First date: Vous avez dit culte de la personnalité ? (Spot the error: Obama hasn’t even left office, but in supposedly racist America the hagiography has definitely begun)

26 septembre, 2016
soutsidewithyou
obamaplaquekisssugarshack

barryobamaindonesianfilmU.S. President Barack Obama speaks during the dedication of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, U.S., September 24, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

C’est ça, l’Ouest, monsieur le sénateur:  quand la légende devient réalité, c’est la légende qu’il faut publier. Maxwell Scott  (journaliste dans ‘L’Homme qui tua Liberty Valance’, John Ford, 1962)
We real cool. We Left school. We Lurk late. We Strike straight. We Sing sin. We Thin gin. We Jazz June. We Die soon. Gwendolyn Brooks (1959)
Murders in the U.S. jumped by 10.8% in 2015, according to figures released Monday by the Federal Bureau of Investigation—a sharp increase that could fuel concerns that the nation’s two-decade trend of falling crime rates may be ending. The figures had been expected to show an increase, after preliminary data released earlier this year indicated violent crime and murders were rising. But the double-digit increase in murders dwarfed any in the past 20 years, eclipsing the 3.7% increase in 2005, the year in which the biggest increase occurred before now. In 2014, the FBI recorded violent crime narrowly falling, by 0.2%. In 2015, the number of violent crimes rose 3.9% though the number of property crimes dropped 2.6%, the FBI said. Richard Rosenfeld, a criminologist at the University of Missouri-St.Louis, said a key driver of the murder spike may be an increasing distrust of police in major cities where controversial officer shootings have led to protests. “This rise is concentrated in certain large cities where police-community tensions have been notable,’’ said Mr. Rosenfeld, citing Cleveland, Baltimore, and St. Louis as examples. The rise in killings is not spread evenly around America, he noted, but is rather centered on big cities with large African-American populations. (…) Mr. Rosenfeld said the FBI data suggests the increase in murder may be caused by some version of the “Ferguson effect’’—a term often used by law-enforcement officials to describe what they see as the negative effects of the recent anti-police protests. The killing by a police officer of an unarmed black 18-year-old in Ferguson, Mo., in 2014 led to protests there and around the country. Some law-enforcement officials, including FBI Director James Comey, have argued that since then, some officers may be more reluctant to get out of their patrol cars and engage in the kind of difficult work that reduces street crime, out of fear they may be videotaped and criticized publicly. Mr. Rosenfeld suggested a different dynamic may be at play, though stemming from the same tensions. Members of minority and poor communities may be more reluctant to talk to police and help them solve crimes in cities where officers are viewed as untrustworthy and threatening, he said, particularly where there have been recent controversial killings by police officers. (…) John Pfaff, a professor at Fordham Law School, said the numbers are concerning but that it is too early to draw any definite conclusions from the data, noting that the murder rate in 2015 was still lower than in 2009. “It’s not a giant rollback of things. 2015 is the third-safest year for violent crime since 1970,’’ Mr. Pfaff said. “The last time we saw a jump like this was 1989 to 1990, and that was a much more broad increase in crime.’’ WSJ
Tout ce qu’on sait, c’est qu’on en sait  très peu sur Barack Obama et que ce qu’on sait est très différent de ce qui est allégué. Tous les présidents ont leurs mythographies, mais ils ont également un bilan et des experts  qui peuvent  distinguer les faits  de la fiction. Dans le cas d’Obama, on ne nous a nous jamais donné tous les faits et il y avait peu de gens dans la presse intéressés à les trouver. Comme le dit Maxwell Scott dans L’homme qui a tué Liberty Valance, ‘quand la légende devient fait, c’est la légende qu’il faut imprimer’.  Victor Davis Hanson
Apart from other unprecedented aspects of his rise, it is a geographical truth that no politician in American history has traveled farther than Barack Obama to be within reach of the White House. He was born and spent most of his formative years on Oahu, in distance the most removed population center on the planet, some 2,390 miles from California, farther from a major landmass than anywhere but Easter Island. In the westward impulse of American settlement, his birthplace was the last frontier, an outpost with its own time zone, the 50th of the United States, admitted to the union only two years before Obama came along. Those who come from islands are inevitably shaped by the experience. For Obama, the experience was all contradiction and contrast. As the son of a white woman and a black man, he grew up as a multiracial kid, a « hapa, » « half-and-half » in the local lexicon, in one of the most multiracial places in the world, with no majority group. There were native Hawaiians, Japanese, Filipinos, Samoans, Okinawans, Chinese and Portuguese, along with Anglos, commonly known as haole (pronounced howl-lee), and a smaller population of blacks, traditionally centered at the U.S. military installations. But diversity does not automatically translate into social comfort: Hawaii has its own difficult history of racial and cultural stratification, and young Obama struggled to find his place even in that many-hued milieu. He had to leave the island to find himself as a black man, eventually rooting in Chicago, the antipode of remote Honolulu, deep in the fold of the mainland, and there setting out on the path that led toward politics. Yet life circles back in strange ways, and in essence it is the promise of the place he left behind — the notion if not the reality of Hawaii, what some call the spirit of aloha, the transracial if not post-racial message — that has made his rise possible. Hawaii and Chicago are the two main threads weaving through the cloth of Barack Obama’s life. Each involves more than geography. Hawaii is about the forces that shaped him, and Chicago is about how he reshaped himself. Chicago is about the critical choices he made as an adult: how he learned to survive in the rough-and-tumble of law and politics, how he figured out the secrets of power in a world defined by it, and how he resolved his inner conflicts and refined the subtle, coolly ambitious persona now on view in the presidential election. Hawaii comes first. It is what lies beneath, what makes Chicago possible and understandable. (…) « Dreams From My Father » is as imprecise as it is insightful about Obama’s early life. Obama offers unusually perceptive and subtle observations of himself and the people around him. Yet, as he readily acknowledged, he rearranged the chronology for his literary purposes and presented a cast of characters made up of composites and pseudonyms. This was to protect people’s privacy, he said. Only a select few were not granted that protection, for the obvious reason that he could not blur their identities — his relatives. (…) Keith and Tony Peterson (…) wondered why Obama focused so much on a friend he called Ray, who in fact was Keith Kukagawa. Kukagawa was black and Japanese, and the Petersons did not even think of him as black. Yet in the book, Obama used him as the voice of black anger and angst, the provocateur of hip, vulgar, get-real dialogues. (…) Sixteen years later, Barry was no more, replaced by Barack, who had not only left the island but had gone to two Ivy League schools, Columbia undergrad and Harvard Law, and written a book about his life. He was into his Chicago phase, reshaping himself for his political future … David Maraniss
Nous ne sommes pas un fardeau pour l’Amérique, une tache sur l’Amérique, un objet de honte ou de pitié pour l’Amérique. Nous sommes l’Amérique ! Barack Hussein Obama
Ce n’est pas un musée du crime ou de la culpabilité, c’est un lieu qui raconte le voyage d’un peuple et l’histoire d’une nation. Il n’y a pas de réponses simples à des questions complexes». Lonnie Bunch
Abraham Lincoln was long dead when John Ford polished the presidential halo in the 1939 film “Young Mr. Lincoln.” Mr. Obama hasn’t even left office, but the cinematic hagiography has begun. The NYT
As this primary season has gone along, a strange sensation has come over me: I miss Barack Obama. Now, obviously I disagree with a lot of Obama’s policy decisions. I’ve been disappointed by aspects of his presidency. I hope the next presidency is a philosophic departure. But over the course of this campaign it feels as if there’s been a decline in behavioral standards across the board. Many of the traits of character and leadership that Obama possesses, and that maybe we have taken too much for granted, have suddenly gone missing or are in short supply. The first and most important of these is basic integrity. The Obama administration has been remarkably scandal-free. Think of the way Iran-contra or the Lewinsky scandals swallowed years from Reagan and Clinton. (…) Second, a sense of basic humanity. Donald Trump has spent much of this campaign vowing to block Muslim immigration. You can only say that if you treat Muslim Americans as an abstraction. President Obama, meanwhile, went to a mosque, looked into people’s eyes and gave a wonderful speech reasserting their place as Americans. He’s exuded this basic care and respect for the dignity of others time and time again. (…)  Third, a soundness in his decision-making process. (…) Take health care. (…) President Obama may have been too cautious, especially in the Middle East, but at least he’s able to grasp the reality of the situation. Fourth, grace under pressure. (…) I happen to think overconfidence is one of Obama’s great flaws. But a president has to maintain equipoise under enormous pressure. Obama has done that, especially amid the financial crisis. (…) Fifth, a resilient sense of optimism. To hear Sanders or Trump, Cruz and Ben Carson campaign is to wallow in the pornography of pessimism, to conclude that this country is on the verge of complete collapse. That’s simply not true. We have problems, but they are less serious than those faced by just about any other nation on earth. People are motivated to make wise choices more by hope and opportunity than by fear, cynicism, hatred and despair. Unlike many current candidates, Obama has not appealed to those passions. No, Obama has not been temperamentally perfect. Too often he’s been disdainful, aloof, resentful and insular. But there is a tone of ugliness creeping across the world, as democracies retreat, as tribalism mounts, as suspiciousness and authoritarianism take center stage. Obama radiates an ethos of integrity, humanity, good manners and elegance that I’m beginning to miss, and that I suspect we will all miss a bit, regardless of who replaces him. David Brooks
Le rituel du soir de Barack Obama n’est un secret pour personne : le président des États-Unis est un couche-tard. Ces quelques heures de solitude, entre la fin du dîner et l’heure de dormir, vers 1 heure du matin, sont celles où il réfléchit et se retrouve seul avec lui-même. De menus détails sur sa vie qui sont connus du public depuis plusieurs années.  Alors pourquoi les raconter à nouveau ? pourrait-on demander au New York Times, et son enquête intitulée « Obama après la tombée de la nuit ». Parce que les lecteurs apprécient visiblement ces quelques images de l’intimité d’un président qui quittera bientôt la Maison Blanche. Deux jours après sa publication, l’article est toujours dans le top 10 des plus lus sur le site. Barack Obama a toujours été un pro du storytelling. Tout, dans l’image qu’il donne de lui-même, est précisément contrôlé, y compris les moments de décontraction. Pete Souza, le photographe officiel de la Maison Blanche, en est le meilleur témoin et le meilleur outil. Le professionnel met en avant l’image d’un président plus décontracté, en marge du protocole officiel, proche des enfants, jouant allongé par terre avec un bébé tenu à bout de bras ou autorisant un jeune garçon à lui toucher les cheveux « pour savoir s’ils sont comme les siens ». Dans cet article, c’est encore une fois l’image d’un homme décontracté, mais aussi plus sage et solitaire qu’à l’ordinaire, qui est travaillée. Et d’abord par l’introduction qui compare les habitudes nocturnes de Barack Obama à celle de ses prédécesseurs. « Le président George W. Bush, un lève-tôt, était au lit à dix heures. Le président Bill Clinton se couchait tard comme M. Obama, mais il consacrait du temps à de longues conversations à bâtons rompus avec ses amis et ses alliés politiques. » Là où Bill Clinton appréciait la compagnie jusqu’à tard dans la nuit, Barack Obama choisit la solitude réflexive. Pour enfoncer le clou, l’article cite alors l’historien Doris Kearns Goodwin : « C’est quelqu’un qui est bien seul avec lui-même. » (…) L’huile qui fait tourner les rouages d’un storytelling réussi, ce sont les anecdotes, inoffensives ou amusantes. Ici, on découvre celle des sept amandes que Barack Obama mange le soir. Les amandes montrent que le président a une hygiène de vie impeccable, qu’il n’a besoin de boissons excitantes ou sucrées pour tenir le coup. Et en même temps, le chiffre précis a quelque chose d’insolite, qui donne l’image de quelqu’un d’un peu crispé, qui veut tout contrôler. Mais pas trop. (…) Le portrait de Barack Obama, une fois la nuit tombée, soigne également l’image d’un bourreau de travail, perfectionniste et attaché aux détails. (…) Dans le même temps, il faut entretenir l’image de « Mister Cool » et continuer à travailler sur celle du père de famille. Barack Obama ne fait pas que travailler dans son bureau. Il se tient au courant des résultats sportifs sur ESPN et joue à Words With Friends, un dérivé du Scrabble sur iPad. Le « rituel du coucher » n’a plus vraiment de raison d’être maintenant que ses filles Malia et Sasha ont 18 et 15 ans, mais il reste la « movie night », la soirée cinéma de la famille, tous les vendredis soirs dans le « Family Theater », une salle de projection privée de 40 places. Avec le petit détail qui change tout : Barack et Michelle apprécient les séries ultra-populaires Breaking Bad ou Game of Thrones. Le procédé est efficace, et l’impression générale qui se dégage est celle d’un homme réfléchi, calme, solitaire. Le Monde
George W. Bush avait signé en 2003 la loi créant le Musée national de l’Histoire et de la Culture Afro-Américaines, mais c’est au premier président noir du pays qu’est revenu le privilège de l’inaugurer ce samedi. Outre Barack et Michelle Obama, George W. et Laura Bush les élus du Congrès et les juges de la Cour suprême, quelque 20.000 personnes se sont rassemblées en milieu de journée sur le Mall de Washington, la grande esplanade faisant face au Capitole, au nombre desquelles tout ce que le pays compte de célébrités noires. Oprah Winfrey, qui a donné 20 millions de dollars, a eu droit à une place d’honneur. (…) Au-dessus de lui, le bâtiment de six étages, dessiné par l’architecte britannique d’origine tanzanienne David Adjaye, se dresse comme une couronne africaine de bronze face au Washington Monument (l’obélisque érigé en hommage au premier président des Etats-Unis), à l’endroit même où, il y a deux siècles, se tenait un marché aux esclaves. Son matériau, inspirée des textiles d’Afrique de l’Ouest, laisse passer la lumière et rougeoie au soleil couchant, créant une impression massive de l’extérieur et aérienne de l’intérieur. Il a fallu treize ans et 540 millions de dollars pour bâtir le dix-neuvième musée de la Smithsonian Institution et y rassembler plus de 35.000 témoignages de l’histoire des Afro-Américains, dont aucun aspect n’est occulté: ni la traite des esclaves, ni la ségrégation, ni la lutte pour les droits civiques, ni les réussites contemporaines, du sport au hip-hop et à la politique. La présidence de Barack Obama y est documentée dans l’un des 27 espaces d’exposition, non loin de la Cadillac de Chuck Berry ou des chaussures de piste de Jessie Owens. Mais le visiteur est d’abord invité à passer devant les chaînes, les fouets, les huttes misérables des esclaves, les photos de dos lacérés ou de lynchages (3437 Noirs pendus entre 1882 et 1851), ou encore le cercueil d’Emmett Till, tué à l’âge de 14 ans dans le Mississippi pour avoir sifflé une femme blanche en 1955. «Ce n’est pas un musée du crime ou de la culpabilité, insiste son directeur, Lonnie Bunch, c’est un lieu qui raconte le voyage d’un peuple et l’histoire d’une nation. Il n’y a pas de réponses simples à des questions complexes». Au moment où les marches de la communauté noire se répandent dans le pays pour protester contre les violences policières, Barack Obama a invité Donald Trump à visiter le Musée de l’Histoire et de la Culture Afro-Américaine. Le candidat républicain à sa succession a déclaré que les Noirs vivaient aujourd’hui «dans les pires conditions qu’ils aient jamais connues». Dans une interview vendredi à la chaîne ABC, le président a répliqué: «Je crois qu’un enfant de 8 ans est au courant que l’esclavage n’était pas très bon pour les Noirs et que l’ère Jim Crow (les lois ségrégationnistes, Ndlr) n’était pas très bonne pour les Noirs». Au moment où les marches de la communauté noire se répandent dans le pays pour protester contre les violences policières, Barack Obama a invité Donald Trump à visiter le Musée de l’Histoire et de la Culture Afro-Américaine. Le candidat républicain à sa succession a déclaré que les Noirs vivaient aujourd’hui «dans les pires conditions qu’ils aient jamais connues». Dans une interview vendredi à la chaîne ABC, le président a répliqué: «Je crois qu’un enfant de 8 ans est au courant que l’esclavage n’était pas très bon pour les Noirs et que l’ère Jim Crow (les lois ségrégationnistes, Ndlr) n’était pas très bonne pour les Noirs». Le Figaro
A young Jack Kennedy leads his shipwrecked crew to safety on a deserted island, dragging an injured sailor as he swims. A middle-aged FDR is struck down by polio, then fights to recover his ability to walk in order to step back onto the political stage. An up-and-coming Abraham Lincoln, new to the legal profession, stops a lynch mob from killing two young men suspected of murder, then successfully defends them in court. A young Barack Obama, interning at a corporate law firm, convinces his supervisor to go on a date. They kiss. One of these things is not like the others. The vast majority of presidential movies focus on presidents being presidents, sitting at the head of state, living arguably the most consequential moments of their lives. A man with the power and responsibility of the highest office in the country is instantly interesting, whether that’s JFK with the Cuban missile crisis, Lincoln on the eve of the Civil War, Nixon authorizing break-ins at the Watergate, or that famous speech President Bill Pullman gives toward the end of Independence Day. It’s easy for a president to get turned into a figure of high drama, a hero or villain of our national narrative.But when a film dips into a president’s pre-presidential years, there’s more than just a good story going on. In fact, only a handful of presidential films have ignored a president’s years in the Oval Office entirely: PT-109 (the JFK war movie), Sunrise at Campobello (FDR’s recovery drama), Young Mr. Lincoln (on Lincoln’s… yes, younger years), and now Southside With You, the new movie about Barack and Michelle Obama’s first date in Chicago in 1991.  Iwan Morgan, editor of Presidents in the Movies and professor of U.S. Studies and American History at University College London, explained over email that both JFK’s and FDR’s early biopics “deal with pre-presidential triumph over adversity to emphasize their suitability to lead in office, rather than celebrating their leadership in office.” Morgan added that John Ford, director of Young Mr. Lincoln, “focuses on the pre-heroic Lincoln to explore his formative influences and preparation for greatness.” The whole point of making a presidential prequel is to show the pattern of the POTUS-to-be. So what does Southside with You show us? The film follows the Obamas through a fictionalized version of their famous first date, whose end is already memorialized by a plaque in front of a Hyde Park Baskin-Robbins — inscribed with this quote from a 2007 O, The Oprah Magazine interview with Barack: “On our first date, I treated her to the finest ice cream Baskin-Robbins had to offer, our dinner table doubling as the curb. I kissed her, and it tasted like chocolate.”However sweet the ending, the day didn’t begin as a date, at least in Southside’s telling. Barack is a broke summer associate at a corporate law firm; Michelle, his supervisor. He knows she thinks dating within the office is a bad look (and it is), so he asks her out to a community activist meeting at the Gardens — a housing project on Chicago’s South Side — and he fudges the timing a little so they’ll have an opportunity to hang beforehand. They take a trip to the Art Institute of Chicago, where Barack recites the Gwendolyn Brooks poem “We Real Cool” from memory in front of an Ernie Barnes painting, then meander around a public park, trading political opinions and biographical details. (…) Within the context of the rom-com, this makes for sweet (if somewhat boring) viewing. A first date is all about potential, but we know how this particular love story ends. The Obamas are paragons of the modern married couple; Barack’s promise as a potential partner paid off. But (…) in spite of itself, this plays right to the most persistent criticisms of the Obama presidency, and to the greatest fears of his supporters: that Obama never moved beyond his perceived potential from the 2008 election, and was never able to deliver much more than a solid speech. Dargis called the film a “cinematic hagiography” in the Times, but to borrow another Christian term of art, it’s closer to a piece of apologetics. Instead of a miracle story of a hero’s precocious powers, it presents an argument against his critics, a character study by way of excuse. In Southside, the young Obama doesn’t demonstrate his future leadership ability as much as his ability to convince you of his future leadership ability. Which is, ironically, what many of his strongest critics say about his presidency. That it was — and remained, throughout his eight years in office — about possibility. Southside tells us that, if it wasn’t for the system, Obama could have accomplished more, and despite it all, did an admirable job of keeping his head up. It urges us to believe what we already know: that he’s a cool guy in private, even if he keeps calling for drone strikes and deporting more people  — that’s just playing to the white couple at the movie theater, the conservative crowd. It argues, ice cream cone in hand, that Obama would have made a truly great president, if he had just been given the chance. Sam Dean
The writer and director Richard Tanne’s first feature, “Southside with You,” which will be released next Friday, is an opening act of superb audacity, a self-imposed challenge so mighty that it might seem, on paper, to be a stunt. It’s a drama about Barack Obama and Michelle Robinson’s first date, in Chicago, in the summer of 1989. It stars Parker Sawyers as the twenty-eight-year-old Barack, a Harvard Law student and summer associate at a Chicago law firm, and Tika Sumpter (who also co-produced the film) as the twenty-five-year-old Michelle, a Harvard Law graduate and a second-year associate at the same firm. The results don’t resemble a stunt; far from it. “Southside with You,” running a brisk hour and twenty minutes, is a fully realized, intricately imagined, warmhearted, sharp-witted, and perceptive drama, one that sticks close to its protagonists while resonating quietly but grandly with the sweep of a historical epic. Tanne tells the story of the First Couple’s first date with a tightly constrained time frame—one day’s and evening’s worth of action—that begins with the protagonists preparing for their rendezvous and ends with them back at their homes. In between, Tanne pulls off a near-miracle, conveying these historic figures’ depth and complexity of character without making them grandiose. The dialogue is freewheeling and intimate, ranging through subjects far from the matters at hand, suggesting enormous intellect and enormous promise without seeming cut-and-pasted from speeches or memoirs. The film exudes Tanne’s own sense of calm excitement, nearly a documentarian’s serendipitous thrill at being present to catch on-camera a secret miracle of mighty historical import. Movies about public figures—ones whose appearance, diction, and gestures are deeply ingrained in the minds of most likely viewers—must confront the Scylla of impersonation and the Charybdis of unfaithfulness. Tanne’s extraordinary actors thread that strait nimbly, delivering performances that exist on their own but feel true to the characters, that spin with dialectical delight and embody the ardors, ambitions, and uncertainties that even the most able and aware young adults must face. (…) Tanne achieves something that few other directors—whether of independent or Hollywood or art-house films—ever do: he creates characters with an ample sense of memory, who fully inhabit their life prior to their time onscreen, and who have a wide range of cultural references and surging ideas that leap spontaneously into their conversation. A scene in which Michelle and Barack visit an exhibit of Afrocentric art—he discusses the importance of the painter Ernie Barnes to the sitcom “Good Times,” and together they recall Gwendolyn Brooks’s poem “We Real Cool”—has an effortless grace that reflects an unusual cinematic depth of lived experience. The centerpiece of the film is a splendid bit of romantic and principled performance art on the part of Barack. He plans the non-date date around a community meeting in a mainly black neighborhood that Michelle—who did pro-bono work at Harvard and who admits to frustration with her trademark-law work at the firm—is eager to attend. There, Barack, who had been active with the organization before heading to Harvard, is received like a prodigal son. The subject of the meeting is the legislature’s refusal to build a much-needed community center; frustration among the attendees mounts, until Barack addresses them and offers some brilliant practical suggestions to overcome the opposition. At the meeting, he displays, above all, his gifts for public speaking and, even more, for empathy. He reveals, to the community group but also to Michelle, a preternatural genius at grasping interests and motives, at seeking common cause, and at recognizing—and acting upon—the human factor. There, Barack also displays a personal philosophy of practical politics that’s tied to his larger reflections on American history and political theory. The intellectual passion that Tanne builds into the scene, and that Sawyers delivers with nuanced fervor, is all the more striking and exquisite for its subtle positioning as a device of romantic seduction. Michelle’s sense of principled responsibility and groundedness, her worldly maturity and practical insight, is matched by Barack’s ardent but callow, mighty but still-unfocussed energies. The movie’s ring of authenticity carried me through from start to finish without inviting my speculations as to the historical veracity of the events. Curiosity eventually kicked in, though; most accounts of the first date suggest that its general contours involved Michelle’s reluctance to date a colleague who was also a subordinate, the visit to the Art Institute, a walk, a drink, and a viewing of the recently released film “Do the Right Thing.” The community meeting is usually described as occurring at another occasion, yet it fits into the first date with a verisimilitude as well as an emotional impact that justify the dramatization. As for their viewing of Spike Lee’s movie, the scene that Tanne derives from it is a minor masterwork of ironic psychology and mother wit. It’s too good to spoil; suffice it to say that the scene is set against the backdrop of controversy that greeted Lee’s film at the time of its release, with some critics—white critics—fearing that the climactic act of violence (meaning not the police killing of Radio Raheem but Mookie’s throwing a garbage can through the window of Sal’s Pizzeria and leading his neighbors to ransack the venue) would incite riots. “Southside with You” is the sort of movie that, say, Richard Linklater’s three “Before” movies aren’t—an intimate story that has a reach far greater than its scale, that has stakes and substance extending beyond the couple’s immediate fortunes. There’s a noble historical precedent for Tanne’s film. If the modern cinema was inspired by Roberto Rossellini’s “Voyage to Italy,” from 1954—which taught a handful of ambitious young French critics that all they needed to make a movie was two actors and a car, that they could make a low-budget and small-scale production that would be rich in cinematic ideas and romantic passion alike—then “Southside with You” is an exemplary work of cinematic modernity. Rossellini, a cinematic philosopher, ranges far through history and politics to ground a couple’s intimate disasters in the deep currents of modern life. Tanne does this, too, and goes one step further; his inspiration is reminiscent of the advice that the nineteen-year-old critic Jean-Luc Godard gave to his cinematic elders, “unhappy filmmakers of France who lack scenarios.” Godard advised them to make films about “the tax system,” about the writer and Nazi collaborator Philippe Henriot, about the Resistance activist Danielle Casanova. Tanne picks a great subject of contemporary history and politics—indeed, one of the very greatest—and approaches it without the pomp and bombast of ostensibly important, message-mongering Oscarizables. He realizes Barack Obama and Michelle Robinson onscreen with the same meticulous, thoughtful, inventive imagination that other directors might bring to figures of legend, people they know, or their own lives. “Southside with You” is a virtuosic realization of history on the wing, of the lives of others incarnated as firsthand experience. To tell this story is a nearly impossible challenge, and Tanne meets it at its high level. The New Yorker
Like “Before Sunrise,” a film which invites comparison, “Southside with You” is a two-hander that’s top-heavy with dialogue, walking and a knowing sense of location. Unlike that film, however, we already know the ending before the lights go down in the theater. So, writer/director Richard Tanne replaces the suspenseful pull of “will they or won’t they?” with an equally compelling and understated character study that humanizes his larger-than-life public figures. Tanne reminds us that, before ascending to the most powerful office in the world, Barack and Michelle were just two regular people who started out somewhere much smaller. This down-to-earth approach works surprisingly well because “Southside with You” never loses sight of the primary tenet of a great romantic comedy: All you need is two people whom the audience wants to see get together—then you put them together. So many entries in this genre fail miserably because the filmmakers feel compelled to overcomplicate matters with useless subplots and extraneous characters; they mistake cacophony for complexity. “Southside with You” builds its emotional richness by coasting on the charisma of its two leads as they carefully navigate each other’s personality quirks and life stories. We may be ahead of them in terms of knowing the outcome, but we’re simultaneously learning the details. “Southside with You” is at once a love song to the city of Chicago and its denizens, an unmistakably Black romance and a gentle, universal comedy. It is unapologetic about all three of these elements, and interweaves them in such a subtle fashion that they become more pronounced only upon later reflection. The Chicago affection manifests itself not only in a scene where, in front of a small group of community activists welcoming back their favorite son, Barack demonstrates a rough version of the speechmaking ability that will later become his trademark, but also when Barack takes Michelle to an art gallery. He points out that the Ernie Barnes paintings they’re viewing were used on the Chicago-set sitcom “Good Times.” Then the duo recite Chicago native Gwendolyn Brooks’ poem about the pool players at the Golden Shovel, « We Real Cool. » Even the beloved founder of this site, Roger Ebert, gets a shout-out for championing “Do the Right Thing, » the movie Barack and Michelle attend in the closing hours of their date. Though its depiction of romance is recognizable to anyone who has ever gone on a successful first date, “Southside with You” also takes time to address the concerns Michelle has with dating her co-worker, especially since she’s his superior and the only Black woman in the office. The optics of this pairing worries her in ways that hint at the corporate sexism that existed back in 1989, and continues in some fashion today. Her concern is that her superiors might think she threw herself at the only other Black employee which, based on my own personal workplace experience, I found completely relatable. This plotline has traction, culminating in a fictional though very effective climactic scene between Barack, Michelle and their boss. It’s a bit overdramatic, but the payoff is a lovely ice cream-based reconciliation that may do for Baskin-Robbins what Beyoncé’s “Formation” did for Red Lobster. Odie Henderson
Such hagiography of our chief executives is not unheard of, but it’s also less common than you might think. The complicated portraits of presidents painted by Oliver Stone in Nixon (1995) and W. (2008)—sympathetic, to a point, but unsparing and occasionally unfair—are far more interesting than the offering to Obama’s cult of personality that Southside With You represents. John Ford’s Young Mr. Lincoln (1939) and Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln (2012) are perhaps the two most impressive examples of pure homage to the presidency. Young Mr. Lincoln in particular is a deft piece of filmmaking—as the booklet that comes with the Criterion Collection’s edition of the film notes, the legendary Soviet director Sergei Eisenstein once wrote that if he could lay claim to any American film, it would have been this one—which culminates in as powerful a sequence as any in film history. Honest Abe (Henry Fonda) has defended two brothers from a wrongful murder charge—first saving them from a lynch mob and then proving their innocence in court—and seen the grateful family off. A friend asks if he wants to come back to town. “No, I think I might go on a piece. Maybe to the top of that hill,” Lincoln replies, striding off into the sunset. As he crests the ridge and as the Battle Hymn of the Republic plays, the sky cracks and rain pours forth. He pushes on, into the rain, the lightning, the thunder. It’s a storm Lincoln will have to face alone, a storm similar to the one the nation faced when the film was produced in 1939. It’s not a subtle image, particularly, but it does hold up through the decades, a simple and powerful picture of a man with the weight of a nation on his shoulders. In its own way, the closing moments of Southside With You are also affecting. Barack Obama sits in a chair, smoking a cigarette, a book on his lap. He smiles, thinking of himself and his date. The storm clouds gather again—mass murder in Syria; a destabilized Middle East; a resurgent China and Russia—but you wouldn’t know it from the placid look on the future chief executive’s face. He is detached, concerned with his own affairs, his own place in the world. If that’s the impression Tanne was going for, well, to quote another president: Mission Accomplished. Free Beacon
In a highly effective move, the will they/won’t they drama of Southside with You climaxes with an incident that very much did happen in real life—kinda. Hitting the movies to check out Spike Lee’s controversial new joint Do The Right Thing, the pair find themselves face to face with Michelle’s nightmare: a senior white partner from their law firm, who’s also come to check out the movie. Like Southside’s brief mention of Obama’s white girlfriend at Columbia, the name of the real partner is changed onscreen. “Avery” and his wife Laura were really lawyer Newton Minow and his wife Jo, who ran into the future Mr. and Mrs. Obama at the movies. (…) Unfortunately, the film uses him for its own dramatic purposes: to play up the racial and cultural frictions that theoretically gave Barack and Michelle common ground as two of the only African-Americans at the office, and to justify Movie Michelle’s fears that the older white men of Sidley Austin might lose respect for her as an attorney in her own right if she started dating Barack. Those racially-charged frustrations, portrayed purposefully onscreen by Sumpter, have not been expressed much by the real Michelle and Barack in interviews about their romance. Daily Beast
Pas un soupçon d’intérêt historique (ou autre), tant cette romance cui-cui/cucul baigne dans l’eau de rose. Voici
Après avoir longtemps hésité, Michelle Robinson, associée dans un cabinet juridique, accepte finalement une invitation à sortir de Barack Obama, le stagiaire prometteur engagé pour l’été. Comme la jeune femme ne souhaite pas que leur soirée ressemble à un rendez-vous amoureux traditionnel, il décide d’emmener sa supérieure se promener dans différents endroits du Chicago de la fin des années 1980. Il espère profiter de ces moments informels pour apprendre à mieux la connaître. Durant leur balade, ils visitent l’institut d’art de la ville, où ils évoquent ensemble leur amour pour la poésie de Gwendolyn Brooks ou pour la peinture d’Ernie Barnes. Télérama
Un jour de 1989, une avocate, Michelle, se fait inviter par un stagiaire prénommé Barack… On espère que le premier rendez-vous du futur président des Etats-Unis avec son épouse a été moins ennuyeux et moins pompeux que celui de leurs personnages sur l’écran. On en est même sûr. Sinon, ils se seraient quittés le soir même pour ne plus jamais se revoir…  Pierre Murat
La machine hagiographique hollywoodienne n’a pas attendu le terme du second mandat de Barack Obama pour embaumer le 44e président des Etats-Unis dans sa propre légende. Pour cela, First Date n’emprunte pas les voies traditionnelles du biopic (biographie filmée), mais d’une comédie romantique se déroulant sur une seule journée : celle de 1989 où la future « First Lady » Michelle, alors jeune avocate à Chicago, tombe amoureuse du stagiaire de sa firme, l’humble, pondéré, clairvoyant, attentionné, plébiscité et prometteur Barack. Constitué d’une longue conversation entre les deux personnages, au gré des endroits qu’ils visitent, le film insiste sur leur élégance simple, leur aisance naturelle et la perfection de leur pedigree. Comme dans beaucoup de fictions américaines, la séduction se passe un peu comme un entretien d’embauche, où il s’agit moins de décocher les flèches de Cupidon que de cocher les cases d’un CV imaginaire rempli de bienséance et de respectabilité. Les dialogues en profitent pour énumérer les états de service, éléments biographiques et souvenirs officiels des personnages, en somme tout ce qu’il faut savoir des locataires de la Maison Blanche, à la façon d’une notice Wikipédia. Le tout est enrobé par la mise en scène dans un environnement lisse, soyeux, confortable, soigneusement aseptisé par les lumières douces et les couleurs pastel d’un climat ensoleillé. Les scènes se suivent sans remous : l’une au musée pour nous montrer que Barack est cultivé, l’autre dans sa paroisse de quartier pour prouver sa dévotion à la communauté et ses talents d’orateur, une autre encore au cinéma, devant Do the Right Thing, de Spike Lee, pour marquer son acuité de conscience. (…) Les armes émollientes de la comédie romantique contribuent à déréaliser ces figures politiques, pour en faire de petites marionnettes telles qu’en rêverait une parfaite midinette. Ce qui en dit long sur la manière dont on considère l’électeur démocrate dans les officines du cinéma indépendant. Le Monde
Déjà ? Cinq mois avant leur départ de la Maison Blanche, Michelle et Barack Obama sont les héros d’un biopic qui retrace leur rencontre et leur histoire d’amour. (…) Un autre film, Barry, sur les années new-yorkaises du futur président, alors étudiant à l’université Columbia, sera présenté à la mi-septembre au Festival de Toronto (Ontario, Canada). Sans attendre que l’Amérique tourne la page avec l’élection présidentielle du 8 novembre, la légende cinématographique des Obama se construit déjà. L’histoire de la rencontre entre Barack et Michelle à Chicago (Illinois) est connue. Elle a été racontée par les intéressés eux-mêmes. C’était l’été 1989, en pleine canicule. Michelle Robinson, 25 ans, était avocate associée au cabinet juridique Sidley Austin, un début de carrière brillant pour cette fille d’employé municipal du « South Side », le quartier noir de la ville. Le stagiaire qui venait de lui être assigné pour l’été portait ce drôle de nom, Barack Obama. A 28 ans, il arrivait comme elle de la prestigieuse faculté de droit de Harvard. Michelle était assez sceptique – et caustique – sur les hommes. Dans un cabinet uniformément blanc, elle n’allait pas compromettre sa position en sortant avec le premier stagiaire venu. Barack a dû déployer tout son charme et quelques ruses pour la conquérir. (…) Dans le film, le récit est fidèle à la réalité, à quelques raccourcis près : c’est plus tard, et non le premier jour, que Barack a emmené sa « boss » à la réunion communautaire où il lui a fait la démonstration de ses talents politiques. Mais c’est effectivement devant le glacier Baskin-Robbins de Hyde Park qu’a été échangé ce jour-là le premier baiser (« Je l’ai embrassée et ça avait un goût de chocolat », a-t-il raconté à l’animatrice Oprah Winfrey). Depuis 2012, dans la cité de l’Illinois, une plaque commémore le « first kiss » au coin de Dorchester Avenue et de la 53e Rue. Du jamais vu dans la classe politique. (…) Pour les Noirs, qui ont peu de role models (« figures modèles ») dans les représentations cinématographiques, la vision d’un couple uni et d’une famille « ordinaire » est une bénédiction. Tika Sumpter arrive à peine à l’épaule de « Barack », alors que la First Lady mesure 1,80 m. Mais le film est un hommage à un couple qui a réussi à faire entrer toute la gamme du « cool » à la Maison Blanche. (…) Avec le Barry de Vikram Gandhi, ce sont les années pré-Michelle que les spectateurs vont pouvoir découvrir. 1981, une année torturée. Barack (Devon Terrell), qui se fait encore appeler Barry, est à la recherche d’une famille et d’une identité. Sa girlfriend de l’époque est une Blanche, Genevieve Cook (jouée par Anya Taylor-Joy), la fille d’un diplomate australien. Leur relation est compliquée par les incompréhensions raciales… Aujourd’hui, le président américain a encore cinq mois devant lui ; la date de passation de pouvoir est fixée au 20 janvier par la Constitution. Il y aura un dernier sommet du G20 en Asie, un dernier discours aux Nations unies (ONU), une dernière dinde graciée pour Thanksgiving. Mais la nostalgie a déjà envahi l’Amérique. Obama n’a jamais été aussi populaire. Depuis février, il dépasse les 50 % d’opinions favorables, ce qui ne lui était plus arrivé depuis l’hiver 2013. Le Monde magazine

Cherchez l’erreur !

Plaque commémorant le « first kiss » présidentiel,  sortie de pas moins – sans compter une comédie sur son enfance indonésienne – de deux films de Hollywood six mois avant la fin du deuxième mandat du président, articles du New York Times célébrant le coucher présidentiel ou se lamentant de son départ, sondages pour une fin de 2e mandat stratosphériques …

A l’heure où, si l’on en croit nos petits écrans et nos unes de journaux, certaines rues américaines, victimes du racisme policier sont à feu et à sang …

Et que comme pour l’élimination de Ben Laden, c’est au messie noir de la Maison Blanche que revient le mérite de l’ouverture du musée des horreurs du racisme américain dont le président Bush avait signé l’ordre de construction en 2003 …

Comment ne pas être émerveillé …

Entre les panégyriques de Hollywood et les dithyrambes du New Yort Times ou de Youtube …

Alors que suite à l’indécision ou aux décisions catastrophiques voire à l’aveuglement du soi-disant chef du Monde libre face à la menace islamiste …

Le Moyen-Orient comme certaines de nos rues à l’occasion sont elles réellement à feu et à sang …

De l’incroyable capacité de storytelling du premier président américain noir et plus rapide prix Nobel de l’histoire

Comme de la non moins incroyable capacité d‘aveuglement volontaire de ceux qui sont censés nous informer ?

« First Date » : quand Michelle rencontre Barack

Mathieu Macheret

Le Monde

30.08.2016

L’avis du « Monde » – on peut éviter

La machine hagiographique hollywoodienne n’a pas attendu le terme du second mandat de Barack Obama pour embaumer le 44e président des Etats-Unis dans sa propre légende. Pour cela, First Date n’emprunte pas les voies traditionnelles du biopic (biographie filmée), mais d’une comédie romantique se déroulant sur une seule journée : celle de 1989 où la future « First Lady » Michelle, alors jeune avocate à Chicago, tombe amoureuse du stagiaire de sa firme, l’humble, pondéré, clairvoyant, attentionné, plébiscité et prometteur Barack.

Comme dans beaucoup de fictions américaines, la séduction se passe un peu comme un entretien d’embauche

Constitué d’une longue conversation entre les deux personnages, au gré des endroits qu’ils visitent, le film insiste sur leur élégance simple, leur aisance naturelle et la perfection de leur pedigree. Comme dans beaucoup de fictions américaines, la séduction se passe un peu comme un entretien d’embauche, où il s’agit moins de décocher les flèches de Cupidon que de cocher les cases d’un CV imaginaire rempli de bienséance et de respectabilité. Les dialogues en profitent pour énumérer les états de service, éléments biographiques et souvenirs officiels des personnages, en somme tout ce qu’il faut savoir des locataires de la Maison Blanche, à la façon d’une notice Wikipédia.

Un environnement aseptisé

Le tout est enrobé par la mise en scène dans un environnement lisse, soyeux, confortable, soigneusement aseptisé par les lumières douces et les couleurs pastel d’un climat ensoleillé. Les scènes se suivent sans remous : l’une au musée pour nous montrer que Barack est cultivé, l’autre dans sa paroisse de quartier pour prouver sa dévotion à la communauté et ses talents d’orateur, une autre encore au cinéma, devant Do the Right Thing, de Spike Lee, pour marquer son acuité de conscience.

En fait, tout se passe comme si c’était moins Michelle qu’il devait séduire, que le spectateur. Les armes émollientes de la comédie romantique contribuent à déréaliser ces figures politiques, pour en faire de petites marionnettes telles qu’en rêverait une parfaite midinette. Ce qui en dit long sur la manière dont on considère l’électeur démocrate dans les officines du cinéma indépendant.

Film américain de Richard Tanne avec Parker Sawyers, Tika Sumpter, Vanessa Bell Calloway, Phillip Edward Van Lear (1 h 21).

Voir également:

Les Obama, vrais héros de cinéma

Corine Lesnes (San Francisco, correspondante)

M le magazine du Monde

26.08.2016

« First Date » relate la rencontre, en 1989, entre Michelle Robinson, avocate à Chicago, et son stagiaire Barack Obama.

Déjà ? Cinq mois avant leur départ de la Maison Blanche, Michelle et Barack Obama sont les héros d’un biopic qui retrace leur rencontre et leur histoire d’amour. Sorti le 26 août aux Etats-Unis, Southside with You est attendu sur les écrans français le 31 août sous le titre de First Date (« premier rendez-vous »).

Un autre film, Barry, sur les années new-yorkaises du futur président, alors étudiant à l’université Columbia, sera présenté à la mi-septembre au Festival de Toronto (Ontario, Canada). Sans attendre que l’Amérique tourne la page avec l’élection présidentielle du 8 novembre, la légende cinématographique des Obama se construit déjà.

L’histoire de la rencontre entre Barack et Michelle à Chicago (Illinois) est connue. Elle a été racontée par les intéressés eux-mêmes. C’était l’été 1989, en pleine canicule. Michelle Robinson, 25 ans, était avocate associée au cabinet juridique Sidley Austin, un début de carrière brillant pour cette fille d’employé municipal du « South Side », le quartier noir de la ville. Le stagiaire qui venait de lui être assigné pour l’été portait ce drôle de nom, Barack Obama.

Comment séduire la sceptique Michelle

A 28 ans, il arrivait comme elle de la prestigieuse faculté de droit de Harvard. Michelle était assez sceptique – et caustique – sur les hommes. Dans un cabinet uniformément blanc, elle n’allait pas compromettre sa position en sortant avec le premier stagiaire venu. Barack a dû déployer tout son charme et quelques ruses pour la conquérir.

« Ce n’est pas un rendez-vous amoureux », ne cessait de répéter Michelle à propos de leur premier après-midi ensemble (visite à l’Art Institute de Chicago et film de Spike Lee). Dans le film, le récit est fidèle à la réalité, à quelques raccourcis près : c’est plus tard, et non le premier jour, que Barack a emmené sa « boss » à la réunion communautaire où il lui a fait la démonstration de ses talents politiques.

Mais c’est effectivement devant le glacier Baskin-Robbins de Hyde Park qu’a été échangé ce jour-là le premier baiser (« Je l’ai embrassée et ça avait un goût de chocolat », a-t-il raconté à l’animatrice Oprah Winfrey). Depuis 2012, dans la cité de l’Illinois, une plaque commémore le « first kiss » au coin de Dorchester Avenue et de la 53e Rue.

Une famille modèle pour la communauté noire

Du jamais vu dans la classe politique. Il est vrai que, dans l’univers très « House of Cards » de Washington, les Obama détonnent. Après sept ans d’exercice du pouvoir, ils ont réussi à échapper aux scandales et ils continuent à afficher une image de complicité. Pour les Noirs, qui ont peu de role models (« figures modèles ») dans les représentations cinématographiques, la vision d’un couple uni et d’une famille « ordinaire » est une bénédiction.

Réalisé par Richard Tanne en dix-sept jours, avec un budget modeste, et produit par le chanteur et compositeur John Legend, un ami des Obama, Southside with You a emballé le Festival de Sundance (Utah) au début de l’année. Pourtant, les deux acteurs – Parker Sawyers, un quasi-inconnu, dans le rôle du futur président et Tika Sumpter (ex- « Gossip Girl »), dans celui de la brillante avocate – n’ont pas le swag (la classe) de Barack et Michelle Obama.

Ni même l’allure. Tika Sumpter arrive à peine à l’épaule de « Barack », alors que la First Lady mesure 1,80 m. Mais le film est un hommage à un couple qui a réussi à faire entrer toute la gamme du « cool » à la Maison Blanche. « On sait où ils sont arrivés, commente John Legend. C’est génial de voir où ils ont commencé. »

Regain d’amour pour le président sortant

Avec le Barry de Vikram Gandhi, ce sont les années pré-Michelle que les spectateurs vont pouvoir découvrir. 1981, une année torturée. Barack (Devon Terrell), qui se fait encore appeler Barry, est à la recherche d’une famille et d’une identité. Sa girlfriend de l’époque est une Blanche, Genevieve Cook (jouée par Anya Taylor-Joy), la fille d’un diplomate australien. Leur relation est compliquée par les incompréhensions raciales…

Aujourd’hui, le président américain a encore cinq mois devant lui ; la date de passation de pouvoir est fixée au 20 janvier par la Constitution. Il y aura un dernier sommet du G20 en Asie, un dernier discours aux Nations unies (ONU), une dernière dinde graciée pour Thanksgiving. Mais la nostalgie a déjà envahi l’Amérique. Obama n’a jamais été aussi populaire.

Depuis février, il dépasse les 50 % d’opinions favorables, ce qui ne lui était plus arrivé depuis l’hiver 2013. « Obama me manque », écrivait au début des primaires le chroniqueur républicain David Brooks dans le New York Times.

L’intéressé en joue lui-même. Lors du dernier dîner des correspondants à la Maison Blanche, début mai, il a été introduit sur la chanson phare de la comédie musicale Pitch Perfect : « Je vous manquerai quand je serai parti. »

Voir encore:

Movies

Review: In an Obama Biopic, the Audacity of Hagiography?

Southside With You

  • Directed by Richard Tanne
  • Biography, Drama, Romance
  • PG-13
  • 1h 24m

“Something else is pulling at me,” the gangly young man with the jug ears says. “I wonder if I can write books or hold a position of influence in civil rights,” he adds. “Politics?” the pretty young woman asks. He shrugs. “Maybe.”

At that point in the romantic idyll “Southside With You,” these two conversationalists are well into one of those intimate walk-and-talks future lovers sometimes share, the kind in which day turns into night and night sometimes turns into the next day (and the day after that). As they amble through one Chicago neighborhood after another — pausing here, driving there — they also meander down their memory lanes. He’s from Hawaii and Indonesia. She’s from Chicago, the South Side. He’s going to Harvard Law. She’s been there, done that, and is now practicing law. You see where this is going.

Sweet, slight and thuddingly sincere, “Southside With You” is a fictional re-creation of Barack and Michelle Obama’s first date. It’s a curious conceit for a movie less because as dates go this one is pretty low key but because the writer-director Richard Tanne mistakes faithfulness for truthfulness. He’s obviously interested in the Obamas, but he’s so cautious and worshipful that there’s nothing here to discover, only characters to admire. Every so often, you catch a glimpse of two people seeing each other as if for the first time; mostly, though, the movie just sets a course for the White House. “You definitely have a knack for making speeches,” Michelle says. Yes he does (can).

The story opens with Michelle (Tika Sumpter) talking about Barack (Parker Sawyers) to her parents (“Barack o-what-a?” says dad), while he tells his grandmother about Michelle. She’s his adviser at the firm where he’s a summer associate. Barack digs her; Michelle thinks their dating would be inappropriate. Still, he perseveres with gentle confidence, chipping away at her defenses with searching disquisitions, a park-bench lunch and a visit to an art show, where this stealth-seducer recites lines from Gwendolyn Brooks’s short poem “We Real Cool,” an ominous, disconcerting pre-mortem of some young men shooting pool that closes with the words “We die soon.”

Like Michelle and Barack’s journey through Chicago, the poem raises a cluster of ideas — literary, political, philosophical — about Barack, suggesting where he’s at and where he’s going. Mr. Tanne has clearly made a close study of his real-life inspirations, yet his movie is soon hostage to the couple’s history. His characters feel on loan and, despite his actors, eventually make for dull company because too many lines and details serve the great-man-to-be story rather than the romance. At the art show, when Barack explains that the painter Ernie Barnes did the canvases featured in the sitcom “Good Times,” it isn’t just a guy trying to impress a date; it’s a setup for another big moment.

Ms. Sumpter’s enunciation has a near-metonymic precision suggestive of Mrs. Obama’s, while Mr. Sawyers’s gestural looseness, playful smile and lanky saunter will be familiar. Mr. Sawyers has the better, more satisfying role, partly because of who he plays, though also because Barack is more complex and vulnerable. He is the one with the thorny father issues who is trying to win over the girl (the audience, the nation). He’s hard to resist even if, by the time he takes Michelle to a community meeting in a housing project — where the aspirations of the family in “Good Times” meet their real-world counterpart — his words sound like footnotes in a political biography.

Mr. Obama wrote one such book, “The Audacity of Hope,” in which he describes this first date in a scene that’s echoed in the movie. “I asked if I could kiss her,” Mr. Obama writes, before cutting loose his smooth operator: “It tasted of chocolate.” It’s no surprise that Mr. Obama is a better writer than Mr. Tanne and has a stronger sense of drama. But it’s too bad that while Mr. Obama’s story about his date has tension, a moral and politics, Mr. Tanne’s has plaster saints. Abraham Lincoln was long dead when John Ford polished the presidential halo in the 1939 film “Young Mr. Lincoln.” Mr. Obama hasn’t even left office, but the cinematic hagiography has begun.

“Southside With You” is rated PG-13 (Parents strongly cautioned) for cigarette smoking. Running time: 1 hour 24 minutes.

Voir aussi:

‘Southside With You’ Review

Hagiographic retelling of Obama’s first date likely to disappoint those uninitiated into his cult of personality

Free Beacon
September 2, 2016

The pivotal moment in Southside With You amounts to a center-left cinematic version of John Galt’s Speech.

Barack Obama (Parker Sawyers) strides to the pulpit of a rundown inner-city church and launches into a clunky but heartfelt riff on the nature of American society—that we can only make progress when we come together and work for the greater good. Though mercifully shorter than John Galt’s stem-winder near the end of Atlas Shrugged, Obama’s speech is also staged poorly: The camera lingers on our hero, static, shot slightly from below to give him a majestic visage. When we cut away, it’s often to Michelle (Tika Sumpter), who is seen smiling in the audience, overcome by the great man’s words, Dagny Taggart gazing at the man who would jumpstart the motor of the world.

“You definitely have a knack for making speeches,” she says, a cringe-inducing summation of Obama’s political talents.

Like Galt’s rambling ode to the Makers-Not-Takers Class, Obama’s vision of a world that works best when compromise is prized bears little relation to the world we’ve seen for the last few years.

The rest of the film is less annoyingly, but rarely more artfully, put together. It’s a lot of shot/reverse shot and slow walk-and-talks, with Barack and Michelle’s faces all-too-often draped in shadows. Oddly, the movie often works better when Michelle and Barack are not on screen together, as in the early going when the two of them discuss the evening’s events with their respective families.

There’s an interesting film to be made about Obama’s relation to his father, but director Richard Tanne doesn’t make much use of this fertile territory. He’s more interested in resurrecting the idea of hope and change, as embodied by the young couple in love, than he is in examining why the former has been lost and the latter has failed. As the New York Times’ Manohla Dargis—no indignant reactionary offended by this mediocre offering’s praise to the heavens, she—put it, “Mr. Obama hasn’t even left office, but the cinematic hagiography has begun.”

Such hagiography of our chief executives is not unheard of, but it’s also less common than you might think. The complicated portraits of presidents painted by Oliver Stone in Nixon (1995) and W. (2008)—sympathetic, to a point, but unsparing and occasionally unfair—are far more interesting than the offering to Obama’s cult of personality that Southside With You represents.

John Ford’s Young Mr. Lincoln (1939) and Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln (2012) are perhaps the two most impressive examples of pure homage to the presidency. Young Mr. Lincoln in particular is a deft piece of filmmaking—as the booklet that comes with the Criterion Collection’s edition of the film notes, the legendary Soviet director Sergei Eisenstein once wrote that if he could lay claim to any American film, it would have been this one—which culminates in as powerful a sequence as any in film history.

Honest Abe (Henry Fonda) has defended two brothers from a wrongful murder charge—first saving them from a lynch mob and then proving their innocence in court—and seen the grateful family off. A friend asks if he wants to come back to town. “No, I think I might go on a piece. Maybe to the top of that hill,” Lincoln replies, striding off into the sunset. As he crests the ridge and as the Battle Hymn of the Republic plays, the sky cracks and rain pours forth. He pushes on, into the rain, the lightning, the thunder. It’s a storm Lincoln will have to face alone, a storm similar to the one the nation faced when the film was produced in 1939.

It’s not a subtle image, particularly, but it does hold up through the decades, a simple and powerful picture of a man with the weight of a nation on his shoulders. In its own way, the closing moments of Southside With You are also affecting. Barack Obama sits in a chair, smoking a cigarette, a book on his lap. He smiles, thinking of himself and his date. The storm clouds gather again—mass murder in Syria; a destabilized Middle East; a resurgent China and Russia—but you wouldn’t know it from the placid look on the future chief executive’s face. He is detached, concerned with his own affairs, his own place in the world.

If that’s the impression Tanne was going for, well, to quote another president: Mission Accomplished.

Voir encore:

Barack Obama: The Rom-Com President

What ‘Southside With You’ says about President Obama’s legacy

Sam Dean

MEL

Aug 31 2016

A young Jack Kennedy leads his shipwrecked crew to safety on a deserted island, dragging an injured sailor as he swims. A middle-aged FDR is struck down by polio, then fights to recover his ability to walk in order to step back onto the political stage. An up-and-coming Abraham Lincoln, new to the legal profession, stops a lynch mob from killing two young men suspected of murder, then successfully defends them in court. A young Barack Obama, interning at a corporate law firm, convinces his supervisor to go on a date. They kiss.

One of these things is not like the others.

The vast majority of presidential movies focus on presidents being presidents, sitting at the head of state, living arguably the most consequential moments of their lives. A man with the power and responsibility of the highest office in the country is instantly interesting, whether that’s JFK with the Cuban missile crisis, Lincoln on the eve of the Civil War, Nixon authorizing break-ins at the Watergate, or that famous speech President Bill Pullman gives toward the end of Independence Day. It’s easy for a president to get turned into a figure of high drama, a hero or villain of our national narrative.

But when a film dips into a president’s pre-presidential years, there’s more than just a good story going on. In fact, only a handful of presidential films have ignored a president’s years in the Oval Office entirely: PT-109 (the JFK war movie), Sunrise at Campobello (FDR’s recovery drama), Young Mr. Lincoln (on Lincoln’s… yes, younger years), and now Southside With You, the new movie about Barack and Michelle Obama’s first date in Chicago in 1991.

Iwan Morgan, editor of Presidents in the Movies and professor of U.S. Studies and American History at University College London, explained over email that both JFK’s and FDR’s early biopics “deal with pre-presidential triumph over adversity to emphasize their suitability to lead in office, rather than celebrating their leadership in office.” Morgan added that John Ford, director of Young Mr. Lincoln, “focuses on the pre-heroic Lincoln to explore his formative influences and preparation for greatness.” The whole point of making a presidential prequel is to show the pattern of the POTUS-to-be.

So what does Southside with You show us? The film follows the Obamas through a fictionalized version of their famous first date, whose end is already memorialized by a plaque in front of a Hyde Park Baskin-Robbins — inscribed with this quote from a 2007 O, The Oprah Magazine interview with Barack: “On our first date, I treated her to the finest ice cream Baskin-Robbins had to offer, our dinner table doubling as the curb. I kissed her, and it tasted like chocolate.”

However sweet the ending, the day didn’t begin as a date, at least in Southside’s telling. Barack is a broke summer associate at a corporate law firm; Michelle, his supervisor. He knows she thinks dating within the office is a bad look (and it is), so he asks her out to a community activist meeting at the Gardens — a housing project on Chicago’s South Side — and he fudges the timing a little so they’ll have an opportunity to hang beforehand. They take a trip to the Art Institute of Chicago, where Barack recites the Gwendolyn Brooks poem “We Real Cool” from memory in front of an Ernie Barnes painting, then meander around a public park, trading political opinions and biographical details.

Barack (Parker Sawyers) and Michelle (Tika Sumpter) mostly speak in expository monologues; their back-and-forth has all the zip and timing of an exchange between animatronics in the Hall of Presidents. It’s less like Before Sunset, the movie’s obvious walk-and-talk precedent, and more like an extended video-game cut scene — even something about the cinematography feels expectant, like something is always about to happen, but never does.

The future POTUS and FLOTUS head to a bar, where Michelle finally agrees to call their day together a “date,” and then they go see Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing (another movie that takes place in one day, though the similarities end right about there). Walking out, the couple runs into a higher-up from the law firm and his wife.

This presents a double danger: First, Michelle’s main reason for not wanting to date within the office (and especially not wanting to date the only other black person in the office) was to avoid office gossip, and the undermining that comes with being anything less than professional; second, they ask the young black couple if they could explain the famous final scene of Do The Right Thing, in which the main character, Mookie (played by Spike Lee), throws a trash can through the window of the pizzeria where he works.

Mookie threw the trash can to save the life of the pizzeria owner and divert the crowd’s anger toward the restaurant itself, Barack explains, clearly catering to the older white couple. But once they walk away, he assures Michelle that he was just playing to his audience—Mookie threw the trash can because he was angry. Then: the ice cream, and the kiss.

Within the context of the rom-com, this makes for sweet (if somewhat boring) viewing. A first date is all about potential, but we know how this particular love story ends. The Obamas are paragons of the modern married couple; Barack’s promise as a potential partner paid off. But, as Manohla Dargis pointed out in her review in The New York Times, it’s clear throughout Southside that Michelle is meant to be a stand-in for the audience, for the Obama voter, for the nation at large — Barack didn’t just want Michelle, he wanted you.

So what about his promise as a president? Besides getting Michelle to go on a date with him in the first place, two moments where young Barack seemingly takes action are at the meeting in the Gardens and, belatedly, after Do the Right Thing. In the first, he gives a speech about not being discouraged by a fractious and adversarial political system, counseling patience. In the second, he gives a palatable answer to an older, conservative white audience, saving his real charm (and real insight) for Michelle. Now that’s politics.

Perhaps this would all be more touching if we knew that these tactics had made for a rip-roaring two terms as president. Instead, and in spite of itself, this plays right to the most persistent criticisms of the Obama presidency, and to the greatest fears of his supporters: that Obama never moved beyond his perceived potential from the 2008 election, and was never able to deliver much more than a solid speech.

Dargis called the film a “cinematic hagiography” in the Times, but to borrow another Christian term of art, it’s closer to a piece of apologetics. Instead of a miracle story of a hero’s precocious powers, it presents an argument against his critics, a character study by way of excuse. In Southside, the young Obama doesn’t demonstrate his future leadership ability as much as his ability to convince you of his future leadership ability. Which is, ironically, what many of his strongest critics say about his presidency. That it was — and remained, throughout his eight years in office — about possibility.

Southside tells us that, if it wasn’t for the system, Obama could have accomplished more, and despite it all, did an admirable job of keeping his head up. It urges us to believe what we already know: that he’s a cool guy in private, even if he keeps calling for drone strikes and deporting more people  — that’s just playing to the white couple at the movie theater, the conservative crowd. It argues, ice cream cone in hand, that Obama would have made a truly great president, if he had just been given the chance.

Voir de même:

Roger Ebert
August 26, 2016 

As Michelle Robinson (Tika Sumpter) gets dressed in her home on the South Side of Chicago, her mother (Vanessa Bell Calloway) playfully teases her about the amount of effort Michelle is putting into her appearance. “I thought this wasn’t a date,” she chides. Michelle insists it isn’t. “You know I like to look nice when I go out,” she says. When her father joins his wife in ribbing their daughter, Michelle digs in her heels about this being a “non-date”. But it’s clear the lady doth protest too much. In her mind, there’s no way she’s falling for the smooth-talking co-worker who invited her to a community event. She’s seen this type of brother before, and she thinks she’s immune to his brand of charm.

Soon, the brother in question, Barack Obama (Parker Sawyers), picks up Miss Robinson. Our first glimpse of him, backed by Janet Jackson’s deliriously catchy 1989 hit “Miss You Much, » is a master class of not allowing one’s meager means to interfere with one’s confidence level. Barack smokes with the preternaturally efficient coolness of Bette Davis, yet drives a car built for Fred Flintstone. The large hole in the passenger side floor of his raggedy vehicle will not diminish his swagger nor derail his plan. Using the community event as a jumping-off point, he intends to gently push this non-date into the date category.

So begins the romantic comedy « Southside with You, » a mostly-true account of the first date between our current President and the First Lady.Southside with you

Like “Before Sunrise,” a film which invites comparison, “Southside with You” is a two-hander that’s top-heavy with dialogue, walking and a knowing sense of location. Unlike that film, however, we already know the ending before the lights go down in the theater. So, writer/director Richard Tanne replaces the suspenseful pull of “will they or won’t they?” with an equally compelling and understated character study that humanizes his larger-than-life public figures. Tanne reminds us that, before ascending to the most powerful office in the world, Barack and Michelle were just two regular people who started out somewhere much smaller.

This down-to-earth approach works surprisingly well because “Southside with You” never loses sight of the primary tenet of a great romantic comedy: All you need is two people whom the audience wants to see get together—then you put them together. So many entries in this genre fail miserably because the filmmakers feel compelled to overcomplicate matters with useless subplots and extraneous characters; they mistake cacophony for complexity. “Southside with You” builds its emotional richness by coasting on the charisma of its two leads as they carefully navigate each other’s personality quirks and life stories. We may be ahead of them in terms of knowing the outcome, but we’re simultaneously learning the details.

“Southside with You” is at once a love song to the city of Chicago and its denizens, an unmistakably Black romance and a gentle, universal comedy. It is unapologetic about all three of these elements, and interweaves them in such a subtle fashion that they become more pronounced only upon later reflection. The Chicago affection manifests itself not only in a scene where, in front of a small group of community activists welcoming back their favorite son, Barack demonstrates a rough version of the speechmaking ability that will later become his trademark, but also when Barack takes Michelle to an art gallery. He points out that the Ernie Barnes paintings they’re viewing were used on the Chicago-set sitcom “Good Times.” Then the duo recite Chicago native Gwendolyn Brooks’ poem about the pool players at the Golden Shovel, « We Real Cool. » Even the beloved founder of this site, Roger Ebert, gets a shout-out for championing “Do the Right Thing, » the movie Barack and Michelle attend in the closing hours of their date.

Though its depiction of romance is recognizable to anyone who has ever gone on a successful first date, “Southside with You” also takes time to address the concerns Michelle has with dating her co-worker, especially since she’s his superior and the only Black woman in the office. The optics of this pairing worries her in ways that hint at the corporate sexism that existed back in 1989, and continues in some fashion today. Her concern is that her superiors might think she threw herself at the only other Black employee which, based on my own personal workplace experience, I found completely relatable. This plotline has traction, culminating in a fictional though very effective climactic scene between Barack, Michelle and their boss. It’s a bit overdramatic, but the payoff is a lovely ice cream-based reconciliation that may do for Baskin-Robbins what Beyoncé’s “Formation” did for Red Lobster.

Heady topics aside, “Southside with You” is often hilarious and never loses its old-fashioned sweetness. Sumpter’s take on Michelle is a tad more on-point than Sawyers’ Barack, but he compensates by exuding the same bemused self-assurance as his real-life counterpart. The two leads are both excellent, but this is really Michelle’s show. Sumpter relishes throwing those “you think you’re cute” looks that poke sharp, though loving holes in all forms of braggadocio, and Sawyers fills them with surprising vulnerability. The two manage to create a beautiful tribute to enduring love in just under 90 minutes, making “Southside with You” an irresistibly romantic and rousing success.

Voir aussi:

Movies
Tika Sumpter on Playing the Future First Lady, Michelle Obama

Robert Ito

The New York Times

Aug. 18, 2016

WEST HOLLYWOOD, Calif. — Tika Sumpter knew the screenplay was something special. It was, at its core, a romance, with two charming leads slowly falling for each other over the course of a single Chicago day. They speak passionately — at some points, angrily — about moral courage and racial politics and the struggles of staying true to oneself. They take sides on “Good Times” versus “The Brady Bunch,” ice cream versus pie. They quote the poet Gwendolyn Brooks (“We Real Cool”) from memory, while sizing up Ernie Barnes’s painting “Sugar Shack.” They watch “Do the Right Thing.”

It didn’t hurt that the two characters were Barack Obama and Michelle Robinson, in a fictionalized account of their first date, in 1989, when Spike Lee’s film was in theaters and Janet Jackson’s “Miss You Much” was in the air.

“I loved that it was an origin story about the two most famous people in the world right now, and about how they fell in love,” Ms. Sumpter said. “You don’t see a lot of black leads in love stories, and you definitely don’t see a lot of walk and talks with black people.”

In “Southside With You,” which opens Aug. 26, Ms. Sumpter plays the first lady-to-be at 25, a corporate lawyer who is also an adviser to a young man named Barack Obama (Parker Sawyers), an up-and-coming, Harvard-educated summer associate. The film received rave reviews when it had its premiere at Sundance, where it was one of the festival’s breakouts, in large part because of Ms. Sumpter’s performance. But “Southside With You” may not have been made if Ms. Sumpter hadn’t also pitched in as one of three producers.

As much as Ms. Sumpter coveted the meaty role of Michelle Robinson, once she secured the part, reality set in. “At first it was overwhelming,” she admitted. “I’ve never been to Harvard, I’ve never been to Princeton. I didn’t even finish school because I couldn’t afford it. But once I stripped away that ‘Michelle Obama,’ I was able to take it back to that girl from the South Side.”

The actress was here at the London Hotel on a recent morning, holding forth on the challenges of playing the young Ms. Robinson. Dressed in a black sundress and high heels, Ms. Sumpter, 36, would occasionally and animatedly slip into Mrs. Obama’s distinctive speech patterns to describe a scene or illustrate a point. “You feel like she’s talking just to you,” she said. “And she enunciates everything, to show that she really means what she says.”

Born Euphemia LatiQue Sumpter in Queens, the actress was the fourth child of six. Her mother was a corrections officer at Rikers Island; her father died when she was 13. “My mom said I was quiet and observant,” she said. “I always wanted to impress her, so I’d always clean the house.” In school, she was on the cheerleading squad, ran for student council, befriended skinheads and “the preppy girls,” spoke up for the bullied. “I was that girl in high school,” she said.

Ms. Sumpter caught the acting bug in grade school while watching episodes of “The Cosby Show” and “A Different World.” “I was like, I want to be in that box,” she said. “I don’t know how I’m going to get in there, but I want to do that.” At 16, after her family moved to Long Island, she would take the train into Manhattan, paying for acting classes with money she earned working the concession stand at a local movie theater. “I’d go to open calls and be totally wrong for everything,” she remembered. “My hair would not be right.”
Continue reading the main story

At 20, she booked a commercial for Curve perfume. “They probably still sell it at Rite Aid,” she said with a laugh. It was her first gig, and it was filmed in Times Square, and she couldn’t have been happier.

In 2005, Ms. Sumpter secured a regular role on “One Life to Live.” She’s been working steadily ever since, on television (“Gossip Girl,” “The Haves and the Have Nots”) and films (“Get On Up,” “Ride Along 2”).

In 2015, she saw an early synopsis of “Southside With You” by Richard Tanne. “I was like, please write this script,” she said. “I would call him every few weeks, ‘Are you writing it, are you writing it?’”

Even if she didn’t get the part, she told him, she wanted to be a producer on the film, to ensure that it got made. Before long, the first-time producer was doing everything from finding financing and locating extras to pitching studios and helping cast Barack.

“I don’t think she necessarily expected to be the lead producer alongside me,” said Mr. Tanne, who also directed the film. “But I was a first-time filmmaker, and people wanted to maybe impose their own vision on the film. She kind of naturally sprung into action to safeguard what the movie needed to be.”

The details of that storied first date — the stop at the art museum, their first kiss over a cone of Baskin-Robbins — have been recounted in biographies and articles about the first family. Mrs. Obama told David Mendell, author of “Obama: From Promise to Power,” that “I had dated a lot of brothers who had this kind of reputation coming in, so I figured he was one of those smooth brothers who could talk straight and impress people.”

In the film, Ms. Sumpter goes from wary to icy to “maybe this guy isn’t so bad” and back again, as Michelle is initially repelled by some of Barack’s moves (his insistence that this “not a date” actually is) before warming to others (his deep knowledge of African-American art, his gift for lighting up a crowd). “We talked about the levels of guard she might have up at any given time,” Mr. Tanne remembered. “We had three levels, almost like a DEFCON system.”

To prepare the actress worked with a vocal coach to master Mrs. Obama’s speech patterns, and watched videos to see how she walked and carried herself. “Once we started rehearsing,” said Mr. Sawyers, “I was like, oh, that’s it! She nailed it.”

In one scene, Michelle talks about the racism she encountered at Princeton and Harvard — some subtle, some less so — and how, even at her current firm, she has to navigate between “Planet Black and Planet White.” Ms. Sumpter admitted that there were parallels in her own field. “You see the differences in the way certain movies are treated,” she said. “But once you come to terms with that, you have to go, O.K., I’m not going to allow that to hold me back. Which is what I love about Michelle. She never allowed the color of her skin and all the things she was up against to keep her from breaking through.”

A lot of that confidence came from Mrs. Obama’s family, just as it did for Ms. Sumpter, who is expecting her own daughter this fall. “Because of my mom, I never felt less than,” she said, looking back on her early days trying to make it in the business. “I never came into this world thinking, I’m a brown-skinned girl going to Hollywood. I was always like, I’m talented and I’m beautiful and I’m smart. Why wouldn’t you want me?”

Voir de plus:

Roger Ebert
August 26, 2016 

As Michelle Robinson (Tika Sumpter) gets dressed in her home on the South Side of Chicago, her mother (Vanessa Bell Calloway) playfully teases her about the amount of effort Michelle is putting into her appearance. “I thought this wasn’t a date,” she chides. Michelle insists it isn’t. “You know I like to look nice when I go out,” she says. When her father joins his wife in ribbing their daughter, Michelle digs in her heels about this being a “non-date”. But it’s clear the lady doth protest too much. In her mind, there’s no way she’s falling for the smooth-talking co-worker who invited her to a community event. She’s seen this type of brother before, and she thinks she’s immune to his brand of charm.

Soon, the brother in question, Barack Obama (Parker Sawyers), picks up Miss Robinson. Our first glimpse of him, backed by Janet Jackson’s deliriously catchy 1989 hit “Miss You Much, » is a master class of not allowing one’s meager means to interfere with one’s confidence level. Barack smokes with the preternaturally efficient coolness of Bette Davis, yet drives a car built for Fred Flintstone. The large hole in the passenger side floor of his raggedy vehicle will not diminish his swagger nor derail his plan. Using the community event as a jumping-off point, he intends to gently push this non-date into the date category.

So begins the romantic comedy « Southside with You, » a mostly-true account of the first date between our current President and the First Lady. Like “Before Sunrise,” a film which invites comparison, “Southside with You” is a two-hander that’s top-heavy with dialogue, walking and a knowing sense of location. Unlike that film, however, we already know the ending before the lights go down in the theater. So, writer/director Richard Tanne replaces the suspenseful pull of “will they or won’t they?” with an equally compelling and understated character study that humanizes his larger-than-life public figures. Tanne reminds us that, before ascending to the most powerful office in the world, Barack and Michelle were just two regular people who started out somewhere much smaller.

This down-to-earth approach works surprisingly well because “Southside with You” never loses sight of the primary tenet of a great romantic comedy: All you need is two people whom the audience wants to see get together—then you put them together. So many entries in this genre fail miserably because the filmmakers feel compelled to overcomplicate matters with useless subplots and extraneous characters; they mistake cacophony for complexity. “Southside with You” builds its emotional richness by coasting on the charisma of its two leads as they carefully navigate each other’s personality quirks and life stories. We may be ahead of them in terms of knowing the outcome, but we’re simultaneously learning the details.

“Southside with You” is at once a love song to the city of Chicago and its denizens, an unmistakably Black romance and a gentle, universal comedy. It is unapologetic about all three of these elements, and interweaves them in such a subtle fashion that they become more pronounced only upon later reflection. The Chicago affection manifests itself not only in a scene where, in front of a small group of community activists welcoming back their favorite son, Barack demonstrates a rough version of the speechmaking ability that will later become his trademark, but also when Barack takes Michelle to an art gallery. He points out that the Ernie Barnes paintings they’re viewing were used on the Chicago-set sitcom “Good Times.” Then the duo recite Chicago native Gwendolyn Brooks’ poem about the pool players at the Golden Shovel, « We Real Cool. » Even the beloved founder of this site, Roger Ebert, gets a shout-out for championing “Do the Right Thing, » the movie Barack and Michelle attend in the closing hours of their date.

Though its depiction of romance is recognizable to anyone who has ever gone on a successful first date, “Southside with You” also takes time to address the concerns Michelle has with dating her co-worker, especially since she’s his superior and the only Black woman in the office. The optics of this pairing worries her in ways that hint at the corporate sexism that existed back in 1989, and continues in some fashion today. Her concern is that her superiors might think she threw herself at the only other Black employee which, based on my own personal workplace experience, I found completely relatable. This plotline has traction, culminating in a fictional though very effective climactic scene between Barack, Michelle and their boss. It’s a bit overdramatic, but the payoff is a lovely ice cream-based reconciliation that may do for Baskin-Robbins what Beyoncé’s “Formation” did for Red Lobster.

Heady topics aside, “Southside with You” is often hilarious and never loses its old-fashioned sweetness. Sumpter’s take on Michelle is a tad more on-point than Sawyers’ Barack, but he compensates by exuding the same bemused self-assurance as his real-life counterpart. The two leads are both excellent, but this is really Michelle’s show. Sumpter relishes throwing those “you think you’re cute” looks that poke sharp, though loving holes in all forms of braggadocio, and Sawyers fills them with surprising vulnerability. The two manage to create a beautiful tribute to enduring love in just under 90 minutes, making “Southside with You” an irresistibly romantic and rousing success.

Voir par ailleurs:

Barack Obama, le « storytelling » jusqu’au bout de la nuit

Le Monde

05.07.2016

Le rituel du soir de Barack Obama n’est un secret pour personne : le président des États-Unis est un couche-tard. Ces quelques heures de solitude, entre la fin du dîner et l’heure de dormir, vers 1 heure du matin, sont celles où il réfléchit et se retrouve seul avec lui-même. De menus détails sur sa vie qui sont connus du public depuis plusieurs années.

Alors pourquoi les raconter à nouveau ? pourrait-on demander au New York Times, et son enquête intitulée « Obama après la tombée de la nuit ». Parce que les lecteurs apprécient visiblement ces quelques images de l’intimité d’un président qui quittera bientôt la Maison Blanche. Deux jours après sa publication, l’article est toujours dans le top 10 des plus lus sur le site.

Barack Obama a toujours été un pro du storytelling. Tout, dans l’image qu’il donne de lui-même, est précisément contrôlé, y compris les moments de décontraction. Pete Souza, le photographe officiel de la Maison Blanche, en est le meilleur témoin et le meilleur outil. Le professionnel met en avant l’image d’un président plus décontracté, en marge du protocole officiel, proche des enfants, jouant allongé par terre avec un bébé tenu à bout de bras ou autorisant un jeune garçon à lui toucher les cheveux « pour savoir s’ils sont comme les siens ».

Dans cet article, c’est encore une fois l’image d’un homme décontracté, mais aussi plus sage et solitaire qu’à l’ordinaire, qui est travaillée. Et d’abord par l’introduction qui compare les habitudes nocturnes de Barack Obama à celle de ses prédécesseurs.

« Le président George W. Bush, un lève-tôt, était au lit à dix heures. Le président Bill Clinton se couchait tard comme M. Obama, mais il consacrait du temps à de longues conversations à bâtons rompus avec ses amis et ses alliés politiques. »

Là où Bill Clinton appréciait la compagnie jusqu’à tard dans la nuit, Barack Obama choisit la solitude réflexive. Pour enfoncer le clou, l’article cite alors l’historien Doris Kearns Goodwin : « C’est quelqu’un qui est bien seul avec lui-même. »

« Il y a quelque chose de spécial, la nuit. C’est plus étroit, la nuit. Cela lui laisse le temps de penser. »

« C’est plus étroit, la nuit »

L’huile qui fait tourner les rouages d’un storytelling réussi, ce sont les anecdotes, inoffensives ou amusantes. Ici, on découvre celle des sept amandes que Barack Obama mange le soir. Les amandes montrent que le président a une hygiène de vie impeccable, qu’il n’a besoin de boissons excitantes ou sucrées pour tenir le coup. Et en même temps, le chiffre précis a quelque chose d’insolite, qui donne l’image de quelqu’un d’un peu crispé, qui veut tout contrôler. Mais pas trop. « C’était devenu une blague entre Michelle et moi », raconte Sam Kass, le chef cuisinier personnel de la famille entre 2009 et 2014. « Ni six, ni huit, toujours sept amandes. »

Le portrait de Barack Obama, une fois la nuit tombée, soigne également l’image d’un bourreau de travail, perfectionniste et attaché aux détails. Cody Keenan, qui supervise l’écriture des discours à la Maison Blanche, raconte qu’il est parfois rappelé le soir pour revenir travailler. Les nuits les plus longues sont celles où Obama a décidé de retravailler ses discours. Cody Keenan comprend :

Une image de « Mister Cool »

Dans le même temps, il faut entretenir l’image de « Mister Cool » et continuer à travailler sur celle du père de famille. Barack Obama ne fait pas que travailler dans son bureau. Il se tient au courant des résultats sportifs sur ESPN et joue à Words With Friends, un dérivé du Scrabble sur iPad.

Le « rituel du coucher » n’a plus vraiment de raison d’être maintenant que ses filles Malia et Sasha ont 18 et 15 ans, mais il reste la « movie night », la soirée cinéma de la famille, tous les vendredis soirs dans le « Family Theater », une salle de projection privée de 40 places. Avec le petit détail qui change tout : Barack et Michelle apprécient les séries ultra-populaires Breaking Bad ou Game of Thrones.

Le procédé est efficace, et l’impression générale qui se dégage est celle d’un homme réfléchi, calme, solitaire. Dans les commentaires qui accompagnent l’article, les lecteurs se livrent à leurs propres analyses : seul un grand solitaire comme Barack peut incarner la fonction présidentielle, car « sa motivation dans la vie va au-delà du besoin narcissique d’obtenir des confirmations de sa grandeur ».

« J’ai bien plus confiance en quelqu’un qui a cette discipline et cette concentration que pour les extravertis qui candidatent habituellement à ces postes », dit un autre, sans donner de noms.

Voir enfin:

I Miss Barack Obama

As this primary season has gone along, a strange sensation has come over me: I miss Barack Obama. Now, obviously I disagree with a lot of Obama’s policy decisions. I’ve been disappointed by aspects of his presidency. I hope the next presidency is a philosophic departure.

But over the course of this campaign it feels as if there’s been a decline in behavioral standards across the board. Many of the traits of character and leadership that Obama possesses, and that maybe we have taken too much for granted, have suddenly gone missing or are in short supply.

The first and most important of these is basic integrity. The Obama administration has been remarkably scandal-free. Think of the way Iran-contra or the Lewinsky scandals swallowed years from Reagan and Clinton.

We’ve had very little of that from Obama. He and his staff have generally behaved with basic rectitude. Hillary Clinton is constantly having to hold these defensive press conferences when she’s trying to explain away some vaguely shady shortcut she’s taken, or decision she has made, but Obama has not had to do that.

He and his wife have not only displayed superior integrity themselves, they have mostly attracted and hired people with high personal standards. There are all sorts of unsightly characters floating around politics, including in the Clinton camp and in Gov. Chris Christie’s administration. This sort has been blocked from team Obama.

Second, a sense of basic humanity. Donald Trump has spent much of this campaign vowing to block Muslim immigration. You can only say that if you treat Muslim Americans as an abstraction. President Obama, meanwhile, went to a mosque, looked into people’s eyes and gave a wonderful speech reasserting their place as Americans.

He’s exuded this basic care and respect for the dignity of others time and time again. Let’s put it this way: Imagine if Barack and Michelle Obama joined the board of a charity you’re involved in. You’d be happy to have such people in your community. Could you say that comfortably about Ted Cruz? The quality of a president’s humanity flows out in the unexpected but important moments.

Third, a soundness in his decision-making process. Over the years I have spoken to many members of this administration who were disappointed that the president didn’t take their advice. But those disappointed staffers almost always felt that their views had been considered in depth.

Obama’s basic approach is to promote his values as much as he can within the limits of the situation. Bernie Sanders, by contrast, has been so blinded by his values that the reality of the situation does not seem to penetrate his mind.

Take health care. Passing Obamacare was a mighty lift that led to two gigantic midterm election defeats. As Megan McArdle pointed out in her Bloomberg View column, Obamacare took coverage away from only a small minority of Americans. Sanderscare would take employer coverage away from tens of millions of satisfied customers, destroy the health insurance business and levy massive new tax hikes. This is epic social disruption.

To think you could pass Sanderscare through a polarized Washington and in a country deeply suspicious of government is to live in intellectual fairyland. President Obama may have been too cautious, especially in the Middle East, but at least he’s able to grasp the reality of the situation.

Fourth, grace under pressure. I happen to find it charming that Marco Rubio gets nervous on the big occasions — that he grabs for the bottle of water, breaks out in a sweat and went robotic in the last debate. It shows Rubio is a normal person. And I happen to think overconfidence is one of Obama’s great flaws. But a president has to maintain equipoise under enormous pressure. Obama has done that, especially amid the financial crisis. After Saturday night, this is now an open question about Rubio.

Fifth, a resilient sense of optimism. To hear Sanders or Trump, Cruz and Ben Carson campaign is to wallow in the pornography of pessimism, to conclude that this country is on the verge of complete collapse. That’s simply not true. We have problems, but they are less serious than those faced by just about any other nation on earth.

People are motivated to make wise choices more by hope and opportunity than by fear, cynicism, hatred and despair. Unlike many current candidates, Obama has not appealed to those passions.

No, Obama has not been temperamentally perfect. Too often he’s been disdainful, aloof, resentful and insular. But there is a tone of ugliness creeping across the world, as democracies retreat, as tribalism mounts, as suspiciousness and authoritarianism take center stage.

Obama radiates an ethos of integrity, humanity, good manners and elegance that I’m beginning to miss, and that I suspect we will all miss a bit, regardless of who replaces him.

Voir aussi:

The Authentic Joy of “Southside with You”

The writer and director Richard Tanne’s first feature, “Southside with You,” which will be released next Friday, is an opening act of superb audacity, a self-imposed challenge so mighty that it might seem, on paper, to be a stunt. It’s a drama about Barack Obama and Michelle Robinson’s first date, in Chicago, in the summer of 1989. It stars Parker Sawyers as the twenty-eight-year-old Barack, a Harvard Law student and summer associate at a Chicago law firm, and Tika Sumpter (who also co-produced the film) as the twenty-five-year-old Michelle, a Harvard Law graduate and a second-year associate at the same firm. The results don’t resemble a stunt; far from it. “Southside with You,” running a brisk hour and twenty minutes, is a fully realized, intricately imagined, warmhearted, sharp-witted, and perceptive drama, one that sticks close to its protagonists while resonating quietly but grandly with the sweep of a historical epic.

Tanne tells the story of the First Couple’s first date with a tightly constrained time frame—one day’s and evening’s worth of action—that begins with the protagonists preparing for their rendezvous and ends with them back at their homes. In between, Tanne pulls off a near-miracle, conveying these historic figures’ depth and complexity of character without making them grandiose. The dialogue is freewheeling and intimate, ranging through subjects far from the matters at hand, suggesting enormous intellect and enormous promise without seeming cut-and-pasted from speeches or memoirs. The film exudes Tanne’s own sense of calm excitement, nearly a documentarian’s serendipitous thrill at being present to catch on-camera a secret miracle of mighty historical import.

Movies about public figures—ones whose appearance, diction, and gestures are deeply ingrained in the minds of most likely viewers—must confront the Scylla of impersonation and the Charybdis of unfaithfulness. Tanne’s extraordinary actors thread that strait nimbly, delivering performances that exist on their own but feel true to the characters, that spin with dialectical delight and embody the ardors, ambitions, and uncertainties that even the most able and aware young adults must face.

The movie’s first dramatic uncertainty is whether Michelle and Barack’s meeting is even a date. Talking to her parents before his arrival, she denies that it is; talking with him on the street soon after he picks her up in his beat-up car, she not only denies that it is but also demands that it not be one. Michelle explains that, as a black woman with mainly white male co-workers, the perception arising from her dating a black summer associate—especially one whose nominal adviser she is—would be perceived negatively by higher-ups at the firm. But Barack, smooth-talking, brashly funny, and calmly determined, makes no bones about his intentions, even as he apparently defers to her insistence.

The easygoing yet rapid-fire dialogue—and the actors’ controlled yet passionate delivery of it, as they get to know each other, size each other up, and make each other aware of their motives and doubts—evokes the pregnant power of the occasion. Yet the couple’s depth of character emerges all the more vividly through Tanne’s alert directorial impressionism, a sensitivity to the actors’ probing glances that provides a sort of visual matrix for the actors’ inner life. It comes through in small but memorable touches, as when young Barack, smoking a cigarette in his rattling car, sprays some air freshener before pulling up to Michelle’s house. When she gets in, she sniffs the chemical blend; as the car pulls away, she glances down at a hole in the floor of the car, through which she sees the asphalt below. That flickering subjectivity suffuses and sustains the action, lends images to the characters, states of mind and moods to their ideas.

Tanne achieves something that few other directors—whether of independent or Hollywood or art-house films—ever do: he creates characters with an ample sense of memory, who fully inhabit their life prior to their time onscreen, and who have a wide range of cultural references and surging ideas that leap spontaneously into their conversation. A scene in which Michelle and Barack visit an exhibit of Afrocentric art—he discusses the importance of the painter Ernie Barnes to the sitcom “Good Times,” and together they recall Gwendolyn Brooks’s poem “We Real Cool”—has an effortless grace that reflects an unusual cinematic depth of lived experience.

The centerpiece of the film is a splendid bit of romantic and principled performance art on the part of Barack. He plans the non-date date around a community meeting in a mainly black neighborhood that Michelle—who did pro-bono work at Harvard and who admits to frustration with her trademark-law work at the firm—is eager to attend. There, Barack, who had been active with the organization before heading to Harvard, is received like a prodigal son. The subject of the meeting is the legislature’s refusal to build a much-needed community center; frustration among the attendees mounts, until Barack addresses them and offers some brilliant practical suggestions to overcome the opposition. At the meeting, he displays, above all, his gifts for public speaking and, even more, for empathy. He reveals, to the community group but also to Michelle, a preternatural genius at grasping interests and motives, at seeking common cause, and at recognizing—and acting upon—the human factor. There, Barack also displays a personal philosophy of practical politics that’s tied to his larger reflections on American history and political theory. The intellectual passion that Tanne builds into the scene, and that Sawyers delivers with nuanced fervor, is all the more striking and exquisite for its subtle positioning as a device of romantic seduction.

 

Michelle’s sense of principled responsibility and groundedness, her worldly maturity and practical insight, is matched by Barack’s ardent but callow, mighty but still-unfocussed energies. The movie’s ring of authenticity carried me through from start to finish without inviting my speculations as to the historical veracity of the events. Curiosity eventually kicked in, though; most accounts of the first date suggest that its general contours involved Michelle’s reluctance to date a colleague who was also a subordinate, the visit to the Art Institute, a walk, a drink, and a viewing of the recently released film “Do the Right Thing.” The community meeting is usually described as occurring at another occasion, yet it fits into the first date with a verisimilitude as well as an emotional impact that justify the dramatization.

As for their viewing of Spike Lee’s movie, the scene that Tanne derives from it is a minor masterwork of ironic psychology and mother wit. It’s too good to spoil; suffice it to say that the scene is set against the backdrop of controversy that greeted Lee’s film at the time of its release, with some critics—white critics—fearing that the climactic act of violence (meaning not the police killing of Radio Raheem but Mookie’s throwing a garbage can through the window of Sal’s Pizzeria and leading his neighbors to ransack the venue) would incite riots.

“Southside with You” is the sort of movie that, say, Richard Linklater’s three “Before” movies aren’t—an intimate story that has a reach far greater than its scale, that has stakes and substance extending beyond the couple’s immediate fortunes. There’s a noble historical precedent for Tanne’s film. If the modern cinema was inspired by Roberto Rossellini’s “Voyage to Italy,” from 1954—which taught a handful of ambitious young French critics that all they needed to make a movie was two actors and a car, that they could make a low-budget and small-scale production that would be rich in cinematic ideas and romantic passion alike—then “Southside with You” is an exemplary work of cinematic modernity. Rossellini, a cinematic philosopher, ranges far through history and politics to ground a couple’s intimate disasters in the deep currents of modern life.

Tanne does this, too, and goes one step further; his inspiration is reminiscent of the advice that the nineteen-year-old critic Jean-Luc Godard gave to his cinematic elders, “unhappy filmmakers of France who lack scenarios.” Godard advised them to make films about “the tax system,” about the writer and Nazi collaborator Philippe Henriot, about the Resistance activist Danielle Casanova. Tanne picks a great subject of contemporary history and politics—indeed, one of the very greatest—and approaches it without the pomp and bombast of ostensibly important, message-mongering Oscarizables. He realizes Barack Obama and Michelle Robinson onscreen with the same meticulous, thoughtful, inventive imagination that other directors might bring to figures of legend, people they know, or their own lives. “Southside with You” is a virtuosic realization of history on the wing, of the lives of others incarnated as firsthand experience. To tell this story is a nearly impossible challenge, and Tanne meets it at its high level.

Voir enfin:

Politics
Obama After Dark: The Precious Hours Alone

Michael D. Shear

The New York Times

July 2, 2016

WASHINGTON — “Are you up?”

The emails arrive late, often after 1 a.m., tapped out on a secure BlackBerry from an email address known only to a few. The weary recipients know that once again, the boss has not yet gone to bed.

The late-night interruptions from President Obama might be sharply worded questions about memos he has read. Sometimes they are taunts because the recipient’s sports team just lost.

Last month it was a 12:30 a.m. email to Benjamin J. Rhodes, the deputy national security adviser, and Denis R. McDonough, the White House chief of staff, telling them he had finished reworking a speechwriter’s draft of presidential remarks for later that morning. Mr. Obama had spent three hours scrawling in longhand on a yellow legal pad an angry condemnation of Donald J. Trump’s response to the attack in Orlando, Fla., and told his aides they could pick up his rewrite at the White House usher’s office when they came in for work.

Mr. Obama calls himself a “night guy,” and as president, he has come to consider the long, solitary hours after dark as essential as his time in the Oval Office. Almost every night that he is in the White House, Mr. Obama has dinner at 6:30 with his wife and daughters and then withdraws to the Treaty Room, his private office down the hall from his bedroom on the second floor of the White House residence.

There, his closest aides say, he spends four or five hours largely by himself.

He works on speeches. He reads the stack of briefing papers delivered at 8 p.m. by the staff secretary. He reads 10 letters from Americans chosen each day by his staff. “How can we allow private citizens to buy automatic weapons? They are weapons of war,” Liz O’Connor, a Connecticut middle school teacher, wrote in a letter Mr. Obama read on the night of June 13.

The president also watches ESPN, reads novels or plays Words With Friends on his iPad.

Michelle Obama occasionally pops in, but she goes to bed before the president, who is up so late he barely gets five hours of sleep a night. For Mr. Obama, the time alone has become more important.

“Everybody carves out their time to get their thoughts together. There is no doubt that window is his window,” said Rahm Emanuel, Mr. Obama’s first chief of staff. “You can’t block out a half-hour and try to do it during the day. It’s too much incoming. That’s the place where it can all be put aside and you can focus.”

President George W. Bush, an early riser, was in bed by 10. President Bill Clinton was up late like Mr. Obama, but he spent the time in lengthy, freewheeling phone conversations with friends and political allies, forcing aides to scan the White House phone logs in the mornings to keep track of whom the president might have called the night before.

“A lot of times, for some of our presidential leaders, the energy they need comes from contact with other people,” said the historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, who has had dinner with Mr. Obama several times in the past seven and a half years. “He seems to be somebody who is at home with himself.”
‘Insane Amount of Paper’

When Mr. Obama first arrived at the White House, his after-dinner routine started around 7:15 p.m. in the game room, on the third floor of the residence. There, on an old Brunswick pool table, Mr. Obama and Sam Kass, then the Obama family’s personal chef, would spend 45 minutes playing eight-ball.

Mr. Kass saw pool as a chance for Mr. Obama to decompress after intense days in the Oval Office, and the two kept a running score. “He’s a bit ahead,” said Mr. Kass, who left the White House at the end of 2014.

In those days, the president followed the billiards game with bedtime routines with his daughters. These days, now that both are teenagers, Mr. Obama heads directly to the Treaty Room, named for the many historical documents that have been signed in it, including the peace protocol that ended the Spanish-American War in 1898.

“The sports channel is on,” Mr. Emanuel said, recalling the ubiquitous images on the room’s large flat-screen television. “Sports in the background, with the volume down.”

By 8 p.m., the usher’s office delivers the president’s leather-bound daily briefing book — a large binder accompanied by a tall stack of folders with memos and documents from across the government, all demanding the president’s attention. “An insane amount of paper,” Mr. Kass said.

Mr. Obama often reads through it in a leather swivel chair at his tablelike desk, under a portrait of President Ulysses S. Grant. Windows on each side of Grant look out on the brightly lit Washington Monument and the Jefferson Memorial.

Other nights, the president settles in on the sofa under the 1976 “Butterfly” by Susan Rothenberg, a 6-foot-by-7-foot canvas of burnt sienna and black slashes that evokes a galloping horse.

“He is thoroughly predictable in having gone through every piece of paper that he gets,” said Tom Donilon, Mr. Obama’s national security adviser from 2010 to 2013. “You’ll come in in the morning, it will be there: questions, notes, decisions.”
Photo
Mr. Obama often works on speeches late into the night, like the one he gave in Selma, Ala., on the 50th anniversary of “Bloody Sunday.” Here, people listened to his speech last year. Credit Doug Mills/The New York Times
Seven Almonds

To stay awake, the president does not turn to caffeine. He rarely drinks coffee or tea, and more often has a bottle of water next to him than a soda. His friends say his only snack at night is seven lightly salted almonds.

“Michelle and I would always joke: Not six. Not eight,” Mr. Kass said. “Always seven almonds.”

The demands of the president’s day job sometimes intrude. A photo taken in 2011 shows Mr. Obama in the Treaty Room with Mr. McDonough, at that time the deputy national security adviser, and John O. Brennan, then Mr. Obama’s counterterrorism chief and now the director of the C.I.A., after placing a call to Prime Minister Naoto Kan of Japan shortly after Japan was hit by a devastating magnitude 9.0 earthquake. “The call was made near midnight,” the photo caption says.

But most often, Mr. Obama’s time in the Treaty Room is his own.

“I’ll probably read briefing papers or do paperwork or write stuff until about 11:30 p.m., and then I usually have about a half-hour to read before I go to bed, about midnight, 12:30 a.m., sometimes a little later,” Mr. Obama told Jon Meacham, the editor in chief of Newsweek, in 2009.

In 2014, Mr. Obama told Kelly Ripa and Michael Strahan of ABC’s “Live With Kelly and Michael” that he stayed up even later — “until like 2 o’clock at night, reading briefings and doing work” — and added that he woke up “at a pretty reasonable hour, usually around 7.”
‘Can You Come Back?’

Mr. Obama’s longest nights — the ones that stretch well into the early morning — usually involve speeches.

One night last June, Cody Keenan, the president’s chief speechwriter, had just returned home from work at 9 p.m. and ordered pizza when he heard from the president: “Can you come back tonight?”

Mr. Keenan met the president in the usher’s office on the first floor of the residence, where the two worked until nearly 11 p.m. on the president’s eulogy for nine African-Americans fatally shot during Bible study at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C.

Three months earlier, Mr. Keenan had had to return to the White House when the president summoned him — at midnight — to go over changes to a speech Mr. Obama was to deliver in Selma, Ala., on the 50th anniversary of “Bloody Sunday,” when protesters were brutally beaten by the police on the Edmund Pettus Bridge.

“There’s something about the night,” Mr. Keenan said, reflecting on his boss’s use of the time. “It’s smaller. It lets you think.”

In 2009, Jon Favreau, Mr. Keenan’s predecessor, gave the president a draft of his Nobel Prize acceptance speech the night before they were scheduled to leave for the ceremony in Oslo. Mr. Obama stayed up until 4 a.m. revising the speech, and handed Mr. Favreau 11 handwritten pages later that morning.

On the plane to Norway, Mr. Obama, Mr. Favreau and two other aides pulled another near-all-nighter as they continued to work on the speech. Once Mr. Obama had delivered it, he called the exhausted Mr. Favreau at his hotel.

“He said, ‘Hey, I think that turned out O.K.,’” Mr. Favreau recalled. “I said, ‘Yes.’ And he said, ‘Let’s never do that again.’”
Some Time for Play

Not everything that goes on in the Treaty Room is work.

In addition to playing Words With Friends, a Scrabble-like online game, on his iPad, Mr. Obama turns up the sound on the television for big sports games.

“If he’s watching a game, he will send a message. ‘Duke should have won that game,’ or whatever,” said Reggie Love, a former Duke basketball player who was Mr. Obama’s personal aide for the first three years of his presidency.

The president also uses the time to catch up on the news, skimming The New York Times, The Washington Post and The Wall Street Journal on his iPad or watching cable. Mr. Love recalls getting an email after 1 a.m. after Mr. Obama saw a television report about students whose “bucket list” included meeting the president. Why had he not met them, the president asked Mr. Love.

“‘Someone decided it wasn’t a good idea,’ I said,” Mr. Love recalled. “He said, ‘Well, I’m the president and I think it’s a good idea.’”

Mr. Obama and his wife are also fans of cable dramas like “Boardwalk Empire,” “Game of Thrones” and “Breaking Bad.” On Friday nights — movie night at the White House — Mr. Obama and his family are often in the Family Theater, a 40-seat screening room on the first floor of the East Wing, watching first-run films they have chosen and had delivered from the Motion Picture Association of America.

There is time, too, for fantasy about what life would be like outside the White House. Mr. Emanuel, who is now the mayor of Chicago but remains close to the president, said he and Mr. Obama once imagined moving to Hawaii to open a T-shirt shack that sold only one size (medium) and one color (white). Their dream was that they would no longer have to make decisions.

During difficult White House meetings when no good decision seemed possible, Mr. Emanuel would sometimes turn to Mr. Obama and say, “White.” Mr. Obama would in turn say, “Medium.”

Now Mr. Obama, who has six months left of solitary late nights in the Treaty Room, seems to be looking toward the end. Once he is out of the White House, he said in March at an Easter prayer breakfast in the State Dining Room, “I am going to take three, four months where I just sleep.”

Barack Obama inaugure le Musée afro-américain de Washington
Philippe Gélie
Le Figaro
24/09/2016

VIDÉO – Le président conseille à Donald Trump de « visiter » le nouvel édifice, qui raconte l’esclavage et la discrimination mais aussi les succès des Noirs américains.

De notre correspondant à Washington

George W. Bush avait signé en 2003 la loi créant le Musée national de l’Histoire et de la Culture Afro-Américaines, mais c’est au premier président noir du pays qu’est revenu le privilège de l’inaugurer ce samedi.

Outre Barack et Michelle Obama, George W. et Laura Bush les élus du Congrès et les juges de la Cour suprême, quelque 20.000 personnes se sont rassemblées en milieu de journée sur le Mall de Washington, la grande esplanade faisant face au Capitole, au nombre desquelles tout ce que le pays compte de célébrités noires. Oprah Winfrey, qui a donné 20 millions de dollars, a eu droit à une place d’honneur.

Dans un discours où son émotion a affleuré, le président Obama a célébré «une part essentielle de l’histoire américaine, parfois laissée de côté. Une grande nation ne se cache pas la vérité. La vérité nous renforce, nous fortifie. Comprendre d’où nous venons est un acte de patriotisme.» Parlant au nom des Afro-Américains, il a ajouté: «Nous ne sommes pas un fardeau pour l’Amérique, une tache sur l’Amérique, un objet de honte ou de pitié pour l’Amérique. Nous sommes l’Amérique!»

Au-dessus de lui, le bâtiment de six étages, dessiné par l’architecte britannique d’origine tanzanienne David Adjaye, se dresse comme une couronne africaine de bronze face au Washington Monument (l’obélisque érigé en hommage au premier président des Etats-Unis), à l’endroit même où, il y a deux siècles, se tenait un marché aux esclaves. Son matériau, inspirée des textiles d’Afrique de l’Ouest, laisse passer la lumière et rougeoie au soleil couchant, créant une impression massive de l’extérieur et aérienne de l’intérieur.

Obama a invité Trump

Il a fallu treize ans et 540 millions de dollars pour bâtir le dix-neuvième musée de la Smithsonian Institution et y rassembler plus de 35.000 témoignages de l’histoire des Afro-Américains, dont aucun aspect n’est occulté: ni la traite des esclaves, ni la ségrégation, ni la lutte pour les droits civiques, ni les réussites contemporaines, du sport au hip-hop et à la politique. La présidence de Barack Obama y est documentée dans l’un des 27 espaces d’exposition, non loin de la Cadillac de Chuck Berry ou des chaussures de piste de Jessie Owens.

Mais le visiteur est d’abord invité à passer devant les chaînes, les fouets, les huttes misérables des esclaves, les photos de dos lacérés ou de lynchages (3437 Noirs pendus entre 1882 et 1851), ou encore le cercueil d’Emmett Till, tué à l’âge de 14 ans dans le Mississippi pour avoir sifflé une femme blanche en 1955. «Ce n’est pas un musée du crime ou de la culpabilité, insiste son directeur, Lonnie Bunch, c’est un lieu qui raconte le voyage d’un peuple et l’histoire d’une nation. Il n’y a pas de réponses simples à des questions complexes».

Au moment où les marches de la communauté noire se répandent dans le pays pour protester contre les violences policières, Barack Obama a invité Donald Trump à visiter le Musée de l’Histoire et de la Culture Afro-Américaine. Le candidat républicain à sa succession a déclaré que les Noirs vivaient aujourd’hui «dans les pires conditions qu’ils aient jamais connues». Dans une interview vendredi à la chaîne ABC, le président a répliqué: «Je crois qu’un enfant de 8 ans est au courant que l’esclavage n’était pas très bon pour les Noirs et que l’ère Jim Crow (les lois ségrégationnistes, Ndlr) n’était pas très bonne pour les Noirs».

Voir enfin:

U.S. Murders Increased 10.8% in 2015
The figures, released by the FBI, could stoke worries that the trend of falling crime rates may be ending
Devlin Barrett
The Wall Street Journal

Sept. 26, 2016

WASHINGTON—Murders in the U.S. jumped by 10.8% in 2015, according to figures released Monday by the Federal Bureau of Investigation—a sharp increase that could fuel concerns that the nation’s two-decade trend of falling crime rates may be ending.

The figures had been expected to show an increase, after preliminary data released earlier this year indicated violent crime and murders were rising. But the double-digit increase in murders dwarfed any in the past 20 years, eclipsing the 3.7% increase in 2005, the year in which the biggest increase occurred before now.

In 2014, the FBI recorded violent crime narrowly falling, by 0.2%. In 2015, the number of violent crimes rose 3.9% though the number of property crimes dropped 2.6%, the FBI said.

Richard Rosenfeld, a criminologist at the University of Missouri-St.Louis, said a key driver of the murder spike may be an increasing distrust of police in major cities where controversial officer shootings have led to protests.

“This rise is concentrated in certain large cities where police-community tensions have been notable,’’ said Mr. Rosenfeld, citing Cleveland, Baltimore, and St. Louis as examples. The rise in killings is not spread evenly around America, he noted, but is rather centered on big cities with large African-American populations.

In all, there were 15,696 instances of murder and non-negligence manslaughter in the U.S. last year, the FBI said.

Early figures for 2016 indicate murders may still be rising. While Baltimore and Washington, D.C., are seeing their murder numbers fall back down so far this year, Chicago has seen a tremendous spike, to 316 homicides in the first half of 2016 compared with 211 in the first half of 2015. Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel delivered an emotional speech on crime last Thursday, and Chicago police officials have announced an increase of nearly 1,000 officers over two years.

A report by the Major Cities Chiefs Association found that for the first half of this year, murders rose in 29 of the nation’s biggest cities while they fell in 22 others.

Mr. Rosenfeld said the FBI data suggests the increase in murder may be caused by some version of the “Ferguson effect’’—a term often used by law-enforcement officials to describe what they see as the negative effects of the recent anti-police protests.

The killing by a police officer of an unarmed black 18-year-old in Ferguson, Mo., in 2014 led to protests there and around the country. Some law-enforcement officials, including FBI Director James Comey, have argued that since then, some officers may be more reluctant to get out of their patrol cars and engage in the kind of difficult work that reduces street crime, out of fear they may be videotaped and criticized publicly.

Mr. Rosenfeld suggested a different dynamic may be at play, though stemming from the same tensions. Members of minority and poor communities may be more reluctant to talk to police and help them solve crimes in cities where officers are viewed as untrustworthy and threatening, he said, particularly where there have been recent controversial killings by police officers.

The crime rise in such a short period of time eliminates possible causes like economic struggles or changing demographics, Mr. Rosenfeld said.

“What has happened in the course of the last year or two is attention to police-community relations and controversies over police use of deadly force, especially involving unarmed African-Americans,” he said.

Beyond that, the new figures show a growing racial disparity in who gets killed in America.

Nationally, the murder of black Americans outpaces that of whites—7,039 African-Americans were killed last year, compared with 5,854 whites, according to the data. The races of the remaining victims is unknown because not all police departments report it. That is in a nation where 13% of Americans identify solely as African-American and 77% identify solely as white.

In 2014, 698 more blacks were killed than whites, according to the FBI. In 2015, 1,185 more blacks were killed than whites, according to the data.

The number and percentage of killings involving guns also increased. In 2014, 67.9% of murders were committed with guns, compared to 71.5% in 2015, the FBI said. Guns have long been used in about two-thirds of the killings in America, data show.

Attorney General Loretta Lynch, in a speech Monday, said the report shows “we still have so much work to do. But the report also reminds us of the progress that we are making. It shows that in many communities, crime has remained stable or even decreased from historic lows reported in 2014.”

The new figures are certain to fuel the ongoing debate about what causes crime to rise and what should be done to reverse that.

John Pfaff, a professor at Fordham Law School, said the numbers are concerning but that it is too early to draw any definite conclusions from the data, noting that the murder rate in 2015 was still lower than in 2009.

“It’s not a giant rollback of things. 2015 is the third-safest year for violent crime since 1970,’’ Mr. Pfaff said. “The last time we saw a jump like this was 1989 to 1990, and that was a much more broad increase in crime.’’

Still, the new figures could further dampen efforts in Congress to pass laws cutting prison sentences for nonviolent offenders or others. Mr. Pfaff cautioned that the political impact of the data could be disproportionate to their actual significance.

“The politics of crime are very asymmetric,” he said. “We overreact to bad news and underreact to good news.’’

FBI Director James Comey, in releasing the figures, called for “more transparency and accountability in law enforcement.”

Mr. Comey said the FBI has been working to get better crime statistics, and to get them quicker, because the agency has been criticized for the length of time it has taken to process crime figures it receives from states.


Racisme: Vous avez dit pompiers pyromanes ? (Black lies matter: When all else fails, play the race card)

25 septembre, 2016
colin-kaepernick-time-coverofficer-brentley-vinsonramirezsep23Les Européens disent maintenant au revoir à M. Bush, et espèrent l’élection d’un président américain qui partage, le croient-ils, leurs attitudes sophistiquées de postnationalisme, post-modernisme et multiculturalisme. Mais ne soyez pas étonné si, afin de protéger la liberté et la démocratie chez eux dans les années à venir, les dirigeants européens commencent à ressembler de plus en plus au cowboy à la gâchette facile de l’étranger qu’ils se délectent aujourd’hui à fustiger. Natan Sharansky
La chaîne de télévision australienne Channel 7 a diffusé ce samedi la vidéo d’une femme en burkini se faisant « chasser » d’une plage de Villeneuve-Loubet par des baigneurs. Selon un témoin, la scène est montée de toute pièce. Selon une vidéo diffusée par une chaîne de la télévision australienne, Zeynab Alshelh, une étudiante de 23 ans, aurait été forcée de quitter une plage de Villeneuve-Loubet où elle s’était installée. En cause? Son burkini, jugé provocateur par d’autres baigneurs. L’histoire a été reprise par tous les médias et notamment par l’AFP. Mais selon une mère de famille qui se trouvait sur la plage à ce moment-là, la scène qui s’est déroulée sous ses yeux était plus que suspecte. « Nous étions installés sur la plage avec mes enfants, quand nous avons vu la caméra débarquer à quelques mètres de nous, explique-t-elle. Ce n’est qu’après qu’un homme et deux femmes en burkini sont arrivés. Ils ont marché quelques minutes le long de la plage, puis sont venus s’installer juste devant l’équipe télé ». Alors, un coup monté? « On s’est immédiatement posé la question. C’est d’ailleurs pour ça que tous les gens sur la plage regardent dans la direction de la caméra. » Mais la vidéo diffusée par la chaîne australienne va plus loin. On y voit un homme se diriger vers la caméra et lâcher: « Vous faites demi-tour et vous partez ». Tel qu’est monté le reportage, cette invective semble dirigée à l’encontre des deux femmes en burkini. Une impression appuyée par la voix off de la vidéo qui confirme: « Nous avons été forcés de partir, car les gens ont dit qu’ils allaient appeler la police. » Mais il n’en est rien. « L’homme sur la vidéo est mon oncle, atteste notre témoin. Il n’a jamais demandé à ce que ces trois personnes quittent la plage. Il s’adressait à la caméra pour demander au cameraman de partir. Il y avait des enfants sur la plage, dont les nôtres, et on ne voulait pas qu’ils soient filmés. » La suite de la vidéo montre le même homme en train de téléphoner. « Oui, il appelait la police. Pas pour les faire intervenir pour chasser ces personnes, mais pour demander comment on pouvait faire pour empêcher la caméra de nous filmer, surtout nos enfants ». Et d’ajouter: « A aucun moment des gens sont venus demander aux femmes en burkini de quitter la plage. » Une version corroborée par un autre témoin de la scène. « On voyait que c’était scénarisé, c’était trop gros pour être vrai et ça puait le coup monté », raconte Stéphane. Ce père de famille était dans l’eau avec ses enfants, au niveau de la plage privée Corto Maltese, quand il a vu débarquer la petite équipe sur la plage. « L’homme et les deux femmes sont arrivés presque en courant pour s’installer. En 10 secondes, ils avaient déplié leurs serviettes et planté leur parasol. Ils se sont mis en plein milieu du couloir à jet-ski de la plage privée. Comme ils gênaient, le propriétaire de la plage est sorti leur demander de se pousser. » Ce n’est qu’après que Stéphane aperçoit la journaliste et son cameraman « planqués » derrière les voitures, en train de filmer. Il raconte qu’à ce moment-là, le propriétaire de la plage a fait entrer le petit groupe dans son restaurant. « Ils sont ressortis au bout d’un moment. L’homme et les deux femmes ont continué à marcher le long de la plage en direction de la Siesta. Des fois, ils se posaient. Puis ils repartaient. » Le journaliste et le cameraman, qui avaient fait mine de partir, étaient en fait toujours cachés derrière les voitures. « On aurait dit qu’ils attendaient des réactions ». Stéphane assistera de loin à la scène du baigneur qui pressera les journalistes de quitter les lieux. « J’ai vu ce monsieur au téléphone. Mais j’étais trop loin pour entendre ce qu’il disait. » Le petit groupe finira par quitter les lieux. « Il y avait un véhicule qui les attendait en haut de la plage, comme pour les exfiltrer au cas où… » Nice-Matin
The Seven Network and the pugnacious Muslim Aussie family it flew to the French Riviera with the aim of provoking beachgoers into a “racist” reaction to the “Aussie cossie” burkini owe the traumatised people of Nice and France a swift apology. The cynical stunt pulled by the Sunday Night program, where it spirited Sydney hijab-proselytising medical student Zeynab Alshelh and her activist parents off to a beach near Nice to “show solidarity” with (radically conservative) Muslims, featured the 23-year-old flaunting her burkini in an obvious attempt to bait Gallic sun lovers into religious and ethnically motivated hatred. Except according to the French people filmed against their will, the claimed “chasing off the beach” that made international headlines never occurred because Seven used hidden camera tactics, selective editing and deliberate distor­tion to reach its predeter­mined conclusions. (…) The manipulation is the latest example of calculated French-bashing fuelled by collusion between the goals of political Islam and compliant media outlets seeking culture clash cliches. (…) No one was hounded off the beach, despite the scripted whining of Seven’s solemn-faced presenter Rahni Sadler and her well-rehearsed talent the Alshelhs. The swimming public were upset to see the camera crew filming them and their children without permission in a country where privacy is legally protected and paparazzi do not have the same rights as they do in Australia to film without consent. (…) The shameful Seven report went viral globally thanks to an international media thirsty for stereotypes about France’s unsubstantiated rising tide of Islamophobia. It was dishonest sensationalism that deliberately skewed complex issues surrounding secularism a la francaise and surging religious fundamentalism of the Islamist variety in the context of ever-present terrorist threats and a state of emergency. The Australian
C’est avec un chapelet et une croix autour du cou que Marina Nalesso, présentatrice du journal télévisée de 13h30 à la télévision publique italienne, la Rai, un des plus regardés, a dirigé dernièrement son programme d’informations. Elle le fait, a-t-elle-expliqué à Fanpage « par foi et pour rendre témoignage. » Ces dernières semaines des centaines de messages louangeurs et d’estime ont fleuri sur Facebook. Mais elle a été aussi attaquée violemment par des athées, des musulmans ou des laïcs convaincus. Un lynchage auquel a pris part également un conseiller de Turin appartenant au Parti Démocrate au pourvoir actuellement, Silvio Viale. Medias-Presse-info
Un homme armé a tué vendredi soir quatre femmes et un homme dans un centre commercial de l’Etat de Washington, dans le nord-ouest des Etats-Unis. Après 24 heures de cavale, le suspect, Arcan Cetin, 20 ans, né en Turquie, a été arrêté. (…) Le FBI, la police fédérale, a fait savoir qu’il n’y avait à ce stade aucun indice d’ « acte terroriste ». Le Figaro
L’avenir ne doit pas appartenir à ceux qui calomnient le prophète de l’Islam. Barack Obama (siège de l’ONU, New York, 26.09.12)
Je crois qu’en ce moment nous sommes tous confrontés à un choix. Nous pouvons choisir d’aller de l’avant avec un meilleur modèle de coopération et d’intégration. Ou nous pouvons nous retirer dans un monde profondément divisé, et finalement en conflit, sur lignes séculaires de la nation et de la tribu et de la race et la religion. (…) Et comme ces vrais problèmes ont été négligés, d’autres visions du monde sont avancées à la fois dans les pays les plus riches et les plus pauvres: fondamentalisme religieux, politiques tribales, ethniques, sectaires, populisme grossier venu parfois de l’extrême gauche mais le plus souvent de l’extrême droite qui cherche à revenir à un temps jugé meilleur et plus simple.(…) Compte tenu de la difficulté qu’il y a à forger une véritable démocratie (…), il n’est pas surprenant que certains soutiennent que l’avenir appartient aux hommes forts, aux verticales du pouvoir plutôt qu’aux institutions fortes et démocratiques. (…) Nous voyons la Russie tenter de récupérer la gloire perdue par la force ; des puissances asiatiques vouloir revenir sur des revendications soldées par l’Histoire ; et en Europe et aux États-Unis, des gens s’inquiéter de l’immigration et de l’évolution démographique en laissant entendre que d’une certaine manière les gens qui apparaissent comme différents corrompent le caractère de nos pays. Barack Hussein Obama (ONU, 20 septembre 2016)
Vous allez dans certaines petites villes de Pennsylvanie où, comme dans beaucoup de petites villes du Middle West, les emplois ont disparu depuis maintenant 25 ans et n’ont été remplacés par rien d’autre (…) Et il n’est pas surprenant qu’ils deviennent pleins d’amertume, qu’ils s’accrochent aux armes à feu ou à la religion, ou à leur antipathie pour ceux qui ne sont pas comme eux, ou encore à un sentiment d’hostilité envers les immigrants. Barack Obama
Part of the reason that our politics seems so tough right now, and facts and science and argument does not seem to be winning the day all the time, is because we’re hard-wired not to always think clearly when we’re scared. Barack Obama
Je ne peux qu’imaginer ce qu’endurent ses parents. Et quand je pense à ce garçon, je pense à mes propres enfants. Si j’avais un fils, il ressemblerait à Trayvon. Obama
Et, bien sûr, ce qui est également la routine est que quelqu’un, quelque part, va commenter et dire, Obama a politisé cette question. Eh bien, cela est quelque chose que nous devrions politiser. Il est pertinent de notre vie commune ensemble, le corps politique. Obama
Mon nom ne sera peut-être pas sur les bulletins de vote, mais notre progrès dépend de ce bulletin de vote. Je le prendrai comme une insulte personnelle, une insulte à mon héritage si la communauté afro-américaine baisse la garde et ne s’active pas lors de ces élections. Vous voulez m’adresser des adieux chaleureux ? Alors allez voter. Barack Hussein Obama (devant la fondation du Caucus noir du Congrès)
Pour généraliser, en gros, vous pouvez placer la moitié des partisans de Trump dans ce que j’appelle le panier des pitoyables. Les racistes, sexistes, homophobes, xénophobes, islamophobes. A vous de choisir. Hillary Clinton
 Je ne vais pas afficher de fierté pour le drapeau d’un pays qui opprime les Noirs.  Colin Kaepernick
C’est vraiment dégoûtant la façon dont il a été traité, la façon dont les médias ont traité cette affaire, dira-t-elle après la partie. Étant homosexuelle, je sais ce que veut dire regarder le drapeau américain en étant consciente qu’il ne protège pas toutes les libertés. Megan Rapinoe
Le joueur de football américain Colin Kaepernick, au cour d’une polémique aux Etats-Unis depuis qu’il boycotte l’hymne américain avant les matches de son équipe, est à la Une du prestigieux hebdomadaire américain Time, un honneur rare pour un sportif. Le quarterback des San Francisco 49ers apparaît, en couverture du magazine publié mercredi, un genou posé à terre, geste qu’il utilise lors de l’hymne américain pour protester contre l’oppression dont est victime, selon lui, la communauté noire aux Etats-Unis, en référence aux bavures policières visant des noirs ces derniers mois. La photo de Kaepernick est accompagnée du titre « Le combat périlleux ». Son boycott a fait tache d’huile au sein de la Ligue nationale de football américain (NFL) mais aussi dans d’autres sports, comme le football et le basket: toutes les joueuses de l’équipe d’Indiana ont ainsi posé un genou à terre mercredi lors de l’hymne américain, joué traditionnellement avant toutes les rencontres sportives aux Etats-Unis. Kaepernick, qui affirme avoir reçu des menaces de mort, est loin de faire l’unanimité au sein de la population américaine. Selon un sondage publié mercredi par la chaîne de télévision ESPN, il est désormais le joueur de NFL le moins apprécié pour 29% des 1100 personnes interrogées. AFP
Savez-vous que les Noirs sont 10 pour cent de la population de Saint-Louis et sont responsables de 58% de ses crimes? Nous avons à faire face à cela. Et nous devons faire quelque chose au sujet de nos normes morales. Nous savons qu’il y a beaucoup de mauvaises choses dans le monde blanc, mais il y a aussi beaucoup de mauvaises choses dans le monde noir. Nous ne pouvons pas continuer à blâmer l’homme blanc. Il y a des choses que nous devons faire pour nous-mêmes. Martin Luther King (St Louis, 1961)
The absurdity of Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton is that they want to make a movement out of an anomaly. Black teenagers today are afraid of other black teenagers, not whites. … Trayvon’s sad fate clearly sent a quiver of perverse happiness all across America’s civil rights establishment, and throughout the mainstream media as well. His death was vindication of the ‘poetic truth’ that these establishments live by. Shelby Steele
Before the 1960s the black American identity (though no one ever used the word) was based on our common humanity, on the idea that race was always an artificial and exploitive division between people. After the ’60s—in a society guilty for its long abuse of us—we took our historical victimization as the central theme of our group identity. We could not have made a worse mistake. It has given us a generation of ambulance-chasing leaders, and the illusion that our greatest power lies in the manipulation of white guilt. Shelby Steele
But what about all the other young black murder victims? Nationally, nearly half of all murder victims are black. And the overwhelming majority of those black people are killed by other black people. Where is the march for them? Where is the march against the drug dealers who prey on young black people? Where is the march against bad schools, with their 50% dropout rate for black teenaged boys? Those failed schools are certainly guilty of creating the shameful 40% unemployment rate for black teens? How about marching against the cable television shows constantly offering minstrel-show images of black youth as rappers and comedians who don’t value education, dismiss the importance of marriage, and celebrate killing people, drug money and jailhouse fashion—the pants falling down because the jail guard has taken away the belt, the shoes untied because the warden removed the shoe laces, and accessories such as the drug dealer’s pit bull. (…) There is no fashion, no thug attitude that should be an invitation to murder. But these are the real murderous forces surrounding the Martin death—and yet they never stir protests. The race-baiters argue this case deserves special attention because it fits the mold of white-on-black violence that fills the history books. Some have drawn a comparison to the murder of Emmett Till, a black boy who was killed in 1955 by white racists for whistling at a white woman. (…) While civil rights leaders have raised their voices to speak out against this one tragedy, few if any will do the same about the larger tragedy of daily carnage that is black-on-black crime in America. (…) Almost one half of the nation’s murder victims that year were black and a majority of them were between the ages of 17 and 29. Black people accounted for 13% of the total U.S. population in 2005. Yet they were the victims of 49% of all the nation’s murders. And 93% of black murder victims were killed by other black people, according to the same report. (…) The killing of any child is a tragedy. But where are the protests regarding the larger problems facing black America? Juan Williams
« More whites are killed by the police than blacks primarily because whites outnumber blacks in the general population by more than five to one, » Forst said. The country is about 63 percent white and 12 percent black. (…) A 2002 study in the American Journal of Public Health found that the death rate due to legal intervention was more than three times higher for blacks than for whites in the period from 1988 to 1997. (…) Candace McCoy is a criminologist at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice at the City University of New York. McCoy said blacks might be more likely to have a violent encounter with police because they are convicted of felonies at a higher rate than whites. Felonies include everything from violent crimes like murder and rape, to property crimes like burglary and embezzlement, to drug trafficking and gun offenses. The Bureau of Justice Statistics reported that in 2004, state courts had over 1 million felony convictions. Of those, 59 percent were committed by whites and 38 percent by blacks. But when you factor in the population of whites and blacks, the felony rates stand at 330 per 100,000 for whites and 1,178 per 100,000 for blacks. That’s more than a three-fold difference. McCoy noted that this has more to do with income than race. The felony rates for poor whites are similar to those of poor blacks. « Felony crime is highly correlated with poverty, and race continues to be highly correlated with poverty in the USA, » McCoy said. « It is the most difficult and searing problem in this whole mess. » PunditFact
America is coming apart. For most of our nation’s history, whatever the inequality in wealth between the richest and poorest citizens, we maintained a cultural equality known nowhere else in the world—for whites, anyway. (…) But t’s not true anymore, and it has been progressively less true since the 1960s. People are starting to notice the great divide. The tea party sees the aloofness in a political elite that thinks it knows best and orders the rest of America to fall in line. The Occupy movement sees it in an economic elite that lives in mansions and flies on private jets. Each is right about an aspect of the problem, but that problem is more pervasive than either political or economic inequality. What we now face is a problem of cultural inequality. When Americans used to brag about « the American way of life »—a phrase still in common use in 1960—they were talking about a civic culture that swept an extremely large proportion of Americans of all classes into its embrace. It was a culture encompassing shared experiences of daily life and shared assumptions about central American values involving marriage, honesty, hard work and religiosity. Over the past 50 years, that common civic culture has unraveled. We have developed a new upper class with advanced educations, often obtained at elite schools, sharing tastes and preferences that set them apart from mainstream America. At the same time, we have developed a new lower class, characterized not by poverty but by withdrawal from America’s core cultural institutions. (…) Why have these new lower and upper classes emerged? For explaining the formation of the new lower class, the easy explanations from the left don’t withstand scrutiny. It’s not that white working class males can no longer make a « family wage » that enables them to marry. The average male employed in a working-class occupation earned as much in 2010 as he did in 1960. It’s not that a bad job market led discouraged men to drop out of the labor force. Labor-force dropout increased just as fast during the boom years of the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s as it did during bad years. (…) As I’ve argued in much of my previous work, I think that the reforms of the 1960s jump-started the deterioration. Changes in social policy during the 1960s made it economically more feasible to have a child without having a husband if you were a woman or to get along without a job if you were a man; safer to commit crimes without suffering consequences; and easier to let the government deal with problems in your community that you and your neighbors formerly had to take care of. But, for practical purposes, understanding why the new lower class got started isn’t especially important. Once the deterioration was under way, a self-reinforcing loop took hold as traditionally powerful social norms broke down. Because the process has become self-reinforcing, repealing the reforms of the 1960s (something that’s not going to happen) would change the trends slowly at best. Meanwhile, the formation of the new upper class has been driven by forces that are nobody’s fault and resist manipulation. The economic value of brains in the marketplace will continue to increase no matter what, and the most successful of each generation will tend to marry each other no matter what. As a result, the most successful Americans will continue to trend toward consolidation and isolation as a class. Changes in marginal tax rates on the wealthy won’t make a difference. Increasing scholarships for working-class children won’t make a difference. The only thing that can make a difference is the recognition among Americans of all classes that a problem of cultural inequality exists and that something has to be done about it. That « something » has nothing to do with new government programs or regulations. Public policy has certainly affected the culture, unfortunately, but unintended consequences have been as grimly inevitable for conservative social engineering as for liberal social engineering. The « something » that I have in mind has to be defined in terms of individual American families acting in their own interests and the interests of their children. Doing that in Fishtown requires support from outside. There remains a core of civic virtue and involvement in working-class America that could make headway against its problems if the people who are trying to do the right things get the reinforcement they need—not in the form of government assistance, but in validation of the values and standards they continue to uphold. The best thing that the new upper class can do to provide that reinforcement is to drop its condescending « nonjudgmentalism. » Married, educated people who work hard and conscientiously raise their kids shouldn’t hesitate to voice their disapproval of those who defy these norms. When it comes to marriage and the work ethic, the new upper class must start preaching what it practices. Charles Murray
The furor of ignored Europeans against their union is not just directed against rich and powerful government elites per se, or against the flood of mostly young male migrants from the war-torn Middle East. The rage also arises from the hypocrisy of a governing elite that never seems to be subject to the ramifications of its own top-down policies. The bureaucratic class that runs Europe from Brussels and Strasbourg too often lectures European voters on climate change, immigration, politically correct attitudes about diversity, and the constant need for more bureaucracy, more regulations, and more redistributive taxes. But Euro-managers are able to navigate around their own injunctions, enjoying private schools for their children; generous public pay, retirement packages and perks; frequent carbon-spewing jet travel; homes in non-diverse neighborhoods; and profitable revolving-door careers between government and business. The Western elite classes, both professedly liberal and conservative, square the circle of their privilege with politically correct sermonizing. They romanticize the distant “other” — usually immigrants and minorities — while condescendingly lecturing the middle and working classes, often the losers in globalization, about their lack of sensitivity. On this side of the Atlantic, President Obama has developed a curious habit of talking down to Americans about their supposedly reactionary opposition to rampant immigration, affirmative action, multiculturalism, and political correctness — most notably in his caricatures of the purported “clingers” of Pennsylvania. Yet Obama seems uncomfortable when confronted with the prospect of living out what he envisions for others. He prefers golfing with celebrities to bowling. He vacations in tony Martha’s Vineyard rather than returning home to his Chicago mansion. His travel entourage is royal and hardly green. And he insists on private prep schools for his children rather than enrolling them in the public schools of Washington, D.C., whose educators he so often shields from long-needed reform. In similar fashion, grandees such as Facebook billionaire Mark Zuckerberg and Univision anchorman Jorge Ramos do not live what they profess. They often lecture supposedly less sophisticated Americans on their backward opposition to illegal immigration. But both live in communities segregated from those they champion in the abstract. The Clintons often pontificate about “fairness” but somehow managed to amass a personal fortune of more than $100 million by speaking to and lobbying banks, Wall Street profiteers, and foreign entities. The pay-to-play rich were willing to brush aside the insincere, pro forma social-justice talk of the Clintons and reward Hillary and Bill with obscene fees that would presumably result in lucrative government attention. Consider the recent Orlando tragedy for more of the same paradoxes. The terrorist killer, Omar Mateen — a registered Democrat, proud radical Muslim, and occasional patron of gay dating sites — murdered 49 people and wounded even more in a gay nightclub. His profile and motive certainly did not fit the elite narrative that unsophisticated right-wing American gun owners were responsible because of their support for gun rights. No matter. The Obama administration and much of the media refused to attribute the horror in Orlando to Mateen’s self-confessed radical Islamist agenda. Instead, they blamed the shooter’s semi-automatic .223 caliber rifle and a purported climate of hate toward gays. (…) In sum, elites ignored the likely causes of the Orlando shooting: the appeal of ISIS-generated hatred to some young, second-generation radical Muslim men living in Western societies, and the politically correct inability of Western authorities to short-circuit that clear-cut connection. Instead, the establishment all but blamed Middle America for supposedly being anti-gay and pro-gun. In both the U.S. and Britain, such politically correct hypocrisy is superimposed on highly regulated, highly taxed, and highly governmentalized economies that are becoming ossified and stagnant. The tax-paying middle classes, who lack the romance of the poor and the connections of the elite, have become convenient whipping boys of both in order to leverage more government social programs and to assuage the guilt of the elites who have no desire to live out their utopian theories in the flesh. Victor Davis Hanson
Barack Obama is the Dr. Frankenstein of the supposed Trump monster. If a charismatic, Ivy League-educated, landmark president who entered office with unprecedented goodwill and both houses of Congress on his side could manage to wreck the Democratic Party while turning off 52 percent of the country, then many voters feel that a billionaire New York dealmaker could hardly do worse. If Obama had ruled from the center, dealt with the debt, addressed radical Islamic terrorism, dropped the politically correct euphemisms and pushed tax and entitlement reform rather than Obamacare, Trump might have little traction. A boring Hillary Clinton and a staid Jeb Bush would most likely be replaying the 1992 election between Bill Clinton and George H.W. Bush — with Trump as a watered-down version of third-party outsider Ross Perot. But America is in much worse shape than in 1992. And Obama has proved a far more divisive and incompetent president than George H.W. Bush. Little is more loathed by a majority of Americans than sanctimonious PC gobbledygook and its disciples in the media. And Trump claims to be PC’s symbolic antithesis. Making Machiavellian Mexico pay for a border fence or ejecting rude and interrupting Univision anchor Jorge Ramos from a press conference is no more absurd than allowing more than 300 sanctuary cities to ignore federal law by sheltering undocumented immigrants. Putting a hold on the immigration of Middle Eastern refugees is no more illiberal than welcoming into American communities tens of thousands of unvetted foreign nationals from terrorist-ridden Syria. In terms of messaging, is Trump’s crude bombast any more radical than Obama’s teleprompted scripts? Trump’s ridiculous view of Russian President Vladimir Putin as a sort of « Art of the Deal » geostrategic partner is no more silly than Obama insulting Putin as Russia gobbles up former Soviet republics with impunity. Obama callously dubbed his own grandmother a « typical white person, » introduced the nation to the racist and anti-Semitic rantings of the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, and petulantly wrote off small-town Pennsylvanians as near-Neanderthal « clingers. » Did Obama lower the bar for Trump’s disparagements? Certainly, Obama peddled a slogan, « hope and change, » that was as empty as Trump’s « make America great again. » (…) How does the establishment derail an out-of-control train for whom there are no gaffes, who has no fear of The New York Times, who offers no apologies for speaking what much of the country thinks — and who apparently needs neither money from Republicans nor politically correct approval from Democrats? Victor Davis Hanson
In 1978, the eminent sociologist William Julius Wilson argued confidently that class would soon displace race as the most important social variable in American life. As explicit legal barriers to minority advancement receded farther into the past, the fates of the working classes of different races would converge. By the mid 2000s, Wilson’s thesis looked pretty good: The black middle class was vibrant and growing as the average black wealth nearly doubled from 1995 to 2005. Race appeared to lose its salience as a political predictor: More and more blacks were voting Republican, reversing a decades-long trend, and in 2004 George W. Bush collected the highest share of the Latino (44 percent) vote of any Republican ever and a higher share of the Asian vote (43 percent) than he did in 2000. Our politics grew increasingly ideological and less racial: Progressives and the beneficiaries of a generous social-welfare state generally supported the Democratic party, while more prosperous voters were more likely to support Republicans. Stable majorities expressed satisfaction with the state of race relations. It wasn’t quite a post-racial politics, but it was certainly headed in that direction. But in the midst of the financial crisis of 2007, something happened. Both the white poor and the black poor began to struggle mightily, though for different reasons. And our politics changed dramatically in response. It’s ironic that the election of the first black president marked the end of our brief flirtation with a post-racial politics. By 2011, William Julius Wilson had published a slight revision of his earlier thesis, noting the continued importance of race. The black wealth of the 1990s, it turned out, was built on the mirage of house values. Inner-city murder rates, which had fallen for decades, began to tick upward in 2015. In one of the deadliest mass shootings in recent memory, a white supremacist murdered nine black people in a South Carolina church. And the ever-present antagonism between the police and black Americans — especially poor blacks whose neighborhoods are the most heavily policed — erupted into nationwide protests. Meanwhile, the white working class descended into an intense cultural malaise. Prescription-opioid abuse skyrocketed, and deaths from heroin overdoses clogged the obituaries of local papers. In the small, heavily white Ohio county where I grew up, overdoses overtook nature as the leading cause of death. A drug that for so long was associated with inner-city ghettos became the cultural inheritance of the southern and Appalachian white: White youths died from heroin significantly more often than their peers of other ethnicities. Incarceration and divorce rates increased steadily. Perhaps most strikingly, while the white working class continued to earn more than the working poor of other races, only 24 percent of white voters believed that the next generation would be “better off.” No other ethnic group expressed such alarming pessimism about its economic future. And even as each group struggled in its own way, common forces also influenced them. Rising automation in blue-collar industries deprived both groups of high-paying, low-skill jobs. Neighborhoods grew increasingly segregated — both by income and by race — ensuring that poor whites lived among poor whites while poor blacks lived among poor blacks. As a friend recently told me about San Francisco, Bull Connor himself couldn’t have designed a city with fewer black residents. Predictably, our politics began to match this new social reality. In 2012, Mitt Romney collected only 27 percent of the Latino vote. Asian Americans, a solid Republican constituency even in the days of Bob Dole, went for Obama by a three-to-one margin — a shocking demographic turn of events over two decades. Meanwhile, the black Republican became an endangered species. Republican failures to attract black voters fly in the face of Republican history. This was the party of Lincoln and Douglass. Eisenhower integrated the school in Little Rock at a time when the Dixiecrats were the defenders of the racial caste system.(…) For many progressives, the Sommers and Norton research confirms the worst stereotypes of American whites. Yet it also reflects, in some ways, the natural conclusions of an increasingly segregated white poor. (…) The reality is not that black Americans enjoy special privileges. In fact, the overwhelming weight of the evidence suggests that the opposite is true. Last month, for instance, the brilliant Harvard economist Roland Fryer published an exhaustive study of police uses of force. He found that even after controlling for crime rates and police presence in a given neighborhood, black youths were far likelier to be pushed, thrown to the ground, or harassed by police. (Notably, he also found no racial disparity in the use of lethal force.) (…) Getting whipped into a frenzy on conspiracy websites, or feeling that distant, faceless elites dislike you because of your white skin, doesn’t compare. But the great advantages of whiteness in America are invisible to the white poor, or are completely swallowed by the disadvantages of their class. The young man from West Virginia may be less likely to get questioned by Yale University police, but making it to Yale in the first place still requires a remarkable combination of luck and skill. In building a dialogue around “checking privilege,” the modern progressive elite is implicitly asking white America — especially the segregated white poor — for a level of social awareness unmatched in the history of the country. White failure to empathize with blacks is sometimes a failure of character, but it is increasingly a failure of geography and socialization. Poor whites in West Virginia don’t have the time or the inclination to read Harvard economics studies. And the privileges that matter — that is, the ones they see — are vanishing because of destitution: the privilege to pay for college without bankruptcy, the privilege to work a decent job, the privilege to put food on the table without the aid of food stamps, the privilege not to learn of yet another classmate’s premature death. (…) Because of this polarization, the racial conversation we’re having today is tribalistic. On one side are primarily white people, increasingly represented by the Republican party and the institutions of conservative media. On the other is a collection of different minority groups and a cosmopolitan — and usually wealthier — class of whites. These sides don’t even speak the same language: One side sees white privilege while the other sees anti-white racism. There is no room for agreement or even understanding. J. D. Vance
In another eerie ditto of his infamous 2008 attack on the supposedly intolerant Pennsylvania “clingers,” Obama returned to his theme that ignorant Americans “typically” become xenophobic and racist: “Typically, when people feel stressed, they turn on others who don’t look like them.” (“Typically” is not a good Obama word to use in the context of racial relations, since he once dubbed his own grandmother a “typical white person.”) Too often Obama has gratuitously aroused racial animosities with inflammatory rhetoric such as “punish our enemies,” or injected himself into the middle of hot-button controversies like the Trayvon Martin case, the Henry Louis Gates melodrama, and the “hands up, don’t shoot” Ferguson mayhem. Most recently, Obama seemed to praise backup 49ers quarterback and multimillionaire Colin Kaepernick for his refusal to stand during the National Anthem, empathizing with Kaepernick’s claims of endemic American racism. (…) Even presidential nominee and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is not really defending the Obama administration’s past “red line” in Syria, the “reset” with Vladimir Putin’s Russia, the bombing of Libya, the Benghazi tragedy, the euphemistic rebranding of Islamic terrorism as mere “violent extremism,” the abrupt pullout from (and subsequent collapse of) Iraq, or the Iran nuclear deal that so far seems to have made the theocracy both rich and emboldened. (…) Racial relations in this country seem as bad as they have been in a half-century. (…) Following the Clinton model, a post-presidential Obama will no doubt garner huge fees as a “citizen of the world” — squaring the circle of becoming fabulously rich while offering sharp criticism of the cultural landscape of the capitalist West on everything from sports controversies to pending criminal trials. What, then, is the presidential legacy of Barack Obama? It will not be found in either foreign- or domestic-policy accomplishment. More likely, he will be viewed as an outspoken progressive who left office loudly in the same manner that he entered it — as a critic of the culture and country in which he has thrived. But there may be another, unspoken legacy of Obama, and it is his creation of the candidacy of Donald J. Trump. Trump is running as an angry populist, fueled by the promise that whatever supposed elites such as Obama have done to the country, he will largely undo. Obama’s only legacy seems to be that “hope and change” begat “make America great again.” Victor Davis Hanson
Hillary Clinton’s comment that half of Donald Trump’s supporters are “racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamophobic”—a heck of a lot of phobia for anyone to lug around all day—puts back in play what will be seen as one of the 2016 campaign’s defining forces: the revolt of the politically incorrect. They may not live at the level of Victor Hugo’s “Les Misérables,” but it was only a matter of time before les déplorables—our own writhing mass of unheard Americans—rebelled against the intellectual elites’ ancien régime of political correctness. (…) Mrs. Clinton’s (…) dismissal, at Barbra Streisand’s LGBT fundraiser, of uncounted millions of Americans as deplorables had the ring of genuine belief. Perhaps sensing that public knowledge of what she really thinks could be a political liability, Mrs. Clinton went on to describe “people who feel that the government has let them down, the economy has let them down, nobody cares about them . . . and they’re just desperate for change.” She is of course describing the people in Charles Murray’s recent and compelling book on cultural disintegration among the working class, “Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960-2010.” This is indeed the bedrock of the broader Trump base. Mrs. Clinton is right that they feel the system has let them down. There is a legitimate argument over exactly when the rising digital economy started transferring income away from blue-collar workers and toward the “creative class” of Google and Facebook employees, no few of whom are smug progressives who think the landmass seen from business class between San Francisco and New York is pocked with deplorable, phobic Americans. Naturally, they’ll vote for the status quo, which is Hillary. But in the eight years available to Barack Obama to do something about what rankles the lower-middle class—white, black or brown—the non-employed and underemployed grew. A lot of them will vote for Donald Trump because they want a radical mid-course correction. (…) The progressive Democrats, a wholly public-sector party, have disconnected from the realities of the private economy, which exists as a mysterious revenue-producing abstraction. Hillary’s comments suggest they now see much of the population has a cultural and social abstraction. (…) Donald Trump’s appeal, in part, is that he cracks back at progressive cultural condescension in utterly crude terms. Nativists exist, and the sky is still blue. But the overwhelming majority of these people aren’t phobic about a modernizing America. They’re fed up with the relentless, moral superciliousness of Hillary, the Obamas, progressive pundits and 19-year-old campus activists. Evangelicals at last week’s Values Voter Summit said they’d look past Mr. Trump’s personal résumé. This is the reason. It’s not about him. The moral clarity that drove the original civil-rights movement or the women’s movement has degenerated into a confused moral narcissism. (…) It is a mistake, though, to blame Hillary alone for that derisive remark. It’s not just her. Hillary Clinton is the logical result of the Democratic Party’s new, progressive algorithm—a set of strict social rules that drives politics and the culture to one point of view. (…) Her supporters say it’s Donald Trump’s rhetoric that is “divisive.” Just so. But it’s rich to hear them claim that their words and politics are “inclusive.” So is the town dump. They have chopped American society into so many offendable identities that only a Yale freshman can name them all. If the Democrats lose behind Hillary Clinton, it will be in part because America’s les déplorables decided enough of this is enough. Bret Stephens
It doesn’t matter that the cop who killed Keith Scott is black (…) As of Wednesday morning, the most recent story of a black man killed by police is that of Keith Scott in Charlotte. Scott was killed Tuesday and details of the incident are still scant. One of the few bits of information shared by officials and reported by media, however, is that Bentley Vinson, the officer who killed Scott, was also black. As the country struggles to make sense of Scott’s death in relation to the estimated 193 other black people killed by police so far this year (and 306 in 2015), Vinson’s race is being used by some to dismiss charges that Scott was the victim of racist policing. To reduce the role of anti-blackness in policing to merely the race of officers involved in fatal police encounters is misguided, however. It betrays a profound misunderstanding of the ways racism and anti-blackness work within systems, assumes that black people are free of anti-black bias, and that black officers somehow transcend the police cultures in which they’re steeped. (…) Studies have shown that black people are not only capable of anti-black bias but that those who’ve been tested for racial bias are evenly split when it comes to pro-white and pro-black attitudes. Even more, research on the impact of police force diversity on officer-involved homicides has found no relationship between the racial representation of police forces and police killings in the cities they serve. In fact, one study revealed that the best way to predict how many police shootings might occur in a city is to look at the size of its black population. All of that without mentioning the troubling accounts from black police officers of the racism they experience on the force and the pressure they often face to engage in race-based policing in the communities they serve. Ice Cube put it simply in 1988 on N.W.A.’s Fuck tha Police, “But don’t let it be a black and a white one, ‘cause they’ll slam ya down to the street top. Black police showing out for the white cop.” What a 19-year-old Cube understood nearly 30 years ago seems to still elude members of the media and even policymakers today. That’s that there are a number of factors that impact how police officers—yes, even black officers—engage black civilians and suspects, the least of which is shared characteristics. To be sure, America could benefit from more diversity in its police force, especially in communities of color. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, nearly 65 percent of the nation’s 3,109,000 law enforcement officers are white. That number jumps to 70 percent for patrol officers and nearly 80 percent for police supervisors. But, while we’re concerned with the race of cops, we should be as concerned with the culture, policy, and practices that guide their actions. The issue at hand isn’t the personal feelings of cops who encounter black civilians but the deadly system of policing that criminalizes blackness, actively profiles black people, over-policies our neighborhoods as a matter of policy, and that uses force against us at three times the rate of whites. That is the ugly state of American policing and that truth doesn’t suddenly change when the boys in blue are black. Donovan X. Ramsey
Brentley Vinson, l’agent lui-même noir qui a abattu la victime, a été suspendu en attendant les résultats d’une enquête administrative, mais la situation ne s’est pas calmée à Charlotte. Deux nuits de violences se sont succédées depuis, et l’Etat d’urgence a été déclaré sur place. Terence Crutcher et Keith Lamont Scott font partie de la longue liste des 822 personnes tuées cette année lors d’une intervention policière aux Etats-Unis, selon le site Mapping Police Violence. Ils font également partie des 214 Noirs américains tués en 2016 par des policiers. Si ces chiffres sont très éloignés des 351 victimes blanches, il convient de les remettre en perspective. Comme l’indique le Washington Post, les Blancs constituent 62% des Américains, mais seulement 49% des victimes policières. Au contraire, les Noirs font partie à 24% des victimes policières, alors que le nombre d’Afro-Américains dans la population totale n’est que de 13%. Le site ProPublica, qui a analysé des chiffres du FBI concernant la période 2012-2012, écrit qu’un adolescent noir a 21 chances de plus d’être tué par la police qu’un adolescent blanc. Si la majorité des Afro-Américains tués en 2016 étaient armés (…), 48 d’entre eux ne l’étaient pas (..) Une étude du Washington Post a démontré qu’en 2015, un Noir non-armé avait sept fois plus de chances d’être abattu qu’un blanc.Impossible cependant d’expliquer ces disparités sans prendre un compte la dimension sociale du phénomène. Comme l’explique Vox, la police patrouille en majorité dans les quartiers aux taux de crimes élevés, où la population noire est plus importante que dans la moyenne américaine. Mais des études ont aussi montré qu’à l’entrainement sur des plateformes de simulation, les policiers tiraient plus rapidement sur des suspects noirs. Un biais qui conduirait à des erreurs d’autant plus importantes sur le terrain. JDD
L’économiste noir nous explique ici que la meilleure façon de lutter contre les violences policières et les ‘mauvaises écoles’ se trouve dans les données, et non dans l’expérience personnelle. (…) Le plus jeune Afro-américain titulaire d’une chaire à l’université d’Harvard explique ses dernières recherches sur les inégalités raciales à travers l’utilisation de la force par la police américaine. Adolescent, Fryer s’est retrouvé face aux armes pointées par des policiers “six ou sept” fois. “Mais, dit-il en traçant une courbe descendante de gauche à droite, il y a une tendance inquiétante, les gens parlent des races aux États-Unis en se basant uniquement sur leur expérience personnelle.” Avec sa voix teintée d’un soupçon d’accent du sud des États-Unis, il poursuit : “Je m’en fiche, de mon expérience personnelle, ou de celle des autres. Tout ce que je veux savoir, c’est comment cette expérience nous amène aux données chiffrées, pour nous aider à savoir ce qui se passe vraiment.” L’année dernière, comprendre ce qui se passe vraiment a conduit Roland Fryer, 38 ans, à remporter la médaille John Bates Clark, récompense annuelle décernée à un économiste américain de moins de 40 ans. La médaille est considérée comme le prix le plus prestigieux en économie, après le prix Nobel. (…) Roland Fryer me raconte qu’il a passé deux jours l’an dernier à suivre les policiers durant leurs rondes à Camden, dans le New Jersey (lors du premier jour de patrouille, une femme a succombé à une overdose devant lui). Roland Fryer cherchait à comprendre si les meurtres de Michael Brown et de Eric Garner, deux jeunes Afro-américains dont la mort a provoqué d’énormes manifestations, s’inscrivaient dans un modèle de répétitions identifiable, comme le mouvement activiste Black Lives Matter l’affirmait. Après une semaine de patrouilles, il a collecté plus de six millions de données des autorités, dont celles de la ville de New York, sur les victimes noires, blanches et latino de violences policières. (…) une fois les facteurs de contexte pris en compte, les Noirs ne sont pas plus susceptibles selon ces données d’être abattus par la police. Ce qui soulève la question : pourquoi ce tollé en 2014 à Ferguson, dans le Missouri, où le jeune Michael Brown a été abattu ? (…) “Ce sont les données” dit Fryer. “Maintenant, une hypothèse pour expliquer ce qui est arrivé à Ferguson – pas la fusillade, mais la réaction d’indignation – : ce n’était pas parce que les gens faisaient une déduction statistique, pas à propos de l’innocence ou de la culpabilité de Michael, mais parce qu’ils détestent cette putain de police.” Il poursuit : “la raison pour laquelle ils détestent la police est que si vous avez passé des années être fouillés, jetés à terre, menottés sans motif réel, et ensuite, vous entendez qu’un policier a tiré dans votre ville, comment pouvez-vous croire que c’était autre chose que de la discrimination ?” “Je pense que cela a à voir avec les incentives et les récompenses” ajoute Fryer. Les officiers de police, explique-t-il, reçoivent souvent les mêmes récompenses indépendamment de la gravité des crimes qu’ils traitent, et ils ne sont pas sanctionnés pour l’utilisation de “la force de bas niveau” sans raison valable [aux États-Unis, les moyens de pression de la police sont classés du plus bas niveau (injonction verbale) au plus haut niveau (arme létale), ndt]. Cela encourage un comportement agressif. Financial Times
In 1978, the eminent sociologist William Julius Wilson argued confidently that class would soon displace race as the most important social variable in American life. As explicit legal barriers to minority advancement receded farther into the past, the fates of the working classes of different races would converge. By the mid 2000s, Wilson’s thesis looked pretty good: The black middle class was vibrant and growing as the average black wealth nearly doubled from 1995 to 2005. Race appeared to lose its salience as a political predictor: More and more blacks were voting Republican, reversing a decades-long trend, and in 2004 George W. Bush collected the highest share of the Latino (44 percent) vote of any Republican ever and a higher share of the Asian vote (43 percent) than he did in 2000. Our politics grew increasingly ideological and less racial: Progressives and the beneficiaries of a generous social-welfare state generally supported the Democratic party, while more prosperous voters were more likely to support Republicans. Stable majorities expressed satisfaction with the state of race relations. It wasn’t quite a post-racial politics, but it was certainly headed in that direction. But in the midst of the financial crisis of 2007, something happened. Both the white poor and the black poor began to struggle mightily, though for different reasons. And our politics changed dramatically in response. It’s ironic that the election of the first black president marked the end of our brief flirtation with a post-racial politics. By 2011, William Julius Wilson had published a slight revision of his earlier thesis, noting the continued importance of race. The black wealth of the 1990s, it turned out, was built on the mirage of house values. Inner-city murder rates, which had fallen for decades, began to tick upward in 2015. In one of the deadliest mass shootings in recent memory, a white supremacist murdered nine black people in a South Carolina church. And the ever-present antagonism between the police and black Americans — especially poor blacks whose neighborhoods are the most heavily policed — erupted into nationwide protests. Meanwhile, the white working class descended into an intense cultural malaise. Prescription-opioid abuse skyrocketed, and deaths from heroin overdoses clogged the obituaries of local papers. In the small, heavily white Ohio county where I grew up, overdoses overtook nature as the leading cause of death. A drug that for so long was associated with inner-city ghettos became the cultural inheritance of the southern and Appalachian white: White youths died from heroin significantly more often than their peers of other ethnicities. Incarceration and divorce rates increased steadily. Perhaps most strikingly, while the white working class continued to earn more than the working poor of other races, only 24 percent of white voters believed that the next generation would be “better off.” No other ethnic group expressed such alarming pessimism about its economic future. And even as each group struggled in its own way, common forces also influenced them. Rising automation in blue-collar industries deprived both groups of high-paying, low-skill jobs. Neighborhoods grew increasingly segregated — both by income and by race — ensuring that poor whites lived among poor whites while poor blacks lived among poor blacks. As a friend recently told me about San Francisco, Bull Connor himself couldn’t have designed a city with fewer black residents. Predictably, our politics began to match this new social reality. In 2012, Mitt Romney collected only 27 percent of the Latino vote. Asian Americans, a solid Republican constituency even in the days of Bob Dole, went for Obama by a three-to-one margin — a shocking demographic turn of events over two decades. Meanwhile, the black Republican became an endangered species. Republican failures to attract black voters fly in the face of Republican history. This was the party of Lincoln and Douglass. Eisenhower integrated the school in Little Rock at a time when the Dixiecrats were the defenders of the racial caste system.(…) For many progressives, the Sommers and Norton research confirms the worst stereotypes of American whites. Yet it also reflects, in some ways, the natural conclusions of an increasingly segregated white poor. (…) The reality is not that black Americans enjoy special privileges. In fact, the overwhelming weight of the evidence suggests that the opposite is true. Last month, for instance, the brilliant Harvard economist Roland Fryer published an exhaustive study of police uses of force. He found that even after controlling for crime rates and police presence in a given neighborhood, black youths were far likelier to be pushed, thrown to the ground, or harassed by police. (Notably, he also found no racial disparity in the use of lethal force.) (…) Getting whipped into a frenzy on conspiracy websites, or feeling that distant, faceless elites dislike you because of your white skin, doesn’t compare. But the great advantages of whiteness in America are invisible to the white poor, or are completely swallowed by the disadvantages of their class. The young man from West Virginia may be less likely to get questioned by Yale University police, but making it to Yale in the first place still requires a remarkable combination of luck and skill. In building a dialogue around “checking privilege,” the modern progressive elite is implicitly asking white America — especially the segregated white poor — for a level of social awareness unmatched in the history of the country. White failure to empathize with blacks is sometimes a failure of character, but it is increasingly a failure of geography and socialization. Poor whites in West Virginia don’t have the time or the inclination to read Harvard economics studies. And the privileges that matter — that is, the ones they see — are vanishing because of destitution: the privilege to pay for college without bankruptcy, the privilege to work a decent job, the privilege to put food on the table without the aid of food stamps, the privilege not to learn of yet another classmate’s premature death. (…) Because of this polarization, the racial conversation we’re having today is tribalistic. On one side are primarily white people, increasingly represented by the Republican party and the institutions of conservative media. On the other is a collection of different minority groups and a cosmopolitan — and usually wealthier — class of whites. These sides don’t even speak the same language: One side sees white privilege while the other sees anti-white racism. There is no room for agreement or even understanding. J. D. Vance
Par son geste, Kaepernick a emboîté le pas à d’autres joueurs professionnels luttant contre les discriminations raciales ou la violence des armes à feu, parmi lesquels les stars du basket-ball Dwyane Wade, LeBron James ou Carmelo Anthony. Mais, contrairement à ces piliers de la NBA, Kaepernick a délivré son message à un moment très sensible. Aux Etats-Unis s’attaquer au Stars and Stripes (le drapeau) ou au Star-Spangled Banner (l’hymne national) est un jeu très dangereux. La chanteuse Sinead O’Connor en avait fait les frais en 1990, excluant de se produire dans le New Jersey si l’hymne américain était joué en préambule. L’Irlandaise avait été la cible d’une campagne de rejet, bannie par plusieurs radios. Un quart de siècle plus tard, Colin Kaepernick se retrouve vilipendé sur les réseaux sociaux, des Américains exigeant de la Ligue nationale de football américain (NFL) sa suspension, voire son licenciement. Accusé de bafouer un symbole et de politiser son sport, Colin Kaepernick s’inscrit aussi dans une lignée d’athlètes protestataires noirs qui ont marqué les Etats-Unis. Inhumé en juin entouré d’hommages planétaires, la légende de la boxe Mohamed Ali avait payé de plusieurs années d’interruption de carrière son refus d’aller combattre au Vietnam. Egalement gravés dans la mémoire collective sont les poings gantés de noir de Tommie Smith et John Carlos, sur le podium du 200 mètres des jeux Olympiques de Mexico de 1968. Ces deux athlètes, dénonçant la ségrégation raciale théoriquement abolie mais encore bien présente alors, ont été boycottés par les médias et honnis durant des décennies, avant d’être réhabilités tardivement. Francetv
La promesse d’une Amérique post-raciale n’a pas été tenue. Il y a quelques jours à peine, Barack Obama a même invité la communauté noire à s’opposer en bloc à Donald Trump le 8 novembre, en disant qu’il serait vexé si elle ne soutenait pas Hilary Clinton. On a beau croire et dire que l’Amérique entretient un rapport décomplexé avec les statistiques ethniques, il n’en demeure pas moins que cet appel explicite au vote ethnique et communautariste ramène l’Amérique a son clivage originel. De son côté, même s’il ne joue pas explicitement la carte raciale, Donald Trump est le candidat de la classe moyenne blanche qui ressent son déclassement symbolique et économique dans une Amérique convertie au multiculturalisme et au libre-échangisme. Il canalise politiquement un ressentiment qui s’accumule depuis longtemps. Aussi fantasque et inquiétant soit-il, il se présente comme le porte-parole d’une Amérique périphérique en révolte. La question de l’immigration est centrale dans la présente présidentielle. On le sait, le mythe américain est celui d’une nation d’immigrants. Il suffirait d’embrasser le rêve américain et les valeurs américaines pour adhérer à la nation. On oublie pourtant l’existence d’une nation historique américaine, qui s’est transformée au fil des vagues d’immigration successives, mais qui n’est pas pour autant un simple amas d’individus indéterminés. Il existe un noyau culturel américain. Aujourd’hui, l’Amérique est confrontée à l’hispanisation des États du sud. Une bonne partie de cette immigration massive est clandestine et on compte plusieurs millions de sans-papiers dans le pays. Rares sont ceux qui croient possible ou qui souhaitent leur expulsion systématique. Mais tous savent qu’une politique d’amnistie jouerait le rôle d’une pompe aspirante pour de nouvelles vagues de clandestins. De grands pans de l’électorat américain sont traversés par une forme d’angoisse identitaire, qu’on ne saurait réduire mesquinement à une forme de panique morale, comme s’il était globalement paranoïaque. On peut y reconnaître la hantise de déclassement d’un empire qui avait pris l’habitude de sa supériorité mondiale. On y verra aussi, toutefois, une peur de la dilution de l’identité américaine et de sa submersion démographique, semblable à celle qui se manifeste dans les pays européens. En s’en prenant violemment il y a quelques jours à la moitié des électeurs de Trump pour les qualifier de racistes, de sexistes, d’homophobes, de xénophobes et d’islamophobes, Hillary Clinton a certainement procuré satisfaction à la frange la plus radicale de la base démocrate, qu’on trouve dans les universités et les médias. Mais un tel mépris de classe de la part de la représentante par excellence des élites américaines pourrait lui coûter cher chez ceux qui se sentent exclus du système politique et qui rêvent de punir la classe politique. Le pays du 11 septembre n’est pas épargné non plus par les nouveaux visages du terrorisme islamiste, comme on l’a vu notamment à Orlando et à San Bernardino. L’Amérique ne se sent plus à l’abri dans ses frontières. L’islamisme a prouvé à plus d’une reprise sa capacité à frapper en son cœur n’importe quelle société occidentale. Le grand malaise de Barack Obama lorsque vient le temps de nommer l’islam radical, par peur de l’amalgame, affaiblit moralement le président américain, qui semble incapable de faire face à l’ennemi qui le désigne. On en trouve de moins en moins pour célébrer cette dissolution du réel dans une rhétorique inclusive qui, pour ne blesser personne, se montre incapable de nommer le principal péril sécuritaire qui pèse sur notre époque. Obama est ici victime d’une illusion caractéristique de l’universalisme radical. (…) Il ne sert à rien de faire aujourd’hui un réquisitoire contre Obama, d’autant que sa présidence ne fut pas sans grandeur. Appelé à présider une Amérique déclinante dans un contexte mondial impossible, il aura, comme on dit, fait tout son possible pour la pacifier. Si on peut faire le bilan d’un échec relatif de sa présidence, on ne saurait toutefois parler d’une faillite morale. Mathieu Bock-Côté

Vous avez dit pompiers pyromanes ?

A l’heure où semble se confirme l’hypothèse de la provocation délibérée et d’un véritable coup monté d’une porteuse de burkini australienne prétendant avoir été chassée par des baigneurs de Villeneuve-Loubet le 18 septembre dernier et où en Italie une présentatrice de la télévison se voit fustigée pour le port d’une croix pendant qu’après la première olympienne, c’est à la première présentatrice voilée que se prépare l’Amérique …

Où, 15 ans après le 11 septembre et un nouveau massacre, le leader du Monde libre ne peut toujours pas donner un nom à la principale menace qui pèse sur ledit Monde libre …

Mais appelle explicitement au vote ethnique et communautariste alors que son ancienne secrétaire d’Etat et candidate de son parti qualifie de racistes, sexistes, homophobes, xénophobes et islamophobes la moitié des électeurs de son adversaire …

Pendant que les médias gratifient de leur couverture pour son antipatriotisme un sportif noir également élevé par des blancs …

Et qu’un mouvement antiraciste dénonce sytématiquement contre toute évidence le prétendu « racisme policier » …

Qui prendra la peine de rappeler que la dernière victime en date dudit « racisme » est comme dans bien d’autres cas aussi noire que celui qui l’a abattu ?

Et qui aura le courage de reconnaitre contre ceux qui s’accrochent à sa prétendue « grandeur » pour se refuser à faire un « réquisitoire » ou parler de « faillite morale » …

Qu’une présidence qui n’ayant jamais eu de mots assez durs pour rabaisser son propre pays et en fustiger les manquements  …

N’a sans compter la hausse du nombre d’homicides lié à l’effet Ferguson qui décourage les policiers d’entrer dans certains quartiers …

Fait en réalité qu’ajouter de l’huile sur le feu et enhardir les ennemis de la liberté ?

L’échec du grand rêve d’Obama
Mathieu Bock-Côté
Le Figaro
24/09/2016

FIGAROVOX/ANALYSE – Sur fond d’émeutes raciales, Barack Obama a livré un plaidoyer pour le multiculturalisme et contre le populisme lors de son dernier discours à l’assemblée générale de l’ONU. Pour Mathieu Bock-Côté, la fin de sa présidence est cependant marquée par la révolte de l’Amérique périphérique.
Mathieu Bock-Côté est docteur en sociologie et chargé de cours aux HEC à Montréal. Ses travaux portent principalement sur le multiculturalisme, les mutations de la démocratie contemporaine et la question nationale québécoise. Il est l’auteur d’Exercices politiques (VLB éditeur, 2013), de Fin de cycle: aux origines du malaise politique québécois (Boréal, 2012) et de La dénationalisation tranquille: mémoire, identité et multiculturalisme dans le Québec post-référendaire (Boréal, 2007). Mathieu Bock-Côté est aussi chroniqueur au Journal de Montréal et à Radio-Canada. Son dernier livre, Le multiculturalisme comme religion politique vient de paraître aux éditions du Cerf.

Dans son dernier discours à l’assemblée générale de l’ONU, Barack Obama a cru devoir livrer un plaidoyer militant contre le populisme qui partout monterait en Occident. En toile de fond de son intervention, il avait naturellement en tête la poussée de Donald Trump, dont on ne peut exclure l’élection à la Maison-Blanche, dans quelques semaines, et qui a mené une campagne portant principalement sur les périls de l’immigration massive et la reconstruction des frontières américaines. On peut croire, toutefois, qu’il visait aussi les mouvements populistes qui progressent sur le vieux continent et qui témoignent de semblables préoccupations. Ce discours en forme d’avertissement permettait à Obama de rappeler les fondements de sa philosophie politique: l’Amérique est un pays d’immigrants et multiculturel. Il a aussi pour vocation de servir d’exemple à l’humanité entière, pour peu qu’il soit à la hauteur de ses idéaux.

Cette mise en garde n’est pas surprenante. L’Amérique n’a rien du paradis multiculturel qu’Obama entendait construire à l’aube de sa présidence, quand on l’imaginait dans les traits du grand réconciliateur d’une nation divisée. La renaissance des tensions raciales, ces derniers mois, plombe une fin de présidence déjà décevante. Si le récit médiatique radicalise une situation déjà difficile, en présentant systématiquement des policiers blancs pourchassant de jeunes noirs, et n’hésitant pas à ouvrir le feu sur eux, on doit néanmoins convenir que la multiplication des bavures rouvre la vieille plaie mal guérie de la ségrégation raciale. En juillet, à Baton Rouge, en Louisiane, cela a même poussé dans une logique de guerre civile un jeune noir qui a assassiné trois policiers blancs. Dans un pays violent, l’Américain moyen a le réflexe de s’armer. Les gated communities se multiplient aussi. La méfiance règne.

La promesse d’une Amérique post-raciale n’a pas été tenue. Il y a quelques jours à peine, Barack Obama a même invité la communauté noire à s’opposer en bloc à Donald Trump le 8 novembre, en disant qu’il serait vexé si elle ne soutenait pas Hilary Clinton. On a beau croire et dire que l’Amérique entretient un rapport décomplexé avec les statistiques ethniques, il n’en demeure pas moins que cet appel explicite au vote ethnique et communautariste ramène l’Amérique a son clivage originel. De son côté, même s’il ne joue pas explicitement la carte raciale, Donald Trump est le candidat de la classe moyenne blanche qui ressent son déclassement symbolique et économique dans une Amérique convertie au multiculturalisme et au libre-échangisme. Il canalise politiquement un ressentiment qui s’accumule depuis longtemps. Aussi fantasque et inquiétant soit-il, il se présente comme le porte-parole d’une Amérique périphérique en révolte.

La question de l’immigration est centrale dans la présente présidentielle. On le sait, le mythe américain est celui d’une nation d’immigrants. Il suffirait d’embrasser le rêve américain et les valeurs américaines pour adhérer à la nation. On oublie pourtant l’existence d’une nation historique américaine, qui s’est transformée au fil des vagues d’immigration successives, mais qui n’est pas pour autant un simple amas d’individus indéterminés. Il existe un noyau culturel américain. Aujourd’hui, l’Amérique est confrontée à l’hispanisation des États du sud. Une bonne partie de cette immigration massive est clandestine et on compte plusieurs millions de sans-papiers dans le pays. Rares sont ceux qui croient possible ou qui souhaitent leur expulsion systématique. Mais tous savent qu’une politique d’amnistie jouerait le rôle d’une pompe aspirante pour de nouvelles vagues de clandestins.

De grands pans de l’électorat américain sont traversés par une forme d’angoisse identitaire, qu’on ne saurait réduire mesquinement à une forme de panique morale, comme s’il était globalement paranoïaque. On peut y reconnaître la hantise de déclassement d’un empire qui avait pris l’habitude de sa supériorité mondiale. On y verra aussi, toutefois, une peur de la dilution de l’identité américaine et de sa submersion démographique, semblable à celle qui se manifeste dans les pays européens. En s’en prenant violemment il y a quelques jours à la moitié des électeurs de Trump pour les qualifier de racistes, de sexistes, d’homophobes, de xénophobes et d’islamophobes, Hillary Clinton a certainement procuré satisfaction à la frange la plus radicale de la base démocrate, qu’on trouve dans les universités et les médias. Mais un tel mépris de classe de la part de la représentante par excellence des élites américaines pourrait lui coûter cher chez ceux qui se sentent exclus du système politique et qui rêvent de punir la classe politique.

Le pays du 11 septembre n’est pas épargné non plus par les nouveaux visages du terrorisme islamiste, comme on l’a vu notamment à Orlando et à San Bernardino. L’Amérique ne se sent plus à l’abri dans ses frontières. L’islamisme a prouvé à plus d’une reprise sa capacité à frapper en son cœur n’importe quelle société occidentale. Le grand malaise de Barack Obama lorsque vient le temps de nommer l’islam radical, par peur de l’amalgame, affaiblit moralement le président américain, qui semble incapable de faire face à l’ennemi qui le désigne. On en trouve de moins en moins pour célébrer cette dissolution du réel dans une rhétorique inclusive qui, pour ne blesser personne, se montre incapable de nommer le principal péril sécuritaire qui pèse sur notre époque. Obama est ici victime d’une illusion caractéristique de l’universalisme radical.

Huit ans plus tard, l’optimisme radieux des premiers mois de la présidence d’Obama semble bien éloigné. L’Amérique misait sur cet homme exceptionnellement doué pour la parole publique pour tourner une page de son histoire et transcender ce qu’on appellera son péché originel. La tâche était probablement trop grande et les fractures américaines, plus profondes qu’on ne le pensait. Peut-être dirons-nous quand même un jour qu’il a marqué une étape majeure dans l’émancipation de la communauté noire, même si l’histoire n’avance pas aussi vite qu’on le souhaiterait. Il ne sert à rien de faire aujourd’hui un réquisitoire contre Obama, d’autant que sa présidence ne fut pas sans grandeur. Appelé à présider une Amérique déclinante dans un contexte mondial impossible, il aura, comme on dit, fait tout son possible pour la pacifier. Si on peut faire le bilan d’un échec relatif de sa présidence, on ne saurait toutefois parler d’une faillite morale.

Voir aussi:

CARTES. Etats-Unis : les abus de la police à l’encontre des Afro-Américains

La mort d’un Noir américain tué mardi par la police a conduit à des émeutes importantes à Charlotte, où l’état d’urgence a été déclaré. Vendredi, un autre Afro-Américain a été abattu à côté de sa voiture alors qu’il n’était pas armé et semblait coopérer.

JDD

22 septembre 2016

Après la mort le 16 septembre dernier de Terence Crutcher, abattu par la police près de son véhicule alors qu’il n’était pas armé et avait les mains en l’air, le problème des abus des forces de l’ordre à l’encontre des Afro-Américains revient sur le devant de la scène outre-Atlantique. D’autant plus depuis mardi et la mort dans des conditions troubles de Keith Lamont Scott, un Noir américain de 43 ans, lui aussi tué par des policiers à Charlotte en Caroline du Nord. La police maintient qu’il était armé et faisait peser une menace vitale réelle, mais la soeur de la victime contredit cette version, arguant qu’il lisait un livre au moment de sa mort.

En 2016, déjà 822 tués par la police

Brentley Vinson, l’agent lui-même noir qui a abattu la victime, a été suspendu en attendant les résultats d’une enquête administrative, mais la situation ne s’est pas calmée à Charlotte. Deux nuits de violences se sont succédées depuis, et l’Etat d’urgence a été déclaré sur place. Le gouverneur, Pat McCrory, a en outre annoncé sur Twitter avoir « pris l’initiative de déployer la Garde nationale et la police autoroutière pour aider la police locale ».

Terence Crutcher et Keith Lamont Scott font partie de la longue liste des 822 personnes tuées cette année lors d’une intervention policière aux Etats-Unis, selon le site Mapping Police Violence :

Ils font également partie des 214 Noirs américains tués en 2016 par des policiers. Si ces chiffres sont très éloignés des 351 victimes blanches, il convient de les remettre en perspective.

Comme l’indique le Washington Post, les Blancs constituent 62% des Américains, mais seulement 49% des victimes policières. Au contraire, les Noirs font partie à 24% des victimes policières, alors que le nombre d’Afro-Américains dans la population totale n’est que de 13%. Le site ProPublica, qui a analysé des chiffres du FBI concernant la période 2012-2012, écrit qu’un adolescent noir a 21 chances de plus d’être tué par la police qu’un adolescent blanc.

Des disparités sociales

Depuis janvier 2016, les Etats enregistrant le plus grand nombre de victimes Afro-Américaines sont la Californie, la Floride et le Texas, toujours selon Mapping Police Violence. Des chiffres liés à la densité de population des agglomérations. Il n’est donc pas surprenant de retrouver aussi une densité importante de victimes dans la zone allant de New York jusqu’à Washington.

Si la majorité des Afro-Américains tués en 2016 étaient armés (en rouge sur la carte), 48 d’entre eux ne l’étaient pas (en noir). Une étude du Washington Post a démontré qu’en 2015, un Noir non-armé avait sept fois plus de chances d’être abattu qu’un blanc.

Impossible cependant d’expliquer ces disparités sans prendre un compte la dimension sociale du phénomène. Comme l’explique Vox, la police patrouille en majorité dans les quartiers aux taux de crimes élevés, où la population noire est plus importante que dans la moyenne américaine. Mais des études ont aussi montré qu’à l’entrainement sur des plateformes de simulation, les policiers tiraient plus rapidement sur des suspects noirs. Un biais qui conduirait à des erreurs d’autant plus importantes sur le terrain. « Dans la situation où ils devraient être le plus entraînés, note ainsi le chercheur Josh Corell, qui a enquêté sur ce sujet, nous avons des raisons de croire que leur entraînement les conduit à se tromper. »

Voir également:

Cops and Political Narratives

In case you hadn’t heard, the Charlotte police shooter is black.

Wall Street Journal

Sept. 23, 2016

We realize this is a prosaic point but it is also roundly ignored as the media and politicians try to fit each shooting episode into the same political narrative: trigger-happy, racist cops kill defenseless young black man, and then the racist system conspires to deny the victim and his family the justice they deserve.

The reality is that policing is hard and dangerous work, confrontations in the street are complicated, and the political uproar since Ferguson has made police more fearful and offenders more brazen. Sometimes the shootings are defensible, and sometimes not, depending on the specific circumstances. But shootings are investigated thoroughly in most cases and the truth does usually emerge.

In Tulsa the police and prosecutors investigated and have charged a white female police officer with first-degree manslaughter for shooting unarmed Terence Crutcher. The district attorney charged Betty Shelby with overreacting to a situation that did not justify lethal force. She will get her day in court and could go to prison for years, so this certainly is no law-enforcement cover-up.

The Charlotte investigation is still underway, but this too fits no easy narrative. The policeman who shot Keith Lamont Scott is black, and so is Charlotte police chief Kerr Putney. There are conflicting accounts about whether Scott had a gun. The video released Friday by Scott’s family is painful to watch but hardly definitive about what happened.

Chief Putney is withholding other videos from the public pending the investigation, a delay that offends distant progressives who want to make political statements. But the goal should be justice, not electing Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump, and witnesses should be interviewed about what they saw before they can be influenced by publicly released videos.

Time after time in these cases reality has confounded politically motivated snap judgments. In Ferguson, the initial claim was that Darren Wilson, a white cop, shot Michael Brown while he was surrendering with his hands up. But it turned out Brown had scuffled with the cop over his gun, and even Eric Holder’s Justice Department found that the original witnesses weren’t credible and declined to indict Mr. Wilson.

In Baltimore in 2015, the district attorney charged six cops involved in the arrest of Freddie Gray with murder, manslaughter or illegal arrest. But three were acquitted at trial, another was freed after a mistrial, and eventually all charges were dropped in the case. Three of the cops are black, as is Judge Barry Williams, who presided over the trials.

Americans may disagree with these outcomes, but they cannot say that the cases were handled with racial animus or legal indifference. The cases in their various details also do not show that there is some widespread racial bias in American policing. With the exception of Ferguson, the police forces involved in most of these controversial killings are ethnically diverse and many have black chiefs.

In any event, none of these cases justify rioting in Charlotte or anywhere else. A civilized society cannot tolerate vandalism or protests that shut down business in a city every time there is a police shooting.

Political leaders, President Obama above all, should defend public order. Mr. Obama should defend police and the judicial system as they handle these sensitive cases. And he should highlight and work with House Speaker Paul Ryan and other politicians who have shown a commitment to bringing opportunity back to American cities.

One tragedy of the Obama Presidency—perhaps the greatest—is that our first black President will leave office with race relations more polarized than when he was elected with such hope eight years ago. The reasons are more complex than we can offer today. But in the weeks he has left, Mr. Obama could do his country a service if he would resist indulging easy but false narratives and do more to bridge the growing divide between the police and young black Americans.

 Voir de plus:

It Doesn’t Matter That the Cop Who Killed Keith Scott Is Black
Donovan X. Ramsey
Complex.com

Sep 21, 2016

As of Wednesday morning, the most recent story of a black man killed by police is that of Keith Scott in Charlotte. Scott was killed Tuesday and details of the incident are still scant. One of the few bits of information shared by officials and reported by media, however, is that Bentley Vinson, the officer who killed Scott, was also black.

As the country struggles to make sense of Scott’s death in relation to the estimated 193 other black people killed by police so far this year (and 306 in 2015), Vinson’s race is being used by some to dismiss charges that Scott was the victim of racist policing. To reduce the role of anti-blackness in policing to merely the race of officers involved in fatal police encounters is misguided, however. It betrays a profound misunderstanding of the ways racism and anti-blackness work within systems, assumes that black people are free of anti-black bias, and that black officers somehow transcend the police cultures in which they’re steeped.

What we know from police accounts is that four officers from the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department were serving a warrant at an apartment complex when they say a man, later identified as Scott, emerged from his car with a handgun. Police say Scott then got back into his car before coming out for a second time with the gun, posing an “imminent threat.” At least one of officers fired at Scott, killing him.

Witnesses have claimed that Scott was unarmed. Officials insist that he was, however, and have shared little else about in the incident, including video footage from the body cameras some of the officers involved. Curiously, though, the CMPD released officer Vinson’s name to the media the day of the incident, an unusual act for a police department in the early phases of an investigation and something that often hasn’t been done in other high-profile police shooting cases. Of course, within no time, a photo sourced from the CMPD’s official Facebook page surfaced of Vinson—a black man—in uniform surrounded by other smiling black people and colleagues.

The caption from CMPD’s post of the picture reads, “An anonymous donor sent an ice cream truck into the Dillehay neighborhood. Some of the neighbors were still without electricity following the power outage. Metro division officers Vinson, Kennedy, Reiber and Pinckney served sweltering community members. One little girl said, ‘Well now I like the po-po!’”

It should go without saying, with all the nation has learned about policing in the past two years, but the race of the officer who killed Scott has little to no bearing on if Scott himself was killed because he was black. Given the complexity of our system of policing, it is as relevant to the matter as is whether or not that officer loves passing out ice cream.

Studies have shown that black people are not only capable of anti-black bias but that those who’ve been tested for racial bias are evenly split when it comes to pro-white and pro-black attitudes. Even more, research on the impact of police force diversity on officer-involved homicides has found no relationship between the racial representation of police forces and police killings in the cities they serve. In fact, one study revealed that the best way to predict how many police shootings might occur in a city is to look at the size of its black population. All of that without mentioning the troubling accounts from black police officers of the racism they experience on the force and the pressure they often face to engage in race-based policing in the communities they serve.

Ice Cube put it simply in 1988 on N.W.A.’s Fuck tha Police, “But don’t let it be a black and a white one, ‘cause they’ll slam ya down to the street top. Black police showing out for the white cop.” What a 19-year-old Cube understood nearly 30 years ago seems to still elude members of the media and even policymakers today. That’s that there are a number of factors that impact how police officers—yes, even black officers—engage black civilians and suspects, the least of which is shared characteristics.

To be sure, America could benefit from more diversity in its police force, especially in communities of color. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, nearly 65 percent of the nation’s 3,109,000 law enforcement officers are white. That number jumps to 70 percent for patrol officers and nearly 80 percent for police supervisors. But, while we’re concerned with the race of cops, we should be as concerned with the culture, policy, and practices that guide their actions.

The issue at hand isn’t the personal feelings of cops who encounter black civilians but the deadly system of policing that criminalizes blackness, actively profiles black people, over-policies our neighborhoods as a matter of policy, and that uses force against us at three times the rate of whites. That is the ugly state of American policing and that truth doesn’t suddenly change when the boys in blue are black.

Voir encore:

Football Américain
Colin Kaepernick au coeur d’une polémique aux Etats-Unis
Marine Couturier, AFP
Francetv
30/08/2016

Boycotter l’hymne américain ? Une hérésie au pays de l’oncle Sam. Pourtant Colin Kaepernick, quaterback des San Francisco 49ers, a refusé vendredi de se lever au moment de l’hymne américain lors d’un match de pré-saison. Sa motivation : protester contre « l’oppression » de la communauté noire aux Etats-Unis. De l’autre côté de l’Atlantique, la polémique enfle portée notamment par le candidat républicain à la Maison Blanche Donald Trump.

Pendant que la France se divise sur la question du burkini, les Etats-Unis ont eux aussi des débats nationaux houleux. La faute – si cela en est une – au joueur de football américain Colin Kaepernick, qui a refusé vendredi de se lever de sa chaise tandis que retentissaient les notes de « La Bannière étoilée » dans le Levi’s Stadium, où son équipe accueillait les Green Bay Packers. Le métis de 28 ans, dont le père biologique était noir mais qui a été adopté et élevé par un couple de Blancs, a ensuite justifié son geste : « Je ne vais pas afficher de fierté pour le drapeau d’un pays qui opprime les Noirs. Il y a des cadavres dans les rues et des meurtriers qui s’en tirent avec leurs congés payés » faisant ainsi référence à de récents abus policiers ayant causé la mort brutale de Noirs non armés.

Des internautes se sont filmés en train de brûler le maillot du quarterback, qui avait pourtant conduit San Francisco jusqu’au Super Bowl 2013 (défaite contre Baltimore 34-31). Pour l’instant, le joueur aux bras tatoués semble pouvoir compter sur le soutien de son club. « Nous reconnaissons le droit à tout individu de choisir de participer, ou non, à la célébration de notre hymne national », ont fait savoir les 49ers, qui ont remporté le Super Bowl à cinq reprises. La Maison Blanche s’est elle clairement démarquée du sportif, en lui reconnaissant toutefois le droit de proférer ses opinions.

Donald Trump prend parti
Lundi, le candidat républicain à la maison Blanche Donald Trump y est allé de sa déclaration lors d’une interview à une radio de Seattle, qualifiant d' »exécrable » la posture de Kaepernick et lui conseillant de « chercher un pays mieux adapté ».

La légende du football américain Jerry Rice a lui aussi pris position sur un message posté sur Twitter :

« Toutes les vies sont importantes. Il se passe tellement de choses dans ce monde aujourd’hui. Est-ce qu’on ne peut pas tous vivre ensemble ? Colin, je respecte votre position mais ne manquez pas de respect au drapeau. »

Kaepernick dans la lignée d’autres sportifs
Par son geste, Kaepernick a emboîté le pas à d’autres joueurs professionnels luttant contre les discriminations raciales ou la violence des armes à feu, parmi lesquels les stars du basket-ball Dwyane Wade, LeBron James ou Carmelo Anthony. Mais, contrairement à ces piliers de la NBA, Kaepernick a délivré son message à un moment très sensible. Aux Etats-Unis s’attaquer au Stars and Stripes (le drapeau) ou au Star-Spangled Banner (l’hymne national) est un jeu très dangereux.

La chanteuse Sinead O’Connor en avait fait les frais en 1990, excluant de se produire dans le New Jersey si l’hymne américain était joué en préambule. L’Irlandaise avait été la cible d’une campagne de rejet, bannie par plusieurs radios. Un quart de siècle plus tard, Colin Kaepernick se retrouve vilipendé sur les réseaux sociaux, des Américains exigeant de la Ligue nationale de football américain (NFL) sa suspension, voire son licenciement.

Accusé de bafouer un symbole et de politiser son sport, Colin Kaepernick s’inscrit aussi dans une lignée d’athlètes protestataires noirs qui ont marqué les Etats-Unis. Inhumé en juin entouré d’hommages planétaires, la légende de la boxe Mohamed Ali avait payé de plusieurs années d’interruption de carrière son refus d’aller combattre au Vietnam. Egalement gravés dans la mémoire collective sont les poings gantés de noir de Tommie Smith et John Carlos, sur le podium du 200 mètres des jeux Olympiques de Mexico de 1968. Ces deux athlètes, dénonçant la ségrégation raciale théoriquement abolie mais encore bien présente alors, ont été boycottés par les médias et honnis durant des décennies, avant d’être réhabilités tardivement.

Au regard de précédents historiques, Colin Kaepernick peut s’attendre à naviguer en mer agitée un bon bout de temps. D’autant que le joueur a promis de continuer à s’asseoir pour les prochains matches. Le feuilleton n’a pas fini d’être alimenté.

Voir aussi:

Colin Kaepernick divise l’Amérique, mais fait des émules
Ce joueur de football américain refuse de se lever quand retentit l’hymne américain avant les matchs, pour protester contre les violences policières. D’autres sportifs commencent à l’imiter
Gilles Biassette
La Croix
06/09/2016

Depuis qu’il reste assis lors de l’hymne d’avant-match, le joueur de football américain Colin Kaepernick est l’objet de vives attaques. Mais il a aussi reçu le soutien d’autres sportifs.

Protestation muette
Pour la troisième fois en moins de deux semaines, Colin Kaepernick ne s’est pas levé jeudi 1er septembre, alors que l’hymne américain retentissait dans le stade de San Diego et que le public, comme les joueurs, se tenaient debout, main sur le cœur et regard rivé sur le drapeau.

Le joueur de 28 ans de l’équipe des « San Francisco 49ers », dont le père biologique était noir et absent, et la mère blanche et pauvre, et qui a été adopté très jeune par un couple de Blancs, proteste à sa façon contre les violences policières. « Je ne vais pas afficher de fierté pour le drapeau d’un pays qui opprime les Noirs », a-t-il expliqué après être resté assis la première fois.

Cet acte lui a valu d’être conspué jeudi à chaque fois qu’il a eu le ballon entre les mains. On ne badine pas avec la bannière étoilée à San Diego, port d’attache de l’immense flotte du Pacifique.

Des soutiens venus du terrain
Cette attitude alimente la polémique outre-Atlantique. Certains internautes se filment même brûlant un maillot frappé du nom de Colin Kaepernick, en dépit de ses exploits passés.

Mais d’autres se ruent pour acheter la tunique, en signe de soutien, au point d’en faire l’un des maillots désormais les plus vendus. Le joueur a promis de donner un million de dollars (900 000 €) à différentes associations intervenant dans les quartiers difficiles du pays.

Mieux encore, d’autres sportifs suivent son exemple. Jeudi, un de ses coéquipiers l’a imité à San Diego. Au même moment, à l’autre extrémité de la côte ouest, à Seattle, Jeremy Lane restait aussi sur son banc avant d’affronter l’équipe d’Oakland.

Dimanche soir, c’est une joueuse de football qui se joignait au mouvement. Megan Rapinoe, 31 ans, posait un genou à terre lorsque les notes de la « bannière étoilée » retentissaient, en signe de solidarité avec Colin Kaepernick.

« C’est vraiment dégoûtant la façon dont il a été traité, la façon dont les médias ont traité cette affaire, dira-t-elle après la partie. Étant homosexuelle, je sais ce que veut dire regarder le drapeau américain en étant consciente qu’il ne protège pas toutes les libertés. »

La Maison-Blanche s’en mêle
La polémique a pris une telle ampleur que la classe politique a été interpellée. Depuis la Chine, où il venait de participer au sommet du G20, Barack Obama a défendu lundi 5 septembre la démarche du joueur, jugeant qu’il avait réussi à attirer l’attention « sur des sujets qui méritent d’être abordés ».

« Il exerce son droit constitutionnel à faire passer un message », a souligné le locataire de la Maison-Blanche. Reconnaissant que cela pouvait être « quelque chose de difficile » à digérer pour les familles de militaires, Barack Obama a estimé que la démarche du joueur pouvait se comprendre.

« Je préfère voir des jeunes gens qui sont impliqués et essayent de concevoir comment ils peuvent participer au débat démocratique plutôt que des gens qui se comportent en spectateurs et ne prêtent pas attention du tout à ce qui se passe », a-t-il conclu.

Gilles Biassette

Profil
Colin Kaepernick, l’homme qui a lancé un débat national sur le patriotisme aux Etats-Unis
LIBERATION

22 septembre 2016

Colin Kaepernick, meneur de jeu des San Francisco 49ers, le 26 août 2016 à Santa Clara en Californie Photo Thearon W. Henderson. AFP
En refusant de se lever pendant l’hymne d’avant-match pour protester contre le racisme de la police américaine, le footballeur américain âgé de 28 ans a lancé une polémique nationale, à tel point que d’autres athlètes américains, comme lui, s’interrogent sur leur rapport au patriotisme.

Colin Kaepernick, l’homme qui a lancé un débat national sur le patriotisme aux Etats-Unis
Le magazine américain Time consacre cette semaine sa couverture au footballeur américain Colin Kaepernick, qui a initié un débat vif dans son pays lorsqu’il a refusé, cet été, de se lever pendant l’hymne américain lors d’un match.

Qui est Colin Kaepernick ? Agé de 28 ans, il joue au poste de quarterback pour les 49ers de San Francisco. Mais ce ne sont pas ses qualités de joueurs qui lui offrent, le 26 août, une notoriété internationale. Ce vendredi-là, au Levi’s Stadium de Californie où son équipe affronte les Green Bay Packets, il reste assis au moment de l’hymne national, alors que tout le monde se lève. Et s’en justifie ensuite : «Je ne vais pas afficher de fierté pour le drapeau d’un pays qui opprime les Noirs.» «Il y a des cadavres dans les rues et des meurtriers qui s’en tirent avec leurs congés payés», explique-t-il.

A lire aussi : Le footballeur Colin Kaepernick snobe l’hymne national dans un geste politique

Son geste a choqué de nombreuses personnes aux Etats-Unis, certains supporters de son équipe mettant le feu à son maillot dans des images diffusées sur les réseaux sociaux. Mais le joueur a tenu bon. «Quand des changements significatifs auront été apportés et que je sentirai que ce drapeau représente ce qu’il doit représenter, que ce pays représente le peuple de la manière dont il doit le faire, alors je me lèverai», a-t-il dit, soutenu par son équipe, qui a expliqué dans un communiqué : «Dans le respect de grands principes américains telles que la liberté de religion et la liberté d’expression, nous reconnaissons le droit d’un individu de participer, ou non, à la célébration de notre hymne national».

Le joueur porte aussi régulièrement des chaussettes figurant des images de porcs en uniforme policier. Dans un message sur Instagram, Kaepernick s’en est expliqué : «Les policiers sans scrupule qui se voient confier des postes dans des services de police mettent en danger non seulement la population mais aussi les policiers ayant de bonnes intentions, car ils créent une atmosphère de tension et de défiance».

Depuis, Colin Kaepernick a aussi suscité un vaste mouvement de soutien : les ventes de son maillot ont explosé. «La seule façon dont je peux vous rendre ce soutien est de faire don de tous les gains que je reçois de ces ventes aux communautés !», a-t-il annoncé sur son compte Instagram.

Ces derniers jours, le footballeur, fort de presque un million d’abonnés sur Twitter, a abondamment tweeté et retweeté des messages sur le meurtre de Terence Crutcher par une policière de l’Oklahoma le 16 septembre.

En lui consacrant sa couverture, le magazine Time explique que Colin Kaepernick a lancé un mouvement de protestation chez les athlètes américains, qui s’interrogent sur la façon dont les Etats-Unis définissent le patriotisme.

Colin Kaepernick (San Francisco) divise les Etats-Unis
L’Equipe

30/08/2016
Le quarterback des San Francisco 49ers a refusé de se lever pour l’hymne national des Etats-Unis, vendredi lors d’un match de pré-saison, créant une polémique dans son pays. Kaepernick a agi de la sorte pour protester contre  »l’oppression » de la communauté noire américaine.

Colin Kaepernick avait emmené les San Francisco 49ers au Super Bowl il y a trois ans. Les Californiens avaient été battus par Baltimore. (Reuters)
Aux Etats-Unis, la tradition veut que joueurs, entraîneurs et spectateurs se lèvent et se découvrent la tête pour entonner l’hymne, regard tourné vers le drapeau. Mais, juste avant d’affronter les Green Bay Packers il y a quatre jours, Colin Kaepernick, joueur métis âgé de 28 ans, n’a pas quitté sa chaise. «Je ne vais pas afficher de fierté pour le drapeau d’un pays qui opprime les Noirs, a-t-il ensuite déclaré, faisant référence à de récents abus policiers ayant causé la mort brutale de Noirs non armés. Il y a des cadavres dans les rues et des meurtriers qui s’en tirent avec leurs congés payés.» Kaepernick a suivi d’autres joueurs professionnels luttant contre les discriminations raciales ou la violence des armes à feu, parmi lesquels Dwyane Wade, LeBron James ou Carmelo Anthony.

Mais, contrairement aux stars de la NBA, le quarterback des San Francisco 49ers a délivré son message à un moment très sensible. Aux Etats-Unis on ne s’attaque pas impunément au Stars and Stripes (le drapeau) ou au Star Spangled Banner (l’hymne national). Cela lui vaut aujourd’hui d’être vilipendé sur les réseaux sociaux. Des Américains ont même exigé de la NFL sa suspension, voire son licenciement. Et des internautes se sont filmés en train de brûler le maillot du quarterback des 49ers. La polémique a pris une dimension nationale, quand Donald Trump, le candidat républicain aux prochaines élections présidentielles, a qualifié «d’exécrable» la posture de Kaepernick et lui a conseillé de «chercher un pays mieux adapté».

La Maison Blanche, elle, s’est clairement démarquée du sportif, en lui reconnaissant toutefois le droit de proférer ses opinions. Mais Colin Kaepernick semble pouvoir compter sur le soutien de son club. «Nous reconnaissons le droit à tout individu de choisir de participer, ou non, à la célébration de notre hymne national», ont fait savoir les San Francisco 49ers. Kaepernick a promis de continuer à s’asseoir pour les prochains matches.
Rédaction avec AFP

Voir par ailleurs:

Femme en burkini chassée d’une plage à Villeneuve-Loubet, un coup monté ?

Marie Cardona

Nice-Matin

20/09/2016
La chaîne de télévision australienne Channel 7 a diffusé ce samedi la vidéo d’une femme en burkini se faisant « chasser » d’une plage de Villeneuve-Loubet par des baigneurs. Selon un témoin, la scène est montée de toute pièce.

Selon une vidéo diffusée par une chaîne de la télévision australienne, Zeynab Alshelh, une étudiante de 23 ans, aurait été forcée de quitter une plage de Villeneuve-Loubet où elle s’était installée. En cause? Son burkini, jugé provocateur par d’autres baigneurs.

L’histoire a été reprise par tous les médias et notamment par l’AFP.

Mais selon une mère de famille qui se trouvait sur la plage à ce moment-là, la scène qui s’est déroulée sous ses yeux était plus que suspecte.

« Nous étions installés sur la plage avec mes enfants, quand nous avons vu la caméra débarquer à quelques mètres de nous, explique-t-elle. Ce n’est qu’après qu’un homme et deux femmes en burkini sont arrivés. Ils ont marché quelques minutes le long de la plage, puis sont venus s’installer juste devant l’équipe télé ».

Alors, un coup monté? « On s’est immédiatement posé la question. C’est d’ailleurs pour ça que tous les gens sur la plage regardent dans la direction de la caméra. »

Mais la vidéo diffusée par la chaîne australienne va plus loin. On y voit un homme se diriger vers la caméra et lâcher: « Vous faites demi-tour et vous partez ». Tel qu’est monté le reportage, cette invective semble dirigée à l’encontre des deux femmes en burkini.

Une impression appuyée par la voix off de la vidéo qui confirme: « Nous avons été forcés de partir, car les gens ont dit qu’ils allaient appeler la police. »

Mais il n’en est rien. « L’homme sur la vidéo est mon oncle, atteste notre témoin. Il n’a jamais demandé à ce que ces trois personnes quittent la plage. Il s’adressait à la caméra pour demander au cameraman de partir. Il y avait des enfants sur la plage, dont les nôtres, et on ne voulait pas qu’ils soient filmés. »

La suite de la vidéo montre le même homme en train de téléphoner. « Oui, il appelait la police. Pas pour les faire intervenir pour chasser ces personnes, mais pour demander comment on pouvait faire pour empêcher la caméra de nous filmer, surtout nos enfants ». Et d’ajouter: « A aucun moment des gens sont venus demander aux femmes en burkini de quitter la plage. »

« C’était trop gros pour être vrai »

Une version corroborée par un autre témoin de la scène. « On voyait que c’était scénarisé, c’était trop gros pour être vrai et ça puait le coup monté », raconte Stéphane. Ce père de famille était dans l’eau avec ses enfants, au niveau de la plage privée Corto Maltese, quand il a vu débarquer la petite équipe sur la plage.

« L’homme et les deux femmes sont arrivés presque en courant pour s’installer. En 10 secondes, ils avaient déplié leurs serviettes et planté leur parasol. Ils se sont mis en plein milieu du couloir à jet-ski de la plage privée. Comme ils gênaient, le propriétaire de la plage est sorti leur demander de se pousser. »

Ce n’est qu’après que Stéphane aperçoit la journaliste et son cameraman « planqués » derrière les voitures, en train de filmer. Il raconte qu’à ce moment-là, le propriétaire de la plage a fait entrer le petit groupe dans son restaurant.

« Ils sont ressortis au bout d’un moment. L’homme et les deux femmes ont continué à marcher le long de la plage en direction de la Siesta. Des fois, ils se posaient. Puis ils repartaient. » Le journaliste et le cameraman, qui avaient fait mine de partir, étaient en fait toujours cachés derrière les voitures. « On aurait dit qu’ils attendaient des réactions ».

Stéphane assistera de loin à la scène du baigneur qui pressera les journalistes de quitter les lieux. « J’ai vu ce monsieur au téléphone. Mais j’étais trop loin pour entendre ce qu’il disait. »

Le petit groupe finira par quitter les lieux. « Il y avait un véhicule qui les attendait en haut de la plage, comme pour les exfiltrer au cas où… »

Voir aussi:

Inquirer
Seven and its burkini family owe France an apology
Emma-Kate Symons
The Australian
September 24, 2016

The Seven Network and the pugnacious Muslim Aussie family it flew to the French Riviera with the aim of provoking beachgoers into a “racist” reaction to the “Aussie cossie” burkini owe the traumatised people of Nice and France a swift apology.

The cynical stunt pulled by the Sunday Night program, where it spirited Sydney hijab-proselytising medical student Zeynab Alshelh and her activist parents off to a beach near Nice to “show solidarity” with (radically conservative) Muslims, featured the 23-year-old flaunting her burkini in an obvious attempt to bait Gallic sun lovers into religious and ethnically motivated hatred. Except according to the French people filmed against their will, the claimed “chasing off the beach” that made international headlines never occurred because Seven used hidden camera tactics, selective editing and deliberate distor­tion to reach its predeter­mined conclusions.

This unethical exercise in journalism deliberately painted France as “hostile to Muslims” even though the most hostile countries in the world for Muslim women are places such as Iran and Saudi Arabia, where being female entails forcible veiling and the threat of punishment with the lash, prison or worse for flouting bans on driving, playing sport, committing “adultery” or doing much at all without a male guardian.

The manipulation is the latest example of calculated French-bashing fuelled by collusion between the goals of political Islam and compliant media outlets seeking culture clash cliches.

Alshelh and her family, just like her burkini — which leading French Muslim women such as broadcaster Sonia Mabrouk, Charlie Hebdo journalist Zineb El Rhazoui and radicalisation prevention champion Nadia Remadna condemn as a standard bearer of extremism and the retrograde notion that women are impure vessels whose bodies must be covered — are not just your regular mainstream Muslims, as presented in the program. Au contraire.

Alshelh’s father, who appeared in this cringe-worthy report complete with jarring Jaws-like music, is Ghayath Alshelh, head of the Islamic Charity Projects Association in Sydney’s Bankstown.

His association was formed from the hotly contested Lebanese-Ethiopian al-Ahbash movement and repeatedly condemned as a “fringe sect” by prominent mainstream Australian Muslim figures and organisations, who even pushed for what they describe as its radical Muslim radio station 2MFM to be taken off the air. The association, which proclaims “Islam the true religion” on its home page, was forced to defend itself last year after a police counter-terrorism investigation into a student allegedly exposed to violent ideologies drawing on radical Islam in its prayer groups at Epping Boys High.

Beyond the Alshelh family’s zealotry, which puts them firmly in an ultra-orthodox, unrepresentative minority, locals claim Seven hoodwinked us again: the seaside ostracism of this Aussie girl desperate to give a Down Under lesson in tolerance to those xeno­phobic French never even took place. According to people quoted in the newspaper Nice-Matin, the entire show smelled of a set-up.

No one was hounded off the beach, despite the scripted whining of Seven’s solemn-faced presenter Rahni Sadler and her well-rehearsed talent the Alshelhs. The swimming public were upset to see the camera crew filming them and their children without permission in a country where privacy is legally protected and paparazzi do not have the same rights as they do in Australia to film without consent.

The beachgoers were also well aware France’s highest judicial body had struck down the mayoral burkini ban at Villeneuve-Loubet.

A French mother who witnessed the incident, which she considered “more than suspect”, told Nice-Matin she was sitting on the beach with her family and children when she saw the camera planted only a few metres away. “And it was only at that point the man and two women in burkinis arrived. They walked up and down the beach for several minutes, then they stopped and sat down right in front of the TV crew.

“We immediately asked ourselves if it was a set-up. And that was why everyone on the beach started looking in the direction of the TV crew.

“The man on the video (who said, ‘You turn around and you leave’) was my uncle. He never asked these three people to leave the beach. He spoke to the camera because he was asking the cameraman to leave.

“There were children on the beach, including our own, and we didn’t want them to be filmed.

“Yes, he called the police, but not to get them to chase these people away; instead it was to ask how he could stop them from filming us, and especially our children.

“At no point did anyone come and demand these people leave the beach.”

Another witness told Nice-Matin: “We could see it was being dramatised, it was too much to be true and it stank of a set-up. The man and the two women almost ran to get themselves set-up. In 10 seconds they had laid out their towels and planted their umbrella. They put themselves right in the middle of the jet-ski corridor of the private beach. Because they were in the way of others, the owner of the beach came out and asked them to move.”

It was at this moment that the witness Stephane saw the journalist and her cameraman “planted” behind cars, filming. “The man and the two women continued to walk the length of the beach … sometimes they sat down. Then they started moving again.” But the journalist and cameraman, who had given the impression of leaving, were in fact hidden all the time behind the cars. “You would say they were waiting for some reactions,” he said. “There was a car waiting for them at the top of the beach, as if it was going to spirit them away them just in case.”

Zeynab Alshelh still insisted on air that she was “threatened” and told to leave as she rambled undergraduate-style: “At least in Australia if there is some racism here and there and whatever, but like, the government does not say that it’s OK to be racist towards anyone.”

L’Express magazine attacked the Sunday Night beat-up as a “caricature of France as racist” and publications including Europe1 online and Causeur responded caustically to Australians giving “moral lessons” to France, mocking our “multicultural paradise” and citing the Cronulla race riots and ethnically targeted crimes as evidence. (Alshelh, who denies the set-up, tells Inquirer she “won’t comment on financing questions”, directing inquiries to Seven, but contradicting the show’s script in admitting the network contacted her family first about the French trip).

The shameful Seven report went viral globally thanks to an international media thirsty for stereotypes about France’s unsubstantiated rising tide of Islamophobia. It was dishonest sensationalism that deliberately skewed complex issues surrounding secularism a la francaise and surging religious fundamentalism of the Islamist variety in the context of ever-present terrorist threats and a state of emergency.

Next time Seven should finance Zeynab Alshelh trying her luck taking off her veil in Saudi Arabia or Iran, or perhaps the trainee doctor could use hidden camera techniques in Egypt on doctors practising illegal female genital mutilation on the vast majority of little girls.

But as she confesses to Inquirer: “I’m not going to put myself in that kind of danger — and anyway, they are not preaching secularism (like France) they are just doing whatever they want to do.”

 


Héritage Obama: Attention, une tribalisation peut en cacher une autre ! (Revenge of the Deplorables: It’s “hope and change” which begat “make America great again”, stupid !)

18 septembre, 2016

etats unis hymne national

KAEPERNICK REID

COLUMBUS, OH - SEPTEMBER 15: Megan Rapinoe #15 of the U.S. Women's National Team kneels during the playing of the U.S. National Anthem before a match against Thailand on September 15, 2016 at MAPFRE Stadium in Columbus, Ohio. Jamie Sabau/Getty Images/AFP

Aux États-Unis, les plus opulents citoyens ont bien soin de ne point s’isoler du peuple ; au contraire, ils s’en rapprochent sans cesse, ils l’écoutent volontiers et lui parlent tous les jours. Ils savent que les riches des démocraties ont toujours besoin des pauvres et que, dans les temps démocratiques, on s’attache le pauvre par les manières plus que par les bienfaits. La grandeur même des bienfaits, qui met en lumière la différence des conditions, cause une irritation secrète à ceux qui en profitent; mais la simplicité des manières a des charmes presque irrésistibles : leur familiarité entraîne et leur grossièreté même ne déplaît pas toujours. Ce n’est pas du premier coup que cette vérité pénètre dans l’esprit des riches. Ils y résistent d’ordinaire tant que dure la révolution démocratique, et ils ne l’abandonnent même point aussitôt après que cette révolution est accomplie. Ils consentent volontiers à faire du bien au peuple ; mais ils veulent continuer à le tenir à distance. Ils croient que cela suffit ; ils se trompent. Ils se ruineraient ainsi sans réchauffer le coeur de la population qui les environne. Ce n’est pas le sacrifice de leur argent qu’elle leur demande; c’est celui de leur orgueil. Tocqueville
Toutes les stratégies que les intellectuels et les artistes produisent contre les « bourgeois » tendent inévitablement, en dehors de toute intention expresse et en vertu même de la structure de l’espace dans lequel elles s’engendrent, à être à double effet et dirigées indistinctement contre toutes les formes de soumission aux intérêts matériels, populaires aussi bien que bourgeoises. Bourdieu
Il y a à peine plus de 3 millions de musulmans aux Etats-Unis, soit 1 pour cent de la population. C’est donc un peu comme si l’on assistait à l’inversion de la situation qui prévalait dans les années 1920, quand la France comptait à peine 5.000 Noirs et la «négrophilie» tenait le haut du pavé à Paris. À l’époque, l’élite française ne trouvait pas de mots assez durs pour fustiger le «racisme américain ». Géraldine Smith
America is coming apart. For most of our nation’s history, whatever the inequality in wealth between the richest and poorest citizens, we maintained a cultural equality known nowhere else in the world—for whites, anyway. (…) But t’s not true anymore, and it has been progressively less true since the 1960s. People are starting to notice the great divide. The tea party sees the aloofness in a political elite that thinks it knows best and orders the rest of America to fall in line. The Occupy movement sees it in an economic elite that lives in mansions and flies on private jets. Each is right about an aspect of the problem, but that problem is more pervasive than either political or economic inequality. What we now face is a problem of cultural inequality. When Americans used to brag about « the American way of life »—a phrase still in common use in 1960—they were talking about a civic culture that swept an extremely large proportion of Americans of all classes into its embrace. It was a culture encompassing shared experiences of daily life and shared assumptions about central American values involving marriage, honesty, hard work and religiosity. Over the past 50 years, that common civic culture has unraveled. We have developed a new upper class with advanced educations, often obtained at elite schools, sharing tastes and preferences that set them apart from mainstream America. At the same time, we have developed a new lower class, characterized not by poverty but by withdrawal from America’s core cultural institutions. (…) Why have these new lower and upper classes emerged? For explaining the formation of the new lower class, the easy explanations from the left don’t withstand scrutiny. It’s not that white working class males can no longer make a « family wage » that enables them to marry. The average male employed in a working-class occupation earned as much in 2010 as he did in 1960. It’s not that a bad job market led discouraged men to drop out of the labor force. Labor-force dropout increased just as fast during the boom years of the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s as it did during bad years. (…) As I’ve argued in much of my previous work, I think that the reforms of the 1960s jump-started the deterioration. Changes in social policy during the 1960s made it economically more feasible to have a child without having a husband if you were a woman or to get along without a job if you were a man; safer to commit crimes without suffering consequences; and easier to let the government deal with problems in your community that you and your neighbors formerly had to take care of. But, for practical purposes, understanding why the new lower class got started isn’t especially important. Once the deterioration was under way, a self-reinforcing loop took hold as traditionally powerful social norms broke down. Because the process has become self-reinforcing, repealing the reforms of the 1960s (something that’s not going to happen) would change the trends slowly at best. Meanwhile, the formation of the new upper class has been driven by forces that are nobody’s fault and resist manipulation. The economic value of brains in the marketplace will continue to increase no matter what, and the most successful of each generation will tend to marry each other no matter what. As a result, the most successful Americans will continue to trend toward consolidation and isolation as a class. Changes in marginal tax rates on the wealthy won’t make a difference. Increasing scholarships for working-class children won’t make a difference. The only thing that can make a difference is the recognition among Americans of all classes that a problem of cultural inequality exists and that something has to be done about it. That « something » has nothing to do with new government programs or regulations. Public policy has certainly affected the culture, unfortunately, but unintended consequences have been as grimly inevitable for conservative social engineering as for liberal social engineering. The « something » that I have in mind has to be defined in terms of individual American families acting in their own interests and the interests of their children. Doing that in Fishtown requires support from outside. There remains a core of civic virtue and involvement in working-class America that could make headway against its problems if the people who are trying to do the right things get the reinforcement they need—not in the form of government assistance, but in validation of the values and standards they continue to uphold. The best thing that the new upper class can do to provide that reinforcement is to drop its condescending « nonjudgmentalism. » Married, educated people who work hard and conscientiously raise their kids shouldn’t hesitate to voice their disapproval of those who defy these norms. When it comes to marriage and the work ethic, the new upper class must start preaching what it practices. Charles Murray
Vous allez dans certaines petites villes de Pennsylvanie où, comme dans beaucoup de petites villes du Middle West, les emplois ont disparu depuis maintenant 25 ans et n’ont été remplacés par rien d’autre (…) Et il n’est pas surprenant qu’ils deviennent pleins d’amertume, qu’ils s’accrochent aux armes à feu ou à la religion, ou à leur antipathie pour ceux qui ne sont pas comme eux, ou encore à un sentiment d’hostilité envers les immigrants. Barack Obama
Part of the reason that our politics seems so tough right now, and facts and science and argument does not seem to be winning the day all the time, is because we’re hard-wired not to always think clearly when we’re scared. Barack Obama
Pour généraliser, en gros, vous pouvez placer la moitié des partisans de Trump dans ce que j’appelle le panier des pitoyables. Les racistes, sexistes, homophobes, xénophobes, islamophobes. A vous de choisir. Hillary Clinton
La nuit dernière j’ai ‘généralisé en gros’, et ce n’est jamais une bonne idée. Je regrette avoir dit ‘la moitié’, c’était mal. Hillary Clinton
Notre code vestimentaire du district interdit les couvre-chefs, sauf lorsque les élèves les portent pour des raisons religieuses. (…) De plus, il interdit notamment les bandanas et les bandeaux car certains gangs de la zone les utilisent pour se reconnaitre entre eux. Mais chaque chef d’établissement est libre de l’adapter selon les communautés spécifiques de son école. Dans ce cas-ci, le principal du lycée de Gibbs permet aux jeunes filles de porter des foulards africains aussi longtemps qu’elles ont une autorisation parentale. Donc, pour nous, le problème est résolu et nous n’envisageons pas de modifier notre politique globale. Lisa Wolf (chargée de communication du district)
Les «élites» françaises, sous l’inspiration et la domination intellectuelle de François Mitterrand, on voulu faire jouer au Front National depuis 30 ans, le rôle, non simplement du diable en politique, mais de l’Apocalypse. Le Front National représentait l’imminence et le danger de la fin des Temps. L’épée de Damoclès que se devait de neutraliser toute politique «républicaine». Cet imaginaire de la fin, incarné dans l’anti-frontisme, arrive lui-même à sa fin. Pourquoi? Parce qu’il est devenu impossible de masquer aux Français que la fin est désormais derrière nous. La fin est consommée, la France en pleine décomposition, et la république agonisante, d’avoir voulu devenir trop bonne fille de l’Empire multiculturel européen. Or tout le monde comprend bien qu’il n’a nullement été besoin du Front national pour cela. Plus rien ou presque n’est à sauver, et c’est pourquoi le Front national fait de moins en moins peur, même si, pour cette fois encore, la manœuvre du «front républicain», orchestrée par Manuel Valls, a été efficace sur les électeurs socialistes. Les Français ont compris que la fin qu’on faisait incarner au Front national ayant déjà eu lieu, il avait joué, comme rôle dans le dispositif du mensonge généralisé, celui du bouc émissaire, vers lequel on détourne la violence sociale, afin qu’elle ne détruise pas tout sur son passage. Remarquons que le Front national s’était volontiers prêté à ce dispositif aussi longtemps que cela lui profitait, c’est-à-dire jusqu’à aujourd’hui. Le parti anti-système a besoin du système dans un premier temps pour se légitimer. Nous approchons du point où la fonction de bouc émissaire, théorisée par René Girard  va être entièrement dévoilée et où la violence ne pourra plus se déchaîner vers une victime extérieure. Il faut bien mesurer le danger social d’une telle situation, et la haute probabilité de renversement qu’elle secrète: le moment approche pour ceux qui ont désigné la victime émissaire à la vindicte du peuple, de voir refluer sur eux, avec la vitesse et la violence d’un tsunami politique, la frustration sociale qu’ils avaient cherché à détourner. Les élections régionales sont sans doute un des derniers avertissements en ce sens. Les élites devraient anticiper la colère d’un peuple qui se découvre de plus en plus floué, et admettre qu’elles ont produit le système de la victime émissaire, afin de détourner la violence et la critique à l’égard de leur propre action. Pour cela, elles devraient cesser d’ostraciser le Front national, et accepter pleinement le débat avec lui, en le réintégrant sans réserve dans la vie politique républicaine française. Y-a-t-il une solution pour échapper à une telle issue? Avouons que cette responsabilité est celle des élites en place, ayant entonné depuis 30 ans le même refrain. A supposer cependant que nous voulions les sauver, nous pourrions leur donner le conseil suivant: leur seule possibilité de survivre serait d’anticiper la violence refluant sur elles en faisant le sacrifice de leur innocence. Elles devraient anticiper la colère d’un peuple qui se découvre de plus en plus floué, et admettre qu’elles ont produit le système de la victime émissaire, afin de détourner la violence et la critique à l’égard de leur propre action. Pour cela, elles devraient cesser d’ostraciser le Front national, et accepter pleinement le débat avec lui, en le réintégrant sans réserve dans la vie politique républicaine française. Pour cela, elles devraient admettre de déconstruire la gigantesque hallucination collective produite autour du Front national, hallucination revenant aujourd’hui sous la forme inversée du Sauveur. Ce faisant, elles auraient tort de se priver au passage de souligner la participation du Front national au dispositif, ce dernier s’étant prêté de bonne grâce, sous la houlette du Père, à l’incarnation de la victime émissaire. Il faut bien avouer que nos élites du PS comme de Les Républicains ne prennent pas ce chemin, démontrant soit qu’elles n’ont strictement rien compris à ce qui se passe dans ce pays depuis 30 ans, soit qu’elles l’ont au contraire trop bien compris, et ne peuvent plus en assumer le dévoilement, soit qu’elles espèrent encore prospérer ainsi. Il n’est pas sûr non plus que le Front national soit prêt à reconnaître sa participation au dispositif. Il y aurait intérêt pourtant pour pouvoir accéder un jour à la magistrature suprême. Car si un tel aveu pourrait lui faire perdre d’un côté son «aura» anti-système, elle pourrait lui permettre de l’autre, une alliance indispensable pour dépasser au deuxième tour des présidentielles le fameux «plafond de verre». Il semble au contraire après ces régionales que tout changera pour que rien ne change. Deux solutions qui ne modifient en rien le dispositif mais le durcissent au contraire se réaffirment. La première solution, empruntée par le PS et désirée par une partie des Républicains, consiste à maintenir coûte que coûte le discours du front républicain en recherchant un dépassement du clivage gauche/droite. Une telle solution consiste à aller plus loin encore dans la désignation de la victime émissaire, et à s’exposer à un retournement encore plus dévastateur. (…) Car sans même parler des effets dévastateurs que pourrait avoir, a posteriori, un nouvel attentat, sur une telle déclaration, comment ne pas remarquer que les dernières décisions du gouvernement sur la lutte anti-terroriste ont donné rétrospectivement raison à certaines propositions du Front national? On voit mal alors comment on pourrait désormais lui faire porter le chapeau de ce dont il n’est pas responsable, tout en lui ôtant le mérite des solutions qu’il avait proposées, et qu’on n’a pas hésité à lui emprunter! La deuxième solution, défendue par une partie des Républicains suivant en cela Nicolas Sarkozy, consiste à assumer des préoccupations communes avec le Front national, tout en cherchant à se démarquer un peu par les solutions proposées. Mais comment faire comprendre aux électeurs un tel changement de cap et éviter que ceux-ci ne préfèrent l’original à la copie? Comment les électeurs ne remarqueraient-ils pas que le Front national, lui, n’a pas changé de discours, et surtout, qu’il a précédé tout le monde, et a eu le mérite d’avoir raison avant les autres, puisque ceux-ci viennent maintenant sur son propre terrain? Comment d’autre part concilier une telle proximité avec un discours diabolisant le Front national et cherchant l’alliance au centre? Curieuses élites, qui ne comprennent pas que la posture «républicaine», initiée par Mitterrand, menace désormais de revenir comme un boomerang les détruire. Christopher Lasch avait écrit La révolte des élites, pour pointer leur sécession d’avec le peuple, c’est aujourd’hui le suicide de celles-ci qu’il faudrait expliquer, dernière conséquence peut-être de cette sécession. Vincent Coussedière
We’re in the midst of a rebellion. The bottom and middle are pushing against the top. It’s a throwing off of old claims and it’s been going on for a while, but we’re seeing it more sharply after New Hampshire. This is not politics as usual, which by its nature is full of surprise. There’s something deep, suggestive, even epochal about what’s happening now. I have thought for some time that there’s a kind of soft French Revolution going on in America, with the angry and blocked beginning to push hard against an oblivious elite. It is not only political. Yes, it is about the Democratic National Committee, that house of hacks, and about a Republican establishment owned by the donor class. But establishment journalism, which for eight months has been simultaneously at Donald Trump’s feet (“Of course you can call us on your cell from the bathtub for your Sunday show interview!”) and at his throat (“Trump supporters, many of whom are nativists and nationalists . . .”) is being rebelled against too. Their old standing as guides and gatekeepers? Gone, and not only because of multiplying platforms. (…) All this goes hand in hand with the general decline of America’s faith in its institutions. We feel less respect for almost all of them—the church, the professions, the presidency, the Supreme Court. The only formal national institution that continues to score high in terms of public respect (72% in the most recent Gallup poll) is the military (…) we are in a precarious position in the U.S. with so many of our institutions going down. Many of those pushing against the system have no idea how precarious it is or what they will be destroying. Those defending it don’t know how precarious its position is or even what they’re defending, or why. But people lose respect for a reason. (…) It’s said this is the year of anger but there’s a kind of grim practicality to Trump and Sanders supporters. They’re thinking: Let’s take a chance. Washington is incapable of reform or progress; it’s time to reach outside. Let’s take a chance on an old Brooklyn socialist. Let’s take a chance on the casino developer who talks on TV. In doing so, they accept a decline in traditional political standards. You don’t have to have a history of political effectiveness anymore; you don’t even have to have run for office! “You’re so weirdly outside the system, you may be what the system needs.” They are pouring their hope into uncertain vessels, and surely know it. Bernie Sanders is an actual radical: He would fundamentally change an economic system that imperfectly but for two centuries made America the wealthiest country in the history of the world. In the young his support is understandable: They have never been taught anything good about capitalism and in their lifetimes have seen it do nothing—nothing—to protect its own reputation. It is middle-aged Sanders supporters who are more interesting. They know what they’re turning their backs on. They know they’re throwing in the towel. My guess is they’re thinking something like: Don’t aim for great now, aim for safe. Terrorism, a world turning upside down, my kids won’t have it better—let’s just try to be safe, more communal. A shrewdness in Sanders and Trump backers: They share one faith in Washington, and that is in its ability to wear anything down. They think it will moderate Bernie, take the edges off Trump. For this reason they don’t see their choices as so radical. (…) The mainstream journalistic mantra is that the GOP is succumbing to nativism, nationalism and the culture of celebrity. That allows them to avoid taking seriously Mr. Trump’s issues: illegal immigration and Washington’s 15-year, bipartisan refusal to stop it; political correctness and how it is strangling a free people; and trade policies that have left the American working class displaced, adrift and denigrated. Mr. Trump’s popularity is propelled by those issues and enabled by his celebrity. (…) Mr. Trump is a clever man with his finger on the pulse, but his political future depends on two big questions. The first is: Is he at all a good man? Underneath the foul mouthed flamboyance is he in it for America? The second: Is he fully stable? He acts like a nut, calling people bimbos, flying off the handle with grievances. Is he mature, reliable? Is he at all a steady hand? Political professionals think these are side questions. “Let’s accuse him of not being conservative!” But they are the issue. Because America doesn’t deliberately elect people it thinks base, not to mention crazy. Peggy Noonan
The furor of ignored Europeans against their union is not just directed against rich and powerful government elites per se, or against the flood of mostly young male migrants from the war-torn Middle East. The rage also arises from the hypocrisy of a governing elite that never seems to be subject to the ramifications of its own top-down policies. The bureaucratic class that runs Europe from Brussels and Strasbourg too often lectures European voters on climate change, immigration, politically correct attitudes about diversity, and the constant need for more bureaucracy, more regulations, and more redistributive taxes. But Euro-managers are able to navigate around their own injunctions, enjoying private schools for their children; generous public pay, retirement packages and perks; frequent carbon-spewing jet travel; homes in non-diverse neighborhoods; and profitable revolving-door careers between government and business. The Western elite classes, both professedly liberal and conservative, square the circle of their privilege with politically correct sermonizing. They romanticize the distant “other” — usually immigrants and minorities — while condescendingly lecturing the middle and working classes, often the losers in globalization, about their lack of sensitivity. On this side of the Atlantic, President Obama has developed a curious habit of talking down to Americans about their supposedly reactionary opposition to rampant immigration, affirmative action, multiculturalism, and political correctness — most notably in his caricatures of the purported “clingers” of Pennsylvania. Yet Obama seems uncomfortable when confronted with the prospect of living out what he envisions for others. He prefers golfing with celebrities to bowling. He vacations in tony Martha’s Vineyard rather than returning home to his Chicago mansion. His travel entourage is royal and hardly green. And he insists on private prep schools for his children rather than enrolling them in the public schools of Washington, D.C., whose educators he so often shields from long-needed reform. In similar fashion, grandees such as Facebook billionaire Mark Zuckerberg and Univision anchorman Jorge Ramos do not live what they profess. They often lecture supposedly less sophisticated Americans on their backward opposition to illegal immigration. But both live in communities segregated from those they champion in the abstract. The Clintons often pontificate about “fairness” but somehow managed to amass a personal fortune of more than $100 million by speaking to and lobbying banks, Wall Street profiteers, and foreign entities. The pay-to-play rich were willing to brush aside the insincere, pro forma social-justice talk of the Clintons and reward Hillary and Bill with obscene fees that would presumably result in lucrative government attention. Consider the recent Orlando tragedy for more of the same paradoxes. The terrorist killer, Omar Mateen — a registered Democrat, proud radical Muslim, and occasional patron of gay dating sites — murdered 49 people and wounded even more in a gay nightclub. His profile and motive certainly did not fit the elite narrative that unsophisticated right-wing American gun owners were responsible because of their support for gun rights. No matter. The Obama administration and much of the media refused to attribute the horror in Orlando to Mateen’s self-confessed radical Islamist agenda. Instead, they blamed the shooter’s semi-automatic .223 caliber rifle and a purported climate of hate toward gays. (…) In sum, elites ignored the likely causes of the Orlando shooting: the appeal of ISIS-generated hatred to some young, second-generation radical Muslim men living in Western societies, and the politically correct inability of Western authorities to short-circuit that clear-cut connection. Instead, the establishment all but blamed Middle America for supposedly being anti-gay and pro-gun. In both the U.S. and Britain, such politically correct hypocrisy is superimposed on highly regulated, highly taxed, and highly governmentalized economies that are becoming ossified and stagnant. The tax-paying middle classes, who lack the romance of the poor and the connections of the elite, have become convenient whipping boys of both in order to leverage more government social programs and to assuage the guilt of the elites who have no desire to live out their utopian theories in the flesh. Victor Davis Hanson
Barack Obama is the Dr. Frankenstein of the supposed Trump monster. If a charismatic, Ivy League-educated, landmark president who entered office with unprecedented goodwill and both houses of Congress on his side could manage to wreck the Democratic Party while turning off 52 percent of the country, then many voters feel that a billionaire New York dealmaker could hardly do worse. If Obama had ruled from the center, dealt with the debt, addressed radical Islamic terrorism, dropped the politically correct euphemisms and pushed tax and entitlement reform rather than Obamacare, Trump might have little traction. A boring Hillary Clinton and a staid Jeb Bush would most likely be replaying the 1992 election between Bill Clinton and George H.W. Bush — with Trump as a watered-down version of third-party outsider Ross Perot. But America is in much worse shape than in 1992. And Obama has proved a far more divisive and incompetent president than George H.W. Bush. Little is more loathed by a majority of Americans than sanctimonious PC gobbledygook and its disciples in the media. And Trump claims to be PC’s symbolic antithesis. Making Machiavellian Mexico pay for a border fence or ejecting rude and interrupting Univision anchor Jorge Ramos from a press conference is no more absurd than allowing more than 300 sanctuary cities to ignore federal law by sheltering undocumented immigrants. Putting a hold on the immigration of Middle Eastern refugees is no more illiberal than welcoming into American communities tens of thousands of unvetted foreign nationals from terrorist-ridden Syria. In terms of messaging, is Trump’s crude bombast any more radical than Obama’s teleprompted scripts? Trump’s ridiculous view of Russian President Vladimir Putin as a sort of « Art of the Deal » geostrategic partner is no more silly than Obama insulting Putin as Russia gobbles up former Soviet republics with impunity. Obama callously dubbed his own grandmother a « typical white person, » introduced the nation to the racist and anti-Semitic rantings of the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, and petulantly wrote off small-town Pennsylvanians as near-Neanderthal « clingers. » Did Obama lower the bar for Trump’s disparagements? Certainly, Obama peddled a slogan, « hope and change, » that was as empty as Trump’s « make America great again. » (…) How does the establishment derail an out-of-control train for whom there are no gaffes, who has no fear of The New York Times, who offers no apologies for speaking what much of the country thinks — and who apparently needs neither money from Republicans nor politically correct approval from Democrats? Victor Davis Hanson
In 1978, the eminent sociologist William Julius Wilson argued confidently that class would soon displace race as the most important social variable in American life. As explicit legal barriers to minority advancement receded farther into the past, the fates of the working classes of different races would converge. By the mid 2000s, Wilson’s thesis looked pretty good: The black middle class was vibrant and growing as the average black wealth nearly doubled from 1995 to 2005. Race appeared to lose its salience as a political predictor: More and more blacks were voting Republican, reversing a decades-long trend, and in 2004 George W. Bush collected the highest share of the Latino (44 percent) vote of any Republican ever and a higher share of the Asian vote (43 percent) than he did in 2000. Our politics grew increasingly ideological and less racial: Progressives and the beneficiaries of a generous social-welfare state generally supported the Democratic party, while more prosperous voters were more likely to support Republicans. Stable majorities expressed satisfaction with the state of race relations. It wasn’t quite a post-racial politics, but it was certainly headed in that direction. But in the midst of the financial crisis of 2007, something happened. Both the white poor and the black poor began to struggle mightily, though for different reasons. And our politics changed dramatically in response. It’s ironic that the election of the first black president marked the end of our brief flirtation with a post-racial politics. By 2011, William Julius Wilson had published a slight revision of his earlier thesis, noting the continued importance of race. The black wealth of the 1990s, it turned out, was built on the mirage of house values. Inner-city murder rates, which had fallen for decades, began to tick upward in 2015. In one of the deadliest mass shootings in recent memory, a white supremacist murdered nine black people in a South Carolina church. And the ever-present antagonism between the police and black Americans — especially poor blacks whose neighborhoods are the most heavily policed — erupted into nationwide protests. Meanwhile, the white working class descended into an intense cultural malaise. Prescription-opioid abuse skyrocketed, and deaths from heroin overdoses clogged the obituaries of local papers. In the small, heavily white Ohio county where I grew up, overdoses overtook nature as the leading cause of death. A drug that for so long was associated with inner-city ghettos became the cultural inheritance of the southern and Appalachian white: White youths died from heroin significantly more often than their peers of other ethnicities. Incarceration and divorce rates increased steadily. Perhaps most strikingly, while the white working class continued to earn more than the working poor of other races, only 24 percent of white voters believed that the next generation would be “better off.” No other ethnic group expressed such alarming pessimism about its economic future. And even as each group struggled in its own way, common forces also influenced them. Rising automation in blue-collar industries deprived both groups of high-paying, low-skill jobs. Neighborhoods grew increasingly segregated — both by income and by race — ensuring that poor whites lived among poor whites while poor blacks lived among poor blacks. As a friend recently told me about San Francisco, Bull Connor himself couldn’t have designed a city with fewer black residents. Predictably, our politics began to match this new social reality. In 2012, Mitt Romney collected only 27 percent of the Latino vote. Asian Americans, a solid Republican constituency even in the days of Bob Dole, went for Obama by a three-to-one margin — a shocking demographic turn of events over two decades. Meanwhile, the black Republican became an endangered species. Republican failures to attract black voters fly in the face of Republican history. This was the party of Lincoln and Douglass. Eisenhower integrated the school in Little Rock at a time when the Dixiecrats were the defenders of the racial caste system.(…) For many progressives, the Sommers and Norton research confirms the worst stereotypes of American whites. Yet it also reflects, in some ways, the natural conclusions of an increasingly segregated white poor. (…) The reality is not that black Americans enjoy special privileges. In fact, the overwhelming weight of the evidence suggests that the opposite is true. Last month, for instance, the brilliant Harvard economist Roland Fryer published an exhaustive study of police uses of force. He found that even after controlling for crime rates and police presence in a given neighborhood, black youths were far likelier to be pushed, thrown to the ground, or harassed by police. (Notably, he also found no racial disparity in the use of lethal force.) (…) Getting whipped into a frenzy on conspiracy websites, or feeling that distant, faceless elites dislike you because of your white skin, doesn’t compare. But the great advantages of whiteness in America are invisible to the white poor, or are completely swallowed by the disadvantages of their class. The young man from West Virginia may be less likely to get questioned by Yale University police, but making it to Yale in the first place still requires a remarkable combination of luck and skill. In building a dialogue around “checking privilege,” the modern progressive elite is implicitly asking white America — especially the segregated white poor — for a level of social awareness unmatched in the history of the country. White failure to empathize with blacks is sometimes a failure of character, but it is increasingly a failure of geography and socialization. Poor whites in West Virginia don’t have the time or the inclination to read Harvard economics studies. And the privileges that matter — that is, the ones they see — are vanishing because of destitution: the privilege to pay for college without bankruptcy, the privilege to work a decent job, the privilege to put food on the table without the aid of food stamps, the privilege not to learn of yet another classmate’s premature death. (…) Because of this polarization, the racial conversation we’re having today is tribalistic. On one side are primarily white people, increasingly represented by the Republican party and the institutions of conservative media. On the other is a collection of different minority groups and a cosmopolitan — and usually wealthier — class of whites. These sides don’t even speak the same language: One side sees white privilege while the other sees anti-white racism. There is no room for agreement or even understanding. J. D. Vance
Est-ce le plus beau cadeau qu’Hillary Clinton ait fait à son adversaire ? En traitant “la moitié” des électeurs de Trump de “basket of deplorables”, Hillary a donné à l’équipe Trump un nouveau slogan de campagne : Les Deplorables (en français sur l’affiche avec le “e” sans accent, et aussi sur les t-shirts, sur les pots à café, dans la salle, etc.) ; avec depuis hier une affiche empruntée au formidable succès de scène de 2012 à Broadway Les Misérables (avec le “é” accentué, ou Les Mis’, tout cela en français sur l’affiche et sur la scène), et retouchée à la mesure-Trump (drapeau US à la place du drapeau français, bannière avec le nom de Trump). Grâce soit rendue à Hillary, le mot a une certaine noblesse et une signification à la fois, – étrangement, – précise et sophistiqué, dont le sens négatif peut aisément être retourné dans un contexte politique donné (le mot lui-même a, également en anglais, un sens négatif et un sens positif), surtout avec la référence au titre du livre de Hugo devenu si populaire aux USA depuis 2012…  L’équipe Trump reprend également la chanson-standard de la comédie musicale “Do You Hear the People Sing”, tout cela à partir d’une idée originale d’un partisan de Trump, un artiste-graphiste qui se désigne sous le nom de Keln : il a réalisé la composition graphique à partir de l’affiche des Misérables et l’a mise en ligne en espérant qu’elle serait utilisée par Trump. Depuis quelques jours déjà, les partisans de Trump se baptisent de plus en plus eux-mêmes Les Deplorables (comme l’on disait il y a 4-5 ans “les indignés”) et se reconnaissent entre eux grâce à ce mot devenu porte-drapeau et slogan et utilisé sur tous les produits habituels (“nous sommes tous des Deplorables”, comme d’autres disaient, dans le temps, “Nous sommes tous des juifs allemands”). De l’envolée de Clinton, – dont elle s’est excusée mais sans parvenir à contenir l’effet “déplorable” pour elle, ni l’effet-boomerang comme on commence à le mesurer, –nous écrivions ceci le 15 septembre : « L’expression (“panier” ou “paquet de déplorables”), qui qualifie à peu près une moitié des électeurs de Trump, est assez étrange, sinon arrogante et insultante, voire sophistiquée et devrait être très en vogue dans les salons progressistes et chez les milliardaires d’Hollywood ; elle s’accompagne bien entendu des autres qualificatifs classiques formant le minimum syndical de l’intellectuel-Système, dits explicitement par Hillary, de “racistes”, xénophobes”, et ajoutons comme sous-entendus “crétins absolus” ou bien “sous-hommes”, et ajoutons encore implicitement “irrécupérables” et de la sorte “à liquider” ou à envoyer en camp de rééducation ou plutôt à l’asile, comme l’éclairé Bacri conseille de faire avec Zemmour. » Récupéré par les électeurs de Trump eux-mêmes puis par l’équipe Trump, le slogan peu résonner comme un cri de révolte qui pourrait donner un formidable rythme et un atout considérable de communication à la campagne du candidat républicain. Philippe Grasset
In another eerie ditto of his infamous 2008 attack on the supposedly intolerant Pennsylvania “clingers,” Obama returned to his theme that ignorant Americans “typically” become xenophobic and racist: “Typically, when people feel stressed, they turn on others who don’t look like them.” (“Typically” is not a good Obama word to use in the context of racial relations, since he once dubbed his own grandmother a “typical white person.”) Too often Obama has gratuitously aroused racial animosities with inflammatory rhetoric such as “punish our enemies,” or injected himself into the middle of hot-button controversies like the Trayvon Martin case, the Henry Louis Gates melodrama, and the “hands up, don’t shoot” Ferguson mayhem. Most recently, Obama seemed to praise backup 49ers quarterback and multimillionaire Colin Kaepernick for his refusal to stand during the National Anthem, empathizing with Kaepernick’s claims of endemic American racism. (…) Even presidential nominee and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is not really defending the Obama administration’s past “red line” in Syria, the “reset” with Vladimir Putin’s Russia, the bombing of Libya, the Benghazi tragedy, the euphemistic rebranding of Islamic terrorism as mere “violent extremism,” the abrupt pullout from (and subsequent collapse of) Iraq, or the Iran nuclear deal that so far seems to have made the theocracy both rich and emboldened. (…) Racial relations in this country seem as bad as they have been in a half-century. (…) Following the Clinton model, a post-presidential Obama will no doubt garner huge fees as a “citizen of the world” — squaring the circle of becoming fabulously rich while offering sharp criticism of the cultural landscape of the capitalist West on everything from sports controversies to pending criminal trials. What, then, is the presidential legacy of Barack Obama? It will not be found in either foreign- or domestic-policy accomplishment. More likely, he will be viewed as an outspoken progressive who left office loudly in the same manner that he entered it — as a critic of the culture and country in which he has thrived. But there may be another, unspoken legacy of Obama, and it is his creation of the candidacy of Donald J. Trump. Trump is running as an angry populist, fueled by the promise that whatever supposed elites such as Obama have done to the country, he will largely undo. Obama’s only legacy seems to be that “hope and change” begat “make America great again.” Victor Davis Hanson
Hillary Clinton’s comment that half of Donald Trump’s supporters are “racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamophobic”—a heck of a lot of phobia for anyone to lug around all day—puts back in play what will be seen as one of the 2016 campaign’s defining forces: the revolt of the politically incorrect. They may not live at the level of Victor Hugo’s “Les Misérables,” but it was only a matter of time before les déplorables—our own writhing mass of unheard Americans—rebelled against the intellectual elites’ ancien régime of political correctness. (…) Mrs. Clinton’s (…) dismissal, at Barbra Streisand’s LGBT fundraiser, of uncounted millions of Americans as deplorables had the ring of genuine belief. Perhaps sensing that public knowledge of what she really thinks could be a political liability, Mrs. Clinton went on to describe “people who feel that the government has let them down, the economy has let them down, nobody cares about them . . . and they’re just desperate for change.” She is of course describing the people in Charles Murray’s recent and compelling book on cultural disintegration among the working class, “Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960-2010.” This is indeed the bedrock of the broader Trump base. Mrs. Clinton is right that they feel the system has let them down. There is a legitimate argument over exactly when the rising digital economy started transferring income away from blue-collar workers and toward the “creative class” of Google and Facebook employees, no few of whom are smug progressives who think the landmass seen from business class between San Francisco and New York is pocked with deplorable, phobic Americans. Naturally, they’ll vote for the status quo, which is Hillary. But in the eight years available to Barack Obama to do something about what rankles the lower-middle class—white, black or brown—the non-employed and underemployed grew. A lot of them will vote for Donald Trump because they want a radical mid-course correction. (…) The progressive Democrats, a wholly public-sector party, have disconnected from the realities of the private economy, which exists as a mysterious revenue-producing abstraction. Hillary’s comments suggest they now see much of the population has a cultural and social abstraction. (…) Donald Trump’s appeal, in part, is that he cracks back at progressive cultural condescension in utterly crude terms. Nativists exist, and the sky is still blue. But the overwhelming majority of these people aren’t phobic about a modernizing America. They’re fed up with the relentless, moral superciliousness of Hillary, the Obamas, progressive pundits and 19-year-old campus activists. Evangelicals at last week’s Values Voter Summit said they’d look past Mr. Trump’s personal résumé. This is the reason. It’s not about him. The moral clarity that drove the original civil-rights movement or the women’s movement has degenerated into a confused moral narcissism. (…) It is a mistake, though, to blame Hillary alone for that derisive remark. It’s not just her. Hillary Clinton is the logical result of the Democratic Party’s new, progressive algorithm—a set of strict social rules that drives politics and the culture to one point of view. (…) Her supporters say it’s Donald Trump’s rhetoric that is “divisive.” Just so. But it’s rich to hear them claim that their words and politics are “inclusive.” So is the town dump. They have chopped American society into so many offendable identities that only a Yale freshman can name them all. If the Democrats lose behind Hillary Clinton, it will be in part because America’s les déplorables decided enough of this is enough. Bret Stephens

Attention: une tribalisation peut en cacher une autre !

Alors que des Etats-Unis volontiers donneurs de leçons redécouvrent après la France et la Belgique …

Les attaques terroristes que subissent depuis près d’un an et dans l’indifférence générale les citoyens israéliens

Et que des élèves afro-américaines manifestent contre l’interdiction du port non-religieux du foulard africain

Pendant que l’autre côté de l’Atlantique c’est au nom de la laïcité que les jeunes Français se voient interdire tout couvre-chef ou signe religieux visible …

Comment ne pas voir avec les plus lucides des commentateiurs américains tels que David Henninger ou Victor Davis Hanson …

Derrière ce « panier de pitoyables » que, gala LGBT aidant, la candidate démocrate vient – avant de s’excuser elle aussi – d’asséner aux « accros aux armes à feu ou à la religion » dénoncés en son temps par son prédécesseur  …

Et à l’instar de ces stars multimillionnaires du sport refusant de saluer le drapeau national …

La véritable tribalisation d’une élite toujours plus coupée de la réalité et du reste du pays

Mais aussi, incarnée par leur rival républicain tant honni, la révolte qui gronde …

Contre ceux qui sont les premiers responsables de la polarisation de la société américaine qu’ils dénoncent  ?

Les Déplorables
Hillary Clinton names the five phobias of Donald Trump’s political supporters.
Daniel Henninger
The WSJ
Sept. 14, 2016

Hillary Clinton’s comment that half of Donald Trump’s supporters are “racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamophobic”—a heck of a lot of phobia for anyone to lug around all day—puts back in play what will be seen as one of the 2016 campaign’s defining forces: the revolt of the politically incorrect.

They may not live at the level of Victor Hugo’s “Les Misérables,” but it was only a matter of time before les déplorables—our own writhing mass of unheard Americans—rebelled against the intellectual elites’ ancien régime of political correctness.

It remains to be seen what effect Hillary’s five phobias will have on the race, which tightened even before these remarks and Pneumonia-gate. The two events produced one of Mrs. Clinton’s worst weeks in opposite ways.

As with the irrepressible email server, Mrs. Clinton’s handling of her infirmity—“I feel great,” the pneumonia-infected candidate said while hugging a little girl—deepened the hole of distrust she lives in. At the same time, her dismissal, at Barbra Streisand’s LGBT fundraiser, of uncounted millions of Americans as deplorables had the ring of genuine belief.

Perhaps sensing that public knowledge of what she really thinks could be a political liability, Mrs. Clinton went on to describe “people who feel that the government has let them down, the economy has let them down, nobody cares about them . . . and they’re just desperate for change.”

She is of course describing the people in Charles Murray’s recent and compelling book on cultural disintegration among the working class, “Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960-2010.” This is indeed the bedrock of the broader Trump base.

Mrs. Clinton is right that they feel the system has let them down. There is a legitimate argument over exactly when the rising digital economy started transferring income away from blue-collar workers and toward the “creative class” of Google and Facebook employees, no few of whom are smug progressives who think the landmass seen from business class between San Francisco and New York is pocked with deplorable, phobic Americans. Naturally, they’ll vote for the status quo, which is Hillary.

But in the eight years available to Barack Obama to do something about what rankles the lower-middle class—white, black or brown—the non-employed and underemployed grew. A lot of them will vote for Donald Trump because they want a radical mid-course correction. Which Mrs. Clinton isn’t and never will be.

This is not the Democratic Party of Bill Clinton. The progressive Democrats, a wholly public-sector party, have disconnected from the realities of the private economy, which exists as a mysterious revenue-producing abstraction. Hillary’s comments suggest they now see much of the population has a cultural and social abstraction.

To repeat: “racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamophobic.”

Those are all potent words. Or once were. The racism of the Jim Crow era was ugly, physically cruel and murderous. Today, progressives output these words as reflexively as a burp. What’s more, the left enjoys calling people Islamophobic or homophobic. It’s bullying without personal risk.

Donald Trump’s appeal, in part, is that he cracks back at progressive cultural condescension in utterly crude terms. Nativists exist, and the sky is still blue. But the overwhelming majority of these people aren’t phobic about a modernizing America. They’re fed up with the relentless, moral superciliousness of Hillary, the Obamas, progressive pundits and 19-year-old campus activists.

Evangelicals at last week’s Values Voter Summit said they’d look past Mr. Trump’s personal résumé. This is the reason. It’s not about him.

The moral clarity that drove the original civil-rights movement or the women’s movement has degenerated into a confused moral narcissism. One wonders if even some of the people in Mrs. Clinton’s Streisandian audience didn’t feel discomfort at the ease with which the presidential candidate slapped isms and phobias on so many people.

Presidential politics has become hyper-focused on individual personalities because the media rubs them in our face nonstop. It is a mistake, though, to blame Hillary alone for that derisive remark. It’s not just her. Hillary Clinton is the logical result of the Democratic Party’s new, progressive algorithm—a set of strict social rules that drives politics and the culture to one point of view. A Clinton victory would enable and entrench the forces her comment represents.

Her supporters say it’s Donald Trump’s rhetoric that is “divisive.” Just so. But it’s rich to hear them claim that their words and politics are “inclusive.” So is the town dump. They have chopped American society into so many offendable identities that only a Yale freshman can name them all.

If the Democrats lose behind Hillary Clinton, it will be in part because America’s les déplorables decided enough of this is enough.

Voir aussi:

The Legacies of Barack Obama
Without policy achievements to hang his hat on, Obama’s rhetoric will be how he’s remembered – and the results have been ugly.
Victor Davis Hanson
National Review Online
9/16/2016

On his recent Asian tour, President Obama characterized his fellow Americans (the most productive workers in the world) as “lazy.”

In fact, he went on to deride Americans for a list of supposed transgressions ranging from the Vietnam War to environmental desecration to the 19th century treatment of Native Americans.

“If you’re in the United States,” the president said, “sometimes you can feel lazy and think we’re so big we don’t have to really know anything about other people.”

The attack on supposedly insular Americans was somewhat bizarre, given that Obama himself knows no foreign languages. He often seems confused about even basic world geography. (His birthplace of Hawaii is not “Asia,” Austrians do not speak “Austrian,” and the Falkland Islands are not the Maldives).

Obama’s sense of history is equally weak. Contrary to his past remarks, the Islamic world did not spark either the Western Renaissance or the Enlightenment. Cordoba was not, as he once suggested, an Islamic center of “tolerance” during the Spanish Inquisition; in fact, its Muslim population had been expelled during the early Reconquista over two centuries earlier.

In another eerie ditto of his infamous 2008 attack on the supposedly intolerant Pennsylvania “clingers,” Obama returned to his theme that ignorant Americans “typically” become xenophobic and racist: “Typically, when people feel stressed, they turn on others who don’t look like them.” (“Typically” is not a good Obama word to use in the context of racial relations, since he once dubbed his own grandmother a “typical white person.”)

Too often Obama has gratuitously aroused racial animosities with inflammatory rhetoric such as “punish our enemies,” or injected himself into the middle of hot-button controversies like the Trayvon Martin case, the Henry Louis Gates melodrama, and the “hands up, don’t shoot” Ferguson mayhem.

Most recently, Obama seemed to praise backup 49ers quarterback and multimillionaire Colin Kaepernick for his refusal to stand during the National Anthem, empathizing with Kaepernick’s claims of endemic American racism.

What is going on in Obama’s home stretch?

But divisive sermonizing and the issuing of executive orders are not the same as successfully reforming our health-care system. The Affordable Care Act, born of exaggeration and untruth, is now in peril as insurers pull out and the costs of premiums and deductibles soar.

Even presidential nominee and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is not really defending the Obama administration’s past “red line” in Syria, the “reset” with Vladimir Putin’s Russia, the bombing of Libya, the Benghazi tragedy, the euphemistic rebranding of Islamic terrorism as mere “violent extremism,” the abrupt pullout from (and subsequent collapse of) Iraq, or the Iran nuclear deal that so far seems to have made the theocracy both rich and emboldened.

The U.S. economy — with its record-low growth over eight years, near-record labor non-participation rates, record national debt, and record consecutive years of zero interest rates — is not much of a legacy either.

Racial relations in this country seem as bad as they have been in a half-century.

Given the scandal involving Hillary Clinton’s use of a private, unsecured e-mail server for official State Department communications, the politicization of the IRS, the messes at the GSA and VA, and the current ethical confusion at the FBI and Justice Department over Clinton’s violations, Obama has not made good on his promise of a transparent, efficient, and honest government.

Near energy independence through fracking is certainly a revolutionary development, but it arrived largely despite, not because of, the Obama administration.

The sharper the sermon, the more Obama preps himself for his post-presidency as a social justice warrior, akin to the pre-political incarnation of Obama as a community organizer.

Following the Clinton model, a post-presidential Obama will no doubt garner huge fees as a “citizen of the world” — squaring the circle of becoming fabulously rich while offering sharp criticism of the cultural landscape of the capitalist West on everything from sports controversies to pending criminal trials.

What, then, is the presidential legacy of Barack Obama?

It will not be found in either foreign- or domestic-policy accomplishment. More likely, he will be viewed as an outspoken progressive who left office loudly in the same manner that he entered it — as a critic of the culture and country in which he has thrived.

But there may be another, unspoken legacy of Obama, and it is his creation of the candidacy of Donald J. Trump.

Trump is running as an angry populist, fueled by the promise that whatever supposed elites such as Obama have done to the country, he will largely undo.

Obama’s only legacy seems to be that “hope and change” begat “make America great again.”

Voir également:

French Touch : “Nous sommes tous ‘Les Deplorables’”
Philippe Grasset
Dedefensa
17 septembre 2016

Est-ce le plus beau cadeau qu’Hillary Clinton ait fait à son adversaire ? En traitant “la moitié” des électeurs de Trump de “basket of deplorables”, Hillary a donné à l’équipe Trump un nouveau slogan de campagne : Les Deplorables (en français sur l’affiche avec le “e” sans accent, et aussi sur les t-shirts, sur les pots à café, dans la salle, etc.) ; avec depuis hier une affiche empruntée au formidable succès de scène de 2012 à Broadway Les Misérables (avec le “é” accentué, ou Les Mis’, tout cela en français sur l’affiche et sur la scène), et retouchée à la mesure-Trump (drapeau US à la place du drapeau français, bannière avec le nom de Trump). Grâce soit rendue à Hillary, le mot a une certaine noblesse et une signification à la fois, – étrangement, – précise et sophistiqué, dont le sens négatif peut aisément être retourné dans un contexte politique donné (le mot lui-même a, également en anglais, un sens négatif et un sens positif), surtout avec la référence au titre du livre de Hugo devenu si populaire aux USA depuis 2012…  L’équipe Trump reprend également la chanson-standard de la comédie musicale “Do You Hear the People Sing”, tout cela à partir d’une idée originale d’un partisan de Trump, un artiste-graphiste qui se désigne sous le nom de Keln : il a réalisé la composition graphique à partir de l’affiche des Misérables et l’a mise en ligne en espérant qu’elle serait utilisée par Trump.

Depuis quelques jours déjà, les partisans de Trump se baptisent de plus en plus eux-mêmes Les Deplorables (comme l’on disait il y a 4-5 ans “les indignés”) et se reconnaissent entre eux grâce à ce mot devenu porte-drapeau et slogan et utilisé sur tous les produits habituels (“nous sommes tous des Deplorables”, comme d’autres disaient, dans le temps, “Nous sommes tous des juifs allemands”). De l’envolée de Clinton, – dont elle s’est excusée mais sans parvenir à contenir l’effet “déplorable” pour elle, ni l’effet-boomerang comme on commence à le mesurer, –nous écrivions ceci le 15 septembre : « L’expression (“panier” ou “paquet de déplorables”), qui qualifie à peu près une moitié des électeurs de Trump, est assez étrange, sinon arrogante et insultante, voire sophistiquée et devrait être très en vogue dans les salons progressistes et chez les milliardaires d’Hollywood ; elle s’accompagne bien entendu des autres qualificatifs classiques formant le minimum syndical de l’intellectuel-Système, dits explicitement par Hillary, de “racistes”, xénophobes”, et ajoutons comme sous-entendus “crétins absolus” ou bien “sous-hommes”, et ajoutons encore implicitement “irrécupérables” et de la sorte “à liquider” ou à envoyer en camp de rééducation ou plutôt à l’asile, comme l’éclairé Bacri conseille de faire avec Zemmour. » Récupéré par les électeurs de Trump eux-mêmes puis par l’équipe Trump, le slogan peu résonner comme un cri de révolte qui pourrait donner un formidable rythme et un atout considérable de communication à la campagne du candidat républicain.

L’affaire est présentée notamment par le Daily Mail, ce 17 septembre : « Donald Trump unveiled a new visual campaign theme in Miami on Friday – a mashup of the Broadway musical ‘Les Misérables’ and an epithet Hillary Clinton leveled at his supporters one week ago. He took the stage, introduced by former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, as the ‘Les Mis’ anthem ‘Do You Hear the People Sing’ blasted through loudspeakers.

» The video screen behind the podium flashed to an artistic rendering of ‘Les Deplorables,’ complete with USA and ‘Trump’ flags replacing the French colors, and a bald eagle soaring over the revolutionary scene. “Welcome to all of you deplorables!’ Trump boomed as thousands screamed “Trump! Trump! Trump!” and “We love you!” […]

» His supporters have embraced the Clinton label and worn it as a badge of honor, and in the space of just a few days Trump rally-goers have already begun to sport ‘I am deplorable’ t-shirts and signs. […]

» The man who created the artwork [Trump] used Friday, an artist known online as ‘Keln,’ was banned from using Reddit on Saturday, shortly after posting the image there. He first posted it to a right-wing blog called ‘The Conservative Treehouse.’ “I made the Les Deplorables meme on @Reddit last Saturday,” he would later write on Twitter. “Been banned ever since. They won’t respond to tell me why.” He wrote on his blog, NukingPolitics.com, that he suspected Reddit had an anti-Trump bias. […] Just before the Trump rally began, his Reddit account was reinstated. He was pleased the Trump campaign used his artwork. “Thank you @realDonaldTrump for using my meme to stick it to Hillary and her ilk. #MAGA We are just gonna keep winning,” he tweeted. “I made it, I am glad He used it,” he added, insisting the Trump campaign had a right to turn his work into a campaign backdrop. »

Voir encore:

« In the 1960s you had white people who were really scared of change, and who were attracted to Goldwater’s rhetoric and agenda, including his vote against the Civil Rights Act, » says Christopher S. Parker, a political science professor at the University of Washington and author, with Matt Barreto, of « Change They Can’t Believe In: The Tea Party and Reactionary Politics in America.«  Nowadays, white Americans are feeling not only the threat of social change, but the diminished power that comes with the the increased percentages of African-American and Latinos citizens in the U.S., adds Daniel Cox, research director of the nonpartisan Public Religion Research Institute.

« White conservative men are seeing a cultural displacement. Their influence in the culture is being challenged and is receding, » Cox explains.

Obama’s election, far from making Americans more comfortable with minority leadership, in some ways exacerbated those fears, Parker says, giving rise to Trump. « I think that Trump is actually a course correction, probably an over-course correction, » he says. « Obama scared so many white people, it made Trump’s candidacy possible and his nomination plausible. »

The growth of the Latino population has added to the national angst as well, says Pastor Samuel Rodriguez, President of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference. « We’re having this uber, exacerbated moment as it pertains to race and our culture, » he says. « Instead of [racial tension and animus] dying down, or moderating to a degree that it becomes de minimus, we’re actually regressing. It seems like we’re going backwards. »

While Democrats have long captured an overwhelming majority of the African-American vote, Trump (who has gotten less than 1 percent of black voters in some polls) is doing worse against Clinton among those voters than either Mitt Romney or John McCain did against Obama. And while race was always an undercurrent of the Obama-McCain contest in 2008, it was less mainstream ( — racially offensive images and remarks about Obama tended to be contained to extremist websites and niche publications. Nor did McCain personally encourage such talk, famously correcting a woman at a McCain rally who called Obama an « Arab. »

Trump, Parker says, doesn’t even bother with what political specialists call « dog whistle » remarks – statements that seem benign on the surface but act as a subtle signal to certain groups, such as Ronald Reagan’s « welfare queens » comments that appealed to a racist idea but were not explicitly racist. Instead, Trump has been blatant about describing Mexican-American immigrants as « rapists » and « criminals, » has called for a ban on Muslim immigration to thwart terrorism and has described African-American communities as dens of unemployment, poverty, bad education and violent crime. And that message is resonating among many white voters, in part, Cox says, because they resent « politically correct » standards that make them feel they have to censor their own thoughts. « You can see how that would engender the idea that ‘I’m being attacked,' » Cox says.

And unlike Goldwater, who denounced the KKK and refused their endorsement, Trump refused several times to renounce former Klansman David Duke, insisting he knew nothing about him. He later said a faulty earpiece kept him from hearing the question clearly.

Polling shows the races have widely divergent ideas of what life is like for racial and ethnic minorities. A recent Pew Research Center study showed that just 45 percent of whites thought race relations were generally bad, compared to 61 percent of African-Americans and 58 percent of Hispanics. Meanwhile, 41 percent of whites believe too much attention is being paid to racial issues, compared to 25 percent of blacks and 22 percent of Hispanics. The same study showed that African-Americans are about twice as likely as whites to say discrimination is holding back success for black Americans.

A recent PRRI poll also showed a large difference in perception of equality when the question was put to Democrats (who have African-Americans and Latinos in their base of support) and Republicans (who have a bigger portion of the white vote). About 80 percent of Democrats believe that both African-Americans and immigrants face significant discrimination in society, compared to 32 percent of Republicans who think blacks face significant discrimination, and 46 percent who say immigrants suffer from bias. And a Suffolk University poll Sept. 1 showed a drastically different impression of trump’s rhetoric, with 76 percent of Democrats casting trump as a racist, and just 11 percent of Republicans leveling that charge.

When African-Americans have protested against what they see as institutional racism, they have faced aggressive push-back. The Black Lives Matter movement, spurred by suspect police killings of African-Americans, has been vilified by critics including former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, who called the group « inherently racist. » A New York Times-CBS poll this summer found that 70 percent of blacks approve of the BLM movement, compared to just 37 percent of whites.

When mixed-race San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick refused to stand for the national anthem, citing oppression of African-Americans and people of color, critics burned his jersey. Trump said Kaepernick should find another country in which to live.

That disparity in perspective has come to define the views on race relation held, generally, by supporters of the respective presidential candidates. Where one side sees racism, the other sees « the race card, » rhetoric and protests they say make things worse. « From my perspective, I think a lot of this [tension] has to do with President Obama, » says conservative writer Tom Borelli. After delivering campaign speeches about a united America, « President Obama kind of weighed in on local police matters and race issues » such as the George Zimmerman-Trayvon Martin case, Borelli says. « It kind of escalated the racial tension. »

As for statistics showing that African-Americans are far more likely to be shot and killed by police than whites, Borelli points to the same social problems Trump assigns to black communities, saying poverty and unemployment lead to crime. They « go into crime, drug-dealing. That’s a tragedy, » Borelli says. « What we need is better schools, lower taxes. »

Rodriguez says the differing perceptions of the reality of race is due to two factors: anxiety among white Americans over the changing racial and ethnic demographics in the country, and disappointment among African-Americans and Latinos, who had hoped Obama’s presidency would bring immigration reform and more opportunity for blacks. « There’s angst on the majority side, and disappointment on the minority side, » he says.

Whites also don’t have the same personal experiences minorities have, Cox says, noting an earlier PRRI study showing that 70 percent of white Americans did not have people of color in their families or inner social circles. And many also don’t like to acknowledge that America, a nation founded on inclusion and opportunity, is still struggling with racism, he says.

« There’s a desire to point to these big, symbolic events, such as the election of Barack Obama, as a milestone, » Cox says. « It is absolutely a milestone, but it doesn’t mean everything else is changed. »

France 24 Observateurs

Liu Montsho Kwayera

16 septembre 2016

Quand un responsable de leur école leur a demandé « d’ôter les foulards africains » qu’elles portaient sur la tête, des adolescentes noires d’un lycée de Floride ont décidé de ne pas se laisser faire. Malgré les pressions, elles ont lancé un mouvement et arborent tous les mercredis cette coiffe, symbole pour elle de leur identité culturelle.

Dans le lycée Gibbs, à Saint Petersburg en Floride, les règles en matière de couvre-chef sont très strictes : il est interdit de porter casquette, foulard ou bandana, sauf pour raison religieuse. Sur la base de ce règlement, le 25 août dernier, un surveillant a demandé à des jeunes filles d’enlever leurs foulards, noués à l’africaine. Ce geste a fait naître un mouvement baptisé « Black girls wrap Wednesday » (« Les filles noires se couvrent le mercredi »).

« Je n’ai pas besoin de permission pour vivre ma culture »

Liu Montsho Kwayera

Liu Montsho Kwayer a 17 ans et étudie au lycée Gibbs. Elle est l’une des leaders du mouvement.

Les gens voient ces foulards comme un accessoire, mais c’est bien plus que ça. Les femmes noires et africaines les portent depuis longtemps. Cela fait partie intégrante de notre culture et de notre héritage. Pour moi, en porter un, c’est embrasser cet héritage.

Quand nous avons été « volés » sur le continent africain [en référence aux traites négrières des XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles, NDLR], nos ancêtres ont été dépossédés de leur culture, leur nom, leur langue. Pour moi, ceux qui disent que nous ne pouvons pas porter ces foulards nous renvoient à cette époque de répression.

Lorsque l’interdiction a été émise, j’étais désespérée. Particulièrement parce que c’est un policier qui a demandé à la première victime d’enlever son foulard. C’était une situation très humiliante. Voir qu’un policier pouvait intervenir sur ce sujet dans l’enceinte d’un lycée, c’était effrayant.

Je suis rentrée en contact avec des membres du mouvement Uhuru [un mouvement panafricain socialiste radicalinternational centré sur la question des conditions sociales et économiques des populations africaines à travers le monde ; ses bureaux internationaux se trouvent à Saint Petersburg en Floride, NDLR]. Nous avons organisé notre première manifestation le 31 août. Six filles sont venues en portant un foulard ou un dashiki [un vêtement traditionnel d’Afrique de l’Ouest, NDLR]. Les responsables de l’école les ont envoyées au bureau de la vie scolaire et ont appelé leurs parents. C’était très stressant.

Après les premières manifestations, la directrice Reuben Hepburn a accepté que les jeunes filles puissent porter un foulard africain si elles avaient la permission de leurs parents. Mais cette décision n’était pas suffisante pour les leaders du mouvement Uhuru qui a rencontré la directrice pour demander plus de droits pour les jeunes filles. Elles n’ont depuis même plus besoin de l’accord parental.

Contactée par France 24, Lisa Wolf, chargée de communication du district, affirme que l’incident est pour eux clos. Ils précisent : « Notre règlement concernant l’interdiction de se couvrir la tête visait notamment les bandanas et les bandeaux, car certains gangs de la zone utilisent ces objets pour se reconnaitre entre eux. Mais chaque directeur d’école est libre de l’adapter selon les circonstances. »


« C’est une lutte pour toutes les femmes noires »

Selon notre Observatrice Kwayera, le combat n’est pour autant pas terminé.

Parfois, nous nous faisons embêter par l’équipe dirigeante. Tous les mercredis, j’amène un sac rempli de foulards africains pour les jeunes filles qui n’auraient pas pu prendre le leur. Je mets en place comme un petit atelier dans les toilettes pour les nouer aux jeunes filles qui le souhaitent. La semaine dernière, une surveillante s’est rendue compte de ça, et a essayé de faire pression sur moi pour que j’arrête.

Malgré tout ça, nous poursuivons notre mouvement. Nous sommes entre 30 et 40 participantes chaque semaine. Même des jeunes garçons de notre lycée ont commencé à porter des foulards africains, et des amis d’autres lycées m’envoient des messages pour me dire qu’ils ont aussi lancé le mouvement dans leur établissement.
Ce n’est pas juste une question de foulard : pour moi, c’est une lutte pour toutes les femmes noires pour qu’elles aient le droit de vivre leur culture

Le mouvement « Black girls wrap Wednesday » a formulé quatre demandes allant de l’interdiction d’intervention policière dans le lycée pour demander d’enlever un foulard à l’intervention de l’organisation nationale des femmes africaines dans le campus.

Des revendications similaires ont été émises en février dernier à Durham, en Caroline du Nord, mais aussi dans d’autres pays comme cet été en Afrique du Sud où un lycée avait interdit les coupes afro.

Voir également:

Colin Kaepernick a encore boycotté l’hymne américain, la polémique prend de l’ampleur
Claire Digiacomi
Le HuffPost
12/09/2016

INTERNATIONAL – Ce 12 septembre, à 4h du matin heure française, les États-Unis avaient le regard tourné vers le Levi’s Stadium, antre de la franchise de football américain de San Francisco. Au-delà du derby entre deux équipes californiennes, les Rams de Los Angeles et donc les locaux des 49ers, au-delà aussi du fait que LA ait une équipe au plus haut niveau pour la première fois depuis vingt ans, un homme a focalisé l’attention de toute une nation: Colin Kaepernick.

À l’occasion du match du lundi soir, traditionnellement la plus belle affiche de chaque journée de NFL, les États-Unis attendaient de voir si l’homme allait rééditer un geste qui a d’ores et déjà fait couler beaucoup d’encre et qui ne cesse de déchirer le pays. Et sans grande surprise, le footballeur a persisté dans son geste. Mieux, il a été rejoint dans sa démarche par deux de ses adversaires des Rams. Pourtant, cet acte militant divise outre-Atlantique.

Le 26 août dernier, le quarterback de San Francisco avait effectivement décidé de boycotter l’hymne américain en refusant de se lever pendant qu’il était chanté, sa manière de s’opposer aux violences policières qui s’abattent contre la communauté noire aux États-Unis depuis de longs mois. Une posture choc qui a fait des émules, notamment dans la nuit de dimanche à lundi.

Tête baissée, un gant noir sur la main, le poing levé vers le ciel, le joueur des Kansas City Chiefs Marcus Peters a marqué par ce geste le début de la première journée du championnat de football américain de la NFL dimanche, sur la pelouse du Arrowhead Stadium de Kansas City. L’image, hautement symbolique, est en fait un message politique dont l’écho ne cesse de se répandre aux États-Unis ces dernières semaines.

Ce poing levé, qui rappelle ceux de Tommie Smith et John Carlos dénonçant la ségrégation raciale aux Jeux olympiques de Mexico de 1968, a entériné le ralliement du joueur au boycott lancé fin août par Colin Kaepernick, pour protester contre « l’oppression » de la communauté noire aux États-Unis. Ses coéquipiers, les bras joints au moment d’écouter l’hymne américain, interprété aux États-Unis avant chaque compétition sportive, ont eux aussi formé cette chaîne humaine en « signe de solidarité », comme ils l’indiquent dans un communiqué.

D’autres footballeurs ont apporté dimanche leur soutien à Colin Kaepernick: quatre joueurs des Miami Dolphins ont mis un genou à terre pendant l’hymne national lors de leur match à Seattle, trois Tennessee Titans ont imité Marcus Peters en levant le poing, tout comme deux New England Patriots à la fin de l’hymne.

Le 4 septembre, c’est l’internationale américaine Megan Rapinoe qui a fait « un petit geste en direction de Colin Kaepernick » selon ses mots, en posant un genou à terre pendant l’hymne américain avant le match du Championnat professionnel américain entre Seattle et Chicago, son équipe.

Le quinzième anniversaire des attentats du 11 septembre 2001, commémoré dimanche, a pu refréner l’intention de certains de se faire remarquer pour le début de la NFL, ce qui fait dire à Esquire que le mouvement pourrait encore prendre de l’ampleur dans les jours à venir.

Faire entendre la voix des opprimés

À l’origine du boycott entamé mi-août, Colin Kaepernick souhaite contester le symbole d’un pays où, dit-il, l’impunité continue à profiter à des policiers coupables d’homicides contre des Noirs non armés. « Je ne vais pas afficher de fierté pour le drapeau d’un pays qui opprime les Noirs », a justifié le quarterback, dont le père biologique était noir mais qui a été adopté et élevé par un couple de Blancs.

« Je vois des choses arriver à des gens qui n’ont pas de voix, des gens qui n’ont pas de tribune pour parler, faire entendre leur voix et voir les choses changer. Alors je suis dans cette position où je peux faire cela et je vais le faire pour les gens qui ne peuvent pas », explique-t-il encore.

« Étant homosexuelle, je sais ce que veut dire regarder le drapeau américain en étant consciente qu’il ne protège pas toutes les libertés », a aussi fait valoir Megan Rapinoe, qui explique avoir suivi Kaepernick pour « déclencher une prise de conscience et des conversations ».

Pour Peter Dreier, professeur à l’Occidental College de Los Angeles cité par le LA Times, Colin Kaepernick profite d’un moment unique dans l’histoire américaine pour faire bouger les lignes. « Nous sommes en plein milieu d’une campagne électorale qui ajoute de la tension à l’atmosphère générale. Le mouvement ‘Black lives matter’ fait partie intégrante du discours politique et ne peut être évité. Les meurtres commis par des policiers et les tueries de masse ont suscité une prise de conscience sur la question des armes à feu. Et de plus en plus d’athlètes sont instruits », fait-il valoir.

En seulement quelques semaines, la polémique a enflé au fur et à mesure que le joueur des 49ers de San Francisco continuait d’ignorer la tradition qui veut que joueurs, entraîneurs et spectateurs se lèvent et se découvrent la tête pour entonner « Star-Spangled Banner » (La Bannière étoilée), regard tourné vers le drapeau, dans un moment de communion patriotique.

Chaque geste du meneur de jeu, dont l’action est soutenue par son équipe et le grand patron de la NFL, est désormais scruté à la loupe… jusqu’à ses chaussettes à l’entraînement, où des regards bien affûtés ont repéré des images de porcs en uniforme policier. Le joueur s’est expliqué dans un communiqué, estimant que « les policiers sans scrupules qui se voient confier des postes dans des services de police mettent en danger non seulement la population mais aussi les policiers ayant de bonnes intentions, car ils créent une atmosphère de tension et de défiance ».

Un maillot haï autant qu’adoré

Héros pour certains, traître pour d’autres, Colin Kaepernick est désormais au cœur d’une polémique nationale. Si certains estiment qu’il fait bien d’utiliser sa notoriété pour dénoncer un problème qu’ils jugent réel, en témoignent les récentes bavures choquantes de policiers envers des citoyens afro-américains, d’autres considèrent que ses outrages à l’hymne ou au drapeau américains sont intolérables.

Sur le terrain le 1er septembre, le joueur de 28 ans a été conspué à chacun de ses touchers de ballon par une bonne partie des spectateurs. Des internautes se sont aussi filmés en train de brûler le maillot du quarterback, qui avait pourtant conduit San Francisco jusqu’au Super Bowl 2013 (défaite contre Baltimore 34-31) avant de perdre sa place de titulaire l’an dernier. D’autres ont publié des photos de soldats amputés des jambes, debout sur leurs prothèses, pour rappeler au joueur qu’il a touché à un symbole patriotique

Sa mère biologique, qui a donné naissance à son fils à 19 ans et l’a confié en adoption, a même exprimé sur Twitter son désaccord.

« Il y a des moyens de faire changer les choses sans manquer de respect et faire honte au pays entier et à sa famille, qui vous ont apporté tant de bonheur »

Et son boycott divise jusqu’à la classe politique. Le candidat républicain à la Maison blanche Donald Trump a ainsi qualifié d' »exécrable » son attitude, lui conseillant de « chercher un pays mieux adapté ». Barack Obama a en revanche défendu sa démarche, jugeant qu’il avait réussi à attirer l’attention « sur des sujets qui méritent d’être abordés ».

« Il existe une longue histoire de figures du sport qui ont fait de même. Et il y a différentes façons de le faire », a-t-il ajouté. Et pour cause, dans un pays où la liberté d’expression est protégée par le premier des amendements constitutionnels, Colin Kaepernick a simplement emboîté le pas à d’autres joueurs professionnels luttant contre les discriminations raciales ou la violence par armes à feu, parmi lesquels les stars du basket Dwyane Wade, LeBron James ou Carmelo Anthony.

En France, on se souvient de Christian Karembeu qui a toujours refusé de chanter « La Marseillaise ». Le footballeur, né en Nouvelle-Calédonie, protestait de cette manière contre le sort du peuple kanak. « ‘La Marseillaise’ je l’ai apprise et chantée tout petit. Mon père était enseignant et en Nouvelle-Calédonie, nous apprenions très tôt l’histoire de nos ancêtres les Gaulois. Mais moi, mes ancêtres ce ne sont pas les Gaulois. Mes ancêtres, c’est un peuple qui a souffert pour obtenir sa liberté », confiait-il, comme le rapporte Francetv sport.

Colin Kaepernick est en tout cas parvenu à rassembler des soutiens très divers. Comme le relate Le Journal de Montréal, les ventes de maillot à l’effigie du joueur aux bras tatoués ont explosé depuis début septembre. Sur Instagram, le joueur a d’ores et déjà promis de reverser les bénéfices qu’il touchera de ces ventes à des œuvres de charité.
« J’aimerais remercier toutes les personnes qui m’ont prouvé leur amour et leur soutien, ça veut dire beaucoup pour moi! Je ne m’attendais pas à ce que les ventes de mon maillot explosent après ça, mais ça prouve que les gens pensent que nous pouvons atteindre la justice et l’égalité pour tous! La seule manière pour moi de vous rendre cela est de faire don de tous ces bénéfices à des œuvres de charité! Je crois au peuple, et NOUS pouvons être le changement! »

Voir par ailleurs:

ETATS-UNIS. Roland Fryer, le jeune prodige qui s’attaque aux inégalités raciales

Ce gamin de banlieue, devenu le plus jeune prof noir de Harvard, a créé un laboratoire éducatif pour réduire les inégalités raciales sans idéologie. Un futur prix Nobel ?

Philippe Boulet-Gercourt

L’Obs
02 janvier 2016

Cet économiste-là est moins célèbre que le Français Thomas Piketty, auteur du « Capital au XXIe siècle », moins reconnu que le Britannique Angus Deaton, qui a été couronné par le prix Nobel cette année pour sa recherche sur la pauvreté. Mais, tout autant qu’eux, Roland Fryer bouleverse la réflexion sur les inégalités. Ses pairs l’ont bien compris : en avril dernier, ils ont décerné à ce prof de l’université Harvard la prestigieuse médaille John Bates Clark, réservée aux économistes de moins de 40 ans. Les deux tiers des « Bates Clark » ont par la suite obtenu le prix Nobel. Roland Fryer y pense-t-il ? Pour l’instant, ses préoccupations sont ailleurs. Il veut absolument comprendre et évaluer l’influence des différences raciales dans l’usage de la force par la police, et s’est donc installé à l’arrière des voitures de flics de Camden (New Jersey) et d’Austin (Texas).

Une méthode de recherche empirique de plus en plus à la mode parmi les économistes ? Pour Fryer, c’est plus que cela. L’expérience ressemble à un mauvais souvenir ! Cet universitaire qui n’en finit pas d’aligner les records – devenu le plus jeune prof noir titularisé à Harvard (à 30 ans), élu dans le Top 100 de « Time Magazine » en 2009 – a grandi dans une famille pauvre de Floride : mère envolée quand il avait 4 ans, père violent, cousins et tantes plongés jusqu’au cou dans le trafic de crack… Il a 15 ans quand il se retrouve plaqué contre le capot d’une voiture de police et fouillé sans ménagement.

Je n’avais jamais été arrêté de ma vie, raconte-t-il. Les flics m’ont un peu bousculé, et c’est là que j’ai réalisé que je ne voulais à aucun prix aller en prison. Je rapinais à droite et à gauche, sans jamais dépasser le seuil de 500 dollars qui fait de vous un criminel. Mais cette interpellation musclée m’a fait basculer. J’ai su que je ne voulais pas de ce monde. »

Après quelques heures d’interrogatoire, la police, qui l’avait pris pour un dealer, le relâche.

L’obsession du « truc qui marche »

Sportif accompli, il rejoint l’université du Texas à 18 ans grâce à une bourse d’athlète. Au bout d’un semestre, ses notes sont tellement bonnes qu’il décroche une bourse académique. Il découvre l’économie à l’université d’Etat de Pennsylvanie et finit brillamment ses études à Chicago. A 25 ans, tout le monde s’arrache ce jeune prodige, à commencer par Harvard, qui lui offre un poste de chercheur. « A Harvard, les gens me demandaient : ‘Oh, vous êtes allé à l’école publique ?’ Ou bien : ‘Vous n’avez pas mis les pieds en Europe ? Vous n’étiez pas à Martha’s Vineyard [l’île chic du Tout-Boston] cet été ? Vous n’avez jamais bu un bon bordeaux ?’ Le bordeaux ? Je ne savais pas que cela existait ! »
Il s’est depuis rattrapé sur les plaisirs de France et a même épousé sa femme, une Autrichienne, à Ménerbes dans le Lubéron. Mais il n’a jamais oublié d’où il venait, au contraire >L’inégalité raciale, pour moi, ce n’est pas un problème à résoudre sur un tableau noir. C’est quelque chose de profondément personnel. Et je me moque des partis pris idéologiques, je veux juste des réponses au problème de l’inégalité. Je suis tellement prêt à tout pour trouver ces réponses que je me fiche de savoir si elles proviennent de telle boîte à idées plutôt que de telle autre. »

Cette obsession du « truc qui marche » l’a conduit à mener des expériences iconoclastes, comme celle consistant à donner 50 dollars à un élève de troisième, toutes les cinq semaines, s’il obtient la meilleure note (A) dans une discipline. Ou à présenter des conclusions politiquement incorrectes, comme cette étude expliquant une partie du retard scolaire des Noirs par une peur de « jouer au Blanc » en obtenant de bonnes notes, et d’être de ce fait rejeté par ses pairs. Avec son équipe d’Edlabs, le « labo éducatif » qu’il a créé à Harvard, Fryer teste toutes sortes de solutions, animé de la conviction que « la science économique l’a démontré depuis vingt ans : c’est moins le marché du travail qui est source de discriminations, en traitant différemment des gens à compétences égales, que le fait qu’une partie de la population se présente sur ce marché avec des qualifications inférieures ». Autrement dit, les racines de la pauvreté chez les Noirs – qui n’a « rien d’une fatalité », insiste-t-il – sont moins à chercher dans la discrimination à l’embauche que dans le déficit scolaire. Surtout entre les âges de 14 et 17 ans.

« Les bonnes idées trouveront leur chemin »

Roland Fryer teste et teste encore, avec une rigueur impressionnante. Il veut par exemple comprendre pourquoi les bons élèves de familles pauvres noires ne tentent pas aussi souvent leur chance dans les meilleures universités que les Blancs ou les Asiatiques, et découvrir la meilleure façon de les convaincre de s’inscrire dans une bonne fac à deux heures d’avion de chez eux. Et il passe un temps fou sur le terrain.

Parce qu’il est noir et issu d’une famille pauvre, certains ne manquent pas de noter qu’il peut parler plus librement et tester des hypothèses controversées sans risque d’être taxé de racisme. « C’est peut-être vrai, répond-il. Mais c’est aussi le fait que je m’assieds avec les profs, les pasteurs, les familles, et que je leur parle comme à des êtres humains. C’est peut-être parce que je leur ai payé une bière et que j’ai eu avec eux une conversation normale qu’ils se disent : ‘Ce type est OK, laissons-le faire.' »

A l’arrivée, dit-il, « si une expérience ne marche pas, et cela arrive souvent, nous le disons et passons à autre chose ».

Quand on s’attaque à des sujets aussi explosifs que l’éducation et les inégalités raciales, on finit forcément par être rattrapé par la politique. A Houston, des syndicalistes enseignants mécontents ont fait le siège de l’immeuble où résidait le prof. Dans le Massachusetts, où il a rejoint une commission chargée de choisir la meilleure façon de tester les élèves, certains l’accusent de vouloir faire le lit des ennemis de l’école publique. Fryer lui-même a trempé un orteil dans le monde politique en 2007-2008, comme conseiller du maire de New York, Michael Bloomberg. « Cela devait durer deux ans, j’ai tenu sept mois, sourit-il… Pas pour moi ! » Le pire, à ses yeux, est de voir un responsable éducatif ou politique rejeter une solution à l’efficacité prouvée parce qu’il « ne peut pas la vendre »… « Mais les bonnes idées trouveront leur chemin, prédit Fryer, si ce n’est pas ici, ce sera en France ou ailleurs. Quelqu’un ouvrira le livre de recettes et dira : ‘Qu’est-ce qui marche, et qu’est-ce qui ne marche pas ?' »

John McDermott

The Financial Times/Le Nouvel économiste

 

Adolescent, ses copains appartenaient à des gangs et des membres de sa famille se trouvaient en prison. L’économiste noir nous explique ici que la meilleure façon de lutter contre les violences policières et les ‘mauvaises écoles’ se trouve dans les données, et non dans l’expérience personnelle.

Nous avons commencé notre déjeuner depuis cinq minutes quand Roland Fryer me demande s’il peut utiliser mon carnet de notes et mon stylo pour dessiner un graphique. Le plus jeune Afro-américain titulaire d’une chaire à l’université d’Harvard explique ses dernières recherches sur les inégalités raciales à travers l’utilisation de la force par la police américaine. Adolescent, Fryer s’est retrouvé face aux armes pointées par des policiers “six ou sept” fois. “Mais, dit-il en traçant une courbe descendante de gauche à droite, il y a une tendance inquiétante, les gens parlent des races aux États-Unis en se basant uniquement sur leur expérience personnelle.” Avec sa voix teintée d’un soupçon d’accent du sud des États-Unis, il poursuit : “Je m’en fiche, de mon expérience personnelle, ou de celle des autres. Tout ce que je veux savoir, c’est comment cette expérience nous amène aux données chiffrées, pour nous aider à savoir ce qui se passe vraiment.”

L’année dernière, comprendre ce qui se passe vraiment a conduit Roland Fryer, 38 ans, à remporter la médaille John Bates Clark, récompense annuelle décernée à un économiste américain de moins de 40 ans. La médaille est considérée comme le prix le plus prestigieux en économie, après le prix Nobel. Son travail empirique a lacéré un discours indigeste sur les races, l’éducation et les inégalités. Dans son laboratoire, le Education Innovation Lab, fondé en 2008, Roland Fryer tente de redéfinir comment l’Amérique pense sa politique, statistique après statistique.

C’est aussi la démarche adoptée pour ses travaux les plus récents. À une table calme, dans le caverneux Hawksmoor Seven Dials, un restaurant d’une chaîne chic dans le centre de Londres, le décor est marron et la viande est rouge. Roland Fryer me raconte qu’il a passé deux jours l’an dernier à suivre les policiers durant leurs rondes à Camden, dans le New Jersey (lors du premier jour de patrouille, une femme a succombé à une overdose devant lui). Roland Fryer cherchait à comprendre si les meurtres de Michael Brown et de Eric Garner, deux jeunes Afro-américains dont la mort a provoqué d’énormes manifestations, s’inscrivaient dans un modèle de répétitions identifiable, comme le mouvement activiste Black Lives Matter l’affirmait. Après une semaine de patrouilles, il a collecté plus de six millions de données des autorités, dont celles de la ville de New York, sur les victimes noires, blanches et latino de violences policières.

Le croquis qu’il me passe entre le sel et le poivre présente ses résultats préliminaires. L’axe horizontal est l’échelle de la gravité des faits : de la bousculade, à gauche, jusqu’aux tirs d’armes à feu, à droite. La courbe démarre en haut, ce qui suggère de grandes différences entre incidents mineurs, puis descend vers zéro, là où les faits deviennent plus violents. En d’autres mots, une fois les facteurs de contexte pris en compte, les Noirs ne sont pas plus susceptibles selon ces données d’être abattus par la police. Ce qui soulève la question : pourquoi ce tollé en 2014 à Ferguson, dans le Missouri, où le jeune Michael Brown a été abattu ?

“Mon garçon, tu commences ta vie avec un 10 et tu grandis dans la pauvreté, alors, enlevons 3. Et si tu vas dans une mauvaise école, enlevons encore 3. Et si tu es élevé par une mère seule, soustrayons encore 3. Mais tu sais ce qu’il reste ? La dignité’.””

“Ce sont les données” dit Fryer. “Maintenant, une hypothèse pour expliquer ce qui est arrivé à Ferguson – pas la fusillade, mais la réaction d’indignation – : ce n’était pas parce que les gens faisaient une déduction statistique, pas à propos de l’innocence ou de la culpabilité de Michael, mais parce qu’ils détestent cette putain de police.” Il poursuit : “la raison pour laquelle ils détestent la police est que si vous avez passé des années être fouillés, jetés à terre, menottés sans motif réel, et ensuite, vous entendez qu’un policier a tiré dans votre ville, comment pouvez-vous croire que c’était autre chose que de la discrimination ?”

“Je pense que cela a à voir avec les incentives et les récompenses” ajoute Fryer. Les officiers de police, explique-t-il, reçoivent souvent les mêmes récompenses indépendamment de la gravité des crimes qu’ils traitent, et ils ne sont pas sanctionnés pour l’utilisation de “la force de bas niveau” sans raison valable [aux États-Unis, les moyens de pression de la police sont classés du plus bas niveau (injonction verbale) au plus haut niveau (arme létale), ndt]. Cela encourage un comportement agressif.

Voilà ce que lui ont révélé les données, mais il admet que cela correspond à son expérience personnelle aussi. Depuis qu’il travaille à Harvard, en 2003, il répugne à parler de son passé. Il souhaite être jugé sur les résultats de son travail sur les données. Il est cependant évident que Fryer n’est pas seulement poussé par sa formation ; ses expériences personnelles ont nourri ses recherches jusqu’ici.

Il est né en Floride en 1977. Sa mère est partie quand il était bébé et à l’âge de quatre ans, Fryer et son père ont déménagé au Texas. Son père buvait beaucoup et battait ses partenaires. Adolescent, les copains de Fryer appartenaient à des gangs. Huit membres de sa proche famille sont soit morts jeunes, soit ont été en prison, souvent pour avoir vendu de la cocaïne au crack.

“Je n’ai jamais cru qu’aller en prison c’était cool”, dit-il. C’est une bourse sportive (sa carrure d’athlète parle de son passé de footballeur américain dans une université américaine) qui l’a arraché à une “mauvaise école” et amené à l’université du Texas, où il a découvert l’économie.

“Mon grand-père n’était pas très éduqué”, explique Fryer. “Il avait pour habitude de parler par énigmes. Il me disait de petites choses, il disait ‘Mon garçon, tu commences ta vie avec un 10 et tu grandis dans la pauvreté, alors, enlevons 3. Et si tu vas dans une mauvaise école, enlevons encore 3. Et si tu es élevé par une mère seule, soustrayons encore 3. Mais tu sais ce qu’il reste ? La dignité’.”

“C’est pour ça que je peux utiliser ma propre expérience” dit-il. Son passé lui a donné des pistes sur les théories à tester, mais c’est uniquement par les données qu’il peut atteindre des conclusions fermes. “Je connais le danger qu’il y a à enlever leur dignité aux gens. Mais l’expérience seule n’aide pas à élaborer des politiques qui vont marcher.”

L’approche qu’a Fryer du menu est brutale. “Je vais y aller à fond” avertit-il, en émettant un de ses petits rires graves et fréquents. Il commande un steak tartare pour commencer, puis un faux-filet et des frites à la graisse de bœuf. J’opte pour le faux-filet et les frites aussi, mais avec une entrée au crabe. Je ne réussis pas à le persuader de se joindre à moi pour un verre de vin rouge. Il préfère un pot de thé anglais de petit-déjeuner.

Il est à Londres pour donner une conférence à la Banque d’Angleterre en hommage à Sir Arthur Lewis, feu le prix Nobel originaire de Sainte-Lucie, l’un des plus grands chercheurs en développement économique. “Il était vraiment concret, comme les économistes de ma génération ne le sont plus” souligne Fryer. Il me dit que son discours évoquera ses propres “efforts – et ce n’est probablement pas le bon mot – pour être un ingénieur social. Essayer d’être terre à terre, faire des politiques dont la théorie dira qu’elles seront efficaces pour donner leur chance aux gens défavorisés.”

Alors que les entrées arrivent, nous passons de son travail sur la justice criminelle à la majeure de Fryer : l’éducation. Son premier essai, co-écrit avec Steven Levitt, célèbre pour son livre ‘Freakonomics’, a été publié en 2002 avant qu’il n’achève sa thèse à la Penn State University. Il tentait d’expliquer l’“écart blancs-noirs dans les résultats des tests scolaires”, ou encore pourquoi les élèves noirs réussissent en moyenne moins bien à l’école que les blancs.

Pour faire une distinction un peu crue, à l’époque, deux interprétations étaient souvent données pour expliquer l’écart des résultats. La première, couramment utilisée par la gauche, était que tout s’explique par la pauvreté. Les Afro-américains étaient plus susceptibles d’être pauvres et de ce fait, étaient moins susceptibles de réussir à l’école. La deuxième thèse, plus prisée des conservateurs, soulignait le taux de “rupture familiale” chez les Afro-américains.

La première publication de Fryer, et les suivantes, transcendait ces interprétations en démontrant le rôle important de la scolarité dans les inégalités. De fait, les élèves noirs réussissaient moins bien parce qu’ils fréquentaient de mauvaises écoles. Fryer posait l’hypothèse que, à l’inverse, de bonnes écoles réduiraient peut-être cet écart.

Après de nombreuses visites de très bonnes “charter schools” [écoles pilotes privées sous contrat, ndt] – celles qui échappent dans une certaine mesure aux contrôles du gouvernement de leur État –, et des térabytes de données plus tard, il est arrivé aux cinq points communs définissant une bonne école : une journée et une année scolaire plus longues ; des enseignants qui utilisent les données ; une culture d’exigence élevée ; du tutorat en petits groupes ; et un “engagement à un capital humain de grande qualité” (des enseignants très compétents).

“Nous devons comprendre comment enseigner à ces enfants” dit Fryer. “Bien entendu, les parents comptent, bien entendu, la démographie compte. La question est : est-ce qu’ils peuvent surmonter ? Est-ce que nous pouvons donner à ces gamins la vitesse de libération ?” demande-t-il, utilisant un terme de physique qui décrit la vitesse minimum nécessaire pour qu’un objet échappe à l’attraction de la gravitation. “Je pense vraiment, peut-être que c’est naïf, mais je crois à la grâce de Dieu quand je vois ces gamins dans ces écoles.”

Pour une fois, le torrent d’idées s’arrête. Il se tait. “Ça m’empêche de dormir la nuit.”

“Je suis tellement fatigué d’écouter l’argument que c’est juste la pauvreté” reprend-il. “Les écoles suffisent, réellement, si ce sont de bonnes écoles.”

Je lui demande si ce n’est pas trop simpliste, s’il ne néglige pas les raisons systémiques des inégalités. Non, répond-il. Il connaît déjà bien l’histoire, rappelle-t-il. Par exemple, la partie oubliée du discours de Martin Luther King ‘I have a dream’, en 1963, qui évoquait l’effet corrosif des brutalités policières de cette époque.

Mais il admet que le plus important pour lui est ce qui marche. “La question est : comment pouvons-nous progresser ?”

Cette volonté de progression a conduit Fryer en terrain miné. Je l’interroge sur son hypothèse du “faire comme les Blancs”. Elle pose que certains enfants noirs sont bridés par la pression de leur groupe à ne pas travailler dur, ou encore à ne pas “faire comme les Blancs”. Fryer admet avoir “tenté de pousser les gens à franchir la frontière raciale” quand il était plus jeune, mais “c’était principalement à propos de la musique. L’idée qu’une personne noire puisse écouter un orchestre comme le Dave Matthews Band [orchestre blanc, ndt], je pense que c’était le truc le plus dingue que j’ai jamais entendu.”

C’est le problème du “faire comme les Blancs” qui explique pourquoi Fryer défend une culture d’exigence scolaire élevée et veut travailler plus sur le développement du caractère. Les meilleures écoles font mentir le fatalisme de certains conservateurs, qui affirment qu’il ne peut y avoir de progrès sans une “meilleure” éducation parentale. “Je leur dis : les parents vous envoient les meilleurs enfants qu’ils ont. Ils ne cachent pas les meilleurs à la maison”.

Il est “immensément optimiste” pour le futur. L’écart dans les résultats aux tests scolaires s’est réduit de moitié au cours de la dernière décennie, en partie, dit-il, grâce à l’émergence de ce qu’il voit comme des “super-écoles”, comme la Harlem Children’s Zone, un projet éducatif respecté lancé dans les années 70 à New York. “Il y a eu une série d’écoles qui ont fait des choses remarquables pour les enfants. Vraiment des choses merveilleuses. La question est : comment pouvons-nous mettre ça en bouteille et le reproduire à plus grande échelle ?”

Ce challenge a une dimension personnelle aussi, comme me l’explique Fryer une fois que les steaks arrivent. De grands steaks succulents et d’un prix qui exige d’être reconnaissant envers le ‘Financial Times’, qui règle l’addition…

Je lui demande si c’est difficile de convaincre les gens de la nécessité de fournir un grand effort pour transformer les mauvaises écoles, quand le chercheur superstar qui le demande est lui-même un produit de ce système.

“Ça craint d’être regardé et considéré comme une exception parce que vous sentez que vous n’êtes jamais l’un des leurs. L’une de mes préoccupations premières, avec ma fille, est de juste faire en sorte qu’elle se sente à l’aise.”

Fryer est marié avec Franziska Michor, une mathématicienne de Harvard avec un doctorat en biologie de l’évolution. Ils se sont rencontrés voici dix ans quand ils étaient tous deux membres de la prestigieuse Society of Fellows, un groupe de jeunes chercheurs dispensés des obligations pratiques de la vie d’enseignant. Il l’a courtisée en faisant un pari : un dîner avec lui s’il trouvait des preuves que fumer réduit les risques de cancer. À la grande stupéfaction de Franziska, il lui a envoyé une étude produite par un lobby du tabac. Au lendemain de ce rendez-vous, ils ont emménagé ensemble à Cambridge, où ils vivent actuellement avec leur fille de 2 ans.

Ont-ils adopté une approche par les données pour l’éducation de leur fille, me demandé-je ? Fryer confesse qu’il a ouvert un compte Dropbox nommé “La science des enfants”, avec des données à ressortir durant les disputes sur l’heure du coucher. Ils ont aussi analysé la courbe de poids de leur fille sur un fichier Excel pendant quelques semaines. “Mais c’était trop fatiguant. Il n’y a rien de mieux que votre propre enfant pour vous donner envie de jeter les données par la fenêtre” plaisante-t-il.

Il admet qu’il a ralenti le rythme depuis sa phase d’accro au travail, mais je soupçonne que cela ne joue que sur des marges minimes.

Tandis que nous réglons leur sort à nos steaks, je lui demande s’il a une liste d’expériences à tenter pour lui permettre d’y parvenir.

“Vous ne voulez pas voir ma ‘to do list’. La liste de choses à faire est dingue.” Fryer mentionne un travail parallèle, conduire des essais contrôlés pour découvrir comment améliorer la gestion des mauvaises écoles. Il veut essayer les “comptes de formation” : donner de l’argent directement aux parents, à investir dans l’éducation de leur enfant (les parents les plus pauvres recevant davantage d’argent). Et il achève une recherche sur les moyens d’améliorer l’assiduité scolaire dans les années cruciales de la petite enfance, en donnant aux parents des bonus en cash. Ce qui s’est déjà révélé efficace dans des contextes similaires et dans des pays comme le Mexique.

L’économiste tente aussi d’imaginer de nouvelles façons de rémunérer les professeurs. L’une de ses recherches a prouvé que les rémunérer aux résultats ne fait pas grande différence, à moins de les payer automatiquement puis de les menacer de reprendre l’argent si les résultats ne s’améliorent pas. Ce qui illustre le pouvoir d’un phénomène qualifié par les psychologues d’“aversion pour la perte”. Il veut maintenant tester de nouvelles grilles de rémunération pour les professeurs principaux afin de les empêcher d’être débauchés pour des tâches administratives, “moins utiles”.

Et la technologie ? “Les données montrent que ça ne change rien [pour réduire l’écart].” Un jour, dit-il, l’utilisation de tablettes, l’enseignement à distance, ou encore les analyses quantitatives poussées pourront aider les enseignants les moins bons à s’améliorer, mais “en ce moment, la technologie exacerbe l’écart de qualité entre enseignants, parce que les bons professeurs en font un complément à ce qu’ils font déjà”. Donc ce qui vaut pour le marché du travail au sens large vaut aussi pour les enseignants ? “Exactement”, dit Fryer.

Après avoir refusé un autre plat à base de viande, Fryer et moi déclinons le dessert. Lui prend un autre thé et moi un café macchiato. Que pense-t-il des réformes de l’éducation de Barack Obama et de celles proposées par les candidats à la présidentielle de 2016 ?

“Je pense qu’Obama s’en est pas mal tiré avec l’éducation. J’ai eu le grand plaisir de le rencontrer deux fois à ce sujet lors d’un déjeuner” se souvient-il, avant d’ajouter : “Le steak n’était pas aussi bon que celui-ci !”

Il dit être en accord avec la plupart des choses qu’a faites le président à travers son programme ‘Race to the Top initiative’, qui a soutenu par des incitations le type d’écoles privées sous contrat saluées par les recherches de Fryer, rencontrant souvent l’opposition des gouvernements locaux et des syndicats d’enseignants, des forces avec lesquelles il faut compter dans le parti démocrate. Fryer dit que la moitié des écoles qui étaient des “usines à déscolarisation” ont disparu sous le contrôle d’Obama.

“Je crains qu’avec la prochaine loi sur l’éducation, nous ne régressions au lieu de progresser.” Hillary Clinton, qui était initialement en faveur des écoles privées sous contrat, les a inondées de critiques sous la pression de la compétition avec son concurrent, le candidat démocrate Bernie Sanders.

“Les politiques doivent dire des choses auxquelles ils ne croient pas, et je n’arrive pas à comprendre pourquoi c’est une bonne chose. Je n’arrive pas à croire que tous les républicains croient vraiment dans ces trucs sur les armes à feu. Ils sont probablement indifférents, mais ils doivent réaliser qu’il n’y a pas d’espace pour progresser dans leur parti. Hillary a fait certaines déclarations sur les écoles à charte l’autre jour, et je ne suis pas sûr qu’elle croie en ce qu’elle a dit non plus.”

L’addition arrive, et je lui demande s’il envisagerait un jour la politique : secrétaire à l’Éducation, peut-être ? “Je pense que le secrétariat à l’Éducation sous le bon président serait super”, répond-il. “Heureusement, ça ne dépend pas de moi. Je suis juste un type qui tente d’être l’expert en chef, pas le commandant en chef.”

 Voir enfin:

The Research Is Only As Good As the Data

Rosa Li

July 15, 2016

A new study found no evidence of racial bias in police shootings. But last year, a study came to the opposite conclusion. Why?

Why did these two papers reach such different conclusions? Because they drew on different data sources and consequently relied on different statistical methods. Right now, there is no comprehensive official federal database documenting shootings by U.S. law enforcement officers.* Instead, researchers must read through thousands of 50+ page police reports from a few cooperative cities, as Fryer’s team quite impressively did, or use alternative databases compiled by nongovernment groups, as Ross did. With incomplete and imperfect datasets, researchers are limited in the analyses that they can perform.

Right now, there is no official federal database documenting shootings by U.S. law enforcement officers.

Fryer’s study compared all 500 police shootings that occurred in Houston from 2000–2015 to a random sample of Houston cases from the same time period in which lethal force could have been justified but was not used.* With these data, he was able to use the statistical method of logistic regression to determine how much a suspect’s race affected whether he or she would be shot by police during a heated encounter. Fryer found that black Houstonites, compared to white Houstonites, were actually almost 25 percent less likely to be shot by police in such encounters. Fryer was quite explicit about the fact that his data were specific to Houston and more data are needed in order to understand whether police shootings are racially biased in other parts of the country.

Ross, a Ph.D. student, probably did not have an army of research assistants at his disposal, which may explain why he used Deadspin’s crowd-sourced U.S. Police-Shooting Database. This database has the lofty goal of tracking every police shooting in the U.S. by calling on everyday people to Google and log police shootings for every calendar day from 2011 to 2014. The idea is that this might eliminate inadvertent bias that plays out in how police reports are made, but of course, it also introduces all kinds of new biases, too, such as what the media chooses to report and how Google’s search algorithm prioritizes search results. Importantly, at the time of Ross’ analyses, only about half of the days had been searched, and out of the nearly 2,000 records, just over 700 contained enough location and race data to be useable for Ross’s analyses. Thus, while Fryer’s Houston police shooting dataset had painstakingly complete coverage (though only for a single city), Ross’ dataset was less thorough and reliable, though it did draw on reports from across the U.S.

Because the Deadspin dataset also only recorded media-reported shootings and not all police encounters in which shootings could have happened, Ross used Bayesian statistics to ask a different question from Fryer’s: “For people shot by the police, what is the relative likelihood that they are black versus white and armed versus unarmed?” According Ross’ analyses, people are three times more likely to be black, unarmed, and shot by police than they are to be white, unarmed, and shot by police. (This type of analysis yields risk ratios that compare relative probabilities rather than exact values.) For those who questioned how Philando Castile’s gun-carrying affected his risk of being shot, Ross finds that black Americans shot by police are 2.8 times more likely to be armed than unarmed. (White Americans shot by police are 3.3 times more likely to be armed than unarmed.)

It makes sense that Fryer’s study received more attention—its data were more comprehensive, and his team uniquely investigated a comparison group of nonshooting police encounters. But even though Ross’ study used a less reliable dataset, there still may be useful findings. For example, he was able to identify counties in which racial biases may be especially strong. (He specifically calls out Miami-Dade in Florida, Los Angeles, and New Orleans.) Applying Fryer’s method of thoroughly combing police reports to the cities Ross’ paper identified as being especially biased would be a smart way to proceed.

The most important takeaway here is to remember that each study is not a definitive reflection of the truth but an assessment of the data available to a researcher. The researchers know this. Fryer notes that his paper just “takes first steps into the treacherous terrain of understanding the extent of racial differences in police use of force,” and Ross writes that the Deadspin database is incomplete and needs thorough verification. Both authors agree on the need for more readily available and complete data on U.S. police shootings so that more research can be conducted.

Our current state of scattered record-keeping on police violence only allows researchers to extrapolate limited conclusions that come with many caveats. A comprehensive central database that tracks all instances of police shootings would allow researchers to draw more accurate conclusions. Until then, we have to remember that a conclusion is only as strong as the data it pulls from—and our data on this issue are weak.

Voir enfin:

Le FN, René Girard et la théorie du bouc émissaire Vincent Coussedière
18/12/2015

FIGAROVOX/TRIBUNE – Vincent Coussedière estime que le Front national est en passe de fracturer un système qui l’a érigé en bouc-émissaire.

Vincent Coussedière est agrégé de philosophie et auteur d’Éloge du populisme (Elya éditions).

Les «élites» françaises, sous l’inspiration et la domination intellectuelle de François Mitterrand, on voulu faire jouer au Front National depuis 30 ans, le rôle, non simplement du diable en politique, mais de l’Apocalypse. Le Front National représentait l’imminence et le danger de la fin des Temps. L’épée de Damoclès que se devait de neutraliser toute politique «républicaine».

Cet imaginaire de la fin, incarné dans l’anti-frontisme, arrive lui-même à sa fin. Pourquoi? Parce qu’il est devenu impossible de masquer aux français que la fin est désormais derrière nous. La fin est consommée, la France en pleine décomposition, et la république agonisante, d’avoir voulu devenir trop bonne fille de l’Empire multiculturel européen. Or tout le monde comprend bien qu’il n’a nullement été besoin du Front national pour cela. Plus rien ou presque n’est à sauver, et c’est pourquoi le Front national fait de moins en moins peur, même si, pour cette fois encore, la manœuvre du «front républicain», orchestrée par Manuel Valls, a été efficace sur les électeurs socialistes. Les Français ont compris que la fin qu’on faisait incarner au Front national ayant déjà eu lieu, il avait joué, comme rôle dans le dispositif du mensonge généralisé, celui du bouc émissaire, vers lequel on détourne la violence sociale, afin qu’elle ne détruise pas tout sur son passage. Remarquons que le Front national s’était volontiers prêté à ce dispositif aussi longtemps que cela lui profitait, c’est-à-dire jusqu’à aujourd’hui. Le parti anti-système a besoin du système dans un premier temps pour se légitimer.

Nous approchons du point où la fonction de bouc émissaire, théorisée par René Girard (1) va être entièrement dévoilée et où la violence ne pourra plus se déchaîner vers une victime extérieure. Il faut bien mesurer le danger social d’une telle situation, et la haute probabilité de renversement qu’elle secrète: le moment approche pour ceux qui ont désigné la victime émissaire à la vindicte du peuple, de voir refluer sur eux, avec la vitesse et la violence d’un tsunami politique, la frustration sociale qu’ils avaient cherché à détourner.

Les élections régionales sont sans doute un des derniers avertissements en ce sens.

Les élites devraient anticiper la colère d’un peuple qui se découvre de plus en plus floué, et admettre qu’elles ont produit le système de la victime émissaire, afin de détourner la violence et la critique à l’égard de leur propre action. Pour cela, elles devraient cesser d’ostraciser le Front national, et accepter pleinement le débat avec lui, en le réintégrant sans réserve dans la vie politique républicaine française.

Y-a-t-il une solution pour échapper à une telle issue? Avouons que cette responsabilité est celle des élites en place, ayant entonné depuis 30 ans le même refrain. A supposer cependant que nous voulions les sauver, nous pourrions leur donner le conseil suivant: leur seule possibilité de survivre serait d’anticiper la violence refluant sur elles en faisant le sacrifice de leur innocence. Elles devraient anticiper la colère d’un peuple qui se découvre de plus en plus floué, et admettre qu’elles ont produit le système de la victime émissaire, afin de détourner la violence et la critique à l’égard de leur propre action. Pour cela, elles devraient cesser d’ostraciser le Front national, et accepter pleinement le débat avec lui, en le réintégrant sans réserve dans la vie politique républicaine française. Pour cela, elles devraient admettre de déconstruire la gigantesque hallucination collective produite autour du Front national, hallucination revenant aujourd’hui sous la forme inversée du Sauveur. Ce faisant, elles auraient tort de se priver au passage de souligner la participation du Front national au dispositif, ce dernier s’étant prêté de bonne grâce, sous la houlette du Père, à l’incarnation de la victime émissaire.

Il faut bien avouer que nos élites du PS comme de Les Républicains ne prennent pas ce chemin, démontrant soit qu’elles n’ont strictement rien compris à ce qui se passe dans ce pays depuis 30 ans, soit qu’elles l’ont au contraire trop bien compris, et ne peuvent plus en assumer le dévoilement, soit qu’elles espèrent encore prospérer ainsi. Il n’est pas sûr non plus que le Front national soit prêt à reconnaître sa participation au dispositif. Il y aurait intérêt pourtant pour pouvoir accéder un jour à la magistrature suprême. Car si un tel aveu pourrait lui faire perdre d’un côté son «aura» anti-système, elle pourrait lui permettre de l’autre, une alliance indispensable pour dépasser au deuxième tour des présidentielles le fameux «plafond de verre». Il semble au contraire après ces régionales que tout changera pour que rien ne change. Deux solutions qui ne modifient en rien le dispositif mais le durcissent au contraire se réaffirment.

La première solution, empruntée par le PS et désirée par une partie des Républicains, consiste à maintenir coûte que coûte le discours du front républicain en recherchant un dépassement du clivage gauche/droite. Une telle solution consiste à aller plus loin encore dans la désignation de la victime émissaire, et à s’exposer à un retournement encore plus dévastateur. Car le Front national aura un boulevard pour dévoiler qu’il a été la victime émissaire d’une situation catastrophique dont tout montre de manière de plus en plus éclatante qu’il n’y est strictement pour rien. En ce sens, si à court terme, la déclaration de Valls sur le Front national, fauteur de guerre civile, a semblé efficace, elle s’avérera sans doute à plus ou moins long terme, comme le stade ultime de l’utilisation du dispositif de la victime émissaire, avant que celui-ci ne s’écroule sur ses promoteurs mêmes. Car sans même parler des effets dévastateurs que pourrait avoir, a posteriori, un nouvel attentat, sur une telle déclaration, comment ne pas remarquer que les dernières décisions du gouvernement sur la lutte anti-terroriste ont donné rétrospectivement raison à certaines propositions du Front national? On voit mal alors comment on pourrait désormais lui faire porter le chapeau de ce dont il n’est pas responsable, tout en lui ôtant le mérite des solutions qu’il avait proposées, et qu’on n’a pas hésité à lui emprunter!

La deuxième solution, défendue par une partie de Les Républicains suivant en cela Nicolas Sarkozy, consiste à assumer des préoccupations communes avec le Front national, tout en cherchant à se démarquer un peu par les solutions proposées. Mais comment faire comprendre aux électeurs un tel changement de cap et éviter que ceux-ci ne préfèrent l’original à la copie? Comment les électeurs ne remarqueraient-ils pas que le Front national, lui, n’a pas changé de discours, et surtout, qu’il a précédé tout le monde, et a eu le mérite d’avoir raison avant les autres, puisque ceux-ci viennent maintenant sur son propre terrain? Comment d’autre part concilier une telle proximité avec un discours diabolisant le Front national et cherchant l’alliance au centre?

Curieuses élites, qui ne comprennent pas que la posture «républicaine», initiée par Mitterrand, menace désormais de revenir comme un boomerang les détruire. Christopher Lasch avait écrit La révolte des élites, pour pointer leur sécession d’avec le peuple, c’est aujourd’hui le suicide de celles-ci qu’il faudrait expliquer, dernière conséquence peut-être de cette sécession.

(1) René Girard: La violence et le sacré


Attentat de Nice: C’est les Israéliens dansants, imbécile ! (Damn if you do, damn if you don’t : Guess who got blamed again for rejoicing that the world would now understand them)

26 juillet, 2016
Le mythe des 4 000 Juifs absents du World Trade Center
RammingPoster

Cynthia McKinney
"Complotisme" : quelques remarques sur la querelle opposant Bernard Cazeneuve et Libération
Malheur à vous! parce que vous bâtissez les tombeaux des prophètes, que vos pères ont tués. Vous rendez donc témoignage aux oeuvres de vos pères, et vous les approuvez; car eux, ils ont tué les prophètes, et vous, vous bâtissez leurs tombeaux. C’est pourquoi la sagesse de Dieu a dit: Je leur enverrai des prophètes et des apôtres; ils tueront les uns et persécuteront les autres, afin qu’il soit demandé compte à cette génération du sang de tous les prophètes qui a été répandu depuis la création du monde, depuis le sang d’Abel jusqu’au sang de Zacharie, tué entre l’autel et le temple … Jésus (Luc 11: 47-51)
L’heure vient où quiconque vous fera mourir croira rendre un culte à Dieu. Jésus (Jean 16: 2)
Beat me, hate me
You can never break me
Will me, thrill me
You can never kill me
Jew me, sue me
Everybody do me
Kick me, kike me
Don’t you black or white me
All I wanna say is that
They don’t really care about us … Michael Jackson
J’ai une prémonition qui ne me quittera pas: ce qui adviendra d’Israël sera notre sort à tous. Si Israël devait périr, l’holocauste fondrait sur nous. Eric Hoffer
D’abord ils sont venus (…) pour les Juifs, mais je n’ai rien dit parce que je n’étais pas juif … Martin Niemöller
Si Israël est un occupant dans son pays, le christianisme, qui tire sa légitimité de l’histoire d’Israël, l’est aussi comme le serait tout autre État infidèle. Bat Ye’or
Le canari (…) fut longtemps élevé dans les mines où il était utilisé pour détecter le grisou. L’appareil respiratoire de l’oiseau étant fragile, le canari cessait de chanter et mourait dès l’apparition de ce gaz. Daniele
L’employé juif d’un coiffeur parisien va voir son patron et lui dit : « Patron, je dois démissionner ». « Mais pourquoi donc ? » lui répond le patron. « Parce que tous vos employés sont antisémites ! » « Allons bon, mon cher Jean-Claude. Je suis sûr que ce n’est pas vrai. Qu’est ce qui vous fait penser cela ? » « C’est simple, patron. Lorsque je leur dit qu’Hitler a voulu tuer tous les juifs et les coiffeurs… » Le patron l’interrompt : « Mais Jean-Claude, pourquoi les coiffeurs ? » « Vous voyez patron, vous aussi ! » Blague juive
Tuez les Juifs partout où vous les trouverez. Cela plaît à Dieu, à l’histoire et à la religion. Cela sauve votre honneur. Dieu est avec vous. (…) [L]es Allemands n’ont jamais causé de tort à aucun musulman, et ils combattent à nouveau contre notre ennemi commun […]. Mais surtout, ils ont définitivement résolu le problème juif. Ces liens, notamment ce dernier point, font que notre amitié avec l’Allemagne n’a rien de provisoire ou de conditionnel, mais est permanente et durable, fondée sur un intérêt commun. Haj Amin al-Husseini (moufti de Jérusalem, discours sur Radio Berlin, le 1er mars 1944)
Israël existe et continuera à exister jusqu’à ce que l’islam l’abroge comme il a abrogé ce qui l’a précédé. Hasan al-Bannâ (préambule de la charte du Hamas, 1988)
Les enfants de la nation du Hezbollah au Liban sont en confrontation avec [leurs ennemis] afin d’atteindre les objectifs suivants : un retrait israélien définitif du Liban comme premier pas vers la destruction totale d’Israël et la libération de la Sainte Jérusalem de la souillure de l’occupation … Charte du Hezbollah (1985)
La libération de la Palestine a pour but de “purifier” le pays de toute présence sioniste. Charte de l’OLP (article 15, 1964)
Depuis les premiers jours de l’islam, le monde musulman a toujours dû affronter des problèmes issus de complots juifs. (…) Leurs intrigues ont continué jusqu’à aujourd’hui et ils continuent à en ourdir de nouvelles. Sayd Qutb (membre des Frères musulmans, Notre combat contre les Juifs)
Nous vous bénissons, nous bénissons les Mourabitoun (hommes) et les Mourabitat (femmes). Nous saluons toutes gouttes de sang versées à Jérusalem. C’est du sang pur, du sang propre, du sang qui mène à Dieu. Avec l’aide de Dieu, chaque djihadiste (shaheed) sera au paradis, et chaque blessé sera récompensé. Nous ne leur permettrons aucune avancée. Dans toutes ses divisions, Al-Aqsa est à nous et l’église du Saint Sépulcre est notre, tout est à nous. Ils n’ont pas le droit de les profaner avec leurs pieds sales, et on ne leur permettra pas non plus. Mahmoud Abbas
Enveloppés dans leurs châles de prières, quatre fidèles s’effondrent sous les coups des tueurs opérant à visage découvert, qui seront ensuite tués par deux policiers israéliens accourus sur place. Trois des victimes israéliennes étaient également de nationalité américaine, la quatrième avait aussi la nationalité britannique. Huit fidèles ont été par ailleurs blessés, dont un se trouvait hier dans un état critique tandis que trois autres étaient sérieusement atteints. Les terroristes, des cousins âgés d’une vingtaine d’années, venaient du quartier arabe de Jabal Moukaber, à Jérusalem-Est (annexée). Ils sont parvenus jusqu’à la synagogue sans rencontrer la moindre difficulté. Les 270 000 Arabes de la Ville sainte, sur un total de 800 000 habitants, peuvent en effet circuler librement en Israël. À Gaza, des tirs de joie ont éclaté et le Hamas a salué « un acte héroïque ». Mais, à Ramallah (Cisjordanie), le président palestinien Mahmoud Abbas a vivement condamné cet attentat « visant des civils, dans un lieu sanctifié ». Dans la foulée, il a aussi dénoncé « les attaques contre Al-Aqsa et les mosquées ». Le secrétaire d’État américain, John Kerry, s’est indigné contre l’attaque. « Ce matin à Jérusalem, des Palestiniens ont attaqué des juifs qui priaient dans une synagogue. Des gens venus prier Dieu dans le sanctuaire d’une synagogue (…) ont été assassinés dans ce qui constitue un acte de pure terreur, d’une brutalité insensée », a fustigé le chef de la diplomatie américaine. Invoquant l’intensification de la colonisation israélienne et les provocations de juifs radicaux à l’Esplanade des mosquées (troisième lieu saint de l’islam), appelé le Mont du Temple (de Salomon) par les juifs, les Palestiniens multiplient les manifestations et les attaques depuis l’été dernier. La Croix (19 novembre 2014)
Si vous pouvez tuer un incroyant américain ou européen – en particulier les méchants et sales Français – ou un Australien ou un Canadien, ou tout […] citoyen des pays qui sont entrés dans une coalition contre l’État islamique, alors comptez sur Allah et tuez-le de n’importe quelle manière. (…) Tuez le mécréant qu’il soit civil ou militaire. (…) Frappez sa tête avec une pierre, égorgez-le avec un couteau, écrasez-le avec votre voiture, jetez-le d’un lieu en hauteur, étranglez-le ou empoisonnez-le. Abou Mohammed al-Adnani (porte-parole de l’EI)
Toujours viser les endroits fréquentés, tel que les lieux touristiques, les grandes surfaces, les synagogues, les églises, les loges maçonniques, les permanences des partis politiques, les lieux de prêches des apostats, le but étant d’installer la peur dans leur coeur (…) avec n’importe quel moyen qui est à votre disposition, un simple couteau de cuisine ou un autre objet tranchant comme des cutters. Dar al Islam (magazine de l’Etat islamique, mars 2016)
Les Etats-Unis prendront des mesures pour stopper le terrorisme dans le monde (…) Vous voyez de quoi ils sont capables… Les Etats-Unis devront dorénavant s’impliquer (…) Israël a maintenant l’espoir que le monde nous comprendra. Les Américains sont naïfs et l’Amérique est facile à pénétrer. Il n’y a pas beaucoup de contrôles en Amérique. Et désormais l’Amérique sera plus dure à propos de ceux qui débarquent sur son territoire. Israeliens interroges par le FBI (septembre 2001)
J’en avais les larmes aux yeux. Ces gars-là plaisantaient et ca m’a dérangé. Pour ces gars-là, c’était comme, ‘maintenant l’Amérique sait ce que nous vivons.’ Urban Moving worker
According to Cannistraro, many people in the U.S. intelligence community believed that some of the men arrested were working for Israeli intelligence. Cannistraro said there was speculation as to whether Urban Moving had been « set up or exploited for the purpose of launching an intelligence operation against radical Islamists in the area, particularly in the New Jersey-New York area. » Under this scenario, the alleged spying operation was not aimed against the United States, but at penetrating or monitoring radical fund-raising and support networks in Muslim communities like Paterson, N.J., which was one of the places where several of the hijackers lived in the months prior to Sept. 11. For the FBI, deciphering the truth from the five Israelis proved to be difficult. One of them, Paul Kurzberg, refused to take a lie-detector test for 10 weeks — then failed it, according to his lawyer. Another of his lawyers told us Kurzberg had been reluctant to take the test because he had once worked for Israeli intelligence in another country. Sources say the Israelis were targeting these fund-raising networks because they were thought to be channeling money to Hamas and Islamic Jihad, groups that are responsible for most of the suicide bombings in Israel. « [The] Israeli government has been very concerned about the activity of radical Islamic groups in the United States that could be a support apparatus to Hamas and Islamic Jihad, » Cannistraro said. The men denied that they had been working for Israeli intelligence out of the New Jersey moving company, and Ram Horvitz, their Israeli attorney, dismissed the allegations as « stupid and ridiculous. » (…) Despite the denials, sources tell ABCNEWS there is still debate within the FBI over whether or not the young men were spies. Many U.S. government officials still believe that some of them were on a mission for Israeli intelligence. But the FBI told ABCNEWS, « To date, this investigation has not identified anybody who in this country had pre-knowledge of the events of 9/11. » Sources also said that even if the men were spies, there is no evidence to conclude they had advance knowledge of the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11. The investigation, at the end of the day, after all the polygraphs, all of the field work, all the cross-checking, the intelligence work, concluded that they probably did not have advance knowledge of 9/11, » Cannistraro noted. As to what they were doing on the van, they say they read about the attack on the Internet, couldn’t see it from their offices and went to the parking lot for a better view. But no one has been able to find a good explanation for why they may have been smiling with the towers of the World Trade Center burning in the background. Both the lawyers for the young men and the Israeli Embassy chalk it up to immature conduct. According to ABCNEWS sources, Israeli and U.S. government officials worked out a deal — and after 71 days, the five Israelis were taken out of jail, put on a plane, and deported back home. While the former detainees refused to answer ABCNEWS’ questions about their detention and what they were doing on Sept. 11, several of the detainees discussed their experience in America on an Israeli talk show after their return home. Said one of the men, denying that they were laughing or happy on the morning of Sept. 11, « The fact of the matter is we are coming from a country that experiences terror daily. Our purpose was to document the event. » ABC News
Sur le Coran de La Mecque, je vais attaquer une église. Adel Kermiche
 Vers 9h25, deux hommes porteurs d’armes blanches ont surgi dans l’église de Saint-Etienne-du-Rouvray. Ils ont pris en otages six personnes, le prêtre, trois religieuses et un couple de paroissiens. L’une des religieuses est parvenue à prendre la fuite et à donner l’alerte. La brigade d’intervention (BRI) et une brigade anti-criminalité arrivées sur place ont tenté d’entamer une négociation avec les terroristes. Les policiers ont ensuite tenté une incursion, sans succès. Peu après, trois otages – les deux religieuses et une paroissienne – sont sortis de l’église suivis par les deux terroristes criant « Allah Akbar », dont l’un portait une arme de poing. Les deux assaillants ont été tués par la BRI. Selon le témoignage d’une religieuse parvenue à s’enfuir, les terroristes se sont « enregistrés » au moment du crime, l’un a fait « un peu comme un sermon autour de l’autel en arabe » avant l’assassinat du prêtre. Le Figaro
For many Israelis, the horrifying images of a truck plowing through crowds for more than a mile in the French resort town of Nice struck a macabrely familiar chord. (…)  Nice was an even more direct, if far deadlier, echo of a 2011 rampage in which an Arab-Israeli man’s truck barreled down a Tel Aviv street for a mile, killing one and wounding 17. These followed a spate of attacks with heavy construction vehicles and cars as weapons in 2008. And since October, according to Shin Bet, Israel’s domestic security agency, at least 32 Palestinians have rammed vehicles into people at bus stops, intersections and military checkpoints. The French prime minister said after the Nice attack, the nation’s third mass killing in 18 months, that France “must live with terrorism.” That is what Israelis have been doing for decades, through the plane hijackings of the 1970s; the suicide bombers of the second intifada, or Palestinian uprising, which began in 2000; and the lone-wolf stabbings and shootings of the past 10 months. In Israel, ordinary citizens, security officials and experts feel they have seen it all and say they have adapted to a perennial, if ever-changing, threat. They speak of constantly staying alert, exercising caution and growing accustomed to what some may find to be intrusive levels of security, but essentially carrying on.  (…) That routine includes opening bags for a check and passing through metal detectors at train or bus stations, shopping malls and movie complexes. At the height of the suicide bombings, customers paid a small surcharge at cafes and restaurants to subsidize the cost of a guard at the door. Hundreds of armed civilian guards have been deployed to protect public transportation in Jerusalem in recent months amid the wave of attacks, which have been glorified by some Palestinians on social media. The guards stand at bus and light-rail stops, and hop on and off buses along main routes, with the same powers to search and arrest as the police. Israel has also invested hugely in intelligence, its tactics evolving as its enemies change theirs. Several psychological studies in Israel have found that people habituate quickly to threats, making adjustments to daily life — keeping children at home, for example, rather than sending them to summer camp — and adopting dark humor about the randomness of the threat. (…) Some Israeli politicians have been disparaging about what they view as European negligence in security matters. After the attacks in March in Brussels, for example, a senior minister, Israel Katz, said Belgium would not be able to fight Islamist terrorism “if Belgians continue eating chocolate and enjoying life and looking like great democrats and liberals.” In a radio interview on Sunday, Yaakov Perry, a former Shin Bet chief now in Parliament, recommended deeper intelligence supervision of neighborhoods “where Muslims, refugees, Daesh supporters of various sorts live,” using an Arabic acronym to refer to the Islamic State. He also suggested that the French police were complacent, referring to news reports that the driver in Nice had told officers he was delivering ice cream. “If the driver says he has ice cream, open the truck and check if he has ice cream,” Mr. Perry said. That the attack occurred at a mass gathering for Bastille Day, France’s national holiday, had Israelis shaking their heads. Micky Rosenfeld, an Israeli police spokesman, said that to secure a major event like Independence Day celebrations, when tens of thousands of people gather along the Tel Aviv seafront to watch an air and naval display, officers gather intelligence for weeks beforehand, and erect a 360-degree enclosure of the area, with layers of security around the perimeter. Main roads are typically blocked off with rows of buses, and smaller side streets with patrol cars. In addition to a large uniformed and undercover police presence, counterterrorism teams are strategically placed to provide a rapid response if needed. For intelligence gathering, Shin Bet has used a “basic coverage” method, which involves homing in on a particular neighborhood or population sector that is considered a potential security risk. The agency then builds an intimate system of surveillance and a network of local informers who can point to any sign of suspicious or unusual activity.(…) But several security experts acknowledged that with citizens in a democracy, including Israel’s large Arab minority, these methods of intelligence gathering — “neighbors informing on neighbors,” as one put it — can be difficult to balance with civil liberties. These measures are also less effective, they say, in trying to prevent individual attacks that are not affiliated with any organization and that at times appear to have erupted spontaneously. The NYT
There, is of course, a very important reason why the mainstream media ignores radical Muslim persecution of Christians: if the full magnitude of this phenomenon was ever known, many cornerstones of the mainstream media—most prominent among them, that Israel is oppressive to Palestinians—would immediately crumble. Why? Because radical Muslim persecution of Christians throws a wrench in the media’s otherwise well-oiled narrative that “radical-Muslim-violence-is-a-product-of-Muslim-grievance”—chief among them Israel. Consider it this way: because the Jewish state is stronger than its Muslim neighbors, the media can easily portray Islamic terrorists as frustrated “underdogs” doing whatever they can to achieve “justice.” No matter how many rockets are shot into Tel Aviv by Hamas and Hezbollah, and no matter how anti-Israeli bloodlust is articulated in radical Islamic terms, the media will present such hostility as ironclad proof that Palestinians under Israel are so oppressed that they have no choice but to resort to terrorism. However, if radical Muslims get a free pass when their violence is directed against those stronger than them, how does one rationalize away their violence when it is directed against those weaker than them—in this case, millions of indigenous Christians? The media simply cannot portray radical Muslim persecution of Christians—which in essence and form amount to unprovoked pogroms—as a “land dispute” or a product of “grievance” (if anything, it is the ostracized and persecuted Christian minorities who should have grievances). And because the media cannot articulate radical Islamic attacks on Christians through the “grievance” paradigm that works so well in explaining the Arab-Israeli conflict, their main recourse is not to report on them at all. In short, Christian persecution is the clearest reflection of radical Islamic supremacism. Vastly outnumbered and politically marginalized Christians simply wish to worship in peace, and yet still are they hounded and attacked, their churches burned and destroyed, their women and children enslaved and raped. These Christians are often identical to their Muslim co-citizens, in race, ethnicity, national identity, culture, and language; there is no political dispute, no land dispute. The only problem is that they are Christian and so, Islamists believe according to their scriptural exegesis, must be subjugated. If mainstream media were to report honestly on Christian persecution at the hands of radical Islamists so many bedrocks of the leftist narrative currently dominating political discourse would crumble, first and foremost, the idea that radical Islamic intolerance is a product of “grievances,” and that Israel is responsible for all Jihadist terrorism against it. Raymond Ibrahim
The Maginot Line of “European values” won’t prevail over people who recognize none of those values. So much was made clear by French Prime Minister Manuel Valls, who remarked after the Nice attack that “France is going to have to live with terrorism.” This may have been intended as a statement of fact but it came across as an admission that his government isn’t about to rally the public to a campaign of blood, toil, tears and sweat against ISIS—another premature capitulation in a country that has known them before (…) Then there is Germany, site of three terror attacks in a week. It seems almost like a past epoch that Germans welcomed a million Middle Eastern migrants in an ecstasy of moral self-congratulation, led by Angela Merkel’s chant of “We can do it!” Last summer’s slogan now sounds as dated and hollow as Barack Obama’s “Yes we can!” Now Germany will have to confront a terror threat that will make the Baader-Meinhof gang of the 1970s seem trivial. The German state is stronger and smarter than the French one, but it also surrenders more easily to moral intimidation. The idea of national self-preservation at all costs will always be debatable in a country seeking to expiate an inexpiatable sin. Thus the question of whether Europe is helpless. At its 1980s peak, under François Mitterrand and Helmut Kohl, the European project combined German economic strength and French confidence in power politics. Today, it mixes French political weakness with German moral solipsism. This is a formula for rapid civilizational decline, however many economic or military resources the EU may have at its disposal. Can the decline be stopped? Yes, but that would require a great unlearning of the political mythologies on which modern Europe was built. Among those mythologies: that the European Union is the result of a postwar moral commitment to peace; that Christianity is of merely historical importance to European identity; that there’s no such thing as a military solution; that one’s country isn’t worth fighting for; that honor is atavistic and tolerance is the supreme value. People who believe in nothing, including themselves, will ultimately submit to anything. The alternative is a recognition that Europe’s long peace depended on the presence of American military power, and that the retreat of that power will require Europeans to defend themselves. Europe will also have to figure out how to apply power not symbolically, as it now does, but strategically, in pursuit of difficult objectives. That could start with the destruction of ISIS in Libya. More important, Europeans will have to learn that powerlessness can be as corrupting as power—and much more dangerous. The storm of terror that is descending on Europe will not end in some new politics of inclusion, community outreach, more foreign aid or one of Mrs. Merkel’s diplomatic Rube Goldbergs. It will end in rivers of blood. Theirs or yours? In all this, the best guide to how Europe can find its way to safety is the country it has spent the best part of the last 50 years lecturing and vilifying: Israel. For now, it’s the only country in the West that refuses to risk the safety of its citizens on someone else’s notion of human rights or altar of peace. Europeans will no doubt look to Israel for tactical tips in the battle against terrorism—crowd management techniques and so on—but what they really need to learn from the Jewish state is the moral lesson. Namely, that identity can be a great preserver of liberty, and that free societies cannot survive through progressive accommodations to barbarians. Bret Stephens
Dans une enquête publiée aujourd’hui, Libération accuse le ministre de l’Intérieur d’avoir menti s’agissant de la sécurisation de la Promenade des Anglais le soir du 14 juillet dernier. Riposte immédiate de Bernard Cazeneuve : Libération utilise des «procédés qui empruntent aux ressorts du complotisme» et cherche à l’atteindre «dans sa réputation». Dans un édito en forme de «c’est celui qui dit qui l’est», Johan Hufnagel, directeur délégué de Libération, suggère que c’est Bernard Cazeneuve qui est victime d’«une poussée de complotisme». (…) Ni la presse ni le Gouvernement, cibles de choix des complotistes patentés, ne sortent grandis d’une telle séquence. Morale de l’histoire : cessons de gloser sur le complotisme présumé des uns et des autres à partir de matériaux aussi fragiles. Ne contribuons pas à faire du «complotisme» une étiquette infamante parmi d’autres. Utiliser ce mot de manière aussi peu fondée pour délégitimer un détracteur est en réalité une manière d’œuvrer à sa démonétisation et de rendre, au final, un fier service à tous ceux – vrais imposteurs et autres désinformateurs professionnels – qui prospèrent sur la montée contemporaine du complotisme. Conspiracy watch
Sait-on par exemple que les seules personnes arrêtées le jour même et en relation avec les attaques terroristes du 11-Septembre sont des Israéliens ? L’information a été rapportée dès le lendemain par le journaliste Paulo Lima dans The Record, quotidien du comté de Bergen dans le New Jersey, d’après des sources policières. Immédiatement après le premier impact sur la tour Nord, trois individus furent aperçus par divers témoins sur le toit d’un van stationné à Liberty State Park dans Jersey City, « en train d’exulter » (celebrating), de « sauter de joie » (jumping up and down), et de se photographier avec les tours jumelles en arrière-plan. Ils déplacèrent ensuite leur van sur un autre parking de Jersey City, où d’autres témoins les virent se livrer aux mêmes réjouissances ostentatoires. La police émit aussitôt une alerte BOLO (be-on-the-look-out) : « Véhicule possiblement lié à l’attaque terroriste de New York. Van blanc Chevrolet 2000 avec une plaque du New Jersey et un signe ‘Urban Moving Systems’ à l’arrière, a été vu au Liberty State Park, Jersey City, NJ, au moment du premier impact d’avion de ligne dans le World Trade Center. Trois individus avec le van ont été vus se réjouissant après l’impact initial et l’explosion qui s’en suivit. » Le van fut intercepté par la police quelques heures plus tard, avec à son bord cinq jeunes Israéliens : Sivan et Paul Kurzberg, Yaron Shmuel, Oded Ellner et Omer Marmari. Contraint physiquement de sortir du véhicule et plaqué à terre, le conducteur, Sivan Kurzberg, lança cette phrase étrange : « On est Israéliens. On n’est pas votre problème. Vos problèmes sont nos problèmes. Les Palestiniens sont le problème. » Les sources policières qui informèrent Paulo Lima étaient convaincues de l’implication de ces Israéliens dans les attentats de la matinée : « Il y avait des cartes de la ville dans le van avec certains points surlignés. On aurait dit qu’ils étaient au courant, […] qu’ils savaient ce qui allait se passer lorsqu’ils étaient à Liberty State Park. » On trouva également sur eux des passeports de nationalités diverses, près de 6 000 dollars en espèces et des billets d’avion open pour l’étranger. Les frères Kurzberg furent formellement identifiés comme agents du Mossad. Les cinq Israéliens travaillaient officiellement pour une compagnie de déménagement nommée Urban Moving Systems, dont les employés étaient majoritairement israéliens. « J’étais en pleurs. Ces types blaguaient et ça me perturbait, » révéla au Record un des rares employés non-israéliens. Le 14 septembre, après avoir reçu la visite de la police, le propriétaire de l’entreprise, Dominik Otto Suter, quittait le pays pour Tel-Aviv. L’information divulguée par le Record, confirmée par le rapport de police, a été reprise par des sites d’investigation comme le Wayne Madsen Report (14 septembre 2005) et Counterpunch (7 février 2007). Elle fut aussi rapportée dans quelques grands médias comme mais d’une façon qui minimisait sa portée : le New York Times (21 novembre 2001) omettait de préciser la nationalité des individus, tout comme Fox News et l’agence Associated Press. Le Washington Post (23 novembre 2001) disait bien qu’ils étaient Israéliens, mais passa sous silence leur apparente préconnaissance de l’événement. En revanche, The Forward (15 mars 2002), magazine de la communauté juive new-yorkaise, révéla, d’après une source anonyme du renseignement états-unien, qu’Urban Moving Systems était une antenne sous couverture du Mossad (ce qui ne l’empécha pas de bénéficier d’un prêt fédéral de 498 750 dollars, comme le révèlent les archives du fisc. Le FBI diligenta sur cette affaire une enquête consignée dans un rapport de 579 pages, partiellement déclassifié en 2005 (il le sera totalement en 2035). Le journaliste indépendant Hicham Hamza a analysé ce rapport en détail dans son livre : Israël et le le 11-Septembre : le Grand Tabou. Il en ressort plusieurs éléments accablants. Tout d’abord, les photos prises par ces jeunes Israéliens les montrent effectivement dans des attitudes de célébration devant la tour Nord en feu : « Ils souriaient, ils s’embrassaient et ils se tapaient mutuellement dans les mains. » Pour expliquer cette attitude, les intéressés dirent qu’ils s’étaient simplement réjoui « que les États-Unis auraient maintenant à prendre des mesures pour arrêter le terrorisme dans le monde » (alors que, à ce point, une majorité de gens pensait à un accident plutôt qu’à un acte terroriste). Plus grâve, un témoin au moins les a vus positionnés dès 8 heures, soit avant qu’un avion ne percute la première tour, tandis que d’autres certifient qu’ils prenaient déjà des photos cinq minutes après, ce que confirment leurs photos. Un ancien employé confirma au FBI l’ambiance fanatiquement pro-israélienne et anti-américaine qui régnait dans l’entreprise, prêtant même à son directeur Dominik Otto Suter ces paroles : « Donnez-nous vingt ans et nous nous emparerons de vos médias et détruirons votre pays. » Les cinq Israéliens arrêtés étaient en contact avec une autre entreprise de déménagement dénommée Classic International Movers, dont quatre employés avaient été interrogés indépendamment pour leur liens avec les dix-neufs pirates de l’air présumés. L’un d’eux avait téléphoné à « un individu en Amérique du Sud possédant des liens authentiques avec les militants islamiques au Moyen Orient. » Enfin, « un chien renifleur donna un résultat positif pour la présence de traces d’explosifs dans le véhicule. » Comme le remarque Hamza, la conclusion du rapport laisse sonjeur : le FBI informe la police locale, qui détient les suspects, « que le FBI n’a plus aucun intérêt à enquêter sur les détenus et qu’il convient d’entamer les procédures d’immigration appropriées. » Une lettre du Service fédéral de l’immigration et de la naturalisation prouve qu’en fait la direction du FBI avait recommandé la clôture de l’enquête dès le 24 septembre 2001. Les cinq Israéliens passèrent cependant 71 jours dans une prison de Brooklyn, au cours desquels ils refusèrent puis échouèrent plusieurs fois au détecteur de mensonge. Puis ils furent rapatriés sous la simple charge de visa violations. On doit, pour finir, évoquer un détail essentiel de cette affaire, qui apporte peut-être une explication supplémentaire au comportement exhubérant de ces jeunes Isréaliens : certains témoins précisent, dans leurs appels à la police, que les individus se réjouissant sur le toit de leur van semblaient « arabes » ou « Palestiniens ». En particulier, peu après l’effondrement des tours, un appel anonyme à la police de Jersey City, rapporté le jour même par NBC News, signale « un van blanc, avec deux ou trois types à l’intérieur, ils ressemblent à des Palestiniens et ils tournent autour d’un bâtiment » ; l’un d’eux « mélange des choses et il a cet uniforme ‘sheikh’. […] Il est habillé comme un arabe. » Tout porte à croire que ces individus étaient précisément les cinq Israéliens arrêtés plus tard. Deux hypothèses viennent à l’esprit : ou bien nos faux déménageurs se sont effectivement livrés à une mise en scène pour apparaître comme arabes/Palestiniens, ou bien le ou les témoins les ayant décrits comme tels étaient des complices. Dans un cas comme dans l’autre, il ressort que leur but était d’initier la rumeur médiatique qu’on avait repéré des musulmans qui non seulement se réjouissaient des attentats, mais en avaient préconnaissance. L’information fut effectivement diffusée sur certaines radios dès midi, et sur NBC News dans l’après-midi. Je penche personnellement pour la seconde hypothèse (les informateurs complices plutôt que de vrais déguisement arabes), car le rapport de police ne signale pas de vêtement exotique trouvé dans le van, mais surtout parce que l’informateur cité plus haut, qui insiste sur ce détail vestimentaire, semble avoir voulu induire en erreur la police sur la localisation exacte du van ; ce dernier ne fut intercepté que parce que la police, au lieu de se contenter de cette localisation, barra tous les ponts et souterrains entre New Jersey et New York. Mais l’important est ceci : Si les Israéliens n’avaient pas été interpelés en fin d’après-midi, l’histoire aurait probablement fait la une des journaux sous le titre : The Dancing Arabs. Au lieu de ça, elle fut totalement étouffée et ne circula que confidentiellement, sous le titre the dancing Israelis, ou the highfivers. Laurent Guyenot (Reseau Voltaire)
1/ Des résidus explosifs ont été retrouvés dans le fourgon des cinq Israéliens (1-7). Un chien affecté à la détection de bombes a également réagi lors de la fouille du véhicule (5-44).
 2/ Les trois Israéliens aperçus -avant et après l’impact du second avion- en train de se filmer et de se photographier, avec la première tour embrasée en arrière-plan, étaient joviaux (1-35, 1-65). 76 photos en noir et blanc ont été développées par les enquêteurs (1-80).
3/ La présence de leur véhicule sur le lieu des réjouissances est attestée par deux témoins vers 8h/8h15 du matin, ce mardi 11 septembre 2001, soit une demi-heure environ avant le crash du premier avion dans la Tour Nord (6-42, 5-25). Les trois Israéliens concernés affirmeront aux enquêteurs n’avoir débarqué qu’aux alentours de 9h -juste avant l’impact du second avion-et seulement après avoir appris l’information du premier crash sur Internet. Vers 9h20, soit une quinzaine de minutes après le crash du second avion, le van blanc aura déjà quitté les lieux.
4/ Un autre témoin raconte les avoir vus en action 5 mn après l’impact du premier avion (5-25). Les photos développées confirment qu’ils étaient déjà sur place : la fumée –visible sur leurs images- vient à peine de s’échapper de la Tour Nord (5-62).
5/ Plusieurs témoins ont rapporté avoir constaté l’usage d’une caméra vidéo qui n’aurait pas été retrouvée lors de l’arrestation des Israéliens (6-45). Ceux-ci ont démenti avoir eu recours à un tel appareil. Le FBI évoque pourtant une « tromperie » (5-56). Sur ce point crucial comme sur la question de leur emploi du temps, les enquêteurs ont déjà noté de nombreuses contradictions dans leurs témoignages (6-43).
6/ Lors de leur arrestation musclée et arme au poing, les policiers ont retrouvé des cartes d’étudiant falsifiées, aucun équipement relatif à leur activité de déménageur (5-45), un passeport allemand, près de 6000 dollars en cash ainsi que des billets d’avion pour un départ ouvert et immédiat à destination de l’étranger (5-44).
7/ Interrogés sur leur perception des attentats, les Israéliens ont tenu des propos très politiques : « Les Etats-Unis prendront des mesures pour stopper le terrorisme dans le monde » (5-86), « Vous voyez de quoi ils sont capables…Les Etats-Unis devront dorénavant s’impliquer » (5-20), « Israël a maintenant l’espoir que le monde nous comprendra. Les Américains sont naïfs et l’Amérique est facile à pénétrer. Il n’y a pas beaucoup de contrôles en Amérique. Et désormais l’Amérique sera plus dure à propos de ceux qui débarquent sur son territoire »
8/ Les enquêteurs du FBI ont appris de la part d’un ancien salarié de l’entreprise de déménagement que le dirigeant -nommé Dominic Suter et considéré depuis comme un fugitif (90-1)- avait un profond mépris pour les Etats-Unis ( 5-42). Un anti-américanisme partagé par ses employés israéliens dont l’un aurait jadis déclaré cette phrase stupéfiante : « Donnez-nous vingt ans et nous nous emparerons de vos médias et détruirons votre pays » (1-37).
9/ Le FBI a constaté dans son enquête plusieurs éléments troublants : la petite compagnie de déménagement disposait d’une quinzaine d’ordinateurs –soit un nombre disproportionné par rapport à la taille de l’entreprise (1-47) ; le personnel était essentiellement composé d’Israéliens, de Russes et d’Hongrois qui pratiquaient une forme de discrimination dans leurs réunions à l’encontre des employés non-Juifs (5-41) ; un des cinq détenus israéliens s’était fait passer pour un « ouvrier de chantier » le 10 septembre 2001 aux abords de l’endroit où il sera présent le lendemain lors de la capture photographique des tours embrasées (5-46) ; le chauffeur du van blanc était capable, selon un employé égyptien d’une station d’essence qui fut interrogé par le FBI, de s’exprimer en arabe (5-31).
10/ Pour conclure, une attention particulière mérite d’être consacrée à ces quatre extraits étonnants : les cinq employés d’Urban Moving Systems étaient en contact avec d’autres déménageurs israéliens exerçant pour une compagnie basée également dans le New Jersey et dénommée Classic International Movers. Chose étrange : le FBI a interrogé quatre de ses employés -tous issus de l’armée israélienne- en raison de leur lien avéré avec un des dix-neuf pirates de l’air présumés (1-39).
L’un d’entre eux sera visiblement mal à l’aise durant l’interrogatoire (6-47).
Un des cinq Israéliens disposa également du contact téléphonique d’un homme vivant en Amérique du Sud et lié aux « militants islamiques du Moyen-Orient » (6-40).
Les enquêteurs du FBI ont remarqué un fait qualifié de « bizarre » : un van appartenant à la compagnie Urban Moving Systems s’était dirigé -hors de son secteur régulier- le matin du 11 septembre 2001 en direction du site du crash du vol 93 (1-36).
Enfin, l’un des cinq Israéliens a exprimé, de retour ce matin-là dans l’entreprise, une phrase curieuse à la suite de la chute de la première tour : « Ils vont abattre le second bâtiment ». Interrogé sur le sens des mots employés, il s’est contenté d’affirmer aux enquêteurs qu’il avait d’abord envisagé que l’effondrement de la Tour Sud était une démolition contrôlée par les autorités afin d’éviter des dégâts colossaux (3-64).
Chacun pourra tirer ses propres déductions de cette sélection nécessairement parcellaire. Prochainement, Oumma continuera de soulever le voile en revenant notamment sur l’histoire de ce réseau américain d’espions israéliens dont la mission, en 2000/2001, aurait été uniquement de surveiller les cellules islamistes. En outre, nous aborderons également l’un des aspects les plus méconnus du 11-Septembre : l’existence de liens privilégiés entre les autorités de Tel Aviv et plusieurs responsables du World Trade Center. D’ici là, nous vous invitons à interpréter comme bon vous semblera cet autre passage issu du rapport sur les cinq Israéliens.
En date du 24 septembre 2001, soit 13 jours à peine après leur arrestation, le QG du FBI avait déjà transmis à l’antenne locale chargée de l’enquête -officiellement achevée en 2003- cette « recommandation » (5-59) : « Le FBI n’a plus aucun intérêt à enquêter sur les détenus ». Rapport du FBI (Extraits)
Les Afro-Américains ont toujours su qu’un petit peu de paranoïa ne pouvait pas nous faire de mal. Cynthia McKinney
J’aurai probablement des problèmes pour ce que je viens de vous dire ce soir, confie-t-elle un soir d’été de l’année 2003, devant un parterre de fidèles de l’Eglise baptiste abyssinienne de Harlem. Mais ce ne sera pas la première fois que j’aurai des problèmes pour avoir dit la vérité. Et je continuerai à dire la vérité. Comme je l’ai déjà dit auparavant, je ne m’assiérai pas et je ne me tairai pas. Cynthia McKinney
Ce qui s’est passé au Rwanda n’est pas un génocide planifié par les Hutu. C’est un changement de régime. Un coup d’Etat terroriste perpétré par Kagame avec l’aide de forces étrangères. Cynthia McKinney
Le lobby sioniste dresse sa tête hideuse dans bien trop de facettes de la vie de ce pays, en particulier dans la vie politique (…) les sionistes ont réussi à me mettre à la porte du Congrès à deux reprises. Cynthia McKinney
Les Juifs ont acheté tout le monde. Bill McKinney (ancien représentant, père et plus proche conseiller politique de Cynthia McKinney)
L’occupation israélienne doit finir, y compris au Congrès. Raeed Tayeh (plume de Cynthia McKinney)
Le même photographe israélien prend en photo les tragédies de Nice et Munich. Quelle en était la probabilité ? Vous souvenez-vous des Israéliens qui dansent ? … Cynthia McKinney
McKinney professe un internationalisme consistant, pour l’essentiel, à accuser le gouvernement de son pays et l’Etat d’Israël d’être à l’origine de tous les maux de la planète. A contrario, elle excelle à prendre la défense des régimes les plus liberticides, pourvus qu’ils « résistent à l’Empire ». Ainsi McKinney n’hésite-t-elle pas à chanter les louanges du régime de Robert Mugabe au Zimbabwe ou à exalter la « résistance » du Hamas et du Hezbollah. Concernant le génocide rwandais, l’ancienne membre du Congrès américain partage les thèses très controversées d’un Pierre Péan ou d’un Charles Onana (…) Pour elle, « ce qui s’est passé au Rwanda n’est pas un génocide planifié par les Hutu. C’est un changement de régime. Un coup d’Etat terroriste perpétré par Kagame avec l’aide de forces étrangères ». McKinney a également relayé sans scrupule la théorie du complot selon laquelle les Etats-Unis dissimulerait au monde l’existence d’immenses réserves de pétrole au large des côtes d’Haïti, une richesse qu’ils convoiteraient depuis des décennies, privant ainsi scandaleusement le peuple haïtien de ses ressources naturelles. (…) Se comparant souvent à Rosa Parks, Cynthia McKinney se voit elle-même en martyr de la liberté d’expression, en pasionaria de la Vérité (…) le politologue Michael Barkun classe Cynthia McKinney parmi ces « rebelles de la politique » dont les outrances s’inscrivent dans une stratégie du dérapage n’ayant d’autre fin que de faire parler d’eux. En 2002, quelques mois après ses premières philippiques conspirationnistes sur le 11-Septembre, elle perd le siège qu’elle occupait à la Chambre des représentants depuis 1993 à l’occasion d’une primaire démocrate. La candidate malheureuse explique sa défaite par l’hostilité des « médias » à son encontre. Son père, l’ancien représentant Bill McKinney, qui est aussi le plus proche conseiller politique de Cynthia, fait valoir une toute autre interprétation : la veille du scrutin, interrogé sur l’un des soutiens de sa fille, il incrimine « les Juifs [qui] ont acheté tout le monde », avant d’épeler chacune des lettres du mot « Jews » pour s’assurer que chacun comprenne clairement ce qu’il est en train de dire. Une déclaration que Cynthia McKinney n’a jamais cru devoir désavouer. Les violentes diatribes anti-israéliennes dans lesquelles se lance Cynthia McKinney lui valent une popularité réelle au sein de la communauté arabo-musulmane américaine, particulièrement sensible à la cause palestinienne. En 2002, le Washington Post révèle ainsi que les trois-quarts des fonds levés par McKinney pour sa campagne proviennent de donateurs issus de la communauté musulmane ne résidant même pas dans le 4ème district de l’Etat de Géorgie dans lequel elle se présentait.  (…)  McKinney retrouve momentanément son siège de représentante de l’Etat de Géorgie en 2004 mais le perd à nouveau aux primaires démocrates d’août 2006, un scrutin marqué par la révélation de la présence, au sein de l’équipe chargée de sa sécurité et jusque dans son QG de campagne, de membres du New Black Panther Party, organisation suprématiste noir ouvertement antisémite (…) formation dissidente du Black Panther Party historique. (…) Pour McKinney, l’explication de cette seconde défaite tient en deux mots : « lobby sioniste ». (…) La décennie 2000-2010 l’a vu passer du respectable Parti démocrate – dont elle claqua la porte en 2007 – aux marges les plus nauséabondes de la scène politique américaine. Parallèlement à la fondation de son propre mouvement, « Dignity », sur le modèle de celui créé en Grande-Bretagne par son ami George Galloway, elle n’a eu de cesse de resserrer ses liens avec cette nébuleuse parfois qualifiée de « rouge-brune » où se croisent, se rencontrent et se mêlent militants pro-palestiniens radicaux, activistes islamistes, suprématistes noirs et racistes d’extrême droite. Le Southern Poverty Law Center (…) a consacré un article à Cynthia McKinney, soulignant ses flirts poussés avec le petit monde des négationnistes. (…) McKinney est l’une des personnalités phares du 9/11 Truth Movement ; elle fréquente des antisémites notoires qui pensent que tous les maux de ce monde prennent leur source dans une vaste conspiration judéo-maçonnique ourdie depuis des siècles ; elle explique ses échecs électoraux par le pouvoir « impitoyable » du « lobby sioniste » ; elle considère que Barack Obama aspire à « créer un Etat policier » aux Etats-Unis (…)… Mais n’allez surtout pas dire à Cynthia McKinney qu’elle est une conspirationniste : elle croira que vous faites partie d’un complot visant à la discréditer. Conspiracy watch
Le 17 septembre 2001, la chaîne libanaise du Hezbollah ouvre son journal avec un scoop qu’elle attribue au journal jordanien Al-Watan, lui-même informé par « des sources diplomatiques arabes » : 4 000 Juifs ne sont pas venus travailler au World Trade Center, avertis par le Mossad de l’imminence d’une attaque menée par des agents israéliens. Dans les jours qui suivent, des dizaines de journaux arabes ou musulmans, à Londres, au Caire, à Téhéran, à Damas, à Riyad, rapportent l’affaire des 4 000 Juifs manquants.  Le 19 septembre 2001, en direct sur Al-Jazira, le présentateur vedette Faycal Al-Qassem avance qu’« aucun des 4 000 Juifs travaillant au WTC n’est venu travailler le 11 septembre ». La chaîne qatarie est potentiellement regardée par quarante millions de téléspectateurs. Al-Qassem sera suspendu quelques semaines par sa hiérarchie. Le 21 septembre, la Pravda russe emboîte le pas, sous la signature d’Irina Malenko, reprenant pratiquement mot pour mot les « révélations » d’Al-Manar. (…) Le chiffre de 4 000 Juifs est totalement imaginaire. Personne ne peut dire avec certitude combien de Juifs travaillaient dans les tours, dans la mesure où, fort heureusement, personne ne tenait de registre des Juifs du World Trade Center. Pour savoir combien sont morts dans les tours, on en est réduit à compter les noms à consonance juive parmi les patronymes des victimes. Ils sont nombreux, entre trois et quatre cents : Adler, Aron, Berger, Bernstein, Cohen, Eichler, Eisenberg, etc. La folie de certains esprits oblige à dresser des listes, une pratique de sinistre mémoire. Alors pourquoi précisément ce chiffre ? On en trouve trace dans une interview donnée par un diplomate israélien en poste à New York le matin des attentats. Celui-ci déclarait que ses services avaient reçu 4 000 appels téléphoniques d’Israéliens, inquiets pour leurs proches, citoyens israéliens vivant ou travaillant à Manhattan. Comment cette brève s’est métamorphosée en la théorie d’Al-Manar que l’on sait ? Insondables sont les mystères de l’imagination lorsqu’elle est en proie à la paranoïa, au dogmatisme et à la bêtise. Sans doute aussi les journalistes de la chaîne libanaise n’ont-ils vu que peu d’inconvénients à prendre des libertés avec la déontologie. Al-Manar TV est en effet la propriété d’un groupe en bonne place sur la liste des organisations terroristes du département d’État américain : le Hezbollah, le « parti de Dieu » télécommandé par l’Iran. Après avoir révélé le scoop prouvant l’implication du Mossad, le présentateur avait avancé un argument supplémentaire : « Les seuls à profiter de cet acte de terrorisme sont les Juifs ». Autrement dit : à qui profite le crime ? (…) Mahmud Bakri, le représentant officiel d’Al-Manar dans la capitale égyptienne (…) n’est pas directement à l’origine de l’information délirante sur les Juifs du WTC, puisqu’elle venait du siège de Beyrouth, mais il continue d’en défendre la véracité. (…) Pour preuve, il se livre à un jeu de questions-réponses : « Pourquoi pas le Mossad ? S’agit-il d’un simple accident normal effectué par de jeunes Arabes ou s’agit-il d’un complot ? Car il faut lier ces événements avec leur suite, la guerre contre le terrorisme et la destruction de pays arabes musulmans, dans le cadre d’un plan américain qui vise à servir les intérêts israéliens en premier lieu. Et si en plus on voit qu’il y a un soutien américain à Israël hors du commun, on peut arriver à la conclusion que le 11 septembre était un complot israélien ». Argument classique des aficionados du complot, à Paris comme au Caire, qui consiste à inverser les faits et les conséquences, au nom du non moins classique « à qui profite le crime ? ». Conspiracy watch

Vous souvenez-vous des Israéliens dansants ?

A l’heure où entre la France et l’Allemagne la série noire d’attaques islamistes (pas moins de six en à peine deux semaines)  …
Et malgré tant les dénégations de CNN (« pas de lien » entre elles mais pourquoi semblent-ils tous s’appeler – sauf rares exceptions – Mohamed ou Ali et apprecier les Allahu akbar ?) …
Ressemble de plus en plus furieusement, jusqu’aux attaques à l’intérieur de lieux de culte, à une intifada

Devinez sur qui courent les rumeurs  les plus folles …

Pour Nice comme pour les autres attentats depuis ceux de Charlie hebdo …

Ou même depuis le 11 septembre avec sans compter ceux qui –  à 300 ou 400 près – avaient été « prévenus »

Les fameux «Israéliens dansants» …

 Coupables de s’être réjouits un peu tôt qu’Israël allait avoir «maintenant l’espoir que le monde nous comprendra» ?

Une ex-membre du Congrès prétend qu’Israël est derrière les massacres européens
Cynthia McKinney a posté le lien d’une vidéo « prouvant » qu’Israël est responsable des attaques de Nice et Munich, car un photographe allemand aurait assisté aux deux drames et est marié à une ancien députée de la Knesset

25 juillet 2016

Une ancienne membre du Congrès des États-Unis a affirmé sur Twitter qu’un photographe israélien avait été sur place pour les massacres à Nice et Munich, prouvant qu’Israël avait un lien avec ces deux attaques.

Cynthia McKinney, une démocrate et ancienne membre de la Chambre des représentants de la Géorgie, a posté une vidéo sur Twitter avec le message : « le même photographe israélien prend en photo les tragédies de Nice et Munich. Quelle en était la probabilité ? Vous souvenez-vous des Israéliens qui dansent ? … »

La vidéo affirme que Richard Gutjahr, un journaliste allemand marié à une ancienne membre de la Knesset, l’Israélienne Einat Wilf, était présent à la fois sur les lieux du saccage par un chauffeur de camion à Nice, en France, au début du mois qui a fait 84 morts, et lors d’une fusillade dans un centre commercial à Munich, où neuf adolescents ont été tués.

Le profil Twitter de Gutjahr montre qu’il a posté des photos de Nice, mais pas de Munich. Il n’aurait pas pris la nationalité israélienne.

« Les Israéliens qui dansent » se réfère à une théorie du complot largement discréditée alléguant que cinq hommes israéliens ont été arrêtés dans le New Jersey, le 11 septembre 2001, après avoir été vus célébrant l’attaque terroriste.

Dans un tweet antérieur, McKinney avait demandé « pourquoi étaient-ils en train de danser dans le parc alors que les Américains étaient en train de mourir ? Pourquoi étaient-ils dans le parc en premier lieu ? »

McKinney, qui a été à la Chambre des représentants de la Géorgie de 1992 à 2002, a été connue pendant son mandat pour faire des remarques incendiaires et a été accusée d’antisémitisme par le passé. En 2002, elle a perdu la primaire démocrate, un jour après que son père soit apparu à la télévision disant que les « Juifs ont acheté tout le monde … J-E-W-S ».

Dans son message original, McKinney a posté un lien vers une vidéo intitulée « Richard Gutjahr le photographe allemand à Nice et à Munich – Connexions israéliennes » postée par une chaîne YouTube qui semble se spécialiser dans les théories du complot et les sentiments antisémites.

Dans la vidéo, dont la séquence d’ouverture est un symbole des Illuminati, le narrateur semble se demander comment « ils » pourraient être « tellement négligeants » qu’ils ont envoyé Gutjahr sur les deux attaques.

« Le fait que ce gars-là se trouvait aux deux endroits, il n’y a aucun moyen que ce soit une coïncidence », allègue l’homme, ajoutant qu’il est « clair à 100 % que les empreintes digitales d’Israël sont sur tous ces événements ».

)

Cette conclusion est fondée sur une vérification joyeuse de la page Wikipedia de Wilf qui confirme qu’elle est Israélienne et a servi dans une unité de renseignement supérieur dans l’armée israélienne.

« Nice est une opération déguisée et Munich est soit une opération déguisée, soit un canular », dit l’homme, qui n’apparaît pas dans la vidéo.

Voir aussi:

 Ex-candidate du Green Party aux présidentielles américaines de 2008, Cynthia McKinney est aussi une figure incontournable du 9/11 Truth Movement. Peu connue en France, cette militante de 55 ans a pourtant une réputation sulfureuse outre-Atlantique. Elle a été récemment épinglée par le Southern Poverty Law Center pour son flirt poussé avec les milieux négationnistes.

9 octobre 2009. Le maire du 2ème Arrondissement de Paris accueille dans ses murs une conférence de presse de Cynthia McKinney. Rien d’exceptionnel à ce qu’un élu vert parisien reçoive la candidate du Green Party aux dernières élections présidentielles américaines. Comme son homologue héxagonal, le Green Party est signataire de la Charte des Verts mondiaux et partage ses préoccupations écologiques. Pourtant, Cynthia McKinney ne s’est pas attardée sur la protection de l’environnement ou le réchauffement climatique. Ce jour-là, cette ex-membre du Congrès est venue parler… du 11-Septembre. C’est d’ailleurs à l’initiative privée d’Alix Dreux-Boucard, alias AtMOH, fondateur et animateur du site conspirationniste ReOpen911, que la conférence a été organisée.

Cynthia McKinney est une pionnière du 9/11 Truth Movement. Le 25 mars 2002, elle suggère à l’antenne de la radio californienne KPFA que l’Administration Bush, parce qu’elle a tiré profit des attentats du 11 septembre 2001, les aurait en fait délibérément laissé se produire. Depuis plusieurs années, elle n’a de cesse d’apporter sa caution à des partisans de la thèse de l’inside job (complot interne), comme Michael C. Ruppert, un ancien inspecteur de la police de Los Angeles qui s’est rendu célèbre dans les années 1990 pour avoir accusé la CIA d’être derrière un vaste trafic de cocaïne au cœur même des Etats-Unis. Revenu sur le devant de la scène à la faveur des attentats du 11-Septembre, Ruppert a publié un livre intitulé The Truth and Lies of 9/11 dans lequel il défend l’idée que l’Administration Bush mais aussi, Enron, le Mossad et les services secrets pakistanais seraient directement impliqués dans les attentats de 2001.

Certes, en matière de conspirationnisme, McKinney est loin d’en être à son premier coup d’essai. Chris Suellentrop, du magazine en ligne Slate.com, constatait en 2002 que « sur les dix années qu’elle a passées au Congrès, il est difficile d’en trouver une seule où elle ne s’est pas livré à des accusations bizarres ou à de folles théories du complot ». Nourrissant une défiance quasi-paranoïaque à l’égard des autorités fédérales, McKinney est par exemple persuadée que le programme Cointelpro (acronyme d’un programme du FBI mis en œuvre entre 1956 et 1971) est toujours en vigueur et qu’il ne serait pas étranger aux assassinats de JFK, Martin Luther King, Bob Kennedy ou du chanteur de rap Tupac Shakur. Elle a même commencé une thèse sur le sujet.

Il y a deux ans, en pleine campagne présidentielle, à Oakland, le fief historique des Black Panthers, McKinney cite des « témoignages » – anonymes, cela va sans dire – selon lesquels l’armée américaine aurait profité de la confusion régnant durant l’ouragan Katrina pour assassiner d’une balle dans la tête pas moins de 5 000 prisonniers avant de se débarrasser de leurs cadavres dans un marais de Louisiane… Des propos qui portent un grave coup à la crédibilité du Green Party et expliquent, peut-être, le pourcentage dérisoire des suffrages qui se sont portés sur la candidature McKinney : 0,12%. Un score très inférieur à celui de Ralph Nader. Inférieur également aux scores des deux autres « petits » candidats, Bob Barr et Chuck Baldwin.

« Un peu de paranoïa ne peut pas nous faire de mal »

McKinney professe un internationalisme consistant, pour l’essentiel, à accuser le gouvernement de son pays et l’Etat d’Israël d’être à l’origine de tous les maux de la planète. A contrario, elle excelle à prendre la défense des régimes les plus liberticides, pourvus qu’ils « résistent à l’Empire ». Ainsi McKinney n’hésite-t-elle pas à chanter les louanges du régime de Robert Mugabe au Zimbabwe ou à exalter la « résistance » du Hamas et du Hezbollah. Concernant le génocide rwandais, l’ancienne membre du Congrès américain partage les thèses très controversées d’un Pierre Péan ou d’un Charles Onana, dont elle a préfacé, l’année dernière, un livre intitulé : Ces tueurs tutsi au cœur de la tragédie congolaise. Pour elle, « ce qui s’est passé au Rwanda n’est pas un génocide planifié par les Hutu. C’est un changement de régime. Un coup d’Etat terroriste perpétré par Kagame avec l’aide de forces étrangères ».

McKinney a également relayé sans scrupule la théorie du complot selon laquelle les Etats-Unis dissimulerait au monde l’existence d’immenses réserves de pétrole au large des côtes d’Haïti, une richesse qu’ils convoiteraient depuis des décennies, privant ainsi scandaleusement le peuple haïtien de ses ressources naturelles. Cette intox a été propagée sur internet à partir d’une interview de deux conférenciers haïtiens, Ginette et Daniel Mathurin . Sans surprise, McKinney s’appuie sur les prétendues « recherches » de ce couple de scientifiques – dont aucun n’a la moindre qualification en matière de prospection pétrolière – dans un article mis en ligne récemment sur le site du Green Party, et dont ReOpen911 a gracieusement assuré la traduction en français.

McKinney assume. « Les Afro-Américains ont toujours su, a-t-elle un jour répondu à un journaliste du mensuel de gauche The Progressive, qu’un petit peu de paranoïa ne pouvait pas nous faire de mal ». Se comparant souvent à Rosa Parks, Cynthia McKinney se voit elle-même en martyr de la liberté d’expression, en pasionaria de la Vérité : « J’aurai probablement des problèmes pour ce que je viens de vous dire ce soir, confie-t-elle un soir d’été de l’année 2003, devant un parterre de fidèles de l’Eglise baptiste abyssinienne de Harlem. Mais ce ne sera pas la première fois que j’aurai des problèmes pour avoir dit la vérité. Et je continuerai à dire la vérité. Comme je l’ai déjà dit auparavant, je ne m’assiérai pas et je ne me tairai pas ».

« Les sionistes ont réussi à me mettre à la porte du Congrès »

Dans son ouvrage A Culture of Conspiracy: Apocalyptic Visions in Contemporary America (University of California Press, 2003), le politologue Michael Barkun classe Cynthia McKinney parmi ces « rebelles de la politique » dont les outrances s’inscrivent dans une stratégie du dérapage n’ayant d’autre fin que de faire parler d’eux. En 2002, quelques mois après ses premières philippiques conspirationnistes sur le 11-Septembre, elle perd le siège qu’elle occupait à la Chambre des représentants depuis 1993 à l’occasion d’une primaire démocrate. La candidate malheureuse explique sa défaite par l’hostilité des « médias » à son encontre. Son père, l’ancien représentant Bill McKinney, qui est aussi le plus proche conseiller politique de Cynthia, fait valoir une toute autre interprétation : la veille du scrutin, interrogé sur l’un des soutiens de sa fille, il incrimine « les Juifs [qui] ont acheté tout le monde », avant d’épeler chacune des lettres du mot « Jews » pour s’assurer que chacun comprenne clairement ce qu’il est en train de dire. Une déclaration que Cynthia McKinney n’a jamais cru devoir désavouer.

Malaise au sein du Parti démocrate. D’autant plus palpable que quelques mois plus tôt, le porte-plume de Cynthia McKinney, Raeed Tayeh, l’auteur de la plupart de ses discours à l’époque, avait déclaré à la presse que « l’occupation israélienne [devait] finir, y compris au Congrès ». Une déclaration plus qu’ambigüe, qui s’ajoute à la réputation déjà sulfureuse de Cynthia McKinney : dès 1994, la deuxième année de son mandat à la Chambre des représentants, McKinney avait refusé, au nom de la liberté d’expression, de voter une résolution condamnant les propos haineux d’un ténor de la Nation of Islam, Khalid Abdul Muhammad. Peu après, elle était apparue aux côtés du chef de ce mouvement, le prédicateur antisémite Louis Farrakhan, lors d’une conférence organisée à l’Université Howard.

Les violentes diatribes anti-israéliennes dans lesquelles se lance Cynthia McKinney lui valent une popularité réelle au sein de la communauté arabo-musulmane américaine, particulièrement sensible à la cause palestinienne. En 2002, le Washington Post révèle ainsi que les trois-quarts des fonds levés par McKinney pour sa campagne proviennent de donateurs issus de la communauté musulmane ne résidant même pas dans le 4ème district de l’Etat de Géorgie dans lequel elle se présentait.

McKinney retrouve momentanément son siège de représentante de l’Etat de Géorgie en 2004 mais le perd à nouveau aux primaires démocrates d’août 2006, un scrutin marqué par la révélation de la présence, au sein de l’équipe chargée de sa sécurité et jusque dans son QG de campagne, de membres du New Black Panther Party, organisation suprématiste noir ouvertement antisémite dirigé par Malik Zulu Shabazz. Les New Black Panthers sont une formation dissidente du Black Panther Party historique. A l’heure actuelle, leur représentant en France n’est autre que Kémi Séba, le très médiatique fondateur de la Tribu Ka .

Pour McKinney, l’explication de cette seconde défaite tient en deux mots : « lobby sioniste ». Le 14 août dernier, lors d’un dîner organisé par le Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), elle expliquait ainsi que le « le lobby sioniste dresse sa tête hideuse dans bien trop de facettes de la vie de ce pays, en particulier dans la vie politique » (sic) et que « les sionistes [avaient] réussi à [la] mettre à la porte du Congrès à deux reprises » (voir la vidéo).

Descente aux enfers

La mue de Cynthia McKinney s’est véritablement opérée au cours de ces dernières années. La décennie 2000-2010 l’a vu passer du respectable Parti démocrate – dont elle claqua la porte en 2007 – aux marges les plus nauséabondes de la scène politique américaine. Parallèlement à la fondation de son propre mouvement, « Dignity », sur le modèle de celui créé en Grande-Bretagne par son ami George Galloway, elle n’a eu de cesse de resserrer ses liens avec cette nébuleuse parfois qualifiée de « rouge-brune » où se croisent, se rencontrent et se mêlent militants pro-palestiniens radicaux, activistes islamistes, suprématistes noirs et racistes d’extrême droite.

Le Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) est l’une des organisation de défense des droits de l’homme les plus actives outre-Atlantique. Il publie chaque année un rapport sur les groupes extrémistes américains qui fait autorité. A l’hiver 2009, il a consacré un article à Cynthia McKinney, soulignant ses flirts poussés avec le petit monde des négationnistes. L’ancienne élue démocrate a en effet fraternisé publiquement avec plusieurs figures notoires de l’antisémitisme contemporain. Parcourant le monde à l’invitation de l’ancien Premier ministre malaisien Mahathir Mohamad , (« l’un de mes héros » écrit-elle à son propos sur le site du Green Party), elle a également fait l’éloge d’un livre de Matthias Chang sur la crise financière (voir ici ). Matthias Chang recycle ouvertement les écrits du propagandiste nazi américain Eustace Mullins et fût parmi les invités de la conférence négationniste organisée à Téhéran en 2006 à l’instigation du président Ahmadinejad. Cela ne semble pas ébranler McKinney. Tout comme elle n’est nullement gênée de se faire photographier bras dessus bras dessous en compagnie des négationnistes Michele Renouf (elle aussi présente à la conférence iranienne de 2006), Israël Shamir (de son vrai nom : Adam Ermash ; voir ici et ), ou encore du théoricien islamiste David Musa Pidcock (qu’elle affuble du petit nom affectueux de « My London friend »). Ce Britannique est le fondateur de l’Islamic Party of Britain. Son livre, Satanic Voices Ancient & Modern (1992), dénonce une conspiration séculaire impliquant la franc-maçonnerie, la famille Rockefeller, les grandes compagnies pétrolières, le Council on Foreign Relations (CFR), les Illuminati et les « Sionistes Lucifériens ».

Le 30 avril 2009, Cynthia McKinney passe pour la première fois dans une émission de radio diffusée sur internet animée par Ognir alias Noel Ryan. L’émission est consacrée obsessionnellement à la dénonciation des « Juifs sionistes ». Face à McKinney, Ognir explique que Rahm Emanuel, le chef des services administratifs de la Maison Blanche, a une « nationalité juive et une loyauté juive ». Il manipulerait même le président Obama à travers une grande conspiration sioniste internationale. Pendant l’interview, les « sionistes » sont accusés d’encourager le cannabis thérapeutique et le mariage gay dans le seul but d’« affaiblir » la société américaine, de la rendre moins résistante à leurs projets maléfiques. McKinney ne se démarque pas des propos d’Ognir, l’approuvant même lorsqu’il explique que les « sionistes » contrôlent la Maison Blanche et le Congrès et abondant dans son sens en expliquant que des espions « sionistes » ont infiltré sa propre campagne pour le Congrès. Pour McKinney, cette émission de radio n’est pas un dérapage. Elle y retourne un mois plus tard.

En juin 2009, McKinney continue sa descente aux enfers. Elle est reçue à trois reprises dans l’émission de radio de Daryl Bradford Smith (ici, et encore ). Elle le retrouve de nouveau le 14 janvier 2010, en compagnie d’Ognir cette fois-ci. Daryl Bradford Smith est un autre obsédé du complot juif. Son site web, où l’on trouve des interviews radio de David Pidcock, Israël Shamir et Eustace Mullins ainsi que les signatures de Christopher Bollyn et Eric Hufschmid (voir ici), fait la promotion des Protocoles des Sages de Sion – le célèbre faux antisémite –, du Juif International d’Henry Ford, ou encore de La Synagogue de Satan d’Andrew Carrington Hitchcock. On y trouve même des raretés comme la traduction d’un livre publié dans l’Allemagne hitlérienne sur la pratique du meurtre rituel chez les juifs ou encore un ouvrage de Leslie Fry intitulé La Guerre contre la Royauté du Christ, présentant le communisme comme un « complot judéo-bolchevique contre la Chrétienté »… Bref, la bibliothèque du parfait petit nazillon. La page d’accueil du site est bandée dans toute sa largeur par une phrase en majuscule indiquant : « LE MONDE DOIT DECLARER LA GUERRE A L’ETAT D’ISRAEL ! ».

L’interview avec McKinney prend un tour stupéfiant lorsque Daryl Bradford Smith suggère avec insistance que le Mossad est derrière les attentats du 11-Septembre et se met à citer plusieurs noms juifs – parmi lesquels ceux de Larry Silverstein (le propriétaire des immeubles du World Trade Centrer) et de Ari Fleischer (ancien porte-parole de la Maison Blanche sous Georges W. Bush) – avant de déclarer : « Tous ces gens, en fait, sont une cinquième colonne qui a envahi la structure de contrôle de notre gouvernement. Et ils sont fortement impliqués au Congrès, ils ont un contrôle complet de l’exécutif. Maintenant, comment est-ce que nous pouvons faire pour nous libérer de l’emprise de ce genre de gang criminel ? » Et Cynthia McKinney de répondre : « Eh bien… les gens doivent se lever ! L’une des choses que vous avez dite, je dois le dire, j’ai entendu un discours extraordinaire donné par Lord Levy, qui est, je crois, à la Chambre des Lords britannique. Et le langage qu’il a utilisé était absolument incroyable ! En gros, il a dit que seulement 3% des Israéliens ont voté pour la paix… il a parlé d’Israël comme d’un Etat indéfendable… En étant aux Etats-Unis, nous n’entendons jamais ce genre de discours. C’était un membre juif de la Chambre des Lords qui disait cela ».

« Je ne suis pas une conspirationniste ». C’est ce que Cynthia McKinney a déclaré devant la caméra de John-Paul Lepers lors de son dernier séjour parisien. McKinney est l’une des personnalités phares du 9/11 Truth Movement ; elle fréquente des antisémites notoires qui pensent que tous les maux de ce monde prennent leur source dans une vaste conspiration judéo-maçonnique ourdie depuis des siècles ; elle explique ses échecs électoraux par le pouvoir « impitoyable » du « lobby sioniste » ; elle considère que Barack Obama aspire à « créer un Etat policier » aux Etats-Unis (lire sa dernière déclaration)… Mais n’allez surtout pas dire à Cynthia McKinney qu’elle est une conspirationniste : elle croira que vous faites partie d’un complot visant à la discréditer.

Voir aussi:

Le rôle d’Israël dans les événements du 11 Septembre 2001 — qui déterminent le 21ème siècle — fait l’objet d’âpres controverses, ou plutôt d’un véritable tabou au sein même du « Mouvement pour la vérité sur le 11-Septembre » (9/11 Truth Movement) provoquant la mise à l’écart de l’homme par qui le scandale arriva, Thierry Meyssan. La plupart des associations militantes, mobilisées derrière le slogan « 9/11 was an Inside Job » (Le 11-Septembre était une opération intérieure), restent discrètes sur les pièces à conviction mettant en cause les services secrets de l’État hébreux. Laurent Guyénot fait le point sur quelques données aussi incontestables que méconnues, et analyse les mécanismes du déni.

28 juin 2013

Tandis que le rôle d’Israël dans la déstabilisation du monde post-11-Septembre devient de plus en plus évident, l’idée qu’une faction de likoudniks, aidés par leurs alliés infiltrés dans l’appareil d’Etat US, sont responsables de l’opération sous fausse bannière du 11-Septembre devient plus difficile à refouler, et quelques personnalités ont le courage de l’énoncer publiquement. Francesco Cossiga, président d’Italie entre 1985 et 1992, déclara le 30 novembre 2007 au quotidien Corriere della Sera  : « On nous fait croire que Ben Laden aurait avoué l’attaque du 11 septembre 2001 sur les deux tours à New York — alors qu’en fait les services secrets américains et européens savent parfaitement que cette attaque désastreuse fut planifiée et exécutée par la CIA et le Mossad, dans le but d’accuser les pays arabes de terrorisme et de pouvoir ainsi attaquer l’Irak et l’Afghanistan [1]. » Alan Sabrosky, ancien professeur du U.S. Army War College et à la U.S. Military Academy, n’hésite pas à clamer sa conviction que le 11-Septembre est « une opération classiquement orchestrée par le Mossad » réalisée avec des complicités au sein du gouvernement états-unien, et sa voix est relayée avec force par quelques sites de vétérans de l’armée U.S., dégoutés par les guerres ignobles qu’on leur a fait faire au nom du mensonge du 11-Septembre ou de celui des armes de destruction massives de Saddam Hussein [2].

Les arguments en faveur de l’hypothèse du Mossad ne tiennent pas seulement à la réputation du service secret le plus puissant du monde, qu’un rapport de la U.S. Army School for Advanced Military Studies (cité par le Washington Times la veille du 11-Septembre), décrit comme : « Sournois. impitoyabe et rusé. Capable de commettre une attaque sur les forces américaines et de les déguiser en un acte commis par les Palestiniens/Arabes [3]. » L’implication du Mossad, associé à d’autres unités d’élite israéliennes, est rendue évidente par un certain nombre de faits peu connus.

Le livre électronique de Hicham Hamza, Israël et le 11-Septembre : le Grand Tabou (2013) réunit l’ensemble du dossier à charge d’Israël, avec une rigueur irréprochable et l’ensemble des sources aisément accessibles.

Les Israéliens dansants

Sait-on par exemple que les seules personnes arrêtées le jour même et en relation avec les attaques terroristes du 11-Septembre sont des Israéliens [4] ? L’information a été rapportée dès le lendemain par le journaliste Paulo Lima dans The Record, quotidien du comté de Bergen dans le New Jersey, d’après des sources policières. Immédiatement après le premier impact sur la tour Nord, trois individus furent aperçus par divers témoins sur le toit d’un van stationné à Liberty State Park dans Jersey City, « en train d’exulter » (celebrating), de « sauter de joie » (jumping up and down), et de se photographier avec les tours jumelles en arrière-plan. Ils déplacèrent ensuite leur van sur un autre parking de Jersey City, où d’autres témoins les virent se livrer aux mêmes réjouissances ostentatoires. La police émit aussitôt une alerte BOLO (be-on-the-look-out) : « Véhicule possiblement lié à l’attaque terroriste de New York. Van blanc Chevrolet 2000 avec une plaque du New Jersey et un signe ‘Urban Moving Systems’ à l’arrière, a été vu au Liberty State Park, Jersey City, NJ, au moment du premier impact d’avion de ligne dans le World Trade Center. Trois individus avec le van ont été vus se réjouissant après l’impact initial et l’explosion qui s’en suivit [5]. » Le van fut intercepté par la police quelques heures plus tard, avec à son bord cinq jeunes Israéliens : Sivan et Paul Kurzberg, Yaron Shmuel, Oded Ellner et Omer Marmari. Contraint physiquement de sortir du véhicule et plaqué à terre, le conducteur, Sivan Kurzberg, lança cette phrase étrange : « On est Israéliens. On n’est pas votre problème. Vos problèmes sont nos problèmes. Les Palestiniens sont le problème [6]. » Les sources policières qui informèrent Paulo Lima étaient convaincues de l’implication de ces Israéliens dans les attentats de la matinée : « Il y avait des cartes de la ville dans le van avec certains points surlignés. On aurait dit qu’ils étaient au courant, […] qu’ils savaient ce qui allait se passer lorsqu’ils étaient à Liberty State Park [7]. » On trouva également sur eux des passeports de nationalités diverses, près de 6 000 dollars en espèces et des billets d’avion open pour l’étranger. Les frères Kurzberg furent formellement identifiés comme agents du Mossad. Les cinq Israéliens travaillaient officiellement pour une compagnie de déménagement nommée Urban Moving Systems, dont les employés étaient majoritairement israéliens. « J’étais en pleurs. Ces types blaguaient et ça me perturbait [8], » révéla au Record un des rares employés non-israéliens. Le 14 septembre, après avoir reçu la visite de la police, le propriétaire de l’entreprise, Dominik Otto Suter, quittait le pays pour Tel-Aviv.

L’information divulguée par le Record, confirmée par le rapport de police, a été reprise par des sites d’investigation comme le Wayne Madsen Report (14 septembre 2005) et Counterpunch (7 février 2007). Elle fut aussi rapportée dans quelques grands médias comme mais d’une façon qui minimisait sa portée : le New York Times (21 novembre 2001) omettait de préciser la nationalité des individus, tout comme Fox News et l’agence Associated Press. Le Washington Post (23 novembre 2001) disait bien qu’ils étaient Israéliens, mais passa sous silence leur apparente préconnaissance de l’événement. En revanche, The Forward (15 mars 2002), magazine de la communauté juive new-yorkaise, révéla, d’après une source anonyme du renseignement états-unien, qu’Urban Moving Systems était une antenne sous couverture du Mossad (ce qui ne l’empécha pas de bénéficier d’un prêt fédéral de 498 750 dollars, comme le révèlent les archives du fisc [9].

Le FBI diligenta sur cette affaire une enquête consignée dans un rapport de 579 pages, partiellement déclassifié en 2005 (il le sera totalement en 2035). Le journaliste indépendant Hicham Hamza a analysé ce rapport en détail dans son livre : Israël et le le 11-Septembre : le Grand Tabou. Il en ressort plusieurs éléments accablants. Tout d’abord, les photos prises par ces jeunes Israéliens les montrent effectivement dans des attitudes de célébration devant la tour Nord en feu : « Ils souriaient, ils s’embrassaient et ils se tappaient mutuellement dans les mains. » Pour expliquer cette attitude, les intéressés dirent qu’ils s’étaient simplement réjoui « que les États-Unis auraient maintenant à prendre des mesures pour arrêter le terrorisme dans le monde » (alors que, à ce point, une majorité de gens pensait à un accident plutôt qu’à un acte terroriste). Plus grâve, un témoin au moins les a vus positionnés dès 8 heures, soit avant qu’un avion ne percute la première tour, tandis que d’autres certifient qu’ils prenaient déjà des photos cinq minutes après, ce que confirment leurs photos. Un ancien employé confirma au FBI l’ambiance fanatiquement pro-israélienne et anti-américaine qui régnait dans l’entreprise, prêtant même à son directeur Dominik Otto Suter ces paroles : « Donnez-nous vingt ans et nous nous emparerons de vos médias et détruirons votre pays. » Les cinq Israéliens arrêtés étaient en contact avec une autre entreprise de déménagement dénommée Classic International Movers, dont quatre employés avaient été interrogés indépendamment pour leur liens avec les dix-neufs pirates de l’air présumés. L’un d’eux avait téléphoné à « un individu en Amérique du Sud possédant des liens authentiques avec les militants islamiques au Moyen Orient. » Enfin, « un chien renifleur donna un résultat positif pour la présence de traces d’explosifs dans le véhicule [10]. »

Comme le remarque Hamza, la conclusion du rapport laisse sonjeur : le FBI informe la police locale, qui détient les suspects, « que le FBI n’a plus aucun intérêt à enquêter sur les détenus et qu’il convient d’entamer les procédures d’immigration appropriées [11]. » Une lettre du Service fédéral de l’immigration et de la naturalisation prouve qu’en fait la direction du FBI avait recommandé la clôture de l’enquête dès le 24 septembre 2001. Les cinq Israéliens passèrent cependant 71 jours dans une prison de Brooklyn, au cours desquels ils refusèrent puis échouèrent plusieurs fois au détecteur de mensonge. Puis ils furent rapatriés sous la simple charge de visa violations.

Omer Marmari, Oded Ellner et Yaron Shmuel, trois des cinq « Israéliens dansants », sont invités à témoigner dans une émission israélienne dès leur retour en novembre 2001. Niant être membres du Mossad, l’un d’eux déclara candidement : « Notre but était d’enregistrer l’événement. »

On doit, pour finir, évoquer un détail essentiel de cette affaire, qui apporte peut-être une explication supplémentaire au comportement exhubérant de ces jeunes Isréaliens : certains témoins précisent, dans leurs appels à la police, que les individus se réjouissant sur le toit de leur van semblaient « arabes » ou « Palestiniens ». En particulier, peu après l’effondrement des tours, un appel anonyme à la police de Jersey City, rapporté le jour même par NBC News, signale « un van blanc, avec deux ou trois types à l’intérieur, ils ressemblent à des Palestiniens et ils tournent autour d’un bâtiment » ; l’un d’eux « mélange des choses et il a cet uniforme ‘sheikh’. […] Il est habillé comme un arabe [12]. » Tout porte à croire que ces individus étaient précisément les cinq Israéliens arrêtés plus tard. Deux hypothèses viennent à l’esprit : ou bien nos faux déménageurs se sont effectivement livrés à une mise en scène pour apparaître comme arabes/Palestiniens, ou bien le ou les témoins les ayant décrits comme tels étaient des complices. Dans un cas comme dans l’autre, il ressort que leur but était d’initier la rumeur médiatique qu’on avait repéré des musulmans qui non seulement se réjouissaient des attentats, mais en avaient préconnaissance. L’information fut effectivement diffusée sur certaines radios dès midi, et sur NBC News dans l’après-midi. Je penche personnellement pour la seconde hypothèse (les informateurs complices plutôt que de vrais déguisement arabes), car le rapport de police ne signale pas de vêtement exotique trouvé dans le van, mais surtout parce que l’informateur cité plus haut, qui insiste sur ce détail vestimentaire, semble avoir voulu induire en erreur la police sur la localisation exacte du van ; ce dernier ne fut intercepté que parce que la police, au lieu de se contenter de cette localisation, barra tous les ponts et souterrains entre New Jersey et New York. Mais l’important est ceci : Si les Israéliens n’avaient pas été interpelés en fin d’après-midi, l’histoire aurait probablement fait la une des journaux sous le titre : The Dancing Arabs. Au lieu de ça, elle fut totalement étouffée et ne circula que confidentiellement, sous le titre the dancing Israelis, ou the highfivers.

Ehud Barak, ancien chef du Renseignement militaire israélien (Sayeret Matkal), était premier ministre de juillet 1999 à mars 2001. Remplacé par Ariel Sharon, il s’installe aux États-Unis comme conseiller pour Electronic Data Systems et pour SCP Partners, une compagnie écran du Mossad spécialisée dans les questions de sécurité qui, avec ses partenaires Metallurg Holdings et Advanced Metallurgical, avait la capacité de produire de la nano-thermite. SCP Partners disposait d’un bureau à moins de dix kilomètres d’Urban Moving Systems. Une heure après la désintégration des tours, Ehud Barak est sur le plateau de BBC World pour désigner Ben Laden comme principal suspect(Bollyn, Solving 9-11, p. 278-280).

200 espions experts en explosifs

Peu de gens, même parmi les 9/11 Truthers, connaissent cette histoire d’ « Israéliens dansants » (on attend toujours, par exemple, que l’association Reopen 9/11 en parle sur son site francophone, pourtant très pointus sur tous les autres aspects du dossier). Peu de gens également savent qu’à la date des attentats, les polices fédérales US étaient occupées à démanteler le plus vaste réseau d’espionnage israélien jamais identifié sur le sol états-unien. En mars 2001, le National CounterIntelligence Center (NCIC) avait posté ce message sur son site web : « Durant les dernières six semaines, des employés des bureaux fédéraux situés dans tout les États-Unis ont signalé des activitées suspectes liées à des individus se présentant comme des étudiants étrangers vendant ou livrant des œuvres d’art. » Le NCIC précise que ces individus, de nationalité israélienne, « se sont également rendus aux domiciles privés d’officiers fédéraux sous le prétexte de vendre des objets artistiques [13]. »

Puis dans l’été, la Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), après avoir été visée par un grand nombre d’incidents de ce type, compila un rapport qui sera révélé au public par le Washington Post le 23 novembre 2001, puis dans Le Monde le 14 mars 2002, avant d’être rendu entièrement accessible par le magazine français Intelligence Online. Ce rapport liste 140 Israéliens appréhendés depuis mars 2001. Âgés entre 20 et 30 ans et organisés en équipes de 4 à 8 membres, ils ont visité au moins « 36 sites sensibles du Département de la Défense ». Nombres d’entre eux furent identifiés comme membres du Mossad ou du Aman (renseignement militaire israélien), et six étaient en possession de téléphones payés par un ancien vice-consul israélien. Soixante arrestations eurent encore lieu après le 11-Septembre, ce qui porte à 200 le nombre d’espions Israéliens arrêtés. Tous furent finalement relâchés.

Michael Chertoff, citoyen israélien, fils d’un rabbin orthodoxe et d’une pionnière du Mossad, dirigeait la Criminal Division du Department of Justice en 2001, et fut à ce titre responsable de la rétention et destruction de toutes les preuves concernant le 11-Septembre — des caméras du Pentagone aux poutres du World Trade Center. C’est à lui également que les « Israéliens dansants » doivent leur discret rapatriement. En 2003, il fut nommé à la tête du nouveau Department of Homeland Security, chargé du contre-terrorisme sur le territoire états-unien, ce qui lui permet de contrôler la dissidence tout en continuant à restreindre l’accès au dossier du 11-Septembre à travers la loi Sensitive Security Information.

Le rapport de la DEA conclut que « la nature des comportements des individus […] nous conduit à penser que les incidents constituent peut-être une activité de collecte de renseignement [14]. » Mais la nature des renseignements collectés reste inconnue. Il se pourrait qu’en fait l’espionnage n’ait été qu’une couverture secondaire — un sous-vêtement — de ces Israeli art students, si l’on considère les formations militaires reçues par certains comme demolition/explosive ordnance expert, combat engineer, bomb disposal expert, electronic signal intercept operator, selon la DEA. L’un des agents arrêtés, Peer Segalovitz, « a reconnu qu’il était capable de faire exploser des bâtiments, des ponts, des voitures, et tout ce qu’il voulait [15]. » Pourquoi ces agents israéliens auraient-ils fait diversion sur leur véritable mission par une campagne d’espionnage aussi ostentatoire qu’improductive, curieusement concentrée sur la Drug Enforcement Agency ? La réponse à cette question est suggérée par un lien troublant, de nature géographique, entre ce réseau et les attentats du 11-Septembre.

Selon le rapport de la DEA, « La localité d’Hollywood en Floride semble être le point focal de ces individus [16]. » En effet, plus d’une trentaine des faux étudiants-espions israéliens arrêtés peu avant le 11 septembre vivaient dans ou près de la ville d’Hollywood en Floride, où s’étaient précisément regroupés 15 des 19 prétendus pirates de l’air islamistes (9 à Hollywood même, 6 à proximité). L’un d’eux, Hanan Serfaty, par qui transita au moins 100 000 dollars en trois mois, avait loué deux appartements à Hollywood à proximité immédiate de l’appartement et de la boite postale loués par Mohamed Atta, qu’on nous présentera comme le chef de la bande des pirates de l’air. Quels étaient les rapports entre les « espions israéliens » et les « terroristes islamistes » ? Selon l’explication embarrassée des médias alignés, les premiers ne faisaient que surveiller les seconds. Écoutons par exemple David Pujadas introduisant l’article d’Intelligence Online au journal télévisé du 5 mars 2002 sur France 2 : « Toujours à propos d’Israël, mais concernant l’Afghanistan maintenant, cette affaire d’espionnage, qui sème le trouble : un réseau israélien a été démantelé aux États-Unis, notamment en Floride : l’une de ses missions aurait été de pister les hommes d’Al-Qaïda (c’était avant le 11 septembre). Certaines sources vont même plus loin : elles indiquent que le Mossad n’aurait pas livré toutes les informations en sa possession. » Cette explication euphémique est un bel exemple de damage control. Israël en ressort à peine entachée, puisqu’on ne peut raisonnablement blâmer un service d’espionnage de ne pas partager ses informations. Tout au plus Israël pourra-t-il être accusé d’avoir « laissé faire », ce qui lui garantit l’impunité. Ainsi s’explique, à mon avis, la sous-couverture d’espions des faux étudiants israéliens, en réalité experts en attentats sous fausse bannière. En fait, leur couverture volontairement grossière d’étudiants était faite pour attirer l’attention sur leur couverture secondaire, celle d’espions, qui servirait d’alibi à leur proximité avec les pirates supposés.

Pourquoi Pujadas (propulsé au journal télévisé de France 2 tout juste une semaine avant le 11-Septembre) évoque-t-il l’Afghanistan, qui n’a aucun rapport avec l’information qu’il introduit ? Le lapsus ne peut être que volontaire et illustre « le grand tabou » dont parle Hicham Hamza : ne jamais mentionner le 11-Septembre et Israël dans la même phrase.

La vérité est probablement qu’ils n’espionnaient pas ces pirates, mais qu’ils les manipulaient, les finançaient, et probablement les ont éliminés peu avant le 11-Septembre. Un article du New York Times du 18 février 2009 a établi qu’Ali al-Jarrah, cousin d’un pirate présumé du vol UA93, Ziad al-Jarrah, avait été pendant 25 ans espion pour le Mossad, infiltré dans la résistance palestinienne et dans le Hezbollah depuis 1983. Il est actuellement en prison au Liban. Rappelons également que le Mohamed Atta de Floride était un faux. Le vrai Mohamed Atta, qui téléphona à son père au lendemain des attentats (comme ce dernier le confirma au magazine allemand Bild am Sonntag fin 2002), est décrit par sa famille comme réservé, pieux, évitant les femmes et ayant la phobie des avions. Il s’était fait voler son passeport en 1999 alors qu’il étudiait l’architecture à Hambourg. Le faux Mohamed Atta de Floride vivait avec une strip-teaseuse, mangeait du porc, aimait les voitures rapides, les casinos et la cocaïne. Comme l’a rapporté le South Florida Sun-Sentinel dès le 16 septembre (sous le titre « Suspects’ Actions Don’t Add Up » (« Les comportements des suspects ne collent pas »), suivi par de nombreux quotidiens nationaux, ce Atta s’est saoulé, drogué et a payé les services de plusieurs prostituées dans les semaines et les jours précédant le 11-Septembre, et quatre autres des terroristes suicidaires ont eu des comportements similaires peu compatibles avec des islamistes se préparant à la mort [17].

Le réseau new-yorkais

Selon l’agent renégat Victor Ostrovsky (By Way of Deception, 1990), le Mossad tire son efficacité de son réseau international de sayanim (« collaborateurs »), terme hébreu désignant des juifs vivant hors d’Israël et prêts à accomplir sur demande des actions illégales, sans nécessairement connaître leur finalité. Ils se comptent par milliers aux États-Unis, et particulièrement à New York, où se concentre la communauté juive US. Larry Silverstein, titulaire du bail des tours jumelles depuis avril 2001, apparaît comme l’archétype du sayan du 11-Septembre. Il est membre dirigeant de la United Jewish Appeal Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York, le plus grand leveur de fonds américains pour Israël (après l’État US, qui verse chaque année trois milliards d’aide à Israël). Silverstein était aussi, au moment des attentats, l’ami intime d’Ariel Sharon et de Benjamin Netanyahou, avec qui il est en conversation téléphonique chaque dimanche, selon le journal israélien Haaretz. Le partenaire de Silverstein dans le bail du WTC était, pour le centre commercial du sous-sol, Frank Lowy, un autre « philanthrope » sioniste proche d’Ehud Barak et Ehud Olmert, ancien membre de la Haganah. Le chef de la New York Port Authority, qui privatisa le WTC en concédant le bail à Silverstein et Lowy, était Lewis Eisenberg, également membre de la United Jewish Appeal Federation et ancien vice-président de l’AIPAC. Silverstein, Lowy et Eisenberg furent sans aucun doute trois hommes clés dans la planification des attentats contre les tours jumelles.

Lucky Larry ! Chaque matin, sans exception, Larry Silverstein prenait son petit-déjeuner au Windows on the World au sommet de la tour Nord du WTC. Jusqu’au matin du 11 septembre, où il avait rendez-vous chez le dermatologue.

D’autres membres du réseau new-yorkais peuvent être identifiés. Selon le rapport du NIST, le Boeing qui s’encastra dans la tour Nord « a fait une entaille de plus de la moitié de la largeur du bâtiment et qui s’étendait du 93ème au 99ème étage. Tous ces étages étaient occupés par Marsh & McLennan, une compagnie d’assurance internationale qui occupait également le 100ème étage [18]. » Le PDG de Marsh & McLennan est alors Jeffrey Greenberg, membre d’une richissime famille juive qui contribua massivement à la campagne de George W. Bush. Les Greenberg étaient aussi les assureurs des tours jumelles et, le 24 juillet 2001, ils avaient pris la précaution de réassurer leur contrat auprès de concurrents, qui durent indemniser Silverstein et Lowy. Et comme le monde des néoconservateurs est petit, en novembre 2000, le conseil d’administration de Marsh & McLennan accueille Paul Bremer, président de la National Commission on Terrorism au moment des attentats, et nommé en 2003 à la la tête de la Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA) en 2003

Paul Bremer intervient le 11 septembre 2001 sur le plateau de NBC, calme et détendu, tandis que 400 employés de sa compagnie sont portés disparus (au final, 295 employés et plus de 60 collaborateurs du groupe seront officiellement dénombrés parmi les victimes).

Des complicités devront aussi être cherchées dans les aéroports et les compagnies aériennes impliquées dans les attentats. Les deux aéroports d’où sont partis les vols AA11, UA175 et UA93 (l’aéroport Logan à Boston et l’aéroport Newark Liberty près de New York) sous-traitaient leur sécurité à la compagnie International Consultants on Targeted Security (ICTS), une firme à capital israélien présidée par Menahem Atzmon, un des trésoriers du Likoud. Une enquête approfondie permettrait certainement de remonter à d’autres complicités. Elle devrait par exemple s’intéresser à Zim Israel Navigational, un géant du transport maritime détenu à 48 % par l’État hébreu (connu pour servir occasionnellement de couverture aux services secrets israéliens), dont l’antenne états-unienne quitta ses bureaux du WTC avec ses 200 employés le 4 septembre 2001, une semaine avant les attentats — « comme par un acte de Dieu [19] », commente le PDG Shaul Cohen-Mintz.

It’s the oil, stupid !

Tous ces faits donnent un sens nouveau aux propos du membre de la Commission sur le 11-Septembre Bob Graham, qui citait dans son interview à PBS en décembre 2002, « des preuves que des gouvernements étrangers ont contribué à faciliter les activités d’au moins certains des terroristes aux États-Unis [20]. » Graham, bien sûr, voulait parler de l’Arabie saoudite. Pourquoi la famille Saoud aurait-elle aidé Oussama Ben Laden, après l’avoir déchu de sa nationalité saoudienne et avoir mis sa tête à prix pour ses attentats sur leur sol ? La réponse de Graham, formulée en juillet 2011, est : « la menace de soulèvements sociaux contre la monarchie, conduits par Al-Qaïda [21]. » Les Saoud auraient aidé Ben Laden sous sa menace de fomenter une révolution. Cette théorie ridicule (que Graham, à court d’argument, développa dans un roman) [22] n’a qu’un seul but : détourner les soupçons loin du seul « gouvernement étranger » dont les liens avec les terroristes présumés sont démontrés, Israël, vers son ennemi l’Arabie Saoudite. On sourit pareillement en lisant, dans le résumé du livre La Guerre d’après (2003) de l’anti-saoudien Laurent Murawiec, que « Le pouvoir royal [saoudien] a réussi au fil des ans à infiltrer des agents d’influence au plus haut niveau de l’administration américaine et à organiser un efficace lobby intellectuel qui contrôle désormais plusieurs universités du pays parmi les plus prestigieuses [23]. »

En affirmant en outre que la piste saoudienne a été étouffée en raison de l’amitié entre les Bush et les Saoud, Graham et ses amis néconservateurs se servent de George W. Bush comme fusible ou paratonnerre. La stratégie paye, puisque le 9/11 Truth movement, dans son ensemble, s’acharne contre lui et renacle à prononcer le nom d’Israël. On reconnaît l’art de Machiavel : faire accomplir le sale boulot par un autre, puis diriger la vindicte populaire contre lui.

Comme je l’ai montré ailleurs, une dénomination plus appropriée pour les « néo-conservateurs » serait « machiavelo-sionistes ». Michael Ledeen en donne la preuve dans un article de la {Jewish World Review} du 7 juin 1999, où il défend la thèse que Machiavel était « secrètement juif » comme l’étaient à l’époque des milliers de familles nominalement converties au catholicisme sous menace d’expulsion (principalement les Marranes issus de la péninsule ibérique). « Écoutez sa philosophie politique et vous entendrez la musique juive » Par définition, le machiavélisme avance masqué par un discours vertueux (c.a.d. droit-de-l’hommiste), mais un nombre croissant de sionistes s’en réclament ouvertement : un autre exemple avec le livre d’Obadiah Shoher, « Samson Blinded : A Machiavellian Perspective on the Middle East Conflict ».

Le jour où, sous la pression de l’opinion publique, les grands médias seront forcés d’abandonner la thèse officielle, le mouvement constestataire aura déjà été soigneusement infiltré, et le slogan 9/11 is an inside job aura préparé les esprits à un déchaînement contre Bush, Cheney et quelques autres, tandis que les néonconservateurs resteront hors d’atteinte de toute Justice. Et si, par malheur, le jour du grand déballage, les médias sionisés ne parvenaient pas à maintenir Israël hors d’atteinte, l’État hébreu pourra toujours jouer la carte chomskienne : America made me do it. Noam Chomsky [24], qui campe à l’extrême gauche depuis que le trotskiste Irving Kristol virait à l’extrême droite pour former le mouvement néoconservateur, continue en effet d’asséner sans relâche la thèse éculée qu’Israël ne fait qu’exécuter la volonté des États-Unis, dont elle ne serait que le 51ème État et le gendarme au Proche-Orient.

Selon Chomsky et les figures médiatisées de la gauche radicale états-unienne comme Michael Moore, la déstabilisation du Proche-Orient serait la volonté de Washington avant d’être celle de Tel-Aviv. La guerre d’Irak ? Pour le pétrole évidemment : « Bien sûr que c’était les ressources énergétiques de l’Irak. La question ne se pose même pas [25]. » Signe des temps, voilà Chomsky rejoint dans ce refrain par Alan Greenspan, directeur de la Réserve Fédérale, qui dans son livre Le Temps des turbulences (2007) fait mine de concéder « ce que tout le monde sait : l’un des grands enjeux de la guerre d’Irak était le pétrole de la région ».

« Je crois personnellement qu’il y a une relation profonde entre les événements du 11-Septembre et le pic pétrolier, mais ce n’est pas quelque-chose que je peux prouver, » énonce déjà Richard Heinberg, spécialiste de la déplétion énergétique, dans le documentaire {Oil, Smoke and Mirrors}{.} Autant dire que la thèse relève de la foi irrationnelle.

À cela il faut répondre, avec James Petras (Zionism, Militarism and the Decline of US Power), Stephen Sniegoski (The Transparent Cabal) ou Jonathan Cook (Israel and the Clash of Civilizations) : « Big Oil non seulement n’a pas encouragé l’invasion, mais n’a même pas réussi à contrôler un seul puits de pétrole, malgré la présence de 160 000 soldats états-uniens, 127 000 mercenaires payés par le Pentagone et le Département d’ État, et un gouvernement fantoche corrompu [26] ». Non, le pétrole n’explique pas la guerre en Irak, pas plus qu’il n’explique la guerre en Afghanistan, pas plus qu’il n’explique l’agression de la Syrie par mercenaires interposés, pas plus qu’il n’explique la guerre programmée contre l’Iran. Et ce n’est certainement pas le lobby du pétrole qui a le pouvoir d’imposer le « grand tabou » sur toute la sphère médiatique (de Marianne aux Échos, pour ce qui concerne la France).

La culture israélienne de la terreur sous fausse bannière

Un petit rappel s’impose ici, pour mieux situer le 11-Septembre dans l’histoire. Les Etats-uniens ont une longue pratique dans la fabrication des faux prétextes de guerre. On pourrait remonter à 1845 avec la guerre expansionniste contre le Mexique, déclenchée par des provocations américaines sur la zone contestée de la frontière avec le Texas (la rivière Nueces selon le Mexique, le Rio Grande selon les Texans) jusqu’à ce que des affrontements donnent au président James Polk (un Texan) l’occasion de déclarer que les Mexicains « ont versé le sang américain sur le sol américain. » Après la guerre, un député du nom d’Abraham Lincoln fit reconnaître par le Congrès le caractère mensonger de ce casus belli. Par la suite, toutes les guerres entreprises par les États-Unis l’ont été sous de faux prétextes : l’explosion du USS Maine pour la guerre contre l’Espagne à Cuba, le torpillage du Lusitania pour l’entrée dans la Première Guerre mondiale, Pearl Harbor pour la seconde, et le Golfe du Tonkin pour l’embrasement du Nord-Vietnam. Cependant, seule l’explosion du USS Maine, qui fit peu de morts, relève à proprement parler du stratagème de fausse bannière  ; encore n’est-ce pas certain.

Le paquebot transatlantique {RMS Lusitania} fut torpillé le 7 mai 1915 par les Allemands, alors qu’il naviguait dans une zone de guerre. C’est par le slogan {Remember the Lusitania} que le président Woodrow Wilson mobilisa ensuite l’opinion US en faveur de l’entrée en guerre. Le fait qu’une seule torpille ait suffi à couler le navire en quinze minutes suscite des questions. Dans son journal, le colonel Mendel Edward House, conseiller de Wilson, rapporte une conversation qu’il eut peu avant avec le ministre des Affaires étrangères britannique Edward Grey (qui deviendra en 1919 ambassadeur aux États-Unis). « Que feraient les Américains si les Allemands coulait un transatlantique avec des passagers américains à bord ? » demanda Grey. House lui répondit : « Je pense qu’un feu d’indignation balaierait les États-Unis et que cela suffirait à nous entraîner dans la guerre »

En revanche, c’est un fait qu’Israël a un passé chargé et une grande expertise des attaques et attentats sous faux drapeaux. Une histoire mondiale de ce stratagème devrait sans doute consacrer la moitié de ses pages à Israël, pourtant la plus jeune des nations modernes. Le pli a été pris avant même la création d’Israël, avec l’attentat du King David Hotel, quartier-général des autorités britanniques à Jérusalem. Le 22 juillet 1946 au matin, six terroristes de l’Irgun (la milice terroriste commandée par Menahem Begin, futur premier ministre) habillés en Arabes pénètrent dans le bâtiment et déposent autour du pillier central du bâtiment 225 kg d’explosif TNT cachés dans des bidons de lait, tandis que d’autres miliciens de l’Irgun répandent des explosifs le long des routes d’accès à l’hôtel pour empêcher l’arrivée des secours. Quand un officier britannique se montre suspicieux, une fusillade éclate dans l’hôtel et les membres du commando s’enfuient en allumant les explosifs. L’explosion tua 91 personnes, majoritairement des Britanniques, mais aussi 15 juifs.

Le stratagème fut répété en Égypte durant l’été 1954, avec l’Opération Susannah, dont le but était de compromettre le retrait des Britanniques du Canal de Suez exigé par le colonel Abdul Gamal Nasser avec le soutien du président Eisenhower. Cette opération fut également éventée et reste connu comme « l’Affaire Lavon », du nom du ministre israélien qui fut porté responsable. La plus célèbre et la plus calamiteuse des attaques israéliennes sous fausse bannière est celle du navire américain de la NSA USS Liberty, le 8 juin 1967 au large de l’Égypte, deux jours avant la fin de guerre des Six Jours ; on y voit déjà à l’œuvre une collaboration profonde entre Israël et les USA, l’administration Johnson ayant couvert et peut-être même incité ce crime contre ses propres ingénieurs et soldats. J’ai évoqué ces deux affaires dans un précédent article et n’y reviens pas [27].

En 1986, le Mossad a tenté de faire croire qu’une série d’ordres terroristes était transmise depuis la Libye à diverses ambassades libyennes dans le monde. Selon l’ancien agent Victor Ostrovsky (By Way of Deception, 1990), le Mossad utilisa un système spécial de communication nommé « Cheval de Troie » implanté par des commandos à l’intérieur du territoire ennemi. Le système agit comme station relais pour de fausses transmissions émises depuis un navire israélien et réémises instantanément sur une fréquence utilisée par l’État libyen. Ainsi que le Mossad l’avait espéré, la NSA capta et déchiffra les transmissions, qui furent interprétées comme une preuve que les Libyens soutenaient le terrorisme, ce que des rapports du Mossad venaient opportunément confirmer. Israël comptait sur la promesse de Reagan de représailles contre tout pays surpris en flagrant délit de soutien au terrorisme. Les États-uniens tombèrent dans le piège et entraînèrent avec eux les Britanniques et les Allemands : le 14 avril 1986, cent soixante avions US lâchèrent plus de soixante tonnes de bombes sur la Libye, ciblant principalement les aéroports et les bases militaires. Parmi les victimes civiles du coté libyen se trouvait la fille adoptive de Kadhafi, âgée de quatre ans. La frappe fit capoter un accord pour la libération des otages états-uniens détenus au Liban, ce qui permettait de conserver le Hezbollah comme ennemi numéro un aux yeux de l’Occident.

Isser Harel, fondateur des services secrets israéliens, aurait prédit au chrétien sioniste Michael Evans en 1980 que le terrorisme islamique finirait par frapper les USA. « Dans la théologie islamique, le symbole phallique est très important. Votre plus gros symbole phallique est New York City et le plus haut bâtiment sera le symbole phallique qu’ils frapperont » En rapportant cet entretien dans une interview en 2004, Evans, auteur de « The American Prophecies, Terrorism and Mid-East Conflict Reveal a Nation’s Destiny », espère faire passer Harel pour un prophète. Les esprits rationnels y verront plutôt l’indice que le 11-Septembre mûrissait depuis 30 ans au sein de l’État profond israélien.

La capacité de manipulation du Mossad à cette époque peut encore être illustrée par deux histoires analysées par Thomas Gordon. Le 17 avril 1986, une jeune irlandaise du nom d’Ann-Marie Murphy embarque, à son insue, 1,5 kilos de Semtex dans un vol Londres-Tel-Aviv. Son fiancé, un Pakistanais du nom de Nezar Hindaoui, est arrêté alors qu’il tente de se réfugier à l’ambassade de Syrie. Tous deux ont en fait été manipulés par le Mossad, qui obtient ainsi le résultat souhaité : le gouvernement Thatcher rompt ses relations diplomatiques avec la Syrie. Mais la manipulation est éventée en haut lieu (comme Jacques Chirac le confiera au Washington Times) [28].

En janvier 1987, le Palestinien Ismaïl Sowan, une taupe du Mossad ayant infiltré l’OLP à Londres, se voit confier, par un inconnu soit-disant envoyé par son chef à l’OLP, deux valises bourrées d’armes et d’explosifs. Ismaïl en fait part à ses contacts au Mossad, qui lui font faire un aller-retour à Tel-Aviv, puis le dénonce à Scotland Yard comme suspect dans un projet d’attentat islamiste à Londres. Ismaïl est cueilli à son retour à l’aéroport d’Heathrow et inculpé sur la base des armes trouvées chez lui. Résultat : le Mossad rentre dans les faveurs du gouvernement Thatcher [29]. Après l’attentat du 26 février 1993 contre le WTC, le FBI arrêta le Palestinien Ahmed Ajaj et l’identifia comme un terroriste lié au Hamas, mais le journal israélien Kol Ha’ir démontra qu’Ajaj n’avait jamais été mêlé au Hamas ou à l’OLP. Selon le journaliste Robert Friedman, auteur d’un article dans The Village Voice le 3 août 1993, Ajaj n’était en réalité qu’un petit escroc arrêté en 1988 pour fabrication de faux dollars, condamné à deux ans et demi de prison et libéré au bout d’un an après un marché avec le Mossad, pour le compte duquel il devait infiltrer les groupes palestiniens. À sa libération, Ajaj subit un sheep-dipping classique en étant à nouveau brièvement emprisonné, cette fois pour avoir tenté de passer des armes en Cisjordanie pour le Fatah. On a donc, avec l’attentat de 1993 contre le WTC, un précédent et prototype du 11-Septembre, dans lequel sont démontrées la responsabilité d’Israël dans le terrorisme et sa volonté de faire accuser les Palestiniens.

L’attentat contre l’ambassade d’Israël à Buenos Aires en 1992, qui fit 29 morts et 242 blessés, fut instantanément mis sur le compte de kamikazes du Hezbollah ayant utilisé un camion piégé. Mais le juge chargé de l’instruction révéla des pressions exercées par des délégués états-uniens et israéliens, ainsi que des manipulations de preuves et un faux témoignage destinés à orienter l’enquête vers l’hypothèse d’un camion piégé, alors que les faits indiquaient que l’explosion provenait de l’intérieur du bâtiment. Lorsque la Cour Suprême argentine confirma cette thèse, le porte-parole de l’ambassade d’Israël accusa les juges d’antisémitisme.

Il est intéressant de rappeler ce qu’écrivit Philip Zelikow avec John Deutch en décembre 1998 dans un article de Foreign Affairs intitulé « Catastrophic Terrorism », imaginant à propos de cet attentat de 1993 que la bombe fût nucléaire, et évoquant déjà un nouveau Pearl Harbor : « Un tel acte de ‘terrorisme catastrophique’ qui tuerait des milliers ou des dizaines de milliers et affecteraient les nécessités vitales de centaines de milliers, peut-être de millions, serait un point de non-retour dans l’histoire des États-Unis. Il pourrait provoquer des pertes humaines et matérielles sans précédent en temps de paix et réduirait à néant le sentiment de sécurité de l’Amérique à l’intérieur de ses frontières, d’une manière similaire au test atomique des Soviétique en 1949, ou peut-être pire. […]. Comme Pearl Harbor, cet événement diviserait notre histoire entre un avant et un après. Les États-Unis pourraient répondre par des mesures draconniennes, en réduisant les libertés individuelles, en autorisant une surveillance plus étroite des citoyens, l’arrestation des suspects et l’emploi de la force létale [30]. »

Le 12 janvier 2000, selon l’hebdomadaire indien The Week, des officiers des Renseignements indiens ont arrêté à l’aéroport de Calcutta onze prêcheurs islamistes qui s’apprêtaient à embarquer sur un vol à destination du Bengladesh. Ils étaient soupçonnés d’appartenir à Al-Qaïda et de vouloir détourner l’avion. Ils se présentèrent comme des Afghans ayant séjourné en Iran avant de passer deux mois en Inde pour prêcher l’islam. Mais on découvrit qu’ils possédaient tous des passeports israéliens. L’officier des services de Renseignement indien déclara à The Week que Tel Aviv « exerted considerable pressure » sur New Delhi pour les faire libérer.

Le 12 octobre 2000, dans les dernières semaines du mandat de Clinton, le destroyer USS Cole, en route vers le Golfe persique, reçoit l’ordre depuis son port d’attache de Norfolk de faire le plein dans le port d’Aden au Yémen, une procédure inhabituelle puisque ces destroyers sont généralement approvisionnés en mer par un pétrolier de la Navy. Le commandant du navire exprima sa surprise et son inquiétude : le USS Cole avait fait récemment le plein à l’entrée du Canal de Suez, et le Yémen est une zone hostile. Le USS Cole était en manœuvre d’amarrage lorsqu’il fut abordé par un dinghy destiné apparemment à l’évacuation des poubelles, qui explosa contre sa coque, tuant 17 marins et en blessant 50. Les deux « kamikazes » pilotant l’embarcation périrent aussi dans cet « attentat-suicide ». L’attaque fut aussitôt attribuée à Al-Qaïda, bien que Ben Laden ne l’ait pas revendiquée et que les Talibans nièrent que leur « hôte » ait pu être impliqué. L’accusation donna aux États-Unis un prétexte pour forcer le président yéménite Ali Abdullah Saleh à coopérer à la lutte contre l’islamisme anti-impérialiste, en fermant pour commencer treize camps paramilitaires sur son territoire. En plus de cela, quelques semaines avant les élections, l’attentat fut l’October Surprise qui porta Bush au pouvoir.

John O’Neill fut chargé de l’enquête. Au FBI depuis vingt ans, spécialiste expérimenté du contre-terrorisme, il avait déjà enquêté en 1993 sur l’attentat à la bombe au WTC. Son équipe en vint à soupçonner Israël d’avoir tiré un missile depuis un sous-marin : le trou était en effet indicatif d’une charge perforante et inexplicable par la seule explosion du dinghy. Les soupçons étaient partagés par le président Saleh, qui évoqua dans une interview à Newsweek la possibilité que l’attaque soit due à Israël, « essayant de nuire aux relations USA-Yémen [31]. » O’Neill et son équipe subirent l’hostilité de l’ambassadrice US, Barbara Bodine. Ils se virent interdire de plonger pour inspecter les dégâts. Finalement, profitant de leur retour à New York pour Thanksgiving, Bodine leur refusa l’entrée au Yémen. Les membres de l’équipage du Cole se virent ordonner de ne parler de l’attentat qu’au Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS). En juillet 2001, O’Neill démissionna du FBI. Il se vit peu après offrir un poste de responsable de la sécurité au WTC, qu’il devait assurer à partir du 11 septembre 2001. Son corps fut retrouvé dans les décombres du WTC, après qu’il ait disparu depuis deux jours. Quant à Barbara Bodine, elle intégrera en 2003 l’équipe corrompue de la Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA) de Baghdad.

Où s’arrête la liste du faux terrorisme islamique de conception sioniste ? Le « New York Times » et d’autres journaux rapportèrent que le 19 septembre 2005, deux agents des forces spéciales britanniques (SAS) furent arrêtés après avoir forcé un barrage à bord d’une voiture remplie d’armes, munitions, explosifs et détonateurs, qu’ils conduisaient déguisés en Arabes. On soupçonne qu’ils planifiaient de commettre des attentats meurtriers dans le centre de Bassora durant un événement religieux, pour attiser les conflits entre shiites et sunnites. Le soir même, une unité du SAS libéra les deux agents en détruisant la prison à l’aide d’une dizaine de tanks assistés par des hélicoptères. Le capitaine Masters, chargé de l’enquête sur cette affaire embarrassante, mourut à Bassora le 15 octobre.

[1] Article original en italien : « Demystifying 9/11 : Israel and the Tactics of Mistake »,

[2] “Wildcard. Ruthless and cunning. Has capability to target U.S. forces and make it look like a Palestinian/Arab act” (Rowan Scarborough, « U.S. troops would enforce peace Under Army study », The Washington Times, 10 septembre 2001, ).

[3] Outre le livre de Hicham Hamza et celui de Christopher Bollyn, on consultera sur ce dossier : Justin Raimondo, The Terror Enigma : 9/11 and the Israeli Connection, iUniversal, 2003 ainsi qu’à un article de Christopher Ketcham, « What Did Israel Know in Advance of the 9/11 Attacks ? » CounterPunch, 2007, vol. 14, p. 1-10, ).

[4] « Vehicle possibly related to New York terrorist attack. White, 2000 Chevrolet van with New Jersey registration with ’Urban Moving Systems’ sign on back seen at Liberty State Park, Jersey City, NJ, at the time of first impact of jetliner into World Trade Center. Three individuals with van were seen celebrating after initial impact and subsequent explosion » (Raimondo, The Terror Enigma, p. xi).

[5] « We are Israelis. We are not your problem. Your problems are our problems. The Palestinians are your problem » (Hicham Hamza, Le Grand Tabou, ch. 2).

[6] « There are maps of the city in the car with certain places highlighted. It looked like they’re hooked in with this. It looked like they knew what was going to happen when they were at Liberty State Park » (Raimondo, The Terror Enigma, p. xi).

[7] « I was in tears. These guys were joking and that bothered me » (Raimondo, The Terror Enigma, p. 19 ). Hamza, Le Grand Tabou, ch. 2.

[8] « They smiled, they hugged each other and they appeared to ‘high five’ one another » ; « the United States will take steps to stop terrorism in the world » ; « Give us twenty years and we’ll take over your media and destroy your country » ; « an individual in South America with authentic ties to Islamic militants in the middle east » ; « The vehicule was also searched by a trained bomb-sniffing dog which yielded a positive result for the presence of explosive traces » (Hamza, Le Grand Tabou, ch. 2).

[9] « that the FBI no longer has any investigative interests in the detainees and they should proceed with the appropriate immigration proceedings » (Hamza, Le Grand Tabou, ch. 2).

[10] “Our purpose was to document the event” (voir sur Youtube, « Dancing Israelis Our purpose was to document the event »).

[11] « Yes, we have a white van, 2 or 3 guys in there, they look like Palestinians and going around a building. […] I see the guy by Newark Airport mixing some junk and he has those sheikh uniforms. […] He’s dressed like an Arab » (Bollyn, Solving 9-11, p. 278-80).

[12] « Yes, we have a white van, 2 or 3 guys in there, they look like Palestinians and going around a building. […] I see the guy by Newark Airport mixing some junk and he has those sheikh uniforms. […] He’s dressed like an Arab » (Bollyn, Solving 9-11, p. 278-80).

[13] In the past six weeks, employees in federal office buildings located throughout the United States have reported suspicious activities connected with individuals representing themselves as foreign students selling or delivering artwork.” “these individuals have also gone to the private residences of senior federal officials under the guise of selling art.” Le rapport comlet de la DEA est sur

[14] “The nature of the individuals’ conducts […] leads us to believe the incidents may well be an organized intelligence gathering activity” (Raimondo, The Terror Enigma, p. x).

[15] “acknowledged he could blow up buildings, bridges, cars, and anything else that he needed to” (Bollyn, Solving 9/11, p. 159).

[16] The Hollywood, Florida, area seems to be a central point for these individuals” (Raimondo, The Terror Enigma, p. 3).

[17] David Ray Griffin, 9/11 Contradictions, Arris Books, 2008, p. 142-156, citant le Daily Mail, le Boston Herald, le San Francisco Chronicle et le Wall Street Journal.

[18] « The aircraft cut a gash that was over half the width of the building and extended from the 93rd floor to the 99th floor. All but the lowest of these floors were occupied by Marsh & McLennan, a worldwide insurance company, which also occupied the 100th floor » (p. 20). Ces éléments ont été analysés par Lalo Vespera dans La Parenthèse enchantée, chapitre 10.

[19] « Like an act of God, we moved » (USA Today, 17 septembre 2001).

[20] “evidence that there were foreign governments involved in facilitating the activities of at least some of the terrorists in the United States” (Raimondo, The Terror Enigma, p. 64).

[21] « the threat of civil unrest against the monarchy, led by al Qaeda » » (« Saudi Arabia : Friend or Foe ? », The Daily Beast, 11 juillet 2011).

[22] The Keys to the Kingdom, Vanguard Press, 2011.

[23] Résumé d’Amazon.ca

[24] « Le contrôle des dégâts : Noam Chomsky et le conflit israélo-israélien » et « Contrairement aux théories de Chomsky, les États-Unis n’ont aucun intérêt à soutenir Israël », par Jeffrey Blankfort, Traduction Marcel Charbonnier, Réseau Voltaire, 30 juillet et 21 août 2006,

[25] “Of course it was Iraq’s energy resources. It’s not even a question” (cité dans Stephen Sniegoski, The Transparent Cabal : The Neoconservative Agenda, War in the Middle East, and the National Interest of Israel, Enigma Edition, 2008, p. 333).

[26] « ‘Big Oil’ not only did not promote the invasion, but has failed to secure a single oil field, despite the presence of 160,000 US troops, 127,000 Pentagon/State Department paid mercenaries and a corrupt puppet régime » (James Petras, Zionism, Militarism and the Decline of US Power, Clarity Press, 2008, p. 18).

[27] http://www.voltairenet.org/article1…

[28] Gordon Thomas, Histoire secrète du Mossad : de 1951 à nos jours, Nouveau Monde éditions, 2006, p. 384-5.

[29] Thomas, Histoire secrète du Mossad, p. 410-41.

[30] “An act of catastrophic terrorism that killed thousands or tens of thousands of people and/or disrupted the necessities of life for hundreds of thousands, or even millions, would be a watershed event in America’s history. It could involve loss of life and property unprecedented for peacetime and undermine Americans’ fundamental sense of security within their own borders in a manner akin to the 1949 Soviet atomic bomb test, or perhaps even worse. […] Like Pearl Harbor, the event would divide our past and future into a before and after. The United States might respond with draconian measures scaling back civil liberties, allowing wider surveillance of citizens, detention of suspects and use of deadly force” (Griffin, 9/11 Contradictions, p. 295-6).

[31] trying to spoil the U.S.-Yemeni Relationship

21 juillet 2016

Dans une enquête publiée aujourd’hui, Libération accuse le ministre de l’Intérieur d’avoir menti s’agissant de la sécurisation de la Promenade des Anglais le soir du 14 juillet dernier. Riposte immédiate de Bernard Cazeneuve : Libération utilise des «procédés qui empruntent aux ressorts du complotisme» et cherche à l’atteindre «dans sa réputation». Dans un édito en forme de «c’est celui qui dit qui l’est», Johan Hufnagel, directeur délégué de Libération, suggère que c’est Bernard Cazeneuve qui est victime d’«une poussée de complotisme».

Première observation : on peut regretter que le ministre de l’Intérieur ne se soit pas abstenu d’user du terme «complotisme» sans préciser la différence de nature qu’il peut y avoir entre un journal comme Libération et les médias authentiquement complotistes qui prolifèrent sur la Toile. Surtout dans un moment où la prévention «des risques d’emprise complotiste» est constitutive des actions que le Gouvernement cherche à mettre en oeuvre pour lutter contre la radicalisation et le terrorisme.

Remarquons cependant que Bernard Cazeneuve n’accuse pas la rédaction de Libération d’être complotiste, comme le suggère le titre de l’édito de Johan Hufnagel. Dans un contexte où Libération lui reproche rien moins que d’avoir diffusé «un mensonge», de surcroît en une de son édition, le locataire de la place Beauvau a cru devoir dénoncer des «procédés qui empruntent aux ressorts du complotisme», ce qui n’est pas exactement la même chose que de mettre sur le même plan Libération et, mettons, Egalité & Réconciliation.

Le ministre a également laissé entendre que Libération était partie prenante «de campagnes politiques ou de presse qui visent à [l’] atteindre […] dans sa réputation». Etait-il vraiment nécessaire que Libération en tire prétexte pour accuser à son tour Bernard Cazeneuve de céder aux sirènes du complotisme ? Ne peut-on pas, là aussi, regretter l’usage d’un tel terme dirigé contre un ministre de la République qui ne saurait être confondu avec le premier théoricien du complot venu ? Ne peut-on, dans le même temps, trouver malvenue sa dénonciation de «campagnes de presse» là où, de toute évidence, Libération se contente d’assumer le rôle que lui assigne son statut d’acteur du quatrième pouvoir ?

Ni la presse ni le Gouvernement, cibles de choix des complotistes patentés, ne sortent grandis d’une telle séquence. Morale de l’histoire : cessons de gloser sur le complotisme présumé des uns et des autres à partir de matériaux aussi fragiles. Ne contribuons pas à faire du «complotisme» une étiquette infamante parmi d’autres. Utiliser ce mot de manière aussi peu fondée pour délégitimer un détracteur est en réalité une manière d’œuvrer à sa démonétisation et de rendre, au final, un fier service à tous ceux – vrais imposteurs et autres désinformateurs professionnels – qui prospèrent sur la montée contemporaine du complotisme.

Attentat de Nice : le retour des théories du complot

Metronews
16-07-2016 20:40

Policiers tués à Dallas: Attention, une violence peut en cacher une autre ! (The real danger behind the myths of the “Black Lives Matter” movement)

9 juillet, 2016

Fry'em

Pigs AADL Micah Xavier JohnsonBHOCharleston-Dallas
https://jcdurbant.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/homicidesbyrace.gif?w=450baby-killed-drive-by-shooting

I had feared that thousands of furious blond, blue-eyed women and their brunette sympathizers would take their rage into the streets, burning, killing and looting. While I don’t condone rioting, the historic and sociological reasons would have made such violence understandable. As one woman told me after the verdict: « For thousands of years, we have been putting up with abuse from large, strong, arrogant, evil-tempered men. « There is no group on Earth that has been kicked around the way women have. Since the dawn of history, we’ve been beaten, violated, enslaved, abandoned, stalked, pimped, murdered and even dissed by men. « Now this jury and the legal system have sent a clear message to society: It’s OK for men to cut our throats from ear to ear. » Mike Royko
« 60 % à 70 % » des détenus en France sont musulmans alors qu’ils représentent « à peine 12 % de la population totale du pays ». « Sur un continent où la présence des immigrés et de leurs enfants dans les systèmes carcéraux est généralement disproportionnée, les données françaises sont les plus flagrantes. En Grande-Bretagne, 11 % des prisonniers seraient musulmans, pour 3 % de la population. Une étude de l’ONG Open Society du milliardaire américain George Soros souligne de son côté qu’aux Pays-Bas, 20 % des détenus sont musulmans alors qu’ils représentent 5,5 % de la population, et, en Belgique, au moins 16 % de la population carcérale pour 2 % de la population totale. Les chiffres avancés ne sont pas officiels, car l’Etat français ne demande pas à ses citoyens de communiquer leur origine ou leur religion. En revanche, le quotidien affirme qu’il s’agit d’« estimations généralement acceptées » par les démographes et les sociologues. The Washington Post
Savez-vous que les Noirs sont 10 pour cent de la population de Saint-Louis et sont responsables de 58% de ses crimes? Nous avons à faire face à cela. Et nous devons faire quelque chose au sujet de nos normes morales. Nous savons qu’il y a beaucoup de mauvaises choses dans le monde blanc, mais il y a aussi beaucoup de mauvaises choses dans le monde noir. Nous ne pouvons pas continuer à blâmer l’homme blanc. Il y a des choses que nous devons faire pour nous-mêmes. Martin Luther King (St Louis, 1961)
Nous devons admettre le fait que ce type de violence n’arrive pas dans d’autres pays développés (…) Le fait que cela ait eu lieu dans une église noire soulève évidemment des questions sur une page sombre de notre histoire. Ce n’est pas la première fois que des églises noires ont été attaquées. Et nous savons que la haine entre les races et les religions posent une menace particulière pour notre démocratie et nos idéaux. Barack Hussein Obama (19.06.2015)
Je pense qu’il est très difficile de démêler les motivations de ce tireur. Par définition, si vous tirez sur des gens qui ne constituent aucune menace pour vous, vous avez un problème. Barack Hussein Obama (09.07.2016)
L’Amérique n’est pas aussi divisée qu’on le suggère (…)  L’individu dément qui a accompli ces attaques, il n’est pas plus représentatif des Noirs américains que le tireur de Charleston ne l’était des Américains blancs ou que le tireur d’Orlando ou de San Bernardino n’était représentatif des Américains musulmans. Barack Hussein Obama (09.07.2016)
It’s just not the police. (…) It’s a kind of anti-black mood, anti-semitism, anti-Muslim bashing, immigrant bashing, female bashing, a kind of mean spirited division in the country. (…) The poison of the rhetoric has had a devastating impact. (…) Just the permissiveness of violence towards black people is ready and apparent. We’ve being used as scapegoats for deeper economic and social fears. (…) It’s not just Trump, it’s the followers of Trump. Jessie Jackson
But what about all the other young black murder victims? Nationally, nearly half of all murder victims are black. And the overwhelming majority of those black people are killed by other black people. Where is the march for them? Where is the march against the drug dealers who prey on young black people? Where is the march against bad schools, with their 50% dropout rate for black teenaged boys? Those failed schools are certainly guilty of creating the shameful 40% unemployment rate for black teens? How about marching against the cable television shows constantly offering minstrel-show images of black youth as rappers and comedians who don’t value education, dismiss the importance of marriage, and celebrate killing people, drug money and jailhouse fashion—the pants falling down because the jail guard has taken away the belt, the shoes untied because the warden removed the shoe laces, and accessories such as the drug dealer’s pit bull. (…) There is no fashion, no thug attitude that should be an invitation to murder. But these are the real murderous forces surrounding the Martin death—and yet they never stir protests. The race-baiters argue this case deserves special attention because it fits the mold of white-on-black violence that fills the history books. Some have drawn a comparison to the murder of Emmett Till, a black boy who was killed in 1955 by white racists for whistling at a white woman. (…) While civil rights leaders have raised their voices to speak out against this one tragedy, few if any will do the same about the larger tragedy of daily carnage that is black-on-black crime in America. (…) Almost one half of the nation’s murder victims that year were black and a majority of them were between the ages of 17 and 29. Black people accounted for 13% of the total U.S. population in 2005. Yet they were the victims of 49% of all the nation’s murders. And 93% of black murder victims were killed by other black people, according to the same report. (…) The killing of any child is a tragedy. But where are the protests regarding the larger problems facing black America? Juan Williams
The absurdity of Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton is that they want to make a movement out of an anomaly. Black teenagers today are afraid of other black teenagers, not whites. … Trayvon’s sad fate clearly sent a quiver of perverse happiness all across America’s civil rights establishment, and throughout the mainstream media as well. His death was vindication of the ‘poetic truth’ that these establishments live by. Shelby Steele
Would Trayvon be alive today had he been walking home—Skittles and ice tea in hand—wearing a polo shirt with an alligator logo? Possibly. And does this make the ugly point that dark skin late at night needs to have its menace softened by some show of Waspy Americana? Possibly. (…) Before the 1960s the black American identity (though no one ever used the word) was based on our common humanity, on the idea that race was always an artificial and exploitive division between people. After the ’60s—in a society guilty for its long abuse of us—we took our historical victimization as the central theme of our group identity. We could not have made a worse mistake. It has given us a generation of ambulance-chasing leaders, and the illusion that our greatest power lies in the manipulation of white guilt. Shelby Steele
When we say fry them, we’re not speaking of killing a police officer…we’re saying, treat the police the same as you’re going to treat a civilian who commits murder against a police officer. Rashad Turner (Black lives matter activist)
Pour neutraliser l’homme suspecté d’avoir abattu plusieurs officiers, les forces de l’ordre américaines ont eu recours à une machine armée d’une bombe. Vendredi à l’aube, un sniper suspecté d’avoir tiré sur des policiers et retranché depuis des heures dans un bâtiment est finalement tué par un robot télécommandé, utilisé pour faire détoner une bombe. Micah Johnson, jeune Noir de 25 ans, avait servi dans l’armée américaine en Afghanistan. Sur son profil Facebook, il avait publié des images avec le slogan «Black Power» des extrémistes afro-américains des années 1960 et 1970. Il avait également ajouté la lettre «X» entre son prénom et son nom, probablement en référence à Malcolm X, leader noir opposé à la non-violence prônée par Martin Luther King. Pour neutraliser ce suspect armé, la police de Dallas disposait d’un robot Northrop Grumman Andros, conçu pour les équipes de démineurs et l’armée. (…) «C’est la première fois qu’un robot est utilisé de cette façon par la police», a assuré sur Twitter Peter Singer, de la fondation New America, un groupe de réflexion spécialisé notamment dans les questions de sécurité. Ce spécialiste des méthodes modernes de combat a précisé qu’un appareil baptisé Marcbot «a été employé de la même façon par les troupes en Irak». (…) Des chercheurs de l’université de Floride travaillent eux au développement de «Telebot», comparé dans certains articles au célèbre «Robocop» imaginé au cinéma. Destiné notamment à assister des policiers handicapés pour qu’ils puissent reprendre le service, Telebot a été conçu «pour avoir l’air intimidant et assez autoritaire pour que les citoyens obéissent à ses ordres» tout un gardant «une apparence amicale» qui rassurent «les citoyens de tous âges», selon un rapport d’étudiants de l’université de Floride. L’arrivée de robots aux armes létales dans la police suscite de nombreuses interrogations. L’ONG Human Rights Watch et l’organisation International Human Rights Clinic, qui dépend de l’université de Harvard, s’inquiétaient ainsi en 2014 du recours aux robots par les forces de l’ordre. Ces engins «ne sont pas dotés de qualités humaines, telles que le jugement et l’empathie, qui permettent à la police d’éviter de tuer illégalement dans des situations inattendues», écrivaient-elles dans un rapport. Si l’emploi des robotos armés était amené à se développer, le bouleversement anthropologique suscité serait considérable. Le Figaro
Violence in Chicago is reaching epidemic proportions. In the first five months of 2016, someone was shot every two and a half hours and someone murdered every 14 hours, for a total of nearly 1,400 nonfatal shooting victims and 240 fatalities. Over Memorial Day weekend, 69 people were shot, nearly one per hour, dwarfing the previous year’s tally of 53 shootings over the same period. The violence is spilling over from the city’s gang-infested South and West Sides into the downtown business district; Lake Shore Drive has seen drive-by shootings and robberies. The growing mayhem is the result of Chicago police officers’ withdrawal from proactive enforcement, making the city a dramatic example of what I have called the “Ferguson effect.” Since the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, in August 2014, the conceit that American policing is lethally racist has dominated the national airwaves and political discourse, from the White House on down. In response, cops in minority neighborhoods in Chicago and other cities around the country are backing off pedestrian stops and public-order policing; criminals are flourishing in the resulting vacuum. (…) Residents of Chicago’s high-crime areas are paying the price. (…) Through the end of May, shooting incidents in Chicago were up 53 percent over the same period in 2015, which had already seen a significant increase over 2014. Compared with the first five months of 2014, shooting incidents in 2016 were up 86 percent. Certain police districts saw larger spikes. The Harrison District on the West Side, encompassing West Humboldt Park, for example, had a 191 percent increase in homicides through the end of May. Shootings in May citywide averaged nearly 13 a day, a worrisome portent for summer. (…) Social breakdown lies behind Chicago’s historically high levels of violence. Fatherlessness in the city’s black community is at a cataclysmic level—close to 80 percent of children are born to single mothers in high-crime areas. Illegitimacy is catching up fast among Hispanics, as well. Gangs have stepped in where fathers are absent. A 2012 gang audit documented 59 active street gangs with 625 factions, some controlling a single block. Schools in gang territories go on high alert at dismissal time to fend off violence. Endemic crime has prevented the commercial development and gentrification that are revitalizing so many parts of Chicago closer to downtown; block after block on the South Side features a wan liquor store or check-cashing outlet, surrounded by empty lots and the occasional skeleton of a once-magnificent beaux-arts apartment complex or bank. Nonfunctioning streetlights, their fuse boxes vandalized, signal the reign of a local gang faction. (…) Public-order infractions, otherwise known as “Broken Windows” offenses, abound. Stand just a few minutes on a South or West Side thoroughfare, and someone will stride by hawking bootleg CDs or videos and loose cigarettes. Some law-abiding Chicagoans blame the rising violence on just such street disorder. (…) The drug trade is less overt but more ubiquitous than the trafficking in CDs and loosies. The majority of victims in the current crime wave are already known to the police. (…) But innocents, like the Lake Shore Drive robbery victims, are being attacked as well (…) Officers who try to intervene in this disorder face a virulent street situation, thanks to the current anti-cop ideology. “People are a hundred times more likely to resist arrest,” an officer who has worked a decade and a half on the South Side informs me. “People want to fight you; they swear at you. ‘Fuck the police, we don’t have to listen,’ they say. I haven’t seen this kind of hatred toward the police in my career.” (…) The “no-snitch” ethic of refusing to cooperate with the cops is the biggest impediment to solving crime, according to Chicago commanders. But the Black Lives Matter narrative about endemically racist cops has made the street dynamic much worse. A detective says: “From patrol to investigation, it’s almost an undoable job now. If I get out of my car, the guys get hostile right away and several people are taping [with cell phones].” Bystanders and suspects try to tamper with crime scenes and aggressively interfere with investigations. Additional officers may be needed during an arrest to keep angry onlookers away.  This volatile policing environment now exists in urban areas across the country. (…) Criminals have become emboldened by the police disengagement. “Gangbangers now realize that no one will stop them,” says a former high-ranking police official. And people who wouldn’t have carried a gun before are now armed, a South Side officer says. Heather Mac Donald
To judge from Black Lives Matter protesters and their media and political allies, you would think that killer cops pose the biggest threat to young black men today. But this perception, like almost everything else that many people think they know about fatal police shootings, is wrong. The Washington Post has been gathering data on fatal police shootings over the past year and a half to correct acknowledged deficiencies in federal tallies. The emerging data should open many eyes. For starters, fatal police shootings make up a much larger proportion of white and Hispanic homicide deaths than black homicide deaths. According to the Post database, in 2015 officers killed 662 whites and Hispanics, and 258 blacks. (The overwhelming majority of all those police-shooting victims were attacking the officer, often with a gun.) Using the 2014 homicide numbers as an approximation of 2015’s, those 662 white and Hispanic victims of police shootings would make up 12% of all white and Hispanic homicide deaths. That is three times the proportion of black deaths that result from police shootings. The lower proportion of black deaths due to police shootings can be attributed to the lamentable black-on-black homicide rate. There were 6,095 black homicide deaths in 2014—the most recent year for which such data are available—compared with 5,397 homicide deaths for whites and Hispanics combined. Almost all of those black homicide victims had black killers. Police officers—of all races—are also disproportionately endangered by black assailants. Over the past decade, according to FBI data, 40% of cop killers have been black. Officers are killed by blacks at a rate 2.5 times higher than the rate at which blacks are killed by police. Some may find evidence of police bias in the fact that blacks make up 26% of the police-shooting victims, compared with their 13% representation in the national population. But as residents of poor black neighborhoods know too well, violent crimes are disproportionately committed by blacks. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, blacks were charged with 62% of all robberies, 57% of murders and 45% of assaults in the 75 largest U.S. counties in 2009, though they made up roughly 15% of the population there. Such a concentration of criminal violence in minority communities means that officers will be disproportionately confronting armed and often resisting suspects in those communities, raising officers’ own risk of using lethal force. The Black Lives Matter movement claims that white officers are especially prone to shooting innocent blacks due to racial bias, but this too is a myth. A March 2015 Justice Department report on the Philadelphia Police Department found that black and Hispanic officers were much more likely than white officers to shoot blacks based on “threat misperception”—that is, the mistaken belief that a civilian is armed. (…) The Black Lives Matter movement has been stunningly successful in changing the subject from the realities of violent crime. The world knows the name of Michael Brown but not Tyshawn Lee, a 9-year-old black child lured into an alley and killed by gang members in Chicago last fall. Tyshawn was one of dozens of black children gunned down in America last year. (…) Those were black lives that mattered, and it is a scandal that outrage is heaped less on the dysfunctional culture that produces so many victims than on the police officers who try to protect them. Heather Mac Donald
However intolerable and inexcusable every act of police brutality is, and while we need to make sure that the police are properly trained in the Constitution and in courtesy, there is a larger reality behind the issue of policing, crime, and race that remains a taboo topic. The problem of black-on-black crime is an uncomfortable truth, but unless we acknowledge it, we won’t get very far in understanding patterns of policing. Every year, approximately 6,000 blacks are murdered. This is a number greater than white and Hispanic homicide victims combined, even though blacks are only 13 percent of the national population. Blacks are killed at six times the rate of whites and Hispanics combined. (…) The astronomical black death-by-homicide rate is a function of the black crime rate. Black males between the ages of 14 and 17 commit homicide at ten times the rate of white and Hispanic male teens combined. Blacks of all ages commit homicide at eight times the rate of whites and Hispanics combined, and at eleven times the rate of whites alone. (…) The nation’s police killed 987 civilians in 2015, according to a database compiled by The Washington Post. Whites were 50 percent—or 493—of those victims, and blacks were 26 percent—or 258. Most of those victims of police shootings, white and black, were armed or otherwise threatening the officer with potentially lethal force. The black violent crime rate would actually predict that more than 26 percent of police victims would be black. Officer use of force will occur where the police interact most often with violent criminals, armed suspects, and those resisting arrest, and that is in black neighborhoods. In America’s 75 largest counties in 2009, for example, blacks constituted 62 percent of all robbery defendants, 57 percent of all murder defendants, 45 percent of all assault defendants—but only 15 percent of the population. Moreover, 40 percent of all cop killers have been black over the last decade. And a larger proportion of white and Hispanic homicide deaths are a result of police killings than black homicide deaths—but don’t expect to hear that from the media or from the political enablers of the Black Lives Matter movement. Twelve percent of all white and Hispanic homicide victims are killed by police officers, compared to four percent of all black homicide victims. (…) Standard anti-cop ideology, whether emanating from the ACLU or the academy, holds that law enforcement actions are racist if they don’t mirror population data. New York City illustrates why that expectation is so misguided. Blacks make up 23 percent of New York City’s population, but they commit 75 percent of all shootings, 70 percent of all robberies, and 66 percent of all violent crime, according to victims and witnesses. Add Hispanic shootings and you account for 98 percent of all illegal gunfire in the city. Whites are 33 percent of the city’s population, but they commit fewer than two percent of all shootings, four percent of all robberies, and five percent of all violent crime. These disparities mean that virtually every time the police in New York are called out on a gun run—meaning that someone has just been shot—they are being summoned to minority neighborhoods looking for minority suspects. Officers hope against hope that they will receive descriptions of white shooting suspects, but it almost never happens. This incidence of crime means that innocent black men have a much higher chance than innocent white men of being stopped by the police because they match the description of a suspect. This is not something the police choose. It is a reality forced on them by the facts of crime. The geographic disparities are also huge. In Brownsville, Brooklyn, the per capita shooting rate is 81 times higher than in nearby Bay Ridge, Brooklyn—the first neighborhood predominantly black, the second neighborhood predominantly white and Asian. As a result, police presence and use of proactive tactics are much higher in Brownsville than in Bay Ridge. Every time there is a shooting, the police will flood the area looking to make stops in order to avert a retaliatory shooting. They are in Brownsville not because of racism, but because they want to provide protection to its many law-abiding residents who deserve safety. Who are some of the victims of elevated urban crime? On March 11, 2015, as protesters were once again converging on the Ferguson police headquarters demanding the resignation of the entire department, a six-year-old boy named Marcus Johnson was killed a few miles away in a St. Louis park, the victim of a drive-by shooting. No one protested his killing. Al Sharpton did not demand a federal investigation. Few people outside of his immediate community know his name. (…) This mindless violence seems almost to be regarded as normal, given the lack of attention it receives from the same people who would be out in droves if any of these had been police shootings. As horrific as such stories are, crime rates were much higher 20 years ago. In New York City in 1990, for example, there were 2,245 homicides. In 2014 there were 333—a decrease of 85 percent. The drop in New York’s crime rate is the steepest in the nation, but crime has fallen at a historic rate nationwide as well—by about 40 percent—since the early 1990s. The greatest beneficiaries of these declining rates have been minorities. Over 10,000 minority males alive today in New York would be dead if the city’s homicide rate had remained at its early 1990s level. What is behind this historic crime drop? A policing revolution that began in New York and spread nationally, and that is now being threatened. Starting in 1994, the top brass of the NYPD embraced the then-radical idea that the police can actually prevent crime, not just respond to it. They started gathering and analyzing crime data on a daily and then hourly basis. They looked for patterns, and strategized on tactics to try to quell crime outbreaks as they were emerging. Equally important, they held commanders accountable for crime in their jurisdictions. Department leaders started meeting weekly with precinct commanders to grill them on crime patterns on their watch. These weekly accountability sessions came to be known as Compstat. (…) For decades, the rap against the police was that they ignored crime in minority neighborhoods. Compstat keeps New York commanders focused like a laser beam on where people are being victimized most, and that is in minority communities. (…) In New York City, businesses that had shunned previously drug-infested areas now set up shop there, offering residents a choice in shopping and creating a demand for workers. Senior citizens felt safe to go to the store or to the post office to pick up their Social Security checks. Children could ride their bikes on city sidewalks without their mothers worrying that they would be shot. But the crime victories of the last two decades, and the moral support on which law and order depends, are now in jeopardy thanks to the falsehoods of the Black Lives Matter movement. Police operating in inner-city neighborhoods now find themselves routinely surrounded by cursing, jeering crowds when they make a pedestrian stop or try to arrest a suspect. Sometimes bottles and rocks are thrown. Bystanders stick cell phones in the officers’ faces, daring them to proceed with their duties. Officers are worried about becoming the next racist cop of the week and possibly losing their livelihood thanks to an incomplete cell phone video that inevitably fails to show the antecedents to their use of force.  (…) As a result of the anti-cop campaign of the last two years and the resulting push-back in the streets, officers in urban areas are cutting back on precisely the kind of policing that led to the crime decline of the 1990s and 2000s. (…) On the other hand, the people demanding that the police back off are by no means representative of the entire black community. Go to any police-neighborhood meeting in Harlem, the South Bronx, or South Central Los Angeles, and you will invariably hear variants of the following: “We want the dealers off the corner.” “You arrest them and they’re back the next day.” “There are kids hanging out on my stoop. Why can’t you arrest them for loitering?” “I smell weed in my hallway. Can’t you do something?” I met an elderly cancer amputee in the Mount Hope section of the Bronx who was terrified to go to her lobby mailbox because of the young men trespassing there and selling drugs. The only time she felt safe was when the police were there. “Please, Jesus,” she said to me, “send more police!” The irony is that the police cannot respond to these heartfelt requests for order without generating the racially disproportionate statistics that will be used against them in an ACLU or Justice Department lawsuit. Unfortunately, when officers back off in high crime neighborhoods, crime shoots through the roof. Our country is in the midst of the first sustained violent crime spike in two decades. Murders rose nearly 17 percent in the nation’s 50 largest cities in 2015, and it was in cities with large black populations where the violence increased the most. (…) I first identified the increase in violent crime in May 2015 and dubbed it “the Ferguson effect.” (…) The number of police officers killed in shootings more than doubled during the first three months of 2016. In fact, officers are at much greater risk from blacks than unarmed blacks are from the police. Over the last decade, an officer’s chance of getting killed by a black has been 18.5 times higher than the chance of an unarmed black getting killed by a cop. (…) We have been here before. In the 1960s and early 1970s, black and white radicals directed hatred and occasional violence against the police. The difference today is that anti-cop ideology is embraced at the highest reaches of the establishment: by the President, by his Attorney General, by college presidents, by foundation heads, and by the press. The presidential candidates of one party are competing to see who can out-demagogue President Obama’s persistent race-based calumnies against the criminal justice system, while those of the other party have not emphasized the issue as they might have. I don’t know what will end the current frenzy against the police. What I do know is that we are playing with fire, and if it keeps spreading, it will be hard to put out. Heather Mac Donald

Et si les principales victimes n’étaient pas celles que l’on croyait ?

Au lendemain d’un nouveau massacre américain …

Perpétré cette fois par un noir, apparemment proche de mouvements appelant au meurtre de policiers, contre des policiers blancs lors d’une manifestation justement contre les brutalités des policiers blancs contre les noirs …

Et qui sera finalement abattu par un robot raciste dont on ne sait toujours pas la couleur …

Comment ne pas voir avec la chercheuse américaine Heather MacDonald (merci Charly Karl Ékoulé Maneng) …

La terrible responsabilité, entre Maison Blanche, universités et médias, de nos pompiers-pyromanes et chasseurs d’ambulances patentés …

Qui lorsqu’ils n’appellent pas explicitement, à l’instar de nos casseurs à nous, à « griller les cochons comme du bacon » …

Nous rebattent les oreilles avec leurs habituelles contre-vérités niant l’évidence de la sur-criminalité noire (deux tiers des cambriolages, plus de la moitié des meurtres et presque la moitié des attaques à main armée dans les principales zones urbaines pour seulement 13% de la population totale – étrangement parallele d’ailleurs a la surcriminalite musulmane en France) …

Comme de la sous-victimisation noire pour les homicides du fait de la police (4% contre 12% pour les blancs et hispaniques) …

Des limites de certains concepts comme celui de « non-armé » (5 sur 7 des victimes noires d’homicides du fait de la police avaient essayé d’arracher l’arme du policier ou de le battre avec son propre équipement) …

De la survictimisation de policiers d’origine minoritaire  (18,5 fois plus probable qu’un policier soit tué par un Noir – 40% de tueurs de policiers sont des Noirs – qu’un policier tue un Noir non armé ou désarmé) mais aussi logiquement de leur plus grande tendance à faire usage de leur arme (3,3 fois plus que les policiers blancs) …

Mais aussi sur le véritable secret de polichinelle ou, comme le dit si bien l’anglais, « l’éléphant dans la pièce » de l’histoire …

A savoir la violence intra-ethnique noirs contre noirs (près de  6 000 noirs tués – sans compter les nombreux blessés et les victimes collatérales dont de nombreux enfants – majoritairement par d’autres noirs soit plus que le total de blancs et d’hispaniques pour seulement 13% de la population totale) …

Et, plus pervers encore, « l’effet Ferguson » qui, sans compter l’explosion des incivilités, l’encouragement au refus des contrôles policiers et le doublement des meurtres de policiers ce dernier semestre, voit une hausse de 17% des meurtres dans les 50 plus grandes agglomérations américaines du fait justement de la moindre activité policière, par peur d’être accusés de racisme, dans certaines zones à risque …

Et donc, à terme, la perte des acquis, en matière de sécurité, de décennies de travail policier (moins 40% d’homicides et moins 85% à New York depuis les annés 90) pour les zones et les populations qui en auraient le plus besoin …

Soit, triste ironie de l’histoire, le retour à ce qui était justement reproché à la police des années 60 et 70 voire bien avant, l’indifférence à la sécurité des plus démunis ?

The Danger of the “Black Lives Matter” Movement
Heather Mac Donald
Manhattan Institute
Imprimis – Hillsdale College
April 1, 2016

The following is adapted from a speech delivered on April 27, 2016, at Hillsdale College’s Allan P. Kirby, Jr. Center for Constitutional Studies and Citizenship in Washington, D.C., as part of the AWC Family Foundation Lecture Series.

For almost two years, a protest movement known as “Black Lives Matter” has convulsed the nation. Triggered by the police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, in August 2014, the Black Lives Matter movement holds that racist police officers are the greatest threat facing young black men today. This belief has triggered riots, “die-ins,” the murder and attempted murder of police officers, a campaign to eliminate traditional grand jury proceedings when police use lethal force, and a presidential task force on policing.

Even though the U.S. Justice Department has resoundingly disproven the lie that a pacific Michael Brown was shot in cold blood while trying to surrender, Brown is still venerated as a martyr. And now police officers are backing off of proactive policing in the face of the relentless venom directed at them on the street and in the media. As a result, violent crime is on the rise.

The need is urgent, therefore, to examine the Black Lives Matter movement’s central thesis—that police pose the greatest threat to young black men. I propose two counter hypotheses: first, that there is no government agency more dedicated to the idea that black lives matter than the police; and second, that we have been talking obsessively about alleged police racism over the last 20 years in order to avoid talking about a far larger problem—black-on-black crime.

Let’s be clear at the outset: police have an indefeasible obligation to treat everyone with courtesy and respect, and to act within the confines of the law. Too often, officers develop a hardened, obnoxious attitude. It is also true that being stopped when you are innocent of any wrongdoing is infuriating, humiliating, and sometimes terrifying. And needless to say, every unjustified police shooting of an unarmed civilian is a stomach-churning tragedy.

Given the history of racism in this country and the complicity of the police in that history, police shootings of black men are particularly and understandably fraught. That history informs how many people view the police. But however intolerable and inexcusable every act of police brutality is, and while we need to make sure that the police are properly trained in the Constitution and in courtesy, there is a larger reality behind the issue of policing, crime, and race that remains a taboo topic. The problem of black-on-black crime is an uncomfortable truth, but unless we acknowledge it, we won’t get very far in understanding patterns of policing.

Every year, approximately 6,000 blacks are murdered. This is a number greater than white and Hispanic homicide victims combined, even though blacks are only 13 percent of the national population. Blacks are killed at six times the rate of whites and Hispanics combined. In Los Angeles, blacks between the ages of 20 and 24 die at a rate 20 to 30 times the national mean. Who is killing them? Not the police, and not white civilians, but other blacks. The astronomical black death-by-homicide rate is a function of the black crime rate. Black males between the ages of 14 and 17 commit homicide at ten times the rate of white and Hispanic male teens combined. Blacks of all ages commit homicide at eight times the rate of whites and Hispanics combined, and at eleven times the rate of whites alone.

The police could end all lethal uses of force tomorrow and it would have at most a trivial effect on the black death-by-homicide rate. The nation’s police killed 987 civilians in 2015, according to a database compiled by The Washington Post. Whites were 50 percent—or 493—of those victims, and blacks were 26 percent—or 258. Most of those victims of police shootings, white and black, were armed or otherwise threatening the officer with potentially lethal force.

The black violent crime rate would actually predict that more than 26 percent of police victims would be black. Officer use of force will occur where the police interact most often with violent criminals, armed suspects, and those resisting arrest, and that is in black neighborhoods. In America’s 75 largest counties in 2009, for example, blacks constituted 62 percent of all robbery defendants, 57 percent of all murder defendants, 45 percent of all assault defendants—but only 15 percent of the population.

Moreover, 40 percent of all cop killers have been black over the last decade. And a larger proportion of white and Hispanic homicide deaths are a result of police killings than black homicide deaths—but don’t expect to hear that from the media or from the political enablers of the Black Lives Matter movement. Twelve percent of all white and Hispanic homicide victims are killed by police officers, compared to four percent of all black homicide victims. If we’re going to have a “Lives Matter” anti-police movement, it would be more appropriately named “White and Hispanic Lives Matter.”

Standard anti-cop ideology, whether emanating from the ACLU or the academy, holds that law enforcement actions are racist if they don’t mirror population data. New York City illustrates why that expectation is so misguided. Blacks make up 23 percent of New York City’s population, but they commit 75 percent of all shootings, 70 percent of all robberies, and 66 percent of all violent crime, according to victims and witnesses. Add Hispanic shootings and you account for 98 percent of all illegal gunfire in the city. Whites are 33 percent of the city’s population, but they commit fewer than two percent of all shootings, four percent of all robberies, and five percent of all violent crime. These disparities mean that virtually every time the police in New York are called out on a gun run—meaning that someone has just been shot—they are being summoned to minority neighborhoods looking for minority suspects.

Officers hope against hope that they will receive descriptions of white shooting suspects, but it almost never happens. This incidence of crime means that innocent black men have a much higher chance than innocent white men of being stopped by the police because they match the description of a suspect. This is not something the police choose. It is a reality forced on them by the facts of crime.

The geographic disparities are also huge. In Brownsville, Brooklyn, the per capita shooting rate is 81 times higher than in nearby Bay Ridge, Brooklyn—the first neighborhood predominantly black, the second neighborhood predominantly white and Asian. As a result, police presence and use of proactive tactics are much higher in Brownsville than in Bay Ridge. Every time there is a shooting, the police will flood the area looking to make stops in order to avert a retaliatory shooting. They are in Brownsville not because of racism, but because they want to provide protection to its many law-abiding residents who deserve safety.

Who are some of the victims of elevated urban crime? On March 11, 2015, as protesters were once again converging on the Ferguson police headquarters demanding the resignation of the entire department, a six-year-old boy named Marcus Johnson was killed a few miles away in a St. Louis park, the victim of a drive-by shooting. No one protested his killing. Al Sharpton did not demand a federal investigation. Few people outside of his immediate community know his name.

Ten children under the age of ten were killed in Baltimore last year. In Cleveland, three children five and younger were killed in September. A seven-year-old boy was killed in Chicago over the Fourth of July weekend by a bullet intended for his father. In November, a nine-year-old in Chicago was lured into an alley and killed by his father’s gang enemies; the father refused to cooperate with the police. In August, a nine-year-old girl was doing her homework on her mother’s bed in Ferguson when a bullet fired into the house killed her. In Cincinnati in July, a four-year-old girl was shot in the head and a six-year-old girl was left paralyzed and partially blind from two separate drive-by shootings. This mindless violence seems almost to be regarded as normal, given the lack of attention it receives from the same people who would be out in droves if any of these had been police shootings. As horrific as such stories are, crime rates were much higher 20 years ago. In New York City in 1990, for example, there were 2,245 homicides. In 2014 there were 333—a decrease of 85 percent. The drop in New York’s crime rate is the steepest in the nation, but crime has fallen at a historic rate nationwide as well—by about 40 percent—since the early 1990s. The greatest beneficiaries of these declining rates have been minorities. Over 10,000 minority males alive today in New York would be dead if the city’s homicide rate had remained at its early 1990s level.

What is behind this historic crime drop? A policing revolution that began in New York and spread nationally, and that is now being threatened. Starting in 1994, the top brass of the NYPD embraced the then-radical idea that the police can actually prevent crime, not just respond to it. They started gathering and analyzing crime data on a daily and then hourly basis. They looked for patterns, and strategized on tactics to try to quell crime outbreaks as they were emerging. Equally important, they held commanders accountable for crime in their jurisdictions. Department leaders started meeting weekly with precinct commanders to grill them on crime patterns on their watch. These weekly accountability sessions came to be known as Compstat. They were ruthless, high tension affairs. If a commander was not fully informed about every local crime outbreak and ready with a strategy to combat it, his career was in jeopardy.

Compstat created a sense of urgency about fighting crime that has never left the NYPD. For decades, the rap against the police was that they ignored crime in minority neighborhoods. Compstat keeps New York commanders focused like a laser beam on where people are being victimized most, and that is in minority communities. Compstat spread nationwide. Departments across the country now send officers to emerging crime hot spots to try to interrupt criminal behavior before it happens.

In terms of economic stimulus alone, no other government program has come close to the success of data-driven policing. In New York City, businesses that had shunned previously drug-infested areas now set up shop there, offering residents a choice in shopping and creating a demand for workers. Senior citizens felt safe to go to the store or to the post office to pick up their Social Security checks. Children could ride their bikes on city sidewalks without their mothers worrying that they would be shot. But the crime victories of the last two decades, and the moral support on which law and order depends, are now in jeopardy thanks to the falsehoods of the Black Lives Matter movement.

Police operating in inner-city neighborhoods now find themselves routinely surrounded by cursing, jeering crowds when they make a pedestrian stop or try to arrest a suspect. Sometimes bottles and rocks are thrown. Bystanders stick cell phones in the officers’ faces, daring them to proceed with their duties. Officers are worried about becoming the next racist cop of the week and possibly losing their livelihood thanks to an incomplete cell phone video that inevitably fails to show the antecedents to their use of force. Officer use of force is never pretty, but the public is clueless about how hard it is to subdue a suspect who is determined to resist arrest.

As a result of the anti-cop campaign of the last two years and the resulting push-back in the streets, officers in urban areas are cutting back on precisely the kind of policing that led to the crime decline of the 1990s and 2000s. Arrests and summons are down, particularly for low-level offenses. Police officers continue to rush to 911 calls when there is already a victim. But when it comes to making discretionary stops—such as getting out of their cars and questioning people hanging out on drug corners at 1:00 a.m.—many cops worry that doing so could put their careers on the line. Police officers are, after all, human. When they are repeatedly called racist for stopping and questioning suspicious individuals in high-crime areas, they will perform less of those stops. That is not only understandable—in a sense, it is how things should work. Policing is political. If a powerful political block has denied the legitimacy of assertive policing, we will get less of it.

On the other hand, the people demanding that the police back off are by no means representative of the entire black community. Go to any police-neighborhood meeting in Harlem, the South Bronx, or South Central Los Angeles, and you will invariably hear variants of the following: “We want the dealers off the corner.” “You arrest them and they’re back the next day.” “There are kids hanging out on my stoop. Why can’t you arrest them for loitering?” “I smell weed in my hallway. Can’t you do something?” I met an elderly cancer amputee in the Mount Hope section of the Bronx who was terrified to go to her lobby mailbox because of the young men trespassing there and selling drugs. The only time she felt safe was when the police were there. “Please, Jesus,” she said to me, “send more police!” The irony is that the police cannot respond to these heartfelt requests for order without generating the racially disproportionate statistics that will be used against them in an ACLU or Justice Department lawsuit.

Unfortunately, when officers back off in high crime neighborhoods, crime shoots through the roof. Our country is in the midst of the first sustained violent crime spike in two decades. Murders rose nearly 17 percent in the nation’s 50 largest cities in 2015, and it was in cities with large black populations where the violence increased the most. Baltimore’s per capita homicide rate last year was the highest in its history. Milwaukee had its deadliest year in a decade, with a 72 percent increase in homicides. Homicides in Cleveland increased 90 percent over the previous year. Murders rose 83 percent in Nashville, 54 percent in Washington, D.C., and 61 percent in Minneapolis. In Chicago, where pedestrian stops are down by 90 percent, shootings were up 80 percent through March 2016.

I first identified the increase in violent crime in May 2015 and dubbed it “the Ferguson effect.” My diagnosis set off a firestorm of controversy on the anti-cop Left and in criminology circles. Despite that furor, FBI Director James Comey confirmed the Ferguson effect in a speech at the University of Chicago Law School last October. Comey decried the “chill wind” that had been blowing through law enforcement over the previous year, and attributed the sharp rise in homicides and shootings to the campaign against cops. Several days later, President Obama had the temerity to rebuke Comey, accusing him (while leaving him unnamed) of “cherry-pick[ing] data” and using “anecdotal evidence to drive policy [and] feed political agendas.” The idea that President Obama knows more about crime and policing than his FBI director is of course ludicrous. But the President thought it necessary to take Comey down, because to recognize the connection between proactive policing and public safety undermines the entire premise of the anti-cop Left: that the police oppress minority communities rather than bring them surcease from disorder.

As crime rates continue to rise, the overwhelming majority of victims are, as usual, black—as are their assailants. But police officers are coming under attack as well. In August 2015, an officer in Birmingham, Alabama, was beaten unconscious by a convicted felon after a car stop. The suspect had grabbed the officer’s gun, as Michael Brown had tried to do in Ferguson, but the officer hesitated to use force against him for fear of being charged with racism. Such incidents will likely multiply as the media continues to amplify the Black Lives Matter activists’ poisonous slander against the nation’s police forces.

The number of police officers killed in shootings more than doubled during the first three months of 2016. In fact, officers are at much greater risk from blacks than unarmed blacks are from the police. Over the last decade, an officer’s chance of getting killed by a black has been 18.5 times higher than the chance of an unarmed black getting killed by a cop.

The favorite conceit of the Black Lives Matter movement is, of course, the racist white officer gunning down a black man. According to available studies, it is a canard. A March 2015 Justice Department report on the Philadelphia Police Department found that black and Hispanic officers were much more likely than white officers to shoot blacks based on “threat misperception,” i.e., the incorrect belief that a civilian is armed. A study by University of Pennsylvania criminologist Greg Ridgeway, formerly acting director of the National Institute of Justice, has found that black officers in the NYPD were 3.3 times more likely to fire their weapons at shooting scenes than other officers present. The April 2015 death of drug dealer Freddie Gray in Baltimore has been slotted into the Black Lives Matter master narrative, even though the three most consequential officers in Gray’s arrest and transport are black. There is no evidence that a white drug dealer in Gray’s circumstances, with a similar history of faking injuries, would have been treated any differently.

We have been here before. In the 1960s and early 1970s, black and white radicals directed hatred and occasional violence against the police. The difference today is that anti-cop ideology is embraced at the highest reaches of the establishment: by the President, by his Attorney General, by college presidents, by foundation heads, and by the press. The presidential candidates of one party are competing to see who can out-demagogue President Obama’s persistent race-based calumnies against the criminal justice system, while those of the other party have not emphasized the issue as they might have.

I don’t know what will end the current frenzy against the police. What I do know is that we are playing with fire, and if it keeps spreading, it will be hard to put out.

Voir aussi:

The Myths of Black Lives Matter
The movement has won over Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders. But what if its claims are fiction?
Heather Mac Donald
The Wall Street Journal
Feb. 11, 2016

A television ad for Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign now airing in South Carolina shows the candidate declaring that “too many encounters with law enforcement end tragically.” She later adds: “We have to face up to the hard truth of injustice and systemic racism.”

Her Democratic presidential rival, Bernie Sanders, met with the Rev. Al Sharpton on Wednesday. Mr. Sanders then tweeted that “As President, let me be very clear that no one will fight harder to end racism and reform our broken criminal justice system than I will.” And he appeared on the TV talk show “The View” saying, “It is not acceptable to see unarmed people being shot by police officers.”

Apparently the Black Lives Matter movement has convinced Democrats and progressives that there is an epidemic of racist white police officers killing young black men. Such rhetoric is going to heat up as Mrs. Clinton and Mr. Sanders court minority voters before the Feb. 27 South Carolina primary.

But what if the Black Lives Matter movement is based on fiction? Not just the fictional account of the 2014 police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., but the utter misrepresentation of police shootings generally.

To judge from Black Lives Matter protesters and their media and political allies, you would think that killer cops pose the biggest threat to young black men today. But this perception, like almost everything else that many people think they know about fatal police shootings, is wrong.

The Washington Post has been gathering data on fatal police shootings over the past year and a half to correct acknowledged deficiencies in federal tallies. The emerging data should open many eyes.

For starters, fatal police shootings make up a much larger proportion of white and Hispanic homicide deaths than black homicide deaths. According to the Post database, in 2015 officers killed 662 whites and Hispanics, and 258 blacks. (The overwhelming majority of all those police-shooting victims were attacking the officer, often with a gun.) Using the 2014 homicide numbers as an approximation of 2015’s, those 662 white and Hispanic victims of police shootings would make up 12% of all white and Hispanic homicide deaths. That is three times the proportion of black deaths that result from police shootings.

The lower proportion of black deaths due to police shootings can be attributed to the lamentable black-on-black homicide rate. There were 6,095 black homicide deaths in 2014—the most recent year for which such data are available—compared with 5,397 homicide deaths for whites and Hispanics combined. Almost all of those black homicide victims had black killers.

Police officers—of all races—are also disproportionately endangered by black assailants. Over the past decade, according to FBI data, 40% of cop killers have been black. Officers are killed by blacks at a rate 2.5 times higher than the rate at which blacks are killed by police.

Some may find evidence of police bias in the fact that blacks make up 26% of the police-shooting victims, compared with their 13% representation in the national population. But as residents of poor black neighborhoods know too well, violent crimes are disproportionately committed by blacks. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, blacks were charged with 62% of all robberies, 57% of murders and 45% of assaults in the 75 largest U.S. counties in 2009, though they made up roughly 15% of the population there.

Such a concentration of criminal violence in minority communities means that officers will be disproportionately confronting armed and often resisting suspects in those communities, raising officers’ own risk of using lethal force.

The Black Lives Matter movement claims that white officers are especially prone to shooting innocent blacks due to racial bias, but this too is a myth. A March 2015 Justice Department report on the Philadelphia Police Department found that black and Hispanic officers were much more likely than white officers to shoot blacks based on “threat misperception”—that is, the mistaken belief that a civilian is armed.

A 2015 study by University of Pennsylvania criminologist Greg Ridgeway, formerly acting director of the National Institute of Justice, found that, at a crime scene where gunfire is involved, black officers in the New York City Police Department were 3.3 times more likely to discharge their weapons than other officers at the scene.

The Black Lives Matter movement has been stunningly successful in changing the subject from the realities of violent crime. The world knows the name of Michael Brown but not Tyshawn Lee, a 9-year-old black child lured into an alley and killed by gang members in Chicago last fall. Tyshawn was one of dozens of black children gunned down in America last year. The Baltimore Sun reported on Jan. 1: “Blood was shed in Baltimore at an unprecedented pace in 2015, with mostly young, black men shot to death in a near-daily crush of violence.”

Those were black lives that mattered, and it is a scandal that outrage is heaped less on the dysfunctional culture that produces so many victims than on the police officers who try to protect them.

Ms. Mac Donald is the Thomas W. Smith fellow at the Manhattan Institute and author of “The War on Cops,” forthcoming in July from Encounter Books.

Voir également:
Black and Unarmed: Behind the Numbers
What the Black Lives Matter movement misses about those police shootings
Heather Mac Donald
The Marshall Project
02.08.2016

For the last year or so, the Washington Post has been gathering data on fatal police shootings of civilians. Its database for 2015 is now complete. Commentators have taken the Post’s data as evidence that the police are gunning down unarmed blacks out of implicit bias. But a close examination of the Post’s findings presents a more complicated picture of policing and casts doubt on the notion that these shootings were driven by race.

The Post began its police shootings project in response to the 2014 killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, a death that triggered days of rioting, the assassination of two New York City police officers, and a surge of support for the Black Lives Matter protest movement. Federal tallies of lethal police shootings are notoriously incomplete; the Post sought to correct that lacuna by searching news sites and other information sources for reports of officer-involved homicides. The results: As of Jan. 15, the Post had documented 987 victims of fatal police shootings in 2015, about twice the number historically recorded by federal agencies. Whites were 50 percent of those victims, and blacks were 26 percent. By comparison, whites are 62 percent of the U.S. population, and blacks, 13 percent. The ensuing debate has largely centered on whether the disproportionate number of black deaths was a result of police racism or the relatively high rate of crime in black neighborhoods, which brings black men into more frequent, and more fraught, encounters with the police.

In August of 2015 the Post zeroed in on unarmed black men, who the paper said were seven times more likely than unarmed white men to die by police gunfire. The article noted that 24 of the 60 “unarmed” deaths up to that date — some 40 percent — were of black men, helping to explain « why outrage continues to simmer a year after Ferguson. » By year’s end, there were 36 unarmed black men (and two black women) and 31 unarmed white men (and one white woman) among the total 987 victims. The rate at which unarmed black men were more likely than unarmed white men to die by police gunfire had dropped, but was still six-to-one.

But the numbers don’t tell the whole story. It is worth looking at the specific cases included in the Post’s unarmed victim classification in some detail, since that category is the most politically explosive. The “unarmed” label is literally accurate, but it frequently fails to convey highly-charged policing situations. In a number of cases, if the victim ended up being unarmed, it was certainly not for lack of trying. At least five black victims had reportedly tried to grab the officer’s gun, or had been beating the cop with his own equipment. Some were shot from an accidental discharge triggered by their own assault on the officer. And two individuals included in the Post’s “unarmed black victims” category were struck by stray bullets aimed at someone else in justified cop shootings. If the victims were not the intended targets, then racism could have played no role in their deaths.

In one of those unintended cases, an undercover cop from the New York Police Department was conducting a gun sting in Mount Vernon, just north of New York City. One of the gun traffickers jumped into the cop’s car, stuck a pistol to his head, grabbed $2,400 and fled. The officer gave chase and opened fire after the thief again pointed his gun at him. Two of the officer’s bullets accidentally hit a 61-year-old bystander, killing him. That older man happened to be black, but his race had nothing to do with his tragic death. In the other collateral damage case, Virginia Beach, Virginia, officers approached a car parked at a convenience store that had a homicide suspect in the passenger seat. The suspect opened fire, sending a bullet through an officer’s shirt. The cops returned fire, killing their assailant as well as a woman in the driver’s seat. That woman entered the Post’s database without qualification as an “unarmed black victim” of police fire.

Unfortunately, innocent blacks like the elderly Mount Vernon man probably do face a higher chance of getting shot by stray police fire than innocent whites. But that is because violent crime in their neighborhoods is so much higher. The per capita shooting rate in Brownsville, Brooklyn, with its legacy of poverty and crime, is 81 times higher than in working-class Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, a few miles away, according to the New York Police Department. This exponentially higher rate of gun violence means that the police will be much more intensively deployed in Brownsville, trying to protect innocent residents and gangbangers alike from shootings. If the police are forced to open fire, in rare instances a police bullet will go astray and hit a bystander. That is tragic, but that innocent’s chance of getting shot by the police is dwarfed by his chance of getting shot by criminals.

Other unarmed black victims in the Post’s database were so fiercely resisting arrest, judging from press accounts, that the officers involved could reasonably have viewed them as posing a grave danger. In October 2015, a San Diego officer was called to a Holiday Inn in nearby Point Loma, after hotel employees ejected a man causing a disturbance in the lobby. The officer approached a male casing cars in the hotel’s parking lot. The suspect jumped the officer and both fell to the ground. The officer tried to Tase the man, hitting himself as well. The suspect repeatedly tried to wrench the officer’s gun from its holster, according to news reports, and continued assaulting the officer after both had stood up. Fearing for his life, the officer shot the man. It is hard to see how race entered into that encounter. Someone who tries for an officer’s gun must be presumed to have the intention to use it. In 2015, three officers were killed with their own guns, which the suspects had wrestled from them. Similarly, in August, an officer from Prince George’s County, Maryland, pursued a man who had fled from a car crash. The man tried to grab the officer’s gun, and it discharged. The suspect continued to fight with the officer until he was Tased by a second officer and tackled by a third. The shot that was discharged during the struggle ultimately proved fatal to the suspect. In January, a sheriff’s deputy in Strong, Arkansas, responded to a pharmacy burglary alarm in the early morning. The burglar inside fought with the deputy for control of the deputy’s gun and it discharged. The suspect fled the store but was caught outside, at which point the deputy noticed the suspect’s gun injury and called an ambulance.

A police critic may reject the officers’ accounts of these deaths, invoking the cell phone videos that discredited police accounts in the shootings of Walter Scott in North Charleston, South Carolina, and Laquan McDonald in Chicago. Viral videos of these events have generated an understandable skepticism towards police narratives. But equal skepticism is warranted towards witness accounts of allegedly unjustified officer shootings. Case in point: the persistent claim by bystanders that a peaceable Michael Brown, hands up, was gunned down in cold blood by Officer Darren Wilson. In fact, as forensic evidence and more credible eyewitnesses established, Brown had assaulted Wilson and tried to grab his gun. Until there is a critical mass of such resolved narratives, whether one trusts officer accounts more than bystander accounts, or vice versa, will depend on one’s prior assumptions regarding the police and the community.

In several cases in the Post’s “unarmed black man” category, the suspect had gained control of other pieces of an officer’s equipment and was putting it to potentially lethal use. In New York City, a robbery suspect apprehended in a narrow stairwell beat two detectives’ faces bloody with a police radio. In Memphis, Tennessee, a 19-year-old wanted on two out-of-state warrants, including a sex offense in Iowa, kicked open a car door during a car stop, grabbed the officer’s handcuffs, and hit him in the face with them.

In other instances in the Post’s “unarmed black man” category, the suspect’s physical resistance was so violent that it could reasonably have put the officer in fear for his life. A trespasser at a motel in Barstow, California, brought a sheriff’s deputy to the ground and beat him in the face so viciously that he broke numerous bones and caused other injuries. The suspect refused repeated orders to desist and move away. An officer in such a situation can’t know whether he will lose consciousness under the blows to his head; if he does, he is at even greater risk that his gun will be used against him.

An Orlando, Florida, officer was called about a fight in an apartment complex. The suspect fought so violently with the responding officer that the officer’s equipment had been torn off and was strewn about the scene, including his used Taser, baton, gun magazine, and wristwatch. In Dearborn, Michigan, a probation violator escaped from officers after committing a theft; later in the day, an officer approached him and he again took off running. A fight ensued, which left the officer with his gun belt loosened, his equipment from the belt on the ground, and his uniform ripped. The officer was covered with mud and sustained minor injuries. In Miami, a man crashed a taxi cab in the early morning hours and took off running onto a highway. During the fight, the driver bit the officer’s finger so hard that he nearly severed it; surgery was required to reattach it to the left hand. One can debate the tactics used and the moment when an officer would have been justified in opening fire, but these cases are more complicated and morally ambiguous than a simple “unarmed” classification would lead a reader to believe.

The Post’s cases do not support the idea that the police have a more demanding standard for using lethal force when confronting unarmed white suspects. According to the press accounts, only one unarmed white victim attempted to grab the officer’s gun. In Tuscaloosa, Alabama, a 50-year-old white suspect in a domestic assault call ran at the officer with a spoon; he was Tased and then shot. A 28-year-old driver in Des Moines, Iowa, led police on a chase, then got out of his car and walked quickly toward the officer, and was shot. In Akron, Ohio, a 21-year-old suspect in a grocery store robbery who had escaped on a bike did not remove his hand from his waistband when ordered to do so. Had any of these victims been black, police critics might well have conferred on them instant notoriety; instead, they are unknown.

While the nation was focused on the non-epidemic of racist police killings throughout 2015, the routine drive-by shootings in urban areas were taking their usual toll, including on children, to little national notice. In Cleveland, three children ages five and younger were killed in September. Five children were shot in Cleveland over the Fourth of July weekend. A seven-year-old boy was killed in Chicago that same weekend by a bullet intended for his father. In November, a nine-year-old in Chicago was lured into an alley and killed by his father’s gang enemies; the alleged murderer was reportedly avenging the killing of his own 13-year-old brother in October. In August a nine-year-old girl was doing her homework on her mother’s bed in Ferguson when a bullet shot into the house killed her. In Cincinnati in July, a four-year-old girl was shot in the head and a six-year-old girl was left paralyzed and partially blind from two separate drive-by shootings. A six-year-old boy was killed in a drive-by shooting on West Florissant Avenue in March in St. Louis, as protesters were again converging on the Ferguson Police Department to demand the resignation of the entire department. Ten children under the age of 10 were killed in Baltimore last year; 12 victims were between the age of 10 and 17. This is just a partial list of child victims. While the world knows who Michael Brown is, few people outside these children’s immediate communities know their names.

Without question, police officers must be constantly retrained in courtesy and respect; too often they develop boorish, callous attitudes towards civilians on the street. Some are unfit to serve. Some are surely racists. And if de-escalation training can safely reduce officer use of force further, it should be widely implemented. But the Black Lives Matter movement’s focus on shootings by police should not distract attention from the most serious use-of-force problem facing black communities: criminal violence. In 2014, there were 6,095 black homicide victims, more than all white and Hispanic homicide victims combined, even though blacks are only 13 percent of the population. The black homicide toll will be even higher in 2015. In over 90 percent of those black deaths, the killer was another black civilian. By all means, we must try to eliminate unjustified use of force by police. But as long as crime rates in black communities remain so high, officers will be disproportionately engaged there, with all the attendant risks of such deployment. Indeed, the incessant refrain that cops are racist could well increase the likelihood that black suspects will resist arrest, and that witnesses will be reluctant to cooperate.

Heather Mac Donald is the Thomas W. Smith fellow at the Manhattan Institute and author of the forthcoming “The War on Cops.”

Voir encore:

Chicago on the Brink
A retreat from proactive policing has unleashed mayhem in the city
Heather Mac Donald
City journal
Summer 2016

Violence in Chicago is reaching epidemic proportions. In the first five months of 2016, someone was shot every two and a half hours and someone murdered every 14 hours, for a total of nearly 1,400 nonfatal shooting victims and 240 fatalities. Over Memorial Day weekend, 69 people were shot, nearly one per hour, dwarfing the previous year’s tally of 53 shootings over the same period. The violence is spilling over from the city’s gang-infested South and West Sides into the downtown business district; Lake Shore Drive has seen drive-by shootings and robberies.

The growing mayhem is the result of Chicago police officers’ withdrawal from proactive enforcement, making the city a dramatic example of what I have called the “Ferguson effect.” Since the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, in August 2014, the conceit that American policing is lethally racist has dominated the national airwaves and political discourse, from the White House on down. In response, cops in minority neighborhoods in Chicago and other cities around the country are backing off pedestrian stops and public-order policing; criminals are flourishing in the resulting vacuum. (An early and influential Ferguson-effect denier has now changed his mind: in a June 2016 study for the National Institute of Justice, Richard Rosenfeld of the University of Missouri–St. Louis concedes that the 2015 homicide increase in the nation’s large cities was “real and nearly unprecedented.” “The only explanation that gets the timing right is a version of the Ferguson effect,” he told the Guardian.)

Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel warned in October 2015 that officers were going “fetal,” as shootings in the city skyrocketed. But 2016 has brought an even sharper reduction in proactive enforcement. Devastating failures in Chicago’s leadership after a horrific police shooting and an ill-considered pact between the American Civil Liberties Union and the police are driving that reduction. Residents of Chicago’s high-crime areas are paying the price.

Felicia Moore, a wiry middle-aged woman with tattoos on her face and the ravaged frame of a former drug addict, is standing inside a Polish sausage joint on Chicago’s South Side at 10 PM. Asked about crime, she responds: “I’ve been in Chicago all my life. It’s never been this bad. Mothers and grandchildren are scared to come out on their porch; if you see more than five or six niggas walking together, you gotta run.” The violence claimed her only son last year, she says, just as he was being drafted by the Atlanta Hawks. Moore is engaging in some revisionist history: her son, Jeremiah Moore, was, in fact, killed with a shot to his head—but in 2013, a little over a year after he was released from prison for shooting a mother at a bus stop; the Atlantic Hawks don’t enter into it.

Felicia Moore’s assessment of the present crime situation in Chicago, however, is more reality-based. Through the end of May, shooting incidents in Chicago were up 53 percent over the same period in 2015, which had already seen a significant increase over 2014. Compared with the first five months of 2014, shooting incidents in 2016 were up 86 percent. Certain police districts saw larger spikes. The Harrison District on the West Side, encompassing West Humboldt Park, for example, had a 191 percent increase in homicides through the end of May. Shootings in May citywide averaged nearly 13 a day, a worrisome portent for summer.

A man who calls himself City Streets is standing in a ragtag group of drinkers and hustlers outside a liquor and convenience store on the South Side. They pass around beer, cigarettes, and cash and ask strangers for money. A young woman shoves her boy along, oblivious to the late hour. “It’s terrible out here. Someone gets shot every day,” City Streets tells me. “It ain’t no place to hang,” he adds, ignoring his own advice.

Social breakdown lies behind Chicago’s historically high levels of violence. Fatherlessness in the city’s black community is at a cataclysmic level—close to 80 percent of children are born to single mothers in high-crime areas. Illegitimacy is catching up fast among Hispanics, as well. Gangs have stepped in where fathers are absent. A 2012 gang audit documented 59 active street gangs with 625 factions, some controlling a single block. Schools in gang territories go on high alert at dismissal time to fend off violence. Endemic crime has prevented the commercial development and gentrification that are revitalizing so many parts of Chicago closer to downtown; block after block on the South Side features a wan liquor store or check-cashing outlet, surrounded by empty lots and the occasional skeleton of a once-magnificent beaux-arts apartment complex or bank. Nonfunctioning streetlights, their fuse boxes vandalized, signal the reign of a local gang faction.

But disorder, bad before, seems to be worsening. The night after my conversations with Felicia Moore and City Streets, dozens of teens burst into the intersection of Cicero and Madison on the West Side, stopping traffic and ignoring the loud approach of a fire truck. They hold their cell phones high, the new sign of urban empowerment. Earlier that day, a fight involving at least 60 teens took over a nearby intersection, provoking a retaliatory shooting two days later at a local fried-chicken restaurant. On May 14, a 13-year-old girl stabbed a 15-year-old girl to death in a South Side housing complex; the murderer’s mother had given her the knife. In the summer of 2015, wolf packs of teens marauded down Michigan Avenue’s Magnificent Mile, robbing stores and pedestrians. The phenomenon started even earlier this year. A couple strolling on Lake Shore Drive downtown on Memorial Day weekend were chased by more than a half-dozen young men, at least one armed with a gun. The two tried to escape across the highway, the teens in hot pursuit. A pickup truck hit the couple, killing the female. A police officer flashed his emergency lights at the teens, and they fled. “If it wasn’t for the police being there at the time, I don’t know where I might be now,” the surviving man told the Chicago Sun-Times. “Six feet under?”

Public-order infractions, otherwise known as “Broken Windows” offenses, abound. Stand just a few minutes on a South or West Side thoroughfare, and someone will stride by hawking bootleg CDs or videos and loose cigarettes. Oliver, a 34-year-old with a Bloods tattoo and alcohol on his breath, has just been frisked by the police in a West Side White Castle parking lot around 9:30 PM. “The police are assholes,” he says. “I know my rights; I’m selling CDs, so I know I’m doing something wrong, but they weren’t visible in my bag.” Oliver then sells two loosies to a passerby, laboriously counting out change from a five-dollar bill.

Some law-abiding Chicagoans blame the rising violence on just such street disorder. After a woman and four men were shot at a bus stop on the South Side in May, a local resident complained about the illegal vending. “This sort of congregation of people who meet at this space dealing drugs and selling loose cigarettes . . . is despicable,” he told the Chicago Tribune. The drug trade is less overt but more ubiquitous than the trafficking in CDs and loosies. As I approach a Jamaican jerk restaurant on the West Side, the young men in front melt away. “You saw what happened when you pulled up here—everyone disappeared,” a middle-aged man tells me. “They sell drugs everywhere.”

The majority of victims in the current crime wave are already known to the police. Four-fifths of the Memorial Day shooting victims, for example, were on the Chicago Police Department’s list of gang members deemed most prone to violence. But innocents, like the Lake Shore Drive robbery victims, are being attacked as well: a 59-year-old Pakistani cabdriver, fatally shot in the head in February by a 19-year-old passenger; a DePaul student brutally beaten in April on the subway while other passengers passively looked on; a 49-year-old female dispatcher with the city’s 311 call center, killed in May while standing outside a Starbucks a few blocks from police headquarters; a worker driving home at night from her job at FedEx, shot four times in the head while waiting at an intersection and saved from death by the cell phone at her ear; a trucker shot in the face in May on the Dan Ryan Expressway; three eighth-graders robbed at gunpoint outside their school in May; a six-year-old girl playing outside her grandmother’s house in June, shot in the back and lung; a man stabbed in the stomach by a felon, who said: “I hate white people. Give me your money.”

The murder that shook the city to its core was the assassination of nine-year-old Tyshawn Lee. He was playing in a park on November 2, 2015, when a 22-year-old gangster, Dwight Boone-Doty, lured him into an alley with the promise of chips and candy. Boone-Doty fatally shot the boy, then fled with two accomplices, bleaching the getaway car and dumping it in Dalton, Illinois. Boone-Doty’s original plan, according to a police source, was to kidnap Tyshawn and send his ears and fingers to his mother. Tyshawn’s father was a member of the gang believed responsible for shooting the brother and mother of one of Boone-Doty’s accomplices a few weeks earlier. After the shooting, local schools went on lockdown, terrified that the children of gang members were now fair game for execution.

Officers who try to intervene in this disorder face a virulent street situation, thanks to the current anti-cop ideology. “People are a hundred times more likely to resist arrest,” an officer who has worked a decade and a half on the South Side informs me. “People want to fight you; they swear at you. ‘Fuck the police, we don’t have to listen,’ they say. I haven’t seen this kind of hatred toward the police in my career.”

Antipolice animus is nothing new in Chicago, of course. An Illinois state representative, Monique Davis, told a Detroit radio station in 2013 that people in her South Side community believed that the reason so few homicide cases were solved is that it was the police who were killing young black males. Davis later refused to repudiate her statement: “We can’t say that it is not happening.” The “no-snitch” ethic of refusing to cooperate with the cops is the biggest impediment to solving crime, according to Chicago commanders. But the Black Lives Matter narrative about endemically racist cops has made the street dynamic much worse. A detective says: “From patrol to investigation, it’s almost an undoable job now. If I get out of my car, the guys get hostile right away and several people are taping [with cell phones].” Bystanders and suspects try to tamper with crime scenes and aggressively interfere with investigations. Additional officers may be needed during an arrest to keep angry onlookers away. “It’s very dangerous out there now,” a detective tells me. In March 2016, then-chief of patrol (now superintendent) Eddie Johnson decried what he called the “string of violent attacks against the police” after an off-duty officer was shot by a felon who had ordered him on the ground after robbing him. The previous week, three officers were shot during a drug investigation.

This volatile policing environment now exists in urban areas across the country. But Chicago officers face two additional challenges: a new oversight regime for pedestrian stops; and the fallout from an officer’s killing of Laquan McDonald in October 2014.

In March 2015, the ACLU of Illinois accused the Chicago Police Department of engaging in racially biased stops, locally called “investigatory stops,” because its stop rate did not match population ratios. Blacks were 72 percent of all stop subjects during a four-month period in 2014, reported the ACLU, whereas whites were 9 percent of all stop subjects. But blacks and whites each make up roughly 32 percent of the city’s populace. Ergo, the police are racially profiling. This by-now drearily familiar and ludicrously inadequate benchmarking methodology ignores the incidence of crime. In 2014, blacks in Chicago made up 79 percent of all known nonfatal shooting suspects, 85 percent of all known robbery suspects, and 77 percent of all known murder suspects, according to police department data. Whites were 1 percent of known nonfatal shootings suspects in 2014, 2.5 percent of known robbery suspects, and 5 percent of known murder suspects, the latter number composed disproportionately of domestic homicides. Whites are nearly absent, in other words, among violent street criminals—precisely whom proactive policing aims to deter. Whites are actually over-stopped compared with their involvement in street crime. Nearly 40 percent of young white males surveyed by Northwestern University criminologist Wes Skogan in 2015 reported getting stopped in the previous year, compared with nearly 70 percent of young black males. “Statistically, age is the strongest correlate of being stopped,” says Skogan—not race.

Despite the groundlessness of the ACLU’s racial-bias charges, then–police superintendent Garry McCarthy and the city’s corporation counsel signed an agreement in August 2015 allowing the ACLU to review all future stops made by the department. The agreement also created an independent monitor for police stops. “Why McCarthy agreed to put the ACLU in charge is beyond us,” says a homicide detective. McCarthy’s signing of the stop agreement was indeed ironic, since he had encouraged a dramatic increase in stops. They rose 50 percent in his first two years, ultimately reaching about 700,000 a year, more than the NYPD performed at the height of its own stop activity, even though the CPD is about a third the size of the NYPD.

On January 1, 2016, the police department rolled out a new form for documenting investigatory stops, developed to meet ACLU demands. The new form, traditionally called a contact card, was two pages long and contained a whopping 70 fields of information to be filled out, including three narrative sections. (Those narrative sections were subsequently combined to try to quiet criticism.) The new contact card dwarfs even arrest reports and takes at least 30 minutes to complete. Every contact card is forwarded to the ACLU. Stops dropped nearly 90 percent in the first quarter of 2016. Detectives had long relied on the information contained in contact cards to solve crimes. When 15-year-old Hadiya Pendleton was killed in January 2013, days after performing with her high school band in President Barack Obama’s second inaugural, investigators identified the occupants of the getaway car through descriptions of the vehicle in previous contact cards. Now, however, crime sleuths have almost nothing to go on. Earlier this year, a detective working armed robbery had a pattern of two male Hispanics with tattoos on their faces sticking up people in front of their homes. But virtually no contact cards had been written in the area for three months. So he made car stops in the neighborhood himself, coming across the stolen car used in the robberies and the parolees responsible for the crimes. This is not a maximally efficient division of labor.

Criminals have become emboldened by the police disengagement. “Gangbangers now realize that no one will stop them,” says a former high-ranking police official. And people who wouldn’t have carried a gun before are now armed, a South Side officer says. The solution, according to officers, is straightforward: “If tomorrow, we still had to fill out the new forms, but they no longer went to the ACLU, stops would increase,” a detective claims.

But a more profound pall hangs over the department because of a shockingly unjustified police homicide and the missteps of top brass and the mayor in handling it. On the night of October 20, 2014, a report went out over the police radio that someone was breaking into cars in a trucking yard in the southwest neighborhood of Archer Heights; the vandal had threatened the 911 caller with a knife. Two officers found 17-year-old Laquan McDonald a block away; he punctured a tire on their squad car and struck its windshield with his three-inch blade. The cops trailed McDonald, who was high on PCP, for nearly half a mile while waiting for backup units with a Taser. Two additional patrol cars pulled up as McDonald strode along the middle of Pulaski Road, energetically swinging his right arm, knife in hand. One car parked behind him; its dashboard camera recorded the subsequent events. The other car stopped about 30 yards ahead. The officers in that forward vehicle jumped out, guns pointed at McDonald, commanding him to drop the knife. Less than ten seconds after exiting, Officer Jason Van Dyke began shooting. McDonald spun 360 degrees under the impact of the first bullets and dropped to the ground. Van Dyke continued shooting, emptying his cartridge into McDonald’s crumpled and gently writhing body.

The shooting, pitiable to watch, represented a catastrophic failure of tactics and judgment. Some police use-of-force experts claim that a suspect armed with a knife can rush and slash an unprepared officer if the assailant is within 21 feet. Even if that so-called 21-foot rule applied here, Van Dyke and his partner had no need to exit the car and put themselves within possible reach of McDonald. If they were in any imminent risk of lethal harm, they created that risk themselves. But even then, McDonald did not appear poised to attack, despite his failure to drop the knife. He was on a slight rightward trajectory away from Van Dyke, who was on his left, before the shooting began.

What followed the homicide was almost as shocking. Five officers at the scene all told variants of the same tale in their written reports: that McDonald had been advancing toward Van Dyke, aggressively raising his knife as if to attack. Once on the ground, McDonald tried to get up, they said, continuing to point his knife at Van Dyke. None of those claims is borne out by the video. McDonald displayed no aggressive behavior toward Van Dyke. It is true that for two strides immediately before the first bullets hit him, McDonald’s trajectory had minimally shifted to the left so as to be perpendicular to Van Dyke rather than veering diagonally away. But that modest and likely unconscious alteration of trajectory does not rise to the level of lethal threat. And having made the mistake of opening fire in the first place, Van Dyke should at least have stopped shooting once McDonald fell. Had McDonald had a gun, capable of striking from a distance, rather than a knife, the analysis might have been different.

A police-union spokesman at the scene of the killing told reporters that McDonald had been threatening Van Dyke. The police department press release a few hours later essentially echoed that account, stating that McDonald continued to approach the officers after being warned. Superintendent McCarthy viewed the video the next day, without retracting the department’s press release, explaining later that he was too busy trying to learn what had happened. From then on out, officials made no effort to countermand the McDonald attack narrative. (A rumor that cops destroyed a video of the incident taken at a nearby Burger King, however, proved not to be true.)

McCarthy immediately stripped Van Dyke of his police powers and forwarded the case to the civilian board that reviews police shootings, the Independent Police Review Authority (IPRA). The case also went to the Cook County state attorney’s office, the U.S. attorney’s office, and the FBI. In April, the mayor’s corporation counsel, Stephen Patton, attained city council approval for a $5 million settlement with the McDonald family, conditioned on the continued non-release of the video. Later that month, the detectives’ bureau cleared and closed the case, astoundingly concluding that the “recovered in-car camera video was . . . consistent with the accounts of the witnesses” and that “Van Dyke’s use of deadly force was within bounds of CPD guidelines.”

By then, the Chicago press was clamoring for the video’s release, but it was not until November 24, 2015, that the video came out, under a judge’s order. The reaction was understandably explosive; weeks of angry protests denouncing alleged police racism and brutality followed.

The Cook County state attorney announced first-degree murder charges against Officer Van Dyke on the day that the McDonald video was released. Mayor Emanuel fired McCarthy a week later and appointed the Police Accountability Task Force, dominated by critics of the police. That task force issued a report in April 2016, claiming that the Chicago Police Department is shot through with “racism.” Emanuel is now genuflecting to the city’s activists. He has adopted many of the report’s most sweeping recommendations, including the appointment of a costly and unnecessary inspector general for the department (that will come on top of the independent monitor for investigatory stops), the replacement of the IPRA with a new entity, the Civilian Police Investigative Agency, and the creation of the “Community Safety Oversight Board.” All these additional layers of oversight will only complicate chains of command and further discourage proactive policing.

McCarthy defends his decision not to release the video or to correct the record early on the ground that he didn’t want to compromise the integrity of the investigation. He did not have the legal authority to comment once the case went to federal agencies, he says. Those protocols may be appropriate in the case of an ordinary police shooting, but this was no ordinary police shooting. Allowing a fabrication about a very bad shooting to stand, especially during the current era of fevered antipolice sentiment, is guaranteed to amplify the demagoguery against the police. McCarthy, an able and accomplished police executive, should have at least called in the investigating bodies in emergency session and worked out with them a way to counter the false narrative without jeopardizing their work. The Emanuel administration also bears enormous responsibility for the crisis in legitimacy that now afflicts the department. Emanuel has praised himself for being the first Chicago mayor to acknowledge an alleged police code of silence, but he knew about the shooting, and his aides had seen the video early on. City hall was already in damage-control mode by February 2015, as Emanuel faced a tight runoff election. It is irresponsible for Emanuel to scapegoat McCarthy when his own administration also failed to set the record straight.

The damage to the Chicago police and to policing nationally from the mishandling of the McDonald homicide is incalculable. The episode can now be invoked to confirm every false generalization about the police peddled by the Black Lives Matter movement. Yet the shooting was a tragic aberration, not the norm. A New York Times Magazine article in April 2016 tried to establish the department’s racially driven malfeasance by citing the absolute number of fatal police shootings in Chicago: from 2010 to 2014, Chicago police killed 70 people, more than any other police agency. The Times article neglected to reveal that Phoenix, Philadelphia, and Dallas all lead Chicago in the per-capita rate of such fatal shootings. Chicago’s rate of police shootings is nearly 50 percent lower than Phoenix’s—even though its murder rate is twice as high—and 35 percent lower than Philadelphia’s.

The number of armed felons that the city’s cops confront dwarfs the number of officer-involved shootings. No other police department takes more guns off the street. In the first nine months of 2015, the CPD recovered 20 illegal weapons a day. From January 2007 to November 30, 2015, the police made 37,408 arrests of an armed felon, or roughly 4,670 a year. Each of those arrests could have turned into an officer shooting. But in 2015, even as crime was increasing under the Ferguson effect, the Chicago police shot 30 people, eight fatally. Those fatal shootings represent 1.6 percent of the 492 homicides that year. Nationally, police shootings make up 12 percent of all white and Hispanic homicide deaths and 4 percent of all black homicide deaths. Chicago’s ratio of fatal police shootings to criminal homicide deaths is less than the national average.

The Emanuel-appointed Police Accountability Task Force claimed that police shooting data give “validity to the widely held belief that the police have no regard for the sanctity of life when it comes to people of color.” The task force pointed to the fact that of the 404 individuals shot by the police between 2008 and 2015, both fatally and nonfatally, 74 percent (or 299) were black, and 8 percent (or 33) were white. Predictably, the task force said not one word about black and white crime rates, which were even more disproportionate in 2015 than in 2014. In 2015, blacks were 80 percent of all known murder suspects and 80 percent of all known nonfatal shooting suspects. Whites made up 0.9 percent of known murder suspects in 2015 and 1.4 percent of all known nonfatal shooting suspects. And blacks were overwhelmingly the victims of criminal shootings as well. In 2015, 2,460 blacks were shot lethally and nonlethally, or nearly seven blacks a day. By contrast, roughly 30 blacks were shot lethally and nonlethally by the police in all of 2015. Those 2,460 black victims of criminal shootings constituted nearly 81 percent of all known shooting victims. Seventy-eight whites were shot in 2015, or one white every 4.6 days, constituting 2.5 percent of all known shooting victims. If 74 percent of police shootings have black subjects, that is because officer use of force is going to occur most frequently where the police are trying to protect the law-abiding from armed and dangerous suspects—and that is in predominantly minority neighborhoods.

Emanuel is disbanding the IPRA because it found that of the 404 police shootings between 2008 and 2015, only two were unjustified. The mandate of its replacement body will be clear: penalize more cops. But absent an examination of each of those cases, no conclusion can be reached about whether the low number of findings of misconduct represents a miscarriage of justice. The IPRA has been understaffed over the years, but its fundamental design is strong. The fact that it has not found many bad shootings most likely means that they are rare. The IPRA released more than 100 files of police misconduct cases in early June, as part of a new policy of increased transparency. Prediction: the press will find few cases of clear wrongdoing.

The CPD’s critics are right about one thing, however: the cumbersome disciplinary process makes it too hard to fire officers found guilty of wrongdoing. And Chicago has had some truly bad cops over the years—most infamously, Jon Burge, a detective who tortured suspects from 1972 to 1991 to obtain false confessions. But the vast majority of officers today observe the law and are dedicated to serving the community; what they need is more tactical training, adequate staffing and equipment, and better leadership from an ingrown, highly political management cadre. As for the alleged blue wall, or code, of silence, it is hard in any department to crack the defensive solidarity among officers, who feel that they are facing an uncomprehending and often hostile world. Even now, a few of the officers I spoke with will not pass judgment on the McDonald homicide, on the ground that they were not there. Such solidarity is understandable, but commanders need to stress that when it results in distorting the truth, not only will the officer be severely punished; he is also making today’s anti-cop environment all the worse.

Despite the activists’ charge that the Chicago police are intent on killing black males, it’s easy to find support for the cops in crime-ridden areas. Mr. Fisher, a 55-year-old sanitation worker at a West Side bakery, is waiting for his wife outside Wiley’s Soul Food and Bar-B-Que on the West Side. Fisher was pulled over earlier in 2016 for a missing light on his license plate. The officer was courteous, he says. “I ain’t trying to buck them, I ain’t trying to disrespect them, I ain’t trying to give them a hard time, because I love my job. It’s not them, it’s the younger generation that’s got us messed up.” Civilians provoke confrontations with cops, not vice versa, Fisher says: “I seen a lot of people disrespect them, cussin’ and fussin’. If a cop was to get out of his car here, someone would run. To me, if you’re not doing anything, why would you run?” (Such commonsensical hypotheses have been ruled illegal by many courts—if a cop makes them.) Melissa, a 24-year-old outside D & J’s Hair Club on Pulaski Road, says that she has no problem with the police. “They doing they job. I don’t give them no reason to talk to me.” The problem is crime, she says: “I feel unsafe here. It just gets worse and worse.”

Sometimes support for the cops comes from unexpected places. In May 2016, a 38-year-old drug trafficker named Toby Jones received a 40-year federal prison sentence for repeatedly trying to gun down a federal informant, in the process shooting three people. He told the judge: “Even with all the latest police shootings on minorities in Chicago, I don’t blame these cops one bit for most of their decisions in the field. And the black community has to first come to grips with why these cops are so afraid,” the Chicago Sun-Times reported. Stories of heroic cops go untold, Jones said, “but as soon as a black kid gets shot, everyone is in an uproar.”

Activists and politicians are proposing the usual “root causes” solution to the current crime wave—more government programs—as well as less usual ones, such as abolishing the police department. The mayor’s Police Accountability Task Force wants the mayor and Cook County to “implement programs that address socioeconomic justice and equality, housing segregation, systemic racism, poverty, education, health and safety.” Such top-down spending ignores the normative breakdown that renders government social services largely futile. The bakery where Fisher works has been hiring for the last five years; he tells the “young brothers” about the jobs. “Half of them don’t show up; the others have drugs in their system. Half want to hang out and make the fast money that can get you in jail,” Fisher observes.

But the Chicago violence is also undermining the politically correct consensus about crime and policing. The Chicago Tribune has called for the police to make more traffic stops to quell the highway shootings; it points out that the Illinois vehicle code offers plenty of reasons to stop drivers, whether for a broken taillight or an expired registration sticker. Traffic stops are, of course, a prime target in the specious campaign against racial profiling; the mayor’s Police Accountability Task Force blasted the CPD for its allegedly biased stop rates, ignoring differential rates of vehicle and moving violations.

Police superintendent Eddie Johnson wants three-strikes-and-you’re-out-type sentencing laws for repeat felons. Chicago’s criminal-justice system “fails to hold these individuals accountable and allows them to bring . . . violent acts into our neighborhoods,” he said in March 2016. Stricter sentencing for repeat offenders is also a prime target for Black Lives Matter protesters. A few days after Johnson’s plea, anti-law-enforcement activists assailed former president Bill Clinton for having signed the 1994 Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act, which lengthened federal sentences for repeat felony offenders. Such sentences, protesters charged, resulted in “mass incarceration” for blacks. And an Illinois bill mandating stricter sentencing for illegal gun possession was blocked by the black caucus in Springfield in 2013, on the ground that it would have a disparate impact on blacks.

Some people in the community, however, are demanding even stronger measures than Johnson calls for. After a 15-year-old car passenger was killed in a drive-by shooting on June 1 on the South Side, a friend of his family told the Chicago Tribune, “We need martial law. Period. If it’s to protect our children, then so be it.”

Such calls will undoubtedly multiply this summer, since the violence shows no signs of abating. It may not be time to call out the National Guard yet. But it is time to reinvigorate the Chicago Police Department. With the Police Accountability Task Force charge of endemic racism and the ACLU straitjacket depressing morale, and with resistance of lawful authority growing, that will be no small task. City leaders will need to show that they understand and will support officers like the cold-case homicide detective who told me, in reaction to the task-force report: “Never once has anyone complained to me that I’m racist. I’m in it to do what’s right.”

 Voir encore:

5 Statistics You Need To Know About Cops Killing Blacks
Aaron Bandler
July 7, 2016

The Alton Sterling and Philando Castile shootings have caused an uproar among leftists because they fuel their narrative that racist white police officers are hunting down innocent black men. But the statistics – brought to light by the superb work of Heather MacDonald – tell a different story.

Here are five key statistics you need to know about cops killing blacks.

1. Cops killed nearly twice as many whites as blacks in 2015. According to data compiled by The Washington Post, 50 percent of the victims of fatal police shootings were white, while 26 percent were black. The majority of these victims had a gun or « were armed or otherwise threatening the officer with potentially lethal force, » according to MacDonald in a speech at Hillsdale College.

Some may argue that these statistics are evidence of racist treatment toward blacks, since whites consist of 62 percent of the population and blacks make up 12 percent of the population. But as MacDonald writes in The Wall Street Journal, 2009 statistics from the Bureau of Justice Statistics reveal that blacks were charged with 62 percent of robberies, 57 percent of murders and 45 percent of assaults in the 75 biggest counties in the country, despite only comprising roughly 15 percent of the population in these counties.

« Such a concentration of criminal violence in minority communities means that officers will be disproportionately confronting armed and often resisting suspects in those communities, raising officers’ own risk of using lethal force, » writes MacDonald.

MacDonald also pointed out in her Hillsdale speech that blacks « commit 75 percent of all shootings, 70 percent of all robberies, and 66 percent of all violent crime » in New York City, even though they consist of 23 percent of the city’s population.

« The black violent crime rate would actually predict that more than 26 percent of police victims would be black, » MacDonald said. « Officer use of force will occur where the police interact most often with violent criminals, armed suspects, and those resisting arrest, and that is in black neighborhoods. »

2. More whites and Hispanics die from police homicides than blacks. According to MacDonald, 12 percent of white and Hispanic homicide deaths were due to police officers, while only four percent of black homicide deaths were the result of police officers.

« If we’re going to have a ‘Lives Matter’ anti-police movement, it would be more appropriately named « White and Hispanic Lives Matter,' » said MacDonald in her Hillsdale speech.

3. The Post’s data does show that unarmed black men are more likely to die by the gun of a cop than an unarmed white man…but this does not tell the whole story. In August 2015, the ratio was seven-to-one of unarmed black men dying from police gunshots compared to unarmed white men; the ratio was six-to-one by the end of 2015. But MacDonald points out in The Marshall Project that looking at the details of the actual incidents that occurred paints a different picture:

The “unarmed” label is literally accurate, but it frequently fails to convey highly-charged policing situations. In a number of cases, if the victim ended up being unarmed, it was certainly not for lack of trying. At least five black victims had reportedly tried to grab the officer’s gun, or had been beating the cop with his own equipment. Some were shot from an accidental discharge triggered by their own assault on the officer. And two individuals included in the Post’s “unarmed black victims” category were struck by stray bullets aimed at someone else in justified cop shootings. If the victims were not the intended targets, then racism could have played no role in their deaths.

In one of those unintended cases, an undercover cop from the New York Police Department was conducting a gun sting in Mount Vernon, just north of New York City. One of the gun traffickers jumped into the cop’s car, stuck a pistol to his head, grabbed $2,400 and fled. The officer gave chase and opened fire after the thief again pointed his gun at him. Two of the officer’s bullets accidentally hit a 61-year-old bystander, killing him. That older man happened to be black, but his race had nothing to do with his tragic death. In the other collateral damage case, Virginia Beach, Virginia, officers approached a car parked at a convenience store that had a homicide suspect in the passenger seat. The suspect opened fire, sending a bullet through an officer’s shirt. The cops returned fire, killing their assailant as well as a woman in the driver’s seat. That woman entered the Post’s database without qualification as an “unarmed black victim” of police fire.

MacDonald examines a number of other instances, including unarmed black men in San Diego, CA and Prince George’s County, MD attempting to reach for a gun in a police officer’s holster. In the San Diego case, the unarmed black man actually « jumped the officer » and assaulted him, and the cop shot the man since he was « fearing for his life. » MacDonald also notes that there was an instance in 2015 where « three officers were killed with their own guns, which the suspects had wrestled from them. »

4. Black and Hispanic police officers are more likely to fire a gun at blacks than white officers. This is according to a Department of Justice report in 2015 about the Philadelphia Police Department, and is further confirmed that by a study conducted University of Pennsylvania criminologist Gary Ridgeway in 2015 that determined black cops were 3.3 times more likely to fire a gun than other cops at a crime scene.

5. Blacks are more likely to kill cops than be killed by cops. This is according to FBI data, which also found that 40 percent of cop killers are black. According to MacDonald, the police officer is 18.5 times more likely to be killed by a black than a cop killing an unarmed black person.

Despite the facts, the anti-police rhetoric of Black Lives Matter and their leftist sympathizers have resulted in what MacDonald calls the « Ferguson Effect, » as murders have spiked by 17 percent among the 50 biggest cities in the U.S. as a result of cops being more reluctant to police neighborhoods out of fear of being labeled as racists. Additionally, there have been over twice as many cops victimized by fatal shootings in the first three months of 2016.

Anti-police rhetoric has deadly consequences.

Voir de même:

Dallas Shooter Micah Xavier Johnson Followed Groups Promoting Black Panthers and Cop-Killing
Sigrid Johannes and Benny Johnson
Independent Journal
July 8, 2016

Police have identified the dead suspect in the Dallas police shooting incident as Micah Xavier Johnson. The 25-year-old man was a resident of Dallas. Johnson has no criminal record or ties to terror organizations, according to reports.

However, Johnson’s Facebook profile told a different story. CBS News confirmed that this now deleted profile was Johnson’s.

Before Facebook deleted the profile, which is standard practice for the social media site in the wake of one of its users committing a violent act, Independent Journal Review screen grabbed some of Johnson’s alarming activity. Johnson’s Facebook activity dates as far back as 2011.

The LA Times confirmed Johnson’s military history, but there was no mention of service on his Facebook page.

Johnson was killed after a prolonged negotiation with police. He threatened that officers would discover improvised explosives throughout the city. His stated goal was to kill white people, specifically white law enforcement.

Voir de plus:

The Dallas Shooting and the Advent of Killer Police Robots

Chief David Brown says officers used a device equipped with a bomb to kill a suspect, a perhaps unprecedented move that raises new questions about use of lethal force.
David A. Graham

The Atlantic

Jul 8, 2016

In the mourning over the murders of five police officers in Dallas, and relief that the standoff had ended, one unusual detail stuck out: the manner in which police killed one suspect after negotiations failed.

“We saw no other option but to use our bomb robot and place a device on its extension for it to detonate where the suspect was,” Chief David Brown said in a press conference Friday morning. “Other options would have exposed our officers to grave danger. The suspect is deceased … He’s been deceased because of a detonation of the bomb.”

That use of a robot raises questions about the way police adopt and use new technologies. While many police forces have adopted robots—or, more accurately, remote-controlled devices—for uses like bomb detonation or delivery of non-lethal force like tear gas, using one to kill a suspect is at least highly unusual and quite possibly unprecedented.

“I’m not aware of officers using a remote-controlled device as a delivery mechanism for lethal force,” said Seth Stoughton, an assistant professor of law at the University of South Carolina who is a former police officer and expert on police methods. “This is sort of a new horizon for police technology. Robots have been around for a while, but using them to deliver lethal force raises some new issues.”

Robotics expert Peter Singer of New America also told the Associated Press he believed the use was unprecedented.

But while there are likely to be intense ethical debates about when and how police deploy robots in this manner, Stoughton said he doesn’t think Dallas’s decision is particularly novel from a legal perspective. Because there was an imminent threat to officers, the decision to use lethal force was likely reasonable, while the weapon used was immaterial.

“The circumstances that justify lethal force justify lethal force in essentially every form,” he said. “If someone is shooting at the police, the police are, generally speaking, going to be authorized to eliminate that threat by shooting them, or by stabbing them with a knife, or by running them over with a vehicle. Once lethal force is justified and appropriate, the method of delivery—I doubt it’s legally relevant.”

Police forces have adopted remote-controlled devices for a wide variety of tasks in recent years, from tiny to large. These tools can search for bombs, take cameras into dangerous areas, deliver tear gas or pepper spray, and even rescue wounded people. Police used one small robot in the manhunt for Boston Marathon bomber Dzohkar Tsarnaev. In May, the Dallas Police Department posted on its blog that it had acquired new robots. Other law-enforcement agencies have experimented with flying “drones,” again more correctly remotely controlled aerial vehicles. So far, those uses appear to have been solely for surveillance. The Department of Justice said in 2013 that it had used drones in the U.S. on 10 occasions.

In a few cases, forces have used remote-controlled devices to deliver non-lethal force, too, as Vice reported last year. In Albuquerque, New Mexico, in 2014, “the Bomb Squad supported APD’s SWAT Team on November 9 at a local residence. The SWAT team requested robot assistance to assist on a barricaded subject armed with a gun. The Bomb Squad robot was able to deploy chemical munitions into the subject’s motel room, which led to the subject’s surrender.” Vice cited other news reports that involved hostage situations where robots were deployed, though the applications are sometimes vague. A remote-controlled device could also be equipped to deliver a flash-bang grenade, used to disorient suspects.

Brown didn’t explain what kind of explosive DPD attached to their device. While a department might stock flash-bangs, explosives for breaching doors, and a few other explosive devices, “I’m not aware of any police department having on hand something that is intended to be used as a weaponized explosive,” Stoughton said.

Use of remote-controlled devices by law enforcement raises a range of possible questions about when and where they are appropriate. The advent of new police technologies, from the firearm to the Taser, has often resulted in accusations of inappropriate use and recalibration in when police use them. Stoughton pointed out that prior to the Supreme Court’s 1985 decision in Tennessee v. Garner, the “fleeing-felon rule” gave officers the right to use lethal force to prevent a suspect in a serious crime from escaping. But the justices limited the rule, saying that firearms meant the rule was no longer current. Unless either they or civilians are in danger of death or serious bodily harm, police can only use non-lethal force to stop a fleeing felon. Similarly, the adoption of the Taser has raised questions about whether officers are too quick to use the devices when they would be better served to deescalate or use their hands.

“I think we will see similar concerns when we’re talking about the use of robots to employ lethal force,” Stoughton said. For example, in Dallas, the police appear to have faced danger of death or serious bodily harm. But imagine a scenario in which a suspect has been shooting but is not currently firing, and in which all officers are safely covered. In such a case, police would likely not open up a gun battle. But would commanders be quicker to deploy a robot, since there would be less danger to officers? And would current lethal-force rules really justify it? There is reason to believe they would not.

The nascent questions over police use of remote-controlled devices echoes an existing argument over the military use of such tools. U.S. drone strikes overseas are believed to have killed hundreds of civilians, and the legal justifications for when and where they are used are often hotly contested. In some cases, drone strikes have killed American citizens without due process. Many civil libertarians are troubled by the implications for stateside use. In 2013, Senator Rand Paul, a Kentucky Republican, mounted a 13-hour filibuster blocking the confirmation John Brennan, President Obama’s nominee to direct the CIA, over the White House’s refusal to say whether it believed it could use military drones to kill American suspects on American soil. Attorney General Eric Holder later wrote Paul to say that the president does not have the authority to do so.

Move away from the realm of remote-controlled devices into the world of autonomous or partially autonomous robots that could deliver lethal, or even non-lethal, force, and the concerns mount. There’s already a heated debate over whether and how the military should deploy lethal, autonomous robots. That debate, too, could transfer to police forces. But as Stoughton noted, law enforcement serves a different purpose than the army.

“The military has many missions, but at its core is about dominating and eliminating an enemy,” he said. “Policing has a different mission: protecting the populace. That core mission, as difficult as it is to explains sometimes, includes protecting some people who do some bad things. It includes not using lethal force when it’s possible to not.”

A Dallas, la police a utilisé pour la première fois un «robot tueur»
Pierre Jova , AFP agence
Le Figaro
08/07/2016

VIDÉO – Pour neutraliser l’homme suspecté d’avoir abattu plusieurs officiers, les forces de l’ordre américaines ont eu recours à une machine armée d’une bombe.

Vendredi à l’aube, un sniper suspecté d’avoir tiré sur des policiers et retranché depuis des heures dans un bâtiment est finalement tué par un robot télécommandé, utilisé pour faire détoner une bombe.

Micah Johnson, jeune Noir de 25 ans, avait servi dans l’armée américaine en Afghanistan. Sur son profil Facebook, il avait publié des images avec le slogan «Black Power» des extrémistes afro-américains des années 1960 et 1970. Il avait également ajouté la lettre «X» entre son prénom et son nom, probablement en référence à Malcolm X, leader noir opposé à la non-violence prônée par Martin Luther King.

Pour neutraliser ce suspect armé, la police de Dallas disposait d’un robot Northrop Grumman Andros, conçu pour les équipes de démineurs et l’armée. La photo d’un robot de ce type a été diffusée par le magazine américain Popular Science.

«C’est la première fois qu’un robot est utilisé de cette façon par la police», a assuré sur Twitter Peter Singer, de la fondation New America, un groupe de réflexion spécialisé notamment dans les questions de sécurité. Ce spécialiste des méthodes modernes de combat a précisé qu’un appareil baptisé Marcbot «a été employé de la même façon par les troupes en Irak».

L’arrivée des robots armés dans la police?
Dans l’armée américaine, les robots terrestres transforment le visage de la guerre depuis plusieurs années déjà. Ils sont notamment capables de récupérer et désactiver une charge explosive, à l’aide d’un bras téléguidé par des soldats restés à l’abri du danger. Ils semblent voués à être désormais de plus en plus employés à des fins de combat. Y compris par les forces de l’ordre.

En Chine, l’université de la défense nationale a conçu un appareil baptisé «AnBot», destiné à avoir «un rôle important à jouer pour renforcer les mesures anti-terroristes et anti-émeutes». «La caractéristique la plus controversée d’AnBot est bien sûr son ‘outil intégré anti-émeute électrisé’ (ressemblant certainement à un Taser ou à un aiguillon pour bétail). Il ne peut être déclenché que par les humains contrôlant Anbot à distance», écrivaient Peter Singer avec un autre spécialiste Jeffrey Lin, en avril, dans Popular Science. «Le fait qu’Anbot soit si grand veut dire qu’il a la place d’intégrer d’autres équipements de police, comme des gaz lacrymogènes et d’autres armes moins létales», poursuivaient les auteurs.

Des chercheurs de l’université de Floride travaillent eux au développement de «Telebot», comparé dans certains articles au célèbre «Robocop» imaginé au cinéma. Destiné notamment à assister des policiers handicapés pour qu’ils puissent reprendre le service, Telebot a été conçu «pour avoir l’air intimidant et assez autoritaire pour que les citoyens obéissent à ses ordres» tout un gardant «une apparence amicale» qui rassurent «les citoyens de tous âges», selon un rapport d’étudiants de l’université de Floride.

L’arrivée de robots aux armes létales dans la police suscite de nombreuses interrogations. L’ONG Human Rights Watch et l’organisation International Human Rights Clinic, qui dépend de l’université de Harvard, s’inquiétaient ainsi en 2014 du recours aux robots par les forces de l’ordre. Ces engins «ne sont pas dotés de qualités humaines, telles que le jugement et l’empathie, qui permettent à la police d’éviter de tuer illégalement dans des situations inattendues», écrivaient-elles dans un rapport.

Si l’emploi des robotos armés était amené à se développer, le bouleversement anthropologique suscité serait considérable.

Voir enfin:

The Post-O.J. Trial Upside: Riots As Scarce As Justice

October 6, 1995

 Millions of people were stunned and outraged by the not-guilty verdict in the O.J. Simpson trial. But I always try to look at the upside. And there are plenty of reasons to feel relief and gratitude.

For one thing, there was no rioting. I had feared that thousands of furious blond, blue-eyed women and their brunette sympathizers would take their rage into the streets, burning, killing and looting.

While I don’t condone rioting, the historic and sociological reasons would have made such violence understandable.

As one woman told me after the verdict: « For thousands of years, we have been putting up with abuse from large, strong, arrogant, evil-tempered men.

« There is no group on Earth that has been kicked around the way women have. Since the dawn of history, we’ve been beaten, violated, enslaved, abandoned, stalked, pimped, murdered and even dissed by men.

« Now this jury and the legal system have sent a clear message to society: It’s OK for men to cut our throats from ear to ear. »

But why haven’t you rioted?

« It would just give men another excuse to kick us around. »

Another group that I feared would riot were obscure waiters.

As one of them said after the verdict: « This figures. Throughout history, obscure waiters have received little respect. A waiter goes to a table and says to someone like O.J., `Hi, I’m Ron and I’ll be your server.’ Would O.J. say, `Hi, Ron, I’m O.J. and I’ll be your customer?’ No, all O.J. would say is: `Get me a clean fork.’

« What do you think that jury would have done if O.J. the superstar had been murdered by a obscure waiter? Do you think Johnnie Cochran would say that some cop planted the waiter’s bloody apron as false evidence? »

Then why didn’t all of you obscure waiters riot?

« What, and miss the dinner trade? »

Another positive development was that Mark Fuhrman, while a Los Angeles cop, was a bigot and had used the infamous « N-word. »

This was a shocking revelation because it shattered the widely accepted stereotype of big city cops as being incurable liberals who support the ACLU and love white wine spritzers and Woody Allen movies.

It also led to the perfectly logical conclusion that any white cop who used the « N-word » was almost certainly involved in a massive racial frame-up, regardless of what DNA and other scientific evidence indicated.

This could lead to a new body of law in which Irish-American cops are asked if they ever said « dago, » Italian-American cops if they ever said « polack, » Polish-American cops if they ever used the word « heeb, » Jewish cops if they ever used the word « schwarz, » and black cops if they ever used the word « honky. »

It could resolve the problem of overcrowded prisons by assuring just about every accused criminal an acquittal on the grounds that policemen use bad words.

My faith in the jury system has also been restored.

Until now, I didn’t believe that someone like O.J. Simpson, a black football hero and star of TV commercials and motion pictures, who could not afford to spend more than $8 million on lawyers, could possibly get a fair shake from a predominantly black jury when accused of killing his white ex-wife and a Jewish body-building young waiter.

But this jury proved that they could overlook the racially volatile fact that Simpson belongs to a mostly white golf club and reach a verdict based strictly on the evidence.

And the verdict helped wipe away the slander that America is a still a racially polarized country. No, the sight of all those middle-aged white people leaping about the streets, hugging, kissing, cheering and giving each other high fives, while blacks grimaced and shook their heads, has inspired hope for the future.

Finally, Simpson, now a free man, has vowed to devote his energies to tracking down the real murderer of his ex-wife.

That’s very good because some people had thought it strange that from the very beginning of this mystery, Simpson had seemed far more concerned with his own feelings than with the terrible fact that the woman he loved had been brutally murdered.

Now he says he will try to find the evil brute who killed the mother of his children. Maybe he can invite the Goldman and Brown families to join him in the hunt.

So those of us who believe in justice should wish him well in his search for the identity of the real killer.

But I wonder – can Simpson shave without looking in the mirror?