Hommage: De la seule nation qui vénère le même Dieu qu’il y a 3 000 ans au seul pays fondé sur une idée (On the Fourth of July, honoring American exceptionalism and an exceptional American, Charles Krauthammer)

4 juillet, 2018
Israël est l’incarnation pure et simple de la continuité juive : c’est la seule nation au monde qui habite la même terre, porte le même nom, parle la même langue et vénère le même Dieu qu’il y a 3000 ans. En creusant le sol, on peut trouver des poteries du temps de David, des pièces de l’époque de Bar Kochba, et des parchemins vieux de 2000 ans, écrits de manière étonnamment semblable à celle qui, aujourd’hui, vante les crèmes glacées de la confiserie du coin. Charles Krauthammer

En ce nouvel anniversaire du « seul pays fondé sur une idée, l’idée de liberté » …

Comment ne pas avoir une pensée …

Pour l’un de ses plus fidèles et regrettés hérauts

Issu justement de la seule nation qui vénère le même Dieu qu’il y a 3 000 ans ?

On the Fourth of July, Honoring American Exceptionalism and an Exceptional American, Charles Krauthammer

Amid all the pomp and parades, the fireworks and other illuminations, the hot dogs and the ice cream, the home runs and the World Cup goals, let us be sure to pause on this Fourth of July holiday and say with grateful hearts and proud voices, “Happy birthday, America!”

This land—our land—is 242 years young today.

Led by Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and Ben Franklin, our Founding Fathers signed a document that raised high the banner of independence and challenged England, at the time the most powerful nation in the world.

Remarked one delegate as he signed the Declaration of Independence, “My hand trembles, but my heart does not.”

What was the central idea of this revolutionary declaration that Jefferson, its author, called “an expression of the American mind”? Here is what Charles Krauthammer, the TV commentator and syndicated columnist, said: “America is the only country ever founded on an idea … and the idea is liberty.”

Many of us in Washington, D.C., are still lamenting the June 21 death of Krauthammer, who had a commanding grasp of politics, including foreign policy, that sprang from his intellect, his medical training and practice, and his formation in the Jewish tradition.

Krauthammer was very much like a Founder. Whether they agreed with him or not, those who knew him commented on his grace, civility, and humor. He combined the character of George Washington, the prudential mind of James Madison, and the wit of Franklin.

Asked how he could go from being a speechwriter for Walter Mondale to a political commentator on Fox News, he replied, “I was young once.”  He was a happy warrior even though he dealt with more difficulties—he was a quadriplegic from the age of 22—than most of us can imagine.

He could sum up a politician or a historical trend in just a few words. One year into the Obama administration, he wrote, “Fairness through leveling is the essence of Obamaism.” Toward the end of President Barack Obama’s first term, he summed up the four years: “The greatest threat to a robust, autonomous civil society is the ever-growing Leviathan state and those like Obama who see it as the ultimate expression of the collective.”

Krauthammer excelled at explaining our times. He coined the phrase “the Reagan Doctrine” to explain President Ronald Reagan’s support of anti-communist forces in Afghanistan and Nicaragua, and extolled Winston Churchill as the 20th century’s most indispensable leader. Paraphrasing the Nobel laureate Milton Friedman, he said, “The free lunch is the essence of modern liberalism.”

He was ever generous toward the rising generation. The co-author of this commentary will be always grateful for his support at the start of her academic career. Krauthammer would meet with her students who learned much about politics from him, although nearly all disagreed with him—at least at the beginning.

On one occasion, she took her students to see the satirical troupe “Capitol Steps,” and Krauthammer was there with his family, laughing at the anti-conservative sallies.

In the introduction to his book “Things That Matter,” Krauthammer referred to Adams and Jefferson and their tempered hopes for the durability of liberty.

He was not pessimistic, but realistic, about the future, writing: “The lesson of our history is that the task of merely maintaining strong and sturdy the structures of a constitutional order is unending, the continuing and ceaseless work of every generation.”

He was a prime example of someone who knows that man does not live by politics alone. His favorite diversion (after chess) was baseball, specifically the up-and-down, in-and-out, always unpredictable Washington Nationals, about whom he would wax poetic.

You get there [to the park], and the twilight’s gleaming, the popcorn’s popping, the kids’re romping, and everyone’s happy. The joy of losing consists in this: Where there are no expectations, there is no disappointment.

But Krauthammer, liberal-turned-conservative, psychiatrist-turned-political commentator, expected good things from the people. He wrote of the tea party revolt, “No matter how far the ideological pendulum swings in the short term, in the end, the bedrock common sense of the American people will prevail.”

In his final column, he wrote: “I believe that the pursuit of truth and right ideas through honest debate and rigorous argument is a noble undertaking. I am grateful to have played a small role in the conversations that have helped guide this extraordinary nation’s destiny.”

Of course, his was not a small, but rather a leading, role, one that will serve as a model for those with the right ideas who take up the responsibility of keeping this exceptional nation on the road to liberty.

So—along with “Happy Birthday, America!”—we say to Charles Krauthammer, a mentor and an inspiration who will be missed beyond measure: “May God bless you and keep you.”

At Last, Zion

The Weekly Standard

I. A SMALL NATION

Milan Kundera once defined a small nation as « one whose very existence may be put in question at any moment; a small nation can disappear, and it knows it. »

The United States is not a small nation. Neither is Japan. Or France. These nations may suffer defeats. They may even be occupied. But they cannot disappear. Kundera’s Czechoslovakia could — and once did. Prewar Czechoslovakia is the paradigmatic small nation: a liberal democracy created in the ashes of war by a world determined to let little nations live free; threatened by the covetousness and sheer mass of a rising neighbor; compromised fatally by a West grown weary « of a quarrel in a far-away country between people of whom we know nothing »; left truncated and defenseless, succumbing finally to conquest. When Hitler entered Prague in March 1939, he declared, « Czechoslovakia has ceased to exist. »

Israel too is a small country. This is not to say that extinction is its fate. Only that it can be.

Moreover, in its vulnerability to extinction, Israel is not just any small country. It is the only small country — the only period, period — whose neighbors publicly declare its very existence an affront to law, morality, and religion and make its extinction an explicit, paramount national goal. Nor is the goal merely declarative. Iran, Libya, and Iraq conduct foreign policies designed for the killing of Israelis and the destruction of their state. They choose their allies (Hamas, Hezbollah) and develop their weapons (suicide bombs, poison gas, anthrax, nuclear missiles) accordingly. Countries as far away as Malaysia will not allow a representative of Israel on their soil nor even permit the showing of Schindler’s List lest it engender sympathy for Zion.

Others are more circumspect in their declarations. No longer is the destruction of Israel the unanimous goal of the Arab League, as it was for the thirty years before Camp David. Syria, for example, no longer explicitly enunciates it. Yet Syria would destroy Israel tomorrow if it had the power. (Its current reticence on the subject is largely due to its post-Cold War need for the American connection.)

Even Egypt, first to make peace with Israel and the presumed model for peacemaking, has built a vast U.S.-equipped army that conducts military exercises obviously designed for fighting Israel. Its huge « Badr ’96 » exercises, for example, Egypt’s largest since the 1973 war, featured simulated crossings of the Suez Canal.

And even the PLO, which was forced into ostensible recognition of Israel in the Oslo Agreements of 1993, is still ruled by a national charter that calls in at least fourteen places for Israel’s eradication. The fact that after five years and four specific promises to amend the charter it remains unamended is a sign of how deeply engraved the dream of eradicating Israel remains in the Arab consciousness.

II. THE STAKES

The contemplation of Israel’s disappearance is very difficult for this generation. For fifty years, Israel has been a fixture. Most people cannot remember living in a world without Israel.

Nonetheless, this feeling of permanence has more than once been rudely interrupted — during the first few days of the Yom Kippur War when it seemed as if Israel might be overrun, or those few weeks in May and early June 1967 when Nasser blockaded the Straits of Tiran and marched 100,000 troops into Sinai to drive the Jews into the sea.

Yet Israel’s stunning victory in 1967, its superiority in conventional weaponry, its success in every war in which its existence was at stake, has bred complacency. Some ridicule the very idea of Israel’s impermanence. Israel, wrote one Diaspora intellectual, « is fundamentally indestructible. Yitzhak Rabin knew this. The Arab leaders on Mount Herzl [at Rabin’s funeral] knew this. Only the land-grabbing, trigger-happy saints of the right do not know this. They are animated by the imagination of catastrophe, by the thrill of attending the end. »

Thrill was not exactly the feeling Israelis had when during the Gulf War they entered sealed rooms and donned gas masks to protect themselves from mass death — in a war in which Israel was not even engaged. The feeling was fear, dread, helplessness — old existential Jewish feelings that post- Zionist fashion today deems anachronistic, if not reactionary. But wish does not overthrow reality. The Gulf War reminded even the most wishful that in an age of nerve gas, missiles, and nukes, an age in which no country is completely safe from weapons of mass destruction, Israel with its compact population and tiny area is particularly vulnerable to extinction.

Israel is not on the edge. It is not on the brink. This is not ’48 or ’67 or ’73. But Israel is a small country. It can disappear. And it knows it.

It may seem odd to begin an examination of the meaning of Israel and the future of the Jews by contemplating the end. But it does concentrate the mind. And it underscores the stakes. The stakes could not be higher. It is my contention that on Israel — on its existence and survival — hangs the very existence and survival of the Jewish people. Or, to put the thesis in the negative, that the end of Israel means the end of the Jewish people. They survived destruction and exile at the hands of Babylon in 586 B.C. They survived destruction and exile at the hands of Rome in 70 A.D., and finally in 132 A.D. They cannot survive another destruction and exile. The Third Commonwealth — modern Israel, born just 50 years ago — is the last.

The return to Zion is now the principal drama of Jewish history. What began as an experiment has become the very heart of the Jewish people — its cultural, spiritual, and psychological center, soon to become its demographic center as well. Israel is the hinge. Upon it rest the hopes — the only hope – – for Jewish continuity and survival.

III. THE DYING DIASPORA

In 1950, there were 5 million Jews in the United States. In 1990, the number was a slightly higher 5.5 million. In the intervening decades, overall U.S. population rose 65 percent. The Jews essentially tread water. In fact, in the last half-century Jews have shrunk from 3 percent to 2 percent of the American population. And now they are headed for not just relative but absolute decline. What sustained the Jewish population at its current level was, first, the postwar baby boom, then the influx of 400,000 Jews, mostly from the Soviet Union.

Well, the baby boom is over. And Russian immigration is drying up. There are only so many Jews where they came from. Take away these historical anomalies, and the American Jewish population would be smaller today than today. In fact, it is now headed for catastrophic decline. Steven Bayme, director of Jewish Communal Affairs at the American Jewish Committee, flatly predicts that in twenty years the Jewish population will be down to four million, a loss of nearly 30 percent. In twenty years! Projecting just a few decades further yields an even more chilling future.

How does a community decimate itself in the benign conditions of the United States? Easy: low fertility and endemic intermarriage.

The fertility rate among American Jews is 1.6 children per woman. The replacement rate (the rate required for the population to remain constant) is 2.1. The current rate is thus 20 percent below what is needed for zero growth. Thus fertility rates alone would cause a 20 percent decline in every generation. In three generations, the population would be cut in half.

The low birth rate does not stem from some peculiar aversion of Jewish women to children. It is merely a striking case of the well-known and universal phenomenon of birth rates declining with rising education and socio- economic class. Educated, successful working women tend to marry late and have fewer babies.

Add now a second factor, intermarriage. In the United States today more Jews marry Christians than marry Jews. The intermarriage rate is 52 percent. (A more conservative calculation yields 47 percent; the demographic effect is basically the same.) In 1970, the rate was 8 percent.

Most important for Jewish continuity, however, is the ultimate identity of the children born to these marriages. Only about one in four is raised Jewish. Thus two-thirds of Jewish marriages are producing children three-quarters of whom are lost to the Jewish people. Intermarriage rates alone would cause a 25 percent decline in population in every generation. (Math available upon request.) In two generations, half the Jews would disappear.

Now combine the effects of fertility and intermarriage and make the overly optimistic assumption that every child raised Jewish will grow up to retain his Jewish identity (i.e., a zero dropout rate). You can start with 100 American Jews; you end up with 60. In one generation, more than a third have disappeared. In just two generations, two out of every three will vanish.

One can reach this same conclusion by a different route (bypassing the intermarriage rates entirely). A Los Angeles Times poll of American Jews conducted in March 1998 asked a simple question: Are you raising your children as Jews? Only 70 percent said yes. A population in which the biological replacement rate is 80 percent and the cultural replacement rate is 70 percent is headed for extinction. By this calculation, every 100 Jews are raising 56 Jewish children. In just two generations, 7 out of every 10 Jews will vanish.

The demographic trends in the rest of the Diaspora are equally unencouraging. In Western Europe, fertility and intermarriage rates mirror those of the United States. Take Britain. Over the last generation, British Jewry has acted as a kind of controlled experiment: a Diaspora community living in an open society, but, unlike that in the United States, not artificially sustained by immigration. What happened? Over the last quarter- century, the number of British Jews declined by over 25 percent.

Over the same interval, France’s Jewish population declined only slightly. The reason for this relative stability, however, is a one-time factor: the influx of North African Jewry. That influx is over. In France today only a minority of Jews between the ages of twenty and forty-four live in a conventional family with two Jewish parents. France, too, will go the way of the rest.

« The dissolution of European Jewry, » observes Bernard Wasserstein in Vanishing Diaspora: The Jews in Europe since 1945, « is not situated at some point in the hypothetical future. The process is taking place before our eyes and is already far advanced. » Under present trends, « the number of Jews in Europe by the year 2000 would then be not much more than one million — the lowest figure since the last Middle Ages. »

In 1990, there were eight million.

The story elsewhere is even more dispiriting. The rest of what was once the Diaspora is now either a museum or a graveyard. Eastern Europe has been effectively emptied of its Jews. In 1939, Poland had 3.2 million Jews. Today it is home to 3,500. The story is much the same in the other capitals of Eastern Europe.

The Islamic world, cradle to the great Sephardic Jewish tradition and home to one-third of world Jewry three centuries ago, is now practically Judenrein. Not a single country in the Islamic world is home to more than 20,000 Jews. After Turkey with 19,000 and Iran with 14,000, the country with the largest Jewish community in the entire Islamic world is Morocco with 6, 100. There are more Jews in Omaha, Nebraska.

These communities do not figure in projections. There is nothing to project. They are fit subjects not for counting but for remembering. Their very sound has vanished. Yiddish and Ladino, the distinctive languages of the European and Sephardic Diasporas, like the communities that invented them, are nearly extinct.

IV. THE DYNAMICS OF ASSIMILATION

Is it not risky to assume that current trends will continue? No. Nothing will revive the Jewish communities of Eastern Europe and the Islamic world. And nothing will stop the rapid decline by assimilation of Western Jewry. On the contrary. Projecting current trends — assuming, as I have done, that rates remain constant — is rather conservative: It is risky to assume that assimilation will not accelerate. There is nothing on the horizon to reverse the integration of Jews into Western culture. The attraction of Jews to the larger culture and the level of acceptance of Jews by the larger culture are historically unprecedented. If anything, the trends augur an intensification of assimilation.

It stands to reason. As each generation becomes progressively more assimilated, the ties to tradition grow weaker (as measured, for example, by synagogue attendance and number of children receiving some kind of Jewish education). This dilution of identity, in turn, leads to a greater tendency to intermarriage and assimilation. Why not? What, after all, are they giving up? The circle is complete and self-reinforcing.

Consider two cultural artifacts. With the birth of television a half- century ago, Jewish life in America was represented by The Goldbergs: urban Jews, decidedly ethnic, heavily accented, socially distinct. Forty years later The Goldbergs begat Seinfeld, the most popular entertainment in America today. The Seinfeld character is nominally Jewish. He might cite his Jewish identity on occasion without apology or self- consciousness — but, even more important, without consequence. It has not the slightest influence on any aspect of his life.

Assimilation of this sort is not entirely unprecedented. In some ways, it parallels the pattern in Western Europe after the emancipation of the Jews in the late 18th and 19th centuries. The French Revolution marks the turning point in the granting of civil rights to Jews. As they began to emerge from the ghetto, at first they found resistance to their integration and advancement. They were still excluded from the professions, higher education, and much of society. But as these barriers began gradually to erode and Jews advanced socially, Jews began a remarkable embrace of European culture and, for many, Christianity. In A History of Zionism, Walter Laqueur notes the view of Gabriel Riesser, an eloquent and courageous mid-19th-century advocate of emancipation, that a Jew who preferred the non-existent state and nation of Israel to Germany should be put under police protection not because he was dangerous but because he was obviously insane.

Moses Mendelssohn (1729-1786) was a harbinger. Cultured, cosmopolitan, though firmly Jewish, he was the quintessence of early emancipation. Yet his story became emblematic of the rapid historical progression from emancipation to assimilation: Four of his six children and eight of his nine grandchildren were baptized.

In that more religious, more Christian age, assimilation took the form of baptism, what Henrich Heine called the admission ticket to European society. In the far more secular late-20th century, assimilation merely means giving up the quaint name, the rituals, and the other accouterments and identifiers of one’s Jewish past. Assimilation today is totally passive. Indeed, apart from the trip to the county courthouse to transform, say, (shmattes by) Ralph Lifshitz into (Polo by) Ralph Lauren, it is marked by an absence of actions rather than the active embrace of some other faith. Unlike Mendelssohn’s children, Seinfeld required no baptism.

We now know, of course, that in Europe, emancipation through assimilation proved a cruel hoax. The rise of anti-Semitism, particularly late-19th- century racial anti-Semitism culminating in Nazism, disabused Jews of the notion that assimilation provided escape from the liabilities and dangers of being Jewish. The saga of the family of Madeleine Albright is emblematic. Of her four Jewish grandparents — highly assimilated, with children some of whom actually converted and erased their Jewish past — three went to their deaths in Nazi concentration camps as Jews.

Nonetheless, the American context is different. There is no American history of anti-Semitism remotely resembling Europe’s. The American tradition of tolerance goes back 200 years to the very founding of the country. Washington’s letter to the synagogue in Newport pledges not tolerance — tolerance bespeaks non-persecution bestowed as a favor by the dominant upon the deviant — but equality. It finds no parallel in the history of Europe. In such a country, assimilation seems a reasonable solution to one’s Jewish problem. One could do worse than merge one’s destiny with that of a great and humane nation dedicated to the proposition of human dignity and equality.

Nonetheless, while assimilation may be a solution for individual Jews, it clearly is a disaster for Jews as a collective with a memory, a language, a tradition, a liturgy, a history, a faith, a patrimony that will all perish as a result.

Whatever value one might assign to assimilation, one cannot deny its reality. The trends, demographic and cultural, are stark. Not just in the long-lost outlands of the Diaspora, not just in its erstwhile European center, but even in its new American heartland, the future will be one of diminution, decline, and virtual disappearance. This will not occur overnight. But it will occur soon — in but two or three generations, a time not much further removed from ours today than the founding of Israel fifty years ago.

V. ISRAELI EXCEPTIONALISM

Israel is different. In Israel the great temptation of modernity — assimilation — simply does not exist. Israel is the very embodiment of Jewish continuity: It is the only nation on earth that inhabits the same land, bears the same name, speaks the same language, and worships the same God that it did 3,000 years ago. You dig the soil and you find pottery from Davidic times, coins from Bar Kokhba, and 2,000-year-old scrolls written in a script remarkably like the one that today advertises ice cream at the corner candy store.

Because most Israelis are secular, however, some ultra-religious Jews dispute Israel’s claim to carry on an authentically Jewish history. So do some secular Jews. A French critic (sociologist Georges Friedmann) once called Israelis « Hebrew-speaking gentiles. » In fact, there was once a fashion among a group of militantly secular Israeli intellectuals to call themselves  » Canaanites, » i.e., people rooted in the land but entirely denying the religious tradition from which they came.

Well then, call these people what you will. « Jews, » after all, is a relatively recent name for this people. They started out as Hebrews, then became Israelites. « Jew » (derived from the Kingdom of Judah, one of the two successor states to the Davidic and Solomonic Kingdom of Israel) is the post- exilic term for Israelite. It is a latecomer to history.

What to call the Israeli who does not observe the dietary laws, has no use for the synagogue, and regards the Sabbath as the day for a drive to the beach — a fair description, by the way, of most of the prime ministers of Israel? It does not matter. Plant a Jewish people in a country that comes to a standstill on Yom Kippur; speaks the language of the Bible; moves to the rhythms of the Hebrew (lunar) calendar; builds cities with the stones of its ancestors; produces Hebrew poetry and literature, Jewish scholarship and learning unmatched anywhere in the world — and you have continuity.

Israelis could use a new name. Perhaps we will one day relegate the word Jew to the 2,000-year exilic experience and once again call these people Hebrews. The term has a nice historical echo, being the name by which Joseph and Jonah answered the question: « Who are you? »

In the cultural milieu of modern Israel, assimilation is hardly the problem. Of course Israelis eat McDonald’s and watch Dallas reruns. But so do Russians and Chinese and Danes. To say that there are heavy Western (read: American) influences on Israeli culture is to say nothing more than that Israel is as subject to the pressures of globalization as any other country. But that hardly denies its cultural distinctiveness, a fact testified to by the great difficulty immigrants have in adapting to Israel.

In the Israeli context, assimilation means the reattachment of Russian and Romanian, Uzbeki and Iraqi, Algerian and Argentinian Jews to a distinctively Hebraic culture. It means the exact opposite of what it means in the Diaspora: It means giving up alien languages, customs, and traditions. It means giving up Christmas and Easter for Hanukkah and Passover. It means giving up ancestral memories of the steppes and the pampas and the savannas of the world for Galilean hills and Jerusalem stone and Dead Sea desolation. That is what these new Israelis learn. That is what is transmitted to their children. That is why their survival as Jews is secure. Does anyone doubt that the near- million Soviet immigrants to Israel would have been largely lost to the Jewish people had they remained in Russia — and that now they will not be lost?

Some object to the idea of Israel as carrier of Jewish continuity because of the myriad splits and fractures among Israelis: Orthodox versus secular, Ashkenazi versus Sephardi, Russian versus sabra, and so on. Israel is now engaged in bitter debates over the legitimacy of conservative and reform Judaism and the encroachment of Orthodoxy upon the civic and social life of the country.

So what’s new? Israel is simply recapitulating the Jewish norm. There are equally serious divisions in the Diaspora, as there were within the last Jewish Commonwealth: « Before the ascendancy of the Pharisees and the emergence of Rabbinic orthodoxy after the fall of the Second Temple, » writes Harvard Near East scholar Frank Cross, « Judaism was more complex and variegated than we had supposed. » The Dead Sea Scrolls, explains Hershel Shanks, « emphasize a hitherto unappreciated variety in Judaism of the late Second Temple period, so much so that scholars often speak not simply of Judaism but of Judaisms. »

The Second Commonwealth was a riot of Jewish sectarianism: Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes, apocalyptics of every stripe, sects now lost to history, to say nothing of the early Christians. Those concerned about the secular- religious tensions in Israel might contemplate the centuries-long struggle between Hellenizers and traditionalists during the Second Commonwealth. The Maccabean revolt of 167-4 B.C., now celebrated as Hanukkah, was, among other things, a religious civil war among Jews.

Yes, it is unlikely that Israel will produce a single Jewish identity. But that is unnecessary. The relative monolith of Rabbinic Judaism in the Middle Ages is the exception. Fracture and division is a fact of life during the modern era, as during the First and Second Commonwealths. Indeed, during the period of the First Temple, the people of Israel were actually split into two often warring states. The current divisions within Israel pale in comparison.

Whatever identity or identities are ultimately adopted by Israelis, the fact remains that for them the central problem of Diaspora Jewry — suicide by assimilation — simply does not exist. Blessed with this security of identity, Israel is growing. As a result, Israel is not just the cultural center of the Jewish world, it is rapidly becoming its demographic center as well. The relatively high birth rate yields a natural increase in population. Add a steady net rate of immigration (nearly a million since the late 1980s), and Israel’s numbers rise inexorably even as the Diaspora declines.

Within a decade Israel will pass the United States as the most populous Jewish community on the globe. Within our lifetime a majority of the world’s Jews will be living in Israel. That has not happened since well before Christ.

A century ago, Europe was the center of Jewish life. More than 80 percent of world Jewry lived there. The Second World War destroyed European Jewry and dispersed the survivors to the New World (mainly the United States) and to Israel. Today, 80 percent of world Jewry lives either in the United States or in Israel. Today we have a bipolar Jewish universe with two centers of gravity of approximately equal size. It is a transitional stage, however. One star is gradually dimming, the other brightening.

Soon an inevitably the cosmology of the Jewish people will have been transformed again, turned into a single-star system with a dwindling Diaspora orbiting around. It will be a return to the ancient norm: The Jewish people will be centered — not just spiritually but physically — in their ancient homeland.

VI. THE END OF DISPERSION

The consequences of this transformation are enormous. Israel’s centrality is more than just a question of demography. It represents a bold and dangerous new strategy for Jewish survival.

For two millennia, the Jewish people survived by means of dispersion and isolation. Following the first exile in 586 B.C. and the second exile in 70 A. D. and 132 A.D., Jews spread first throughout Mesopotamia and the Mediterranean Basin, then to northern and eastern Europe and eventually west to the New World, with communities in practically every corner of the earth, even unto India and China.

Throughout this time, the Jewish people survived the immense pressures of persecution, massacre, and forced conversion not just by faith and courage, but by geographic dispersion. Decimated here, they would survive there. The thousands of Jewish villages and towns spread across the face of Europe, the Islamic world, and the New World provided a kind of demographic insurance. However many Jews were massacred in the First Crusade along the Rhine, however many villages were destroyed in the 1648-1649 pogroms in Ukraine, there were always thousands of others spread around the globe to carry on.

This dispersion made for weakness and vulnerability for individual Jewish communities. Paradoxically, however, it made for endurance and strength for the Jewish people as a whole. No tyrant could amass enough power to threaten Jewish survival everywhere.

Until Hitler. The Nazis managed to destroy most everything Jewish from the Pyrenees to the gates of Stalingrad, an entire civilization a thousand years old. There were nine million Jews in Europe when Hitler came to power. He killed two-thirds of them. Fifty years later, the Jews have yet to recover. There were sixteen million Jews in the world in 1939. Today, there are thirteen million.

The effect of the Holocaust was not just demographic, however. It was psychological, indeed ideological, as well. It demonstrated once and for all the catastrophic danger of powerlessness. The solution was self-defense, and that meant a demographic reconcentration in a place endowed with sovereignty, statehood, and arms.

Before World War II there was great debate in the Jewish world over Zionism. Reform Judaism, for example, was for decades anti-Zionist. The Holocaust resolved that debate. Except for those at the extremes — the ultra-Orthodox right and far left — Zionism became the accepted solution to Jewish powerlessness and vulnerability. Amid the ruins, Jews made a collective decision that their future lay in self-defense and territoriality, in the ingathering of the exiles to a place where they could finally acquire the means to defend themselves.

It was the right decision, the only possible decision. But oh so perilous. What a choice of place to make one’s final stand: a dot on the map, a tiny patch of near-desert, a thin ribbon of Jewish habitation behind the flimsiest of natural barriers (which the world demands that Israel relinquish). One determined tank thrust can tear it in half. One small battery of nuclear- tipped Scuds can obliterate it entirely.

To destroy the Jewish people, Hitler needed to conquer the world. All that is needed today is to conquer a territory smaller than Vermont. The terrible irony is that in solving the problem of powerlessness, the Jews have necessarily put all their eggs in one basket, a small basket hard by the waters of the Mediterranean. And on its fate hinges everything Jewish.

VII. THINKING THE UNTHINKABLE

What if the Third Jewish Commonwealth meets the fate of the first two? The scenario is not that far-fetched: A Palestinian state is born, arms itself, concludes alliances with, say, Iraq and Syria. War breaks out between Palestine and Israel (over borders or water or terrorism). Syria and Iraq attack from without. Egypt and Saudi Arabia join the battle. The home front comes under guerilla attack from Palestine. Chemical and biological weapons rain down from Syria, Iraq, and Iran. Israel is overrun.

Why is this the end? Can the Jewish people not survive as they did when their homeland was destroyed and their political independence extinguished twice before? Why not a new exile, a new Diaspora, a new cycle of Jewish history?

First, because the cultural conditions of exile would be vastly different. The first exiles occurred at a time when identity was nearly coterminous with religion. An expulsion two millennia later into a secularized world affords no footing for a reestablished Jewish identity.

But more important: Why retain such an identity? Beyond the dislocation would be the sheer demoralization. Such an event would simply break the spirit. No people could survive it. Not even the Jews. This is a people that miraculously survived two previous destructions and two millennia of persecution in the hope of ultimate return and restoration. Israel is that hope. To see it destroyed, to have Isaiahs and Jeremiahs lamenting the widows of Zion once again amid the ruins of Jerusalem is more than one people could bear.

Particularly coming after the Holocaust, the worst calamity in Jewish history. To have survived it is miracle enough. Then to survive the destruction of that which arose to redeem it — the new Jewish state — is to attribute to Jewish nationhood and survival supernatural power.

Some Jews and some scattered communities would, of course, survive. The most devout, already a minority, would carry on — as an exotic tribe, a picturesque Amish-like anachronism, a dispersed and pitied remnant of a remnant. But the Jews as a people would have retired from history.

We assume that Jewish history is cyclical: Babylonian exile in 586 B.C., followed by return in 538 B.C. Roman exile in 135 A.D., followed by return, somewhat delayed, in 1948. We forget a linear part of Jewish history: There was one other destruction, a century and a half before the fall of the First Temple. It went unrepaired. In 722 B.C., the Assyrians conquered the other, larger Jewish state, the northern kingdom of Israel. (Judah, from which modern Jews are descended, was the southern kingdom.) This is the Israel of the Ten Tribes, exiled and lost forever.

So enduring is their mystery that when Lewis and Clark set off on their expedition, one of the many questions prepared for them by Dr. Benjamin Rush at Jefferson’s behest was this: « What Affinity between their [the Indians’] religious Ceremonies & those of the Jews? » « Jefferson and Lewis had talked at length about these tribes, » explains Stephen Ambrose. « They speculated that the lost tribes of Israel could be out there on the Plains. »

Alas, not. The Ten Tribes had melted away into history. As such, they represent the historical norm. Every other people so conquered and exiled has in time disappeared. Only the Jews defied the norm. Twice. But never, I fear, again.

Publicités

Médias: Qui sème le vent (It’s not about us: Old Gray Lady gets public spanking for narcissism by former executive editor)

29 juin, 2018

RUSSIANS HUNGRY, BUT NOT STARVING Walter Duranty
The WSJ is edited for those who run the world; the WaPo is edited for those who think they run the world; the Old Gray Lady is edited for those who think they should run the world. Urban dictionary
An old joke in the newspaper world holds that The Wall Street Journal is read by the people who run the country, The New York Times by those who think they run the country, The Washington Post by those who think they ought to run the country and The Boston Globe by people whose parents used to run the country. ABC news
« Peut mieux faire », a en dit en substance le New York Times à l’élève McCain en lui renvoyant sa copie. La rubrique « Opinions » du journal américain a, en effet, rejeté une tribune sur l’Irak, rédigée par le candidat républicain à l’élection présidentielle, en réponse à celle de Barack Obama, publiée lundi 14 juillet. Cette décision a particulièrement irrité l’équipe de John McCain, comme en atteste le communiqué d’un de ses porte-parole : « John McCain croit que la victoire en Irak doit être fondée sur les conditions sur le terrain, et non pas sur des calendriers arbitraires. Contrairement à Barack Obama, sa position ne changera pas selon les demandes du New York Times. » D’après le New York Times, la tribune de M. McCain, qui a par ailleurs été reproduite intégralement sur le site conservateur Drudge report, n’a pas été refusée définitivement mais a été renvoyée à son auteur pour être améliorée. David Shipley, le rédacteur en chef de la rubrique « Opinions », a ainsi publié lundi 21 juillet, sur le blog du journal, l’e-mail envoyé à l’équipe de campagne du candidat républicain. Il s’y dit « très désireux de publier le sénateur » dans sa rubrique, mais « dans l’incapacité d’accepter cette tribune dans son état actuel ». Dans ce mail, M. Shipley explique les raisons pour lesquelles il a décidé de publier le point de vue sur l’Irak de Barack Obama. Si le candidat démocrate y contestait les positions de son adversaire républicain, il apportait également de nouveaux détails sur son propre plan en Irak. Le rédacteur en chef ajoute que son journal est prêt à accueillir un nouveau point de vue de John McCain si celui-ci y »définit concrètement ce qu’il considère être la victoire en Irak ». « L’article devra aussi proposer un plan clair pour atteindre la victoire, incluant le nombre de troupes, des calendriers », précise M. Shipley. Une demande qui risque d’être difficilement satisfaite ; M. McCain s’opposant à la mise en place d’un calendrier de retrait des troupes depuis le début de sa campagne. Devant les nombreuses protestations républicaines, le NYT a publié un communiqué précisant qu’il est habituel pour ses pages « Opinions », et pour celles d’autres publications, de procéder à un va-et-vient des tribunes entre les auteurs et la rédaction. Le communiqué rappelle également que le New York Times a publié au moins sept tribunes de John McCain depuis 1996, et que le sénateur a été le candidat officiellement soutenu par le quotidien lors des dernières primaires républicaines. L’équipe de campagne républicaine, qui dénonce régulièrement la couverture médiatique de Barack Obama, qu’elle juge trop favorable, a, elle, répliqué sur son site en mettant en ligne, mardi, une vidéo intitulée »Les médias sont amoureux de Barack Obama ». Sur un fond rose, le film compile des extraits d’émissions d’actualité avec en fond musical « You’re just too good to be true » de Frankie Valli. Le Monde
The long romance of Western leftists with some of the bloodiest regimes and political movements in history is a story not told often enough, and Jamie Glazov’s United in Hate tells it particularly well. (…) United in Hate begins with a brief survey of the many leftists who since 9/11 have rationalized jihadist terrorism and blamed the United States for the attacks: “From Noam Chomsky to Norman Mailer,” Glazov writes, “from Eric Foner to Susan Sontag, the Left used 9/11 to castigate America,” seeing the 3,000 dead in Manhattan as “merely collateral victims of the world’s well-founded rebellion against the evil American empire.” But similar attitudes are also found in the Democratic Party itself. From Jimmy Carter’s courtship of Hamas to the Democratic congressional leadership’s eagerness to declare the Iraq War a failure—even as millions of Iraqis voted in free elections—the presumably “moderate” Democratic leadership has regularly created obstacles to defeating a murderous jihadist ideology that opposes every ideal the liberal Left supposedly embraces. Before returning to the subject of Islam and the Left in greater detail, Glazov surveys the long history of the Left’s “useful idiocy.” Western political pilgrims to post-revolutionary Russia gushed like schoolgirls over Lenin and Stalin, even as torture, terror, and famine were inflicted on the Russian people. New York Times reporter Walter Duranty stands as perhaps the quintessential fellow-traveler, killing news reports of famine and writing that Ukrainians were “healthier and more cheerful” than he had expected, and that markets were overflowing with food—this at the height of Stalin’s slaughter of the kulaks. Today’s Times continues to list Duranty among the paper’s Pulitzer Prize winners. Other abettors of terror and famine, both famous and obscure, make their appearance in Glazov’s hall of dishonor. They include George Bernard Shaw and Bertholt Brecht, who, he writes, “excused and promoted Stalin’s crimes at every turn,” and American sociologist Jerome Davis, who said of Stalin, “everything he does reflects the desires and hopes of the masses.” The same delusions clouded the vision of Western fans of China’s Mao Tse-tung, whose butcher’s bill of dead, tortured, starved, and imprisoned eclipses Hitler’s and Stalin’s combined. The next generation of leftists in America, the so-called “New Left,” may have become disillusioned with the Soviet Union after Khrushchev validated every anti-Communist charge, but they still clung to the ideology that had justified and driven Communism’s crimes. They simply shopped around for new autocrats to worship. Castro’s Cuba became, and to some extent has remained, the Shangri-La for starry-eyed American leftists, despite its half-million political prisoners—“the highest incarceration rate per capita in the world,” Glazov points out—and its execution of 15,000 enemies of the state. Vietnam for a time inspired pilgrimages as well, lauded by intellectuals like Susan Sontag and Mary McCarthy despite the Viet Cong’s bloody record of torture, forced depopulation, and murder. The bloody dénouement of Saigon’s fall—the purges, executions, refugees, and a holocaust in neighboring Cambodia—soon diverted the Left’s adulation to the next revolution de jour, in Nicaragua. Fans of the thuggish Sandinistas, or the “sandalistas,” as critics dubbed these “political tourists,” did not seem to mind the regime’s 8,000 political executions, 20,000 political prisoners, forced population relocations, or regular use of torture on state enemies. Indeed, about 250,000 Americans went to Nicaragua to work for the Sandinista government. In 1990, the Sandinistas faced a reasonably fair election and were voted out of power. When China began easing toward greater economic freedom, the only full-blown Communist regime left besides Cuba’s was that of North Korea’s lunatic Kim Jong Il, whose mad dictatorship even American leftists struggled to idealize. However, some found in the resurgent Islamic jihad the next supposed victim of American imperialism and capitalism that, Glazov writes, “would fill the void left by communism’s collapse.” The first stirrings of this unholy alliance between leftists and jihadists were visible after the Iranian revolution of 1979. Again displaying a remarkable myopia about their new heroes’ crimes—the mullahs in Iran killed more people just in the span of two weeks in 1979 (about 20,000) than the hated Shah had in 38 years—Western radicals like French philosopher Michel Foucault indulged both their noble-savage idealization of the non-Western “other” and their usual adolescent worship of “revolution.” The Left’s flirtation with Islamists is particularly bizarre. Unlike Communist tyrannies, which at least paid lip service to the ideals of social justice and equality, the jihadists in word and deed continually displayed their contempt for feminism, human rights, cosmopolitan tolerance, and democratic freedom—everything the Left claims to stand for. Yet American feminists, who can become enraged over a single masculine pronoun, find all sorts of rationalizations for gender apartheid, honor killings, genital mutilations, wife-beating, polygamy, and other medieval sexist abuses sanctioned by Islam, Glazov shows. Duke professor Miriam Cooke, for example, asserts, “What is driving Islamist men is globalization,” and she praises female suicide bombers for manifesting “agency” against colonial powers. In response to the high incidence of Muslims raping Norwegian women, Professor Unni Wikan of the University of Oslo recommends that Norwegian women wear a veil. And Nation columnist Naomi Klein calls on leftists to join in solidarity with Muqtada al-Sadr, the Iraqi Shiite who has fomented violence against the American military and fellow Iraqis. The only villain in the leftist melodrama remains the capitalist, colonialist, imperialist, Christian West. Hence the surreal sight of American feminists marching against the Iraq War and George W. Bush, though the hated president had freed more women than all the activists and women’s studies professors combined. Bruce Thornton
Toute la newsroom s’est évidemment concentrée sur l’événement.» C’est-à-dire la centaine de journalistes chargés de «couvrir» New York, la trentaine de reporters du bureau de Washington, toute l’équipe d’éditorialistes et de billettistes qui, chaque jour dans les célèbres pages «Op-Ed» (opinions, éditoriaux), donnent le «la» de ce qu’il faut penser à l’élite américaine. Ce mardi-là, comme tous les soirs, aux alentours de 19 heures, les grands titres de la une du Times ont été envoyés par messagerie électronique à la plupart des grands quotidiens américains, qui ne manquent jamais de jeter un oeil sur les orientations de leur confrère avant d’en finir avec leurs propres éditions. Car c’est bien lui la référence. Le journal aux soixante-dix-neuf Pulitzer (ces oscars du journalisme), celui qui a osé publier, en 1971, les archives secrètes du Pentagone expliquant les raisons de l’entrée en guerre des Etats-Unis au Viêt-nam. Et dont l’aura dépasse largement New York, puisqu’il publie une édition nationale diffusée à partir d’une douzaine d’imprimeries réparties sur le sol américain. (…) Bien sûr, il y a la demande d’informations. Et là, le New York Times, qui s’est choisi pour slogan «Toutes les nouvelles qu’il convient d’imprimer», peut en remontrer à tous les journaux du monde. Intraitable devant ses propres erreurs, qu’il rectifie chaque jour dans un emplacement ad hoc, en page 2. Maniaquement sérieux dans tout ce qu’il traite. «La vieille dame grise» ­ son surnom ­ est sans doute le seul journal au monde à envoyer ses chroniqueurs gastronomiques trois fois de suite dans un même restaurant, avant de les autoriser à en faire une critique ! Ce faiseur d’opinion se flatte d’être «indépendant». Démocrate, en fait. Le New York Times n’est pas du style à faire des cadeaux à la présidence. Il n’a cessé, l’an passé, de mordre les mollets du candidat George W. Bush, fustigeant notamment le délabrement du système de santé publique au Texas, dont le républicain était gouverneur. A tel point que, en pleine campagne présidentielle, le futur président, apercevant un journaliste, s’est écrié (sans savoir que le micro était ouvert): «Tiens, voilà ce trou du cul de première classe (major league asshole) du New York Times»… (…) Et alors qu’il s’apprêtait à fêter son anniversaire, dans son édition du week-end dernier, 720 pages, épaisse comme Autant en emporte le vent, se vante-t-on ­, le New York Times a très symboliquement choisi d’imprimer sur sa dernière page un drapeau américain à découper. Sous le titre suivant: «Une nation panse ses plaies en rouge, blanc, bleu.». Libération
Bien qu’elle se targue de privilégier les faits, la presse des Etats-Unis traite souvent l’actualité internationale comme un conte moral illustrant les bienfaits du « modèle » américain et les « archaïsmes » de ceux qui refusent de le suivre. Cette fable idéologique réserve à la France un rôle de choix. La victoire électorale de la gauche, la défense de l’exception culturelle et le refus par Paris d’emboîter le pas aux élans guerriers de Washington dans le Golfe n’ont fait que conforter cette aigreur médiatique. Thomas Frank (Le Monde diplomatique, 1998)
Voilà huit ans que les Etats-Unis n’ont plus d’ennemi sur lequel compter, qu’il leur manque une nation à dépeindre comme l’incarnation de l’obstination et de la menace. Il y a bien sûr l’Irak, avec son dictateur caricatural, mais ce pays ne s’est jamais vraiment montré à la hauteur des espérances : trop circonscrit, trop outrancier, trop idéologiquement déroutant. Il fallait donc trouver un Etat aux choix économiques lisibles, et dont la politique pourrait être comprise – et stigmatisée – comme un rejet de la mondialisation cybernétique que chacun ou presque glorifie, des firmes informatiques au président William Clinton. L’année 1997 a enfin permis de trouver la cible cherchée. Où que l’on se tourne, experts, journalistes, porte-parole des industriels et magnats de la publicité de Madison Avenue s’allient pour persuader l’opinion de deux évidences : le triomphe de l’ordre industriel américain et l’archaïsme de la France, encore encombrée d’un Etat-providence presque intact. Correspondant à Paris du New York Times – et parfois invité par les chaînes de télévision françaises -, Roger Cohen a dressé, il y a un an, la longue liste des travers hexagonaux : les Français ne comprendraient rien à Internet, ils n’aiment pas les Etats-Unis, et ils s’accrochent à un système « socialiste » dans lequel des « technocrates » décident de tout, encore que les syndicats restent infiniment trop puissants. En octobre dernier, le journaliste américain pouvait enfin théoriser sa condamnation définitive : « La France a choisi, dans la dernière décennie du XXe siècle, de devenir ce qui ressemble peut-être le plus à un rival idéologique sérieux des Etats-Unis. » Le thème de la « récalcitrance française » vient épauler les arguments des partisans du nouvel ordre mondial. (…) Dans un éditorial de sa livraison d’automne 1997, le magazine littéraire Granta se charge d’édifier le lecteur cultivé. Qu’on en juge : le refus de la France de reconnaître que la « mondialisation est inévitable » ne serait qu’un nouvel effort fantasque de sa part « pour préserver l’idée qu’elle cultive de la “francité”». Ajoutez à cela quelques références prévisibles à l’ascension de M. Jean-Marie Le Pen, et l’article s’écrit tout seul. Puisqu’on confond désormais libre-échange et liberté, marché et démocratie, les Etats-Unis voient, dans chaque effort pour ne pas tout subordonner au marché, un acte d’une prétention impardonnable. Et, dans cette optique, les Français représentent l’ennemi idéal : ils résistent à la baisse des salaires et à la refonte du système de santé, leurs syndicats combattent les « réformes » dont nul manager américain n’ignore qu’elles sont un élément décisif de la « compétitivité mondiale ». Sans compter que les Français conservent dans l’imaginaire américain une image de snobs. Aux Etats-Unis, même le téléspectateur le plus indifférent ne peut en effet ignorer que la France est un pays qui contingenterait les films américains, qui tenterait d’éradiquer les termes anglais de son vocabulaire, et qui croirait devoir enseigner la cuisine française dès l’école maternelle. En somme, c’est un peuple têtu qui persisterait à nager à contre-courant de la culture et de l’économie ; un gouvernement intraitable qui interdirait à ses citoyens de surfer sur les gammes des plaisirs sensuels comme sur les ondes extatiques du commerce ; une nation de rabat-joie pincés, décidés à gâcher la douce musique américaine que le monde entier brûle d’entendre. Que l’on parle des sarcasmes du serveur parisien vous apportant le ketchup ou des travailleurs sociaux qui cherchent à adoucir les effets du capitalisme mondial, tout est dans tout : pour les combattants culturels du nouvel ordre, la possibilité de mélanger stéréotypes et croisade économique est décidément irrésistible. Il est donc logique qu’on ne puisse désormais actionner une télécommande sans entendre quelque ragot sur les Français. Une émission diffusée à la Radio publique nationale laisse entendre que ce sont des têtes de lard. Un éditorial du New Republic se moque des Gaulois, qui votent à tort et à travers. Mais le procureur le plus constant dans sa mise en accusation de la France est le New York Times, dont les correspondants en Europe et les éditorialistes martèlent une thématique presque immuable : pas une semaine sans quelque décision française hilarante ou image mémorable – par exemple, cet intellectuel parisien que l’on aurait surpris à écrire un livre sur l’impact d’Internet… avec un crayon noir ! Thomas Friedman, éditorialiste au New York Times et ancien correspondant de ce quotidien au Proche-Orient, posa les termes du conflit entre la démocratie globale et l’arrogance française dans son commentaire du 26 février 1997. Pour lui, comme pour les publicitaires d’American Express, partout dans le monde « la pression de la technologie et l’économie globale forcent les nations à transférer le pouvoir de la bureaucratie d’Etat et des monopoles autrefois dominants au secteur privé ». Mais les Français s’obstineraient à vouloir entraver le puissant flot de l’Histoire. Ils sont, tout simplement, « des gens qui sentent que le monde change et qui veulent l’en empêcher ». Business Week enfonce le clou : « Imaginez un pays où un patron risque la prison parce que les cadres de l’entreprise travaillent plus de trente-neuf heures sans être payés en heures supplémentaires. (…) Quel type de régime enverrait ainsi le patron en prison ? Mais c’est la France ! ». La clé de cette impulsion répressive et bornée ? Une culture que tout bon amateur de sitcoms a appris à abhorrer : « Le système français récompense ceux qui ont la capacité de suivre le chemin qu’on a tracé pour eux », explique à Thomas Friedman un « expert » amical ; le système américain inviterait au contraire les gens à « se rebeller ». C’est l’homme au costume gris contre James Dean. Le mal français, en d’autres termes, ne relèverait pas de l’obstination dans l’erreur économique : il serait plutôt caractérisé par la lutte des bureaucrates contre les rebelles, de l’Académie française contre Internet, des intellectuels contre le peuple. Dans ce mélodrame classique, l’éditorialiste prend évidemment place dans le camp des bons, et dépoussière une artillerie de propagande digne des premiers temps de la guerre froide. La France, écrit-il, ne fait rien de moins que « du pied aux ennemis de l’Amérique, qui sont souvent les ennemis de la modernité ». Mais Thomas Friedman ne fait que construire son discours sur les fondations posées par Roger Cohen, dont la correspondance de Paris reprend sans cesse comme mécanisme explicatif les stéréotypes américains sur l’arrogance française. Pour le journaliste du New York Times, le moindre choix économique fait à Paris s’explique par des traits culturels douteux. L’ « aspiration à la grandeur », les « prétentions excessives », le « sentiment d’occuper une position proche du centre du monde », ces facettes de la vanité nationale empêchent les Français d’embrasser l’exaltant avenir multiculturel ; leur besoin de nourrir l’« ego français » rend difficile la prédiction de leur prochaine lubie électorale. Toujours victime de l’illusion gaullienne d’ « une certaine idée de la France », selon Roger Cohen, ce pays, « aussi mobile qu’un bloc de ciment », serait en pleine « paralysie interne (…), menacé par l’innovation ». Les entrepreneurs y sont fortement découragés, ses « technocrates (…) semblent dépassés par l’économie globale », et ses syndicats, « qui arborent fièrement les haillons d’un rêve socialiste épuisé (…) , semblent également fossilisés ». Des bons points ? Le correspondant du New York Times en décerne quelques-uns, de préférence à d’exemplaires amis du peuple : le baron du logiciel Bernard Liautaud, fourmillant d’idées égalitaires ramassées à l’université Stanford comme la « promotion d’une culture de l’actionnaire » et le « penser marketing » ; ou Bernard Arnault, « entrepreneur infatigable », héros de la petite parabole du Château d’Yquem : pour identifier l’orgueilleux aristocrate à qui il dispute la propriété de ce domaine vinicole, Cohen le représente méditant de façon poignante sur une montre arrêtée. Aux antipodes de l’archaïsme, le journaliste évoque aussi avec une évidente délectation le glorieux (et irrésistible) progrès de la culture de masse américaine. Par les mécanismes magiques du marché, celle-ci exprime la volonté du peuple. Sous la photographie de patineurs effectuant sauts et cascades face à la tour Eiffel, un article acclame cette jeunesse de France qui embrasse le marché mondial avec allégresse, qui ne craint pas de consommer les produits de la culture jeunes en dépit des injonctions de ses aînés. « Casquette de base-ball à l’envers, baskets aux pieds, films et musique américains sont les figures de référence de la majorité des enfants français. L’anti-américanisme facile des intellectuels et des politiques rencontre fort peu d’écho auprès des Français ordinaires. » Bien entendu, il est un peu audacieux de prétendre que la culture de masse serait forcément l’expression des goûts du public. Mais, même quand un phénomène culturel est créé par l’industrie, les journalistes américains y décèlent le signe d’une victoire du peuple – et du marché – sur l’arrogance française. Un article sur l’importation de la fête de Halloween fit ainsi la « une » du New York Times et de l’ International Herald Tribune. L’auteur de l’article réussit toutefois à transformer la fête en expression d’un conflit : entre, d’une part, la volonté du peuple – un peuple d’acheteurs et de vendeurs dans les grands magasins, de fabricants de téléphones portables – et, d’autre part, l’anti-américanisme fatigué des mandarins culturels du pays. Le New York Times choisit d’illustrer l’article par une photographie juxtaposant à la fière tour Eiffel un millier de citrouilles placées là par l’un des parrains (commerciaux) de l’opération. Cependant, c’est en essayant de transposer à toute force cette idée fixe dans le domaine politique, en lisant l’information politique au travers de la lutte entre la liberté du marché et l’arrogance de l’Etat que la presse américaine à Paris se met à déraper pour de bon. Puisque refuser les mécanismes néolibéraux revient à mépriser le peuple, et que s’écarter du marché serait en définitive une des formes du racisme, un homme politique est naturellement mis en relief : M. Jean-Marie Le Pen, à qui « l’état d’esprit [français] offre un terrain parfait ». La description ainsi faite des événements politiques mène tout droit à ce personnage exutoire d’un pays qui regarde en arrière. Le Washington Post résume le propos avec brio : « Tous les responsables politiques, même Jean-Marie Le Pen à l’extrême droite, sont des sociaux-démocrates sous une forme ou sous une autre. » Toute personnalité politique se voit alors présentée comme un Le Pen sans le racisme, ou un Le Pen sans l’europhobie ; chaque élection est assimilée à une victoire du Front national. Une vision d’une cohérence interne et d’une force de conviction telles qu’elle pourrait surprendre des lecteurs américains découvrant que l’extrême droite française n’est pas au pouvoir et que M. Le Pen ne détient aucun mandat national. La confusion entretenue autour des projets de M. Lionel Jospin est encore plus étrange. Dès juin 1997, le Wall Street Journal expliquait : « Les protecteurs de la culture socialiste française étaient enthousiasmés par l’arrivée au pouvoir de M. Jospin, un homme qui n’est aucunement souillé par la moindre pensée moderne. » Reprenant la même antienne et assimilant le premier ministre à un pur produit du sentiment rétrograde et arrogant des Français, le New York Times n’eut d’autre souci que de prouver l’inconséquence de ses décisions. Le 11 octobre 1997, commentant le projet de loi sur la réduction du temps de travail à 35 heures hebdomadaires, le quotidien new-yorkais rendit compte des réactions des représentants du patronat et établit la liste des pays européens qui connaissaient une véritable réussite – car eux, évidemment, ne cherchaient pas à imposer une telle contrainte aux marchés. Le tout, couronné par la citation d’un économiste de la firme de courtage Smith Barney : « Le problème de ces idées [socialistes] est qu’elles confortent un fantasme. » De fait, une telle relation des événements est conçue comme un conte moral. Les nouvelles de France s’apparentent alors à une fable des bienfaits du capitalisme mondial, aussi policée qu’une publicité pour un fabricant d’ordinateurs. Et la jeunesse « rebelle » devient aussi exaltante que les rêves éveillés imaginés par Nike, Reebok, Pepsi, Coke et Sprite… Thomas Frank (Le Monde diplomatique, 1998)
Entre le « New York Times » et le « Washington Post » c’est à qui sortira le plus de choses sur Donald Trump. Une telle concurrence n’était pas arrivée depuis le scandale du Watergate. C’est très bon pour notre démocratie. On a besoin d’enquêtes au sommet de l’Etat. C’est le genre d’époques que tous les journalistes rêvent de vivre. Un moment historique, à la fois pour l’Amérique et pour leur profession. David Remnick (New Yorker)
Vous parlez des mensonges de Donald Trump, mais il y a aussi beaucoup de mensonges dans la presse. Un journaliste de l’agence Bloomberg a affirmé que le nouveau président avait retiré le portrait de Martin Luther King du Bureau ovale. L’information était fausse mais a été reprise en boucle. Les journalistes ont évidemment droit à l’erreur. Mais je ne pense pas que cette erreur aurait été commise sous l’ère Obama. (…) Il faut arrêter de faire de la critique sélective, ciblée uniquement sur Trump. Il faut que notre incrédulité soit universelle. John Carney
Les analystes politiques, les sondeurs et les journalistes ont donné à penser que la victoire d’Hillary Clinton était assurée avant l’élection. En cela, c’est une surprise, car la sphère médiatique n’imaginait pas la victoire du candidat républicain. Elle a eu tort. Si elle avait su observer la société américaine et entendre son malaise, elle n’aurait jamais exclu la possibilité d’une élection de Trump. (…) Sans doute, ils ont rejeté Donald Trump car ils le trouvaient – et c’est le cas – démagogue, populiste et vulgaire. Je n’ai d’ailleurs jamais vu une élection américaine avec un tel parti pris médiatique. Même le très réputé hebdomadaire britannique « The Economist » a fait un clin d’oeil à Hillary Clinton. Je pense que la stigmatisation sans précédent de Donald Trump par les médias a favorisé chez les électeurs américains la dissimulation de leur intention de vote auprès des instituts de sondage. En clair, un certain nombre de votants n’a pas osé admettre qu’il soutenait le candidat américain. Ce phénomène est classique en politique. Souvenez-vous du 21 avril 2002 et de la qualification surprise de Jean-Marie Le Pen, leader du Front national, au second tour de l’élection présidentielle française. (…) A travers l’élection de Trump, certains Américains ont exprimé leur colère. Une partie de l’Amérique ne trouve pas ses gains dans la globalisation. Cette Amérique-là ne parvient pas à retrouver son niveau de vie d’avant la crise des subprimes, elle a le sentiment d’être abandonnée. Ce sentiment était particulièrement perceptible chez les ouvriers, qui voient l’industrie s’effilocher. Ne se sentant pas assez considérés, ils ont davantage choisi Donald Trump qu’Hillary Clinton. (…) une partie des électeurs de Donald Trump ont voté contre Washington et ses élites (…) certains Américains souffrent d’un mépris de classe, en particulier dans l’Amérique profonde. Mais dire que le peuple s’est tourné vers Trump est inexact. Le candidat républicain et la candidate démocrate sont au coude à coude en termes de suffrages exprimés [à 15 heures, 47,5% pour Trump et 47,6% pour Clinton , NDLR]. Au passage, nous avons affaire à deux candidats richissimes. Si ma mémoire est bonne, Donald Trump, pseudo-candidat du peuple, n’est pas issu de la classe ouvrière… (…) L’arrivée au pouvoir de dirigeants populistes s’explique avant tout par des spécificités locales. Après, il y a des effets communs. De nouvelles puissances émergent. Les gens se sentent décentrés. Il y a une surabondance d’innovations technologiques et scientifiques. Une partie de la société se sent déclassée. L’immigration accélère les mécanismes de recomposition culturelle. Aux Etats-Unis, les Blancs anglo-saxons deviennent minoritaires. Ceci induit une réaction exprimée en votant pour un candidat populiste : Donald Trump. (…) Une chose est certaine : l’élection de Trump, mais aussi le Brexit, vont peser sur le langage et le lexique employés par une partie des prétendants à la présidentielle française. Des acteurs politiques, de droite comme de gauche, seront tentés de durcir leur discours. Mais ce climat chauffé à blanc devrait avant tout profiter à Marine Le Pen, la candidate du Front national. Personne ne fait mieux qu’elle dans ce registre. Dominique Reynié
L’objectif du New York Times est de donner de la vraie information, mais aussi de faire chuter Donald Trump. Ils seront ravis s’ils réussissent au moins à le fragiliser. (…) Le journal et Donald Trump se sont forcément côtoyés, et avaient peut-être voulu faire du business, comme de la publicité pour Trump Organization. Mais aujourd’hui pour Trump, le NY Times incarne “l’archétype du journal bobo gauchiste, avec des journalistes soupçonnés d’être méprisants. A contrario, Trump est perçu par une bonne partie de leurs lecteurs comme “un homme inculte, pas très malin, ni très instruit. (…) Le Washington Post a fait tomber Bill Clinton, eux n’ont pas cette gloire-là. Donald Trump craint les révélations du New York Times, mais “peut-être pas plus qu’un autre média, la menace peut venir de partout. (…) Il hésiterait encore plus à prendre le risque de sortir une fausse information. Je ne pense pas qu’il sera le premier à sortir celle qui le fera tomber. [néanmoins] Trump se méfie de lui, ce qui reste “le meilleur gage de qualité qu’un média puisse avoir. Arnaud Mercier (Institut Français de presse)
Le soleil n’est pas encore levé que les journalistes du « New York Times  » sont déjà en alerte. Réveillés à 5h30 du matin, ils guettent les premiers tweets que Donald Trump envoie généralement au saut du lit, peu après 6 heures. Les week-ends ne sont pas plus reposants. Basés à Washington, les rédacteurs rattachés à la présidence sont désormais sommés de passer leur week-end en Floride. Ils rôdent dans les parages de Mar-a-Lago -la « Maison-Blanche » d’hiver, comme on l’appelle désormais – sans garantie de croiser le milliardaire. « Nos journalistes sont épuisés. Ils n’ont jamais autant travaillé de leur vie », témoigne Elisabeth Bumiller, qui dirige le bureau de Washington du « New York Times ». Ceux qui couvrent la Maison-Blanche se comptent désormais au nombre de six – du jamais-vu dans l’histoire du journal. La direction a même rapatrié Peter Baker, qui venait de prendre la tête du bureau de Jérusalem. « Nous n’avions pas le choix : nous avons besoin des meilleurs « , poursuit Elisabeth Bumiller. En passant du Moyen-Orient à la Maison-Blanche, Peter Baker n’a finalement fait que troquer un conflit pour un autre. La presse est « l’ennemi du peuple américain « , a lancé Donald Trump le mois dernier. « La guerre avec la presse ne va faire qu’empirer « , a prévenu son très sulfureux conseiller Steve Bannon. Consternés par ces propos, une vingtaine de patrons de presse et de journalistes (Reuters, CNN, « New York Times « , « New Yorker », etc.) se sont réunis à l’Université de Columbia début mars pour partager leur émoi et comprendre comment faire évoluer leur métier. « Les dictatures commencent toujours par une ostracisation de la presse », a rappelé David Remnick, directeur de la rédaction du « New Yorker « . Le président des Etats-Unis n’est certes pas le premier à imposer des mesures de rétorsion aux journaux qui lui nuisent. Mais c’est le premier à leur barrer l’accès aux conférences de presse, comme le « New York Times », CNN et Politico en ont récemment fait l’expérience. C’est aussi le premier à attaquer les journalistes nommément sur les réseaux sociaux. « C’est totalement irresponsable  ! Je ne veux pas céder à l’hystérie mais nous recevons des menaces de mort « , lance Sabrina Siddiqui, une journaliste de religion musulmane qui suit la Maison-Blanche pour le quotidien britannique « The Guardian ». La tension est telle que certains patrons de presse recommandent à leurs journalistes le même sang-froid que dans les pays totalitaires (…) Et pourtant, Donald Trump adore les médias ! Il leur consacre plusieurs heures par jour et par nuit, ne s’accordant jamais plus de quatre heures de sommeil. Dès potron-minet, le voilà donc qui s’énerve en regardant l’émission « Morning Joe « , diffusé sur la chaîne à tendance démocrate MSNBC. Il se rassure en zappant sur « Fox & Friends », un « show » à sa gloire diffusé entre 6 et 9 heures du matin. Il fulmine en regardant « Saturday Night Live » _ un programme hilarant où l’acteur Alec Baldwin singe ses excès et son incompétence. Côté papier, il dévore le « New York Times » (tendance centre gauche) et le « New York Post » (tendance droite). Plus que la haine, son rapport aux médias relève de l’obsession. « C’est assez ironique, car nous n’avons jamais reçu autant de coups de fil de la Maison-Blanche. Certains ont pris l’habitude de nous appeler de manière anonyme – exactement ce que Trump réprouve publiquement !, raconte Sabrina Siddiqui du « Guardian « . La communication à outrance n’est malheureusement pas un gage de transparen « Les briefings qui sont organisés pour nous à la Maison-Blanche sont truffés de mensonges. Donald Trump est passé maître dans l’art de manipuler les médias. Il oriente la couverture médiatique avec des projets de réforme qui se révèlent totalement creux au final  » , poursuit Sabrina Siddiqui. Aucun interlocuteur ne semble totalement fiable : « C’est le chaos total quand nous cherchons à vérifier nos informations. Il n’est pas rare d’avoir deux personnalités de la Maison-Blanche qui nous donnent deux réponses diamétralement opposées », raconte Elisabeth Bumiller, du « New York Times ». Chroniqueur au « New Yorker », Jelani Cobb a fouillé dans l’histoire pour savoir si la presse américaine avait déjà été confrontée à de pareilles difficultés. Elle l’a été au moins une fois, à l’époque de Joseph McCarthy, tristement connu pour avoir lancé une chasse aux sorcières contre les communistes dans les années 1950. « Sa stratégie était de mentir de manière exponentielle, les journalistes ne pouvant vérifier ses dires que de manière linéaire. De ce point de vue-là, il constitue le grand mentor de Donald Trump « , estime-t-il. Cette difficulté a un avantage : celui de réveiller la presse d’investigation. « D’une certaine manière, Donald Trump nous libère : il oblige les journalistes à chercher l’information en dehors des cercles habituels du pouvoir. Il y avait une proximité avec les administrations Bush et Obama qu’on ne retrouve plus aujourd’hui, et c’est tant mieux », estime Brian Stelter, journaliste chez CNN. Le « New York Times  » a ainsi ouvert un bureau d’enquête à Washington, en plus de celui qui existait déjà à New York. Dirigé par Mark Mazzetti, il a beaucoup contribué aux récentes révélations sur les connexions entre Moscou et l’administration Trump. A période exceptionnelle, le quotidien new-yorkais a aussi répondu par des procédés exceptionnels : il a créé une messagerie Internet ultra-sécurisé pour que fonctionnaires, personnalités politiques et anonymes puissent dénoncer les dérives de l’administration Trump. « Nous recevons 52.000 alertes par jour », confie Elisabeth Bumiller. A voir les chiffres de diffusion, l’élection de Donald Trump est effectivement une chance pour la presse : le « New York Times » a augmenté le nombre de ses abonnés de plus de 250.000 au dernier trimestre, avec un pic tout particulier après l’élection, soit plus qu’au cours de 2013 et 2014 réunis. Le « Washington Post » a lui accru de 75 % le nombre de ses lecteurs l’an dernier. Derrière ces chiffres flatteurs se cache une réalité plus sombre : au-delà de l’élite qui feuillette le « New York Times » et le « Washington Post », la défiance à l’égard de la presse n’a jamais été aussi forte. « Certains Américains ont retrouvé le goût des journaux avec cette élection. D’autres s’en sont définitivement coupés », reconnaît Brian Stelter, chez CNN. Seuls 40 % des Américains font confiance aux médias pour rapporter des informations de manière « exhaustive, exacte et impartiale », soit le plus bas niveau depuis une quinzaine d’années, selon un sondage publié par l’institut Gallup. La presse est accusée d’être de gauche, anti-Trump, ce qui expliquerait pourquoi elle aurait si mal anticipé sa victoire. [John Carney] Cet ancien journaliste du « Wall Street Journal », débauché par le site nationaliste Breitbart News, est persuadé que les journalistes ont un point de vue pro-mondialisation et ne sont qu’une infime minorité à partager les idées de Donald Trump. Unis contre le populisme, ils représenteraient une population beaucoup moins diverse que l’électorat américain – qui a voté à 46 % pour Trump. Les Echos
Le New York Times s’est donné une mission : faire chuter Donald Trump. Mais depuis son élection les deux jouent au chat et à la souris, tant les affaires de l’un font le bonheur de l’autre. Depuis plusieurs mois, Donald Trump et le New York Times (NY Times) se font la guerre par tweets et articles interposés. Quand le président américain qualifie le journal de “honte pour les médias”, de “défaillant”, jusqu’à le surnommer “l’ennemi du peuple”, celui-ci réplique par des enquêtes pointilleuses qui écornent toujours plus l’image du président : le mystérieux limogeage du chef du FBI, les révélations sur une probable ingérence russe pendant l’élection présidentielle… Bref, entre le NY Times et Trump, c’est à celui qui fera tomber l’autre en premier, et peu importe le prix. Le journal a décidé de taper fort dès la victoire du républicain : il a investi 5 millions de dollars pour créer un bureau spécial d’investigation basé à Washington, en plus de celui qui existait déjà à New York. Jour et nuit, six de leurs meilleurs journalistes sont ainsi chargés de couvrir exclusivement la Maison Blanche. Du jamais vu dans l’histoire du journal (…) Ils distillent les moindres tweets, faits et gestes du président, surtout en off. Ils ont aussi mis en place une messagerie Internet ultra-sécurisée, qui permet à n’importe qui de dénoncer anonymement les dérives de l’administration Trump. Le déploiement de cette artillerie lourde s’inscrit dans un contexte général de crise de la presse américaine. Fragilisés pour avoir si mal anticipé sa victoire, les médias tentent de renforcer leurs rangs pour débusquer des fausses informations. Pour le New York Times, il en va de sa réputation du média le plus influent dans le monde. Le journal couvrait déjà l’actualité du milliardaire et celle de l’empire de son père, avant qu’il ne soit élu président. (…) Mais aujourd’hui pour Trump, le NY Times incarne “l’archétype du journal bobo gauchiste, avec des journalistes soupçonnés d’être méprisants”, décrit le spécialiste. A contrario, Trump est perçu par une bonne partie de leurs lecteurs comme “un homme inculte, pas très malin, ni très instruit”, poursuit-il. Pourtant, s’il critique très souvent le journal, le président lui accorde souvent des entretiens pour avoir la satisfaction de voir son nom cité dans les pages. Le 19 juillet, il accordait ainsi une longue interview sidérante de près d’une heure, où il enchaîne les punchlines, dont “[Macron] adore me tenir la main”. Ce genre d’entrevue permet de servir les deux camps : pour Trump, c’est l’occasion d’affirmer que le média est sans intérêt quand il y discerne des propos mal retranscrits ou des “fake news”, et pour le journal, de gagner des lecteurs et de l’argent. Il tire un intérêt direct de la victoire de Trump et de ses frasques quotidiennes : il a ainsi gagné 348 000 abonnés en ligne ses trois derniers mois, un record. La saga accordée à Trump a même renfloué ses caisses, avec un bénéfice net de 13,1 millions de dollars sur cette période. Il n’est pas le seul média a avoir profité de son élection pour se refaire une beauté. La radio NPR (l’équivalent de notre France Inter) ou le Washington Post en ont eux aussi profité et une vraie concurrence s’est installée (…) Le célèbre journal new-yorkais ressent de plus en plus la concurrence, et pour se différencier, sa seule chance est de sortir le “scoop” qui servira de coup de grâce à Trump. “Le Washington Post a fait tomber Bill Clinton, eux n’ont pas cette gloire-là”, souligne Arnaud Mercier. Le 21 janvier 1998, le Washington Post révélait en effet un scandale qui défrayera la chronique et le monde politique : l’affaire Monica Lewinsky, avec qui le président américain de l’époque a eu des relations sexuelles et a poussée au silence. Donald Trump craint les révélations du New York Times, mais “peut-être pas plus qu’un autre média, la menace peut venir de partout”, nuance Arnaud Mercier. Le NY Times a en effet un point de retard dans la chasse aux scoops : le journal se freine pour la course à la publication pour ne pas mettre en péril sa crédibilité. “Il hésiterait encore plus à prendre le risque de sortir une fausse information. Je ne pense pas qu’il sera le premier à sortir celle qui le fera tomber”, admet Arnaud Mercier. Ce conflit aura néanmoins permis une chose : redonner un élan au journalisme d’investigation. Les journalistes vont chercher les informations ailleurs, à tel point que le New York Times redevient le digne représentant du quatrième pouvoir et le fer de lance de l’investigation. Trump se méfie de lui, ce qui reste “le meilleur gage de qualité qu’un média puisse avoir”, ajoute le spécialiste. Les Inrocks
It is one of the finest — if not the finest — papers in the country. I am a big fan. I read it religiously. Every day I pick up the paper and find something that I didn’t expect, that surprises me, that I wouldn’t have known otherwise. They’re analytical. They have fun with the writing. It is one of the premier writing institutions in the country. (…) We’re so entertainment and celebrity crazed that we’re just not getting the kind information to make decisions about who we are as a country. So as we really do less and less on our news pages, it’s more important to have papers like The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times and The Washington Post that you can depend on to be there. Arlene Morgan (Columbia University)
The Journal is to Wall Street and capital markets what The New York Times is to the White House and the State Department and U.S. politics. It’s the most authoritative watchdog there is. It is the paper of record. The Journal has lost some of its luster in recent years. Part of that is a general decline in newspaper readership and part of it is because The Journal is now focusing on more hard business news — inside baseball-type of coverage. Still, it’s a great paper that does what few publications can. If you’re interested in the markets and business, Starkman said, The Journal is an « indispensable source. There’s no substitute. Over the last 20 years, at its height, it had an enormous staff. We had seven real estate reporters. (…) You want a large, powerful, sophisticated news organization keeping an eye on all of that. You want somebody looking over the shoulder of the Securities and Exchange Commission, the FCC and the FDA. Dean Starkman (Columbia Journalism Review)
The Journal is the first or second most important paper in the country. They are clearly the authority in so many things, particularly in business issues. And if for some reason they change or didn’t exist, who would discover Enron? Richard Roth (Northwestern University)
Many Tuesday night were asking, “who is Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez” after her stunning primary victory over the No. 4 House Democrat Joe Crowley in New York’s 14th District. The New York Times called her a “Democratic dragon slayer.” MSNBC’s Joy Reid admitted on Twitter to “doing an Ocasio-Cortez crash course.” She didn’t have a Wikipedia page until last night. A year ago, she was working as a bartender in Manhattan. She is young. She’s working class. She’s a New Yorker who has been immersed in community-based leadership, organizing, and service work. Ocasio-Cortez is one of the most progressive, uncompromising candidates to make it to the general election as a Democrat and the fact that she beat an entrenched machine politician has propelled her to instant national recognition. She’s also spoken out on Israel’s crimes against Palestinians, labeling a recent massacre for what it was, putting her at direct odds with much of the institutional Democratic leadership. After earning her degree from Boston University, Ocasio-Cortez moved back home to the Bronx, and was working long hours as a waitress to support her family in the aftermath of her father’s untimely death. Her dad, like many working-class people, died without a will, and so Ocasio-Cortez and her family found themselves fighting a nasty, cold bureaucracy that featured legal vultures who carved off parts of her father’s estate for profit as she and her family struggled to make ends meet. She said she never planned on running for office, but after traveling across the country — from Flint, Michigan, to Standing Rock, asking Americans about the issues they were facing in the aftermath of the Trump’s election — the progressive organization Brand New Congress got in touch asked if she’d be willing to run for Congress. Her defeated primary opponent, the powerful Democratic Rep. Joe Crowley, is current chair of the House Democratic caucus and he has been trying to position himself as the successor to Nancy Pelosi as the leader of the Democrats and the future speaker of the House. This district where Crowley is a congressman is one of the most racially and culturally diverse in the United States. It spans parts of Queens and the Bronx. The district also includes the notorious Rikers prison and is home to Trump Golf Links. Crowley has held that seat since 1999 and he had not faced a primary challenger since at least 2004. Clearly, he and his re-election campaign underestimated the often nameless “young progressive challenger.” Now everyone knows her name. The Intercept
Paper Shooting Suspect Reportedly Identified, Had Dispute with Paper Since 2012… …but Media Blame Trump… Breibart
As we have meticulously documented, Jeff Zucker’s CNN has spent the last five years inspiring, normalizing, encouraging, and outright calling for political violence. Zucker and his CNN puppets (most especially Chris Cuomo and Jake Tapper) see mob justice as a legitimate political tool, a way to boost Democrat turnout, to blame their own chaos on Trump, and to terrorize their targets, including innocent police officers. And if this media-inspired violence can intimidate a few weak-kneed Republicans into voting against Trump’s upcoming Supreme Court pick, all the better. Unfortunately for law-abiding Americans on the right and left, CNN is no longer alone. As we have witnessed during the past weeks, the rest of the establishment media have now joined CNN in its unholy crusade to justify and inspire left-wing hate mobs. The entire media, all of it, just spent two weeks manufacturing an intentionally volatile narrative that was nothing less than a hoax. President Trump’s humane policy of separating illegal alien adults from children is the same policy Barack Obama practiced for eight years. But to inflame hate against Trump and his supporters, the establishment media pretended a cruel president had invented this policy. We witnessed NBC News stars not only comparing Trump to Nazis, but everyday Trump supporters to Nazis; we watched as the media tried to fool people into believing Trump is caging small children; we saw Time magazine publish a fake cover; we have heard words like “Holocaust,” “internment,” and other hyperbolic lies hurled into a country where left wingers have already tried to murder a group of Republican lawmakers playing baseball. No rational person can interpret the media’s behavior during the past two weeks as anything other than a call for mob action. And the media got what they wanted: most of it was aimed at women. Press secretary Sarah Sanders, Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi, Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao — all variously menaced, harassed, bullied, blocked, and even spit at. A burnt animal carcass was left on the porch of a DHS staffer, Congresswoman Maxine Waters (D-CA) is publicly whipping up mobs to “push” Trump officials out of public spaces, and death threats against Republicans are on the rise. And the media are not only responsible for ginning up this climate of hate; the media are openly condoning, encouraging, downplaying, and justifying it. Here is what is truly scary: this is the level of thuggery we are seeing over a hoax, a lie, a fabricated narrative involving a child separation policy that is two decades old. The stakes involving the Supreme Court, however, are not a hoax. When CNN’s Jeffrey Toobin (who has very personal reasons to keep abortion legal) says the legalization of abortion is on the line, that is not hyperbole. When cable news anchors, on the verge of nervous collapse, say the court will be dominated by conservatives (meaning those who don’t rewrite the Constitution), that is not hyperbole. Think about it: if the media are willing to inspire and justify mob justice over a hoax, how far will they go when faced with losing the Supreme Court for two decades? Already the media rhetoric is amped. MSNBC’s Chris Matthews is using the term “civil war” approvingly and openly calling for “vengeance“; the disgraced Dan Rather is leading the charge hurling words like “coup“; CNN favorite Michael Avenatti is calling on the mob to “fight like hell” with the hashtag #WhateverItTakes; a Comedy Central writer openly wished for Anthony Kennedy’s assassination… John Nolte
I fear sounding like a jealous old-timer. I’ve resisted critiquing the place publicly, but this shit is bad. I’m feeling about the NYT now like I did when my son cheated on a test in 10th grade. I loved him to death, believed he was a thoroughly wonderful young man, but he needed a course correction. So I left my desk at The NYT, where I was DC [Bureau] Chief, met his school bus and read him the riot act. He needed a course correction. (…) From four years of teaching at Harvard, so many of my students are interested in journalism, but they mostly want to write first-person, highly personal narratives about themselves. That may reflect their age. But I think there’s too much of that in journalism. It’s not about us. It’s about the world, and covering the world. Jill Abramson

Qui sème le vent …

Faux historiques de Walter Duranty ou plus récemment de Jayson Blair, adulation sans limite du candidat démocrate Obama et rejet d’une tribune du candidat républicain John McCain, indulgence systématique envers le président démocrate Obama, démolition de sa journaliste Alice Watkins,  aveuglement total sur l’élection du candidat Trump comme tout récemment de la jeune candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez aux primaires démocrates de New York, dénigrement systématique du président Trump,  …

Au lendemain du fiasco médiatique de la petite Yanela

Et à l’heure où avec la retraite du juge de la Cour suprême Anthony Kennedy …

L’ensemble des médias dits « progressistes » américains sont repartis pour un tour d’hystérie collective

Contre un président dont ils n’ont jamais vu venir l’élection

Mais qui aujourd’hui est devenu leur fonds de commerce

Alors qu’avec la concurrence des nouveaux médias numériques …

Les incitations à la violence qu’ils contribuent à diffuser

Pourraient bien finir par se retourner contre eux

Devinez qui vient tout quotidien de référence qu’il soit …

Et pour cause, série télé à la gloire de ses journalistes comprise, de « narcissisme » aggravé …

De se faire remonter les bretelles par l’une de ses anciennes rédactrices en chef ?

Ouch !
Jill Abramson, Ex-New York Times Editor: The ‘Narcissistic’ NYT Is Making ‘Horrible Mistakes,’ Needs a ‘Course Correction’
After her ‘pissed off’ tweet, the former editor slams the newspaper staff’s ‘narcissism,’ its ‘crucifying’ Ali Watkins profile, and ‘missing’ the rise of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.
Lloyd Grove
The Daily Beast
06.28.18

It may not have been the tweet heard ’round the world, but it was certainly heard—like a thunderclap—at The New York Times’ headquarters at 620 Eighth Avenue in Manhattan.

“Kind of pisses me off that @ nytimes is still asking Who Is Ocasio-Cortez? when it should have covered her campaign,” Jill Abramson erupted on Twitter on Wednesday morning—a biting reference to the newspaper’s original headline concerning the 28-year-old socialist’s shocking Democratic primary upset, a landslide actually, over incumbent Joe Crowley in New York’s 14th Congressional District.

Indeed, a quick review of the Times’ coverage of the primary race turned up mention of and quotes from Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in two news stories prior to Election Night, and a few name-checks in editorials—one of which, published in the June 20 print edition, noted that she’s “a challenger [Crowley] is heavily favored to beat.”

“Missing her rise [is] akin to not seeing Trump’s win coming in 2016,” Abramson added in her tweet—an even more biting reference to the Timesself-acknowledged failings in the paper’s reporting of the presidential campaign.

In response to Abramson’s critique—which she elaborated in several emailed comments shared with the Times—Times spokeswoman Eileen Murphy told The Daily Beast: “We have enormous respect for Jill and deeply appreciate her passion. Criticism and feedback helps us do better work and we’re always open to it. On these specifics though, we just disagree with Jill.” A few hours after Abramson’s tweet, the headline phrase that pissed her off, “Who is Alexandria Ocasia-Cortez?” was changed online to “Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez: A 28-Year-Old Democratic Giant Slayer.”

The Times, of course, is used to reader complaints—but not to public spankings from former executive editors.

Abramson, 64, famously held that job for nearly three years—the first and only woman to do so—until she was summarily sacked amid an unseemly public-relations melee in May 2014.

Given all that history—which included then-Publisher Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. talking publicly about her alleged newsroom management flaws—Abramson, these days a senior lecturer at Harvard, is something of a King Kong Kibitzer.

“I fear sounding like a jealous old-timer. I’ve resisted critiquing the place publicly, but this shit is bad,” Abramson wrote in an email to this reporter, in which she elaborated on her tweet.

“I’m feeling about the NYT now like I did when my son cheated on a test in 10th grade,” she wrote. “I loved him to death, believed he was a thoroughly wonderful young man, but he needed a course correction. So I left my desk at The NYT, where I was DC [Bureau] Chief, met his school bus and read him the riot act. He needed a course correction.

“So does the NYT… it’s making horrible mistakes left and right. Here are a few:

“Not covering the ‘stunning’ upset of Joe Crowley. It’s the NYT that was undeservedly stunned, letting down its readers.

“That horrible 3,000-word exposé on Ali Watkins [the Times reporter who’s caught up in a leak investigation involving her ex-boyfriend, a former top staffer on the Senate Intelligence Committee] that aired her sex life and conflicts while not probing why she was hired, responsibility of editors, or, most crucially, the value of her journalism (her Carter Page scoop in BuzzFeed actually helped lead to appt of Mueller).

“That story hung a 26-year-old young woman out to dry. It was unimaginable to me what the pain must be like for her.

“Readers, meanwhile, the most important NYT constituency, were left in a state of confusion.

“Decision by international and new TV show plan to focus on personal feelings and experiences of NYT journalists covering news.

“More narcissism: It’s always about us. Yikes. Distance is part of journalism’s discipline.

“They need a course correction.

“Am I wrong?”

In a subsequent phone interview, Abramson tried to soften the sting of her critiques, saying they come from “a place of pure love” for the newspaper, and adding that “Dean [Baquet] is doing a great job” as executive editor.

“I would describe my tweet as momentary disappointment, not deep dissatisfaction,” she said.

However, Abramson didn’t back away from her assessments.

The Ali Watkins profile, she said, “read like a steamy romance novel in parts,” adding that it amounted to “a front-page piece about ‘my love affair with someone.’ It’s just crucifying. How do you then show up for work? I don’t see a good resolution for that.”

Abramson, a frequent and vociferous critic of Barack Obama’s administration for its aggressive attempts to uncover reporters’ confidential sources, also faulted the story for placing more focus on Watkins’ personal life—and her admittedly questionable decision to withhold information about the government’s actions against her from her employer—than on the Trump Justice Department’s war on leaks.

“As journalists, we want to leap to the defense of anybody embroiled in this hideous leak investigation,” she said.

Abramson—who, as managing editor, pointedly declined to participate in Page One, the 2011 documentary about the Times—said she hasn’t watched the Showtime series The Fourth Estate.

And doesn’t intend to.

“From four years of teaching at Harvard, so many of my students are interested in journalism, but they mostly want to write first-person, highly personal narratives about themselves. That may reflect their age. But I  think there’s too much of that in journalism. It’s not about us. It’s about the world, and covering the world.”

The Times, she said, remains essential: “Now more than ever, it  stands at the pinnacle of the news food chain.”

Abramson—who left the Times under contentious circumstances—insisted she’s no longer angry (and indeed attended the recent retirement party for former publisher Sulzberger, the man who fired her four years ago.)

“Absolutely not,” she said. “Anyone who spends as much time as I do with a two-and-a-half-year old [a reference to her granddaughter Eloise] has zero rage.”

Voir aussi:

With ‘The Weekly,’ The New York Times Gets Serious About TV
The New York Times is going Hollywood
John Koblin
The New York Times
May 9, 2018

The cable channel FX announced on Wednesday that it would be making a new weekly documentary series centered on stories that appear in The Times and the journalists who report them. The show, which will be called “The Weekly,” builds on the success of the podcast “The Daily,” which began last year and generally examines a story a day from the Times newsroom.
FX has given “The Weekly” a 30-week commitment and a Sunday night time slot. The show, at 30 minutes per episode, is expected to debut later this year, possibly in time for the midterm elections. Hulu has the rights to stream the new series, giving the program a dedicated streaming platform the day after it premieres on cable.
Unlike “The Daily,” which is hosted by Michael Barbaro, the television version will not have a dedicated host, FX said. But in keeping with the podcast’s format, “The Weekly” will follow a reporter or team of journalists as a Times story makes its way toward publication.

For The Times, the FX show signals a turn toward the entertainment world. The company recently made a deal with Netflix to turn a feature from The New York Times Magazine into a documentary series called “The Diagnosis,” with Scott Rudin producing. Megan Ellison’s Annapurna Pictures and Plan B, a production company co-founded by Brad Pitt, have gobbled up the rights to make a movie about how The Times broke the Harvey Weinstein story. Later this month, “The Fourth Estate,” a four-episode series from the documentary filmmaker Liz Garbus chronicling the Times newsroom during the first year of the Trump administration, will premiere on Showtime.

Times leaders have been sending signals that this would be the year it would be aggressive in entering the crowded television space.

“We think this could be a way both of directly generating revenue but also again of getting Times journalism in front of new audiences and further building the reputation and the influence of The New York Times,” the Times Company chief executive, Mark Thompson, said on a quarterly earnings call last week.

The Times receives most of its revenue from subscriptions, and has said in recent years that it is making a concerted effort to get its product in front as many potential subscribers as possible.

In a statement, Meredith Kopit Levien, the chief operating officer of the Times Company, said: “Our ambition with ‘The Weekly’ is to bring the authority and excellence of New York Times journalism to the largest possible television audience. Partnering with FX and Hulu together for distribution represents an entirely new and uniquely powerful way do just that.”

In a memo to the staff, Dean Baquet, the executive editor of The Times, and Joseph Kahn, the newspaper’s managing editor, said that the show “represents one of our big bets of the year.”

“With it,” they added, “we expect to reach entirely new audiences, tap new revenue streams and gain entry into new parts of people’s lives beyond the time reserved for reading news — all of which should give our journalism even greater impact.”

The three Times people who worked on developing “The Weekly” and finding distribution partners for it were Sam Dolnick, an assistant managing editor; Jake Silverstein, the editor in chief of the Times Magazine; and Stephanie Preiss, the director of strategy and business development.

The planned series also breaks ground for FX, a cable network known for critically acclaimed scripted shows like “The Americans” and “Atlanta”: It is the network’s first foray into unscripted content in some time. Rivals like Showtime, Netflix and HBO have been making documentary series for years.

FX, like nearly every other cable channel in the streaming and cord-cutting era, has had declining ratings in recent years, but is still available in 90 million homes. Hulu announced last week that it now has more than 20 million subscribers.

Partnerships between publications and traditional cable players are nothing new. Buzzfeed has a dedicated studio division, and recently made a deal with Netflix to create a new series featuring its reporters following a story. Vice has a daily newscast on HBO, though that series has had trouble breaking through the din. And two cable channels built on journalism-based brands — Viceland and Esquire — premiered in recent years but fizzled.

Voir également:

Nolte: Supreme Court Fight Will Increase Violence from Media-Sanctioned Mobs
With nothing less than the fate of the Supreme Court at stake, America’s far-left radicals and their enablers in the establishment media are about to turn bullying, intimidation, menacing, and outright violence up to 11.
28 Jun 2018

As we have meticulously documented, Jeff Zucker’s CNN has spent the last five years inspiring, normalizing, encouraging, and outright calling for political violence.

Zucker and his CNN puppets (most especially Chris Cuomo and Jake Tapper) see mob justice as a legitimate political tool, a way to boost Democrat turnout, to blame their own chaos on Trump, and to terrorize their targets, including innocent police officers. And if this media-inspired violence can intimidate a few weak-kneed Republicans into voting against Trump’s upcoming Supreme Court pick, all the better.

Unfortunately for law-abiding Americans on the right and left, CNN is no longer alone. As we have witnessed during the past weeks, the rest of the establishment media have now joined CNN in its unholy crusade to justify and inspire left-wing hate mobs.

The entire media, all of it, just spent two weeks manufacturing an intentionally volatile narrative that was nothing less than a hoax. President Trump’s humane policy of separating illegal alien adults from children is the same policy Barack Obama practiced for eight years. But to inflame hate against Trump and his supporters, the establishment media pretended a cruel president had invented this policy.

We witnessed NBC News stars not only comparing Trump to Nazis, but everyday Trump supporters to Nazis; we watched as the media tried to fool people into believing Trump is caging small children; we saw Time magazine publish a fake cover; we have heard words like “Holocaust,” “internment,” and other hyperbolic lies hurled into a country where left wingers have already tried to murder a group of Republican lawmakers playing baseball.

No rational person can interpret the media’s behavior during the past two weeks as anything other than a call for mob action.

And the media got what they wanted: most of it was aimed at women.

Press secretary Sarah Sanders, Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi, Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao — all variously menaced, harassed, bullied, blocked, and even spit at.

A burnt animal carcass was left on the porch of a DHS staffer, Congresswoman Maxine Waters (D-CA) is publicly whipping up mobs to “push” Trump officials out of public spaces, and death threats against Republicans are on the rise.

And the media are not only responsible for ginning up this climate of hate; the media are openly condoning, encouraging, downplaying, and justifying it.

Here is what is truly scary: this is the level of thuggery we are seeing over a hoax, a lie, a fabricated narrative involving a child separation policy that is two decades old.

The stakes involving the Supreme Court, however, are not a hoax.

When CNN’s Jeffrey Toobin (who has very personal reasons to keep abortion legal) says the legalization of abortion is on the line, that is not hyperbole.

When cable news anchors, on the verge of nervous collapse, say the court will be dominated by conservatives (meaning those who don’t rewrite the Constitution), that is not hyperbole.

Think about it: if the media are willing to inspire and justify mob justice over a hoax, how far will they go when faced with losing the Supreme Court for two decades?

Already the media rhetoric is amped. MSNBC’s Chris Matthews is using the term “civil war” approvingly and openly calling for “vengeance“; the disgraced Dan Rather is leading the charge hurling words like “coup“; CNN favorite Michael Avenatti is calling on the mob to “fight like hell” with the hashtag #WhateverItTakes; a Comedy Central writer openly wished for Anthony Kennedy’s assassination…

And this is just the warm-up.

It pains me to say this, and I pray I am wrong,  but the coming media-approved mob violence will pale compared to last week, and even pale compared to what we saw from the gangsters in the Occupy Wall Street movement.

I fear we are headed back 50 years, to the violence Democrats practiced against black Americans to hold onto electoral power in the segregated South, as well as the terrorist violence practiced by the likes of the leftist Weather Underground.

And throughout this coming campaign of violence, the establishment media will be the ringleaders, the justifiers, the enablers, and the cheerleaders…

Any more question about why the media are so eager to disarm us?

Voir de même:

Culture
The Democrats Are Done Pretending to Be Moderate
Kyle Smith
National Review
June 28, 2018

They think they’re unpopular because they aren’t left-wing enough.The Democratic love of socialism was for many years the love that dared not speak its name. No more. Now the party is figuratively jumping on Oprah’s couch shouting its love of socialism. You’d have to plug your ears not to hear it.

Socialist Bernie Sanders is unquestionably the spiritual leader of the Democratic party, which is radicalizing itself in his image, and on the strength of her blowout Democratic-primary win over liberal incumbent Joe Crowley in the party-ruled NY-14 congressional district, soon-to-be-congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is now one of the most prominent faces in the Democratic party. A poll last fall put support for socialism at 44 percent among Millennials, and even more disturbingly, 23 percent of this group agreed that Joseph Stalin is a “hero.” Socialized medicine, i.e., Medicare for all, is the hottest issue on the Left (unless you count hating Trump as an “issue”).

In short, Democrats are who we thought they were. They’re just losing their inhibitions about it. As the woke-youth site Vox puts it, “Maybe Democrats should stop being afraid of the left” because “Ocasio-Cortez’s victory is a big sign that Democrats can run on socialist ideas and win.” Talk of revolution flows naturally. After Justice Kennedy announced his retirement, MSNBC’s Chris Matthews said, “I tell you, the Democratic base is wired now for a revolt.”

It’s become a cliché to compare Washington politics to Wag the Dog (1997) or Idiocracy (2006), perhaps the two most-cited political movies of this era. A forgotten political film from the 1990s, though, deserves more attention for its prescience: Warren Beatty’s Bulworth, which appeared in theaters 20 years ago this spring. (Spoilers follow. The movie is streaming on the Starz pay-TV service.)

After a full term of President Clinton’s triangulating leadership, Beatty was fed up with the state of the Democratic party. The California senator he portrayed, Jay Bulworth, was a typical cautious, house-trained, corporate-owned Democrat of the era who decided to abandon all restraint and not only say what he thought, but say so in rap. Yes, in case you were wondering, this is the movie in which Warren Beatty puts on shades and a beanie and goes full Eminem, to roars of approbation. It’s meant to be a comedy.

The premise of the story seemed ludicrous at the time: Clinton’s ventures to the left in 1993–94 had proved a debacle that turned control of Congress over to the Republican party for the first time since the 1952 elections. Chastened, he not only abandoned pushing for progressivism but began talking like a moderate Republican. The notion that the cure for what ailed the Democrats was to go hard left seemed suicidal. Indeed, for Bulworth, it was suicidal; in the movie, having lost all hope, he hires a hitman (who turns out to be Halle Berry) to assassinate him so that his daughter can collect the insurance payoff. But when he speaks his mind he is surprised by the strength of the response he gets from voters.

When he changes his mind about wanting to die, he gets murdered anyway, not by his designated assassin but by the health-insurance goon squad. (Beatty’s martyr complex is the through-line of his career: His character is also mowed down by malign forces at the end of Bonnie and Clyde, McCabe and Mrs. Miller, The Parallax View, Heaven Can Wait, Reds, and Bugsy.) In the meantime, while expecting to get killed at any moment, he is liberated to speak the truth as he sees it. And his truth is that blacks are suffering unimaginably, that institutions such as public education are broken, that health insurers and corporations are corrupt, and that America needs a single-payer health system.

This week proves that Beatty had something dead right about the soul of the Democratic party after Clinton. Facing a period of reflection following humiliating rejection by the voters, their reaction is: We lost because we were too much like our opponents. We must fight the urge to be moderate, temperate, and civil. We must stop mincing words and go full Bulworth. At a peak moment in the movie, Bulworth raps the words, “Socialism! Socialism!”

After the 2016 wipeout that put the Republican party in the best position it has enjoyed since the period following the election of 1928, the Democrats have made no effort to moderate their stances to appeal to swing voters. Instead the party derides the voters who rejected it and turns more and more to its base; it speaks only to and for the engaged and fired-up primary voter it thinks represents a typical American. But that base not only thinks Bill Clinton was too moderate, it thinks Barack Obama blew it by being accommodating instead of angry with Republicans.

Obama himself wanted to “go Bulworth” and referred to the movie when, according to David Axelrod, he told staffers, “Maybe I should go out there and just let it rip.” When he did so, it manifested in his ceasing to pretend he was against gay marriage, according to Axelrod, and in being openly hostile to Israeli premier Benjamin Netanyahu.

Bernie Sanders’s wacky candidacy essentially meant going full Bulworth. And now the Democrats who seek to lead the party want to be like him. Socialism! Socialism! We’ll be hearing that cry more and more.

Voir de plus:

Comment Trump est devenu le meilleur ennemi du New York Times
Le New York Times s’est donné une mission : faire chuter Donald Trump. Mais depuis son élection les deux jouent au chat et à la souris, tant les affaires de l’un font le bonheur de l’autre.
Les Inrocks
25/07/2017

Depuis plusieurs mois, Donald Trump et le New York Times (NY Times) se font la guerre par tweets et articles interposés. Quand le président américain qualifie le journal de “honte pour les médias”, de “défaillant”, jusqu’à le surnommer “l’ennemi du peuple”, celui-ci réplique par des enquêtes pointilleuses qui écornent toujours plus l’image du président : le mystérieux limogeage du chef du FBI, les révélations sur une probable ingérence russe pendant l’élection présidentielle… Bref, entre le NY Times et Trump, c’est à celui qui fera tomber l’autre en premier, et peu importe le prix.

Le journal a décidé de taper fort dès la victoire du républicain : il a investi 5 millions de dollars pour créer un bureau spécial d’investigation basé à Washington, en plus de celui qui existait déjà à New York. Jour et nuit, six de leurs meilleurs journalistes sont ainsi chargés de couvrir exclusivement la Maison Blanche. Du jamais vu dans l’histoire du journal : “Nous n’avions pas le choix : nous avons besoin des meilleurs”, indiquait alors Elisabeth Bumiller, responsable du bureau, dans Les Echos. Ils distillent les moindres tweets, faits et gestes du président, surtout en off. Ils ont aussi mis en place une messagerie Internet ultra-sécurisée, qui permet à n’importe qui de dénoncer anonymement les dérives de l’administration Trump.

Une longue relation qui ne date pas hier

Le déploiement de cette artillerie lourde s’inscrit dans un contexte général de crise de la presse américaine. Fragilisés pour avoir si mal anticipé sa victoire, les médias tentent de renforcer leurs rangs pour débusquer des fausses informations. Pour le New York Times, il en va de sa réputation du média le plus influent dans le monde.

“L’objectif du New York Times est de donner de la vraie information, mais aussi de faire chuter Donald Trump. Ils seront ravis s’ils réussissent au moins à le fragiliser”, analyse Arnaud Mercier, professeur spécialisé en communication politique à l’Institut Français de presse.

L’immeuble du New York Times à New York. (©Flickr/Florent Lamoureux)

Le journal couvrait déjà l’actualité du milliardaire et celle de l’empire de son père, avant qu’il ne soit élu président. “Le journal et Donald Trump se sont forcément côtoyés, et avaient peut-être voulu faire du business, comme de la publicité pour Trump Organization”, souligne Arnaud Mercier.

Mais aujourd’hui pour Trump, le NY Times incarne “l’archétype du journal bobo gauchiste, avec des journalistes soupçonnés d’être méprisants”, décrit le spécialiste. A contrario, Trump est perçu par une bonne partie de leurs lecteurs comme “un homme inculte, pas très malin, ni très instruit”, poursuit-il.

Trump , la poule aux œufs d’or du NYT

Pourtant, s’il critique très souvent le journal, le président lui accorde souvent des entretiens pour avoir la satisfaction de voir son nom cité dans les pages. Le 19 juillet, il accordait ainsi une longue interview sidérante de près d’une heure, où il enchaîne les punchlines, dont “[Macron] adore me tenir la main”.

Ce genre d’entrevue permet de servir les deux camps : pour Trump, c’est l’occasion d’affirmer que le média est sans intérêt quand il y discerne des propos mal retranscrits ou des “fake news”, et pour le journal, de gagner des lecteurs et de l’argent. Il tire un intérêt direct de la victoire de Trump et de ses frasques quotidiennes : il a ainsi gagné 348 000 abonnés en ligne ses trois derniers mois, un record. La saga accordée à Trump a même renfloué ses caisses, avec un bénéfice net de 13,1 millions de dollars sur cette période.

Le NYT veut son affaire “Lewinsky”

Il n’est pas le seul média a avoir profité de son élection pour se refaire une beauté. La radio NPR (l’équivalent de notre France Inter) ou le Washington Post en ont eux aussi profité et une vraie concurrence s’est installée :

Entre le New York Times et le Washington Post c’est à qui sortira le plus de choses sur Donald Trump. Une telle concurrence n’était pas arrivée depuis le scandale du Watergate”, observe pour Les Echos David Remnick, directeur de la rédaction du New Yorker.

Le célèbre journal new-yorkais ressent de plus en plus la concurrence, et pour se différencier, sa seule chance est de sortir le “scoop” qui servira de coup de grâce à Trump. “Le Washington Post a fait tomber Bill Clinton, eux n’ont pas cette gloire-là”, souligne Arnaud Mercier. Le 21 janvier 1998, le Washington Post révélait en effet un scandale qui défrayera la chronique et le monde politique : l’affaire Monica Lewinsky, avec qui le président américain de l’époque a eu des relations sexuelles et a poussée au silence.

Au cœur du conflit, la gloire du journalisme d’investigation

Donald Trump craint les révélations du New York Times, mais “peut-être pas plus qu’un autre média, la menace peut venir de partout”, nuance Arnaud Mercier. Le NY Times a en effet un point de retard dans la chasse aux scoops : le journal se freine pour la course à la publication pour ne pas mettre en péril sa crédibilité. “Il hésiterait encore plus à prendre le risque de sortir une fausse information. Je ne pense pas qu’il sera le premier à sortir celle qui le fera tomber”, admet Arnaud Mercier.

Ce conflit aura néanmoins permis une chose : redonner un élan au journalisme d’investigation. Les journalistes vont chercher les informations ailleurs, à tel point que le New York Times redevient le digne représentant du quatrième pouvoir et le fer de lance de l’investigation. Trump se méfie de lui, ce qui reste “le meilleur gage de qualité qu’un média puisse avoir”, ajoute le spécialiste.

Voir de même:

Dominique Reynié : «L’élection de Trump n’est pas une surprise»
Kevin Badeau
Les Echos
09/11/2016

LE CERCLE/INTERVIEW – Pour Dominique Reynié, directeur général de la Fondapol, les médias n’ont pas su entendre le malaise de la population américaine.

Donald Trump a été élu Président des Etats-Unis, est-ce vraiment une surprise ?
Les analystes politiques, les sondeurs et les journalistes ont donné à penser que la victoire d’Hillary Clinton était assurée avant l’élection. En cela, c’est une surprise, car la sphère médiatique n’imaginait pas la victoire du candidat républicain. Elle a eu tort. Si elle avait su observer la société américaine et entendre son malaise, elle n’aurait jamais exclu la possibilité d’une élection de Trump. Pour cette raison, ce n’est pas une surprise.

Pourquoi les médias n’ont-ils rien vu venir ?
Sans doute, ils ont rejeté Donald Trump car ils le trouvaient – et c’est le cas – démagogue, populiste et vulgaire. Je n’ai d’ailleurs jamais vu une élection américaine avec un tel parti pris médiatique. Même le très réputé hebdomadaire britannique « The Economist » a fait un clin d’oeil à Hillary Clinton.

Je pense que la stigmatisation sans précédent de Donald Trump par les médias a favorisé chez les électeurs américains la dissimulation de leur intention de vote auprès des instituts de sondage. En clair, un certain nombre de votants n’a pas osé admettre qu’il soutenait le candidat américain. Ce phénomène est classique en politique. Souvenez-vous du 21 avril 2002 et de la qualification surprise de Jean-Marie Le Pen, leader du Front national, au second tour de l’élection présidentielle française.

L’élection de Donald Trump traduit-elle le refus de la mondialisation par les Américains ?
A travers l’élection de Trump, certains Américains ont exprimé leur colère. Une partie de l’Amérique ne trouve pas ses gains dans la globalisation. Cette Amérique-là ne parvient pas à retrouver son niveau de vie d’avant la crise des subprimes, elle a le sentiment d’être abandonnée. Ce sentiment était particulièrement perceptible chez les ouvriers, qui voient l’industrie s’effilocher. Ne se sentant pas assez considérés, ils ont davantage choisi Donald Trump qu’Hillary Clinton.

Est-ce une victoire du peuple américain contre l’establishment, comme on l’entend parfois ?
Cette formule est très exagérée. Oui, une partie des électeurs de Donald Trump ont voté contre Washington et ses élites. Oui, certains Américains souffrent d’un mépris de classe, en particulier dans l’Amérique profonde. Mais dire que le peuple s’est tourné vers Trump est inexact. Le candidat républicain et la candidate démocrate sont au coude à coude en termes de suffrages exprimés [à 15 heures, 47,5% pour Trump et 47,6% pour Clinton , NDLR]. Au passage, nous avons affaire à deux candidats richissimes. Si ma mémoire est bonne, Donald Trump, pseudo-candidat du peuple, n’est pas issu de la classe ouvrière…

Victor Orban en Hongrie, Andrzej Duda en Pologne, Trump aux Etats-Unis, pourquoi une telle vague populiste dans le monde occidental ?

L’arrivée au pouvoir de dirigeants populistes s’explique avant tout par des spécificités locales. Après, il y a des effets communs. De nouvelles puissances émergent. Les gens se sentent décentrés. Il y a une surabondance d’innovations technologiques et scientifiques. Une partie de la société se sent déclassée. L’immigration accélère les mécanismes de recomposition culturelle. Aux Etats-Unis, les Blancs anglo-saxons deviennent minoritaires. Ceci induit une réaction exprimée en votant pour un candidat populiste : Donald Trump.

L’élection de Trump est-elle une excellente nouvelle pour Marine Le Pen ?
Une chose est certaine : l’élection de Trump, mais aussi le Brexit, vont peser sur le langage et le lexique employés par une partie des prétendants à la présidentielle française. Des acteurs politiques, de droite comme de gauche, seront tentés de durcir leur discours. Mais ce climat chauffé à blanc devrait avant tout profiter à Marine Le Pen, la candidate du Front national. Personne ne fait mieux qu’elle dans ce registre.

Propos recueillis par Kévin Badeau

Voir encore:

Trump et la presse, les meilleurs ennemis
Le président américain multiplie les mesures vexatoires à l’égard des journalistes. Son élection n’est pourtant pas une mauvaise chose pour la presse, qui s’est lancée dans un passionnant travail d’autocritique.
Lucie Robequain
Les Echos
20/03/17

Le soleil n’est pas encore levé que les journalistes du « New York Times  » sont déjà en alerte. Réveillés à 5h30 du matin, ils guettent les premiers tweets que Donald Trump envoie généralement au saut du lit, peu après 6 heures. Les week-ends ne sont pas plus reposants. Basés à Washington, les rédacteurs rattachés à la présidence sont désormais sommés de passer leur week-end en Floride.

Ils rôdent dans les parages de Mar-a-Lago -la « Maison-Blanche » d’hiver, comme on l’appelle désormais – sans garantie de croiser le milliardaire. « Nos journalistes sont épuisés. Ils n’ont jamais autant travaillé de leur vie », témoigne Elisabeth Bumiller, qui dirige le bureau de Washington du « New York Times ». Ceux qui couvrent la Maison-Blanche se comptent désormais au nombre de six – du jamais-vu dans l’histoire du journal. La direction a même rapatrié Peter Baker, qui venait de prendre la tête du bureau de Jérusalem. « Nous n’avions pas le choix : nous avons besoin des meilleurs « , poursuit Elisabeth Bumiller.

Les dictatures commencent toujours par une ostracisation de la presse

En passant du Moyen-Orient à la Maison-Blanche, Peter Baker n’a finalement fait que troquer un conflit pour un autre. La presse est « l’ennemi du peuple américain « , a lancé Donald Trump le mois dernier. « La guerre avec la presse ne va faire qu’empirer « , a prévenu son très sulfureux conseiller Steve Bannon.

Dernier tweet de Donald Trump lundi 20 janvier attaquant CNN  :

Consternés par ces propos, une vingtaine de patrons de presse et de journalistes (Reuters, CNN, « New York Times « , « New Yorker », etc.) se sont réunis à l’Université de Columbia début mars pour partager leur émoi et comprendre comment faire évoluer leur métier. « Les dictatures commencent toujours par une ostracisation de la presse », a rappelé David Remnick, directeur de la rédaction du « New Yorker « .

Le président des Etats-Unis n’est certes pas le premier à imposer des mesures de rétorsion aux journaux qui lui nuisent. Mais c’est le premier à leur barrer l’accès aux conférences de presse, comme le « New York Times », CNN et Politico en ont récemment fait l’expérience.

Conférence de presse de Donald Trump du 11 janvier dernier à New York

https://www.ultimedia.com/deliver/generic/iframe/mdtk/01946947/src/8vkrpp/zone/35/showtitle/1/C’est aussi le premier à attaquer les journalistes nommément sur les réseaux sociaux. « C’est totalement irresponsable  ! Je ne veux pas céder à l’hystérie mais nous recevons des menaces de mort « , lance Sabrina Siddiqui, une journaliste de religion musulmane qui suit la Maison-Blanche pour le quotidien britannique « The Guardian ».

La tension est telle que certains patrons de presse recommandent à leurs journalistes le même sang-froid que dans les pays totalitaires : le chef de l’agence Reuters, Steve Adler, a ainsi envoyé une note à l’ensemble de la rédaction fin janvier, dans laquelle il cite en exemple le travail effectué en Turquie, en Irak, au Yémen, en Chine, au Zimbabwe et en Russie, des pays où nous affrontons une combinaison de censure, de procès, de refus de visas et de menaces physiques « .

Plus de l’obsession que de la haine

Et pourtant, Donald Trump adore les médias ! Il leur consacre plusieurs heures par jour et par nuit, ne s’accordant jamais plus de quatre heures de sommeil. Dès potron-minet, le voilà donc qui s’énerve en regardant l’émission « Morning Joe « , diffusé sur la chaîne à tendance démocrate MSNBC.

Il se rassure en zappant sur « Fox & Friends », un « show » à sa gloire diffusé entre 6 et 9 heures du matin. Il fulmine en regardant « Saturday Night Live » _ un programme hilarant où l’acteur Alec Baldwin singe ses excès et son incompétence. Côté papier, il dévore le « New York Times » (tendance centre gauche) et le « New York Post » (tendance droite).

Plus que la haine, son rapport aux médias relève de l’obsession. « C’est assez ironique, car nous n’avons jamais reçu autant de coups de fil de la Maison-Blanche. Certains ont pris l’habitude de nous appeler de manière anonyme – exactement ce que Trump réprouve publiquement !, raconte Sabrina Siddiqui du « Guardian « . La communication à outrance n’est malheureusement pas un gage de transparence.

Les briefings qui sont organisés pour nous à la Maison-Blanche sont truffés de mensonges. Donald Trump est passé maître dans l’art de manipuler les médias

« Les briefings qui sont organisés pour nous à la Maison-Blanche sont truffés de mensonges. Donald Trump est passé maître dans l’art de manipuler les médias. Il oriente la couverture médiatique avec des projets de réforme qui se révèlent totalement creux au final «  , poursuit Sabrina Siddiqui.

Aucun interlocuteur ne semble totalement fiable : « C’est le chaos total quand nous cherchons à vérifier nos informations. Il n’est pas rare d’avoir deux personnalités de la Maison-Blanche qui nous donnent deux réponses diamétralement opposées », raconte Elisabeth Bumiller, du « New York Times ».

Chroniqueur au « New Yorker », Jelani Cobb a fouillé dans l’histoire pour savoir si la presse américaine avait déjà été confrontée à de pareilles difficultés. Elle l’a été au moins une fois, à l’époque de Joseph McCarthy, tristement connu pour avoir lancé une chasse aux sorcières contre les communistes dans les années 1950. « Sa stratégie était de mentir de manière exponentielle, les journalistes ne pouvant vérifier ses dires que de manière linéaire. De ce point de vue-là, il constitue le grand mentor de Donald Trump « , estime-t-il.

Révélations en cascades

Cette difficulté a un avantage : celui de réveiller la presse d’investigation. « D’une certaine manière, Donald Trump nous libère : il oblige les journalistes à chercher l’information en dehors des cercles habituels du pouvoir. Il y avait une proximité avec les administrations Bush et Obama qu’on ne retrouve plus aujourd’hui, et c’est tant mieux », estime Brian Stelter, journaliste chez CNN.

Le « New York Times  » a ainsi ouvert un bureau d’enquête à Washington, en plus de celui qui existait déjà à New York. Dirigé par Mark Mazzetti, il a beaucoup contribué aux récentes révélations sur les connexions entre Moscou et l’administration Trump.

Entre le « New York Times » et le « Washington Post  » c’est à qui sortira le plus de choses sur Donald Trump. Une telle concurrence n’était pas arrivée depuis le scandale du Watergate

A période exceptionnelle, le quotidien new-yorkais a aussi répondu par des procédés exceptionnels : il a créé une messagerie Internet ultra-sécurisé pour que fonctionnaires, personnalités politiques et anonymes puissent dénoncer les dérives de l’administration Trump. « Nous recevons 52.000 alertes par jour », confie Elisabeth Bumiller.

Le « Washington Post  » n’est pas en reste, qui a recruté une soixantaine de personnes pour renforcer, entre autres, son pôle « investigations « . « Entre le « New York Times » et le « Washington Post » c’est à qui sortira le plus de choses sur Donald Trump. Une telle concurrence n’était pas arrivée depuis le scandale du Watergate » , salue David Remnick, directeur de la rédaction du « New Yorker « .

Boum des abonnés

« C’est très bon pour notre démocratie. On a besoin d’enquêtes au sommet de l’Etat « . Le « quatrième pouvoir » ne semble ainsi jamais aussi puissant que dans l’adversité. « C’est le genre d’époques que tous les journalistes rêvent de vivre. Un moment historique, à la fois pour l’Amérique et pour leur profession », s’enthousiasme David Remnick.

A voir les chiffres de diffusion, l’élection de Donald Trump est effectivement une chance pour la presse : le « New York Times » a augmenté le nombre de ses abonnés de plus de 250.000 au dernier trimestre, avec un pic tout particulier après l’élection, soit plus qu’au cours de 2013 et 2014 réunis. Le « Washington Post » a lui accru de 75 % le nombre de ses lecteurs l’an dernier.

Derrière ces chiffres flatteurs se cache une réalité plus sombre : au-delà de l’élite qui feuillette le « New York Times » et le « Washington Post », la défiance à l’égard de la presse n’a jamais été aussi forte. « Certains Américains ont retrouvé le goût des journaux avec cette élection. D’autres s’en sont définitivement coupés », reconnaît Brian Stelter, chez CNN. Seuls 40 % des Américains font confiance aux médias pour rapporter des informations de manière « exhaustive, exacte et impartiale », soit le plus bas niveau depuis une quinzaine d’années, selon un sondage publié par l’institut Gallup.

La presse est accusée d’être de gauche, anti-Trump, ce qui expliquerait pourquoi elle aurait si mal anticipé sa victoire. « Vous parlez des mensonges de Donald Trump, mais il y a aussi beaucoup de mensonges dans la presse. Un journaliste de l’agence Bloomberg a affirmé que le nouveau président avait retiré le portrait de Martin Luther King du Bureau ovale. L’information était fausse mais a été reprise en boucle. Les journalistes ont évidemment droit à l’erreur. Mais je ne pense pas que cette erreur aurait été commise sous l’ère Obama « , pense John Carney.

Il faut arrêter de faire de la critique sélective, ciblée uniquement sur Trump. Il faut que notre incrédulité soit universelle

Cet ancien journaliste du « Wall Street Journal », débauché par le site nationaliste Breitbart News, est persuadé que les journalistes ont un point de vue pro-mondialisation et ne sont qu’une infime minorité à partager les idées de Donald Trump. Unis contre le populisme, ils représenteraient une population beaucoup moins diverse que l’électorat américain – qui a voté à 46 % pour Trump. « Il faut arrêter de faire de la critique sélective, ciblée uniquement sur Trump. Il faut que notre incrédulité soit universelle », insiste John Carney.

Regagner la confiance

Certains patrons de presse ne disent pas autre chose : le directeur de la rédaction de l’agence Reuters, Steve Adler, recommande à ses journalistes de dépassionner le débat et de taire leurs opinions personnelles. « Plus le comportement des journalistes sera éthique, plus nous regagnerons la confiance des lecteurs. Nous devons reconnaître quand nous avons merdé. Nous devons rappeler les gens qui critiquent nos articles « , fait-il valoir.

L’agence a par ailleurs développé un nouvel algorithme, baptisé « News Tracer », qui permet de vérifier la véracité des informations circulant sur les réseaux sociaux. « Ça marche tellement bien qu’on envisage de le vendre à d’autres médias », indique-t-il.

Il plaide aussi pour plus de transparence dans les salles de rédaction : « pendant longtemps, les journalistes ont entretenu un certain culte du secret. Je pense qu’il faut ouvrir les portes et raconter comment nous travaillons. C’est comme ça que nous regagnerons la confiance « , estime-t-il. Un beau défi pour la prochaine élection !

Voir par ailleurs:

Les 150 ans sans fête de «la Vieille Dame grise»
Le «New York Times» annule ses célébrations.
Catherine Mallaval
Libération
19 septembre 2001

Les célébrations ont été annulées. Actualité oblige, décence exige. Le vénérable New York Times a eu 150 ans, hier, en toute discrétion. Soucieux de la «récente tragédie» qui, voilà huit jours, a frappé le World Trade Center, à plus de soixante blocs au sud de son siège. «Nous sommes à Times Square. D’ici, nous n’avons rien vu. Dès que l’on a su, tout le monde s’est efforcé de se comporter de façon responsable, malgré la très vive émotion», raconte un porte-parole du journal. «La direction a proposé aux employés qui le souhaitaient de rentrer chez eux.» Mais elle leur a surtout conseillé, faute de transports en commun, de ne pas quitter l’immeuble. Et même d’inviter familles et amis à venir s’y réfugier en cas de besoin. «Et puis, bien sûr, nous avons fait le journal.»

Opinion

Combien de journalistes ont-ils été immédiatement réquisitionnés? «Impossible de répondre. Toute la newsroom s’est évidemment concentrée sur l’événement.» C’est-à-dire la centaine de journalistes chargés de «couvrir» New York, la trentaine de reporters du bureau de Washington, toute l’équipe d’éditorialistes et de billettistes qui, chaque jour dans les célèbres pages «Op-Ed» (opinions, éditoriaux), donnent le «la» de ce qu’il faut penser à l’élite américaine.

Référence

Ce mardi-là, comme tous les soirs, aux alentours de 19 heures, les grands titres de la une du Times ont été envoyés par messagerie électronique à la plupart des grands quotidiens américains, qui ne manquent jamais de jeter un oeil sur les orientations de leur confrère avant d’en finir avec leurs propres éditions. Car c’est bien lui la référence. Le journal aux soixante-dix-neuf Pulitzer (ces oscars du journalisme), celui qui a osé publier, en 1971, les archives secrètes du Pentagone expliquant les raisons de l’entrée en guerre des Etats-Unis au Viêt-nam. Et dont l’aura dépasse largement New York, puisqu’il publie une édition nationale diffusée à partir d’une douzaine d’imprimeries réparties sur le sol américain.

Dans son édition du mercredi 12 septembre, toute la première «section» du journal, dévolue à l’information internationale et nationale, est consacrée à la tragédie: vingt-huit pages grand format. Et d’autres articles, encore, disséminés dans les suppléments (pas moins de sept, chaque mercredi !). Comme son confrère le Los Angeles Times, il titre: «U.S. Attacked» [L’Amérique attaquée]. Mais, prudence, le quotidien évoque déjà des «Représailles difficiles» et, dans un commentaire intitulé «Un monde différent», invite George W. Bush à «adopter une position reconnaissant que l’Amérique ne peut seule assurer la sécurité» de la planète.

Ce jour-là, le quotidien voit ses ventes grimper à 1,65 million, contre 1,2 million en moyenne. Tout au long de la semaine, 450 000 exemplaires supplémentaires sont imprimés tous les jours.

Intraitable

Bien sûr, il y a la demande d’informations. Et là, le New York Times, qui s’est choisi pour slogan «Toutes les nouvelles qu’il convient d’imprimer», peut en remontrer à tous les journaux du monde. Intraitable devant ses propres erreurs, qu’il rectifie chaque jour dans un emplacement ad hoc, en page 2. Maniaquement sérieux dans tout ce qu’il traite. «La vieille dame grise» ­ son surnom ­ est sans doute le seul journal au monde à envoyer ses chroniqueurs gastronomiques trois fois de suite dans un même restaurant, avant de les autoriser à en faire une critique !

Ce faiseur d’opinion se flatte d’être «indépendant». Démocrate, en fait. Le New York Times n’est pas du style à faire des cadeaux à la présidence. Il n’a cessé, l’an passé, de mordre les mollets du candidat George W. Bush, fustigeant notamment le délabrement du système de santé publique au Texas, dont le républicain était gouverneur. A tel point que, en pleine campagne présidentielle, le futur président, apercevant un journaliste, s’est écrié (sans savoir que le micro était ouvert): «Tiens, voilà ce trou du cul de première classe (major league asshole) du New York Times»…

Symbole

L’anecdote, soudain, semble lointaine. Et alors qu’il s’apprêtait à fêter son anniversaire, dans son édition du week-end dernier ­ 720 pages, épaisse comme Autant en emporte le vent, se vante-t-on ­, le New York Times a très symboliquement choisi d’imprimer sur sa dernière page un drapeau américain à découper. Sous le titre suivant: «Une nation panse ses plaies en rouge, blanc, bleu.».

Voir aussi:

Le « New York Times » refuse de publier en l’état une tribune de John McCain
Le quotidien a demandé au candidat républicain de modifier une tribune qu’il lui avait envoyée, en y « définissant concrètement ce qu’il considère être la victoire en Irak ».
Cécile Dehesdin
Le Monde
22.07.2008

« Peut mieux faire », a en dit en substance le New York Times à l’élève McCain en lui renvoyant sa copie. La rubrique « Opinions » du journal américain a, en effet, rejeté une tribune sur l’Irak, rédigée par le candidat républicain à l’élection présidentielle, en réponse à celle de Barack Obama, publiée lundi 14 juillet.

Cette décision a particulièrement irrité l’équipe de John McCain, comme en atteste le communiqué d’un de ses porte-parole : « John McCain croit que la victoire en Irak doit être fondée sur les conditions sur le terrain, et non pas sur des calendriers arbitraires. Contrairement à Barack Obama, sa position ne changera pas selon les demandes du New York Times.« 

D’après le New York Times, la tribune de M. McCain, qui a par ailleurs été reproduite intégralement sur le site conservateur Drudge report, n’a pas été refusée définitivement mais a été renvoyée à son auteur pour être améliorée. David Shipley, le rédacteur en chef de la rubrique « Opinions », a ainsi publié lundi 21 juillet, sur le blog du journal, l’e-mail envoyé à l’équipe de campagne du candidat républicain. Il s’y dit « très désireux de publier le sénateur » dans sa rubrique, mais « dans l’incapacité d’accepter cette tribune dans son état actuel ».

PLUS DE DÉTAILS

Dans ce mail, M. Shipley explique les raisons pour lesquelles il a décidé de publier le point de vue sur l’Irak de Barack Obama. Si le candidat démocrate y contestait les positions de son adversaire républicain, il apportait également de nouveaux détails sur son propre plan en Irak. Le rédacteur en chef ajoute que son journal est prêt à accueillir un nouveau point de vue de John McCain si celui-ci y« définit concrètement ce qu’il considère être la victoire en Irak ». « L’article devra aussi proposer un plan clair pour atteindre la victoire, incluant le nombre de troupes, des calendriers », précise M. Shipley. Une demande qui risque d’être difficilement satisfaite ; M. McCain s’opposant à la mise en place d’un calendrier de retrait des troupes depuis le début de sa campagne.

Devant les nombreuses protestations républicaines, le NYT a publié un communiqué précisant qu’il est habituel pour ses pages « Opinions », et pour celles d’autres publications, de procéder à un va-et-vient des tribunes entre les auteurs et la rédaction. Le communiqué rappelle également que le New York Times a publié au moins sept tribunes de John McCain depuis 1996, et que le sénateur a été le candidat officiellement soutenu par le quotidien lors des dernières primaires républicaines.L’équipe de campagne républicaine, qui dénonce régulièrement la couverture médiatique de Barack Obama, qu’elle juge trop favorable, a, elle, répliqué sur son site en mettant en ligne, mardi, une vidéo intitulée »Les médias sont amoureux de Barack Obama ». Sur un fond rose, le film compile des extraits d’émissions d’actualité avec en fond musical « You’re just too good to be true » de Frankie Valli.

Voir également:

Vue des Etats-Unis

Cette impardonnable exception française
Bien qu’elle se targue de privilégier les faits, la presse des Etats-Unis traite souvent l’actualité internationale comme un conte moral illustrant les bienfaits du « modèle » américain et les « archaïsmes » de ceux qui refusent de le suivre. Cette fable idéologique réserve à la France un rôle de choix. La victoire électorale de la gauche, la défense de l’exception culturelle et le refus par Paris d’emboîter le pas aux élans guerriers de Washington dans le Golfe n’ont fait que conforter cette aigreur médiatique.
Thomas Frank
Le Monde diplomatique
avril 1998

Voilà huit ans que les Etats-Unis n’ont plus d’ennemi sur lequel compter, qu’il leur manque une nation à dépeindre comme l’incarnation de l’obstination et de la menace. Il y a bien sûr l’Irak, avec son dictateur caricatural, mais ce pays ne s’est jamais vraiment montré à la hauteur des espérances : trop circonscrit, trop outrancier, trop idéologiquement déroutant. Il fallait donc trouver un Etat aux choix économiques lisibles, et dont la politique pourrait être comprise – et stigmatisée – comme un rejet de la mondialisation cybernétique que chacun ou presque glorifie, des firmes informatiques au président William Clinton.

L’année 1997 a enfin permis de trouver la cible cherchée. Où que l’on se tourne, experts, journalistes, porte-parole des industriels et magnats de la publicité de Madison Avenue s’allient pour persuader l’opinion de deux évidences : le triomphe de l’ordre industriel américain et l’archaïsme de la France, encore encombrée d’un Etat-providence presque intact.

Correspondant à Paris du New York Times – et parfois invité par les chaînes de télévision françaises -, Roger Cohen a dressé, il y a un an, la longue liste des travers hexagonaux : les Français ne comprendraient rien à Internet, ils n’aiment pas les Etats-Unis, et ils s’accrochent à un système « socialiste » dans lequel des « technocrates » décident de tout, encore que les syndicats restent infiniment trop puissants. En octobre dernier, le journaliste américain pouvait enfin théoriser sa condamnation définitive : « La France a choisi, dans la dernière décennie du XXe siècle, de devenir ce qui ressemble peut-être le plus à un rival idéologique sérieux des Etats-Unis (1). »

Le thème de la « récalcitrance française » vient épauler les arguments des partisans du nouvel ordre mondial. Une campagne de publicité pour American Express a ainsi présenté, par exemple, la success-story sans surprise d’un dénommé Jake Burton, entrepreneur en surf des neiges. Sur fond de musique rock, le spot publicitaire montre d’abord une succession de sauts et de cascades athlétiques censée illustrer les capacités « extrêmes » de l’entrepreneur. Puis il juxtapose au héros et à ses disciples, ouverts et internationalistes, quelques plans courts consacrés à l’Autre, l’esprit anti-entrepreneurial : de vieux grabataires soucieux, puis une troupe de skieurs aux vêtements coûteux mais démodés, qui observent, narquois, nos sportifs à la page. Bien que les skieurs sceptiques ne figurent que quelques secondes à l’écran, les concepteurs de cette publicité ont fait en sorte qu’on ne s’y trompe pas : leur identité est dévoilée par leur accent. Un accent français.

Dans un éditorial de sa livraison d’automne 1997, le magazine littéraire Granta se charge d’édifier le lecteur cultivé. Qu’on en juge : le refus de la France de reconnaître que la « mondialisation est inévitable » ne serait qu’un nouvel effort fantasque de sa part « pour préserver l’idée qu’elle cultive de la “francité” (2) ». Ajoutez à cela quelques références prévisibles à l’ascension de M. Jean-Marie Le Pen, et l’article s’écrit tout seul.

Puisqu’on confond désormais libre-échange et liberté, marché et démocratie, les Etats-Unis voient, dans chaque effort pour ne pas tout subordonner au marché, un acte d’une prétention impardonnable. Et, dans cette optique, les Français représentent l’ennemi idéal : ils résistent à la baisse des salaires et à la refonte du système de santé, leurs syndicats combattent les « réformes » dont nul manager américain n’ignore qu’elles sont un élément décisif de la « compétitivité mondiale ». Sans compter que les Français conservent dans l’imaginaire américain une image de snobs.

Aux Etats-Unis, même le téléspectateur le plus indifférent ne peut en effet ignorer que la France est un pays qui contingenterait les films américains, qui tenterait d’éradiquer les termes anglais de son vocabulaire, et qui croirait devoir enseigner la cuisine française dès l’école maternelle. En somme, c’est un peuple têtu qui persisterait à nager à contre-courant de la culture et de l’économie ; un gouvernement intraitable qui interdirait à ses citoyens de surfer sur les gammes des plaisirs sensuels comme sur les ondes extatiques du commerce ; une nation de rabat-joie pincés, décidés à gâcher la douce musique américaine que le monde entier brûle d’entendre.

Que l’on parle des sarcasmes du serveur parisien vous apportant le ketchup ou des travailleurs sociaux qui cherchent à adoucir les effets du capitalisme mondial, tout est dans tout : pour les combattants culturels du nouvel ordre, la possibilité de mélanger stéréotypes et croisade économique est décidément irrésistible.

Il est donc logique qu’on ne puisse désormais actionner une télécommande sans entendre quelque ragot sur les Français. Une émission diffusée à la Radio publique nationale laisse entendre que ce sont des têtes de lard. Un éditorial du New Republic se moque des Gaulois, qui votent à tort et à travers. Mais le procureur le plus constant dans sa mise en accusation de la France est le New York Times, dont les correspondants en Europe et les éditorialistes martèlent une thématique presque immuable : pas une semaine sans quelque décision française hilarante ou image mémorable – par exemple, cet intellectuel parisien que l’on aurait surpris à écrire un livre sur l’impact d’Internet… avec un crayon noir !

Thomas Friedman, éditorialiste au New York Times et ancien correspondant de ce quotidien au Proche-Orient, posa les termes du conflit entre la démocratie globale et l’arrogance française dans son commentaire du 26 février 1997. Pour lui, comme pour les publicitaires d’American Express, partout dans le monde « la pression de la technologie et l’économie globale forcent les nations à transférer le pouvoir de la bureaucratie d’Etat et des monopoles autrefois dominants au secteur privé ».

Mais les Français s’obstineraient à vouloir entraver le puissant flot de l’Histoire. Ils sont, tout simplement, « des gens qui sentent que le monde change et qui veulent l’en empêcher ». Business Week enfonce le clou : « Imaginez un pays où un patron risque la prison parce que les cadres de l’entreprise travaillent plus de trente-neuf heures sans être payés en heures supplémentaires. (…) Quel type de régime enverrait ainsi le patron en prison ? Mais c’est la France !  (3) ». La clé de cette impulsion répressive et bornée ? Une culture que tout bon amateur de sitcoms a appris à abhorrer : « Le système français récompense ceux qui ont la capacité de suivre le chemin qu’on a tracé pour eux », explique à Thomas Friedman un « expert » amical ; le système américain inviterait au contraire les gens à « se rebeller ». C’est l’homme au costume gris contre James Dean.

Le mal français, en d’autres termes, ne relèverait pas de l’obstination dans l’erreur économique : il serait plutôt caractérisé par la lutte des bureaucrates contre les rebelles, de l’Académie française contre Internet, des intellectuels contre le peuple. Dans ce mélodrame classique, l’éditorialiste prend évidemment place dans le camp des bons, et dépoussière une artillerie de propagande digne des premiers temps de la guerre froide. La France, écrit-il, ne fait rien de moins que « du pied aux ennemis de l’Amérique, qui sont souvent les ennemis de la modernité ».

Mais Thomas Friedman ne fait que construire son discours sur les fondations posées par Roger Cohen, dont la correspondance de Paris reprend sans cesse comme mécanisme explicatif les stéréotypes américains sur l’arrogance française. Pour le journaliste du New York Times, le moindre choix économique fait à Paris s’explique par des traits culturels douteux. L’ « aspiration à la grandeur », les « prétentions excessives », le « sentiment d’occuper une position proche du centre du monde », ces facettes de la vanité nationale empêchent les Français d’embrasser l’exaltant avenir multiculturel ; leur besoin de nourrir l’« ego français » rend difficile la prédiction de leur prochaine lubie électorale.

Toujours victime de l’illusion gaullienne d’ « une certaine idée de la France », selon Roger Cohen, ce pays, « aussi mobile qu’un bloc de ciment », serait en pleine « paralysie interne (…), menacé par l’innovation ». Les entrepreneurs y sont fortement découragés, ses « technocrates (…) semblent dépassés par l’économie globale », et ses syndicats, « qui arborent fièrement les haillons d’un rêve socialiste épuisé (…) , semblent également fossilisés ».

Seuls héros : les barons du logiciel
Des bons points ? Le correspondant du New York Times en décerne quelques-uns, de préférence à d’exemplaires amis du peuple : le baron du logiciel Bernard Liautaud, fourmillant d’idées égalitaires ramassées à l’université Stanford comme la « promotion d’une culture de l’actionnaire » et le « penser marketing » ; ou Bernard Arnault, « entrepreneur infatigable », héros de la petite parabole du Château d’Yquem : pour identifier l’orgueilleux aristocrate à qui il dispute la propriété de ce domaine vinicole, Cohen le représente méditant de façon poignante sur une montre arrêtée (4).

Aux antipodes de l’archaïsme, le journaliste évoque aussi avec une évidente délectation le glorieux (et irrésistible) progrès de la culture de masse américaine. Par les mécanismes magiques du marché, celle-ci exprime la volonté du peuple. Sous la photographie de patineurs effectuant sauts et cascades face à la tour Eiffel, un article acclame cette jeunesse de France qui embrasse le marché mondial avec allégresse, qui ne craint pas de consommer les produits de la culture jeunes en dépit des injonctions de ses aînés. « Casquette de base-ball à l’envers, baskets aux pieds, films et musique américains sont les figures de référence de la majorité des enfants français. L’anti-américanisme facile des intellectuels et des politiques rencontre fort peu d’écho auprès des Français ordinaires. »

Bien entendu, il est un peu audacieux de prétendre que la culture de masse serait forcément l’expression des goûts du public. Mais, même quand un phénomène culturel est créé par l’industrie, les journalistes américains y décèlent le signe d’une victoire du peuple – et du marché – sur l’arrogance française. Un article sur l’importation de la fête de Halloween fit ainsi la « une » du New York Times et de l’ International Herald Tribune. L’auteur de l’article réussit toutefois à transformer la fête en expression d’un conflit : entre, d’une part, la volonté du peuple – un peuple d’acheteurs et de vendeurs dans les grands magasins, de fabricants de téléphones portables – et, d’autre part, l’anti-américanisme fatigué des mandarins culturels du pays. Le New York Times choisit d’illustrer l’article par une photographie juxtaposant à la fière tour Eiffel un millier de citrouilles placées là par l’un des parrains (commerciaux) de l’opération (5).

Cependant, c’est en essayant de transposer à toute force cette idée fixe dans le domaine politique, en lisant l’information politique au travers de la lutte entre la liberté du marché et l’arrogance de l’Etat que la presse américaine à Paris se met à déraper pour de bon.

Puisque refuser les mécanismes néolibéraux revient à mépriser le peuple, et que s’écarter du marché serait en définitive une des formes du racisme, un homme politique est naturellement mis en relief : M. Jean-Marie Le Pen, à qui « l’état d’esprit [français] offre un terrain parfait ». La description ainsi faite des événements politiques mène tout droit à ce personnage exutoire d’un pays qui regarde en arrière. Le Washington Post résume le propos avec brio : « Tous les responsables politiques, même Jean-Marie Le Pen à l’extrême droite, sont des sociaux-démocrates sous une forme ou sous une autre (6). » Toute personnalité politique se voit alors présentée comme un Le Pen sans le racisme, ou un Le Pen sans l’europhobie ; chaque élection est assimilée à une victoire du Front national. Une vision d’une cohérence interne et d’une force de conviction telles qu’elle pourrait surprendre des lecteurs américains découvrant que l’extrême droite française n’est pas au pouvoir et que M. Le Pen ne détient aucun mandat national.

La confusion entretenue autour des projets de M. Lionel Jospin est encore plus étrange. Dès juin 1997, le Wall Street Journal expliquait : « Les protecteurs de la culture socialiste française étaient enthousiasmés par l’arrivée au pouvoir de M. Jospin, un homme qui n’est aucunement souillé par la moindre pensée moderne (7). » Reprenant la même antienne et assimilant le premier ministre à un pur produit du sentiment rétrograde et arrogant des Français, le New York Times n’eut d’autre souci que de prouver l’inconséquence de ses décisions. Le 11 octobre 1997, commentant le projet de loi sur la réduction du temps de travail à 35 heures hebdomadaires, le quotidien new-yorkais rendit compte des réactions des représentants du patronat et établit la liste des pays européens qui connaissaient une véritable réussite – car eux, évidemment, ne cherchaient pas à imposer une telle contrainte aux marchés. Le tout, couronné par la citation d’un économiste de la firme de courtage Smith Barney : « Le problème de ces idées [socialistes] est qu’elles confortent un fantasme. »

De fait, une telle relation des événements est conçue comme un conte moral. Les nouvelles de France s’apparentent alors à une fable des bienfaits du capitalisme mondial, aussi policée qu’une publicité pour un fabricant d’ordinateurs. Et la jeunesse « rebelle » devient aussi exaltante que les rêves éveillés imaginés par Nike, Reebok, Pepsi, Coke et Sprite…
Thomas Frank

Auteur de The Conquest of Cool (The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1997) et de One Market Under God : Extreme Capitalism, Market Populism and the end of Economic Democracy (Doubleday, New York, 2000).
(1)  The New York Times, 20 octobre 1997.
(2)  Granta, Londres, automne 1997.
(3) Gail Edmondson, « I’m shocked ! There are People Working in Here », Business Week, 8 mars 1998. La dernière phrase est en français dans le texte.
(4)  The New York Times, 12 juillet 1997.
(5)  The New York Times et International Herald Tribune, 31 octobre 1997.
(6) Charles Truehart, « Resisting Global Currents, France Sticks to Being French », The Washington Post National Weekly Edition, 15 juillet 1997.
(7) George Melloan, « Europe Faces a familiar Problem : Satisfying France », The Wall Street Journal Europe, Paris, 17 juin 1997.

Voir par ailleurs:

An Interview With Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the Young Democratic Socialist Who Just Shocked the Establishment
Jeremy Scahill
The Intercept
June 27 2018

Many Tuesday night were asking, “who is Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez” after her stunning primary victory over the No. 4 House Democrat Joe Crowley in New York’s 14th District. The New York Times called her a “Democratic dragon slayer.” MSNBC’s Joy Reid admitted on Twitter to “doing an Ocasio-Cortez crash course.” She didn’t have a Wikipedia page until last night. A year ago, she was working as a bartender in Manhattan. She is young. She’s working class. She’s a New Yorker who has been immersed in community-based leadership, organizing, and service work.

Ocasio-Cortez is one of the most progressive, uncompromising candidates to make it to the general election as a Democrat and the fact that she beat an entrenched machine politician has propelled her to instant national recognition. She’s also spoken out on Israel’s crimes against Palestinians, labeling a recent massacre for what it was, putting her at direct odds with much of the institutional Democratic leadership.

After earning her degree from Boston University, Ocasio-Cortez moved back home to the Bronx, and was working long hours as a waitress to support her family in the aftermath of her father’s untimely death. Her dad, like many working-class people, died without a will, and so Ocasio-Cortez and her family found themselves fighting a nasty, cold bureaucracy that featured legal vultures who carved off parts of her father’s estate for profit as she and her family struggled to make ends meet.

She said she never planned on running for office, but after traveling across the country — from Flint, Michigan, to Standing Rock, asking Americans about the issues they were facing in the aftermath of the Trump’s election — the progressive organization Brand New Congress got in touch asked if she’d be willing to run for Congress. Her defeated primary opponent, the powerful Democratic Rep. Joe Crowley, is current chair of the House Democratic caucus and he has been trying to position himself as the successor to Nancy Pelosi as the leader of the Democrats and the future speaker of the House.

This district where Crowley is a congressman is one of the most racially and culturally diverse in the United States. It spans parts of Queens and the Bronx. The district also includes the notorious Rikers prison and is home to Trump Golf Links. Crowley has held that seat since 1999 and he had not faced a primary challenger since at least 2004. Clearly, he and his re-election campaign underestimated the often nameless “young progressive challenger.” Now everyone knows her name.

We spoke with Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez last month about her campaign’s grassroots start, immigration, the #MeToo movement, and foreign policy on the Intercepted podcast. What follows is the audio of our conversation as aired on Intercepted and the full transcript of the unedited interview.

The interview begins at 15:10

JS: I want to start by talking about the way that ICE has evolved since its creation. You’ve been tweeting a lot in response to this ACLU report that came out, with 30,000 pages or so of documentation of how families, children, civilians are treated under the ICE program.

How has ICE’s actions changed from Obama to Trump? Is there anything that’s markedly different?

AOC: There are things that are markedly different. I would say that the basic infrastructure of ICE, its legal structures are the same, but the latitude and rather the extent to which the Trump administration is really bending these rules is at an absolutely new level. This idea of, most recently, separating children from their parents in order to kind of force the state to take over their custody is just an extremely different and draconian level to which ICE enforcement is now being taken.

The Trump Administration is changing these policies at a breakneck pace. So even the most prolific immigration lawyers in the country can barely keep up with the changes that they’re making here, and we’re seeing things that started in the Obama Administration — you know, ICE showing up at courtrooms and things like that — are just starting to become much more regular and commonplace.

JS: What’s your understanding of this policy that ends up separating parents from children? Like, where was that born?

AOC: So, basically the United States had a standing policy for minors who showed up at the border. And what that was originally designed for was occasionally you would have teenagers, mostly — people who were 14, 15, under 18, but old enough to kind of navigate the world on their own — and they would show up at our borders, and we kind of previously saw this hit a crisis when we had this wave of young people and children showing up at the borders of South Texas after the regime change in Honduras. And so we had a standing policy for when a minor showed up at the border unaccompanied — the U.S. government would intervene, there would be child custody services and things like that to help that child navigate that system. That is what we were initially dealing with.

Now what’s happening is parents who show up with their children at the border are getting separated from their children, and that has never happened before. Before, those families would be processed together. And now we are seeing things — I believe it was on MSNBC — where we’re actually seeing cases of a 53-week-old infant in court on their own separated from their mothers.

And many of these children, you know, have yet to see their parents ever again. And some of these children don’t even have legal defense. So this is beyond the pale. This is just totally beyond the pale.

JS: Jeff Sessions — at least for now — the attorney general, in defending this policy, said the following in a series of speeches in Arizona, which is known for its really harsh, draconian position on immigration, as well as in San Diego, California, which is in Southern California, this is Sessions.

”It’s an offense to enter the country unlawfully. If you smuggle an illegal alien across the border, then will prosecute you for smuggling. If you’re smuggling a child, then we’re going to prosecute you. And that child will be separated from you, probably, as required by law. If you don’t want your child to be separated, then don’t bring him across the border illegally. It’s not our fault that somebody does that.

JS: Your response?

AOC: Well, first of all, we are seeing people showing up claiming refugee status. You know, we have this very clear case of this Congolese woman who showed up, refugee status, and if you are fleeing persecution in your home country, the United States refugee policy is that you can show up to our borders, claim refugee status, say, “I’m a refugee” and be classified as such.

We’ve had generations of Americans that have come from things like the Rwandan genocide and regime changes in Latin America show up and claim refugee status and we are doing this to those people too, so that’s the first thing.

But then the second thing is that when you have undocumented people show up in our border, usually what you do is turn them away, you know? That has been the historic policy of the United States — people who show up undocumented without a visa, we turn them away at our borders. But the idea of prosecuting anybody who just shows up at a checkpoint is an expansion of what we are doing in this country and in fact we are taking these people in and we’re putting them into this black-box detention system that we have allowed ICE to create.

And I think what a lot of people don’t realize is that ICE is now the second largest criminal investigative agency in the United States, second only to the FBI. And the fact that they operate without the accountability of the Department of Justice is extremely concerning to us all. There are threads here that stretch all the way to warrantless wiretapping and other forms of overreach. This is squarely in the category of civil rights abuses.

JS: When you say there’s no oversight from the Justice Department, what do you mean?

AOC: So basically, ICE operates under the Department of Homeland Security. And, in my opinion, to have a criminal investigative agency that is not housed under the Department of Justice is so backwards, especially when we see that the Department of Homeland Security was just created in 2003. And so this is not an agency with the institutional knowledge or support or structures to handle such a large operation. And it’s very clear that we see, you know, while the Department of Justice, at least towards the end of the Obama administration started winding down its systems of for-profit detention, for example, for-profit prisons, ICE has just had an expansion. As a matter of fact, ICE is the only criminal investigative agency, the only enforcement agency in the United States that has a bed quota. So ICE is required to fill 34,000 beds with detainees every single night and that number has only been increasing since 2009.

There is the acknowledgment that these things did start with the Obama administration, but, again, that is always the danger of creating governmental structures without accountability under the premise of: Just trust us, this guy, this one President is fine, we can trust this one president. Because when we do have draconian administrations like the one we have now, we see exactly what happens.

JS: Well, and you know people, a lot of times say, “Well, why do you criticize the Democrats? The only game in town right now is opposing Trump.” And I’m certainly sympathetic if you’re looking at what are the greatest risks to democratic society, civil liberties, global peace — yeah, this is a very dangerous administration.

On the other hand whether it’s drone strikes or borderless wars or immigration policy, I feel like you would be omitting an essential part of the context if you don’t talk about how Obama, in his eight years, created systems that were dependent on trusting in him rather than, hey, here’s the rules for how this is done.

AOC: Right.

JS: And, you know, I think a lot of people that didn’t pay any attention to these issues, particularly immigration under Obama are now waking up because it’s Trump, but like when are we going to break that cycle where we — you’re confronting the Democratic Party establishment in your race for Congress.

AOC: Yes.

JS: You’re going up against a long-time member of Congress who there’s discussion he may one day be the Speaker of the House or the leader of the Democrats in the Congress. But the role that the institutional elite or the mainstream of Democratic Party politicians play in creating the ground for Trump to do something like this.

AOC: First of all, the idea of immigration as a partisan issue, the idea of war as a partisan issue, the idea of certain issues that should be galvanizing around social, economic and racial justice, that all of us should be agreeing on are now becoming partisan. And so what’s concerning to me about saying, “Trump! Trump! Trump!” or “GOP! GOP! GOP!” is that in the history of the United States, particularly the modern history of the United States, immigration has never been a partisan issue. In fact, George W. Bush and Ronald Reagan, not to defend or evangelize their administrations, but they were actually known to be quite liberal on immigration. You know, Reagan had his amnesty policy. You have George W. Bush that was actually very welcoming in both his rhetoric and many of his policies towards immigrants, despite the creation of ICE.

And so, historically, immigration has not been a partisan issue until the rising racial resentments of the Trump administration and what we have recently seen in perhaps the last five years. Issues that are just morally right and wrong are now starting to be hijacked by both parties as partisan issues, which should be very, very concerning to all of us as American citizen.

Moreover, the fact that the Democratic Party has not been the party of immigrants.

And 10 years ago I had worked in Ted Kennedy’s immigration office and he, to his credit, he had one of the best immigration constituent service offices in the country. And I would be handling some of these cases, and women and families would call me in a total panic because their husbands were scooped off the street in the middle of the day or they came home and there are literally stories of people coming home to their front doors open, and you know their stove flames are still on and their families are missing. And our incumbents created that system. Everyone who voted for it is responsible. Period. And they need to be held accountable and if they’re not actively calling for the abolition of ICE, then I don’t want to hear it. This idea that we’re going to fight Trump without taking hard committed stances is just a farce and it’s a media play and I do think that our Democratic establishment has to take ownership over the mistakes that they have made in the past — and they either, they should either acknowledge their past actions as mistakes and commit to a course correction or, if they don’t acknowledge that their actions were a mistake, frankly, they need to go.

JS: You dropped a little mini-bomb in there that I want to rewind and examine. You said that you’re calling for abolishing ICE.

AOC: Mhmm.

JS: I think, maybe not people who listen to this show or are supporting you on your campaign, but a lot of people in America I think would listen to that and think: “So what does she want? She just wants people to pour in here?”

You’re running for Congress, so explain from a policy perspective how you can have that position, “Let’s abolish ICE” and be running for Congress in the United States.

AOC: Yeah. For sure.

Well and a little bit of context to the community that I’m running in. My community, New York 14, it’s half in Queens, half in the Bronx, it’s half immigrant. So our communities are very, very familiar with U.S. immigration policy. If you are not an immigrant or naturalized U.S. citizen yourself, you either are part of an immigrant family or you are very close to immigrants. And so I do think that if any seat should be calling for the abolishment of ICE, it should be New York 14 — among others, there are several others.

And yeah, that’s always the question. Like, what do you expect? Are you an open borders fanatic? Like, all of these things. And people forget that ICE was established in 2003, in the post 9/11, frankly, authoritarian crackdown, where we saw the Patriot Act, the Iraq War, the AUMF, and then, of course, you have the establishment of the Homeland Security which included the establishment of ICE. And that’s when we first started seeing, again, this enforcement agency that does not answer to the Department of Justice.

Before ICE we had the INS. So we had the Immigration and Naturalization Services. There are very intense operations that we do need to monitor. We have to keep tabs on human trafficking, child sex trafficking, child pornography and, of course, just standard immigration in and out. And so the INS had handled that before. And so criminal investigations will get forwarded to the Department of Justice which had the infrastructure to kind of handle those proceedings, and then there are other investigatory arms, either within the FBI or within Health and Human Services that would handle those different pockets.

Now when the Department of Homeland Security was established, it concentrated and centralized all of those things into one. And those operations in and of themselves can continue. You know, you can have Border and Customs do the things that they have always done.

The one line that I do want to draw is that when I started talking about this over the weekend it kind of recently blew up, and I’m starting to see, particularly, other congressional candidates say: “Let’s return to the INS.” And that I want to make sure is not correct either.

This is not about going back to the INS. This is really about, in some ways, we need to go all the way back to the root of our immigration policy to begin with, which the very first immigration policy law passed in the United States was the Chinese Exclusion Act in the 1800s, and so the very bedrock of U.S. immigration policy, the very beginning of it was a policy based on racial exclusion. And I think that we need to really reimagine our immigration policy based around two things like I had said before, foreign policy and criminal justice and additionally our economic goals as well. And we really kind of need I think to reimagine our immigration services as part of an economic engine, as part of an accommodation to our own foreign policy aims and, where necessary, enforcement of serious crimes like human trafficking and so on.

So abolishing ICE doesn’t mean get rid of our immigration policy, but what it does mean is to get rid of the draconian enforcement that has happened since 2003 that routinely violates our civil rights, because, frankly, it was designed with that structure in mind.

JS: Just to change gears for a moment, Joe Crowley, who is sort of the self-declared King of Queens, is obviously from Queens, represents Queens. Trump is from Queens. The governor of New York, Cuomo, is from Queens. Talk about the sort of men of Queens and not just the political machine that you’re fighting in the Democratic Party, but the sort of culture of politics in the part of the area where you would represent.

AOC: Yeah. I mean, it’s a trip. It’s a trip, because, excluding Trump for a moment, all of these guys really love to engage in performative solidarity.

I’m going, maybe get in trouble with this, but like you know Cuomo recently had this whole speech where he literally stands up on the stage and he says, “I am a black woman. I am undocumented.” And I think that the real mistake here is just that there’s a lot of talking about these communities, but, at the end of the day, their grip on power causes them to refuse to actually give these communities a true seat at the table. And when these communities want to run for office or when these communities want to have real teeth in our legislative and political processes, they only allow those whom they give permission.

And so it’s a real systemic problem. People think of New York as a liberal state. People think of New York City as liberal politics. And it’s not. New York state is responsible for some of the worst voter suppression in the United States. You have for example, folks like Cuomo and Crowley where they will call for voter reform, but they don’t fund it. They don’t fund it. And so it’s just a press release. So what they’ll say is, “We have stood with immigrants forever. We have stood with women. We have co-sponsored this bill.” But then you have someone like Joe Crowley who loves to talk about how he’s the third most powerful member of Congress — who is putting all of these articles about how he’s the heir apparent to Nancy Pelosi. And the only transformative and impactful legislation that he’s passed in the last five years was FIRPTA which was the deregulation of foreign real estate developers in the United States, which has created this epidemic of shady LLCs, many of which are tied to campaign finance issues. So they co-sponsored these bills to high heaven, but when you actually see the bills that they’re passing, they are just to empower Wall Street. And these communities themselves, the furthest they’ll go is endorse someone with a Hispanic last name but there is very little beyond that getting done. It’s a real problem. There’s a personality thing going on here.

And then also you look at New York State, New York City, one of the most diverse cities in the United States where 56 percent people of color were majority female. And in that city, our governor, our mayor, our city council speaker, the chairman of our state party, and Crowley himself, who’s the chairman of the Queens Democratic Party are all one gender and one race. They are all white men. And that is statistically almost impossible.

So that is not done by chance. That is the systemic concentration of power. And the systemic concentration of power that falls along historical lines, falls along the empowerment and the concentration of power that that tends to be along men, that tends to be along, you know, white Americans and that is how, you know, if the most diverse city in America can’t get a person of color or someone that’s not a man to have high office then how can we have that hope for any other place in the United States.

JS: One of the things I noticed on your Twitter feed is you’ve been intimating, and at times, describing directly the sexism and misogyny that you’ve experienced as you’ve run your campaign for Congress against a white man who’s been around for a long time. Talk about being you and being in this campaign and what it means to be a young woman of color challenging an establishment Democrat.

AOC: Yeah. I think it’s amusing because they start, a lot of people start losing their minds when I talk about this. “Oh, she’s making this about identity — this term — identity politics.” And it’s really funny because when I just talk about who our community is, when I just say, “Hey, New York 14 is 70 percent people of color, we’re 60 percent Hispanic, we’re 40 percent primarily Spanish speaking. We’re also overwhelmingly working class. We have a lot of white brothers and sisters out here, too, right in the same boat as us, making $47,000 a year on average in New York. In New York City.” People really start losing their minds.

You know, people in the opposite camp have been saying, “She’s making this about race.” And, you know what? It is about race. And it is about education. And it is about our incomes. And it is about wealth inequality. Because this campaign is about our issues. And what is infuriating I think a lot of people in New York’s political establishment is that I haven’t asked anyone for permission.

And there’s always this go back to, “Who is she?” And, I mean, when I look upwards, and even when I try, like if I hypothetically wanted to “do it the right way” and ask for this permission and work through these channels, there’s no people up there that would help me. There are no women in power in New York City, in like, an authentic — you know, we’ve got some borough presidents, we got some folks out here, but we don’t have, we have no people of color that are a city council speaker right now. We have none of that. We have very few working class Americans as well.

And so what you see as well is that this machine has been overwhelmingly male for so long that the misogyny becomes the political culture of New York City politics. The emails I get — like I will have never spoken to someone before in my whole life — and I’ll get a message that’s like “you have failed to contact me.” I think it’s just a reflection of how off base it is. No one wants to talk about how painful it was to have someone like Eric Shneiderman have the explosive allegations that he did. For a lot of people — it hurt me, that hit very close to me, because you see some of these folks, and you’re like, “that guy is fighting for us” and in many ways he was, legislatively —

JS: Just to clarify for people who aren’t from New York, Eric Schneiderman, until very recently, was the attorney general of New York and was, I think, generally thought of as being aggressive, and a fairly progressive guy. I mean, he certainly came into office pledging to be a social justice oriented AG and now has gone down under allegations that he was extremely physically and sexually abusive to a number of women.

AOC: Yeah and so, there are a lot of folks who are in the camp of saying, “Ignore his private life, look at what he did with his lawsuits,” which he did! His lawsuits were very much focused on social justice and the idea that we should kind of just ignore all of this other stuff — but when you think about: those guys are mini-kingmakers in their own right. And you think about how they protect each other and how they elevate their protégées, which for many of them, are just people who remind them of younger versions of themselves so they’ll amplify those folks. You think about how many, for example, future female AGs have been cast aside with people like that at the helm. So you look at New York City Council — record low number of women sitting on New York City’s council. You have the Queens Democratic Party, which is overwhelmingly male as well. So we have to look at who’s actually in power in New York City and not just what press statements they’re releasing or what bills they’re co-sponsoring. 

JS: Harvey Weinstein recently was quote-unquote arrested and they put on this show — it was like a Weinstein film where he looks completely disheveled and hollowed out and he was briefly filmed in handcuffs. But the reality is that the whole thing was a negotiated, prearranged show and he was in and out almost instantly. I have a friend who is a lawyer that works with very, very poor people that was actually in the court room and he chronicled how Weinstein was basically in and out and then the person that came after him was someone who could not afford their bail, didn’t have cash, and was totally unable to pay, and then goes away and is going to be held in prison just because they don’t have resources. But someone like Harvey Weinstein, who was accused of raping and abusing many, many women, can pop in and out and just have a little mini-perp walk as part of the negotiations.

AOC: Yeah, absolutely. And then you have someone like Manafort who is literally accused of treasonous acts and that guy gets to walk around with an ankle bracelet. And then you get a kid in the South Bronx that jumps a turnstile because he doesn’t have $2.75 for a MetroCard and that guy gets thrown into Rikers prison because he can’t afford the $400 bail to get out.

JS: In fact, your district encompasses Rikers. What has Joe Crowley, given that he’s a powerful Democrat, done on Rikers and the issues of abuse there, the conditions, women being assaulted?

AOC: I wish I could say something. He’s co-sponsored some bills, but as the third most powerful Democrat in the House of Representatives of the United States of America, nothing’s been passed. I could understand the argument of, “Oh, I’ve co-sponsored this I’ve co-sponsored that” if you’re just a normal rank-and-file member — but the heir apparent to Nancy Pelosi can’t deliver on Rikers? I mean he stands out for the “close Rikers” campaign, but mostly that advocacy came out after the mayor already agreed to shut it down in 10 years. Now the fight is to shut it down closer than that but also he accepts money from folks like Bloomberg who created stop and frisk that stuffed those jails up to the brim. Again, it’s more about the actions and what this power is being used for, because we should just support the powerful because they already have power I think is a farce. We need to support those who use their power to really transform our structures of racial and economic and social justice. 

JS: You’ve been endorsed by Black Lives Matter as well as the Democratic Socialists of America. And you mentioned earlier, stop and frisk. Bloomberg, the former mayor of New York — who is a Republican but transformed himself into an independent because he was flirting with the idea of a presidential run — he has been hosting fundraisers for your opponent. One fundraiser that he hosted at his home in Manhattan on May 2 suggested contributions of a $1,000, $2,700, and $5,400 dollars. Why is Michael Bloomberg backing your opponent in the Democratic primary?

AOC: Because Joe Crowley creates and advances policies both in his capacity as a congressman and also in his capacity as the chairman of the Queens Democratic Party to pad the pockets of luxury real estate developers and private equity groups of which Michael Bloomberg is the king. It’s total quid-pro-quo. The idea that special interests give money to candidates as a form of charity is laughable. Or the idea that you can maintain independence while you depend on those same lobbies to get re-elected is also laughable.

JS: That was one of the things I loved about Trump’s sort of schtick on the campaign trail is he was openly talking about how he would bribe politicians. 

AOC: Yeah.

JS: “Even Hillary Clinton — I was bribing her!” He really spoke openly about it — it was actually one of the refreshing things in a sea of horrifying, terrifying, neo-Nazi , white nationalism, nativism, horrible stuff. Trump actually told the truth occasionally and this issue was one of them where he basically said, “This is legalized bribery and I’m all for it.”

AOC: Yeah, and OK, here’s an ultimate irony: Trump Links is in our district. In that same scene overlooking Rikers, you’ve got Trump Links as you’re crossing over the bridge. 

JS: What is Trump Links?

AOC: It’s a golf course out there in Queens. The day that Trump Links opened, there’s a quote right there from Crowley singing the praises of the opening of this phenomenal development. I think it just goes to show: We really need to take a magnifying glass to some of these folks to see if they’re the real deal or if they’re performative. It’s important for us to follow that money.

JS: What do you think just going back a moment to the broader movement that’s been identified as #MeToo. What’s your analysis of this? You’re running for Congress in New York City, which many consider the kind of cultural capital of New York. And many powerful men who are residents of this city stand accused of pretty horrifying, despicable, disgusting crimes against women. But as you’ve run for office — what’s your position on these issues? How should we as a society respond to this?

AOC: Well, I think that when someone stands accused of very serious instances of sexual assault — first of all, I think we need to kind of shift our culture to giving these folks a fair hearing. There are some grey areas. There’s some aspects to #MeToo where it’s like, when one person makes an accusation, on one hand, we have to have to maintain the spirit of due process. I do believe that. But then when you have cases like, for example, Schneiderman, or cases like Weinstein, the fact that we have a culture that has to wait until a person is accused by 80 women, 50 women, 10 women —

JS: One of them is the president.

AOC: — for us to do anything about it is also equally very concerning. I think that we probably have some legal structures in place that are not particularly conducive to victims of sexual assault and sex crimes. And this is done sometimes in child cases as well — having to testify publicly in front of a court which opens people up to all sort of forms of intimidation. I think there are some legal ways we can look into this as well. But then culturally, we do need to measure — where we need to have a culture where we believe people when they say these very serious things, but we also need to make sure that due process is held. That’s a tough road that we’re all navigating right now. But I do think that having women at the table is very important in that process. You look at New York state? Oh my goodness. New York state — our state law, we just recently went through in the state legislature kind of a spate of more sexual harassment claims, and the folks who are generating the state sexual harassment policy were literally four men in a room. There wasn’t a single women at the table drafting the consequences for sexual harassment claims in Albany. And it is the biggest open secret in New York state politics that Albany is a toxic, toxic place of sexual harassment and the victimization of women as well as political corruption. We know that. In January, there were six public officials up for trial on corruption charges. I think for a long time we just take it as fact. We’ve taken for granted for so long how backwards and corrupt Albany is that we’re just like, “Oh, that’s the way it is.” We take this defeatist or fatalist approach saying, “That’s the way our government is.” I think we need to take a moment, especially in 2018: It’s not just about red to blue. This is about transforming our system into a system of justice overall. It’s not just about red to blue, it’s about cleaning up our backyard. It’s about making that crooked path straight.

JS: What is your relationship with the institutional Democratic Party like, you know, DCCC, the DNC?

AOC: My opponent is the institutional Democratic Party. So my relationship to them, in a formal sense, is pretty much non-existent. He gives the D-trip about a million bucks a year on average, some years and stuff.

JS: This is the Democratic campaign fundraising mechanism that’s used by the institutional party.

AOC: Right. Moreover, our community has been ignored by the national party — New York 14. So the Bronx and Queens. We talk about communities like Jackson Heights. We talk about communities like East Elmshearst and Corona, Woodside, Sunnyside. The national Democratic Party does not really have a footprint here.

JS: For people who are not from New York, these are some of the most diverse neighborhoods anywhere on the planet. If you go into parts of Queens, that are also included in your district, you can walk from one block to the next and it’s like you’re traveling through eight, 10 different countries.

AOC: What I think is unfortunate about that is I think it’s a lost opportunity because this district is 85 percent Democrat, then it’s like another 10 percent independent and unaffiliated, then you have a small sliver of Republican voters. So this seat is the opportunity to really champion some of the most ambitious and progressive legislation in the United States. Instead, we’ve been having middle of the road corporate policies coming out of the most diverse and working class district arguably in New York City, if not in the country. 

JS: Has the Democratic Party tried to stop you from challenging Crowley?

AOC: No one has tried to dissuade me from running, and I think it’s because when I started this race I was so small potatoes. You know, my background, for those who may not know, I’m an educator, I’m an organizer — I have an academic background in economics international policy but I’m also very working class. I’m a first-generation college graduate and during the financial crisis, which like, eviscerated my family, I was bartending and waitressing while doing community work.

JS: Explain what happened with your family after your father passed away.

AOC: So, as the markets were crashing in 2008, my father died of lung cancer, a very rare form of lung cancer — he was not a smoker or anything like that — in the state of New York. So my father passed away without a will like many working class and poor families do. We entered something known as the surrogates court. Otherwise casually known as the “widows and orphans court.” What many people don’t realize is that machine appointments to the lawyers of the surrogates court is one of the most lucrative positions you can have. While we were in a different county, essentially the lawyers that Crowley appoints to the surrogates court are his friends and they’re the lawyers who politically protect him. So in exchange for that, they’ve made over $30 million off the New York surrogates court. 

JS: How do they make that money?

AOC: Being appointed as a lawyer to the surrogates court, you then rake in the legal fees for all of these families that come through ,whether they enter foreclosure, whether their family members die without an estate or a will. So, my father pretty much died with nothing. He left us almost nothing except we had a house and small things here and there. So when you sell that home and all that stuff happens, every time you go through that court, you get these legal fees kind of shaved off. And so there are standing lawyers in that court and those legal fees go to those folks.

JS: In the case of your family they were chiseling away at a family home’s value.

AOC: Right, or whatever was left that we had. So when you do that — obviously this is New York City — unfortunately, many people find themselves in this situation. It’s just kind of a piggy bank for this kind of stuff. Anyways, with my family we sold my childhood home. My mother was forced to move to Florida because she could no longer afford to live in New York City, remain in New York City. And I found myself, you know, while we were kind of on that brink, I started working a second job. And so when I first started this campaign, I started it out of a grocery bag, going to work, and I put my palm cards and my campaign banner in a grocery bag, and I put my change of clothes for the end of that day, and I would take it to a bar and I would hide it behind the counter. I would work my shift for that day. I would get out. I would change my clothes. I would go to community events. I would go to people’s living rooms and say, “Hey, we need to change our politics in America.”

And that’s how this campaign started. And it was such a joke, I think, to the establishment and it was so small potatoes that nobody paid attention and nobody thought of us as a threat, which I think is a fabulous place to be.

JS: Was it the personal experience that drove you to challenge Joe Crowley? The family experience that you’re describing?

AOC: The family experience that I just told gave me the strength and the resolve to do it. One of the big decisions though was that I was at Standing Rock in December 2016 and when I saw how corporations had literally militarized themselves to do physical harm to American citizens, in particularly Native peoples. And I saw what the Lakota Sioux and Native peoples were doing — putting everything on the line not just to protect their land but to protect the entire water supply of the Midwest United States, I really just felt like we had to have a turning point and that it wasn’t going to come from the Democratic establishment, that it had to be people. It had to be everyday people who were aware enough to know what was going on. The day after I got off camp, I was contacted by a progressive organization, Brand New Congress ,which was seeking to mount noncorporate candidates in the 2018 midterm. They said, “Would you be interested in running this race?” So, with the confidence of not doing this alone, paired with my own pained personal experiences on the local and national level — I think that I really felt like this was something that had to be done. We haven’t had a primary in 14 years in New York 14, so it was very clear that nobody else was going to do this. And so, in a way, in New York City to challenge a kingmaker, you have to do it from the outside, because everyone else is too scared.

JS: If you win the primary, it seems pretty clear then you would win the general election given the demographics of the district. So you walk into Washington, it’s not just going to be the issues that you are fluent on that you’re going to have to deal with. You’re also going to have to talk about and develop positions on things that you maybe have never considered before. I want to ask you a few foreign policy questions. To you right now, what is the single greatest threat that the people of the United States face in the world on a foreign policy level?

AOC: I think we’ve got two fronts. One, we have a reordering of global power right now. Because of that, its powered by economic developments and also geopolitical developments, as well. So you have two really big hotspots. You have the role of this multipolar power with China, Russia, and the United States as well as what you’ve got going on in Europe and the Middle East. You look at what’s going on in global trade, and first of all, the global concentration of power is destabilizing countries across the world. It’s not just happening in the United States, it’s happening in Europe, it’s happening in Latin America. That is the consequence of extreme global inequality. The consequence is basically mass social destabilization. 

So when people say you have to choose globally, internationally, or domestically, between issues of race and social justice, or issues of class, that’s why I reject that outright. So, we have the destabilization of countries around the world due to wealth inequality that has been historically powered by global trade deals that concentrate the gains of trade into multinational corporations as opposed to the workers who create that wealth. First of all I think that’s one huge one thematically.

So when you kind of drill down — one, we need to figure out how to approach trade in a way that creates more stable economic outcomes for families across the world. But then secondly, I think you have some of these geopolitical realities of — we now have Russia playing a very aggressive role in other nations. We have what we saw in Europe ahead of the French elections where, thankfully, they had planned for a cyberattack, but we have a lot of the destabilization of our political institutions as well. We see the role that Russia is playing in that. We see that, for example, because of the domestic role that the Trump administration is playing in this protectionist ante up ,we see China — this has been happening before Trump — but now especially during this administration, they are now starting to fill that vacuum of power that the United States formerly held. So I think that from our vantage point, within the United States we have to address those two things. Of course we have continuing developments in the Middle East. We have what just happened in Palestine, and so on. I think at the end of the day, a lot of this has to do with what’s going on with the global concentration of wealth. All of these things tie back to that. You look at what’s happening in these FBI investigations and the things we’re finding and lo and behold, it’s this petrol Russian oligarch is tied directly financially to what happened in the 2016 U.S. elections.

JS: Is there any U.S. military action since 9/11 that you would have supported if you were in Congress? Let’s go from September 11th, 2001, to today, as we speak. Bombing a country, drone strikes, snatching people off the streets, invading countries, surging as Obama did in Afghanistan —

AOC: In terms of aggressive military actions, no. I’m proud to have the endorsement of Common Defense which is a group of military veterans and their families that are trying to fight for social justice and economic justice and peace in the world abroad. So when I had these conversations — I think it’s important to echo that not all military actions are what you’re discussing. In terms of what you’re discussing, probably not. The only one that, I mean, even with the surge, with Obama’s surge, I think what he was trying to do was deal with this mess of going into Afghanistan in the first place. In a sense, there are some tough spots that you’re in where when you have boots on the ground, and you have those soldiers that are there, pulling out immediately sometimes isn’t the most stabilizing course of action. So I think there, maybe. But I don’t think that these drone strikes were just. I don’t think that essentially this blank check on wars that the AUMF provided that allowed us to go into places like Yemen and, so on, to essentially wage war that Americans don’t even know about — I think all of those actions are pretty reprehensible and they don’t serve to further stabilize communities and, in fact, we’ve pumped arms into a lot of these areas. We arm one rebel group and then that eventually becomes a destabilizing force five years on from that.

JS: Do you happen to know how many members of the House of Representatives voted against the AUMF?

AOC: It was a terribly low number —

JS: One. Rep. Barbara Lee of California. We had her on this show and she described how she and her family were recipients of many death threats. I always say, particularly to high school students, “Every single one of you should watch that speech that Barbara Lee gave on the floor just days after 9/11.” Do you think you would have the temerity to be the only one voting against an issue in the aftermath of 9/11 or some catastrophic thing because there were some really good lawmakers there who are generally on the right side of history, more or less, who did not have the spine that Barbara Lee did. It’s tough to make those decisions. 

AOC: Of course, and 9/11 was right here in New York City — I want to say yes. But more than just saying, “I want to say yes,” what I actually try to do in my campaign is prevent those decisions by just being made by me. My campaign so intensely relies on the communities that are issue focused that are anti-war, that are anti-criminal justice, that are anti-imperialism, and so on, that because I rely on them to organize our campaign to knock on doors, to win re-election, I would like to think that in the same way that many democratic establishment incumbents rely on their donors and make legislative decisions based on what their lobbyists tell them: that I try to rely on these movements to inform a lot of those policies as well. I also think again, my district is very different. My district has many people from Middle Eastern countries, from South Asian counties, many people from Latin America. We have very high populations from Venezuela, from Bangladesh, and so on, that I think our community is just a natural check to what tends to be mainstream public opinion. I would like say yes, not only because I think I’m a good person, whatever that may be, but because I think that is in line with our community as well. 

JS: Alexandria, thank you so much for joining us.

AOC: Thank you so much for having me.

Assistant Producer Elise Swain contributed to this story.

Voir enfin:

What Do the Rich and Powerful Read?
Scott Mayerowitz
ABC News
July 28, 2007

An old joke in the newspaper world holds that The Wall Street Journal is read by the people who run the country, The New York Times by those who think they run the country, The Washington Post by those who think they ought to run the country and The Boston Globe by people whose parents used to run the country.Whether or not that is true, The Wall Street Journal does hold tremendous sway. It reaches one of the largest audiences and has some of the richest and most-powerful readers of any newspaper.So as the Bancroft family mulls whether to sell The Journal and its parent company, Dow Jones, to Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp., many people are paying particularly close attention to what is otherwise a fairly routine business deal.While newspaper’s influence is waning as readers and advertisers migrate to the Internet, the newspaper still provides an important public service. »It is one of the finest — if not the finest — papers in the country, » said Arlene Morgan, associate dean of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and a former assistant managing editor at The Philadelphia Inquirer. « I am a big fan. I read it religiously. »Every day I pick up the paper and find something that I didn’t expect, that surprises me, that I wouldn’t have known otherwise, » she said. « They’re analytical. They have fun with the writing. It is one of the premier writing institutions in the country. »Each day more than 2 million people pick up a copy of The Wall Street Journal or read it online, more than any other newspaper in the country, except USA Today, according to the Audit Bureau of Circulations.

More than three-fourths of them have a college degree, and their average household income is $234,909. The readers of USA Today and The New York Times tend to earn less.

The Journal has a strong grasp on a group of readers who have the disposable income to spend on big-ticket items. A full-page color ad in the paper costs $168,500 to $234,000.

Private Jets, Ranches

Friday’s paper has ads for private jets, expensive watches, a $12.5 million house in Vail, Colo., and a ranch in Montana for $13.5 million.

(The Wall Street Journal holds added value for Murdoch because News Corp. is launching its own cable business channel, which is expected to compete head to head with CNBC.)

« The Journal is to Wall Street and capital markets what The New York Times is to the White House and the State Department and U.S. politics, » said Dean Starkman, who spent eight years as a reporter at The Journal and is now assistant managing editor of the Columbia Journalism Review. « It’s the most authoritative watchdog there is. It is the paper of record. »

Starkman said The Journal has lost some of its luster in recent years. Part of that is a general decline in newspaper readership and part of it is because The Journal is now focusing on more hard business news — inside baseball-type of coverage.

Still, he said, it’s a great paper that does what few publications can.

If you’re interested in the markets and business, Starkman said, The Journal is an « indispensable source. There’s no substitute. »

Part of that is because of the large staff that digs deeply into topics. « Over the last 20 years, at its height, it had an enormous staff, » said Starkman, who used to cover real estate. « We had seven real estate reporters. »

Today, The Journal has a news staff of more than 750 worldwide, according to Robert H. Christie, spokesman for the paper.

Many media watchers fear that Murdoch will interfere with the independence The Journal’s editors and reporters now have. Such meddling could diminish the paper’s stature and influence.

Business Newspaper of Record

So why should those outside the media and business worlds care?

Starkman said The Journal covers everything — from credit cards to banks to cars to the food supply.

« You want a large, powerful, sophisticated news organization keeping an eye on all of that, » he said. « You want somebody looking over the shoulder of the Securities and Exchange Commission, the FCC and the FDA. »

Richard Roth, senior associate dean and faculty member at Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism, said The Journal is the « first or second most important paper in the country. »

« They are clearly the authority in so many things, particularly in business issues, » he said.

And if for some reason they change or didn’t exist, Roth said: « Who would discover Enron? » referring to problems at the Texas The Journal was among the first to uncover.

The paper has a wide range of knowledge, Columbia’s Morgan points out. Not only does the paper cover business, but it also reviews wines, and is a leading voice on technology.

The paper has won 33 Pulitzer Prizes, including one awarded in 2005 to Joe Morgenstern for his film reviews.

« We’re so entertainment and celebrity crazed that we’re just not getting the kind information to make decisions about who we are as a country, » Morgan said. « So as we really do less and less on our news pages, it’s more important to have papers like The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times and The Washington Post that you can depend on to be there. »

Who Reads the Newspapers

  • The Wall Street Journal is read by the people who run the country.
  • The Washington Post is read by people who think they run the country.
  • The New York Times is read by people who think they should run the country.
  • USA Today is read by people who think they ought to run the country but don’t really understand the Washington Post. They do, however, like their statistics shown in pie chart format.
  • The Los Angeles Times is read by people who wouldn’t mind running the country, if they could spare the time, and if they didn’t have to leave LA to do it.
  • The Boston Globe is read by people whose parents used to run the country and they did a far superior job of it, thank you very much.
  • The New York Daily News is read by people who aren’t too sure who’s running the country, and don’t really care as long as they can get a seat on the train.
  • The New York Post is read by people who don’t care who’s running the country, as long as they do something really scandalous, preferably while intoxicated.
  • The San Francisco Chronicle is read by people who aren’t sure there is a country or that anyone is running it; but whoever it is, they oppose all that they stand for. There are occasional exceptions if the leaders are handicapped minority feminist atheist dwarfs, who also happen to be illegal aliens from ANY country or galaxy as long as they are Democrats.
  • The Miami Herald is read by people who are running another country but need the baseball scores.
  • The National Enquirer is read by people trapped in line at the grocery store.

This was passed along to me by my wife’e late friend, Gary Curtis. God knows where it came from originally.

In response to this page, Gary O’Brien sent this British version of the list, whose provenance he identifies as from a December 1987 episode of the BBC series « Yes, Prime Minister. » Link below.

Unfortunately, I understand that the Sun has now discontinued its traditional topless « Page Three » girls. I don’t know what the world is coming to.

      1. The Daily Mirror is read by people who think they run the country.
      2. The Guardian is read by people who think they ought to run the country.
      3. The Times is read by people who actually do run the country.
      4. The Daily Mail is read by the wives of the people who run the country.
      5. The Financial Times is read by people who own the country.
      6. The Morning Star is read by people who think the country ought to be run by another country.
      7. The Daily Telegraph is read by people who think it is run by another country.
      8. The Sun readers don’t care who runs the country, as long as she’s got big tits.

Affaire de la petite Yanela: C’est la formulation, imbécile ! (It’s not fake news, it’s misstated news, stupid !)

24 juin, 2018
https://i1.wp.com/www.theaugeanstables.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/ghetto-boy-2.jpg

Two children detained by the Border Patrol in a holding cell in Nogales, Ariz. This image has been widely shared on social media in recent days, offered as an example of the Trump administration’s cruel policies toward immigrants, but in fact the picture was taken in 2014.

« La version originale de cet article a donné une mauvaise formulation du sort de la petite fille après la photographie. Elle n’a pas été emmenée en larmes par les patrouilles frontalières ; sa mère l’a récupérée et les deux ont été interpellées ensemble. »

Devrai-je sacrifier mon enfant premier-né pour payer pour mon crime, le fils, chair de ma chair, pour expier ma faute? On te l’a enseigné, ô homme, ce qui est bien et ce que l’Eternel attend de toi: c’est que tu te conduises avec droiture, que tu prennes plaisir à témoigner de la bonté et qu’avec vigilance tu vives pour ton Dieu. Michée 6: 7-8
Laissez les petits enfants, et ne les empêchez pas de venir à moi; car le royaume des cieux est pour ceux qui leur ressemblent. Jésus (Matthieu 19: 14)
Quiconque reçoit en mon nom un petit enfant comme celui-ci, me reçoit moi-même. Mais, si quelqu’un scandalisait un de ces petits qui croient en moi, il vaudrait mieux pour lui qu’on suspendît à son cou une meule de moulin, et qu’on le jetât au fond de la mer. Jésus (Matthieu 18: 5-6)
Une civilisation est testée sur la manière dont elle traite ses membres les plus faibles. Pearl Buck
Le monde moderne n’est pas mauvais : à certains égards, il est bien trop bon. Il est rempli de vertus féroces et gâchées. Lorsqu’un dispositif religieux est brisé (comme le fut le christianisme pendant la Réforme), ce ne sont pas seulement les vices qui sont libérés. Les vices sont en effet libérés, et ils errent de par le monde en faisant des ravages ; mais les vertus le sont aussi, et elles errent plus férocement encore en faisant des ravages plus terribles. Le monde moderne est saturé des vieilles vertus chrétiennes virant à la folie.  G.K. Chesterton
Je crois que le moment décisif en Occident est l’invention de l’hôpital. Les primitifs s’occupent de leurs propres morts. Ce qu’il y a de caractéristique dans l’hôpital c’est bien le fait de s’occuper de tout le monde. C’est l’hôtel-Dieu donc c’est la charité. Et c’est visiblement une invention du Moyen-Age. René Girard
Notre monde est de plus en plus imprégné par cette vérité évangélique de l’innocence des victimes. L’attention qu’on porte aux victimes a commencé au Moyen Age, avec l’invention de l’hôpital. L’Hôtel-Dieu, comme on disait, accueillait toutes les victimes, indépendamment de leur origine. Les sociétés primitives n’étaient pas inhumaines, mais elles n’avaient d’attention que pour leurs membres. Le monde moderne a inventé la « victime inconnue », comme on dirait aujourd’hui le « soldat inconnu ». Le christianisme peut maintenant continuer à s’étendre même sans la loi, car ses grandes percées intellectuelles et morales, notre souci des victimes et notre attention à ne pas nous fabriquer de boucs émissaires, ont fait de nous des chrétiens qui s’ignorent. René Girard
L’inauguration majestueuse de l’ère « post-chrétienne » est une plaisanterie. Nous sommes dans un ultra-christianisme caricatural qui essaie d’échapper à l’orbite judéo-chrétienne en « radicalisant » le souci des victimes dans un sens antichrétien. René Girard
J’espère offrir mon fils unique en martyr, comme son père. Dalal Mouazzi (jeune veuve d’un commandant du Hezbollah mort en 2006 pendant la guerre du Liban, à propos de son gamin de 10 ans)
Nous n’aurons la paix avec les Arabes que lorsqu’ils aimeront leurs enfants plus qu’ils ne nous détestent. Golda Meir
Les Israéliens ne savent pas que le peuple palestinien a progressé dans ses recherches sur la mort. Il a développé une industrie de la mort qu’affectionnent toutes nos femmes, tous nos enfants, tous nos vieillards et tous nos combattants. Ainsi, nous avons formé un bouclier humain grâce aux femmes et aux enfants pour dire à l’ennemi sioniste que nous tenons à la mort autant qu’il tient à la vie. Fathi Hammad (responsable du Hamas, mars 2008)
L’image correspondait à la réalité de la situation, non seulement à Gaza, mais en Cisjordanie. Charles Enderlin (Le Figaro, 27/01/05)
Oh, ils font toujours ça. C’est une question de culture. Représentants de France 2 (cités par Enderlin)
La mort de Mohammed annule, efface celle de l’enfant juif, les mains en l’air devant les SS, dans le Ghetto de Varsovie. Catherine Nay (Europe 1)
Il y a lieu de décider que Patrick Karsenty a exercé de bonne foi son droit à la libre critique (…) En répondant à Denis Jeambar et à Daniel Leconte dans le Figaro du 23 janvier 2005 que « l’image correspondait à la réalité de la situation, non seulement à Gaza, mais en Cisjordanie », alors que la diffusion d’un reportage s’entend comme le témoignage de ce que le journaliste a vu et entendu, Charles Enderlin a reconnu que le film qui a fait le tour du monde en entrainant des violences sans précédent dans toute la région ne correspondait peut-être pas au commentaire qu’il avait donné. Laurence Trébucq (Présidente de la Cour d’appel de Paris, 21.05.08)
Voilà sept ans qu’une campagne obstinée et haineuse s’efforce de salir la dignité professionnelle de notre confrère Charles Enderlin, correspondant de France 2 à Jerusalem. Voilà sept ans que les mêmes individus tentent de présenter comme une « supercherie » et une « série de scènes jouées » , son reportage montrant la mort de Mohammed al-Doura, 12 ans, tué par des tirs venus de la position israélienne, le 30 septembre 2000, dans la bande de Gaza, lors d’un affrontement entre l’armée israélienne et des éléments armés palestiniens. Appel du Nouvel observateur (27 mai 2008)
This is not staging, it’s playing for the camera. When they threw stones and Molotov cocktails, it was in part for the camera. That doesn’t mean it’s not true. They wanted to be filmed throwing stones and being hit by rubber bullets. All of us — the ARD too — did reports on kids confronting the Israeli army, in order to be filmed in Ramallah, in Gaza. That’s not staging, that’s reality. Enderlin
Dans le numéro 1931 du Nouvel Observateur, daté du 8 novembre 2001, Sara Daniel a publié un reportage sur le « crime d’honneur » en Jordanie. Dans son texte, elle révélait qu’à Gaza et dans les territoires occupés, les crimes dits d’honneur qui consistent pour des pères ou des frères à abattre les femmes jugées légères représentaient une part importante des homicides. Le texte publié, en raison d’un défaut de guillemets et de la suppression de deux phrases dans la transmission, laissait penser que son auteur faisait sienne l’accusation selon laquelle il arrivait à des soldats israéliens de commettre un viol en sachant, de plus, que les femmes violées allaient être tuées. Il n’en était évidemment rien et Sara Daniel, actuellement en reportage en Afghanistan, fait savoir qu’elle déplore très vivement cette erreur qui a gravement dénaturé sa pensée. Une mise au point de Sara Daniel (Le Nouvel Observateur, le 15 novembre 2001)
Les Israéliens ne savent pas que le peuple palestinien a progressé dans ses recherches sur la mort. Il a développé une industrie de la mort qu’affectionnent toutes nos femmes, tous nos enfants, tous nos vieillards et tous nos combattants. Ainsi, nous avons formé un bouclier humain grâce aux femmes et aux enfants pour dire à l’ennemi sioniste que nous tenons à la mort autant qu’il tient à la vie. Fathi Hammad (responsable du Hamas, mars 2008)
Les pays européens qui ont transformé la Méditerranée en un cimetière de migrants partagent la responsabilité de chaque réfugié mort. Erdogan
Mr. Kurdi brought his family to Turkey three years ago after fleeing fighting first in Damascus, where he worked as a barber, then in Aleppo, then Kobani. His Facebook page shows pictures of the family in Istanbul crossing the Bosporus and feeding pigeons next to the famous Yeni Cami, or new mosque. From his hospital bed on Wednesday, Mr. Kurdi told a Syrian radio station that he had worked on construction sites for 50 Turkish lira (roughly $17) a day, but it wasn’t enough to live on. He said they depended on his sister, Tima Kurdi, who lived in Canada, for help paying the rent. Ms. Kurdi, speaking Thursday in a Vancouver suburb, said that their father, still in Syria, had suggested Abdullah go to Europe to get his damaged teeth fixed and find a way to help his family leave Turkey. She said she began wiring her brother money three weeks ago, in €1,000 ($1,100) amounts, to help pay for the trip. Shortly after, she said her brother called her and said he wanted to bring his whole family to Europe, as his wife wasn’t able to support their two boys alone in Istanbul. “If we go, we go all of us,” Ms. Kurdi recounted him telling her. She said she spoke to his wife last week, who told her she was scared of the water and couldn’t swim. “I said to her, ‘I cannot push you to go. If you don’t want to go, don’t go,’” she said. “But I guess they all decided they wanted to do it all together.” At the morgue, Mr. Kurdi described what happened after they set off from the deserted beach, under cover of darkness. “We went into the sea for four minutes and then the captain saw that the waves are so high, so he steered the boat and we were hit immediately. He panicked and dived into the sea and fled. I took over and started steering, the waves were so high the boat flipped. I took my wife in my arms and I realized they were all dead.” Mr. Kurdi gave different accounts of what happened next. In one interview, he said he swam ashore and walked to the hospital. In another, he said he was rescued by the coast guard. In Canada, Ms. Kurdi said her brother had sent her a text message around 3 a.m. Turkish time Wednesday confirming they had set off. (…) “He said, ‘I did everything in my power to save them, but I couldn’t,’” she said. “My brother said to me, ‘My kids have to be the wake-up call for the whole world.’” WSJ
Personne ne dit que ce n’est pas raisonnable de partir de Turquie avec deux enfants en bas âge sur une mer agitée dans un frêle esquife. Arno Klarsfeld
La justice israélienne a dit disposer d’une déposition selon laquelle la famille d’un bébé palestinien mort dans des circonstances contestées dans la bande de Gaza avait été payée par le Hamas pour accuser Israël, ce que les parents ont nié. Vif émoi après la mort de l’enfant. Leïla al-Ghandour, âgée de huit mois, est morte mi-mai alors que l’enclave palestinienne était depuis des semaines le théâtre d’une mobilisation massive et d’affrontements entre Palestiniens et soldats israéliens le long de la frontière avec Gaza. Son décès a suscité un vif émoi. Sa famille accuse l’armée israélienne d’avoir provoqué sa mort en employant des lacrymogènes contre les protestataires, parmi lesquels se trouvait la fillette. La fillette souffrait-elle d’un problème cardiaque ? L’armée israélienne, se fondant sur les informations d’un médecin palestinien resté anonyme mais qui selon elle connaissait l’enfant et sa famille, dit que l’enfant souffrait d’un problème cardiaque. Le ministère israélien de la Justice a rendu public jeudi l’acte d’inculpation d’un Gazaoui de 20 ans, présenté comme le cousin de la fillette. Selon le ministère, il a déclaré au cours de ses interrogatoires par les forces israéliennes que les parents de Leila avaient touché 8.000 shekels (1.800 euros) de la part de Yahya Sinouar, le chef du Hamas dans la bande de Gaza, pour dire que leur fille était morte des inhalations de gaz. Une « fabrication » du Hamas dénoncée par Israël. Les parents ont nié ces déclarations, réaffirmé que leur fille était bien morte des inhalations, et ont contesté qu’elle était malade. Selon la famille, Leïla al-Ghandour avait été emmenée près de la frontière par un oncle âgé de 11 ans et avait été prise dans les tirs de lacrymogènes. Europe 1
Donald Trump aurait (…) menti en affirmant que la criminalité augmentait en Allemagne, en raison de l’entrée dans le pays de 1,1 million de clandestins en 2015. (…) Les articles se sont immédiatement multipliés pour dénoncer « le mensonge » du président américain. Pourquoi ? Parce que les autorités allemandes se sont félicitées d’une baisse des agressions violentes en 2017. C’est vrai, elles ont chuté de 5,1% par rapport à 2016. Est-il possible, cependant, de feindre à ce point l’incompréhension ? Car les détracteurs zélés du président omettent de préciser que la criminalité a bien augmenté en Allemagne à la suite de cette vague migratoire exceptionnelle : 10% de crimes violents en plus, sur les années 2015 et 2016. L’étude réalisée par le gouvernement allemand et publiée en janvier dernier concluait même que 90% de cette augmentation était due aux jeunes hommes clandestins fraîchement accueillis, âgés de 14 à 30 ans. L’augmentation de la criminalité fut donc indiscutablement liée à l’accueil de 1,1 millions de clandestins pendant l’année 2015. C’est évidement ce qu’entend démontrer Donald Trump. Et ce n’est pas tout. Les chiffres du ministère allemand de l’Intérieur pour 2016 révèlent également une implication des étrangers et des clandestins supérieure à celle des Allemands dans le domaine de la criminalité. Et en hausse. La proportion d’étrangers parmi les personnes suspectées d’actes criminels était de 28,7% en 2014, elle est passée à 40,4% en 2016, avant de chuter à 35% en 2017 (ce qui reste plus important qu’en 2014). En 2016, les étrangers étaient 3,5 fois plus impliqués dans des crimes que les Allemands, les clandestins 7 fois plus. Des chiffres encore plus élevés dans le domaine des crimes violents (5 fois plus élevés chez les étrangers, 15 fois chez les clandestins) ou dans celui des viols en réunion (10 fois plus chez les étrangers, 42 fois chez les clandestins !). Factuellement, la criminalité n’augmente pas aujourd’hui en Allemagne. Mais l’exceptionnelle vague migratoire voulue par Angela Merkel en 2015 a bien eu pour conséquence l’augmentation de la criminalité en Allemagne. Les Allemands, eux, semblent l’avoir très bien compris. Valeurs actuelles
Je vous demande de ne rien céder, dans ces temps troublés que nous vivons, de votre amour pour l’Europe. Je vous le dis avec beaucoup de gravité. Beaucoup la détestent, mais ils la détestent depuis longtemps et vous les voyez monter, comme une lèpre, un peu partout en Europe, dans des pays où nous pensions que c’était impossible de la voir réapparaître. Et des amis voisins, ils disent le pire et nous nous y habituons. Emmanuel Macron
Il y a des choses insoutenables. Mais pourquoi on en est arrivé là ? Parce que justement il y a des gens comme Emmanuel Macron qui venaient donner des leçons de morale aux autres. Il y a une inquiétude identitaire » en Europe, « c’est une réalité politique. Tous les donneurs de leçon ont tué l’Europe, il y a une angoisse chez les Européens d’être dilués, pas une angoisse raciste, mais une angoisse de ne plus pouvoir être eux, chez eux. Jean-Sébastien Ferjou
Our message absolutely is don’t send your children unaccompanied, on trains or through a bunch of smugglers. We don’t even know how many of these kids don’t make it, and may have been waylaid into sex trafficking or killed because they fell off a train. Do not send your children to the borders. If they do make it, they’ll get sent back. More importantly, they may not make it. Obama (2014)
I also think that we have to understand the difficulty that President Obama finds himself in because there are laws that impose certain obligations on him. And it was my understanding that the numbers have been moderating in part as the Department of Homeland Security and other law enforcement officials understood that separating children from families — I mean, the horror of a father or a mother going to work and being picked up and immediately whisked away and children coming home from school to an empty house and nobody can say where their mother or father is, that is just not who we are as Americans. And so, I do think that while we continue to make the case which you know is very controversial in some corridors, that we have to reform our immigration system and we needed to do it yesterday. That’s why I approved of the bill that was passed in the Senate. We need to show humanity with respect to people to people who are working, contributing right now. And deporting them, leaving their children alone or deporting an adolescent, doing anything that is so contrary to our core values, just makes no sense. So I would be very open to trying to figure out ways to change the law, even if we don’t get to comprehensive immigration reform to provide more leeway and more discretion for the executive branch. (…) the numbers are increasing dramatically. And the main reason I believe why that’s happening is that the violence in certain of those Central American countries is increasing dramatically. And there is not sufficient law enforcement or will on the part of the governments of those countries to try to deal with this exponential increase in violence, drug trafficking, the drug cartels, and many children are fleeing from that violence. (…) first of all, we have to provide the best emergency care we can provide. We have children 5 and 6 years old who have come up from Central America. We need to do more to provide border security in southern Mexico. (…) they should be sent back as soon as it can be determined who responsible adults in their families are, because there are concerns whether all of them should be sent back. But I think all of them who can be should be reunited with their families. (…) But we have so to send a clear message, just because your child gets across the border, that doesn’t mean the child gets to stay. So, we don’t want to send a message that is contrary to our laws or will encourage more children to make that dangerous journey. Hillary Clinton (2014)
Over the past six years, President Obama has tried to make children the centerpiece of his efforts to put a gentler face on U.S. immigration policy. Even as his administration has deported a record number of unauthorized immigrants, surpassing two million deportations last year, it has pushed for greater leniency toward undocumented children. After trying and failing to pass the Dream Act legislation, which would offer a path to permanent residency for immigrants who arrived before the age of 16, the president announced an executive action in 2012 to block their deportation. Last November, Obama added another executive action to extend similar protections to undocumented parents. “We’re going to keep focusing enforcement resources on actual threats to our security,” he said in a speech on Nov. 20. “Felons, not families. Criminals, not children. Gang members, not a mom who’s working hard to provide for her kids.” But the president’s new policies apply only to immigrants who have been in the United States for more than five years; they do nothing to address the emerging crisis on the border today. Since the economic collapse of 2008, the number of undocumented immigrants coming from Mexico has plunged, while a surge of violence in Central America has brought a wave of migrants from Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala. According to recent statistics from the Department of Homeland Security, the number of refugees fleeing Central America has doubled in the past year alone — with more than 61,000 “family units” crossing the U.S. border, as well as 51,000 unaccompanied children. For the first time, more people are coming to the United States from those countries than from Mexico, and they are coming not just for opportunity but for survival. The explosion of violence in Central America is often described in the language of war, cartels, extortion and gangs, but none of these capture the chaos overwhelming the region. Four of the five highest murder rates in the world are in Central American nations. The collapse of these countries is among the greatest humanitarian disasters of our time. While criminal organizations like the 18th Street Gang and Mara Salvatrucha exist as street gangs in the United States, in large parts of Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador they are so powerful and pervasive that they have supplanted the government altogether. People who run afoul of these gangs — which routinely demand money on threat of death and sometimes kidnap young boys to serve as soldiers and young girls as sexual slaves — may have no recourse to the law and no better option than to flee. The American immigration system defines a special pathway for refugees. To qualify, most applicants must present themselves to federal authorities, pass a “credible fear interview” to demonstrate a possible basis for asylum and proceed through a “merits hearing” before an immigration judge. Traditionally, those who have completed the first two stages are permitted to live with family and friends in the United States while they await their final hearing, which can be months or years later. If authorities believe an applicant may not appear for that court date, they can require a bond payment as guarantee or place the refugee in a monitoring system that may include a tracking bracelet. In the most extreme cases, a judge may deny bond and keep the refugee in a detention facility until the merits hearing. The rules are somewhat different when children are involved. Under the terms of a 1997 settlement in the case of Flores v. Meese, children who enter the country without their parents must be granted a “general policy favoring release” to the custody of relatives or a foster program. When there is cause to detain a child, he or she must be housed in the least restrictive environment possible, kept away from unrelated adults and provided access to medical care, exercise and adequate education. Whether these protections apply to children traveling with their parents has been a matter of dispute. The Flores settlement refers to “all minors who are detained” by the Immigration and Naturalization Service and its “agents, employees, contractors and/or successors in office.” When the I.N.S. dissolved into the Department of Homeland Security in 2003, its detention program shifted to the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency. Federal judges have ruled that ICE is required to honor the Flores protections for all children in its custody. Even so, in 2005, the administration of George W. Bush decided to deny the Flores protections to refugee children traveling with their parents. Instead of a “general policy favoring release,” the administration began to incarcerate hundreds of those families for months at a time. To house them, officials opened the T. Don Hutto Family Detention Center near Austin, Tex. Within a year, the administration faced a lawsuit over the facility’s conditions. Legal filings describe young children forced to wear prison jumpsuits, to live in dormitory housing, to use toilets exposed to public view and to sleep with the lights on, even while being denied access to appropriate schooling. In a pretrial hearing, a federal judge in Texas blasted the administration for denying these children the protections of the Flores settlement. “The court finds it inexplicable that defendants have spent untold amounts of time, effort and taxpayer dollars to establish the Hutto family-detention program, knowing all the while that Flores is still in effect,” the judge wrote. The Bush administration settled the suit with a promise to improve the conditions at Hutto but continued to deny that children in family detention were entitled to the Flores protections. In 2009, the Obama administration reversed course, abolishing family detention at Hutto and leaving only a small facility in Pennsylvania to house refugee families in exceptional circumstances. For all other refugee families, the administration returned to a policy of release to await trial. Studies have shown that nearly all detainees who are released from custody with some form of monitoring will appear for their court date. But when the number of refugees from Central America spiked last summer, the administration abruptly announced plans to resume family detention. (…) From the beginning, officials were clear that the purpose of the new facility in Artesia was not so much to review asylum petitions as to process deportation orders. “We have already added resources to expedite the removal, without a hearing before an immigration judge, of adults who come from these three countries without children,” the secretary of Homeland Security, Jeh Johnson, told a Senate committee in July. “Then there are adults who brought their children with them. Again, our message to this group is simple: We will send you back.” Elected officials in Artesia say that Johnson made a similar pledge during a visit to the detention camp in July. “He said, ‘As soon as we get them, we’ll ship them back,’ ” a city councilor from Artesia named Jose Luis Aguilar recalled. The mayor of the city, Phillip Burch, added, “His comment to us was that this would be a ‘rapid deportation process.’ Those were his exact words.” (…) “I arrived on July 5 and turned myself in at 2 a.m.,” a 28-year-old mother of two named Ana recalled. In Honduras, Ana ran a small business selling trinkets and served on the P.T.A. of her daughter’s school. “I lived well,” she said — until the gangs began to pound on her door, demanding extortion payments. Within days, they had escalated their threats, approaching Ana brazenly on the street. “One day, coming home from my daughter’s school, they walked up to me and put a gun to my head,” she said. “They told me that if I didn’t give them the money in less than 24 hours, they would kill me.” Ana had already seen friends raped and murdered by the gang, so she packed her belongings that night and began the 1,800-mile journey to the U.S. border with her 7-year-old daughter. Four weeks later, in McAllen, Tex., they surrendered as refugees. Ana and her daughter entered Artesia in mid-July. In October they were still there. Ana’s daughter was sick and losing weight rapidly under the strain of incarceration. Their lawyer, a leader in Chicago’s Mormon Church named Rebecca van Uitert, said that Ana’s daughter became so weak and emaciated that doctors threatened drastic measures. “They were like, ‘You’ve got to force her to eat, and if you don’t, we’re going to put a PICC line in her and force-feed her,’ ” van Uitert said. Ana said that when her daughter heard the doctor say this, “She started to cry and cry.” (…) Many of the volunteers in Artesia tell similar stories about the misery of life in the facility. “I thought I was pretty tough,” said Allegra Love, who spent the previous summer working on the border between Mexico and Guatemala. “I mean, I had seen kids in all manner of suffering, but this was a really different thing. It’s a jail, and the women and children are being led around by guards. There’s this look that the kids have in their eyes. This lackadaisical look. They’re just sitting there, staring off, and they’re wasting away. That was what shocked me most.” The detainees reported sleeping eight to a room, in violation of the Flores settlement, with little exercise or stimulation for the children. Many were under the age of 6 and had been raised on a diet of tortillas, rice and chicken bits. In Artesia, the institutional cafeteria foods were as unfamiliar as the penal atmosphere, and to their parents’ horror, many of the children refused to eat. “Gaunt kids, moms crying, they’re losing hair, up all night,” an attorney named Maria Andrade recalled. Another, Lisa Johnson-Firth, said: “I saw children who were malnourished and were not adapting. One 7-year-old just lay in his mother’s arms while she bottle-fed him.” Mary O’Leary, who made three trips to Artesia last fall, said: “I was trying to talk to one client about her case, and just a few feet away at another table there was this lady with a toddler between 2 and 4 years old, just lying limp. This was a sick kid, and just with this horrible racking cough.” (…) Attorneys for the Obama administration have argued in court, like the Bush administration previously, that the protections guaranteed by the Flores settlement do not apply to children in family detention. “The Flores settlement comes into play with unaccompanied minors,” a lawyer for the Department of Homeland Security named Karen Donoso Stevens insisted to a judge on Aug. 4. “That argument is moot here, because the juvenile is detained — is accompanied and detained — with his mother.” Federal judges have consistently rejected this position. Just as the judge reviewing family detention in 2007 called the denial of Flores protections “inexplicable,” the judge presiding over the Aug. 4 hearing issued a ruling in September that Homeland Security officials in Artesia must honor the Flores Settlement Agreement. “The language of the F.S.A. is unambiguous,” Judge Roxanne Hladylowycz wrote. “The F.S.A. was designed to create a nationwide policy for the detention of all minors, not only those who are unaccompanied.” Olavarria said she was not aware of that ruling and would not comment on whether the Department of Homeland Security believes that the Flores ruling applies to children in family detention today. (…) As the pro bono project in Artesia continued into fall, its attorneys continued to win in court. By mid-November, more than 400 of the detained women and children were free on bond. Then on Nov. 20, the administration suddenly announced plans to transfer the Artesia detainees to the ICE detention camp in Karnes, Tex., where they would fall under a new immigration court district with a new slate of judges. That announcement came at the very moment the president was delivering a live address on the new protections available to established immigrant families. In an email to notify Artesia volunteers about the transfer, an organizer for AILA named Stephen Manning wrote, “The disconnect from the compassionate-ish words of the president and his crushing policies toward these refugees is shocking.” Brown was listening to the speech in her car, while driving to Denver for a rare weekend at home, when her cellphone buzzed with the news that 20 of her clients would be transferred to Texas the next morning. Many of them were close to a bond release; in San Antonio, they might be detained for weeks or months longer. Brown pulled her car to the side of the highway and spent three hours arguing to delay the transfer. Over the next two weeks, officials moved forward with the plan. By mid-December, most of the Artesia detainees were in Karnes (…) One of McPhaul’s colleagues, Judge Gary Burkholder, was averaging a 91.6 percent denial rate for the asylum claims. Some Karnes detainees had been in the facility for nearly six months and could remain there another six. (…) “I agree,” Sischo said. “We should not be spending resources on detaining these families. They should be released. But people don’t understand the law. They think they should be deported because they’re ‘illegals.’ So they’re missing a very big part of the story, which is that they aren’t breaking the law. They’re trying to go through the process that’s laid out in our laws.” Wil S. Hylton (NYT magazine, 2015)
It was the kind of story destined to take a dark turn through the conservative news media and grab President Trump’s attention: A vast horde of migrants was making its way through Mexico toward the United States, and no one was stopping them. “Mysterious group deploys ‘caravan’ of illegal aliens headed for U.S. border,” warned Frontpage Mag, a site run by David Horowitz, a conservative commentator. The Gateway Pundit, a website that was most recently in the news for spreading conspiracies about the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., suggested the real reason the migrants were trying to enter the United States was to collect social welfare benefits. And as the president often does when immigration is at issue, he saw a reason for Americans to be afraid. “Getting more dangerous. ‘Caravans’ coming,” a Twitter post from Mr. Trump read. The story of “the caravan” followed an arc similar to many events — whether real, embellished or entirely imagined — involving refugees and migrants that have roused intense suspicion and outrage on the right. The coverage tends to play on the fears that hiding among mass groups of immigrants are many criminals, vectors of disease and agents of terror. And often the president, who announced his candidacy by blaming Mexico for sending rapists and drug dealers into the United States, acts as an accelerant to the hysteria. The sensationalization of this story and others like it seems to serve a common purpose for Mr. Trump and other immigration hard-liners: to highlight the twin dangers of freely roving migrants — especially those from Muslim countries — and lax immigration laws that grant them easy entry into Western nations. The narrative on the right this week, for example, mostly omitted that many people in the caravan planned to resettle in Mexico, not the United States. And it ignored how many of those who did intend to come here would probably go through the legal process of requesting asylum at a border checkpoint — something miles of new wall and battalions of additional border patrol would not have stopped. (…) The story of the caravan has been similarly exaggerated. And the emotional outpouring from the right has been raw — that was the case on Fox this week when the TV host Tucker Carlson shouted “You hate America!” at an immigrants rights activist after he defended the people marching through Mexico. The facts of the caravan are not as straightforward as Mr. Trump or many conservative pundits have portrayed them. The story initially gained widespread attention after BuzzFeed News reported last week that more than 1,000 Central American migrants, mostly from Honduras, were making their way north toward the United States border. Yet the BuzzFeed article and other coverage pointed out that many in the group were planning to stay in Mexico. That did not stop Mr. Trump from expressing dismay on Tuesday with a situation “where you have thousands of people that decide to just walk into our country, and we don’t have any laws that can protect it.” The use of disinformation in immigration debates is hardly unique to the United States. Misleading crime statistics, speculation about sinister plots to undermine national sovereignty and Russian propaganda have all played a role in stirring up anti-immigrant sentiment in places like Britain, Germany and Hungary. Some of the more fantastical theories have involved a socialist conspiracy to import left-leaning voters and a scheme by the Hungarian-born Jewish philanthropist George Soros to create a borderless Europe. NYT
With the help of a humanitarian group called “Pueblo Sin Fronteras” (people without borders), the 1,000 plus migrants will reach the U.S. border with a list of demands to several governments in Central America, the United States, and Mexico. Here’s what they demanded of Mexico and the United States in a Facebook post:  -That they respect our rights as refugees and our right to dignified work to be able to support our families -That they open the borders to us because we are as much citizens as the people of the countries where we are and/or travel -That deportations, which destroy families, come to an end -No more abuses against us as migrants -Dignity and justice -That the US government not end TPS for those who need it -That the US government stop massive funding for the Mexican government to detain Central American migrants and refugees and to deport them -That these governments respect our rights under international law, including the right to free expression -That the conventions on refugee rights not be empty rhetoric. The Blaze
Au moins 150 migrants centraméricains sont arrivés à Tijuana au Mexique, à la frontière avec les États-Unis. Ils sont décidés à demander l’asile à Washington. Plusieurs centaines de migrants originaires d’Amérique centrale se sont rassemblés dimanche 30 avril à la frontière mexico-américaine au terme d’un mois de traversée du Mexique. Nombre d’entre eux ont décidé de se présenter aux autorités américaines pour déposer des demandes d’asile et devraient être placés en centres de rétention. « Nous espérons que le gouvernement des États-Unis nous ouvrira les portes », a déclaré Reyna Isabel Rodríguez, 52 ans, venu du Salvador avec ses deux petits-enfants. L’ONG Peuple Sans Frontières organise ce type de caravane depuis 2010 pour dénoncer le sort de celles et ceux qui traversent le Mexique en proie à de nombreux dangers, entre des cartels de la drogue qui les kidnappent ou les tuent, et des autorités qui les rançonnent. « Nous voulons dire au président des États-Unis que nous ne sommes pas des criminels, nous ne sommes pas des terroristes, qu’il nous donne la chance de vivre sans peur. Je sais que Dieu va toucher son cœur », a déclaré l’une des organisatrices de la caravane, Irineo Mujica. L’ONG, composée de volontaires, permet notamment aux migrants de rester groupés – lors d’un périple qui se fait à pied, en bus ou en train – afin de se prémunir de tous les dangers qui jalonnent leur chemin. En espagnol, ces caravanes sont d’ailleurs appelées « Via Crucis Migrantes » ou le « Chemin de croix des migrants », en référence aux processions catholiques, particulièrement appréciées en Amérique du Sud, qui mettent en scène la Passion du Christ, ou les derniers événements qui ont précédé et accompagné la mort de Jésus de Nazareth. Cette année, le groupe est parti le 25 mars de Tapachula, à la frontière du Guatemala, avec un groupe de près de 1 200 personnes, à 80 % originaires du Honduras, les autres venant du Guatemala, du Salvador et du Nicaragua, selon Rodrigo Abeja. Dans le groupe, près de 300 enfants âgés de 1 mois à 11 ans, une vingtaine de jeunes homosexuels et environ 400 femmes. Certains se sont ensuite dispersés, préférant rester au Mexique, d’autres choisissant de voyager par leurs propres moyens. En avril, les images de la caravane de migrants se dirigeant vers les États-Unis avaient suscité la colère de Donald Trump et une forte tension entre Washington et Mexico. Le président américain, dont l’un des principaux thèmes de campagne était la construction d’un mur à la frontière avec le Mexique pour lutter contre l’immigration clandestine, avait ordonné le déploiement sur la frontière de troupes de la Garde nationale. Il avait aussi soumis la conclusion d’un nouvel accord de libre-échange en Amérique du Nord à un renforcement des contrôles migratoires par le Mexique, une condition rejetée par le président mexicain Enrique Pena Nieto. France 24 
Il faut noter que les migrants qui veulent demander l’asile se rendent facilement aux agents de patrouille aux frontières. Ce ne sont pas des migrants sans papiers classiques, ils viennent avec autant de documents que possible pour obtenir l’asile politique. Dans ce groupe se trouvaient une vingtaine de femmes et d’enfants. La plupart venaient du Honduras.  (…) J’avais remarqué une mère qui tenait un enfant. Elle m’a dit que sa fille et elle voyageaient depuis un mois, au départ du Honduras. Elle m’a dit que sa fille avait 2 ans, et j’ai pu voir dans ses yeux qu’elle était sur ses gardes, exténuée et qu’elle avait probablement vécu un voyage très difficile. C’est l’une des dernières familles à avoir été embarquée dans le véhicule. Un des officiers a demandé à la mère de déposer son enfant à terre pendant qu’elle était fouillée. Juste à ce moment-là, la petite fille a commencé à pleurer, très fort. J’ai trois enfants moi-même, dont un tout petit, et c’était très difficile à voir, mais j’avais une fenêtre de tir très réduite pour photographier la scène. Dès que la fouille s’est terminée, elle a pu reprendre son enfant dans ses bras et ses pleurs se sont éteints. Moi, j’ai dû m’arrêter, reprendre mes esprits et respirer profondément. J’avais déjà photographié des scènes comme ça à de nombreuses reprises. Mais celle-ci était unique, d’une part à cause des pleurs de cette enfant, mais aussi parce que cette fois, je savais qu’à la prochaine étape de leur voyage, dans ce centre de rétention, elles allaient être séparées. Je doute que ces familles aient eu la moindre idée de ce qui allait leur arriver. Tous voyageaient depuis des semaines, ils ne regardaient pas la télévision et n’avaient aucun moyen d’être au courant de la nouvelle mesure de tolérance zéro et de séparation des familles mise en place par Trump. (…) Cela fait dix ans que je photographie l’immigration à la frontière américaine, toujours avec l’objectif d’humaniser des histoires complexes. Souvent, on parle de l’immigration avec des statistiques, arides et froides. Et je crois que la seule manière que les personnes dans ce pays trouvent des solutions humaines est qu’elles voient les gens comme des êtres humains. Je n’avais jamais imaginé que j’allais un jour mettre un visage sur une politique de séparation des familles, mais c’est le cas aujourd’hui. John Moore
Pourquoi aurait-elle fait subir ça à notre petite fille ? (….) Je pense que c’était irresponsable de sa part de partir avec le bébé dans les bras parce qu’on ne sait pas ce qui aurait pu arriver. Denis Hernandez
Interrogé par le Daily Mail, Denis Varela a indiqué que sa femme voulait expérimenter le rêve américain et trouver un travail au pays de l’Oncle Sam, mais qu’il était opposé à l’idée qu’elle parte avec sa fille : « Elle est partie sans prévenir. Je n’ai pas pu dire « Au revoir » à ma fille et maintenant la seule chose que je peux faire, c’est attendre. » Le couple a aussi trois autres enfants, un fils de 14 ans, et deux filles de 11 et 6 ans. « Les enfants comprennent ce qu’il se passe. Ils sont un peu inquiets mais j’essaye de ne pas trop aborder le sujet. Ils savent que leur mère et leur sœur sont en sécurité. » Il a ajouté qu’il espère que « les droits de sa femme et de sa fille sont respectés, parce qu’elles sont des reines […] Nous avons tous des droits. » Ouest France
Protecting children at the border is complicated because there have, indeed, been instances of fraud. Tens of thousands of migrants arrive there every year, and those with children in tow are often released into the United States more quickly than adults who come alone, because of restrictions on the amount of time that minors can be held in custody. Some migrants have admitted they brought their children not only to remove them from danger in such places as Central America and Africa, but because they believed it would cause the authorities to release them from custody sooner. Others have admitted to posing falsely with children who are not their own, and Border Patrol officials say that such instances of fraud are increasing. (…) [Jessica M. Vaughan, the director of policy studies for the Center for Immigration Studies] said that some migrants were using children as “human shields” in order to get out of immigration custody faster. “It makes no sense at all for the government to just accept these attempts at fraud,” Ms. Vaughan said. “If it appears that the child is being used in this way, it is in the best interest of the child to be kept separately from the parent, for the parent to be prosecuted, because it’s a crime and it’s one that has to be deterred and prosecuted.” NYT
Over the weekend, you may have seen a horrifying story: Almost 1,500 migrant children were missing, and feared to be in the hands of human traffickers. The Trump administration lost track of the children, the story went, after separating them from their parents at the border. The news spread across liberal social media — with the hashtag #Wherearethechildren trending on Twitter — as people demanded immediate action. But it wasn’t true, or at least not the way that many thought. The narrative had combined parts of two real events and wound up with a horror story that was at least partly a myth. The fact that so many Americans readily believed this myth offers a lesson in how partisan polarization colors people’s views on a gut emotional level without many even realizing it. As other articles have explained, the missing children and the Trump administration’s separation of families who are apprehended at the border are two different matters. (…) These “missing” children had actually come to the United States without their parents, been picked up by the Border Patrol and then released to the custody of a parent or guardian. Many probably are not really missing. The figure represents the number of children whose households didn’t answer the phone when the Department of Health and Human Services called to check on them. The unanswered phone calls may warrant further welfare checks, but are not themselves a sign that something nefarious has happened. The Obama administration also detained immigrant families and children, as did other recent administrations. This past weekend, some social media users circulated a photo they said showed children detained as a result of President Trump’s policies, but the image was actually from 2014. (…) Long-running social science surveys have found that since the 1980s, Republicans’ opinions of Democrats and Democrats’ opinions of Republicans have been increasingly negative. At the same time, as Lilliana Mason, a political scientist at the University of Maryland, writes in a new book, partisan identity has become an umbrella for other important identities, including those involving race, religion, geography and even educational background. It has become a tribal identity itself, not merely a matter of policy preferences. So it’s not that liberals didn’t care about immigrant children until Mr. Trump became president, or that they’re only pretending to care now so as to score political points. Rather, with the Trump administration’s making opposition to immigrants a signature issue, the topic has become salient to partisan conflict in a way it wasn’t before. Mr. Trump’s treatment of immigrant families and children, when refracted through the lens of partisan bias, affirms liberals’ perception of being engaged in a broader moral struggle with the right, making it feel like an urgent threat. Mr. Obama’s detaining of immigrant children, by contrast, felt like a matter of abstract moral concern. Identity polarization means “you want to show that you’re a good member of your tribe,” Sean Westwood, a political scientist at Dartmouth College who studies partisan polarization, said in an interview early last year. “You want to show others that Republicans are bad or Democrats are bad, and your tribe is good.” Sharing stories on social media “provides a unique opportunity to publicly declare to the world what your beliefs are and how willing you are to denigrate the opposition and reinforce your own political candidates,” he said. Accurate news can serve that purpose. But fake news has an advantage. It can perfectly capture one side’s villainous archetypes of the other, without regard for pesky facts that might not fit the story line. The narrative that President Trump’s team lost hundreds of children after tearing them away from their parents combines some of the main liberal critiques of the administration: that it is racist, that it is authoritarian and that it is incompetent. The administration’s very real policy of separating families already plays to the first two archetypes. By adding in the missing children, the story manages to incorporate an incompetence angle as well. NYT
Nous ne voulons pas séparer les familles, mais nous ne voulons pas que des familles viennent illégalement. Si vous faites passer un enfant, nous vous poursuivrons. Et cet enfant sera séparé de vous, comme la loi le requiert. Jeff Sessions
Le dilemme est si vous êtes mou, ce que certaines personnes aimeraient que vous soyez, si vous êtes vraiment mou, pathétiquement mou… le pays va être envahi par des millions de gens. Et si vous êtes ferme, vous n’avez pas de coeur. C’est un dilemme difficile. Peut-être que je préfère être ferme, mais c’est un dilemme difficile. Donald Trump
La version originale de cet article a donné une représentation inexacte de ce qui est arrivé à la petite fille après la photo. Elle n’a pas été emmenée en larmes par les patrouilles frontalières ; sa mère l’a récupérée et les deux ont été interpellées ensemble. Time
Time has not responded to a request for comment from The Post, but in a statement sent to media outlets, the magazine said it’s standing by its cover. Washington Post
La photographie du 12 juin de la petite Hondurienne de 2 ans est devenue le symbole le plus visible du débat sur l’immigration en cours aux États-Unis et il y a une raison pour cela. Dans le cadre de la politique appliquée par l’administration, avant son revirement de cette semaine, ceux qui traversaient la frontière illégalement étaient l’objet de poursuites criminelles, qui entraînaient à leur tour la séparation des enfants et des parents. Notre couverture et notre reportage saisissent les enjeux de ce moment. Edward Felsenthal (rédacteur en chef de Time).
The Time cover is an illustration that interprets a wider issue being reported on within the magazine. The photograph I took is a straightforward and an honest image; it shows a brief moment in time of a distressed little girl, whose mother is being searched as they are both taken into custody. I believe this image has raised awareness of the zero tolerance policy of the current administration. Having covered immigration for Getty Images for 10 years, this photograph for me is part of a much larger story. John Moore
Obviously this child never met the president, it’s not misleading at all in that sense. I think that the power of it is in the juxtaposition of the two figures, of the child who quickly came to represent all of the children that we’re talking about, and the president who was making the decisions about their fate. Nancy Gibbs (former editor of Time)
It was well within the parameters of editorial license. This is a caustic, sharp-edged cover. But it’s a caustic, sharp-edged cover about an issue that is deeply emotional that has divided America. Moore’s photos are « iconic » and will be remembered alongside historic images of Emmett Till and the photo of a naked little girl running from a Naplam attack in Vietnam. Bruce Shapiro (Columbia University)
Il existe aux Etats-Unis un grave problème d’immigration illégale. Trump a commencé à prendre des décisions pour le régler. Les entrées clandestines dans le pays par la frontière Sud ont diminué de 70 pour cent. Elles sont encore trop nombreuses. Les immigrants illégaux présents dans le pays ne sont pas tous criminels, mais ils représentent une proportion importante des criminels incarcérés et des membres de gangs violents impliqués, entre autres, dans le trafic de drogue. Jeff Sessions, ministre de la justice inefficace dans d’autres secteurs, est très efficace dans ce secteur. Les Démocrates veulent que l’immigration illégale se poursuive, et s’intensifie, car ils ont besoin d’un électorat constitué d’illégaux fraîchement légalisés pour maintenir à flot la coalition électorale sur laquelle ils s’appuient et garder des chances de victoire ultérieure (minorités ethniques, femmes célibataires, étudiants, professeurs). La diminution de l’immigration clandestine leur pose problème. Les actions de la police de l’immigration (ICE; Immigration Control Enforcement) suscitent leur hostilité, d’où l’existence de villes sanctuaires démocrates et, en Californie, d’un Etat sanctuaire(démocrate, bien sûr). Ce qui se passe depuis quelques jours à la frontière Sud du pays est un coup monté auquel participent le parti démocrate, les grands médias américains, des organisations gauchistes, et le but est de faire pression sur Trump en diabolisant son action. La plupart des photos utilisées datent des années Obama, au cours desquelles le traitement des enfants entrant clandestinement dans le pays était exactement similaire à ce qu’il est aujourd’hui, sans qu’à l’époque les Démocrates disent un seul mot. Les enfants qui pleurent sur des vidéos ont été préparés à être filmés à des fins de propagande et ont appris à dire “daddy”, “mummy”. Le but est effectivement de faire céder Trump. Quelques Républicains à veste réversible ont joint leur voix au chœur. Trump, comme il sait le faire, a agi pour désamorcer le coup monté. On lui reproche de faire ce qui se fait depuis des années (séparer les enfants de leurs parents dès lors que les parents doivent être incarcérés) ? Il vient de décider que les enfants ne seront plus séparés des parents, et qu’ils seront placés ensemble dans des lieux de rétention.  Cela signifie-t-il un recul ? Non. La lutte contre l’immigration clandestine va se poursuivre selon exactement la même ligne. Les parents qui ont violé la loi seront traités comme ils l’étaient auparavant. Les enfants seront-ils dans de meilleures conditions ? Non. Ils ne seront pas dans des conditions plus mauvaises non plus. Décrire les lieux où ils étaient placés jusque là comme des camps de concentration est une honte et une insulte à ceux qui ont été placés dans de réels camps de concentration (certains Démocrates un peu plus répugnants que d’autres sont allés jusqu’à faire des comparaisons avec Auschwitz !) : les enfants sont placés dans ce qui est comparable à des auberges pour colonies de vacances. Un enfant clandestin coûte au contribuable américain à ce jour 35.000 dollars en moyenne annuelle. Désamorcer le coup monté ne réglera pas le problème d’ensemble. Des femmes viennent accoucher aux Etats-Unis pour que le bébé ait la nationalité américaine et puisse demander deux décennies plus tard un rapprochement de famille. Des gens font passer leurs enfants par des passeurs en espérant que l’enfant sera régularisé et pourra lui aussi demander un rapprochement de famille. Des parents paient leur passage aux Etats Unis en transportant de la drogue et doivent être jugés pour cela (le tarif des passeurs si on veut passer sans drogue est  de 10.000 dollars par personne). S’ils sont envoyés en prison, ils n’y seront pas envoyés avec leurs enfants.  Quand des trafiquants de drogue sont envoyés en prison, aux Etats-Unis ou ailleurs, ils ne vont pas en prison en famille, et si quelqu’un suggérait que leur famille devait les suivre en prison, parce que ce serait plus “humain”, les Démocrates seraient les premiers à hurler. Les Etats-Unis, comme tout pays développé, ne peuvent laisser entrer tous ceux qui veulent entrer en laissant leurs frontières ouvertes. Un pays a le droit de gérer l’immigration comme il l’entend et comme l’entend sa population, et il le doit, s’il ne veut pas être submergé par une population qui ne s’intègre pas et peut le faire glisser vers le chaos. Les pays européens sont confrontés au même problème que les Etats-Unis, d’une manière plus aiguë puisqu’en Europe s’ajoute le paramètre “islam”. La haine de la civilisation occidentale imprègne la gauche européenne, qui veut la dissolution des peuples européens. Une même haine imprègne la gauche américaine, qui veut la dissolution du peuple américain. Les grandes villes de l’Etat sanctuaire de Californie sont déjà méconnaissables, submergées par des sans abris étrangers (pas un seul pont de Los Angeles qui n’abrite désormais un petit bidonville, et un quart du centre ville est une véritable cour des miracles, à San Francisco ce n’est pas mieux). Il n’est pas du tout certain que le coup monte servira les Démocrates lors des élections de mi mandat. Nombre d’Américains ne veulent pas la dissolution du peuple américain. Guy Millière
Sur le plateau de la NBCNews, l’ancien président du Comité national du parti Républicain, Michael Steele, vient de comparer les centres dans lesquels sont accueillis les enfants de clandestins aux Etats-Unis à des camps de concentration. Il s’adresse alors aux Américains : « Demain, ce pourrait être vos enfants ». La scène résume à elle seule la folie qui s’est emparée de la sphère politico-médiatique après que Donald Trump a ordonné aux autorités gardant la frontière mexicaine d’appliquer la loi et de séparer les parents de leurs enfants entrés illégalement aux Etats-Unis. Passons sur la comparaison. Aussi indécente que manipulatrice : ces enfants ne sont pas enfermés en attendant la mort. Quant à la mise en garde, elle est grotesque. Aucun Américain ne se verra subitement séparé de ses enfants. A moins d’avoir commis un crime ou un délit puni de prison. Quand un citoyen lambda est condamné à une peine de prison, personne ne s’offusque jamais de cette séparation … Jusqu’à ce que cela touche des clandestins. Leur particularité étant de n’avoir aucun logement dans le pays dont ils viennent de violer la frontière, leurs enfants sont donc pris en charge dans des camps, en attendant que la situation des adultes soit examinée. Aux frais des Américains. (…) Reste que les parents, prévenus de la loi que nul n’est censé ignorer, sont les premiers responsables du sort qui menace leurs enfants, en choisissant de la violer. Ce sont eux qui font payer leur délit à leur propre progéniture. Les clandestins sont des adultes tout aussi responsables que n’importe quel autre adulte : leur retirer leur capacité de décision, leur liberté et donc leur responsabilité n’est pas exactement les respecter. Mais (…) remontons à 2014, époque bénie du président Barack Obama. Cette année-là, 47.017 mineurs sont appréhendés, alors qu’ils traversent la frontière… seuls. Des enfants, envoyés par leurs parents qui n’ont apparemment pas eu peur de s’en séparer pour leur faire prendre des risques inconsidérés. Comment est-ce possible ? L’administration américaine d’alors avait affirmé que les étrangers envoyaient leurs enfants seuls, persuadés qu’ils seraient ainsi mieux traités que des adultes. Le New York Times avait donné raison à l’administration : « alors que l’administration Obama a évolué vers une attitude plus agressive d’expulsion des adultes, elle a, dans les faits, expulsé beaucoup moins d’enfants que par le passé. » Les clandestins le savent, tout comme ils connaissent aujourd’hui les risques qui pèsent sur leurs propres enfants. On apprend également qu’à l’époque, les enfants mexicains sont directement reconduits de l’autre côté de la frontière et que les autres sont « pris en charge par le département de la Santé et des Services humanitaires qui les place dans des centres temporaires en attendant que leur processus d’expulsion soit lancé. » En 2013, 80 centres accueillaient 25 000 enfants non accompagnés. Et ce, dans les mêmes conditions aujourd’hui dénoncées. Si similaires d’ailleurs que certains ont voulu critiquer la politique migratoire de Donald Trump en usant de photos datant de… 2014 ! Rien n’a changé. A un détail près. Les enfants dont on parle en ce mois de juin 2018 sont parfois accompagnés d’adultes. Comme sous l’administration Obama, les enfants sont séparés de ces adultes lorsqu’il y a un doute sur le lien réel de parenté, en cas de suspicion de trafic de mineurs ou par manque de place dans les centres de rétention pour les familles. Restent les enfants effectivement accompagnés de leurs parents et malgré tout séparés de ces derniers qui partent en prison. Chaque mois, 50.000 clandestins entrent aux Etats-Unis, parmi lesquels 15% de familles. Une fois arrêtés, les clandestins sont pénalement poursuivis avant toute demande d’asile. (…) Mais il a suffi de quelques images, publiées en même temps que la sortie du très attendu rapport sur la possible partialité du FBI lors des dernières élections présidentielles américaines, pour que l’opinion politico-médiatique hurle au scandale. Jusqu’à la première dame du pays, Mélania Trump, qui a confié « détester » voir les clandestins séparés de leurs enfants. Le Président lui-même a fini par douter publiquement : «Le dilemme est si vous êtes mou, ce que certaines personnes aimeraient que vous soyez, si vous êtes vraiment mou, pathétiquement mou… le pays va être envahi par des millions de gens. Et si vous êtes ferme, vous n’avez pas de coeur. C’est un dilemme difficile. Peut-être que je préfère être ferme, mais c’est un dilemme difficile.» Donald Trump a subi l’indignation générale (à moins d’en profiter), au point de montrer au monde que même lui avait du cœur en annonçant la signature d’un décret mettant fin à cette séparation forcée. Tout le monde s’est félicité du résultat de la mobilisation : enfin, les enfants vont pouvoir rejoindre leurs parents en prison ! Quelle victoire… Charlotte d’Ornellas

Attention: une manipulation peut en cacher beaucoup d’autres !

Au lendemain de la révélation que la petite Hondurienne de deux ans dont les larmes avaient fait le tour du monde comme symbole de la séparation des familles de migrants aux Etats-Unis …

N’avait en fait jamais été séparée de sa mère, comme a bien dû le reconnaitre – problème de « mauvaise formulation », s’il vous plait  ! – le célèbre « Time magazine » lui-même qui en avait fait sa couverture

Ayant même, selon les dires du père resté seul avec leurs trois autres enfants, été emmenée à son insu par sa mère après une première tentative il y a cinq ans non de fuir la violence de son Honduras natal comme il avait été dit mais de « réaliser son rêve américain »…

Et sans compter la fausse attribution à l’Administration Trump de photos d’enfants détenus datant de 2014 et donc, comme d’ailleurs la pratique elle-même (mesure de protection des enfants – faut-il le rappeler ? – que, sauf en Corée du nord, l’on n’emprisonne normalement pas avec leur parents délinquants), de l’Administration Obama qui l’avait précédée …

Comment ne pas repenser …

Au-delà de la véritable situation de chaos, y compris par le simple effet de leur nombre dans les centres de rétention, que fuient et subissent depuis au moins dix ans nombre de demandeurs d’asile …

Des enfants boucliers humains du Hamas au petit Mohammed ou au petit Aylan ou même tout dernièrement à la petite Leila de Gaza …

A non seulement, dévoyant et détournant ce singulier souci des plus faibles qui fait la singularité de l’Occident judéo-chrétien, l’irresponsabilité voire de l‘intention clairement criminelle de tous ces parents, appuyés par militants et ONG sansfrontieristes, qui exploitent ainsi la misère de leurs enfants …

Mais aussi à la lourde responsabilité de médias qui, entre deux « mauvaises formulations » ou manipulations, leur servent de caisse de résonance ou même les encouragent …

Et qui aujourd’hui n’ont que le mot « fake news » à la bouche quand il s’agit de qualifier les dires du président Trump ou des rares médias qui le défendent encore ?

Charlotte d’Ornellas

Valeurs actuelles

21 juin 2018

Immigration. Pendant plusieurs jours, les médias du monde entier ont fait tourner en boucle des images d’enfants clandestins séparés de leurs parents à la frontière mexicano-américaine. Au point d’empêcher toute possibilité de réflexion.

Sur le plateau de la NBCNews, l’ancien président du Comité national du parti Républicain, Michael Steele, vient de comparer les centres dans lesquels sont accueillis les enfants de clandestins aux Etats-Unis à des camps de concentration. Il s’adresse alors aux Américains : « Demain, ce pourrait être vos enfants ».

La scène résume à elle seule la folie qui s’est emparée de la sphère politico-médiatique après que Donald Trump a ordonné aux autorités gardant la frontière mexicaine d’appliquer la loi et de séparer les parents de leurs enfants entrés illégalement aux Etats-Unis. Passons sur la comparaison. Aussi indécente que manipulatrice : ces enfants ne sont pas enfermés en attendant la mort. Quant à la mise en garde, elle est grotesque. Aucun américain ne se verra subitement séparé de ses enfants. A moins d’avoir commis un crime ou un délit puni de prison.

Quand un citoyen lambda est condamné à une peine de prison, personne ne s’offusque jamais de cette séparation … Jusqu’à ce que cela touche des clandestins. Leur particularité étant de n’avoir aucun logement dans le pays dont ils viennent de violer la frontière, leurs enfants sont donc pris en charge dans des camps, en attendant que la situation des adultes soit examinée. Aux frais des Américains.

Parce qu’un rappel n’est pas inutile dans le débat : franchir illégalement la frontière d’un pays est une violation de la loi. Un délit, puni d’emprisonnement aux Etats-Unis. Avec sa raison et non ses bons sentiments irrationnels, l’homme politique interrogé aurait donc pu être plus juste : si vous commettez un crime ou un délit passible de prison, vous aussi pourriez être séparés de vos enfants.

Reste que les parents, prévenus de la loi que nul n’est censé ignorer, sont les premiers responsables du sort qui menace leurs enfants, en choisissant de la violer. Ce sont eux qui font payer leur délit à leur propre progéniture. Les clandestins sont des adultes tout aussi responsables que n’importe quel autre adulte : leur retirer leur capacité de décision, leur liberté et donc leur responsabilité n’est pas exactement les respecter.

Certains ont voulu critiquer la politique migratoire de Donald Trump en usant de photos datant de… 2014

Mais penchons-nous plus précisément sur ce qui se passe à la frontière mexico-américaine. Et plutôt que de regarder la situation actuelle, qui ne saurait être analysée de manière raisonnable maintenant que Trump préside les Etats-Unis, remontons à 2014, époque bénie du président Barack Obama. Cette année-là, 47.017 mineurs sont appréhendés, alors qu’ils traversent la frontière… seuls.

Des enfants, envoyés par leurs parents qui n’ont apparemment pas eu peur de s’en séparer pour leur faire prendre des risques inconsidérés. Comment est-ce possible ? L’administration américaine d’alors avait affirmé que les étrangers envoyaient leurs enfants seuls, persuadés qu’ils seraient ainsi mieux traités que des adultes. Le New York Times avait donné raison à l’administration : « alors que l’administration Obama a évolué vers une attitude plus agressive d’expulsion des adultes, elle a, dans les faits, expulsé beaucoup moins d’enfants que par le passé. » 

Les clandestins le savent, tout comme ils connaissent aujourd’hui les risques qui pèsent sur leurs propres enfants. On apprend également qu’à l’époque, les enfants mexicains sont directement reconduits de l’autre côté de la frontière et que les autres sont « pris en charge par le département de la Santé et des Services humanitaires qui les place dans des centres temporaires en attendant que leur processus d’expulsion soit lancé. » En 2013, 80 centres accueillaient 25 000 enfants non accompagnés. Et ce, dans les mêmes conditions aujourd’hui dénoncées. Si similaires d’ailleurs que certains ont voulu critiquer la politique migratoire de Donald Trump en usant de photos datant de… 2014 !

Rien n’a changé. A un détail près. Les enfants dont on parle en ce mois de juin 2018 sont parfois accompagnés d’adultes. Comme sous l’administration Obama, les enfants sont séparés de ces adultes lorsqu’il y a un doute sur le lien réel de parenté, en cas de suspicion de trafic de mineurs ou par manque de place dans les centres de rétention pour les familles.

Restent les enfants effectivement accompagnés de leurs parents et malgré tout séparés de ces derniers qui partent en prison. Chaque mois, 50.000 clandestins entrent aux Etats-Unis, parmi lesquels 15% de familles. Une fois arrêtés, les clandestins sont pénalement poursuivis avant toute demande d’asile. Or Trump a été élu pour une tolérance zéro : la loi est donc strictement appliquée. Cette même loi américaine ne permet pas que les enfants puissent suivre leurs parents lorsque ces derniers sont poursuivis pénalement. La séparation était donc une conséquence logique, même très pénible, du choix des Américains.

«Le dilemme est si vous êtes mou, le pays va être envahi par des millions de gens. Et si vous êtes ferme, vous n’avez pas de coeur» 

C’est d’ailleurs ce qu’a immédiatement répondu le ministre américain de la justice Jeff Session : « Nous ne voulons pas séparer les familles, mais nous ne voulons pas que des familles viennent illégalement. Si vous faites passer un enfant, nous vous poursuivrons. Et cet enfant sera séparé de vous, comme la loi le requiert ». 

Mais il a suffi de quelques images, publiées en même temps que la sortie du très attendu rapport sur la possible partialité du FBI lors des dernières élections présidentielles américaines, pour que l’opinion politico-médiatique hurle au scandale. Jusqu’à la première dame du pays, Mélania Trump, qui a confié « détester » voir les clandestins séparés de leurs enfants.
Le Président lui-même a fini  par douter publiquement : «Le dilemme est si vous êtes mou, ce que certaines personnes aimeraient que vous soyez, si vous êtes vraiment mou, pathétiquement mou… le pays va être envahi par des millions de gens. Et si vous êtes ferme, vous n’avez pas de coeur. C’est un dilemme difficile. Peut-être que je préfère être ferme, mais c’est un dilemme difficile.»

Donald Trump a subi l’indignation générale (à moins d’en profiter), au point de montrer au monde que même lui avait du cœur en annonçant la signature d’un décret mettant fin à cette séparation forcée. Tout le monde s’est félicité du résultat de la mobilisation : enfin, les enfants vont pouvoir rejoindre leurs parents en prison ! Quelle victoire… Mais Donald Trump a insisté sur sa détermination à stopper l’immigration illégale en même temps, appelant de ses vœux un vote du Congrès pour « changer les lois ». Depuis son accession à la présidence, notamment due à un discours extrêmement ferme sur l’immigration, Donald Trump est empêché par les démocrates, comme par son administration : ils bloquent son projet de mur à la frontière, l’immigration fondée sur le mérite ainsi que tous les ajustements proposés pour les forces de l’ordre.

La situation finit par le servir, et il ne pouvait l’ignorer : il vient de faire une concession, il appelle maintenant le Congrès à voter contre les « anciennes lois horribles » en adoptant la sienne. Nul ne connaît la suite. Mais pour Donald Trump, le défi est immense. S’il n’a pas été élu sur la seule promesse d’une tolérance zéro vis-à-vis de l’immigration illégale, le sujet reste l’une des préoccupations majeures de ses électeurs.

Voir aussi:

Yanela, symbole des enfants séparés dans « Time magazine »… tout n’était pas tout à fait vrai

DÉCRYPTAGE – Son visage, en larmes, s’affiche en une du célèbre « Time Magazine » face au président Donald Trump dans un photomontage saisissant. Symbole de la politique migratoire qui a éloigné des milliers d’enfants de leurs parents, la petite Yanela Hernandez n’aurait en réalité jamais été séparée de sa mère. Le sort de la maman et de la fille, originaires du Honduras, reste néanmoins inconnu. Explications.

C’est une image qui a fait le tour du monde en quelques heures. Pour illustrer sa dernière Une, consacrée à la polémique autour de la politique migratoire de Donald Trump, le célèbre « Time Magazine » a réalisé un photomontage sur fond rouge qui met en scène une fillette en pleurs, sous les yeux du président, un sourire en coin. Le titre ? « Welcome to America » (Bienvenue en Amérique).

Sur le site de l’hebdomadaire, le photographe de l’agence Getty John Moore expliquait mercredi les coulisses du cliché, pris le 11 juin dernier à la frontière entre le Texas et le Mexique. Il a été réalisé au moment où les policiers étaient en train de fouiller la mère de la petite fille, âgée de 2 ans. « Dès qu’ils ont eu terminé, elles ont été mises dans un camion (…) Tout ce que je voulais, c’est la prendre avec moi. Mais je ne pouvais pas. »

Le photographe laisse également entendre que la mère et l’enfant, originaires du Honduras, ont pu être séparées par la suite, comme l’ont été au moins 23.000 enfants sans papiers depuis avril dernier, dans le cadre de politique de tolérance zéro menée par l’administration en matière migratoire. Face au tollé international, le président américain a annoncé mettre fin à ces séparations, expliquant également avoir été influencé par son épouse Melania.

Quid de la petite fille en une de « Time » ? Depuis la parution du magazine, de nombreux internautes ont relayé un appel pour aider à la retrouver, soutenus par de nombreuses personnalités comme les écrivains Don Winslow et Stephen King. Interrogé mercredi par le site américain Buzzfeed, un porte-parole de la police des frontière affirmait toutefois que mère et fille n’avait pas été séparées, sans donner plus de précision.

C’est finalement le père de la fillette qui a donné de ses nouvelles, ce vendredi. Dans un entretien téléphonique accordé au Daily Mail depuis le Honduras, Denis Javier Valera Hernandez, 32 ans, révèle que l’enfant s’appelle Yanela et qu’elle n’aurait pas été séparée de sa mère, Sandra. « Vous imaginez ce que j’ai ressenti lorsque j’ai vu la photo de ma fille. J’en ai eu le coeur brisé. C’est difficile pour un père de voir ça. Mais je sais maintenant qu’elles sont hors de danger. Elles sont plus en sécurité que lorsqu’elles ont fait le voyage vers la frontière. »

Denis Hernandez explique que sa femme et sa fille ont quitté leur pays en bateau, le 3 juin dernier, depuis le port de Puerto Cortes, sans le prévenir, afin de rejoindre des membres de sa famille déjà installés aux Etats-Unis. Pour effectuer le voyage, la mère aurait payé 6.000 dollars à un passeur. Depuis leur arrestation, Il affirme qu’elles sont détenues ensemble dans la ville frontalière de McAllen, au Texas, dans l’attente de l’examen d’un dossier de demande d’asile que la mère a déposé. S’il est refusé, elles seront contraintes de rentrer au Honduras.

« J’attends de voir ce qui va leur arriver »,  réagit le père dans un autre entretien accordé à l’agence de Reuters, qui a eu confirmation des faits par Nelly Jerez, la ministre des Affaires étrangères du Honduras. Ni les autorités américaines, ni « Time Magazine », n’ont commenté ces informations pour le moment. Et certains internautes continuent de les mettre en doute, tant que Yanela et sa mère n’auront pas été filmées par les caméras de télévision…

Quoi qu’il en soit, cet imbroglio vient mettre en lumière la difficulté de réunir les familles, dans la foulée de la décision  spectaculaire de la Maison Blanche. D’après Jodi Goodwin, avocate spécialisée dans l’immigration au Texas,  l’organisme ayant pris en charge les enfants ne dispose pas d’un système pour se synchroniser avec les autorités migratoires qui détiennent les parents et assurer ainsi une fluidité des informations.

« Lorsque je parle avec les parents, ils ont le regard fixé dans le vide parce qu’ils ne peuvent tout simplement pas comprendre, ils ne peuvent accepter, ils ne peuvent croire qu’ils ignorent où se trouvent leurs enfants et que le gouvernement américain les leur a retirés », a-t-elle expliqué à l’AFP. Un discours partagé dans les médias par de nombreuses ONG pour qui le revirement de Donald Trump n’est qu’une étape.

Rappelons que le décret, signé par le président américain devant les caméras, stipule que des poursuites pénales continueront à être engagées contre ceux qui traversent la frontière illégalement. Mais que parents et enfants seront détenus ensemble dans l’attente de l’examen de leur dossier. La petite Yanela et sa mère bénéficieront-elles de la clémence de la Maison Blanche ?

Voir de même:

La fillette en larmes sur la couverture du « Time » n’avait pas été séparée de sa mère
La petite fille éplorée lors de l’arrestation de sa mère hondurienne à la frontière n’a pas été séparée d’elle.
Delphine Bernard-Bruls
Le Monde
22.06.2018

Sur sa dernière couverture, le magazine américain Time a réutilisé une photographie déjà célèbre montrant une fillette en larmes alors que sa mère est arrêtée par la police à la frontière entre les Etats-Unis et le Mexique. Placée face au président américain, Donald Trump, et à l’expression « Bienvenue en Amérique », la photo devait illustrer la politique migratoire de « tolérance zéro » qui a mené à plus de 2 000 séparations entre parents et enfants clandestins. Sauf que, contrairement à ce que de nombreux observateurs ont laissé penser, la mère et la fille n’ont pas été séparées à leur arrivée à McAllen, au Texas.

Le photographe de Getty Images, John Moore, savait que la fillette au gilet rose et sa mère arrivaient du Honduras, rien de plus. S’il ignorait que son cliché illustrerait le mouvement d’indignation contre la politique migratoire de M. Trump – contre laquelle ce dernier a finalement signé un décret le 20 juin – il ne savait pas plus que mère et fille n’avaient pas été séparées mais internées ensemble. Dans le Time, M. Moore a expliqué avoir photographié la mère et la fille dans la nuit du 12 au 13 juin alors qu’elles achevaient un mois de marche en direction des Etats-Unis.
Mise à jour tardive

Interrogé sur CNN, le photographe a souligné en début de semaine ne pas avoir été témoin d’une quelconque séparation, mais a rapporté que mère et fille « ont été envoyées vers un centre où elles ont peut-être été séparées », comme quelque 2 000 familles au cours de ces deux derniers mois. Le Time a lui-même fait l’erreur : après avoir d’abord affirmé le 19 juin que mère et fille avaient été séparées, le magazine a ajouté une mise à jour au bas de son article.

« La version originale de cet article a fait une fausse affirmation quant au sort de la petite fille après la photographie. Elle n’a pas été emmenée en larmes par les patrouilles frontalières ; sa mère l’a récupérée et les deux ont été interpellées ensemble. »

A des milliers de kilomètres de là, au Honduras, Denis Javier Varela Hernandez a reconnu la bambine en larmes figurant sur la photo devenue virale, et assuré qu’il s’agissait de sa fille, qu’il n’avait pas vue depuis plusieurs semaines. Il a d’abord affirmé cela, mardi sur la chaîne de télévision hispanophone Univision : « Cette photo… dès que je l’ai vue j’ai su que c’était ma fille. » Il a répété cette affirmation au quotidien britannique Daily Mail, précisant que sa compagne ne l’avait pas mis au courant de ses projets de migration vers les Etats-Unis. Sans nouvelles d’elle depuis son départ, il a appris la semaine dernière qu’elle avait été interpellée à son arrivée au Texas, mais internée avec sa fille.

D’autres sources sont venues corroborer les propos du père, resté au Honduras : « La mère et la fille n’ont pas été séparées », a déclaré une porte-parole des autorités douanières et frontalières au Daily Beast. Côté hondurien, la ministre adjointe des relations internationales, Nelly Jerez, a confirmé le récit du père auprès de l’agence de presse Reuters. Optimiste, ce dernier a estimé que « si elles sont déportées, ça ne fait rien, tant qu’ils ne laissent pas l’enfant sans sa mère ».

Voir de plus:

Que devient la fillette qui a ému l’Amérique ?

Valentin Davodeau

Ouest France

22 juin 2018

La photo de cette enfant de 2 ans en pleurs, arrêtée à la frontière entre le Mexique et les États-Unis avec sa mère, avait fait le tour des médias américains et internationaux. Selon le père de la fillette, elles seraient toutes les deux détenues actuellement dans un centre au Texas.

« Elles sont détenues dans un établissement du Texas mais elles vont bien », a déclaré Denis Javier Varela Hernandez, père de la petite Yanela, 2 ans, et mari de Sandra Sanchez, 32 ans. Interrogé par différents médias, cet homme de 32 ans vivant à Puerto Cortes au Honduras dit avoir reconnu sa fille sur cette photo qui a fait le tour du monde. « Mon cœur était en miette quand j’ai vu ma petite fille sur cette image », a-t-il expliqué à Univision,

La mère et sa fille n’ont pas été séparées

Denis Varela a précisé que sa femme et sa fille n’ont pas été séparées quand elles ont été interceptées le 12 juin par la patrouille des frontières, à proximité de la ville d’Hidalgo, au Texas. Depuis le 5 mai, plus de 2 300 enfants ont été écartés de leurs parents alors que ces familles tentaient de passer la frontière entre le Mexique et les États-Unis.

Yanela et sa mère se trouveraient actuellement dans un centre de rétention à Dilley, au sud du « Lone Star State ». Parties du Honduras le 3 juin, Sandra Sanchez et Yanela ont parcouru près de 2 900 kilomètres pour arriver jusqu’aux États-Unis.

Le rêve américain

Interrogé par le Daily Mail, Denis Varela a indiqué que sa femme voulait expérimenter le rêve américain et trouver un travail au pays de l’Oncle Sam, mais qu’il était opposé à l’idée qu’elle parte avec sa fille : « Elle est partie sans prévenir. Je n’ai pas pu dire « Au revoir » à ma fille et maintenant la seule chose que je peux faire, c’est attendre. »

Le couple a aussi trois autres enfants, un fils de 14 ans, et deux filles de 11 et 6 ans. « Les enfants comprennent ce qu’il se passe. Ils sont un peu inquiets mais j’essaye de ne pas trop aborder le sujet. Ils savent que leur mère et leur sœur sont en sécurité. » Il a ajouté qu’il espère que « les droits de sa femme et de sa fille sont respectés, parce qu’elles sont des reines […] Nous avons tous des droits. »

Voir encore:

Cette photo bouleverse le monde entier et illustre les effets de la politique de « tolérance zéro » revendiquée par Donald Trump sur la politique de séparation des familles pour lutter contre l’immigration illégale.

Une petite fille en pleurs, vêtue d’un tee-shirt rose et de chaussures assorties. Du haut de ses 2 ans, elle regarde avec effroi un garde-frontière qui vient d’arrêter sa mère, une immigrée hondurienne qui tentait de passer la frontière entre les États-Unis et le Mexique. La photo a été prise le 12 juin et a, depuis, fait le tour du monde. Elle donne un visage aux 2 000 enfants séparés de leurs parents depuis que l’administration de Donald Trump a abruptement décrété début mai une politique de « tolérance zéro », sous la houlette de l’ultraconservateur ministre de la Justice, Jeff Sessions.

L’auteur de cette image, John Moore, s’efforce depuis dix ans d’illustrer l’immigration et ses souffrances. Mais cette photo restera unique à ses yeux. Ce correspondant spécial de Getty Images, titulaire du prix Pulitzer et auteur du livre de photos Undocumented (« Clandestin » en français), répond aux questions de franceinfo et nous raconte l’émotion de cette scène.

Franceinfo : Dans quelles circonstances avez-vous photographié cette famille ? 

John Moore : J’étais à McAllen, dans la vallée du Rio Grande, dans le sud du Texas, près de la frontière avec le Mexique. Je suivais les patrouilles aux frontières pendant leurs opérations. Cette nuit-là, un groupe de migrants a atteint les États-Unis. Ils ont été arrêtés et réunis au bord d’une route en terre par les patrouilles. Il faut noter que les migrants qui veulent demander l’asile se rendent facilement aux agents de patrouille aux frontières. Ce ne sont pas des migrants sans papiers classiques, ils viennent avec autant de documents que possible pour obtenir l’asile politique. Dans ce groupe se trouvaient une vingtaine de femmes et d’enfants. La plupart venaient du Honduras. Tous ces migrants ont dû se débarrasser de leurs effets personnels, ils ont dû se défaire de leurs sacs, de leurs bijoux et même des lacets de leurs chaussures. Il ne leur restait plus que leurs vêtements. Ils ont ensuite été fouillés avant d’être embarqués dans un van qui allait les emmener dans un centre de rétention.

Pourquoi la petite fille pleure-t-elle sur votre photo ? 

J’avais remarqué une mère qui tenait un enfant. Elle m’a dit que sa fille et elle voyageaient depuis un mois, au départ du Honduras. Elle m’a dit que sa fille avait 2 ans, et j’ai pu voir dans ses yeux qu’elle était sur ses gardes, exténuée et qu’elle avait probablement vécu un voyage très difficile. C’est l’une des dernières familles à avoir été embarquée dans le véhicule. Un des officiers a demandé à la mère de déposer son enfant à terre pendant qu’elle était fouillée.

Juste à ce moment-là, la petite fille a commencé à pleurer, très fort. J’ai trois enfants moi-même, dont un tout petit, et c’était très difficile à voir, mais j’avais une fenêtre de tir très réduite pour photographier la scène. Dès que la fouille s’est terminée, elle a pu reprendre son enfant dans ses bras et ses pleurs se sont éteints. Moi, j’ai dû m’arrêter, reprendre mes esprits et respirer profondément.

Comment avez-vous vécu la scène ? 

J’avais déjà photographié des scènes comme ça à de nombreuses reprises. Mais celle-ci était unique, d’une part à cause des pleurs de cette enfant, mais aussi parce que cette fois, je savais qu’à la prochaine étape de leur voyage, dans ce centre de rétention, elles allaient être séparées. Je doute que ces familles aient eu la moindre idée de ce qui allait leur arriver. Tous voyageaient depuis des semaines, ils ne regardaient pas la télévision et n’avaient aucun moyen d’être au courant de la nouvelle mesure de tolérance zéro et de séparation des familles mise en place par Trump.

Même maintenant, quand je regarde ces photos, cela m’attriste toujours, alors que je les ai maintenant vues de nombreuses fois. Cela fait dix ans que je photographie l’immigration à la frontière américaine, toujours avec l’objectif d’humaniser des histoires complexes. Souvent, on parle de l’immigration avec des statistiques, arides et froides. Et je crois que la seule manière que les personnes dans ce pays trouvent des solutions humaines est qu’elles voient les gens comme des êtres humains. Je n’avais jamais imaginé que j’allais un jour mettre un visage sur une politique de séparation des familles, mais c’est le cas aujourd’hui.

Je suis actuellement de retour chez moi, dans le Connecticut. Je suis très heureux d’être à la maison, avec mes enfants, pendant un moment. Ma dernière semaine de reportage m’a rappelé que nous ne pouvons jamais prendre la présence de nos êtres aimés pour acquise.

Voir aussi:

The crying Honduran girl on the cover of Time was not separated from her mother

The widely shared photo of the little girl crying as a U.S. Border Patrol agent patted down her mother became a symbol of the families pulled apart by the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” policy at the border, even landing on the new cover of Time magazine.

But the girl’s father told The Washington Post on Thursday night that his child and her mother were not separated, and a U.S. Customs and Border Protection spokesman confirmed that the family was not separated while in the agency’s custody. In an interview with CBS News, Border Patrol agent Carlos Ruiz, who was among the first to encounter the mother and her daughter at the border in Texas, said the image had been used to symbolize a policy but “that was not the case in this picture.”

Ruiz, who was not available for an interview Friday, said agents asked the mother, Sandra Sanchez, to put down her daughter, nearly 2-year-old Yanela, so they could search her. Agents patted down the mother for less than two minutes, and she immediately picked up her daughter, who then stopped crying.

“I personally went up to the mother and asked her, ‘Are you doing okay? Is the kid okay?’ and she said, ‘Yes. She’s tired and thirsty. It’s 11 o’clock at night,” Ruiz told CBS News.

The revelation has prompted a round of media criticism from the White House and other conservatives.

“It’s shameful that dems and the media exploited this photo of a little girl to push their agenda,” White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders tweeted Friday. “She was not separated from her mom. The separation here is from the facts.”

The heart-wrenching image, captured by award-winning Getty Images photographer John Moore, was spread across the front pages of international newspapers. It was used to promote a Facebook fundraiser that has collected more than $18 million to help reunite separated families.

And on Thursday, hours before the little girl’s father spoke out, Time magazine released its July 2 cover using the child’s image — without the mother — in a photo illustration that shows her looking up at President Trump, who is seen towering above her.

“Welcome to America,” the cover reads.

Time has not responded to a request for comment from The Post, but in a statement sent to media outlets, the magazine said it’s standing by its cover.

Time also has added a correction to an online article and gallery that ran Tuesday, before the cover was released: “The original version of this story misstated what happened to the girl in the photo after she [was] taken from the scene. The girl was not carried away screaming by U.S. Border Patrol agents; her mother picked her up and the two were taken away together.”

Moore, the photographer, told The Post in an email that Time corrected the story after he made a request minutes after it was published. He said that the picture “is a straightforward and honest image” showing a “distressed little girl” whose mother was being searched by border officials.

“I believe this image has raised awareness to the zero-tolerance policy of this administration. Having covered immigration for Getty Images for 10 years, this photograph for me is part of a much larger story,” Moore said, adding later: “The image showed a moment in time at the border, but the emotion in the little girl’s distress has ignited a response. As a photojournalist, my job is to inform and report what is happening, but I also think it is important to humanize an issue that is often reported in statistics.”

Moore told The Post’s Avi Selk that he ran into the mother and toddler in McAllen, Tex., on the night of June 12. He knew only that they were from Honduras and had been on the road for about a month. “I can only imagine what dangers she’d passed through, alone with the girl,” he said.

Moore photographed the girl crying as the border agent patted down the mother.

Moore said the woman picked up her daughter, they walked into the van, and the van drove away. When he took the picture, he said he did not know whether the mother and her daughter would be separated, “but it was a very real possibility,” given the slew of family separations carried out by the Trump administration.

He said he’s glad that although the two were detained, “they are together.”

In Honduras, Denis Javier Varela Hernandez recognized his daughter in the photo and also feared that she was separated from her mother, he told The Post.

But he said he learned this week that his 32-year-old wife and daughter were, in fact, detained together at a facility in McAllen. Honduran Deputy Foreign Minister Nelly Jerez confirmed Varela’s account to Reuters.

An Immigration and Customs Enforcement spokesman said in a statement to The Post that Sanchez was arrested by the U.S. Border Patrol near Hidalgo, Tex., on June 12 while traveling with a family member. She was transferred to ICE custody on June 17 and is being housed at the South Texas Family Residential Center in Dilley, Tex., according to ICE.

ICE said Sanchez was previously deported to Honduras in July 2013.

Sanchez and her daughter left for the United States from Puerto Cortes, north of the Honduran capital of Tegucigalpa, on June 3, Varela said. Sanchez had told her husband that she hoped to go to the United States to seek a better life for her children, away from the dangers of their home country. But she left without telling him that she was taking their youngest daughter with her. Varela, who has three other children with Sanchez, feared for the little girl’s safety, he said. Yanela is turning 2 years old in July.

After Sanchez left, Varela had no way to contact her or learn of her whereabouts. Then, on the news, he saw the photo of the girl in the pink shirt.

“The first second I saw it, I knew it was my daughter,” Varela told The Post. “Immediately, I recognized her.”

He heard that U.S. officials were separating families at the border, before Trump reversed the policy Wednesday. Varela felt helpless and distressed “imagining my daughter in that situation,” he said.

This week, Varela received a phone call from an official with Honduras’s foreign ministry, letting him know his wife and daughter were detained together. While he doesn’t know anything about the conditions of the facility or what is next for Sanchez and Yanela, he was relieved to hear they were in the same place.

As news emerged late Thursday that the mother and child were not separated, conservative media jumped on the story, portraying it as evidence of “fake news” surrounding the Trump administration’s immigration policies.

It was the most prominent story on the home page of the conservative news outlet Breitbart, which called it a “fake news photo.” Infowars, owned by conspiracy theorist Alex Jones, singled out Time and CNN for using the “completely misleading” image to push “open border propaganda.”

Donald Trump Jr. has been talking about the photo on Twitter on Friday.

“No one is shocked anymore. There is a no low they won’t go to for their narrative,” the president’s eldest son tweeted.

Varela pushed back against the portrayals of his daughter’s story, saying it should not cast doubt on the “human-rights violations” taking place at the border.

“This is the case for my daughter, but it is not the case for 2,000 children that were separated from their parents,” Varela said.

At least 2,500 migrant children have been separated from their parents at the border since May 5.

Varela said he felt “proud” that his daughter has “represented the subject of immigration” and helped propel changes in policy. But he asked that Trump “put his hand on his heart.”

He hopes that U.S. officials will grant asylum to his wife and daughter, he said.

Asked whether he would also like to come to the United States, he said, “Of course, someday.”

Voir de même:

EXCLUSIVE: ‘They’re together and safe’: Father of Honduran two-year-old who became the face of family separation crisis reveals daughter was never separated from her mother, but the image of her in tears at U.S. border control ‘broke his heart’

  • Denis Javier Varela Hernandez spoke out about the status of his wife Sandra, 32, and daughter, Yanela, 2
  • Yanela became the face of the immigration crisis after a Getty photographer snapped a photo of her in tears
  • Speaking to DailyMail.com Hernandez said he has still not been in direct contact with his wife Sandra because he does not have a way of communicating
  • Denis said a Honduran official in the US told him that his wife and daughter are together and are doing ‘fine’
  • Sandra was part of a group that were caught by Border Patrol agents after making their way across the Rio Grande river on a raft
  • She set out on her journey from Puerto Cortes, Honduras to the U.S. at 6am on June 3 and allegedly paid $6,000 for a coyote
  • Hernandez  said he did not support his wife’s decision to make the journey with their young daughter in her arms and never got to properly say goodbye

The father of the Honduran girl who became the face of the family separation crisis has revealed that he still has not been in touch with his wife or daughter but was happy to learn they are safe.

Denis Javier Varela Hernandez, 32, said that he had not heard from his wife Sandra, 32, who was with his two-year-old daughter Yanela Denise, for nearly three weeks until he saw the image of them being apprehended in Texas.

In an exclusive interview with DailyMail.com, Hernandez, who lives in Puerto Cortes, Honduras, says that he was told on Wednesday by a Honduran official in the US that his wife and child are being detained at a family residential center in Texas but are together and are doing ‘fine.’

‘You can imagine how I felt when I saw that photo of my daughter. It broke my heart. It’s difficult as a father to see that, but I know now that they are not in danger. They are safer now than when they were making that journey to the border,’ he said.

A spokeswoman for Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has told DailyMail.com that Sandra had been previously been deported from the US in 2013.

The spokeswoman said that she was ‘encountered by immigration officials in Hebbronville, Texas’ in and sent back to Honduras 15 days later under ‘expedited removal.’

Sandra current immigration proceedings are ‘ongoing’ and she is being housed at a family detention center in Texas.

Denis said that his wife had previously mentioned her wish to go to the United States for a ‘better future’ but did not tell him nor any of their family members that she was planning to make the trek.

‘I didn’t support it. I asked her, why? Why would she want to put our little girl through that? But it was her decision at the end of the day.’

He said that Sandra had always wanted to experience ‘the American dream’ and hoped to find a good job in the States.

Denis, who works as a captain at a port on the coast of Puerto Cortes, explained that things back home were fine but not great, and that his wife was seeking political asylum.

He said that Sandra set out on the 1,800-mile journey with the baby girl on June 3, at 6am, and he has not heard from her since.

‘I never got the chance to say goodbye to my daughter and now all I can do is wait’, he said, adding that he hopes they are either granted political asylum or are sent back home.

‘I don’t have any resentment for my wife, but I do think it was irresponsible of her to take the baby with her in her arms because we don’t know what could happen.’

The couple has three other children, son Wesly, 14, and daughters Cindy, 11, and Brianna, six.

‘The kids see what’s happening. They’re a little worried but I don’t try to bring it up that much. They know their mother and sister are safe now.’

Denis said that he believes the journey across the border is only worth it to some degree, and admits that it’s not something he would ever consider.

He said he heard from friends that his wife paid $6,000 for a coyote – a term for someone who smuggles people across the border.

‘I wouldn’t risk my life for it. It’s hard to find a good job here and that’s why many people choose to leave. But I thank God that I have a good job here. And I would never risk my life making that journey.’

The heart-breaking photo was taken by Getty photographer John Moore close to midnight on the night of June 12 near McAllen, Texas, as the row over Donald Trump’s separation of migrant parents and children escalated.

Denis said that he hopes to use the photo and his family’s situation to help him reunite with his daughter.

‘I don’t want money, what I want is someone to tell me that my daughter is going to be OK.’

When asked about his views on Trump’s border policy, Denis said: ‘I’ve never seen it in a positive light the way others do. It violates human rights and children’s rights. Separating children from their parents is just wrong. They are suffering and are traumatized.

‘The laws need to be modified and we need to have a conversation. It’s just not right.

‘[Illegal] Immigration and drug smuggling across the United States border is never gonna stop. They can build a wall and it’s never going to stop,’ he said.

Sandra was part of a group that were caught by Border Patrol agents after making their way across the Rio Grande river on a raft.

Moore’s photo showed Yanela crying on a dirt track as her mother is patted down by a Border Patrol agent.

For many the photo summed up the cruelty of Trump’s ‘zero tolerance’ policy towards migrants which has caused 2,300 children to be separated from their mothers and fathers.

A photo of Yanela was used on the front cover of TIME magazine to show the devastating effect of the policy, which was brought in in April.

But actually Yanela remained with her mother after she arrived in the US after making the perilous 1,800 mile journey North through Central America and Mexico,

TIME magazine later issued a clarification saying that the original version of its story accompanying the cover was wrong because Yanela ‘was not carried away screaming by Border Patrol Agents’.

TIME’s editor in chief Edward Felsenthal said in a statement that it stood behind the wider point which is that Yanela was ‘the most visible symbol of the ongoing immigration debate’

Among those who have Tweeted DailyMail.com’s story have been White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders.

She wrote: ‘It’s shameful that dems and the media exploited this photo of a little girl to push their agenda. She was not separated from her mom. The separation here is from the facts’.

Moore, who has worked on the border with Mexico for years and has won a Pulitzer for his photography, has said the the image of Yanela was the last one he took that night.

Speaking to People magazine he said that the girl’s mother was the last to be searched and a female agent asked her to put Yanela down so she could pat her down

Moore said: ‘The mother hesitated and then set down the little girl and the child immediately started crying.

‘As a father, it was very emotional for me just to hear those cries. When I saw this little girl break down in tears I wanted to comfort this child.

‘But as a photojournalist we sometimes have to keep photographing when things are hard. And tell a story that people would never see.’

Moore crouched 6ft from the girl as she looked up at her mother and took seven shots, Yanela’s mother’s hands spread out on the Border Patrol truck.

The image was a major factor in pressuring Trump to do a U-turn on his immigration policy and sign an executive order allowing families to stay together.

The President said that he wanted to look strong but admitted that the ‘zero tolerance’ policy made him look like he had ‘no heart’.

Trump’s climb down came after worldwide outrage including British Prime Minister Theresa May who called his policy ‘deeply disturbing’ while Pope Francis said it was ‘immoral’.

The climb down was a rare one from Trump, who almost never apologizes and rarely backs down.

But he had not choice when his policy created a wall of opposition between him and others, including his own wife Melania, Democrats, Republicans, every living former First Lady, Amnesty International and the United Nations.

Voir encore:

‘All I Wanted to Do Was Pick Her Up.’ How a Photographer at the U.S.-Mexico Border Made an Image America Could Not Ignore

« This one was tough for me. As soon as it was over, they were put into a van. I had to stop and take deep breaths, » Getty photographer John Moore said
June 19, 2018

John Moore has been photographing immigrants and the hardship and heartbreak of crossing the U.S.-Mexico border for years — but this time, he said, something is different.

The Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer for Getty Images said the Trump administration’s policy of separating children from their parents — part of its “zero tolerance” stance toward people who illegally cross into the U.S. — has changed everything about enforcement at the U.S.-Mexico border and resulted in a level of despair for immigrants that Americans can no longer ignore.

“It’s a very different scene now,” he said. “I’m almost positive these families last week had no idea they’d be separated from their children.”

Moore’s image last week of a 2-year-old Honduran girl crying as a U.S. Border Patrol agent patted down her mother has become a symbol of the human cost — and many critics say cruelty — of President Donald Trump’s hard line on immigration. The crying girl has become the face of the family separation policy, which has been criticized by Democrats and Republicans alike.

“When the officer told the mother to put her child down for the body search, I could see this look in the little girl’s eyes,” Moore told TIME. “As soon as her feet touched the ground she began to scream.”

Moore said the girl’s mother had a weariness in her eyes as she was stopped by Border Patrol agents. The father of three said his years of experience did not inoculate him from feeling intense emotions as he watched agents allowed the mother to pick up her child and loaded them both into a van. But, he said, he knew he had to keep photographing the scene.

“This one was tough for me. As soon as it was over, they were put into a van. I had to stop and take deep breaths,” he said. “All I wanted to do was pick her up. But I couldn’t.”

More than 2,000 children have been taken away from their parents since April, when Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced at “zero tolerance” policy that refers all cases of illegal entry at the border for prosecution. The Trump administration has said Border Patrol agents separate children from parents because children cannot be locked up for the crimes of their mothers and fathers.

A Honduran mother holds her two-year-old as U.S. Border Patrol as agents review their papers near the U.S.-Mexico border in McAllen, Texas on June 12, 2018. The asylum seekers had rafted across the Rio Grande from Mexico and were detained by U.S. Border Patrol agents before being sent to a processing center for possible separation.
A Honduran mother holds her two-year-old as U.S. Border Patrol as agents review their papers near the U.S.-Mexico border in McAllen, Texas on June 12, 2018. The asylum seekers had rafted across the Rio Grande from Mexico and were detained by U.S. Border Patrol agents before being sent to a processing center for possible separation.
John Moore—Getty Images
A U.S. Border Patrol spotlight shines on a terrified mother and son from Honduras as they are found in the dark near the U.S.-Mexico border in McAllen, Texas on June 12, 2018.
A U.S. Border Patrol spotlight shines on a terrified mother and son from Honduras as they are found in the dark near the U.S.-Mexico border in McAllen, Texas on June 12, 2018.
John Moore—Getty Images
U.S. Border Patrol agents detain a group of Central American asylum seekers near the U.S.-Mexico border in McAllen, Texas on June 12, 2018.
U.S. Border Patrol agents detain a group of Central American asylum seekers near the U.S.-Mexico border in McAllen, Texas on June 12, 2018.
John Moore—Getty Images

Moore has followed immigrant families and enforcement efforts since 2014 and recently published a book of some of his most stirring photographs, Undocumented: Immigration and the Militarization of the United States-Mexico Border. He said despite the tough new policy, immigrants are not likely to lose the determination that drives them to make the dangerous journey to the United States.

“It’s been very easy for Americans to ignore over the years the desperation that people have to have a better life,” Moore said. “They often leave with their children with their shirts on their backs.”

A boy from Honduras watches a movie at a detention facility run by the U.S. Border Patrol in McAllen, Tex. on Sept. 8, 2014.
A boy from Honduras watches a movie at a detention facility run by the U.S. Border Patrol in McAllen, Tex. on Sept. 8, 2014.
John Moore—Getty Images

Footage released Monday of a detention facility where families arrested at the border and children taken from their parents are held echo a photo Moore took in 2014 of a Honduran child watching Casper in the same facility, alone except for a guard keeping watch. That photo, taken at the same detention center in McCallen, Texas where children are now being grouped inside cages, has stayed with Moore over the years.

While he is not sure if that boy was an unaccompanied minor or what happened to him, he said many of the other children at the facility were without their parents. “That picture is still haunting for me.”

Most of the photos below come from Moore’s 2018 book, published by powerHouse Books.

Families attend a memorial service for two boys who were kidnapped and killed in San Juan Sacatepequez, Guatemala on Feb. 14, 2017. More than 2,000 people walked in a funeral procession for Oscar Armando Top Cotzajay, 11, and Carlos Daniel Xiqin, 10 who were abducted walking to school Friday morning when they were abducted.
Families attend a memorial service for two boys who were kidnapped and killed in San Juan Sacatepequez, Guatemala on Feb. 14, 2017. More than 2,000 people walked in a funeral procession for Oscar Armando Top Cotzajay, 11, and Carlos Daniel Xiqin, 10 who were abducted walking to school Friday morning when they were abducted.
John Moore—Getty Images
Sonia Morales massages the back of her son Jose Issac Morales, 11, at the door of their one-room home in San Pedro Sula, Honduras on Aug. 20, 2017. The mother of three said that her son's spinal deformation began at age four, but has never been able to afford the $6,000 surgery to correct his spinal condition. The boy's father, Issac Morales, 30, said he tried to immigrate to the U.S. in 2016 to work and send money home but was picked up by U.S. Border Patrol officers in the Arizona desert and deported back to Honduras.
Sonia Morales massages the back of her son Jose Issac Morales, 11, at the door of their one-room home in San Pedro Sula, Honduras on Aug. 20, 2017. The mother of three said that her son’s spinal deformation began at age four, but has never been able to afford the $6,000 surgery to correct his spinal condition. The boy’s father, Issac Morales, 30, said he tried to immigrate to the U.S. in 2016 to work and send money home but was picked up by U.S. Border Patrol officers in the Arizona desert and deported back to Honduras.
John Moore—Getty Images
An Indigenous family walks from Guatemala into Mexico after illegally crossing the border at the Suchiate River in Talisman, Mexico on Aug. 1, 2013.
An Indigenous family walks from Guatemala into Mexico after illegally crossing the border at the Suchiate River in Talisman, Mexico on Aug. 1, 2013.
John Moore—Getty Images
Undocumented immigrant families walk before being taken into custody by Border Patrol agents near McAllen, Texas on July 21, 2014.
Undocumented immigrant families walk before being taken into custody by Border Patrol agents near McAllen, Texas on July 21, 2014.
John Moore—Getty Images
Families of Central American immigrants, including Lorena Arriaga, 27, and her son Jason Ramirez, 7, from El Salvador, turn themselves in to U.S. Border Patrol agents after crossing the Rio Grande River from Mexico to Mission, Texas on Sept. 8, 2014.
Families of Central American immigrants, including Lorena Arriaga, 27, and her son Jason Ramirez, 7, from El Salvador, turn themselves in to U.S. Border Patrol agents after crossing the Rio Grande River from Mexico to Mission, Texas on Sept. 8, 2014.
John Moore—Getty Images
Immigrants from Central America wait to be taken into custody by U.S. Border Patrol agents in Roma, Texas on August 17, 2016.
Immigrants from Central America wait to be taken into custody by U.S. Border Patrol agents in Roma, Texas on August 17, 2016.
John Moore—Getty Images
U.S. Border Patrol agents take undocumented immigrants into custody after capturing them after they crossed Rio Grande from Mexico into Texas near Sullivan City, Texas on Aug. 18, 2016.
U.S. Border Patrol agents take undocumented immigrants into custody after capturing them after they crossed Rio Grande from Mexico into Texas near Sullivan City, Texas on Aug. 18, 2016.
John Moore—Getty Images
Undocumented immigrants are led after being caught and handcuffed by Border Patrol agents near the U.S.-Mexico border in Weslaco, Texas on April 13, 2016.
Undocumented immigrants are led after being caught and handcuffed by Border Patrol agents near the U.S.-Mexico border in Weslaco, Texas on April 13, 2016.
John Moore—Getty Images
Women and children sit in a holding cell at a U.S. Border Patrol processing center after being detained by agents near the U.S.-Mexico border near McAllen, Texas on Sept. 8, 2014.
Women and children sit in a holding cell at a U.S. Border Patrol processing center after being detained by agents near the U.S.-Mexico border near McAllen, Texas on Sept. 8, 2014.
John Moore—Getty Images
Women and children wait in a holding cell at a U.S. Border Patrol processing center after being detained by agents near the U.S.-Mexico border near McAllen, Texas on Sept. 8, 2014.
Women and children wait in a holding cell at a U.S. Border Patrol processing center after being detained by agents near the U.S.-Mexico border near McAllen, Texas on Sept. 8, 2014.
John Moore—Getty Images
A girl from Central America rests on thermal blankets at a detention facility run by the U.S. Border Patro in McAllen, Texasl on Sept. 8, 2014.
A girl from Central America rests on thermal blankets at a detention facility run by the U.S. Border Patro in McAllen, Texasl on Sept. 8, 2014.
John Moore—Getty Images
Donated clothing await immigrants at the Catholic Sacred Heart Church Immigrant Respite Center from McAllen, Texas on Aug. 15, 2016.
Donated clothing await immigrants at the Catholic Sacred Heart Church Immigrant Respite Center from McAllen, Texas on Aug. 15, 2016.
John Moore—Getty Images
A detained Mexican immigrant (L) visits with his wife and children at the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention facility in Florence, Ariz on July 30, 2010.
A detained Mexican immigrant (L) visits with his wife and children at the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention facility in Florence, Ariz on July 30, 2010.
John Moore—Getty Images
Immigrants from Central America await transport from the U.S. Border Patrol in Roma, Texas on Aug. 17, 2016.
Immigrants from Central America await transport from the U.S. Border Patrol in Roma, Texas on Aug. 17, 2016.
John Moore—Getty Images
Central American immigrant families depart ICE custody, pending future immigration court hearings in McAllen, Texas on June 11, 2018.
Central American immigrant families depart ICE custody, pending future immigration court hearings in McAllen, Texas on June 11, 2018.
John Moore—Getty Images

Correction (Posted June 19): The original version of this story misstated what happened to the girl in the photo after she was taken from the scene. The girl was not carried away screaming by U.S. Border Patrol agents; her mother picked her up and the two were taken away together.

Voir par ailleurs:

Smuggler abandons 6-year-old in blazing desert heat

– A 6-year-old Costa Rican boy was rescued by U.S. Border Patrol agents after he was abandoned on a border road in Arizona on Tuesday evening.

The agents discovered the boy just north of the border west of Lukeville in temperatures over 100 degrees.

The child claimed that he was dropped off by « his uncle » and that Border Patrol would pick him up. Agents say the boy said he was on his way to see his mother in the U.S.

They say that the child was found in good condition.  He was taken to Tucson to be checked out and processed.  It was unclear what would happen to him next.

The Border Patrol says the incident highlights the dangers faced by migrants at the hands of smugglers. Children in particular are extremely vulnerable, not only to exploitation, but also to the elements in the environment.

They added that Arizona’s desert « is a merciless environment for those unprepared for its remote, harsh terrain and unpredictable weather. »

Voir aussi:

Guy Millière
Dreuz
21 juin 2018

Les titres des journaux européens et de bon nombre de journaux américains ces derniers jours prêtent à sourire une fois de plus. Trump, dit-on, aurait “reculé” en matière d’immigration.

Ceux qui disent cela ajoutent qu’il se conduit de manière infâme vis-à-vis des enfants à la frontière Sud des Etats-Unis. Des photos sont fournies à l’appui, montrant des enfants dans des lieux décrits comme des “camps de concentration”. Des vidéos ont été montrées où on voit des enfants pleurer de manière déchirante en appelant leurs parents, dont un agent de l’immigration vient de les séparer, et ils utilisent des mots anglais (ce qui est normal puisqu’ils viennent de pays où on parle espagnol et puisqu’ils ne parlent pas un mot d’anglais).

Ceux qui disent cela ajoutent aussi que “sous une large pression”, Trump vient de signer un executive order permettant d’éviter que les enfants soient séparés de leur famille et a donc dû se conduire de manière un peu moins infâme.

Ceux qui disent cela ne disent pas un seul mot de ce qui est en train de se passer par ailleurs aux Etats-Unis. L’Etat profond anti-Trump est en train de s’effondrer. Il résiste, certes, mais il est désormais très mal en point, comme c’était prévisible.

Disons ici ce qui doit l’être, car ce ne sera pas fait ailleurs, j’en suis, hélas, certain.

1. Il existe aux Etats-Unis un grave problème d’immigration illégale. Trump a commencé à prendre des décisions pour le régler. Les entrées clandestines dans le pays par la frontière Sud ont diminué de 70 pour cent. Elles sont encore trop nombreuses. Les immigrants illégaux présents dans le pays ne sont pas tous criminels, mais ils représentent une proportion importante des criminels incarcérés et des membres de gangs violents impliqués, entre autres, dans le trafic de drogue. Jeff Sessions, ministre de la justice inefficace dans d’autres secteurs, est très efficace dans ce secteur.

2. Les Démocrates veulent que l’immigration illégale se poursuive, et s’intensifie, car ils ont besoin d’un électorat constitué d’illégaux fraîchement légalisés pour maintenir à flot la coalition électorale sur laquelle ils s’appuient et garder des chances de victoire ultérieure (minorités ethniques, femmes célibataires, étudiants, professeurs). La diminution de l’immigration clandestine leur pose problème. Les actions de la police de l’immigration (ICE; Immigration Control Enforcement) suscitent leur hostilité, d’où l’existence de villes sanctuaires démocrates et, en Californie, d’un Etat sanctuaire(démocrate, bien sûr).

3. Ce qui se passe depuis quelques jours à la frontière Sud du pays est un coup monté auquel participent le parti démocrate, les grands médias américains, des organisations gauchistes, et le but est de faire pression sur Trump en diabolisant son action. La plupart des photos utilisées datent des années Obama, au cours desquelles le traitement des enfants entrant clandestinement dans le pays était exactement similaire à ce qu’il est aujourd’hui, sans qu’à l’époque les Démocrates disent un seul mot. Les enfants qui pleurent sur des vidéos ont été préparés à être filmés à des fins de propagande et ont appris à dire “daddy”, “mummy”. Le but est effectivement de faire céder Trump. Quelques Républicains à veste réversible ont joint leur voix au chœur.

4. Trump, comme il sait le faire, a agi pour désamorcer le coup monté. On lui reproche de faire ce qui se fait depuis des années (séparer les enfants de leurs parents dès lors que les parents doivent être incarcérés) ? Il vient de décider que les enfants ne seront plus séparés des parents, et qu’ils seront placés ensemble dans des lieux de rétention.  Cela signifie-t-il un recul ? Non. La lutte contre l’immigration clandestine va se poursuivre selon exactement la même ligne. Les parents qui ont violé la loi seront traités comme ils l’étaient auparavant. Les enfants seront-ils dans de meilleures conditions ? Non. Ils ne seront pas dans des conditions plus mauvaises non plus. Décrire les lieux où ils étaient placés jusque là comme des camps de concentration est une honte et une insulte à ceux qui ont été placés dans de réels camps de concentration (certains Démocrates un peu plus répugnants que d’autres sont allés jusqu’à faire des comparaisons avec Auschwitz !) : les enfants sont placés dans ce qui est comparable à des auberges pour colonies de vacances. Un enfant clandestin coûte au contribuable américain à ce jour 35.000 dollars en moyenne annuelle.

5. Désamorcer le coup monté ne réglera pas le problème d’ensemble. Des femmes viennent accoucher aux Etats-Unis pour que le bébé ait la nationalité américaine et puisse demander deux décennies plus tard un rapprochement de famille. Des gens font passer leurs enfants par des passeurs en espérant que l’enfant sera régularisé et pourra lui aussi demander un rapprochement de famille. Des parents paient leur passage aux Etats Unis en transportant de la drogue et doivent être jugés pour cela (le tarif des passeurs si on veut passer sans drogue est  de 10.000 dollars par personne). S’ils sont envoyés en prison, ils n’y seront pas envoyés avec leurs enfants.  Quand des trafiquants de drogue sont envoyés en prison, aux Etats-Unis ou ailleurs, ils ne vont pas en prison en famille, et si quelqu’un suggérait que leur famille devait les suivre en prison, parce que ce serait plus “humain”, les Démocrates seraient les premiers à hurler.

6. Les Etats-Unis, comme tout pays développé, ne peuvent laisser entrer tous ceux qui veulent entrer en laissant leurs frontières ouvertes. Un pays a le droit de gérer l’immigration comme il l’entend et comme l’entend sa population, et il le doit, s’il ne veut pas être submergé par une population qui ne s’intègre pas et peut le faire glisser vers le chaos. Les pays européens sont confrontés au même problème que les Etats-Unis, d’une manière plus aiguë puisqu’en Europe s’ajoute le paramètre “islam”. La haine de la civilisation occidentale imprègne la gauche européenne, qui veut la dissolution des peuples européens. Une même haine imprègne la gauche américaine, qui veut la dissolution du peuple américain. Les grandes villes de l’Etat sanctuaire de Californie sont déjà méconnaissables, submergées par des sans abris étrangers (pas un seul pont de Los Angeles qui n’abrite désormais un petit bidonville, et un quart du centre ville est une véritable cour des miracles, à San Francisco ce n’est pas mieux). Il n’est pas du tout certain que le coup monte servira les Démocrates lors des élections de mi mandat. Nombre d’Américains ne veulent pas la dissolution du peuple américain.

7. Le coup monté m’est pas arrive par hasard, à ce moment précisément. Le rapport de l’inspecteur général Michael Horowitz, même s’il est édulcoré, contient des éléments accablants pour James Comey, John Mc Cabe, l’enquêteur appelé Peter Strzoc. Le Congres procède à des auditions très révélatrices. Ce n’est que le début. L’Etat profond anti-Trump est en train de s’effondrer, disais-je. La monstruosité totalitaire que fut l’administration Obama finissante et le caractère criminel des activités d’Hillary Clinton commencent tout juste à être mis au jour. Des peines de prison suivront. L’équipe sinistre conduite par Robert Mueller avance dans le vide : tout ce qui lui sert de prétexte se révèle être une gigantesque imposture. La complicité des grands médias américains et mondiaux ne pourra pas être cachée indéfiniment. Un écran de fumée devait monter dans l’atmosphère pour détourner l’attention et éviter qu’on parle de l’effondrement de l’Etat profond. Le coup monte a servi d’écran de fumée. Que nul ne soit dupe. La révolution Trump ne fait que commencer.

Voir de plus:

Selon les déclarations d’un homme présenté comme le cousin de l’enfant, rendues publiques par Israël, les parents de la fillette morte mi-mai auraient touché 8.000 shekels (1.800 euros).

La justice israélienne a dit disposer d’une déposition selon laquelle la famille d’un bébé palestinien mort dans des circonstances contestées dans la bande de Gaza avait été payée par le Hamas pour accuser Israël, ce que les parents ont nié.

Vif émoi après la mort de l’enfant. Leïla al-Ghandour, âgée de huit mois, est morte mi-mai alors que l’enclave palestinienne était depuis des semaines le théâtre d’une mobilisation massive et d’affrontements entre Palestiniens et soldats israéliens le long de la frontière avec Gaza. Son décès a suscité un vif émoi. Sa famille accuse l’armée israélienne d’avoir provoqué sa mort en employant des lacrymogènes contre les protestataires, parmi lesquels se trouvait la fillette.

La fillette souffrait-elle d’un problème cardiaque ? L’armée israélienne, se fondant sur les informations d’un médecin palestinien resté anonyme mais qui selon elle connaissait l’enfant et sa famille, dit que l’enfant souffrait d’un problème cardiaque. Le ministère israélien de la Justice a rendu public jeudi l’acte d’inculpation d’un Gazaoui de 20 ans, présenté comme le cousin de la fillette. Selon le ministère, il a déclaré au cours de ses interrogatoires par les forces israéliennes que les parents de Leila avaient touché 8.000 shekels (1.800 euros) de la part de Yahya Sinouar, le chef du Hamas dans la bande de Gaza, pour dire que leur fille était morte des inhalations de gaz.

Une « fabrication » du Hamas dénoncée par Israël. Les parents ont nié ces déclarations, réaffirmé que leur fille était bien morte des inhalations, et ont contesté qu’elle était malade. Selon la famille, Leïla al-Ghandour avait été emmenée près de la frontière par un oncle âgé de 11 ans et avait été prise dans les tirs de lacrymogènes. L’armée israélienne, en butte aux accusations d’usage disproportionné de la force, a dénoncé ce cas comme une « fabrication » de la part du Hamas, le mouvement islamiste qui dirige la bande de Gaza et contrôle les autorités sanitaires, et auquel Israël a livré trois guerres depuis 2008.

Voir également:

Valeurs actuelles

19 juin 2018

Fake News. Donald Trump aurait donc menti en affirmant que la criminalité augmentait en Allemagne, en raison de l’entrée dans le pays de 1,1 million de clandestins en 2015. Pas si simple…

Nouveau tweet, nouvelle agitation médiatique. Les commentateurs n’ont pas tardé à s’armer de leur indéboulonnable mépris pour le président des États-Unis pour dénoncer un « mensonge », au lieu d’user d’une saine distance permettant de décrypter sereinement l’affirmation de Donald Trump.

« Le peuple allemand se rebelle contre ses gouvernants alors que l’immigration secoue une coalition déjà fragile », a donc entamé le président des États-Unis dans un tweet publié le 18 juin, alors que le gouvernement allemand se déchirait sur fond de crise migratoire. Propos factuel si l’on en croit un récent sondage allemand qui révèle que 90% des allemands désirent plus d’expulsions des personnes déboutées du droit d’asile.

Le chiffre ne laisse aucune place au doute : la population allemande penche du côté du ministre de l’Intérieur qui s’applique, depuis quelques jours, à contraindre Angela Merkel à la fermeté.

Et Donald Trump de poursuivre avec la phrase qui occupe nombre de journalistes depuis sa publication : « la criminalité augmente en Allemagne. Une grosse erreur a été commise partout en Europe : laisser rentrer des millions de personnes qui ont fortement et violemment changé sa culture. » Que n’avait-il pas dit. Les articles se sont immédiatement multipliés pour dénoncer « le mensonge » du président américain.

Pourquoi ? Parce que les autorités allemandes se sont félicitées d’une baisse des agressions violentes en 2017. C’est vrai, elles ont chuté de 5,1% par rapport à 2016.

Est-il possible, cependant, de feindre à ce point l’incompréhension ? Car les détracteurs zélés du président omettent de préciser que la criminalité a bien augmenté en Allemagne à la suite de cette vague migratoire exceptionnelle : 10% de crimes violents en plus, sur les années 2015 et 2016. L’étude réalisée par le gouvernement allemand et publiée en janvier dernier concluait même que 90% de cette augmentation était due aux jeunes hommes clandestins fraîchement accueillis, âgés de 14 à 30 ans.

En 2016, les étrangers étaient 3,5 fois plus impliqués dans des crimes que les Allemands, les clandestins 7 fois plus

L’augmentation de la criminalité fut donc indiscutablement liée à l’accueil de 1,1 millions de clandestins pendant l’année 2015. C’est évidement ce qu’entend démontrer Donald Trump.

Et ce n’est pas tout. Les chiffres du ministère allemand de l’Intérieur pour 2016 révèlent également une implication des étrangers et des clandestins supérieure à celle des Allemands dans le domaine de la criminalité. Et en hausse. La proportion d’étrangers parmi les personnes suspectées d’actes criminels était de 28,7% en 2014, elle est passée à 40,4% en 2016, avant de chuter à 35% en 2017 (ce qui reste plus important qu’en 2014).

En 2016, les étrangers étaient 3,5 fois plus impliqués dans des crimes que les Allemands, les clandestins 7 fois plus. Des chiffres encore plus élevés dans le domaine des crimes violents (5 fois plus élevés chez les étrangers, 15 fois chez les clandestins) ou dans celui des viols en réunion (10 fois plus chez les étrangers, 42 fois chez les clandestins !).

Factuellement, la criminalité n’augmente pas aujourd’hui en Allemagne. Mais l’exceptionnelle vague migratoire voulue par Angela Merkel en 2015 a bien eu pour conséquence l’augmentation de la criminalité en Allemagne. Les Allemands, eux, semblent l’avoir très bien compris.

Voir par ailleurs:

La caravane des migrants a atteint la frontière avec la Californie

 FRANCE 24

30/04/2018

Au moins 150 migrants centraméricains sont arrivés à Tijuana au Mexique, à la frontière avec les États-Unis. Ils sont décidés à demander l’asile à Washington.

Plusieurs centaines de migrants originaires d’Amérique centrale se sont rassemblés dimanche 30 avril à la frontière mexico-américaine au terme d’un mois de traversée du Mexique.

Nombre d’entre eux ont décidé de se présenter aux autorités américaines pour déposer des demandes d’asile et devraient être placés en centres de rétention. « Nous espérons que le gouvernement des États-Unis nous ouvrira les portes », a déclaré Reyna Isabel Rodríguez, 52 ans, venu du Salvador avec ses deux petits-enfants.

« Nous ne sommes pas des criminels »

L’ONG Peuple Sans Frontières organise ce type de caravane depuis 2010 pour dénoncer le sort de celles et ceux qui traversent le Mexique en proie à de nombreux dangers, entre des cartels de la drogue qui les kidnappent ou les tuent, et des autorités qui les rançonnent. « Nous voulons dire au président des États-Unis que nous ne sommes pas des criminels, nous ne sommes pas des terroristes, qu’il nous donne la chance de vivre sans peur. Je sais que Dieu va toucher son cœur », a déclaré l’une des organisatrices de la caravane, Irineo Mujica.

L’ONG, composée de volontaires, permet notamment aux migrants de rester groupés – lors d’un périple qui se fait à pied, en bus ou en train – afin de se prémunir de tous les dangers qui jalonnent leur chemin. En espagnol, ces caravanes sont d’ailleurs appelées « Via Crucis Migrantes » ou le « Chemin de croix des migrants », en référence aux processions catholiques, particulièrement appréciées en Amérique du Sud, qui mettent en scène la Passion du Christ, ou les derniers événements qui ont précédé et accompagné la mort de Jésus de Nazareth.

Cette année, le groupe est parti le 25 mars de Tapachula, à la frontière du Guatemala, avec un groupe de près de 1 200 personnes, à 80 % originaires du Honduras, les autres venant du Guatemala, du Salvador et du Nicaragua, selon Rodrigo Abeja. Dans le groupe, près de 300 enfants âgés de 1 mois à 11 ans, une vingtaine de jeunes homosexuels et environ 400 femmes. Certains se sont ensuite dispersés, préférant rester au Mexique, d’autres choisissant de voyager par leurs propres moyens.

La colère de Donald Trump

En avril, les images de la caravane de migrants se dirigeant vers les États-Unis avaient suscité la colère de Donald Trump et une forte tension entre Washington et Mexico. Le président américain, dont l’un des principaux thèmes de campagne était la construction d’un mur à la frontière avec le Mexique pour lutter contre l’immigration clandestine, avait ordonné le déploiement sur la frontière de troupes de la Garde nationale.

Il avait aussi soumis la conclusion d’un nouvel accord de libre-échange en Amérique du Nord à un renforcement des contrôles migratoires par le Mexique, une condition rejetée par le président mexicain Enrique Pena Nieto.

Avec AFP et Reuters

Voir aussi:

WASHINGTON — It was the kind of story destined to take a dark turn through the conservative news media and grab President Trump’s attention: A vast horde of migrants was making its way through Mexico toward the United States, and no one was stopping them.

“Mysterious group deploys ‘caravan’ of illegal aliens headed for U.S. border,” warned Frontpage Mag, a site run by David Horowitz, a conservative commentator.

The Gateway Pundit, a website that was most recently in the news for spreading conspiracies about the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., suggested the real reason the migrants were trying to enter the United States was to collect social welfare benefits.

And as the president often does when immigration is at issue, he saw a reason for Americans to be afraid. “Getting more dangerous. ‘Caravans’ coming,” a Twitter post from Mr. Trump read.

The story of “the caravan” followed an arc similar to many events — whether real, embellished or entirely imagined — involving refugees and migrants that have roused intense suspicion and outrage on the right. The coverage tends to play on the fears that hiding among mass groups of immigrants are many criminals, vectors of disease and agents of terror. And often the president, who announced his candidacy by blaming Mexico for sending rapists and drug dealers into the United States, acts as an accelerant to the hysteria.

The sensationalization of this story and others like it seems to serve a common purpose for Mr. Trump and other immigration hard-liners: to highlight the twin dangers of freely roving migrants — especially those from Muslim countries — and lax immigration laws that grant them easy entry into Western nations.

The narrative on the right this week, for example, mostly omitted that many people in the caravan planned to resettle in Mexico, not the United States. And it ignored how many of those who did intend to come here would probably go through the legal process of requesting asylum at a border checkpoint — something miles of new wall and battalions of additional border patrol would not have stopped.

“They end up in schools on Long Island, some of which are MS-13!” declared Brian Kilmeade on the president’s preferred morning news program, “Fox & Friends,” referring to the predominantly Central American gang.

The coverage became so distorted that it prompted a reporter for Breitbart News who covers border migration, Brandon Darby, to push back. “I’m seeing a lot of right media cover this as ‘people coming illegally’ or as ‘illegal aliens.’ That is incorrect,” he wrote on Twitter. “They are coming to a port of entry and requesting refugee status. That is legal.”

In an interview, Mr. Darby said it was regrettable that the relatively routine occurrence of migrant caravans — which organizers rely on as a safety-in-numbers precaution against the violence that can happen along the trek — was being politicized. “The caravan isn’t something that’s a unique event,” he said. “And I think people are looking at it wrong. If you’re upset at the situation, it’s easier to be mad at the migrant than it is to be mad at the political leaders on both sides who won’t change the laws.”

As tends to be the case in these stories, the humanitarian aspects get glossed over as migrants are collapsed into one maligned category: hostile foreign invaders.

In November, Mr. Trump touched off an international furor when he posted a series of videos on Twitter that purported to show the effects of mass Muslim migration in Europe. Initially circulated by a fringe ultranationalist in Britain who has railed against Islam, the videos included titles like “Muslim migrant beats up Dutch boy on crutches!” “Muslim Destroys a Statue of Virgin Mary!” and “Islamist mob pushes teenage boy off roof and beats him to death!”

The assailant in one video the president shared, however, was not a “Muslim migrant.” And the other two videos depicted four-year-old events with no explanation.

These items tend to metastasize irrespective of the facts, but contain powerful visual elements to which Mr. Trump is known to viscerally respond.

Last February, Mr. Trump insinuated that some kind of terror-related episode involving Muslim immigrants had taken place in Sweden. “Who would believe this? Sweden,” he said at a rally in Florida, leaving Swedes and Americans baffled because nothing out of the ordinary had happened at all. “They took in large numbers. They’re having problems like they never thought possible.”

Like the caravan story, which apparently came to Mr. Trump’s attention as he watched “Fox & Friends,” the president was referring to something he had seen on cable news. And he later had to clarify that he was referring to a Fox News segment on issues Sweden was having with migrants generally, not any particular event.

The conservative National Review later called the piece in question “sensationalistic” and pointed out that a lack of government data made it virtually impossible to determine whether crime rates in the country were related to immigration.

When the president himself has not spread stories about immigration that were either misleading or turned out to be false, his White House aides have. Last year, the White House joined a pile-on by the conservative news media after it called attention to the account of a high school student in Montgomery County, Md., who said she was raped at school by two classmates, one of whom is an undocumented immigrant. The case became a national rallying cry on the right against permissive border policies and so-called sanctuary cities that treat undocumented immigrants more leniently. Fox News broadcast live outside the high school for days.

Prosecutors later dropped the charges after they said the evidence did not substantiate the girl’s claims.

The story of the caravan has been similarly exaggerated. And the emotional outpouring from the right has been raw — that was the case on Fox this week when the TV host Tucker Carlson shouted “You hate America!” at an immigrants rights activist after he defended the people marching through Mexico.

The facts of the caravan are not as straightforward as Mr. Trump or many conservative pundits have portrayed them. The story initially gained widespread attention after BuzzFeed News reported last week that more than 1,000 Central American migrants, mostly from Honduras, were making their way north toward the United States border. Yet the BuzzFeed article and other coverage pointed out that many in the group were planning to stay in Mexico.

That did not stop Mr. Trump from expressing dismay on Tuesday with a situation “where you have thousands of people that decide to just walk into our country, and we don’t have any laws that can protect it.”

The use of disinformation in immigration debates is hardly unique to the United States. Misleading crime statistics, speculation about sinister plots to undermine national sovereignty and Russian propaganda have all played a role in stirring up anti-immigrant sentiment in places like Britain, Germany and Hungary. Some of the more fantastical theories have involved a socialist conspiracy to import left-leaning voters and a scheme by the Hungarian-born Jewish philanthropist George Soros to create a borderless Europe.

Anyone watching Fox News this week would have heard about similar forces at work inside “the caravan.”

“This was an organized plan and deliberate attack on the sovereignty of the United States by a special interest group,” said David Ward, whom the network identified as a former agent for Immigration and Customs Enforcement. “They rallied a bunch of foreign nationals to come north into the United States to test our resolve.”

Voir aussi:

Humanitarian group that organized migrant ‘caravan’ headed to US issues list of demands for refugees

 

One thousand Central American migrants are headed to the United States border. Adolfo Flores, a BuzzFeed News reporter, has been traveling with the group of migrants and wrote that “no one in Mexico dares to stop them.” President Donald Trump reacted to the report and called off all negotiations with Democrats over the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA) if the migrants arrive.

With the help of a humanitarian group called “Pueblo Sin Fronteras” (people without borders), the 1,000 plus migrants will reach the U.S. border with a list of demands to several governments in Central America, the United States, and Mexico.

Here’s what they demanded of Mexico and the United States in a Facebook post: 

-That they respect our rights as refugees and our right to dignified work to be able to support our families
-That they open the borders to us because we are as much citizens as the people of the countries where we are and/or travel
-That deportations, which destroy families, come to an end
-No more abuses against us as migrants
-Dignity and justice
-That the US government not end TPS for those who need it
-That the US government stop massive funding for the Mexican government to detain Central American migrants and refugees and to deport them
-That these governments respect our rights under international law, including the right to free expression
-That the conventions on refugee rights not be empty rhetoric

“The border is stained red!”
“Because there they kill the working class!”
“Why do they kill us? Why do they murder us…”
“If we are the hope of Latin America?”

Sincerely,

2018 Refugee Caravan “Migrantes en la Lucha”
Pueblo Sin Fronteras

Voir enfin:

American Nightmare
The shame of America’s refugee camps
Wil S. Hylton
The NYT magazine
February 2015

CHRISTINA BROWN pulled into the refugee camp after an eight-hour drive across the desert. It was late July of last year, and Brown was a 30-year-old immigration lawyer. She had spent a few years after college working on political campaigns, but her law degree was barely a year old, and she had only two clients in her private practice in Denver. When other lawyers told her that the federal government was opening a massive detention center for immigrants in southeastern New Mexico, where hundreds of women and children would be housed in metal trailers surrounded by barbed wire, Brown decided to volunteer legal services to the detainees. She wasn’t sure exactly what rights they might have, but she wanted to make sure they got them. She packed enough clothes to last a week, stopped by Target to pick up coloring books and toys and started driving south.Brown spent the night at a motel, then drove to the detention camp in the morning. She stood in the wind-swept parking lot with the other lawyers, overlooking the barren plains of the eastern plateau. After a few minutes, a transport van emerged from the facility to pick them up. It swung to a stop in the parking lot, and the attorneys filed on. They sat on the cold metal benches and stared through the caged windows as the bus rolled back into the compound and across the bleak brown landscape. It came to a stop by a small trailer, and the lawyers shuffled out.As they opened the door to the trailer, Brown felt a blast of cold air. The front room was empty except for two small desks arranged near the center. A door in the back opened to reveal dozens of young women and children huddled together. Many were gaunt and malnourished, with dark circles under their eyes. “The kids were really sick,” Brown told me later. “A lot of the moms were holding them in their arms, even the older kids — holding them like babies, and they’re screaming and crying, and some of them are lying there listlessly.”Brown took a seat at a desk, and a guard brought a woman to meet her. Brown asked the woman in Spanish how she ended up in detention. The woman explained that she had to escape from her home in El Salvador when gangs targeted her family. “Her husband had just been murdered, and she and her kids found his body,” Brown recalls. “After he was murdered, the gang started coming after her and threatening to kill her.” Brown agreed to help the woman apply for political asylum in the United States, explaining that it might be possible to pay a small bond and then live with friends or relatives while she waited for an asylum hearing. When the woman returned to the back room, Brown met with another, who was fleeing gangs in Guatemala. Then she met another young woman, who fled violence in Honduras. “They were all just breaking down,” Brown said. “They were telling us that they were afraid to go home. They were crying, saying they were scared for themselves and their children. It was a constant refrain: ‘I’ll die if I go back.’ ”As Brown emerged from the trailer that evening, she already knew it would be difficult to leave at the end of the week. The women she met were just a fraction of those inside the camp, and the government was making plans to open a second facility of nearly the same size in Karnes County, Tex., near San Antonio. “I remember thinking to myself that this was an impossible situation,” she said. “I was overwhelmed and sad and angry. I think the anger is what kept me going.”***OVER THE PAST six years, President Obama has tried to make children the centerpiece of his efforts to put a gentler face on U.S. immigration policy. Even as his administration has deported a record number of unauthorized immigrants, surpassing two million deportations last year, it has pushed for greater leniency toward undocumented children. After trying and failing to pass the Dream Act legislation, which would offer a path to permanent residency for immigrants who arrived before the age of 16, the president announced an executive action in 2012 to block their deportation. Last November, Obama added another executive action to extend similar protections to undocumented parents. “We’re going to keep focusing enforcement resources on actual threats to our security,” he said in a speech on Nov. 20. “Felons, not families. Criminals, not children. Gang members, not a mom who’s working hard to provide for her kids.” But the president’s new policies apply only to immigrants who have been in the United States for more than five years; they do nothing to address the emerging crisis on the border today.Since the economic collapse of 2008, the number of undocumented immigrants coming from Mexico has plunged, while a surge of violence in Central America has brought a wave of migrants from Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala. According to recent statistics from the Department of Homeland Security, the number of refugees fleeing Central America has doubled in the past year alone — with more than 61,000 “family units” crossing the U.S. border, as well as 51,000 unaccompanied children. For the first time, more people are coming to the United States from those countries than from Mexico, and they are coming not just for opportunity but for survival.The explosion of violence in Central America is often described in the language of war, cartels, extortion and gangs, but none of these capture the chaos overwhelming the region. Four of the five highest murder rates in the world are in Central American nations. The collapse of these countries is among the greatest humanitarian disasters of our time. While criminal organizations like the 18th Street Gang and Mara Salvatrucha exist as street gangs in the United States, in large parts of Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador they are so powerful and pervasive that they have supplanted the government altogether. People who run afoul of these gangs — which routinely demand money on threat of death and sometimes kidnap young boys to serve as soldiers and young girls as sexual slaves — may have no recourse to the law and no better option than to flee.The American immigration system defines a special pathway for refugees. To qualify, most applicants must present themselves to federal authorities, pass a “credible fear interview” to demonstrate a possible basis for asylum and proceed through a “merits hearing” before an immigration judge. Traditionally, those who have completed the first two stages are permitted to live with family and friends in the United States while they await their final hearing, which can be months or years later. If authorities believe an applicant may not appear for that court date, they can require a bond payment as guarantee or place the refugee in a monitoring system that may include a tracking bracelet. In the most extreme cases, a judge may deny bond and keep the refugee in a detention facility until the merits hearing.The rules are somewhat different when children are involved. Under the terms of a 1997 settlement in the case of Flores v. Meese, children who enter the country without their parents must be granted a “general policy favoring release” to the custody of relatives or a foster program. When there is cause to detain a child, he or she must be housed in the least restrictive environment possible, kept away from unrelated adults and provided access to medical care, exercise and adequate education. Whether these protections apply to children traveling with their parents has been a matter of dispute. The Flores settlement refers to “all minors who are detained” by the Immigration and Naturalization Service and its “agents, employees, contractors and/or successors in office.” When the I.N.S. dissolved into the Department of Homeland Security in 2003, its detention program shifted to the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency. Federal judges have ruled that ICE is required to honor the Flores protections for all children in its custody.Even so, in 2005, the administration of George W. Bush decided to deny the Flores protections to refugee children traveling with their parents. Instead of a “general policy favoring release,” the administration began to incarcerate hundreds of those families for months at a time. To house them, officials opened the T. Don Hutto Family Detention Center near Austin, Tex. Within a year, the administration faced a lawsuit over the facility’s conditions. Legal filings describe young children forced to wear prison jumpsuits, to live in dormitory housing, to use toilets exposed to public view and to sleep with the lights on, even while being denied access to appropriate schooling. In a pretrial hearing, a federal judge in Texas blasted the administration for denying these children the protections of the Flores settlement. “The court finds it inexplicable that defendants have spent untold amounts of time, effort and taxpayer dollars to establish the Hutto family-detention program, knowing all the while that Flores is still in effect,” the judge wrote. The Bush administration settled the suit with a promise to improve the conditions at Hutto but continued to deny that children in family detention were entitled to the Flores protections.In 2009, the Obama administration reversed course, abolishing family detention at Hutto and leaving only a small facility in Pennsylvania to house refugee families in exceptional circumstances. For all other refugee families, the administration returned to a policy of release to await trial. Studies have shown that nearly all detainees who are released from custody with some form of monitoring will appear for their court date. But when the number of refugees from Central America spiked last summer, the administration abruptly announced plans to resume family detention.From the beginning, officials were clear that the purpose of the new facility in Artesia was not so much to review asylum petitions as to process deportation orders. “We have already added resources to expedite the removal, without a hearing before an immigration judge, of adults who come from these three countries without children,” the secretary of Homeland Security, Jeh Johnson, told a Senate committee in July. “Then there are adults who brought their children with them. Again, our message to this group is simple: We will send you back.” Elected officials in Artesia say that Johnson made a similar pledge during a visit to the detention camp in July. “He said, ‘As soon as we get them, we’ll ship them back,’ ” a city councilor from Artesia named Jose Luis Aguilar recalled. The mayor of the city, Phillip Burch, added, “His comment to us was that this would be a ‘rapid deportation process.’ Those were his exact words.”***DURING THE FIRST five weeks that the Artesia facility was open, officials deported more than 200 refugees to Central America. But as word of the detention camp began to spread, volunteers like Christina Brown trickled into town. Their goal was to stop the deportations, schedule asylum hearings for the detainees and, whenever possible, release the women and children on bond. Many of the lawyers who came to Artesia were young mothers, and they saw in the detained children a resemblance to their own. By last fall, roughly 200 volunteers were rotating through town in shifts: renting rooms in local motels, working 12-hour days to interview detainees and file asylum paperwork, then staying awake into the night to consult one another. Some volunteers returned to Artesia multiple times. A few spent more than a month there. Brown never moved back to Denver. She rented a little yellow house by the detention facility, took up office space in a local church and, with help from a nonprofit group called the American Immigration Lawyers Association, or AILA, she began to organize the volunteers pouring in.As Brown got to know detainees in Artesia, grim patterns emerged from their stories. One was the constant threat of gangs in their lives; another was the prevalence of sexual violence. A detainee in Artesia named Sofia explained that a gang murdered her brother, shot her husband and then kidnapped and raped her 14-year-old stepdaughter. A Guatemalan woman named Kira said that she fled when a gang targeted her family over their involvement in a nonviolence movement at church; when Kira’s husband went into hiding, the gang subjected her to repeated sexual assaults and threatened to cut her unborn baby from her womb. An inmate named Marisol said she crossed the U.S. border in June after a gang in Honduras murdered the father of her 3-year-old twins, then turned its attention to her.Less than a week after her arrival in Artesia, Brown represented the young Salvadoran mother she met on her first day. It was a preliminary hearing to see whether the woman met the basic preconditions for asylum. A frequent consideration in the refugee process is whether an applicant is being targeted as a member of a “particular social group.” Judges have interpreted the phrase to include a refugee’s victimhood on the basis of sex or sexual orientation. At the hearing, Brown planned to invoke the pervasiveness of gang violence and sexual assault, but she says the immigration judge refused to let her speak.“I wasn’t allowed to play any role,” Brown said. Speaking to the judge, her client described her husband’s murder and the threats she faced from gangs. “She testified very well,” Brown said. But when the judge asked whether she felt targeted as a member of a “social group,” the woman said no. “Because that is a legal term of art,” Brown said. “She had no idea what the heck it means.” Brown tried to interject, but the judge wouldn’t allow it. He denied the woman’s request for an asylum hearing and slated her for deportation. Afterward, Brown said, “I went behind one of the cubicles, and I started sobbing uncontrollably.”

Detainees who passed their initial hearings often found themselves stranded in Artesia without bond. Lawyers for Homeland Security have adopted a policy they call “no bond or high bond” for the women and children in detention. In court filings, they insist that prolonged detention is necessary to “further screen the detainees and have a better chance of identifying any that present threats to our public safety and national security.” Allowing these young mothers and children to be free on bond, they claim, “would have indirect yet significant adverse national-security consequences.”

As the months ticked by in Artesia, many detainees began to wonder if they would ever be free again. “I arrived on July 5 and turned myself in at 2 a.m.,” a 28-year-old mother of two named Ana recalled. In Honduras, Ana ran a small business selling trinkets and served on the P.T.A. of her daughter’s school. “I lived well,” she said — until the gangs began to pound on her door, demanding extortion payments. Within days, they had escalated their threats, approaching Ana brazenly on the street. “One day, coming home from my daughter’s school, they walked up to me and put a gun to my head,” she said. “They told me that if I didn’t give them the money in less than 24 hours, they would kill me.” Ana had already seen friends raped and murdered by the gang, so she packed her belongings that night and began the 1,800-mile journey to the U.S. border with her 7-year-old daughter. Four weeks later, in McAllen, Tex., they surrendered as refugees.

Ana and her daughter entered Artesia in mid-July. In October they were still there. Ana’s daughter was sick and losing weight rapidly under the strain of incarceration. Their lawyer, a leader in Chicago’s Mormon Church named Rebecca van Uitert, said that Ana’s daughter became so weak and emaciated that doctors threatened drastic measures. “They were like, ‘You’ve got to force her to eat, and if you don’t, we’re going to put a PICC line in her and force-feed her,’ ” van Uitert said. Ana said that when her daughter heard the doctor say this, “She started to cry and cry.”

In October, as van Uitert presented Ana’s case to an immigration judge, the lawyer broke down in the courtroom. “I’m starting to make these arguments before the judge, and I just couldn’t,” she said. “I sounded like a barking seal, just sucking and gasping, and because I was crying, a lot of people started crying. The attorney next to me was crying, Ana was crying, her little girl started crying. I looked over at the bailiff, who actually ended up being my friend when I went back another time. He had tears in his eyes.” The judge granted Ana’s release on bond; she is currently waiting for an asylum hearing in North Carolina.

Many of the volunteers in Artesia tell similar stories about the misery of life in the facility. “I thought I was pretty tough,” said Allegra Love, who spent the previous summer working on the border between Mexico and Guatemala. “I mean, I had seen kids in all manner of suffering, but this was a really different thing. It’s a jail, and the women and children are being led around by guards. There’s this look that the kids have in their eyes. This lackadaisical look. They’re just sitting there, staring off, and they’re wasting away. That was what shocked me most.”

The detainees reported sleeping eight to a room, in violation of the Flores settlement, with little exercise or stimulation for the children. Many were under the age of 6 and had been raised on a diet of tortillas, rice and chicken bits. In Artesia, the institutional cafeteria foods were as unfamiliar as the penal atmosphere, and to their parents’ horror, many of the children refused to eat. “Gaunt kids, moms crying, they’re losing hair, up all night,” an attorney named Maria Andrade recalled. Another, Lisa Johnson-Firth, said: “I saw children who were malnourished and were not adapting. One 7-year-old just lay in his mother’s arms while she bottle-fed him.” Mary O’Leary, who made three trips to Artesia last fall, said: “I was trying to talk to one client about her case, and just a few feet away at another table there was this lady with a toddler between 2 and 4 years old, just lying limp. This was a sick kid, and just with this horrible racking cough.”

***

IN EARLY AUGUST, a paralegal from Oregon named Vanessa Sischo arrived at the camp. Raised in a small town near Mount Hood, Sischo did not realize until high school that her parents brought her into the United States from Mexico as an infant without documentation. She gained protection from deportation under the president’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program in 2012. When Sischo learned that children arriving from Central America were being incarcerated in Artesia, she volunteered immediately. She arrived a week after Christina Brown, and like Brown, she stayed. After about a month, AILA and another nonprofit, the American Immigration Council, hired Brown as the pro bono project’s lead attorney. Brown recommended Sischo for the job of project coordinator. The two women began rooming together in the small yellow house near Main Street.

Brown and Sischo make an unlikely pair. Brown, who has a sturdy build and dark brown hair, has an inborn skepticism and a piercing wit. Sischo is six years younger and preternaturally easygoing. Until she discovered her own immigration background, she had little interest in political affairs and spent much of her time in Oregon as a competitive snowboarder. For both, Artesia was a jarring shift from life at home. As they sat together one evening in December, they described a typical week. “The new volunteers come in on Sunday, go through orientation, and by Wednesday night, everyone is crying,” Brown said. “A lot of the attorneys come in and say: ‘I’ve been doing this for 20 years. I’ve seen all of this before. I’ll be fine.’ ”

“I remember the first time I went in,” Sischo said. “I just stopped, and all I could hear was a symphony of coughing and sneezing and crying and wailing.”

“Kids vomiting all over the place,” Brown said.

“There was a big outbreak of fevers,” Sischo said. “It sent an infant into convulsions.”

“Pneumonia, scabies, lice,” Brown said.

Officials for ICE say these accounts are exaggerated. But they declined multiple requests to visit the Artesia facility and took weeks to answer questions about its facilities. Brown, who oversaw more than 500 detainee cases as lead attorney, was also unable to gain access to the camp’s housing, dining, medical and educational facilities. “I requested three times to be taken on a tour,” she said. “I sent it through the appropriate channels. No one ever responded, to date, to my request.”

Visitors who did gain access to the facility have raised troubling questions about the ethics — and legality — of how it handled children. The Flores settlement requires the government to provide regular schooling for juveniles in detention, but the mayor of Artesia, Phillip Burch, said that on several visits to the compound, the classrooms were always empty. “I was told that children were attending classes,” he recalled. “Did I personally witness it? No. And none of the tours that I made did I see the children actually in class.” Members of the New Mexico Faith Coalition for Immigrant Justice, who toured the facility in October, say that officials also showed them the empty school. When one member asked why the building was empty, an ICE official replied that school was temporarily closed. Detainees have consistently told their lawyers that the school was never reliably open. They recall a few weeks in October when classes were in session for an hour or two per day, then several weeks of closure through November, followed by another brief period of classes in December.

In response to questions about the school, ICE officials would say only that “regular school instruction began Oct. 13, 2014, and ended Dec. 17.” Asked whether the school was open consistently, and for how many hours, ICE officials declined to respond. The senior counselor for immigration issues at the Department of Homeland Security, Esther Olavarria, said that she was aware “there were challenges” at the Artesia school, but couldn’t say exactly when it was open or for how long. Olavarria has a distinguished record as advocate for refugees and previously served as a top immigration adviser for Senator Edward M. Kennedy. She said that she was under the impression that attorneys in Artesia were granted access to the facility, and she could not explain why Brown was not. She also believed that the meal service in Artesia was adapted to reflect the dietary norms of Central America and that medical care was adequate and available. After hearing what detainees, attorneys, faith advocates and elected officials described in Artesia, Olavarria promised to look into these issues and provide further documentation. Despite several attempts to elicit that documentation, she provided none. In a statement, the Department of Homeland Security said: “The regular school instruction began Oct. 13, 2014, but was suspended shortly thereafter in order to ensure appropriate vetting of all teachers.” Officials say that school resumed on Oct. 24 and continued through Dec. 17.

Attorneys for the Obama administration have argued in court, like the Bush administration previously, that the protections guaranteed by the Flores settlement do not apply to children in family detention. “The Flores settlement comes into play with unaccompanied minors,” a lawyer for the Department of Homeland Security named Karen Donoso Stevens insisted to a judge on Aug. 4. “That argument is moot here, because the juvenile is detained — is accompanied and detained — with his mother.”

Federal judges have consistently rejected this position. Just as the judge reviewing family detention in 2007 called the denial of Flores protections “inexplicable,” the judge presiding over the Aug. 4 hearing issued a ruling in September that Homeland Security officials in Artesia must honor the Flores Settlement Agreement. “The language of the F.S.A. is unambiguous,” Judge Roxanne Hladylowycz wrote. “The F.S.A. was designed to create a nationwide policy for the detention of all minors, not only those who are unaccompanied.” Olavarria said she was not aware of that ruling and would not comment on whether the Department of Homeland Security believes that the Flores ruling applies to children in family detention today.

***

AS THE PRO BONO project in Artesia continued into fall, its attorneys continued to win in court. By mid-November, more than 400 of the detained women and children were free on bond. Then on Nov. 20, the administration suddenly announced plans to transfer the Artesia detainees to the ICE detention camp in Karnes, Tex., where they would fall under a new immigration court district with a new slate of judges.

That announcement came at the very moment the president was delivering a live address on the new protections available to established immigrant families. In an email to notify Artesia volunteers about the transfer, an organizer for AILA named Stephen Manning wrote, “The disconnect from the compassionate-ish words of the president and his crushing policies toward these refugees is shocking.” Brown was listening to the speech in her car, while driving to Denver for a rare weekend at home, when her cellphone buzzed with the news that 20 of her clients would be transferred to Texas the next morning. Many of them were close to a bond release; in San Antonio, they might be detained for weeks or months longer. Brown pulled her car to the side of the highway and spent three hours arguing to delay the transfer. Over the next two weeks, officials moved forward with the plan.

By mid-December, most of the Artesia detainees were in Karnes, and Brown and Sischo were scrambling to pack the contents of their home and office. On the afternoon of Dec. 16, they threw their final bags into a U-Haul, its cargo area crammed with laundry baskets, suitcases, file boxes and hiking backpacks, all wedged precariously in place, then set out for the eight-hour drive across the desert to central Texas.

The next morning, a law professor named Barbara Hines was also speeding into San Antonio. Hines is a wiry woman in her 60s with a burst of black curls and an aspect of bristling intensity. In the battle over refugee detention, she is something of a seminal figure for advocates like Brown and Sischo. As co-director of the Immigration Law Clinic at the University of Texas, Hines helped lead the 2007 lawsuit against the Hutto facility, which brought about its closure in 2009 and the abolition of widespread family detention until last summer. When the Obama administration announced plans to resume the practice in Artesia, Hines was outraged; when officials opened the second facility in Karnes, just two hours from her home in Austin, Hines began to organize a pro bono project of her own. Although she’d never met Brown or Sischo, she had been running a parallel operation for months. Now that they were in Texas, Hines was eager to meet them.

But first, she had a client to represent. Hines pulled into a parking lot behind the immigration court in downtown San Antonio and rushed inside, up a clattering elevator to the third floor and down a long hallway to a cramped courtroom. At the front, behind a vast wooden desk, sat Judge Glenn McPhaul, a tidy man with slicked hair and a pencil mustache. He presided from an elevated platform, with a clerk to his right, an interpreter to his left, and a large television monitor in the corner. On screen was the pale and grainy image of a dozen exhausted Central American women.

These were just a few of the Karnes detainees, linked by video feed to the courtroom. Another 500 women and children were in the compound with them. There was no legal distinction between their cases and those of the women in Artesia; they had simply been sent to a different facility, weeks or months earlier. Each of them, like the women in Artesia, had already been through the early stages of the asylum process — presenting herself to immigration authorities, asking for refugee status and passing the “credible-fear interview” to confirm a basis for her claim. But the odds of release in Karnes were worse. One of McPhaul’s colleagues, Judge Gary Burkholder, was averaging a 91.6 percent denial rate for the asylum claims. Some Karnes detainees had been in the facility for nearly six months and could remain there another six.

***

THE SITTING AREA of the courtroom was nearly empty, save for half a dozen attorneys. Many of the volunteers at Karnes are friends and former students of Hines, who has been drafting every licensed lawyer she can find. As she slid down the long bench to a seat, she nodded to some of the attorneys in the room and stopped to whisper with another. Then she spent a few minutes fidgeting with her phone until the clerk called her client’s name, and Hines sprang forward, slipping past the bar rail to a table facing the judge. On the television screen, her client, Juana, was stepping toward the camera at Karnes. She was a young woman with a narrow face and deep eyes. Her hair was pulled back to reveal high cheekbones and a somber expression.

McPhaul asked the stenographer to begin transcription, then he commenced with the ritualized exchange of detention proceedings, recording the names of the attorneys, the detainee and everyone on the bench. He noted the introduction of a series of legal documents and confirmed that Juana was still happy to be represented by Hines. There was a stream of legal jargon and a few perfunctory remarks about the status of the case, all of it in clipped judicial vernacular and a flat, indifferent tone. Then McPhaul set a date for the next hearing, at which Hines could begin to present an argument for Juana’s release on bond.

For now, Juana’s turn was over; the whole affair took less than 10 minutes, without any meaningful discussion of her case or its merits. As Hines stepped out of the courtroom, Juana was turning away from the camera to return to her children in Karnes. It was impossible to say how much of the hearing she understood, since none of the proceedings were translated into Spanish. The courtroom interpreter was there only to translate the judge’s questions and the detainees’ responses; everything else was said exclusively in English, including the outcome. For all that Juana knew, she might have been granted reprieve or confined for another six months.

Over the next two hours, the scene would repeat a dozen times. Each time McPhaul called a name, a new lawyer would step forward, taking a seat before the bench and proceeding through the verbal Kabuki. In a few cases, McPhaul offered the detainee the opportunity to post bond — usually around $3,000. But the courtroom interpreter was not allowed to convey this news to the detainee, either. If the pro bono attorney spoke Spanish fluently, there might be a few minutes at the end of the session to explain what happened. If not, the detainee would return to custody and might not discover that she had been granted bond until, or unless, someone paid it.

These, of course, were the lucky women with an attorney to represent them at all. Although the families in Artesia and Karnes have been detained in an environment that closely resembles incarceration, there is no requirement in American law to provide them with the sort of legal representation afforded to other defendants. Unlike the Artesia project, where the involvement of AILA brought in hundreds of volunteers from across the country, Hines could scrape together only so many friends and compatriots to lend their time. She formed a partnership with the Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services, or Raices, in San Antonio, and the law firm Akin Gump assigned a young lawyer named Lauren Connell to help organize the Karnes project. But there still weren’t enough lawyers to represent the detainees, and Hines and Connell were forced to evaluate which cases were most likely to win. The remaining refugees would proceed to court alone. They would understand little of what happened, and most would be deported.

It was difficult for Hines to think about what might happen to those women next. The refugees who are returned to Central America can be subject to even greater harassment by gangs for having fled. Hector Hernandez, a morgue operator in Honduras, has said that children who come back from U.S. detention “return just to die.” Jose Luis Aguilar, the city councilor for Artesia, recalled a group deportation on the day in July when Secretary Jeh Johnson visited the facility. “He came in the morning, and that same night, they took 79 people and shipped them to El Salvador on the ICE plane,” Aguilar said. “We got reports later that 10 kids had been killed. The church group confirmed that with four of the mortuaries where they went.”

***

HINES WAS HOPING the attorneys from Artesia would help represent the women in Karnes, but she had no idea whether they would be willing to do so. This was her agenda for the first meeting with Christina Brown, which took place that afternoon in a sunlit conference room in the downtown offices of Akin Gump. Hines sat at the head of a long table, with Lauren Connell to her left and an attorney from Raices named Steven Walden to her right. After a few minutes, Brown appeared in the doorway. She was wearing the same green T-shirt and black leggings she had been wearing the day before in Artesia, and she smiled sheepishly, offering a handshake to Hines.

“I’m really sorry,” Brown said with a small laugh. “I want to let you know that I believe very strongly in first impressions — but I am living out of a U-Haul right now.”

Hines smiled sympathetically as they sat down. “So,” she said. “What are you all going to do here?”

Brown paused. “Well, we know we’re going to be continuing our cases,” she said.

“Mmm-hmm,” Hines said.

“And I’m working on cleaning up our spreadsheet and figuring out who’s here,” Brown said. “Many of our clients who were transferred here had already been granted bond.”

“Wait,” Connell said. “They transferred them here to have them bond out?”

Brown sighed. “Yes,” she said.

“That’s ridiculous,” Connell said.

“We’ve had numerous fights on this issue,” Brown said. “We’ve had family members go to pay, and they can’t because the client is already in transit to Karnes.”

Hines shook her head in disbelief.

“It’s been kind of a nightmare,” Brown said.

“Do you have people who have been detained more than 90 days?” Hines asked.

“Every one we’re going forward with on merits has been detained more than 90 days,” Brown said. “So I want to see how you all are moving forward, so I can see what resources are here for Artesia clients.”

Hines laughed. “We can barely staff our cases,” she said. “My hope was that people who were at Artesia, after they’re finished your cases, are going to help with ours.”

“If she says that enough, maybe it will come true,” Connell said.

Brown shook her head. “At the moment, I can commit to nothing,” she said. “Right now, I’m the only attorney, and there’s no guarantee that other volunteers are coming.”

Hines and Connell exchanged a look. Even if the Artesia lawyers could double or triple their workload, the number of detainees would soon overwhelm them. The day before, officials in Karnes had approved a plan to expand the detention facility from about 500 beds to roughly 1,100. At the same time, two hours west of Karnes, in the little town of Dilley, the Department of Homeland Security was about to open another refugee camp for women and children. It would be the largest detention facility in the country, with up to 2,400 beds. If Hines and Brown had trouble finding lawyers to represent a few hundred women and children, there was little chance of generating support for more than 3,000.

***

AFTER THE MEETING, Brown returned to her motel and spent the afternoon searching for an apartment, but the options were limited, and by late afternoon, she and Sischo still had nowhere to live. They decided to spend their first evening in Texas at a vegetarian restaurant downtown. As they settled into a booth at the back of the cafe, they talked about the situation they’d left behind in Artesia, where much of the town opposed the detention facility and the lawyers with equal measure. Town-hall meetings in Artesia became so heated that city officials asked the police to stand guard.

“For people there, it’s a resource issue,” Brown said. “They blame the immigrant community for coming in and being jailed, and for us having to educate their children, when they would like more resources put into their own schools.”

Sischo nodded. “That’s what a guy at the electronics store said: ‘Oh, you’re helping the illegals?’ That’s how they view it. I remember a sign that a protester was holding that was like, ‘What about our children?’ ”

“It’s a legitimate question,” Brown said. “They don’t have a lot of resources in that town, and they should have more.”

“I agree,” Sischo said. “We should not be spending resources on detaining these families. They should be released. But people don’t understand the law. They think they should be deported because they’re ‘illegals.’ So they’re missing a very big part of the story, which is that they aren’t breaking the law. They’re trying to go through the process that’s laid out in our laws.”

For Sischo, seeing the families struggle — families much like her own — was almost more than she could stand. On visits to her parents in Oregon, she struggled to maintain composure. “Every time I’ve gone home, I’ve just cried pretty much nonstop,” she said. “It’s grief and anger and hopelessness and confusion as to how this could happen and whether we’re making a difference.”

For Brown, by contrast, the same experiences seemed to have amplified her energy and commitment. “I haven’t had time to go home and cry yet,” she said. “Maybe I’ll get a job at Dilley, because then I won’t have to process anything!” Brown laughed, but she acknowledged that some part of her was ready to commit to the nomadic life of a legal activist, parachuting into crises for a few months at a time. “That appeals to me,” she said. “It’s nice to be where people need you.”

As dinner came to an end, Brown and Sischo stepped outside into the night. They had parked the U-Haul in a nearby lot, and it had just been towed.

***

IN THE COMING YEAR, most of the families who are currently in detention will wend their way through the refugee system. Some will be released on bond to await their asylum hearing; others will remain in custody until their hearings are complete. Those without an attorney will most likely fail to articulate a reason for their claim in the appropriate jargon of the immigration courts and will be deported to face whatever horror they hoped to flee. Of the 15 families who have been shepherded through the process by the volunteer lawyers so far, 14 have received asylum — “Which should be all you need to know about the validity of their claims,” Brown said.

By late spring, the construction of the new facility at Dilley should be complete. It already represents a drastic departure from the refugee camp in Artesia. Managed by the Corrections Corporation of America, the largest private prison company in the country, the South Texas Family Residential Center has its own promotional website with promissory images of the spacious classrooms, libraries, play areas and lounges that will eventually be available to refugees in long-term detention. Architectural drawings for the site show eight distinct neighborhoods on the campus, with dormitory housing, outdoor pavilions, a chapel and several playgrounds. How much of this will ultimately materialize remains to be seen. Last week, C.C.A. listed job openings for child care workers, library aides and mailroom clerks at the site.

Esther Olavarria, the senior counselor for immigration issues at the Department of Homeland Security, acknowledged that there had been shortcomings in Artesia but described the Dilley facility as a correction. “We stood up Artesia very, very quickly and did the best that we could under the circumstances,” Olavarria said. “As concerns were brought to our attention by advocates, we worked with them to try to address the concerns as quickly as possible.”

Many advocates have expressed concerns about the Dilley facility as well. Its management company, C.C.A., is the same firm that ran the Hutto detention center, and it has been at the center of other significant controversies in recent years. In 2006, federal investigators reported that conditions at a C.C.A. immigration jail in Eloy, Ariz., were so lacking that “detainee welfare is in jeopardy.” Last March, the F.B.I. started an investigation of C.C.A. over a facility the company ran in Idaho, known by inmates as the “Gladiator School” because of unchecked fighting; in 2010, a video surfaced of guards watching one inmate beat another into a coma. Two years ago, C.C.A. executives admitted that employees falsified 4,800 hours of business records. The state has now taken control of the facility.

The management contract at Dilley was also created with unusual terms. In their hurry to open the new facility, officials for the Obama administration bypassed normal bidding procedures and established Dilley under an existing contract for the troubled C.C.A. jail in Eloy. Although the Dilley camp is nearly 1,000 miles away from Eloy, all federal funding for the new camp in Texas will flow through the small town in Arizona, which will keep $438,000 of the annual operating budget as compensation. Eloy city officials say they do not expect to monitor, or even visit, the Dilley facility.

Any new refugees who surrender this spring may spend more than a year in Dilley before their asylum hearings can be scheduled. Olavarria said that officials hope the process will move more quickly, but it will depend on the immigration courts in San Antonio, which fall under the Department of Justice. “From what I’ve heard from the Justice Department, generally it’s not taking 18 months,” Olavarria said. “We’re hearing that cases are being completed in a shorter time. But it’s a case-by-case situation that depends on the complexity, it depends on continuances that are provided to seek counsel, to prepare for cases, all those kinds of things.” The cost to house each detainee at Dilley is about $108,000 per year. A study funded by the Immigration and Naturalization Service, of more than 500 detainees between 1997 and 2000, found that 93 percent will appear in court when placed in a monitoring program. The savings of such a program for the 2,400 detainees at Dilley would be about $250 million per year.

Officials from the Department of Homeland Security say the facilities in Karnes and Dilley are still insufficient to house the detainees they expect to process in the coming year. “Last year, we saw 60,000 families come in,” Olavarria said. “We’re hoping we don’t see those kinds of numbers this year, but even if we see half, those two facilities would hold a fraction of those numbers.” Olavarria said the department was not yet considering additional facilities. “We are in the middle of a battle with the Congress on our funding, so there’s very little discussion about long-term planning,” she said.

For now, the Artesia facility is closed, its bunk beds and hallways empty. Brown and Sischo remain in Texas; they rescued their U-Haul from an impound lot and found an apartment soon thereafter. That same week, an email from the mayor of Artesia, Phillip Burch, was circulating among city residents. “The pro bono attorneys have left our community,” he wrote. “Hopefully not to return.”


Wil S. Hylton is a contributing writer at The New York Times Magazine and the author of Vanished. His complete archive is available on Longform.


Gaza: Quand la condamnation tourne à l’incitation (Behind the smoke and mirrors, guess who’s abetting Hamas’s carefully planned and orchestrated military operation to break through the border of a sovereign state and commit mass murder in the communities beyond using their own civilians as cover ?)

19 mai, 2018
Malheur à ceux qui appellent le mal bien, et le bien mal, qui changent les ténèbres en lumière, et la lumière en ténèbres, qui changent l’amertume en douceur, et la douceur en amertume! Esaïe 5: 20
« Dionysos contre le « crucifié » : la voici bien l’opposition. Ce n’est pas une différence quant au martyr – mais celui-ci a un sens différent. La vie même, son éternelle fécondité, son éternel retour, détermine le tourment, la destruction, la volonté d’anéantir pour Dionysos. Dans l’autre cas, la souffrance, le « crucifié » en tant qu’il est « innocent », sert d’argument contre cette vie, de formulation de sa condamnation.  (…) L’individu a été si bien pris au sérieux, si bien posé comme un absolu par le christianisme, qu’on ne pouvait plus le sacrifier : mais l’espèce ne survit que grâce aux sacrifices humains… La véritable philanthropie exige le sacrifice pour le bien de l’espèce – elle est dure, elle oblige à se dominer soi-même, parce qu’elle a besoin du sacrifice humain. Et cette pseudo-humanité qui s’institue christianisme, veut précisément imposer que personne ne soit sacrifié. Nietzsche
Où est Dieu? cria-t-il, je vais vous le dire! Nous l’avons tué – vous et moi! Nous tous sommes ses meurtriers! Mais comment avons-nous fait cela? Comment avons-nous pu vider la mer? Qui nous a donné l’éponge pour effacer l’horizon tout entier? Dieu est mort! (…) Et c’est nous qui l’avons tué ! (…) Ce que le monde avait possédé jusqu’alors de plus sacré et de plus puissant a perdu son sang sous nos couteaux (…) Quelles solennités expiatoires, quels jeux sacrés nous faudra-t-il inventer? Nietzsche
Le christianisme est une rébellion contre la loi naturelle, une protestation contre la nature. Poussé à sa logique extrême, le christianisme signifierait la culture systématique de l’échec humain. […] Mais il n’est pas question que le national-socialisme se mette un jour à singer la religion en établissant une forme de culte. Sa seule ambition doit être de construire scientifiquement une doctrine qui ne soit rien de plus qu’un hommage à la raison […] Il n’est donc pas opportun de nous lancer maintenant dans un combat avec les Églises. Le mieux est de laisser le christianisme mourir de mort naturelle. Une mort lente a quelque chose d’apaisant. Le dogme du christianisme s’effrite devant les progrès de la science. La religion devra faire de plus en plus de concessions. Les mythes se délabrent peu à peu. Il ne reste plus qu’à prouver que dans la nature il n’existe aucune frontière entre l’organique et l’inorganique. Quand la connaissance de l’univers se sera largement répandue, quand la plupart des hommes sauront que les étoiles ne sont pas des sources de lumière mais des mondes, peut-être des mondes habités comme le nôtre, alors la doctrine chrétienne sera convaincue d’absurdité […] Tout bien considéré, nous n’avons aucune raison de souhaiter que les Italiens et les Espagnols se libèrent de la drogue du christianisme. Soyons les seuls à être immunisés contre cette maladie. Adolf Hitler
Nous avons constaté que le sport était la religion moderne du monde occidental. Nous savions que les publics anglais et américain assis devant leur poste de télévision ne regarderaient pas un programme exposant le sort des Palestiniens s’il y avait une manifestation sportive sur une autre chaîne. Nous avons donc décidé de nous servir des Jeux olympiques, cérémonie la plus sacrée de cette religion, pour obliger le monde à faire attention à nous. Nous avons offert des sacrifices humains à vos dieux du sport et de la télévision et ils ont répondu à nos prières. Terroriste palestinien (Jeux olympiques de Munich, 1972)
La même force culturelle et spirituelle qui a joué un rôle si décisif dans la disparition du sacrifice humain est aujourd’hui en train de provoquer la disparition des rituels de sacrifice humain qui l’ont jadis remplacé. Tout cela semble être une bonne nouvelle, mais à condition que ceux qui comptaient sur ces ressources rituelles soient en mesure de les remplacer par des ressources religieuses durables d’un autre genre. Priver une société des ressources sacrificielles rudimentaires dont elle dépend sans lui proposer d’alternatives, c’est la plonger dans une crise qui la conduira presque certainement à la violence. Gil Bailie
More ink equals more blood,  newspaper coverage of terrorist incidents leads directly to more attacks. It’s a macabre example of win-win in what economists call a « common-interest game. Both the media and terrorists benefit from terrorist incidents. Terrorists get free publicity for themselves and their cause. The media, meanwhile, make money « as reports of terror attacks increase newspaper sales and the number of television viewers. Bruno S. Frey et Dominic Rohner
Amidst the national mourning for the many innocent lives lost in these senseless shooting sprees, it is critical not to overreact and overrespond to the menacing acts of a few. It is, of course, of little comfort to those families and communities impacted in Santa Fe as well as Parkland, Florida, and Benton, Kentucky, but this is not routine. Schools are not under siege. Rather, this more likely reflects a short-term contagion effect in which angry dispirited youngsters are inspired by others whose violent outbursts serve as fodder for national attention. That should subside once we stop obsessing over the risk. History provides an important lesson about how crime contagions arise and eventually play themselves out. Over the five-year time span from 1997 through 2001, America witnessed seven multiple-fatality school rampages with a combined 32 killed and 85 others injured, more such incidents and casualties than during the past five years. (…) Many observers have expressed concern for the excessive attention given to mass shooters of today and the deadliest of yesteryear. CNN’s Anderson Cooper has campaigned against naming names of mass shooters, and 147 criminologists, sociologists, psychologists and other human-behavior experts recently signed on to an open letter urging the media not to identify mass shooters or display their photos. While I appreciate the concern for name and visual identification of mass shooters for fear of inspiring copycats as well as to avoid insult to the memory of those they slaughtered, names and faces are not the problem. It is the excessive detail — too much information — about the killers, their writings, and their backgrounds that unnecessarily humanizes them. We come to know more about them — their interests and their disappointments — than we do about our next door neighbors. Too often the line is crossed between news reporting and celebrity watch. At the same time, we focus far too much on records. We constantly are reminded that some shooting is the largest in a particular state over a given number of years, as if that really matters. Would the massacre be any less tragic if it didn’t exceed the death toll of some prior incident? Moreover, we are treated to published lists of the largest mass shootings in modern US history. For whatever purpose we maintain records, they are there to be broken and can challenge a bitter and suicidal assailant to outgun his violent role models. Although the spirited advocacy of students around the country regarding gun control is to be applauded, we need to keep some perspective about the risk. Slogans like, “I want to go to my graduation, not to my grave,” are powerful, yet hyperbolic. As often said, even one death is one too many, and we need to take the necessary steps to protect children, including expanded funding for school teachers and school psychologists. Still, despite the occasional tragedy, our schools are safe, safer than they have been for decades. James Alan Fox (Northeastern University)
Hélas les morts ne sont que d’un seul côté. Benoit Hamon
A Gaza et dans les territoires occupés, ils ont [les meurtres de violées] représenté deux tiers des homicides » (…) Les femmes palestiniennes violées par les soldats israéliens sont systématiquement tuées par leur propre famille. Ici, le viol devient un crime de guerre, car les soldats israéliens agissent en parfaite connaissance de cause. Sara Daniel (Le Nouvel Observateur, le 8 novembre 2001)
Dans le numéro 1931 du Nouvel Observateur, daté du 8 novembre 2001, Sara Daniel a publié un reportage sur le « crime d’honneur » en Jordanie. Dans son texte, elle révélait qu’à Gaza et dans les territoires occupés, les crimes dits d’honneur qui consistent pour des pères ou des frères à abattre les femmes jugées légères représentaient une part importante des homicides. Le texte publié, en raison d’un défaut de guillemets et de la suppression de deux phrases dans la transmission, laissait penser que son auteur faisait sienne l’accusation selon laquelle il arrivait à des soldats israéliens de commettre un viol en sachant, de plus, que les femmes violées allaient être tuées. Il n’en était évidemment rien et Sara Daniel, actuellement en reportage en Afghanistan, fait savoir qu’elle déplore très vivement cette erreur qui a gravement dénaturé sa pensée. Une mise au point de Sara Daniel (Le Nouvel Observateur, le 15 novembre 2001)
Pendant qu’une petite fille palestinienne mourait d’avoir inhalé des gaz lacrymogènes à Gaza, à Jérusalem, à moins d’une heure et demie de là par la route, on sablait le champagne, lundi, pour fêter le déménagement de l’ambassade américaine. Malgré les snipers israéliens, les Gazaouis auront donc continué à se presser devant la clôture de séparation de cette prison maudite et à ciel ouvert que représente l’enclave de Gaza, honte d’Israël et de la communauté internationale, pour achever la « Marche du grand retour », entamée le 30 mars et censée se conclure ce 15 mai. Une marche pour réclamer les terres perdues au moment de la création d’Israël, il y a soixante-dix ans, mais surtout la fin du blocus israélo-égyptien qui étouffe Gaza. Au cours de ce lundi noir, 59 personnes ont été tuées, et plus de 2.400 ont été blessées par balles. Encore une fois le conflit israélo-palestinien a joué la guerre des images, au cours de ce jour si symbolique. Les Israéliens fêtaient les 70 ans de la naissance de leur Etat, le miracle de son existence, l’incroyable longévité de ce confetti minuscule entouré de nations hostiles. Les Palestiniens commémoraient, eux, leur « catastrophe », leur Nakba, qui les a poussés sur les routes de l’exil, dans l’indifférence d’une communauté internationale lassée par un conflit interminable, happée par d’autres hécatombes plus pressantes. C’est avec cette Marche que les Gazaouis ont tenté de revenir sur la carte des préoccupations mondiales et de rappeler leur agonie à un monde qui les oublie. Pendant ce temps, Israéliens, Américains, Saoudiens et Egyptiens célèbrent leur alliance sur le dos de ces vaincus de l’histoire, les pressant d’accepter un accord, ce que Donald Trump a appelé le « deal ultime », dont les contours sont encore flous mais dont on peut être certain qu’il entérinerait leur déroute. Mais pourquoi les Israéliens ont-ils cédé à cette violence inouïe et inutile alors que, de leur aveu même, le vrai sujet de leurs inquiétudes était le front du Nord avec le Hezbollah et l’Iran ? Est-ce l’hubris des vainqueurs ? En tout cas, Israël n’a pas entendu l’avertissement de Houda Naim, députée du Hamas. (…) Alors, les manifestants ont-ils été manipulés par leurs organisations politiques ? La question est obscène lorsque que la marche, commencée il y a six semaines, a déjà fait plus de 100 morts. Bien sûr, le Hamas, débordé par cette manifestation civile et pacifique, a rejoint le mouvement. A-t-il encouragé les Gazaouis à provoquer les soldats israéliens, les conduisant à une mort certaine ? Peut-être, et le gouvernement israélien l’affirmera. Mais cela ne suffirait pas à expliquer la détermination d’une population excédée, désespérée par ses conditions d’existence. Ce qui vient de se passer à Gaza est un rappel à l’ordre, tragique, à une communauté internationale qui a abandonné ce peuple palestinien à la brutalité israélienne, à l’incurie de ses dirigeants engagés dans une guerre fratricide, à ses alliés arabes historiquement défaillants, à son sort dont nous portons tous la responsabilité. Sara Daniel
En novembre 2004, des civils ivoiriens et des soldats français de la Force Licorne se sont opposés durant quatre jours à Abidjan dans des affrontements qui ont fait des dizaines de morts et de blessés. À la suite d’une mission d’enquête sur le terrain, Amnesty International a recueilli des informations indiquant que les forces françaises ont, à certaines occasions, fait un usage excessif et disproportionné de la force alors qu’elles se trouvaient face à des manifestants qui ne représentaient pas une menace directe pour leurs vies ou la vie de tiers. Amnesty international (26.10.05)
Des tirs sont partis sur nos forces depuis les derniers étages de l’hôtel ivoire de la grande tour que nous n’occupions pas et depuis la foule. Dans ces conditions nos unités ont été amenées à faire des tirs de sommation et à forcer le passage en évitant bien évidemment de faire des morts et des blessés parmi les manifestants. Mais je répète encore une fois les premiers tirs n’ont pas été de notre fait. Général Poncet (Canal Plus 90 minutes 14.02.05)
Nous avons effectivement été amenés à tirer, des tirs en légitime défense et en riposte par rapport aux tireurs qui nous tiraient dessus. Colonel Gérard Dubois (porte-parole de l’état-major français, le 15 novembre 2004)
On n’arrivait pas à éloigner cette foule qui, de plus en plus était débordante. Sur ma gauche, trois de nos véhicules étaient déjà immergés dans la foule. Un manifestant grimpe sur un de mes chars et arme la mitrailleuse 7-62. Un de mes hommes fait un tir d’intimidation dans sa direction ; l’individu redescend aussitôt du blindé. Le coup de feu déclenche une fusillade. L’ensemble de mes hommes fait des tirs uniquement d’intimidation ». (…) seuls les COS auraient visé certains manifestants avec leurs armes non létales. (…) Mes hommes n’ont pu faire cela. Nous n’avions pas les armes pour infliger de telles blessures. Si nous avions tiré au canon dans la foule, ça aurait été le massacre. Colonel Destremau (Libération, 10.12.04)
In a surreal split-screen moment, the Israeli prime minister, Binyamin Netanyahu, was exulting over the opening of America’s embassy in Jerusalem, calling it a “great day for peace”. It is surely right to hold Israel, the strong side, to high standards. But Palestinian parties, though weak, are also to blame. Every state has a right to defend its borders. To judge by the numbers, Israel’s army may well have used excessive force. But any firm conclusion requires an independent assessment of what happened, where and when. The Israelis sometimes used non-lethal means, such as tear-gas dropped from drones. But then snipers went to work with bullets. What changed? Mixed in with protesters, it seems, were an unknown number of Hamas attackers seeking to breach the fence. What threat did they pose? Any fair judgment depends on the details. Just as important is the broader political question. The fence between Gaza and Israel is no ordinary border. Gaza is a prison, not a state. Measuring 365 square kilometres and home to 2m people, it is one of the most crowded and miserable places on Earth. It is short of medicine, power and other essentials. The tap water is undrinkable; untreated sewage is pumped into the sea. Gaza already has one of the world’s highest jobless rates, at 44%. The scene of three wars between Hamas and Israel since 2007, it is always on the point of eruption. Many hands are guilty for this tragedy. Israel insists that the strip is not its problem, having withdrawn its forces in 2005. But it still controls Gaza from land, sea and air. Any Palestinian, even a farmer, coming within 300 metres of the fence is liable to be shot. Israel restricts the goods that get in. Only a tiny number of Palestinians can get out for, say, medical treatment. Israeli generals have long warned against letting the economy collapse. Mr Netanyahu usually ignores them. Egypt also contributes to the misery. The Rafah crossing to Sinai, another escape valve, was open to goods and people for just 17 days in the first four months of this year. And Fatah, which administers the PA and parts of the West Bank, has withheld salaries for civil servants working for the PA in Gaza, limited shipments of necessities, such as drugs and baby milk, and cut payments to Israel for Gaza’s electricity. Hamas bears much of the blame, too. It all but destroyed the Oslo peace accords through its campaign of suicide-bombings in the 1990s and 2000s. Having driven the Israelis out of Gaza, it won a general election in 2006 and, after a brief civil war, expelled Fatah from the strip in 2007. It has misruled Gaza ever since, proving corrupt, oppressive and incompetent. It stores its weapons in civilian sites, including mosques and schools, making them targets. Cement that might be used for reconstruction is diverted to build underground tunnels to attack Israel. Hamas all but admitted it was not up to governing when it agreed to hand many administrative tasks to the PA last year as part of a reconciliation deal with Fatah. But the pact collapsed because Hamas is not prepared to give up its weapons. Israel, Egypt and the PA cannot just lock away the Palestinians in Gaza in the hope that Hamas will be overthrown. Only when Gazans live more freely might they think of getting rid of their rulers. Much more can be done to ease Gazans’ plight without endangering Israel’s security. But no lasting solution is possible until the question of Palestine is solved, too. Mr Netanyahu has long resisted the idea of a Palestinian state—and has kept building settlements on occupied land. It is hard to convince Israelis to change. As Israel marks its 70th birthday, the economy is booming. By “managing” the conflict, rather than trying to end it, Mr Netanyahu has kept Palestinian violence in check while giving nothing away. When violence flares Israel’s image suffers, but not much. The Trump administration supports it. And Arab states seeking an ally against a rising Iran have never had better relations with it. Israel is wrong to stop seeking a deal. And Mr Trump is wrong to prejudge the status of Jerusalem. But Palestinians have made it easy for Israel to claim that there is “no partner for peace”, divided as they are between a tired nationalist Fatah that cannot deliver peace, and an Islamist Hamas that refuses to do so. Palestinians desperately need new leaders. Fatah must renew itself through long-overdue elections. And Hamas must realise that its rockets damage Palestinian dreams of statehood more than they hurt Israel. For all their talk of non-violence, Hamas’s leaders have not abandoned the idea of “armed struggle” to destroy Israel. They refuse to give up their guns, or fully embrace a two-state solution; they speak vaguely of a long-term “truce”. With this week’s protests, Hamas’s leaders boasted of freeing a “wild tiger”. They found that Israel can be even more ferocious. If Hamas gave up its weapons, it would open the way for a rapprochement with Fatah. If it accepted Israel’s right to exist, it would expose Israel’s current unwillingness to allow a Palestinian state. If Palestinians marched peacefully, without guns and explosives, they would take the moral high ground. In short, if Palestinians want Israel to stop throttling them, they must first convince Israelis it is safe to let go. The Economist
Salah al-Bardaouil, haut responsable du Hamas, a déclaré à une télévision palestinienne que 50 des 62 Palestiniens tués lundi mais aussi mardi appartenaient au mouvement islamiste. « Cinquante des martyrs (des morts) étaient du Hamas, et 12 faisaient partie du reste de la population », a-t-il dit, interrogé sur les critiques selon lesquelles le Hamas tirait profit de la mobilisation. « Comment le Hamas pourrait-il récolter les fruits (du mouvement) alors qu’il a payé un prix aussi élevé », a-t-il demandé. Il n’a pas fourni de détails sur l’appartenance de ces Palestiniens à la branche armée ou politique du Hamas, ni sur les circonstances dans lesquelles ils avaient été tués. Salah al-Bardaouil « dévoile la vérité », a tweeté un porte-parole du gouvernement israélien, Ofir Gendelman, « ce n’était pas une manifestation pacifique, mais une opération du Hamas ». « Nous avons les mêmes chiffres », a lancé de son côté le Premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahu, avertissant que son pays continuerait « à se défendre par tous les moyens nécessaires ». Un porte-parole du Hamas, Fawzy Barhoum, et un autre haut responsable, Bassem Naim, se sont gardés de confirmer les informations de M. Bardaouil. Le Hamas paie les funérailles de tous, « qu’ils soient membres ou supporters du Hamas, ou pas », a dit M. Barhoum. Il est « naturel de voir de nombreux membres ou supporters du Hamas » à une telle manifestation, a dit M. Naim, en faisant référence à la forte présence du Hamas dans toutes les couches de la société. Ceux qui ont été tués « participaient pacifiquement » au mouvement, a-t-il assuré. Sur la chaîne de télévision Al-Jazeera, l’homme fort du Hamas, Yahya Sinouar, a prévenu: « si le blocus (israélien à Gaza) continue, nous n’hésiterons pas à recourir à la résistance militaire ». La Libre Belgique
The world now demands that Jerusalem account for every bullet fired at the demonstrators, without offering a single practical alternative for dealing with the crisis. But where is the outrage that Hamas kept urging Palestinians to move toward the fence, having been amply forewarned by Israel of the mortal risk? Or that protest organizers encouraged women to lead the charges on the fence because, as The Times’s Declan Walsh reported, “Israeli soldiers might be less likely to fire on women”? Or that Palestinian children as young as 7 were dispatched to try to breach the fence? Or that the protests ended after Israel warned Hamas’s leaders, whose preferred hide-outs include Gaza’s hospital, that their own lives were at risk? Elsewhere in the world, this sort of behavior would be called reckless endangerment. It would be condemned as self-destructive, cowardly and almost bottomlessly cynical. The mystery of Middle East politics is why Palestinians have so long been exempted from these ordinary moral judgments. How do so many so-called progressives now find themselves in objective sympathy with the murderers, misogynists and homophobes of Hamas? Why don’t they note that, by Hamas’s own admission, some 50 of the 62 protesters killed on Monday were members of Hamas? Why do they begrudge Israel the right to defend itself behind the very borders they’ve been clamoring for years for Israelis to get behind? Why is nothing expected of Palestinians, and everything forgiven, while everything is expected of Israelis, and nothing forgiven? That’s a question to which one can easily guess the answer. In the meantime, it’s worth considering the harm Western indulgence has done to Palestinian aspirations. No decent Palestinian society can emerge from the culture of victimhood, violence and fatalism symbolized by these protests. No worthy Palestinian government can emerge if the international community continues to indulge the corrupt, anti-Semitic autocrats of the Palestinian Authority or fails to condemn and sanction the despotic killers of Hamas. And no Palestinian economy will ever flourish through repeated acts of self-harm and destructive provocation. Bret Stephens
The protests on Monday were not about President Donald Trump moving the U.S. Embassy to Jerusalem, and have in fact been occurring weekly on the Gaza border since March. They are part of what the demonstrators have dubbed “The Great March of Return”—return, that is, to what is now Israel. (The Monday demonstration was scheduled months ago to coincide with Nakba Day, an annual occasion of protest; it was later moved up 24 hours to grab some of the media attention devoted to the embassy.) The fact that these long-standing Palestinian protests were mischaracterized by many in the media as simply a response to Trump obscured two disquieting realities: First, that the world has largely dismissed the genuine plight of Palestinians in Gaza, only bothering to pay attention to it when it could be tenuously connected to Trump. Second, that many Palestinians do not simply desire their own state and an end to the occupation and settlements that began in 1967, but an end to the Jewish state that began in 1948. (…) Hamas, which controls the Gaza Strip, is an authoritarian, theocratic regime that has called for Jewish genocide in its charter, murdered scores of Israeli civilians, repressed Palestinian women, and harshly persecuted religious and sexual minorities. It is a designated terrorist group by the United States, Canada, and the European Union. (…) Whether it has been spending its manpower and millions of dollars on subterranean attack tunnels into Israel—including under United Nations schools for Gaza’s children—or launching repeated messianic military operations against Israel, the terrorist group has consistently prioritized the deaths of Israelis over the lives of its Palestinian brethren. (…) Hamas manipulated many of these demonstrators into unwittingly rushing the Israeli border fence under false pretenses in order to produce injuries and fatalities. As the New York Times reported, “After midday prayers, clerics and leaders of militant factions in Gaza, led by Hamas, urged thousands of worshipers to join the protests. The fence had already been breached, they said falsely, claiming Palestinians were flooding into Israel.” Similarly, the Washington Post recounted how “organizers urged protesters over loudspeakers to burst through the fence, telling them Israeli soldiers were fleeing their positions, even as they were reinforcing them.” Hamas has also publicly acknowledged deliberately using peaceful civilians at the protests as cover and cannon fodder for their military operations. “When we talk about ‘peaceful resistance,’ we are deceiving the public,” Hamas co-founder Mahmoud al-Zahar told an interviewer. “This is peaceful resistance bolstered by a military force and by security agencies.” (…) Widely circulated Arabic instructions on Facebook directed protesters to “bring a knife, dagger, or gun if available” and to breach the Israeli border and kidnap civilians. (The posts have now been removed by Facebook for inciting violence but a cached copy can be viewed here.) Hamas further incentivized violence by providing payments to those injured and the families of those killed. Both Hamas and the Islamic Jihad terror group have since claimed many of those killed as their own operatives and posted photos of them in uniform. On Wednesday, Hamas Political Bureau member Salah Al-Bardawil announced that 50 of the 62 fatalities were Hamas members. (…) as the BBC’s Julia MacFarlane recalled from her time covering Gaza, any public dissent against Hamas is perilous: “A boy I met in Gaza during the 2014 war was dragged from his bed at midnight, had his kneecaps shot off in a square and was told next time it would be axes—for an anti-Hamas Facebook post.” The group has publicly executed those it deems “collaborators” and broken up rare protests with gunfire. Likewise, Gazans cannot “vote Hamas out” because Hamas has not permitted elections since it won them and took power in 2006. The group fares poorly in the polls today, but Gazans have no recourse for expressing their dissatisfaction. Protesting Israel, however, is an outlet for frustration encouraged by Hamas. (…) In that regard, Hamas has worked to increase chaos and casualties stemming from the protests by allowing rioters to repeatedly set fire to the Kerem Shalom crossing, Gaza’s main avenue for international and humanitarian aid, and by turning back trucks of needed food and supplies from Israel. (…) despite the claims of viral tweets and the Hamas-run Gaza Health Ministry that were initially parroted by some in the media, Israel did not actually kill an 8-month old baby with tear gas. The Gazan doctor who treated her told the Associated Press that she died from a preexisting heart condition, a fact belatedly picked up by the New York Times and Los Angeles Times. Yair Rosenberg
On the night of May 14, … headlines suggested a causation: The U.S. opens an embassy and hence people get killed. But the causation is faulty: Gazans were killed last week, when the United States had not yet opened its embassy. Gazans were killed for a simple reason: Ignoring warnings, thousands of them decided to get too close to the Israeli border.one must begin with the obvious: The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) has no interest in having more Gazans killed, yet its mission is not to save Gazans’ lives. Its mission — remember, the IDF is a military serving a country — is to defeat an enemy. And in the case of Gaza this past week, the meaning of this was preventing unauthorized, possibly dangerous people from crossing the fence separating Israel from the Gaza Strip. Of course, any bloodshed is regretful. Yet to achieve its objectives, the IDF had to use lethal force. Circumstances on the ground dictate using such measures. The winds made tear gas ineffective. The proximity of the border made it essential to stop Gazan demonstrators from getting too close, lest thousands of them flood the fence, thus forcing the IDF to use even more lethal means. Leaflets warned them not to go near the fence. Media outlets were used to clarify that consequences could be dire. Hence, an unbiased, sincere newspaper headline should have said, “More than 50 killed in Gaza while Hamas leaders ignored warnings.” So, yes, Jerusalem celebrated while Gaza burned. Not because Gaza burned. And, yes, the U.S. moved its embassy while Gaza burned. But this is not what made Gaza burn. It all comes down to legitimacy. Having embassies move to Jerusalem, Israel’s capital, is about legitimacy. Letting Israel keep the integrity of its borders is about legitimacy. President Donald Trump gained the respect and appreciation of Israelis because of his no-nonsense acceptance of a reality, and because of his no-nonsense rejection of delegitimization masqueraded as policy differences. A legitimate country is allowed to defend its border. A legitimate country is allowed to choose its capital. Shmuel Rosner
Hamas understood early that the civilian death toll was driving international outrage at Israel, and that this, not I.E.D.s or ambushes, was the most important weapon in its arsenal. Early in that war, I complied with Hamas censorship in the form of a threat to one of our Gaza reporters and cut a key detail from an article: that Hamas fighters were disguised as civilians and were being counted as civilians in the death toll. The bureau chief later wrote that printing the truth after the threat to the reporter would have meant “jeopardizing his life.” Nonetheless, we used that same casualty toll throughout the conflict and never mentioned the manipulation. (…) Hamas understood that Western news outlets wanted a simple story about villains and victims and would stick to that script, whether because of ideological sympathy, coercion or ignorance. The press could be trusted to present dead human beings not as victims of the terrorist group that controls their lives, or of a tragic confluence of events, but of an unwarranted Israeli slaughter. The willingness of reporters to cooperate with that script gave Hamas the incentive to keep using it. (…) The next step in the evolution of this tactic was visible in Monday’s awful events. If the most effective weapon in a military campaign is pictures of civilian casualties, Hamas seems to have concluded, there’s no need for a campaign at all. All you need to do is get people killed on camera. The way to do this in Gaza, in the absence of any Israeli soldiers inside the territory, is to try to cross the Israeli border, which everyone understands is defended with lethal force and is easy to film. (…) About 40,000 people answered a call to show up. Many of them, some armed, rushed the border fence. Many Israelis, myself included, were horrified to see the number of fatalities reach 60. (…) Most Western viewers experienced these events through a visual storytelling tool: a split screen. On one side was the opening of the American embassy in Jerusalem in the presence of Ivanka Trump, evangelical Christian allies of the White House and Israel’s current political leadership — an event many here found curious and distant from our national life. On the other side was the terrible violence in the desperately poor and isolated territory. The juxtaposition was disturbing. (…) The attempts to breach the Gaza fence, which Palestinians call the March of Return, began in March and have the stated goal of erasing the border as a step toward erasing Israel. A central organizer, the Hamas leader Yehya Sinwar, exhorted participants on camera in Arabic to “tear out the hearts” of Israelis. But on Monday the enterprise was rebranded as a protest against the embassy opening, with which it was meticulously timed to coincide. The split screen, and the idea that people were dying in Gaza because of Donald Trump, was what Hamas was looking for. (…) The press coverage on Monday was a major Hamas success in a war whose battlefield isn’t really Gaza, but the brains of foreign audiences (…) Israeli soldiers facing Gaza have no good choices. They can warn people off with tear gas or rubber bullets, which are often inaccurate and ineffective, and if that doesn’t work, they can use live fire. Or they can hold their fire to spare lives and allow a breach, in which case thousands of people will surge into Israel, some of whom — the soldiers won’t know which — will be armed fighters. (On Wednesday a Hamas leader, Salah Bardawil, told a Hamas TV station that 50 of the dead were Hamas members. The militant group Islamic Jihad claimed three others.) If such a breach occurs, the death toll will be higher. And Hamas’s tactic, having proved itself, would likely be repeated by Israel’s enemies on its borders with Syria and Lebanon. (…) Knowledgeable people can debate the best way to deal with this threat. Could a different response have reduced the death toll? Or would a more aggressive response deter further actions of this kind and save lives in the long run? What are the open-fire orders on the India-Pakistan border, for example? Is there something Israel could have done to defuse things beforehand? These are good questions. But anyone following the response abroad saw that this wasn’t what was being discussed. As is often the case where Israel is concerned, things quickly became hysterical and divorced from the events themselves. Turkey’s president called it “genocide.” A writer for The New Yorker took the opportunity to tweet some of her thoughts about “whiteness and Zionism,” part of an odd trend that reads America’s racial and social problems into a Middle Eastern society 6,000 miles away. The sicknesses of the social media age — the disdain for expertise and the idea that other people are not just wrong but villainous — have crept into the worldview of people who should know better. For someone looking out from here, that’s the real split-screen effect: On one side, a complicated human tragedy in a corner of a region spinning out of control. On the other, a venomous and simplistic story, a symptom of these venomous and simplistic times. Matti Friedman
Depuis le 30 mars, le Hamas organise des violences à grande échelle à la frontière de Gaza et d’Israël. Ces embrasements majeurs ont généralement lieu le vendredi à la fin des prières dans les mosquées ; des actions concertées mobilisant des foules de 40 000 personnes ont été constatées dans cinq zones séparées le long de la frontière. Des violences et diverses actions agressives, y compris des actes de nature terroristes avec explosifs et armes à feu, ont également eu lieu à d’autres moments au cours de cette période. Le Hamas avait prévu une culmination de la violence le 14 ou le 15 mai 2018. Le 15 est la date à laquelle ils commémorent le 70ème anniversaire de la « Nakba » (« Catastrophe ») qui a eu lieu au lendemain de la création de l’Etat d’Israël. Mais une recrudescence de violence a été constatée le 14, jour de l’inauguration de la nouvelle ambassade américaine à Jérusalem. La violence a donc culminé les 14 et 15, deux jours qui coïncident avec la Nakba et l’inauguration de l’ambassade américaine, mais qui marquent aussi le début du mois de Ramadan, une période où la violence augmente au Moyen-Orient et ailleurs. Le Hamas avait prévu de mobiliser jusqu’à 200 000 personnes à la frontière de Gaza, soit un doublement et plus du nombre de manifestants constatés les années précédentes. Le Hamas semblait également déterminé à inciter à un niveau de violence jamais atteint auparavant, avec des pénétrations significatives de la barrière frontalière. Face à de tels projets, il est étonnant que les chiffres en pertes humaines ne soient pas plus élevés parmi les Palestiniens. (…) La violence à Gaza a été orchestrée sous la bannière prétexte de la « Grande marche du retour », une façon d’attirer l’attention sur ce droit au retour dans leurs foyers d’origine que les dirigeants palestiniens promettent à leur peuple. L’intention affichée n’était pas de manifester, mais de franchir en masse la frontière et de cheminer par milliers à travers l’État d’Israël. L’affirmation du « droit de retour » ne vise pas à l’exercice d’un tel « droit », lequel est fortement contesté et doit faire l’objet de négociations sur le statut définitif. Il s’inscrit dans une politique arabe de longue date destinée à éliminer l’Etat d’Israël, un projet à l’encontre duquel le gouvernement israélien s’inscrit de manière non moins systématique. Le véritable objectif de la violence du Hamas est de poursuivre sa stratégie de longue date de création et d’intensification de l’indignation internationale, de la diffamation, de l’isolement et de la criminalisation de l’État d’Israël et de ses fonctionnaires. Cette stratégie passe par la mise en scène de situations qui obligent Tsahal à réagir avec une force meurtrière qui les place aussitôt en position de tortionnaires qui tuent et blessent des civils palestiniens « innocents ». (…) Toutes ces tactiques ont pour particularité d’utiliser des boucliers humains palestiniens – des civils, des femmes et des enfants de préférence, forcés ou volontaires, présents toutes les fois que des attaques sont lancées ou commandées ; des civils présents au côté des combattants, à proximité des dépôts d’armes et de munitions. Toute riposte militaire israélienne engendre des dommages collatéraux chez les civils. Dans certains cas, notamment à l’occasion de la vague de violence actuelle, le Hamas présente ses combattants comme des civils innocents ; de nombreux faux incidents ont été mis en scène et filmés pour faire état de civils tués et blessés par les forces israéliennes ; des scènes de violence filmées ailleurs, notamment en Syrie, ont été présentés comme des violences commises contre les Palestiniens. (…) Les cibles visées – dirigeants politiques de pays tiers, organisations internationales (ONU, UE), groupes de défense des droits de l’homme et médias – n’admettent pas que l’on réponde par la force à des manifestations faussement pacifiques qu’ils sont tentés d’assimiler aux manifestations réellement pacifiques qui ont lieu dans leurs propres villes. (…) Ces manifestations sont en réalité des opérations militaires soigneusement planifiées et orchestrées. Des foules de civils auxquelles se mêlent des groupes de combattants sont rassemblées aux frontières. Combattants et civils ont pour mission de s’approcher de la clôture et de la briser. Des milliers de pneus ont été incendiés pour créer des écrans de fumée afin de dissimuler leurs mouvements en direction de la clôture (et sans grande efficacité, ils ont utilisé des miroirs pour aveugler les observateurs de la FDI et les tireurs d’élite). Les pneus enflammés et les cocktails Molotov ont également été utilisés pour briser la clôture dont certains éléments, à divers endroits, sont en en bois. Le vendredi 4 mai, environ 10 000 Palestiniens ont participé à des manifestations violentes le long de la frontière et des centaines d’émeutiers ont vandalisé et incendié la partie palestinienne de Kerem Shalom, point de passage des convois humanitaires. Ils ont endommagé des canalisations de gaz et de carburant qui partent d’Israël en direction de la bande de Gaza. Ce raid contre Kerem Shalom a eu lieu à deux reprises le 4 mai. Le même jour, deux tentatives d’infiltration ont été déjouées par les troupes de Tsahal à deux endroits différents. Trois des infiltrés ont été tués par les soldats des FDI qui défendaient la frontière. Dans certains cas, les infiltrés ont été arrêtés. Le Hamas et ses miliciens ont utilisé des grappins, des cordes, des pinces coupantes et d’autres outils pour briser la clôture. Ils ont utilisé des drones, de puissants lance-pierres capables de tuer et blesser gravement des soldats, des armes à feu, des grenades à main et des engins explosifs improvisés, à la fois pour tuer des soldats israéliens et pour passer à travers la clôture. Des cerfs-volants ont été lâchés par-dessus la frontière de Gaza afin d’incendier les cultures et l’herbe du côté israélien dans le but de causer des dommages économiques mais aussi pour tuer et mutiler. Cela peut sembler une arme primitive et même risible, mais le 4 mai, les Palestiniens avaient préparé des centaines de bombes incendiaires volantes pour les déployer en essaim en Israël, afin d’exploiter au mieux une vague de chaleur intense. (…) Jusqu’à présent, le Hamas n’a pas réussi de percée significative à travers la clôture. S’ils y arrivaient, il faut s’attendre à ce que des milliers de Gazaouis se déversent par ces brèches parmi lesquels des terroristes armés tenteraient d’atteindre les villages israéliens pour y commettre des assassinats de masse et des enlèvements. Le Hamas a tenté d’ouvrir une brèche au point-frontière le plus proche du kibboutz Nahal Oz, objectif qui pourrait être atteint en 5 minutes ou moins par des hommes armés prêts à tuer. Dans ce scénario, ou des terroristes armés sont indiscernables de civils non armés, qui eux-mêmes représentent une menace physique, il est difficile de voir comment les FDI pourraient éviter d’infliger de lourdes pertes pour défendre leur territoire et de leur population. (…) Compte tenu de leur expérience des violences passées, les FDI ont adopté une réponse graduée. Ils ont largué des milliers de tracts et ont utilisé les SMS, les médias sociaux, les appels téléphoniques et les émissions de radio pour informer les habitants de Gaza et leur demander de ne pas se rassembler à la frontière ni de s’approcher de la barrière. Ils ont contacté les propriétaires de compagnies de bus de Gaza et leur ont demandé de ne transporter personne à la frontière. La coercition exercée par le Hamas à l’encontre de la population civile a rendu ces tentatives de dissuasion inutiles. Les FDI ont alors utilisé des gaz lacrymogènes pour disperser les foules qui approchaient de trop près la clôture. Dans un effort innovant pour atteindre à plus de précision et d’efficacité, des drones ont parfois été utilisés pour disperser les gaz lacrymogènes. Mais, les gaz lacrymogènes ont une efficacité limitée dans le temps, sont sensibles aux sautes de vent, et leur impact est également réduit quand la population ciblée sait comment en atténuer les effets les plus graves. Ensuite, les forces de Tsahal ont utilisé des coups de semonce, des balles tirées au-dessus des têtes. Enfin, seulement lorsque c’était absolument nécessaire (selon leurs règles d’engagement), des munitions à balles ont été tirées dans le but de neutraliser plutôt que de tuer. Bien que tirer pour tuer eut pu passer pour une riposte légale dans certains cas, les FDI soutiennent que même dans ce cas, ils n’ont tiré que pour encapaciter (sauf dans les cas où ils avaient affaire à une attaque de type militaire, comme des tirs contre les forces de Tsahal). (…) Israël estime que 80% des personnes tuées étaient des terroristes ou des sympathisants actifs. Le prix – en vies humaines, en souffrance et réprobation de l’opinion publique internationale – a sans aucun doute été élevé ; mais la barrière n’a pas été pénétrée de manière significative et un prix encore plus élevé a donc été évité. (…) Aujourd’hui, le droit international admet l’usage de munitions réelles face à une menace sérieuse de mort ou de blessure, et quand aucun autre moyen ne permet d’y faire face. Il n’y a aucune exigence que la menace soit « immédiate » – une telle force peut être utilisée quand elle apparait « imminente »; c’est-à-dire au moment où une action agressive doit être empêchée avant qu’elle ne mute en menace immédiate. La réalité est que, dans les conditions créées délibérément par le Hamas, il n’existait aucune étape intermédiaire efficace pour éviter de tirer sur les manifestants les plus menaçants. Si ces personnes (qu’on peut difficilement appeler de simples « manifestants ») avaient été autorisées à atteindre la barrière, le risque vital serait passé d’imminent à immédiat ; il n’aurait pu être évité qu’en infligeant des pertes beaucoup plus grandes, comme il a été mentionné précédemment. Ceux qui soutiennent que Tsahal n’aurait pas dû tirer à des balles réelles, exigent en fait que des dizaines de milliers d’émeutiers violents (et parmi eux, des terroristes) soient laissés libres de faire irruption en territoire israélien. Il aurait fallu attendre avant d’agir que des civils, des forces de sécurité et des biens matériels soient en danger, alors qu’une riposte précise et ciblée contre les individus les plus menaçants a permis d’éviter à ce scénario catastrophique de devenir réalité. Certains ont également soutenu qu’ils n’existe aucune preuve de « manifestant » porteur d’une arme à feu. Ils ne comprennent pas que ce type de conflit n’oppose pas des soldats en uniforme qui s’affrontent ouvertement et en armes sur un champ de bataille. Dans ce contexte, les armes à feu ne sont pas nécessaires pour présenter une menace. En fait, c’est même le contraire compte tenu des objectifs et du mode de fonctionnement. Leurs armes sont des pinces coupantes, des grappins, des cordes, des écrans de fumée, du feu et des explosifs cachés. (…) – les armes ne surgissant qu’une fois l’objectif de pénétration massive atteint. Un soldat qui attendrait de voir une arme à feu pour tirer signerait son propre arrêt de mort, et celui des civils qu’il ou elle a pour mission de protéger. (…) Quand le chef d’état-major dit qu’il positionne « 100 tireurs d’élite à la frontière », il ne fait que verbaliser son devoir légal de défendre son pays ; il ne faut y voir aucun aveu d’une intention d’outrepasser l’usage légal de la force. Certains groupes de défense des droits de l’homme (y compris à nouveau HRW) et nombre de journalistes ont critiqué l’usage de la force par l’armée israélienne au motif qu’aucun soldat n’a été blessé. Ils en ont publiquement conclu que la riposte de Tsahal avait été « disproportionnée ». Comme cela arrive souvent quand de soi-disant experts commentent les opérations militaires occidentales, les réalités des opérations de sécurité et les impératifs légaux sont mal compris – quand ils ne sont pas déformés -. En effet, il n’est pas nécessaire d’afficher une blessure pour démontrer l’existence d’une menace réelle. Le fait que les soldats de Tsahal n’aient pas été grièvement blessés démontre seulement leur professionnalisme militaire, et non l’absence de menace. Il a également été affirmé qu’en l’absence de conflit armé, l’usage de la force à Gaza est régi par la charte internationale des droits de l’homme et non par les lois régissant les conflits militaires. Il s’agit là d’une interprétation erronée : toute la bande de Gaza est une zone de guerre définie comme telle par l’agression armée de longue date du Hamas contre l’Etat d’Israël. Par conséquent, dans cette situation, les deux types de loi sont applicables, en fonction des circonstances précises. Il est licite pour Tsahal de combattre et de tuer tout combattant ennemi identifié comme tel, n’importe où dans la bande de Gaza conformément aux lois de la guerre, que cet ennemi soit en uniforme ou non, armé ou non, représentant ou non une menace imminente, attaquant ou fuyant. Dans la pratique cependant, il apparait que face à des émeutes violentes, les FDI ont agi en supposant que tous les acteurs sur le terrain étaient des civils (contre lesquels il n’est pas nécessaire de recourir à la force létale au premier recours) à moins que l’évidence démontre le contraire. (…) Toutes ces fausses critiques de l’action israélienne, ainsi que les menaces d’enquêtes internationales, de renvoi d’Israël devant la CPI et de recours à une juridiction universelle contre les responsables israéliens impliqués dans cette situation, font le jeu du Hamas. Ils valident l’utilisation de boucliers humains et la stratégie du Hamas d’obliger au meurtre de leurs propres civils. Les implications débordent largement ce conflit. Comme l’ont démontré de précédents épisodes de violence, les réactions internationales de ce type, y compris une condamnation injuste, généralisent ces tactiques et augmentent le nombre de morts parmi les civils innocents dans le monde entier. (…) La nouvelle tactique du Hamas a eu beaucoup de succès en dressant contre Israël des personnalités de la communauté internationale et en endommageant sa réputation. Il est probable que les effets continueront à se faire sentir longtemps après la fin de cette vague de violence. Richard Kemp

Attention: une effroyable imposture peut en cacher une autre !

En ces temps étranges où l’on voit des manipulations et des complots partout …

Et où à coup d’images juxtaposées nos médiasfaussaires notoires compris – et nos belles âmes rivalisent d’ingéniosité …

Pour noircir – jusqu’à regretter qu’il n’ait pas de morts de son côté – le seul pays que vous savez et son actuel et rare défenseur à la Maison Blanche …

Pendant que dans l’enthousiasme d’un « succès » médiatique aussi inespéré mais aussi la menace directe de frappes directes sur leurs bunkers dissimulés sous les hôpitaux de Gaza …

Les cyniques tireurs de ficelle du Hamas peuvent se payer le luxe de lever temporairement la mobilisation de leur chair à canon …

Et de révéler – en arabe pour motiver les troupes et ne pas trop effrayer leurs nombreux idiots utiles occidentaux – une partie même de la réalité de leur prétendues manifestations pacifiques …

Comment ne pas s’étonner …

Avec le colonel à la retraite britannique Richard Kemp …

Et l’un des rares militaires occidentaux à oser mettre, contrairement à tous les autres qui se taisent ou laissent dire n’importe quoi, ses compétences de professionnel au service de la vérité …

Du peu d’intérêt que semble soulever chez nos apprentis conspirationnistes …

L’effroyable – et bien réelle – imposture à laquelle se prêtent contre le seul Etat israélien nos médias et autres bonnes âmes des organisations internationales …

Mais aussi, sans compter l’effet directement incitatif, qui n’est pas sans rappeler tant d’autres phénomènes de nature mimétique comme les fusillades scolaires, de l’intérêt médiatique et de la présence des caméras elles-mêmes …

La proprement criminelle incitation, augmentant d’autant à chaque fois le nombre des victimes collatérales, …

Qu’une telle unanimité d’injustes condamnations ne peut que générer ?

Fumée et miroirs : six semaines de violence à la frontière de Gaza
Richard Kemp
Gatestone institute
14 mai 2018
Traduction du texte original: Smoke & Mirrors: Six Weeks of Violence on the Gaza Border

Depuis le 30 mars, le Hamas organise des violences à grande échelle à la frontière de Gaza et d’Israël. Ces embrasements majeurs ont généralement lieu le vendredi à la fin des prières dans les mosquées ; des actions concertées mobilisant des foules de 40 000 personnes ont été constatées dans cinq zones séparées le long de la frontière. Des violences et diverses actions agressives, y compris des actes de nature terroristes avec explosifs et armes à feu, ont également eu lieu à d’autres moments au cours de cette période.

Une tempête parfaite

Le Hamas avait prévu une culmination de la violence le 14 ou le 15 mai 2018. Le 15 est la date à laquelle ils commémorent le 70ème anniversaire de la « Nakba » (« Catastrophe ») qui a eu lieu au lendemain de la création de l’Etat d’Israël. Mais une recrudescence de violence a été constatée le 14, jour de l’inauguration de la nouvelle ambassade américaine à Jérusalem. La violence a donc culminé les 14 et 15, deux jours qui coïncident avec la Nakba et l’inauguration de l’ambassade américaine, mais qui marquent aussi le début du mois de Ramadan, une période où la violence augmente au Moyen-Orient et ailleurs.

Le Hamas avait prévu de mobiliser jusqu’à 200 000 personnes à la frontière de Gaza, soit un doublement et plus du nombre de manifestants constatés les années précédentes. Le Hamas semblait également déterminé à inciter à un niveau de violence jamais atteint auparavant, avec des pénétrations significatives de la barrière frontalière. Face à de tels projets, il est étonnant que les chiffres en pertes humaines ne soient pas plus élevés parmi les Palestiniens.

Outre la zone frontalière, les Palestiniens ont prévu de mener des actions violentes à la même période, à Jérusalem et en Cisjordanie. Bien que le 15 mai soit considéré comme le point culminant de six semaines de violence à la frontière de Gaza, les Palestiniens ont fait savoir qu’ils entendaient maintenir un niveau de violence frontalière élevé tout au long du mois de Ramadan.

Prétexte et réalité

La violence à Gaza a été orchestrée sous la bannière prétexte de la « Grande marche du retour », une façon d’attirer l’attention sur ce droit au retour dans leurs foyers d’origine que les dirigeants palestiniens promettent à leur peuple. L’intention affichée n’était pas de manifester, mais de franchir en masse la frontière et de cheminer par milliers à travers l’État d’Israël.

L’affirmation du « droit de retour » ne vise pas à l’exercice d’un tel « droit », lequel est fortement contesté et doit faire l’objet de négociations sur le statut définitif. Il s’inscrit dans une politique arabe de longue date destinée à éliminer l’Etat d’Israël, un projet à l’encontre duquel le gouvernement israélien s’inscrit de manière non moins systématique.

Le véritable objectif de la violence du Hamas est de poursuivre sa stratégie de longue date de création et d’intensification de l’indignation internationale, de la diffamation, de l’isolement et de la criminalisation de l’État d’Israël et de ses fonctionnaires. Cette stratégie passe par la mise en scène de situations qui obligent Tsahal à réagir avec une force meurtrière qui les place aussitôt en position de tortionnaires qui tuent et blessent des civils palestiniens « innocents ».

Les tactiques terroristes du Hamas

Dans le cadre de cette stratégie, le Hamas a mis au point différentes tactiques, qui passent par des tirs de roquettes depuis Gaza sur les villes israéliennes et la construction de tunnels d’attaque sophistiqués qui débouchent au-delà de la frontière, à proximité de villages israéliens voisins. Toutes ces tactiques ont pour particularité d’utiliser des boucliers humains palestiniens – des civils, des femmes et des enfants de préférence, forcés ou volontaires, présents toutes les fois que des attaques sont lancées ou commandées ; des civils présents au côté des combattants, à proximité des dépôts d’armes et de munitions. Toute riposte militaire israélienne engendre des dommages collatéraux chez les civils.

Dans certains cas, notamment à l’occasion de la vague de violence actuelle, le Hamas présente ses combattants comme des civils innocents ; de nombreux faux incidents ont été mis en scène et filmés pour faire état de civils tués et blessés par les forces israéliennes ; des scènes de violence filmées ailleurs, notamment en Syrie, ont été présentés comme des violences commises contre les Palestiniens.

Même stratégie, nouvelles tactiques

Après les roquettes et les tunnels d’attaque utilisés dans trois conflits majeurs (2008-2009, 2012 et 2014), sans oublier plusieurs incidents mineurs, de nouvelles tactiques ont été mises au point qui ont toutes le même objectif fondamental. Les « manifestations » à grande échelle combinées à des actions agressives sont destinées à provoquer une réaction israélienne qui conduit à tuer et à blesser les civils de Gaza, malgré les efforts énergiques des FDI (Forces de défense d’Israël) pour réduire les pertes civiles.

Cette nouvelle tactique s’avère plus efficace que les roquettes et les tunnels d’attaque. Les cibles visées – dirigeants politiques de pays tiers, organisations internationales (ONU, UE), groupes de défense des droits de l’homme et médias – n’admettent pas que l’on réponde par la force à des manifestations faussement pacifiques qu’ils sont tentés d’assimiler aux manifestations réellement pacifiques qui ont lieu dans leurs propres villes.

Comme à leur habitude, ces cibles-là se montrent toujours disposées à se laisser leurrer par ce stratagème. Depuis le début de cette vague de violence, des condamnations véhémentes ont été émises par l’ONU, l’UE et la CPI ; mais aussi plusieurs gouvernements et organisations des droits de l’homme, notamment Amnesty International et Human Rights Watch ; sans parler de nombreux journaux et stations de radio. Leurs protestations incluent des demandes d’enquête internationale sur les allégations de meurtres illégaux ainsi que des accusations de violation du droit humanitaire international et des droits de l’homme par les FDI.

Les tactiques du Hamas sur le terrain

Ces manifestations sont en réalité des opérations militaires soigneusement planifiées et orchestrées. Des foules de civils auxquelles se mêlent des groupes de combattants sont rassemblées aux frontières. Combattants et civils ont pour mission de s’approcher de la clôture et de la briser. Des milliers de pneus ont été incendiés pour créer des écrans de fumée afin de dissimuler leurs mouvements en direction de la clôture (et sans grande efficacité, ils ont utilisé des miroirs pour aveugler les observateurs de la FDI et les tireurs d’élite). Les pneus enflammés et les cocktails Molotov ont également été utilisés pour briser la clôture dont certains éléments, à divers endroits, sont en en bois.

Le vendredi 4 mai, environ 10 000 Palestiniens ont participé à des manifestations violentes le long de la frontière et des centaines d’émeutiers ont vandalisé et incendié la partie palestinienne de Kerem Shalom, point de passage des convois humanitaires. Ils ont endommagé des canalisations de gaz et de carburant qui partent d’Israël en direction de la bande de Gaza. Ce raid contre Kerem Shalom a eu lieu à deux reprises le 4 mai. Le même jour, deux tentatives d’infiltration ont été déjoues par les troupes de Tsahal à deux endroits différents. Trois des infiltrés ont été tués par les soldats des FDI qui défendaient la frontière. Dans certains cas, les infiltrés ont été arrêtés.

Le Hamas et ses miliciens ont utilisé des grappins, des cordes, des pinces coupantes et d’autres outils pour briser la clôture. Ils ont utilisé des drones, de puissants lance-pierres capables de tuer et blesser gravement des soldats, des armes à feu, des grenades à main et des engins explosifs improvisés, à la fois pour tuer des soldats israéliens et pour passer à travers la clôture.

Cerfs-volants et ballons incendiaires

Des cerfs-volants ont été lâchés par-dessus la frontière de Gaza afin d’incendier les cultures et l’herbe du côté israélien dans le but de causer des dommages économiques mais aussi pour tuer et mutiler. Cela peut sembler une arme primitive et même risible, mais le 4 mai, les Palestiniens avaient préparé des centaines de bombes incendiaires volantes pour les déployer en essaim en Israël, afin d’exploiter au mieux une vague de chaleur intense. Seules des conditions de vent défavorables ont empêché le déploiement de ces cerfs-volants empêchant ainsi des dommages sérieux potentiels.

Dans plusieurs cas, les cerfs-volants en feu ont provoqué des incendies. Ainsi, le 16 avril, un champ de blé a été incendié côté israélien. Le 2 mai, un cerf-volant incendiaire parti de Gaza a provoqué un incendie majeur dans la forêt de Be’eri dévastant de vastes zones boisées. Dix équipes de pompiers ont été nécessaires pour juguler l’incendie. Des ballons incendiaires ont également été utilisés par le Hamas, notamment le 7 mai, l’un d’eux a réussi à incendier un champ de blé près de la forêt de Be’eri. Israël évalue à plusieurs millions de shekels, les dommages économiques résultants des incendies causés par les cerfs-volants et les ballons.

Si le Hamas a traversé

Jusqu’à présent, le Hamas n’a pas réussi de percée significative à travers la clôture. S’ils y arrivaient, il faut s’attendre à ce que des milliers de Gazaouis se déversent par ces brèches parmi lesquels des terroristes armés tenteraient d’atteindre les villages israéliens pour y commettre des assassinats de masse et des enlèvements.

Le Hamas a tenté d’ouvrir une brèche au point-frontière le plus proche du kibboutz Nahal Oz, objectif qui pourrait être atteint en 5 minutes ou moins par des hommes armés prêts à tuer.

Dans ce scénario, ou des terroristes armés sont indiscernables de civils non armés, qui eux-mêmes représentent une menace physique, il est difficile de voir comment les FDI pourraient éviter d’infliger de lourdes pertes pour défendre leur territoire et de leur population.

Forces de défense d’Israel (IDF) : une risposte graduée

Les FDI ont été obligées d’agir avec une grande fermeté – pour empêcher toute pénétration – y compris à l’aide de tirs réels (qui ont parfois été meurtriers) et malgré une condamnation internationale lourde et inévitable.

Compte tenu de leur expérience des violences passées, les FDI ont adopté une réponse graduée. Ils ont largué des milliers de tracts et ont utilisé les SMS, les médias sociaux, les appels téléphoniques et les émissions de radio pour informer les habitants de Gaza et leur demander de ne pas se rassembler à la frontière ni de s’approcher de la barrière. Ils ont contacté les propriétaires de compagnies de bus de Gaza et leur ont demandé de ne transporter personne à la frontière.

La coercition exercée par le Hamas à l’encontre de la population civile a rendu ces tentatives de dissuasion inutiles. Les FDI ont alors utilisé des gaz lacrymogènes pour disperser les foules qui approchaient de trop près la clôture. Dans un effort innovant pour atteindre à plus de précision et d’efficacité, des drones ont parfois été utilisés pour disperser les gaz lacrymogènes. Mais, les gaz lacrymogènes ont une efficacité limitée dans le temps, sont sensibles aux sautes de vent, et leur impact est également réduit quand la population ciblée sait comment en atténuer les effets les plus graves.

Ensuite, les forces de Tsahal ont utilisé des coups de semonce, des balles tirées au-dessus des têtes. Enfin, seulement lorsque c’était absolument nécessaire (selon leurs règles d’engagement), des munitions à balles ont été tirées dans le but de neutraliser plutôt que de tuer. Bien que tirer pour tuer eut pu passer pour une riposte légale dans certains cas, les FDI soutiennent que même dans ce cas, ils n’ont tiré que pour encapaciter (sauf dans les cas où ils avaient affaire à une attaque de type militaire, comme des tirs contre les forces de Tsahal). Dans tous les cas, les forces de Tsahal fonctionnent selon des procédures opérationnelles standard, rédigées en fonction des circonstances et compilées en collaboration avec diverses autorités des FDI.

Néanmoins, ces échanges de tirs ont généré des morts et de nombreux blessés. Les autorités palestiniennes affirment qu’une cinquantaine de personnes ont été tuées jusqu’à présent et que plusieurs centaines d’autres ont été blessées. Israël estime que 80% des personnes tuées étaient des terroristes ou des sympathisants actifs. Le prix – en vies humaines, en souffrance et réprobation de l’opinion publique internationale – a sans aucun doute été élevé ; mais la barrière n’a pas été pénétrée de manière significative et un prix encore plus élevé a donc été évité.

Condamnation internationale, aucune solution

Beaucoup ont estimé qu’Israël n’aurait pas dû répondre comme il l’a fait à la menace. Mladenov, envoyé des Nations Unies au Moyen-Orient, a jugé la riposte d’Israël « scandaleuse ». Le Haut-Commissaire des Nations Unies aux droits de l’homme, Zeid Ra’ad al-Hussein, a condamné l’usage d’une « force excessive ». Le Procureur de la Cour pénale internationale, Fatou Bensouda, a affirmé que « la violence contre les civils – dans une situation comme celle qui prévaut à Gaza – pourrait constituer un crime au regard du Statut de Rome de la CPI ».

Pourtant, en dépit de leurs condamnations, aucun de ces fonctionnaires et experts, n’a été en mesure de proposer une riposte adaptée viable pour empêcher le franchissement violent des frontières israéliennes.

Certains affirment que les troupes israéliennes ont fait un usage de la force disproportionné en tirant à balles réelles sur des manifestants qui ne menaçaient personne. L’UE a ainsi exprimé son inquiétude sur l’utilisation de balles réelles par les forces de sécurité israéliennes. Mais les soi-disant « manifestants » représentaient une menace vitale réelle.

Aujourd’hui, le droit international admet l’usage de munitions réelles face à une menace sérieuse de mort ou de blessure, et quand aucun autre moyen ne permet d’y faire face. Il n’y a aucune exigence que la menace soit « immédiate » – une telle force peut être utilisée quand elle apparait « imminente »; c’est-à-dire au moment où une action agressive doit être empêchée avant qu’elle ne mute en menace immédiate.

La réalité est que, dans les conditions créées délibérément par le Hamas, il n’existait aucune étape intermédiaire efficace pour éviter de tirer sur les manifestants les plus menaçants. Si ces personnes (qu’on peut difficilement appeler de simples « manifestants ») avaient été autorisées à atteindre la barrière, le risque vital serait passé d’imminent à immédiat ; il n’aurait pu être évité qu’en infligeant des pertes beaucoup plus grandes, comme il a été mentionné précédemment.

Échec de la compréhension par la communauté internationale

Ceux qui soutiennent que Tsahal n’aurait pas dû tirer à des balles réelles, exigent en fait que des dizaines de milliers d’émeutiers violents (et parmi eux, des terroristes) soient laissés libres de faire irruption en territoire israélien. Il aurait fallu attendre avant d’agir que des civils, des forces de sécurité et des biens matériels soient en danger, alors qu’une riposte précise et ciblée contre les individus les plus menaçants a permis d’éviter à ce scénario catastrophique de devenir réalité.

Certains ont également soutenu qu’ils n’existe aucune preuve de « manifestant » porteur d’une arme à feu. Ils ne comprennent pas que ce type de conflit n’oppose pas des soldats en uniforme qui s’affrontent ouvertement et en armes sur un champ de bataille. Dans ce contexte, les armes à feu ne sont pas nécessaires pour présenter une menace. En fait, c’est même le contraire compte tenu des objectifs et du mode de fonctionnement. Leurs armes sont des pinces coupantes, des grappins, des cordes, des écrans de fumée, du feu et des explosifs cachés.

Le Hamas a passé des années et dépensé des millions de dollars à creuser des tunnels d’attaque souterrains pour tenter d’entrer en Israël – une menace sérieuse qui implique des pelles, pas des armes à feu. Tout en continuant à creuser des tunnels, ils ont agi au grand jour mais fondus au sein d’une population civile utilisée couverture – les armes ne surgissant qu’une fois l’objectif de pénétration massive atteint. Un soldat qui attendrait de voir une arme à feu pour tirer signerait son propre arrêt de mort, et celui des civils qu’il ou elle a pour mission de protéger.

Des critiques ont été formulées (en particulier par Human Rights Watch) à l’encontre de responsables israéliens qui auraient sciemment accordé leur feu vert aux agissements illégaux des soldats. Par exemple, HRW cite comme preuve certains commentaires publics du chef d’état-major de Tsahal, du porte-parole du Premier ministre et du ministre de la Défense.

Il ne leur est sans doute pas venu à l’esprit que ces fonctionnaires exercent leur autorité par des canaux de communication privés et non à travers des médias publics. Par ailleurs, leurs commentaires ne sont pas des instructions aux troupes mais des avertissements lancés aux civils de Gaza pour réduire le niveau de violence et apaiser les craintes légitimes des Israéliens vivant en zone frontalière. Quand le chef d’état-major dit qu’il positionne « 100 tireurs d’élite à la frontière », il ne fait que verbaliser son devoir légal de défendre son pays ; il ne faut y voir aucun aveu d’une intention d’outrepasser l’usage légal de la force.

Certains groupes de défense des droits de l’homme (y compris à nouveau HRW) et nombre de journalistes ont critiqué l’usage de la force par l’armée israélienne au motif qu’aucun soldat n’a été blessé. Ils en ont publiquement conclu que la riposte de Tsahal avait été « disproportionnée ». Comme cela arrive souvent quand de soi-disant experts commentent les opérations militaires occidentales, les réalités des opérations de sécurité et les impératifs légaux sont mal compris – quand ils ne sont pas déformés -. En effet, il n’est pas nécessaire d’afficher une blessure pour démontrer l’existence d’une menace réelle. Le fait que les soldats de Tsahal n’aient pas été grièvement blessés démontre seulement leur professionnalisme militaire, et non l’absence de menace.

Il a également été affirmé qu’en l’absence de conflit armé, l’usage de la force à Gaza est régi par la charte internationale des droits de l’homme et non par les lois régissant les conflits militaires. Il s’agit là d’une interprétation erronée : toute la bande de Gaza est une zone de guerre définie comme telle par l’agression armée de longue date du Hamas contre l’Etat d’Israël. Par conséquent, dans cette situation, les deux types de loi sont applicables, en fonction des circonstances précises.

Il est licite pour Tsahal de combattre et de tuer tout combattant ennemi identifié comme tel, n’importe où dans la bande de Gaza conformément aux lois de la guerre, que cet ennemi soit en uniforme ou non, armé ou non, représentant ou non une menace imminente, attaquant ou fuyant. Dans la pratique cependant, il apparait que face à des émeutes violentes, les FDI ont agi en supposant que tous les acteurs sur le terrain étaient des civils (contre lesquels il n’est pas nécessaire de recourir à la force létale au premier recours) à moins que l’évidence démontre le contraire.

Faire le jeu du Hamas

Nombreux aussi ont été ceux qui ont affirmé que le gouvernement israélien a refusé de mener une enquête officielle sur les décès survenus. Encore une fois l’assertion est complètement fausse. Les Israéliens ont déclaré qu’ils examineraient les incidents sur la base de leur système juridique, lequel jouit d’un respect unanime au plan international. En revanche, le gouvernement israélien a explicitement refusé une enquête internationale, tout comme les Etats-Unis, le Royaume-Uni ou toute autre démocratie occidentale l’aurait fait dans la même situation.

Toutes ces fausses critiques de l’action israélienne, ainsi que les menaces d’enquêtes internationales, de renvoi d’Israël devant la CPI et de recours à une juridiction universelle contre les responsables israéliens impliqués dans cette situation, font le jeu du Hamas. Ils valident l’utilisation de boucliers humains et la stratégie du Hamas d’obliger au meurtre de leurs propres civils. Les implications débordent largement ce conflit. Comme l’ont démontré de précédents épisodes de violence, les réactions internationales de ce type, y compris une condamnation injuste, généralisent ces tactiques et augmentent le nombre de morts parmi les civils innocents dans le monde entier.

Plus de violence à venir ?

Cette campagne du Hamas peut entraîner des pertes massives dans la population palestinienne. Il est non moins probable que la condamnation des médias, des organisations internationales et des groupes de défense des droits de l’homme va se généraliser. Ceux qui ont un agenda anti-américain et anti-israélien lieront inévitablement cette violence à la décision du président Trump d’ouvrir l’ambassade américaine à Jérusalem.

Action future

La nouvelle tactique du Hamas a eu beaucoup de succès en dressant contre Israël des personnalités de la communauté internationale et en endommageant sa réputation. Il est probable que les effets continueront à se faire sentir longtemps après la fin de cette vague de violence.

Il faut s’attendre à des condamnations supplémentaires de la part d’acteurs internationaux, tels que les divers organismes des Nations Unies, ainsi que des rapports spécifiques produits par des rapporteurs spéciaux des Nations Unies. Des tentatives d’inciter le Procureur de la CPI à examiner ces incidents auront lieu, ainsi que des initiatives de procédures judiciaires lancées par différents États (en utilisant la « compétence universelle ») pour tenter de diffamer et même d’arrêter des responsables militaires et des politiciens israéliens.

Inévitablement, le Hamas et d’autres groupes palestiniens vont renouveler cette tactique à l’avenir. Pour atténuer cela, Israël se prépare à renforcer la frontière de Gaza pour rendre toute tentative de pénétration plus difficile sans recourir à la force létale. (Ils travaillent déjà sur une barrière souterraine pour empêcher la pénétration par effet tunnel.) Cependant, il s’agit d’un projet à long terme et la possibilité d’étanchéifier la frontière au point de la rendre impénétrable demande à être clarifiée.

En outre, Tsahal porte aujourd’hui une attention accrue aux armes non létales. Mais en dépit d’importantes recherches menées au plan international, aucun système viable et efficace ne peut fonctionner dans de telles circonstances.

Les amis et alliés d’Israël peuvent agir pour contrer la propagande anti-israélienne du Hamas, et faire pression sur les dirigeants politiques, les groupes de défense des droits de l’homme, les organisations internationales et les médias pour éviter une fausse condamnation d’Israël ; il faut également lutter contre les réclamations d’une action internationale comme d’une enquête unilatérale des Nations Unies et ses résolutions. Un tel rejet, de préférence accompagné d’une forte condamnation de la tactique violente du Hamas, pourrait contribuer à décourager l’utilisation de tels plans d’action. Bien entendu, face à un agenda anti-israélien aussi profondément enraciné, de telles recommandations sont plus faciles à formuler qu’à mettre en pratique.

Le colonel Richard Kemp commandait les forces britanniques en Irlande du Nord, en Afghanistan, en Irak et dans les Balkans. Cette analyse a été publiée à l’origine sur le site Web de HIGH LEVEL MILITARY GROUP. Elle est reproduite ici avec l’aimable autorisation de l’auteur.

Voir aussi:

Falling for Hamas’s Split-Screen Fallacy

Matti Friedman

Mr. Friedman, a journalist, is the author of the memoir “Pumpkinflowers: A Soldier’s Story of a Forgotten War.”

JERUSALEM — During my years in the international press here in Israel, long before the bloody events of this week, I came to respect Hamas for its keen ability to tell a story.

At the end of 2008 I was a desk editor, a local hire in The Associated Press’s Jerusalem bureau, during the first serious round of violence in Gaza after Hamas took it over the year before. That conflict was grimly similar to the American campaign in Iraq, in which a modern military fought in crowded urban confines against fighters concealed among civilians. Hamas understood early that the civilian death toll was driving international outrage at Israel, and that this, not I.E.D.s or ambushes, was the most important weapon in its arsenal.

Early in that war, I complied with Hamas censorship in the form of a threat to one of our Gaza reporters and cut a key detail from an article: that Hamas fighters were disguised as civilians and were being counted as civilians in the death toll. The bureau chief later wrote that printing the truth after the threat to the reporter would have meant “jeopardizing his life.” Nonetheless, we used that same casualty toll throughout the conflict and never mentioned the manipulation.

Hamas understood that Western news outlets wanted a simple story about villains and victims and would stick to that script, whether because of ideological sympathy, coercion or ignorance. The press could be trusted to present dead human beings not as victims of the terrorist group that controls their lives, or of a tragic confluence of events, but of an unwarranted Israeli slaughter. The willingness of reporters to cooperate with that script gave Hamas the incentive to keep using it.

The next step in the evolution of this tactic was visible in Monday’s awful events. If the most effective weapon in a military campaign is pictures of civilian casualties, Hamas seems to have concluded, there’s no need for a campaign at all. All you need to do is get people killed on camera. The way to do this in Gaza, in the absence of any Israeli soldiers inside the territory, is to try to cross the Israeli border, which everyone understands is defended with lethal force and is easy to film.

About 40,000 people answered a call to show up. Many of them, some armed, rushed the border fence. Many Israelis, myself included, were horrified to see the number of fatalities reach 60.

Most Western viewers experienced these events through a visual storytelling tool: a split screen. On one side was the opening of the American embassy in Jerusalem in the presence of Ivanka Trump, evangelical Christian allies of the White House and Israel’s current political leadership — an event many here found curious and distant from our national life. On the other side was the terrible violence in the desperately poor and isolated territory. The juxtaposition was disturbing.

The attempts to breach the Gaza fence, which Palestinians call the March of Return, began in March and have the stated goal of erasing the border as a step toward erasing Israel. A central organizer, the Hamas leader Yehya Sinwar, exhorted participants on camera in Arabic to “tear out the hearts” of Israelis. But on Monday the enterprise was rebranded as a protest against the embassy opening, with which it was meticulously timed to coincide. The split screen, and the idea that people were dying in Gaza because of Donald Trump, was what Hamas was looking for.

The press coverage on Monday was a major Hamas success in a war whose battlefield isn’t really Gaza, but the brains of foreign audiences.

Israeli soldiers facing Gaza have no good choices. They can warn people off with tear gas or rubber bullets, which are often inaccurate and ineffective, and if that doesn’t work, they can use live fire. Or they can hold their fire to spare lives and allow a breach, in which case thousands of people will surge into Israel, some of whom — the soldiers won’t know which — will be armed fighters. (On Wednesday a Hamas leader, Salah Bardawil, told a Hamas TV station that 50 of the dead were Hamas members. The militant group Islamic Jihad claimed three others.) If such a breach occurs, the death toll will be higher. And Hamas’s tactic, having proved itself, would likely be repeated by Israel’s enemies on its borders with Syria and Lebanon.

Knowledgeable people can debate the best way to deal with this threat. Could a different response have reduced the death toll? Or would a more aggressive response deter further actions of this kind and save lives in the long run? What are the open-fire orders on the India-Pakistan border, for example? Is there something Israel could have done to defuse things beforehand?

These are good questions. But anyone following the response abroad saw that this wasn’t what was being discussed. As is often the case where Israel is concerned, things quickly became hysterical and divorced from the events themselves. Turkey’s president called it “genocide.” A writer for The New Yorker took the opportunity to tweet some of her thoughts about “whiteness and Zionism,” part of an odd trend that reads America’s racial and social problems into a Middle Eastern society 6,000 miles away. The sicknesses of the social media age — the disdain for expertise and the idea that other people are not just wrong but villainous — have crept into the worldview of people who should know better.

For someone looking out from here, that’s the real split-screen effect: On one side, a complicated human tragedy in a corner of a region spinning out of control. On the other, a venomous and simplistic story, a symptom of these venomous and simplistic times.

Voir encore:

The cacophony that accompanies every upsurge in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict can make it seem impossible for outsiders to sort out the facts. Recent events in Gaza are no exception. The shrillest voices on each side are already offering their own mutually exclusive narratives that acknowledge some realities while scrupulously avoiding others.

But while certain facts about Gaza may be inconvenient for the loudest partisans on either side, they should not be inconvenient to the rest of us.

To that end, here are 13 complicated, messy, true things about what has been happening in Gaza. They do not conform to one political narrative or another, and they do not attempt to conclusively apportion all blame. Try, as best you can, to hold them all in your mind at the same time.

1. The protests on Monday were not about President Donald Trump moving the U.S. Embassy to Jerusalem, and have in fact been occurring weekly on the Gaza border since March. They are part of what the demonstrators have dubbed “The Great March of Return”—return, that is, to what is now Israel. (The Monday demonstration was scheduled months ago to coincide with Nakba Day, an annual occasion of protest; it was later moved up 24 hours to grab some of the media attention devoted to the embassy.) The fact that these long-standing Palestinian protests were mischaracterized by many in the media as simply a response to Trump obscured two disquieting realities: First, that the world has largely dismissed the genuine plight of Palestinians in Gaza, only bothering to pay attention to it when it could be tenuously connected to Trump. Second, that many Palestinians do not simply desire their own state and an end to the occupation and settlements that began in 1967, but an end to the Jewish state that began in 1948.

2. The Israeli blockade of Gaza goes well beyond what is necessary for Israel’s security, and in many cases can be capricious and self-defeating. Import and export restrictions on food and produce have seesawed over the years, with what is permitted one year forbidden the next, making it difficult for Gazan farmers to plan for the future. Restrictions on movement between Gaza, the West Bank, and beyond can be similarly overbroad, preventing not simply potential terrorist operatives from traveling, but families and students. In one of the more infamous instances, the U.S. State Department was forced to withdraw all Fulbright awards to students in Gaza after Israel did not grant them permission to leave. Today, official policy bars Gazans from traveling abroad unless they commit to not returning for a full year. It is past time that these issues be addressed, as outlined in part in a new letter from several prominent senators, including Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren.

3. Hamas, which controls the Gaza Strip, is an authoritarian, theocratic regime that has called for Jewish genocide in its charter, murdered scores of Israeli civilians, repressed Palestinian women, and harshly persecuted religious and sexual minorities. It is a designated terrorist group by the United States, Canada, and the European Union.

4. The overbearing Israeli blockade has helped impoverish Gaza. So has Hamas’s utter failure to govern and provide for the basic needs of the enclave’s people. Whether it has been spending its manpower and millions of dollars on subterranean attack tunnels into Israel—including under United Nations schools for Gaza’s children—or launching repeated messianic military operations against Israel, the terrorist group has consistently prioritized the deaths of Israelis over the lives of its Palestinian brethren.

5. Many of the thousands of protesters on the Gaza border, both on Monday and in weeks previous, were peaceful and unarmed, as anyone looking at the photos and videos of the gatherings can see.

6. Hamas manipulated many of these demonstrators into unwittingly rushing the Israeli border fence under false pretenses in order to produce injuries and fatalities. As the New York Times reported, “After midday prayers, clerics and leaders of militant factions in Gaza, led by Hamas, urged thousands of worshipers to join the protests. The fence had already been breached, they said falsely, claiming Palestinians were flooding into Israel.” Similarly, the Washington Post recounted how “organizers urged protesters over loudspeakers to burst through the fence, telling them Israeli soldiers were fleeing their positions, even as they were reinforcing them.” Hamas has also publicly acknowledged deliberately using peaceful civilians at the protests as cover and cannon fodder for their military operations. “When we talk about ‘peaceful resistance,’ we are deceiving the public,” Hamas co-founder Mahmoud al-Zahar told an interviewer. “This is peaceful resistance bolstered by a military force and by security agencies.”

7. A significant number of the protesters were armed, which is how they did things like this:

Widely circulated Arabic instructions on Facebook directed protesters to “bring a knife, dagger, or gun if available” and to breach the Israeli border and kidnap civilians. (The posts have now been removed by Facebook for inciting violence but a cached copy can be viewed here.) Hamas further incentivized violence by providing payments to those injured and the families of those killed. Both Hamas and the Islamic Jihad terror group have since claimed many of those killed as their own operatives and posted photos of them in uniform. On Wednesday, Hamas Political Bureau member Salah Al-Bardawil announced that 50 of the 62 fatalities were Hamas members.

Contrary to certain Israeli talking points, however, these facts do not automatically justify any particular Israeli response or every Palestinian casualty or injury. They simply establish the reality of the threat.

8. It is facile to argue that Gazans should be protesting Hamas and its misrule instead of Israel. One, it is not a binary choice, as both actors have contributed to Gaza’s misery. Two, as the BBC’s Julia MacFarlane recalled from her time covering Gaza, any public dissent against Hamas is perilous: “A boy I met in Gaza during the 2014 war was dragged from his bed at midnight, had his kneecaps shot off in a square and was told next time it would be axes—for an anti-Hamas Facebook post.” The group has publicly executed those it deems “collaborators” and broken up rare protests with gunfire. Likewise, Gazans cannot “vote Hamas out” because Hamas has not permitted elections since it won them and took power in 2006. The group fares poorly in the polls today, but Gazans have no recourse for expressing their dissatisfaction. Protesting Israel, however, is an outlet for frustration encouraged by Hamas.

9. In that regard, Hamas has worked to increase chaos and casualties stemming from the protests by allowing rioters to repeatedly set fire to the Kerem Shalom crossing, Gaza’s main avenue for international and humanitarian aid, and by turning back trucks of needed food and supplies from Israel.

10. A lot of what you’re seeing on social media about what is transpiring in Gaza isn’t actually true. For instance, a video of a Palestinian “martyr” allegedly moving under his shroud that is circulating in pro-Israel circles is actually a 4-year old clip from Egypt. Likewise, despite the claims of viral tweets and the Hamas-run Gaza Health Ministry that were initially parroted by some in the media, Israel did not actually kill an 8-month old baby with tear gas. The Gazan doctor who treated her told the Associated Press that she died from a preexisting heart condition, a fact belatedly picked up by the New York Times and Los Angeles Times. In the era of fake news, readers should be especially vigilant about resharing unconfirmed content simply because it confirms their biases.

11. There are constructive solutions to Gaza’s problems that would alleviate the plight of its Palestinian population while assuaging the security concerns of Israelis. However, these useful proposals do not go viral like angry tweets ranting about how Palestinians are all de facto terrorists or Israelis are the new Nazis, which is one reason why you probably have never heard of them.

12. A truly independent, respected inquiry into Israel’s tactics and rules of engagement in Gaza is necessary to ensure any abuses are punished and create internationally recognized guidelines for how Israel and other state actors should deal with these situations on their borders. The United Nations, which annually condemns Israel in its General Assembly and Human Rights Council more than all other countries combined, and whose notorious bias against Israel was famously condemned by Obama ambassador to the U.N., Samantha Power, clearly lacks the credibility to administer such an inquiry. Between America, Canada, and Europe, however, it should be possible to create one.

13. But because the entire debate around Israel’s conduct has been framed by absolutists who insist either that Israel is utterly blameless or that Israel is wantonly massacring random Palestinians for sport, a reasonable inquiry into what it did correctly and what it did not is unlikely to happen.

***

You can help support Tablet’s unique brand of Jewish journalism. Click here to donate today.

Voir également:

Jerusalem Celebrates, Gaza Burns

On the night of May 14, the leading headline of The Washington Post said, “More than 50 killed in Gaza protests as U.S. opens its new embassy in Jerusalem.” Headlines of other newspapers were not much different.

There is no doubt the headlines were factually accurate. But so would a headline saying, “More than 50 killed in Gaza as the moon was a waning crescent,” or “More than 50 killed in Gaza as Arambulo named co-anchor of NBC4’s ‘Today in LA.’ ” Were they unbiased? Not quite. They suggested a causation: The U.S. opens an embassy and hence people get killed. But the causation is faulty: Gazans were killed last week, when the United States had not yet opened its embassy. Gazans were killed for a simple reason: Ignoring warnings, thousands of them decided to get too close to the Israeli border.

There are arguments one could make against President Donald Trump’s decision to move the American embassy to Jerusalem. People in Gaza getting killed is not one of them. A country such as the United States, a country such as Israel, cannot curb strategic decisions because of inconveniences such as demonstrations. Small things can be postponed to prevent anger. Small decisions can be altered to avoid violent incidents. But not important, historic moves.

At the end of this week, no matter the final tally of Gazans getting hurt, only one event will be counted as “historic.” The opening of a U.S. embassy in Jerusalem is a historic decision of great symbolic significance. Lives lost for no good reason in Gaza — as saddening as it is — is routine. Eleven years ago, on  May 16, 2007, I wrote this about Gaza: “The Gaza Strip is burning, drifting into chaos, turning into hell — and nobody seems to have a way out of this mess. Dozens of people were killed in Gaza in the last couple of weeks, the victims of lawlessness and power struggles between clans and families, gangsters and militias.” Sounds familiar? I assume it does. This is what routine looks like. This is what disregard for human life feels like. And that was 11 years to the week before a U.S. embassy was moved to Jerusalem.

Why were so many lives lost in Gaza? To give a straight answer, one must begin with the obvious: The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) has no interest in having more Gazans killed, yet its mission is not to save Gazans’ lives. Its mission — remember, the IDF is a military serving a country — is to defeat an enemy. And in the case of Gaza this past week, the meaning of this was preventing unauthorized, possibly dangerous people from crossing the fence separating Israel from the Gaza Strip.

As this column was written, the afternoon of May 15, the IDF had achieved its objective: No one was able to cross the border into Israel. The price was high. It was high for the Palestinians. Israel will get its unfair share of criticism from people who have nothing to offer but words of condemnation. This was also to be expected. And also to be ignored. Again, not because criticism means nothing, but rather because there are things of higher importance to worry about. Such as not letting unauthorized hostile people cross into Israel.

Of course, any bloodshed is regretful. Yet to achieve its objectives, the IDF had to use lethal force. Circumstances on the ground dictate using such measures. The winds made tear gas ineffective. The proximity of the border made it essential to stop Gazan demonstrators from getting too close, lest thousands of them flood the fence, thus forcing the IDF to use even more lethal means. Leaflets warned them not to go near the fence. Media outlets were used to clarify that consequences could be dire. Hence, an unbiased, sincere newspaper headline should have said, “More than 50 killed in Gaza while Hamas leaders ignored warnings.”

So, yes, Jerusalem celebrated while Gaza burned. Not because Gaza burned. And, yes, the U.S. moved its embassy while Gaza burned. But this is not what made Gaza burn.

It all comes down to legitimacy. Having embassies move to Jerusalem, Israel’s capital, is about legitimacy. Letting Israel keep the integrity of its borders is about legitimacy. President Donald Trump gained the respect and appreciation of Israelis because of his no-nonsense acceptance of a reality, and because of his no-nonsense rejection of delegitimization masqueraded as policy differences. A legitimate country is allowed to defend its border. A legitimate country is allowed to choose its capital.

Gaza’s Miseries Have Palestinian Authors
Bret Stephens

The New York Times
May 16, 2018

For the third time in two weeks, Palestinians in the Gaza Strip have set fire to the Kerem Shalom border crossing, through which they get medicine, fuel and other humanitarian essentials from Israel. Soon we’ll surely hear a great deal about the misery of Gaza. Try not to forget that the authors of that misery are also the presumptive victims.

There’s a pattern here — harm yourself, blame the other — and it deserves to be highlighted amid the torrent of morally blind, historically illiterate criticism to which Israelis are subjected every time they defend themselves against violent Palestinian attack.

In 1970, Israel set up an industrial zone along the border with Gaza to promote economic cooperation and provide Palestinians with jobs. It had to be shut down in 2004 amid multiple terrorist attacks that left 11 Israelis dead.

In 2005, Jewish-American donors forked over $14 million dollars to pay for greenhouses that had been used by Israeli settlers until the government of Ariel Sharon withdrew from the Strip. Palestinians looted dozens of the greenhouses almost immediately upon Israel’s exit.

In 2007, Hamas took control of Gaza in a bloody coup against its rivals in the Fatah faction. Since then, Hamas, Islamic Jihad and other terrorist groups in the Strip have fired nearly 10,000 rockets and mortars from Gaza into Israel — all the while denouncing an economic “blockade” that is Israel’s refusal to feed the mouth that bites it. (Egypt and the Palestinian Authority also participate in the same blockade, to zero international censure.)

In 2014 Israel discovered that Hamas had built 32 tunnels under the Gaza border to kidnap or kill Israelis. “The average tunnel requires 350 truckloads of construction supplies,” The Wall Street Journal reported, “enough to build 86 homes, seven mosques, six schools or 19 medical clinics.” Estimated cost of tunnels: $90 million.

Want to understand why Gaza is so poor? See above.

Which brings us to the grotesque spectacle along Gaza’s border over the past several weeks, in which thousands of Palestinians have tried to breach the fence and force their way into Israel, often at the cost of their lives. What is the ostensible purpose of what Palestinians call “the Great Return March”?

That’s no mystery. This week, The Times published an op-ed by Ahmed Abu Artema, one of the organizers of the march. “We are intent on continuing our struggle until Israel recognizes our right to return to our homes and land from which we were expelled,” he writes, referring to homes and land within Israel’s original borders.

His objection isn’t to the “occupation” as usually defined by Western liberals, namely Israel’s acquisition of territories following the 1967 Six Day War. It’s to the existence of Israel itself. Sympathize with him all you like, but at least notice that his politics demand the elimination of the Jewish state.

Notice, also, the old pattern at work: Avow and pursue Israel’s destruction, then plead for pity and aid when your plans lead to ruin.

The world now demands that Jerusalem account for every bullet fired at the demonstrators, without offering a single practical alternative for dealing with the crisis.

But where is the outrage that Hamas kept urging Palestinians to move toward the fence, having been amply forewarned by Israel of the mortal risk? Or that protest organizers encouraged women to lead the charges on the fence because, as The Times’s Declan Walsh reported, “Israeli soldiers might be less likely to fire on women”? Or that Palestinian children as young as 7 were dispatched to try to breach the fence? Or that the protests ended after Israel warned Hamas’s leaders, whose preferred hide-outs include Gaza’s hospital, that their own lives were at risk?

Elsewhere in the world, this sort of behavior would be called reckless endangerment. It would be condemned as self-destructive, cowardly and almost bottomlessly cynical.

The mystery of Middle East politics is why Palestinians have so long been exempted from these ordinary moral judgments. How do so many so-called progressives now find themselves in objective sympathy with the murderers, misogynists and homophobes of Hamas? Why don’t they note that, by Hamas’s own admission, some 50 of the 62 protesters killed on Monday were members of Hamas? Why do they begrudge Israel the right to defend itself behind the very borders they’ve been clamoring for years for Israelis to get behind?

Why is nothing expected of Palestinians, and everything forgiven, while everything is expected of Israelis, and nothing forgiven?

That’s a question to which one can easily guess the answer. In the meantime, it’s worth considering the harm Western indulgence has done to Palestinian aspirations.

No decent Palestinian society can emerge from the culture of victimhood, violence and fatalism symbolized by these protests. No worthy Palestinian government can emerge if the international community continues to indulge the corrupt, anti-Semitic autocrats of the Palestinian Authority or fails to condemn and sanction the despotic killers of Hamas. And no Palestinian economy will ever flourish through repeated acts of self-harm and destructive provocation.

If Palestinians want to build a worthy, proud and prosperous nation, they could do worse than try to learn from the one next door. That begins by forswearing forever their attempts to destroy it.

For the third time in two weeks, Palestinians in the Gaza Strip have set fire to the Kerem Shalom border crossing, through which they get medicine, fuel and other humanitarian essentials from Israel. Soon we’ll surely hear a great deal about the misery of Gaza. Try not to forget that the authors of that misery are also the presumptive victims.

There’s a pattern here — harm yourself, blame the other — and it deserves to be highlighted amid the torrent of morally blind, historically illiterate criticism to which Israelis are subjected every time they defend themselves against violent Palestinian attack.

In 1970, Israel set up an industrial zone along the border with Gaza to promote economic cooperation and provide Palestinians with jobs. It had to be shut down in 2004 amid multiple terrorist attacks that left 11 Israelis dead.

In 2005, Jewish-American donors forked over $14 million dollars to pay for greenhouses that had been used by Israeli settlers until the government of Ariel Sharon withdrew from the Strip. Palestinians looted dozens of the greenhouses almost immediately upon Israel’s exit.

Notice, also, the old pattern at work: Avow and pursue Israel’s destruction, then plead for pity and aid when your plans lead to ruin.

The world now demands that Jerusalem account for every bullet fired at the demonstrators, without offering a single practical alternative for dealing with the crisis.

But where is the outrage that Hamas kept urging Palestinians to move toward the fence, having been amply forewarned by Israel of the mortal risk? Or that protest organizers encouraged women to lead the charges on the fence because, as The Times’s Declan Walsh reported, “Israeli soldiers might be less likely to fire on women”? Or that Palestinian children as young as 7 were dispatched to try to breach the fence? Or that the protests ended after Israel warned Hamas’s leaders, whose preferred hide-outs include Gaza’s hospital, that their own lives were at risk?

Elsewhere in the world, this sort of behavior would be called reckless endangerment. It would be condemned as self-destructive, cowardly and almost bottomlessly cynical.

The mystery of Middle East politics is why Palestinians have so long been exempted from these ordinary moral judgments. How do so many so-called progressives now find themselves in objective sympathy with the murderers, misogynists and homophobes of Hamas? Why don’t they note that, by Hamas’s own admission, some 50 of the 62 protesters killed on Monday were members of Hamas? Why do they begrudge Israel the right to defend itself behind the very borders they’ve been clamoring for years for Israelis to get behind?

Why is nothing expected of Palestinians, and everything forgiven, while everything is expected of Israelis, and nothing forgiven?

That’s a question to which one can easily guess the answer. In the meantime, it’s worth considering the harm Western indulgence has done to Palestinian aspirations.

No decent Palestinian society can emerge from the culture of victimhood, violence and fatalism symbolized by these protests. No worthy Palestinian government can emerge if the international community continues to indulge the corrupt, anti-Semitic autocrats of the Palestinian Authority or fails to condemn and sanction the despotic killers of Hamas. And no Palestinian economy will ever flourish through repeated acts of self-harm and destructive provocation.

If Palestinians want to build a worthy, proud and prosperous nation, they could do worse than try to learn from the one next door. That begins by forswearing forever their attempts to destroy it.

Voir par ailleurs:

Un haut responsable du Hamas a affirmé mercredi que la très grande majorité des Palestiniens tués cette semaine lors de manifestations et heurts avec l’armée israélienne dans la bande de Gaza appartenaient au mouvement islamiste, qui dirige l’enclave.

L’armée et le gouvernement israéliens, confrontés à une vague de réprobation après la mort de 59 Palestiniens sous des tirs israéliens lundi, se sont saisis de ces propos pour contester le caractère pacifique des évènements et maintenir que ceux-ci étaient orchestrés par le Hamas.

Des milliers de Palestiniens ont débuté le 30 mars dans la bande de Gaza un mouvement de plus de six semaines contre le blocus israélien et pour le droit des Palestiniens à revenir sur les terres qu’ils ont fuies ou dont ils ont été chassés à la création d’Israël en 1948.

Les violences de lundi ont coïncidé avec l’inauguration controversée à Jérusalem de la nouvelle ambassade américaine, démarche qui a rompu avec des décennies de consensus international.

Le Guatemala a également inauguré mercredi à Jérusalem sa nouvelle ambassade en Israël, s’attirant la colère de la direction palestinienne qui a accusé le gouvernement guatémaltèque de se placer du côté des « crimes de guerre israéliens ».

« Agression israélienne »

Les violences à Gaza lundi, journée la plus meurtrière du conflit israélo-palestinien depuis 2014, ont continué à susciter l’inquiétude ou la colère à l’étranger.

Le pape François s’est dit « très préoccupé par l’escalade des tensions en Terre Sainte » et le président russe Vladimir Poutine a appelé à « renoncer à la violence ». Les ministres arabes des Affaires étrangères devaient tenir jeudi au Caire une réunion extraordinaire sur « l’agression israélienne contre le peuple palestinien ».

La tension est retombée dans la bande de Gaza à la veille du ramadan, le mois de jeûne musulman, mais la situation demeure hautement volatile.

Des chars israéliens ont frappé plusieurs positions du Hamas dans la bande de Gaza, en réponse à des tirs d’armes à feu, a dit notamment l’armée.

Le Hamas a dit soutenir la mobilisation, tout en assurant qu’elle émanait de la société civile et qu’elle était pacifique.

L’armée israélienne accuse de son côté le Hamas, qu’il considère comme « terroriste », de s’être servi du mouvement pour mêler à la foule des hommes armés ou disposer des engins explosifs le long de frontière.

Elle assure n’avoir fait que défendre les frontières, ses soldats et les civils contre une éventuelle infiltration de Palestiniens susceptibles de s’attaquer aux populations riveraines de l’enclave ou de prendre un otage.

Après la mort par balles des Palestiniens, Israël s’est retrouvé en butte aux condamnations et aux appels à une enquête indépendante.

Dans ce contexte, Salah al-Bardaouil, haut responsable du Hamas, a déclaré à une télévision palestinienne que 50 des 62 Palestiniens tués lundi mais aussi mardi appartenaient au mouvement islamiste.

La vérité « dévoilée »

« Cinquante des martyrs (des morts) étaient du Hamas, et 12 faisaient partie du reste de la population », a-t-il dit, interrogé sur les critiques selon lesquelles le Hamas tirait profit de la mobilisation. « Comment le Hamas pourrait-il récolter les fruits (du mouvement) alors qu’il a payé un prix aussi élevé », a-t-il demandé.

Il n’a pas fourni de détails sur l’appartenance de ces Palestiniens à la branche armée ou politique du Hamas, ni sur les circonstances dans lesquelles ils avaient été tués.

Salah al-Bardaouil « dévoile la vérité », a tweeté un porte-parole du gouvernement israélien, Ofir Gendelman, « ce n’était pas une manifestation pacifique, mais une opération du Hamas ».

« Nous avons les mêmes chiffres », a lancé de son côté le Premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahu, avertissant que son pays continuerait « à se défendre par tous les moyens nécessaires ».

Un porte-parole du Hamas, Fawzy Barhoum, et un autre haut responsable, Bassem Naim, se sont gardés de confirmer les informations de M. Bardaouil. Le Hamas paie les funérailles de tous, « qu’ils soient membres ou supporters du Hamas, ou pas », a dit M. Barhoum.

Il est « naturel de voir de nombreux membres ou supporters du Hamas » à une telle manifestation, a dit M. Naim, en faisant référence à la forte présence du Hamas dans toutes les couches de la société. Ceux qui ont été tués « participaient pacifiquement » au mouvement, a-t-il assuré.

Sur la chaîne de télévision Al-Jazeera, l’homme fort du Hamas, Yahya Sinouar, a prévenu: « si le blocus (israélien à Gaza) continue, nous n’hésiterons pas à recourir à la résistance militaire ».

Voir de même:

Gaza, le massacre des oubliés

EDITO. Ce qui vient de se passer à Gaza est un rappel à l’ordre, tragique, à une communauté internationale qui a abandonné le peuple palestinien.

Sara Daniel

Pendant qu’une petite fille palestinienne mourait d’avoir inhalé des gaz lacrymogènes à Gaza, à Jérusalem, à moins d’une heure et demie de là par la route, on sablait le champagne, lundi, pour fêter le déménagement de l’ambassade américaine.

Malgré les snipers israéliens, les Gazaouis auront donc continué à se presser devant la clôture de séparation de cette prison maudite et à ciel ouvert que représente l’enclave de Gaza, honte d’Israël et de la communauté internationale, pour achever la « Marche du grand retour », entamée le 30 mars et censée se conclure ce 15 mai. Une marche pour réclamer les terres perdues au moment de la création d’Israël, il y a soixante-dix ans, mais surtout la fin du blocus israélo-égyptien qui étouffe Gaza.

Au cours de ce lundi noir, 59 personnes ont été tuées, et plus de 2.400 ont été blessées par balles.

Une violence inouïe et inutile

Encore une fois le conflit israélo-palestinien a joué la guerre des images, au cours de ce jour si symbolique. Les Israéliens fêtaient les 70 ans de la naissance de leur Etat, le miracle de son existence, l’incroyable longévité de ce confetti minuscule entouré de nations hostiles. Les Palestiniens commémoraient, eux, leur « catastrophe », leur Nakba, qui les a poussés sur les routes de l’exil, dans l’indifférence d’une communauté internationale lassée par un conflit interminable, happée par d’autres hécatombes plus pressantes.

C’est avec cette Marche que les Gazaouis ont tenté de revenir sur la carte des préoccupations mondiales et de rappeler leur agonie à un monde qui les oublie. Pendant ce temps, Israéliens, Américains, Saoudiens et Egyptiens célèbrent leur alliance sur le dos de ces vaincus de l’histoire, les pressant d’accepter un accord, ce que Donald Trump a appelé le « deal ultime », dont les contours sont encore flous mais dont on peut être certain qu’il entérinerait leur déroute.

Mais pourquoi les Israéliens ont-ils cédé à cette violence inouïe et inutile alors que, de leur aveu même, le vrai sujet de leurs inquiétudes était le front du Nord avec le Hezbollah et l’Iran ? Est-ce l’hubris des vainqueurs ? En tout cas, Israël n’a pas entendu l’avertissement de Houda Naim, députée du Hamas.

« Nous considérons que ces marches pacifiques sont aujourd’hui le meilleur moyen d’atteindre les points faibles de notre ennemi », disait-elle au début du mouvement.

Une population excédée, désespérée

Dans le même esprit que les campagnes BDS qui prônent le boycott de produits israéliens, la nouvelle génération de militants a pensé que c’était par cette approche non violente dans la filiation de Gandhi que la cause palestinienne aurait une chance de revenir sur le devant de la scène internationale.

Alors, les manifestants ont-ils été manipulés par leurs organisations politiques ? La question est obscène lorsque que la marche, commencée il y a six semaines, a déjà fait plus de 100 morts. Bien sûr, le Hamas, débordé par cette manifestation civile et pacifique, a rejoint le mouvement. A-t-il encouragé les Gazaouis à provoquer les soldats israéliens, les conduisant à une mort certaine ? Peut-être, et le gouvernement israélien l’affirmera. Mais cela ne suffirait pas à expliquer la détermination d’une population excédée, désespérée par ses conditions d’existence. Ce qui vient de se passer à Gaza est un rappel à l’ordre, tragique, à une communauté internationale qui a abandonné ce peuple palestinien à la brutalité israélienne, à l’incurie de ses dirigeants engagés dans une guerre fratricide, à ses alliés arabes historiquement défaillants, à son sort dont nous portons tous la responsabilité.

Voir enfin:

Danger in overreacting to Santa Fe school shooting

School shootings, however horrific, are not the new normal. Santa Fe killings are part of a bloody contagion that will pass.

James Alan Fox

USA Today

May 18, 2018

Today’s ghastly shooting at a high school in Santa Fe, Texas, claiming the lives of at least 10 victims, has many Americans, including President Trump, wondering when and how the carnage will cease. Coming on the heels of two other multiple fatality school massacres earlier this year, it is no wonder that many are seeing this type of random gun violence as the “new normal.”

Amidst the national mourning for the many innocent lives lost in these senseless shooting sprees, it is critical not to overreact and overrespond to the menacing acts of a few. It is, of course, of little comfort to those families and communities impacted in Santa Fe as well as Parkland, Florida, and Benton, Kentucky, but this is not routine. Schools are not under siege. Rather, this more likely reflects a short-term contagion effect in which angry dispirited youngsters are inspired by others whose violent outbursts serve as fodder for national attention. That should subside once we stop obsessing over the risk.

History provides an important lesson about how crime contagions arise and eventually play themselves out. Over the five-year time span from 1997 through 2001, America witnessed seven multiple-fatality school rampages with a combined 32 killed and 85 others injured, more such incidents and casualties than during the past five years.

Following the March 2001 massacre at a high school in Santee, California, the venerable Dan Rather declared school shootings an “epidemic.” Then, after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack on America, the nation turned its attention to a very different kind of threat, and the school shooting “epidemic” disappeared.

Summertime will soon bring a natural break to the heightened concern over school shootings. Hopefully, come September, we can deal with the underlying issues facing alienated adolescents who seek to follow in the bloody footsteps of their undeserving heroes, without inadvertently fueling the contagion of bloodshed.

Many observers have expressed concern for the excessive attention given to mass shooters of today and the deadliest of yesteryear. CNN’s Anderson Cooper has campaigned against naming names of mass shooters, and 147 criminologists, sociologists, psychologists and other human-behavior experts recently signed on to an open letter urging the media not to identify mass shooters or display their photos.

While I appreciate the concern for name and visual identification of mass shooters for fear of inspiring copycats as well as to avoid insult to the memory of those they slaughtered, names and faces are not the problem. It is the excessive detail — too much information — about the killers, their writings, and their backgrounds that unnecessarily humanizes them. We come to know more about them — their interests and their disappointments — than we do about our next door neighbors. Too often the line is crossed between news reporting and celebrity watch.

At the same time, we focus far too much on records. We constantly are reminded that some shooting is the largest in a particular state over a given number of years, as if that really matters. Would the massacre be any less tragic if it didn’t exceed the death toll of some prior incident? Moreover, we are treated to published lists of the largest mass shootings in modern US history. For whatever purpose we maintain records, they are there to be broken and can challenge a bitter and suicidal assailant to outgun his violent role models.

Although the spirited advocacy of students around the country regarding gun control is to be applauded, we need to keep some perspective about the risk. Slogans like, “I want to go to my graduation, not to my grave,” are powerful, yet hyperbolic.

As often said, even one death is one too many, and we need to take the necessary steps to protect children, including expanded funding for school teachers and school psychologists. Still, despite the occasional tragedy, our schools are safe, safer than they have been for decades.

James Alan Fox is the Lipman Professor of Criminology, Law and Public Policy at Northeastern University, a member of USA TODAY’s Board of Contributors and co-author of Extreme Killing: Understanding Serial and Mass Murder.


« Marche du retour »: The show must go on (From Gaza to Iran, it’s all smoke and mirrors, stupid !)

9 mai, 2018

 

Le président de l'Autorité palestinienne Mahmoud Abbas devant le Parlement européen à Bruxelles, le 23 juin 2016. (Crédit : AFP/John Thys)
Au coeur de l’accord iranien, il y avait un énorme mythe selon laquelle un régime meurtrier ne cherchait qu’un programme pacifique d’énergie nucléaire. Aujourd’hui nous avons la preuve définitive que la promesse iranienne était un mensonge. Le futur de l’Iran appartient à son peuple et les Iraniens méritent une nation qui rende justice à leurs rêves, qui honore leur histoire. (…) Nous n’allons pas laisser un régime qui scande « Mort à l’Amérique » avoir accès aux armes les plus meurtrières sur terre. Donald Trump
La paix ne peut être obtenue où la violence est récompensée. Donald Trump
Un écran de fumée désigne, dans le domaine militaire, une tactique utilisée afin de masquer la position exacte d’unités à l’ennemi, par l’émission d’une fumée dense. Cette dernière peut-être naturelle mais est le plus souvent produite artificiellement à partir de grenades fumigènes (composées notamment d’acide chlorosulfurique). Certains véhicules blindés, en général des chars, disposent de lance-grenades spécifiquement conçus à cet effet, mais utilisent surtout l’injection de carburant Diesel dans l’échappement de leur moteur pour produire des écrans de fumée pouvant atteindre 400 m de long et persister plusieurs minutes. Par exemple, le T-72 soviétique injecte dix litres de carburant à la minute pour créer ses écrans de fumée. Dans les temps anciens, des simples feux de broussailles bien nourris suffisaient parfois à faire l’affaire.Wikipedia
More ink equals more blood, newspaper coverage of terrorist incidents leads directly to more attacks. It’s a macabre example of win-win in what economists call a « common-interest game. Both the media and terrorists benefit from terrorist incidents. Terrorists get free publicity for themselves and their cause. The media, meanwhile, make money « as reports of terror attacks increase newspaper sales and the number of television viewers. Bruno S. Frey and Dominic Rohner
Nous avons constaté que le sport était la religion moderne du monde occidental. Nous savions que les publics anglais et américain assis devant leur poste de télévision ne regarderaient pas un programme exposant le sort des Palestiniens s’il y avait une manifestation sportive sur une autre chaîne. Nous avons donc décidé de nous servir des Jeux olympiques, cérémonie la plus sacrée de cette religion, pour obliger le monde à faire attention à nous. Nous avons offert des sacrifices humains à vos dieux du sport et de la télévision et ils ont répondu à nos prières. Terroriste palestinien (Jeux olympiques de Munich, 1972)
Les Israéliens ne savent pas que le peuple palestinien a progressé dans ses recherches sur la mort. Il a développé une industrie de la mort qu’affectionnent toutes nos femmes, tous nos enfants, tous nos vieillards et tous nos combattants. Ainsi, nous avons formé un bouclier humain grâce aux femmes et aux enfants pour dire à l’ennemi sioniste que nous tenons à la mort autant qu’il tient à la vie. Fathi Hammad (responsable du Hamas, mars 2008)
Je n’ai pas l’intention de cesser de payer les familles des martyrs prisonniers, même si cela me coûte mon siège. Je continuerai à les payer jusqu’à mon dernier jour. Mahmoud Abbas
 Récemment, un certain nombre de rabbins en Israël ont tenu des propos clairs, demandant à leur gouvernement d’empoisonner l’eau pour tuer les Palestiniens. Mahmoud Abbas
Après qu’il soit devenu évident que les déclarations supposées d’un rabbin, relayées par de nombreux médias, se sont révélées sans fondement, le président Mahmoud Abbas a affirmé qu’il n’avait pas pour intention de s’en prendre au judaïsme ou de blesser le peuple juif à travers le monde. Communiqué Autorité palestinienne
Du XIe siècle jusqu’à l’Holocauste qui s’est produit en Allemagne, les juifs vivant en Europe de l’ouest et de l’est ont été la cible de massacres tous les 10 ou 15 ans. Mais pourquoi est-ce arrivé ? Ils disent: « parce que nous sommes juifs » (…) L’hostilité contre les juifs n’est pas due à leur religion, mais plutôt à leur fonction sociale, leurs fonctions sociales liées aux banques et intérêts. Mahmoud Abbas
Si mes propos devant le Conseil national palestinien ont offensé des gens, en particulier des gens de confession juive, je leur présente mes excuses. Je voudrais assurer à tous que telle n’était pas mon intention et réaffirmer mon respect total pour la religion juive, ainsi que pour toutes les religions monothéistes. Je voudrais renouveler notre condamnation de longue date de l’Holocauste, le crime le plus odieux de l’histoire, et exprimer notre compassion envers ses victimes. Mahmoud Abbas
J’espère que les journalistes diront qu’il s’agit de la seule démocratie pluraliste du Moyen-Orient, un pays libre, un pays sûr. Un pays normal, comme la France ou l’Italie. Il n’y a aucune ville dans le monde qui s’appelle Jérusalem-Ouest. Il n’y a pas de Paris-Ouest ou de Rome-Ouest. La course part de la ville de Jérusalem, donc on écrit « Jérusalem » sur la carte. Sylvan Adams
Amer anniversaire. Israël a fêté mercredi son 70e anniversaire en brandissant sa puissance militaire et son improbable réussite économique face aux menaces régionales renouvelées et aux incertitudes intérieures. Après s’être recueillis depuis mardi à la mémoire de leurs compatriotes tués au service de leur pays ou dans des attentats, les Israéliens ont entamé mercredi soir les célébrations marquant la création de leur Etat proclamé le 14 mai 1948, mais fêté en ce moment en fonction du calendrier hébraïque. (…) Israël agite régulièrement le spectre d’une attaque de l’Iran, son ennemi juré. La crainte d’un tel acte d’hostilité, à la manière de l’offensive surprise d’une coalition arabe lors des célébrations de Yom Kippour en 1973, a été attisée par un raid le 9 avril contre une base aérienne en Syrie, imputé à Israël par le régime de Bachar al-Assad et ses alliés iranien et russe. Mais en février, Israël a admis pour la première fois avoir frappé des cibles iraniennes après l’intrusion d’un drone iranien dans son espace aérien. C’était la première confrontation ouvertement déclarée entre Israël et l’Iran en Syrie. Israël martèle qu’il ne permettra pas à l’Iran de s’enraciner militairement en Syrie voisine. Les journaux israéliens ont publié mercredi des éléments spécifiques sur la présence en Syrie des Gardiens de la révolution, unité d’élite iranienne. La publication de photos satellite de bases aériennes et d’appareils civils soupçonnés de décharger des armes, de cartes et même de noms de responsables militaires iraniens constitue un avertissement, convenaient les commentateurs militaires: Israël sait où et qui frapper en cas d’attaque. (…) Avec plus de 8,8 millions d’habitants, la population a décuplé depuis 1948, selon les statistiques officielles. La croissance s’est affichée à 4,1% au quatrième trimestre 2017. Le pays revendique une douzaine de prix Nobel. Cependant, Israël accuse parmi les plus fortes inégalités des pays développés. L’avenir du Premier ministre, englué dans les affaires de corruption présumée, est incertain. S’agissant du conflit israélo-palestinien, une solution a rarement paru plus lointaine. L’anniversaire d’Israël coïncide avec «la marche du retour», mouvement organisé depuis le 30 mars dans la bande de Gaza, territoire palestinien soumis au blocus israélien. Après bientôt trois semaines de violences le long de la frontière qui ont fait 34 morts palestiniens, de nouvelles manifestations sont attendues vendredi. Le ministère israélien de la Défense a annoncé qu’un «puissant engin explosif», apparemment destiné à un attentat lors des fêtes israéliennes, avait été découvert dans un camion palestinien intercepté à un point de passage entre la Cisjordanie occupée et Israël. Libération
Le Giro d’Italia débute ce vendredi de Jérusalem, offrant à l’Etat hébreu son premier événement sportif d’envergure. Tracé qui esquive les Territoires palestiniens, équipes qui hésitent à s’engager, soupçons d’enveloppes d’argent… les autorités ont éteint toutes les critiques pour en faire une vitrine. Libération
Le monde a basculé ce 8 mai 2018. Rien n’y a fait. Ni les câlins d’Emmanuel Macron. Ni les menaces du président iranien. Ni les assurances des patrons de la CIA et de l’AIEA. Donald Trump a tranché : sous le prétexte non prouvé que l’Iran ne le respecte pas, i l retire les Etats-Unis de l’accord nucléaire signé le 14 juillet 2015. Une folle décision aux conséquences considérables. Après la dénonciation de celui de Paris sur le climat, voici l’abandon unilatéral d’un autre accord qui a été négocié par les grandes puissances pendant plus de dix ans. L’Amérique devient donc, à l’évidence, un « rogue state » – un Etat voyou qui ne respecte pas ses engagements internationaux et ment une fois encore ouvertement au monde. L’invasion de l’Irak n’était donc pas une exception malheureuse : Washington n’incarne plus l’ordre international mais le désordre.  Si l’on en doutait encore, le monde dit libre n’a plus de leader crédible ni même de grand frère. Ce qui va troubler un peu plus encore les opinions publiques et les classes dirigeantes occidentales. Puisque l’Iran en est l’un des plus gros producteurs et qu’il va être empêché d’en vendre, le prix du pétrole, déjà à 70 dollars le baril, va probablement exploser, ce qui risque de ralentir voire de stopper la croissance mondiale – et donc celle de la France.
D’ailleurs, de tous les pays occidentaux, la France est celui qui a le plus à perdre d’un retour des sanctions américaines – directes et indirectes. L’Iran a, en effet, passé commandes de 100 Airbus pour 19 milliards de dollars et a signé un gigantesque contrat avec Total pour l’exploitation du champ South Pars 11. Or Trump a choisi la version la plus dure : interdire de nouveau à toute compagnie traitant avec Téhéran de faire du business aux Etats-Unis. Pour continuer à commercer sur le marché américain, Airbus et Total devront donc renoncer à ces deals juteux. L’Obs
Of all the arguments for the Trump administration to honor the nuclear deal with Iran, none was more risible than the claim that we gave our word as a country to keep it. The Obama administration refused to submit the deal to Congress as a treaty, knowing it would never get two-thirds of the Senate to go along. Just 21 percent of Americans approved of the deal at the time it went through, against 49 percent who did not, according to a Pew poll. The agreement “passed” on the strength of a 42-vote Democratic filibuster, against bipartisan, majority opposition. “The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (J.C.P.O.A.) is not a treaty or an executive agreement, and it is not a signed document,” Julia Frifield, then the assistant secretary of state for legislative affairs, wrote then-Representative Mike Pompeo in November 2015 (…) In the weeks leading to Tuesday’s announcement, some of the same people who previously claimed the deal was the best we could possibly hope for suddenly became inventive in proposing means to fix it. This involved suggesting side deals between Washington and European capitals to impose stiffer penalties on Tehran for its continued testing of ballistic missiles — more than 20 since the deal came into effect — and its increasingly aggressive regional behavior. But the problem with this approach is that it only treats symptoms of a problem for which the J.C.P.O.A. is itself a major cause. The deal weakened U.N. prohibitions on Iran’s testing of ballistic missiles, which cannot be reversed without Russian and Chinese consent. That won’t happen. The easing of sanctions also gave Tehran additional financial means with which to fund its depredations in Syria and its militant proxies in Yemen, Lebanon and elsewhere. Any effort to counter Iran on the ground in these places would mean fighting the very forces we are effectively feeding. Why not just stop the feeding? Apologists for the deal answer that the price is worth paying because Iran has put on hold much of its production of nuclear fuel for the next several years. Yet even now Iran is under looser nuclear strictures than North Korea, and would have been allowed to enrich as much material as it liked once the deal expired. That’s nuts. Apologists also claim that, with Trump’s decision, Tehran will simply restart its enrichment activities on an industrial scale. Maybe it will, forcing a crisis that could end with U.S. or Israeli strikes on Iran’s nuclear sites. But that would be stupid, something the regime emphatically isn’t. More likely, it will take symbolic steps to restart enrichment, thereby implying a threat without making good on it. What the regime wants is a renegotiation, not a reckoning. (…) Even with the sanctions relief, the Iranian economy hangs by a thread: The Wall Street Journal on Sunday reported “hundreds of recent outbreaks of labor unrest in Iran, an indication of deepening discord over the nation’s economic troubles.” This week, the rial hit a record low of 67,800 to the dollar; one member of the Iranian Parliament estimated $30 billion of capital outflows in recent months. That’s real money for a country whose gross domestic product barely matches that of Boston. The regime might calculate that a strategy of confrontation with the West could whip up useful nationalist fervors. But it would have to tread carefully: Ordinary Iranians are already furious that their government has squandered the proceeds of the nuclear deal on propping up the Assad regime. The conditions that led to the so-called Green movement of 2009 are there once again. Nor will it help Iran if it tries to start a war with Israel and comes out badly bloodied. (…) Trump’s courageous decision to withdraw from the nuclear deal will clarify the stakes for Tehran. Now we’ll see whether the administration is capable of following through. Bret Stephens
Hello ! Welcome to the show ! Al Jazeera
It was supposed to be a peaceful day. But as then. Unarmed protesters marched towards the border fence, Israeli soldiers opened fire. Al Jazeera journalist
We will continue to sacrifice the blood of our children. Hamas leader
All impure Jews are dogs. They should be burned. They are dirty. Palestinian woman
Je crois dans la volonté d’un peuple. Ce qui m’inspire, c’est la destruction du mur de Berlin. On ne veut pas mourir. Notre message est pacifique, on ne veut jeter personne à la mer. Si les Israéliens nous tuent, ce sera leur crime. Ahmed Abou Irtema
Nous préférons mourir dans notre pays plutôt qu’en mer, comme les réfugiés syriens, ou enfermés à Gaza ou dans les camps au Liban. Moïn Abou Okal (ministère de l’intérieur de Gaza et membre du comité de pilotage de la marche)
 Les gens sont plein de fureur et de colère, dit  On n’a pris aucune décision pour pousser des centaines de milliers de personnes vers la frontière. On veut que cela reste une manifestation pacifique. Mais il n’y a ni négociations avec Israël ni réconciliation entre factions. Il faut laisser les gens s’exprimer. Ghazi Hamad (responsable des relations internationales du Hamas)
Le cauchemar israélien se résume en une image : celle de dizaines de milliers de manifestants non armés, avançant vers la frontière, pour réclamer leur sortie de la prison à ciel ouvert qu’est Gaza. Les responsables sécuritaires israéliens ont averti : tout franchissement illégal sera considéré comme une menace. Plusieurs alertes sérieuses ont eu lieu ces derniers jours, des individus ayant passé la clôture trop aisément. L’armée, qui craint l’enfouissement d’engins explosifs, a prévu d’employer des drones pour larguer des canettes de gaz lacrymogène. (…) En présentant les manifestants comme des personnes achetées, manipulées ou dangereuses, Israël réduit l’événement de vendredi à une question sécuritaire. Il prive ainsi les Gazaouis de leur intégrité comme sujets politiques, de leur capacité à formuler des espérances et à se mobiliser pour les défendre. Or, l’initiative de ce mouvement n’est pas du tout le fruit de délibérations au bureau politique du Hamas, qui gouverne la bande de Gaza depuis 2007. Le mouvement islamiste, affaibli et isolé, soutient comme les autres factions cette mobilisation, y compris par des moyens logistiques, parce qu’il y voit une façon de mettre enfin Israël sous pression. L’idée originelle, c’est Ahmed Abou Irtema qui la revendique. C’était juste après l’annonce de la reconnaissance unilatérale de Jérusalem comme capitale d’Israël par Donald Trump, le 6 décembre 2017. La réconciliation entre le Hamas et le Fatah du président Mahmoud Abbas était dans l’impasse. La situation humanitaire, plus dramatique que jamais. Ce journaliste de 33 ans, père de quatre garçons, a évoqué l’idée, sur Facebook, d’un vaste rassemblement pacifique. (…) Le jeune homme, comme les autres activistes, ne parle pas d’un Etat palestinien, mais de leurs droits historiques sur des terrains précisément délimités. (…) Ils invoquent l’article 11 de la résolution 194, adoptée par les Nations unies (ONU) à la fin de 1948, sur le droit des réfugiés à retourner chez eux ou à obtenir compensation. (…) de son côté Moïn Abou Okal, fonctionnaire au ministère de l’intérieur et membre du comité de pilotage (…) affirme que les manifestants ne tenteront de pénétrer en Israël que le 15 mai. Le Monde
Depuis deux semaines le Hamas et autres organisations terroristes ont repris à leur compte ce qu’ils veulent faire passer pour un soulèvement populaire «pacifiste». Une fois de plus, le détournement du vocabulaire est habile car ces manifestations à plusieurs couches – l’une pacifique et bon enfant, servant de couverture aux multiples tentatives de destruction de la barrière de séparation entre Gaza et Israël, d’enlèvement de soldats, et d’attentats terroristes heureusement avortés – voudraient promouvoir un «droit au retour» à l’intérieur d’Israël des descendants de descendants de «réfugiés». (…) Voici que des milliers de civils, hommes, femmes, enfants, se massent à proximité des zones tampons établies en bordure de la barrière de sécurité israélienne, dans une ambiance de kermesse destinée à nous faire croire qu’il s’agit là de manifestations au sens démocratique du terme. Voici, également, que des milliers de pneus sont enflammés, dégageant une fumée noirâtre visible depuis les satellites, dans le but d’aveugler les forces de sécurité israéliennes qui ont pourtant prévenu: aucun franchissement sauvage de la barrière-frontière ne sera toléré. Toute tentative sera stoppée par des tirs à balle réelle – ce qui, n’en déplaise à beaucoup, est absolument légal dans toute buffer zone entre entités ennemies. À cette annonce, les dirigeants du Hamas ont dû jubiler! Eux qui jouent gagnant-gagnant dans une stratégie impliquant l’utilisation de leurs civils comme boucliers humains, puisqu’il s’agit surtout d’une guerre d’influence, n’en espéraient pas autant. Dès lors ils allaient enfin pouvoir de nouveau compter leurs morts comme autant de victoires médiatiques. Et cela – au grand dam des Israéliens – s’est déroulé exactement comme prévu. Au moment où paraissent ces lignes, Gaza pleure plus de trente morts et les hôpitaux sont débordés par le nombre de blessés – même si les chiffres sont sujets à caution puisque seulement fournis par le Hamas. Pour une fois, cependant, le Hamas s’est piégé lui-même, en publiant avec fierté l’identité de la majorité des victimes qui, de toute évidence appartiennent à ses troupes. C’est le cas du journaliste Yasser Mourtaja dont le double rôle de correspondant de presse et d’officier salarié du Hamas a également été dévoilé.Mais aurait-il été possible pour Israël d’avoir recours à d’autres moyens? L’alignement de snipers parallèlement à l’utilisation de procédés antiémeutes, était-il vraiment indispensable? Imaginons, un instant, que, dans les semaines à venir, comme annoncé par le dirigeant de l’organisation terroriste, Yahya Sinwar, la «marche du retour» permette à ses militants de détruire les barrières, tandis que des milliers de manifestants, femmes et enfants poussés en première ligne, se ruent à l’intérieur d’Israël, bravant non plus les tirs ciblés des soldats entraînés mais la riposte massive d’un peuple paniqué? En menaçant d’avoir recours à des mesures extrêmes, et en tenant cet engagement, Israël ne fait que dissuader et empêcher le développement d’un cauchemar humanitaire dont les dirigeants du Hamas, acculés économiquement et politiquement, pourraient se régaler. Contrairement aux images promues par d’autres abus du vocabulaire, Gaza n’est pas une «prison à ciel ouvert» mais une bande de 360 km² relativement surpeuplée, où vivent également nombre de millionnaires dans des villas fastueuses côtoyant des quartiers miséreux. Chaque jour, environ 1 500 à 2 500 tonnes d’aide humanitaire et de biens de consommation sont autorisés à passer la frontière par le gouvernement israélien. Plusieurs programmes permettent aux habitants de Gaza de se faire soigner dans les hôpitaux de Tel Aviv et de Haïfa. Un projet d’île portuaire sécurisée est à l’étude à Jérusalem, et des tonnes de fruits et légumes sont régulièrement achetés aux paysans gazaouis par les réseaux de distribution alimentaires israéliens. L’Égypte contrôle toute la partie sud et fait souvent montre de beaucoup plus de rigueur qu’Israël pour protéger sa frontière, sachant que le Hamas est issu des Frères Musulmans, organisation interdite par le gouvernement de Abdel Fatah Al Sissi.Mais Gaza souffre, en effet, et même terriblement! Gaza souffre du fait que le Hamas détourne la majorité des fonds destinés à sa population pour creuser des tunnels et se construire une armée dont le seul but, ouvertement déclaré dans sa charte, est d’oblitérer Israël et d’exterminer ses habitants. Gaza souffre des promesses d’aide financière non tenues par les pays Arabes et qui se chiffrent en milliards de dollars. Gaza souffre de n’avoir que trois heures d’électricité par jour, car les terroristes du Hamas ont envoyé une roquette sur la principale centrale pendant le dernier conflit et l’Autorité Palestinienne, de son côté, refuse de payer les factures correspondant à son alimentation, espérant de la sorte provoquer une crise qui conduira à la perte de pouvoir de son concurrent. Gaza souffre d’un taux de chômage de plus de 50 %, après que ses habitants, dans l’euphorie du départ des Juifs, aient saccagé et détruit les serres à légumes et les manufactures construites par Israël et donc jugées «impures» selon les théories islamistes qui les ont conduits, ne l’oublions pas non plus, à voter massivement pour le Hamas. Gaza souffre enfin de ces détournements du vocabulaire, de ces concepts esthétiques manichéens conçus au détriment des êtres, qui empêchent les hommes de conscience de comprendre le cœur du problème et sont forcés de penser qu’Israël est l’unique cause du malheur de ses habitants.C’est pour cela qu’il faut, une fois de plus, clamer quelques faits incontournables. Israël ne peut faire la paix avec une organisation terroriste vouée à sa disparition. Les habitants de Gaza seraient libres de circuler et de se construire un avenir à l’instant même où ils renonceraient à la disparition de leur voisin. Le Hamas et autres organisations terroristes savent qu’ils peuvent compter sur la sympathie des Nations unies et de nombre d’ONG à prétention humanitaire et ne se privent donc pas d’exploiter la population qu’ils détiennent en otage puisqu’ils savent qu’Israël sera systématiquement condamné à leur place. Pierre Rehov
Welcome to the parade for the return – the latest big show organized by Hamas. Every day between 10,000 and 30,000 Muslim Arabs will participate in this smoke screen operation. Pierre Rehov
I shot the video because I observed many times first hand how Palestinians build their propaganda and I strongly believe that no peace will be possible as long as international media believe their narrative instead of seeing the facts. Hamas knows that it can count on the international community when it launches initiatives such as those ‘peaceful protests’ which have claimed too many lives already, while Israel has no choice but to defend its borders. Pierre Rehov
Behind the Smoke Screen, which was shot in recent weeks by two Palestinian cameramen who work with Rehov on a regular basis, went viral and was published by many pro-Israel organizations. The short movie then goes on to show shocking images of children being dragged to the front lines of the clashes as human shields and disturbing footage of animal cruelty. It shows the contradictory tone of Palestinian leaders speaking in English in front of an international audience versus speaking in Arabic to their own people. It shows the health and environmental risk of the burning tire protests and then asks rhetorically: « Where are the ecologist protests? »It shows Hamas’ goals of crossing the border and carrying out attacks, and, if all else fails, trying to provoke soldiers, hoping for a stray bullet and making the front pages of international newspapers. Jerusalem Post
Pour ceux qui croyaient encore que les écrans ou rideaux de fumée étaient une tactique militaire
Infiltration de terroristes armés, sabotage de la barrière de sécurité, destruction de champs israéliens via l’envoi de cerf-volants enflammés, torture et incinération d’animaux, boucliers humains de femmes et d’enfants, miroirs, écran de fumée …
A l’heure où après avoir le mensonge de 70 ans du refus des ambassades étrangères à Jérusalem …
Et l’imposture entre une accusation d’empoisonnement de puits sous les ovations du Parlement européen et une justification de l’antisémitisme européen sous celles de son propre parlement …
D’un président d’une Autorité palestinienne et auteur enfin reconnu d’une thèse négationniste sur le génocide juif …
Le va-t-en-guerre de la Maison blanche vient, entre – excusez du peu – le retour nord-coréen à la table des négociations, la libération de trois otages américains et avec 57% le plus haut taux d’optimisme national depuis 13 ans, d’éventer la supercherie de 40 ans du programme prétendument pacifique …
D’un régime qui, sous couvert d’un accord jamais avalisé par le Congrès américain mais soutenu par les quislings et gros intérêts économiques européens et entre deux « Mort à l’Amérique ! » et menaces de rayement de la carte d’Israël, multiplie les essais balistiques et du Yemen au Liban met le Moyen-Orient à feu et à sang …
Pendant qu’entre dénonciation de son 70e anniversaire et médisance sur la première venue d’un grand évènement sportif dans la seule démocratie du Moyen-Orient …
Nos médias rivalisent dans la mauvaise foi et la désinformation
Bienvenue au grand barnum de la « Marche du retour » !
Cet incroyable de mélange de fête de l’Huma et kermesse bon enfant …
Qui monopolise depuis six semaines nos écrans et les unes de nos journaux …
Et qui comme le montre l’excellent petit documentaire du réalisateur franco-israélien Pierre Rehov
Se révèle être un petit joyau de propagande et de prestidigitation …
Miroirs et écrans de fumée compris …
Des maitres-illusionistes du Hamas et de nos médias !

WATCH: Exclusive footage from inside Gaza reveals true face of protests

« Hamas knows that it can count on the international community when it launches initiatives such as those ‘peaceful protests’ which have claimed too many lives already. »

Juliane Helmhold
The Jerusalem Post
May 7, 2018 13:13

The short movie Behind the Smoke Screen by filmmaker Pierre Rehov shows exclusive images from inside the Gaza Strip, aimed at changing the international perception of the ongoing six-week protests dubbed the « Great March of Return » by Hamas.

« I shot the video because I observed many times first hand how Palestinians build their propaganda and I strongly believe that no peace will be possible as long as international media believe their narrative instead of seeing the facts, » the French filmmaker told The Jerusalem Post.

« Hamas knows that it can count on the international community when it launches initiatives such as those ‘peaceful protests’ which have claimed too many lives already, while Israel has no choice but to defend its borders. »

Rehov, who also writes regularly for the French daily Le Figaro, has been producing documentaries about the Arab-Israeli conflict for 18 years, many of which have aired on Israeli media outlets, including The Road to Jenin, debunking Mohammad Bakri’s claim of a massacre in Jenin, War Crimes in Gaza, demonstrating Hamas’ use of civilians as human shields and Beyond Deception Strategy, exploring the plight of minorities inside Israel and how BDS is hurting Palestinians.

Behind the Smoke Screen, which was shot in recent weeks by two Palestinian cameramen who work with Rehov on a regular basis, went viral and was published by many pro-Israel organizations.Behind The Smoke Screen (Pierre Rehov/Youtube)

« Welcome to the parade for the return – the latest big show organized by Hamas. Every day between 10,000 and 30,000 Muslim Arabs will participate in this smoke screen operation, » the video introduces the subject matter in the opening remarks.

The short movie then goes on to show shocking images of children being dragged to the front lines of the clashes as human shields and disturbing footage of animal cruelty.

It shows the contradictory tone of Palestinian leaders speaking in English in front of an international audience versus speaking in Arabic to their own people.

It shows the health and environmental risk of the burning tire protests and then asks rhetorically: « Where are the ecologist protests? »

It shows Hamas’ goals of crossing the border and carrying out attacks, and, if all else fails, trying to provoke soldiers, hoping for a stray bullet and making the front pages of international newspapers.

« I want to present facts, and one image is worth 1000 words, » the filmmaker emphasized.

Voir aussi:

Pierre Rehov : un autre regard sur Gaza

Pierre Rehov
Le Figaro
20/04/2018

FIGAROVOX/TRIBUNE – Le reporter Pierre Rehov s’attaque, dans une tribune, à la grille de lecture dominante dans les médias français des événements actuels à Gaza. Selon lui, la réponse d’Israël est proportionnée à la menace terroriste que représentent les agissements du Hamas.

Pierre Rehov est reporter, écrivain et réalisateur de documentaires, dont le dernier, «Unveiling Jérusalem», retrace l’histoire de la ville trois fois sainte.

Les organisations islamistes qui s’attaquent à Israël ont toujours eu le sens du vocabulaire dans leur communication avec l’Occident. Convaincus à juste titre que peu parmi nous sont capables, ou même intéressés, de décrypter leurs discours d’origine révélateur de leurs véritables intentions, ils nous arrosent depuis des décennies de concepts erronés, tout en puisant à la source de notre propre histoire les termes qui nous feront réagir dans le sens qui leur sera favorable. C’est ainsi que sont nés, au fil des ans, des terminologies acceptées par tous, y compris, il faut le dire, en Israël même.

Prenons par exemple le mot «occupation». Le Hamas, organisation terroriste qui règne sur la bande de Gaza depuis qu’Israël a retiré ses troupes et déraciné plus de 10 000 Juifs tout en laissant les infrastructures qui auraient permis aux Gazaouites de développer une véritable économie indépendante, continue à se lamenter du «fait» que l’État Juif occupe des terres appartenant «de toute éternité au Peuple Palestinien». Il s’agit là, évidemment, d’un faux car les droits éventuels des Palestiniens ne sauraient être réalisés en niant ceux des Juifs sur leur terre ancestrale.

Le terme «occupation» étant associé de triste mémoire à l’Histoire européenne, lorsqu’un lecteur, mal informé, se le voit asséner à longueur d’année par les médias les ONG et les politiciens, la première image qui lui vient est évidemment celle de la botte allemande martelant au pas de l’oie le pavé parisien ou bruxellois.

Cette répétition infligée tout autant qu’acceptée d’un terme erroné a pour but d’occulter un fait essentiel, gravé dans l’Histoire: selon la loi internationale, ces territoires dits «occupés» ne sont que «disputés». Car, afin d’occuper une terre, encore eût-il fallu qu’elle appartînt à un pays reconnu au moment de sa conquête. La «Palestine», renommée ainsi par l’Empereur Hadrien en 127 pour humilier les Juifs après leur seconde révolte contre l’empire romain, n’était qu’une région de l’empire Ottoman jusqu’à la défaite des Turcs en 1917. Ce sont les pays Arabes dans leur globalité qui, en rejetant le plan de partition de l’ONU en 1947, ont empêché la naissance d’une «nation palestinienne» dont on ne retrouve aucune trace dans l’histoire jusqu’à sa mise au goût du jour, en 1964, par Nasser et le KGB.

Depuis deux semaines le Hamas et autres organisations terroristes ont repris à leur compte ce qu’ils veulent faire passer pour un soulèvement populaire « pacifiste ».

Lorsqu’à l’issue d’une guerre défensive, Israël a «pris» la Cisjordanie et Gaza en 1967, ces deux territoires avaient déjà été conquis par la Jordanie et l’Égypte. Ce qui nous conduit à remettre en question une autre révision sémantique. Pourquoi des terres qui, pendant des siècles, se sont appelées Judée-Samarie deviendraient-elles, tout à coup, Cisjordanie ou Rive Occidentale, de par la seule volonté du pays qui les a envahies en 1948 avant d’en expulser tous les Juifs dans l’indifférence générale? Serait-ce pour effacer le simple fait que la Judée… est le berceau du judaïsme?

Mais revenons à Gaza.

Depuis deux semaines le Hamas et autres organisations terroristes ont repris à leur compte ce qu’ils veulent faire passer pour un soulèvement populaire «pacifiste». Une fois de plus, le détournement du vocabulaire est habile car ces manifestations à plusieurs couches – l’une pacifique et bon enfant, servant de couverture aux multiples tentatives de destruction de la barrière de séparation entre Gaza et Israël, d’enlèvement de soldats, et d’attentats terroristes heureusement avortés – voudraient promouvoir un «droit au retour» à l’intérieur d’Israël des descendants de descendants de «réfugiés».

J’ai déjà abondamment écrit, y compris dans ces pages, sur cette aberration tragique perpétuée au profit de l’UNWRA, une agence onusienne empêchant, dans sa forme actuelle, l’établissement et le développement des Arabes de Palestine sur leurs terres d’accueil. Je n’y reviendrai que par une phrase. Pourquoi un enfant, né à côté de Ramallah ou à Gaza, de parents nés au même endroit, ou pire encore, né à Brooklyn ou à Stockholm de parents immigrés, serait-il considéré comme «réfugié» – comme c’est le cas dans les statistiques de l’UNRWA – si un enfant Juif né à Tel Aviv, de parents nés à Bagdad, Damas ou Tripoli, et chassés entre 1948 et 1974 n’a jamais bénéficié du même statut?

Mais voici que des bus affrétés par le Hamas et la Jihad Islamique, et décorés de clés géantes et de noms enluminés de villages disparus censés symboliser ce «droit au retour» au sein d’un pays honni, viennent cueillir chaque vendredi devant les mosquées et les écoles de Gaza une population manipulée, prête aux derniers sacrifices afin de répondre à des mots d’ordre cyniques ou désuets.

Voici que des milliers de civils, hommes, femmes, enfants, se massent à proximité des zones tampons établies en bordure de la barrière de sécurité israélienne, dans une ambiance de kermesse destinée à nous faire croire qu’il s’agit là de manifestations au sens démocratique du terme.

Voici, également, que des milliers de pneus sont enflammés, dégageant une fumée noirâtre visible depuis les satellites, dans le but d’aveugler les forces de sécurité israéliennes qui ont pourtant prévenu: aucun franchissement sauvage de la barrière-frontière ne sera toléré. Toute tentative sera stoppée par des tirs à balle réelle – ce qui, n’en déplaise à beaucoup, est absolument légal dans toute buffer zone entre entités ennemies.

À cette annonce, les dirigeants du Hamas ont dû jubiler! Eux qui jouent gagnant-gagnant dans une stratégie impliquant l’utilisation de leurs civils comme boucliers humains, puisqu’il s’agit surtout d’une guerre d’influence, n’en espéraient pas autant. Dès lors ils allaient enfin pouvoir de nouveau compter leurs morts comme autant de victoires médiatiques. Et cela – au grand dam des Israéliens – s’est déroulé exactement comme prévu. Au moment où paraissent ces lignes, Gaza pleure plus de trente morts et les hôpitaux sont débordés par le nombre de blessés – même si les chiffres sont sujets à caution puisque seulement fournis par le Hamas.

En menaçant d’avoir recours à des mesures extrêmes, Israël ne fait que dissuader et empêcher le développement d’un cauchemar humanitaire.

Pour une fois, cependant, le Hamas s’est piégé lui-même, en publiant avec fierté l’identité de la majorité des victimes qui, de toute évidence appartiennent à ses troupes. C’est le cas du journaliste Yasser Mourtaja dont le double rôle de correspondant de presse et d’officier salarié du Hamas a également été dévoilé .

Mais aurait-il été possible pour Israël d’avoir recours à d’autres moyens? L’alignement de snipers parallèlement à l’utilisation de procédés antiémeutes, était-il vraiment indispensable?

Imaginons, un instant, que, dans les semaines à venir, comme annoncé par le dirigeant de l’organisation terroriste, Yahya Sinwar, la «marche du retour» permette à ses militants de détruire les barrières, tandis que des milliers de manifestants, femmes et enfants poussés en première ligne, se ruent à l’intérieur d’Israël, bravant non plus les tirs ciblés des soldats entraînés mais la riposte massive d’un peuple paniqué?

En menaçant d’avoir recours à des mesures extrêmes, et en tenant cet engagement, Israël ne fait que dissuader et empêcher le développement d’un cauchemar humanitaire dont les dirigeants du Hamas, acculés économiquement et politiquement, pourraient se régaler.

Contrairement aux images promues par d’autres abus du vocabulaire, Gaza n’est pas une «prison à ciel ouvert» mais une bande de 360 km² relativement surpeuplée, où vivent également nombre de millionnaires dans des villas fastueuses côtoyant des quartiers miséreux.

Chaque jour, environ 1 500 à 2 500 tonnes d’aide humanitaire et de biens de consommation sont autorisés à passer la frontière par le gouvernement israélien. Plusieurs programmes permettent aux habitants de Gaza de se faire soigner dans les hôpitaux de Tel Aviv et de Haïfa.

Un projet d’île portuaire sécurisée est à l’étude à Jérusalem, et des tonnes de fruits et légumes sont régulièrement achetés aux paysans gazaouis par les réseaux de distribution alimentaires israéliens.

L’Égypte contrôle toute la partie sud et fait souvent montre de beaucoup plus de rigueur qu’Israël pour protéger sa frontière, sachant que le Hamas est issu des Frères Musulmans, organisation interdite par le gouvernement de Abdel Fatah Al Sissi.

Mais Gaza souffre, en effet, et même terriblement!

Gaza souffre du fait que le Hamas détourne la majorité des fonds destinés à sa population pour creuser des tunnels et se construire une armée dont le seul but, ouvertement déclaré dans sa charte, est d’oblitérer Israël et d’exterminer ses habitants.

Gaza souffre des promesses d’aide financière non tenues par les pays Arabes et qui se chiffrent en milliards de dollars.

Gaza souffre de n’avoir que trois heures d’électricité par jour, car les terroristes du Hamas ont envoyé une roquette sur la principale centrale pendant le dernier conflit et l’Autorité Palestinienne, de son côté, refuse de payer les factures correspondant à son alimentation, espérant de la sorte provoquer une crise qui conduira à la perte de pouvoir de son concurrent.

Gaza souffre d’un taux de chômage de plus de 50 %, après que ses habitants, dans l’euphorie du départ des Juifs, aient saccagé et détruit les serres à légumes et les manufactures construites par Israël et donc jugées «impures» selon les théories islamistes qui les ont conduits, ne l’oublions pas non plus, à voter massivement pour le Hamas.

Israël ne peut faire la paix avec une organisation terroriste vouée à sa disparition.

Gaza souffre enfin de ces détournements du vocabulaire, de ces concepts esthétiques manichéens conçus au détriment des êtres, qui empêchent les hommes de conscience de comprendre le cœur du problème et sont forcés de penser qu’Israël est l’unique cause du malheur de ses habitants.

C’est pour cela qu’il faut, une fois de plus, clamer quelques faits incontournables.

Israël ne peut faire la paix avec une organisation terroriste vouée à sa disparition.

Les habitants de Gaza seraient libres de circuler et de se construire un avenir à l’instant même où ils renonceraient à la disparition de leur voisin.

Le Hamas et autres organisations terroristes savent qu’ils peuvent compter sur la sympathie des Nations unies et de nombre d’ONG à prétention humanitaire et ne se privent donc pas d’exploiter la population qu’ils détiennent en otage puisqu’ils savent qu’Israël sera systématiquement condamné à leur place.

J’en veux, pour exemple, une anecdote affligeante.

En septembre 2017, une organisation regroupant des femmes arabes et israéliennes a organisé une marche en Cisjordanie (Judée-Samarie). Aucun parent n’aurait pu être indifférent aux images de ces mères juives et arabes qui avouent leur quête d’un avenir meilleur pour leurs enfants. Durant la marche, aucun pneu brûlé, pas de lancement de pierres ou de cocktails Molotov, aucune tentative d’envahir Israël, aucun propos haineux. Tout le contraire. C’était une authentique manifestation pacifique.

Seulement, le Hamas a immédiatement condamné la marche en déclarant que «la normalisation est une arme israélienne».

L’ONU, de son côté, n’a pas cru bon promouvoir l’initiative. Pourquoi l’aurait-elle fait?

Il est davantage dans sa tradition, et certainement plus politiquement correct de condamner Israël pour ses «excès» en matière défensive tandis que le Moyen Orient, faute d’une vision honnête, bascule progressivement dans un conflit généralisé.

Voir encore:

Protestations sous haute tension prévues le long de la bande de Gaza

Vendredi, cinq zones, toutes situées à au moins 700 mètres de la clôture, doivent accueillir les Gazaouis du nord au sud de la bande.

Piotr Smolar (Bande de Gaza, envoyé spécial)

Le Monde

Le décor est planté. Le vent puissant éparpille les émanations de gaz lacrymogène. Les sardines empêchent les tentes de s’envoler. On est à la veille du grand jour à Gaza, celui craint par Israël depuis des semaines.

En ce jeudi 29 mars, deux cents jeunes viennent faire leurs repérages près du poste frontière fermé de Karni, en claquettes ou pieds nus. Perchés sur des monticules de sable, ou bien s’avançant vers les soldats israéliens qui veillent à quelques centaines de mètres derrière la clôture, ils semblent leur lancer un avertissement muet.

Le 30 mars est coché de longue date dans le calendrier palestinien : c’est le jour de la Terre, en mémoire de la confiscation de terres arabes en Galilée, en 1976, et des six manifestants tués à l’époque. Mais cette année, il marque surtout le début d’un mouvement à la force et aux développements imprévisibles, intitulé la « marche du retour ».

« Un tournant »

Cette marche doit culminer le 15 mai, jour de la Nakba (la grande « catastrophe » que fut l’expulsion de centaines de milliers de Palestiniens lors de la création d’Israël). Il s’agit d’un appel à des manifestations pacifiques massives pour réclamer le retour vers les terres perdues. Et ce alors que l’Etat hébreu, soutenu par Washington, souhaite une restriction drastique de la définition du réfugié palestinien.

Vendredi, cinq zones ouvertes, toutes situées à au moins 700 mètres de la clôture, doivent accueillir les Gazaouis du nord au sud de la bande, de Jabaliya jusqu’à Rafah. Des mariages seront célébrés, des concerts et des danses organisés. On y parlera aussi politique, blessures familiales, droits historiques. Pour Bassem Naïm, haut responsable du Hamas :

« Ce rassemblement est un tournant. Malgré les divisions entre factions, malgré la politique américaine, nous pouvons être une nouvelle fois créatifs pour relancer la question palestinienne. Israël peut facilement s’en tirer dans un conflit militaire, contre les Palestiniens ou au niveau régional. Mais c’est un tigre de papier. Il est acculé face à la perspective d’une foule pacifique réclamant le respect de ses droits. »

Mélange de fébrilité et d’intoxication

« Acculé », le mot est excessif. Mais, depuis le début de la semaine, dans un mélange de fébrilité et d’intoxication, les autorités israéliennes n’ont cessé de dramatiser les enjeux de cette journée. Les compagnies de bus à Gaza ont reçu des coups de fil intimidants pour qu’elles ne transportent pas les manifestants. Le ministère des affaires étrangères a diffusé à ses ambassades des éléments de langage pour décrédibiliser l’événement. Il s’agirait d’une « campagne dangereuse et préméditée » par le Hamas, qui y consacrerait « plus de dix millions de dollars [plus de 8 millions d’euros] », notamment pour rémunérer les manifestants.

Du côté militaire, le chef d’état-major, Gadi Eizenkot, a averti dans la presse que « plus de cent snipers » seraient déployés le long de la clôture de sécurité frontalière, en plus des unités supplémentaires mobilisées pour l’occasion.

Il s’agit de justifier par avance l’usage possible de la violence, allant de moyens de dispersion classiques jusqu’aux balles réelles. Le cauchemar israélien se résume en une image : celle de dizaines de milliers de manifestants non armés, avançant vers la frontière, pour réclamer leur sortie de la prison à ciel ouvert qu’est Gaza.

Plusieurs alertes sérieuses

Les responsables sécuritaires israéliens ont averti : tout franchissement illégal sera considéré comme une menace. Plusieurs alertes sérieuses ont eu lieu ces derniers jours, des individus ayant passé la clôture trop aisément. L’armée, qui craint l’enfouissement d’engins explosifs, a prévu d’employer des drones pour larguer des canettes de gaz lacrymogène. Quant aux soldats, ils n’hésiteront pas à tirer à balles réelles si des Palestiniens se rapprochent. Huit personnes ont été ainsi tuées en décembre 2017.

En présentant les manifestants comme des personnes achetées, manipulées ou dangereuses, Israël réduit l’événement de vendredi à une question sécuritaire. Il prive ainsi les Gazaouis de leur intégrité comme sujets politiques, de leur capacité à formuler des espérances et à se mobiliser pour les défendre.

Or, l’initiative de ce mouvement n’est pas du tout le fruit de délibérations au bureau politique du Hamas, qui gouverne la bande de Gaza depuis 2007. Le mouvement islamiste, affaibli et isolé, soutient comme les autres factions cette mobilisation, y compris par des moyens logistiques, parce qu’il y voit une façon de mettre enfin Israël sous pression.

L’idée d’un vaste rassemblement pacifique

L’idée originelle, c’est Ahmed Abou Irtema qui la revendique. C’était juste après l’annonce de la reconnaissance unilatérale de Jérusalem comme capitale d’Israël par Donald Trump, le 6 décembre 2017. La réconciliation entre le Hamas et le Fatah du président Mahmoud Abbas était dans l’impasse. La situation humanitaire, plus dramatique que jamais.

Ce journaliste de 33 ans, père de quatre garçons, a évoqué l’idée, sur Facebook, d’un vaste rassemblement pacifique. « Il y a eu énormément de réactions, les associations se sont emparées de la proposition, puis les factions. Un comité de pilotage a vu le jour. »

Ahmed Abou Irtema a une vision, celle d’une foule marchant un jour – pas vendredi – vers ses anciennes terres :

« Je crois dans la volonté d’un peuple. Ce qui m’inspire, c’est la destruction du mur de Berlin. On ne veut pas mourir. Notre message est pacifique, on ne veut jeter personne à la mer. Si les Israéliens nous tuent, ce sera leur crime. »

Le jeune homme, comme les autres activistes, ne parle pas d’un Etat palestinien, mais de leurs droits historiques sur des terrains précisément délimités.

« Les gens sont plein de fureur et de colère »

Qu’ils aient peu de chance d’obtenir gain de cause ne les interroge pas. Ils invoquent l’article 11 de la résolution 194, adoptée par les Nations unies (ONU) à la fin de 1948, sur le droit des réfugiés à retourner chez eux ou à obtenir compensation.

« Nous préférons mourir dans notre pays plutôt qu’en mer, comme les réfugiés syriens, ou enfermés à Gaza ou dans les camps au Liban », explique de son côté Moïn Abou Okal, fonctionnaire au ministère de l’intérieur et membre du comité de pilotage.

Ce dernier affirme que les manifestants ne tenteront de pénétrer en Israël que le 15 mai. La vérité est que rien n’est écrit. Tout dépendra de la force de la mobilisation et de l’ampleur de la réaction israélienne. « Les gens sont plein de fureur et de colère, dit Ghazi Hamad, responsable des relations internationales du Hamas. On n’a pris aucune décision pour pousser des centaines de milliers de personnes vers la frontière. On veut que cela reste une manifestation pacifique. Mais il n’y a ni négociations avec Israël ni réconciliation entre factions. Il faut laisser les gens s’exprimer. »

A l’aube du vendredi 30 mars, un Palestinien a été tué par une frappe israélienne avant le rassemblement prévu à Gaza.

Voir également:

Trump annonce le retrait des Etats-Unis de l’accord nucléaire iranien

Le président américain a promis de « graves » conséquences à l’Iran s’il se dote de la bombe nucléaire ; l’Iran mérite un « meilleur gouvernement »

Le président américain Donald Trump a annoncé mardi le retrait des Etats-Unis de l’accord sur le nucléaire iranien, qu’il a qualifié de « désastreux », et le rétablissement des sanctions contre Téhéran.

« J’annonce aujourd’hui que les Etats-Unis vont se retirer de l’accord nucléaire iranien », a-t-il déclaré dans une allocution télévisée depuis la Maison Blanche.

Trump a démarré son discours par ces mots :

« Aujourd’hui, je veux informer les Américains de nos efforts afin d’empêcher l’Iran d’acquérir l’arme nucléaire. Le régime iranien est le principal sponsor étatique de la terreur. Il exporte de dangereux missiles, alimente les conflits à travers le Moyen-Orient et soutient des groupes terroristes alliés et des milices comme le Hezbollah, le Hamas, les Talibans et Al-Qaïda. Au fil des années, l’Iran et ses mandataires ont bombardé des militaires et des installations américaines [et ont commis une série d’autres attaques contre les Américains et les intérêts américains]. »

« Le régime iranien a financé son long règne de chaos et de terreur en pillant la richesse de son peuple. Aucune mesure prise par le régime n’a été plus dangereuse que sa poursuite vers le nucléaire et ses efforts pour l’obtenir. »

Dans son discours, Trump a déclaré :

« En théorie, le soi-disant accord concernant l’Iran était censé protéger les Etats-Unis et leurs alliés de la folie d’une bombe nucléaire iranienne – une arme qui ne ferait que mettre en péril la survie du régime iranien.

« En fait, l’accord a permis à l’Iran de continuer à enrichir de l’uranium et, au fil du temps, d’atteindre un point de rupture en terme de nucléaire. Il a bénéficié de la levée de sanctions paralysantes en échange de très faibles efforts sur son activité nucléaire. Aucune autre limite n’a été fixé concernant ses autres activités malfaisantes.

« En d’autres termes, au moment où les Etats-Unis disposaient d’un maximum de pouvoir, cet accord désastreux a apporté à ce régime – et c’est un régime de terreur – plusieurs milliards de dollars, dont une partie en espèces, ce qui représente un grand embarras pour moi en tant que citoyen et pour tous les citoyens des Etats-Unis. Un accord plus constructif aurait facilement pu être conclu à ce moment-là. »

Voici les principaux extraits de sa déclaration à la Maison Blanche.

Retrait

« J’annonce aujourd’hui que les Etats-Unis vont se retirer de l’accord nucléaire iranien ».

« Le fait est que c’est un accord horrible et partial qui n’aurait jamais dû être conclu. Il n’a pas apporté le calme. Il n’a pas apporté la paix. Et il ne le fera jamais ».

Sanctions

« Dans quelques instants, je vais signer un ordre présidentiel pour commencer à rétablir les sanctions américaines liées au programme nucléaire du régime iranien. Nous allons instituer le plus haut niveau de sanctions économiques ».

Et « tout pays qui aidera l’Iran dans sa quête d’armes nucléaires pourrait aussi être fortement sanctionné par les Etats-Unis ».

Le conseiller à la sécurité nationale, John Bolton, a de son côté indiqué que le rétablissement des sanctions américaines était effectif immédiatement pour les nouveaux contrats et que les entreprises étrangères auraient quelques mois pour « sortir » d’Iran.

Le Trésor américain a lui fait savoir que les sanctions concernant les anciens contrats conclus en Iran entreraient en vigueur après une période de transition de 90 à 180 jours.

« Vraie solution »

« Alors que nous sortons de l’accord iranien, nous travaillerons avec nos alliés pour trouver une vraie solution complète et durable à la menace nucléaire iranienne. Cela comprendra des efforts pour éliminer la menace du programme de missiles balistiques (de l’Iran), pour stopper ses activités terroristes à travers le monde et pour bloquer ses activités menaçantes à travers le Moyen-Orient ».

« Nous n’allons pas laisser un régime qui scande +Mort à l’Amérique+ avoir accès aux armes les plus meurtrières sur terre ».

« Mais le fait est qu’ils vont vouloir conclure un accord nouveau et durable, un accord qui bénéficierait à tout l’Iran et au peuple iranien. Quand ils (seront prêts), je serai prêt et bien disposé. De belles choses peuvent arriver à l’Iran ».

« Preuve »

« Au coeur de l’accord iranien, il y avait un énorme mythe selon laquelle un régime meurtrier ne cherchait qu’un programme pacifique d’énergie nucléaire. Aujourd’hui nous avons la preuve définitive que la promesse iranienne était un mensonge ».

Régime contre peuple

« Le futur de l’Iran appartient à son peuple » et les Iraniens « méritent une nation qui rende justice à leurs rêves, qui honore leur histoire ».

« Le régime iranien est le principal sponsor étatique de la terreur ». « Il soutient des terroristes et des milices comme le Hezbollah, le Hamas, les talibans et Al-Qaïda ».

L’ancien président américain Barack Obama a qualifié mardi de « grave erreur » la décision de Donald Trump de retirer les Etats-Unis de l’accord sur le nucléaire iranien, jugeant que ce dernier « fonctionne » et est dans l’intérêt de Washington.

« Je pense que la décision de mettre le JCPOA en danger sans aucune violation de l’accord de la part des Iraniens est une grave erreur, » a indiqué l’ex-président américain, très discret depuis son départ de la Maison Blanche, dans un communiqué au ton particulièrement ferme.

Voir de même:

Donald Trump furieux contre Mahmoud Abbas suite à un « mensonge »

 
Des sources palestiniennes ont réfuté cette publication

Le président américain Donald Trump aurait fustigé le président de l’Autorité palestinienne, Mahmoud Abbas, lors de leur réunion à Bethléem, rapporte dimanche Channel 2.

Selon la chaîne, citant des sources israéliennes, Trump aurait « crié » sur Abbas, car ce dernier lui aurait « menti ».

« Vous m’avez menti à Washington lorsque vous avez parlé de l’engagement pour la paix, mais les Israéliens m’ont montré que vous étiez personnellement responsable de l’incitation », aurait déclaré Trump.

Les sources palestiniennes ont cependant contredit la publication de Channel 2, affirmant que la rencontre entre les deux dirigeants avait été calme.

Dans son discours après la réunion avec Abbas, Trump a insisté sur le fait que « la paix ne peut être obtenue où la violence est récompensée ». Une déclaration considérée comme une critique du financement de l’Autorité palestinienne destiné aux familles de terroristes emprisonnés ou tués.

Ce rapport intervient alors que le président américain a affirmé hier que les deux parties sont prêtes à « parvenir à la paix ».

Le président de l’Autorité palestinienne, Mahmoud Abbas, « m’a assuré qu’il est prêt à faire la paix avec Israël, et je le crois », a déclaré Trump ajoutant que Benyamin Netanyahou a de son coté « assuré qu’il était prêt à parvenir à la paix ».

Voir encore:

Territoires palestiniens: Abbas s’excuse après ses propos jugés antisémites

Ses propos ont fait l’objet de vives critiques dans le monde entier ces derniers jours. En début de semaine, dans un discours prononcé devant des représentants de l’Organisation de libération de la Palestine, Mahmoud Abbas avait estimé que les massacres dont les juifs avaient été victimes en Europe, et notamment l’Holocauste, étaient dus au « comportement social » des juifs et non à leur religion. Il évoquait notamment leurs activités bancaires. Des propos largement condamnés sur la scène internationale par les dirigeants israéliens, par les Etats-Unis, l’Union européenne, l’ONU et la France notamment.

De notre correspondant à Jérusalem,  Guilhem Delteil

Finalement, ce vendredi, le président de l’Autorité palestinienne a décidé de présenter ses excuses. Depuis mardi soir, les critiques se succédaient et les mots employés étaient parfois très forts. Le coordinateur de l’ONU pour le processus de paix avait condamné des propos « inacceptables ». Il s’agissait pour lui de « certaines des insultes antisémites les plus méprisantes ». Quant au Premier ministre israélien, il estimait pour sa part que « un négationniste reste un négationniste » et il disait souhaiter voir « disparaître » Mahmoud Abbas.

Face à ce tollé, le président de l’Autorité palestinienne n’a d’abord rien dit. Puis après deux jours de silence, ce vendredi, il a choisi de s’excuser. « Si des gens ont été offensés par ma déclaration (…), spécialement des personnes de confession juive, je leur présente mes excuses », écrit Mahmoud Abbas dans un communiqué. « Je réitère mon entier respect pour la foi juive et les autres religions monothéistes », poursuit-il.

Le président de l’Autorité palestinienne se défend de tout antisémitisme. « Nous le condamnons sous toutes ses formes » assure-t-il. Il tient également à « réitérer », dit-il, sa « condamnation de longue date de l’Holocauste » qu’il qualifie de « crime le plus odieux de l’Histoire ».

Voir de même:

Abbas revient sur ses propos relatifs aux rabbins voulant “empoisonner” les puits palestiniens

Après avoir été accusé de diffamation, le dirigeant de l’AP rétracte son affirmation “sans fondement”, et ajoute ne pas avoir voulu “offenser le peuple juif”

Le président du parlement européen Martin Schulz (à droite) avec le président de l’Autorité palestinienne Mahmoud Abbas au parlement de l’Union européenne à Bruxelles, le 23 juin 2016. (Crédit : AFP/John Thys)

Le président de l’Autorité palestinienne (AP) Mahmoud Abbas a retiré samedi ses propos concernant des rabbins ayant appelé à empoisonné l’eau des Palestiniens, disant qu’il n’avait pas eu l’intention d’offenser les juifs, après qu’Israël et des organisations juives ont affirmé qu’il faisait la promotion de tropes diffamatoires et antisémites.

« Après qu’il soit devenu évident que les déclarations supposées d’un rabbin, relayées par de nombreux médias, se sont révélées sans fondement, le président Mahmoud Abbas a affirmé qu’il n’avait pas pour intention de s’en prendre au judaïsme ou de blesser le peuple juif à travers le monde », a déclaré son bureau dans un communiqué.

Pendant un discours prononcé devant le Parlement de l’Union européenne à Bruxelles jeudi, Abbas avait affirmé que les accusations d’incitations [à la violence] palestiniennes étaient injustes puisque « les Israéliens le font aussi… Certains rabbins en Israël ont dit très clairement à leur gouvernement que notre eau devait être empoisonnée afin de tuer des Palestiniens. »

Un article publié en juin dans la presse turque affirmait qu’un rabbin avait fait un tel appel, mais l’histoire s’était rapidement révélée fausse.

Son bureau a déclaré qu’il « rejetait toutes les accusations formulées à son encontre et à celle du peuple palestinien d’offense au judaïsme. [Il] a également condamné toutes les accusations d’antisémitisme. »

En revanche, Abbas n’a pas retiré son affirmation, également prononcée pendant son discours devant le Parlement européen, que le terrorisme mondial serait éradiqué si Israël se retirait de Cisjordanie et de Jérusalem Est.

Israël a dénoncé jeudi Abbas, le qualifiant de colporteur de mensonges, le bureau du Premier ministre déclarant qu’il « a montré son vrai visage », et qu’il « ment quand il affirme que ses mains sont tendues vers la paix. »

Le Premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahu avait accusé jeudi Abbas de « propager des diffamations au parlement européen ».

« Israël attend le jour où Abbas cessera de colporter des mensonges et d’inciter [à la haine contre Israël]. D’ici là, Israël continuera à se défendre contre les incitations palestiniennes, qui alimentent le terrorisme », pouvait-on lire dans le communiqué du bureau du Premier ministre.

Le Conseil représentatif des institutions juives de France (CRIF), vitrine politique de la première communauté juive d’Europe, avait accusé vendredi Abbas de « propager les caricatures anti juives d’autrefois […] dont on sait qu’elles nourrissent la haine antisémite ».

Voir de plus:

« Jusqu’à son dernier jour », Abbas payera les « familles des martyrs prisonniers »

 Le président de l’Autorité palestinienne a rendu hommage aux efforts déployés par Donald Trump

Le président de l’Autorité palestinienne, Mahmoud Abbas, a déclaré jeudi qu’il ne renoncera pas aux salaires reversés aux terroristes et aux familles des terroristes ayant été emprisonnés en Israël pour avoir mené des attentats, ou ayant tenté de tuer des Israéliens.

« Je n’ai pas l’intention de cesser de payer les familles des martyrs prisonniers, même si cela me coûte mon siège. Je continuerai à les payer jusqu’à mon dernier jour », a déclaré M. Abbas, d’après les médias israéliens.

Le financement par l’Autorité palestinienne de subventions pour les familles des terroristes est un point de discorde entre les Palestiniens et l’administration Trump. Pendant sa visite dans la région plus tôt cette année, le président des Etats-Unis avait souligné que son pays ne tolérerait pas ces rétributions.

Cette déclaration du président de l’AP survient alors que des émissaires américains conduits par Jared Kushner, proche conseiller du président américain, ont rencontré à nouveau cette semaine les dirigeants israéliens et palestiniens.

Après avoir rencontré des responsables saoudiens, émiratis, qataris, jordaniens et égyptiens, la délégation américaine a été reçue jeudi par Benyamin Netanyahou et a rencontré le président de l’Autorité palestinienne Mahmoud Abbas à Ramallah.

M. Trump « est déterminé à parvenir à une solution qui apportera la prospérité et la paix à tout le monde dans cette zone », a déclaré Jared Kushner, au début de ses entretiens avec le Premier ministre israélien à Tel-Aviv, selon une vidéo diffusée par l’ambassade américaine.

Le bureau de Benyamin Netanyahou a qualifié les discussions de « constructives et de substantielles » sans autre détail, indiquant qu’elles allaient se poursuivre « dans les prochaines semaines » et remerciant le président américain « pour son ferme soutien à Israël ».

Le président Abbas a pour sa part rendu hommage aux efforts déployés par Donald Trump et a affirmé que « cette délégation (américaine) œuvre pour la paix ». « Nous savons que c’est difficile et compliqué mais ce n’est pas impossible », a-t-il fait savoir.

(Avec agence)

Voir par ailleurs:

Israël a fêté mercredi son 70e anniversaire en brandissant sa puissance militaire et son improbable réussite économique face aux menaces régionales renouvelées et aux incertitudes intérieures.

Après s’être recueillis depuis mardi à la mémoire de leurs compatriotes tués au service de leur pays ou dans des attentats, les Israéliens ont entamé mercredi soir les célébrations marquant la création de leur Etat proclamé le 14 mai 1948, mais fêté en ce moment en fonction du calendrier hébraïque.

Lors d’une cérémonie à Jérusalem, le Premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahu a salué ce qu’il a appelé les «vrais germes de la paix» qui selon lui commençaient à pousser parmi certains pays arabes.

Il n’a pas donné plus de détails mais des signes de réchauffement, tout particulièrement avec Ryad, ont été récemment enregistrés, alors qu’Israël comme le royaume saoudien voit en l’Iran une grave menace.

Israël agite régulièrement le spectre d’une attaque de l’Iran, son ennemi juré.

La crainte d’un tel acte d’hostilité, à la manière de l’offensive surprise d’une coalition arabe lors des célébrations de Yom Kippour en 1973, a été attisée par un raid le 9 avril contre une base aérienne en Syrie, imputé à Israël par le régime de Bachar al-Assad et ses alliés iranien et russe.

Ali Akbar Velayati, conseiller du guide suprême iranien, l’ayatollah Ali Khamenei, a promis que cette attaque ne resterait «pas sans réponse».

Depuis le début de la guerre en Syrie en 2011, des dizaines de frappes à distance dans ce pays sont attribuées à Israël, qui se garde communément de les confirmer ou démentir. Elles visent des positions syriennes et des convois d’armes au Hezbollah libanais, qui comme l’Iran et la Russie, aide militairement le régime Assad.

– Les «conseils» de Lieberman –

Mais en février, Israël a admis pour la première fois avoir frappé des cibles iraniennes après l’intrusion d’un drone iranien dans son espace aérien. C’était la première confrontation ouvertement déclarée entre Israël et l’Iran en Syrie.

Israël martèle qu’il ne permettra pas à l’Iran de s’enraciner militairement en Syrie voisine.

Les journaux israéliens ont publié mercredi des éléments spécifiques sur la présence en Syrie des Gardiens de la révolution, unité d’élite iranienne.

La publication de photos satellite de bases aériennes et d’appareils civils soupçonnés de décharger des armes, de cartes et même de noms de responsables militaires iraniens constitue un avertissement, convenaient les commentateurs militaires: Israël sait où et qui frapper en cas d’attaque.

L’armée a décidé par précaution de renoncer à envoyer des chasseurs F-15 à des manœuvres prévues en mai aux Etats-Unis, a rapporté la radio militaire.

Sans évoquer une menace iranienne immédiate, le ministre de la Défense Avigdor Lieberman a prévenu: «Nous ne cherchons pas l’aventure», mais «je conseille à nos voisins au nord (Liban et Syrie) et au sud (bande de Gaza) de tenir sérieusement compte» de la détermination à défendre Israël.

– «Forteresse» –

Le 70e anniversaire est l’occasion pour Israël de célébrer le «miracle» de son existence, sa force militaire, la prospérité de la «nation start-up» et son modèle démocratique.

Avec plus de 8,8 millions d’habitants, la population a décuplé depuis 1948, selon les statistiques officielles. La croissance s’est affichée à 4,1% au quatrième trimestre 2017. Le pays revendique une douzaine de prix Nobel.

Cependant, Israël accuse parmi les plus fortes inégalités des pays développés. L’avenir du Premier ministre, englué dans les affaires de corruption présumée, est incertain.

S’agissant du conflit israélo-palestinien, une solution a rarement paru plus lointaine.

L’anniversaire d’Israël coïncide avec «la marche du retour», mouvement organisé depuis le 30 mars dans la bande de Gaza, territoire palestinien soumis au blocus israélien. Après bientôt trois semaines de violences le long de la frontière qui ont fait 34 morts palestiniens, de nouvelles manifestations sont attendues vendredi.

Le ministère israélien de la Défense a annoncé qu’un «puissant engin explosif», apparemment destiné à un attentat lors des fêtes israéliennes, avait été découvert dans un camion palestinien intercepté à un point de passage entre la Cisjordanie occupée et Israël.

«Israël a été établi pour que le peuple juif, qui ne s’est presque jamais senti chez soi nulle part au monde, ait enfin un foyer», a déclaré l’écrivain David Grossman lors d’une cérémonie mardi soir à Tel-Aviv troublée par des militants de droite protestant contre la présence de familles palestiniennes.

«Aujourd’hui, après 70 ans de réussites étonnantes dans tant de domaines, Israël, avec toute sa force, est peut-être une forteresse. Mais ce n’est toujours pas un foyer. Les Israéliens n’auront pas de foyer tant que les Palestiniens n’auront pas le leur».

Cyclisme

Giro : Israël, braquet à l’italienne

Le Giro d’Italia débute ce vendredi de Jérusalem, offrant à l’Etat hébreu son premier événement sportif d’envergure. Tracé qui esquive les Territoires palestiniens, équipes qui hésitent à s’engager, soupçons d’enveloppes d’argent… les autorités ont éteint toutes les critiques pour en faire une vitrine.

Pierre Carrey et Guillaume Gendron, correspondant à Tel-Aviv

Plus de doute, avec Benyamin Nétanyahou qui fait des acrobaties à vélo, le départ du Tour d’Italie (Giro d’Italia) de Jérusalem ce vendredi est bien une affaire politique. «Il faut que je m’entraîne», plaisante le Premier ministre dans une vidéo diffusée fin avril sur les réseaux sociaux où on le voit enfourcher un VTT bleu avec casque et costume-cravate. Etonnamment agile pour ses 68 ans, «Bibi» (en réalité, sa doublure) accomplit le tour d’un rond-point sur la roue arrière… Et exhorte l’équipe d’Israel Cycling Academy, dont deux coureurs sur les huit engagés sont israéliens : «Je vais vous aider à gagner !»

Le big start («grand départ») du Giro à Jérusalem est un big deal pour Israël. Trois jours de course : un contre-la-montre de 9,7 km dans les quartiers ouest de la ville «trois fois sainte», une étape de 167 km reliant le port de Haïfa, au nord, avec les plages de Tel-Aviv et enfin 226 km de canyons désertiques entre Beer Sheva et la station balnéaire d’Eilat, au bord de la mer Rouge, à la pointe sud du pays. Le tracé s’arrête à la «ligne verte» et évite soigneusement les Territoires palestiniens ainsi que la Vieille Ville de Jérusalem (mais longera cependant ses murs) et sa partie Est, dont l’annexion par Israël en 1980 n’a jamais été acceptée par la communauté internationale. En principe donc, pas de plans d’hélico des toits rouges des colonies de Cisjordanie ou du mur de séparation…

Cet événement d’envergure (évalué à 120 millions de shekels, soit 27 millions d’euros, l’équivalent de la somme dépensée mi-avril par l’Etat hébreu pour fêter ses 70 ans) est tout à la fois le premier départ d’un grand tour cycliste hors d’Europe, l’une des plus grandes manifestations sportives ou culturelles jamais organisées en Israël et potentiellement l’événement le plus sécurisé de son histoire (protégé par 6 000 policiers et agents privés). Plus encore que les funérailles d’Yitzhak Rabin, le Premier ministre assassiné en 1995. Question retombées, le gouvernement espère une hausse du tourisme grâce à une audience de la course complètement fantasmée, évaluée à un milliard de téléspectateurs.

De son côté, la société italienne RCS Sport, organisatrice de l’épreuve, entend tenir le Giro, simple «événement sportif», «à l’écart de toute discussion politique». Le consul général d’Italie à Tel-Aviv appuyait ces propos lundi, tout en répétant son attachement à l’antienne de la communauté internationale, soit la solution à deux Etats. A l’inverse, le milliardaire Sylvan Adams, qui a attiré le Giro à Jérusalem, envoie valser cette supposée neutralité et annonce la couleur : «On va contourner les médias traditionnels en s’adressant directement aux fans de sport qui n’en ont rien à faire du conflit et veulent juste admirer nos beaux paysages.»

«Un pays normal»

Ce riche héritier canadien de 59 ans s’est installé en Israël en 2016. Une alyah autant motivée par une fibre sioniste proclamée à tout instant que par une certaine affinité avec la fiscalité israélienne : le magnat de l’immobilier a fait sa valise en s’acquittant d’un redressement de 64 millions d’euros auprès du Trésor québécois. Depuis son arrivée, Adams, six fois champion cycliste canadien chez les vétérans, a décidé de financer une école de vélo, une équipe de deuxième division mondiale – celle que rencontre Nétanyahou dans la vidéo -, la construction d’un vélodrome olympique à Tel-Aviv et, point d’orgue, une grande partie du départ du Giro. Un programme supposé transformer Israël en nation de vélo, ce qu’elle n’était pas jusque-là, mais aussi destiné à soutenir l’effort de communication national, soit une version cycliste de l’hasbara (terme hébraïque signifiant «explication» et «propagande»).

Face à la presse, à Tel-Aviv, Sylvan Adams a dicté fin avril les éléments de langage : «J’espère que les journalistes diront qu’il s’agit de la seule démocratie pluraliste du Moyen-Orient, un pays libre, un pays sûr. Un pays normal, comme la France ou l’Italie.» Normal, il faut le dire vite. Lors de la présentation du tracé à Milan, fin 2017, l’emploi de l’appellation «Jérusalem-Ouest» avait suscité la fureur d’Israël, qui avait obtenu gain de cause (suscitant, en retour, l’indignation des Palestiniens). Désormais, sur les documents officiels, la distinction n’est plus faite. «Il n’y a aucune ville dans le monde qui s’appelle Jérusalem-Ouest, s’agace Adams. Il n’y a pas de Paris-Ouest ou de Rome-Ouest. La course part de la ville de Jérusalem, donc on écrit « Jérusalem » sur la carte.» Représentant de RCS en Israël, Daniel Benaim va dans le même sens : «Quand les hélicoptères vont filmer Jérusalem, ils vont filmer la beauté du tout, on ne va pas diviser la ville !»

Le mouvement propalestinien BDS («Boycott, désinvestissement, sanctions») accuse l’épreuve de «normaliser l’occupation» israélienne, en utilisant des images du Dôme du Rocher ou de la porte de Damas, symboles palestiniens de la Vieille Ville. Haussement d’épaules côté organisateurs. Benaim : «Le BDS a essayé de faire du bruit en Italie, mais ça ne prend pas. Nous sommes heureux de dire qu’il y a une participation totale des équipes.» Deux groupes sportifs ont néanmoins hésité à s’engager, Bahrain-Merida et le Team UAE (Emirats arabes unis), tous deux dirigés par des managers italiens mais financés par des pétromonarchies du Golfe, qui ne reconnaissent pas officiellement Israël. Elles seront finalement au départ. «Les équipes n’ont pas le choix, rappelle le patron d’une formation concurrente. Quand nous avons appris que le Tour d’Italie partait de Jérusalem [peu après les remous causés par la reconnaissance de la ville comme capitale israélienne par Donald Trump, ndlr], nous nous sommes demandé comment on osait envoyer nos coureurs dans cette zone instable. Hélas, les équipes WorldTour [première division mondiale] sont tenues de participer à toutes les épreuves du calendrier. C’est une règle à changer dans un futur proche pour éviter de subir ces parcours absurdes.»

En façade, le milieu du vélo s’attache à éteindre les controverses. Fabio Aru, coureur originaire de Sardaigne, membre du Team UAE qui aurait pu déclarer forfait, sur Sportfair.it : «On m’a demandé si j’avais peur. Au contraire, je suis enthousiaste […]. Le sport peut aider à réconcilier les peuples.» Le Néerlandais Tom Dumoulin (Team Sunweb), vainqueur sortant du Giro, sur Cyclingnews.com : «Je ne suis pas du genre à me mêler de politique ; je suis cycliste. Si une course démarre d’Israël, on doit être au départ.»

Prime secrète

En off, plusieurs concurrents expriment leurs craintes. Pas tant d’être pris pour cible (d’ailleurs, le dispositif de sécurité était en apparence allégé aux abords de leurs hôtels jeudi) mais inquiets de l’effort physique supplémentaire à consentir. Entre les quatre heures de vol retour qui vont entamer leur récupération lundi (direction la Sicile) et la chaleur attendue dimanche dans le désert. Daniel Benaim rejette : «Je les ai vu monter des cols en Sardaigne sous 36 degrés…» Le silence gêné du peloton s’explique peut-être par la récurrence des courses dans des environnements climatiques et politiques discutables. En particulier à Dubaï et Abou Dhabi, où RCS Sport met sur pied des épreuves, ou encore au Qatar qui fut de 2002 à 2016 le terrain de jeu d’Amaury Sport Organisation, propriétaire du Tour de France. Mais il est aussi possible que cette discrétion soit tenue par des arrangements financiers.

La tête d’affiche de l’épreuve, le Britannique Chris Froome (Team Sky, lire ci-contre) aurait ainsi empoché de 1,4 à 2 millions d’euros de prime de participation selon plusieurs médias spécialisés. Menacé de sanctions pour un contrôle positif, le quadruple vainqueur de la Grande Boucle est accueilli à bras ouverts par des organisateurs misant sur sa notoriété. Théoriquement interdite par l’Union cycliste internationale (les coureurs étant rémunérés par leur équipe et non par les patrons d’épreuves), la pratique s’est banalisée. RCS est ainsi soupçonné d’avoir versé, en 2009, de 1 à 3 millions d’euros à Lance Armstrong, directement ou par l’intermédiaire de sa fondation contre le cancer. Par ailleurs, Libération a appris que l’organisateur italien gonfle depuis des années les frais de participation des équipes pour les inciter à aligner leurs stars sur le Giro.

RCS nie toute prime secrète. Ce qui pourrait laisser penser que, si chèque il y a, il a été signé par les Israéliens. Très excité, Sylvan Adams annonçait : «On espère avoir Froome, même si ça coûte cher. C’est comme faire jouer Messi dans sa ville, sauf que là on l’a pour trois jours avec notre beau pays en toile de fond et pas juste un stade anonyme.» Les images doivent être belles à tout prix. Même celles affichant un optimisme forcé (ou naïf), peu raccord avec l’enlisement actuel du processus de paix. Interrogé par le site Insidethegames.biz, le président de l’UCI, le Français David Lappartient veut y croire : «Espérons que le cyclisme permette de promouvoir la paix, comme les JO l’ont fait en Corée.»


Chris Froome, favori des soupçons

«Je n’ai rien fait de mal.» Christopher Froome va bouffer toujours les mêmes questions et répandre toujours la même odeur de petit scandale au long des 3 600 km du Tour d’Italie qui s’élance de Jérusalem ce vendredi. Le Britannique s’attaque à un exploit jamais vu, hors Eddy Merckx et Bernard Hinault : remporter trois grands tours d’affilée. S’il enlève l’épreuve italienne fin mai, Froome signerait un triplé après le Tour de France (en juillet) et celui d’Espagne (en septembre). A moins qu’il perde tout : le leader de l’équipe Sky est accusé d’abus médicamenteux – pour ne pas dire de dopage -, depuis que des doses élevées de salbutamol ont été retrouvées dans ses urines le 7 septembre. Il avance la prise de ventoline pour soigner son asthme et réussit pour le moment à gagner du temps avec ses avocats. Mais Froome devrait tôt ou tard être sanctionné. Donc certainement, si on s’en réfère au cas d’Alberto Contador en 2012, perdre le bénéfice de sa victoire au Tour d’Espagne. Et celle, peut-être à venir, au Tour d’Italie. Dès lors, pourquoi courir le Giro ? Froome le sait : le public retient les victoires acquises sur le terrain et oublie lorsqu’elles sont effacées a posteriori. Et puis, il y a cette histoire de prime de participation secrète que Froome aurait perçue de la part des organisateurs, pour lesquels le scandale constitue manifestement un argument marketing. P.C.

Voir aussi:

A Courageous Trump Call on a Lousy Iran Deal

Bret Stephens
New York Times

May 8, 2018

Of all the arguments for the Trump administration to honor the nuclear deal with Iran, none was more risible than the claim that we gave our word as a country to keep it.

“Our”?

The Obama administration refused to submit the deal to Congress as a treaty, knowing it would never get two-thirds of the Senate to go along. Just 21 percent of Americans approved of the deal at the time it went through, against 49 percent who did not, according to a Pew poll. The agreement “passed” on the strength of a 42-vote Democratic filibuster, against bipartisan, majority opposition.

“The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (J.C.P.O.A.) is not a treaty or an executive agreement, and it is not a signed document,” Julia Frifield, then the assistant secretary of state for legislative affairs, wrote then-Representative Mike Pompeo in November 2015, referring to the deal by its formal name. It’s questionable whether the deal has any legal force at all.

Build on political sand; get washed away by the next electoral wave. Such was the fate of the ill-judged and ill-founded J.C.P.O.A., which Donald Trump killed on Tuesday by refusing to again waive sanctions on the Islamic Republic. He was absolutely right to do so — assuming, that is, serious thought has been given to what comes next.

In the weeks leading to Tuesday’s announcement, some of the same people who previously claimed the deal was the best we could possibly hope for suddenly became inventive in proposing means to fix it. This involved suggesting side deals between Washington and European capitals to impose stiffer penalties on Tehran for its continued testing of ballistic missiles — more than 20 since the deal came into effect — and its increasingly aggressive regional behavior.

But the problem with this approach is that it only treats symptoms of a problem for which the J.C.P.O.A. is itself a major cause. The deal weakened U.N. prohibitions on Iran’s testing of ballistic missiles, which cannot be reversed without Russian and Chinese consent. That won’t happen.

The easing of sanctions also gave Tehran additional financial means with which to fund its depredations in Syria and its militant proxies in Yemen, Lebanon and elsewhere. Any effort to counter Iran on the ground in these places would mean fighting the very forces we are effectively feeding. Why not just stop the feeding?

Apologists for the deal answer that the price is worth paying because Iran has put on hold much of its production of nuclear fuel for the next several years. Yet even now Iran is under looser nuclear strictures than North Korea, and would have been allowed to enrich as much material as it liked once the deal expired. That’s nuts.

Apologists also claim that, with Trump’s decision, Tehran will simply restart its enrichment activities on an industrial scale. Maybe it will, forcing a crisis that could end with U.S. or Israeli strikes on Iran’s nuclear sites. But that would be stupid, something the regime emphatically isn’t. More likely, it will take symbolic steps to restart enrichment, thereby implying a threat without making good on it. What the regime wants is a renegotiation, not a reckoning.

Why? Even with the sanctions relief, the Iranian economy hangs by a thread: The Wall Street Journal on Sundayreported “hundreds of recent outbreaks of labor unrest in Iran, an indication of deepening discord over the nation’s economic troubles.” This week, the rial hit a record low of 67,800 to the dollar; one member of the Iranian Parliament estimated $30 billion of capital outflows in recent months. That’s real money for a country whose gross domestic product barely matches that of Boston.

The regime might calculate that a strategy of confrontation with the West could whip up useful nationalist fervors. But it would have to tread carefully: Ordinary Iranians are already furious that their government has squandered the proceeds of the nuclear deal on propping up the Assad regime. The conditions that led to the so-called Green movement of 2009 are there once again. Nor will it help Iran if it tries to start a war with Israel and comes out badly bloodied.

All this means the administration is in a strong position to negotiate a viable deal. But it missed an opportunity last month when it failed to deliver a crippling blow to Bashar al-Assad, Iran’s puppet in Syria, for his use of chemical weapons. Trump’s appeals in his speech to the Iranian people also sounded hollow from a president who isn’t exactly a tribune of liberalism and has disdained human rights as a tool of U.S. diplomacy. And the U.S. will need to mend fences with its European partners to pursue a coordinated diplomatic approach.

The goal is to put Iran’s rulers to a fundamental choice. They can opt to have a functioning economy, free of sanctions and open to investment, at the price of permanently, verifiably and irreversibly forgoing a nuclear option and abandoning their support for terrorists. Or they can pursue their nuclear ambitions at the cost of economic ruin and possible war. But they are no longer entitled to Barack Obama’s sweetheart deal of getting sanctions lifted first, retaining their nuclear options for later, and sponsoring terrorism throughout.

Trump’s courageous decision to withdraw from the nuclear deal will clarify the stakes for Tehran. Now we’ll see whether the administration is capable of following through.

Voir également:

Trump now needs to bring Iran’s economy to its knees

President Trump’s declaration Tuesday that he would exit the 2015 Iran nuclear deal was more than just a fulfillment of a campaign promise; it was a much-needed shift in US foreign policy. The message to the world: The era of appeasement is over.

The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action was among the worst deals negotiated in modern times. In exchange for the suspension of America’s toughest economic sanctions, Iran needed only freeze its nuclear program for a limited amount of time — keeping its nuclear capabilities on standby while perfecting its missile arsenal, increasing support to terrorism and expanding its military footprint throughout the Middle East.By withdrawing from the agreement, Trump unshackled America’s most powerful economic weapons and restored US leverage to push back on the entire range of Iran’s malign activities. Trump must now implement a new strategy that forces Iran to withdraw from Syria and Yemen, verifiably and irreversibly dismantle its nuclear and missile programs, end its sponsorship of terrorism and improve its human-rights record.

Sustained political warfare, robust military deterrence and maximum economic pressure will all be necessary. Pressure will build steadily as our re-imposed sanctions take hold.

Under the laws passed by Congress before the nuclear deal, banks throughout the world risk losing their access to the US financial system if they do business with the Central Bank of Iran or in connection with Iran’s energy, shipping, shipbuilding and port sectors. Companies providing insurance and re-insurance for Iran-connected projects face US sanctions as well, as do gold and silver dealers to Iran.

Iran will see its oil-export revenue decline as importers are forced to significantly reduce their purchases. Worse than anything for the regime, Iran’s foreign-held reserves will be on lock-down. Money paid by its oil customers must sit in foreign escrow accounts. Banks that allow Iran to repatriate, transfer or convert these payments to other currencies face the full measure of US financial sanctions.

What happens to a country that is cut off from hard currency and faces declining export revenues? In 2013, we saw the result: a balance-of-payments crisis. What happens, however, when these sanctions are imposed amid a raging liquidity crisis while the Iranian currency is in free-fall and the regime is drawing down its foreign-exchange reserves? The Trump administration is hoping for a situation that makes the mullahs choose between economic collapse and wide-ranging behavioral change.

The strategy just might work, but it’ll take a lot more than just re-imposing sanctions to succeed. Sanctions are only effective if they are enforced. The sooner the Trump administration identifies a sanctions-evading bank and cuts it off from the international financial system, the sooner a global chilling effect will amplify the impact of American sanctions. The same goes for underwriters and gold-traders.

Beyond enforcement, the Trump administration will need key allies to fully implement this pressure campaign. The Saudis, under attack by Iranian missiles from Yemen, should be a willing partner in the effort to drive down Iran’s oil exports — ensuring Saudi production increases to replace Iranian contracts and stabilize the market. Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Bahrain should also combine their market leverage to force European and Asian investors to choose between doing business in their countries or doing business in Iran.Trump will also need Europeans to act on one key issue which, given their opposition to his withdrawal from the deal, may present a diplomatic challenge. Under US law, the president may impose sanctions on secure financial messaging services — like the Brussels-based SWIFT service — if they provide access to the Central Bank of Iran or other blacklisted Iranian banks.

In 2012, when Congress first proposed the idea, the European Union ordered SWIFT to disconnect Iranian banks, which closed a major loophole in US sanctions. Now that Trump has left the deal, SWIFT must once again disconnect Iran’s central bank. If SWIFT refuses, Trump should consider imposing sanctions on the group’s board of directors.

Trump’s Iran pivot from appeasement to pressure offers America the best chance to fundamentally change Iranian behavior and improve our national security. If his administration implements the strategy effectively, the Iranian regime will have a choice: meet America’s demands or face economic collapse.

Richard Goldberg, an architect of congressionally enacted sanctions against Iran, is a senior adviser at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies.

Voir encore:

Trump annonce le retrait des Etats-Unis de l’accord nucléaire iranien

OLJ/Agences
08/05/2018

Donald Trump a annoncé mardi soir  le retrait des Etats-Unis de l’accord nucléaire iranien au risque d’ouvrir une période de vives tensions avec ses alliés européens et d’incertitudes quant aux ambitions atomiques de Téhéran.

Quinze mois après son arrivée au pouvoir, le 45e président des Etats-Unis a décidé, comme il l’avait promis en campagne, de sortir de cet accord emblématique conclu en 2015 par son prédécesseur démocrate Barack Obama après 21 mois de négociations acharnées. « J’annonce aujourd’hui que les Etats-Unis vont se retirer de l’accord nucléaire iranien », a-t-il déclaré dans une allocution télévisée depuis la Maison Blanche, annonçant le rétablissement des sanctions contre la République islamique qui avaient été levées en contrepartie de l’engagement pris par l’Iran de ne pas se doter de l’arme nucléaire. Le locataire de la Maison Blanche n’a donné aucune précision sur la nature des sanctions qui seraient rétablies et à quelle échéance mais il a mis en garde: « tout pays qui aidera l’Iran dans sa quête d’armes nucléaires pourrait aussi être fortement sanctionné par les Etats-Unis ».
Dénonçant avec force cet accord « désastreux », il a assuré avoir la « preuve » que le régime iranien avait menti sur ses activités nucléaires.

Un peu plus tard, le département du Trésor américain a précisé que les Etats-Unis allaient rétablir une large palette de sanctions concernant l’Iran à l’issue de périodes transitoires de 90 et 180 jours, qui viseront notamment le secteur pétrolier iranien ainsi que les transactions en dollar avec la banque centrale du pays. Dans un communiqué et un document publiés sur son site internet, le Trésor précise que le rétablissement des sanctions concerne également les exportations aéronautiques vers l’Iran, le commerce de métaux avec ce pays ainsi que toute tentative de Téhéran d’obtenir des dollars US.

(Lire aussi : Derrière l’accord nucléaire, l’influence de l’Iran en question)

Son allocution était très attendue au Moyen-Orient où beaucoup redoutent une escalade avec la République islamique mais aussi de l’autre côté de planète, en Corée du Nord, à l’approche du sommet entre Donald Trump et Kim Jong Un sur la dénucléarisation de la péninsule. A ce sujet, le chef de la Maison Blanche a également indiqué que le secrétaire d’Etat américain Mike Pompeo arrivera en Corée du Nord d’ici « une heure » pour préparer le sommet entre Donald Trump et Kim Jong Un. « En ce moment même, le secrétaire Pompeo est en route vers la Corée du Nord pour préparer ma future rencontre avec Kim Jong Un », a-t-il déclaré. « On en saura bientôt plus » sur le sort des trois prisonniers américains, a-t-il ajouté.

Réactions

L’Iran souhaite continuer à respecter l’accord de 2015 sur son programme nucléaire, après l’annonce de la décision de Donald Trump, a réagi le président iranien, Hassan Rohani. « Si nous atteignons les objectifs de l’accord en coopération avec les autres parties prenantes de cet accord, il restera en vigueur  (…). En sortant de l’accord, l’Amérique a officiellement sabordé son engagement concernant un traité international », a dit le président iranien dans une allocution télévisée. »J’ai donn é pour consigne au ministère des Affaires étrangères de négocier avec les pays européens, la Chine et la Russie dans les semaines à venir. Si, au bout de cette courte période, nous concluons que nous pouvons pleinement bénéficier de l’accord avec la coopération de tous les pays, l’accord restera en vigueur », a-t-il continué.
M. Rohani a ajouté que Téhéran était prêt à reprendre ses activités nucléaires si les intérêts iraniens n’étaient pas garantis par un nouvel accord après des consultations avec les autres parties signataires du « Plan d’action global conjoint » (JCPOA) de 2015.

La Syrie a également « condamné avec force » l’annonce du retrait des Etats-Unis, affirmant sa « totale solidarité » avec Téhéran et sa confiance dans la capacité de l’Iran à surmonter l’impact de la « position agressive » de Washington.

Le Premier ministre israélien Benjamin Netanyahu a, pour sa part, dit « soutenir totalement » la décision « courageuse » du président américain. « Israël soutient totalement la décision courageuse prise aujourd’hui par le président Trump de rejeter le désastreux accord nucléaire » avec la République islamique, a dit M. Netanyahu en direct sur la télévision publique dans la foulée de la déclaration de M. Trump.

L’Arabie saoudite a également salué mardi soir la décision de Donald Trump de rétablir les sanctions contre l’Iran et de dénoncer l’accord de 2015 sur le programme nucléaire de Téhéran, a fait savoir la télévision saoudienne. Les Emirats arabes unis et Bahreïn, alliés de l’Arabie saoudite dans le Golfe, ont emboîté le pas à Riyad en saluant par la voix de leur ministère des Affaires étrangères la décision de M. Trump. Bahreïn accueille la 5e flotte américaine.

La France, l’Allemagne et le Royaume-Uni « regrettent » la décision américaine de se retirer de l’accord sur le programme nucléaire iranien conclu en 2015, a, de son côté, réagi Emmanuel Macron sur Twitter, évoquant sa volonté de travailler collectivement à un « cadre plus large » sur ce dossier. « Le régime international de lutte contre la prolifération nucléaire est en jeu », a estimé le chef de l’Etat français, qui s’était entretenu au téléphone avec la chancelière allemande Angela Merkel et la Première ministre britannique Theresa May à 19h30 heure de Paris, peu avant la prise de parole de Donald Trump. « Nous travaillerons collectivement à un cadre plus large, couvrant l’activité nucléaire, la période après 2025, les missiles balistiques et la stabilité au Moyen-Orient, en particulier en Syrie, au Yémen et en Irak », a-t-il ajouté, toujours sur Twitter.

Un peu plus tard, la cheffe de la diplomatie européenne Federica Mogherini a déclaré, depuis Rome, que l’UE est « déterminée à préserver » l’accord nucléaire iranien. L’accord de Vienne de 2015 « répond à son objectif qui est de garantir que l’Iran ne développe pas des armes nucléaires, l’Union européenne est déterminée à le préserver », a insisté Mme Mogherini, lors d’une brève déclaration à la représentation de la Commission européenne à Rome, en se disant « particulièrement inquiète » de l’annonce de nouvelles sanctions américaines contre Téhéran..

Le secrétaire général de l’ONU, Antonio Guterres, a, quant à lui, appelé les six autres signataires de l’accord sur le nucléaire iranien « à respecter pleinement leurs engagements », après le retrait des Etats-Unis. « Je suis profondément préoccupé par l’annonce du retrait des Etats-Unis de l’accord JCPOA (en référence à l’acronyme en anglais ndlr) et de la reprise de sanctions américaines », a aussi souligné le patron des Nations unies dans un communiqué.

Le porte-parole de la présidence turque Ibrahim Kalin a, de son côté, estimé que « le retrait unilatéral des Etats-Unis de l’accord sur le nucléaire est une décision qui va causer de l’instabilité et de nouveaux conflits ». « La Turquie va continuer de s’opposer avec détermination à tous types d’armes nucléaires », a ajouté le porte-parole de Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

Le ministère russe des Affaires étrangères a, pour sa part, déclaré que la Russie est « profondément déçue » par la décision du président américain.
« Nous sommes extrêmement inquiets que les Etats-Unis agissent contre l’avis de la plupart des Etats (…) en violant grossièrement les normes du droit international », selon le texte.  Selon Moscou, cette décision de Donald Trump « est une nouvelle preuve de l’incapacité de Washington de négocier » et les « griefs américains concernant l’activité nucléaire légitime de l’Iran ne servent qu’à régler les comptes politiques » avec Téhéran.

Quelles répercussions?

A l’exception des Etats-Unis, tous les signataires ont défendu jusqu’au bout ce compromis qu’ils jugent « historique », soulignant que l’Agence internationale de l’énergie atomique (AIEA) a régulièrement certifié le respect par Téhéran des termes du texte censé garantir le caractère non militaire de son programme nucléaire. En contrepartie des engagements pris par Téhéran, Washington a suspendu ses sanctions liées au programme nucléaire iranien. Mais la loi américaine impose au président de se prononcer sur le renouvellement de cette suspension tous les 120 ou 180 jours, selon le type de mesures punitives. Certaines suspensions arrivent à échéance samedi, mais le gros d’entre elles restent en théorie en vigueur jusqu’à mi-juillet.

Dès mardi soir, le nouvel ambassadeur américain en Allemagne a écrit, sur Twitter, que les entreprises allemandes devraient immédiatement cesser leurs activités en Iran. Le président américain Donald Trump « a dit que les sanctions allaient viser des secteurs critiques de l’économie de l’Iran. Les entreprises allemandes faisant des affaires en Iran devraient cesser leurs opérations immédiatement », a commenté Richard Grenell qui a pris ses fonctions hier.

Airbus a, de son côté, annoncé qu’il allait examiner la décision prise par Donald Trump avant de réagir. « Nous analysons attentivement cette annonce et évaluerons les prochaines étapes en cohérence avec nos politiques internes et dans le respect complet des sanctions et des règles de contrôle des exportations », a dit le responsable de la communication d’Airbus, Rainer Ohler. « Cela prendra du temps », a-t-il ajouté. Un peu plus tard, le secrétaire américain au Trésor, Steve Mnuchin, annonçait que les Etats-Unis allaient retirer à Airbus et à Boeing les autorisations de vendre des avions de ligne à l’Iran.

En janvier, l’ancien magnat de l’immobilier avait lancé un ultimatum aux Européens, leur donnant jusqu’au 12 mai pour « durcir » sur plusieurs points ce texte signé par Téhéran et les grandes puissances (Etats-Unis, Chine, Russie, France, Royaume-Uni, Allemagne). En ligne de mire: les inspections de l’AIEA; la levée progressive, à partir de 2025, de certaines restrictions aux activités nucléaires iraniennes, qui en font selon lui une sorte de bombe à retardement; mais aussi le fait qu’il ne s’attaque pas directement au programme de missiles balistiques de Téhéran ni à son rôle jugé « déstabilisateur » dans plusieurs pays du Moyen-Orient (Syrie, Yémen, Liban…).

L’annonce de mardi va avoir des répercussions encore difficiles à prédire. Les Européens ont fait savoir qu’ils comptent rester dans l’accord quoi qu’il advienne. Mais que vont faire les Iraniens?
Pour l’instant, Téhéran, où cohabitent des ultraconservateurs autour du guide suprême Ali Khamenei et des dirigeants plus modérés autour du président Hassan Rohani, ont soufflé le chaud et le froid.
La République islamique a menacé de quitter à son tour l’accord de 2015, de relancer et accélérer le programme nucléaire, mais a aussi laissé entendre qu’elle pourrait y rester si les Européens pallient l’absence américaine.

Voir de plus:

Accord sur le nucléaire iranien : 10 conséquences de la (folle) décision de Trump

Le monde a basculé le 8 mai 2018, avec la sortie des Etats-Unis de l’accord sur le nucléaire iranien. Voici ce qui risque de se passer maintenant.

Vincent Jauvert

Le monde a basculé ce 8 mai 2018.

Rien n’y a fait. Ni les câlins d’Emmanuel Macron. Ni les menaces du président iranien. Ni les assurances des patrons de la CIA et de l’AIEA. Donald Trump a tranché : sous le prétexte non prouvé que l’Iran ne le respecte pas, il retire les Etats-Unis de l’accord nucléaire signé le 14 juillet 2015. Une folle décision aux conséquences considérables.

  1. Après la dénonciation de celui de Paris sur le climat, voici l’abandon unilatéral d’un autre accord qui a été négocié par les grandes puissances pendant plus de dix ans. L’Amérique devient donc, à l’évidence, un « rogue state » – un Etat voyou qui ne respecte pas ses engagements internationaux et ment une fois encore ouvertement au monde. L’invasion de l’Irak n’était donc pas une exception malheureuse : Washington n’incarne plus l’ordre international mais le désordre.
  2. Si l’on en doutait encore, le monde dit libre n’a plus de leader crédible ni même de grand frère. Ce qui va troubler un peu plus encore les opinions publiques et les classes dirigeantes occidentales.
  3. Puisque l’Iran en est l’un des plus gros producteurs et qu’il va être empêché d’en vendre, le prix du pétrole, déjà à 70 dollars le baril, va probablement exploser, ce qui risque de ralentir voire de stopper la croissance mondiale – et donc celle de la France.
  4. D’ailleurs, de tous les pays occidentaux, la France est celui qui a le plus à perdre d’un retour des sanctions américaines – directes et indirectes. L’Iran a, en effet, passé commandes de 100 Airbus pour 19 milliards de dollars et a signé un gigantesque contrat avec Total pour l’exploitation du champ South Pars 11. Or Trump a choisi la version la plus dure : interdire de nouveau à toute compagnie traitant avec Téhéran de faire du business aux Etats-Unis. Pour continuer à commercer sur le marché américain, Airbus et Total devront donc renoncer à ces deals juteux.
  5. En Iran, le président « réformateur » Rohani, qui avait défendu bec et ongles l’accord en promettant des retombées économiques mirifiques pour son pays et accepté, par cet accord, que son pays démonte les deux tiers de ses centrifugeuses et se sépare de 98% de son uranium enrichi, est humilié. Tandis que le clan des « durs » pavoise.
  6. L’accord dénoncé, l’Iran va donc probablement relancer au plus vite son programme nucléaire militaire en commençant par réassembler les centrifugeuses et les faire tourner dans un bunker enterré très profondément.
  7. Ce qui devrait être le déclencheur d’une course folle à l’armement atomique dans tout le Moyen-Orient. L’Arabie saoudite, grâce au Pakistan, et la Turquie, grâce à son développement économique, ne voudront pas être dépassées par l’Iran et voudront, donc, devenir elles aussi des puissances nucléaires. Si bien qu’Emmanuel Macron a eu raison d’évoquer « un risque de guerre » (dans le « Spiegel » samedi dernier) si les Etats-Unis se retiraient de l’accord. De fait, le risque est grand que cette dénonciation unilatérale, alliée à un retour en force des « conservateurs » à Téhéran, ne précipite un affrontement militaire de grande envergure entre Israël et l’Iran – affrontement qui a déjà commencé à bas bruit, ces dernières semaines, par les frappes de Tsahal contre des bases du Hezbollah en Syrie.
  8. La milice chiite pro-iranienne qui vient de remporter les élections législatives au Liban pourrait profiter de cette victoire électorale inattendue et du retrait unilatéral américain – gros de menaces militaires – pour attaquer le nord d’Israël.
  9. Et, ainsi soutenu politiquement par le président américain, le gouvernement israélien pourrait décider de frapper ce qui reste des installations nucléaires iraniennes, ainsi qu’il l’avait sérieusement envisagé plusieurs fois avant l’accord de 2015. Autrement dit, la seule question est peut-être désormais de savoir lequel des deux pays, l’Iran ou Israël, va lancer la vaste offensive en premier. A moins que les Etats-Unis ne décident de frapper eux-mêmes « préventivement » la République islamique, avec les conséquences géopolitiques que l’on n’ose imaginer. Vous croyez cela impossible ? N’oubliez pas que Donald Trump vient de se choisir un nouveau conseiller à la sécurité. Il s’agit d’un certain John Bolton, un néoconservateur qui milite depuis le 11-Septembre pour que les Etats-Unis renversent le « régime des mollahs »…
  10. Evidemment, cette décision de Trump éloigne un peu plus encore l’espoir d’un règlement politique du conflit syrien. Et augmente les risques sur le terrain d’affrontements militaires entre milices iraniennes et soldats occidentaux – dont les forces spéciales françaises.

     Voir enfin:

    Remarks by President Trump on the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action

    My fellow Americans: Today, I want to update the world on our efforts to prevent Iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon.

    The Iranian regime is the leading state sponsor of terror. It exports dangerous missiles, fuels conflicts across the Middle East, and supports terrorist proxies and militias such as Hezbollah, Hamas, the Taliban, and al Qaeda.

    Over the years, Iran and its proxies have bombed American embassies and military installations, murdered hundreds of American servicemembers, and kidnapped, imprisoned, and tortured American citizens. The Iranian regime has funded its long reign of chaos and terror by plundering the wealth of its own people.

    No action taken by the regime has been more dangerous than its pursuit of nuclear weapons and the means of delivering them.

    In 2015, the previous administration joined with other nations in a deal regarding Iran’s nuclear program. This agreement was known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA.

    In theory, the so-called “Iran deal” was supposed to protect the United States and our allies from the lunacy of an Iranian nuclear bomb, a weapon that will only endanger the survival of the Iranian regime. In fact, the deal allowed Iran to continue enriching uranium and, over time, reach the brink of a nuclear breakout.

    The deal lifted crippling economic sanctions on Iran in exchange for very weak limits on the regime’s nuclear activity, and no limits at all on its other malign behavior, including its sinister activities in Syria, Yemen, and other places all around the world.

    In other words, at the point when the United States had maximum leverage, this disastrous deal gave this regime — and it’s a regime of great terror — many billions of dollars, some of it in actual cash — a great embarrassment to me as a citizen and to all citizens of the United States.

    A constructive deal could easily have been struck at the time, but it wasn’t. At the heart of the Iran deal was a giant fiction that a murderous regime desired only a peaceful nuclear energy program.

    Today, we have definitive proof that this Iranian promise was a lie. Last week, Israel published intelligence documents long concealed by Iran, conclusively showing the Iranian regime and its history of pursuing nuclear weapons.

    The fact is this was a horrible, one-sided deal that should have never, ever been made. It didn’t bring calm, it didn’t bring peace, and it never will.

    In the years since the deal was reached, Iran’s military budget has grown by almost 40 percent, while its economy is doing very badly. After the sanctions were lifted, the dictatorship used its new funds to build nuclear-capable missiles, support terrorism, and cause havoc throughout the Middle East and beyond.

    The agreement was so poorly negotiated that even if Iran fully complies, the regime can still be on the verge of a nuclear breakout in just a short period of time. The deal’s sunset provisions are totally unacceptable. If I allowed this deal to stand, there would soon be a nuclear arms race in the Middle East. Everyone would want their weapons ready by the time Iran had theirs.

    Making matters worse, the deal’s inspection provisions lack adequate mechanisms to prevent, detect, and punish cheating, and don’t even have the unqualified right to inspect many important locations, including military facilities.

    Not only does the deal fail to halt Iran’s nuclear ambitions, but it also fails to address the regime’s development of ballistic missiles that could deliver nuclear warheads.

    Finally, the deal does nothing to constrain Iran’s destabilizing activities, including its support for terrorism. Since the agreement, Iran’s bloody ambitions have grown only more brazen.

    In light of these glaring flaws, I announced last October that the Iran deal must either be renegotiated or terminated.

    Three months later, on January 12th, I repeated these conditions. I made clear that if the deal could not be fixed, the United States would no longer be a party to the agreement.

    Over the past few months, we have engaged extensively with our allies and partners around the world, including France, Germany, and the United Kingdom. We have also consulted with our friends from across the Middle East. We are unified in our understanding of the threat and in our conviction that Iran must never acquire a nuclear weapon.

    After these consultations, it is clear to me that we cannot prevent an Iranian nuclear bomb under the decaying and rotten structure of the current agreement.

    The Iran deal is defective at its core. If we do nothing, we know exactly what will happen. In just a short period of time, the world’s leading state sponsor of terror will be on the cusp of acquiring the world’s most dangerous weapons.

    Therefore, I am announcing today that the United States will withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal.

    In a few moments, I will sign a presidential memorandum to begin reinstating U.S. nuclear sanctions on the Iranian regime. We will be instituting the highest level of economic sanction. Any nation that helps Iran in its quest for nuclear weapons could also be strongly sanctioned by the United States.

    America will not be held hostage to nuclear blackmail. We will not allow American cities to be threatened with destruction. And we will not allow a regime that chants “Death to America” to gain access to the most deadly weapons on Earth.

    Today’s action sends a critical message: The United States no longer makes empty threats. When I make promises, I keep them. In fact, at this very moment, Secretary Pompeo is on his way to North Korea in preparation for my upcoming meeting with Kim Jong-un. Plans are being made. Relationships are building. Hopefully, a deal will happen and, with the help of China, South Korea, and Japan, a future of great prosperity and security can be achieved for everyone.

    As we exit the Iran deal, we will be working with our allies to find a real, comprehensive, and lasting solution to the Iranian nuclear threat. This will include efforts to eliminate the threat of Iran’s ballistic missile program; to stop its terrorist activities worldwide; and to block its menacing activity across the Middle East. In the meantime, powerful sanctions will go into full effect. If the regime continues its nuclear aspirations, it will have bigger problems than it has ever had before.

    Finally, I want to deliver a message to the long-suffering people of Iran: The people of America stand with you. It has now been almost 40 years since this dictatorship seized power and took a proud nation hostage. Most of Iran’s 80 million citizens have sadly never known an Iran that prospered in peace with its neighbors and commanded the admiration of the world.

    But the future of Iran belongs to its people. They are the rightful heirs to a rich culture and an ancient land. And they deserve a nation that does justice to their dreams, honor to their history, and glory to God.

    Iran’s leaders will naturally say that they refuse to negotiate a new deal; they refuse. And that’s fine. I’d probably say the same thing if I was in their position. But the fact is they are going to want to make a new and lasting deal, one that benefits all of Iran and the Iranian people. When they do, I am ready, willing, and able.

    Great things can happen for Iran, and great things can happen for the peace and stability that we all want in the Middle East.

    There has been enough suffering, death, and destruction. Let it end now.

    Thank you. God bless you. Thank you.


Cinéma: Pallywood tous les jours sur un écran chez vous (It’s just standard evacuation practice, stupid ! – complete with shouts of pain and Allahu akbar)

7 avril, 2018
Abattre un Européen, c’est faire d’une pierre deux coups, supprimer en même temps un oppresseur et un opprimé ; restent un homme mort et un homme libre. Sartre (préface des « Damnés de la terre » de Franz Fanon, 1961)
L’action de Septembre Noir a fait éclater la mascarade olympique, a bouleversé les arrangements à l’amiable que les réactionnaires arabes s’apprêtaient à conclure avec Israël […] Aucun révolutionnaire ne peut se désolidariser de Septembre Noir. Nous devons défendre inconditionnellement face à la répression les militants de cette organisation […] A Munich, la fin si tragique, selon les philistins de tous poils qui ne disent mot de l’assassinat des militants palestiniens, a été voulue et provoquée par les puissances impérialistes et particulièrement Israël. Il fut froidement décidé d’aller au carnage. Edwy Plenel (alias Joseph Krasny)
Je n’ai jamais fait mystère de mes contributions à Rouge, de 1970 à 1978, sous le pseudonyme de Joseph Krasny. Ce texte, écrit il y a plus de 45 ans, dans un contexte tout autre et alors que j’avais 20 ans, exprime une position que je récuse fermement aujourd’hui. Elle n’avait rien d’exceptionnel dans l’extrême gauche de l’époque, comme en témoigne un article de Jean-Paul Sartre, le fondateur de Libération, sur Munich dans La Cause du peuple–J’accuse du 15 octobre 1972. Tout comme ce philosophe, j’ai toujours dénoncé et combattu l’antisémitisme d’où qu’il vienne et sans hésitation. Mais je refuse l’intimidation qui consiste à taxer d’antisémite toute critique de la politique de l’Etat d’Israël. Edwy Plenel
Pendant 24 mn à peu près on ne voit que de la mise en scène … C’est un envers du décor qu’on ne montre jamais … Mais oui tu sais bien que c’est toujours comme ça ! Entretien Jeambar-Leconte (RCJ)
Au début (…) l’AP accueillait les reporters à bras ouverts. Ils voulaient que nous montrions des enfants de 12 ans se faisant tuer. Mais après le lynchage, quand des agents de l’AP firent leur possible pour détruire et confisquer l’enregistrement de ce macabre événement et que les Forces de Défense Israéliennes utilisèrent les images pour repérer et arrêter les auteurs du crime, les Palestiniens donnèrent libre cours à leur hostilité envers les Etats-Unis en harcelant et en intimidant les correspondants occidentaux. Après Ramallah, où toute bonne volonté prit fin, je suis beaucoup plus prudent dans mes déplacements. Chris Roberts (Sky TV)
La tâche sacrée des journalistes musulmans est, d’une part, de protéger la Umma des “dangers imminents”, et donc, à cette fin, de “censurer tous les matériaux” et, d’autre part, “de combattre le sionisme et sa politique colonialiste de création d’implantations, ainsi que son anéantissement impitoyable du peuple palestinien”. Charte des médias islamiques de grande diffusion (Jakarta, 1980)
Il s’agit de formes d’expression artistique, mais tout cela sert à exprimer la vérité… Nous n’oublions jamais nos principes journalistiques les plus élevés auxquels nous nous sommes engagés, de dire la vérité et rien que la vérité. Haut responsable de la Télévision de l’Autorité palestinienne
Je suis venu au journalisme afin de poursuivre la lutte en faveur de mon peuple. Talal Abu Rahma (lors de la réception d’un prix, au Maroc, en 2001, pour sa vidéo sur al-Dura)
Karsenty est donc si choqué que des images truquées soient utilisées et éditées à Gaza ? Mais cela a lieu partout à la télévision, et aucun journaliste de télévision de terrain, aucun monteur de film, ne seraient choqués. Clément Weill-Raynal (France 3)
Nous avons toujours respecté (et continuerons à respecter) les procédures journalistiques de l’Autorité palestinienne en matière d’exercice de la profession de journaliste en Palestine… Roberto Cristiano (représentant de la “chaîne de télévision officielle RAI, Lettre à l’Autorité palestinienne)
La mort de Mohammed annule, efface celle de l’enfant juif, les mains en l’air devant les SS, dans le Ghetto de Varsovie. Catherine Nay (Europe 1)
Dans la guerre moderne, une image vaut mille armes. Bob Simon
Oh, ils font toujours ça. C’est une question de culture. Représentants de France 2 (cités par Enderlin)
L’image correspondait à la réalité de la situation, non seulement à Gaza, mais en Cisjordanie. Charles Enderlin (Le Figaro, 27/01/05)
J’ai travaillé au Liban depuis que tout a commencé, et voir le comportement de beaucoup de photographes libanais travaillant pour les agences de presse m’a un peu troublé. Coupable ou pas, Adnan Hajj a été remarqué pour ses retouches d’images par ordinateur. Mais, pour ma part, j’ai été le témoin de pratique quotidienne de clichés posés, et même d’un cas où un groupe de photographes d’agences orchestraient le dégagement des cadavres, donnant des directives aux secouristes, leur demandant de disposer les corps dans certaines positions, et même de ressortir des corps déjà inhumés pour les photographier dans les bras de personnes alentour. Ces photographes ont fait moisson d’images chocs, sans manipulation informatique, mais au prix de manipulations humaines qui posent en elles-mêmes un problème éthique bien plus grave. Quelle que soit la cause de ces excès, inexpérience, désir de montrer de la façon la plus spectaculaire le drame vécu par votre pays, ou concurrence effrénée, je pense que la faute incombe aux agences de presse elles-mêmes, car ce sont elles qui emploient ces photographes. Il faut mettre en place des règles, faute de quoi toute la profession finira par en pâtir. Je ne dis pas cela contre les photographes locaux, mais après avoir vu ça se répéter sans arrêt depuis un mois, je pense qu’il faut s’attaquer au problème. Quand je m’écarte d’une scène de ce genre, un autre preneur de vue dresse le décor, et tous les autres suivent… Brian X (Journaliste occidental anonyme)
Pour qui nous prenez-vous ? Nous savons qui vous êtes, nous lisons tout ce que vous écrivez et nous savons où vous habitez. Hussein (attaché de presse du Hezbollah au journaliste Michael Totten)
L’attaque a été menée en riposte aux tirs incessants de ces derniers jours sur des localités israéliennes à partir de la zone visée. Les habitants de tous les villages alentour, y compris Cana, ont été avertis de se tenir à l’écart des sites de lancement de roquettes contre Israël. Tsahal est intervenue cette nuit contre des objectifs terroristes dans le village de Cana. Ce village est utilisé depuis le début de ce conflit comme base arrière d’où ont été lancées en direction d’Israël environ 150 roquettes, en 30 salves, dont certaines ont atteint Haïfa et des sites dans le nord, a déclaré aujourd’hui le général de division Gadi Eizenkot, chef des opérations. Tsahal regrette tous les dommages subis par les civils innocents, même s’ils résultent directement de l’utilisation criminelle des civils libanais comme boucliers humains par l’organisation terroriste Hezbollah. (…) Le Hezbollah place les civils libanais comme bouclier entre eux et nous, alors que Tsahal se place comme bouclier entre les habitants d’Israël et les terroristes du Hezbollah. C’est la principale différence entre eux et nous. Rapport de l’Armée israélienne
Après trois semaines de travail intense, avec l’assistance active et la coopération de la communauté Internet, souvent appelée “blogosphère”, nous pensons avoir maintenant assez de preuves pour assurer avec certitude que beaucoup des faits rapportés en images par les médias sont en fait des mises en scène. Nous pensons même pouvoir aller plus loin. À notre avis, l’essentiel de l’activité des secours à Khuraybah [le vrai nom de l’endroit, alors que les médias, en accord avec le Hezbollah, ont utilisé le nom de Cana, pour sa connotation biblique et l’écho du drame de 1996] le 30 juillet a été détourné en exercice de propagande. Le site est devenu en fait un vaste plateau de tournage, où les gestes macabres ont été répétés avec la complaisance des médias, qui ont participé activement et largement utilisé le matériau récolté. La tactique des médias est prévisible et tristement habituelle. Au lieu de discuter le fond de nos arguments, ils se focalisent sur des détails, y relevant des inexactitudes et des fausses pistes, et affirment que ces erreurs vident notre dossier de toute valeur. D’autres nous étiquètent comme de droite, pro-israéliens ou parlent simplement de théories du complot, comme si cela pouvait suffire à éliminer les éléments concrets que nous avons rassemblés. Richard North (EU Referendum)
Lorsque les médias se prêtent au jeu des manipulations plutôt que de les dénoncer, non seulement ils sacrifient les Libanais innocents qui ne veulent pas que cette mafia religieuse prenne le pouvoir et les utilise comme boucliers, mais ils nuisent aussi à la société civile de par le monde. D’un côté ils nous dissimulent les actes et les motivations d’organisations comme le Hamas ou le Hezbollah, ce qui permet aux musulmans ennemis de la démocratie, en Occident, de nous (leurs alliés progressistes présumés) inviter à manifester avec eux sous des banderoles à la gloire du Hezbollah. De l’autre, ils encouragent les haines et les sentiments revanchards qui nourrissent l’appel au Jihad mondial. La température est montée de cinq degrés sur l’échelle du Jihad mondial quand les musulmans du monde entier ont vu avec horreur et indignation le spectacle de ces enfants morts que des médias avides et mal inspirés ont transmis et exploité. Richard Landes
Nous avons commis une terrible erreur, un texte malencontreux sur l’une de nos photos du jour du 18 avril dernier (à gauche), mal traduit de la légende, tout ce qu’il y a de plus circonstanciée, elle, que nous avait fournie l’AFP*: sur la « reconstitution », dans un camp de réfugiés au Liban, de l’arrestation par de faux militaires israéliens d’un Palestinien, nous avons omis d’indiquer qu’il s’agissait d’une mise en scène, que ces « soldats » jouaient un rôle et que tout ça relevait de la pure et simple propagande. C’est une faute – qu’atténuent à peine la précipitation et la mauvaise relecture qui l’ont provoquée. C’en serait une dans tous les cas, ça l’est plus encore dans celui-là: laisser planer la moindre ambiguïté sur un sujet aussi sensible, quand on sait que les images peuvent être utilisées comme des armes de guerre, donner du crédit à un stratagème aussi grossier, qui peut contribuer à alimenter l’exaspération antisioniste là où elle s’enflamme sans besoin de combustible, n’appelle aucun excuse. Nous avons déconné, gravement. J’ai déconné, gravement: je suis responsable du site de L’Express, et donc du dérapage. A ce titre, je fais amende honorable, la queue basse, auprès des internautes qui ont été abusés, de tous ceux que cette supercherie a pu blesser et de l’AFP, qui n’est EN AUCUN CAS comptable de nos propres bêtises. Eric Mettout (L’Express)
Comment expliquer qu’une légende en anglais qui dit clairement qu’il s’agit d’une mise en scène (la légende, en anglais, de la photo fournie par l’AFP: « LEBANON, AIN EL-HELWEH: Palestinian refugees pose as Israeli soldiers arresting and beating a Palestinian activist during celebrations of Prisoners’ Day at the refugee camp of Ain el-Helweh near the coastal Lebanese city of Sidon on April 17, 2012 in solidarity with the 4,700 Palestinian inmates of Israeli jails. Some 1,200 Palestinian prisoners held in Israeli jails have begun a hunger strike and another 2,300 are refusing food for one day, a spokeswoman for the Israel Prisons Service (IPS) said. »), soit devenue chez vous « Prisonnier palestinien 18/04/2012. Mardi, lors de la Journée des prisonniers, des centaines de détenus palestiniens ont entamé une grève de la faim pour protester contre leurs conditions de détention », étonnant non ? David Goldstein
On Friday, the Palestinian terror group Hamas, which controls the Gaza Strip, is inaugurating what it is calling “The March of Return.” According to Hamas’s leadership, the “March of Return” is scheduled to run from March 30 – the eve of Passover — through May 15, the 70th anniversary of Israel’s establishment. According to Israeli media reports, Hamas has budgeted $10 million for the operation. Throughout the “March of Return,” Hamas intends to send thousands of civilians to the Israeli border. Hamas is planning to set up tent camps along the border fence and then, presumably, order participants to overrun it on May 15. The Palestinians refer to May 15 as “Nakba,” or Catastrophe Day. (…) what is it trying to accomplish by sending them into harm’s way? Why is the terror group telling Gaza residents to place themselves in front of the border fence and challenge Israeli security forces charged with defending Israel? The answer here is also obvious. Hamas intends to provoke Israel to shoot at the Palestinian civilians it is sending to the border. It is setting its people up to die because it expects their deaths to be captured live by the cameras of the Western media, which will be on hand to watch the spectacle. In other words, Hamas’s strategy of harming Israel by forcing its soldiers to kill Palestinians is predicated on its certainty that the Western media will act as its partner and ensure the success of its lethal propaganda stunt. Given widespread assessments that Iran is keen to start a new round of war between Israel and its terror proxies, Hamas in Gaza and Hezbollah in Lebanon, it is possible that Hamas intends for this lethal propaganda stunt to be the initial stage of a larger war. By this assessment, Hamas is using the border operation to cultivate and escalate Western hostility against Israel ahead of a larger shooting war. (…) The real issue revealed by Hamas’s planned operation — as it was revealed by the Mavi Marmara, as well as by Hamas’s military campaigns against Israel in 2014, 2011 and 2008-09 —  is not how Israel will deal with it. The real issue is that Hamas’s entire strategy is predicated on its faith that the Western media and indeed the Western left will side with it against Israel. Hamas is certain that both the media and leftist activists and politicians in Europe and the U.S. will blame Israel for Palestinian civilian casualties. And as past experience proves, Hamas is right to believe the media and leftist activists will play their assigned role. So long as the media and the left rush to indict Israel for its efforts to defend itself and its citizens against its terrorist foes, who turn the laws of war on their head as a matter of course, these attacks will continue and they will escalate. If this border assault does in fact serve as the opening act in a larger terror war against Israel, then a large portion of the blame for the bloodshed will rest on the shoulders of the Western media for empowering the terrorists of Hamas and Hezbollah to attack Israel. Caroline Glick
Je pense que les Palestiniens et les Israéliens ont droit à leur propre terre. Mais nous devons obtenir un accord de paix pour garantir la stabilité de chacun et entretenir des relations normales. Prince héritier Mohammed ben Salmane
A set of photos, below, has been spreading all over social media in the past week. Sometimes, the photos are reposted individually. However, they all send the same message: Israel is supposedly deceiving the world into thinking their soldiers are getting wounded in Gaza by using special effects makeup. Closer analysis of these photos, however, shows that none of them are recent, most were not even taken in Israel, and all of them are taken out of context. France 24
The video turned out to be from an art workshop which creates this health exercise annually in Gaza. The goal of the workshop is to recreate child injuries sustained in warzones so that doctors can get familiar with them and learn how to care for injured children, the owner of the workshop, Abd al-Baset al-Loulou said. Al Arabya
Dix-huit morts et au moins 1 400 blessés. La « grande marche du retour », appelée vendredi par la société civile palestinienne et encadrée par le Hamas, le long de la barrière frontalière séparant la bande de Gaza et Israël, a dégénéré lorsque l’armée israélienne a tiré à balles réelles sur des manifestants qui s’approchaient du point de passage. (…) Famille, enfants, musique, fête, puis débordements habituels de jeunes lançant des cailloux à l’armée. Lorsque les émeutiers sont arrivés à quelques centaines de mètres de la fameuse grille, les snipers israéliens sont entrés en action. L’un des garçons, « armé » d’un pneu, a été abattu d’une balle dans la nuque alors qu’il s’enfuyait. (…) Ce mouvement, qui exige le « droit au retour » et la fin du blocus de Gaza, doit encore durer six semaines. C’est long. Le gouvernement israélien compte peut-être sur l’usure des protestataires, la fatigue, le renoncement, persuadé que quelques balles en plus pourraient faire la différence. A-t-il la mémoire courte ? Selon la Torah, Moïse avait 80 ans lorsqu’a commencé la traversée du désert. Ces quarante années d’errance douloureuse sont au coeur de tous les Juifs. Espérer qu’après soixante-dix ans d’exil les Palestiniens oublient leur histoire à coups de fusil est aussi absurde que ne pas faire la différence entre une balle de 5,56 et une pierre calcaire … Le Canard enchainé (Balles perdues, 04.04.2018)
Pro-Israel organization StandWithUs has resorted to claiming Palestinians are faking injuries to garner international sympathy and supported their claims by posting videos showing « Palestinians practicing for the cameras. » The Palestinians in the video were actually practicing how to evacuate the wounded during the protest… Telesur

C’est juste un entrainement à l’évacuation, imbécile !

A l’heure où devant le désintérêt croissant du Monde arabe ….

Le Hamas tente par une ultime mise en scène de faire oublier le fiasco toujours plus criant de leur régime  terroriste …

Et qu’entre deux leçons de théologie, nos belles âmes et médias en mal de contenu nous resservent le scénario réchauffé de la riposte disproportionnée d’Israël …

Alors que l’on redécouvre que nos anciens faussaires – certains ayant toujours pignon sur rue – n’avaient rien à envier à nos actuels Charles Enderlin

Retour sur la florissante industrie de fausses images palestinienne plus connue sous le nom de Pallywood …

After at least 20 were killed last Friday by Israeli forces, protesters ignited tires to create black smoke hoping to block visibility
Telesur
6 April 2018

At least four Palestinian protesters were killed, and over 200 have been wounded after Israeli troops opened fire on protesters along the Israel-Gaza border Friday. Five of the persons injured as thousands participated in the March of Return are said to be in critical condition according to medical officials.

The deaths in Friday’s protest follow 24 others, which took place in the first round of demonstrations last week, and add to the trend of severe violence from Israeli troops that led to over 1000 injuries over the same period. Thousands converged on Gaza’s border with Israel and set fire to mounds of tires, which were supposed to block the visibility of Israeli snipers and avoid more deaths, in the second week of demonstrations.

Israel’s violent response to peaceful protests has been heavily criticized over the last week. The United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights has urged troops to exercise restraint, these calls, however, haven’t been heeded.

Israeli officials have attempted to portray the use of deadly force and firearms as a necessary measure to prevent “terrorists” from infiltrating into Israel and to « protect its border. »

An Israeli military spokesman said Friday they “will not allow any breach of the security infrastructure and fence, which protects Israeli civilians.”

However, the U.N. has reminded the Israeli government that an attempt to cross the border fence does not amount to “threat to life or serious injury that would justify the use of live ammunition.”

The U.N. has also stressed Israel remains the occupying force in Gaza and has the « obligations to ensure that excessive force is not employed against protestors and that in the context of a military occupation, as in the case in Gaza, the unjustified and unlawful recourse to firearms by law enforcement resulting in death may amount to willful killing. »

Israeli Defence Minister Avigdor Lieberman told Israeli public radio Thursday that « if there are provocations, there will be a reaction of the harshest kind like last week, » showing no sign that his government would reconsider their strategy when responding to unarmed protesters.

Pro-Israel organization StandWithUs has resorted to claiming Palestinians are faking injuries to garner international sympathy and supported their claims by posting videos showing « Palestinians practicing for the cameras. » The Palestinians in the video were actually practicing how to evacuate the wounded during the protest.

Other claims advanced by Israeli authorities include accusing the political party Hamas, which Israel considers a terrorist organization, of being, behind the protests.

Asad Abu Sharekh, the spokesperson of the march, has countered the claim saying « the march is organized by refugees, doctors, lawyers, university students, Palestinian intellectuals, academics, civil society organizations and Palestinian families. »

Since March 30th, which marks Palestinian Land Day, thousands have set up several tent encampments within Gaza, some 65 kilometers away from the border.

The symbolic move is part of the Great March of Return which aims to demand the right of over 5 million Palestinian refugees to return to the lands from which they were expelled from after the formation of the state of Israel.

More than half of the 2 million Palestinians who live in Gaza under an over 10-year-long blockade are refugees.

Israel has denied Palestinian refugees this right because of what they call a “demographic threat.”

Voir aussi:

 

Voir par ailleurs:

Votre question

Checknews
Libération

Bonjour,

Dans un texte écrit en 1972, publié dans Rouge, l’hebdomadaire de la Ligue communiste révolutionnaire (LCR), Edwy Plenel a, en effet, appelé à «défendre inconditionnellement» les militants de l’organisation palestinienne Septembre Noir, qui venait alors d’assassiner onze membres de l’équipe olympique israélienne lors d’une prise d’otage pendant les Jeux Olympiques de Munich, qui ont eu lieu cette année-là. En ces termes :

« L’action de Septembre Noir a fait éclater la mascarade olympique, a bouleversé les arrangements à l’amiable que les réactionnaires arabes s’apprêtaient à conclure avec Israël (…) Aucun révolutionnaire ne peut se désolidariser de Septembre Noir. Nous devons défendre inconditionnellement face à la répression les militants de cette organisation (…) A Munich, la fin si tragique, selon les philistins de tous poils qui ne disent mot de l’assassinat des militants palestiniens, a été voulue et provoquée par les puissances impérialistes et particulièrement Israël. Il fut froidement décidé d’aller au carnage ».

Voilà plusieurs années que ces mots, signés Joseph Krasny, nom de plume de Plenel dans Rouge, sont connus. C’est en 2008 dans Enquête sur Edwy Plenel, écrit par le journaliste Laurent Huberson, qu’ils sont pour la première fois exhumés. Quasiment un chapitre est consacré à l’anticolonialisme, l’antiracisme, et l’antisionisme radical du jeune militant Plenel. C’est dans ces pages que sont retranscrites ces lignes.

 

Aujourd’hui, elles figurent en bonne place sur la page Wikipedia du journaliste.

Depuis plusieurs jours, ils refont pourtant surface sur Twitter, partagés la plupart du temps par des comptes proches de l’extrême droite. Ce 3 avril, Gilles-William Goldnadel, avocat, longtemps chroniqueur à Valeurs Actuelles, qui officie aujourd’hui sur C8 dans l’émission de Thierry Ardisson Les Terriens du Dimanche, a interpellé le co-fondateur de Mediapart sur Twitter : «Bonsoir Edwy Plenel, c’est pour une enquête de la France Libre [la webtélé de droite lancée par l’avocat début 2018]. Pourriez-vous s’il vous plaît confirmer ou infirmer les infos qui circulent selon lesquelles vous auriez sous l’alias de Krasny féliciter dans Rouge Septembre Noir ?».

« Ce texte exprime une position que je récuse fermement aujourd’hui »

Plenel n’a pas répondu à Goldnadel sur Twitter. Mais contacté par CheckNews, il a accepté de revenir, par ce mail, sur ce texte écrit en 1972.  En nous demandant de reproduire intégralement sa réponse, «car évidemment, cette campagne n’est pas dénuée d’arrière-pensées partisanes». Que pense donc le Plenel de 2018 des écrits de Krasny en 1972 ?

« Je n’ai jamais fait mystère de mes contributions à Rouge, de 1970 à 1978, sous le pseudonyme de Joseph Krasny. Ce texte, écrit il y a plus de 45 ans, dans un contexte tout autre et alors que j’avais 20 ans, exprime une position que je récuse fermement aujourd’hui. Elle n’avait rien d’exceptionnel dans l’extrême gauche de l’époque, comme en témoigne un article de Jean-Paul Sartre, le fondateur de Libération, sur Munich dans La Cause du peuple–J’accuse du 15 octobre 1972. Tout comme ce philosophe, j’ai toujours dénoncé et combattu l’antisémitisme d’où qu’il vienne et sans hésitation. Mais je refuse l’intimidation qui consiste à taxer d’antisémite toute critique de la politique de l’Etat d’Israël ».

On résume : le co-fondateur de Mediapart, sous le pseudo Joseph Krasny, a bien soutenu en 1972 l’action de l’organisation palestinienne Septembre Noir, qui venait alors d’assassiner onze athlètes israéliens lors des Jeux Olympiques de Munich. Cette chronique, exhumée en 2008 dans un livre critique sur Plenel, a refait surface ces derniers jours sur les réseaux sociaux. Contacté par CheckNews, Edwy Plenel, récuse fermement ce texte aujourd’hui qui, selon lui, n’avait rien d’exceptionnel dans l’extrême gauche de l’époque.

Bien cordialement,

Robin A.


Fusillade de Floride: Vous avez dit « fake news » ? (18 and counting: Guess who suffers in the end when gun control activists and the media inflate their school shootings statistics with suicides, accidents and adjacent or after-hours violent crime ?)

17 février, 2018

En Europe, depuis le Moyen Âge, le contrat social veut que la sécurité soit déléguée à l’État. La déclaration d’indépendance américaine a été motivée par la question des taxes, mais aussi sur le droit de porter des armes, que réprouvait l’Angleterre. Dans la conception américaine, ce n’est plus uniquement à l’État d’assurer la sécurité mais également aux citoyens eux-mêmes. Cette question est devenue la pierre angulaire de la vision sociétale des conservateurs libertariens, notamment depuis leur radicalisation dans les années 1980. C’est le modèle du Far West. Et qu’est-ce que le Far West, sinon un système où il n’y a pas d’État? Laurence Nardon (Ifri)
Je vais devenir un professionnel de la tuerie en milieu scolaire. Nikolas Cruz
Il s’agit de la 18e fusillade dans une école depuis le début de l’année aux Etats-Unis. Le Parisien
Depuis janvier 2013, il y a eu au moins 283 fusillades à travers tout le pays, ce qui revient à une fusillade en milieu scolaire par semaine.  Everytown for Gun Safety (fin janvier 2018)
C’est la 18ème fusillade dans un établissement scolaire américain depuis début janvier et la 291ème survenue au cours de ces cinq dernières années. France TVinfo
Depuis le début de l’année, 18 [fusillades meurtrières] ont été enregistrées dans les établissements scolaires américains. Parmi elles, sept se sont soldées par des blessés ou des morts, comme mercredi à Parkland, en Floride. Sept depuis le début de l’année, cela représente une par semaine. (…) L’ONG Everytown for gun safety répertorie les incidents liés aux armes à feux dans les écoles. Elle en relève 290 depuis 2013. (…) Dans 55% des cas, la fusillade entraîne des morts et des blessés et dans 24% des cas, elle ne fait aucune victime. Dans 4/5e des drames survenant dans les établissements scolaires donc, le tireur avait l’intention de nuire aux autres. Le reste regroupe les accidents et les suicides. (…) Le discours porté par le lobby des armes peut paraître, vu d’Europe, ubuesque. Il se résume bien souvent à réclamer davantage d’armes après chaque tuerie, estimant que si les personnes en avaient été munies, elles auraient été en capacité de se défendre, et donc de survivre. Un argument utilisé par Donald Trump, alors candidat à la primaire républicaine, lors des attentats de Paris en novembre 2015. Le Figaro
In the rest of the world, there have been 18 school shootings in the last twenty years. In the U.S., there have been 18 school shootings since January 1.  Jeff Greenfield
With the high school massacre in Parkland, Fla., several days gone but hardly forgotten, the time seems right to examine closely some of the statistical hype that made frightening news alongside details of the horrific shooting. In print and on TV, Americans were bombarded with facts and figures suggesting that the problem of school shootings was out of control. We were informed, for example, that since 2013 there has been an average of one school shooting a week in the U.S., and 18 since the beginning of this year. While these statistics were not exactly lies or fake news, they involved stretching the definition of a school shooting well beyond the limits of most people’s imagination. Everytown for Gun Safety reported that there have been 290 school shootings since the catastrophic massacre in Newtown, Conn., more than five years ago. However, very few of these were anything akin to Sandy Hook or Parkland. Sure, they all involved a school of some type (including technical schools and colleges) as well as a firearm, but the outcomes were hardly similar. Nearly half of the 290 were completed or attempted suicides, accidental discharges of a gun, or shootings with not a single individual being injured. Of the remainder, the vast majority involved either one fatality or none at all. It is easy to believe that school shootings are the “new normal” as has been intimated, or that we are facing a crisis of epidemic proportions. (…)For all those who believe that schools are under siege like never before, it is instructive to take a statistical road trip back in time. Since 1990, there have been 22 shootings at elementary and secondary schools in which two or more people were killed, not counting those perpetrators who committed suicide. Whereas five of these incidents have occurred over the past five-plus years since 2013, claiming the lives of 27 victims (17 at Parkland), the latter half of the 1990s witnessed seven multiple-fatality shootings with a total of 33 killed (13 at Columbine). In fact, the 1997-98 school year was so awful, with four multiple-fatality shooting sprees at the hands of armed students (in Pearl, Miss.; West Paducah, Ky.; Jonesboro, Ark.; and Springfield, Ore.), that then-President Clinton formed a White House expert committee to advise him. Nearly a decade later, President Bush convened a White House Conference on School Safety in the wake of multiple-fatality incidents during his administration. (…) Notwithstanding the occasional multiple-fatality shooting that takes place at one of the 100,000 public schools across America, the nation’s schools are safe. Over the past quarter-century, on average about 10 students are slain in school shootings annually. Compare the school fatality rate with the more than 100 school-age children accidentally killed each year riding their bikes or walking to school. Congress might be too timid to pass gun legislation to protect children, but how about a national bicycle helmet law for minors? Half of the states do not require them. There is no NRA — National Riding Association — opposing that. I’m all for shielding our kids from harm. But let’s at least deal with the low hanging fruit while we debate and Congress does nothing about the role of guns in school shootings. James Alan Fox
The law that barred the sale of assault weapons from 1994 to 2004 made little difference. It turns out that big, scary military rifles don’t kill the vast majority of the 11,000 Americans murdered with guns each year. Little handguns do. In 2012, only 322 people were murdered with any kind of rifle, F.B.I. data shows. The continuing focus on assault weapons stems from the media’s obsessive focus on mass shootings, which disproportionately involve weapons like the AR-15, a civilian version of the military M16 rifle. (…) This politically defined category of guns — a selection of rifles, shotguns and handguns with “military-style” features — only figured in about 2 percent of gun crimes nationwide before the ban. Handguns were used in more than 80 percent of gun murders each year, but gun control advocates had failed to interest enough of the public in a handgun ban. Handguns were the weapons most likely to kill you, but they were associated by the public with self-defense. (…) Still, the majority of Americans continued to support a ban on assault weapons. One reason: The use of these weapons may be rare over all, but they’re used frequently in the gun violence that gets the most media coverage, mass shootings. The criminologist James Alan Fox at Northeastern University estimates that there have been an average of 100 victims killed each year in mass shootings over the past three decades. That’s less than 1 percent of gun homicide victims. But these acts of violence in schools and movie theaters have come to define the problem of gun violence in America. Most Americans do not know that gun homicides have decreased by 49 percent since 1993 as violent crime also fell, though rates of gun homicide in the United States are still much higher than those in other developed nations. A Pew survey conducted after the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., found that 56 percent of Americans believed wrongly that the rate of gun crime was higher than it was 20 years ago. NYT
But what about all the other young black murder victims? Nationally, nearly half of all murder victims are black. And the overwhelming majority of those black people are killed by other black people. Where is the march for them? Where is the march against the drug dealers who prey on young black people? Where is the march against bad schools, with their 50% dropout rate for black teenaged boys? Those failed schools are certainly guilty of creating the shameful 40% unemployment rate for black teens? How about marching against the cable television shows constantly offering minstrel-show images of black youth as rappers and comedians who don’t value education, dismiss the importance of marriage, and celebrate killing people, drug money and jailhouse fashion—the pants falling down because the jail guard has taken away the belt, the shoes untied because the warden removed the shoe laces, and accessories such as the drug dealer’s pit bull. (…) There is no fashion, no thug attitude that should be an invitation to murder. But these are the real murderous forces surrounding the Martin death—and yet they never stir protests. The race-baiters argue this case deserves special attention because it fits the mold of white-on-black violence that fills the history books. Some have drawn a comparison to the murder of Emmett Till, a black boy who was killed in 1955 by white racists for whistling at a white woman. (…) While civil rights leaders have raised their voices to speak out against this one tragedy, few if any will do the same about the larger tragedy of daily carnage that is black-on-black crime in America. (…) Almost one half of the nation’s murder victims that year were black and a majority of them were between the ages of 17 and 29. Black people accounted for 13% of the total U.S. population in 2005. Yet they were the victims of 49% of all the nation’s murders. And 93% of black murder victims were killed by other black people, according to the same report. (…) The killing of any child is a tragedy. But where are the protests regarding the larger problems facing black America? Juan Williams
It’s sadly apparent that the United States of America is paralyzed with political indecision over something the State of Israel figured out more than 40 years ago: all schools should have mandated security features and active shooter protocols. The horrific scene in Parkland, and the upsetting videos broadcast from the school during the shooting, should be the final straw.  The kids should not have been hiding and screaming, they should have been in the midst of a pre-determined security protocol. (…) In 1974, Israel endured the Ma’alot Massacre in which “Palestinian” terrorists took 115 people hostage at Netiv Meir Elementary School.  Twenty-two children and three others were killed and 68 injured.  Israel now requires schools with 100 or more students to have a guard posted. The civilian police force handles the entire security system of all schools from kindergarten through college.  The Ministry of Education funds shelters and fences, reinforces school buses, and hires and trains guards. Guards don’t just stand around.  They check everyone entering, and engage threats. And yeah, they’ve got guns.The lawful purposes for carrying guns are very clear: protect school personnel and students, create a sense of security, deter the ill-intentioned, and provide self-defense. Common sense.   Except to the illogical dullards who claim that “adding guns to schools won’t fix anything” and are fixated on the NRA and the ridiculous notions that gun laws magically stop criminals and crazy people from obtaining one of the 300 million guns in our country. But more to the point, Israel’s Police Community & Civil Guard Department have a preventative care program that encourages safe behavior and offers violence protection strategies in normal situations.  Yet students are also trained in how to respond to an active shooter situation. Ben Goldstein, an American who made aliyah to Israel, and now serves as volunteer security and supporter of IDF soldiers, says America is behind the curve.  Nevertheless, he says, it doesn’t take much for students and teachers to protect themselves.“Barricade, barricade. Are desks movable?  Is the teacher’s desk movable?  Can they barricade inside of 20 seconds? If the shooter gets in, the kids should take whatever they’ve got and attack.  They can’t just sit there frozen or they will die.  America does earthquake drills, why not active shooter drills?   More kids have been killed by shooters than earthquakes.” Barricading works, says Goldstein.In an active shooter situation, where a gunman is roaming a campus, five minutes is a lifetime, enough time for law enforcement to get to the scene.  “In those five minutes, the shooter will have to move from class to class, reload, clear malfunctions, all that stuff takes time.  And during gunfire lulls, kids must be taught to do something.  Don’t freeze.Moving once gets you out of that deer-in-headlights space. Take command of the classroom.” (…) Gun control debates are a distraction and impractical, and criminals ignore laws anyway.Crazy people are obviously not being dealt with properly – students at Parkland even predicted this would happen. (…) Instead of handing out participation trophies, let’s make our kids into the self-reliant, pro-active defenders of themselves and others. Lawrence Meyers
Un utilisateur de la plateforme de vidéos YouTube avait alerté le FBI l’an passé après avoir visionné un message posté par Nikolas Cruz, patronyme utilisé par le principal suspect de la fusillade de Parkland, qui a fait 17 morts. Dans ce dernier, le tireur menaçait explicitement sa volonté de commettre une fusillade dans un lycée. « Je vais devenir un professionnel de la tuerie en milieu scolaire », avait écrit en commentaire d’une vidéo un abonné qui se faisait appeler Nikolas Cruz. (…) « Quand j’ai vu le commentaire dans mes notifications […], ça a attiré mon attention. J’en ai donc fait une capture d’écran que j’ai envoyée au FBI », a expliqué jeudi Ben Bennight, un utilisateur YouTube, à CNN.La police fédérale américaine a confirmé avoir reçu un signalement concernant ce commentaire en septembre 2017. « Le FBI a procédé à des recherches dans des bases de données, mais n’a pas été capable d’identifier avec plus de précisions la personne qui a posté ce commentaire », a déclaré l’agence dans un communiqué. Ben Bennight a expliqué au site BuzzFeed News qu’au lendemain de sa signalisation, des agents du FBI se sont rendus à son bureau pour lui demander s’il possédait plus d’informations sur l’utilisateur qui avait publié ce commentaire. Ouest France
La police fédérale américaine a reconnu ce vendredi ne pas avoir pris les mesures qui s’imposaient après avoir été avertie en janvier de la dangerosité potentielle de Nikolas Cruz, l’homme qui a tué mercredi 17 personnes dans un lycée de Floride. Le FBI a précisé avoir reçu un appel d’un proche de M. Cruz, qui a décrit le comportement déviant du jeune homme de 19 ans et son intention de tuer des personnes. Cette information « aurait dû être traitée comme une menace potentielle » et « la procédure en vigueur n’a pas été respectée », a ajouté le FBI. Un utilisateur YouTube confiait jeudi à BuzzFeed avoir lui aussi signalé le tireur aux autorités. Il avait repéré sur la plateforme de vidéos en ligne un commentaire explicite du jeune homme de 19 ans qui assurait vouloir commettre une fusillade dans un lycée. L’informateur, qui n’a pas été identifié, a également livré au téléphone des détails sur le fait que Cruz était armé et qu’il publiait des messages menaçants sur les réseaux sociaux. Ouest France
No, there have not been 18 school shootings already this year, as CNBC, Politico, The Washington Post, ABC, The (New York) Daily News and briefly a USA TODAY column all reported in the hours since a 19-year-old allegedly slaughtered 17 at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, Fla., on Ash Wednesday. Fake stats like that make finding a solution to the real problem of gun violence, which has actually struck American schools at least six times this year, that much harder. Amping up fears, and muddying the search for fixes that can cut back the senseless violence, only undermines efforts to reconcile the real concerns of parents and the legitimate desire of civil rights advocates to protect the Bill of Rights. Everytown for Gun Safety, the gun-control advocacy group responsible for spreading this bogus statistic, should be ashamed of its blatant dishonesty. When parents hear the words “school shooting,” their hearts freeze and their heads fill with images of Sandy Hook: dead and dying grade-schoolers, broken and bleeding in a classroom, helpless teachers crying over their charges and slain colleagues as a black-clad killer switches magazines in his AR-15. That’s mostly not what Everytown is talking about. (…) By Everytown’s criteria, nobody has to be injured and the “shooting” doesn’t actually have to take place on campus, though it does have to be heard on campus or a bullet has to hit somewhere on campus. David Mastio (USA Today)
A tweet by Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) including the claim had been liked more than 45,000 times by Thursday evening, and one from political analyst Jeff Greenfield had cracked 126,000. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio tweeted it, too, as did performers Cher and Alexander William and actors Misha Collins and Albert Brooks. News organizations — including MSNBC, ABC News, NBC News, CBS News, Time, MSN, the BBC, the New York Daily News and HuffPost — also used the number in their coverage. By Wednesday night, the top suggested search after typing “18” into Google was “18 school shootings in 2018.” (…) Everytown has long inflated its total by including incidents of gunfire that are not really school shootings. Take, for example, what it counted as the year’s first: On the afternoon of Jan. 3, a 31-year-old man who had parked outside a Michigan elementary school called police to say he was armed and suicidal. Several hours later, he killed himself. The school, however, had been closed for seven months. There were no teachers. There were no students. Also listed on the organization’s site is an incident from Jan. 20, when at 1 a.m. a man was shot at a sorority event on the campus of Wake Forest University. A week later, as a basketball game was being played at a Michigan high school, someone fired several rounds from a gun in the parking lot. No one was injured, and it was past 8 p.m., well after classes had ended for the day, but Everytown still labeled it a school shooting. (…) Sarah Tofte, Everytown’s research director, calls the definition “crystal clear,” noting that “every time a gun is discharged on school grounds it shatters the sense of safety” for students, parents and the community. (…) After The Washington Post published this report, Everytown removed the Jan. 3 suicide outside the closed Michigan school. The figures matter because gun-control activists use them as evidence in their fight for bans on assault weapons, stricter background checks and other legislation. Gun rights groups seize on the faults in the data to undermine those arguments and, similarly, present skewed figures of their own. (…) Just five of Everytown’s 18 school shootings listed for 2018 happened during school hours and resulted in any physical injury. Three others appeared to be intentional shootings but did not hurt anyone. Two more involved guns — one carried by a school police officer and the other by a licensed peace officer who ran a college club — that were unintentionally fired and, again, led to no injuries. At least seven of Everytown’s 18 shootings took place outside normal school hours. (…) A month ago, for example, a group of college students were at a meeting of a criminal-justice club in Texas when a student accidentally fired a real gun, rather than a training weapon. The bullet went through a wall, then a window. Though no one was hurt, it left the student distraught. Is that a school shooting, though? Yes, Everytown says. “Since 2013,” the organization says on its website, “there have been nearly 300 school shootings in America — an average of about one a week.” But since Everytown began its tracking, it has included these dubious examples — in August 2013, a man shot on a Tennessee high school’s property at 2 a.m.; in December 2014, a man shot in his car late one night and discovered the next day in a Pennsylvania elementary school’s parking lot; in August 2015, a man who climbed atop the roof of an empty Texas school on a Sunday morning and fired sporadically; in January 2016, a man in an Indiana high school parking lot whose gun accidentally went off in his glove box, before any students had arrived on campus; in December 2017, two teens in Washington state who shot up a high school just before midnight on New Year’s Eve, when the building was otherwise empty. (…) About 6 p.m. Jan. 10, a bullet probably fired from off campus hit the window of a building at a college in Southern California. No one was hurt, but students could still have been frightened. Classes were canceled, rooms were locked down and police searched campus for the gunman, who was never found. On Feb. 5, a police officer was sitting on a bench in a Minnesota school gym when a third-grader accidentally pulled the trigger of his holstered pistol, firing a round into the floor. None of the four students in the gym were injured, but, again, the incident was probably scary. Washington Post
The original source of the figure is Mike Bloomberg’s gun-control advocacy organization, Everytown for Gun Safety. The organization arrives at the figure by defining a “school shooting” as any time a gun is fired at or near a school, college, or university, regardless of whether students are present or anyone is injured. In fact, if one counts only events where a shooter enters a school and shoots someone, there have been three school shootings, including yesterday’s. (The other spree shooting was in Kentucky and a murder happened at a school in Texas.)  (…) Everytown’s list includes incidents such as an adult committing suicide in the parking lot of a school that had long been closed down and gun violence in the neighborhood where California State University–San Bernardino is located (it is one of the most crime-ridden cities in the country, with California’s second-highest murder rate.) While such acts are obviously cause for concern in their own right, all that conflating these incidents with “school shootings” does is to create a climate of terror. Suicide and violent crime are very real social problems, but they are not the same thing as school shootings. Yesterday’s events are horrific enough on their own. There’s no need to amplify them by manipulating the public with falsehoods. National Review
On the U.S. part of his claim, Greenfield told us his 18 school shootings in 2018 comes from the Everytown for Gun Safety Support Fund, as reported by ABC News. We found that in the immediate aftermath of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, Politico, TIME, CNBC and other national media also reported on Everytown’s 18 figure. In addition, the New York Daily News claimed 18 school shootings, listing the same incidents as Everytown, and HuffPost reported 18, too. But (…) when we asked Greenfield for information to back up his claim, he noted to us in his email that the Everytown group’s count « conflates very different incidents, from the harmless to the deadly. » (…) Everytown, an advocacy group co-founded by former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg that seeks to prevent gun violence, uses a broad definition of school shooting — that is, any time a firearm discharges a live round inside a school building, or on a school campus or grounds. Its database includes incidents when no one was injured; attempted or completed suicide, with no intent to injure others; and cases when a gun was fired unintentionally, resulting in injury or death. The list also includes incidents on college campuses. [and] counts shooting incidents that are dramatically different than what happened in Florida (…) 18 incidents in which a gun was fired inside a school or on school property. Three — Italy, Texas, Kentucky and Florida — were mass shootings. But of the other shootings: Nine involved no deaths and no gunshot injuries. Two were suicides, with no other injuries (including the one at the closed school). Three were unintentional (although one caused injuries). (…) as for the other part of Greenfield’s claim — that there have been only 18 school shootings in the rest of the world over the past 20 years — Greenfield told us he couldn’t recall the source of that information, adding, « yes, I cop to insufficient research. » (…) About 24 hours after posting the tweet, Greenfield took it down. PolitiFact

Attention: une « fake news » peut en cacher une autre !

Fusillades de masse avec victimes (3), coups de feu sans victimes (9), tirs accidentels avec victimes (1), tirs accidentels sans victimes (3, y compris hors des classes ou des heures de cours), suicides ou tentatives sans intention de faire d’autres victimes (2 dont celui d’un adulte dans le parking d’une école désaffectée depuis plus de six mois) …

Alors qu’avec une nouvelle fusillade de lycée américaine …

Nos médias et nos belles âmes repartent comme un seul homme  …

Entre deux dénonciations des « fake news » du président Donald Trump …

Dans leur sempiternelle condamnation d’un « Far west » américain …

Qui arbre cachant commodément la véritable forêt de la violence entre noirs

Aurait fait en 45 jours pas moins de 18 attaques du même type …

Pendant que, sans compter la question de l’entrée dans un établissement scolaire d’un tueur porteur d’un sac bourré d’armes et de munitions, se confirme la défaillance d’un FBI

Qui apparemment trop occupé par la prétendue collusion du président avec la Russie …

N’avait même pas pris la peine d’investiguer sérieusement le signalement d’un jeune …

Qui annonçait sur Facebook l’an dernier sa vocation de « professionnel de la tuerie en milieu scolaire »

Devinez ce qu’inclut ce fameux chiffre de 18 fusillades dans les établissements scolaires américains depuis le début de l’année ?

Mostly False: 18 U.S. school shootings so far in 2018 and 18 in rest of the world over past 20 years

Amid the early news reports about a Florida school shooting that left 17 dead on Feb. 14, 2018, longtime network TV journalist and author Jeff Greenfield declared in a tweet:

In the rest of the world, there have been 18 school shootings in the last twenty years. In the U.S., there have been 18 school shootings since January 1.

It’s a provocative claim that drew more the 130,000 likes on Twitter.

Greenfield, a University of Wisconsin-Madison graduate, may be on the right track generally in contrasting how much gun violence there is in America compared to the rest of the world.

But as for his specific claim, he leaves a misleading impression with the U.S. part and lacks evidence for the part about the rest of the world.

U.S. school shootings

On the U.S. part of his claim, Greenfield told us his 18 school shootings in 2018 comes from the Everytown for Gun Safety Support Fund, as reported by ABC News.

We found that in the immediate aftermath of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, Politico, TIME, CNBC and other national media also reported on Everytown’s 18 figure. In addition, the New York Daily News claimed 18 school shootings, listing the same incidents as Everytown, and HuffPost reported 18, too.

But there are some major caveats to that figure.

Indeed, when we asked Greenfield for information to back up his claim, he noted to us in his email that the Everytown group’s count « conflates very different incidents, from the harmless to the deadly. »

As PolitiFact National has reported, Everytown, an advocacy group co-founded by former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg that seeks to prevent gun violence, uses a broad definition of school shooting — that is, any time a firearm discharges a live round inside a school building, or on a school campus or grounds. Its database includes incidents when no one was injured; attempted or completed suicide, with no intent to injure others; and cases when a gun was fired unintentionally, resulting in injury or death. The list also includes incidents on college campuses.

As we’ll see, Everytown counts shooting incidents that are dramatically different than what happened in Florida:

2018 U.S. school shootings as counted by Everytown

Date Place Details
Jan. 3 East Olive Elementary, St. Johns, Mich. Man committed suicide in parking lot. No other injuries.

(We found the building was not being used as a school, as East Olive had been shut down more than six months earlier.)

Jan. 4 New Start High, Seattle Unidentified shooter fired shots into building. No injuries.
Jan. 10 Grayson College, Denison, Texas Student unintentionally fired a bullet from gun legally possessed by an instructor that struck a wall. No injuries.
Jan. 10 Coronado Elementary, Sierra Vista, Ariz. Student committed suicide in bathroom. No other injuries.
Jan. 10 California State University, San Bernardino Gunshots, most likely fired from off campus, hit a campus building window. No injuries.
Jan. 15 Wiley College, Marshall, Texas Shots fired from car in parking lot, with one shot hitting window of residence hall. No injuries.
Jan. 20 Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, N.C. One student wounds another student during argument at sorority party.
Jan. 22 Italy High, Italy, Texas Student opens fire in cafeteria, wounding one student before firing at another student and missing.
Jan. 22 NET Charter High, Gentilly, La. Unknown person fired shots at students standing in parking lot. No injuries from gunshots.
Jan. 23 Marshall County High, Benton, Ky. 2 students left dead in mass shooting by student. More than a dozen students injured.
Jan. 25 Murphy High, Mobile, Ala. Student fired into the air outside school after argument in school. No injuries.
Jan. 26 Dearborn High, Dearborn, Mich. Individual ejected from game for fighting was shot at in parking lot. No injuries.
Jan. 31 Lincoln High, Philadelphia Man fatally wounded in fight in parking lot.
Feb. 1 Salvador B. Castro Middle, Los Angeles Student unintentionally fires gun in classroom, wounds two students.
Feb. 5 Oxon Hill High, Oxon Hill, Md. Student wounded in parking lot during apparent robbery.
Feb. 5 Harmony Learning K-12, Maplewood, Minn. Student pressed trigger on school liaison officer’s gun. No injuries.
Feb. 8 Metropolitan High, New York, N.Y. Student fired gun into floor in classroom. No injuries.
Feb. 14 Stoneman Douglas High, Parkland, Fla. Ex-student allegedly commits mass shooting; 17 deaths.

So, there are 18 incidents in which a gun was fired inside a school or on school property.

Three — Italy, Texas, Kentucky and Florida — were mass shootings.

But of the other shootings:

  • Nine involved no deaths and no gunshot injuries.
  • Two were suicides, with no other injuries (including the one at the closed school).
  • Three were unintentional (although one caused injuries).

Rest of the world

As PolitiFact National has noted, mass shootings do happen in other countries. But they do not happen with the same frequency as in the United States.

Two researchers — Jaclyn Schildkraut of the State University of New York in Oswego and H. Jaymi Elsass of Texas State University — analyzed mass shootings in 11 countries, covering the period from 2000-14. Aside from the United States, they looked at Australia, Canada, China, England, Finland, France, Germany, Mexico, Norway and Switzerland.

The United States had more mass shootings — and more people cumulatively killed or injured — than the other 10 nations combined, according to their research. While part of this is because the United States has a much bigger population than all but China, the difference can’t be explained by skewed population numbers alone.

But as for the other part of Greenfield’s claim — that there have been only 18 school shootings in the rest of the world over the past 20 years — Greenfield told us he couldn’t recall the source of that information, adding, « yes, I cop to insufficient research. »

Mark Bryant, executive director of the Gun Violence Archive (which the New York Times uses to track school shooting data), told us the 18-shootings figure could be correct in terms of how many mass shootings occur in schools outside of the United States that get widespread news coverage.

But Bryant said there is no way to know — based on the definition of school shootings that Greenfield relies on — how many such shootings occur around the globe.

About 24 hours after posting the tweet, Greenfield took it down.

Our rating

In the wake of a Florida school shooting that left 17 people dead, Greenfield said: « In the rest of the world, there have been 18 school shootings in the last twenty years. In the U.S., there have been 18 school shootings since January 1. »

By one count widely cited in the news media, there have been 18 incidents in which shots were fired inside or outside of a school or university building in the United States so far in 2018. But only three involved a mass shooting. And the count includes two suicides, three accidental shootings and nine incidents in which there were no fatalities or injuries.

As for the rest of the world, Greenfield had no evidence to back up that part of his claim. And an expert relied on by the New York Times for gun violence statistics told us there is no way to know how many school shootings — using the definition Greenfield relies on — have occurred outside of the United States over the past 20 years.

For a statement that contains only an element of truth, our rating is Mostly False.

Voir aussi:

There Were Three School Shootings This Year, Not 18. That’s Still Too Many.

Jibran Khan

National review

February 15, 2018

Any number of school shootings is too many. And, at this time when we are so rightly hurting at yesterday’s brutality in Parkland, Fla., a sensationalist report has gone viral, claiming that there have been 18 such acts this year alone. The factoid has been promoted by countless major media and political figures, as well as by celebrities. Indeed, such a number would mean an unprecedented crisis. But it’s not true. The original source of the figure is Mike Bloomberg’s gun-control advocacy organization, Everytown for Gun Safety. The organization arrives at the figure by defining a “school shooting” as any time a gun is fired at or near a school, college, or university, regardless of whether students are present or anyone is injured. In fact, if one counts only events where a shooter enters a school and shoots someone, there have been three school shootings, including yesterday’s. (The other spree shooting was in Kentucky and a murder happened at a school in Texas.) This information is viewable on Everytown’s site itself, as a click on any location reveals the details and news sources of the incident in question. Everytown’s list includes incidents such as an adult committing suicide in the parking lot of a school that had long been closed down and gun violence in the neighborhood where California State University–San Bernardino is located (it is one of the most crime-ridden cities in the country, with California’s second-highest murder rate.) While such acts are obviously cause for concern in their own right, all that conflating these incidents with “school shootings” does is to create a climate of terror. Suicide and violent crime are very real social problems, but they are not the same thing as school shootings. Yesterday’s events are horrific enough on their own. There’s no need to amplify them by manipulating the public with falsehoods.

Voir également:

No, there haven’t been 18 school shootings in 2018. That number is flat wrong.
John Woodrow Cox and Steven Rich

Washington Post

February 15, 2018

The stunning number swept across the Internet within minutes of the news Wednesday that, yet again, another young man with another semiautomatic rifle had rampaged through a school, this time at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High in South Florida.

The figure originated with Everytown for Gun Safety, a nonprofit group, co-founded by Michael Bloomberg, that works to prevent gun violence and is most famous for its running tally of school shootings.

“This,” the organization tweeted at 4:22 p.m. Wednesday, “is the 18th school shooting in the U.S. in 2018.”

A tweet by Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) including the claim had been liked more than 45,000 times by Thursday evening, and one from political analyst Jeff Greenfield had cracked 126,000. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio tweeted it, too, as did performers Cher and Alexander William and actors Misha Collins and Albert Brooks. News organizations — including MSNBC, ABC News, NBC News, CBS News, Time, MSN, the BBC, the New York Daily News and HuffPost — also used the number in their coverage. By Wednesday night, the top suggested search after typing “18” into Google was “18 school shootings in 2018.”

It is a horrifying statistic. And it is wrong.

At least 17 people were killed in a shooting at a high school in Parkland, Fla., on Feb. 14. According to officials, this is how and when the events occurred. (Melissa Macaya, Patrick Martin/The Washington Post)

Everytown has long inflated its total by including incidents of gunfire that are not really school shootings. Take, for example, what it counted as the year’s first: On the afternoon of Jan. 3, a 31-year-old man who had parked outside a Michigan elementary school called police to say he was armed and suicidal. Several hours later, he killed himself. The school, however, had been closed for seven months. There were no teachers. There were no students.

Also listed on the organization’s site is an incident from Jan. 20, when at 1 a.m. a man was shot at a sorority event on the campus of Wake Forest University. A week later, as a basketball game was being played at a Michigan high school, someone fired several rounds from a gun in the parking lot. No one was injured, and it was past 8 p.m., well after classes had ended for the day, but Everytown still labeled it a school shooting.

Everytown explains on its website that it defines a school shooting as “any time a firearm discharges a live round inside a school building or on a school campus or grounds.”

Sarah Tofte, Everytown’s research director, calls the definition “crystal clear,” noting that “every time a gun is discharged on school grounds it shatters the sense of safety” for students, parents and the community.

She said she and her colleagues work to reiterate those parameters in their public messaging. But the organization’s tweets and Facebook posts seldom include that nuance. Just once in 2018, on Feb. 2, has the organization clearly explained its definition on Twitter. And Everytown rarely pushes its jarring totals on social media immediately after the more questionable shootings, as it does with those that are high-profile and undeniable, such as the Florida massacre or one from last month in Kentucky that left two students dead and at least 18 people injured.

After The Washington Post published this report, Everytown removed the Jan. 3 suicide outside the closed Michigan school.

The figures matter because gun-control activists use them as evidence in their fight for bans on assault weapons, stricter background checks and other legislation. Gun rights groups seize on the faults in the data to undermine those arguments and, similarly, present skewed figures of their own.

Gun violence is a crisis in the United States, especially for children, and a huge number — one that needs no exaggeration — have been affected by school shootings. An ongoing Washington Post analysis has found that more than 150,000 students attending at least 170 primary or secondary schools have experienced a shooting on campus since the Columbine High School massacre in 1999. That figure, which comes from a review of online archives, state and federal enrollment figures and news stories, is a conservative calculation and does not include dozens of suicides, accidents and after-school assaults that have also exposed youths to gunfire.

Just five of Everytown’s 18 school shootings listed for 2018 happened during school hours and resulted in any physical injury. Three others appeared to be intentional shootings but did not hurt anyone. Two more involved guns — one carried by a school police officer and the other by a licensed peace officer who ran a college club — that were unintentionally fired and, again, led to no injuries. At least seven of Everytown’s 18 shootings took place outside normal school hours.

Shootings of any kind, of course, can be traumatic, regardless of whether they cause physical harm.

A month ago, for example, a group of college students were at a meeting of a criminal-justice club in Texas when a student accidentally fired a real gun, rather than a training weapon. The bullet went through a wall, then a window. Though no one was hurt, it left the student distraught.

Is that a school shooting, though? Yes, Everytown says.

“Since 2013,” the organization says on its website, “there have been nearly 300 school shootings in America — an average of about one a week.”

But since Everytown began its tracking, it has included these dubious examples — in August 2013, a man shot on a Tennessee high school’s property at 2 a.m.; in December 2014, a man shot in his car late one night and discovered the next day in a Pennsylvania elementary school’s parking lot; in August 2015, a man who climbed atop the roof of an empty Texas school on a Sunday morning and fired sporadically; in January 2016, a man in an Indiana high school parking lot whose gun accidentally went off in his glove box, before any students had arrived on campus; in December 2017, two teens in Washington state who shot up a high school just before midnight on New Year’s Eve, when the building was otherwise empty.

In 2015, The Post’s Fact Checker awarded the group’s figures — invoked by Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) — four Pinocchios for misleading methodology.

Another database, the Gun Violence Archive, defines school shootings in much narrower terms, considering only those that take place during school hours or extracurricular activities.

Yet many journalists rely on Everytown’s data. Post media critic Erik Wemple included the 18 figure in a column Wednesday night, and Michael Barbaro, host of the New York Times’ podcast “The Daily,” used the number to punctuate the end of his Thursday show.

Much like trying to define a mass shooting, deciding what is and is not a school shooting can be difficult. Some obviously fit the common-sense definition: Last month, a teen in Texas opened fire in a school cafeteria, injuring a 15-year-old girl.

Others that Everytown includes on its list, though, are trickier to categorize.

About 6 p.m. Jan. 10, a bullet probably fired from off campus hit the window of a building at a college in Southern California. No one was hurt, but students could still have been frightened. Classes were canceled, rooms were locked down and police searched campus for the gunman, who was never found.

On Feb. 5, a police officer was sitting on a bench in a Minnesota school gym when a third-grader accidentally pulled the trigger of his holstered pistol, firing a round into the floor. None of the four students in the gym were injured, but, again, the incident was probably scary.

What is not in dispute is gun violence’s pervasiveness and its devastating impact on children. A recent study of World Health Organization data published in the American Journal of Medicine that found that, among high-income nations, 91 percent of children younger than 15 who were killed by bullets lived in the United States.

And the trends are only growing more dire.

On average, two dozen children are shot every day in the United States, and in 2016 more youths were killed by gunfire — 1,637 — than during any previous year this millennium.

Voir de même:

No, there have not been 18 school shootings already this year

Amping up fears only undermines efforts to reconcile parents and civil rights advocates who want to protect the Bill of Rights.

David Mastio

USA TODAY

Feb. 16, 2018

No, there have not been 18 school shootings already this year, as CNBC, Politico, The Washington Post, ABC, The (New York) Daily News and briefly a USA TODAY column all reported in the hours since a 19-year-old allegedly slaughtered 17 at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, Fla., on Ash Wednesday.

Fake stats like that make finding a solution to the real problem of gun violence, which has actually struck American schools at least six times this year, that much harder. Amping up fears, and muddying the search for fixes that can cut back the senseless violence, only undermines efforts to reconcile the real concerns of parents and the legitimate desire of civil rights advocates to protect the Bill of Rights.

Everytown for Gun Safety, the gun-control advocacy group responsible for spreading this bogus statistic, should be ashamed of its blatant dishonesty. When parents hear the words “school shooting,” their hearts freeze and their heads fill with images of Sandy Hook: dead and dying grade-schoolers, broken and bleeding in a classroom, helpless teachers crying over their charges and slain colleagues as a black-clad killer switches magazines in his AR-15.

That’s mostly not what Everytown is talking about. At least when The Washington Post reported Everytown’s propaganda, it included some important caveats:

“That data point … includes any discharge of a firearm at a school — including accidents — as a ‘shooting.’ It also includes incidents that happened to take place at a school, whether students were involved or not.”

The Post should have kept including caveats. By Everytown’s criteria, nobody has to be injured and the “shooting” doesn’t actually have to take place on campus, though it does have to be heard on campus or a bullet has to hit somewhere on campus.

Some examples:

►On Jan. 3, a 31-year-old “military veteran who suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder, a traumatic brain injury and depression” shot himself in a school parking lot after he called police to report he was suicidal, according to the Lansing (Mich.) State Journal, part of the USA TODAY Network. (Everytown removed this instance from their report after The Post found that the school had been closed down for months.)

►On Jan. 10, in Denison, Texas, at Grayson College Criminal Justice Center, a student mistook a real firearm belonging to an officer, who was authorized to carry the weapon, for a practice weapon and fired it into a wall. No one was killed or injured.

►On Feb. 5, in Maplewood, Minn., a third-grader pulled the trigger on a police gun while the officer was sitting on a bench. No one was killed or injured.

In eight of the 18 cases originally counted by Everytown, no one was injured or killed. Two were suicides.

Voir encore:

INFOGRAPHIES – Un certain fatalisme s’installe face à la récurrence de ces tragiques événements et l’impossibilité de changer la loi.

Barack Obama le déplorait lorsqu’il était encore président. Les fusillades meurtrières sont devenues une «routine». Depuis le début de l’année, 18 ont été enregistrées dans les établissements scolaires américains. Parmi elles, sept se sont soldées par des blessées ou des morts, comme mercredi à Parkland, en Floride. Sept depuis le début de l’année, cela représente une par semaine.

Un certain fatalisme s’est emparé d’une partie des Américains. Si la tuerie survenue mercredi fait bien la une de tous les grands sites d’information, les médias consacrent globalement moins de place à ce type d’événements que par le passé. Et ce malgré le bilan dramatique de 17 morts à Parkland.

Un rapport du FBI portant sur les fusillades de masse, établi sur 160 incidents étalés entre 2000 et 2013, montre que près d’un quart se déroule dans l’environnement scolaire. Et la tendance est à l’augmentation. L’agent qui l’a rédigée affichait il y a peu son pessimisme dans les colonnes du New York Times : «Nous sommes devenus insensibles à ce genre de fusillades, et je pense que cela continuera […] À chaque fois qu’on tire dans une école, on réagit de manière viscérale. Mais au fond, je ne pense pas que la société n’aborde la question des fusillades plus sérieusement qu’avant, et c’est un tort.»

290 fusillades dans les écoles depuis 2013

L’ONG Everytown for gun safety répertorie les incidents liés aux armes à feux dans les écoles. Elle en relève 290 depuis 2013. En reprenant ces chiffres année par année, on constate une progression assez claire. Le début de l’année 2018 laisse craindre que cette hausse ne sera pas enrayée.

Dans 55% des cas, la fusillade entraîne des morts et des blessés et dans 24% des cas, elle ne fait aucune victime. Dans 4/5e des drames survenant dans les établissements scolaires donc, le tireur avait l’intention de nuire aux autres. Le reste regroupe les accidents et les suicides.

En détaillant ces chiffres par zone géographique, on se rend compte, sans surprise, que le Texas ou la Floride, États particulièrement laxistes sur la législation des armes à feu, occupent la tête du triste classement. On sait en effet qu’il existe une corrélation entre contrôle des armes à feu et nombre de morts.

Cette progression inquiétante du nombre de fusillades à l’école, associée au manque de volonté politique de faire changer les choses, induit cette banalisation et ce fatalisme face aux drames qui se répètent. Pendant son deuxième mandat, Barack Obama avait reconnu son impuissance face au lobby des armes, la NRA, estimant même que ce blocage serait la plus grande frustration de sa présidence. Cette résignation fataliste, qui gagne surtout les partisans d’une meilleure régulation, pourrait s’illustrer par ce dessin de presse:Le discours porté par le lobby des armes peut paraître, vu d’Europe, ubuesque. Il se résume bien souvent à réclamer davantage d’armes après chaque tuerie, estimant que si les personnes en avaient été munies, elles auraient été en capacité de se défendre, et donc de survivre. Un argument utilisé par Donald Trump, alors candidat à la primaire républicaine, lors des attentats de Paris en novembre 2015. Un autre dessin circulant sur les réseaux sociaux, émis par le lobby des armes, résume bien cette pensée:

Laurence Nardon, responsable du programme Amérique du Nord à l’Ifri, rappelle que la question relative aux armes est inhérente à l’histoire américaine. «En Europe, depuis le Moyen Âge, le contrat social veut que la sécurité soit déléguée à l’État. La déclaration d’indépendance américaine a été motivée par la question des taxes, mais aussi sur le droit de porter des armes, que réprouvait l’Angleterre. Dans la conception américaine, ce n’est plus uniquement à l’État d’assurer la sécurité mais également aux citoyens eux-mêmes. Cette question est devenue la pierre angulaire de la vision sociétale des conservateurs libertariens, notamment depuis leur radicalisation dans les années 1980. C’est le modèle du Far West. Et qu’est-ce que le Far West, sinon un système où il n’y a pas d’État?»

Actuellement, les États-Unis sont confrontés à une période de dérégulation très forte du droit de port d’arme, notamment à cause de l’influence de la NRA au Congrès. Tout n’est cependant pas gravé dans le marbre. Laurence Nardon rappelle que durant certaines périodes, la régulation des armes a été bien plus forte aux États-Unis qu’elle ne l’est aujourd’hui. Souvent à cause de tragiques événements: dans les années 1930 suite à la prohibition et à la volonté de contrôler la mafia, dans les années 1970 après plusieurs assassinats politiques ou encore dans les années 1990, à la suite de l’attentat contre Ronald Reagan. La chercheuse juge toutefois peu probable une inflexion de l’actuelle politique avant une trentaine d’années.

Voir de plus:

Un utilisateur de la plateforme de vidéos YouTube avait alerté le FBI l’an passé après avoir visionné un message posté par Nikolas Cruz, patronyme utilisé par le principal suspect de la fusillade de Parkland, qui a fait 17 morts. Dans ce dernier, le tireur menaçait explicitement sa volonté de commettre une fusillade dans un lycée.

« Je vais devenir un professionnel de la tuerie en milieu scolaire », avait écrit en commentaire d’une vidéo un abonné qui se faisait appeler Nikolas Cruz.

Il s’agirait du jeune homme de 19 ans qui a été inculpé ce jeudi après être revenu dans son ancien lycée à Pakland en Floride pour déclencher une fusillade faisant 17 morts.

Une capture écran envoyée au FBI

« Quand j’ai vu le commentaire dans mes notifications […], ça a attiré mon attention. J’en ai donc fait une capture d’écran que j’ai envoyée au FBI », a expliqué jeudi Ben Bennight, un utilisateur YouTube, à CNN.La police fédérale américaine a confirmé avoir reçu un signalement concernant ce commentaire en septembre 2017.

« Le FBI a procédé à des recherches dans des bases de données, mais n’a pas été capable d’identifier avec plus de précisions la personne qui a posté ce commentaire », a déclaré l’agence dans un communiqué.

Ben Bennight a expliqué au site BuzzFeed News qu’au lendemain de sa signalisation, des agents du FBI se sont rendus à son bureau pour lui demander s’il possédait plus d’informations sur l’utilisateur qui avait publié ce commentaire.

« Je n’en avais pas. Ils ont fait une copie de ma capture d’écran et c’est la dernière fois que j’ai entendu parler d’eux », a-t-il expliqué à BuzzFeed.

Voir enfin:

Fusillade

Fusillade en Floride. Averti sur le tireur, le FBI reconnaît une défaillance

Après la fusillade qui a fait 17 morts, mercredi, dans un lycée à Parkland en Floride, le FBI a reconnu une défaillance, alors que le tireur avait été signalé comme dangereux aux autorités.

La police fédérale américaine a reconnu ce vendredi ne pas avoir pris les mesures qui s’imposaient après avoir été avertie en janvier de la dangerosité potentielle de Nikolas Cruz, l’homme qui a tué mercredi 17 personnes dans un lycée de Floride.

Le tireur signalé au FBI par un proche

Le FBI a précisé avoir reçu un appel d’un proche de M. Cruz, qui a décrit le comportement déviant du jeune homme de 19 ans et son intention de tuer des personnes. Cette information « aurait dû être traitée comme une menace potentielle » et « la procédure en vigueur n’a pas été respectée », a ajouté le FBI.

Un utilisateur YouTube confiait jeudi à BuzzFeed avoir lui aussi signalé le tireur aux autorités. Il avait repéré sur la plateforme de vidéos en ligne un commentaire explicite du jeune homme de 19 ans qui assurait vouloir commettre une fusillade dans un lycée.

Le tireur avait été renvoyé du lycée

L’informateur, qui n’a pas été identifié, a également livré au téléphone des détails sur le fait que Cruz était armé et qu’il publiait des messages menaçants sur les réseaux sociaux.

Le jeune homme de 19 ans avait été renvoyé du lycée Marjory Stoneman Douglas, situé dans la ville de Parkland.Il a ouvert le feu mercredi au fusil semi-automatique dans les classes de cet établissement, ses balles fauchant une trentaine de personnes, dont 17 sont décédées, parmi lesquelles une majorité d’adolescents.

Face à la gravité de l’absence d’une enquête qui aurait pu empêcher ce massacre, le directeur du FBI, Christopher Wray, s’est engagé à « aller au fond du problème ». M. Wray s’est également dit prêt à revoir les procédures en place, dans une déclaration jointe au communiqué.

Une arme achetée dans une armurerie

Interpellé peu après sa fusillade, Nikolas Cruz a été écroué. Il est poursuivi pour 17 meurtres avec préméditation.

Lors d’une brève comparution jeudi devant une magistrate, M. Cruz est apparu prostré entre ses avocats, les membres entravés par des chaînes, avec un visage aux traits encore juvéniles.

Face aux enquêteurs, il a reconnu avoir mené son attaque avec un fusil d’assaut et des chargeurs de munitions qu’il avait légalement acquis dans une armurerie et qu’il transportait dans un sac à dos.

Réussissant à se fondre parmi les élèves évacués, il est ensuite allé s’acheter à boire dans une sandwicherie Subway, puis s’est arrêté dans un McDonald’s, avant d’être interpellé.

Le débat sur les armes à feu ressurgit

Ce rebondissement vient alourdir le climat pesant autour du déplacement attendu en Floride du président Donald Trump, que des proches des victimes du lycée de Parkland exhortent à agir contre les armes à feu.

Parmi les parents parvenant à surmonter leur désespoir pour s’exprimer devant les caméras, Lori Alhadeff a suscité une vive émotion par l’intensité de ses suppliques. Elle a perdu sa fille de 14 ans, Alyssa.

« Des actes ! Des actes ! Des actes ! », a-t-elle crié sur l’antenne de CNN, en interpellant directement le locataire de la Maison Blanche.

« Je viens de voir ma fille, au corps froid comme la glace. Elle a reçu des tirs dans le cœur, dans la tête, dans la main. Morte ! Froide ! Elle ne reviendra pas », a martelé Mme Alhadeff, à l’issue d’une veillée ayant rassemblé des milliers d’habitants.

Le président parle d’un acte de « déséquilibré »

Le président Trump, qui avait été activement soutenu dans sa campagne par les lobbys des armuriers, s’est pour l’instant gardé d’établir un lien entre la dissémination des armes à feu dans le pays et la fusillade qui a semé en quelques secondes la mort et le chaos au lycée Marjory Stoneman Douglas de Parkland.

À l’inverse, M. Trump a insisté sur les perturbations mentales de Nikolas Cruz, en soulignant vouloir porter ses efforts sur le terrain de la prise en charge des personnes souffrant de troubles psychiques.

« Je vais me rendre en Floride aujourd’hui pour rencontrer des gens parmi les plus courageux sur Terre – mais des gens dont les vies ont été totalement anéanties », a tweeté le président.

M. Trump n’a pas précisé quand il allait rencontrer les victimes, mais il a prévu de se rendre dans sa résidence de Mar-a-Lago, qui se trouve non loin de Parkland, pour le long week-end de President’s Day.

En tout cas, il est attendu de pied ferme. Le long de la route vers le lycée, des pancartes récemment posées affichent : « No guns 4 kids » (« Pas d’armes pour les enfants »).

Voir par ailleurs:

President Trump: Have Education Department Mandate Active Shooter Protocols

Townhall
|
Feb 15, 2018
I’m a small government guy, however, it’s sadly apparent that the United States of America is paralyzed with political indecision over something the State of Israel figured out more than 40 years ago: all schools should have mandated security features and active shooter protocols.The horrific scene in Parkland, and the upsetting videos broadcast from the school during the shooting, should be the final straw.  The kids should not have been hiding and screaming, they should have been in the midst of a pre-determined security protocol.President Trump, if the Department of Education can force Americans to deal with the disaster of Common Core, it can certainly issue a federal mandate regarding school security. The time is now.My personal manifesto is that government should never get involved in an issue unless an ongoing clear and present danger exists to large numbers of people, and that any regulation or legislation has a sunset provision.

Here we are.

In 1974, Israel endured the Ma’alot Massacre in which “Palestinian” terrorists took 115 people hostage at Netiv Meir Elementary School.  Twenty-two children and three others were killed and 68 injured.  Israel now requires schools with 100 or more students to have a guard posted. The civilian police force handles the entire security system of all schools from kindergarten through college.  The Ministry of Education funds shelters and fences, reinforces school buses, and hires and trains guards.

Guards don’t just stand around.  They check everyone entering, and engage threats.

And yeah, they’ve got guns.The lawful purposes for carrying guns are very clear: protect school personnel and students, create a sense of security, deter the ill-intentioned, and provide self-defense.

Common sense.   Except to the illogical dullards who claim that “adding guns to schools won’t fix anything” and are fixated on the NRA and the ridiculous notions that gun laws magically stop criminals and crazy people from obtaining one of the 300 million guns in our country.

But more to the point, Israel’s Police Community & Civil Guard Department have a preventative care program that encourages safe behavior and offers violence protection strategies in normal situations.  Yet students are also trained in how to respond to an active shooter situation.

Ben Goldstein, an American who made aliyah to Israel, and now serves as volunteer security and supporter of IDF soldiers, says America is behind the curve.  Nevertheless, he says, it doesn’t take much for students and teachers to protect themselves.

“Barricade, barricade. Are desks movable?  Is the teacher’s desk movable?  Can they barricade inside of 20 seconds? If the shooter gets in, the kids should take whatever they’ve got and attack.  They can’t just sit there frozen or they will die.  America does earthquake drills, why not active shooter drills?   More kids have been killed by shooters than earthquakes.”

Barricading works, says Goldstein.In an active shooter situation, where a gunman is roaming a campus, five minutes is a lifetime, enough time for law enforcement to get to the scene.  “In those five minutes, the shooter will have to move from class to class, reload, clear malfunctions, all that stuff takes time.  And during gunfire lulls, kids must be taught to do something.  Don’t freeze.Moving once gets you out of that deer-in-headlights space.  Take command of the classroom.”

There is no other way, says Goldstein, and “sometimes children must take matters into their own hands.If the school has no proper security – two guards in case one gets shot, and no active shooter protocol, and no doors to withstand an attack – then the child needs to run as fast as they can AWAY from the shooter.”

Because right now, America is the deer-in-headlights.  Gun control debates are a distraction and impractical, and criminals ignore laws anyway.Crazy people are obviously not being dealt with properly – students at Parkland even predicted this would happen.

The only solution is for America to toughen up.  We have a pugilist for a president, and that is long overdue.  Now its time for President Trump to fight for our children by wielding government power in the proper manner, to do something that any reasoned American would agree with.

Instead of handing out participation trophies, let’s make our kids into the self-reliant, pro-active defenders of themselves and others.

Mr. President, the time is now.

COMPLEMENT:

School shootings are not the new normal, despite statistics that stretch the truth

If you think that our schools are under siege like never before, take a statistical trip back in time.

James Alan Fox

USA Today

Feb. 19, 2018

With the high school massacre in Parkland, Fla., several days gone but hardly forgotten, the time seems right to examine closely some of the statistical hype that made frightening news alongside details of the horrific shooting.

In print and on TV, Americans were bombarded with facts and figures suggesting that the problem of school shootings was out of control. We were informed, for example, that since 2013 there has been an average of one school shooting a week in the U.S., and 18 since the beginning of this year. While these statistics were not exactly lies or fake news, they involved stretching the definition of a school shooting well beyond the limits of most people’s imagination.

Everytown for Gun Safety reported that there have been 290 school shootings since the catastrophic massacre in Newtown, Conn., more than five years ago. However, very few of these were anything akin to Sandy Hook or Parkland. Sure, they all involved a school of some type (including technical schools and colleges) as well as a firearm, but the outcomes were hardly similar. Nearly half of the 290 were completed or attempted suicides, accidental discharges of a gun, or shootings with not a single individual being injured. Of the remainder, the vast majority involved either one fatality or none at all.

It is easy to believe that school shootings are the “new normal” as has been intimated, or that we are facing a crisis of epidemic proportions. When schools are placed on lockdown based on an active shooter alert (which many times is a false alarm), cable news channels immediately inform their viewers of the danger, and word is tweeted and retweeted to millions, most of whom have no direct connection to the event.

And when gunshots ring out, we hear the sounds replayed from cellphone recordings and watch through satellite feed as terrified survivors flee the scene. It makes a lasting impression, to be sure.

For all those who believe that schools are under siege like never before, it is instructive to take a statistical road trip back in time.

Since 1990, there have been 22 shootings at elementary and secondary schools in which two or more people were killed, not counting those perpetrators who committed suicide.

Whereas five of these incidents have occurred over the past five-plus years since 2013, claiming the lives of 27 victims (17 at Parkland), the latter half of the 1990s witnessed seven multiple-fatality shootings with a total of 33 killed (13 at Columbine).

In fact, the 1997-98 school year was so awful, with four multiple-fatality shooting sprees at the hands of armed students (in Pearl, Miss.; West Paducah, Ky.; Jonesboro, Ark.; and Springfield, Ore.), that then-President Clinton formed a White House expert committee to advise him. Nearly a decade later, President Bush convened a White House Conference on School Safety in the wake of multiple-fatality incidents during his administration.

Of course, I don’t mean to minimize any of the one-per week on average school shootings, but they should not be conflated with the most deadly but rare events.

Unfortunately, most readers and viewers don’t appreciate the distinction when statistics including non-fatal school shootings are cited whenever there is mass killing at a school.

Notwithstanding the occasional multiple-fatality shooting that takes place at one of the 100,000 public schools across America, the nation’s schools are safe. Over the past quarter-century, on average about 10 students are slain in school shootings annually.

Compare the school fatality rate with the more than 100 school-age children accidentally killed each year riding theirbikes or walking to school. Congress might be too timid to pass gun legislation to protect children, but how about a national bicycle helmet law for minors? Half of the states do not require them. There is no NRA — National Riding Association — opposing that.

I’m all for shielding our kids from harm. But let’s at least deal with the low hanging fruit while we debate and Congress does nothing about the role of guns in school shootings.

James Alan Fox is the Lipman Professor of Criminology, Law and Public Policy at Northeastern University, a member of USA TODAY’s Board of Contributors and co-author of Extreme Killing: Understanding Serial and Mass Murder.