Syrie: Obama a menti, des milliers ont péri (With Syria and Iran, we’re coming to grips with the human and strategic price of the Obama administration’s mendacity)

13 avril, 2017

Bush a menti, des milliers ont péri. Slogan bien connu (2003)
Il est 3 heures du matin, le téléphone sonne à la Maison Blanche. Qui voulez-vous voir au bout du fil ? Hillary Clinton
Chemical and biological weapons which Saddam is endeavoring to conceal have been moved from Iraq to Syria. Ariel Sharon (Israel’s Channel 2, Dec. 23, 2002)
Dans l’immédiat, notre attention doit se porter en priorité sur les domaines biologique et chimique. C’est là que nos présomptions vis-à-vis de l’Iraq sont les plus significatives : sur le chimique, nous avons des indices d’une capacité de production de VX et d’ypérite ; sur le biologique, nos indices portent sur la détention possible de stocks significatifs de bacille du charbon et de toxine botulique, et une éventuelle capacité de production.  Dominique De Villepin (05.02.2003)
Damascus has an active CW development and testing program that relies on foreign suppliers for key controlled chemicals suitable for producing CW. George Tenet (CIA, March 2004)
Saddam transferred the chemical agents from Iraq to Syria. No one went to Syria to find it. Lieutenant General Moshe Yaalon
There are weapons of mass destruction gone out from Iraq to Syria, and they must be found and returned to safe hands. I am confident they were taken over. (…) Saddam realized, this time, the Americans are coming. They handed over the weapons of mass destruction to the Syrians. General Georges Sada (2006)
Comme l’exemple d’usage chimique contre les populations kurdes de 1987-1988 en avait apporté la preuve, ces armes avaient aussi un usage interne. Thérèse Delpech (mars 2003)
Les inspecteurs n’ont jamais pu vérifier ce qu’il était advenu de 3,9 tonnes de VX (…) dont la production entre 1988 et 1990 a été reconnue par l’Irak. Bagdad a déclaré que les destructions avaient eu lieu en 1990 mais n’en a pas fourni de preuves. En février 2003 (…) un document a été fourni [par Bagdad] à l’Unmovic pour tenter d’expliquer le devenir d’environ 63 % du VX manquant. Auparavant, les Irakiens prétendaient ne pas détenir un tel document. » Idem pour l’anthrax, dont l’Irak affirmait avoir détruit le stock en 1991. Mais, « en mars 2003, l’Unmovic concluait qu’il existait toujours, très probablement, 10 000 litres d’anthrax non détruits par l’Irak... Comme pour le VX, l’Irak a fourni à l’ONU, en février 2003, un document sur ce sujet qui ne pouvait permettre de conclure quelles quantités avaient été détruites … Thérèse Delpech (2004)
While Western governments were able to pressure Moscow to alter its weapons shipments, Bashar al-Assad may not have limited himself to over-the-counter weapons purchases. The Syrian military’s unconventional weapons arsenal already has a significant stockpile of sarin. The Syrian regime has also attempted to produce other toxic agents in order to advance its inventory of biological weapons. Several different intelligence sources raised red flags about suspicious truck convoys from Iraq to Syria in the days, weeks, and months prior to the March 2003 invasion of Iraq. These concerns first became public when, on December 23, 2002, Ariel Sharon stated on Israeli television, « Chemical and biological weapons which Saddam is endeavoring to conceal have been moved from Iraq to Syria. » About three weeks later, Israel’s foreign minister repeated the accusation. The U.S., British, and Australian governments issued similar statements. The Syrian foreign minister dismissed such charges as a U.S. attempt to divert attention from its problems in Iraq. But even if the Syrian regime were sincere, Bashar al-Assad’s previous statement— »I don’t do everything in this country, »—suggested that Iraqi chemical or biological weapons could cross the Syrian frontier without regime consent. Rather than exculpate the Syrian regime, such a scenario makes the presence of Iraqi weapons in Syria more worrisome, for it suggests that Assad might either eschew responsibility for their ultimate custody or may not actually be able to prevent their transfer to terrorist groups that enjoy close relations with officials in his regime. Two former United Nations weapon inspectors in Iraq reinforced concerns about illicit transfer of weapon components into Syria in the wake of Saddam Hussein’s fall. Richard Butler viewed overhead imagery and other intelligence suggesting that Iraqis transported some weapons components into Syria. Butler did not think « the Iraqis wanted to give them to Syria, but … just wanted to get them out of the territory, out of the range of our inspections. Syria was prepared to be the custodian of them. » Former Iraq Survey Group head David Kay obtained corroborating information from the interrogation of former Iraqi officials. He said that the missing components were small in quantity, but he, nevertheless, felt that U.S. intelligence officials needed to determine what reached Syria. Baghdad and Damascus may have long been rivals, but there was precedent for such Iraqi cooperation with regional competitors when faced with an outside threat. In the run-up to the 1991 Operation Desert Storm and the liberation of Kuwait, the Iraqi regime flew many of its jets to Iran, with which, just three years previous, it had been engaged in bitter trench warfare. Subsequent reports by the Iraq Survey Group at first glance threw cold water on some speculation about the fate of missing Iraqi weapons, but a closer read suggests that questions about a possible transfer to Syria remain open. The September 30, 2004 Duelfer report, while inconclusive, left open such a possibility. While Duelfer dismissed reports of official transfer of weapons material from Iraq into Syria, the Iraq Survey Group was not able to discount the unofficial movement of limited material. Duelfer described weapons smuggling between both countries prior to Saddam’s ouster. In one incident detailed by a leading British newspaper, intelligence sources assigned to monitor Baghdad’s air traffic raised suspicions that Iraqi authorities had smuggled centrifuge components out of Syria in June 2002. The parts were initially stored in the Syrian port of Tartus before being transported to Damascus International Airport. The transfer allegedly occurred when Iraqi authorities sent twenty-four planes with humanitarian assistance into Syria after a dam collapsed in June 2002, killing twenty people and leaving some 30,000 others homeless. Intelligence officials do not believe these planes returned to Iraq empty. Regardless of the merits of this one particular episode, it is well documented that Syria became the main conduit in Saddam Hussein’s attempt to rebuild his military under the 1990-2003 United Nations sanctions, and so the necessary contacts between regimes and along the border would already have been in place. Indeed, according to U.S. Defense Department sources, the weapons smuggling held such importance for the Syrian regime that the trade included Assad’s older sister and his brother-in-law, Assaf Shawqat, deputy chief of Syria’s military intelligence organization. Numerous reports also implicate Shawqat’s two brothers who participated in the Syrian-Iraqi trade during the two years before Saddam’s ouster. While the Duelfer report was inconclusive, part of its failure to tie up all loose ends was due to declining security conditions in Iraq, which forced the Iraq Survey Group to curtail its operations. The cloud of suspicion over the Syrian regime’s role in smuggling Iraq’s weapons—and speculation as to the nature of those weapons—will not dissipate until Damascus reveals the contents of truck convoys spotted entering Syria from Iraq in the run-up to the March 2003 U.S.-led invasion of Iraq. U.S. intelligence officials and policymakers also will not be able to end speculation until Bashar al-Assad completely and unconditionally allows international inspectors to search suspected depots and interview key participants in the Syrian-Iraqi weapons trade. Four repositories in Syria remain under suspicion. Anonymous U.S. sources have suggested that some components may have been kept in an ammunition facility adjacent to a military base close to Khan Abu Shamat, 30 miles (50 kilometers) west of Damascus. In addition, three sites in the western part of central Syria, an area where support for the Assad regime is strong, are reputed to house suspicious weapons components. These sites include an air force factory in the village of Tall as-Sinan; a mountainous tunnel near Al-Baydah, less than five miles from Al-Masyaf (Masyaf); and another location near Shanshar. While the Western media often focus on the fate of Iraqi weapons components, just as important to Syrian proliferation efforts has been the influx of Iraqi weapons scientists. The Daily Telegraph reported prior to the 2003 Iraq war that Iraq’s former special security organization and Shawqat arranged for the transfer into Syria of twelve mid-level Iraqi weapons specialists, along with their families and compact disks full of research material on their country’s nuclear initiatives. According to unnamed Western intelligence officials cited in the report, Assad turned around and offered to relocate the scientists to Iran, on the condition that Tehran would share the fruits of their research with Damascus. The Middle East Quarterly (Fall 2005)
Syria’s President Bashir al-Asad is in secret negotiations with Iran to secure a safe haven for a group of Iraqi nuclear scientists who were sent to Damascus before last year’s war to overthrow Saddam Hussein. Western intelligence officials believe that President Asad is desperate to get the Iraqi scientists out of his country before their presence prompts America to target Syria as part of the war on terrorism.The issue of moving the Iraqi scientists to Iran was raised when President Asad made a visit to Teheran in July. Intelligence officials understand that the Iranians have still to respond to the Syrian leader’s request.  A group of about 12 middle-ranking Iraqi nuclear technicians and their families were transported to Syria before the collapse of Saddam’s regime. The transfer was arranged under a combined operation by Saddam’s now defunct Special Security Organisation and Syrian Military Security, which is headed by Arif Shawqat, the Syrian president’s brother-in-law. The Iraqis, who brought with them CDs crammed with research data on Saddam’s nuclear programme, were given new identities, including Syrian citizenship papers and falsified birth, education and health certificates. Since then they have been hidden away at a secret Syrian military installation where they have been conducting research on behalf of their hosts. Growing political concern in Washington about Syria’s undeclared weapons of mass destruction programmes, however, has prompted President Asad to reconsider harbouring the Iraqis. American intelligence officials are concerned that Syria is secretly working on a number of WMD programmes. They have also uncovered evidence that Damascus has acquired a number of gas centrifuges – probably from North Korea – that can be used to enrich uranium for a nuclear bomb. Relations between Washington and Damascus have been strained since last year’s war in Iraq, with American commanders accusing the Syrians of allowing foreign fighters to cross the border into Iraq, where they carry out terrorist attacks against coalition forces. (…) Under the terms of the deal President Asad offered the Iranians, the Iraqi scientists and their families would be transferred to Teheran together with a small amount of essential materials. The Iraqi team would then assist Iranian scientists to develop a nuclear weapon. Apart from paying the relocation expenses, President Asad also wants the Iranians to agree to share the results of their atomic weapons research with Damascus. The Syrian offer comes at a time when Iran is under close scrutiny from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) which is investigating claims that Iran is maintaining a secret nuclear bomb programme.  The Daily Telegraph
The pilots told Mr. Sada that two Iraqi Airways Boeings were converted to cargo planes by removing the seats, Mr. Sada said. Then Special Republican Guard brigades loaded materials onto the planes, he said, including « yellow barrels with skull and crossbones on each barrel. » The pilots said there was also a ground convoy of trucks. The flights – 56 in total, Mr. Sada said – attracted little notice because they were thought to be civilian flights providing relief from Iraq to Syria, which had suffered a flood after a dam collapse in June of 2002. (…) Mr. Sada said that the Iraqi official responsible for transferring the weapons was a cousin of Saddam Hussein named Ali Hussein al-Majid, known as « Chemical Ali. » The Syrian official responsible for receiving them was a cousin of Bashar Assad who is known variously as General Abu Ali, Abu Himma, or Zulhimawe. (…) Syria is one of only eight countries that has not signed the Chemical Weapons Convention, a treaty that obligates nations not to stockpile or use chemical weapons. Syria’s chemical warfare program, apart from any weapons that may have been received from Iraq, has long been the source of concern to America, Israel, and Lebanon. The NY Sun
Even when viewed through a post-war lens, documentary evidence of messages are consistent with the Iraqi Survey Group’s conclusion that Saddam was at least keeping a WMD program primed for a quick re-start the moment the UN Security Council lifted sanctions. Iraqi Perpectives Project (March 2006)
By late 2003, even the Bush White House’s staunchest defenders were starting to give up on the idea that there were weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. But WikiLeaks’ newly-released Iraq war documents reveal that for years afterward, U.S. troops continued to find chemical weapons labs, encounter insurgent specialists in toxins and uncover weapons of mass destruction. Wired magazine (2010)
It’s more than a little ironic that, with its newest document dump from the Iraq campaign, WikiLeaks may have just bolstered one of the Bush administration’s most controversial claims about the Iraq war: that Iran supplied many of the Iraq insurgency’s deadliest weapons and worked hand-in-glove with some of its most lethal militias. The documents indicate that Iran was a major combatant in the Iraq war, as its elite Quds Force trained Iraqi Shiite insurgents and imported deadly weapons like the shape-charged Explosively Formed Projectile bombs into Iraq for use against civilians, Sunni militants and U.S. troops. A report from 2006 claims “neuroparalytic” chemical weapons from Iran were smuggled into Iraq. (It’s one of many, many documents recounting WMD efforts in Iraq.) Others indicate that Iran flooded Iraq with guns and rockets, including the Misagh-1 surface-to-air missile, .50 caliber rifles, rockets and much more. As the New York Times observes, Iranian agents plotted to kidnap U.S. troops from out of their Humvees — something that occurred in Karbala in 2007, leaving five U.S. troops dead. (It’s still not totally clear if the Iranians were responsible.) Wired (2010)
Les lamentations sur ce qui est advenu de la politique étrangère américaine au Moyen-Orient passent à côté de l’essentiel. Le plus remarquable concernant la diplomatie du président Obama dans la région, c’est qu’elle est revenue au point de départ – jusqu’au début de sa présidence. La promesse d’ « ouverture » vers l’Iran, l’indulgence envers la tyrannie de Bashar Assad en Syrie, l’abandon des gains américains en Irak et le malaise systématique à l’égard d’Israël — tels étaient les traits distinctifs de l’approche du nouveau président en politique étrangère. A présent, nous ne faisons qu’assister aux conséquences alarmantes d’une perspective aussi malavisée que naïve. Fouad Ajami (oct. 2013)
The policy of “leading from behind” and the crudity of “We came, we saw, he [Qaddafi] died” have left a human tragedy in Libya. Backing the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt was an inexplicable choice, and it almost ruined the country. The United States did not need to hound and jail an innocent video maker in order to concoct a myth to cover up the culpable lax security in Benghazi. Yemen was strangely declared a model of our anti-terrorism efforts — just weeks before it ignited into another Somalia or Congo. ISIS was airily written off as a jayvee bunch as it spread beyond Syria and Iraq. There is little need to do a detailed comparison of Iraq now and Iraq in February 2009 (when it was soon to be the administration’s “greatest achievement,” a “stable” and “self-reliant” nation); the mess in between is attributable to Obama’s use of the aftermath of the Iraq War for pre-election positioning. Ordering Assad to flee while ignoring the violence in Syria and proclaiming a faux red line has now tragically led to a million refugees in Europe (and another 4 million in the neighborhood) and more than 200,000 dead. Israel is now considered not an ally, not even a neutral, but apparently a hostile state worthy of more presidential invective than is Iran. We have few if any reliable friends any more in the Gulf. Iran will become a nuclear power. The only mystery over how that will happen is whether Obama was inept or whether he deliberately sought to make the theocracy some sort of a strategic power and U.S. ally. The Middle East over the next decade may see three or four additional new nuclear powers. The Russia of kleptocrat Vladimir Putin is seen in the region as a better friend than is the U.S. — and certainly a far more dangerous enemy to provoke. There is no easy cure for all this; it will take years just to sort out the mess. Victor Davis Hanson
Ce que les Rosenberg avaient fait pour Staline, Obama le fait aujourd’hui pour l’ayatollah Khamenei. Le méprisable accord nucléaire d’Obama avec l’Iran a déjà précipité l’agression iranienne dans la région. En réponse aux concessions faites par Obama, Hillary Clinton et John Kerry, l’Iran raidissait son attitude et devenait plus agressif. À l’heure actuelle, l’Iran est impliqué dans des guerres dans la région, entrainant déjà les États-Unis dans leur sillage. Si l’Iran se dote de l’arme nucléaire, ces guerres s’aggraveront et deviendront beaucoup plus dévastatrices. Ce n’est pas seulement Chamberlain. C’est Quisling et Philippe Pétain. Il ne s’agit nullement d’un mauvais jugement. Il s’agit d’une trahison. (…) En ouvrant à l’Iran la voie vers la bombe nucléaire, Obama a transformé les conflits lents du terrorisme classique en crise de civilisations catastrophique. Une bombe nucléaire iranienne ne se faufilera pas discrètement comme le fait la crise démographique de la migration musulmane avec son complément de terrorisme. Ce ne sera pas un problème progressif. Une course aux armes nucléaires entre sunnites et chiites impliquant des terroristes des deux côtés qui emploient des armes nucléaires rendra insoutenable toute la structure de la civilisation occidentale. L’attaque du 11/9 a vu l’usage de quelques jets pour dévaster une ville. La prochaine vague d’armes pourrait tuer des millions, pas des milliers. Les traîtres qui ont fait de l’URSS une puissance capable de détruire le monde étaient motivés par le même agenda caché des partisans à l’accord nucléaire iranien. Ils croyaient que le monopole nucléaire américain conduirait à l’arrogance et au bellicisme. Ils étaient convaincus que la puissance américaine devrait être surveillée en s’assurant que l’union soviétique puisse égaler l’oncle Sam, nucléaire pour nucléaire. Ceux qui ont ouvert les portes du nucléaire à Téhéran aujourd’hui croient qu’un Iran nucléaire aura un effet dissuasif contre l’impérialisme américain dans la région. Leur nombre inclut Barack Obama.(…) Obama a trahi l’Amérique. Il a trahi les victimes américaines du terrorisme iranien. Il a trahi les soldats américains qui ont été assassinés, mutilés et torturés par les armées terroristes iraniennes. Il a trahi des centaines de millions d’Américains dans leur patrie, et qui seront contraints d’élever leurs enfants sous l’égide de la terreur nucléaire iranienne. Sa trahison nucléaire est non seulement une trahison de l’Amérique. Pour la première fois depuis la fin de la guerre froide, elle ouvre les portes de l’assassinat en masse de millions d’américains par un ennemi vicieux. Obama a appauvri des millions d’Américains, il a le sang des soldats et des policiers sur ses mains, mais son héritage final peut être la collaboration dans un acte d’assassinat en masse qui pourrait rivaliser avec Adolf Hitler. Daniel Greenfield
Pour nous, la ligne rouge, c’est l’utilisation d’armes chimiques  ; ça changerait ma vision des choses. Barack Hussein Obama
Je suis convaincu que si cet accord-cadre mène à un accord total et définitif, notre pays, nos alliés et le monde seront plus en sécurité. L’Iran sera « plus inspecté que n’importe quel autre pays dans le monde. Si l’Iran triche, le monde le saura. Si nous voyons quelque chose de louche, nous mènerons des inspections.  Cet accord n’est pas basé sur la confiance, il est basé sur des vérifications sans précédent. Barack Hussein Obama (2015)
Il y a un manuel de stratégie à Washington que les présidents sont censés utiliser. (…) Et le manuel de stratégie prescrit des réponses aux différents événements, et ces réponses ont tendance à être des réponses militarisées. (…) Au milieu d’un défi international comme la Syrie, vous êtes jugé sévèrement si vous ne suivez pas le manuel de stratégie, même s’il y a de bonnes raisons. (…) Je suis très fier de ce moment.  Le poids écrasant de la sagesse conventionnelle et la machinerie de notre appareil de sécurité nationale était allés assez loin. La perception était que ma crédibilité était en jeu, que la crédibilité de l’Amérique était en jeu. Et donc pour moi d’appuyer sur le bouton arrêt à ce moment-là, je le savais, me coûterait cher politiquement. Le fait que je pouvais me débarrasser des pressions immédiates et réfléchir sur ce qui  était dans l’intérêt de l’Amérique, non seulement à l’égard de la Syrie, mais aussi à l’égard de notre démocratie, a été une décision très difficile – et je crois que finalement, ce fut la bonne décision à prendre. (…) Je suppose que vous pourriez me qualifier de réaliste qui croit que nous ne pouvons pas soulager toute la misère du monde. Barack Hussein Obama (2016)
Je ne regrette pas du tout d’avoir dit que si je voyais Bachar al-Assad utiliser des armes chimiques contre son peuple, cela changerait mon évaluation sur ce que nous étions prêts à faire ou pas en Syrie. J’aurais fait une plus grande erreur si j’avais dit ‘Eh, des armes chimiques. Ça ne change pas vraiment mes calculs’. Je pense qu’il était important pour moi en tant que président des États-Unis d’envoyer le message qu’il y a bien quelque chose de différent sur les armes chimiques. Et malgré la façon dont ça s’est fini (…) ce qui est vrai c’est qu’Assad s’est débarrassé de ses armes chimiques. Barack Hussein Obama (15.01.2017)
Nous avons réussi à faire en sorte que le gouvernement syrien abandonne volontairement et de manière évidente son stock d’armes chimiques. Susan Rice (16.01.2017)
Cette interrogation n’en finit pas de tourmenter  Barack Obama. A-t-il pris, ce jour-là, la bonne décision  ? De cette décision il a affirmé être  « fier », mais il a aussi assuré, dans une même interview, que  le dossier syrien est  «  son plus grand regret  ».  Par prudence, mieux vaut dire tout et son contraire, car il  sait ce qu’on en pense  : sa décision a changé la face  du monde. La plus grave attaque chimique depuis  la Seconde Guerre mondiale demeurée impunie  ? La  victoire de Bachar el-Assad  ? L’ascension des djihadistes  ? La montée en puissance des Russes au Moyen- Orient, en Europe et au-delà  ? L’effacement de l’Occident  ? Peut-être même la victoire de Donald Trump  ?  Tout partirait de son choix, de cette journée-là. Le 30 août 2013 (…) Le matin même,  il a annoncé publiquement réfléchir à  «  une action limitée contre Bachar  ».  Ses alliés français, la Ligue arabe,  l’Australie fourbissent leurs armes. Kerry a quasiment  annoncé la réplique américaine  :  « La crédibilité du président comme celle des Etats-Unis sont engagées.  »  Et même  :  « L’Histoire nous jugerait sévèrement si on ne faisait rien » … A  vrai  dire,  il  n’aurait  jamais  pensé  se  retrouver  dans cette situation. Autour de la table, chacun a en  tête  sa  conférence  de  presse  donnée  un  an  auparavant, presque jour pour jour, le 20 août 2012, et une  phrase. Un journaliste lui avait demandé ce qui pourrait infléchir sa position, pour le moins prudente, sur  le conflit syrien, lui qui refuse d’armer les rebelles.  «  Pour nous, la ligne rouge, c’est l’utilisation d’armes chimiques  ; ça changerait ma vision des choses  »,  avait-il  répondu. A question imprévue réponse non préparée. Ses  conseillers avaient été interloqués. Certes, El-Assad  avait été mis en garde par des canaux discrets, mais  rendre  publique  une  ligne  rouge  n’est  jamais  une   bonne chose. On s’était promptement rassuré  ; le régime  syrien  semblait  tellement  affaibli  qu’il  n’oserait pas s’attirer les foudres du président des Etats-Unis. Il a pourtant osé, comme en témoignent les schémas et les photos satellites qu’on diffuse dans la salle  de crise. Il y a eu d’abord de petites attaques chimiques  au printemps. Puis, devant l’absence de réactions, le  21 août 2013, cette attaque d’ampleur dans la banlieue  de Damas, plus tard contestée  (…).  Bachar  a-t-il voulu tester les Etats-Unis  ? Ou, simplement, son  armée n’avait-elle pas d’autres moyens de terrifier sa  population insurgée  ? On ne sait pas. Auprès de Philip Gordon, Obama a insisté  :  «  Il nous faut des preuves.  »  «  Le président était hanté par l’Irak et ne voulait pas entrer  en  guerre  sur  la  base  de  simples  suspicions» ,  témoigne   Gordon. Mais les preuves sont là. Les obus au gaz sarin tirés par le camp loyaliste ont tué environ 1  400  personnes, dont beaucoup d’enfants, selon une note de  la CIA dont chacun, dans la pièce, a reçu une copie.  Plus  contraignantes  que  les  preuves,  les  images.   Atroces, elles ont fait le tour du monde. Ce père qui  tient sa fillette morte dans les bras et qui l’interpelle,  lui, le président des Etats-Unis  :  «  Je vous en prie  ! Ce  ne sont que des enfants  ! Ils n’ont encore rien vu de la vie.  Du chimique ! »  Il est contraint de répondre. Un tabou,  depuis la Seconde Guerre mondiale, a été transgressé,  les traités internationaux ont été violés, l’ordre du  monde menacé, l’Amérique défiée. (….) Tout le pousse à intervenir… Mais… Le Parlement  britannique  a  mis  son  veto  la  veille.  C’est  une  première alerte. (…) Il converse  pendant trois quarts d’heure avec son plus proche allié,  le  Français  François  Hollande,  dont  les  Rafale   chargent leurs missiles de croisière Scalp. Il l’assure  que rien n’est changé. L’après-midi s’achève. (…) Il n’aime guère  les  choix  tranchés,  préférant  le  consensus. (…) Il propose à un homme  de confiance d’aller se promener dans le jardin de la  Maison-Blanche. Cet homme, c’est son chef de l’ad ministration, Denis McDonough  : ni un militaire ni  un diplomate, mais son collaborateur le plus loyal.  Pendant une heure, il lui livre ses doutes. Tout cela  est trop incertain. Ne va-t-il pas engager son pays dans  une nouvelle guerre alors qu’il a été élu pour se dé sengager de conflits coûteux  ? Et puis, cela ne risque- t-il pas de mettre en péril son grand œuvre, l’accord  nucléaire avec l’Iran  ? Trop de risques. Il teste une idée  auprès de McDonough  : demander une autorisation  préalable au Congrès. Une manière de reculer, car chacun sait qu’un soutien du Congrès est plus qu’incertain. (…) En  début  de  soirée,  il  convoque  à  nouveau  ses   conseillers dans son bureau. L’ambiance est décontractée. Il leur annonce la nouvelle. Ils n’en reviennent  pas. Ils insistent  :  «  Ce sera dévastateur pour votre autorité politique »,  le préviennent-ils. Il tient bon. Gordon  nous avoue avoir été estomaqué. Devant lui, Obama  raisonne en politique  :  «  Si ça ne dissuade pas Assad de  recommencer, si des inspecteurs de l’Onu sont pris comme  boucliers humains, si on perd un pilote, j’aurai l’opinion,  le Congrès sur le dos. On me reprochera tout et son contraire,  d’être intervenu, de ne pas être intervenu plus fortement,  de ne pas être intervenu plus légèrement.  »  Gordon se souvient  d’un  autre  argument  du  président   :  le  risque   d’engrenage.  Si  Assad  ou  ses  parrains  russes  et  iraniens  décidaient  d’une  nouvelle  attaque  chimique   «  trois semaines plus tard  »,  alors  «  on devrait frapper de nouveau, et plus fort, et ainsi de suite  ».  Il ne serait plus  maître du processus, craint-il, alors qu’Assad le serait.  Cela, cet homme qui veut tout contrôler ne peut l’accepter. Et rien n’est moins contrôlable qu’une guerre. (…) Il prévient Kerry, qui est furieux.  «  L’Histoire nous jugera  avec une sévérité extrême  »,  lâche ce dernier à ses collaborateurs et à certains de ses homologues étrangers.  Le lendemain, à 18 heures, quelques heures avant l’attaque, il contacte aussi Hollande, qui tombe de haut.  (…) Puis (…) sur le perron de la Maison-Blanche, Barack Obama tient une conférence de presse  : « J’ai décidé d’intervenir,  proclame-t-il, avant d’ajouter  :  mais je demanderai que cet usage de la force soit approuvé par le Congrès.  »  Il s’est donné du temps. C’est fini. Il vient de changer l’ordre du monde sans pouvoir, à cet instant, le  deviner.  Certains  comprennent  en  revanche  que  rien ne sera plus comme avant. Sur les hauteurs de Damas, Bachar el-Assad comprend qu’il n’a plus rien à craindre des Occidentaux.  Il se paiera même le luxe d’utiliser de nouveau des  armes  chimiques  deux  ans  plus  tard.  L’opposition   «  modérée  », autour de l’Armée syrienne libre, sent  que l’Occident l’abandonne. Les djihadistes, mieux  armés, recrutent les déçus et montent en puissance,  scellant le piège qui permettra au président syrien de se présenter comme rempart contre le chaos. Au Kremlin, Vladimir Poutine se jette sur l’occasion. Aux Américains il offre de convaincre El-Assad  de  détruire  ses  armes  chimiques  contre  l’abandon  de tout projet d’intervention. Comment refuser, après  avoir reculé le 30 août  ? La Russie prend la main en  Syrie.  Plus  tard,  Poutine  estimera  ne  rien  redouter  du  président  américain  et  envahira  la  Crimée.  Les   Républicains et un certain Donald Trump, admirateur  de  Poutine,  ne  cesseront  de  dénoncer  ce  nouveau  Munich  et  ce  président  qui  a  affaibli  une   Amérique qu’il faudrait rendre  « great  again ». Il ne lui reste que des questions sans réponses. Que  se serait-il passé s’il avait frappé  ? Ce 30 août 2013 est-il  le jour où Obama a mis fin au règne des Etats-Unis  comme seule superpuissance mondiale  ? Le jour où  le  camp  des  démocraties  a  dû  renoncer  à  se  battre  pour ses valeurs  ? Antoine Vatkine
This is the president’s mendacity continuing to a degree that is really quite remarkable. « There are people on both sides and beyond » – so he means Republicans at home and Israelis – « who are against the diplomatic resolution ». That’s a lie. They are against this diplomatic resolution, the deal he’s doing, that any observer will tell you paves the road to an Iranian nuclear weapon that is legitimate and accepted by the international community. It is a disaster. That’s why it is opposed. People are not opposed to diplomacy, they are opposed to a specific deal. And to address this to Iranians as if Iran is a democracy when it’s a dictatorship that put down a democratic revolution in 2009 of which he turned his face and never supported is disgraceful. Charles Krauthammer
The disgusting aspect of the last eight years is that Obama mistook the sidelines for the moral high ground. So he would use all this lofty rhetoric about red lines and he would stand there would be people killing each other, slaughtering each other, dead babies and he’d stand there with his hand on his hip giving a speech. And he stripped words of their meaning. And Trump isn’t as articulate. He isn’t as polished but his words have meaning. And to do that while is he having dinner with the Chinese. You said did he tell him over the salad bowl, as I understand it, he told him over the creme brulee or the tiramisu. How cool is that to actually make the Chinese politburo sit through a night of American targeted bombing? I think he’s accomplished certain things. He sent a message to the Chinese as they are sitting across the dinner table from him. He sent a message to Putin, and, thereby, incidentally also made all these stupid investigations of investigations of investigations that the Senate and the House are chasing their tails and look absolutely ridiculous. You know, he has picked a fight with Putin at a when Congress has spent and Susan Rice has spent a year investigating whether he is Putin stooge. How stupid do they look? I think they understand this is really — last night was inauguration day. That America is back in the world. Mark Steyn
L’actualité de ces dernières semaines a mené certains à douter de la maîtrise de Trump sur son personnel et sur sa politique intérieure, tandis que d’autres le disaient carrément indifférent aux affaires étrangères. D’abord le fiasco Ryancare. Fidèle à ses promesses, Trump a voulu abroger l’Obamacare, mais mal lui en a pris de faire confiance au si peu fiable Speaker de la Chambre, Paul Ryan, et de s’engager à ses côtés, croyant pouvoir ainsi gagner des votes démocrates. Le « plan en 3 phases » du technocrate Ryan, trop compliqué et n’abrogeant pas les pires mesures de la loi d’Obama, ne pouvait que rencontrer l’opposition ferme du Freedom Caucus, la trentaine de représentants les plus conservateurs de la base électorale de Trump. L’échec est pour Ryan. Trump s’en sort plutôt bien, même si le poids fiscal d’Obamacare perdure et va donc le gêner dans sa réforme fiscale d’envergure. Au moins a-t-il appris, sur le tas, qu’il ne servait à rien de courtiser des démocrates obtus et qu’il valait mieux pour lui s’impliquer le moins possible dans les jeux du Congrès. Puis, font désordre les disputes de personnel au sein des divers ministères et le fait que Trump, soi-disant complètement ballotté entre des avis divergents, tarderait à débarrasser son administration « des restes d’Obama », même à des postes élevés, parce que, en gros, il subirait l’influence de Tillerson, Mattis, McMaster et Kushner (le « Premier Gendre »), tous des centristes-interventionnistes, en opposition radicale au nationaliste-isolationniste Bannon… Tout cela sur fond de l’exécrable Russiagate, servi tous les jours par les démocrates dans l’espoir de délégitimer Trump et de l’empêcher de gouverner. Lassant, le feuilleton se retourne contre ses auteurs avec le scandale des écoutes de l’équipe de transition de Trump : ex-ambassadeur à l’ONU et ex-Conseiller à la Sécurité nationale, l’incroyable Susan Rice, après avoir nié (ce n’était jamais que la 4e fois qu’elle mentait pour protéger Obama), reconnaît avoir « dévoilé » l’identité de plusieurs personnes et autorisé des fuites à la presse… Rappelons que les démocrates ne s’émouvaient pas des ingérences russes lorsque celles-ci semblaient favoriser leur candidate et que ce sont eux qui ont un long passé de connivence avec la Russie : de Roosevelt et Staline aux espions à la solde de l’URSS sous Truman, jusqu’à la « flexibilité » promise par Obama en 2012 à Medvedev, concrétisée en 2013 par l’abandon pur et simple de ses responsabilités au Moyen-Orient à Poutine… La réalité est que Trump peuple ses agences de gens d’avis opposés, exprès, afin d’appréhender toutes les possibilités pour trancher par lui-même. Pragmatique, mais n’hésitant pas à prendre des risques, il vient de prouver qu’il était bien maître à bord. Tous les pourparlers à l’amiable ayant échoué, Trump riposte à l’intolérable par les frappes de 59 missiles Tomahawk sur la base syrienne de Shayrat, chargée du largage de gaz sarin. Fait remarquable : sans toucher aux 5 autres bases aériennes de l’armée syrienne et sans causer le moindre dommage aux installations russes. Simple avertissement, parfaitement ciblé et mesuré, destiné à protéger les quelque mille militaires américains présents sur le théâtre d’opérations et à montrer que l’Amérique est de retour et qu’il faut désormais compter avec sa détermination. La Syrie et l’État islamique, mais aussi la Chine, la Russie, l’Iran, la Corée du Nord peuvent en prendre note, tandis que les alliés traditionnels au Moyen-Orient et en Asie se rassurent, comme devraient se rassurer les Européens s’il leur restait quelque bon sens. Et c’est tout ! Il n’y a pas d’escalade, ni d’intention de régler les affaires de la Syrie, ni (hélas !) de reprendre le bâton de policier du monde. Seulement l’intention de ne plus rester passif face aux agressions… Evelyne Joslain
Syria is weird for reasons that transcend even the bizarre situation of bombing an abhorrent Bashar al-Assad who was bombing an abhorrent ISIS — as we de facto ally with Iran, the greater strategic threat, to defeat the more odious, but less long-term strategic threat, ISIS. Trump apparently hit a Syrian airfield to express Western outrage over the likely Syrian use of chemical weapons. Just as likely, he also sought to remind China, Russia, Iran, and North Korea that he is unpredictable and not restrained by self-imposed cultural, political, and ethical bridles that seemed to ensure that Obama would never do much over Chinese and Russian cyber-warfare, or Iranian interception of a U.S. warship or the ISIS terror campaign in the West or North Korea’s increasingly creepy and dangerous behavior. But the strike also raised as many questions as it may have answered. (…) Trump campaigned on not getting involved in Syria, deriding the Iraq War, and questioning the Afghan effort. Does his sudden strike signal a Jacksonian effort to hit back enemies if the mood comes upon us — and therefore acceptable to his base as a sort of one-off, don’t-tread-on-me hiss and rattle? Or does the strike that was so welcomed by the foreign-policy establishment worry his supporters that Trump is now putting his suddenly neocon nose in someone’s else’s business? And doing so without congressional authorizations or much exegesis? Does the Left trash Trump for using force or keep quiet, given the ostensible humanitarian basis for the strike, and the embarrassing contrast with Obama, whose reset with Russia led to inviting Putin into the Middle East to solve the WMD problem that we could not, and which Obama and Susan Rice not long ago assured us was indeed solved by our de facto friend at the time Putin? These dilemmas, apart from Obama’s prior confusion about Syria and Russia, arise in part because Trump never thought it wise or necessary to resolve contradictions in Trumpism — especially at what point the long overdue need to restore U.S. respect and deterrence to end “lead from behind” appeasement becomes overseas entanglements not commensurate with Trump’s “America First” assurances. Victor Davis Hanson
Now we’re coming to grips with the human and strategic price of the Obama administration’s mendacity. The sham agreement gave Assad confidence that he could continue to murder his opponents indefinitely without fear of Western reprisal. It fostered the view that his regime was preferable to its opponents. It showed Tehran that it could drive a hard diplomatic bargain over its nuclear file, given that the administration was so plainly desperate for face-saving excuses for inaction. And it left Mr. Obama’s successor with a lousy set of options. Rex Tillerson and Nikki Haley erred badly by announcing, just days before last week’s sarin attack, that the Trump administration had no plans to depose Assad. They gave the dictator reason to believe he had as little to fear from this U.S. president as he did from the last one. But, unlike their predecessors, the secretary of state and U.N. ambassador deserve credit for learning from that mistake—as does the president they serve. The core of the problem in Syria isn’t Islamic State, dreadful as it is. It’s a regime whose appetite for unlimited violence is one of the main reasons ISIS has thrived. To say there is no easy cure for Syria should not obscure the fact that there won’t be any possibility of a cure until Assad falls. Mr. Obama and his advisers will never run out of self-justifications for their policy in Syria. They can’t outrun responsibility for the consequences of their lies. Bret Stephens

Attention: un mensonge peut en cacher un autre !

Au terme d’une semaine à donner le tournis …

Où l’on redécouvre non seulement en Syrie les armes chimiques soi-disant inexistantes de Saddam Hussein

Mais où après avoir tant critiqué les guerres d’Irak – prétendus mensonges sur les ADM compris – et d’Afghanistan ou appelé à la retenue sur la Syrie …

Le champion de l’Amérique d’abord et de la non-ingérence surprend tout son monde …

Avec le bombardement d’une base aérienne syrienne d’où aurait été lancé une attaque chimique de populations civiles …

Comment au-delà des nombreuses questions que soulève le revirement du président Trump …

Ne pas voir l’incroyable propension au mensonge d’une Administration …

Qui sans compter la mise sur écoutes et l’autorisation de fuites à la presse concernant l’équipe de son futur successeur …

Se vantait jusqu’il y a trois mois de son accord d’élimination des ADM syriennes ?

Et surtout ne pas s’inquiéter de l’autre grand motif de fierté de ladite administration Obama …

A savoir l’accord prétendument sans faille sur le nucléaire iranien ?

The Price of Obama’s Mendacity
The consequences of his administration’s lies about Syria are becoming clear
Bret Stephens
The Wall Street Journal
April 10, 2017

Last week’s cruise-missile strike against a Syrian air base in response to Bashar Assad’s use of chemical weapons has reopened debate about the wisdom of Barack Obama’s decision to forgo a similar strike, under similar circumstances, in 2013.

But the real issue isn’t about wisdom. It’s about honesty.

On Sept. 10, 2013, President Obama delivered a televised address in which he warned of the dangers of not acting against Assad’s use of sarin gas, which had killed some 1,400 civilians in the Damascus suburb of Ghouta the previous month.

“If we fail to act, the Assad regime will see no reason to stop using chemical weapons,” Mr. Obama said. “As the ban against these weapons erodes, other tyrants will have no reason to think twice about acquiring poison gas, and using them. Over time, our troops would again face the prospect of chemical weapons on the battlefield. And it could be easier for terrorist organizations to obtain these weapons, and use them to attack civilians.”

It was a high-minded case for action that the president immediately disavowed for the least high-minded reason: It was politically unpopular. The administration punted a vote to an unwilling Congress. It punted a fix to the all-too-willing Russians. And it spent the rest of its time in office crowing about its success.

In July 2014 Secretary of State John Kerry claimed “we got 100% of the chemical weapons out.” In May 2015 Mr. Obama boasted that “Assad gave up his chemical weapons. That’s not speculation on our part. That, in fact, has been confirmed by the organization internationally that is charged with eliminating chemical weapons.” This January, then-National Security Adviser Susan Rice said “we were able to get the Syrian government to voluntarily and verifiably give up its chemical weapons stockpile.”

Today we know all this was untrue. Or, rather, now all of us know it. Anyone paying even slight attention has known it for years.

In June 2014 U.N. Ambassador Samantha Power noted “discrepancies and omissions related to the Syrian government’s declaration of its chemical weapons program.” But that hint of unease didn’t prevent her from celebrating the removal “of the final 8% of chemical weapons materials in Syria’s declaration” of its overall stockpile.

The following summer, The Wall Street Journal’s Adam Entous and Naftali Bendavid reported “U.S. intelligence agencies have concluded that the [Assad] regime didn’t give up all of the chemical weapons it was supposed to.” In February 2016, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper confirmed the Journal’s story, telling Congress “Syria has not declared all the elements of its chemical weapons program.”

Why did Mr. Obama and his senior officials stick to a script that they knew was untethered from the facts? Let’s speculate. They thought the gap between Assad’s “declared” and actual stockpile was close enough for government work. They figured a credulous press wouldn’t work up a sweat pointing out the difference. They didn’t imagine Assad would use what was left of his chemical arsenal for fear of provoking the U.S.

And they didn’t want to disturb the public narrative that multilateral diplomacy was a surer way than military action to disarm rogue Middle Eastern regimes of their illicit weapons. Two months after Mr. Obama’s climb-down with Syria, he signed on to the interim nuclear deal with Iran. The remainder of his term was spent trying not to upset the fragile beauty of his nuclear diplomacy.

Now we’re coming to grips with the human and strategic price of the Obama administration’s mendacity. The sham agreement gave Assad confidence that he could continue to murder his opponents indefinitely without fear of Western reprisal. It fostered the view that his regime was preferable to its opponents. It showed Tehran that it could drive a hard diplomatic bargain over its nuclear file, given that the administration was so plainly desperate for face-saving excuses for inaction.

And it left Mr. Obama’s successor with a lousy set of options.

Rex Tillerson and Nikki Haley erred badly by announcing, just days before last week’s sarin attack, that the Trump administration had no plans to depose Assad. They gave the dictator reason to believe he had as little to fear from this U.S. president as he did from the last one.

But, unlike their predecessors, the secretary of state and U.N. ambassador deserve credit for learning from that mistake—as does the president they serve. The core of the problem in Syria isn’t Islamic State, dreadful as it is. It’s a regime whose appetite for unlimited violence is one of the main reasons ISIS has thrived. To say there is no easy cure for Syria should not obscure the fact that there won’t be any possibility of a cure until Assad falls.

Mr. Obama and his advisers will never run out of self-justifications for their policy in Syria. They can’t outrun responsibility for the consequences of their lies.

Voir aussi:

Hall of Mirrors in Syria
Victor Davis Hanson
The National Review Corner
April 10, 2017

Syria is weird for reasons that transcend even the bizarre situation of bombing an abhorrent Bashar al-Assad who was bombing an abhorrent ISIS — as we de facto ally with Iran, the greater strategic threat, to defeat the more odious, but less long-term strategic threat, ISIS.

Trump apparently hit a Syrian airfield to express Western outrage over the likely Syrian use of chemical weapons. Just as likely, he also sought to remind China, Russia, Iran, and North Korea that he is unpredictable and not restrained by self-imposed cultural, political, and ethical bridles that seemed to ensure that Obama would never do much over Chinese and Russian cyber-warfare, or Iranian interception of a U.S. warship or the ISIS terror campaign in the West or North Korea’s increasingly creepy and dangerous behavior.

But the strike also raised as many questions as it may have answered.

Is Trump saying that he can send off a few missiles anywhere and anytime rogues go too far? If so, does that willingness to use force enhance deterrence? (probably); does it also risk further escalation to be effective? (perhaps); and does it solve the problem of an Assad or someone similar committing more atrocities? (no).

Was the reason we hit Assad, then, because he is an especially odious dictator and kills his own, or that the manner in which he did so was cruel and barbaric (after all, ISIS burns, drowns, and cuts apart its victims without much Western reprisals until recently)? Or is the reason instead that he used WMD, and since 1918 with a few exceptions (largely in the Middle East), “poison” gas has been a taboo weapon among the international community? (Had Assad publicly beheaded the same number who were gassed, would we have intervened?)

Do we continue to sort of allow ISIS to fight it out with Syria/Iran/Hezbollah in the manner of our shrug during the Iran-Iraq War and in the fashion until Pearl Harbor that we were okay with the Wehrmacht and the Red Army killing each other en masse for over five months in Russia? Or do we say to do so cynically dooms innocents in a fashion that they are not quite as doomed elsewhere, or at least not doomed without chance of help as is true in North Korea?

Trump campaigned on not getting involved in Syria, deriding the Iraq War, and questioning the Afghan effort. Does his sudden strike signal a Jacksonian effort to hit back enemies if the mood comes upon us — and therefore acceptable to his base as a sort of one-off, don’t-tread-on-me hiss and rattle?

Or does the strike that was so welcomed by the foreign-policy establishment worry his supporters that Trump is now putting his suddenly neocon nose in someone’s else’s business? And doing so without congressional authorizations or much exegesis?

Does the Left trash Trump for using force or keep quiet, given the ostensible humanitarian basis for the strike, and the embarrassing contrast with Obama, whose reset with Russia led to inviting Putin into the Middle East to solve the WMD problem that we could not, and which Obama and Susan Rice not long ago assured us was indeed solved by our de facto friend at the time Putin?

These dilemmas, apart from Obama’s prior confusion about Syria and Russia, arise in part because Trump never thought it wise or necessary to resolve contradictions in Trumpism — especially at what point the long overdue need to restore U.S. respect and deterrence to end “lead from behind” appeasement becomes overseas entanglements not commensurate with Trump’s “America First” assurances. At some point, does talking and tweeting toughly (“bomb the sh** out of ISIS”) require a Tomahawk missile to retain credibility? And does “Jacksonianism” still allow blowing some stuff up, but not doing so at great cost and for the ideals of consensual government rather than immediate U.S. security?

Most likely for now, Trump’s strike resembles Reagan’s 1986 Libyan bombing that expressed U.S. outrage over Libyan support for then recent attacks on Americans in Berlin. But Reagan’s dramatic act (in pursuit of U.S. interests, not international norms) did not really stop Moammar Qaddafi’s support for terrorists (cf. the 1988 likely Libyan-inspired retaliatory Lockerbie bombing) or do much else to muzzle Qaddafi.

About all we can say, then, about Trump’s action was that he felt like it was overdue — or like a high-school friend once put to me after unexpectedly unloading on a school bully who daily picked on weaklings, “It seemed a good idea at the time.”

Voir également:

La semaine de Trump.Virage à 180 degrés sur la Syrie
Gabriel Hassan
Courrier international
07/04/2017

Attaque à l’arme chimique en Syrie, rencontres avec les présidents égyptien et chinois : la semaine de Donald Trump a été très chargée sur le front diplomatique. Avec des déclarations à donner le tournis.

Le départ de Bachar El-Assad de Syrie ne faisait pas partie jusqu’ici des priorités du président Trump. L’attaque chimique qui a eu lieu dans la région d’Idlib pourrait changer les choses.

  • Les États-Unis attaquent Bachar El-Assad

Donald Trump change de cap. Trois jours après l’attaque chimique à Khan Cheikhoun, dans la région d’Idlib (nord-ouest de la Syrie), le président américain a ordonné le bombardement d’une base aérienne syrienne.

Dans la nuit de jeudi à vendredi – vers 20 h 40 heure de Washington – 59 missiles Tomahawk ont été tirés par la marine américaine. Il s’agit de “la première attaque américaine contre le régime de Bachar El-Assad depuis le début de la guerre en Syrie”, il y a six ans, souligne The Washington Post. Et de la première intervention militaire de la présidence Trump.

Le président américain a déclaré cette nuit qu’“il [était] dans l’intérêt national et vital des États-Unis de prévenir et de décourager la propagation et le recours aux armes chimiques mortelles”, rapporte The New York Times.

Réuni en urgence à l’Organisation des Nations unies mercredi soir, le Conseil de sécurité avait, à l’exception de la Russie, fermement condamné le régime de Bachar El-Assad. Brandissant des photos de victimes, l’ambassadrice américaine Nikki Haley avait assuré que les États-Unis étaient prêts à agir unilatéralement en cas de mésentente.

L’opération militaire de la nuit dernière constitue un revirement important. Il y a une semaine, Nikki Haley avait laissé entendre que Washington s’accommoderait de Bachar El-Assad, mais l’attaque à l’arme chimique perpétrée près d’Idlib, qui a fait des dizaines de victimes, semble avoir tout remis en question. Le 5 avril, Trump a déclaré que le président syrien avait franchi “beaucoup, beaucoup de lignes”, laissant ainsi entendre qu’il devrait peut-être partir.

  • Deux hommes forts en visite

Le président égyptien Abdelfattah Al-Sissi en début de semaine à la Maison-Blanche, le président chinois Xi Jinping jeudi 6 et vendredi 7 avril à Mar-a-Lago, en Floride : Trump aura reçu en quelques jours deux présidents très autoritaires.

Le dirigeant américain a fait un véritable éloge du leader égyptien, saluant son “boulot fantastique, dans une situation très difficile”. Pour une large partie de la presse américaine, ce soutien affiché à un régime brutal est une erreur, qui ne sert qu’en apparence les intérêts américains.

Les discussions s’annonçaient plus difficiles avec le président chinois, accueilli dans la résidence personnelle de Donald Trump en Floride. Sur Twitter, avant leur rencontre, le locataire de la Maison-Blanche avait mis la pression, car il a besoin de la coopération de Pékin en matière commerciale, et surtout concernant le brûlant dossier nord-coréen. Xi Jinping avait donc beaucoup de cartes en main. Et Trump ne pouvait pas cette fois pratiquer la “diplomatie du golf”, un sport mal vu chez les officiels chinois.

  • Lutte de clans à la Maison-Blanche

L’influence de Steve Bannon, l’éminence grise de Trump, n’est apparemment plus sans limite. Le stratège en chef de Donald Trump a été évincé le 5 avril du Conseil de sécurité nationale, où sa nomination avait fait polémique. Une victoire pour le conseiller de Trump pour la sécurité nationale, le lieutenant général H. R. McMaster.

À travers lui, c’est le clan des “nationalistes économiques”, tenants d’une ligne populiste, qui essuie un revers.

À l’inverse, Jared Kushner, gendre de Trump et membre, selon un chroniqueur du Washington Post, du clan des “New-Yorkais” ou “démocrates”, n’en finit plus d’accumuler les missions. À son programme : réformer l’État fédéral, instaurer la paix au Proche-Orient, servir d’intermédiaire avec la Chine ou le Mexique. Rien que cela… En visite en Irak en début de semaine, l’époux d’Ivanka Trump a même devancé le secrétaire d’État américain sur ce terrain hautement stratégique dans la lutte contre Daech.

  • Encore des accusations

Rares sont les semaines où Trump ne fait pas de déclaration polémique. Le président a encore émis des accusations sans preuve, visant cette fois Susan Rice, conseillère de Barack Obama pour la sécurité nationale. D’après lui, cette dernière pourrait avoir commis un crime en demandant à ce que soient dévoilés les noms de collaborateurs de Trump mentionnés de manière incidente dans des communications interceptées lors de la présidence d’Obama. Reprenant à son compte des accusations lancées par des médias conservateurs, Trump a déclaré au New York Times :

C’est une affaire tellement importante pour notre pays et pour le monde. C’est une des grandes affaires de notre temps.”

Pour ses détracteurs, cette assertion n’est que la dernière tentative en date pour détourner l’attention des questions au sujet des liens de son entourage avec la Russie. En mars, Trump avait accusé Obama de l’avoir “mis sur écoute” à la Trump Tower durant la campagne présidentielle.

  • Neil Gorsuch élu à la Cour suprême

C’était une promesse du candidat républicain Donald Trump : “Neil Gorsuch est devenu, vendredi 7 avril, le neuvième juge de la Cour suprême”, annonce le NewYork Times.

Depuis plus d’un an, démocrates et républicains s’opposaient sur le remplacement du juge Antonin Scalia, décédé soudainement en février 2016. Quelques jours après son investiture, le président américain avait annoncé la nomination de M. Gorsuch à laquelle s’opposaient farouchement les démocrates.

Minoritaires au Sénat – composé de 52 démocrates et 48 républicains – les partisans de Donald Trump avaient prévenu qu’ils passeraient en force. Chose faite ce vendredi : les républicains ont abaissé la majorité requise pour permettre ce scrutin, un changement historique des règles, explique le quotidien américain.

Favorables aux armes à feu et fermement opposé à l’avortement, Neil Gorsuch siégera donc dans la chambre haute du Congrès à partir de la mi-avril. Il a été nommé à vie.

  • Twitter poursuit Washington en justice

Le bras de fer se poursuit entre la Maison-Blanche et Twitter. Il y a quelques semaines, le président américain demandait au réseau social de lui fournir les données et l’identité des personnes qui se cachaient derrière les comptes hostiles à sa politique.

Mais, jeudi 6 avril, Twitter, refusant de fournir une quelconque information, a saisi la justice. La plateforme, citée par The Washington Post, rappelle que “les droits à la liberté d’expression accordés aux utilisateurs de Twitter et à Twitter lui-même en vertu du premier amendement de la Constitution incluent un droit à diffuser des propos politiques anonymes ou sous pseudonyme”. Donald Trump n’a, pour l’heure, pas rétorqué.

 Voir encore:

Trump peut-il gouverner ?
Evelyne Joslain
Les 4 vérités
10 avril, 2017

L’actualité de ces dernières semaines a mené certains à douter de la maîtrise de Trump sur son personnel et sur sa politique intérieure, tandis que d’autres le disaient carrément indifférent aux affaires étrangères.

D’abord le fiasco Ryancare. Fidèle à ses promesses, Trump a voulu abroger l’Obamacare, mais mal lui en a pris de faire confiance au si peu fiable Speaker de la Chambre, Paul Ryan, et de s’engager à ses côtés, croyant pouvoir ainsi gagner des votes démocrates.

Le « plan en 3 phases » du technocrate Ryan, trop compliqué et n’abrogeant pas les pires mesures de la loi d’Obama, ne pouvait que rencontrer l’opposition ferme du Freedom Caucus, la trentaine de représentants les plus conservateurs de la base électorale de Trump.

L’échec est pour Ryan. Trump s’en sort plutôt bien, même si le poids fiscal d’Obamacare perdure et va donc le gêner dans sa réforme fiscale d’envergure.

Au moins a-t-il appris, sur le tas, qu’il ne servait à rien de courtiser des démocrates obtus et qu’il valait mieux pour lui s’impliquer le moins possible dans les jeux du Congrès.

Puis, font désordre les disputes de personnel au sein des divers ministères et le fait que Trump, soi-disant complètement ballotté entre des avis divergents, tarderait à débarrasser son administration « des restes d’Obama », même à des postes élevés, parce que, en gros, il subirait l’influence de Tillerson, Mattis, McMaster et Kushner (le « Premier Gendre »), tous des centristes-interventionnistes, en opposition radicale au nationaliste-isolationniste Bannon…

Tout cela sur fond de l’exécrable Russiagate, servi tous les jours par les démocrates dans l’espoir de délégitimer Trump et de l’empêcher de gouverner. Lassant, le feuilleton se retourne contre ses auteurs avec le scandale des écoutes de l’équipe de transition de Trump : ex-ambassadeur à l’ONU et ex-Conseiller à la Sécurité nationale, l’incroyable Susan Rice, après avoir nié (ce n’était jamais que la 4e fois qu’elle mentait pour protéger Obama), reconnaît avoir « dévoilé » l’identité de plusieurs personnes et autorisé des fuites à la presse… Rappelons que les démocrates ne s’émouvaient pas des ingérences russes lorsque celles-ci semblaient favoriser leur candidate et que ce sont eux qui ont un long passé de connivence avec la Russie : de Roosevelt et Staline aux espions à la solde de l’URSS sous Truman, jusqu’à la « flexibilité » promise par Obama en 2012 à Medvedev, concrétisée en 2013 par l’abandon pur et simple de ses responsabilités au Moyen-Orient à Poutine…

La réalité est que Trump peuple ses agences de gens d’avis opposés, exprès, afin d’appréhender toutes les possibilités pour trancher par lui-même.

Pragmatique, mais n’hésitant pas à prendre des risques, il vient de prouver qu’il était bien maître à bord. Tous les pourparlers à l’amiable ayant échoué, Trump riposte à l’intolérable par les frappes de 59 missiles Tomahawk sur la base syrienne de Shayrat, chargée du largage de gaz sarin. Fait remarquable : sans toucher aux 5 autres bases aériennes de l’armée syrienne et sans causer le moindre dommage aux installations russes.

Simple avertissement, parfaitement ciblé et mesuré, destiné à protéger les quelque mille militaires américains présents sur le théâtre d’opérations et à montrer que l’Amérique est de retour et qu’il faut désormais compter avec sa détermination.

La Syrie et l’État islamique, mais aussi la Chine, la Russie, l’Iran, la Corée du Nord peuvent en prendre note, tandis que les alliés traditionnels au Moyen-Orient et en Asie se rassurent, comme devraient se rassurer les Européens s’il leur restait quelque bon sens.

Et c’est tout ! Il n’y a pas d’escalade, ni d’intention de régler les affaires de la Syrie, ni (hélas !) de reprendre le bâton de policier du monde. Seulement l’intention de ne plus rester passif face aux agressions…

Et Trump gouverne bel et bien, malgré les obstacles et les commentaires malveillants.

La liste de ses accomplissements est déjà longue. Signe de confiance, les indices boursiers sont bons. Les emplois reviennent grâce aux dérégulations signées par décret exécutif. Les syndicats du privé sont apaisés et le climat est redevenu favorable aux petites entreprises, tandis que sont mis en œuvre des moyens nouveaux pour réduire le poids de l’État fédéral. Des milliers de récidivistes illégaux ont été déportés, 1 500 hackers pédophiles arrêtés…

En fait, les bonnes nouvelles n’arrêtent pas !

Voir par ailleurs:

Le jour où Obama a flanché
Exclusif.  En 2013, l’ex-président américain renonçait, au dernier  moment et malgré sa promesse, à frapper El-Assad. Le documentariste  Antoine Vitkine nous révèle les coulisses de cette volte-face
Antoine Vitkine
Le Point
13 avril 2017

Cette interrogation n’en finit pas de tourmenter  Barack Obama. A-t-il pris, ce jour-là, la bonne décision  ? De cette décision il a affirmé être  « fier », mais il a aussi assuré, dans une même interview, que  le dossier syrien est  «  son plus grand regret  ».  Par prudence, mieux vaut dire tout et son contraire, car il  sait ce qu’on en pense  : sa décision a changé la face  du monde. La plus grave attaque chimique depuis  la Seconde Guerre mondiale demeurée impunie  ? La  victoire de Bachar el-Assad  ? L’ascension des djihadistes  ? La montée en puissance des Russes au Moyen- Orient, en Europe et au-delà  ? L’effacement de l’Occident  ? Peut-être même la victoire de Donald Trump  ?  Tout partirait de son choix, de cette journée-là.

Le 30 août 2013, l’été s’achève à Washington dans  une épuisante touffeur. Tout juste rentré de quelques  jours de vacances sur l’île de Martha’s Vineyard, où il  a fait du VTT avec Michelle, il lui faut de nouveau assumer une charge harassante. A quoi bon cette réunion  ? Le sort n’en est-il pas jeté  ? Ce vendredi, en début  d’après-midi, dans la salle de crise de la Maison-Blanche,  il participe à une ultime réunion du Conseil de sécurité consacrée à l’intervention militaire contre le régime syrien. Autour de lui, ses conseillers, dont Philip   Gordon, qui s’occupe du Moyen-Orient,  les dirigeants de l’armée, ses ministres les plus importants, dont John Kerry, son secrétaire d’Etat. Pour tous,  l’intervention ne fait aucun doute. Le matin même,  il a annoncé publiquement réfléchir à  «  une action limitée contre Bachar  ».  Ses alliés français, la Ligue arabe,  l’Australie fourbissent leurs armes. Kerry a quasiment  annoncé la réplique américaine  :  « La crédibilité du président comme celle des Etats-Unis sont engagées.  »  Et même  :  « L’Histoire nous jugerait sévèrement si on ne faisait rien » …

A  vrai  dire,  il  n’aurait  jamais  pensé  se  retrouver   dans cette situation. Autour de la table, chacun a en  tête  sa  conférence  de  presse  donnée  un  an  auparavant, presque jour pour jour, le 20 août 2012, et une  phrase. Un journaliste lui avait demandé ce qui pourrait infléchir sa position, pour le moins prudente, sur  le conflit syrien, lui qui refuse d’armer les rebelles.  «  Pour nous, la ligne rouge, c’est l’utilisation d’armes chimiques  ; ça changerait ma vision des choses  »,  avait-il  répondu. A question imprévue réponse non préparée. Ses  conseillers avaient été interloqués. Certes, El-Assad  avait été mis en garde par des canaux discrets, mais  rendre  publique  une  ligne  rouge  n’est  jamais  une   bonne chose. On s’était promptement rassuré  ; le régime  syrien  semblait  tellement  affaibli  qu’il  n’oserait pas s’attirer les foudres du président des Etats-Unis.

Il a pourtant osé, comme en témoignent les schémas et les photos satellites qu’on diffuse dans la salle  de crise. Il y a eu d’abord de petites attaques chimiques  au printemps. Puis, devant l’absence de réactions, le  21 août 2013, cette attaque d’ampleur dans la banlieue  de Damas, plus tard contestée  (voir ci-contre).  Bachar  a-t-il voulu tester les Etats-Unis  ? Ou, simplement, son  armée n’avait-elle pas d’autres moyens de terrifier sa  population insurgée  ? On ne sait pas. Auprès de Philip Gordon, Obama a insisté  :  «  Il nous faut des preuves.  »  «  Le président était hanté par l’Irak et ne voulait pas entrer  en  guerre  sur  la  base  de  simples  suspicions» ,  témoigne   Gordon. Mais les preuves sont là. Les obus au gaz sarin tirés par le camp loyaliste ont tué environ 1  400  personnes, dont beaucoup d’enfants, selon une note de  la CIA dont chacun, dans la pièce, a reçu une copie.  Plus  contraignantes  que  les  preuves,  les  images.   Atroces, elles ont fait le tour du monde. Ce père qui  tient sa fillette morte dans les bras et qui l’interpelle,  lui, le président des Etats-Unis  :  «  Je vous en prie  ! Ce  ne sont que des enfants  ! Ils n’ont encore rien vu de la vie.  Du chimique ! »  Il est contraint de répondre. Un tabou,  depuis la Seconde Guerre mondiale, a été transgressé,  les traités internationaux ont été violés, l’ordre du  monde menacé, l’Amérique défiée.

Devant ses conseillers, il assume sa phrase.  «  Il nous  a dit  : “Quand j’ai parlé d’une ligne rouge, c’est vraiment  ce  que  je  voulais  dire”   »,   se  souvient  Gordon.  Tous  le   poussent à agir, et d’abord les plus proches, les plus réalistes, Gordon, justement, ou l’avisé Antony Blinken, qui lâche  :  «  Une superpuissance ne bluffe pas.  » « La  frappe doit servir d’avertissement à l’Iran, au Hezbollah  ou à la Corée du Nord si un jour ils songeaient à recourir  à des armes de destruction massive  » , déclare pour sa part  Kerry. Ils lui présentent les différentes options. Le général Flynn, alors chef du renseignement militaire, a  participé à la sélection des cibles  : aéroports, centres  de commandement, bases militaires, dépôts d’armes.  «  Cela aurait été dévastateur et aurait considérablement  atténué la capacité du régime à frapper des non-combattants »,   nous  déclare-t-il.  Autour  de  la  table,  Martin   Dempsey, chef d’état-major, fait savoir  :  «  On a le doigt  sur la détente.  »  Faut-il une journée de frappes ou plusieurs  ? Les militaires prônent plusieurs jours d’intervention.  Il  suit  leur  avis.  Des  frappes  aériennes  en   Syrie seront déclenchées le lendemain dans la nuit, à  3  heures GMT. La réunion s’achève : les derniers choix  militaires  sont  arrêtés.  Les  conseillers  quittent  les   lieux. Remarquent-ils qu’il n’a pas donné d’ordre, qu’il  n’a pas dit  « allez-y »  et n’a pas encore signé d’ordre  ? Il  a laissé la décision se prendre toute seule, portée par  sa propre logique, se contentant de suivre l’avis géné ral. Il n’a rien dit des doutes qui l’assaillent.

Tout le pousse à intervenir… Mais… Le Parlement  britannique  a  mis  son  veto  la  veille.  C’est  une  première alerte. Et si le régime s’effondrait à la suite des  frappes  ? L’Amérique deviendrait responsable du chaos  qui pourrait en résulter, après l’Irak, après la Libye. Il  a entre les mains des rapports indiquant que le régime  syrien est plus fébrile que jamais. Des officiers expédient leurs familles hors de Damas. Les opposants se  disent prêts à fondre sur la capitale si le pouvoir, déjà  affaibli, flanchait. Quelle est l’alternative politique au  régime  ? Depuis plusieurs jours, les partisans du soutien à la rébellion ne ménagent pas leurs efforts pour  le rallier à leurs vues, comme Robert Ford, ex-ambassadeur américain à Damas  :  «  Au sein de l’administration,  certains  craignaient  que  les  djihadistes  prennent  le   pouvoir à Damas. Je n’y croyais pas. Les modérés étaient,  à ce moment-là, les plus forts  »,  explique-t-il. Quelques  jours plus tôt, il a rencontré Obama pour le persuader que  «  frapper convaincra le régime de négocier vraiment  à  Genève   ».   Ford  a  l’impression  d’avoir  réussi…   Gordon,  lui  aussi,  s’est  voulu  rassurant   :   « Quelques  jours de frappes ne suffiront pas à décapiter un régime qui  s’accroche au pouvoir.  »  Mais comment en être sûr  ?

L’agenda se rappelle à Barack Obama. Il converse  pendant trois quarts d’heure avec son plus proche allié,  le  Français  François  Hollande,  dont  les  Rafale   chargent leurs missiles de croisière Scalp. Il l’assure  que rien n’est changé. L’après-midi s’achève. Son emploi du temps lui laisse enfin un répit. Il n’aime guère  les  choix  tranchés,  préférant  le  consensus.  Mais  la   machine est lancée. Il est président, il peut encore faire marche arrière, mais il faut aller vite  et, cette fois, se décider.  «  J’ai dit  : “Pause. On réfléchit.  J’ai voulu m’extraire des pressions”  »,  confiera-t-il en 2016  au  journaliste  Jeffrey  Goldberg.  Il  a  besoin  de  marcher pour avoir les idées claires. Il propose à un homme  de confiance d’aller se promener dans le jardin de la  Maison-Blanche. Cet homme, c’est son chef de l’ad ministration, Denis McDonough  : ni un militaire ni  un diplomate, mais son collaborateur le plus loyal.  Pendant une heure, il lui livre ses doutes. Tout cela  est trop incertain. Ne va-t-il pas engager son pays dans  une nouvelle guerre alors qu’il a été élu pour se dé sengager de conflits coûteux  ? Et puis, cela ne risque- t-il pas de mettre en péril son grand œuvre, l’accord  nucléaire avec l’Iran  ? Trop de risques. Il teste une idée  auprès de McDonough  : demander une autorisation  préalable au Congrès. Une manière de reculer, car chacun sait qu’un soutien du Congrès est plus qu’incertain. McDonough approuve la prudence de son boss.

En  début  de  soirée,  il  convoque  à  nouveau  ses   conseillers dans son bureau. L’ambiance est décontractée. Il leur annonce la nouvelle. Ils n’en reviennent  pas. Ils insistent  :  «  Ce sera dévastateur pour votre autorité politique »,  le préviennent-ils. Il tient bon. Gordon  nous avoue avoir été estomaqué. Devant lui, Obama  raisonne en politique  :  «  Si ça ne dissuade pas Assad de  recommencer, si des inspecteurs de l’Onu sont pris comme  boucliers humains, si on perd un pilote, j’aurai l’opinion,  le Congrès sur le dos. On me reprochera tout et son contraire,  d’être intervenu, de ne pas être intervenu plus fortement,  de ne pas être intervenu plus légèrement.  »  Gordon se souvient  d’un  autre  argument  du  président   :  le  risque   d’engrenage.  Si  Assad  ou  ses  parrains  russes  et  iraniens  décidaient  d’une  nouvelle  attaque  chimique   «  trois semaines plus tard  »,  alors  «  on devrait frapper de nouveau, et plus fort, et ainsi de suite  ».  Il ne serait plus  maître du processus, craint-il, alors qu’Assad le serait.  Cela, cet homme qui veut tout contrôler ne peut l’accepter. Et rien n’est moins contrôlable qu’une guerre.

Il a désormais quelques annonces délicates à faire.  Il prévient Kerry, qui est furieux.  «  L’Histoire nous jugera  avec une sévérité extrême  »,  lâche ce dernier à ses collaborateurs et à certains de ses homologues étrangers.  Le lendemain, à 18 heures, quelques heures avant l’attaque, il contacte aussi Hollande, qui tombe de haut.  Présent, Laurent Fabius, ministre des Affaires étrangères, nous résume le contenu de la conversation  :  « Il  nous a dit  : c’est plus difficile que prévu, il faut que je consulte…  Bref, plus de ligne rouge. Il n’était pas question pour la  France d’agir seule. Le château de cartes s’est effondré.  » Puis, dans la fournaise d’une fin de journée d’été,  sur le perron de la Maison-Blanche, Barack Obama  tient une conférence de presse  : « J’ai décidé d’intervenir,  proclame-t-il, avant d’ajouter  :  mais je demanderai que cet usage de la force soit approuvé par le Congrès.  »  Il s’est donné du temps. C’est fini. Il vient de changer l’ordre du monde sans pouvoir, à cet instant, le  deviner.  Certains  comprennent  en  revanche  que  rien ne sera plus comme avant.

Sur les hauteurs de Damas, Bachar el-Assad comprend qu’il n’a plus rien à craindre des Occidentaux.  Il se paiera même le luxe d’utiliser de nouveau des  armes  chimiques  deux  ans  plus  tard.  L’opposition   «  modérée  », autour de l’Armée syrienne libre, sent  que l’Occident l’abandonne. Les djihadistes, mieux  armés, recrutent les déçus et montent en puissance,  scellant le piège qui permettra au président syrien de se présenter comme rempart contre le chaos.

Au Kremlin, Vladimir Poutine se jette sur l’occasion. Aux Américains il offre de convaincre El-Assad  de  détruire  ses  armes  chimiques  contre  l’abandon  de tout projet d’intervention. Comment refuser, après  avoir reculé le 30 août  ? La Russie prend la main en  Syrie.  Plus  tard,  Poutine  estimera  ne  rien  redouter  du  président  américain  et  envahira  la  Crimée.  Les   Républicains et un certain Donald Trump, admirateur  de  Poutine,  ne  cesseront  de  dénoncer  ce  nouveau  Munich  et  ce  président  qui  a  affaibli  une   Amérique qu’il faudrait rendre  « great  again ».

Il ne lui reste que des questions sans réponses. Que  se serait-il passé s’il avait frappé  ? Ce 30 août 2013 est-il  le jour où Obama a mis fin au règne des Etats-Unis  comme seule superpuissance mondiale  ? Le jour où  le  camp  des  démocraties  a  dû  renoncer  à  se  battre  pour ses valeurs  ? A-t-il été trop raisonnable dans une  période troublée où un homme d’Etat ne devrait pas  l’être  ? Ou bien est-ce le jour où lui, un sage président,  a évité au Moyen-Orient de vivre un chaos supplémentaire et à l’Amérique de s’y trouver empêtrée  ?

* Ecrivain, documentariste, a réalisé «  Bachar, moi ou le chaos. »


Baisse de la natalité: Pourquoi il faut voter Fillon (After France, America faces unexpected baby bust)

1 avril, 2017
 
millennials living at home4Fertility Rate

The western world is going out of business because it’s given up having babies. The 20th century welfare state, with its hitherto unknown concepts such as spending a third of your adult lifetime in « retirement », is premised on the basis that there will be enough new citizens to support the old. But there won’t be. Lazy critics of my thesis thought that I was making a « prediction », and that my predictions were no more reliable than Al Gore’s or Michael Mann’s on the looming eco-apocalypse. I tried to explain that it’s not really a prediction at all: When it comes to forecasting the future, the birthrate is the nearest thing to hard numbers. If only a million babies are born in 2006, it’s hard to have two million adults enter the workforce in 2026 (or 2033, or 2037, or whenever they get around to finishing their Anger Management and Queer Studies degrees). And the hard data on babies around the Western world is that they’re running out a lot faster than the oil is. « Replacement » fertility rate–i.e., the number you need for merely a stable population, not getting any bigger, not getting any smaller–is 2.1 babies per woman. Some countries are well above that: the global fertility leader, Somalia, is 6.91, Niger 6.83, Afghanistan 6.78, Yemen 6.75. Notice what those nations have in common? Scroll way down to the bottom of the Hot One Hundred top breeders and you’ll eventually find the United States, hovering just at replacement rate with 2.07 births per woman. Ireland is 1.87, New Zealand 1.79, Australia 1.76. But Canada’s fertility rate is down to 1.5, well below replacement rate; Germany and Austria are at 1.3, the brink of the death spiral; Russia and Italy are at 1.2; Spain 1.1, about half replacement rate. That’s to say, Spain’s population is halving every generation. By 2050, Italy’s population will have fallen by 22%. (…) Enter Islam, which sportingly volunteered to be the children we couldn’t be bothered having ourselves, and which kind offer was somewhat carelessly taken up by the post-Christian west. As I wrote a decade ago: The design flaw of the secular social-democratic state is that it requires a religious-society birthrate to sustain it. Post-Christian hyperrationalism is, in the objective sense, a lot less rational than Catholicism or Mormonism. Indeed, in its reliance on immigration to ensure its future, the European Union has adopted a 21st-century variation on the strategy of the Shakers, who were forbidden from reproducing and thus could increase their numbers only by conversion. That didn’t work out too great for the Shakers, but the Europeans figured it would be a piece of cake for them: « westernization » is so seductive, so appealing that, notwithstanding the occasional frothing imam and burka-bagged crone, their young Muslims would fall for the siren song of secular progressivism just like they themselves had. So, as long as you kept the immigrants coming, there would be no problem – as long as you oomphed up the scale of the solution. As I put it: To avoid collapse, European nations will need to take in immigrants at a rate no stable society has ever attempted. Last year, Angela Merkel decided to attempt it. The German Chancellor cut to the chase and imported in twelve months 1.1 million Muslim « refugees ». That doesn’t sound an awful lot out of 80 million Germans, but, in fact, the 1.1 million Muslim are overwhelmingly (80 per cent plus) fit, virile, young men. Germany has fewer than ten million people in the same population cohort, among whom Muslims are already over-represented: the median age of Germans as a whole is 46, the median age of German Muslims is 34. But let’s keep the numbers simple, and assume that of those ten million young Germans half of them are ethnic German males. Frau Merkel is still planning to bring in another million « refugees » this year. So by the end of 2016 she will have imported a population equivalent to 40 per cent of Germany’s existing young male cohort. The future is here now: It’s not about « predictions ». On standard patterns of « family reunification », these two million « refugees » will eventually bring another four or five persons each from their native lands – or another eight-to-ten million. In the meantime, they have the needs of all young lads, and no one around to gratify them except the local womenfolk. Hence, New Year’s Eve in Cologne, and across the southern border the Vienna police chief warning women not to go out unaccompanied, and across the northern border: Danish nightclubs demand guests have to speak Danish, English or German to be allowed in after ‘foreign men in groups’ attack female revellers But don’t worry, it won’t be a problem for long: On the German and Swedish « migrant » numbers, there won’t be a lot of « female revelry » in Europe’s future. The formerly firebreathing feminists at The Guardian and the BBC are already falling as mute as battered wives – saying nothing, looking away, making excuses, clutching at rationalizations… (…)  A few weeks before The Wall Street Journal published my piece, I discussed its themes at an event in New York whose speakers included Douglas Murray. Douglas was more optimistic: He suggested that Muslim populations in Europe were still small, and immigration policy could be changed: Easier said than done. My essay and book were so influential that in the decade since, the rate of Islamization in the west has increased – via all three principal methods: Muslim immigration, Muslim birthrates of those already here, Muslim conversion of the infidels. David Goldman thinks aging, childless Germany has embraced civilizational suicide as redemption for their blood-soaked sins. Maybe. But it is less clear why the Continent’s less tainted polities – impeccably « neutral » Sweden, for example – are so eager to join them. (…) Somewhere, deep down, the European political class understands that the Great Migrations have accelerated the future I outlined way back when (…) It’s the biggest story of our time, and, ten years on, Europe’s leaders still can’t talk about it, not to their own peoples, not honestly. For all the « human rights » complaints, and death threats from halfwits, and subtler rejections from old friends who feel I’m no longer quite respectable, I’m glad I brought it up. And it’s well past time for others to speak out. Mark Steyn
For over a century, social scientists have predicted declines in religious beliefs and their replacement with more scientific/naturalistic outlooks, a prediction known as the secularization hypothesis. However, skepticism surrounding this hypothesis has been expressed by some researchers in recent decades. After reviewing the pertinent evidence and arguments, we examined some aspects of the secularization hypothesis from what is termed a biologically informed perspective. Based on large samples of college students in Malaysia and the USA, religiosity, religious affiliation, and parental fertility were measured using self-reports. Three religiosity indicators were factor analyzed, resulting in an index for religiosity. Results reveal that average parental fertility varied considerably according to religious groups, with Muslims being the most religious and the most fertile and Jews and Buddhists being the least. Within most religious groupings, religiosity was positively associated with parental fertility. While cross-sectional in nature, when our results are combined with evidence that both religiosity and fertility are substantially heritable traits, findings are consistent with view that earlier trends toward secularization (due to science education surrounding advancements in science) are currently being counter-balanced by genetic and reproductive forces. We also propose that the inverse association between intelligence and religiosity, and the inverse correlation between intelligence and fertility lead to predictions of a decline in secularism in the foreseeable future. A contra-secularization hypothesis is proposed and defended in the discussion. It states that secularism is likely to undergo a decline throughout the remainder of the twenty-first century, including Europe and other industrial societies.’ Lee Ellis, Anthony W. Hoskin, Edward Dutton and Helmuth Nyborg
Secularization is not likely to replace the popularity of religions. ‘Instead, over the long term, we predict that the most religious ‘shall inherit the earth,’ so to speak’. ‘This is especially so for the most fertile religious groups – Islam’. Lee Ellis, Anthony W. Hoskin, Edward Dutton and Helmuth Nyborg
En 100 ans à peine, les pays musulmans ont reproduit la multiplication par dix que l’Europe a réalisée entre 1500 et 1900. Au cours du dernier siècle, la population musulmane a grimpé en flèche de 140 millions à 1.4 milliard. Si l’Europe était parvenue à la multiplication par quatre observée aux États-unis (de 75 millions à 300 millions entre 1900 et 2006), les 1.6 milliards d’habitants de son continent auraient fait paraître bien chétives la Chine de 1.3 milliards et l’Inde de 1.1 milliards. Cependant, la part de l’Europe dans la population mondiale des hommes en âge de combattre, qui était de 27% en 1914, est aujourd’hui, avec 9%, inférieure aux 11% de 1500. Ainsi, les nouveaux habits du « pacifisme européen » et du « soft power » sont les cache-sexe de son impuissance. Gunnar Heinsohn
Depuis plusieurs années, l’Unaf met en avant les atteintes à la politique familiale. Et ce, dans une réflexion transpartisane. « La baisse du quotient familial et la réduction du congé parental depuis le 1er janvier 2015 » sont les principales mesures dénoncées. « Les familles s’interrogent. La confiance est perdue », poursuit Marie-Andrée Blanc en brandissant un chiffre clé : d’après une enquête de 2013, le désir d’enfant des Français est de 2,37 enfants par famille. Il est donc bien plus important que le nombre effectif d’enfants. Cet écart peut s’expliquer par la situation économique des ménages en temps de crise. Avoir plusieurs enfants demande généralement une stabilité concernant le logement, l’emploi, les revenus. Le pouvoir d’achat des familles n’étant pas extensible, le choix d’une deuxième naissance serait de moins en moins évident. « C’est inquiétant car un pays avec des enfants est un pays qui consomme et finance ses retraites. » L’argument économique est également validé par le démographe. Même s’il le nuance légèrement. « On sait qu’en période de croissance du chômage, il y a moins de naissances, note Laurent Toulemon. Mais je ne crois pas que l’affaiblissement de la politique familiale puisse avoir un impact. On n’a pas encore de données précises. » Le chercheur pense notamment à la récente restriction d’allocations pour les familles aisées (+ de 6.000 euros de revenus). Il valide en revanche une autre piste liée à la baisse du nombre de mariages depuis 1970. «Les couples mariés ont plus d’enfants que les autres. Et quand les couples mariés font peu d’enfants, la fécondité baisse.» Enfin à moyen terme, le déficit de naissances peut s’expliquer par la baisse du nombre de couples en âge d’avoir des enfants. La deuxième vague du baby-boom ayant déjà eu des enfants, il faudra peut-être attendre que la troisième génération se fasse appeler papa et maman. 20 minutes
I fail to see why any economist should be surprised by this. A record number of millennials are living at home. Unless the millennials… Shed student debt Move out on their own Get a job that supports raising a family No longer have to take care of their aging parents Have a significant change in attitudes about homes, families, debt, and mobility …. economists will still be wondering “what happened” years from now. Zero edge
Attention: une chute peut en cacher une autre !
Crise économique, explosion des déficits publics et de la dette privée, multiplication des Tanguy, banalisation du divorce, de l’avortement et du mariage homosexuel, dévalorisation des mâles et de la religion …
Et après, les mêmes causes produisant les mêmes effets, celle de la France il y a un an …
Chute record et inattendue de la natalité aux Etats-Unis six mois après !

Baisse de la natalité: Pourquoi les Français font moins d’enfants

POPULATION La France a enregistré 19.000 naissances de moins en 2015 qu’en 2014…

20 minutes

21.01.2016

Moins de biberons ou de tétées en pleine nuit, moins de couches, mais aussi moins de premiers sourires et de dents qui poussent. C’est d’une certaine manière le bilan comptable des familles françaises l’année dernière puisque celles-ci ont fait 19.000 enfants de moins qu’en 2014. Les derniers chiffres publiés par l’Insee révèlent une baisse de la natalité de 2,3 %, ce qui porte le nombre de naissances à son plus bas niveau depuis 10 ans.

La chute est conséquente, mais n’a rien d’alarmant selon Laurent Toulemon, démographe spécialiste de la fécondité. « On revient autour de 800.000 naissances par an. Ce sont des niveaux moyens sur 40 ans. En fait, il y a eu une fécondité très élevée entre 2006 et 2014. Ça relativise un peu la baisse. » Par ailleurs, avec un taux de 1,96 enfants par femme, la France fait toujours figure de bonne élève face à ses voisins européens qui tournent autour d’1,5.

Baisse du quotient familial et réduction du congé parental

Pas de quoi s’affoler, donc, mais il ne faudrait pas que la chute se poursuive dans les années à venir. « On doit garder ce taux de fécondité, c’est indicateur du bien-être des familles » prévient Marie-Andrée Blanc, la présidente de l’Union nationale des Associations Familiales (Unaf), associations apolitique et aconfessionnel représentant les 18 millions de familles sur le territoire français.

Pour elle, ce tassement de la natalité n’est pas surprenant. Depuis plusieurs années, l’Unaf met en avant les atteintes à la politique familiale. Et ce, dans une réflexion transpartisane. « La baisse du quotient familial et la réduction du congé parental depuis le 1er janvier 2015 » sont les principales mesures dénoncées. « Les familles s’interrogent. La confiance est perdue », poursuit Marie-Andrée Blanc en brandissant un chiffre clé : d’après une enquête de 2013, le désir d’enfant des Français est de 2,37 enfants par famille. Il est donc bien plus important que le nombre effectif d’enfants.

Le chômage responsable ?

Cet écart peut s’expliquer par la situation économique des ménages en temps de crise. Avoir plusieurs enfants demande généralement une stabilité concernant le logement, l’emploi, les revenus. Le pouvoir d’achat des familles n’étant pas extensible, le choix d’une deuxième naissance serait de moins en moins évident. « C’est inquiétant car un pays avec des enfants est un pays qui consomme et finance ses retraites. »

L’argument économique est également validé par le démographe. Même s’il le nuance légèrement. « On sait qu’en période de croissance du chômage, il y a moins de naissances, note Laurent Toulemon. Mais je ne crois pas que l’affaiblissement de la politique familiale puisse avoir un impact. On n’a pas encore de données précises. » Le chercheur pense notamment à la récente restriction d’allocations pour les familles aisées (+ de 6.000 euros de revenus).

En attente de la 3e vague du baby-boom

Il valide en revanche une autre piste liée à la baisse du nombre de mariages depuis 1970. «Les couples mariés ont plus d’enfants que les autres. Et quand les couples mariés font peu d’enfants, la fécondité baisse.» Enfin à moyen terme, le déficit de naissances peut s’expliquer par la baisse du nombre de couples en âge d’avoir des enfants. La deuxième vague du baby-boom ayant déjà eu des enfants, il faudra peut-être attendre que la troisième génération se fasse appeler papa et maman.

Natalité/fécondité: La natalité est l’étude du nombre de naissances au sein d’une population. Il ne faut pas la confondre avec la fécondité qui est l’étude du nombre des naissances par femme en âge de procréer.

Voir aussi:

Baby Bust: US Fertility Rate Unexpectedly Drops To Lowest On Record

Submitted by Michael Shedlock via MishTalk.com,

Economists figured the recovery would bring about increased confidence and a rise in the birth rate.

Instead, the rate dropped into a tie with the lowest birth rate on record.

This is yet another surprise for economists to ponder.

Please consider the Wall Street Journal report Behind the Ongoing U.S. Baby Bust.

The newest official tally  from the National Center for Health Statistics showed an unexpected drop in the number of babies born in the U.S. in 2015. The report was a surprise: Demographers had generally expected the number of births to rise in 2015, as it had in 2014. Instead, the U.S. appears to still be stuck in something of an ongoing “baby bust” that started with the recession and housing collapse and has yet to reverse.

The Wall Street Journal concludes “There’s still good reason to believe the birth rate will pick up in coming years. After slumping for nearly a decade into the 1970s, births picked up in the 1980s and 1990s (giving us the generation known as millennials.) The most common age in America is 24 or 25, meaning there’s a very large cohort of these millennials who are about to hit the years that people are most likely to become parents.”

No Mystery

I fail to see why any economist should be surprised by this. A record number of millennials are living at home.

This is simply too obvious. So I have two questions:

  1. Do economists read anything or do they just believe in their models?
  2. If they do read, how come they cannot grasp simple, easy to understand ideas?

Economists who could not figure any of this out now place their faith in the fact “a very large cohort of these millennials who are about to hit the years that people are most likely to become parents.

Mish’s Alternate View

Unless the millennials…

  1. Shed student debt
  2. Move out on their own
  3. Get a job that supports raising a family
  4. No longer have to take care of their aging parents
  5. Have a significant change in attitudes about homes, families, debt, and mobility ….

…economists will still be wondering “what happened” years from now.

Voir également:

Voir par ailleurs:

Mormons more likely to marry, have more children than other U.S. religious groups

The share of Americans who identify as Mormons has roughly held steady even as the percentage of Christians in the U.S. has declined dramatically in recent years, according to the Pew Research Center’s 2014 Religious Landscape Study. And the study found Mormons stand out in other ways: They have higher fertility rates and are far more likely than members of most other major religious traditions to be married – especially to other Mormons.

Mormons made up 1.6% of the American adult population in 2014, little changed from 2007 (1.7%), the last time a similar survey was conducted. By contrast, the percentage of Christians in the U.S. has dropped from 78.4% to 70.6% during the same time period.

Two-thirds (66%) of U.S. Mormon adults are currently married, down slightly from 71% in 2007 – but still high compared with current rates among Christians overall (52%) and U.S. adults overall (48%). (Marriage rates are lower across the board than they were several years ago.) 

Compared with many other religious groups, Mormons who are married are especially likely to have spouses who share their faith. Eight-in-ten Mormons who are married or living with a partner (82%) have a Mormon spouse or partner; among religious traditions, only Hindus have a higher rate of “in-marriage” (91%).

Mormons also tend to have more children than other groups. Mormons ages 40-59 have had an average of 3.4 children in their lifetime, well above the comparable figure for all Americans in that age range (2.1) and higher than any other religious group. Overall, Mormon adults have an average of 1.1 children currently living at home, nearly double the national average (0.6).

These findings line up with U.S. Mormons’ priorities as expressed in a 2011 Pew Research survey of the group. In that survey, 73% of U.S. Mormons said that having a successful marriage is “one of the most important things in life,” and 81% said the same about being a good parent. Among the general public, half or fewer call each of these life goals “one of the most important things in life.”

Some other findings about U.S. Mormons from the 2014 study include:

  • Most adults who were raised as Mormons still identify as Mormons today (64%), a retention rate roughly on par with that of evangelical Protestants (65%) and slightly above that of Catholics (59%). Among those who were raised as Mormons but have left the church, most are now religiously unaffiliated (21% of all those who were raised Mormon).
  • About as many people have joined the Mormon faith after being raised in another religious tradition (0.5% of U.S. adults) as have left the church after being raised Mormon (0.6%).
  • While the U.S. population has become more racially and ethnically diverse in recent years, the racial and ethnic composition of Mormons has not changed much; Mormons remain overwhelmingly white. Mormons were 14% non-white in 2007 and 15% non-white in 2014; Christians overall were 29% non-white in 2007 and 34% non-white in 2014.
  • Utah still has by far the biggest share of Mormon residents of any state (55%), a percentage that has changed little in recent years.

Présidence Trump: Attention un président peut en cacher un autre (The Ronald was once a Donald too)

12 mars, 2017

Governor Reagan does not dye his hair. He is just turning prematurely orange. Gerald Ford (Gridiron Dinner, 1974)
Au cours de ces 100 premiers jours, qu’est-ce qui vous a le plus surpris sur la présidence ? Qu’est-ce qui vous a le plus enchanté ? Vous a ramené à la réalité ? Et vous a le plus inquiété ? Jeff Zeleney
Vous avez accumulé beaucoup de victoires au cours des dernières semaines que beaucoup de gens pensaient difficiles. Êtes-vous prêt à vous appeler le  »comeback kid’ ? Carry Bohan
You racked up a lot of wins in the last few weeks that a lot of people thought would be difficult to come by. Are you ready to call yourself the ‘comeback kid’ ? Carry Bohan
During these first 100 days, what has surprised you the most about this office? Enchanted you the most from serving in this office? Humbled you the most? And troubled you the most? Jeff Zeleney (the New York Times)
Ronald Reagan has absolutely confounded prediction… Today, at the age of 77, he relinquishes the office so many people thought he never could get, being, it was said eight years ago, too old, too ideological, too conservative, too poorly informed, too politically marginal — in short, too out of it. But there he is, going out in a rare end-of-the-term surge of good feeling, his critics — on key issues, we are emphatically among them — still at a loss as to how to assess and finally even understand this man. The Washington Post (1989)
With a year left in the Gipper’s administration, Washington Post columnist Charles Krauthammer wrote that the Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker scandal signaled “the end of the Age of Reagan” and his time in Washington was marked by “more disgraces than can fit in a nursery rhyme. (…) Before he went to Washington, and after he left Washington, the dominant culture loathed Ronald Reagan, had always loathed Reagan, would always loathe Reagan, and spent many an hour trying to tear him down. Simply understood, Ronald Reagan had made a lifetime of challenging conventional wisdom. Even in the hours after his death, they attacked and criticized him, even taking time to lambaste his movie career, which had ended exactly fifty years earlier in 1964. Craig Shirley
There are a lot of people who have a lot of reason to be fearful of him, mad at him. But that was one of the most extraordinary moments you have ever seen in American politics, period. And he did something extraordinary, and for people who have been hoping that he would become unifying, hoping that he might find some way to become presidential, they should be happy with that moment. For people who have been hoping that he would remain a divisive cartoon, which he often does, they should be a little worried tonight. That thing you just saw him do, if he finds way to do that over and over again, he’ll be there eight years. There was a lot he said in that speech that was counter-factual, not true, not right, and I oppose and will oppose, but he did something you can’t take away from him, he became president of the United States. Van Jones
Clashes among staff are common in the opening days of every administration, but they have seldom been so public and so pronounced this early. “This is a president who came to Washington vowing to shake up the establishment, and this is what it looks like. It’s going to be a little sloppy, there are going to be conflicts,” said Ari Fleischer, President George W. Bush’s first press secretary. All this is happening as Mr. Trump, a man of flexible ideology but fixed habits, adjusts to a new job, life and city. Cloistered in the White House, he now has little access to his fans and supporters — an important source of feedback and validation — and feels increasingly pinched by the pressures of the job and the constant presence of protests, one of the reasons he was forced to scrap a planned trip to Milwaukee last week. NYT
The media suffer the lowest approval numbers in nearly a half-century. In a recent Emerson College poll, 49 percent of American voters termed the Trump administration “truthful”; yet only 39 percent believed the same about the news media. Every president needs media audit. The role of journalists in a free society is to act as disinterested censors of government power—neither going on witch-hunts against political opponents nor deifying ideological fellow-travelers. Sadly, the contemporary mainstream media—the major networks (ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN), the traditional blue-chip newspapers (Washington Post, New York Times), and the public affiliates (NPR, PBS)—have lost credibility. They are no more reliable critics of President Trump’s excesses than they were believable cheerleaders for Barack Obama’s policies. Trump may have a habit of exaggeration and gratuitous feuding that could cause problems with his presidency. But we would never quite know that from the media. In just his first month in office, reporters have already peddled dozens of fake news stories designed to discredit the President—to such a degree that little they now write or say can be taken at face value. No, Trump did not have any plans to invade Mexico, as Buzzfeed and the Associated Press alleged. No, Trump’s father did not run for Mayor of New York by peddling racist television ads, as reported by Sidney Blumenthal. No, there were not mass resignations at the State Department in protest of its new leaders, as was reported by the Washington Post. No, Trump’s attorney did not cut a deal with the Russians in Prague. Nor did Trump indulge in sexual escapades in Moscow. Buzzfeed again peddled those fake news stories. No, a supposedly racist Trump did not remove the bust of Martin Luther King Jr. from the White House, as a Time Magazine reporter claimed. No, election results in three states were not altered by hackers or computer criminals to give Trump the election, as implied by New York Magazine. No, Michael Flynn did not tweet that he was a scapegoat. That was a media fantasy endorsed by Nancy Pelosi. (…) We would like to believe writers for the New York Times or Washington Post when they warn us about the new president’s overreach. But how can we do so when they have lost all credibility—either by colluding with the Obama presidency and the Hillary Clinton campaign, or by creating false narratives to ensure that Trump fails? (…) There are various explanations for the loss of media credibility. First, the world of New York and Washington DC journalism is incestuous. Reporters share a number of social connections, marriages, and kin relationships with liberal politicians, making independence nearly culturally impossible. More importantly, the election in 2008 of Barack Obama marked a watershed, when a traditionally liberal media abandoned prior pretenses of objectivity and actively promoted the candidacy and presidency of their preferred candidate. The media practically pronounced him god, the smartest man ever to enter the presidency, and capable of creating electric sensations down the legs of reporters. (…)  Obama, as the first African-American president—along with his progressive politics that were to the left of traditional Democratic policies—enraptured reporters who felt disinterested coverage might endanger what otherwise was a rare and perhaps not-to-be-repeated moment. We are now in a media arena where there are no rules. The New York Times is no longer any more credible than talk radio; CNN—whose reporters have compared Trump to Hitler and gleefully joked about his plane crashing—should be no more believed than a blogger’s website. Buzzfeed has become like the National Inquirer. Trump now communicates, often raucously and unfiltered, directly with the American people, to ensure his message is not distorted and massaged by reporters who have a history of doing just that. Unfortunately, it is up to the American people now to audit their own president’s assertions. The problem is not just that the media is often not reliable, but that it is predictably unreliable. It has ceased to exist as an auditor of government. Ironically the media that sacrificed its reputation to glorify Obama and demonize Trump has empowered the new President in a way never quite seen before. At least for now, Trump can say or do almost anything he wishes without media scrutiny—given that reporters have far less credibility than does Trump. Trump is the media’s Nemesis—payback for its own hubris. Victor Davis Hanson
The final irony? The supposedly narcissistic and self-absorbed Trump ran a campaign that addressed in undeniably sincere fashion the dilemmas of a lost hinterland. And he did so after supposedly more moral Republicans had all but written off the rubes as either politically irrelevant or beyond the hope of salvation in a globalized world. How a brutal Manhattan developer, who thrived on self-centered controversy and even scandal, proved singularly empathetic to millions of the forgotten is apparently still not fully understood. Victor Davis Hanson
In its most recent attack on Donald Trump and his supporters by the Wall Street Journal editorial page, one of its leading columnists, Peggy Noonan, asserted that Trump supporters are historically inaccurate in comparing Trump to the late President. She described Trump-Reagan comparisons as “desperate” and those who draw them as “idiots” and historical “illiterates.” She questions the level of competence of Trump but ignores that Reagan was also regarded as grossly incompetent — by media and GOP establishment hard-losers and spoilers, not Republican voters —and especially dangerous in foreign policy, which, presumably, only elites can understand foreign. Reagan was depicted as some sort of cowboy B-rated-film-star yahoo and loose cannon by the “chattering class” of 1980, one who might be tolerable as a governor, but who was definitely not sophisticated enough to comprehend let alone conduct foreign policy. Peggy Noonan relates in her column an adoring revisionist depiction of Ronald Reagan, as he has come to be appreciated today in the retrospective light of history. The Ronald Reagan she summons to make her case, however, is far from the Ronald Reagan of historical accuracy. The Ronald Reagan of the 1970s and 1980s was derided as inept and a potential disaster by status quo apologists, much as Donald Trump is being mocked today. (…) Like Donald Trump, Ronald Reagan was an entrepreneur – an aspiring broadcast sports reporter and film actor. He had to face the brutal competition of Hollywood, a place in which most aspirants to stardom failed. He started by himself, by selling his brand, just as Donald Trump started building hotels and golf courses by himself, also selling his brand (and did not squander his money, as young people from means often do, but multiplied it a thousand fold – and more — making the correct plans and decisions in difficult situations, and plain hard work). Reagan had to sell himself as a labor union leader, too – to character actors and extras in the movie industry, not just stars. He was not involved with any governmental entity early in his career. Later, he worked for General Electric, one of the largest capitalist success stories in the U.S. at the time. Before he became governor of California, he was a man of business in the entertainment industry, climbing up the ladder of success in radio, movies, and television completely on his own. Ronald Reagan believed in free market capitalism and would have been deeply impressed, I believe, by the business accomplishments and acumen of Donald Trump. Ronald Reagan knew the core greatness of the U.S. lies not in government and the wisdom of professional politicians but in that very private sector in which Donald Trump has thrived and achieved an extraordinary level of success. Donald Trump’s children, obviously well brought up, appear to be following in his footsteps. (…) Ronald Reagan knew the sting of being called a “light weight” movie star, a graduate of rural Midwestern Eureka College which no one among the elite had ever heard of. And doubtless ad hominem attacks detracted from, and damaged in some respects, his core message of more limited government and defeat of the Soviet empire. But he persisted despite the snide heckling of the arrogant establishment of the time, and he communicated his message honestly and directly – and, turns out, successfully — to the American people, thereby, accomplishing much good for the nation. Yes, and he also gave wings to a powerful political force, conservatism, which today, I suggest, finds its relevant fresh champion, however odd and imperfect the fit might seem at times, in the likes of a populist New York billionaire businessman who has a propensity to communicate his message of a better life and more secure future for Americans, directly and honestly, and with conviction, to the American body politic. Ronald Reagan as President of the United States? NEVER, they said. But the people voted, the nation spoke, and so, they were wrong. Today, despite differences over style and some issues, one thing we can all agree on: Hillary Clinton is no Ronald Reagan.  Ambassador Faith Whittlesey
Trump is a unique figure in American political history, but the nature of his singularity is not necessarily appreciated. He appalls people on both ends of the spectrum because his behavior and statements are not what we expect from our political leaders. His vulgarity, lack of impulse control, and willingness to ignore the truth and to spew abuse at anyone who criticizes him are — in the context of normative conduct among our power elites, let alone polite society — abnormal. His stubborn refusal to conform to conventional ideas about how leaders should behave still shocks those who consider themselves the gatekeepers of American politics. It isn’t so much that Trump is wrong on the issues in the eyes of those gatekeepers; it’s that they think his behavior makes him unfit for the presidency. While we give lip service to the notion that class distinctions shouldn’t matter, what is truly galling about Trump is that he won’t bow to the expectations of the powerful; instead, he has refused to assimilate into their culture. When they suggest that democracy is failing or accuse of Trump of being authoritarian or even anti-Semitic, what they are really doing is voicing dismay at the way he breaks the rules they hold sacred. What they are not doing is credibly asserting that he is a threat. But Trump’s refusal to live by the behavioral rules of our governing class heightens his appeal to many Americans who are sick of conventional politicians and the culture that produced them. He is a living, breathing rebuke to the deadening hand of political correctness that has gained such a grip on public discourse for just about everyone except Donald Trump. (…) Trump didn’t come to politics through the usual paths of law school, issues advocacy, or low-level political involvement, during the course of which standard-issue politicians learn how to behave in the manner we expect from members of the governing and chattering classes. He comes from great wealth and attended elite institutions, but he is the product of outer-borough New York, with its chip-on-the-shoulder sensibility, and the rough-and-tumble of the real-estate business. He spent the decades before his presidential campaign running a high-stakes business that placed him in the unorthodox worlds of the gaming industry and entertainment, not the corridors of political power. His niche was in celebrity culture, where people who more or less own permanent space in the gossip pages of New York tabloids, as Trump did throughout much of his adult life, might mix with those who run the country and sometimes donate to their campaigns but are not considered their peers. It might seem odd to claim that a billionaire who lived in a gold-plated Fifth Avenue penthouse has more in common with blue-collar Americans than with the country’s elites. But this is exactly the way Trump is perceived; it is also the way he acts. Despite the vituperation against his immigration policies or the effort to inflate alleged Russian connections into a new Watergate, it is this class factor that is at the heart of anti-Trump sentiment. If you are a member of our educated professional classes, Trump’s manners and statements appall you no matter where you stand on the political spectrum. They might also lead you to believe that his refusal to abide by the accepted rules of public discourse constitutes an encouragement of bigots — the tiny number of Americans who dwell in the political fever swamps and think Trump’s intemperate statements echo their own hate. But the belief that Trump is “dog whistling” to hate groups makes his critics largely blind to their own misjudgment: They cannot distinguish between, on one hand, their disgust with his manners and, on the other, policy disagreements with Trump, even though he is advocating either traditional conservative beliefs or populist stands that are likely to generate significant support across the political spectrum. Tuesday’s speech to Congress was not the beginning of the “pivot” that pundits have talked about since he started running for president. Trump will always be Trump in that he will never entirely conform to the cultural norms of the governing class, and its members within the media and the bureaucracy will continue trying to undermine him every chance they get. Yet his performance illustrates that he can also play the Washington game. And he can play it in a manner that could marginalize those who are still convulsed by the mad rage he generates in those who are offended by his conduct. Stories about Trump’s alleged ties to Russia help Democrats keep the national conversation focused on the administration’s illegitimacy. As long as such stories are front and center, Democrats can avoid confronting the source of their anger at him. Yet the shock when he speaks in a way that reassures the country that he can govern — as he did in Congress –unnerves his opponents because it illustrates that he can transcend class differences. And it’s Trump’s non-elite class affiliations that make them think they can eventually cast him out of power without having to appeal to the voters who put him in the White House. Unless the Russia stories become a genuine scandal that undoes his administration, a few more such presidential moments point the way to a Trump presidency that could be more successful than either his liberal or conservative critics could have imagined. Jonathan S. Tobin
Reagan’s and Trump’s opposing styles belie their similarities of substance. Both have marketed the same brand of outrage to the same angry segments of the electorate, faced the same jeering press, attracted some of the same battlefront allies (Roger Stone, Paul Manafort, Phyllis Schlafly), offended the same elites (including two generations of Bushes), outmaneuvered similar political adversaries, and espoused the same conservative populism built broadly on the pillars of jingoistic nationalism, nostalgia, contempt for Washington, and racial resentment. They’ve even endured the same wisecracks about their unnatural coiffures. (…) Though Reagan’s 1980 campaign slogan (“Let’s Make America Great Again”) is one word longer than Trump’s, that word reflects a contrast in their personalities — the avuncular versus the autocratic — but not in message. Reagan’s apocalyptic theme, “The Empire is in decline,” is interchangeable with Trump’s, even if the Gipper delivered it with a smile.  (…) Grassroots Republicans, whom Reagan had been courting for years with speeches, radio addresses, and opinion pieces beneath the mainstream media’s radar, were indeed in his camp. But aside from a lone operative (John Sears) (…) “the other major GOP players — especially Easterners and moderates — thought Reagan was a certified yahoo.” (…) Only a single Republican senator, Paul Laxalt of Nevada, signed on to Reagan’s presidential quest from the start, a solitary role that has been played in the Trump campaign by Jeff Sessions of Alabama. What put off Reagan’s fellow Republicans will sound very familiar. He proposed an economic program — 30 percent tax cuts, increased military spending, a balanced budget — whose math was voodoo and then some. He prided himself on not being “a part of the Washington Establishment” and mocked Capitol Hill’s “buddy system” and its collusion with “the forces that have brought us our problems—the Congress, the bureaucracy, the lobbyists, big business, and big labor.” He kept a light campaign schedule, regarded debates as optional, wouldn’t sit still to read briefing books, and often either improvised his speeches or worked off index cards that contained anecdotes and statistics gleaned from Reader’s Digest and the right-wing journal Human Events — sources hardly more elevated or reliable than the television talk shows and tabloids that feed Trump’s erroneous and incendiary pronouncements. Like Trump but unlike most of his (and Trump’s) political rivals, Reagan was accessible to the press and public. His spontaneity in give-and-takes with reporters and voters played well but also gave him plenty of space to disgorge fantasies and factual errors so prolific and often outrageous that he single-handedly made the word gaffe a permanent fixture in America’s political vernacular. He confused Pakistan with Afghanistan. He claimed that trees contributed 93 percent of the atmosphere’s nitrous oxide and that pollution in America was “substantially under control” even as his hometown of Los Angeles was suffocating in smog. He said that the “finest oil geologists in the world” had found that there were more oil reserves in Alaska than Saudi Arabia. He said the federal government spent $3 for each dollar it distributed in welfare benefits, when the actual amount was 12 cents. He also mythologized his own personal history in proto-Trump style. As Garry Wills has pointed out, Reagan referred to himself as one of “the soldiers who came back” when speaking plaintively of his return to civilian life after World War II — even though he had come back only from Culver City, where his wartime duty was making Air Force films at the old Hal Roach Studio. Once in office, he told the Israeli prime minister Yitzhak Shamir that he had filmed the liberated Nazi death camps, when in reality he had not seen them, let alone (as he claimed) squirreled away a reel of film as an antidote to potential Holocaust deniers. For his part, Trump has purported that his enrollment at the New York Military Academy, a prep school, amounted to Vietnam-era military service, and has borne historical witness to the urban legend of “thousands and thousands” of Muslims in Jersey City celebrating the 9/11 attacks. Even when these ruses are exposed, Trump follows the Reagan template of doubling down on mistakes rather than conceding them. Nor was Reagan a consistent conservative. He deviated from party orthodoxy to both the left and the right. He had been by his own account a “near hopeless hemophilic liberal” for much of his adult life, having campaigned for Truman in 1948 and for Helen Gahagan Douglas in her senatorial race against Nixon in California in 1950. He didn’t switch his registration to Republican until he was 51. As California governor, he signed one of America’s strongest gun-control laws and its most liberal abortion law (both in 1967). His vocal opposition helped kill California’s 1978 Briggs Initiative, which would have banned openly gay teachers at public schools. As a 1980 presidential candidate, he flip-flopped to endorse bailouts for both New York City and the Chrysler Corporation. Reagan may be revered now as a free-trade absolutist in contrast to Trump, but in that winning campaign he called for halting the “deluge” of Japanese car imports raining down on Detroit. “If Japan keeps on doing everything that it’s doing, what they’re doing, obviously, there’s going to be what you call protectionism,” he said. Republican leaders blasted Reagan as a trigger-happy warmonger. Much as Trump now threatens to downsize NATO and start a trade war with China, so Reagan attacked Ford, the sitting Republican president he ran against in the 1976 primary, and Henry Kissinger for their pursuit of the bipartisan policies of détente and Chinese engagement. The sole benefit of détente, Reagan said, was to give America “the right to sell Pepsi-Cola in Siberia.” For good measure, he stoked an international dispute by vowing to upend a treaty ceding American control over the Panama Canal. “We bought it, we paid for it, it’s ours, and we’re going to keep it!” he bellowed with an America First truculence reminiscent of Trump’s calls for our allies to foot the bill for American military protection. Even his own party’s hawks, like William F. Buckley Jr. and his pal John Wayne, protested. Goldwater, of all people, inveighed against Reagan’s “gross factual errors” and warned he might “take rash action” and “needlessly lead this country into open military conflict.” Trump’s signature cause of immigration was not a hot-button issue during Reagan’s campaigns. In the White House, he signed a bill granting “amnesty” (Reagan used the now politically incorrect word) to 1.7 million undocumented immigrants. But if Reagan was free of Trump’s bigoted nativism, he had his own racially tinged strategy for wooing disaffected white working-class Americans fearful that liberals in government were bestowing favors on freeloading, lawbreaking minorities at their expense. Taking a leaf from George Wallace’s populist campaigns, Reagan scapegoated “welfare chiselers” like the nameless “strapping young buck” he claimed used food stamps to buy steak. His favorite villain was a Chicago “welfare queen” who, in his telling, “had 80 names, 30 addresses, and 12 Social Security cards, and is collecting veterans’ benefits on four nonexistent deceased husbands” to loot the American taxpayer of over $150,000 of “tax-free cash income” a year. Never mind that she was actually charged with using four aliases and had netted $8,000: Reagan continued to hammer in this hyperbolic parable with a vengeance that rivals Trump’s insistence that Mexico will pay for a wall to fend off Hispanic rapists. The Republican elites of Reagan’s day were as blindsided by him as their counterparts have been by Trump. Though Reagan came close to toppling the incumbent president at the contested Kansas City convention in 1976, the Ford forces didn’t realize they could lose until the devil was at the door. A “President Ford Committee” campaign statement had maintained that Reagan could “not defeat any candidate the Democrats put up” because his “constituency is much too narrow, even within the Republican party” and because he lacked “the critical national and international experience that President Ford has gained through 25 years of public service.” In Ford’s memoirs, written after he lost the election to Jimmy Carter, he wrote that he hadn’t taken the Reagan threat seriously because he “didn’t take Reagan seriously.” Reagan, he said, had a “penchant for offering simplistic solutions to hideously complex problems” and a stubborn insistence that he was “always right in every argument.” Even so, a Ford-campaign memo had correctly identified one ominous sign during primary season: a rising turnout of Reagan voters who were “not loyal Republicans or Democrats” and were “alienated from both parties because neither takes a sympathetic view toward their issues.” To these voters, the disdain Reagan drew from the GOP elites was a badge of honor. During the primary campaign, Times columnist William Safire reported with astonishment that Kissinger’s speeches championing Ford and attacking Reagan were helping Reagan, not Ford — a precursor of how attacks by Trump’s Establishment adversaries have backfired 40 years later. Much of the press was slow to catch up, too. A typical liberal-Establishment take on Reagan could be found in Harper’s, which called him Ronald Duck, “the Candidate from Disneyland.” That he had come to be deemed “a serious candidate for president,” the magazine intoned, was “a shame and embarrassment for the country.” But some reporters who tracked Reagan on the campaign trail sensed that many voters didn’t care if he came from Hollywood, if his policies didn’t add up, if his facts were bogus, or if he was condescended to by Republican leaders or pundits. As Elizabeth Drew of The New Yorker observed in 1976, his appeal “has to do not with competence at governing but with the emotion he evokes.” As she put it, “Reagan lets people get out their anger and frustration, their feeling of being misunderstood and mishandled by those who have run our government, their impatience with taxes and with the poor and the weak, their impulse to deal with the world’s troublemakers by employing the stratagem of a punch in the nose.” The power of that appeal was underestimated by his Democratic foes in 1980 even though Carter, too, had run as a populist and attracted some Wallace voters when beating Ford in 1976.  (…) Voters wanted to “follow some authority figure,” he theorized — a “leader who can take charge with authority; return a sense of discipline to our government; and, manifest the willpower needed to get this country back on track.” Or at least a leader from outside Washington, like Reagan and now Trump, who projects that image (“You’re fired!”) whether he has the ability to deliver on it or not. (…) Were Trump to gain entry to the White House, it’s impossible to say whether he would or could follow Reagan’s example and function within the political norms of Washington. His burlesque efforts to appear “presidential” are intended to make that case: His constant promise to practice “the art of the deal” echoes Reagan’s campaign boast of having forged compromises with California’s Democratic legislature while governor. More likely a Trump presidency would be the train wreck largely predicted, an amalgam of the blunderbuss shoot-from-the-hip recklessness of George W. Bush and the randy corruption of Warren Harding, both of whom were easily manipulated by their own top brass. The love child of Hitler and Mussolini Trump is not. He lacks the discipline and zeal to be a successful fascist. The good news for those who look with understandable horror on the prospect of a Trump victory is that the national demographic math is different now from Reagan’s day. The nonwhite electorate, only 12 percent in 1980, was 28 percent in 2012 and could hit 30 percent this year. Few number crunchers buy the Trump camp’s spin that the GOP can reclaim solidly Democratic territory like Pennsylvania and Michigan — states where many white working-class voters, soon to be christened “Reagan Democrats,” crossed over to vote Republican in Reagan’s 1984 landslide. Many of those voters are dead; their epicenter, Macomb County, Michigan, was won by Barack Obama in 2008. Nor is there now the ’70s level of discontent that gave oxygen to Reagan’s insurgency. President Obama’s approval numbers are lapping above 50 percent. Both unemployment and gas prices are low, hardly the dire straits of Carter’s America. Trump’s gift for repelling women would also seem to be an asset for Democrats, creating a gender gap far exceeding the one that confronted Reagan, who was hostile to the Equal Rights Amendment. And yet, to quote the headline of an Economist cover story on Reagan in 1980: It’s time to think the unthinkable. Trump and Bernie Sanders didn’t surge in a vacuum. This is a volatile nation. Polls consistently find that some two-thirds of the country thinks the country is on the wrong track. The economically squeezed middle class rightly feels it has been abandoned by both parties. The national suicide rate is at a 30-year high. Anything can happen in an election where the presumptive candidates of both parties are loathed by a majority of their fellow Americans, a first in the history of modern polling. It’s not reassuring that some of those minimizing Trump’s chances are the experts who saw no path for Trump to the Republican nomination. There could be a July surprise in which party divisions capsize the Democratic convention rather than, as once expected, the GOP’s. An October surprise could come in the form of a terrorist incident that panics American voters much as the Iranian hostage crisis is thought to have sealed Carter’s doom in 1980. Frank Rich
Et si comme le Ronald avant lui le Donald faisait un bon président ?
Même âge avancé, même situation maritale douteuse, même orange décrié des cheveux teints, (quasi) identique slogan de campagne, même passage dans le monde du spectacle, mêmes changements d’étiquettes politiques, même opposition y compris des caciques de son propre parti, même succession à une présidence faible et largement catastrophique, mêmes moqueries continuelles, (quasi) identique surnom dévalorisant, menaces d’assassinat, même retrait du diner annuel des correspondants  …
A l’heure où malgré un premier discours au Congrès pour une fois salué par tous
Vite éclipsé certes par ses allégations sur la surveillance de ses communications pendant sa campagne électorale de la part d’une Administration Obama …

Qui en son temps n’avait pas hésité à lancer le fisc sur ses ennemis ou faire écouter certains journalistes …

Se confirme, jour après jour et fuite après fuite, la véritable campagne de déstabilisation de la nouvelle administration américaine par la collusion des services secrets et de la presse …

Qui se souvient encore …
Contrastant avec l’étrange complaisance qui avait accueilli son prédécesseur …
Et au-delà d’une évidente différence d’expérience politique et de style …
Des moqueries et de l’opposition qu’avait attiré lui aussi à ses débuts …

Jusqu’à une tentative d’assassinat le privant notamment pour la première fois d’assister au fameux diner annuel des correspondants

Avant de devenir le président respecté des historiens aujourd’hui…
Celui que l’on qualifiait alors méchamment de… « le Ronald » ?
Ronald Reagan Was Once Donald Trump
What The Donald Shares With The Ronald
The Trump candidacy looks a lot more like Reagan’s than anyone might care to notice
Frank Rich
NY magazine
June 1, 2016
In an election cycle that has brought unending surprises, let it be said that one time-honored tradition has been upheld: the Republican presidential contenders’ quadrennial tug-of-war to seize the mantle of Ronald Reagan. John Kasich, gesturing toward the Air Force One on display at the Reagan-library debate, said, « I think I actually flew on this plane with Ronald Reagan when I was a congressman. » Rand Paul claimed to have met Reagan as a child; Ben Carson said he switched parties because of Reagan; Chris Christie said he cast his first vote for Reagan; Ted Cruz cheered Reagan for having defeated Soviet Communism and vowed, for nonsensical good measure, to « do the same thing. » And then there was Donald Trump, never one to be outdone by the nobodies in any competition. « I helped him, » he said of Reagan on NBC last fall. « I knew him. He liked me and I liked him. »The Reagan archives show no indication that the two men had anything more than a receiving-line acquaintanceship; Trump doesn’t appear in the president’s voluminous diaries. But of all the empty boasts that have marked Trump’s successful pursuit of the Republican nomination, his affinity to Reagan may have the most validity and the most pertinence to 2016. To understand how Trump has advanced to where he is now, and why he has been underestimated at almost every step, and why he has a shot at vanquishing Hillary Clinton in November, few road maps are more illuminating than Reagan’s unlikely path to the White House. One is almost tempted to say that Trump has been studying the Reagan playbook — but to do so would be to suggest that he actually might have read a book, another Trumpian claim for which there is scant evidence.

Before the fierce defenders of the Reagan faith collapse into seizures at the bracketing of their hero with the crudest and most vacuous presidential candidate in human memory, let me stipulate that I am not talking about Reagan the president in drawing this parallel, or about Reagan the man. I am talking about Reagan the candidate, the canny politician who, after a dozen years of failed efforts attended by nonstop ridicule, ended up leading the 1980 GOP ticket at the same age Trump is now (69) and who, like his present-day counterpart, was best known to much of the electorate up until then as a B-list show-business personality.

It’s true that Reagan, unlike Trump, did hold public office before seeking the presidency (though he’d been out of government for six years when he won). But Trump would no doubt argue that his executive experience atop the august Trump Organization more than compensates for Reagan’s two terms in Sacramento. (Trump would also argue, courtesy of Arnold Schwarzenegger, that serving as governor of California is merely a bush-league audition for the far greater responsibilities of hosting Celebrity Apprentice.) It’s also true that Reagan forged a (fairly) consistent ideology to address late-20th-century issues that are no longer extant: the Cold War, a federal government that feasted on a top income-tax bracket of 70 percent, and runaway inflation. Trump has no core conviction beyond gratifying his own bottomless ego.

Remarkably, though, the Reagan model has proved quite adaptable both to Trump and to our different times. Trump’s tenure as an NBC reality-show host is comparable to Reagan’s stint hosting the highly rated but disposable General Electric Theater for CBS in the Ed Sullivan era. Trump’s embarrassing turn as a supporting player in a 1990 Bo Derek movie (Ghosts Can’t Do It) is no more egregious than Reagan’s starring opposite a chimp in Hollywood’s Bedtime for Bonzo of 1951. While Trump has owned tacky, bankrupt casinos in Atlantic City, Reagan was a mere casino serf — the emcee of a flop nightclub revue featuring barbershop harmonizing and soft-shoe dancing at the Frontier Hotel in Las Vegas in 1954. While Trump would be the first president to have been married three times, here, too, he is simply updating his antecedent, who broke a cultural barrier by becoming the first White House occupant to have divorced and remarried. Neither Reagan nor Trump paid any price with the Evangelical right for deviations from the family-values norm; they respectively snared the endorsements of Jerry Falwell and Jerry Falwell Jr.

Reflecting the contrasting pop cultures of their times, Reagan’s and Trump’s performance styles are antithetical. Reagan’s cool persona of genial optimism was forged by his stints as a radio baseball broadcaster and a movie-studio utility player, and finally by his emergence on television when it was ruled by the soothing suburban patriarchs of Ozzie and Harriet, Father Knows Best, and Leave It to Beaver. Trump’s hot shtick, his scowling bombast and put-downs, is tailor-made for a culture that favors conflict over consensus, musical invective over easy listening, and exhibitionism over decorum in prime time. The two men’s representative celebrity endorsers — Jimmy Stewart and Pat Boone for Reagan, Hulk Hogan and Bobby Knight for Trump — belong to two different American civilizations.

But Reagan’s and Trump’s opposing styles belie their similarities of substance. Both have marketed the same brand of outrage to the same angry segments of the electorate, faced the same jeering press, attracted some of the same battlefront allies (Roger Stone, Paul Manafort, Phyllis Schlafly), offended the same elites (including two generations of Bushes), outmaneuvered similar political adversaries, and espoused the same conservative populism built broadly on the pillars of jingoistic nationalism, nostalgia, contempt for Washington, and racial resentment. They’ve even endured the same wisecracks about their unnatural coiffures. “Governor Reagan does not dye his hair,” said Gerald Ford at a Gridiron Dinner in 1974. “He is just turning prematurely orange.” Though Reagan’s 1980 campaign slogan (“Let’s Make America Great Again”) is one word longer than Trump’s, that word reflects a contrast in their personalities — the avuncular versus the autocratic — but not in message. Reagan’s apocalyptic theme, “The Empire is in decline,” is interchangeable with Trump’s, even if the Gipper delivered it with a smile.

Craig Shirley, a longtime Republican political consultant and Reagan acolyte, has written authoritative books on the presidential campaigns of 1976 and 1980 that serve as correctives to the sentimental revisionist history that would have us believe that Reagan was cheered on as a conquering hero by GOP elites during his long climb to national power. To hear the right’s triumphalism of recent years, you’d think that only smug Democrats were appalled by Reagan while Republicans quickly recognized that their party, decimated by Richard Nixon and Watergate, had found its savior.

Grassroots Republicans, whom Reagan had been courting for years with speeches, radio addresses, and opinion pieces beneath the mainstream media’s radar, were indeed in his camp. But aside from a lone operative (John Sears), Shirley wrote, “the other major GOP players — especially Easterners and moderates — thought Reagan was a certified yahoo.” By his death in 2004, “they would profess their love and devotion to Reagan and claim they were there from the beginning in 1974, which was a load of horse manure.” Even after his election in 1980, Shirley adds, “Reagan was never much loved” by his own party’s leaders. After GOP setbacks in the 1982 midterms, “a Republican National Committee functionary taped a piece of paper to her door announcing the sign-up for the 1984 Bush for President campaign.”

Shirley’s memories are corroborated by reportage contemporaneous with Reagan’s last two presidential runs. (There was also an abortive run in 1968.) A poll in 1976 found that 90 percent of Republican state chairmen judged Reagan guilty of “simplistic approaches,” with “no depth in federal government administration” and “no experience in foreign affairs.” It was little different in January 1980, when a U.S. News and World Report survey of 475 national and state Republican chairmen found they preferred George H.W. Bush to Reagan. One state chairman presumably spoke for many when he told the magazine that Reagan’s intellect was “thinner than spit on a slate rock.” As Rick Perlstein writes in The Invisible Bridge, the third and latest volume of his epic chronicle of the rise of the conservative movement, both Nixon and Ford dismissed Reagan as a lightweight. Barry Goldwater endorsed Ford over Reagan in 1976 despite the fact that Reagan’s legendary speech on behalf of Goldwater’s presidential campaign in October 1964, “A Time for Choosing,” was the biggest boost that his kamikaze candidacy received. Only a single Republican senator, Paul Laxalt of Nevada, signed on to Reagan’s presidential quest from the start, a solitary role that has been played in the Trump campaign by Jeff Sessions of Alabama.

What put off Reagan’s fellow Republicans will sound very familiar. He proposed an economic program — 30 percent tax cuts, increased military spending, a balanced budget — whose math was voodoo and then some. He prided himself on not being “a part of the Washington Establishment” and mocked Capitol Hill’s “buddy system” and its collusion with “the forces that have brought us our problems—the Congress, the bureaucracy, the lobbyists, big business, and big labor.” He kept a light campaign schedule, regarded debates as optional, wouldn’t sit still to read briefing books, and often either improvised his speeches or worked off index cards that contained anecdotes and statistics gleaned from Reader’s Digest and the right-wing journal Human Events — sources hardly more elevated or reliable than the television talk shows and tabloids that feed Trump’s erroneous and incendiary pronouncements.

Like Trump but unlike most of his (and Trump’s) political rivals, Reagan was accessible to the press and public. His spontaneity in give-and-takes with reporters and voters played well but also gave him plenty of space to disgorge fantasies and factual errors so prolific and often outrageous that he single-handedly made the word gaffe a permanent fixture in America’s political vernacular. He confused Pakistan with Afghanistan. He claimed that trees contributed 93 percent of the atmosphere’s nitrous oxide and that pollution in America was “substantially under control” even as his hometown of Los Angeles was suffocating in smog. He said that the “finest oil geologists in the world” had found that there were more oil reserves in Alaska than Saudi Arabia. He said the federal government spent $3 for each dollar it distributed in welfare benefits, when the actual amount was 12 cents.

He also mythologized his own personal history in proto-Trump style. As Garry Wills has pointed out, Reagan referred to himself as one of “the soldiers who came back” when speaking plaintively of his return to civilian life after World War II — even though he had come back only from Culver City, where his wartime duty was making Air Force films at the old Hal Roach Studio. Once in office, he told the Israeli prime minister Yitzhak Shamir that he had filmed the liberated Nazi death camps, when in reality he had not seen them, let alone (as he claimed) squirreled away a reel of film as an antidote to potential Holocaust deniers. For his part, Trump has purported that his enrollment at the New York Military Academy, a prep school, amounted to Vietnam-era military service, and has borne historical witness to the urban legend of “thousands and thousands” of Muslims in Jersey City celebrating the 9/11 attacks. Even when these ruses are exposed, Trump follows the Reagan template of doubling down on mistakes rather than conceding them.

Nor was Reagan a consistent conservative. He deviated from party orthodoxy to both the left and the right. He had been by his own account a “near hopeless hemophilic liberal” for much of his adult life, having campaigned for Truman in 1948 and for Helen Gahagan Douglas in her senatorial race against Nixon in California in 1950. He didn’t switch his registration to Republican until he was 51. As California governor, he signed one of America’s strongest gun-control laws and its most liberal abortion law (both in 1967). His vocal opposition helped kill California’s 1978 Briggs Initiative, which would have banned openly gay teachers at public schools. As a 1980 presidential candidate, he flip-flopped to endorse bailouts for both New York City and the Chrysler Corporation. Reagan may be revered now as a free-trade absolutist in contrast to Trump, but in that winning campaign he called for halting the “deluge” of Japanese car imports raining down on Detroit. “If Japan keeps on doing everything that it’s doing, what they’re doing, obviously, there’s going to be what you call protectionism,” he said.

Republican leaders blasted Reagan as a trigger-happy warmonger. Much as Trump now threatens to downsize NATO and start a trade war with China, so Reagan attacked Ford, the sitting Republican president he ran against in the 1976 primary, and Henry Kissinger for their pursuit of the bipartisan policies of détente and Chinese engagement. The sole benefit of détente, Reagan said, was to give America “the right to sell Pepsi-Cola in Siberia.” For good measure, he stoked an international dispute by vowing to upend a treaty ceding American control over the Panama Canal. “We bought it, we paid for it, it’s ours, and we’re going to keep it!” he bellowed with an America First truculence reminiscent of Trump’s calls for our allies to foot the bill for American military protection. Even his own party’s hawks, like William F. Buckley Jr. and his pal John Wayne, protested. Goldwater, of all people, inveighed against Reagan’s “gross factual errors” and warned he might “take rash action” and “needlessly lead this country into open military conflict.”

Trump’s signature cause of immigration was not a hot-button issue during Reagan’s campaigns. In the White House, he signed a bill granting “amnesty” (Reagan used the now politically incorrect word) to 1.7 million undocumented immigrants. But if Reagan was free of Trump’s bigoted nativism, he had his own racially tinged strategy for wooing disaffected white working-class Americans fearful that liberals in government were bestowing favors on freeloading, lawbreaking minorities at their expense. Taking a leaf from George Wallace’s populist campaigns, Reagan scapegoated “welfare chiselers” like the nameless “strapping young buck” he claimed used food stamps to buy steak. His favorite villain was a Chicago “welfare queen” who, in his telling, “had 80 names, 30 addresses, and 12 Social Security cards, and is collecting veterans’ benefits on four nonexistent deceased husbands” to loot the American taxpayer of over $150,000 of “tax-free cash income” a year. Never mind that she was actually charged with using four aliases and had netted $8,000: Reagan continued to hammer in this hyperbolic parable with a vengeance that rivals Trump’s insistence that Mexico will pay for a wall to fend off Hispanic rapists.

The Republican elites of Reagan’s day were as blindsided by him as their counterparts have been by Trump. Though Reagan came close to toppling the incumbent president at the contested Kansas City convention in 1976, the Ford forces didn’t realize they could lose until the devil was at the door. A “President Ford Committee” campaign statement had maintained that Reagan could “not defeat any candidate the Democrats put up” because his “constituency is much too narrow, even within the Republican party” and because he lacked “the critical national and international experience that President Ford has gained through 25 years of public service.” In Ford’s memoirs, written after he lost the election to Jimmy Carter, he wrote that he hadn’t taken the Reagan threat seriously because he “didn’t take Reagan seriously.” Reagan, he said, had a “penchant for offering simplistic solutions to hideously complex problems” and a stubborn insistence that he was “always right in every argument.” Even so, a Ford-campaign memo had correctly identified one ominous sign during primary season: a rising turnout of Reagan voters who were “not loyal Republicans or Democrats” and were “alienated from both parties because neither takes a sympathetic view toward their issues.” To these voters, the disdain Reagan drew from the GOP elites was a badge of honor. During the primary campaign, Times columnist William Safire reported with astonishment that Kissinger’s speeches championing Ford and attacking Reagan were helping Reagan, not Ford — a precursor of how attacks by Trump’s Establishment adversaries have backfired 40 years later.

Much of the press was slow to catch up, too. A typical liberal-Establishment take on Reagan could be found in Harper’s, which called him Ronald Duck, “the Candidate from Disneyland.” That he had come to be deemed “a serious candidate for president,” the magazine intoned, was “a shame and embarrassment for the country.” But some reporters who tracked Reagan on the campaign trail sensed that many voters didn’t care if he came from Hollywood, if his policies didn’t add up, if his facts were bogus, or if he was condescended to by Republican leaders or pundits. As Elizabeth Drew of The New Yorker observed in 1976, his appeal “has to do not with competence at governing but with the emotion he evokes.” As she put it, “Reagan lets people get out their anger and frustration, their feeling of being misunderstood and mishandled by those who have run our government, their impatience with taxes and with the poor and the weak, their impulse to deal with the world’s troublemakers by employing the stratagem of a punch in the nose.”

The power of that appeal was underestimated by his Democratic foes in 1980 even though Carter, too, had run as a populist and attracted some Wallace voters when beating Ford in 1976. By the time he was up for reelection, Carter was an unpopular incumbent presiding over the Iranian hostage crisis, gas shortages, and a reeling economy, yet surely the Democrats would prevail over Ronald Duck anyway. A strategic memo by Carter’s pollster, Patrick Caddell, laid out the campaign against Reagan’s obvious vulnerabilities with bullet points: “Is Reagan Safe? … Shoots From the Hip … Over His Head … What Are His Solutions?” But it was the strategy of Caddell’s counterpart in the Reagan camp, the pollster Richard Wirthlin, that carried the day with the electorate. Voters wanted to “follow some authority figure,” he theorized — a “leader who can take charge with authority; return a sense of discipline to our government; and, manifest the willpower needed to get this country back on track.” Or at least a leader from outside Washington, like Reagan and now Trump, who projects that image (“You’re fired!”) whether he has the ability to deliver on it or not.

What we call the Reagan Revolution was the second wave of a right-wing populist revolution within the GOP that had first crested with the Goldwater campaign of 1964. After Lyndon Johnson whipped Goldwater in a historic landslide that year, it was assumed that the revolution had been vanquished. The conventional wisdom was framed by James Reston of the Times the morning after Election Day: “Barry Goldwater not only lost the presidential election yesterday but the conservative cause as well.” But the conservative cause hardly lost a step after Goldwater’s Waterloo; it would soon start to regather its strength out West under Reagan. It’s the moderate wing of the party, the GOP of Nelson Rockefeller and George Romney and Henry Cabot Lodge and William Scranton, that never recovered and whose last, long-smoldering embers were finally extinguished with a Jeb Bush campaign whose high-water mark in the Republican primaries was 11 percent of the vote in New Hampshire.

Mitt Romney and his ilk are far more conservative than that previous generation of ancien régime Republicans. But the Romney crowd is not going to have a restoration after the 2016 election any more than his father’s crowd did post-1964 — regardless of whether Trump is buried in an electoral avalanche, as Goldwater was, or wins big, as Reagan did against both Carter and Walter Mondale. Trump is far more representative of the GOP base than all the Establishment conservatives who are huffing and puffing that he is betraying the conservative movement and the spirit of Ronald Reagan. When the Bush family announces it will skip the Cleveland convention, the mainstream media dutifully report it as significant news. But there’s little evidence that many grassroots Republicans now give a damn what any Bush has to say about Trump or much else.

The only conservative columnist who seems to recognize this reality remains Peggy Noonan, who worked in the Reagan White House. As she pointed out in Wall Street Journal columns this spring, conservatism as “defined the past 15 years by Washington writers and thinkers” (i.e., since George W. Bush’s first inauguration) — “a neoconservative, functionally open borders, slash-the-entitlements party” — appears no longer to have any market in the Republican base. A telling poll by Public Policy Polling published in mid-May confirmed that the current GOP Washington leadership is not much more popular than the departed John Boehner and Eric Cantor: Only 40 percent of Republicans approve of the job performance of Paul Ryan, the Establishment wonder boy whose conservative catechism Noonan summarized, while 44 percent disapprove. Only 14 percent of Republicans approve of Mitch McConnell. This is Trump’s party now, and it was so well before he got there. It’s the populist-white-conservative party that Goldwater and Reagan built, with a hefty intervening assist from Nixon’s southern strategy, not the atavistic country-club Republicanism whose few surviving vestiges had their last hurrahs in the administrations of Bush père and fils. The third wave of the Reagan Revolution is here to stay.

Were Trump to gain entry to the White House, it’s impossible to say whether he would or could follow Reagan’s example and function within the political norms of Washington. His burlesque efforts to appear “presidential” are intended to make that case: His constant promise to practice “the art of the deal” echoes Reagan’s campaign boast of having forged compromises with California’s Democratic legislature while governor. More likely a Trump presidency would be the train wreck largely predicted, an amalgam of the blunderbuss shoot-from-the-hip recklessness of George W. Bush and the randy corruption of Warren Harding, both of whom were easily manipulated by their own top brass. The love child of Hitler and Mussolini Trump is not. He lacks the discipline and zeal to be a successful fascist.

The good news for those who look with understandable horror on the prospect of a Trump victory is that the national demographic math is different now from Reagan’s day. The nonwhite electorate, only 12 percent in 1980, was 28 percent in 2012 and could hit 30 percent this year. Few number crunchers buy the Trump camp’s spin that the GOP can reclaim solidly Democratic territory like Pennsylvania and Michigan — states where many white working-class voters, soon to be christened “Reagan Democrats,” crossed over to vote Republican in Reagan’s 1984 landslide. Many of those voters are dead; their epicenter, Macomb County, Michigan, was won by Barack Obama in 2008. Nor is there now the ’70s level of discontent that gave oxygen to Reagan’s insurgency. President Obama’s approval numbers are lapping above 50 percent. Both unemployment and gas prices are low, hardly the dire straits of Carter’s America. Trump’s gift for repelling women would also seem to be an asset for Democrats, creating a gender gap far exceeding the one that confronted Reagan, who was hostile to the Equal Rights Amendment.

And yet, to quote the headline of an Economist cover story on Reagan in 1980: It’s time to think the unthinkable. Trump and Bernie Sanders didn’t surge in a vacuum. This is a volatile nation. Polls consistently find that some two-thirds of the country thinks the country is on the wrong track. The economically squeezed middle class rightly feels it has been abandoned by both parties. The national suicide rate is at a 30-year high. Anything can happen in an election where the presumptive candidates of both parties are loathed by a majority of their fellow Americans, a first in the history of modern polling. It’s not reassuring that some of those minimizing Trump’s chances are the experts who saw no path for Trump to the Republican nomination. There could be a July surprise in which party divisions capsize the Democratic convention rather than, as once expected, the GOP’s. An October surprise could come in the form of a terrorist incident that panics American voters much as the Iranian hostage crisis is thought to have sealed Carter’s doom in 1980.*

While I did not rule out the possibility that Trump could win the Republican nomination as his campaign took off after Labor Day last year, I wrote that he had “no chance of ascending to the presidency.” Meanwhile, he was performing an unintended civic service: His bull-in-a-china-shop candidacy was exposing, however unintentionally, the sterility, corruption, and hypocrisy of our politics, from the consultant-and-focus-group-driven caution of candidates like Clinton to the toxic legacy of Sarah Palin on a GOP that now pretends it never invited her cancerous brand of bigoted populism into its midst. But I now realize I was as wrong as the Reagan naysayers in seeing no chance of Trump’s landing in the White House. I will henceforth defer to Norm Ornstein of the American Enterprise Institute, one of the few Washington analysts who saw Trump’s breakthrough before the pack did. As of early May, he was giving Trump a 20 percent chance of victory in November.

What is to be done to lower those odds further still? Certainly the feeble efforts of the #NeverTrump Republicans continue to be, as Trump would say, Sad! Alumni from the Romney, Bush, and John McCain campaigns seem to think that writing progressively more enraged op-ed pieces about how Trump is a shame and embarrassment for the country will make a difference. David Brooks has called this a “Joe McCarthy moment” for the GOP — in the sense that history will judge poorly those who don’t stand up to the bully in the Fifth Avenue tower. But if you actually look at history, what it says is that there were no repercussions for Republicans who didn’t stand up to McCarthy — or, for that matter, to Nixon at the height of his criminality. William Buckley co-wrote a book defending McCarthy in 1954, and his career only blossomed thereafter. Goldwater was one of McCarthy’s most loyal defenders, and Reagan refused to condemn Nixon even after the Republican senatorial leadership had deserted him in the endgame of Watergate. Far from being shunned, both men ended up as their party’s presidential nominees, and one of them became president.

If today’s outraged Republican elites are seriously determined to derail Trump, they have a choice between two options: (1) Put their money and actions where their hashtags are and get a conservative third-party candidate on any state ballots they can, where a protest vote might have a spoiler effect on Trump’s chances; (2) Hold their nose and support Clinton. Both (1) and (2) would assure a Clinton presidency, so this would require those who feel that Trump will bring about America’s ruin to love their country more than they hate Clinton.

Dream on. That’s not happening. It’s easier to write op-ed pieces invoking Weimar Germany for audiences who already loathe Trump. Meanwhile, Republican grandees will continue to surrender to Trump no matter how much they’ve attacked him or he’s attacked them or how many high-minded editorials accuse them of failing a Joe McCarthy moral test. Just as Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus capitulated once Trump signed a worthless pledge of party loyalty last fall, so other GOP leaders are now citing Trump’s equally worthless list of potential Supreme Court nominees as a pretext for jumping on the bandwagon.

The handiest Reagan-era prototype for Christie, McCain, Nikki Haley, Peter King, Bobby Jindal, and all the other former Trump-haters who have now about-faced is Kissinger. Reagan had attacked him in the 1976 campaign for making America what Trump would call a loser — “No. 2” — to the Soviets in military might. Kissinger’s disdain of Reagan was such that, as Craig Shirley writes, he tried to persuade Ford to run again in 1980 so Reagan could be blocked. When that fizzled, Kissinger put out the word that Reagan was the only Republican contender he wouldn’t work with. But once Reagan had locked up the nomination, Kissinger declared him the “trustee of all our hopes” and lobbied to return to the White House as secretary of State. As I write these words, Kissinger is meeting with Trump.

And the Democrats? Hillary Clinton is to Trump what Carter and especially Mondale were to Reagan: a smart, mainstream liberal with a vast public-service résumé who stands for all good things without ever finding that one big thing that electrifies voters. No matter how many journalistic exposés are to follow on both candidates, it’s hard to believe that most Americans don’t already know which candidate they prefer when the choices are quantities as known as she and Trump. The real question is which one voters are actually going to show up and cast ballots for. Could America’s fading white majority make its last stand in 2016? All demographic and statistical logic says no. But as Reagan seduced voters and confounded the experts with his promise of Morning in America, we can’t entirely rule out the possibility that Trump might do the same with his stark, black-and-white entreaties to High Noon.

*This article appears in the May 30, 2016 issue of New York Magazine.

Voir aussi:

In its most recent attack on Donald Trump and his supporters by the Wall Street Journal editorial page, one of its leading columnists, Peggy Noonan, asserted that Trump supporters are historically inaccurate in comparing Trump to the late President. She described Trump-Reagan comparisons as “desperate” and those who draw them as “idiots” and historical “illiterates.”

She questions the level of competence of Trump but ignores that Reagan was also regarded as grossly incompetent — by media and GOP establishment hard-losers and spoilers, not Republican voters —and especially dangerous in foreign policy, which, presumably, only elites can understand foreign. Reagan was depicted as some sort of cowboy B-rated-film-star yahoo and loose cannon by the “chattering class” of 1980, one who might be tolerable as a governor, but who was definitely not sophisticated enough to comprehend let alone conduct foreign policy.

Peggy Noonan relates in her column an adoring revisionist depiction of Ronald Reagan, as he has come to be appreciated today in the retrospective light of history. The Ronald Reagan she summons to make her case, however, is far from the Ronald Reagan of historical accuracy. The Ronald Reagan of the 1970s and 1980s was derided as inept and a potential disaster by status quo apologists, much as Donald Trump is being mocked today.

Noonan also cites Reagan’s experience as president of a labor union as a qualification for the Presidency that candidate Reagan had, but that candidate Trump lacks. Taking away nothing from Ronald Reagan, I suggest that managing a multi-billion dollar business for decades, one that operates in practically every corner of the globe, as Donald Trump has done, might count as roughly equivalent to heading a Screen Actors Guild – and maybe even serving as a governor of California.

She also says Trump, unlike Reagan, is not a “leader of men.” Here, again, the columnist tries too hard to make her argument. Reagan “was the leader of an entire political movement,” Noonan writes. The people “elected him in landslides,” she asserts. Who does that sound like today? What political candidate in 2016 best resembles Reagan in both respects? Fortunately, voters create political verdicts, not columnists, and Donald Trump both leads a very substantial populist political movement and has won many primaries, often by unprecedented margins.

Noonan denigrates the historical comparison of Donald Trump and Ronald Reagan that Trump supporters often make. On closer inspection, it is she who is more historically “illiterate” or, to be kinder, “forgetful” — of the complete facts of Ronald Reagan’s rise to power, and how in so many respects that rise parallels Donald Trump’s emergence as a conservative challenger to the status quo.

Like Donald Trump, Ronald Reagan was an entrepreneur – an aspiring broadcast sports reporter and film actor. He had to face the brutal competition of Hollywood, a place in which most aspirants to stardom failed. He started by himself, by selling his brand, just as Donald Trump started building hotels and golf courses by himself, also selling his brand (and did not squander his money, as young people from means often do, but multiplied it a thousand fold – and more — making the correct plans and decisions in difficult situations, and plain hard work).

Reagan had to sell himself as a labor union leader, too – to character actors and extras in the movie industry, not just stars. He was not involved with any governmental entity early in his career. Later, he worked for General Electric, one of the largest capitalist success stories in the U.S. at the time. Before he became governor of California, he was a man of business in the entertainment industry, climbing up the ladder of success in radio, movies, and television completely on his own.

Ronald Reagan believed in free market capitalism and would have been deeply impressed, I believe, by the business accomplishments and acumen of Donald Trump. Ronald Reagan knew the core greatness of the U.S. lies not in government and the wisdom of professional politicians but in that very private sector in which Donald Trump has thrived and achieved an extraordinary level of success. Donald Trump’s children, obviously well brought up, appear to be following in his footsteps.

Do Mr. Trump’s business accomplishments count for so little at the Wall Street Journal? How many other men have tried and failed to do what Donald Trump has done in the private sector? Has his extraordinary success not won him some plaudits from a leading member of the conservative free market press? In her column, Noonan also makes numerous points about Trump’s lack of record as a proven governmental leader, as if this deficiency were disqualifying. Since when in the U.S. have we belittled a man of business accomplishments with such venom? Isn’t it entrepreneurs who built the prosperity of our great nation? The accusation Noonan levels against Donald Trump of “serving only himself” is the charge collectivists the world over frequently lodge against free market capitalists.

Ronald Reagan would never have discounted Donald Trump’s achievements, as the Wall Street Journal editorial page frequently does. Ronald Reagan was wiser than that. He would have praised them. He never would have said that because a man has not held elected office in this nation that he is, ipso facto, not a “leader of men.” A man who employs thousands (22,500 at last report) is not a “leader of men”? Someone who has built an enormous international business that brings him into contact on any given day with foreign leaders, both business and political, is not a leader? To recall a touch more history, the Founding Fathers were overwhelmingly men of property as well as “citizen leaders” like both Ronald Reagan and Donald Trump. They were not career politicians.

Ronald Reagan knew the sting of being called a “light weight” movie star, a graduate of rural Midwestern Eureka College which no one among the elite had ever heard of. And doubtless ad hominem attacks detracted from, and damaged in some respects, his core message of more limited government and defeat of the Soviet empire. But he persisted despite the snide heckling of the arrogant establishment of the time, and he communicated his message honestly and directly – and, turns out, successfully — to the American people, thereby, accomplishing much good for the nation.

Yes, and he also gave wings to a powerful political force, conservatism, which today, I suggest, finds its relevant fresh champion, however odd and imperfect the fit might seem at times, in the likes of a populist New York billionaire businessman who has a propensity to communicate his message of a better life and more secure future for Americans, directly and honestly, and with conviction, to the American body politic.

Ronald Reagan as President of the United States? NEVER, they said. But the people voted, the nation spoke, and so, they were wrong.

Today, despite differences over style and some issues, one thing we can all agree on: Hillary Clinton is no Ronald Reagan.

Ambassador Faith Whittlesey served as White House Director of the Office of Public Liaison from 1983 to 1985 and twice, from 1981 to 1983 and again from 1985 to 1988, as U.S. Ambassador to Switzerland. She also was active in President Reagan’s unsuccessful 1976 campaign and was Co-chairman of President Reagan’s Pennsylvania campaign in 1980.

Voir également:

Deja Vu All Over Again?

‘Ronald’ Trump: Why 2016 Is Looking a Lot Like 1980

In memory, Reagan’s victory seems easy and inevitable. It was anything but. And the parallels to today are a little creepy.

Meg Jacobs

The Daily Beast

05.24.16

It’s 1980 all over again. A media celebrity runs for the GOP nomination—something he has been planning for years—and sweeps the primaries, rattling the Republican establishment along the way. That’s the story of Ronald Reagan as he mobilized for what would be his landslide 1980 victory. And it is the story of Donald Trump too.

Trump and Speaker Paul Ryan met in an effort to heal the wounds that have opened up in this brutal primary. Come convention time, if history is any indicator, they will join together. But it is likely to be a rocky road. The same was true in 1980.

Today Republicans lionize Reagan and remember him as the quintessential coalition-builder. He brought the Republican Party together, unlike Donald Trump, who spent the spring tearing the GOP apart. But the truth is that in real time in 1980, Reagan was seen as the outside antiestablishment candidate. He was also seen as less than a serious contender, even when it looked like he would secure the nomination.When the Republican primary season started out, he was the only one out of seven candidates who had not held a government position inside Washington, a roster that included two senators, three congressmen, and a Treasury Secretary. Instead, Reagan was best known for his starring roles in middle-brow American movies, a career he parlayed into a run as California governor. When he announced his candidacy, critics derided him as the “celebrity in chief.”

Reagan held himself up as the icon of conservatism but, much like Trump, his past suggested a history of political flexibility if not outright liberalism. He had once been a Roosevelt Democrat. By the 1964 presidential race, he’d endorsed the GOP’s Senator Barry Goldwater and made his conversion to full-fledged conservative.

Still, in his years in the California governorship, Reagan continued to demonstrate political flexibility. He supported abortion rights, welfare spending, and, when necessary, tax increases. True, he called for cracking down on campus unrest. And by now his hallmark issue was fierce anticommunism as well as anti taxation. But Reagan understood that he governed in a state where ideological purity would not have secured for him the office he sought given that Democrats greatly outnumbered Republicans.

And yet in 1980 Reagan ran as the standard bearer of the Republican Party. Throughout the primary season, there was deep skepticism. George H.W. Bush was the presumptive establishment candidate. He had been a congressman, the Republican National chairman, an ambassador to the UN and China, and the CIA director. Bush’s early victory in the Iowa caucus suggested that voters were not sold on the movie star.

But Reagan was onto something, much the same way that Trump is. After a decade of slow growth, declining productivity, double-digit inflation—and an energy crisis that graphically demonstrated the government’s incapacity to solve problems—America was eager for solutions. What people hungered for more than anything else was leadership. Jerry Rafshoon, President Carter’s adviser, told him, ”People want you to act like a leader.”

And that is what Reagan understood. In short, digestible sound bites, he promised Americans that they would once again be great. On foreign policy, he would bring peace through strength. If Trump promises to build a wall, Reagan would tear one down. And on domestic policy, he would cut taxes. To Trump’s protectionism, Reagan offered supply-side economics. The master of media knew a winning platform when he saw it.

The establishment was slow to rally behind him. With the disastrous memory of 1964, when Barry Goldwater and his brand of conservatism lost in a landslide, Reagan seemed too risky. Moderates worried that his fierce anticommunist rhetoric would escalate tensions with the Soviet Union—even Barry Goldwater called him “trigger happy”—while mainstream fiscal conservatives said his budget numbers did not add up. Bush denounced this policy as “voodoo economics.”

Gerald Ford called Reagan “unelectable” in late March. Many Washington insiders and party regulars saw Reagan as too extreme and hoped that the former president would throw his hat in. Indeed, early polls showed Ford with greater appeal than Reagan among Democrats, a serious liability in a race where Republicans would need to attract cross-over voters to win. In early match ups, Ted Kennedy, who was challenging Carter from the left in the Democratic primary, beat Reagan by as much as 64 to 34 percent.

And age seemed a problem too. Reagan turned 69 a month into the primaries and, if elected, would surpass William Henry Harrison as the oldest president, who in 1841 caught a cold delivering his inaugural address, developed pneumonia, and died a month later. A Newsday reporter said Reagan was in a “race against time.”

He was also vulnerable as a celebrity. Reagan was, as one commentator explained, a “the end product of television politics . . . It is a show and he’s a star actor.” That was not a compliment.

Reagan won in New Hampshire, but the primary season was long and drawn out. In Massachusetts, he came in third behind Bush and John Anderson, the Illinois Senator who dropped out of the Republican contest and ran as an Independent. The conventional wisdom maintained that Anderson would draw votes from Carter as a moderate alternative, but nevertheless, his presence in the race suggested that the electorate might not be ready for Reagan’s brand of conservatism.

Indeed, Bush scored important victories in Pennsylvania and in Michigan. As Bush did well, some rallied behind Reagan, including Senator Howard Baker, who dropped out of the race, saying: “Only divisions from within our party can keep us from benefiting from the bitter divisions within the Democratic Party. The time has come to give Ronald Reagan our prayers, our nomination, our enthusiastic support.”

But the primary season did not come to an end until late May when, at last, Reagan secured enough delegates to win the nomination. And even then, many embraced Reagan only as an act of political pragmatism. As Ohio Governor James Rhodes explained, “I love George Bush. I love Gerald Ford. I love Ronald Reagan. Sometimes in love you have to make your choice. My choice is Ronald Reagan.”

As the GOP convention drew closer, other leading Republicans fell in line, among them the most senior liberal Republican, Senator Jacob Javits. He had refused to endorse Goldwater in 1964, but now he cast his lot with Reagan. With the endorsement, Javits would be a delegate at large. “I felt it was important for me to have an input,” he said, “and I knew I couldn’t have it unless I cast my vote for Reagan.” The New York senator was up for reelection, and he also believed that the GOP had a chance, with Reagan at the head of the ticket, to reclaim the Senate. (It did, but without him—Javits was upset in the Republican primary by the more conservative Al D’Amato)

But the prospect of party disunity did not end at the convention. Now it was the Republican right’s turn to fret about its candidate. When Reagan announced that he was selecting George Bush as his running mate, a decision that came only at the end of the convention and after much media speculation, the right threatened to walk. In 1976, Reagan had subverted his effort to win the Republican nomination over President Gerald Ford when he announced that his running mate would be Pennsylvania Republican Richard Schweiker, a liberal Republican who was antithetical to Reagan’s conservative claims. Now he seemed to be toying with moderation once again.

With evangelical voters mobilizing at the grassroots and many entering electoral politics for the first time, the leaders of this new social force wanted someone who would fight for their causes. Paul Weyrich, the head of right-wing Committee for the Survival of a Free Congress, was angry. “I feel no need obligation to bring about our own destruction,” Weyrich thundered. “I won’t support a Reagan-Bush ticket.”

Reagan attempted to appease the right by signing onto a platform that dropped the ERA and called for an anti-abortion amendment. He also called evolution just a “theory” and expressed skepticism about the man-made causes of pollution. But the establishment was still worried. Texas Senator John Tower, who chaired the convention’s platform committee, warned his colleagues, “Republicans have a singular facility sometimes for snatching defeat from the jaws of victory. Disunity has cost us elections in the past.” Nevada Senator Paul Laxalt said the new right is “afraid of Ron.”

The general election was far from a shoo-in. The polls were all over the place, including placing President Carter ahead of the insurgent candidate. In the end, Reagan scored a decisive victory. But his success, and the ingredients that allowed for this landslide victory, were clear only in hindsight. A week before the election, it was too close to call.

Rather than moderating his rhetoric and toning down his platform in the general election, Reagan stepped up his game. He blamed Carter personally for the gas lines that had signaled the decline of American strength and prosperity. It was Carter’s fault that Iranian terrorists seized the American embassy in Teheran and held American hostages. And Carter’s efforts to negotiate nuclear deals with the Soviets were a disaster.

Reagan was a master of the sound bite: « A recession is when you lose your job, a depression is when your neighbor does, and a recovery is when Jimmy Carter does.” And he told a narrative that simultaneously devastated Carter while instilling confidence in him. His signature campaign slogan captured it all: “Are you better off than you were four years ago?”

These messages appealed to independent voters and white working-class voters, the so-called Reagan Democrats, who were suffering from slow growth and stagnant wages as they saw jobs disappearing overseas.
Reagan also eagerly embraced the race card. He went after white voters in the South, saying he was a defender of states’ rights near where civil rights workers had been brutally murdered in 1964. He denounced “welfare queens in fashion jeans” as the embodiment of excessive government waste, another not so subtly coded racial message.

1980 was also the first gender gap election when there was a clear discrepancy between how men and women voted. Reagan’s cowboy swagger and tough sounding rhetoric appealed to men. Lee Atwater explained it wasn’t so much that women didn’t like Reagan, it was just that men liked him so much.

If 1980 is any indicator of how an unlikely outspoken conservative candidate with a liberal background could win, Trump is well on his way. And Reagan did not just win; he won in a landslide, one that many did not see coming, and one that severely weakened much of the liberal agenda and put the country on a rightward path that still shapes politics today. Like Reagan, Trump has dominated the primaries, worried the establishment, and yet reveals himself to have deep-seated support. Like Reagan, he is the master of a new media to mobilize and rally supporters, especially white men. In spite of the media criticism he receives as running a post-policy campaign, his supporters feel he provides solutions and refreshingly says what he wants.

Just as Reagan did, Trump has had his eye set on the White House for a long time. In a 1990 Playboy interview, he said, “I hate seeing this country go to hell. We are laughed at by the rest of the world.” He also said, “Vision is my best asset. I know what sells and I know what people want.” Like Reagan, he has spent decades crafting his message. And so far his strategy seems to be working.

Voir encore:

Liberals sneered at Reagan yet he stunned the world. Don’t laugh, but Trump could too, says Justin Webb

‘He’s a lightweight, not someone to be considered seriously.’ It could have been the judgment of the world on Donald Trump. But, actually, it wasn’t. It was Ronald Reagan (pictured)

The verdict is unambiguous: ‘He’s a lightweight, not someone to be considered seriously.’ It could have been the judgement of the world on Donald Trump. But, actually, it wasn’t.

These words were spoken by President Richard Nixon about Ronald Reagan in the Seventies. Nixon added, for good measure, that Reagan was ‘shallow’ and of ‘limited mental capacity’.

Gerald Ford, who took over the presidency when Nixon had to resign after the Watergate scandal, was no less dismissive.

In a 1976 press release when Reagan announced he would challenge Ford as Republican nominee for the White House, Ford stated: ‘The simple political fact is that he cannot defeat any candidates the Democrats put up. Reagan’s constituency is much too narrow, even within the Republican Party.’

The Democrats were equally nonplussed. Those who did not write him off him as a man itching to start World War III, saw Reagan as merely useless —a B-list Hollywood actor whose best film was called Bedtime For Bonzo and starred a monkey.

Dunce

Washington grandee Clark Clifford — who was an adviser to four Democrat Presidents including JFK — simply called Reagan ‘an amiable dunce’.

Yet Reagan not only won the election in 1980 and 1984; he went on to become one of the 20th century’s towering figures.

Today, many of the U.S.’s brightest and best are once again united in their view: the man the Republicans have chosen as Presidential candidate is so unqualified for the job that this was — in effect — the week Hillary Clinton became the 45th president.

Yes, she has to see off her pesky Left-wing challenger Bernie Sanders before she can win her party’s official nomination.

But that’s almost done. And the rest is easy. Come the November presidential poll, she will face a man so barmy, so extreme, so utterly unpresidential, that she can’t lose. A dunce who is not even amiable. Donald Trump is going to gift Hillary Clinton the White House.

But some serious U.S. commentators are questioning conventional wisdom and citing Reagan’s rise to the White House all those years ago as a possible portent of things to come.

They are chastened by how wrong so many pundits have already been over ‘The Donald’, how he was written off from the start — only to come out with the Republican nomination.

They are seriously starting to wonder if he could go all the way and win the U.S. election in November.

Likewise, some in the British Establishment now fear David Cameron will have to work hard to patch things up with Trump after saying the tycoon’s suggested ban on Muslims was ‘divisive, stupid and wrong’ — and that if Trump ‘came to visit our country he’d unite us all against him’.

Could ‘The Donald’ really make the White House? If so, what kind of President would he be?

Let’s be blunt about the task Trump faces. He is massively unpopular. A Washington Post/ABC News poll last month found 67 per cent of likely voters had an unfavourable opinion of him.

Could ‘The Donald’ really make the White House? If so, what kind of President would he be?

Among most Americans he is only slightly less popular than Vladimir Putin (who comes in at around 70 per cent unfavourable). And in certain key groups, Hispanics, women, the young, he is off the scale — properly detested, even feared.

But American presidents are not elected in a single nationwide contest. And it is because of this that he could secure victory.

Under its Electoral College system, the people don’t actually vote directly for the President; they vote for a group of electors in their own state.

And these electors — 538 in total — then cast their votes to decide who enters the White House. The point is that in the U.S. Presidential election of 2012, if just 64 electors’ votes had gone to the other side, the Republican candidate Mitt Romney would have beaten Barack Obama.

Since most states are already firmly in the Republican or Democrat camp, it is these few votes at the margins that count.

And Trump, with his hugely resourced campaign and outrageous populist pledges, could swing them his way.

Moreover, he represents the anti-Establishment, a no-nonsense change for those fed up with the entire political class.

In New York a few weeks ago, I met Carl Paladino, who ran for the New York state governorship for the Republicans in 2010.

He is a Trump man now, and waves aside what he regards as old-fashioned talk of Democrats and Republicans and party allegiances.

‘Imagine you are a carpenter on a building site,’ he told me, ‘you sweat all day and get wet and cold. You don’t care about party. You want a champion. That’s Trump. It’s about him.’

The carpenters, united, could swing it Trump’s way. They would need help from fitters and joiners and other men (yes, his supporters are almost entirely men) who work with their hands. But it could be done.

The so-called rust belt states — in the north-east and midwest — are ripe for the picking. Trump does best in areas where the death rate among white people under 49 is highest — the downtrodden working class.

Megalomaniac

Many of these people traditionally vote Democrat, but they have been voting for Bernie Sanders — Hillary Clinton’s Left-wing rival for the Democrat nomination — rather than Hillary herself. She lost the Michigan contest to Sanders, just as she lost Indiana to him this week.

Yes, Sanders is a socialist and Trump a billionaire plutocrat. But on trade — protection of American jobs — Sanders and Trump are on the same page.

Add a dash of Trump’s xenophobia and he’s in business.

Those who voted for Sanders because he speaks up for the little guy might well feel that Trump is closer to their hearts than Hillary.

The so-called rust belt states — in the north-east and midwest — are ripe for the picking. Many of these people traditionally vote Democrat, but they have been voting for Bernie Sanders — Hillary Clinton’s Left-wing rival for the Democrat nomination — rather than Hillary herself

So President Trump is not a fantasy. There is a path for him.

Not an easy one, but a path nonetheless.

But if he won, what then?

Again, the conventional wisdom might well be wrong. He is portrayed as a dictator. A megalomaniac. A man who has taken over a political party for his own crazed purposes.

All of which might be true.

But if Trump seriously thinks he can run America as he runs Trump Casinos, he has a shock coming. America was designed to be ungovernable without the consent of Congress.

Trump may have pledged to build a wall with Mexico, but he could never get that passed, still less a scheme to keep Muslims out of America.

He would need Congress on his side. He would need the Supreme Court to agree that it was constitutional.

Defeat

Remember the key Obama policy of closing Guantanamo Bay was stymied not by Republicans but by members of his own party in Congress? He said: ‘DO IT’. They said no. And Guantanamo is still open.

Even in foreign affairs, where presidents can make quite a splash, the system is likely to defeat him. Trump seems, for instance, to be in favour of torture and has said that, as President, he’d authorise ‘worse than waterboarding’ against suspected terrorist captives.

But already John Rizzo, a top lawyer at the CIA when the agency employed so-called enhanced interrogation techniques, has pointed out that President Trump would face a revolt by his own staff.

It would be carnage if he tried to implement his preferred torture measures. Not for the captives, but for the President.

But would he care? Would he not just shrug and move on?

Perhaps the greatest oddness of Trump is that his core supporters are a fading and old-fashioned constituency — angry white people — but his politics are uber-modern.

He has no ideology. He believes in what works, and is, in some ways, surprisingly Left-wing.

He will fight a dizzying campaign this summer, coming at Hillary Clinton from the Right and from the Left. He will even accuse her of sexism for sticking up for Bill during his ‘bimbo eruptions’. He’ll dodge and weave, confuse and outrage, and generally shake up the nation.

He is no Ronald Reagan — at least not yet. But who knows, Donald Trump could yet surprise everyone and end up as the most unexpected President the White House has ever seen.

Voir par ailleurs:

Très attendue, l’intervention du président américain face à un Congrès au grand complet lui a permis d’endosser un ton rassembleur, sans pour autant préciser clairement les priorités et le chiffrage de sa politique ambitieuse.

C’était il y a plus de cinq semaines, le 20 janvier dernier. Lors de son investiture sur les marches du capitole, à Washington, Donald Trump était apparu à la tribune poing levé, et avait tenu un premier discours de président particulièrement sombre, évoquant un « carnage américain » dont sont victimes « trop de nos concitoyens ». Et promis d’y mettre fin « ici et maintenant », assurant que « chaque décision sur le commerce, les impôts, l’immigration, les affaires étrangères sera prise pour le bénéfice des familles et des travailleurs américains ».

C’est dire si, cinq semaines plus tard, sa première intervention solennelle devant le Congrès était attendue. Surtout après plus d’un mois passé à la Maison-Blanche, au cours duquel le 45e président des États-Unis a multiplié les annonces et déclarations qui ont jeté le flou sur sa capacité à endosser son costume présidentiel et à fixer des priorités dans sa politique.

Cravate bleue rayée et ton solennel

Sur la forme, Donald Trump, ce mardi 28 février au soir, devant un Congrès au grand complet, où siégeaient pour la circonstance les représentants, sénateurs, ministres et juges de la Cour suprême, a tenu sans doute son discours le plus « présidentiel », le plus modéré, le moins provocateur.

Apparu à la tribune, pour une fois, paré d’une cravate bleue rayée, comme pour rompre également avec son style habituel sur le plan vestimentaire, le président américain a fait une déclaration plus solennelle et optimiste, sans doute, saluant l’émergence d’une « nouvelle fierté nationale », saluant « un nouveau chapitre de la grandeur américaine (qui) débute », plaidant pour un « renouveau de l’esprit américain » indissociable, selon lui, d’une grande fermeté sur l’immigration, l’un des thèmes qu’il a le plus développés lors de son intervention.

Au cours de son discours, qu’il a voulu rassembleur, il a également à plusieurs reprises salué la présence de « témoins » dans l’assistance, auxquels il a rendu hommage, chacun venant incarner un chapitre de la politique qu’il entendait mettre en œuvre : une personne ayant subi une agression de la part d’un immigré en situation irrégulière sur le sol américain, les parents de policiers tués dans leur mission…

Hommage unanime à la veuve d’un soldat tué au Yémen

Ou encore la veuve du soldat Ryan Owens, membre des forces spéciales américaines, tué le 29 janvier dernier au cours d’une opération au Yémen. Assise aux côtés d’Ivanka Trump, fille du président, Carryn Owens, émue aux larmes a été longuement ovationnée par l’ensemble du congrès, offrant à cette cérémonie un moment d’unité nationale inédit depuis la prise de fonction de Donald Trump.

Sur le fond, le 45e président américain a repris nombre de ses thèmes favoris, promettant en particulier de ramener « des millions d’emplois » aux Américains ou dénonçant les accords de libre-échange. Il a fait peu de nouvelles annonces, et est resté pour l’heure en deçà des attentes sur ce que seraient véritablement ses priorités, ainsi que le financement de ses différentes mesures. Le discours, sur ce plan, s’annonce comme un prélude à la bataille pour le budget 2018 qui s’ouvre au Congrès, où les alliés républicains du président sont majoritaires.

Les premiers mots de son discours ont rendu hommage aux « célébrations du mois de l’Histoire des Noirs » et ont donné au président l’occasion de condamner solennellement « les dernières menaces en date visant des centres de la communauté juive et le vandalisme contre des cimetières juifs ». Il a également dénoncé une attaque raciste visant deux ressortissants indiens, dont l’un a été tué, une semaine plus tôt dans le Kansas.

Un effort de « reconstruction nationale »

Sur le plan économique, Donald Trump a énoncé deux principes qui reprennent ceux de son discours du 20 janvier : « achetez américain, engagez américain ». Il est revenu pour s’en féliciter sur les annonces d’investissement aux États-Unis de la part de plusieurs constructeurs automobiles, qui doivent selon lui mener à la création de nombreux emplois. Il a aussi salué la reprise des travaux des oléoducs Keystone XL et Dakota Access Pipeline.

Il en a également appelé à un effort de « reconstruction nationale » : « Pour lancer la reconstruction du pays, je vais demander au Congrès d’approuver une législation qui déclenchera des investissements de mille milliards de dollars pour les infrastructures aux États-Unis, financés grâce à des capitaux à la fois publics et privés, et créera des millions d’emplois », a-t-il déclaré, non sans déplorer que son pays ait dépensé jusqu’ici « des milliards et des milliards de dollars à l’étranger ».

Donald Trump a également évoqué son projet de réforme fiscale sans s’appesantir : « Notre équipe économique est en train de préparer une réforme fiscale historique qui réduira le montant des impôts de nos entreprises pour qu’elles puissent concurrencer n’importe qui et prospérer n’importe où et avec n’importe qui. En même temps, nous réduirons de manière massive les impôts pour la classe moyenne. » « Nous devons faire en sorte qu’il soit plus facile pour nos entreprises de faire des affaires aux États-Unis et plus difficile pour elles de partir », a-t-il aussi martelé.

Il a aussi demandé au Congrès de promulguer une loi afin de remplacer l’Obamacare, la loi sur la santé emblématique de Barack Obama, appelant de ses vœux « des réformes qui étendront le choix, donneront un meilleur accès (aux soins) et réduiront les coûts ».

Immigration : un système « basé sur le mérite »

Le président américain a abordé le sujet de l’immigration, un thème sur lequel il était très attendu, d’autant que, peu avant son allocution, lors d’une rencontre avec des journalistes de télévision à la Maison-Blanche, il avait provoqué la surprise en évoquant la possibilité d’une loi de régularisation pour les sans-papiers n’ayant pas commis de délit.

Il n’en a toutefois pas été question lors du discours au Congrès, du moins pas ouvertement. Mais Donald Trump a évoqué une réforme législative et proposé d’abandonner le système actuel, pour adopter à la place « un système basé sur le mérite ».

« Je pense qu’une réelle réforme positive de l’immigration est possible, pour autant que nous nous concentrons sur les objectifs suivants : améliorer l’emploi et les salaires des Américains, renforcer la sécurité de notre pays et restaurer le respect de nos lois », a-t-il aussi déclaré, confirmant par la même occasion son intention de construire un mur à la frontière avec le Mexique, ainsi que l’imminence d’un nouveau décret après l’échec du premier, bloqué par la justice.

Sur ce thème de l’immigration, il a encore annoncé la création d’un bureau spécial pour les victimes de crimes « d’immigration », baptisé VOICE (Victims Of Immigration Crime Engagement). « Nous donnons une voix à ceux qui sont ignorés par les médias et réduits au silence par les intérêts particuliers », a affirmé Donald Trump dans une de ses rares piques hostiles aux médias.

« Représenter les États-Unis d’Amérique » plutôt que « le monde »

Enfin, Donald Trump est revenu sur sa demande au Congrès, annoncée la veille, de valider une hausse des dépenses militaires de 54 milliards de dollars. Il a toutefois précisé que son rôle n’était pas « de représenter le monde mais de représenter les États-Unis d’Amérique ». Sans donner de précision sur sa politique étrangère, il a prôné « l’harmonie et la stabilité », plutôt que « des guerres et des conflits », et réaffirmé son attachement à l’Otan, mis en doute par des déclarations antérieures évoquant obsolescence de l’Alliance.

Les représentants démocrates sont restés pour la plupart assis dans leurs sièges, visage fermé et bras croisés après ce discours. En signe de protestation silencieuse, une quarantaine d’élues démocrates s’étaient habillées en blanc, la couleur symbolisant la défense des droits des femmes.

La chaîne d’information CNN a pour sa part publié un sondage peu après le discours : une majorité de téléspectateurs y ont réagi positivement.

Voir aussi:
The Metaphysics of Trump
 Paradox: How does a supposedly bad man appoint good people eager to advance a conservative agenda that supposedly more moral Republicans failed to realize?
Victor Davis Hanson
National Review
February 28, 2017

We variously read that Trump should be impeached, removed, neutralized — or worse. But until he is, are his appointments, executive orders, and impending legislative agenda equally abhorrent? General acclamation followed the Trump appointments of retired Generals H. R. McMaster as national-security adviser, James Mattis as defense secretary, and John Kelly to head Homeland Security. The brief celebration of Trump’s selections was almost as loud as the otherwise daily denunciations of Trump himself. Trump’s equally inspired decisions, such as the nomination of Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court and Jeff Sessions as attorney general, presented the same ironies.

Most of these and other fine appointments came amid a near historic pushback against Trump, mostly over what he has said rather than what he’s done. But again, do the appointments create a dilemma for his existential critics who have gone beyond the traditional media audit of a public official and instead descended into calls for his removal — or worse?

Indeed, removal chic is now widespread, as even conservatives ponder impeachment, invoking the 25th Amendment for mental unfitness, while the more radical (here and abroad and both Right and Left) either abstractly or concretely ponder a coup or some other road to his demise.

How do his opponents square such excellent appointments with Trump himself? Even bad people can occasionally do good?

Are his Cabinet secretaries patriotically (as I believe) serving their president, even if prepared at times to nudge him away from what they might feel are occasional unwise detours? Appointees of the caliber of a Mattis, McMaster, or Kelly do not go to work for any president with the likelihood of becoming undercover actors — undercutting his authority, or posing to the press that they are the moral superior to their boss, or leaking information to massage favorable accounts of their superior savvy or morality at the president’s expense. No, they serve the president because they want their country to prosper and think that it can if their commander in chief (whose agendas for the most part they share) is successful.

Or do critics argue that such fine men and women are “selling out” by putting careers before principled resistance to a president who will supposedly usher in unprecedented disasters? So far, even the most vehement Trump censors have not faulted these fine appointees for supposedly being soiled by association with Trump, whom they have otherwise accused, in varying degrees, of partaking of fascism, Stalinism, and Hitlerism.

Again, the point is, How do critics square the circle of damning Trump as singularly unfit while simultaneously praising his inspired appointees, who, if they were to adopt a similar mindset, would never set foot in a Trump White House? How does someone so unqualified still manage to listen to advice or follow his own instincts to appoint so many willing, gifted public servants — at a time, we are told, when nearly the entire diplomatic and security establishment in Washington refuses to work for such a reprobate?

The same disconnect holds true for Trump’s executive orders. Except for the rocky rollout of the temporary ban on immigration — since rectified and reformulated — his executive orders seem inspired and likely to restore the rule of law, curb endless and burdensome new regulations, address revolving-door ethics, enhance the economy, halt federal bloat, promote energy production, and create jobs. Without the Trump victory, the Paul Ryan agenda — radical tax reform and deregulation — that has been comatose for a decade would never have become viable. So, is the position of the conservative rejectionists something like the following: “I detest Trump because even his positive agendas are spoiled by his sponsorship?”

Or do they reason that because his views deviate from free-market economics (when he jawbones companies and aims to renegotiate bilateral rather than multi-country trade deals, or use quid pro quo import taxes), so too his otherwise conservative positions on social issues, school choice, Obamacare’s repeal, defense spending, and tax reform are likewise suspect or irrelevant? Of course, his leftist critics face no such dilemmas and are far more consistent: They hate the Trump the man, and they hate Trump’s initiatives, and the two to them are inseparable and logical consequences of each other.

I thought that both Bush presidents were fine and good men and their agendas far preferable to the alternative. But was either in a political position to effect (or perhaps even willing to embrace) the sort of conservative change that the supposedly “not a conservative” Trump might well attempt? That irony too raises another metaphysical question: Does the Trump moment come despite or because of his take-no-prisoners rhetorical style?

In some sense (to adopt a taboo military metaphor) is Trump a sort of shaped charge? That is, is Trump’s combative coarseness the radiant outer shell that is necessary to melt through the deep state and bureaucratic armor so that the inner explosive of a conservative revolutionary agenda may reach its target intact? Given the hysterical and entrenched opposition, I’m not sure that John McCain or Mitt Romney would have enforced immigration law, frozen government hiring, or embraced Reagan-like tax and regulatory reform, although to be sure, McCain and Romney would have avoided Trump’s rhetorical excesses, his Twitter storms, and his occasional coarseness.

Which should properly be more exasperating: Trump’s over-the-top rhetoric that accompanies a possibly revolutionary and realized conservative agenda, or McCain and Romney’s sober and judicious failures at pushing a mostly Bush-like agenda? By not fighting back in take-no-prisoner terms, both Republican candidates failed, ensuring eight years of Obama — years that in my view have done far more damage to the country than anything envisioned by Trump’s first administration.

Even conservatives sometimes seem more bothered by Trump’s raw uncouthness in service to a conservative agenda than they were by Obama’s sautéed orneriness in advancing progressive hope and change. Years of the Cairo Speech, the apology tours, the Iran deal, the Iraq pullout, Obamacare, record debt and low growth — editorialized by chronic attacks on Fox News, along with “you didn’t build that,” “punish our enemies,” and “I won” putdowns from Obama — never prompted calls for the 25th Amendment like those in some anti-Trump tweets. Is the difference predicated on class, accent, education, tone, appearance, tastes, comportment, or the idea that a shared Beltway culture trumps diverse politics? If a polished and now-president Marco Rubio had the same agendas as Trump, but avoided his rhetoric and bluster, would anti-Trump conservatives be pro-Rubio? And would Rubio’s personality and cunning have ensured his election and confidence in steamrolling such an agenda through the Congress?

I don’t have easy answers to any of these paradoxes but will only suggest that in the last 40 years, despite three different Republican administrations, frequent GOP control of the House and Senate, and ostensible Republican majorities on the Supreme Court, the universities have eroded, the borders have evaporated, the government has grown, the debt has soared, the red–blue divide has intensified, identity politics have become surreal, the nation’s infrastructure has crumbled, the undeniable benefits from globalism have increasingly blessed mostly an entrenched elite, the culture has grown more crass and intolerant, the redistributive deep state has spread, and the middle classes have seen their purchasing power and quality of life either stagnate or decline.

In sum, it is far more difficult in 2017 to enact conservative change than it was 40 years ago — not necessarily because the message is less popular, but because government is far more deeply embedded in our lives, the Left is far more sophisticated in its political efforts to advance a message that otherwise has no real record of providing prosperity and security, and the Right had avoided the bare-knuckles brawling of the Left and instead grown accustomed to losing in a dignified fashion.

To the losers of globalization, the half-employed, and the hopelessly deplorable and irredeemable, lectures from the Republican establishment about reductions in capital-gain taxes, more free-trade agreements, and de facto amnesties, were never going to win the Electoral College the way that Trump did when he used the plural personal pronoun (“We love our miners, farmers, vets”) and promised to jawbone industries to help rust-belt workers.

The final irony? The supposedly narcissistic and self-absorbed Trump ran a campaign that addressed in undeniably sincere fashion the dilemmas of a lost hinterland. And he did so after supposedly more moral Republicans had all but written off the rubes as either politically irrelevant or beyond the hope of salvation in a globalized world. How a brutal Manhattan developer, who thrived on self-centered controversy and even scandal, proved singularly empathetic to millions of the forgotten is apparently still not fully understood.

Presidential Payback for Media Hubris
Victor Davis Hanson
Defining Ideas
Hoover institution
March 2, 2017

Donald Trump conducted a press conference recently as if he were a loud circus ringmaster whipping the media circus animals into shape. The establishment thought the performance was a window into an unhinged mind; half the country thought it was a long overdue media comeuppance.

The media suffer the lowest approval numbers in nearly a half-century. In a recent Emerson College poll, 49 percent of American voters termed the Trump administration “truthful”; yet only 39 percent believed the same about the news media.

Every president needs media audit. The role of journalists in a free society is to act as disinterested censors of government power—neither going on witch-hunts against political opponents nor deifying ideological fellow-travelers.

Sadly, the contemporary mainstream media—the major networks (ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN), the traditional blue-chip newspapers (Washington Post, New York Times), and the public affiliates (NPR, PBS)—have lost credibility. They are no more reliable critics of President Trump’s excesses than they were believable cheerleaders for Barack Obama’s policies.

Trump may have a habit of exaggeration and gratuitous feuding that could cause problems with his presidency. But we would never quite know that from the media. In just his first month in office, reporters have already peddled dozens of fake news stories designed to discredit the President—to such a degree that little they now write or say can be taken at face value.

No, Trump did not have any plans to invade Mexico, as Buzzfeed and the Associated Press alleged.

No, Trump’s father did not run for Mayor of New York by peddling racist television ads, as reported by Sidney Blumenthal.

No, there were not mass resignations at the State Department in protest of its new leaders, as was reported by the Washington Post.

No, Trump’s attorney did not cut a deal with the Russians in Prague. Nor did Trump indulge in sexual escapades in Moscow. Buzzfeed again peddled those fake news stories.

No, a supposedly racist Trump did not remove the bust of Martin Luther King Jr. from the White House, as a Time Magazine reporter claimed.

No, election results in three states were not altered by hackers or computer criminals to give Trump the election, as implied by New York Magazine.

No, Michael Flynn did not tweet that he was a scapegoat. That was a media fantasy endorsed by Nancy Pelosi.

In fact, Daniel Payne of the Federalist has compiled a lengthy list of sensational stories about Trump’s supposed buffooneries, mistakes, and crudities that all proved either outright lies or were gross exaggerations and distortions.

We would like to believe writers for the New York Times or Washington Post when they warn us about the new president’s overreach. But how can we do so when they have lost all credibility—either by colluding with the Obama presidency and the Hillary Clinton campaign, or by creating false narratives to ensure that Trump fails?

Ezra Klein at Vox just wrote a warning about the autocratic tendencies of Donald Trump. Should we believe him? Perhaps not. Klein was the originator of Journolist, a “left-leaning” private online chat room of journalists that was designed to coordinate media narratives that would enhance Democratic politicians and in particular Barack Obama. Such past collusion begs the question of whether Klein is really disinterested now in the fashion that he certainly was not during the Obama administration.

Recently, New York Times White House correspondent Glenn Thrush coauthored a report about initial chaos among the Trump White House staff, replete with unidentified sources. Should we believe Thrush’s largely negative story?

Perhaps. But then again, Thrush not so long ago turned up in the Wikileaks troves as sending a story to Hillary Clinton aide John Podesta for prepublication audit. Thrush was his own honest critic, admitting to Podesta: “Because I have become a hack I will send u the whole section that pertains to u. Please don’t share or tell anyone I did this Tell me if I f**ked up anything.”

Dana Milbank of the Washington Post has become a fierce critic of President Trump. Are his writs accurate? Milbank also appeared in Wikileaks, asking the Democratic National Committee to provide him with free opposition research for a negative column he was writing about candidate Trump. Are Milbank’s latest attacks his own—or once again coordinated with Democratic researchers?

The Washington Post censor Glenn Kessler posted the yarn about Trump’s father’s racist campaign for New York mayor—until he finally fact-checked his own fake news and deleted his tweet.

Sometimes the line between journalism and politicians is no line at all. Recently, former Obama deputy National Security advisor Ben Rhodes (brother of CBS news president David Rhodes) took to Twitter to blast the Trump administration’s opposition to the Iran Deal, brokered in large part by Rhodes himself. “Everything Trump says here,” Rhodes stormed, “is false.”

Should we believe Rhodes’s charges that Trump is now lying about the details of the Iran Deal?

Who knows, given that Rhodes himself not long ago bragged to the New York Times of his role in massaging reporters to reverberate an administration narrative: “We created an echo chamber They were saying things that validated what we had given them to say.” Rhodes also had no respect for the very journalists that he had manipulated: “The average reporter we talk to is 27 years old, and their only reporting experience consists of being around political campaigns. That’s a sea change. They literally know nothing.”

Is Rhodes now being disinterested or once again creating an “echo chamber”?

His boss, former UN Ambassador and National Security Advisor in the Obama administration, Susan Rice (married to Ian Cameron, a former producer at ABC news), likewise went on Twitter to blast the Trump administration’s decision to include presidential advisor Steven Bannon in meetings of the National Security Council: “This is stone cold crazy,” Rice asserted, “After a week of crazy.”

Is Rice (who has no military experience) correct that the former naval officer Bannon has no business participating in such high strategy meetings?

In September 2012, Rice went on television on five separate occasions to insist falsely to the nation that the attacks on the Benghazi consulate were the work of spontaneous rioters and not a preplanned hit by an al Qaeda franchise. Her own quite crazy stories proved a convenient administration reelection narrative of Al Qaeda on the run, but there were already sufficient sources available to Rice to contradict her false news talking points.

There are various explanations for the loss of media credibility.

First, the world of New York and Washington DC journalism is incestuous. Reporters share a number of social connections, marriages, and kin relationships with liberal politicians, making independence nearly culturally impossible.

More importantly, the election in 2008 of Barack Obama marked a watershed, when a traditionally liberal media abandoned prior pretenses of objectivity and actively promoted the candidacy and presidency of their preferred candidate. The media practically pronounced him god, the smartest man ever to enter the presidency, and capable of creating electric sensations down the legs of reporters. The supposedly hard-hitting press corps asked Obama questions such as, “During these first 100 days, what has …enchanted you the most from serving in this office? Humbled you the most…?”

Obama, as the first African-American president—along with his progressive politics that were to the left of traditional Democratic policies—enraptured reporters who felt disinterested coverage might endanger what otherwise was a rare and perhaps not-to-be-repeated moment.

We are now in a media arena where there are no rules. The New York Times is no longer any more credible than talk radio; CNN—whose reporters have compared Trump to Hitler and gleefully joked about his plane crashing—should be no more believed than a blogger’s website. Buzzfeed has become like the National Inquirer.

Trump now communicates, often raucously and unfiltered, directly with the American people, to ensure his message is not distorted and massaged by reporters who have a history of doing just that. Unfortunately, it is up to the American people now to audit their own president’s assertions. The problem is not just that the media is often not reliable, but that it is predictably unreliable. It has ceased to exist as an auditor of government. Ironically the media that sacrificed its reputation to glorify Obama and demonize Trump has empowered the new President in a way never quite seen before. At least for now, Trump can say or do almost anything he wishes without media scrutiny—given that reporters have far less credibility than does Trump.

Trump is the media’s Nemesis—payback for its own hubris.

As soon as President Trump began fielding press questions, liberal reporters started developing a new pastime: balking at their conservative counterparts for lobbing « softball questions. » But a quick review of the record reveals that journalism’s strike zone has narrowed suddenly and significantly. The mainstream media certainly wasn’t pitching heat during President Barack Obama’s first couple press conferences.

While some straight-laced newspapermen threw fastballs, plenty of reporters from well-respected outlets were more than happy to let the Democratic president tee-off. Anyone who doubts that should rewind the highlights from Obama’s early months in office.

When Obama called on Jeff Zeleney back in May 2009, the New York Times reporter didn’t get the president on the record about the state of national security or the worsening fiscal crisis. Instead, the writer wondered if the leader of the free world felt magical.

« During these first 100 days, » he asked, « what has surprised you the most about this office? Enchanted you the most from serving in this office? Humbled you the most? And troubled you the most? »

More than happy to oblige, Obama hammered the four-point question. But the press didn’t balk. They were enthralled. And for the next eight years, that episode would repeat itself again and again.

Even after Democrats got hammered in the 2010 midterms, the rigor of questions didn’t improve. Instead, respected journalists from respectable outlets kept up their game of soft toss. Normally, the press is supposed to be a bit adversarial with their sources. But Carry Bohan of Reuters was downright congratulatory about a bipartisan tax deal forged with Republicans.

« You racked up a lot of wins in the last few weeks that a lot of people thought would be difficult to come by, » Bohan asked Obama. « Are you ready to call yourself the ‘comeback kid?' »

Sometimes, the press openly batted for Democrats. During the 2011 Republican primary, CNN White House correspondent Dan Lothian asked Obama if he thought the GOP candidates were « uninformed, out of touch, or irresponsible. »

Only when Obama headed for the exit did it seem like journalists really started to dig deep. Before Trump set up shop in the Oval Office, the press corps went on the offensive. During Obama’s final presser, six of the eight questions were about Obama’s successor.

If hatred of Trump is rooted in class rather than ideology, more civility from the president will undo the ‘resistance.’

Jonathan S. Tobin
The Weekly standard
March 2, 2017

Terrorisme: Attention, un aveuglement peut en cacher un autre (Rhetorical tricks aside, the reality is that during Obama’s tenure scores of innocent Americans have been murdered on U.S. soil by jihadists, mostly inspired by or acting under the direction of foreign terror groups)

26 février, 2017
https://pibillwarner.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/26581-terrorthreatsnapshot_sept_website.png?w=450&h=428https://counterjihadnews.files.wordpress.com/2016/02/terrorthreatsnapshot_february_social-media-862x1024.png?w=450&h=535
https://i2.wp.com/inhomelandsecurity.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Terror-threat-snapshot-December.jpghttps://infogram.io/p/dea9a0118ed0319648c2609ed7d0088a.png
https://swedishsurveyor.files.wordpress.com/2014/11/immigrationeurope.jpg?w=451&h=353
https://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/pics/932.jpg
Daech dispose d’équipements militaires nombreux, rustiques mais aussi lourds et sophistiqués. Plus que d’une mouvance terroriste, nous sommes confrontés à une véritable armée encadrée par des militaires professionnels. Quel est le docteur Frankenstein qui a créé ce monstre ? Affirmons-le clairement, parce que cela a des conséquences : ce sont les États-Unis. Par intérêt politique à court terme, d’autres acteurs – dont certains s’affichent en amis de l’Occident – d’autres acteurs donc, par complaisance ou par volonté délibérée, ont contribué à cette construction et à son renforcement. Mais les premiers responsables sont les Etats-Unis. Général Vincent Desportes (17.12.2014)
We should take great pride in the progress that we’ve made over the last eight years. That’s the bottom line. No foreign terrorist organization has successfully planned and executed an attack on our homeland. (…) The most deadly attacks on the homeland over the last eight years have not been carried out by operatives with sophisticated networks or equipment directed from abroad. “They’ve been carried out by home-grown and largely isolated individuals who were radicalized online. Barack Hussein Obama (MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa, Fla., Dec. 6, 2016)
L’Amérique est un endroit meilleur et plus fort qu’il ne l’était quand nous avons commencé. (…) Si je vous avais dit il y a huit ans que l’Amérique renverserait une grande récession, redémarrerait notre industrie automobile et entammerait la plus longue période de création d’emplois de notre histoire … si je vous avais dit que nous ouvririons un nouveau chapitre avec le peuple cubain , que nous fermerions le programme d’armes nucléaires de l’Iran sans tirer un coup de feu, et tuer le cerveau des attentats du 9/11 … si je vous avais dit que nous gagnerions l’égalité au mariage et le droit à l’assurance maladie pour 20 millions de nos concitoyens – Vous auriez pu dire que nos objectifs étaient un peu trop élevés. (…) Les relations raciales sont meilleures qu’avant, croyez-moi, mais nous se sommes pas encore où nous devons être. (…) En raison de l’extraordinaire courage de nos hommes et de nos femmes en uniforme, des officiers du renseignement, des forces de l’ordre et des diplomates qui les soutiennent, aucune organisation terroriste étrangère n’a planifié et exécuté avec succès une attaque dans notre pays ces huit dernières années. Et bien que Boston et Orlando nous rappellent à quel point la radicalisation peut être dangereuse, nos forces de l’ordre sont plus efficaces et plus vigilantes que jamais. Barack Hussein Obama (Chicago, 10.01.2017)
Regardez ce qui se passe en Allemagne, regardez ce qui s’est passé hier soir en Suède. La Suède, qui l’aurait cru ? La Suède. Ils ont accueilli beaucoup de réfugiés, et maintenant ils ont des problèmes comme ils ne l’auraient jamais pensé. Donald Trump
La sécurité nationale commence par la sécurité aux frontières. Les terroristes étrangers ne pourront pas frapper l’Amérique s’ils ne peuvent entrer dans notre pays. Regardez ce qui se passe en Europe! Regardez ce qui passe en Europe! J’adore la Suède mais les gens là-bas comprennent que j’ai raison. J’ai un ami, c’est quelqu’un de très très important. Il adore la Ville lumière. Pendant des années, tous les étés, il allait à Paris, avec sa femme et sa famille. Je ne l’avais pas vu depuis longtemps et j’ai dit “Jim, comment va Paris?”; “Je n’y vais plus. Paris n’est plus Paris. Il n’aurait jamais raté une occasion. Aujourd’hui, il n’envisage même plus d’y aller. Donald Trump
Je ne ferai pas de comparaison, mais ici il n’y a pas de circulation d’armes, il n’y a pas de personnes qui prennent des armes pour tirer dans la foule. François Hollande
Examinant mon passeport, il relève que j’ai bénéficié récemment d’un visa « J1 », accordé notamment aux universitaires. J’ai été, en effet, professeur invité à l’Université Columbia de New York, de septembre 2016 à janvier 2017. Il conclut que je suis donc revenu travailler « illégalement » avec un visa expiré. J’ai beau expliquer que ma situation n’a rien d’anormal, sinon l’université n’aurait pas pu m’inviter, rien n’y fait. N’étant pas en possession d’un document fédéral m’autorisant à travailler aux États-Unis, je suis en infraction. La décision sera confirmée plus tard par son supérieur hiérarchique – que je n’aurai pas la possibilité de rencontrer. (…) Vers 21h, il reste une demi-douzaine de personnes, somnolentes et inquiètes, un Africain ne parlant pas bien l’anglais, les autres sans doute d’origine latino-américaine. Je suis apparemment le seul Européen – le seul « blanc ». Arrivent alors deux officiers de police. Ils se dirigent vers le monsieur assis devant moi, peut-être un Mexicain, bien mis de sa personne. Ils lui montrent un billet d’avion et lui disent qu’ils vont l’emmener. Invité à se lever, il est alors menotté, enchaîné à la taille, et entravé aux chevilles. Je n’en crois pas mes yeux. Des images d’esclaves me traversent l’esprit: la policière qui lui met les fers aux pieds est une Africaine-Américaine, vaguement gênée. J’imagine le temps qu’il va mettre pour rejoindre la porte d’embarquement. Je me demande surtout si c’est le même sort qui nous attend. Je préfère croire que lui a commis un délit sérieux. J’apprendrai par la suite que « c’est la procédure ». Cette façon de faire – proprement indigne – serait exigée par les compagnies aériennes. Je ne suis pas sûr, au demeurant, que les conditions d’expulsion soient plus humaines chez nous.A 1h 30 du matin – cela fait plus de 26 heures que j’ai quitté mon domicile parisien – je vois une certaine agitation. Une policière vient vers moi et me demande quelle est ma destination finale aux États-Unis et si quelqu’un m’attend à l’aéroport. (…) Quelques minutes plus tard, un policier au ton cette fois amical me rend mon téléphone et mon passeport, dûment tamponné, et me déclare autorisé à entrer aux États-Unis. Les restrictions qui m’ont été imposées sont levées, ajoute-t-il, sans que je puisse savoir ce qui va rester dans leurs fichiers. Il m’explique que le fonctionnaire qui a examiné mon dossier était « inexpérimenté » et ne savait pas que certaines activités, dont celles liées à la recherche et à l’enseignement, bénéficiaient d’un régime d’exception et pouvaient parfaitement être menées avec un simple visa touristique. « Il ne savait pas ». Abasourdi, je lui demande, ou plutôt je déclare que c’était donc une erreur. Il ne me répond pas. Il me laisse simplement entendre qu’ayant, lui, une longue expérience, il a vu le problème en prenant son poste en début de nuit. Il aura l’amabilité de me raccompagner à la sortie d’un aéroport totalement désert, m’indiquant l’adresse d’un hôtel dans la zone portuaire. À aucun moment, ni lui, ni ses collègues ne se sont excusés. En réalité, ma libération n’a rien eu de fortuit. Elle est la conséquence de l’intervention de mon collègue auprès du président de l’université Texas A & M, d’une professeure de droit chargée des questions d’immigration, et de plusieurs avocats. Sans eux, j’aurais été conduit menotté, enchaîné, et entravé à l’embarquement pour Paris. Historien de métier, je me méfie des interprétations hâtives. Cet incident a occasionné pour moi un certain inconfort, difficile de le nier. Je ne peux, cependant, m’empêcher de penser à tous ceux qui subissent ces humiliations et cette violence légale sans les protections dont j’ai pu bénéficier. J’y pense d’autant plus que j’ai connu l’expulsion et l’exil dans mon enfance. Pour expliquer ce qui s’est passé, j’en suis rendu aux conjectures. Pourquoi le contrôle aléatoire est-il tombé sur moi? Je ne le sais pas mais ce n’est pas le fruit du hasard. Mon « cas » présentait un problème avant même l’examen approfondi de mon visa. Peut-être est-ce mon lieu de naissance, l’Egypte, peut-être ma qualité d’universitaire, peut-être mon récent visa de travail expiré, pourtant sans objet ici, peut-être aussi ma nationalité française. Peut-être aussi le contexte. Quand bien même aurais-je commis une erreur, ce qui n’est pas le cas, cela méritait-il pareil traitement? Comment expliquer ce zèle, évident, de la part du policier qui m’a examiné et de son supérieur hiérarchique sinon par le souci de faire du chiffre et de justifier, au passage, ces contrôles accrus? J’étais d’autant plus « intéressant » que je ne tombais pas dans la catégorie habituelle des « déportables ». Telle est donc la situation aujourd’hui. Il faut désormais faire face outre-Atlantique à l’arbitraire et à l’incompétence la plus totale. Je ne sais ce qui est le pire. Ce que je sais, aimant ce pays depuis toujours, c’est que les États-Unis ne sont plus tout à fait les États-Unis. Henry Rousso
La chancelière allemande Angela Merkel et les Premiers ministres des 16 Landers allemands ont conclu jeudi un accord visant à faciliter les expulsions de réfugiés dont la demande d’asile a été rejetée. Les expulsions sont normalement du ressort des landers, mais Merkel souhaite coordonner un certain nombre de choses au niveau fédéral pour accélérer les procédures. Le gouvernement fédéral veut s’accaparer plus de pouvoirs pour refuser des permis de séjour et effectuer lui-même les expulsions. L’un des objectifs centraux du plan en 16 points est de construire un centre de rapatriement à Potsdam (Berlin) qui comptera un représentant pour chaque lander. En outre, il prévoit la création de centres d’expulsion à proximité des aéroports pour faciliter les expulsions collectives. Un autre objectif est de faciliter l’expulsion des immigrants qui présentent un danger pour la sécurité du pays et de favoriser les «retours volontaires» d’autres migrants par le biais d’incitations financières s’ils acceptent de quitter le pays avant qu’une décision ait été prise au regard de leur demande d’asile. Une somme de 40 millions d’euros est consacrée à ce projet. Selon le ministère allemand de l’Intérieur, 280.000 migrants ont sollicité l’asile en Allemagne en 2016. C’est trois fois moins que les 890.000 de l’année précédente, au plus fort de la crise des réfugiés en Europe. Près de 430 000 demandes d’asile sont encore en cours d’instruction. L’Express
When President Trump last week raised Sweden’s problematic experience with open door immigration, skeptics were quick to dismiss his claims. Two days later an immigrant suburb of Stockholm was racked by another riot. No one was seriously injured, though the crowd burned cars and hurled stones at police officers. Mr. Trump did not exaggerate Sweden’s current problems. If anything, he understated them. Sweden took in about 275,000 asylum-seekers from 2014-16—more per capita than any other European country. Eighty percent of those who came in 2015 lacked passports and identification, but a majority come from Muslim nations. Islam has become Sweden’s second-largest religion. In Malmö, our third-largest city, Mohamed is the most common name for baby boys. The effects are palpable, starting with national security. An estimated 300 Swedish citizens with immigrant backgrounds have traveled to the Middle East to fight for Islamic State. Many are now returning to Sweden and are being welcomed back with open arms by our socialist government. In December 2010 we had our first suicide attack on Swedish soil, when an Islamic terrorist tried to blow up hundreds of civilians in central Stockholm while they were shopping for Christmas presents. Thankfully the bomber killed only himself. Riots and social unrest have become a part of everyday life. Police officers, firefighters and ambulance personnel are regularly attacked. Serious riots in 2013, involving many suburbs with large immigrant populations, lasted for almost a week. Gang violence is booming. Despite very strict firearm laws, gun violence is five times as common in Sweden, in total, as in the capital cities of our three Nordic neighbors combined. Anti-Semitism has risen. Jews in Malmö are threatened, harassed and assaulted in the streets. Many have left the city, becoming internal refugees in their country of birth. The number of sex crimes nearly doubled from 2014-15, according to surveys by the Swedish government body for crime statistics. One-third of Swedish women report that they no longer feel secure in their own neighborhoods, and 12% say they don’t feel safe going out alone after dark. A 1996 report from the same government body found that immigrant men were far likelier to commit rape than Swedish men.  (…) Our nation’s culture hasn’t been spared either. Artists accused of insulting Islam live under death threats. Dance performances and art exhibitions have been called off for fear of angering Islamists. Schools have prohibited the singing of traditional Christian hymns because they don’t want to “insult” non-Christian immigrants. Yet reports made with hidden cameras by journalists from Swedish public media show mosques teaching fundamentalist interpretations of Islam. Sweden’s government now spends an incredible amount of money caring for newly arrived immigrants each year. The unemployment rate among immigrants is five times as high as that of native Swedes. Among some groups, such as Somalis, in places like Malmö unemployment reaches 80%. Jimmie Åkesson and Mattias Karlsson
Sweden has the highest rape rate in Europe, author Naomi Wolf said on the BBC’s Newsnight programme recently. (…) The Swedish police recorded the highest number of offences – about 63 per 100,000 inhabitants – of any force in Europe, in 2010. The second-highest in the world. This was three times higher than the number of cases in the same year in Sweden’s next-door neighbour, Norway, and twice the rate in the United States and the UK. It was more than 30 times the number in India, which recorded about two offences per 100,000 people. On the face of it, it would seem Sweden is a much more dangerous place than these other countries. But that is a misconception, according to Klara Selin, a sociologist at the National Council for Crime Prevention in Stockholm. She says you cannot compare countries’ records, because police procedures and legal definitions vary widely. « In Sweden there has been this ambition explicitly to record every case of sexual violence separately, to make it visible in the statistics, » she says. « So, for instance, when a woman comes to the police and she says my husband or my fiance raped me almost every day during the last year, the police have to record each of these events, which might be more than 300 events. In many other countries it would just be one record – one victim, one type of crime, one record. » The thing is, the number of reported rapes has been going up in Sweden – it’s almost trebled in just the last seven years. In 2003, about 2,200 offences were reported by the police, compared to nearly 6,000 in 2010. So something’s going on. But Klara Selin says the statistics don’t represent a major crime epidemic, rather a shift in attitudes. The public debate about this sort of crime in Sweden over the past two decades has had the effect of raising awareness, she says, and encouraging women to go to the police if they have been attacked. The police have also made efforts to improve their handling of cases, she suggests, though she doesn’t deny that there has been some real increase in the number of attacks taking place – a concern also outlined in an Amnesty International report in 2010. « There might also be some increase in actual crime because of societal changes. Due to the internet, for example, it’s much easier these days to meet somebody, just the same evening if you want to. Also, alcohol consumption has increased quite a lot during this period. « But the major explanation is partly that people go to the police more often, but also the fact that in 2005 there has been reform in the sex crime legislation, which made the legal definition of rape much wider than before. » The change in law meant that cases where the victim was asleep or intoxicated are now included in the figures. Previously they’d been recorded as another category of crime. BBC
Comment se fait-il, alors, qu’en 2008, le Danemark, voisin de la Suède, avait seulement 7,3 viols pour cent mille habitants par rapport à 53,2 en Suède ? La législation danoise n’est pas très différente de celle de la Suède et il n’y a aucune raison évidente pour laquelle les femmes danoises auraient moins tendance à signaler un viol que les femmes suédoises. En 2011, six mille cinq cent neuf viols ont été signalés à la police suédoise – mais seulement trois cent quatre vingt douze au Danemark. La population du Danemark est d’environ la moitié de celle de Suède et, même ajustée à ces chiffres, la différence est donc significative. En Suède, les autorités font ce qu’elles peuvent pour dissimuler l’origine des violeurs. Au Danemark, l’Office Statistique Officiel de l’État, Statistics Denmark, a révélé qu’en 2010, plus de la moitié des violeurs condamnés étaient issus de l’immigration. Depuis 2000, il n’y a eu qu’un seul rapport de recherche sur la criminalité des immigrants. Cela a été fait en 2006 par Ann-Christine Hjelm de l’Université Karlstads. Il est apparu que, en 2002, 85% des personnes condamnées à au moins deux ans de prison pour viol par Svea hovrätt, une cour d’appel, étaient nées à l’étranger ou étaient des immigrants de deuxième génération. Un rapport de 1996 du Conseil National Suédois pour la Prévention du Crime est arrivé à la conclusion que les immigrants en provenance d’Afrique du Nord (Algérie, Libye, Maroc et Tunisie) étaient vingt-trois fois plus susceptibles de commettre des viols que les Suédois. Les chiffres pour les hommes venus d’Irak, de Bulgarie et de Roumanie étaient, respectivement de vingt, dix-huit et dix-huit. Les hommes venant du reste de l’Afrique étaient seize fois plus susceptibles de commettre un viol ; et les hommes originaires d’Iran, du Pérou, de l’Équateur et de Bolivie, dix fois plus enclins à en commettre que les Suédois. Une nouvelle tendance a frappé la Suède de plein fouet au cours des dernières décennies : le viol collectif – pratiquement inconnu auparavant dans l’histoire criminelle suédoise. Le nombre de viols collectifs a augmenté de façon spectaculaire entre 1995 et 2006. Depuis lors, aucune étude n’a été faite à ce sujet. L’un des pires cas s’est produit en 2012, quand une femme de trente ans a été violée par huit hommes dans une cité pour demandeurs d’asile, dans la petite ville de Mariannelund. Cette femme était une connaissance d’un Afghan qui avait vécu en Suède pendant un certain nombre d’années. Il l’a invitée à sortir avec lui. Elle avait accepté. Cet Afghan l’avait emmenée dans une cité pour réfugiés et l’y avait laissée, sans défense. Pendant la nuit, elle a été violée à plusieurs reprises par des demandeurs d’asile et quand son « ami » est revenu, il l’a violée aussi. Le lendemain matin, elle a réussi à appeler la police. Le Procureur de la Suède a qualifié cet incident de « pire crime de viol de l’histoire criminelle suédoise. » Gatestone institute
Depuis les Attentats du 11 septembre 2001, la France doit faire face, comme d’autres pays, à une menace plus diffuse et qui n’émane plus d’États bien identifiés. Les attentats les plus récents sont généralement revendiqués par l’État islamique. Eric Denécé évalue à 102 morts le nombre de victimes françaises du terrorisme islamiste entre 2001 et le 5 mai 20156. Les tueries de mars 2012 à Toulouse et Montauban font un total de 8 morts dont l’agresseur. Les attentats de janvier 2015 à Paris et dans sa région (au siège de Charlie Hebdo, à Montrouge, à Dammartin-en-Goële et la prise d’otages du magasin Hyper Cacher de la porte de Vincennes) font un total de 20 morts dont les trois terroristes. Le 19 avril 2015 Sid Ahmed Ghlam assassine Aurélie Châtelain à Villejuif et se blesse avant de pouvoir attaquer plusieurs églises. Le 26 juin 2015, attentat de Saint-Quentin-Fallavier: Yassin Salhi décapite son patron et fait deux blessés. Il se suicide en prison 6 mois plus tard. Lors des attentats du 13 novembre 2015 en France, deux kamikazes font détoner leur ceinture d’explosifs au Stade de France, faisant une victime ; en même temps, diverses fusillades à la Kalachnikov visent des restaurants situés dans le 10e et 11e arrondissements de Paris, suivies d’une nouvelle fusillade puis d’une prise d’otages au Bataclan, qui se soldera après assaut des forces de l’ordre par la mort de 89 otages et des trois terroristes impliqués. Au total, le bilan s’élève à 130 morts et 415 blessés7. Les attentats seront revendiqués par l’État islamique8. Tous les terroristes sont abattus par les forces de l’ordre ou meurent dans ce qui sont les premiers attentats suicides en France, sauf Salah Abdeslam qui sera capturé 4 mois plus tard en Belgique Le 13 juin 2016, un terroriste, Larossi Abballa (Français d’origine marocaine), ayant fait allégeance à l’État islamique perpètre un double meurtre sur des fonctionnaires de police, un commandant et sa compagne, agent administratif, par arme blanche, à leur domicile9. Le bilan est de trois morts, dont l’assassin, abattu lors de l’assaut du RAID. Le couple laisse un jeune enfant. Lors de l’attentat du 14 juillet 2016 à Nice, Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhlel fonce délibérément sur la promenade des Anglais à Nice, au volant d’un poids lourd de 19 tonnes avec lequel il écrase de nombreux passants qui regardaient la fin du feu d’artifice lors de la fête nationale française. L’attentat fait 86 morts et 434 blessés, dont de nombreux enfants. Le terroriste est abattu par la police à bord de son véhicule. Le père Jacques Hamel est égorgé le mardi 26 juillet 2016 lors de l’attentat de l’église de Saint-Étienne-du-Rouvray, ses deux assassins sont abattus par la police alors qu’il sortaient avec des otages. Le 3 février 2017 se déroule une attaque au Musée du Louvre à Paris. Des militaires sont agressés par un homme les attaquant avec deux machettes. L’un d’eux est légèrement blessé et ses camarades neutralisent l’assaillant en ouvrant le feu. Plusieurs projets d’attentats sont déjoués en 2015, notamment contre des églises et des bases militaires10. Le plus spectaculaire est l’attentat du train Thalys le 21 août 2015 où Ayoub El Khazzani est arrêté dans sa tentative par un français et des militaires américains en permission. Une tentative d’attentat de la cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris par des femmes est déjoué en septembre 2016. En 2016, de nombreux projets sont également déjoués dans le pays11. En France, la région parisienne, la région Rhône-Alpes et l’agglomération Roubaix-Tourcoing sont considérées comme des « viviers du terrorisme islamique » selon Claude Moniquet, codirecteur de l’European strategic Intelligence and Security Center. En France, environ 5000 personnes font l’objet d’une fiche « S » (Sûreté de l’État) et la majorité des terroristes de la seconde vague d’attentats qui ont touché la France étaient fichés « S » eux aussi. Wikipedia
Les déclarations controversées de Donald Trump associant immigration et criminalité en Suède ont involontairement ravivé le débat dans le pays scandinave sur les réussites et les échecs de sa politique d’intégration. Deux jours après les propos du président américain samedi en Floride, des émeutes dans un quartier nord de Stockholm où vit une majorité de personnes issues de l’immigration ont semblé mettre en pièces l’argumentaire déployé pour lui répondre. (…) Lundi soir en effet, plusieurs dizaines de jeunes ont affronté les policiers venus procéder à l’arrestation d’un trafiquant de drogue, incendiant des voitures, pillant des commerces. Les forces de l’ordre ont effectué un tir à balles réelles pour se dégager, a indiqué à l’AFP Lars Byström, porte-parole de la police de la capitale. Les images ont fait le tour du monde, brouillant la réponse des autorités suédoises à Donald Trump et à la chaîne Fox News qui a diffusé un reportage sur l’insécurité en Suède dont le président républicain s’était inspiré. Pour Tove Lifvendahl, éditorialiste du quotidien Svenska Dagbladet, il existe bel et bien « une once de vérité dans ce qu’a dit Trump ». « Que cela nous plaise ou non, c’est l’occasion de se demander si la perception que l’étranger a de nous et la perception que nous avons de nous-mêmes coïncident », écrivait-elle mercredi. Les contradicteurs de M. Trump font valoir que la Suède n’a pas connu d’attentat depuis 2010, qu’elle n’enregistre pas d’inflation criminelle depuis l’accueil de 244.000 migrants en 2014 et 2015 –un record en Europe par habitant –, et qu’elle demeure au total un pays parmi les plus sûrs du monde. Parmi les plus riches aussi. Si la Suède n’est pas épargnée par les difficultés de l’intégration, elle est loin de connaître les tensions entre communautés, les inégalités, la pauvreté et la violence à l’oeuvre aux États-Unis, soulignent-ils. Une autre vision met en avant la surreprésentation des personnes d’origine étrangère dans les statistiques de la délinquance, leur sous-activité professionnelle, les règlements de compte, les quelque 300 jeunes partis faire le jihad en Syrie et en Irak, le repli religieux, l’existence présumée de zones de non-droit… (…) Benjamin Dousa, un élu local conservateur d’origine turque, dénonce lui dans une tribune « une émeute par mois, un incendie de voitures par jour et le plus fort taux d’homicides par balles au niveau national » par habitant. En tout état de cause, le président américain a tort de stigmatiser une population en raison de son origine ethnique ou religieuse, estiment les sociologues Susanne Urban et Oskar Adenfelt. La clé de l’intégration est sociale et passe par « l’accès à l’État-providence, aux services sociaux, à l’emploi, à une école de qualité, à la mixité et au droit de peser sur la vie locale », défendaient-ils mercredi dans le grand quotidien Dagens Nyheter. Le Point/AFP

Attention: un aveuglement peut en cacher un autre !

Alors qu’après ses récentes allusions aux problèmes soulevés par l’immigration et le terrorisme islamiques en Europe nos médias se sont dument gaussés de la prétendue ignorance du président Trump …

Inspiré certes pour la Suède d’un reportage quelque peu sensationaliste sur un pays qui, sans compter un attentat-suicide d’un immigré irakien heureusement sans victimes il y a sept ans, tout en ayant apparemment dramatiquement sa définition du viol se trouve avoir ces dernières années le record du nombre de viols comme de migrants par habitant …

Et que refusant toute « comparaison » après, sans parler il y a deux mois ou encore hier en une Allemagne en pleine révision de sa politique migratoire, la quarantaine d’attentats et projets d’attentats islamistes depuis 2012 pour quelque 240 morts et 800 blessés, un président français nous assure qu’ « ici (…) il n’y a pas de personnes qui prennent des armes pour tirer dans la foule »

Pendant qu’apparemment victime du zèle d’un employé inexpérimenté et d’un contrôle de sécurité prolongé à un aéroport américain un mois à peine après un attentat à l’aéroport de Fort Lauderdale ayant fait cinq morts et six blessés, un universitaire français né en Egypte, porteur d’un ancien visa de travail et en route pour une conférence rémunérée se fend d’une tribune entière déplorant avec force « images d’esclaves » que « les États-Unis ne sont plus tout à fait les États-Unis » …

Comment ne pas repenser à un autre président américain

Qui au terme de deux mandats qui, suite à l’abandon d’un Irak alors sécurisé, ont vu pas moins de 124 attentats ou tentatives d’attentats islamiques

Dont une douzaine, entre Little Rock, Fort Hood, Boston, Moore (Oklahoma), Queens, Brooklyn, Garland, Chattanooga, San Bernardino, Orlando, St. Cloud (Minnesota), New York,  Columbus, d’attaques majeures …

Nous annonçait tranquillement il y a un mois qu’ « aucune organisation terroriste étrangère n’a planifié et exécuté avec succès une attaque dans notre pays ces huit dernières années » ?

A Complete List of Radical Islamic Terror Attacks on U.S. Soil Under Obama

James Barrett

Dailywire
December 7, 2016

In a speech at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, Florida on Tuesday, President Obama declared that « [n]o foreign terrorist organization has successfully planned and executed an attack on our homeland. » The claim earned perfunctory applause, but a closer look at the reaction of many of the servicemen and women there made clear what they really thought about the administration’s handling of national security.

The President’s claim — which he has repeated in some form or fashion over the last few years — is an obvious rhetorical attempt to gloss over the reality of the threat of radical Islamic terror on American soil. The attempt to disconnect « lone wolf » terrorists from the terror organizations who often inspire them does nothing to alleviate the pain of those who have suffered at the hands of jihadists and only hurts prevention efforts. Rhetorical tricks aside, the reality is that during Obama’s tenure scores of innocent Americans have been murdered on U.S. soil by jihadists, most of whom were inspired by or acting under the direction of foreign terror groups, particularly the Islamic state.

Below is a list of the major, verifiable radical Islamic terror attacks « successfully planned and executed » on U.S. soil since Obama first took office in 2009 (the first section provided by Daily Wire’s Aaron Bandler):

Little Rock, Arkansas, June 1, 2009. Abdulhakim Mujahid Muhammad shot and murdered one soldier, Army Pvt. William Andrew Long, and injured another, Pvt. Quinton Ezeagwula, at a military recruiting station in Little Rock. Muhammad reportedly converted to Islam in college and was on the FBI’s radar after being arrested in Yemen–a hotbed of radical Islamic terrorism–for using a Somali passport, even though he was a U.S. citizen. In a note to an Arkansas judge, Muhammad claimed to be a member of al-Qaeda in the Arab Peninsula, the terror group’s Yemen chapter.

Fort Hood, Texas, November 5, 2009. Major Nidal Malik Hasan shot up a military base in Fort Hood and murdered 14 people. Hasan was in contact with al-Qaeda terrorist Anwar al-Awlaki prior to the attack and shouted « Allahu Akbar! » as he fired upon the soldiers on the Fort Hood base. After being sentenced to death, Hasan requested to join ISIS while on death row. It took six years for Obama to acknowledge the shooting as a terror attack instead of « workplace violence. »

Boston, Massachusetts, April 15, 2013. Tamerlan and Dhozkar Tsarnaev set off two bombs at the 2013 Boston marathon, killing three and injuring over 260 people. The Tsarnaev brothers later shot and murdered Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer Sean Collier. The Tsarnaev brothers were self-radicalized through online jihadist propaganda and through a mosque with ties to al-Qaeda.

Moore, Oklahoma, September 24, 2014. Alton Nolen beheaded a woman, Colleen Huff, at a Vaughan Foods plant and stabbed and injured another person. While Nolen’s motives are unclear, he appears to have been another radicalized Muslim who was obsessed with beheadings.

Queens, New York, October 23, 2014. Zale Thompson, another self-radicalized Muslim, injured two police officers with a hatchet before being shot dead by other cops. Thompson reportedly indoctrinated himself with ISIS, al-Qaeda and al-Shabab–a Somali jihadist terror group–websites and was a lone wolf attacker.

Brooklyn, New York, December 20, 2014. Ismaayil Brinsley shot and murdered two police officers execution-style and his Facebook page featured jihadist postings and had ties to a terror-linked mosque.

Garland, Texas, May 3, 2015. Two gunmen shot up the Curtis Culwell Center in Garland, where a Mohammed cartoon contest was taking place, and were killed by a police officer. ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack.

Chattanooga, Tennessee, July 16, 2015. Muhammad Youssef Abdulazeez shot and killed four Marines and a sailor at a military base in Chattanooga and was believed to have been inspired by ISIS.

San Bernardino, California, December 14, 2015. Two radical Islamists, Syed Farook and Tashfeen Malik, shot and murdered 14 people and injured 22 others at an office holiday party.

Orlando, Florida, June 12, 2016. Omar Mateen, 29, opened fire at a gay nightclub, killing 49 and injuring 53. The FBI investigated Mateen twice before his rampage, but did not take any substantive action. Officials believe Mateen was self-radicalized but he pledged fealty to ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi before his death. « The real muslims will never accept the filthy ways of the west, » Mateen posted on his Facebook page after committing his heinous act at Pulse nightclub. « I pledge my alliance to (ISIS leader) abu bakr al Baghdadi..may Allah accept me, » he wrote.

St. Cloud, Minnesota, September 17, 2016. Dahir Ahmed Adan, a 20-year-old Somali refugee, began hacking at people with a steak knife at a Minnesota mall, injuring nine people before he was shot dead by off-duty police officer Jason Falconer. The FBI said numerous witnesses heard Adan yelling « Allahu akbar! » and « Islam! Islam! » during the rampage. He also asked potential victims if they were Muslims before inflicting wounds in their heads, necks, and chests. The FBI believe he had recently become self-radicalized. (As the Daily Wire highlighted, the Minneapolis Star Tribune attempted to blame « anti-Muslim tensions » for his murderous actions.)

New York City/New Jersey, September 17, 2016. Ahmad Khan Rahami, a 28-year-old naturalized citizen from Afghanistan, set off multiple bombs in New York and New Jersey. In Chelsea, his bomb resulted in the injury of over 30 people. Rahami wrote in his journal that he was connected to « terrorist leaders, » and appears to have been heavily influenced by Sheikh Anwar, Anwar al-Awlaki, Nidal Hassan, and Osama bin Laden. « I pray to the beautiful wise ALLAH, [d]o not take JIHAD away from me, » Rahami wrote. « You [USA Government] continue your [unintelligible] slaught[er] » against the holy warriors, « be it Afghanistan, Iraq, Sham [Syria], Palestine … « 

Columbus, Ohio, November 28, 2016. Abdul Razak Ali Artan, an ISIS-inspired 20-year-old Somali refugee who had been granted permanent legal residence in 2014 after living in Pakistan for 7  years, attempted to run over his fellow Ohio State students on campus. After his car was stopped by a barrier, he got out of the vehicle and began hacking at people with a butcher knife before being shot dead by a campus police officer. He injured 11 people, one critically. ISIS took credit for the attack, describing Artan as their « soldier. » Just three minutes before his rampage, Artan posted a warning to America on Facebook that the « lone wolf attacks » will continue until America « give[s] peace to the Muslims. » He also praised deceased al-Qaeda cleric Anwar Al-Awlaki as a « hero. »

Voir aussi:

Les États-Unis sont-ils encore les États-Unis?
Il faut désormais faire face outre-Atlantique à l’arbitraire et à l’incompétence la plus totale.
Henry Rousso
Historien, directeur de recherches au CNRS (Institut d’histoire du temps présent)
Le Hugffington Post

26.02.2017

Le 22 février dernier, j’ai atterri vers 14h30 à l’aéroport de Houston, aux États-Unis, en provenance de Paris. Je devais me rendre à un colloque de la Texas A&M University (College Station), où j’ai été invité à plusieurs reprises ces dernières années. Au guichet de l’immigration, une fonctionnaire me refuse l’entrée et m’emmène dans une salle attenante pour contrôle, sans explications. Une trentaine de personnes y attendent que l’on statue sur leur sort. J’observe machinalement une certaine fréquence dans les entrées et sorties. Au bout de trois quarts d’heure, alors que la plupart de ceux qui attendent repartent sans problèmes, un jeune officier de police me demande de le suivre dans un bureau particulier. Commence alors un interrogatoire informel. Je lui demande ce qui me vaut d’être là. Il me répond : « contrôle aléatoire » (random check). Il me demande ce que je viens faire aux États-Unis. Je lui présente alors la lettre d’invitation de l’université. Cette intervention doit-elle être rémunérée ? Je confirme – c’est la règle dans beaucoup universités Nord-américaines. Il m’objecte alors que je n’ai qu’un visa touristique et non un visa spécifique de travail. Je lui réponds que je n’en ai pas besoin, que l’université s’est occupée comme d’habitude des formalités et, surtout, que je fais cela depuis plus de trente ans sans jamais avoir eu le moindre ennui. Son attitude se fait alors encore plus suspicieuse. Examinant mon passeport, il relève que j’ai bénéficié récemment d’un visa « J1 », accordé notamment aux universitaires. J’ai été, en effet, professeur invité à l’Université Columbia de New York, de septembre 2016 à janvier 2017. Il conclut que je suis donc revenu travailler « illégalement » avec un visa expiré. J’ai beau expliquer que ma situation n’a rien d’anormal, sinon l’université n’aurait pas pu m’inviter, rien n’y fait. N’étant pas en possession d’un document fédéral m’autorisant à travailler aux États-Unis, je suis en infraction. La décision sera confirmée plus tard par son supérieur hiérarchique – que je n’aurai pas la possibilité de rencontrer.

On bascule alors dans une autre dimension. Le policier me fait prêter serment et me soumet à un interrogatoire étendu : questions sur mon père, ma mère, ma situation familiale, me posant près d’une dizaine de fois les mêmes questions: qui m’emploie, où j’habite, etc. J’ai la copie du procès-verbal. Il relève toutes mes empreintes digitales, pourtant déjà enregistrées dans le système comme pour tous les visiteurs. Il opère une fouille au corps en règle, malgré mes protestations. « C’est la procédure », me rétorque-t-il. Il m’informe ensuite que je vais être refoulé (deported) et mis dans le prochain avion en partance pour Paris. Il ajoute que je ne pourrai plus jamais entrer dans le pays sans un visa particulier. Je suis stupéfait mais ne peux rien faire sinon prévenir mon collègue de l’université. Le policier me demande si je veux contacter le Consulat de France à Houston. Je réponds par l’affirmative mais c’est lui qui se charge de composer le numéro, plusieurs heures après, aux alentours de 19h, appelant le standard et non le numéro d’urgence, donc sans résultat. Il m’indique également qu’il n’arrive pas à contacter Air France pour mon billet. Cela fait déjà près de cinq heures que je suis détenu et je comprends alors que rien ne se passera avant le lendemain.

Je m’apprête donc à passer encore entre une dizaine ou une vingtaine d’heures installé sur une chaise, sans téléphone – l’usage en est interdit –, avant de pouvoir occuper un fauteuil un peu plus adapté à la situation de personnes ayant effectué un long voyage. Toutes les heures, un fonctionnaire vient nous proposer à boire ou à manger, et nous fait signer un registre comme quoi nous avons accepté ou refusé. Malgré la tension, j’observe ce qui se passe dans ce lieu insolite, à la fois salle d’attente anodine et zone de rétention. Si la plupart des policiers adoptent un ton réglementaire, non discourtois, quelques-uns ricanent discrètement en observant cette population hétéroclite sous leur contrôle. Une policière engueule une femme dont le garçon de trois ans court dans tous les sens. Un homme se lève pour demander ce qu’il en est de sa situation. Trois policiers lui hurlent de s’asseoir immédiatement.

Vers 21h, il reste une demi-douzaine de personnes, somnolentes et inquiètes, un Africain ne parlant pas bien l’anglais, les autres sans doute d’origine latino-américaine. Je suis apparemment le seul Européen – le seul « blanc ». Arrivent alors deux officiers de police. Ils se dirigent vers le monsieur assis devant moi, peut-être un Mexicain, bien mis de sa personne. Ils lui montrent un billet d’avion et lui disent qu’ils vont l’emmener. Invité à se lever, il est alors menotté, enchaîné à la taille, et entravé aux chevilles. Je n’en crois pas mes yeux. Des images d’esclaves me traversent l’esprit: la policière qui lui met les fers aux pieds est une Africaine-Américaine, vaguement gênée. J’imagine le temps qu’il va mettre pour rejoindre la porte d’embarquement. Je me demande surtout si c’est le même sort qui nous attend. Je préfère croire que lui a commis un délit sérieux. J’apprendrai par la suite que « c’est la procédure ». Cette façon de faire – proprement indigne – serait exigée par les compagnies aériennes. Je ne suis pas sûr, au demeurant, que les conditions d’expulsion soient plus humaines chez nous.

L’attente continue, cette fois avec une réelle angoisse. A 1h 30 du matin – cela fait plus de 26 heures que j’ai quitté mon domicile parisien – je vois une certaine agitation. Une policière vient vers moi et me demande quelle est ma destination finale aux États-Unis et si quelqu’un m’attend à l’aéroport. Je réponds avec un début d’énervement – à éviter absolument dans ce genre de situations – que le chauffeur de l’université, qui se trouve à deux heures de route, est sans doute reparti… Elle me prie alors de ne pas me rendormir car je vais être appelé. Quelques minutes plus tard, un policier au ton cette fois amical me rend mon téléphone et mon passeport, dûment tamponné, et me déclare autorisé à entrer aux États-Unis. Les restrictions qui m’ont été imposées sont levées, ajoute-t-il, sans que je puisse savoir ce qui va rester dans leurs fichiers. Il m’explique que le fonctionnaire qui a examiné mon dossier était « inexpérimenté » et ne savait pas que certaines activités, dont celles liées à la recherche et à l’enseignement, bénéficiaient d’un régime d’exception et pouvaient parfaitement être menées avec un simple visa touristique. « Il ne savait pas ». Abasourdi, je lui demande, ou plutôt je déclare que c’était donc une erreur. Il ne me répond pas. Il me laisse simplement entendre qu’ayant, lui, une longue expérience, il a vu le problème en prenant son poste en début de nuit. Il aura l’amabilité de me raccompagner à la sortie d’un aéroport totalement désert, m’indiquant l’adresse d’un hôtel dans la zone portuaire. À aucun moment, ni lui, ni ses collègues ne se sont excusés.

En réalité, ma libération n’a rien eu de fortuit. Elle est la conséquence de l’intervention de mon collègue auprès du président de l’université Texas A & M, d’une professeure de droit chargée des questions d’immigration, et de plusieurs avocats. Sans eux, j’aurais été conduit menotté, enchaîné, et entravé à l’embarquement pour Paris.

Historien de métier, je me méfie des interprétations hâtives. Cet incident a occasionné pour moi un certain inconfort, difficile de le nier. Je ne peux, cependant, m’empêcher de penser à tous ceux qui subissent ces humiliations et cette violence légale sans les protections dont j’ai pu bénéficier. J’y pense d’autant plus que j’ai connu l’expulsion et l’exil dans mon enfance. Pour expliquer ce qui s’est passé, j’en suis rendu aux conjectures. Pourquoi le contrôle aléatoire est-il tombé sur moi? Je ne le sais pas mais ce n’est pas le fruit du hasard. Mon « cas » présentait un problème avant même l’examen approfondi de mon visa. Peut-être est-ce mon lieu de naissance, l’Egypte, peut-être ma qualité d’universitaire, peut-être mon récent visa de travail expiré, pourtant sans objet ici, peut-être aussi ma nationalité française. Peut-être aussi le contexte. Quand bien même aurais-je commis une erreur, ce qui n’est pas le cas, cela méritait-il pareil traitement? Comment expliquer ce zèle, évident, de la part du policier qui m’a examiné et de son supérieur hiérarchique sinon par le souci de faire du chiffre et de justifier, au passage, ces contrôles accrus? J’étais d’autant plus « intéressant » que je ne tombais pas dans la catégorie habituelle des « déportables ». Telle est donc la situation aujourd’hui. Il faut désormais faire face outre-Atlantique à l’arbitraire et à l’incompétence la plus totale. Je ne sais ce qui est le pire. Ce que je sais, aimant ce pays depuis toujours, c’est que les États-Unis ne sont plus tout à fait les États-Unis.

 Voir aussi:
Valeurs actuelles

25 février 2017 

Irrespect. Suite à une nouvelle critique du président américain sur la situation sécuritaire de la France et de sa capitale, François Hollande a de nouveau dérapé. Une faute que la droite n’a pas manqué de souligner.

François Hollande a sans doute la mémoire courte. Alors que Donald Trump citait vendredi “un ami” effrayé par l’insécurité qui règne à Paris, le chef de l’État a tenté de répliquer, samedi 25 février, affirmant qu’en France il “n’y a pas de circulation d’armes, il n’y a pas de personnes qui prennent des armes pour tirer dans la foule”.

“Comment François Hollande peut-il ainsi effacer les victimes ?”

Passablement remontée contre cette réponse fallacieuse, qui fait fi des dizaines de victimes récentes du terrorisme dans l’Hexagone, la droite a confronté le président socialiste à ses incohérences. François Fillon a par exemple rappelé les drames de “Toulouse, Charlie, Bataclan, Nice” et dénoncé un “effacement” des victimes.

Du côté du Front national, Florian Philippot s’est insurgé contre le “manque de respect pour les familles des victimes des attentats” et l’“indécence” du locataire de l’Élysée, quand Nicolas Bay a fustigé un “oubli [des victimes] du Bataclan et de Charlie Hebdo”.

Voir également:

L’effet Trump? La Suède s’interroge sur sa politique d’intégration

Le Point/ AFP

22/02/2017

Voir de même:

Trump Is Right: Sweden’s Embrace of Refugees Isn’t Working

The country has accepted 275,000 asylum-seekers, many without passports—leading to riots and crime.

Jimmie Åkesson and Mattias Karlsson
The Wall Street Journal
Feb. 22, 2017

When President Trump last week raised Sweden’s problematic experience with open door immigration, skeptics were quick to dismiss his claims. Two days later an immigrant suburb of Stockholm was racked by another riot. No one was seriously injured, though the crowd burned cars and hurled stones at police officers.

Mr. Trump did not exaggerate Sweden’s current problems. If anything, he understated them. Sweden took in about 275,000 asylum-seekers from 2014-16—more per capita than any other European country. Eighty percent of those who came in 2015 lacked passports and identification, but a majority come from Muslim nations. Islam has become Sweden’s second-largest religion. In Malmö, our third-largest city, Mohamed is the most common name for baby boys.

The effects are palpable, starting with national security. An estimated 300 Swedish citizens with immigrant backgrounds have traveled to the Middle East to fight for Islamic State. Many are now returning to Sweden and are being welcomed back with open arms by our socialist government. In December 2010 we had our first suicide attack on Swedish soil, when an Islamic terrorist tried to blow up hundreds of civilians in central Stockholm while they were shopping for Christmas presents. Thankfully the bomber killed only himself.

Riots and social unrest have become a part of everyday life. Police officers, firefighters and ambulance personnel are regularly attacked. Serious riots in 2013, involving many suburbs with large immigrant populations, lasted for almost a week. Gang violence is booming. Despite very strict firearm laws, gun violence is five times as common in Sweden, in total, as in the capital cities of our three Nordic neighbors combined.

Anti-Semitism has risen. Jews in Malmö are threatened, harassed and assaulted in the streets. Many have left the city, becoming internal refugees in their country of birth.

The number of sex crimes nearly doubled from 2014-15, according to surveys by the Swedish government body for crime statistics. One-third of Swedish women report that they no longer feel secure in their own neighborhoods, and 12% say they don’t feel safe going out alone after dark. A 1996 report from the same government body found that immigrant men were far likelier to commit rape than Swedish men. Last year our party asked the minister of justice to conduct a new report on crime and immigration, and he replied: “In light of previous studies, I do not see that a further report on recorded crime and individuals’ origins would add knowledge with the potential to improve the Swedish society.”

Our nation’s culture hasn’t been spared either. Artists accused of insulting Islam live under death threats. Dance performances and art exhibitions have been called off for fear of angering Islamists. Schools have prohibited the singing of traditional Christian hymns because they don’t want to “insult” non-Christian immigrants. Yet reports made with hidden cameras by journalists from Swedish public media show mosques teaching fundamentalist interpretations of Islam.

Sweden’s government now spends an incredible amount of money caring for newly arrived immigrants each year. The unemployment rate among immigrants is five times as high as that of native Swedes. Among some groups, such as Somalis, in places like Malmö unemployment reaches 80%.

Our party, the Sweden Democrats, wants to put the security and welfare of Swedish citizens first. We are surging in the opinion polls and seem to have a good chance of becoming the country’s largest party during the elections next year. We will not rest until we have made Sweden safe again.

For the sake of the American people, with whom we share so many strong historical and cultural ties, we can only hope that the leaders in Washington won’t make the same mistakes that our socialist and liberal politicians did.

Mr. Åkesson is party chairman of the Sweden Democrats. Mr. Karlsson is the party’s group leader in Parliament.

Voir par ailleurs:

Hommage national aux victimes du terrorisme: Trois décennies d’attentats en France

Laure Cometti

20 minutes

L’hommage national aux victimes du terrorisme, qui a lieu chaque année le 19 septembre, depuis 1998, prend ce lundi un écho particulier. Depuis janvier 2015, 236 personnes sont mortes dans des attentats en France, sur un total de 271 en trente ans. 20 Minutes revient sur les attaques terroristes perpétrées dans l’Hexagone au cours des trois dernières décennies.

1986

Cette année est marquée par neuf attaques terroristes, dont six sont meurtrières. Elles s’inscrivent dans une vague d’attentats, de décembre 1985 à septembre 1986, dont certains seront imputés au Hezbollah.

Le mois de septembre est particulièrement meurtrier. Le 8, une explosion fait un mort et dix-huit blessés dans le bureau de poste de l’Hôtel de Ville à Paris. Le 12, plus d’une cinquantaine de personnes sont blessées par une bombe placée dans un magasin Casino à la Défense. Le 14, une nouvelle explosion tue deux personnes dans le pub Renault des Champs-Elysées. Le lendemain, c’est la préfecture de police de Paris qui est visée : une bombe fait un mort et 51 blessés. Le 17, ce mois de septembre meurtrier s’achève par un attentat à la bombe devant le magasin Tati de la rue de Rennes, toujours à Paris. Le bilan est de sept morts et une cinquantaine de blessés.

1995

Entre juillet et novembre, l’Hexagone est le théâtre d’une série d’attaques à la bombe imputées à l’organisation terroriste algérienne du Groupe islamique armé (GIA). La seule attaque meurtrière est celle de la station de RER B Saint-Michel à Paris, le 25 juillet. Le bilan est de huit tués et plus d’une centaine de blessés.

Près de Lyon, une bombe est découverte le 26 août sur une ligne de TGV. Les empreintes digitales de Khaled Kelkal sont retrouvées sur l’engin explosif. Le jeune homme, impliqué dans l’attentat de la station Saint-Michel, est abattu par la police le 29 septembre. Arrêté deux jours auparavant, son complice Karim Koussa a été jugé et condamné à de la prison. Deux autres membres du GIA ont été arrêtés le 1er novembre dans le cadre de l’enquête sur cette vague d’attentats, Boualem Bensaïd et Smaïn Aït Ali Belkacem, tous deux jugés et incarcérés.

Le 3 septembre, une bombe blesse quatre personnes sur un marché du boulevard Richard Lenoir à Paris.

Les transports en commun de la capitale sont ciblés à deux autres reprises, sans faire de morts : le 6 octobre à Maison-Blanche (seize blessés) et le 17 octobre dans une rame du RER C, entre les stations Saint-Michel et Quai d’Orsay (une trentaine de blessés).

1996

Le 3 décembre, une explosion tue quatre personnes et en blesse plus de 90 à la station de RER B de Port-Royal. Les auteurs de l’attaque n’ont pas été identifiés.

2000

Le 19 avril, une bombe explose dans un restaurant de la chaîne McDonald’s à Quévert (ôtes-d’Armor), tuant une employée. L’enquête démontrera plus tard que la bombe devait exploser pendant la nuit. Trois hommes appartenant à la mouvance indépendantiste bretonne seront jugés puis acquittés dans cette affaire qui n’a pas été élucidée à ce jour.

2007

Le 6 décembre, un colis piégé explose dans un cabinet d’avocat au 52, boulevard Malesherbes à Paris. La secrétaire du cabinet est tuée sur le coup. L’affaire n’est pas élucidée à ce jour.

2012

En mars, Mohamed Merah tue sept personnes par balle à Toulouse et Montauban. Il s’agit de trois militaires et de  trois élèves et un professeur d’une école juive. Le terroriste islamiste est abattu le 22 mars après une intervention du Raid dans le quartier de Côte Pavée à Toulouse.

2015

Le début de l’année est marquée par la tuerie au siège de Charlie Hebdo. Les frères Saïd et Chérif Kouachi, qui affirment agir au nom de l’organisation Al-Qaida dans la péninsule arabique (Aqpa), abattent le 7 janvier huit membres de la rédaction de l’hebdomadaire, un dessinateur invité à la conférence du journal, deux policiers et un agent de maintenance de l’entreprise Sodexo. Les terroristes sont tués deux jours plus tard à Dammartin-en-Goële.

Le lendemain, une policière municipale est tuée à Montrouge par Amédy Coulibaly qui mènera la prise d’otages du magasin Hypercacher de la Porte de Vincennes, le 9 janvier. Le terroriste, qui se revendique du groupe Etat islamique (EI) dans une vidéo, est abattu après avoir tué un employé et trois clients de la boutique vendant des produits casher.

Le 26 juin, Yassin Salhi décapite son patron sur le site de l’usine AirProducts. Fiché S pour ses liens avec l’islam radical, le présumé coupable s’est suicidé en prison le 23 décembre de la même année.

Le 13 novembre au soir, des attaques simultanées à Saint-Denis et Paris font 130 morts et plus de 400 blessés. Il s’agit des pires attaques terroristes de l’histoire de la France. Tous les auteurs de ces attentats, revendiqués par Daesh, sont morts en kamikazes. Salah Abdeslam, l’unique membre encore vivant des commandos, a été arrêté en le 18 mars 2016 en Belgique et remis à la France où il a été écroué.

2016

Le 13 juin, un policier de Magnanville et sa compagne employée au commissariat de Mantes-la-Jolie (Yvelines) sont assassinés chez eux par  Larossi Abballa, qui avait revendiqué son action sur Twitter et Facebook au nom de Daesh. Le terroriste est abattu par le Raid.

Le soir de la fête nationale, Mohamed Lahouaiej-Bouhlel, au volant d’un camion, fonce dans la foule quelques instants après le feu d’artifice du 14 juillet sur la Promenade des Anglais à Nice. Le bilan est de 86 morts et plus de 300 blessés. L’attaque est revendiquée par Daesh.

Le 26 juillet, un prêtre est tué lors d’une prise d’otages pendant la messe dans une église catholique à Saint-Etienne-du-Rouvray. Les auteurs, deux djihadistes sont abattus par les forces de l’ordre. Cette attaque est aussi revendiquée par Daesh..

Voir de même:

Nordactu.fr

19/07/2016

Alors que le bilan humain de l’attentat de Nice du 14 juillet n’est pas encore définitif, Nord Actu a dressé la liste chronologique des attentats terroristes islamistes qui ont touché la France depuis début 2012, ainsi que les tentatives déjouées par les services de sécurité dont nous avons eu connaissance. La liste des projets d’attentats est donc non-exhaustive, mais permet de se faire une idée sur la quantité d’actions islamistes entreprises depuis 4 ans en France. Le bilan humain provisoire de cette guerre fait état de 254 morts et 684 blessés.

(NDLR: les attentats ayant « abouti » apparaissent en gras)

Attentats de mars 2012 par Mohammed Merah : 8 morts et 6 blessés.

Attentat du 25 mai 2013, un individu tente d’égorger un militaire à la Défense : 1 blessé.

Attentat déjoué en octobre 2013 : Un homme arrêté à Lille après son retour de Syrie.

Attentat déjoué en février 2014 : Le carnaval de Nice.

Attentat déjoué en juillet 2014 : Des lieux chiites à Créteil.

Attentat déjoué en août 2014 : Des synagogues à Lyon.

Attentat déjoué en septembre 2014 : Une réunion du CRIF à Lyon.

Attentat du 20 décembre 2014 à Joué les Tours, un individu attaque le commissariat à l’arme blanche, il est abattu : 1 mort et 3 blessés.

Attentat du 21 décembre 2014 à Dijon, un individu fonce dans la foule avec son véhicule au cri d’ «Allah Ahkbar» : 13 blessés.

Attentat du 22 décembre 2014 à Nantes, modus operandi similaire à l’attaque de Dijon : 1 mort et 10 blessés.

Attentats de janvier 2015 (Charlie hebdo + Montrouge + Hyper Kasher) : 17 morts et 22 blessés.

Attentat du 3 février 2015 à Nice, Moussa Coulibaly attaque des militaires à l’arme blanche : 3 blessés.

Attentat du 19 avril 2015 : Meurtre d’Aurélie Châtelain à Villejuif par Sid Ahmed Ghlam lors du vol de son véhicule devant servir à des actions contre des églises (voir ci-dessous) : 1 mort.

Attentat déjoué en avril 2015 : Une ou plusieurs églises en région parisienne par Sid Ahmed Ghlam (le suspect avait effectué des repérages autour du Sacré Cœur  de Montmartre et de deux églises de Villejuif).

Attentat de Saint-Quentin-Fallavier 26 juin 2015 : 1 mort et 2 blessés.

Attentat déjoué en juillet 2015 : Une base militaire dans les Pyrénées-Orientales.

Attentat du 21 août 2015 (attaque d’un train Thalys entre Bruxelles et Paris) : 3 blessés.

Attentat déjoué en octobre 2015 : Hakim Marnissi voulait attaquer la base navale de Toulon.

Attentat déjoué en octobre 2015 : Arrestation à Fontenay-sous-Bois, Salim et Ahmed M., deux frères « velléitaires pour le jihad syrien » qui ont planifié de s’en prendre à « des militaires, des policiers et/ou des juifs ».

Attentats du 13 novembre 2015 (Bataclan + terrasses de cafés + Stade de France + St Denis) : 137 morts et 413 blessés.

Attentat déjoué en novembre 2015 : Le quartier de la Défense.

Attentat déjoué en décembre 2015 : « Des représentants de la force publique » dans la région d’Orléans. Les deux suspects voulaient s’en prendre notamment au préfet du Loiret et à une centrale nucléaire.

Attentat déjoué en décembre 2015 : Interpellation d’un couple à Montpellier, la femme aurait dû commettre un attentat suicide à l’aide d’un faux-ventre de femme enceinte rempli d’explosifs.

Attentat du 1er janvier 2016 à Valence : un individu fonce sur des militaires avec son véhicule. Il doit être neutralisé par des tirs, un passant est blessé : 3 blessés au total.

Attentat du 7 janvier 2016 au commissariat de la Goutte d’Or à Paris : 1 mort (l’assaillant).

Attentat du 11 janvier 2016 à Marseille, un kurde de 15 ans attaque un enseignant juif à la machette : 1 blessé. Des policiers étaient également visés.

Attentat déjoué en janvier 2016 : Fort Béar dans les Pyrénées orientales, un gradé devait être kidnappé puis décapité. 3 interpellés.

Attentat déjoué du 2 février 2016 : Arrestation à Lyon de 6 individus qui projetaient d’attaquer des « clubs échangistes en France ».

Attentat déjoué du 9 mars 2016 : Un individu radicalisé d’une trentaine d’années a embarqué à l’aéroport de Nantes en direction de Fès. Il a été arrêté au Maroc par les autorités marocaines. Il était en possession de plusieurs armes blanches et une bonbonne de gaz.

Attentat déjoué du 9 mars  2016 : Un franco-algérien a délibérément lancé sa voiture contre la façade d’un commissariat de police à Firminy. D’après Noëlle Deraime, directrice départementale de la sécurité publique, il ne s’agit pas d’un accident.

Attentat déjoué en mars 2016 : 4 jeunes femmes devaient attaquer une salle de concert, deux cafés et un centre commercial à Paris.

Attentat déjoué en mars 2016: Quatre personnes (3 hommes et 1 femme) ont été interpellées par la DGSI dans le XVIIIe arrondissement de Paris ainsi qu’en Seine-Saint-Denis. Elles sont suspectées de s’être préparées à commettre des attentats dans la capitale.

Attentat déjoué en mars 2016 : Arrestation de Rada Kriket à Boulogne Billancourt, d’Anis B. à Rotterdam et d’Abderahmane Ameuroud  à Bruxelles pour « risque imminent d’action terroriste ».

Attentat déjoué le 8 avril 2016: Arrestation de Mohamed Abrini, recherché depuis les attentats du 13 novembre, à Anderlecht. Il révèle que le commando des attentats du 22 mars 2016 à Bruxelles devait à nouveau frapper la France.

Attentat du 24 avril 2016: Un militaire de l’opération Sentinelle est agressé au cutter par un individu tenant des propos en arabe à Strasbourg. L’agresseur prend la fuite et est interpellé le 4 mai 2016. Bilan : 1 blessé.

Attentat contre un couple de policiers du 13 juin 2016 à Magnanville par Larossi Abballa : 3 morts.

Attentat du 14 juin 2016 à Rennes, une lycéenne âgée de 19 ans est agressée à coups de couteau par un homme de 32 ans connu des services de police qui voulait procéder à un « sacrifice » au cours du ramadan, selon ses propres termes. Bilan : 1 blessé.

Attentat déjoué le 16 juin 2016: Un jeune homme de 22 ans arrêté par la DGSI à la gare de Carcassonne en possession d’un couteau et d’une machette projetant un attentat en s’attaquant à des touristes américains et anglais ainsi qu’aux forces de l’ordres et « mourir en martyr ».

Attentat déjoué le 17 juin 2016: À Béziers, un détenu converti à l’islam et radicalisé voulait commettre un attentat contre un club naturiste au Cap d‘Agde car il n’aimait pas les « culs-nus ». L’individu s’est fait allonger sa peine de 6 mois supplémentaires.

Attentat du 14 juillet 2016 à Nice : 84 morts et 202 blessés

Le détail des attentats déjoués en France depuis un an

INFO LE FIGARO – Des projets d’assassinats et d’attentats, visant notamment un centre commercial, une salle de spectacle ou encore une centrale nucléaire, ont été révélés devant la commission d’enquête parlementaire.

«Nous avons tout eu»: le 18 mai, devant la commission d’enquête, le coordonnateur national du renseignement, Didier Le Bret, résume en une formule les multiples attaques, contrecarrées ou non, qui ont visé le pays. Pour la première fois, le rapport de Sébastien Pietrasanta fournit le détail d’une dizaine d’attentats déjoués en France en un an. Certains, comme celui ciblant la base militaire de Port Vendres où trois djihadistes voulaient filmer la décapitation d’un haut gradé ou celui en octobre contre des militaires de la base de Toulon, sont connus. D’autres sont restés plus confidentiels. Ainsi, le document révèle que, le 16 mars, «quatre jeunes femmes, dont trois mineures (…) ont été interpellées à Roubaix, Lyon et Brie-Comte-Robert» alors qu’«elles avaient formé le projet d’attaquer une salle de concert, deux cafés et un centre commercial à Paris».

Ce coup de filet a lieu huit jours avant que la DGSI interpelle Reda Kriket à Boulogne-Billancourt et découvre à Argenteuil une «cache» remplie d’armes de guerre et d’explosifs susceptible de perpétrer une attaque au nom de Daech. Les 15 et 16 décembre dernier, la DGSI arrêtait Rodrigue D. et Karim K., deux terroristes en puissance qui «projetaient de s’attaquer à des militaires et des policiers orléanais». Le rapport dévoile que «tout en minimisant son implication dans ce projet», Karim K. a «reconnu vouloir assassiner le préfet du Loiret et s’attaquer à une centrale nucléaire». Avant de préciser que «les deux mis en cause ont confirmé le rôle d’Anthony D., djihadiste français de l’EI évoluant en Syrie depuis fin 2014, comme soutien financier».

Communications cryptées

Au même moment, la DGSI, toujours elle, appréhendait, à Tours, Issa Khassiev, un Russe d’origine tchétchène «susceptible d’avoir rejoint la Syrie en 2013» et qui envisageait de «réaliser une action violente en France avant de regagner la zone syro-irakienne pour y mourir en martyr». Lors d’une perquisition, celui qui a prêté «allégeance à l’EI» avait «proféré des menaces à l’encontre des fonctionnaires de police présents». Outre le cas d’un radicalisé en prison projetant d’assassiner une députée parisienne interpellé en octobre «après s’être lui-même dénoncé (…)», le document évoque aussi l’arrestation, à Fontenay-sous-Bois, de Salim et Ahmed M., deux frères «velléitaires pour le djihad syrien» qui voulaient s’en prendre à des «militaires, des policiers et/ou des juifs». Ces réussites policières ne peuvent cependant obérer les échecs des attentats de janvier et de novembre qui enseignent que «les terroristes ne relèvent plus d’aucune logique nationale ni dans leur profil ou leur recrutement, ni dans leur mode opératoire et la conception de leurs attaques».

Rappelant que «les commandos ne se sont effectivement rendus sur le territoire français que la veille des attaques, un délai peut-être trop bref pour être repérés par les seuls services français», Sébastien Pietrasanta considère que «cette tactique a également si bien fonctionné parce que les terroristes ont encore accru leur mobilité par une bien plus grande furtivité que par le passé». Le directeur général de la sécurité extérieure, Bernard Bajolet, l’a concédé devant la commission Fenech: «La difficulté à laquelle nous nous heurtons est que ces terroristes sont rompus à la clandestinité et font une utilisation très prudente, très parcimonieuse, des moyens de communication: les téléphones ne sont utilisés qu’une seule fois, les communications sont cryptées et nous ne pouvons pas toujours les décoder.» «Pour connaître leurs projets, il faut avoir des sources humaines directement en contact avec ces terroristes, décrit le patron de la DGSE. Or ces réseaux sont très cloisonnés, ils peuvent recevoir des instructions de caractère général, mais avoir ensuite une certaine autonomie dans la mise en œuvre de la mission qui leur est confiée.» (…). Et le rapporteur Pietrasanta de conclure: «L’explosion des communications électroniques, le développement du darknet, la mise à portée de tous de moyens de communication bénéficiant de puissants chiffrements – telle que l’application de messagerie Telegram – rendent les terroristes plus furtifs aux yeux des services de renseignements et leur imposent d’opérer des sauts capacitaires réguliers.»

Voir de plus:

Sweden’s rape rate under the spotlight

  • 15 September 2012

The Julian Assange extradition case has put Sweden’s relatively high incidence of rape under the spotlight. But can such statistics be reliably compared from one country to another?

Which two countries are the kidnapping capitals of the world?

Australia and Canada.

Official figures from the United Nations show that there were 17 kidnaps per 100,000 people in Australia in 2010 and 12.7 in Canada.

That compares with only 0.6 in Colombia and 1.1 in Mexico.

So why haven’t we heard any of these horror stories? Are people being grabbed off the street in Sydney and Toronto, while the world turns a blind eye?

No, the high numbers of kidnapping cases in these two countries are explained by the fact that parental disputes over child custody are included in the figures.

If one parent takes a child for the weekend, and the other parent objects and calls the police, the incident will be recorded as a kidnapping, according to Enrico Bisogno, a statistician with the United Nations.

Comparing crime rates across countries is fraught with difficulties – this is well known among criminologists and statisticians, less so among journalists and commentators.

Sweden has the highest rape rate in Europe, author Naomi Wolf said on the BBC’s Newsnight programme recently. She was commenting on the case of Julian Assange, the Wikileaks founder who is fighting extradition from the UK to Sweden over rape and sexual assault allegations that he denies.

Is it true? Yes. The Swedish police recorded the highest number of offences – about 63 per 100,000 inhabitants – of any force in Europe, in 2010. The second-highest in the world.

This was three times higher than the number of cases in the same year in Sweden’s next-door neighbour, Norway, and twice the rate in the United States and the UK. It was more than 30 times the number in India, which recorded about two offences per 100,000 people.

On the face of it, it would seem Sweden is a much more dangerous place than these other countries.

But that is a misconception, according to Klara Selin, a sociologist at the National Council for Crime Prevention in Stockholm. She says you cannot compare countries’ records, because police procedures and legal definitions vary widely.

« In Sweden there has been this ambition explicitly to record every case of sexual violence separately, to make it visible in the statistics, » she says.

« So, for instance, when a woman comes to the police and she says my husband or my fiance raped me almost every day during the last year, the police have to record each of these events, which might be more than 300 events. In many other countries it would just be one record – one victim, one type of crime, one record. »

The thing is, the number of reported rapes has been going up in Sweden – it’s almost trebled in just the last seven years. In 2003, about 2,200 offences were reported by the police, compared to nearly 6,000 in 2010.

So something’s going on.

But Klara Selin says the statistics don’t represent a major crime epidemic, rather a shift in attitudes. The public debate about this sort of crime in Sweden over the past two decades has had the effect of raising awareness, she says, and encouraging women to go to the police if they have been attacked.

The police have also made efforts to improve their handling of cases, she suggests, though she doesn’t deny that there has been some real increase in the number of attacks taking place – a concern also outlined in an Amnesty International report in 2010.

« There might also be some increase in actual crime because of societal changes. Due to the internet, for example, it’s much easier these days to meet somebody, just the same evening if you want to. Also, alcohol consumption has increased quite a lot during this period.

« But the major explanation is partly that people go to the police more often, but also the fact that in 2005 there has been reform in the sex crime legislation, which made the legal definition of rape much wider than before. »

The change in law meant that cases where the victim was asleep or intoxicated are now included in the figures. Previously they’d been recorded as another category of crime.

So an on-the-face-of-it international comparison of rape statistics can be misleading.

Botswana has the highest rate of recorded attacks – 92.9 per 100,000 people – but a total of 63 countries don’t submit any statistics, including South Africa, where a survey three years ago showed that one in four men questioned admitted to rape.

In 2010, an Amnesty International report highlighted that sexual violence happens in every single country, and yet the official figures show that some countries like Hong Kong and Mongolia have zero cases reported.

Evidently, women in some countries are much less likely to report an attack than in others and are much less likely to have their complaint recorded.

UN statistician Enrico Bisogno says surveys suggest that as few as one in 10 cases are ever reported to the police, in many countries.

« We often present the situation as kind of an iceberg where really what we can see is just the tip while the rest is below the sea level. It remains below the radar of the law enforcement agencies, » he says.

Naomi Wolf has also written that Sweden has the lowest conviction rate in Europe.

She was relying on statistics from a nine-year-old report, which calculated percentage conviction rates based on the number of offences recorded by the police and the number of convictions. But this is a problematic way of analysing statistics, as several offences could be committed by one person.

The United Nations holds official statistics on the number of convictions for rape per 100,000 people and actually, by that measure, Sweden has the highest number of convictions per capita in Europe, bar Russia. In 2010, 3.7 convictions were achieved per 100,000 population.

Though it’s still the case, as Wolf pointed out to the BBC, that women in Sweden report a high number of offences – and only a small number of rapists are punished.

So there’s a lot that official statistics don’t tell us. They certainly don’t reveal the real number of rapes that happen in Sweden, or any other country. And they don’t give a clear view of which countries have worse crime rates than others.

Rape is particularly complex, but you’d think it would be straightforward to analyse murder rates across different countries – just count up the dead bodies, and compare and contrast.

If only, says Enrico Bisogno. « For example, if I punch somebody and the person eventually dies, some countries can consider that as an intentional murder, others as a manslaughter. Or in some countries, dowry killings are coded separately because there is separate legislation. »

What’s more, a comparison of murder rates between developed and less developed countries may tell you as much about health as crime levels, according to Professor Chris Lewis, a criminologist from Portsmouth University in the UK.

The statistics are to some unknown degree complicated by the fact that you’re more likely to survive an attack in a town where you’re found quickly and taken to a hospital that’s well-equipped.


Histoire: Plus inconnu que le soldat inconnu… le déserteur ! (Dos Passos was right: Book reveals how gangs of AWOL GIs terrorized WWII Paris with a reign of mob-style violence)

23 février, 2017
Glass's study of the very different stories and men grouped together under the label, Deserters

hacksaw-ridgehacksawLife_1
Cela met en lumière ce que cela signifie pour un homme de conviction et de foi de se retrouver dans une situation infernale… et, au milieu de ce cauchemar, cet homme est en mesure d’approfondir sa spiritualité et d’accomplir quelque chose de plus grand. Mel Gibson
Oscars Poll: 60 percent of Americans can’t name one best picture nominee (…) For most of the best picture nominees, Clinton voters were more likely to have seen the various films when compared to Trump voters. The big exception was Hacksaw Ridge, which Trump voters were considerately more likely (27%) than Clinton voters (18%). The Hollywood Reporter
Après les vives polémiques provoquées par La Passion du Christ (2004) puis Apocalypto (2006) (…) Mel Gibson a choisi de mettre en scène Desmond Doss, objecteur de conscience américain, qui tint à aller au front comme infirmier pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale, sans jamais porter d’arme. Les images sanglantes, christiques, cruelles de son film font écho à celles de ses réalisations précédentes. (…) Dans chacun de ses films, Mel Gibson, fervent catholique, explore une figure isolée, prête à soulever les foules, mais aussi à subir les exactions de ses pourfendeurs. Le paroxysme de ce postulat –  la cruauté humaine envers ses semblables – est atteint avec La passion du Christ, où la foule déchaînée s’acharne sans relâche pour faire crucifier Jésus. Le film suscitera une immense controverse autour du réalisateur, accusé de véhiculer un message profondément antisémite, les Juifs étant représentés comme un peuple cruel et déicide. Cette foule haineuse, on la retrouve aussi dans Braveheart (1995) avant le sacrifice de William Wallace, torturé puis tué dans d’atroces souffrances. Dans Tu ne tueras point, le choix de Desmond Doss de ne pas porter d’armes déplaît fortement aux autres soldats qui le prennent pour un lâche, le torturent psychologiquement puis le passent lâchement à tabac en pleine nuit. (…) Tu ne tueras point, met en scène la figure ô combien christique de Desmond Doss, adventiste du septième jour, objecteur de conscience qui sauva 75 de ses camarades pendant la bataille d’Okinawa. Le tout, renforcé par des plans sans ambiguïté : Wallace les bras en croix avant la torture, ou Desmond, filmé allongé sur son brancard, en contre-plongée, les bras ouverts, comme appelé par les cieux. Télérama
“Don’t think I’m sticking up for the Germans,” puts in the lanky young captain in the upper berth, “but…” “To hell with the Germans,” says the broad-shouldered dark lieutenant. “It’s what our boys have been doing that worries me.” The lieutenant has been talking about the traffic in Army property, the leaking of gasoline into the black market in France and Belgium even while the fighting was going on, the way the Army kicks the civilians around, the looting. “Lust, liquor and loot are the soldier’s pay,” interrupts a red-faced major. (…) A tour of the beaten-up cities of Europe six months after victory is a mighty sobering experience for anyone. Europeans. Friend and foe alike, look you accusingly in the face and tell you how bitterly they are disappointed in you as an American. They cite the evolution of the word “liberation.” Before the Normandy landings it meant to be freed from the tyranny of the Nazis. Now it stands in the minds of the civilians for one thing, looting. (…) Never has American prestige in Europe been lower. People never tire of telling you of the ignorance and rowdy-ism of American troops, of out misunderstanding of European conditions. They say that the theft and sale of Army supplies by our troops is the basis of their black market. They blame us for the corruption and disorganization of UNRRA. (…) The Russians came first. The Viennese tell you of the savagery of the Russian armies. They came like the ancient Mongol hordes out of the steppes, with the flimsiest supply. The people in the working-class districts had felt that when the Russians came that they at least would be spared. But not at all. In the working-class districts the tropes were allowed to rape and murder and loot at will. When victims complained, the Russians answered, “You are too well off to be workers. You are bourgeoisie.” When Americans looted they took cameras and valuables but when the Russians looted they took everything. And they raped and killed. From the eastern frontiers a tide of refugees is seeping across Europe bringing a nightmare tale of helpless populations trampled underfoot. When the British and American came the Viennese felt that at last they were in the hands of civilized people. (…) We have swept away Hitlerism, but a great many Europeans feel that the cure has been worse than the disease. John Dos Passos (Life, le 7 janvier 1946)
lls sont venus, ils ont vaincu, ils ont violé… Sale nouvelle, les beaux GI débarqués en 1944 en France se sont comportés comme des barbares. Libération (mars 2006)
Oui, les libérateurs pratiquaient un racisme institutionnalisé et ils condamnèrent à mort des soldats noirs, accusés à tort de viols. En son temps, l’écrivain Louis Guilloux, qui fut l’interprète officiel des Américains en 1944 en Bretagne, assista à certains de ces procès en cour martiale. Durablement marqué, il relata son expérience dans OK, Joe !, un récit sobre, tranchant, qui a la puissance d’un brûlot. Loin du mélo. Télérama (décembre 2009)
Sur fond d’histoire d’amour impossible, Les Amants de l’ombre nous transportent dans une période méconnue de la Seconde Guerre mondiale où l’armée américaine, présentée comme libératrice, n’hésitait pas à condamner à mort des soldats noirs accusés à tort de viol. Métro (dec. 2009)
Soviet and German treatment of deserters, a story of pitiless savagery, is not mentioned here. Glass is concerned only with the British and Americans in the second world war, whose official attitudes to the problem were tortuous. In the first world war, the British shot 304 men for desertion or cowardice, only gradually accepting the notion of « shell-shock ». In the United States, by contrast, President Woodrow Wilson commuted all such death sentences. In the second world war, the British government stood up to generals who wanted to bring back the firing squad (the Labour government in 1930 had abolished the death penalty for desertion). Cunningly, the War Office suggested that restoration might suggest to the enemy that morale in the armed forces was failing. President Roosevelt, on the other hand, was persuaded in 1943 to suspend « limitations of punishment ». In the event, the Americans shot only one deserter, the luckless Private Eddie Slovik, executed in France in January 1945. He was an ex-con who had never even been near the front. Slovik quit when his unit was ordered into action, calculating that a familiar penitentiary cell would be more comfortable than being shot at in a rainy foxhole. His fate was truly unfair, set against the bigger picture. According to Glass, « nearly 50,000 American and 100,000 British soldiers deserted from the armed forces » during the war. Some 80% of these were front-line troops. Almost all « took a powder » (as they said then) in the European theatres of war; there were practically no desertions from US forces in the Pacific, perhaps because there was nowhere to go. By the end of the conflict, London, Paris and Naples, to name only a few European cities, swarmed with heavily-armed Awol servicemen, many of them recruited into gangs robbing and selling army supplies. Units were diverted from combat to guard supply trains, which were being hijacked all over liberated Europe. Paris, where the police fought nightly gun battles with American bandits, seemed to be a new Chicago. The Guardian
Thousands of American soldiers were convicted of desertion during the war, and 49 were sentenced to death. (Most were given years of hard labor.) Only one soldier was actually executed, an unlucky private from Detroit named Eddie Slovik. This was early 1945, at the moment of the Battle of the Bulge. Mr. Glass observes: “It was not the moment for the supreme Allied commander, Gen. Dwight Eisenhower, to be seen to condone desertion.” There were far more desertions in Europe than in the Pacific theater. In the Pacific, there was nowhere to disappear to. “In Europe, the total that fled from the front rarely exceeded 1 percent of manpower,” Mr. Glass writes. “However, it reached alarming proportions among the 10 percent of the men in uniform who actually saw combat.” (…) Too few men did too much of the fighting during World War II, the author writes. Many of them simply cracked at the seams. Poor leadership was often a factor. “High desertion rates in any company, battalion or division pointed to failures of command and logistics for which blame pointed to leaders as much as to the men who deserted,” he says. Mr. Glass adds, “Some soldiers deserted when all the other members of their units had been killed and their own deaths appeared inevitable.” The essential unfairness of so few men seeing the bulk of the combat was undergirded by other facts. Many men never shipped out. Mr. Glass cites a statistic that psychiatrists allowed about 1.75 million men to avoid service for “reasons other than physical.”This special treatment led to bitterness. Mr. Glass quotes a general who wrote, “When, in 1943, it was found that 14 members of the Rice University football team had been rejected for military service, the public was somewhat surprised.”Mr. Glass provides information about desertions in other American wars. During the Civil War, more than 300,000 troops went AWOL from the Union and Confederate armies. He writes, “Mark Twain famously deserted from both sides.” The NYT
In the weeks following liberation from the Nazis, Paris was hit by wave of crime and violence that saw the city compared to Prohibition New York or Chicago. And the cause was the same: American Gangsters. While the Allies fought against Hitler’s forces in Europe, law enforcers fought against the criminals who threatened that victory. Men who had abandoned the ‘greater good’ in favour of self-interest, black-market profits and the lure of the cafes and brothels of Paris: deserters. Highly organised, armed to the teeth and merciless, these deserters used their US uniforms as another tool of their trade along with the vast arrays of stolen weapons, forged passes and hijacked vehicles they had at their disposal. Between June 1944 and April 1945 the US army’s Criminal Investigation Branch (CBI) handled a total of 7,912 cases. Forty per cent involved misappropriation of US supplies. Greater yet was the proportion of crimes of violence – rape, murder, manslaughter and assault which accounted for 44 per cent of the force’s workload. The remaining 12 per cent were crimes such as robbery, housebreaking and riot.Many were afraid. They had reached a point beyond which they could not endure and chosen disgrace over the grave. Some recounted waking, as if from a dream, to find their bodies had led them away from the battelfield. (…)  Others, like Weiss, fought until their faith in their immediate commanders disappeared. Was it a form of madness or a dawning lucidity that led them to desert? Glass does not claim to be able to answer that question to which Weiss himself had devoted his latter years to addressing to no avail. Others still deserted to make money, stealing and selling the military supplies that their comrades at the front needed to survive. Opportunists and crooks, certainly, but not cowards – the life they chose was every bit as violent and bloody as battle. 50,000 American and 100,000 British soldiers deserted during World War II. Yet according to Glass the astounding fact is not that so many men deserted, but that so few did. Only one was executed for it, Eddie Slovik. He was, until that point, by his own assessment the unluckiest man alive.He never fought a battle. He never went on the run as most deserters did. He simply made it clear that he preferred prison to battle.  Of the 49 Americans sentenced to death for desertion during the Second World War he was the only one whose appeal for commutation was rejected. His greatest sin, as Glass tells it, was his timing. His appeal came in January 1945 just as the German counter-offensive, the Battle of the Bulge, was at its peak. Allied forces were near breaking point. It was not, Supreme Allied Commander, General Dwight Eisenhower decided, time to risk seeming to condone desertion. (…) Led by an ex-paratrooper sergeant, raids were planned like military operations. Whitehead himself admitted, ‘we stole trucks, sold whatever they carried, and used the trucks to rob warehouses of the goods in them.’ They used combat tactics, hijacked goods destined for front-line troops. Their crimes even spread into Belgium. They attacked civilians and military targets indiscriminately. His gangland activities gave Whitehead ‘a bigger thrill than battle.’ Quoting from the former soldier’s memoir Glass recounts his boasts: ‘We robbed every café in Paris, in all sectors except our own, while the gendarmes went crazy.’ They robbed crates of cognac and champagne, hijacked jeeps and raided private houses whose bed sheets and radios were ‘easy to fence.’ They stole petrol, cigarettes, liquor and weapons. Within six months Whitehead reckoned his share of the plunder at $100,000. Little wonder that when Victory in Europe was announced on 7 May 1945, Whitehead admitted, ‘That day and night everyone in Paris and the rest of Europe was celebrating, but I just stayed in my apartment thinking about it all.’ (…) Ultimately Whitehead was captured and court martialled. He was dishonourably discharged and spent time in the Delta Disciplinary Training Barracks in the south of France and in federal penitentiaries in New Jersey. Many years later he had that ‘dishonourable discharge,’ turned into a General one on rather disingenuous legal grounds.
En Allemagne, on dresse depuis 1986 des monuments aux déserteurs allemands de la seconde guerre mondiale. En Grande-Bretagne et aux Etats-Unis, personne, jusqu’il y a peu, ne voulait aborder cette thématique historique des déserteurs des armées de la coalition anti-hitlérienne. Charles Glass, ancien correspondant d’ABC pour le Moyen Orient, otage de milices chiites au Liban pendant 67 jours en 1987, vient d’innover en la matière: il a brisé ce tabou de l’histoire contemporaine, en racontant par le menu l’histoire des 50.000 militaires américains et des 100.000 militaires britanniques qui ont déserté leurs unités sur les théâtres d’opération d’Europe et d’Afrique du Nord. Le chiffre de 150.000 hommes est énorme: cela signifie qu’un soldat sur cent a abandonné illégalement son unité. Chez les Américains, constate Glass, les déserteurs ne peuvent pas être considérés comme des lâches ou des tire-au-flanc; il s’agit souvent de soldats qui se sont avérés des combattants exemplaires et courageux, voir des idéalistes qui ont prouvé leur valeur au front. Ils ont flanché pour les motifs que l’on classe dans la catégorie “SNAFU” (“Situation Normal, All Fucked Up”). Il peut s’agir de beaucoup de choses: ces soldats déserteurs avaient été traités bestialement par leurs supérieurs hiérarchiques incompétents, leur ravitaillement n’arrivait pas à temps, les conditions hygiéniques étaient déplorables; aussi le fait que c’était toujours les mêmes unités qui devaient verser leur sang, alors que personne, dans la hiérarchie militaire, n’estimait nécessaire de les relever et d’envoyer des unités fraîches en première ligne. Dans une telle situation, on peut comprendre la lassitude des déserteurs surtout que certaines divisions d’infanterie en France et en Italie ont perdu jusqu’à 75% de leurs effectifs. Pour beaucoup de GI’s appartenant à ces unités lourdement éprouvées, il apparaissait normal de déserter ou de refuser d’obéir aux ordres, même face à l’ennemi. (…) Au cours de l’automne 1944, dans l’US Army en Europe, il y avait chaque mois près de 8500 déserteurs ou de cas d’absentéisme de longue durée, également passibles de lourdes sanctions. La situation était similaire chez les Britanniques: depuis l’offensive de Rommel en Afrique du Nord, le nombre de déserteurs dans les unités envoyées dans cette région a augmenté dans des proportions telles que toutes les prisons militaires du Proche Orient étaient pleines à craquer et que le commandant-en-chef Claude Auchinleck envisageait de rétablir la peine de mort pour désertion, ce qui n’a toutefois pas été accepté pour des motifs de politique intérieure (ndt: ou parce que les Chypriotes grecs et turcs ou les Juifs de Palestine avaient été enrôlés de force et en masse dans la 8ème Armée, contre leur volonté?). Les autorités britanniques ont dès lors été forcées d’entourer tous les camps militaires britanniques d’une triple rangée de barbelés pour réduire le nombre de “fuites”. Le cauchemar du commandement allié et des décideurs politiques de la coalition anti-hitlérienne n’était pas tellement les déserteurs proprement dits, qui plongeaient tout simplement dans la clandestinité et attendaient la fin de la guerre, mais plutôt ceux d’entre eux qui se liguaient en bandes et se donnaient pour activité principale de piller la logistique des alliés et de vendre leur butin au marché noir. La constitution de pareilles bandes a commencé dès le débarquement des troupes anglo-saxonnes en Italie, où les gangs de déserteurs amorcèrent une coopération fructueuse avec la mafia locale. Parmi elles, le “Lane Gang”, dirigé par un simple soldat de 23 ans, Werner Schmeidel, s’est taillé une solide réputation. Ce “gang” a réussi à s’emparer d’une cassette militaire contenant 133.000 dollars en argent liquide. A l’automne 1944, ces attaques perpétrées par les “gangs” a enrayé l’offensive du Général Patton en direction de l’Allemagne: des déserteurs américains et des bandes criminelles françaises avaient attaqué et pillé les véhicules de la logistique amenant vivres et carburants. La situation la plus dramatique s’observait alors dans le Paris “libéré”, où régnait l’anarchie la plus totale: entre août 1944 et avril 1945, la “Criminal Investigation Branch” de l’armée américaine a ouvert 7912 dossiers concernant des délits importants, dont 3098 cas de pillage de biens militaires américains et 3481 cas de viol ou de meurtre (ou d’assassinat). La plupart de ces dossiers concernaient des soldats américains déserteurs. La situation était analogue en Grande-Bretagne où 40.000 soldats britanniques étaient entrés dans la clandestinité et étaient responsables de 90% des délits commis dans le pays. Pour combattre ce fléau, la justice militaire américaine s’est montrée beaucoup plus sévère que son homologue britannique: de juin 1944 à l’automne 1945, 70 soldats américains ont été exécutés pour avoir commis des délits très graves pendant leur période de désertion. La masse énorme des déserteurs “normaux” était internée dans d’immenses camps comme le “Loire Disciplinary Training Center” où séjournait 4500 condamnés. Ceux-ci y étaient systématiquement humiliés et maltraités. Des cas de décès ont été signalés et attestés car des gardiens ont à leur tour été traduits devant des juridictions militaires. En Angleterre, la chasse aux déserteurs s’est terminée en pantalonnade: ainsi, la police militaire britannique a organisé une gigantesque razzia le 14 décembre 1945, baptisée “Operation Dragnet”. Résultat? Quatre arrestations! Alors qu’à Londres seulement, quelque 20.000 déserteurs devaient se cacher. Au début de l’année 1945, l’armée américaine se rend compte que la plupart des déserteurs condamnés avaient été de bons soldats qui, vu le stress auquel ils avaient été soumis pendant de trop longues périodes en zones de combat, auraient dû être envoyés en clinique plutôt qu’en détention. Les psychologues entrent alors en scène, ce qui conduit à une révision de la plupart des jugements qui avaient condamné les soldats à des peines entre 15 ans et la perpétuité. En Grande-Bretagne, il a fallu attendre plus longtemps la réhabilitation des déserteurs malgré la pression de l’opinion publique. Finalement, Churchill a cédé et annoncé une amnistie officielle en février 1953. Wolfgang Kaufmann 

C’est Dos Passos qui avait raison !

Combattants exemplaires et courageux, voire idéalistes qui craquent, bandes de charognards sans scrupule pillant la logistique de vivres et de carburants des Alliés et les revendant au marché noir, violeurs notamment noirs ou assassins …

A la veille d’une cérémonie des Oscars …

Où face à des films nombriliste (La la land) ou très marqués minorités (Hidden figures, Fences) voire minorités/homosexualité (Moonlight) ou étranger (Lion) ou la chronique sociale d’une communauté de marins prolétaires (Manchester by the sea), la science fiction classique (Arrival/Premier contact) ou le néo-western (Hell or high water/Comancheria) …

Emerge notamment du côté des électeurs républicains, avec quand même six nominations, par le réalisateur controversé de la Passion du Christ …

L’étrange ovni (souligné par ailleurs par son titre français tiré tout droit du décalogue) du film de guerre religieux  (Hacksaw ridge/Tu ne tueras point) …

Avec cette histoire vraie mais ô combien christique du seul objecteur de conscience américain à recevoir la médaille d’honneur …

Ce guerrier sans armes qui tout en s’en tenant à sa volonté de ne pas porter d’armes parvint à sauver des dizaines de soldats (ennemis compris !) …

Retour, avec le livre du journaliste-historien Charles Glass d’il y a quatre ans …

Sur ces oubliés des oubliés de notre dernière grande guerre …

A savoir les déserteurs !

Une étude sur les déserteurs des armées alliées pendant la deuxième guerre mondiale
Wolfgang Kaufmann

Snerfies

16 janvier 2014

En Allemagne, on dresse depuis 1986 des monuments aux déserteurs allemands de la seconde guerre mondiale. En Grande-Bretagne et aux Etats-Unis, personne, jusqu’il y a peu, ne voulait aborder cette thématique historique des déserteurs des armées de la coalition anti-hitlérienne. Charles Glass, ancien correspondant d’ABC pour le Moyen Orient, otage de milices chiites au Liban pendant 67 jours en 1987, vient d’innover en la matière: il a brisé ce tabou de l’histoire contemporaine, en racontant par le menu l’histoire des 50.000 militaires américains et des 100.000 militaires britanniques qui ont déserté leurs unités sur les théâtres d’opération d’Europe et d’Afrique du Nord. Le chiffre de 150.000 hommes est énorme: cela signifie qu’un soldat sur cent a abandonné illégalement son unité.

Chez les Américains, constate Glass, les déserteurs ne peuvent pas être considérés comme des lâches ou des tire-au-flanc; il s’agit souvent de soldats qui se sont avérés des combattants exemplaires et courageux, voir des idéalistes qui ont prouvé leur valeur au front. Ils ont flanché pour les motifs que l’on classe dans la catégorie “SNAFU” (“Situation Normal, All Fucked Up”). Il peut s’agir de beaucoup de choses: ces soldats déserteurs avaient été traités bestialement par leurs supérieurs hiérarchiques incompétents, leur ravitaillement n’arrivait pas à temps, les conditions hygiéniques étaient déplorables; aussi le fait que c’était toujours les mêmes unités qui devaient verser leur sang, alors que personne, dans la hiérarchie militaire, n’estimait nécessaire de les relever et d’envoyer des unités fraîches en première ligne.

Dans une telle situation, on peut comprendre la lassitude des déserteurs surtout que certaines divisions d’infanterie en France et en Italie ont perdu jusqu’à 75% de leurs effectifs. Pour beaucoup de GI’s appartenant à ces unités lourdement éprouvées, il apparaissait normal de déserter ou de refuser d’obéir aux ordres, même face à l’ennemi. Parmi les militaires qui ont réfusé d’obéir, il y avait le Lieutenant Albert C. Homcy, de la 36ème division d’infanterie, qui n’a pas agi pour son bien propre mais pour celui de ses subordonnés. Il a comparu devant le conseil de guerre le 19 octobre 1944 à Docelles, qui l’a condamné à 50 ans de travaux forcés parce qu’il avait refusé d’obéir à un ordre qui lui demandait d’armer et d’envoyer à l’assaut contre les blindés allemands des cuisiniers, des boulangers et des ordonnances sans formation militaire aucune.

Au cours de l’automne 1944, dans l’US Army en Europe, il y avait chaque mois près de 8500 déserteurs ou de cas d’absentéisme de longue durée, également passibles de lourdes sanctions. La situation était similaire chez les Britanniques: depuis l’offensive de Rommel en Afrique du Nord, le nombre de déserteurs dans les unités envoyées dans cette région a augmenté dans des proportions telles que toutes les prisons militaires du Proche Orient étaient pleines à craquer et que le commandant-en-chef Claude Auchinleck envisageait de rétablir la peine de mort pour désertion, ce qui n’a toutefois pas été accepté pour des motifs de politique intérieure (ndt: ou parce que les Chypriotes grecs et turcs ou les Juifs de Palestine avaient été enrôlés de force et en masse dans la 8ème Armée, contre leur volonté?). Les autorités britanniques ont dès lors été forcées d’entourer tous les camps militaires britanniques d’une triple rangée de barbelés pour réduire le nombre de “fuites”.

Le cauchemar du commandement allié et des décideurs politiques de la coalition anti-hitlérienne n’était pas tellement les déserteurs proprement dits, qui plongeaient tout simplement dans la clandestinité et attendaient la fin de la guerre, mais plutôt ceux d’entre eux qui se liguaient en bandes et se donnaient pour activité principale de piller la logistique des alliés et de vendre leur butin au marché noir. La constitution de pareilles bandes a commencé dès le débarquement des troupes anglo-saxonnes en Italie, où les gangs de déserteurs amorcèrent une coopération fructueuse avec la mafia locale. Parmi elles, le “Lane Gang”, dirigé par un simple soldat de 23 ans, Werner Schmeidel, s’est taillé une solide réputation. Ce “gang” a réussi à s’emparer d’une cassette militaire contenant 133.000 dollars en argent liquide. A l’automne 1944, ces attaques perpétrées par les “gangs” a enrayé l’offensive du Général Patton en direction de l’Allemagne: des déserteurs américains et des bandes criminelles françaises avaient attaqué et pillé les véhicules de la logistique amenant vivres et carburants.

La situation la plus dramatique s’observait alors dans le Paris “libéré”, où régnait l’anarchie la plus totale: entre août 1944 et avril 1945, la “Criminal Investigation Branch” de l’armée américaine a ouvert 7912 dossiers concernant des délits importants, dont 3098 cas de pillage de biens militaires américains et 3481 cas de viol ou de meurtre (ou d’assassinat). La plupart de ces dossiers concernaient des soldats américains déserteurs. La situation était analogue en Grande-Bretagne où 40.000 soldats britanniques étaient entrés dans la clandestinité et étaient responsables de 90% des délits commis dans le pays. Pour combattre ce fléau, la justice militaire américaine s’est montrée beaucoup plus sévère que son homologue britannique: de juin 1944 à l’automne 1945, 70 soldats américains ont été exécutés pour avoir commis des délits très graves pendant leur période de désertion. La masse énorme des déserteurs “normaux” était internée dans d’immenses camps comme le “Loire Disciplinary Training Center” où séjournait 4500 condamnés. Ceux-ci y étaient systématiquement humiliés et maltraités. Des cas de décès ont été signalés et attestés car des gardiens ont à leur tour été traduits devant des juridictions militaires. En Angleterre, la chasse aux déserteurs s’est terminée en pantalonnade: ainsi, la police militaire britannique a organisé une gigantesque razzia le 14 décembre 1945, baptisée “Operation Dragnet”. Résultat? Quatre arrestations! Alors qu’à Londres seulement, quelque 20.000 déserteurs devaient se cacher.

Au début de l’année 1945, l’armée américaine se rend compte que la plupart des déserteurs condamnés avaient été de bons soldats qui, vu le stress auquel ils avaient été soumis pendant de trop longues périodes en zones de combat, auraient dû être envoyés en clinique plutôt qu’en détention. Les psychologues entrent alors en scène, ce qui conduit à une révision de la plupart des jugements qui avaient condamné les soldats à des peines entre 15 ans et la perpétuité.

En Grande-Bretagne, il a fallu attendre plus longtemps la réhabilitation des déserteurs malgré la pression de l’opinion publique. Finalement, Churchill a cédé et annoncé une amnistie officielle en février 1953.

Wolfgang KAUFMANN.

(article paru dans “Junge Freiheit”, n°49/2013; http://www.jungefreiheit.de ).

Charles GLASS, The Deserters. A hidden history of World War II, Penguin Press, New York, 2013, 380 pages, ill., 20,40 euro.

The untold truth about WWII deserters the US Army tried to hide: New book reveals how gangs of AWOL GIs terrorized WWII Paris with a reign of mob-style violence

In the weeks following liberation from the Nazis, Paris was hit by wave of crime and violence that saw the city compared to Prohibition New York or Chicago.

And the cause was the same: American Gangsters.

While the Allies fought against Hitler’s forces in Europe, law enforcers fought against the criminals who threatened that victory. Men who had abandoned the ‘greater good’ in favour of self-interest, black-market profits and the lure of the cafes and brothels of Paris: deserters.

Glass’s study of the very different stories and men grouped together under the label, Deserters

Highly organised, armed to the teeth and merciless, these deserters used their US uniforms as another tool of their trade along with the vast arrays of stolen weapons, forged passes and hijacked vehicles they had at their disposal.

Between June 1944 and April 1945 the US army’s Criminal Investigation Branch (CBI) handled a total of 7,912 cases. Forty per cent involved misappropriation of US supplies.

Greater yet was the proportion of crimes of violence – rape, murder, manslaughter and assault which accounted for 44 per cent of the force’s workload. The remaining 12 per cent were crimes such as robbery, housebreaking and riot.

Former Chief Middle East correspondent for ABC News, the book’s author Charles Glass had long harboured an interest in the subject. But it was only truly ignited by a chance meeting with Steve Weiss – decorated combat veteran of the US 36th Infantry Division and former deserter.

Glass was giving a talk to publicise his previous book, ‘Americans in Paris: Life and Death under Nazi Occupation’ when the American started asking questions. It was clear, Glass recounts, that the questioner’s knowledge of the French Resistance was more intimate than his own.

Tested beyond endurance: This official US Army photograph taken in Pozzuoli near Naples in August 1944, captured Private First Class Steve Weiss boarding a British landing craft. He is climbing the gangplank on the right-hand side of the photograph. The Deserters, A Hidden History of World War II by Charles Glass

Hero or Coward? Steve Weiss receives the Croix de Guerre in July 1946 yet 2 years earlier the US army jailed him as a deserter

They met for coffee and Weiss asked Glass what he was working on. Glass recalls: ‘I told him it was a book on American and British deserters in the Second World War and asked if he knew anything about it.

‘He answered, « I was a deserter. »‘

This once idealistic boy from Brooklyn who enlisted at 17, had fought on the beachhead at Anzio and through the perilous Ardennes forest, he was one of the very few regular American soldiers to fight with the Resistance in 1944. And he had deserted.

His story was, Glass realised, both secret and emblematic of a group of men, wreathed together under a banner of shame that branded them cowards. Yet the truth was far more complex.

Many were afraid. They had reached a point beyond which they could not endure and chosen disgrace over the grave. Some recounted waking, as if from a dream, to find their bodies had led them away from the battelfield.

Others, like Weiss, fought until their faith in their immediate commanders disappeared. Was it a form of madness or a dawning lucidity that led them to desert? Glass does not claim to be able to answer that question to which Weiss himself had devoted his latter years to addressing to no avail

Others still deserted to make money, stealing and selling the military supplies that their comrades at the front needed to survive. Opportunists and crooks, certainly, but not cowards – the life they chose was every bit as violent and bloody as battle.

50,000 American and 100,000 British soldiers deserted during World War II. Yet according to Glass the astounding fact is not that so many men deserted, but that so few did.

Only one was executed for it, Eddie Slovik. He was, until that point, by his own assessment the unluckiest man alive.

The Unluckiest Man: Eddie Slovik, left, was the only American executed for desertion as his trial fell at a time when General Dwight Eisenhower, right, decided he could not risk appearing lenient on the crime

He never fought a battle. He never went on the run as most deserters did. He simply made it clear that he preferred prison to battle.

Of the 49 Americans sentenced to death for desertion during the Second World War he was the only one whose appeal for commutation was rejected. His greatest sin, as Glass tells it, was his timing.

His appeal came in January 1945 just as the German counter-offensive, the Battle of the Bulge, was at its peak. Allied forces were near breaking point. It was not, Supreme Allied Commander, General Dwight Eisenhower decided, time to risk seeming to condone desertion.

Slovik was shot for his crime on the morning of 31 January 1945.

He was dispatched in the remote French village of Sainte-Marie-aux-Mines and the truth concealed even from his wife, Antoinette.

She was informed that her husband had died in the European Theatre of Operations.

His identity was ultimately revealed in 1954 and twenty years later Martin Sheen played him in the television film, The Execution of Private Slovik.

In it Sheen recites the words Slovik spoke before the firing squad shot him.

‘They’re not shooting me for deserting the United States Army,’ he said.

‘They just need to make an example out of somebody and I’m it because I’m an ex-con.

‘I used to steal things when I was a kid, and that’s what they are shooting me for.

‘They’re shooting me for the bread and chewing gum I stole when I was 12 years old.’

Private Alfred T Whitehead’s was a very different story.

He was a farm boy from Tennessee who rushed to join up to escape a life of brutalising poverty and violence at the hands of his stepfather.

He ended up a gangster tearing through Paris.

Whitehead fought at Normandy and claims to have stormed the beaches on the D-Day landings.

He considered himself a battle-hardened professional soldier and bit by bit the small reserve of mercy that had survived his childhood evaporated in the heat of war.

He had been in continuous combat with them from D-Day to 30th December 1944. He had earned the Silver Star, two Bronze Stars, Combat Infantry Badge and Distinguished Unit Citation.

When he was invalided out to Paris with appendicitis and assumed that he would rejoin his unit, the 2nd Division, on his recovery.

Instead he was sent to the 94th Reinforcement Battalion, a replacement depot in Fontainebleau.

When a young lieutenant presented Whitehead with a First World War vintage rifle for guard duty, he told the officer to take the ‘peashooter’ and ‘shove it up his ass.’

Loyalties Lost: Before deserting Alfred T Whitehead was decorated for bravery he has identified himself as the third soldier on the right, visible in profile, at the front of this D-Day landing craft approaching Normandy 6 June 1944

He demanded the weapons he was used to – a .45 pistol, a Thompson sub-machine gun and a trench knife.

His actual desertion was unspectacular. Whitehead was looking for a drink. The American Service Club refused him entrance because he didn’t have a pass and so he wandered on ‘in search of a bed in a brothel.’

He found one. By morning he was officially AWOL. The next day a waitress in a café took pity on him and added fried eggs and potatoes to his order of soup and bread. When Military Police came in and started asking questions she gave Whitehead the key to her room in a cheap hotel and told him to wait for her there.

From decorated soldier he moved seamlessly into life as a criminal in the Paris underworld.

A chance meeting led to him taking his place as a member of one of the many gangs of ex-soldiers terrorizing Paris.

Led by an ex-paratrooper sergeant, raids were planned like military operations. Whitehead himself admitted, ‘we stole trucks, sold whatever they carried, and used the trucks to rob warehouses of the goods in them.’

They used combat tactics, hijacked goods destined for front-line troops.

Their crimes even spread into Belgium. They attacked civilians and military targets indiscriminately.

His gangland activities gave Whitehead ‘a bigger thrill than battle.’ Quoting from the former soldier’s memoir Glass recounts his boasts: ‘We robbed every café in Paris, in all sectors except our own, while the gendarmes went crazy.’

They robbed crates of cognac and champagne, hijacked jeeps and raided private houses whose bed sheets and radios were ‘easy to fence.’ They stole petrol, cigarettes, liquor and weapons.
Within six months Whitehead reckoned his share of the plunder at $100,000.

Little wonder that when Victory in Europe was announced on 7 May 1945, Whitehead admitted, ‘That day and night everyone in Paris and the rest of Europe was celebrating, but I just stayed in my apartment thinking about it all.’

Because Private Whitehead’s desertion did not end his war – it was a part of it. As it was a part of many soldiers’ wars that has long gone unrecorded.

Ultimately Whitehead was captured and court martialled. He was dishonourably discharged and spent time in the Delta Disciplinary Training Barracks in the south of France and in federal penitentiaries in New Jersey.

Many years later he had that ‘dishonourable discharge,’ turned into a General one on rather disingenuous legal grounds.

In peacetime appearances mattered more to Whitehead than they ever had in war.

Back then, he admitted: ‘I never knew what tomorrow would hold, so I took every day as it came. War does strange things to people, especially their morality.’

Those ‘strange things’ rather than the false extremes of courage and cowardice are the truths set out in this account of the War and its deserters.

The Deserters: A Hidden History of world War II by Charles Glass is published by The Penguin Press, 13 June, Price $27.95. Available on Amazon by clicking here.

Voir également:

Deserter: The Last Untold Story of the Second World War by Charles Glass: review
Nearly 150,000 Allied soldiers deserted during the Second World War – some through fear and some for love. Nicholas Shakespeare uncovers their story, reviewing Deserter by Charles Glass.
The Telegraph
09 Apr 2013

In 1953, Winston Churchill gave an amnesty for wartime deserters as part of the celebrations for the coronation. According to Charles Glass, nearly 100,000 British and 50,000 American soldiers had deserted the armed forces during the Second World War, but only one was executed for this (theoretically) capital offence: a 25-year-old US infantryman who preferred to go to prison than into battle, and was condemned “to death by musketry” in January 1945. His story was finally told, a year after Churchill’s amnesty, in William Bradford Huie’s The Execution of Private Slovik, which remains, according to Glass, “almost the only full-length discussion of the subject”.

Who were the other deserters, why did they desert – and what happened to them? The absence of readily available material is a blood-red rag to a bullish reporter like Glass. Following his masterful study into the activities of his compatriots in Nazi-occupied France, Americans in Paris (2009), Glass has unearthed a shameful and inconvenient cluster of tragedies, which history – unreliably narrated by the victors – has whitened over.

At the opposite end to Pte Slovik was Pte Wayne Powers, an army truck driver from Missouri who absconded for love and was one of a few convicted deserters to get off scot-free. Buried in Glass’s introduction, and casually discarded, is the account of Powers’s elopement with a dark-haired French girl in November 1944. Hiding in her family house near the Belgian border, the couple had five children. For the next 14 years, Powers stayed a wanted man but undetected – until 1958, when a car crashed into the house, and a policeman, taking down details, noticed a face peering through the curtains. Court-martialed, Powers was released after 60,000 letters appealed for clemency; but his haunted gaze in the window is what lingers, and unites him with each deserter: an ever-present fear of capture, “an overshadowing presence that darkened my consciousness”, in the words of John Bain, a 23-year-old British soldier finally run to ground in Leeds.

Neither the conscientious objector Slovik nor the love-struck Powers were emblematic of the vast majority who deserted from the ranks. John Bain, the only British example explored by Glass, is a more satisfying representative. A boxer-poet like Byron, Bain is known today by the cover name that he adopted when on the run, Vernon Scannell (“a name picked from a passport in a brothel”). He had wandered away from his post in Wadi Akarit, trance-like, in “a kind of disgust”, after seeing his friends loot the corpses of their own men. His punishment was consistent both with US Gen George Patton’s remedy for malingerers – in Sicily, Patton famously slapped a shell-shocked soldier – and with US Brig Gen Elliot Cooke’s suspicion of “psychiatricks”.

Bain was imprisoned in Mustafa Barracks near Alexandria, snarled at by officers (“You’re all cowards. You’re all yellow”) and brutalised by guards, not one of whom had been within range “of any missile more dangerous than a flying cork” writes Glass. Captured in Leeds after going awol a third time, Bain told his interrogators that he wished to write poetry. Only then was his condition recognised. “We’ll send him to a psychiatrist. He’s clearly mad.”

Bain, who would go on to write some of the best poetry of the war, observed that “the dramatically heroic role is for the few”. He had left the battlefield to preserve his humanity, his time in the Army “totally destructive of the human qualities I most valued, the qualities of imagination, sensitivity and intelligence”.

With his own skill and sensitivity, Glass recreates the inhuman scenes that pummel the other soldiers he examines. Almost all of them were brave men like Bain. They knew what it was to be bombed by your own side. Slog through minefields littered with bloated, blackened bodies. Sit in foxholes knee-deep in your own excrement. Listen to the rising screams of the wounded. Struggle to obey orders that were impossible to carry out.

All too frequently, as in William Wharton’s memorable novel A Midnight Clear, your own commanders posed the greatest danger. Bain’s captain deserted from the Mareth Line in 1943, only to bob up as a major. Conversely, in the US 36th Division, which boasted the highest number of deserters, Lt Albert Homcy, already singled out for “exceptionally meritorious conduct” in Italy, was sentenced to 50 years of hard labour after he refused to lead untrained men to certain death.

Glass displays an unusual degree of empathy and kinship with these men. It causes him to focus on those he senses to have been misjudged or misdiagnosed, and whose condition cried out for treatment rather than punishment. There is a deficit in his book of more flagrant, less nuanced absconders. With a slight air of duty and disdain, one feels, he tracks the fate of Sgt Al Whitehead from Tennessee, who deserted for reasons of avarice and goes “to live it up” in Paris, where he became part of a GI gang that stole Allied supplies and shot at military policemen. Glass leaves us thirsty for details about these gangsters (also observed in Naples, with exemplary dry comedy, by Norman Lewis) and their British equivalents in Egypt.

Given the author’s knowledge of Paris – “home to deserters from most of the armies of Europe” – the absence of any French, German or Italian examples is also a curious omission. Deserter is unashamedly an Anglo-American story. In its selection of hitherto suppressed voices, it is refreshing and stimulating – history told from the loser’s perspective. But if I have a quibble, it is that the author concentrates too much on too few.

Even so Glass’s principal guide, on whom the narrative depends, is a compelling choice to lead the author’s project of rehabilitation. Pte Steve Weiss, who after the war became (of all things) a psychiatrist, is perhaps not your typical deserter, but if anyone deserves a sympathetic hearing, it is Weiss. Enlisting against his father’s wishes at 18, and determined to play a meaningful part in the war, Weiss joined the French Resistance after being separated from the 36th Division near Valence; for his courage, he would earn the Légion d’honneur. Eventually reunited with his company, he was treated like just another round of ammunition. After one earth tremor too many, he stumbled off into a forest during an artillery barrage. Discovered in a shell-shocked state by American troops, having slept for six days, Weiss was tried before a court-martial that lasted a mere five hours, including one hour for lunch, and condemned to hard labour for life.

His father complained: “This is the thanks he received for giving his all to his country.” Later interviewed by a military psychiatrist in the Loire Disciplinary Training Camp, Weiss was told: “You don’t belong here. You belong in a hospital.” It is altogether fitting that when Glass accompanies 86-year-old Weiss back to Bruyères to look for the courtroom in which the US Army delivered its ludicrous sentence, they cannot find it.

Deserter: The Last Untold Story of the Second World War

by Charles Glass

400pp, Harperpress, t £23 (PLUS £1.35 p&p) Buy now from Telegraph Books (RRP £25, ebook £12.50)

Voir encore:

Deserter: The Untold Story of WWII by Charles Glass – review

The shocking stories of three young men who fled the battlefield leave Neal Ascherson wondering why more soldiers don’t go awol
Neal Ascherson
The Guardian
28 March 2013

Desertion in war is not a mystery. It can have contributory motives – « family problems » at home, hatred of some officer or moral reluctance to kill are among them. But the central motive is the obvious one: to get away from people who are trying to blow your head off or stick a bayonet through you. Common sense, in other words. So the enigma is not why soldiers desert. It is why most of them don’t, even in battle and even in the face of imminent defeat (remember the stubborn Wehrmacht in the second world war). They do not run away, but stand and fight. Why?

That is the most interesting thing in Charles Glass‘s new book. He takes three young men – boys, really – who were drafted into the infantry in the last European war, who fought, deserted, and yet often fought again. Steve Weiss was from a Jewish family in Brooklyn; his father had been wounded and gassed in the first world war. Alfred Whitehead came from the bleakest rural poverty in Tennessee. John Bain was English (and after the war became famous as the poet Vernon Scannell); he was desperate to get away from his sadistic father, another veteran of the trenches.

All three quit their posts for solid and obvious reasons. Two of them deserted several times over. They saw heartbreaking horrors, or were tempted by women, booze and loot in a liberated city, or were shattered by prolonged artillery barrages, or realised – suddenly, and with cold clarity – that they would almost certainly be killed in the next few days.

The common sense of desertion was plain to almost anyone who had actually been under fire. Again and again, Glass’s book tells how these men on the run were fed, sheltered, comforted and transported by soldiers close to the front line. But the further away from the guns they got, entering the reposeful regions of pen-pushing « rear echelons », the more wary, disapproving and uncomprehending their compatriots became. Ultimately they would end up in the hands of the military police, and then in some nightmare « stockade » or military prison where shrieking, muscle-bound monsters who had never been within miles of a mortar « stonk » devoted themselves to breaking their spirit.

Soviet and German treatment of deserters, a story of pitiless savagery, is not mentioned here. Glass is concerned only with the British and Americans in the second world war, whose official attitudes to the problem were tortuous.

In the first world war, the British shot 304 men for desertion or cowardice, only gradually accepting the notion of « shell-shock ». In the United States, by contrast, President Woodrow Wilson commuted all such death sentences. In the second world war, the British government stood up to generals who wanted to bring back the firing squad (the Labour government in 1930 had abolished the death penalty for desertion). Cunningly, the War Office suggested that restoration might suggest to the enemy that morale in the armed forces was failing. President Roosevelt, on the other hand, was persuaded in 1943 to suspend « limitations of punishment ». In the event, the Americans shot only one deserter, the luckless Private Eddie Slovik, executed in France in January 1945. He was an ex-con who had never even been near the front. Slovik quit when his unit was ordered into action, calculating that a familiar penitentiary cell would be more comfortable than being shot at in a rainy foxhole.

His fate was truly unfair, set against the bigger picture. According to Glass, « nearly 50,000 American and 100,000 British soldiers deserted from the armed forces » during the war. Some 80% of these were front-line troops. Almost all « took a powder » (as they said then) in the European theatres of war; there were practically no desertions from US forces in the Pacific, perhaps because there was nowhere to go. By the end of the conflict, London, Paris and Naples, to name only a few European cities, swarmed with heavily-armed Awol servicemen, many of them recruited into gangs robbing and selling army supplies. Units were diverted from combat to guard supply trains, which were being hijacked all over liberated Europe. Paris, where the police fought nightly gun battles with American bandits, seemed to be a new Chicago.

But none of Glass’s three subjects left the front as soon as fighting began. They tried to do their duty for as long as they could. Steve Weiss first encountered battle in Italy, posted to the 36th infantry division near Naples after the Salerno and Anzio landings. He was 18 years old. At Anzio he saw for the first time deserters in a stockade yelling abuse at the army, found that a friend had collapsed with « battle fatigue », and was bombed from the air.

Soon he was fighting his way up Italy with « Charlie Company », facing artillery and snipers by day and night. Once, exhausted, rain-drenched and on his own, he broke down in tears of fatigue and terror and cried out for his mother. Next day he was street-fighting in the ruins of Grosseto. What kept him going? Not ideals about the war. He had seen Naples, now run by the Mafia boss Vito Genovese in cahoots with the Americans, and the notion that Roosevelt’s « Four Freedoms » could matter to starving Italians was a joke. What kept him and the other two going was comradeship: trust in a friend, or in some older and more experienced member of the squad. For Weiss in Italy, it was Corporal Bob Reigle, and later in France, a Captain Binoche in the resistance. For the truculent Alfred Whitehead, who survived Omaha Beach and the murderous battles of the Normandy « Bocage », it was his fellow-Tennessean Paul « Timmiehaw » Turner; staying drunk helped too. For John Bain, with the 51st Highland Division in North Africa and Normandy, it was his foul-mouthed, loyal pal Hughie from Glasgow.

The war was crazy, the army was brainless and callous, but there were these men who would never let you down, and for whose sake you bore the unbearable. When Weiss rejoined his company in the Vosges and found how many comrades were dead, when « Timmiehaw » was killed by a mine near St-Lo and Hughie by a mortar barrage near Caen, the psychic exhaustion all three young men had been suppressing finally kicked in.

Whitehead left to become a gangster in liberated Paris. Weiss and a few mates ran away from the winter battles in the Vosges hills; he did time in a military prison and eventually became a psychiatrist in California. Bain had already deserted once before, in Tunisia, and served a sentence in the appalling Mustafa Barracks « glasshouse » near Alexandria. Badly wounded in Normandy, he deserted again after the war was over because he couldn’t wait to be demobbed, and vanished into London to become poet and boxer Scannell.

Not much of this book, it should be said, is about deserting. Most of it consists of the three men’s own narratives of « their war », published or unpublished, and – because they are the stories of individual human beings who eventually cracked under the strain of hardly imaginable fear and misery – they are wonderful, unforgettable acts of witness, something salvaged from a time already sinking into the black mud of the past. I’ll certainly remember Bain watching his mates rifling the pockets of their own dead, Weiss witnessing the botched hanging of black soldiers for rape, Whitehead hijacking an American supply truck in the middle of the Paris traffic.

Memorable, too, is the astonishing Psychology for the Fighting Man, a work of startling empathy and humanity, produced in 1943 and distributed to American forces. Glass posts extracts at the outset of each chapter. « Giving up is nature’s way of protecting the organism against too much pain. » Or « There are a few men in every army who know no fear – just a few. But these men are not normal. » Statements of the obvious? Maybe. But in the madness of war, the right to state the obvious becomes worth fighting for.

Neal Ascherson’s Black Sea is published by Vintage.

Voir de plus:

Stories about cowardice can be as gripping as those about courage. One tells us about who we’d like to be; the other tells us about who we fear we are.

Nearly 50,000 American and 100,000 British soldiers deserted from the armed forces during World War II. (The British were in the war much longer.) Some fell into the arms of French or Italian women. Some became black-market pirates. Many more simply broke under the strain of battle.

These men’s stories have rarely been told. During the war, newspapers largely abstained from writing about desertions. The topic was bad for morale and could be exploited by the enemy. In more recent decades the subject has been essentially taboo, as if to broach it would dent the halo around the Greatest Generation.

Gen. George S. Patton wanted to shoot the men, whom he considered “cowards.” Other commanders were more humane. “They recognized that the mind — subject to the daily threat of death, the concussion of aerial bombardment and high-velocity artillery, the fear of land mines and booby traps, malnutrition, appalling hygiene and lack of sleep — suffered wounds as real as the body’s,” Mr. Glass writes. “Providing shattered men with counseling, hot food, clean clothes and rest was more likely to restore them to duty than threatening them with a firing squad.”

Thousands of American soldiers were convicted of desertion during the war, and 49 were sentenced to death. (Most were given years of hard labor.) Only one soldier was actually executed, an unlucky private from Detroit named Eddie Slovik. This was early 1945, at the moment of the Battle of the Bulge. Mr. Glass observes: “It was not the moment for the supreme Allied commander, Gen. Dwight Eisenhower, to be seen to condone desertion.”

There were far more desertions in Europe than in the Pacific theater. In the Pacific, there was nowhere to disappear to. “In Europe, the total that fled from the front rarely exceeded 1 percent of manpower,” Mr. Glass writes. “However, it reached alarming proportions among the 10 percent of the men in uniform who actually saw combat.”

It is among this book’s central contentions that “few deserters were cowards.” Mr. Glass also observes, “Those who showed the greatest sympathy to deserters were other front-line soldiers.”

Too few men did too much of the fighting during World War II, the author writes. Many of them simply cracked at the seams. Poor leadership was often a factor. “High desertion rates in any company, battalion or division pointed to failures of command and logistics for which blame pointed to leaders as much as to the men who deserted,” he says.

Mr. Glass adds, “Some soldiers deserted when all the other members of their units had been killed and their own deaths appeared inevitable.”

The essential unfairness of so few men seeing the bulk of the combat was undergirded by other facts. Many men never shipped out. Mr. Glass cites a statistic that psychiatrists allowed about 1.75 million men to avoid service for “reasons other than physical.”This special treatment led to bitterness. Mr. Glass quotes a general who wrote, “When, in 1943, it was found that 14 members of the Rice University football team had been rejected for military service, the public was somewhat surprised.”Mr. Glass provides information about desertions in other American wars. During the Civil War, more than 300,000 troops went AWOL from the Union and Confederate armies. He writes, “Mark Twain famously deserted from both sides.” Nearly all of the information I have provided about “The Deserters” thus far comes from its excellent introduction. The rest of the book is not nearly so provocative or rending.

Mr. Glass abandons his textured overview of his topic to focus almost exclusively on three individual soldiers, men who respectively abandoned their posts in France, Italy and Africa.

One was a young man from Brooklyn who fought valiantly with the 36th Infantry Division in Italy and France before coming unglued. Another is the English poet Vernon Scannell, who suffered in Mustafa Barracks, the grim prison camp in Egypt. The third was a Tennessee farm boy who fought bravely with the 2nd Infantry Division before deserting and becoming a criminal in post-liberation Paris.

These men’s stories are not uninteresting, but Mr. Glass tells them at numbing length in bare, reportorial prose that rarely picks up much resonance. On the rare occasions the author reaches for figurative language, he takes a pratfall: “Combat exhaustion was etched into each face as sharp as a bullet hole.”The lives and times of Mr. Glass’s three soldiers slide by slowly, as if you were scanning microfilm. We lose sight of this book’s larger topic for many pages at a time. The men’s stories provide limited points of view. From the author we long for more synthesis and sweep and argument and psychological depth.

Terminology changes. Before we had post-traumatic stress disorder we had battle fatigue, and before that, in World War I, there was shell shock. In her lovely book “Soldier’s Heart: Reading Literature Through Peace and War at West Point” (2007), Elizabeth D. Samet reminds us that “soldier’s heart” was another and quite resonant term for much the same thing.

At its best, “The Deserters” has much to say about soldier’s hearts. It underscores the truth of the following observation, made by a World War II infantry captain named Charles B. MacDonald: “It is always an enriching experience to write about the American soldier in adversity no less than in glittering triumph.”

THE DESERTERS

A Hidden History of World War II

By Charles Glass

Illustrated. 380 pages. The Penguin Press. $27.95.

Voir encore:
“Tu ne tueras point“ : violence, religion et sacrifice chez Mel Gibson

Dans son dernier film, le réalisateur poursuit une œuvre où les héros se débattent dans une vallée de sang et de larmes. Pour tenter de saisir la spiritualité du Christ.

En 1995, dans Braveheart, Mel Gibson se mettait en scène sous les traits et les peintures de guerre de William Wallace. Soumis à la torture à la fin du film, le héros du peuple écossais rendait l’âme en hurlant : « Liberté ! » Pouvait-on se douter que ce dénouement aussi sanglant qu’exalté placerait toute la carrière du réalisateur – jusqu’à Tu ne tueras point aujourd’hui – sous le signe du sacrifice ?

Le lien avec La Passion du Christ (2004) et Apocalypto (2006) semble évident, le premier sur la crucifixion de Jésus, le second sur les sacrifices humains au crépuscule de la civilisation maya. Les deux sont des hécatombes. Pas de sacrifice, chez Gibson, sans tripes ni hémoglobine. Si cette vision a été critiquée pour son simplisme, elle n’en témoigne pas moins d’une conviction de réalisateur : montrer dans le détail la réalité charnelle de la passion du Christ aide à en saisir la dimension spirituelle. Gibson semble friand de ce paradoxe catholique voulant que le salut puisse passer par le spectacle ou le récit de la déchéance. Ce qu’il illustrera d’ailleurs jusque dans sa vie privée par ses frasques et sa traversée du désert après 2006 : problèmes d’alcool, violence, propos antisémites…

L’histoire de Tu ne tueras point (Hacksaw Ridge en VO) ne dépareille pas dans ce tableau : pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale, un objecteur de conscience qui s’est engagé comme infirmier dans l’armée américaine, se retrouve propulsé dans la boucherie de la bataille d’Okinawa. Le champ de bataille que le héros Desmond Doss foule du pied est littéralement tapissé de corps déchiquetés. À un moment du film, un blessé se cache dans la terre pour échapper à la vigilance de ses ennemis, offrant la vision saisissante d’une terre humanisée et, inversement, d’une humanité rabaissée à sa seule condition terrestre. Mais à ces corps rampants répond à la fin du film un plan sur le corps suspendu de Doss, sur fond de nuages radieux. Le héros de Gibson est un saint, c’est-à-dire un trait d’union entre la terre et le ciel. Une idée qui pourra être diversement prise au sérieux, mais dont l’évidence esthétique ne peut que frapper ici.

Gibson semble friand de ce paradoxe catholique voulant que le salut puisse passer par le spectacle ou le récit de la déchéance.

De Braveheart à Tu ne tueras point, l’idée de sacrifice permet à Mel Gibson de faire le pont entre plusieurs idées contradictoires. Le rapport entre la force et la justice, par exemple : tous les héros gibsonniens, victimes d’une injustice initiale, s’interrogent en retour sur l’usage de leur puissance. L’Écossais, après avoir fédéré la rébellion, donne sa mort en exemple. L’Amérindien capturé par des guerriers mayas devient un héros parce qu’il doit sauver sa famille. Et bien sûr Jésus, pourtant le plus puissant de tous, laisse s’abattre sur lui une violence inouïe. Au-delà même de la question de la foi, ces personnages se distinguent par leur capacité à tracer leur propre chemin dans des vallées de sang et de larmes.

Rien d’étonnant, dans ce contexte, à ce que Gibson s’intéresse cette fois-ci à un objecteur de conscience. La représentation de la violence dans le film pose évidemment un certain nombre de problèmes, qui sont intéressants dans la mesure où ils répondent aux questions que se pose Doss sur la guerre. La position de ce dernier est compliquée : adventiste, il ne veut pas toucher à une arme mais veut bien aller au combat. Il y a très vite un écart entre la radicalité de sa position et la casuistique qu’elle finit par impliquer. Ne pourrait-on pas considérer qu’en se battant au côté des soldats, il contribue tout de même à tuer ?

Il y a une ambiguïté équivalente dans la manière dont Gibson représente le déchaînement de la puissance de feu des Américains. C’est comme si le sacrifice de Doss (faire la guerre, mais avant tout pour sauver ses camarades blessés) était augmenté et sublimé par la vision de l’enfer même qu’il est censé avoir refusé. Toujours ce rapport contourné de Gibson à la force, que l’on retrouve chez un autre des personnages du film : le père de Desmond Doss, un pacifiste paradoxalement violent et tourmenté par la vision des boyaux de ses amis morts au combat lors de la Première Guerre mondiale.

Au-delà même de la question de la foi, les personnages de Mel Gibson se distinguent par leur capacité à tracer leur propre chemin dans des vallées de sang et de larmes.

Le sacrifice est enfin, pour Mel Gibson, une sorte de pivot entre les religions païennes et la religion chrétienne, qu’il aime mettre en regard. Apocalypto racontait la fin de la civilisation maya et la manière dont un sacrifice héroïque pouvait prendre le pas sur les sacrifices humains. En toute logique, la fin ouvrait sur l’arrivée des colons chrétiens. Dans Tu ne tueras point, la confrontation avec l’altérité religieuse, tournant à nouveau autour du sacrifice, vient de l’affrontement avec les Japonais, qui ont des kamikazes en guise de héros. La scène de hara kiri d’un général japonais, typiquement gibsonnienne, est une sorte de version négative du sacrifice de Doss.

Tu ne tueras point est à bien des égards un film naïf – ne serait-ce que dans son portrait d’un héroïsme conciliant gaiement la guerre à l’objection de conscience –, mais il l’est de manière audacieuse. La simplicité est un trait de personnalité de Doss, qui est présenté de la même manière étrange que les personnages d’Apocalypto, sans abuser des ficelles canoniques de l’identification. Ce côté très entier du personnage est à l’image d’un film qui va jusqu’au bout de son système : au bord du ridicule sans jamais y basculer totalement, portant la violence jusqu’au grotesque et l’héroïsme jusqu’à la sainteté.

Passé par plusieurs années de purgatoire à Hollywood, essentiellement en raison de ses dérapages personnels, Mel Gibson a-t-il choisi à dessein ce sujet ? Difficile de ne pas se poser la question, tant c’est au cœur des visions infernales et des pulsions bellicistes que le cinéaste semble vouloir ménager pour ses héros – et pour lui-même ? – un horizon pacifique.

Voir enfin:
THOU SHALL NOT KILL
He was devoutly Christian, a member of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, and was unusually, unfashionably (even for America, even for the 1940s) tenacious in his beliefs. Unable to reconcile his adherence to the commandment “Thou shalt not kill” with a role as a soldier, but nonetheless patriotic, he was classed as a conscientious objector and joined the army as a medic. Unlike many other medics, he also refused to carry any form of knife or gun, determined that, no matter what situation he found himself in, he would not take the life of another human being. Instead, Doss’s heroism took another form: he is remembered today for the number of lives he saved.
Original estimates places the number of lives saved at 100: Doss (both modest and rigorously honest) later insisted that “it couldn’t have been more than 50”, and the 75 figure was agreed as a compromise.
In some ways, Doss himself – a man who combined staunch religious faith with patriotism and outstanding bravery – feels like the perfect movie subject for both the traditional American heartlands and for Gibson himself, who is Catholic and often described as an ultra-conservative. But Doss’s story is also a very human one, with a much wider importance and appeal.
Whether or not the film will really restore Gibson to awards-ceremony respectability and acclaim remains to be seen – but it looks as if one of America’s most unlikely heroes may have finally received a fitting cinematic tribute.
Desmond Doss was born in Lynchburg, Virginia, son of William Thomas Doss, a carpenter, and Bertha E. (Oliver) Doss. Enlisting voluntarily in April 1942, Doss refused to kill an enemy soldier or carry a weapon (pistol) into combat because of his personal beliefs as a Seventh-day Adventist. He consequently became a medic, and while serving in the Pacific theatre of World War II, he saved the lives of numerous comrades, while at the same time adhering to his religious convictions. Doss was wounded three times during the war, and shortly before leaving the Army, he was diagnosed with tuberculosis, which cost him a lung. Discharged from the Army in 1946, he spent five years undergoing medical treatment for his injuries and illness….

Héritage Obama: Attention, un monstre peut en cacher un autre ! (The “Legacy of Obama” can be explained in one word: Trump)

20 février, 2017
osmonster obamaangel
Obamastein

Le monde moderne n’est pas mauvais : à certains égards, il est bien trop bon. Il est rempli de vertus féroces et gâchées. Lorsqu’un dispositif religieux est brisé (comme le fut le christianisme pendant la Réforme), ce ne sont pas seulement les vices qui sont libérés. Les vices sont en effet libérés, et ils errent de par le monde en faisant des ravages ; mais les vertus le sont aussi, et elles errent plus férocement encore en faisant des ravages plus terribles. Le monde moderne est saturé des vieilles vertus chrétiennes virant à la folie.  G.K. Chesterton
Tous les grands événements et personnages historiques se répètent pour ainsi dire deux fois […] la première fois comme tragédie, la seconde fois comme farce. Marx
Il faut constamment se battre pour voir ce qui se trouve au bout de son nez. George Orwell
Le plus difficile n’est pas de dire ce que l’on voit mais d’accepter de voir ce que l’on voit. Charles Péguy
Qui veut noyer son chien l’accuse de la rage. La Fontaine
Nous crions d’un bout à l’autre de l’Afrique : Attention, l’Amérique a la rage. Tranchons tous les liens qui nous rattachent à elle, sinons nous serons à notre tour mordus et enragés. Sartre (1953)
The average reporter we talk to is 27 years old, and their only reporting experience consists of being around political campaigns. That’s a sea change. They literally know nothing. (…) We created an echo chamber. They were saying things that validated what we had given them to say. Ben Rhodes (conseiller du président Obama)
When a Republican congressman on MSNBC brought up a 2012 incident where President Barack Obama was caught on a hot mic promising to give Russia’s Vladimir Putin a little more “flexibility” after the election, NBC journalist and MSNBC host Katy Tur seemed not to recall the incident. Tur pressed Florida Representative Francis Rooney about the number of Donald Trump advisors with close tie to Russia. “I see a lot of folks within Donald Trump’s administration who have a friendlier view of Russia than maybe past administrations did,” she noted. “Well, I think it was Obama that leaned over to Putin and said, ‘I’ll have a little more flexibility to give you what you want after the re-election,’” Rooney responded. Tur paused for a moment. “I’m sorry, I don’t know what you’re referring to, Congressman,” she said. “Remember when he leaned over at a panel discussion or in a meeting, and he said, ‘I’ll have more flexibility after the election’?” Rooney asked. “No one pushed the president on what he meant by that, but I can only assume for a thug like Putin that it would embolden him,” which gave Tur pause, again. In Tur’s defense, Rooney is slightly off in his retelling: it was then-Russian President Dmitry Medvedev who Obama whispered to, who then promised to relay Obama’s message to Putin. But his recollection of the content of Obama’s message was accurate: “This is my last election. After my election I have more flexibility,” he told the Russians. Obama’s hot mic comments were major news at the time, receiving widespread coverage. Obama’s Republican opponent Mitt Romney seized upon the gaffe and worked it into his stump speeches, even bringing it up during one of the presidential debates. Mediaite
Donald Trump est ici ce soir et je sais qu’il s’est pris des critiques ces derniers temps, mais personne n’est plus heureux, plus fier, que cette affaire de certificat de naissance soit enfin réglée que le Donald. Et c’est parce qu’il va maintenant pouvoir se concentrer sur les problèmes importants. Par exemple, notre vol sur la Lune était-il un faux? Qu’est-il vraiment arrivé à Roswell? Et où sont Biggie et Tupac ?  Barack Obama
Cette soirée d’humiliation publique, plutôt que d’éloigner M. Trump (de la scène politique), a accéléré ses efforts féroces pour gagner en stature au sein du monde politique. Et cela illustre jusqu’à quel point la campagne de Trump est inspirée par un besoin profond (qui est) parfois obscurci par ses fanfaronnades et vantardises : un désir d’être pris au sérieux. The NY Times
La présidence Obama a inventé une propagande branchée, une communication cool. Au cœur de cette stratégie  : les réseaux sociaux, qui ont largement porté sa victoire en 2008. L’engagement numérique de la campagne du «Yes We Can» a d’ailleurs été décortiqué par les équipes de com du monde entier. Tandis que la droite américaine propageait son venin conspirationniste par de bonnes vieilles chaînes de mails –  le candidat démocrate aurait menti sur son certificat de naissance, serait musulman…  –, Obama prenait mille longueurs d’avance, touchant un public beaucoup plus large, plus jeune. «En 2008, les efforts de son adversaire, John McCain, pour tenter de le rattraper sur les réseaux sociaux étaient presque pathétiques», se souvient Michael Barris, coauteur de The Social Media President (Palgrave, 2013). L’équipe du sénateur de l’Illinois a compris l’intérêt de Facebook, de Twitter –  plus tard viendront Instagram, Snapchat, LinkedIn…  – pour lever des fonds, diffuser des messages, obtenir des soutiens, grâce à ce porte-à-porte virtuel d’un nouveau genre. «Obama s’est fait élire sur des promesses de démocratie participative via les réseaux sociaux, rappelle Michael Barris. Mais finalement, les réseaux sociaux ont surtout été pour lui un formidable outil de diffusion, de validation par le public, et de promotion d’une image très positive : celle d’un président branché, connecté, proche des gens.» Viser un public, via le bon médium, avec le bon ton : huit ans que le président américain, avec son équipe de quatorze personnes dédiée à la stratégie numérique, montre sa maîtrise. Et son adaptation à l’évolution des usages. La Maison Blanche est devenue une véritable boîte de production, avec plus de 500 vidéos réalisées chaque année (infographies, coulisses…), distribuées sur les différentes plateformes (site officiel, YouTube, Facebook…). «Le premier président de l’ère des médias sociaux a fixé les règles d’interactions numériques entre politiques et électeurs, écrit le Washington Post. Certains chefs d’Etat se préoccupaient des chaînes d’info ; Obama est le président ­Netflix.» (….) Mais le président américain ne laisse rien au hasard : cette spontanéité est surtout parfaitement chorégraphiée, écrite à l’avance par des équipes d’auteurs talentueux. D’autodérision, il en a beaucoup fait preuve lors du dîner annuel des correspondants à la Maison Blanche, véritable scène de stand-up pour le président sortant. Maîtrise des silences, des regards, intonations, vidéos bien ficelées… Ces soirs-là, Obama fait de l’humour une technique de dégoupillage imparable des critiques. Comme en 2011, alors que la droite le harcèle une nouvelle fois sur son certificat de naissance. Pour faire taire les rumeurs, il annonce la «diffusion exclusive de la vidéo de sa mise au monde» –  en fait, le début du Roi Lion de Disney. Dans la salle, Donald Trump, déjà porte-voix de ces allégations, ne moufte pas. Les journalistes, qui rient à gorge déployée, ont laissé leurs armes au vestiaire. Libération
Chacun sait que notre époque de fausse liberté a accouché d’une tyrannie de la pensée dont la sage-femme devenue folle était déguisée en antiraciste diplômée. Valeurs Actuelles en a fait les frais en osant voiler Marianne pour défendre la laïcité républicaine contre les menées islamistes et Pascal Bruckner comme Georges Bensoussan payeront peut-être le prix pour des raisons voisines. Silence dans les rangs de la gauche paraît-il démocratique. Mais aujourd’hui vient d’éclater une tout autre affaire dans laquelle, au contraire, le racisme comme l’antisémitisme n’ont rien d’imaginaire. Et je prends le pari, qu’ici, précisément, les organisations prétendument antiracistes resteront aux abris. La vedette s’appelle Mehdi Meklat, hier encore il était la coqueluche de la famille islamo-gauchiste et de tous ses compagnons de chambrée. Dans le numéro du 1er février des Inrockuptibles il partageait la une avec l’icône Taubira. Il collaborait aussi avec le Bondy Blog, très engagé dans le combat actuel contre les policiers considérés uniment comme des tortionnaires racistes. Il était encore récemment chroniqueur de la radio active de service public France Inter. Oui mais voilà, patatras, on a retrouvé parmi les milliers de tweets qu’il n’a pas réussi à effacer des gazouillis racistes du dernier cri strident. Échantillons choisis : “je crache des glaires sur la sale gueule de Charb et tous ceux de Charlie hebdo”. “Sarkozy = la synagogue = les juifs = Shalom = oui, mon fils = l’argent”, “Faites entrer Hitler pour tuer les juifs”, “j’ai gagné 20 $ au PMU, je ne les ai pas rejoués parce que je suis un juif”, “les Blancs vous devez mourir asap” etc. Avec une touchante spontanéité, à présent qu’ils ont été découverts, voici ce que notre Mehdi a tweeté samedi dernier : “je m’excuse si ces tweets ont pu choquer certains d’entre vous : ils sont obsolètes”. Bah voyons, certains datent de 2012, autant dire le déluge. J’en connais qui vont fouiller les poubelles du père Le Pen, d’autres qui reprochent à un ancien conseiller de Sarkozy d’avoir dirigé Minute il y a 30 ans, mais dans notre cas, certains plaident déjà l’Antiquité… Gilles-William Goldnadel
Mehdi Meklat, 24 ans, était jusqu’ici connu pour son ton décalé. Du Bondy Blog, à France Inter en passant par Arte, le chroniqueur, journaliste et auteur, s’est taillé, avec son compère Badrou (« les Kids », époque France Inter) une réputation de porte-voix de la jeunesse, « à l’avant garde d’une nouvelle génération venue de banlieue » écrivaient encore Les Inrocks le 1er février. Sauf qu’entre temps, des internautes ont exhumé des tweets de Meklat : injures antisémites, homophobes, racistes, misogynes. Un florilège qui provoque la sidération. De son côte, le jeune homme s’excuse, dépublie, et assure qu’il s’agissait « de questionner la notion d’excès et de provocation » à travers un « personnage fictif ». Faire mentir les stéréotypes sur les-jeunes-de-banlieue. Sans rien renier de soi. Depuis ses débuts au Bondy Blog en 2008, c’est ce que Mehdi Meklat tente de faire, au gré d’une exposition médiatique précoce. A 24 ans désormais, après avoir fait ses premiers pas de journaliste au Bondy Blog à 16 ans, puis tenu chronique pendant six ans chez France Inter en duo avec son ami Badrou (« les Kids »), Meklat le touche à tout (réalisateur, blogueur, reporter) est en promo pour un second livre. Mehdi et Badrou « l’avant-garde d’une nouvelle génération venue de banlieue qui compte bien faire entendre sa voix » écrivaient les Inrocks qui leur consacraient une couverture le 1er février en compagnie de Christiane Taubira. Un binôme qui avait tapé dans l’œil de l’animatrice de France Inter Pascale Clark dès 2010, pour son ton « décalé », sa capacité à chroniquer avec autant d’acuité la vie de l’autre côté du périph (Meklat a grandi à Saint-Ouen, Badrou à la Courneuve) que le tout venant de l’actualité plus « médiatique ». Et voilà que depuis quelques jours, après son passage sur le plateau de l’émission la Grande Librairie (France 5) pour la promo de son second livre, le roman « Minute » (co-écrit avec Badrou), Meklat est dans l’œil du cyclone Twitter. Propulsé dans les sujets les plus discutés non pas pour la promotion de son nouvel ouvrage dédié à Adama Traoré. Mais pour des tweets, exhumés ces derniers jours par plusieurs internautes. Pas quelques tweets isolés. Mais des messages par dizaines, anciens (2012) et pour certains plus récents (2016) dans lesquels Meklat tape tous azimuts sur « les Français », « les juifs », « les homos », Alain Finkelkraut, Charlie Hebdo, les séropositifs, les « travelos »… La liste est longue, et les messages à même d’interpeller. Une prose en 140 signes qui tranche avec l’image de jeune talent à la plume « poétique » et acérée que Meklat s’était jusqu’ici taillée et qui lui a valu jusqu’à aujourd’hui des articles dithyrambiques dans la presse culturelle. Quelques heures auront suffit pour que, soient exhumés et massivement partagés des dizaines de messages issus de son compte twitter personnel @mehdi_meklat. (…) Parmi les premiers et les plus zélés chasseurs de tweets, la fachosphère s’est ruée sur l’occasion. Le blog d’extrême droite Fdesouche publie à tout-va plus d’une cinquantaine de messages de Meklat « journaliste homophobe et antisémite du Bondy blog ». Le site d’extrême droite Boulevard Voltaire, fondé par Robert Ménard, trouve là prétexte à acculer la « gauchosphère sous son vrai visage », quand l’ex-porte parole de génération identitaire s’en donne, lui aussi, à coeur joie. Très vite rejoint dans cette avalanche d’indignation par Marion Maréchal Le Pen. Ce dimanche, la twitta-éditorialiste du Figaro Eugénie Bastié y allait aussi de ses commentaires en 140 signes, suivis d’un article corrosif, soulignant bien au passage que Meklat avait fondé il y a peu avec le journaliste Mouloud Achour (CliqueTV) les « éditions du grand Remplacement » qui ont lancé en juin dernier un magazine baptisé « Téléramadan ». Cette nouvelle revue annuelle qui entend parler d’islam de façon dépassionnée, avait su trouver un titre pied-de-nez déjà à même de faire bondir certains. Mais dans le cas des tweets de Meklat, de fait, la sidération dépasse de loin la sphère des militants de droite et d’extrême droite. D’autres aussi s’indignent : de simples twittos, mais aussi des journalistes, tels Françoise Laborde, Claude Askolovitch, des élus PS comme la ministre de la Famille Laurence Rossignol, ou encore la conseillère municipale Elodie Jauneau sans compter le délégué interministériel à la lutte contre le racisme et l’antisémitisme Gille Clavreul. Ils interpellent les Inrocks qui ont placé Meklat en Une de leur numéro du 1er février au côté de Taubira. Ils apostrophent également les éditions du Seuil où Meklat vient de publier son ouvrage, et font part de leur stupéfaction. A l’image de l’auteur de bande dessinée, romancier et réalisateur, Joann Sfar qui s’étrangle : « Je découvre tout ça ce matin, il semble que c’est authentique. Je trouve ça inexcusable quand on se veut représentant de la jeunesse. » Face à l’avalanche de messages indignés, sommé de s’expliquer, samedi après-midi, Meklat se fend finalement de quatre tweets d’excuse et d’explication : « je m’excuse si ces tweets ont pu choquer certains d’entre vous : ils sont obsolètes », assure Meklat qui supprimera dans la foulée la totalité de ses tweets d’avant février 2017 (plus de 30 000). Surtout, il affirme que ces messages ne reflètent en rien sa pensée. Il ne nie pas en être l’auteur, mais assure qu’il s’agit de messages parodiques. « Jusqu’en 2015, sous le pseudo Marcelin Deschamps, j’incarnais un personnage honteux raciste antisémite misogyne homophobe sur Twitter ». Marcellin Deschamps ? Un « personnage fictif », assure-t-il par lequel il avait entrepris de « questionner la notion d’excès et de provocation ». Mais, il l’affirme : les propos de ce personnage « ne représentent évidemment pas ma pensée et en sont tout l’inverse. » Sur Twitter, une fois troqué son pseudo contre son vrai patronyme, le jeune homme n’a pas supprimé ces anciens messages, apparaissant depuis sous son vrai nom Mehdi Meklat. Dans la foulée, ce samedi, l’animatrice radio Pascale Clark, ex chaperonne de Meklat à France Inter (2010-2015) a pris sa défense « Son personnage odieux, fictif, ne servait qu’à dénoncer », assure-t-elle sur Twitter avant de préciser dans un second message : « Les comiques font ça à longueur d’antenne et tout le monde applaudit ». Un peu facile de se cacher derrière un personnage fictif ? A la remarque de plusieurs internautes, le journaliste Claude Askolovitch tempère : « c’est même piteux. Mais cela ne change pas la nature de ses messages pourris – une énorme connerie, pas des appels au meurtre ». Si le journaliste ne cache pas son dégoût pour ces messages qu’il assimile à « des excréments verbaux », « des blagues absolument laides, impardonnables, perverses », « dans un jeu périlleux », il se refuse à y voir de « vraies prises de position ». Tout en tançant « un mec qui s’est cru assez malin pour twitter des immondices ». « Twitter des immondices », sous pseudo dans « un jeu périlleux » ? Yagg, le site de presse LGBT y avait vu davantage qu’un jeu. Le site avait bondi en mars 2014 quand Meklat écrivait sur Twitter : « Christophe Barbier a des enfants séropo ». Yagg le taxe alors d’ « humour sérophobe », « au goût douteux » (visant des personnes séropositives). Le site avait contacté Meklat pour qu’il s’en explique. Réponse de l’intéressé : « J’ai un pseudo sur Twitter, il ne faut pas faire d’amalgame entre mon personnage et moi-même ». Contacté par Yagg, il développait : « Je peux comprendre qu’on se sente insulté par mes tweets, car ils sont parfois extrêmes, provocants ou insultants, mais il ne faut pas en faire des tonnes(…) J’ai créé un personnage violent, provocant, méchant. Pourquoi? Je ne me l’explique pas à moi-même, alors je ne peux pas l’expliquer aux autres. Mais je ne suis pas du tout homophobe. » En octobre 2012, les Inrocks consacraient un portrait élogieux (comme beaucoup) aux gamins précoces Mehdi Meklat et Badroudine Saïd Abdallah, alias « les Kids » de France inter qui entamaient leur quatrième saison sur les ondes de la radio publique. « Un matin, ils partent avec leur micro enregistrer la plainte de la vallée de Florange abandonnée, le lendemain ils sont à l’Elysée et tapent la discute avec Michael Haeneke » écrivent les Inrocks qui dressent le portrait de deux « gamins « talentueux », de « vrais passe-murailles ». Comme beaucoup, l’hebdo s’enthousiasme de leur « reportages poétiques » et de leur « style unique ». Les Inrocks notent : « ils attirent les sympathies ». Quant à Meklat ? Au passage, l’hebdo raconte que c’est « le plus provoc » de deux. « Il faut le voir sur Twitter, vaguement caché derrière un pseudo depuis longtemps éventé : c’est une vraie terreur. Il se pose en métallo furieux, insulte à tout va, se moque de tout et de tous avec une férocité indécente » écrivent les Inrocks qui commentent : « Ça peut aller trop loin (France Inter lui a déjà demandé de retirer un tweet) mais la plupart du temps, c’est drôle à mourir. » Et Meklat d’expliquer déjà que sur le réseau social il « joue un personnage » : « Je ne suis attaché à rien, je n’ai de comptes à rendre à personne, j’ai la liberté de dire ce que je veux. C’est un terrain de jeu, j’y abuse de tout, je ne me mets pas de limite. » Trois ans plus tard. Octobre 2015. Les « Kids » de Pascale Clark ont grandi. Lorsque Le Monde les interviewe pour la sortie de leur premier livre, la journaliste s’attarde sur le cas Meklat. « Si doux et poli à la ville, Mehdi s’est inventé sur Twitter un double diabolique, qui insulte à tout-va », écrit Le Monde. Meklat commente alors : « Tout est trop convenu, on n’ose plus s’énerver. L’idée de casser ça en étant méchant gratuitement me plaît ». En septembre 2016, dans un long article, la journaliste Marie-France Etchegoin revenait pour M le magazine du Monde sur le parcours et l’état d’esprit du tandem Mehdi-Badrou, « une nouvelle génération, à la fois cool et dure, investissant le champ de la culture plutôt que celui des partis politiques, et extrêmement engagée ». Engagée, brillante et convoitée. Comme l’explique M, le duo Mehdi-Badrou est sollicité de toutes parts, ces dernier temps. Ici pour pour un projet avec la Fondation Cartier, là pour écrire un dossier de presse pour un long-métrage avec Depardieu. Ou encore pour mettre en scène la pièce d’un auteur suédois. Quant à leur magazine Téléramadan, la revue annuelle « des musulmans qui ne veulent plus s’excuser d’exister », la journaliste explique que « Pierre Bergé mais aussi Agnès b ont accepté de soutenir la revue ». Parfait. Seul bémol dans la success story, observe la journaliste : « Les bonnes fées qui accompagnent les deux garçons depuis l’adolescence observent leur évolution, avec parfois une pointe d’inquiétude, qui n’empêche ni bienveillance ni compréhension. » Concrètement ? Il est question notamment de Meklat et de son usage de Twitter. « Un troll déchaîné qui déconne et dézingue à tout-va. «Giclez-lui sa mère», «On s’en bat les couilles», «Elle est pas morte, celle-là?» « , énumère la journaliste qui constate : « il se défoule sur des personnalités dont les manières ou les prises de position sur l’islam n’ont pas l’heur de lui plaire ». Certains parrains et autres bonnes fées, explique la journaliste, s’en soucient : « «Arrête ces Tweets! Tu n’es pas dans une cour de récréation!» Mouloud Achour le met en garde: «Les écrits restent, un jour on te les ressortira.». Quant à Mehdi, raconte la journaliste, il « se défend, la main sur le cœur: «Ce n’est pas moi, c’est un personnage que j’ai inventé», ne pouvant s’empêcher d’ajouter, comme dans un lapsus: «Mes Tweets sont des pulsions!» » Meklat et son avatar pulsionnel, une histoire qui ne date pas d’hier. Un double « je » qui ne semble pas géner Meklat, mais qui ne met pas tout le monde à l’aise. Ce dimanche, l’animateur de la Grande Librairie (France 5) François Busnel, qui avait invité Meklat cette semaine publie un communiqué pour prendre ses distances avec son invité. Busnel y affirme que si il avait eu connaissance de ces messages, il n’aurait pas invité le jeune homme dans son émission. Samedi, le Bondy Blog, pressé par une foule d’internautes de réagir, avait également publié un message sur Twitter , expliquant que « les tweets de Meklat n’engagent en aucun cas la responsabilité de la rédaction ». Et le média de préciser : « Puisqu’il y a des évidences qu’il faut affirmer, le Bondy Blog ne peut cautionner des propos antisémites, sexistes, homophobes, racistes, ou tout autre propos discriminatoires et stigmatisants, même sur le ton de l’humour ». Arrêt sur images
Des milliers de manifestants anti-Trump ont défilé à New York lundi et dans plusieurs villes américaines à l’occasion du « Presidents Day », un jour férié en l’honneur des présidents des Etats-Unis. Au cri de « Pas mon président! », quelque 10’000 manifestants  – selon une estimation officieuse de la police – de tous âges et toutes origines se sont rassemblés devant le Trump International Hotel de New York près de Central Park, pour exprimer une nouvelle fois leur opposition au milliardaire républicain un mois jour pour jour après son entrée en fonction.  Les activistes anti-Trump avaient appelé à détourner les célébrations du « Presidents Day » au profit d’un « Not My President Day » avec des rassemblements dans plusieurs villes, dont Los Angeles, Chicago, Atlanta et Washington. Par ailleurs, environ 7000 opposants à Donald Trump ont manifesté lundi aux abords du parlement britannique contre le projet de visite d’Etat du président américain à Londres. Cela au moment même où les députés débattaient du sujet. Une pétition demandant que sa visite ne soit pas « d’Etat » – ce qui pourrait mettre la reine dans l’embarras -, a recueilli 1,8 million de signatures. RTS info
Fuir Washington, le temps d’un week-end de trois jours. Donald Trump attendait impatiemment cette escapade en Floride, devant ses irréductibles supporteurs, fidèles de la première heure, qui se font si rares depuis un mois à Washington. Oublier le froid, le crachin pendant le discours d’investiture, ces médias «malhonnêtes», ces manifestants acrimonieux, les fuites des services secrets, la fronde de la Justice face à son décret sur l’immigration, celle du Congrès face à ses plans grandioses de mur à la frontière mexicaine, le limogeage à contrecœur du général Michael Flynn, son conseiller à la sécurité nationale, éclaboussé par la «Russian Connection», et les centaines de nominations gouvernementales en souffrance. Mais tout cela n’a que peu d’importance pour le «peuple de Trump». «Nous l’aimons et nous sommes venus le lui dire», s’exclame Sheila Gaylor, une résidente de Melbourne, où le président fait escale le temps d’un rassemblement populaire. Comme durant la campagne, lorsque l’adrénaline le poussait de l’avant. Cette ivresse s’est tarie, mais voici l’occasion de la ressusciter, grâce à un bain de foule régénérateur, et de remettre le tribun sur orbite, loin du «marigot» fédéral si difficile à «assécher». Dans le hangar 6 de l’aérodrome local, plusieurs milliers de Floridiens, blancs pour la plupart, se pressent pour apercevoir la tignasse blonde la plus célèbre du monde, et la silhouette élégante de sa femme, Melania. C’est ici, à Melbourne, en septembre 2016, que 15 000 supporteurs déchaînés ont offert au candidat républicain l’une de ses escales les plus mémorables. Peu importe que les opposants se fassent entendre au dehors, réclamant la destitution du président milliardaire.«Ils ne sont que quelques milliers, alors que nous sommes 50 000. Vous croyez que les médias malhonnêtes vont parler de quoi?» gronde une femme à crinière blonde, reprenant le discours officiel.Les pro-Trump ne sont en réalité que 9 000, selon la police de Melbourne sur Twitter, mais leur enthousiasme, débordant, est récompensé par un vrombissement dans le ciel: le Boeing présidentiel Air Force One surgit en rase-mottes, déclenchant les vivats. Le quadriréacteur s’immobilise dans le soleil couchant, et le couple présidentiel apparaît. Dans un tonnerre d’ovations, le chef de l’État s’empresse de révéler la raison de sa venue sur la Space Coast: «Je suis ici parce que je veux être parmi mes amis, et parmi le peuple. Je veux être au même endroit que des patriotes travailleurs qui aiment leur pays, qui saluent le drapeau et prient pour un avenir meilleur.» Ce même peuple qui l’a porté au pouvoir et continue de lui vouer une loyauté sans faille. Ce soutien est inestimable, et probablement fondamental: apprenant à naviguer dans l’air vicié de Washington, le milliardaire va devoir pérenniser sa base militante, surtout s’il compte briguer une réélection en 2020. C’est d’ailleurs son comité de soutien officiel, lancé le 20 janvier, qui finance l’événement du jour, annonciateur de raouts semblables à l’avenir. Bronzé et visiblement détendu, Donald Trump s’amuse avec la foule. Il recycle ses thèmes les plus populaires et désigne ses boucs émissaires habituels. (…) Un mot, un seul, à l’adresse des médias, une allusion (erronée) à «tous ces grands présidents, comme Thomas Jefferson, qui se sont souvent battus avec les médias, ont dénoncé leurs mensonges», et des centaines de poings rageurs se dressent vers la forêt de caméras. Que ses ouailles se rassurent: «La Maison-Blanche tourne comme sur des roulettes!» «CNN craint!» renchérit la foule en chœur. «Je peux vous parler directement, sans le filtre des fausses informations», poursuit Trump. (…) À l’applaudimètre, celui que «nous attendions depuis si longtemps», selon Claudia, une mère au foyer venue de Titusville, un rejeton assoupi dans les bras, ce «héros qui va se dresser», selon l’expression imprimée sur les badges d’accès, l’emporte en évoquant les emplois, le business, qui vont décoller sous son mandat, ces contrats militaires bons pour la région, et, surtout, ce «fichu islamisme radical que nous allons tenir à distance de notre pays». (…) «Il est vraiment formidable, il est comme nous, il parle comme nous, confient d’une seule voix Jake et Colleen, un couple de retraités débonnaire exhibant toute la panoplie du parfait petit supporteur, croisé dans la pénombre en bordure d’aérodrome, pour voir s’envoler le Boeing présidentiel. Il est en train de tenir toutes ses promesses, encore plus vite que prévu. Au-delà de toutes nos attentes!» Le Figaro
Thank you, President Barack Obama, for serving the country for the past eight years. (…) Thank you for the Iran deal. Before the deal, Iran was weeks from attaining nuclear bomb capability. Now the world has a decade before the mullahs have the capability of developing a bomb. (…) Thank you for killing Osama bin Laden. And for taking out al-Qaida’s senior leadership. And for stopping and reversing gains by ISIS. (…) Thank you for standing up to Vladimir Putin. You saw the expansionist, anti-democratic nature of Putin’s actions in Ukraine and quickly confronted him. Perhaps that opposition slowed what may have been an inevitable march through the Baltics. (….) Thank you for recognizing our Cuba embargo was a failed policy and that the time for change had come. Thank you for steering the country through the recession. Thank you for cutting unemployment in half. And for doing so in the face of Republican obstructionism on the kind of infrastructure bill that your successor now likely will get through. Thank you for doubling clean energy production. For recognizing that our dependence on fossil fuels can’t help but degrade our environment and hold us back from being competitive in the green energy future, and embolden corrupt and backward regimes from Venezuela to the Middle East to Russia. (…) Thank you for the Affordable Care Act. It has brought the security of health care to millions. It has saved lives. It has kept the rate of cost increases in premiums lower in the past eight years than they were in the previous eight years. It needs to be fixed — what doesn’t? — but only with better ideas, not worse ones. (…) Thank you for trying to get immigration reform through Congress, and for pursuing the policy known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, which let 5 million people already living and working here come out of the shadows. (…) Thank you for trying. You grappled with one great chaos after another, and sometimes you fell short. In Syria, you needed a smarter course of action. In Israeli-Palestinian peacemaking, you underestimated the need, early on, to deal with Israeli fears and Palestinian obstructionism. As for ending the Sudan embargo, the jury is out. (…) Thank you. Thank you for not embarrassing us, your family or yourself. Though your opponents and their friends at “Fox and Friends” tried to pin scandals to you, none could stick. In my lifetime, there has never been an administration so free from personal and professional moral stain. Thank you for the seriousness, dignity, grace, humor and cool you brought to the Oval Office. Thank you for being my president. Rob Eshman
I think it’s important not to dismiss the president’s reply simply as dumb. We ought to assume that it’s darkly brilliant — if not in intention than certainly in effect. The president is responding to a claim of fact not by denying the fact, but by denying the claim that facts are supposed to have on an argument. He isn’t telling O’Reilly that he’s got his facts wrong. He’s saying that, as far as he is concerned, facts, as most people understand the term, don’t matter: That they are indistinguishable from, and interchangeable with, opinion; and that statements of fact needn’t have any purchase against a man who is either sufficiently powerful to ignore them or sufficiently shameless to deny them — or, in his case, both. (…) But the most interesting conversation is not about why Donald Trump lies. Many public figures lie, and he’s only a severe example of a common type. The interesting conversation concerns how we come to accept those lies. Nearly 25 years ago, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, the great scholar and Democratic Senator from New York, coined the phrase, “defining deviancy down.” His topic at the time was crime, and how American society had come to accept ever-increasing rates of violent crime as normal. “We have been re-defining deviancy so as to exempt much conduct previously stigmatized, and also quietly raising the ‘normal’ level in categories where behavior is now abnormal by any earlier standard,” Moynihan wrote. You can point to all sorts of ways in which this redefinition of deviancy has also been the story of our politics over the past 30 years, a story with a fully bipartisan set of villains. I personally think we crossed a rubicon in the Clinton years, when three things happened: we decided that some types of presidential lies didn’t matter; we concluded that “character” was an over-rated consideration when it came to judging a president; and we allowed the lines between political culture and celebrity culture to become hopelessly blurred. But whatever else one might say about President Clinton, what we have now is the crack-cocaine version of that. If a public figure tells a whopping lie once in his life, it’ll haunt him into his grave. If he lies morning, noon and night, it will become almost impossible to remember any one particular lie. Outrage will fall victim to its own ubiquity. It’s the same truth contained in Stalin’s famous remark that the death of one man is a tragedy but the death of a million is a statistic. One of the most interesting phenomena during the presidential campaign was waiting for Trump to say that one thing that would surely break the back of his candidacy. Would it be his slander against Mexican immigrants? Or his slur about John McCain’s record as a POW? Or his lie about New Jersey Muslims celebrating 9/11? Or his attacks on Megyn Kelly, on a disabled New York Times reporter, on a Mexican-American judge? Would it be him tweeting quotations from Benito Mussolini, or his sly overtures to David Duke and the alt-right? Would it be his unwavering praise of Vladimir Putin? Would it be his refusal to release his tax returns, or the sham that seems to been perpetrated on the saps who signed up for his Trump U courses? Would it be the tape of him with Billy Bush? None of this made the slightest difference. On the contrary, it helped him. Some people became desensitized by the never-ending assaults on what was once quaintly known as “human decency.” Others seemed to positively admire the comments as refreshing examples of personal authenticity and political incorrectness. (…) Donald Trump’s was the greatest political strip-tease act in U.S. political history: the dirtier he got, the more skin he showed, the more his core supporters liked it. Abraham Lincoln, in his first inaugural address, called on Americans to summon “the better angels of our nature.” Donald Trump’s candidacy, and so far his presidency, has been Lincoln’s exhortation in reverse. Bret Stephens
Barack Obama is the Dr. Frankenstein of the supposed Trump monster. If a charismatic, Ivy League-educated, landmark president who entered office with unprecedented goodwill and both houses of Congress on his side could manage to wreck the Democratic Party while turning off 52 percent of the country, then many voters feel that a billionaire New York dealmaker could hardly do worse. If Obama had ruled from the center, dealt with the debt, addressed radical Islamic terrorism, dropped the politically correct euphemisms and pushed tax and entitlement reform rather than Obamacare, Trump might have little traction. A boring Hillary Clinton and a staid Jeb Bush would most likely be replaying the 1992 election between Bill Clinton and George H.W. Bush — with Trump as a watered-down version of third-party outsider Ross Perot. But America is in much worse shape than in 1992. And Obama has proved a far more divisive and incompetent president than George H.W. Bush. Little is more loathed by a majority of Americans than sanctimonious PC gobbledygook and its disciples in the media. And Trump claims to be PC’s symbolic antithesis. Making Machiavellian Mexico pay for a border fence or ejecting rude and interrupting Univision anchor Jorge Ramos from a press conference is no more absurd than allowing more than 300 sanctuary cities to ignore federal law by sheltering undocumented immigrants. Putting a hold on the immigration of Middle Eastern refugees is no more illiberal than welcoming into American communities tens of thousands of unvetted foreign nationals from terrorist-ridden Syria. In terms of messaging, is Trump’s crude bombast any more radical than Obama’s teleprompted scripts? Trump’s ridiculous view of Russian President Vladimir Putin as a sort of « Art of the Deal » geostrategic partner is no more silly than Obama insulting Putin as Russia gobbles up former Soviet republics with impunity. Obama callously dubbed his own grandmother a « typical white person, » introduced the nation to the racist and anti-Semitic rantings of the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, and petulantly wrote off small-town Pennsylvanians as near-Neanderthal « clingers. » Did Obama lower the bar for Trump’s disparagements? Certainly, Obama peddled a slogan, « hope and change, » that was as empty as Trump’s « make America great again. » (…) How does the establishment derail an out-of-control train for whom there are no gaffes, who has no fear of The New York Times, who offers no apologies for speaking what much of the country thinks — and who apparently needs neither money from Republicans nor politically correct approval from Democrats? Victor Davis Hanson
To me, the “Legacy of Obama” can be explained in one word: Trump. Hallie Lerman
Once hailed as a political genius, Obama’s radicalism led his party into disarray, and repeated electoral disaster, with some 1000 national and state legislative seats and many Governorships lost during his tenure. Ungenerous to his political opponents, he ultimately was quite uncaring about his own political party too. The black community faired quite economically poorly during his two terms. And, abandoning his roots, Barack Obama has sadly accepted no accountability for the years-long murder wave gripping Chi-town. Barack Hussein Obama chose purposefully to assail American allies abroad, befriend tyrannies, abandon dissidents and victims abroad, and attack traditional Americans and economic growth at home. He was also never a truth teller about Islamic Jihad and the challenge of radical Islam’s assaults on Americans within our own borders. His legacy is to have made America less safe and sovereign, less prosperous and entrepreneurial, and less united than the promised hope and change campaign of 2008. Larry Greenfield
Tiré à quatre épingles, col blanc éclatant et cravate rouge vif, l’homme grand, noir, élégant, fait son apparition sur scène devant des milliers de drapeaux américains portés par une marée humaine en délire. Des applaudissements se mélangent aux cris hystériques, pleurs et voix hurlant en chœur « Yes we can ». Les larmes coulent sur les joues du révérend Jesse Jackson qui vient d’apprendre que le rêve de Martin Luther King s’est réalisé en ce 4 novembre 2008. Et le monde entier assiste, le souffle coupé, à cette scène inédite de l’histoire. « Hello Chicago », lance le quadragénaire avec un sourire tiré des publicités de dentifrice. « S’il y a encore quelqu’un qui doute que l’Amérique est un endroit où tout est possible, ce soir, vous avez votre réponse. » Et la foule s’enflamme. Ce soir-là, Barack Obama a réussi son pari en devenant le premier président noir des Etats-Unis. Aux yeux de ses électeurs, il n’était pas seulement l’incarnation de l’ » American dream ». Il était aussi celui qui allait tendre l’oreille aux difficultés des minorités, sortir une nation de la pire crise économique depuis la Grande Dépression, ramasser les pots cassés de George W. Bush, soigner les plaies d’un pays hanté par la guerre et l’insécurité, rendre aux familles leurs soldats partis en Irak et en Afghanistan, offrir des soins de santé aux plus démunis… La liste est sans fin. (…) Les attentes étaient particulièrement grandes au sein de la communauté afro-américaine (…) « Tout le monde a cru qu’avec Obama nous allions rentrer dans une ère post-raciale. C’est donc assez ironique que la race soit devenue un problème majeur sous sa présidence », affirme Robert Shapiro, politologue à l’université new-yorkaise de Columbia. (…) Outre quelques discours, le Président se distingue par le peu d’initiatives prises en faveur de sa communauté. Certes, il a nommé un nombre sans précédent de juges noirs. Et, paradoxalement, cette reprise de la lutte pour l’égalité est parfois notée comme une victoire du Président, malgré lui. (…) Dans un premier temps, l’ancien sénateur a aussi suscité la colère des immigrés en situation irrégulière en autorisant un nombre record d’expulsions. Barack Obama finira par faire volte-face et s’engagera dans une lutte féroce pour faire passer au Congrès le « Dream Act », projet de loi légalisant 2 millions de jeunes sans-papiers. En vain. Furieux, le chef d’Etat signera alors un décret permettant à ceux-ci d’obtenir un permis de travail et donc de les protéger. Aussi, peu de présidents américains peuvent se targuer d’avoir fait autant progresser la protection des droits des homosexuels. En mai 2012, « Newsweek » surnommait Barack Obama « the first gay president », pour saluer sa décision de soutenir le mariage homosexuel. Quelques mois plus tard, la loi « Don’t ask, don’t tell », interdisant aux militaires d’afficher leur homosexualité, était abrogée. Et, en 2015, Barack Obama criait « victoire », alors que la Cour suprême venait de légaliser le mariage gay. Reste que le natif de Hawaii n’est pas parvenu à réduire les inégalités sociales et raciales qui sévissent toujours aux Etats-Unis. En 2012, 27,2 % des Afro-Américains et 25,6 % des Latinos vivaient sous le seuil de pauvreté, contre 9,7 % des Blancs. Autre épine dans le pied du Démocrate : la débâcle de la ville de Detroit, majoritairement peuplée par des Noirs et déclarée en banqueroute de 2013 à 2014. (…) Peut-être était-il trop dépensier. Surnommé « Monsieur 20 trillions », Barack Obama est accusé d’avoir doublé la dette publique. (…) L’histoire se souviendra d’Obama comme de celui qui aura doté les Etats-Unis d’un système d’assurance santé universelle. L’ »Affordable Care Act », lancé en 2010 après quinze mois de tractations, est « la » grande victoire du Démocrate. (…) Mais (…) le système montre-t-il ses limites puisque (…) il comprend (…) trop de personnes malades, nécessitant des soins, et pas assez de personnes en bonne santé. Ce problème est devenu récurrent et des compagnies d’assurances quittent le programme », explique Victor Fuchs, spécialiste américain de l’économie de la santé. (…) En 2009, le Président envoie 30 000 hommes supplémentaires en Afghanistan, pour ensuite déclarer la fin des opérations militaires en Irak, avant de bombarder la Libye. (…) Sa crédibilité en prend un coup lorsqu’il refuse de frapper la Syrie, même après que Bachar Al-Assad eut franchi la fameuse ligne rouge, tracée par Obama lui-même, en utilisant des armes chimiques contre les rebelles. En huit ans, le prix Nobel de la paix, arrivé au pouvoir comme un Président antiguerre, aura entériné le recours à la force militaire dans neuf pays (Afghanistan, Irak, Syrie, Pakistan, Libye, Yémen, Somalie, Ouganda et Cameroun). Le « New York Times » indique d’ailleurs que « si les Etats-Unis restent au combat en Afghanistan, Irak et Syrie jusqu’à la fin de son mandat […] il deviendra de façon assez improbable le seul président dans l’histoire du pays à accomplir deux mandats entiers à la tête d’un pays en guerre ». Le Congrès aura été le talon d’Achille de Barack Obama. (…) Résultat : l’adepte du « centrisme » laissera derrière lui un paysage politique plus polarisé que jamais. « Il n’y a pas une Amérique libérale et une Amérique conservatrice, il y a les Etats-Unis d’Amérique. Les érudits aiment à découper notre pays entre Etats rouges et Etats bleus […] mais j’ai une nouvelle pour eux. Nous formons un seul peuple », avait-il pourtant déclaré lors de la Convention démocrate de Boston le 27 juillet 2004. Ce jour-là, une star politique était née. Barack Obama avait tout : la rhétorique enflammée, le charisme hors norme, l’intelligence, le parcours au parfum de rêve américain et la famille idéale. Avec son style châtié, son allure juvénile, sa capacité à susciter l’enthousiasme des jeunes électeurs, il était le candidat parfait du XXIe siècle. Trop parfait, peut être. A tel point qu’il aura suscité plus d’espoirs qu’il ne pouvait en porter. « Il a été meilleur candidat en campagne qu’il n’a été président », regrette M. McKee. La Libre Belgique

Attention: un monstre peut en cacher un autre !

En ce Washington’s Day devenu Presidents’ Day

Et, si l’on en croit nos valeureux journalistes,  Not my Presidents’ Day

Pendant qu’en Floride la part maudite de l’Amérique encensait son élu …

Dont on se souvient la part qu’avait pu avoir dans sa décision de briguer la Maison Blanche …

L’humiliation qu’il avait reçue de son prédecesseur il y a six ans lors d’un tristement fameux dîner annuel des correspondants …

Et qu’en France nos propres juges comme nos médias montrent le vrai prix, selon la tête du client, qu’ils attachent à la vérité

Comment ne pas voir …

Par l’un de ces effets de balancier dont l’histoire est friande …

La radicalité encouragée par la trop grande adulation et indulgence de toute une presse et finalement tant d’entre nous

D’un certain Dr. Frankenstein dont l’actuel président américain ne serait au bout du compte que la créature ?

Voir aussi:

Le bilan Obama
Barack Obama, le président dont on attendait trop
Maria Udrescu
La Libre Belgique
2016

Le Président n’a pas pu sortir de baguette magique pour laisser derrière lui une Amérique idéale.

Tiré à quatre épingles, col blanc éclatant et cravate rouge vif, l’homme grand, noir, élégant, fait son apparition sur scène devant des milliers de drapeaux américains portés par une marée humaine en délire. Des applaudissements se mélangent aux cris hystériques, pleurs et voix hurlant en chœur « Yes we can ». Les larmes coulent sur les joues du révérend Jesse Jackson qui vient d’apprendre que le rêve de Martin Luther King s’est réalisé en ce 4 novembre 2008. Et le monde entier assiste, le souffle coupé, à cette scène inédite de l’histoire. « Hello Chicago », lance le quadragénaire avec un sourire tiré des publicités de dentifrice. « S’il y a encore quelqu’un qui doute que l’Amérique est un endroit où tout est possible, ce soir, vous avez votre réponse. » Et la foule s’enflamme.

Ce soir-là, Barack Obama a réussi son pari en devenant le premier président noir des Etats-Unis. Aux yeux de ses électeurs, il n’était pas seulement l’incarnation de l’ » American dream ». Il était aussi celui qui allait tendre l’oreille aux difficultés des minorités, sortir une nation de la pire crise économique depuis la Grande Dépression, ramasser les pots cassés de George W. Bush, soigner les plaies d’un pays hanté par la guerre et l’insécurité, rendre aux familles leurs soldats partis en Irak et en Afghanistan, offrir des soins de santé aux plus démunis…

La liste est sans fin. Et huit ans plus tard, d’aucuns applaudissent les réussites du Démocrate malgré un contexte hostile – un Congrès aux mains des Républicains – et une situation dramatique héritée de son prédécesseur. D’autres s’étonnent de voir que ce Président, qui aura suscité un enthousiasme quasi messianique, n’ait pas sorti sa baguette magique pour laisser derrière lui une Amérique idéale, ou même pour tenir toutes ses promesses de campagne.

La désillusion des minorités

Les attentes étaient particulièrement grandes au sein de la communauté afro-américaine, même si Barack Obama, né d’un père kenyan, ne s’est jamais présenté comme un « président des Noirs ». « Tout le monde a cru qu’avec Obama nous allions rentrer dans une ère post-raciale. C’est donc assez ironique que la race soit devenue un problème majeur sous sa présidence », affirme Robert Shapiro, politologue à l’université new-yorkaise de Columbia.

En 2014, des vagues de protestation ont secoué la ville de Ferguson après la mort de Michael Brown, un Afro-Américain tué par un policier blanc. Un an plus tôt, le « Black Lives Matter » naissait dans la foulée de l’acquittement de George Zimmerman, policier ayant abattu Trayvon Martin, un jeune Noir. Barack Obama avait alors célèbrement déclaré : « Trayvon Martin, ça aurait pu être moi il y a trente-cinq ans »

Outre quelques discours, le Président se distingue par le peu d’initiatives prises en faveur de sa communauté. Certes, il a nommé un nombre sans précédent de juges noirs. Et, paradoxalement, cette reprise de la lutte pour l’égalité est parfois notée comme une victoire du Président, malgré lui. « Le ‘Black Lives Matter’ rappelle enfin que des problèmes liés à l’héritage de discrimination raciale existent encore aux Etats-Unis, comme dans la justice ou la distribution des richesses », explique William Howell, professeur de sciences politiques à l’université de Chicago. Mais, « Barack Obama a été réticent à prendre des mesures qui affectent uniquement les Afro-Américains, au risque de voir les électeurs blancs l’accuser de se charger uniquement de ‘ses gens’ », observe Seth McKee, de la Texas Tech University. Dans un premier temps, l’ancien sénateur a aussi suscité la colère des immigrés en situation irrégulière en autorisant un nombre record d’expulsions. Barack Obama finira par faire volte-face et s’engagera dans une lutte féroce pour faire passer au Congrès le « Dream Act », projet de loi légalisant 2 millions de jeunes sans-papiers. En vain. Furieux, le chef d’Etat signera alors un décret permettant à ceux-ci d’obtenir un permis de travail et donc de les protéger.

Aussi, peu de présidents américains peuvent se targuer d’avoir fait autant progresser la protection des droits des homosexuels. En mai 2012, « Newsweek » surnommait Barack Obama « the first gay president », pour saluer sa décision de soutenir le mariage homosexuel. Quelques mois plus tard, la loi « Don’t ask, don’t tell », interdisant aux militaires d’afficher leur homosexualité, était abrogée. Et, en 2015, Barack Obama criait « victoire », alors que la Cour suprême venait de légaliser le mariage gay.

Une croissance florissante, mais inégale

Reste que le natif de Hawaii n’est pas parvenu à réduire les inégalités sociales et raciales qui sévissent toujours aux Etats-Unis. En 2012, 27,2 % des Afro-Américains et 25,6 % des Latinos vivaient sous le seuil de pauvreté, contre 9,7 % des Blancs. Autre épine dans le pied du Démocrate : la débâcle de la ville de Detroit, majoritairement peuplée par des Noirs et déclarée en banqueroute de 2013 à 2014.

Barack Obama peut néanmoins rétorquer que c’est le bien-être économique de tout un pays qu’il a dû relever, à la sueur de son front. En effet, »personne ne peut dire, objectivement, que l’économie est dans un pire état aujourd’hui que lorsqu’Obama est devenu président. En 2008, le taux de chômage présentait deux chiffres, la Bourse était en chute libre, les banques fermaient, c’était un chaos total », rappelle M. Howell. Aujourd’hui, l’Amérique s’est remise de la grande récession de 2008, présentant un taux de chômage de 5 %, une croissance de 2,4 % et une Bourse au plus haut. Pendant ses mandats, l’Amérique a créé près de 16 millions d’emplois et le rachat de General Motors et Chrysler en a sauvé 3 millions.

Peut-être aurait-il pu faire plus. « Mais gardez à l’esprit qu’il a dû faire avec un Congrès qui ne voulait lui accorder aucune victoire », rappelle M. Howell. A défaut de convaincre les Républicains de relever le salaire minimum bloqué à 7,25 dollars de l’heure, le Président a dû se résoudre à le faire par décret pour les employés des sociétés privées au service de l’Etat.

Peut-être était-il trop dépensier. Surnommé « Monsieur 20 trillions », Barack Obama est accusé d’avoir doublé la dette publique. Mais ce phénomène est en grande partie dû aux dépenses liées au paiement des retraites et, surtout, à la santé.

L’Obamacare, légendaire, mais sur la sellette

L’histoire se souviendra d’Obama comme de celui qui aura doté les Etats-Unis d’un système d’assurance santé universelle. L’ »Affordable Care Act », lancé en 2010 après quinze mois de tractations, est « la » grande victoire du Démocrate. Honni des Républicains et traîné par trois fois devant la Cour suprême, l’Obamacare a malgré tout accordé une couverture médicale à près de 20 millions de personnes. « La réforme a aussi interdit aux compagnies d’assurances de refuser de couvrir une personne en raison de son état de santé et relevé l’âge en dessous duquel les enfants peuvent être couverts par l’assurance de leurs parents. Mais est-ce tout ce dont Obama a rêvé ? Sûrement pas. Est-ce que ça a résolu la crise des soins de santé aux Etats-Unis ? Sûrement pas », analyse M. Howell.

Tout d’abord parce que la Cour suprême a donné, en 2012, le choix aux Etats d’adopter ou non Medicaid, assurance santé destinée aux Américains les plus pauvres. Aussi, le système montre-t-il ses limites puisque « l’amende infligée à ceux qui n’y participent pas n’est pas suffisamment élevée (1 % du salaire brut la première année et en augmentation les années suivantes, NdlR). Il comprend donc trop de personnes malades, nécessitant des soins, et pas assez de personnes en bonne santé. Ce problème est devenu récurrent et des compagnies d’assurances quittent le programme », explique Victor Fuchs, spécialiste américain de l’économie de la santé.

De façon générale, selon Seth McKee, « l’‘Affordable Care Act’ est une législation polarisante. Mais c’est une réforme massive telle qu’on n’en a plus vu depuis le président Johnson, dans les années 60 ».

Un Président engagé contre le réchauffement climatique

Le locataire de la Maison-Blanche s’était aussi lancé le défi de convaincre les Etats-Unis de mieux préserver la planète. En juin 2008, Obama s’exclamait : « Nous pourrons nous souvenir de ce jour et dire à nos enfants qu’alors la montée des océans a commencé à ralentir et la planète à guérir ».

Huit ans plus tard, les Américains sont loin d’avoir adopté un esprit vert, malgré des signes alarmants tels que la sécheresse en Californie ou les inondations en Louisiane. La majorité des tentatives du chef d’Etat pour limiter la pollution – comme son projet de loi plafonnant les émissions de carbone – ont été torpillées par les Républicains.

Mais Barack Obama n’en est pas au point de décoller son étiquette de « green president ». Ainsi, le « New York Times » l’a-t-il surnommé le « monument maker », soulignant que le Démocrate a créé 23 espaces protégés et la plus grande réserve naturelle marine au monde. Il a été le premier chef d’Etat américain à se rendre en Alaska pour y mettre en relief les effets du changement climatique, même si, peu après sa visite, il décida maladroitement d’autoriser Shell à forer dans la mer des Tchouktches. En novembre 2015, il a mis son veto à l’oléoduc Keystone, qui devait relier le Canada au golfe du Mexique. « Last but not least », le président américain a convaincu Pékin de s’engager à ses côtés pour permettre aux négociations climatiques d’aboutir à Paris.

Une diplomatie tantôt gauche, tantôt fructueuse

La politique internationale est d’ailleurs le domaine où Barack Obama a accumulé le plus de victoires… et d’échecs. Ni messianique ni indifférent, le Démocrate dit être un « réaliste », prêt à faire la balance entre les intérêts des Etats-Unis et ceux de ses alliés. Lorsqu’il prend place derrière le Bureau ovale, l’Amérique a mauvaise presse. Le pays avait sorti le plus grand mensonge de l’histoire de l’espionnage pour envahir l’Irak et était en passe de perdre une guerre en Afghanistan.

Les premiers pas du leader américain sur la scène internationale sont prometteurs. Quelques mois après son investiture, il prononce le discours du Caire visant à améliorer les relations entre Washington et le monde musulman. Mais entre une Amérique plus modeste, recentrée sur ses défis nationaux, et un interventionnisme militaire digne de la plus grande puissance mondiale, son cœur balance.

En 2009, le Président envoie 30 000 hommes supplémentaires en Afghanistan, pour ensuite déclarer la fin des opérations militaires en Irak, avant de bombarder la Libye. Barack Obama avait pourtant promis de tourner la page des années George W. Bush. Et l’exécution d’Oussama Ben Laden, le chef d’Al Qaïda, devait y mettre le point final. Mais le printemps arabe lui force la main et rappelle les Etats-Unis au Proche-Orient. Sa crédibilité en prend un coup lorsqu’il refuse de frapper la Syrie, même après que Bachar Al-Assad eut franchi la fameuse ligne rouge, tracée par Obama lui-même, en utilisant des armes chimiques contre les rebelles.

En huit ans, le prix Nobel de la paix, arrivé au pouvoir comme un Président antiguerre, aura entériné le recours à la force militaire dans neuf pays (Afghanistan, Irak, Syrie, Pakistan, Libye, Yémen, Somalie, Ouganda et Cameroun). Le « New York Times » indique d’ailleurs que « si les Etats-Unis restent au combat en Afghanistan, Irak et Syrie jusqu’à la fin de son mandat […] il deviendra de façon assez improbable le seul président dans l’histoire du pays à accomplir deux mandats entiers à la tête d’un pays en guerre ».

Le dirigeant américain ne manque pas pour autant de faire honneur à son prix Nobel. Le 10 décembre 2013, il échange une poignée de main historique avec le dirigeant cubain Raúl Castro. C’est le début du dégel des relations entre les deux pays, après plus d’un demi-siècle d’animosités et de sanctions économiques. Autre grand succès diplomatique de l’ancien sénateur : l’accord sur le nucléaire iranien, que les Républicains n’ont pas réussi à bloquer.

Ces derniers parviendront par contre à tuer dans l’œuf un autre de ses projets : la fermeture de Guantanamo. S’il ne reste plus que 61 prisonniers dans le centre ouvert à Cuba en 2002, Barack Obama aura échoué à verrouiller définitivement les portes de ce site.

Une Amérique divisée

Le Congrès aura été le talon d’Achille de Barack Obama. La droite ne pouvait avaler sa double défaite face à un Démocrate, noir et fils d’un immigré musulman, qui plus est. Le cœur du Parti républicain a presque fait de la dénonciation du Président son seul programme politique. « De façon générale, pour toute une partie de l’Amérique, avoir un Président afro-américain, issu des grandes universités de la côte Est, qui est ouvert sur le monde et prône le multiculturalisme et la tolérance vis-à-vis de l’islam, c’est insupportable », observe Marie-Cécile Naves, chercheuse associée à l’Institut de relations internationales et stratégiques (Iris).

De son côté, Barack Obama a voulu effacer ce qui avait fait de lui l’homme providentiel, symbole d’une nouvelle ère, pour apparaître comme un « président normal ». Aussi, « il n’a pas eu la motivation suffisante de travailler avec le Congrès, raison pour laquelle il ne s’est pas donné les moyens de le faire. Il a presque abandonné avant même d’essayer », estime Seth McKee. Résultat : l’adepte du « centrisme » laissera derrière lui un paysage politique plus polarisé que jamais.

« Il n’y a pas une Amérique libérale et une Amérique conservatrice, il y a les Etats-Unis d’Amérique. Les érudits aiment à découper notre pays entre Etats rouges et Etats bleus […] mais j’ai une nouvelle pour eux. Nous formons un seul peuple », avait-il pourtant déclaré lors de la Convention démocrate de Boston le 27 juillet 2004. Ce jour-là, une star politique était née. Barack Obama avait tout : la rhétorique enflammée, le charisme hors norme, l’intelligence, le parcours au parfum de rêve américain et la famille idéale. Avec son style châtié, son allure juvénile, sa capacité à susciter l’enthousiasme des jeunes électeurs, il était le candidat parfait du XXIe siècle. Trop parfait, peut être. A tel point qu’il aura suscité plus d’espoirs qu’il ne pouvait en porter. « Il a été meilleur candidat en campagne qu’il n’a été président », regrette M. McKee.

« Barack Obama ne figurera pas sur la liste des grands présidents américains, réservée à ceux qui étaient en fonction pendant les grandes guerres », estime M. Shapiro. « Mais plutôt sur celle des bons présidents, aux côtés de Truman, Reagan ou encore Jefferson. Parce qu’il a engrangé beaucoup de réussites, parce qu’il a fait face à de grands défis économiques et militaires, et parce qu’il est le premier Président noir des Etats-Unis. »

Voir aussi:

A legacy of O
Larry Greenfield
JTA
Jan 17, 2017

When he ran for President, Barack Obama promoted “we are not red states or blue states, but the United States.” He didn’t mean it.

Radicalized by his prolific communist mentor Frank Marshall Davis, Barry (Soetero) enjoyed his pot-smoking “choom gang” in high school, and then regularly attended socialist conferences while in college.

He became a community organizer in Chicago and close friend of the radical Rev. Jeremiah Wright, and the domestic terrorist Bill Ayers, his philosophical and political influencers. Obama’s “Dreams from My Father” were calculations against the American Dream.

As Presidential candidate in 2008, Senator Obama declared the cumulative national debt, at 8 Trillion dollars, “unpatriotic.” But his unprecedented generational assault on America’s children has now resulted in a staggering debt of 20 Trillion dollars, and all-time high levels of government dependency in “food stamp nation”.

For that bill, taxpayers could have easily covered all the medical care of the uninsured without imposing the Obamacare disaster. But the Affordable Care Act was never about affordability, access, reducing health care costs, or keeping your insurance or your doctor.  It was always about federal control and a path to socialized health care through an eventual single-payer system.

Obama’s legacy therefore is a decline of consumer choice and health care competition, with providers and doctors walking away, and middle class Americans shocked at their skyrocketing insurance premiums and extremely high insurance deductibles.

Since 1790, the annual average domestic economic growth rate in our nation is just under 4%. Having never worked in the private sector, Barack Obama has presided over the poorest-ever 8 year national economic performance, a mere 1.5% annual growth.

Declaring “I won”, President Obama promoted an extreme and often petty partisanship, incessantly castigating, and never compromising with Congress.

He demoralized entrepreneurs (“you didn’t build that”), demonized the “bitter clingers” to their guns and religion, opposed domestic energy production (Keystone pipeline) and ridiculed doctors “seeking profit”.

A former adjunct law professor, Obama’s executive over-reach was repeatedly repudiated by the Courts.

Mr. Obama promised transparency, but his administration produced a stunning collection of scandals:

Fast & Furious gun running to Mexican drug lords, the IRS assault on Conservatives, the targeting of James Rosen and AP reporters, released GITMO terrorists returning to battle, the Benghazi failure to anticipate, protect, defend, or admit the truth about the planned 9/11 anniversary assault on U.S. assets, Healthcare Insurance Fraud, the woeful Bo Berghdahl trade, Auto Dealergate, the DOJ Black Panther whitewash, the NEA Art scandal, the Sestak affair, Inspector General Gerald Walpin’s firing, the mis-spending of Stimulus Funds , the DOJ propaganda unit, Solyndra, the Attorney General held in contempt of Congress, and massive failures at the Veterans Administration, the CDC, and the Secret Service.  The list goes on and on.

As Commander in Chief, Mr. Obama, absent any national security experience or credentials, called our troops “corpsemen” and oversaw significant declines in military preparedness and troops, tanks, planes, and warship levels.

His human rights record is a disaster — diffidence about assaults on Christians, and Yazidi and Nigerian girls sold into slavery without rescue, and unforgivable decisions to side against dissidents from Tehran to Eastern Europe.  Mr. Obama took the wrong side in Honduras and Egypt (Moslem Brotherhood), and sought to appease and empower the Castro regime in Cuba and the Mullah tyranny in Iran.  He didn’t extract concessions; he conceded, over and over, to our enemies.

The Russian re-set was an historic blunder (“Tell Vladimir I’ll have more flexibility after I’m re-elected”) and Obama failed to retaliate against Chinese cyber hacking, a lesson Russians must have learned.

The Nobel Peace Prize winner managed a tripling of US combat deaths in Afghanistan over his predecessor, and his most unfortunate withdrawal of all U.S. troops from Iraq, which VP Biden had declared stable, helped to unleash the barbarism of ISIS (“a JV Team”, “contained”).

Secretaries of State Clinton and Kerry exhibited remarkable ineffectiveness in promoting stability in the Middle East, encouraging Palestinian irredentism and resulting in failed states in Libya and Yemen.

UN Ambassador Samantha Power who literally wrote the book on R2P, the “responsibility to protect” against genocide, failed her mission. Responsibility was abandoned to beg favor with the Iranians, who received not further sanction but billions of American dollars and a green light to continue regional domination and terror, support of Assad in Syria, and threats against Israel.

Most egregiously, President Obama failed to enforce his own red line in Syria or even create no fly zones, after the Assad regime used chemical weapons. There is no more Syrian state, 500,000 are dead, and millions of refugees are flooding into Europe, destabilizing the West.  History will judge this administration harshly.

The Obama Doctrine (“offend friends and hug thugs”) was perhaps most calculated to undermine Bibi Netanyahu, (including Obama sending his political team and U.S. taxpayer funds to influence the Israeli elections).  Seeking “daylight” between special allies, Mr. Obama used every opportunity to destroy the bi-partisan tradition of U.S. diplomatic and political support for the Jewish state.  During the Iran Deal debate, Mr. Obama sank to new lows, castigating opponents (the majority in Congress and in public opinion) as dual loyalists.

Once hailed as a political genius, Obama’s radicalism led his party into disarray, and repeated electoral disaster, with some 1000 national and state legislative seats and many Governorships lost during his tenure. Ungenerous to his political opponents, he ultimately was quite uncaring about his own political party too.

The black community faired quite economically poorly during his two terms.  And, abandoning his roots, Barack Obama has sadly accepted no accountability for the years-long murder wave gripping Chi-town.

Barack Hussein Obama chose purposefully to assail American allies abroad, befriend tyrannies, abandon dissidents and victims abroad, and attack traditional Americans and economic growth at home.

He was also never a truth teller about Islamic Jihad and the challenge of radical Islam’s assaults on Americans within our own borders.

His legacy is to have made America less safe and sovereign, less prosperous and entrepreneurial, and less united than the promised hope and change campaign of 2008.


Larry Greenfield has served as executive director of the Reagan Legacy Foundation, the Jewish Institute for National Security Affairs, and the Republican Jewish Coalition of California. He is long associated with the Claremont Institute for the Study of Statesmanship & Political Philosophy.

Voir également:

Thank you, Obama

Thank you, President Barack Obama, for serving the country for the past eight years.

Thank you, Obama, for not moving the American embassy in Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. You were wise enough to follow the lead of your Democratic and Republican predecessors and realize the chaos such a move could cause would not be worth the cost. There is no doubt the embassy should be in Jerusalem. There is no question that Jerusalem is the eternal and contemporary capital of Israel. But thank you for knowing that not every right must be claimed at any cost.

Thank you for protecting Israel when and where it mattered most: with off-budget millions for Iron Dome, for standing up for Israel’s right to defend itself in the Gaza war, for a record-setting $38 billion in aid.

Thank you for declaring as eloquently as any president ever has, and in as many international forums as possible, the value and justice of a Jewish state. Thank you for trying to protect that state from pursuing policies that will endanger its own existence.

Thank you for the Iran deal. Before the deal, Iran was weeks from attaining nuclear bomb capability. Now the world has a decade before the mullahs have the capability of developing a bomb. You tackled a problem that only had gotten worse under previous American and Israeli leaders. Despite fierce opposition, you found a solution that even those Israelis who hated it have grown to see as beneficial.

Thank you for killing Osama bin Laden. And for taking out al-Qaida’s senior leadership. And for stopping and reversing gains by ISIS. You know who’s really happy to see you go? Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.

Thank you for standing up to Vladimir Putin. You saw the expansionist, anti-democratic nature of Putin’s actions in Ukraine and quickly confronted him. Perhaps that opposition slowed what may have been an inevitable march through the Baltics. There is nothing wrong with having positive relations with Russia, but “positive” cannot mean giving the Putin regime a pass.

Thank you for recognizing our Cuba embargo was a failed policy and that the time for change had come.

Thank you for steering the country through the recession. Thank you for cutting unemployment in half. And for doing so in the face of Republican obstructionism on the kind of infrastructure bill that your successor now likely will get through.

Thank you for doubling clean energy production. For recognizing that our dependence on fossil fuels can’t help but degrade our environment and hold us back from being competitive in the green energy future, and embolden corrupt and backward regimes from Venezuela to the Middle East to Russia.

Thank you for saving the American auto industry. You revived General Motors with $50 billion in loans, saving 1.2 million jobs and creating $35 billion in tax revenue so far. Have you checked out GM’s Chevy Bolt? All electric, 240 miles per charge, drives like a rocket and made in Detroit. They should call it the “Obamacar.”

Thank you for the Paris Agreement to address climate change. Thank you for throwing America’s lot in with the rest of the planet.

Thank you for the Affordable Care Act. It has brought the security of health care to millions. It has saved lives. It has kept the rate of cost increases in premiums lower in the past eight years than they were in the previous eight years. It needs to be fixed — what doesn’t? — but only with better ideas, not worse ones.

Thank you for Merrick Garland. It was a great idea while it lasted.

Thank you for trying to get immigration reform through Congress, and for pursuing the policy known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, which let 5 million people already living and working here come out of the shadows.

Thanks for Michelle. Not just her brains and biceps, but her choice of causes. Your wife saw all the good the food movement had accomplished from the grass roots up and planted it squarely in the front yard of the White House, where it would grow even more from the top down.

Thank you for trying. You grappled with one great chaos after another, and sometimes you fell short. In Syria, you needed a smarter course of action. In Israeli-Palestinian peacemaking, you underestimated the need, early on, to deal with Israeli fears and Palestinian obstructionism. As for ending the Sudan embargo, the jury is out. Stateside, your administration should have put some of the bad guys of the recession behind bars and found fixes that better addressed the wealth gap.

Time will reveal more blemishes — and heal some of the scars. But in the meantime:

Thank you. Thank you for not embarrassing us, your family or yourself. Though your opponents and their friends at “Fox and Friends” tried to pin scandals to you, none could stick. In my lifetime, there has never been an administration so free from personal and professional moral stain.

Thank you for the seriousness, dignity, grace, humor and cool you brought to the Oval Office. Thank you for being my president.


ROB ESHMAN is publisher and editor-in-chief of TRIBE Media Corp./Jewish Journal. Email him at robe@jewishjournal.com. You can follow him on Instagram and Twitter @foodaism and @RobEshman.

Voir encore:

Media
Bret Stephens
Time
Feb 18, 2017

Bret Stephens writes the foreign-affairs column of the Wall Street Journal, for which he won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for commentary.

Bret Stephens delivered the Daniel Pearl Memorial Lecture this week at the University of California, Los Angeles. Read the full text of his remarks below:

I’m profoundly honored to have this opportunity to celebrate the legacy of Danny Pearl, my colleague at The Wall Street Journal.

My topic this evening is intellectual integrity in the age of Donald Trump. I suspect this is a theme that would have resonated with Danny.

When you work at The Wall Street Journal, the coins of the realm are truth and trust — the latter flowing exclusively from the former. When you read a story in the Journal, you do so with the assurance that immense reportorial and editorial effort has been expended to ensure that what you read is factual.

Not probably factual. Not partially factual. Not alternatively factual. I mean fundamentally, comprehensively and exclusively factual. And therefore trustworthy.

This is how we operate. This is how Danny operated. This is how he died, losing his life in an effort to nail down a story.

In the 15 years since Danny’s death, the list of murdered journalists has grown long.

Paul Klebnikov and Anna Politkovskaya in Russia.

Zahra Kazemi and Sattar Behesti in Iran.

Jim Foley and Steve Sotloff in Syria.

Five journalists in Turkey. Twenty-six in Mexico. More than 100 in Iraq.

When we honor Danny, we honor them, too.

We do more than that.

We honor the central idea of journalism — the conviction, as my old boss Peter Kann once said, “that facts are facts; that they are ascertainable through honest, open-minded and diligent reporting; that truth is attainable by laying fact upon fact, much like the construction of a cathedral; and that truth is not merely in the eye of the beholder.”

And we honor the responsibility to separate truth from falsehood, which is never more important than when powerful people insist that falsehoods are truths, or that there is no such thing as truth to begin with.

So that’s the business we’re in: the business of journalism. Or, as the 45th president of the United States likes to call us, the “disgusting and corrupt media.”

Some of you may have noticed that we’re living through a period in which the executive branch of government is engaged in a systematic effort to create a climate of opinion against the news business.

The President routinely describes reporting he dislikes as FAKE NEWS. The Administration calls the press “the opposition party,” ridicules news organizations it doesn’t like as business failures, and calls for journalists to be fired. Mr. Trump has called for rewriting libel laws in order to more easily sue the press.

This isn’t unprecedented in U.S. history, though you might have to go back to the Administration of John Adams to see something quite like it. And so far the rhetorical salvos haven’t been matched by legal or regulatory action. Maybe they never will be.

But the question of what Mr. Trump might yet do by political methods against the media matters a great deal less than what he is attempting to do by ideological and philosophical methods.

Ideologically, the president is trying to depose so-called mainstream media in favor of the media he likes — Breitbart News and the rest. Another way of making this point is to say that he’s trying to substitute news for propaganda, information for boosterism.

His objection to, say, the New York Times, isn’t that there’s a liberal bias in the paper that gets in the way of its objectivity, which I think would be a fair criticism. His objection is to objectivity itself. He’s perfectly happy for the media to be disgusting and corrupt — so long as it’s on his side.

But again, that’s not all the president is doing.

Consider this recent exchange he had with Bill O’Reilly. O’Reilly asks:

Is there any validity to the criticism of you that you say things that you can’t back up factually, and as the President you say there are three million illegal aliens who voted and you don’t have the data to back that up, some people are going to say that it’s irresponsible for the President to say that.

To which the president replies:

Many people have come out and said I’m right.

Now many people also say Jim Morrison faked his own death. Many people say Barack Obama was born in Kenya. “Many people say” is what’s known as an argumentum ad populum. If we were a nation of logicians, we would dismiss the argument as dumb.

We are not a nation of logicians.

I think it’s important not to dismiss the president’s reply simply as dumb. We ought to assume that it’s darkly brilliant — if not in intention than certainly in effect. The president is responding to a claim of fact not by denying the fact, but by denying the claim that facts are supposed to have on an argument.

He isn’t telling O’Reilly that he’s got his facts wrong. He’s saying that, as far as he is concerned, facts, as most people understand the term, don’t matter: That they are indistinguishable from, and interchangeable with, opinion; and that statements of fact needn’t have any purchase against a man who is either sufficiently powerful to ignore them or sufficiently shameless to deny them — or, in his case, both.

If some of you in this room are students of political philosophy, you know where this argument originates. This is a version of Thrasymachus’s argument in Plato’s Republic that justice is the advantage of the stronger and that injustice “if it is on a large enough scale, is stronger, freer, and more masterly than justice.”

Substitute the words “truth” and “falsehood” for “justice” and “injustice,” and there you have the Trumpian view of the world. If I had to sum it up in a single sentence, it would be this: Truth is what you can get away with.

If you can sell condos by claiming your building is 90% occupied when it’s only 20% occupied, well, then—it’s 90% occupied. If you can convince a sufficient number of people that you really did win the popular vote, or that your inauguration crowds were the biggest—well then, what do the statistical data and aerial photographs matter?

Now, we could have some interesting conversations about why this is happening—and why it seems to be happening all of a sudden.

Today we have “dis-intermediating” technologies such as Twitter, which have cut out the media as the middleman between politicians and the public. Today, just 17% of adults aged 18-24 read a newspaper daily, down from 42% at the turn of the century. Today there are fewer than 33,000 full-time newsroom employees, a drop from 55,000 just 20 years ago.

When Trump attacks the news media, he’s kicking a wounded animal.

But the most interesting conversation is not about why Donald Trump lies. Many public figures lie, and he’s only a severe example of a common type.

The interesting conversation concerns how we come to accept those lies.

Nearly 25 years ago, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, the great scholar and Democratic Senator from New York, coined the phrase, “defining deviancy down.” His topic at the time was crime, and how American society had come to accept ever-increasing rates of violent crime as normal.

“We have been re-defining deviancy so as to exempt much conduct previously stigmatized, and also quietly raising the ‘normal’ level in categories where behavior is now abnormal by any earlier standard,” Moynihan wrote.

You can point to all sorts of ways in which this redefinition of deviancy has also been the story of our politics over the past 30 years, a story with a fully bipartisan set of villains.

I personally think we crossed a rubicon in the Clinton years, when three things happened: we decided that some types of presidential lies didn’t matter; we concluded that “character” was an over-rated consideration when it came to judging a president; and we allowed the lines between political culture and celebrity culture to become hopelessly blurred.

But whatever else one might say about President Clinton, what we have now is the crack-cocaine version of that.

If a public figure tells a whopping lie once in his life, it’ll haunt him into his grave. If he lies morning, noon and night, it will become almost impossible to remember any one particular lie. Outrage will fall victim to its own ubiquity. It’s the same truth contained in Stalin’s famous remark that the death of one man is a tragedy but the death of a million is a statistic.

One of the most interesting phenomena during the presidential campaign was waiting for Trump to say that one thing that would surely break the back of his candidacy.

Would it be his slander against Mexican immigrants? Or his slur about John McCain’s record as a POW? Or his lie about New Jersey Muslims celebrating 9/11? Or his attacks on Megyn Kelly, on a disabled New York Times reporter, on a Mexican-American judge? Would it be him tweeting quotations from Benito Mussolini, or his sly overtures to David Duke and the alt-right? Would it be his unwavering praise of Vladimir Putin? Would it be his refusal to release his tax returns, or the sham that seems to been perpetrated on the saps who signed up for his Trump U courses? Would it be the tape of him with Billy Bush?

None of this made the slightest difference. On the contrary, it helped him. Some people became desensitized by the never-ending assaults on what was once quaintly known as “human decency.” Others seemed to positively admire the comments as refreshing examples of personal authenticity and political incorrectness.

Shameless rhetoric will always find a receptive audience with shameless people. Donald Trump’s was the greatest political strip-tease act in U.S. political history: the dirtier he got, the more skin he showed, the more his core supporters liked it.

Abraham Lincoln, in his first inaugural address, called on Americans to summon “the better angels of our nature.” Donald Trump’s candidacy, and so far his presidency, has been Lincoln’s exhortation in reverse.

Here’s a simple truth about a politics of dishonesty, insult and scandal: It’s entertaining. Politics as we’ve had it for most of my life has, with just a few exceptions, been distant and dull.

Now it’s all we can talk about. If you like Trump, his presence in the White House is a daily extravaganza of sticking it to pompous elites and querulous reporters. If you hate Trump, you wake up every day with some fresh outrage to turn over in your head and text your friends about.

Whichever way, it’s exhilarating. Haven’t all of us noticed that everything feels speeded up, more vivid, more intense and consequential? One of the benefits of an alternative-facts administration is that fiction can take you anywhere.

Earlier today, at his press conference, the president claimed his administration is running like a “fine-tuned machine.” In actual fact, he just lost his Labor Secretary nominee, his National Security Adviser was forced out in disgrace, and the Intelligence Community is refusing to fully brief the president for fear he might compromise sources and methods.

But who cares? Since when in Washington has there been a presidential press conference like that? Since when has the denial of reality been taken to such a bald-faced extreme?

At some point, it becomes increasingly easy for people to mistake the reality of the performance for reality itself. If Trump can get through a press conference like that without showing a hint of embarrassment, remorse or misgiving—well, then, that becomes a new basis on which the president can now be judged.

To tell a lie is wrong. But to tell a lie with brass takes skill. Ultimately, Trump’s press conference will be judged not on some kind of Olympic point system, but on whether he “won”—which is to say, whether he brazened his way through it. And the answer to that is almost certainly yes.

So far, I’ve offered you three ideas about how it is that we have come to accept the president’s behavior.

The first is that we normalize it, simply by becoming inured to constant repetition of the same bad behavior.

The second is that at some level it excites and entertains us. By putting aside our usual moral filters—the ones that tell us that truth matters, that upright conduct matters, that things ought to be done in a certain way—we have been given tickets to a spectacle, in which all you want to do is watch.

And the third is that we adopt new metrics of judgment, in which politics becomes more about perceptions than performance—of how a given action is perceived as being perceived. If a reporter for the New York Times says that Trump’s press conference probably plays well in Peoria, then that increases the chances that it will play well in Peoria.

Let me add a fourth point here: our tendency to rationalize.

One of the more fascinating aspects of last year’s presidential campaign was the rise of a class of pundits I call the “TrumpXplainers.” For instance, Trump would give a speech or offer an answer in a debate that amounted to little more than a word jumble.

But rather than quote Trump, or point out that what he had said was grammatically and logically nonsensical, the TrumpXplainers would tell us what he had allegedly meant to say. They became our political semioticians, ascribing pattern and meaning to the rune-stones of Trump’s mind.

If Trump said he’d get Mexico to pay for his wall, you could count on someone to provide a complex tariff scheme to make good on the promise. If Trump said that we should not have gone into Iraq but that, once there, we should have “taken the oil,” we’d have a similarly high-flown explanation as to how we could engineer this theft.

A year ago, when he was trying to explain his idea of a foreign policy to the New York Times’s David Sanger, the reporter asked him whether it didn’t amount to a kind of “America First policy”—a reference to the isolationist and anti-Semitic America First Committee that tried to prevent U.S. entry into World War II. Trump clearly had never heard of the group, but he liked the phrase and made it his own. And that’s how we got the return of America First.

More recently, I came across this headline in the conservative Washington Times: “How Trump’s ‘disarray’ may be merely a strategy,” by Wesley Pruden, the paper’s former editor-in-chief. In his view, the president’s first disastrous month in office is, in fact, evidence of a refreshing openness to dissent, reminiscent of Washington and Lincoln’s cabinet of rivals. Sure.

Overall, the process is one in which explanation becomes rationalization, which in turn becomes justification. Trump says X. What he really means is Y. And while you might not like it, he’s giving voice to the angers and anxieties of Z. Who, by the way, you’re not allowed to question or criticize, because anxiety and anger are their own justifications these days.

Watching this process unfold has been particularly painful for me as a conservative columnist. I find myself in the awkward position of having recently become popular among some of my liberal peers—precisely because I haven’t changed my opinions about anything.

By contrast, I’ve become suddenly unpopular among some of my former fans on the right—again, because I’ve stuck to my views. It is almost amusing to be accused of suffering from something called “Trump Derangement Syndrome” simply because I feel an obligation to raise my voice against, say, the president suggesting a moral equivalency between the U.S. and Vladimir Putin’s Russia.

The most painful aspect of this has been to watch people I previously considered thoughtful and principled conservatives give themselves over to a species of illiberal politics from which I once thought they were immune.

In his 1953 masterpiece, “The Captive Mind,” the Polish poet and dissident Czeslaw Milosz analyzed the psychological and intellectual pathways through which some of his former colleagues in Poland’s post-war Communist regime allowed themselves to be converted into ardent Stalinists. In none of the cases that Milosz analyzed was coercion the main reason for the conversion.

They wanted to believe. They were willing to adapt. They thought they could do more good from the inside. They convinced themselves that their former principles didn’t fit with the march of history, or that to hold fast to one’s beliefs was a sign of priggishness and pig-headedness. They felt that to reject the new order of things was to relegate themselves to irrelevance and oblivion. They mocked their former friends who refused to join the new order as morally vain reactionaries. They convinced themselves that, brutal and capricious as Stalinism might be, it couldn’t possibly be worse than the exploitative capitalism of the West.

I fear we are witnessing a similar process unfold among many conservative intellectuals on the right. It has been stunning to watch a movement that once believed in the benefits of free trade and free enterprise merrily give itself over to a champion of protectionism whose economic instincts recall the corporatism of 1930s Italy or 1950s Argentina. It is no less stunning to watch people who once mocked Obama for being too soft on Russia suddenly discover the virtues of Trump’s “pragmatism” on the subject.

And it is nothing short of amazing to watch the party of onetime moral majoritarians, who spent a decade fulminating about Bill Clinton’s sexual habits, suddenly find complete comfort with the idea that character and temperament are irrelevant qualifications for high office.

The mental pathways by which the new Trumpian conservatives have made their peace with their new political master aren’t so different from Milosz’s former colleagues.

There’s the same desperate desire for political influence; the same belief that Trump represents a historical force to which they ought to belong; the same willingness to bend or discard principles they once considered sacred; the same fear of seeming out-of-touch with the mood of the public; the same tendency to look the other way at comments or actions that they cannot possibly justify; the same belief that you do more good by joining than by opposing; the same Manichean belief that, if Hillary Clinton had been elected, the United States would have all-but ended as a country.

This is supposed to be the road of pragmatism, of turning lemons into lemonade. I would counter that it’s the road of ignominy, of hitching a ride with a drunk driver.

So, then, to the subject that brings me here today: Maintaining intellectual integrity in the age of Trump.

When Judea wrote me last summer to ask if I’d be this year’s speaker, I got my copy of Danny’s collected writings, “At Home in the World,” and began to read him all over again. It brought back to me the fact that, the reason we honor Danny’s memory isn’t that he’s a martyred journalist. It’s that he was a great journalist.

Let me show you what I mean. Here’s something Danny wrote in February 2001, almost exactly a year before his death, from the site of an earthquake disaster in the Indian town of Anjar.

What is India’s earthquake zone really like? It smells. It reeks. You can’t imagine the odor of several hundred bodies decaying for five days as search teams pick away at slabs of crumbled buildings in this town. Even if you’ve never smelled it before, the brain knows what it is, and orders you to get away. After a day, the nose gets stuffed up in self-defense. But the brain has registered the scent, and picks it up in innocent places: lip balm, sweet candy, stale breath, an airplane seat.

What stands out for me in this passage is that it shows that Danny was a writer who observed with all his senses. He saw. He listened. He smelled. He bore down. He reflected. He understood that what the reader had to know about Anjar wasn’t a collection of statistics; it was the visceral reality of a massive human tragedy. And he was able to express all this in language that was compact, unadorned, compelling and deeply true.

George Orwell wrote, “To see what is in front of one’s nose needs a constant struggle.” Danny saw what was in front of his nose.

We each have our obligations to see what’s in front of one’s nose, whether we’re reporters, columnists, or anything else. This is the essence of intellectual integrity.

Not to look around, or beyond, or away from the facts, but to look straight at them, to recognize and call them for what they are, nothing more or less. To see things as they are before we re-interpret them into what we’d like them to be. To believe in an epistemology that can distinguish between truth and falsity, facts and opinions, evidence and wishes. To defend habits of mind and institutions of society, above all a free press, which preserve that epistemology. To hold fast to a set of intellectual standards and moral convictions that won’t waver amid changes of political fashion or tides of unfavorable opinion. To speak the truth irrespective of what it means for our popularity or influence.

The legacy of Danny Pearl is that he died for this. We are being asked to do much less. We have no excuse not to do it.

Thank you.

Voir par ailleurs:

Trump retrouve «son» peuple, le temps d’un meeting en Floride

Maurin Picard

19/02/2017

VIDÉO – À Melbourne, le président américain s’est remis sur orbite le temps d’une escale devant des supporters de la première heure, soutien inestimable.

De notre envoyé spécial à Melbourne (Floride)

Fuir Washington, le temps d’un week-end de trois jours. Donald Trump attendait impatiemment cette escapade en Floride, devant ses irréductibles supporteurs, fidèles de la première heure, qui se font si rares depuis un mois à Washington. Oublier le froid, le crachin pendant le discours d’investiture, ces médias «malhonnêtes», ces manifestants acrimonieux, les fuites des services secrets, la fronde de la Justice face à son décret sur l’immigration, celle du Congrès face à ses plans grandioses de mur à la frontière mexicaine, le limogeage à contrecœur du général Michael Flynn, son conseiller à la sécurité nationale, éclaboussé par la «Russian Connection», et les centaines de nominations gouvernementales en souffrance.

Mais tout cela n’a que peu d’importance pour le «peuple de Trump». «Nous l’aimons et nous sommes venus le lui dire», s’exclame Sheila Gaylor, une résidente de Melbourne, où le président fait escale le temps d’un rassemblement populaire. Comme durant la campagne, lorsque l’adrénaline le poussait de l’avant. Cette ivresse s’est tarie, mais voici l’occasion de la ressusciter, grâce à un bain de foule régénérateur, et de remettre le tribun sur orbite, loin du «marigot» fédéral si difficile à «assécher».

Dans le hangar 6 de l’aérodrome local, plusieurs milliers de Floridiens, blancs pour la plupart, se pressent pour apercevoir la tignasse blonde la plus célèbre du monde, et la silhouette élégante de sa femme, Melania. C’est ici, à Melbourne, en septembre 2016, que 15 000 supporteurs déchaînés ont offert au candidat républicain l’une de ses escales les plus mémorables. Peu importe que les opposants se fassent entendre au dehors, réclamant la destitution du président milliardaire.«Ils ne sont que quelques milliers, alors que nous sommes 50 000. Vous croyez que les médias malhonnêtes vont parler de quoi?» gronde une femme à crinière blonde, reprenant le discours officiel.Les pro-Trumpne sont en réalité que 9 000, selon la police de Melbourne sur Twitter, mais leur enthousiasme, débordant, est récompensé par un vrombissement dans le ciel: le Boeing présidentiel Air Force One surgit en rase-mottes, déclenchant les vivats. Le quadriréacteur s’immobilise dans le soleil couchant, et le couple présidentiel apparaît. Dans un tonnerre d’ovations, le chef de l’État s’empresse de révéler la raison de sa venue sur la Space Coast: «Je suis ici parce que je veux être parmi mes amis, et parmi le peuple. Je veux être au même endroit que des patriotes travailleurs qui aiment leur pays, qui saluent le drapeau et prient pour un avenir meilleur.» Ce même peuple qui l’a porté au pouvoir et continue de lui vouer une loyauté sans faille. Ce soutien est inestimable, et probablement fondamental: apprenant à naviguer dans l’air vicié de Washington, le milliardaire va devoir pérenniser sa base militante, surtout s’il compte briguer une réélection en 2020. C’est d’ailleurs son comité de soutien officiel, lancé le 20 janvier, qui finance l’événement du jour, annonciateur de raouts semblables à l’avenir.

Bronzé et visiblement détendu, Donald Trump s’amuse avec la foule. Il recycle ses thèmes les plus populaires et désigne ses boucs émissaires habituels. Puis, il invite à ses côtés Gene Huber, un inconditionnel fier d’avoir patienté depuis 4 heures du matin et autorisé par le président en personne à enjamber la barrière, au grand dam du Secret Service. Un mot, un seul, à l’adresse des médias, une allusion (erronée) à «tous ces grands présidents, comme Thomas Jefferson, qui se sont souvent battus avec les médias, ont dénoncé leurs mensonges», et des centaines de poings rageurs se dressent vers la forêt de caméras. Que ses ouailles se rassurent: «La Maison-Blanche tourne comme sur des roulettes!» «CNN craint!» renchérit la foule en chœur. «Je peux vous parler directement, sans le filtre des fausses informations», poursuit Trump. «Je ne regarde même plus le Saturday Night Live!» s’esclaffe une supportrice tout de rouge vêtue, affichant son soutien au site conspirationniste infowars.com.

À l’applaudimètre, celui que «nous attendions depuis si longtemps», selon Claudia, une mère au foyer venue de Titusville, un rejeton assoupi dans les bras, ce «héros qui va se dresser», selon l’expression imprimée sur les badges d’accès, l’emporte en évoquant les emplois, le business, qui vont décoller sous son mandat, ces contrats militaires bons pour la région, et, surtout, ce «fichu islamisme radical que nous allons tenir à distance de notre pays». «Ce gouvernement va tenir toutes ses promesses», martèle le chef de l’État, sur un air des Rolling Stones, avant de rembarquer à bord d’Air Force One.

«Il est vraiment formidable, il est comme nous, il parle comme nous, confient d’une seule voix Jake et Colleen, un couple de retraités débonnaire exhibant toute la panoplie du parfait petit supporteur, croisé dans la pénombre en bordure d’aérodrome, pour voir s’envoler le Boeing présidentiel. Il est en train de tenir toutes ses promesses, encore plus vite que prévu. Au-delà de toutes nos attentes!»

Voir encore

Donald Trump’s Presidential Run Began in an Effort to Gain Stature

Donald J. Trump arrived at the White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner in April 2011, reveling in the moment as he mingled with the political luminaries who gathered at the Washington Hilton. He made his way to his seat beside his host, Lally Weymouth, the journalist and socialite daughter of Katharine Graham, longtime publisher of The Washington Post.

A short while later, the humiliation started.

The annual dinner features a lighthearted speech from the president; that year, President Obama chose Mr. Trump, then flirting with his own presidential bid, as a punch line.

He lampooned Mr. Trump’s gaudy taste in décor. He ridiculed his fixation on false rumors that the president had been born in Kenya. He belittled his reality show, “The Celebrity Apprentice.”

Mr. Trump at first offered a drawn smile, then a game wave of the hand. But as the president’s mocking of him continued and people at other tables craned their necks to gauge his reaction, Mr. Trump hunched forward with a frozen grimace.

After the dinner ended, Mr. Trump quickly left, appearing bruised. He was “incredibly gracious and engaged on the way in,” recalled Marcus Brauchli, then the executive editor of The Washington Post, but departed “with maximum efficiency.”

That evening of public abasement, rather than sending Mr. Trump away, accelerated his ferocious efforts to gain stature within the political world. And it captured the degree to which Mr. Trump’s campaign is driven by a deep yearning sometimes obscured by his bluster and bragging: a desire to be taken seriously.

That desire has played out over the last several years within a Republican Party that placated and indulged him, and accepted his money and support, seemingly not grasping how fervently determined he was to become a major force in American politics. In the process, the party bestowed upon Mr. Trump the kind of legitimacy that he craved, which has helped him pursue a credible bid for the presidency.

“Everybody has a little regret there, and everybody read it wrong,” said David Keene, a former chairman of the American Conservative Union, an activist group Mr. Trump cultivated. Of Mr. Trump’s rise, Mr. Keene said, “It’s almost comical, except it’s liable to end up with him as the nominee.”

Repeatedly underestimated as a court jester or silly showman, Mr. Trump muscled his way into the Republican elite by force of will. He badgered a skittish Mitt Romney into accepting his endorsement on national television, and became a celebrity fixture at conservative gatherings. He abandoned his tightfisted inclinations and cut five- and six-figure checks in a bid for clout as a political donor. He courted conservative media leaders as deftly as he had the New York tabloids.

At every stage, members of the Republican establishment wagered that they could go along with Mr. Trump just enough to keep him quiet or make him go away. But what party leaders viewed as generous ceremonial gestures or ego stroking of Mr. Trump — speaking spots at gatherings, meetings with prospective candidates and appearances alongside Republican heavyweights — he used to elevate his position and, eventually, to establish himself as a formidable figure for 2016.

In an interview on Friday, Mr. Trump acknowledged that he had encountered many who doubted or dismissed him as a political force before now. “I realized that unless I actually ran, I wouldn’t be taken seriously,” he said. But he denied having been troubled by Mr. Obama’s derision.

“I loved that dinner,” Mr. Trump said, adding, “I can handle criticism.”

Phantom Campaign

Even before the correspondents’ dinner, Mr. Trump had moved to grab a bigger role in political affairs. In February, he addressed the annual Conservative Political Action Conference. Organizers gave Mr. Trump an afternoon speaking slot, and Mr. Keene perceived him as an entertaining attraction, secondary to headliners like Mitch Daniels, then the governor of Indiana.

But Mr. Trump understood his role differently. Reading carefully from a prepared text, he tested the themes that would one day frame his presidential campaign: American economic decline, and the weakness and cluelessness of politicians in Washington.

Over the next few months, Mr. Trump met quietly with Republican pollsters who tested a political message and gauged his image across the country, according to people briefed on his efforts, some of whom would speak about them only on the condition of anonymity.

One pollster, Kellyanne Conway, took a survey that showed Mr. Trump’s negative ratings were sky-high, but advised him there was still an opening for him to run.

Another, John McLaughlin, who had been recommended to Mr. Trump by the former Clinton adviser Dick Morris, drew up a memo that described how Mr. Trump could run as a counterpoint to Mr. Obama in 2012, and outshine Mr. Romney with his relentless antagonism of the president.

Roger Stone, a longtime Trump adviser, wrote a column on his website envisioning a Trump candidacy steamrolling to the nomination, powered by wall-to-wall media attention.

After all that preparation, Mr. Trump rejected two efforts to “draft” him set up by close advisers. If his interest in politics was growing, he was not yet prepared to abandon his career as a reality television host: In mid-May, Mr. Trump announced that he would not run and canceled a planned speech to a major Republican fund-raising dinner in Iowa.

Latching On to Romney

Having stepped back from a campaign of his own, Mr. Trump sought relevance through Mr. Romney’s. Again, Mr. Trump’s determination to seize a role for himself collided with the skepticism of those he approached: While he saw himself as an important spokesman on economic issues and a credible champion for the party, the Romney campaign viewed him as an unpredictable attention-seeker with no real political foundation.

Still, given his expansive media platform — in addition to his reality-show franchise, Mr. Trump was a frequent guest on Fox News — and a fortune that he could theoretically bestow upon a campaign, Mr. Trump was drawing presidential candidates seeking his support to his Fifth Avenue high-rise. In September 2011, Mr. Romney made the trip, entering and exiting discreetly, with no cameras on hand to capture the event.

The decision to court Mr. Trump, former Romney aides said in interviews, stemmed partly from the desire to use him for fund-raising help, but also from the conviction that it would be more dangerous to shun such an expert provocateur than to build a relationship with him and try to contain him.

The test of that strategy came in January 2012, before the make-or-break Florida primary, when Mr. Trump reached out to say he wanted to endorse Mr. Romney at a Trump property in the state. Wary of such a spectacle in a crucial state, Mr. Romney’s aides began a concerted effort to relegate Mr. Trump’s endorsement to a sideshow.

The Romney campaign conducted polling in four states that showed Mr. Trump unpopular everywhere but Nevada, and suggested to Mr. Trump that they hold an endorsement event there, far away from Florida voters.

On the day he was to deliver the endorsement in Las Vegas, according to Mr. Romney’s advisers, Mr. Trump met with Romney aides and said he hoped to hold a joint news conference with Mr. Romney, raising for the campaign the terrifying possibility that Mr. Romney might end up on camera responding to reporters’ questions next to a man who had spent months questioning whether the president was an American citizen.

In an appeal to Mr. Trump’s vanity, the Romney campaign stressed that his endorsement was so vital — with such potential to ripple in the media — that it would be a mistake to dilute the impact with a question-and-answer session.

“The self-professed genius was just stupid enough to buy our ruse,” said Ryan Williams, a former spokesman for the Romney campaign. While they agreed to hold the event in a Trump hotel, the campaign put up blue curtains around the ballroom when the endorsement took place, so that Mr. Romney did not appear to be standing “in a burlesque house or one of Saddam’s palaces,” Mr. Williams said. On stage, as the cameras captured the moment, Mr. Romney seemed almost bewildered. “There are some things that you just can’t imagine happening in your life,” he told reporters as he took the podium, taking in his surroundings. “This is one of them.”

Mr. Trump insisted in the interview that the Romney campaign had strenuously lobbied for his support, and described his own endorsement as the biggest of that year. “What they’re saying is not true,” he said.

But if Mr. Trump expected a major role in the Romney campaign, he was mistaken. While Mr. Trump hosted fund-raising events for Mr. Romney, the two men never hit the campaign trail together. The campaign allowed Mr. Trump to record automated phone calls for Mr. Romney, but drew the line at his demand for a prominent speaking slot at the Republican National Convention. (Mr. Trump recorded a video to be played on the first day of the convention, but the whole day’s events were canceled because of bad weather.)

Stuart Stevens, a senior strategist for Mr. Romney, believed that Mr. Trump had been strictly corralled. “He wanted to campaign with Mitt,” Mr. Stevens wrote in an email. “Nope. Killed. Wanted to speak at the convention. Nope. Killed.”

Still, to Mr. Romney’s opponent that year, the accommodation of Mr. Trump looked egregious. Mr. Obama, in a speech on Friday, said Republicans had long treated Mr. Trump’s provocations as “a hoot” — just as long as they were directed at the president.

Building an Operation

Only a handful of people close to Mr. Trump understood the depth of his interest in the presidency, and the earnestness with which he eyed the 2016 campaign. Mr. Trump had struck up a friendship in 2009 with David N. Bossie, the president of the conservative group Citizens United, who met Mr. Trump through the casino magnate Steve Wynn.

Mr. Trump conferred with Mr. Bossie during the 2012 election and, as 2016 approached, sought his advice on setting up a campaign structure. Mr. Bossie made recommendations for staff members to hire, and Mr. Trump embraced them.

Mr. Trump also carefully cultivated relationships with conservative media outlets, reaching out to talk radio personalities and right-wing websites like Breitbart.com.

By then, Mr. Trump had won a degree of acceptance as a Republican donor. Advised by Mr. Stone, one of his longest-serving counselors, he had abandoned his long-held practice of giving modest sums to both parties, and opened his checkbook for Republicans with unprecedented enthusiasm.

Mr. Trump began a relationship with Reince Priebus, the Republican National Committee chairman, who was trying to rescue the party from debt. He gave substantial donations to “super PACs” supporting Republican leaders on Capitol Hill.

In 2014, he cut a quarter-million dollar check to the Republican Governors Association, in response to a personal entreaty from the group’s chairman — Chris Christie. Still, Mr. Trump’s intentions seemed opaque.

In January 2015, Mr. Trump met for breakfast in Des Moines with Newt and Callista Gingrich. Having traveled to Iowa to speak at a conservative event, Mr. Trump peppered Mr. Gingrich with questions about the experience of running for president, asking about how a campaign is set up, what it is like to run and what it would cost.

Mr. Gingrich said he had seen Mr. Trump until then as “a guy who is getting publicity, playing a game with the birther stuff and enjoying the limelight.” In Iowa, a different reality dawned.

“That’s the first time I thought, you know, he is really thinking about running,” Mr. Gingrich said.

On June 16, 2015, after theatrically descending on the escalator at Trump Tower, Mr. Trump announced his candidacy for president, hitting the precise themes he had laid out in the Conservative Political Action Conference speech five years earlier.

“We are going to make our country great again,” Mr. Trump declared. “I will be the greatest jobs president that God ever created.”

Still, rival campaigns and many in the news media did not regard him seriously, predicting that he would quickly withdraw from the race and return to his reality show. Pundits seemed unaware of the spade work he had done throughout that spring, taking a half dozen trips to early voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina and using forums hosted by Mr. Bossie’s group to road test a potential campaign.

Even as he jumped to an early lead, opponents suggested that he was riding his celebrity name recognition and would quickly fade. It was only late in the fall, when Mr. Trump sustained a position of dominance in the race — delivering a familiar, nationalist message about immigration controls and trade protectionism — that his Republican rivals began to treat him as a mortal threat.

Mr. Trump, by then, had gained the kind of status he had long been denied, and seemed more and more gleeful as he took in the significance of what he had achieved.

“A lot of people have laughed at me over the years,” he said in a speech days before the New Hampshire primary. “Now, they’re not laughing so much.”

Voir de même:

Hélène Garçon
Femmes.orange.fr

Personne ne pensait cela possible. Et pourtant ! Donald Trump a bel et bien coiffé Hillary Clinton au poteau en remportant les élections présidentielles américaines dans la nuit du mardi 8 novembre 2016. Comment ce puissant businessman sorti de nulle part, a-t-il pu accéder au rang de président des États-Unis ? Une question sur toutes les bouches, à laquelle la rédaction a tenté de répondre.

Théorie n°1 : il se laisse tenter par le défi d’un twittos

Si la moitié des électeurs américains n’ont pas fermé l’oeil dans la nuit du 8 novembre 2016, Russell Steinberg, lui, a dû passer une soirée plus compliquée encore que celle des autres. Cet internaute pourrait, en effet, avoir instillé dans l’esprit de Donald Trump l’idée de se présenter, et ce, par la force d’un seul tweet. L’histoire remonte à février 2013. À cette époque, Donald Trump prend un malin plaisir à descendre en flèche les moindres faits et gestes du président démocrate Barack Obama sur les réseaux sociaux. Lassé des diatribes du businessman critiquant en permanence le pays, Russel Steinberg a jugé bon de lui répondre sur Twitter en optant pour la carte de l’ironie dans un tweet aujourd’hui supprimé.

« Si vous détestez tant l’Amérique, vous devriez vous présenter à la présidentielle et arranger les choses« . Ce à quoi Donald Trump a répondu par une menace : « Faites attention !« . Résultat : l’homme d’affaires l’a visiblement pris au pied de la lettre, en déposant sa candidature deux ans plus tard, en 2015, et en remportant les élections en novembre 2016. Il y en a un qui doit se mordre les doigts !

Théorie n°2 : humilié par Obama, il prend sa revanche

Donald Trump n’a jamais caché son aversion pour Barack Obama. Lequel n’a pas non plus été tendre avec lui. Alors que le milliardaire enchaînait les apparitions télé en 2011, demandant à consulter le certificat de naissance du président pour vérifier s’il était vraiment américain, celui-ci décidait de contre-attaquer lors du dîner des correspondants à la Maison Blanche, le 30 avril 2011. Le chef d’État s’en est alors donné à coeur joie en humiliant, avec sa verve légendaire, le milliardaire.

« Donald Trump est ici ce soir et je sais qu’il a encaissé des critiques ces derniers temps, mais personne n’est plus heureux, plus fier que cette affaire d’acte de naissance soit enfin réglée que le Donald« , lançait Barack Obama au moment de son discours. « Et c’est parce qu’il va maintenant pouvoir se concentrer sur les problèmes importants. Par exemple, notre vol sur la Lune était-il un faux? Qu’est-il vraiment arrivé à Roswell? Et où sont Biggie et Tupac ?« . Une pique qui aurait servi de déclic au businessman, lequel ne supporterait pas l’humiliation selon Isabelle Hanne, journaliste à Libération, qui a rapporté la scène. La vengeance est un plat qui se mange froid : cinq ans après, Donald Trump a finalement eu sa revanche sur Barack Obama.

Théorie n°3 : il souhaite détruire le parti Républicain

C’est la rumeur la plus folle qui a fait trembler la toile pendant la course à la présidentielle américaine : Donald Trump, serait en réalité un partisan d’Hillary Clinton, et se serait lancé dans la course à l’investiture dans l’unique but de devenir président et de détruire le parti républicain, sous la bannière duquel il a mené toute sa campagne. Une théorie complètement tirée par les cheveux, mais à laquelle ont adhéré de nombreux internautes après que l’ancienne amitié des Trump et des Clinton ait été révélée au grand jour, au début de l’année 2016.

En plus de partager le même cercle d’amis que sa rivale Hillary Clinton, qu’il a d’ailleurs invitée au mariage de sa fille, il a été découvert que Donald Trump et sa famille ont participé financièrement à la campagne de la démocrate en 2008, et ont également fait un don de 100 000 dollars à la Fondation Clinton. Un geste généreux qui aurait mis la puce à l’oreille de nombreux internautes, qui ont alors immédiatement crié au complot.

Voir de plus:

Obama blues

Obama et la com : la politique du rire

Sur les réseaux sociaux ou sur les plateaux des late-night shows, Obama aura démontré son talent d’humoriste et un grand sens de l’autodérision, inventant une communication bien à lui pour toucher un public plus jeune.

Isabelle Hanne

Libération
20 janvier 2017 

Cet article a été publié fin octobre dans notre supplément «Obama Blues».

Un président qui vient dérouler son bilan en musique, devant des millions de téléspectateurs, un public applaudissant à tout rompre et un présentateur acquis à sa cause. Vous n’êtes pas dans une dictature d’Asie centrale, mais sur le plateau du Tonight Show de Jimmy Fallon sur NBC, le late-night show (émission de troisième partie de soirée) le plus regardé des Etats-Unis. Avec, dans le rôle de l’autocrate-crooner, Barack Obama, venu en juin se prêter à une session de «slow jam the news» – les invités racontent l’actu en musique, «slow jams» désignant ces romantiques ballades r’n’b. Economie, santé, mariage gay, accord transpacifique… Les années Obama y passent en sept minutes, ponctuées de blagues de Fallon et soulignées par la mélodie sensuelle des Roots, le groupe résident du show. La vidéo a été vue 11 millions de fois sur YouTube.

Evidemment, le «Preezy of the United Steezy», comme l’appelle Jimmy Fallon, ne fait pas ça que pour s’amuser. En deux mandats, l’entertainer Obama s’est servi des shows comiques –  lisant les «méchants tweets» à son encontre chez Jimmy Kimmel, remplaçant Stephen Colbert pour son Colbert Report sur Comedy Central  – pour appuyer sa communication. Avec, dans le viseur, les jeunes, plus prompts à partager des vidéos marrantes qu’à écouter des longs discours.

Porte-à-porte virtuel

Fin 2013, le démarrage des plateformes en ligne de mutuelles privées, au cœur de l’Obamacare, son emblématique réforme de la santé, est catastrophique. Bugs, méfiance du public, peu d’inscrits… «Barry» prend alors sa perche à selfie de pèlerin. A coups de vidéos et de GIF sur Buzzfeed –  Things Everybody Does But Doesn’t Talk About («Les choses que tout le monde fait, mais dont personne ne parle»), 60 millions de vues  –, ou lors d’une interview lunaire et hilarante à Between Two Ferns, le faux talk-show de Zach Galifianakis diffusé sur la plateforme Funny or Die, le commander-in-chief se plie à l’exercice pour promouvoir sa réforme. Au passage, il renforce sa street cred.

La présidence Obama a inventé une propagande branchée, une communication cool. Au cœur de cette stratégie  : les réseaux sociaux, qui ont largement porté sa victoire en 2008. L’engagement numérique de la campagne du «Yes We Can» a d’ailleurs été décortiqué par les équipes de com du monde entier. Tandis que la droite américaine propageait son venin conspirationniste par de bonnes vieilles chaînes de mails –  le candidat démocrate aurait menti sur son certificat de naissance, serait musulman…  –, Obama prenait mille longueurs d’avance, touchant un public beaucoup plus large, plus jeune. «En 2008, les efforts de son adversaire, John McCain, pour tenter de le rattraper sur les réseaux sociaux étaient presque pathétiques», se souvient Michael Barris, coauteur de The Social Media President (Palgrave, 2013). L’équipe du sénateur de l’Illinois a compris l’intérêt de Facebook, de Twitter –  plus tard viendront Instagram, Snapchat, LinkedIn…  – pour lever des fonds, diffuser des messages, obtenir des soutiens, grâce à ce porte-à-porte virtuel d’un nouveau genre.

«Obama s’est fait élire sur des promesses de démocratie participative via les réseaux sociaux, rappelle Michael Barris. Mais finalement, les réseaux sociaux ont surtout été pour lui un formidable outil de diffusion, de validation par le public, et de promotion d’une image très positive : celle d’un président branché, connecté, proche des gens.» Viser un public, via le bon médium, avec le bon ton : huit ans que le président américain, avec son équipe de quatorze personnes dédiée à la stratégie numérique, montre sa maîtrise. Et son adaptation à l’évolution des usages. La Maison Blanche est devenue une véritable boîte de production, avec plus de 500 vidéos réalisées chaque année (infographies, coulisses…), distribuées sur les différentes plateformes (site officiel, YouTube, Facebook…). «Le premier président de l’ère des médias sociaux a fixé les règles d’interactions numériques entre politiques et électeurs, écrit le Washington Post. Certains chefs d’Etat se préoccupaient des chaînes d’info ; Obama est le président ­Netflix.»

«Un humour naturel»

Il use, sur Twitter comme dans les late-night shows, d’un humour contemporain, ultra-référencé, abreuvé de culture web et de culture populaire tout court. Pour le Washington Post, il est même le «premier président alt comedy», cette catégorie d’humour alternatif maniant l’ironie, centré sur soi. «Pour la plupart des chefs d’Etat, l’humour est considéré comme une marque de faiblesse, avance l’universitaire Arie Sover, qui dirige l’Israeli Society for Humor Studies. Il faut montrer qu’on est dur, qu’on ne plaisante pas. Vous avez déjà vu rire, même sourire, Erdogan ou Poutine  ?»

A l’autre bout du spectre, Obama rit, montre ses émotions, fait des vannes questionnant son hétérosexualité –  il raconte que son vice-président, Joe Biden, et lui sont «si proches» qu’ils ne pourraient pas aller dans une pizzeria de l’Indiana, en référence à un restaurant qui refusait ses services de traiteur pour les mariages gays. «Non seulement Obama a de l’humour, mais en plus c’est un humour naturel, spontané, décrit Arie Sover. L’humour en politique permet de toucher son public au cœur. Et Obama pratique l’autodérision, la forme la plus élevée d’humour.»

Mais le président américain ne laisse rien au hasard : cette spontanéité est surtout parfaitement chorégraphiée, écrite à l’avance par des équipes d’auteurs talentueux. D’autodérision, il en a beaucoup fait preuve lors du dîner annuel des correspondants à la Maison Blanche, véritable scène de stand-up pour le président sortant. Maîtrise des silences, des regards, intonations, vidéos bien ficelées… Ces soirs-là, Obama fait de l’humour une technique de dégoupillage imparable des critiques. Comme en 2011, alors que la droite le harcèle une nouvelle fois sur son certificat de naissance. Pour faire taire les rumeurs, il annonce la «diffusion exclusive de la vidéo de sa mise au monde» –  en fait, le début du Roi Lion de Disney. Dans la salle, Donald Trump, déjà porte-voix de ces allégations, ne moufte pas. Les journalistes, qui rient à gorge déployée, ont laissé leurs armes au vestiaire.

Voir enfin:

‘I Don’t Know What You’re Referring To’: NBC’s Katy Tur Doesn’t Remember Obama Promising Putin ‘Flexibility’

 Alex Griswold

When a Republican congressman on MSNBC brought up a 2012 incident where President Barack Obama was caught on a hot mic promising to give Russia’s Vladimir Putin a little more “flexibility” after the election, NBC journalist and MSNBC host Katy Tur seemed not to recall the incident.

Tur pressed Florida Representative Francis Rooney about the number of Donald Trump advisors with close tie to Russia. “I see a lot of folks within Donald Trump’s administration who have a friendlier view of Russia than maybe past administrations did,” she noted.

“Well, I think it was Obama that leaned over to Putin and said, ‘I’ll have a little more flexibility to give you what you want after the re-election,’” Rooney responded.

Tur paused for a moment. “I’m sorry, I don’t know what you’re referring to, Congressman,” she said.

“Remember when he leaned over at a panel discussion or in a meeting, and he said, ‘I’ll have more flexibility after the election’?” Rooney asked. “No one pushed the president on what he meant by that, but I can only assume for a thug like Putin that it would embolden him,” which gave Tur pause, again.

In Tur’s defense, Rooney is slightly off in his retelling: it was then-Russian President Dmitry Medvedev who Obama whispered to, who then promised to relay Obama’s message to Putin. But his recollection of the content of Obama’s message was accurate: “This is my last election. After my election I have more flexibility,” he told the Russians.

Obama’s hot mic comments were major news at the time, receiving widespread coverage. Obama’s Republican opponent Mitt Romney seized upon the gaffe and worked it into his stump speeches, even bringing it up during one of the presidential debates.

Voir par ailleurs:

Goldnadel : “Lorque Medhi s’éclate…”

Gilles-William Goldnadel

Valeurs actuelles

20 février 2017

Il y a évidemment pire que les excès de la liberté d’expression : son absence. Mais il y a le pire du pire: la liberté d’expression à la tête du client. Du racisme à l’état pur. L’hypocrisie en prime. Chacun sait que notre époque de fausse liberté a accouché d’une tyrannie de la pensée dont la sage-femme devenue folle était déguisée en antiraciste diplômée. Valeurs Actuelles en a fait les frais en osant voiler Marianne pour défendre la laïcité républicaine contre les menées islamistes et Pascal Bruckner comme Georges Bensoussan payeront peut-être le prix pour des raisons voisines. Silence dans les rangs de la gauche paraît-il démocratique. Mais aujourd’hui vient d’éclater une tout autre affaire dans laquelle, au contraire, le racisme comme l’antisémitisme n’ont rien d’imaginaire. Et je prends le pari, qu’ici , précisément, les organisations prétendument antiracistes resteront aux abris. La vedette s’appelle Mehdi Meklat, hier encore il était la coqueluche de la famille islamo-gauchiste et de tous ses compagnons de chambrée. Dans le numéro du 1er février des Inrockuptibles il partageait la une avec l’icône Taubira. Il collaborait aussi avec le Bondy Blog, très engagé dans le combat actuel contre les policiers considérés uniment comme des tortionnaires racistes. Il était encore récemment chroniqueur de la radio active de service public France Inter.

Oui mais voilà, patatras, on a retrouvé parmi les milliers de tweets qu’il n’a pas réussi à effacer des gazouillis racistes du dernier cri strident. Échantillons choisis : “je crache des glaires sur la sale gueule de Charb et tous ceux de Charlie hebdo”. “Sarkozy = la synagogue = les juifs = Shalom = oui, mon fils = l’argent”, “Faites entrer Hitler pour tuer les juifs”, “j’ai gagné 20 $ au PMU, je ne les ai pas rejoués parce que je suis un juif”, “les Blancs vous devez mourir asap” etc.

Avec une touchante spontanéité, à présent qu’ils ont été découverts, voici ce que notre Mehdi a tweeté samedi dernier : “je m’excuse si ces tweets ont pu choquer certains d’entre vous : ils sont obsolètes”.

Bah voyons, certains datent de 2012, autant dire le déluge. J’en connais qui vont fouiller les poubelles du père Le Pen, d’autres qui reprochent à un ancien conseiller de Sarkozy d’avoir dirigé Minute il y a 30 ans, mais dans notre cas, certains plaident déjà l’Antiquité.

Car le plus grave n’habite pas dans la tête dérangée d’un islamo-gauchiste finalement assez classique, il demeure dans le silence gêné de la gauche donneuse de leçons. Il réside plus encore dans les combles du gauchisme médiatique façon France Inter. Ainsi, Pascale Clark maîtresse d’école antiraciste en chef et qui a eu l’effronterie de tenter d’expliquer que son petit Mehdi était dans la provocation… D’autres expliquent qu’il faut prendre cela au troisième degré… Evidemment, puisque c’est de gauche , c’est plus subtil… Il arrive parfois que l’ignoble atteigne les sommets du sublime.

Que cela plaise ou non à Madame Clark, Mehdi Meklat a rejoint Messieurs de Lesquen et Bourbon dans le même bataillon. Il y a encore pire que l’absence de liberté d’expression : la liberté d’expression à la tête du client.

Voir de même:

Mehdi Meklat, jeune écrivain prodige, et son double antisémite et homophobe
L’ex-chroniqueur (France Inter, Bondy Blog) pris à son double « Je » : sidération sur Twitter

Manuel Vicuña

Arrêt sur images

20/02/2017

Mehdi Meklat, 24 ans, était jusqu’ici connu pour son ton décalé. Du Bondy Blog, à France Inter en passant par Arte, le chroniqueur, journaliste et auteur, s’est taillé, avec son compère Badrou (« les Kids », époque France Inter) une réputation de porte-voix de la jeunesse, « à l’avant garde d’une nouvelle génération venue de banlieue » écrivaient encore Les Inrocks le 1er février. Sauf qu’entre temps, des internautes ont exhumé des tweets de Meklat : injures antisémites, homophobes, racistes, misogynes. Un florilège qui provoque la sidération. De son côte, le jeune homme s’excuse, dépublie, et assure qu’il s’agissait « de questionner la notion d’excès et de provocation » à travers un « personnage fictif ».

Faire mentir les stéréotypes sur les-jeunes-de-banlieue. Sans rien renier de soi. Depuis ses débuts au Bondy Blog en 2008, c’est ce que Mehdi Meklat tente de faire, au gré d’une exposition médiatique précoce. A 24 ans désormais, après avoir fait ses premiers pas de journaliste au Bondy Blog à 16 ans, puis tenu chronique pendant six ans chez France Inter en duo avec son ami Badrou (« les Kids »), Meklat le touche à tout (réalisateur, blogueur, reporter) est en promo pour un second livre. Mehdi et Badrou « l’avant-garde d’une nouvelle génération venue de banlieue qui compte bien faire entendre sa voix » écrivaient les Inrocks qui leur consacraient une couverture le 1er février en compagnie de Christiane Taubira. Un binôme qui avait tapé dans l’œil de l’animatrice de France Inter Pascale Clark dès 2010, pour son ton « décalé », sa capacité à chroniquer avec autant d’acuité la vie de l’autre côté du périph (Meklat a grandi à Saint-Ouen, Badrou à la Courneuve) que le tout venant de l’actualité plus « médiatique ».

Et voilà que depuis quelques jours, après son passage sur le plateau de l’émission la Grande Librairie (France 5) pour la promo de son second livre, le roman « Minute » (co-écrit avec Badrou), Meklat est dans l’œil du cyclone Twitter. Propulsé dans les sujets les plus discutés non pas pour la promotion de son nouvel ouvrage dédié à Adama Traoré. Mais pour des tweets, exhumés ces derniers jours par plusieurs internautes.

Pas quelques tweets isolés. Mais des messages par dizaines, anciens (2012) et pour certains plus récents (2016) dans lesquels Meklat tape tous azimuts sur « les Français », « les juifs », « les homos », Alain Finkelkraut, Charlie Hebdo, les séropositifs, les « travelos »… La liste est longue, et les messages à même d’interpeller. Une prose en 140 signes qui tranche avec l’image de jeune talent à la plume « poétique » et acérée que Meklat s’était jusqu’ici taillée et qui lui a valu jusqu’à aujourd’hui des articles dithyrambiques dans la presse culturelle. Quelques heures auront suffit pour que, soient exhumés et massivement partagés des dizaines de messages issus de son compte twitter personnel @mehdi_meklat.

Ici un tweet de 2011 dans lequel Meklat « regrette que Ben Laden soit mort. Il aurait pu tout faire péter ». Là, Meklat au sujet du dessinateur de Charlie Hebdo, Charb : « Je crache des glaires sur la sale gueule de Charb et de Charlie Hebdo » (le 30 décembre 2012, avant la tuerie qui a décimé la rédaction). Plus récemment, Alain Finkelkraut qui pointe son nez à un rassemblement de Nuit Debout en avril 2016 : « fallait lui casser la jambe à ce fils de putes ». Plus en amont dans son fil Twitter : « Vive les PD vive le sida avec Hollande » (3 décembre 2013). La campagne de Sarkozy en 2012 ? « Sarkozy = la synagogue = les juifs = shalom = oui, mon fils = l’argent ». La remise des Césars la même année ? « Faites entrer Hitler pour tuer les juifs » (24/02/2012). Toute cette vaste littérature en 140 caractères est subitement remontée à la surface de Twitter et a été, depuis, copieusement documentée.

Parmi les premiers et les plus zélés chasseurs de tweets, la fachosphère s’est ruée sur l’occasion. Le blog d’extrême droite Fdesouche publie à tout-va plus d’une cinquantaine de messages de Meklat « journaliste homophobe et antisémite du Bondy blog ». Le site d’extrême droite Boulevard Voltaire, fondé par Robert Ménard, trouve là prétexte à acculer la « gauchosphère sous son vrai visage », quand l’ex-porte parole de génération identitaire s’en donne, lui aussi, à coeur joie. Très vite rejoint dans cette avalanche d’indignation par Marion Maréchal Le Pen.

Ce dimanche, la twitta-éditorialiste du Figaro Eugénie Bastié y allait aussi de ses commentaires en 140 signes, suivis d’un article corrosif, soulignant bien au passage que Meklat avait fondé il y a peu avec le journaliste Mouloud Achour (CliqueTV) les « éditions du grand Remplacement » qui ont lancé en juin dernier un magazine baptisé « Téléramadan ». Cette nouvelle revue annuelle qui entend parler d’islam de façon dépassionnée, avait su trouver un titre pied-de-nez déjà à même de faire bondir certains.

« excréments verbaux »

Mais dans le cas des tweets de Meklat, de fait, la sidération dépasse de loin la sphère des militants de droite et d’extrême droite. D’autres aussi s’indignent : de simples twittos, mais aussi des journalistes, tels Françoise Laborde, Claude Askolovitch, des élus PS comme la ministre de la Famille Laurence Rossignol, ou encore la conseillère municipale Elodie Jauneau sans compter le délégué interministériel à la lutte contre le racisme et l’antisémitisme Gille Clavreul.

Ils interpellent les Inrocks qui ont placé Meklat en Une de leur numéro du 1er février au côté de Taubira. Ils apostrophent également les éditions du Seuil où Meklat vient de publier son ouvrage, et font part de leur stupéfaction. A l’image de l’auteur de bande dessinée, romancier et réalisateur, Joann Sfar qui s’étrangle : « Je découvre tout ça ce matin, il semble que c’est authentique. Je trouve ça inexcusable quand on se veut représentant de la jeunesse. »

Face à l’avalanche de messages indignés, sommé de s’expliquer, samedi après-midi, Meklat se fend finalement de quatre tweets d’excuse et d’explication : « je m’excuse si ces tweets ont pu choquer certains d’entre vous : ils sont obsolètes », assure Meklat qui supprimera dans la foulée la totalité de ses tweets d’avant février 2017 (plus de 30 000). Surtout, il affirme que ces messages ne reflètent en rien sa pensée. Il ne nie pas en être l’auteur, mais assure qu’il s’agit de messages parodiques. « Jusqu’en 2015, sous le pseudo Marcelin Deschamps, j’incarnais un personnage honteux raciste antisémite misogyne homophobe sur Twitter ».

Marcellin Deschamps ? Un « personnage fictif », assure-t-il par lequel il avait entrepris de « questionner la notion d’excès et de provocation ». Mais, il l’affirme : les propos de ce personnage « ne représentent évidemment pas ma pensée et en sont tout l’inverse. » Sur Twitter, une fois troqué son pseudo contre son vrai patronyme, le jeune homme n’a pas supprimé ces anciens messages, apparaissant depuis sous son vrai nom Mehdi Meklat.

Dans la foulée, ce samedi, l’animatrice radio Pascale Clark, ex chaperonne de Meklat à France Inter (2010-2015) a pris sa défense « Son personnage odieux, fictif, ne servait qu’à dénoncer », assure-t-elle sur Twitter avant de préciser dans un second message : « Les comiques font ça à longueur d’antenne et tout le monde applaudit ».

Un peu facile de se cacher derrière un personnage fictif ? A la remarque de plusieurs internautes, le journaliste Claude Askolovitch tempère : « c’est même piteux. Mais cela ne change pas la nature de ses messages pourris – une énorme connerie, pas des appels au meurtre ». Si le journaliste ne cache pas son dégoût pour ces messages qu’il assimile à « des excréments verbaux », « des blagues absolument laides, impardonnables, perverses », « dans un jeu périlleux », il se refuse à y voir de « vraies prises de position ». Tout en tançant « un mec qui s’est cru assez malin pour twitter des immondices ».

« Twitter des immondices », sous pseudo dans « un jeu périlleux » ? Yagg, le site de presse LGBT y avait vu davantage qu’un jeu. Le site avait bondi en mars 2014 quand Meklat écrivait sur Twitter : « Christophe Barbier a des enfants séropo ». Yagg le taxe alors d’ « humour sérophobe », « au goût douteux » (visant des personnes séropositives). Le site avait contacté Meklat pour qu’il s’en explique. Réponse de l’intéressé : « J’ai un pseudo sur Twitter, il ne faut pas faire d’amalgame entre mon personnage et moi-même ». Contacté par Yagg, il développait : « Je peux comprendre qu’on se sente insulté par mes tweets, car ils sont parfois extrêmes, provocants ou insultants, mais il ne faut pas en faire des tonnes(…) J’ai créé un personnage violent, provocant, méchant. Pourquoi? Je ne me l’explique pas à moi-même, alors je ne peux pas l’expliquer aux autres. Mais je ne suis pas du tout homophobe. »

« C’est un terrain de jeu, j’y abuse de tout »

En octobre 2012, les Inrocks consacraient un portrait élogieux (comme beaucoup) aux gamins précoces Mehdi Meklat et Badroudine Saïd Abdallah, alias « les Kids » de France inter qui entamaient leur quatrième saison sur les ondes de la radio publique. « Un matin, ils partent avec leur micro enregistrer la plainte de la vallée de Florange abandonnée, le lendemain ils sont à l’Elysée et tapent la discute avec Michael Haeneke » écrivent les Inrocks qui dressent le portrait de deux « gamins « talentueux », de « vrais passe-murailles ».

Comme beaucoup, l’hebdo s’enthousiasme de leur « reportages poétiques » et de leur « style unique ». Les Inrocks notent : « ils attirent les sympathies ». Quant à Meklat ? Au passage, l’hebdo raconte que c’est « le plus provoc » de deux. « Il faut le voir sur Twitter, vaguement caché derrière un pseudo depuis longtemps éventé : c’est une vraie terreur. Il se pose en métallo furieux, insulte à tout va, se moque de tout et de tous avec une férocité indécente » écrivent les Inrocks qui commentent : « Ça peut aller trop loin (France Inter lui a déjà demandé de retirer un tweet) mais la plupart du temps, c’est drôle à mourir. » Et Meklat d’expliquer déjà que sur le réseau social il « joue un personnage » : « Je ne suis attaché à rien, je n’ai de comptes à rendre à personne, j’ai la liberté de dire ce que je veux. C’est un terrain de jeu, j’y abuse de tout, je ne me mets pas de limite. »

Trois ans plus tard. Octobre 2015. Les « Kids » de Pascale Clark ont grandi. Lorsque Le Monde les interviewe pour la sortie de leur premier livre, la journaliste s’attarde sur le cas Meklat. « Si doux et poli à la ville, Mehdi s’est inventé sur Twitter un double diabolique, qui insulte à tout-va », écrit Le Monde. Meklat commente alors : « Tout est trop convenu, on n’ose plus s’énerver. L’idée de casser ça en étant méchant gratuitement me plaît ».

En septembre 2016, dans un long article, la journaliste Marie-France Etchegoin revenait pour M le magazine du Monde sur le parcours et l’état d’esprit du tandem Mehdi-Badrou, « une nouvelle génération, à la fois cool et dure, investissant le champ de la culture plutôt que celui des partis politiques, et extrêmement engagée ». Engagée, brillante et convoitée. Comme l’explique M, le duo Mehdi-Badrou est sollicité de toutes parts, ces dernier temps. Ici pour pour un projet avec la Fondation Cartier, là pour écrire un dossier de presse pour un long-métrage avec Depardieu. Ou encore pour mettre en scène la pièce d’un auteur suédois.

Quant à leur magazine Téléramadan, la revue annuelle « des musulmans qui ne veulent plus s’excuser d’exister », la journaliste explique que « Pierre Bergé mais aussi Agnès b ont accepté de soutenir la revue ». Parfait. Seul bémol dans la success story, observe la journaliste : « Les bonnes fées qui accompagnent les deux garçons depuis l’adolescence observent leur évolution, avec parfois une pointe d’inquiétude, qui n’empêche ni bienveillance ni compréhension. » Concrètement ? Il est question notamment de Meklat et de son usage de Twitter. « Un troll déchaîné qui déconne et dézingue à tout-va. «Giclez-lui sa mère», «On s’en bat les couilles», «Elle est pas morte, celle-là?» « , énumère la journaliste qui constate : « il se défoule sur des personnalités dont les manières ou les prises de position sur l’islam n’ont pas l’heur de lui plaire ». Certains parrains et autres bonnes fées, explique la journaliste, s’en soucient : « «Arrête ces Tweets! Tu n’es pas dans une cour de récréation!» Mouloud Achour le met en garde: «Les écrits restent, un jour on te les ressortira.». Quant à Mehdi, raconte la journaliste, il « se défend, la main sur le cœur: «Ce n’est pas moi, c’est un personnage que j’ai inventé», ne pouvant s’empêcher d’ajouter, comme dans un lapsus: «Mes Tweets sont des pulsions!» »

Meklat et son avatar pulsionnel, une histoire qui ne date pas d’hier. Un double « je » qui ne semble pas géner Meklat, mais qui ne met pas tout le monde à l’aise. Ce dimanche, l’animateur de la Grande Librairie (France 5) François Busnel, qui avait invité Meklat cette semaine publie un communiqué pour prendre ses distances avec son invité. Busnel y affirme que si il avait eu connaissance de ces messages, il n’aurait pas invité le jeune homme dans son émission.

Samedi, le Bondy Blog, pressé par une foule d’internautes de réagir, avait également publié un message sur Twitter , expliquant que « les tweets de Meklat n’engagent en aucun cas la responsabilité de la rédaction ».

Et le média de préciser : « Puisqu’il y a des évidences qu’il faut affirmer, le Bondy Blog ne peut cautionner des propos antisémites, sexistes, homophobes, racistes, ou tout autre propos discriminatoires et stigmatisants, même sur le ton de l’humour ».

Voir aussi pour mémoire:

Les réactions en France

Le Nouvel Obs

07 novembre 2008

LES POLITIQUES 

A droite :

Jacques Chirac, ancien président : « Alors que votre élection suscite dans le monde émotion et espoir en ces temps difficiles, je ne doute pas que la France et le peuple français auront à coeur d’entretenir et d’approfondir avec votre pays et le peuple américain, les liens d’amitié et de coopération si intenses qu’une longue histoire commune a forgés ». « En récompensant votre inlassable engagement en faveur des valeurs fondamentales de liberté, de démocratie et de progrès, le peuple américain a adressé au monde un message d’ouverture et d’optimisme », affirme également Jacques Chirac, en adressant à Barack Obama ses « félicitations les plus vives et les plus chaleureuses pour cette très brillante victoire ». (Lettre adressée à Barack Obama)

Nicolas Sarkozy chef de l’Etat français : « Quel que soit le pays, quelle que soit la région du monde, c’est le changement qui avait gagné, qu’Obama avait dans cette campagne incarné la rupture. L’Amérique a fait hier soir le choix de la rupture ». « Les Etats-Unis avaient vécu une belle campagne présidentielle avec un taux de participation record de 66%, une campagne entre un fils d’immigré kenyan d’un côté, et de l’autre un héros de la guerre, John McCain ».
« Toute cette campagne et son dénouement traduisaient la capacité de la démocratie américaine à se renouveler, à se régénérer. Il a indiqué que le nouveau président, Barack Obama, avait compris que l’Amérique devait à nouveau se tourner vers le monde et qu’il y aurait incontestablement des opportunités de renforcement des liens transatlantiques ». (Porte-parole de Nicolas Sarkozy)

Jean-Marie Le Pen, président du Front national : « Le sénateur Obama n’a pas fait sa campagne électorale sur sa couleur, au contraire. Ce n’est pas le fils d’un Noir américain, c’est un métis, fils d’un Noir africain, qui ne porte donc pas sur les épaules le poids de l’esclavage et qui par conséquent est beaucoup plus à l’aise que quiconque ». Il s’agit « d’une victoire conjoncturelle, c’est-à-dire que c’est la présidence de Bush qui est condamnée ». Jean-Marie le Pen dit ne pas être « choqué » par l’élection d’un Noir. « Ca me choque d’autant moins que la première fois que j’ai été élu député, en 1956, mon deuxième de liste était un Noir. (…) Je n’ai pas de leçons à recevoir ». (Vidéo mise en ligne sur son site).

Brice Hortefeux, le ministre de l’Immigration : L’élection de Barak Obama allait « changer le regard des Français et en général des Européens sur les Etats-Unis ». « Il y a aussi un côté symbolique puisque chacun sait que Barak Obama est d’une famille issue de l’immigration ». « C’est le témoignage que le défi de l’intégration peut être relevé ». « L’apport de l’immigration est lié intrinsèquement à l’histoire des Etats Unis ». « En Europe, même si les politiques d’intégration ont globalement échoué, je pense qu’on peut être optimiste ». « En France et en Europe, ces politiques sont à bout de souffle. C’est pour cela que j’ai organisé la conférence européenne de Vichy ». « La démarche d’Obama symbolise le renouvellement et sans doute la rupture après deux mandats d’administration républicaine et aussi la crise financière ». (Déclaration à la presse)

François Bayrou, président du Mouvement démocrate (MoDem) : « Après le désastre des années Bush (…), l’élection de Barack Obama fait que le monde respire mieux ». « Nous savons que le nouveau président n’aura pas une baguette magique, qu’il ne résoudra pas tous les problèmes en un jour », et que « dans l’ombre, de puissants intérêts ne se laisseront pas oublier ». « Mais au moins pouvons-nous espérer qu’une nouvelle vision, plus ouverte, plus généreuse, plus sociale, inspire la politique américaine ». « Nous pouvons espérer qu’Europe et Etats-Unis, avec les autres grandes régions du monde, inventent ensemble un partenariat pour la planète ». « Ensemble, ils peuvent répondre à la grande question : la démocratie peut-elle gouverner le monde, au lieu de la force militaire ou de la force de l’argent ? ». Cette élection représente également « un message personnel à des centaines de millions d’hommes et de femmes, de garçons et de filles, à la peau noire, qui ont vécu l’expérience de la discrimination ». « Pour eux, ce n’est pas seulement une grande nouvelle politique, c’est une grande nouvelle humaine, un grand espoir pour leur vie ». (Communiqué)

Laurent Wauquiez, secrétaire d’Etat à l’Emploi: « On a l’impression que tout à coup, on a ouvert les fenêtres sur une politique américaine qui sentait la naphtaline » (Déclaration à la sortie du conseil des ministres).
« On a la même analyse des choses. Ca devrait permettre d’avoir des points de convergence (entre la France et les Etats-Unis) mais ce n’est pas parce qu’Obama est génial – ce dont je suis convaincu – que c’est nécessairement bon pour notre pays ». Il faut « qu’on regarde comment le travail ensemble va se faire. Notre job, c’est de s’assurer que les intérêts des Etats-Unis convergent avec les nôtres. » (Déclaration sur Canal +)

Nadine Morano
, secrétaire d’Etat en charge de la Famille: « En élisant Barack Obama, le peuple américain a changé le visage du monde (…) Un président métis à la Maison Blanche, c’est le sens de l’histoire qui est en marche ». (Communiqué)

Alain Juppé, ancien Premier ministre : « Il y a une espèce d’enthousiasme un peu partout, (mais) il faut quand même se dire que le monde ne va pas changer du jour au lendemain et que la tâche qui attend Obama est formidable, dans tous les sens du mot : à la fois enthousiasmante et un peu effrayante ». (Déclaration sur Canal+)

Dominique de Villepin, ancien Premier ministre : « c’est une formidable victoire pour les Etats-Unis, pour la démocratie américaine mais c’est surtout la fierté retrouvée pour les Américains. (…) (Il y a une) incertitude parce que se retrouver président des Etats-Unis dans un moment de crise sans avoir eu d’expérience préalable de grande fonction dans l’administration américaine, c’est évidemment un pari ». (Déclaration sur LCI)

Axel Poniatowski (UMP), président de la Commission des Affaires étrangères de l’Assemblée nationale : « C’est avant tout l’espoir d’une approche américaine plus multilatérale dans les affaires internationales. C’est aussi l’espoir de sortir plus vite de la crise économique et financière en parvenant à un accord consensuel sur une économie de marché mieux régulée et mieux encadrée ». (Communiqué)
« Notre vie politique n’a pas connu encore le renouvellement que connaissent aujourd’hui les Etats-Unis: nous avons d’un côté un parti de mouvement et de rupture, de l’autre côté un parti de contestation, il reste à inventer un grand mouvement de réconciliation. Mais force est de constater qu’en France, personne ne revendique aujourd’hui cette stratégie ».
Selon l’ancien Premier ministre, la différence entre Nicolas Sarkozy et le président américain élu Barack Obama, c’est que le premier prône « la rupture » là où le deuxième incarne « la réconciliation ». (Déclaration sur Europe 1)

Valérie Létard
, secrétaire d’Etat à la solidarité: La victoire de Barack Obama est « un espoir pour l’évolution du droit des femmes » car il « s’est engagé pour la prévention et la lutte contre les violences faites aux femmes » (Communiqué)

Fadela Amara, secrétaire d’Etat à la politique de la Ville: salue « un formidable exemple d’un renouveau du rêve américain, où chacun, quelle que soit son origine sociale ou ethnique, peut se dire que c’est possible. Barack Obama, incarne pour toute une jeunesse, notamment celle des quartiers populaires, le symbole d’un espoir, d’un changement pour le progrès de l’humanité ». (Déclaration)

Mouvement national républicain (MNR, extrême-droite) : « S’étonne des réactions outrancières voire parfois délirantes de la classe politico-journalistique après l’élection de Barack Obama (qui) relèvent d’un parti pris idéologique dépourvu de toute rationalité puisqu’elles ne se fondent que sur la personne du nouveau président et nullement sur son programme » (Communiqué).

Bernard Accoyer, le président de l’Assemblée nationale : « L’élection de Barack Obama ouvre une ère nouvelle pour l’Amérique et marque la force et la vitalité de la démocratie américaine ». « Lors de sa première visite en France, j’aurai le plaisir et l’honneur de l’inviter à s’exprimer devant l’Hémicycle de l’Assemblée nationale ».

Nicolas Sarkozy, chef de l’Etat français, félicite Barack Obama pour sa « victoire brillante ». « Recevez mes félicitations les plus chaleureuses, et à travers moi, celles du peuple français tout entier. Votre victoire brillante récompense un engagement inlassable au service du peuple américain. Elle couronne également une campagne exceptionnelle, dont le souffle et l’élévation ont prouvé au monde entier la vitalité de la démocratie américaine, en même temps qu’ils le tenaient en haleine », écrit le chef de l’Etat. « En vous choisissant, c’est le choix du changement, de l’ouverture et de l’optimisme qu’a fait le peuple américain. Alors que le monde est dans la tourmente et qu’il doute, le peuple américain, fidèle à ses valeurs qui font depuis toujours l’identité même de l’Amérique, a exprimé avec force sa foi dans le progrès et dans l’avenir », juge-t-il. « Ce message du peuple américain résonne bien au-delà de vos frontières. Au moment où nous devons faire face tous ensemble à d’immenses défis, votre élection soulève en France, en Europe et au-delà dans le monde un immense espoir. Celui d’une Amérique ouverte, solidaire et forte qui montrera à nouveau la voie, avec ses partenaires, par la force de l’exemple et l’adhésion à ses principes ». « La France et l’Europe, qui sont unies depuis toujours aux Etats-Unis par les liens de l’histoire, des valeurs et de l’amitié, y puiseront une énergie nouvelle pour travailler avec l’Amérique à préserver la paix et la prospérité du monde. Soyez assuré que vous pourrez compter sur la France et sur mon soutien personnel ».

François Fillon, Premier ministre : « Votre si belle victoire est historique. Elle illustre la vitalité et la maturité de la démocratie américaine. Elle consacre votre parcours exceptionnel qui constitue un symbole éclatant de renouveau et de rassemblement ». « Votre succès est le signe que le rêve américain continue d’inspirer votre peuple. Et ce rêve transcende aujourd’hui les frontières. Votre victoire adresse au monde un message d’espoir et d’ouverture ». « Votre élection célèbre la force des idéaux américains. Elle vous place devant de très hautes responsabilités. Face aux défis de notre temps – qu’il s’agisse de la crise financière, du changement climatique ou de la paix au Proche-Orient – je tiens à vous assurer de l’importance qu’attache mon gouvernement au lien transatlantique. La France sera à vos côtés pour répondre à ces défis, comme elle l’a toujours été au cours de la longue histoire qui unit fraternellement nos deux pays ».

Christine Lagarde, la ministre de l’Economie a salué l’élection « symboliquement extraordinaire » de Barack Obama et estimé que l’arrivée au pouvoir d’un représentant d’une minorité s’était déjà « un peu produite en France » avec l’élection de Nicolas Sarkozy.
« C’est symboliquement extraordinaire de voir un représentant d’une minorité prendre les commandes d’un pays qui est la première puissance économique, la première puissance militaire au monde ».
« Le président de la République aujourd’hui, à plusieurs reprises, a indiqué qu’il était lui-même le représentant d’une minorité ». Concernant l’impact de l’élection de Barack Obama sur la crise économique, Christine Lagarde a estimé qu' »il ne (fallait) pas soulever trop d’espérance », ajoutant que le nouveau président américain devra faire face « à une situation sur le plan financier et économique extrêmement détériorée ». « Je serais très étonnée qu’il ne souhaite pas avancer dans la même direction que nous : c’est-à-dire plus de supervision, des marchés organisés (…), pas de produits financiers à risque et puis pas d’acteurs financiers qui opèrent (…) sans surveillance ». (Déclaration sur France 2)

Bernard Kouchner, ministre des Affaires étrangères : L’élection de Barack Obama est une « occasion historique de conjuguer nos efforts ». Il salue la victoire d' »un homme attaché au dialogue ». « J’adresse mes plus chaleureuses et très amicales félicitations au sénateur Barack Obama pour son élection à la présidence des Etats-Unis d’Amérique et lui souhaite le plus grand succès pour son action future à la tête de son pays ». « Ensemble, nous devons saisir l’occasion historique de conjuguer nos efforts pour relever les défis économiques, climatiques ou de sécurité auxquels nous sommes tous également confrontés ». « Je rends hommage à l’esprit d’engagement, de générosité et de tolérance qui anime Barack Obama ». Le monde a « besoin de son dynamisme, de son refus des injustices et de sa volonté d’aller de l’avant pour bâtir un monde plus stable, plus sûr et plus juste ».

Patrick Devedjian<