book, whether with low-income people or middle-class people. I would think that Bernie Sanders also tapped into it a bit, but in a very different way.

Who is the book written for?

People who are interested in understanding the United States, how it functions, what keeps it together — what is at the heart of its social contract, its national identity. My respondents have a genuine attachment to the idea of America, and I think that’s because, in the end, what one discovers is that America is for the people and the people own it.

We should all try and understand their patriotism. Much depends on it. They contribute heavily to the military — their investment in the country, in a way, contributes to stability and social peace. As long as they believe in the American Dream and in the United States as a country they are unlikely to demand fundamental changes of society. And so, if we want to understand why the United States is a stable country, we have to understand why people latch on so tightly to it, even though they appear to be suffering and getting a lot less than the poor elsewhere.

Voir encore:

Why are poor people in America so patriotic? One man went on an odyssey to find outFrancesco Duina visited bus stations and laundromats to find out why inequality’s victims still love America
Chauncey DeVegaSalon

June 11, 2018
By many important measures, the United States is not a democracy. It is an oligarchy.The evidence is not hidden. Ninety percent of the wealth in the United States is held by .1 percent of households. Intergenerational class mobility has been stagnant for several decades. The racial wealth gap continues to persist. It is so extreme that economists and other experts predict that African-Americans as a group will have zero wealth by 2053. « Tax reform » has continued to divert money upward to the very rich and away from all other Americans. Political scientists Martin Gilens and Benjamin Page have shown that America’s elected officials are almost wholly unresponsive to the political demands of the average American.There can be no real democracy in a country where the courts have decided that money is speech. Such a power dynamic suppresses the political power of most citizens and grotesquely favors rich people and large corporations.Despite these facts, poor and working-class Americans are extremely patriotic and nationalistic — much more so than any other group in the country.Why is this? How do poor and working-class Americans reconcile such enthusiastic support for a country that has in many ways failed them? Is this a form of false consciousness? What explains the power of cultural myths about meritocracy and individualism, in the face of ample evidence that they do not represent reality for most people? How was Donald Trump able to exploit the patriotism and nationalism of poor and working-class white Americans (and others) to win the White House?In an effort to answer these questions, I recently spoke with sociologist Francesco Duina. He is a professor of sociology at Bates College and the author of the award-winning new book « Broke and Patriotic: Why Poor Americans Love Their Country.« This conversation has been edited for clarity and length.How would you explain how Donald Trump was able to win the 2016 presidential election?I think there are two or three reasons. One is nationalism. National identity is especially important to certain sections of the population, but I think that the Democratic Party has assumed a type of « global elite, » East Coast-West Coast mentality.In so doing, I think it has forgotten a bit about national identity. For those who feel like many other things in their lives have fallen by the wayside, such a person could hear “Make America Great Again » and it would resonate. I also think that people who voted for Trump were, as he said, « not interested in that P.C. stuff. »Sociologists and others would rephrase « political correctness » as « collective demands for equality. » This is a way of saying that these collective identities — whether it’s blacks, gays, women, etc. — demand things from the government as a matter of right. To be clear, I would agree that those demands are legitimate.In a way this is, historically speaking, a non-American thing. It goes against the tradition of individualism. You have certain basic rights as an individual, not as a group. I think the people who voted for Trump by and large could be characterized as more individualistic-oriented. They lack interest in the government providing things for them and are more interested in the government getting out of their way. His voters and other supporters also feel that the government is corrupt and catering to all sorts of people instead of them.There is all this talk about the perils of « identity politics » among liberals and progressives who want to privilege discussions of class inequality over racism and racial inequality. You hear Bernie Sanders and others echoing this narrative: « We need to get away from identity politics if we’re going to win the next election. » How do we respond with the fact that all politics is identity politics? White identity politics has dominated America since before the founding. I think the Trump supporters were, in a way, reacting against identity politics.By embracing white identity politics, white supremacy and white nationalism.Correct, but that’s you and I saying that. His voters and other supporters wouldn’t say that they are embracing white supremacy at all. They would say, « I’m embracing true American values that are values of individualism and civic nationalism based on certain principles. » They would also say, like Trump, “I am not racist. I don’t hate anybody. I love women, I love gays and I love everybody. »Trump is also giving his supporters a sense of value and identity by railing against « the system. » His use of the language and terms like « political correctness » is a way of channeling resentment against experts, the college-educated, nonwhites, bureaucrats and others who his voters feel are telling them what to do.That goes back to this sense of individual self-determination. They feel that they are unable to determine their own future as hard-working individuals, which should be the key to success in America. They think to themselves, “Well we do work hard, yet we’re unable to be successful because the government has been helping ‘special interests’ but also corporate America. » As you said, these people also don’t want to be told what to do.Trump’s white voters — and white Americans as a group — benefit a great deal from government benefits such as tax subsidies [for] educational opportunities not historically allowed to nonwhites. They say that other people are « skipping ahead in line, » but they are the ultimate group that has « skipped ahead in line » in America. But you’re not going to get anywhere talking to Trump’s voters, and most other white people, about those facts.
They don’t feel it. Another way of thinking about it that I find useful is to differentiate between the nation and the state. I think that Trump ran a campaign that was based on the nation, not the state. The state was made the culprit, almost. It was a partner in crime. It’s a swamp. The state has not done its job. It has, over the decades, done the wrong things — gone against the fundamental American values of individual self-determination and colorblindness and all of these things.On the other hand, I think Trump has said we need to go back to the nation. The nation is good. We need to rescue it. He played the « nation card, » and it worked fantastically.We also need to define terms. The nation is the fundamental social contract, which in every country is a bit different. In the American case, it is civic individualism, based on certain civic values such as self-determination and freedom and the like. That’s what is celebrated.That’s the key to how Trump won. That’s why it doesn’t matter what you throw at him and his supporters. It can be logic, it can be fact. It doesn’t matter whether Trump contradicts himself one moment or the other because that’s not what they’re listening to. He is just a provocateur, as a revolutionary agent against the status quo.What was the genesis of your book?Symbols of patriotism are everywhere in America. National anthems at major sport events, the Pledge of Allegiance in schools, flags everywhere. Then you see those flags outside of homes which are not well kept, but somebody with barely any means has a flag pole with a big American flag.Over the years I started wondering about that: It just doesn’t make sense to me. The poor in America are actually worse off by most measures than the poor in other advanced countries. Whether it’s the number of hours worked, the social safety net, intergenerational mobility, you name it. But by most measures, the American poor are the most patriotic, compared to the poor elsewhere, and certainly relative to rich Americans.I wanted to talk to these people and ask, « Why do you love this country so much? Why is it such a prominent aspect of your life? »Americans do not like to talk about class. The old truism holds that everyone is middle-class in America. What was your approach to finding people to speak with? I spent time at places like bus stations, laundromats and homeless shelters. I went to Montana and Alabama. I would begin general conversations with people. Those are places where people usually have a lot of time on their hands.I would start talking to people, waiting for a moment. Maybe there was a basketball game on or something. The American flag shows up and I would say, « Hey, listen, I’m kind of curious: Are you patriotic? Do you like the American flag? » They would start talking to me. Then I would probe a little deeper and then eventually I would say, “Listen, I’m traveling across the country. I would like to talk to you, if you want to, for about a half hour or 45 minutes of your time. I’ll give you a little bit of money, I have some funding. Can we talk? « I think it was rather smooth. I never had any trouble that way. People were very happy to talk. Many of the conversations became very emotional for them, and for me actually, once I got into their life stories and what happened to them over time. These are very poor people, working-class people, who had difficult lives. They really were hanging on to their America that deeply. It was very meaningful for me and for them. I also made sure to ensure variety by traveling to urban and rural areas, men and women, people of different ethnic and racial backgrounds.Why would poor and working-class people be so patriotic? This country has failed them. Is this a form of false consciousness?What is a puzzle for you and me is actually not a puzzle for them at all. It is, in fact, the opposite. It is precisely because so many things have gone wrong for them that they get so much mileage out of being an American, which still happens to be a very prestigious national identity. One could argue that in a way it gives them a sense of identity like nothing else. They’re hanging on to it precisely because they have nothing else to hang on to.Saying they are possessed by false consciousness is actually a condescending take. Because when you talk to these people they are quite knowledgeable about American history. They are quite knowledgeable about the American social contract.They don’t have their history wrong. I think they’re being too harsh on themselves. They also differentiate between themselves and the government and say, “What happened to me is my responsibility.” In the end, they hang onto this idea. They feel motivated to continue and to do better the next morning. Many of them said that.I would push back and ask, « Have you reconciled what happened to you with your love of country? Didn’t you get screwed? » They would respond, “No, what happened to me is my thing.” This is not false consciousness. This is a true sense of dignity that they get from the social contract as they perceive it.In America, aren’t we brainwashed by capitalism through these myths about meritocracy and individualism? Every society has to reproduce itself.I largely agree. But I must ask, who’s not brainwashed? I lived in Denmark for a year and I go to Denmark quite often. I love the society and it’s very humane and has done great in many ways. It’s a different society and an « almost perfect society, » as they describe it. But they are equally collectively hypnotized around their nation and what they call themselves: « the Tribe. » There are plenty of myths about themselves and plenty of stories they tell themselves about who they are. Citizens of Denmark are so homogeneous and so collectively oriented they’re just as brainwashed as anybody else.Who are we to judge? Who am I to judge the person in Montana who tells me, “Yeah, I love the United States. I can own guns and that way I can feed my family.” Of course I can say, “Look, I can go to Canada and do the same thing.” But who am I to judge their logic?How did the people you spoke to narrate the stories of their own lives?I was talking to people who were prostitutes, former drug addicts and current drug addicts. Many were homeless. They would say several things in common. One was that they felt free to come and go and do the things they wanted and also to do and think whatever they wanted. In Montana, I met a young white person in the library who was homeless. I asked him, “Why are you homeless?” He said to me, “I’m homeless because it’s basically a sabbatical from life for me. I’m working on an app.” I thought, that cannot possibly be true. He then said, “In other countries, they would probably force me into a shelter. Whereas here, I can stay homeless and nobody bothers me for it.” I thought to myself, that is amazing.

A type of radical autonomy.

Certainly. Many of them felt very autonomous. Many of these people would also say fantastical things to me like, “Look, I’ve turned a corner a month ago » or « I found God six months ago. Now I’m in good standing before God I don’t drink anymore. On Monday I have a job lined up. » I don’t know if that was true or not.

The God thing, I should say, was also very prevalent. This sense that they’re walking with God and that America is God’s country. God loves America more than he loves other countries. This sense, still, of walking with God in God’s country, trying to do the right thing.

What were some of the conversations and life stories that really moved you?

One person I spoke with was a white woman struggling with brain cancer. She was young. She had three kids. We chatted at a bus station in Colorado but she was from Alabama. She was talking to me about her life. It was very important to her to have her kids read the Pledge of Allegiance, recite it at home. She was struggling to teach them the right values before she dies.

There was an African-American I met in Alabama. She was studying at a community college or the like to be a chef. She said to me, “Life out of country, life out of me.” She was saying: If you take the country away from me, you take the life away from myself; I have to have that. She was in her late 30s or early 40s.

I also met this couple who were living out of a very old Saab. I met them at laundromat in Billings, Montana. He was probably 20 years older than she was. He was probably in his 40s. She was in her early 20s. She had served in the military. He hadn’t.

She was expecting. We had an amazing conversation. They were very articulate and very thoughtful. It was him who said, “We have to be patriotic. You have to have a shred of dignity. Yeah, the system is corrupt, the police are corrupt, we’re being watched by everybody. » Mind you, this is Montana, so they were very libertarian.

Does a person believe that the system is fair because to accept the truth of how unfair and biased it is would be too devastating? 

Why don’t the poor rise up and rebel in America? Well, I think I discovered that part of the reason is that they still believe in the nation. Not necessarily the state, but the nation. They still believe in it.

Well, if they do, then they’re not going to ask for a major rewrite of the social contract. Maybe, if you want to be cynical about it, it is a way of perpetuating the inequality and the status quo. At the same time, I felt enormous power and self-determination and hope and knowledge.

How did the poor and working-class people you spoke with feel about the rich?

I asked that question many times. I would wait for the right moment when, for example, a big Mercedes would drive by. In almost all cases, what I heard was, « They earned it and they made it on their own. Just like my failures and my faults, their successes are their successes. » Now I would challenge that and say, « Come on, you were probably born in a certain context that was not helpful to you. They were probably born in well-to-do families. »

I have these quotes in my head. One fellow said to me, « It’s got to be choices. It’s got be bad choices or good choices, but it’s got to be choices. It comes down to choices. » But this same man had just told me how his father had beaten him up all his life. He was 14 years old and homeless; he ran away. Those are not choices. It was very difficult to get them away from that type of thinking. They thought that the rich essentially deserved it. The rich were generous. They get a lot of things as a result of that. These poor and working-class people actually told me that.

Now, I also spoke to a few people — out of the 90 total, three or four — who were not so patriotic. They would talk about feeling that the system has duped us. They want to rip up the American flag. We are invaders of other countries. There’s imperialism. The rich don’t care for us. The government doesn’t care for us. One guy told me that American nationalism and the American flag reminded him of a bunch of preppy boys at a fraternity party at some university.

But no matter how you measure it, the poor in America are very patriotic.

Voir aussi:

Why Poor Americans Are So Patriotic

Even in Hard Times, Pride in Country Offers Comfort, Security, and the Hope That Life Will Get Better

Why do the worst-off American citizens love their country so much?

Patriotism may be defined as a belief in the greatness, if not superiority, of one’s country relative to others. Depending on how one defines the term exactly, somewhere between 85 to 90% of America’s poor are “patriotic.” They would rather be citizens of their country, for instance, than of any other country on Earth, and they think America is a better place than most other places in the world.

This is striking for at least three reasons. First, those are very high figures in absolute terms. Secondly, the corresponding figures for working class, middle class, and upper class Americans are generally lower. And, thirdly, the worst-off in most other advanced nations are also less patriotic than America’s—even in countries where people receive better social benefits from their government, work fewer hours, and have better chances of upward intergenerational mobility than their counterparts in the United States.

Why are America’s poor so patriotic? The short answer is: We don’t know for sure. And we should, because so much depends on the patriotism of poor Americans. Their love of country contributes to social stability, informs and supports America’s understanding of itself as a special place, and is essential for military recruitment. It is also a force that can be tapped into by politicians eager to rally a large contingent of voters.

To understand this patriotism, I spent parts of 2015 and 2016 in Alabama and Montana—two distinctly different states that are both ‘hotbeds’ of patriotism among the poor. I hung out in laundromats, bus stations, homeless shelters, public libraries, senior citizen centers, used-clothing stores, run-down neighborhoods, and other venues. And I interviewed 63 poor Americans of different ages, genders, religious and political orientations, races, and histories of military service.

I came away with three overarching insights.

First, many view the United States as the “last hope”—for themselves and the world. Their strong sense is that the country offers its people a sense of dignity, a closeness to God, and answers to most of humanity’s problems. Deprive us of our country, the people I met told me, and you deprive us of the only thing that is left for us to hang on to.

This feeling of ownership is national and personal. Consider the words of Shirley (all names here are pseudonyms, per my research rules), a 46-year-old unemployed black woman in Birmingham with plans to become a chef: “For me to give up hope on the country in which I live in is almost to give up hope for self. So I gotta keep the light burning for me and for my country or I’m gonna be in the dark.”

In my interviews, people separated the country’s possibilities from their own frustrations; many took full responsibility for their own troubles in life.

That comment connected to a second insight. America appeals to the poor because it is rich. “The land of milk and honey” was a phrase I heard often. The poor see it as a place where those who work hard have a chance to succeed. In my interviews, people separated the country’s possibilities from their own frustrations; many took full responsibility for their own troubles in life. “People make their own life, make their own money the way that they wanna make it and however much they wanna make it,” said Jeff, a white man in a bus station in Billings, Montana.

Many saw this as an American virtue. Here, at least, your failures belong to you. Your chances aren’t taken away by others. “If you fail,” said Harley, a vet now on food stamps, “gotta be bad choices.” This sentiment was articulated with particular frequency by African American interviewees in Alabama—something that particularly struck me, given the legacies of slavery and segregation in that part of the country.

For the same reason, many were confident that the future was about to bring them better things. Several felt that they had just turned a corner—perhaps with God on their side. Rich Americans, they told me, deserve what they have. Besides, they added, look at the rest of the world: They keep trying to come to America. This must be the place to be.

That related to a third source of pride in the nation: America is the freest country on earth. Many of the people I met spoke of feeling very free to come and go from different places, and to think as they wish. America allows people to be as they want, with few preconceived notions about what the good life should look like. Such a narrative took on libertarian tones in Montana.

For some, this included the freedom to be homeless, if they choose. As Marshall, a young, white homeless man, told me in Billings, “it’s a very free country. I mean, I’m actually, I live on the streets, I’m kinda choosing to do that … sabbatical. Nobody bothers me for it; I’m not bothering anybody. I got my own little nook. There are other places in the world where I’d be forced into some place to shelter up or, you know, herded off or … jailed.”

When conversations turned to freedom, guns were often mentioned. Guns give one security and make hunting possible—enabling one to feed one’s self and family. I was accordingly often reminded that Americans rebelled against the English by making guns. Guns equal freedom. And America, thankfully, ensures gun ownership.

Taken together, these conversations helped me understand that the patriotism of the poor is rooted in a widespread belief that America belongs to its people. There is a bottom-up, instinctive, protective, and intense identification with the country. This is a people’s country.

Of course, some of this patriotism is clearly grounded in misconceptions about other countries. One person told me that there are only two democracies in the world: Israel and the United States. Another told me that Japan is a communist country. Yet another that in Germany one’s tongue can get cut off for a minor crime. Many also assumed that other countries are poorer than they really are. But these were almost tangential reflections that further justified—rather than drive—their commitment to the country. They seldom came up on their own unless I asked about the limitations of other countries.

As I completed my interviews and reflected on what I heard from these patriots, I realized that their beliefs about America are not a puzzle to be solved. In America, there is no contradiction between one’s difficult life trajectories and one’s love of country. If anything, those in difficulty have more reasons than most of us to believe in the promise of America.

Francesco Duina is Professor of Sociology at Bates College, as well as Honorary Professor of Sociology at the University of British Columbia. He is the author of Broke and Patriotic: Why Poor Americans Love Their Country, published by Stanford University Press.
Voir enfin:

La nationalité française classée meilleure du monde

Puissance économique, stabilité, liberté de voyager et de travailler à l’étranger… Selon l’Indice de qualité de la nationalité mesuré chaque année, la nationalité française est celle qui offrirait le plus d’avantages.
BFM TV
21/11/2019

Cocorico! Pour la huitième année consécutive, la nationalité française vient d’être désignée meilleure nationalité du monde selon l’Indice de qualité de la nationalité de Kälin et Kochenov (QNI). Pour établir ce constat, les auteurs de cette évaluation s’appuient sur plusieurs critères internes et externes aux pays étudiés tels que la paix et la stabilité, la puissance économique, le développement humain, la liberté de voyager ou de travailler à l’étranger…

La nationalité française arrive ainsi en tête du classement avec un score de 83,5%, juste devant la nationalité allemande et néerlandaise à égalité avec 82,8%. Le Danemark complète le podium (81,7%).

D’autres grands pays sont loin derrière. Ainsi, le Royaume-Uni arrive huitième (80,3%). Et la nationalité britannique devrait dégringoler dans les prochaines années avec le Brexit, selon l’étude de Kälin et Kochenov. La nationalité américaine se classe pour sa part 25e (70%), la nationalité chinoise 56e (44,3%) et la russe 62e (42%).

Liberté de voyager et de s’installer à l’étranger

Comment expliquer la première place de la nationalité française? En tant que sixième puissance mondiale, l’Hexagone affiche un niveau de stabilité, de puissance économique et de développement humain élevé. Surtout, elle profite de l’Union européenne qui offre notamment à ses citoyens une grande liberté de voyager. D’ailleurs, les 28 États membres se trouvent tous dans le haut du classement.

Les Français peuvent également voyager librement dans de nombreux pays du monde (le passeport français permet de voyager dans 165 pays sans visa préalable). Ils jouiraient surtout d’une importante liberté d’établissement avec une plus grande facilité pour s’installer et travailler à l’étranger sans être empêchés par des formalités administratives trop lourdes, selon l’étude de Kälin et Kochenov.


Médias: Vous avez dit « fake news » ? (What casual, everyday bias of reporters ?)

22 novembre, 2019
Lors d\'une manifestation contre la politique de Donald Trump sur l\'immigration, le 9 juin 2019, à Los Angeles (Etats-Unis).
L’oppression mentale totalitaire est faite de piqûres de moustiques et non de grands coups sur la tête. (…) Quel fut le moyen de propagande le plus puissant de l’hitlérisme? Etaient-ce les discours isolés de Hitler et de Goebbels, leurs déclarations à tel ou tel sujet, leurs propos haineux sur le judaïsme, sur le bolchevisme? Non, incontestablement, car beaucoup de choses demeuraient incomprises par la masse ou l’ennuyaient, du fait de leur éternelle répétition.[…] Non, l’effet le plus puissant ne fut pas produit par des discours isolés, ni par des articles ou des tracts, ni par des affiches ou des drapeaux, il ne fut obtenu par rien de ce qu’on était forcé d’enregistrer par la pensée ou la perception. Le nazisme s’insinua dans la chair et le sang du grand nombre à travers des expressions isolées, des tournures, des formes syntaxiques qui s’imposaient à des millions d’exemplaires et qui furent adoptées de façon mécanique et inconsciente. Victor Klemperer (LTI, la langue du IIIe Reich)
Parmi les hommes, ce sont ordinairement ceux qui réfléchissent le moins qui ont le plus le talent de l’imitation. Buffon
La tendance à l’imitation est vivace surtout chez les sauvages. Darwin
Comme la faculté d’imitation dépend de la faculté d’observation, elle se développera d’autant plus chez les animaux qu’ils seront plus intelligents. George John Romanes
Presque aucun des fidèles ne se retenait de s’esclaffer, et ils avaient l’air d’une bande d’anthropophages chez qui une blessure faite à un blanc a réveillé le goût du sang. Car l’instinct d’imitation et l’absence de courage gouvernent les sociétés comme les foules. Et tout le monde rit de quelqu’un dont on voit se moquer, quitte à le vénérer dix ans plus tard dans un cercle où il est admiré. C’est de la même façon que le peuple chasse ou acclame les rois. Marcel Proust
Pour qu’il y ait cette unanimité dans les deux sens, un mimétisme de foule doit chaque fois jouer. Les membres de la communauté s’influencent réciproquement, ils s’imitent les uns les autres dans l’adulation fanatique puis dans l’hostilité plus fanatique encore. René Girard
Les journalistes moyens à qui nous parlons ont 27 ans et leur seule expérience de journaliste, c’est de suivre les campagnes politiques. C’est un changement radical. Ils ne savent littéralement rien. (…) Nous avons créé une chambre d’écho. Ils disaient des choses qui validaient ce que nous leur avions donné à dire.  Ben Rhodes (conseiller-adjoint à la sécurité extérieure d’Obama)
Media feeding frenzies have become almost commonplace in recent years, as Gary Hart, Oliver North, Vice President Dan Quayle and Speaker of the House Jim Wright, among many others, could readily attest. But in McMartin, the media seemed especially zealous–in large part because of the monstrous, bizarre and seemingly incredible nature of the original accusations. More than most big stories, McMartin at times exposed basic flaws in the way the contemporary news organizations function. Pack journalism. Laziness. Superficiality. Cozy relationships with prosecutors. A competitive zeal that sends reporters off in a frantic search to be first with the latest shocking allegation, responsible journalism be damned. A tradition that often discourages reporters from raising key questions if they aren’t first brought up by the principals in a story. In the early months of the case in particular, reporters and editors often abandoned two of their most cherished and widely trumpeted traditions–fairness and skepticism. As most reporters now sheepishly admit–and as the record clearly shows–the media frequently plunged into hysteria, sensationalism and what one editor calls « a lynch mob syndrome. » On so volatile an issue in an election year, defense attorneys maintain, that helped make it all but inevitable that the case would be prosecuted on a scale greater than the actual evidence warranted. There were stories about child prostitution and massive child pornography rings, stories about children being exchanged between preschools for sexual purposes, stories about a connection between alleged molestation at McMartin and a murder eight years earlier. None of these charges was ultimately proved, but the media largely acted in a pack, as it so often does on big events, and reporters’ stories, in print and on the air, fed on one another, creating an echo chamber of horrors. The LA Times
La presse accréditée à la Maison-Blanche est-elle victime du syndrome de Stockholm? Dans un livre devenu un classique du reportage politique américain, The Boys on the Bus, le reporter de Rolling Stone Timothy Crouse comparait en 1973 le convoi de la presse présidentielle sous Nixon à «un affreux petit camp de prisonniers de guerre, le chouchou du commandant, un officier débutant bien dressé et trop zélé, persécutant les prisonniers, étudiant leurs failles, récompensant leurs échecs, les punissant pour leurs succès et les encourageant à se dénoncer mutuellement». Jean-Marie Pottier
Les experts politiques ne sont pas un groupe très diversifié et ont tendance à accorder beaucoup de confiance aux opinions de leurs confrères et des autres membres de l’establishment politique. Une fois établi, le consensus tend à se renforcer jusqu’à et à moins que ne viennent l’interrompre des preuves absolument irréfutables. Les médias sociaux, Twitter en particulier, ne peuvent qu’aggraver encore le phénomène de pensée de groupe jusqu’à la création d’une véritable chambre d’écho. (…) Depuis au moins l’époque des « Boys on the bus, » le journalisme politique souffre d’une mentalité de meute. Les événements tels que les conventions et les débats rassemblent dans la même salle des milliers de journalistes; il suffit d’assister à l’un de ces événements pour presque littéralement sentir la nouvelle doxa se fabriquer en temps réel.  Nate Silver
Political experts aren’t a very diverse group and tend to place a lot of faith in the opinions of other experts and other members of the political establishment. Once a consensus view is established, it tends to reinforce itself until and unless there’s very compelling evidence for the contrary position. Social media, especially Twitter, can amplify the groupthink further. It can be an echo chamber. James Surowiecki’s book “The Wisdom of Crowds” argues that crowds usually make good predictions when they satisfy these four conditions: Diversity of opinion. “Each person should have private information, even if it’s just an eccentric interpretation of the known facts.” Independence. “People’s opinions are not determined by the opinions of those around them.” Decentralization. “People are able to specialize and draw on local knowledge.” Aggregation. “Some mechanism exists for turning private judgments into a collective decision.” Political journalism scores highly on the fourth condition, aggregation. While Surowiecki usually has something like a financial or betting market in mind when he refers to “aggregation,” the broader idea is that there’s some way for individuals to exchange their opinions instead of keeping them to themselves. And my gosh, do political journalists have a lot of ways to share their opinions with one another, whether through their columns, at major events such as the political conventions or, especially, through Twitter. But those other three conditions? Political journalism fails miserably along those dimensions. Diversity of opinion? For starters, American newsrooms are not very diverse along racial or gender lines, and it’s not clear the situation is improving much. And in a country where educational attainment is an increasingly important predictor of cultural and political behavior, some 92 percent of journalists have college degrees. A degree didn’t used to be a de facto prerequisite for a reporting job; just 70 percent of journalists had college degrees in 1982 and only 58 percent did in 1971. The political diversity of journalists is not very strong, either. As of 2013, only 7 percent of them identified as Republicans (although only 28 percent called themselves Democrats with the majority saying they were independents). And although it’s not a perfect approximation — in most newsrooms, the people who issue endorsements are not the same as the ones who do reporting — there’s reason to think that the industry was particularly out of sync with Trump. Of the major newspapers that endorsed either Clinton or Trump, only 3 percent (2 of 59) endorsed Trump. By comparison, 46 percent of newspapers to endorse either Barack Obama or Mitt Romney endorsed Romney in 2012. Furthermore, as the media has become less representative of right-of-center views — and as conservatives have rebelled against the political establishment — there’s been an increasing and perhaps self-reinforcing cleavage between conservative news and opinion outlets such as Breitbart and the rest of the media. Although it’s harder to measure, I’d also argue that there’s a lack of diversity when it comes to skill sets and methods of thinking in political journalism. Publications such as Buzzfeed or (the now defunct) Gawker.com get a lot of shade from traditional journalists when they do things that challenge conventional journalistic paradigms. But a lot of traditional journalistic practices are done by rote or out of habit, such as routinely granting anonymity to staffers to discuss campaign strategy even when there isn’t much journalistic merit in it. Meanwhile, speaking from personal experience, I’ve found the reception of “data journalists” by traditional journalists to be unfriendly, although there have been exceptions. Independence? This is just as much of a problem. Crowds can be wise when people do a lot of thinking for themselves before coming together to exchange their views. But since at least the days of “The Boys on the Bus,” political journalism has suffered from a pack mentality. Events such as conventions and debates literally gather thousands of journalists together in the same room; attend one of these events, and you can almost smell the conventional wisdom being manufactured in real time. (Consider how a consensus formed that Romney won the first debate in 2012 when it had barely even started, for instance.) Social media — Twitter in particular — can amplify these information cascades, with a single tweet receiving hundreds of thousands of impressions and shaping the way entire issues are framed. As a result, it can be largely arbitrary which storylines gain traction and which ones don’t. What seems like a multiplicity of perspectives might just be one or two, duplicated many times over. Decentralization? Surowiecki writes about the benefit of local knowledge, but the political news industry has become increasingly consolidated in Washington and New York as local newspapers have suffered from a decade-long contraction. That doesn’t necessarily mean local reporters in Wisconsin or Michigan or Ohio should have picked up Trumpian vibrations on the ground in contradiction to the polls. But as we’ve argued, national reporters often flew into these states with pre-baked narratives — for instance, that they were “decreasingly representative of contemporary America” — and fit the facts to suit them, neglecting their importance to the Electoral College. A more geographically decentralized reporting pool might have asked more questions about why Clinton wasn’t campaigning in Wisconsin, for instance, or why it wasn’t more of a problem for her that she was struggling in polls of traditional bellwethers such as Ohio and Iowa. If local newspapers had been healthier economically, they might also have commissioned more high-quality state polls; the lack of good polling was a problem in Michigan and Wisconsin especially. There was once a notion that whatever challenges the internet created for journalism’s business model, it might at least lead readers to a more geographically and philosophically diverse array of perspectives. But it’s not clear that’s happening, either. Instead, based on data from the news aggregation site Memeorandum, the top news sources (such as the Times, The Washington Post and Politico) have earned progressively more influence over the past decade: The share of total exposure for the top five news sources climbed from roughly 25 percent a decade ago to around 35 percent last year, and has spiked to above 40 percent so far in 2017. While not a perfect measure, this is one sign the digital age hasn’t necessarily democratized the news media. Instead, the most notable difference in Memeorandum sources between 2007 and 2017 is the decline of independent blogs; many of the most popular ones from the late ’aughts either folded or (like FiveThirtyEight) were bought by larger news organizations. Thus, blogs and local newspapers — two of the better checks on Northeast Corridor conventional wisdom run amok — have both had less of a say in the conversation. All things considered, then, the conditions of political journalism are poor for crowd wisdom and ripe for groupthink. Likewise, improving diversity is liable to be a challenge, especially because the sort of diversity that Surowiecki is concerned with will require making improvements on multiple fronts (demographic diversity, political diversity, diversity of skill sets). Still, the research Surowiecki cites is emphatic that there are diminishing returns to having too many of the same types of people in small groups or organizations. Teams that consist entirely of high-IQ people may underperform groups that contain a mix of high-IQ and medium-IQ participants, for example, because the high-IQ people are likely to have redundant strengths and similar blind spots. That leaves independence. In some ways the best hope for a short-term fix might come from an attitudinal adjustment: Journalists should recalibrate themselves to be more skeptical of the consensus of their peers. That’s because a position that seems to have deep backing from the evidence may really just be a reflection from the echo chamber. You should be looking toward how much evidence there is for a particular position as opposed to how many people hold that position: Having 20 independent pieces of evidence that mostly point in the same direction might indeed reflect a powerful consensus, while having 20 like-minded people citing the same warmed-over evidence is much less powerful. Obviously this can be taken too far and in most fields, it’s foolish (and annoying) to constantly doubt the market or consensus view. But in a case like politics where the conventional wisdom can congeal so quickly — and yet has so often been wrong — a certain amount of contrarianism can go a long way. Nate Silver
Dans les médias de la communication, une chambre d’écho, ou chambre d’écho médiatique est une description métaphorique d’une situation dans laquelle l’information, les idées, ou les croyances sont amplifiées ou renforcées par la communication et la répétition dans un système défini. Il s’agit d’une analogie avec la chambre d’écho acoustique, ou chambre réverbérante, dans laquelle les sons sont réverbérés par les murs. À l’intérieur d’une chambre d’écho médiatique, les sources ne sont généralement pas remises en question et les points de vues opposés sont censurés ou sous-représentés. John Scruggs, lobbyiste chez le cigarettier Philip Morris, décrit en 1998 deux mécanismes de ce qu’il appelle les «chambres d’écho». Le premier consiste en la répétition d’un même message par différentes sources. Le second mécanisme consiste en la diffusion de messages similaires mais complémentaires par une seule source. Scruggs décrit la chambre d’écho comme stratégie pour augmenter la crédibilité de certaines informations au regard d’une audience cible. Avec la démocratisation de l’internet et l’arrivée des médias sociaux, les chambres d’écho se sont multipliées. Les algorithmes des réseaux sociaux agissent comme des filtres et engendrent ce qu’on a nommé des bulles de filtres. L’utilisateur à l’intérieur d’une telle bulle obtient de l’information triée à son insu en fonction de son activité sur un réseau. L’accessibilité accrue aux informations correspondant aux opinions des individus fait que ces derniers sont moins exposés à des opinions différentes des leurs. Dans les chambres d’échos, les opinions opposées à celles de la majorité sont peu diffusées et, lorsqu’elles le sont, sont souvent la cible d’attaques par cette majorité pour les discréditer. Lorsqu’une information est reprise par de nombreux médias, elle peut être déformée, exagérée, jusqu’à être plus ou moins dénaturée. En augmentant l’exposition à une fausse rumeur, sa crédibilité a tendance à augmenter. À l’intérieur d’une chambre d’écho, il peut ainsi arriver qu’une majorité d’individus croient en une version dénaturée d’une information véridique, ou en une information carrément fausse. Wikipédia
With ten people shot and four killed, this obviously meets the media’s current definition of a mass shooting. So where was the outrage? Where were the calls for new gun control laws? How did this tragedy turn into a non-story? First of all, the victims were all adult males from the Hmong community. And while police said they didn’t find any ties to gang activity among the victims, they were looking into a recent “disturbance” between some of them and members of one of the local Hmong gangs. (Fresno has had problems with gang violence, including Hmong groups, for quite a while now.) Another factor is the fact that police reported the assailants using semiautomatic handguns. The event was reportedly over pretty quickly, so they probably weren’t using collections of extended magazines. In other words, this mass shooting is uninteresting to much of the media because it fails all the normal tests and doesn’t fit in with the narrative. Had the men at least been using “assault rifles” they might have merited a bit more coverage. But those events are vanishingly rare because most gang members are well aware that it’s tough to hide a long gun when walking down the street to attack someone or while fleeing the scene afterward. Further, if initial reports prove accurate, this was an incident of adult Asian people shooting other adult Asian people. And most of the press has about as much interest in that story as one where black gang members are shooting other black people. In short… basically none. It’s reminiscent of the Bunny Friend Park shooting in New Orleans back in 2015. It was the second-largest mass shooting of the year in the United States. Seventeen people were shot in the middle of a public festival but if you didn’t live in New Orleans or subscribe to the Times-Picayune, you probably never heard about it. Why? Because it was two rival gangs composed primarily of African-Americans settling a turf war. Unfortunately, they were such poor marksmen that almost all of the victims were bystanders, including a young boy who was shot through the spine and will likely spend his life in a wheelchair. So the Fresno shooting has effectively already gone down the memory hole, while the last school shooting (that claimed fewer victims) is still popping up in the news a week later. Hot air
Les États-Unis ont « le plus haut taux d’enfants en détention au monde ». Est-ce que ça vaut la peine d’être signalé ? Peut-être, peut-être pas. Néanmoins, l’Agence France-Presse, ou AFP, et Reuters l’ont signalé, attribuant l’information à une « étude des Nations Unies » sur les enfants migrants détenus à la frontière entre les États-Unis et le Mexique. Puis les deux agences sont revenues sur leur déclaration. Supprimée, retirée, démolie. S’ils avaient pu utiliser l’un de ces hommes en noir, ils l’auraient fait. Les deux agences de presse ont expliqué que, voyez-vous, les données de l’ONU dataient de 2015 – dans le cadre d’une répression à la frontière qui avait commencé des années auparavant. Nous savons tous qui était le président en 2015. Ce n’était pas ce monstre maléfique qu’est le président Trump. C’était ce gentil, compatissant, monstre de garderie qu’était le président Barack Obama. Zap. L’histoire a fait passer Obama pour le méchant. Donc l’histoire a été retirée. Pas mise à jour ou corrigée, supprimée. Je sais que c’est un environnement médiatique dense. Qui peut suivre ? Mais essayez de vous souvenir de celle-ci, car elle est instructive. Les gens croient que les organes de presse fabriquent délibérément des fausses nouvelles, mais c’est rarement le cas. Les fausses nouvelles sont un problème qui surgit ici et là, mais les attaques beaucoup plus systématiques et profondément ancrées contre la vérité sont les distorsions quotidiennes et désinvoltes des journalistes. L’AFP et Reuters ont supprimé une histoire qui était, dans un sens strict, vraie – une étude de l’ONU a affirmé que les États-Unis avaient quelque 100 000 enfants en détention liée aux migrations. L’ONU est horriblement partiale contre l’Amérique et l’Occident. Pourtant, sur le plan du journalisme paresseux et axé sur la diffusion de communiqués de presse, l’histoire des enfants enfermés n’avait qu’une validité minimale. Ce que les agences ne semblaient pas apprécier, c’était l’implication de l’histoire : Obama, plutôt que Trump, a enfermé beaucoup d’enfants. C’est ce qui est important : non pas que l’AFP et Reuters aient supprimé une histoire, mais que l’implication de l’histoire signifie quelque chose pour eux. Chaque fois que vous lisez quelque chose de l’AFP et de Reuters (et de CNN et du Washington Post), vous devriez penser non pas ‘C’est une fausse nouvelle’ mais : ‘Quel est l’ordre du jour ?’ Pour paraphraser le commentaire tristement célèbre et instructif de Chuck Schumer sur la CIA, les médias ont six façons de vous faire penser ce qu’ils veulent que vous pensiez, dont aucune ne consiste à inventer des choses. L’une d’elles consiste à ne pas communiquer les choses. Les nouvelles qui ne sont pas mentionnées n’arrivent pas au public. Les cotes d’approbation d’Obama étaient pour la plupart très basses, comparables à celles de Trump, généralement dans les 40%. Les sondages le disaient, et les Ron Burgundy ne le signalaient tout simplement pas. Trump ne bénéficie pas de cette courtoisie. Il ne peut pas non plus être associé à de bonnes nouvelles. Un récent sondage de Newsbusters a révélé que, sur une récente période de six semaines, même pas un pour cent des médias ayant rapporté des nouvelles sur l’administration de Trump ont mentionné des mesures économiques positives. Une autre astuce consiste à rapporter sobrement les propositions politiques du politicien un, mais en se concentrant entièrement sur les mésaventures et les controverses mesquines du politicien deux. Vous pourriez, si vous êtes un consommateur d’actualités, avoir l’impression que la sénatrice Elizabeth Warren a un ensemble de plans sobres et bien raisonnés. Ces plans sont, cependant, si farfelus qu’ils sont à couper le souffle. Elle a promis 20,5 billions de dollars en nouvelles dépenses fédérales, soit une augmentation de 40 % par rapport aux montants actuels. Et pourtant, Warren n’est pas une candidate que les médias dépeignent comme déséquilibrée. Pendant ce temps, les gaffes des démocrates suscitent très peu d’intérêt . (…) Une autre astuce consiste à décider qu’une affaire qui fait avancer le mauvais récit est simplement une « nouvelle locale », et ne mérite donc pas l’attention des grands médias. Tout crime commis par des migrants illégaux peut être ignoré sans problème par CNN, mais tout crime associé à l’aile droite devient une cause de consternation nationale et d’introspection. Cette semaine, CNN a fait un reportage de grande envergure impliquant les talents de cinq reporters après que personne de l’Université de Syracuse ait envoyé un manifeste de la suprématie blanche à « plusieurs » téléphones portables et que des graffitis racistes aient été découverts dans une résidence. Auparavant, des incidents similaires sur le campus s’étaient avérés être basés sur des canulars. En cas de dissipation de cette histoire, CNN peut affirmer avec justesse: nous ne faisions que rapporter que les étudiants étaient effrayés. L’impression créée par un millier de récits de ce genre – que l’Amérique de 2019 est un cauchemar de la suprématie blanche – persistera tout de même. Utiliser ou ignorer les faits selon qu’ils créent ou non l’impression souhaitée est le principal objectif des médias d’aujourd’hui. NY Post
Séparer les enfants de leurs parents, comme cela a été fait par l’administration Trump, même de jeunes enfants, à la frontière avec le Mexique (…) constitue un traitement inhumain à la fois pour les parents et pour l’enfant. Manfred Nowak
Plus de 100 000 enfants sont actuellement détenus en lien avec l’immigration aux Etats-Unis. Ce total comprend les enfants détenus avec leurs parents et les mineurs détenus séparément, a affirmé lundi 18 novembre l’ONU. Plus précisément, « le nombre total des (enfants) détenus est de 103 000 », a déclaré à l’AFP Manfred Nowak, principal auteur de l’Etude globale des Nations unies sur les enfants privés de liberté. Il a qualifié de « prudente » cette estimation, basée sur les chiffres officiels ainsi que sur des sources complémentaires « très fiables ». Au niveau mondial, ce sont au moins 330 000 enfants qui sont détenus dans 80 pays pour des raisons liées aux migrations, selon cette étude. « Un traitement inhumain à la fois pour les parents et pour l’enfant » Selon Manfred Nowak, le nombre de 103 000 enfants détenus aux Etats-Unis comprend les mineurs non accompagnés, ceux qui ont été arrêtés avec leurs proches, et ceux qui ont été séparés de leurs parents avant la détention. L’étude examine notamment les violations de la Convention des droits de l’enfant, qui stipule que la détention des enfants ne doit être utilisée « que comme une mesure de dernier recours et pour la durée possible la plus courte ». Les Etats-Unis sont le seul pays membre des Nations unies à n’avoir pas ratifié la convention, entrée en vigueur en 1990. Mais Manfred Nowak a souligné que cela n’exonérait pas l’administration du président Donald Trump de la responsabilité de ses actes en matière de détention d’enfants migrants à sa frontière avec le Mexique. France info
Étude : 1/3 des enfants immigrés détenus dans le monde le sont aux États-Unis Triste record pour les États-Unis. Alors que l’administration Trump mène une politique unique dans l’histoire des USA en matière d’immigration, l’on apprend via un rapport que le nombre d’enfants détenus dans le cadre de la lutte contre l’immigration atteint un sommet comparé aux statistiques mondiales. Et pour cause, avec un total de 330.000 enfants détenus dans le monde pour des raisons migratoires, les États-Unis de Donald Trump tiennent le haut du pavé avec un total de plus de 100.000 enfants détenus pour les mêmes raisons. La Nouvelle tribune
The Associated Press has withdrawn its story about a claim about the number of children being held in migration-related detention in the United States. The story quoted an independent expert working with the U.N. human rights office saying that over 100,000 children are currently being held. But that figure refers to the total number of U.S. child detentions for the year 2015, according to the U.N. refugee agency. A substitute version will be sent. The AP
AFP is withdrawing this story. The author of the report has clarified that his figures do not represent the number of children currently in migration-related US detention, but the total number of children in migration-related US detention in 2015. We will delete the story. AFP
Correction: Report Withdrawn Because Of Error In Study Data An updated report about the study and the author’s error has been posted here. We have withdrawn this story about U.S. incarceration rates of children because the U.N. study’s author has acknowledged a significant error in the data. We will post a revised article with more complete information as soon as possible. Because of an error by the study’s author, NPR removed its original story about a study of U.S. incarceration rates of children. NPR has published a new story about the study here. NPR

Vous avez dit « fake news » ? (recette incluse)

Sortez un titre choc (« United States has the world’s highest rate of children in detention”, « Les États-Unis, champions du monde de la détention de mineurs », Étude : 1/3 des enfants immigrés détenus dans le monde le sont aux États-Unis) …

Ou plus factuellement subtil (« Plus de 100 000 enfants en détention aux Etats-Unis en lien avec l’immigration« ) …

N’hésitez pas à forcer la dose avec un chiffre ahurissant (en fait, le total accumulé de tous les enfants détenus en une année) …

Attribuez le aux seuls Etats-Unis (Corée du nord comprise !)

Citez un rapport de l’ONU (une étude de 2005 fera l’affaire) …

Sortez l’info massivement dans toutes les agences de presse internationales (AFP, Associated Press, Reuters)

Et même pour faire bonne mesure les organes de presse nationaux (National Public radio, France info) …

Comme les quotidiens de référence (NYT) …

N’oubliez pas une photo bien larmoyante d’enfants manifestants contre ledit traitement inhumain (ou au pire une photo de barbelés) …

Enfin en cas d’impair …

Entre un dessin antisémite et une rétention d’information

Retirez tranquillement l’info (un simple 404 ou au besoin trois lignes de communiqué sur Twitter ou un site de journal) …

Et, le tour est joué, …

Ne rappelez surtout pas …

Qui était président des Etats-Unis en 2015 (pour les mémoires chancelantes, Donald Trump arrive au pouvoir en janvier 2017) !

Plus de 100 000 enfants en détention aux Etats-Unis en lien avec l’immigration

 Au niveau mondial, ce sont au moins 330 000 enfants qui sont détenus dans 80 pays pour des raisons liées aux migrations.

Lors d\'une manifestation contre la politique de Donald Trump sur l\'immigration, le 9 juin 2019, à Los Angeles (Etats-Unis).

Lors d’une manifestation contre la politique de Donald Trump sur l’immigration, le 9 juin 2019, à Los Angeles (Etats-Unis). (DAVID MCNEW / AFP)

Voir aussi:

Then the two agencies retracted the story. Deleted, withdrew, demolished. If they could have used one of those Men in Black memory-zappers on us, they would have. Sheepishly, the two news organizations explained that, you see, the UN data was from 2015 — part of a border crackdown that had begun years earlier.

We all know who the president was in 2015. It wasn’t evil, child-caging monster President Trump. It was that nice, compassionate, child-caging monster President Barack Obama.

Zap. The story made Obama look bad. Hence the story was removed. Not updated or corrected, removed.

I know it’s a heavy news environment. Who can keep up? But try to remember this one, because it’s instructive. People think news organizations flat-out fabricate stories. That isn’t often the case. Fake news is a problem that pops up here and there, but the much more systematic and deeply entrenched attack on truth is the casual, everyday bias of reporters.

AFP and Reuters deleted a story that was, in a narrow sense, true — that a UN study claimed the United States had some 100,000 children in migrant-related detention. The United Nations is horribly biased against America and the West. Still, on the level of lazy, news-release-driven journalism, the locked-up-kids story was minimally valid.

At any rate, what the agencies didn’t seem to like was the story’s changed implication: That Obama, rather than Trump, locked up a lot of children. This is what’s important: Not that AFP and Reuters deleted a story, but that the implication of the story meant everything to them.

Every time you read something from AFP and Reuters (and CNN and the Washington Post), you should be thinking not “This is fake news” but: “What’s the agenda?” To paraphrase Chuck Schumer’s infamous, and instructive, comment on the CIA, news outlets have six ways from Sunday of getting you to think what they want you to think, none of which involve making up stuff.

One is simply not reporting things. News that isn’t mentioned didn’t really happen to that outlet’s consumers. Obama’s approval ratings were mostly really low, comparable to Trump’s, typically in the low to mid-40s. Polls would come out saying this, and the Ron Burgundys would simply not report it.

Using, or ignoring, facts in accordance with whether they create the desired impression is the principal agenda of today’s media.

Trump doesn’t enjoy this courtesy. Nor can he be associated with good news. A recent Newsbusters survey found that, over a recent six-week period, not even 1 percent of network news reporting on the Trump administration even mentioned positive economic news.

Another trick is soberly reporting the policy proposals of Politician One but focusing entirely on the miscues and petty controversies of Politician Two. You might, if you are a news consumer, be under the impression that Sen. Elizabeth Warren has a sober, well-reasoned set of plans. These plans are, however, so far-fetched as to be breathtaking. She has vowed $20.5 trillion in new federal spending, an increase of 40 percent on top of current levels. Yet Warren isn’t the candidate the media habitually portray as unhinged.

Meanwhile, the gaffes of Democrats attract very little interest; network news basically ignored the mini-scandal involving Pete Buttigieg, who promoted a list of black supporters, many of whom either were not black or did not support him. The networks declined to cast Buttigieg as racially insensitive.

Still another trick is deciding that a matter that advances the wrong narrative is simply “local news,” hence not worthy of attention from the major outlets. Any crimes committed by illegal immigrants can be safely ignored by CNN, but any crimes associated with right-wingers become cause for national dismay and soul searching.

CNN did a massive story this week involving the talents of five reporters after someone at Syracuse University sent out a white supremacist manifesto to “several” cellphones and racist graffiti was discovered in a residence hall. Previously, similar outbreaks of campus fear turned out to be based on hoaxes. Yet if this story dissolves, CNN can accurately claim, hey, we were just reporting that students were scared.

The impression created by a thousand stories like this — that America in 2019 is a white supremacist nightmare — will linger all the same. Using, or ignoring, facts in accordance with whether they create the desired impression is the principal agenda of today’s media.

Voir également:

Surprise! Reports claiming US has ‘more than 100,000 children’ currently in migration-related detention facilities are bogus
Becket Adams
The Washington Examiner
November 19, 2019

Various news outlets, including Agence France-Presse, the Associated Press, National Public Radio, and Reuters, reported this week that a United Nations study showed that there are « more than 100,000 children in migration-related U.S. detention.”

That sounds pretty bad. It means America has “the world’s highest rate of children in detention,” in violation of “international law.”

Except, oops! It is total nonsense.

First, the number of minors currently detained in the United States is more like 6,500: 1,500 detained by the Department of Homeland Security and 5,000 detained by the Department of Health and Human Services, as attorney and Washington Examiner contributor Gabriel Malor helpfully notes.

Second, newsrooms wrongly blamed the Trump administration for what was actually a study of the cumulative (not current) number of migration-related detentions for the year 2015. The 100,000 figure cited in the U.N. study includes everything from minors who were held for a day to minors who were held for several months. Further, you might recall — if you are not suffering too severely from « Trump derangement syndrome » — that Trump was not even sworn in to the White House until January 2017. In fact, in 2015, nobody thought Trump would ever be president.

That “100,000” figure should have never made it past the editing process, let alone launch a handful of headlines declaring the U.S. the leader in detained children. That figure requires not just shoddy math but also a total suspension of disbelief regarding what goes on in the darker, more tyrannical corners of the world. To say the U.S. is a world leader in detained minors would mean that America is measured against all countries, including China, Russia, and North Korea. If you believe U.N. investigators have reliable figures from any of those countries, then, oh boy, have I got a bridge to sell you.

To the surprise of absolutely no one with even an ounce of skepticism, the supposedly shocking news report has fallen apart. A few of the outlets that misreported the U.N. study have announced since that they are withdrawing their respective articles.

“AFP is withdrawing this story,” the French newsgroup announced Tuesday. “The author of the report has clarified that his figures do not represent the number of children currently in migration-related U.S. detention, but the total number of children in migration-related U.S. detention in 2015. We will delete the story.”

Voir de plus:

Étude : 1/3 des enfants immigrés détenus dans le monde le sont aux États-Unis
Sam Boton
La Nouvelle tribune (Maroc)
19 novembre 2019

Triste record pour les États-Unis. Alors que l’administration Trump mène une politique unique dans l’histoire des USA en matière d’immigration, l’on apprend via un rapport que le nombre d’enfants détenus dans le cadre de la lutte contre l’immigration atteint un sommet comparé aux statistiques mondiales.

Et pour cause, avec un total de 330.000 enfants détenus dans le monde pour des raisons migratoires, les États-Unis de Donald Trump tiennent le haut du pavé avec un total de plus de 100.000 enfants détenus pour les mêmes raisons.

STORY REMOVED: BC-EU–UN-US-Detained Children

The Associated Press has withdrawn its story about a claim about the number of children being held in migration-related detention in the United States. The story quoted an independent expert working with the U.N. human rights office saying that over 100,000 children are currently being held. But that figure refers to the total number of U.S. child detentions for the year 2015, according to the U.N. refugee agency.

A substitute version will be sent.

The AP

Voir encore:

 

 

Bill Chappell

Posted on Nov. 20 at 5:15 p.m. ET

An updated report about the study and the author’s error has been posted here.

Posted on Nov. 19 at 6:53 p.m. ET

We have withdrawn this story about U.S. incarceration rates of children because the U.N. study’s author has acknowledged a significant error in the data. We will post a revised article with more complete information as soon as possible.

Correction Nov. 20, 2019

Because of an error by the study’s author, NPR removed its original story about a study of U.S. incarceration rates of children. NPR has published a new story about the study here.

Voir par ailleurs:

Why you’re not hearing more about that mass shooting in Fresno

This particular bit of awful news out of Fresno, California broke on Sunday evening and at first, it caused quite a stir in the media. A mass shooting had taken place in the back yard of a family home where a group of people had gathered to watch football. Multiple gunmen entered the yard through a side gate and without saying a word began firing into the crowd. When they fled there were four dead and six more injured. People were justifiably horrified. (Associated Press)

A close-knit Hmong community was in shock after gunmen burst into a California backyard gathering and shot 10 men, killing four.

“We are right now just trying to figure out what to do, what are the next steps. How do we heal, how do we know what’s going on,” said Bobby Bliatout, a community leader…

“Our community is in mourning, and we still don’t know what’s going on, or who are the suspects,” said Pao Yang, CEO of the Fresno Center, a Hmong community group.

This shooting qualified for multiple Breaking News announcements on cable news and announcements arriving in people’s email inboxes. And then a strange thing seemed to happen. By Monday morning there was almost no additional coverage. I think I saw it mentioned briefly twice on CNN, and then it was back to the impeachment hearings pretty much non-stop

With ten people shot and four killed, this obviously meets the media’s current definition of a mass shooting. So where was the outrage? Where were the calls for new gun control laws? How did this tragedy turn into a non-story?

First of all, the victims were all adult males from the Hmong community. And while police said they didn’t find any ties to gang activity among the victims, they were looking into a recent “disturbance” between some of them and members of one of the local Hmong gangs. (Fresno has had problems with gang violence, including Hmong groups, for quite a while now.)

Another factor is the fact that police reported the assailants using semiautomatic handguns. The event was reportedly over pretty quickly, so they probably weren’t using collections of extended magazines.

In other words, this mass shooting is uninteresting to much of the media because it fails all the normal tests and doesn’t fit in with the narrative. Had the men at least been using “assault rifles” they might have merited a bit more coverage. But those events are vanishingly rare because most gang members are well aware that it’s tough to hide a long gun when walking down the street to attack someone or while fleeing the scene afterward.

Further, if initial reports prove accurate, this was an incident of adult Asian people shooting other adult Asian people. And most of the press has about as much interest in that story as one where black gang members are shooting other black people. In short… basically none. It’s reminiscent of the Bunny Friend Park shooting in New Orleans back in 2015. It was the second-largest mass shooting of the year in the United States.

Seventeen people were shot in the middle of a public festival but if you didn’t live in New Orleans or subscribe to the Times-Picayune, you probably never heard about it. Why? Because it was two rival gangs composed primarily of African-Americans settling a turf war. Unfortunately, they were such poor marksmen that almost all of the victims were bystanders, including a young boy who was shot through the spine and will likely spend his life in a wheelchair.

So the Fresno shooting has effectively already gone down the memory hole, while the last school shooting (that claimed fewer victims) is still popping up in the news a week later. There’s no real underlying lesson here that we didn’t already know about. I only bring it up as a useful data point for future reference. The police still have no suspects identified in the Fresno shooting, but hopefully, progress will be made. We should send out our thoughts and prayers to the victims and their families.


Iran: Quel soulèvement national ? (Iranian thugs shoot unarmed protesters in Lebanon, Iraq and now Iran itself and guess who the whole world keeps denouncing ?)

19 novembre, 2019


MPEG4 - 7 MoImage may contain: text

Les Iraniens sont dans les rues et manifestent contre le régime. Récemment, les mollahs ont perdu tous leurs alliés en raison de leurs tentatives de déstabilisation du Moyen-Orient et leur volonté permanente d’agiter les marchés pétroliers pour forcer leurs adversaires à capituler. Manquant de tout notamment de carburant pour produire de l’électricité nécessaire à leur régime et leur sécurité, ils ont repris le projet de paupérisation du peuple pour préserver les stocks existants de vivres et de carburant en augmentant par surprise le vendredi 15 novembre 2019 le prix du carburant de 300%. Les Iraniens dépités par cette décision inhumaine qui allait aggraver leur misère sont descendus dans la rue en attaquant les sièges de la milice du régime avec la ferme intention de mettre fin au pouvoir des mollahs et leurs associés. Le prince Reza Pahlavi qui est très aimé en Iran a apporté son soutien à ce mouvement et a appelé les forces de l’ordre à en faire autant. Sa mère, la reine Farah Pahlavi, encore plus populaire, en raison de la gigantesque popularité de son mari (le Shah d’Iran) et de son père, Reza Shah Reza Shah, depuis plusieurs années et aussi en raison des épreuves familiales qu’elle a endurées, a aussi apporté son soutien au peuple. Trump a aussi apporté son soutien au peuple, mais en revanche hélas pas les Européens. Cependant, les miliciens de base du régime se sont gardés de le défendre. Grâce à leur passivité bienveillante, il y a désormais des manifestations hostiles au régime dans tout le pays. Les rares miliciens fidèles au régime sont débordés. La chute du régime est vue comme possible à court terme. Le régime a coupé l’internet pour limiter le transfert des informations via les réseaux sociaux, mais les Iraniens se débrouillent et ont envoyé quelques vidéos pour montrer qu’ils comptaient continuer jusqu’à la chute du régime. Les rares miliciens restés fidèles au régime ne parviennent pas à contenir les manifestants. Le régime désespéré par le manque de sa capacité à réprimer les Iraniens leur envoie des SMS pour les avertir qu’ils pourraient les arrêter. Chers lecteurs français. Nous avons besoin de vous. Vos dirigeants ainsi que leurs collègues européens ne font rien pour aider la chute des mollahs. Nous comptons sur vous pour mettre fin à leur passivité car en dehors des considérations humanistes, la chute des mollahs, patrons du terrorisme islamique et de la propagande intégriste, permettra de sauver votre pays et de nombreux pays d’Afrique du Nord et du Moyen-Orient que vous aimez. Iran Resist
Les Iraniens sont dans les rues et manifestent contre le régime après une très forte hausse du carburant de 300% destinée à entraîner une forte hausse de tous les prix. Il y a une semaine, nous vous avons expliqué que les mollahs n’avaient plus d’alliés car les Irakiens et les Libanais se sont soulevés contre le Hezbollah et Russie et la Syrie se sont rapprochés de Trump… Dès lors, en attendant le succès de leurs provocations intimidantes ou un changement de la conduite du Hezbollah, les mollahs, manquant d’alliés pour obtenir des produits alimentaires qu’ils ont cessé de produire, de fait confrontés à un risque plus élevé de pénuries et d’émeutes, ont continué à ne pas payer les ouvriers et de nombreux fonctionnaires ou retraités pour limiter leur pouvoir d’achat afin d’éloigner les pénuries et les émeutes qu’elles provoqueraient. Ces mesures qui comme toujours punissaient le peuple sans peser sur les responsables du régime et les dévier de leur terrorisme régional ont renforcé la contestation du régime par les ouvriers et les fonctionnaires iraniens. Les routiers les ont aussi rejoints. Même des proches du régime rassemblés à Yazd pour applaudir Rohani l’ont hué à en début de la semaine dernière. La semaine dernière, ils ont aussi prélevé 1000 dollars sur les comptes d’épargne de tous les Iraniens notamment leurs cadres administratifs qu’ils avaient déjà siphonnés il y a un an en annulant les épargnes déposées dans des organismes de crédit. Le résultat a été le boycott interne de l’anniversaire de la prise de l’ambassade américaine : moins de 200 personnes à Téhéran et rien dans les autres villes car on a seulement vu des images pour Ardabil et il s’agissait des images d’archive étant donné que les gens étaient en chemisette alors que la température était de seulement 1° ! Les mollahs ont alors cherché à provoquer la panique dans la région en parlant de nouvelles armes disponibles pour les Houthis et le Hezbollah et d’un plus fort taux d’enrichissement pour faire reculer Trump et ses nouveaux alliés. Mais ils ont échoué et ont une la confirmation de leur isolement car le Hezbollah s’est gardé de les soutenir. La soudaine chute des températures il y deux jours parfois jusqu’à -12° les a exposés à une explosion de la consommation des carburants qu’ils ne produisent plus depuis des années pour en acheter aux pays industrialisés afin d’acheter leur soutien. Les mollahs, certains de ne pouvoir trouver de carburant pour l’alimentation des centrales thermiques qui produisent l’essentiel de l’énergie en Iran, ont intensifié le rationnement de l’essence en augmentant son prix de 1000 à 1500 tomans (+50%) pour une consommation limitée à 60 litres pour les particuliers et à 400 litres pour les taxis. Ils ont aussi fixé le prix à 3000 tomans (+200%) pour une consommation hors ces rations. Ils ont ainsi imposé indirectement une hausse de 50 à 200 % à tous les produits nécessitant des livraisons (essentiellement les produits alimentaires) et ont tenté de duper les Iraniens en affirmant qu’ils allaient leur distribuer les revenus de cette hausse !!! Les gens n’ont pas été dupes et ont immédiatement investi les rues en criant leur haine des mollahs et ont attaqué les dépôts de carburants des mollahs ainsi que les postes de la police ou les bureaux des renseignements de la milice ! Les mollahs n’ont pas trouvé assez de miliciens de base pour se défendre. On a même vu une vidéo d’un commandant de la police affirmant aux manifestants qui l’appelaient à les rejoindre qu’il était leur serviteur ! Le refus des miliciens de la police ou l’armée de frapper les manifestants a souligné la fragilité de leur régime ! Les mollahs ont demandé au peu de miliciens insolvables qui leur sont fidèles en raison de passé de tortionnaires d’intervenir et de tirer sur les manifestants. À l’heure actuelle, selon les nouvelles, il y aurait au moins 300 blessés et plus d’une vingtaine de morts dans plusieurs villes du pays. Depuis le régime est en état d’alerte au point que certains mollahs ont pris la défense du peuple après avoir été parmi ses bourreaux et ses voleurs pendant 40 ans ! Voici d’autres images du régime en danger et le peuple en révolte pour s’en débarrasser… Aidez-les svp en diffusant ces nouvelles sur tous les réseaux sociaux. Iran Resist
Protests have erupted across Iran after the government unexpectedly announced it was rationing petrol and increasing its price. At least one person has been killed and others injured in the violence. Officials say the changes, which have seen prices rise by at least 50%, will free up money to help the poor. Iran is already suffering economically due to stiff sanctions imposed by the US after Washington decided to pull out of the 2015 Iran nuclear deal. Protests erupted hours after the new policies were announced on Friday – with fresh demonstrations on Saturday in some cities. Fresh protests were held Saturday in the cities of Doroud, Garmsar, Gorgan, Ilam, Karaj, Khoramabad, Mehdishahr, Qazvin, Qom, Sanandaj, Shahroud and Shiraz, Irna reported. Footage posted on social media suggest other people may have been killed on Saturday. The semi-official Isna news agency reported that security officials have threatened to legally pursue social media users who were sharing footage online. On both days there were reports of angry motorists blocking some roads by turning off car engines or abandoning vehicles in traffic. Videos posted online purportedly showed motorists in the capital, Tehran, stopping traffic on the Imam Ali Highway and chanting for the police to support them. Another clip shows what appeared to be a roadblock across the Tehran-Karaj motorway, hit by the season’s first heavy snowfall. Other videos spreading online show clashes between security forces and protesters, and banks burning in several cities. Some pictures appeared to show police stations aflame in the southern city of Shiraz. Under the new fuel measures, each motorist is allowed to buy 60 litres (13 gallons) of petrol a month at 15,000 rials ($0.13; £0.10) a litre. Each additional litre then costs 30,000 rials. Previously, drivers were allowed up to 250 litres at 10,000 rials per litre, AP reports. The revenues gained from removing subsidies on petrol will be used for cash payments to low-income households, the government says. BBC
L’ancien système fondé sur les appartenances ethniques et religieuses ne fonctionne plus. Aujourd’hui la répartition de la population a changé et l’équilibre du pouvoir n’est plus le même entre les trois communautés du Liban : les chiites, les sunnites et les chrétiens. C’est vrai que ce système a fonctionné pendant longtemps, mais ce n’est plus le cas aujourd’hui. À cela s’ajoute également le fait qu’une grande partie des hommes politiques libanais sont à la fois corrompus et incompétents, incapables de gérer correctement les affaires du pays. C’est le cas aussi en Irak, où les dirigeants politiques sont gangrenés par la corruption. (…) Le Hezbollah sait qu’il va tout perdre en cas d’un véritable changement politique dans le pays. Le parti chiite a gagné la sympathie des Libanais en tenant tête à Israël. Mais il s’est montré incapable de gérer les affaires politiques du pays en temps de paix, il a donc perdu sa popularité. Les agents du Hezbollah sont peut-être de bons soldats, mais ils n’ont aucune compétence sur les plans politique, économique et social, comme d’ailleurs leurs frères iraniens. Le parti de Hassan Nassrallah est aussi corrompu et nul que les ayatollahs de Téhéran lorsqu’il s’agit de gérer les intérêts nationaux de leur pays. (…) La République islamique n’est pas de taille pour pouvoir imposer son ingérence dans la région. L’Iran d’aujourd’hui est un pays en plein chaos politique et économique à cause de quarante ans de politique belliqueuse de ses dirigeants et de leur incompétence légendaire en matière de gestion des affaires internes du pays. Ils ont plutôt intérêt à s’occuper de leur pays au lieu de s’ingérer dans le système politique des pays de la région comme l’Irak et le Liban. Les ayatollahs de Téhéran n’ont ni la capacité ni la légitimité de le faire. Les contestations massives des Libanais et des Irakiens montrent à quel point les peuples ne veulent pas de l’ingérence de la République islamique dans leur pays. Et cela est précisément en harmonie avec ce que les Iraniens ont toujours demandé de leurs dirigeants : Que faites-vous en Irak, au Liban, en Syrie ou ailleurs ? Pourquoi vous lapidez notre richesse ailleurs ? Pour les manipuler, pour semer les troubles chez eux ? Il s’agit d’une incompréhension totale des Iraniens envers les ayatollahs corrompus de Téhéran. En Iran, les gens ne peuvent pas exprimer leur colère face à un régime qui les réprime, qui les tue et qui verrouille toute possibilité de révolte politique populaire. C’est pour ça que les Iraniens jubilent en voyant ce qui se passe en Irak et au Liban. (…) La région est en train de sortir du système de gouvernance fondé sur les communautés ethniques et religieuses. Les Libanais ont pris conscience de cela. De même pour les Irakiens. Les manifestations au Liban et en Irak sont d’ordre éminemment politique et dévoilent la force de l’identité nationale, au-delà de toute appartenance ethnique ou religieuse. » Mahnaz Shirali
La police va massacrer les gens sur le campus. C’est Tiananmen bis. On ne sait pas du tout comment aider ceux restés sur place. On essaie tout ce qu’on peut, on essaie juste de gagner du temps. Jeune Hongkongaise
With virtually no chance Senate Republicans will vote to remove President Trump from office, House Democrats’ drive for impeachment is more likely aimed at creating a deluge of negative daily headlines hoping to cripple Trump going into next year’s election. If that is indeed Democrats’ goal, then the three broadcast networks are doing everything they can to help achieve this partisan objective… But while media coverage of the U.S. mission against al-Baghdadi was mostly positive, the President’s role in it was not. Out of nine evaluative statements about the President himself, two-thirds (67%) were negative. These focused on his refusal to brief congressional leaders, as well as his belittling description of the cruel ISIS leader’s last moments (“He died like a dog….He died like a coward….Whimpering, screaming and crying.”) “It’s possible that President Trump’s bellicose language about the manner in which he died could actually inspire some ISIS fighters to retaliate,” NBC’s Courtney Kube speculated on the October 27 Nightly News. (…) Silent on Economic Success: Despite record highs in the stock market and a fifty-year low in the unemployment rate, the President’s handling of the economy was given a stingy 4 minutes, 6 seconds of airtime during these six weeks, or less than one percent of all Trump administration news (645 minutes). Impeachment Diverting Airtime from 2020 Democrats: TV’s heavy coverage of impeachment has essentially smothered coverage of the Democratic presidential race, which drew a meager 110 minutes of coverage during these six weeks — barely a third of the airtime granted to the 2016 campaign during these same weeks in 2015 (312 minutes). Nearly half of this year’s campaign coverage (51 minutes) was about Joe Biden, his son and the Ukraine, leaving only 59 minutes for non-impeachment related topics. The next most-covered campaign event, Bernie Sanders’ heart attack, drew just 16 minutes of airtime. Boosting Biden: But when it came his Ukraine dealings, Biden has received the best press of his campaign (71% positive), as some journalists repeated a mantra that “there is no evidence of any wrongdoing” (ABC’s Jon Karl, September 24), while others traveled to the Ukraine to make the same point. “Did you ever see any evidence of wrongdoing by Joe Biden,” CBS’s Roxana Saberi asked an ex-deputy prosecutor. “Never, ever,” came the reply… Newsbusters
According to a recent Reuters/Ipsos poll, 36 percent of independents said they did not watch, read, or hear anything about the hearings. Of the 64 percent of independents who have paid some attention to the hearings, only 19 percent actually watched them. Seventeen percent said they watched or listened to news summaries, and 30 percent said they read or listened to news summaries. While the poll shows that most independents are paying attention, it also shows that they are not as engaged as other demographics.The poll showed that Democrats were the most engaged demographic — with 35 percent watching or listening to the hearing compared to only 26 percent of Republicans. And more Democrats than Republicans and independents watched, listened to, or read news summaries about the hearings. That could be bad news for Democrats who are hoping the hearings will sway the American public and persuade Republicans in the Senate to support impeachment. It could also be good news for Republicans, who do not think the American people care to tune into the hearings, which have often turned into history lessons on U.S.-Ukraine relations. Breitbart
Demander aux distributeurs d’ajouter « colonie israélienne » sur les produits en provenance « de Cisjordanie, de Jérusalem-Est et du Golan » relève d’un traitement discriminatoire appliqué au seul État d’Israël alors que de nombreux autres pays sont concernés par des conflits territoriaux similaires. Au moment où la paix dans la région est un enjeu essentiel, cette décision qui vise à isoler Israël ne répond pas à l’impartialité nécessaire pour prétendre jouer un rôle constructif et aura pour conséquence certaine le ralentissement des initiatives économiques dans ces territoires et un appauvrissement des Palestiniens qui travaillent dans ces entreprises. Le Crif rappelle que l’obsession anti-israélienne contribue à l’importation du conflit en France et attise la haine. Pour Francis Kalifat, Président du Crif, cette décision discriminatoire ne va pas dans le sens de l’apaisement et renforce le mouvement illégal BDS qui déverse sa haine et sa détestation d’Israël, appelant au mépris de la loi, au boycott et à la dé légitimation du seul état du peuple juif, pratiquant ainsi un antisionisme obsessionnel qui véhicule la forme moderne de l’antisémitisme. CRIF (29.11.2016)
Imposer l’étiquetage de produits israéliens alors qu’on ne le fait pas pour des denrées fabriquées au Tibet, à Chypre-Nord ou en Crimée, cela s’appelle de la discrimination. Ce type de décision est de nature à encourager ceux qui appellent au boycott pur et simple d’Israël, et à conforter leur obsession antisioniste. Francis Kalifat (CRIF)
C’est la fin d’une ambiguïté. Dans un arrêt rendu mardi à Luxembourg, la Cour de justice de l’Union européenne (CJUE) a tranché que les denrées alimentaires produites dans les colonies israéliennes de Cisjordanie et commercialisées sur le continent devront à l’avenir porter la mention explicite de leur origine. Cette décision est applicable non seulement en France, où le ministère des Finances avait pris les devants en réclamant un tel étiquetage dès novembre 2016, mais aussi dans les nombreux pays européens qui hésitaient jusqu’à présent à le mettre en œuvre. Le ministre israélien des Affaires étrangères, Israël Katz, a aussitôt dénoncé un arrêt «inacceptable à la fois moralement et en principe». «J’ai l’intention de travailler avec les ministres des Affaires étrangères européens afin d’empêcher la mise en œuvre de cette politique profondément erronée», a-t-il ajouté. Saeb Erekat, le négociateur en chef de l’Organisation de libération de la Palestine, s’est au contraire réjoui. «Nous appelons tous les pays européens à mettre en oeuvre cette obligation légale et politique», a-t-il déclaré, ajoutant : «Nous ne voulons pas seulement que ces produits soient uniquement identifiés comme provenant de colonies illégales, mais souhaitons qu’ils soient bannis des marchés internationaux». Plus de 400.000 Israéliens vivent dans la centaine de colonies de peuplement aménagées après la conquête de la Cisjordanie lors de la guerre des Six-Jours, en juin 1967. La communauté internationale considère, dans sa grande majorité, que l’occupation de ce territoire est illégale (ce que l’Etat hébreu conteste) et appelle à y créer un Etat palestinien, dans un cadré négocié. En l’absence de processus de paix, les ministres européens des Affaires étrangères sont tombés d’accord en 2011 pour promouvoir une politique de «différenciation» entre les denrées fabriquées dans les frontières d’Israël et celles qui sont produites en Cisjordanie occupée. En novembre 2015, la Commission européenne a fait un pas de plus en demandant aux Etats membres d’identifier celles-ci par un étiquetage explicite. Initiative aussitôt condamnée par les autorités israéliennes. Rejetant le principe même d’une telle différenciation, les viticulteurs de Psagot, une colonie édifiée en lisière de Ramallah, croyaient sans doute frapper un coup de maître lorsqu’ils saisirent la CJUE en juillet 2018. Objet de leur démarche : faire annuler le texte réglementaire par lequel la France a réclamé en novembre 2016 l’étiquetage des produits fabriqués dans les colonies. A court terme, l’initiative permet de geler son application. Mais elle va vite se retourner contre eux. En juin 2019, l’avocat général de la Cour, Gérard Hogan, prend fait et cause pour l’étiquetage. « De même que de nombreux consommateurs européens étaient opposés à l’achat de produits sud-africains à l’époque de l’apartheid avant 1994, écrit-il, les consommateurs d’aujourd’hui peuvent, pour des motifs similaires, s’opposer à l’achat de produits en provenance d’un pays donné ». Dans son arrêt rendu mardi, la CJUE estime que les denrées alimentaires produites dans des territoires occupés par l’Etat d’Israël devront dorénavant « porter la mention de leur territoire d’origine, accompagnée, lorsque ces denrées proviennent d’une colonie israélienne à l’intérieur de ce territoire, de la mention de cette provenance ». Il s’agit, précise la Cour, d’éviter toute ambiguïté susceptible d’«induire les consommateurs en erreur». «L’information doit permettre à ces derniers de se décider en toute connaissance de cause et dans le respect non seulement de considérations sanitaires, économiques, écologiques ou sociales, mais également d’ordre éthique ou ayant trait au respect du droit international». En saisissant une juridiction européenne qui s’était jusqu’à présent tenue à l’écart du dossier, les colons israéliens ont en quelque sorte marqué un but contre leur camp. Sa décision a en effet vocation à s’appliquer dans tous les Etats membres. Francis Kalifat, président du Conseil représentatif des institutions juives de France, qui s’était associé à la démarche des viticulteurs de Psagot, a exprimé mardi sa «grande déception». «Imposer l’étiquetage de produits israéliens alors qu’on ne le fait pas pour des denrées fabriquées au Tibet, à Chypre-Nord ou en Crimée, cela s’appelle de la discrimination, estime-t-il. Ce type de décision est de nature à encourager ceux qui appellent au boycott pur et simple d’Israël, et à conforter leur obsession antisioniste». Le Figaro
Could uprisings in Iraq and Lebanon, coupled with US sanctions, permanently impair Iran’s influence in the region? In the past few weeks, frustrated and fed-up demonstrators have taken to the streets of Lebanon and Iraq to voice grievances against their governments. The perception of Iranian infiltration and influence certainly continues to impact this political shake-up in both regions. These protests have toppled two governments in just three days. Saad Hariri, Lebanon’s prime minister, announced his resignation last week. Iraq’s President Barham Salih stated that Prime Minister Adil Abdul-Mahdi had also agreed to resign from office once a successor is decided upon. (…) in both regions, prominent Shia parties are conjoined with Iran. Since protesters are demanding an end to their government’s power-sharing system, Tehran is in trouble. Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei announced via Twitter on Thursday that, “The people [protesters] have justifiable demands, but they should know their demands can only be fulfilled within the legal structure and framework of their country. When the legal structure is disrupted in a country, no action can be carried out.” This statement, riddled with irony, completely discounts the revolution which birthed the government Khamenei currently leads. The ayatollah also verified how deeply entrenched Hezbollah has become in Lebanon’s political makeup. For over two decades, Tehran has played the role of puppet-master in Beirut, attempting to counter the influence of its enemies: the US, Israel and Saudi Arabia. Hezbollah’s critical influence in the region was demonstrated during the 2006 war with Israel and with the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps’ (IRGC) intervention in the Syrian conflict. Although Hezbollah’s military wing was rightfully designated as a terrorist organization in April by US President Donald Trump, the organization’s military and political wings work in tandem to export the regime’s disturbing agenda. In 2017, the US State Department identified more than 250 operatives and 150 companies with Hezbollah ties. Last year, the details of Project Cassandra exposed the sophistication and breadth of Hezbollah’s billion-dollar criminal enterprise. Since Tehran heavily invests in Hezbollah’s role globally, these protests do not bode well for the regime. Iranian leadership clearly grasps the magnitude of these demonstrations since its officials have attempted to paint them as manifestations of foreign meddling. Khamenei has accused “US and Western intelligence services, with the financial backing of evil countries,” of orchestrating these protests. In Iraq, anti-Iran sentiment has monopolized the demonstrations. Last week in Baghdad, protesters were pictured torching an Iranian flag. On Sunday, they threw gasoline bombs at the Iranian Consulate in the country’s capital of Karbala. The former head of the Iraqi National Archives explained that, “the revolution is not anti-American, it is anti-Iran; it is anti-religion – anti-political religion, not religion as such.” Pro-Iranian paramilitary forces have violently intervened in recent demonstrations. Since October 1, the Iraqi High Commission for Human Rights reports that 301 protesters have been killed, and thousands more injured. As Tehran continues to dismiss these protests as inauthentic and foreign-led, demonstrators will only gain more momentum. While Iran grapples with the economic consequences of Trump’s maximum-pressure campaign, it may not be able to survive the coupled onslaught of these protests.
To summarize, the September 14 attack on the Saudi oil facilities was a brilliant feat of arms. It was precise, carefully-calibrated, devastating yet bloodless – a model of a surgical operation that reaped for Iran a rich political and military harvest at the minimal cost of a few cheap unmanned vehicles, yet with a low risk of retribution. The planning and execution of the operation was flawless. The Iranians managed to mask their own role, to divert responsibility to their Houthi allies, to sneak two flights of unmanned air vehicles into two of Saudi Arabia’s most important oil facilities, and to execute unprecedented precision strikes on their installations without even breaking a window in a nearby town. And all this with utter surprise, with no intelligence leaks and without being detected either upon launch or on the way to the targets. The US armed forces could not do any better. (…) While there is no information on who directed this feat of arms, there is no doubt that it was authorized by the highest level of government in Iran. Simply put, its strategic purpose was to knock Saudi Arabia out of the war. It stands to reason that this prospect became tempting after Iran’s success in knocking the UAE out of the war. In June 2019 the UAE announced that it was withdrawing most of its troops from Yemen and shifting from a “military first” to “diplomacy first” policy in that country. Speculations about UAE motives abounded. Yet the impact of the purported attacks on Dubai and Abu Dhabi international airports by long-range Houthi UAVs during the summer of 2018 cannot be dismissed. Whether these attacks actually took place is controversial. In May 2019 the Houthis released a video purporting to show security camera footage of an attack by a fairly large, straight-wing and most probably propeller-driven UAV on a truck park inside Abu Dhabi’s international airport, causing an explosion. The Emirati authorities conceded that an “incident involving supply trucks” had occurred in that airport but did not specify its nature or cause. The video could be fabricated. Abu Dhabi’s airport is almost 1400 km. away from Houthiland, and thus the prospects of a simple propeller UAV traversing this distance with no hitch are far from sure, and the video itself has some suspicious features. Yet, if the attack did occur, it might have damped the ardor of UAE to involve itself any further in the Yemen war. The UAE’s warning after the Sept 14 attack about the consequence of any attack on their major cities illustrates its concern. Iran took big political and military risks by launching an attack of such magnitude on September 14. Had its key role in this attack been exposed right away, it night have faced both military retaliation from the US and diplomatic censure from the international community. That Iran was ready to take this risk indicates Iranian confidence in its ability to hide its role as well as confidence in US passivity. The Iranians clearly sense US reluctance to use force in the region. After all, the US failed to retaliate significantly after Iran shot down a $220 million American UAV several months ago. This, coupled with the UAE withdrawal, may have emboldened Iran to raise the stakes in its struggle for regional hegemony. It now threatens to raise the stakes even further, by threatening through the Houthis to launch further and even more devastating attacks on Saudi Arabia’s oil facilities. Whether this will knock Saudi Arabia out of the war, leaving Iran the master of Yemen and the key holder of the Bab el-Mandeb straights remain to be seen. Nevertheless, this impressive feat of arms has raised Iran’s prestige in the region, and no less important within Iran itself, and this at a time when US sanctions are imposing hardships on the Iranian public. Judging by the hardly concealed glee in the tightly controlled Iranian press, the regime is exploiting its success to the hilt to ensure public resilience in face of the economic pressures. Evidently, the Houthis and their Iranian sponsors have discovered a chink in Saudi Arabia’s armor. Air and missile defense radars are configured to detect high-flying threats. Since they are not required to detect ground-hugging objects, they are usually aimed a few degrees above the horizon to avoid ground clutter from nearby topographic features. This creates a gap between the radar fence and the ground, through which low-flying air threats can sneak in undetected. The Iranians apparently used this technique in earlier operations deep inside Saudi Arabia. In May 2019 two Saudi oil pumping stations in Afif and Dawadimi (770 and 820 km. respectively from the Yemeni border) were struck by UAVs, causing a temporary surge in global oil prices. On August 17 the Shayba oil field in eastern Saudi Arabia, almost 1200 km. from Houthiland, was struck, causing gas fires. Regardless from where the UAVs came from – they might have been launched locally by dissidents or by Houthi raiders – the fact is that they succeeded to slip through whatever defenses may have been protecting those installations. In many senses, the May and August raids were the precursors of the more devastating September 14 attack. (…) Defense systems require detection and tracking of their targets. Without detection there is no engagement and no interception. It stands to reason, then, that the inactivity of the Saudi air defenses was an inevitable result of the lack of early warning and detection. This had nothing to do with any real or imaginary flaws in the US- and European-supplied Saudi air and missile defense systems but with the fact that they were not designed to deal with ground-hugging threats. Simply put, the Iranians outfoxed the defense systems. To summarize, the September 14 attack on the Saudi oil facilities was a brilliant feat of arms. It was precise, carefully-calibrated, devastating yet bloodless – a model of a surgical operation that reaped for Iran a rich political and military harvest at the minimal cost of a few cheap unmanned vehicles, yet with a low risk of retribution. The planning and execution of the operation was flawless. The Iranians managed to mask their own role, to divert responsibility to their Houthi allies, to sneak two flights of unmanned air vehicles into two of Saudi Arabia’s most important oil facilities, and to execute unprecedented precision strikes on their installations without even breaking a window in a nearby town. And all this with utter surprise, with no intelligence leaks and without being detected either upon launch or on the way to the targets. The US armed forces could not do any better. While there is no information on who directed this feat of arms, there is no doubt that it was authorized by the highest level of government in Iran. Simply put, its strategic purpose was to knock Saudi Arabia out of the war. It stands to reason that this prospect became tempting after Iran’s success in knocking the UAE out of the war. In June 2019 the UAE announced that it was withdrawing most of its troops from Yemen and shifting from a “military first” to “diplomacy first” policy in that country. Speculations about UAE motives abounded. Yet the impact of the purported attacks on Dubai and Abu Dhabi international airports by long-range Houthi UAVs during the summer of 2018 cannot be dismissed. Whether these attacks actually took place is controversial. In May 2019 the Houthis released a video purporting to show security camera footage of an attack by a fairly large, straight-wing and most probably propeller-driven UAV on a truck park inside Abu Dhabi’s international airport, causing an explosion. The Emirati authorities conceded that an “incident involving supply trucks” had occurred in that airport but did not specify its nature or cause. The video could be fabricated. Abu Dhabi’s airport is almost 1400 km. away from Houthiland, and thus the prospects of a simple propeller UAV traversing this distance with no hitch are far from sure, and the video itself has some suspicious features. Yet, if the attack did occur, it might have damped the ardor of UAE to involve itself any further in the Yemen war. The UAE’s warning after the Sept 14 attack about the consequence of any attack on their major cities illustrates its concern. Iran took big political and military risks by launching an attack of such magnitude on September 14. Had its key role in this attack been exposed right away, it night have faced both military retaliation from the US and diplomatic censure from the international community. That Iran was ready to take this risk indicates Iranian confidence in its ability to hide its role as well as confidence in US passivity. The Iranians clearly sense US reluctance to use force in the region. After all, the US failed to retaliate significantly after Iran shot down a $220 million American UAV several months ago. This, coupled with the UAE withdrawal, may have emboldened Iran to raise the stakes in its struggle for regional hegemony. It now threatens to raise the stakes even further, by threatening through the Houthis to launch further and even more devastating attacks on Saudi Arabia’s oil facilities. What was the secret of the Iranian’s success in the Sept 14 attack? While detailed information is still lacking, we can hazard some speculation about its ingredients. First is the successful maintenance of absolute secrecy which assured a complete surprise. The second factor is a good appreciation of the performance and vulnerabilities of Saudi Arabia air and missile defense systems. Third, a comprehensive intelligence picture of their deployment at the time of the attack. Fourth, a meticulous planning of flight paths to avoid terrain obstacles and to circumvent Saudi radars or fly below their horizons. Fifth, the last word in automatic optical homing to ensure surgical precision. Of these five factors, the most decisive factor is the undetected access to the targets. The surgical precision was useful but not crucial. Even with coarser GPS guidance, and armed with explosive warheads, the incoming UAVs could devastate the Khurais and Abqaiq facilities, albeit less elegantly and probably with some loss of Saudi lives. Simply put, good secret-keeping and good intelligence allowed the Iranians to exploit the gaps in Saudi Arabia air and missile defense. Could this happen to Israel?  As noted, UAVs are not hard to shoot down, provided they are detected in time. Simple, relatively low-tech radar guided anti-aircraft guns can destroy low flying UAVs once they are detected. A good example of a simple yet effective close air defense system that can shoot down low flying UAVs is the Russian “Panzir” (SA-22), comprised of a radar, two 30 mm. cannons and 12 short-range ground-to-air heat-seeking missiles mounted on a truck chassis. Comparable systems can be improvised in the West in short order. More readily but more expensively, the Patriot system can shoot down UAVs, as was demonstrated by Israel during the 2014 Gaza war. The key question then is not how to shoot down UAVs but how to detect them in time. The Iranians sneaked through the inherent, built-in gaps in Saudi detection systems. Do such gaps exist in Israel, and if so, can they be closed? When asked by CBS’s “Sixty Minutes” program why his county’s air defense systems failed to detect the incoming UAVs, Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman replied that “Saudi Arabia is almost the size of a continent. It is bigger than all of Western Europe. We have 360 degrees of threats. It’s challenging to cover all of this fully.” In other words, Saudi Arabia does not have a comprehensive, country-wide detection system, due to its huge size. There are probably only local “bubbles” of radar coverage, in between which low-flying raiders can penetrate. In contrast, Israel is one of the smallest countries in the world. Israel Air Force controllers routinely shush away civilian ultralight aircraft and paragliders that stray into no-fly zones – which are basically comparable to low-flying UAVs. It can therefore be deduced that Israel’s airspace is fully transparent to air force controllers, at least from a certain altitude and above. Whether there exists a gap between the detectability horizon of Israel’s airspace control radars and the ground, of the kind that allowed the Houthi and Iranian UAVs to sneak below radar coverage, is unknown. Still, even if such gap exists it can be easily closed by existing means such as inexpensive Doppler radars of the kind used in the US Marine Corps MRZR anti-drone system (These radars, incidentally, are of Israeli origin). The sophistication of the September 14 attack in Saudi Arabia stands in stark contrast to the desultory efforts of Iran’s Quds force to strike Israel in recent times. Quds forces fired 32 rockets on May 10, 2018 targeting the Golan Heights. Most failed to reach Israel and fell harmlessly in Syria while four were shot down by Israel’s Iron Dome system. In January 2019 Quds forces near Damascus fired one rocket at Israel’s Mount Hermon. The rocket was destroyed by Iron Dome. On August 25, 2019 Israel frustrated a Quds force drone attack on its territory by destroying the base near Damascus from which the attack was to originate. These feeble, low-scale operations were aimed to retaliate against effective (and painful) Israeli strikes on Quds assets in Syria. The contrast to the level of effort and ingenuity invested by Iran in the September 14 attack on Saudi Arabia cannot be sharper. This disparity begs an explanation. Perhaps the answer lies in Iran’s strategic priorities. It stands to reason that Yemen and the preservation of the Houthi regime takes precedence in Iran’s calculus; while confronting Israel is relegated, for the time being, to the back burner. There are important reasons for Iran to make this choice. The painful sanctions by the US probably contribute to its urgent need to break the logjam and bring Saudi Arabia to the negotiating table. When this is achieved, there is little doubt that Iran will turn westwards and ratchet-up its confrontation with Israel. No one can know when this might happen, but if and when it does, a September 14-style attack on Israel’s key infrastructures cannot be excluded. This is a serious threat. Israel’s successes thus far in the so-called “war between the wars” against Iran should not be taken for granted. Complacence is the mother of misfortune. The key to avoiding a Saudi-style debacle in Israel is prior intelligence and seamless early warning systems. Israel’s political and military leadership must draw the appropriate conclusions from Saudi Arabia’s “Black September.” Dr. Uzi Rubin
>
Although much of this was known, the 700 pages of documents, translated from Farsi, show new details and, the report notes, shows how Iran got a firm grip on Iraq and is using it as a “gateway for Iranian power” that now stretches through Syria to Lebanon and increasingly threatens Israel. Iraq is the “near abroad” for Iran now, and Iran is building its own IRGC in Iraq, called the Popular Mobilization Units (PMU). The archive of documents comes from 2014-2015 and is from “officers of Iran’s Ministry of Intelligence and Security.” 2014-2015 was a pivotal year because it is when ISIS swallowed up a third of Iraq and threatened Baghdad. In response, Iran sent advisors, and Iraq’s Ayatollah Ali Sistani called for mass mobilization of Shi’ite men to fight. That became the PMU, which became part of the Iraqi Security Forces; now their party is the second largest in Iraq. 2015 was also the year of the Iran deal when Washington and Tehran appeared on the same page in Iraq. The US under the Obama administration supported the Iranian-backed Shi’ite sectarian Nouri al-Maliki to be prime minister and then supported his replacement Haider al-Abadi. In both cases, Washington wanted a “strong man” in Baghdad. And they got one. But so did Iran. Later, the US would encourage Abadi to attack the Kurds in Kirkuk, helping Iran’s Qasem Soleimani seize a strategic region of Iraq in 2017. The US thought it was empowering Baghdad to be “nationalist” and got Abadi a meeting with the Saudis. In fact, America was backing Iran’s influence, punishing its own Kurdish allies in a method that would replay itself in Syria. Iran didn’t have an uphill battle in Iraq, the documents show. Many leading Shi’ite Iraqis had aided Iran in the 1980s against the brutal Saddam Hussein regime. While Donald Rumsfeld was shaking hands with Saddam, men like Hadi al-Amiri were with the IRGC. Even current Prime Minister Adel Abdul-Mahdi had a “special relationship” with Iran, the documents note. In each case that means Tehran had an open door to most ministries, including key areas like the Interior and oil sector. IT’S HARD to know what “close ties to Iran,” means when Iran and Iraq are neighbors. Many American politicians may have close friends in Canada, but it doesn’t make them agents of Trudeau. Proximity and Shi’ite milieu make for close connections, as well as the clear militant link between leaders of the PMU and the IRGC. But Iran didn’t just want friends or allies. It wanted to know what the Americans were doing. To do that it needed men with a certain set of skills. In one quoted document, an informant was procured to try to insert themself into a place where they would become knowledgeable about US “covert operations” or to know what the State Department was doing. Iran even worked to find a “spy inside the State Department” and sought to roll up former CIA assets and put them on the dole. In the free-for-all days after the 2003 US invasion, Iran also “moved some of its best officers from both the intelligence ministry and from the Intelligence Organization of the Revolutionary Guards” to Iraq, the Intercept notes. The report characterizes some Iranian actions as silly, such as breaking into a German cultural institute, but not having the right codes. Is that more silly than the Watergate break in during the 1970s? The important thing is they tried to get to the Germans – and that Iran wanted to be everywhere. What were Iran’s goals? It wanted Iraq not to sink into chaos, as eventually happened in 2014. It wanted to stop an “independent Kurdistan,” which it did in 2017. It wanted to protect Shi’ites. It wanted to crush Sunni takfiri (apostates), and jihadists, like ISIS. It has done that. Win, win, win, and another win for Iran. Unsurprisingly, Tehran benefited not because it is some genius actor in Iraq but because it had a massive pool of recruits and sympathizers, and people that needed its largesse. When ISIS came knocking in 2014, it’s no surprise that Soleimani of the IRGC’s Quds Force was looked on as a savior by some in the Shi’ite sectarian militias. Iran also benefited from how the US tends to treat its friends in the Middle East. Because the US, through men like James Jeffrey at the State Department, view relationships with people in Iraq and Syria as “temporary, transactional and tactical, » the US doesn’t cultivate long-term friends. It uses locals and then discards them, thinking that this short-term planning will work. Iran played the long game, the one where you start in 1981 and you work your way to get to 2019. “The CIA had tossed many of its longtime secret agents out on the street, leaving them jobless,” the Intercept notes. Whoops. One man said that he had worked for the US for 18 months and been paid $3,000 a month. That’s a large amount in Iraqi terms. Oddly, the agent’s fake name was “Donnie Brasco,” named after an FBI agent who infiltrated the mob. In this case he apparently infiltrated Al Qaeda. Once again though, the reports of the agents reveal things that make sense. Another man, who apparently worked for Iraqi military intelligence, went to meet his Iranian “brothers” to tell them some details. His commander was happy, noting they are all fighting ISIS together. This wasn’t exactly clandestine. “All of the Iraqi army’s intelligence, consider it yours,” they told Tehran. To track the American efforts, the Iranians not only infiltrated Sunni Arab parties and offices in Baghdad, they also followed US movements. They were concerned that Washington would work with Sunnis as it had in the past. THE REAL coup for Iran was penetration of government institutions at all levels. In one discussion, in late 2014 or early 2015, the Iranians went down a list of Iraqi officials. At the Minister of Municipalities they didn’t need to worry: These were members of the Badr Organization, linked to the PMU and also to Amiri, allies of Iran. The Minister of Transport was close to Iran. Abdul-Mahdi was close to Iran. The foreign minister was close to Iran. The Minister of Health is from Maliki’s Dawa Party. He’s “loyal,” the note said. They were concerned about men close to Sadr, who now runs the largest party in Iraq. They preferred others. Iran had larger strategic considerations as well. It needed Iraqi airspace to supply the Syrian regime and also to get weapons to Hezbollah. Soleimani was sent to deal with the problem through the Ministry of Transport. It wasn’t even a discussion; the minister put a hand over his eyes to indicate that he would pretend not to see the flights. Soleimani kissed the man’s forehead. It was a tender moment. But Iran may have overstretched and been too arrogant. In 2015, an agent described the Sunnis in Iraq as “vagrants” and mocked their cities for having been destroyed by ISIS. They had little future. The Iranians would also outplay the Kurds in 2017 and use the Americans to help punish the Kurdish region. By 2018 they were supremely confident, but protests against Iran and its allied militias were beginning. Now those protests have grown. Soleimani went to Baghdad in October to help suppress them. 350 Iraqis have been gunned down by snipers, many allegedly backed by Iran. But it could backfire. Indeed, agents reported back to Iran that Soleimani’s star was fading. He was posting too much on social media. Iraqis, angry at Shia militia abuses were saying they would turn to America and “even Israel” to enter Iraq and save it from Iran. There, the seeds were sown in 2015 for the mass protests that have come in 2019. Iraq’s future is still unclear. But what is clear is that Iran sought total domination of Iraq. It grew arrogant through the open channels of support it had, often due to the legacy of the 1980s war. But a new generation was rising and they only knew Iran as the power in charge: not the liberator, not the underdog. For them, Soleimani, Amiri, Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, Qais Khazali, Abadi, Maliki and so many others were not young men fighting the power of America and Saddam, but the big men running things. Iran now has to control Iraq, not be the one choosing the time and place of its battles. And Iraq is not easy to control. Seth J. Frantzman
A l’inverse, la situation de l’Iran se dégrade aussi concernant certains paramètres : il disposera de moins en moins de fonds pour payer l’entretien de ses milices (évaluées à 200.000 combattants au total) et la fourniture de services aux populations locales où elles sont cantonnées tant que des sanctions économiques américaines perdureront ; des mouvement de masse puissants et durables se sont développés au Liban et en Irak pour protester contre la présence de ses milices supplétives et son emprise sur les états nationaux, ce qui multiplie les aléas qui pèsent sur sa stratégie expansionniste et en augmentent le coût ; la dégradation de la situation économique de Téhéran ne peut pas manquer d’accroître l’instabilité intérieure du régime, ce qui devrait aussi modérer ses avancées régionales. Que veut exactement l’Iran ? Comme « partisan d’Ali » Khomeiny a donné à sa révolution la mission de rétablir l’essence divine de la succession du Prophète, c’est-à-dire d’amener les musulmans à rallier la vraie foi et d’écarter du pouvoir islamique suprême quiconque ne peut faire valoir un lien de filiation avec lui. Le rêve du régime est de chasser du Moyen-Orient le grand Satan américain pour agir sans entraves, de détruire le petit Satan israélien pour se poser en libérateur, et de retirer à la famille Saoud, dépourvue de tout lien familial avec Mohamed, la fonction de gardien des deux villes saintes de l’Islam, La Mecque et Médine. Il pourrait sur la base de ces victoires devenir le phare des musulmans et leur rendre leur foi épurée des 15 derniers siècles d’errements. C’est en cela qu’il s’agit d’un régime d’essence révolutionnaire et que tout ses actes doivent être rapportés à cette grille de lecture. Enfin, depuis plusieurs décennies, les Khomeynistes rêvent de sanctuariser leur pré carré et s’ouvrir des opportunités de conquête en développant un armement nucléaire et balistique moderne. Au-delà de ces rêves entretenus avec persévérance depuis 40 ans, les ayatollahs sont pragmatiques et opportunistes en même temps. Ils poursuivent aujourd’hui des objectifs d’étape très concrets. La destruction d’Israël n’est pas leur première urgence. Ils la voient comme le couronnement de leur emprise sur le Moyen-Orient dans un processus progressif d’isolement, de harcèlement et d’étranglement, car leur doctrine opérationnelle leur commande de masquer leurs coups et d’agir par procuration. Ils s’attachent actuellement à multiplier les sites d’origine de leurs possibles attaques, et à disperser des cibles toujours plus nombreuses pour compliquer la défense d’Israël. Mais pour sécuriser leur implantations en Irak et en Syrie exposées aux frappes israéliennes, ils pourraient lancer à n’importe quel moment des attaques à l’intérieur de l’État hébreu sur le modèle de celle qui a ébranlé l’Arabie saoudite le 14 septembre, ou sur une mode nouveau, moins prévisible. On peut anticiper leur agenda : le raid écrasant qu’ils ont mené le 14 septembre sur les champs pétroliers du cœur de l’Arabie avait sans doute pour objectif premier l’abandon par Riyad de son intervention au Yémen. D’ailleurs, après les Émirats arabes unis, ils semble que ce pays ait baissé les bras et soit en train de négocier sa sortie du théâtre yéménite d’importance majeure pour son avenir. Dans cette affaire, l’Iran trouve l’avantage de consolider le règne de son obligé Houthi qui lui offre des positions rêvées à l’entrée du détroit stratégique de Bab el-Mandel. Le second objectif, c’est d’obtenir un gel progressif des sanctions américaines en cours. Christopher Ford déclarait lors de la conférence de Tel Aviv évoquée plus haut que les États-Unis avaient proposé à l’Iran une offre de négociation comprenant : « l’allègement de toutes les sanctions[…] le rétablissement des relations diplomatiques et des relations de coopération semblables à celles avec les États normaux[…] Vous devez vous comporter comme un État normal, mais j’espère que l’Iran fera ce choix[à son tour]. » Les ayatollahs attendent sans doute pour acquiescer d’avoir la garantie, façon Obama, qu’un nouvel accord scellera la réconciliation sans vraiment brider la poursuite de leur programme nucléaire et balistique. L’Iran poursuivra naturellement l’édification du « cercle de feu » autour d’Israël en stabilisant les groupes armés supplétifs déjà déployés, en les équipant d’armes toujours plus avancées, en améliorant leur coordination et leur capacité de manœuvre. De ce point de vue, la Jordanie est dans l’œil du cyclone car elle dispose de longues frontières avec l’Irak et aussi avec Israël. On peut s’attendre à des opérations de subversion téléguidées depuis Téhéran pour contraindre ce royaume sunnite à intégrer « l’axe chiite ». Enfin, la campagne électorale américaine s’achèvera le 03 novembre 2020, dans un peu moins d’une année. Comme l’a bien précisé Christopher Ford, l’Iran aura dans cette période une totale liberté d’action y compris concernant la conduite de son programme nucléaire. Les ayatollahs pourraient parfaitement saisir cette fenêtre inespérée pour se projeter dans le « saut nucléaire », la construction de la bombe, qui nécessiterait théoriquement un an mais en réalité, chacun le sait, seulement quelques mois. Quelle stratégie pour Israël ? Dans un affrontement sur un théâtre stratégique aussi vaste, élargi encore de milliers de kilomètres par la portée nouvelle des missiles, l’un des impératifs est d’identifier les alliances possibles. Les premiers alliés potentiels d’Israël face à l’Iran devraient être les pays européens, pas par excès de sympathie pour l’État juif, mais parce qu’ils partagent avec lui d’importants intérêts communs. L’Europe est à portée des missiles intercontinentaux de l’Iran et elle sait que ces missiles risquent d’être bientôt garnis d’ogives nucléaires. Elle sait aussi avec quelle brutalité les ayatollahs poussent leurs pions. Les 58 soldats du poste Drakkar tués en 1983, les attentats de Paris de 1985/86 et les prises d’otage du Liban, l’attentat déjoué de Villepinte en 2018, sont dans les mémoires. Elle sait que l’Iran est en train de s’approcher de la Méditerranée, leurs arrière-cour en quelque sorte. Enfin, elle sait enfin qu’étant déployés dans le Golfe persique et aux abords de Bab el-Mandel, les Iraniens tiennent des routes maritimes stratégiques du sud qu’ils peuvent assaisonner à leur gré, provoquant s’il le faut un séisme dans l’économie mondiale dont l’Europe serait la première victime. Israël doit rechercher et nourrir cette alliance dans un esprit créatif. Par ailleurs, Israël doit se préparer à l’éventualité d’attaques massives par des vagues de missiles. On estime que le Hezbollah dispose au Liban de 130 à 150.000 missiles qui pour une part disposent d’un guidage de précision. En cas de guerre totale, le groupe terroriste, qui est en fait une armée, pourrait lancer 1.000 missiles par jour. Il est impossible d’interrompre ce genre d’offensive par des dispositifs antimissiles (qui seraient saturés) ni par l’aviation qui n’est pas configurée pour frapper une quantité indéterminée de micro cibles. La seule solution serait le déploiement immédiat de troupes au sol pour occuper au plus vite le terrain. Cela suppose un changement radical de doctrine militaire. Depuis 1982 la doctrine d’Israël est résumée en une formule, « Intel/Firepower », soit renseignement et frappes puissantes sur les cibles. Cette option permet d’économiser les déploiements au sol, donc la vie des soldats. Mais l’ennemi s’est adapté. Il sait disperser les cibles, il sait déployer de pseudo-cibles, il sait enterrer ses hommes et ses armes. D’où un rendement décroissant du couple Intel/Firepower. L’alternative est le retour à la doctrine antérieure des « résultats décisifs », c’est-à-dire combattre au sol sur le territoire de l’ennemi pour mettre un terme effectif à sa capacité de nuisance. La victoire dans la seconde Intifada est intervenue en avril 2002 avec l’opération « Rempart », quand après des centaines de victimes on a enfin consenti à envoyer les soldats dans les grandes villes palestiniennes d’où partaient les commandos jihadistes. La construction d’une armée conventionnelle capable d’exceller dans les manœuvres au sol est une option complexe qui prend du temps. L’état-major israélien en est parfaitement conscient. Le troisième aspect de la stratégie d’Israël est la défense contre les missiles de croisière et les drones d’attaque si difficiles à détecter. Si les satellites américains et saoudiens et les dispositifs au sol ont été incapables de détecter les deux essaims de missiles et de drones d’attaque iraniens qui approchaient de leurs cibles en volant près du sol, c’est en partie parce que la zone à couvrir était immense. La surface de l’Arabie saoudite est du même ordre que celle de l’Europe entière. De ce point de vue, Israël a deux avantages. D’un coté, il n’est pas soumis à l’effet de surprise puisque le raid en Arabie est antérieur et qu’il a été dument analysé. De l’autre, vu l’exigüité la zone à couvrir, la couverture actuelle est presque suffisante et il existe des radars Doppler bon marché, de conception israélienne, qui peuvent couvrir l’espace éventuel entre l’horizon de détectabilité des dispositifs actuels et le sol. Enfin, last but not least, quelle réponse apporter à un Iran qui aurait entrepris le « saut nucléaire », une hypothèse bien plausible, on l’a vu. L’état-major israélien connait ses propres moyens et les difficultés d’une telle entreprise. A trois reprises, de 2010 à 2012, Bibi Netanyahou et Ehoud Barak auraient commandé à l’armée des raids de destruction des installations du programme nucléaire des ayatollahs que les responsables de la défense Meir Dagan et Gabi Askhenazi en 2010, puis Benny Gantz en 2011, ont refusé d’exécuter. La troisième tentative en 2012 a avorté suite à un différend sur le calendrier entre Netanyahou et Barak. En 2019, l’opération est beaucoup plus compliquée car l’Iran s’est doté, 10 ans après, de moyens de défense et de riposte nouveaux. L’affaire est aujourd’hui entre les mains des hiérarchies politiques et militaires du pays. Ce qui est sûr c’est qu’il y a plusieurs façons de poser le problème iranien en général. A demi-mots Yaakov Amidror suggère une critique de la politique suivie dans la dernière décennie : une stratégie « prudente », donc perdante, a laissé le Hezbollah accumuler un arsenal offensif monstrueux sur la gorge de l’état juif. Ensuite, avec la guerre de Syrie, une « stratégie agressive », donc gagnante, a permis de freiner les transferts d’armes vers le nord, la diffusion des systèmes de guidage de précision des missiles et l’installation de bases militaires. Que nous suggère Yaakov Amidror ? « L’Iran s’est rendu compte qu’Israël a réussi en Syrie [à démanteler une machine de guerre], alors il a commencé à construire une branche de sa machine de guerre indépendante en Irak…. Pour l’Iran, l’idée est d’avoir une capacité militaire proche d’Israël, tout en restant à distance. Une question intéressante est de savoir quelle devrait être la réaction d’Israël dans une telle situation. Nous savons que la tête du serpent est en Iran. Israël va-t-il poursuivre des cibles en Syrie, en Irak, au Liban ou au Yémen ? Ou irons-nous directement à la tête du serpent ? » Jean-Pierre Bensimon
Cherchez l’erreur !
Alors qu’après les Libanais et les Irakiens, le peuple iranien lui-même se soulève contre 40 ans d’oppression de la part du principal Etat terroriste de la planète …
Et que dans l’indifférence générale à Hong Kong, nos amis chinois préparent tranquillement leur nouveau Tiananmen
Devinez entre le soporifique procès de Moscou du président Trump à la Chambre des repésentants américaine et l’infamante étoilejaunisation européenne des seuls produits israéliens
Quel camp la France et l’Europe ainsi que leurs laquais des médias ont à nouveau choisi ?

Iran : un soulèvement national (J+4)
Iran Resist
19.11.2019

Les Iraniens sont dans les rues et manifestent contre le régime. Récemment, les mollahs ont perdu tous leurs alliés en raison de leurs tentatives de déstabilisation du Moyen-Orient et leur volonté permanente d’agiter les marchés pétroliers pour forcer leurs adversaires à capituler. Manquant de tout notamment de carburant pour produire de l’électricité nécessaire à leur régime et leur sécurité, ils ont repris le projet de paupérisation du peuple pour préserver les stocks existants de vivres et de carburant en augmentant par surprise le vendredi 15 novembre 2019 le prix du carburant de 300%.
Les Iraniens dépités par cette décision inhumaine qui allait aggraver leur misère sont descendus dans la rue en attaquant les sièges de la milice du régime avec la ferme intention de mettre fin au pouvoir des mollahs et leurs associés.
Le prince Reza Pahlavi qui est très aimé en Iran a apporté son soutien à ce mouvement et a appelé les forces de l’ordre à en faire autant. Sa mère, la reine Farah Pahlavi, encore plus populaire, en raison de la gigantesque popularité de son mari (le Shah d’Iran) et de son père, Reza Shah Reza Shah, depuis plusieurs années et aussi en raison des épreuves familiales qu’elle a endurées, a aussi apporté son soutien au peuple. Trump a aussi apporté son soutien au peuple, mais en revanche hélas pas les Européens.
Cependant, les miliciens de base du régime se sont gardés de le défendre. Grâce à leur passivité bienveillante, il y a désormais des manifestations hostiles au régime dans tout le pays. Les rares miliciens fidèles au régime sont débordés. La chute du régime est vue comme possible à court terme.
Le régime a coupé l’internet pour limiter le transfert des informations via les réseaux sociaux, mais les Iraniens se débrouillent et ont envoyé quelques vidéos pour montrer qu’ils comptaient continuer jusqu’à la chute du régime.
Les rares miliciens restés fidèles au régime ne parviennent pas à contenir les manifestants. Le régime désespéré par le manque de sa capacité à réprimer les Iraniens leur envoie des SMS pour les avertir qu’ils pourraient les arrêter.
Chers lecteurs français. Nous avons besoin de vous. Vos dirigeants ainsi que leurs collègues européens ne font rien pour aider la chute des mollahs. Nous comptons sur vous pour mettre fin à leur passivité car en dehors des considérations humanistes, la chute des mollahs, patrons du terrorisme islamique et de la propagande intégriste, permettra de sauver votre pays et de nombreux pays d’Afrique du Nord et du Moyen-Orient que vous aimez.
Voir aussi:

Iran’s Islamic Regime Fires Upon Unarmed Protestors Against the Regime

The world is witnessing the biggest revolt against the Iranian regime since the Islamic revolution back in 1979. One can say that the economic sanctions are working. Iranians are protesting the horrific economic situation of the country. Ironically enough, the world is not really able to witness everything that is going on because the Islamic regime of Iran has shut down all internet access for the country. Iranians are outraged that they are suffering tremendously economically while the Shiite Islamic Republic of Iran invests billions of dollars in military programs to take over the Middle East. Iran spends money on developing nuclear weapons, it supports their proxy Shiite forces to destroy Israel, including Hizbullah in Lebanon as well as the Islamic Jihad and Hamas in Gaza, as well as supports the Houthis in Yemen, to pose a threat to Sunni Yemen and Saudi Arabia. Most Iranians do not support the Islamic regime. They want to live normal lives and they are against the fanatical Islamic agenda of their Shiite leaders.
Ironically, while today Iran is Israel’s biggest enemy, Iran used to be Israel’s biggest ally in the Middle East to counter their joint enemy, the Sunni Muslim states. Today, it is the Sunni Muslim states, like Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Jordan etc. that are reaching out to Israel for help to stop the Islamic regime of Iran! Israel has always said that Iranians are not the enemy, just the fanatical Shiite Muslim regime that leads Iran. They are the enemy.
Reports are also coming in that Lebanese and Iraqis are also protesting against the Islamic Regime of Iran right now. Both Lebanon and Iraq are basically Iranian proxy countries, a dangerous development that was allowed during the Obama regime, since former President Obama preferred partnering with Shiite Iran over the Sunni countries.
Why no international outrage?
Where is the United Nations and all the Western nations of the world decrying Iran for shooting innocent, unarmed protestors? There is total silence regarding this massive human rights abuse.
If Israel would as much as harm an Arab, even if he is a terrorist, then the world goes wild with UN resolutions against Israel. Just now, the UN passed 8 resolutions against Israel, following Israel’s killing 25 Islamic Jihad terrorists, and defending itself from more than 450 rocket attacks on its civilian population. Yet, the UN is silent about Iran murdering its own peaceful protestors in the street!
It is clear that the world has one standard for Israel and another standard for the rest of the world.
Voir encore:

Is Iran losing the Middle East?

Hezbollah is certainly the Islamic Republic of Iran’s most successful export.

Could uprisings in Iraq and Lebanon, coupled with US sanctions, permanently impair Iran’s influence in the region?
In the past few weeks, frustrated and fed-up demonstrators have taken to the streets of Lebanon and Iraq to voice grievances against their governments. The perception of Iranian infiltration and influence certainly continues to impact this political shake-up in both regions.

These protests have toppled two governments in just three days. Saad Hariri, Lebanon’s prime minister, announced his resignation last week. Iraq’s President Barham Salih stated that Prime Minister Adil Abdul-Mahdi had also agreed to resign from office once a successor is decided upon.

In both Iraq and Lebanon, political factions are divided by religions and sects. These government systems are designed to limit sectarian conflicts by ensuring a sharing of power to different communities. However, in both regions, prominent Shia parties are conjoined with Iran. Since protesters are demanding an end to their government’s power-sharing system, Tehran is in trouble.
Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei announced via Twitter on Thursday that, “The people [protesters] have justifiable demands, but they should know their demands can only be fulfilled within the legal structure and framework of their country. When the legal structure is disrupted in a country, no action can be carried out.”

This statement, riddled with irony, completely discounts the revolution which birthed the government Khamenei currently leads. The ayatollah also verified how deeply entrenched Hezbollah has become in Lebanon’s political makeup.

Hezbollah is certainly the Islamic Republic of Iran’s most successful export. For over two decades, Tehran has played the role of puppet-master in Beirut, attempting to counter the influence of its enemies: the US, Israel and Saudi Arabia. Hezbollah’s critical influence in the region was demonstrated during the 2006 war with Israel and with the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps’ (IRGC) intervention in the Syrian conflict.

Although Hezbollah’s military wing was rightfully designated as a terrorist organization in April by US President Donald Trump, the organization’s military and political wings work in tandem to export the regime’s disturbing agenda. In 2017, the US State Department identified more than 250 operatives and 150 companies with Hezbollah ties. Last year, the details of Project Cassandra exposed the sophistication and breadth of Hezbollah’s billion-dollar criminal enterprise.

Since Tehran heavily invests in Hezbollah’s role globally, these protests do not bode well for the regime. Iranian leadership clearly grasps the magnitude of these demonstrations since its officials have attempted to paint them as manifestations of foreign meddling. Khamenei has accused “US and Western intelligence services, with the financial backing of evil countries,” of orchestrating these protests.

In Iraq, anti-Iran sentiment has monopolized the demonstrations. Last week in Baghdad, protesters were pictured torching an Iranian flag. On Sunday, they threw gasoline bombs at the Iranian Consulate in the country’s capital of Karbala. The former head of the Iraqi National Archives explained that, “the revolution is not anti-American, it is anti-Iran; it is anti-religion – anti-political religion, not religion as such.” Pro-Iranian paramilitary forces have violently intervened in recent demonstrations. Since October 1, the Iraqi High Commission for Human Rights reports that 301 protesters have been killed, and thousands more injured.

As Tehran continues to dismiss these protests as inauthentic and foreign-led, demonstrators will only gain more momentum. While Iran grapples with the economic consequences of Trump’s maximum-pressure campaign, it may not be able to survive the coupled onslaught of these protests.

The writer is a master’s candidate in counter-terrorism and homeland security at IDC Herzliya’s Lauder School of Government. She is also associate producer and analyst at the Center for Security Policy in Washington.

Voir par ailleurs:
Communiqués de presse
|

#Crif – Communiqué de presse : Halte à la discrimination d’Israël

CRIF

29 Novembre 2016

Le Crif condamne avec la plus grande fermeté la décision du gouvernement français.

Le Crif rappelle que l’obsession anti-israélienne contribue à l’importation du conflit en France et attise la haine

Le Crif condamne avec la plus grande fermeté la décision du gouvernement français de rendre obligatoire le double étiquetage des produits en provenance d’Israël.
Demander aux distributeurs d’ajouter « colonie israélienne » sur les produits en provenance « de Cisjordanie, de Jérusalem-Est et du Golan » relève d’un traitement discriminatoire appliqué au seul État d’Israël alors que de nombreux autres pays sont concernés par des conflits territoriaux similaires.
Au moment où la paix dans la région est un enjeu essentiel, cette décision qui vise à isoler Israël ne répond pas à l’impartialité nécessaire pour prétendre jouer un rôle constructif et aura pour conséquence certaine le ralentissement des initiatives économiques dans ces territoires et un appauvrissement des Palestiniens qui travaillent dans ces entreprises.
Le Crif rappelle que l’obsession anti-israélienne contribue à l’importation du conflit en France et attise la haine.
Pour Francis Kalifat, Président du Crif, cette décision discriminatoire ne va pas dans le sens de l’apaisement et renforce le mouvement illégal BDS qui déverse sa haine et sa détestation d’Israël, appelant au mépris de la loi, au boycott et à la dé légitimation du seul état du peuple juif, pratiquant ainsi un antisionisme obsessionnel qui véhicule la forme moderne de l’antisémitisme.

La justice européenne impose l’étiquetage des produits fabriqués dans les colonies israéliennes

La haute juridiction avait été saisie en juillet 2018 par des viticulteurs de Psagot (Cisjordanie), qui contestaient un texte réglementaire français.

Cyrille Louis

C’est la fin d’une ambiguïté. Dans un arrêt rendu mardi à Luxembourg, la Cour de justice de l’Union européenne (CJUE) a tranché que les denrées alimentaires produites dans les colonies israéliennes de Cisjordanie et commercialisées sur le continent devront à l’avenir porter la mention explicite de leur origine. Cette décision est applicable non seulement en France, où le ministère des Finances avait pris les devants en réclamant un tel étiquetage dès novembre 2016, mais aussi dans les nombreux pays européens qui hésitaient jusqu’à présent à le mettre en œuvre.

Le ministre israélien des Affaires étrangères, Israël Katz, a aussitôt dénoncé un arrêt «inacceptable à la fois moralement et en principe». «J’ai l’intention de travailler avec les ministres des Affaires étrangères européens afin d’empêcher la mise en œuvre de cette politique profondément erronée», a-t-il ajouté. Saeb Erekat, le négociateur en chef de l’Organisation de libération de la Palestine, s’est au contraire réjoui. «Nous appelons tous les pays européens à mettre en oeuvre cette obligation légale et politique», a-t-il déclaré, ajoutant : «Nous ne voulons pas seulement que ces produits soient uniquement identifiés comme provenant de colonies illégales, mais souhaitons qu’ils soient bannis des marchés internationaux».

Une décision saluée par les autorités palestiniennes

Plus de 400.000 Israéliens vivent dans la centaine de colonies de peuplement aménagées après la conquête de la Cisjordanie lors de la guerre des Six-Jours, en juin 1967. La communauté internationale considère, dans sa grande majorité, que l’occupation de ce territoire est illégale (ce que l’Etat hébreu conteste) et appelle à y créer un Etat palestinien, dans un cadré négocié. En l’absence de processus de paix, les ministres européens des Affaires étrangères sont tombés d’accord en 2011 pour promouvoir une politique de «différenciation» entre les denrées fabriquées dans les frontières d’Israël et celles qui sont produites en Cisjordanie occupée. En novembre 2015, la Commission européenne a fait un pas de plus en demandant aux Etats membres d’identifier celles-ci par un étiquetage explicite. Initiative aussitôt condamnée par les autorités israéliennes.

Rejetant le principe même d’une telle différenciation, les viticulteurs de Psagot, une colonie édifiée en lisière de Ramallah, croyaient sans doute frapper un coup de maître lorsqu’ils saisirent la CJUE en juillet 2018. Objet de leur démarche : faire annuler le texte réglementaire par lequel la France a réclamé en novembre 2016 l’étiquetage des produits fabriqués dans les colonies. A court terme, l’initiative permet de geler son application. Mais elle va vite se retourner contre eux. En juin 2019, l’avocat général de la Cour, Gérard Hogan, prend fait et cause pour l’étiquetage. « De même que de nombreux consommateurs européens étaient opposés à l’achat de produits sud-africains à l’époque de l’apartheid avant 1994, écrit-il, les consommateurs d’aujourd’hui peuvent, pour des motifs similaires, s’opposer à l’achat de produits en provenance d’un pays donné ».

Dans son arrêt rendu mardi, la CJUE estime que les denrées alimentaires produites dans des territoires occupés par l’Etat d’Israël devront dorénavant « porter la mention de leur territoire d’origine, accompagnée, lorsque ces denrées proviennent d’une colonie israélienne à l’intérieur de ce territoire, de la mention de cette provenance ». Il s’agit, précise la Cour, d’éviter toute ambiguïté susceptible d’«induire les consommateurs en erreur». «L’information doit permettre à ces derniers de se décider en toute connaissance de cause et dans le respect non seulement de considérations sanitaires, économiques, écologiques ou sociales, mais également d’ordre éthique ou ayant trait au respect du droit international».

En saisissant une juridiction européenne qui s’était jusqu’à présent tenue à l’écart du dossier, les colons israéliens ont en quelque sorte marqué un but contre leur camp. Sa décision a en effet vocation à s’appliquer dans tous les Etats membres. Francis Kalifat, président du Conseil représentatif des institutions juives de France, qui s’était associé à la démarche des viticulteurs de Psagot, a exprimé mardi sa «grande déception». «Imposer l’étiquetage de produits israéliens alors qu’on ne le fait pas pour des denrées fabriquées au Tibet, à Chypre-Nord ou en Crimée, cela s’appelle de la discrimination, estime-t-il. Ce type de décision est de nature à encourager ceux qui appellent au boycott pur et simple d’Israël, et à conforter leur obsession antisioniste».

Voir enfin:

Qui attaquera qui ? L’Iran et le destin d’Israël, Jean-Pierre Bensimon

Publié le 15 novembre 2019 par danilette’s

Il faut lire cet analyse magistrale, très documentée
de Jean-Pierre Bensimon !

L’éventualité d’une attaque iranienne imminente est la question que se posent avec plus d’acuité que jamais les responsables politiques et militaires israéliens. Dans les derniers mois le paysage stratégique a changé radicalement. A l’occasion de l’installation de la 22ème Knesset le 3 octobre dernier, Netanyahou soulignait : « Nous sommes confrontés à un énorme défi sécuritaire, qui en fait s’intensifie de semaine en semaine. ». Le chef d’état major Aviv Kochavi confirmait cette évolution le 24 octobre : « Sur les fronts Nord et Sud, la situation est fragile et tendue et pourrait dégénérer en confrontation »[1] Son directeur des opérations, le général Aaron Haliva, précisa « Il y a des menaces qui pèsent sur notre Est, notre Nord et notre Sud… L’année prochaine ne sera pas favorable à la sécurité d’Israël… il y a des forces iraniennes sur le plateau du Golan, ce n’est pas de l’alarmisme, ils sont là. »[2] Dans le même temps, Yaakov Amidror, l’un des experts les plus remarquables du pays, observait que l’Iran veut construire autour de l état juif un « cercle de feu ».[3] De leur coté les Iraniens multiplient les variations autour de leur promesse éradicatrice. Pour Hossein Salami, le chef des Gardes de la révolution, « le sinistre régime doit être rayé de la surface de la terre, et ce n’est plus un rêve lointain, ….mais un but atteignable. »[4]. Deux jours plus tôt son adjoint chargé des opérations, Abbas Nilforoushan, se vantait dans le même esprit : « l’Iran a encerclé Israël de quatre cotés. Il ne restera rien d’Israël. »[5]

Les données de l’affrontement israélo-iranien avant l’été 2019

En fait si le tableau de l’affrontement s’est radicalement modifié à l’été 2019, on doit rappeler les données de la situation antérieure pour comprendre ce qui est en train de se passer.

A la suite de l’accord nucléaire de Vienne de juillet 2015, l’Iran a bénéficié d’un redressement spectaculaire de ses finances. Outre 100 milliards de dollars restitués en cash et 15 milliards offerts en récompense de son consentement à négocier, Téhéran recevait une pléthore d’investissements en provenance d’Europe, de Chine, de Russie, etc. Fort de ses victoires diplomatiques et financières, profitant de la faiblesse de ses partenaires occidentaux et d’abord du calcul de Barack Obama qui voulait en fait lui remettre les clés de la région, l’avenir s’éclairait pour le régime des ayatollahs. Allait-il penser à l’existence quotidienne de son peuple ou à la modernisation de sa société ? Il fallait un certain penchant pour l’élucubration, souvent présente chez l’occidental post-moderne et universaliste, pour le croire. L’Autre ne voit pas ce que vous imaginez qu’il voit, quand vous portez vos lunettes noires. Le régime iranien avait fait dès sa naissance le choix idéologique de servir le triomphe planétaire de l’islam. « l’Armée de la République islamique d’Iran et le Corps des Gardes de la Révolution islamique … seront responsables, non seulement de la garde et de la préservation des frontières du pays, mais aussi de l’exécution de la mission idéologique du jihad sur la voie de Dieu, c’est-à-dire de l’expansion de la souveraineté de la Loi de Dieu à travers le monde… » [6]

Concrètement, l’Iran se fixait en juillet 2015 le double objectif de précipiter son effort nucléaire et redoubler ses menées expansionnistes dans la région. Concernant l’armement nucléaire, il se focalisait sur les technologies et les moyens qui lui manquaient encore : l’usinage de la bombe, sa miniaturisation[7] et un système de missiles balistiques intercontinentaux. Concernant la région, il allait déclencher des guerres pour investir en profondeur de nouveaux espaces, la Syrie, l’Irak et le Yémen. Ainsi, le parlementaire Ali Reza Zakani  ou l’ayatollah Ali Yunesi, conseiller de Rohani, se vanteront dès 2015 de contrôler Beyrouth, Damas, Bagdad, et Sanaa.

Les tactiques de guerre de l’Iran sont originales à cette échelle. Elles consistent grossièrement à créer ou à contrôler des groupes, partis, milices, tribus, clans, qui feront la guerre pour son compte par procuration, sur le modèle du Hezbollah iranien, du Djihad islamique palestinien ou des Houthi yéménites. C’est ce qui permet aux ayatollahs de ne pas s’afficher en première ligne dans les campagnes ordonnées aux supplétifs, ni d’endosser les horreurs qu’ils commettent. En même temps, ils économisent hommes et finances dans ces conflits relativement peu coûteux. Dans cette logique, l’Iran n’hésite pas à transférer massivement les armes et les technologies les plus avancées à ses milices. Par exemple, après avoir abondamment doté en missiles le Hezbollah, il lui apporte aujourd’hui le savoir-faire et les équipements pour ajouter sur place des systèmes de guidage de précision sur les engins de son arsenal, ce qui en multiplie la dangerosité.

Aujourd’hui les Occidentaux sont alarmés par une disposition de l’accord de Vienne qui limite à cinq ans l’embargo sur les livraisons d’armes avancées à l’Iran. La Chine et la Russie auront à ce terme le feu vert pour livrer des engins avancés comme les missiles de croisière et les technologies connexes à Téhéran, lequel s’empressera de les confier à ses « proxies ». Bian Hook, le représentant spécial des États-Unis pour l’Iran, a mis en garde la commission des affaires étrangères du Sénat à ce sujet : « Depuis 2017, l’Iran a élargi ses activités en matière de missiles balistiques à ses partenaires dans toute la région. »[8] L’embargo devra être levé le 18 octobre 2020, et ni la Chine, ni la Russie, qui ont droit de veto à l’ONU ne semblent disposés à le proroger. Les armes concernées peuvent frapper Israël, mais l’Europe tout aussi bien.

Ainsi, les guerres de l’Iran par supplétifs interposés, en marge du droit et des conventions internationales, qu’on les appelle asymétriques ou terroristes, lui permettent de réaliser la fusion inouïe, entre le rôle de mentor d’une politique révolutionnaire et celui de membre de la communauté internationale, entre le statut de seigneur de la subversion et celui de zélateur de l’ordre international.[9]

La stratégie israélienne de guerre entre deux guerres

de son coté, Israël ne peut pas accepter trois implications de la poussée des fous de Dieu chiites après 2015 :

  1. a) que l’Iran devienne nucléaire. En effet la bombe atomique peut infliger des dommages immenses à un pays  exigu, où les populations et les infrastructures sont aussi concentrées. Sans même l’utiliser directement, elle constituerait un moyen de chantage imparable rendant vite la vie impossible dans l’état juif. Et même, strictement cantonnée à la défense d’un Iran mythique qui serait prudent et rationnel, son déploiement se terminerait inéluctablement en apocalypse comme l’a démontré avec finesse Steven R. Davis ;[10]
  2. b) que se forme à sa frontière Nord avec la Syrie et au-delà en Irak, un second front sur le modèle de celui du Liban-sud, avec le déploiement de milices pro-iraniennes à sa frontière et de missiles à moyenne distance ;
  3. c) que des arsenaux de missiles dotés d’un guidage de précision soient déployés à portée de son « interland » mettent ses populations, ses villes, et ses infrastructures à la merci des supplétifs du Guide suprême iranien.

C’est ainsi que les stratèges de Jérusalem ont inventé et appliqué le concept de « guerre entre deux guerres »[11], c’est-à-dire d’opérations ponctuelles interdisant à proximité des frontières, le déploiement de troupes ou d’infrastructures ennemies et les transports d’armes conventionnelles et de systèmes de guidage « game changers », c’est-à-dire susceptibles de bouleverser l’équilibre des forces militaires. Les opérations sont parfois militaires mais elles peuvent aussi bien consister en cyber-attaques, en guerre psychologique, économique et même diplomatique. Pour rester « entre deux guerres » ces initiatives ne doivent pas déboucher sur une guerre générale et elles sont soigneusement sélectionnées pour obéir à cette condition. Mais la non-guerre n’est pas la paix ; c’est le moment « gris » où l’on agit ponctuellement pour ne pas aborder la guerre suivante dans des conditions défavorables. Ainsi, selon des rapports étrangers, on ne compte pas moins de 300 cibles frappées par Israël en Syrie seulement. D’autres rapports évoquent une activité encore plus importante. Yaakov Amidror, cité plus haut, se félicite des résultats de cette stratégie « agressive » mais regrette à demi-mots la stratégie antérieure de « prudence » qui a laissé le Hezbollah accumuler de 130 à 150.000 missiles au Liban sud.[12] Cependant il semble bien que depuis que l’Iran a fait savoir qu’il riposterait aux attaques sur ses forces ou ses installations, Israël fasse preuve d’une retenue inhabituelle. Selon certains observateurs, trop de choses ont changé, la guerre entre deux guerre est un concept désormais caduc.[13] Pour eux, il faut revoir d’urgence la doctrine stratégique du pays et l’ajuster à la situation nouvelle.

Les grands changements de l’été 2019

Dès le mois de juin, l’Iran est passé à l’offensive, bouleversant la politique américaine au point que Donald Trump est passé de la position de celui qui impose des négociations à l’Iran à celui qui les quémande. Abandonnant du même coup ses alliés traditionnels, il a perdu toute fiabilité à leurs yeux. Cela les a incités à rechercher des relations directes avec l’Iran pour obtenir des accommodements. De plus Téhéran a montré des capacités tactiques inattendues . Déjouant par un coup de maître stupéfiant tous les systèmes de détection américains et saoudiens il a paralysé en quelques minutes par des frappes ponctuelles, 50% du potentiel pétrolier de Riyad, sans faire de morts ni de blessés, sans même casser une vitre dans un bâtiment des environs.[14] Sa liberté d’action est désormais si totale qu’il n’hésite plus à se libérer ouvertement des contraintes de l’accord nucléaire.

Le naufrage de Donald Trump

Le 8 mais 2018 Donald Trump s’était retiré de l’accord iranien conformément à son engagement électoral de refuser le « pire des accords ». Il avait auparavant demandé à Téhéran, sans succès, une réouverture des négociations. Il voulait revenir sur le caractère temporaire des restrictions de la production iranienne de matière fissile (sunset clauses) et élargir la discussion aux missiles à longue portée et aux activités subversives des ayatollahs dans plusieurs pays du Moyen-Orient. Devant le refus persistant de ces derniers, il annonçait un retour progressif au régime des sanctions dans les 180 jours. Plusieurs trains de ces mesures ont fini par créer une situation où l’Iran, désertée par les multinationales qui développaient des projets sur son sol, était privé d’exportation de son pétrole, les pays étrangers acheteurs y compris la Chine risquant eux-mêmes des sanctions.

Ce régime de « pressions maximales » devait amener Téhéran à accepter d’entrer en négociation dans les termes voulus par Donald Trump. Mais l’Iran a tout de suite exigé le retrait préalable des sanctions avant d’envisager l’opportunité d’une négociation. La situation était bloquée et l’ardeur d’Emmanuel Macron et d’Angela Merkel qui ajoutaient une soulte de 15 milliards de $ pour complaire aux ayatollahs ne fit pas avancer les choses d’un pouce.

Au lieu de s’incliner, l’Iran choisit l’offensive. Une série d’opérations d’intimidation intervenaient à partir du mois de mai 2019, juste après l’expiration des autorisations provisoires d’achat de pétrole iranien accordées pour 6 mois à quelques pays. Très agressives, elles allaient du sabotage de pétroliers en mer, à la capture de cargos et de pétroliers, et aux frappes sur des terminaux en l’Arabie saoudite. Pour couronner le tout, un drone de surveillance Global Hawk aux couleurs américaines, particulièrement onéreux, était abattu le 20 juin 2019. L’Iran ne reconnait jamais qu’il est l’auteur ou l’inspirateur de ces opérations de guérilla étatique. Il oppose aux accusations un déni moqueur, y compris dans le cas du drone américain abattu, l’accusant d’avoir violé son espace aérien.

L’Iran a démontré à Trump qu’il pouvait paralyser les routes maritimes de la zone du Golfe, ouvrir divers fronts dans la région, et l’entrainer dans le bourbier d’une guerre asymétrique, le cauchemar absolu du Pentagone et du candidat à la réélection en 2020.

Résumons : Trump a cru qu’il pourrait faire plier l’Iran avec des sanctions économiques. L’Iran a répondu en menaçant de le contraindre à une guerre asymétrique globale par procuration qui lui coûterait sa réélection. Khamenei a ainsi triomphé de Trump par ippon.

S’ouvrait l’ère du recul. KO debout, Donald Trump a commencé par s’abstenir de répondre militairement aux perturbation des routes maritimes, aux sabotages, aux captures de pétroliers, à la destruction d’un drone d’observation aux couleurs de l’Amérique, à la frappe du 14 septembre au cœur du territoire de son allié saoudien. La première mesure administrative de cette marche arrière date du 1er août 2019. Ce jour-là le président américain renouvela les dérogations (waivers) autorisant certains pays à coopérer avec l’Iran dans le nucléaire civil, l’une des voies identifiées de la poursuite clandestine de son programme nucléaire militaire. Selon Michael Doran, l’un des experts américains les plus pointus, « Pour Khamenei, alors, les dérogations sont la pierre angulaire de l’accord nucléaire, la structure qui procure une couverture internationale pour le programme d’armes nucléaires de l’Iran. ”[15] C’est cette pierre angulaire que Trump n’a toujours pas osé renverser en révoquant les fameux « waivers » à l’échéance de la fin octobre, alors que les Iraniens s’autorisent officiellement une reprise des activités nucléaires interdites à Fordow et à Arak, deux infrastructures nucléaires majeures de leur programme d’armement.[16] En cohérence avec ce rétropédalage général, il avait déjà congédié le 10 septembre son conseiller à la sécurité nationale, John Bolton, un partisan d’une ligne de fermeté.[17]

Les « pressions maximales » ne sont désormais rien de plus qu’un slogan. Lors de la session de rentrée de l’Assemblée générale de l’Onu à Washington, Trump s’humiliait en quémandant un entretien téléphonique  à Hassan Rohani dans son hôtel, lequel ne daigna pas prendre l’appel.

Comment expliquer ce désastre historique ? On peut évoquer la campagne électorale en cours, Trump ayant promis à ses électeurs de retirer les États-Unis des guerres entamées par ses prédécesseurs et de ne pas en engager de nouvelles. Il y a aussi la perte de valeur relative de la région moyen-orientale pour des États-Unis désormais autosuffisants en pétrole. Il y a l’habile stratégie iranienne de refus du rapport des forces, de montée aux extrêmes, attitude totalement inimaginable pour un artiste du business. Il y a la nécessaire focalisation des moyens américains sur l’Asie où la Chine leur taille des croupières. Cependant, ces contraintes ne justifient nullement les choix hasardeux de l’actuel locataire de la Maison Blanche.

Fondamentalement, les failles de Trump ont été de deux ordres : l’ignorance de l’histoire, l’absence d’une vision d’un coté, des méthodes de travail qui confinent à la légèreté de l’autre. Sa conception du leadership se limite à l’art du deal, à gagner sur le tapis une série ininterrompue de conflits matériels. Elle néglige la vision de l’avenir et le poids des éléments immatériels. Le président ne saisit visiblement pas la force mentale des convictions partagées ni la puissance des postures comme le respect des engagements, la distinction entre amis et ennemis, la dissuasion à l’endroit de l’ennemi, la coïncidence entre les paroles et les actes, etc. En matière de prise de décision, ce qui frappe c’est son amateurisme : incapable d’envisager le second et le troisième coup qui suivent une décision, sa méconnaissance de l’histoire est flagrante comme son incapacité à stabiliser et à animer les travaux de ses équipes de conseillers. Plus que le cynisme, c’est la médiocrité qu’il faut incriminer.

La liberté d’action de l’Iran et sa maîtrise des technologies militaires de pointe

La déconfiture de Trump a eu un effet immédiat : l’impunité de l’Iran. L’héritier de la Perse antique  ne craint plus les représailles potentiellement redoutables de l’Amérique quelles que soient ses prises de risque dans la région. Il a pu frapper impunément à Abqaiq et Khurais le vieil allié du Pacte du Quincy de 1945 avec une arrogance inouïe, privant la communauté internationale de 5% de ses ressources en hydrocarbures. Il a pu abattre impunément le fameux drone d’observation. Il a pu fournir impunément aux Houthi des armes avancées, se comporter en occupant en Irak, etc.

La seconde liberté d’action obtenue par Téhéran est le produit de la déconfiture de ses adversaires sunnites directs l’Arabie, Bahreïn,  et les Émirats arabes Unis, exposés à ses coups de boutoir. Ils sont allés à Canossa, c’est-à-dire à la cour de Khamenei, pour s’épargner de nouvelles volées de bois vert iranien. « Le ministre saoudien des Affaires étrangères Adel al-Jubeir a confirmé sur Twitter que l’Arabie saoudite a relayé un message à l’Iran via un  » pays frère « , à savoir que l’Arabie saoudite a toujours recherché la stabilité et la sécurité régionales. »[18] Les ayatollahs n’ont plus de souci à se faire de ce coté là, du moins à court terme, car l’antagonisme ancré dans les appartenances religieuses est trop profond pour être si aisément résolu.

Restent deux questions : 1) l’Amérique de Trump restera-t-elle neutre si l’Iran attaque Israël ? 2) Restera-t-elle en dehors du jeu si l’Iran décide de passer au « saut nucléaire » ?

Des réponses assez nettes ont été apportées par les dirigeants des deux pays. Netanyahou ne se fait aucune illusion : il aurait déclaré au membres du cabinet « que le président américain Donald Trump n’agirait pas contre l’Iran avant les élections générales américaines de novembre 2020 au plus tôt … »[19] Christopher Ford, secrétaire d’État adjoint à la non prolifération des États-Unis participait à Tel Aviv à une conférence de l’INSS (Institute for National Security Studies) le 11 novembre dernier. Interrogé sur l’attitude des États-Unis face à la violation croissante par l’Iran des limitations de l’accord nucléaire, il répondit que ceux-ci « ne peuvent pas forcer l’Iran à revenir sur l’impasse que connait l’accord nucléaire… nous avons mis autant de contraintes que possible sur le comportement de l’Iran… » Visiblement il faut entendre que les États-Unis ne veulent utiliser, même dans les cas les plus graves, d’autres moyens de contrainte, les moyens militaires par exemple.[20] Le général Yaakov Amidror qui participait à la même réunion que le secrétaire d’état américain n’est pas allé par quatre chemins : « Il se peut que nous devions agir directement en Iran pour arrêter les Iraniens… Le monde n’est pas prêt à agir, ..ni l’Otan, ni les USA… ils préfèrent fermer les yeux. » ajoutant « si le monde n’empêchait pas l’Iran de se doter de l’arme nucléaire, l’Arabie saoudite et la Turquie le feraient aussi et de nombreux pays du Moyen-Orient auraient éventuellement des armes qui pourraient potentiellement dévaster Moscou, Berlin et Washington. »[21]

Comment se présente en définitive le théâtre du Moyen-Orient pour Israël à la fin de l’été 2019 ?

  1. Son principal allié, l’Amérique, qui a perdu son influence dissuasive sur les acteurs locaux, laisse une liberté d’action entière à l’Iran, y compris s’il s’engage dans le « saut nucléaire »;
  2. L’Iran maîtrise des technologies militaires comme le traitement avancé du renseignement et l’emploi de missiles et de drone de croisière particulièrement indétectables. Il représente donc une menace stratégique toute nouvelle qu’Israël ne sait pas forcement traiter ;
  3. Les alliés arabes, coalisés face à l’Iran sous l’aile américaine, se débandent désormais et négocient avec les ayatollahs, ce qui permettra d’attendre d’eux, au mieux, une certaine neutralité dans l’affrontement d’Israël avec l’Iran ;
  4. La « guerre entre deux guerres » qui limitait l’arrivée des armes avancées, l’incrustation des milices sur le Golan et les tirs venant d’Irak, semble être ravalée par l’Iran à un casus belli, retirant à Jérusalem une option pour se défendre tout en évitant la  guerre ouverte ;
  5. Les capacités offensives des milices supplétives de l’Iran au Liban, à Gaza, en Syrie, en Irak et au Yémen sont en progression rapide puisque l’Iran leur transfère systématiquement des armes avancées (en partie missiles de croisière, drones d’attaque) et les technologies pour les produire sur place ;
  6. Les origines géographiques possibles de la menace se sont élargies puisque le Yémen, destinataire de missiles iraniens à longue portée, s’est ajouté à la liste des pays d’où l’Iran peut lancer ses attaques, par le sud cette fois-ci, prenant à revers les défenses israéliennes plutôt orientées contre une menace venant du nord.

A l’inverse, la situation de l’Iran se dégrade aussi concernant certains paramètres :

  1. Il disposera de moins en moins de fonds pour payer l’entretien de ses milices (évaluées à 200.000 combattants au total) et la fourniture de services aux populations locales où elles sont cantonnées tant que des sanctions économiques américaines perdureront ;
  2. Des mouvement de masse puissants et durables se sont développés au Liban et en Irak pour protester contre la présence de ses milices supplétives et son emprise sur les états nationaux , ce qui multiplie les aléas qui pèsent sur sa stratégie expansionniste et en augmentent le coût ;
  3. La dégradation de la situation économique de Téhéran ne peut pas manquer d’accroître l’instabilité intérieure du régime, ce qui devrait aussi modérer ses avancées régionales.

Que veut exactement l’Iran ?

Comme « partisan d’Ali » Khomeiny a donné à sa révolution la mission de rétablir l’essence divine de la succession du Prophète, c’est-à-dire d’amener les musulmans à rallier la vraie foi et d’écarter du pouvoir islamique suprême quiconque ne peut faire valoir un lien de filiation avec lui.

Le rêve du régime est de chasser du Moyen-Orient le grand Satan américain pour agir sans entraves, de détruire le petit Satan israélien pour se poser en libérateur, et de retirer à la famille Saoud, dépourvue de tout lien familial avec Mohamed, la fonction de gardien des deux villes saintes de l’Islam, La Mecque et Médine. Il pourrait sur la base de ces victoires  devenir le phare des musulmans et leur rendre leur foi épurée des 15 derniers siècles d’errements. C’est en cela qu’il s’agit d’un régime d’essence révolutionnaire et que tout ses actes doivent être rapportés à cette grille de lecture.

Enfin, depuis plusieurs décennies, les Khomeynistes rêvent de sanctuariser leur pré carré et s’ouvrir des opportunités de conquête en développant un armement nucléaire et balistique moderne.

Au-delà de ces rêves entretenus avec persévérance depuis 40 ans, les ayatollahs sont pragmatiques et opportunistes en même temps. Ils  poursuivent aujourd’hui des objectifs d’étape très concrets. La destruction d’Israël n’est pas leur première urgence. Ils la voient comme le couronnement de leur emprise sur le Moyen-Orient dans un processus progressif d’isolement, de harcèlement et d’étranglement, car leur doctrine opérationnelle leur commande de masquer leurs coups et d’agir par procuration. Ils s’attachent actuellement à multiplier les sites d’origine de leurs possibles attaques, et à disperser des cibles toujours plus nombreuses pour compliquer la défense d’Israël. Mais pour sécuriser leur implantations en Irak et en Syrie exposées aux frappes israéliennes, ils pourraient lancer à n’importe quel moment des attaques à l’intérieur de l’État hébreu sur le modèle de celle qui a ébranlé l’Arabie saoudite le 14 septembre, ou sur une mode nouveau, moins prévisible.

On peut anticiper leur agenda : le raid écrasant qu’ils ont mené le 14 septembre sur les champs pétroliers du cœur de l’Arabie avait sans doute pour objectif premier l’abandon par Riyad de son intervention au Yémen. D’ailleurs, après les Émirats arabes unis, ils semble que ce pays ait baissé les bras et soit en train de négocier sa sortie du théâtre yéménite d’importance majeure pour son avenir. Dans cette affaire, l’Iran trouve l’avantage de consolider le règne de son obligé Houthi qui lui offre des positions rêvées à l’entrée du détroit stratégique de Bab el-Mandel.

Le second objectif, c’est d’obtenir un gel progressif des sanctions américaines en cours. Christopher Ford déclarait lors de la conférence de Tel Aviv évoquée plus haut que les États-Unis avaient proposé à l’Iran une offre de négociation comprenant : « l’allègement de toutes les sanctions[…] le rétablissement des relations diplomatiques et des relations de coopération semblables à celles avec les États normaux[…] Vous devez vous comporter comme un État normal, mais j’espère que l’Iran fera ce choix[à son tour]. »[22] Les ayatollahs attendent sans doute pour acquiescer d’avoir la garantie, façon Obama, qu’un nouvel accord scellera la réconciliation sans vraiment brider la poursuite de leur programme nucléaire et balistique.

L’Iran poursuivra naturellement l’édification du « cercle de feu » autour d’Israël en stabilisant les groupes armés supplétifs déjà déployés, en les équipant d’armes toujours plus avancées, en améliorant leur coordination et leur capacité de manœuvre. De ce point de vue, la Jordanie est dans l’œil du cyclone car elle dispose de longues frontières avec l’Irak et aussi avec Israël. On peut s’attendre à des opérations de subversion téléguidées depuis Téhéran pour contraindre ce royaume sunnite à intégrer « l’axe chiite ».

Enfin, la campagne électorale américaine s’achèvera le 03 novembre 2020, dans un peu moins d’une année. Comme l’a bien précisé Christopher Ford, l’Iran aura dans cette période une totale liberté d’action y compris concernant la conduite de son programme nucléaire. Les ayatollahs pourraient parfaitement saisir cette fenêtre inespérée pour se projeter dans le « saut nucléaire », la construction de la bombe, qui nécessiterait théoriquement un an mais en réalité, chacun le sait, seulement quelques mois.

Quelle stratégie pour Israël ?

Dans un affrontement sur un théâtre stratégique aussi vaste, élargi encore de milliers de kilomètres par la portée nouvelle des missiles, l’un des impératifs est d’identifier les alliances possibles. Les premiers alliés potentiels d’Israël face à l’Iran devraient être les pays européens, pas par excès de sympathie pour l’État juif, mais parce qu’ils partagent avec lui d’importants intérêts communs. L’Europe est à portée des missiles intercontinentaux de l’Iran et elle sait que ces missiles risquent d’être bientôt garnis d’ogives nucléaires. Elle sait aussi avec quelle brutalité les ayatollahs poussent leurs pions. Les 58 soldats du poste Drakkar tués en 1983, les attentats de Paris de 1985/86 et les prises d’otage du Liban, l’attentat déjoué de Villepinte en 2018, sont dans les mémoires. Elle sait que l’Iran est en train de s’approcher de la Méditerranée, leurs arrière-cour en quelque sorte. Enfin, elle sait enfin qu’étant déployés dans le Golfe persique et aux abords de Bab el-Mandel, les Iraniens tiennent des routes maritimes stratégiques du sud qu’ils peuvent assaisonner à leur gré, provoquant s’il le faut un séisme dans l’économie mondiale dont l’Europe serait la première victime. Israël doit rechercher et nourrir cette alliance dans un esprit créatif.

Par ailleurs, Israël doit se préparer à l’éventualité d’attaques massives par des vagues de missiles. On estime que le Hezbollah dispose au Liban de 130 à 150.000 missiles qui pour une part disposent d’un guidage de précision. En cas de guerre totale, le groupe terroriste, qui est en fait une armée, pourrait lancer 1.000 missiles par jour. Il est impossible d’interrompre ce genre d’offensive par des dispositifs antimissiles (qui seraient saturés) ni par l’aviation qui n’est pas configurée pour frapper une quantité indéterminée de micro cibles. La seule solution serait le déploiement immédiat de troupes au sol pour occuper au plus vite le terrain.

Cela suppose un changement radical de doctrine militaire. Depuis 1982 la doctrine d’Israël est résumée en une formule, « Intel/Firepower », soit renseignement et frappes puissantes sur les cibles. Cette option permet d’économiser les déploiements au sol, donc la vie des soldats. Mais l’ennemi s’est adapté. Il sait disperser les cibles, il sait déployer de pseudo-cibles, il sait enterrer ses hommes et ses armes. D’où un rendement décroissant du couple Intel/Firepower. L’alternative est le retour à la doctrine antérieure des « résultats décisifs », c’est-à-dire combattre au sol sur le territoire de l’ennemi pour mettre un terme effectif à sa capacité de nuisance. La victoire dans la seconde Intifada est intervenue en avril 2002 avec l’opération « Rempart », quand après des centaines de victimes on a enfin consenti à envoyer les soldats dans les grandes villes palestiniennes d’où partaient les commandos jihadistes. [23]La construction d’une armée conventionnelle capable d’exceller dans les manœuvres au sol est une option complexe qui prend du temps. L’état-major israélien en est parfaitement conscient.

Le troisième aspect de la stratégie d’Israël est la défense contre les missiles de croisière et les drones d’attaque si difficiles à détecter. Si les satellites américains et saoudiens et les dispositifs au sol ont été incapables de détecter les deux essaims de missiles et de drones d’attaque iraniens qui approchaient de leurs cibles en volant près du sol, c’est en partie parce que la zone à couvrir était immense. La surface de l’Arabie saoudite est du même ordre que celle de l’Europe entière. De ce point de vue, Israël a deux avantages. D’un coté, il n’est pas soumis à l’effet de surprise puisque le raid en Arabie est antérieur et qu’il a été dument analysé[24]. De l’autre, vu l’exigüité la zone à couvrir, la couverture actuelle est presque suffisante et il existe des radars Doppler bon marché, de conception israélienne, qui peuvent couvrir l’espace éventuel entre l’horizon de détectabilité des dispositifs actuels et le sol.

Enfin, last but not least, quelle réponse apporter à un Iran qui aurait entrepris le « saut nucléaire », une hypothèse bien plausible, on l’a vu. L’état-major israélien connait ses propres moyens et les difficultés d’une telle entreprise. A trois reprises, de 2010 à 2012, Bibi Netanyahou et Ehoud Barak auraient commandé à l’armée des raids de destruction des installations du programme nucléaire des  ayatollahs que les responsables de la défense Meir Dagan et Gabi Askhenazi  en 2010, puis Benny Gantz en 2011, ont refusé d’exécuter. La troisième tentative en 2012 a avorté suite à un différend sur le calendrier entre Netanyahou et Barak.[25] En 2019, l’opération est beaucoup plus compliquée car l’Iran s’est doté, 10 ans après,  de moyens de défense et de riposte nouveaux. L’affaire est aujourd’hui entre les mains des hiérarchies politiques et militaires du pays.

Ce qui est sûr c’est qu’il y a plusieurs façons de poser le problème iranien en général. A demi-mots Yaakov Amidror suggère une critique de la politique suivie dans la dernière décennie : une stratégie « prudente », donc perdante, a laissé le Hezbollah accumuler un arsenal offensif monstrueux sur² la gorge de l’état juif. Ensuite, avec la guerre de Syrie, une « stratégie agressive », donc gagnante, a permis de freiner les transferts d’armes vers le nord, la diffusion des systèmes de guidage de précision des missiles et l’installation de bases militaires. Que nous suggère Yaakov Amidror ? « L’Iran s’est rendu compte qu’Israël a réussi en Syrie [à démanteler une machine de guerre], alors il a commencé à construire une branche de sa machine de guerre indépendante en Irak…. Pour l’Iran, l’idée est d’avoir une capacité militaire proche d’Israël, tout en restant à distance. Une question intéressante est de savoir quelle devrait être la réaction d’Israël dans une telle situation. Nous savons que la tête du serpent est en Iran. Israël va-t-il poursuivre des cibles en Syrie, en Irak, au Liban ou au Yémen ? Ou irons-nous directement à la tête du serpent ? »[26]

[1] Israel’s army chief stands alone against security threats Ben Caspit October 25, 2019  https://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/originals/2019/10/israel-security-threat-us-withdrawal-iran-russia-kochavi.html#ixzz64rLtM5eE

[2] Idf Operations Head: Threat Posed By Iran Is Not ‘Fear-Mongering’ https://www.jpost.com/Arab-Israeli-Conflict/IDF-Operations-Head-Threat-posed-by-Iran-is-not-fear-mongering-606991

[3] Foreign-policy experts predict that an Iranian attack on Israel is just a matter of time  Israel Kasnett, JNS, 4 nov 2019 https://www.jns.org/foreign-policy-experts-predict-that-an-iranian-attack-on-israel-is-just-a-matter-of-time/

[4] Iran Guards chief: Destroying Israel now not a dream but an ‘achievable goal’ AFP andTOI STAFF30 Sept. 2019, https://www.timesofisrael.com/iran-guards-chief-says-destroying-israel-is-not-a-dream-but-an-achievable-goal/

[5] ibi

[6] Préambule de la constitution iranienne du 24 octobre 1979 http://www.servat.unibe.ch/icl/ir00000_.html

[7] Pour être tranquilles, les Iraniens interdirent aux inspecteur de l’AIEA l’accès des sites militaires où ces recherché étaient menées, sans que les vertueux pays négociateurs de l’accord de Vienne s’en émeuvent…

[8] Iranian Mayhem Is About to Get Worse, Eli Lake, 24 Octobre 2019 https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-10-24/iranian-mayhem-in-the-middle-east-is-about-to-get-worse

[9] Ce thème est développé dans le remarquable rapport de l’International Institute for Strategic Studies Iran’s Networks of Influence in the Middle East, 7 Nov. 2019, https://www.iiss.org/publications/strategic-dossiers

[10]Armed and Dangerous: Why a Rational, Nuclear Iran Is an Unacceptable Risk to Israel , Prof. Steven R. David,  1er Novembre 2013 https://besacenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/MSPS104.pdf

[11] The Campaign Between Wars: How Israel Rethought Its Strategy to Counter Iran’s Malign Regional Influence, Gadi Eisenkot et Gabi Siboni, PolicyWatch 3174, 04 Sept. 2019, https://www.washingtoninstitute.org/policy-analysis/view/the-campaign-between-wars-how-israel-rethought-its-strategy-to-counter-iran

[12] Foreign-policy experts predict that an Iranian attack on Israel is just a matter of time  Israel Kasnett op. cit.

[13] Israel’s restraint comes with a price by Yoav Limor, Israel Hayom, 07 nov 2019 https://www.israelhayom.com/2019/11/07/israels-restraint-comes-with-a-price/

[14] Saudi Arabia’s Black September, Dr. Uzi Rubin, 15 oct. 2019, https://jiss.org.il/en/rubin-saudi-arabias-black-september/

[15] What Iran Is Really Up To, Michael Doran, June 24 2019 https://mosaicmagazine.com/observation/politics-current-affairs/2019/06/what-iran-is-really-up-to/

[16]  Trump renews sanctions waivers to allow Russia, China and Europe to continue nuclear work in Iran, Negar Mortazavi, 31 October 2019, https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/trump-iran-nuclear-work-russia-china-europe-sanction-a9180121.html

[17] The Purge of John Bolton, Dr. Jiri et Leni Valenta, 15 oct. 2019, https://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/15021/bolton-purge-trump-obama-moments

[18] A Possible Thaw in Iranian-Saudi Tensions: Ramifications for the Region and for Israel, Yoel GuzanskySima Shine, INSS Insight No. 1222, November 3, 2019 https://www.inss.org.il/publication/a-possible-thaw-in-iranian-saudi-tensions-ramifications-for-the-region-and-for-israel

[19] Netanyahu told ministers Trump can’t be counted on to act against Iran, TOI STAFF,  01 November 2019,https://www.timesofisrael.com/netanyahu-told-ministers-us-cant-be-counted-on-against-iran-report/

[20] Top Us Official: We Can’t Force Iran To Change, But Have Cornered It, YONAH JEREMY BOB,  NOVEMBER 11, 2019 https://www.jpost.com/Middle-East/Top-US-official-We-cant-force-Iran-to-change-but-have-cornered-it-607529

[21] Top Us Official: We Can’t Force Iran To Change, But Have Cornered It op. cit.

[22] Top Us Official: We Can’t Force Iran To Change, But Have Cornered It op. cit.

[23] Prepare For War – The Right Way, David M. Weinberg,  25 oct. 2019, https://www.jpost.com/Opinion/Prepare-for-war-the-right-way-605734

[24] Saudi Arabia’s Black September, op. cit.

[25] Israel’s true failures on Iran , Dr. Limor Samimian-Darash, 10 oct. 2019 https://www.israelhayom.com/opinions/israels-true-failures-on-iran/

[26] Foreign-policy experts predict that an Iranian attack on Israel is just a matter of time, Israel Kasnett JNS 04 nov. 2019 https://www.jns.org/foreign-policy-experts-predict-that-an-iranian-attack-on-israel-is-just-a-matter-of-time/


Mort de Jacques Chirac: La France qui triche a trouvé son héros (As amnesic France goes gaga over the death of its first former head of state to be convicted since Petain, ex-British spy chief confirms ‘Grand Philanderer’ Chirac was ‘a roguish individual who manoeuvred very cleverly’)

29 septembre, 2019

Image may contain: 1 person, text

https://i2.wp.com/davidphenry.com/Paris/StudentsProtesting1May2002.jpgImage result for Chirac, c'est Rastignac plus Ravaillac le Canard enchainé

Image result for Chirac s'énerve à jérusalemImage result for Tour Eiffel éteinte pour Chirac

Une droite qui voudrait que soit placé dans nos mairies et nos écoles le portrait d’un homme mis en examen, qui a perdu toute autorité morale. Richard Ferrand (14.04.2017)
Presque aucun des fidèles ne se retenait de s’esclaffer, et ils avaient l’air d’une bande d’anthropophages chez qui une blessure faite à un blanc a réveillé le goût du sang. Car l’instinct d’imitation et l’absence de courage gouvernent les sociétés comme les foules. Et tout le monde rit de quelqu’un dont on voit se moquer, quitte à le vénérer dix ans plus tard dans un cercle où il est admiré. C’est de la même façon que le peuple chasse ou acclame les rois. Marcel Proust
Un père, ça peut être une femme, une grand-mère. Agnès Buzyn (ministre française de la Santé)
L’enfant a le droit à un nom dès la naissance. Il a également le droit d’ acquérir une nationalité et, dans la mesure du possible, de connaître ses parents et d’être élevé par eux. Convention internationale des droits de l’enfant (article 7, 1989)
La loi ne doit pas mentir sur l’origine de la vie. Conférence des évêques
Une droite qui voudrait que soit placé dans nos mairies et nos écoles le portrait d’un homme mis en examen, qui a perdu toute autorité morale. Richard Ferrand (14.04.2017)
Le président Chirac incarna une certaine idée de la France. (…) Jacques Chirac était un destin français. (…) Jacques Chirac portait en lui l’amour de la France et des Français. Emmanuel Macron
Dans une autre publication, il tenait à peu près les mêmes propos concernant le candidat LR: “nous disons à François Fillon qu’il a perdu toute autorité morale pour diriger l’État et parler au nom de la France”. Lundi 30 septembre 2019 est une journée de deuil national à la suite du décès de M. Jacques CHIRAC, ancien Président de la République. Durant cette journée, les enseignants qui le souhaitent peuvent consacrer un cours à l’évocation de la mémoire de l’ancien chef de l’État. A cette fin, éduscol vous propose des ressources pédagogiques permettant de revenir sur la biographie de Jacques Chirac, son engagement politique national et international, sa relation à l’histoire des arts… Ministère de l’Education nationale
C’est très français au fond. La seule chose que l’on retiendra de la présidence de Jacques Chirac est une belle bravade sans conséquence: son refus spectaculaire de la guerre américaine en Irak. Laquelle, pour le coup, en eut de fâcheuses. Dieu sait combien Jacques Chirac représentait le caractère national. Au milieu de beaucoup de compromissions, ce fut une parenthèse de gloire, de panache et d’honneur. Cela n’a servi à rien mais le geste en était d’autant plus beau. Chirac eut quelque chose de Cyrano de Bergerac au cours de cet hiver 2002-2003, entraînant la Russie de Poutine et l’Allemagne de Schröder et bien d’autres nations derrière lui. Villepin, au contraire, avait peur de se fâcher avec l’Amérique. Il n’a pas troqué le retour de la France dans le comité militaire de l’Otan en échange de quelques postes honorifiques. Il a osé renouveler la dissuasion nucléaire française. C’est en souvenir de ces moments-là que la France est encore écoutée dans le monde. (…) Jacques Chirac avait un grand mérite: il connaissait l’histoire du monde et de ses civilisations. Il savait que l’Irak est un des berceaux de l’humanité et qu’on ne pouvait la détruire sans commettre l’irréparable. Il savait aussi que la démocratie ne se construit pas sur le sable d’une occupation militaire et que tôt ou tard, les chiites d’Irak se tourneraient vers leurs coreligionnaires iraniens, entraînant une terrible guerre de religions. Ce qui devait advenir arriva: la rage cumulée des pétromonarchies du golfe et des terroristes wahhabites a redoublé de violence. Daech et les destructions de Mossoul, Palmyre et Alep sont des contrecoups de la folle expédition de Dick Cheney et Donald Rumsfeld. Tout le Moyen-Orient a souffert de cette lamentable aventure mais pas seulement. Après les attentats de 2004-2005 et 2015-2016 en Europe, nous sommes loin d’avoir retrouvé l’équilibre. Depuis 2003, le Moyen-Orient est une région en guerre de religion, fracturée et travaillée par le terrorisme, minée par les migrations, incapable de se coordonner et d’avancer ensemble. Chirac avait au long de sa carrière noué des relations fidèles avec les chefs d’États d’Afrique et d’Asie. Il était soucieux du sort des Palestiniens, lui qui était intraitable avec l’antisémitisme. (…) Chirac s’intéressait et comprenait les relations internationales, sans avoir peur de quiconque. Le Figaro
Nous avons été présidés par un délinquant pendant 12 ans, et mon adversaire de 2002 est quelqu’un qui aurait dû être condamné à la prison. Le Pen
Attendu que la responsabilité de Jacques Chirac, maire de París, découle du mandat reçu de la collectivité des Parisiens ; qu’elle résulte également de l’autorité hiérarchique exercée par lui sur l’ensemble du personnel de la Ville de Paris et singulièrement sur ses collaborateurs immédiats au premier rang desquels son directeur de cabinet ; Attendu que le dossier et les débats ont établi que Jacques Chirac a été l’initiateur et l’auteur principal des délits d’abus de confiance, détournement de fonds publics, ingérence et prise illégale d’intérêts ; que sa culpabilité résulte de pratiques pérennes et réitérées qui lui sont personnellement imputables et dont le développement a été grandement favorisé par une parfaite connaissance des rouages de la municipalité ainsi que la qualité des liens tissés avec les différents acteurs administratifs et politiques au cours de ses années passées à la tête de la Ville de Paris ; qu’en multipliant les connexions entre son parti et la municipalité parisienne, Jacques Chirac a su créer et entretenir entre la collectivité territoriale et l’organisation politique une confusion telle qu’elle a pu entraîner ses propres amis politiques ; que le gain en résultant, nonobstant les économies des salaires payés par la mairie de Paris, a pu prendre la forme soit d’un renforcement des effectifs du parti politique dont il était le président soit d’un soutien à la contribution intellectuelle pour l’élaboration du programme politique de ce parti ; Attendu que par l’ensemble de ces agissements, Jacques Chirac a engagé les fonds de la Ville de Paris pour un montant total d’environ 1 400 000 euros ; Attendu que l’ancienneté des faits, l’absence d’enrichissement personnel de Jacques Chirac, l’indemnisation de la Ville de Paris par l’UMP et Jacques Chirac, ce dernier à hauteur de 500.000 euros, l’âge et l’état de santé actuel de Jacques Chirac, dont la dégradation est avérée, ainsi que les éminentes responsabilités de chef de l’Etat qu’il a exercées pendant les douze années ayant immédiatement suivi la période de prévention, sont autant d’éléments qui doivent être pris en considération pour déterminer la sanction qu’il convient d’appliquer à son encontre ; Attendu que ces éléments ne sauraient occulter le fait que, par son action délibérée, en ayant recours au cours de ces cinq années à dix neuf emplois totalement ou partiellement fictifs, Jacques Chirac a manqué à l’obligation de probité qui pèse sur les personnes publiques chargées de la gestion des fonds ou des biens qui leur sont confiés, cela au mépris de l’intérêt général des Parisiens ; que dans ces conditions, le recours à une peine d’emprisonnement avec sursis dont le quantum sera fixé à deux années apparaît tout à la fois adapté à la personnalité du prévenu et ainsi qu’à la nature et la gravité des faits qu’il a commis. Verdict de la 11e chambre correctionnelle de Paris (15.12.11)
Pour la première fois depuis Louis XVI et Philippe Pétain, un ancien chef de l’Etat français a été condamné par la justice de son pays. Jacques Chirac, 79 ans, reconnu coupable d’abus de confiance, de détournement de fonds publics et de prise illégale d’intérêts, a écopé ce jeudi matin de deux ans de prison avec sursis. Dans un communiqué, Jacques Chirac a annoncé qu’il ne ferait pas appel, même si « sur le fond [il] conteste catégoriquement ce jugement ». Il explique ne plus avoir « hélas, toutes les forces nécessaires pour mener par [lui-même], face à de nouveaux juges, le combat pour la vérité ». Nouvel obs
Janvier 1975. C’est l’époque du journalisme politique à la Françoise Giroud, la patronne de L’Express envoie alors de jeunes et jolies reporters pour faire parler les politiques. Jacqueline Chabridon, journaliste au Figaro, est mandatée par son rédacteur en chef pour suivre Jacques Chirac et en tirer un portrait du jeune Premier ministre de Valéry Giscard d’Estaing. Elle n’en a guère envie, le voit comme « un soudard, un prêt-à-tout (…) sentencieux et ringard au possible », écrivent les auteurs. De son côté, il veut vérifier à qui il a affaire. Il la met au défi d’engloutir les copieuses portions de tête de veau trônant sur la table aussi vite que lui. Elle s’y colle, en bonne vivante. Il est séduit par cette petite jeune femme de 34 ans. Comme le dit son ami Jacques Toubon, alors conseiller technique à Matignon, « c’est le charme fait femme ». Pauline de Saint-Rémy d’expliquer : « On s’était imaginé une femme impressionnante, très élégante, très intello. Avec sa voix fluette, sa petite taille, elle est en fait très simple. Au sens noble du terme. » C’est peut-être cela qui plaît alors au Premier ministre. Elle est d’origine modeste, auvergnate, fille de communistes. Affirme simplement son goût pour la vie. « Jacques et Jacqueline, c’est aussi et avant tout une complicité de classe, relatent les journalistes dans leur livre. Une sorte de reconnaissance mutuelle. » De son côté, Jacqueline voit désormais derrière le technocrate ambitieux un homme qui a « du goût pour les gens ». Très vite, « son envie de la revoir vire à l’obsession. Il la veut à ses côtés, en public comme en privé », lit-on dans Jacques et Jacqueline (1). On prête à Chirac un parcours de séducteur « mais avec elle, ça a été différent, affirment Laureline Dupont et Pauline de Saint-Rémy. Pour elle, il a failli tout quitter ; ça a eu des répercussions sur sa vie politique, dans un moment charnière. » Le livre raconte l’appartement aménagé pour eux rue de Marignan, à Paris : c’est là qu’il installe sa collection d’ouvrages de la Pléiade, un mur entier. Il l’emmène en escapade à La Rochelle. Elle le suit dans ses déplacements, en tant que journaliste. Fin 1975, il organise même, selon les auteurs, un voyage de presse aux Antilles pour passer Noël en sa compagnie ! Les reporters présents sur place s’agacent des nombreux « briefings » du chef du gouvernement. Dans l’ouvrage, Jacques Toubon se souvient des chuchotements qu’il surprend alors : « Il [Chirac] n’a rien à nous dire… » « C’est ridicule ! C’est juste pour la voir. » Le couple fait face à l’incompréhension de son entourage devant cette histoire qui dure, devant ce mariage qu’il lui aurait promis. Jacqueline Chabridon, dont les premières noces avec le socialiste Charles Hernu ont été célébrées par François Mitterrand, se fait rabrouer par ses amis de gauche, expliquent les auteurs. Chirac, lui, encaisse l’hostilité de sa conseillère Marie-France Garaud. Elle s’inquiète. Et si l’affaire s’ébruitait ? « Beaucoup de gens savaient, à l’époque, souligne Laureline Dupont. Le sujet fait jaser dans les dîners parisiens. » Toujours selon le livre, Le Nouvel Observateur s’apprête à publier en avril 1976 un court article intitulé « La garçonnière du Premier ministre ». La publication sera stoppée. Mais c’en est trop pour les conseillers. Trop pour Bernadette Chirac aussi. Dans Jacques et Jacqueline, on la voit faire front commun avec Marie-France Garaud pour éloigner la maîtresse. Et puis à l’époque, on ne divorce pas. Surtout si l’on envisage la plus haute fonction… Été 1976. Jacqueline Chabridon découvre l’appartement vidé. Leur correspondance a disparu. Le choc. Dans un bureau anonyme, il lui annonce que c’est fini. Certains y ont vu la pression de ses proches. Les auteurs livrent une autre hypothèse : « De nombreux témoins nous ont dit que Chirac, qui s’apprêtait à lancer le RPR (Rassemblement pour la République, ndlr) – il venait de démissionner de Matignon pour ça -, avait besoin d’avoir le coeur et les mains libres. Parce qu’il entretenait un rapport charnel et chaleureux aux électeurs. Notre théorie, c’est qu’il a été rattrapé par son ambition, plus que par son entourage. » Apporter un autre éclairage sur Jacques Chirac, c’était un des objectifs des deux journalistes : « Il est plus humain et plus complexe qu’il n’y paraît, perclus de passions contraires. » Fallait-il pour autant, quarante ans après, remettre cet amour sous le feu des projecteurs ? « Certains seront heurtés car on est sur le terrain de la vie privée. Mais c’est un récit politique, pas un livre sulfureux, répond Pauline de Saint-Rémy. Nous voulions aussi donner un autre éclairage à cette époque politico-médiatique en nous intéressant à la petite histoire dans la grande histoire. » Jacqueline Chabridon, elle, a poursuivi la sienne. Le coeur à gauche. « Elle qui pensait ne jamais pouvoir voter pour lui a fini par le faire en avril 2002. Mais on a compris que ça lui avait fait un peu mal. » Aujourd’hui encore, elle est proche des socialistes. Voit François Hollande régulièrement. Et Laureline Dupont de conclure : « Elle a 75 ans et a l’air très heureuse. » Grazia
Voici un homme qui a dû se représenter à  sa réélection l’an dernier afin de préserver son immunité  présidentielle des poursuites judiciaires pour de graves accusations de corruption. Voici un homme qui a aidé Saddam Hussein à construire un réacteur nucléaire et qui savait très bien ce qu’il comptait en faire. Voici un homme à la tête de la France qui est en fait ouvertement à vendre. Il me fait penser au banquier de « L’Education Sentimentale » de Flaubert : un homme si habitué à la corruption qu’il payerait pour le plaisir de se vendre lui-même. Ici, également, est un monstre positif de vanité. Lui et son ministre des affaires étrangères, Dominique de Villepin, ont mielleusement déclaré que la « force est toujours le dernier recours.  » Vraiment ? Ce n’était pas la position de l’establishment français quand des troupes ont été envoyées au Rwanda pour tenter de sauver le client-régime qui venait de lancer un ethnocide contre les Toutsis. Ce n’est pas, on présume, la position des généraux français qui traitent actuellement comme leur fief  la population et la nation ivoiriennes. Ce n’était pas la position de ceux qui ont commandité la destruction d’un bateau désarmé, le Rainbow à l’ancre dans un port de Nouvelle Zélande après les manifestations contre la pratique officielle française d’essais nucléaires atmosphériques dans le Pacifique. (…) Nous nous rendons tous compte du fait que Saddam Hussein doit beaucoup d’argent à des compagnies françaises et à l’Etat français. Nous espérons tous que le parti Baath irakien n’a fait aucun cadeau privé à des personnalités politiques françaises, même si le moins qu’on puisse dire c’est que de tels scrupules des deux côtés seraient une anomalie. Est-il possible qu’il y ait plus en jeu que cela ? Il est très possible que le futur gouvernement de Bagdad ne se considère plus tellement responsable des dettes de Saddam. Ce seul fait conditionne-t-il la réponse de Chirac à une fin de régime en Irak ? (…) Charles de Gaulle avait un égo colossal, mais il se sentit obligé à un moment crucial de représenter une certaine idée de la  France à un moment où cette nation avait été trahie dans le servitude et la honte par son establishment politique et militaire. (…) Il avait un sens de l’histoire. Aux intérêts permanents de la France, il tenait à joindre une certaine idée de la liberté aussi. Il aurait approuvé les propos de Vaclav Havel – ses derniers en tant que président tchèque – parlant hardiment des droits du peuple irakien. Et on aime à penser qu’il aurait eu un mépris  pour son pygmée de successeur, l’homme vain, poseur et vénal qui, souhaitant jouer le rôle d’une Jeanne d’Arc travestie, fait de la France le proxénète abject de Saddam. C’est le cas du rat qui voulait rugir. Christopher Hitchens (2003)
Pasqua n’était guère cocaïnomane – «j’en suis sûr», atteste notre lascar – mais l’argent parallèle du secteur a pu l’intéresser… Fauré, précoce dealer au Maroc puis un peu partout ailleurs, raconte avoir été très vite pris en charge, dans les années 70, par l’Organisation de l’armée secrète. Initialement dédiée au maintien de l’Algérie française, l’OAS changera très vite de fusil d’épaule : «opérations homo» (assassinats ciblés) contre des indépendantistes basques ou corses, mais aussi braquages de banques. Le Service d’action civique (SAC) prendra ensuite le relais. Fauré, fort de ses compétences en la matière, met la main à l’ouvrage : «La recette Pasqua consistait à constituer des « mouvements patriotiques », en vérité violents, avec des voyous peu recommandables. Comment les rémunérer ? Tout simplement avec l’argent provenant de gros braquages de banques et de bijouteries, commis en toute impunité. Avec Pasqua, tout était possible, du moins pour les membres du SAC. Patriote, certainement prêt à mourir pour son pays, il gardait en revanche un œil attentif sur les caisses du parti. Moyennant la moitié de nos gains, il nous garantissait l’impunité sur des affaires juteuses et triées sur le volet, sachant exactement là ou il fallait frapper.» (…) A l’issue de l’entretien, Gérard Fauré croisera illico le parrain marseillais «Tony» Zampa, qui traînait là par hasard, lequel l’entreprend dans la foulée sur différentes affaires à venir : des investissements dans les casinos et la prostitution aux Pays-Bas. Cas peut-être unique dans les annales de la voyoucratie, il fera parallèlement équipe avec l’illustre Francis Vanverberghe, dit «Francis le Belge», «doté d’un savoir-vivre qui valait bien son savoir-tuer». (…) Pour la petite histoire, il reconstitue leur brouille à propos de… Johnny Hallyday : «Tous les deux voulaient le prendre sous tutelle, pour capter sa fortune ou l’utiliser comme prête-nom. Ils ont fini par s’entre-tuer pour ce motif et quelques autres.» Fauré considérait Johnny comme sa «plus belle prise de guerre» dans le microcosme de la coke. Mais lui gardera un chien de sa chienne après que le chanteur l’a balancé sans vergogne aux Stups, contre sa propre immunité. (…) «Si vous le voulez bien, j’attends votre version des faits s’agissant des deux chèques de M. Chirac rédigés à votre ordre. Je vous invite à bien réfléchir avant de répondre» : sollicitation d’une juge d’instruction parisienne en 1986, hors procès-verbal. Tempête sous un crâne à l’issue de laquelle Gérard Fauré évoquera une dette de jeu au backgammon… Dans son bouquin, l’explication est tout autre – «J’avais dû travestir la vérité.» S’il ne peut attester que l’ex-président prenait de la coke, il évoque son penchant pour les femmes… Pour l’anecdote, les deux chèques en question feront l’objet d’une rapide opposition de leur signataire. «Chirac, dont j’avais admiré la prestance et même les idées politiques, s’est avéré mauvais payeur.» (…) Le livre s’achève sur cet hommage indirect à la police française : lors d’une perquisition à son domicile, 10 des 15 kilos de cocaïne disparaissent, tout comme 90 % des 300 000 euros logés dans un tiroir. «Je n’ai pas pensé un seul instant me plaindre de la brigade du quai des Orfèvres, dans la mesure où les vols qu’elle commettait chez moi ne pouvaient qu’alléger ma future condamnation. » Libération
Chirac’s opposition to the Iraq War put him at loggerheads with George W. Bush and Tony Blair. As President he made a historic apology for France’s role in the Holocaust but his term was also marked by riots and a stinging defeat over EU integration. He also had a reputation as a womaniser and philanderer who repeatedly cheated on his long-suffering wife Bernadette during their 63 years of marriage. His reputed partners included Italian sex symbol Claudia Cardinale and there were rumours about a series of relationships with journalists and politicians. Chirac was also known for a love of fine living, revelling in the trappings of power including luxury trips abroad and life at the presidential palace. After leaving office, Chirac was found guilty of corruption dating back to his time as mayor of Paris and given a two-year suspended prison sentence. The Daily Mail
How many times have certain Western politicians cast an envious glance at Jacques Chirac and thought: just how the hell did he get away with it? France is in deep mourning following the news that its flamboyant, philandering former centre-Right president has died at the age of 86. World leaders joined in a chorus of tributes yesterday. Precisely what and whom they are mourning, however, remains as opaque as ever. Former French President Jacques Chirac was often seen in the company of beautiful women such as legendary actress Brigitte Bardot (….) The first ex-president in French history to be convicted of corruption, he managed to espouse contradictory opinions on just about everything during four decades in politics. Here was the great peacemonger – famous for keeping France out of the 2003 invasion of Iraq – who also flogged nuclear technology to Iraq’s Saddam Hussein and who obliterated a South Pacific coral atoll with his own nuclear weapons. (…) He was the self-styled champion of human rights and the developing world who also sucked up to the most appalling tyrants, argued that ‘Africa is not ready for democracy’ and deplored the ‘noise and smell’ of workshy immigrants. And all the while, he was the family man who enjoyed affairs with umpteen women – from humble secretaries and party workers to film stars. As mayor of Paris, he kept a mayoral bus with a bedroom for assignations and used public funds to rent a flat for a political journalist from Le Figaro who was his then mistress. As president, so it was claimed by one biographer, he would never want for ‘naked women, burning with desire’ on board the presidential jet. On a state visit to Tunisia, he managed to bring along both his long-suffering wife, Bernadette, and his mistress du moment on the same trip. The two women did not exchange a word. Not that he would ever allow himself to be distracted from his work for long. Following the publication of the memoirs of the presidential chauffeur, Chirac could never quite shake off the nickname he acquired thereafter: ‘Five minutes – including shower’ (to add insult to injury, this was later reduced from ‘five’ to ‘three’). Routinely satirised on a top French comedy show as ‘Superliar’, Chirac would never have got where he got – or lasted as long as he did – in British politics. It was his good fortune to be blessed with a French media which seldom subjected him to the same scrutiny endured by his British counterparts. It also helped that he was sleeping with quite a few of them. (…) In 2011, he received a two-year prison sentence for abuse of trust and public funds, though the sentence was suspended. The Daily Mail
There were strong indications in the US and UK [intelligence services] that Chirac received money from Saddam. His recent obituaries are saying that Chirac got it right [on Iraq] and the rest of us got it wrong. But I am saying that Chirac’s motive for getting it right may not appear to be what it is.’‘He had this questionable relationship with Saddam Hussein. It raises a lot of questions as to what his motives were for opposing the UN Resolution in the build-up to the invasion. It was not a matter of conscience, it was his reputation. If it came out in the wash [that he received money from Saddam], it would have been damaging to him as a politician. It was a dimension which at the time was politically worrying – Chirac had a longstanding relationship with Saddam, which was not state to state, it was personal. He was a roguish individual who manoeuvred very cleverly.  Sir Richard Dearlove
J’ai un principe simple en politique étrangère. Je regarde ce que font les Américains et je fais le contraire. Alors, je suis sûr d’avoir raison. Jacques Chirac
Le multipartisme est une erreur politique, une sorte du luxe que les pays en voie de développement, qui doivent concentrer leurs efforts sur leur expansion économique n’ont pas les moyens de s’offrir. Jacques Chirac (Abidjan, février 1990)
Si les valeurs des droits de l’homme sont universelles, elles peuvent s’exprimer sous des formes différentes. Jacques Chirac (Paris, 1996, visite de Li Peng)
Ici, le message millénaire de l’islam rejoint l’héritage et les valeurs de la République. Jacques Chirac (Grande Mosquée de Paris, 9/4/02)
La guerre … est toujours la pire des solutions … Jacques Chirac (Paris, 17 janvier 2003, au côté de Hans Blix, président exécutif de la commission de contrôle de vérification et d’inspection des Nations Unies en Irak et de Mohamed El Baradei, directeur de l’Agence Internationale de l’Energie Atomique)
Cette institution met la Russie au premier rang des démocraties, pour le respect dû aux peuples premiers, pour le dialogue des cultures et tout simplement pour le respect de l’autre. Jacques Chirac (Saint-Pétersbourg, juin 2003, inauguration de l’Académie polaire)
Le premier des droits de l’homme, c’est de manger, d’être soigné, de recevoir une éducation et d’avoir un habitat. De ce point de vue, la Tunisie est très en avance sur beaucoup de pays. Jacques Chirac (Tunis, le 3 décembre 2003, jour où l’opposante Radhia Nasraoui entrait dans son 50e jour de grève de la faim)
Je n’ai pas à juger les choix de politique intérieure d’un homme démocratiquement élu. Mais je sais une chose : il a rendu sa dignité à un peuple privé de ses droits et de son identité.» Il « a rendu sa dignité à son peuple ». « On ne peut pas vouloir des élections au suffrage universel et contester leurs résultats. Jacques Chirac (sur le président bolivien Evo Morales, Brasilia, 25 mai 2006)
Les racines de l’Europe sont autant musulmanes que chrétiennes. Jacques Chirac
Ce n’est pas une politique de tuer des enfants. Chirac (accueillant Barak à Paris, le 4 octobre 2000)
La situation est tragique mais les forces en présence au Moyen-Orient font qu’au long terme, Israël, comme autrefois les Royaumes francs, finira par disparaître. Cette région a toujours rejeté les corps étrangers. Dominique Galouzeau de Villepin (Paris, automne 2001)
La France condamne les attaques du Hezbollah et toutes les actions terroristes unilatérales, où qu’elles se mènent, contre des soldats ou des populations civiles. Oui, ces attaques sont terroristes, et la France souhaite que la réplique frappe aussi peu que possible les populations civiles. Epargner les populations civiles est une contrainte que s’efforce de respecter Israël. Lionel Jospin (Jérusalem, 24 février 2000)
On his visit to Birzeit University, Lionel Jospin had the gall to speak of the Hizbullah fighters as terrorists, also expressing his « understanding » of Israel’s actions against Lebanon. Edward Said
Soudain, une pluie de pierres s’abat sur le groupe, petites d’abord, puis de plus en plus grosses. Les gardes du corps déploient aussitôt leur protection en kevlar. Le premier ministre disparaît littéralement sous les corps massés « en tortue » de sa protection rapprochée, avant d’être précipité à l’arrière de la Mercedes blindée qui l’attend. Une voiture, posée en travers de la route, barre le départ du cortège et immobilise quelques longues secondes celle de M. Jospin, criblée de pierres et de coups de pied, tandis qu’un enseignant, debout sur le toit du véhicule, lève les bras pour tenter de calmer les manifestants. Une vitre est atteinte par un pavé. Un photographe de l’Agence France-Presse, Manoucher Deghati, est renversé, la jambe cassée. Il sera transféré à l’hôpital de Jérusalem. Dans le hurlement des sirènes et sous les insultes des manifestants, le cortège repart, enfin. Le Monde
Vous savez bien que l’Irak est un pays pacifique géré par des gens pacifiques. Jacques Chirac (Journal marocain, septembre 1980)
Il y a un problème, c’est la possession probable d’armes de destruction massive par un pays incontrôlable, l’Irak. La communauté internationale a raison de s’émouvoir de cette situation. Et elle a eu raison de décider qu’il fallait désarmer l’Irak. (…) Il faut laisser aux inspecteurs le temps de le faire. Jacques Chirac
Dans l’immédiat, notre attention doit se porter en priorité sur les domaines biologique et chimique. C’est là que nos présomptions vis-à-vis de l’Iraq sont les plus significatives : sur le chimique, nous avons des indices d’une capacité de production de VX et d’ypérite ; sur le biologique, nos indices portent sur la détention possible de stocks significatifs de bacille du charbon et de toxine botulique, et une éventuelle capacité de production.  Dominique De Villepin (05.02.03)
Les visées militaires du programme nucléaire iranien ne font plus de doute mais les possibilités de négociations avec le régime de Téhéran n’ont pas été épuisées. (…) De l’avis des experts, d’ici deux à trois ans, l’Iran pourrait être en possession d’une arme nucléaire. Rapport parlementaire français (17 décembre 2008)
Même aux pires moments de notre relation, quand le général De Gaulle a quitté l’OTAN, critiqué la guerre du Vietnam et voulu remplacer le dollar par l’étalon-or, il n’est jamais allé aussi loin. Il n’a jamais tenté, lui, de monter une coalition contre nous. Kissinger (Paris, automne 2003)
Il est maintenant clair que les assurances données par Chirac ont joué un rôle crucial, persuadant Saddam Hussein de ne pas offrir les concessions qui auraient pu éviter une guerre et le changement de régime. Selon l’ex-vice président Tareq Aziz, s’exprimant depuis sa cellule devant des enquêteurs américains et irakiens, Saddam était convaincu que les Français, et dans une moindre mesure, les Russes allaient sauver son régime à la dernière minute. Amir Taheri
L’affaire Boidevaix-Mérimée est-elle l’arbre qui cache la forêt ? Certaines sources au Quai d’Orsay l’insinuent. « Il est impossible que Mérimée se soit mouillé pour une telle somme (156 000 dollars), qui n’est pas si importante au regard des risques encourus et des profits possibles », estime un diplomate qui a côtoyé l’ancien représentant de la France au Conseil de sécurité. « Nous sommes plusieurs à penser que les sommes en jeu sont en réalité colossales. » Olivier Weber (Le Point 01/12/05)
A senior U.S. official said France’s refusal to join in threatening force against Iraq doomed the united front assembled in November and convinced Iraqi President Saddam Hussein that he could split the international community and avert war without divulging his programs to develop weapons of mass destruction. (…) As the United States and Britain lobbied for a second U.N. resolution that would authorize the use of force, France played hardball, openly competing for Security Council votes and trying to intimidate supporters of the U.S. position among Eastern European countries. It wasn’t just France’s anti-war stance that Washington resented, but the « gleeful organizing against us, » a senior U.S. official said. This generated even more disfavor within the Bush administration than was reserved for Russia, which opposed the war less aggressively. (…) U.S.-French strains did not start with Iraq, and are unlikely to end anytime soon. Determined to act as a counterweight to American power in Europe and to preserve its influence among former colonies in Africa and the Middle East, France has long viewed the United States and its power with a mixture of gratitude, Old World disdain and sheer mischievousness. President Charles de Gaulle set the relationship on its rocky course in 1966 when he pulled France out of the military arm of the U.S.-led North Atlantic Treaty Organization while remaining part of its political umbrella, the North Atlantic Council, and providing troops and equipment for NATO missions. In the years since, France has refused to give unblinking support for U.S. actions, even blocking the use of its airspace when the United States, under President Ronald Reagan, bombed Libya in 1986. The Baltimore Sun (09.05.2003)

Attention: un mensonge peut en cacher beaucoup d’autres !

Longue allocution présidentielle, unes et dossiers spéciaux médiatiques, drapeaux en berne, extinction de la Tour Eiffel, photo géante sur la façade de l’Hôtel de ville de Paris, messe, journée de deuil national, minute de silence dans les écoles …

A l’heure où après le mariage pour tous, l’on s’apprête à mentir à nos enfants sur leurs propres origines

Où jusque dans leurs salles de classe …

Une France étrangement amnésique multiplie, aussi hypocrites les uns que les autres, hagiographies et hommages …

Et où pour faire oublier le long feuilleton des gilets jaunes et le retour des affaires, la Macronie tente de nous refaire le coup des funérailles quasi-nationales de Johnny il y a deux ans …

Merci au Daily Mail et à l’ancien patron des services secrets britanniques …

Pour leur salutaire remise des pendules à l’heure …

Sur, entre le pillage systématique de la mairie de Paris pendant 20 ans et la fourniture de l’arme nucléaire puis, contre espèces sonnates et trébuchantes, l’indéfectible soutien au tyran Saddam …

Le maitre ès escrocqueries et repris de justice Chirac !

Saddam Hussein ‘bribed Jacques Chirac’ with £5million in bid to make the former French President oppose the US-led Iraq war

Jacques Chirac (pictured) was paid millions of pounds in bribes by Saddam Hussein to oppose the US-led war in Iraq, according to Britain’s former spy chief

Jacques Chirac was paid millions of pounds in bribes by Saddam Hussein to oppose the US-led war in Iraq, according to intelligence revealed for the first time by Britain’s former spy chief.

Sir Richard Dearlove – head of MI6 in the run-up to the invasion of Iraq in 2003 – spoke out as recent obituaries for the former French President cited his principled opposition to US President George Bush’s plans for military action.

But the former spymaster, speaking exclusively to The Mail on Sunday, revealed that Chirac’s true motive for opposing the Gulf War was because he accepted ‘substantial amounts’ of cash from the Iraqi tyrant for his election campaigns.

Sir Richard, who made the sensational revelation only days after the French statesman’s death on Thursday aged 86, said: ‘There were strong indications in the US and UK [intelligence services] that Chirac received money from Saddam.

‘His recent obituaries are saying that Chirac got it right [on Iraq] and the rest of us got it wrong. But I am saying that Chirac’s motive for getting it right may not appear to be what it is.’

Chirac had led an alliance of France, Germany and Russia against plans by the US and Britain to invade Iraq over suspicions that Saddam possessed weapons of mass destruction, which it would pass on to terrorist groups like Al Qaeda.

Sir Richard Dearlove said there had been 'strong indications in the US and UK [intelligence services] that Chirac received money from Saddam'. French Prime Minister Jacques Chirac, left, is seen with Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, right, after arriving in Bagdad in 1976

Sir Richard Dearlove said there had been ‘strong indications in the US and UK [intelligence services] that Chirac received money from Saddam’. French Prime Minister Jacques Chirac, left, is seen with Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, right, after arriving in Bagdad in 1976

The French President addressed his nation on television to declare that he would use France’s veto at the UN to prevent George Bush and Tony Blair gaining a resolution that sanctioned a military invasion.

Chirac’s anti-war stance caused a massive rift between France and the US, prompting American media to deride the French as ‘cheese-eating surrender monkeys’ and some restaurants to rename French fries as ‘Freedom fries’.

While the US and Britain went to war with Iraq without a UN resolution, France stayed out of the coalition.

At the time, MI6 and its US counterparts were gathering ‘reliable intelligence’ that Chirac had pocketed £5 million from the Iraqi dictator to fight his presidential elections in 1995 and in 2002.

The money came from Saddam’s own personal funds and was passed to Chirac through intermediaries, according to the intelligence.

Sir Richard told this newspaper that the ‘long relationship’ between Chirac and Saddam was the real reason why the French leader opposed the 2003 invasion of Iraq.

‘He [Chirac] had this questionable relationship with Saddam Hussein,’ said Sir Richard. ‘It raises a lot of questions as to what his motives were for opposing the UN Resolution in the build-up to the invasion.’

He added: ‘It was not a matter of conscience, it was his [Chirac’s] reputation. If it came out in the wash [that he received money from Saddam], it would have been damaging to him as a politician.

‘It was a dimension which at the time was politically worrying – Chirac had a longstanding relationship with Saddam, which was not state to state, it was personal.’

Sir Richard said obituaries on Chirac praised the former leader’s stance without knowing the full facts. He went on: ‘He was a roguish individual who manoeuvred very cleverly.’

The former spymaster, known as ‘C’ during his five-year spell as head of MI6, is due to give further details at the Cliveden Literary Festival later today.

Last night, France’s embassy in London declined to comment on the revelations, but spokeswoman Aurelie Bonal said: ‘History has shown who took the right decision.’

Former Foreign Secretary Sir Malcolm Rifkind said: ‘Regardless of personal reasons, Chirac would have opposed the war because the French public opposed it so vehemently.’

Voir aussi:

Adieu to Le Grand Philanderer: As Jacques Chirac dies at 86, ROBERT HARDMAN bids farewell to a president so priapic even his official jet had room for illicit trysts

How many times have certain Western politicians cast an envious glance at Jacques Chirac and thought: just how the hell did he get away with it?

France is in deep mourning following the news that its flamboyant, philandering former centre-Right president has died at the age of 86. World leaders joined in a chorus of tributes yesterday.

Precisely what and whom they are mourning, however, remains as opaque as ever.

Former French President Jacques Chirac was often seen in the company of beautiful women such as legendary actress Brigitte Bardot, pictured here in October 1990

The first ex-president in French history to be convicted of corruption, he managed to espouse contradictory opinions on just about everything during four decades in politics.

Here was the great peacemonger – famous for keeping France out of the 2003 invasion of Iraq – who also flogged nuclear technology to Iraq’s Saddam Hussein and who obliterated a South Pacific coral atoll with his own nuclear weapons.

Here was Chirac the ardent Eurosceptic who ended up a passionate advocate of a European superstate.

He was the self-styled champion of human rights and the developing world who also sucked up to the most appalling tyrants, argued that ‘Africa is not ready for democracy’ and deplored the ‘noise and smell’ of workshy immigrants.

And all the while, he was the family man who enjoyed affairs with umpteen women – from humble secretaries and party workers to film stars. As mayor of Paris, he kept a mayoral bus with a bedroom for assignations and used public funds to rent a flat for a political journalist from Le Figaro who was his then mistress.

Chirac, pictured here in 1987 with Madonna, was routinely satirised on a top French comedy show as 'Superliar'

Chirac, pictured here in 1987 with Madonna, was routinely satirised on a top French comedy show as ‘Superliar’

As president, so it was claimed by one biographer, he would never want for ‘naked women, burning with desire’ on board the presidential jet. On a state visit to Tunisia, he managed to bring along both his long-suffering wife, Bernadette, and his mistress du moment on the same trip. The two women did not exchange a word.

Not that he would ever allow himself to be distracted from his work for long. Following the publication of the memoirs of the presidential chauffeur, Chirac could never quite shake off the nickname he acquired thereafter: ‘Five minutes – including shower’ (to add insult to injury, this was later reduced from ‘five’ to ‘three’).

Routinely satirised on a top French comedy show as ‘Superliar’, Chirac would never have got where he got – or lasted as long as he did – in British politics. It was his good fortune to be blessed with a French media which seldom subjected him to the same scrutiny endured by his British counterparts. It also helped that he was sleeping with quite a few of them.

And even when scandals did emerge – be it bungs or mysterious six-figure payments for family entertainment – the publicity never seemed to do him lasting damage. As far as millions of what he called ‘my dear compatriots’ were concerned, he was a quintessentially French political chancer who put the gloire back in to French public life.

He may have enraged the wider world. The British public, for example, were appalled by his withering attack on the UK: ‘You can’t trust people who cook as badly as that.’ Yet it all played brilliantly to a domestic audience.

Chirac, pictured with the Princess of Wales in September 1995, criticised the UK with a withering remark: 'You can’t trust people who cook as badly as that'

Chirac, pictured with the Princess of Wales in September 1995, criticised the UK with a withering remark: ‘You can’t trust people who cook as badly as that’

And on the few occasions when his extra-marital infidelities did emerge into the public domain, they did little harm to his ratings. ‘Do you know where my husband is tonight?’ the aristocratic Bernadette, asked his chauffeur on the night in 1997 when Diana, Princess of Wales was killed in a Paris car crash. According to the chauffeur, the president was enjoying a tryst with an Italian actress. When the story emerged some time later, the French public shrugged.

Chirac was the only surviving child of a well-to-do middle class family who shone at school and university and beyond, passing through the French Army – where he was top of his officer intake – and the prestigious Ecole Nationale d’Administration, the training school for elite civil servants.

His determination, along with his political and bureaucratic skills, were soon spotted by the French prime minister, Georges Pompidou who made him chief of staff and gave him the first of his many nicknames: ‘Le Bulldozer’. Having entered the French parliament in 1967, he was promoted to agriculture minister in the early Seventies. He wisely backed the new president, Giscard d’Estaing, and was rewarded with the post of prime minister.

He soon had a formidable power base from which to stake his claim for the top prize (while also dishing out fake jobs to chums). In 1977, he was elected mayor of Paris and remained there for nearly 20 years.

Chirac became president in 1995 and set about trying to apply a mild dose of Thatcherism to France’s bloated state sector. An inevitable succession of strikes and U-turns ensured that little changed.

At the same time, Chirac decided to conduct a series of nuclear tests on a far-flung Pacific atoll in the French colony of French Polynesia – just before France was due to sign a test ban treaty. There was outrage around the world, although a handful of France’s allies – including Britain – refused to condemn him.

Months later, the British government invited Chirac and his wife on a state visit to London where he was given the full Buckingham Palace treatment. She was said to be charmed by Chirac and the English-speaking Bernadette. However, within a year, Chirac was touring China, deploring Britain’s imperial record in Hong Kong to secure contracts for French businesses in China.

Having seen off a far-Right challenge by the National Front’s Jean-Marie Le Pen, Chirac won a second term as president in 2002.

Soon afterwards, his refusal to join the US and the UK in invading Iraq saw his approval ratings soar at home. However, his decision provoked such contempt among allies that he was derided by the tabloid press as a ‘cheese-eating surrender monkey’.

There was also another trip to stay with the Queen as Britain and France marked the centenary of the bilateral friendship agreement known as the ‘Entente Cordiale’.

Yet, at the same time, he was cosying up to a man whom Britain was trying to ostracise from the rest of the world.

Zimbabwe despot Robert Mugabe had been banned from visiting Europe. Yet Chirac gave him a special pass to attend a meeting of African nations in Paris.

By now, reports of corruption during his days as Mayor of Paris were catching up. In 2011, he received a two-year prison sentence for abuse of trust and public funds, though the sentence was suspended. Thereafter, he disappeared from public view. Bernadette, meanwhile, would have the last word.

Four years ago, she let it be known that she was not a fan of her husband’s policies and that she supported his successor, Nicolas Sarkozy, whom Chirac loathed. She also accused her husband of ‘ruining her life’. His life in the public eye had certainly taken its toll on their two daughters, one of whom died in 2016 after a lifelong battle with anorexia.

In 2002, Bernadette had publicly acknowledged that she had been married to a serial womaniser. It had been difficult, she said but her husband had ‘always returned’ to her. ‘Anyway,’ she added, ‘I have often warned him: Napoleon lost everything on the day he abandoned Josephine.’

Voir également:

Death of a playboy president: France mourns as former head of state Jacques Chirac – famed for his love of fine living and many rumoured affairs – passes away aged 86

Former French President Jacques Chirac has died at the age of 86.

Chirac, who had suffered a series of health problems in recent years, died this morning ‘surrounded by his family’, his son-in-law Frederic Salat-Baroux said today.

In Paris a minute’s silence was held in the National Assembly when the former President’s death was announced this morning while mourners have brought flowers to his home in the capital.

In a long career on the French right, Chirac was twice Prime Minister of France before serving as head of state from 1995 to 2007.

Chirac’s opposition to the Iraq War put him at loggerheads with George W. Bush and Tony Blair. As President he made a historic apology for France’s role in the Holocaust but his term was also marked by riots and a stinging defeat over EU integration.

He also had a reputation as a womaniser and philanderer who repeatedly cheated on his long-suffering wife Bernadette during their 63 years of marriage.

His reputed partners included Italian sex symbol Claudia Cardinale and there were rumours about a series of relationships with journalists and politicians.

Chirac was also known for a love of fine living, revelling in the trappings of power including luxury trips abroad and life at the presidential palace.

After leaving office, Chirac was found guilty of corruption dating back to his time as mayor of Paris and given a two-year suspended prison sentence.

His two immediate successors both paid tribute today, Nicolas Sarkozy declaring that ‘a part of my life has disappeared’ while Francois Hollande said France was ‘losing a statesman’. Current President Emmanuel Macron will speak later.

Voir encore:

« Jacques Chirac a manqué à l’obligation de probité » : le jugement

Pour la première fois depuis Louis XVI et Philippe Pétain, un ancien chef de l’Etat français a été condamné par la justice de son pays. Jacques Chirac, 79 ans, reconnu coupable d’abus de confiance, de détournement de fonds publics…

Augustin Scalbert

Pour la première fois depuis Louis XVI et Philippe Pétain, un ancien chef de l’Etat français a été condamné par la justice de son pays. Jacques Chirac, 79 ans, reconnu coupable d’abus de confiance, de détournement de fonds publics et de prise illégale d’intérêts, a écopé ce jeudi matin de deux ans de prison avec sursis.

Dans un communiqué, Jacques Chirac a annoncé qu’il ne ferait pas appel, même si « sur le fond [il] conteste catégoriquement ce jugement ». Il explique ne plus avoir « hélas, toutes les forces nécessaires pour mener par [lui-même], face à de nouveaux juges, le combat pour la vérité ».

Les réactions à cette première historique sous ce régime sont évidemment nombreuses. Certaines portent sur la sévérité du jugement.

Rue89 publie ci-dessous les attendus – c’est-à-dire les motivations – de la condamnation de Jacques Chirac, tels qu’ils ont été communiqués par la justice à l’Association de la presse judiciaire. (Les caractères gras sont de la rédaction.)

« Attendu que la responsabilité de Jacques Chirac, maire de París, découle du mandat reçu de la collectivité des Parisiens ; qu’elle résulte également de l’autorité hiérarchique exercée par lui sur l’ensemble du personnel de la Ville de Paris et singulièrement sur ses collaborateurs immédiats au premier rang desquels son directeur de cabinet ;

Attendu que le dossier et les débats ont établi que Jacques Chirac a été l’initiateur et l’auteur principal des délits d’abus de confiance, détournement de fonds publics, ingérence et prise illégale d’intérêts ;

que sa culpabilité résulte de pratiques pérennes et réitérées qui lui sont personnellement imputables et dont le développement a été grandement favorisé par une parfaite connaissance des rouages de la municipalité ainsi que la qualité des liens tissés avec les différents acteurs administratifs et politiques au cours de ses années passées à la tête de la Ville de Paris ;

qu’en multipliant les connexions entre son parti et la municipalité parisienne, Jacques Chirac a su créer et entretenir entre la collectivité territoriale et l’organisation politique une confusion telle qu’elle a pu entraîner ses propres amis politiques ;

que le gain en résultant, nonobstant les économies des salaires payés par la mairie de Paris, a pu prendre la forme soit d’un renforcement des effectifs du parti politique dont il était le président soit d’un soutien à la contribution intellectuelle pour l’élaboration du programme politique de ce parti ;

Attendu que par l’ensemble de ces agissements, Jacques Chirac a engagé les fonds de la Ville de Paris pour un montant total d’environ 1 400 000 euros ;

Attendu que l’ancienneté des faits, l’absence d’enrichissement personnel de Jacques Chirac, l’indemnisation de la Ville de Paris par l’UMP et Jacques Chirac, ce dernier à hauteur de 500.000 euros, l’âge et l’état de santé actuel de Jacques Chirac, dont la dégradation est avérée, ainsi que les éminentes responsabilités de chef de l’Etat qu’il a exercées pendant les douze années ayant immédiatement suivi la période de prévention, sont autant d’éléments qui doivent être pris en considération pour déterminer la sanction qu’il convient d’appliquer à son encontre ;

Attendu que ces éléments ne sauraient occulter le fait que, par son action délibérée, en ayant recours au cours de ces cinq années à dix neuf emplois totalement ou partiellement fictifs, Jacques Chirac a manqué à l’obligation de probité qui pèse sur les personnes publiques chargées de la gestion des fonds ou des biens qui leur sont confiés, cela au mépris de l’intérêt général des Parisiens ;

que dans ces conditions, le recours à une peine d’emprisonnement avec sursis dont le quantum sera fixé à deux années apparaît tout à la fois adapté à la personnalité du prévenu et ainsi qu’à la nature et la gravité des faits qu’il a commis. »

Voir enfin:

Chirac, le président qui a dit non à l’Amérique

FIGAROVOX/TRIBUNE – Jacques Chirac a tenu tête à George Bush en refusant d’engager la France dans la guerre en Irak. Pour l’essayiste Hadrien Desuin, si, encore aujourd’hui, on écoute la France dans le monde, c’est notamment grâce à l’acte de bravoure de cet ancien président, fin connaisseur des relations internationales.


Spécialiste des questions internationales et de défense, Hadrien Desuin est essayiste. Il a publié La France atlantiste ou le naufrage de la diplomatie (éd. du Cerf, 2017).


C’est très français au fond. La seule chose que l’on retiendra de la présidence de Jacques Chirac est une belle bravade sans conséquence: son refus spectaculaire de la guerre américaine en Irak. Laquelle, pour le coup, en eut de fâcheuses.

Dieu sait combien Jacques Chirac représentait le caractère national. Au milieu de beaucoup de compromissions, ce fut une parenthèse de gloire, de panache et d’honneur. Cela n’a servi à rien mais le geste en était d’autant plus beau. Chirac eut quelque chose de Cyrano de Bergerac au cours de cet hiver 2002-2003, entraînant la Russie de Poutine et l’Allemagne de Schröder et bien d’autres nations derrière lui. Villepin, au contraire, avait peur de se fâcher avec l’Amérique.

Il n’a pas troqué le retour de la France dans le comité militaire de l’Otan en échange de quelques postes honorifiques. Il a osé renouveler la dissuasion nucléaire française.

C’est en souvenir de ces moments-là que la France est encore écoutée dans le monde. Malheureusement, la geste irakienne n’a pas eu de suites. Que ce soit en Libye et en Syrie, les leçons du vieux Chirac n’ont pas été retenues.

» LIRE AUSSI – Jacques Chirac, le mousquetaire du monde multipolaire

Jacques Chirac avait un grand mérite: il connaissait l’histoire du monde et de ses civilisations. Il savait que l’Irak est un des berceaux de l’humanité et qu’on ne pouvait la détruire sans commettre l’irréparable. Il savait aussi que la démocratie ne se construit pas sur le sable d’une occupation militaire et que tôt ou tard, les chiites d’Irak se tourneraient vers leurs coreligionnaires iraniens, entraînant une terrible guerre de religions. Ce qui devait advenir arriva: la rage cumulée des pétromonarchies du golfe et des terroristes wahhabites a redoublé de violence. Daech et les destructions de Mossoul, Palmyre et Alep sont des contrecoups de la folle expédition de Dick Cheney et Donald Rumsfeld. Tout le Moyen-Orient a souffert de cette lamentable aventure mais pas seulement. Après les attentats de 2004-2005 et 2015-2016 en Europe, nous sommes loin d’avoir retrouvé l’équilibre.

Depuis 2003, le Moyen-Orient est une région en guerre de religion, fracturée et travaillée par le terrorisme, minée par les migrations, incapable de se coordonner et d’avancer ensemble. Chirac avait au long de sa carrière noué des relations fidèles avec les chefs d’États d’Afrique et d’Asie. Il était soucieux du sort des Palestiniens, lui qui était intraitable avec l’antisémitisme.

L’ancien Premier ministre de Giscard et Mitterrand a aussi commis quelques erreurs. On pense notamment à sa gestion de la crise en Côte d’Ivoire ou lorsqu’il laissa l’Otan bombarder le Kosovo sans mandat des Nations unies.

Mais au moins Chirac s’intéressait et comprenait les relations internationales, sans avoir peur de quiconque.

Voir par ailleurs:

Richard Ferrand rattrapé par ses tweets sur la mise en examen de François Fillon

En 2017, il estimait que le candidat de la droite, alors mis en examen, avait « perdu toute autorité morale ».

Romain Herreros

Hufffington Post

12/09/2019

POLITIQUE – Les paroles s’envolent, les écrits restent. Après la mise en examen de Richard Ferrand ce jeudi 12 septembre, les réactions sont nombreuses dans la classe politique. Alors que la majorité et l’Elysée font bloc autour du président de l’Assemblée nationale, des responsables de l’opposition, à l’image du socialiste Olivier Faure ou du député LR Philippe Gosselin, estiment que l’élu du Finistère n’est plus en condition de diriger les débats sereinement.

Mais au delà de son maintien (ou non) au Perchoir, c’est la “présomption d’innocence” à géométrie variable de Richard Ferrand qui est pointée, notamment à droite. En cause, des tweets qu’il avait publiés en pleine campagne présidentielle, quand François Fillon, alors embourbé dans le “Penelope Gate”, avait été mis en examen pour détournement de fonds publics.

L’ex-député socialiste s’en prenait à cette droite qui “voudrait que soit placé dans nos mairies et nos écoles le portrait d’un homme mis en examen, qui a perdu toute autorité morale”. Dans une autre publication, il tenait à peu près les mêmes propos concernant le candidat LR: “nous disons à François Fillon qu’il a perdu toute autorité morale pour diriger l’État et parler au nom de la France”.

Des propos qui intervenaient dans un contexte où le candidat de la droite avait promis qu’il jetterai l’éponge en cas de mise en examen, et qui avait attaqué Nicolas Sarkozy sur ce point lors de la primaire de la droite.

Voir enfin:

Profil

Gérard Fauré, une clientèle haut de came

L’ancien dealer et braqueur de banque, qui a croisé la route de Charles Pasqua ou de Johnny Hallyday publie son autobiographie. Son parcours hors norme laisse entrevoir les liens entre politique et voyoucratie.

Renaud Lecadre

Barnum garanti. Aujourd’hui sort en librairie l’autobiographie d’un beau voyou. Gérard Fauré (1), fils d’un médecin militaire, fut un authentique trafiquant de cocaïne, doublé d’un braqueur de banques, et tueur à gages à l’occasion. A ce titre, l’intitulé du bouquin, Dealer du tout-Paris, le fournisseur des stars parle (1), pourrait prêter à confusion. Il n’était pas que cela. Mais comme le souligne son éditeur, Yannick Dehée, «c’est la première fois qu’un voyou parle sur les politiques». Et pas n’importe lesquels : Charles Pasqua et Jacques Chirac.

Un quart du manuscrit initial a été expurgé, des noms ont été initialisés ou anonymisés. Demeure le name-dropping dans le milieu du show-biz, visant des personnalités déjà connues pour leur addiction à la coke. Certains lecteurs s’en délecteront, mais il y a mieux – ou pire : l’interférence entre la politique et la voyoucratie, fournisseuse de services en tous genres. «On entre dans le dur», souligne un spécialiste du secteur.

Pasqua n’était guère cocaïnomane – «j’en suis sûr», atteste notre lascar – mais l’argent parallèle du secteur a pu l’intéresser… Fauré, précoce dealer au Maroc puis un peu partout ailleurs, raconte avoir été très vite pris en charge, dans les années 70, par l’Organisation de l’armée secrète. Initialement dédiée au maintien de l’Algérie française, l’OAS changera très vite de fusil d’épaule : «opérations homo» (assassinats ciblés) contre des indépendantistes basques ou corses, mais aussi braquages de banques. Le Service d’action civique (SAC) prendra ensuite le relais. Fauré, fort de ses compétences en la matière, met la main à l’ouvrage : «La recette Pasqua consistait à constituer des « mouvements patriotiques », en vérité violents, avec des voyous peu recommandables. Comment les rémunérer ? Tout simplement avec l’argent provenant de gros braquages de banques et de bijouteries, commis en toute impunité. Avec Pasqua, tout était possible, du moins pour les membres du SAC. Patriote, certainement prêt à mourir pour son pays, il gardait en revanche un œil attentif sur les caisses du parti. Moyennant la moitié de nos gains, il nous garantissait l’impunité sur des affaires juteuses et triées sur le volet, sachant exactement là ou il fallait frapper.»

L’auteur narre ainsi sa rencontre avec le politique, qu’il situe en 1978 : «Charles Pasqua donnait de sa voix tonitruante des ordres à tout le personnel, toutes les têtes brûlées de France et de l’Algérie française.» Et de lui lancer : «Alors, c’est toi le mec dont on me vante les mérites ? Bien. Tu vas reprendre du service dès aujourd’hui, avec tes amis, si tu veux bien. J’ai une mission de la plus haute importance, que tu ne peux pas te permettre de refuser, ni de rater. Compris ?»

Backgammon

A l’issue de l’entretien, Gérard Fauré croisera illico le parrain marseillais «Tony» Zampa, qui traînait là par hasard, lequel l’entreprend dans la foulée sur différentes affaires à venir : des investissements dans les casinos et la prostitution aux Pays-Bas. Cas peut-être unique dans les annales de la voyoucratie, il fera parallèlement équipe avec l’illustre Francis Vanverberghe, dit «Francis le Belge», «doté d’un savoir-vivre qui valait bien son savoir-tuer». Il en garde un souvenir mi-épaté mi-amusé : «Zampa ou « le Belge », qui pourtant étaient des gangsters d’envergure internationale, se seraient fait descendre comme des mouches s’ils avaient eu la mauvaise idée de mettre les pieds en Colombie ou au Venezuela, car ils étaient prétentieux.» Pour la petite histoire, il reconstitue leur brouille à propos de… Johnny Hallyday : «Tous les deux voulaient le prendre sous tutelle, pour capter sa fortune ou l’utiliser comme prête-nom. Ils ont fini par s’entre-tuer pour ce motif et quelques autres.» Fauré considérait Johnny comme sa «plus belle prise de guerre» dans le microcosme de la coke. Mais lui gardera un chien de sa chienne après que le chanteur l’a balancé sans vergogne aux Stups, contre sa propre immunité.

Notre voyou prétend n’avoir jamais balancé, lui, du moins jusqu’à ce livre. «Si vous le voulez bien, j’attends votre version des faits s’agissant des deux chèques de M. Chirac rédigés à votre ordre. Je vous invite à bien réfléchir avant de répondre» : sollicitation d’une juge d’instruction parisienne en 1986, hors procès-verbal. Tempête sous un crâne à l’issue de laquelle Gérard Fauré évoquera une dette de jeu au backgammon… Dans son bouquin, l’explication est tout autre – «J’avais dû travestir la vérité.» S’il ne peut attester que l’ex-président prenait de la coke, il évoque son penchant pour les femmes… Pour l’anecdote, les deux chèques en question feront l’objet d’une rapide opposition de leur signataire. «Chirac, dont j’avais admiré la prestance et même les idées politiques, s’est avéré mauvais payeur.»

Hommage

Ce livre-confession est une authentique plongée dans le commerce de la drogue. Notre trafiquant, dix-huit ans de prison au compteur, connaît son produit : «Aucune coke ne ressemble à une autre. Certaines, comme la colombienne, vous donnent envie de danser, de faire l’amour, mais rendent très agressif, parano et méfiant. La bolivienne rend morose, triste, et pousse parfois au suicide. La meilleure est la péruvienne, qui augmente votre tonus, votre joie de vivre et pousse à la méditation, au questionnement. La vénézuélienne a des effets uniquement sur la performance sexuelle. Les autres, brésilienne, chilienne ou surinamienne, ne sont que des pâles copies.» Son mode de transport aussi : dans le ventre d’une chèvre, elle-même logée dans l’estomac d’un boa que les douaniers, à l’aéroport d’arrivée, prendront soin de ne pas réveiller. Puis, une fois le coup du boa connu des gabelous, le ventre d’un nourrisson – une technique brésilienne consistant à empailler un bébé mort pour le maintenir en bon état, et ainsi faire croire qu’il dort au moment de passer la frontière…

Le livre s’achève sur cet hommage indirect à la police française : lors d’une perquisition à son domicile, 10 des 15 kilos de cocaïne disparaissent, tout comme 90 % des 300 000 euros logés dans un tiroir. «Je n’ai pas pensé un seul instant me plaindre de la brigade du quai des Orfèvres, dans la mesure où les vols qu’elle commettait chez moi ne pouvaient qu’alléger ma future condamnation.»

(1) Nouveau Monde, 224 pp., 17,90 €.


11 septembre/18e: Des gens avaient fait quelque chose (While the Ilhan Omars of this world never miss an opportunity to spit on their adopted countries, thank God for Mitchell Zuckoff’s attempt to ‘delay the descent of 9/11 into the well of history’)

11 septembre, 2019

Image result for Nicholas Haros Jr.

Image result for Here's your something NYP coverImage result for George W bush Job approval ratings trend
Related imagehttp://2.bp.blogspot.com/-J5FqbfMis0E/TndH_ZSniVI/AAAAAAAAAZU/5hYzGzijR4o/s1600/IMG_1426.jpgCountries That Lost Citizens On 9/11
Image result for fall and rise zuckoff book cover
Il n’y a pas de plus grand amour que de donner sa vie pour ses amis. (…) Si le monde vous hait, sachez qu’il m’a haï avant vous. (…) S’ils m’ont persécuté, ils vous persécuteront aussi. Jésus (Jean 15: 13-20)
Let’s roll ! Todd Beamer
You’ve got to turn on evil,when it’s coming after you, you’ve gotta face it down … Neil Young (« Let’s roll, 2001)
[Beamer’s wife Lisa] was talking about how he always used to say that (« let’s roll ») with the kids when they’d go out and do something, that it’s what he said a lot when he had a job to do. And it’s just so poignant, and there’s no more of a legendary, heroic act than what those people did. With no promise of martyrdom, no promise of any reward anywhere for this, other than just knowing that you did the right thing. And not even having a chance to think about it or plan it or do anything — just a gut reaction that was heroic and ultimately cost them all their lives. What more can you say? It was just so obvious that somebody had to write something or do something. Neil Young
In the normal course of events, Presidents come to this chamber to report on the state of the Union. Tonight, no such report is needed. It has already been delivered by the American people. We have seen it in the courage of passengers, who rushed terrorists to save others on the ground — passengers like an exceptional man named Todd Beamer. And would you please help me to welcome his wife, Lisa Beamer, here tonight. George W. Bush
Et immédiatement, le centre sacrificiel se mit à générer des réactions habituelles : un sentiment d’unanimité et de deuil. […] Des phrases ont commencé à se dire comme « Nous sommes tous Américains » – un sentiment purement fictif pour la plupart d’entre nous. Ce fut étonnant de voir l’unité se former autour du centre sacré, rapidement nommé Ground Zero, une unité qui se concrétisera ensuite par un drapeau, une grande participation aux cérémonies religieuses, les chefs religieux soudainement pris au sérieux, des bougies, des lieux saints, des prières, tous les signes de la religion de la mort. […] Et puis il y avait le deuil. Comme nous aimons le deuil ! Cela nous donne bonne conscience, nous rend innocents. Voilà ce qu’Aristote voulait dire par katharsis, et qui a des échos profonds dans les racines sacrificielles de la tragédie dramatique. Autour du centre sacrificiel, les personnes présentes se sentent justifiées et moralement bonnes. Une fausse bonté qui soudainement les sort de leurs petites trahisons, leurs lâchetés, leur mauvaise conscience. James Alison
La révolte contre l’ethnocentrisme est une invention de l’Occident, introuvable en dehors. (…) À la différence de toutes les autres cultures, qui ont toujours été ethnocentriques tout de go et sans complexe, nous autres occidentaux sommes toujours simultanément nous-mêmes et notre propre ennemi. René Girard
L’erreur est toujours de raisonner dans les catégories de la « différence », alors que la racine de tous les conflits, c’est plutôt la « concurrence », la rivalité mimétique entre des êtres, des pays, des cultures. La concurrence, c’est-à-dire le désir d’imiter l’autre pour obtenir la même chose que lui, au besoin par la violence. Sans doute le terrorisme est-il lié à un monde « différent » du nôtre, mais ce qui suscite le terrorisme n’est pas dans cette « différence » qui l’éloigne le plus de nous et nous le rend inconcevable. Il est au contraire dans un désir exacerbé de convergence et de ressemblance. (…) Ce qui se vit aujourd’hui est une forme de rivalité mimétique à l’échelle planétaire. Lorsque j’ai lu les premiers documents de Ben Laden, constaté ses allusions aux bombes américaines tombées sur le Japon, je me suis senti d’emblée à un niveau qui est au-delà de l’islam, celui de la planète entière. Sous l’étiquette de l’islam, on trouve une volonté de rallier et de mobiliser tout un tiers-monde de frustrés et de victimes dans leurs rapports de rivalité mimétique avec l’Occident. Mais les tours détruites occupaient autant d’étrangers que d’Américains. Et par leur efficacité, par la sophistication des moyens employés, par la connaissance qu’ils avaient des Etats-Unis, par leurs conditions d’entraînement, les auteurs des attentats n’étaient-ils pas un peu américains ? On est en plein mimétisme.Ce sentiment n’est pas vrai des masses, mais des dirigeants. Sur le plan de la fortune personnelle, on sait qu’un homme comme Ben Laden n’a rien à envier à personne. Et combien de chefs de parti ou de faction sont dans cette situation intermédiaire, identique à la sienne. Regardez un Mirabeau au début de la Révolution française : il a un pied dans un camp et un pied dans l’autre, et il n’en vit que de manière plus aiguë son ressentiment. Aux Etats-Unis, des immigrés s’intègrent avec facilité, alors que d’autres, même si leur réussite est éclatante, vivent aussi dans un déchirement et un ressentiment permanents. Parce qu’ils sont ramenés à leur enfance, à des frustrations et des humiliations héritées du passé. Cette dimension est essentielle, en particulier chez des musulmans qui ont des traditions de fierté et un style de rapports individuels encore proche de la féodalité. (…) Cette concurrence mimétique, quand elle est malheureuse, ressort toujours, à un moment donné, sous une forme violente. A cet égard, c’est l’islam qui fournit aujourd’hui le ciment qu’on trouvait autrefois dans le marxisme.  René Girard
J’ai l’impression que beaucoup de gens ont oublié le 11 Septembre – pas complètement, mais ils l’ont réduit à une espèce de norme tacite. Quand j’ai donné cet entretien au Monde, l’opinion générale pensait qu’il s’agissait d’un événement inhabituel, nouveau, et incomparable. Aujourd’hui, je pense que beaucoup de gens seraient en désaccord avec cette remarque. Malheureusement, l’attitude des Américains face au 11 Septembre a été influencée par l’idéologie politique, à cause de la guerre en Irak. Le fait d’insister sur le 11 Septembre est devenu « « conservateur » et « alarmiste ». Ceux qui aimeraient mettre une fin immédiate à la guerre en Irak tendent donc à le minimiser. Cela dit, je ne veux pas dire qu’ils ont tort de vouloir terminer la guerre en Irak, mais avant de minimiser le 11 Septembre, ils devraient faire très attention et considérer la situation dans sa globalité. Aujourd’hui, cette tendance est très répandue, car les événements dont vous parlez – qui ont eu lieu après le 11 Septembre et qui en sont, en quelque sorte, de vagues réminiscences – sont incomparablement moins puissants et ont beaucoup moins de visibilité. Par conséquent, il y a tout le problème de l’interprétation : qu’est-ce que le 11 Septembre ? (…) je le vois comme un événement déterminant, et c’est très grave de le minimiser aujourd’hui. Le désir habituel d’être optimiste, de ne pas voir l’unicité de notre temps du point de vue de la violence, correspond à un désir futile et désespéré de penser notre temps comme la simple continuation de la violence du XXe siècle. Je pense, personnellement, que nous avons affaire à une nouvelle dimension qui est mondiale. Ce que le communisme avait tenté de faire, une guerre vraiment mondiale, est maintenant réalisé, c’est l’actualité. Minimiser le 11 Septembre, c’est ne pas vouloir voir l’importance de cette nouvelle dimension. (…)  [la guerre froide et le terrorisme islamiste] sont similaires dans la mesure où elles représentent une menace révolutionnaire, une menace globale. Mais la menace actuelle va au-delà de la politique, puisqu’elle comporte un aspect religieux. Ainsi, l’idée qu’il puisse y avoir un conflit plus total que celui conçu par les peuples totalitaires, comme l’Allemagne nazie, et qui puisse devenir en quelque sorte la propriété de l’islam, est tout simplement stupéfiante, tellement contraire à ce que tout le monde croyait sur la politique. Il faudrait beaucoup y travailler, car il n’y a pas de vraie réflexion sur la coexistence des autres religions, et en particulier du christianisme avec l’islam. Le problème religieux est plus radical dans la mesure où il dépasse les divisions idéologiques – que bien sûr, la plupart des intellectuels aujourd’hui ne sont pas prêts d’abandonner. En deçà de ces visions idéologiques, nos réflexions sur le 11 Septembre resteront superficielles. Nous devons réfléchir dans le contexte plus large de la dimension apocalyptique du christianisme. Celle-ci est une menace, car la survie même de la planète est en jeu. Notre planète est menacée par trois choses qui émanent de l’homme : la menace nucléaire, la menace écologique et la manipulation biologique de l’espèce humaine. L’idée que l’homme ne puisse pas maîtriser ses propres pouvoirs est aussi vraie dans le domaine biologique que dans le domaine militaire. C’est cette triple menace mondiale qui domine aujourd’hui. (…) Le terrorisme est une forme de guerre, et la guerre est la continuation de la politique par d’autres moyens. En ce sens, le terrorisme est politique. Mais le terrorisme est la seule forme possible de guerre face à la technologie. Les événements actuels en Irak le confirment. La supériorité de l’Occident, c’est sa technologie, et elle s’est révélée inutile en Irak. L’Occident s’est mis dans la pire des situations en déclarant qu’il transformerait l’Irak en une démocratie jeffersonienne ! C’est précisément ce qu’il ne peut pas faire. Il est impuissant face à l’islam car la division entre les sunnites et les chiites est infiniment plus importante. Alors même qu’ils combattent l’Occident, ils parviennent encore à lutter l’un contre l’autre. Pourquoi l’Occident devrait-il s’investir dans ce conflit interne à l’islam alors que nous ne parvenons même pas à en concevoir l’immense puissance au sein du monde islamique lui-même ? (…) Il s’agit de notre incompréhension du rôle de la religion, et de notre propre monde ; c’est ne pas comprendre que ce qui nous unit est très fragile. Lorsque nous évoquons nos principes démocratiques, parlons-nous de l’égalité et des élections, ou bien parlons-nous de capitalisme, de consommation, de libre échange, etc. ? Je pense que dans les années à venir, l’Occident sera mis à l’épreuve. Comment réagira-t-il : avec force ou faiblesse ? Se dissoudra-t-il ? Les occidentaux devraient se poser la question de savoir s’ils ont de vrais principes, et si ceux-ci sont chrétiens ou bien purement consuméristes. Le consumérisme n’a pas d’emprise sur ceux qui se livrent aux attentats suicides. L’Amérique devrait y réfléchir, car elle offre au monde ce que l’on considère de plus attrayant. Pourquoi cela ne fonctionne- t-il pas vraiment chez les musulmans ? Est-ce par ressentiment ou ont-ils, contre cela, un système de défense bien organisé ? Ou bien, leur perspective religieuse est-elle plus authentique et plus puissante ? Le vrai problème est là. (…) Je suis bien moins affirmatif que je ne l’étais au moment du 11 Septembre sur l’idée d’un ressentiment total. Je me souviens m’être emporté lors d’une rencontre à l’École Polytechnique lorsque je me suis mis d’accord avec Jean-Pierre Dupuy sur l’interprétation du ressentiment du monde musulman. Maintenant, je ne pense pas que cela suffise. Le ressentiment seul peut-il motiver cette capacité de mourir ainsi ? Le monde musulman pourrait-il vraiment être indifférent à la culture de consommation de masse ? Peut-être qu’il l’est. Je ne sais pas. Il serait sans doute excessif de leur attribuer une telle envie. Si les islamistes ont vraiment pour objectif la domination du monde, alors ils l’ont déjà dépassée. Nous ne savons pas si l’industrialisation rapide apparaîtra dans le monde musulman, ou s’ils tenteront de gagner sur la croissance démographique et la fascination qu’ils exercent. Il y a de plus en plus de conversions en Occident. La fascination de la violence y joue certainement un rôle. (…) Il y a là du ressentiment, évidemment. Et c’est ce qui a dû émouvoir ceux qui ont applaudi les terroristes, comme s’ils étaient dans un stade. C’est cela le ressentiment. C’est évident et indéniable. Mais est-ce qu’il représente l’unique force ? La force majeure ? Peut-il être l’unique cause des attentats suicides ? Je n’en suis pas sûr. La richesse accumulée en Occident, comparée au reste du monde, est un scandale, et le 11 Septembre n’est pas sans rapport avec ce fait. Si je ne veux donc pas complètement supprimer l’idée du ressentiment, il ne peut pas être l’unique explication. (…)  L’autre force serait religieuse. Allah est contre le consumérisme, etc. En réalité, le musulman pense que les rituels de prohibition religieuse sont une force qui maintient l’unité de la communauté, ce qui a totalement disparu ou qui est en déclin en Occident. Les gens en Occident ne sont motivés que par le consumérisme, les bons salaires, etc. Les musulmans disent : « leurs armes sont terriblement dangereuses, mais comme peuple, ils sont tellement faibles que leur civilisation peut être facilement détruite ». C’est ce qu’ils pensent et ils n’ont peut-être pas complètement tort. Il me semble qu’il y a quelque chose de juste dans ce propos. Finalement, je crois que la perspective chrétienne sur la violence surmontera tout, mais ce sera une épreuve importante. (…) Il faut faire attention à ne pas justifier le 11 Septembre en le qualifiant de sacrificiel. Je pense que Jean-Pierre Dupuy ne le dit pas. Il maintient une sorte de neutralité. Mais ce qu’il dit sur la nature sacrée de Ground Zero au World Trade Center est, je pense, parfaitement justifié. (…) Je pense que James Alison a raison de parler de la katharsis dans le contexte du 11 Septembre. La notion de katharsis est extrêmement importante. C’est un mot religieux. En réalité, cela veut dire « la purge » au sens de purification. Dans l’Église orthodoxe, par exemple, katharos veut dire purification. C’est le mot qui exprime l’effet positif de la religion. La purge est ce qui nous rend purs. C’est ce que la religion est censée faire, et ce qu’elle fait avec le sacrifice. Je considère l’utilisation du mot katharsis par Aristote comme parfaitement juste. Quand les gens condamnent la théorie mimétique, ils ne voient pas l’apport d’Aristote. Il ne semble parler que de tragédie, mais pourtant, le théâtre tragique traite du sacrifice comme un drame. On l’appelle d’ailleurs ‘l’ode de la chèvre’. Aristote est toujours conventionnel dans ses explications – conventionnel au sens positif. Un Grec très intelligent cherchant à justifier sa religion, utiliserait, je pense, le mot katharsis. Ainsi, ma réponse mettrait l’accent sur la katharsis au sens aristotélicien du terme. (…) pour le 11 Septembre, il y avait la télévision qui nous rendait présents à l’événement, et intensifiait ainsi l’expérience. L’événement était en direct, comme nous le disons en français. On ne savait pas ce qui allait advenir par la suite. Moi-même, j’ai vu le deuxième avion frapper le gratte-ciel, en direct. C’était comme un spectacle tragique, mais réel en même temps. Si nous ne l’avions pas vécu dans le sens le plus littéral, il n’aurait pas eu le même impact. Je pense que si j’avais écrit La Violence et le Sacré après le 11 Septembre, j’y aurais très probablement inclus cet événement. C’est l’événement qui rend possible une compréhension des événements contemporains, car il rend l’archaïque plus intelligible. Le 11 Septembre représente un étrange retour à l’archaïque à l’intérieur du sécularisme de notre temps. Il n’y a pas si longtemps, les gens auraient eu une réaction chrétienne vis-à-vis du 11 Septembre. Aujourd’hui, ils ont une réaction archaïque, qui augure mal de l’avenir. (…) L’avenir apocalyptique n’est pas quelque chose d’historique. C’est quelque chose de religieux sans lequel on ne peut pas vivre. C’est ce que les chrétiens actuels ne comprennent pas. Parce que, dans l’avenir apocalyptique, le bien et le mal sont mélangés de telle manière que d’un point de vue chrétien, on ne peut pas parler de pessimisme. Cela est tout simplement contenu dans le christianisme. Pour le comprendre, lisons la Première Lettre aux Corinthiens : si les puissants, c’est-à-dire les puissants de ce monde, avaient su ce qui arriverait, ils n’auraient jamais crucifié le Seigneur de la Gloire – car cela aurait signifié leur destruction (cf. 1 Co 2, 8). Car lorsque l’on crucifie le Seigneur de la Gloire, la magie des pouvoirs, qui est le mécanisme du bouc émissaire, est révélée. Montrer la crucifixion comme l’assassinat d’une victime innocente, c’est montrer le meurtre collectif et révéler ce phénomène mimétique. C’est finalement cette vérité qui entraîne les puissants à leur perte. Et toute l’histoire est simplement la réalisation de cette prophétie. Ceux qui prétendent que le christianisme est anarchiste ont un peu raison. Les chrétiens détruisent les pouvoirs de ce monde, car ils détruisent la légitimité de toute violence. Pour l’État, le christianisme est une force anarchique, surtout lorsqu’il retrouve sa puissance spirituelle d’autrefois. Ainsi, le conflit avec les musulmans est bien plus considérable que ce que croient les fondamentalistes. Les fondamentalistes pensent que l’apocalypse est la violence de Dieu. Alors qu’en lisant les chapitres apocalyptiques, on voit que l’apocalypse est la violence de l’homme déchaînée par la destruction des puissants, c’est-à-dire des États, comme nous le voyons en ce moment. (…) mais (…) à la fin, la force religieuse est du côté du Christ. Cependant, il semblerait que la vraie force religieuse soit du côté de la violence. (…) Lorsque les puissances seront vaincues, la violence deviendra telle que la fin arrivera. Si l’on suit les chapitres apocalyptiques, c’est bien cela qu’ils annoncent. Il y aura des révolutions et des guerres. Les États s’élèveront contre les États, les nations contre les nations. Cela reflète la violence. Voilà le pouvoir anarchique que nous avons maintenant, avec des forces capables de détruire le monde entier. On peut donc voir l’apparition de l’apocalypse d’une manière qui n’était pas possible auparavant. Au début du christianisme, l’apocalypse semblait magique : le monde va finir ; nous irons tous au paradis, et tout sera sauvé ! L’erreur des premiers chrétiens était de croire que l’apocalypse était toute proche. Les premiers textes chronologiques chrétiens sont les Lettres aux Thessaloniciens qui répondent à la question : pourquoi le monde continue-t-il alors qu’on en a annoncé la fin ? Paul dit qu’il y a quelque chose qui retient les pouvoirs, le katochos (quelque chose qui retient). L’interprétation la plus commune est qu’il s’agit de l’Empire romain. La crucifixion n’a pas encore dissout tout l’ordre. Si l’on consulte les chapitres du christianisme, ils décrivent quelque chose comme le chaos actuel, qui n’était pas présent au début de l’Empire romain. Comment le monde peut-il finir alors qu’il est tenu si fortement par les forces de l’ordre ? (…)  [La religion chrétienne], fondamentalement, c’est la religion qui annonce le monde à venir ; il n’est pas question de se battre pour ce monde. C’est le christianisme moderne qui oublie ses origines et sa vraie direction. L’apocalypse au début du christianisme était une promesse, pas une menace, car ils croyaient vraiment en un monde prochain. (…) Je suis pessimiste au sens actuel du terme. Mais en fait, je suis optimiste si l’on regarde le monde actuel qui confirme vraiment toutes les prédictions. On voit l’apocalypse s’étendre tous les jours : le pouvoir de détruire le monde, les armes de plus en plus fatales, et autres menaces qui se multiplient sous nos yeux. Nous croyons toujours que tous ces problèmes sont gérables par l’homme mais, dans une vision d’ensemble, c’est impossible. Ils ont une valeur quasi surnaturelle. Comme les fondamentalistes, beaucoup de lecteurs de l’Évangile reconnaissent la situation mondiale dans ces chapitres apocalyptiques. Mais les fondamentalistes croient que la violence ultime vient de Dieu, alors ils ne voient pas vraiment le rapport avec la situation actuelle – le rapport religieux. Cela montre combien ils sont peu chrétiens. La violence humaine, qui menace aujourd’hui le monde, est plus conforme au thème apocalyptique de l’Évangile qu’ils ne le pensent. (…) Par exemple, nous avons moins de violence privée. Comparé à aujourd’hui, si vous regardez les statistiques du XVIIIe siècle, c’est impressionnant de voir la violence qu’il y avait. (…) le mouvement pacifiste est totalement chrétien, qu’il l’avoue ou non. Mais en même temps, il y a un déferlement d’inventions technologiques qui ne sont plus retenues par aucune force culturelle. Jacques Maritain disait qu’il y a à la fois plus de bien et plus de mal dans le monde. Je suis d’accord avec lui. Au fond, le monde est en permanence plus chrétien et moins chrétien. Mais le monde est fondamentalement désorganisé par le christianisme. (…) la pensée de Marcel Gauchet résulte de toute l’interprétation moderne du christianisme. Nous disons que nous sommes les héritiers du christianisme, et que l’héritage du christianisme est l’humanisme. Cela est en partie vrai. Mais en même temps, Marcel Gauchet ne considère pas le monde dans sa globalité. On peut tout expliquer avec la théorie mimétique. Dans un monde qui paraît plus menaçant, il est certain que la religion reviendra. Le 11 Septembre est le début de cela, car lors de cette attaque, la technologie n’était pas utilisée à des fins humanistes mais à des fins radicales, métaphysico-religieuses non chrétiennes. Je trouve cela incroyable, car j’ai l’habitude d’observer les forces religieuses et humanistes ensemble, et non pas en opposition. Mais suite au 11 Septembre, j’ai eu l’impression que la religion archaïque revenait, avec l’islam, d’une manière extrêmement rigoureuse. L’islam a beaucoup d’aspects propres aux religions bibliques à l’exception de la compréhension de la violence comme un mal non pas divin mais humain. Il considère la violence comme totalement divine. C’est pour cela que l’opposition est plus significative qu’avec le communisme, qui est un humanisme même s’il est factice et erroné, et qu’il tourne à la terreur. Mais c’est toujours un humanisme. Et tout à coup, on revient à la religion, la religion archaïque – mais avec des armes modernes. Ce que le monde attend est le moment où les musulmans radicaux pourront d’une certaine manière se servir d’armes nucléaires. Il faut regarder le Pakistan, qui est une nation musulmane possédant des armes nucléaires et l’Iran qui tente de les développer. (…) [la Guerre Froide est] complètement dépassée (…) Et la rapidité avec laquelle elle a été dépassée est incroyable. L’Union Soviétique a montré qu’elle devenait plus humaine lorsqu’elle n’a pas tenté de forcer le blocus de Kennedy, et à partir de cet instant, elle n’a plus fait peur. Après Khrouchtchev on a eu rapidement besoin de Gorbatchev. Quand Gorbatchev est arrivé au pouvoir, les oppositions ne se trouvaient plus à l’intérieur de l’humanisme. Les communistes voulaient organiser le monde pour qu’il n’y ait plus de pauvres. Les capitalistes ont constaté que les pauvres n’avaient pas de poids. Les capitalistes l’ont emporté. [Et ce conflit sera plus dangereux parce qu’il ne s’agit plus d’une lutte au sein de l’humanisme] bien qu’ils n’aient pas les mêmes armes que l’Union Soviétique – du moins pas encore. Le monde change si rapidement. Cela dit, de plus en plus de gens en Occident verront la faiblesse de notre humanisme ; nous n’allons pas redevenir chrétiens, mais on fera plus attention au fait que la lutte se trouve entre le christianisme et l’islam, plus qu’entre l’islam et l’humanisme. (…) Avec l’islam je pense que l’opposition est totale. Dans l’islam, si l’on est violent, on est inévitablement l’instrument de Dieu. Cela veut donc dire que la violence apocalyptique vient de Dieu. Aux États-Unis, les fondamentalistes disent cela, mais les grandes églises ne le disent pas. Néanmoins, ils ne poussent pas suffisamment leur pensée pour dire que si la violence ne vient pas de Dieu, elle vient de l’homme, et que nous en sommes responsables. Nous acceptons de vivre sous la protection d’armes nucléaires. Cela a probablement été la plus grande erreur de l’Occident. Imaginez-vous les implications. (…) la dissuasion nucléaire. Mais il s’agit de faibles excuses. Nous croyons que la violence est garante de la paix. Mais cette hypothèse ne me paraît pas valable. Nous ne voulons pas aujourd’hui réfléchir à ce que signifie cette confiance dans la violence. [Après autre événement tel que le 11 Septembre] Je pense que les personnes deviendraient plus conscientes. Mais cela serait probablement comme la première attaque. Il y aurait une période de grande tension spirituelle et intellectuelle, suivie d’un lent relâchement. Quand les gens ne veulent pas voir, ils y arrivent. Je pense qu’il y aura des révolutions spirituelles et intellectuelles dans un avenir proche. Ce que je dis aujourd’hui semble complètement invraisemblable, et pourtant je pense que le 11 Septembre va devenir de plus en plus significatif.  (…) Il faut distinguer entre le sacrifice des autres et le sacrifice de soi. Le Christ dit au Père : « Vous ne vouliez ni holocauste, ni sacrifice ; moi je dis : “Me voici” » (cf. He 10, 6-7). Autrement dit, je préfère me sacrifier plutôt que de sacrifier l’autre. Mais cela doit toujours être nommé sacrifice. Lorsque nous utilisons le mot « sacrifice » dans nos langues modernes, c’est dans le sens chrétien. Dieu dit : « Si personne d’autre n’est assez bon pour se sacrifier lui plutôt que son frère, je le ferai. » Ainsi, je satisfais à la demande de Dieu envers l’homme. Je préfère mourir plutôt que tuer. Mais tous les autres hommes préfèrent tuer plutôt que mourir. (…)  Dans le christianisme, on ne se martyrise pas soi-même. On n’est pas volontaire pour se faire tuer. On se met dans une situation où le respect des préceptes de Dieu (tendre l’autre joue, etc.) peut nous faire tuer. Cela dit, on se fera tuer parce que les hommes veulent nous tuer, non pas parce qu’on s’est porté volontaire. Ce n’est pas comme la notion japonaise de kamikaze. La notion chrétienne signifie que l’on est prêt à mourir plutôt qu’à tuer. C’est bien l’attitude de la bonne prostituée face au jugement de Salomon. Elle dit : « Donnez l’enfant à mon ennemi plutôt que de le tuer. » Sacrifier son enfant serait comme se sacrifier elle-même, car en acceptant une sorte de mort, elle se sacrifie elle-même. Et lorsque Salomon dit qu’elle est la vraie mère, cela ne signifie pas qu’elle est la mère biologique, mais la mère selon l’esprit. Cette histoire se trouve dans le Premier Livre des Rois (3, 16-28), qui est, à certains égards, un livre assez violent. Mais il me semble qu’il n’y a pas de meilleur symbole préchrétien du sacrifice de soi par le Christ. (…) Je vois en cela le contraste du christianisme avec toutes les religions archaïques du sacrifice. Cela dit, la religion musulmane a beaucoup copié le christianisme et elle n’est donc pas ouvertement sacrificielle. Mais la religion musulmane n’a pas détruit le sacrifice de la religion archaïque comme l’a fait le christianisme. Bien des parties du monde musulman ont conservé le sacrifice prémusulman. (…) bien entendu. Il faut lire les romans de William Faulkner. Bien des gens croient que le sud des États-Unis est une incarnation du christianisme. Je dirais que le sud est sans doute la partie la moins chrétienne des États-Unis en termes d’esprit, bien qu’il en soit la plus chrétienne en termes de rituel. Il n’y a pas de doute que le christianisme médiéval était beaucoup plus proche du fondamentalisme actuel. Mais il y a beaucoup de manières de trahir une religion. En ce qui concerne le sud, cela est évident, car il y a un grand retour aux formes les plus archaïques de la religion. Il faut interpréter ces lynchages comme une forme d’acte religieux archaïque. (…) Le terme de « violence religieuse » est souvent employé d’une manière qui ne m’aide pas à résoudre les problèmes que je me pose, à savoir ceux d’un rapport à la violence en mouvement constant et également historique. (…) Je dirais que toute violence religieuse implique un degré d’archaïsme. Mais certains points sont très compliqués. Par exemple, lors de la première guerre mondiale, est-ce que les soldats qui acceptaient d’être mobilisés pour mourir pour leur pays, et beaucoup au nom du christianisme, avaient une attitude vraiment chrétienne ? Il y a là quelque chose qui est contraire au christianisme. Mais il y a aussi quelque chose de vrai. Cela ne supprime pas, à mon avis, le fait qu’il y a une histoire de la violence religieuse, et que les religions, surtout le christianisme, au fond, sont continuellement influencées par cette histoire, bien que son influence soit, le plus souvent, pervertie. René Girard
Des millions de Faisal Shahzad sont déstabilisés par un monde moderne qu’ils ne peuvent ni maîtriser ni rejeter. (…) Le jeune homme qui avait fait tous ses efforts pour acquérir la meilleure éducation que pouvait lui offrir l’Amérique avant de succomber à l’appel du jihad a fait place au plus atteint des schizophrènes. Les villes surpeuplées de l’Islam – de Karachi et Casablanca au Caire – et ces villes d’Europe et d’Amérique du Nord où la diaspora islamique est maintenant présente en force ont des multitudes incalculables d’hommes comme Faisal Shahzad. C’est une longue guerre crépusculaire, la lutte contre l’Islamisme radical. Nul vœu pieu, nulle stratégie de « gain des coeurs et des esprits », nulle grande campagne d’information n’en viendront facilement à bout. L’Amérique ne peut apaiser cette fureur accumulée. Ces hommes de nulle part – Shahzad Faisal, Malik Nidal Hasan, l’émir renégat né en Amérique Anwar Awlaki qui se terre actuellement au Yémen et ceux qui leur ressemblent – sont une race de combattants particulièrement dangereux dans ce nouveau genre de guerre. La modernité les attire et les ébranle à la fois. L’Amérique est tout en même temps l’objet de leurs rêves et le bouc émissaire sur lequel ils projettent leurs malignités les plus profondes. Fouad Ajami
Relire aujourd’hui les principaux textes consacrés à ces attentats par des philosophes de renom constitue une étrange expérience. De manière prévisible, on y rencontre élaborations sophistiquées, affirmations grandioses ou péremptoires, performances rhétoriques bluffantes. Malgré tout, avec le recul, on ne peut qu’être saisi par un décalage profond entre ces performances virtuoses et la réalité rampante du terrorisme mondialisé que nous vivons à présent quotidiennement. Au fil des ans, un écart frappant s’est creusé entre discours subtils et réalités grossières, propos éthérés et faits massifs. Le 11 septembre devait être nécessairement considéré comme une énigme. Le philosophe français Jacques Derrida affirmait qu’« on ne sait pas, on ne pense pas, on ne comprend pas, on ne veut pas comprendre ce qui s’est passé à ce moment-là ». Il fallait d’abord récuser les évidences, considérées comme clichés idéologiques ou manipulations médiatiques. Ne parler donc ni de d’acte de guerre, ni de haine de l’Occident, ni de volonté de détruire les libertés fondamentales. Dialoguant à propos du 11 septembre avec Jürgen Habermas, qui centrait alors son analyse principalement sur la politique de l’Europe, Derrida, pour comprendre l’événement, s’attardait sur la notion d’Ereignis (« événement », ou « avenance ») dans l’histoire de l’être selon Heidegger et finissait par proposer une « hospitalité sans condition ». « C’est eux qui l’on fait, mais c’est nous qui l’avons voulu » soutenait pour sa part le sociologue Jean Baudrillard, attribuant aux rêves suicidaires de l’Occident l’effondrement des tours et la fascination des images des attentats. Pour celui voulait mettre en lumière « l’esprit du terrorisme », les « vrais » responsables étaient donc, au choix, les Etats-Unis, l’hégémonie occidentale ou chacun d’entre nous… D’autres se demandèrent aussitôt « à qui profite le crime » et conclurent que ce ne pouvait être qu’à la CIA, préparant ainsi les théories du complot qui firent florès. Ce ne sont que quelques exemples. Une histoire des lectures philosophiques du 11 septembre reste à écrire. Elle montrerait combien anti-américanisme et anti-capitalisme ont empêché tant d’esprits affutés de voir la nature religieuse du nouveau terrorisme comme les singularités de la nouvelle guerre. S’y ajoutaient la volonté de n’être pas dupe et la défiance envers les propagandes, transformées en déni systématique des informations de base. Les philosophes ont évidemment pour rôle indispensable d’être critiques, donc de démonter préjugés et fausses évidences, mais n’ont-ils pas pour devoir de ne jamais faire l’impasse sur les faits ? Au lieu de mettre en cause l’empire américain, l’arrogance des tours, le règne des images, il fallait scruter l’islamisme politique, les usages inédits de la violence, l’art terroriste de la communication. Quelques-uns l’ont fait, en parlant dans le désert. Aujourd’hui, il est urgent d’analyser ce qu’impliquent les changements intervenus depuis le 11 septembre. Car ce ne sont plus des symboles, comme les Twin Towers ou le Pentagone, qui sont ciblés, mais n’importe qui vivant chez les « impies » – dans la rue, aux terrasses, au concert, à l’école…. Les terroristes ne sont plus des commandos organisés d’ingénieurs formés au pilotage pour transformer des Boeing en bombes, mais de petits délinquants autogérés, s’emparant d’un couteau de cuisine ou d’un camion. Pour en venir à bout, il va falloir rattraper, au plus vite, le temps perdu à penser à côté de la plaque. Roger-Pol Droit
Le Cair a été fondé après le 11 Septembre parce qu’ils ont pris acte du fait que des gens avaient fait quelque chose et que nous tous allions commencer à perdre accès à nos libertés civiles. Ilhan Omar
Je pense que c’est un produit des médias sensationnalistes. Vous avez ces extraits sonores, et ces mots, et tout le monde les prononce avec une telle intensité, car ça doit avoir une signification plus grande. Je me souviens quand j’étais à la fac, j’ai suivi un cours sur l’idéologie du terrorisme. A chaque fois que le professeur disait « Al-Qaeda », ses épaules se soulevaient. Ilhan Omar
I was 18 years old when that happened. I was in a classroom in college and I remember rushing home after being dismissed and getting home and seeing my father in complete horror as he sat in front of that TV. And I remember just feeling, like the world was ending. The events of 9/11 were life-changing, life-altering for all of us. My feeling around it is one of complete horror. None of us are ever going to forget that day and the trauma that we will always have to live with. Ilhan Omar
9/11 was an attack on all Americans. It was an attack on all of us. And I certainly could not understand the weight of the pain that the victims of the families of 9/11 must feel. But I think it is really important for us to make sure that we are not forgetting, right, the aftermath of what happened after 9/11. Many Americans found themselves now having their civil rights stripped from them. And so what I was speaking to was the fact that as a Muslim, not only was I suffering as an American who was attacked on that day, but the next day I woke up as my fellow Americans were now treating me a suspect. Ilhan Omar
This book is painful to read. Even with the passage of nearly 18 years, reliving modern America’s most terrible day hits an exposed nerve that you thought had been fully numbed, only to discover that the ache was merely in remission. In “Fall and Rise: The Story of 9/11,” Mitchell Zuckoff relives each minute of that morning in 2001 through the perspectives of those who endured the worst: passengers and crew members on the four planes turned into missiles by Islamist hijackers; innocents trapped in the burning twin towers and the Pentagon; rescue workers who struggled valiantly but futilely and, in many cases, fatally; people in Shanksville, Pa., on whom death rained from a clear sky. As much as anything, “Fall and Rise” is a quilt work of futures unrealized, from the woman about to tell her parents she was pregnant to the doctor hoping to build a kidney dialysis center, from the retired bookkeeper set to move in with her daughter to the college student with dreams of becoming a child psychologist. Zuckoff, a professor of narrative studies at Boston University and the author of several nonfiction books, relies on his own interviews with survivors, but also leans heavily on government studies, trial transcripts, books and documentaries long in the public realm. And so the overall picture that he shapes is not really new. But freshness of detail seems less his objective than preservation of memory — an attempt, as he says, “to delay the descent of 9/11 into the well of history.” By design, this narrative of close to 500 pages is not encyclopedic. Big Picture grandiosity — how Sept. 11 changed America and the world — has been left to others. The terrorism puppet master Osama bin Laden gets scant attention. Actions (and inactions) of President George W. Bush and his team merit only a few pages. Rudolph Giuliani, who made a lucrative life for himself after 9/11, earns glancing mention. Flawed communications systems that doomed hundreds of New York’s emergency responders are not explored with the kind of detail that can be found in, say, “102 Minutes,” a 2005 work by the New York Times journalists Jim Dwyer and Kevin Flynn. Rather, this book derives its power from its focus on individuals in the main unknown to the larger world, who managed to survive the ordeal or who lost their lives simply because they were unlucky. With journalistic rigor, Zuckoff acknowledges what he doesn’t know, for example how exactly each group of hijackers seized control of its plane. His language is largely unadorned; then again, embellishment is neither needed nor wanted. Many details are hard to take: the melted flesh, the pulverized bodies, the scorched lungs and, for sure, the revived memory of scores of desperate victims leaping from on high to escape the World Trade Center inferno. But there are also inspiring moments, like the grit shown by those aboard United Airlines Flight 93. It was the plane that never reached its target, crashing in Shanksville after passengers revolted against the hijackers. Phone messages that they left “formed a spoken tapestry of grace, warning, bravery, resolve and love.” Heroes abound, though not in the way that word is routinely used and abused. Heroism, as we see here, is often a product of necessity. Some may ask if this book, covering territory already well traveled, needed to be written. For those who lived through the horror, perhaps not. But a full generation has come of age with no memory of that day. It needs to hear anew what happened, and maybe learn that time, in fact, does not heal all wounds. Clyde Haberman
I teach really engaged journalism students. I’m not sure how the generation as a whole reacts to it. My students approach it with curiosity and a little bit of uncertainty because they didn’t experience it. They are well-read and aware of things, but for them it is a little like Pearl Harbor. They know who was involved and can cite numbers. They can say 3,000 dead, 9/11, four hijacked planes, 19 hijackers. They got the test questions down very well. They don’t have the human connection or that feeling for it that I wish they did. I hope that’s what my book can do. Mitchell Zuckoff
There is this entire generation who didn’t live through this, who don’t have any independent memories of what happened those days. Some members of that generation are going off to war to fight in Afghanistan — a war that started after this — and they don’t have any direct connection to it. Right now, other than Osama bin Laden, is there a single name that’s a household name associated with 9/11?. Names are news, and we connect to them, and that is what’s so important about this: before the time passes, before the people who I could talk to were gone, dead or just not available, to capture this as one story. (…) People do I think know to some extent what happened on Flight 93, the 40 heroes of 93, who rose up and fought back to try to save themselves and ultimately ended up saving untold numbers of people, either at the Capitol or the White House, was the destination. But there in Shanksville — and I tell the story largely through Terry Shaffer, who was the volunteer fire chief there, who had been planning for something his whole life, and he thought it might be a pile-up on the Pennsylvania Turnpike. And he races toward the scene expecting to find casualties, expecting to find people he can help. The story of the people in Shanksville and how they came together, and sort of embraced the families of the Flight 93 victims, is I think one of the most beautiful stories I’ve ever heard. (…) One of the advantages of a book almost 18 years after the event is so much of the material has become public, that all the FAA records of the flight altitudes almost on a second-by-second basis, as we’re approaching Shanksville, Pennsylvania, the transcript of the cockpit recorder — which was enormously valuable, where we have the terrorist pilots discussing what they’re doing with each other, ‘Should we put it into the ground?’ All of those different things, because that and the the trial of Zacarias Moussaoui in 2006 [the so-called 20th hijacker,] certainly a conspirator even though he didn’t get on one of the planes. All of that material became available, and it was a mountain of material. But for me, it was priceless. (…) It was too important not to. It becomes a responsibility when you realize that there are so many people who don’t have a human connection to this story — the way I think of it is sometimes, 9/11 is becoming a story reduced to numbers: 9 and 11, four planes, 19 hijackers, 3,000 people killed. But you don’t connect names to it. And I felt if I could do that, if I could give people the story as it unfolded through the people that they could connect to, then I would have done something worthwhile. Mitchell Zuckoff

A ceux pour qui à chaque fois qu’il est prononcé, le nom « Al-Qaeda » soulève les épaules …

En cette 18e commémoration de l’abomination islamiste du 11 septembre 2001 …

Où, après l’avoir minimisé drapée dans son hijab, une membre du Congrès américain nous joue [avant comme à son habitude de se rétracter quatre jours plus tard – mise à jour du 15.09.2019] les sanglots longs de l’automne

Comment ne pas saluer les efforts ô combien méritoires de l’auteur d’un récent livre réunissant l’ensemble des témoignages possibles de l’évènement …

Contre les ravages du temps et les faiblesses et dérives de la psychologie et de la mémoire humaines …

Où à l’instar de ce journaliste de la radio publique américaine NPR qui n’avait en tête comme noms liés au 11/9 hormis Ben Laden, que le nom honni de Mohamed Atta …

Un peuple américain qui au lendemain de la tragédie avait plébiscité leur président jusqu’au score de popularité proprement soviétique ou africain de 99% le traine à présent dans la boue …

Et où, le même peuple qui avait, entre mémoriaux, noms d’écoles ou de bâtiments publics, films, livres, chansons ou tee-shirts, fait un véritable triomphe aux véritables héros du jour et aux dernières paroles de leur leader Todd Beamer (« Let’s roll !« ) …

En est à présent, via l’antisémite de service du Congrès américain Ilhan Omar et heureusement sauf exceptions, à minimiser l’attentat le plus proprement diabolique de leur histoire ?

‘Fall And Rise’ Seeks To Capture 9/11 As ‘One Story’ — And Keep It From Fading
Jeremy Hobson
WBUR
April 29, 2019

« There is this entire generation who didn’t live through this, who don’t have any independent memories of what happened those days, » Zuckoff (@mitchellzuckoff) tells Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson. « Some members of that generation are going off to war to fight in Afghanistan — a war that started after this — and they don’t have any direct connection to it. »

One of the driving forces behind the book was an effort to tie 9/11 into a single narrative before it was too late, Zuckoff says — and to ensure the attacks don’t fade too far from the public consciousness.

« Right now, other than Osama bin Laden, is there a single name that’s a household name associated with 9/11? » he says. « Names are news, and we connect to them, and that is what’s so important about this: before the time passes, before the people who I could talk to were gone, dead or just not available, to capture this as one story. »

Interview Highlights

On starting the book with what happened in the days leading up to Sept. 11

« That was very much by design, to start the book actually on September 10th, because what Mohamed Atta, what Ziad Jarrah, what the other terrorists were doing, all these machinations: training to fly planes coming here, living in this country and coming closer and closer — the circle is tightening — to get them in a position doing trial runs and making this plan which took very little money, a lot of planning but very little money, very little overhead, if you will, and to position themselves where they could be here in Boston, they could go up to Portland, Maine, and be ready to do these events.

« It’s not entirely clear [why they started their journey from Portland.] One strong suspicion we have is that the trip to Portland would allow them to avoid some suspicion. If you had eight Arab men all arriving at Boston’s Logan Airport at the same exact time for the same flights, they thought this might avoid some of that. But that is one of those unanswerable questions. »

« The idea of turning [a plane] into a guided missile wasn’t, quite literally, on the radar for anyone. And that’s unfortunately so sadly why it was so effective. »

Mitchell Zuckoff

On whether all of the hijackers knew the full extent of what they were doing

« I think it’s clear that all 19 knew exactly what was being planned, because it was a very coordinated attack. What happened on each one of the four planes was quite similar, where at a trigger moment, the muscle hijackers — the guys who were not flying the plane — went into attack mode. All of them had discussed … the preparations for purifying themselves for what they understood would be their last day. »

On the hijackers’ use of Mace in the cabin so that it would be more difficult for passengers to thwart the attack

« The Mace is an open question. There was some discussion they had it. A lot of it was just the element of surprise, was the greatest thing, and they committed an act of violence almost on every plane. They immediately cut someone’s throat to make it clear that they meant business. They said they had a bomb, they herded — these were very lightly attended planes, it was a random Tuesday morning to most people — they herded everyone into the back. And they also understood that the flight attendants and the crews would know that there was a standard protocol: You negotiate with terrorists. You expect that they’re going to want to land somewhere and exchange passengers and money for their freedom, or for their political aims. This was not part of anyone’s script except the terrorists.

« The idea of turning [a plane] into a guided missile wasn’t, quite literally, on the radar for anyone. And that’s unfortunately so sadly why it was so effective. »

On how communication failures shaped the way Sept. 11 unfolded

« Communication failures were rampant that day on every level, and that’s where really, that’s the sort of ground zero, if you will, of the communications failures — that people were calling saying what was going on. The airlines knew about it. And then even when it did finally reach the FAA, they weren’t alerting the military. So planes are still taking off. Things are still happening that [are] allowing one after another of these hijackings. The communication failures, they’re rampant, they’re across everything in terms of the communication failures at the towers, communication failures even before it happened.

« A fact that always stayed with me was on 9/11, the FAA had a list, a no-fly list, of a dozen people on it. The State Department had a list, its tip-off terrorists list of 60,000 people it was watching. The director of airline security for the FAA didn’t even know that State Department list existed. »

« Communication failures were rampant that day on every level. »

Mitchell Zuckoff

On stories about passengers on the planes that have stuck with him

« There are so many. One is from … United Flight 175, the second plane that [crashed into the World Trade Center,] took off from from Boston’s Logan Airport. And on that plane was a fellow named Peter Hanson and his wife Sue Kim and their daughter Christine. Christine was 2 years old and she was the youngest person directly affected by 9/11.

« While they were approaching the South Tower and it was clear something terrible was happening, they knew it, Peter called his father Lee in Connecticut, and the two phone calls between Peter and Lee are so poignant. And I spent time with Lee and Eunice Hanson in their home, in Peter’s boyhood bedroom, talking about those. Peter was actually first telling his father, ‘Please call someone, let them know what’s happening.’ And then Peter is actually comforting his father on the phone, when his wife and daughter are there huddled next to him in the back of this plane that they understand is flying too low, is heading toward the Statue of Liberty and toward the World Trade Center. »

On people in the first tower to be hit thinking they didn’t need to evacuate

« They were being told not to evacuate in both the towers. Some people were being told, ‘It’s over in the other tower.’ People didn’t know what was happening. And when the plane cut through, it knocked out the telecommunication system within the building that would have allowed people down in the basement and in the first floor to communicate to them. So the confusion began immediately, and people — some of them stayed in place for well over an hour. They didn’t know there was a ticking clock for the survival of the building.

« I spoke to a number of the Port Authority police officers who were the dispatchers that day who took those calls. They haunted by them still. And they are recorded calls, so I can hear them, I can see the transcripts. They’re remarkable in that they’re trying to keep these people calm, they’re trying to hope for the best. But there is no way up, and there’s no way out. »

On « the miracle of Stairwell B »

« One group of firefighters was Ladder 6, it was a unit in New York led by a remarkable guy named Jay Jonas, and Jay Jonas was a fire captain and he had this team of guys, a half dozen guys, and they’re sent into the North Tower, and they’re going up and they’re walking stair by stair. And when the South Tower collapses, Jay realizes, ‘I gotta get my guys out of here, quick.’

« On the way down, they pause to help a woman, Josephine Harris, who has been injured, who was exhausted, who can’t go any farther. But they slow their exit to help Josephine, and as they’re going farther and farther down through the building to get to the lobby, the North Tower starts to collapse. They’re inside this center stairwell, and they just huddled together, hold on for dear life, and the building literally peels away around them, just keeping a few floors of Stairwell B — which is exactly where they are. And Jay realizes that having slowed to help Josephine ended up saving all of them, because had they been in the lobby, the lobby was completely destroyed. Had they been just outside, they would have been wiped out as well. So it truly was a miracle. »

On what unfolded in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, on 9/11

« People do I think know to some extent what happened on Flight 93, the 40 heroes of 93, who rose up and fought back to try to save themselves and ultimately ended up saving untold numbers of people, either at the Capitol or the White House, was the destination. But there in Shanksville — and I tell the story largely through Terry Shaffer, who was the volunteer fire chief there, who had been planning for something his whole life, and he thought it might be a pile-up on the Pennsylvania Turnpike. And he races toward the scene expecting to find casualties, expecting to find people he can help. The story of the people in Shanksville and how they came together, and sort of embraced the families of the Flight 93 victims, is I think one of the most beautiful stories I’ve ever heard. »

On the difficulties of determining what exactly was happening on the planes

« One of the advantages of a book almost 18 years after the event is so much of the material has become public, that all the FAA records of the flight altitudes almost on a second-by-second basis, as we’re approaching Shanksville, Pennsylvania, the transcript of the cockpit recorder — which was enormously valuable, where we have the terrorist pilots discussing what they’re doing with each other, ‘Should we put it into the ground?’ All of those different things, because that and the the trial of Zacarias Moussaoui in 2006 [the so-called 20th hijacker,] certainly a conspirator even though he didn’t get on one of the planes. All of that material became available, and it was a mountain of material. But for me, it was priceless. »

On why he wrote this book

« It was too important not to. It becomes a responsibility when you realize that there are so many people who don’t have a human connection to this story — the way I think of it is sometimes, 9/11 is becoming a story reduced to numbers: 9 and 11, four planes, 19 hijackers, 3,000 people killed. But you don’t connect names to it. And I felt if I could do that, if I could give people the story as it unfolded through the people that they could connect to, then I would have done something worthwhile. »

Book Excerpt: ‘Fall And Rise’

by Mitchell Zuckoff

Just after 9 a.m., inside her hilltop house in rural Stoystown, Pennsylvania, homemaker Linda Shepley watched her television in shock. The screen showed smoke billowing from a gash in the North Tower as Today show anchor Katie Couric interviewed an NBC producer who witnessed the crash of American Flight 11.

“You say that emergency vehicles are there?” Couric asked Elliott Walker by phone.

“Oh, my goodness!” Walker cried at 9:03 a.m. “Ah! Another one just hit!”

Linda watched the terror in her living room beside her husband, Jim, a Pennsylvania Department of Transportation manager, who’d taken the day off to trade in their old car. The Shepleys saw a grim-faced President Bush speak to the nation from Booker Elementary School in Sarasota, Florida. Then Couric interviewed a terrorism expert but interrupted him for a phone call with NBC military correspondent Jim Miklaszewski, who declared at 9:39 a.m., “Katie, I don’t want to alarm anybody right now, but apparently, it felt just a few moments ago like there was an explosion of some kind here at the Pentagon.”

From the home where they’d lived for nearly three decades, the Shepleys could have driven to Washington in time for lunch or to New York City for an afternoon movie. Yet as the political and financial capitals reeled, those big cities felt almost as far away as the caves of Afghanistan. Jim went to the garage, to clean out the car he still planned to trade in that day. Linda hurried to finish the laundry before she accompanied Jim to the dealership.

Forty-seven years old, with kind eyes and three grown sons, Linda loved the smell of clothes freshly dried by the crisp Allegheny mountain air. As ten o’clock approached, she filled a basket with wet laundry and carried it to the clothesline in her backyard, two grassy acres with unbroken views over rolling hills that stretched southeast toward the neighboring borough of Shanksville. As Linda lifted a wet T-shirt toward the line, she heard a loud thump-thump sound behind her, like a truck rumbling over a bridge. Startled, she glanced over her left shoulder and saw a large commercial passenger plane, its wings wobbling, rocking left and right, flying much too low in the bright blue sky.

As the plane passed overhead at high speed, Linda saw the jet was intact, with neither smoke nor flame coming from either engine. Linda made no connection between the plane’s strange behavior and the news she’d watched minutes earlier about hijacked airliners crashing into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Instead, she suspected that a mechanical problem had forced the plane low and wobbly, on a flight path over her house that she’d never before witnessed. Maybe, Linda thought, the pilot was signaling distress and searching for someplace to make an emergency landing. Linda worried that their local airstrip, Somerset County Airport, was far too small to handle such a big plane. And if that was the pilot’s destination, she thought, he or she was heading the wrong way.

Linda didn’t know the plane was United Flight 93, and she couldn’t imagine that minutes earlier the passengers and crew had taken a vote to fight back. Or that CeeCee Lyles, Jeremy Glick, Todd Beamer, Sandy Bradshaw, and others on board had shared that decision during emotional phone calls, or that the revolt was reaching its peak, or that the four hijackers had resolved to crash the plane short of their target to prevent the hostages from retaking control.

Linda tracked the jet as sunlight glinted off its metal skin. Its erratic flight pattern continued. The right wing dipped farther and farther. The left wing rose higher, until the plane was almost perpendicular with the earth, like a catamaran in high winds. Linda saw it start to turn and roll, flipping nearly upside down. Then the plane plunged, nosediving beyond a stand of hemlocks two miles from where Linda stood. As quickly as the jet disappeared, an orange fireball blossomed, accompanied by a thick mushroom cloud of dark smoke.

“Jim!” Linda screamed. “Call 9-1-1!”

Her husband burst outside, fearing that their neighbor’s Rottweiler mix had broken loose from its chain and attacked her.

“A big plane just crashed!” Linda yelled.

“A small plane,” Jim said skeptically, as he regained his bearings. “No, no, no, no. It was a big one. It was a big one! I saw the engines on the wings.”

Jim rushed inside and grabbed a phone.

Heartsick, still clutching the wet T-shirt, Linda stared toward the rising smoke. Soon she’d wonder whether, in the last seconds before the crash, any of the men and women on board saw her hanging laundry on this glorious late-summer day.


Excerpted from the book FALL AND RISE by Mitchell Zuckoff. Copyright © 2019 by Mitchell Zuckoff. Republished with permission of HarperCollins Publishers.

Voir aussi:

The Many Tragedies of 9/11
Clyde Haberman
The NYT
May 3, 2019

FALL AND RISE
The Story of 9/11
By Mitchell Zuckoff

This book is painful to read. Even with the passage of nearly 18 years, reliving modern America’s most terrible day hits an exposed nerve that you thought had been fully numbed, only to discover that the ache was merely in remission.

In “Fall and Rise: The Story of 9/11,” Mitchell Zuckoff relives each minute of that morning in 2001 through the perspectives of those who endured the worst: passengers and crew members on the four planes turned into missiles by Islamist hijackers; innocents trapped in the burning twin towers and the Pentagon; rescue workers who struggled valiantly but futilely and, in many cases, fatally; people in Shanksville, Pa., on whom death rained from a clear sky. As much as anything, “Fall and Rise” is a quilt work of futures unrealized, from the woman about to tell her parents she was pregnant to the doctor hoping to build a kidney dialysis center, from the retired bookkeeper set to move in with her daughter to the college student with dreams of becoming a child psychologist.

Zuckoff, a professor of narrative studies at Boston University and the author of several nonfiction books, relies on his own interviews with survivors, but also leans heavily on government studies, trial transcripts, books and documentaries long in the public realm. And so the overall picture that he shapes is not really new. But freshness of detail seems less his objective than preservation of memory — an attempt, as he says, “to delay the descent of 9/11 into the well of history.”

By design, this narrative of close to 500 pages is not encyclopedic. Big Picture grandiosity — how Sept. 11 changed America and the world — has been left to others. The terrorism puppet master Osama bin Laden gets scant attention. Actions (and inactions) of President George W. Bush and his team merit only a few pages. Rudolph Giuliani, who made a lucrative life for himself after 9/11, earns glancing mention. Flawed communications systems that doomed hundreds of New York’s emergency responders are not explored with the kind of detail that can be found in, say, “102 Minutes,” a 2005 work by the New York Times journalists Jim Dwyer and Kevin Flynn.

Rather, this book derives its power from its focus on individuals in the main unknown to the larger world, who managed to survive the ordeal or who lost their lives simply because they were unlucky. With journalistic rigor, Zuckoff acknowledges what he doesn’t know, for example how exactly each group of hijackers seized control of its plane. His language is largely unadorned; then again, embellishment is neither needed nor wanted.

Many details are hard to take: the melted flesh, the pulverized bodies, the scorched lungs and, for sure, the revived memory of scores of desperate victims leaping from on high to escape the World Trade Center inferno. But there are also inspiring moments, like the grit shown by those aboard United Airlines Flight 93. It was the plane that never reached its target, crashing in Shanksville after passengers revolted against the hijackers. Phone messages that they left “formed a spoken tapestry of grace, warning, bravery, resolve and love.”

Heroes abound, though not in the way that word is routinely used and abused. Heroism, as we see here, is often a product of necessity.

Some may ask if this book, covering territory already well traveled, needed to be written. For those who lived through the horror, perhaps not. But a full generation has come of age with no memory of that day. It needs to hear anew what happened, and maybe learn that time, in fact, does not heal all wounds.

Clyde Haberman, the former NYC columnist for The Times, is a contributing writer for the newspaper.

FALL AND RISE
The Story of 9/11
By Mitchell Zuckoff
589 pp. Harper/HarperCollins Publishers. $29.99.

Voir également:

 

When the first of the World Trade Center towers collapsed on September 11 2001, paramedic Moussa Diaz was among thousands of people engulfed in the cloud of smoke and debris that surged from the wreckage.

Asphyxiating in the toxic swirl around him, he fought the urge to give up, staggering on until he saw a spotlight wielded by a man with a white beard and long hair.

“Are you Jesus Christ?” Diaz asked, convinced he must already be dead. “No,” came the reply. “I’m a cameraman.”

Those who have been close to death often talk of how the experience played tricks on their mind, including the fleeting belief that they could not possibly have survived and must already be in the afterlife.

Yet as Mitchell Zuckoff notes in his new book about 9/11, little of the extraordinary individual testimony from that awful day has worked its way into the public memory.

The average person may recall what they were doing on 9/11, and perhaps the names of hijackers such as Mohamed Atta, but would likely struggle to name a single one of the 2,977 people who died.

“Of the nearly three thousand men, women, and children killed on 9/11, arguably none can be considered a household name,” Zuckoff writes. “The best ‘known’ victim might be the so-called Falling Man, photographed plummeting from the North Tower.”

This is not because the world sought to forget: merely that in the avalanche of events triggered by the atrocity – Afghanistan was invaded less than a month later – the voices of the day itself got buried in the sheer weight of news coverage.

With that in mind, Zuckoff, who covered the attacks for the Boston Globe, has produced this doorstopper of a reconstruction, aimed partly at younger generations who feel no “personal connection” to what happened. He notes that for some of his students at Boston University, where he now teaches journalism, it seems “as distant as World War I”.

Rather like the investigators who searched the mountains of rubble for victims’ personal effects, it is a mammoth undertaking. As well as interviews with Diaz and others, Zuckoff sifts through official archives, trials of terror suspects, and countless news reports. The stories of rescuers and survivors are interwoven with the poignant last words of victims, many of whom left only desperate voice messages as their planes hit the towers.

This, however, is not a print version of United 93, the Hollywood take on the “Let’s roll” passenger rebellion, which brought down one hijacked plane before it could hit the White House. Reluctant to use journalistic licence for a topic of such gravitas, Zuckoff sticks strictly to the known facts.

As a result, his account of the “Let’s roll” incident favours accuracy over drama, relying partly on the more fragmentary version of events preserved by the cockpit voice recorder. The sounds of a struggle, followed by the hijacker-turned-pilot screaming “Hey, hey, give it to me!” suggests passengers may have got as far as wrestling the joystick from his control. But Zuckoff leaves us to fill in many of the gaps for ourselves.

Far more vivid are the scenes inside the burning towers, where witnesses are still alive to recreate what they saw. A dead lobby guard sits melted to his desk by the fireball from the planes’ fuel. Women have hair clips melted into their skulls by the heat. One paramedic, reminded of his own daughter by the sight of a girl’s severed foot inside a pink trainer, looks skywards to clear his mind, only to see people jumping from the towers.

In all, about 200 people ended their lives that way, one killing a firefighter as they landed. Ernest Armstead, a fire department medic, recalls a harrowing conversation with one female jumper who was somehow still alive, despite being little more than a head on a crumpled torso. When she saw him place a black triage tag around her neck, indicating she was beyond help, she shouted: “I am not dead!”

For many rescuers, it was clear early on that the entire crash scene was beyond help. As they contemplate the 1,000ft climb to the blazing North Tower impact zone – the lifts are out of action – firefighter-farmer Gerry Nevins speaks for all his colleagues when he says: “We may not live through today.” They shake hands, then start climbing nonetheless. Father-of-two Nevins was among the 420 emergency workers to perish.

For all the heroism, it was also a day of failures, not least in imagining that terrorists might use planes as bombs in the first place. Air safety chiefs considered hijackings a thing of the past, leading to lax security procedures that allowed the hijackers to carry knives on board.

A plan to stage an exercise where terrorists flew a cargo plane into the UN’s New York HQ had been ruled out as too fanciful. Boasts that the Twin Towers could withstand airline crashes failed to consider the thousands of gallons of burning jet fuel, which weakened their steel cores and caused them to collapse.

This book is not an easy read: heartwarming in parts, horrific in others and studiously cautious in those areas where only the dead really know what happened.

But as a definitive “lest we forget” account, it will take some beating. For those too young to remember where they were on 9/11, and for all future generations too, it should be required reading.

Voir encore:

Mitchell Zuckoff on Writing His 9/11 Magnum Opus

Adam Vitcavage
The Millions
July 10, 2019

The seniors graduating from high school this year know what 9/11 is. They know four planes, two towers, 3,000-plus victims, 19 terrorists, Osama bin Laden. They know all of that because they were taught it in history classes. Because, to them, that’s all it is: history.

With each passing year, the terrorist attacks that happened on the bright blue morning of September 11, 2001 become more of a history lesson than a lived experience. This year, most high school seniors were born in 2001. Eighteen years later, they have the facts memorized, but often fail to understand the emotional and lived experience of that day.

Fall and Rise: The Story of 9/11, a new book by former Boston Globe reporter and current Boston University professor Mitchell Zuckoff, aims to fix that. Fall and Rise reports the facts, but Zuckoff also weaves the lives of people affected by 9/11 to create a narrative not frequently seen on cable news channels or in documentaries.

Fall and Rise shares stories about pilots, passengers, and aviation professionals linked to American Airlines Flights 11 and 77, and United Airlines Flights 93 and 175. He reveals stories about Mohammed Atta and other terrorists. Zuckoff also dives into the stories of New Yorkers and other Americans who experienced that day in different ways. The result is a woven story that puts the humanity back into a day the history books won’t forget.

I spoke with Zuckoff about what he was doing the day of the attacks, what followed, and how a Boston Globe feature published five days after the attacks turned into an essential book more than 6,000 days later.

The Millions: What was the day of September 11, 2001 like for you?

Mitchell Zuckoff: I was on book leave from the Boston Globe trying to write my first book. When the first plane went in, I didn’t think much of it. It could have been an accident. When the second plane went in, I ran to the phone and it was ringing as I got there. Globe editor Mark Morrow was on the other line and said my book leave was over.

He told me to come to the paper and it became apparent that I was going to be in what we call the control chair to write the lead story for that day. It became a matter of trying to figure out what was going on by taking feeds from several of my colleagues, working closely with the aviation reporter, Matthew Brelis, who took the byline with me. It was an intense and confusing day.

This was personal, on top of everything, because two of the planes took off about a mile from the Globe office at Logan International Airport.

TM: You mention the confusion. When did it become clear to you that it was a coordinated terrorist attack?

MZ: I think when the second plane went in. I was still home. When the first plane went in, we didn’t know what size it was. There was speculation that it was some sightseeing plane that got confused. Then there was no way, 17 minutes apart, that two planes were going to hit two towers accidentally. When I got in my car, we didn’t know about the flight heading to the Pentagon or United 93.

TM: What exactly were you looking for in real time during an event like this?

MZ: Really, what we do on any story. We were trying to answer the who, what, when, where, why, and how of it in as much detail as possible. I was just trying to process it all. My desk is an explosion of papers and printers and notes from reporters. We want it to come out so our readers can digest it in a meaningful way.

TM: I was in seventh grade and in Arizona at the time, so I had no clue what was going on. I was hours back—

MZ: That’s significant. Really significant. Folks on the West Coast, by the time they woke up, it was essentially over. People on the East Coast were watching the Today Show or running to CNN to watch it unfold. It’s a different experience.

TM: I remember it as my mother waking me up for school. She said something, and to this day I remember it as being “They’re attacking us.” I always second-guessed myself, but as you said it was something being reported.

MZ: That would have been a good thing to say.

TM: As the day continued to unfold, how much of a rush was it to finish the initial report out there?

MZ: The adrenaline is flying. We had a rolling deadline because we knew we had as many editions as we needed. The first probably left my hands at 6:00 p.m. I continued to write through the story as it continued to unfold. There were little details—little edits like finding better verbs—that continued to be changed until about 1:00 a.m. or 2:00 a.m.

You can’t unwind after that. You walk around the newsroom waiting until it comes off the presses. I needed to let the adrenaline leave because I knew I wouldn’t be able to sleep.

TM: Then that first week, and this may be a dumb question, but how much did the events consume your writing life?

MZ: Completely. I wrote the lead story again the next day. I came back in and it was understood I would do it again. The next day, on Thursday the 13th, I approached the editors with the idea that I could keep doing the leads, but I had an idea for a narrative I could have done for Sunday’s paper. I needed to dispatch some reporters to help me, but I pitched them to weave a narrative. I wanted to weave together six lives: three people on the first plane and three people from New York: one who got out, one who we didn’t know, and a first responder.

That consumed me all day Thursday and Friday reporting it with those reporters. Then writing it Friday into Saturday for the lead feature in the Sunday paper.

TM: That’s what became the backbone of Fall and Rise. But, at the time, you were already reporting the facts. What was it like going into the humanity of those affected less than a week after the attacks?

MZ: Satisfying in a really deep way. I felt, as much as I valued writing the news, I felt we could do something distinctive and lasting with this narrative. I think all of us—not just reporting the news, but consuming the news—all of us were so inundated with information.

I felt we needed to reflect on the emotion of the moment. By talking about the pilot John Oganowsky and the other folks I focused in on, I felt it could be a bit cathartic. We were all numb and in shock. But this could help.

TM: Did you talk t