Mal de dos : Attention, un mal peut en cacher un autre (Back pain: When your mind uses physical pain to protect you from psychic pain)

8 septembre, 2015
https://i0.wp.com/ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51yvtnNhYYL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_.jpghttps://i0.wp.com/livingmaxwell.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/john-sarno-767x1024.jpghttps://i0.wp.com/www.macroeditions.com/data/prodotti/cop/galleria/big/g/guerir-le-mal-de-dos.jpgUn coeur joyeux est un bon remède, Mais un esprit abattu dessèche les os. Proverbes 17: 22
L’opprobre me brise le coeur et je suis malade. Psaumes 69: 21
La même force culturelle et spirituelle qui a joué un rôle si décisif dans la disparition du sacrifice humain est aujourd’hui en train de provoquer la disparition des rituels de sacrifice humain qui l’ont jadis remplacé. Tout cela semble être une bonne nouvelle, mais à condition que ceux qui comptaient sur ces ressources rituelles soient en mesure de les remplacer par des ressources religieuses durables d’un autre genre. Priver une société des ressources sacrificielles rudimentaires dont elle dépend sans lui proposer d’alternatives, c’est la plonger dans une crise qui la conduira presque certainement à la violence. Gil Bailie
Plus d’un siècle après que Charcot a démontré que les hystériques n’étaient pas des simulateurs et que Freud a découvert l’inconscient, il nous est difficile d’accepter que nos souffrances puissent être à la fois réelles et sans cause matérielle. Georges Saline (responsable du département santé environnement de l’INVS)
Chacun a bien compris que « syndrome du bâtiment malsain » est la traduction politiquement correcte d’ »hystérie collective ». Le Monde
Musculoskeletal pain is very common. A review of prevalence studies indicated that in adult populations almost one fifth reported widespread pain, one third shoulder pain, and up to
one half reported low back pain in a 1-month period
(McBeth & Jones 2007)
Les muscles sont riches en terminaisons nerveuses, et lorsque le cerveau «en situation de stress», transmet trop d’informations aux nerfs, ils se trouvent alors saturés. Le muscle va y répondre par une crispation, une contraction musculaire, qui peut être la cause d’une douleur locale ou d’une douleur projetée. Et l’état de stress chronique favorise les poussées inflammatoires sur les articulations par la libération dans le sang de substances inflammatoires. Il suffit d’avoir un peu d’arthrose et d’être stressé pour que les articulations se mettent à exprimer une souffrance. Dr Gilles Mondoloni
We have incredible healing mechanisms that have evolved over millions of years. No matter how severe, injuries heal. Continuing pain is always the signal that TMS has begun. Consider that a fracture of the largest bone in the body, the femur (thigh bone), takes only six weeks to heal and will be stronger at the fracture site than it was before the break. Strong support that whiplash is part of TMS came to my attention in the Medical Science section of the New York Times from a piece published in the May 7, 1996, issue titled « In One Country, Chronic Whiplash Is Uncompensated (and Unknown). John E. Sarno
In a survey done in 1975 it was found that 88 per cent of patients with TMS had histories of up to five common mindbody disorders, including a variety of stomach symptoms, such as, heartburn, acid indigestion, gastritis and hiatal hernia; problems lower in the intestinal tract, such as spastic colon, irritable bowel syndrome and chronic constipation; common allergic conditions, such as hay fever and asthma; a variety of skin disorders, such as ecema, acne, hives and psoriasis; tension or migraine headache; frequent urinary tract or respiratory infections; and dizziness or ringing in the ears. . . . » (…) Even when there are structural abnormalities found in the back and in arthritic joints, many with such pathology have no symptoms; others have pain symptoms disproportionate to the actual pathology of the normal aging process. Even after surgeries to correct these « abnormalities » the pain continues. (…) . . . insight oriented therapy is the choice for people with TMS or its equivalents. The therapists to whom I refer patients are trained to help them explore the unconscious and become aware of feelings that are buried there, usually because they are frightening, embarrassing or in some way unacceptable. These feelings, and the rage to which they often give rise, are responsible for the many mindbody symptoms I have described. When we become aware of these feelings, in some cases by gradually becoming able to feel them, the physical symptoms because unnecessary and go away. (…) . . . insight oriented therapy is the choice for people with TMS or its equivalents. The therapists to whom I refer patients are trained to help them explore the unconscious and become aware of feelings that are buried there, usually because they are frightening, embarrassing or in some way unacceptable. These feelings, and the rage to which they often give rise, are responsible for the many mindbody symptoms I have described. When we become aware of these feelings, in some cases by gradually becoming able to feel them, the physical symptoms because unnecessary and go away. John Sarno (…) The pain will not stop unless you are able to say, « I have a normal back; I now know that the pain is due to a basically harmless condition, initiated by my brain to serve a psychological purpose. (…) The brain tries desperately to divert our attention from rage in the unconscious. . . . So we must bring reason to the process! This is the heart of the very important concept. . . . (…) Remember, the purpose of the pain is to divert attention from what’s going on emotionally and to keep you focused on the body. (…) For some people simply shifting attention from the physical to the psychological will do the trick. Others need more information on how the strategy works, and still others require psychotherapy. John Sarno
Our results suggest that chronic symptoms were not usually caused by the car accident. Expectation of disability, a family history, and attribution of pre-existing symptoms to the trauma may be more important determinants for the evolution of the late whiplash syndrome. Dr. Harald Schrader et al
The study in Lithuania provides a healthy reminder to Western societies that a heavy price is paid when a culture of self-imposed victimhood and self-serving litigation develops. One part of that price appears in impersonal numbers: lost efficiency, soaring costs, unfair usurpation of health-care resources. But a far more tragic cost is personal: individuals shackled for years by their belief that inescapable pain rules their lives day after day. Christian Science Monitor
I’ve seen patients 25 years down the road still having problems. The condition can become chronic, he said, when people alter their posture to relieve the pain of injured tendons and muscles. « They begin to compensate. and these compensations also cause problems. Dr. Barry August (New York University Medical Center)
And then, in an instant, I started to cry. Not little tears, not sad, quiet oh-my-back-hurts-so-much tears, but the deepest, hardest tears I’ve ever cried. Out of control tears, anger, rage, desperate tears. And I heard myself saying things like, Please take care of me, I don’t ever want to have to come out from under the covers, I’m so afraid, please take care of me, don’t hurt me, I want to cut my wrists, please let me die, I have to run away, I feel sick-and on and on, I couldn’t stop and R–, bless him, just held me. And as I cried, and as I voiced these feelings, it was, literally, as if there was a channel, a pipeline, from my back and out through my eyes. I FELT the pain almost pour out as I cried. It was weird and strange and transfixing. I knew–really knew–that what I was feeling at that moment was what I felt as a child, when no one would or could take care of me, the scaredness, the grief, the loneliness, the shame, the horror. As I cried, I was that child again and I recognized the feelings I have felt all my life which I thought were crazy or at the very best, bizarre. Maybe I removed myself from my body and never even allowed myself to feel when I was young. But the feelings were there and they poured over me and out of me. TMS Patient
Dr. Sarno’s theory can be stated simply: Most muscular/ skeletal pain is usually the result of early infantile and childhood trauma which has been repressed. The emotion involved is invariably that of profound anger and rage. Our mind plays tricks and confuses us into focusing our attention on physical pain while the real problem is in our not facing and uncovering our repressed emotions, particular deep rage. Sarno’s thesis is quite different from Janov’s in that the cure to Sarno’s Tension Myositis Syndrome (TMS) is simply to come to realize that the origin of the pain is from the unconscious mind and not from any bodily abnormality. Janov’s primal theory, on the other hand, emphasizes that this insightful knowledge is not curative; that what is needed for cure is a full re-living of the original repressed trauma. The disorders which are encompassed by this syndrome include, low back and leg pain, most neck and shoulder pain, fibromyalgia, and chronic fatigue syndrome. The author believes that anxiety and depression are both TMS equivalents. (…) The author surmises that the source of the pain in TMS is mild oxygen deprivation to the involved tissues and organ systems. At a very deep unconscious level repressed rage is the cause of the pain. Sarno takes issue with the medical profession since most physicians do not accept that the primary cause of many such chronic pain syndromes are psychological problems. Most physicians recognize that emotions play a role in such problems but are quick to find an inconsequential abnormality which they believe to be the cause of the TMS symptoms. (…) Unless the patient can become convinced that his back or neck is normal, the pain will continue. They must be reassured and then really come to believe that « . . . structural abnormalities that have been found on X ray, CT scan or MRI are normal changes associated with activity and aging. »  This newly acquired belief, Dr. Sarno writes, will thwart the strategy of the brain to make one become fixated on the body and instead begin to understand that the problem is an unfelt trauma stored in one’s unconscious. It is as though the mind fears the release of the repressed rage. To make the pain go away the patient must acknowledge and accept the true basis of the pain. Think psychologically and talk to your brain! This will divert attention from the body. Insight, knowledge, and understanding are the cures for the TMS symdrome. (…) This was a patient, who at first despite knowing and accepting the source of her back pain, did not improve. Instead, the author writes, this patient’s pain became worse. He believes that her symptoms were exacerbated in a desperate attempt by the body to prevent their being released into consciousness — into her knowing their actual source. « The feelings would not be denied expression, » he wrote, « and when they exploded into consciousness the pain disappeared. It no longer had a purpose; it had failed in its mission. » (…) It is the unconscious repressed rage which is the source of the chronic pain, not the anger and rage which is consciously known by the patient. (…) There is an inexorable press by the unconscious to release and reveal its past traumas. When the patient understands the repressed presence of rage the feelings will stop trying to become conscious and « removal of that threat eliminates the need for physical distraction, and the pain stops. » John A. Speyrer
Quand un patient arrive dans une consultation d’hopital, la routine est de faire un scanner IRM. Invariablement, on observe une quelconque anormalité anatomique comme un disque déplacé, une sténose spinale, ou de l’arthrite spinale. Alors le docteur déclare quelque chose comme : « C’est à cause du disque que vous avez mal » et dirige le patient vers la thérapie physiologique destinée à traiter le disque, avec de faibles résultats à long terme. En étudiant la littérature médicale, le Dr Sarno avait remarqué que si vous prenez une centaine de patients entre 40 et 60 ans ne présentant aucune douleur du dos et que vous leur faites passer un scanner IRM, dans 65% des cas vous constatez qu’il existe un disque déplacé ou une sténose spinale SANS douleur (New England Journal of Medicine, article 1994). Alors il s’est posé la question : « Si ce n’est pas le disque qui cause la douleur, alors c’est quoi ? » Il a découvert que les gens qui souffraient avaient des tensions chroniques et des spasmes musculaires dans le cou, le dos, les épaules ou les fessiers. Il affirme que lorsqu’un muscle est tendu de façon chronique, le sang ne peut pas circuler normalement à cet endroit ; il y a un manque d’oxygène et cela cause une douleur sévère. Vous pouvez aussi imaginer un muscle tendu enserrant un nerf et provoquant les symptômes de la sciatique. L’important ici, c’est que le Dr Sarno ne dit pas à ses patients que la douleur est dans leur tête. Il leur donne une véritable explication physiologique. Et nous allons bientôt voir la connexion logique avec les émotions. Le Dr Sarno s’est demandé : « Et d’abord, pourquoi est-ce que les gens ont les muscles tendus de façon chronique ? » Il a trouvé l’explication suivante. C’est que nombre de nos concitoyens grandissent dans des familles dans lesquelles ils apprennent, à un certain niveau (inconscient), que ce n’est pas bien d’exprimer sa colère ou sa peur. C’est un problème parce qu’en grandissant nous traversons des événements spécifiques ou des traumatismes qui suscitent la colère ou la peur. Et dès que ces émotions émergent dans le corps, notre inconscient dit en substance : « Ce n’est pas bien ni sécurisant de ressentir ces choses ». Alors, selon Sarno, l’inconscient provoque la crispation et le raidissement des muscles afin que la douleur nous détourne de ce qui nous met en colère ou nous fait peur. Quelquefois, ce processus de douleur peut continuer pendant des dizaines d’années. Dr Eric Robins

Attention: un mal peut en cacher un autre !

« Dorsalgies », « lombalgies », « lumbago », « mal de reins », « tour de rein », « sciatiques » …

Alors qu’en ce meilleur des mondes où les bébés se vendent désormais sur catalogue

Et où même les bâtiments tombent malades …

Nos thérapeutes et nos médias multiplient, sur fond de victimisation devenue folle, les appellations et les spécialités médicales comme les thérapies et les formules pharmacologiques censées y remédier …

Comment ne pas s’étonner de l’étrange consensus autour de cette quasi-épidémie qu’il est devenu normal d’appeler mal du siècle ?

Et du tout autant singulier silence sur les travaux du Dr Sarno (seulement traduit en français l’an dernier) …

Qui, remarquant le fréquent décalage entre les anormalités anatomiques et les douleurs ressenties ou la tendance desdites douleurs à se déplacer à mesure qu’elles étaient « guéries » ..

A depuis longtemps montré que nombre de nos douleurs physiques chroniques …

Ne sont souvent qu’une manière pour notre cerveau de nous détourner de douleurs psychiques plus profondes ou plus anciennes ?

Book Review: The Mindbody Prescription: Healing the Body, Healing the Pain by John E. Sarno, M.D. Warner Books, 1998, pp. 210

Reviewed by John A. Speyrer

I first learned of Dr. John E. Sarno when he was a guest on Larry King’s television show a few years ago. The author is professor of Clinical Rehabilitation Medicine at the New York University School of Medicine and an attending physician at the Howard A. Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine at New York University Medical Center. His theories seemed to be related to primal therapy so I had intended to eventually read what he had to say about the cause and cure of back ailments. Then recently while surfing the internet I ran across a website with book reviews of both Sarno’s book and Janov’s The Primal Scream. I thought that perhaps Sarno’s theories were closer related to Janov’s primal theory than I had originally surmised so I decided to read his book, The Mindbody Prescription.

Dr. Sarno’s theory can be stated simply: Most muscular/ skeletel pain is usually the result of early infantile and childhood trauma which has been repressed. The emotion involved is invariably that of profound anger and rage. Our mind plays tricks and confuses us into focusing our attention on physical pain while the real problem is in our not facing and uncovering our repressed emotions, particular deep rage. Sarno’s thesis is quite different from Janov’s in that the cure to Sarno’s Tension Myositis Syndrome (TMS) is simply to come to realize that the origin of the pain is from the unconscious mind and not from any bodily abnormality. Janov’s primal theory, on the other hand, emphasizes that this insightful knowledge is not curative; that what is needed for cure is a full re-living of the original repressed trauma.

The disorders which are encompassed by this syndrome include, low back and leg pain, most neck and shoulder pain, fibromyalgia, and chronic fatigue syndrome. The author believes that anxiety and depression are both TMS equivalents.

Dr. Sarno writes:

« In a survey done in 1975 it was found that 88 per cent of patients with TMS had histories of up to five common mindbody disorders, including a variety of stomach symptoms, such as, heartburn, acid indigestion, gastritis and hiatal hernia; problems lower in the intestinal tract, such as spastic colon, irritable bowel syndrome and chronic constipation; common allergic conditions, such as hay fever and asthma; a variety of skin disorders, such as ecema, acne, hives and psoriasis; tension or migraine headache; frequent urinary tract or respiratory infections; and dizziness or ringing in the ears. . . . » p. 29
Even when there are structural abnormalities found in the back and in arthritic joints, many with such pathology have no symptoms; others have pain symptoms disproportionate to the actual pathology of the normal aging process. Even after surgeries to correct these « abnormalities » the pain continues.

The author surmises that the source of the pain in TMS is mild oxygen deprivation to the involved tissues and organ systems. At a very deep unconscious level repressed rage is the cause of the pain. Sarno takes issue with the medical profession since most physicians do not accept that the primary cause of many such chronic pain syndromes are psychological problems. Most physicians recognize that emotions play a role in such problems but are quick to find an inconsequential abnormality which they believe to be the cause of the TMS symptoms.

If the cause of the pain is oftentimes repressed rage, what is the role of psychotherapy in the elimination of the chronic pains of TMS? After giving his patient a physical exam to eliminate any gross physical abnormality from consideration, Dr. Sarno primarily uses education to explain the operation and power of repressed feelings. He believes that the pain, weakness, stiffness, burning pressure and numbness caused by a reduced a blood flow causes no permanent damage to the tissues.

Unless the patient can become convinced that his back or neck is normal, the pain will continue. They must be reassured and then really come to believe that « . . . structural abnormalities that have been found on X ray, CT scan or MRI are normal changes associated with activity and aging. »

This newly acquired belief, Dr. Sarno writes, will thwart the strategy of the brain to make one become fixated on the body and instead begin to understand that the problem is an unfelt trauma stored in one’s unconscious. It is as though the mind fears the release of the repressed rage. To make the pain go away the patient must acknowledge and accept the true basis of the pain. Think psychologically and talk to your brain! This will divert attention from the body. Insight, knowledge, and understanding are the cures for the TMS symdrome.

Psychotherapy is rarely used. Dr. Sarno explains its role:

« . . . insight oriented therapy is the choice for people with TMS or its equivalents. The therapists to whom I refer patients are trained to help them explore the unconscious and become aware of feelings that are buried there, usually because they are frightening, embarrassing or in some way unacceptable. These feelings, and the rage to which they often give rise, are responsible for the many mindbody symptoms I have described. When we become aware of these feelings, in some cases by gradually becoming able to feel them, the physical symptoms because unnecessary and go away. » p. 161
On page 13 one of his patients described what seems to have been a primal regression encouraged by her husband’s support: »And then, in an instant, I started to cry. Not little tears, not sad, quiet oh-my-back-hurts-so-much tears, but the deepest, hardest tears I’ve ever cried. Out of control tears, anger, rage, desperate tears. And I heard myself saying things like, Please take care of me, I don’t ever want to have to come out from under the covers, I’m so afraid, please take care of me, don’t hurt me, I want to cut my wrists, please let me die, I have to run away, I feel sick-and on and on, I couldn’t stop and R–, bless him, just held me. And as I cried, and as I voiced these feelings, it was, literally, as if there was a channel, a pipeline, from my back and out through my eyes. I FELT the pain almost pour out as I cried. It was weird and strange and transfixing. I knew–really knew–that what I was feeling at that moment was what I felt as a child, when no one would or could take care of me, the scaredness, the grief, the loneliness, the shame, the horror. As I cried, I was that child again and I recognized the feelings I have felt all my life which I thought were crazy or at the very best, bizarre. Maybe I removed myself from my body and never even allowed myself to feel when I was young. But the feelings were there and they poured over me and out of me. »
This was a patient, who at first despite knowing and accepting the source of her back pain, did not improve. Instead, the author writes, this patient’s pain became worse. He believes that her symptoms were exacerbated in a desperate attempt by the body to prevent their being released into consciousness — into her knowing their actual source. « The feelings would not be denied expression, » he wrote, « and when they exploded into consciousness the pain disappeared. It no longer had a purpose; it had failed in its mission. » (The author’s emphasis.) It is the unconscious repressed rage which is the source of the chronic pain, not the anger and rage which is consciously known by the patient.

There is an inexorable press by the unconscious to release and reveal its past traumas. When the patient understands the repressed presence of rage the feelings will stop trying to become conscious and « removal of that threat eliminates the need for physical distraction, and the pain stops. »

Sarno claims the rate of « cure » is between 90 and 95 per cent and yet his practice is comprised mostly of sufferers who have gone to him as a last resort — those who have been suffering for decades. He has treated over 10,000 patients and will only accept a patient who he believes can accept the psychological explanation as the cause of their distress. Being convinced and coming to believe that the pain has its origins in repressed feelings is essential for the treatment to be successful. This is a maxim of the treatment and is repeated throughout the book. It is not a form of denial of the existence of the pain but only an affirmation and acceptance of its true origin.

Dr. Sarno writes that one must accept the emotional explanation in order to get well.

« Increasingly, we discussed the pain with the patient, where it came from and why it would go away once the psychological poison was revealed. » p. 105
« He (the patient) understood and accepted the principle of psychological causation as applicable to his symptoms — and he got better. » p. 111
« In many cases merely acknowledging that a symptom may be emotional in origin is enough to stop it. » p. 113.
« I would tell patients their backaches were induced by stress and tension, and if they were open to that idea, they got better. » p. 113
« The pain will not stop unless you are able to say, « I have a normal back; I now know that the pain is due to a basically harmless condition, initiated by my brain to serve a psychological purpose. . . . » p. 142
« The brain tries desperately to divert our attention from rage in the unconscious. . . . So we must bring reason to the process! This is the heart of the very important concept. . . . » p. 144
« I tell my patients that they must consciously think about repressed rage and the reasons for it whenever they are aware of the pain. » p. 145
« Remember, the purpose of the pain is to divert attention from what’s going on emotionally and to keep you focused on the body. » p. 148
« For some people simply shifting attention from the physical to the psychological will do the trick. Others need more information on how the strategy works, and still others require psychotherapy. » p. 149
An extensive bibliography is contained in The Mindbody Prescription. Sections of the book include discussions of the the psychosomatic theories of Walter B. Canon, Heinz Kohut, Franz Alexander, Stanley Coen, Candace Pert, Sigmund Freud, Graeme Taylor, and others. A technical appendix with more indepth studies is included.

The author has also written:

Healing Back Pain: The Mind-Body Connection
Mind over Back Pain : A Radically New Approach to the Diagnosis and Treatment of Back Pain

Voir aussi:

Health
Pain Relief
When Back Pain Starts In Your Head
Is repressed anger causing your back pain?

Mike McGrath

Prevention.com

November 3, 2011
John Sarno, MD, thinks that virtually all lower back pain is caused not by structural abnormalities but by repressed rage.

He’s written three books about it, including The Mindbody Prescription. A professor of clinical rehabilitation medicine at the New York University School of Medicine in New York City, Dr. Sarno believes that to protect you from acting on—or being destroyed by—that rage, your unconscious mind distracts you from the anger by creating a socially acceptable malaise: lower back pain.

Noted integrative medicine specialist and Prevention advisor Andrew Weil, MD, is a big fan of Dr. Sarno’s theory. So are actress Anne Bancroft and ABC-TV correspondent John Stossel—three of the thousands who report that Dr. Sarno cured their back pain.

What is the cure? In a word, awareness. Accept that your brain is trying to protect you from the rage, and the pain will go away. How’s that for « instant »?

Dr. Sarno has coined the term TMS— »Tension Myositis Syndrome »—to describe this « psychophysiological » condition. The brain, he says, mildly oxygen-deprives our back muscles and certain nerves and tendons to distract us and prevent our repressed anger from lashing out.

He readily acknowledges that this diagnosis is controversial. In fact, he tells Prevention, « Most people won’t buy it. But my TMS patients who do accept it cure themselves. » John Stossel was a hard sell. « I tried chiropractic. I tried acupuncture. I tried every back chair and special pillow I could find, » he recalls. His back still hurt so much that he spent entire meetings stretched out on the floor. This went on for 15 years, until a colleague told him about Dr. Sarno.

Stossel, the kind of reporter who would normally try to debunk such a theory, says that « it sounded ridiculous » to him. « But my back really hurt, and my medical insurance paid for 80%. So I went to see him, read one of his books, and—except for some occasional twinges—got better immediately. »

But it didn’t last. « Six months later, the pain came back, and Dr. Sarno gave me a kind of ‘I told you so’ look. I hadn’t done one thing he had strongly suggested, which was to attend one of his seminars. So I went, got better again, and I’ve been virtually pain-free for 10 years. »

Are you at risk for rage-induced back pain? Dr. Sarno has found that people with certain personality traits are at higher risk for this back pain disorder, specifically intelligent, talented, compulsive perfectionists and those who tend to put the needs of others first.

Voir encore:

In One Country, Chronic Whiplash Is Uncompensated (and Unknown)
Denise Grady
The New York Times

May 7, 1996

In, Lithuania, rear-end collisions happen much as they do in the rest of the world. Cars crash, bumpers crumple and tempers flare. But drivers in cars that have been hit there do not seem to suffer the long-term complaints so common in other countries: the headaches or lingering neck pains that have come to be known as chronic whiplash, or whiplash syndrome.

Cars are no safer in Lithuania, and the average neck is not any stronger. The difference, a new study says, might be described as a matter of indemnity.

Drivers in Lithuania did not carry personal-injury insurance at the time of the study, and people there were not in the habit of suing one another. Most medical bills were paid by the government. And although some private insurance is now appearing, at the time there were no claims to be filed, no money to be won and nothing to be gained from a diagnosis of chronic whiplash. Most Lithuanians, in fact, had never heard of whiplash.

The circumstances in Lithuania are described in the current issue of The Lancet, a British medical journal, by a team of Norwegian researchers who conducted a study there. The results, they wrote, suggest that the chronic whiplash syndrome « has little validity. »

The study was prompted by « an explosion of chronic-whiplash cases in Norway, » said Dr. Harald Schrader, a neurologist at University Hospital in Trondheim. He explained: « We are topping the world list. In a country of 4.2 million, we have 70,000 people in a patients’ organization who feel they have chronic disability because of whiplash. People are claiming compensation for injuries from mechanical forces not more than you would get in daily life, from coughing, sneezing, running down the steps, plopping into a chair. And they are getting millions of kroner in compensation. It’s mass hysteria. »

Dr. Schrader said he and his colleagues had chosen Lithuania for a study of whiplash « because there is no awareness there about whiplash or potential disabling consequences, and no, or very seldom, insurance for personal injury. »

Without disclosing the purpose of the study, the researchers gave health questionnaires to 202 drivers whose cars had been struck from behind one to three years earlier. The accidents varied in severity; 11 percent of the cars had severe damage, and the rest had either mild or moderate damage.

The drivers were questioned about symptoms, and their answers were compared with the answers of a control group, made up of the same number of people, of similar ages and from the same town, who had not been in a car accident. The study found no difference between the two groups.

Thirty-five percent of the accident victims reported neck pain, but so did 33 percent of the controls. Similarly, 53 percent who had been in accidents had headaches, but so did 50 percent of the controls. The researchers concluded, « No one in the study group had disabling or persistent symptoms as a result of the car accident. »

Dr. Schrader said he and his colleagues had been astounded by the results. Even though they were skeptical about chronic whiplash, they had expected that a few genuine cases would turn up. But not one did, not even among the 16 percent of drivers who recalled having neck pain shortly after their accidents.

When the subjects were finally told the real purpose of the study, they were amazed to learn that anyone could think that an accident that had happened more than a year ago could still be causing health problems. Dr. Schrader recalled, « They said, ‘Headaches? Why don’t you ask me why after two years I still haven’t got the spare part for my bumper?’ « 

When the findings were publicized in Norway, Dr. Schrader said, the leader of the whiplash patients’ organization threatened to sue him. Questions were also raised about whether the research had been financed by the insurance industry. The answer is no, he said; the money came from his university.

Dr. Schrader said he did not doubt the existence of short-term whiplash injuries but did doubt the validity of chronic cases. His conclusions agree with those of a study, published a year ago in the journal Spine, that concluded that about 90 percent of whiplash injuries healed on their own in days or a few weeks and needed very little treatment.

But other injuries may persist, physicians say. « You can’t conclude from this small study that whiplash syndrome doesn’t exist, » said Dr. Paul McCormick, an associate professor of neurosurgery at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. « But the researchers are right on in questioning the prevalence. »

Dr. McCormick said that some patients sustained lasting, identifiable injuries from whiplash but that milder cases were hard to diagnose. « We don’t have objective criteria for those, » he said. « There’s no lab test. » Soft-tissue injuries do not show up clearly on X-rays or in M.R.I. scans. The diagnosis is based on symptoms reported by the patient, who may or may not be reliable. « We have to be careful as scientists and human beings not to see everyone as scheming and lying, » Dr. McCormick said.

Other specialists also say that some chronic whiplash cases are real. « I’ve seen patients 25 years down the road still having problems, » said Dr. Barry August, a dentist who is a director of the head and facial pain-management program at New York University Medical Center. The condition can become chronic, he said, when people alter their posture to relieve the pain of injured tendons and muscles. « They begin to compensate, » he said, « and these compensations also cause problems. »

Dr. August also questioned the methods in the Lancet study. Even though the people in the control group had not been in car accidents, they might have had other injuries, he said. « Falling down the stairs, slipping on the ice, can set off a whiplash injury, » he said, « and it can be longstanding. For controls, you’d need to look at people without any injuries, even in childhood. »

Whiplash is the bane of the insurance industry. From half to two-thirds of all the people who file injury claims from car accidents report back and neck sprains. Insurers say some of those claims are false, or exaggerated.

The National Insurance Crime Bureau estimates that $16 of every $100 paid out in auto injury claims is for fraudulent claims and that half of that amount is paid for « exaggerated soft-tissue claims, » which include whiplash. Phony medical claims cost the insurance industry billions of dollars; those expenses are passed on to the public and add from $100 to $130 to the price of each car-insurance policy, said Carolyn Gorman, a spokeswoman for the Insurance Information Institute in Washington.

« Whiplash is a claim that’s growing, » Ms. Gorman said. « But you can’t be glib and think everybody’s faking it. For someone who really has whiplash, it is painful and it can last a long time and cost a lot of money. But it’s hard to tell whether someone has it. You can’t prove it. »

Voir également:

Necessary Pain?
Christian ScienceMonitor

May 14, 1996

You might say personal-injury lawyers are feeling the lash of The Lancet.

In an era when a tiny slice of the American electorate – plaintiff’s lawyers – are vetoing legislation through massive political contributions and backstage lobbying, it’s of more than passing interest to see a rebuke from the scientific community.

This comes in the form of a study of whiplash published in the British medical journal, The Lancet.

A team of Norwegian researchers studied the cases of 202 Lithuanian drivers involved in rear-ended car accidents of varying seriousness. Those studied reported an incidence of neck and headache problems similar to that of a control group not involved in auto accidents. But in no case did any of the collision victims report the kind of persisting pain known in lawsuits as whiplash.

Almost no private auto insurance is available in Lithuania. And people generally haven’t heard of whiplash. So the researchers drew the undeniably logical conclusion that chronic whiplash exists only where people are mentally conditioned to expect and/or benefit financially from it. And also where the insurance and legal system provides a framework to nourish its supposed existence.

Not surprisingly, when the study results were announced, Dr. Harald Schrader, a hospital neurologist on the research team, was threatened with suit by the head of a whiplash-patients organization in Norway. (There are some 70,000 people in that organization who claim chronic disability.)

No one, of course, should suggest singling out the victims for blame. A whole system is geared to reinforce their belief in their continuing infirmity. That system includes well-intentioned lawmakers, fee-seeking lawyers, and busy (and sometimes unethical) health-care providers.

But the study in Lithuania provides a healthy reminder to Western societies that a heavy price is paid when a culture of self-imposed victimhood and self-serving litigation develops.

One part of that price appears in impersonal numbers: lost efficiency, soaring costs, unfair usurpation of health-care resources. But a far more tragic cost is personal: individuals shackled for years by their belief that inescapable pain rules their lives day after day. Instead of threatening suit, those people might spare a word of gratitude to Dr. Shrader and his colleagues. His team offers them the beginning of knowledge to set them free.

Voir enfin:EFT et le modèle de Sarno
Extrait d’un communiqué de presse présenté par le Dr Eric Robins, urologue californien.
http://www.emofree.com/Pain-management/pain-sarno-eric.htm

3 juillet 2008

Le Docteur John Sarno, professeur de médecine à l’Université de New York, voit quotidiennement des patients atteints des pires douleurs chroniques au monde. La plupart souffrent de douleurs graves (cou, dos, épaules, fessiers) depuis 10 à 30 ans, la plupart ont reçu de multiples injections épidurales, subi une ou plusieurs opérations chirurgicales et se sont soumis à des séances de kinésithérapie pendant des années. Tous ont été victimes de mécanismes d’action terribles (par exemple, passer sous un camion ou un boeing) et leurs radios ressemblent à celles d’Elephant Man : ils auraient donc de bonnes raisons de souffrir.
Avec cette cohorte de patients, Sarno obtient un pourcentage de guérison de 70% (à la fois pour la douleur et pour la fonctionnalité), ainsi qu’un taux supplémentaire de 15% de patients se sentant beaucoup mieux (avec 40 à 80% d’amélioration). Et il a eu ces résultats avec environ 12 000 patients.

Quand un patient arrive dans une consultation d’hopital, la routine est de faire un scanner IRM. Invariablement, on observe une quelconque anormalité anatomique comme un disque déplacé, une sténose spinale, ou de l’arthrite spinale. Alors le docteur déclare quelque chose comme : « C’est à cause du disque que vous avez mal » et dirige le patient vers la thérapie physiologique destinée à traiter le disque, avec de faibles résultats à long terme.

En étudiant la littérature médicale, le Dr Sarno avait remarqué que si vous prenez une centaine de patients entre 40 et 60 ans ne présentant aucune douleur du dos et que vous leur faites passer un scanner IRM, dans 65% des cas vous constatez qu’il existe un disque déplacé ou une sténose spinale SANS douleur (New England Journal of Medicine, article 1994). Alors il s’est posé la question : « Si ce n’est pas le disque qui cause la douleur, alors c’est quoi ? »
Il a découvert que les gens qui souffraient avaient des tensions chroniques et des spasmes musculaires dans le cou, le dos, les épaules ou les fessiers. Il affirme que lorsqu’un muscle est tendu de façon chronique, le sang ne peut pas circuler normalement à cet endroit ; il y a un manque d’oxygène et cela cause une douleur sévère. Vous pouvez aussi imaginer un muscle tendu enserrant un nerf et provoquant les symptômes de la sciatique.
L’important ici, c’est que le Dr Sarno ne dit pas à ses patients que la douleur est dans leur tête. Il leur donne une véritable explication physiologique. Et nous allons bientôt voir la connexion logique avec les émotions.

Le Dr Sarno s’est demandé : « Et d’abord, pourquoi est-ce que les gens ont les muscles tendus de façon chronique ? » Il a trouvé l’explication suivante. C’est que nombre de nos concitoyens grandissent dans des familles dans lesquelles ils apprennent, à un certain niveau (inconscient), que ce n’est pas bien d’exprimer sa colère ou sa peur.
C’est un problème parce qu’en grandissant nous traversons des événements spécifiques ou des traumatismes qui suscitent la colère ou la peur. Et dès que ces émotions émergent dans le corps, notre inconscient dit en substance : « Ce n’est pas bien ni sécurisant de ressentir ces choses ». Alors, selon Sarno, l’inconscient provoque la crispation et le raidissement des muscles afin que la douleur nous détourne de ce qui nous met en colère ou nous fait peur. Quelquefois, ce processus de douleur peut continuer pendant des dizaines d’années.

Alors, comment le Dr Sarno obtient-il ses merveilleux résultats ? Il amène ses patients à deux conférences. Dans la première, il dit aux gens : « Ce n’est pas le disque déplacé ni une autre anormalité anatomique qui cause votre douleur. La plupart des gens de votre âge qui vivent sans douleur ont aussi un disque déplacé ou une sténose spinale. Ce qui vous cause de la douleur, c’est l’état chronique de tension et de spasme de vos muscles. »
Dans la deuxième conférence, le Dr Sarno leur dit : « Quand vous avez mal, je veux que vous remarquiez contre quoi vous êtes en colère ou de quoi vous avez peur. » Ensuite, il leur fait tenir un journal, ou bien il les inscrit à des séances de thérapie de groupe, ou encore il leur fait suivre une psychothérapie (« behavioral therapy », psychothérapie comportementale). Il dit que 20% de ses patients n’étaient pas conscients de ce qui les mettait en colère ou les rendait anxieux ; ils avaient besoin de travailler avec un thérapeute pour entrer en contact avec leur matériel réprimé ou inconscient.

Le Dr Eric Robins commente :
« J’explique le modèle de Sarno quand je fais une conférence à cause des résultats étonnants qu’il obtient. Dans l’un de ses livres les plus récents, Sarno explique que ce modèle émotionnel ne concerne pas seulement la douleur musculo-squelettale, mais qu’il peut être utilisé pour la plupart des maladies chroniques ou fonctionnelles. Je suis certain qu’il est évident pour vous que certaines des méthodes qu’il utilisait sont archaiques comparées à la rapidité et à l’efficacité d’EFT. Nous pouvons nous attendre à des résultats meilleurs et plus rapides avec EFT puisque cette dernière technique est la meilleure et la plus rapide des techniques mental-corps utilisées cliniquement à l’heure actuelle dans le monde. »

Voir enfin:

Pour en finir avec le mal de dos
Martine Betti-Cusso

Le Figaro

27/02/2015
Le médecin ostéopathe et acupuncteur, Dr Gilles Mondoloni nous parle du mal du siècle, le mal de dos. Il prône un traitement global pour prévenir et guérir de ce mal. Les habitudes de vie, le stress ou l’alimentation sont aussi responsables.

LE FIGARO MAGAZINE – Pourquoi souffre-t-on du dos?

Dr Gilles MONDOLONI – Parce que nous sommes de plus en plus sédentaires, nous faisons peu de sport et ce déconditionnement à l’effort a pour effet d’affaiblir les muscles. Il y a aussi les postures inadéquates et une alimentation favorable à la prise de poids et nuisible aux articulations. De plus, nous vivons avec un stress répété qui participe à la survenue du mal de dos et à sa chronicisation. Enfin, il y a l’usure des disques et des articulations consécutive au vieillissement… L’état de notre dos reflète notre hygiène de vie et notre santé psychique et physique.

Toutes les tranches d’âges sont affectées, des enfants aux seniors…

Les enfants et les adolescents peuvent ressentir des douleurs dans le dos dues à une croissance rapide et à la pratique de sports intenses. Il s’agit le plus souvent de spondylolisthésis, ce qui correspond à une petite fracture de la dernière vertèbre lombaire suivie de son glissement sur celle située au-dessous. Lorsque les douleurs se situent en haut du dos, derrière les omoplates, ce peut être la maladie de Scheuermann, laquelle se caractérise par une altération des disques. Elle se traite notamment par des exercices de rééducation.

Et quels sont les problèmes les plus fréquents chez l’adulte?

Eux souffrent de discopathies. Les problèmes de disques dont font partie les lumbagos (fissure du disque intervertébral), les hernies discales (déplacement d’une partie des disques intervertébraux) et les sciatiques (compression d’un nerf) apparaissent autour de la quarantaine. Le senior, lui, sera atteint plus souvent d’arthrose, ce qui entraînera des douleurs localisées dans le dos et limitera ses mouvements. Mais il faut savoir que les maux de dos les plus fréquents sont les tensions musculaires, souvent liées à des facteurs de stress et à des mauvaises positions lesquels vont provoquer des contractions musculaires qui vont bloquer des pans entiers du rachis.

Comment diagnostiquez-vous l’origine d’un mal de dos?

Je commence par questionner mon patient sur ses antécédents, sur sa manière de vivre, sur les circonstances d’apparition de ses douleurs, sur le cheminement de son mal de dos. Ce qui me permet de connaître son hygiène de vie, ses faiblesses et les causes probables de son mal de dos. Puis je l’examine. En croisant les informations obtenues par l’interrogatoire et l’examen clinique, et sans recourir systématiquement à des radios, scanners ou IRM, j’aboutis à un diagnostic précis. Ceci est fondamental: on ne doit pas traiter un mal de dos sans en connaître précisément la cause. La plupart du temps, le mal provient d’un ensemble de facteurs où se mêlent les habitudes de vie, l’émotionnel, l’alimentation. C’est une erreur que de ne s’attacher qu’aux symptômes. On doit considérer le patient comme un tout et soigner autant la cause que la conséquence du mal.

Comment les facteurs psychologiques, le stress ou l’anxiété agissent-ils sur le dos?

Il y a différentes explications. Les muscles sont riches en terminaisons nerveuses, et lorsque le cerveau «en situation de stress», transmet trop d’informations aux nerfs, ils se trouvent alors saturés. Le muscle va y répondre par une crispation, une contraction musculaire, qui peut être la cause d’une douleur locale ou d’une douleur projetée. Et l’état de stress chronique favorise les poussées inflammatoires sur les articulations par la libération dans le sang de substances inflammatoires. Il suffit d’avoir un peu d’arthrose et d’être stressé pour que les articulations se mettent à exprimer une souffrance.
Comment soignez-vous vos patients?

Je propose toujours une prise en charge globale, avec fréquemment des manipulations lorsqu’il n’y a pas de contre-indications. Elles sont très efficaces, en particulier pour soigner les cervicalgies, dorsalgies et lombalgies communes, lesquelles sont liées à l’usure d’un disque entre les vertèbres, à l’arthrose ou à des tensions musculaires ou ligamentaires. Lorsqu’il y a une inflammation dans le dos (poussée d’arthrose, crise de sciatique…) et si la situation l’exige, je vais prescrire des anti-inflammatoires. Si l’inflammation est de faible intensité, je vais recourir aux oligoéléments, à la phytothérapie, à la micronutrition, à l’acupuncture, qui agit sur la douleur, sur la contracture musculaire mais aussi sur le stress, l’anxiété, la circulation de l’énergie. Cette approche globale, sans effet indésirable, optimise l’efficacité des soins. Pour preuve, des patients en stade préopératoire qui me sont adressés par des neurochirurgiens sont une fois sur deux suffisamment améliorés pour éviter l’opération ou la reporter à plus tard.

Dans quels cas les manipulations sont-elles recommandées et contre-indiquées?

Elles sont incontournables pour traiter les douleurs mécaniques, qu’elles soient cervicales, dorsales ou lombaires. Souvent, ces douleurs apparaissent à l’effort, lorsque la personne est en mouvement, et durent moins d’une demi-heure lorsque l’on se lève le matin. Les manipulations vont permettre de détendre les muscles coincés qui bloquent les articulations. En revanche, les manipulations sont non recommandées voire contre-indiquées en cas de douleurs inflammatoires. Celles-ci surviennent ou persistent au repos et s’installent la nuit, en exigeant plus d’une demi-heure de «dérouillage» le matin. Elles sont aussi contre-indiquées en cas d’ostéoporose, de tumeurs osseuses et d’infection des vertèbres.

Comment bien manipuler?
D’abord en restant à l’écoute des sensations et des réactions du patient. Je manipule à contre-sens de la douleur, en partant des zones les moins douloureuses et les moins raides. Les pressions doivent être mesurées, douces, progressives. Et j’ajouterai qu’il faut faire preuve d’une grande prudence au niveau des cervicales. Ce sont des articulations fragiles qui, à la faveur d’une manipulation brutale, peuvent se fissurer et entraîner de rares mais graves accidents vasculaires cérébraux. Théoriquement, les manipulations au niveau des cervicales sont du seul ressort des médecins et doivent être précédées de radios du cou. Avant toute manipulation, il faut exiger un diagnostic médical précis. On ne manipule pas à tout va. Il est indispensable de se renseigner sur la formation suivie par le praticien. Le titre de docteur en médecine est une précaution supplémentaire pour profiter au mieux des bienfaits des manipulations sans s’exposer à des risques.

Quelle différence entre l’ostéopathie et la chiropractie?

Ce sont des techniques proches et complémentaires. La chiropractie est plutôt centrée sur la colonne vertébrale et utilise des techniques généralement plus appuyées. L’ostéopathie a un champ d’action plus large. Elle va traiter l’ensemble des affections neuromusculaires mais aussi des pathologies viscérales. Les deux méthodes sont efficaces. C’est le thérapeute qui fait la différence. Or beaucoup ne sont pas suffisamment formés, ce qui jette un discrédit sur ces disciplines tout à fait nobles.

Que pensez-vous des méthodes de Mézières ou de Mc Kenzie?

La méthode Mc Kenzie consiste à faire travailler la colonne vertébrale en extension et donne des résultats intéressants. La méthode Mézières est une technique de rééducation qui opère sur l’ensemble de la musculature du corps. Chaque approche est pertinente. Elles visent à corriger les déséquilibres et à tonifier les muscles.

Quels sont les gestes et postures à privilégier?

Pour commencer, il est nécessaire d’adopter des gestes souples et d’avoir le réflexe de se tenir droit le plus souvent possible. Lorsque l’on se penche au sol pour ramasser un objet lourd, il faut utiliser la position du balancier. On prend appui en mettant une main sur un point fixe et on lève la jambe opposée en arrière pour tenir l’équilibre. Les charges lourdes doivent être portées au plus près du corps, au niveau du centre de gravité. En position debout, il s’agit de répartir le poids du corps sur les deux jambes, en gardant les pieds suffisamment écartés pour maintenir une bonne stabilité. Ces simples postures suffisent à économiser les muscles et les articulations.

Vous affirmez que l’alimentation joue un rôle dans le mal de dos. Dans quelle mesure?

Déjà, être en surpoids ne peut qu’aggraver les maux de dos ou les provoquer parce que les kilos en trop entraînent une plus forte pression du corps sur les vertèbres et les disques intervertébraux. Mais il faut savoir aussi qu’une carence en oligoéléments favorise la survenue de discopathies: le disque moins bien nourri aura tendance à se fissurer plus facilement. Par ailleurs, des composés comme les oméga 3 ou des épices comme le curcuma ont des effets anti-inflammatoires naturels qui vont participer à réduire la douleur. Je conseille de limiter les viandes grasses, les fromages, les charcuteries, les viennoiseries et tout ce qui acidifie l’organisme. Evidemment, je recommande d’arrêter le tabac: les études montrent que les personnes qui fument ont plus de douleurs dorsales et lombaires que les non-fumeurs.

Quand faut-il recourir aux médicaments et aux infiltrations?

Je recours aux anti-inflammatoires en cas de sciatique, de lumbago, de névralgie cervico-brachiale… Sinon, je prescris des antalgiques – paracétamol, codéine ou tramadol – en fonction de l’intensité de la douleur, lorsque l’approche ostéopathique et acupuncture ne suffit pas à soulager le patient. Je propose les infiltrations , qui sont efficaces quand elles sont bien utilisées, en cas de fortes poussées inflammatoires d’arthrose ou de sciatiques douloureuses ou paralysantes. Je les prescris rarement pour les lumbagos, car l’ostéopathie suffit à les traiter.
Et quand faut-il recourir à la chirurgie?

Elle est nécessaire dans le cas d’importantes hernies discales qui vont entraîner des douleurs permanentes et intolérables. Mais aussi dans le cas de certaines sciatiques paralysantes, de canal lombaire rétréci ou d’arthrose très invalidante qui étrangle véritablement le nerf… Quand les traitements médicamenteux et naturels ont été bien réalisés pendant suffisamment de temps mais sont restés inefficaces, il faut s’orienter rapidement vers une chirurgie, car un nerf trop comprimé pendant trop longtemps peut parfois ne plus cicatriser et laisser des séquelles comme des paralysies.

Le Dr Gilles Mondoloni est attaché des hôpitaux de Paris (service du Dr Jean-Yves Maigne), chargé d’enseignement en ostéopathie à la faculté de médecine et l’auteur de Stop au mal de dos, à paraître le 5 avril aux éditions Solar.
La bonne position au bureau
Passer huit heures par jour mal assis derrière un bureau est destructeur pour le dos. D’où l’importance de veiller au confort de sa chaise et à sa posture. La chaise doit être réglable, disposer d’un dossier qui maintienne fermement le dos et d’un siège pivotant pour éviter les torsions.
Il faut se tenir droit, les fesses calées au fond du siège et les pieds bien à plat. Un repose-pieds permet de diminuer les tensions. Les avant-bras doivent reposer sur la table. Evitez la position penchée pour écrire. L’écran de l’ordinateur doit être face à vous et son milieu doit se situer à la hauteur des yeux de façon à permettre de garder la tête droite. Il est déconseillé de rester assis plus de deux heures d’affilée. Alors, prenez un temps d’arrêt pour faire quelques pas ou pour vous étirer afin de détendre votre dos.
Plein le dos du stress!
Le stress chronique est responsable de bien des maux, des troubles digestifs aux problèmes de peau, des troubles cardiaques aux douleurs lombaires. Le mal de dos serait en effet un signe d’alerte, signifiant que nous avons dépassé nos limites. Le stress participe à l’apparition du mal de dos et à sa chronicisation, car il augmente les contractures musculaires et la sensibilité à la douleur. Selon le rhumatologue Jean-Yves Maigne, le stress «est capable de déclencher, d’entretenir ou d’amplifier un mal de dos. Il augmente la tension musculaire et peut être responsable de cervicalgies ou de dorsalgies de tension.
Il peut aussi dérégler le système nerveux qui commande la douleur. Un grand nombre de souffrances trouvent ainsi leur origine. Cela crée un état douloureux chronique qui se manifeste particulièrement au niveau du dos.» De plus, il participe à affaiblir les défenses immunitaires de l’organisme, ce qui pourrait contribuer à la survenue de zones d’inflammation sur des disques intervertébraux. Et cela crée un cercle vicieux, car souffrir du mal de dos constitue en soi un facteur de stress. Pour préserver son dos, il faut donc savoir se détendre: par des exercices de respiration, des massages ou en recourant à des méthodes de relaxation comme la sophrologie.

Voir pa ailleurs

Designer babies? It looks like racism and eugenics to me
Julie Bindel
The case of a lesbian couple suing a sperm bank over their black donor has laid bare the ethical minefield of the ‘gayby’ boom
Jennifer Cramblett is taking legal action against a Chicago-area sperm bank after she became pregnant with sperm donated by a black man instead of a white man as she had intended. Photograph: Mark Duncan/AP
3 October 2014

The designer baby trend has been laid bare with the case of a lesbian couple who are suing a sperm bank after one of them became pregnant with sperm donated by an African American instead of the white donor they had chosen. The birth mother, Jennifer Cramblett, was five months pregnant in 2012 when she and her partner learned that the Midwest Sperm Bank near Chicago had selected the wrong donor. Cramblett said she decided to sue to prevent the sperm bank from making the same mistake again, and is apparently seeking a minimum of $50,000 (£30,000) in damages.

I understand concerns about mixed-race babies being raised by white parents in white neighbourhoods. Suffering racism at school or in the streets and having to go home to a white family that cannot properly understand or offer informed support can make it significantly worse. But those that make use of commercial services in order to reproduce should be prepared to move house if something unexpected arises. After all, a child can be born with a disability that requires care that is unavailable locally.

I know white people who have adopted black children. They tend to ensure that the children have black peers and elders to contribute to their upbringing. At least one of these couples, when told a black child would be placed with them, quite seriously considered whether they would be doing right by the child. This is a million miles away in terms of attitude and actions from the Cramblett case.

I can only wonder what the damages, if the case is successful, will be used for. Relocation to an area more ethnically diverse, perhaps? The reality is that house prices in white areas in the US are generally more expensive than those in mixed areas, so I am unsure what the money is needed for. Hurt feelings? Whichever way this issue is approached, it smacks of racism.

With the designer “gayby” boom looking set to expand even further, there are some important questions to ask about the ethics of commercialised reproduction. In London alone there are a number of clinics offering sperm for sale; brokers that arrange wombs-to-rent, often in countries where women are desperately poor and sometimes coerced into being surrogates; and egg donation that can cause significant pain and health risks to the donors. There is also the “mix and match” temptation that comes with choosing eggs and sperm from a catalogue. There is even an introduction agency for those who wish to meet the sperm while it is encased in a body.

In the 1970s and 80s, before commercialisation, lesbians who wanted a baby of their own would often ask male friends to donate sperm, but – like anything where money can be made – the product began to be sold. I recall more than one white lesbian couple opting for sperm from a black or Asian donor because they thought mixed-race babies more attractive than white ones. I have interviewed gay men, who opted for IVF with an egg donor, who flicked through catalogues of Ivy league, blonde, posh young women trying to decide what type of nose they would prefer their baby to have. This smacks of eugenics to me.

And if something unexpectedly happens in such circumstances, just remember: if the child you end up with does not exactly fit your ideal requirements, you can’t give it back – and nor should you even suggest that something bad has happened to you.

Voir enfin:

Une femme lesbienne porte plainte pour avoir accouché d’une enfant métis
Valeurs actuelles

07 Septembre 2015

Faits divers. Une lesbienne de l’Ohio aux Etats-Unis a porté plainte après avoir accouché d’une petite-fille métis, qui ne correspondait pas au sperme commandé.
Un enfant à la carte ? C’est que réclamait Jennifer Cramblett déçue par le « service après-vente » de la clinique dans laquelle elle s’est rendue pour une GPA dans l’Ohio.

Une erreur dans le numéro du donneur

La femme de 37 ans, homosexuelle et en couple avec Amanda Zinkon, voulait un enfant et A eu recours à une banque de sperme de l’Illinois en 2011. Auprès de celle-ci, Jennifer avait « commandé » le numéro 380, c’est-à-dire le sperme d’un donneur de race blanche, blond aux yeux bleus. Mais le numéro, écrit à la main par l’employé, a été mal écrit et pris pour le numéro 330, celui d’un donneur afro-américain. La blonde Jennifer a alors accouché d’une petite-fille métis, Payton.

« Tout le soin qu’elles avaient mis à sélectionner la bonne parenté du donneur était réduit à néant »

Apprendre que l’enfant commandé n’allait pas être le bon a dévasté la jeune femme lors de sa grossesse. Selon son avocat, « Tout le soin qu’elles avaient mis à sélectionner la bonne parenté du donneur était réduit à néant. En un instant. L’excitation qu’elle avait ressentie pendant sa grossesse, ses projections, s’étaient muées en colère, en déception et en peur. »

Une peur de l’exclusion

Parmi ses motifs de craintes, emmener sa fille… chez le coiffeur : « pour Jennifer, ce n’est pas quelque chose d’anodin, parce que Payton a les cheveux crépus d’une petite Africaine », « pour que sa fille ait une coupe de cheveu décente, Jennifer doit se rendre dans un quartier noir où son apparence diffère des autres et où elle n’est pas la bienvenue » explique son avocat.

En outre, les deux femmes habitent dans une communauté très peu mélangée et craignent que leur fille soit l’une des seuls enfants métis et soit exclue en raison de sa couleur de peau, notamment au sein de sa famille.

Des dommages et intérêts exigés pour avoir accouché du mauvais donneur

La banque de sperme avait envoyé un mot d’excuses et remboursé tous les frais. Mais ce n’est pas suffisant pour Jennifer qui a décidé de poursuivre en justice la banque de sperme pour obtenir des dommages et intérêts supplémentaires. Si sa demande a été rejetée par un juge la semaine dernière, les jeunes femmes sont décidées à resoumettre l’affaire à la cour pour négligences au mois de décembre.


Guerre des sexes: Les transports new-yorkais s’attaquent à la fertilité masculine (Dude, close your legs: From manspreading to infertility spreading ?)

7 janvier, 2015

https://i2.wp.com/static01.nyt.com/images/2014/12/21/nyregion/21MANSPREADING3/21MANSPREADING3-articleLarge.jpg

https://i2.wp.com/static01.nyt.com/images/2014/12/21/nyregion/21MANSPREADING4web/21MANSPREADING4web-articleLarge.jpg

https://i2.wp.com/gothamist.com/attachments/arts_jen/neworigladydogsubway14.jpg

https://i1.wp.com/pop-up-urbain.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/parodie-de-la-publicite-ratp-lecon-de-seduction-n-1-marquer-son-territoire-dr_109460_w460.jpghttps://i2.wp.com/41.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lzip42DjZu1r3zuqao1_1280.jpghttps://pbs.twimg.com/media/BlW-6Q-CUAAsL96.jpg:large https://i0.wp.com/pixel.nymag.com/imgs/daily/intelligencer/2013/08/12/12-neil-degrasse-tyson-subway.w245.h368.2x.jpghttps://i2.wp.com/static.lexpress.fr/medias_4711/w_605,h_270,c_fill,g_north/pour-etre-fertiles-portez-le-kilt_2412314.jpghttps://i2.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0f/Sperme_spermatogen%C3%A8se_d%C3%A9l%C3%A9tionFertility2Commons.jpg/800px-Sperme_spermatogen%C3%A8se_d%C3%A9l%C3%A9tionFertility2Commons.jpg

 

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/B6v_v-bCEAAcP5s.jpgLe monde moderne n’est pas mauvais : à certains égards, il est bien trop bon. Il est rempli de vertus féroces et gâchées. Lorsqu’un dispositif religieux est brisé (comme le fut le christianisme pendant la Réforme), ce ne sont pas seulement les vices qui sont libérés. Les vices sont en effet libérés, et ils errent de par le monde en faisant des ravages ; mais les vertus le sont aussi, et elles errent plus férocement encore en faisant des ravages plus terribles. Le monde moderne est saturé des vieilles vertus chrétiennes virant à la folie.  G.K. Chesterton
L’avenir ne doit pas appartenir à ceux qui calomnient le prophète de l’Islam. Barack Obama (président américain, issu d’une minorité opprimée, siège de l’ONU, New York, 26.09.12)
On a vengé le prophète Mohammed ! On a tué Charlie hebdo ! Cherif Kouachi (jeune victime de l’islamophobie, Paris, 07.01.15)
On a commencé avec la déconstruction du langage et on finit avec la déconstruction de l’être humain dans le laboratoire. (…) Elle est proposée par les mêmes qui d’un côté veulent prolonger la vie indéfiniment et nous disent de l’autre que le monde est surpeuplé. René Girard
Le privilège masculin est aussi un piège et il trouve sa contrepartie dans la tension et la contention permanentes, parfois poussées jusqu’à l’absurde, qu’impose à chaque homme le devoir d’affirmer en toute circonstance sa virilité. (…) Tout concourt ainsi à faire de l’idéal impossible de virilité le principe d’une immense vulnérabilité. C’est elle qui conduit, paradoxalement, à l’investissement, parfois forcené, dans tous les jeux de violence masculins, tels dans nos sociétés les sports, et tout spécialement ceux qui sont les mieux faits pour produire les signes visibles de la masculinité, et pour manifester et aussi éprouver les qualités dites viriles, comme les sports de combat. Pierre Bourdieu
C’est très difficile de se comporter correctement quand on a une jupe. Si vous êtes un homme, imaginez-vous en jupe, plutôt courte, et essayez donc de vous accroupir, de ramasser un objet tombé par terre sans bouger de votre chaise ni écarter les jambes… La jupe, c’est un corset invisible, qui impose une tenue et une retenue, une manière de s’asseoir, de marcher. Elle a finalement la même fonction que la soutane. Revêtir une soutane, cela change vraiment la vie, et pas seulement parce que vous devenez prêtre au regard des autres. Votre statut vous est rappelé en permanence par ce bout de tissu qui vous entrave les jambes, de surcroît une entrave d’allure féminine. Vous ne pouvez pas courir ! Je vois encore les curés de mon enfance qui relevaient leurs jupes pour jouer à la pelote basque. La jupe, c’est une sorte de pense-bête. La plupart des injonctions culturelles sont ainsi destinées à rappeler le système d’opposition (masculin/féminin, droite/gauche, haut/bas, dur/mou…) qui fonde l’ordre social. Des oppositions arbitraires qui finissent par se passer de justification et être enregistrées comme des différences de nature. Par exemple, avec » tiens ton couteau dans la main droite « , se transmet toute la morale de la virilité, où, dans l’opposition entre la droite et la gauche, la droite est » naturellement » le côté de la virtus comme vertu de l’homme (vir). La jupe, ça montre plus qu’un pantalon et c’est difficile à porter justement parce que cela risque de montrer. Voilà toute la contradiction de l’attente sociale envers les femmes : elles doivent être séduisantes et retenues, visibles et invisibles (ou, dans un autre registre, efficaces et discrètes). On a déjà beaucoup glosé sur ce sujet, sur les jeux de la séduction, de l’érotisme, toute l’ambiguïté du montré-caché. La jupe incarne très bien cela. Un short, c’est beaucoup plus simple: ça cache ce que ça cache et ça montre ce que ça montre. La jupe risque toujours de montrer plus que ce qu’elle montre. Il fut un temps où il suffisait d’une cheville entr’aperçue!… Les injonctions en matière de bonne conduite sont particulièrement puissantes parce qu’elles s’adressent d’abord au corps et qu’elles ne passent pas nécessairement par le langage et par la conscience. Les femmes savent sans le savoir que, en adoptant telle ou telle tenue, tel ou tel vêtement, elles s’exposent à être perçues de telle ou telle façon. Le gros problème des rapports entre les sexes aujourd’hui, c’est qu’il y a des contresens, de la part des hommes en particulier, sur ce que veut dire le vêtement des femmes. Beaucoup d’études consacrées aux affaires de viol ont montré que les hommes voient comme des provocations des attitudes qui sont en fait en conformité avec une mode vestimentaire. (…) Les études montrent que, de manière générale, les femmes sont très peu satisfaites de leur corps. Quand on leur demande quelles parties elles aiment le moins, c’est toujours celles qu’elles trouvent trop » grandes » ou trop » grosses » ; les hommes étant au contraire insatisfaits des parties de leur corps qu’ils jugent trop » petites « . Parce qu’il va de soi pour tout le monde que le masculin est grand et fort et le féminin petit et fin. Ajoutez les canons, toujours plus stricts, de la mode et de la diététique, et l’on comprend comment, pour les femmes, le miroir et la balance ont pris la place de l’autel et du prie-dieu. Pierre Bourdieu
À quoi ressemble l’homme idéal ? Il s’épile. Il achète des produits de beauté. Il porte des bijoux. Il rêve d’amour éternel. Il croit dur comme fer aux valeurs féminines. Il préfère le compromis à l’autorité et privilégie le dialogue, la tolérance, plutôt que la lutte. L’homme idéal est une vraie femme. Il a rendu les armes. Le poids entre ses jambes est devenu trop lourd. Certaines féministes se sont emparées de cette vacance du pouvoir, persuadées que l’égalité c’est la similitude.  Aujourd’hui, les jeunes générations ont intégré cette confusion. Les fils ne rêvent que de couple et de féminisation longue durée. Ils ne veulent surtout pas être ce qu’ils sont : des garçons. Tout ce qui relève du masculin est un gros mot. Une tare. Mais la révolte gronde. Les hommes ont une identité à reprendre. Une nouvelle place à conquérir. Pour ne plus jamais dire à leurs enfants : «Tu seras une femme, mon fils. Eric Zemmour
Depuis quelques années, en France, des intellectuels, journalistes, psychologues et militants cherchent à attirer l’attention sur la difficulté d’être un homme, dans une société soi-disant dominée par les femmes en général, et les féministes en particulier. À les écouter, les hommes seraient en perte de repères, et il serait temps de contre-attaquer celles – et parfois ceux – qui ont travaillé au bouleversement de la société traditionnelle : les féministes. C’est la thèse, par exemple, du journaliste Éric Zemmour dans son livre Le Premier Sexe ; de l’énarque psychanalyste Michel Schneider dans son livre Big mother : Psychopathologie de la vie politique, ou encore de l’ex-candidat au poste d’idéologue du Front national, Alain Soral, dans son ouvrage Vers la féminisation ? Ce discours, que nous qualifions de « masculiniste », est, pour beaucoup, un phénomène marginal véhiculé par quelques individus isolés, voire dérangés. Mais à y regarder de plus près, il s’agit bel et bien d’un mouvement idéologique, dynamique en Grande-Bretagne ou au Québec, mais qui s’active également en France. (…) La tactique du masculinisme est, souvent, de récupérer les outils d’analyse et le vocabulaire féministe pour les retourner contre les féministes en dénonçant un système d’oppression imaginaire. Ainsi, le matriarcat aurait désormais remplacé le patriarcat. Ce n’est pas sans faire penser à ces journalistes défenseurs du système capitaliste qui, inversant les rôles, n’ont de cesse de dénoncer « la dictature des syndicats »… Cette mauvaise foi, c’est celle d’un Patrick Guillot, auteur de La Cause des hommes, et pour qui il a suffi qu’une seule femme soit devenue pilote de Concorde, en 2000, pour affirmer que la profession s’était féminisée et que les hommes n’avaient « plus de modèle ». Plus magnanime, Michel Schneider reconnaît que les hommes dominent largement les sphères du pouvoir, mais… qu’ils gouvernent comme des « mères », imposant des « valeurs féminines » à la France. Des héros comme Zidane ne sont plus des modèles masculins parce que, selon Zemmour – qui ne se prive pas de flirter avec l’homophobie –, ils jouent « comme des femmes », avec un esprit d’entraide, et adoptent une esthétique homosexuelle… Pour théoriser la « crise des hommes », les masculinistes développent systématiquement quatre arguments : les filles réussissent mieux à l’école ; des hommes sont également victimes de violences conjugales ; les hommes se suicident plus que les femmes ; et en cas de divorce les tribunaux attribuent généralement la garde des enfants à la mère. Examinons chacun de ces arguments. Primo, si les filles ont tendance à obtenir de meilleurs résultats scolaires, cette donnée fluctue selon les écoles, et les milieux favorisés ne présentent pas ce type d’écart. Dans les écoles qui le sont moins, les filles seraient en moyenne plus studieuses parce qu’elles savent, consciemment ou non, que le marché de l’emploi est généralement bien plus favorable aux hommes. Secundo, les masculinistes brandissent des chiffres selon lesquels les hommes sont autant, sinon davantage, victimes de violence conjugale que les femmes. Ils s’abstiennent toutefois de se pencher sur le contexte des violences conjugales. La violence des hommes est majoritairement plus brutale et répétitive – s’inscrivant dans une logique de pouvoir sur les femmes –, et celle des femmes relève davantage de la défense. Tertio, le taux de suicide des hommes serait plus élevé que celui des femmes. Cette affirmation est, encore une fois, isolée de son contexte. En fait la proportion de tentatives de suicide est quasi la même pour les femmes que pour les hommes même si ces derniers « réussissent » davantage. Et c’est sans compter que d’autres phénomènes de désespoir, comme la dépression, touchent majoritairement les femmes. Quarto, en réalité, dans la grande majorité des cas, les divorces se concluent à l’amiable, et la grande majorité des pères délèguent volontiers à la mère la garde des enfants. Certes, lorsque les tribunaux doivent trancher, les juges attribuent plus souvent la garde des enfants aux mères qu’aux pères, mais c’est bien le patriarcat qui est en cause, la magistrature considérant qu’il est plus « naturel » qu’une femme s’occupe des enfants. Mélissa Blais et Francis Dupuis-Déri
Dès leur plus jeune âge, on apprend aux filles à croiser ou à serrer les jambes alors que les hommes les écartent pour affirmer leur virilité. Sophie Bouchet (Glamour)
Pour faire simple, un homme croisant les jambes est catalogué “efféminé” depuis la petite école ; une femme se tenant les jambes écartées est jugée ou bien “masculine” (vulgaire) ou bien “aguicheuse” (surtout si elle porte une jupe)… Margot Baldassi
Le taux moyen de spermatozoïdes (…) a décliné toute la seconde moitié du XXe siècle, avec en France une accélération dans les années 1970 : en 20 ans, les donneurs de sperme du CECOS de Paris ont perdu — en moyenne — 40 % de leurs spermatozoïdes (− 2,1 %/an) ; le nombre de spermatozoïdes chutant de 89×106/mL de sperme en 1973 à 60×106/mL en 1992. Après ajustement (âge et durée de l’abstinence sexuelle), sur ces 20 ans, chaque nouvelle génération (par année civile de naissance) a perdu 2,6 % des spermatozoïdes de la cohorte née l’année précédente, et le taux de spermatozoïdes mobiles a diminué de 0,3 % par an, et celui des spermatozoïdes de forme normale a diminué de 0,7 %/an. (…)  À ce rythme, en 2070 (dans les pays d’où proviennent les études) toute la population masculine devrait être infertile, et dès 2025, le sperme ne serait plus assez fécondant pour qu’un couple puisse se passer d’une fécondation assistée. Cette tendance ne peut cependant être qu’indicative, car la cause du phénomène est encore mal cernée, et pourrait peut-être avoir été corrigée dans les prochaines décennies, avant un seuil fatal. Wikipedia
La température joue un rôle primordial dans la spermatogenèse.  La cigarette, la cannabis, l’alimentation et le fait d’être assis, ont une incidence. Pour fabriquer des petits soldats, les glandes génitales masculines doivent rester à une température idéale de 22 degrés -voilà pourquoi elles sont à l’extérieur du corps, contrairement aux ovaires chez la femme. A 37 degrés, la spermatogenèse se bloque. Stéphane Droupy (professeur d’urologie, CHU de Nîmes)
There are anecdotal reports that men who wear (Scottish) kilts have better sperm quality and better fertility. But how much is true? Total sperm count and sperm concentration reflect semen quality and male reproductive potential. It has been proven that changes in the scrotal temperature affect spermatogenesis. We can at least affirm that clothing increases the scrotal temperature to an abnormal level that may have a negative effect on spermatogenesis. Thus, it seems plausible that men should wear skirts and avoid trousers, at least during the period during which they plan to conceive children. Methods and results Analysis of literature concerning scrotal temperature and spermatogenesis and fertility. Wearing a Scottish kilt in a traditional (‘regimental’) way may have clear health-related benefits. Kilt wearing likely produces an ideal physiological scrotal environment, which in turn helps maintain normal scrotal temperature, which is known to be beneficial for robust spermatogenesis and good sperm quality. Based on literature on scrotal temperature, spermatogenesis and fertility, the hypothesis that men who regularly wear a kilt during the years in which they wish to procreate will, as a group, have significantly better rates of sperm quality and higher fertility. EJO Kompanjie
A half-hour train ride with legs crossed might raise testicular temperatures, but not long enough to do any harm. Dr. Marc Goldstein (director of the center for male reproductive medicine and microsurgery at New York-Presbyterian Hospital Weill Cornell Medical Center)
You have been taught to grow out, I have been taught to grow in. You learn from our father how to emit, how to produce, to roll each thought off your tongue with confidence. You used to lose your voice every other week from shouting so much. I learned to absorb. I took lessons from our mother in creating space around myself. I learned to read the knots in her forehead while the guys went out for oysters. Lily Myers
Have I ever thought that I’m taking up too much space? Not really. But maybe now I am. Manspreader
Of course, hogging space in a crowded subway car is rude and inconsiderate. But are men really the worst offenders? After years of subway riding, I can say I’ve never noticed this to be the case. Neither have some of my female friends in New York City; others have said that while they’ve noticed male leg-spread, women can be just as bad with purses and shopping bags. In the past year, I’ve tried to watch for subway space-hogging patterns myself. The worst case I saw was a woman sitting at a half turn with her purse next to her, occupying at least two and possibly three seats. Granted it was in a half-empty car, but the same seems to be true in most photos posted by activists to shame « manspreaders. » Incidentally, in some of those photos, you can spot female passengers taking up extra space — sometimes because of the way they cross their legs. Yes, men tend to sit with their legs apart. (Many will tell you it’s an issue of comfort and, well, male anatomy.) I haven’t seen many do so in a way that inconveniences others. Indeed, the supposed offenders in some of the shaming photos are clearly not spreading beyond their own seats. It’s also worth noting that when criticisms of bad subway manners first began to show up on the Internet five years ago, no one seemed particularly exercised about male postures. When street artist Jason Shelowitz (or Jay Shells) surveyed New Yorkers about subway etiquette violations for a series of posters in 2010, nail clipping topped the list, followed by religion and noise pollution. « Physical contact » and disregard of seating priority were also mentioned, but with no regard to gender. The anti-spread campaign has little to do with etiquette. It’s part of a recent surge in a noxious form of feminism — or pseudo feminism — preoccupied with male misbehavior, no matter how trivial. The activists believe that « man-sitting, » as it has also been dubbed, is a matter of male entitlement, display of power or even sexual harassment. That says far more about feminist paranoia than it does about male conduct. This brand of feminism is not about equality; it’s about shaming directed at males, as the subway seating issue makes abundantly clear. Even the word « manspreading, » with its nasty and somewhat obscene overtones, is a gender-based slur. Imagine the reaction if men took photos of inconsiderate women with large purses or shopping bags and posted them with exhortations to « stop the womanspread. » You can bet such activism would not get positive media coverage or a sympathetic response from the MTA. A public service campaign against space-hogging — and other forms of incivility on the subway — would be welcome. Selective male-shaming is not. Stop the bashing, please; it’s a human issue. Cathy Young
I am glad that the government is finally taking action. This is clearly not the kind of thing that could be solved by asking people to scoot over and make room for you to sit down, and I am glad the government is finally doing something about it. Katherine Timpf
I see these guys all the time. Legs spread wide, taking up the space of three or four people, leaning against the train doors and blocking the entrance, stretched out so no one sit next to them. It all plays out like an assertion of male dominance, in which every one of them feels as if they have to claim their territory and their manhood in this public space, even at the discomfort of all the other passengers. Who gives a fuck if you can’t sit, they are men. See their balls. I never thought about the way I sit or stand in public before now. I never felt the need to sit with my legs wider than the shoulders of an NFL linebacker to feel comfortable. When I stand, I sometimes cross my legs. I move to accommodate people. And now I wonder what people see when they look at me doing so. Perhaps they think I’m exceedingly polite. Maybe I’m a docile black man. I may be read as effeminate. I never worried about these things from behind the driver’s seat of a car. But now people can see me, and as much as I want to divorce myself from the idea of there being a proper way to perform masculinity, I find myself burdened with thinking I’m doing it wrong. And this is what our culture does. It takes the most mundane of activities and turns them into performances that are supposed to articulate or worthiness as human beings. When I stand with my legs crossed on a train where people can clearly see me, I’m supposed to feel bad about myself. I’m supposed to adjust into a more “manly” pose, whether no regard for whether it feels natural or comfortable. Apply that to things more important than how one looks riding the subway, and the crisis of masculinity becomes a real, dangerous one that requires our introspection. Mychal Denzel Smith
Research in environmental sciences has found that the ergonomic design of human-made environments influences thought, feeling and action. (…) The first three experiments found that individuals who engaged in expansive postures (either explicitly or inadvertently) were more likely to steal money,cheat on a test, and commit traffic violations in a driving simulation. Results suggested that participants’ self-reported sense of power mediated the link between postural expansiveness and dishonesty. Study 4 revealed that automobiles with more expansive driver’s seats were more likely to be illegally parked on New York City streets. Taken together, results suggest that:(1) environments that expand the body can inadvertently lead us to feel more powerful, and (2) these feelings of power can cause dishonest behavior. Andy J. Yap (MIT)
In groups of men, those with higher status typically assume looser and more relaxed postures; the boss lounges comfortably behind the desk while the applicant sits tense and rigid on the edge of his seat.  Higher-status individuals may touch their subordinates more than they themselves get touched; they initiate more eye contact and are smiled at by their inferiors more than they are observed to smile in return.  What is announced in the comportment of superiors is confidence and ease… Sandra Lee Bartky
Psychologist Andy Yap and his colleagues tested whether “expansive body postures” like the ones associated with masculinity increase people’s sense of powerfulness and entitlement.  They did.  In laboratory experiments, people who were prompted to take up more space were more likely to steal, cheat, and violate traffic laws in a simulation.  A sense of powerfulness, reported by the subjects, mediated the effect (a robust finding that others have documented as well). In a real world test of the theory, they found that large automobiles with greater internal space were more likely than small ones to be illegally parked in New York City.  Lisa Wade
By virtue of being occupied by both men and women, space is inherently gendered. The way women and men interact is guided by norms and scripts that steer our behavior in a way that is so powerful that it is often unconscious. Research shows that when in public, women tend to occupy less space, holding legs closer together and keeping their arms closer to their bodies. Men on the other hand are more likely to have their legs spread at a 10- to 15-degree angle and keep their arms 5 to 10 degrees away from their bodies. But this isn’t just about space. Researchers have found that taking expansive body postures doesn’t just make people feel more entitled, it also makes them more likely to steal, cheat and fail to respect traffic laws. So manspreading can breed bigger problems than just crowded subway cars: It reinforces attitudes and behaviors that are harmful for society as a whole. Elizabeth Plank

Et après on s’étonne de la baisse de fertilité des hommes !

En ces temps étranges, entre marche des salopes et bataille des toilettes, de mariage et de gestation assistée pour tous mais aussi d’euthanasie peut-être bientôt remboursée par la Sécurité sociale …

Pendant qu’entre polluants, sédentarisation, vêtements et sous-vêtements serrés voire ordinateurs portables, la baisse de la fertilité masculine des pays riches depuis 50 ans pourrait à terme rendre nécessaire la fécondation assistée, poussant déjà certains à prôner pour les hommes le retour  de cette conquête sociale devenue désormais corset invisible pour les femmes …

Et que longtemps tolérée voire encouragée quand il s’agissait d‘Israël, la barbarie islamiste atteint à présent nos propres rues

Comment à l’heure où le métro de New York lance une campagne de sensibilisation contre les incivilités et notamment l’étalement masculin (pardon: le « manspreading »)  …

Ne pas voir la grandeur d’une société occidentale en voie de mondialisation toujours plus soucieuse du plus faible

Mais aussi les dérives victimaires de ces idées chrétiennes devenues folles dont Chesterton parlait déjà au siècle dernier ?

« Manspreading »: une campagne de sensibilisation dans les transports new-yorkais s’attaque aux incivilités masculines
Morgane Fabre-Bouvier
Le HuffPost
23/12/2014

SOCIÉTÉ- Le vendredi 19 décembre, la Metropolitan Transportation Authority de New-York, l’équivalent de la RATP parisienne ou de la RTM marseillaise, a dévoilé les visuels de sa nouvelle campagne « courtesy counts », soit « l’importance de la courtoisie ». La campagne entend éduquer les voyageurs et combattre l’incivilité. En ligne de mire ceux qui mangent dans les rames de métro, les porteurs de sacs à dos à l’heure de pointe, mais surtout les « manspreaders », ces usagers qui se rendent coupables de « man-spreading ».

Le man-spreading ? C’est le fameux Urban Dictionnary, le dictionnaire en ligne des mots argotiques anglophones, qui popularise le terme. « Lorsqu’un mec s’assoit en étalant ses jambes au maximum, avec la forme d’un V » peut-on lire sur le site. Le terme dénonce ces hommes envahissants qui s’assoient en écartant les jambes, prenant parfois l’équivalent de deux places dans les trains, métros ou bus, souvent au détriment de leurs voisines.

En France, le terme apparaît pour la première en 2013, lorsque le succès du Tumblr Men taking up too much space on the train (ces hommes qui prennent trop de place dans le métro) traverse l’Atlantique. Sur le site du Monde, un billet de blog affirmait déjà à l’époque: « Constatée dans le ‘subway’ de New York, la domination masculine sur les bancs du métro est également avérée à Paris, voire dans les trains du quotidien, en France’.

De fait, sur internet, les témoignages, photos et articles sur le sujet affluent. Dans Glamour, on peut lire: « Dès leur plus jeune âge, on apprend aux filles à croiser ou à serrer les jambes alors que les hommes les écartent pour affirmer leur virilité ». Le débat se poursuit sur Twitter. Le blog pop-up urbain résume : « Pour faire simple, un homme croisant les jambes est catalogué ‘efféminé’ depuis la petite école; une femme se tenant les jambes écartées est jugée ‘masculine’ (vulgaire) ou bien ‘aguicheuse’ (surtout si elle porte une jupe) « .

Sur Kombini, on essaye tant bien que mal d’avancer des explications : « la tendance masculine à écarter les cuisses en position assise relève avant tout d’un réflexe physiologique », tente l’auteur. « Mon grand, je doute que ton sexe soit si énorme qu’il ait besoin de sa propre banquette » réplique le blog féministe Jezebel. Sur le tumblr Saving room for cats (je garde la place pour des chats) des internautes photoshopent des chats entre les jambes des « manspreaders ».

Libérer la parole

Avec cette campagne de publicité, la Metropolitan Transportation Authority tente avant tout d’ouvrir le débat. « Il va sans dire que l’objectif de cet exercice n’est pas de bêtement pointer du doigt les manspreaders », peut-on lire sur le site Distractify. « Il s’agit d’ouvrir le dialogue et d’essayer de comprendre pourquoi quelque chose d’aussi énervant continue d’exister », poursuit l’auteur.

Lorsque la journaliste Lauren Evans part à la rencontre des manspreaders du métro new-yorkais, nombreux sont ceux qui affirment ne tout simplement pas se rendre compte que leur position est gênante (vidéo en anglais)…

Quel effet pour cette campagne ? Le métro new-yorkais ne prévoit aucune sanction pour les contrevenants. Dans le New-York Times, la majorité des hommes abordés semble prendre la question à la légère. Interrogé, un jeune homme de 20 ans répond « je ne vais pas croiser mes jambes comme le font les femmes. Je vais continuer de m’asseoir de la façon dont je veux ».

Dans le même article toutefois, une jeune femme affirme que grâce à ces affiches, elle a enfin l’impression d’être prise au sérieux et d’avoir l’autorité de son côté. « De cette façon, j’oserai davantage demander à ces hommes de me faire de la place » explique-t-elle. De fait, les langues se délient progressivement autour du problème. Au Japon, des affiches representant les « manspreaders » en envahisseur venus de l’espace pullulent dans le métro. En Turquie, une organisation féministe a lancé en Février un mouvement sur les réseaux sociaux pour inciter les hommes à laisser de la place aux femmes dans les transports en commun.

Voir aussi:

N.Y. / Region
A Scourge Is Spreading. M.T.A.’s Cure? Dude, Close Your Legs.
‘Manspreading’ on New York Subways Is Target of New M.T.A. Campaign
Emma G. Fitzimmons
NYT

Dec. 20, 2014

It is the bane of many female subway riders. It is a scourge tracked on blogs and on Twitter.

And it has a name almost as distasteful as the practice itself.

It is manspreading, the lay-it-all-out sitting style that more than a few men see as their inalienable underground right.

Now passengers who consider such inelegant male posture as infringing on their sensibilities — not to mention their share of subway space — have a new ally: the Metropolitan Transportation Authority.

Taking on manspreading for the first time, the authority is set to unveil public service ads that encourage men to share a little less of themselves in the city’s ever-crowded subways cars.

The targets of the campaign, those men who spread their legs wide, into a sort of V-shaped slouch, effectively occupying two, sometimes even three, seats are not hard to find. Whether they will heed the new ads is another question.

Riding the F train from Brooklyn to Manhattan on a recent afternoon, Fabio Panceiro, 20, was unapologetic about sitting with his legs spread apart.
Manspreading in action. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority will address the practice as part a new ad campaign. Credit Hiroko Masuike/The New York Times
“I’m not going to cross my legs like ladies do,” he said. “I’m going to sit how I want to sit.”

And what if Mr. Panceiro, an administrative assistant from Los Angeles, saw posters on the train asking him to close his legs? “I’d just laugh at the ad and hope that someone graffitis over it,” he said.

For Kelley Rae O’Donnell, an actress who confronts manspreaders and tweets photos of them, her solitary shaming campaign now has the high-powered help of the transportation authority, whose ads will be plastered inside subway cars.

“It drives me crazy,” she said of men who spread their legs. “I find myself glaring at them because it just seems so inconsiderate in this really crowded city.”

When Ms. O’Donnell, who lives in Brooklyn and is in her 30s, asks men to move, she said, they rarely seem chastened: “I usually get grumbling or a complete refusal.”

Kelley Rae O’Donnell, who confronts manspreaders and posts their photos online, captured an image of one on a train this month. Credit Hiroko Masuike/The New York Times
The new ads — aimed at curbing rude behavior like manspreading and wearing large backpacks on crowded trains — are set to go up in the subways next month. They will all carry the slogan, “Courtesy Counts: Manners Make a Better Ride.”

One of the posters is likely to be especially welcome to women — as well as to men who frown on manspreading: “Dude… Stop the Spread, Please” reads the caption next to an image of riders forced to stand as a man nearby sits so that he takes up two seats.

The campaign is the latest in a long line of courtesy-themed crusades by the authority going back to at least the 1940s. One such ad urged women annoyed by impolite male riders to, “Hit Him Again Lady, We Don’t Like Door-Blockers Either.”

The new ads come as more riders are crowding onto the subways than at any time in recent history. In 2014, the system logged as many as 6.1 million riders on a single day, up from just under 5.1 million riders on the busiest day a decade ago. The city’s population, meanwhile, has swelled to more than 8.4 million people, pushing everyone closer and closer.

With crime no longer rampant on the subway, the campaign is the latest sign that other unwelcome behavior is getting attention.

A poster taking aim at the practice of manspreading is part of a new civility-themed campaign by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Credit Metropolitan Transportation Authority.
Several blogs regularly highlight instances of manspreading where knees stretch several feet apart. On some sites, images of large objects like the Death Star from “Star Wars” have been added with Photoshop into the space between the splayed legs. While there are women who take up more than their share of space, the offenders are usually men.

One admitted manspreader, John Hubbard, sat with his legs wide apart on an F train as it traveled through Manhattan recently.

“It’s more comfortable,” he said with a shrug.

Mr. Hubbard, 45, an engineer who lives in New Jersey, said he might move his leg, but not for just anyone. For an older person, he would. And for an attractive woman, he said, he definitely would.

Sherod Luscombe shook his head when he saw two men sitting with their legs spread on another train, taking up three seats between them. Mr. Luscombe, 58, a clinical social worker, said he thought the men should move, but he was not about to confront them.

“I’m not going to say, ‘Bro, there is a lady standing up right there. Cross your legs, young man,’ ” he said.

Women have theories about why some men sit this way. Some believe it is just a matter of comfort and may not even be intentional. Others consider it an assertion of power, or worse.

Bridget Ellsworth, a 28-year-old music teacher, views manspreading as sexual harassment because some men engage in it near her even when the subway car is not packed.

“They could move over and spread out their legs all they want,” she said, “but they’re squeezing next to me and doing it.”

For men who think that sitting with their legs spread is socially acceptable, manners experts say it is not. Peter Post, the author of the book “Essential Manners for Men” and great-grandson of etiquette guru Emily Post, said the proper way for men to sit is with their legs parallel rather than in a V-shape.

“I’m baffled by people who do that kind of thing, who take other people’s space,” he said.

Olof Hansson, a director of the Manhattan men’s spa John Allan’s, put it more succinctly. “A true gentleman doesn’t sit on the subway, he stands.”

As for men who may worry that crossing their legs could hurt their virility, doctors say there is nothing to fear. A half-hour train ride with legs crossed might raise testicular temperatures, but not long enough to do any harm, said Dr. Marc Goldstein, director of the center for male reproductive medicine and microsurgery at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital Weill Cornell Medical Center.

Philadelphia has a new etiquette campaign, too, with posters that say, “Dude It’s Rude… Two Seats — Really?”

But Kristin Geiger, a spokeswoman for the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority, said the campaign in the City of Brotherly Love is aimed at passengers with bags on seats, not people spreading their legs too far apart. Manspreading, she said, may be a “localized” problem in New York. “I don’t know of any complaints that have come through customer service about manspreading,” she said. Transit officials in Chicago and Washington said the phenomenon is not a major concern for riders in those cities either.

In New York, the transportation authority went back and forth about what tone to take when tackling the topic, said Paul Fleuranges, the authority’s senior director for corporate and internal communications. Officials knew it could be ripe for parody on late night television and did not want their approach to be too snarky. But Mr. Fleuranges said he knew that the ads had to speak directly to the spreaders.

“I had them add the dude part,” he said, “because I think, ‘Dude, really?’ « 

Voir également:

Why ‘Manspreading’ Is Definitely a Serious Issue, as Explained by the Feminist Internet
The government should maybe do even more.

Katherine Timpf

National review online

January 6, 2015

You might not think that it’s appropriate for the government to launch a campaign telling men how to sit on the subway. Well guess what? You’re wrong.

If you “manspread” on the subway (which, by the way, means to sit with your legs apart, in case you are a fixture of the patriarchy who doesn’t educate himself on important women’s issues), you are doing so much more than taking up space.

Here’s what’s really going on with manspreading, as explained by some of the bright, forward-thinking minds on the Feminist Internet:

1. Manspreading is saying, “Who gives a fuck if you can’t sit, [we] are men. See [our] balls.”

This is as explained by a man, Mychal Denzel Smith, for the blog Feministing. (Finally a man courageous enough to cue the rest of the world in to the secret language of the subway brotherhood!)

2. Manspreading is “an assertion of male dominance,” and “every one” of the manspreaders does it because he feels like he has to “claim [his] territory and [his] manhood in this public space, even at the discomfort of all the other passengers.”

Another great point by Smith. Who, by the way, also wrote: “When I stand, I sometimes cross my legs.” Sexy, sexy, sexy! Amirite ladies?!

3. “Let’s talk about these f***ing guys for a second because they’re f***ing everywhere. The MTA is full of them.”

Madeleine Davies of Jezebel really makes a great point here. In her brilliant piece, titled “F*** You, Dudes Who Sit With Their Legs Spread So Wide That They Take Up Two Seats,” Davies explains that it’s not just like two or three dudes who sit this way. Seeing as literally millions of people ride the subway every day, I might have been able to use context clues to figure out that probably there are a lot of people doing this, but she deserves praise for putting it so eloquently.

4. “There is no worse, man-centric behavior than manspreading on the subway.”

Seriously — Brian Moylan is totally right. There is nothing worse than manspreading. I would much rather be sneezed on or purposely verbally sexually harassed. I wonder if he crosses his legs when he stands the way Smith does. If so, there are wayyyyy more sexy men in NYC than I thought!

See, it’s so much worse than just being rude. It’s the patriarchy. I’m pretty angry that the MTA campaign will also cover people taking up space with backpacks and stuff as if it’s even close to the same thing. Stupid idiot female traitors like Cathy Young, who wrote a piece called “‘Manspreading’? But Women Hog Subway Space, Too,” don’t help. But I guess some people just don’t get it. Manspreading is nothing like when I sometimes come on the train with a giant backpack, because my backpack does not metaphorically spit on your face for your gender.

I am glad that the government is finally taking action. This is clearly not the kind of thing that could be solved by asking people to scoot over and make room for you to sit down, and I am glad the government is finally doing something about it.

— Katherine Timpf is a reporter at National Review Online.

Voir encore:

‘Manspreading’? But women hog subway space, too

Cathy Young

Newsday

January 5, 2015

As we enter 2015, the latest feminist crusade seems to come straight from the life-imitates-satire department. It has everything one could want in a caricature of feminism: petty grievances, gleeful male-bashing, egregious double standards. And it also seems to have the official blessing of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. It’s the war on « manspreading, » the male habit of sitting with legs apart and (supposedly) taking up too much space on the subway.

Gripes about this alleged offense have been cropping up on feminist blogs for a couple of years. Now it is the target of a new public service ad campaign. MTA posters will show a figure seated with wide-open legs next to two standing passengers, with the tagline, « Dude . . . Stop the spread, please. It’s a space issue. »

Of course, hogging space in a crowded subway car is rude and inconsiderate. But are men really the worst offenders? After years of subway riding, I can say I’ve never noticed this to be the case. Neither have some of my female friends in New York City; others have said that while they’ve noticed male leg-spread, women can be just as bad with purses and shopping bags.
CartoonMatt Davies’ latest cartoon: ‘Broken windows’

In the past year, I’ve tried to watch for subway space-hogging patterns myself. The worst case I saw was a woman sitting at a half turn with her purse next to her, occupying at least two and possibly three seats. Granted it was in a half-empty car, but the same seems to be true in most photos posted by activists to shame « manspreaders. » Incidentally, in some of those photos, you can spot female passengers taking up extra space — sometimes because of the way they cross their legs.

Yes, men tend to sit with their legs apart. (Many will tell you it’s an issue of comfort and, well, male anatomy.) I haven’t seen many do so in a way that inconveniences others. Indeed, the supposed offenders in some of the shaming photos are clearly not spreading beyond their own seats. It’s also worth noting that when criticisms of bad subway manners first began to show up on the Internet five years ago, no one seemed particularly exercised about male postures. When street artist Jason Shelowitz (or Jay Shells) surveyed New Yorkers about subway etiquette violations for a series of posters in 2010, nail clipping topped the list, followed by religion and noise pollution. « Physical contact » and disregard of seating priority were also mentioned, but with no regard to gender.

The anti-spread campaign has little to do with etiquette. It’s part of a recent surge in a noxious form of feminism — or pseudo feminism — preoccupied with male misbehavior, no matter how trivial. The activists believe that « man-sitting, » as it has also been dubbed, is a matter of male entitlement, display of power or even sexual harassment. That says far more about feminist paranoia than it does about male conduct.

This brand of feminism is not about equality; it’s about shaming directed at males, as the subway seating issue makes abundantly clear. Even the word « manspreading, » with its nasty and somewhat obscene overtones, is a gender-based slur. Imagine the reaction if men took photos of inconsiderate women with large purses or shopping bags and posted them with exhortations to « stop the womanspread. » You can bet such activism would not get positive media coverage or a sympathetic response from the MTA.

A public service campaign against space-hogging — and other forms of incivility on the subway — would be welcome. Selective male-shaming is not. Stop the bashing, please; it’s a human issue.

Voir de plus:

Shrinking Women
Lily Myers
2013

Across from me at the kitchen table, my mother smiles over red wine that she drinks out of a measuring glass.
She says she doesn’t deprive herself,
but I’ve learned to find nuance in every movement of her fork.
In every crinkle in her brow as she offers me the uneaten pieces on her plate.
I’ve realized she only eats dinner when I suggest it.
I wonder what she does when I’m not there to do so.

Maybe this is why my house feels bigger each time I return; it’s proportional.
As she shrinks the space around her seems increasingly vast.
She wanes while my father waxes. His stomach has grown round with wine, late nights, oysters, poetry. A new girlfriend who was overweight as a teenager, but my dad reports that now she’s « crazy about fruit. »

It was the same with his parents;
as my grandmother became frail and angular her husband swelled to red round cheeks, round stomach,
and I wonder if my lineage is one of women shrinking,
making space for the entrance of men into their lives,
not knowing how to fill it back up once they leave.

I have been taught accommodation.
My brother never thinks before he speaks.
I have been taught to filter.
« How can anyone have a relationship to food? » he asks, laughing, as I eat the black bean soup I chose for its lack of carbs.
I want to say: we come from difference, Jonas,
you have been taught to grow out,
I have been taught to grow in.
You learned from our father how to emit, how to produce, to roll each thought off your tongue with confidence, you used to lose your voice every other week from shouting so much.
I learned to absorb.
I took lessons from our mother in creating space around myself.
I learned to read the knots in her forehead while the guys went out for oysters,
and I never meant to replicate her, but
spend enough time sitting across from someone and you pick up their habits-

that’s why women in my family have been shrinking for decades.
We all learned it from each other, the way each generation taught the next how to knit,
weaving silence in between the threads
which I can still feel as I walk through this ever-growing house,
skin itching,
picking up all the habits my mother has unwittingly dropped like bits of crumpled paper from her pocket on her countless trips from bedroom to kitchen to bedroom again.
Nights I hear her creep down to eat plain yogurt in the dark, a fugitive stealing calories to which she does not feel entitled.
Deciding how many bites is too many.
How much space she deserves to occupy.

Watching the struggle I either mimic or hate her,
And I don’t want to do either anymore,
but the burden of this house has followed me across the country.
I asked five questions in genetics class today and all of them started with the word « sorry. »
I don’t know the requirements for the sociology major because I spent the entire meeting deciding whether or not I could have another piece of pizza,
a circular obsession I never wanted, but

inheritance is accidental,
still staring at me with wine-soaked lips from across the kitchen table.

Voir par ailleurs:

Les sous-vêtements ont-ils un impact sur la fertilité masculine?
Anaïs Giroux
L’Express
26/04/2013

Alors qu’une récente étude prône l’absence de sous-vêtements pour favoriser la fertilité, Stéphane Droupy, professeur d’urologie, nous explique le réel impact des slips et des caleçons sur la fecondité masculine.

Des sous-vêtements trop serrés peuvent-ils réellement nuire à la production de spermatozoïdes?

Le port du kilt favoriserait la fertilité, affirme une étude publiée le 24 avril 2013 dans une revue scientifique… écossaise. Tiens donc. Derrière le trait d’humour, les chercheurs avancent néanmoins que les sous-vêtements et pantalons serrés nuiraient à la production de spermatozoïdes en tenant les testicules trop au chaud. « La température joue un rôle primordial dans la spermatogenèse », confirme Stéphane Droupy, professeur d’urologie au CHU de Nîmes.

La cigarette, la cannabis, l’alimentation et le fait d’être assis, ont une incidence
Pour fabriquer des petits soldats, les glandes génitales masculines doivent rester à une température idéale de 22 degrés, explique Pr Droupy -voilà pourquoi elles sont à l’extérieur du corps, contrairement aux ovaires chez la femme. « A 37 degrés, la spermatogenèse se bloque, poursuit le spécialiste. Certains chercheurs ont donc proposé comme méthodes de contraception le port d’un slip chauffant ou des opérations pour rentrer les testicules à l’intérieur du corps en les faisant remonter dans le canal inguinal. »

Les sous-vêtements n’ont aucun impact sur la fertilité
Entre ce genre d’intervention et le fait d’être à l’étroit du paquet, il y a une marge. Boxer, slip ou caleçon, le type de sous-vêtement n’a donc aucune incidence réelle sur votre futur de papa -« à moins d’être en fourrure, et encore », plaisante l’urologue. La cigarette, le cannabis, l’alimentation et le fait d’être assis sur une longue durée ont en revanche un impact scientifiquement prouvé. Parmi ses patients traités pour des problèmes de fertilité, Stéphane Droupy compte notamment des chauffeurs routiers, qui passent le plus clair de leur temps assis au volant de leur véhicule.

Le boxer plébiscité par les hommes
Coupes ou matières, vous êtes donc libre de choisir ce qui vous sied le mieux. En gardant peut-être en tête que, comme le rappelle avec humour le professeur, « pour faire des enfants, la première étape reste de trouver une partenaire. » Sur les forums comme au sein de la rédaction du site de L’Express, le boxer moulant de couleur sobre fait presque l’unanimité.
Le slip, boudé par tous
Message reçu pour 57% des hommes qui en portent d’ailleurs quotidiennement, selon un sondage de Kantar Worldpanel réalisé à l’occasion du salon de la lingerie 2011. Si le caleçon est apprecié par la gent masculine pour son confort, le slip, quant à lui, ne fait plus rêver personne. Il faut croire que Jean-Claude Dusse dans Les Bronzés ou encore Gros Dégueulasse, héros de la bande-dessinée de Reiser qui porte parfaitement son nom, ont réussi à ternir sa réputation à jamais.

L’urologue Stéphane Droupy est responsable d’andrologie et de médecine sexuelle de l’Association Française d’Urologie.

Voir de plus:

Renouveau de l’antiféminisme : L’éclosion du phénomène « masculiniste »
Mélissa Blais et Francis Dupuis-Déri
Alternative libertaire
3 octobre 2008

De ce côté-ci de l’Atlantique, on ne les prend pas vraiment au sérieux. Pourtant, l’expérience nord-américaine montre que les provocations d’un énergumène comme Eric Zemmour ou d’un plumitif aigri comme Alain Soral peuvent être les signes avant-coureurs d’une vague antiféministe plus large.

Depuis quelques années, en France, des intellectuels, journalistes, psychologues et militants cherchent à attirer l’attention sur la difficulté d’être un homme, dans une société soi-disant dominée par les femmes en général, et les féministes en particulier. À les écouter, les hommes seraient en perte de repères, et il serait temps de contre-attaquer celles – et parfois ceux – qui ont travaillé au bouleversement de la société traditionnelle : les féministes. C’est la thèse, par exemple, du journaliste Éric Zemmour dans son livre Le Premier Sexe ; de l’énarque psychanalyste Michel Schneider dans son livre Big mother : Psychopathologie de la vie politique, ou encore de l’ex-candidat au poste d’idéologue du Front national, Alain Soral, dans son ouvrage Vers la féminisation ?

Ce discours, que nous qualifions de « masculiniste », est, pour beaucoup, un phénomène marginal véhiculé par quelques individus isolés, voire dérangés. Mais à y regarder de plus près, il s’agit bel et bien d’un mouvement idéologique, dynamique en Grande-Bretagne ou au Québec, mais qui s’active également en France.

Actions spectaculaires
Comme tout mouvement social, le masculinisme adopte différentes stratégies et tactiques pour promouvoir « la cause des hommes » : lobbying et dépôt de mémoires en commissions parlementaires, publication de livres, création de sites web et réseautage sur Internet, activisme juridique et actions directes. Au Québec, c’est le mouvement masculiniste qui a réussi les actions de perturbation les plus spectaculaires ces dernières années. En septembre 2005, par exemple, un militant a escaladé la structure du pont Jacques-Cartier, à Montréal pour bloquer la voie rapide et attirer l’attention sur la prétendue « crise des hommes ».

Une étude menée auprès d’environ 80 groupes de femmes au Québec (maisons d’hébergement, comités de femmes de quartier, etc.) a révélé que près de la moitié ont été la cibles de menaces diverses, allant de coups de fil anonymes à des courriels haineux, en passant par des intimidations physiques, de la part de militants masculinistes ou, à tout le moins, antiféministes.

En plus des intellectuels et des militants radicaux de groupes de pères qui mènent des actions chocs, comme Fathers for Justice (F4J), le mouvement masculiniste peut compter sur le relais de certains éditorialistes, de professeurs d’université, de professionnels de la santé, de députés et même de militants de gauche et d’extrême gauche qui reprennent leur discours selon lequel le féminisme serait « allé trop loin ».

Inversion des rôles
La tactique du masculinisme est, souvent, de récupérer les outils d’analyse et le vocabulaire féministe pour les retourner contre les féministes en dénonçant un système d’oppression imaginaire. Ainsi, le matriarcat aurait désormais remplacé le patriarcat. Ce n’est pas sans faire penser à ces journalistes défenseurs du système capitaliste qui, inversant les rôles, n’ont de cesse de dénoncer « la dictature des syndicats »…

Cette mauvaise foi, c’est celle d’un Patrick Guillot, auteur de La Cause des hommes, et pour qui il a suffi qu’une seule femme soit devenue pilote de Concorde, en 2000, pour affirmer que la profession s’était féminisée et que les hommes n’avaient « plus de modèle ». Plus magnanime, Michel Schneider reconnaît que les hommes dominent largement les sphères du pouvoir, mais… qu’ils gouvernent comme des « mères », imposant des « valeurs féminines » à la France. Des héros comme Zidane ne sont plus des modèles masculins parce que, selon Zemmour – qui ne se prive pas de flirter avec l’homophobie –, ils jouent « comme des femmes », avec un esprit d’entraide, et adoptent une esthétique homosexuelle…

Quatre arguments structurants
Pour théoriser la « crise des hommes », les masculinistes développent systématiquement quatre arguments : les filles réussissent mieux à l’école ; des hommes sont également victimes de violences conjugales ; les hommes se suicident plus que les femmes ; et en cas de divorce les tribunaux attribuent généralement la garde des enfants à la mère. Examinons chacun de ces arguments.

Primo, si les filles ont tendance à obtenir de meilleurs résultats scolaires, cette donnée fluctue selon les écoles, et les milieux favorisés ne présentent pas ce type d’écart. Dans les écoles qui le sont moins, les filles seraient en moyenne plus studieuses parce qu’elles savent, consciemment ou non, que le marché de l’emploi est généralement bien plus favorable aux hommes.

Secundo, les masculinistes brandissent des chiffres selon lesquels les hommes sont autant, sinon davantage, victimes de violence conjugale que les femmes. Ils s’abstiennent toutefois de se pencher sur le contexte des violences conjugales. La violence des hommes est majoritairement plus brutale et répétitive – s’inscrivant dans une logique de pouvoir sur les femmes –, et celle des femmes relève davantage de la défense.

Tertio, le taux de suicide des hommes serait plus élevé que celui des femmes. Cette affirmation est, encore une fois, isolée de son contexte. En fait la proportion de tentatives de suicide est quasi la même pour les femmes que pour les hommes même si ces derniers « réussissent » davantage. Et c’est sans compter que d’autres phénomènes de désespoir, comme la dépression, touchent majoritairement les femmes.

Quarto, en réalité, dans la grande majorité des cas, les divorces se concluent à l’amiable, et la grande majorité des pères délèguent volontiers à la mère la garde des enfants. Certes, lorsque les tribunaux doivent trancher, les juges attribuent plus souvent la garde des enfants aux mères qu’aux pères, mais c’est bien le patriarcat qui est en cause, la magistrature considérant qu’il est plus « naturel » qu’une femme s’occupe des enfants.

En somme, le masculinisme constitue une menace pour les femmes et pour le mouvement féministe qui, en plus de lutter contre le patriarcat, doit se défendre des violences diverses à son endroit.

• Mélissa Blais et Francis Dupuis-Déri ont dirigé l’ouvrage Le Mouvement masculiniste au Québec, l’antiféminisme démasqué, 264 pages, Remue-ménage, 2008.
Plus d’information sur la toile :
deux analyses de E. Morraletat, de la Nefac (communistes libertaires canadiens) : « Qui sont les masculinistes ? » et « Masculinisme : ressac identitaire patriarcal » sur http://www.nefac.net.
un dossier très complet sur http://www.arte-tv.com/masculinisme.
d’Hélène Palma, « La percée de la mouvance masculiniste en Occident » sur http://sisyphe.org.

Et sur papier :
Susan Falludi, Backlash, La guerre froide contre les femmes, éditions Des femmes, 1993, 576 pages, 37 euros.
Dorain Dozolme, Maud Gelly, « L’offensive masculiniste », in Femmes, genre, féminisme , Syllepse, 2007, 120 pages, 7 euros.
Patrizia Romito, Un silence de mortes : la violence masculine occultée, Syllepse, 2006, 298 pages, 25 euros.

Voir enfin:

Eric Zemmour, le « suicide français » et la haine des femmes
Martine Storti
Mediapart
24 octobre 2014

Ce sont les pages sur le régime de Vichy qui ont suscité la majeure partie des critiques faites au dernier livre d’Eric Zemmour, Le suicide français. Et à juste titre beaucoup ont pris la parole et la plume pour rappeler ce qu’il convenait, à savoir que, contrairement à ce qu’affirme Zemmour, c’est bien le régime pétainiste qui a envoyé des Juifs de France et des Juifs français dans les camps de la mort.
Cette réhabilitation de Vichy n’est pas un accident ou bien une provocation collatérale, elle est en cohérence avec le reste du livre. En effet rendre Vichy responsable, c’est rendre la France responsable, donc la salir, donc contribuer à la détruire. Et tel est bien l’enjeu de ce gros livre : dresser la liste de tous les responsables de « la mort de la France ».
Certes, pour Eric Zemmour le déclin de la France remonte à bien des décennies, quasiment deux siècles puisqu’il a commencé avec la défaite de Waterloo et la fin du Premier empire. Déclin car la France n’est vraiment elle-même que si elle est impériale, non pas à travers un empire colonial ou une domination par la culture et par la langue, mais seulement comme une puissance dominante en Europe, et même de préférence dominante de l’Europe, la « grandeur de la France se confondant avec la gloire de ses armées ».

Si le déclin de la France a commencé avec Waterloo, il s’accélère, selon Eric Zemmour, avec mai 68 et les décennies qui suivent cet épouvantable évènement, réduit, soit dit en passant, à quelques slogans et aux « enragés » alors qu’il s’est agi d’une très grande et très longue grève ouvrière, une grève faite par ce « peuple » que Zemmour prétend tellement aimer et tellement défendre. Il est vrai que pour lui, le « peuple » – on a la précision à la page 525 du livre – se compose aujourd’hui plutôt des « bonnets rouges bretons » et des « manifestants contre le mariage pour tous ».

Le puzzle zemmourien du « suicide français » comprend de nombreuses pièces : la mondialisation libérale, le capitalisme financiarisé, l’Europe bruxelloise, l’euro, l’Angleterre, l’Allemagne forcément « hégémonique », les USA, les anglo-saxons, les protestants, mais aussi mai 68, les gauchistes, la gauche (mais pas les communistes qui ont eu le courage de défendre le « produire français » et la nation française), la droite (de l’extrême droite rien n’est dit), le centre, les antiracistes, les différents communautarismes, surtout juif et musulman, les écologistes, les homosexuels, les technocrates, les bobos, les immigrés, les féministes, j’en oublie sûrement, forcément le livre fait plus de 500 pages !

Comme Zemmour fait feu de tout bois, pioche chez les uns et les autres, s’en prend à beaucoup et aborde de nombreux sujets, il est possible de trouver telle ou telle partie de l’exercice pertinente et juste. Mais c’est l’ensemble, le systématisme du réquisitoire qui fait problème, tout se passant en effet comme si les nombreux responsables énoncés ci-dessus étaient les multiples composantes d’un vaste complot visant à détruire la France, multiples composantes alliées les unes aux autres, complémentaires les unes des autres. J’ajoute que dans le logiciel de Zemmour, pas de place pour la nuance, la complexité, la reconnaissance qu’il peut y avoir, au sein de tel ou tel courant de pensée, de tel ou tel mouvement des différences, des divergences, des désaccords. Non, il faut s’en tenir au global, et même globaliser à outrance, les partisans de l’Europe par exemple étant forcément tous complices de la dérive libérale, les soixanthuitards pensant forcément tous la même chose, les antiracistes aussi, les bobos aussi, eux qui d’ailleurs habitent, n’est-ce pas, les mêmes quartiers (c’est-à-dire sous la plume de Zemmour aussi bien, pour les parisiens, le Marais que Belleville, comme si le prix de l’immobilier y était le même !).

Il serait trop long de passer en revue dans cet article toutes les pièces du puzzle, je m’en tiens à l’une d’entre elles, parce qu’elle me concerne de près mais aussi parce que Eric Zemmour fait du féminisme et même des femmes en général l’une des causes principales de cette « mort » de la France qui le chagrine tant.

Résumons : dans l’alliance mortifère « du libéralisme économique et du libéralisme sociétal », le féminisme tient une place centrale puisqu’il est responsable de la fin du patriarcat, de la mort du père, (c’est un leitmotiv), de la fin du mariage, de la fin de la famille, de la fin de la virilité, de la féminisation de la France et donc de son avachissement (les deux sont synonymes), et même du développement de la société de consommation et de la financiarisation de l’économie. Les pères d’avant « contenaient les pulsions consommatrices » tandis que les femmes, elles, sont des agents du consumérisme et donc du grand marché libéral ! Ainsi les femmes qui font souvent et depuis très longtemps le marché et les courses font aussi, qui l’eut cru, le grand marché !
Bref le féminisme, les femmes, les mères, confondues les unes aux autres sont des contributrices principales de la destruction de la société et de la France.

Mort du patriarcat, avec un mariage contractuel entre égaux, mais « la contractualisation du mariage de deux êtres égaux méconnait la subtilité des rapports entre les hommes et les femmes. Le besoin des hommes de dominer – au moins formellement- pour se rassurer sexuellement. Le besoin des femmes d’admirer pour se donner sans honte ».On appréciera le « au moins formellement ». Quant à la « subtilité », sans doute existe-t-elle dans le si « subtil » « manifeste des 343 salauds : touche pas à ma pute ! » dont Zemmour a été, en 2013, l’un des premiers signataires.Mais le patriarcat n’a pas disparu pour laisser place à l’égalité, non, à lui s’est substitué le matriarcat qui fait disparaître les pères, sommés de devenir « des mères comme les autres », tandis que l’Etat fort, garant de la force de la France, est remplacé par un « Etat maternel » donc « infantilisant » et « culpabilisant ». Le féminisme a aussi détruit « la famille occidentale », nous faisant ainsi revenir à « une humanité d’avant la loi qu’elle s’était donnée en interdisant l’inceste : une humanité barbare, sauvage, inhumaine ». Rien que ça !
Pour Eric Zemmour, la famille est patriarcale ou elle n’est pas. Cependant il y a encore des familles patriarcales où les enfants reçoivent « une éducation patriarcale », ce sont par exemple les « familles maghrébines ». Mais alors, pas de chance, ce maintien « détériore les relations avec les indigènes – les ouvriers et leurs familles, issus de l’exode rural ou de l’immigration européenne » qui sont en train de rejeter la dite éducation patriarcale. Pas de chance non plus, malgré cette éducation patriarcale, les garçons « volent et violent », sans doute parce qu’ils ne sont pas de vrais Français.

Vous ne trouverez pas une ligne, pas un mot sur ce qu’était, en France, la situation des femmes dans ces années tant regrettées par Zemmour, avant les mouvements féministes, avant la libéralisation de l’avortement, avant les luttes pour l’émancipation, pour l’égalité, ou contre les violences, luttes qui sont d’ailleurs sans cesse à reprendre. Pas un mot, ah non j’exagère ; de ce passé idyllique, il  parle, quand il évoque par exemple, « le jeune chauffeur de bus qui glisse une main concupiscente sur un charmant fessier féminin » sans que « la jeune femme ne porte plainte pour harcèlement sexuel » !

Réquisitoire contre le féminisme et obsession des femmes sur lesquelles Zemmour  ne peut s’empêcher de glisser une allusion, et parfois avec une grande élégance, n’est-ce pas, ainsi : «  les débats sont comme les femmes, les meilleurs sont ceux qu’on n’a pas eus », ou encore les hommes virils « préfèrent prendre les femmes sans les comprendre plutôt que de les comprendre sans les prendre », ou encore « la jeunesse diplômée qui tient « le rôle du gibier féminin face au chasseur viril ». Obsession de la virilité, par exemple celle des« soldats allemands qui sont impressionnants de virilité conquérante » et au charme desquels « beaucoup de femmes succombent ». Ne pas oublier aussi que « la domination sociale à chez elles (les femmes) un fort pouvoir érotique ».

Il serait trop long de tout citer ici. Je ne sais pas quand on touche le fond. Est-ce quand, à la revendication avancée par les féministes dans la lutte pour la liberté de l’avortement, « le droit de disposer de son corps », Zemmour ajoute « même avec un soldat ennemi » ? Est-ce quand il souligne l’évidence, après un « homosexuel assumé » maire de Paris, de la candidature en 2014 de deux femmes à sa succession, soit un pas de plus dans la dégradation de la capitale ? Pire qu’un gay, une femme !

Cependant, en parlant des femmes, il ne faut pas oublier les différences de classe, puisque l’un des objectifs de l’ouvrage est de séduire ceux que Zemmour appelle tantôt « les classes populaires », tantôt les « petits blancs ». J’ignorais quant à moi que le divorce entre adultes consentants avait été imposé par « la petite bourgeoisie montante » aux « classes populaires qui n’en pouvaient mais », comme si les dites classes populaires n’avaient droit qu’au divorce conflictuel ! Ou encore que la lutte pour la liberté de l’avortement et plus largement les luttes d’émancipation des femmes n’étaient qu’une lutte de « bourgeoises volant indûment aux prolétaires mâles le rôle envieux de victimes et d’exploitées », comme si aucune prolétaire n’était jamais morte d’un avortement clandestin, (d’ailleurs plus souvent justement que les dites « bourgeoises » qui avaient les moyens d’aller en Suisse ou en Angleterre pour avorter dans de bonnes conditions), comme si aucune ouvrière n’avait jamais été victime d’un viol…Il faut flatter aussi les jeunes prolétaires, et là encore ce sont les filles qui tiennent le mauvais rôle puisqu’aux « petits blancs » elles « préfèrent le bagout de la jeunesse des écoles ou même la virilité ostentatoire des racailles de banlieue ».

Il y a dans les pages du « suicide français », une misogynie affichée, une haine des féministes mais plus largement des femmes que je ne soupçonnais pas pouvoir encore exister ainsi.
J’ajoute que dans les quarante dernières années telles que les raconte Eric Zemmour, dansla France telle qu’il la voit, pas un tout petit coin de ciel bleu, pas un pâle rayon de soleil, pas même une lueur. Non, tout est négatif, sombre, noir, moche. Pas non plus l’ombre d’une proposition pour sortir la France de l’épouvantable situation dans laquelle, selon lui, elle se trouve. A quoi bon d’ailleurs puisque « la France se meurt, la France est morte » ?  A la fin de son livre, Zemmour, devenu prophète, annonce « la guerre civile » à venir. A se demander s’il ne la souhaite pas. S’il ne la veut pas.

PS : Comme Zemmour emprunte à beaucoup et que nombreuses sont les citations non référencées, tout vérifier demande un long travail. Mais il y en a au moins une immédiatement corrigible, ce n’est pas « Bien creusé, la taupe », c’est « Bien creusé, vieille taupe » !

Voir aussi:

http://mta-nyc.custhelp.com/app/ask_sh

http://web.mta.info/nyct/safety/#harassment

http://gothamist.com/2014/09/30/worst_subway_etiquette_ever.php


Ebola: C’est Sarkozy qui avait raison (Perfect storm: Outdated beliefs and funeral rituals, witch craftery, denial, conspiracy theories, suspicion of local governments, distrust of western medicine, civil war, corrupt dictatorship, collapsed health systems)

18 octobre, 2014
https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xfp1/v/t1.0-9/10405614_4809587734638_648492990704325538_n.jpg?oh=2c9c795d1d03a335609916c27cf1b805&oe=54B2DF56&__gda__=1424902741_06ca2d972aa259e25142ae08c8c666e1

Nous sommes là pour dire et réclamer : laissez entrer les peuples noirs sur la grande scène de l’Histoire. Aimé Césaire
Ebola (…) J’ai l’impression qu’il y a vraiment un programme d’extermination qui est en train d’être mis en place … Dieudonné
Le drame de l’Afrique, c’est que l’homme africain n’est pas assez entré dans l’histoire. Le paysan africain, qui, depuis des millénaires, vit avec les saisons, dont l’idéal de vie est d’être en harmonie avec la nature, ne connaît que l’éternel recommencement du temps rythmé par la répétition sans fin des mêmes gestes et des mêmes paroles. Dans cet imaginaire, où tout recommence toujours, il n’y a de place ni pour l’aventure humaine, ni pour l’idée de progrès. Dans cet univers où la nature commande tout, l’homme échappe à l’angoisse de l’histoire qui tenaille l’homme moderne mais reste immobile au milieu d’un ordre immuable où tout semble écrit d’avance. Jamais l’homme ne s’élance vers l’avenir. Jamais il ne lui vient à l’idée de sortir de la répétition pour s’inventer un destin. Le problème de l’Afrique, et permettez à un ami de l’Afrique de le dire, il est là. Guaino-Sarkozy
Moi, je pense que non seulement l’homme africain est entré dans l’histoire mais qu’il a même été le premier à y entrer. Rama Yade
Quelqu’un est venu ici vous dire que ‘l’Homme africain n’est pas entré dans l’histoire’. Pardon, pardon pour ces paroles humiliantes et qui n’auraient jamais dû être prononcées et – je vous le dis en confidence – qui n’engagent ni la France, ni les Français. Ségolène Royal
Et si Sarkozy avait raison… (…) L’opinion africaine dite intellectuelle s’est mobilisée, depuis quelques temps, contre le discours de Dakar du président français Nicolas Sarkozy, considéré, à notre avis, sans raison, de discours raciste, méprisant, humiliant. Et pourtant il ne faisait que nous rappeler, amicalement, sans doute d’une manière brutale et maladroite, qu’il était temps que nous sortions de la préhistoire pour entrer dans l’histoire contemporaine d’un monde qui est faite d’imagination, de techniques, de sciences, au lieu de nous complaire dans la médiocrité actuelle de nos choix. Il nous faut, en effet, sortir de notre logique fataliste, fondée sur un ancrage intellectuel, philosophique et culturel dans un passé plusieurs fois centenaire alors que le siècle qui frappe à notre porte exige notre entrée dans l’histoire contemporaine. Baba Diouf (Le Soleil)
Aid, by itself, has never developed anything, but where it has been allied to good public policy, sound economic management, and a strong determination to battle poverty, it has made an enormous difference in countries like India, Indonesia, and even China. Those examples illustrate another lesson of aid. Where it works, it represents only a very small share of the total resources devoted to improving roads, schools, heath services, and other things essential for raising incomes. Aid must not overwhelm or displace local efforts; instead, it must settle with being the junior partner. Because of Africa’s needs, and the stubborn nature of its poverty, the continent has attracted far too much aid and far too much interfering by outsiders. (…) In the last 20 years, some states — like Ghana, Uganda, Tanzania, Mozambique, and Mali — have broken the mould, recognized the importance of taking charge, and tried to use aid more strategically and efficiently. Some commentators would add Benin, Zambia, and Rwanda to that list. But most African governments remain stuck in a culture of dependence or indifference. There are still too many dictators in Africa (six have been in office for more than 25 years) and many elected leaders behave no differently. (…) The Blair Commission Report on Africa in 2005 reported that 70,000 trained professionals leave Africa every year, and until they — and the 40 percent of the continent’s savings that are held abroad — start coming home, we need to use aid more restrictively. An obvious solution is to focus aid on the small number of countries that are trying seriously to fight poverty and corruption. Other countries will need to wait — or settle with only small amounts of aid — until their politics or policies or attitudes to the private sector are more promising. We should also consider introducing incentives for countries to match outside assistance with greater progress in raising local funds. (…) We must not be distracted by recent news of Africa’s « spectacular » growth and its sudden attractiveness to private investment. Some basic things are changing on the continent, with real effects for the future; above all, Africans are speaking out and refusing to accept tired excuses from their governments. But the truth is that most of Africa’s growth — based on oil and mineral exports — has not made a whit of difference to the lives of most Africans. Political freedoms shrank on the continent last year, according to the U.S.-based Freedom House index. A quarter of school-age children are still not enrolled, according to World Bank statistics; many of those that are, are receiving a very mediocre education. And agricultural productivity — the key to reducing poverty — is essentially stagnant. The really good news is likely to stay local and seep out in small doses, until it eventually overwhelms the inertia and indifference of governments. Five years ago, Kenya managed to double its tax revenues because a former businessman, appointed to head the national revenue agency, took a hatchet to the dishonest practices of many tax collectors. He had every reason to do so. Only five percent of Kenya’s budget comes from foreign aid, compared with 40 percent in neighboring countries. This is a good example of the sometimes-perverse effects of aid, but also of the importance of imagination and individual initiative in promoting a better life for Africans. Robert Calderisi
A month ago I visited Kibera, the largest slum in Africa. This suburb of Nairobi, the capital of Kenya, is home to more than one million people, who eke out a living in an area of about one square mile — roughly 75% the size of New York’s Central Park. (…)  Kibera festers in Kenya, a country that has one of the highest ratios of development workers per capita. This is also the country where in 2004, British envoy Sir Edward Clay apologized for underestimating the scale of government corruption and failing to speak out earlier. Giving alms to Africa remains one of the biggest ideas of our time — millions march for it, governments are judged by it, celebrities proselytize the need for it. Calls for more aid to Africa are growing louder, with advocates pushing for doubling the roughly $50 billion of international assistance that already goes to Africa each year. Yet evidence overwhelmingly demonstrates that aid to Africa has made the poor poorer, and the growth slower. The insidious aid culture has left African countries more debt-laden, more inflation-prone, more vulnerable to the vagaries of the currency markets and more unattractive to higher-quality investment. It’s increased the risk of civil conflict and unrest (the fact that over 60% of sub-Saharan Africa’s population is under the age of 24 with few economic prospects is a cause for worry). Aid is an unmitigated political, economic and humanitarian disaster. Few will deny that there is a clear moral imperative for humanitarian and charity-based aid to step in when necessary, such as during the 2004 tsunami in Asia. Nevertheless, it’s worth reminding ourselves what emergency and charity-based aid can and cannot do. Aid-supported scholarships have certainly helped send African girls to school (never mind that they won’t be able to find a job in their own countries once they have graduated). This kind of aid can provide band-aid solutions to alleviate immediate suffering, but by its very nature cannot be the platform for long-term sustainable growth. Whatever its strengths and weaknesses, such charity-based aid is relatively small beer when compared to the sea of money that floods Africa each year in government-to-government aid or aid from large development institutions such as the World Bank. Over the past 60 years at least $1 trillion of development-related aid has been transferred from rich countries to Africa. Yet real per-capita income today is lower than it was in the 1970s, and more than 50% of the population — over 350 million people — live on less than a dollar a day, a figure that has nearly doubled in two decades. Even after the very aggressive debt-relief campaigns in the 1990s, African countries still pay close to $20 billion in debt repayments per annum, a stark reminder that aid is not free. In order to keep the system going, debt is repaid at the expense of African education and health care. Well-meaning calls to cancel debt mean little when the cancellation is met with the fresh infusion of aid, and the vicious cycle starts up once again. (…) The most obvious criticism of aid is its links to rampant corruption. Aid flows destined to help the average African end up supporting bloated bureaucracies in the form of the poor-country governments and donor-funded non-governmental organizations. In a hearing before the U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations in May 2004, Jeffrey Winters, a professor at Northwestern University, argued that the World Bank had participated in the corruption of roughly $100 billion of its loan funds intended for development. As recently as 2002, the African Union, an organization of African nations, estimated that corruption was costing the continent $150 billion a year, as international donors were apparently turning a blind eye to the simple fact that aid money was inadvertently fueling graft. With few or no strings attached, it has been all too easy for the funds to be used for anything, save the developmental purpose for which they were intended. (…) A constant stream of « free » money is a perfect way to keep an inefficient or simply bad government in power. As aid flows in, there is nothing more for the government to do — it doesn’t need to raise taxes, and as long as it pays the army, it doesn’t have to take account of its disgruntled citizens. No matter that its citizens are disenfranchised (as with no taxation there can be no representation). All the government really needs to do is to court and cater to its foreign donors to stay in power. Stuck in an aid world of no incentives, there is no reason for governments to seek other, better, more transparent ways of raising development finance (such as accessing the bond market, despite how hard that might be). The aid system encourages poor-country governments to pick up the phone and ask the donor agencies for next capital infusion. It is no wonder that across Africa, over 70% of the public purse comes from foreign aid. (…) Africa remains the most unstable continent in the world, beset by civil strife and war. Since 1996, 11 countries have been embroiled in civil wars. According to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, in the 1990s, Africa had more wars than the rest of the world combined. (…) Proponents of aid are quick to argue that the $13 billion ($100 billion in today’s terms) aid of the post-World War II Marshall Plan helped pull back a broken Europe from the brink of an economic abyss, and that aid could work, and would work, if Africa had a good policy environment. Dambisa Moyo
En Afrique, oui, il y a un risque d’épidémisation, mais je ne pense pas qu’elle puisse s’étendre au reste du monde. Bien sûr, il y aura des cas sporadiques en Occident, on recensera encore quelques personnes contaminées venues d’Afrique, ainsi que quelques cas d’infections survenues au contact de ces malades. Mais cela restera très rare. D’une part, les conditions du cycle de propagation naturelle du virus ne sont pas réunies comme c’est le cas en Afrique, où nous avons un parasite porteur du virus, de fortes concentrations humaines, certains comportements humains ou rites particuliers (comme toucher les morts), des conditions sanitaires défavorables, un certain type d’alimentation, etc. D’autre part, le développement de la médecine occidentale permet de mettre en place des moyens d’action pour éviter une généralisation, avec notamment l’isolement absolu du patient, un strict protocole, des équipements médicaux pointus et le développement de stratégies de détection rapide du virus. Malgré un manque au niveau des traitements à l’heure actuelle, le risque n’est donc pas majeur dans les pays développés, mais Ebola sera l’une des plus grandes épidémies africaines. Le XXe siècle a marqué le retour des épidémies : dans les années 70, sont apparues les fièvres hémorragiques (dont Ebola); dans les années 80, le VIH; dans les années 90, l’hépatite C; et dans les années 2000, le Sras, la grippe H1N1, le chikungunya, etc. Ces maladies n’ont pas toutes les mêmes caractéristiques épidémiologiques ni la même transmission vectorielle, mais elles se sont propagées à cause d’une série de facteurs, comportementaux et environnementaux. Les échanges, les migrations, les voyages intercontinentaux, mais aussi la pénétration humaine en forêt et la déforestation, qui ont amené les hommes à entrer en contact avec une faune sauvage porteuse d’agents pathogènes, ont favorisé la contamination. Et l’Afrique est un continent qui a un lot considérable d’agents infectieux. Il ne faut d’ailleurs pas oublier qu’Ebola n’est pas le seul fléau en Afrique. Des études ont montré que ce continent concentre 70% des cas de VIH et 90% des cas de choléra. Et 90% des décès de paludisme surviennent en Afrique. Mais il y a aussi toute une conjonction qui fait que c’est un continent malade. La structure sanitaire y est déficitaire, du fait des régimes instables ou des zones de guerre. C’est aussi un territoire de migration. Et encore une fois, les comportements humains sont souvent responsables de la propagation des virus. L’éducation en général, et l’éducation sanitaire en particulier, joue un rôle fondamental. De simples gestes d’hygiène permettraient de réduire les fléaux médicaux qui touchent l’Afrique. Par exemple, les diarrhées «normales» tuent chaque année des centaines de milliers d’enfants. Se laver les mains permettrait de réduire de 50% le taux de mortalité.(…)  Mais Ebola est plus dangereux dans le sens où tous les émonctoires (l’urine, la salive, le liquide séminal…) sont vecteurs de transmission. Le simple fait de toucher le patient est dangereux, ce qui n’est pas le cas avec le sida. Néanmoins, le sida est une maladie chronique de longue durée, tandis qu’Ebola est une maladie très aiguë, avec un très fort taux de mortalité, très rapide. Avec Ebola, l’épidémisation est donc moins forte. (…) J’espère en tout cas qu’Ebola servira de déclencheur pour les différents régimes politiques, qu’ils deviendront plus désireux d’investir l’argent dans un système de santé efficace, sans détourner les fonds. J’espère aussi que cette épidémie va faire prendre conscience aux organisations internationales qu’il faut accorder une aide majeure à l’Afrique, et lui apporter une aide logistique et humaine plus importante. On a commencé, mais c’est encore timide. Pour ce qui est de la société elle-même, des efforts considérables d’information sont à faire. Mais passé une période d’incompréhension et la recherche de responsables (la population met notamment en cause les pouvoirs politiques), la société pourra peut-être aussi changer beaucoup de comportements. Jean-Pierre Dedet
« After the typhoon, we got flooded with calls asking, ‘How do I give?' » Sweeny said. « With this (Ebola), we’re not getting those kinds of requests. » Why the difference? For starters, it’s been evident that national governments will need to shoulder the bulk of the financial burden in combatting Ebola, particularly as its ripple effects are increasingly felt beyond the epicenter in West Africa. Regine A. Webster of the Center for Disaster Philanthropy, which advises nonprofits on disaster response strategies, said the epidemic blurred the lines in terms of the categories that guide some big donors. « This is a confusing issue for the private donor community — is it a disaster, or a health problem? » Webster said. « Institutions and individuals have been quite slow to respond. » Officials at InterAction, an umbrella group for U.S. relief agencies active abroad, see other intangible factors at work, including the video and photographic images emerging from West Africa. Joel Charny, InterAction’s vice president for humanitarian policy, said it was clear from the imagery out of Haiti and the Philippines that donations could help rebuild shattered homes and schools, while the images of Ebola are more frightening and less conducive to envisioning a happy ending. « People give when they see that there’s a plausible solution, » Charny said. « They can say, ‘If I give my $50 or $200, it’s going to translate in some tangible way into relieving suffering.’ … That makes them feel good. » « With Ebola, there’s kind of a fear factor, » he said. « Even competent agencies are feeling somewhat overwhelmed, and the nature of the disease — being so awful — makes it hard for people to engage. » Huffington Post
Le drame avec Ebola, c’est que cette épidémie s’attaque cruellement et insidieusement à nos valeurs culturelles ! Il y a par exemple la question des enterrements traditionnels, où les familles touchent le corps pendant les rites funéraires. Qui, à présent, pour s’occuper d’une personne emportée par le virus Ebola ? Au Liberia, de nombreux malades atteints par le virus Ebola, préfèrent rester chez eux plutôt que de se rendre dans les centres de santé. La psychose s’est répandue partout. Nul ne se sent désormais à l’abri, dans une Afrique lacérée par des traditions hétéroclites et des pratiques religieuses tenaces. Combattre le virus Ebola, que d’engagements, d’implications mais surtout de renoncements ! Des marchés aux rassemblements qu’occasionnent les naissances, les mariages, les baptêmes, les deuils, les prières et autres rites funéraires, les Africains aiment à s’illustrer comme de bons exemples. Qu’ils soient simples fidèles, parents, amis, connaissances ou voisins, ils ne veulent pas se voir rejetés pour avoir failli un tant soit peu.(…) Avec Ebola, au-delà des modes de vie, c’est aussi le mode de fonctionnement de la cellule familiale et de la société tout entière qu’il faudra revoir. Il faudra oser s’attaquer à des valeurs ancrées dans la cosmogonie africaine, revisiter nos croyances et nos comportements. De vrais défis ! Au Nigeria, on a dû incinérer le cadavre d’une victime d’Ebola. Le médecin qui l’avait soigné a aussi été mis en quarantaine. Pourra-t-on intégrer ces pratiques dans les nouvelles habitudes ? Il le faut pourtant. Pire que la peste et le choléra réunis, l’épidémie d’Ebola détruit les espaces de solidarité. Les pesanteurs socioculturelles ajoutées au manque de moyens (humains, matériels, financiers), le manque de coordination des actions, font de la fièvre rouge, une maladie aussi redoutable qu’effroyable sur le continent. Le médecin traitant, lui-même, est vulnérable. Une implication de l’Occident est requise. Elle doit être forte. Mais, parce qu’il engloutit des sommes colossales, l’Occident doit exiger en contrepartie que les dirigeants africains s’assument plus sérieusement que face au SIDA. En effet, le problème de la délinquance politique et économique reste toujours posé du côté de l’Afrique. Outre les questions relatives à l’hygiène publique et à l’assainissement, des problèmes de mal gouvernance se trouvent au cœur même de la gestion de nos grands fléaux. Pour le cas d’Ebola, celle-ci se propage parce que les politiques africaines de développement, de santé, d’environnement, de population tout court, sont généralement inadéquates. A preuve, des mesures préventives sont recommandées, sans que des dispositions ne soient toujours prises pour annihiler les conséquences fâcheuses au plan socio-économique. Il est bien de défendre aux gens de manger de la viande de brousse ou de chauves-souris, pour se prémunir contre l’infection au virus d’Ebola. Mais, que faire pour compenser les pertes au niveau des chasseurs, des intermédiaires et des vendeurs de viandes prisées de certaines populations ? Il faudra veiller à une saine utilisation des fonds qui seront mis à la disposition des Etats frappés par le mal. Le passé est à ce sujet suffisamment lourd d’enseignements. Face au SIDA, que n’a-t-on pas vu sur ce continent? La délinquance à tous les étages, impliquant des personnes insignifiantes et des hauts cadres, y compris le sommet de l’Etat. Face à l’épidémie d’Ebola, des dispositions plus rigoureuses doivent être prises. Si Ebola fait des ravages au point d’ébranler l’âme de l’Afrique, il faut éviter que les délinquants à col blanc ne perpétuent continuellement la saignée du continent, en profitant sans vergogne et impunément des efforts de la communauté internationale. L’expérience de fléaux comme celle du SIDA montre qu’en Afrique, une saine gestion des fonds, sur fond de bonne gouvernance politique, est un bon préalable au recul de l’épidémie. Le Pays
L’état de vétusté des infrastructures sanitaires, la faiblesse des ressources humaines, les problèmes d’hygiène et les traditions funéraires, entre autres, font des pays africains un terreau fertile à la propagation de ce virus. Dans le domaine culturel justement, cette épidémie est en train de détruire l’âme africaine. Les efforts pour contenir les infections commandent, entre autres, une attitude à la limite du rejet des victimes. Les parents et voisins sont invités à éviter de toucher aux corps des personnes ayant succombé, afin d’éviter tout risque de contamination par le virus. Nul doute que cette capacité du virus à se transmettre même après la mort de sa victime, est une cause de panique au sein des populations et cela sape les valeurs légendaires de solidarité africaine de même que des pans de la culture en ce qui concerne le traitement des corps des personnes décédées. (…) la vérité c’est que l’Afrique a, une fois de plus, failli. Comme à son habitude, elle aura manqué de prospective. Si non, comment comprendre qu’un virus qui a fait son apparition depuis 1976 et fait jusque-là de nombreuses victimes en Afrique centrale, n’ait pas, près de 40 ans après, encore été pris au sérieux au point qu’il puisse ressurgir et faire autant de victimes ? Comment comprendre que malgré tous les discours sur la souveraineté de l’Afrique, le sort et le salut du continent soient encore entre les mains des mêmes Occidentaux régulièrement conspués ? Que reste-t-il vraiment encore de la fierté des Africains ? Hélas, tout ce qui intéresse vraiment les dirigeants africains, c’est le pouvoir. (…) Aux Africains donc de se ressaisir, à commencer par leurs dirigeants, pour mériter le respect qu’ils réclament des autres, mais aussi et surtout pour prendre en main eux-mêmes leur destin. Le Pays
Ebola met à nu les tares des systèmes sanitaires africains La gouvernance des Etats africains présente beaucoup d’insuffisances. (…) Une des illustrations les plus frappantes de ce fait est la situation chaotique dans laquelle se trouvent nos systèmes de santé. En effet, la propagation du virus Ebola a contribué à mettre à nu toute l’étendue de cette triste réalité, qui doit désormais interpeller toutes les consciences. Lorsque l’on fait l’état des lieux, l’on peut avoir des raisons objectives d’être remonté contre nos gouvernants.Les zones d’ombre sont nombreuses. Elles se rapportent notamment à l’insuffisance du personnel soignant qualifié, au niveau rudimentaire des plateaux techniques, à la gestion artisanale des structures de santé, au manque de professionnalisme et de motivation des agents de santé, etc. Dans ces conditions, l’on comprend pourquoi la moindre épidémie peut constituer une véritable épreuve pour les autorités sanitaires. (…) Lorsque l’on prend le cas du Libéria qui est l’un des pays le plus touché par le virus, l’on peut tomber des nues de constater que ce pays, qui est indépendant depuis 1847, dispose seulement de 250 médecins, soit un ratio effroyable d’un ou de deux médecins pour 100 000 habitants. Il n’est donc pas étonnant que le pays de William Tolbert ait beaucoup de mal à déployer un personnel qualifié suffisant, pour la prise en charge des personnes infectées et affectées. Que l’on n’aille surtout pas brandir l’insuffisance de moyens financiers pour justifier cet état de fait. En effet, le Libéria regorge d’énormes richesses minières dont l’exploitation judicieuse pourrait permettre au peuple libérien de sortir la tête de l’eau. Malheureusement, ces richesses sont exploitées au profit d’une caste politique qui vit sur un îlot d’opulence, dans un océan de misère et d’indigence indescriptibles. L’exemple du Libéria est celui de la plupart des Etats africains. Lorsqu’il s’agit de répondre aux besoins de base des populations en termes d’éducation, de santé, de logement, l’on n’hésite pas en haut lieu à invoquer le manque de moyens financiers et à tendre sans gêne la sébile à la communauté internationale. Par contre, lorsqu’il s’agit de dépenser pour réaliser des activités dont l’intérêt pour les populations n’est pas évident, l’argent est vite mobilisé. Pour revenir à la propagation de la fièvre rouge, l’on a envie de dire que l’Afrique est en train de payer pour son manque de vision. Gouverner, dit-on, c’est prévoir. Mais en Afrique, c’est tout le contraire. C’est le pilotage à vue qui est érigé en mode de gouvernance. Lorsque survient la moindre urgence, c’est le sauve-qui-peut, nos Etats donnant l’impression d’être complètement désarmés. D’ailleurs, le fait qui consiste pour les princes qui nous gouvernent de courir, toutes affaires cessantes, en Occident, même pour soigner leurs petits bobos, est un aveu du peu d’intérêt et de crédit qu’ils accordent à nos structures sanitaires et à nos spécialistes de la santé. La tendance est loin d’être inversée. En effet, nos hôpitaux se présentent de plus en plus comme des antichambres de la mort : les urgences médicales sont difficilement assurées, l’encombrement et l’insalubrité crèvent les yeux. Le Pays
It is traditional beliefs and modern expressions of Christianity that is contributing to the spread of Ebola. This is not just a biomedical crisis, this is driven by beliefs, behaviours and denial. (…) It is enough to have one person who, for example, is at a funeral and can go on to contaminated 10 to 20 people, and it all starts again. (…) We thought it was over, and then a very well known person, a woman who was a powerful traditional practitioner and the head of a secret society, died (…) ‘People from three countries came to her funeral, there dozens of people got infected. From there the virus spread to Sierra Leone and Liberia. (…) It took about 1,000 Africans dying and two Americans being repatriated. That’s basically the equation in the value of life and what triggers an international response. Professor Peter Piot (director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine)
Ultimately the spread is due to different cultural practices, as well as infrastructure. Chief among these is how people handle disease, from the avoidance, to the treatment, containment, and the handling of the victims. One aspect of certain beliefs and practices in the area is a deep distrust of medicine, as accusations of cannibalism by doctors, alongside suspicion that the disease is caused by witchcraft, and other conspiracy theories have caused riots outside treatment centres in Sierra Leone, and families to break into hospital to remove patients. The primary issue, however, is the funerary practices. The virus is able to capitalize on the tenderness in West African traditions, with devastating results. Traditional funeral proceedings in West Africa in involve lots of touching, kissing, and general handling (like washing) of the deceased; each victim, in effect, becomes far more dangerous after the virus has killed. A big part of this containment is the fact that urban centres are both better able to handle dangerous cases, and less likely to host them in the first place. This is especially bad, because it means that the most deadly strains are spread the most, and milder variants go extinct. The good news? It’s unlikely that Ebola will become a global pandemic. While there is some possibility of mutations occurring that increase the ability to spread, the fundamental mechanism that makes it deadly would likely be interrupted. The bad news is that until the population is educated in hygiene, the medical establishment, and the dangers of eating carrier species (pig, monkeys, and bats) the virus will continue to ravage these smaller villages. Oneclass
The idea is to train these people here to go back and disseminate the main instructions about the disease.” An Ebola infection often looks like malaria at first, so people may not suspect they have it. It later progresses to the classic symptoms of a hemorrhagic fever, with vomiting, diarrhea, high fever and both internal and external bleeding. With so many bodily fluids pouring from a patient, it is easy to see how caregivers could become infected. we’ve shown people how to do a traditional burial, only wearing gloves. And you can allow the body to be washed briefly. Workers have been attentive to the traditions, allowing the body to be wrapped without exposing people to the virus.” Genetic analysis of the virus causing the current outbreaks show it’s distinct from the virus seen in east Africa. This suggests it may be from a local source. No one’s sure just where Ebola cames from. It can affect great apes but fruit bats are a prime suspect. Today

 C’est Sarkozy qui avait raison !

Croyances et rites funéraires d’un autre âge, sorcellerie, déni, théories du complot, suspicion généralisée des administrations locales, méfiance à l’égard de la médecine occidentale, guerres civiles, dictatures corrompues, effondrement des systèmes de santé, attaques de centres d’isolement  …

A l’heure où 50 ans après les indépendances et des dizaines de milliards de ressources et d’aide détournées (pour un total d’au moins mille milliards de dollars sur 60 ans pour la seule aide au développement !) …

Un continent qui continue à concentrer les misères du monde (70% des cas de VIH, 90% des cas de choléra et des décès de paludisme, entre 26 et 40% d’alphabétisation, sans parler des filles, pour les pays les plus pauvres) 

Est en train, avec l’une des pires épidémies de son histoire et pendant qu’à l’instar de leurs coreligionnaires d’Irak les djihadistes sahéliens multiplient les exactions, de démontrer au monde toute l’étendue de son sous-développement …

Pendant que jusqu’en Occident même certains propagent les pires théories du complot

Comment ne pas repenser aux paroles, qui avait tant été dénoncées, du discours de Dakar de l’ancien président Sarkozy de juillet 2007 sur la non-entrée dans l’histoire de l’homme noir ?

Et ne pas voir, comme l’ont bien perçu nombre de commentateurs en Afrique même, que c’était bien Sarkozy qui avait raison ?

RAVAGES DE LA FIEVRE ROUGE : Quand Ebola ébranle l’âme de l’Afrique
Avec le virus Ebola, l’identité culturelle est dangereusement remise en cause par une épidémie qui, du début de l’année à ce jour, a fait 887 morts en Afrique subsaharienne. Des cas ont été signalés aux Etats-Unis.

Le Pays

5 août 2014

Si les deux cas révélés aux Etats-Unis étaient effectivement hors de danger, cela augurerait de bonnes perspectives pour la recherche. Celle-ci semble piétiner depuis la découverte du virus en 1976. A ce propos, l’Occident n’est point exempt de critique. Pourquoi avoir tant négligé les risques de propagation du mal qui avait d’abord sévi en Afrique centrale ? Sans aller jusqu’à jeter l’anathème sur l’Occident, il conviendrait de s’interroger sur le manque patent de médicaments à ce jour : insuffisance de ressources ou tout simplement manque de volonté politique ? Avec les révélations de cas en Occident (Etats-Unis), il faut souhaiter de meilleures dispositions, afin que la recherche vienne à bout de ce fléau.

Ebola s’attaque à nos valeurs culturelles

En tout cas, selon l’OMS, il existe des traitements, même si aucun vaccin homologué n’a encore vu le jour. Cela vient ainsi contredire les idées reçues selon lesquelles la maladie est mortelle à 100%. Que dire du docteur Kent Brantly et de son assistante Nancy Writebol, de retour aux Etats-Unis, après avoir contracté le virus lors de leur mission au Liberia ? Hospitalisés, ils avaient reçu plusieurs injections d’un mystérieux sérum baptisé ZMapp, conçu à San Diego en Californie. Les deux coopérants qui se trouvaient dans un état critique, seraient aujourd’hui dans un état « stable ». Jusque-là, le sérum n’avait été testé que sur quatre singes infectés par Ebola. Ils ont survécu après avoir reçu une dose du produit.Malheureusement, des membres des personnels de santé d’Afrique n’auront pas eu la chance des deux experts américains. Tombés les armes à la main, ces médecins, infirmiers ou sages-femmes méritent d’être célébrés. Le drame avec Ebola, c’est que cette épidémie s’attaque cruellement et insidieusement à nos valeurs culturelles ! Il y a par exemple la question des enterrements traditionnels, où les familles touchent le corps pendant les rites funéraires. Qui, à présent, pour s’occuper d’une personne emportée par le virus Ebola ? Au Liberia, de nombreux malades atteints par le virus Ebola, préfèrent rester chez eux plutôt que de se rendre dans les centres de santé.

La psychose s’est répandue partout. Nul ne se sent désormais à l’abri, dans une Afrique lacérée par des traditions hétéroclites et des pratiques religieuses tenaces. Combattre le virus Ebola, que d’engagements, d’implications mais surtout de renoncements ! Des marchés aux rassemblements qu’occasionnent les naissances, les mariages, les baptêmes, les deuils, les prières et autres rites funéraires, les Africains aiment à s’illustrer comme de bons exemples. Qu’ils soient simples fidèles, parents, amis, connaissances ou voisins, ils ne veulent pas se voir rejetés pour avoir failli un tant soit peu.

La lutte contre Ebola est difficile, mais pas impossible ! Elle devra se mener vaille que vaille, au plan individuel et collectif. Avec Ebola, au-delà des modes de vie, c’est aussi le mode de fonctionnement de la cellule familiale et de la société tout entière qu’il faudra revoir. Il faudra oser s’attaquer à des valeurs ancrées dans la cosmogonie africaine, revisiter nos croyances et nos comportements. De vrais défis ! Au Nigeria, on a dû incinérer le cadavre d’une victime d’Ebola. Le médecin qui l’avait soigné a aussi été mis en quarantaine. Pourra-t-on intégrer ces pratiques dans les nouvelles habitudes ? Il le faut pourtant. Pire que la peste et le choléra réunis, l’épidémie d’Ebola détruit les espaces de solidarité.

Des dispositions plus rigoureuses doivent être prises

Les pesanteurs socioculturelles ajoutées au manque de moyens (humains, matériels, financiers), le manque de coordination des actions, font de la fièvre rouge, une maladie aussi redoutable qu’effroyable sur le continent. Le médecin traitant, lui-même, est vulnérable. Une implication de l’Occident est requise. Elle doit être forte. Mais, parce qu’il engloutit des sommes colossales, l’Occident doit exiger en contrepartie que les dirigeants africains s’assument plus sérieusement que face au SIDA. En effet, le problème de la délinquance politique et économique reste toujours posé du côté de l’Afrique. Outre les questions relatives à l’hygiène publique et à l’assainissement, des problèmes de mal gouvernance se trouvent au cœur même de la gestion de nos grands fléaux. Pour le cas d’Ebola, celle-ci se propage parce que les politiques africaines de développement, de santé, d’environnement, de population tout court, sont généralement inadéquates. A preuve, des mesures préventives sont recommandées, sans que des dispositions ne soient toujours prises pour annihiler les conséquences fâcheuses au plan socio-économique. Il est bien de défendre aux gens de manger de la viande de brousse ou de chauves-souris, pour se prémunir contre l’infection au virus d’Ebola. Mais, que faire pour compenser les pertes au niveau des chasseurs, des intermédiaires et des vendeurs de viandes prisées de certaines populations ?

Il faudra veiller à une saine utilisation des fonds qui seront mis à la disposition des Etats frappés par le mal. Le passé est à ce sujet suffisamment lourd d’enseignements. Face au SIDA, que n’a-t-on pas vu sur ce continent? La délinquance à tous les étages, impliquant des personnes insignifiantes et des hauts cadres, y compris le sommet de l’Etat. Face à l’épidémie d’Ebola, des dispositions plus rigoureuses doivent être prises. Si Ebola fait des ravages au point d’ébranler l’âme de l’Afrique, il faut éviter que les délinquants à col blanc ne perpétuent continuellement la saignée du continent, en profitant sans vergogne et impunément des efforts de la communauté internationale. L’expérience de fléaux comme celle du SIDA montre qu’en Afrique, une saine gestion des fonds, sur fond de bonne gouvernance politique, est un bon préalable au recul de l’épidémie.

Voir aussi:

PROPAGATION DE LA FIEVRE ROUGE : Ebola ou la désintégration des peuples
C’est le branle-bas de combat dans tous les pays ou presque. Ceux qui sont touchés cherchent les voies et moyens de contenir le virus ; les autres pays prennent des mesures nécessaires pour prévenir une quelconque infection. En plus de la sous-région ouest-africaine où le cap des 1 000 morts d’Ebola a été dépassé, selon les chiffres de l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé (OMS), les Etats-Unis d’Amérique, l’Inde et le Canada font face à la menace Ebola à travers leurs ressortissants vivant dans les pays touchés. Le virus fait des ravages au point d’être classé ennemi public à l’échelle mondiale.

Le Pays

10 août 2014

Pour l’Afrique, la situation est critique

En effet, face à la propagation de la fièvre rouge, la communauté internationale est à présent sur le pied de guerre. L’OMS, au regard de l’ampleur que prend l’épidémie, a estimé que «les conditions d’une urgence de santé publique de portée mondiale sont réunies » et a sonné la mobilisation générale.

Pour l’Afrique particulièrement, la situation est critique. L’état de vétusté des infrastructures sanitaires, la faiblesse des ressources humaines, les problèmes d’hygiène et les traditions funéraires, entre autres, font des pays africains un terreau fertile à la propagation de ce virus. Dans le domaine culturel justement, cette épidémie est en train de détruire l’âme africaine. Les efforts pour contenir les infections commandent, entre autres, une attitude à la limite du rejet des victimes. Les parents et voisins sont invités à éviter de toucher aux corps des personnes ayant succombé, afin d’éviter tout risque de contamination par le virus. Nul doute que cette capacité du virus à se transmettre même après la mort de sa victime, est une cause de panique au sein des populations et cela sape les valeurs légendaires de solidarité africaine de même que des pans de la culture en ce qui concerne le traitement des corps des personnes décédées. Les mesures prises de part et d’autre pour limiter la propagation du virus sont, bien entendu, fort compréhensibles. Les contrôles des passagers dans bien des pays en Afrique de l’Ouest, participent des moyens de contenir l’épidémie. Mais, on peut s’interroger sur l’efficacité de telles mesures. Les frontières en Afrique, faut-il le rappeler, sont très poreuses et il n’est pas évident de pouvoir soumettre à des tests toutes les personnes qui vont d’un pays à un autre. Cela est surtout vrai pour ceux qui voyagent en train, en bus ou par divers autres moyens de déplacement. Ils sont difficiles à passer au scanner des forces de contrôle. C’est le cas notamment des voyageurs qui empruntent de simples pistes et sentiers reliant des pays. Cela dit et loin de jouer les oiseaux de mauvais augure, il est certain que le virus touche déjà bien plus de pays ouest-africains que la Sierra Leone, le Liberia, la Guinée et le Nigeria. Il ne faut pas se leurrer, le mal touche probablement plus de pays qu’on ne le pense. Et cela n’est pas sans conséquence sur l’intégration des peuples et les activités économiques. En effet, les mesures de riposte ou de prévention prises par la plupart des pays, ont un impact certain sur la libre circulation des personnes. Les entrées étant plus contrôlées aux frontières terrestres ou aériennes des pays, les voyages sont rendus de facto, plus difficiles. De plus, la psychose des contaminations amène des populations à limiter par elles-mêmes leurs déplacements vers d’autres pays, à défaut de les annuler purement et simplement.

La volonté politique et les moyens ne sont pas à la hauteur

En cela, on peut dire que le virus Ebola est un facteur de désintégration des peuples. Et cette désintégration s’accompagne d’une morosité des activités économiques. En témoigne la suspension des liaisons aériennes entre certains pays. L’espoir une fois de plus pourrait venir de l’Occident, notamment de l’Amérique. En tout cas, il est attendu beaucoup du sérum expérimental développé par les Etats-Unis d’Amérique. Il faut croiser les doigts pour que ce vaccin soit le plus rapidement possible, disponible avant 2015, comme initialement prévu et qu’il soit efficace. Certes, on peut se dire qu’il aura fallu que les économies et des vies occidentales soient en danger pour que la réponse s’organise à l’échelle mondiale et que des esquisses de solution voient le jour. Mais ce serait faire un faux procès à l’Occident que de ne voir la situation que sous ce prisme. Les Occidentaux défendent leurs intérêts et c’est, le moins du monde, normal. Il est de bon ton que les Etats-Unis d’Amérique se préoccupent du sort de leurs compatriotes contaminés par un virus de l’autre côté de la planète et cela devrait donner à réfléchir à bien des gouvernants. Car, la vérité c’est que l’Afrique a, une fois de plus, failli. Comme à son habitude, elle aura manqué de prospective. Si non, comment comprendre qu’un virus qui a fait son apparition depuis 1976 et fait jusque-là de nombreuses victimes en Afrique centrale, n’ait pas, près de 40 ans après, encore été pris au sérieux au point qu’il puisse ressurgir et faire autant de victimes ? Comment comprendre que malgré tous les discours sur la souveraineté de l’Afrique, le sort et le salut du continent soient encore entre les mains des mêmes Occidentaux régulièrement conspués ? Que reste-t-il vraiment encore de la fierté des Africains ? Hélas, tout ce qui intéresse vraiment les dirigeants africains, c’est le pouvoir. C’est le moins que l’on puisse dire au regard du fait qu’ils sont incapables de résoudre les problèmes de santé et d’éducation des populations pour ne citer que cela. L’Afrique devrait pouvoir prendre en charge elle-même la recherche dans des domaines où ses intérêts sont en jeu. Elle a la matière grise pour cela. Seulement, l’esprit d’anticipation fait largement défaut. On attend toujours que la situation soit hors de contrôle ou en passe de l’être, pour réagir. De plus, la volonté politique et les moyens ne sont pas à la hauteur pour des pays qui rêvent d’émergence. Il n’y a qu’à observer les parts des budgets réservées à la recherche qui, comme on le sait, sont généralement modiques sous nos tropiques. Pourtant, il est évident que dans la lutte contre le virus Ebola et les autres maladies qui écument le continent, si les chercheurs africains arrivaient à mettre au point des vaccins ou des remèdes dont la qualité scientifique est éprouvée, le reste du monde ne pourrait que s’incliner devant de telles découvertes. C’est dire que le respect et la reconnaissance des autres en matière de recherches scientifiques comme dans bien d’autres domaines, se méritent. Aux Africains donc de se ressaisir, à commencer par leurs dirigeants, pour mériter le respect qu’ils réclament des autres, mais aussi et surtout pour prendre en main eux-mêmes leur destin.

Voir encore:

PROPAGATION DE LA FIEVRE ROUGE : Quand Ebola met à nu les tares des systèmes sanitaires africains
La gouvernance des Etats africains présente beaucoup d’insuffisances. Il n’y a que les personnes de mauvaise foi qui peuvent en douter. Une des illustrations les plus frappantes de ce fait est la situation chaotique dans laquelle se trouvent nos systèmes de santé. En effet, la propagation du virus Ebola a contribué à mettre à nu toute l’étendue de cette triste réalité, qui doit désormais interpeller toutes les consciences. Lorsque l’on fait l’état des lieux, l’on peut avoir des raisons objectives d’être remonté contre nos gouvernants.

Pousdem Pickou

Le Pays
21 août 2014

L’Afrique est en train de payer pour son manque de vision

Les zones d’ombre sont nombreuses. Elles se rapportent notamment à l’insuffisance du personnel soignant qualifié, au niveau rudimentaire des plateaux techniques, à la gestion artisanale des structures de santé, au manque de professionnalisme et de motivation des agents de santé, etc. Dans ces conditions, l’on comprend pourquoi la moindre épidémie peut constituer une véritable épreuve pour les autorités sanitaires. Certes, Ebola n’est pas comme les autres maladies infectieuses, mais la précarité et le dénuement dans lesquels évoluent les systèmes sanitaires de bien des Etats africains, peuvent expliquer en partie sa propagation. Lorsque l’on prend le cas du Libéria qui est l’un des pays le plus touché par le virus, l’on peut tomber des nues de constater que ce pays, qui est indépendant depuis 1847, dispose seulement de 250 médecins, soit un ratio effroyable d’un ou de deux médecins pour 100 000 habitants. Il n’est donc pas étonnant que le pays de William Tolbert ait beaucoup de mal à déployer un personnel qualifié suffisant, pour la prise en charge des personnes infectées et affectées. Que l’on n’aille surtout pas brandir l’insuffisance de moyens financiers pour justifier cet état de fait. En effet, le Libéria regorge d’énormes richesses minières dont l’exploitation judicieuse pourrait permettre au peuple libérien de sortir la tête de l’eau. Malheureusement, ces richesses sont exploitées au profit d’une caste politique qui vit sur un îlot d’opulence, dans un océan de misère et d’indigence indescriptibles. L’exemple du Libéria est celui de la plupart des Etats africains. Lorsqu’il s’agit de répondre aux besoins de base des populations en termes d’éducation, de santé, de logement, l’on n’hésite pas en haut lieu à invoquer le manque de moyens financiers et à tendre sans gêne la sébile à la communauté internationale. Par contre, lorsqu’il s’agit de dépenser pour réaliser des activités dont l’intérêt pour les populations n’est pas évident, l’argent est vite mobilisé. Pour revenir à la propagation de la fièvre rouge, l’on a envie de dire que l’Afrique est en train de payer pour son manque de vision. Gouverner, dit-on, c’est prévoir.

Il y a urgence à repenser les systèmes de santé des pays africains

Mais en Afrique, c’est tout le contraire. C’est le pilotage à vue qui est érigé en mode de gouvernance. Lorsque survient la moindre urgence, c’est le sauve-qui-peut, nos Etats donnant l’impression d’être complètement désarmés. D’ailleurs, le fait qui consiste pour les princes qui nous gouvernent de courir, toutes affaires cessantes, en Occident, même pour soigner leurs petits bobos, est un aveu du peu d’intérêt et de crédit qu’ils accordent à nos structures sanitaires et à nos spécialistes de la santé. La tendance est loin d’être inversée. En effet, nos hôpitaux se présentent de plus en plus comme des antichambres de la mort : les urgences médicales sont difficilement assurées, l’encombrement et l’insalubrité crèvent les yeux. Ces réalités laissent de marbre certains gouvernants. C’est dans ce contexte que certains Etats africains poussent l’indécence jusqu’à l’extrême, en parlant d’émergence. Face à un tel ridicule qui consiste à se chatouiller pour rire, l’on a envie de se poser la question suivante : Sacrée Afrique, quand est-ce que tu vas cesser d’être la risée des autres ? Cela dit, aujourd’hui plus jamais, il y a urgence à repenser les systèmes de santé des pays africains. Cela nécessite certes des moyens financiers, mais surtout de l’ingéniosité et de la volonté politique. L’Afrique a certainement des chercheurs de qualité. Mais encore faut-il qu’ils aient le minimum de moyens pour mener leurs recherches. C’est en adoptant de nouvelles résolutions, en termes de bonne gouvernance, que l’on pourra dire que l’Afrique a tiré leçon des ravages que la fièvre rouge est en train de faire sur son sol.

Voir de plus:

L’homme africain et l’histoire

Henri Guaino
Le Monde

26.07.2008

Il y a un an à Dakar, le président de la République française prononçait sa première grande allocution en terre africaine. On sait le débat qu’elle a provoqué. Jamais pourtant un président français n’avait été aussi loin sur l’esclavage et la colonisation : « Il y a eu la traite négrière. Il y a eu l’esclavage, les hommes, les femmes, les enfants achetés et vendus comme des marchandises. Et ce crime ne fut pas seulement un crime contre les Africains, ce fut un crime contre l’homme, ce fut un crime contre l’humanité tout entière (…). Jadis les Européens sont venus en Afrique en conquérants. Ils ont pris la terre de vos ancêtres. Ils ont banni les dieux, les langues, les croyances, les coutumes de vos pères. Ils ont dit à vos pères ce qu’ils devaient penser, ce qu’ils devaient croire, ce qu’ils devaient faire. Ils ont eu tort. »

Mais il a voulu rappeler en même temps que, parmi les colons, « il y avait aussi des hommes de bonne volonté (…) qui ont construit des ponts, des routes, des hôpitaux, des dispensaires, des écoles (…) ». Il doit beaucoup à Senghor, qui proclamait : « Nous sommes des métis culturels. » C’est sans doute pourquoi il a tant déplu à une certaine intelligentsia africaine qui trouvait Senghor trop francophile. Il ne doit en revanche rien à Hegel. Dommage pour ceux qui ont cru déceler un plagiat. Reste que la tonalité de certaines critiques pose une question : faut-il avoir une couleur de peau particulière pour avoir le droit de parler des problèmes de l’Afrique sans être accusé de racisme ?

A ceux qui l’avaient accusé de racisme à propos de Race et culture (1971), Lévi-Strauss avait répondu : « En banalisant la notion même de racisme, en l’appliquant à tort et à travers, on la vide de son contenu et on risque d’aboutir à un résultat inverse de celui qu’on recherche. Car qu’est-ce que le racisme ? Une doctrine précise (…). Un : une corrélation existe entre le patrimoine génétique d’une part, les aptitudes intellectuelles et les dispositions morales d’autre part. Deux : ce patrimoine génétique est commun à tous les membres de certains groupements humains. Trois : ces groupements appelés « races » peuvent être hiérarchisés en fonction de la qualité de leur patrimoine génétique. Quatre : ces différences autorisent les « races » dites supérieures à commander, exploiter les autres, éventuellement à les détruire. »

Où trouve-t-on une telle doctrine dans le discours de Dakar ? Où est-il question d’une quelconque hiérarchie raciale ? Il est dit, au contraire : « L’homme africain est aussi logique et raisonnable que l’homme européen. » Et « le drame de l’Afrique n’est pas dans une prétendue infériorité de son art, de sa pensée, de sa culture, car pour ce qui est de l’art, de la pensée, de la culture, c’est l’Occident qui s’est mis à l’école de l’Afrique ».

Est-ce raciste de dire : « En écoutant Sophocle, l’Afrique a entendu une voix plus familière qu’elle ne l’aurait cru et l’Occident a reconnu dans l’art africain des formes de beauté qui avaient jadis été les siennes et qu’il éprouvait le besoin de ressusciter » ?

Parler de « l’homme africain » était-il raciste ? Mais qui a jamais vu quelqu’un traité de raciste parce qu’il parlait de l’homme européen ? Nul n’ignore la diversité de l’Afrique. A Dakar, le président a dit : « Je veux m’adresser à tous les Africains, qui sont si différents les uns des autres, qui n’ont pas la même langue, la même religion, les mêmes coutumes, la même culture, la même histoire, et qui pourtant se reconnaissent les uns les autres comme Africains. »

Chercher ce que les Africains ont en commun n’est pas plus inutile ni plus sot que de chercher ce que les Européens ont en partage. L’anthropologie culturelle est un point de vue aussi intéressant que celui de l’historien sur la réalité du monde.

UN DISCOURS POUR LA JEUNESSE

Revenons un instant sur le passage qui a déchaîné tant de passions et qui dit que « l’homme africain n’est pas assez entré dans l’histoire ». Nulle part il n’est dit que les Africains n’ont pas d’histoire. Tout le monde en a une. Mais le rapport à l’histoire n’est pas le même d’une époque à une autre, d’une civilisation à l’autre. Dans les sociétés paysannes, le temps cyclique l’emporte sur le temps linéaire, qui est celui de l’histoire. Dans les sociétés modernes, c’est l’inverse.

L’homme moderne est angoissé par une histoire dont il est l’acteur et dont il ne connaît pas la suite. Cette conception du temps qui se déploie dans la durée et dans une direction, c’est Rome et le judaïsme qui l’ont expérimentée les premiers. Puis il a fallu des millénaires pour que l’Occident invente l’idéologie du progrès. Cela ne veut pas dire que dans toutes les autres formes de civilisation il n’y a pas eu des progrès, des inventions cumulatives. Mais l’idéologie du progrès telle que nous la connaissons est propre à l’héritage des Lumières.

En 1947, Emmanuel Mounier partait à la rencontre de l’Afrique, et en revenant il écrivit : « Il semble que le temps inférieur de l’Africain soit accordé à un monde sans but, à une durée sans hâte, que son bonheur soit de se laisser couler au fil des jours et non pas de brûler les espaces et les minutes. » Raciste, Mounier ?

A propos du paysan africain, le discours parle d’imaginaire, non de faits historiques. Il ne s’agissait pas de désigner une classe sociale, mais un archétype qui imprègne encore la mentalité des fils et des petits-fils de paysans qui habitent aujourd’hui dans les villes.

L’Afrique est le berceau de l’humanité, et nul n’a oublié ni l’Egypte ni les empires du Ghana et du Mali, ni le royaume du Bénin, ni l’Ethiopie. Mais les grands Etats furent l’exception, dit Braudel, qui ajoute : « L’Afrique noire s’est ouverte mal et tardivement sur le monde extérieur. » Raciste, Braudel ?

L’homme africain est entré dans l’histoire et dans le monde, mais pas assez. Pourquoi le nier ?

Ce discours ne s’adressait pas aux élites installées, aux notables de l’Afrique. Mais à sa jeunesse qui s’apprête à féconder l’avenir. Et il lui dit : « Vous êtes les héritiers des plus vieilles traditions africaines et vous êtes les héritiers de tout ce que l’Occident a déposé dans le coeur et dans l’âme de l’Afrique », la liberté, la justice, la démocratie, l’égalité vous appartiennent aussi.

L’Afrique n’est pas en dehors du monde. D’elle aussi, il dépend que le monde de demain soit meilleur. Mais l’engagement de l’Afrique dans le monde a besoin d’une volonté africaine, car « la réalité de l’Afrique, c’est celle d’un grand continent qui a tout pour réussir et qui ne réussit pas parce qu’il n’arrive pas à se libérer de ses mythes ». Cessons de ressasser le passé et tournons-nous ensemble vers l’avenir. Cet avenir a un nom : l’Eurafrique, et l’Union pour la Méditerranée en est la première étape. Voilà ce que le président de la République a dit en substance à Dakar.

On a beaucoup parlé des critiques, moins de ceux qui ont approuvé, comme le président de l’Afrique du Sud, M. Thabo Mbeki. On n’a pas parlé du livre si sérieux, si honnête d’André Julien Mbem, jeune philosophe originaire du Cameroun. Parlera-t-on du livre si savant à paraître bientôt à Abidjan de Pierre Franklin Tavares, philosophe spécialiste de Hegel, originaire du Cap-Vert ?

L’éditorial du quotidien sénégalais Le Soleil du 9 avril dernier était intitulé : « Et si Sarkozy avait raison ? » Bara Diouf, grande figure du journalisme africain, qui fut l’ami de Cheikh Anta Diop (1923-1986, historien et anthropologue sénégalais), écrivait : « Le siècle qui frappe à notre porte exige notre entrée dans l’histoire contemporaine. »

Raciste, Bara Diouf ou mauvais connaisseur de l’Afrique ?

Toute l’Afrique n’a pas rejeté le discours de Dakar. Encore faut-il le lire avec un peu de bonne foi. On peut en discuter sans mépris, sans insultes. Est-ce trop demander ? Et si nous n’en sommes pas capables, à quoi ressemblera demain notre démocratie ?

Henri Guaino est conseiller spécial du président de la République

Voir encore:

Ebola : « Le risque n’est pas majeur dans les pays développés »
Tatiana Salvan

Libération

17 octobre 2014

INTERVIEW Selon le microbiologiste Jean-Pierre Dedet, les conditions d’une épidémie ne sont pas réunies en Occident. Mais Ebola sera bien l’une des plus grandes épidémies africaines.

Avec l’annonce d’un deuxième cas d’infection par le virus Ebola aux Etats-Unis, l’Occident redoute plus que jamais qu’Ebola ne franchisse les frontières. La France vient d’annoncer la mise en place d’un dispositif de contrôle sanitaire dans les aéroports français. Mais pour Jean-Pierre Dedet, professeur émérite à l’université Montpellier I et microbiologiste, auteur de Epidémies, de la peste noire à la grippe A/H1N1 (2010), l’épidémie d’Ebola restera concentrée en Afrique.

Sur le même sujetLe Sénégal n’est plus touché par Ebola
Selon l’OMS, l’épidémie d’Ebola pourrait faire 10 000 nouveaux cas par semaine. Existe-il un véritable risque de pandémie ?

En Afrique, oui, il y a un risque d’épidémisation, mais je ne pense pas qu’elle puisse s’étendre au reste du monde. Bien sûr, il y aura des cas sporadiques en Occident, on recensera encore quelques personnes contaminées venues d’Afrique, ainsi que quelques cas d’infections survenues au contact de ces malades. Mais cela restera très rare. D’une part, les conditions du cycle de propagation naturelle du virus ne sont pas réunies comme c’est le cas en Afrique, où nous avons un parasite porteur du virus, de fortes concentrations humaines, certains comportements humains ou rites particuliers (comme toucher les morts), des conditions sanitaires défavorables, un certain type d’alimentation, etc. D’autre part, le développement de la médecine occidentale permet de mettre en place des moyens d’action pour éviter une généralisation, avec notamment l’isolement absolu du patient, un strict protocole, des équipements médicaux pointus et le développement de stratégies de détection rapide du virus. Malgré un manque au niveau des traitements à l’heure actuelle, le risque n’est donc pas majeur dans les pays développés, mais Ebola sera l’une des plus grandes épidémies africaines.

Comment situer Ebola par rapport aux autres grandes épidémies ?

Le XXe siècle a marqué le retour des épidémies : dans les années 70, sont apparues les fièvres hémorragiques (dont Ebola); dans les années 80, le VIH; dans les années 90, l’hépatite C; et dans les années 2000, le Sras, la grippe H1N1, le chikungunya, etc. Ces maladies n’ont pas toutes les mêmes caractéristiques épidémiologiques ni la même transmission vectorielle, mais elles se sont propagées à cause d’une série de facteurs, comportementaux et environnementaux. Les échanges, les migrations, les voyages intercontinentaux, mais aussi la pénétration humaine en forêt et la déforestation, qui ont amené les hommes à entrer en contact avec une faune sauvage porteuse d’agents pathogènes, ont favorisé la contamination. Et l’Afrique est un continent qui a un lot considérable d’agents infectieux.

Il ne faut d’ailleurs pas oublier qu’Ebola n’est pas le seul fléau en Afrique. Des études ont montré que ce continent concentre 70% des cas de VIH et 90% des cas de choléra. Et 90% des décès de paludisme surviennent en Afrique. Mais il y a aussi toute une conjonction qui fait que c’est un continent malade. La structure sanitaire y est déficitaire, du fait des régimes instables ou des zones de guerre. C’est aussi un territoire de migration. Et encore une fois, les comportements humains sont souvent responsables de la propagation des virus.

Les fléaux médicaux en Afrique en 2012 comparés à l’épidémie d’Ebola en 2014

L’éducation est donc essentielle pour éviter les épidémies ?

L’éducation en général, et l’éducation sanitaire en particulier, joue un rôle fondamental. De simples gestes d’hygiène permettraient de réduire les fléaux médicaux qui touchent l’Afrique. Par exemple, les diarrhées «normales» tuent chaque année des centaines de milliers d’enfants. Se laver les mains permettrait de réduire de 50% le taux de mortalité.

Peut-on comparer le virus Ebola au VIH ?

Ils ont un point commun : la transmission directe interhumaine. Mais Ebola est plus dangereux dans le sens où tous les émonctoires (l’urine, la salive, le liquide séminal…) sont vecteurs de transmission. Le simple fait de toucher le patient est dangereux, ce qui n’est pas le cas avec le sida. Néanmoins, le sida est une maladie chronique de longue durée, tandis qu’Ebola est une maladie très aiguë, avec un très fort taux de mortalité, très rapide. Avec Ebola, l’épidémisation est donc moins forte.

Cette épidémie peut influencer le mode de fonctionnement de la société africaine ?

J’espère en tout cas qu’Ebola servira de déclencheur pour les différents régimes politiques, qu’ils deviendront plus désireux d’investir l’argent dans un système de santé efficace, sans détourner les fonds. J’espère aussi que cette épidémie va faire prendre conscience aux organisations internationales qu’il faut accorder une aide majeure à l’Afrique, et lui apporter une aide logistique et humaine plus importante. On a commencé, mais c’est encore timide.

Pour ce qui est de la société elle-même, des efforts considérables d’information sont à faire. Mais passé une période d’incompréhension et la recherche de responsables (la population met notamment en cause les pouvoirs politiques), la société pourra peut-être aussi changer beaucoup de comportements.

Voir de même:

Peur
Le virus Ebola alimente les théories du complot
Pierre Haski
Rue 89
03/08/2014

Obama veut imposer une « tyrannie médicale » et des médecins apportent la maladie en Afrique. Voilà les explications qui émergent alors que l’épidémie s’amplifie, et menacent prévention et mesures de précaution.

Une épidémie d’une maladie incurable, mystérieuse, alimente toujours les théories du complot ou les thèses farfelues. Ce fut le cas du sida dans les années 80, avant que le monde devienne -hélas- familier de ce virus ; c’est aujourd’hui le cas d’Ebola, qui sévit en Afrique de l’ouest.

Le rapatriement aux Etats-Unis, samedi, d’un médecin américain contaminé par le virus Ebola, a donné un nouvel élan aux amateurs de complots, jouant avec le risque de prolifération de l’épidémie sur le sol américain.

Le Dr Kent Brantly, qui travaillait au Libéria avec les patients d’Ebola, a été contaminé et rapatrié samedi à Atlanta, où il est arrivé revêtu d’un scaphandre de protection, suffisamment fort pour descendre seul de l’ambulance. Une deuxième américaine contaminée devrait être rapatriée dans les prochains jours, dans les mêmes conditions.

« Complot eugéniste et mondialiste »
Dès samedi, l’un des « complotistes » les plus célèbres des Etats-Unis, Alex Jones, qui débusque le « globaliste » derrière chaque geste de l’administration américaine et a l’oreille du « Tea Party », s’en est ému dans une vidéo sur son site Infowars.com et sur YouTube. Il s’insurge :

« Mesdames, Messieurs, c’est sans précédent pour un gouvernement occidental d’amener une personne atteinte de quelque chose d’aussi mortel qu’Ebola dans leur propre pays. (…) C’est le signe qu’on cherche à susciter la terreur et l’effroi, afin d’imposer une tyrannie médicale encore plus forte. »

Pour ce « guerrier de l’info », comme il se décrit, qui n’a pas moins de 250 000 abonnés à son compte Twitter, le virus ne restera pas confiné à l’hôpital et s’échappera. « Il s’agit d’un gouvernement et d’un système politique qui se moquent des gens », accusant les « eugénistes “ et les ‘mondialistes’ de déployer un scénario catastrophe.

Au même moment, pourtant, les autorités américaines expliquent qu’elles ont ramené le Dr Brantly à Atlanta pour lui donner une chance de survivre, en renforçant ses défenses dans l’espoir qu’il surmonte l’attaque du virus. Le taux de mortalité de cette souche d’Ebola n’est ‘que’ de 60% environ, contre plus de 90% pour d’autres épidémies antérieures en Afrique.

Et ils le font dans l’endroit le plus adapté : Atlanta est le siège du Centre de contrôle des maladies infectieuses (CDC) aux Etats-Unis, et de l’un des seuls labos au monde spécialisés dans les virus, un laboratoire de niveau P4, le plus élevé et dans lequel la sécurité est la plus rigoureuse, avec plusieurs sas de décontamination pour s’y déplacer. L’autre labo du même type au monde se trouve … à Lyon.

‘Ebola, Ebola’
Il n’y a pas qu’aux Etats-Unis que la menace d’Ebola suscite fantasmes et peurs quasi-millénaristes : Adam Nossiter, l’envoyé spécial du New York Times racontait il y a quelques jours de Guinée –l’un des pays les plus touchés par Ebola– comment des villageois ont constitué des groupes d’autodéfense pour empêcher les équipes médicales d’approcher. ‘Partout où elles passent, on voit apparaître la maladie’, dit un jeune Guinéen interdisant l’accès de son village.

Son récit se poursuit :

‘Les travailleurs [sanitaires] et les officiels, rendus responsables par des populations en panique pour la propagation du virus, ont été menacés avec des couteaux, des pierres et des machettes, et leurs véhicules ont parfois été entourés par des foules menaçantes. Des barrages de troncs d’arbre interdisent l’accès aux équipes médicales dans les villages où l’on soupçonne la présence du virus. Des villageois malades ou morts, coupés de toute aide médicale, peuvent dès lors infecter d’autres personnes.

C’est très inhabituel, on ne nous fait pas confiance, dit Marc Poncin, coordinateur pour la Guinée de Médecins sans Frontières, le principal groupe luttant contre le virus. Nous ne pouvons pas stopper l’épidémie.’
Le journaliste ajoute que les gens s’enfuient à la vue d’une croix rouge, et crient ‘Ebola, Ebola’ à la vue d’un Occidental. Un homme en train de creuser une tombe pour un patient décédé du virus conclut : ‘nous ne pouvons rien faire, seul Dieu peut nous sauver’.

Sur le site du New Yorker, Richard Preston, auteur d’un livre sur Ebola dont nous avons cité de larges extraits récemment, raconte qu’au Libéria, les malades d’Ebola quittent la capitale, Monrovia, dont le système de santé est dépassé par l’épidémie, et retournent dans leur village d’origine pour consulter des guérisseurs ou simplement rejoindre leurs familles. Au risque de diffuser un peu plus le virus.

Le sida pour ‘décourager les amoureux’
Peurs, fantasmes, parano sont fréquents à chaque nouvelle maladie. Ce fut le cas lors de l’apparition du sida au début des années 80. A Kinshasa, durement touchée par la pandémie, la population n’a pas cru aux explications officielles sur la transmission sexuelle du virus, et avait rebaptisé le sida ‘Syndrome inventé pour décourager les amoureux’… Les églises évangélistes s’en étaient emparées pour parler de ‘punition divine’ et recruter un peu plus de brebis égarées.

Pire, en Afrique du Sud, la méfiance vis-à-vis de la médecine occidentale a gagné jusqu’au Président de l’époque, Thabo Mbeki, qu’on aurait cru plus prudent, et qui avait encouragé le recours à des remèdes traditionnels plutôt que les antirétroviraux qui commençaient à faire leur apparition et ont, depuis, fait leurs preuves. Un temps précieux, et beaucoup de vies humaines, ont été sacrifiés dans cette folie.

Avec le temps, la connaissance de la maladie et de ses modes de transmission a progressé, même s’il reste de nombreuses inégalités dans les accès aux soins.

Bien que le virus ait été identifié en 1976, il y a près de quatre décennies, les épidémies ont été très localisées, et de brève durée. Elle reste donc peu connue en dehors des spécialistes, et surtout entourée d’une réputation terrifiante : pas de remède, fort taux de mortalité, virus mutant…

Avec retard, la mobilisation internationale se met en place pour contenir l’épidémie apparue en Afrique de l’Ouest. L’information des populations n’est pas la tache la moins importante. Même s’il est probable qu’aucun argument rationnel ne pourra convaincre Alex Jones et ses disciples que l’administration Obama, malgré tous ses défauts, n’est pas en train d’importer Ebola pour quelque projet d’eugénisme au sein de la population américaine…

Voir par ailleurs:

Kissing the Corpses in Ebola Country
Ebola victims are most infectious right after death—which means that West African burial practices, where families touch the bodies, are spreading the disease like wildfire.

Abby Hagelage

The Daily beast
08.13.14

From 8 a.m. to midnight, wearing three pairs of gloves, the young men of Sierra Leone bury Ebola casualities. An activity that’s earned the Red Cross recruits an unwelcome designation: The Dead Body Management Team.

Some days, just one call to collect a newly deceased victim comes in from the Kailahun district. Some days, the team receives nine. The calls from medical professionals at isolation centers are met with relief. These bodies have been quarantined. The infection can—with copious amounts of disinfectant (bleach) and meticulous attention to detail—end there. Once cleaned and sealed in two body bags, the corpse will be driven to a fresh row of graves. In gowns, boots, goggles, and masks, the men will lower the body into a 6-foot grave below. In these burials, safety trumps tradition.

The harder phone calls that the Dead Body Management Team receives, and the more dangerous burials they perform, take place in the communities themselves. Here, they must walk a delicate line between allowing the family to perform goodbye rituals and safeguarding the living from infecting themselves. The washing, touching, and kissing of these bodies—typical in many West African burials—can be deadly. But prohibiting communities from properly honoring their dead ones—and thereby worsening their distrust in medical professionals—can be deadly, too.

Insufficient medical care, shortage of supplies, and lack of money are undoubtedly contributing to an epidemic the World Health Organization has a deemed a “national disaster.” But with a death toll now topping 1,000 in four countries, it’s the battle over dead bodies that is fueling it.

***

In the remains of a deceased victim, Ebola lives on. Tears, saliva, urine, blood—all are inundated with a lethal viral load that threatens to steal any life it touches. Fluids outside the body (and in death, there are many) are highly contagious. According to the World Health Organization, they remain so for at least three days.

Dr. Terry O’Sullivan, director of the Center for Emergency Management and Homeland Security Policy Research, spent three years volunteering in Sierra Leone. He hasn’t witnessed an Ebola outbreak directly, but has watched a hemorrhagic fever overtake the body—which he describes in vivid detail. “Those that have just died are teeming with virus, in all their fluids,” says O’Sullivan. “That is in fact the worst point because their immune systems are failed…they are leaking out of every orifice. They are extremely dangerous.” A passage in the 2004 paper Containing a Haemorrhagic Fever Epidemic published in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases paints an even bleaker picture. Citing two specific studies, the authors suggest that a “high concentration of the virus is secreted on the skin of the dead.”

With fluids seeping out of every body opening, and potentially every pore, it’s no mystery why the burial rituals of West Africa pose such a danger. In a pamphlet on safety methods for treating victims of Ebola, The World Health Organization outlines proper procedures to prevent infection from spreading outward from a deceased Ebola victim. “Be aware of the family’s cultural practices and religious beliefs,” the WHO document reads. “Help the family understand why some practices cannot be done because they place the family or others at risk for exposure…explain to the family that viewing the body is not possible.”

Villagers began running from the ambulances, trying to burn down hospitals, and attacking humanitarian workers.

Telling this to the families of deceased is one thing—making sure they understand is entirely another. In Sierra Leone, a country whose literacy rate in 2013 was just over 35 percent, it’s particularly challenging. In neighboring Guinea and Liberia, two places with similar levels of poverty and illiteracy, education alone isn’t a viable solution either.

It’s a phenomenon O’Sullivan witnessed firsthand in Sierra Leone. “People have no idea how infectious diseases work. They see people go into the hospital sick and come out dead—or never come out at all,” he says. “They think if they can avoid the hospital they can survive.” This mistrust of the medical world seems to be validated when a family is prohibited from honoring the dead, participating in the funeral, or even seeing the body.

Prior Ebola outbreaks in Africa, specifically in Uganda in 2000, have yielded similar reactions among afflicted communities. Dr. Barry Hewlett and Dr. Bonnie Hewlett, the first anthropologist to be invited by WHO to join a medical intervention team, studied the Ugandan Ebola outbreak. In a book cataloging their experience—Ebola, Culture, and Politics: The Anthropology of an Emerging Disease— they explore the dangers of African burial rituals, as well as the dangers of prohibiting them.

In the Ugandan ceremonies the Hewletts witnessed, the sister of the deceased’s father is responsible for bathing, cleaning, and dressing the body in a “favorite outfit.” This task, they write, is “too emotionally painful” for the immediate family. In the event that no aunt exists, a female elder in the community takes this role on. The next step, the mourning, is where the real ceremony takes place. “Funerals are major cultural events that can last for days, depending on the status of the deceased person,” they write. As the women “wail” and the men “dance,” the community takes time to “demonstrate care and respect for the dead.” The more important the person, the longer the mourning. When the ceremony is coming to a close, a common bowl is used for ritual hand-washing, and a final touch or kiss on the face of the corpse (which is known as a “a love touch”) is bestowed on the dead. When the ceremony has concluded, the body is buried on land that directly adjoins the deceased’s house because “the family wants the spirit to be happy and not feel forgotten.”

According to the Hewletts’ analysis, these burial rituals and funerals are a critical way for the community to safely transfer the deceased into the afterlife. Prohibiting families from performing such rites is not only viewed as an affront to the deceased, but as actually putting the family in danger. “In the event of an improper burial, the deceased person’s spirit (tibo) will cause harm and illness to the family,” the Hewletts write. In Sierra Leone, O’Sullivan experienced similar sentiments when proper burials were not performed. “It is tragic. In those countries they feel very strongly about being able to say goodbye to their ancestors. To not be able to have that ritual, or treat them with the respect they traditionally give for those who passed away is very difficult,” says O’Sullivan. “Especially in concert with the fear of the disease in general.”

Worse than stopping burial rites, found the Hewletts, is keeping the body (and the burial) hidden. Barring relatives from seeing the dead in Uganda fueled hostility and fear—leading some communities to believe that medical professionals were keeping the corpses for nefarious purposes. A mass graveyard near an airfield—an attempt to remedy the problem by allowing families to see, but not touch, the graves—didn’t help. Villagers began running from the ambulances, trying to burn down hospitals, and attacking humanitarian workers. They feared the disease—but they feared the medicine even more, as well as the people delivering it.

***

In a July 28 interview with ABC News, Dr. Hilde de Clerck of Doctors Without Borders described resistance from residents in Sierra Leone, who, he says, accused him and his colleagues of bringing the disease to the country. “To control the chain of disease transmission it seems we have to earn the trust of nearly every individual in an affected family,” de Clerck said. It is, in this case, a seemingly impossible feat.

There aren’t enough health-care workers in all of West Africa to ensure that community burials are performed safely. There aren’t enough in the world to convince every family that banning such a burial isn’t the work of the devil. “It’s gotten out of control,” says O’Sullivan of this new outbreak. “So many people involved who have responded to this in the past are completely overwhelmed. They can’t get the messages out.” Until the medical community can win the trust of West Africans, the infected will miss their chance at potentially life-saving medicine.

Without it, their family members will likely face the same fate.

Voir aussi:

 As Ebola epidemic tightens grip, west Africa turns to religion for succour
Fears evangelical churches that hold thousands and services promising ‘healing’ could ignite new chains of transmission

Monica Mark, west Africa correspondent

The Guardian

17 October 2014

Every Sunday since she can remember, Annette Sanoh has attended church in Susan’s Bay, a slum of crowded tin-roofed homes in Freetown. Now as the Ebola epidemic mushrooms in the capital of Sierra Leone, Sanoh has started going to church services almost every night.

“I believe we are all in God’s hands now. Business is bad because of this Ebola problem, so rather than sit at home, I prefer to go to church and pray because I don’t know what else we can do,” said Sanoh, a market trader. At the church she attends, a small building jammed between a hairdresser’s and two homes, she first washes her hands in a bucket of chlorinated water before joining hands with fellow church members as they pray together.

“We pray Ebola will not be our portion and we pray for hope,” said Sanoh, as the disease this week reached the last remaining district that hadn’t yet recorded a case.

By any measure, West Africa is deeply religious and the region is home to some of the world’s fastest-growing Muslim and Christian populations. Posters and banners strewn across the city are constant reminders of the hope many find in spirituality amid a fearful and increasingly desperate situation. In one supermarket, a notice asking customers to pray for Ebola to end was taped on to a fridge full of butter. It urged Muslims to recite the alfathia; Christians, Our Father; and Hindus Namaste. “For non-believers, please believe in God. Amen, Amina,” it finished.

But officials have fretted about the impact of influential spiritual leaders, worrying that evangelical churches which sometimes hold thousands of faithful and services promising “healing” could ignite new chains of transmission.

As the outbreak races into its eleventh month, leaving behind almost 4,500 dead across Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, experts have warned that an influx of international aid can only contain the epidemic alongside other measures in communities.

“Control of transmission of Ebola in the community, that’s going to be the key for controlling this epidemic,” said Professor Peter Piot, director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, speaking at Oxford University on Thursday.

“Will it be possible without the vaccine? We really don’t know, because it supposes a massive behavioural change in the community; behavioural change about funeral rites, so people don’t touch dead bodies any longer, in carers, as people could be infected while transporting someone to a hospital.”

But there are signs that messages are filtering through. Some churches are playing a critical role in educating their congregations about the disease, which is spread through direct contact with body fluids of those already showing symptoms.

In Liberia, pastor Amos Teah, said once full pews were now largely empty as members feared gathering in crowds, while he has changed the way he conducts his Methodist church services.

“These days we go to church, we sing, but we no longer carry out the tradition of passing the peace. We no longer shake hands. We are even thinking about using spoons to serve communion … to drop the bread into a person’s palm, avoiding all contacts with that person. The church has placed strong emphasis on prevention,” he said.

Among other changes, women no longer wore veils to church, as they were often shared among churchgoers.

In Guinea, an 85% Muslim country, Abou Fofana said he had stopped going to mosque for another reason. “Even though I survived Ebola, nobody wants to come near me. Even my children have faced problems as a result.”

He said he still continued to pray at home. Like many survivors, he credits his faith in helping him pull through.

At the MSF centre in Sierra Leone’s forested interior of Kailahun, Malcolm Hugo, a psychologist, said he hadn’t been able to find an imam willing to visit the centre. So the church services are “mainly filled with Muslims attending,” said Hugo, one particularly bad afternoon in which several children had died.

Health experts and officials warn that the longer the epidemic is left unchecked, the greater the risk of it spreading to other countries in a region where families extend across porous borders.

However, in one piece of rare good news, the UN health agency officially declared an end on Friday to the Ebola outbreak in Senegal. The WHO commended the country on its “diligence to end the transmission of the virus,” citing Senegal’s quick and thorough response.

A case of Ebola in Senegal was confirmed on 29 August in a young man who had travelled by road to Dakar from Guinea, where he had direct contact with an Ebola patient. By 5 September laboratory samples from the patient tested negative, indicating that he had recovered from Ebola. The declaration from WHO came because Senegal made it past the 42-day mark, which is twice the maximum incubation period for Ebola, without detecting more such cases.

“Senegal’s response is a good example of what to do when faced with an imported case of Ebola,” the WHO said in a statement. “The government’s response plan included identifying and monitoring 74 close contacts of the patient, prompt testing of all suspected cases, stepped-up surveillance at the country’s many entry points and nationwide public awareness campaigns.”

“While the outbreak is now officially over, Senegal’s geographical position makes the country vulnerable to additional imported cases of Ebola virus disease,” WHO said.

Additional reporting by Wade Williams in Monrovia

Voir également:

Why foreign aid and Africa don’t mix
Robert Calderisi, Special to CNN
August 18, 2010

Editor’s note: Robert Calderisi has 30 years of professional experience in international development, including senior positions at the World Bank. He is the author of « The Trouble with Africa: Why Foreign Aid Isn’t Working. » He writes for CNN as part of Africa 50, a special coverage looking at 17 African nations marking 50 years of independence this year.

Friday, Charles Abugre of the UN Millennium Campaign writes for CNN about why aid is important for Africa and how it can be made more effective.

(CNN) — I once asked a president of the Central African Republic, Ange-Félix Patassé, to give up a personal monopoly he held on the distribution of refined oil products in his country.

He was unapologetic. « Do you expect me to lose money in the service of my people? » he replied.

That, in a nutshell, has been the problem of Africa. Very few African governments have been on the same wavelength as Western providers of aid.

Aid, by itself, has never developed anything, but where it has been allied to good public policy, sound economic management, and a strong determination to battle poverty, it has made an enormous difference in countries like India, Indonesia, and even China.

Those examples illustrate another lesson of aid. Where it works, it represents only a very small share of the total resources devoted to improving roads, schools, heath services, and other things essential for raising incomes.

Aid must not overwhelm or displace local efforts; instead, it must settle with being the junior partner.

Because of Africa’s needs, and the stubborn nature of its poverty, the continent has attracted far too much aid and far too much interfering by outsiders.

From the start, Western governments tried hard to work with public agencies, but fairly soon ran up against the obvious limitations of capacity and seriousness of African states.

Early solutions were to pour in « technical assistance, » i.e. foreign advisers who stayed on for years, or to try « enclave » or turn-key projects that would be independent of government action.

More recently, Western agencies have worked with non-government organizations or the private sector. Or, making a virtue of necessity, they have poured large amounts of their assistance directly into government budgets, citing the need for « simplicity » and respect for local « sovereignty. »

Through all of this, the development challenge was always on somebody else’s shoulders and governments have been eager receivers, rather than clear-headed managers of Western generosity.

In the last 20 years, some states — like Ghana, Uganda, Tanzania, Mozambique, and Mali — have broken the mould, recognized the importance of taking charge, and tried to use aid more strategically and efficiently. Some commentators would add Benin, Zambia, and Rwanda to that list.

But most African governments remain stuck in a culture of dependence or indifference. There are still too many dictators in Africa (six have been in office for more than 25 years) and many elected leaders behave no differently.

In Zambia last year, journalist Chansa Kabwela sent photographs of a woman giving birth on the street outside a major hospital (where she had been refused admission) to the president’s office, hoping he would look into why this had happened.

Instead, the president, Rupiah Banda, ordered the journalist prosecuted for promoting pornography. She was later acquitted.

Government callousness is one thing. Discouraging investors is even worse. No aid professional ever suggested that outside help was more important than private effort; on the contrary, foreign aid was intended to help lay the foundations for greater public confidence and private savings and investment.

Few economists thought that aid would create wealth, although most hoped that it would help distribute the benefits of growth more evenly. It was plain that institutions, policy, and individual effort were more important than money.

So, where — despite decades of aid — the conditions for private savings and investment are still forbidding, it is high time we ask ourselves why we are still trying to improve them.

The Blair Commission Report on Africa in 2005 reported that 70,000 trained professionals leave Africa every year, and until they — and the 40 percent of the continent’s savings that are held abroad — start coming home, we need to use aid more restrictively.

An obvious solution is to focus aid on the small number of countries that are trying seriously to fight poverty and corruption. Other countries will need to wait — or settle with only small amounts of aid — until their politics or policies or attitudes to the private sector are more promising.

We should also consider introducing incentives for countries to match outside assistance with greater progress in raising local funds.

President Obama is being criticized for increasing U.S. contributions to the international fight against HIV/AIDS by only two percent, with the result that people in Uganda are already being turned away from clinics and condemned to die.

When challenged, U.S. officials have had a fairly solid answer. Uganda has recently discovered oil and gas deposits but has gone on a spending spree, reportedly ordering fighter planes worth $300 million from Russia, according to a recent report in the New York Times.

Does a government that shows such wanton disregard for common sense or even good taste really have the moral basis for insisting on more help with AIDS?

We must not be distracted by recent news of Africa’s « spectacular » growth and its sudden attractiveness to private investment. Some basic things are changing on the continent, with real effects for the future; above all, Africans are speaking out and refusing to accept tired excuses from their governments.

But the truth is that most of Africa’s growth — based on oil and mineral exports — has not made a whit of difference to the lives of most Africans.

Political freedoms shrank on the continent last year, according to the U.S.-based Freedom House index.

A quarter of school-age children are still not enrolled, according to World Bank statistics; many of those that are, are receiving a very mediocre education. And agricultural productivity — the key to reducing poverty — is essentially stagnant.

The really good news is likely to stay local and seep out in small doses, until it eventually overwhelms the inertia and indifference of governments.

Five years ago, Kenya managed to double its tax revenues because a former businessman, appointed to head the national revenue agency, took a hatchet to the dishonest practices of many tax collectors. He had every reason to do so. Only five percent of Kenya’s budget comes from foreign aid, compared with 40 percent in neighboring countries.

This is a good example of the sometimes-perverse effects of aid, but also of the importance of imagination and individual initiative in promoting a better life for Africans.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Robert Calderisi.

Development aid to Africa
Top 10 « official development assistance » recipients in 2008:

1 Ethiopia $3.327 billion
2 Sudan $2.384 billion
3 Tanzania $2.331 billion
4 Mozambique $1.9994 billion
5 Uganda $1.657 billion
6 DR Cong $1.610 billion
7 Kenya $1.360 billion
8 Egypt $1.348 billion
9 Ghana $1.293 billion
10 Nigeria $1.290 billion

Net official development assistance to Africa in 2008: $44 billion.

Source: Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Voir encore:

Why Foreign Aid Is Hurting Africa
Money from rich countries has trapped many African nations in a cycle of corruption, slower economic growth and poverty. Cutting off the flow would be far more beneficial, says Dambisa Moyo.
Dambisa Moyo
WSJ

March 21, 2009

A month ago I visited Kibera, the largest slum in Africa. This suburb of Nairobi, the capital of Kenya, is home to more than one million people, who eke out a living in an area of about one square mile — roughly 75% the size of New York’s Central Park. It is a sea of aluminum and cardboard shacks that forgotten families call home. The idea of a slum conjures up an image of children playing amidst piles of garbage, with no running water and the rank, rife stench of sewage. Kibera does not disappoint.

What is incredibly disappointing is the fact that just a few yards from Kibera stands the headquarters of the United Nations’ agency for human settlements which, with an annual budget of millions of dollars, is mandated to « promote socially and environmentally sustainable towns and cities with the goal of providing adequate shelter for all. » Kibera festers in Kenya, a country that has one of the highest ratios of development workers per capita. This is also the country where in 2004, British envoy Sir Edward Clay apologized for underestimating the scale of government corruption and failing to speak out earlier.

Giving alms to Africa remains one of the biggest ideas of our time — millions march for it, governments are judged by it, celebrities proselytize the need for it. Calls for more aid to Africa are growing louder, with advocates pushing for doubling the roughly $50 billion of international assistance that already goes to Africa each year.

Yet evidence overwhelmingly demonstrates that aid to Africa has made the poor poorer, and the growth slower. The insidious aid culture has left African countries more debt-laden, more inflation-prone, more vulnerable to the vagaries of the currency markets and more unattractive to higher-quality investment. It’s increased the risk of civil conflict and unrest (the fact that over 60% of sub-Saharan Africa’s population is under the age of 24 with few economic prospects is a cause for worry). Aid is an unmitigated political, economic and humanitarian disaster.

Few will deny that there is a clear moral imperative for humanitarian and charity-based aid to step in when necessary, such as during the 2004 tsunami in Asia. Nevertheless, it’s worth reminding ourselves what emergency and charity-based aid can and cannot do. Aid-supported scholarships have certainly helped send African girls to school (never mind that they won’t be able to find a job in their own countries once they have graduated). This kind of aid can provide band-aid solutions to alleviate immediate suffering, but by its very nature cannot be the platform for long-term sustainable growth.

Whatever its strengths and weaknesses, such charity-based aid is relatively small beer when compared to the sea of money that floods Africa each year in government-to-government aid or aid from large development institutions such as the World Bank.

Over the past 60 years at least $1 trillion of development-related aid has been transferred from rich countries to Africa. Yet real per-capita income today is lower than it was in the 1970s, and more than 50% of the population — over 350 million people — live on less than a dollar a day, a figure that has nearly doubled in two decades.

Even after the very aggressive debt-relief campaigns in the 1990s, African countries still pay close to $20 billion in debt repayments per annum, a stark reminder that aid is not free. In order to keep the system going, debt is repaid at the expense of African education and health care. Well-meaning calls to cancel debt mean little when the cancellation is met with the fresh infusion of aid, and the vicious cycle starts up once again.

In Zambia, former President Frederick Chiluba (with wife Regina in November 2008) has been charged with theft of state funds. AFP/Getty Images
In 2005, just weeks ahead of a G8 conference that had Africa at the top of its agenda, the International Monetary Fund published a report entitled « Aid Will Not Lift Growth in Africa. » The report cautioned that governments, donors and campaigners should be more modest in their claims that increased aid will solve Africa’s problems. Despite such comments, no serious efforts have been made to wean Africa off this debilitating drug.

The most obvious criticism of aid is its links to rampant corruption. Aid flows destined to help the average African end up supporting bloated bureaucracies in the form of the poor-country governments and donor-funded non-governmental organizations. In a hearing before the U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations in May 2004, Jeffrey Winters, a professor at Northwestern University, argued that the World Bank had participated in the corruption of roughly $100 billion of its loan funds intended for development.

As recently as 2002, the African Union, an organization of African nations, estimated that corruption was costing the continent $150 billion a year, as international donors were apparently turning a blind eye to the simple fact that aid money was inadvertently fueling graft. With few or no strings attached, it has been all too easy for the funds to be used for anything, save the developmental purpose for which they were intended.

In Zaire — known today as the Democratic Republic of Congo — Irwin Blumenthal (whom the IMF had appointed to a post in the country’s central bank) warned in 1978 that the system was so corrupt that there was « no (repeat, no) prospect for Zaire’s creditors to get their money back. » Still, the IMF soon gave the country the largest loan it had ever given an African nation. According to corruption watchdog agency Transparency International, Mobutu Sese Seko, Zaire’s president from 1965 to 1997, is reputed to have stolen at least $5 billion from the country.

It’s scarcely better today. A month ago, Malawi’s former President Bakili Muluzi was charged with embezzling aid money worth $12 million. Zambia’s former President Frederick Chiluba (a development darling during his 1991 to 2001 tenure) remains embroiled in a court case that has revealed millions of dollars frittered away from health, education and infrastructure toward his personal cash dispenser. Yet the aid keeps on coming.

A nascent economy needs a transparent and accountable government and an efficient civil service to help meet social needs. Its people need jobs and a belief in their country’s future. A surfeit of aid has been shown to be unable to help achieve these goals.

A constant stream of « free » money is a perfect way to keep an inefficient or simply bad government in power. As aid flows in, there is nothing more for the government to do — it doesn’t need to raise taxes, and as long as it pays the army, it doesn’t have to take account of its disgruntled citizens. No matter that its citizens are disenfranchised (as with no taxation there can be no representation). All the government really needs to do is to court and cater to its foreign donors to stay in power.

Stuck in an aid world of no incentives, there is no reason for governments to seek other, better, more transparent ways of raising development finance (such as accessing the bond market, despite how hard that might be). The aid system encourages poor-country governments to pick up the phone and ask the donor agencies for next capital infusion. It is no wonder that across Africa, over 70% of the public purse comes from foreign aid.

In Ethiopia, where aid constitutes more than 90% of the government budget, a mere 2% of the country’s population has access to mobile phones. (The African country average is around 30%.) Might it not be preferable for the government to earn money by selling its mobile phone license, thereby generating much-needed development income and also providing its citizens with telephone service that could, in turn, spur economic activity?

Look what has happened in Ghana, a country where after decades of military rule brought about by a coup, a pro-market government has yielded encouraging developments. Farmers and fishermen now use mobile phones to communicate with their agents and customers across the country to find out where prices are most competitive. This translates into numerous opportunities for self-sustainability and income generation — which, with encouragement, could be easily replicated across the continent.

To advance a country’s economic prospects, governments need efficient civil service. But civil service is naturally prone to bureaucracy, and there is always the incipient danger of self-serving cronyism and the desire to bind citizens in endless, time-consuming red tape. What aid does is to make that danger a grim reality. This helps to explain why doing business across much of Africa is a nightmare. In Cameroon, it takes a potential investor around 426 days to perform 15 procedures to gain a business license. What entrepreneur wants to spend 119 days filling out forms to start a business in Angola? He’s much more likely to consider the U.S. (40 days and 19 procedures) or South Korea (17 days and 10 procedures).

Even what may appear as a benign intervention on the surface can have damning consequences. Say there is a mosquito-net maker in small-town Africa. Say he employs 10 people who together manufacture 500 nets a week. Typically, these 10 employees support upward of 15 relatives each. A Western government-inspired program generously supplies the affected region with 100,000 free mosquito nets. This promptly puts the mosquito net manufacturer out of business, and now his 10 employees can no longer support their 150 dependents. In a couple of years, most of the donated nets will be torn and useless, but now there is no mosquito net maker to go to. They’ll have to get more aid. And African governments once again get to abdicate their responsibilities.

In a similar vein has been the approach to food aid, which historically has done little to support African farmers. Under the auspices of the U.S. Food for Peace program, each year millions of dollars are used to buy American-grown food that has to then be shipped across oceans. One wonders how a system of flooding foreign markets with American food, which puts local farmers out of business, actually helps better Africa. A better strategy would be to use aid money to buy food from farmers within the country, and then distribute that food to the local citizens in need.

Then there is the issue of « Dutch disease, » a term that describes how large inflows of money can kill off a country’s export sector, by driving up home prices and thus making their goods too expensive for export. Aid has the same effect. Large dollar-denominated aid windfalls that envelop fragile developing economies cause the domestic currency to strengthen against foreign currencies. This is catastrophic for jobs in the poor country where people’s livelihoods depend on being relatively competitive in the global market.

To fight aid-induced inflation, countries have to issue bonds to soak up the subsequent glut of money swamping the economy. In 2005, for example, Uganda was forced to issue such bonds to mop up excess liquidity to the tune of $700 million. The interest payments alone on this were a staggering $110 million, to be paid annually.

The stigma associated with countries relying on aid should also not be underestimated or ignored. It is the rare investor that wants to risk money in a country that is unable to stand on its own feet and manage its own affairs in a sustainable way.

Africa remains the most unstable continent in the world, beset by civil strife and war. Since 1996, 11 countries have been embroiled in civil wars. According to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, in the 1990s, Africa had more wars than the rest of the world combined. Although my country, Zambia, has not had the unfortunate experience of an outright civil war, growing up I experienced first-hand the discomfort of living under curfew (where everyone had to be in their homes between 6 p.m. and 6 a.m., which meant racing from work and school) and faced the fear of the uncertain outcomes of an attempted coup in 1991 — sadly, experiences not uncommon to many Africans.

Civil clashes are often motivated by the knowledge that by seizing the seat of power, the victor gains virtually unfettered access to the package of aid that comes with it. In the last few months alone, there have been at least three political upheavals across the continent, in Mauritania, Guinea and Guinea Bissau (each of which remains reliant on foreign aid). Madagascar’s government was just overthrown in a coup this past week. The ongoing political volatility across the continent serves as a reminder that aid-financed efforts to force-feed democracy to economies facing ever-growing poverty and difficult economic prospects remain, at best, precariously vulnerable. Long-term political success can only be achieved once a solid economic trajectory has been established.

“ The 1970s were an exciting time to be African. Many of our nations had just achieved independence, and with that came a deep sense of dignity, self-respect and hope for the future. ”

Proponents of aid are quick to argue that the $13 billion ($100 billion in today’s terms) aid of the post-World War II Marshall Plan helped pull back a broken Europe from the brink of an economic abyss, and that aid could work, and would work, if Africa had a good policy environment.

The aid advocates skirt over the point that the Marshall Plan interventions were short, sharp and finite, unlike the open-ended commitments which imbue governments with a sense of entitlement rather than encouraging innovation. And aid supporters spend little time addressing the mystery of why a country in good working order would seek aid rather than other, better forms of financing. No country has ever achieved economic success by depending on aid to the degree that many African countries do.

The good news is we know what works; what delivers growth and reduces poverty. We know that economies that rely on open-ended commitments of aid almost universally fail, and those that do not depend on aid succeed. The latter is true for economically successful countries such as China and India, and even closer to home, in South Africa and Botswana. Their strategy of development finance emphasizes the important role of entrepreneurship and markets over a staid aid-system of development that preaches hand-outs.

African countries could start by issuing bonds to raise cash. To be sure, the traditional capital markets of the U.S. and Europe remain challenging. However, African countries could explore opportunities to raise capital in more non-traditional markets such as the Middle East and China (whose foreign exchange reserves are more than $4 trillion). Moreover, the current market malaise provides an opening for African countries to focus on acquiring credit ratings (a prerequisite to accessing the bond markets), and preparing themselves for the time when the capital markets return to some semblance of normalcy.

Governments need to attract more foreign direct investment by creating attractive tax structures and reducing the red tape and complex regulations for businesses. African nations should also focus on increasing trade; China is one promising partner. And Western countries can help by cutting off the cycle of giving something for nothing. It’s time for a change.

Dambisa Moyo, a former economist at Goldman Sachs, is the author of « Dead Aid: Why Aid Is Not Working and How There Is a Better Way for Africa. »

Corrections & Amplifications

In the African nations of Burkina Faso, Rwanda, Somalia, Mali, Chad, Mauritania and Sierra Leone from 1970 to 2002, over 70% of total government spending came from foreign aid, according to figures from the World Bank. This essay on foreign aid to Africa incorrectly said that 70% of government spending throughout Africa comes from foreign aid.

Voir de même:

This Is Why Americans Are Donating Less To Fight Ebola Than Other Recent Disasters
Associated Press
10/16/2014

NEW YORK (AP) — Individual Americans, rich or not, donated generously in response to many recent international disasters, including the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and last year’s Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. The response to the Ebola epidemic is far less robust, and experts are wondering why.

There have been some huge gifts from American billionaires — $50 million from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, $11.9 million from Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen’s foundation, and a $25 million gift this week from Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan. Their beneficiaries included the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization and the U.S. Fund for UNICEF.

But the flow of smaller donations has been relatively modest.

The American Red Cross, for example, received a $2.8 million share of Allen’s donations. But Jana Sweeny, the charity’s director of international communications, said that’s been supplemented by only about $100,000 in gifts from other donors. By comparison, the Red Cross received more than $85 million in response to Typhoon Haiyan.

« After the typhoon, we got flooded with calls asking, ‘How do I give?' » Sweeny said. « With this (Ebola), we’re not getting those kinds of requests. »

Why the difference? For starters, it’s been evident that national governments will need to shoulder the bulk of the financial burden in combatting Ebola, particularly as its ripple effects are increasingly felt beyond the epicenter in West Africa.

Regine A. Webster of the Center for Disaster Philanthropy, which advises nonprofits on disaster response strategies, said the epidemic blurred the lines in terms of the categories that guide some big donors.

« This is a confusing issue for the private donor community — is it a disaster, or a health problem? » Webster said. « Institutions and individuals have been quite slow to respond. »

Officials at InterAction, an umbrella group for U.S. relief agencies active abroad, see other intangible factors at work, including the video and photographic images emerging from West Africa. Joel Charny, InterAction’s vice president for humanitarian policy, said it was clear from the imagery out of Haiti and the Philippines that donations could help rebuild shattered homes and schools, while the images of Ebola are more frightening and less conducive to envisioning a happy ending.

« People give when they see that there’s a plausible solution, » Charny said. « They can say, ‘If I give my $50 or $200, it’s going to translate in some tangible way into relieving suffering.’ … That makes them feel good. »

« With Ebola, there’s kind of a fear factor, » he said. « Even competent agencies are feeling somewhat overwhelmed, and the nature of the disease — being so awful — makes it hard for people to engage. »

Gary Shaye, senior director for emergency operations with Save The Children, suggested that donors were moved to help after recent typhoons, tsunamis and earthquakes because of huge death tolls reported in the first wave of news reports. The Ebola death toll, in contrast, has been rising alarmingly but gradually over several months.

Like other organizations fighting Ebola, Save the Children is trying to convey to donors that it urgently needs private gifts — cherished because they can be used flexibly — regardless of how much government funding is committed.

« We need both — it’s not either/or, » said Shaye. He said Save the Children was particularly reliant on private funding to underwrite child-protection work in the three worst-hit countries — Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone — where many children have been isolated and stigmatized after their parents or other relatives got Ebola.

By last count, Shaye said, Save the Children had collected about $500,000 in private gifts earmarked for the Ebola crisis.

« We’re proud that we raised $500,000 — but we’re talking about millions in needs that we will have, » he said.

Another group working on the front lines in West Africa is the Los Angeles-based International Medical Corps, which runs a treatment center in Liberia and plans to open one soon in Sierra Leone.

Rebecca Milner, a vice president of the corps, said it had been a struggle to raise awareness when Ebola-related fundraising efforts began in earnest in midsummer.

« It took a while before people began to respond, but now there’s definitely increased concern, » she said.

Thus far, Milner said, gifts and pledges earmarked for the Ebola response have totaled about $2.5 million — compared with about $6 million that her organization received in the first three months after the Haiti earthquake.

Among the groups most heartened by donor response is Doctors without Borders, which is widely credited with mounting the most extensive operations of any non-governmental organization in the Ebola-stricken region.

Thomas Kurmann, director of development for the organization’s U.S. branch, said American donors had given $7 million earmarked for the Ebola response, a portion of the roughly $40 million donated worldwide.

« It’s very good news, » Kurmann said. « There’s been significantly increased interest in the past three months. »

Doctors Without Borders said this week that 16 of its staff members have been infected with Ebola and nine have died.

A smaller nonprofit, North Carolina-based SIM USA, found itself in the headlines in August and September, when two of its American health workers were infected with Ebola in Liberia. Both survived.

SIM’s vice president for finance and operations, George Salloum, said the missionary organization — which typically gets $50 million a year in donations — received several hundred thousand dollars in gifts specifically linked to those Ebola developments.

Even as the crisis worsens, Salloum said nonprofits active in the Ebola zone need to be thinking long-term.

« At some point, we’ll be beyond the epidemic, » he said. « Then the challenge will be how to deal with the aftermath, when thousands of people have been killed. What about the elders, the children? There will be a lot of work for years. »

Support UNICEF’s efforts to combat Ebola through the fundraising widget below.

Voir enfin:

‘SNL’ Has One of the Year’s Most Surprisingly Sharp Critiques of Poverty Aid in Africa
Zak Cheney-Rice

Mic

October 15, 2014

Saturday Night Live still manages to surprise once in a while. The long-running sketch comedy show has drawn criticism for its lack of diversity and questionable joke decisions of late, but this past weekend saw its satirical gears in rare form:

The sketch features guest host Bill Hader as Charles Daniels, a soft-voiced, thick-bearded incarnation of a common late night infomercial trope, the philanthropy fund spokesperson. The clip opens with shots of an unnamed African village, where residents pass the time by gazing longingly into the camera and dolefully stirring pots of stew.

« For only 39 cents a day, » Daniels says to his viewers, « you can provide water, food and medicine for these people … That’s less than a small cup of coffee. »

« Ask for more, » whispers a villager played by Jay Pharoah. « Why you starting so low? »

So begins a three-minute interrogation around why this « cheap-ass white man » is asking for so little money — « [the] number has been decided by very educated and caring people, » Daniels claims — and more importantly, why he thinks throwing money at this problem will solve it in the first place.

The sketch ends with Daniels’ implied abduction, along with demands for a larger sum in exchange for his release. The question of where he’s getting a 39-cent cup of coffee remains unanswered.

While it’s unclear why the black performers are talking like they’re in a Good Times parody, the sketch brings up some valid political points. For one, the long-term effectiveness of foreign aid has been questioned for years, with critics at outlets ranging from CNN to the Wall Street Journal claiming it can foster a relationship of « dependence » while ultimately providing cosmetic solutions that fail to address systemic issues.

Even CARE, one of the biggest charities in the world, rejected $45 million a year in federal funding in 2007 because American food aid was so « plagued with inefficiencies » as to be detrimental, according to the New York Times (by the same token, many such organizations disagree).

SNL illustrates this perfectly when Daniels implies the villagers are ungrateful when they ask for more. « You know, for a starving village, you people have a lot of energy, » he says.

The sketch also touches on monolithic Western views of African diversity: When the villagers ask Daniels which country he thinks he’s in, he simply responds, « Africa. »

Considering SNL’s less than sterling record on racial humor, the overall pointedness of this skit is a pleasant surprise. Best-case scenario, it indicates that producer Lorne Michaels’ recent emphasis on casting and writer diversity is incrementally starting to pay dividends.


Rockers dépendants: faut-il les prendre chez soi ? (Aging rockers: How far can you take youthful rebellion and age denial when you’re way past your expiration date and qualify for senior discounts?)

20 janvier, 2014
https://fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/t1/q71/1604780_10151906148861219_1924074961_n.jpgHope I die before I get old. (…) Why don’t you all fade away ? The Who
Please join me and all our brothers and sisters in global civil society in proclaiming our rejection of Apartheid in Israel and occupied Palestine, by pledging not to perform or exhibit in Israel or accept any award or funding from any institution linked to the government of Israel, until such time as Israel complies with international law and universal principles of human rights. Roger Waters
I have absolutely one rule, right? Until I see an Arab country, a Muslim country, with a democracy, I won’t understand how anyone can have a problem with how they [the Palestinians] are treated.  Johnny « Rotten » Lydon
We’ve arrived at this happy situation for several reasons, among them the growing realization, as articulated by John Lydon, that there is something absurd about boycotting Israel when the states that surround it engage in egregious human rights violations. Waters won’t play in Israel, but he was quite happy to play in Dubai in 2007 – an Arab city almost entirely built by slave labor imported from Muslim countries like Pakistan and Bangladesh. If other stars grasp the appalling hypocrisy this represents, then having Roger Waters indulge his hatred of Israel at every opportunity is a price worth paying. Ben Cohen
It’s like hearing that your grandparents still have sex: bully for them, but spare us the details. (…) After 40, it’s time to lose the sequins, unless you’re Liberace. The NYT
I hate the idea of attending a show just for the morbidity factor: ‘This guy is so old /so ill we might not see him again.’ Marianne
I will donate $1,000 to #121212Concert if Roger Daltry  buttons his shirt. Alan Zweibel (comedy writer, 62)
Rock stars, after all, face the same battles with crow’s feet and sagging jowls that everyone else eventually does. But their visible aging happens under the microscope, and seems somehow more tragic since they toil in a business built on youthful rebellion, and contrasts so sharply with our shared cultural images of them, frozen in youthful glory. The issue takes on added relevance for graying fans from the baby boom and Generation X who grew up taking style cues from these rock heroes (and continue to make geriatric acts like Bruce Springsteen and Roger Waters some of the biggest draws in the concert business). If rock immortals can’t accept with a certain grace the ravages of time, what does this portend for the rest of us? Perhaps this is why so many of the concert’s 19 million American viewers turned into fashion critics during the show, zapping the rockers on blogs and Twitter not just for looking old, but for their occasionally clumsy efforts to appear young. The quickest route to ridicule, it seems, is for aging rockers to proceed as if nothing has changed. The truth is, years have passed, and to deny this is a form of visual dishonesty. With his shirt thrown open during a rousing rendition of “Baba O’Riley” Mr. Daltrey — a specimen for his age, to be sure — unfortunately invited comparisons to his groupie-magnet self from the “Tommy” era. In doing so, he violated an obvious dictum for seniors: keep your clothes on in public. But he is not the only offender. At 65, Iggy Pop still takes the stage wearing no shirt, just jeans, as if it’s 1972. It’s not that his body is not freakishly impressive for a man his age. Aside from a few sags and bulging veins, his torso generally looks as lithe as a Joffrey dancer’s. The problem is not the image itself, so much as the image suggested, as if these aging sex symbols are still attracting hordes of groupies to the cozy confines of their tour buses. That may well be true, of course, but when these flesh-baring rockers are men of Viagra-taking age, that’s a visual most people could do without. It’s like hearing that your grandparents still have sex: bully for them, but spare us the details. Hair is complicated for seemingly anyone over 40 — to dye or not to dye, that is question. But it is a tougher call for rock stars like Mr. Bon Jovi, whose hair has always been a key element of his brand. If, one day, the pop-metal crooner were to appear singing “Lay Your Hands on Me” sporting a professor emeritus shock of white hair, as the fellow “12-12-12” performer Mr. Waters of Pink Floyd did, would anyone heed his siren call? (I guess we should be grateful that Mr. Bon Jovi hasn’t gone the route of Roy Orbison, who maintained his jet-black coif well into his 50s, giving him the unfortunate look of an aging blackjack dealer at a lesser Vegas casino.) Given the raised eyebrows that Mr. Jagger and Mr. McCartney attract with their ever-chocolate locks (though at least Mr. Jagger’s wrinkled magnificence suggested his face had been untouched by a surgeon’s blade), it is no wonder the new tonsorial compromise of choice for aging rockers is strategic baldness. A close-cropped buzz cut or shaven head simply erases all visible evidence of follicular aging, as well as lending them a vague bouncerish tough guy appeal. It works for Phil Collins, Moby and Seal. With his shaved head, Paul Shaffer, the David Letterman foil, looked nearly as age-ambiguous playing piano behind Adam Sandler on the comedian’s “Hallelujah” parody during the “12-12-12” as he did playing in the “Saturday Night Live” house band in the late ’70s. It would have worked for Michael Stipe, too, if he hadn’t chosen to tarnish the effect with a silver Robert E. Lee beard. Ultimately, there is little to be done about graying temples or sagging jowls (short of medical intervention, anyway). This leaves clothing as the prime area for rock stars to experiment with age denial, without looking plastic. Most fading rock gods seem to intuit that overly sexualized stage outfits turn into clown costumes after a certain age. David Lee Roth, who scissor-kicked his way through the ’80s in skintight tiger-stripe jumpsuits, took the stage on a recent Van Halen tour dressed more like a groom atop a biker wedding cake: black leather pants, shiny blue shirt, black pinstripe vest. Take a lesson from Eric Clapton and his well-fitting suits: after 40, it’s time to lose the sequins, unless you’re Liberace. Sometimes, though, even a keen fashion sense is not enough to ward off the jibes. At the “12-12-12” concert, Mick Jagger took the stage in a subtly snazzy gray python jacket, a Bordeaux taffeta shirt and black jeans. The jacket and shirt, designed by his longtime companion L’Wren Scott, were a far cry from his sequined jumpsuits of the ’70s, but that did not stop the wisecracks. “Mick Jagger looks like your aunt trying to be cool at a wedding,” tweeted Gregg Hughes, known as “Opie,” the SiriusXM radio shock-jock. But Mr. Jagger, who at 69 still bounds and gyrates through unimaginably athletic, 2 1/2-hour sets, has a built-in response at the ready. As he put it long ago, “Anything worth doing is worth overdoing.” The NYT
Unlike the bluntly bluesy garage-band sound of the Stones, Mr. Fagen’s music is a rich-textured, harmonically oblique amalgam of rock, jazz and soul. It is, in a word, music for grown-ups—with lyrics to match. What is especially interesting about Mr. Fagen, though, is that unlike most of his contemporaries, he has always made music for grown-ups. Steely Dan, the group that he co-founded with Walter Becker in 1972, never did go in for kid stuff, and doesn’t now. Jazz heavies like Wayne Shorter and Phil Woods have long popped up from time to time on Steely Dan’s albums, playing solos that don’t sound even slightly out of place. Needless to say, musical complexity is not the same thing as maturity. What makes Mr. Fagen’s music stand out is its coolly detached point of view. He knows full well that the narrator of « Slinky Thing » is a comic figure and deserves to be. Nor does he lapse into the breast-baring confessionalism that is the blight of second-rate singer-songwriters. He’s a portrait artist, and even when the subject is himself, he wields a razor-sharp brush. Mr. Fagen, who turns 65 on Thursday, is about the same age as the 69-year-old Mr. Jagger. The difference is that he acts his age. Wall Street Journal contributor Marc Myers put it well when he wrote on JazzWax, his blog, that Mr. Fagen’s music « fully embraces the male aging process, which is what makes him cool. » The WSJ
Does the music of protest have to be accompanied by bounding across the stage, gyrations and age-denying cosmetic interventions? This is not a remote issue: the “You are My Sunshine” days of sing-along music activities in long-term care settings are coming to an end. We need to think about how the next wave may want to spend their time enjoying music in groups when they are not listening to iPods or rock wall climbing. (…) Let me introduce the concept of “trait transformation” as a proposed solution that allows aging boomers to rock on without engaging in age denial. This finding in developmental psychology helps to explain how people develop and get more complex, but stay the same person. Trait transformation is the process that takes place as a result of development and maturation when a lifelong trait changes how it appears in a person’s behavior. For example, infants who were very good at following a moving picture of a human face were superior socializers at three months, but then they didn’t seem to want to follow the picture anymore. They had moved on; the trait that was being measured had transformed from tracking a picture to interacting with a human being. The Experience Corps is full of retirees who use their traits to help others although they no longer work in their old jobs. If the music boomers grew up on is still meaningful, then enjoying its essence—its many meanings—as we age will have to be available without the distractions of age-denying cosmetic overlays that the stars use. Rockers can get old and still rock on, and that will be the “new normal.” The message of the ’60s and ’70s was not about only about sexual revolution and protest, it also was about protesting the status quo that limits the diversity of individual expression of who we were and what we could become, aging rockers have much to contribute to how boomers will experience aging. If they would only accept that they don’t have to deny their aging to be relevant. For many of their aging fans, the next era of life will depart from the conformity that an ageist, declinist approach to aging dictates. You won’t need to take off your shirt or dye your hair to be an icon of cool aging or to sing songs about what was (and is) important. Because what’s cool looks different as a person ages, but cool remains a trait. Judah L. Ronch
All those matey thumbs-up gestures and ghastly peace signs. All that dated slang and frankly feeble inter-song patter. There’s an argument for saying that Paul was always that way. But the difference was that back in the Sixties that gawky lack of street cred seemed puppyishly charming. Now it looks lame and desperate – a sixtyish man trying unsuccessfully to show he’s still one of the lads. What you also notice – and this annoyance is by no means confined to Macca – is how very different the song you’re hearing sounds from the one on your old LPs. As a diehard fan – and you wouldn’t be there if you weren’t a diehard fan – you want your favourite hits to be played exactly as they are on the record. Yet the ageing rocker gives you anything but. First, he can’t hit the high notes like he once could. Second, he has played this song so many times before that he finds it demeaning and boring to do it in the old-fashioned way. Instead, he wants to show you how adventurous and inventive he still is 30 or 40 years on. And if you don’t like it – well, tough, because he’s the star and you’re not, and you should be damn grateful he’s playing it at all. Bob Dylan is a particular master of this art. I remember watching him play a set of classics including Lay, Lady, Lay, Like A Rolling Stone, and Mr Tambourine Man – and the only reason I discovered which songs they were was because I asked the person next to me. (…) But what it does mean is that the version we’ll always have in our heads is the pristine studio version from the original album, recorded when Robert Plant was a snake-hipped, leather-larynxed rock god of 23. What we don’t want to hear is the version he sang on Monday at the age of 59, when the Valkyrie shrieking of yore sounded more like a rutting bull moose. And lyrics such as « If there’s a bustle in your hedgerow don’t be alarmed now – it’s just a spring clean for the May Queen » sound a little undignified for a man well on the way to his free bus pass. It’s a cliche that rock ‘n’ roll is a young man’s game. But it’s a cliche because it’s true. Try, if you can, to think of a single rock act which has made a half-way decent album past the age of 35. I can think of only one, Johnny Cash, who actually got better the more he began resembling the Old Testament prophet he was so clearly born to be. For the majority of rock acts – harsh but true – by far the more sensible course of action if you want to be viewed kindly by posterity is to get yourself killed tragically young. (…) « Ah, but what of the Rolling Stones? » some will ask. Aren’t they still going strong after all these years? Well, up to point. But the reason we queue to see them today has less to do with their continued greatness than the extraordinary freak-show value that a band with the combined age of Methuselah can yet go on performing without the aid of respirators and cardiac nurses. Pete Townshend had it right, of course, when in 1965 he wrote « Hope I die before I get old » – lines he has lived increasingly to regret the older he has grown. Perhaps it would be too much to ask for an official culling system to be introduced, in the manner of the science fiction film Logan’s Run, where all rock stars are quietly exterminated at the age of 30. But surely they owe it to their fans and their own sense of dignity to realise when enough is enough? It’s not as though they got a particularly raw deal in life. Long before middle age, they have earned more money and enjoyed more sex than most of us could manage in several lifetimes. In return, they should accept that part of the package includes early retirement. The Daily Mail

A l’heure où, entre deux concerts anti-Israël, nos rockers viellissants ont du mal à s’assumer seuls, la question de les accueillir à notre domicile peut se poser.

Mais attention, il faut y être prêt.

Quelques conseils glanés dans la presse anglo-saxonne …

God save us from ageing rockers!

The Daily Mail

Led Zeppelin were the greatest rock band in the universe: so loud, raunchy and virile they made the Rolling Stones look like Trappist monks; so epic, majestic and inventive they made The Beatles sound like choirboys.

They were so rich, extravagant and outrageous with their private jets and TVs-chucked-from-hotel-bedrooms that they made the meanest gangsta rappers look like Steptoe and Son.

But note that use of the past tense. Led Zeppelin were the greatest rock band in the world.

But they’re not any more. Not by a mile – as the more honest among the 20,000 punters who saw them perform at London’s O2 Arena on Monday night ought surely now to have the good sense to admit.

No matter how proficient Robert Plant, Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones, the three survivors of the Seventies’ heyday, played, no matter how good it is to see them back on stage still breathing and vaguely compos mentis, there is something deeply sad and unedifying about rockers who go on rocking past their natural sell-by date.

It was something I noticed a few years ago, seeing Paul McCartney trotting through his old hits at the Glastonbury festival.

Your immediate response is pure jubilation: « I’m standing here watching Eleanor Rigby and Penny Lane being performed by the actual Beatle who wrote them! » you think.

It isn’t long, though, before the niggling doubts creep in.

You notice, for example, how painfully and embarrassingly uncool this alleged rock legend is.

All those matey thumbs-up gestures and ghastly peace signs. All that dated slang and frankly feeble inter-song patter.

There’s an argument for saying that Paul was always that way. But the difference was that back in the Sixties that gawky lack of street cred seemed puppyishly charming.

Now it looks lame and desperate – a sixtyish man trying unsuccessfully to show he’s still one of the lads.

What you also notice – and this annoyance is by no means confined to Macca – is how very different the song you’re hearing sounds from the one on your old LPs.

As a diehard fan – and you wouldn’t be there if you weren’t a diehard fan – you want your favourite hits to be played exactly as they are on the record.

Yet the ageing rocker gives you anything but. First, he can’t hit the high notes like he once could.

Second, he has played this song so many times before that he finds it demeaning and boring to do it in the old-fashioned way.

Instead, he wants to show you how adventurous and inventive he still is 30 or 40 years on.

And if you don’t like it – well, tough, because he’s the star and you’re not, and you should be damn grateful he’s playing it at all.

Bob Dylan is a particular master of this art. I remember watching him play a set of classics including Lay, Lady, Lay, Like A Rolling Stone, and Mr Tambourine Man – and the only reason I discovered which songs they were was because I asked the person next to me.

If you’re really unlucky, your ageing rock band will have a new record to promote – as The Eagles had recently with their flabby, eco-breast-beating, sublimely awful Long Road Out Of Eden.

For every song you want to hear, there’ll be another introduced by those dread words « and here’s one from the new album ».

And you have to listen politely, and applaud enthusiastically at the end, when all you’re really thinking throughout is: « Oh, for Heaven’s sake! Get on and play Ziggy Stardust/Hotel California/Sympathy For The Devil/Stairway To Heaven will you? »

Ah yes, Led Zeppelin’s Stairway To Heaven. Let us suppose, as many think, that it really is the greatest rock song ever written.

Is that sufficient justification for its three surviving originators – one now looking like an accountant, one like a Muppet in a white fright wig, one like the Cowardly Lion from The Wizard Of Oz – to creak back on stage and play it not quite as excitingly as they could in 1971, 1972 or 1973 for an audience of mostly staid, pot-bellied, middle-aged men in a smokeless environment named after a mobile phone company?

And if they insist on doing so, shouldn’t it be renamed Stannah Stairlift To Heaven?

The only proper place for Stairway To Heaven to be played live by Led Zeppelin today is in the fond, addled memories of ageing hippies.

This might seem harsh on people such as me, too young to have caught Led Zep in their heyday.

But what it does mean is that the version we’ll always have in our heads is the pristine studio version from the original album, recorded when Robert Plant was a snake-hipped, leather-larynxed rock god of 23.

What we don’t want to hear is the version he sang on Monday at the age of 59, when the Valkyrie shrieking of yore sounded more like a rutting bull moose.

And lyrics such as « If there’s a bustle in your hedgerow don’t be alarmed now – it’s just a spring clean for the May Queen » sound a little undignified for a man well on the way to his free bus pass.

It’s a cliche that rock ‘n’ roll is a young man’s game. But it’s a cliche because it’s true.

Try, if you can, to think of a single rock act which has made a half-way decent album past the age of 35.

I can think of only one, Johnny Cash, who actually got better the more he began resembling the Old Testament prophet he was so clearly born to be.

For the majority of rock acts – harsh but true – by far the more sensible course of action if you want to be viewed kindly by posterity is to get yourself killed tragically young.

Would we revere Marc Bolan nearly so much if he hadn’t driven into that tree? Would we Hell. As it was, he could barely play three chords.

« Ah, but what of the Rolling Stones? » some will ask. Aren’t they still going strong after all these years?

Well, up to point. But the reason we queue to see them today has less to do with their continued greatness than the extraordinary freak-show value that a band with the combined age of Methuselah can yet go on performing without the aid of respirators and cardiac nurses.

Pete Townshend had it right, of course, when in 1965 he wrote « Hope I die before I get old » – lines he has lived increasingly to regret the older he has grown.

Perhaps it would be too much to ask for an official culling system to be introduced, in the manner of the science fiction film Logan’s Run, where all rock stars are quietly exterminated at the age of 30.

But surely they owe it to their fans and their own sense of dignity to realise when enough is enough? It’s not as though they got a particularly raw deal in life.

Long before middle age, they have earned more money and enjoyed more sex than most of us could manage in several lifetimes. In return, they should accept that part of the package includes early retirement.

Voir aussi:

The Music Is Timeless, but About the Rockers …

Alex Williams

The New York Times

December 19, 2012

THERE was Roger Daltrey, 68, with his open shirt revealing a Palm Beach perma-tan, and abs so snare-tight that they immediately raised suspicion. (“Implants!” charged a few skeptical members of the Twittersphere.)

There was Jon Bon Jovi, 50, with his flowing mane now a shade of coppery gold that only a hairdresser could love.

There was Paul McCartney, 70, with his unlined face retaining an eerie degree of his Beatlemania-era boyishness.

Last week’s star-studded “12-12-12” concert — a showcase of retirement-age rock icons like the Rolling Stones, the Who and Eric Clapton — not only raised millions to benefit victims of Hurricane Sandy, but as the “the largest collection of old English musicians ever assembled in Madison Square Garden,” as Mick Jagger joked onstage, it also inspired viewer debate about whether is it possible to look cool and rebellious after 50 without looking foolish?

Rock stars, after all, face the same battles with crow’s feet and sagging jowls that everyone else eventually does. But their visible aging happens under the microscope, and seems somehow more tragic since they toil in a business built on youthful rebellion, and contrasts so sharply with our shared cultural images of them, frozen in youthful glory.

The issue takes on added relevance for graying fans from the baby boom and Generation X who grew up taking style cues from these rock heroes (and continue to make geriatric acts like Bruce Springsteen and Roger Waters some of the biggest draws in the concert business). If rock immortals can’t accept with a certain grace the ravages of time, what does this portend for the rest of us?

Perhaps this is why so many of the concert’s 19 million American viewers turned into fashion critics during the show, zapping the rockers on blogs and Twitter not just for looking old, but for their occasionally clumsy efforts to appear young.

“I want to re-knight Sir Paul for those next-level dad jeans,” tweeted Julieanne Smolinski, 29, a New York writer, in reference to Sir Paul’s crisp, pre-faded dungarees, which looked like Gap deadstock from 1991.

“I will donate $1,000 to #121212Concert if Roger Daltry buttons his shirt,” tweeted Alan Zweibel, 62, a comedy writer.

The quickest route to ridicule, it seems, is for aging rockers to proceed as if nothing has changed. The truth is, years have passed, and to deny this is a form of visual dishonesty. With his shirt thrown open during a rousing rendition of “Baba O’Riley” Mr. Daltrey — a specimen for his age, to be sure — unfortunately invited comparisons to his groupie-magnet self from the “Tommy” era. In doing so, he violated an obvious dictum for seniors: keep your clothes on in public.

But he is not the only offender. At 65, Iggy Pop still takes the stage wearing no shirt, just jeans, as if it’s 1972. It’s not that his body is not freakishly impressive for a man his age. Aside from a few sags and bulging veins, his torso generally looks as lithe as a Joffrey dancer’s.

The problem is not the image itself, so much as the image suggested, as if these aging sex symbols are still attracting hordes of groupies to the cozy confines of their tour buses.

That may well be true, of course, but when these flesh-baring rockers are men of Viagra-taking age, that’s a visual most people could do without. It’s like hearing that your grandparents still have sex: bully for them, but spare us the details.

Hair is complicated for seemingly anyone over 40 — to dye or not to dye, that is question. But it is a tougher call for rock stars like Mr. Bon Jovi, whose hair has always been a key element of his brand. If, one day, the pop-metal crooner were to appear singing “Lay Your Hands on Me” sporting a professor emeritus shock of white hair, as the fellow “12-12-12” performer Mr. Waters of Pink Floyd did, would anyone heed his siren call? (I guess we should be grateful that Mr. Bon Jovi hasn’t gone the route of Roy Orbison, who maintained his jet-black coif well into his 50s, giving him the unfortunate look of an aging blackjack dealer at a lesser Vegas casino.)

Given the raised eyebrows that Mr. Jagger and Mr. McCartney attract with their ever-chocolate locks (though at least Mr. Jagger’s wrinkled magnificence suggested his face had been untouched by a surgeon’s blade), it is no wonder the new tonsorial compromise of choice for aging rockers is strategic baldness. A close-cropped buzz cut or shaven head simply erases all visible evidence of follicular aging, as well as lending them a vague bouncerish tough guy appeal. It works for Phil Collins, Moby and Seal. With his shaved head, Paul Shaffer, the David Letterman foil, looked nearly as age-ambiguous playing piano behind Adam Sandler on the comedian’s “Hallelujah” parody during the “12-12-12” as he did playing in the “Saturday Night Live” house band in the late ’70s. It would have worked for Michael Stipe, too, if he hadn’t chosen to tarnish the effect with a silver Robert E. Lee beard. Ultimately, there is little to be done about graying temples or sagging jowls (short of medical intervention, anyway). This leaves clothing as the prime area for rock stars to experiment with age denial, without looking plastic.

Most fading rock gods seem to intuit that overly sexualized stage outfits turn into clown costumes after a certain age. David Lee Roth, who scissor-kicked his way through the ’80s in skintight tiger-stripe jumpsuits, took the stage on a recent Van Halen tour dressed more like a groom atop a biker wedding cake: black leather pants, shiny blue shirt, black pinstripe vest.

Take a lesson from Eric Clapton and his well-fitting suits: after 40, it’s time to lose the sequins, unless you’re Liberace.

Sometimes, though, even a keen fashion sense is not enough to ward off the jibes.

At the “12-12-12” concert, Mick Jagger took the stage in a subtly snazzy gray python jacket, a Bordeaux taffeta shirt and black jeans. The jacket and shirt, designed by his longtime companion L’Wren Scott, were a far cry from his sequined jumpsuits of the ’70s, but that did not stop the wisecracks. “Mick Jagger looks like your aunt trying to be cool at a wedding,” tweeted Gregg Hughes, known as “Opie,” the SiriusXM radio shock-jock.

But Mr. Jagger, who at 69 still bounds and gyrates through unimaginably athletic, 2 1/2-hour sets, has a built-in response at the ready. As he put it long ago, “Anything worth doing is worth overdoing.”

Voir également:

Should aging rockers ever stop?

Joanna Weiss

Boston.com

June 20, 2013

So maybe getting old isn’t a drag after all. Last week, the Rolling Stones swung through the TD Garden on their « Fifty and Counting » tour, kicking off a Boston summer filled with what might be called vintage rock. Sir Paul McCartney is playing Fenway Park next month. The Rascals, Zombies, and Monkees are coming to town. Steven Tyler, 65, is making noise about a solo album.

On the occasion of the Stones show, Globe columnist Scot Lehigh mused on aging rockers and the people who will spend $600 per ticket to see them. At a time when 70 is clearly the new 50, long careers are something to celebrate. But does age change expectations? Does a certain kind of performance — say, Mick Jagger’s feral prance — feel different when a rocker qualifies for senior discounts? Or should rockers flaunt what they’ve got for as long as they can? Below are some thoughts on the Stones and other rockers with longevity. Add yours to the comments below, or tweet at the hashtag #stillrocking.

This could be the last time?

Lehigh mug.jpgA self-proclaimed goodbye tour is a time-tested audience-enhancer for flagging bands, but that doesn’t describe the Stones. They aren’t talking about calling it a day — not openly, at least. Their last real album, “A Bigger Bang,” was their best in years. Their recent performances have gotten deservedly strong reviews. But the-end-is-near fear hangs palpably over the band’s 50th anniversary expedition. It’s not that Mick and Keith, both 69, are old. Not by today’s standards…. Rather, it’s that they are pressing hard against our expectations for rock musicians. You can’t be skipping around the stage singing “Sympathy for the Devil” at 75, at 80…can you?

Scot Lehigh, Globe columnist

‘Swan Song Angst,’ June 19, 2013

In the Senate, they’d be in their prime

IMG_2212.JPGDianne Feinstein is 80 years old as of Saturday. But in the United States Senate, where she was just elected to another six-year-term, she’s more powerful than ever, and every bit as active. Indeed, senators are presumed to be on top of their game in their 70s, with John McCain (77 in August) leading the charge on immigration reform while crisscrossing the world on military issues. John Kerry, who just took over as Secretary of State, turns 70 in December – a week before Keith Richards, as it turns out. But Richards is the only one getting flak for continuing to work. Actually, rock stars who keep up a full touring schedule, replete with gyrating dance moves and soaring vocals, are doing everyone else a favor. They’re demonstrating that people who keep on working in their 70s aren’t in denial about their declining abilities; they’re fully engaged and just as inspired as when they were younger.

Peter Canellos, Editorial Page Editor

The Boston Globe

Unstoppable

Be kind to your fans

IMG_2213.JPGYes, the Rolling Stones should quit touring — if only as a humane gesture to their loyal fans. It’s not that the band can’t still put on a show: last week’s concerts at the TD Garden proved that. But their relationship with concert-goers has become exploitative. Scot Lehigh wrote that he went to the Stones concert partly because the band members are now so old: seeing Mick and Keith strut around on stage made the fantasy of postponing the inevitable seem feasible. Lehigh probably wasn’t the only fan who felt that way. But that turns the twilight of the band’s career into a sad spectacle — a kind of Baby Boomer coping ritual, a group rage against the dying of the light. Surely, the Stones have harvested enough money from the Boomers already that they could stop cashing in on their angst.

Alan Wirzbicki

Globe editorial writer

Don’t go for the ‘morbidity factor’

geoff edgers mug.jpgLike any true hypocrite, I’ll go see the Rascals and Zombies this summer out of curiosity. But you won’t see me at the TD Garden this week throwing down $600 plus to shuffle to “One More Shot.” Been there, done that. [My friend] Marianne wrote: “I hate the idea of attending a show just for the morbidity factor: ‘This guy is so old /so ill we might not see him again.’ ” On this one, I’m with you.

Geoff Edgers, Globe arts writer

The Stones still have it

James Reed mug.jpgTo answer the questions you no doubt have: Yes, Mick sounded great, strutted like a feral alley cat, and he’s still skinnier than you and I will ever be. Yes, Keith Richards is the most unbelievable pirate guitarist who ever lived. Yes, Ronnie Wood looks like he’s having more fun than anyone else on stage. And yes, Charlie Watts remains the underrated statesman of the band, keeping the beat and regal in a polo shirt while his cohorts looked every inch the rock stars they are.

James Reed, Globe music critic

Concert review, June 13, 2013

Voir encore:

How to Be an Aging Rocker

Terry Teachout

The WSJ

Jan. 3, 2013

What does it mean to say that a work of art is « dated »? I know people who sincerely believe that Shakespeare’s plays are dated because of the way in which they portray women, a point of view that says far more about the complainants in question than it does about Shakespeare. On the other hand, countless once-popular artists were so desperate to stay up to the minute that their art barely outlived them. An artist, however talented, who goes out of his way to be « with it » is foreordained to end up looking blush-makingly quaint sooner or later, usually sooner.

Consider, if it doesn’t embarrass you too much to do so, the rock music of the 1960s and ’70s. How much of it holds up today? I was raised on rock and took it with supreme seriousness, but most of the albums with which my high-school playlist was clotted now strike me as jejune at best, horrendous at worst. I don’t know about anybody else, but I haven’t been able to listen to Crosby, Stills & Nash or Jefferson Airplane for decades.

One of the reasons why so much first- and second-generation rock ‘n’ roll has aged so badly is that most of it was created by young people for consumption by even younger people. And what’s wrong with that? Nothing—if you’re a teenager. But if you’re not, why would you want to listen to it now? And what has happened to its makers now that they’re over the demographic hill? Have they anything new to say to us, or are they simply going through the motions?

The Rolling Stones, who recently embarked on their 50th-anniversary tour, can still play up a storm—but so what? When not recycling the hits of their long-lost youth, Sir Mick Jagger and his venerable colleagues trot out « new » songs that sound as though they’d been written in 1962.

Compare these two lyrics:

« Everybody’s talking / Showing off their wit / The moon is yellow but I’m not Jell-O / Staring down your tits. »

« We went to a party / Everybody stood around / Thinkin’: Hey what’s she doin’ / With a burned-out hippie clown. »

The first quatrain is from « Oh No, Not You Again, » written by Mr. Jagger and Keith Richards and recorded by the Stones on « A Bigger Bang, » their most recent album, released in 2005. The second is from « Slinky Thing, » the first track on « Sunken Condos, » Donald Fagen’s new solo album, which came out in October. It’s a sly, ironic portrait of a Goethe-quoting 60-something gent who is dating a considerably younger woman, much to the sardonic amusement of her friends. And which song sounds fresher? « Slinky Thing, » by the longest of long shots.

Unlike the bluntly bluesy garage-band sound of the Stones, Mr. Fagen’s music is a rich-textured, harmonically oblique amalgam of rock, jazz and soul. It is, in a word, music for grown-ups—with lyrics to match. What is especially interesting about Mr. Fagen, though, is that unlike most of his contemporaries, he has always made music for grown-ups. Steely Dan, the group that he co-founded with Walter Becker in 1972, never did go in for kid stuff, and doesn’t now. Jazz heavies like Wayne Shorter and Phil Woods have long popped up from time to time on Steely Dan’s albums, playing solos that don’t sound even slightly out of place.

Needless to say, musical complexity is not the same thing as maturity. What makes Mr. Fagen’s music stand out is its coolly detached point of view. He knows full well that the narrator of « Slinky Thing » is a comic figure and deserves to be. Nor does he lapse into the breast-baring confessionalism that is the blight of second-rate singer-songwriters. He’s a portrait artist, and even when the subject is himself, he wields a razor-sharp brush. Mr. Fagen, who turns 65 on Thursday, is about the same age as the 69-year-old Mr. Jagger. The difference is that he acts his age. Wall Street Journal contributor Marc Myers put it well when he wrote on JazzWax, his blog, that Mr. Fagen’s music « fully embraces the male aging process, which is what makes him cool. »

The British author V.S. Pritchett, who was as good a critic as he was a short-story writer, had a particular affinity for the works of novelists « who are not driven back by life, who are not shattered by the discovery that it is a thing bounded by unsought limits, by interests as well as by hopes, and that it ripens under restriction. Such writers accept. They think that acceptance is the duty of a man. » No doubt it would have surprised him to hear his words applied to a gray-haired rocker, but they couldn’t be more relevant to the music of Donald Fagen. Not only does he accept life’s limits, but he smiles wryly at them—and when he does, so do we.

—Mr. Teachout, the Journal’s drama critic, writes « Sightings » every` other Friday. He is the author of « Pops: A Life of Louis Armstrong. » Write to him at tteachout@wsj.com.

Voir de plus:

Aging well or just aging: The rockers of my youth

Judah L. Ronch, PhD

Itlmagazine

January 2, 2013

I was one of the estimated 50 million people who watched the “12-12-12” concert for Hurricane Sandy relief and I had two reactions. The first was that event was especially poignant because, as the New York Times reported, more than 40% of the fatalities of this storm were people over age 65. Many drowned in their homes or died when help couldn’t reach them in time to get medical care. (I think this is really a comment about aging in community vs. aging in place.) But, this is an issue beyond my ken to solve. I am not a politician or a policy person. What I am, though, is a “child who’s grown old” with rock and roll music as the soundtrack of my life, and I saw this in stark detail during the broadcast.

An article by Alex Williams headlined: The music is timeless, but about the rockers… was the second thing I reacted to. Here were the groups that helped me get through the turbulence of the 1960s and ’70s. They were largely, as Mick Jagger so aptly quipped, “…the largest collection of old English musicians ever assembled in Madison Square Garden.” (Springsteen, Bon Jovi and Billy Joel were there too, and while they are younger they were termed “geriatric” in the article.)

The old English musicians were about my age or younger! Williams’ article looked at the critical issue of whether it is “possible to look cool and rebellious after 50 without looking foolish.” In other words, do those aging rock stars who dyed their hair and bared their bellies have to fade away when they no longer have the youthful images that are the calling card of youthful rebellion?

There was much reaction to Roger Daltrey showing his midriff during The Who’s energetic set of classics (remember their hit “My Generation,” with the line “Hope I die before I get old.”?), and of the color of Bon Jovi’s and Paul McCartney’s hair. These and other icons were reported to have been the subjects of snarky Tweets. And Jagger still struts like he did when he was in his twenties, but it looked odd to me doing it at almost 70. So why do some aging rockers have to use age denial to perpetuate their rebellious bona fides?

Does the music of protest have to be accompanied by bounding across the stage, gyrations and age-denying cosmetic interventions? This is not a remote issue: the “You are My Sunshine” days of sing-along music activities in long-term care settings are coming to an end. We need to think about how the next wave may want to spend their time enjoying music in groups when they are not listening to iPods or rock wall climbing.

Let me introduce the concept of “trait transformation” as a proposed solution that allows aging boomers to rock on without engaging in age denial. This finding in developmental psychology helps to explain how people develop and get more complex, but stay the same person. Trait transformation is the process that takes place as a result of development and maturation when a lifelong trait changes how it appears in a person’s behavior. For example, infants who were very good at following a moving picture of a human face were superior socializers at three months, but then they didn’t seem to want to follow the picture anymore. They had moved on; the trait that was being measured had transformed from tracking a picture to interacting with a human being. The Experience Corps is full of retirees who use their traits to help others although they no longer work in their old jobs.

If the music boomers grew up on is still meaningful, then enjoying its essence—its many meanings—as we age will have to be available without the distractions of age-denying cosmetic overlays that the stars use. Rockers can get old and still rock on, and that will be the “new normal.”

The message of the ’60s and ’70s was not about only about sexual revolution and protest, it also was about protesting the status quo that limits the diversity of individual expression of who we were and what we could become, aging rockers have much to contribute to how boomers will experience aging. If they would only accept that they don’t have to deny their aging to be relevant.

For many of their aging fans, the next era of life will depart from the conformity that an ageist, declinist approach to aging dictates. You won’t need to take off your shirt or dye your hair to be an icon of cool aging or to sing songs about what was (and is) important. Because what’s cool looks different as a person ages, but cool remains a trait.

Thanks to McCartney, Jagger and the old English musicians, the beat went on. That’s the soundtrack of the boomers’ lives. What will the music in your setting be in 2030, and what timeless music will people singing along with? I expect that people will still agree with Mick: “I know it’s only rock and roll but I like it.”

Voir aussi:

Neil Young Stuns With a Spellbinding Carnegie Hall Show

The marathon set featured a wealth of Seventies classics

Rolling stone

January 7, 2014

When Neil Young walked onstage for the first of his four-night stand at Carnegie Hall, nobody in the audience had any idea what sort of show he was about to present. His previous theater tour in 2010 was a bizarre (and ultimately unsatisfying) mixture of solo acoustic and solo electric tunes, concentrating on hits and selections from his then-unreleased LP Le Noise. The last time he launched a solo acoustic tour was eleven years ago in Europe, and those crowds heard a complete performance of his rock opera Greendale, which wouldn’t hit shelves for another four months. More recently, he played a set at Farm Aid last year that consisted almost entirely of other people’s songs. If the man’s anything, he’s unpredictable.

Thankfully, Neil Young had no such surprises for the capacity crowd at Carnegie Hall. Instead, he treated them to an absolutely jaw-dropping two hour and 20-minute show that focused largely on his golden period of 1966 to 1978. He only deviated from that era for two songs from 1992’s Harvest Moon, the 1989 obscurity « Someday » and a pair of covers by Phil Ochs and Bert Jansch. The opening notes of classics « Harvest, » « A Man Needs a Maid » and « On the Way Home » sent shockwaves of recognition and joy through the crowd, who then listened to them in near silence. It was, without a doubt, one of the greatest Neil Young shows of the past decade, at least when he wasn’t playing with Crazy Horse.

The first time Young played Carnegie Hall was a two-night stand in late 1970, capping off an incredible year where he recorded Deja Vu with Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young as well as his solo album After the Gold Rush. « I was pretty jacked up [that night], » he said early on last night. « People started yelling out and doing all kinds of things. I said, ‘Listen, I know what I’m doing here. I’ve been dying to get into this place. I planned it out. I know exactly what I’m going to play and nothing you’re going to say is going to change my mind.’ Then I was playing this Buffalo Springfield song ‘Nowadays Clancy Can’t Even Sing’ and somebody yelled out from the audience and I stopped and said, ‘Shit, I lost my concentration.’ Then I left. There wasn’t going to be an intermission, but there was. Tonight I planned on an intermission. I’m much more mellow now. »

It would be tough to be less mellow than Neil Young circa 1970, but there were no outbursts last night (though Carnegie Hall’s incredible acoustics made every knucklehead’s commentary perfectly audible to the entire auditorium). « You guys finished? » he asked calmly after a group of guys refused to stop demanding loudly that he play the extreme rarity « Don’t Be Denied. » « You paid real money to get in here, so you should be able to listen to each other. I hear a little voice, ‘Be nice, be nice.’ Thank you, sweetheart. »

Much like his stellar 1999 solo acoustic tour, there was a chair in the center of the stage surrounded by about eight acoustic guitars and a banjo. There were also two pianos and a pump organ, and sometimes between songs Young would wander around, pick up a guitar, briefly contemplate using it, and then opt for another. He was also in a chatty mood, sharing stories behind many of the instruments, including the legendary guitar that once belonged to Hank Williams.

But the night was largely devoted to classics from Young’s commercial peak in the early Seventies. It’s been years since he crammed this many hits into a set, playing over half the songs on Harvest (« Heart of Gold, » « Are You Ready for the Country, » « Old Man, » « The Needle and the Damage Done, » « A Man Needs A Maid » and « Harvest »), along with « Ohio, » « After the Gold Rush, » « Only Love Can Break Your Heart, » « Comes a Time, » « Long May You Run » and his first performance of « Southern Man » in nearly a decade.

Midway through the second set he broke out Bert Jansch’s 1965 classic « Needle of Death. » Young has claimed he lifted the chords of « Ambulance Blues » from the tune, and he emphasized the similarities between the two during the intro. He followed it up with the thematically similar « Needle and the Damage Done, » showing just how influential this single tune was on his songwriting.

Some of the best moments of the night came when he resurrected material from the Buffalo Springfield catalog. « On the Way Home » was absolutely spellbinding, and he proved why « Flying on the Ground Is Wrong » is one of his most under-appreciated masterpieces when he played it on the upright piano. But the most radically rearranged song of the night was « Mr. Soul, » which he played on the pump organ.

Other highlights included a banjo rendition of the Tonight’s the Night gem « Mellow My Mind, » a rollicking « Are You Ready for the Country? » and a climactic « After the Gold Rush, » both on the standup piano. The only real complaint is that he played so many early Seventies classics that he neglected all other eras of his long career. Not a single note of music was played from the past 22 years, nor did he go near anything from 1978 to 1989. The late Sixties and the Seventies were obviously the period when he produced his best work, but there’s been a lot of amazing stuff since then, and it would have been nice to hear just a little more of it.

It’s incredible to think that in the past five months, Young has played ridiculously loud, feedback-drenched marathon concerts with Crazy Horse all over Europe, reunited with Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young at the Bridge School Benefit and put together this gentle, nostalgic Carnegie Hall show. At age 68, his voice has lost only a bit of its range, and his guitar playing sounds just like it did the first time he played Carnegie Hall.

It’s unclear if he’s going to perform this show outside of Carnegie Hall and his four « Honor the Treaties » gigs in Canada later this month, but Neil Young fans should make every possible effort to see it while they can. This is the show they’ve been waiting to see for years and years.

Voir enfin:

Aging Rocker’s Failed Anti-Israel Crusade

Sarcasm aside, this is anti-Semitism of the ugliest, most primitive kind.

Ben Cohen

August 29th, 2013

Back in 1976, when the burgeoning punk movement began transforming the rock’n’roll landscapes of London and New York, a young punk rocker named John Lydon scrawled the words “I Hate…” on his Pink Floyd t-shirt.

With this one stroke, Lydon, aka Johnny Rotten, demarcated the past from the future: eschewing the lengthy and ponderous compositions of Pink Floyd frontman Roger Waters, Rotten and his mates set about delivering sharp, angry tunes in a compact three-minute format. Almost 40 years later, popular music has undergone numerous other transformations, but Rotten (who now calls himself Lydon again) and Waters have remained polar opposites. And as Israelis know better than most, that’s true both inside and outside the recording studio.

Back in 2010, Lydon rounded on critics of his decision to play a gig in Tel Aviv by telling them, “I have absolutely one rule, right? Until I see an Arab country, a Muslim country, with a democracy, I won’t understand how anyone can have a problem with how they [the Palestinians] are treated.”

By contrast, Waters, outwardly, a much more refined and eloquent fellow, has firmly hitched himself to the movement pressing for a campaign of Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) against Israel. Waters’s support for BDS is thought to be the reason that his scheduled appearance at the 92nd Sreet Y in New York City was canceled back in April, while more recently he tussled with the Simon Wiesenthal Center over an accusation of anti-Semitism that stemmed from a feature of his live show, in which a Star of David is projected onto a flying inflatable pig.

In his response to the Wiesenthal Center, Waters denied he was an anti-Semite, coming out with the standard response that hating Zionism and hating Jews are completely distinct. But a subsequent letter written in August to “My Colleagues in Rock’n’Roll” – his legendary pomposity remains unaltered – is certain to revive the charge. This time, it’s hard to see how Waters can wriggle around it.

The letter begins by citing another British musician, the violinist Nigel Kennedy, who slammed Israeli “apartheid” during a recent concert that was recorded by the BBC. “Nothing unusual there you might think,” Waters wrote, “[but] then one Baroness Deech, (nee Fraenkel) disputed the fact that Israel is an apartheid state and prevailed upon the BBC to censor Kennedy’s performance by removing his statement.”

Why did Waters think it necessary to point out the maiden name of Baroness Ruth Deech, a noted academic and lawyer? The answer is obvious: before she was Deech, a name that resonates with English respectability, she was Fraenkel, a name that sounds positively, well, Jewish. And much as she might try to hide her origins, the intrepid Waters is determined to out her, along with her nefarious Jewish –sorry, I mean, Zionist – agenda.

Sarcasm aside, this is anti-Semitism of the ugliest, most primitive kind. Appropriately, Waters’s letter appeared first on the website of the Electronic Intifada, a U.S.-based outfit that has emerged as one of the prime organizing platforms of the BDS movement.

The Waters letter ends as follows: “Please join me and all our brothers and sisters in global civil society in proclaiming our rejection of Apartheid in Israel and occupied Palestine, by pledging not to perform or exhibit in Israel or accept any award or funding from any institution linked to the government of Israel, until such time as Israel complies with international law and universal principles of human rights.”

In case it’s not clear, in the BDS movement, such elaborate formulations are code for “until such time as the state of Israel, which was born in a state of original sin, is finally eliminated.”

Here’s the rub, though: ten years ago, when the BDS movement was a relatively new phenomenon, statements like these would have set off a minor panic in the Jewish world. These days, we’re far more sanguine, and we’ve learned that Israel can survive and flourish no matter how many graying prog-rockers like Waters dedicate their lives to removing the world’s only Jewish state from the map.

As unpalatable as this may be for Waters’s digestion, the plain truth is that the BDS movement has failed. Its original aim was to replicate the massive outcry against South African apartheid during the 1980s, when songs like “Free Nelson Mandela” and “(I Ain’t Gonna Play) Sun City” ruled the airwaves. Instead, it has remained a fringe movement, a minor irritant that has had precious little impact on Israel’s economic life and garners media attention only when someone like Waters decides to shoot his mouth off.

We’ve arrived at this happy situation for several reasons, among them the growing realization, as articulated by John Lydon, that there is something absurd about boycotting Israel when the states that surround it engage in egregious human rights violations. Waters won’t play in Israel, but he was quite happy to play in Dubai in 2007 – an Arab city almost entirely built by slave labor imported from Muslim countries like Pakistan and Bangladesh. If other stars grasp the appalling hypocrisy this represents, then having Roger Waters indulge his hatred of Israel at every opportunity is a price worth paying.

About the Author: Ben Cohen is the Shillman Analyst for JNS.org. His writings on Jewish affairs and Middle Eastern politics have been published in Commentary, the New York Post, Haaretz, Jewish Ideas Daily and many other publications.


Carence iodée: Vers le retour des crétins des Alpes ? (If the salt loses its savor: From the smarting up of America to the dumbing down of Europe)

28 juillet, 2013
http://spicesandspackledotcom.files.wordpress.com/2012/10/morton-full-size.pnghttps://i0.wp.com/www3.uakron.edu/mmlab/dose/ya-20.gif[morton_salt.jpg]Vous êtes le sel de la terre. Mais si le sel perd sa saveur, avec quoi la lui rendra-t-on? Il ne sert plus qu’à être jeté dehors, et foulé aux pieds par les hommes. Jésus (Matthieu 5: 13)
La carence en iode est si facile à prévenir que c’est un crime de permettre qu’un seul enfant naisse handicapé mental pour cette raison. H.R. Labrouisse (directeur de l’UNICEF, 1978)
The idea of putting additives in salt to promote health dates back to the 1920s, when salt suppliers in the United States and Switzerland began fortifying their salt with iodine. The measure was intended to combat a condition known as “goiter” — a swelling of the thyroid, a gland that sits just in front of the windpipe. Goiters have plagued humans for at least several thousand years. As early as 2,700 B.C., Chinese emperor Shen Nung allegedly prescribed seaweed, now known to be rich in iodine, as a treatment. Although not especially painful, large goiters can interfere with breathing and swallowing. And we now know that they’re only a symptom of a much larger problem. “The goiter is the visible manifestation” of iodine deficiency, says Richard Hanneman, president of the Salt Institute in Alexandria, Va. Iodine, a purplish-brown element that is rare in Earth’s crust but common in seawater, is essential for all life. Humans need about 150 micrograms each day. Most of that gets taken up by the thyroid and is used to make hormones that regulate metabolism. If the body lacks iodine, the thyroid doesn’t have the raw materials it needs to make these hormones. To compensate, the gland begins to grow, forming a goiter. In the United States, few realized just how common goiters were until doctors began examining men drafted to serve in World War I. Simon Levin, a physician in Lake Linden, Mich., found that 30 percent had visibly swollen thyroids: Another 2 percent had goiters large enough to prevent them from serving. In fact, more men in northern Michigan were disqualified from military service because of goiters than any other medical condition. The state was in the middle of a swath of land that would become known as the “goiter belt.” Before people got iodine from salt, they got it from their food. Foods pick up iodine from the soils where they grow (or, in the case of seafood, from seawater). But the element is unevenly distributed across Earth’s landmasses. Inland areas and mountainous regions tend to have iodine-poor soil. And because historically most of the food consumed was locally grown, the inhabitants of iodine-poor regions tended to develop iodine deficiency, and goiters. Although health officials didn’t know it at the time, iodine deficiency also leads to much more serious problems. Expectant mothers who don’t get enough iodine can have children who are mentally and physically stunted — a condition known as “cretinism.” Even moderate iodine deficiency in the mother during pregnancy can reduce her child’s IQ by 10 to 15 points. Before iodized salt was introduced in 1978, the village of Jixian in northeast China was so iodine deficient, it was known locally as the “village of idiots.” Doctors had been treating iodine deficiency with iodine syrup, but health officials wanted to prevent goiters, not just treat them. Obviously going door to door with bottles of iodine syrup wasn’t going to work. They needed to find a way to mass distribute iodine that would be economical and efficient. Salt was an obvious choice — it’s cheap, it’s easy to transport, it doesn’t spoil and everyone uses it. Salt is the “food that comes closest to being universally consumed,” says Venkatesh Mannar, executive director of the Canada-based Micronutrient Initiative. And the risk of overdose is minimal because everyone eats a predictable amount, between five and 15 grams each day: The same can’t be said of other commodities, such as sugar or flour. What’s more, iodine occurs naturally in some salt deposits. In fact, until 1900, salt mined and used by residents in the Kanawha River Valley in West Virginia contained trace amounts of iodine. As a result, goiters were rare in the region. But then, the crude brown local salt was replaced with clean, processed salt mined in Ohio and Michigan. By 1922, 60 percent of schoolgirls surveyed in Charleston and Huntington, W.Va., had enlarged thyroids. Iodized salt first appeared on grocery store shelves in Switzerland in 1921 and in the United States in 1924. In Michigan alone, the prevalence of goiter dropped more than 75 percent over the next two decades. Iodized salt didn’t begin making its way into developing countries until the 1980s. With support from UNICEF and the World Health Organization, however, it spread remarkably fast. Globally, the percentage of people with access to iodized salt has climbed from 20 percent in the mid-1990s to about 70 percent today. “It’s a great public health success,” Houston says. Geotimes
More than 70 countries, including the United States and Canada, have salt iodization programs. As a result, approximately 70% of households worldwide use iodized salt, ranging from almost 90% of households in North and South America to less than 50% in Europe and the Eastern Mediterranean regions. (…) The use of iodized salt is the most widely used strategy to control iodine deficiency. Currently, about 70% of households worldwide use iodized salt, but iodine insufficiency is still prevalent in certain regions. In the European region included in WHO reports, 52% of the population has insufficient iodine intake and, according to UNICEF, only about 49% of households in Europe (outside of the Western European subregion) have access to iodized salt. Iodine insufficiency is also prevalent in Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Eastern Mediterranean WHO regions where rates of iodized salt use range from approximately 47% to 67%. Worldwide, it is estimated that about 31% of school-age children do not have access to iodized salt. NIH
While cretinism, the most extreme expression of iodine deficiency, has become very rare and even disappeared in Europe, of considerably greater concern are the more subtle degrees of mental impairment associated with iodine deficiency that lead to poor school performance, reduced intellectual ability, and impaired work capacity. For iodine-deficient communities, between 10 and 15 IQ points may be lost when compared to similar but non-iodine-deficient populations. Iodine deficiency is the world’s greatest single cause of preventable brain damage. (…) In the early 1960s, only a few countries had IDD control programmes; most of them in the United States of America and Europe. Since then, and especially over the last two decades, extraordinary progress has been achieved by increasing the number of people with access to iodized salt and reducing the rate of iodine deficiency in most parts of the world. However, this has not been the case in several industrialized countries, especially in Europe. Compared to other regions in the world, iodized salt coverage is not as high in Europe, reaching only 27% of households. In addition, there is growing evidence that iodine deficiency has reappeared in some European countries where it was thought to have been eliminated. WHOAll European countries except Iceland have experienced this health and socioeconomic scourge to a greater or lesser degree. Endemic cretinism, the most severe consequence of iodine deficiency, was extensively reported in the past, particularly from isolated and mountain- ous areas in Austria, Bulgaria, Croatia, France, Italy, Spain and Switzerland, and was so common that the term “cretin of the Alps” became part of the common vocabulary. Nevertheless, only limited attention has been paid to the public health consequences of iodine defi ciency in Europe until recently. Over a century and a half ago iodine deficiency had already been recognized. At the beginning of the 19th century, it was first suggested that the use of salt fortified with iodine would lead to good health in people living in mountainous regions. Switzerland was the first European country to introduce iodized salt on a large scale in order to eliminate iodine deficiency. After the pioneering work of Swiss doctors that demonstrated that iodine deficiency was indeed the cause of goitre, attempts began to locally iodize salt using a hand-and-shovel method. In 1922, the Swiss Goitre Commission recommended to the then 25 Swiss Cantons (provinces) that salt be iodized on a voluntary basis at a level of 3.75 mg iodine per kg salt (or 3.75 ppm). Non-iodized salt also remained available for sale. Due to the decentralized system of the Government of Switzerland the availability of iodized salt progressed slowly; the last Canton (Aargau) allowed the sale of iodized salt only in 1952. Today, over 90% of households consume iodized salt, and about 70% of the salt used in industrial food production is iodized. However, this example was not generally replicated by many other countries in Europe. In 1999, the access of iodized salt at the household level for Europe was the lowest regional average figure in the world at 27%. Because of the declining consumption of table salt, this probably did not reflect properly the access of households to salt, and consequently, potentially to iodized salt. WHO
A new study indicates that Americans gained up to 15 IQ points after the addition of iodine to salt became mandatory. In an effort to prevent goiter related to iodine deficiency, authorities ruled that iodine be added to U.S. salt products in 1924. The iodine, in addition to eliminating goiter, appears to have had an unexpected result: smarter Americans. (…) Iodine comes from food sources, and is especially abundant in seafood and foods grown in coastal areas with high levels of iodine in the soil. Mountainous and inland areas are often very low in the nutrient, meaning food grown there doesn’t have enough iodine. Today, iodine deficiency is the leading cause of preventable mental retardation in the world. The condition, known as cretinism, was also common in the U.S. until the introduction of iodized salt. Originally, U.S. authorities wanted to reduce the incidence of goiter, but research since that time has shown that iodine plays an important role in brain development, especially during gestation. The World Health Organization estimates that two billion people worldwide are at risk of iodine deficiency. And it’s not just a Third World problem – the WHO reports that only 27 per cent of households in Europe have access to iodized salt. The researchers say that iodine may also be a cause of the so-called Flynn Effect, the steady rise in IQ that’s been ongoing since the 1930s. Daily Mail
Les populations montagnardes n’ont jamais pu se procurer aisément du sel de mer en raison de son prix. Les cas de difformité et de nanisme étaient donc fréquents parmi les populations paysannes alpines. Dans les Alpes, la population isolée des vallées était beaucoup plus souvent atteinte de désordres liés à la carence en iode. Du reste, Diderot est le premier à consigner le nom de « crétin » dans son encyclopédie raisonnée des sciences, des arts et des métiers (1754). L’expression « crétin des Alpes » est usuelle. Le crétinisme est une forme de débilité mentale et de dégénérescence physique en rapport avec une insuffisance thyroïdienne.(…) Pour éviter les carences en iode, qui altèrent le système hormonal, mais aussi le développement de l’enfant, il est souvent ajouté de l’iode au sel de cuisine (sel iodé) et parfois au lait (au Royaume-Uni notamment). Cet ajout provient de recherches faites aux États-Unis au début du XXème siècle sur les liens entre « goître endémique » et carences en iode. L’enrichissemnet en iode du sel de table a été recommandé et mis en œuvre aux Etats-Unis après la première guerre mondiale, durant les décennies 1920 et 1930. En 1955, la carence en iode semblaient avoir été éliminée aux États-Unis grâce à l’utilisation domestique du sel de table (Salt Institute, 2008, cité par l’EPA6). Cependant ensuite, dans les années 1970 – et pour des raisons mal comprises (une des explications pourrait être les régimes sans sel ou peut-être des polluants de l’eau perturbateurs de l’acquisition de l’iode par la thyroïde tels que les perchlorates) – une nouvelle tendance au manque d’iode a été observée via les enquêtes épidémiologiques NHANES. Ces dernières montrent que le taux d’américains des États-Unis touchés par cette carence (définie par l’OMS comme une teneur en iode urinaire inférieure à 100µg/L) a augmenté de 1971-1974 à 1988-19947. Ce recul semble s’être ensuite stabilisé de 1988 à 1994 selon l’enquête NHANES 2001-2002 (Hollowell et al, 1998 ; Caldwell et al 2005 cité par l’EPA6) ; La teneur médiane (320 µg/L) était supérieures à 100µg/L en 1971-1974 (NHANES I), pour passer à 145 µg/L en 1988-1994 (NHANES III) et à 168 µg/L dans l’enquête NHANES 2001-2002. Dans tous les cas, les femmes étaient à peu près deux fois plus nombreuses que les hommes à être touchées par ce déficit en iode. Selon Hollowell et al. (1998) cité par l’EPA6, aux états unis « seuls » 2,6 % de la population (1,6 % chez les hommes et 3,5 % chez les femmes) étaient en 1971 – 1974 carencés avec des teneurs urinaires en iode de moins de 50 ug/L d’iode, mais le nombre de personnes carencées a plus que quadruplé, passant à 11,7 % en 1988-1994 (8,1 % des hommes et 15,1 % chez les femmes). Lors de l’étude NHANES 2001-2002, la concentration urinaire médiane était de 167,8 pour la population totale, 11 % des personnes testées présentaient encore des concentrations inférieures à 50 UI µg/L (6,7 % chez les hommes et de 15,3 % chez les femmes) (Caldwell et al. 2005 cités par l’EPA6), ce qui montre une stabilisation, mais non une situation satisfaisante (plus de 15 % des femmes sous 50µg/L et 36,6 % des femmes sous le seuil OMS des 100µg/L, seuil OMS). Wikipedia
Depuis la publication en 1985 du premier rapport traitant du statut en iode des populations européennes, la France occupe une position intermédiaire entre les pays d’Europe du nord où les apports en io de sont satisfaisants, et ceux d’Europe du sud encore marqués par une déficience modérée, à la limite de la carence résiduelle dans certaines régions d’Italie ou d’Espagne (Scriba et al . 1985). Il existe donc un risque important pour les populations exposées de ne pouvoir répondre à toute situation physiologique correspondant à une augmentation des besoins en iode (croissance, puberté, grossesse, allaitement). Tous les pays européens ont adopté des mesures de prophylaxie de la déficience en iode reposant s ur une autorisation d’enrichissement du sel en iode. Limitée dans un premier temps au seul sel à usage domestique, cette autorisation a été élargie dans quelques pays au sel alimentaire industriel entrant dans la fabrication de certains produits alimentair es, source de conflit avec les recommandations de santé publique visant à une réduction du risque d’hypertension artérielle par une diminution de la teneur en sel des aliments transformés. I.1.1 Contexte La réduction de la déficience en iode constitue l’un des 1 00 objectifs de la loi relative à la politique de santé publique avec un objectif chiffré de réduction de 20 % de la fréquence de la déficience en iode dans la population vivant en France au terme de la période 2004 – 2008 (J.O. n° 185 du 11/08/2004). L’évo lution des modes de consommation avec le développement de la restauration collective et hors foyer, et la part croissante occupée par les produits transformés ont rendu marginale l’efficacité de la salière domestique comme vecteur du sel iodé. Le sel ajouté (sel de cuisson et sel d’ajout volontaire) représente environ 20 % de l’apport total en sel (James et al. 1987), et moins de 50 % de ce sel est enrichi en iode (Comité des Salines de France 2003). Les campagnes de prévention du risque d’hypertension arté rielle engagées depuis plus de vingt ans ont conduit à diminuer la fréquence d’utilisation de la salière domestique, ainsi que les quantités ajoutées de sel. Les récentes recommandations du rapport « Sel » de l’AFSSA (AFSSA 2002) en faveur d’une réduction d es apports sodés ( – 20 % en 5 ans), notamment via de meilleures pratiques culinaires et comportementales (utilisation non systématique de la salière domestique), devraient encore réduire l’impact du sel iodé ajouté dans la prophylaxie de la déficience en io de. Les enquêtes nationales de consommation permettent aujourd’hui de disposer de données précises de consommations alimentaires individuelles des enfants et des adultes en France. Elles ont été utilisées pour des travaux de simulation nutritionnelle : si mulations d’enrichissement des aliments en vitamines et minéraux (enrichissement des produits laitiers frais en vitamine D) ou simulations de recommandations nutritionnelles. Elles devraient permettre, grâce à la réalisation d’une table de composition alim entaire en iode, de disposer d’évaluations quantitatives liées à l’enrichissement d’aliments en iode et de montrer l’absence de risque pour la population en contrôlant les risques de dépassements des limites supérieures de sécurité. (…) La mise en évidence de l’effet protecteur du se l alimentaire naturellement riche en iode sur le risque de goitre endémique repose sur les observations de J.B. Boussingault en Colombie (1833). Il faudra cependant attendre les résultats des études de Marine et Kimball (1917 – 1920) à Akron (Ohio) pour que l’action tant thérapeutique que prophylactique de l’iode soit reconnue (Marine et al . 1920). Ce n’est finalement qu’en 1922 que le sel enrichi artisanalement en iode est introduit comme mesure de santé publique dans la prévention du goitre endémique parmi la population du canton suisse d’Appenzell. Très rapidement cette – 50 – pratique s’étendra aux autres cantons de la Confédération helvétique, ainsi qu’aux pays proches (Autriche, 1923). (…) – 52 – L’accès à un sel enrichi en iode est autorisé dans tous les pays européens, et le taux moyen (étendue) d’enrichissement est de 15 – 20 mg (5 – 60 mg) par kg de sel, avec des taux très variables, de 8 – 13 mg/kg au Danemark à 40 – 70 mg/kg en Turquie (Tableau 25). L’enrichissement est volontaire et limité au sel à usage domestique dans la plupart des pays d’Europe occidentale, il n’est obligatoire que dans 10 pays, principalement d’Europe centrale. L’enrichis sement est en majorité à base d’iodure de potassium, certains états autorisant indifféremment les deux formes, iodure et iodate. L’utilisation du sel iodé par les industries agroalimentaires reste exceptionnelle. La pénétration du sel iodé est cependant tr ès variable selon les pays. Seuls 27 % des ménages européens ont accès à un sel iodé. Le pourcentage de sel iodé à usage domestique est inférieur à 5 % en Italie et en Angleterre, il atteint 45 – 50 % en France, 50 – 60 % aux USA, et dépasse 90 % en Suisse et en Autriche. (…) Le taux de pénétration du sel iodé en France (sel fin et gros sel en petits conditionnements) est en diminution constante, 55 % en 1988, 45 % en 1997. Ce taux est estimé à 47 % en 2002 (Table au 26) (Comité des Salines de France, 2003) (…) Cette ba isse du taux de pénétration est le fait de la concurrence de sels alimentaires à moindre prix et non iodés en provenance de pays voisins, du développement des ventes de sels artisanaux (non iodés) qui représentent 10 % des ventes en petits conditionnements (sels de Guérande, Noirmoutier et Ré) et d’une absence d’implication des pouvoirs publics, en particulier en direction des populations des régions les plus exposées à la déficience en iode. Les enquêtes épidémiologiques récemment conduites dans divers pa ys européens et aux Etats – Unis montrent que selon les pays, la fraction réellement ingérée de sel ne représente que 15 à 30 % du sel de cuisson utilisé pour la préparation des aliments, réduisant ainsi de façon significative la contribution du sel enrichi en iode dans la couverture des besoins en iode. Le sel iodé, après soustraction des pertes d’iode liées à l’utilisation, aux modes de préparation, de conservation et de cuisson, ne représente en fait qu’une faible fraction de l’apport total d’iode. Les re commandations du rapport « Sel » de l’Afssa (Afssa 2002) de réduire de 20 % l’apport moyen de chlorure de sodium devraient conduire les consommateurs à modifier leurs comportements, aussi bien dans la recherche des produits artisanaux ou agroalimentaires (étiquetage du NaCl), que dans les pratiques individuelles d’utilisation du sel (fréquence d’utilisation des salières individuelles et quantité de sel ajoutée). Ces recommandations devraient donc en partie atténuer les bénéfices attendus du récent avis de l’A FSSA (31 juillet 2002) modifiant la réglementation sur l’enrichissement en iode du sel de qualité alimentaire. L’efficacité du sel iodé dans la prophylaxie de la déficience en iode dans les pays européens semble le plus souvent très largement surévaluée : (1) les quantités de sel alimentaire citées dans la littérature (3 à 5 g par jour) sont très supérieures aux quantités ingérées associées aux prises alimentaires mêmes augmentées du sel de cuisson, (2) les quantités sont appliquées à la totalité de la pop ulation et non aux seuls utilisateurs, (3) la totalité du sel alimentaire à usage domestique est considérée comme enrichi en iode. En France, sous l’hypothèse d’indépendance des fréquences d’utilisation et de choix du type de sel d’ajout (iodé contre non iodé) un quart des sujets (26,4 %) utilisent quotidiennement du sel iodé (0,48 g par jour). La contribution totale du sel iodé à usage domestique est cependant légèrement sous – évaluée, le sel de cuisson n’étant pas pris en compte dans l’évaluation des appo rts en iode. Dans les pays anciennement les plus marqués par la carence en iode (Suisse, Autriche), l’iodation du sel reste un objectif prioritaire de santé publique dans la lutte contre la déficience en iode. L’efficacité du sel iodé a été régulièrement maintenue par des ajustements successifs du taux d’enrichissement aux réductions des apports sodés dans la population. En Suisse, le taux d’enrichissement en iode (mg I/kg de sel) a ainsi été successivement augmenté de 3,75 (1922), à 7,5 (1962), 15 (1980) et 20 mg/g de sel (1998). Ces progressions ont cependant été insuffisantes pour compenser les effets des importations de sel non iodé et des campagnes de réduction des apports sodés, et ont conduit à autoriser l’utilisation de sel iodé dans certains produi ts alimentaires transformés (pain, fromages, produits de charcuterie traités en salaison, conserves et plats préparés) (Als et al. 2003). En conclusion, toutes les études mettent en évidence une relation temporelle entre le début de l’introduction du sel iodé et la réduction du risque de déficience en iode dans les populations européennes. Cependant l’interprétation de l’implication du sel iodé dans les augmentations récentes de la consommation alimentaire d’iode est ambiguë en l’absence d’un cadre expérim ental. En effet, la part potentielle relative liée à l’effet propre de l’amélioration de la supplémentation individuelle par le sel iodé est difficile à distinguer des conséquences, d’une part, des évolutions des consommations alimentaires de produits natu rellement riches en iode (produits de la pêche et de l’aquaculture) et d’autre part, de l’apparition de nouvelles sources d’iode alimentaire (produits laitiers et œufs). (…) La diminution de la consommation de sel au niveau domestique et les incitations à limiter son utilisation pèsent de façon négative sur la promotion du sel iodé à usage domestique. Bien que son intérêt à long terme puisse être discuté, il est indispensable à moyen terme de favoriser les conditions d’une augmentation du taux d’utilisation (pénétration) du sel iodé dans la population, condition préalable à toute nouvelle augmentation du taux d’enrichissement. Rapport AFSSA (2005)
La carence en iode est très répandue dans le monde puisque, selon l’OMS, elle toucherait 1,5 milliards d’individus. Douze pour cent de la population mondiale présente un goître endémique et 20 millions de personnes ont un retard mental, incluant 3 millions de crétins. La carence en iode est la première cause de retard mental évitable dans les pays développés et représente donc un problème mondial de Santé Publique. L’International council for the control of iodine deficiency disorders (ICCIDD), créé en 1985, est une organisation non gouvernementale, qui promeut l’éradication de la carence en iode dans le monde. Son action conjointe avec l’UNICEF et l’OMS a contribué à diminuer la prévalence de la carence iodée à travers le monde par l’intermédiaire de programmes de supplémentation en coordination avec les autorités sanitaires de chaque pays. L’enjeu est énorme en terme de développement cognitif des populations. La solution sur le papier est simple avec la fortification en iode d’éléments-clés de l’alimentation. Cependant, les politiques sanitaires varient selon les pays et se heurtent à des problèmes de mise en place et d’accès aux aliments fortifiés. En conséquence, la carence iodée est très variable d’une région du monde à une autre ; elle serait par exemple six fois plus fréquente en Europe qu’en Amérique. En 2002, selon l’ICCIDD, 64 % des 600 millions d’Européens de l’Ouest et du Centre présentaient une carence en iode. En France, la supplémentation n’est pas obligatoire et se fait par l’intermédiaire du sel fortifié en iode. Le sel marin commun ne contient pas d’iode. À titre d’exemple, il est estimé que 46 % des foyers en France consomment du sel fortifié en iode, contre 90 % en Amérique et 27 % pour l’Europe en général. (…) Depuis 1952, en France, les autorités sanitaires ont donc recommandé la supplémentation en iode de la population via la fortification du sel de table par de l’iodure de potassium (10 à 15 mg/kg). Cette concentration en iodure est cependant considérée trop faible pour prévenir complètement la carence iodée. De plus, cette mesure n’est pas obligatoire, et ainsi seuls 46 % des foyers utilisent ce sel fortifié. L’Académie de médecine a recommandé un enrichissement en iode par iodures à la concentration de 20 mg/kg, portant sur la totalité du sel alimentaire destiné aux particuliers, collectivités et aux industries alimentaires. Chez la femme enceinte et allaitante, dans des zones géographiques à carence en iode faible ou modérée comme la nôtre, une supplémentation en iode de 100 à 150 μg/j est recommandée. John Libbey Eurotext

Et si le sel perdait sa saveur ?

A l’heure où, avec les incessantes campagnes et l’innombrable littérature en dénonçant les méfaits mais aussi la vogue des sels naturels, le sel pourrait bien disparaitre de nos tables ..

Qui se souvient, comme le rappelle une récente étude, que les Etats-Unis lui doivent un gain de 15 points de QI ?

Qui se souvient que c’est grâce à une campagne d’iodation systématique du simple sel de table à partir des années 20 qu’ils vinrent à bout de la fameuse « ceinture du goître » découverte entre les Grand Lacs et les zones isolées des montagnes ou plaines intérieures au moment du recrutement de la première Guerre mondiale ?

Mais qui se souvient dans l’Europe des « crétins des Alpes » et des « cous du Debyshire » dans les Midlands anglaises qui entre le manque d’iode et l’endogamie étaient devenus au XIXe siècle de véritables curiosités touristiques  …

Qu’avec seuls 27% des foyers ayant accès au sel iodé (46% en France), c’est justement cette zone qui est actuellement et à nouveau l’une des plus menacées, par la carence en iode ?

How adding iodine to salt made America smarter

The U.S. introduced iodized salt in 1924

A new study compares IQ results of people in iodine deficient areas before and after iodized salt

Americans born in iodine deficient areas showed an IQ increase of 15 points after 1924

Iodine deficiency causes goiter and mental and physical retardation in infants

Alex Greig

Daily Mail

24 July 2013

A new study indicates that Americans gained up to 15 IQ points after the addition of iodine to salt became mandatory.

In an effort to prevent goiter related to iodine deficiency, authorities ruled that iodine be added to U.S. salt products in 1924.

The iodine, in addition to eliminating goiter, appears to have had an unexpected result: smarter Americans.

In a report published in the National Bureau of Economic Research, James Freyer, David Weil and Dimitra Politi examined data from about two million enlistees for World War II born between 1921 and 1927, comparing the intelligence levels of those born just before 1924 and those born just after.

To do this, they looked to standardized IQ tests that each recruit took as a part of the enlistment process.

While the researchers didn’t have access to the test scores themselves, they had another way of gauging intelligence levels: smarter recruits were sent to the Air Forces, while the less intelligent ones were assigned to the Ground Forces.

Next, the economists worked out likely iodine levels in different cities and towns around America using statistics gathered after World War I on the occurrence of goiter.

Matching the recruits with their hometowns showed researchers that the men from low-iodine areas made a huge leap in IQ after the introduction of iodine.

The men born in low-iodine areas after 1924 were much more likely to get into the Air Force and had an average IQ that was 15 points above that of their slightly older comrades.

This averages out to a 3.5 point rise in IQ levels across the nation.

The World Health Organization backed up these results saying:

‘For iodine-deficient communities, between 10 and 15 IQ points may be lost when compared to similar but non-iodine-deficient populations.’

Iodine comes from food sources, and is especially abundant in seafood and foods grown in coastal areas with high levels of iodine in the soil.

Mountainous and inland areas are often very low in the nutrient, meaning food grown there doesn’t have enough iodine.

Today, iodine deficiency is the leading cause of preventable mental retardation in the world. The condition, known as cretinism, was also common in the U.S. until the introduction of iodized salt.

Originally, U.S. authorities wanted to reduce the incidence of goiter, but research since that time has shown that iodine plays an important role in brain development, especially during gestation.

The World Health Organization estimates that two billion people worldwide are at risk of iodine deficiency.

And it’s not just a Third World problem – the WHO reports that only 27 per cent of households in Europe have access to iodized salt.

The researchers say that iodine may also be a cause of the so-called Flynn Effect, the steady rise in IQ that’s been ongoing since the 1930s.

Voir encore:

In Raising the World’s I.Q., the Secret’s in the Salt

Donald G. McNeil Jr.

The New York Times

December 16, 2006

ASTANA, Kazakhstan — Valentina Sivryukova knew her public service messages were hitting the mark when she heard how one Kazakh schoolboy called another stupid. “What are you,” he sneered, “iodine-deficient or something?”

Ms. Sivryukova, president of the national confederation of Kazakh charities, was delighted. It meant that the years spent trying to raise public awareness that iodized salt prevents brain damage in infants were working. If the campaign bore fruit, Kazakhstan’s national I.Q. would be safeguarded.

In fact, Kazakhstan has become an example of how even a vast and still-developing nation like this Central Asian country can achieve a remarkable public health success. In 1999, only 29 percent of its households were using iodized salt. Now, 94 percent are. Next year, the United Nations is expected to certify it officially free of iodine deficiency disorders.

That turnabout was not easy. The Kazakh campaign had to overcome widespread suspicion of iodization, common in many places, even though putting iodine in salt, public health experts say, may be the simplest and most cost-effective health measure in the world. Each ton of salt needs about two ounces of potassium iodate, which costs about $1.15.

Worldwide, about two billion people — a third of the globe — get too little iodine, including hundreds of millions in India and China. Studies show that iodine deficiency is the leading preventable cause of mental retardation. Even moderate deficiency, especially in pregnant women and infants, lowers intelligence by 10 to 15 I.Q. points, shaving incalculable potential off a nation’s development.

The most visible and severe effects — disabling goiters, cretinism and dwarfism — affect a tiny minority, usually in mountain villages. But 16 percent of the world’s people have at least mild goiter, a swollen thyroid gland in the neck.

“Find me a mother who wouldn’t pawn her last blouse to get iodine if she understood how it would affect her fetus,” said Jack C. S. Ling, chairman of the International Council for Control of Iodine Deficiency Disorders, a committee of about 350 scientists formed in 1985 to champion iodization.

The 1990 World Summit for Children called for the elimination of iodine deficiency by 2000, and the subsequent effort was led by Professor Ling’s organization along with Unicef, the World Health Organization, Kiwanis International, the World Bank and the foreign aid agencies of Canada, Australia, the Netherlands, the United States and others.

Largely out of the public eye, they made terrific progress: 25 percent of the world’s households consumed iodized salt in 1990. Now, about 66 percent do.

But the effort has been faltering lately. When victory was not achieved by 2005, donor interest began to flag as AIDS, avian flu and other threats got more attention.

And, like all such drives, it cost more than expected. In 1990, the estimated price tag was $75 million — a bargain compared with, for example, the fight against polio, which has consumed about $4 billion.

Since then, according to David P. Haxton, the iodine council’s executive director, about $160 million has been spent, including $80 million from Kiwanis and $15 million from the Gates Foundation, along with unknown amounts spent on new equipment by salt companies.

“Very often, I’ll talk to a salt producer at a meeting, and he’ll have no idea he had this power in his product,” Mr. Haxton said. “He’ll say ‘Why didn’t you tell me? Sure, I’ll do it. I would have done it sooner.’ ”

In many places, like Japan, people get iodine from seafood, seaweed, vegetables grown in iodine-rich soil or animals that eat grass grown in that soil. But even wealthy nations, including the United States and in Europe, still need to supplement that by iodizing salt.

The cheap part, experts say, is spraying on the iodine. The expense is always for the inevitable public relations battle.

In some nations, iodization becomes tarred as a government plot to poison an essential of life — salt experts compare it to the furious opposition by 1950s conservatives to fluoridation of American water.

In others, civil libertarians demand a right to choose plain salt, with the result that the iodized kind rarely reaches the poor. Small salt makers who fear extra expense often lobby against it. So do makers of iodine pills who fear losing their market.

Rumors inevitably swirl: iodine has been blamed for AIDS, diabetes, seizures, impotence and peevishness. Iodized salt, according to different national rumor mills, will make pickled vegetables explode, ruin caviar or soften hard cheese.

Breaking down that resistance takes both money and leadership.

“For 5 cents per person per year, you can make the whole population smarter than before,” said Dr. Gerald N. Burrow, a former dean of Yale’s medical school and vice chairman of the iodine council.

“That has to be good for a country. But you need a government with the political will to do it.”

‘Scandal’ of Stunted Children

In the 1990s, when the campaign for iodization began, the world’s greatest concentration of iodine-deficient countries was in the landlocked former Soviet republics of Central Asia.

All of them — Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Kyrghzstan — saw their economies break down with the collapse of the Soviet Union. Across the region, only 28 percent of all households used iodized salt.

“With the collapse of the system, certain babies went out with the bathwater, and iodization was one of them,” said Alexandre Zouev, chief Unicef representative in Kazakhstan.

Dr. Toregeldy Sharmanov, who was the Kazakh Republic’s health minister from 1971 to 1982, when it was in the Soviet Union, said the problem was serious even then. But he had been unable to fix it because policy was set in Moscow.

“Kazakh children were stunted compared to the same-age Russian children,” he said. “But they paid no attention. It was a scandal.”

In 1996, Unicef, which focuses on the health of children, opened its first office in Kazakhstan and arranged for a survey of 5,000 households. It found that 10 percent of the children were stunted, opening the way for international aid. (Stunting can have many causes, but iodine deficiency is a prime culprit.)

In neighboring Turkmenistan, President Saparmurat Niyazov — a despot who requires all clocks to bear his likeness and renamed the days of the week after his family — solved the problem by simply declaring plain salt illegal in 1996 and ordering shops to give each citizen 11 pounds of iodized salt a year at state expense.

In Kazakhstan, the democratic credentials of President Nursultan A. Nazarbayev, who has ruled since 1991, have come under criticism, but he does not rule by decree. “Those days are over,” said Ms. Sivryukova of the confederation of Kazakh charities. “Businesses are private now. They don’t follow the president’s orders.”

Importantly, however, the president was supportive. But even so, as soon as Parliament began debating mandatory iodization in 2002, strong lobbies formed against the measure.

The country’s biggest salt company was initially reluctant to cooperate, fearing higher costs, a Unicef report said. Cardiologists argued against iodization, fearing it would encourage people to use more salt, which can raise blood pressure. More insidious, Dr. Sharmanov said, were private companies that sold iodine pills.

“They promoted their products in the mass media, saying iodized salt was dangerous,” he said, shaking his head.

So Dr. Sharmanov, the national Health Ministry, Ms. Sivryukova and others devised a marketing campaign — much of it paid for by American taxpayers, through money given to Unicef by the United States Agency for International Development.

Comic strips starring a hooded crusader, Iodine Man, rescuing a slow-witted student from an enraged teacher were handed out across the country.

A logo was designed for food packages certified to contain iodized salt: a red dot and a curved line in a circle, meant to represent a face with a smile so big that the eyes are squeezed shut.

Also, Ms. Sivryukova’s network of local charity women stepped in. As in all ex-Soviet states, government advice is regarded with suspicion, while civic organizations have credibility.

Her volunteers approached schools, asking teachers to create dictation exercises about iodized salt and to have students bring salt from home to test it for iodine in science class.

Ms. Sivryukova described one child’s tears when he realized he was the only one in his class with noniodized salt.

The teacher, she said, reassured him that it was not his fault. “Children very quickly start telling their parents to buy the right salt,” she said.

One female volunteer went to a bus company and rerecorded its “next-stop” announcements interspersed with short plugs for iodized salt. “She had a very sexy voice, and men would tell the drivers to play it again,” Ms. Sivryukova said.

Even the former world chess champion Anatoly Karpov, who is a hero throughout the former Soviet Union for his years as champion, joined the fight. “Eat iodized salt,” he advised schoolchildren in a television appearance, “and you will grow up to be grandmasters like me.”

Mr. Karpov, in particular, handled hostile journalists adeptly, Mr. Zouev said, deflecting inquiries as to why he did not advocate letting people choose iodized or plain salt by comparing it to the right to have two taps in every home, one for clean water and one for dirty.

By late 2003, the Parliament finally made iodization mandatory.

In Aral, Mountains Made of Salt

Today in central Kazakhstan, a miniature mountain range rises over Aral, a decaying factory town on what was once the shore of the Aral Sea, a salt lake that has steadily shrunk as irrigation projects begun under Stalin drained the rivers that feed it.

Drive closer and the sharp white peaks turn out to be a small Alps of salt — the Aral Tuz Company stockpile. Salt has been dug here for centuries. Nowadays, a great rail-mounted combine chews away at a 10-foot-thick layer of salt in the old seabed, before it is towed 11 miles back to the plant, and washed and ground. Before it reaches the packaging room, as the salt falls through a chute from one conveyor belt to another, a small pump sprays iodine into the grainy white cascade. The step is so simple that, if it were not for the women in white lab coats scooping up samples, it would be missed.

The $15,000 tank and sprayer were donated by Unicef, which also used to supply the potassium iodate. Today Aral Tuz and its smaller rival, Pavlodar Salt, buy their own.

Asked about the Unicef report saying that Aral Tuz initially resisted iodization on the grounds that it would eat up 7 percent of profits, the company’s president, Ontalap Akhmetov, seemed puzzled. “I’ve only been president three years,” he said. “But that makes no sense.” The expense, he said, was minimal. “Only a few cents a ton.”

Kazakhstan was lucky. It had just the right mix of political and economic conditions for success: political support, 98 percent literacy, an economy helped along by rising prices for its oil and gas. Most important, perhaps, one company, Aral Tuz, makes 80 percent of the edible salt.

That combination is missing in many nations where iodine deficiency remains a health crisis. In nearby Pakistan, for instance, where 70 percent of households have no iodized salt, there are more than 600 small salt producers.

“If a country has a reasonably well-organized salt system and only a couple of big producers who get on the bandwagon, iodization works,” said Venkatesh Mannar, a former salt producer in India who now heads the Micronutrient Initiative in Ottawa, which seeks to fortify the foods of the world’s poor with iodine, iron and other minerals. “If there are a lot of small producers, it doesn’t.”

Now that Kazakhstan has its law, Ms. Sivryukova’s volunteers have not let up their vigilance. They help enforce it by going to markets, buying salt and testing it on the spot. The government has trained customs agents to test salt imports and fenced some areas where people dug their own salt. Children still receive booklets and instruction.

Experts agree the country is unlikely to slip back into neglect. Surveys find consumers very aware of iodine, and the red-and-white logo is such a hit that food producers have asked for permission to use it on foods with added iron or folic acid, said Dr. Sharmanov, the former Kazakh Republic health minister. And the salt is working. In the 1999 survey that found stunted children, a smaller sampling of urine from women of child-bearing age found that 60 percent had suboptimal levels of iodine.

“We just did a new study, which is not released yet,” said Dr. Feruza Ospanova, head of the nutrition academy’s laboratory. “The number was zero percent.”

Voir encore:

L’homme de Flores, peut-être un «crétin des Alpes»

Isabelle Brisson

06/03/2008

Une carence nutritionnelle en iode serait à l’origine du nanisme de cet homme préhistorique.

Les restes de l’homme de Flores (Homo floresiensis) portent les traces caractéristiques d’une insuffisance thyroïdienne causée par un déficit en iode de la mère pendant la grossesse, indique une récente étude australienne (1). Les fossiles de cet homme préhistorique de petite taille, vieux de 18 000 ans, ont été mis au jour dans la grotte de Liang Bua sur l’île de Flores (Indonésie) et décrits en 2004 comme une nouvelle espèce d’hominidé.

La carence en iode induit un déficit en hormone thyroïdienne qui aboutit au goitre et altère dans certains cas la croissance corporelle et la maturation du cerveau, causant parfois un retard mental profond. Dans le cas de l’homme de Flores, les chercheurs australiens ont trouvé les traces anatomiques de cette maladie. Il s’agit d’un creux dans le crâne situé au niveau de l’hypophyse ou «fossette pituitaire» et du doublement des racines des prémolaires inférieures. C’est ce qui a certainement interdit à l’homme de Flores de dépasser le mètre de haut en taille, indiquent les auteurs de l’étude qui ont comparé l’image de son crâne à des crânes humains actuels ayant souffert d’hypothyroïdisme. «Cette pathologie se repère en principe sur les sutures crâniennes en fonction de l’âge», confirme le professeur Philippe Chanson, endocrinologue. Les paléontologues australiens en concluent qu’ils sont en présence d’individus atteints de cette maladie et non d’une nouvelle espèce humaine.

«Ebu Gogo»

À l’appui de leur démonstration, ils s’appuient sur de vieilles légendes locales qui relatent la présence de petits ancêtres velus, appelés «Ebu Gogo». Ceux-ci vivaient dans les cavernes de l’île indonésienne, avaient des problèmes d’élocution et volaient des fruits et des légumes dans les jardins. En France nous connaissons aussi cette maladie sous le nom de «crétinisme des Alpes». Autrefois, en effet, dans les régions éloignées de la mer, les populations qui vivaient en cercles restreints et dont les individus se mariaient entre eux souffraient de carence en iode.

Deux théories scientifiques s’opposent, parfois violemment, à propos de l’homme de Flores. Les uns y voient une nouvelle espèce atteinte de nanisme insulaire, les autres considèrent qu’il s’agit d’individus mal développés ou malades. Des études génétiques pourraient peut-être trancher le débat. À condition que les échantillons ne soient pas contaminés par l’ADN des chercheurs eux-mêmes…

Voir enfin:

Salt of the Earth

The public health community employs a mineral to fight infectious disease.

Cassandra Willyard

Geotimes

June 2008

In the tiny South American nation of Guyana lives a problematic parasite called Wuchereria bancrofti. This thread-like worm hitchhikes from person to person in the bellies of mosquitoes and lodges itself in the delicate vessels of the body’s lymphatic system. There it wreaks havoc.

The lymphatic system drains and filters the body’s fluids. But when tangled nests of worms infest the vessels, fluids can’t flow properly. Instead, they pool within the body, causing an infected individual’s limbs or genitals to swell and stretch. The disease is called lymphatic filariasis, but the symptoms have their own names, such as elephantiasis or the more colloquial “Big Foot.”Filariasis not only disfigures, it also disables. Some Guyanese are unable to walk or even stand, let alone work. And then there’s the stigma that goes along with having feet so large that no shoe will fit. (Men have been known to abandon their wives for less.) “These people become total social outcasts,” says Robin Houston, an international public health consultant who has worked in Guyana. “They can’t really do anything.”

Filariasis is difficult to treat, but easy to prevent. A cheap drug called diethylcarbamazine — DEC for short — kills the worms before they can cause damage or spread. Used consistently, it can stop transmission of the parasite. Distribution, however, is a problem. Guyana’s roads can be muddy and treacherous. Moreover, even in areas where the roads are passable, the country doesn’t have enough health workers to ensure that everyone takes the medication. So instead of handing out pills, the government decided to spike the salt supply.

Whoever first said, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure,” likely wasn’t thinking of salt. Yet the saltshaker has become one of the most powerful weapons in the public health arsenal. “Salt is an ideal vehicle,” says Trevor Milner, an international public health consultant based on St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands. “It’s cheap and it’s accessible to everyone.”

An ounce of prevention

The idea of putting additives in salt to promote health dates back to the 1920s, when salt suppliers in the United States and Switzerland began fortifying their salt with iodine. The measure was intended to combat a condition known as “goiter” — a swelling of the thyroid, a gland that sits just in front of the windpipe.

Goiters have plagued humans for at least several thousand years. As early as 2,700 B.C., Chinese emperor Shen Nung allegedly prescribed seaweed, now known to be rich in iodine, as a treatment. Although not especially painful, large goiters can interfere with breathing and swallowing. And we now know that they’re only a symptom of a much larger problem. “The goiter is the visible manifestation” of iodine deficiency, says Richard Hanneman, president of the Salt Institute in Alexandria, Va.

Iodine, a purplish-brown element that is rare in Earth’s crust but common in seawater, is essential for all life. Humans need about 150 micrograms each day. Most of that gets taken up by the thyroid and is used to make hormones that regulate metabolism. If the body lacks iodine, the thyroid doesn’t have the raw materials it needs to make these hormones. To compensate, the gland begins to grow, forming a goiter.

In the United States, few realized just how common goiters were until doctors began examining men drafted to serve in World War I. Simon Levin, a physician in Lake Linden, Mich., found that 30 percent had visibly swollen thyroids: Another 2 percent had goiters large enough to prevent them from serving. In fact, more men in northern Michigan were disqualified from military service because of goiters than any other medical condition. The state was in the middle of a swath of land that would become known as the “goiter belt.”

Before people got iodine from salt, they got it from their food. Foods pick up iodine from the soils where they grow (or, in the case of seafood, from seawater). But the element is unevenly distributed across Earth’s landmasses. Inland areas and mountainous regions tend to have iodine-poor soil. And because historically most of the food consumed was locally grown, the inhabitants of iodine-poor regions tended to develop iodine deficiency, and goiters.

Although health officials didn’t know it at the time, iodine deficiency also leads to much more serious problems. Expectant mothers who don’t get enough iodine can have children who are mentally and physically stunted — a condition known as “cretinism.” Even moderate iodine deficiency in the mother during pregnancy can reduce her child’s IQ by 10 to 15 points. Before iodized salt was introduced in 1978, the village of Jixian in northeast China was so iodine deficient, it was known locally as the “village of idiots.”

Doctors had been treating iodine deficiency with iodine syrup, but health officials wanted to prevent goiters, not just treat them. Obviously going door to door with bottles of iodine syrup wasn’t going to work. They needed to find a way to mass distribute iodine that would be economical and efficient. Salt was an obvious choice — it’s cheap, it’s easy to transport, it doesn’t spoil and everyone uses it. Salt is the “food that comes closest to being universally consumed,” says Venkatesh Mannar, executive director of the Canada-based Micronutrient Initiative. And the risk of overdose is minimal because everyone eats a predictable amount, between five and 15 grams each day: The same can’t be said of other commodities, such as sugar or flour.

What’s more, iodine occurs naturally in some salt deposits. In fact, until 1900, salt mined and used by residents in the Kanawha River Valley in West Virginia contained trace amounts of iodine. As a result, goiters were rare in the region. But then, the crude brown local salt was replaced with clean, processed salt mined in Ohio and Michigan. By 1922, 60 percent of schoolgirls surveyed in Charleston and Huntington, W.Va., had enlarged thyroids.

Iodized salt first appeared on grocery store shelves in Switzerland in 1921 and in the United States in 1924. In Michigan alone, the prevalence of goiter dropped more than 75 percent over the next two decades. Iodized salt didn’t begin making its way into developing countries until the 1980s. With support from UNICEF and the World Health Organization, however, it spread remarkably fast. Globally, the percentage of people with access to iodized salt has climbed from 20 percent in the mid-1990s to about 70 percent today. “It’s a great public health success,” Houston says.

Stacking the DEC

Salt iodization paved the way for other additives. In 1955, Switzerland began adding fluoride to its salt to prevent dental cavities. Soon after, people began to experiment with more controversial, human-made additives — first, the anti-malarial medication chloroquine, and later, DEC.

Lymphatic filariasis isn’t limited to Guyana. The World Health Organization estimates that more than 120 million people worldwide are infected with Wuchereria bancrofti or one of the other two worms that cause lymphatic filariasis in Africa, South America and Asia. Of those, 40 million have been disfigured or handicapped by the disease. The goal, as outlined by the World Health Assembly in 1997, is to eliminate lymphatic filariasis by 2020 — no easy feat given that the disease persists in some of the most isolated and impoverished regions of the world.

To combat filariasis, health workers usually prescribe DEC tablets. Each year, they try to get as many people in the affected areas to take a dose of DEC (combined with another drug) as possible. But the intervention is expensive and time-consuming. Guyana doesn’t have enough health workers to carry the tablets door to door. Put the DEC in salt, however, and it distributes itself.

There are other benefits to using salt. Large doses of DEC can cause side effects in those who are infected. The medicine kills microscopic worms in the bloodstream and a massive die-off can sometimes cause memorable symptoms — headaches, fever and nausea. People who agree to take the pill one year, might not the next. “I think it’s very difficult to mobilize an entire population to take a pill once a year,” Houston says. But the dose of DEC people get in the salt is so low “that it’s not associated with the same side effects,” says Patrick Lammie, an immunologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Ga.

The idea of adding DEC to salt to eliminate filariasis was the brainchild of physician Frank Hawking, father of famed astronomer Stephen Hawking. In 1967, Hawking published a paper in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization showing that DEC stays stable and potent in salt, even after being cooked. He and a colleague even tested DEC salt on mental patients and prisoners in Recife, Brazil, with good results. But it wasn’t administered on a large scale until the 1970s, when China began using it as part of a campaign to eliminate filariasis. “They were the ones that really showed that you could use this as a public health intervention,” Lammie says. “Over 200 million people in China received DEC salt.”

The results were impressive. In one county in Shandong Province, DEC salt reduced the rate of infection from 9 percent to less than 1 percent in as few as six months. After six years, doctors could not find anyone who was infected. Before the initiative, an estimated 31 million people in China were infected. As of 1994, transmission had ceased. In 2006, the World Health Organization declared China officially free of lymphatic filariasis.

But it’s unclear whether the strategy can work as well in democratic nations, Milner says. China’s situation was unique, he says. “They were very much a command and control society.” They mandated that certain regions use DEC salt rather than giving people an option. As a result, “they were able to achieve very high levels of population coverage,” Lammie says.

Success has proven more difficult to achieve in other countries, where officials must convince salt producers to make DEC salt, shopkeepers to carry it and consumers to buy it. “The question that hasn’t been fully answered is whether this kind of strategy can work in open markets,” Lammie says. Fortifying salt with an essential element is perhaps more socially acceptable than fortifying it with a drug. Guyana, which introduced DEC salt in 2003, is a test case. And things haven’t been going well.

One of the first problems arose even before DEC salt was on the shelves. Back then, most salt suppliers in Guyana sold salt in 50-kilogram bags. “The shopkeepers would parcel this out,” putting it into smaller unmarked bags, Milner says. To help prevent contamination and accidental spills, Milner and his colleagues asked the supplier to put the salt in individual labeled bags. They wanted to “upgrade the packaging and presentation,” he says. There was just one problem: On the label was a list of ingredients that included an FDA-approved anti-caking agent called potassium ferrocyanide.

The chemical had been in the salt for years, but seeing cyanide on the label gave Guyana’s residents pause. Their trepidation wasn’t all that surprising given that hundreds of followers of cult-leader Jim Jones died in Guyana in 1978 after drinking cyanide. “When they saw this name, the negative associations took place,” Milner says.

The next obstacle came soon after the salt went on sale. DEC salt should be white, but this salt had turned blue, says Nicola Butts, who works for Guyana’s Ministry of Health. It’s not clear exactly what the problem was (Milner says acidity, Butts says moisture), but according to Milner, the discolored salt was “off-putting.”

Once officials finally had coaxed people into trying DEC salt, they ran into supply problems. Guyana imports all its salt from neighboring countries. DEC salt comes from a single salt producer in Jamaica. In 2004, Hurricane Ivan destroyed the facility, halting production. By the spring of 2005, the country had run out of DEC salt. Even in fair weather, however, supplies can be unstable. “Guyana is fairly isolated in the trade networks,” Milner says. “It’s at the end of the line and transport is expensive.” Often the importers will wait until they can bring in an entire shipload of salt before restocking supplies. In the meantime, the salt supply dwindles. “In the case of the DEC salt, it ran out,” Milner says. The other importers took advantage of the opening and flooded the market with untreated salt. As of 2005, only half of the population used DEC salt and only a third of the shops carried it.

According to Butts, most of these problems have been resolved and she and her colleagues are making headway — mainly through public education. People used to think filariasis was hereditary, Butts says. “But now they know that it’s caused by a mosquito and that anybody can get it.” They are also starting to understand that DEC can protect them from the parasite. Guyana even has a catchy slogan: “Get on the BUS — Buy DEC salt, Use DEC salt and Share the information with family and friends.” And now DEC salt comes fortified with iodine and fluoride. “They are responding to it positively,” Butts says. But Guyana still has a long way to go before the disease is eradicated, as does the rest of the world.

Worth its salt?

Whether DEC salt will continue to play a role in the eradication effort is not entirely clear. Guyana is one of only a handful of countries that are using DEC salt. The fact that the strategy hasn’t been “a roaring success,” Lammie says, might mean it will be one of the last. “It’s an open question at this point whether Guyana can stick to this strategy. The fact that it hasn’t been a quick fix probably will lead other countries to be more cautious,” he says.

In retrospect, Guyana may not have been a good place to test DEC salt, Houston says. In fact, the country never even had a successful iodization program in place. “We had a number of things that conspired against us,” he says.

Despite the disappointments, Milner, Lammie and Houston argue that DEC salt can succeed. They point to China’s achievement and the mass distribution of iodized salt as proof of concept. “It seems so obvious that once you can get this thing working, it will eradicate the disease at a lower cost and in a shorter period of time,” Milner says. “The big ace card that we hold is that it works.”

Willyard is a Geotimes staff writer.

Voir enfin:

Pas de carence en iode !

Doctissimo

L’iode est un composant indispensable de notre alimentation. Et les carences sont dangereuses à plus d’un titre : du développement de l’embryon aux problèmes de thyroïde. Un dossier pour éviter les impairs et faire le plein de cet aliment santé.

Iode, un minéral indispensable

Iode minéral besoins Plus de 740 millions de personnes souffrent d’une carence en iode dans le monde. En France, les troubles thyroïdiens restent très répandus. Car certaines situations et périodes de la vie exposent particulièrement aux manques : grossesse, tabagisme, pratique d’un sport, végétarisme… Découvrez vos besoins pour mieux les combler.

Quels sont vos besoins en iode ?

Doctissimo

L’iode est un minéral indispensable à notre organisme ! Toute carence ou excès peut avoir des répercussions importantes sur la santé. Il est donc essentiel d’adapter ses apports à ses besoins, surtout dans certains cas : grossesses, sport… Petit guide pour garder la forme et éviter les coups de pompe.

L’iode entre dans la fabrication des fameuses hormones thyroïdiennes. Celles-ci sont fabriquées en permanence par notre organisme, tout au long de la vie. Des apports réguliers en iode sont ainsi indispensables pour couvrir nos besoins.

Iode à tout âge !

Bien sûr, nos besoins en iode varient. Ainsi, ils augmentent en fonction des années… Or selon l’enquête SUVIMAX, nos apports ont tendance au contraire à diminuer avec l’âge. Conséquence : les risques de carences augmentent au fil du temps, pour toucher un quart des personnes de plus de 55 ans.

Apports conseillés en Iode (en microgrammes)

Enfants de 1 à 3 ans 80

Enfants de 4 à 6 ans 90

Enfants de 6 à 9 ans 120

Enfants de 10 à 12 ans 150

Adolescents de 13 à 16 ans 150

Adolescentes de 13 à 16 ans 150

Adolescents de 16 à 19 ans 150

Adolescentes de 16-19 ans 150

Hommes adultes 150

Femmes adultes 150

Femmes enceintes (3e trimestre) 200

Femmes allaitantes 200

Hommes de plus de 65 ans 150

Femmes de plus de 55 ans 150

Personne de plus de 75 ans 150

Quels sont vos besoins ?

Les hormones thyroïdiennes, qui participent notamment au bon fonctionnement du système nerveux, sont plus sollicitées dans certains cas :

Chez les femmes enceintes et allaitantes : Hors de question d’avoir une carence en iode pendant les neuf mois de grossesse ! En effet, tout manque de ce minéral peut entraîner un retard mental chez le futur bébé. Les besoins sont ainsi plus élevés chez les futures mamans, de même que chez les femmes allaitantes. Pour bébé, il est essentiel d’éviter les carences au moins jusqu’à la diversification alimentaire.

Chez les sportifs : La pratique d’une activité physique semble particulièrement exposer les sportifs au manque d’iode. Les carences pourraient être liées aux pertes par la sueur. Il faut donc être vigilant, notamment en cas de chaleur importante.

Chez les végétariens : Les végétariens semblent particulièrement exposés au risque de carences. En effet, la viande, le poisson ou le lait sont des sources importantes d’iode. De plus, certains végétaux peuvent limiter l’absorption en iode.

Chez les fumeurs : Le tabac est un élément qui freine l’absorption de l’iode contenue dans les aliments. La cigarette serait ainsi en partie responsable de certains goitres. Ce serait particulièrement vrai chez les femmes enceintes, qui ont tout intérêt à se sevrer totalement…

En fonction des régions… Si vous habitez près de la mer, vous avez moins de chances de souffrir de carences en iode. Cela est certainement du à votre régime alimentaire, peut-être plus riche en poisson et autres crustacés. Donc pour tous ceux qui habitent dans le centre et l’Est de la France, à la montagne (même si le crétinisme à aujourd’hui disparu)… Il ne faut pas oublier d’insister sur les aliments riches en iode.

Gare aux anti-iode !

Attention, parfois les carences apparaissent alors que les apports sont suffisants : en effet, certains aliments vont empêcher le passage de l’iode dans le corps :

Le chou, le chou-fleur ;

Les navets ;

Le soja ;

Le manioc ;

Le millet.

Iode besoins santéDe manière générale, certains antioxydants, pourtant indispensables à la santé, sont nocifs à la bonne absorption de l’iode. Il s’agit notamment des flavonoïdes des fruits et légumes ou du sélénium… Attention, pas question de bannir ces aliments et nutriments de votre alimentation. Il faut simplement être vigilant et augmenter vos apports en iode en conséquence.

Pour limiter les risques de carence, une seule solution : manger varié ! Et ne pas hésiter à demander conseils à son médecin ou à un nutritionniste…

Louis Asana

Sources :

Apports nutritionnels conseillés pour la population Française, Agence Française de Sécurité Sanitaire des Aliments, 3e édition, Ed. Tec & Doc.

La carence en Iode, Mer et santé, fédération internationale de thalassothérapie, 2004


Mimétisme: Qui s’assemble se ressemble (What if it was flocks that made birds of a feather ?)

18 juillet, 2013
https://i2.wp.com/www.fubiz.net/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/babeltalesscreamingdreamers.jpghttps://i2.wp.com/www.ethanham.com/blog/uploaded_images/CommunicatingCommunity-731129.jpghttps://i1.wp.com/www.v1gallery.com/artistimage/image/588/BABELTALES.MemoryLane.jpgIl leur dit: Allez! Ils sortirent, et entrèrent dans les pourceaux. Et voici, tout le troupeau se précipita des pentes escarpées dans la mer, et ils périrent dans les eaux. Matthieu 8: 31-32
Ils se retirèrent un à un, depuis les plus âgés jusqu’aux derniers. Jean 8: 9
Comme le Père m’a aimé, je vous ai aussi aimés. Demeurez dans mon amour. Jésus (Jean 15: 9)
Venez à moi, vous tous qui êtes fatigués et chargés, et je vous donnerai du repos. Prenez mon joug sur vous et recevez mes instructions, car je suis doux et humble de coeur; et vous trouverez du repos pour vos âmes.Car mon joug est doux, et mon fardeau léger. Jésus (Matthieu 11: 28-30)
Nul ne peut servir deux maîtres. Car, ou il haïra l’un, et aimera l’autre; ou il s’attachera à l’un, et méprisera l’autre. Vous ne pouvez servir Dieu et Mamon. Jésus (Matthieu 6: 24)
Si donc nous maintenons notre premier principe, à savoir que nos gardiens, dispensés de tous les autres métiers, doivent être les artisans tout dévoués de l’indépendance de la cité, et négliger ce qui n’y porte point, il faut qu’ils ne fassent et n’imitent rien d’autre ; s’ils imitent, que ce soient les qualités qu’il leur convient d’acquérir dès l’enfance : le courage, la tempérance, la sainteté, la libéralité et les autres vertus du même genre ; mais la bassesse, ils ne doivent ni la pratiquer ni savoir habilement l’imiter, non plus qu’aucun des autres vices, de peur que de l’imitation ils ne recueillent le fruit de la réalité. Ou bien n’as-tu pas remarqué que l’imitation, si depuis l’enfance on persévère à la cultiver, se fixe dans les habitudes et devient une seconde nature pour le corps, la voix et l’esprit ? Certainement, répondit-il. Nous ne souffrirons donc pas, repris-je, que ceux dont nous prétendons prendre soin et qui doivent devenir des hommes vertueux, imitent, eux qui sont des hommes, une femme jeune ou vieille, injuriant son mari, rivalisant avec les dieux et se glorifiant de son bonheur, ou se trouvant dans le malheur, dans le deuil et dans les larmes ; à plus forte raison n’admettrons-nous pas qu’ils l’imitent malade, amoureuse ou en mal d’enfant. Non, certes, dit-il. Ni qu’ils imitent les esclaves, mâles ou femelles, dans leurs actions serviles. Cela non plus. Ni, ce semble, les hommes méchants et lâches qui font le contraire de ce que nous disions tout à l’heure, qui se rabaissent et se raillent les uns les autres, et tiennent des propos honteux, soit dans l’ivresse, soit de sang-froid ; ni toutes les fautes dont se rendent coupables de pareilles gens, en actes et en paroles, envers eux-mêmes et envers les autres. Je pense qu’il ne faut pas non plus les habituer à contrefaire le langage et la conduite des fous; car il faut connaître les fous et les méchants, hommes et femmes, mais ne rien faire de ce qu’ils font et ne pas les imiter. Cela est très vrai, dit-il. Quoi donc? poursuivis-je, imiteront-ils les forgerons, les autres artisans, les rameurs qui font avancer les trirèmes, les maîtres d’équipage, et tout ce qui se rapporte à ces métiers ? Et comment, répliqua-t-il, le leur permettrait-on, puisqu’ils n’auront même pas le droit de s’occuper d’aucun de ces métiers ? Et le hennissement des chevaux, le mugissement des taureaux, le murmure des rivières, le fracas de la mer, le tonnerre et tous les bruits du même genre, les imiteront-ils ? Non, répondit-il, car il leur est interdit d’être fous et d’imiter les fous. Platon
Nous sommes automates dans les trois quarts de nos actions. Leibniz
Qu’est‑ce que nos principes naturels, sinon nos principes accoutumés ? Et dans les enfants, ceux qu’ils ont reçus de la coutume de leurs pères, comme la chasse dans les animaux ? Une différente coutume en donnera d’autres principes naturels. Cela se voit par expérience. Pascal
C’est la coutume…. qui fait tant de chrétiens ; c’est elle qui fait les Turcs, les païens, les métiers, les soldats. Pascal
C’est être superstitieux de mettre son espérance dans les formalités, mais c’est être superbe de ne vouloir s’y soumettre. (…) Il faut que l’extérieur soit joint à l’intérieur pour obtenir de Dieu; c’est-à-dire que l’on se mette à genoux, prie des lèvres, etc., afin que l’homme orgueilleux qui n’a voulu se soumettre à Dieu soit maintenant soumis à la créature. Attendre de cet extérieur le secours est être superstitieux; ne vouloir pas le joindre à l’intérieur est être superbe. (…) Les autres religions, comme les païennes, sont plus populaires, car elles sont en extérieur, mais elles ne sont pas pour les gens habiles. Une religion purement intellectuelle serait plus proportionnée aux habiles, mais elle ne servirait pas au peuple. La seule religion chrétienne est proportionnée à tous, étant mêlée d’extérieur et d’intérieur. Elle élève le peuple à l’intérieur, et abaisse les superbes à l’extérieur, et n’est pas parfaite sans les deux, car il faut que le peuple entende l’esprit de la lettre et que les habiles soumettent leur esprit à la lettre. (…) Car il ne faut pas se méconnaître, nous sommes automate autant qu’esprit. Et de là vient que l’instrument par lequel la persuasion se fait n’est pas la seule démonstration. Combien y a(-t-) il peu de choses démontrées? Les preuves ne convainquent que l’esprit, la coutume fait nos preuves les plus fortes et les plus rues. Elle incline l’automate qui entraîne l’esprit sans qu’il y pense. Qui a démontré qu’il sera demain jour et que nous mourrons, et qu’y a(-t-)il de plus cru? C’est donc la coutume qui nous en persuade. C’est elle qui fait tant de chrétiens, c’est elle qui fait les Turcs, les païens, les métiers, les soldats, etc. Il y a la foi reçue dans le baptême de plus aux chrétiens qu’aux païens. Enfin il faut avoir recours à elle quand une fois l’esprit a vu où est la vérité afin de nous abreuver et nous teindre de cette créance qui nous échappe à toute heure, car d’en avoir toujours les preuves présentes c’est trop d’affaire. Il faut acquérir une créance plus facile qui est celle de l’habitude qui sans violence, sans art, sans argument nous fait croire les choses et incline toutes nos puissances à cette croyance, en sorte que notre âme y tombe naturellement. Quand on ne croit que par la force de la conviction et que l’automate est incliné à croire le contraire ce n’est pas assez. Il faut donc faire croire nos deux pièces, l’esprit par les raisons qu’il suffit d’avoir vues une fois en sa vie et l’automate par la coutume, et en ne lui permettant pas de s’incliner au contraire. Inclina cor meum deus. La raison agit avec lenteur et avec tant de vues sur tant de principes, lesquels il faut qu’ils soient toujours présents, qu’à toute heure elle s’assoupit ou s’égare manque d’avoir tous ses principes présents. Le sentiment n’agit pas ainsi; il agit en un instant et toujours est prêt à agir. Il faut donc mettre notre foi dans le sentiment, autrement elle sera toujours vacillante. Pascal
Si un homme ne marche pas au pas de ses camarades, c’est qu’il entend le son d’un autre tambour. Thoreau
Il nous arriverait, si nous savions mieux analyser nos amours, de voir que souvent les femmes ne nous plaisent qu’à cause du contrepoids d’hommes à qui nous avons à les disputer (…) ce contrepoids supprimé, le charme de la femme tombe. On en a un exemple dans l’homme qui, sentant s’affaiblir son goùt pour la femme qu’il aime, applique spontanément les règles qu’il a dégagées, et pour être sûr qu’il ne cesse pas d’aimer la femme, la met dans un milieu dangereux où il faut la protéger chaque jour. Proust
On ne peut pas observer les Dix commandments si on vit au sein d’une société qui ne les respecte pas. Un soldat doit porter l’uniforme et vivre à la caserne. Celui qui veut servir Dieu doit arborer les insignes de Dieu et s’écarter de ceux qui ne se soucient que d’eux-mêmes. La barbe, les papillottes, le châle de prière, les franges rituelles – tout cela fait partie de l’uniforme d’un juif. Ce sont les signes extérieurs de son appartenance au monde de Dieu, pas aux bas-fonds. Herz Dovid Grein (ombres sur l’Hudson, Isaac Bashevis Singer, 1957)
Pénétrez dans une demeure de paysan et regardez son mobilier : depuis sa fourchette et son verre jusqu’à sa chemise, depuis ses chenets jusqu’à sa lampe, depuis sa hache jusqu’à son fusil, il n’est pas un de ses meubles, de ses vêtements ou de ses instruments, qui, avant de descendre jusqu’à sa chaumière, n’ait commencé par être un objet de luxe à l’usage des rois ou des chefs guerriers, ou ecclésiastiques, puis des seigneurs, puis des bourgeois, puis des propriétaires voisins. Faites parler ce paysan : vous ne trouverez pas en lui une notion de droit, d’agriculture, de politique ou d’arithmétique, pas un sentiment de famille ou de patriotisme, pas un vouloir, pas un désir, qui n’ait été à l’origine une découverte ou une initiative singulière, propagée des hauteurs sociales, graduelle­ment, jusqu’à son bas-fonds. Tarde (1890)
I see Babel Tales as both musical and as a musical. A musical in the sense that it seems everyone in the images has stopped what they are doing to participate in some predetermined choreography – to tell a story, although perhaps it is one, which cannot be fully understood. They are musical in the sense that every person is like an instrument, they all have different sounds, but because they are all more or less performing the same actions, it’s as if they are playing a song together. These songs or stories are, in a way, a meta-story looking into the chaos of the mass of people; the mass of stories is exiting in one city. This fascination of mine comes from films where peoples’ paths cross in serendipitous or clandestine ways, particularly Short Cuts by Robert Altman and Magnolia by Paul Thomas Anderson. I am trying to show another way of finding commonalities between people, outside race or religion or any sort of predefined background. Where does the individual end and the group begin? And how do you define human behavior if this line is blurred? I think the answers lie somewhere when coincidences are too symbolic to be true, in magical points in time, or Cartier-Bresson’s decisive moment, where randomness always has a place where it clicks. Peter Frunch
Des neurones qui stimulent en même temps, sont des neurones qui se lient ensemble. Règle de Hebb (1949)
Le phénomène est déjà fabuleux en soi. Imaginez un peu : il suffit que vous me regardiez faire une série de gestes simples – remplir un verre d’eau, le porter à mes lèvres, boire -, pour que dans votre cerveau les mêmes zones s’allument, de la même façon que dans mon cerveau à moi, qui accomplis réellement l’action. C’est d’une importance fondamentale pour la psychologie. D’abord, cela rend compte du fait que vous m’avez identifié comme un être humain : si un bras de levier mécanique avait soulevé le verre, votre cerveau n’aurait pas bougé. Il a reflété ce que j’étais en train de faire uniquement parce que je suis humain. Ensuite, cela explique l’empathie. Comme vous comprenez ce que je fais, vous pouvez entrer en empathie avec moi. Vous vous dites : « S’il se sert de l’eau et qu’il boit, c’est qu’il a soif. » Vous comprenez mon intention, donc mon désir. Plus encore : que vous le vouliez ou pas, votre cerveau se met en état de vous faire faire la même chose, de vous donner la même envie. Si je baille, il est très probable que vos neurones miroir vont vous faire bailler – parce que ça n’entraîne aucune conséquence – et que vous allez rire avec moi si je ris, parce que l’empathie va vous y pousser. Cette disposition du cerveau à imiter ce qu’il voit faire explique ainsi l’apprentissage. Mais aussi… la rivalité. Car si ce qu’il voit faire consiste à s’approprier un objet, il souhaite immédiatement faire la même chose, et donc, il devient rival de celui qui s’est approprié l’objet avant lui ! (…) C’est la vérification expérimentale de la théorie du « désir mimétique » de René Girard ! Voilà une théorie basée au départ sur l’analyse de grands textes romanesques, émise par un chercheur en littérature comparée, qui trouve une confirmation neuroscientifique parfaitement objective, du vivant même de celui qui l’a conçue. Un cas unique dans l’histoire des sciences ! (…) Notre désir est toujours mimétique, c’est-à-dire inspiré par, ou copié sur, le désir de l’autre. L’autre me désigne l’objet de mon désir, il devient donc à la fois mon modèle et mon rival. De cette rivalité naît la violence, évacuée collectivement dans le sacré, par le biais de la victime émissaire. À partir de ces hypothèses, Girard et moi avons travaillé pendant des décennies à élargir le champ du désir mimétique à ses applications en psychologie et en psychiatrie. En 1981, dans Un mime nommé désir, je montrais que cette théorie permet de comprendre des phénomènes étranges tels que la possession – négative ou positive -, l’envoûtement, l’hystérie, l’hypnose… L’hypnotiseur, par exemple, en prenant possession, par la suggestion, du désir de l’autre, fait disparaître le moi, qui s’évanouit littéralement. Et surgit un nouveau moi, un nouveau désir qui est celui de l’hypnotiseur. (…)  et ce qui est formidable, c’est que ce nouveau « moi » apparaît avec tous ses attributs : une nouvelle conscience, une nouvelle mémoire, un nouveau langage et des nouvelles sensations. Si l’hypnotiseur dit : « Il fait chaud » bien qu’il fasse frais, le nouveau moi prend ces sensations suggérées au pied de la lettre : il sent vraiment la chaleur et se déshabille. (…) On comprend que la théorie du désir mimétique ait suscité de nombreux détracteurs : difficile d’accepter que notre désir ne soit pas original, mais copié sur celui d’un autre. Pr Jean-Michel Oughourlian
Les neurones miroirs sont des neurones qui s’activent, non seulement lorsqu’un individu exécute lui-même une action, mais aussi lorsqu’il regarde un congénère exécuter la même action. On peut dire en quelque sorte que les neurones dans le cerveau de celui/celle qui observe imitent les neurones de la personne observée; de là le qualitatif ‘miroir’ (mirror neurons). C’est un groupe de neurologues italiens, sous la direction de Giacomo Rizzolati (1996), qui a fait cette découverte sur des macaques. Les chercheurs ont remarqué – par hasard – que des neurones (dans la zone F5 du cortex prémoteur) qui étaient activés quand un singe effectuait un mouvement avec but précis (par exemple: saisir un objet) étaient aussi activés quand le même singe observait simplement ce mouvement chez un autre singe ou chez le chercheur, qui donnait l’exemple. Il existe donc dans le cerveau des primates un lien direct entre action et observation. Cette découverte s’est faite d’abord chez des singes, mais l’existence et l’importance des neurones miroirs pour les humains a été confirmée. Dans une recherche toute récente supervisé par Hugo Théoret (Université de Montréal), Shirley Fecteau a montré que le mécanisme des neurones miroirs est actif dans le cerveau immature des petits enfants et que les réseaux de neurones miroirs continuent de se développer dans les stades ultérieurs de l’enfance. Il faut ajouter ici que les savants s’accordent pour dire que ces réseaux sont non seulement plus développés chez les adultes (comparé aux enfants), mais qu’ils sont considérablement plus évolués chez les hommes en général comparé aux autres primates. Simon De Keukelaere
Faut-il se méfier de l’influence d’un ou d’une ami(e) obèse sur sa ligne ? Une étude américaine publiée, jeudi 26 juillet, dans la très sérieuse revue médicale New England Journal of Medecine, semble accréditer cette idée. Ainsi, le risque pour une personne de devenir obèse augmente de 57 % si il ou elle a un(e) ami(e) devenu(e) obèse. Si ce proche est du même sexe, la probabilité grimpe à 71 % et pour les hommes à 100 %. Las, s’il s’agit de son meilleur ami, le risque s’envole à 171 % ! Frères et soeurs représentent, eux, un risque accru de 40 % et les conjoint(e)s de 37 %. Le Monde
« Les gens qui sont entourés par beaucoup de gens heureux (…) ont plus de chance d’être heureux dans le futur. Les statistiques montrent que ces groupes heureux sont bien le résultat de la contagion du bonheur et non seulement d’une tendance de ces individus à se rapprocher d’individus similaires, » précisent les chercheurs. Les chances de bonheur augmentent de 8 % en cas de cohabitation avec un conjoint heureux, de 14 % si un proche parent heureux vit dans le voisinage, et même de 34 % en cas de voisins joyeux. Ces recherches « sont une raison supplémentaire de concevoir le bonheur, comme la santé, comme un phénomène collectif » expliquent-ils. Le Monde
Si le chant possède bien des vertus (lutte contre le stress, amélioration des capacités respiratoires), cet art quand il est pratiqué en groupe cache encore quelques mystères. Des scientifiques suédois viennent pourtant de révéler que lorsque plusieurs personnes chantent à l’unisson, leurs battements de cœur se synchronisent. En effet, non seulement les différentes voix d’une chorale s’harmonisent mais également ses pulsations du cœur. En prenant le pouls des participants de 15 chorales différentes, ils ont remarqué que leur rythme cardiaque s’accélérait ou ralentissait à la même vitesse. (…) Les recherches ont prouvé en outre que plus le morceau est structuré en différentes parties, plus les battements s’harmonisent. L’effet est encore plus visible quand le morceau choisi repose sur une rythmique lente. (…) Cette découverte rappelle ainsi la pratique du yoga dans lequel le contrôle de la respiration et son harmonisation joue un rôle important. Le HuffPost
Prier contre la maladie d’Alzheimer n’est pas seulement un acte de foi, mais peut être un geste thérapeutique. Selon une étude menée conjointement en Israël et aux États-Unis avec un financement de l’Institut national de la santé américain, la prière constitue un antidote très efficace qui permettrait de réduire de moitié chez les femmes les risques de contracter la maladie d’Alzheimer ou d’être victimes de pertes de mémoire et de démence «légères». Le Figaro
Revenons pour ce faire à notre précédent exemple du cri chez le bébé et observons tout d’abord que sa persistance dans le temps aura d’autant plus de chance de se produire que d’autres bébés se trouveront à proximité. C’est le phénomène bien connu de contagion du cri qui s’observe régulièrement lorsque plusieurs bébés sont rassemblés dans un même espace : pouponnière, crèche, etc. Dans un tel cadre, la hantise des soignants ou des éducateurs est que par ses cris, un bébé mette en émoi tout le groupe car le concert de cris peut alors durer de longues heures avant que la fatigue ne reprenne le dessus et permette un retour au calme toujours précaire. Remarquons que la hantise des responsables de ces tout petits hommes est exactement la même que celle de nos responsables politiques. Depuis la Révolution, ceux-ci ont bien compris que leur pire ennemi étaient les foules humaines solidarisées (prises en masse) dans un même élan acquis par imitation réciproque. Au XIXe siècle, les premières psychologies sociales (cf. Tarde, Le Bon, Sighele, Baldwin, etc.) répondent avant tout au besoin de comprendre (et de contrôler) ces « foules délinquantes » qui renversent l’ordre établi et font les révolutions. Toutes vont converger vers cet aspect fondamental de la psyché humaine qu’est l’imitation. Au XXe siècle, les mouvements fascistes en tireront d’ailleurs de très puissantes stratégies de manipulation des masses. (…) Tels des bébés qui, portés par l’imitation réciproque, se solidarisent dans un cri unanime et se canalisent donc les uns les autres vers une même activité à laquelle ils s’adonnent avec frénésie, de tout leur être, nous sommes dans quasiment tous les aspects de nos vies des êtres soumis aux normes des groupes et des communautés auxquels nous pensons appartenir, en particulier, celles de la société occidentale individualiste qui nous formate à l’idée que nous sommes des êtres rationnels, indépendants, autonomes, doués de libre-arbitre et donc rebelles à toutes les formes d’influence sociale. (…) Les meilleurs amis du monde sont souvent ceux qui, au travers d’un progressif « accordage » de leurs représentations, de leurs goûts et de leurs affects en viennent à être des « alter ego » l’un pour l’autre. Bien sûr, aucun ne cessera de voir ce qui le différencie de l’autre, mais leur proximité, et plus exactement leur similitude sur un grand nombre de points n’échappera pas à l’observateur extérieur. Cette logique d’accrochage automatique des cycles de l’habitude permet de comprendre l’omniprésence des phénomènes du genre il bâille, je bâille, il tousse, je tousse, il boit, j’ai soif, il mange, ça me donne faim, il regarde ici ou là, je regarde ici et là, il a peur, j’angoisse, il est serein, je suis rassuré, etc. (…) Que les choses soient claires : la soumission aux normes n’est jamais qu’un panurgisme, une imitation de la dynamique du troupeau auquel nous pensons appartenir. Manipulations et propagandes n’existent que parce que nous sommes toujours-déjà portés à l’imitation et au suivisme. Luc-Laurent Salvador

Et si c’était plutôt: qui s’assemble se ressemble ?

Conversation, combat, danse, amour, cris du bébé, baillements, toux, sourires, (fous) rires, chants, prières, prise alimentaire, obésité, anorexie/boulimie, rythmes respiratoire et cardiaque, mentruation (du latin mensis « mois », proche du grec mene « lune »), hystérie collective …

Alors qu’avec le dernier exemple en date du chant en groupe qui mène à l’harmonisation des rythmes cardiaques …

Mais aussi après les neurones-miroirs, les « bâtiments qui tombent malades », les choix politiques ou amoureux, les « orientations sexuelles », les bienfaits (ou méfaits) de la pratique religieuse ou parareligieuse (yoga, méditation), le bonheur, les épidémies de suicides,  attentats-suicides, divorces, émeutes

Pendant que sur la scène politique et aux cris d’allah akbar, le prétendu « printemps arabe » continue son inexorable et explosive progression …

La science comme l’actualité démontrent chaque jour un peu plus les effets de contagion dont, pour le meilleur comme pour le pire, sont faits les moindres de nos affects, émotions et comportements …

Comment ne pas voir le psychologue social Luc-Laurent Salvador …

Après Platon, Tarde et Girard …

Mais aussi contre la fiction moderne et occidentale de l’individualisme naturel et spontané (et de la commode et rassurante contre-fiction de la propagande et de la manipulation comme corruption de celui-ci) …

Et des bébés en crèche aux casseurs en meute ou aux fidèles assemblés …

Comme des simples amis ou amoureux en conversation aux ennemis ou combattants en lutte …

La formidable machine mimétique ou « machine à imiter » que nous sommes finalement tous ?

Théorie de la mimesis générale

Luc-Laurent Salvador
Agoravox
8 février 2013

Dans ce cinquième volet de notre introduction à la psychologie synthétique (cf. 1, 2, 3, 4), nous abordons la partie peut-être la plus fascinante de la psychologie humaine, à savoir, notre tendance à l’imitation. Bien connue depuis Platon, qui parlait de mimesis, elle n’a cessé depuis de faire l’objet d’un formidable déni au travers duquel nous tentons de croire en la vision romantique de l’être humain libre et indépendant dans ses désirs, ses choix et ses actes. De Spinoza à René Girard en passant par Tarde, Le Bon ou même Freud, nombre d’auteurs ont traité de l’imitation et de ses effets de contagion, mentale et comportementale, auxquels aucun aspect de l’humain n’échappe. Nul mécanisme explicatif de l’imitation n’a cependant fait l’objet d’un consensus. Nous allons nous tenir au plus ancien d’entre-eux, la réaction circulaire, qui n’est au fond qu’une formulation savante de l’habitude et dont le principe peut se retrouver dans chacun des mécanismes qui ont ensuite été proposés. Cette notion présentée dans le précédent article nous permettra de comprendre que si l’Homme est bien un être d’habitudes (postulat unique de la psychologie synthétique), alors, il est avant toute chose, une « machine à imiter ».

La première fois que j’ai présenté dans un cadre scientifique l’hypothèse selon laquelle l’humain serait une sorte de machine mimétique constamment portée à l’imitation, un auditeur malicieux m’a lancé « et quand on fait l’amour, on imite » ?

Si on pense que l’imitation c’est faire le perroquet, le mouton de panurge ou, au mieux, le bon élève, on pourrait voir là une objection sérieuse. Car lorsqu’ on fait l’amour, on est au plus près de soi-même, on se sent dans la pure spontanéité et certainement pas dans un quelconque suivisme.

Toutefois, réfléchissons, un couple qui fait l’amour, c’est quand même bien deux personnes qui tendent à maximiser leur similitude puisqu’elles sont … :

  • venues sur le même lieu
  • venues là au même moment
  • tôt ou tard, pareillement nues
  • toutes les deux dans le même contact peau à peau ; souvent elles sont lèvres à lèvres et, par hypothèse, sexe à sexe
  • toutes deux à se plonger dans le regard l’une de l’autre
  • toutes deux avec une respiration synchrone
  • toutes les deux à entretenir des mouvements de la zone pelvienne sur un même rythme, donc de manière synchrone.

Il apparaît donc que, par une imitation réciproque de tous les instants principalement affirmée dans l’accordage des rythmes, ces deux personnes en sont venues à se ressembler autant qu’il est possible et cela constitue, à mon sens, un parfait exemple d’imitation.

La seule différence remarquable qui persiste entre ces deux êtres, c’est celle des sexes — du moins pour un couple hétérosexuel. Mais là encore, le concave n’est-il pas une imitation en creux du convexe et inversement ? La serrure n’est-elle pas une reproduction en creux de la clé et inversement ?

Cette ressemblance active des partenaires fait leur unité et on peut même dire leur harmonie car on peut se faire à l’idée qu’elles se sont progressivement accordées un peu comme le feraient deux magnifiques instruments de musique disposés à jouer une symphonie proprement céleste.

Aussi étrange que cela puisse paraître, cet accordage est, toutes choses égales par ailleurs, le même que celui opéré par deux personnes en conversation ou deux personnes qui se battent. Les interlocuteurs ou les protagonistes se calent en effet sur les mêmes rythmes (ceux du tour de paroles ou du « coup pour coup ») et en viennent à se ressembler étrangement dans leur attitudes, leurs comportements, leurs émotions, etc.

Selon le psychosociologue Gabriel Tarde, toutes les interactions humaines seraient mimétiques d’une manière ou d’une autre. Autrement dit, l’imitation serait omniprésente et constituerait ni plus ni moins que « le fait social élémentaire ». Nous avons beaucoup de peine à imaginer la généralité et la puissance de ce processus, mais Tarde nous offre de remarquables illustrations… :

« Pénétrez dans une demeure de paysan et regardez son mobilier : depuis sa fourchette et son verre jusqu’à sa chemise, depuis ses chenets jusqu’à sa lampe, depuis sa hache jusqu’à son fusil, il n’est pas un de ses meubles, de ses vêtements ou de ses instruments, qui, avant de descendre jusqu’à sa chaumière, n’ait commencé par être un objet de luxe à l’usage des rois ou des chefs guerriers, ou ecclésiastiques, puis des seigneurs, puis des bourgeois, puis des propriétaires voisins. Faites parler ce paysan : vous ne trouverez pas en lui une notion de droit, d’agriculture, de politique ou d’arithmétique, pas un sentiment de famille ou de patriotisme, pas un vouloir, pas un désir, qui n’ait été à l’origine une découverte ou une initiative singulière, propagée des hauteurs sociales, graduelle­ment, jusqu’à son bas-fonds. » Tarde, Philosophie pénale, 1890 p. 39

Cette généralité du fait mimétique, quoi que nous en pensions, nous, — individus civilisés, libres et indépendants du XXIe siècle — n’y sommes pas étrangers, loin s’en faut

Que cela nous plaise ou non, nous prenons modèles, ici et là, d’un bout à l’autre de nos vies. Deux cas sont possibles : soit nous aimons être « tendance », suivre les modes, au gré des vents médiatiques, publicitaires et propagandistes, soit nous pensons résister à cela… en suivant d’autres modèles plus conservateurs, avec des valeurs et une culture que nous avons précédemment intériorisées — c’est-à-dire imitées — et auxquelles nous restons fidèles en les reproduisant avec constance.

Autrement dit, que nous ayons l’habitude du changement ou celle de la constance, nous sommes toujours dans l’habitude de l’imitation.

Au final, toute la différence entre ces deux extrêmes tient aux rythmes auxquels nous nous « accordons » aux autres : soit ils sont rapides et rendent le changement manifeste, soit ils sont lents et nous semblont alors cultiver la constance alors que, dans un cas comme dans l’autre, nous suivons le rythme et donc, nous imitons.

Comme le disait excellement le poète Thoreau : « si un homme ne marche pas au pas de ses camarades, c’est qu’il entend le son d’un autre tambour ». Comprenons qu’ à chaque instant, l’homme « reproduit » quelque chose, il imite donc. Ce qui n’enlève rien au fait qu’il puisse avoir sa propre manière de marcher. Disons le clairement une bonne fois pour toutes : la différence n’annule pas la ressemblance. Une reproduction peut être originale en amenant des variations ou des différences, elle n’en reste pas moins une reproduction.

Ceci étant, comment comprendre la généralité du fait mimétique, comment l’expliquer ?

Ainsi que je l’ai déjà suggéré plusieurs fois, si on considère l’habitude, comme étant (1) d’une absolue généralité et (2) une véritable « machine à imiter », l’omniprésence des phénomènes d’imitation cesse d’être un mystère.

C’est cette hypothèse que nous allons à présent explorer, l’objectif étant de comprendre comment il se pourrait faire que l’imitation soit le produit logique, nécessaire, automatique de l’habitude, c’est-à-dire, résulte inévitablement du fonctionnement des cycles perception-action ou des réactions circulaires dont nous sommes constitués.

Revenons pour ce faire à notre précédent exemple du cri chez le bébé et observons tout d’abord que sa persistance dans le temps aura d’autant plus de chance de se produire que d’autres bébés se trouveront à proximité. C’est le phénomène bien connu de contagion du cri qui s’observe régulièrement lorsque plusieurs bébés sont rassemblés dans un même espace : pouponnière, crèche, etc.

Dans un tel cadre, la hantise des soignants ou des éducateurs est que par ses cris, un bébé mette en émoi tout le groupe car le concert de cris peut alors durer de longues heures avant que la fatigue ne reprenne le dessus et permette un retour au calme toujours précaire.

Remarquons que la hantise des responsables de ces tout petits hommes est exactement la même que celle de nos responsables politiques. Depuis la Révolution, ceux-ci ont bien compris que leur pire ennemi étaient les foules humaines solidarisées (prises en masse) dans un même élan acquis par imitation réciproque.

Au XIXe siècle, les premières psychologies sociales (cf. Tarde, Le Bon, Sighele, Baldwin, etc.) répondent avant tout au besoin de comprendre (et de contrôler) ces « foules délinquantes » qui renversent l’ordre établi et font les révolutions. Toutes vont converger vers cet aspect fondamental de la psyché humaine qu’est l’imitation. Au XXe siècle, les mouvements fascistes en tireront d’ailleurs de très puissantes stratégies de manipulation des masses [1].

Notons que si on a beaucoup glosé sur la manipulation, c’est d’abord pour préserver l’idéal romantique du sujet en tant qu’être autonome dont le désir est absolument libre et absolument propre à sa personne ; c’est ensuite pour mieux masquer le fait que, le panurgisme étant ce qu’il est, le mensonge des dirigeants à l’égard du peuple a toujours été la norme et que nos « démocraties » capitalistes et consuméristes n’ont fait, en somme, qu’industrialiser une propagande (cf. The century of self) qui a été de toutes les époques.

Celle que nous connaissons actuellement a été d’autant plus efficace que tel un phare projettant dans nos esprits aveuglés le mythe de l’individu libre et autonome, elle a ipso facto produit la matrice d’une modernité dont elle se voudrait, autant que possible, absente.

Nous croyons mordicus en notre autonomie et notre libre-arbitre, nous les posons en principe explicatif de nos actes et, cette habitude de pensée, présente au plus intime de notre expérience quotidienne, structure automatiquement cette dernière de manière à se perpétuer indéfiniment, comme toute habitude digne de ce nom.

Autrement dit, si vous pensez vivre dans une société moderne, démocratique constituée d’individus libres et indépendants, il est clair que vous êtes vous-même victime de cette propagande née au XXe siècle. Vous pratiquez le même « grégarisme individualiste » que les Monty Python ont brillamment tourné en dérision dans cette séquence du savoureux film « La Vie de Brian ».

Tels des bébés qui, portés par l’imitation réciproque, se solidarisent dans un cri unanime et se canalisent donc les uns les autres vers une même activité à laquelle ils s’adonnent avec frénésie, de tout leur être, nous sommes dans quasiment tous les aspects de nos vies des êtres soumis aux normes des groupes et des communautés auxquels nous pensons appartenir, en particulier, celles de la société occidentale individualiste qui nous formate à l’idée que nous sommes des êtres rationnels, indépendants, autonomes, doués de libre-arbitre et donc rebelles à toutes les formes d’influence sociale.

Que les choses soient claires : la soumission aux normes n’est jamais qu’un panurgisme, une imitation de la dynamique du troupeau auquel nous pensons appartenir. Manipulations et propagandes n’existent que parce que nous sommes toujours-déjà portés à l’imitation et au suivisme. C’est pourquoi, avant de nous intéresser aux premières, il importe de comprendre la tendance à l’imitation.

D’où vient cette mimesis dont la puissance est telle que Platon allait jusqu’à nous prévenir de ne pas imiter ni la femme heureuse ou malheureuse, ni les esclaves, ni les méchants, ni les fous, ni « le hennissement des chevaux, le mugissement des taureaux, le murmure des rivières, le fracas de la mer, le tonnerre et tous les bruits du même genre… » (République 395d – 396b) ?

Platon nous met d’emblée sur la piste d’une affinité entre imitation et habitude qui est à présent bien connue :

« …n’as-tu pas remarqué que l’imitation, si depuis l’enfance on persévère à la cultiver, se fixe dans les habitudes et devient une seconde nature pour le corps, la voix et l’esprit ? » (République 395d – 396b)

C’est une évidence, l’imitation mène à la formation d’habitudes, bonnes ou mauvaises. Elle a donc constitué, depuis toujours, la base première de l’éducation. Mais cela ne suffit pas. Pour comprendre la généralité de l’imitation il importe que l’inverse soit vrai, à savoir, que l’habitude elle-même suscite l’imitation.

Le fait est que l’habitude est déjà un mécanisme de reproduction de comportements passés : les nôtres. Ne pourrait-elle aussi nous porter à la reproduction de comportements semblables, donc de comportements manifestés par nos semblables ?

C’est précisément ce que nous allons pouvoir constater. Pour cela, revenons à l’exemple de la réaction circulaire de cri du bébé qui est illustrée ci-dessous par la Figure 1. Pour résumer très vite, disons que cette réaction produit un cri qui est justement le stimulus qui la déclenche, l’entretient ou la stimule de sorte qu’elle ne cesse de se… reproduire.

Son mécanisme, excessivement simple, est constitué d’un simple lien sensori-(idéo)-moteur qui relie le percept à l’action motrice, faisant que l’actualité du premier amène la réalisation de la seconde.

En effet, à l’audition d’un stimulus, c’est-à-dire, d’un cri, la réaction circulaire qui le perçoit et le reconnaît comme semblable au sien va s’activer et reproduire le cri en question. Elle reproduit donc à nouveau « le stimulus qui la déclenche, l’entretient ou la stimule » et, dès lors, l’action consistant à crier va logiquement suivre, grâce le lien idéomoteur. La boucle est bouclée et peut se perpétuer ad libitum.

Ce modèle en cycle perception-action nous donne donc une explication très simple et immédiate du phénomène d’imitation : rien ne ressemblant plus à un cri de bébé qu’un autre cri de bébé, il est aisé de comprendre que le cri d’un quelconque bébé pourra stimuler la réaction circulaire de cri de n’importe quel autre bébé et souvent même de plusieurs autres. Ceci est illustré par la Figure 2.

En assimilant le cri de l’autre au sien propre, le bébé qui active sa réaction circulaire imite bel et bien son congénère puisqu’il reproduit son comportement en criant à son tour. Ce faisant, il renforce le stimulus et très vite les deux bébés crient de concert, produisant en chœur un signal plus puissant, plus stable qui entraînera progressivement tous les bébés alentours, même les plus sereins.

La phase clé de ce mécanisme mimétique est l’assimilation, c’est-à-dire, le fait qu’un individu perçoive le comportement de son congénère comme semblable au sien. C’est seulement parce que le bébé B assimile le cri de A au sien que cette perception peut enchaîner mécaniquement sur la production du même comportement, un cri, via le lien sensori-idéo-moteur constitutif de son habitude.

Ce qu’il faut comprendre, c’est qu’une fois l’assimilation opérée, l’imitation suit automatiquement — sauf si un effort volontaire nous porte à inhiber ce comportement. Cette mécanicité de l’imitation peut déranger, mais elle ne peut nous surprendre dès lors qu’on la sait adossée à l’habitude, LE mécanisme automatique par excellence.

Considérons à présent ce qui se passe lorsque notre écosystème d’habitudes se trouve en présence d’une autre personne et donc d’un autre écosystème d’habitudes.

La chose est très simple : partout où les habitudes de l’un pourront assimiler les habitudes de l’autres, elles se verront activées et si rien ne vient les inhiber, il y aura reproduction, donc imitation, le plus souvent en toute inconscience.

Les meilleurs amis du monde sont souvent ceux qui, au travers d’un progressif « accordage » de leurs représentations, de leurs goûts et de leurs affects en viennent à être des « alter ego » l’un pour l’autre. Bien sûr, aucun ne cessera de voir ce qui le différencie de l’autre, mais leur proximité, et plus exactement leur similitude sur un grand nombre de points n’échappera pas à l’observateur extérieur.

Cette logique d’accrochage automatique des cycles de l’habitude permet de comprendre l’omniprésence des phénomènes du genre il bâille, je bâille, il tousse, je tousse, il boit, j’ai soif, il mange, ça me donne faim, il regarde ici ou là, je regarde ici et là, il a peur, j’angoisse, il est serein, je suis rassuré, etc.

C’est mathématique : si nous n’avons pas de raison d’inhiber, nous imitons, d’autant plus que nous nous sentons proches (semblables) des personnes avec qui nous sommes en interaction.

Lorsque deux personnes sont engagées dans une conversation amicale le simple fait de changer de posture d’une manière ou d’une autre — comme croiser ou décroiser les bras ou les jambes — augmente considérablement les chances que l’interlocuteur fasse de même car (a) non seulement il n’a concrètement aucune raison d’inhiber ce comportement mais (b) il a, au contraire, toutes les bonnnes raisons de le faire vu que l’impact en est très positif : c’est en effet le meilleur moyen de montrer une empathie « sincère », le fait que l’on est « en phase » avec le locuteur.

Même si nous n’en prenons généralement pas conscience, nous percevons et nous aimons que notre interlocuteur vienne se synchroniser avec nos rythmes, jusques et y compris le rythme respiratoire. Qui n’aime se sentir en accord, « accordé » et donc approuvé ?

Cet accrochage des rythme est d’ailleurs devenu la technique de manipulation de base de la PNL. Car celui à qui nous disons « oui » par notre attitude, celui que, manifestement, nous suivons, sera par la suite mimétiquement porté à nous dire « oui » lui aussi, il nous suivra beaucoup plus facilement. Cette imitation réciproque est ainsi un « accrochage » au sens propre car il y a alors moyen de « tirer » la personne concernée dans la direction souhaitée.

* *

*

En résumé, le modèle en réaction circulaire met en lumière ce grand secret de l’habitude qu’est sa tendance mimétique. L’habitude est un processus de reproduction qui, parce qu’il s’appuie sur une phase d’assimilation, ne peut pas ne pas être mimétique puisqu’il y a toujours moyen d’assimiler un semblable à soi et dès lors, la machinerie de reproduction de l’habitude ne pourra manquer de s’activer à une occasion ou une autre.

L’imitation a ainsi toutes raisons d’être aussi générale que l’habitude et c’est précisément ce qui n’a cessé d’être observé [2]. Non pas seulement au niveau du bâillement [3] mais dans absolument tous les registres de comportements.

Ceci est, bien sûr, davantage une annonce qu’un constat argumenté. Il conviendrait d’indiquer le lien qu’entretient précisément chaque domaine psychologique avec l’imitation. Il serait encore plus important d’expliquer comment et pourquoi l’imitation est tellement générale qu’elle concerne la biologie, la chimie et la physique — d’où le titre de cet article. Tout cela sera développé dans le prochain article car il est temps de donner une conclusion provisoire et donc, de revenir à la question de l’autisme.

Conclusion

Nous venons de faire l’hypothèse que tous les phénomènes de « contagion » comportementale ou mentale que nous connaissons peuvent se comprendre comme résultant d’une tendance mimétique inhérente au mécanisme de l’habitude.

En concevant celle-ci comme une réaction circulaire ou un cycle perception-action qui se ferme sur lui-même et tend donc à se répèter indéfiniment en assimilant le produit de sa propre activité, nous comprenons aisément que cette dernière pourra être déclenchée, entretenue ou stimulée si le cycle en question assimile pareillement le produit de l’activité d’un de ses semblables.

L’habitude et l’imitation dépendraient donc toutes deux de ce processus clé qu’est l’assimilation, c’est-à-dire, le fait de reconnaître deux formes comme semblables ; ce qu’en informatique et en sciences cognitives on désigne souvent par le terme anglais de « pattern matching ».

Ce constat devient particulièrement intéressant lorsque l’on sait que la plupart des animaux sont dotés d’une certaine capacité à reconnaître leur semblables. Et cela pour… :

  1. la reconnaissance, l’attachement et la relation du nouveau-né aux parents nourriciers (et réciproquement)
  2. la reconnaissance, l’attachement et toutes les formes de relation aux congénères tellement importantes pour les espèces sociales.
  3. la reconnaissance de l’autre en tant que possible partenaire sexuel

Ceci est, bien sûr, tout spécialement vrai pour le petit de l’Homme qui, dès la naissance, sait reconnaître et les formes et les mouvements humains. Ainsi, en voyant le dessin d’un visage, même très schématique, le bébé reconnaît un semblable, il se sent en sécurité et se met à sourire.

Ceci étant, demandons-nous ce qui se passerait pour un bébé qui, pour quelque raison que ce soit, ne serait pas capable de reconnaître la forme humaine, sa propre forme, et serait donc incapable de s’assimiler les êtres qui l’entourent ?

Mon hypothèse est que ce serait tout le tableau de l’autisme qui en découlerait. Comme je ne peux argumenter à présent, je vais me contenter d’illustrer ce que peut donner un déficit d’assimilation en citant Donna Williams, elle-même autiste et auteur d’un livre remarquable : « Nobody Nowhere » traduit en français sous le titre « Si on me touche, je n’existe plus ». Voici ce qu’elle écrivait :

« Je me rappelle mon premier rêve — ou du moins, c’est le premier dont je me rappelle. Je me déplaçais dans du blanc, sans aucun objet, juste du blanc. Des points lumineux de couleur duveteuse m’entouraient de toute part. Je passais à travers eux et ils passaient à travers moi. C’était le genre de choses qui me faisaient rire. Ce rêve est venu avant tous les autres où il y avait de la merde, des gens ou des monstres et certainement bien avant que je remarque la différence entre les trois. » (p. 3) (tr. auct.) C’est moi qui souligne

Au travers de ce rêve Donna Williams nous oriente directement vers la problématique de l’assimilation. C’est cette piste que nous tenterons de suivre dans le prochain article.


[1] Cf. le livre de Serge Moscovici (1985) L’ère des foules qui est très informatif sous ce rapport.

[3] cf. le moche et cependant très riche site baillement.com

Voir aussi:

Les chanteurs harmonisent leur rythme cardiaque quand ils pratiquent en groupe
Le HuffPost
Baptiste Piroja-Pattarone
11/07/2013

SANTÉ – Si le chant possède bien des vertus (lutte contre le stress, amélioration des capacités respiratoires), cet art quand il est pratiqué en groupe cache encore quelques mystères. Des scientifiques suédois viennent pourtant de révéler que lorsque plusieurs personnes chantent à l’unisson, leurs battements de cœur se synchronisent.

En effet, non seulement les différentes voix d’une chorale s’harmonisent mais également ses pulsations du cœur. En prenant le pouls des participants de 15 chorales différentes, ils ont remarqué que leur rythme cardiaque s’accélérait ou ralentissait à la même vitesse.

Inspirant, retenant leur souffle et expirant au même moment, les choristes coordonnent leur respiration sur le même tempo. « La pulsation s’accélère quand vous inspirez et ralentit quand vous expirez », explique le Dr Bjorn Vickhoff avant d’ajouter que « lorsque vous chantez, vous êtes en train d’expirer alors le rythme cardiaque augmente ».

Les recherches ont prouvé en outre que plus le morceau est structuré en différentes parties, plus les battements s’harmonisent. L’effet est encore plus visible quand le morceau choisi repose sur une rythmique lente.

« Quand vous soufflez, vous activez le nerf vague (un nerf très important qui régule la digestion, la fréquence cardiaque) qui part du tronc cérébral jusqu’au cœur. Et quand celui-ci est activé, le cœur bat moins vite », explique le docteur. Cette découverte rappelle ainsi la pratique du yoga dans lequel le contrôle de la respiration et son harmonisation joue un rôle important.

Voir également:

La prière, une arme contre Alzheimer

Le Figaro

Marc Henry

26/07/2012

La prière régulière réduirait de 50 % le risque de souffrir de la maladie, selon une étude en Israël.

Prier contre la maladie d’Alzheimer n’est pas seulement un acte de foi, mais peut être un geste thérapeutique. Selon une étude menée conjointement en Israël et aux États-Unis avec un financement de l’Institut national de la santé américain, la prière constitue un antidote très efficace qui permettrait de réduire de moitié chez les femmes les risques de contracter la maladie d’Alzheimer ou d’être victimes de pertes de mémoire et de démence «légères». L’étude, lancée en 2003 auprès d’un échantillon de 892 Arabes israéliens âgés de plus de 65 ans, a été présentée récemment lors d’un colloque sur la maladie d’Alzheimer en Israël.

Le Pr Rivka Inzelberg, de la faculté de médecine de Tel-Aviv, qui a supervisé l’enquête, a précisé au quotidien israélien Haaretz «que, dans l’échantillon choisi, 60 % des femmes priaient cinq fois par jour, comme le veut la coutume musulmane, tandis que 40 % ne priaient que de façon irrégulière». «Nous avons constaté, dix ans après le début de l’étude, que les femmes pratiquantes du premier groupe (celles qui priaient cinq fois par jour) avaient 50 % de chances de moins de développer des problèmes de mémoire ou la maladie d’Alzheimer que les femmes du deuxième groupe», a ajouté la spécialiste. La prière, selon l’étude, a également une influence deux fois plus importante que l’éducation pour protéger les femmes contre cette dégénérescence cérébrale. «La prière est une coutume qui nécessite un investissement de la pensée, c’est sans doute l’activité intellectuelle liée à la prière qui pourrait constituer un facteur de protection ralentissant le développement de la maladie d’Alzheimer», a ajouté le Pr Rivka Inzelberg. Les tests n’ont pas été effectués parmi les hommes de ce groupe dans la mesure où le pourcentage de ceux qui ne priaient pas n’était que de 10 %, un taux insuffisant d’un point de vue statistique pour aboutir à des conclusions fiables. L’enquête a également permis de confirmer que la probabilité de souffrir de la maladie d’Alzheimer est deux fois plus importante chez les femmes que chez les hommes.

Parmi les autres facteurs de risque de présenter une démence de type Alzheimer, les chercheurs ont également retrouvé dans ce travail l’hypertension, le diabète, l’excès de graisses dans le sang et plus globalement les antécédents de maladies cardio-vasculaires.

Les bienfaits de la cannelle

Détail important, ces conclusions ne sont pas les premières à établir un lien entre pratiques religieuses ou spirituelles et santé. En 2005, des recherches effectuées en Israël avaient permis de constater que les activités spirituelles ont tendance à ralentir le processus de dépendance provoqué par la maladie d’Alzheimer. Une autre étude, menée sur un tout autre sujet, aussi en Israël, avait conclu que le taux de mortalité parmi les enfants était inférieur au sein des communautés très pratiquantes que parmi la population laïque.

Par ailleurs, le Pr Michael Ovadia, de l’université de Tel-Aviv, a réussi récemment à isoler une substance extraite de la cannelle qui freinerait le développement de la maladie d’Alzheimer. «L’avantage évident est que la cannelle n’est pas un médicament, mais un produit naturel n’ayant aucun effet secondaire», a affirmé le Pr Ovadia. Des expérimentations ont été entreprises sur des souris. Pour le moment, toutefois, il n’a pas encore été possible de produire à large échelle la molécule aux vertus curatives. Seule certitude, le marché est énorme avec 70.000 personnes souffrant de la maladie d’Alzheimer en Israël et plus d’une vingtaine de millions dans le monde, selon les chiffres de l’Organisation mondiale de la santé. En France, la maladie concerne 850.000 personnes. Les stratégies de prévention basées sur la pratique d’activités intellectuelles, sur le lien social et l’exercice physique ne doivent pas être négligées.

Voir aussi:

La prière, qu’est-ce que c’est?

Sans être une thérapie en tant que telle, il est indéniable que la prière peut avoir de véritables effets thérapeutiques, au-delà des connotations spirituelles ou religieuses. On peut affirmer au moins 2 choses sur la prière, lorsqu’on la considère comme une « modalité thérapeutique » :

  • Elle a des effets positifs observables et mesurables sur la santé.
  • On ne comprend pas bien quels sont les mécanismes qui entraînent ces effets.

Bien sûr, ces affirmations exigent certaines nuances. Les études sur les effets spécifiques de la prière sont relativement peu nombreuses, mais certaines ont démontré des résultats positifs. Les données actuelles semblent donc prometteuses et justifient la poursuite des recherches. Mais elles ne sont toutefois pas suffisamment concluantes pour faire accéder la prière au rang de « traitement médical »1-6.

Beaucoup de chercheurs sceptiques affirmaient toutefois, jusqu’à tout récemment, qu’en l’absence d’explication rationnelle permettant de comprendre comment agirait la prière, on avait affaire au mieux à des effets placebos, au pire à des fraudes7. Ce point de vue prévaut toutefois de moins en moins. En effet, plusieurs hypothèses sont désormais étudiées sérieusement; elles vont de la théorie quantique à la psychoneuroimmunologie (approches corps-esprit) en passant par la réponse de relaxation et même l’intervention « d’entités spirituelles » (voir plus loin).

Les scientifiques sont toutefois peu enclins à envisager des explications qui fassent appel à des notions comme la spiritualité ou la transcendance. Sans nier l’existence de tels phénomènes, ni même leur influence réelle sur la santé, ils préfèrent généralement exclure ces notions de leurs champs d’investigation.

En ce qui concerne la pratique religieuse, les données sont plus concluantes. De nombreuses synthèses d’études et des méta-analyses établissent un lien clair entre la pratique religieuse et la santé. Cela a d’ailleurs mené à la création d’un nouveau champ d’études, l’épidémiologie de la religion. Ainsi, 2 études8,9 ayant porté sur des dizaines de milliers d’Américains ont établi un lien clair entre la pratique religieuse et l’espérance de vie. Les chercheurs ont constaté que les gens qui ne s’adonnaient à aucune pratique religieuse avaient presque 2 fois plus de risques de mourir dans les 8 prochaines années que ceux qui pratiquaient plus d’une fois par semaine. Et l’espérance de vie à l’âge de 20 ans de ces pratiquants était supérieure de 7 ½ ans à celle des non-pratiquants.

Les chercheurs se demandent toutefois dans quelle mesure ces bénéfices sont attribuables à la pratique religieuse comme telle, ou au mode de vie « santé » qui y est souvent associé10. En effet, les personnes qui ont une vie religieuse active auraient plus tendance à manger des fruits et des légumes, à bien déjeuner, à faire de l’exercice, à dormir au moins 7 heures par nuit et à porter la ceinture de sécurité11. Ils auraient aussi moins de comportements à risque en ce qui concerne le tabagisme, la consommation d’alcool et la sexualité, par exemple12.

De plus, la pratique religieuse permet souvent de nourrir des relations sociales, ce qui est un facteur propice à la santé. Enfin, certains chercheurs ont émis l’hypothèse que la religion et la spiritualité, en donnant un sens à la vie et en procurant un sentiment de maîtrise accru, permettraient d’affronter plus efficacement le stress, la maladie et les difficultés13,14.

De quoi parle-t-on?

La prière – et tout ce qui touche à la spiritualité – est un sujet délicat où se mêlent des éléments culturels et sociaux, moraux et éthiques, aussi bien que religieux et scientifiques. Dans ce contexte, il peut être utile de préciser le sens de quelques termes.

  • La prière. Elle peut se définir comme une communication ou une ouverture au sacré, à la transcendance, à un aspect non matériel et universel qui dépasse l’existence individuelle. La prière peut se pratiquer à l’intérieur d’un cadre religieux ou non.
    On distingue 2 catégories principales de prière. La première consiste à diriger des paroles ou des pensées (de paix ou de guérison, par exemple) vers soi-même ou vers d’autres personnes. On peut la qualifier de prière personnelle. La seconde, la prière par intercession, fait spécifiquement appel à une puissance extérieure – Dieu, Bouddha, l’Univers – qu’on prie d’intervenir.
  • La spiritualité. Elle implique la croyance en des forces plus grandes que soi, actives dans tout l’Univers, ainsi que l’intuition d’une unité et d’une interdépendance avec tout ce qui existe. Elle débouche souvent sur le développement de valeurs personnelles, comme la compassion, l’altruisme et la paix intérieure. Tout comme la prière, la spiritualité peut être associée ou non à une pratique religieuse15.
  • La religiosité. Elle consiste à adhérer aux croyances et aux pratiques d’une religion organisée tandis que la spiritualité est plutôt une quête de sens ou d’une relation personnelle avec une puissance supérieure. La plupart des études scientifiques portant sur la guérison « spirituelle » étudient les liens entre la santé et la pratique religieuse (la fréquence de la prière, la participation aux offices religieux, etc.) parce que la religiosité est plus facile à mesurer objectivement que la spiritualité2.
Quelques chiffres révélateurs (dans la population américaine)16-20

  • 82 % des personnes croient aux vertus thérapeutiques de la prière.
  • 73 % croient que de prier pour les autres peut avoir un effet guérisseur.
  • 69 % des personnes qui prient à cause d’un problème médical spécifique estiment que la prière est très efficace.
  • 64 % croient que les médecins devraient prier pour les patients qui le leur demandent.
  • 45 % ont eu recours à la prière quand ils ont connu des problèmes de santé en 2002, contre 35 % en 1997, et 25 % en 1991.
  • 45 % disent que la religion influencerait leurs décisions médicales en cas de maladie sérieuse.
  • 94 % estiment que les médecins devraient discuter des croyances religieuses de leurs patients gravement malades, ce qui, en pratique, est bien loin d’être le cas.

Les effets observables de la prière

Plusieurs synthèses de recherches et méta-analyses2,7,21 ainsi que 2 études épidémiologiques portant chacune sur près de 4 000 personnes sur une période de 6 ans28,51 tendent à démontrer un lien direct entre la pratique spirituelle (personnelle ou dans un cadre formel) d’une part, et une meilleure santé ou une plus grande longévité d’autre part.

Selon le Dr Larry Dossey, un des chercheurs les plus réputés du domaine, les conclusions des recherches ne font aucun doute : la religion et la spiritualité sont excellentes autant pour la santé en général que pour des problèmes particuliers, comme les troubles cardiaques, l’hypertension, le cancer, les problèmes digestifs, etc.1

En ce qui concerne les vertus de la prière en particulier, plusieurs synthèses d’études2-4,7,22,23 concluent que, malgré beaucoup d’imperfections méthodologiques, elles tendraient à démontrer les effets bénéfiques de la prière pour certaines maladies6, dont les problèmes cardiaques (voir Applications thérapeutiques).

Beaucoup d’experts demeurent sceptiques devant ces résultats. C’est notamment le cas du Dr Richard Sloan24, psychiatre et professeur à l’Université Columbia de New York. Selon lui, les études sur la prière par intercession manquent de rigueur et présentent d’importantes lacunes méthodologiques. De plus, il considère que la médecine outrepasse sa sphère d’activité quand elle se mêle de spiritualité. Même s’il admet que, pour beaucoup de personnes, la religion apporte un réconfort quand la maladie frappe, cela ne signifie pas pour autant que la médecine devrait considérer les pratiques religieuses comme un traitement complémentaire25.

C’est également l’avis du professeur en philosophie Derek Turner, pour qui le fait d’étudier la prière à distance, comme s’il s’agissait d’un médicament, est un non-sens éthique et méthodologique26. Il déplore que plusieurs études sur le sujet aient été conduites sans l’obtention du consentement éclairé des participants faisant ainsi abstraction du droit fondamental des gens de se retirer de tels projets. Cet auteur soulève également de nombreuses questions comme le fait que rien n’empêche les participants de recevoir des prières de leurs proches ou que les groupes de prière ne décident de prier également pour les participants du groupe témoin. Il termine en mentionnant que les études portant sur la prière à distance ne font, finalement, que reproduire les tensions ancestrales entre science et religion.

De possibles effets négatifs

La pratique de la religion pourrait aussi avoir des effets pervers. Voici quelques-unes des conclusions auxquelles en sont venus des chercheurs, après avoir recensé les études à ce sujet27.

  • La culpabilité vis-à-vis de la religion, l’incapacité de se conformer à ce qu’elle demande ou les peurs qu’elle suscite parfois peuvent contribuer à la maladie.
  • La guérison « par la foi », si elle cause le rejet des traitements médicaux, peut entraîner de graves conséquences allant jusqu’à la mort.
  • Des problèmes de dépression ont été associés à une pratique religieuse extrinsèque (lorsque la religion est surtout considérée comme utilitaire et comporte un Dieu extérieur à la fois tout puissant, mais aussi despotique, ou qu’on peut blâmer dans l’adversité).
  • Les relations interpersonnelles négatives et les critiques subies dans un cadre religieux accroîtraient aussi les risques de dépression.
  • Chez les personnes âgées ou gravement malades, les doutes et les conflits intérieurs au sujet de la foi sont liés à une augmentation significative du risque de mortalité.

Les mécanismes d’explication

Des facteurs psychosociaux ou l’effet placebo peuvent expliquer certains des effets de la pratique religieuse. Ce n’est toutefois pas le cas pour la prière par intercession. Selon le Dr Dale Matthews3, dans le cas des études à double insu sur la prière à distance, même quand on élimine toutes les variables confondantes (l’âge, l’état de santé préalable, les facteurs sociaux, etc.), les conclusions demeurent et ne peuvent pas être expliquées uniquement par la science classique. Rien dans la science médicale actuelle ne peut expliquer pourquoi des gens pour qui on a prié obtiendraient des résultats différents des autres. Ces différences ne pourraient être attribuables qu’à une force « surnaturelle » ou alors à un type « d’énergie » dont on ne connaît pas encore la nature.

Le Dr Harold Koenig, qui a publié plusieurs études sur la prière et la religiosité10,12,21,28, admet qu’on peut être tenté de croire que leurs conséquences sur la santé ne dépendent pas que du soutien social, du mode de vie ou de l’effet méditatif. Il y aurait « autre chose ». Les croyants diront que c’est l’intervention de Dieu. Les scientifiques diront qu’il s’agit de quelque chose qu’on ne peut pas expliquer pour le moment2. Voici certaines des hypothèses qui se profilent à l’horizon.

La psychoneuroimmunologie. Cette science, qui a vu le jour il y a tout juste 25 ans (voir la fiche Approches corps-esprit), étudie l’interdépendance entre le corps et l’esprit, entre la biologie et les pensées… Déjà en 200029, des chercheurs affirmaient, à partir d’une recension de recherches expérimentales et cliniques, qu’il était désormais certain que le corps et l’esprit s’influencent mutuellement que ce soit pour tendre vers la santé ou la maladie. D’autre part, il est reconnu scientifiquement qu’en dirigeant des pensées avec une intention précise, on peut jouer sur des systèmes aléatoires simples, même si les effets mesurés sont très faibles22.

Selon certains chercheurs, si on pouvait démontrer que des pensées dirigées intentionnellement – peu importe la distance – avaient une influence sur la guérison, cela impliquerait que les êtres humains sont beaucoup plus reliés entre eux et responsables les uns des autres qu’on ne l’aurait cru jusqu’à présent. Si ces liens existent, proviennent-ils de Dieu, de la conscience, de l’amour, des électrons ou d’une combinaison de tout cela? Des recherches futures y répondront peut-être…30

La physique quantique. La physique moderne explique que tout objet – un crayon ou une maison – peut être vu comme un amas de particules en mouvement contenant en réalité une infime quantité de « matière ». Ce qui donne leur forme, leur « matérialité », aux objets provient bien plus du mouvement rapide de leurs particules – de leur « énergie » – que de leur « matière ». La médecine moderne commence à imaginer qu’il puisse en être de même des organismes vivants qu’on pourrait décrire en tant qu’entités énergétiques.

De plus, la physique quantique a constaté que des particules subatomiques qui ont été en contact entre elles et qui sont ensuite séparées demeurent « en lien ». Un changement dans une particule est instantanément reproduit dans l’autre particule, même si elle se trouve à des milliers de kilomètres. C’est ce qu’on appelle la non-localité.

Se pourrait-il qu’un phénomène semblable se produise dans la pensée et explique le fonctionnement de la prière à distance? C’est la question sur laquelle se penchent actuellement certains scientifiques1,31,32.

L’effet méditatif et la réponse de relaxation. Une synthèse de recherches15 a confirmé que le fait de réciter des prières ou de s’adonner à des pratiques spirituelles induit un état de relaxation semblable à celui qui est procuré par la méditation. Cela stimule les fonctions neurologiques, endocrines, immunitaires et cardiovasculaires.

À la fin des années 1960, le Dr Herbert Benson, directeur émérite du Benson-Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine, a constaté que la répétition de mouvements, de sons, de phrases ou de mots (comme dans le cas de la prière) crée un ensemble de réactions métaboliques et émotives. Parmi celles-ci, l’activation de certaines zones du cerveau, la diminution du rythme cardiaque et de la pression sanguine, et une quiétude généralisée33. Il a nommé ce phénomène la réponse de relaxation en opposition à la « réponse au stress » qui, elle, provoque une augmentation du rythme cardiaque, une montée d’adrénaline, plus de tension musculaire, etc. Cela pourrait expliquer en partie les bienfaits de la prière sur la santé. Selon le Dr Benson, l’état de bien-être et « d’unité » qui résulte d’une séance de prière pourra être interprété, encore une fois, comme une connexion divine par les croyants, et comme un simple attribut du cerveau par les non-croyants.

Mentionnons également qu’une autre étude34 a permis de constater que la récitation traditionnelle du rosaire (l’Ave Maria en latin) et du mantra yogique om-mani-padme-om entraînent tous deux un ajustement de la respiration à 6 cycles par minute. Des chercheurs ont constaté que ce rythme est particulièrement bénéfique pour les fonctions cardiovasculaires et respiratoires, l’oxygénation du sang et la résistance à l’effort. Ils émettent l’hypothèse que les rythmes des prières et des mantras ont été choisis parce qu’ils permettaient de se synchroniser avec certains rythmes bienfaisants inhérents à la physiologie humaine.

Et Dieu dans tout ça?

Il y a quelques années, par l’intermédiaire de la revue Archives of Internal Medicine de l’American Medical Association, plusieurs spécialistes se sont penchés sur l’opportunité de tenir compte d’une dimension « divine » dans les recherches scientifiques sur la prière35. Certains considèrent que la prière implique une relation directe entre les humains et une réalité transcendante, hors du cadre de la nature, et que, par conséquent, la science – qui étudie la nature – ne devrait pas s’en préoccuper.

D’autres affirment que, si la prière fait intervenir un élément « divin », doté de sa sagesse et de ses intentions propres, la science, ne pouvant contrôler cette « variable », devrait se retirer de ce champ d’investigation.

Un autre point de vue est qu’il serait souhaitable que la science et la médecine reconnaissent beaucoup plus l’importance de la religion et de la spiritualité sur la santé, même si elles ne peuvent appliquer la méthode scientifique aux recherches sur la prière.

Différentes traditions spirituelles, comme le bouddhisme et l’anthroposophie (voir la fiche Médecine anthroposophique), proposent un tout autre point de vue. Selon elles, on devrait inclure la science matérielle, telle que nous la connaissons actuellement, à l’intérieur du domaine plus vaste d’une véritable « science spirituelle ». Cette science inclusive serait dotée d’outils de mesure allant au-delà de nos 5 sens, de façon à inclure les phénomènes de l’esprit dans ses recherches.

Les médecins devraient-ils parler de spiritualité avec leurs patients?

Même si, selon des sondages américains, plus de 80 % des gens croient que la prière ou un contact avec Dieu peut avoir un effet thérapeutique, et que près de 70 % des médecins disent que les patients leur font des demandes de nature religieuse en phase terminale, seulement 10 % des médecins s’informeraient des pratiques ou des croyances spirituelles de leurs patients1.

À cet égard, une étude a conclu qu’en fonction des données scientifiques qui établissent un lien entre la pratique religieuse et la santé, et du besoin d’établir un contact plus humain entre les médecins et leurs patients, il est important pour les praticiens de la santé d’aborder les questions de religion et de spiritualité avec leurs patients de façon respectueuse, avec intégrité et dignité3. C’est d’ailleurs ce que réclament de plus en plus les patients, qui y voient entre autres une façon d’humaniser les soins.

Un chercheur australien, après s’être penché à fond sur la question en 200736, a conclu que :

  • Les plus récentes études démontrent l’importance d’inclure dans la pratique clinique les préoccupations spirituelles et religieuses des patients. Sinon, on risque de passer à côté d’éléments déterminants pour leur guérison et leur bien-être.
  • Quand ils se préoccupent de la dimension spirituelle de leur patient, les intervenants de la santé démontrent leur intérêt pour la personne toute entière. Cela peut améliorer la relation patient-intervenant et ainsi accroître l’effet des traitements.
  • Les professionnels de la santé ne devraient toutefois pas « prescrire » de pratiques religieuses ou faire la promotion de leurs propres croyances. Pour des consultations en profondeur, ils devraient pouvoir diriger leurs patients vers les personnes-ressources appropriées.
  • Les médecins pourraient inclure, dans le bilan de santé de leurs patients, des questions pour connaître leur histoire « spirituelle ». Voici les 4 questions proposées par un comité de l’American College of Physicians (le Collège des médecins américain).
    – Est-ce que la foi, la religion ou la spiritualité sont importantes pour vous?
    – Ont-elles été importantes à d’autres moments de votre vie?
    – Y a-t-il quelqu’un avec qui vous pouvez parler de ces questions?
    – Aimeriez-vous aborder ces questions avec quelqu’un?

Applications thérapeutiques de la prière

De nombreuses études se sont penchées sur les liens entre la spiritualité et la santé. Elles peuvent être divisées en 2 catégories principales. D’une part, les études sur la pratique religieuse, incluant la fréquentation de l’église, la prière personnelle, la méditation spirituelle et la lecture et l’étude de livres sacrés comme la Bible37,52. D’autre part, celles qui évaluent la prière par intercession, c’est-à-dire demander à Dieu, à l’Univers ou à une puissance supérieure d’intervenir en faveur d’un individu ou d’un patient7.

Pratique religieuse

Efficace Augmenter l’espérance de vie. Le lien entre l’implication religieuse et le taux de mortalité a fait l’objet d’une revue publiée en 20048. Les auteurs ont conclu qu’il existe un lien clair entre ces deux variables au sein de la population américaine. Le mécanisme par lequel l’implication religieuse influencerait la mortalité comprendrait des éléments comme l’intégration et le soutien social, la régulation sociale (normes à propos des drogues ou de l’alcool et de certains comportements, par exemple) ainsi que la disponibilité de ressources psychologiques.

Efficace Mieux réagir devant des situations stressantes. En 2005, dans une méta-analyse regroupant 49 études48, des chercheurs ont tenté de savoir si la présence de la religion dans la vie des gens pouvait avoir une influence sur leur capacité à affronter des situations stressantes. Les résultats indiquent que, lorsque la religion est vue « positivement » (je fais partie d’un grand tout spirituel, Dieu est un partenaire qui m’aide et me pardonne…), cela permet effectivement de combattre le stress de façon significativement plus efficace. Par contre, une vision « négative » de la religion (Dieu me guette et pourrait me punir, existe-t-Il vraiment…) entraîne à l’opposé une amplification des conséquences néfastes du stress, comme l’anxiété et la dépression.

En 2010, une étude aléatoire, réalisée auprès de 111 étudiants universitaires, avait pour objectif d’évaluer les changements de niveau de stress lors d’une entrevue de 4 minutes53. Au milieu de l’entrevue, ils devaient, pour se détendre, soit lire un texte neutre, un texte d’automotivation ou une prière. Les résultats ont montré qu’une plus grande réduction de stress a été observée chez les groupes automotivation et prière que chez le groupe témoin (texte neutre). Mais il n’y a pas eu de différence significative entre le groupe prière et le groupe automotivation.

Efficace Favoriser la bonne santé mentale. Dans les années 2006 à 2008, des revues de la littérature scientifique ont étudié le lien entre la religiosité et la santé mentale10,54,55. La majorité des études s’accordent sur le fait qu’une implication religieuse importante est positivement associée à des indicateurs de bien-être psychologique (satisfaction face à sa vie, bonheur, etc.) ainsi qu’à une moindre incidence de dépression, de pensées et comportements suicidaires, et d’abus ou de consommation d’alcool et de drogues. De plus, cet effet positif serait davantage marqué chez les personnes aux prises avec des situations stressantes. Les auteurs exposent également des théories pouvant expliquer cette association positive, par exemple le fait que la plupart des religions prônent des comportements et des styles de vie sains ou encore fournissent un soutien social et psychologique accessible en cas de besoin.

Efficace Promouvoir des comportements sains chez les adolescents. Une revue systématique (en 2006) regroupant 43 études s’est penchée sur l’association entre la religiosité/spiritualité des adolescents et les attitudes et comportements propices à favoriser une bonne santé49 : exercices, saines habitudes alimentaires, sommeil suffisant, pratiques sexuelles saines, etc. Plus de 3 études sur 4 ont conclu qu’il existait un lien entre la santé et la religiosité/spiritualité.

Efficacité incertaine Améliorer la qualité de vie en cas de cancer. Le lien entre la religiosité/spiritualité et le cancer a fait l’objet d’une revue systématique en 2006 dans laquelle 17 études ont été retenues50. De ce nombre, 7 ont conclu que la religiosité améliorerait l’adaptation à long terme à la maladie. Elle favoriserait entre autres le maintien de l’estime de soi et d’un sens et un but à la vie, ainsi que le bien-être émotionnel et l’espoir en l’avenir. Par contre, 7 études n’ont montré aucun lien significatif de cet ordre. Les 3 autres ont conclu que la religiosité pouvait même être néfaste lorsqu’un individu devait combattre contre le cancer. Selon les auteurs, pour le moment, aucune conclusion ferme ne peut être tirée au sujet du lien entre religiosité et l’adaptation au cancer.

Efficacité incertaine Atténuer les symptômes de la ménopause. En 2009, une enquête canadienne sur l’utilisation des médecines alternatives et complémentaires, réalisée auprès de femmes ménopausées, a été publiée56. Quatre-vingt-onze pour cent des femmes ont rapporté avoir utilisé une thérapie alternative et complémentaire, parmi lesquelles, 35,7 % utilisaient la prière pour soulager leurs symptômes de ménopause. Les auteurs ont observé que les thérapies considérées comme les plus efficaces par les utilisatrices étaient la prière et la spiritualité (73,2 %), la relaxation (71,0 %), le counseling (66,4 %) et le toucher thérapeutique ainsi que le Reiki (66,0 %).

Efficacité incertaine Améliorer la survie des personnes atteintes du VIH. Pendant 3 ans, 901 personnes atteintes du VIH ont été suivies afin de documenter l’utilisation des thérapies corps-esprit et spirituelles57. Les chercheurs ont constaté une association entre les activités spirituelles, comme la prière, la méditation et la visualisation et une amélioration du taux de survie. Cette relation était plus marquée chez les patients qui étaient moins gravement atteints par la maladie.

Prière par intercession

Efficacité incertaine Atténuer les problèmes de santé en général. Une revue de la littérature scientifique, comprenant uniquement des études cliniques aléatoires, a été publiée en 2009 à ce sujet6. Les auteurs jugent qu’on ne peut tirer de conclusions fiables de ces études, dont la plupart présentent des résultats équivoques. Ils constatent toutefois que, pour la fertilisation in vitro38, la prière pourrait avoir montré un certain effet positif (voir plus loin). Ils concluent tout de même que les résultats accumulés jusqu’à présent sont suffisamment intéressants pour justifier de continuer la recherche.

Efficacité incertaine Réduire les complications des chirurgies cardiaques. Quatre études cliniques aléatoires d’envergure ont évalué l’influence de la prière auprès de patients souffrant de problèmes cardiaques. Les 2 premières ont révélé des résultats positifs. Dans les 2 autres, la prière n’a montré aucun effet bénéfique. La quatrième étude a même fait état de résultats négatifs dans le cas où les gens savaient qu’on priait pour eux.

La première, publiée en 1988, comprenait 393 patients devant subir une chirurgie cardiaque39. Des chrétiens qui ne les connaissaient pas ont prié quotidiennement pour la moitié d’entre eux jusqu’à leur sortie de l’hôpital. Les participants du groupe prière ont eu besoin de moins d’assistance ventilatoire, d’antibiotiques et de diurétiques à la suite de l’opération en comparaison avec le groupe témoin.

La seconde étude, publiée en 199940, s’est penchée sur l’effet de la prière sur l’état général et la durée du séjour de patients cardiaques hospitalisés. Des 990 patients, 466 ont fait l’objet de prières quotidiennes durant 4 semaines. Les résultats ont favorisé le groupe prière pour un ensemble de paramètres comme l’hypotension, l’utilisation d’antibiotiques, les saignements gastro-intestinaux, etc. (appelés les scores MAHI-CCU). Cependant, aucune différence concernant la durée de séjour n’a été observée.

La troisième étude, publiée en 2001, a vérifié l’effet de la prière sur la progression de la maladie cardiovasculaire à la suite du congé de 799 patients d’une unité coronarienne5. Des volontaires ont prié pour la moitié d’entre eux, au moins 1 fois par semaine, durant 26 semaines. La prière n’a eu d’effet significatif sur aucun des éléments étudiés : taux de mortalité, arrêts cardiaques subséquents, réhospitalisations, visites à l’urgence liées à la maladie et nombre de revascularisations coronariennes.

Enfin, la quatrième étude, réalisée en 2006 et à laquelle ont participé 6 hôpitaux, a évalué l’effet de la prière sur 1 802 patients devant subir une chirurgie de déviation de l’artère coronaire41. Les participants ont été attribués au hasard à l’un des 3 groupes suivants :

  • ceux qui ne reçoivent pas la prière, mais ne savent pas s’ils la reçoivent ou non;
  • ceux qui reçoivent la prière, mais ne savent pas s’ils la reçoivent ou non;
  • ceux qui reçoivent la prière, et savent qu’ils la reçoivent.

Les prières ont été effectuées par des chrétiens pendant 14 jours. Les taux de complications postopératoires, de survenue d’événements majeurs ou de mortalité sont demeurés les mêmes, que l’on ait prié ou non pour les patients. Par contre, les gens qui étaient certains de recevoir la prière, et qui la recevaient effectivement, ont présenté un taux de complication de près de 10 % plus élevé que les autres. Les causes de ce phénomène sont loin d’être claires. Des auteurs42,43 ont émis l’hypothèse que les gens pourraient moins bien prendre la responsabilité de leur guérison lorsqu’ils savent que l’on prie pour eux. Des chercheurs ont fait le même constat dans une étude concernant les alcooliques44.

Efficacité incertaine Aider rétroactivement à soigner des personnes infectées. Un essai clinique aléatoire publié en 2001, et pour le moins inusité, a porté sur l’effet que la prière pourrait avoir sur des événements déjà passés45. Dans ce cas, il s’agissait des conséquences sur une hospitalisation consécutive à une infection sanguine. Ainsi, en 2000, 3 393 patients ayant eu infection sanguine entre 1990 et 1996 ont été séparés aléatoirement en 2 groupes : un groupe témoin (sans prière) et un groupe recevant a posteriori de la prière à distance. Les prières étaient effectuées par une personne demandant le bien-être et la récupération complète pour tout le groupe. Les résultats indiquent que la durée du séjour hospitalier et de la fièvre a été significativement moins longue pour le groupe de personnes pour lesquelles on allait prier des années plus tard, que pour les autres.

Inutile de dire que ces résultats, qui semblent défier la raison, ont suscité une grande controverse dans les milieux scientifiques et médicaux46,47. Une controverse qui ne semble pas prête d’être résolue.

Efficacité incertaine Améliorer la fertilisation in vitro. Une étude publiée en 2001 a évalué l’effet de la prière sur le taux de grossesse auprès de 219 femmes traitées par fertilisation in vitro38. Cette étude était multicentrique, les investigateurs provenant des États-Unis, les participants de la Corée, et les groupes de prière du Canada, d’Australie et des États-Unis. Les résultats indiquent que les taux d’implantation des embryons tout comme les taux de grossesse ont été significativement supérieurs dans le groupe prière. Les auteurs ont conclu que ces résultats étaient encourageants, mais ont précisé qu’ils n’étaient encore que préliminaires.

Prière – Références

Note : les liens hypertextes menant vers d’autres sites ne sont pas mis à jour de façon continue. Il est possible qu’un lien devienne introuvable. Veuillez alors utiliser les outils de recherche pour retrouver l’information désirée.

Bibliographie

Benson-Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine. [Consulté le 2 décembre 2010]. www.mgh.harvard.edu
Center for Spirituality, Theology and Health. [Consulté le 2 décembre 2010]. www.dukespiritualityandhealth.org
Dossey Dr Larry. Do religion and spirituality matter in health? A response to the recent article in The Lancet. Altern Ther Health Med. 1999 May;5(3):16-8.
Dossey Dr Larry. How healing happens: exploring the nonlocal gap, Altern Ther Health Med. 2002 Mar-Apr;8(2):12-6, 103-10.
Gundersen Linda. Faith and Healing, Annals of Internal Medicine, 2000;132:169-172. [Consulté le 2 décembre 2010]. www.annals.org
PubMed – National Library of Medicine. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Notes

1. Dossey L. Do religion and spirituality matter in health? A response to the recent article in The Lancet. Altern Ther Health Med. 1999 May;5(3):16-8.
2. Gundersen L. Faith and healing. Ann Intern Med. 2000 Jan 18;132(2):169-72.
3. Matthews DA. Prayer and spirituality. Rheum Dis Clin North Am. 2000 Feb;26(1):177-87, xi
4. Townsend M, Kladder V, et al. Systematic review of clinical trials examining the effects of religion on health. South Med J. 2002 Dec;95(12):1429-34. Synthèse d’études.
5. Aviles JM, Whelan SE, et al. Intercessory prayer and cardiovascular disease progression in a coronary care unit population: a randomized controlled trial. Mayo Clin Proc. 2001 Dec;76(12):1192-8. Article complet accessible au www.mayoclinicproceedings.com [Consulté le 2 décembre 2010].
6. Roberts L, Ahmed I, Hall S. Intercessory prayer for the alleviation of ill health. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009(2):CD000368.
7. Astin John A, Harkness E, Ernst E. The Efficacy of « Distant Healing »: A Systematic Review of Randomized Trials, Annals of Internal Medicine, 2000;132:169-172.
8. Hummer RA, Ellison CG, et al. Religious involvement and adult mortality in the United States: review and perspective. South Med J. 2004;97(12):1223-30.
9. Hummer RA, Rogers RG, et al. Religious involvement and U.S. adult mortality. Demography. 1999 May;36(2):273-85.
10. Moreira-Almeida A, Neto FL, Koenig HG. Religiousness and mental health: a review. Rev Bras Psiquiatr. 2006;28(3):242-50.
11. Wallace JM Jr, Forman TA. Religion’s role in promoting health and reducing risk among American youth. Health Educ Behav. 1998 Dec;25(6):721-41.
12. Koenig HG. Religion, spirituality and medicine in Australia: research and clinical practice. Med J Aust. 2007 May 21;186(10 Suppl):S45-6. Article complet accessible en cliquant sur eMJA Free Text.
13. Hill PC, Pargament KI. Advances in the conceptualization and measurement of religion and spirituality. Implications for physical and mental health research. Am Psychol. 2003 Jan;58(1):64-74. Review.
14. O’Mathuna DP. Prayer research. What are we measuring?J Christ Nurs. 1999 Summer;16(3):17-21. Review.
15. Parkman CA. Faith and healing.Case Manager. 2003 Jan-Feb;14(1):33-6. Synthèse d’études.
16. Wallis C. Faith and healing: can prayer, faith and spirituality really improve your physical health? Time, 1996; 147:58
17. Eisenberg DM, Davis RB, et al. Trends in alternative medicine use in the United States, 1990-1997: results of a follow-up national survey. JAMA. 1998 Nov 11;280(18):1569-75.
18. Ehman JW, Ott BB, et al. Do patients want physicians to inquire about their spiritual or religious beliefs if they become gravely ill?Arch Intern Med. 1999 Aug 9-23;159(15):1803-6.
19. Barnes PM, Powell-Griner E, et al. Complementary and alternative medicine use among adults: United States, 2002. Adv Data. 2004 May 27;(343):1-19. Article complet disponible au : www.cdc.gov [Consulté le 2 décembre 2010]
20. McCaffrey AM, Eisenberg DM, et al. Prayer for health concerns: results of a national survey on prevalence and patterns of use. Arch Intern Med. 2004 Apr 26;164(8):858-62.
21. McCullough ME, Hoyt WT, et al. Religious involvement and mortality: a meta-analytic review.Health Psychol. 2000 May;19(3):211-22.
22. Jonas WB. The middle way: realistic randomized controlled trials for the evaluation of spiritual healing.J Altern Complement Med. 2001 Feb;7(1):5-7.
23. Krucoff Dr Mitchell et Crater Suzanne. Dose Response and The Effects of Distant Prayer on Health Outcomes: The State of the Research, Integrative Medicine Consult, vol. 4, no 5, mai 2002.
24. Sloan RP, Bagiella E, Powell T. Religion, spirituality, and medicine. Lancet. 1999 Feb 20;353(9153):664-7. Synthèse d’études. Article complet disponible au www.thelancet.com [Consulté le 2 décembre 2010].
25. Sloan RP, Bagiella E. Data without a prayer.Arch Intern Med. 2000 Jun 26;160(12):1870
26. Turner DD. Just another drug? A philosophical assessment of randomised controlled studies on intercessory prayer. J Med Ethics. 2006;32(8):487-90.
27. Williams DR, Sternthal MJ. Spirituality, religion and health: evidence and research directions. Med J Aust. 2007 May 21;186(10 Suppl):S47-50. Article complet disponible en cliquant sur eMJA Free Text.
28. Koenig HG, Hays JC, et al. Does religious attendance prolong survival? A six-year follow-up study of 3,968 older adults. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 1999 Jul;54(7):M370-6.
29. Masek K, Petrovicky P, et al. Past, present and future of psychoneuroimmunology.Toxicology. 2000 Jan 17;142(3):179-88. Synthèse d’études.
30. Targ E, Thomson KS. Can prayer and intentionality be researched? Should they be?Altern Ther Health Med. 1997 Nov;3(6):92-6.
31. Benor Dr Daniel J. Distant Healing, Wholistic Healing Research, 2000. [Consulté le 2 décembre 2010]. www.wholistichealingresearch.com
32. Dossey L. How healing happens: exploring the nonlocal gap. Altern Ther Health Med. 2002 Mar-Apr;8(2):12-6, 103-10.
33. The Relaxation Response, Benson-Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine. [Consulté le 2 décembre 2010]. www.mgh.harvard.edu
34. Bernardi L, Sleight P, et al. Effect of rosary prayer and yoga mantras on autonomic cardiovascular rhythms: comparative study. BMJ. 2001 Dec 22-29;323(7327):1446-9. Article complet disponible en cliquant sur Full Text Free.
35. Chibnall JT, Jeral JM, Cerullo MA. Experiments on distant intercessory prayer: God, science, and the lesson of Massah. Arch Intern Med. 2001 Nov 26;161(21):2529-36.
36. D’Souza R. The importance of spirituality in medicine and its application to clinical practice. Med J Aust. 2007 May 21;186(10 Suppl):S57-9. Review. Article complet accessible en cliquant sur eMJA Free Text.
37. Easom LR. Prayer: folk home remedy vs. spiritual practice. J Cult Divers. 2006;13(3):146-51.
38. Cha KY, Wirth DP, Lobo RA. Does prayer influence the success of in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer? Report of a masked, randomized trial. J Reprod Med. 2001;46(9):781-7.
39. Byrd RC. Positive therapeutic effects of intercessory prayer in a coronary care unit population. South Med J. 1988 Jul;81(7):826-9.
40. Harris WS, Gowda M, et al. A randomized, controlled trial of the effects of remote, intercessory prayer on outcomes in patients admitted to the coronary care unit. Arch Intern Med. 1999 Oct 25;159(19):2273-8.
41. Benson H, Dusek JA, et al. Study of the Therapeutic Effects of Intercessory Prayer (STEP) in cardiac bypass patients: a multicenter randomized trial of uncertainty and certainty of receiving intercessory prayer. Am Heart J. 2006;151(4):934-42.
42. Hobbins P. A step towards more ethical prayer studies. Am Heart J. 2006 Oct;152(4):e33.
43. Palmer RF, Katerndahl D, Morgan-Kidd J. A randomized trial of the effects of remote intercessory prayer: interactions with personal beliefs on problem-specific outcomes and functional status. J Altern Complement Med. 2004 Jun;10(3):438-48.
44. Walker SR, Tonigan JS, et al. Intercessory prayer in the treatment of alcohol abuse and dependence: a pilot investigation. Altern Ther Health Med. 1997;3(6):79-86.
45. Leibovici L. Effects of remote, retroactive intercessory prayer on outcomes in patients with bloodstream infection: randomised controlled trial. BMJ. 2001;323(7327):1450-1. Article complet accessible en cliquant sur Full Text Free.
46. Olshansky B, Dossey L. Retroactive prayer: a preposterous hypothesis?BMJ. 2003 Dec 20;327(7429):1465-8. Article complet disponible en cliquant sur Full Text Free.
47. Bishop JP, Stenger VJ. Retroactive prayer: lots of history, not much mystery, and no science. BMJ. 2004 Dec 18;329(7480):1444-6. Review. Article complet disponible en cliquant sur Full Text Free.
48. Ano GG, Vasconcelles EB. Religious coping and psychological adjustment to stress: a meta-analysis. J Clin Psychol. 2005;61(4):461-80.
49. Rew L, Wong YJ. A systematic review of associations among religiosity/spirituality and adolescent health attitudes and behaviors. J Adolesc Health. 2006;38(4):433-42.
50. Thune-Boyle IC, Stygall JA, et al. Do religious/spiritual coping strategies affect illness adjustment in patients with cancer? A systematic review of the literature. Soc Sci Med. 2006;63(1):151-64.
51. Helm HM, Hays JC, et al. Does private religious activity prolong survival? A six-year follow-up study of 3,851 older adults.J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2000 Jul;55(7):M400-5.
52. Levin J. How faith heals: a theoretical model. Explore (NY). 2009;5(2):77-96.
53. Belding JN, Howard MG, McGuire AM, et al. Social buffering by God: prayer and measures of stress. J Relig Health. 2010;49(2):179-87.
54. Koenig HG. Spirituality and depression: a look at the evidence. South Med J. 2007;100(7):737-9.
55. Verghese A. Spirituality and mental health. Indian J Psychiatry. 2008;50(4):233-7.
56. Lunny CA, Fraser SN. The use of complementary and alternative medicines among a sample of Canadian menopausal-aged women. J Midwifery Womens Health. 2010;55(4):335-43.
57. Fitzpatrick AL, Standish LJ, et al. Survival in HIV-1-positve adults practicing psychological or spiritual activities for one year. Altern Ther Health Med. 2007;13(5):18-20, 22-4.

Voir par ailleurs en anglais:

Choir singers ‘synchronise their heartbeats’
Rebecca Morelle
BBC World Service
9 July 2013

Choir singers not only harmonise their voices, they also synchronise their heartbeats, a study suggests.

Researchers in Sweden monitored the heart rates of singers as they performed a variety of choral works.

They found that as the members sang in unison, their pulses began to speed up and slow down at the same rate.

Writing in the journal Frontiers in Psychology, the scientists believe the synchrony occurs because the singers coordinate their breathing.

Dr Bjorn Vickhoff, from the Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University in Sweden, said: « The pulse goes down when you exhale and when you inhale it goes up.

« So when you are singing, you are singing on the air when you are exhaling so the heart rate would go down. And between the phrases you have to inhale and the pulse will go up.

« If this is so then heart rate would follow the structure of the song or the phrases, and this is what we measured and this is what we confirmed. »

Sing from the heart

The scientists studied 15 choir members as they performed different types of songs.

When you exhale you activate the vagus nerve… that goes form the brain stem to the heart”

Dr Bjorn Vickhoff Gothenburg University

They found that the more structured the work, the more the singers’ heart rates increased or decreased together.

Slow chants, for example, produced the most synchrony.

The researchers also found that choral singing had the overall effect of slowing the heart rate.

This, they said, was another effect of the controlled breathing.

Dr Vickhoff explained: « When you exhale you activate the vagus nerve, we think, that goes from the brain stem to the heart. And when that is activated the heart beats slower. »

The researchers now want to investigate whether singing could have an impact on our health.

« There have been studies on yoga breathing, which is very close to this, and also on guided breathing and they have seen long-terms effects on blood pressure… and they have seen that you can bring down your blood pressure.

« We speculate that it is possible singing could also be beneficial. »

Voir encore:

Music ‘releases mood-enhancing chemical in the brain’
Sonya McGilchrist
BBC News
9 January 2011

Music releases a chemical in the brain that has a key role in setting good moods, a study has suggested.

The study, reported in Nature Neuroscience, found that the chemical was released at moments of peak enjoyment.

Researchers from McGill University in Montreal said it was the first time that the chemical – called dopamine – had been tested in response to music.

Dopamine increases in response to other stimuli such as food and money.

It is known to produce a feel-good state in response to certain tangible stimulants – from eating sweets to taking cocaine.

Dopamine is also associated with less tangible stimuli – such as being in love.

In this study, levels of dopamine were found to be up to 9% higher when volunteers were listening to music they enjoyed.

The report authors say it’s significant in proving that humans obtain pleasure from music – an abstract reward – that is comparable with the pleasure obtained from more basic biological stimuli.

Music psychologist, Dr Vicky Williamson from Goldsmiths College, University of London welcomed the paper. She said the research didn’t answer why music was so important to humans – but proved that it was.

« This paper shows that music is inextricably linked with our deepest reward systems. »

Musical ‘frisson’

The study involved scanning the brains of eight volunteers over three sessions, using two different types of scan.
Continue reading the main story
“Start Quote

This paper shows that music is inextricably linked with our deepest reward systems”

Dr Vicky Williamson Goldsmiths College, University of London

The relatively small sample had been narrowed down from an initial group of 217 people.

This was because the participants had to experience « chills » consistently, to the same piece of music, without diminishing on multiple listening or in different environments.

A type of nuclear medicine imaging called a PET scan was used for two sessions. For one session, volunteers listened to music that they highly enjoyed and during the other, they listened to music that they were neutral about.

In the third session the music alternated between enjoyed and neutral, while a functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI scan was made.

Data gathered from the two different types of scans was then analysed and researchers were able to estimate dopamine release.

Dopamine transmission was higher when the participants were listening to music they enjoyed.
Consistent chills

A key element of the study was to measure the release of dopamine, when the participants were feeling their highest emotional response to the music.

To achieve this, researchers marked when participants felt a shiver down the spine of the sort that many people feel in response to a favourite piece of music.

This « chill » or « musical frisson » pinpointed when the volunteers were feeling maxim pleasure.

The scans showed increased endogenous dopamine transmission when the participants felt a « chill ». Conversely, when they were listening to music which did not produce a « chill », less dopamine was released.

What is dopamine?

Dopamine is a common neurotransmitter in the brain. It is released in response to rewarding human activity and is linked to reinforcement and motivation – these include activities that are biologically significant such as eating and sex

Dr Robert Zatorre said: « We needed to be sure that we could find people who experienced chills very consistently and reliably.

« That is because once we put them in the scanner, if they did not get chills then we would have nothing to measure.

« The other factor that was important is that we wanted to eliminate any potential confound from verbal associations, so we used only instrumental music.

« This also eliminated many of the original sample of people because the music they brought in that gave them chills had lyrics. »


Société: Pourquoi le mariage pour tous est le meilleur des mondes pour les enfants (Marriage for all: Give them committed parents, a biological connection and a stable home !)

13 mars, 2013
brave_new_world_cover_1The most important thing is really having equal rights. It’s not about the marriage. It’s having the same rights that you would get if you were married.  Marie C. Wilson (Ms. Foundation)
If men could get pregnant, abortion would be a sacrament. Florynce Kennedy
Cette impuissance fondamentale du politique, déjà révélée d’une autre façon par l’échec du volontarisme sarkozyste, conduit les gouvernants à mettre en scène leurs diverses initiatives de manière plus ou moins heureuse. Le comble du ridicule a été atteint avec la demande adressée à deux de ses ministres, par le chef du gouvernement, de recevoir d’urgence une association de pères au prétexte que l’un d’entre eux avait réussi à capter l’attention médiatique. «Le Premier ministre suit avec la plus grande attention la situation du père qui s’est retranché en haut d’une grue à Nantes», expliqua doctement l’hôtel Matignon. Les joutes scripturales entre Maurice Taylor, le sanguin patron américain de Titan, et Arnaud Montebourg, le volubile ministre du Redressement productif, ont par ailleurs permis de dresser le tableau de l’affrontement entre un méchant capitaliste et un gentil socialiste. Mais il n’est pas certain du tout que l’opinion, pour le moins désabusée, soit dupe de telles mises en scène. Le combat homérique autour du mariage homosexuel a également servi de cause précieuse à la gauche pour lui faire oublier, un temps, qu’elle était méchamment ballottée par la crise. Là encore, l’effet est cependant loin d’être assuré à moyen terme. Pour emblématique qu’elle soit aux yeux de certaines, cette réforme ne concerne, au maximum, que 0,6% des couples français… L’intervention militaire au Mali, enfin, a pu donner l’impression que le volontarisme politique trouvait refuge dans ce type d’expéditions à l’étranger. D’aucuns ont même cru, à l’Elysée ou ailleurs, que le président Hollande en sortirait transfiguré et renouerait ainsi avec l’opinion. Las, le rebond dans les sondages fut d’aussi faible ampleur que de courte durée. Le chef de l’Etat est désormais retombé dans une impopularité record. Eric Dupin
Début 2011, en France métropolitaine, l’Insee dénombre (…) 200.000 personnes majeures qui déclarent être en couple – soit 100.000 couples de même sexe. Ce qui ne fait qu’un petit 0,6% des couples français. Et dans cette population en couple, légèrement moins de femmes: six fois sur dix en effet, les couples sont constitués d’hommes. Les personnes en couple de même sexe, toujours selon l’Insee, sont plus jeunes (…)  Les couples homos seraient aussi plus diplômés et plus urbains. (…) peut être favorisée par une plus grande facilité des rencontres et une plus forte acceptation de l’homosexualité dans les milieux urbains (…) environ une personne en couple de même sexe sur dix réside (au moins une partie du temps) avec au moins un enfant qu’elle déclare comme le sien (celui d’un membre du couple ou des deux) – contre 53% dans les couples hétéros. Pour la plupart, ces enfants sont nés d’une union hétérosexuelle précédente, et les enfants sont alors partagés. (…) ces couples homos qui vivent au moins une partie du temps avec un enfant sont majoritairement des femmes (huit fois sur dix environ). (…) les couples homos, gays comme lesbiens, résident moins souvent avec leur conjoint que les personnes en couple hétéro, soit 12 points de plus que les personnes en couple de sexe différent. Une différence qui reste marquée à tous les âges. Têtu
L’effet Hawthorne ou expérience Hawthorne, décrit la situation dans laquelle les résultats d’une expérience ne sont pas dus aux facteurs expérimentaux mais au fait que les sujets ont conscience de participer à une expérience dans laquelle ils sont testés, ce qui se traduit généralement par une plus grande motivation. Cet effet tire son nom des études de sociologie du travail menées par Elton Mayo dans l’usine Western Electric de Cicero, la Hawthorne Works, près de Chicago de 1927 à 1932. Cet effet psychologique est à rapprocher de l’effet Pygmalion, que l’on observe chez des élèves dont les résultats s’améliorent du simple fait que le professeur attend davantage d’eux. On peut aussi le rapprocher de l’effet placebo. De 1927 à 1932, Mayo dirigea une expérience dans l’usine Hawthorne, occupant dans plusieurs ateliers une main-d’œuvre ouvrière principalement féminine. Ces ouvrières assemblaient des circuits électriques destinés à des appareils de radio. Elton Mayo, alors professeur à la Harvard Business School, mena une série d’études entre 1927 et 1932 sur la productivité au travail des employés de la Western Electric Company dans l’usine Hawthorne, occupant dans plusieurs ateliers une main d’œuvre ouvrière principalement féminine. Ces ouvrières assemblaient des circuits électriques destinés à des appareils de radio. Afin de déterminer les facteurs modulant la productivité, Mayo et son équipe de psychologues sélectionna un groupe d’employées qu’il fit travailler dans différentes conditions de travail, en jouant notamment sur l’intensité de la lumière de l’éclairage. Mayo vérifia que l’amélioration des conditions matérielles de travail (l’éclairage, en particulier) faisait croître la productivité. Mais il s’aperçut aussi, paradoxalement, que la suppression de ces améliorations (allongement des horaires, interdiction de parler pendant le travail, etc.) ne faisait pas baisser la productivité. D’autre part, Mayo et son équipe constatèrent que la productivité des ouvrières dans l’atelier témoin avait tendance à s’accroître sans qu’aucune amélioration des conditions n’ait pu l’expliquer quand les employées étaient remises dans leurs conditions habituelles de travail. Wikipedia
S’il nous était demandé de concevoir un système destiné à répondre aux besoins essentiels de l’enfant, nous finirions probablement par inventer quelque chose d’assez proche de l’idéal d’une famille avec deux parents. Sarah McLanahan et Gary Sandefur (1994)
Alors qu’il semblait y avoir des différences d’impact entre les enfants issus de ménages homosexuels et ceux issus de ménages hétérosexuels, il n’y en avait pas autant que ce à quoi les spécialistes auraient pu s’attendre et certaines différences — comme une inclination vers l’expérimentation homosexuelle — n’ont plus à être considérées comme des carences à une époque éclairée comme la nôtre. American Sociological Review (2001)
Aucune étude n’a trouvé d’enfants de parents lesbiennes ou gay défavorisés d’une façon significative par rapport aux enfants de parents hétérosexuels. APA (2005)
Sur la stricte base des publications scientifiques, on pourrait arguer que deux femmes s’occupent mieux en moyenne de leurs enfants qu’une femme et un homme, ou du moins qu’une femme et un homme avec une division traditionnelle du travail. Les coparentes lesbiennes semblent surpasser les parents mariés hétérosexuels et biologiques sur plusieurs mesures, alors même que l’on continue à leur refuser les privilèges considérables du mariage. Judith Stacey et Tim Biblarz (2010)
La famille nucléaire biologiquement intacte et stable semble être, même si c’est une fausse impression, une espèce en voie de disparition. Cependant, elle demeure l’environnement le plus sain et sécurisant pour le développement de l’enfant. […] Ce qu’affirmaient les sociologues Sarah McLanahan et Gary Sandefur en 1994 reste une réalité : ” S’il nous était demandé de concevoir un système destiné à répondre aux besoins essentiels de l’enfant, nous finirions probablement par inventer quelque chose d’assez proche de l’idéal d’une famille avec deux parents.” Ses avantages sont amplement démontrés : accès au temps et à l’argent de deux adultes, un système d’équilibre des pouvoirs, une double connexion biologique à l’enfant, le tout renforçant la “probabilité que les parents s’identifient à l’enfant et soient capable de se sacrifier pour cet enfant, ce qui réduirait la probabilité que l’un des parents abuse de l’enfant. Mark Regnerus
Un des problèmes du débat français sur l’opportunité d’accorder le droit aux personnes de même sexe de se marier, et d’adopter des enfants, est la mise en avant de statistiques dont les origines sont assez obscures. Ces chiffres portent sur le nombre de foyers homosexuels où des enfants sont élevés, et sur les conséquences pour ces enfants, présentées comme égales, sinon optimales par rapport aux enfants élevés dans un foyer composé d’un père et d’une mère mariés. La plupart de ces affirmations ne sont pas fondées sur des études sociologiques françaises, mais sur des études américaines, qui se sont multipliées depuis le début des années 2000. Dans un article (…) rendu public le 11 juin 2012, Mark Regnerus, chercheur en sociologie à l’université du Texas, présente une étude  (qui) remet en cause le dogme, qui s’était établi dans le milieu scientifique et militant, selon lequel grandir dans un foyer où les parents sont de même sexe ne changerait rien, voire serait bénéfique pour l’enfant en comparaison à d’autres configurations familiales. Quelques-unes de ces études avaient même été jusqu’à affirmer la supériorité d’un foyer composé de deux femmes sur un foyer avec père et mère mariés. Cela constituait un changement de paradigme scientifique très brusque puisque au milieu de la décennie 1990, moment où les fictions télévisuelles commencèrent à présenter divers arrangements familiaux impliquant des homosexuels sous une perspective favorable (pensons à la série Friends par exemple), les experts de la famille considéraient encore que l’arrangement familial le plus favorable pour le devenir des enfants était avoir un père et une mère toujours mariés. Ce brusque bouleversement de paradigme est apparu comme suspect aux yeux de Regnerus. Alliance Vita
The rapid pace at which the overall academic discourse surrounding gay and lesbian parents’ comparative competence has swung—from the wide acknowledgement of challenges to “no differences” to more capable than mom and pop families—is notable, and frankly a bit suspect. Scientific truths are seldom reversed in a decade. By comparison, studies of adoption—a common method by which many same-sex couples (but even more heterosexual ones) become parents—have repeatedly and consistently revealed important and wide-ranging differences, on average, between adopted children and biological ones. The differences have been so pervasive and consistent that adoption experts now emphasize that “acknowledgement of difference” is critical for both parents and clinicians when working with adopted children and teens. This ought to give social scientists studying gay-parenting outcomes pause—rather than lockstep unanimity. After all, many children of gay and lesbian couples are adopted.Far more of them, however, are the children of single parents, and were born the old-fashioned way.
So why did this study come up with such different results than previous work in the field? And why should one study alter so much previous sentiment? Basically, better methods. When it comes to assessing how children of gay parents are faring, the careful methods and random sampling approach found in demography has not often been employed by scholars studying this issue, due in part—to be sure—to the challenges in locating and surveying small minorities randomly. In its place, the scholarly community has often been treated to small, nonrandom “convenience” studies of mostly white, well-educated lesbian parents, including plenty of data-collection efforts in which participants knew that they were contributing to important studies with potentially substantial political consequences, elevating the probability of something akin to the “Hawthorne Effect.” This is hardly an optimal environment for collecting unbiased data (and to their credit, many of the researchers admitted these challenges). I’m not claiming that all the previous research on this subject is bunk. But small or nonrandom studies shouldn’t be the gold standard for research, all the more so when we’re dealing with a topic so weighted with public interest and significance. 
The political take-home message of the NFSS study is unclear, however. On the one hand, the instability detected in the NFSS could translate into a call for extending the relative security afforded by marriage to gay and lesbian couples. On the other hand, it may suggest that the household instability that the NFSS reveals is just too common among same-sex couples to take the social gamble of spending significant political and economic capital to esteem and support this new (but tiny) family form while Americans continue to flee the stable, two-parent biological married model, the far more common and accomplished workhorse of the American household, and still—according to the data, at least—the safest place for a kid. Mark Regnerus
Since they can’t produce children from their combined gametes, they suffer, in Regnerus’ words, “a diminished context of kin altruism.” He points out that in studies of adoption, stepfamilies, and cohabitation, this kinship deficit has “typically proven to be a risk setting, on average, for raising children when compared with married, biological parenting.” Homosexuals who want to have kids could emulate the biological model by using eggs or sperm from a sibling of the non-biological parent, though the effects of this practice on family dynamics are unknown. But the infertility of same-sex couples also confers an advantage. As Regnerus acknowledges, “Today’s children of gay men and lesbian women are more apt to be ‘planned’ (that is, by using adoption, IVF, or surrogacy) than as little as 15–20 years ago, when such children were more typically the products of heterosexual unions.” In fact, “Given that unintended pregnancy is impossible among gay men and a rarity among lesbian couples, it stands to reason that gay and lesbian parents today are far more selective about parenting than the heterosexual population, among whom unintended pregnancies remain very common, around 50%.” And the more planned your child is, the more likely it is that she’ll turn out well. Based on previous research, Regnerus predicts that outcomes among children of stable, planned same-sex families are “quite likely distinctive” from outcomes among children of failed heterosexual unions. William Saletan (Slate)

Donnez aux homos (qui en plus n’ont pas le risque des grossesses accidentelles) l’engagement, la connection biologique (ils doivent bien avoir des gamètes qui trainent du côté de leurs frères et soeurs) et la stabilité et bingo… vous aurez le meilleur des mondes pour les enfants !

Recherches non extrapolables à la population entière (à partir d’une base réduite de la population – 0,6% pour la France!), échantillons trop faibles (44 personnes au maximum), échantillons non aléatoires (selon la méthode « boule de neige » d’autosélection à l’intérieur d’un réseau autocoopté), non représentativité de la composition socio-économique, religieuse, raciale et géographique du pays, effet hawthorne (conscience des interviewés de l’impact politique de l’enquête à laquelle ils participent) …

A lire d’urgence …

Pour tous ceux qui avaient encore des doutes sur le « mariage pour tous »et le matrquage d’études américaines systématiquement orientées …

L’imparable argumentation du magazine internet Slate …

Back in the Gay

Does a new study indict gay parenthood or make a case for gay marriage?

William Saletan

Slate

June 11, 2012

Is same-sex marriage a good idea? Or is an intact biological family the best environment for raising a child? The answer may turn out to be yes and yes.

That’s the curious implication of a study reported yesterday in Social Science Research and outlined in Slate today by its principal investigator, sociologist Mark Regnerus. The study, which found inferior economic, educational, social, and psychological outcomes among children of gay parents, comes across as evidence that homosexuals are unfit to raise kids. But the study doesn’t document the failure of same-sex marriage. It documents the failure of the closeted, broken, and unstable households that preceded same-sex marriage.

The project, known as the New Family Structures Study, was sponsored, to the tune of nearly $800,000, by two socially conservative funders: the Witherspoon Institute and the Bradley Foundation. In his journal article, Regnerus says it “clearly reveals that children appear most apt to succeed well as adults—on multiple counts and across a variety of domains—when they spend their entire childhood with their married mother and father.” In Slate, he notes, “On 25 of 40 different outcomes evaluated, the children of women who’ve had same-sex relationships fare quite differently than those in stable, biologically-intact mom-and-pop families, displaying numbers more comparable to those from heterosexual stepfamilies and single parents.”

These findings shouldn’t surprise us, because this isn’t a study of gay couples who decided to have kids. It’s a study of people who engaged in same-sex relationships—and often broke up their households—decades ago.

To understand the study, you have to read the questionnaire that defined the sample. It began by asking each respondent, as the child of this or that kind of family arrangement, his age. If the respondent was younger than 18 or older than 39, the survey was terminated. This means the entire sample was born between 1971 and 1994, when same-sex marriage was illegal throughout the United States, and millions of homosexuals were trying to pass or function as straight spouses.

The survey went on to ask: “From when you were born until age 18 … did either of your parents ever have a romantic relationship with someone of the same sex?” If the respondent said yes, he was put in the “gay father” (GF) or “lesbian mother” (LM) category, regardless of subsequent answers. But if he said no, a later question about the relationship between “your biological parents” was used to classify him as the product of an “intact biological family” (IBF) or of an “adopted,” “divorced,” “stepfamily,” or “single-parent” household. In other words, broken families were excluded from the IBF category but included in the GF and LM categories.

This loaded classification system produced predictable results. In his journal article, Regnerus says respondents who were labeled GF or LM originated most commonly from a “failed heterosexual union.” As evidence, he observes that “just under half of such respondents reported that their biological parents were once married.” Most respondents classified as LM “reported that their biological mother exited the respondent’s household at some point during their youth.” Regnerus calculates that only one-sixth to one-quarter of kids in the LM sample—and less than 1 percent of kids in the GF sample—were planned and raised by an already-established gay parent or couple. In Slate, he writes that GF kids “seldom reported living with their father for very long, and never with his partner for more than three years.” Similarly, “less than 2 percent” of LM kids “reported living with their mother and her partner for all 18 years of their childhood.”

In short, these people aren’t the products of same-sex households. They’re the products of broken homes. And the closer you look, the weirder the sample gets. Of the 73 respondents Regnerus classified as GF, 12—one of every six—“reported both a mother and a father having a same-sex relationship.” Were these mom-and-dad couples bisexual swingers? Were they closet cases who covered for each other? If their kids, 20 to 40 years later, are struggling, does that reflect poorly on gay parents? Or does it reflect poorly on the era of fake heterosexual marriages?

What the study shows, then, is that kids from broken homes headed by gay people develop the same problems as kids from broken homes headed by straight people. But that finding isn’t meaningless. It tells us something important: We need fewer broken homes among gays, just as we do among straights. We need to study Regnerus’ sample and fix the mistakes we made 20 or 40 years ago. No more sham heterosexual marriages. No more post-parenthood self-discoveries. No more deceptions. No more affairs. And no more polarization between homosexuality and marriage. Gay parents owe their kids the same stability as straight parents. That means less talk about marriage as a right, and more about marriage as an expectation.

The study does raise a fundamental challenge for same-sex couples. Since they can’t produce children from their combined gametes, they suffer, in Regnerus’ words, “a diminished context of kin altruism.” He points out that in studies of adoption, stepfamilies, and cohabitation, this kinship deficit has “typically proven to be a risk setting, on average, for raising children when compared with married, biological parenting.” Homosexuals who want to have kids could emulate the biological model by using eggs or sperm from a sibling of the non-biological parent, though the effects of this practice on family dynamics are unknown.

But the infertility of same-sex couples also confers an advantage. As Regnerus acknowledges, “Today’s children of gay men and lesbian women are more apt to be ‘planned’ (that is, by using adoption, IVF, or surrogacy) than as little as 15–20 years ago, when such children were more typically the products of heterosexual unions.” In fact, “Given that unintended pregnancy is impossible among gay men and a rarity among lesbian couples, it stands to reason that gay and lesbian parents today are far more selective about parenting than the heterosexual population, among whom unintended pregnancies remain very common, around 50%.” And the more planned your child is, the more likely it is that she’ll turn out well. Based on previous research, Regnerus predicts that outcomes among children of stable, planned same-sex families are “quite likely distinctive” from outcomes among children of failed heterosexual unions.

The study’s main takeaway, according to Regnerus, is that kids of gay parents have turned out differently from kids of straight parents, and not in a good way. I’m sure that conclusion will please the study’s conservative sponsors. But the methodology and findings, coupled with previous research, point to deeper differences that transcend orientation. Kids do better when they have two committed parents, a biological connection, and a stable home. If that’s good advice for straights, it’s good advice for gays, too.

Voir aussi:

Queers as Folk

Does it really make no difference if your parents are straight or gay?

Mark Regnerus

June 11, 2012

Not far beneath all the debate about marriage equality remains a longstanding concern about children. Parents and advocates of all stripes wonder, and some worry, whether the children of gay and lesbian parents will turn out “different.” Different in significant ways, not just odd or unique ones. Family scholars, in particular, have paid closer attention to the specific family dynamics that might affect such children, like the number and gender of parents, their genetic relationship to the children, as well as any “household transitions” the kids have endured.

Most family scholars had, until recently, consistently (and publicly) affirmed the elevated stability and social benefits of the married, heterosexual, biological, two-parent household, when contrasted to single mothers, cohabiting couples, adoptive parents, divorced parents, and—tacitly—gay and lesbian parents. For instance, in their 1994 book Growing Up With A Single Parent, sociologists Sara McLanahan and Gary Sandefur wrote, “If we were asked to design a system for making sure that children’s basic needs were met, we would probably come up with something quite similar to the two-parent ideal.” Other family structures were all widely perceived to fall short—even if not far short—in a variety of developmental domains such as educational achievement, behavior problems, and emotional well-being. While many of us have anecdotal evidence or personal experience to the contrary, the social science on the matter remained clear: When mom and dad stay together their children tend to be, in the weekly words of Garrison Keillor, “above average.” Stepparents and single moms got used to the chorus of voices telling them their job was a tall one. Ditto for gay and lesbian parents.

For this last group, however, things began to change in 2001 with the publication of a review article in the American Sociological Review, which noted that while there appeared to be some differences in outcomes between children in same-sex and heterosexual households, there weren’t as many as family scholars might have expected, and some differences—like a proclivity toward same-sex experimentation—need no longer be perceived as deficits in an enlightened age like ours. Since that time the conventional wisdom has been that there are “no differences” of note in the child outcomes of gay and lesbian parents. The phrase has appeared in dozens of studies, reports, depositions, and articles—and in countless email and Facebook debates—since then.

Ten years later, the discourse has actually shifted further still, suggesting that same-sex parents now appear to be more competent than heterosexual ones. A second review of research asserted that “non-heterosexual” parents, on average, enjoy significantly better relationships with their children than do heterosexual ones, and that the kids in same-sex families exhibited no differences in the domains of cognitive development, psychological adjustment, and gender identity. Elsewhere it was noted that in lesbian families there is zero evidence of sexual abuse, and the news was widely publicized. This line of argument led to yet another review article—this one on gender and parenting in 2010—with sociologists Judith Stacey and Tim Biblarz openly contending that:

based strictly on the published science, one could argue that two women parent better on average than a woman and a man, or at least than a woman and man with a traditional division of labor. Lesbian coparents seem to outperform comparable married heterosexual, biological parents on several measures, even while being denied the substantial privileges of marriage.

The matter was considered settled. In fact, it was old news to psychologists by then, since in 2005 the APA had issued a brief on lesbian and gay parenting in which it was asserted, “Not a single study has found children of lesbian or gay parents to be disadvantaged in any significant respect relative to children of heterosexual parents.”

The rapid pace at which the overall academic discourse surrounding gay and lesbian parents’ comparative competence has swung—from the wide acknowledgement of challenges to “no differences” to more capable than mom and pop families—is notable, and frankly a bit suspect. Scientific truths are seldom reversed in a decade. By comparison, studies of adoption—a common method by which many same-sex couples (but even more heterosexual ones) become parents—have repeatedly and consistently revealed important and wide-ranging differences, on average, between adopted children and biological ones. The differences have been so pervasive and consistent that adoption experts now emphasize that “acknowledgement of difference” is critical for both parents and clinicians when working with adopted children and teens. This ought to give social scientists studying gay-parenting outcomes pause—rather than lockstep unanimity. After all, many children of gay and lesbian couples are adopted.

Far more of them, however, are the children of single parents, and were born the old-fashioned way. This is one conclusion of the New Family Structures Study (NFSS), an overview article about which appears in the July issue of the journal Social Science Research. Instead of relying on small samples, or the challenges of discerning sexual orientation of household residents using census data, my colleagues and I randomly screened over 15,000 Americans aged 18-39 and asked them if their biological mother or father ever had a romantic relationship with a member of the same sex. I realize that one same-sex relationship does not a lesbian make, necessarily. But our research team was less concerned with the complicated politics of sexual identity than with same-sex behavior.

The basic results call into question simplistic notions of “no differences,” at least with the generation that is out of the house. On 25 of 40 different outcomes evaluated, the children of women who’ve had same-sex relationships fare quite differently than those in stable, biologically-intact mom-and-pop families, displaying numbers more comparable to those from heterosexual stepfamilies and single parents. Even after including controls for age, race, gender, and things like being bullied as a youth, or the gay-friendliness of the state in which they live, such respondents were more apt to report being unemployed, less healthy, more depressed, more likely to have cheated on a spouse or partner, smoke more pot, had trouble with the law, report more male and female sex partners, more sexual victimization, and were more likely to reflect negatively on their childhood family life, among other things. Why such dramatic differences? I can only speculate, since the data are not poised to pinpoint causes. One notable theme among the adult children of same-sex parents, however, is household instability, and plenty of it. The children of fathers who have had same-sex relationships fare a bit better, but they seldom reported living with their father for very long, and never with his partner for more than three years.

So why did this study come up with such different results than previous work in the field? And why should one study alter so much previous sentiment? Basically, better methods. When it comes to assessing how children of gay parents are faring, the careful methods and random sampling approach found in demography has not often been employed by scholars studying this issue, due in part—to be sure—to the challenges in locating and surveying small minorities randomly. In its place, the scholarly community has often been treated to small, nonrandom “convenience” studies of mostly white, well-educated lesbian parents, including plenty of data-collection efforts in which participants knew that they were contributing to important studies with potentially substantial political consequences, elevating the probability of something akin to the “Hawthorne Effect.” This is hardly an optimal environment for collecting unbiased data (and to their credit, many of the researchers admitted these challenges). I’m not claiming that all the previous research on this subject is bunk. But small or nonrandom studies shouldn’t be the gold standard for research, all the more so when we’re dealing with a topic so weighted with public interest and significance.

To improve upon the science and to test the theory of “no differences,” the NFSS collected data from a large, random cross-section of American young adults—apart from the census, the largest population-based dataset prepared to answer research questions about households in which mothers or fathers have had same-sex relationships—and asked them questions about their life both now and while they were growing up. When simply and briefly asked if their mother and/or father had been in a same-sex romantic relationship, 175 said it was true of their mothers and 73 said the same about their fathers—numbers far larger than has typified studies in this area. We interviewed all of these respondents (and a random sample of others) about their own lives and relationships, as well as asked them to reflect upon their family life while growing up. The differences, it turns out, were numerous. For instance, 28 percent of the adult children of women who’ve had same-sex relationships are currently unemployed, compared to 8 percent of those from married mom-and-dad families. Forty percent of the former admit to having had an affair while married or cohabiting, compared to 13 percent of the latter. Nineteen percent of the former said they were currently or recently in psychotherapy for problems connected with anxiety, depression, or relationships, compared with 8 percent of the latter. And those are just three of the 25 differences I noted.

While we know that good things tend to happen—both in the short-term and over the long run—when people provide households that last, parents in the NFSS who had same-sex relationships were the least likely to exhibit such stability. The young-adult children of women in lesbian relationships reported the highest incidence of time spent in foster care (at 14 percent of total, compared to 2 percent among the rest of the sample). Forty percent spent time living with their grandparents (compared to 10 percent of the rest); 19 percent spent time living on their own before age 18 (compared to 4 percent among everyone else). In fact, less than 2 percent of all respondents who said their mother had a same-sex relationship reported living with their mother and her partner for all 18 years of their childhood.

Kudos to those gay parents, like those of Zach Wahls, who have done a remarkable job in raising their now young-adult children. I’m sure the challenges were significant and the social support often modest. There are cases in the data of people like Zach, but not very many. Stability is pivotal, but uncommon.

There are limitations to this study, of course. We didn’t have as many intact lesbian and gay families as we hoped to evaluate, even though they are the face of much public deliberation about marriage equality. But it wasn’t for lack of effort.

Let me be clear: I’m not claiming that sexual orientation is at fault here, or that I know about kids who are presently being raised by gay or lesbian parents. Their parents may be forging more stable relationships in an era that is more accepting and supportive of gay and lesbian couples. But that is not the case among the previous generation, and thus social scientists, parents, and advocates would do well from here forward to avoid simply assuming the kids are all right.

This study arrives in the middle of a season that’s already exhibited plenty of high drama over same-sex marriage, whether it’s DOMA, the president’s evolving perspective, Prop 8 pinball, or finished and future state ballot initiatives. The political take-home message of the NFSS study is unclear, however. On the one hand, the instability detected in the NFSS could translate into a call for extending the relative security afforded by marriage to gay and lesbian couples. On the other hand, it may suggest that the household instability that the NFSS reveals is just too common among same-sex couples to take the social gamble of spending significant political and economic capital to esteem and support this new (but tiny) family form while Americans continue to flee the stable, two-parent biological married model, the far more common and accomplished workhorse of the American household, and still—according to the data, at least—the safest place for a kid.

Voir encore:

L’étude de Mark Regnerus (US) sur les enfants ayant eu un parent homosexuel

Concernant l’homoparentalité, une nouvelle étude de sociologie américaine nous met en garde contre l’usage abusif des science sociales dans le débat public, tout en offrant un bon aperçu de l’expérience d’avoir eu un parent homosexuel pour la génération aujourd’hui adulte. Cette étude va dans le sens de ce qui a longtemps été une évidence, et qui fait aujourd’hui l’objet de controverses : en moyenne, un enfant s’en sort mieux lorsque son père et sa mère restent mariés.

L’apport américain

La spécificité des États-Unis en matière de débat sur l’homoparentalité est double : l’évolution de la société fait que des situations d’homoparentalité de fait existent depuis les années 1990, et donc une génération d’enfants de ces foyers est parvenue à l’âge adulte ; l’autre spécificité est le grand respect pour l’apport des sciences sociales : aux États-Unis, même les sujets controversés, comme par exemple les inégalités sociales, sont abordés à travers de grandes enquêtes sociologiques et statistiques. Les chercheurs en sciences sociales jouissent d’une assez grande autonomie pour étudier divers objets sans nécessairement se soucier de l’opinion dominante.

Un des problèmes du débat français sur l’opportunité d’accorder le droit aux personnes de même sexe de se marier, et d’adopter des enfants, est la mise en avant de statistiques dont les origines sont assez obscures. Ces chiffres portent sur le nombre de foyers homosexuels où des enfants sont élevés, et sur les conséquences pour ces enfants, présentées comme égales, sinon optimales par rapport aux enfants élevés dans un foyer composé d’un père et d’une mère mariés. La plupart de ces affirmations ne sont pas fondées sur des études sociologiques françaises, mais sur des études américaines, qui se sont multipliées depuis le début des années 2000.

L’étude de Mark Regnerus

Dans un article intitulé « How different are the adult children of parents who have same-sex relationships? Findings from the New Family Structures Study » [« A quel point les enfants devenus adultes de parents ayant eu une relation homosexuelle sont-ils différents ? Résultats de l’Étude sur les nouvelles structures familiales » ] et rendu public le 11 juin 2012, Mark Regnerus, chercheur en sociologie à l’université du Texas, présente une étude considérée comme rigoureuse et complète selon l’analyse de plusieurs de ses pairs1, ou même de promoteurs de l’homoparentalité2.

Cette étude remet en cause le dogme, qui s’était établi dans le milieu scientifique et militant, selon lequel grandir dans un foyer où les parents sont de même sexe ne changerait rien, voire serait bénéfique pour l’enfant en comparaison à d’autres configurations familiales. Quelques-unes de ces études avaient même été jusqu’à affirmer la supériorité d’un foyer composé de deux femmes sur un foyer avec père et mère mariés. Cela constituait un changement de paradigme scientifique très brusque puisque au milieu de la décennie 1990, moment où les fictions télévisuelles commencèrent à présenter divers arrangements familiaux impliquant des homosexuels sous une perspective favorable (pensons à la série Friends par exemple), les experts de la famille considéraient encore que l’arrangement familial le plus favorable pour le devenir des enfants était avoir un père et une mère toujours mariés. Ce brusque bouleversement de paradigme est apparu comme suspect aux yeux de Regnerus, sociologue respecté, dont les études précédentes portent notamment sur l’activité sexuelle des jeunes gens non mariés3.

Méthodologie de l’enquête

Aidé par des collègues, Mark Regnerus a repris une base de données sociologique très fouillée appelée New Family Structures Study4, et il a posé une question à plus de 15 000 américains devenus adultes entre 1990 et 2009 et sélectionnés de façon aléatoire : « Est-ce que l’un de vos parents biologiques a eu, entre votre naissance et l’âge de vos 18 ans, une relation amoureuse avec quelqu’un de son propre sexe ? » 175 ont répondu que c’était le cas pour leur mère, 73 pour leur père. Ces personnes, ainsi qu’un échantillon représentatif de cette génération de la population américaine, ont passé un entretien approfondi portant sur leur vie, leurs relations amoureuses et leur propre éducation, – soit en tout 2 988 personnes interrogées. L’objet de l’enquête est de tester le paradigme de l’absence de différences. Pour cela, Mark Regnerus a constitué huit groupes parmi les  personnes interrogées suivant les structures familiales dans lesquelles ils avaient grandi :

– Famille biologique intacte (“still-intact, biological family”) : un père et une mère marié depuis la naissance de l’enfant jusqu’à aujourd’hui. (919)

– Mère lesbienne : la mère a eu une relation amoureuse avec une femme. (163)

– Père gay : le père a eu une relation amoureuse avec un homme. (73)

– Adopté : adoption par un ou deux parents avant l’âge de deux ans. (101)

– Divorce tardif ou garde partagée : l’enfant a vécu avec ses deux parents jusqu’à 18 ans, ils ne sont plus mariés. (116)

– Belle-famille : les parents biologiques n’ont jamais été mariés ou ont divorcé, le parent ayant la garde s’est marié avec quelqu’un d’autre avant les 18 ans de l’enfant. (394)

– Monoparentalité : les parents biologiques n’ont jamais été mariés ou ont divorcé, le parent ayant la garde ne s’est pas marié ou remarié avant les 18 ans de l’enfant. (816)

– Autres configurations, dont le décès d’un des parents. (406)

Les résultats significatifs

Comparés aux enfants de “famille biologique intacte”, les enfants aujourd’hui adultes dont la mère a eu une relation amoureuse avec une femme présentent 25 différences significatives sur les 40 variables testées :

Variable testée Enfants devenus adultes de famille biologique encore intacte Enfants devenus adultes dont la mère a eu une relation amoureuse avec une femme avant leur majorité
Questions de type OUI ou NON, résultats moyens en pourcentages
En cohabitation actuellement 9% 24%
La famille a reçu des aides publiques pendant la jeunesse des enfants 17% 69%
Bénéficiaires d’aides publiques actuellement 10% 38%
Employés à temps plein actuellement 49% 26%
Actuellement au chômage 8% 28%
Ont voté à la dernière élection présidentielle 57% 41%
S’identifient comme entièrement hétérosexuels 90% 61%
Ont eu une relation extraconjugale alors que mariés ou en cohabitation 13% 40%
Ont subi des attouchements sexuels par un parent ou un adulte 2% 23%
Ont subi une relation sexuelle contre leur consentement 8% 31%
Questions portant sur une échelle continue, résultats moyens.
Niveau d’éducation atteint (échelle de 1 à 5) 3,19 2,39
Sentiment de sûreté dans la famille d’origine (1 à 5) 4,13 3,12
Impact négatif de la famille d’origine (1 à 5) 2,3 3,13
Auto-estimation de la santé physique (1 à 5) 3,75 3,38
Index de dépression (échelle de 1 à 4) 1,83 2,2
Échelle d’évaluation du degré de dépendance à autrui (1 à 5) 2,82 3,43
Niveau de revenu (1 à 13) 8,27 6,08
Relation amoureuse actuelle en difficulté (1 à 4) 2,04 2,35
Questions portant sur des fréquences, des occurrences, moyenne sur une échelle
Fréquence d’usage de la marijuana (1 à 6) 1,32 1,84
Fréquence d’usage de la cigarette (1 à 6) 1,79 2,76
Fréquence d’utilisation de la télévision (1 à 6) 3,01 3,70
Fréquence d’arrestations par la police (1 à 4) 1,18 1,68
Fréquence de ceux ayant reconnu avoir commis un délit (1 à 4) 1,1 1,36
Nombre de partenaires sexuels féminins pour les femmes (0 à 11) 0,22 1,04
Nombre de partenaires sexuels masculins pour les femmes (0 à 11) 2,79 4,02

Lecture : En moyenne, 9% des enfants aujourd’hui adultes dont le père et la mère sont encore mariés vivent en cohabitation sans être mariés, contre 24% des enfants devenus adultes dont la mère a eu une relation amoureuse avec une femme entre le moment de leur naissance et l’âge de 18 ans.

Les résultats présentés ci-dessus sont une sélection traduite de tableaux pris directement dans l’article de Regnerus. Ces 25 variables présentent des différences statistiquement probantes et testées entre “avoir grandi dans une famille dont les parents biologiques sont mariés”, et “avoir fait l’expérience entre 0 et 18 ans d’une mère ayant eu une relation amoureuse avec une femme”.

Quelques conclusions à retenir

– Toutes les recherches scientifiques précédentes sur l’homoparentalité sont d’une utilité quasiment nulle, car leurs conclusions ne peuvent pas être extrapolées à la population entière : d’une part, les échantillons y sont trop faibles (des échantillons de 44 personnes au maximum, d’après Regnerus, p. 754, qui donne un résumé de ces recherches) ; d’autre part, ils sont constitués de façon non aléatoire, selon la méthode « boule de neige » : les membres de l’échantillon sont sélectionnés à l’intérieur d’un réseau dont les membres se cooptent. Pour ces raisons, ces échantillons ne sauraient refléter la composition socio-économique, religieuse, raciale et géographique des Etats-Unis. Par ailleurs, les interviewés ont souvent conscience de l’impact politique de l’enquête à laquelle ils participent.

– Cette étude est novatrice car elle donne avec une grande rigueur méthodologique le point de vue de l’enfant sur le fait d’avoir eu un parent homosexuel, alors que la parole était jusqu’ici monopolisée par les parents.

– Le trait le plus marquant de cette enquête sociologique, s’il fallait en retenir un, est l’instabilité de la vie de l’enfant dont la mère a eu une relation amoureuse avec une femme : davantage de temps passé dans un foyer d’accueil, davantage de temps passé chez les grands parents, davantage de temps passé de manière autonome avant 18 ans. En fait, moins de 2% de ces enfants ont passé leur enfance entière avec leur mère et sa partenaire.5

Les limites d’une telle recherche

– Cette étude ne dit rien sur l’expérience de grandir dans des foyers homoparentaux dans la période actuelle, et ce pour deux raisons : 1. Avoir un parent ayant eu une relation homosexuelle n’est pas synonyme d’avoir grandi dans un foyer homoparental. 2. Cette étude porte sur une génération aujourd’hui adulte, pour laquelle le fait homosexuel était peut-être moins bien accepté socialement qu’aujourd’hui.

– Il ne faut pas demander aux sciences sociales plus qu’elles ne peuvent donner : une bonne recherche ne peut être normative ou prédictive. C’est la description qui doit guider la démarche, mais elle est elle-même dépendante de catégories utilisables et opportunes. Les catégories prises ici reflètent cela : ce n’est pas tant une étude de l’homoparentalité que de l’expérience d’avoir un père ou une mère biologique ayant eu au moins une fois une expérience homosexuelle avant la majorité de l’enfant. Même si dans l’échantillon, certaines personnes ont effectivement eu une expérience de vie dans un foyer homoparental, ils sont bien moins nombreux que les membres des deux catégories ciblées. (23% des enfants dont la mère a eu une relation amoureuse avec une femme ont vécu avec ces deux femmes pendant au moins trois ans avant d’atteindre 18 ans; moins de 2% des enfants dont le père a eu une relation amoureuse avec un homme ont vécu avec ces deux hommes pendant au moins trois ans avant d’atteindre 18 ans).

– Mark Regnerus met prudemment en garde contre l’utilisation d’une telle étude à des fins politiques : ses seules applications solides et concrètes seraient de défaire l’utilisation politique et idéologique des études précédentes participant du paradigme de l’absence de différences, et d’indiquer la rareté d’une telle configuration familiale pour les générations dont les enfants sont devenus adultes. La sociologie nous ordonne ici à grands frais de nous méfier d’elle, offrant une remise à plat du bruit médiatique autour de l’apport de la « Science » au débat sur la légitimité de l’homoparentalité.

– En fait, ce qui est fondamentalement en jeu ici, c’est le maintien de l’idéal de la famille biologique mariée. Pour Mark Regnerus : « La famille nucléaire biologiquement intacte et stable semble être, même si c’est une fausse impression, une espèce en voie de disparition. Cependant, elle demeure l’environnement le plus sain et sécurisant pour le développement de l’enfant. […] Ce qu’affirmaient les sociologues Sarah McLanahan et Gary Sandefur en 1994 reste une réalité : ” S’il nous était demandé de concevoir un système destiné à répondre aux besoins essentiels de l’enfant, nous finirions probablement par inventer quelque chose d’assez proche de l’idéal d’une famille avec deux parents.” Ses avantages sont amplement démontrés : accès au temps et à l’argent de deux adultes, un système d’équilibre des pouvoirs, une double connexion biologique à l’enfant, le tout renforçant la “probabilité que les parents s’identifient à l’enfant et soient capable de se sacrifier pour cet enfant, ce qui réduirait la probabilité que l’un des parents abuse de l’enfant.” Cette étude confirme la sagesse du sens commun. »6

  1. Osborne, Cynthia. « Further comments on the papers by Marks and Regnerus ». Social Science Research 41, no. 4 (juillet 2012) : 779-783
  2. Burroway, Jim. « First Look at Mark Regnerus’s Study on Children of Parents In Same-Sex Relationships », boxturtlebulletin.com, juin 10, 2012
  3. Regnerus, Mark, et Jeremy Uecker. Premarital Sex in America : How Young Americans Meet, Mate, and Think about Marrying. Oxford University Press, USA, 2011
  4. NFSS, que l’on peut traduire par « Etude sur les nouvelles structures familiales »
  5. Mark Regnerus, « Queers as Folk », Slate, juin 11, 2012.
  6. in Mark Regnerus « Response to Paul Amato, David Eggebeen, and Cynthia Osborne », Social Science Research, juillet 2012, Vol. 41, n°4, p. 786-787

Voir encore:

Homoparentalité : l’étude statistique censurée en France

lesoufflet

Riposte laïque

23 janvier 2013

Une étude publiée par un sociologue américain démontre les effets de l’homoparentalité sur la psychologie des enfants privés d’altérité dans leur éducation et confrontés aux questions sur leur conception et leurs origines. Cette étude tenue secrète en France démontre, outre les problèmes de déséquilibre psychologique des enfants élevés par des couples homosexuels, que ces enfants sont en moyenne 10 fois plus victimes d’attouchements sexuels que les enfants ayant grandi dans leurs familles biologiques…

Le sociologue américain Mark Regnerus a publié un article dans le journal américain « Social Science Research, intitulé « How different are the adult children of parents who have same-sex relationships? Findings from the New Family Structures Study » (A quel point les enfants devenus adultes de parents ayant eu une relation homosexuelle sont-ils différents ? Résultats de l’Étude sur les nouvelles structures familiales), qui dresse la bilan de la longue étude qu’il a menée sur 2988 personnes interrogées.

Les résultats de cette étude du chercheur universitaire sont surprenants. Ils ont été repris dans le site d’information américain Slate. Selon cette étude, les enfants élevés dans leurs familles biologiques disposent d’un meilleur niveau d’études, d’une meilleure santé mentale et physique, ils consomment moins de drogue, se tiennent plus éloignés des activités criminelles et se considèrent plus heureux que les enfants élevés par un couple homosexuel.

A l’inverse, les enfants issus de familles homoparentales, et en particulier de couples lesbiens sont bien plus sujets aux dépressions, il ont plus de problèmes physiques, il consomment plus de marijuana et ont plus de chance d’être au chômage (69% des enfants issus de familles homoparentales vivent des prestations sociales contre 17% pour les enfants de couples hétéros). Surtout, contrairement aux théories de Jean-Michel Aphatie et de Caroline Fourest, selon lesquelles les hétérosexuels sont de violents alcooliques qui frappent leurs enfants et en abusent, les enfants de couple lesbiens seraient en moyenne 10 fois plus victimes d’attouchements sexuels que dans les familles « hétéro-parentales » (23% contre 2% de moyenne).

Aux États-Unis, le lobby gay a été choqué par cette étude et l’a dénoncée si violemment (appuyé par des journalistes progressistes) qu’un mouvement de scientifiques s’est créé pour soutenir ces travaux et leur sérieux méthodologique.

Il est étonnant de constater que cette étude n’a jamais été évoquée par le moindre journaliste, en France, alors que nous sommes censés être en plein débat sur l’homoparentalité. Les journalistes préfèrent suivre les socialistes dans leur chasse aux « dérapages » homophobes plutôt que de s’interroger sur le fond du sujet et sur les dangers d’une telle loi.

Il est clair que les études sociologiques peuvent être controversées, mais pourquoi nous cacher celle là, alors que tous les défenseurs du mariage pour tous les homos, sans jamais rien citer, disent, l’air sûrs d’eux, que les premières études prouvent qu’il n’y a pas de différence éducative entre l’homoparentalité et la parenté « classique » ? Pourquoi personne ne parle tout haut de cet élément qui pourra certes être débattu mais qui ne peut qu’apporter des faits nouveaux aux discussions.

Qu’on montre toute les études et chacun se fera son idée, pourquoi laisser Caroline Fourest nous expliquer que les enfants de couples homosexuels sont en pleine forme sans mettre en doute cette vérité énoncée qui ne coule pourtant pas de sens ?

En même temps, tous ces futurs enfants dépressifs, drogués, aux troubles psychologiques, parasites de l’état, formeront de formidables électeurs (et militants pour ceux qui seront un peu plus en forme) du Parti Socialiste. On comprend mieux pourquoi le PS veut déglinguer nos enfants et légaliser le commerce des bébés…

La dégénérescence programmée, c’est maintenant !

Voir aussi:

Selon l’Insee, il y a 100.000 couples homosexuels en France

Paul Parant

Têtu

14 février 2013

Pour la Saint-Valentin, l’Insee publie des chiffres passionnants sur les couples homosexuels. On y apprend notamment que ces couples sont plus jeunes, plus diplômés et plus urbains que les autres.

C’est la Saint-Valentin! Pour l’occasion, l’Insee publie le billet le moins romantique qui soit: une étude statistique sur le couple en France, avec en particulier beaucoup d’infos sur les couples de personnes de même sexe. Et les résultats sont passionnants, car inédits.

60% de gays, 40% de lesbiennes

Début 2011, en France métropolitaine, l’Insee dénombre en effet 200.000 personnes majeures qui déclarent être en couple – soit 100.000 couples de même sexe. Ce qui ne fait qu’un petit 0,6% des couples français. Et dans cette population en couple, légèrement moins de femmes: six fois sur dix en effet, les couples sont constitués d’hommes.

Les personnes en couple de même sexe, toujours selon l’Insee, sont plus jeunes: la moitié a moins de 40 ans – contre 48 pour les personnes en couple hétéro. Et près d’une personne sur quatre, dans un couple homo, est âgée de moins de 30 ans: soit deux fois plus que pour les personnes en couple hétéro. «Ces écarts d’âge, analyse l’Insee, peuvent refléter des différences de comportements au cours du cycle de vie ou correspondre à un effet de génération: avoir un conjoint de même sexe pouvait être plus difficilement envisageable par le passé.»

Plus jeunes, plus diplômés, plus urbains

Les couples homos seraient aussi plus diplômés et plus urbains. 48% des personnes se déclarant en couple homo ont un diplôme universitaire, soit 20 points de plus que les personnes en couples hétéros. «A âge comparable, elles restent plus diplômées que les autres», conclue l’institut de statistiques.

Plus diplômés, plus urbain aussi: les trois quarts de ces personnes vivent dans des grands pôles urbains, contre seulement 56% des personnes en couple de sexe différent. Et 30% résident en Île-de-France (contre 17 % des personnes en couple hétéro). «Cette résidence plus fréquente dans les grandes villes reste vraie à âge et diplôme équivalents. Elle peut être favorisée par une plus grande facilité des rencontres et une plus forte acceptation de l’homosexualité dans les milieux urbains, la vie privée restant plus confidentielle dans une grande ville. Elle peut aussi s’expliquer par la présence plus rare d’enfants dans ces couples, plus en adéquation avec un environnement urbain», note l’Insee.

Vous avez des enfants?

Sur l’homoparentalité, l’étude est intéressante aussi: environ une personne en couple de même sexe sur dix réside (au moins une partie du temps) avec au moins un enfant qu’elle déclare comme le sien (celui d’un membre du couple ou des deux) – contre 53% dans les couples hétéros. Pour la plupart, ces enfants sont nés d’une union hétérosexuelle précédente, et les enfants sont alors partagés. Comme on pouvait s’y attendre, ces couples homos qui vivent au moins une partie du temps avec un enfant sont majoritairement des femmes (huit fois sur dix environ).

Après 35 ans, la majorité des personnes en couple de même sexe est pacsée, apprend-on encore. Si, chez les couples hétéros, 74% sont mariés et 4% pacsés (le reste vit en concubinage), pour les couples homos, la proportion des personnes pacsées est en effet de 55% après 35 ans – et cela n’augmente pas vraiment pour les couples plus âgés, ce qui «peut en partie s’expliquer par le fait que le pacs n’existait pas au début de l’union pour les mises en couple les plus anciennes».

En couple, mais parfois séparés

Au final, et sans surprise, la part des couples pacsés parmi les couples homos est supérieure à la part de couples pacsés parmi les couples de sexe différent. Mais elle reste inférieure à la part des couples pacsés ou mariés parmi ces derniers.

Dernière info: les couples homos, gays comme lesbiens, résident moins souvent avec leur conjoint que les personnes en couple hétéro: 16% déclarent ne pas vivre dans le même logement que leur conjoint, soit 12 points de plus que les personnes en couple de sexe différent. Une différence qui reste marquée à tous les âges.

Voir enfin:

AVEC LE « MARIAGE POUR TOUS », LE MEILLEUR DES MONDES?..

H. Gizardin

09 janvier 2013

De nombreux experts et pédopsychiatres se sont exprimés sur les conséquences pour les enfants, et donc l’avenir de notre société du mariage dit « Pour tous »! Ils mettent en avant le Droit DE l’ enfant contre le Droit À l’enfant, ce qui suffirait amplement pour convaincre les indécis.

Mais je continue de dessiner des conséquences et extrapolations ubuesques que peu de débateurs ont explorées. Scénarios de fiction face aux œillères roses des adhérents forcenés à la proposition 31 du candidat Hollande…

Déjà une nouvelle disposition administrative (héritage de Roselyne Bachelot) qui fait peu d’échos est désormais en vigueur pour les documents officiels. Le terme de « Mademoiselle » est supprimé! Il connotait trop l’état sexuel de la personne et la discriminait. Désormais donc, une petite fille devra être interpellée « Madame » à l’école ou dans toute administration! Délicieux parfum protocolaire de l’ ancien régime.

Mais heureusement elle demeure donc de sexe féminin aux yeux de la société…

Le mariage homosexuel qui permettra l’adoption, la PMA ou la location d’un ventre géniteur fera entrer dans ces familles des enfants venus d’ailleurs ou de nulle part. Nés de mère porteuse, d’abandon ou sous X, ils seront les enfants de Pierre, P1 et d’André, P2 . Dans un couple féminin, un enfant pourra être descendant génétique de Jeanne, P1 (ou P2).

À la première génération, il sera aisé de leur donner le patronyme des deux associés . Mais j’imagine que le le législateur saura voir plus loin. Le bambin aura donc le choix de sa « généalogie » à 18 ans?

Je suggère que la photo de la carte d’identité, soit remplacée par un code barre renvoyant à une identité ADN enregistrée en préfecture. De même pour la carte Vitale débarrassée aussi des 1 et 2 initiaux du numéro de sécurité sociale, qui créent une détestable inégalité entre sexes.

Quant au Livret de « Famille » il devra s’affranchir des ascendants au bénéfice également du seul ADN (en l’état actuel de la génétique).

Lors de mariage de sujets de cette nouvelle génération, les bans devront logiquement être remplacés par la publication des identités génétiques respectives, permettant pour un objecteur (y compris étranger) de se faire connaître avant comparution devant le maire.

Il est évident que deux individus non porteurs de la même identité pourront , au nom de cette liberté chaudement acquise, convoler et même procréer par voies classiques, dont beaucoup garderont encore le goût…

Ce qui ouvrira la possibilité d’union entre frères et/ou sœurs d’un même foyer homoparental. Très commode pour le regroupement familial et une organisation néo tribale!..

L’amour étant, pour les promoteurs de la Loi, le fondement du mariage pour TOUS, il n’y aura aucune objection de principe à permettre également des poly-unions, ce qui devrait satisfaire les tenants de la polygamie ancestrale et explique peut-être le silence contenu des musulmans dans le débat public?

Après divorces et générations postérieures, le problème se compliquera que je n’ai pas encore simulé ou anticipé!..

Mais je promets du bonheur aux fonctionnaires de l’état civil, aux notaires, aux juges des affaires conjugales (on ne saurait dire désormais « matrimoniales ») et aux traceurs de généalogies…

Rappel 1: Taubira

Rappel bis: Exeption française

Rappel ter:Normalitude


%d blogueurs aiment cette page :