Elimination du général Soleimani: Attention, une décision irresponsable peut en cacher une autre ! (Guess who just pulled another decisive blow against Iran’s rogue adventurism ?)

3 janvier, 2020

CA502K5W8AAepmb"Soleimani is my commander" says the lower graffiti on the U.S. embassy in Baghdad at the very end of 2019LONG LIVE TRUMP ! (On Tehran streets after Soleimani's elimination, Jan. 3, 2019)
Image result for damet garm poeticPersian is a beautifully lyrical and highly emotional language, one that adds a touch of poetry to everyday phrases. Discover these 18 poetic Persian phrases you'll wish English had.

3 a.m. There is a phone in the White House and it’s ringing. Who do you want answering the phone? Hillary Clinton ad (2008)
The assassination of Iran Quds Force chief Qassem Soleimani is an extremely dangerous and foolish escalation. The US bears responsibility for all consequences of its rogue adventurism.  Mohammad Javad Zarif (Iranian Foreign Minister)
Le président Trump vient de jeter un bâton de dynamite dans une poudrière, et il doit au peuple américain une explication. C’est une énorme escalade dans une région déjà dangereuse. Joe Biden
Iraqis — Iraqis — dancing in the street for freedom; thankful that General Soleimani is no more. Mike Pompeo
Qassem Soleimani was an arch terrorist with American blood on his hands. His demise should be applauded by all who seek peace and justice. Proud of President Trump for doing the strong and right thing. Nikki Haley
To Iran and its proxy militias: We will not accept the continued attacks against our personnel and forces in the region. Attacks against us will be met with responses in the time, manner and place of our choosing. We urge the Iranian regime to end malign activities. Mark Esper (US Defense Secretary)
At the direction of the President, the U.S. military has taken decisive defensive action to protect U.S. personnel abroad by killing Qasem Soleimani, the head of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps-Quds Force, a U.S.-designated Foreign Terrorist Organization. General Soleimani was actively developing plans to attack American diplomats and service members in Iraq and throughout the region. General Soleimani and his Quds Force were responsible for the deaths of hundreds of American and coalition service members and the wounding of thousands more. He had orchestrated attacks on coalition bases in Iraq over the last several months – including the attack on December 27th – culminating in the death and wounding of additional American and Iraqi personnel. General Soleimani also approved the attacks on the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad that took place this week. This strike was aimed at deterring future Iranian attack plans. The United States will continue to take all necessary action to protect our people and our interests wherever they are around the world. US state department
In March 2007, Soleimani was included on a list of Iranian individuals targeted with sanctions in United Nations Security Council Resolution 1747. On 18 May 2011, he was sanctioned again by the U.S. along with Syrian president Bashar al-Assad and other senior Syrian officials due to his alleged involvement in providing material support to the Syrian government. On 24 June 2011, the Official Journal of the European Union said the three Iranian Revolutionary Guard members now subject to sanctions had been « providing equipment and support to help the Syrian government suppress protests in Syria ». The Iranians added to the EU sanctions list were two Revolutionary Guard commanders, Soleimani, Mohammad Ali Jafari, and the Guard’s deputy commander for intelligence, Hossein Taeb. Soleimani was also sanctioned by the Swiss government in September 2011 on the same grounds cited by the European Union. In 2007, the U.S. included him in a « Designation of Iranian Entities and Individuals for Proliferation Activities and Support for Terrorism », which forbade U.S. citizens from doing business with him. The list, published in the EU’s Official Journal on 24 June 2011, also included a Syrian property firm, an investment fund and two other enterprises accused of funding the Syrian government. The list also included Mohammad Ali Jafari and Hossein Taeb. On 13 November 2018, the U.S. sanctioned an Iraqi military leader named Shibl Muhsin ‘Ubayd Al-Zaydi and others who allegedly were acting on Soleimani’s behalf in financing military actions in Syria or otherwise providing support for terrorism in the region. Wikipedia
The historic nuclear accord between a US-led group of countries and Iran was good news for a man who some consider to be the Middle East’s most effective covert operative. As a result of the deal, Qasem Suleimani, the commander of the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Qods Force and the general responsible for overseeing Iran’s network of proxy organizations, will be removed from European Union sanctions lists once the agreement is implemented, and taken off a UN sanctions list after eight or fewer years. Iran obtained some key concessions as a result of the nuclear agreement, including access to an estimated $150 billion in frozen assets; the lifting of a UN arms embargo, the eventual end to sanctions related to the country’s ballistic missile program; the ability to operate over 5,000 uranium enrichment centrifuges and to run stable elements through centrifuges at the once-clandestine and heavily guarded Fordow facility; nuclear assistance from the US and its partners; and the ability to stall inspections of sensitive sites for as long as 24 days. In light of these accomplishments, the de-listing of a general responsible for coordinating anti-US militia groups in Iraq — someone who may be responsible for the deaths of US soldiers — almost seems gratuitous. It’s unlikely that the entire deal hinged on a single Iranian officer’s ability to open bank accounts in EU states or travel within Europe. But it got into the deal anyway. So did a reprieve for Bank Saderat, which the US sanctioned in 2006 for facilitating money transfers to Iranian regime-supported terror groups like Hezbollah and Islamic Jihad. As part of the deal, Bank Saderat will leave the EU sanctions list on the same timetable as Suleimani, although it will remain under US designation. Like Suleimani’s removal, Bank Saderat’s apparent legalization in Europe suggests that for the purposes of the deal, the US and its partners lumped a broad range of restrictions under the heading of « nuclear-related » sanctions. Suleimani and Bank Saderat are still going to remain under US sanctions related to the Iranian regime’s human rights abuses and support for terrorism. US sanctions have broad extraterritorial reach, and the US Treasury Department has turned into the scourge of compliance desks at banks around the world. But that matters to a somewhat lesser degree inside of the EU, where companies have actually been exempted from complying with certain US « secondary sanctions » on Iran since the mid-1990s. (…) Some time in the next few years, Qasem Suleimani will be able to travel and do business inside the EU, while a bank that’s facilitated the funding of US-listed terror group’s will be allowed to enter the European market. As part of the nuclear deal, the US and its partners bargained away much of the international leverage against some of the more problematic sectors in the Iranian regime, including entities whose wrongdoing went well beyond the nuclear realm. The result is the almost complete reversal of the sanctions regime in Europe. Iran successfully pushed for a broad definition of « nuclear-related sanctions, » and bargained hard — and effectively — for a maximal degree of sanctions relief. And the de-listing of Bank Saderat and Qasem Suleimani, along with the late-breaking effort to classify arms trade restrictions as purely nuclear-related, demonstrates just how far the US and its partners were willing to go to close a historic nuclear deal. Armin Rosen
This was a combatant. There’s no doubt that he fit the description of ‘combatant.’ He was a uniformed member of an enemy military who was actively planning to kill Americans; American soldiers and probably, as well, American civilians. It was the right thing to do. It was legally justified, and I think we should applaud the president for his decision. We send a very powerful message to the Iranian government that we will not stand by as the American embassy is attacked — which is an act of war — and we will not stand by as plans are being made to attack and kill American soldiers. I think every president who had any degree of courage would do the same thing, and I applaud our president for doing it, and the members of the military who carried it out, risking their own lives and safety. I think this is an action that will have saved lives in the end.  The president doesn’t need congressional authorization, or any legal authorization … The president, as the commander-in-chief of the army is entitled to take preventive actions to save the lives of the American military. This is very similar to what Barack Obama did with Ben Rhodes’s authorization and approval — without Congress’s authorization — in killing Osama bin Laden. In fact, that was worse, in some ways, because that was a revenge act. There was no real threat that Osama bin Laden would carry out any future terrorist acts. Moreover, he was not a member of an official armed forces in uniform, so it’s a fortiori from what Obama did and Rhodes did that President Trump has complete legal authority in a much more compelling way to have taken the military action that was taken today. Alan Dershowitz
Trump in full fascist 101 mode-,steal and lie – untill there’s nothing left and start a war – He’s so idiotic he doesn’t know he just attacked Iran And that’s not like anywhere else. John Cusak
Dear , The USA has disrespected your country, your flag, your people. 52% of us humbly apologize. We want peace with your nation. We are being held hostage by a terrorist regime. We do not know how to escape. Please do not kill us. . Rose McGowan
On se réveille dans un monde plus dangereux (…) et l’escalade militaire est toujours dangereuse. Amélie de Montchalin (secrétaire d’État française aux Affaires européennes)
C’est d’abord l’Iranienne qui va vous répondre et celle-là ne peut que se réjouir de ce qui s’est passé. Je parle en mon nom mais je peux vous l’assurer aussi au nom de millions d’Iraniens, probablement la majorité d’entre eux : cet homme était haï, il incarnait le mal absolu ! Je suis révoltée par les commentaires que j’ai entendus venant de certains pseudo-spécialistes de l’Iran, le présentant sur une chaîne de télévision comme un individu charismatique et populaire. Il faut ne rien connaître et ne rien comprendre à ce pays pour tenir ce genre de sottises. Pour l’Iranien lambda, Soleimani était un monstre, ce qui se fait de pire dans la République islamique. (…) Soleimani en était un élément essentiel, aussi puissant que Khameini et ce n’est pas de la propagande que d’affirmer que sa mort ne choque presque personne. (…) Je ne suis pas dans le secret des généraux iraniens mais une simple observatrice informée. Le régime est aux abois depuis des mois, totalement isolé. Ils savent qu’ils n’ont pas d’avenir, la rue et le peuple n’en veulent plus, ils ne peuvent pas vraiment compter sur l’Union européenne et pas plus sur la Chine. Ils n’ont aucun avenir et c’est ce qui rend la situation particulièrement dangereuse car ils sont dans une logique suicidaire. (…) En réalité, ils ont tout perdu et ne peuvent plus sortir du pays pour s’installer à l’étranger car des mandats ont été lancés contre la plupart d’entre eux. Les sanctions ont asséché la manne des pétrodollars et c’est essentiel car il n’y avait pas d’adhésion idéologique à ce régime. (…) Donald Trump (…) a considérablement affaibli ce régime, comme jamais auparavant, et peut-être même a-t-il signé leur arrêt de mort. Nous verrons. Lors des manifestations populaires, à Téhéran et dans d’autre villes, les noms de Khameini, de Rohani, de Soleimani étaient hués. Il n’y a jamais eu de slogans anti-Trump ou contre les Etats-Unis. (…) [Mais] hélas ils n’abandonneront pas le pouvoir tranquillement, j’en suis convaincue. Mahnaz Shirali
The whole “protest” against the United States Embassy compound in Baghdad last week was almost certainly a Suleimani-staged operation to make it look as if Iraqis wanted America out when in fact it was the other way around. The protesters were paid pro-Iranian militiamen. No one in Baghdad was fooled by this. In a way, it’s what got Suleimani killed. He so wanted to cover his failures in Iraq he decided to start provoking the Americans there by shelling their forces, hoping they would overreact, kill Iraqis and turn them against the United States. Trump, rather than taking the bait, killed Suleimani instead. I have no idea whether this was wise or what will be the long-term implications. But (…) Suleimani is part of a system called the Islamic Revolution in Iran. That revolution has managed to use oil money and violence to stay in power since 1979 — and that is Iran’s tragedy, a tragedy that the death of one Iranian general will not change. Today’s Iran is the heir to a great civilization and the home of an enormously talented people and significant culture. Wherever Iranians go in the world today, they thrive as scientists, doctors, artists, writers and filmmakers — except in the Islamic Republic of Iran, whose most famous exports are suicide bombing, cyberterrorism and proxy militia leaders. The very fact that Suleimani was probably the most famous Iranian in the region speaks to the utter emptiness of this regime, and how it has wasted the lives of two generations of Iranians by looking for dignity in all the wrong places and in all the wrong ways. (…) in the coming days there will be noisy protests in Iran, the burning of American flags and much crying for the “martyr.” The morning after the morning after? There will be a thousand quiet conversations inside Iran that won’t get reported. They will be about the travesty that is their own government and how it has squandered so much of Iran’s wealth and talent on an imperial project that has made Iran hated in the Middle East. And yes, the morning after, America’s Sunni Arab allies will quietly celebrate Suleimani’s death, but we must never forget that it is the dysfunction of many of the Sunni Arab regimes — their lack of freedom, modern education and women’s empowerment — that made them so weak that Iran was able to take them over from the inside with its proxies. (…) the Middle East, particularly Iran, is becoming an environmental disaster area — running out of water, with rising desertification and overpopulation. If governments there don’t stop fighting and come together to build resilience against climate change — rather than celebrating self-promoting military frauds who conquer failed states and make them fail even more — they’re all doomed. Thomas L. Friedman
It is impossible to overstate the importance of this particular action. It is more significant than the killing of Osama bin Laden or even the death of [Islamic State leader Abu Bakr] al-Baghdadi. Suleimani was the architect and operational commander of the Iranian effort to solidify control of the so-called Shia crescent, stretching from Iran to Iraq through Syria into southern Lebanon. He is responsible for providing explosives, projectiles, and arms and other munitions that killed well over 600 American soldiers and many more of our coalition and Iraqi partners just in Iraq, as well as in many other countries such as Syria. So his death is of enormous significance. The question of course is how does Iran respond in terms of direct action by its military and Revolutionary Guard Corps forces? And how does it direct its proxies—the Iranian-supported Shia militia in Iraq and Syria and southern Lebanon, and throughout the world? (…) The reasoning seems to be to show in the most significant way possible that the U.S. is just not going to allow the continued violence—the rocketing of our bases, the killing of an American contractor, the attacks on shipping, on unarmed drones—without a very significant response. Many people had rightly questioned whether American deterrence had eroded somewhat because of the relatively insignificant responses to the earlier actions. This clearly was of vastly greater importance. Of course it also, per the Defense Department statement, was a defensive action given the reported planning and contingencies that Suleimani was going to Iraq to discuss and presumably approve. This was in response to the killing of an American contractor, the wounding of American forces, and just a sense of how this could go downhill from here if the Iranians don’t realize that this cannot continue. (…) Iran is in a very precarious economic situation, it is very fragile domestically—they’ve killed many, many hundreds if not thousands of Iranian citizens who were demonstrating on the streets of Iran in response to the dismal economic situation and the mismanagement and corruption. I just don’t see the Iranians as anywhere near as supportive of the regime at this point as they were decades ago during the Iran-Iraq War. Clearly the supreme leader has to consider that as Iran considers the potential responses to what the U.S. has done. It will be interesting now to see if there is a U.S. diplomatic initiative to reach out to Iran and to say, “Okay, the next move could be strikes against your oil infrastructure and your forces in your country—where does that end?” (…) We haven’t declared war, but we have taken a very, very significant action. (…) We’ve taken numerous actions to augment our air defenses in the region, our offensive capabilities in the region, in terms of general purpose and special operations forces and air assets. The Pentagon has considered the implications, the potential consequences and has done a great deal to mitigate the risks—although you can’t fully mitigate the potential risks.  (…) Again what was the alternative? Do it in Iran? Think of the implications of that. This is the most formidable adversary that we have faced for decades. He is a combination of CIA director, JSOC [Joint Special Operations Command] commander, and special presidential envoy for the region. This is a very significant effort to reestablish deterrence, which obviously had not been shored up by the relatively insignificant responses up until now. (…) Obviously all sides will suffer if this becomes a wider war, but Iran has to be very worried that—in the state of its economy, the significant popular unrest and demonstrations against the regime—that this is a real threat to the regime in a way that we have not seen prior to this. (…) The incentive would be to get out from under the sanctions, which are crippling. Could we get back to the Iran nuclear deal plus some additional actions that could address the shortcomings of the agreement? This is a very significant escalation, and they don’t know where this goes any more than anyone else does. Yes, they can respond and they can retaliate, and that can lead to further retaliation—and that it is clear now that the administration is willing to take very substantial action. This is a pretty clarifying moment in that regard. (…) Right now they are probably doing what anyone does in this situation: considering the menu of options. There could be actions in the gulf, in the Strait of Hormuz by proxies in the regional countries, and in other continents where the Quds Force have activities. There’s a very considerable number of potential responses by Iran, and then there’s any number of potential U.S. responses to those actions. Given the state of their economy, I think they have to be very leery, very concerned that that could actually result in the first real challenge to the regime certainly since the Iran-Iraq War. (…) The [Iraqi] prime minister has said that he would put forward legislation to [kick the U.S. military out of Iraq], although I don’t think that the majority of Iraqi leaders want to see that given that ISIS is still a significant threat. They are keenly aware that it was not the Iranian supported militias that defeated the Islamic State, it was U.S.-enabled Iraqi armed forces and special forces that really fought the decisive battles. Gen. David Petraeus
[Qasem Soleimani] was our most significant Iranian adversary during my four years in Iraq, [and] certainly when I was the Central Command commander, and very much so when I was the director of the CIA. He is unquestionably the most significant and important — or was the most significant and important — Iranian figure in the region, the most important architect of the effort by Iran to solidify control of the Shia crescent, and the operational commander of the various initiatives that were part of that effort. (…)  He sent a message to me through the president of Iraq in late March of 2008, during the battle of Basra, when we were supporting the Iraqi army forces that were battling the Shia militias in Basra that were supported, of course, by Qasem Soleimani and the Quds Force. He sent a message through the president that said, « General Petraeus, you should know that I, Qasem Soleimani, control the policy of Iran for Iraq, and also for Syria, Lebanon, Gaza and Afghanistan. » And the implication of that was, « If you want to deal with Iran to resolve this situation in Basra, you should deal with me, not with the Iranian diplomats. » And his power only grew from that point in time. By the way, I did not — I actually told the president to tell Qasem Soleimani to pound sand. (…) I suspect that the leaders in Washington were seeking to reestablish deterrence, which clearly had eroded to some degree, perhaps by the relatively insignificant actions in response to these strikes on the Abqaiq oil facility in Saudi Arabia, shipping in the Gulf and our $130 million dollar drone that was shot down. And we had seen increased numbers of attacks against US forces in Iraq. So I’m sure that there was a lot of discussion about what could show the Iranians most significantly that we are really serious, that they should not continue to escalate. Now, obviously, there is a menu of options that they have now and not just in terms of direct Iranian action against perhaps our large bases in the various Gulf states, shipping in the Gulf, but also through proxy actions — and not just in the region, but even in places such as Latin America and Africa and Europe. (…) I am not privy to the intelligence that was the foundation for the decision, which clearly was, as was announced, this was a defensive action, that Soleimani was going into the country to presumably approve further attacks. Without really being in the inner circle on that, I think it’s very difficult to either second-guess or to even think through what the recommendation might have been. Again, it is impossible to overstate the significance of this action. This is much more substantial than the killing of Osama bin Laden. It’s even more substantial than the killing of Baghdadi. (…) my understanding is that we have significantly shored up our air defenses, our air assets, our ground defenses and so forth. There’s been the movement of a lot of forces into the region in months, not just in the past days. So there’s been a very substantial augmentation of our defensive capabilities and also our offensive capabilities.  And (…) the question Iran has to ask itself is, « Where does this end? » If they now retaliate in a significant way — and considering how vulnerable their infrastructure and forces are at a time when their economy is in dismal shape because of the sanctions. So Iran is not in a position of strength, although it clearly has many, many options available to it, as I mentioned, not just with their armed forces and the Revolutionary Guards Corps, but also with these Quds Force-supported proxy elements throughout the region in the world. (…) I think one of the questions is, « What will the diplomatic ramifications of this be? » And again, there have been celebrations in some places in Iraq at the loss of Qasem Soleimani. So, again, there’s no tears being shed in certain parts of the country. And one has to ask what happens in the wake of the killing of the individual who had a veto, virtually, over the leadership of Iraq. What transpires now depends on the calculations of all these different elements. And certainly the US, I would assume, is considering diplomatic initiatives as well, reaching out and saying, « Okay. Does that send a sufficient message of our seriousness? Now, would you like to return to the table? » Or does Iran accelerate the nuclear program, which would, of course, precipitate something further from the United States? Very likely. So lots of calculations here. And I think we’re still very early in the deliberations on all the different ramifications of this very significant action. (…) I think that this particular episode has been fairly impressively handled. There’s been restraint in some of the communications methods from the White House. The Department of Defense put out, I think, a solid statement. It has taken significant actions, again, to shore up our defenses and our offensive capabilities. The question now, I think, is what is the diplomatic initiative that follows this? What will the State Department and the Secretary of State do now to try to get back to the table and reduce or end the battlefield consequences? [The flag that Donald Trump posted last night, no words] (…) I think relative to some of his tweets that was quite restrained. Gen. David Petraeus
Washington gave Israel a green light to assassinate Qassem Soleimani, the commander of the Quds Force, the overseas arm of Iran’s Revolutionary Guard, Kuwaiti newspaper Al-Jarida reported on Monday. Al-Jarida, which in recent years had broken exclusive stories from Israel, quoted a source in Jerusalem as saying that « there is an American-Israeli agreement » that Soleimani is a « threat to the two countries’ interests in the region. » It is generally assumed in the Arab world that the paper is used as an Israeli platform for conveying messages to other countries in the Middle East. (…) The agreement between Israel and the United States, according to the report, comes three years after Washington thwarted an Israeli attempt to kill the general. The report says Israel was « on the verge » of assassinating Soleimani three years ago, near Damascus, but the United States warned the Iranian leadership of the plan, revealing that Israel was closely tracking the Iranian general. Haaretz (2018)
Most revered military leader’ now joins ‘austere religious scholar’ and ‘mourners’ trying to storm our embassy as word choices that make normal people wonder whose side the American mainstream media is on. Buck Sexton
Make no mistake – this is bigger than taking out Osama Bin Laden. Ranj Alaaldin
The reported deaths of Iranian General Qassem Suleimani and the Iraqi commander of the militia that killed an American last week was a bold and decisive military action made possible by excellent intelligence and the courage of America’s service members. His death is a huge loss for Iran’s regime and its Iraqi proxies, and a major operational and psychological victory for the United States. The Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), led by Suleimani, was responsible for the deaths of more than 600 Americans in Iraq between 2003-2011, and countless more injured. He was a chief architect behind Iran’s continuing reign of terror in the region. This strike against one of the world’s most odious terrorists is no different than the mission which took out Osama bin Laden – it is, in fact, even more justifiable since he was in a foreign country directing terrorist attacks against Americans. Lt. Col. (Ret.) James Carafano (Heritage Foundation)
This is a major blow. I would argue that this is probably the most major decapitation strike the United States has ever carried out. … This is a man who controlled a transnational foreign legion that was controlling governments in numerous different countries. He had a hell of a lot of power and a hell of a lot of control. You have to be a strong leader in order to get these people to work with you, know how and when to play them off one another, and also know which Iranians do I need within the IRGC-QF, which Lebanese do I need, which Iraqis do I need … that’s not something you can just pick up at a local five and dime. It takes decades of experience. (…) It’s an incredible two-fer. This is another one of those old hands. These guys don’t grow on trees. It takes time. Iran has been at war with the United States since the Islamic Revolutionary regime took power in Tehran in 1979. To say that we are going to war or that this is yet another American escalation — I think we need to be a little more detailed. Over the past year, Kata’ib Hizballah, was launching rockets and mortars at Americans in Iraq and eventually killed one. Over the past couple of years we’ve had a number of issues in the Gulf, we’ve had a number of issues in different countries, we’ve had international terrorism issues, you name it, you can throw everything at the wall, and the Iranians have in some way been behind some of it. Even arm supplies to the Taliban … so this didn’t just appear in a vacuum because ‘we didn’t like the Iranians. What the administration must offer now is firm diplomacy backed by the continuing, credible threat of the use of military force. President Trump has wisely shown that he will act with the full powers of his office when American interests are threatened, and the extremist regime in Tehran would be wise to take notice. Phillip Smyth (Washington Institute)
From a military and diplomatic perspective, Soleimani was Iran’s David Petraeus and Stan McChrystal and Brett McGurk all rolled into one. And that’s now the problem Iran faces. I do not know of a single Iranian who was more indispensable to his government’s ambitions in the Middle East. From 2015 to 2017, when we were in the heat of the fighting against the Islamic State in both Syria and Iraq, I would watch Soleimani shuttle back and forth between Syria and Iraq. When the war to prop up Bashar al-Assad was going poorly, Soleimani would leave Iraq for Syria. And when Iranian-backed militias in Iraq began to struggle against the Islamic State, Soleimani would leave Syria for Iraq. That’s now a problem for Iran. Just as the United States often faces a shortage of human capital—not all general officers and diplomats are created equal, sadly, and we are not exactly blessed with a surplus of Arabic speakers in our government—Iran also doesn’t have a lot of talent to go around. One of the reasons I thought Iran erred so often in Yemen—giving strategic weapons such as anti-ship cruise missiles to a bunch of undertrained Houthi yahoos, for example—was a lack of adult supervision. Qassem Soleimani was the adult supervision. He was spread thin over the past decade, but he was nonetheless a serious if nefarious adversary of the United States and its partners in the region. And Iran and its partners will now feel his loss greatly. Soleimani was at least partially, and in many cases directly, responsible for dozens if not hundreds of attacks on U.S. forces in Iraq going back to the height of the Iraq War. Andrew Exum
Soleimani is responsible for the Iranian military terror reign across the Middle East. Many Arab Muslims across the region are celebrating today. Unfortunately, many US Democrats are not. Instead, they are criticizing President Trump. If the death of Soleimani leads to any escalation, it is the Islamic regime of Iran that is to blame. The same Islamic terror regime that past President Obama wanted to align as the US closest ally in the Middle East, handing them the disastrous nuclear deal, as well as billions of dollars in cash. As Iran considers the US “big satan” and Israel as “little satan”, Israel is on high alert for any Iranian attacks in retaliation. Iran has always viewed an attack on Israeli interests as an attack on the USA. Avi Abelow
The successful operation against Qassem Suleimani, head of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, is a stunning blow to international terrorism and a reassertion of American might. (…) President Trump has conditioned his policies on Iranian behavior. When Iran spread its malign influence, Trump acted to check it. When Iran struck, Trump hit back: never disproportionately, never definitively. He left open the possibility of negotiations. He doesn’t want to have the greater Middle East — whether Libya, Syria, Iraq, Iran, Yemen, or Afghanistan — dominate his presidency the way it dominated those of Barack Obama and George W. Bush. America no longer needs Middle Eastern oil. Best to keep the region on the back burner and watch it so it doesn’t boil over. Do not overcommit resources to this underdeveloped, war-torn, sectarian land. The result was reciprocal antagonism. In 2018, Trump withdrew the United States from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action negotiated by his predecessor. He began jacking up sanctions. The Iranian economy turned to a shambles. This “maximum pressure” campaign of economic warfare deprived the Iranian war machine of revenue and drove a wedge between the Iranian public and the Iranian government. Trump offered the opportunity to negotiate a new agreement. Iran refused. And began to lash out. Last June, Iran’s fingerprints were all over two oil tankers that exploded in the Persian Gulf. Trump tightened the screws. Iran downed a U.S. drone. Trump called off a military strike at the last minute and responded indirectly, with more sanctions, cyber attacks, and additional troop deployments to the region. Last September a drone fleet launched by Iranian proxies in Yemen devastated the Aramco oil facility in Abqaiq, Saudi Arabia. Trump responded as he had to previous incidents: nonviolently. Iran slowly brought the region to a boil. First it hit boats, then drones, then the key infrastructure of a critical ally. On December 27 it went further: Members of the Kataib Hezbollah militia launched rockets at a U.S. installation near Kirkuk, Iraq. Four U.S. soldiers were wounded. An American contractor was killed. Destroying physical objects merited economic sanctions and cyber intrusions. Ending lives required a lethal response. It arrived on December 29 when F-15s pounded five Kataib Hezbollah facilities across Iraq and Syria. At least 25 militiamen were killed. Then, when Kataib Hezbollah and other Iran-backed militias organized a mob to storm the U.S. embassy in Baghdad, setting fire to the grounds, America made a show of force and threatened severe reprisals. The angry crowd melted away. The risk to the U.S. embassy — and the possibility of another Benghazi — must have angered Trump. “The game has changed,” Secretary of Defense Mark Esper said hours before the assassination of Soleimani at Baghdad airport. (…) Deterrence, says Fred Kagan of the American Enterprise Institute, is credibly holding at risk something your adversary holds dear. If the reports out of Iraq are true, President Trump has put at risk the entirety of the Iranian imperial enterprise even as his maximum-pressure campaign strangles the Iranian economy and fosters domestic unrest. That will get the ayatollah’s attention. And now the United States must prepare for his answer. The bombs over Baghdad? That was Trump calling Khamenei’s bluff. The game has changed. But it isn’t over. Matthew Continetti
D’un point de vue fonctionnel, [Soleimani] était responsable de la force al-Qods des Gardiens de la Révolution, c’est-à-dire de l’ensemble des opérations menées par l’Iran dans toute la région. Cet homme avait beaucoup de secrets. Il était l’un des vecteurs, sinon le vecteur principal, du déploiement de l’influence de l’Iran. Je ne suis pas de ceux qui pensent qu’il y a une volonté expansionniste de l’Iran, mais Téhéran a développé des réseaux d’influence et c’est probablement Soleimani qui avait la haute main sur ceux-ci. Sur tous les terrains chauds de la région où l’Iran a une influence, on retrouve le général Soleimani. Il avait été localisé en Syrie ces dernières années, ce qui indique que la coordination des opérations des milices chiites dans le pays était sous sa responsabilité. Le fait qu’il ait été assassiné à Bagdad cette nuit prouve qu’il avait une importance logistique sur la coordination des milices en Irak. (…) Il ne faut pas sous-estimer l’importance de cette décision irresponsable de Donald Trump. Depuis le retrait unilatéral des Etats-Unis de l’accord sur le nucléaire, en mai 2018, les tensions avec l’Iran se sont accrues. Ce qui était très important, c’est que ces tensions étaient mesurées, sous contrôle. Elles avaient un fort impact sur la vie quotidienne des Iraniens. Pour autant, il n’y avait pas beaucoup de dérapages militaires : quelques incidents dans le golfe, le bombardement de sites pétroliers en Arabie-Saoudite. C’était un combat à fleuret moucheté. Personne ne franchissait la ligne rouge. Je crains fort qu’elle ait été franchie par cette décision, en raison de la qualité de la cible et de son importance dans le dispositif régional iranien. Les tensions s’étaient ravivées au cours des dernières heures, avec le siège de l’ambassade américaine à Bagdad, sans nul doute mené par les milices iraniennes. Il est évident que Soleimani a tenu un rôle. Cette prise d’assaut venait à la suite d’attaques ciblées des Etats-Unis. (…) Cela s’explique par le manque de sang-froid de Donald Trump. Ce matin, les démocrates s’insurgent, car cette décision a été prise sans concertation. C’est une décision à l’emporte-pièce, il a été sans doute un peu excité par les va-t-en-guerre de son camp, comme le secrétaire d’Etat Mike Pompeo, qui prône une ligne dure contre l’Iran. On y est presque. (…) Les Iraniens ne vont pas rester les deux pieds dans le même sabot. Je ne sais pas de quelles manières ils réagiront, ni où et quand. Ce ne sera sans doute pas tout de suite, mais nul doute qu’ils réagiront. Nous sommes dans une nouvelle séquence, ouverte par cet assassinat ciblé, réalisé au mépris de toutes les conventions internationales. Je ne maîtrise pas tous les paramètres, mais, à chaud, je peux imaginer qu’il y aura une recrudescence d’action militaire contre des objectifs américains, des bases militaires, des ambassades ou des intérêts sur place. Il y a également des risques pour Israël, qui sera peut-être une cible. Les milices pro-iraniennes déployées en Syrie ont une capacité de feu contre des villes israéliennes. Dans la région, il va y avoir un regain de mobilisation de toutes les forces proches de l’Iran, en Irak, au Liban et en Syrie. Je ne veux pas dire qu’il y a un risque d’embrasement général, je n’en sais rien, ce n’est pas la peine d’alimenter le fantasme. Mais la situation est infiniment préoccupante. Il y aura des conséquences, même si on ne sait pas bien les mesurer. (…) Une action sur le détroit d’Ormuz [où transitent de nombreux pétroliers] peut faire partie des mesures mises en œuvre par les Iraniens. Ils peuvent bloquer ou menacer de bloquer. Je ne pense pas qu’ils feront un blocage complet : les Iraniens font de la politique et ils savent que cela se retournerait contre eux. Mais il peut y avoir quelques arraisonnements de navires pétroliers et les cours du pétrole pourraient monter, même si cela n’avait pas été le cas après les incidents de l’été dernier dans le détroit. Didier Billion

Attention: une décision irresponsable peut en cacher une autre !

A l’heure où …

Après les attaques de pétroliers, la destruction d’installations pétrolières saoudiennes et les roquettes sur des bases américaines ayant entrainé la mort d’un citoyen américain …

Et avant sa brillante élimination par les forces américaines …

Le cerveau du dispositif terroriste des mollahs au Moyen-Orient préparait une possible deuxième attaque de l’ambassade américaine à Bagdad …

Pendant que la rue arabe comme la rue iranienne peinent à cacher leur joie …

Devinez quelle « décision irresponsable » dénoncent le parti démocrate américain, nos médias ou nos prétendus spécialistes ?

Mort du général Soleimani : « C’est une décision irresponsable de Donald Trump », estime un spécialiste de la région
Interrogé par franceinfo, Didier Billion, directeur adjoint de l’Institut de relations internationales et stratégique (Iris), spécialiste du Moyen-Orient, redoute qu’une « ligne rouge » ait été franchie.
Propos recueillis par Thomas Baïetto
France Télévisions
03/01/202

Qassem Soleimani est mort. Cet influent général iranien a été tué, vendredi 3 janvier, par une frappe américaine contre son convoi qui circulait sur l’aéroport de Bagdad (Irak). Cette élimination, ordonnée par le président américain Donald Trump, fait craindre une nouvelle escalade militaire dans la région.

Pour franceinfo, Didier Billion, directeur adjoint de l’Institut de relations internationales et stratégiques (Iris) et spécialiste du Moyen-Orient, analyse les possibles conséquences de cette mort.

Franceinfo : Pouvez-vous nous rappeler le rôle de Qassem Soleimani dans le régime iranien ?

Didier Billion : D’un point de vue fonctionnel, il était responsable de la force al-Qods des Gardiens de la Révolution, c’est-à-dire de l’ensemble des opérations menées par l’Iran dans toute la région. Cet homme avait beaucoup de secrets. Il était l’un des vecteurs, sinon le vecteur principal, du déploiement de l’influence de l’Iran. Je ne suis pas de ceux qui pensent qu’il y a une volonté expansionniste de l’Iran, mais Téhéran a développé des réseaux d’influence et c’est probablement Soleimani qui avait la haute main sur ceux-ci.

Sur tous les terrains chauds de la région où l’Iran a une influence, on retrouve le général Soleimani.Didier Billion à franceinfo

Il avait été localisé en Syrie ces dernières années, ce qui indique que la coordination des opérations des milices chiites dans le pays était sous sa responsabilité. Le fait qu’il ait été assassiné à Bagdad cette nuit prouve qu’il avait une importance logistique sur la coordination des milices en Irak.

Comment analysez-vous la décision des Etats-Unis de le tuer ?

Il ne faut pas sous-estimer l’importance de cette décision irresponsable de Donald Trump. Depuis le retrait unilatéral des Etats-Unis de l’accord sur le nucléaire, en mai 2018, les tensions avec l’Iran se sont accrues. Ce qui était très important, c’est que ces tensions étaient mesurées, sous contrôle. Elles avaient un fort impact sur la vie quotidienne des Iraniens. Pour autant, il n’y avait pas beaucoup de dérapages militaires : quelques incidents dans le golfe, le bombardement de sites pétroliers en Arabie-Saoudite. C’était un combat à fleuret moucheté. Personne ne franchissait la ligne rouge.

Je crains fort qu’elle ait été franchie par cette décision, en raison de la qualité de la cible et de son importance dans le dispositif régional iranien. Les tensions s’étaient ravivées au cours des dernières heures, avec le siège de l’ambassade américaine à Bagdad, sans nul doute mené par les milices iraniennes. Il est évident que Soleimani a tenu un rôle. Cette prise d’assaut venait à la suite d’attaques ciblées des Etats-Unis.

Tout indiquait une montée en tension, mais là, ce n’est pas seulement un mort de plus, c’est très important.Didier Billionà franceinfo

Cela s’explique par le manque de sang-froid de Donald Trump. Ce matin, les démocrates s’insurgent, car cette décision a été prise sans concertation. C’est une décision à l’emporte-pièce, il a été sans doute un peu excité par les va-t-en-guerre de son camp, comme le secrétaire d’Etat Mike Pompeo, qui prône une ligne dure contre l’Iran. On y est presque.

A quelles réactions peut-on s’attendre de la part de l’Iran ?

Les Iraniens ne vont pas rester les deux pieds dans le même sabot. Je ne sais pas de quelles manières ils réagiront, ni où et quand. Ce ne sera sans doute pas tout de suite, mais nul doute qu’ils réagiront. Nous sommes dans une nouvelle séquence, ouverte par cet assassinat ciblé, réalisé au mépris de toutes les conventions internationales. Je ne maîtrise pas tous les paramètres, mais, à chaud, je peux imaginer qu’il y aura une recrudescence d’action militaire contre des objectifs américains, des bases militaires, des ambassades ou des intérêts sur place.

Il y a également des risques pour Israël, qui sera peut-être une cible. Les milices pro-iraniennes déployées en Syrie ont une capacité de feu contre des villes israéliennes. Dans la région, il va y avoir un regain de mobilisation de toutes les forces proches de l’Iran, en Irak, au Liban et en Syrie. Je ne veux pas dire qu’il y a un risque d’embrasement général, je n’en sais rien, ce n’est pas la peine d’alimenter le fantasme. Mais la situation est infiniment préoccupante. Il y aura des conséquences, même si on ne sait pas bien les mesurer.

Peut-on s’attendre à des conséquences économiques ?

Une action sur le détroit d’Ormuz [où transitent de nombreux pétroliers] peut faire partie des mesures mises en œuvre par les Iraniens. Ils peuvent bloquer ou menacer de bloquer. Je ne pense pas qu’ils feront un blocage complet : les Iraniens font de la politique et ils savent que cela se retournerait contre eux. Mais il peut y avoir quelques arraisonnements de navires pétroliers et les cours du pétrole pourraient monter, même si cela n’avait pas été le cas après les incidents de l’été dernier dans le détroit.

Voir aussi:

Mort de Soleimani : l’Iran menace, la scène internationale s’inquiète
Le puissant général Qassem Soleimani a été tué à Bagdad. L’ambassade américaine à Bagdad a appelé ses ressortissants à quitter l’Irak « immédiatement ».
Le Point/AFP
03/01/2020

C’est certainement un moment clé du conflit qui oppose les États-Unis à l’Iran. Le puissant général Qassem Soleimani a été tué, jeudi 2 janvier, dans un raid américain à Bagdad, trois jours après une attaque inédite contre l’ambassade américaine. Le général Soleimani « n’a eu que ce qu’il méritait », a abondé le sénateur républicain Tom Cotton. Rapidement, des ténors républicains se sont félicités de ce raid ordonné par Trump. Une attaque dénoncée par ses adversaires démocrates, dont son potentiel rival à la présidentielle, Joe Biden.

Le Premier ministre israélien, Benyamin Netanyahou, a interrompu vendredi son voyage officiel en Grèce afin de rentrer en Israël, a indiqué son bureau à l’Agence France-Presse. Benyamin Netanyahou, arrivé à Athènes jeudi où il a signé un accord avec Chypre et la Grèce en faveur d’un projet de gazoduc, devait rester dans ce pays jusqu’à samedi, mais il a écourté son voyage après l’annonce du décès de Qassem Soleimani, chef des forces iraniennes al-Qods souvent accusées par Israël de préparer des attaques contre l’État hébreu.

La France a plaidé pour la « stabilité »

Le chef du mouvement chiite libanais Hezbollah, grand allié de l’Iran, a promis « le juste châtiment » aux « assassins criminels » responsables de la mort du général iranien Qassem Soleimani. « Apporter le juste châtiment aux assassins criminels […] sera la responsabilité et la tâche de tous les résistants et combattants à travers le monde », a promis dans un communiqué le chef du Hezbollah, Hassan Nasrallah, qui utilise généralement le terme de « Résistance » pour désigner son organisation et ses alliés.

De son côté, la France a plaidé pour la « stabilité » au Moyen-Orient estimant, par la voix d’Amélie de Montchalin, secrétaire d’État aux Affaires européennes, que « l’escalade militaire [était] toujours dangereuse ». « On se réveille dans un monde plus dangereux. L’escalade militaire est toujours dangereuse », a-t-elle déclaré au micro de RTL. « Quand de telles opérations ont lieu, on voit bien que l’escalade est en marche alors que nous souhaitons avant tout la stabilité et la désescalade », a-t-elle ajouté.

Le ministre britannique des Affaires étrangères, Dominic Raab, a appelé « toutes les parties à la désescalade ». « Nous avons toujours reconnu la menace agressive posée par la force iranienne Qods dirigée par Qassem Soleimani. Après sa mort, nous exhortons toutes les parties à la désescalade. Un autre conflit n’est aucunement dans notre intérêt », a déclaré le chef de la diplomatie britannique dans un communiqué.

Éviter une « escalade des tensions »

La Chine a fait part de sa « préoccupation » et a appelé au « calme ». La Chine est l’un des pays signataires de l’accord sur le nucléaire iranien, dont les États-Unis se sont retirés unilatéralement en 2018, et l’un des principaux importateurs de brut iranien. « Nous demandons instamment à toutes les parties concernées, en particulier aux États-Unis, de garder leur calme et de faire preuve de retenue afin d’éviter une nouvelle escalade des tensions », a indiqué devant la presse un porte-parole de la diplomatie chinoise, Geng Shuang.

La Russie a mis en garde contre les conséquences de l’assassinat ciblé à Bagdad du général iranien Qassem Soleimani, une frappe américaine « hasardeuse » qui va se traduire par un « accroissement des tensions dans la région ». « L’assassinat de Soleimani […] est un palier hasardeux qui va mener à l’accroissement des tensions dans la région », a déclaré le ministère russe des Affaires étrangères, cité par les agences RIA Novosti et TASS. « Soleimani servait fidèlement les intérêts de l’Iran. Nous présentons nos sincères condoléances au peuple iranien », a-t-il ajouté.

Les ressortissants américains en Irak appelés à fuir

L’assassinat ciblé du général iranien Qassem Soleimani représente « une escalade dangereuse dans la violence », a déclaré, vendredi, la présidente de la Chambre des représentants, la démocrate Nancy Pelosi. « L’Amérique et le monde ne peuvent pas se permettre une escalade des tensions qui atteigne un point de non-retour », a estimé Nancy Pelosi dans un communiqué.

Le pouvoir syrien a dénoncé la « lâche agression américaine » y voyant une « grave escalade » pour le Moyen-Orient, a rapporté l’agence officielle Sana. La Syrie est certaine que cette « lâche agression américaine […] ne fera que renforcer la détermination à suivre le modèle de ces chefs de la résistance », souligne une source du ministère des Affaires étrangères à Damas citée par Sana.

L’ambassade américaine à Bagdad a appelé ses ressortissants à quitter l’Irak « immédiatement ». La chancellerie conseille vivement aux Américains en Irak de partir « par avion tant que cela est possible », alors que le raid a eu lieu dans l’enceinte même de l’aéroport de Bagdad, « sinon vers d’autres pays par voie terrestre ». Les principaux postes-frontières de l’Irak mènent vers l’Iran et la Syrie en guerre, alors que d’autres points de passage existent vers l’Arabie saoudite et la Turquie.

« Une guerre dévastatrice en Irak »

Le Premier ministre démissionnaire irakien Adel Abdel Mahdi a estimé que le raid allait « déclencher une guerre dévastatrice en Irak ». « L’assassinat d’un commandant militaire irakien occupant un poste officiel est une agression contre l’Irak, son État, son gouvernement et son peuple », affirme Adel Abdel Mahdi dans un communiqué, alors qu’Abou Mehdi al-Mouhandis est le numéro deux du Hachd al-Chaabi, une coalition de paramilitaires pro-Iran intégrée à l’État. « Régler ses comptes contre des personnalités dirigeantes irakiennes ou d’un pays ami sur le sol irakien […] constitue une violation flagrante des conditions autorisant la présence des troupes américaines », ajoute le texte.

Le guide suprême iranien, l’ayatollah Ali Khamenei, s’est engagé vendredi à « venger » la mort du puissant général iranien Qassem Soleimani, tué plus tôt dans un raid américain à Bagdad, et a décrété un deuil national de trois jours dans son pays. « Le martyre est la récompense de son inlassable travail durant toutes ces années. […] Si Dieu le veut, son œuvre et son chemin ne s’arrêteront pas là, et une vengeance implacable attend les criminels qui ont empli leurs mains de son sang et de celui des autres martyrs », a dit l’ayatollah Khamenei sur son compte Twitter en farsi.

L’Iran promet une vengeance

L’Iran et les « nations libres de la région » se vengeront des États-Unis après la mort du puissant général iranien Qassem Soleimani, a promis le président Hassan Rohani. « Il n’y a aucun doute sur le fait que la grande nation d’Iran et les autres nations libres de la région prendront leur revanche sur l’Amérique criminelle pour cet horrible meurtre », a déclaré Hassan Rohani dans un communiqué publié sur le site du gouvernement.

Qaïs al-Khazali, un commandant de la coalition pro-iranienne en Irak, a appelé « tous les combattants » à se « tenir prêts », quelques heures après l’assassinat par les Américains du général iranien Qassem Soleimani à Bagdad. « Que tous les combattants résistants se tiennent prêts, car ce qui nous attend, c’est une conquête proche et une grande victoire », a écrit Qaïs al-Khazali, chef d’Assaïb Ahl al-Haq, l’une des plus importantes factions du Hachd al-Chaabi qui regroupe les paramilitaires pro-Iran sous la tutelle de l’État irakien, dans une lettre manuscrite dont l’Agence France-Presse a pu consulter une copie.

Les républicains serrent les rangs

« J’apprécie l’action courageuse du président Donald Trump contre l’agression iranienne », a salué sur Twitter l’influent sénateur républicain Lindsey Graham, proche allié du président peu après la confirmation par le Pentagone que le locataire de la Maison-Blanche avait donné l’ordre de tuer le général iranien Qassem Soleimani, dans un raid à Bagdad. « Au gouvernement iranien : si vous en voulez plus, vous en aurez plus », a-t-il menacé, avant d’ajouter : « Si l’agression iranienne se poursuit et que je travaillais dans une raffinerie iranienne de pétrole, je songerais à une reconversion. »

Comme cet élu de Caroline du Sud, les républicains serraient les rangs jeudi soir derrière la stratégie du président américain. « Les actions défensives que les États-Unis ont prises contre l’Iran et ses mandataires sont conformes aux avertissements clairs qu’ils ont reçus. Ils ont choisi d’ignorer ces avertissements parce qu’ils croyaient que le président des États-Unis était empêché d’agir en raison de nos divisions politiques internes. Ils ont extrêmement mal évalué », a également salué le sénateur républicain Marco Rubio.

« Un bâton de dynamite »

Dans l’autre camp, les adversaires démocrates du président qui ont approuvé le mois dernier à la Chambre basse du Congrès son renvoi en procès pour destitution ont dénoncé le bombardement et les risques d’escalade avec l’Iran. « Le président Trump vient de jeter un bâton de dynamite dans une poudrière, et il doit au peuple américain une explication », a dénoncé l’ancien vice-président Joe Biden, en lice pour la primaire démocrate en vue de l’élection présidentielle de novembre. « C’est une énorme escalade dans une région déjà dangereuse », a-t-il insisté, dans un communiqué.

« La dangereuse escalade de Trump nous amène plus près d’une autre guerre désastreuse au Moyen-Orient », a dénoncé Bernie Sanders, autre favori de la primaire démocrate. « Trump a promis de terminer les guerres sans fin, mais cette action nous met sur le chemin d’une autre », a poursuivi le sénateur indépendant.

« Un affront aux pouvoirs du Congrès »

Le chef démocrate de la commission des Affaires étrangères de la Chambre des représentants a déploré que Donald Trump n’ait pas notifié le Congrès américain du raid mené en Irak. « Mener une action de cette gravité sans impliquer le Congrès soulève de graves problèmes légaux et constitue un affront aux pouvoirs du Congrès », a écrit dans un communiqué Eliot Engel.

« D’accord, il ne fait aucun doute que Soleimani a beaucoup de sang sur les mains. Mais c’est un moment vraiment effrayant. L’Iran va réagir et probablement à différents endroits. Pensée à tout le personnel américain dans la région en ce moment », a, quant à lui, estimé Ben Rhodes, ancien proche conseiller de Barack Obama. « Un président qui a juré de tenir les États-Unis à l’écart d’une autre guerre au Moyen-Orient vient dans les faits de faire une déclaration de guerre », a réagi le président de l’organisation International Crisis Group Robert Malley.

Voir également:

Frappe américaine : « Pour l’Iranien lambda, le général Soleimani était un monstre »
Propos recueillis par Alain Léauthier
Marianne
03/01/2020

Le puissant général iranien Qassem Soleimani a été éliminé ce vendredi 3 janvier, dans un raid américain sur l’aéroport de Bagdad. Y’a-t-il un risque d’escalade et de guerre ouverte avec les Etats-Unis ? Décryptage avec Mahnaz Shirali, chercheuse iranienne à Sciences Po.

Au fou ! Quelques heures après l’élimination spectaculaire, tôt dans la matinée de ce vendredi 3 janvier, du général Qassem Soleimani, le chef des opérations extérieures (la force al-Qods) des Gardiens de la Révolution iranienne et pilier du régime des mollahs, nombre de chancelleries étrangères condamnaient à demi-mot le raid aérien ciblé ordonné par Donald Trump. « On se réveille dans un monde plus dangereux (…) et l’escalade militaire est toujours dangereuse », a ainsi benoitement déclaré Amélie de Montchalin, la secrétaire d’État française aux Affaires européennes.

En Irak même, l’ex Premier ministre Adel Abdoul Mahdi, proche de Téhéran et obligé de démissionner en décembre sous la pression de la rue, a dénoncé une « atteinte aux conditions de la présence américaine en Irak et atteinte à la souveraineté du pays », allant jusqu’à qualifier d’ « assassinat » la frappe qui a également coûté la vie à Abou Mehdi al-Mouhandis, le numéro deux du Hachd al-Chaabi, une coalition de paramilitaires pro-Iran, désormais intégrés à l’Etat irakien et très actifs dans la tentative d’assaut de l’ambassade américaine à Bagdad il y a trois jours. Dans un tweet musclé, le secrétaire d’État Mike Pompéo l’avait clairement désigné comme un des responsables des évènements ainsi que Qaïs al-Khazali, fondateur de la milice chiite Assaïb Ahl al-Haq, une des factions du Hachd al-Chaabi.

Les mollahs disposent d’une grande variété de relais pour semer le chaos dans la région

Ce dernier ne se trouvait pas dans le convoi visé par la frappe létale et a lancé un appel au djihad – « Que tous les combattants résistants se tiennent prêts car ce qui nous attend, c’est une conquête proche et une grande victoire » – relayant une déclaration tonitruante de l’ayatollah Ali Khamenei. Dans un tweet, le guide suprême iranien a promis une « vengeance implacable » aux « criminels qui ont empli leurs mains de son sang et de celui des autres martyrs », menace sur laquelle s’est aussitôt calé le président Hassan Rohani, longtemps présenté comme le chef de file des « modérés » et réformateurs.

Les dignitaires de la République islamique ne pouvaient guère faire moins à l’issue de plusieurs mois de tensions et d’accrochages indirects qui ont culminé vendredi 27 décembre avec la mort d’un sous-traitant américain lors d’une énième attaque à la roquette contre une base militaire, située cette fois à Kirkouk, dans le nord de l’Irak, en pleine zone pétrolière.

Deux jours plus tard, les avions américains avaient répliqué en bombardant des garnisons des brigades du Hezbollah, autre faction pro-iranienne à la solde de Qassem Soleimani, et c’est autour du cortège funéraire des vingt-cinq « martyrs » tombés ce jour-là qu’avait débuté l’assaut contre l’ambassade des Etats-Unis à Bagdad. En attendant les éventuelles représailles iraniennes, les Etats-Unis ont encouragé leurs ressortissants à quitter au plus vite le sol irakien, tâche qui ne sera pas forcément des plus aisées, et les forces israéliennes ont été placées en état d’alerte maximal. Si une confrontation directe semble pour l’heure exclue, du Yemen au Liban en passant par la Syrie et bien sûr l’Irak, les mollahs disposent d’une grande variété de relais pour semer le chaos dans la région, à l’image du bombardement téléguidé d’installations pétrolières dans l’est de l’Arabie saoudite en septembre dernier.

Aux Etats-Unis, à en croire les commentaires alarmistes de Nancy Pelosi, la présidente démocrate de la Chambre des représentants, et ceux d’une presse lui reprochant déjà des vacances prolongées en Floride alors qu’il met le feu aux poudres, Donald Trump aurait montré une fois de plus l’incohérence de sa politique étrangère. Traître à la cause des Kurdes un jour mais jouant les apprentis sorciers un autre. Tel n’est pourtant pas tout à fait le sentiment de la chercheuse iranienne Mahnaz Shirali, enseignante à Science-Po, dans l’entretien qu’elle nous accorde ce vendredi.


Marianne : Quelle est votre première réaction après la mort de Qassem Soleimani ?

Mahnaz Shirali : C’est d’abord l’Iranienne qui va vous répondre et celle-là ne peut que se réjouir de ce qui s’est passé. Je parle en mon nom mais je peux vous l’assurer aussi au nom de millions d’Iraniens, probablement la majorité d’entre eux : cet homme était haï, il incarnait le mal absolu ! Je suis révoltée par les commentaires que j’ai entendus venant de certains pseudo-spécialistes de l’Iran, le présentant sur une chaîne de télévision comme un individu charismatique et populaire. Il faut ne rien connaître et ne rien comprendre à ce pays pour tenir ce genre de sottises. Pour l’Iranien lambda, Soleimani était un monstre, ce qui se fait de pire dans la République islamique.

C’est un coup dur pour le régime ?

Évidemment, Soleimani en était un élément essentiel, aussi puissant que Khameini et ce n’est pas de la propagande que d’affirmer que sa mort ne choque presque personne.

A quoi peut-on s’attendre ?

Je ne suis pas dans le secret des généraux iraniens mais une simple observatrice informée. Le régime est aux abois depuis des mois, totalement isolé. Ils savent qu’ils n’ont pas d’avenir, la rue et le peuple n’en veulent plus, ils ne peuvent pas vraiment compter sur l’Union européenne et pas plus sur la Chine. Ils n’ont aucun avenir et c’est ce qui rend la situation particulièrement dangereuse car ils sont dans une logique suicidaire.

Les mollahs ont accumulé des fortunes à l’étranger. Ne voudront-ils pas préserver leurs acquis financiers ?

En réalité, ils ont tout perdu et ne peuvent plus sortir du pays pour s’installer à l’étranger car des mandats ont été lancés contre la plupart d’entre eux. Les sanctions ont asséché la manne des pétrodollars et c’est essentiel car il n’y avait pas d’adhésion idéologique à ce régime.

Est-ce à dire que ligne suivi par Trump sur la question iranienne et durement critiquée par de nombreux experts, peut se révéler positive ?

Je ne suis pas compétente pour juger de la politique de Donald Trump. Je peux juste faire quelques observations. Il a considérablement affaibli ce régime, comme jamais auparavant, et peut-être même a-t-il signé leur arrêt de mort. Nous verrons. Lors des manifestations populaires, à Téhéran et dans d’autre villes, les noms de Khameini, de Rohani, de Soleimani étaient hués. Il n’y a jamais eu de slogans anti-Trump ou contre les Etats-Unis.

Mais la situation désormais est explosive…

Probablement oui, hélas, ils n’abandonneront pas le pouvoir tranquillement, j’en suis convaincue.

Voir de même:

Soleimani : La rue iranienne félicite Trump
Iran Resist
03.01.2020

Trump dit avoir mis à mort le Vador immortel des mollahs, Qassem Soleimani. Les adversaires de Trump le blâment. La France s’est jointe à eux par l’intermédiaire de Malbrunot. Mais les Iraniens sont heureux et se félicitent de cette mort et félicitent Trump comme le montre ce slogan écrit dans un quartier chic de Téhéran : Trump Damet garm ! Trump ! Reste en forme !

PNG - 639.5 ko

© IRAN-RESIST.ORG

Par ailleurs, à Kermanshâh (Kurdistan iranien), les gens ont fait un gâteau pour une fête en honneur de l’élimination de Hadj Ghassem Soleimani. Dans une vidéo faisant part de cette initiative, un homme qui partage le gâteau fait référence à Soleimani en utilisant son sobriquet de Shash Ghassem (pisseux Ghassem) !

© IRAN-RESIST.ORG


© IRAN-RESIST. ORG

JPEG - 232.9 ko
JPEG - 36 ko

Il y a d’autres vidéos ou images du même genre.

© IRAN-RESIST.ORG


© IRAN-RESIST. RG

PNG - 430.5 ko
JPEG - 56.1 ko

© IRAN-RESIST.ORG

D’autres opposants en exil appellent aussi les ambassades du régime pour faire part de leur joie et leurs interlocuteurs ne prennent pas la peine de protester !

© IRAN-RESIST.ORG


© IRAN-RESIST. ORG

Il y a aussi des scènes de joie en Irak et en Syrie !

© IRAN-RESIST.ORG


© IRAN-RESIST.ORG

© IRAN-RESIST.ORG


© IRAN-RESIST.ORG

Contrairement aux prédictions des Malbrunot & co (voix du Quai d’Orsay), le Moyen-Orient ne va pas basculer dans le chaos pro-mollahs ! Les Français feraient mieux de changer de discours et suivre les peuples de la région au lieu de suivre leurs ennemis par aversion pour Trump ou par jalousie pour ses succès.

Trump Damet garm !

Voir de plus:

Petraeus Says Trump May Have Helped ‘Reestablish Deterrence’ by Killing Suleimani
The former U.S. commander and CIA director says Iran’s “very fragile” situation may limit its response.
Lara Seligman
Foreign policy
January 3, 2020

As a former commander of U.S. forces in Iraq and Afghanistan and a former CIA director, retired Gen. David Petraeus is keenly familiar with Qassem Suleimani, the powerful chief of Iran’s Quds Force, who was killed in a U.S. airstrike in Baghdad Friday morning.

After months of a muted U.S. response to Tehran’s repeated lashing out—the downing of a U.S. military drone, a devastating attack on Saudi oil infrastructure, and more—Suleimani’s killing was designed to send a pointed message to the regime that the United States will not tolerate continued provocation, he said.

Petraeus spoke to Foreign Policy on Friday about the implications of an action he called “more significant than the killing of Osama bin Laden.” This interview has been edited for clarity and length.

Foreign Policy: What impact will the killing of Gen. Suleimani have on regional tensions?

David Petraeus: It is impossible to overstate the importance of this particular action. It is more significant than the killing of Osama bin Laden or even the death of [Islamic State leader Abu Bakr] al-Baghdadi. Suleimani was the architect and operational commander of the Iranian effort to solidify control of the so-called Shia crescent, stretching from Iran to Iraq through Syria into southern Lebanon. He is responsible for providing explosives, projectiles, and arms and other munitions that killed well over 600 American soldiers and many more of our coalition and Iraqi partners just in Iraq, as well as in many other countries such as Syria. So his death is of enormous significance.

The question of course is how does Iran respond in terms of direct action by its military and Revolutionary Guard Corps forces? And how does it direct its proxies—the Iranian-supported Shia militia in Iraq and Syria and southern Lebanon, and throughout the world?

FP: Two previous administrations have reportedly considered this course of action and dismissed it. Why did Trump act now?

DP: The reasoning seems to be to show in the most significant way possible that the U.S. is just not going to allow the continued violence—the rocketing of our bases, the killing of an American contractor, the attacks on shipping, on unarmed drones—without a very significant response.

Many people had rightly questioned whether American deterrence had eroded somewhat because of the relatively insignificant responses to the earlier actions. This clearly was of vastly greater importance. Of course it also, per the Defense Department statement, was a defensive action given the reported planning and contingencies that Suleimani was going to Iraq to discuss and presumably approve.

This was in response to the killing of an American contractor, the wounding of American forces, and just a sense of how this could go downhill from here if the Iranians don’t realize that this cannot continue.

FP: Do you think this response was proportionate?

DP: It was a defensive response and this is, again, of enormous consequence and significance. But now the question is: How does Iran respond with its own forces and its proxies, and then what does that lead the U.S. to do?

Iran is in a very precarious economic situation, it is very fragile domestically—they’ve killed many, many hundreds if not thousands of Iranian citizens who were demonstrating on the streets of Iran in response to the dismal economic situation and the mismanagement and corruption. I just don’t see the Iranians as anywhere near as supportive of the regime at this point as they were decades ago during the Iran-Iraq War. Clearly the supreme leader has to consider that as Iran considers the potential responses to what the U.S. has done.

It will be interesting now to see if there is a U.S. diplomatic initiative to reach out to Iran and to say, “Okay, the next move could be strikes against your oil infrastructure and your forces in your country—where does that end?”

FP: Will Iran consider this an act of war?

DP: I don’t know what that means, to be truthful. They clearly recognize how very significant it was. But as to the definition—is a cyberattack an act of war? No one can ever answer that. We haven’t declared war, but we have taken a very, very significant action.

FP: How prepared is the U.S. to protect its forces in the region?

DP: We’ve taken numerous actions to augment our air defenses in the region, our offensive capabilities in the region, in terms of general purpose and special operations forces and air assets. The Pentagon has considered the implications the potential consequences and has done a great deal to mitigate the risks—although you can’t fully mitigate the potential risks.

FP: Do you think the decision to conduct this attack on Iraqi soil was overly provocative?

DP: Again what was the alternative? Do it in Iran? Think of the implications of that. This is the most formidable adversary that we have faced for decades. He is a combination of CIA director, JSOC [Joint Special Operations Command] commander, and special presidential envoy for the region. This is a very significant effort to reestablish deterrence, which obviously had not been shored up by the relatively insignificant responses up until now.

FP: What is the likelihood that there will be an all-out war?

DP: Obviously all sides will suffer if this becomes a wider war, but Iran has to be very worried that—in the state of its economy, the significant popular unrest and demonstrations against the regime—that this is a real threat to the regime in a way that we have not seen prior to this.

FP: Given the maximum pressure campaign that has crippled its economy, the designation of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps as a terrorist organization, and now this assassination, what incentive does Iran have to negotiate now?

DP: The incentive would be to get out from under the sanctions, which are crippling. Could we get back to the Iran nuclear deal plus some additional actions that could address the shortcomings of the agreement?

This is a very significant escalation, and they don’t know where this goes any more than anyone else does. Yes, they can respond and they can retaliate, and that can lead to further retaliation—and that it is clear now that the administration is willing to take very substantial action. This is a pretty clarifying moment in that regard.

FP: What will Iran do to retaliate?

DP: Right now they are probably doing what anyone does in this situation: considering the menu of options. There could be actions in the gulf, in the Strait of Hormuz by proxies in the regional countries, and in other continents where the Quds Force have activities. There’s a very considerable number of potential responses by Iran, and then there’s any number of potential U.S. responses to those actions

Given the state of their economy, I think they have to be very leery, very concerned that that could actually result in the first real challenge to the regime certainly since the Iran-Iraq War.

FP: Will the Iraqi government kick the U.S. military out of Iraq?

DP: The prime minister has said that he would put forward legislation to do that, although I don’t think that the majority of Iraqi leaders want to see that given that ISIS is still a significant threat. They are keenly aware that it was not the Iranian supported militias that defeated the Islamic State, it was U.S.-enabled Iraqi armed forces and special forces that really fought the decisive battles.

Lara Seligman is a staff writer at Foreign Policy.

Voir encore:

Gen. Petraeus on Qasem Soleimani’s killing: ‘It’s impossible to overstate the significance’
The World
January 03, 2020

The United States is sending nearly 3,000 additional troops to the Middle East from the 82nd Airborne Division as a precaution amid rising threats to American forces in the region, the Pentagon said on Friday.

Iran promised vengeance after a US airstrike in Baghdad on Friday killed Qasem Soleimani, Tehran’s most prominent military commander and the architect of its growing influence in the Middle East.

The overnight attack, authorized by US President Donald Trump, was a dramatic escalation in the « shadow war » in the Middle East between Iran and the United States and its allies, principally Israel and Saudi Arabia.

As former commander of US forces in Iraq and Afghanistan and a former CIA director, retired Gen. David Petraeus is very familiar with Soleimani. He spoke to The World’s host Marco Werman about what could happen next.

Marco Werman: How did you know Qasem Soleimani?

Gen. David Petraeus: Well, he was our most significant Iranian adversary during my four years in Iraq, [and] certainly when I was the Central Command commander, and very much so when I was the director of the CIA. He is unquestionably the most significant and important — or was the most significant and important — Iranian figure in the region, the most important architect of the effort by Iran to solidify control of the Shia crescent, and the operational commander of the various initiatives that were part of that effort.

General Petraeus, did you ever interact directly or indirectly with him?

Indirectly. He sent a message to me through the president of Iraq in late March of 2008, during the battle of Basra, when we were supporting the Iraqi army forces that were battling the Shia militias in Basra that were supported, of course, by Qasem Soleimani and the Quds Force. He sent a message through the president that said, « General Petraeus, you should know that I, Qasem Soleimani, control the policy of Iran for Iraq, and also for Syria, Lebanon, Gaza and Afghanistan. »

And the implication of that was, « If you want to deal with Iran to resolve this situation in Basra, you should deal with me, not with the Iranian diplomats. » And his power only grew from that point in time. By the way, I did not — I actually told the president to tell Qasem Soleimani to pound sand.

So why do you suppose this happened now, though?

Well, I suspect that the leaders in Washington were seeking to reestablish deterrence, which clearly had eroded to some degree, perhaps by the relatively insignificant actions in response to these strikes on the Abqaiq oil facility in Saudi Arabia, shipping in the Gulf and our $130 million dollar drone that was shot down. And we had seen increased numbers of attacks against US forces in Iraq. So I’m sure that there was a lot of discussion about what could show the Iranians most significantly that we are really serious, that they should not continue to escalate.

Now, obviously, there is a menu of options that they have now and not just in terms of direct Iranian action against perhaps our large bases in the various Gulf states, shipping in the Gulf, but also through proxy actions — and not just in the region, but even in places such as Latin America and Africa and Europe.

Would you have recommended this course of action right now?

I’d hesitate to answer that just because I am not privy to the intelligence that was the foundation for the decision, which clearly was, as was announced, this was a defensive action, that Soleimani was going into the country to presumably approve further attacks. Without really being in the inner circle on that, I think it’s very difficult to either second-guess or to even think through what the recommendation might have been.

Again, it is impossible to overstate the significance of this action. This is much more substantial than the killing of Osama bin Laden. It’s even more substantial than the killing of Baghdadi.

Final question, General Petraeus, how vulnerable are US military and civilian personnel in the Middle East right now as a result of what happened last night?

Well, my understanding is that we have significantly shored up our air defenses, our air assets, our ground defenses and so forth. There’s been the movement of a lot of forces into the region in months, not just in the past days. So there’s been a very substantial augmentation of our defensive capabilities and also our offensive capabilities.

And, you know, the question Iran has to ask itself is, « Where does this end? » If they now retaliate in a significant way — and considering how vulnerable their infrastructure and forces are at a time when their economy is in dismal shape because of the sanctions. So Iran is not in a position of strength, although it clearly has many, many options available to it, as I mentioned, not just with their armed forces and the Revolutionary Guards Corps, but also with these Quds Force-supported proxy elements throughout the region in the world.

Two short questions for what’s next, Gen. Petraeus — US remaining in Iraq, and war with Iran. What’s your best guess?

Well, I think one of the questions is, « What will the diplomatic ramifications of this be? » And again, there have been celebrations in some places in Iraq at the loss of Qasem Soleimani. So, again, there’s no tears being shed in certain parts of the country. And one has to ask what happens in the wake of the killing of the individual who had a veto, virtually, over the leadership of Iraq. What transpires now depends on the calculations of all these different elements. And certainly the US, I would assume, is considering diplomatic initiatives as well, reaching out and saying, « Okay. Does that send a sufficient message of our seriousness? Now, would you like to return to the table? » Or does Iran accelerate the nuclear program, which would, of course, precipitate something further from the United States? Very likely. So lots of calculations here. And I think we’re still very early in the deliberations on all the different ramifications of this very significant action.

Do you have confidence in this administration to kind of navigate all those calculations?

Well, I think that this particular episode has been fairly impressively handled. There’s been restraint in some of the communications methods from the White House. The Department of Defense put out, I think, a solid statement. It has taken significant actions, again, to shore up our defenses and our offensive capabilities. The question now, I think, is what is the diplomatic initiative that follows this? What will the State Department and the Secretary of State do now to try to get back to the table and reduce or end the battlefield consequences?

The flag that Donald Trump posted last night, no words. Was that restraint, do you think?

I think it was. Certainly all things are relative. And I think relative to some of his tweets that was quite restrained.

Voir enfin:

Iran’s strategic mastermind got a huge boost from the nuclear deal

The historic nuclear accord between a US-led group of countries and Iran was good news for a man who some consider to be the Middle East’s most effective covert operative.As a result of the deal, Qasem Suleimani, the commander of the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Qods Force and the general responsible for overseeing Iran’s network of proxy organizations, will be removed from European Union sanctions lists once the agreement is implemented, and taken off a UN sanctions list after eight or fewer years.

Iran obtained some key concessions as a result of the nuclear agreement, including access to an estimated $150 billion in frozen assets; the lifting of a UN arms embargo, the eventual end to sanctions related to the country’s ballistic missile program; the ability to operate over 5,000 uranium enrichment centrifuges and to run stable elements through centrifuges at the once-clandestine and heavily guarded Fordow facility; nuclear assistance from the US and its partners; and the ability to stall inspections of sensitive sites for as long as 24 days. In light of these accomplishments, the de-listing of a general responsible for coordinating anti-US militia groups in Iraq — someone who may be responsible for the deaths of US soldiers — almost seems gratuitous.

It’s unlikely that the entire deal hinged on a single Iranian officer’s ability to open bank accounts in EU states or travel within Europe. But it got into the deal anyway. So did a reprieve for Bank Saderat, which the US sanctioned in 2006 for facilitating money transfers to Iranian regime-supported terror groups like Hezbollah and Islamic Jihad. As part of the deal, Bank Saderat will leave the EU sanctions list on the same timetable as Suleimani, although it will remain under US designation.

Like Suleimani’s removal, Bank Saderat’s apparent legalization in Europe suggests that for the purposes of the deal, the US and its partners lumped a broad range of restrictions under the heading of « nuclear-related » sanctions.

Suleimani and Bank Saderat are still going to remain under US sanctions related to the Iranian regime’s human rights abuses and support for terrorism. US sanctions have broad extraterritorial reach, and the US Treasury Department has turned into the scourge of compliance desks at banks around the world. But that matters to a somewhat lesser degree inside of the EU, where companies have actually been exempted from complying with certain US « secondary sanctions » on Iran since the mid-1990s.

Any company that transacts with a US-designated individual takes on a certain degree of US legal exposure. That actually creates problem for US allies whose companies operate under less restrictive legal regimes. It’s perfectly legal under domestic law for companies in many EU countries — among the US’s closest allies — to perform transactions for certain US-listed individuals and entities. This has been the cause of some trans-Atlantic tensions in the past, with an upshot that’s of immediate relevance to the nuclear deal reached Tuesday.In 1996, the US Congress passed the Iran-Libya Sanctions Act, targeting entities in two longstanding opponents of the US. But these were countries where European companies had routinely invested. The law didn’t just sanction two unfriendly regimes — it effectively sanctioned US allies where business with both countries was legally tolerated.

The law triggered consultations between the US and the EU under the World Trade Organization’s various dispute mechanisms. Diplomatic protests forced the US and and its European allies to figure out a compromise that wouldn’t expose their companies to additional legal scrutiny or lead to an unnecessary escalation in trans-Atlantic trade barriers.

The result is that the US kept the law on the books, but scaled back their implementation in Europe. Then-President Bill Clinton « negotiated an agreement under which the United States would not impose any ISLA sanctions
on European firms – much to Congress’ dismay. »

And in November 1996, the Council of Europe adopted a resolution protecting European companies from the reach of US law. The resolution authorized « blocking recognition or enforcement of decisions or judgments giving effect to the covered laws, » effectively canceling the extraterritoriality of certain US sanctions on European soil (although legal exposure continued for European companies with enough of a US presence to put them under American jurisdiction). In past disputes, companies inside of Europe have had an EU-authorized waiver for complying with US secondary sanctions.

In a post-deal environment in which European companies are eager investors in a far less diplomatically isolated Iran, the 1996 spat could be a sign of things to come, as well as a guideline for smoothing out disputes over US sanctions enforcement in Europe.

Some time in the next few years, Qasem Suleimani will be able to travel and do business inside the EU, while a bank that’s facilitated the funding of US-listed terror group’s will be allowed to enter the European market. As part of the nuclear deal, the US and its partners bargained away much of the international leverage against some of the more problematic sectors in the Iranian regime, including entities whose wrongdoing went well beyond the nuclear realm.The result is the almost complete reversal of the sanctions regime in Europe. « If you look at the competing annexes, the European list is much more comprehensive and there are going to be significant differences between the designation lists that are maintained, » Jonathan Schanzer, vice president for research at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, told Business Insider. « The Europeans look as if they’re about to just open up entirely to Iran. »

Iran successfully pushed for a broad definition of « nuclear-related sanctions, » and bargained hard — and effectively — for a maximal degree of sanctions relief.

And the de-listing of Bank Saderat and Qasem Suleimani, along with the late-breaking effort to classify arms trade restrictions as purely nuclear-related, demonstrates just how far the US and its partners were willing to go to close a historic nuclear deal.

Voir par ailleurs:

Iran: le général Soleimani raconte sa guerre israélo-libanaise de 2006
Le Point/AFP
01/10/2019

La télévision d’Etat iranienne a diffusé mardi soir un entretien exclusif avec le général de division Ghassem Soleimani, un haut commandant des Gardiens de la Révolution, consacré à sa présence au Liban lors du conflit israélo-libanais de l’été 2006.

L’entretien est présenté comme la première interview du général Soleimani, homme de l’ombre à la tête de la force Qods, chargée des opérations extérieures –notamment en Irak et en Syrie— des Gardiens, l’armée idéologique de la République islamique.

Au cours des quelque 90 minutes d’entretien diffusées sur la première chaîne de la télévision d’Etat, le général Soleimani explique avoir passé au Liban, avec le Hezbollah chiite libanais, l’essentiel de ce conflit ayant duré 34 jours.

Le général dit être entré au pays du Cèdre au tout début de la guerre à partir de la Syrie avec Imad Moughnieh, haut commandant militaire du Hezbollah (tué en 2008) considéré par le mouvement chiite comme l’artisan de la « victoire » contre Israël lors de ce conflit ayant fait 1.200 morts côté libanais et 160 côté israélien.

Il revient sur l’élément déclencheur de la guerre: l’attaque, le 12 juillet, d’un commando du Hezbollah parvenu « à entrer en Palestine occupée (Israël, NDLR), attaquer un (blindé) sioniste et capturer deux soldats blessés ».

Mis à part une courte mission au bout « d’une semaine » pour rendre compte de la situation au guide suprême iranien, l’ayatollah Ali Khamenei, et revenir au Liban le jour-même avec un message de sa part pour Hassan Nasrallah, le chef du Hezbollah, le général dit être resté au Liban pour aider ses compagnons d’armes chiites.

Dans l’entretien, l’officier ne mentionne pas la présence d’autres Iraniens. Il livre le récit d’une expérience avant tout personnelle, au contact de Moughnieh et de M. Nasrallah.

Il raconte comment, pris sous des bombardements israéliens sur la banlieue sud de Beyrouth, bastion du Hezbollah, il évacue avec Moughniyeh le cheikh Nasrallah de la « chambre d’opérations » où il se trouve.

Selon son récit, lui et Moughniyeh font passer le chef du Hezbollah cette nuit-là d’abri en cachette avant de revenir tous deux à leur centre de commandement.

La publication de l’interview, réalisée par le bureau de l’ayatollah Khamenei, survient quelques jours après la publication, par ce même bureau, d’une photo inédite montrant Hassan Nasrallah « au-côté » de M. Khamenei et du général Soleimani et accréditant l’idée d’une rencontre récente entre les trois hommes à Téhéran.

Voir aussi:

Trump Calls the Ayatollah’s Bluff

And scores a victory against terrorism
Matthew Continetti
National review
January 3, 2020

The successful operation against Qassem Suleimani, head of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, is a stunning blow to international terrorism and a reassertion of American might. It will also test President Trump’s Iran strategy. It is now Trump, not Ayatollah Khamenei, who has ascended a rung on the ladder of escalation by killing the military architect of Iran’s Shiite empire. For years, Iran has set the rules. It was Iran that picked the time and place of confrontation. No more.

Reciprocity has been the key to understanding Donald Trump. Whether you are a media figure or a mullah, a prime minister or a pope, he will be good to you if you are good to him. Say something mean, though, or work against his interests, and he will respond in force. It won’t be pretty. It won’t be polite. There will be fallout. But you may think twice before crossing him again.

That has been the case with Iran. President Trump has conditioned his policies on Iranian behavior. When Iran spread its malign influence, Trump acted to check it. When Iran struck, Trump hit back: never disproportionately, never definitively. He left open the possibility of negotiations. He doesn’t want to have the greater Middle East — whether Libya, Syria, Iraq, Iran, Yemen, or Afghanistan — dominate his presidency the way it dominated those of Barack Obama and George W. Bush. America no longer needs Middle Eastern oil. Best to keep the region on the back burner and watch it so it doesn’t boil over. Do not overcommit resources to this underdeveloped, war-torn, sectarian land.

The result was reciprocal antagonism. In 2018, Trump withdrew the United States from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action negotiated by his predecessor. He began jacking up sanctions. The Iranian economy turned to a shambles. This “maximum pressure” campaign of economic warfare deprived the Iranian war machine of revenue and drove a wedge between the Iranian public and the Iranian government. Trump offered the opportunity to negotiate a new agreement. Iran refused.

And began to lash out. Last June, Iran’s fingerprints were all over two oil tankers that exploded in the Persian Gulf. Trump tightened the screws. Iran downed a U.S. drone. Trump called off a military strike at the last minute and responded indirectly, with more sanctions, cyber attacks, and additional troop deployments to the region. Last September a drone fleet launched by Iranian proxies in Yemen devastated the Aramco oil facility in Abqaiq, Saudi Arabia. Trump responded as he had to previous incidents: nonviolently.

Iran slowly brought the region to a boil. First it hit boats, then drones, then the key infrastructure of a critical ally. On December 27 it went further: Members of the Kataib Hezbollah militia launched rockets at a U.S. installation near Kirkuk, Iraq. Four U.S. soldiers were wounded. An American contractor was killed.

Destroying physical objects merited economic sanctions and cyber intrusions. Ending lives required a lethal response. It arrived on December 29 when F-15s pounded five Kataib Hezbollah facilities across Iraq and Syria. At least 25 militiamen were killed. Then, when Kataib Hezbollah and other Iran-backed militias organized a mob to storm the U.S. embassy in Baghdad, setting fire to the grounds, America made a show of force and threatened severe reprisals. The angry crowd melted away.

The risk to the U.S. embassy — and the possibility of another Benghazi — must have angered Trump. “The game has changed,” Secretary of Defense Mark Esper said hours before the assassination of Soleimani at Baghdad airport. Indeed it has. The decades-long gray-zone conflict between Iran and the United States manifested itself in subterfuge, terrorism, technological combat, financial chicanery, and proxy forces. Throughout it all, the two sides confronted each other directly only once: in the second half of Ronald Reagan’s presidency. That is about to change.

Deterrence, says Fred Kagan of the American Enterprise Institute, is credibly holding at risk something your adversary holds dear. If the reports out of Iraq are true, President Trump has put at risk the entirety of the Iranian imperial enterprise even as his maximum-pressure campaign strangles the Iranian economy and fosters domestic unrest. That will get the ayatollah’s attention. And now the United States must prepare for his answer.

The bombs over Baghdad? That was Trump calling Khamenei’s bluff. The game has changed. But it isn’t over.

Voir également:

The Shadow Commander
Qassem Suleimani is the Iranian operative who has been reshaping the Middle East. Now he’s directing Assad’s war in Syria.
The New Yorker
September 23, 2013

Last February, some of Iran’s most influential leaders gathered at the Amir al-Momenin Mosque, in northeast Tehran, inside a gated community reserved for officers of the Revolutionary Guard. They had come to pay their last respects to a fallen comrade. Hassan Shateri, a veteran of Iran’s covert wars throughout the Middle East and South Asia, was a senior commander in a powerful, élite branch of the Revolutionary Guard called the Quds Force. The force is the sharp instrument of Iranian foreign policy, roughly analogous to a combined C.I.A. and Special Forces; its name comes from the Persian word for Jerusalem, which its fighters have promised to liberate. Since 1979, its goal has been to subvert Iran’s enemies and extend the country’s influence across the Middle East. Shateri had spent much of his career abroad, first in Afghanistan and then in Iraq, where the Quds Force helped Shiite militias kill American soldiers.

Shateri had been killed two days before, on the road that runs between Damascus and Beirut. He had gone to Syria, along with thousands of other members of the Quds Force, to rescue the country’s besieged President, Bashar al-Assad, a crucial ally of Iran. In the past few years, Shateri had worked under an alias as the Quds Force’s chief in Lebanon; there he had helped sustain the armed group Hezbollah, which at the time of the funeral had begun to pour men into Syria to fight for the regime. The circumstances of his death were unclear: one Iranian official said that Shateri had been “directly targeted” by “the Zionist regime,” as Iranians habitually refer to Israel.

At the funeral, the mourners sobbed, and some beat their chests in the Shiite way. Shateri’s casket was wrapped in an Iranian flag, and gathered around it were the commander of the Revolutionary Guard, dressed in green fatigues; a member of the plot to murder four exiled opposition leaders in a Berlin restaurant in 1992; and the father of Imad Mughniyeh, the Hezbollah commander believed to be responsible for the bombings that killed more than two hundred and fifty Americans in Beirut in 1983. Mughniyeh was assassinated in 2008, purportedly by Israeli agents. In the ethos of the Iranian revolution, to die was to serve. Before Shateri’s funeral, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the country’s Supreme Leader, released a note of praise: “In the end, he drank the sweet syrup of martyrdom.”

Kneeling in the second row on the mosque’s carpeted floor was Major General Qassem Suleimani, the Quds Force’s leader: a small man of fifty-six, with silver hair, a close-cropped beard, and a look of intense self-containment. It was Suleimani who had sent Shateri, an old and trusted friend, to his death. As Revolutionary Guard commanders, he and Shateri belonged to a small fraternity formed during the Sacred Defense, the name given to the Iran-Iraq War, which lasted from 1980 to 1988 and left as many as a million people dead. It was a catastrophic fight, but for Iran it was the beginning of a three-decade project to build a Shiite sphere of influence, stretching across Iraq and Syria to the Mediterranean. Along with its allies in Syria and Lebanon, Iran forms an Axis of Resistance, arrayed against the region’s dominant Sunni powers and the West. In Syria, the project hung in the balance, and Suleimani was mounting a desperate fight, even if the price of victory was a sectarian conflict that engulfed the region for years.

Suleimani took command of the Quds Force fifteen years ago, and in that time he has sought to reshape the Middle East in Iran’s favor, working as a power broker and as a military force: assassinating rivals, arming allies, and, for most of a decade, directing a network of militant groups that killed hundreds of Americans in Iraq. The U.S. Department of the Treasury has sanctioned Suleimani for his role in supporting the Assad regime, and for abetting terrorism. And yet he has remained mostly invisible to the outside world, even as he runs agents and directs operations. “Suleimani is the single most powerful operative in the Middle East today,” John Maguire, a former C.I.A. officer in Iraq, told me, “and no one’s ever heard of him.”

When Suleimani appears in public—often to speak at veterans’ events or to meet with Khamenei—he carries himself inconspicuously and rarely raises his voice, exhibiting a trait that Arabs call khilib, or understated charisma. “He is so short, but he has this presence,” a former senior Iraqi official told me. “There will be ten people in a room, and when Suleimani walks in he doesn’t come and sit with you. He sits over there on the other side of room, by himself, in a very quiet way. Doesn’t speak, doesn’t comment, just sits and listens. And so of course everyone is thinking only about him.”

At the funeral, Suleimani was dressed in a black jacket and a black shirt with no tie, in the Iranian style; his long, angular face and his arched eyebrows were twisted with pain. The Quds Force had never lost such a high-ranking officer abroad. The day before the funeral, Suleimani had travelled to Shateri’s home to offer condolences to his family. He has a fierce attachment to martyred soldiers, and often visits their families; in a recent interview with Iranian media, he said, “When I see the children of the martyrs, I want to smell their scent, and I lose myself.” As the funeral continued, he and the other mourners bent forward to pray, pressing their foreheads to the carpet. “One of the rarest people, who brought the revolution and the whole world to you, is gone,” Alireza Panahian, the imam, told the mourners. Suleimani cradled his head in his palm and began to weep.

The early months of 2013, around the time of Shateri’s death, marked a low point for the Iranian intervention in Syria. Assad was steadily losing ground to the rebels, who are dominated by Sunnis, Iran’s rivals. If Assad fell, the Iranian regime would lose its link to Hezbollah, its forward base against Israel. In a speech, one Iranian cleric said, “If we lose Syria, we cannot keep Tehran.”

Although the Iranians were severely strained by American sanctions, imposed to stop the regime from developing a nuclear weapon, they were unstinting in their efforts to save Assad. Among other things, they extended a seven-billion-dollar loan to shore up the Syrian economy. “I don’t think the Iranians are calculating this in terms of dollars,” a Middle Eastern security official told me. “They regard the loss of Assad as an existential threat.” For Suleimani, saving Assad seemed a matter of pride, especially if it meant distinguishing himself from the Americans. “Suleimani told us the Iranians would do whatever was necessary,” a former Iraqi leader told me. “He said, ‘We’re not like the Americans. We don’t abandon our friends.’ ”

Last year, Suleimani asked Kurdish leaders in Iraq to allow him to open a supply route across northern Iraq and into Syria. For years, he had bullied and bribed the Kurds into coöperating with his plans, but this time they rebuffed him. Worse, Assad’s soldiers wouldn’t fight—or, when they did, they mostly butchered civilians, driving the populace to the rebels. “The Syrian Army is useless!” Suleimani told an Iraqi politician. He longed for the Basij, the Iranian militia whose fighters crushed the popular uprisings against the regime in 2009. “Give me one brigade of the Basij, and I could conquer the whole country,” he said. In August, 2012, anti-Assad rebels captured forty-eight Iranians inside Syria. Iranian leaders protested that they were pilgrims, come to pray at a holy Shiite shrine, but the rebels, as well as Western intelligence agencies, said that they were members of the Quds Force. In any case, they were valuable enough so that Assad agreed to release more than two thousand captured rebels to have them freed. And then Shateri was killed.

Finally, Suleimani began flying into Damascus frequently so that he could assume personal control of the Iranian intervention. “He’s running the war himself,” an American defense official told me. In Damascus, he is said to work out of a heavily fortified command post in a nondescript building, where he has installed a multinational array of officers: the heads of the Syrian military, a Hezbollah commander, and a coördinator of Iraqi Shiite militias, which Suleimani mobilized and brought to the fight. If Suleimani couldn’t have the Basij, he settled for the next best thing: Brigadier General Hossein Hamedani, the Basij’s former deputy commander. Hamedani, another comrade from the Iran-Iraq War, was experienced in running the kind of irregular militias that the Iranians were assembling, in order to keep on fighting if Assad fell.

Late last year, Western officials began to notice a sharp increase in Iranian supply flights into the Damascus airport. Instead of a handful a week, planes were coming every day, carrying weapons and ammunition—“tons of it,” the Middle Eastern security official told me—along with officers from the Quds Force. According to American officials, the officers coördinated attacks, trained militias, and set up an elaborate system to monitor rebel communications. They also forced the various branches of Assad’s security services—designed to spy on one another—to work together. The Middle Eastern security official said that the number of Quds Force operatives, along with the Iraqi Shiite militiamen they brought with them, reached into the thousands. “They’re spread out across the entire country,” he told me.

A turning point came in April, after rebels captured the Syrian town of Qusayr, near the Lebanese border. To retake the town, Suleimani called on Hassan Nasrallah, Hezbollah’s leader, to send in more than two thousand fighters. It wasn’t a difficult sell. Qusayr sits at the entrance to the Bekaa Valley, the main conduit for missiles and other matériel to Hezbollah; if it was closed, Hezbollah would find it difficult to survive. Suleimani and Nasrallah are old friends, having coöperated for years in Lebanon and in the many places around the world where Hezbollah operatives have performed terrorist missions at the Iranians’ behest. According to Will Fulton, an Iran expert at the American Enterprise Institute, Hezbollah fighters encircled Qusayr, cutting off the roads, then moved in. Dozens of them were killed, as were at least eight Iranian officers. On June 5th, the town fell. “The whole operation was orchestrated by Suleimani,” Maguire, who is still active in the region, said. “It was a great victory for him.”

Despite all of Suleimani’s rough work, his image among Iran’s faithful is that of an irreproachable war hero—a decorated veteran of the Iran-Iraq War, in which he became a division commander while still in his twenties. In public, he is almost theatrically modest. During a recent appearance, he described himself as “the smallest soldier,” and, according to the Iranian press, rebuffed members of the audience who tried to kiss his hand. His power comes mostly from his close relationship with Khamenei, who provides the guiding vision for Iranian society. The Supreme Leader, who usually reserves his highest praise for fallen soldiers, has referred to Suleimani as “a living martyr of the revolution.” Suleimani is a hard-line supporter of Iran’s authoritarian system. In July, 1999, at the height of student protests, he signed, with other Revolutionary Guard commanders, a letter warning the reformist President Mohammad Khatami that if he didn’t put down the revolt the military would—perhaps deposing Khatami in the process. “Our patience has run out,” the generals wrote. The police crushed the demonstrators, as they did again, a decade later.

Iran’s government is intensely fractious, and there are many figures around Khamenei who help shape foreign policy, including Revolutionary Guard commanders, senior clerics, and Foreign Ministry officials. But Suleimani has been given a remarkably free hand in implementing Khamenei’s vision. “He has ties to every corner of the system,” Meir Dagan, the former head of Mossad, told me. “He is what I call politically clever. He has a relationship with everyone.” Officials describe him as a believer in Islam and in the revolution; while many senior figures in the Revolutionary Guard have grown wealthy through the Guard’s control over key Iranian industries, Suleimani has been endowed with a personal fortune by the Supreme Leader. “He’s well taken care of,” Maguire said.

Suleimani lives in Tehran, and appears to lead the home life of a bureaucrat in middle age. “He gets up at four every morning, and he’s in bed by nine-thirty every night,” the Iraqi politician, who has known him for many years, told me, shaking his head in disbelief. Suleimani has a bad prostate and recurring back pain. He’s “respectful of his wife,” the Middle Eastern security official told me, sometimes taking her along on trips. He has three sons and two daughters, and is evidently a strict but loving father. He is said to be especially worried about his daughter Nargis, who lives in Malaysia. “She is deviating from the ways of Islam,” the Middle Eastern official said.

Maguire told me, “Suleimani is a far more polished guy than most. He can move in political circles, but he’s also got the substance to be intimidating.” Although he is widely read, his aesthetic tastes appear to be strictly traditional. “I don’t think he’d listen to classical music,” the Middle Eastern official told me. “The European thing—I don’t think that’s his vibe, basically.” Suleimani has little formal education, but, the former senior Iraqi official told me, “he is a very shrewd, frighteningly intelligent strategist.” His tools include payoffs for politicians across the Middle East, intimidation when it is needed, and murder as a last resort. Over the years, the Quds Force has built an international network of assets, some of them drawn from the Iranian diaspora, who can be called on to support missions. “They’re everywhere,” a second Middle Eastern security official said. In 2010, according to Western officials, the Quds Force and Hezbollah launched a new campaign against American and Israeli targets—in apparent retaliation for the covert effort to slow down the Iranian nuclear program, which has included cyber attacks and assassinations of Iranian nuclear scientists.

Since then, Suleimani has orchestrated attacks in places as far flung as Thailand, New Delhi, Lagos, and Nairobi—at least thirty attempts in the past two years alone. The most notorious was a scheme, in 2011, to hire a Mexican drug cartel to blow up the Saudi Ambassador to the United States as he sat down to eat at a restaurant a few miles from the White House. The cartel member approached by Suleimani’s agent turned out to be an informant for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. (The Quds Force appears to be more effective close to home, and a number of the remote plans have gone awry.) Still, after the plot collapsed, two former American officials told a congressional committee that Suleimani should be assassinated. “Suleimani travels a lot,” one said. “He is all over the place. Go get him. Either try to capture him or kill him.” In Iran, more than two hundred dignitaries signed an outraged letter in his defense; a social-media campaign proclaimed, “We are all Qassem Suleimani.”

Several Middle Eastern officials, some of whom I have known for a decade, stopped talking the moment I brought up Suleimani. “We don’t want to have any part of this,” a Kurdish official in Iraq said. Among spies in the West, he appears to exist in a special category, an enemy both hated and admired: a Middle Eastern equivalent of Karla, the elusive Soviet master spy in John le Carré’s novels. When I called Dagan, the former Mossad chief, and mentioned Suleimani’s name, there was a long pause on the line. “Ah,” he said, in a tone of weary irony, “a very good friend.”

In March, 2009, on the eve of the Iranian New Year, Suleimani led a group of Iran-Iraq War veterans to the Paa-Alam Heights, a barren, rocky promontory on the Iraqi border. In 1986, Paa-Alam was the scene of one of the terrible battles over the Faw Peninsula, where tens of thousands of men died while hardly advancing a step. A video recording from the visit shows Suleimani standing on a mountaintop, recounting the battle to his old comrades. In a gentle voice, he speaks over a soundtrack of music and prayers.

“This is the Dasht-e-Abbas Road,” Suleimani says, pointing into the valley below. “This area stood between us and the enemy.” Later, Suleimani and the group stand on the banks of a creek, where he reads aloud the names of fallen Iranian soldiers, his voice trembling with emotion. During a break, he speaks with an interviewer, and describes the fighting in near-mystical terms. “The battlefield is mankind’s lost paradise—the paradise in which morality and human conduct are at their highest,” he says. “One type of paradise that men imagine is about streams, beautiful maidens, and lush landscape. But there is another kind of paradise—the battlefield.”

Suleimani was born in Rabor, an impoverished mountain village in eastern Iran. When he was a boy, his father, like many other farmers, took out an agricultural loan from the government of the Shah. He owed nine hundred toman—about a hundred dollars at the time—and couldn’t pay it back. In a brief memoir, Suleimani wrote of leaving home with a young relative named Ahmad Suleimani, who was in a similar situation. “At night, we couldn’t fall asleep with the sadness of thinking that government agents were coming to arrest our fathers,” he wrote. Together, they travelled to Kerman, the nearest city, to try to clear their family’s debt. The place was unwelcoming. “We were only thirteen, and our bodies were so tiny, wherever we went, they wouldn’t hire us,” he wrote. “Until one day, when we were hired as laborers at a school construction site on Khajoo Street, which was where the city ended. They paid us two toman per day.” After eight months, they had saved enough money to bring home, but the winter snow was too deep. They were told to seek out a local driver named Pahlavan—“Champion”—who was a “strong man who could lift up a cow or a donkey with his teeth.” During the drive, whenever the car got stuck, “he would lift up the Jeep and put it aside!” In Suleimani’s telling, Pahlavan is an ardent detractor of the Shah. He says of the two boys, “This is the time for them to rest and play, not work as a laborer in a strange city. I spit on the life they have made for us!” They arrived home, Suleimani writes, “just as the lights were coming on in the village homes. When the news travelled in our village, there was pandemonium.”

As a young man, Suleimani gave few signs of greater ambition. According to Ali Alfoneh, an Iran expert at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, he had only a high-school education, and worked for Kerman’s municipal water department. But it was a revolutionary time, and the country’s gathering unrest was making itself felt. Away from work, Suleimani spent hours lifting weights in local gyms, which, like many in the Middle East, offered physical training and inspiration for the warrior spirit. During Ramadan, he attended sermons by a travelling preacher named Hojjat Kamyab—a protégé of Khamenei’s—and it was there that he became inspired by the possibility of Islamic revolution.

In 1979, when Suleimani was twenty-two, the Shah fell to a popular uprising led by Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini in the name of Islam. Swept up in the fervor, Suleimani joined the Revolutionary Guard, a force established by Iran’s new clerical leadership to prevent the military from mounting a coup. Though he received little training—perhaps only a forty-five-day course—he advanced rapidly. As a young guardsman, Suleimani was dispatched to northwestern Iran, where he helped crush an uprising by ethnic Kurds.

When the revolution was eighteen months old, Saddam Hussein sent the Iraqi Army sweeping across the border, hoping to take advantage of the internal chaos. Instead, the invasion solidified Khomeini’s leadership and unified the country in resistance, starting a brutal, entrenched war. Suleimani was sent to the front with a simple task, to supply water to the soldiers there, and he never left. “I entered the war on a fifteen-day mission, and ended up staying until the end,” he has said. A photograph from that time shows the young Suleimani dressed in green fatigues, with no insignia of rank, his black eyes focussed on a far horizon. “We were all young and wanted to serve the revolution,” he told an interviewer in 2005.

Suleimani earned a reputation for bravery and élan, especially as a result of reconnaissance missions he undertook behind Iraqi lines. He returned from several missions bearing a goat, which his soldiers slaughtered and grilled. “Even the Iraqis, our enemy, admired him for this,” a former Revolutionary Guard officer who defected to the United States told me. On Iraqi radio, Suleimani became known as “the goat thief.” In recognition of his effectiveness, Alfoneh said, he was put in charge of a brigade from Kerman, with men from the gyms where he lifted weights.

The Iranian Army was badly overmatched, and its commanders resorted to crude and costly tactics. In “human wave” assaults, they sent thousands of young men directly into the Iraqi lines, often to clear minefields, and soldiers died at a precipitous rate. Suleimani seemed distressed by the loss of life. Before sending his men into battle, he would embrace each one and bid him goodbye; in speeches, he praised martyred soldiers and begged their forgiveness for not being martyred himself. When Suleimani’s superiors announced plans to attack the Faw Peninsula, he dismissed them as wasteful and foolhardy. The former Revolutionary Guard officer recalled seeing Suleimani in 1985, after a battle in which his brigade had suffered many dead and wounded. He was sitting alone in a corner of a tent. “He was very silent, thinking about the people he’d lost,” the officer said.

Ahmad, the young relative who travelled with Suleimani to Kerman, was killed in 1984. On at least one occasion, Suleimani himself was wounded. Still, he didn’t lose enthusiasm for his work. In the nineteen-eighties, Reuel Marc Gerecht was a young C.I.A. officer posted to Istanbul, where he recruited from the thousands of Iranian soldiers who went there to recuperate. “You’d get a whole variety of guardsmen,” Gerecht, who has written extensively on Iran, told me. “You’d get clerics, you’d get people who came to breathe and whore and drink.” Gerecht divided the veterans into two groups. “There were the broken and the burned out, the hollow-eyed—the guys who had been destroyed,” he said. “And then there were the bright-eyed guys who just couldn’t wait to get back to the front. I’d put Suleimani in the latter category.”

Ryan Crocker, the American Ambassador to Iraq from 2007 to 2009, got a similar feeling. During the Iraq War, Crocker sometimes dealt with Suleimani indirectly, through Iraqi leaders who shuttled in and out of Tehran. Once, he asked one of the Iraqis if Suleimani was especially religious. The answer was “Not really,” Crocker told me. “He attends mosque periodically. Religion doesn’t drive him. Nationalism drives him, and the love of the fight.”

Iran’s leaders took two lessons from the Iran-Iraq War. The first was that Iran was surrounded by enemies, near and far. To the regime, the invasion was not so much an Iraqi plot as a Western one. American officials were aware of Saddam’s preparations to invade Iran in 1980, and they later provided him with targeting information used in chemical-weapons attacks; the weapons themselves were built with the help of Western European firms. The memory of these attacks is an especially bitter one. “Do you know how many people are still suffering from the effects of chemical weapons?” Mehdi Khalaji, a fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, said. “Thousands of former soldiers. They believe these were Western weapons given to Saddam.” In 1987, during a battle with the Iraqi Army, a division under Suleimani’s command was attacked by artillery shells containing chemical weapons. More than a hundred of his men suffered the effects.

The other lesson drawn from the Iran-Iraq War was the futility of fighting a head-to-head confrontation. In 1982, after the Iranians expelled the Iraqi forces, Khomeini ordered his men to keep going, to “liberate” Iraq and push on to Jerusalem. Six years and hundreds of thousands of lives later, he agreed to a ceasefire. According to Alfoneh, many of the generals of Suleimani’s generation believe they could have succeeded had the clerics not flinched. “Many of them feel like they were stabbed in the back,” he said. “They have nurtured this myth for nearly thirty years.” But Iran’s leaders did not want another bloodbath. Instead, they had to build the capacity to wage asymmetrical warfare—attacking stronger powers indirectly, outside of Iran.

The Quds Force was an ideal tool. Khomeini had created the prototype for the force in 1979, with the goal of protecting Iran and exporting the Islamic Revolution. The first big opportunity came in Lebanon, where Revolutionary Guard officers were dispatched in 1982 to help organize Shiite militias in the many-sided Lebanese civil war. Those efforts resulted in the creation of Hezbollah, which developed under Iranian guidance. Hezbollah’s military commander, the brilliant and murderous Imad Mughniyeh, helped form what became known as the Special Security Apparatus, a wing of Hezbollah that works closely with the Quds Force. With assistance from Iran, Hezbollah helped orchestrate attacks on the American Embassy and on French and American military barracks. “In the early days, when Hezbollah was totally dependent on Iranian help, Mughniyeh and others were basically willing Iranian assets,” David Crist, a historian for the U.S. military and the author of “The Twilight War,” says.

For all of the Iranian regime’s aggressiveness, some of its religious zeal seemed to burn out. In 1989, Khomeini stopped urging Iranians to spread the revolution, and called instead for expediency to preserve its gains. Persian self-interest was the order of the day, even if it was indistinguishable from revolutionary fervor. In those years, Suleimani worked along Iran’s eastern frontier, aiding Afghan rebels who were holding out against the Taliban. The Iranian regime regarded the Taliban with intense hostility, in large part because of their persecution of Afghanistan’s minority Shiite population. (At one point, the two countries nearly went to war; Iran mobilized a quarter of a million troops, and its leaders denounced the Taliban as an affront to Islam.) In an area that breeds corruption, Suleimani made a name for himself battling opium smugglers along the Afghan border.

In 1998, Suleimani was named the head of the Quds Force, taking over an agency that had already built a lethal résumé: American and Argentine officials believe that the Iranian regime helped Hezbollah orchestrate the bombing of the Israeli Embassy in Buenos Aires in 1992, which killed twenty-nine people, and the attack on the Jewish center in the same city two years later, which killed eighty-five. Suleimani has built the Quds Force into an organization with extraordinary reach, with branches focussed on intelligence, finance, politics, sabotage, and special operations. With a base in the former U.S. Embassy compound in Tehran, the force has between ten thousand and twenty thousand members, divided between combatants and those who train and oversee foreign assets. Its members are picked for their skill and their allegiance to the doctrine of the Islamic Revolution (as well as, in some cases, their family connections). According to the Israeli newspaper Israel Hayom, fighters are recruited throughout the region, trained in Shiraz and Tehran, indoctrinated at the Jerusalem Operation College, in Qom, and then “sent on months-long missions to Afghanistan and Iraq to gain experience in field operational work. They usually travel under the guise of Iranian construction workers.”

After taking command, Suleimani strengthened relationships in Lebanon, with Mughniyeh and with Hassan Nasrallah, Hezbollah’s chief. By then, the Israeli military had occupied southern Lebanon for sixteen years, and Hezbollah was eager to take control of the country, so Suleimani sent in Quds Force operatives to help. “They had a huge presence—training, advising, planning,” Crocker said. In 2000, the Israelis withdrew, exhausted by relentless Hezbollah attacks. It was a signal victory for the Shiites, and, Crocker said, “another example of how countries like Syria and Iran can play a long game, knowing that we can’t.”

Since then, the regime has given aid to a variety of militant Islamist groups opposed to America’s allies in the region, such as Saudi Arabia and Bahrain. The help has gone not only to Shiites but also to Sunni groups like Hamas—helping to form an archipelago of alliances that stretches from Baghdad to Beirut. “No one in Tehran started out with a master plan to build the Axis of Resistance, but opportunities presented themselves,” a Western diplomat in Baghdad told me. “In each case, Suleimani was smarter, faster, and better resourced than anyone else in the region. By grasping at opportunities as they came, he built the thing, slowly but surely.”

In the chaotic days after the attacks of September 11th, Ryan Crocker, then a senior State Department official, flew discreetly to Geneva to meet a group of Iranian diplomats. “I’d fly out on a Friday and then back on Sunday, so nobody in the office knew where I’d been,” Crocker told me. “We’d stay up all night in those meetings.” It seemed clear to Crocker that the Iranians were answering to Suleimani, whom they referred to as “Haji Qassem,” and that they were eager to help the United States destroy their mutual enemy, the Taliban. Although the United States and Iran broke off diplomatic relations in 1980, after American diplomats in Tehran were taken hostage, Crocker wasn’t surprised to find that Suleimani was flexible. “You don’t live through eight years of brutal war without being pretty pragmatic,” he said. Sometimes Suleimani passed messages to Crocker, but he avoided putting anything in writing. “Haji Qassem’s way too smart for that,” Crocker said. “He’s not going to leave paper trails for the Americans.”

Before the bombing began, Crocker sensed that the Iranians were growing impatient with the Bush Administration, thinking that it was taking too long to attack the Taliban. At a meeting in early October, 2001, the lead Iranian negotiator stood up and slammed a sheaf of papers on the table. “If you guys don’t stop building these fairy-tale governments in the sky, and actually start doing some shooting on the ground, none of this is ever going to happen!” he shouted. “When you’re ready to talk about serious fighting, you know where to find me.” He stomped out of the room. “It was a great moment,” Crocker said.

The coöperation between the two countries lasted through the initial phase of the war. At one point, the lead negotiator handed Crocker a map detailing the disposition of Taliban forces. “Here’s our advice: hit them here first, and then hit them over here. And here’s the logic.” Stunned, Crocker asked, “Can I take notes?” The negotiator replied, “You can keep the map.” The flow of information went both ways. On one occasion, Crocker said, he gave his counterparts the location of an Al Qaeda facilitator living in the eastern city of Mashhad. The Iranians detained him and brought him to Afghanistan’s new leaders, who, Crocker believes, turned him over to the U.S. The negotiator told Crocker, “Haji Qassem is very pleased with our coöperation.”

The good will didn’t last. In January, 2002, Crocker, who was by then the deputy chief of the American Embassy in Kabul, was awakened one night by aides, who told him that President George W. Bush, in his State of the Union Address, had named Iran as part of an “Axis of Evil.” Like many senior diplomats, Crocker was caught off guard. He saw the negotiator the next day at the U.N. compound in Kabul, and he was furious. “You completely damaged me,” Crocker recalled him saying. “Suleimani is in a tearing rage. He feels compromised.” The negotiator told Crocker that, at great political risk, Suleimani had been contemplating a complete reëvaluation of the United States, saying, “Maybe it’s time to rethink our relationship with the Americans.” The Axis of Evil speech brought the meetings to an end. Reformers inside the government, who had advocated a rapprochement with the United States, were put on the defensive. Recalling that time, Crocker shook his head. “We were just that close,” he said. “One word in one speech changed history.”

Before the meetings fell apart, Crocker talked with the lead negotiator about the possibility of war in Iraq. “Look,” Crocker said, “I don’t know what’s going to happen, but I do have some responsibility for Iraq—it’s my portfolio—and I can read the signs, and I think we’re going to go in.” He saw an enormous opportunity. The Iranians despised Saddam, and Crocker figured that they would be willing to work with the U.S. “I was not a fan of the invasion,” he told me. “But I was thinking, If we’re going to do it, let’s see if we can flip an enemy into a friend—at least tactically for this, and then let’s see where we can take it.” The negotiator indicated that the Iranians were willing to talk, and that Iraq, like Afghanistan, was part of Suleimani’s brief: “It’s one guy running both shows.”

After the invasion began, in March, 2003, Iranian officials were frantic to let the Americans know that they wanted peace. Many of them watched the regimes topple in Afghanistan and Iraq and were convinced that they were next. “They were scared shitless,” Maguire, the former C.I.A. officer in Baghdad, told me. “They were sending runners across the border to our élite elements saying, ‘Look, we don’t want any trouble with you.’ We had an enormous upper hand.” That same year, American officials determined that Iran had reconfigured its plans to develop a nuclear weapon to proceed more slowly and covertly, lest it invite a Western attack.

After Saddam’s regime collapsed, Crocker was dispatched to Baghdad to organize a fledgling government, called the Iraqi Governing Council. He realized that many Iraqi politicians were flying to Tehran for consultations, and he jumped at the chance to negotiate indirectly with Suleimani. In the course of the summer, Crocker passed him the names of prospective Shiite candidates, and the two men vetted each one. Crocker did not offer veto power, but he abandoned candidates whom Suleimani found especially objectionable. “The formation of the governing council was in its essence a negotiation between Tehran and Washington,” he said.

Voir de même:

Gen. Soleimani: A new brand of Iranian hero for nationalist times
Not a Shiite religious figure and not a martyr, Qassem Soleimani, the living commander of Iran’s elite Qods Force, has been elevated to hero status.
Scott Peterson
The Christian Science Monitor
February 15, 2016

Tehran, Iran
For years the commander of Iran’s elite Qods Force worked from the shadows, conducting the nation’s battles from Afghanistan to Lebanon.

But today Qassem Soleimani is Iran’s celebrity general, a man elevated to hero status by a social media machine that has at least 10 Instagram accounts and spreads photographs and selfies of him at the front lines in Syria and Iraq.

The Islamic Republic long ago turned hero worship into an art form, with its devotion to Shiite religious figures and war martyrs. But the growing personality cult that halos Maj. Gen. Soleimani is different: The gray-haired servant of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) is very much alive, and his ascent to stardom coincides with a growing nationalist trend in Iran.

“Propaganda in Iran is changing, and every nation needs a live hero,” says a conservative analyst in Qom, who asked not to be named.

“The dead heroes now are not useful; we need a live hero now. Iranian people like great commanders, military heroes in history,” he says, ticking off a string of names. “I think Qassem Soleimani is the right person for our new propaganda policy – the right person at the right time.”

Soleimani’s face surged into public view after the self-described Islamic State (IS) swept from Syria into Iraq in June 2014. Frontline photographs of the general mingling with Iranian fighters went viral.

Iranians cite many reasons for his rise, from “saving” Baghdad from IS jihadists and reactivating Shiite militias in Iraq to preserving the rule of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad during nearly six years of war.

Never mind that some analysts suggest that earlier failures to prevent internal upheaval in Iraq and Syria – for years those countries were part of Soleimani’s responsibility – are the reason for Iran’s deep involvement today.

For his part, Soleimani attributes the “collapse of American power in the region” to Iran’s “spiritual influence” in bolstering resistance against the United States, Israel, and their allies.

“It is very extraordinary. Who else can come close?” says a veteran observer in Tehran, Iran, who asked not to be named. “I don’t know how intentional this is; you see people in all walks of life respect him. It shows we can have a very popular hero who is not a cleric.”

“There is no stain on his image,” says the observer.

Indeed, Soleimani has become a source of pride and a symbol for Iranians of all stripes of their nation’s power abroad. At a pro-regime rally, even young Westernized women in makeup pledge to be “soldiers” of Soleimani. At a bodybuilding championship held in his honor, bare-chested men flaunted their muscles beside a huge portrait of him.

Among the Islamic Revolution’s true believers, Soleimani’s exploits are sung by religious storytellers and posted online. His writings about the Iran-Iraq War are steeped in religious language.

In a video from the Syrian front line broadcast on state TV last month, he addressed fighters, saying, of an Iranian volunteer who was killed, “God loves the person who makes holy war his path.”

When erroneous reports of Soleimani’s death recently emerged (Iran has lost dozens of senior IRGC commanders in Syria and Iraq and hundreds of “advisers”), he laughed and said, “This [martyrdom] is something that I have climbed mountains and crossed plains to find.

Some say the hero worship has gone too far; months ago the IRGC ordered Iranian media not to publish frontline selfies. When a young director wanted to make a film inspired by his hero, the general said he was against it and was embarrassed.

Yet Soleimani appears to have relented for Ebrahim Hatamikia, a renowned director of war films.

“Bodyguard” is now premièring at a festival in Tehran. “I made this film for the love of Haj Qassem Soleimani,” the director told an Iranian website, adding that he is “the earth beneath Soleimani’s feet.”

Voir de plus:

The war on ISIS is getting weird in Iraq
Michael B Kelley
Business insider
Mar 25, 2015

The US has started providing « air strikes, airborne intelligence, and Advise & Assist support to Iraqi security forces headquarters » as Baghdad struggles to drive ISIS militants out of Saddam Hussein’s hometown of Tikrit.

The Iraqi assault has heretofore been spearheaded by Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, the head of Iran’s Quds Force, the foreign arm of the Iran Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC), and most of the Iraqi forces are members of Shiite militias beholden to Tehran.

The British magazine The Week features Suleimani in bed with Uncle Sam, which is quite striking given that Suleimani directed « a network of militant groups that killed hundreds of Americans in Iraq, » as detailed by Dexter Filkins in The New Yorker.The notion of the US working on the same side Suleimani is confounding to those who consider him a formidable adversary.

« There’s just no way that the US military can actively support an offensive led by Suleimani, » Christopher Harmer, a former aviator in the United States Navy in the Persian Gulf who is now an analyst with the Institute for the Study of War, told Helene Cooper of The New York Times recently. « He’s a more stately version of Osama bin Laden. »

Suleimani’s Iraqi allies — such as the powerful Badr militia — are known for allegedly burning down Sunni villages and using power drills on enemies.

« It’s a little hard for us to be allied on the battlefield with groups of individuals who are unrepentantly covered in American blood, » Ryan Crocker, a career diplomat who served as the US ambassador to Iraq from 2007 to 2009, told US News.

Nevertheless, American warplanes have provided support for the so-called special groups over the past few months.

Badr commander Hadi al-Ameri recently told Eli Lake of Bloomberg that the US ambassador to Iraq offered airstrikes to support the Iraqi army and the Badr ground forces. Ameri added that Suleimani « advises us. He offers us information, we respect him very much. »

The Wall Street Journal noted that « U.S. officials want to ensure that Iran doesn’t play a central role in the fight ahead. U.S. officials want to be certain that the Iraqi military provides strong oversight of the Shiite militias. »

The question is who tells Suleimani to get out of the way but leave his militias behind.

Voir de plus:

Trump Kills Iran’s Most Overrated Warrior
Suleimani pushed his country to build an empire, but drove it into the ground instead.
Thomas L. Friedman
NYT
Jan. 3, 2020

One day they may name a street after President Trump in Tehran. Why? Because Trump just ordered the assassination of possibly the dumbest man in Iran and the most overrated strategist in the Middle East: Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani.

Think of the miscalculations this guy made. In 2015, the United States and the major European powers agreed to lift virtually all their sanctions on Iran, many dating back to 1979, in return for Iran halting its nuclear weapons program for a mere 15 years, but still maintaining the right to have a peaceful nuclear program. It was a great deal for Iran. Its economy grew by over 12 percent the next year. And what did Suleimani do with that windfall?

He and Iran’s supreme leader launched an aggressive regional imperial project that made Iran and its proxies the de facto controlling power in Beirut, Damascus, Baghdad and Sana. This freaked out U.S. allies in the Sunni Arab world and Israel — and they pressed the Trump administration to respond. Trump himself was eager to tear up any treaty forged by President Obama, so he exited the nuclear deal and imposed oil sanctions on Iran that have now shrunk the Iranian economy by almost 10 percent and sent unemployment over 16 percent.

All that for the pleasure of saying that Tehran can call the shots in Beirut, Damascus, Baghdad and Sana. What exactly was second prize?

With the Tehran regime severely deprived of funds, the ayatollahs had to raise gasoline prices at home, triggering massive domestic protests. That required a harsh crackdown by Iran’s clerics against their own people that left thousands jailed and killed, further weakening the legitimacy of the regime.

Then Mr. “Military Genius” Suleimani decided that, having propped up the regime of President Bashar al-Assad in Syria, and helping to kill 500,000 Syrians in the process, he would overreach again and try to put direct pressure on Israel. He would do this by trying to transfer precision-guided rockets from Iran to Iranian proxy forces in Lebanon and Syria.

Alas, Suleimani discovered that fighting Israel — specifically, its combined air force, special forces, intelligence and cyber — is not like fighting the Nusra front or the Islamic State. The Israelis hit back hard, sending a whole bunch of Iranians home from Syria in caskets and hammering their proxies as far away as Western Iraq.

Indeed, Israeli intelligence had so penetrated Suleimani’s Quds Force and its proxies that Suleimani would land a plane with precision munitions in Syria at 5 p.m., and the Israeli air force would blow it up by 5:30 p.m. Suleimani’s men were like fish in a barrel. If Iran had a free press and a real parliament, he would have been fired for colossal mismanagement.

But it gets better, or actually worse, for Suleimani. Many of his obituaries say that he led the fight against the Islamic State in Iraq, in tacit alliance with America. Well, that’s true. But what they omit is that Suleimani’s, and Iran’s, overreaching in Iraq helped to produce the Islamic State in the first place.

It was Suleimani and his Quds Force pals who pushed Iraq’s Shiite prime minister, Nuri Kamal al-Maliki, to push Sunnis out of the Iraqi government and army, stop paying salaries to Sunni soldiers, kill and arrest large numbers of peaceful Sunni protesters and generally turn Iraq into a Shiite-dominated sectarian state. The Islamic State was the counterreaction.

Finally, it was Suleimani’s project of making Iran the imperial power in the Middle East that turned Iran into the most hated power in the Middle East for many of the young, rising pro-democracy forces — both Sunnis and Shiites — in Lebanon, Syria and Iraq.

As the Iranian-American scholar Ray Takeyh pointed out in a wise essay in Politico, in recent years “Soleimani began expanding Iran’s imperial frontiers. For the first time in its history, Iran became a true regional power, stretching its influence from the banks of the Mediterranean to the Persian Gulf. Soleimani understood that Persians would not be willing to die in distant battlefields for the sake of Arabs, so he focused on recruiting Arabs and Afghans as an auxiliary force. He often boasted that he could create a militia in little time and deploy it against Iran’s various enemies.”

It was precisely those Suleimani proxies — Hezbollah in Lebanon and Syria, the Popular Mobilization Forces in Iraq, and the Houthis in Yemen — that created pro-Iranian Shiite states-within-states in all of these countries. And it was precisely these states-within-states that helped to prevent any of these countries from cohering, fostered massive corruption and kept these countries from developing infrastructure — schools, roads, electricity.

And therefore it was Suleimani and his proxies — his “kingmakers” in Lebanon, Syria and Iraq — who increasingly came to be seen, and hated, as imperial powers in the region, even more so than Trump’s America. This triggered popular, authentic, bottom-up democracy movements in Lebanon and Iraq that involved Sunnis and Shiites locking arms together to demand noncorrupt, nonsectarian democratic governance.

On Nov. 27, Iraqi Shiites — yes, Iraqi Shiites — burned down the Iranian consulate in Najaf, Iraq, removing the Iranian flag from the building and putting an Iraqi flag in its place. That was after Iraqi Shiites, in September 2018, set the Iranian consulate in Basra ablaze, shouting condemnations of Iran’s interference in Iraqi politics.

The whole “protest” against the United States Embassy compound in Baghdad last week was almost certainly a Suleimani-staged operation to make it look as if Iraqis wanted America out when in fact it was the other way around. The protesters were paid pro-Iranian militiamen. No one in Baghdad was fooled by this.

In a way, it’s what got Suleimani killed. He so wanted to cover his failures in Iraq he decided to start provoking the Americans there by shelling their forces, hoping they would overreact, kill Iraqis and turn them against the United States. Trump, rather than taking the bait, killed Suleimani instead.

I have no idea whether this was wise or what will be the long-term implications. But here are two things I do know about the Middle East.

First, often in the Middle East the opposite of “bad” is not “good.” The opposite of bad often turns out to be “disorder.” Just because you take out a really bad actor like Suleimani doesn’t mean a good actor, or a good change in policy, comes in his wake. Suleimani is part of a system called the Islamic Revolution in Iran. That revolution has managed to use oil money and violence to stay in power since 1979 — and that is Iran’s tragedy, a tragedy that the death of one Iranian general will not change.

Today’s Iran is the heir to a great civilization and the home of an enormously talented people and significant culture. Wherever Iranians go in the world today, they thrive as scientists, doctors, artists, writers and filmmakers — except in the Islamic Republic of Iran, whose most famous exports are suicide bombing, cyberterrorism and proxy militia leaders. The very fact that Suleimani was probably the most famous Iranian in the region speaks to the utter emptiness of this regime, and how it has wasted the lives of two generations of Iranians by looking for dignity in all the wrong places and in all the wrong ways.

The other thing I know is that in the Middle East all important politics happens the morning after the morning after.

Yes, in the coming days there will be noisy protests in Iran, the burning of American flags and much crying for the “martyr.” The morning after the morning after? There will be a thousand quiet conversations inside Iran that won’t get reported. They will be about the travesty that is their own government and how it has squandered so much of Iran’s wealth and talent on an imperial project that has made Iran hated in the Middle East.

And yes, the morning after, America’s Sunni Arab allies will quietly celebrate Suleimani’s death, but we must never forget that it is the dysfunction of many of the Sunni Arab regimes — their lack of freedom, modern education and women’s empowerment — that made them so weak that Iran was able to take them over from the inside with its proxies.

I write these lines while flying over New Zealand, where the smoke from forest fires 2,500 miles away over eastern Australia can be seen and felt. Mother Nature doesn’t know Suleimani’s name, but everyone in the Arab world is going to know her name. Because the Middle East, particularly Iran, is becoming an environmental disaster area — running out of water, with rising desertification and overpopulation. If governments there don’t stop fighting and come together to build resilience against climate change — rather than celebrating self-promoting military frauds who conquer failed states and make them fail even more — they’re all doomed.

Voir encore:

Love is a Battlefield
Jon Stewart takes the U.S.-Iran ‘strange bedfellows’ line literally, imagines Iraq as a love triangle
Peter Weber
The Week
June 17, 2014

Yes, Jon Stewart is a comedian, and no, The Daily Show isn’t a hard news-and-analysis show. But on Monday night’s show, Stewart gave a remarkably cogent and creative explanation of the geopolitical situation in Iraq. The U.S. and Iran are discussing coordinating their efforts in Iraq to defeat a common enemy, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) militia. Meanwhile, ISIS is getting financial support from one of America’s biggest Arab allies, and Iran’s biggest Muslim enemy, Saudi Arabia.

Forget « strange bedfellows » — this is a romantic Gordian knot. But it makes a lot of sense when Stewart presents the situation as a love triangle. « Sure, you say ‘Death to America’ and burn our flags, but you do it to our face, » Stewart tells Iran. Meanwhile, Saudi Arabia has been funding America’s enemies behind our backs — but what about its sweet, sweet crude oil? Like all good love triangles, this one has a soundtrack — Stewart draws on the hits of the 1980s to great effect. In fact, the only ’80s song Stewart left out that would have tied this all together: « Love Bites. » –Peter Weber

State Department urges U.S. citizens to ‘depart Iraq immediately’ due to ‘heightened tensions’

4:37 a.m.

The State Department on Friday urged « U.S. citizens to depart Iraq immediately, » citing unspecified « heightened tensions in Iraq and the region » and the « Iranian-backed militia attacks at the U.S. Embassy compound. »

Iranian officials have vowed « harsh » retaliation for America’s assassination Friday of Iran’s top regional military commander, Gen. Qassem Soleimani, outside Baghdad International Airport. Syria similarly criticized the « treacherous American criminal aggression » and warned of a « dangerous escalation » in the region.

Iraq’s outgoing prime minister, Adel Abdul-Mahdi, also slammed the the « liquidation operations » against Soleimani and half a dozen Iraqi militiamen killed in the drone strikes as an « aggression against Iraq, » a « brazen violation of Iraq’s sovereignty and blatant attack on the nation’s dignity, » and an « obvious violation of the conditions of U.S. troop presence in Iraq, which is limited to training Iraqi forces. » A senior Iraqi official said Parliament must take « necessary and appropriate measures to protect Iraq’s dignity, security, and sovereignty. »

The Pentagon said President Trump ordered the assassination of Soleimani as a « defensive action to protect U.S. personnel abroad, » claiming the Quds Force commander was « actively developing plans to attack American diplomats and service members in Iraq and throughout the region. » Peter Weber

If President Trump was watching Fox News at Mar-a-Lago on Thursday night, he got a violently mixed messages on his order to assassinate Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani, head of the elite Quds Force, national hero, and scourge of U.S. forces.

Sean Hannity called into his own show to tell guest host Josh Chaffetz that the killing of Soleimani was « a huge victory and total leadership by the president » and « the opposite of what happened in Benghazi. » Rep. Michael Waltz (R-Fla.) channeled Ronald Reagan and praised Trump’s « peace through strength. » Oliver North, Karl Rove, and Ari Flesischer also lauded Trump’s decision.

Earlier, fellow host Tucker Carlson saw neither peace nor strength in Trump’s actions. He blamed « official Washington, » though, and suggested Trump had been « out-maneuvered » by more hawkish advisers who might be pushing America « toward war despite what the president wants. »

« There’s been virtually no debate or even discussion about this, but America appears to be lumbering toward a new Middle East war, » Carlson said. « The very people demanding action against Iran tonight » are « liars, and they don’t care about you, they don’t care about your kids, they’re reckless and incompetent. And you should keep all of that in mind as war with Iran looms closer tonight. » Trump, he added, « doesn’t seek war and he’s wary of it, particularly in an election year. » When his guest, Curt Mills of The American Conservative, said war with Iran « would be twice as bad » as the Iraq War and « if Trump does this, he’s cooked, » Carlson sadly concurred: « I think that’s right. »

Media Matters’ Matt Gertz pointed out that Hannity has always been more « bellicose » than Carlson on Iran, and both men informally advise Trump off-air as well as on-air. And « if you pay attention to the impact the Fox News Cabinet has on the president, » he tweeted Thursday night, « Tucker Carlson has been off for the holidays the past few days as tensions with Iran mounted. » Coincidence? Maybe. But on such twists does the fate of our world turn.

Voir enfin:

Le massacre des prisonniers politiques de 1988 en Iran : une mobilisation forclose ?
Henry Sorg
Raisons politiques
2008/2 (n° 30), pages 59 à 87

« Au nom de Dieu clément et miséricordieux. J’ai décidé afin de me distraire et me calmer l’esprit, sachant qu’il n’y a pas d’issue pour me sauver de cette douleur, de présenter [mes filles] disparues, Leili et Shirine, dans une note pour mes chers petits-enfants qui ignoreront cette histoire et comment elle est arrivée ­ spécialement les enfants de Shirine. D’abord je dois dire que je n’ai pas de savoir pour exprimer correctement tous mes souvenirs et mes observations sur ce qui s’est passé pour moi et mes enfants durant cette période funeste de la Révolution [en Iran]. Je n’ai pris un crayon et une feuille de papier qu’en de rares occasions de ma vie, alors que dire maintenant que je suis un vieillard de 70 ans aux mains tremblantes, aux yeux plein de sang (…). Mais que faire puisque je suis en conflit avec moi-même. Mon appel intérieur m’a tout pris et me crie : â?œnote ce que tu as vu, ce que tu as entendu et ce que tu as vécuâ?. Mon appel intérieur me crie : â?œpuisque c’est vrai, rapporte que Leili était enceinte de huit mois lorsqu’ils l’ont exécutéeâ?Â ; il me crie : â?œEcris au moins que Shirine, après six ans et neuf mois de prison, et après avoir supporté les tortures les plus sauvages et les plus modernes a finalement été exécutée, et ils n’ont pas rendu son corpsâ?. Si ces souvenirs comportent des erreurs d’écriture, on en comprendra l’essentiel du propos à un certain point. Certainement, les enfants de Shirine veulent savoir qui était leur mère et pourquoi elle a été exécutée. »
Carnet de notes retrouvé à T., Iran

1LA RÉVOLUTION IRANIENNE s’est instituée sur la double violence d’une « guerre sainte [2][2]L’ayatollah Khomeini qualifie la guerre de Jihad défensif et… » contre un ennemi extérieur, l’Irak, et d’une élimination physique des opposants intérieurs, celle notamment des prisonniers politiques en 1988 [3][3]L’auteur remercie Sandrine Lefranc pour sa lecture attentive et…. Durant l’été 1988, après que l’ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini eut accepté de mauvaise grâce la résolution 598 de l’ONU mettant fin à la longue guerre contre l’Irak, les prisons du pays ont été purgées de leurs prisonniers politiques. Le nombre exact de prisonniers exécutés et enterrés dans des fosses communes ou des sections de cimetière reste jusqu’à ce jour inconnu. Les rares recherches menées sur la question, les organisations qui ont capitalisé les témoignages de survivants, les groupes politiques dont les membres ont été exécutés, les témoignages individuels, mais aussi certains anciens responsables de l’État islamique s’accordent pour reconnaître que ce bilan se chiffre en plusieurs milliers [4][4]Voir notamment Ervand Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions. Prisons…. Cet événement a non seulement fait l’objet de la part des autorités publiques iraniennes d’un silence orchestré et d’un déni, mais il n’a pas non plus été documenté ou analysé de façon exhaustive. Vingt ans après les faits, on peine encore à mettre au jour cette réalité qui existe de façon fragmentaire, par assemblage d’ouï-dire et de témoignages : matrice à mythes pour certains acteurs politiques exclus du champ national (tel le Parti des Moudjahidines du Peuple dont les membres furent les principales victimes [5][5]Voir E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 215 ;…), drames familiaux couverts d’un silence gêné pour une population iranienne qui ne souhaite pas vraiment connaître ce qu’elle appelle, pudiquement, « ces histoires-là ».

2 Dans le contexte d’une « démocratisation » de la vie sociale et politique [6][6]Farhad Khosrokhavar, « L’Iran, la démocratie et la nouvelle… à partir des années 1990, les exécutions de 1988 sont absentes du débat initié sur les libertés publiques et, notamment, des revendications exprimées en faveur d’un État de droit et d’une nouvelle société civile [7][7]Ibid., p. 309 et Nouchine Yavari d’Hellencourt, « Islam et…. En effet, le contexte politique autoritaire dans lequel se sont perpétrées les violences d’État ­ de 1979, juste après la Révolution, jusqu’aux massacres de 1988 ­ évolue dans la décennie suivante vers une demande de « réforme » et de libéralisation du régime islamique. Cette transformation procède principalement autour de trois mouvements : d’une part, la réflexion théorique (à la fois politique et théologique) qui occupe le débat publique sur les rapports entre islam et droits de l’homme [8][8]Ibid. ; d’autre part, une série de changements politiques au sein des institutions suite à l’élection du président Khatami en 1997, aux élections municipales de 1999 et celles du 6e Parlement en 2000 ; enfin, l’apparition d’un nouveau rapport au politique dans la société avec l’émergence d’une culture politique qui, en rupture avec l’islamisme révolutionnaire des deux décennies précédentes, se détourne des « concepts identitaires classiques comme “peuple” ou “nation” [vers ceux, nouveaux] de société civile (jâme’e madani), de citoyenneté (shahrvandi) et d’individu (fard)  [9][9]Ibid. ». Ces nouveaux mouvements, s’ils mentionnent éventuellement et discrètement les « événements » de 1988, le font sur le mode de l’allusion et non pas sur celui de la mobilisation.

3 L’étoffe du silence qui entoure les exécutions massives de l’été 1988 est complexe : Qui sont les victimes ? Quelles en sont les raisons ? Quelles en sont les conditions et qui en sont les responsables ? Il s’agit d’abord, en s’appuyant sur la littérature existante ainsi que sur les sources premières accessibles, d’exposer quelques éléments de réponses à ces questions, sur un sujet d’étude inédit en France. D’autre part, il s’agit de réfléchir autour de ces faits connus, mais non reconnus ­ selon la définition que Cohen propose du « déni [10][10]Stanley Cohen, States of Denial, Knowing about Atrocities and… » ­ en se demandant comment fonctionnent les dispositifs d’invisibilisation mis en place par le pouvoir et comment y répondent des pratiques de souvenir. Le massacre de 1988 est l’enjeu d’une mémoire dont il s’agit pour le pouvoir d’effacer la trace, d’abord, de façon à la fois concrète et symbolique, à travers l’interdit du rituel funéraire pour les victimes. Cette tension mémorielle travaille la société iranienne et oppose depuis deux décennies un passé non « commémorable » à un travail de mémoire qui se cristallise autour des sépultures.

4 Peu de matériaux empiriques et d’analyses sont disponibles sur l’exécution en masse des prisonniers politiques qui a clos la période de consolidation du pouvoir et de suppression de l’opposition au Parti républicain islamique de 1981 à 1988. Les sources, disponibles en persan et en anglais, se composent principalement de témoignages et de quelques travaux d’investigation historiques [11][11]E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 209-229 ;…, sociologiques [12][12]Maziar Behrooz, « Reflections on Iran’s Prison System During… et juridiques ­ ces derniers s’intéressant à la qualification des exécutions de masse comme « crime contre l’humanité [13][13]Reza Afshari, Human Rights in Iran : The Abuse of Cultural… ». Les rapports non-gouvernementaux et internationaux [14][14]Conseil Économique et Social des Nations Unies (ECOSOC),… constituent une autre source, qui, tout comme les travaux scientifiques, se fondent principalement sur des entretiens avec de rares prisonniers témoins exilés à l’étranger et avec les proches des victimes, ainsi que sur des témoignages écrits [15][15]Un impressionnant travail a été accompli sur ce point par E.…. À cet égard, les Mémoires de l’ayatollah Montazeri documentent les faits du point de vue de l’organisation politique et, dans une certaine mesure, de l’organisation administrative. D’un autre côté, plusieurs témoignages ont été publiés sous forme de romans, de lettres écrites depuis la prison ou de mémoires [16][16]Notamment Nima Parvaresh, Nabardi nabarabar : gozareshi az haft…. D’autres témoignages, nombreux, restent encore à découvrir et assembler, comme celui que nous nous proposons d’explorer dans cet article.

5 Lors d’un séjour dans la ville de T. en 2004, nous avons pu prendre connaissance d’un carnet de notes d’une cinquantaine de pages écrites entre 1989 et 1990 par un homme âgé. Ce cahier a été trouvé à sa mort par ses proches dans ses effets personnels. Javad L., retraité d’une compagnie publique résidant à T., était père de six enfants dont les cinq aînés, qui avaient suivi de solides formations universitaires, commençaient leur vie adulte à la fin des années 1970. Dans ces pages, il racontait dans le détail les circonstances de l’arrestation et de l’exécution de ses deux filles à la suite de la Révolution de 1978. Celles-ci avaient pris part de façon active au mouvement d’opposition des Moudjahidines du Peuple [17][17]Nous reprenons, parmi les différentes transcriptions possibles,…, au cours de la révolution iranienne et dans les premières années de la nouvelle République islamique. Elles ont été arrêtées dans le cadre de la répression politique mise en place à partir de 1980. Le carnet de notes relate des faits qui s’étendent de 1980 à 1988 et détaille l’arrestation, l’emprisonnement et l’exécution des deux jeunes femmes, la première en 1982 et la seconde en 1988. Les destinataires étant de jeunes enfants au moment des faits, l’écriture cherche à faire passer une mémoire qui imbrique généalogie familiale et histoire nationale : « Certainement, les enfants de Shirine veulent savoir qui était leur mère et pourquoi elle a été exécutée. » Le texte poursuit : « Peut-être qu’il leur sera intéressant de connaître les moudjahidines, de quelles franges de la société ils étaient issus, quels étaient leurs buts et leurs intentions et pourquoi ils ont été massacrés sans merci. Je reprends donc depuis le début, du plus loin que vont mes souvenirs. Inhcha’Allah. »

Les moudjahidines : de la révolution à la répression

6 Les membres, et de façon bien plus déterminante en nombre, les proches et sympathisants du Parti des Moudjahidines du peuple (Moudjahidine-e Khalq) sont les principales cibles des vagues de répression successives entre 1981 et 1988 et forment une large majorité des prisonniers exécutés en 1988. Ce parti politique, dont la formation remonte au lendemain des mouvements de mai 1968 dans le monde, se fonde sur une synthèse entre islamisme, gauche radicale et nationalisme anti-impérialiste. À l’origine, le mouvement revendique l’inspiration du Front National (Jebhe-ye Melli) de Mossadeq et Fatemi [18][18]Mohammad Mossadeq a été Premier ministre de 1951 à 1953. Ayant…. Fortement influencés par les écrits de Shariati [19][19]Ervand Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, New Haven/Londres,…, sociologue des religions et figure intellectuelle de l’opposition à la monarchie pahlavie, les moudjahidines articulent la pensée d’un islam chiite politique à une approche socio-économique marxiste et la revendication d’une société sans classe (nezam-e bi tabaghe-ye tawhidi), ainsi qu’une critique de la domination occidentale et un nationalisme révolutionnaire proche des mouvements de libération nationale du Tiers-monde [20][20]Ibid., p. 100-102.. « Quel était leur programme ? écrit Javad, je ne le sais pas. Ce que je sais, c’est que comme la peste et le choléra, en un clin d’ il, tous les jeunes éduqués, engagés et pieux, filles ou garçons, ont commencé à soutenir le programme des moudjahidines, grisés par leur enthousiasme, comme s’ils avaient trouvé réponse à tous leurs manques dans cette école de pensée. (…) Au début, ils se comptaient parmi les partisans de l’ayatolla Khomeini et de feu l’ayatollah Taleghani, et ils considéraient ceux-ci comme les symboles de leur salut. De jour en jour, le nombre de leurs partisans augmentait. Surtout chez les gens éduqués, des professeurs de lycée aux lycéens. » À la différence des autres partis de gauche, et particulièrement l’historique parti communiste (le Tudeh) dirigé par l’élite intellectuelle et bénéficiant d’une certaine base populaire, le parti mobilise une nombreuse population étudiante et lycéenne issue d’une jeunesse non fortunée, mais qui a eu accès à l’éducation [21][21]Ibid., p. 229 ; voir également A. Matin-Asgari, « Twentieth…. « Les moudjahidines, avec leur combinaison de chiisme, de modernisme et de radicalisme social exerçaient une évidente séduction sur la jeune intelligentsia, composée de plus en plus par les enfants, non pas de l’élite aisée ou des laïques éduqués, mais de la classe moyenne traditionnelle [22][22]E. Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, op. cit., p. 229 (notre… », rappelle Abrahamian, qui insiste d’autre part sur l’extrême jeunesse de sa base. Alors que les cadres du parti ont été politisés dans les mouvements étudiants de la fin des années 1960, la base militante a été socialisée et politisée en 1977-79. En 1981, elle se compose principalement de lycéens et d’étudiants radicalisés par l’expérience de la révolution, vivant encore pour la plupart dans le foyer familial.
Présentés comme « islamo-marxistes » et poursuivis dans les dernières années de la monarchie, les moudjahidines prennent une part active au mouvement qui initie la révolution de 1979. Accueillant avec enthousiasme le retour de l’ayatollah Khomeini de son exil français en 1978, les moudjahidines s’opposent pourtant au principe du Velayat-e Faghih (gouvernement du docteur de la loi islamique) [23][23]Appliqué dans la Constitution iranienne de 1979, ce principe…, qui est au fondement constitutionnel de la nouvelle République islamique, et soutiennent le président de la République laïque Bani Sadr. Mobilisant d’importantes manifestations d’opposition dans les principales villes, les moudjahidines sont un des seuls partis politiques à présenter des candidats dans tout le pays en vue des élections législatives de 1981. Le mouvement et ses membres sont violemment écartés de la vie publique à partir de l’attentat du 28 juin 1981 au siège du Parti républicain islamiste : officiellement attribué aux moudjahidines, cet attentat à la bombe fait 71 morts parmi les hauts responsables de ce parti qui amorce à cette époque son appropriation exclusive du pouvoir [24][24]Haleh Afshar (dir.), Iran : A Revolution in Turmoil, Albany,…. Une Fatwa énoncée par Khomeini rend alors les moudjahidines illégaux, en les identifiant comme monafeghins, « hypocrites en matière de religion ». Cette étiquette, télescopant encore une fois l’actualité politique et la tradition musulmane, reprend le nom donné aux polythéistes de Médine qui s’étaient déclarés du côté de Mahommet et ses premiers fidèles, tout en vendant la ville aux assiégeants de la Mecque : le couperet distingue le chiisme « vrai », en condamnant et en discréditant définitivement l’islamisme révolutionnaire inspiré par Chariati. Le 29 juillet 1981, le dirigeant des Moudjahidine-e Kalq, Massoud Rajavi quitte clandestinement le pays en compagnie du président Bani Sadr pour former, en France, le Conseil National de la Résistance. Par la suite, l’ex-président se distancie du mouvement pris en main par le dirigeant moudjahidine qui recompose une structure politique fermée en recrutant de nouveaux sympathisants dans les villes européennes et américaines. Pour les moudjahidines, l’opposition au régime post-révolutionnaire s’est traduite par un anti-patriotisme stratégique qui les a amenés à s’allier avec l’Irak durant le conflit des années 1980 [25][25]Connie Bruck, « Exiles : How Iran’s Expatriates Are Gaming the…. C’est à cette évolution qu’Abrahamian attribue l’évolution sectaire du parti [26][26]E. Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, op. cit., p. 260-261. et sa rupture avec la société iranienne dans les années 1980. L’isolement du parti et de ses membres, ses pratiques hiérarchiques, ses prises de position ambiguës depuis 2001 sont dénoncées [27][27]C. Bruck, « Exiles… », art. cité ; Human Rights Watch, No… et semblent l’avoir marginalisé comme acteur politique dans l’espace iranien [28][28]Elizabeth Rubin, « The Cult of Rajavi », New York Times….

7 « Pourquoi les moudjahidines ont-ils réussi à élargir la base de la mobilisation politique [dans les années 1970 et 1980], mais échoué à accéder au pouvoir [29][29]E. Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, op. cit., p. 3 (notre… ? » Cette question, qui guide la recherche historique d’Abrahamian sur le mouvement [30][30]Ibid., Javad cherche lui aussi à l’éclaircir quand il évoque les élections de 1981 : « En fait dans beaucoup de villes iraniennes, les moudjahidines avaient la majorité des voix [31][31]Le mouvement était le seul à présenter des candidats partout en…. Malheureusement, après le décompte des votes, la situation a changé, et la raison en était que les jeunes moudjahidines n’étaient pas faits pour la politique. Ils n’avaient pas commencé la lutte pour avoir des postes de pouvoir et du prestige. Ils pensaient établir une société pieuse [32][32]Le manuscrit dit : « une société Tohidie  », d’après le Tohid… et sans classe (…) Quel qu’aient été ces idées en tous cas, elles ont été étouffées dans l’ uf. Par ceux qui s’étaient cachés derrière la Révolution et qui sont apparus tout à coup. »

Le massacre de l’été 1988

8 L’institution d’un État islamique en Iran s’est fondée, à partir de 1981, sur un « régime de terreur » qui a duré aussi longtemps que la guerre contre l’Irak, et s’est traduit concrètement par une élimination physique des opposants politiques potentiels, le recours à la torture et une grande publicité de ces deux pratiques afin de « tenir » la population [33][33]E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confession, op. cit., p. 210.. C’est dans ce contexte que vient en 1988, de l’ayatollah Khomeini, l’ordre de purger les prisons en éliminant les opposants politiques. Les membres les plus actifs de l’opposition au régime islamiste ont déjà été éliminés entre 1981 et 1985 (environ 15 000 exécutions) [34][34]Nader Vahabi, « L’obstacle structurel à l’abolition de la peine… ou se sont exilés à cette même époque. Les prisonniers politiques et d’opinion en 1988 sont des (ex-)sympathisants ou des membres des moudjahidines pour la grande majorité, du Tudeh (PC), de partis d’extrême gauche minoritaires, du PDKI (parti indépendantiste kurde), ou encore sans affiliation. Cette purge a lieu au terme de procès spéciaux : d’une part, une condamnation à mort doit être signée par le Vali-e Faghih, mais Khomeini donne procuration à une équipe composée de membres du clergé et de divers corps administratifs (Information, Intérieur, autorités pénitentiaires) pour mener ces procès qui prennent en réalité la forme de brefs interrogatoires à la chaîne. D’autre part, l’ayatollah Montazeri, alors numéro deux du régime, cite une Fatwa énoncée par Khomeini à propos des moudjahidines : « Ceux qui sont dans des prisons du pays et restent engagés dans leur soutien aux Monafeghin [Moujahidines], sont en guerre contre Dieu et condamnés à mort (…) Annihilez les ennemis de l’Islam immédiatement. Dans cette affaire, utilisez tous les critères qui accélèrent l’application du verdict [35][35]H.-A. Montazeri, Khaterat, op. cit.. » Des témoignages de prisonniers acquittés d’Evin et de Gohar Dasht, à Téhéran, ont été par la suite diffusés dans certains journaux libres de langue iranienne et sur les sites Internet d’ONG iraniennes. Celui de Javad est l’un des rares qui évoque l’événement en province, dans la ville de T. Cet épisode, qui clôt son carnet, commence quand il reçoit un appel le 30 juillet 1988 à 22 h 00, de la prison de D. où sa fille est détenue depuis 1981, lui demandant de venir immédiatement la voir car elle « va partir en voyage demain ». Il est surpris : on est dimanche, or personne ne lui a rien dit lors de la visite hebdomadaire du samedi, qui s’est déroulée normalement la veille. Il se rend à la prison où il rencontre sa fille et lui demande des explications. Shirine raconte : « “Hier soir à 23 heures, alors que tout le monde dormait et que la prison était totalement silencieuse, ils sont venus me chercher, ils m’ont bandé les yeux sans expliquer de quoi il s’agissait et ils m’ont emmenée dans une salle où se tenaient un grand nombre de responsables : le gouverneur municipal, le directeur de la prison, le procureur, le chef du département exécutif et quelques membres [du ministère] de l’Information ainsi que quelques personnes que je n’avais jamais vues auparavant. D’abord, le gouverneur municipal se tourne vers moi et me dit : `D’après ce que nous savons, tu es encore partisane des Monafeghins‘. Je réponds : `S’il n’a pas encore été prouvé pour vous que je ne suis plus dans aucune action et que je n’en soutiens aucune, que faut-il faire pour vous convaincre ?’ Ensuite il demande : `Que penses-tu de la République islamique ?’ Je réponds : `Depuis que la République islamique a vu le jour, il y a de cela sept ans et quelques mois, je suis quant à moi en prison. Je n’ai pas eu de contact avec la société pour pouvoir avoir quelconque aperçu des façons de faire de la République islamique.’ Le gouverneur municipal a ordonné `Emmenez-la’. Il était alors minuit environ. Je ne sais pas quel est le but de cet événement.” Le gardien de prison intervient : “Le but est celui que nous avons dit : ils veulent vous envoyer en voyage, mais j’ignore où”. Moi qui étais le père de la prisonnière, je demande : “Quelle somme d’argent peut-elle avoir avec elle dans ce voyage ?” Il me répond : “Elle peut avoir la somme qu’elle veut”. J’ai donc donné 500 tomans que j’avais sur moi à Shirine. Sa mère lui a donné les habits qu’elle avait apportés. (…) Ensuite, j’ai demandé au responsable de la prison : “Quand pourrons-nous avoir des nouvelles de Shirine et savoir où elle est ?” Il répond “Revenez ici dans quinze jours, peut-être qu’on en saura plus d’ici là.” »
À partir du 19 juillet 1988 à Téhéran, et quelques jours plus tard dans les autres villes, les autorités pénitentiaires isolent les prisons. « Quinze jours plus tard, sa mère et moi nous sommes rendus à la prison. Un grand nombre de proches de prisonniers s’étaient regroupés là, même ceux dont les enfants avaient été libérés il y a un ou deux ans ou quelques mois. Nous leur avons demandé ce qu’ils faisaient là. Ils nous ont répondu qu’ils ne savaient pas eux-mêmes. “Tout ce qu’on sait, c’est que nos enfants sont venus pour leur feuille de présence et ils ne sont pas encore ressortis.” Car la règle était que chaque prisonnier libéré devait se présenter une à deux fois par semaine pour signer une feuille de présence. Des gardiens armés postés sur le trottoir devant la prison ne laissaient personne s’approcher et, de la même façon, des gardiens armés étaient postés devant la porte du tribunal révolutionnaire, situé un peu plus loin, pour empêcher les gens d’approcher. Une grande affiche était placardée au mur : “Pour raison de surcharge de travail, nous ne pouvons accueillir les visiteurs.” » Dans les prisons, les détenus sont isolés par groupes d’affiliation politique et par durée de peine ; les espaces communs sont fermés. À l’extérieur, aucune nouvelle des prisons ne paraît plus dans la presse du pays qui, pour des raisons d’intimidation et de propagande, en est très friande en temps normal : c’est le huis-clos dans lequel s’organisent les exécutions, dont le plus gros se déroule en quelques semaines à la fin août 1988. Selon un prisonnier qui se trouvait alors dans la principale prison d’Evin : « À partir de juillet 1988, pas de journaux, pas de télévision, pas de douche, pas de visite des familles et souvent, pas de nourriture. Dans chaque pièce (d’environ 24 mètres carrés) il y avait plus de 45 prisonniers. Finalement, le 29 ou le 30 juillet, ils ont commencé le massacre [36][36]Hossein Mokhtar, Testimony at the September 1st Conference,….  » Les exécutions ont donc lieu à la suite des « procès » spéciaux menés en quelques jours à l’encontre de milliers de prisonniers. Alors que les questions posées à Shirine sont d’ordre politique et interrogent sa loyauté envers le régime en place, les interrogatoires cités par de nombreuses sources, notamment pour les prisons d’Evin et de Gohar Dasht, indiquent l’usage d’une grammaire religieuse, d’une forme « inquisitoire [37][37]E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 209 et… » et d’une certaine vision politique de l’islam qui cherche, à la surprise des prisonniers, non plus à connaître leurs opinions, mais à déterminer s’ils sont de bons musulmans. Au cours d’un échange de quelques minutes, un jury d’autorités religieuses demandait ainsi aux prisonniers communistes s’ils priaient et si leurs parents priaient : en cas de double réponse négative, les prisonniers étaient acquittés (une personne élevée dans l’athéisme ne peut être un « apostat »), si par contre ils étaient athées de parents religieux, ils étaient alors condamnés à mort pour apostasie. Les moudjahidines quant à eux devaient, pour avoir la vie sauve, prouver qu’ils étaient repentants (et donc s’affirmer prêts à étrangler un autre moudjahidine) et loyaux (prêts à nettoyer les champs de mine de l’armée iranienne avec leur corps) : ceux qui répondaient par la négative à ces questions, et ils furent nombreux, étaient condamnés à mort pour « hypocrisie » [38][38]Ibid.. Le processus, qui se déroule de mi-juillet à début septembre, est orchestré dans la discrétion, notamment par le recours aux pendaisons, qui correspondent par ailleurs à l’exécution appropriée pour les non-musulmans (les Kafer, dont il est interdit de faire couler le sang). D’après témoignages, des prisonniers ignoraient que leurs co-détenus étaient en train d’être exécutés par centaines et pensaient qu’ils étaient « transférés ailleurs [39][39]Témoignage cité dans E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…,… ». La forme de ces procès, menés par des autorités ad hoc pour des prisonniers qui ont déjà été jugés une première fois (parfois rejugés plusieurs fois lors de leur peine ou qui l’ont parfois déjà purgée) soulève la question de savoir si l’on doit parler d’« exécution ». Abrahamian parle des « exécutions de masse de 1988 » [40][40]E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 209. ; le mot avancé par ceux qui ont travaillé sur la qualification juridique des événements comme « crimes contre l’humanité » est celui de « massacre » [41][41]K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art.….

Pratiques d’invisibilisation

9 À partir du mois de novembre 1988, la nouvelle des exécutions est annoncée aux familles lors de la visite hebdomadaire ; très vite, l’émotion gagne la foule qui se rassemble devant la prison. Face à la volonté de discrétion du pouvoir, d’autres méthodes sont adoptées. « C’est en âbân [octobre-novembre] qu’un jour, contre toute attente, la porte de la prison s’ouvrit et on nous dit d’entrer. Nous ne tenions plus en place de joie, et nous nous reprochions de ne pas avoir amené quelques fruits avec nous au cas où, ou d’avoir pris quelques vêtements. Mais après un moment d’attente et d’impatience, ils nous ont distribué des formulaires en nous ordonnant de les remplir, afin de consigner tous renseignements concernant les prisonniers et leur famille : domicile, lieu de travail, salaire, activités quotidiennes, connaissances. Ceux qui pouvaient remplir ce formulaire le faisaient eux-mêmes, et ceux qui ne savaient pas écrire se faisaient aider. Quand les formulaires ont été remplis, ils ont été collectés un par un (…) puis la porte s’est ouverte et on nous a dit : “C’est bon, vous pouvez partir” (…) Cette situation incertaine se poursuivait. Les jours de visite, nous nous réunissions comme d’habitude devant la prison, et finalement, comme d’habitude, nous nous dispersions bredouille. Jusqu’à un samedi, au début du mois d’âzar [novembre] : j’étais moi-même parti à la prison quand on a appelé à la maison en disant : “Dites au père de Shirine L. de se rendre demain matin à D.” (…) Le jour suivant, comme indiqué, nous nous sommes rendus devant la prison de D. à 9 heures. Il y avait d’autres personnes attroupées qui avaient reçu le même appel. Quand je les ai vues, je me suis un peu apaisé.(…) Nous étions une centaine ce jour-là, car ils avaient déjà rendu les affaires personnelles d’une trentaine de prisonnières à leur famille. Après un moment d’attente, ils ont appelé la première personne, qui était un vieillard de 60 à 70 ans, comme moi. Tous, nous retenions notre souffle : pourquoi ont-ils appelé cette seule personne ? Nous attendions tous que le vieil homme ressorte afin de lui demander de quoi il retournait. Cela ne dura pas longtemps, peut-être dix minutes, avant que l’on revoie de loin le vieillard, tenant un bout de papier dans la main. Nous nous sommes rués sur lui, mais il était analphabète et ne savait pas de quoi il s’agissait : “Ils m’ont donné ce papier et m’ont dit de partir, et de me le faire lire dehors. Ensuite ils m’ont présenté une lettre et m’ont dit de mettre mes empreintes au bas. Ils m’ont prévenu de ne pas faire le moindre bruit, sans quoi ils viendraient arrêter toute la famille. Ils m’ont recommandé de ne pas perdre le bout de papier.” Ce bout de papier que le vieillard tenait à la main (…) disait ceci : “telle section, tel rang, tel numéro”. Le vieillard s’est assis dans un coin et s’est mis à pleurer. La deuxième et la troisième personne s’en vont et reviennent de la même manière. J’étais le quatrième : un responsable de l’Information venait devant la porte, appelait la personne, l’accompagnait dans le couloir de la prison. Là-bas, on nous faisait entrer dans une pièce pour une fouille complète ; ensuite on entrait dans une deuxième pièce où un jeune de 25 à 30 ans était assis sur une chaise, entouré de deux pasdars[42][42]Les pasdaran-e Sepah, gardiens de la Révolution, sont la milice…. Après des salutations mielleuses, celui-ci nous demandait : “Que pensez-vous de la République islamique ? Quel souvenir gardez-vous du martyre des 72 compagnons de l’Imam [43][43]Expression désignant l’attentat terroriste de juin 1981 où… ?” Je ne sais pas ce qu’on répondait d’habitude ; quant à moi, j’ai exprimé clairement ma pensée. Puis il me tendit un morceau de papier imprimé en disant : “Lis-le, c’est l’accord qui stipule que vous n’avez aucun droit d’organiser une cérémonie de mise en terre, vous n’avez pas le droit d’organiser de cérémonie religieuse privée, ni dans une mosquée, ni à domicile, ni au cimetière, vous devez vous garder de pleurer à haute voix ou faire réciter le Coran pour les défunts.” Puis il lut lui-même la lettre (…) et me demanda de signer. J’ai déchiré la lettre en morceaux sur sa table. Deux personnes sont entrées dans la pièce et m’ont pris ; elles m’ont emmené par la porte de derrière de la prison et m’ont mis dans une voiture. Elles m’ont conduit jusqu’au carrefour de l’aéroport [à une autre extrémité de la ville] et m’ont fait descendre là-bas, en me mettant dans la poche le bout de papier où était écrit : Cimetière X, section 22, rang 3, tombe no 4. Mais dans cette section du cimetière, il y a beaucoup de tombes recouvertes d’une simple dalle de ciment. Des gens trop curieux ont démontré que ces tombes sont anciennes et ne portent pas de nom ; ou bien c’est en recouvrant la dalle en pierre d’une couche de béton qu’ils les présentaient aux familles comme la tombe des êtres chers qu’ils venaient de perdre. On nous disait : “Ce n’est pas la peine d’aller pleurer sur une tombe vide.” Selon un des gardiens de la prison, il restait 400 prisonniers moudjahidines dans les prisons de D. et du Sepah à T. qui ont été emmenés de nuit avec plusieurs camions spéciaux accompagnés d’un groupe de garde, entre 1 et 3 heures du matin. Ils les ont tous emmenés les yeux bandés, et aucun gardien ordinaire de la prison n’a été engagé pour cette affaire. Où ils les ont emmené et ce qu’ils leur ont fait, Dieu seul le sait. »
Les recherches de Shahrooz [44][44]K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art.… sur la façon dont les familles ont été averties des exécutions confirment le récit de Javad : l’isolement des prisons durant l’été, l’usage du téléphone et l’annonce individuelle des exécutions, la demande d’un engagement écrit au silence, mais aussi la surveillance des familles qui se rendent au cimetière et des interrogatoires hebdomadaires au Komité[45][45]Du français « comité » : désigne les cellules informelles… sur le chemin du retour. Ces stratégies s’inscrivent dans un ensemble de pratiques élaborées par le pouvoir depuis 1981 pour « tenir » les familles, dans un contexte où la grande majorité des prisonniers et des condamnés à mort sont des adolescents ou de jeunes adultes. C’est au niveau de la parenté immédiate qu’agit la répression : les frères et s urs, voisins proches et parents sont souvent incarcérés, pour quelques mois, en même temps que les opposants. Si les parents inquiets parlent trop, s’agitent ou se conduisent de façon bruyante dans les différentes situations administratives (devant le procureur révolutionnaire, le tribunal, etc.) où ils viennent s’enquérir du sort de leurs enfants détenus, une pratique courante du Sepah, d’après Javad, est d’emmener les enfants restant de la famille en représailles. Face aux pratiques de terreur qui prennent appui dans le tissu social immédiat (voisinage, parenté), « personne n’osait respirer fort » remarque Javad, qui se souvient avoir perdu son calme un jour, dans le tribunal, alors qu’on l’y avait envoyé pour demander des nouvelles de sa fille. Quinze jours plus tard, une voiture du Sepah s’arrête chez Javad à minuit et vient chercher la jeune s ur de Shirine « pour un interrogatoire ».

10 Les pratiques d’invisibilisation semblent s’organiser en couches successives : si du cercle témoin de la répression, la famille, peu d’information et d’agitation doit filtrer au-dehors, vers des relais sociaux plus larges, les gardiens s’assurent quant à eux que certaines pratiques de gestion des centres de détention ne soient pas connues des familles. Javad identifie ainsi « trois sortes de morts. Ceux qui meurent sous la torture : leur corps ne sont pas rendus et ils ne disent pas aux proches où ils se trouvent ; ceux qui sont pendus : ils donnent un bout de papier disant qu’ils sont enterrés à tel endroit, mais interdisent les cérémonies et les regroupements autour de la tombe ; ceux qui sont fusillés : ils peuvent rendre le corps à la famille contre une somme de 7 à 10 000 tomans ». Cette distinction s’explique peut-être du fait que la pendaison est réservée aux Kafer, aux non-musulmans, et en l’occurrence aux moudjahidines qui sont considérés tels depuis la Fatwa de 1981. Dès lors, les sépultures doivent être dans les carrés non-musulmans des cimetières, ce qui ne serait pas forcément respecté si le corps était rendu aux familles. En 1988, les corps des victimes ne sont pas rendus aux familles qui refusent de leur côté de reconnaître comme authentiques les tombes indiquées par le pouvoir, en particulier depuis la découverte de charniers qui laissent penser que les prisonniers exécutés ont été enterrés dans des fosses communes [46][46]AI, « Mass Executions of Political Prisoners », Amnesty….

11 Le gouvernement dénie les rumeurs d’exécution massive. Le président de la République, aujourd’hui « Guide suprême de la Révolution », Ali Khamenei, reconnaît que quelques Monafeghins ont été exécutés durant l’été, mais justifie cette action au nom de la sûreté d’État et de la préservation du territoire national [47][47]Ibid.. En 1989, une lettre ouverte de la mission permanente de la République islamique d’Iran à l’ONU répond de manière ambiguë au communiqué d’Amnesty International : « Les autorités de la République islamique d’Iran ont toujours nié l’existence d’exécutions politiques, mais cela ne contredit pas d’autres déclarations postérieures confirmant que des espions et des terroristes ont été exécutés [48][48]UN document A/44/153, ZB février 1989, cité dans AI, Iran :…. » En effet, le 5 juillet 1988, peu après la signature du cessez-le-feu entre l’Iran et l’Irak, l’Organisation des moudjahidines exilée dans une base militaire en Irak lance une offensive armée à la frontière iranienne et pénètre brièvement sur le territoire iranien, avant d’être sévèrement défaite par l’armée adverse. Shahrooz réfute l’idée selon laquelle les exécutions massives de 1988, dont les analystes peinent à saisir clairement l’objectif ou le mobile, seraient une riposte à cette tentative d’attaque militaire, en s’appuyant sur plusieurs témoignages individuels et le rapport du représentant spécial auprès de la Commission des Droits de l’Homme des Nations Unies, selon lesquels les procès et les exécutions de 1988 commencent à partir du mois d’avril, soit avant l’attaque du 5 juillet [49][49]Final Report on the situation of human rights in the Islamic….

12 Il faut mentionner que le pouvoir impliqué dans les violences d’État de 1988, comme dans la gestion de leur héritage, est un corps hétérogène, parcouru de divisions d’au moins deux sortes. D’une part, il comprend des acteurs gouvernementaux, officiels, et différents groupes privés ou paramilitaires liés au Parti républicain islamique (le Hezbollah, le Sepah). D’autre part, le dispositif de répression et l’évolution des pratiques carcérales dans les années 1980 s’inscrivent, au sein même du parti au pouvoir, dans des jeux d’influences et des luttes politiques dont l’enjeu est la succession de Khomeini [50][50]M. Behrooz, « Reflections on Iran’s Prison System… », art.…. Une analyse des ordres mettant en place le massacre et des réponses aux réticences exprimées dans les rangs du Parti républicain islamique montre que cet événement est l’occasion pour le pouvoir de faire « le tri entre les mitigés et les vrais croyants parmi [l]es partisans [du régime], leur imposant par ailleurs le silence au sujet des droits humains [51][51]E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 221 (notre…  » : les exécutions de masse auraient servi à verrouiller et à assurer la continuité du gouvernement mis en place par Khomeini, qui s’éteint en 1989. L’ayatollah Montazeri ­ dauphin et successeur pressenti de Khomeini à la fonction de Guide suprême de la Révolution depuis 1979 ­ est ainsi écarté de la scène publique et placé en résidence surveillée à partir de 1988, suite à ses prises de positions critiques au sujet des exécutions [52][52]Ibid., p. 221-222 ; Azadeh Kian-Thiébaut, « La révolution….

13 À défaut de pouvoir s’appuyer sur un recensement officiel ou encore sur des investigations auprès des familles et dans les fosses présumées ­ les gouvernements successifs rendant risquée les mentions ou recherches sur le sujet ­ il est difficile d’estimer le nombre de victimes du massacre. Pour Amnesty International, elles étaient 2 500 en 1990, soit quelques mois après les événements. Depuis, la collecte d’informations auprès des familles, que ce soit par les partis politiques dont les membres étaient concernés ou par des initiatives de droits de l’homme [53][53]H. Mokhtar, Testimony at the September 1 Conference, op. cit…, dresse une liste nominative de 4 000 à 5 000 victimes. Le Parti des Moudjahidine-e Kalq chiffre le massacre à 30 000 [54][54]Christina Lamb, The Telegraph, « Khomeini fatwa “led to killing…, ce qui est bien supérieur aux chiffres avancés ailleurs. Une récente étude qui tente de rassembler les données dans les différentes provinces conclue au chiffre de 12 000 [55][55]Nasser Mohajer, « The Mass Killings in Iran », Aresh, no 57,…. Aux pratiques violentes du pouvoir répond le souci de mettre au jour des faits précis et de prendre la mesure de l’ampleur de l’événement.

14 Face à cela, les analyses juridiques du « crime contre l’humanité » de 1988 s’interrogent sur l’impossibilité ou l’absence de volonté politique actuelle en ce qui concerne la mobilisation sur le terrain du droit, et en particulier du droit pénal international [56][56]K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art.…. Il serait fort utile de confronter les mobilisations du droit dans l’espace publique en Iran depuis la « démocratisation » des années 1990, et les essais de reformulation des exécutions massives de 1988 en un enjeu des droits de l’homme qui n’ont paradoxalement pas connu de relais effectif et de réalisation concrète [57][57]K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art.…. Ce décalage, ou cette absence, se comprend notamment par le passé révolutionnaire, nezami, et l’implication plus ou moins directe de certains responsables du mouvement réformateur dans les violences d’État durant la mise en place du régime islamique, et, notamment, dans le massacre de 1988. Ainsi, Akbar Ganji, journaliste d’opposition connu pour ses engagements en faveur des libertés civiles, plusieurs fois emprisonné depuis 2000, est-il un ancien commandant des Pasdaran-e Sepah[58][58]Voir par exemple N. Yavari d’Hellencourt, « Islam et…. Saïd Hajarian, autre figure de l’opposition démocrate et directeur du journal réformateur Sobh-e Emrooz, était adjoint du ministre de l’Information Reyshahri 1984 à 1989 [59][59]Voir par exemple Ahmed Vahdat, « The Spectre of Montazeri »,…. Abdullah Nouri, qui s’impose à la fin des années 1990 comme la figure principale du parti réformateur, était ministre de l’Intérieur en 1988 et a fait des déclarations niant les allégations d’exécutions, qu’il attribuait à « une campagne organisée à l’étranger  » tout en affirmant que « la loi islamique et le gouvernement de la République islamique d’Iran respectent la dignité humaine et ont organisé les institutions de la République islamique sur ce principe essentiel [60][60]Cité dans K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and… ». Si l’évocation des événements de l’été 1988 a été une ligne rouge à ne pas franchir sous les mandats réformateurs des années 1990-2000, les élections présidentielles de 2005 et les cadres conservateurs au pouvoir sous le mandat d’Ahmadinejad éloignent d’autant plus une perspective de reconnaissance ou de publicisation que la responsabilité pénale individuelle des membres actuels du gouvernement est engagée dans les exécutions de 1988 ­ et, plus généralement, dans le système pénitentiaire des années 1980. Selon plusieurs sources, l’actuel ministre de l’Intérieur, Mostafa Pour-Mohammadi, a siégé au sein de la commission chargée des procès-minute de l’été 1988, en tant que représentant du ministère de l’Information [61][61]E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 210 ;….

La commémoration

15 Ainsi, en dehors des témoignages mentionnés, les faits dont nous parlons n’ont jamais été évoqués dans l’espace public à un niveau politique ou juridique [62][62]E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit. ; R. Afshari,…. Il s’agit alors de regarder du côté des pratiques mémorielles ­ comme nous le suggère la démarche de Javad. Comment la mémoire intime et familiale acquiert-elle une dimension politique ? Face aux pratiques d’invisibilisation (gestion du deuil, confiscation funéraire, etc.), les rites et les lieux funéraires sont travaillés par l’enjeu d’une commémoration dont il s’agit de saisir la porté et les limites, politiques. Ce mouvement se noue d’abord autour de la référence au « martyre » autour de laquelle s’organise l’Islam révolutionnaire. Face aux exécutions de masse, de 1981 à 1988, la réalité des victimes est revisitée à travers la notion de martyre. L’idée du martyre est présente dans la pensée politique de Chariati [63][63]Paul Vieille, « L’institution shi’ite, la religiosité…, et participe à configurer l’action politique des Moujahidines, qu’il s’agisse de l’engagement révolutionnaire ou, plus tard, de la résistance [64][64]Voir par exemple E. Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, op.…. Principal ressort du discours public et de la communication pour l’engagement populaire dans la guerre contre l’Irak, elle est davantage encore une pierre de touche de l’islam chiite à l’aune de l’idéologie révolutionnaire du Parti républicain islamique [65][65]F. Khosrokhavar, L’islamisme et la mort : le martyre…. Autour de ce « culte du martyre », relayé par un art mural prolifique, s’organise la mobilisation nationale, puis la mémoire officielle du conflit [66][66]Ulrich Marzolph, « The Martyr’s Way to Paradise. Shiite Mural…. Entre 1981 et 1988, les jeunes bassidjis révolutionnaires ont nettoyé par centaines de milliers les champs de mines de l’armée, dans une utopie mortifère et salvatrice qui les érigeait en nouveaux « martyrs » de l’Islam. Dans le contexte d’une guerre qui laisse la société iranienne exsangue de 600 000 à un million d’hommes, la sépulture chiite, l’anonymat, la célébration du martyr et de la nation sont fondus dans des offices religieux publiques et médiatisés pour les combattants victimes [67][67]Ali Reza Sheikholeslami, « The Transformation of Iran’s…. Comme l’illustrent la production et le souvenir des martyrs, et le rapport qu’ils instituent à la mort et au corps, à la colère et à la vengeance, la République islamique s’appuie sur une idéologie « martyropathe [68][68]F. Khosrokhavar, L’islamisme et la mort…, op. cit. », née d’un effondrement de l’utopie révolutionnaire, qui s’impose comme la clé de voûte de l’action politique et de la raison d’État. Or, tandis qu’elle enserre l’espace public dans un réseau de passions orchestré par un dispositif rhétorique et institutionnel, elle verrouille toute possibilité de saisir le souvenir et l’émotion collective hors de cette grille logique étroite. C’est dans cette canalisation politique et totalitaire de l’émotion et du deuil que va s’inscrire, de manière subvertie et discrète, une mémoire émotive du massacre de 1988.
Le vendredi matin, dans les cimetières de province, dans le carré des promis au paradis, les mères des enfants « martyrs » de la guerre pleurent ensemble leurs morts, alors que dans le carré d’à côté, sur des tombes sans inscriptions, d’autres mères, dans une même sociabilité et un même rituel, pleurent leurs « martyrs » à elles : ceux de 1988. Un jeune bassidji écrit ainsi à ses parents depuis le front : « Jusqu’à présent, on n’a pas trouvé le corps de certains martyrs. Si cela se produit dans mon cas, n’en soyez pas tristes [mes parents] : vous n’avez pas épargné ma vie et vous l’avez donné pour Dieu, alors renoncez à mon corps et quand vous en ressentez le besoin, rendez-vous sur la tombe des autres martyrs [69][69]Témoignage paru dans le journal islamiste Keyhan en 1984, cité… ! » Le corps dérobé, disparu, du martyr, qui est une constante de l’idéologie islamique révolutionnaire, se réalise paradoxalement dans le cimetière de Khavaran, dans les fosses communes où ont été enterrés les prisonniers de la prison d’Evin exécutés en 1988. Pour les journalistes de la BBC : « Le cimetière de Khavaran n’est rien d’autre qu’un terrain vague terreux où, ça et là, des familles ont démarqué au hasard et de façon symbolique des tombes à l’aide de pierres. Il y a aussi quelques vraies pierres tombales et les familles affirment les y avoir mises car elles disent que leurs proches exécutés ont été enterrés à cet endroit [70][70]BBC Persia, « Le cimetière de Khavaran : des sépultures sans…. » Les cadres religieux où s’ancre le travail du deuil dessinent un espace de négociation, de répression et de détournement pour les acteurs : l’État en joue pour étouffer la possibilité d’une mémoire du massacre, les familles les détournent pour pleurer et se souvenir, malgré tout. Dès lors, la mémoire des exécutés de l’été 1988 flotte silencieusement dans l’imaginaire « martyropathe » de la République islamique ­ qui a assis sa domination précisément sur ces morts politiques. La mère d’un prisonnier exécuté écrit à sa fille exilée à l’étranger : « Le vendredi, toutes les mères et d’autres membres de la famille sont allés au cimetière. Quelle journée de deuil ! C’était comme l’Ashura. Des mères sont venues avec des portraits de leurs fils ; l’une d’elles avait perdu cinq fils et belles-filles. Finalement, le Komité est venu et nous a dispersé [71][71]AI, Iran : Violations of Human Rights 1987-1990, p. 3. Notre…. »

16 L’Ashura, dans la tradition chiite, est un moment de socialisation et de deuil où chacun pleure pour ses morts et ses peines dans le cadre de la commémoration religieuse du « martyr » d’Hussein. La référence à l’Ashura, et l’idée d’une communauté du deuil qui transparaît dans le témoignage, renvoie à une certaine socialité entre les familles de prisonniers comme le noyau autour duquel s’embraient les pratiques de souvenir. Les exécutions ne sont pas pensées dans le cadre préexistant des partis politiques auxquels appartenaient les victimes, mais à un niveau familial et intime. Toutefois, à partir des proches liés par une communauté d’expérience s’élaborent des pratiques de souvenir à un niveau collectif. Cette socialité est nouée dans l’épreuve qu’a été pour les familles de soutenir les prisonniers durant leur peine et de se tenir informées de leur sort. On trouve la trace de ce lien entre les familles, dans le témoignage de Javad. Ainsi commence le récit de l’annonce des exécutions en automne 1988 : « Le jour suivant, comme indiqué, nous nous sommes rendus devant la prison de D. à 9 heures. Il y avait d’autres personnes attroupées qui avaient reçu le même appel. Quand je les ai vus, je me suis un peu apaisé. Nous nous demandions les uns aux autres : “Et vous, qu’en pensez-vous ?” Chacun donnait son avis, l’un disait : “Ils veulent sûrement accorder une visite”, l’autre : “Ils veulent expliquer pourquoi ils ont interdit les visites”. Bref, dans ce brouhaha, nous étions tous d’accord pour dire que nous allions enfin connaître la fin de cette angoissante incertitude. » Ces moments de rencontre et de socialité jouent une fonction essentielle dans la circulation de l’information. Dans le témoignage de Javad, ce sont les nouvelles données par les familles dont les proches sont transférés d’une ville à l’autre, ou qui ont plusieurs proches prisonniers dans plusieurs villes différentes, qui permettent d’avoir une appréhension plus générale de l’échelle et des procédés de répression politique à un niveau national. La sociabilité des proches apparaît ainsi comme le lieu d’une résistance face aux pratiques du pouvoir, à travers une circulation de l’information qui répond aux stratégies de secret, mais aussi à travers la constitution de solidarités ponctuelles. Après 1988, cette socialité des proches de prisonniers semble avoir été une ressource à partir de laquelle des pratiques collectives de souvenir ont peu à peu vu le jour. La mère d’un prisonnier exécuté à Téhéran et enterré dans le cimetière de Khavaran explique dans un entretien : « Quand nous voulions aller sur sa tombe, on nous emmenait au Komité : “Pourquoi êtes-vous venus ? Et les gens avec qui vous parliez, qui était-ce ?” Un jour par semaine, le Komité nous attendait en chemin et nous emmenait là-bas. Jusqu’en 1989, quand on a organisé une cérémonie avec quelques autres mères pour nos enfants. Le soir, ils sont venus et nous ont dit « Venez à [la prison d’] Evin demain. Le lendemain matin de bonne heure nous sommes allés à Evin. Ils nous ont gardés jusqu’à 14 heures les yeux bandés, puis ils nous ont mis dans une voiture et nous ont emmenés au Komité. Ils nous ont gardés trois jours, et nous ont interrogés individuellement pour savoir comment nous nous connaissions. “Ça fait huit ans que nous allons en visite ensemble, nous avons appris à nous connaître ; ça fait un an que vous avez tué nos enfants, nous avons appris à nous connaître. C’est comme dire bonjour à ses voisins : à force d’aller à Evin, aux Komités, nous avons fini par nous connaître.” Ils ont demandé les noms de famille de toutes les mères. “Je ne les connais pas, ai-je répondu. Je connais leur prénom, c’est tout [72][72]Entretien filmé reproduit sur le site internet de l’ONG de….” » La réponse qui semble émerger dans les décennies suivant l’exécution des prisonniers est celle de pratiques mémorielles qui s’organisent autour de deux choses : la commémoration collective des morts dans le cadre d’une cérémonie rituelle qui est celle du bozorgdasht, et l’identification du massacre de 1988 à un lieu spécifique, qui est le cimetière de Khavaran. Ce dernier point renvoie en effet à l’émergence progressive d’un lieu-symbole, investi d’une mémoire presque narrative de l’événement et des pratiques qui ont orchestré les procès et les exécutions collectives, la confiscation des corps, le silence public. La place qu’a progressivement acquise cet endroit dans la commémoration des exécutions, alors qu’il n’est qu’un lieu parmi les cimetières municipaux et les charniers (dont 21 seraient localisés à ce jour [73][73]Entretien télévisé disponible sur internet : Mosahebe-ye…) où les dépouilles ont été enfouies en 1988, semble indiquer qu’au-delà des souvenirs individuels, les pratiques mémorielles tendent à se ressaisir à un niveau collectif. « Khavaran est un nom qui signifie “ne pas oublier” » titrait ainsi un article consacré à une cérémonie de commémoration dans le cimetière en septembre 2005 [74][74]Mohammad Reza Mohini, « Khavaran est un nom qui signifie “ne…. Pourquoi et comment ce mot-symbole a-t-il émergé ? Qu’indique-t-il sur la façon dont les enjeux de non-oubli se saisissent en termes collectifs, et éventuellement politiques ?

« Khavaran : un nom qui signifie “ne pas oublier” »

17 Les procès orchestrant le massacre de 1988 témoignent de cet Islam politique particulier réintroduit par Khomeini, qui repose notamment sur le réinvestissement politique des mythes fondateurs et de la tradition historique du chiisme. Les condamnés le sont pour « hypocrisie » ou pour « apostasie » ; c’est donc en « damnés », et en vue d’assurer cette damnation, que leur passage de ce monde à l’autre sera organisé. On enterre les victimes avec leurs habits et même leurs chaussures (le rituel exige un linceul blanc) dans des fosses communes très peu profondes, à fleur de terre (l’islam exige une profondeur minimum de 1,5 mètre) [75][75]E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confession…, op. cit., p. 218 ; K.…. Le deuil s’organise dans la société chiite autour de plusieurs étapes de commémoration collectives et de rassemblements funéraires : le troisième jour, le septième jour, le quarantième jour, qui marque la fin officielle des funérailles. En 1988, le quarantième jour était passé lorsque les familles furent informées de la mort de leurs proches. La majorité des exécutions eurent lieu à Téhéran et la gestion des corps semble s’être organisée dans l’obsession des règles du najes (la séparation des musulmans et des non-musulmans, du pur et de l’impur) : des fosses sont apparues, non pas dans le cimetière musulman de Behesht-e-Zara (où même des opposants politiques marxistes exécutés par l’ancien régime furent exhumés et déplacés), mais dans un carré situé dans le cimetière de Khavaran perdu sur une route à 16 km au sud-est de Téhéran, qui est un lieu d’inhumation ba’haie [76][76]Communauté religieuse persécutée.. Le lieu a été renommé Kaferestan (la terre des Kafer, des incroyants) ou encore Lanatabad (le lieu des damnés) ; les familles s’y réfèrent comme Golzar-e Khavaran (le champ de fleurs de Khavaran) car elles y ont planté des fleurs, et qu’une fois par an, à la date anniversaire du massacre, la terre du terrain vague est recouverte de bouquets. Le lieu est même parfois désigné comme golestan (le champ de fleurs), par analogie phonique et retournement du mot gourestan (le cimetière). La guerre des noms en fait en tous cas le lieu d’une mémoire laborieuse, tendue.
C’est dans ce contexte que se sont mises en place à Khavaran des cérémonies de commémoration des morts de 1988, inscrites dans la tradition ritualisée du bozorgdasht, qui est celle d’une visite au cimetière à la date anniversaire de la mort, donnant lieu à un rassemblement laïque des proches pour évoquer le souvenir du défunt. Progressivement, ces visites se sont transformées en cérémonies de commémoration du massacre de 1988. Une fois par an, lors du bozorgdasht, « le cimetière de Khavaran, rapportent les observateurs, est transformé en champs de fleurs et des opposants au régime islamique se mêlent aux familles : on récite des poèmes et on lit des textes sur la vie des disparus, de petites marches de protestation s’organisent même dans le cimetière [77][77]BBC Persia, « Le cimetière de Khavaran… », art. cité ; voir…. » Cependant, deux décennies après les faits, les enjeux de visibilisation du massacre, qui engage la responsabilité individuelle de membres de certaines administrations encore en fonction, restent sensibles. En novembre 2005, une radio américaine en langue persane, Radio Farda, annonce que des pierres tombales du cimetière de Khavaran sont détruites par « des individus non-identifiés [78][78]Nouvelles radiophonique du 19 novembre 2005, Radio Farda,… ». En automne 2007, sept personnes ayant participé au bozorgdasht de proches à Khavaran sont arrêtées et détenues dans la « section 209 » de la prison d’Evin à Téhéran, sous autorité du ministère de l’Information [79][79]AI, Action Urgente, « Iran : Craintes de mauvais traitements/…. Un rapport de Human Rights Watch avance des témoignages de familles de victimes selon lesquels « des tombes improvisées, placées par les familles ont été détruites. On dit que le gouvernement prépare une intervention importante à [Khavaran] afin de supprimer les traces d’inhumation [80][80]Human Rights Watch, Minister of murders, op. cit. Notre…. »

18 Lors des commémorations, la présence d’« opposants du régime » aux côtés des familles des victimes ­ la manifestation regroupait 2 000 personnes en 2005 ­ et de « petites marches de protestations » semble témoigner d’une politisation des rites mortuaires autour desquels se sont cristallisés les enjeux d’oubli et de souvenir liés à l’événement. Ce qu’on constate, c’est la fonction de catalyse du lieu dans l’organisation d’une action collective qui dépasserait le cercle des intimes. Ainsi, les membres de Kanoon-e Khavaran (l’Association Khavaran) fondée en 1996 par les sympathisants d’un groupe politique marxiste exilés en Europe et Amérique du Nord, s’organisent-ils en un réseau d’information qui a pour objet la constitution d’archives relatives aux exécutions, la production d’une liste nominale des victimes ainsi que la localisation de charniers à travers le pays [81][81]Kanoon-e Khavaran, op. cit. (site internet).. D’autre part, dans les différents textes lus lors des commémorations, le nom propre, Khavaran, émerge comme une synthèse des événements de 1988 et de leur mémoire. Ainsi de cette chanson qui commence par : « Khavaran ! Khavaran ! Terre des souvenirs. Il y vient parfois des mères… », ou encore de ce poème lu lors d’un bozorgdasht : « Je suis le cri rouge de la liberté / Lis mon nom, ma mère, dans le ciel de Khavaran / Je suis le drapeau sanglant de la liberté / Lis mon nom, mon épouse, dans le ciel de Khavaran / Je suis la bannière rouge de la liberté / Lis mon nom, mon enfant, dans le ciel de Khavaran / Je suis prisonnier sous la terre sèche de Khavaran / Lis mon nom, peuple courageux, dans le ciel de Khavaran [82][82]M. R. Mohini, « Khavaran est un nom qui signifie “ne pas… ». Si les trois premiers vers opposent le parcours politique des victimes (« le cri rouge de la liberté ») à un lien familial autour duquel se noue le souvenir (la mère, l’épouse, l’enfant), le dernier vers propose la mémoire de l’événement non-publicisé (« prisonnier sous la terre sèche de Khavaran ») comme le levier d’une appropriation politique, et presque la condition de reformation du « peuple courageux », en s’insérant ainsi dans un schème essentiel du discours post-révolutionnaire qui est l’invitation au peuple à réitérer la mobilisation héroïque de la révolution. Or, la difficulté d’une politisation de cette histoire alternative que propose Khavaran se négocie précisément autour de cette référence à l’histoire et la grammaire révolutionnaires, et à son « anachronisme » par rapport à un répertoire contemporain de discours et d’actions centré autour de la revendication de libertés civiles [83][83]F. Khosrokhavar, « L’Iran, la démocratie et la nouvelle…. En effet, la charge mémorielle attribuée à ce charnier signifie-t-elle pour autant la formation d’une mémoire collective à partir de laquelle se reconstruit, dans le contexte iranien actuel, l’enjeu politique des exécutions de masse ? Mais alors, quelle identité se cristallise autour de cette mémoire commune ? C’est avec cette question qu’apparaissent les limites et les tensions liées à la possibilité de « se mobiliser » autour de la constitution des exécutions comme une cause publique.

19 Les enjeux de mémoire et d’identité sont pris dans une relation plastique de réciprocité, rappelle Gillis : « Une dimension fondamentale de toute identité individuelle ou collective, à savoir un sentiment de communauté [a sense of sameness] dans le temps et l’espace, s’élabore à partir du souvenir ; et ce dont on se souvient ainsi est défini par l’identité revendiquée [84][84]John R. Gillis (dir.), Commemorations : The Politics of…. » Or il y a une tension entre les pratiques mémorielles qui émergent sur des sites comme Khavaran, et l’identification des victimes du massacre au mouvement des moudjahidines (auquel plus de 70 % des prisonniers exécutés étaient en effet affiliés). Si les exécutions de 1988 ne sont pas vraiment un secret au sein de la population iranienne, elles sont directement rapportées à la trajectoire politique des moudjahidines qui semblent avoir été exclus des revendications et des références par lesquelles une identité nationale iranienne s’est négociée dans les pays depuis la Révolution. De leur côté, les moudjahidines entretiennent une mémoire des « martyrs » de 1988 liée aux narrations et aux symboles qui construisent l’identité forte et exclusive du groupe en exil, et pour ce faire relisent l’événement comme une confrontation entre le pouvoir et la résistance (c’est-à-dire les moudjahidines) ; cette interprétation laisse de côté la diversité des appartenances politiques des victimes en 1988, comme le fait que de nombreux prisonniers d’opinion s’étaient, au cours de leur détention, détachés de toute étiquette politique ou militante. Pour Shahrooz, c’est là le principal obstacle politique à une mobilisation par le droit faisant du massacre de 1988 un « crime contre l’humanité [85][85]K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art.… ».

Un enjeu actuel

20 Dans ses analyses sur la non-commémoration et l’oubli dans la cité athénienne, Nicole Loraux identifiait le « deuil inoublieux [86][86]Nicole Loraux, La cité divisée. L’oubli dans la mémoire… » comme une passion politique qui lie le familial et la vie de la cité. À l’image de Javad qui a décidé de consigner ses mémoires pour ses petits-enfants, on peut observer que l’enjeu d’une résistance mémorielle face aux événements de 1988 engage les notions d’oubli et de déni face à un silence orchestré du pouvoir. Orchestré, et non total, ni effectif. Cette orchestration, c’est cette attitude ambivalente du pouvoir qui enterre en secret les victimes à fleur de terre, tout en faisant de l’odeur putride qui se dégage du charnier la preuve que ces personnes (qui ne sont officiellement pas là) étaient des non-musulmans ; c’est aussi annoncer la mort des prisonniers aux familles, mais en organisant un dispositif de mise sous silence du deuil (contrats de non-sépulture, annonces différées et au téléphone) ; c’est encore l’énonciation d’une Fatwa de mort de la part du Guide suprême, mais la négation d’exécutions de masse, puisque si l’exécution de prisonniers est reconnue, leur échelle niée. L’émergence d’une commémoration esquisse un réinvestissement politique des rites et des lieux de sépulture là où l’invisibilisation du massacre se fondait sur leur confiscation. Il faudrait pouvoir mener une observation interne, comparée, des structures de mobilisation que révèlent ces commémorations, même si une telle étude s’avère difficile dans le contexte actuel marqué par une nouvelle surveillance du pouvoir, comme le montrent les interventions de 2005 à 2007 sur le site de Khavaran, auprès des familles engagées ou de chercheurs souhaitant explorer le sujet [87][87]Nathalie Nougayrède, « Une chercheuse franco-iranienne empêchée…. En se fondant sur les articles scientifiques, les sources médiatiques, les différents témoignages publiés et les sites associatifs consacrés à ce sujet, il apparaît toutefois que les enjeux du non-oubli restent pris dans une tension mémorielle qui enserre les possibilités de mobilisation [88][88]Nader Khoshdel, « Marasem-e bozorgdasht-e zendanian-e siasi :…. Cette tension ne concerne pas uniquement les écarts entre le travail de commémoration initié par les familles et l’investissement politique et identitaire de l’événement parmi les groupes qui se sont, dans une faible mesure, réorganisés en exil. Elle concerne également l’impossibilité paradoxale de constituer la demande de reconnaissance et de justice comme une cause commune, dans un espace public marqué par la revendication de libertés civiles. L’extériorité des événements de 1988 par rapport à la vie politique et l’étanchéité des revendications civiles face à cette réalité invitent à penser la place singulière qu’occupe le massacre de 1988 dans la complexité des jeux de rupture et de continuité qui tissent l’histoire iranienne contemporaine ­ et donc, les enjeux politiques actuels dont est chargée sa mémoire.

Notes

  • [1]
    Notre traduction.
  • [2]
    L’ayatollah Khomeini qualifie la guerre de Jihad défensif et l’appelle « Défense Sacrée » (Def¯a’e moghaddas) ; au sujet des offensives iraniennes il parle de « Kerbala » en référence à la bataille qui, dans cette ville irakienne, marque en 680 le début de la rupture entre les Chiites et les Sunnites ; la guerre en Irak est appelée « Qadisiyya de Sadam » par référence, ici encore religieuse, à la bataille al-Qadisiyya de Sa’d qui eut lieu en Mésopotamie en 636 entre Musulmans et Perses sassanides, dans le cadre de la conquête musulmane de la Perse (voir à ce sujet Sinan Antoon, « Monumental Disrespect », Middle East Report, no 228, automne 2003, p. 28-30).
  • [3]
    L’auteur remercie Sandrine Lefranc pour sa lecture attentive et ses commentaires.
  • [4]
    Voir notamment Ervand Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions. Prisons and Public Recantations in Modern Iran, Berkeley, University of California Press, 1999 ; Amnesty International (AI), « Iran : Violations of Human Rights 1987-1990  », décembre 1990 ; AI, « Iran : Political Executions », décembre 1988 ; anonyme, « Man shahede ghatle ame zendanyane siyasi boodam » (« J’ai été témoin du massacre des prisonniers politiques »), Cheshmandaz, no 14, hiver 1995 ; Hossein-Ali Montazeri, Khaterat (Mémoires), hhhhttp:// wwww. amontazeri. com(consulté le 7 avril 2008).
  • [5]
    Voir E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 215 ; AI, « Iran : Violations of Human Rights 1987-1990  » ; Kaveh Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor : A Preliminary Report on The 1988 Massacre of Iran’s Political Prisoners », Harvard Human Rights Journal, vol. 20, 2007, p. 227-261, p. 228.
  • [6]
    Farhad Khosrokhavar, « L’Iran, la démocratie et la nouvelle citoyenneté », Cahiers internationaux de sociologie, no 111, 2001/2, p. 291-317.
  • [7]
    Ibid., p. 309 et Nouchine Yavari d’Hellencourt, « Islam et démocratie : de la nécessité d’une contextualisation  », Cemoti, no spécial, La question démocratique et les sociétés musulmanes. Le militaire, l’entrepreneur et le paysan, no 27, hhhhttp:// cemoti. revues. org/ document656. html(consulté le 20 avril 2008).
  • [8]
    Ibid.
  • [9]
    Ibid.
  • [10]
    Stanley Cohen, States of Denial, Knowing about Atrocities and Suffering, Cambridge, Polity Press, 2001.
  • [11]
    E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 209-229 ; Afshin Matin-Asgari, « Twentieth Century Iran’s Political Prisoners », Middle Eastern Studies, vol. 42, no 5, 2006, p. 689-707.
  • [12]
    Maziar Behrooz, « Reflections on Iran’s Prison System During the Montazeri Years (1985­1988)  », Iran Analysis Quarterly, vol. 2, no 3, 2005, p. 11-24.
  • [13]
    Reza Afshari, Human Rights in Iran : The Abuse of Cultural Relativism, Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2001 ; K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 243-257 ; Raluca Mihaila, « Political Considerations in Accountability for Crimes Against Humanity : An Iranian Case Study », Hemispheres : The Tufts University Journal of International Affairs, no spécial, State-Building : Risks and Consequences, 2002, hhhhttp:// ase. tufts. edu/ hemispheres/ (consulté le 7 avril 2008).
  • [14]
    Conseil Économique et Social des Nations Unies (ECOSOC), Commission sur les droits humains, « On the Situation of Human Rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran », Situation of Human Rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran, 27, U.N. Doc. A/44/620 (2 novembre 1989) ; Final Report on the situation of human rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran by the Special Representative of the Commission on Human Rights, Mr. Reynaldo Galindo Pohl, pursuant to Commission resolution 1992/67 of 4 March 1992, E/CN.4/1993/41 ; Human Rights Watch, « Pour-Mohammadi and the 1988 Prison Massacres », Ministers of Murder : Iran’s New Security Cabinet, hhhhttp:// wwww. hrw. org/ backgrounder/ mena/ iran1205/ 2. htm#_Toc121896787(consulté le 7 avril 2008).
  • [15]
    Un impressionnant travail a été accompli sur ce point par E. Abrahambian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 209-229, qui reste la principale référence à ce jour.
  • [16]
    Notamment Nima Parvaresh, Nabardi nabarabar : gozareshi az haft sal zendan 1361­68 (Une bataille inégale : rapport de sept ans en prison 1982­1989), Andeesheh va Peykar Publications, 1995 ; Reza Ghaffari, Khaterate yek zendani az zendanhaye jomhuriyeh islami (Les mémoires d’un prisonnier dans les prisons de la République Islamique), Stockholm, Arash Forlag, 1998 ; anonyme, « Man shahede ghatle ame zendanyane siyasi boodam », op. cit.
  • [17]
    Nous reprenons, parmi les différentes transcriptions possibles, l’orthographe adoptée par l’organisation aujourd’hui [[[[http:// wwww. maryam-rajavi. com/ fr/ content/ view/ 300/ 66/ (consulté le 7 avril 2008). « Moudjahidines » est le pluriel de « moudjahed ».
  • [18]
    Mohammad Mossadeq a été Premier ministre de 1951 à 1953. Ayant nationalisé l’industrie pétrolière iranienne en 1951, il est renversé en 1953 suite à l’opération « TP-Ajax » (menée par la CIA), condamné à trois ans d’emprisonnement, puis assigné à résidence jusqu’à sa mort en 1967. Hosein Fatemi est le fondateur du Front de Libération exécuté en 1955.
  • [19]
    Ervand Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, New Haven/Londres, Yale University Press, 1992, p. 115-125.
  • [20]
    Ibid., p. 100-102.
  • [21]
    Ibid., p. 229 ; voir également A. Matin-Asgari, « Twentieth Century Iran’s Political Prisoners », art. cité, p. 690.
  • [22]
    E. Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, op. cit., p. 229 (notre traduction).
  • [23]
    Appliqué dans la Constitution iranienne de 1979, ce principe théologique confère aux religieux la primauté sur le pouvoir politique et assure une gestion réelle du pouvoir par le Guide de la Révolution (Vali-e Faghih) qui détermine la direction politique générale du pays, arbitre les conflits entre pouvoirs législatif, exécutif et judiciaire et est chef des armées (régulières et paramilitaires).
  • [24]
    Haleh Afshar (dir.), Iran : A Revolution in Turmoil, Albany, SUNY Press, 1985 ; Shaul Bakhash, The Reign of the ayatollahs : Iran and the Islamic Revolution, New York, Basic Books, 1984.
  • [25]
    Connie Bruck, « Exiles : How Iran’s Expatriates Are Gaming the Nuclear Threat », The New Yorker, 6 Mars 2006, p. 48.
  • [26]
    E. Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, op. cit., p. 260-261.
  • [27]
    C. Bruck, « Exiles… », art. cité ; Human Rights Watch, No exit : human rights abuses inside the MKO camps, 2005, [[[http:// hrw. org/ backgrounder/ mena/ iran0505/ ?iran0505.pdf, consulté le 7 avril 2008] ; Human Rights Watch, Statement on Responses to Human Rights Watch Report on Abuses by the Mujahedin-e Khalq Organization (MKO), 15 février 2006, [[[[http:// hrw. org/ mideast/ pdf/ iran021506. pdf(consulté le 7 avril 2008).
  • [28]
    Elizabeth Rubin, « The Cult of Rajavi », New York Times Magazine, 13 juillet 2003, p. 26.
  • [29]
    E. Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, op. cit., p. 3 (notre traduction).
  • [30]
    Ibid.
  • [31]
    Le mouvement était le seul à présenter des candidats partout en Iran.
  • [32]
    Le manuscrit dit : « une société Tohidie  », d’après le Tohid qui est le premier principe d’Islam (« Je dis qu’il y a un seul Dieu ») : une société islamique selon la perspective d’Ali Chariati.
  • [33]
    E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confession, op. cit., p. 210.
  • [34]
    Nader Vahabi, « L’obstacle structurel à l’abolition de la peine de mort en Iran », Panagea, « Diritti umani », mars 2007, hhhttp:// wwww. panagea. eu/ web/ index. php? ?option=com_content&task=view&id=150&Itemid=99999999 (consulté le 28 avril 2008).
  • [35]
    H.-A. Montazeri, Khaterat, op. cit.
  • [36]
    Hossein Mokhtar, Testimony at the September 1st Conference, Mission for Establishment of Human Rights in Iran (MEHR), 1998, en ligne, hhhhttp:// wwww. mehr. org/ massacre_1988. htm(consulté le 7 avril 2008). Notre traduction.
  • [37]
    E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 209 et suiv.
  • [38]
    Ibid.
  • [39]
    Témoignage cité dans E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 214 ; K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 238.
  • [40]
    E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 209.
  • [41]
    K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 227 ; R. Mihaila, « Political Considerations in Accountability for Crimes Against Humanity… », art. cité. Ces travaux prolongent une recherche initiale d’Amnesty International qui a produit plusieurs rapports quasi contemporains aux événements (« Iran : Violations of Human Rights 1987-1990  », art. cité ; « Iran : Political Executions », art. cité) et adopte aujourd’hui la définition de crime contre l’humanité : « Aux termes du droit international en vigueur en 1988, on entend par crimes contre l’humanité des attaques généralisées ou systématiques dirigées contre des civils et fondées sur des motifs discriminatoires, y compris d’ordre politique. » (AI, Action Urgente, « Iran : Craintes de mauvais traitements/ Prisonniers d’opinion présumés », 2 novembre 2007, [en ligne hhhhttp:// asiapacific. amnesty. org/ library/ Index/ FRAMDE131282007,consulté le 7 avril 2008]).
  • [42]
    Les pasdaran-e Sepah, gardiens de la Révolution, sont la milice paramilitaire de la République islamique.
  • [43]
    Expression désignant l’attentat terroriste de juin 1981 où 72 cadres du Parti républicain islamique sont morts : le terme renvoie aux « compagnons l’Imam de Hussein » dans la tradition chiite ; l’« Imam » désigne ici Khomeini.
  • [44]
    K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 240-241.
  • [45]
    Du français « comité » : désigne les cellules informelles d’ordre public mises en place par le Hezbollah au début de la Révolution, et qui se solidifient peu à peu en para-forces de l’ordre, surveillant notamment les m urs islamiques.
  • [46]
    AI, « Mass Executions of Political Prisoners », Amnesty International’s Newsletter, février 1989 ; K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 239.
  • [47]
    Ibid.
  • [48]
    UN document A/44/153, ZB février 1989, cité dans AI, Iran : Violations of Human Rights 1987-1990. Notre traduction.
  • [49]
    Final Report on the situation of human rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran by the Special Representative of the Commission on Human Rights.
  • [50]
    M. Behrooz, « Reflections on Iran’s Prison System… », art. cité.
  • [51]
    E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 221 (notre traduction).
  • [52]
    Ibid., p. 221-222 ; Azadeh Kian-Thiébaut, « La révolution iranienne à l’heure des réformes », Le Monde diplomatique, janvier 1998 : hhhhttp:// wwww. monde-diplomatique. fr/ 1998/ 01/ KIAN_THIEBAUT/ 9782. html#nh1(consulté le 20 avril 2008).
  • [53]
    H. Mokhtar, Testimony at the September 1 Conference, op. cit (notre traduction) ; Kanoon-e Khavaran hhhhttp:// wwww. khavaran. com/ HTMLs/ Fraxan-Zendanian-Jan3008. htm(consulté le 7 avril 2008) ; Bidaran, hhhhttp:// wwww. bidaran. net/ (consulté le 7 avril 2008) ; OMID, A Memorial in Defense of Human Rights in Iran, [en llllignehttp:// wwww. abfiran. org/ english/ memorial. php,consulté le 7 avril 2008].
  • [54]
    Christina Lamb, The Telegraph, « Khomeini fatwa “led to killing of 30,000 in Iran” », 19 juin 2001 ; Conseil National de la Résistance Iranienne, site des moudjahidines du Peuple en exil, hhhhttp:// wwww. ncr-iran. org/ fr/ content/ view/ 3966/ 89/ ,(consulté le 7 avril 2008).
  • [55]
    Nasser Mohajer, « The Mass Killings in Iran », Aresh, no 57, août 1996, p. 7, cité in E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 212.
  • [56]
    K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 257 ; R. Mihaila, « Political Considerations in Accountability for Crimes Against Humanity… », art. cité.
  • [57]
    K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 243-257 ; R. Mihaila, « Political Considerations in Accountability for Crimes Against Humanity… », art. cité.
  • [58]
    Voir par exemple N. Yavari d’Hellencourt, « Islam et démocratie… », art. cité.
  • [59]
    Voir par exemple Ahmed Vahdat, « The Spectre of Montazeri », Rouzegar-e-Now, no 8, janvier-février 2003, p. 48.
  • [60]
    Cité dans K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 241.
  • [61]
    E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 210 ; R. Ghaffari, Khaterate yek zendani az zendanhaye jomhuriyeh islami, op. cit., note 23, p. 248 ; HRW, « Pour-Mohammadi and the 1988 Prison Massacres », op. cit. ; H.-A. Montazeri, Khaterat, op. cit.
  • [62]
    E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit. ; R. Afshari, Human Rights in Iran, op. cit.  ; H.-A. Montazeri, Khaterat , op. cit.
  • [63]
    Paul Vieille, « L’institution shi’ite, la religiosité populaire, le martyre et la révolution », Peuples Méditerranéens, no 16, 1981, p. 77-92.
  • [64]
    Voir par exemple E. Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, op. cit., p. 206 et 243.
  • [65]
    F. Khosrokhavar, L’islamisme et la mort : le martyre révolutionnaire en Iran, Paris, l’Harmattan, 1995 ; F. Khosrokhavar, Anthropologie de la révolution iranienne. Le rêve impossible, Paris, l’Harmattan, 1997.
  • [66]
    Ulrich Marzolph, « The Martyr’s Way to Paradise. Shiite Mural Art in the Urban Context  », Ethnologia Europaea, vol. 33, no 2, 2003, p. 87-98.
  • [67]
    Ali Reza Sheikholeslami, « The Transformation of Iran’s Political Culture », Critique : Critical Middle Eastern Studies, vol. 17, no 9, 2000, p.105-133.
  • [68]
    F. Khosrokhavar, L’islamisme et la mort…, op. cit.
  • [69]
    Témoignage paru dans le journal islamiste Keyhan en 1984, cité par F. Khosrokhavar, L’islamisme et la mort…, op. cit., p. 92.
  • [70]
    BBC Persia, « Le cimetière de Khavaran : des sépultures sans nom, et la mise au jour des exécutés », 1er septembre 2005, hhhhttp:// wwww. bbc. co. uk/ persian/ iran/ story/ 2005/ 09/ 050902_mf_cemetery. shtml(notre traduction, consulté le 7 avril 2007).
  • [71]
    AI, Iran : Violations of Human Rights 1987-1990, p. 3. Notre traduction.
  • [72]
    Entretien filmé reproduit sur le site internet de l’ONG de défense des droits humains : hhhhttp:// wwww. bidaran. net/ (consulté le 7 avril 2008).
  • [73]
    Entretien télévisé disponible sur internet : Mosahebe-ye Televisione Internasional ba Babake Yazdi Dar Morede Koshtare Tabestane 67 (interview de la chaîne télévisée Internationale avec Babak Yazdi, concernant les massacres de l’été 88), hhhhttp:// khavaran. com/ Ghatleam(consulté le 7 avril 2007).
  • [74]
    Mohammad Reza Mohini, « Khavaran est un nom qui signifie “ne pas oublier” », Bidaran, hhhhttp:// wwww. bidaran. net/ spip. php? article48(consulté le 7 avril 2008).
  • [75]
    E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confession…, op. cit., p. 218 ; K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 282 ; AI, « Mass Executions of Political Prisoners », art. cité.
  • [76]
    Communauté religieuse persécutée.
  • [77]
    BBC Persia, « Le cimetière de Khavaran… », art. cité ; voir aussi M. R Mohini, « Khavaran est un nom qui signifie “ne pas oublier” », art. cité.
  • [78]
    Nouvelles radiophonique du 19 novembre 2005, Radio Farda, Afrade Nashenas Ghabrhaye Edamyane Siyasiye Daheye 60 ra dar Goorestane Khavaran Takhreeb Kardand (« Des individus non identifiés ont détruit les tombes des prisonniers politiques exécutés dans les années 1980 dans le cimetière de Khavaran »).
  • [79]
    AI, Action Urgente, « Iran : Craintes de mauvais traitements/ Prisonniers d’opinion présumés », op. cit.
  • [80]
    Human Rights Watch, Minister of murders, op. cit. Notre traduction.
  • [81]
    Kanoon-e Khavaran, op. cit. (site internet).
  • [82]
    M. R. Mohini, « Khavaran est un nom qui signifie “ne pas oublier” », art. cité.
  • [83]
    F. Khosrokhavar, « L’Iran, la démocratie et la nouvelle citoyenneté », art. cité.
  • [84]
    John R. Gillis (dir.), Commemorations : The Politics of National Identity, Princeton, Princeton University Press, 1994, p. 3 (notre traduction).
  • [85]
    K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 259 ; voir aussi R. Mihaila, « Political Considerations in Accountability for Crimes Against Humanity… », art. cité, en ligne.
  • [86]
    Nicole Loraux, La cité divisée. L’oubli dans la mémoire d’Athène, Paris, Payot-Rivages, 2005, p. 164.
  • [87]
    Nathalie Nougayrède, « Une chercheuse franco-iranienne empêchée de quitter Téhéran », Le Monde, 6 septembre 2007.
  • [88]
    Nader Khoshdel, « Marasem-e bozorgdasht-e zendanian-e siasi : goft-o-gou ba Mihan Rousta » (« La cérémonie de bozorgdasht des prisonniers politiques : entretien avec Mihan Rousta »), Sedaye-ma, 13 octobre 2004, hhhhttp:// wwww. sedaye-ma. org/ web/ show_article. php? file= src/ didgah/ mihanrousta_10132006_1. htm(consulté le 7 avril 2008).

Historiquement correct: Souvenons-nous des croisades ! (Blame it on the Scotts: guess who actually taught Islam to hate the crusades ?)

24 novembre, 2019
Image result for Rodney Stark Bearing false witness book cover"Image result for Walter Scott The Talisman"
Image result for ridley scott kingdom of heaven film poster Saladin"Ispread_of_religions600l nous faut entrer dans une pensée du temps où la bataille de Poitiers et les Croisades sont beaucoup plus proches de nous que la Révolution française et l’industrialisation du Second Empire. René Girard
Those of us who come from various European lineages are not blameless. Indeed, in the First Crusade, when the Christian soldiers took Jerusalem, they first burned a synagogue with three hundred Jews in it, and proceeded to kill every woman and child who was Muslim on the Temple Mount. The contemporaneous descriptions of the event describe soldiers walking on the Temple Mount, a holy place to Christians, with blood running up to their knees I can tell you that that story is still being told today in the Middle East, and we are still paying for it. Bill Clinton
Nous montons sur nos grands chevaux mais souvenons-nous que pendant les croisades et l’Inquisition, des actes terribles ont été commis au nom du Christ. Dans notre pays, nous avons eu l’esclavage, trop souvent justifié par le Christ. Barack Hussein Obama
Dès le second siècle de l’Hégire, les Arabes deviennent les précepteurs de l’Europe. Voltaire
Sans Charles Martel (…), la France était une province mahométane. Voltaire
Chanoines, moines, curés même, si on vous imposait la loi de ne manger ni boire depuis quatre heures du matin jusqu’à dix heures du soir, pendant le mois de juillet, lorsque le carême arriverait dans ce temps ; si on vous défendait de jouer à aucun jeu de hasard sous peine de damnation ; si le vin vous était interdit sous la même peine ; s’il vous fallait faire un pèlerinage dans des déserts brûlants ; s’il vous était enjoint de donner au moins deux et demi pour cent de votre revenu aux pauvres ; si, accoutumés à jouir de dix-huit femmes, on vous en retranchait tout d’un coup quatorze ; en bonne foi, oseriez-vous appeler cette religion sensuelle ? (…) Il faut combattre sans cesse. Quand on a détruit une erreur, il se trouve toujours quelqu’un qui la ressuscite. Voltaire (dictionnaire philosophique 1764)
Sa religion est sage, sévère, chaste et humaine : sage puisqu’elle ne tombe pas dans la démence de donner à Dieu des associés, et qu’elle n’a point de mystère ; sévère puisqu’elle défend les jeux de hasard, le vin et les liqueurs fortes, et qu’elle ordonne la prière cinq fois par jour ; chaste, puisqu’elle réduit à quatre femmes ce nombre prodigieux d’épouses qui partageaient le lit de tous les princes de l’Orient ; humaine, puisqu’elle nous ordonne l’aumône, bien plus rigoureusement que le voyage de La Mecque. Ajoutez à tous ces caractères de vérité, la tolérance. Voltaire
Il n’y a point de religion dans laquelle on n’ait recommandé l’aumône. La mahométane est la seule qui en ait fait un précepte légal, positif, indispensable. L’Alcoran [le Coran] ordonne de donner deux et demi pour cent de son revenu, soit en argent, soit en denrées. La prohibition de tous les jeux de hasard est peut-être la seule loi dont on ne peut trouver d’exemple dans aucune religion. Toutes ces lois qui, à la polygamie près, sont si austères, et sa doctrine qui est si simple, attirèrent bientôt à la religion, le respect et la confiance. Le dogme surtout de l’unité d’un Dieu présenté sans mystère, et proportionné à l’intelligence humaine, rangea sous sa loi une foule de nations et, jusqu’à des nègres dans l’Afrique, et à des insulaires dans l’Océan indien. Le peu que je viens de dire dément bien tout ce que nos historiens, nos déclamateurs et nos préjugés nous disent : mais la vérité doit les combattre. Voltaire
Le plus grand changement que l’opinion ait produit sur notre globe fut l’établissement de la religion de Mahomet. Ses musulmans, en moins d’un siècle, conquirent un empire plus vaste que l’empire romain. Cette révolution, si grande pour nous, n’est, à la vérité, que comme un atome qui a changé de place dans l’immensité des choses, et dans le nombre innombrable de mondes qui remplissent l’espace; mais c’est au moins un événement qu’on doit regarder comme une des roues de la machine de l’univers, et comme un effet nécessaire des lois éternelles et immuables: car peut-il arriver quelque chose qui n’ait été déterminé par le Maître de toutes choses? Rien n’est que ce qui doit être. Voltaire
Ce fut certainement un très grand homme, et qui forma de grands hommes. Il fallait qu’il fût martyr ou conquérant, il n’y avait pas de milieu. Il vainquit toujours, et toutes ses victoires furent remportées par le petit nombre sur le grand. Conquérant, législateur, monarque et pontife, il joua le plus grand rôle qu’on puisse jouer sur la terre aux yeux du commun des hommes. Voltaire
J’ai dit qu’on reconnut Mahomet pour un grand homme; rien n’est plus impie, dites-vous. Je vous répondrai que ce n’est pas ma faute si ce petit homme a changé la face d’une partie du monde, s’il a gagné des batailles contre des armées dix fois plus nombreuses que les siennes, s’il a fait trembler l’empire romain, s’il a donné les premiers coups à ce colosse que ses successeurs ont écrasé, et s’il a été législateur de l’Asie, de l’Afrique, et d’une partie de l’Europe. Voltaire
Votre Majesté sait quel esprit m’animait en composant cet ouvrage ; l’amour du genre humain et l’horreur du fanatisme, deux vertus qui sont faites pour être toujours auprès de votre trône, ont conduit ma plume. J’ai toujours pensé que la tragédie ne doit pas être un simple spectacle qui touche le cœur sans le corriger. Qu’importent au genre humain les passions et les malheurs d’un héros de l’antiquité, s’ils ne servent pas à nous instruire ? On avoue que la comédie du Tartuffe, ce chef-d’œuvre qu’aucune nation n’a égalé, a fait beaucoup de bien aux hommes, en montrant l’hypocrisie dans toute sa laideur ; ne peut-on pas essayer d’attaquer, dans une tragédie, cette espèce d’imposture qui met en œuvre à la fois l’hypocrisie des uns et la fureur des autres ? Ne peut-on pas remonter jusqu’à ces anciens scélérats, fondateurs illustres de la superstition et du fanatisme, qui, les premiers, ont pris le couteau sur l’autel pour faire des victimes de ceux qui refusaient d’être leurs disciples ? Ceux qui diront que les temps de ces crimes sont passés ; qu’on ne verra plus de Barcochebas [Shimon bar Kokhba], de Mahomet, de Jean de Leyde, etc. ; que les flammes des guerres de religion sont éteintes, font, ce me semble, trop d’honneur à la nature humaine. Le même poison subsiste encore, quoique moins développé ; cette peste, qui semble étouffée, reproduit de temps en temps des germes capables d’infecter la terre. N’a-t-on pas vu de nos jours les prophètes des Cévennes tuer, au nom de Dieu, ceux de leur secte qui n’étaient pas assez soumis ? Voltaire (préface au Fanatisme ou Mahomet, le Prophète, 1742)
C’est un des plus grands événements de l’Histoire: les Sarrasins victorieux, le monde était mahométan. Chateaubriand
Il faut rendre justice au culte de Mahomet qui n’a imposé que deux grands devoirs à l’homme : la prière et la charité. (…) Les deux plus hautes vérités de toute religion. Lamartine (1833)
Cette bataille n’a pas l’importance qu’on lui attribue. Elle n’est pas comparable à la victoire remportée sur Attila. Elle marque la fin d’un raid, mais n’arrête rien en réalité. Si Charles avait été vaincu, il n’en serait résulté qu’un pillage plus considérable. (…) Sans l’Islam, l’Empire franc n’aurait sans doute jamais existé, et Charlemagne sans Mahomet serait inconcevable. Henri Pirenne (historien belge, 1922)
Monsieur Dubois demanda à Madame Nozière quel était le jour le plus funeste de l’Histoire de France. Madame Nozière ne le savait pas. C’est, lui dit Monsieur Dubois, le jour de la bataille de Poitiers, quand, en 732, la science, l’art et la civilisation arabes reculèrent devant la barbarie franque. Anatole France (1922)
Si à Poitiers Charles Martel avait été battu, le monde aurait changé de face. Puisque le monde était déjà condamné à l’influence judaïque (et son sous-produit le christianisme est une chose si insipide !), il aurait mieux valu que l’islam triomphe. Cette religion récompense l’héroïsme, promet au guerrier les joies du septième ciel… Animé d’un esprit semblable, les Germains auraient conquis le monde. Ils en ont été empêchés par le christianisme. Hitler (1942)
Bien des voix se sont élevées pour tenter de ramener la bataille à sa juste place. En vain, car, érigé en symbole, l’événement est passé à la postérité et avec lui son héros Charles Martel. Il appartient à ce fonds idéologique commun qui fonde la nation française, la civilisation chrétienne, l’identité européenne sur la mise en scène du choc des civilisations et l’exclusion de l’Autre. Françoise Micheau et Philippe Sénac (historiens mediévistes)
Recent scholars have suggested Poitiers, so poorly recorded in contemporary sources, was a mere raid and thus a construct of western mythmaking or that a Muslim victory might have been preferable to continued Frankish dominance. What is clear is that Poitiers marked a general continuance of the successful defense of Europe, (from the Muslims). Flush from the victory at Tours, Charles Martel went on to clear southern France from Islamic attackers for decades, unify the warring kingdoms into the foundations of the Carolingian Empire, and ensure ready and reliable troops from local estates. Victor Davis Hanson
Je n’ai jamais entendu un Arabe s’excuser d’être allé jusqu’à Poitiers. Stéphane Denis (2001)
Aujourd’hui les bicots ont dépassé Poitiers. Tunisiano (groupe Sniper, 2003)
I was stunned that the president could say something so at once banal and offensive. Here we are now two days away from an act shocking barbarism, the burning alive of a prisoner of war, and Obama’s message is that we should remember the crusades and the inquisition. I mean, for him to say that all of us have sinned, all religions have been transgressed, is, you know, is adolescent stuff. Everyone knows that. What’s important is what’s happening now. Christianity no longer goes on crusades and it gave up the inquisition a while ago. The Book of Joshua is knee deep in blood. That story is over too. The story of today, of our generation, is the fact that the overwhelming volume of the violence and the barbarism that we are seeing in the world from Nigeria to Paris all the way to Pakistan and even to the Philippines, the island of Mindanao in the Philippines is coming from one source. And that’s from inside Islam. It is not the prevalent idea of Islam, but it is coming from Islam, as many Islamic leaders including the president of Egypt and many others have admitted. And there needs to be a change in Islam. It is not a coincidence that all of these attacks on other religions are happening, all over the world, in a dozen countries, two dozen countries, all in the name of one religion. It’s not a coincidence. And for the president to be lecturing us and to say we shouldn’t get on our high horse and to not remember our own path is ridiculous. The present issue is Muslim radicalism and how to attack it. (…) From Obama’s first speech at West Point in December 2009, ironically announcing the surge in Afghanistan, you could tell that his heart has never been in this fight, never. Charles Krauthammer
Il est important que nous démontrions que nous croyants sommes un facteur de paix pour les sociétés humaines et que nous puissions ainsi répondre à ceux qui nous accusent injustement de fomenter la haine et d’être la cause de la violence. Dans le monde précaire d’aujourd’hui, le dialogue entre les religions n’est pas un signe de faiblesse. Elle trouve sa propre raison d’être dans le dialogue de Dieu avec l’humanité. Il s’agit de changer les attitudes historiques. Une scène de la Chanson de Roland me vient à l’esprit comme un symbole, quand les chrétiens battent les musulmans et les mettent tous en ligne devant les fonts baptismaux, et un avec une épée. Et les musulmans devaient choisir entre le baptême ou l’épée. C’est ce que les chrétiens ont fait. C’était une mentalité que nous ne pouvons plus accepter, ni comprendre, ni faire fonctionner. Prenons soin des groupes fondamentalistes, chacun a le sien. En Argentine, il y a un petit coin fondamentaliste. Et essayons avec la fraternité d’aller de l’avant. Le fondamentalisme est un fléau et toutes les religions ont une sorte de cousin germain fondamentaliste, qui est regroupé. Pape François
La Chanson de Roland n’est pas le reportage détaillé d’un journaliste mais un poème épique rédigé au 11ème siècle et qui traite, 3 siècles après les faits, de l’histoire de Roland de Ronceveaux, un guerrier franc parti combattre l’envahisseur musulman en Espagne aux côtés de Charlemagne. Il s’agissait alors de ralentir l’invasion islamique qui menaçait la Chrétienté d’Occident et la France. Dans ce contexte, on ne peut qu’être stupéfait par la dénonciation bergoglienne des « conversions forcées » de mahométans par les Francs partis porter secours aux Espagnols, les seuls véritablement obligés de se convertir à l’époque. L’intention de l’occupant du Vatican est particulièrement perverse et vise à établir un parallèle surréel entre la campagne de Charlemagne et les massacres de masse perpétrés par les musulmans contre les Chrétiens au 21ème siècle. Les victimes chrétiennes, selon Bergoglio, deviennent les coupables, dans l’Espagne du 8ème siècle tout comme dans l’Europe et l’Orient du 21ème siècle. Cette nouvelle provocation du chef de l’Eglise Catholique s’ajoute à une longue série de propos incendiaires en faveur l’immigration de masse et de l’islam en Europe. Déclarations qui l’ont très largement marginalisé, y compris au sein des derniers pans de la population qui se dit catholique et pratiquante. Caricature du curé gauchiste octogénaire, Bergoglio ne choque plus tant qu’il ne lasse une Europe déjà saturée de sermons iréniques sur l’islam alors que le terrorisme musulman prend toujours plus d’ampleur. Breizato
Le 18 novembre dernier, le pape François a reçu en audience les participants à la réunion organisée par l’Istituto para el Dialogo Interreligioso de la Argentina (IDI), et il a notamment salué trois des dirigeants de cet organisme, le Père Guillermo Marco, le responsable musulman Omar Abboud et le rabbin Daniel Goldman, tous trois vice-présidents de l’IDI. Le Souverain Pontife a prononcé une allocution (…) Il ne s’agit pas là d’une improvisation du pape François, comme il en commet tant notamment en avion, mais d’un texte écrit et publié. Le moins qu’on puisse en dire, c’est que le Saint-Père prend quelques libertés avec la vérité historique et le texte même de la Chanson de Roland, pour appuyer ses affirmations. La Chanson de Roland s’inspire en partie d’un événement historique, l’expédition de Charlemagne en Espagne de 778, le siège avorté de Saragosse, la retraite de l’armée des Francs menacée d’une intervention de l’émir de Cordoue, la prise et le pillage, au passage, de Pampelune, puis le revers de son arrière-garde prise en embuscade, essentiellement par des Basques, à Roncevaux. Il n’est pas inutile de rappeler que cette expédition en Espagne fut décidée à la demande de plusieurs gouverneurs musulmans d’Espagne, en rébellion contre l’émir de Cordoue, et que l’Espagne fut conquise par les musulmans sans que les autochtones les y invitent… La Chanson de Roland n’est évidemment pas une chronique historique racontant des événements, mais un poème épique, une chanson de geste, dont le plus ancien et plus complet manuscrit, rédigé en anglo-normand remonte au tout début du XIIe siècle, quatre siècles après les faits qu’il est supposé raconter… Le souvenir du pape François évoquant la victoire des Francs sur les musulmans, est donc confus, car l’expédition ne fut pas une victoire. Le texte même de cette chanson de geste, ne corrobore pas le souvenir que le Saint-Père en a et qu’il évoque. L’affaire fictive du baptême de force des musulmans supposés vaincus après la prise de Saragosse – qui n’eut pas lieu – n’a rien d’historique mais est une pure imagination du poète. On trouve aux vers 3666 à 3674 cette invention littéraire : Le roi [Charlemagne] croit en Dieu, il veut faire son service ; et ses évêques bénissent les eaux. On mène les païens jusqu’au baptistère ; s’il en est un qui résiste à Charles, le roi le fait pendre, ou brûler ou tuer par le fer [l’ancien français ocire veut dire tuer, massacrer, assassiner pas nécessairement par le fer : il n’est pas question d’un chrétien tenant une épée dans le texte original]. Bien plus de cent mille sont baptisés vrais chrétiens, mais non la reine. Elle sera menée en douce France, captive : le roi veut qu’elle se convertisse par amour. Comment dès lors affirmer que « c’est ce que les chrétiens firent » ? Riposte catholique
L’erreur est toujours de raisonner dans les catégories de la « différence », alors que la racine de tous les conflits, c’est plutôt la « concurrence », la rivalité mimétique entre des êtres, des pays, des cultures. La concurrence, c’est-à-dire le désir d’imiter l’autre pour obtenir la même chose que lui, au besoin par la violence. Sans doute le terrorisme est-il lié à un monde « différent » du nôtre, mais ce qui suscite le terrorisme n’est pas dans cette « différence » qui l’éloigne le plus de nous et nous le rend inconcevable. Il est au contraire dans un désir exacerbé de convergence et de ressemblance. (…) Ce qui se vit aujourd’hui est une forme de rivalité mimétique à l’échelle planétaire. Lorsque j’ai lu les premiers documents de Ben Laden, constaté ses allusions aux bombes américaines tombées sur le Japon, je me suis senti d’emblée à un niveau qui est au-delà de l’islam, celui de la planète entière. Sous l’étiquette de l’islam, on trouve une volonté de rallier et de mobiliser tout un tiers-monde de frustrés et de victimes dans leurs rapports de rivalité mimétique avec l’Occident. Mais les tours détruites occupaient autant d’étrangers que d’Américains. Et par leur efficacité, par la sophistication des moyens employés, par la connaissance qu’ils avaient des Etats-Unis, par leurs conditions d’entraînement, les auteurs des attentats n’étaient-ils pas un peu américains ? On est en plein mimétisme.Ce sentiment n’est pas vrai des masses, mais des dirigeants. Sur le plan de la fortune personnelle, on sait qu’un homme comme Ben Laden n’a rien à envier à personne. Et combien de chefs de parti ou de faction sont dans cette situation intermédiaire, identique à la sienne. Regardez un Mirabeau au début de la Révolution française : il a un pied dans un camp et un pied dans l’autre, et il n’en vit que de manière plus aiguë son ressentiment. Aux Etats-Unis, des immigrés s’intègrent avec facilité, alors que d’autres, même si leur réussite est éclatante, vivent aussi dans un déchirement et un ressentiment permanents. Parce qu’ils sont ramenés à leur enfance, à des frustrations et des humiliations héritées du passé. Cette dimension est essentielle, en particulier chez des musulmans qui ont des traditions de fierté et un style de rapports individuels encore proche de la féodalité. (…) Cette concurrence mimétique, quand elle est malheureuse, ressort toujours, à un moment donné, sous une forme violente. A cet égard, c’est l’islam qui fournit aujourd’hui le ciment qu’on trouvait autrefois dans le marxisme.  René Girard
Malgré eux, les islamistes sont des Occidentaux. Même en rejetant l’Occident, ils l’acceptent. Aussi réactionnaires que soient ses intentions, l’islamisme intègre non seulement les idées de l’Occident mais aussi ses institutions. Le rêve islamiste d’effacer le mode de vie occidental de la vie musulmane est, dans ces conditions, incapable de réussir. Le système hybride qui en résulte est plus solide qu’il n’y paraît. Les adversaires de l’islam militant souvent le rejettent en le qualifiant d’effort de repli pour éviter la vie moderne et ils se consolent avec la prédiction selon laquelle il est dès lors condamné à se trouver à la traîne des avancées de la modernisation qui a eu lieu. Mais cette attente est erronée. Car l’islamisme attire précisément les musulmans qui, aux prises avec les défis de la modernité, sont confrontés à des difficultés, et sa puissance et le nombre de ses adeptes ne cessent de croître. Les tendances actuelles donnent à penser que l’islam radical restera une force pendant un certain temps encore. Daniel Pipes
They are not expressions of an outburst in the West of the [Israeli-Palestinian] conflict in the Middle East. It is truly modern, aimed against American imperialism, capitalism, etc. In other words, they occupy the same space that the proletarian left had thirty years ago, that Action Directe had twenty years ago. . . . It partakes henceforth of the internal history of the West. (…) It can feel like a time-warp, a return to the European left of the 1970s and early 1980s. Europe’s radical-mosque practitioners can appear, mutatis mutandis, like a Muslim version of the hard-core intellectuals and laborers behind the aggrieved but proud Scottish National party in its salad days. (…) In the last three centuries, Europe has given birth and nourishment to most of mankind’s most radical causes. It shouldn’t be that surprising to imagine that Europe could nurture Islamic militancy on its own soil. (…) In Europe as elsewhere, Westernization is the key to the growth and virulence of hard-core Islamic radicalism. The most frightening, certainly the most effective, adherents of bin Ladenism are those who are culturally and intellectually most like us. The process of Westernization liberates a Muslim from the customary sanctions and loyalties that normally corralled the dark side of the human soul. (…) It would be a delightful irony if the more progressive political and religious debates among the Middle East’s Muslims saved their brethren in the intellectually backward lands of the European Union. Reuel Marc Gerecht
Wherever it occurs, Occidentalism is fed by a sense of humiliation, of defeat. It is a war against a particular idea of the West – a bourgeois society addicted to money, creature comforts, sex, animal lusts, self-interest, and security – which is neither new nor unique to Islamist extremism. This idea has historical roots that long precede any form of ‘U.S. imperialism’ . (…) Blood, soil, and the spirit of the Volk were what German romantics in the late 18th and early 19th centuries invoked against the universalist claims of the French Enlightenment, the French Revolution, and Napoleon’s invading armies. This notion of national soul was taken over by the Slavophiles in 19th-century Russia, who used it to attack the « Westernizers, » that is, Russian advocates of liberal reforms. It came up again and again, in the 1930s, when European fascists and National Socialists sought to smash « Americanism, » Anglo-Saxon liberalism, and « rootless cosmopolitanism » (meaning Jews). Aurel Kolnai, the great Hungarian scholar, wrote a book in the 1930s about fascist ideology in Austria and Germany. He called it War Against the West. Communism, too, especially under Stalin, although a bastard child of the Enlightenment and the French Revolution, was the sworn enemy of Western liberalism and « rootless cosmopolitanism. » Many Islamic radicals borrowed their anti-Western concepts from Russia and Germany. The founders of the Ba’ath Party in Syria were keen readers of prewar German race theories. Jalal Al-e Ahmad, an influential Iranian intellectual in the 1960s, coined the phrase « Westoxification » to describe the poisonous influence of Western civilization on other cultures. He, too, was an admirer of German ideas on blood and soil. Clearly, the idea of the West as a malign force is not some Eastern or Middle Eastern idea, but has deep roots in European soil. Defining it in historical terms is not a simple matter. Occidentalism was part of the counter-Enlightenment, to be sure, but also of the reaction against industrialization. Some Marxists have been attracted to it, but so, of course, have their enemies on the far right. Occidentalism is a revolt against rationalism (the cold, mechanical West, the machine civilization) and secularism, but also against individualism. European colonialism provoked Occidentalism, and so does global capitalism today. But one can speak of Occidentalism only when the revolt against the West becomes a form of pure destruction, when the West is depicted as less than human, when rebellion means murder. Wherever it occurs, Occidentalism is fed by a sense of humiliation, of defeat. Isaiah Berlin once described the German revolt against Napoleon as « the original exemplar of the reaction of many a backward, exploited, or at any rate patronized society, which, resentful of the apparent inferiority of its status, reacted by turning to real or imaginary triumphs and glories in its past, or enviable attributes of its own national or cultural character. » The same thing might be said about Japan in the 1930s, after almost a century of feeling snubbed and patronized by the West, whose achievements it so fervently tried to emulate. It has been true of the Russians, who have often slipped into the role of inferior upstarts, stuck in the outer reaches of Asia and Europe. But nothing matches the sense of failure and humiliation that afflicts the Arab world, a once glorious civilization left behind in every respect by the post-Enlightenment West. Humiliation can easily turn into a cult of the pure and the authentic. Among the most resented attributes of the hated Occident are its claims to universalism. Christianity is a universalist faith, but so is the Enlightenment belief in reason. Napoleon was a universalist who believed in a common civil code for all his conquered subjects. The conviction that the United States represents universal values and has the God-given duty to spread democracy in the benighted world belongs to the same universalist tradition. Some of these values may indeed be universal. One would like to think that all people could benefit from democracy or the use of reason. The Code Napoleon brought many benefits. But when universal solutions are imposed by force, or when people feel threatened or humiliated or unable to compete with the powers that promote such solutions, that is when we see the dangerous retreat into dreams of purity. Not all dreams of local authenticity and cultural uniqueness are noxious, or even wrong. As Isaiah Berlin also pointed out, the crooked timber of humanity cannot be forcibly straightened along universal standards with impunity. The experiments on the human soul by Communism showed how bloody universalist dreams can be. And the poetic romanticism of 19th-century German idealists was often a welcome antidote to the dogmatic rationalism that came with the Enlightenment. It is when purity or authenticity, of faith or race, leads to purges of the supposedly inauthentic, of the allegedly impure, that mass murder begins. The fact that anti-Americanism, anti-Zionism, anti-Semitism, and a general hostility to the West often overlap is surely no coincidence. Even in Japan, where Jews play no part in national life, one of the participants at the 1942 Kyoto conference suggested that the war against the West was a war against the « poisonous materialist civilization » built on Jewish financial capitalist power. At the same time, European anti-Semites, not only in Nazi Germany, were blaming the Jews for Bolshevism. Both Bolshevism and capitalism are universalist systems in the sense that they do not recognize national, racial, or cultural borders. Since Jews are traditionally regarded by the defenders of purity as the congenital outsiders, the archetypal « rootless cosmopolitans, » it is no wonder that they are also seen as the main carriers of the universalist virus. To be sure, Jews had sound reasons to be attracted to such notions as equality before the law, secular politics, and internationalism, whether of a socialist or capitalist stamp. Exclusivity, whether racial, religious, or nationalist, is never good for minorities. Only in the Middle East have Jews brought their own form of exclusivity and nationalism. But Zionism came from the West. And so Israel, in the eyes of its enemies, is the colonial outpost of « Westoxification. » Its material success only added to the Arab sense of historic humiliation. The idea, however, that Jews are a people without a soul, mimics with no creative powers, is much older than the founding of the State of Israel. It was one of the most common anti-Semitic slurs employed by Richard Wagner. He was neither the first to do so, nor very original in this respect. Karl Marx, himself the grandson of a rabbi, called the Jews greedy parasites, whose souls were made of money. The same kind of thing was often said by 19th-century Europeans about the British. The great Prussian novelist Theodor Fontane, who rather admired England, nonetheless opined that « the cult of the Gold Calf is the disease of the English people. » He was convinced that English society would be destroyed by « this yellow fever of gold, this sellout of all souls to the devil of Mammon. » And much the same is said today about the Americans. Calculation — the accounting of money, interests, scientific evidence, and so on — is regarded as soulless. Authenticity lies in poetry, intuition, and blind faith. The Occidentalist view of the West is of a bourgeois society, addicted to creature comforts, animal lusts, self-interest, and security. It is by definition a society of cowards, who prize life above death. As a Taliban fighter once put it during the war in Afghanistan, the Americans would never win, because they love Pepsi-Cola, whereas the holy warriors love death. This was also the language of Spanish fascists during the civil war, and of Nazi ideologues, and Japanese kamikaze pilots. The hero is one who acts without calculating his interests. He jumps into action without regard for his own safety, ever ready to sacrifice himself for the cause. And the Occidentalist hero, whether he is a Nazi or an Islamist, is just as ready to destroy those who sully the purity of his race or creed. It is indeed his duty to do so. When the West is seen as the threat to authenticity, then it is the duty of all holy warriors to destroy anything to do with the « Zionist Crusaders, » whether it is a U.S. battleship, a British embassy, a Jewish cemetery, a chunk of lower Manhattan, or a disco in Bali. The symbolic value of these attacks is at least as important as the damage inflicted. What, then, is new about the Islamist holy war against the West? Perhaps it is the totality of its vision. Islamism, as an antidote to Westoxification, is an odd mixture of the universal and the pure: universal because all people can, and in the eyes of the believers should, become orthodox Muslims; pure because those who refuse the call are not simply lost souls but savages who must be removed from this earth. Hitler tried to exterminate the Jews, among others, but did not view the entire West with hostility. In fact, he wanted to forge an alliance with the British and other « Aryan » nations, and felt betrayed when they did not see things his way. Stalinists and Maoists murdered class enemies and were opposed to capitalism. But they never saw the Western world as less than human and thus to be physically eradicated. Japanese militarists went to war against Western empires but did not regard everything about Western civilization as barbarous. The Islamist contribution to the long history of Occidentalism is a religious vision of purity in which the idolatrous West simply has to be destroyed. The worship of false gods is the worst religious sin in Islam as well as in ancient Judaism. The West, as conceived by Islamists, worships the false gods of money, sex, and other animal lusts. In this barbarous world the thoughts and laws and desires of Man have replaced the kingdom of God. The word for this state of affairs is jahiliyya, which can mean idolatry, religious ignorance, or barbarism. Applied to the pre-Islamic Arabs, it means ignorance: People worshiped other gods because they did not know better. But the new jahiliyya, in the sense of barbarism, is everywhere, from Las Vegas and Wall Street to the palaces of Riyadh. To an Islamist, anything that is not pure, that does not belong to the kingdom of God, is by definition barbarous and must be destroyed. Just as the main enemies of Russian Slavophiles were Russian Westernizers, the most immediate targets of Islamists are the liberals, reformists, and secular rulers in their own societies. They are the savage stains that have to be cleansed with blood. But the source of the barbarism that has seduced Saudi princes and Algerian intellectuals as much as the whores and pimps of New York (and in a sense all infidels are whores and pimps) is the West. And that is why holy war has been declared against the West. Ian Buruma
Il est malheureux que le Moyen-Orient ait rencontré pour la première fois la modernité occidentale à travers les échos de la Révolution française. Progressistes, égalitaristes et opposés à l’Eglise, Robespierre et les jacobins étaient des héros à même d’inspirer les radicaux arabes. Les modèles ultérieurs — Italie mussolinienne, Allemagne nazie, Union soviétique — furent encore plus désastreux …Ce qui rend l’entreprise terroriste des islamistes aussi dangereuse, ce n’est pas tant la haine religieuse qu’ils puisent dans des textes anciens — souvent au prix de distorsions grossières —, mais la synthèse qu’ils font entre fanatisme religieux et idéologie moderne. Ian Buruma et Avishai Margalit
La révolution iranienne fut en quelque sorte la version islamique et tiers-mondiste de la contre-culture occidentale. Il serait intéressant de mettre en exergue les analogies et les ressemblances que l’on retrouve dans le discours anti-consommateur, anti-technologique et anti-moderne des dirigeants islamiques de celui que l’on découvre chez les protagonistes les plus exaltés de la contre-culture occidentale. Daryiush Shayegan (Les Illusions de l’identité, 1992)
Sir Ridley Scott, the Oscar-nominated director, was savaged by senior British academics last night over his forthcoming film which they say « distorts » the history of the Crusades to portray Arabs in a favourable light. The £75 million film, which stars Orlando Bloom, Jeremy Irons and Liam Neeson, is described by the makers as being « historically accurate » and designed to be « a fascinating history lesson ». Academics, however – including Professor Jonathan Riley-Smith, Britain’s leading authority on the Crusades – attacked the plot of Kingdom of Heaven, describing it as « rubbish », « ridiculous », « complete fiction » and « dangerous to Arab relations ». The film, which began shooting last week in Spain, is set in the time of King Baldwin IV (1161-1185), leading up to the Battle of Hattin in 1187 when Saladin conquered Jerusalem for the Muslims. The script depicts Baldwin’s brother-in-law, Guy de Lusignan, who succeeds him as King of Jerusalem, as « the arch-villain ». A further group, « the Brotherhood of Muslims, Jews and Christians », is introduced, promoting an image of cross-faith kinship. « They were working together, » the film’s spokesman said. « It was a strong bond until the Knights Templar cause friction between them. » The Knights Templar, the warrior monks, are portrayed as « the baddies » while Saladin, the Muslim leader, is a « a hero of the piece », Sir Ridley’s spokesman said. « At the end of our picture, our heroes defend the Muslims, which was historically correct. » Prof Riley-Smith, who is Dixie Professor of Ecclesiastical History at Cambridge University, said the plot was « complete and utter nonsense ». He said that it relied on the romanticised view of the Crusades propagated by Sir Walter Scott in his book The Talisman, published in 1825 and now discredited by academics. (..) Dr Philips said that by venerating Saladin, who was largely ignored by Arab history until he was reinvented by romantic historians in the 19th century, Sir Ridley was following both Saddam Hussein and Hafez Assad, the former Syrian dictator. Both leaders commissioned huge portraits and statues of Saladin, who was actually a Kurd, to bolster Arab Muslim pride. Prof Riley-Smith added that Sir Ridley’s efforts were misguided and pandered to Islamic fundamentalism. « It’s Osama bin Laden’s version of history. It will fuel the Islamic fundamentalists. » (…) Sir Ridley’s spokesman said that the film portrays the Arabs in a positive light. « It’s trying to be fair and we hope that the Muslim world sees the rectification of history. The Telegraph
[Ridley Scott’s Kingdom of heaven]  is not historically accurate at all. They refer to The Talisman, which depicts the Muslims as sophisticated and civilised, and the Crusaders are all brutes and barbarians. It has nothing to do with reality. Guy of Lusignan lost the Battle of Hattin against Saladin, yes, but he wasn’t any badder or better than anyone else. There was never a confraternity of Muslims, Jews and Christians. That is utter nonsense. It’s Osama bin Laden’s version of history. It will fuel the Islamic fundamentalists. Jonathan Riley-Smith
It does not do any good to distort history, even if you believe you are distorting it in a good way. Cruelty was not on one side but on all. Amin Maalouf
I recently refused to take part in a television series, produced by an intelligent and well-educated Egyptian woman, for whom a continuing Western crusade was an article of faith. Having less to do with historical reality than with reactions to imperialism, the nationalist and Islamist interpretations of crusade history help many people, moderates as well as extremists, to place the exploitation they believe they have suffered in a historical context and to satisfy their feelings of both superiority and humiliation. Jonathan Riley-Smith
For Christians . . . sacred violence cannot be proposed on any grounds save that of love, . . . [and] in an age dominated by the theology of merit this explains why participation in crusades was believed to be meritorious, why the expeditions were seen as penitential acts that could gain indulgences, and why death in battle was regarded as martyrdom. . . . As manifestations of Christian love, the crusades were as much the products of the renewed spirituality of the central Middle Ages, with its concern for living the vita apostolica and expressing Christian ideals in active works of charity, as were the new hospitals, the pastoral work of the Augustinians and Premonstratensians and the service of the friars. The charity of St. Francis may now appeal to us more than that of the crusaders, but both sprang from the same roots. Jonathan Riley-Smith
Within a month of the attacks of September 11, 2001, former president Bill Clinton gave a speech to the students of Georgetown University. As the world tried to make sense of the senseless, Clinton offered his own explanation: “Those of us who come from various European lineages are not blameless,” he declared. “Indeed, in the First Crusade, when the Christian soldiers took Jerusalem, they first burned a synagogue with three hundred Jews in it, and proceeded to kill every woman and child who was Muslim on the Temple Mount. The contemporaneous descriptions of the event describe soldiers walking on the Temple Mount, a holy place to Christians, with blood running up to their knees. “I can tell you that that story is still being told today in the Middle East, and we are still paying for it,” he concluded, and there is good reason to believe he was right. Osama bin Laden and other Islamists regularly refer to Americans as “Crusaders.” Indeed, bin Laden directed his fatwa authorizing the September 11 attacks against the “Crusaders and Jews.” (…) Most people in the West do not believe that they have been prosecuting a continuous Crusade against Islam since the Middle Ages. But most do believe that the Crusades started the problems that plague and endanger us today. Westerners in general (and Catholics in particular) find the Crusades a deeply embarrassing episode in their history. As the Ridley Scott movie Kingdom of Heaven graphically proclaimed, the Crusades were unprovoked campaigns of intolerance preached by deranged churchmen and fought by religious zealots against a sophisticated and peaceful Muslim world. According to the Hollywood version, the blind violence of the Crusades gave birth to jihad, as the Muslims fought to defend themselves and their world. And for what? The city of Jerusalem, which was both “nothing and everything,” a place filled with religion that “drives men mad.” (…) It is generally thought that Christians attacked Muslims without provocation to seize their lands and forcibly convert them. The Crusaders were Europe’s lacklands and ne’er-do-wells, who marched against the infidels out of blind zealotry and a desire for booty and land. As such, the Crusades betrayed Christianity itself. They transformed “turn the other cheek” into “kill them all; God will know his own.” Every word of this is wrong. Historians of the Crusades have long known that it is wrong, but they find it extraordinarily difficult to be heard across a chasm of entrenched preconceptions. For on the other side is, as Riley-Smith puts it “nearly everyone else, from leading churchmen and scholars in other fields to the general public.” There is the great Sir Steven Runciman, whose three-volume History of the Crusades is still a brisk seller for Cambridge University Press a half century after its release. It was Runciman who called the Crusades “a long act of intolerance in the name of God, which is a sin against the Holy Ghost.” The pity of it is that Runciman and the other popular writers simply write better stories than the professional historians. (…) One of the most profound misconceptions about the Crusades is that they represented a perversion of a religion whose founder preached meekness, love of enemies, and nonresistance. Riley-Smith reminds his reader that on the matter of violence Christ was not as clear as pacifists like to think. He praised the faith of the Roman centurion but did not condemn his profession. At the Last Supper he told his disciples, “Let him who has no sword sell his cloak and buy one. For I tell you that this Scripture must be fulfilled in me, And he was reckoned with transgressors.” St. Paul said of secular authorities, “He does not bear the sword in vain; he is the servant of God to execute his wrath on the wrongdoer.” Several centuries later, St. Augustine articulated a Christian approach to just war, one in which legitimate authorities could use violence to halt or avert a greater evil. It must be a defensive war, in reaction to an act of aggression. For Christians, therefore, violence was ethically neutral, since it could be employed either for evil or against it. As Riley-Smith notes, the concept that violence is intrinsically evil belongs solely to the modern world. It is not Christian. All the Crusades met the criteria of just wars. They came about in reaction attacks against Christians or their Church. The First Crusade was called in 1095 in response to the recent Turkish conquest of Christian Asia Minor, as well as the much earlier Arab conquest of the Christian-held Holy Land. The second was called in response to the Muslim conquest of Edessa in 1144. The third was called in response to the Muslim conquest of Jerusalem and most other Christian lands in the Levant in 1187. In each case, the faithful went to war to defend Christians, to punish the attackers, and to right terrible wrongs. As Riley-Smith has written elsewhere, crusading was seen as an act of love—specifically the love of God and the love of neighbor. By pushing back Muslim aggression and restoring Eastern Christianity, the Crusaders were—at great peril to themselves—imitating the Good Samaritan. Or, as Innocent II told the Knights Templar, “You carry out in deeds the words of the gospel, ‘Greater love has no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.’” But the Crusades were not just wars. They were holy wars, and that is what made them different from what came before. They were made holy not by their target but by the Crusaders’ sacrifice. The Crusade was a pilgrimage and thereby an act of penance. When Urban II called the First Crusade in 1095, he created a model that would be followed for centuries. Crusaders who undertook that burden with right intention and after confessing their sins would receive a plenary indulgence. The indulgence was a recognition that they undertook these sacrifices for Christ, who was crucified again in the tribulations of his people. And the sacrifices were extraordinary. As Riley-Smith writes in this book and his earlier The First ­Crusaders, the cost of crusading was staggering. Without financial assistance, only the wealthy could afford to embark on a Crusade. Many noble families impoverished themselves by crusading. Historians have long known that the image of the Crusader as an adventurer seeking his fortune is exactly backward. The vast majority of Crusaders returned home as soon as they had fulfilled their vow. What little booty they could acquire was more than spent on the journey itself. One is hard pressed to name a single returning Crusader who broke even, let alone made a profit on the journey. And those who returned were the lucky ones. As Riley-Smith explains, recent studies show that around one-third of knights and nobility died on crusade. The death rates for lower classes were even higher. One can never understand the Crusades without understanding their penitential character. It was the indulgence that led thousands of men to take on a burden that would certainly cost them dearly. The secular nobility of medieval Europe was a warrior aristocracy. They made their living by the sword. We know from their wills and charters that they were deeply aware of their own sinfulness and anxious over the state of their souls. A Crusade provided a way for them to serve God and to do penance for their sins. It allowed them to use their weapons as a means of their salvation rather than of their damnation. (…) The Crusader sewed a cloth cross to his garment to signify his penitential burden and his hope. Take away penitence and the Crusades cannot be explained. Yet in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries Protestants and then Enlightenment thinkers rejected the idea of temporal penalties due to sin—along with indulgences, purgatory, and the papacy. How then did they explain the Crusades? Why else would thousands of men march thousands of miles deep into enemy territory, if not for something precious? The first explanation was that they were fooled by the Antichrist: The Catholic Church had convinced the simple that their salvation lay in fighting its battles. Later, with the advent of liberalism, critics assumed that the Crusaders must have had economic motives. They were seeking wealth and simply used religion as a cover for their worldly desires. In the nineteenth century, the memory of the Crusades became hopelessly entangled with contemporary European imperialism. Riley-Smith tells the fascinating story of Archbishop Charles-Martial Allemand-Lavigerie of Algiers, the founder of the missionary orders of the White Fathers and White Sisters, who worked diligently to establish a new military order resembling the Knights Templar, Teutonic Knights, and the Knights Hospitaller of the Middle Ages. His new order was to be sent to Africa, where it would protect missionaries, fight against the slave trade, and support the progress of French civilization in the continent. Drawing on money from antislavery societies, Lavigerie purchased lands on the edge of the Saharan Desert to use as a mother house for a new order, L’Institut Religieux et Militaire des Frères Armés du Sahara. The order attracted hundreds of men from all social classes, and in 1891 the first brothers received their white habits emblazoned with red crosses. The dust cover of Riley-Smith’s book is itself a wonderful picture of these brothers at their African home. With palm trees behind them, they look proudly into the camera, each wearing a cross and some holding rifles. The Institut des Fréres Armés lasted scarcely more than a year before it was scrapped and its founder died, but other attempts to found a military order were made in the nineteenth century, even in Protestant England. All wove together the contrasting threads of Romanticism, imperialism, and the medieval Crusades. President Clinton is not alone in thinking that the Muslim world is still brooding over the crimes of the Crusaders. It is commonly thought—even by Muslims—that the effects and memory of that trauma have been with the Islamic world since it was first inflicted in the eleventh century. As Riley-Smith explains, however, the Muslim memory of the Crusades is of very recent vintage. Carole Hillenbrand first uncovered this fact in her groundbreaking book The Crusades: Islamic Perspectives. The truth is that medieval Muslims came to realize that the Crusades were religious but had little interest in them. When, in 1291, Muslim armies removed the last vestiges of the Crusader Kingdom from Palestine, the Crusades largely dropped out of Muslim memory. In Europe, however, the Crusades were a well-remembered formative episode. Europeans, who had bound the Crusades to imperialism, brought the story to the Middle East during the nineteenth century and reintroduced it to the Muslims. Stripping the Crusades of their original purpose, they portrayed the Crusades as Europe’s first colonial venture—the first attempt of the West to bring civilization to the backward Muslim East. Riley-Smith describes the profound effect that Sir Walter Scott’s novel The Talisman had on European and therefore Middle Eastern opinion of the Crusades. Crusaders such as Richard the Lionhearted were portrayed as boorish, brutal, and childish, while Muslims, particularly Saladin, were tolerant and enlightened gentlemen of the nineteenth century. With the collapse of Ottoman power and the rise of Arab nationalism at the end of the nineteenth century, Muslims bound together these two strands of Crusade narrative and created a new memory in which the Crusades were only the first part of Europe’s assault on Islam—an assault that continued through the modern imperialism of European powers. Europeans reintroduced Saladin, who had been nearly forgotten in the Middle East, and Arab nationalists then cleansed him of his Kurdish ethnicity to create a new anti-Western hero. We saw the result during the run-up to the Iraq War, when Saddam Hussein portrayed himself as a new Saladin who would expel the new Crusaders. Arab nationalists made good use of the new story of the Crusades during their struggles for independence. Their enemies, the Islamists, then took over the same tool. Osama bin Laden is only the most recent Islamist to adopt this useful myth to characterize the actions of the West as a continual Crusade against Islam. That is the Crusades’ only connection with modern Islamist terrorism. And yet, so ingrained is this notion that the Crusades began the modern European assault on Islam that many moderate Muslims still believe it. In the Middle East, as in the West, we are left with the gaping chasm between myth and reality. Crusade historians sometimes try to yell across it but usually just talk to each other, while the leading churchmen, the scholars in other fields, and the general public hold to a caricature of the Crusades created by a pox of modern ideologies. Thomas F. Madden (Saint Louis University)
In 2001, former president Bill Clinton delivered a speech at Georgetown University in which he discussed the West’s response to the recent terrorist attacks of September 11. The speech contained a short but significant reference to the crusades. Mr. Clinton observed that “when the Christian soldiers took Jerusalem [in 1099], they . . . proceeded to kill every woman and child who was Muslim on the Temple Mount.” He cited the “contemporaneous descriptions of the event” as describing “soldiers walking on the Temple Mount . . . with blood running up to their knees.” This story, Mr. Clinton said emphatically, was “still being told today in the Middle East and we are still paying for it.” This view of the crusades is not unusual. It pervades textbooks as well as popular literature. One otherwise generally reliable Western civilization textbook claims that “the Crusades fused three characteristic medieval impulses: piety, pugnacity, and greed. All three were essential.”1 The film Kingdom of Heaven (2005) depicts crusaders as boorish bigots, the best of whom were torn between remorse for their excesses and lust to continue them. Even the historical supplements for role-playing games—drawing on supposedly more reliable sources—contain statements such as “The soldiers of the First Crusade appeared basically without warning, storming into the Holy Land with the avowed—literally—task of slaughtering unbelievers”; “The Crusades were an early sort of imperialism”; and “Confrontation with Islam gave birth to a period of religious fanaticism that spawned the terrible Inquisition and the religious wars that ravaged Europe during the Elizabethan era.” The most famous semipopular historian of the crusades, Sir Steven Runciman, ended his three volumes of magnificent prose with the judgment that the crusades were “nothing more than a long act of intolerance in the name of God, which is the sin against the Holy Ghost.” The verdict seems unanimous. From presidential speeches to role-playing games, the crusades are depicted as a deplorably violent episode in which thuggish Westerners trundled off, unprovoked, to murder and pillage peace-loving, sophisticated Muslims, laying down patterns of outrageous oppression that would be repeated throughout subsequent history. In many corners of the Western world today, this view is too commonplace and apparently obvious even to be challenged. But unanimity is not a guarantee of accuracy. What everyone “knows” about the crusades may not, in fact, be true. (…)  In a.d. 632, Egypt, Palestine, Syria, Asia Minor, North Africa, Spain, France, Italy, and the islands of Sicily, Sardinia, and Corsica were all Christian territories. Inside the boundaries of the Roman Empire, which was still fully functional in the eastern Mediterranean, orthodox Christianity was the official, and overwhelmingly majority, religion. Outside those boundaries were other large Christian communities—not necessarily orthodox and Catholic, but still Christian. Most of the Christian population of Persia, for example, was Nestorian. Certainly there were many Christian communities in Arabia. By a.d. 732, a century later, Christians had lost Egypt, Palestine, Syria, North Africa, Spain, most of Asia Minor, and southern France. Italy and her associated islands were under threat, and the islands would come under Muslim rule in the next century. The Christian communities of Arabia were entirely destroyed in or shortly after 633, when Jews and Christians alike were expelled from the peninsula. Those in Persia were under severe pressure. Two-thirds of the formerly Roman Christian world was now ruled by Muslims. (…) The attacks continued, punctuated from time to time by Christian attempts to push back. Charlemagne blocked the Muslim advance in far western Europe in about a.d. 800, but Islamic forces simply shifted their focus and began to island-hop across from North Africa toward Italy and the French coast, attacking the Italian mainland by 837. A confused struggle for control of southern and central Italy continued for the rest of the ninth century and into the tenth. In the hundred years between 850 and 950, Benedictine monks were driven out of ancient monasteries, the Papal States were overrun, and Muslim pirate bases were established along the coast of northern Italy and southern France, from which attacks on the deep inland were launched. Desperate to protect victimized Christians, popes became involved in the tenth and early eleventh centuries in directing the defense of the territory around them. The surviving central secular authority in the Christian world at this time was the East Roman, or Byzantine, Empire. Having lost so much territory in the seventh and eighth centuries to sudden amputation by the Muslims, the Byzantines took a long time to gain the strength to fight back. By the mid-ninth century, they mounted a counterattack on Egypt, the first time since 645 that they had dared to come so far south. Between the 940s and the 970s, the Byzantines made great progress in recovering lost territories. Emperor John Tzimiskes retook much of Syria and part of Palestine, getting as far as Nazareth, but his armies became overextended and he had to end his campaigns by 975 without managing to retake Jerusalem itself. Sharp Muslim counterattacks followed, and the Byzantines barely managed to retain Aleppo and Antioch. The struggle continued unabated into the eleventh century. In 1009, a mentally deranged Muslim ruler destroyed the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem and mounted major persecutions of Christians and Jews. He was soon deposed, and by 1038 the Byzantines had negotiated the right to try to rebuild the structure, but other events were also making life difficult for Christians in the area, especially the displacement of Arab Muslim rulers by Seljuk Turks, who from 1055 on began to take control in the Middle East. This destabilized the territory and introduced new rulers (the Turks) who were not familiar even with the patchwork modus vivendi that had existed between most Arab Muslim rulers and their Christian subjects. Pilgrimages became increasingly difficult and dangerous, and western pilgrims began banding together and carrying weapons to protect themselves as they tried to make their way to Christianity’s holiest sites in Palestine: notable armed pilgrimages occurred in 1064–65 and 1087–91. (…) Desperate, the Byzantines sent appeals for help westward, directing these appeals primarily at the person they saw as the chief western authority: the pope, who, as we have seen, had already been directing Christian resistance to Muslim attacks. In the early 1070s, the pope was Gregory VII, and he immediately began plans to lead an expedition to the Byzantines’ aid. He became enmeshed in conflict with the German emperors, however (what historians call “the Investiture Controversy”), and was ultimately unable to offer meaningful help. Still, the Byzantines persisted in their appeals, and finally, in 1095, Pope Urban II realized Gregory VII’s desire, in what turned into the First Crusade. (…) Far from being unprovoked, then, the crusades actually represent the first great western Christian counterattack against Muslim attacks which had taken place continually from the inception of Islam until the eleventh century, and which continued on thereafter, mostly unabated. Three of Christianity’s five primary episcopal sees (Jerusalem, Antioch, and Alexandria) had been captured in the seventh century; both of the others (Rome and Constantinople) had been attacked in the centuries before the crusades. The latter would be captured in 1453, leaving only one of the five (Rome) in Christian hands by 1500. Rome was again threatened in the sixteenth century. This is not the absence of provocation; rather, it is a deadly and persistent threat, and one which had to be answered by forceful defense if Christendom were to survive. The crusades were simply one tool in the defensive options exercised by Christians. To put the question in perspective, one need only consider how many times Christian forces have attacked either Mecca or Medina. (…) One version of Pope Urban II’s speech at Clermont in 1095 urging French warriors to embark on what would become known as the First Crusade does note that they might “make spoil of [the enemy’s] treasures,” but this was no more than an observation on the usual way of financing war in ancient and medieval society. And Fulcher of Chartres did write in the early twelfth century that those who had been poor in the West had become rich in the East as a result of their efforts on the First Crusade, obviously suggesting that others might do likewise. But Fulcher’s statement has to be read in its context, which was a chronic and eventually fatal shortage of manpower for the defense of the crusader states. Fulcher was not being entirely deceitful when he pointed out that one might become rich as a result of crusading. But he was not being entirely straightforward either, because for most participants, crusading was ruinously expensive. (…) One of the chief reasons for the foundering of the Fourth Crusade, and its diversion to Constantinople, was the fact that it ran out of money before it had gotten properly started, and was so indebted to the Venetians that it found itself unable to keep control of its own destiny. Louis IX’s Seventh Crusade in the mid-thirteenth century cost more than six times the annual revenue of the crown. The popes resorted to ever more desperate ploys to raise money to finance crusades, from instituting the first income tax in the early thirteenth century to making a series of adjustments in the way that indulgences were handled that eventually led to the abuses condemned by Martin Luther. Even by the thirteenth century, most crusade planners assumed that it would be impossible to attract enough volunteers to make a crusade possible, and crusading became the province of kings and popes, losing its original popular character. (…) In short: very few people became rich by crusading, and their numbers were dwarfed by those who were bankrupted. Most medieval people were quite well aware of this, and did not consider crusading a way to improve their financial situations. (…) certainly there were cynics and hypocrites in the Middle Ages—beneath the obvious differences of technology and material culture, medieval people were just as human as we are, and subject to the same failings. However (…) the casualty rates on the crusades were usually very high, and many if not most crusaders left expecting not to return. At least one military historian has estimated the casualty rate for the First Crusade at an appalling 75 percent, for example. (…) It is hard to imagine a more conclusive way of proving one’s dedication to a cause than sacrificing one’s life for it, and very large numbers of crusaders did just that. But this assertion is also revealed to be false when we consider the way in which the crusades were preached. Crusaders were not drafted. Participation was voluntary, and participants had to be persuaded to go. The primary means of persuasion was the crusade sermon, and one might expect to find these sermons representing crusading as profoundly appealing. (…) In fact, the opposite is true: crusade sermons were replete with warnings that crusading brought deprivation, suffering, and often death. That this was the reality of crusading was well known anyway. (…) It worked because crusading was appealing precisely because it was a known and significant hardship, and because undertaking a crusade with the right motives was understood as an acceptable penance for sin. Far from being a materialistic enterprise, crusading was impractical in worldly terms, but valuable for one’s soul. There is no space here to explore the doctrine of penance as it developed in the late antique and medieval worlds, but suffice it to say that the willing acceptance of difficulty and suffering was viewed as a useful way to purify one’s soul (and still is, in Catholic doctrine today). Crusading was the near-supreme example of such difficult suffering, and so was an ideal and very thorough-going penance. (…) As difficult as it may be for modern people to believe, the evidence strongly suggests that most crusaders were motivated by a desire to please God, expiate their sins, and put their lives at the service of their “neighbors,” understood in the Christian sense. (…) Muslims had been attacking Christians for more than 450 years before Pope Urban declared the First Crusade. They needed no incentive to continue doing so. (…) Up until quite recently, Muslims remembered the crusades as an instance in which they had beaten back a puny western Christian attack. (…) Most of the Arabic-language historical writing on the crusades before the mid-nineteenth century was produced by Arab Christians, not Muslims, and most of that was positive. There was no Arabic word for “crusades” until that period, either, and even then the coiners of the term were, again, Arab Christians. It had not seemed important to Muslims to distinguish the crusades from other conflicts between Christianity and Islam. Nor had there been an immediate reaction to the crusades among Muslims. As Carole Hillenbrand has noted, “The Muslim response to the coming of the Crusades was initially one of apathy, compromise and preoccupation with internal problems.” By the 1130s, a Muslim counter-crusade did begin, under the leadership of the ferocious Zengi of Mosul. But it had taken some decades for the Muslim world to become concerned about Jerusalem, which is usually held in higher esteem by Muslims when it is not held by them than when it is. Action against the crusaders was often subsequently pursued as a means of uniting the Muslim world behind various aspiring conquerors, until 1291, when the Christians were expelled from the Syrian mainland. And—surprisingly to Westerners—it was not Saladin who was revered by Muslims as the great anti-Christian leader. That place of honor usually went to the more bloodthirsty, and more successful, Zengi and Baibars, or to the more public-spirited Nur al-Din. The first Muslim crusade history did not appear until 1899. By that time, the Muslim world was rediscovering the crusades—but it was rediscovering them with a twist learned from Westerners. In the modern period, there were two main European schools of thought about the crusades. One school, epitomized by people like Voltaire, Gibbon, and Sir Walter Scott, and in the twentieth century Sir Steven Runciman, saw the crusaders as crude, greedy, aggressive barbarians who attacked civilized, peace-loving Muslims to improve their own lot. The other school, more romantic and epitomized by lesser-known figures such as the French writer Joseph-François Michaud, saw the crusades as a glorious episode in a long-standing struggle in which Christian chivalry had driven back Muslim hordes. In addition, Western imperialists began to view the crusaders as predecessors, adapting their activities in a secularized way that the original crusaders would not have recognized or found very congenial. At the same time, nationalism began to take root in the Muslim world. Arab nationalists borrowed the idea of a long-standing European campaign against them from the former European school of thought—missing the fact that this was a serious mischaracterization of the crusades—and using this distorted understanding as a way to generate support for their own agendas. This remained the case until the mid-twentieth century, when, in Riley-Smith’s words, “a renewed and militant Pan-Islamism” applied the more narrow goals of the Arab nationalists to a worldwide revival of what was then called Islamic fundamentalism and is now sometimes referred to, a bit clumsily, as jihadism. This led rather seamlessly to the rise of Osama bin Laden and al-Qaeda, offering a view of the crusades so bizarre as to allow bin Laden to consider all Jews to be crusaders and the crusades to be a permanent and continuous feature of the West’s response to Islam. Bin Laden’s conception of history is a feverish fantasy. He is no more accurate in his view about the crusades than he is about the supposed perfect Islamic unity which he thinks Islam enjoyed before the baleful influence of Christianity intruded. But the irony is that he, and those millions of Muslims who accept his message, received that message originally from their perceived enemies: the West. So it was not the crusades that taught Islam to attack and hate Christians. Far from it. Those activities had preceded the crusades by a very long time, and stretch back to the inception of Islam. Rather, it was the West which taught Islam to hate the crusades. The irony is rich. (….) Let us return to President Clinton’s Georgetown speech. How much of his reference to the First Crusade was accurate? It is true that many Muslims who had surrendered and taken refuge under the banners of several of the crusader lords—an act which should have granted them quarter—were massacred by out-of-control troops. This was apparently an act of indiscipline, and the crusader lords in question are generally reported as having been extremely angry about it, since they knew it reflected badly on them. To imply—or plainly state—that this was an act desired by the entire crusader force, or that it was integral to crusading, is misleading at best. In any case, John France has put it well: “This notorious event should not be exaggerated. . . . However horrible the massacre . . . it was not far beyond what common practice of the day meted out to any place which resisted.” And given space, one could append a long and bloody list, stretching back to the seventh century, of similar actions where Muslims were the aggressors and Christians the victims. Such a list would not, however, have served Mr. Clinton’s purposes. Mr. Clinton was probably using Raymond of Aguilers when he referred to “blood running up to [the] knees” of crusaders. But the physics of such a claim are impossible, as should be apparent. Raymond was plainly both bragging and also invoking the imagery of the Old Testament and the Book of Revelation. He was not offering a factual account, and probably did not intend the statement to be taken as such. As for whether or not we are “still paying for it,” (…)This is the most serious misstatement of the whole passage. What we are paying for is not the First Crusade, but western distortions of the crusades in the nineteenth century which were taught to, and taken up by, an insufficiently critical Muslim world. The problems with Mr. Clinton’s remarks indicate the pitfalls that await those who would attempt to explicate ancient or medieval texts without adequate historical awareness, and they illustrate very well what happens when one sets out to pick through the historical record for bits—distorted or merely selectively presented—which support one’s current political agenda. This sort of abuse of history has been distressingly familiar where the crusades are concerned. But nothing is served by distorting the past for our own purposes. Or rather: a great many things may be served . . . but not the truth. Distortions and misrepresentations of the crusades will not help us understand the challenge posed to the West by a militant and resurgent Islam, and failure to understand that challenge could prove deadly. Indeed, it already has. It may take a very long time to set the record straight about the crusades. It is long past time to begin the task. Paul F. Crawford
L’historiquement correct, c’est le politiquement correct appliqué à l’histoire : ce n’est pas une lecture scientifique du passé, une tentative de le restituer tel qu’il a été, c’est une interprétation idéologique et politique du monde d’hier, visant à lui faire dire quelque chose pour les hommes d’aujourd’hui, avec les mots et les concepts d’aujourd’hui. L’historiquement correct ne cherche pas à comprendre le passé pour éclairer le présent : il part du présent pour juger le passé. Dans cet état d’esprit, l’histoire devient un écran où se projettent toutes les passions contemporaines. A l’école, à la télévision ou au café du Commerce, l’historiquement correct règne en maître, proposant une histoire tronquée, falsifiée, manipulée. Et c’est ainsi que l’on voit tous les jours traquer l’obscurantisme, l’impérialisme, le colonialisme, le racisme, l’antisémitisme, le fascisme ou le sexisme à travers les siècles, même si ces mots n’ont pas de sens hors d’un contexte précis : l’historiquement correct s’en moque, car son but n’est pas la connaissance mais la propagande. L’historiquement correct pratique l’anachronisme (les événements d’hier sont évalués selon les critères de notre époque) et porte des jugements manichéens, le Bien et le Mal étant définis selon les valeurs qui ont cours aujourd’hui. Jean Sévillia
Des croisades impérialistes. Une Inquisition sanguinaire. Une Église misogyne. Qui plus est, obscurantiste. Antimoderne. Une papauté avide de pouvoirs. Un Vatican richissime. Un Pie XII antisémite, etc. Ainsi présentée, l’histoire de l’Église catholique peut apparaître comme une succession de scandales, une litanie obsédante égrenée sur fond de l’air du temps glacial. Un faux procès qui lui serait intenté et entacherait, à la longue, sa réputation ? C’est justement pour répondre à ces supposées accusations et passer ces clichés au crible de l’analyse historique que trois livres, dont deux traductions de l’allemand et de l’anglais (États-Unis), sont sortis comme un tir groupé. Que faut-il penser de cette démarche ? Que révèle cette polémique de notre époque et de son rapport au christianisme ? Jean Sévillia, journaliste au Figaro, qui s’attache depuis des décennies à traquer dans ses livres les « contrevérités » historiques ou idéologiques, a réuni dans l’Église en procès la réponse des historiens (Tallandier) 15 historiens – parmi lesquels Martin Aurell, Jean-Christian Petitfils, Olivier Chaline, Christophe Dickès ou François Huguenin – pour répondre avec une volonté de nuance et de pondération à ce réquisitoire contre l’Église. Le maître d’oeuvre classifie ces poncifs : si l’« anachronisme » qui consiste à juger le passé avec ses propres critères est la mère de toutes les erreurs, il faut compter aussi avec le « manichéisme », qui fait fi de la complexité, le « mensonge par omission », qui ne présente qu’un pan de vérité, ou bien la fameuse « indignation sélective ». Rodney Stark, un universitaire américain, ferraille lui aussi contre les « préjugés anticatholiques » dans Faux témoignages. Pour en finir avec les préjugés anticatholiques (Salvator). Ce protestant revendiqué affirme n’avoir « pas écrit ce livre pour défendre l’Église, mais pour défendre l’Histoire ». Pour lui, les aspects négatifs de son histoire ne justifient pas les « exagérations extrêmes, les fausses accusations et les fraudes évidentes ». Il répond de la même façon à une liste à la Prévert d’assertions discutables. Creusant pareillement la métaphore judiciaire, Manfred Lütz se veut lui aussi l’avocat d’un « christianisme en procès ». Dans un ouvrage (le Christianisme en procès. Lumière sur 2000 ans d’histoire et de controverses, Éditions Emmanuel) qui s’est vendu à 100.000 exemplaires outre-Rhin, il a vulgarisé les travaux d’un historien, le professeur Arnold Angenendt. Il part de l’idée que les connaissances universitaires existent déjà et qu’il suffit de les diffuser au grand public. Pour lui, ces fake news qui circulent sur le christianisme sont tout sauf anodines : elles l’ont « totalement discrédité et ébranlé jusqu’aux entrailles ». Ce sentiment qu’on ferait un mauvais procès à l’Église et aux chrétiens n’est pas nouveau : il existe même depuis les débuts du christianisme ! Plus récemment, en 2001, l’historien René Rémond, figure respectée de l’Université française, qui se qualifiait lui-même de « catholique d’ouverture », s’était ému dans un livre au large écho (le Christianisme en accusation, DDB) de la constatation d’une « culture du mépris » (moqueries, sarcasmes, condescendance…) à l’égard du catholicisme d’une nature différente du vieil anticléricalisme d’antan. Le regretté « sage de la République » avait remis le couvert en 2005 dans un second ouvrage (le Nouvel Antichristianisme, DDB). En ce début du siècle, il visait notamment un Michel Onfray qui, depuis, a tourné son talent de polémiste vers d’autres combats. En presque 20 ans, que s’est-il donc passé ? Denis Pelletier, directeur d’études à l’École pratique des hautes études, vient de publier une synthèse historique (les Catholiques en France de 1789 à nos jours, Albin Michel) qui aide à comprendre ces glissements et ces évolutions. Par rapport à une époque où, selon l’expression de Danièle Hervieu-Léger, on stigmatisait la « ringardise catholique », il nous confie avoir constaté un « regain d’intérêt » pour cette religion qui, de nouveau, « intéresse et intrigue, émeut et scandalise ». Plusieurs événements ont favorisé ce changement de perception. D’abord, le retour visible des catholiques en politique (plutôt la frange conservatrice) avec la Manif pour tous en 2012-2013 ; ensuite, les attentats islamistes avec l’émoi provoqué par l’assassinat du père Hamel, prêtre de la paroisse de Saint-Étienne-du-Rouvray, le 26 juillet 2016 ; enfin, la crise des migrants avec la mobilisation de réseaux catholiques « qu’on pensait avoir disparu du paysage ». Mais, précise l’universitaire, cet engagement de minorités et cet intérêt grandissant ne doivent pas masquer une « méconnaissance » massive de la majorité à l’égard d’un catholicisme qui, selon lui, serait presque entièrement sorti de la culture ambiante. Ce vide de la connaissance se creusant sans cesse pourrait expliquer la perméabilité de l’opinion à toutes sortes d’idées approximatives qui traînent sur le christianisme. D’autant plus que, selon Denis Pelletier, l’opinion se montre ambivalente. D’un côté, beaucoup de non-pratiquants (mais pas seulement eux) restent attachés à un catholicisme « patrimonial », comme en témoigne l’intense émotion soulevée par l’incendie de Notre-Dame de Paris ; d’un autre côté, l’opinion fait preuve d’exigence à l’égard de l’Église, jusqu’à se montrer d’autant plus sévère lorsque surviennent des scandales comme ceux des prêtres pédophiles. En France, l’anticléricalisme, toujours prêt à se réveiller, côtoierait de façon indéfectible et paradoxale l’attachement au catholicisme. Loin d’être nés du hasard, les préjugés d’aujourd’hui héritent en partie de conflits passés, parfois ravivés. Comme la Révolution française, si dramatique dans sa dimension religieuse, qui a structuré la France contemporaine. Ou comme les guerres de Religion, qui ont opposé catholiques et protestants. Par exemple, lorsque l’Espagne apparut comme la principale puissance catholique, la Grande-Bretagne et les Pays-Bas décrivirent dans leur propagande les Espagnols comme des barbares fanatiques et assoiffés de sang. Avec l’image très noire qui nous est parvenue de l’Inquisition espagnole, il est resté des traces sensibles de cette ancienne confrontation. C’est la raison pour laquelle on nourrit des préjugés souvent avec bonne foi. Le protestant Rodney Stark reconnaît ainsi avoir découvert avec « stupéfaction » que l’Inquisition, selon lui, avait contenu en Espagne et en Italie la « fureur meurtrière » des bûchers de sorcières qui embrasèrent toute l’Europe des XVIe et XVIIe siècles. (…) Cette vulgate anticléricale, selon ce professeur à la Sorbonne [Dumézil] , nous l’avons héritée de Voltaire et des Lumières. Ce qui est moins connu, précise-t-il, c’est qu’au Moyen Âge les stéréotypes du « mauvais clerc » (glouton, salace, avide, sodomite…) ont été colportés par les clercs eux-mêmes dans le but moral de réformer le clergé. Mais avec les polémiques apparues au moment de la Réforme protestante, ces caricatures à usage interne se sont retournées contre l’Église elle-même. Ainsi, les clercs eux-mêmes ont créé l’anticléricalisme, créature incontrôlable qui leur a échappé. Longtemps, l’institution, pour ses adversaires, se montra coriace et, forte de ses bataillons de prêtres et de laïcs, prête à se défendre. Le « grand effondrement » de ces dernières décennies dans un pays comme la France l’a laissée dans un état de faiblesse pouvant expliquer à son égard une virulence d’autant plus intrépide qu’en face la capacité de réplique avait fléchi. Cependant, depuis le traumatisme des attentats islamistes, révélateur, peut-être, sur le moment, d’un désarroi existentiel, on observe dans la sphère publique une atténuation dans le sarcasme, qui avait pu frôler, en certaines circonstances, l’ignominieux. L’Église, si elle l’a jamais été, n’est plus une forteresse. Les chrétiens sont à découvert. Cette vulnérabilité explique pourquoi ces auteurs qui dénoncent les poncifs refusent de substituer une légende dorée à une légende noire – approche d’une autre époque. Dans l’intention en tout cas, ils réfutent l’idée d’entrer dans une démarche apologétique, souhaitent rétablir les faits, rien que les faits. Même si l’on peut discuter leur vision des événements, ils n’ont pas la tentation de construire une histoire parallèle. Ces historiens n’exonèrent pas, le cas échéant, les prélats de leurs responsabilités. Ce qui apparaît en filigrane, dans leur lecture de l’histoire de l’Église, c’est un permanent combat intérieur, révélateur aussi de notre temps. Pour preuve : le livre dirigé par Jean Sévillia se clôt sur un texte de Bernard Lecomte qui montre la résistance opposée par la curie romaine à la volonté de Joseph Ratzinger, comme préfet de la Congrégation pour la doctrine de la foi, puis comme pape Benoît XVI, de lutter vraiment – c’est-à-dire en refusant d’enterrer les affaires – contre la pédophilie dans l’Église. (…)  En Occident, on croit connaître le christianisme alors qu’il est peut-être le plus méconnu. Il ne bénéficie pas – ou assez peu – de l’attrait de l’exotisme qui porte de nos jours les religions ou sagesses orientales. Mais ce qui compte pour les historiens de toute obédience, n’est-ce pas de porter un simple témoignage au nom de l’honnêteté intellectuelle, sans souci d’efficacité immédiate ? Par ailleurs, répondre aux idées fausses est une chose nécessaire, mais rendre compte de tout ce qui a pu être accompli de bien et de beau depuis deux millénaires, malgré les horreurs de chaque époque, en est une autre, non moins vitale. Il ne faudrait pas l’oublier. Jean-Marc Bastière

C’est la faute aux Scott, imbécile !

Anitsémitisme, persécution des païens tolérants, sombre Moyen-Age, croisades en quête de terres, butin et convertis, monstres de l’Inquisition, hérésies scientifiques, bénédiction de l’esclavage, saint autoritarisme, archaïsme économique …

Moyen-Orient berceau du judaïsme et du christianisme, présence multi-millénaire et cumulée juive et chrétienne, 450 ans d’invasions et d’occupation musulmanes y compris jusqu’à Poitiers et au sac de Rome, décennies de provocations, incinération du Saint-Sépulcre, harcèlement et violences contre un marché pourtant longtemps lucratif de pèlerins chrétiens, « guerres justes » et croisades à la fois pénitentielles et défensives aux coûts humains et matériels prohibitifs, flux financiers massifs mais presque exclusivement dans le sens Europe-Levant, massacres occasionnels mais tout à fait dans les moeurs du temps, absence de tout projet d’attaque ou d’invasion de La Mecque ou Médine …

A l’heure où après un Clinton ou un Obama …

Et tant d’autres de leurs devanciers

Le pape nous ressort d’un poème épique, nouvelle petite merveille d’équivalence morale, les conversions forcées imaginaires de musulmans par des chrétiens pour mieux faire le parallèle avec les actuels égorgements de nos amis islamistes …

Pendant que massacre après massacre en Syrie, Irak ou Iran, l’islam montre son vrai visage …

Petite remise des pendules à l’heure ….

Avec la traduction française de l’ouvrage du sociologue des religions américains Rodney Stark …

Et sa recension des dernières recherches des historiens les plus reconnus …

Sur les préjugés antichrétiens en général et anticatholiques en particulier …

Et notamment comme le rappelle Paul F. Crawford …

Sur l’incroyable ironie dont l’Histoire a le secret …

Qui veut que comme souvent ça pourrait bien être l’Occident lui-même …

Via par exemple les Scott (Walter le romancier du 19e et son émule Ridley le cinéaste du 21e) …

Et leurs innombrables fans que nous sommes …

Qui ont appris à nos actuels Ben Laden à haïr les croisades !

Histoire de l’Église : pour en finir avec les clichés

La Croix

07/11/2019

Des croisades impérialistes. Une Inquisition sanguinaire. Une Église misogyne. Qui plus est, obscurantiste. Antimoderne. Une papauté avide de pouvoirs. Un Vatican richissime. Un Pie XII antisémite, etc. Ainsi présentée, l’histoire de l’Église catholique peut apparaître comme une succession de scandales, une litanie obsédante égrenée sur fond de l’air du temps glacial. Un faux procès qui lui serait intenté et entacherait, à la longue, sa réputation ? C’est justement pour répondre à ces supposées accusations et passer ces clichés au crible de l’analyse historique que trois livres, dont deux traductions de l’allemand et de l’anglais (États-Unis), sont sortis comme un tir groupé. Que faut-il penser de cette démarche ? Que révèle cette polémique de notre époque et de son rapport au christianisme ?

Jean Sévillia, journaliste au Figaro,qui s’attache depuis des décennies à traquer dans ses livres les « contrevérités » historiques ou idéologiques, a réuni dans l’Église en procès. La réponse des historiens (Tallandier) 15 historiens – parmi lesquels Martin Aurell, Jean-Christian Petitfils, Olivier Chaline, Christophe Dickès ou François Huguenin – pour répondre avec une volonté de nuance et de pondération à ce réquisitoire contre l’Église. Le maître d’oeuvre classifie ces poncifs : si l’« anachronisme » qui consiste à juger le passé avec ses propres critères est la mère de toutes les erreurs, il faut compter aussi avec le « manichéisme », qui fait fi de la complexité, le « mensonge par omission », qui ne présente qu’un pan de vérité, ou bien la fameuse « indignation sélective ».

Rodney Stark, un universitaire américain, ferraille lui aussi contre les « préjugés anticatholiques » dans Faux témoignages. Pour en finir avec les préjugés anticatholiques (Salvator). Ce protestant revendiqué affirme n’avoir « pas écrit ce livre pour défendre l’Église, mais pour défendre l’Histoire ». Pour lui, les aspects négatifs de son histoire ne justifient pas les « exagérations extrêmes, les fausses accusations et les fraudes évidentes ». Il répond de la même façon à une liste à la Prévert d’assertions discutables.

De l’anticléricalisme au mépris

Creusant pareillement la métaphore judiciaire, Manfred Lütz se veut lui aussi l’avocat d’un « christianisme en procès ». Dans un ouvrage (le Christianisme en procès. Lumière sur 2000 ans d’histoire et de controverses, Éditions Emmanuel) qui s’est vendu à 100.000 exemplaires outre-Rhin, il a vulgarisé les travaux d’un historien, le professeur Arnold Angenendt. Il part de l’idée que les connaissances universitaires existent déjà et qu’il suffit de les diffuser au grand public. Pour lui, ces fake news qui circulent sur le christianisme sont tout sauf anodines : elles l’ont « totalement discrédité et ébranlé jusqu’aux entrailles ».

Ce sentiment qu’on ferait un mauvais procès à l’Église et aux chrétiens n’est pas nouveau : il existe même depuis les débuts du christianisme ! Plus récemment, en 2001, l’historien René Rémond, figure respectée de l’Université française, qui se qualifiait lui-même de « catholique d’ouverture », s’était ému dans un livre au large écho (le Christianisme en accusation, DDB) de la constatation d’une « culture du mépris » (moqueries, sarcasmes, condescendance…) à l’égard du catholicisme d’une nature différente du vieil anticléricalisme d’antan. Le regretté « sage de la République » avait remis le couvert en 2005 dans un second ouvrage (le Nouvel Antichristianisme, DDB). En ce début du siècle, il visait notamment un Michel Onfray qui, depuis, a tourné son talent de polémiste vers d’autres combats.

En presque 20 ans, que s’est-il donc passé ? Denis Pelletier, directeur d’études à l’École pratique des hautes études, vient de publier une synthèse historique (les Catholiques en France de 1789 à nos jours, Albin Michel) qui aide à comprendre ces glissements et ces évolutions. Par rapport à une époque où, selon l’expression de Danièle Hervieu-Léger, on stigmatisait la « ringardise catholique », il nous confie avoir constaté un « regain d’intérêt » pour cette religion qui, de nouveau, « intéresse et intrigue, émeut et scandalise ».

Plusieurs événements ont favorisé ce changement de perception. D’abord, le retour visible des catholiques en politique (plutôt la frange conservatrice) avec la Manif pour tous en 2012-2013 ; ensuite, les attentats islamistes avec l’émoi provoqué par l’assassinat du père Hamel, prêtre de la paroisse de Saint-Étienne-du-Rouvray, le 26 juillet 2016 ; enfin, la crise des migrants avec la mobilisation de réseaux catholiques « qu’on pensait avoir disparu du paysage ». Mais, précise l’universitaire, cet engagement de minorités et cet intérêt grandissant ne doivent pas masquer une « méconnaissance » massive de la majorité à l’égard d’un catholicisme qui, selon lui, serait presque entièrement sorti de la culture ambiante.

Des préjugés hérités du passé

Ce vide de la connaissance se creusant sans cesse pourrait expliquer la perméabilité de l’opinion à toutes sortes d’idées approximatives qui traînent sur le christianisme. D’autant plus que, selon Denis Pelletier, l’opinion se montre ambivalente. D’un côté, beaucoup de non-pratiquants (mais pas seulement eux) restent attachés à un catholicisme « patrimonial », comme en témoigne l’intense émotion soulevée par l’incendie de Notre-Dame de Paris ; d’un autre côté, l’opinion fait preuve d’exigence à l’égard de l’Église, jusqu’à se montrer d’autant plus sévère lorsque surviennent des scandales comme ceux des prêtres pédophiles. En France, l’anticléricalisme, toujours prêt à se réveiller, côtoierait de façon indéfectible et paradoxale l’attachement au catholicisme.

Loin d’être nés du hasard, les préjugés d’aujourd’hui héritent en partie de conflits passés, parfois ravivés. Comme la Révolution française, si dramatique dans sa dimension religieuse, qui a structuré la France contemporaine. Ou comme les guerres de Religion, qui ont opposé catholiques et protestants. Par exemple, lorsque l’Espagne apparut comme la principale puissance catholique, la Grande-Bretagne et les Pays-Bas décrivirent dans leur propagande les Espagnols comme des barbares fanatiques et assoiffés de sang. Avec l’image très noire qui nous est parvenue de l’Inquisition espagnole, il est resté des traces sensibles de cette ancienne confrontation.

C’est la raison pour laquelle on nourrit des préjugés souvent avec bonne foi. Le protestant Rodney Stark reconnaît ainsi avoir découvert avec « stupéfaction » que l’Inquisition, selon lui, avait contenu en Espagne et en Italie la « fureur meurtrière » des bûchers de sorcières qui embrasèrent toute l’Europe des XVIe et XVIIe siècles. Dans le Baptême de Clovis : 24 décembre 505 ?, le médiéviste Bruno Dumézil (voir encadré p. 32) trouve « plutôt pas mal » cette démarche de lutter contre les idées fausses, en tout cas d’apporter de la « nuance ». Le sens de la nuance, que Verlaine applique à l’art poétique, est aussi le maître mot des historiens.

Cette vulgate anticléricale, selon ce professeur à la Sorbonne, nous l’avons héritée de Voltaire et des Lumières. Ce qui est moins connu, précise-t-il, c’est qu’au Moyen Âge les stéréotypes du « mauvais clerc » (glouton, salace, avide, sodomite…) ont été colportés par les clercs eux-mêmes dans le but moral de réformer le clergé. Mais avec les polémiques apparues au moment de la Réforme protestante, ces caricatures à usage interne se sont retournées contre l’Église elle-même. Ainsi, les clercs eux-mêmes ont créé l’anticléricalisme, créature incontrôlable qui leur a échappé. Longtemps, l’institution, pour ses adversaires, se montra coriace et, forte de ses bataillons de prêtres et de laïcs, prête à se défendre. Le « grand effondrement » de ces dernières décennies dans un pays comme la France l’a laissée dans un état de faiblesse pouvant expliquer à son égard une virulence d’autant plus intrépide qu’en face la capacité de réplique avait fléchi.

L’Église n’est plus une forteresse

Cependant, depuis le traumatisme des attentats islamistes, révélateur, peut-être, sur le moment, d’un désarroi existentiel, on observe dans la sphère publique une atténuation dans le sarcasme, qui avait pu frôler, en certaines circonstances, l’ignominieux. L’Église, si elle l’a jamais été, n’est plus une forteresse. Les chrétiens sont à découvert. Cette vulnérabilité explique pourquoi ces auteurs qui dénoncent les poncifs refusent de substituer une légende dorée à une légende noire – approche d’une autre époque. Dans l’intention en tout cas, ils réfutent l’idée d’entrer dans une démarche apologétique, souhaitent rétablir les faits, rien que les faits. Même si l’on peut discuter leur vision des événements, ils n’ont pas la tentation de construire une histoire parallèle.

Ces historiens n’exonèrent pas, le cas échéant, les prélats de leurs responsabilités. Ce qui apparaît en filigrane, dans leur lecture de l’histoire de l’Église, c’est un permanent combat intérieur, révélateur aussi de notre temps. Pour preuve : le livre dirigé par Jean Sévillia se clôt sur un texte de Bernard Lecomte qui montre la résistance opposée par la curie romaine à la volonté de Joseph Ratzinger, comme préfet de la Congrégation pour la doctrine de la foi, puis comme pape Benoît XVI, de lutter vraiment – c’est-à-dire en refusant d’enterrer les affaires – contre la pédophilie dans l’Église.

N’est-ce pas une tâche de Sisyphe, jamais achevée, de combattre des poncifs qui ont la vie dure ? Il est plus difficile, on le sait, de corriger des préjugés que de combler une ignorance. En Occident, on croit connaître le christianisme alors qu’il est peut-être le plus méconnu. Il ne bénéficie pas – ou assez peu – de l’attrait de l’exotisme qui porte de nos jours les religions ou sagesses orientales. Mais ce qui compte pour les historiens de toute obédience, n’est-ce pas de porter un simple témoignage au nom de l’honnêteté intellectuelle, sans souci d’efficacité immédiate ? Par ailleurs, répondre aux idées fausses est une chose nécessaire, mais rendre compte de tout ce qui a pu être accompli de bien et de beau depuis deux millénaires, malgré les horreurs de chaque époque, en est une autre, non moins vitale. Il ne faudrait pas l’oublier.

À lire
L’Église en procès. La réponse des historiens
, sous la direction de Jean Sévillia, Tallandier.
Faux témoignages. Pour en finir avec les préjugés anticatholiques, de Rodney Stark, Salvator.
Le Christianisme en procès. Lumière sur 2000 ans d’histoire et de controverses, de Manfred Lütz, Éditions Emmanuel

Voir aussi:

Protestants et anticatholiques des “Lumières”, responsables des légendes noires contre l’Eglise

Salon beige

On lit souvent que l’Inquisition fut l’un des chapitres les plus terribles et sanglants de l’histoire occidentale ; que Pie XII, dit « le pape d’Hitler », était antisémite ; que l’obscurantisme a freiné la science jusqu’à l’arrivée des Lumières ; et que les croisades furent le premier exemple de l’avidité occidentale. Ces affirmations sont sans fondements historiques.

Dans cet ouvrage, Faux témoignages, Pour en finir avec les préjugés anticatholiques, l’éminent professeur de sociologie des religions Rodney Stark démontre que certaines idées fermement établies sont en réalité des mythes. Il s’attaque aux légendes noires de l’histoire de l’Église et explique de quelles façons elles se sont substituées à la réalité des faits. Son travail est d’autant plus méritoire qu’il est lui-même protestant. Et il écrit justement à propos de ces légendes :

Tout a débuté avec les guerres déclenchées en Europe à la suite de la Réforme qui a opposé protestants et catholiques et fait des millions de morts. A la même époque, l’Espagne apparaissait comme la principale puissance catholique. Par réaction, la Grande-Bretagne et les Pays-Bas ont alors déclenché d’intenses campagnes de propagande qui décrivaient les Espagnols comme de fanatiques barbares assoiffés de sang. Jeffrey Burton Russel, éminent historien du Moyen Age, écrit :

D’innombrables livres et pamphlets furent édités par les presses du Nord accusant l’empire espagnol de dépravation inhumaine et d’horribles atrocités. […] L’Espagne était décrite comme un lieu de ténèbres, d’ignorance et de mal.

[…] Mais les protestants en colère n’étaient pas les seuls à inventer ces histoires ou à y acquiescer. De nombreux mensonges analysés dans les chapitres qui vont suivre étaient soutenus par des auteurs antireligieux, notamment à l’époque des “Lumières”.

Voir également:

Why is this non-Catholic scholar debunking “centuries of anti-Catholic history”?

An interview with Dr. Rodney Stark, sociologist and author of « Bearing False Witness »

The Catholic world report

Dr. Rodney Stark has written nearly 40 books on a wide range of topics, incuding a number of recent books on the history of Christianity, monotheism, Christianity in China, and the roots of modernity. After beginning as a newspaper reporter and spending time in the Army, Stark received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, where he held appointments as a research sociologist at the Survey Research Center and at the Center for the Study of Law and Society. He later was Professor of Sociology and of Comparative Religion at the University of Washington; he has been at Baylor University since 2004. Stark is past president of the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion and of the Association for the Sociology of Religion, and he has won a number of national and international awards for distinguished scholarship. Raised as a Lutheran, he has identified himself as an agnostic but has, more recently, called himself an “independent Christian”.

His most recent book isBearing False Witness: Debunking Centuries of Anti-Catholic History (Templeton Press, 2016), which addresses ten prevalent myths about Church history. Dr. Stark recently responded by e-mail to some questions from Carl E. Olson, editor ofCatholic World Report.

CWR: You begin the book by first noting your upbringing as an American Protestant and then discussing “distinguished bigots”. What is a “distinguished bigot”? And how have such people influenced the way in which the Catholic Church is understood and perceived by many Americans today?

Dr. Rodney Stark: By distinguished bigots I mean prominent scholars and intellectuals who clearly are antagonistic to the Catholic Church and who promulgate false historical claims.

CWR: How did you go about identifying and selecting the ten anti-Catholic myths that you rebut in the book? To what degree are these myths part of a general (if sometimes vague) Protestant culture, and to what degree are they encouraged and spread by a more secular, elite culture?

Dr. Stark: For the most part I encountered these anti-Catholic myths as I wrote about various historical periods and events, and discovered that these well-known ‘facts” were false and therefore was forced to deal with them in those studies. These myths are not limited to some generalized Protestant culture—many Catholics, including well-known ones, have repeated them too. These myths have too often, and for too long, been granted truthful validity by historians in general. Of course secularists—especially ex-Catholics such as Karen Armstrong—love these myths.

CWR: The first chapter is on “sins of anti-Semitism,” perhaps the most divisive and controversial of the topics you address. How have your own views on this issue changed, and why? Why do you think there continues to be a wide-spread belief or impression that the Catholic Church in inherently anti-Semitic?

Dr. Stark: When I began as a scholar, “everybody” including leading Catholics knew the Church was a primary source of anti-Semitism. It was only later as I worked with materials on medieval attacks on Jews that I discovered the effective role of the Church in opposing and suppressing such attacks—this truth being told by medieval Jewish chroniclers and thereby most certainly true. Why do so many ‘intellectuals,’ many of them ex-Catholics, continue to accept the notion that Pope Pius XII was “Hitler’s Pope,” when that is so obviously a vicious lie? It can only be hatred of the Church. Keep in mind that it is prominent Jews who defend the pope.

CWR: Why have various historians, such as Gibbons, presented the ancient pagans as either benevolent or mostly tolerant toward Christianity? What was the actual relationship between Christianity and paganism in the first centuries of the Church’s existence?

Dr. Stark: In those days, the safe way to attack religion was to let readers assume it was only an attack on Catholicism, so that’s what Gibbon and his contemporaries did. Perhaps surprisingly, once the pagans were no longer able to persecute Christians, they were pretty much ignored by the Church and by emperors and only slowly disappeared

CWR: How did the mythology of the “Dark Ages” develop? What are some of the main problems with that mythology?

Dr. Stark: Voltaire and his associates made up the fiction of the Dark Ages so that they could claim to have burst forth with the Enlightenment. As every competent historian (and even the encyclopedias) now acknowledges, there were no Dark Ages. To the contrary, it was during these centuries that Europe took the great cultural and technological leap forward that put it so far ahead of the rest of the world.

CWR: What relationship is there between the mythology of the “Dark Ages” and the myth of “secular Enlightenment”? How rational and scientific, in fact, was the Enlightenment?

Dr. Stark: The “philosophes” of the so-called “Enlightenment played no role in the rise of science—the great scientific progress of the time was achieved by highly religious men, many of them Catholic clergy.

CWR: The Crusades and the Inquisitions continue be presented as epochs and events that involved Christian barbarism and the murder of millions. Why are those myths so widespread and popular, especially after scholars have spent decades correcting and clarifying what really did (or did not) happen?

Dr. Stark: I am competent to reveal that the Crusades were legitimate defensive wars and that the Inquisition was not bloody. I am not competent to explain why the pile of fine research supporting these corrections have had no impact on the chattering classes. I suspect that these myths are too precious for the anti-religious to surrender.

CWR: In addressing “Protestant Modernity” you flatly stated that Max Weber’s thesis that Protestantism birthed capitalism and modernity is “nonsense”. What are the main problems with Weber’s thesis?

Dr. Stark: The problem is simply that capitalism was fully developed and thriving in Europe many centuries before the Reformation.

CWR:
 You emphatically state that as a scholar with a Protestant background working at a Baptist university you did not write your book as “a defense of the Church” but “in defense of history.” Why is that significant? And, finally, do you think most Americans actually give more credence to history than to the Church?

Dr. Stark: I think the distinguished bigots will have a hard time accusing me of being a Catholic toady, trying to cover up the sins of the Church. The only axe I have to grind is that history ought to be honestly reported. As to your final point: I don’t think ‘most Americans’ will ever know that this book was written. I can only hope that I will influence intellectuals and textbook writers—maybe.

Related CWR articles:

“The Story of the West: Who, Why, and How” (June 2014): A review of Rodney Stark’s book, How the West Won: The Neglected Story of the Triumph of Modernity | Gregory J. Sullivan

“A Curious Mix of Sophistication, Sin, and Piety” (May 2011): An interview with sociologist Rodney Stark about the Crusades | Mark Sullivan

Voir de même:

An agnostic demolishes anti-Catholic myths

Michael Duggan

Bearing False Witness
by Rodney Stark
Templeton Press, £19

The Age of Reason began in the 2nd century AD. How about that for a claim? Rodney Stark is not a man to equivocate. In his judgment, the Catholic Church has been routinely traduced by “distinguished bigots” – historians who have twisted or ignored the evidence and polluted popular understanding. Hence Stark’s determination to put back by a millennium-and-a-half the dating of the Age of Reason, which really began, he argues, with certain Church Fathers and their decision to conduct theology; that is, formal reasoning about God. Tertullian, Clement of Alexandria, Augustine: they all insisted on the power of reason and its place in God’s plan.

St Augustine went into raptures about the “sagacity” with which “the movements and connections of the stars have been discovered”. Man’s rational nature was an “unspeakable boon” conferred on us by God.

Hence also Stark’s fury about the term “Dark Ages”. It is remarkable how politicians and journalists wanting to convey disgust these days, whether for the actions of ISIS or for rules about wearing high heels at work, are liable to call such a thing “medieval” or “a return to the Dark Ages”.

And this darkness was, of course, the doing of the Catholic Church. Edward Gibbon said so. So did Voltaire. Daniel Boorstin, librarian of the United States Congress, wrote that the Church “built a grand barrier against the progress of knowledge”.

Rubbish, says Stark. The Dark Ages are nothing but a hoax invented by intellectuals to glorify themselves and vilify the Church. The period from 300 to 1300 was, in fact, one of the great innovative eras of mankind.

Technology was developed and put into use on a scale no civilisation had previously known: water mills, the three-field system, the horse collar, selective plant breeding, chimneys and much more. These things transformed productivity, increased the population, and widened horizons all over supposedly benighted Europe. But high-minded men of letters saw fit not to notice such things.

What else? Human dissection for scientific purposes began in medieval universities and without serious objections from the Church. Stark reels off clergymen-scientists who preceded Copernicus and who, among other things, fought and won the battle for empiricism in science.

There was moral progress too. The irony of ISIS comparisons, given that group’s recourse to abduction and enslavement, is that most of Europe had waved goodbye to slavery by 1300. Though not cited by Stark, Hugh Thomas, the great modern historian of the Atlantic slave trade, attributed the later resurgence of slavery to the memory of antiquity: “If Athens had slaves to build the Parthenon, and Rome to maintain the aqueducts, why should modern Europeans hesitate to have slaves to build its new world in America?” As for the treatment by some historians of the Church’s record on slavery, Stark accuses them of lying in plain sight.

And so, in Bearing False Witness, Rodney Stark takes aim at one “myth” after another about Catholicism. The Spanish Inquisition? A “pack of lies”, originally spread by English and Dutch propagandists. The Inquisition “made little use of the stake, seldom tortured anyone and maintained unusually decent prisons”.

The Crusades? Stark begins by saying, in effect, “the others started it”, and goes from there. He is particularly hot in attacking the idea that the Crusaders were driven by dreams of land and loot. Stark’s style is brusque and clear. He is like a man carefully setting up skittles before firing down bowling balls of fact and argument to send them scattering (though in a couple of cases he is, in reality, rebalancing rather than overturning the debate).

All of which means that Bearing False Witness is stirring, compelling, often convincing stuff. Some bits are especially fascinating, as when Stark makes the case for monasteries as the first true capitalist firms. One hopes that, as can happen when the pursuit of truth gets wrapped up in controversy, Stark is not carting more away from the evidence than he should. It would be fascinating to read a riposte.

And, of course, the greatest obstacle nowadays to perceiving the Catholic Church as a force for good is not the myth of the suppressed Gospels, or the myth of the Protestant work ethic, or whatever else. It is the anything but mythical abuse scandals.

Finally, a word on Professor Stark himself. He is co-director of the Institute for Studies of Religion at Baylor, the world’s largest Baptist university, once a hotbed of militant anti-Catholicism. He grew up an American Protestant, “raised on the glories of the Reformation”. More recently, he has described himself as incapable of religious faith, an agnostic.

One thing Stark is not, therefore, is a Catholic: “I did not write this book in defence of the Church,” he states, looking possible critics straight in the eye. “I wrote it in defence of history.”

Voir de plus:

Lies, myths and patent frauds

Michael Duggan
Catholic Herald

‘Europe is a lot more religious than it appears to be’: sociologist Rodney Stark (Baylor University)

They all laughed at Columbus when he said the world was round,
They all laughed when Edison recorded sound.
Ira Gershwin

Professor Rodney Stark grew up in Jamestown, North Dakota, in the 1930s and 1940s. He was, in his own words, “an American Protestant with intellectual pretensions”.

Every October 12 – Columbus Day – he would look on at “throngs of Knights of Columbus members, accompanied by priests, marching in celebration of the arrival of the ‘Great Navigator’ in the New World”. The young Stark found the spectacle absurd. He knew that Columbus had acted in the teeth of unyielding opposition from Roman Catholic prelates who cited biblical proof that the world was flat. Any attempt to reach Asia by sailing west would mean ships falling off the edge of the world, they said.

Years later he found out that the whole story was a lie. Stark recounts all of this – and explains the real story of the opposition to Columbus – in the introduction to his latest book Bearing False Witness: Debunking Centuries of Anti-Catholic History (reviewed in the Catholic Herald on June 3).

So how did he get his first direct experience of Catholicism? “I was about 16 when I first attended a Catholic service. I went with a girl I was dating. I found nothing remarkable about it.” Stark was raised as a Lutheran and was used to “highly liturgical services. So I did not find Catholic ritual strange. We stood when Catholics knelt.” He adds: “I don’t know that this had any influence on my historical views.”

The historical view that Stark sets out in Bearing False Witness is that a line of “distinguished bigots”, stretching from Gibbon to the present day, have created a common culture in which widely held assumptions about the Catholic Church are based on “extreme exaggerations, false accusations and patent frauds”.

Stark insists that he is not a whitewasher and that he is “simply reporting the prevailing view among qualified experts”. He also reminds his readers that he is not a Catholic. Though never an atheist, he was for some time primarily a “cultural Christian” or, as he has described it elsewhere, “an admirer but not a believer”. And now? “I have not been an agnostic for years. I wrote myself to faith.”

The process of writing himself to faith includes books such as The Triumph of Christianity, which records “how the Jesus Movement became the world’s largest religion”; The Victory of Reason, explaining how Christianity led to freedom, capitalism and Western success; and God’s Battalions, an incisive defence of the Crusades.

As a fledgling historian in the 1960s, though, Stark was still wedded to notions of the baneful role of the Church in history. In his first year of graduate school at Berkeley, he was asked to prepare a brief of research he had been doing on anti-Semitism to be distributed to bishops attending the Second Vatican Council. According to Cardinal Augustin Bea, this summary was influential in the production of Nostra Aetate, the Council’s statement on the Jews.

Stark glowed with pride. But over the years, as he carried out more work on ancient and medieval history, he became aware of “the extent to which the Catholic Church had stood as a consistent barrier against anti-Semitic violence”. A long analysis of all known outbursts of anti-Semitic violence in both Europe and the Islamic world from 500 to 1600 forced him to reconsider the entire link between Christianity and anti-Semitism. This was to become the theme of the first chapter of Bearing False Witness.

Turning to the current state of the Catholic Church, Stark is typically unequivocal. Shame among Catholics about scandals involving paedophile priests is (in America at least) “limited to a few intellectuals. Otherwise there should have been substantial declines in membership or in Mass attendance. And that hasn’t happened. There has been no decline in membership or mass attendance in the United States.

“The commitment of ordinary Catholics seems unaffected. In Latin America, rates of mass attendance have doubled and redoubled during the past 25 years. Catholic membership in the nations of sub-Saharan Africa is very far above that even claimed by the Catholic Almanac and continues to grow rapidly.”

But what about Europe? “Europe is a lot more religious than it is said to be or even than it appears to be. I have written a lot about this, most recently in The Triumph of Faith.” Stark has suggested in other interviews that the lack of attendance at church in Europe is down to “ineffective churches rather than lack of faith, since religious belief remains high all across the continent”.

This is typically trenchant stuff from someone who has spent decades understanding the past and present of Christianity. So what then does Prof Stark see as the future for the Catholic Church? “Continued strength.”

Bearing False Witness: Debunking Centuries of Anti-Catholic History

by Rodney Stark.
Templeton Press, 2016.
Hardcover, 280 pages, $28.

Rodney Stark, while doing research into the history of religion, discovered that the popular history of Catholicism is rife with errors, errors that have been repeatedly exposed as such by serious historians. However, the people who read pop history do not typically read serious historians, and so only a work of pop history can correct the errors in other works of pop history. Thus this book.

Each of the book’s ten chapters addresses a subject concerning which the Catholic Church has been held to have behaved badly. Each chapter begins with a number of examples of writers condemning the Church for some fault, which is useful in showing that Stark is not going after straw men. Nor does he claim that the Church, or those that claim to act in the Church’s name, are uniformly blameless. Rather, his debunk of the more extreme claims has a historiographical purpose: to show that the accusations against theChurch are themselves driven by an anti-Catholic animus rather than scholarly research or factual accuracy.

Stark, a professor of history at Baptist-affiliated Baylor University, first takes up the topic of Jews and the Catholic Church. Stark notes that while Christians sometimes attacked or killed Jews between 500 and 1400, the Church hierarchy consistently defended the Jews. For instance, during the First Crusade, some crusaders decided that, before they went all the way to the Middle East to fight “God’s enemies,” they should “take care” of those enemies who were living next door in Europe (i.e. Jews). And so a certain Emich of Leiningen set out to kill Jews in the Rhineland. Their first stop was Speyer, but:

The bishop of Speyer took the local Jews under his protection, and Emich’s forces could only lay their hands on a dozen Jews who had somehow failed to heed the bishop’s alarm. All twelve were killed. Then Emich led his forces to Worms. Here, too, the bishop took the local Jews into his palace for protection. But this time Emich would have none of that, and his forces broke down the bishop’s gate and killed about five hundred Jews. The same pattern was repeated the following week Mainz. Just as before, the bishop attempted to shield the Jews, but he was attacked and forced to flee for his life.

In the Second Crusade, St. Bernard of Clairvaux rode to the Rhine Valley—apparently the worst place in Medieval Europe to be a Jew—and, as told by a Jewish chronicler Ephraim, said, “Anyone who attacks a Jew and tries to kill him is as though he attacks Jesus himself.”

During the Black Death, rumors arose that Jews were poisoning wells and causing the plague deaths. But, “Pope Clement VI, who directed the clergy to protect the Jews, denounced all claims about poisoned wells, and ordered that those who spread the rumor, as well as anyone who harmed Jews, be excommunicated.” In short, attacks on Jews in the Middle Ages almost always arose from “the mob,” and were resisted by the Church hierarchy.

And so through today. Stark goes on to thoroughly debunk the idea that Pope Pius XII was “Hitler’s Pope,” citing the hundreds of thousands of Jews saved by the Church during World War II, some of them sheltered from Nazis in the Vatican itself. In fact, in the years after the war, a number of prominent Jews, such as Golda Meir, praised Pius for his efforts.

Stark is somewhat less objective when it comes to the so-called “lost gospels.” These gospels are, to a great extent, “Gnostic” in character. The trait that characterizes gnosticism, in general, is that it is neither works nor faith that bring salvation, but knowledge. More specifically, it is usually secret knowledge, available only to spiritual adepts, that saves. And even more specifically, that knowledge is often held to be the knowledge that the physical world is a prison, trapping the adept in his or her body and blocking the adept from realizing the soul’s true nature, as a resident of a better, divine realm. Gnostic texts often set out an elaborate metaphysics of this imprisonment, involving multiple levels of divine beings. In particular, one divine being, the demiurge, had fallen from the Pleroma, the divine realm, essentially gone mad, and created a prison—the physical world—in which he could entrap other spiritual beings and garner their worship. Gnostics often identified this crazed divinity with … Jehovah, the Hebrew God.

This may seem mad or it may seem insightful, but Stark adopts an odd way to describe these beliefs: “[For Gnostics] God is the epitome of evil and the gleeful cause of human suffering.” But no gnostic would likely say that about “God” with a capital G: they always seemed to hold that the god who created the physical world was a distinctly lesser divine being, and that “God,” the ultimate divinity, is good and uniting with him is the true goal of Gnostic practice.

Over the nextfew pages, Stark demonstrates that he understands this quite well, and yet he (or perhaps an editor) continues to call the gnostic demiurge “God” with a capital G. It is as though someone took the fact that orthodox Christians believe that there is a fallen divine being, namely Satan, who epitomizes evil, and claimed that therefore Christians believe that God is evil! Gnostic beliefs seem nutty to Stark, and that is understandable: they have so seemed to many others, including the Church fathers. But the way these beliefs are presented is arguably misleading.

Stark’s next chapter debunks the notion that there were massive “forced conversions” to Christianity in late antiquity. His own work (The Rise of Christianity and The Triumph of Christianity) has shown that the main factors prompting conversions were social and doctrinal: “socially, Christianity generated an intense congregational life” and “doctrinally, in contrast to paganism’s belief in limited, unreliable, and often immoral gods, Christianity presented an image of God as moral, concerned, dependable, and omnipotent.” He demonstrates that the Christian emperors continued to employ large numbers of pagans as consuls and prefects. He quotes the Code of Justinian, from as late as the sixth century, declaring: “We especially command those persons who are truly Christians, or who are said to be so, that they should not abuse the authority of religion and dare to lay violent hands on Jews and pagans, who are living quietly and attempting nothing disorderly or contrary to law.” Of course, this means that there were Christians doing these things, but their acts were not official policy.

In another chapter, Stark shows how the belief in a “Dark Age” is essentially dead among serious historians. He quotes Warren Hollister: “To my mind, anyone who believes that the era that witnessed the building of the Chartres Cathedral and the invention of parliament and the university was ‘dark’ must be mentally retarded.…” And he demonstrates that, contrary to the myth promoted by “Enlightenment” thinkers, almost all of the major figures in the scientific revolution were religious, many of them very devout. Isaac Newton, for instance, devoted more time to biblical scholarship than to science or mathematics. The idea of a “Dark Age” was a piece of Enlightenment propaganda.

Stark relates how recent historical research has revealed the Crusades as largely a response to Muslim aggression in the Middle East. Most of the crusaders were motivated by a religious belief that they were on a mission from God, not by a desire to grab wealth from the Muslims. In fact, crusading was expensive and the Crusader states established in the Middle East had to be constantly subsidized by a flow of silver from Europe. The crusaders certainly committed what wetoday would regard as atrocities, but they were the standard for war at that time, and similar acts were committed by Muslim armies.

Stark next turns his attention to the Spanish Inquisition, today a symbol of oppression and persecution. But as Stark makes clear, by the standards of the day, the Spanish Inquisition was actually fairly innocuous. Torture, for instance, was a standard way of getting confessions at the time, and while the Inquisition employed it, it did so within strict guidelines secular courts often lacked. In fact, the Inquisition’s reputation was so much better than that of the secular courts that defendants would try to get their trials moved to an Inquisition venue.

Stark spends some time blowing apart the myth that having faith means rejecting reason. He quotes various Catholic thinkers, such as Quintus Tertullian: “Reason is a thing of God, inasmuch as there is nothing which God the Maker of all has not provided, disposed, ordained by reason—nothing which he has not willed should be handled and understood by reason.” Or, from Clement of Alexandria, we have: “Do not think we say these things [Christian doctrines] are only to be received by faith, but also that they are to be asserted by reason. For indeed it is not safe to commit these things to bare faith without reason, since assuredly truth cannot be without reason.”

The idea that faith is the opposite of reason is a fairly recent idea, and would have stunned most Christians from the time of Christ through the Middle Ages. It is based on a (willful?) misunderstanding of what was meant by “faith.” So, for instance, when Bertrand Russell writes, “We may define ‘faith’ as a firm belief in something for which there is no evidence,” we should recognize this as another piece of propaganda and not a reasoned philosophical position. In fact, “faith,” properly understood, is every bit as necessary to science as it is to Christianity. We might see Michael Polanyi on this point, or consider this passage:

“I’ve found that a big difference between new coders and experienced coders is faith: faith that things are going wrong for a logical and discoverable reason, faith that problems are fixable, faith that there is a way to accomplish the goal. The path from ‘not working’ to ‘working’ might not be obvious, but with patience you can usually find it.” (Emphasis mine.)

Indeed, this is something I continually have to convey to my own computer science students: they must first believe that our whole enterprise is rational, and will make sense given time, before they will be able to commit to making the effort necessary to overcome all the obstacles to understanding they will face along the way. (Believe that they may know?) In any case, as Alfred North Whitehead has noted, science did not develop in Christian civilization by accident: the faith that creation is fundamentally reasonable was the basis for the whole scientific enterprise.

Stark runs into some problems when he attempts to address more technical aspects of the history of science. For instance, he writes, “To make his system work, Copernicus had to postulate that there were loops in the orbits of the heavenly bodies … However, these loops lacked any observational support; had they existed, a heavenly body should have been observed looping.” What are we to make of this? Copernicus introduced epicycles (Stark’s “loops”) precisely to get his system to fit with the observational data! The “observational support” was that, with the loops, Copernicus could predict where planets would appear reasonably well, but without them he could not. Stark writes that “a heavenly body should have been observed looping,” when in fact, for Copernicus, that is exactly what we are observing all the time.

Thanks to Kepler’s discovery of elliptical orbits, we now have a simpler system for explaining these apparent loops, but the point is that Copernicus introduced epicycles as the only way he could envision to explain the actual observations.

Furthermore, Stark seems to think that “loops” had to be introduced into the planets’ circular orbits to get the orbital period correct: “it would not do for the earth to circle the sun in only three hundred days.” But one can always change the diameter or speed of a circular orbit in one’s model and thus get the orbital period correct. The real problem with positing circular orbits instead of the actual elliptical ones has to do with the relationship of different segments of a planet’s orbit, as can be seen with a visual aid:

In the portions of a planet’s orbit where the ellipse is flatter than a circle, the planet will appear to move too fast for it to have a circular orbit. And in the portion of its elliptical orbit where the ellipse is more curved than a circle, the planet will appear to move too slowly.

So the problem is not that circular orbits show planets having years of too short (or too long) a duration—that problem could be trivially corrected. Instead, the problem is that if we mistakenly assume circular orbits, we are left with having to introduce “loops” to explain why some portions of a planet’s orbit proceed faster than other portions.

Stark next addresses the history of the Catholic Church vis-à-vis slavery. He notes that while slavery was hardly questioned in antiquity, the Catholic Church gradually eliminated it in Western Europe during the Middle Ages. When Aquinas condemned slavery as “contrary to natural law,” this soon became the official Church position. Recent controversies concerning Catholic colleges like Georgetown, which did own and sell slaves, make this a pertinent point, as well as the fact that slavery continues across wide parts of the non-Christian world.

Some Church officials, even some popes, continued to own slaves. (But some popes also engaged in fornication and had children out of wedlock, despite official Church opposition to sex outside of marriage: this shows that popes do not always follow Church doctrine, not that Church doctrine permits fornication.) And the Spanish and Portuguese imperialists often continued to enslave people, despite Church opposition. But when Spain colonized the Canary Islands in the early 1400s and started enslaving the islanders, the action prompted Pope Eugene IV to declare that “these people are to be totally and perpetually free and are to be let go without exaction or reception of any money.”

In the 1500s, Pope Paul II asserted that “the same Indians and all other peoples—even though they be outside the faith … should not be deprived of their liberty or their other possessions … and are not to be reduced to slavery.…” The Inquisition took up the matter in the 1600s, and asked:

Whether it is permitted to buy, sell, or make contracts in their respect Blacks and other natives who have harmed no one and have been made captives by force or deceit?

And it declared, “Answer: no.”

In fact, the papacy denounced slavery in 1462, 1537, 1639, 1741, 1815, and 1839.

Stark’s second-to-last chapter shows that the supposed close link between the Church and authoritarianism is actually rather flimsy; for instance, while the Church supported Franco in the Spanish Civil War, it did so because the Republicans were busily murdering Catholic clergy. Stark’s final chapter denies the link between the rise of capitalism and the Protestant Reformation, arguing that all of the necessary ingredients were already present in Scholastic economics, the large-scale enterprises run by monasteries, and the entrepreneurial Italian city-states.

Stark’s overall thesis, that popular history is frequently anti-Catholic in ways that serious historians today recognize as without factual basis, is certainly correct. And he is correct in suggesting that rectifying this bias is important: far too often, the Catholic argument against, say, abortion “rights” is dismissed with a “well, what does one expect from such a pro-slavery, anti-science, anti-Semitic, authoritarian institution?” But the importance of the project makes it unfortunate that Stark has been sloppy in his research in several sections of this work.


Gene Callahan is a Lecturer in Computer Science and Economics at St. Joseph’s College and a Research Fellow at the Collingwood and British Idealism Centre at Cardiff University, Wales. He is the author of Economics for Real People and Oakeshott on Rome and America.

Voir aussi:

A Baptist Scholar Debunks Anti-Catholic Historical Hogwash

In snappy prose, Bearing False Witness looks at the West’s Christian roots.It’s not exactly beach reading, but for those of a certain mind, Rodney Stark’s Bearing False Witness could prove a page turner. The subtitle — academics invariably include subtitles — makes plain that this is no potboiler: Debunking Centuries of Anti-Catholic History. And true to academic form the book includes more than 20 pages of footnotes and citations. Stark, however, has written a wise and rollicking work of intellectual history that should be read by Catholics, non-Catholics, and, really, anyone who wants to comment on the Catholic Church’s proper place in some 2,000 years of history.

Stark is coordinator of the Institute for Studies of Religion at Baylor University, the world’s largest Baptist University, and the author of several books: The Rise of Christianity; For the Glory of God: How Monotheism Led to Reformations, Science, Witch-Hunts, and the End of Slavery; and One True God: Historical Consequences of Monotheism. In short, he’s a distinguished scholar with impeccable academic credentials, and he is working at the top of his game in Bearing False Witness. Of equal importance, he’s not a Roman Catholic. This is no polemic or tract. Stark’s overriding interest is the historical evidence and the most up-to-date scholarship, and he marshals that evidence and scholarship with a great and subdued power.

It all makes for a snappy and instructive read, because the professor actually writes in English, not academic jargon. He never minces words. He’ll tell you what’s historical hogwash and why, and who promoted anti-Catholic history — and who is promoting it today.

It also says something about Bearing False Witness that Stark does not spare himself scrutiny. Right from the start of the book, from the first chapter on “The Sins of Anti-Semitism,” he lets readers know when his past views were out sync with the historical record. He covers it all. In addition to the alleged anti-Semitism early on up to Pope Pius XII’s fabled complicity with Adolf Hitler and the Nazis, he gives us chapters on the Crusaders and the Inquisition and the Dark Ages.

That is, the so-called Dark Ages, for Stark is at his best in showing how an era or age came by its name and how the vast historical evidence belies the easy — or intentionally hostile — handle. Enter the Dark Ages, which is said to have “fallen” over Europe following the fifth-century collapse of Rome and lasted to at least 1300, a benighted millennium hostile to progress and knowledge, thanks to orthodox Christendom. Even the most educated will be forgiven for accepting this view, which writers from Petrarch to Voltaire, Rousseau to Gibbon advanced for their own purposes. Yet, as Stark points out, “serious scholars” have known for decades that this organizing scheme for Western history is a “complete fraud” and, as Warren Hollister wrote, “an indestructible fossil of self-congratulatory Renaissance humanism.”

The Romans may have called the conquering Goths “barbarians,” but their chieftain (Alaric) had been a Roman commander, and many of the soldiers had served in the Roman army. It’s also the case that the “barbarian North” had been under the rule of Rome. While intellectuals have not been able to appreciate the technological, commercial, and moral progress that took place in the small communities of medieval Europe, that doesn’t mean the advances did not take place. On the contrary, revolutions in agriculture, weaponry, nonhuman power (water and wind power), transportation, manufacturing, education (the first universities in Paris and Bologna), and morals (the fall of slavery) occurred. Scholars have concluded that the flowering of science that followed during the Scientific Revolution in the 16th century was “an evolution, not a revolution.” As Stark writes: “Just as Copernicus simply took the next implicit step in the cosmology of his day, so too the flowering of science in that era was the culmination of the gradual progress that had been made over previous centuries.”

All this progress didn’t happen in spite of the Catholic Church or get started only in the fourth century or the 17th century. According to Stark, the rise of the West began late in the second century because of an “extraordinary faith in reason and progress” that originated in Christianity, which held that human reason could unlock God’s creation.

Bearing False Witness deserves a wide audience. It’s full of spunk and verve, wisdom and scholarship.

Voir également:

Catherine Pepinster sees points scored off historical sceptics

Catherine Pepinster

Churchtimes

16 June 2017

Bearing False Witness: Debunking centuries of anti-Catholic history

Rodney Stark

SPCK £14.99

(978-1-911096-62-7)

Church Times

UNTIL a visit to Louisiana a couple of years ago, I had always assumed that slaves were completely brutalised. But, on a tour of a New Orleans 19th-century home, I discovered that the lady of the house had worked closely alongside her slaves in the kitchen. Then I found out that slaves were forbidden to learn to read, and so their mistress had to read them the recipes. It might have not have been violent, but it was a deeply disturbing form of enslavement. Later, a friend told how the nuns at one of Louisiana’s most exclusive Roman Catholic convent schools, who had schooled the daughters of elite white families at that time, had also secretly taught the slave girls who accompanied them to read.

In reading Rodney Stark’s account of anti-Catholic history — a volume that debunks hundreds of years of prejudice, myth, and false allegations — I could set these stories in context. I now know that RC Louisiana’s treatment of slaves was rather different from the rest of North America’s; for it came under France’s Code Noir, influenced by papal teaching that insisted that Africans and Indians should be afforded the same dignity as anyone else.

Stark, an American sociologist as well as popular historian, guides the reader through some of the most controversial accusations that the Catholic Church has faced: its treatment of Jews, its hostility to learning during the so-called Dark Ages, its part in the Crusades, and the Spanish Inquisition. With each chapter comes a useful list of historians who have explored the issue in more detail and are Stark’s key sources.

Protestants, as well as Voltaire and other Enlightenment intellectuals, are identified as the accusers-in-chief, claiming that the Roman Church suppressed truth and destroyed lives. The Crusades? Voltaire and others say they were caused by Catholic bigotry and cruelty; contemporary historians say that they were a response to Christians’ being robbed and enslaved by Muslims. The Dark Ages? Again, Voltaire and co., and also Bertrand Russell, say it was a time of barbarism and the stifling of learning thanks to the Catholic Church. Not so, says Stark, citing more historians: it was the age of building great cathedrals, developing universities and beautiful prose.

As an apologist, Stark seems on shakier ground over his defence of church treatment of Jews and of Galileo. After all, Pope John Paul II saw fit to apologise for the grievous harm that the Church did to them.

This is a story of a Church more sinned against than sinning. But Stark’s most significant conclusion is that papal authority has never been as strong as both its detractors and its most devoted adherents believe. Popes might denounce slavery and torture, but some powerful Roman Catholic monarchs ignored their teaching and carried out atrocities.

The story today is rather different. The RC Church still has its detractors, but in this ecumenical age, they tend to be ardent secularists rather than other Christians. The heirs of Voltaire, one might say.

Catherine Pepinster, a former editor of The Tablet, is UK Development Officer of the Anglican Centre in Rome, and the author of a forthcoming book on the British and the papacy.

Voir de même:

Inventing the Crusades
Thomas F. Madden
First things
June 2009

The Crusades, Christianity, and Islam 
by Jonathan Riley-Smith
columbia university press, 136 pages, $24.50

Within a month of the attacks of September 11, 2001, former president Bill Clinton gave a speech to the students of Georgetown University. As the world tried to make sense of the senseless, Clinton offered his own explanation: “Those of us who come from various European lineages are not blameless,” he declared. “Indeed, in the First Crusade, when the Christian soldiers took Jerusalem, they first burned a synagogue with three hundred Jews in it, and proceeded to kill every woman and child who was Muslim on the Temple Mount. The contemporaneous descriptions of the event describe soldiers walking on the Temple Mount, a holy place to Christians, with blood running up to their knees.

“I can tell you that that story is still being told today in the Middle East, and we are still paying for it,” he concluded, and there is good reason to believe he was right. Osama bin Laden and other Islamists regularly refer to Americans as “Crusaders.” Indeed, bin Laden directed his fatwa authorizing the September 11 attacks against the “Crusaders and Jews.” He later preached that “for the first time the Crusaders have managed to achieve their historic ambitions and dreams against our Islamic umma, gaining control over Islamic holy places and Holy Sanctuaries. . . . Their defeat in Iraq will mean defeat in all their wars and a beginning of the receding of their Zionist–Crusader tide against us.”

Most people in the West do not believe that they have been prosecuting a continuous Crusade against Islam since the Middle Ages. But most do believe that the Crusades started the problems that plague and endanger us today. Westerners in general (and Catholics in particular) find the Crusades a deeply embarrassing episode in their history. As the Ridley Scott movie Kingdom of Heaven graphically proclaimed, the Crusades were unprovoked campaigns of intolerance preached by deranged churchmen and fought by religious zealots against a sophisticated and peaceful Muslim world. According to the Hollywood version, the blind violence of the Crusades gave birth to jihad, as the Muslims fought to defend themselves and their world. And for what? The city of Jerusalem, which was both “nothing and everything,” a place filled with religion that “drives men mad.”

On September 11, 2001, there were only a few professional historians of the Crusades in America. I was the one who was not retired. As a result, my phone began ringing and didn’t stop for years. In the hundreds of interviews I have given since that terrible day, the most common question has been, “How did the Crusades lead to the terrorist attacks against the West today?” I always answered: “They did not. The Crusades were a medieval phenomenon with no connection to modern Islamist terrorism.”

That answer has never gone over well. It seems counterintuitive. If the West sent Crusaders to attack Muslims throughout the Middle Ages, haven’t they a right to be upset? If the Crusades spawned anti-Western jihads, isn’t it reasonable to see them as the root cause of the current jihads? The answer is no, but to understand it requires more than the scant minutes journalists are usually willing to spare. It requires a grasp not only of the Crusades but of the ways those wars have been exploited and distorted for modern agendas.

That answer is now contained in a book, The Crusades, Christianity, and Islam, written by the most distinguished historian of the Crusades, the Cambridge University scholar Jonathan Riley-Smith. A transcription of the Bampton Lectures he delivered in October 2007 at Columbia University, it is a thin book, brimming with insights, approachable by anyone interested in the subject.

It is generally thought that Christians attacked Muslims without provocation to seize their lands and forcibly convert them. The Crusaders were Europe’s lacklands and ne’er-do-wells, who marched against the infidels out of blind zealotry and a desire for booty and land. As such, the Crusades betrayed Christianity itself. They transformed “turn the other cheek” into “kill them all; God will know his own.”

Every word of this is wrong. Historians of the Crusades have long known that it is wrong, but they find it extraordinarily difficult to be heard across a chasm of entrenched preconceptions. For on the other side is, as Riley-Smith puts it “nearly everyone else, from leading churchmen and scholars in other fields to the general public.” There is the great Sir Steven Runciman, whose three-volume History of the Crusades is still a brisk seller for Cambridge University Press a half century after its release. It was Runciman who called the Crusades “a long act of intolerance in the name of God, which is a sin against the Holy Ghost.” The pity of it is that Runciman and the other popular writers simply write better stories than the professional historians.

So we continue to write our scholarly books and articles, learning more and more about the Crusades but scarcely able to be heard. And when we are heard, we are dismissed as daft. I once asked Riley-Smith if he believed popular perceptions of the Crusades would ever be changed by modern scholarship. “I’ve just about given up hope,” he answered. In his new book he notes that in the last thirty years historians have begun to reject “the long-held belief that it [the Crusade movement] was defined solely by its theaters of operation in the Levant and its hostility toward Islam—with the consequence that in their eyes the Muslims move slightly off center stage—and many of them have begun to face up to the ideas and motivation of the Crusaders. The more they do so the more they find themselves contra mundum or, at least, contra mundum Christianum.”

One of the most profound misconceptions about the Crusades is that they represented a perversion of a religion whose founder preached meekness, love of enemies, and nonresistance. Riley-Smith reminds his reader that on the matter of violence Christ was not as clear as pacifists like to think. He praised the faith of the Roman centurion but did not condemn his profession. At the Last Supper he told his disciples, “Let him who has no sword sell his cloak and buy one. For I tell you that this Scripture must be fulfilled in me, And he was reckoned with transgressors.

St. Paul said of secular authorities, “He does not bear the sword in vain; he is the servant of God to execute his wrath on the wrongdoer.” Several centuries later, St. Augustine articulated a Christian approach to just war, one in which legitimate authorities could use violence to halt or avert a greater evil. It must be a defensive war, in reaction to an act of aggression. For Christians, therefore, violence was ethically neutral, since it could be employed either for evil or against it. As Riley-Smith notes, the concept that violence is intrinsically evil belongs solely to the modern world. It is not Christian.

All the Crusades met the criteria of just wars. They came about in reaction attacks against Christians or their Church. The First Crusade was called in 1095 in response to the recent Turkish conquest of Christian Asia Minor, as well as the much earlier Arab conquest of the Christian-held Holy Land. The second was called in response to the Muslim conquest of Edessa in 1144. The third was called in response to the Muslim conquest of Jerusalem and most other Christian lands in the Levant in 1187.

In each case, the faithful went to war to defend Christians, to punish the attackers, and to right terrible wrongs. As Riley-Smith has written elsewhere, crusading was seen as an act of love—specifically the love of God and the love of neighbor. By pushing back Muslim aggression and restoring Eastern Christianity, the Crusaders were—at great peril to themselves—imitating the Good Samaritan. Or, as Innocent II told the Knights Templar, “You carry out in deeds the words of the gospel, ‘Greater love has no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.’”

But the Crusades were not just wars. They were holy wars, and that is what made them different from what came before. They were made holy not by their target but by the Crusaders’ sacrifice. The Crusade was a pilgrimage and thereby an act of penance. When Urban II called the First Crusade in 1095, he created a model that would be followed for centuries. Crusaders who undertook that burden with right intention and after confessing their sins would receive a plenary indulgence. The indulgence was a recognition that they undertook these sacrifices for Christ, who was crucified again in the tribulations of his people.

And the sacrifices were extraordinary. As Riley-Smith writes in this book and his earlier The First ­Crusaders, the cost of crusading was staggering. Without financial assistance, only the wealthy could afford to embark on a Crusade. Many noble families impoverished themselves by crusading.

Historians have long known that the image of the Crusader as an adventurer seeking his fortune is exactly backward. The vast majority of Crusaders returned home as soon as they had fulfilled their vow. What little booty they could acquire was more than spent on the journey itself. One is hard pressed to name a single returning Crusader who broke even, let alone made a profit on the journey. And those who returned were the lucky ones. As Riley-Smith explains, recent studies show that around one-third of knights and nobility died on crusade. The death rates for lower classes were even higher.

One can never understand the Crusades without understanding their penitential character. It was the indulgence that led thousands of men to take on a burden that would certainly cost them dearly. The secular nobility of medieval Europe was a warrior aristocracy. They made their living by the sword. We know from their wills and charters that they were deeply aware of their own sinfulness and anxious over the state of their souls. A Crusade provided a way for them to serve God and to do penance for their sins. It allowed them to use their weapons as a means of their salvation rather than of their damnation.

Of course it was difficult, but that is what penance is supposed to be. As Urban and later Crusade preachers reminded them, Christ Himself had said, “If any man would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me.” As one Crusade preacher wrote, “Those who take the cross deny, that is to say renounce, themselves by exposing themselves to mortal danger, leaving behind their loved ones, using up their goods, carrying their cross, so that afterward they may be carried to heaven by the cross.” The Crusader sewed a cloth cross to his garment to signify his penitential burden and his hope.

Take away penitence and the Crusades cannot be explained. Yet in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries Protestants and then Enlightenment thinkers rejected the idea of temporal penalties due to sin—along with indulgences, purgatory, and the papacy. How then did they explain the Crusades? Why else would thousands of men march thousands of miles deep into enemy territory, if not for something precious? The first explanation was that they were fooled by the Antichrist: The Catholic Church had convinced the simple that their salvation lay in fighting its battles. Later, with the advent of liberalism, critics assumed that the Crusaders must have had economic motives. They were seeking wealth and simply used religion as a cover for their worldly desires.

In the nineteenth century, the memory of the Crusades became hopelessly entangled with contemporary European imperialism. Riley-Smith tells the fascinating story of Archbishop Charles-Martial Allemand-Lavigerie of Algiers, the founder of the missionary orders of the White Fathers and White Sisters, who worked diligently to establish a new military order resembling the Knights Templar, Teutonic Knights, and the Knights Hospitaller of the Middle Ages. His new order was to be sent to Africa, where it would protect missionaries, fight against the slave trade, and support the progress of French civilization in the continent.

Drawing on money from antislavery societies, Lavigerie purchased lands on the edge of the Saharan Desert to use as a mother house for a new order, L’Institut Religieux et Militaire des Frères Armés du Sahara. The order attracted hundreds of men from all social classes, and in 1891 the first brothers received their white habits emblazoned with red crosses. The dust cover of Riley-Smith’s book is itself a wonderful picture of these brothers at their African home. With palm trees behind them, they look proudly into the camera, each wearing a cross and some holding rifles.

The Institut des Fréres Armés lasted scarcely more than a year before it was scrapped and its founder died, but other attempts to found a military order were made in the nineteenth century, even in Protestant England. All wove together the contrasting threads of Romanticism, imperialism, and the medieval Crusades.

President Clinton is not alone in thinking that the Muslim world is still brooding over the crimes of the Crusaders. It is commonly thought—even by Muslims—that the effects and memory of that trauma have been with the Islamic world since it was first inflicted in the eleventh century. As Riley-Smith explains, however, the Muslim memory of the Crusades is of very recent vintage. Carole Hillenbrand first uncovered this fact in her groundbreaking book The Crusades: Islamic Perspectives. The truth is that medieval Muslims came to realize that the Crusades were religious but had little interest in them. When, in 1291, Muslim armies removed the last vestiges of the Crusader Kingdom from Palestine, the Crusades largely dropped out of Muslim memory.

In Europe, however, the Crusades were a well-remembered formative episode. Europeans, who had bound the Crusades to imperialism, brought the story to the Middle East during the nineteenth century and reintroduced it to the Muslims. Stripping the Crusades of their original purpose, they portrayed the Crusades as Europe’s first colonial venture—the first attempt of the West to bring civilization to the backward Muslim East.

Riley-Smith describes the profound effect that Sir Walter Scott’s novel The Talisman had on European and therefore Middle Eastern opinion of the Crusades. Crusaders such as Richard the Lionhearted were portrayed as boorish, brutal, and childish, while Muslims, particularly Saladin, were tolerant and enlightened gentlemen of the nineteenth century. With the collapse of Ottoman power and the rise of Arab nationalism at the end of the nineteenth century, Muslims bound together these two strands of Crusade narrative and created a new memory in which the Crusades were only the first part of Europe’s assault on Islam—an assault that continued through the modern imperialism of European powers. Europeans reintroduced Saladin, who had been nearly forgotten in the Middle East, and Arab nationalists then cleansed him of his Kurdish ethnicity to create a new anti-Western hero. We saw the result during the run-up to the Iraq War, when Saddam Hussein portrayed himself as a new Saladin who would expel the new Crusaders.

Arab nationalists made good use of the new story of the Crusades during their struggles for independence. Their enemies, the Islamists, then took over the same tool. Osama bin Laden is only the most recent Islamist to adopt this useful myth to characterize the actions of the West as a continual Crusade against Islam.

That is the Crusades’ only connection with modern Islamist terrorism. And yet, so ingrained is this notion that the Crusades began the modern European assault on Islam that many moderate Muslims still believe it. Riley-Smith recounts : “I recently refused to take part in a television series, produced by an intelligent and well-educated Egyptian woman, for whom a continuing Western crusade was an article of faith. Having less to do with historical reality than with reactions to imperialism, the nationalist and Islamist interpretations of crusade history help many people, moderates as well as extremists, to place the exploitation they believe they have suffered in a historical context and to satisfy their feelings of both superiority and humiliation.”

In the Middle East, as in the West, we are left with the gaping chasm between myth and reality. Crusade historians sometimes try to yell across it but usually just talk to each other, while the leading churchmen, the scholars in other fields, and the general public hold to a caricature of the Crusades created by a pox of modern ideologies. If that chasm is ever to be bridged, it will be with well-written and powerful books such as this.

Thomas F. Madden is chair of the department of history at Saint Louis University. He is author of The New Concise History of the Crusades and, most recently, Empires of Trust: How Rome Built—and America Is Building—a New World.

Four Myths about the Crusades

This article first appeared in the print Spring 2011 edition of the Intercollegiate Review.


In 2001, former president Bill Clinton delivered a speech at Georgetown University in which he discussed the West’s response to the recent terrorist attacks of September 11. The speech contained a short but significant reference to the crusades. Mr. Clinton observed that “when the Christian soldiers took Jerusalem [in 1099], they . . . proceeded to kill every woman and child who was Muslim on the Temple Mount.” He cited the “contemporaneous descriptions of the event” as describing “soldiers walking on the Temple Mount . . . with blood running up to their knees.” This story, Mr. Clinton said emphatically, was “still being told today in the Middle East and we are still paying for it.”

This view of the crusades is not unusual. It pervades textbooks as well as popular literature. One otherwise generally reliable Western civilization textbook claims that “the Crusades fused three characteristic medieval impulses: piety, pugnacity, and greed. All three were essential.”1 The film Kingdom of Heaven (2005) depicts crusaders as boorish bigots, the best of whom were torn between remorse for their excesses and lust to continue them. Even the historical supplements for role-playing games—drawing on supposedly more reliable sources—contain statements such as “The soldiers of the First Crusade appeared basically without warning, storming into the Holy Land with the avowed—literally—task of slaughtering unbelievers”;2 “The Crusades were an early sort of imperialism”;3 and “Confrontation with Islam gave birth to a period of religious fanaticism that spawned the terrible Inquisition and the religious wars that ravaged Europe during the Elizabethan era.”4 The most famous semipopular historian of the crusades, Sir Steven Runciman, ended his three volumes of magnificent prose with the judgment that the crusades were “nothing more than a long act of intolerance in the name of God, which is the sin against the Holy Ghost.”5

The verdict seems unanimous. From presidential speeches to role-playing games, the crusades are depicted as a deplorably violent episode in which thuggish Westerners trundled off, unprovoked, to murder and pillage peace-loving, sophisticated Muslims, laying down patterns of outrageous oppression that would be repeated throughout subsequent history. In many corners of the Western world today, this view is too commonplace and apparently obvious even to be challenged.

But unanimity is not a guarantee of accuracy. What everyone “knows” about the crusades may not, in fact, be true. From the many popular notions about the crusades, let us pick four and see if they bear close examination.

Myth #1: The crusades represented an unprovoked attack by Western Christians on the Muslim world.

Nothing could be further from the truth, and even a cursory chronological review makes that clear. In a.d. 632, Egypt, Palestine, Syria, Asia Minor, North Africa, Spain, France, Italy, and the islands of Sicily, Sardinia, and Corsica were all Christian territories. Inside the boundaries of the Roman Empire, which was still fully functional in the eastern Mediterranean, orthodox Christianity was the official, and overwhelmingly majority, religion. Outside those boundaries were other large Christian communities—not necessarily orthodox and Catholic, but still Christian. Most of the Christian population of Persia, for example, was Nestorian. Certainly there were many Christian communities in Arabia.

By a.d. 732, a century later, Christians had lost Egypt, Palestine, Syria, North Africa, Spain, most of Asia Minor, and southern France. Italy and her associated islands were under threat, and the islands would come under Muslim rule in the next century. The Christian communities of Arabia were entirely destroyed in or shortly after 633, when Jews and Christians alike were expelled from the peninsula.6 Those in Persia were under severe pressure. Two-thirds of the formerly Roman Christian world was now ruled by Muslims.

What had happened? Most people actually know the answer, if pressed—though for some reason they do not usually connect the answer with the crusades. The answer is the rise of Islam. Every one of the listed regions was taken, within the space of a hundred years, from Christian control by violence, in the course of military campaigns deliberately designed to expand Muslim territory at the expense of Islam’s neighbors. Nor did this conclude Islam’s program of conquest. The attacks continued, punctuated from time to time by Christian attempts to push back. Charlemagne blocked the Muslim advance in far western Europe in about a.d. 800, but Islamic forces simply shifted their focus and began to island-hop across from North Africa toward Italy and the French coast, attacking the Italian mainland by 837. A confused struggle for control of southern and central Italy continued for the rest of the ninth century and into the tenth. In the hundred years between 850 and 950, Benedictine monks were driven out of ancient monasteries, the Papal States were overrun, and Muslim pirate bases were established along the coast of northern Italy and southern France, from which attacks on the deep inland were launched. Desperate to protect victimized Christians, popes became involved in the tenth and early eleventh centuries in directing the defense of the territory around them.

The surviving central secular authority in the Christian world at this time was the East Roman, or Byzantine, Empire. Having lost so much territory in the seventh and eighth centuries to sudden amputation by the Muslims, the Byzantines took a long time to gain the strength to fight back. By the mid-ninth century, they mounted a counterattack on Egypt, the first time since 645 that they had dared to come so far south. Between the 940s and the 970s, the Byzantines made great progress in recovering lost territories. Emperor John Tzimiskes retook much of Syria and part of Palestine, getting as far as Nazareth, but his armies became overextended and he had to end his campaigns by 975 without managing to retake Jerusalem itself. Sharp Muslim counterattacks followed, and the Byzantines barely managed to retain Aleppo and Antioch.

The struggle continued unabated into the eleventh century. In 1009, a mentally deranged Muslim ruler destroyed the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem and mounted major persecutions of Christians and Jews. He was soon deposed, and by 1038 the Byzantines had negotiated the right to try to rebuild the structure, but other events were also making life difficult for Christians in the area, especially the displacement of Arab Muslim rulers by Seljuk Turks, who from 1055 on began to take control in the Middle East. This destabilized the territory and introduced new rulers (the Turks) who were not familiar even with the patchwork modus vivendi that had existed between most Arab Muslim rulers and their Christian subjects. Pilgrimages became increasingly difficult and dangerous, and western pilgrims began banding together and carrying weapons to protect themselves as they tried to make their way to Christianity’s holiest sites in Palestine: notable armed pilgrimages occurred in 1064–65 and 1087–91.

In the western and central Mediterranean, the balance of power was tipping toward the Christians and away from the Muslims. In 1034, the Pisans sacked a Muslim base in North Africa, finally extending their counterattacks across the Mediterranean. They also mounted counterattacks against Sicily in 1062–63. In 1087, a large-scale allied Italian force sacked Mahdia, in present-day Tunisia, in a campaign jointly sponsored by Pope Victor III and the countess of Tuscany. Clearly the Italian Christians were gaining the upper hand.

But while Christian power in the western and central Mediterranean was growing, it was in trouble in the east. The rise of the Muslim Turks had shifted the weight of military power against the Byzantines, who lost considerable ground again in the 1060s. Attempting to head off further incursions in far-eastern Asia Minor in 1071, the Byzantines suffered a devastating defeat at Turkish hands in the battle of Manzikert. As a result of the battle, the Christians lost control of almost all of Asia Minor, with its agricultural resources and military recruiting grounds, and a Muslim sultan set up a capital in Nicaea, site of the creation of the Nicene Creed in a.d. 325 and a scant 125 miles from Constantinople.

Desperate, the Byzantines sent appeals for help westward, directing these appeals primarily at the person they saw as the chief western authority: the pope, who, as we have seen, had already been directing Christian resistance to Muslim attacks. In the early 1070s, the pope was Gregory VII, and he immediately began plans to lead an expedition to the Byzantines’ aid. He became enmeshed in conflict with the German emperors, however (what historians call “the Investiture Controversy”), and was ultimately unable to offer meaningful help. Still, the Byzantines persisted in their appeals, and finally, in 1095, Pope Urban II realized Gregory VII’s desire, in what turned into the First Crusade. Whether a crusade was what either Urban or the Byzantines had in mind is a matter of some controversy. But the seamless progression of events which lead to that crusade is not.

Far from being unprovoked, then, the crusades actually represent the first great western Christian counterattack against Muslim attacks which had taken place continually from the inception of Islam until the eleventh century, and which continued on thereafter, mostly unabated. Three of Christianity’s five primary episcopal sees (Jerusalem, Antioch, and Alexandria) had been captured in the seventh century; both of the others (Rome and Constantinople) had been attacked in the centuries before the crusades. The latter would be captured in 1453, leaving only one of the five (Rome) in Christian hands by 1500. Rome was again threatened in the sixteenth century. This is not the absence of provocation; rather, it is a deadly and persistent threat, and one which had to be answered by forceful defense if Christendom were to survive. The crusades were simply one tool in the defensive options exercised by Christians.

To put the question in perspective, one need only consider how many times Christian forces have attacked either Mecca or Medina. The answer, of course, is never.7

Myth #2: Western Christians went on crusade because their greed led them to plunder Muslims in order to get rich.

Again, not true. One version of Pope Urban II’s speech at Clermont in 1095 urging French warriors to embark on what would become known as the First Crusade does note that they might “make spoil of [the enemy’s] treasures,”8 but this was no more than an observation on the usual way of financing war in ancient and medieval society. And Fulcher of Chartres did write in the early twelfth century that those who had been poor in the West had become rich in the East as a result of their efforts on the First Crusade, obviously suggesting that others might do likewise.9 But Fulcher’s statement has to be read in its context, which was a chronic and eventually fatal shortage of manpower for the defense of the crusader states. Fulcher was not being entirely deceitful when he pointed out that one might become rich as a result of crusading. But he was not being entirely straightforward either, because for most participants, crusading was ruinously expensive.

As Fred Cazel has noted, “Few crusaders had sufficient cash both to pay their obligations at home and to support themselves decently on a crusade.”10 From the very beginning, financial considerations played a major role in crusade planning. The early crusaders sold off so many of their possessions to finance their expeditions that they caused widespread inflation. Although later crusaders took this into account and began saving money long before they set out, the expense was still nearly prohibitive. Despite the fact that money did not yet play a major role in western European economies in the eleventh century, there was “a heavy and persistent flow of money” from west to east as a result of the crusades, and the financial demands of crusading caused “profound economic and monetary changes in both western Europe and the Levant.”11

One of the chief reasons for the foundering of the Fourth Crusade, and its diversion to Constantinople, was the fact that it ran out of money before it had gotten properly started, and was so indebted to the Venetians that it found itself unable to keep control of its own destiny. Louis IX’s Seventh Crusade in the mid-thirteenth century cost more than six times the annual revenue of the crown.

The popes resorted to ever more desperate ploys to raise money to finance crusades, from instituting the first income tax in the early thirteenth century to making a series of adjustments in the way that indulgences were handled that eventually led to the abuses condemned by Martin Luther. Even by the thirteenth century, most crusade planners assumed that it would be impossible to attract enough volunteers to make a crusade possible, and crusading became the province of kings and popes, losing its original popular character. When the Hospitaller Master Fulk of Villaret wrote a crusade memo to Pope Clement V in about 1305, he noted that “it would be a good idea if the lord pope took steps enabling him to assemble a great treasure, without which such a passage [crusade] would be impossible.”12 A few years later, Marino Sanudo estimated that it would cost five million florins over two years to effect the conquest of Egypt. Although he did not say so, and may not have realized it, the sums necessary simply made the goal impossible to achieve. By this time, most responsible officials in the West had come to the same conclusion, which explains why fewer and fewer crusades were launched from the fourteenth century on.

In short: very few people became rich by crusading, and their numbers were dwarfed by those who were bankrupted. Most medieval people were quite well aware of this, and did not consider crusading a way to improve their financial situations.13

Myth #3: Crusaders were a cynical lot who did not really believe their own religious propaganda; rather, they had ulterior, materialistic motives.

This has been a very popular argument, at least from Voltaire on. It seems credible and even compelling to modern people, steeped as they are in materialist worldviews. And certainly there were cynics and hypocrites in the Middle Ages—beneath the obvious differences of technology and material culture, medieval people were just as human as we are, and subject to the same failings.

However, like the first two myths, this statement is generally untrue, and demonstrably so. For one thing, the casualty rates on the crusades were usually very high, and many if not most crusaders left expecting not to return. At least one military historian has estimated the casualty rate for the First Crusade at an appalling 75 percent, for example.14 The statement of the thirteenth-century crusader Robert of Crésèques, that he had “come from across the sea in order to die for God in the Holy Land”15—which was quickly followed by his death in battle against overwhelming odds—may have been unusual in its force and swift fulfillment, but it was not an atypical attitude. It is hard to imagine a more conclusive way of proving one’s dedication to a cause than sacrificing one’s life for it, and very large numbers of crusaders did just that.

But this assertion is also revealed to be false when we consider the way in which the crusades were preached. Crusaders were not drafted. Participation was voluntary, and participants had to be persuaded to go. The primary means of persuasion was the crusade sermon, and one might expect to find these sermons representing crusading as profoundly appealing.

This is, generally speaking, not the case. In fact, the opposite is true: crusade sermons were replete with warnings that crusading brought deprivation, suffering, and often death. That this was the reality of crusading was well known anyway. As Jonathan Riley-Smith has noted, crusade preachers “had to persuade their listeners to commit themselves to enterprises that would disrupt their lives, possibly impoverish and even kill or maim them, and inconvenience their families, the support of which they would . . . need if they were to fulfill their promises.”16

So why did the preaching work? It worked because crusading was appealing precisely because it was a known and significant hardship, and because undertaking a crusade with the right motives was understood as an acceptable penance for sin. Far from being a materialistic enterprise, crusading was impractical in worldly terms, but valuable for one’s soul. There is no space here to explore the doctrine of penance as it developed in the late antique and medieval worlds, but suffice it to say that the willing acceptance of difficulty and suffering was viewed as a useful way to purify one’s soul (and still is, in Catholic doctrine today). Crusading was the near-supreme example of such difficult suffering, and so was an ideal and very thorough-going penance.

Related to the concept of penance is the concept of crusading as an act of selfless love, of “laying down one’s life for one’s friends.”17 From the very beginning, Christian charity was advanced as a reason for crusading, and this did not change throughout the period. Jonathan Riley-Smith discussed this aspect of crusading in a seminal article well-known to crusade historians but inadequately recognized in the wider scholarly world, let alone by the general public. “For Christians . . . sacred violence,” noted Riley-Smith,

cannot be proposed on any grounds save that of love, . . . [and] in an age dominated by the theology of merit this explains why participation in crusades was believed to be meritorious, why the expeditions were seen as penitential acts that could gain indulgences, and why death in battle was regarded as martyrdom. . . . As manifestations of Christian love, the crusades were as much the products of the renewed spirituality of the central Middle Ages, with its concern for living the vita apostolica and expressing Christian ideals in active works of charity, as were the new hospitals, the pastoral work of the Augustinians and Premonstratensians and the service of the friars. The charity of St. Francis may now appeal to us more than that of the crusaders, but both sprang from the same roots.18

As difficult as it may be for modern people to believe, the evidence strongly suggests that most crusaders were motivated by a desire to please God, expiate their sins, and put their lives at the service of their “neighbors,” understood in the Christian sense.

Myth #4: The crusades taught Muslims to hate and attack Christians.

Part of the answer to this myth may be found above, under Myth #1. Muslims had been attacking Christians for more than 450 years before Pope Urban declared the First Crusade. They needed no incentive to continue doing so. But there is a more complicated answer here, as well.

Up until quite recently, Muslims remembered the crusades as an instance in which they had beaten back a puny western Christian attack. An illuminating vignette is found in one of Lawrence of Arabia’s letters, describing a confrontation during post–World War I negotiations between the Frenchman Stéphen Pichon and Faisal al-Hashemi (later Faisal I of Iraq). Pichon presented a case for French interest in Syria going back to the crusades, which Faisal dismissed with a cutting remark: “But, pardon me, which of us won the crusades?”19

This was generally representative of the Muslim attitude toward the crusades before about World War I—that is, when Muslims bothered to remember them at all, which was not often. Most of the Arabic-language historical writing on the crusades before the mid-nineteenth century was produced by Arab Christians, not Muslims, and most of that was positive.20 There was no Arabic word for “crusades” until that period, either, and even then the coiners of the term were, again, Arab Christians. It had not seemed important to Muslims to distinguish the crusades from other conflicts between Christianity and Islam.21

Nor had there been an immediate reaction to the crusades among Muslims. As Carole Hillenbrand has noted, “The Muslim response to the coming of the Crusades was initially one of apathy, compromise and preoccupation with internal problems.”22 By the 1130s, a Muslim counter-crusade did begin, under the leadership of the ferocious Zengi of Mosul. But it had taken some decades for the Muslim world to become concerned about Jerusalem, which is usually held in higher esteem by Muslims when it is not held by them than when it is. Action against the crusaders was often subsequently pursued as a means of uniting the Muslim world behind various aspiring conquerors, until 1291, when the Christians were expelled from the Syrian mainland. And—surprisingly to Westerners—it was not Saladin who was revered by Muslims as the great anti-Christian leader. That place of honor usually went to the more bloodthirsty, and more successful, Zengi and Baibars, or to the more public-spirited Nur al-Din.

The first Muslim crusade history did not appear until 1899. By that time, the Muslim world was rediscovering the crusades—but it was rediscovering them with a twist learned from Westerners. In the modern period, there were two main European schools of thought about the crusades. One school, epitomized by people like Voltaire, Gibbon, and Sir Walter Scott, and in the twentieth century Sir Steven Runciman, saw the crusaders as crude, greedy, aggressive barbarians who attacked civilized, peace-loving Muslims to improve their own lot. The other school, more romantic and epitomized by lesser-known figures such as the French writer Joseph-François Michaud, saw the crusades as a glorious episode in a long-standing struggle in which Christian chivalry had driven back Muslim hordes. In addition, Western imperialists began to view the crusaders as predecessors, adapting their activities in a secularized way that the original crusaders would not have recognized or found very congenial.

At the same time, nationalism began to take root in the Muslim world. Arab nationalists borrowed the idea of a long-standing European campaign against them from the former European school of thought—missing the fact that this was a serious mischaracterization of the crusades—and using this distorted understanding as a way to generate support for their own agendas. This remained the case until the mid-twentieth century, when, in Riley-Smith’s words, “a renewed and militant Pan-Islamism” applied the more narrow goals of the Arab nationalists to a worldwide revival of what was then called Islamic fundamentalism and is now sometimes referred to, a bit clumsily, as jihadism.23 This led rather seamlessly to the rise of Osama bin Laden and al-Qaeda, offering a view of the crusades so bizarre as to allow bin Laden to consider all Jews to be crusaders and the crusades to be a permanent and continuous feature of the West’s response to Islam.

Bin Laden’s conception of history is a feverish fantasy. He is no more accurate in his view about the crusades than he is about the supposed perfect Islamic unity which he thinks Islam enjoyed before the baleful influence of Christianity intruded. But the irony is that he, and those millions of Muslims who accept his message, received that message originally from their perceived enemies: the West.

So it was not the crusades that taught Islam to attack and hate Christians. Far from it. Those activities had preceded the crusades by a very long time, and stretch back to the inception of Islam. Rather, it was the West which taught Islam to hate the crusades. The irony is rich.

Back to the Present

Let us return to President Clinton’s Georgetown speech. How much of his reference to the First Crusade was accurate?

It is true that many Muslims who had surrendered and taken refuge under the banners of several of the crusader lords—an act which should have granted them quarter—were massacred by out-of-control troops. This was apparently an act of indiscipline, and the crusader lords in question are generally reported as having been extremely angry about it, since they knew it reflected badly on them.24 To imply—or plainly state—that this was an act desired by the entire crusader force, or that it was integral to crusading, is misleading at best. In any case, John France has put it well: “This notorious event should not be exaggerated. . . . However horrible the massacre . . . it was not far beyond what common practice of the day meted out to any place which resisted.”25 And given space, one could append a long and bloody list, stretching back to the seventh century, of similar actions where Muslims were the aggressors and Christians the victims. Such a list would not, however, have served Mr. Clinton’s purposes.

Mr. Clinton was probably using Raymond of Aguilers when he referred to “blood running up to [the] knees” of crusaders.26 But the physics of such a claim are impossible, as should be apparent. Raymond was plainly both bragging and also invoking the imagery of the Old Testament and the Book of Revelation.27 He was not offering a factual account, and probably did not intend the statement to be taken as such.

As for whether or not we are “still paying for it,” see Myth #4, above. This is the most serious misstatement of the whole passage. What we are paying for is not the First Crusade, but western distortions of the crusades in the nineteenth century which were taught to, and taken up by, an insufficiently critical Muslim world.

The problems with Mr. Clinton’s remarks indicate the pitfalls that await those who would attempt to explicate ancient or medieval texts without adequate historical awareness, and they illustrate very well what happens when one sets out to pick through the historical record for bits—distorted or merely selectively presented—which support one’s current political agenda. This sort of abuse of history has been distressingly familiar where the crusades are concerned.

But nothing is served by distorting the past for our own purposes. Or rather: a great many things may be served . . . but not the truth. Distortions and misrepresentations of the crusades will not help us understand the challenge posed to the West by a militant and resurgent Islam, and failure to understand that challenge could prove deadly. Indeed, it already has. It may take a very long time to set the record straight about the crusades. It is long past time to begin the task.

Notes

  1. Warren Hollister, J. Sears McGee, and Gale Stokes, The West Transformed: A History of Western Civilization, vol. 1 (New York: Cengage/Wadsworth, 2000), 311.
  2. R. Scott Peoples, Crusade of Kings (Rockville, MD: Wildside, 2009), 7.
  3. Ibid.
  4. The Crusades: Campaign Sourcebook, ed. Allen Varney (Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1994), 2.
  5. Sir Steven Runciman, A History of the Crusades: Vol. III, The Kingdom of Acre and the Later Crusades (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1954), 480.
  6. Francesco Gabrieli, The Arabs: A Compact History, trans. Salvator Attanasio (New York: Hawthorn Books, 1963), 47.
  7. Reynald of Châtillon’s abortive expedition into the Red Sea, in 1182–83, cannot be counted, as it was plainly a geopolitical move designed to threaten Saladin’s claim to be the protector of all Islam, and just as plainly had no hope of reaching either city.
  8. “The Version of Baldric of Dol,” in The First Crusade: The Chronicle of Fulcher of Chartres and other source materials, 2nd ed., ed. Edward Peters (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1998), 32.
  9. Ibid., 220–21.
  10. Fred Cazel, “Financing the Crusades,” in A History of the Crusades, ed. Kenneth Setton, vol. 6 (Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press, 1989), 117.
  11. John Porteous, “Crusade Coinage with Greek or Latin Inscriptions,” in A History of the Crusades, 354.
  12. “A memorandum by Fulk of Villaret, master of the Hospitallers, on the crusade to regain the Holy Land, c. 1305,” in Documents on the Later Crusades, 1274–1580, ed. and trans. Norman Housley (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1996), 42.
  13. Norman Housley, “Costing the Crusade: Budgeting for Crusading Activity in the Fourteenth Century,” in The Experience of Crusading, ed. Marcus Bull and Norman Housley, vol. 1 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003), 59.
  14. John France, Victory in the East: A Military History of the First Crusade (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994), 142. Not all historians agree; Jonathan Riley-Smith thinks it was probably lower, though he does not indicate just how much lower. See Riley-Smith, “Casualties and Knights on the First Crusade,” Crusades 1 (2002), 17–19, suggesting casualties of perhaps 34 percent, higher than those of the Wehrmacht in World War II, which were themselves very high at about 30 percent. By comparison, American losses in World War II in the three major service branches ranged between about 1.5 percent and 3.66 percent.
  15. The ‘Templar of Tyre’: Part III of the ‘Deeds of the Cypriots,’ trans. Paul F. Crawford (Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2003), §351, 54.
  16. Jonathan Riley-Smith, The Crusades, Christianity, and Islam (New York: Columbia University Press, 2008), 36.
  17. John 15:13.
  18. Jonathan Riley-Smith, “Crusading as an Act of Love,” History 65 (1980), 191–92.
  19. Letter from T. E. Lawrence to Robert Graves, 28 June 1927, in Robert Graves and B. H. Liddell-Hart, T. E. Lawrence to His Biographers (Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1938), 52, note.
  20. Riley-Smith, The Crusades, Christianity, and Islam, 71.
  21. Jonathan Riley-Smith, “Islam and the Crusades in History,” Crusades 2 (2003), 161.
  22. Carole Hillenbrand, The Crusades: Islamic Perspectives, (New York: Routledge, 2000), 20.
  23. Riley-Smith, Crusading, Christianity, and Islam, 73.
  24. There is some disagreement in the primary sources on the question of who was responsible for the deaths of these refugees; the crusaders knew that a large Egyptian army was on its way to attack them, and there does seem to have been a military decision a day or two later that they simply could not risk leaving potential enemies alive. On the question of the massacre, see Benjamin Kedar, “The Jerusalem Massacre of July 1099 in the Western Historiography of the Crusades,” Crusades 3 (2004), 15–75.
  25. France, Victory in the East, 355–56.
  26. Raymond of Aguilers, in August C. Krey, The First Crusade: The Accounts of Eye-witnesses and Participants (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1921), 262.
  27. Revelation 14:20.

Le pape François et la Chanson de Roland

Le Pape François compare la Chanson de Roland au djihadisme et la juge « inacceptable » en raison de sa célébration de la Reconquista

BREIZATAO – ETREBROADEL (19/11/2019) Lors d’une audience accordée à l’Institut pour le Dialogue Interreligieux d’Argentine, l’actuel Pape Jorge Bergoglio s’en est violemment pris aux chevaliers de Charlemagne qui ont prêté main forte aux Espagnols pour stopper l’assaut islamique contre l’Europe chrétienne.

Presse du Vatican (source) :

Dans le monde précaire d’aujourd’hui, le dialogue entre les religions n’est pas un signe de faiblesse. Elle trouve sa propre raison d’être dans le dialogue de Dieu avec l’humanité. Il s’agit de changer les attitudes historiques. Une scène de la Chanson de Roland me vient à l’esprit comme un symbole, quand les chrétiens battent les musulmans et les mettent tous en ligne devant les fonts baptismaux, et un avec une épée. Et les musulmans devaient choisir entre le baptême ou l’épée. C’est ce que les chrétiens ont fait. C’était une mentalité que nous ne pouvons plus accepter, ni comprendre, ni faire fonctionner. Prenons soin des groupes fondamentalistes, chacun a le sien. En Argentine, il y a un petit coin fondamentaliste. Et essayons avec la fraternité d’aller de l’avant. Le fondamentalisme est un fléau et toutes les religions ont une sorte de cousin germain fondamentaliste, qui est regroupé.

La Chanson de Roland n’est pas le reportage détaillé d’un journaliste mais un poème épique rédigé au 11ème siècle et qui traite, 3 siècles après les faits, de l’histoire de Roland de Ronceveaux, un guerrier franc parti combattre l’envahisseur musulman en Espagne aux côtés de Charlemagne.

Il s’agissait alors de ralentir l’invasion islamique qui menaçait la Chrétienté d’Occident et la France.

Dans ce contexte, on ne peut qu’être stupéfait par la dénonciation bergoglienne des « conversions forcées » de mahométans par les Francs partis porter secours aux Espagnols, les seuls véritablement obligés de se convertir à l’époque.

L’intention de l’occupant du Vatican est particulièrement perverse et vise à établir un parallèle surréel entre la campagne de Charlemagne et les massacres de masse perpétrés par les musulmans contre les Chrétiens au 21ème siècle.

Les victimes chrétiennes, selon Bergoglio, deviennent les coupables, dans l’Espagne du 8ème siècle tout comme dans l’Europe et l’Orient du 21ème siècle.

Cette nouvelle provocation du chef de l’Eglise Catholique s’ajoute à une longue série de propos incendiaires en faveur l’immigration de masse et de l’islam en Europe. Déclarations qui l’ont très largement marginalisé, y compris au sein des derniers pans de la population qui se dit catholique et pratiquante.

Caricature du curé gauchiste octogénaire, Bergoglio ne choque plus tant qu’il ne lasse une Europe déjà saturée de sermons iréniques sur l’islam alors que le terrorisme musulman prend toujours plus d’ampleur.

Pour rester sur une note positive, on écoutera ou réécoutera la Chanson de Roland qui, n’en déplaise au Pape de l’islam, exalte l’esprit de résistance face à l’invasion du fanatisme islamique.

A Kinder, Gentler Inquisition
A new revisionist study of the Spanish tribunal asserts that it wasn’t as bad as previously thought. Read the First Chapter

Richard L. Kagan

April 19, 1998

THE SPANISH INQUISITION
A Historical Revision.
By Henry Kamen.
Illustrated. 369 pp. New Haven:
Yale University Press. $35.

At the start of this century Henry Charles Lea, a Philadelphia businessman turned historian, published his monumental  »History of the Inquisition in Spain. » The Spanish Inquisition had been studied before, primarily by Protestant scholars for whom it had become the archsymbol of religious intolerance and ecclesiastical power. William H. Prescott, the great Boston historian, likened it to an  »eye that never slumbered, » a malevolent Argus assisted by legions of spies on the lookout for deviance. His disciple, J. L. Motley, thought similarly, and so did Lea, although the Philadelphian was determined to document the Inquisition’s methods and modes of operation. Lea described it as  »an engine of immense power, constantly applied for the furtherance of obscurantism, the repression of thought, the exclusion of foreign ideas and the obstruction of progress. » For him the Inquisition also exemplified  »theocratic absolutism » at its worst, a power that had so weakened Spain that it was helpless in the face of Yankee might to defend what little remained of its vast overseas empire during the Spanish-American War of 1898.

Starting in the 1920’s, Jewish scholars took up where Lea left off. Although the Inquisition was created exclusively for the purpose of dealing with the problem of Judaizing among Spain’s large population of conversos (Jews converted to Christianity), for centuries it had been associated primarily with the persecution of Protestants. Nineteenth-century historians, including the Spanish scholar Amador de los Rios, helped changed this perception. So too did Yitzhak Baer’s  »History of the Jews in Christian Spain, » Cecil Roth’s  »History of the Marranos » and, after World War II, the work of Haim Beinart, an Israeli scholar, who for the first time published trial transcripts of cases involving conversos.

Throughout it all, the Inquisition remained the Spanish antecedent of the K.G.B. Among the first books to challenge this view was  »The Spanish Inquisition » (1965), a pioneering study in which Henry Kamen, a young British graduate student, argued that the Inquisition was not nearly as cruel or as powerful as commonly believed, let alone an institution capable of precipitating Spain’s decline. That book, though controversial, was partly responsible for a surge of quantitative studies, starting in the 70’s, that attempted to classify and measure the extent of the Inquisition’s activities from 1480, the year its first tribunal began work in Seville, until 1834, when it was abolished. These studies indicated that following an initial burst of activity against conversos suspected of relapsing into Judaism and a mid-16th-century pursuit of Protestants, the Inquisition served principally as a forum Spaniards occasionally used to humiliate and punish people they did not like: blasphemers, bigamists, foreigners and, in Aragon, homosexuals and horse smugglers.

This new scholarship also confirmed Kamen’s contention that the Inquisition had relatively little impact on Spanish intellectual life. In fact, during its last two centuries, other than persecuting hundreds of Portuguese conversos who emigrated to Spain in the 17th century, the Inquisition busied itself mainly with cases designed to protect its authority and to exempt its notorious henchmen, the familiares — laymen who served as the institution’s supporters and occasional spies — from the jurisdiction of civil courts. Kamen incorporated these findings in a revised version of his original study published as  »Inquisition and Society in Spain in the 16th and 17th Centuries » (1985).

In  »The Spanish Inquistion: A Historical Revision, » to my mind the best general book on the Spanish Inquisition both for its range and its depth of information, Kamen restates his original argument, supporting it with additional evidence derived from many new monographic studies by other scholars. He reaffirms his contention that an all-powerful, torture-mad Inquisition is largely a 19th-century myth. In its place he portrays a poor, understaffed institution whose scattered tribunals had only a limited reach and whose methods were more humane than those of most secular courts. Death by fire, he asserts, was the exception, not the rule. He further argues that, beyond a few well-publicized autos de fe staged in 1559, the Inquisition was not the principal reason the Reformation did not take hold in Spain. Kamen believes the failure of Lutheran ideas in Spain had less to do with the Inquisition than with the populace’s indifference to Protestantism. As for the Inquisition’s much-vaunted role as Big Brother and its responsibility for intellectual decline, Kamen rejects this hypothesis out of hand, arguing that it was ineffective as a censor and that it failed even to prevent the importation of items listed on its own Index of Prohibited Books. The Inquisition, more interested in religion than science, did little to prevent the circulation of works by Copernicus, Galileo and Kepler.

Kamen also dismisses the notion that the Inquisition enjoyed widespread popular support. People grudgingly accepted it, he avers, as an institution they employed to torment their enemies. Similarly, the monarchy, despite complaints that the Inquisitors regularly interfered with the administration of royal justice, supported it as a useful means of getting political opponents out of the way, as it did in 1590 when Philip II turned to this tribunal and its tradition of secret proceedings to silence Lucrecia de Leon, a prophetess in Madrid who had criticized the King and his policies.

More controversial is Kamen’s interpretation of its handling of converted Jews, especially during the 1480’s, when, as a  »crisis instrument » created especially to deal with apostasy among conversos, the Inquisition was, by Kamen’s own admission, out of control.  »There is, » he writes,  »no systematic evidence that conversos as a group were secret Jews, » although the evidence for that assertion is ambiguous. Nor does he believe these conversos were persecuted solely out of racial enmity. He admits conversos suffered from a rising tide of anti-Semitism during the 1480’s that eventually led to the expulsion of Spain’s much diminished Jewish community in 1492. The conversos’ troubles, he asserts, were partly self-inflicted: the result of claims to be a  »nation » apart, neither Christian nor Jewish, a reluctance to assimilate (a similar attitude, he claims, contributed to the expulsion of the remnants of Spain’s Muslims in 1609), and also from personal enmities among the converso community, a situation that led to thousands of unwarranted denunciations and trials. Despite this fury, Kamen believes that most conversos escaped unharmed and led a  »relatively undisturbed » life by the close of the 16th century.

One weakness of this argument, and indeed of the whole book, is that Kamen, anxious to counter the 19th-century conception of the Inquisition as a monster that ultimately consumed Spain, fails to get inside the belly of the beast and to assess what it actually meant to individuals living with it. Little is said, for example, about the Inquisitors themselves, and what they sought to achieve beyond a confession of a guilt. Recent studies suggest that they were not faceless bureaucrats but law graduates with varying interests and career aims. Some were even capable of fraternizing with the people they investigated. Nor does Kamen lead the reader through an actual trial. Had he done so, a reader might conclude that the institution he portrays as relatively benign in hindsight was also capable of inspiring fear and desperate attempts at escape, and thus more deserving of its earlier reputation. More too might have been said about the lawyers who intervened in the trials and manipulated its procedures, along with the ploys, like bribes and pleas of insanity, that defendants used to bring the inquisitorial machinery to a halt.

In the end, Kamen’s Inquisition is the Inquisition seen from afar, and, despite his attempted revision, his survey is essentially one whose agenda was set long ago by Prescott, Lea and the others that he set out to refute. To make sense of it, a new, more nuanced evaluation is necessary, one that not only gives the Inquisition more of a human face but also examines it from the perspective of its times. Also necessary are studies that actually use its archives — for all its infamy, it kept excellent records — to reconstruct the world of the individuals, converso or otherwise, who became entangled in its net. Otherwise, it is likely that the Spanish Inquisition will forever remain, as Lea conceived it,  »an engine of immense power. »

Richard L. Kagan is a professor of history and the director of the Program in Iberian and Latin American Studies at Johns Hopkins University. His  »Urban Images of the Hispanic World » will be published later this year.

Historiquement correct
Pour en finir avec le passé unique
André Larané
Hérodote

2014-06-16

Nous avons lu : Historiquement correct, Pour en finir avec le passé unique (Perrin, mars 2003, 452 pages, 21,50 euros), par Jean Sévillia, rédacteur en chef adjoint au Figaro Magazine.
Historiquement correct (Perrin) est un pamphlet dédié aux hommes politiques qui traitent de l’Histoire à tort et à travers.

L’auteur, Jean Sévillia, ne cache pas son aversion pour la gauche. Il a la dent dure contre les politiciens qui conjuguent leur ignorance de l’Histoire et leur parti-pris idéologique.

Faut-il des noms ? Ils sont connus de tous les lecteurs de la presse française et l’auteur de Historiquement correct ne se fait pas faute de les rappeler, citations à l’appui.

En journaliste plus qu’en historien, il montre comment on peut déformer l’Histoire pour la mettre à son service ou cacher des vérités troublantes.

Il rappelle le racisme de Voltaire, les crimes commis contre les Vendéens, l’idéologie colonialiste des dirigeants de la IIIe République, la contribution des leaders de gauche au régime de Vichy.

Historiquement correct comporte 18 chapitres qui chacun se rapporte à une phase de l’Histoire. Cela va de la féodalité à la guerre d’Algérie en passant par les Croisades, l’Inquisition espagnole, la Terreur, la Commune, la Résistance et la Collaboration… Autant de sujets polémiques sur lesquels se déchirent les néophytes et les idéologues mais sur lesquels s’accordent la plupart des historiens, attentifs aux faits et aux sources de première main.

Ainsi, à propos de la féodalité et du Moyen Âge, l’auteur a beau jeu de rappeler qu’elle ne mérite pas les clichés méprisants du XVIIIe siècle. Les médiévistes contemporains, de Régine Pernoud à Jacques Le Goff en passant par Jacques Heers, ont fait litière de ces préjugés et montré comment, sous l’égide du clergé catholique, les peuples de l’Occident ont jeté les bases de la démocratie, de la laïcité, de l’émancipation des femmes etc.

À propos des croisades, Jean Sévillia signale qu’elles furent avant tout une manifestation de foi populaire et une réaction de défense des Européens dans une époque très critique de leur Histoire. Les excès et les massacres qu’on peut leur attribuer ne sortent hélas pas de l’ordinaire de l’époque (et sont plutôt moins choquants que les horreurs du début du XXe siècle).

Pire que le Goulag ( *), l’ Inquisition ! Contre l’imagerie traditionnelle colportée par les protestants anglais et les philosophes français qui fait de l’Inquisition espagnole l’horreur absolue, on rappelle que ses victimes se comptent au nombre de quelques milliers en l’espace de trois siècles.

Venons-en au XVIIIe siècle français. «Voilà un aspect des Lumières qui est aujourd’hui soigneusement caché : le racisme», dit fort justement l’auteur de Historiquement correct. Voltaire, le grand Voltaire, écrit dans Essai sur les moeurs et l’esprit des moeurs : «Il n’est permis qu’à un aveugle de douter que les blancs, les nègres, les albinos, les Hottentots, les Lapons, les Chinois, les Amériques ne soient des races entièrement différents».

En écrivant cela, le pourfendeur du clergé prend le contrepied de l’enseignement religieux qui, depuis Saint Paul, n’a de cesse de souligner l’unicité de la condition humaine. Malheureusement, aux XIXe et XXe siècles, le triste enseignement de Voltaire sera mieux suivi que celui de Saint Paul. Faut-il insister ? Le Siècle des Lumières fut aussi le grand siècle de la traite atlantique et les «philosophes» ne furent pas les derniers à placer leurs économies dans le trafic d’esclaves.

Jean Sévillia a beau jeu de rappeler les crimes commis pendant la Révolution française, sous la Terreur, au nom de la Liberté, mais curieusement ne s’appesantit pas sur Napoléon Bonaparte, dont les actions ont peu de rapport avec la légende. De même, il ne manque pas de rappeler les exactions des Communards de 1871 mais néglige la responsabilité d’ Adolphe Thiers dans cette tragédie.

Plus près de nous, Historiquement correct témoigne de la grande confusion idéologique qui a conduit en France les républicains de gauche à se faire les apologues de la colonisation à la fin du XIXe siècle et à défendre la présence française en Algérie après la seconde guerre mondiale.

De la même façon, peut-on ignorer la contribution de plusieurs dirigeants socialistes ou communistes au gouvernement du maréchal Pétain (Doriot, Déat, Laval, Belin…), tandis que des officiers catholiques et parfois monarchistes s’engageaient dès les débuts de l’occupation allemande dans la Résistance ( d’Estienne d’Orves, Leclerc de Hauteclocque, de Gaulle…) ?

Et quel est l’extrémiste qui confie les lignes suivantes à son journal intime, en juillet 1940 ? «J’espère que l’Allemand vaincra ; car il ne faut pas que le général de Gaulle l’emporte chez nous. Il est remarquable que la guerre revient à une guerre juive, c’est-à-dire à une guerre qui aura des milliards et aussi des Judas Macchabées. » C’est le philosophe Alain, radical et pacifiste, grande conscience de la IIIe République… (pages 367-368).

Discussions en perspective
Le ton de l’essai est vif. Les thèmes abordés sont aussi passionnants les uns que les autres et bien documentés. De quoi nourrir de passionnants débats entre amis. Mais ne prenons pas au pied de la lettre toutes les analyses de Historiquement correct.

Jean Sévillia se montre trop indulgent pour certains personnages (Thiers, Bonaparte…) et lui-même ne se gêne pas pour occulter des faits qui heurtent ses convictions. L’Histoire n’est ni à droite ni à gauche. Elle est tissée de compromis imposés par les circonstances.

Contre l’historiquement correct

René Schleiter
Polemia
4 mai 2003

« Quelle époque peut mieux que la nôtre comprendre l’inquisition médiévale à condition que nous transposions le délit d’opinion du domaine religieux au domaine politique ? » (Régine Pernoud).

Pour qui aime l’histoire, ce livre remplit bien son office. L’auteur, Jean Sévillia, est journaliste et critique littéraire. Rédacteur en chef adjoint au très conformiste Figaro Magazine, il sait de quoi il parle quand il rappelle que « le débat public fait constamment référence à l’histoire » et que « les hommes de presse, les polémistes, les gardiens sévères de la bienséance intellectuelle et, en tout cas, les policiers de la pensée cadrent leurs propos par rapport à des représentations du passé qui sont fausses… ». Il fustige les manuels scolaires en réhabilitant le fait historique et en le dépouillant de toute idéologie marxisante. Ne pouvant être exhaustif il limite son étude à « dix-huit points chauds » de l’histoire française et européenne.

Il entre tout de go dans l’histoire avec la Féodalité dont il désamorce un certain nombre de légendes telles que celle du droit de cuissage et surtout rétablit des concepts fondateurs comme celui, élémentaire mais primordial, de l’instauration de la royauté et de la nation par les Capétiens. Il bat en brèche cette vieille antienne chantée encore aujourd’hui aux jeunes Français lors de la Journée d’appel à la préparation de la défense : « La France commence en 1789 ».

Les Croisades : que de choses ont été écrites à leur sujet ! Aujourd’hui, il est de bon ton chez les humanistes de les considérer comme « une agression perpétrée par les Occidentaux violents et cupides à l’encontre d’un Islam tolérant et raffiné », alors que, si l’on en croit Sévillia, les Croisades sont tout bonnement une riposte à l’expansion militaire de l’Islam et une réplique à l’implantation des Arabes et des Turcs en des régions berceaux du christianisme. Cette considération partisane, pense-t-il, ne fait qu’alimenter la culpabilisation de l’Occident vis-à-vis de l’Orient dans le contexte colonialiste.

Un long chapitre est consacré aux rois catholiques d’Espagne et à l’Inquisition. On cite souvent Torquemada comme le modèle de l’intolérance et de la cruauté ; l’auteur, quant à lui, soutient que l’Inquisition au XVe siècle évolue dans un contexte très particulier propre à l’Espagne : « Torquemada n’est pas le fruit du catholicisme mais le produit d’une histoire nationale ». Toujours selon lui, et contrairement à une croyance bien ancrée, l’antisémitisme qui règne en Espagne au temps d’Isabelle la Catholique n’est nullement du fait de la reine mais des masses populaires qui reprochent aux juifs (air connu !) d’être « puissants, arrogants et accapareurs des meilleures places ». Leur expulsion en 1492 aurait une tout autre raison que celle, simpliste, qui est généralement présentée.

Revenant en France, Sévillia prend la défense de l’Ancien Régime contre les instructions de l’Education nationale. Il trouve comme une forme de paradoxe que, durant leur scolarité, les Français ont fort peu l’occasion d’entendre parler du Grand Siècle en cours d’histoire et, quand on leur en parle, c’est toujours sous le couvert de l’absolutisme et de l’obscurantisme. Pourtant, dans l’esprit de ces mêmes Français, l’Ancien Régime est bien vivant : ils adorent aller au théâtre voir jouer Molière, ils sont fous de la musique baroque, ils envahissent les monuments lors des Journées du patrimoine, etc. Comment comprendre, se demande l’auteur, que ces chefs-d’œoeuvre sont le fruit de l’intelligence et de la sensibilité d’une société qui aurait été hébétée par la servitude résultant de l’absolutisme ? Il a toute une série de réponses, fort séduisantes et convaincantes, sur la réalité de cet absolutisme dont le terme même a été forgé par la Révolution.

Sévillia dénonce la vision angélique que nos républicains modernes ont de la Révolution et de la Terreur en considérant la décennie 1790 comme un passage de l’absolutisme à la liberté, la Terreur ne constituant qu’un accident de parcours. Lui, il voit les choses différemment : « Conduite au nom du peuple, la Révolution s’est effectuée sans le consentement du peuple et souvent même contre le peuple ».

Une révolution en chassant une autre, l’historien traverse à pas de géant le XIXe siècle, alors qu’il aurait eu beaucoup à dire sur le Ier Empire et Napoléon fort délaissés par l’Education nationale, et aboutit à la Commune de 1871 dont il place avec clarté les origines dans la nostalgie de 1792 et les souvenirs de 1830 et 1848. Sa question : « Qui est responsable de cette tache sanglante dans l’histoire de France ? Est-ce le républicain Thiers, qui laisse ses troupes mener sans discernement la répression, ou bien sont-ce les communards, dont l’utopie était porteuse d’une violence que plus personne n’ose rappeler ? ».

Tout naturellement, la Commune, phase préparatoire de la IIIe République, amène l’auteur à s’intéresser à la question ouvrière au cours de l’industrialisation du XIXe siècle. Une fois encore, il dénonce un postulat républicain largement répandu dans les manuels scolaires en démontrant par les faits l’absurdité d’une idée bien installée selon laquelle seuls les socialistes ou les révolutionnaires auraient pris en charge le monde ouvrier. Rien n’est plus faux, dit-il : il suffit de faire l’inventaire des lois et des œoeuvres sociales ou de charité pour se convaincre qu’elles furent prises ou créées le plus souvent par des politiques ou des entrepreneurs catholiques.

Pour rester dans ce siècle avant de basculer dans le deuxième millénaire, l’abolition de l’esclavage, grande victoire de la IIe République, n’échappe pas à la loupe de Sévillia. À l’issue d’un long rappel historique, il conclut sur ce sujet par cette phrase laconique : « Qu’un magazine d’histoire, dénonçant un “tabou français”, publie les vrais chiffres de la traite des Noirs, c’est une démarche très légitime. Cependant, il ne serait pas moins intéressant de connaître les vrais chiffres de la traite des Noirs par les musulmans ».

Parmi les plus « chauds » sujets choisis par l’auteur apparaît l’Affaire Dreyfus. Il nous en livre une exégèse toute personnelle et fort intéressante. Selon lui, l’antisémitisme n’explique pas seul l’Affaire Dreyfus. Il va même jusqu’à écrire que « si l’accusé de 1894 n’avait pas été juif, il y aurait quand même eu une Affaire Dreyfus ». En effet, il fait intervenir dans cette alchimie d’autres éléments, notamment le radicalisme naissant, l’antimilitarisme de gauche et l’anticléricalisme, sujets interactifs qu’il développe.

« Ce n’est pas Hitler qui a engendré le nationalisme allemand ». Au risque de passer pour un iconoclaste, Sévillia dénonce trois raisons à ce nationalisme exacerbé : les énormes pénalités du Traité de Versailles, la stratégie exclusivement défensive conçue par l’état-major français en 1929 et le pacifisme des quarante-deux cabinets ministériels (!) en vingt et un ans.

L’entre-deux-guerres aura été la période du fascisme florissant, avec l’Italie et l’Allemagne et, par voie de conséquence, de l’antifascisme. Ce dernier naît en France de toutes pièces le 6 février 1934 quand la République entre en crise et que l’imaginaire politique de la gauche craint « le danger fasciste contre lequel doivent s’allier les forces de progrès ». Sévillia insiste bien sur le fait que le fascisme français des années 1930 représenté par les ligues et quelques petits partis sans aucune envergure est un mythe que la gauche utilise pour mieux combattre ses adversaires.

L’auteur traite les années 1940-1945 d’une façon inhabituelle mais intéressante. Ne voulant pas se plier à la règle qui veut qu’ « aujourd’hui tout concourt à appréhender prioritairement l’étude de la seconde guerre mondiale par le récit des malheurs juifs », il préfère considérer que « sur le plan historique, cette tragédie est survenue à l’occasion d’un conflit mondial dont les enjeux n’engageaient pas que les juifs ». Après un rappel des événements survenus entre le 10 mai et le 10 juillet 1940, Sévillia analyse la période des quatre années suivantes selon un découpage thématique : Vichy n’est pas un bloc ; La tragédie juive : qui est responsable ? ; De Gaulle : de la révolte à la victoire ; Contre les Allemands, des hommes de tous les camps ; Vérités et légendes de la résistance ; Résistants de droite et collaborateurs de gauche.

Pour ce qui concerne la tragédie juive, l’auteur est mesuré dans ses observations : « S’il n’y a pas une faute collective de la France comme l’a affirmé Jacques Chirac le 16 juillet 1995, ses racines plongent jusqu’à la IIIe République ». « Les Français ne sont pas les antisémites que décrit une certaine légende noire », ce qui apporte un démenti à tout ce qui peut être dit sur cette tragédie dans les manuels scolaires et, plus généralement, dans les médias.

Quant à la Résistance et à la Collaboration, Sévillia réduit à néant le manichéisme habituel d’une gauche résistante et d’une droite collaborationniste en s’appuyant là encore sur des faits et en donnant des exemples de personnalités attachées à l’un ou l’autre camp.

Vers la fin de son livre, l’auteur s’intéresse, d’ailleurs avec une certaine sympathie, à la personnalité du pape Pie XII dont l’attitude pendant la guerre est très controversée. Pour les uns, il n’aurait été que le complice tacite du régime national-socialiste en restant silencieux face au martyre juif dont il aurait eu connaissance ; pour d’autres, il aurait été à la fois favorable aux Alliés et secourable aux juifs en organisant le sauvetage de certains d’entre eux. Sévillia, lui, se dit appartenir au camp de ses défenseurs et s’appuie pour cela sur les archives du Vatican que le pape Paul VI fit ouvrir en 1963 pour faire justice des accusations lancées contre Pie XII. On pourra regretter que l’auteur n’ait pas poussé plus avant sa recherche sur la véritable attitude du pape puisque, écrit-il, « Pendant la guerre, ni Roosevelt, ni Churchill ni le général de Gaulle n’ont publiquement accusé l’Allemagne nazie d’exterminer les juifs ».

Jean Sévillia a atteint son objectif. Puisse son livre être lu ! Fort d’une documentation sérieuse, il a la vivacité et la concision d’une oeœuvre journalistique, la précision et la clarté du travail de l’historien.

Cependant, on peut reprocher à Jean Sévillia, bien qu’il s’en défende, de ne pas s’être suffisamment extrait de la Pensée unique et du Politiquement Correct (environnement oblige !). Alors qu’en sa qualité de journaliste, il ne peut l’ignorer, il omet – et en cela il demeure « Historiquement Correct » – de citer tout l’arsenal répressif qui a été mis en place pour protéger une certaine histoire officielle et interdire certains écrits. Ainsi il a passé sous silence les annulations administratives de thèses et de mémoires universitaires, comme à Nantes ou à Lyon, et bien sûr la loi Fabius-Gayssot du 13 juillet 1990, loi dite « sur la liberté de la presse » qui entrave dans les faits la liberté de recherche historique.
Jean Sévillia, « Historiquement Correct/Pour en finir avec le passé unique », Perrin, 2003, 456 pages, 21,50 euros.

Politique

L’histoire falsifiée

Fabrice Madouas

Valeurs actuelles

22 Décembre 2011

Colonisation, rapports entre l’islam et l’Occident, rôle de l’Église dans les progrès de la civilisation… L’idéologie s’est emparée de l’enseignement de l’histoire. Il est temps de rétablir quelques vérités. Entretien avec Jean Sévillia.

Assurément, les Français ont le goût de l’histoire, écrivait, en mai 2009, l’historien Jean-Pierre Rioux, dans son rapport sur les sites susceptibles d’accueillir un musée de l’Histoire de France. Pour preuve, ajoutait-il, le succès du documentaire sur la Seconde Guerre mondiale, Apocalypse, sur France 2 : 17 millions de téléspectateurs !

Oui, les Français aiment l’histoire, mais, comme ils aiment aussi se quereller, ils adorent se déchirer sur le passé. Le sachant, les plus avisés de nos monarques, républicains compris, ont toujours cherché à refermer nos querelles. « J’assume tout, de Clovis au Comité de salut public », disait Bonaparte.

Pourtant, depuis plusieurs années, la passion paraît l’emporter sur la sagesse. Des feux mal éteints se sont rallumés à l’occasion de l’adoption, sous la pression de communautés diverses, de plusieurs lois mémorielles – on pense notamment à la loi Taubira faisant de la traite négrière transatlantique un crime contre l’humanité, plus de cent cinquante ans après l’abolition de l’esclavage. En 2005, le gouvernement français se tint à l’écart des commémorations de la victoire d’Austerlitz, en raison de la campagne lancée par un écrivain guadeloupéen qualifiant l’Empereur de « despote misogyne, homophobe, antisémite, raciste, fasciste, antirépublicain »…

« Si la manipulation de l’histoire a toujours existé, le phénomène a pris un tour aigu et particulier au cours des dernières décennies, résume Jean Sévillia dans son livre, Historiquement incorrect (Fayard). Le regard contemporain se focalise sur certains épisodes au prix d’indignations sélectives qui ins truisent un procès permanent contre le passé occidental et contre celui de la France. »

Le problème est d’autant plus aigu que l’institution censée transmettre la connaissance de notre passé aux futurs citoyens français, d’où qu’ils viennent, ne le fait plus : l’École a renoncé au récit national, qui fut enseigné par des générations d’instituteurs à des générations d’élèves jusqu’à la fin des années 1950. L’historien Dimitri Casali a raison de souligner que nos “grands hommes” (Saint Louis, François Ier, Louis XIV, Napoléon…) disparaissent progressivement des manuels scolaires.

Sans doute ne peut-on plus raconter l’histoire comme le faisaient les instituteurs de la IIIe République, mais on peut retenir qu’ils surent intégrer à la nation française les hommes les plus divers. Une leçon à méditer pour rassembler et préserver l’unité du pays.

Toutes les époques sont-elles concernées par la falsification historique ? Toutes les époques sont concernées, mais les raisons de ces maquillages varient selon les dominantes idéologiques. Pour faire court, l’histoire est instrumentalisée, en Occident, depuis les Lumières : encyclopédistes et philosophes tressent une légende noire de l’Église, dont ils combattent le pouvoir. Au XIXe siècle, le roman national, tel que l’enseigne l’école jusqu’aux années 1950, s’inscrit dans une veine républicaine qui glorifie la Révolution et caricature l’“Ancien Régime”. L’après-guerre est dominée, jusqu’à la fin des années 1960, par l’histoire marxiste, ce qui s’explique par l’hégémonie culturelle du Parti communiste.

Et par l’influence de l’école des Annales ? À ceci près que Lucien Febvre et Marc Bloch, les fondateurs des Annales, étaient des hommes d’une très grande science, de grands historiens dont les travaux n’ont pas toujours été assimilés par ceux qui les diffusaient ensuite dans les établissements scolaires. Les Annales se sont démarxisées au fil du temps, et bon nombre d’historiens issus de cette école (Georges Duby, Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie, François Furet, Jacques Le Goff…) sont revenus à une vision classique de l’histoire, parfois à la biographie, voire à l’“histoire-bataille”. Quoi qu’il en soit, le marxisme s’effondre dans les années 1980. Un autre paradigme lui est substitué – les droits de l’homme – , et c’est encore à l’aune de ce paradigme qu’on interprète le passé. C’est cela, l’“historiquement correct” : passer l’histoire au crible de l’idéologie du moment. Ce faisant, on commet un anachronisme préjudiciable à la connaissance historique.

Comment définiriez-vous l’idéologie dominante que vous évoquez ? Elle relègue la nation dans les limbes de l’histoire, condamne les frontières, rejette tout enracinement géographique et spirituel. Elle fait l’apologie du nomadisme. Elle élève l’individu au rang de valeur sacrée et proclame son libre arbitre comme ultime référence. Est considéré comme juste celui qui respecte les droits de l’homme, comme injuste – donc immédiatement condamné – celui qui les viole. Alors que l’histoire est un domaine éminemment complexe, on cède à la facilité manichéenne (les bons et les méchants) et l’on procède à des réductions abusives en braquant le projecteur sur certains événements, au risque d’en laisser d’autres dans l’obscurité. Anachronisme, manichéisme, réductionnisme : ce sont les trois procédés de la falsification historique, qui sont beaucoup plus subtils que ce qui se faisait en Union soviétique…

Un exemple ? La Première Guerre mondiale. On ne perçoit plus ce conflit qu’à travers la vie des combattants de base. Ce qu’ils ont vécu fut atroce, mais on insiste tant sur cet aspect qu’on oublie la dimension géopolitique de la guerre. Comme nous sommes attachés par-dessus tout à nos droits individuels, comme nous sommes dans un moment de concorde européenne, nous ne comprenons plus ce qui les animait, ni qu’ils aient largement consenti à ce sacrifice. Nous ne comprenons plus l’expression “faire son devoir”.

Plusieurs controverses ont éclaté sur des sujets de recherche historique, par exemple sur l’esclavage, après la parution d’un livre de l’historien Olivier Pétré-Grenouilleau, les Traites négrières. Essai d’histoire globale (Gallimard). Est-ce aussi l’effet de l’historiquement correct ? Absolument. En 2004, cet historien – dont l’ouvrage a reçu plusieurs prix – démontre que l’esclavage n’a pas été seulement le fait des Occidentaux. En 2005, il déclare, au détour d’un entretien à la presse, que « les traites négrières ne sont pas des génocides ». La condition des esclaves était certes atroce, mais l’intérêt des négriers n’était pas de les laisser mourir puisqu’ils tiraient profit de leur vente. Aussitôt, diverses associations lancent une procédure judiciaire et nourrissent une campagne si violente qu’elle provoque la réaction de nombreux historiens : un millier d’entre eux signeront un appel rappelant que l’histoire n’est ni une religion ni une morale, qu’elle ne doit pas s’écrire sous la dictée de la mémoire et qu’elle ne saurait être un objet juridique. C’est à cette occasion qu’est née l’association Liberté pour l’histoire, à l’époque présidée par René Rémond.

De nombreux historiens considèrent que le Parlement n’a pas à s’emparer de ces questions. Qu’en pensezvous ? Les lois mémorielles entretiennent une concurrence victimaire, indexée sur la tragédie que fut la Shoah. Elles ont aussi nourri des revendications d’ordre politique, de sorte qu’on peut craindre une instrumentalisation de l’histoire. Il est tout à fait légitime d’entretenir la mémoire des tragédies, de toutes les tragédies, mais la mémoire n’est pas toute l’histoire.

Autre polémique, celle qu’a provoquée le livre de Sylvain Gouguenheim, Aristote au mont Saint-Michel (Seuil), en 2008… Agrégé d’histoire et docteur ès lettres, Sylvain Gouguenheim enseigne l’histoire médiévale à l’École normale supérieure de Lyon. Il souligne dans son livre que l’Occident médiéval n’a jamais été coupé de ses sources helléniques pour au moins trois raisons. Tout d’abord, il a toujours subsisté des îlots de culture grecque en Europe. Ensuite, les liens n’ont jamais été rompus entre le monde latin et l’Empire romain d’Orient. Enfin, c’est le plus souvent par des Arabes chrétiens que les penseurs de l’Antiquité grecque ont été traduits dans les régions passées sous la domination de l’islam. Conclusion : si la civilisation musulmane a contribué à la transmission du savoir antique, cette contribution n’a pas été exclusive ; elle a même été moindre que celle de la filière chrétienne. Ce livre a rapidement déclenché la mise en route d’une machine à exclure visant non seu lement à discréditer son auteur comme historien, mais à l’interdire professionnellement !

Pourquoi ? Parce qu’il est couramment admis que l’Occident n’aurait eu connaissance des textes antiques que par le truchement du monde islamique. L’essor de la culture occidentale ne pourrait donc pas s’expliquer sans l’intermédiation musulmane. Quiconque n’épouse pas cette thèse – enseignée dans les collèges – est voué aux gémonies. Il était naguère impossible de critiquer le communisme, il est aujourd’hui presque interdit d’évoquer l’islam. Il est quand même symptomatique que deux journaux français seulement – Valeurs actuelles et le Figaro Magazine – , aient parlé du livre de Christopher Caldwell, Une révolution sous nos yeux, qui explique que les populations musulmanes sont en train de redessiner l’avenir de l’Europe… Le système médiatique français reste politiquement très homogène.

Les programmes d’histoire n’échappent pas à la polémique. L’Éducation nationale est-elle à l’abri de la falsification historique ? Je suis navré de le dire, mais l’Éducation nationale est au coeur de ce système. Les commissions des programmes sont constituées d’enseignants qui, pour beaucoup, sont inspirés par le “pédagogisme” ambiant, donc en accord avec l’idéologie dominante. Le retour à la chronologie est infime, l’histoire est toujours enseignée de façon thématique aux enfants. Qu’un agrégé d’histoire fasse du comparatisme entre les sociétés ou à travers les siècles est très intéressant, mais cela n’est guère adapté à des enfants qui n’ont ni les connaissances ni les repères chronologiques nécessaires. Le problème est d’autant plus important que le système scolaire français est très concentré.

Mais l’école de la République, celle d’Ernest Lavisse, diffusait elle aussi un message idéologique… L’histoire républicaine était nationale. Parfois caricaturalement, mais cette approche avait au moins la vertu de donner aux enfants, qu’ils soient bretons ou provençaux, un patrimoine commun, presque un héritage spirituel. “Nos ancêtres les Gaulois”… Les choses étaient scientifiquement contestables, mais elles avaient un sens. L’histoire, telle qu’on l’enseigne aujourd’hui, sort de ce cadre national, car le credo politique actuel est de mettre à bas les nations. D’où le bannissement des grands hommes de notre histoire.

Comment expliquez-vous que la France doute à ce point d’elle-même ? La nation française est une construction de l’État. Or, l’État a été dépossédé – démocratiquement, c’est vrai – des attributs de sa puissance. Au profit de quoi, de qui ? On ne sait pas très bien : de Bruxelles ? De Francfort ? La crise de la nation est évidemment liée à celle de l’État.,

Les choses peuvent-elles évoluer ? Bien sûr. Les générations passent, les idéologies aussi. Mais ne me demandez pas de prédire l’avenir : nous avons assez à faire avec le passé !  Propos recueillis par Fabrice Madouas

Historiquement incorrect, de Jean Sévillia, Fayard, 372 pages, 20 €Voir égalment:

Voir également:

Rencontres

Entretien avec René Girard

L’entretien avec René Girard réalisé à Paris le mardi 30 octobre 2001, fait ici l’objet d’un compte-rendu qui se borne volontairement à quelques points. Si bref soit-il, puisse-t-il diriger l’attention vers le livre à l’occasion duquel il a été réalisé, Celui par qui le scandale arrive, édité cet automne chez Desclée de Brouwer. Kephas se propose de poursuivre régulièrement la réflexion sur une pensée qui a vigoureusement replacé le christianisme au centre de la compréhension de l’homme, à l’heure où philosophie installée et sciences anthropologiques feignaient de n’avoir plus l’usage de cette vieillerie…

Pierre Gardeil *

Janvier–Mars 2002

Pierre Gardeil

René Girard, votre dernier livre se dévore avec un tel bonheur que je viens, en trois jours, de le lire deux fois ! Et j’ai beaucoup de plaisir à y revenir ici avec vous.

Permettez-moi, pour commencer, d’applaudir à votre éloge du cardinal Ratzinger, qui est, dites-vous, pour certains Américains, un personnage épouvantable ! Et vous poursuivez : « Vous rendez-vous compte, le courage qu’il faut à des hommes comme lui pour s’opposer à tout le monde, pour se rendre impopulaire en rappelant aux théologiens catholiques qu’il y a certaines limites qu’il ne faut pas dépasser sans cesser de se dire légitimement catholique ? Il ne peut rien imposer à personne puisque personne ne peut être contraint de rester dans l’Église contre son gré. Il ne fait que répéter ce que l’Église a toujours dit. Il dit aussi son inquiétude relative à ce qui se voit partout. »

On est surpris que cette conduite responsable suscite aux USA tant de haine !

René Girard

Ce n’est pas réservé aux USA, vous le savez. J’ai été frappé par un petit événement ayant suivi la publication de Dominus Jésus. M’appelait de Paris une dame fort résolue, représentant je ne sais quel magazine français, dont je n’ai pas clairement compris s’il était ou non catholique… Elle me demandait « ma réaction » à ce texte, ajoutant (par avance) que la réaction de tous ceux qu’elle avait consultés avant moi était très négative. Je lui dis alors : « S’ils sont tous contre lui, c’est qu’il doit avoir raison ! » J’ai naturellement fait l’éloge du cardinal Ratzinger. Il a dû paraître dans ce magazine, du moins je l’espère.

P.G.

Il a paru, et il faisait tache ! Au milieu des rabbins, des pasteurs, des prêtres (il y avait même un vice-recteur d’Université Catholique), et à côté d’une autorité musulmane appelant le cardinal à la « tolérance », votre approbation tranquille et ferme ouvrait un paragraphe de respiration !

Allons maintenant au centre de votre livre. Quand vous évoquez le processus d’escalade de la violence parmi nous, vous parlez des violences familiales et scolaires, et du terrorisme sans limites ni frontières. Vous concluez : « Il semble qu’on se dirige vers un rendez-vous planétaire de toute l’humanité avec sa propre violence. » Cela était-il écrit avant le 11 septembre ?

R.G.

Oui, et j’aurais dû en dire les circonstances. Dumouchel m’avait demandé ce texte à propos de la commémoration d’un meurtre à l’Université de Montréal, où un type avait tiré sur les étudiants, à peu près comme un autre vient de le faire ces jours-ci à Tours… Le rendez-vous est bien planétaire, en effet. Rien ne fut plus attendu que la globalisation, l’unité de la planète : que de célébrations, que d’expositions internationales ! Eh bien ! cette unité réalisée suscite plus d’angoisse que d’orgueil. L’effacement des différences n’est pas la réconciliation universelle espérée… Naïveté (ou aveuglement) de l’humanisme.

P.G.

Ce constat ne fut-il pas à l’origine du succès de « l’absurde » ?

R.G.

Certes, mais c’est une vue trop courte. Méditez plutôt cette phrase prodigieuse d’Anaximandre, que je cite dans mon livre : « D’où toutes les choses ont leur naissance, vers là aussi elles doivent sombrer, selon la nécessité, car elles doivent expier et être jugées pour leur injustice, selon l’ordre du temps. » S’il y a quelque rationalité au mythe du retour éternel, la voilà.

P.G.

Crise mimétique1 de l’indifférenciation, sa résolution par la violence, installation de différences sacralisées… dès longtemps vous nous avez appris cette chair de l’histoire, au plus loin des études formelles, qui font leurs délices de l’inépuisable analyse des différences… mais qui cherchent en vain à se tenir à l’écart du « réel ».

R.G.

Ou du « référent », comme dit notre préciosité avec ses pincettes linguistiques ! Se borner aux jeux de langage est tellement exigé aujourd’hui… mais les gens sentent bien que c’est la fin. Le réel nous revient dans la figure.

L’innocence des mythes ne peut plus être supposée. On s’en rend compte, et c’est pourquoi – ultime attaque contre notre « ethnocentrisme » – on déclare qu’il faut renoncer à l’analyse quand on n’est pas partie prenante de la société analysée…

P.G.

Vous avez un fameux chapitre sur l’ethnocentrisme, « Les bons sauvages et les autres ». Personne n’a pu oublier la leçon pieusement transmise depuis qu’il y a de l’Instruction Publique en notre pays, à savoir que les peuples vivant sous les douces lois de nature sont bons, purs et heureux. Il est drôle qu’on la doive, avant Rousseau, à Montaigne, généralement plus perspicace. Mais la diffusion pédagogique de ses vues trop rapides sur les cannibales (en l’occurrence les Tupinambas), étrangement indulgenciés, est bien l’œuvre de notre « humanisme ».

R.G.

Oui, à condition, encore une fois, de ne pas en borner l’aire à notre Éducation Nationale. Aux États-Unis, certains musées d’ethnologie amérindienne minimisent, et parfois éliminent, toute violence religieuse et guerrière dans les cultures des native Americans. Pour en revenir aux Tupinambas, il se trouve qu’on est très bien renseigné sur eux. Alfred Métraux a fait le point sur la question, dès 1928, s’appuyant sur plusieurs témoignages distincts de contemporains de Montaigne : capturés par cette peuplade farouche, ils avaient pu s’en sortir, et nous décrivent par le menu les mœurs terribles de ces peuples, qui faisaient des prisonniers afin de se procurer de futures victimes sacrificielles, mises à mort et dévorées après acclimatation à la tribu des vainqueurs ! Métraux ironisait sur le fait que cette tribu fût justement à l’origine du mythe du « bon sauvage » ! Son texte, si contraire à la vague primitiviste qui allait suivre, fut repris plusieurs fois; L’anthropologie rituelle des Tupinambas se trouve aujourd’hui dans Religions et magies indiennes d’Amérique du Sud (Gallimard 1967).

P.G.

Le christianisme comme révélation de la méchanceté du « religieux » : on vous doit cette magnifique clarification, et comme il est légitime d’opposer « le Bon Dieu » aux faux dieux, qui sont, équivalemment, des « mauvais » dieux. L’opposition, toutefois, n’est pas absolument radicale…

R.G.

En effet. D’une part, on a pu trouver chez de vieux auteurs (imparfaitement christianisés !) la justification de l’offrande du Christ à la messe au titre d’une « efficacité » comparable à celle des sacrifices païens qui obtiennent quelques bons résultats, quand c’est, au cœur du salut, l’efficace de l’amour du Fils qui est à l’œuvre… et vous savez que la Rédemption elle-même a pu être interprétée dans des langages discutables.

D’autre part, on rencontre, dans certains rites païens, une espèce d’excuse présentée à la victime, comme si, sachant qu’elle n’était pas vraiment coupable, on lui reprochait seulement son imprudence…

P.G.

C’est le commencement d’un passage du mythique au tragique…

R.G.

Oui. Toute la part esthétique de la religion, cette espèce d’amoindrissement du sacrifice que constitue la cérémonie (par rapport au lynchage), nous ne devons pas la négliger. On pourrait peut-être en dessiner le parcours dans une histoire de la danse, qui montrerait qu’elle va des choses les plus sauvages aux figures les plus sereines… En tous cas, l’apaisement obtenu par un rite sacrificiel de plus en plus symbolique, on aurait tort d’en faire fi trop vite, et d’en détruire sans précaution les usages sous prétexte de « lumières », dans un monde qui cherche fiévreusement des « repères ».

P.G.

C’est, dans la fausse religion, le soupir de la vraie opprimée !

R.G.

En quelque sorte. Mais, dans un sens réciproque, et puisque vous parlez de tragique, savez-vous qu’à Byzance, on jouait Oedipe-Roi comme la Passion du Christ ? Je trouve cela bouleversant; cette lecture naïve illustre, avec une grande force, le regard que le christianisme porte légitimement sur la culture.

P.G.

Vous écrivez (p. 180) : « La vérité mimétique reste inacceptable pour la plupart des hommes, parce qu’elle implique le Christ. Le chrétien ne peut pas s’empêcher de réfléchir sur le monde tel qu’il est, et d’en voir la fragilité extrême. Je pense que la foi religieuse est la seule manière de vivre avec cette fragilité. » Et vous citez Pascal…

R.G.

Oui, je m’intéresse de plus en plus à Pascal. Cette œuvre est si puissante ! Mais, pour appliquer ce que vous dites à ce que nous vivons, n’est-il pas clair qu’on met bien à tort sur le dos de « différences » (traditionnelles, ancestrales, culturelles, religieuses…) des phénomènes enracinés au contraire dans la perte de ces traditions ? L’incapacité – par trop de retard pris – à participer à la concurrence avec l’Occident, dont on rêve, qui fait le tourment unique, et dont on a, par imitation, adopté les valeurs, devient le désir brûlant de briser ce qu’on ne peut atteindre. Peut-être Pascal n’a-t-il pas vu pleinement cet entraînement mimétique; mais comment ne pas admirer la mise en cause du désir qu’il opère à travers la notion de « divertissement » ?

P.G.

Le regard critique sur le désir blesse au cœur la modernité, qui s’est bâtie sur une fausse désacralisation, puisqu’on la faisait jouer au service de ce désir même, supposé autonome et innocent, idolâtré.

Mais rassurez-nous : ce désir, qui fait corps avec notre être, il n’est pas coupable de naissance ? Nous ne fûmes pas créés par erreur ?

R.G.

Certes pas ! J’adhère profondément à l’idée chrétienne que notre âme est une passion du divin. Simplement, quand nous le rencontrons, ce désir, il a déjà manqué son objet, il est dévoyé. Gare aux conséquences !

P.G.

Le monde est sous l’empire de Satan, lequel – on peut en apporter la précision après les lignes que vous lui consacrez ? – est métaphysiquement bon dans la conception chrétienne traditionnelle. Identifié au mécanisme mimético-sacrificiel, il serait injustifiable en tant que nécessité ontologique… ou créature mauvaise.

Si le mal est une absence d’être, moralement cette absence est le fruit d’un choix, toujours contemporain de celui qui le fait. Comme nous-mêmes, Satan est né pour l’amour… Mystère du choix de la haine (« Ils m’ont haï sans raison », dit Jésus, et encore : « Après avoir vu nos œuvres, ils nous ont haïs, le Père et moi »)… mais ce mystère fait l’objet dans la Genèse d’une description psychologique irrécusable; le premier mot du Tentateur est bien mimétique en effet : « Si vous mangez… vous serez comme ».

R.G.

Je ne prétends pas avoir vidé la question dans ce que j’ai publié à ce propos. Je voulais laisser plus explicitement le sujet ouvert; des considérations très matérielles d’édition ont fait sauter une note qui exprimaient davantage cette ouverture… Il semble en effet inconcevable qu’on puisse être jaloux du bien. Et cependant… Vous connaissez cette histoire de monarchie sacrée au Soudan : renversant les anciennes façons, le nouveau roi et son épouse avaient instauré le régime le plus raisonnable qu’il soit possible d’imaginer, et produisant le plus de bien commun. Une telle envie en était résultée que les voisins s’étaient réunis pour le détruire… Sans aucunement idéaliser notre propre histoire, c’est peut-être la fable du destin de l’Occident…

P.G.

Oui. Vous écrivez p. 120 : « Nous condamnons l’Inquisition au nom de valeurs chrétiennes. Nous ne pouvons pas la condamner au nom du Mahâbhârata, qui est constitué d’une série de meurtres alternés, à peu près dans le style de l’Iliade ! »

R.G.

C’est justement ce qui justifie « la repentance », que certains catholiques ont bien tort de reprocher au pape. Certes, les non-chrétiens, qui oublient régulièrement de se repentir, n’ont pas moins de choses à se reprocher (souvent, bien davantage : quand je pense que l’on continue à monter en épingle les abus de l’Inquisition, après ce que l’incroyance a fait au XXe siècle !) Mais grâce à la Révélation, les chrétiens auraient dû avancer, et faire avancer le monde plus vite. Nous avons « les paroles de la vie éternelle ». Or, c’est toujours le petit nombre qui a compris, et vécu de l’esprit du Christ. Seulement, aujourd’hui, je ne vois pas d’autre lieu que l’Église pour faire barrière à cette terrible désagrégation de tout, qu’on appelle parfois l’apocalypse. Est-ce pour cela que cette Église devient comme un ultime bouc émissaire, et qu’on emploie tant d’efforts pour discréditer ou empêcher sa parole, alors qu’elle n’a plus de pouvoir que spirituel ? Et parfois de son sein même… On a l’impression d’une force diabolique d’auto-destruction… Je dis le mot, on ne l’écrira pas.

P.G.

D’accord, on ne l’écrira pas… Mais pourquoi ? N’est-ce pas le mot par excellence qui cherche à se faire oublier ? C’est ça, le diabolique, que le mot n’y soit pas. Mettons-le, si vous le voulez bien.

R.G.

Vous avez raison, mettons-le.

Propos recueillis par Pierre Gardeil

* Professeur de philosophie, puis directeur du lycée Saint-Jean à Lectoure. A publié dans de nombreuses revues (Nouvelle Revue théologique, Études, Itinéraires…) et, chez Ad Solem, quatre ouvrages : Quinze regards sur le Corps livré; Alors le Bon Dieu, c’est fini ?; La Monnaie du pape, éloge des indulgences; Mon Livre de lectures.


  1. La récurrence du terme « mimétique » peut surprendre celui qui n’est pas familier de la pensée de R.G.
    Toute son œuvre en donne la clef… D’un mot, ici : Le désir est spontanément jaloux, il ne porte pas sur l’objet, mais sur l’autre (désirant lui-même ou possesseur, et par là désignant le désirable). D’où rivalité. Quand le conflit des désirs produit un orage social, le groupe refait son unité par la désignation (arbitraire) d’un coupable dont l’injuste sacrifice ramènera, pour un temps, la tranquillité, et installera dans le groupe des différences sacralisées censées émaner de la puissance surnaturelle dont l’exclusion constitue la fausse transcendance. Celle-ci nous menace de son retour violent si nous ne respectons pas les barrières et interdits qui paraissent son « ordre ». À cette fausse religion du mensonge et de la haine, le christianisme est venu opposer le Dieu de la vérité et de l’amour… Désir mauvais : « Mangez ce fruit… vous serez comme ». Désir suprêmement bon : « Mangez ce corps… vous serez un ». De l’être-comme à l’être-un, tel est le processus de la conversion chrétienne, impossible si le Christ ne la fonde.

Voir de même:

Rene Girard on Dostoevsky’s Legend of the Grand Inquisitor

When we consider the seventy years in the twentieth century his country was in the hands of its revolutionaries trying to build a Communist utopia, we cannot fail to discern in the nineteenth-century Russian novelistFeodor Dostoevsky a prophetic dimension — and one in which we may behold an image of our own culture’s controversies even after the fall of communism. The crisis he explored in nineteenth-century Russia’s belated and vexed encounter with Europe foreshadows the critical confrontations of our own time, as we face the decline of traditional religious, political, and epistemological authority while lost in a fog of competing claims about scientific determinism, groundless freedom, and the latest fashionable ideology.

If we cannot imagine Dostoevsky’s adaptation of our culture wars to the debates he stages in the living rooms, taverns, and seminaries of his novels, we haven’t grasped the implications of his work — as René Girard suggests in the concluding essay he has a’ached to Resurrection from the Underground, his twenty-year-old study of Dostoevsky’s work, now deftly translated into English.

The narrator of the Russian novelist’s Notes from the Underground neatly summarizes the far from completely secularized pandemonium in which we can recognize our own nihilistic climate: “Without books and literature, we are entangled and lost — we don’t know what to join, what to keep up with; what to love, what to hate; what to respect, what to despise.”

The famous passage in Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov — where Ivan Karamazov tells the legend of Jesus Christ returning to the world, only to encounter the Grand Inquisitor — is perhaps the best example ofthe novelist’s own relentless probing into modern culture’s muddled relation to its religious inheritance, the repudiation of which in the name of purely human dominion he views as blindly self-destructive.

But only in Girard’s retrospective comments twenty years after he wrote the book do these elements in Resurrection from the Underground come clear. Here is a reading selection from “Resurrection from the Underground” where Girard deals with the Legend of the Grand Inquisitor:

Dostoevsky begins to explain the freedom that comes from Christ in The Brothers Karamazov. He finally makes his way to this freedom with the aid of Christ and he celebrates it in the famous Legend of the Grand Inquisitor. It is put in the mouth of Ivan Karamazov as he seeks to explain to his brother Alyosha why he, Ivan, must “return his ticket” to a world which is not governed by a just and loving God — if there is a God.

The scene is in Seville in the end of the fifteenth century. Christ appears in a street and a crowd gathers about him, but the Grand Inquisitor comes along the way. He observes the mob and has Christ arrested. That night he goes to pay a visit to the prisoner in his dungeon and shows him, in a long discourse, the folly of his “idea.”

Thou wanted to found thy reign on that freedom that human beings hate and from which they always flee into some idolatry, even if they celebrate it with words. It would be be’er to make humans less free and thou hast made them more free, which only leads them to multiply their idols and conflicts between idols. Thou hast commi’ed humanity to violence, misery, and disorder.

The Inquisitor predicts that a new Tower of Babel will be raised up, more dreadful than the former one and dedicated, like it, to destruction. The grand Promethean enterprise, fruit of Christian freedom, will end in “cannibalism.”

The Grand Inquisitor is not unaware of anything that the underground, Stavrogin, and Kirillov (characters in The Possessed) have taught Dostoevsky. The vulgar rationalists find no trace of Christ, neither in the individual soul nor in history, but the Inquisitor asserts that the divine incarnation has made everything worse. The fifteen centuries gone by and the four centuries to come, whose course he prophesies, support his account.

The Inquisitor does not confuse the message of Christ with the psychological cancer to which it leads, by contrast to Nie-sche and Freud. He therefore doesn’t accuse Christ of having underestimated human nature, but of having overestimated it, of not having understood that the impossible morality of love necessarily leads to a world of masochism and humiliation.The Grand Inquisitor doesn’t seek to make an end of idolatry by an act of metaphysical force, like Kirillov; he wants rather to heal evil with evil, to tie humans to immutable idols and, in particular, to an idolatrous conception of Christ. D. H. Lawrence, in a famous article, accused Dostoevsky of “perversity” because he placed in the mouth of a wicked inquisitor what he, Lawrence, regarded as the truth concerning human beings and the world.

The error of Christ, in the eyes of the Inquisitor, is all the less excusable because “he had adequate warnings.” In the course of the temptations in the wilderness the devil, the “profound spirit of self-destruction and nothingness,” revealed to the redeemer and placed at his disposal the three means capable of insuring the stability, well-being, and happiness of humanity. Christ disdained them, but the Inquisitor and his ilk have taken them up and work — always in the name of Christ but in a spirit contrary to his — for the advent of an earthly kingdom more in keeping with the limitations of human nature.

Agreeing with Dostoevsky, Simone Weil saw in the inquisition the archetype of all totalitarian solutions. The end of the Middle Ages is an essential moment in Christian history; the heir, having reached the age of an adult, lays claim to his heritage. His guardians are not wrong to mistrust his maturity, but they are wrong to want to prolong indefinitely their tutelage. The Legend resumes the problem of evil at the precise point where Demons abandoned it. The underground appeared in this novel as the failure and reversal of Christianity. The wisdom of the redeemer, and especially his redemptive power, are notably absent. Rather than hide his own anxiety from himself, Dostoevsky expresses it and gives it an extraordinary fullness. He never combats nihilism by fleeing from it.

Christianity disappointed Dostoevsky. Christ himself has surely not responded to his expectation. There is, in the first place, the misery that he has not abolished, then the suffering, and also the daily bread that he has not given to all human beings. He has not “changed life.” That is the first reproach, and the second is yet more serious. Christianity does not bring certitude; why does God not send a proof of his existence, a sign, to those who would believe in him, but don’t a&ain this belief? And finally and above all, there is that pride which no effort, no prostration of oneself is able to reduce, that pride which goes as far, sometimes, as envying Christ himself.

When he defines his own grievances against Christianity, Dostoevsky encounters the Gospel, he encounters the three “temptations in the wilderness”:

Then Jesus was led by the Spirit out into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil. He fasted for forty days and forty nights, after which he was very hungry~ and the tempter came and said to him, “If thou art the Son of God, tell these stones to turn into loaves.” But he replied, “Scripture says:

Man does not live on bread alone but on every word that comes from the mouth of God.”

The devil then took him to the holy city and made him stand on the parapet of the Temple. “If thou art the Son of God,” he said, “throw thyself down; for Scripture says:

He will put thee in his angels’ charge, and they will support thee on their hands in case thou hurtest thy foot against a stone.”

Jesus said to him, “Scripture also says:

Thou must not put the Lord your God to the test.”

Next, taking him to a very high mountain, the devil showed him all the kingdoms of the world and their splendor. “I will give thee all these,” he said, “if thou fallest at my feet and worship me.” Then Jesus replied, “Be off, Satan! For Scripture says:

Thou shalt worship the Lord thy God, and serve him alone.”

Then the devil left him, and angels appeared and looked after him. MaÆhew 4:1-11 The translation of Gospel passages follows the Jerusalem Bible except for the use of

the archaic pronouns “thou,” “thy,” “thee.” Dostoevsky evidently made the language of the Inquisitor archaic, and this pronoun usage helps to convey that.

These are indeed the major temptations of Dostoevsky: social Messianism, doubt, and pride. The last one is especially worthy of meditation. Everything that the proud desire leads them, after all, to prostrate themselves before the Other, Satan. The only moments of his life when Feodor Mikhailovich did not succumb to one or the other of the temptations were those when he succumbed to all three at once. So it is therefore to himself in particular that this message is addressed; the Legend is the proof that he finally understands its call. The presence in the Gospel of Ma&hew of a text so adapted to his needs affords him great comfort. There it is, the sign he was seeking, as he tells us in brilliant and veiled fashion by the mouth of his Inquisitor:

And could one say anything more penetrating than what was said to thee in the three questions or, to speak in the language of the Scriptures, the “temptations” that thou rejected? If ever there had been on earth an authentic and resounding miracle, it occurred the day of the three temptations. The very formulation of these three questions constitutes a miracle. Let us suppose that they had disappeared from the Scriptures, that it had been necessary to compose them, to imagine them anew in order to replace them there, and that one had gathered for this all the sages of the earth, persons of state, prelates, scholars, philosophers, poets, saying to them: imagine and compose three questions which not only correspond to the importance of that event, but express in three sentences all the history of future humanity — dost thou believe that this summit gathering of human wisdom could imagine anything as strong and profound as the three questions put to thee by the powerful Spirit? These three questions prove, all by themselves, that one has met here the eternal and absolute Spirit and not a transitory human mind. For they summarize and predict simultaneously all the later history of humanity. These are the three forms in which all the insoluble contradictions of human nature are crystalized. One could not understand it then, for the future was veiled, but now, after fifteen centuries have elapsed, we see that everything had been foreseen in these three questions and has been realized to the point that it is impossible to add anything to them or to remove a single word from them.

The Legend is basically only the repetition and expansion of the Gospel scene evoked by the Grand Inquisitor. This is what must be understood when one wonders, a li&le naively, about the silence that Alyosha maintains in face of the arguments of this new tempter. There is no “refuting” of the Legend since, from a Christian point of view, it is the devil, it is the Grand Inquisitor, it is Ivan who is right. The world is delivered over to evil. In St. Luke the devil asserts that every earthly power has been delivered to him “and I give it to whom I will.” Christ does not “refute” this assertion. Never does he speak in his own name; he takes refuge behind the citations of Scripture. Like Alyosha, he refuses to debate.

The Grand Inquisitor believes he can praise Satan, but it is of the Gospel that he speaks, it is the Gospel that has preserved its freshness after fifteen, after nineteen centuries of Christianity. And it is not only in the instance of the temptations, but at each moment the Legend echoes the Gospel sayings:

Do not suppose that I have come to bring peace to the earth: it is not peace I have come to bring but a sword. For I have come to set a man against his father, a daughter against her mother.

Matthew 10:34-35a

The central idea of the Legend, that of the risk entailed by the increase of freedom for humans, orof the grace conferred by Christ, a risk the Grand Inquisitor refuses to run — this very idea figures in passages of the Gospel which evoke irresistibly Dostoevsky’s concept of underground metaphysics.

When an unclean spirit goes out of a man it wanders through waterless country looking for a place to rest, and cannot find one. Then it says, “I will return to the house I came from.” But on arrival, finding it unoccupied, swept, and tidied, it then goes off and collects seven other spirits more evil than itself, and they go in and set up house there, so that the man ends up by being worse than he was before. That is what will happen to this evil generation.

Matthew 12:43-45

Behind the dark pessimism of the Grand Inquisitor is the outline of an eschatological vision of history that responds to the question Demons left in suspense. Because he foresaw the rebellion of man, Christ foresaw also the sufferings and ruptures that his coming would cause. The proud assurance of the orator allows us to discern a new paradox, that of the divine Providence which effortlessly outwits the calculations of rebellion. The reappearance of Satan does not nullify his prior defeat. Everything must finally converge toward the good, even idolatry.

If the world flees Christ, he will be able to make this flight serve his redemptive plan. In division and contradiction he will accomplish what he wanted to accomplish in union and joy. In seeking to divinize itself without Christ, humankind places itself on the cross. It is the freedom of Christ, perverted but still vital, that produces the underground. There is not a fragment of human nature that is not kneaded and pressed in the conflict between the Other and the Self. Satan, divided against himself, expels Satan. The idols destroy the idols. Humankind exhausts, li&le by li&le, all illusions, including inferior notions of God swept away by atheism. It is caught in a vortex more and more rapid as its always more frantic and mendacious universe strikingly reveals the absence and need of God. The prodigious series of historical catastrophes, the improbable cascade of empires and kingdoms, of social, philosophical, and political systems that we call Western civilization, the circle always greater which covers over an abyss at whose heart history collapses ever more speedily — all this accomplishes the plan of divine redemption. It is not the plan that Christ would have chosen for human beings if he had not respected their freedom, but the one they have chosen for themselves in rejecting him.

Dostoevsky’s art is literally prophetic. He is not prophetic in the sense of predicting the future, but in a truly biblical sense, for he untiringly denounces the fall of the people of God back into idolatry. He reveals the exile, the rupture, and the suffering that results from this idolatry. In a world where the love of Christ and the love of the neighbor form one love, the true touchstone is our relation to others. It is the Other whom one must love as oneself if one does not desire to idolize and hate the Other in the depths of the underground. It is no longer the golden calf, it is this Other who poses the risk of seducing humans in a world commiÆed to the Spirit, for beÆer or for worse.

Between the two forms of idolatry. the one aÆacked in the Old Testament and the other unmasked in the New, there are the same differences and the same analogical relation as between the rigidity of the law and universal Christian freedom. All the biblical words that describe the first idolatry describe analogously the second. This is certainly why the prophetic literature of the Old Testament has remained fresh and alive.

The Christianity that the Inquisitor describes is like the negative of a photograph — it shows everything in a reversed manner, just like the words of Satan in the account of the temptations. It has nothing to do with the metaphysical milk toast that a certain bourgeois piety holds up as a mirror to itself. Christ wanted to make humans into super-humans, but by means opposed to those of Promethean thought. So the arguments of the Grand Inquisitor are turned against him when one understands them as they are intended. It is just this that the pure Alyosha observes to his brother Ivan, the author and narrator of the Legend. “Everything that you say serves not to blame, but to praise Christ.”

Christ has been voluntarily deprived of all prestige and all power. He refuses to exercise the least pressure; he desires to be loved for himself. To reiterate, it is here the Inquisitor who speaks. What Christian would want to “refute” such statements? The Inquisitor sees all, knows all, understands all. He understands even the mute appeal of love but is incapable of responding to it. What to do in this case but to reaffirm the presence of this love? Such is the sense of the kiss that Christ gives, wordlessly, to the wretched old man. Alyosha, too, kisses his brother at the conclusion of his story and Ivan accuses him, laughingly, of plagiary.

The diabolical choice of the Inquisitor is nothing else than a reflection of the diabolical choice made by Ivan Karamazov. The four brothers are accomplices in the murder of their father, but the guiltiest of all is Ivan, for he is the one who inspires the act of murder. The bastard Smerdyakov is the double of Ivan, whom he admires and hates passionately. To kill the father in place of Ivan is to put into practice the audacious statements of this master of rebellion; it is to anticipate his most secret desires; it is to go even further on the road he himself designated. But a diabolical double is soon substituted beside Ivan for this double who is still human.

The hallucination of the double synthesizes, as we have seen, quite a series of subjective and objective phenomena belonging to underground existence. This hallucination, at once true and false, is notperceived until the phenomenon of doubling reaches a certain degree of intensity and gravity.

The hallucination of the devil that Ivan experiences may be explicated, at the phenomenal level, by a new aggravation of psychopathological troubles produced by pride; it embodies, on the religious level, the metaphysical overcoming of underground psychology. The more one approaches madness, the more one equally approaches the truth, and if one does not fall into the former, one must end up necessarily in the laÆer.

What is the traditional conception of the devil? This character is the father of lies; he is thus simultaneously true and false, illusory and real, fantastic and everyday. Outside of us when we believe him to be in us, he is in us when we believe him outside of us. Although he leads an existence useless and parasitic, he is morally and resolutely “Manichean.” He offers us a grimacing caricature of what is worst in us. He is at once both seducer and adversary. He does not cease to thwart the desires that he suggests and if, by chance, he satisfies them it is in order to deceive us.

It is superfluous to emphasize the relations between this devil and the Dostoevskyan double. The individuality of the devil, like that of the double, is not a point of departure, but an outcome. Just as the double is the origin of all doublings or divisions, the devil is the locus and the origin of all possessions and other demoniacal manifestations. The objective reading of the underground leads to demonology. And there is no reason to by astonished by that, for we are really always in this “kingdom of Satan” which is not able to maintain itself, for “it is divided against itself.”

Between the double and the devil there is not a relation of identity but a relation of analogy. One moves from the first to the second in the way in which one moves from the portrait to the caricature; the caricaturist relies on characteristic features and suppresses those that are not. The devil, parodist par excellence, is himself the fruit of parody. For an artist imitates himself, he simplifies, schematizes, makes himself starker in his own essence, in order finally to render ever more striking the meanings with which his work is permeated.

There is no break in continuity, no metaphysical leap between the double and the devil. One moves imperceptibly from one to the other, just as one passed imperceptibly from romantic doublings to the personified double. The process is essentially aesthetic. For Dostoevsky there is, as for most great artists, what could be called an “operational formalism,” from which, however, a formalist theory of art should not be deduced. Perhaps the distinction between form and content, which is always dialectical, is not truly legitimate except from the standpoint of the creative process. It is proper to define the artist by his quest for form, because by form as intermediary he accomplishes the penetration of reality, the knowledge of the world and himself. The form here literally precedes the meaning, and this is why it is bestowed as “pure” form.

In Dostoevsky the devil is thus called forth by an irresistible tendency to bring forth the structure of some fundamental obsessions which constitute the primary subject-maÆer of the work. The idea of the devil does not introduce any new element, but it organizes the old ones in a more coherent and meaningful manner. In fact, this idea is revealed as the only one capable of unifying all the phenomena observed. There is not a gratuitous intervention of the supernatural in the natural world. The devil is not represented to us as the cause of the phenomena. For example, he repeats all the ideas of Ivan, who recognizes in him a “projection” of his sick brain but who ends up, like Luther, by throwing an inkwell at his head.

Ivan’s devil is even more interesting to the extent that Dostoevsky’s realism is so scrupulous. Never, before The Brothers Karamazov, had the theme of the devil contaminated that of the double. Even in the “romantic” period we do not find in Dostoevsky those purely literary and decorative comparisons and connections to which the German writers devote themselves so readily. On the other hand, he had already thought about giving a satanic double to the persona of Stavrogin, but this double is already that of Ivan. It is particularly with Demons(more familiarly known as The Possessed in its first translation), one may recall, that the entire underground psychology appears to Dostoevsky as an inverted image of the Christian structure of reality, as precisely its double. If Dostoevsky temporarily withdrew from his idea, it was not because the novelist within him still held in check a fanaticism to which he gave free rein in The Brothers Karamazov. It is rather because he feared misunderstanding from the public. The interior demand and motivation were not yet mature enough to surmount this obstacle.

With The Brothers Karamazov all things are accomplished. The devil is totally objectified, expelled, exorcised; he must therefore figure in the work as the devil as such. Pure evil is disengaged, and its nothingness is revealed. It no longer causes fear, for separated from the being that it haunts, it seems even derisory and ridiculous, nothing more than a bad nightmare.

This impotence of the devil is not a gratuitous idea, but a truth inscribed on all the pages of the work. If the Inquisitor is able to express only what is good, this is because he goes further in evil than all his predecessors. There is almost no longer any difference between his reality and that of the elect. Indeed, it is with full knowledge that he chooses evil. Almost everything he says is true, but his conclusions are radically false. The last words he states are the pure and simple inversion of the words that end the New Testament in the Apocalypse: for the marana tha of the early Christians — “Come, O Lord” —he substitutes a diabolic “Don’t come back, don’t ever come back, ever!”

This evil that is at once the strongest and the feeblest is evil seized at its root, that is, evil revealedas pure choice. The pinnacle of diabolic lucidity is also extreme blindness. The Dostoevsky of The Brothers Karamazov is just as ambiguous as the romantic Dostoevsky, but the terms of ambiguity are no longer the same. In The Insulted and Injured the rhetoric of altruism, nobility, and devotion covers over pride, masochism, and hate. In The Brothers Karamazov it is pride that comes into the foreground. But the frenzied discourses of this pride allow us to catch a glimpse of a good that has nothing otherwise in common with romantic rhetoric.

Dostoevsky lets evil speak to bring it to the point where it refutes and condemns itself. The Inquisitor discloses his scorn for humanity and his appetite for domination that drives him to prostrate himself before Satan. But this self-refutation, the self-destruction of evil must not be uÆerly explicit for otherwise it would lose all its aesthetic and spiritual value. It would lose, in other words, its value as temptation. This art of which the Legend is the model could indeed be defined as the art of temptation. All the characters of the novel, or almost all, are tempters of Alyosha: his father, his brothers, and also Grushenka, the seductress, who gives money to the wicked monk Rakitin so that he will lead Alyosha to her. Father Zossima himself becomes, after his death, the object of a new temptation as the rapid decomposition of his corpse shocks the naive faith of the monastic community.

But the most terrible tempter is certainly Ivan when he presents the suffering of innocent children as a motif of metaphysical revolt. Alyosha is stunned and upset, but the tempter, once again, is powerless, for without knowing it he works even for the victory of the good, since he incites his brother to concern himself with the unfortunate liÆle Ilyusha and his friends. The same reasons that distance the rebel from Christ impel those open to love toward him. Alyosha well knows that the pain he experiences at the thought of the suffering children comes from Christ himself.

Between the temptations of Christ and the temptations of Alyosha there is an analogy that underlines the parallelism of the two kisses given to the two tempters. The Legend is presented as a series ofconcentric circles around the Gospel archetype: circle of the Legend, circle of Alyosha, and finally the circle of the readers themselves. The aft of the tempter-novelist consists in revealing, behind all human situations, the choices that they imply. The novelist is not the devil but his advocate, advocatus diaboli. He preaches the false in order to lead us to what is true. The task of the reader consists in recognizing, with Alyosha, that everything he has just read “is not for the blame but the praise of Christ.”

The Slavophil and reactionary friends of Dostoevsky did not recognize anything at all. No one, it seems, was really ready for an art so simple and so great. They expected of a Christian novelist some reassuring formulas, some simplistic distinctions between good and bad people, in a word, “religious” art in the ideological sense. The art of the later Dostoevsky is terribly ambiguous from the point of view of the sterile oppositions with which the world is filled because it is terribly clear from the spiritual point of view. Constantine Pobedonos9ev, the procurator of the Holy Synod, was the first to demand this “refutation,” whose absence continues to chagrin or elate so many contemporary critics. There is no need to be astonished if Dostoevsky himself ratifies, in a way, this superficial reading of his work by promising the demanded refutation. It is not the author but the reader who defines the objective meaning of the work. If the reader does not perceive that the strongest negation affirms, how would the writer know that this affirmation is really present in his text? If the reader does not perceive that rebellion and adoration finally converge, how would the writer know that this convergence is effectively realized? How could he analyze the art which he is in the process of living? How would he divine that it is the reader, not he, who is wrong? He knows the spirit in which he has wriÆen his work, but the results escape him, if one says to him that the effect sought is not visible, he can only bow. This is why Dostoevsky promises to refute the irrefutable without ever following through, and this for good reason.

The pages devoted to the death of Father Zossima are beautiful, but they do not have the force of genius found in the invectives of Ivan. The critics who try to bend Dostoevsky in the direction of atheism insist on the laborious character that Dostoevsky’s positive expression of the good always had. The observation is fair, but the conclusions usually drawn from it are not. Those who demand of Dostoevsky a “positive” art see in this art solely the adequate expression of Christian faith. But these are always people who conceive a lame idea either of art or of Christianity. The art of extreme negation is perhaps, to the contrary the only Christian art adapted to our time, the only art worthy of it. This art does not require listening to sermons, for our era cannot tolerate them. It lays aside traditional metaphysics, with which nobody, or almost nobody, can comply. Nor does it base itself on reassuring lies, but on consciousness of universal idolatry.

Direct assertion and affirmation is ineffective in contemporary art, for it necessarily invokes intolerable cha&er about Christian values. The Legend of the Grand Inquisitor escapes from shameful nihilism and the disgusting insipidity of values. The art that emerges in its entirety from the miserable and splendid existence of the writer seeks affirmation beyond negations. Dostoevsky does not claim to escape from the underground. To the contrary, he plunges into it so profoundly that his light comes to him from the other side. “It is not as a child that I believe in Christ and confess him. It is through the crucible of doubt that my Hosanna has passed.”

Voir encore:

L’auteur

Ancien élève de l’ENS (1984), docteur en philosophie (1994) habilité à diriger des recherches (2004) et docteur en science politique (2012), Christian Ferrié enseigne en classes préparatoires aux grandes écoles à Strasbourg. Il a consacré l’essentiel de son travail à la philosophie de langue allemande : deux livres sur l’herméneutique heideggerienne (1998 et 1999), des articles de philosophie politique sur Carl Schmitt et Hannah Arendt (2006-2010), deux ouvrages sur la politique kantienne à publier chez Payot (2015). Parallèlement à ces travaux, il a entrepris un travail de recherche sur l’anthropologie politique de Pierre Clastres qui l’a amené à rédiger un livre (à paraître) : Le mouvement inconscient du politique (essai d’ethno-psychanalyse à partir de Clastres). Dans ce contexte, il a déjà publié une contribution dans le Cahier Clastres (2011), lequel Cahier fait suite au colloque à l’Unesco qui avait été consacré en novembre 2009 à Pierre Clastres : « La dynamique inconsciente du mouvement politique », p.323-339 in Pierre Clastres, sous la dir. de M. Abensour et A. Kupiec, 2011, Sens&Tonka.


À Hélène Clastres

« Des Cannibales » : le titre de l’essai de Montaigne peut paraître paradoxal. L’intention est évidente : cette réflexion sur la barbarie humaine entend rejeter comme unilatérale la condamnation morale et religieuse des pratiques anthropophagiques du Nouveau Monde que les voyageurs et les chroniqueurs ont révélées, en ce XVIe siècle finissant, à une France déchirée par les guerres de religion [1]. Le procédé est tout aussi clair : il s’agit de relativiser le cannibalisme pratiqué en Amérique en le réinsérant dans l’ensemble culturel où il prend sens, tout en éclairant les pratiques de cette nation prétendument barbare par des comparaisons valorisantes à l’Antiquité. Pourtant, le titre de l’essai a ceci d’étrange qu’il semble réduire la nation en question à sa coutume anthropophagique : « cette nation » alliée des Français qui habitait la contrée où le vice-amiral Villegagnon a fondé la France Antarctique – c’est celle dont les relations de Thevet (1557 et 1575) et de Léry (1578) nous entretiennent – n’a pas chez Montaigne de nom propre ; leur cannibalisme en ferait essentiellement des cannibales. Le paradoxe est d’autant plus grand que Montaigne refuse la démarcation sémantique entre les mauvais Cannibales et les bons Amériques, celle même mise en place par la délimitation cartographique du Pays des Cannibales entreprise par Thevet en 1557 à partir du cap de Saint-Augustin [2] : par opposition aux Sauvages des Amériques, lesquels font de manière barbare mourir leurs ennemis pris en guerre en les mangeant (il s’agit des Tamoio de la région autour de Rio de Janeiro), André Thevet dénomme et dénonce ces « Canibales » qui mangent « ordinairement chair humaine » (il s’agit cette fois des Tupi de la région située entre Bahia et le Maranhão [3]). Mais la distance prise par Montaigne avec le cosmographe du Roi suffit à lever le paradoxe apparent du titre.

S’il le fallait, la lecture ethnologique de l’essai de Montaigne à laquelle nous invite sa description, ethnographique avant la lettre, des coutumes de ces « Cannibales » avère ce point. On peut même dire que cet essai annonce la « révolution copernicienne » que Pierre Clastres célèbre dans un article, Copernic et les Sauvages (1969), qui ne porte pas par hasard une citation des Essais de Montaigne en exergue [4]. La conversion du regard qui permet de briser le cercle herméneutique de l’ethnocentrisme – suivant en cela le chemin tracé par l’œuvre de Lévi-Strauss, laquelle a su prendre au sérieux la pensée sauvage –, cette conversion donc trouverait son inspiration dans le voyage de Montaigne au pays des Cannibales : si Jean de Léry écrit bien le bréviaire de l’ethnologue [5], c’est la fraîcheur du regard de Montaigne qui en assure le succès au XVIe siècle [6] et depuis lors. Il s’agirait de proposer une lecture ingénue de son essai, et ce en faisant abstraction de la mise en scène subtile et raffinée des références philosophiques et poétiques qui encadre la présentation par Montaigne des mœurs de cette nation cannibale du Brésil. Cela me semble justifié d’un double point de vue. Dégager les éléments ethnographiques du témoignage de Montaigne en faveur de l’humanité de ces Cannibales du Nouveau Monde ne serait-ce pas rendre justice aux Cannibales de Montaigne tout autant qu’à Montaigne lui-même ?

Les Cannibales sans Montaigne

Les Cannibales qui circulent en France à l’époque de Montaigne et dont parlent les chroniqueurs français du XVIe siècle sont des Tupi-Guarani. Avant la Conquista, ces tribus constituent une population de plusieurs millions : ce qui est un fait tout à fait exceptionnel pour une société primitive ou sauvage [7]. Les tribus tupi-guarani qui vivaient dans la forêt amazonienne et sur le littoral ont une place tout à fait singulière aussi bien d’un point de vue ethnographique que dans une perspective historico-politique : ce sont les Tamoio ou Tupinamba qui servent de modèle à la figure du Cannibale tout autant que du Bon Sauvage ; ce sont des groupes guarani qui, d’une part, frayent aux Espagnols la voie vers l’or inca et, d’autre part, vont être rassemblés dans les missions jésuites des XVIe et XVIIe siècles. L’association entre Tupi et Guarani dans le vocable Tupi-Guarani provient d’une très grande homogénéité culturelle entre ces tribus, remarquable tant au plan de la vie socio-économique qu’au niveau des pratiques rituelles, des croyances religieuses et de la structure des mythes [8]. Les différences culturelles entre ces tribus tupi et guarani sont donc relativement négligeables, en particulier par rapport au cannibalisme, dont le rituel a été observé principalement à partir des Tupi côtiers. Il existe cependant une différence : chez les Tupi, seul le meurtrier changeait de nom alors que, chez les Guarani, tous ceux qui avaient mangé un morceau du corps ou l’avaient touché (les enfants étaient invités à broyer son crâne à la hache et à tremper leurs mains dans son sang) devaient changer de nom [9]. C’est l’occupation du territoire qui semble ainsi constituer la plus grande différence entre Tupi et Guarani : les Guarani à l’intérieur du Paraguay et les Tupi sur la côte brésilienne [10]. Avant la Conquête, les Tupi et les Guarani partagent donc culture et langue, mais ils ne forment aucunement une seule et même nation. Il n’y avait pas plus d’unité politique entre les Tupi qu’entre les Guarani : en effet, les tribus tupi ou guarani se trouvaient bien plutôt dans un état de guerre permanente entre elles comme, par ailleurs, avec les tribus dont elles essayaient de conquérir le territoire suite à leurs propres migrations. C’est en fait le contexte de leur exo-cannibalisme guerrier. Leur pratique pourtant bien particulière de cannibalisme – la capture des hommes et non des femmes est une des « curieuses inversions » notées par Hélène Clastres [11] –, cette anthropophagie rituelle pourtant atypique est paradoxalement devenue avec le temps un classique du genre [12], et ce par l’entremise décisive de Montaigne.

Il y a encore un autre paradoxe, noté par Métraux [13] : le mythe du Bon Sauvage a été forgé en Europe, au sein du milieu calviniste, à partir de la figure idéalisée du Tupinamba anthropophage [14]. C’est que le contexte européen des guerres de religion qui préside à la réception théologico-politique des Tupi-Guarani est au moins aussi important que les stratégies d’alliance des Européens avec les tribus indiennes : les Français avec les Tupinamba, les Portugais avec les Tupininquin [15] et les Espagnols avec les Guarani. En fonction même de ces alliances, les Européens ont une image positive de leurs alliés tupi-guarani avec lesquels ils entretiennent un très bon contact : dans ces conditions, ils peuvent apprécier le commerce avec ces tribus, le soutien militaire des hommes contre leurs ennemis et la beauté des femmes dont ils font des épouses ou des maîtresses (ce qui, en outre, leur assure l’alliance militaire des chefs de famille) [16]. Tout autant de raisons de relativiser leur cannibalisme.

Ces données ethnographiques nous permettent d’aborder en connaissance de cause ethnologique l’essai de Montaigne, lequel pointe tout particulièrement les pratiques guerrières des Cannibales. Mais il est un autre point d’intérêt dont il est également question dans l’essai : c’est l’existence de prophètes chez les Tupinamba. Pour achever cette présentation liminaire des sociétés tupi-guarani, il faut évoquer le phénomène tout à fait singulier des migrations prophétiques, que Nimuendaju (1914) et Métraux (1927) ont étudiées avant que Lowie (1948) et Clastres (1974) n’en fournissent une interprétation. Ce sont ces mouvements prophétiques qui intéressent en premier lieu Pierre Clastres chez les Tupi-Guarani, et non pas leur anthropophagie rituelle. Lire Montaigne à la lumière de Clastres peut, dans ces conditions, paraître aussi téméraire que paradoxal. Risquons ingénument un tel décryptage.

Une lecture ingénue : Des Cannibales de Montaigne

Il s’agit d’éclairer l’évocation ethnographique des mœurs tupi par l’essai de Montaigne en partant du principe que la fiction littéraire construite par Montaigne rencontre la réalité ethnographique. Si l’on fait abstraction des multiples références à l’Ancien monde (et tout particulièrement à la littérature de l’Antiquité) dont Montaigne agrémente la démonstration de l’essai, on peut reconnaître deux moments d’intérêt d’un point de vue ethnographique : le compte rendu par Montaigne du témoignage d’un de ses domestiques quant aux mœurs de cette nation du Nouveau Monde qui pratique notamment le cannibalisme ; le dialogue direct avec trois d’entre eux, lequel porte sur la question du pouvoir socio-politique.

Avant même d’en faire état en deux temps, Montaigne présente le « veritable tesmoignage » d’un homme « simple et grossier », lequel avait « demeuré dix ou douze ans en cet autre monde », à l’endroit même de la France Antarctique de Villegagnon, comme étant d’autant plus authentique et fidèle qu’il a été confirmé par d’autres voyageurs que cet homme simple lui a présentés [17]. Il convient de collecter les informations que ce témoignage ingénu nous apporte, et ce afin de les recouper avec les connaissances ethnographiques qui sont par ailleurs disponibles. Dans un premier temps, les mœurs de cette nation sont présentées d’une double manière. Tout d’abord, il s’agit pour Montaigne de déconstruire l’ethnocentrisme du jugement de ces nations par l’Ancien monde : contredisant leur disqualification comme « barbare et sauvage », il défend cette nation, proche de la nature, contre l’anti-modèle de notre société, artificielle. Mais surtout, il lui faut ensuite faire état de leurs mœurs, et ce afin d’en avérer la simplicité. En fait, tout n’est pas aussi simple qu’il y paraît au premier abord.

Au plan de la civilisation matérielle, leurs « bastimens » sont considérables : une « grangée » de « cent pas de longueur » peut contenir deux à trois cent âmes et constituer un village [18]. Il convient d’apporter une précision ethnographique, laquelle montre un déplacement dans la description de Montaigne. La communauté primitive constitue un groupe local qui réside souvent dans une seule maison (maloca). Mais, chez les Tupi-Guarani, le village est constitué de plusieurs maloca [19] qui abritent en moyenne quatre cents personnes [20]. Par suite, le village étant capable d’abriter mille à trois mille habitants ne ressemble plus à une communauté primitive classique. C’est donc comme si Montaigne projetait sur les villages tupinamba « le modèle primitif habituel » dont ils s’étaient pourtant écartés [21]. C’est le premier déplacement qu’on peut noter, lequel converge avec un second déplacement. Ayant avancé l’idée qu’il n’existe aucune distinction politique parmi cette nation, « nul nom de magistrat, ny de superiorité politique » [22], Montaigne attribue à « quelqu’un des vieillards » la fonction de prêcher toute la grangée le matin [23], alors que ce rôle est traditionnellement dévolu au chef de tribu [24]. Ayant précisé que les gens de cette nation « croyent les ames eternelles », Montaigne affirme que ces prêches quotidiens iraient dans le même sens que les exhortations à la vertu des « prestres et prophetes », dont la « science éthique » se limiterait à deux articles : la résolution à la guerre, où il faut montrer son courage contre les ennemis, et l’affection ou l’amitié envers les femmes [25]. Suivant Léry, Montaigne fait état des grandes fêtes et assemblées solennelles de plusieurs villages qui ont lieu les rares fois où ces Caraïbes, qui demeurent dans les montagnes, en descendent pour se présenter au peuple [26] : leur tâche est de prédire à cette occasion l’issue de la guerre et leur destin de disparaître ou d’être mis à mort s’ils s’avèrent être des « faux prophètes [27] ».

Après un intermède cultivé sur la divination chez les Scythes, la transition est faite pour passer à la question de leurs « guerres contre les nations au delà de leurs montagnes » : armés d’arcs et d’épées de bois, ils vont nus au combat, combat qu’ils mènent sans jamais s’enfuir ni se laisser effrayer ; les guerriers victorieux ramènent comme trophées la tête de l’ennemi vaincu ainsi que des prisonniers, lesquels seront mis à mort et mangés au bout d’un certain temps. Montaigne rend fidèlement compte du rituel qui préside au repas anthropophagique, et ce malgré quelques imprécisions (indiquées entre parenthèses) et quelques inexactitudes de détail [que je m’autorise à corriger] : pendant leur séjour, qui peut effectivement être assez long (jusqu’à quelques années), les prisonniers sont bien traités (même si, lors de leur arrivée dans le village ennemi, ils sont insultés par des femmes et qu’ils le seront à nouveau de temps à autre à l’occasion de fêtes) ; lors de son exécution, le prisonnier est maintenu par une corde attachée [non par les bras, mais] au torse, laquelle corde est tenue par deux autres hommes [et non par le maître et son ami] pendant que son maître [seul] l’assomme d’un coup d’épée-massue ; ensuite, son corps mort est rôti [boucané en fait], puis mangé en commun après une répartition des lots (laquelle a été décidée en amont de la cérémonie) ; tout ce rituel (d’une durée de trois à cinq jours) a pour signification non de satisfaire la faim, mais de « representer une extreme vengeance [28] ». S’il suit fidèlement les chroniqueurs qui, tel Léry, insistent tout particulièrement sur ce dernier point, Montaigne a pour insigne mérite d’avoir parfaitement mis en scène le lien qui unit guerre et cannibalisme [29]. Cette compréhension (pré)ethnologique de la signification de l’anthropophagie guerrière permet à Montaigne de récuser sa condamnation ethnocentriste et, qui plus est, de fustiger le châtiment barbare qui peut être infligé aux cannibales du Nouveau Monde : être livrés à des chiens pour être dévorés vivants [30]. Après cette relativisation de la barbarie cannibale, il est longuement question du sens de leur pratique guerrière et de la signification que revêt dans ce contexte la vengeance anthropophagique.

Montaigne démarque leur manière de faire la guerre, « toute noble et genereuse », d’une guerre de « conqueste de nouvelles terres » et de pillage des « biens des vaincus » : « l’acquest du victorieux c’est la gloire, et l’avantage d’estre demeuré maistre en valeur et en vertu ». Pour étayer cette hypothèse sur le but de la guerre, il rend compte du traitement apparemment ambivalent des prisonniers : si, d’une part, ils sont laissés en liberté et peuvent jouir de toutes les commodités (dont une épouse), c’est pour leur rendre la vie d’autant plus chère et, ainsi, les attacher à la vie qu’on va leur prendre ; d’autre part, les prisonniers sont périodiquement entretenus de leur mort future, des tourments qu’ils vont souffrir et du « festin qui se fera à leurs despens », et ce afin de leur arracher la requête de n’être pas tués et mangés. On leur rend donc la vie agréable tout en leur peignant leur propre mort dans le seul objectif d’abattre leur vaillance :

Tout cela se fait pour cette seule fin d’arracher de leur bouche quelque parole molle ou rabaissée, ou de leur donner envie de s’en fuyr, pour gaigner cet avantage de les avoir espouvantez, et d’avoir faict force à leur constance. Car aussi, à le bien prendre, c’est en ce seul point que consiste la vraye victoire [31].

La véritable victoire et, donc, la vengeance suprême contre l’ennemi, ce serait de parvenir à affaiblir la fermeté d’âme et le courage du guerrier vaincu : c’est peine perdue, car « de vray, ils ne cessent jusques au dernier souspir de les braver et deffier de parole et de contenance ». C’est le sens de cette « chanson faicte par un prisonnier » que Montaigne évoque après avoir établi, à travers une incursion savante dans le monde gréco-romain, le sens de la noble guerre : acquérir l’honneur de la vertu guerrière, laquelle consisterait moins à battre qu’à combattre [32]. Le but de cette généreuse guerre ne serait donc ni la conquête territoriale, ni le pillage des biens, ni même la victoire : ce serait uniquement le gain de gloire. C’est comme si l’analyse de Montaigne rencontrait une forme primitive de guerre que les Tupi-Guarani, en fait, ne pratiquaient plus au moment de la Conquista. Car, pendant la période pré-colombienne, les tribus tupi-guarani ont mené de véritables guerres de conquête [33] qui, par exemple, ont permis aux Tupinamba de repousser les anciens occupants de la côte brésilienne dans les forêts : ceux qu’ils appellent les Tapuya [34]. Rien ne permet d’affirmer que, si la Conquista n’avait pas eu lieu, les Tupinamba s’en seraient tenus aux frontières entre provinces que les Européens ont pu constater au moment de leur arrivée : la séparation de la côte brésilienne en provinces est, en quelque sorte, un cliché de l’état du rapport de forces entre les tribus au moment de la Conquête. C’est donc comme si Montaigne avait projeté la pratique primitive de la guerre sur les Tupi-Guarani tout autant, d’ailleurs, que sur les Grecs et les Romains. Mais ce déplacement a permis à Montaigne d’entrevoir l’idéal-type de la guerre primitive, idéal-type que Pierre Clastres a forgé en s’appuyant sur les paroles des guerriers chulupi du Chaco [35] : le moteur de la guerre en sa forme primitive, c’est la quête insatiable de gloire [36]. C’est un des passages les plus captivants de l’œuvre de Clastres : le guerrier est condamné à mort par sa propre tribu qui le pousse à rechercher la gloire [37], et ce afin d’empêcher la logique mortifère de la guerre de l’emporter sur la logique de vie de la société primitive [38]. La vérité de la guerre primitive, ce serait la mort du guerrier en quête de gloire.

Il faut « revenir à nostre histoire » pour bien comprendre que le guerrier vaincu, fait prisonnier, ne perd pas pour autant son honneur. Afin d’attester leur « contenance gaye », Montaigne fait état de la constance des prisonniers, lesquels défient leurs maîtres, accusés de lâcheté et pressés de les exécuter, et vocifèrent même tout leur mépris « jusques au dernier souspir [39] ». Il évoque les gravures qui « peignent le prisonnier crachant au visage de ceux qui le tuent » en l’assommant, et ce juste après avoir restitué la chanson faite par le prisonnier, mais sans préciser la corrélation entre les deux événements. Il y en a pourtant une : cette « chanson guerrière » (comme Montaigne la dénomme par la suite) est, en effet, le discours que le prisonnier fait pendant le rituel de son exécution, et ce juste avant de mourir [40] ; pour que le rituel soit accompli, il est même tenu de le faire de façon à simuler le combat à mort qui, en quelque sorte, autorise sa mise à mort finale et le repas anthropophagique [41]. Sans transition autre que d’en faire un « tesmoignage de la vertu du mary » et de sa « reputation de vaillance », il est ensuite question de la polygynie, laquelle n’est plus chez les Tupi-Guarani l’apanage du chef ou du chaman, mais est partagée par les guerriers valeureux. Le prestige d’avoir capturé des ennemis se double ainsi du droit prestigieux d’avoir plusieurs femmes : à l’instar de leur groupe familial, ces dernières recherchent elles-mêmes les guerriers les meilleurs et donc les plus prestigieux [42]. Montaigne noterait donc, à juste titre, l’accord des femmes avec le dispositif polygamique de la société : « soigneuse de l’honneur de leurs maris […], elles cherchent et mettent leur sollicitude à avoir le plus de compaignes qu’elles peuvent [43] ». C’est pour montrer que ces femmes ne sont pas servilement dominées et abêties par « l’impression de l’authorité de leur ancienne coutume » (polygénique) qu’est invoquée une chanson amoureuse dont Montaigne restitue le premier couplet et refrain.

Il s’agirait d’illustrer une concorde raffinée entre des femmes qui seraient reliées entre elles par une corde de coton. Je risque une hypothèse, anti-poétique au possible : ce ne serait pas un homme amoureux, mais une femme qui s’adresserait à une couleuvre pour la prier d’arrêter son mouvement, et ce afin qu’elle puisse servir de modèle au cordon filé par sa sœur ; ce qui permettrait à cette femme de l’offrir à son amie ; cette corde pourrait être celle qui est mise autour du cou du prisonnier pendant toute la durée de son séjour ou bien le cordon qui servirait à sa mise à mort. Les Tupi ne tissaient pas, mais filaient et tressaient le coton pour en faire des cordons qui servaient à fabriquer les hamacs, lieux des accouplements, tout autant que la corde maintenant le prisonnier lors de sa mise à mort, la mussurana. C’est un terme tupi qui, à l’origine, désigne un serpent cannibale : insensible au venin des serpents venimeux, ce serpent non venimeux se laisse mordre par la vipère, puis l’enlace de ses volutes avant de s’emparer tout d’abord de sa tête et ensuite de l’engloutir complètement ; de même que « le mussurana-serpent attache avec son propre corps la victime au moment de la tuer », de même la corde-mussurana attache le prisonnier à mettre à mort [44]. Il n’y aurait « rien de barbarie dans cette imagination » mienne : une femme offre à une autre un riche cordon filé par sa sœur sur le modèle d’un serpent inoffensif pour l’être humain ; on peut même s’imaginer que cette autre femme est l’épouse transitoire du prisonnier ennemi. Il faut bien, en effet, que la mussurana soit filée par des femmes avant d’être nouée par des hommes : le prisonnier est alors immobilisé comme le serpent venimeux [45] ; l’épouse du captif sacrifié versait des larmes, puis consommait son époux [46] en suivant le modèle du serpent-mussurana. C’est une hypothèse qui ne peut être vérifiée, faute de disposer de la chanson tupi à laquelle Montaigne se réfère pour en affirmer le caractère anacréontique. Mais on peut en supputer plusieurs traits qui se tresseraient ici en une sorte de cordon directeur d’une interprétation polyphonique de la chanson : la métaphore filée par Montaigne, peut-être, parviendrait à relier la symbolique de la couleuvre à l’ouvrage artisanal et à la création poétique, et ce avec une discrétion anacréontique dont André Tournon a révélé la signification raffinée au possible [47]. Comme si la mélodie tupi, « retirant aux terminaisons Grecques », parvenait de la sorte à faire entendre sa composition symboliquement raffinée en contrepoint du chant poétiquement cultivé par Anacréon.

Discrètement, Montaigne passe du témoignage indirect sur les mœurs de cette nation du Nouveau Monde au dialogue direct avec trois d’entre eux sur la question du pouvoir socio-politique : c’est la rencontre mise en scène à Rouen. Il y a deux scènes dialoguées, lesquelles voient Montaigne passer du statut de spectateur à celui d’interlocuteur. C’est bien connu. L’ensemble est placé tout entier sous le signe de La Boétie, et ce d’entrée de jeu puisque Montaigne les juge « bien miserables de s’estre laissez piper au desir de la nouvelleté [48] ». Il faut s’imaginer la première scène : le jeune roi Charles IX leur parle « long temps » ; pourtant, ce n’est pas le long dialogue royal avec eux qui retient l’attention de Montaigne, mais bien les impressions négatives qu’ils ont de la France monarchique. Faussement inattentif, Montaigne a bien noté les réponses interrogatives qu’ils ont faites aux questions posées par « quelqu’un » d’inconnu qui pourrait figurer le fantôme de La Boétie. Car ce sont manifestement les subversives questions de la servitude volontaire face à la division socio-politique qui caractérise l’Ancien monde depuis la malencontre. Ainsi, Montaigne fait apparaître La Boétie en arrière-plan de ces « gens tout neufs » qu’évoque Le Contr’Un :

… si d’avanture il naissoit aujourdhuy quelques gens tout neufs, ni accoustumés a la subjection, ni affriandés a la liberté, et qu’ils ne sceussent que c’est ni de l’un ni de l’autre ni à grand peine des noms, si on leur présentoit ou d’estre serfs, ou vivre francs selon les loix desquelles ils ne s’accorderoient : il ne faut faire doute qu’ils n’aimassent trop mieulx obéir a la raison seulement, que servir a un homme [49]

Suivant l’allusion de son ami La Boétie, Montaigne ne peut qu’écouter ce que ces gens ont à dire de notre monde de servitude comme de leur monde de liberté. Le versant critique de la rencontre, la vision que les Tupi-Guarani donnent de l’ancien monde, précède dans l’essai le versant positif, l’exposition de leur pratique du pouvoir. C’est la seconde scène du dialogue qui voit Montaigne sortir de l’ombre pour devenir l’interlocuteur principal : à son tour, il parla « à l’un d’eux fort long temps », et ce grâce à la traduction d’un « truchement » qui fut cependant d’une trop grande bêtise pour suivre Montaigne. Tout semble donc défavorable à la compréhension mutuelle entre Montaigne et ce « Capitaine » que les matelots appelaient « Roy » : le truchement normand ayant séjourné au Brésil, cela vaut, par extension, de la difficile rencontre entre l’ancien et le nouveau monde sous les conditions de la Conquête. Malgré tout, l’écoute et l’entente semblent possibles : un dialogue authentique peut avoir lieu… du moins dans l’essai de Montaigne. Toute la mise en scène du dialogue direct de Montaigne avec le Capitaine vise ainsi à nous persuader de l’authenticité d’une fiction qui, en substance, rejoint la réalité. Pour répondre aux questions de Montaigne, le Capitaine avance trois éléments : « marcher le premier à la guerre » est l’avantage que lui apporte sa « superiorité » de chef ; en tant que chef de guerre il est suivi de quatre à cinq mille hommes (selon l’estimation de Montaigne) ; « hors la guerre, toute son autorité estoit expirée » à l’exception du fait qu’on lui fraye des sentiers où il peut passer à l’aise pour accéder aux villages [50]. Cette toute dernière précision pourrait être le fait d’une confusion entre chef et chaman [51]. Mais pour le reste, Montaigne rencontre bien la réalité ethnographique de la chefferie amérindienne, et ce à la faveur de quelques déplacements qu’il nous faut prendre soin d’analyser. Pour ce faire, laissons la clarification ethnologique prendre la relève du décryptage ingénu de ce que l’essai de Montaigne révèle d’évocation ethnographique.

Un éclairage ethnologique : la chefferie tupi

L’éclairage ethnologique n’a pas pour objectif d’infliger une rectification positiviste à la description ethnographique de Montaigne, mais bien d’en attester la justesse en cernant la réalité rencontrée par son essai. Tout atteste, en premier lieu, que l’interlocuteur de Montaigne est un chef de guerre : un capitaine donc (comme Montaigne l’avait bien compris), et peut-être bien un fils de roi plutôt qu’un roi (les matelots revenus du Brésil anticiperaient peut-être son statut à venir). Marcher le premier à la guerre : ce caractère a été relevé par Claude Lévi-Strauss, qui l’évoque dans Tristes tropiques (1955), en écho à sa thèse complémentaire sur les Nambikwara (1948) : la référence explicite à Montaigne conforte le constat ethnographique que « le chef marche en avant », en général et non seulement à la guerre [52]. Il y a là, de la part de Lévi-Strauss, une étrange indistinction entre le chef et le chef de guerre. Ce qui enlève en fait tout son mordant à la réponse faite à Montaigne : pour le chef de guerre, il s’agit de risquer sa vie en s’exposant en premier et, par le courage ainsi donné en exemple, d’inciter les autres à le suivre, alors que les mauvaises décisions du chef risquent tout au plus de provoquer une scission du groupe. Lorsqu’il donne l’exemple des Nambikwara étudiés par Lévi-Strauss (1944), Lowie (1948) néglige bizarrement de remarquer cette confusion entre chef et chef de guerre, et ce alors même qu’il entend avérer l’opposition entre l’influence d’un titular chief sans pouvoir de commandement et l’autorité du war leader :

… les Nambikwara illustrent la montée en puissance d’une chefferie relativement stable, comme celle décrite de manière suggestive par Lévi-Strauss […]. Ici émerge un chef titulaire avec une véritable influence, bien qu’encore dépourvu de pouvoir (not a ruler). Par contraste, le chef de guerre a une autorité éphémère mais absolue, comme cela a déjà été remarqué pour de nombreux groupes d’Amérique du Sud [53].

En règle générale, le chef de guerre n’est pas le chef tout court : le stratège et le chef n’ont pas les mêmes attributs et attributions. Selon Lowie, le chef en titre (titular chief), qui assume la direction du groupe en temps de paix (civil leadership), peut être défini, négativement, par son absence d’autorité coercitive et de pouvoir de commander les autres : positivement, il est un pacificateur caractérisé par sa générosité (obligation de munificence) et par ses dons oratoires [54]. C’est le point de départ de Pierre Clastres dans son texte inaugural sur la philosophie de la chefferie indienne (1962), texte qui fait tout logiquement référence à Lowie et Lévi-Strauss [55]. Selon Clastres, la chefferie indienne est instituée dans l’intention sociologique de figurer « l’impuissance de l’institution » d’un chef condamné à être contrôlé et contesté, si besoin est, par la société :

…le chef ne dispose d’aucune autorité, d’aucun moyen de coercition, d’aucun moyen de donner un ordre. Le chef n’est pas un commandant, les gens de la tribu n’ont aucun devoir d’obéissance. L’espace de la chefferie n’est pas le lieu du pouvoir, et la figure (bien mal nommée) du « chef » sauvage ne préfigure en rien celle d’un futur despote [56].

Clastres note que la guerre perturbe cette situation dans la mesure où le chef de guerre doit, lors d’une expédition guerrière, « exercer un minimum d’autorité », et ce en relation avec sa « compétence technique de guerrier [57] ». Pourtant, le chef de guerre ne commande pas à proprement parler. Ce qui reste vrai pour les Tupi côtiers, et ce alors même que des milliers de combattants étaient engagés sur le champ de bataille [58] : suivant Léry, Métraux précise ainsi qu’après avoir suivi le chef qui menait toujours la colonne, les Tupinamba combattaient sans obéir à aucun commandement [59] ; les plus vaillants à la pointe, ils marchaient au combat sans tenir « ni rang ni ordre », pendant que les femmes assuraient l’approvisionnement [60]. Selon Léry, même la mobilisation initiale des troupes n’était pas le fait du chef, mais bien plutôt une œuvre collective résultant de la décision prise par le Conseil des Anciens [61] : c’est la tribu qui décide de la guerre et c’est elle qui mène le combat. En temps de guerre, le chef de guerre dispose donc d’une force de commandement tout à fait relative et, « hors la guerre », il perd tout pouvoir : en temps de paix, il ne jouit en effet que du prestige d’un guerrier ayant tué et mis à mort beaucoup d’ennemis, prestige qui se marque et se remarque par l’accumulation des tatouages et des noms. Mais prestige n’est pas pouvoir : le chef de guerre ne peut pas faire le chef au sens où nous l’entendons, sauf à renverser le rapport de forces entre la tribu et le chef : s’appuyant sur l’exemple de Geronimo, qui s’y essaie, Clastres avance l’hypothèse que « ça ne marche jamais [62] ». Jusqu’à présent, tout paraît congruent à l’essai de Montaigne.

Il y a pourtant un élément dissonant, qui renvoie à l’état bien particulier de la société tupi à l’époque de la Conquête. Parmi les sociétés primitives, les Tupi-Guarani constituent en effet un cas tout à fait exceptionnel : c’est l’exemple singulier d’une montée en puissance des chefs (de guerre) au sein de la société sauvage, dont le célèbre Quoniambec est une illustration exemplaire. Tout en récusant le déterminisme démographique, Clastres a montré l’articulation entre la croissance démographique et la lente émergence du pouvoir politique par l’intermédiaire sociologique de la concentration de la population dans des unités socio-politiques de plusieurs milliers d’habitants :

…les Tupi-Guarani paraissent, à l’époque où l’Europe les découvre, s’écarter sensiblement du modèle primitif habituel […]. Sur ce fond d’expansion démographique et de concentration de la population se détache – fait également inhabituel dans l’Amérique des Sauvages, sinon dans celle des Empires – l’évidente tendance des chefferies à acquérir un pouvoir inconnu ailleurs [63].

En corrélation avec l’expansion démographique [64], l’expansion territoriale et politique, permise par des guerres de conquête [65], assure ainsi l’autorité de certains chefs sur plusieurs villages et même sur une province entière. La tendance centripète à l’unification [66], qui s’était tout d’abord déployée au niveau d’un village rassemblant plusieurs communautés, conduisait en effet les sociétés tupi-guarani à reproduire le même schéma au plan fédéral du rassemblement de plusieurs villages sous l’autorité d’un chef de province [67]. Lorsque les Européens arrivent, le système social était bien loin d’avoir, à ce niveau provincial, trouvé un état d’équilibre. Car cette dynamique politique créatrice de sortes de « royautés » (les guillemets de Clastres indiquent que le terme révèle la perception des chroniqueurs) constituait un processus conflictuel : « à s’étendre en effet, le champ d’application d’une autorité centrale suscite des conflits aigus avec les petits pouvoirs locaux » (par exemple, entre le « Roy » Quoniambec et ses « roytelets ») ; et ce comme si les chefferies locales résistaient à un processus historique qui, à terme, aurait abouti à l’exercice d’une « hégémonie politique » sur plusieurs communautés ou tribus voisines [68]. Constatant qu’il y a « une différence radicale, une différence de nature » (et non pas simplement de degré) entre le chef d’une centaine de guerriers et les grands leaders tupi-guarani menant au combat plusieurs milliers de guerriers [69], Clastres peut en conclure que « les chefs tupi-guarani n’étaient certes pas des despotes, mais ils n’étaient plus tout à fait des chefs sans pouvoir [70] ».

Cet état socio-politique tout à fait singulier des sociétés tupi-guarani permet de mettre en perspective plusieurs faits ethnographiques évoqués par Montaigne. Tout d’abord, l’existence de villages multi-communautaires éloigne les Tupi-Guarani de l’horizon d’une communauté primitive dont le village se limiterait à la dimension d’une grange (maloca). Ensuite, la polygynie n’est plus limitée aux chefs et chamanes, comme c’est en général le cas dans les communautés primitives. Chez les Tupi, elle s’étend aux guerriers valeureux : Montaigne note ce point juste après avoir rendu compte de la bravoure des prisonniers mis à mort, et ce comme s’il entrevoyait une corrélation entre leur glorieuse capture et la polygynie. C’est devenu un fait social chez les Tupi-Guarani : la société accorde désormais le droit d’avoir plusieurs épouses au guerrier prestigieux qui acquiert ce prestige (noms et tatouages) en faisant prisonnier des ennemis et en les exécutant. La guerre à l’origine du prestige entraîne donc la polygynie, et ce avec l’accord de la société : les femmes recherchent les meilleurs guerriers et un clan familial a tout intérêt à donner ses femmes à des hommes de prestige. Le lignage des chefs de guerre tend par suite à devenir socialement plus important que les autres : le grand guerrier a beaucoup de femmes, donc plus de richesses que les autres, plus d’esclaves (plus de prisonniers de guerre), plus d’enfants, une famille plus importante et plus puissante, plus de gendres, etc. Il a donc davantage d’influence sur son groupe local et, éventuellement, sur d’autres groupes locaux. Ce système de la conjonction guerre-polygynie-pouvoir conduit à une différenciation socio-politique. Clastres signale ainsi qu’au sein d’autres sociétés amérindiennes déjà fortement engagées dans un processus de stratification sociale, la polygynie cesse d’être le privilège du chef pour devenir un attribut des guerriers, lesquels réduisent en esclavage les tribus voisines et s’approprient leurs femmes comme épouses secondaires [71].

La montée en puissance des chefferies et la constitution d’armées imposantes seraient le signe qu’à l’époque de la Conquête, les Tupi étaient confrontés à un processus de transformation profonde de leur société [72] que Clastres finit par mettre en rapport avec l’intensification de leur pratique guerrière et la mutation corollaire du sens même de la guerre : le cas des Tupi l’amène ainsi à envisager « la guerre de conquête dans les sociétés primitives comme amorce possible d’un changement de la structure politique [73] ». Ce qu’il appelle par ailleurs l’emballement de la machine guerrière transformerait la guerre primitive en une guerre de conquête : c’est ce qu’avèreraient la conquête précolombienne de la côte brésilienne par les Tupi [74] tout autant que les guerres incessantes entre tribus à l’époque coloniale. Dans La Terre sans mal (1975), Hélène Clastres rappelle, à la suite de Métraux, qu’avant l’arrivée des Blancs, les Tupi-Guarani sont devenues des « sociétés de conquérants » qui mènent des « guerres de conquête [75] », de sorte que des provinces intertribales se sont constituées sur le fondement d’une répartition politique nouvelle entre tribus amies et ennemies : chez les Tupi, le chef de province a autorité sur les chefs de villages alliés qui, assistés désormais d’un Conseil des Anciens, ont autorité sur les chefs des maisons collectives. Ce qui est donc en gestation, c’est l’« évolution politique » et sociale vers une organisation pyramidale de sociétés qui sont devenues conquérantes en corrélation avec leur explosion démographique.

C’est un phénomène décisif qui marque une sorte de perversion de la fonction politique de la guerre primitive. En effet, les guerres de conquête n’obéissent plus à la logique centrifuge de séparation entre les communautés primitives, mais à la logique inverse de l’unification centripète d’un territoire sous la domination d’une tribu et de ses chefs. Habituellement, les communautés se divisent en cas d’expansion [76], et ce grâce à la scission qui peut, au bout de quelques générations, mener à la guerre en raison d’un renversement d’alliances : les anciens beaux-frères deviennent des ennemis. Scission interne et guerre émanent donc de la même force centrifuge. Clastres reconstruit ainsi l’idéal-type de la guerre qui correspond à l’état de la communauté primitive : la guerre de scission [77], c’est la politique extérieure de la communauté primitive [78]. La fonction politique des guerres de scission, c’est d’empêcher la fusion entre les communautés primitives [79] : il s’agit de maintenir l’Autre à l’extérieur du territoire [80], et ce de manière à prévenir la concentration sociale dans des structures multi-communautaires et l’émergence corollaire de chefferies puissantes. De ce point de vue, le glissement fonctionnel d’un raid guerrier qui devient aussi une entreprise de pillage paraît constituer une perversion économique de la guerre, mais il s’agit encore et toujours pour le guerrier de montrer sa bravoure et d’acquérir de la gloire, et non pas de conquérir des territoires ou de s’approprier des biens [81]. La capture des femmes est un des buts inhérents à la guerre de ce type : « on attaque les ennemis pour s’emparer de leurs femmes », et ce de manière à éviter tout échange [82]. Mais, chez les Tupi-Guarani, il y a un phénomène tout à fait singulier : le but avancé n’est plus la prise des femmes, mais bien plutôt la capture des hommes dont on fait, pendant un temps, des beaux-frères avant de les mettre à mort et de les dévorer [83]. L’inféodation de la guerre à la logique de l’anthropophagie rituelle est un signe que quelque chose de bien particulier s’est passé, dont le prophétisme tupi-guarani pourrait bien s’avérer être le symptôme principal. J’ai déjà évoqué ce point : c’est ce phénomène des migrations prophétiques qui explique l’intérêt de Clastres pour les Tupi-Guarani, et non pas le cannibalisme. Sans dénier la dimension religieuse de ces mouvements que Métraux a mise en avant, Hélène et Pierre Clastres en proposent une lecture socio-politique [84] qui en dégage la « signification politique en son essence » :

…ce prophétisme […] traduisait, sur le plan religieux, une crise profonde de la société, et cette crise elle-même était certainement liée à la lente, mais sûre, émergence de puissantes chefferies. En d’autres termes, la société tupi-guarani en tant que société primitive, en tant que société sans État, voyait surgir de son sein cette chose absolument nouvelle : un pouvoir politique séparé qui, comme tel, menaçait de disloquer l’antique ordre social et de transformer radicalement les relations entre les hommes. On ne saurait comprendre l’apparition des karai, des prophètes, sans l’articuler à cette autre apparition, celle des grands mburuvicha, des chefs. Et la facilité, la ferveur avec laquelle les Indiens répondaient à l’appel des premiers révèlent bien la profondeur du désarroi où les plongeait l’inquiétante figure des chefs : les prophètes ne prêchaient nullement dans le désert [85].

Le prophétisme est le symptôme, de forme et d’apparence religieuse, de la maladie d’un corps social qui souffre de la lente institution d’un pouvoir politique séparé [86]. Mais, en déclarant la mort de la société, devenue mauvaise, ces karai mettent le corps social dans un état critique d’auto-destruction déclarée : le « désir de rupture avec le mal » provoque une « subversion totale de l’ordre ancien » (établi parmi les humains) qui détruit, entre autres, la loi fondamentale de la société humaine (la prohibition de l’inceste) et cette volonté de subversion « allait jusqu’au désir de mort, jusqu’au suicide collectif [87] ». Il s’agit donc de détruire la société mauvaise en mettant fin à tout ce qui caractérise la société en général (la parenté, le travail, etc.) : ainsi, la destruction des lignages devenus inégaux passe par l’abolition de la parenté, la destruction du pouvoir croissant des chefs passe par l’abandon du village comme lieu de la concentration de pouvoir et de population, la destruction de l’accumulation passe par l’abolition du travail, etc. Contrairement à ce qu’a cru Montaigne à la suite de Thevet et de Léry, les karai qui circulent impunément entre les tribus en guerre ne sont pas de même statut que les chamans (ou page), ces guérisseurs affiliés aux villages qui pouvaient prédire l’issue de la guerre [88] : car ces prophètes préconisent non la guerre et l’affection des femmes, mais l’abolition de l’interdit de l’inceste [89]. Or, la circulation des prophètes entre les tribus ennemies indique le mouvement d’abolition de la guerre qu’accomplit effectivement la migration prophétique, et ce comme si la destruction de l’inégalité naissante devait passer par l’abolition de la guerre à l’origine de l’inégalité. Par sa transversalité de nomade traversant tous les groupes, amis ou ennemis, ce transcommunautaire est un ferment d’union qui tendait à supprimer la différence entre les communautés et à abolir la guerre entre les groupes ennemis. En abolissant la guerre comme machine principale pour permettre la dispersion et pour éviter la division sociale, le prophète se révèle, paradoxalement, être un artisan de l’Un et de l’unification [90]. Ce n’est pas le seul effet collatéral de la migration prophétique : l’obéissance aux injonctions subversives des prophètes reviendrait à mettre fin à l’exo-cannibalisme guerrier, même si les karai – à ce qu’il semble – ne le disent pas plus qu’ils ne reconnaissent explicitement dans l’anthropophagie rituelle une composante de la société mauvaise qu’il s’agit de fuir.

Le coup de massue final : interprétations clastriennes du cannibalisme tupi

Il serait temps, à la lumière de ces analyses clastriennes, de risquer une interprétation de l’exo-cannibalisme guerrier des Tupi-Guarani. Comme l’a reconnu Montaigne à la suite des chroniqueurs, la vengeance est le motif manifeste et revendiqué de ce cannibalisme raffiné à l’extrême. Tout semble indiquer que les Tupinamba redoublent de cruauté pour perfectionner la vengeance. Thevet et Léry avancent qu’ils engraissaient les prisonniers à sacrifier [91]. Suivant ce même Léry, Montaigne leur rétorque qu’il s’agit bien plutôt d’affaiblir leur courage [92]. Mais n’y aurait-il pas une forme assez cruelle de perversion à intégrer tout d’abord les captifs à la communauté et à les bien traiter pour mieux leur faire ressentir leur mauvais sort ?

Avant même d’entrer dans le village des vainqueurs, le guerrier vaincu est rasé par son maître, de sorte qu’il ait, au moins extérieurement, l’air d’être un Tupinamba (sourcils rasés, front tonsuré et épilé, paré de des plus beaux ornements de plumes) [93]. L’intégration apparente du captif dans la communauté de ses ennemis semble accomplie par le fait d’un double don qui lui est fait : tous les objets ayant appartenu à un guerrier défunt, dont le prisonnier doit au préalable renouveler la tombe, lui sont donnés ainsi qu’une épouse qui va véritablement le choyer [94]. L’ennemi devient un beau-frère, et ce conformément au double sens du terme tupi tovaja dont Hélène Clastres fait état dans un article décisif sur le cannibalisme tupi au titre significatif : Les beaux-frères ennemis (1972) [95]. Mais l’intégration, provisoire, reste tout à fait ambivalente. Si le captif est bien traité en général et s’il jouit d’une liberté certaine, le fait est que certains signes trahissent son statut de prisonnier, symbolisé par la petite corde attachée à son cou : il lui faut travailler pour son maître, il doit pénétrer dans la maloca par la porte, il est maltraité et subit des humiliations pendant certaines fêtes, etc. [96] Ce traitement ne fait que reproduire l’accueil ambivalent qui lui est fait à son arrivée dans le village : d’une part, le prisonnier entravé est exposé aux coups et autres insultes des femmes ; par contre, de l’autre côté, masculin, il y a ensuite un « dialogue de reconnaissance » entre maîtres et esclaves, qui précède d’ailleurs l’attribution des lots de chair [97]. C’est donc une intégration feinte, dont la fonction est ambiguë : tout en maintenant la distance et en marquant la différence, il s’agit de lui faire – pendant un certain temps, indéfini – une place qu’il a perdue dans sa propre communauté (s’il s’avisait de s’enfuir pour y chercher refuge, il y serait mis à mort par les siens à cause de sa lâcheté [98]) ; il est cependant destiné à être sacrifié, comme il le lui est rappelé à l’occasion de fêtes pendant lesquelles chacun désigne sur son corps les morceaux convoités [99].

Les cérémonies qui président à l’exécution rituelle du captif durent plusieurs jours [100]. Ce rituel commence par mettre fin à l’intégration du captif dans la communauté de ses ennemis en accomplissant un rite de ségrégation [101] qui revient à une véritable dés-intégration : ce processus de s’achèvera par l’incorporation du corps de l’ennemi rituellement sacrifié. Hélène Clastres repère deux grands actes qui ont pour fonction de rendre le prisonnier à sa réalité d’ennemi : le meurtre final, mais également le simulacre de sa capture [102], symbolique, qui initie le rituel préliminaireà son exécution. C’est une sorte de répétition du combat qui a présidé à la capture du prisonnier : après avoir été fictivement délivré, il est maîtrisé par les guerriers parés pour le combat ; il est ensuite encordé par la mussurana ; dès le premier jour et pendant les nuits suivantes, des femmes entonnent des chansons hostiles aux ennemis et dépeignent au prisonnier le sort qui l’attend ; celui-ci séjournera et devra passer ses dernières nuits non plus dans la maison commune, mais dans une hutte individuelle qui, à cette occasion, a été construite sur la place centrale ; à plusieurs reprises, le captif a l’occasion d’assouvir sa propre hostilité par des paroles de vengeance et également par des actes, puisque son épouse le pourvoit en projectiles de divers types qu’il peut jeter sur l’assemblée ; toujours sous la surveillance de vieilles femmes qui chantent, il passe la dernière nuit avec son épouse, qui le quitte en pleurant le matin de son exécution ; lors de la cérémonie d’exécution, le meurtrier apparaît de manière solennelle et échange avec le prisonnier des paroles de vengeance ; entravé par la mussurana tenue par deux guerriers, le captif peut et doit essayer de se défendre et même de s’emparer de l’épée-massue qui va finalement l’assommer ; après qu’il a été tué, sa veuve prononce son éloge comme c’est coutumier pour tout défunt ; le corps est ensuite préparé pour être intégralement consommé par l’ensemble de la communauté, à l’exception du meurtrier qui doit vomir et jeûner, entre autres règles de précautions à prendre pour se protéger contre la vengeance de l’esprit du mort. Tout est ainsi fait pour simuler la lutte à mort avec un guerrier ennemi sur le champ de bataille : « ce n’est pas une victime passive qu’on veut immoler, c’est un ennemi […] qu’on veut tuer au combat [103] ». En effet, il s’agit de tuer un ennemi courageux et de le manger à la suite du combat, comme c’est le cas sur le champ de bataille : car les Tupinamba avaient pour coutume de manger sur place les ennemis tués [104] et également de ramener des morceaux de chair boucanés afin de partager leur repas anthropophagique avec l’ensemble de la communauté [105]. Aucune cérémonie n’est nécessaire en ce cas, car le guerrier ennemi a été tué dans les règles de l’art martial, conformément à ce que les Européens appellent le droit de guerre. Dans le cas, en revanche, où le prisonnier de guerre est mis à mort, un rituel est nécessaire afin de faire passer le meurtre pour un acte de guerre et également de protéger le meurtrier contre la vengeance de l’esprit du mort [106].

Manifestement, l’ensemble du rituel obéit à une logique de répétition, laquelle vise à remettre les protagonistes dans les conditions d’une guerre où l’on ne fait pas de quartier : simulation du combat sur le champ de bataille, puis de la lutte à mort ; dissimulation donc du meurtre rituel qui est présenté comme une mort au combat ; répétition du repas anthropophagique sur le champ de bataille ; simulation d’un rite funéraire qui rend hommage au défunt. Mais cette ritualisation du meurtre sacrificiel donne lieu à une étrange inversion : l’épouse semble pleurer son époux défunt comme s’il s’agissait d’un guerrier tué au combat par l’ennemi et, donc, comme si le prisonnier exécuté était l’époux antérieurement perdu à la guerre. L’un pourrait bien être en effet le substitut de l’autre, et ce dans des conditions que la culture tupi permettrait de déterminer : les veuves des guerriers tués à la guerre ne pouvaient se remarier qu’à condition que l’époux soit au préalable vengé ; on leur faisait épouser un ennemi captif pour compenser la perte de leur défunt mari [107] ; pendant tout le temps du séjour, l’épouse pouvait jouir de ce mari de substitution qu’elle aimait et choyait comme son propre mari (au point même de pouvoir l’aider à fuir) [108] ; la vengeance était accomplie lors de l’exécution, laquelle donnait à l’épouse l’occasion de prendre définitivement congé de son époux mort au combat et mangé par l’ennemi ; ce qui l’autorisait à prendre un nouveau mari dans la communauté sans que l’esprit du mari tué et dorénavant vengé puisse lui en faire reproche. Dans le cas où s’il s’agissait de la veuve d’un guerrier tué à la guerre, il y avait donc là, probablement, une forme de substitution symbolique, laquelle aurait pu assumer une fonction thérapeutique pour la veuve éplorée : le guerrier ennemi prendrait la place du guerrier occis afin de « réparer » sa propre faute et d’ainsi « payer sa dette » par son sacrifice ritualisé [109] ; la répétition aurait une vertu réparatrice pour la veuve qui pourrait revivre activement le traumatisme subi et le dépasser. Ce serait l’idéal-type d’un processus de compensation réparatrice du deuil subi par la veuve et par l’ensemble de la communauté : avant d’entrer dans le village, le captif renouvelle la tombe du mari défunt ; on lui donne les effets personnels de ce guerrier ainsi que sa femme ; il se substitue à l’époux pendant tout le temps de son séjour ; il est pleuré comme l’époux tué sur le champ de bataille ; comme ce mari l’avait été par l’ennemi sur le champ de bataille, le captif sacrifié est mangé par l’épouse. Par contraste avec l’attachement manifesté par l’épouse du prisonnier, la fonction assumée par les (vieilles) femmes tout au long de sa captivité, et ce depuis l’accueil initial du guerrier vaincu jusqu’à son exécution finale en passant par les fêtes intermédiaires, consiste au contraire à marquer l’indépassable hostilité du groupe envers l’ennemi. Cette dernière ambivalence participe du système d’ambivalences qui caractérise le rapport du groupe à l’ennemi captif. La distribution des rôles entre hommes et femmes n’est en effet qu’un aspect d’un dispositif parfaitement réglé qui, comme l’explique Hélène Clastres, implique « une étonnante mise en scène où les rôles ne sont pas seuls distribués par avance, mais réglés également les dialogues, danses et chœurs de femmes, décors, mouvements dans l’espace [110]… ».

Il faut noter ce point décisif. L’ensemble du rituel anthropophagique et, en particulier, la participation active du captif à sacrifier présuppose l’accord culturel entre tous les protagonistes qui sont « gens de même langue et de mêmes mœurs ». L’unité de culture et de langue entre les groupes ennemis est la condition pour que cette mise à mort ritualisée assure une mort honorable à un guerrier valeureux. Tout le rituel perdrait tout sens si le prisonnier s’avérait incapable de jouer le jeu. Thevet rapporte ainsi le cas d’un Portugais que son maître fit mourir à coups de flèches après lui avoir déclaré son mépris : « tu ne mérites pas que l’on te fasse mourir honorablement comme les autres et en bonne compagnie [111] ». L’apparition d’Européens qui ne montrent aucun courage à mourir ne peut que perturber ainsi le fonctionnement même du rituel anthropophagique. Ce qui montre a contrario que la pratique de l’anthropophagie rituelle des Tupi-Guarani serait dépourvue de toute valeur symbolique en dehors de ce cadre culturel qui lui donne tout son sens : il s’agit de mettre à mort et de manger non pas un être humain en général, mais à vrai dire des ennemis bien identifiés qui ont au préalable eux-mêmes mis à mort et mangé des membres de la communauté. Montaigne pourrait bien avoir montré une admirable intuition de la symbolique culturelle qui préside à cet échange de bons procédés entre ennemis anthropophages :

J’ay une chanson faite par un prisonnier, où il y a ce traict : qu’ils viennent hardiment trétous et s’assemblent pour disner de lui : car ils mangeront quant et quant leurs peres et leurs ayeux, qui ont servy d’aliment et de nourriture à son corps. Ces muscles, dit-il, cette cher et ces veines, ce sont les vostres, pauvres fols que vous estes ; vous ne recognoissez pas que la substance des membres de vos ancestres s’y tient encore : savourez les bien, vous y trouverez le goust de votre chair [112].

Montaigne semble savourer la provocation littéraire d’un prisonnier au menu dont la chanson prendrait un malin plaisir à évoquer la saveur culinaire du corps des ennemis. Par ce savoureux assaisonnement, l’essayiste paraît forcer le trait des paroles de captif restituées par les chroniqueurs Thevet [113] et Léry [114]. Certes, mais cette invention littéraire manifeste un sens raffiné de l’altérité culturelle de ces nations du Nouveau Monde. Car c’est un fait ethnologique : les Tupi-Guarani se mangent entre eux. Comme le cannibalisme s’insérait dans le contexte culturel de rites funéraires, Florestan Fernandes (1952) a suggéré en ce sens que les Indiens cherchaient moins à s’incorporer les qualités du guerrier mis à mort qu’à s’approprier la substance du parent qu’il avait dévoré et qu’il s’agissait de venger en lui rendant un dernier hommage [115]. S’appuyant sur la suggestion de Montaigne, Hélène Clastres peut avancer une hypothèse étonnante : apparent, l’exo-cannibalisme tupi pourrait dissimuler une forme d’« endo-cannibalisme étrangement contourné » qui amènerait, « en mangeant les ennemis, à manger en réalité les parents et alliés dont ceux-là s’étaient nourris [116] ». L’anthropophagie rituelle permettrait à la communauté de réincorporer ses propres membres désintégrés par la consommation cannibale des ennemis. Risquons une ultime hypothèse pour comprendre la logique paradoxale de ce contournement raffiné de l’endo-cannibalisme…

Ce que dissimule l’exo-cannibalisme guerrier, ce serait la parenté entre les tribus tupi-guarani en guerre fratricide. Car ce que cultive la guerre, c’est la scission entre ces nations qui ne furent, à l’origine, qu’une seule et même tribu. Les Tupi partagent cette logique de la guerre de scission avec toutes les sociétés primitives. Mais, dans leur cas, il s’agirait de maintenir la séparation entre les tribus de manière d’autant plus brutale qu’un processus d’intégration confédératrice est en cours : le moyen violent d’entretenir la scission polémique entre les tribus tupi, ce serait de cultiver la vengeance à l’extrême en laissant s’emballer la machine de guerre. Il y aurait là comme une sorte de politique inconsciente, laquelle aurait pour stratégie d’empêcher violemment la fusion entre les tribus tupi-guarani en entretenant le cycle de la vindicte. Reste que cette stratégie polémique provoque une intensification de la pratique guerrière qui a des effets ambivalents. Certes, la séparation est bien marquée par ces guerres fratricides et perpétuelles : au plan conscient, il s’agit de se venger et non pas d’exterminer la tribu ennemi. Mais l’emballement de la machine de guerre transforme la nature même de la guerre : la logique de la vengeance pousse à la conquête de territoires ennemis et à l’absorption des tribus ennemies. Comme si la stratégie de la guerre de conquête rejoignait en fin de compte la logique de l’anthropophagie rituelle : s’incorporer l’ennemi en l’intégrant comme un alter ego. Il y aurait là comme une énigme qui relèverait du destin d’une pulsion inconsciente.

Notes

[1Les Essais, livre I, chapitre xxxi, « Des Cannibales »,éd. Pierre Villey (1924/1930), rééd. ss la dir. de V.-L. Saulnier (1965), PUF-Quadrige, 1992, p. 202-214 : « il n’y a rien de barbare et de sauvage en cette nation, à ce qu’on m’en a rapporté, sinon que chacun appelle barbarie ce qui n’est pas de son usage » (p. 205).

[2Ce qui permettrait de mettre en place une distinction de principe entre cannibalisme et androphagie ou anthropophagie : voir Frank Lestringant, Le Cannibale. Grandeur et décadence, Perrin, 1994, chapitre 4, p. 90-96 (démarcation géographique par Thevet entre le Brésil et le pays des Cannibales) vs p. 100 (le refus sémantique de Montaigne d’entériner cette distinction). Lestringant montre que cette distinction est pourtant celle, présupposée par le siècle de Montaigne, entre le cannibalisme d’horreur, qui répond à la satisfaction de la nécessité naturelle de se nourrir, et le cannibalisme d’honneur ou de fureur, lequel s’inscrit dans la logique de la vengeance et de la passion (voir en particulier la mise en place de cette opposition au chapitre 7). Voir, à ce propos, l’entretien de Pierre Clastres avec le journal Veja, « Cannibales et anthropophages » (31 janvier 1973), p. 123-128, in Pierre Clastres, Sens&Tonka, sous la direction de Miguel Abensour et Anne Kupiec, 2011. Clastres y distingue en principe l’anthropophagie pratiquée dans les sociétés primitives, qu’elle prenne une forme endo-cannibale (chez certains Guayaki) ou exo-cannibale (chez les Tupi-Guarani), du cannibalisme comme moyen exceptionnel de survie (comme lors de l’accident d’un avion qui s’est écrasé dans les Andes le 13 octobre 1972, événement qui amène les survivants à se nourrir de la chair des corps des victimes de la catastrophe aérienne).

[3Les Singularitez de la France Antarctique (1557), chap. xl vs chap. lxi : p. 232 (réédition par F. Lestringant dans Le Brésil d’André Thevet, 1997, éd. Chandeigne).

[4P. Clastres, « Copernic et les sauvages » (1969) in La société contre l’État (chapitre 1), p. 23 et p. 7. Soit la citation de Montaigne qui se trouve de facto au début de La société contre l’État : « On disoit à Socrates que quelqu’un ne s’estoit aucunement amendé en son voyage : Je croy bien, dit-il, il s’estoit emporté avecques soy » (Essais, I, xxxix, p. 239).

[5C. Lévi-Strauss, Tristes tropiques (1955), Plon, Terre humaine/poche, 1972, p. 87.

[6« Entretien avec Claude Lévi-Strauss Sur Jean de Léry », in Jean de Léry, Histoire d’un voyage faict en la Terre du Brésil (1578), texte établi, présenté et annoté par Frank Lestringant à partir de la seconde édition (1580), Librairie Générale Française, 1994, Livre de poche, p. 11.

[7P. Clastres, « Éléments de démographie amérindienne » (1973) in La société contre l’État (chapitre 4), p. 69-70.

[8P. Clastres, « Mythes et rites des Indiens d’Amérique du Sud », in Recherches…,p. 61.

[9A. Métraux, « The Guarani », p. 88 in tome III du Handbook of South American Indians (1948) ; Métraux fait référence à Montoya (1892, p. 51).

[10P. Clastres, « Mythes et rites des Indiens d’Amérique du Sud » : III. Le monde tupi-guarani, in Recherches… : « Ces populations occupaient un très vaste territoire : au Sud, les Guarani s’étendaient du fleuve Paraguay à l’Ouest jusqu’au littoral atlantique à l’Est ; quant au Tupi, ils peuplaient ce même littoral jusqu’à l’embouchure de l’Amazone au Nord et s’enfonçaient dans l’arrière-pays sur une profondeur imprécise. C’est au nombre de plusieurs millions que se comptaient les Indiens […]. Fait notable chez ces Indiens : leur densité démographique était nettement plus élevée que celle des populations voisines et les communautés pouvaient rassembler jusqu’à deux mille individus ou plus » (p. 92-93).

[11H. Clastres, « Les beaux-frères ennemis. À propos du cannibalisme tupinamba », in Destins du cannibalisme, Nouvelle Revue de Psychanalyse, n° 6, automne 1972, Gallimard, p. 81.

[12Ce rituel, entre-temps bien connu, a en effet donné lieu à maintes descriptions : Staden (II, 28 ; cf. I, 21-25 – préliminaires -, 36 et 43), Thevet (chap. xi des Singularités), Léry (chap. xv de l’Histoire), etc. La description la plus complète et précise reste celle de Métraux qui, dans sa thèse complémentaire de 1928, compare et synthétise les témoignages des chroniqueurs (Léry, Thevet, Staden, Cardim, Souza, Yves d’Évreux, Claude d’Abbeville, etc.) : voir le chapitre II (p. 45-78) de son ouvrage sur les Religions et magies indiennes d’Amérique du Sud, Gallimard, 1967.

[13Voir la présentation liminaire par Métraux (1967) de son chapitre sur « L’anthropologie rituelle des Tupinamba », p. 45.

[14Frank Lestringant, Le Huguenot et le Sauvage, Droz [1990], 2004 (3e éd. revue et augmentée), p. 409. Dans cet ouvrage, F. Lestringant retrace l’histoire qui unit le Huguenot et le Sauvage dans l’imaginaire européen : leur identification est fonction de la dénonciation de la « tyrannie » espagnole, laquelle consisterait à faire la guerre aux Indiens en rentrant à l’intérieur du pays, et ce contrairement au modèle portugais et français qui préconise de faire du commerce avec eux en restant sur le littoral (p. 392). L’exo-cannibalisme rituel des Tupi n’est pas pour autant nié : en effet, il est bien plutôt comparé, à son avantage, au cannibalisme des nations chrétiennes d’Europe qui s’entredévorent lors d’une boucherie anthropophage (p. 372-375). L’image idéalisée (p. 409) de l’ » Indien imaginaire » (p. 373), menacé d’évanescence par abstraction, s’accomplit pour part par une sorte de « tupinambisation » discrète (des Indiens d’Amérique du Nord) qu’on peut observer dans « Des coches » de Montaigne, chapitre vi du livre III publié en 1588 (p. 381). Dans Le Cannibale (1994), F. Lestringant présente de manière remarquablement synthétique l’arrière-plan théologique de la querelle du cannibalisme, à savoir la polémique entre catholiques et protestants à propos de l’interprétation de la Cène de transsubstantiation ou de consubstantiation, c’est-à-dire de la signification littérale ou symbolique de l’eucharistie (voir la seconde partie de l’ouvrage et, en particulier, les chapitres 6-7).

[15Voir la topographie des tribus de la côte brésilienne sur la carte proposé en ligne http://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ficheiro:Map_of_indigenous_peoples_of_Brazil_(16th_C.).jpg. L’article de Wikipedia en anglais sur les Indigenous peoples of Brazil reprend peu ou prou la description par Métraux de l’occupation de la côte brésilienne par les Tupinamba (pris au sens général de Tupi côtiers) : Alfred Métraux, « The Tupinamba », p. 96 in tome III du Handbook of South American Indians (1948), éd. par Julian H. Steward, Bulletin 143 du Bureau of American Ethnology.

[16A. Métraux, « The Guarani », p. 69-94, ibid., p. 77. Cette remarque vaut tout autant pour les colonisateurs du littoral (en relation avec les Tupi) que pour les Conquistadores de l’intérieur du Brésil (en relation avec les Guarani).

[17Montaigne, « Des Cannibales », p. 205 vs p. 203.

[18Ibid., p. 207-208.

[19Les gravures de Hans Staden montrent à chaque fois quatre maloca : voir liv. II, chap. 4 et liv. I, chap. 22-23, 29-30 & 34.

[20P. Clastres, « Éléments de démographie amérindienne » (1973) in La société contre l’État (chapitre 4), p. 76.

[21P. Clastres,chapitre éponyme (1974) de La société contre l’État,p. 182.

[22Montaigne, « Des Cannibales », p. 206.

[23Ibid., p. 207-208.

[24P. Clastres,« Le devoir de parole » (1973) in La société contre l’État (chapitre 7), p. 133-136.

[25Montaigne, « Des Cannibales », p. 206.

[26Léry, Histoire d’un voyage faict en la Terre du Brésil (1578), p. 396-409 (2de éd. de 1580 publié par Lestringant en 1994 dans le Livre de poche).

[27Il y a là une confusion entre prêtres et prophètes : voir la mise au point très synthétique de Pierre Clastres sur la différence entre les paje, des chamans auxquels est dévolue la fonction ordinaire de guérir, et les karai, ces prophètes tupi-guarani qui initient des mouvements tout à fait exceptionnels (dont Montaigne ne parle pas plus que Thevet ou Léry) : « Mythes et rites des Indiens d’Amérique du Sud » : III. Le monde tupi-guarani, in Recherches…, p. 94. Voir également Hélène Clastres, La terre sans mal, Seuil, 1975, p. 48-55.

[28Montaigne, « Des Cannibales », p. 209.

[29Alfred Métraux présente toujours le cannibalisme en corrélation avec la guerre : voir notamment « Warfare, cannibalism, and human trophies », p. 383-409 in tome V du Handbook of South American Indians (1948).

[30Françoise Mari, « Les Indiens entre Sodome et les Scythes », in Histoire, économie et société, 1986, 5e année, n° 1, p. 20. D’après Fernandez de Oviedo (1535) – dont la traduction française par Poleur en 1555 semble être une des sources de Montaigne –, Pedrarias Davila aurait, en 1528, fait dévorer par ses chiens des Indiens pour les châtier d’avoir eux-mêmes dévoré quatre Espagnols de la région de la ville de León (Historia general y natural de las Indias, liv. xlii, chap. xi, p. 419, éd. Juan Pérez de Tudela Bueso, Madrid, B.A.E., 1959).

[31Montaigne, « Des Cannibales », p. 210.

[32Ibid., p. 211-212.

[33Hélène Clastres, La Terre sans mal, Seuil, 1975, p. 70.

[34Alfred Métraux, « The Tupinamba », p. 97 in tome III du Handbook of South American Indians (1948).

[35C’est l’étude de terrain de la culture guerrière des Chulupi par Clastres (juin-octobre 1966 et juin-septembre 1968) qui donne toute sa consistance ethnographique à la description clastrienne du « Malheur du guerrier sauvage » (1977), rééditéedans les Recherches… (p. 209-248) : « je dois à ces Indiens – d’une lucidité surprenante quant au statut du guerrier dans leur propre communauté – d’avoir entr’aperçu les traits qui composent, pleine d’orgueil, la figure du Guerrier ; d’avoir su repérer les lignes du mouvement nécessaire que décrit la vie guerrière ; enfin d’avoir compris (car ils me le dirent : ils le savaient) quelle est la destinée du guerrier sauvage » (p. 216-217).

[36« …il lui faut à chaque instant recommencer, car chaque exploit accompli est à la fois source de prestige et mise en question de ce prestige. Le guerrier est par essence condamné à la fuite en avant. La gloire conquise ne se suffit jamais à soi-même, elle demande à être sans cesse prouvée, et tout exploit réalisé en appelle aussitôt un autre » (p. 229 in Recherches…).

[37« …il se trouve piégé sans remède dans sa propre vocation, prisonnier de son désir de gloire qui le conduit tout droit à la mort. Il y a échange entre la société et le guerrier : le prestige contre l’exploit. Mais dans ce face à face, c’est la société qui, maîtresse des règles du jeu, a le dernier mot : car l’ultime échange, c’est celui de la gloire éternelle contre l’éternité de la mort. D’avance, le guerrier est condamné à mort par la société » (p. 239 in Recherches…).

[38Ibid., p. 240-242. Certaines formulations de Clastres, à mon sens, autorisent à cet endroit à décrypter l’œuvre de la pulsion de mort : voir C. Ferrié, « La dynamique inconsciente du mouvement politique », in Pierre Clastres, 2011, p. 326-327.

[39Montaigne, « Des Cannibales », p. 210.

[40Jean de Léry, Histoire d’un voyage faict en la Terre du Brésil (1578), chap. xv, p. 356 (éd. par F. Lestringant en 1994). Voir également Hans Staden (II, chap. 28, p. 210 ; cf. I, chap. 43, p. 143). Hans Staden, Wahrhaftige Historia und beschreibung eyner Landschaft der Wilden Nacketen, Grimmigen Menschfresser-Leuthen in der neuen Welt America gelegen (Marburg, 1557). Cette Histoire véritable et description d’un pays de Sauvages nus, féroces anthropophages, situé dans le Nouveau Monde Amérique est actuellement traduite en français dans plusieurs éditions, souvent sous le titre raccourci et un peu trompeur de Nus, féroces, anthropophages : c’est, par exemple, celle de Henri Ternaux Compans chez Métaillé (1979), à laquelle se réfère la pagination française que je donne.

[41Hélène Clastres, « Les beaux-frères ennemis. À propos du cannibalisme tupinamba » in Destins du cannibalisme (1972), p. 79-80.

[42Alfred Métraux, « The Tupinamba », p. 112 vs p. 116 in tome III du Handbook of South American Indians (1948).

[43Montaigne, « Des Cannibales », p. 213.

[44E. Luja, « Les serpents venimeux du Brésil », Bulletin de la Société nationale des Naturalistes Luxembourgeois, 1947, n° 52, p. 8-13 ; v. p. 12-13 (http://snl.lu/publications/bulletin/SNL_1947_052_008_013.pdf).

[45Dans la version de Cardim (Tratados da terra, p. 184-186), un des Anciens fait avec la corde deux nœuds très compliqués dès le premier jour du rituel anthropophagique (p. 55) ; le quatrième jour, les cordes enroulées sont portées par une troupe de nymphes pendant qu’une maîtresse de cérémonie entonne une chanson reprise par les autres femmes : les hommes attachent alors la corde au cou du prisonnier et cette femme lui est attachée par le bras (p. 58), en particulier pendant sa dernière nuit (p. 59). Voir Alfred Métraux, « L’anthropologie rituelle des Tupinamba », chapitre II de Religions et magies indiennes d’Amérique du Sud (1967), p. 55-59.

[46Ibid., p. 65.

[47L’analyse extrêmement fine d’André Tournon éclaire le jugement poétique que Montaigne porte sur la valeur anacréontique de la Chanson de la couleuvre. C’est cette interprétation très suggestive qui m’a incité à rechercher du côté de la culture tupi une sorte d’Anacréon à jamais disparu, le poète inconnu en somme, ou bien plutôt une Sapho et ses sœurs, ces poétesses à jamais méconnues qui auraient filé la chanson polyphonique entendue par Montaigne. Inspirée par une note d’Hélène Clastres (1972) sur le terme mussurana, lequel désigne la corde de coton tout autant qu’un serpent ophiophage, en quelque sorte cannibale (p. 77), mon interprétation de la partition tupi cherche à découvrir un accord mineur qui ferait écho à l’accord majeur de la partition grecque. Non pas qu’il faille, pour l’entendre, s’imaginer un instrument qui soit capable de jouer cette impossible mesure : au lieu de désencorder les fils du cordon directeur de la mélodie, cet instrument imaginaire, forcément désaccordé, ne pourrait produire qu’une dissonance. Accordé à cette improbable possibilité, l’humanisme décentré de Montaigne permettrait, au contraire, de prêter une oreille attentive à la tonalité propre de chacune de ces deux musicalités qu’un gouffre océanique sépare à tout jamais. Et Montaigne d’en percevoir la consonance… comme s’il y avait une sorte d’accord secret, d’une discrétion anacréontique presque imperceptible, entre deux registres culturels dont on ne sait plus, entre la poésie grecque d’un Anacréon reconnu et celle de la chanson tupi d’une Sapho inconnue, lequel donnerait le ton !

[48Montaigne, « Des Cannibales », p. 213.

[49La Boétie, Le discours de la servitude volontaire, ss la dir. de Miguel Abensour, Payot, 1976, p. 146 (Petite Bibliothèque Payot, 1993/2002). C’est à l’initiative de Miguel Abensour que nous devons la redécouverte de ce texte inaugural de La Boétie tout autant que sa relecture par Pierre Clastres (p. 247-267) et Claude Lefort (p. 269-335). Pierre Clastres cite ce passage du Discours de La Boétie dans « Liberté, Malencontre, Innommable » (1976), p. 264et p. 124, rééd. in Recherches d’anthropologie politique (1980).

[50Montaigne, « Des Cannibales », p. 214.

[51Dans Religions et magies indiennes d’Amérique du Sud (1967), Alfred Métraux cite un texte de Nobrega qui irait en ce sens : « Quand un chaman de renom leur rendait visite, les Indiens, en signe de respect, nettoyaient devant lui le sentier qu’il allait fouler » (p. 18).

[52Claude Lévi-Strauss, Tristes tropiques (1955), p. 367 et La vie familiale et sociale des Indiens Nambikwara (Société des Américanistes, Paris, 1948) : « le chef marche en avant » (p. 86), comme l’avait remarqué Montaigne (note 1). C’est dans la section sur le Commandement (et non pas sur Guerre et commerce) que Lévi-Strauss restitue cette formule usuelle, laquelle ne vaut pas spécifiquement pour la guerre, mais en général pour toutes les décisions du chef (se mettre en route, s’arrêter, etc.).

[53Robert Harry Lowie, Some Aspects of Political Organization among the American Aborigines (Huxley Memorial Lecture for 1948, ed. in The Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, 78, n° 1-2, 1948), p. 262-290 in Lowie’s selected Papers, édité par Cora Du Bois, University of California Press, 1960, p. 280.

[54Ibid., p. 270-277.

[55P. Clastres, « Échange et pouvoir : philosophie de la chefferie indienne » (1962) in La société contre l’État (chapitre 2), p. 27-28.

[56Chapitre éponyme (1974) de La société contre l’État, p. 175.

[57Ibid., p. 177.

[58« Éléments de démographie amérindienne » (1973) in La société contre l’État (chapitre 4), p. 77.

[59A. Métraux, « The Tupinamba » in tome III du Handbook of South American Indians (1948), p. 119.

[60Jean de Léry, Histoire d’un voyage faict en la Terre du Brésil (1578), p. 343.

[61Ibid., p. 337-338.

[62Chapitre éponyme (1974) de La société contre l’État, p. 176-180.

[63P. Clastres, chapitre éponyme de La société contre l’État (1974), p. 181-182.

[64« Éléments de démographie amérindienne » (1973) in La société contre l’État (chapitre 4), p. 70.

[65« Entretien avec Clastres »,p. 25-26 (Cahier Clastres, 2011). Confer « Éléments de démographie amérindienne » (1973) in La société contre l’État (chapitre 4), p. 77-78.

[66« Archéologie de la violence : la guerre dans les sociétés primitives »(1977) :« Tel est le cas, absolument exemplaire, des Tupi-Guarani d’Amérique du Sud, dont la société était travaillée, au moment de la découverte du Nouveau Monde, par des forces centripètes, par une logique de l’unification » (note 1 p. 205 in Recherches…).

[67Pierre Clastres explique ainsi que « la tendance à constituer des ensembles sociaux plus vastes que dans le reste du continent » s’accompagne d’une « tendance à construire un modèle de l’autorité qui dépassait largement le cadre du seul village » au point de former, par exemple « chez les Tupinamba de véritables fédérations groupant dix à vingt villages. Les Tupi, et particulièrement ceux de la côte brésilienne, révèlent donc une tendance très nette vers la constitution de systèmes politiques larges, à chefferies puissantes » (p. 64-66) : voir « Indépendance et exogamie » (1963) in La société contre l’État (chapitre 3).

[68Ibid., p. 65-66.

[69« Éléments de démographie amérindienne » (1973) in La société contre l’État (chapitre 4), p. 86.

[70Ibid., p. 182.

[71P. Clastres, « Échange et pouvoir : philosophie de la chefferie indienne » (1962), in La société contre l’État (chapitre 2), p. 31.

[72P. Clastres,chapitre éponyme de La société contre l’État (1974), p. 182-183.

[73Note éditoriale de Libre, adjointe à la fin du « Malheur du guerrier sauvage » (1977)in Recherches…,p. 247.

[74Alfred Métraux, La civilisation matérielle des Tupi-Guarani (1928), p. 290-293 et p. 310-311. Voir également « The Tupinamba », in tome III du Handbook of South American Indians (1948), p. 97-98. Au moment de la Conquête, les Tupinamba avaient conquis depuis peu de temps le littoral (de l’Amazone au Rio del Plata), d’où ils avaient chassé les Tapuya, lesquels s’étaient réfugiés dans les forêts d’où ils menaient des guerres contre leurs envahisseurs.

[75H. Clastres, La terre sans mal (1975), p. 68-71.

[76P. Clastres, « Archéologie de la violence : la guerre dans les sociétés primitives » (1977) : « En Amérique du Sud, lorsque la taille démographique d’un groupe dépasse le seuil jugé optimum par la société, une partie des gens s’en va fonder plus loin un autre village » (note 1 p. 204 in Recherches…).

[77« Entretien avec Clastres »,p. 25 in Pierre Clastres (2011).

[78« Archéologie de la violence : la guerre dans les sociétés primitives »(1977) in Recherches…, p. 195.

[79Ibid., p. 201-204.

[80Ibid., p. 190-193.

[81« Malheur du guerrier sauvage » (1977) in Recherches…, p. 226.

[82« Archéologie de la violence : la guerre dans les sociétés primitives »(1977) in Recherches…, p. 199.

[83H. Clastres, « Les beaux-frères ennemis. À propos du cannibalisme tupinamba » in Destins du cannibalisme (1972), p. 81.

[84H. Clastres, La terre sans mal (1975), p. 72.

[85P. Clastres, Le Grand Parler, Seuil, 1974, p. 9.

[86P. Clastres, « Mythes et rites des Indiens d’Amérique du Sud » : III. Le monde tupi-guarani, in Recherches…, p. 94 vs p. 97-98.

[87Ibid., p. 98-99.

[88Ibid., p. 94-95.

[89M. Nobrega, Informação das terras do Brasil (1549) : « Lhes diz […] as filhas que as dêm a quem quizerem » (p. 92-93 in Revista do Instituto Historico Geographico Brasileiro, t. VI, n° 21, 1844).

[90L’expression « artisan de l’Un et de l’unification » apparaît pratiquement dans toutes les versions des notes d’auditeurs du Cours de 1976-77 qu’Hélène Clastres m’a généreusement permis de consulter. Cette formulation précise la fin elliptique du chapitre éponyme (1974) de La société contre l’État (p. 185-186).

[91André Thevet, Singularitez (1557), chap. xli, p. 160 (1997) et Jean de Léry, Histoire (1578), chapitre xv, p. 354-355.

[92Montaigne, « Des Cannibales », p. 210-211.

[93A. Métraux, « L’anthropologie rituelle des Tupinamba » in Religions et magies indiennes d’Amérique du Sud (1967), p. 47.

[94Ibid., p. 48-49.

[95H. Clastres, « Les beaux-frères ennemis. A propos du cannibalisme tupinamba » in Destins du cannibalisme (1972), p. 73 et p. 77.

[96Ibid., p. 75 ; cf. A. Métraux (1967), p. 50.

[97Ibid., p. 73-74 ; cf. A. Métraux (1967), p. 48-49.

[98Ibid., p. 76-77 ; cf. A. Métraux (1967), p. 52.

[99Ibid., p. 75 ; cf. A. Métraux (1967), p. 50.

[100A. Métraux (1967), p. 53-66 (Cérémonies préliminaires à l’exécution du prisonnier). Pour la description du rituel, je suis Métraux en puisant, en outre, quelques détails dans sa thèse complémentaire de 1928 (p. 137-157) et en m’inspirant très largement de l’analyse d’Hélène Clastres (1972).

[101F. Fernandes, « la guerre et le sacrifice humain chez les Tupinamba », in Journal de la société des Américanistes, tome 41 n°1, 1952, p. 139.

[102H. Clastres, « Les beaux-frères ennemis. À propos du cannibalisme tupinamba » (1972), p. 77.

[103Ibid., p. 80.

[104Ibid., p. 82 ; cf. A. Métraux (1967), p. 46.

[105André Thevet, Singularitez (1557), chap. xli, p. 158 (1997).

[106A. Métraux (1967), p. 73-78.

[107Thevet, Cosmographie (1575) : « …si les freres, enfans, ou autres de la parenté dudit deffunct, de qui le sepulchre a esté renouvellé, ont esté occis en guerre, leurs femmes ne peuvent se joindre en secondes nopces, que premierement leur mary occis n’ait esté vengé par le massacre d’un de leurs ennemis. Si tost donc que un prisonnier est ainsi equippé, quelquefois on luy donne les femmes de celuy qui aura esté occis, à fin qu’il s’en serve : Et elles les ayant pour associez, disent qu’elles sont recompensees de la deffaite de leurs premiers maris » (p. 194). Voir également l’Histoire… de deux voyages (inédit) : « à cette occasion baille on aux vefves le prisonnier pour recompenser la perte de leur defunct mary, jusques à ce que le jour soit venu de le tuer, et manger en vengeance de leur mary […]. Et cela leur oste de detresse et ennuy… » (p. 283). Les deux citations font référence au choix de textes d’André Thevet édité par S. Lussagnet : Les Français en Amérique. Le Brésil et les Brésiliens, PUF, Paris, 1953 ; cité par Métraux (1967), p. 49 et déjà en appendice de sa thèse complémentaire (1928), p. 247. Florestan Fernandes cite ces mêmes textes dans la conclusion de sa thèse de 1952 (A função social da guerra na sociedade tupinamba), laquelle conclusion a été traduite en français par S. Lussagnet : « la guerre et le sacrifice humain chez les Tupinamba », p. 202 in Journal de la société des Américanistes, tome 41 n° 1, 1952.

[108A. Métraux (1967), p. 51.

[109C’est le sens du concept tupi-guarani de vengeance : il s’agit de payer une dette. Dans le Tesoro de la lengua guarani (1639, Madrid), Antonio Ruíz de Montoya traduit ainsi le terme tepi tout d’abord par paga (paye, salaire), puis par vengança (p. 382).

[110Ibid., p. 72.

[111André Thevet, Singularitez (1557), chap. xli, p. 166 (1997).

[112Montaigne, « Des Cannibales », p. 212.

[113André Thevet, Les Singularitez de la France Antarctique (1557), chapitre xl : « Les Margageas nos amis sont gens de bien, forts et puissants en guerre, ils ont pris et mangé grand nombre de nos ennemis, aussi me mangeront-ils [nos ennemis les Tupinamba] quelque jour, quand il leur plaira ; mais de moi, j’ai tué et mangé des parents et amis de celui qui me tient prisonnier… » (p. 161).

[114Jean de Léry, Histoire d’un voyage faict en la Terre du Brésil (1578), chapitre xiv : « avec la contenance de mesme, se tournant de costé et d’autre, il dira à l’un, J’ay mangé de ton pere, à l’autre, J’ay assommé et boucané tes freres : bref, adjoustera-il, J’ai en general tant mangé d’hommes et de femmes, voire des enfants de vous autres » (p. 356) et « N’es-tu pas de la nation nommée Margajas, qui nous est ennemie ? et n’as-tu pas toy-même tué et mangé de nos parents et amis ? Lui plus asseuré que jamais respond en son langage (car les Margajas et les Toupinenquins s’entendent) : Ouy, je suis tres fort et en ay assommé et mangé plusieurs » (p. 357).

[115A. Métraux, « L’anthropologie rituelle des Tupinamba » in Religions et magies indiennes d’Amérique du Sud (1967), p. 70. Parlant de « pures spéculations qu’aucun document ne vient étayer », Métraux reste en 1967 réservé à l’endroit de ce travail de doctorat de Florestan Fernandes (A função social da guerra na sociedade tupinamba, São Paulo, 1952), dont il a fait traduire la conclusion par S. Lussagnet, et ce avant même sa publication au Brésil en 1952, et qu’il a même fait publier par la Société des Américanistes : « La guerre et le sacrifice humain chez les Tupinamba », p. 139-220 in Journal de la société des Américanistes, tome 41 n° 1, 1952. Mettant en avant les rites funéraires de séparation (p. 156), Fernandes interprète la guerre primitive pratiquée par les Tupinamba comme un phénomène purement religieux (p. 185) dont l’enjeu est la récupération mystique des « énergies » du parent mort (p. 192-195).

[116H. Clastres, « Les beaux-frères ennemis. À propos du cannibalisme tupinamba » (1972), p. 82.


Pour citer l’article:

Christian FERRIÉ, « Les cannibales de Montaigne à la lumière ethnologique de Clastres » in Rouen 1562. Montaigne et les Cannibales, Actes du colloque organisé à l’Université de Rouen en octobre 2012 par Jean-Claude Arnould (CÉRÉdI) et Emmanuel Faye (ÉRIAC).
(c) Publications numériques du CÉRÉdI, « Actes de colloques et journées d’étude (ISSN 1775-4054) », n° 8, 2013.

URL: http://ceredi.labos.univ-rouen.fr/public/?les-cannibales-de-montaigne-a-la.html

Pour en finir avec la repentance coloniale
Le passé colonial revisité
Hérodote

Daniel Lefeuvre (1951-2013), professeur à l’Université Paris-8 (Saint-Denis), bouscule les idées reçues, les mystifications et les erreurs qui polluent notre réflexion sur le passé colonial de la France.
Depuis le début du XXIe siècle monte en France un débat autour du passé colonial avec une question très actuelle : les jeunes Français issus des anciennes colonies (Antilles, Afrique du nord, Afrique noire) doivent-ils se considérer comme des victimes de ce passé ?

Daniel Lefeuvre y a répondu avec un essai court mais solidement argumenté : Pour en finir avec la repentance coloniale.

Il démonte avec les bons vieux outils de l’historien (analyse critique des sources et des chiffres, contexte, comparaisons historiques…), les contrevérités, les trucages et les billevesées des anticolonialistes de salon qu’il appelle les « Repentants ».

Le résultat a de quoi surprendre :
– La conquête de l’Algérie et des autres colonies ? Des guerres ni plus ni moins cruelles que les guerres européennes,
– Le bilan économique de la colonisation ? Une perte nette pour la métropole et un transfert de richesses au profit des colonies très supérieur à l’actuelle aide au développement,
– Les immigrants des anciennes colonies dans la société française ? Une intégration beaucoup plus aisée que ne le fut celle des immigrants d’origine européenne (Italiens, Polonais…) !

La démonstration de Daniel Lefeuvre nous invite à réfléchir sur notre passé et sur… les motivations plus ou moins conscientes des « Repentants » dans leur volonté de victimiser les enfants de l’immigration.

Anachronisme
Le premier péché des Repentants, selon l’historien, est l’anachronisme : il consiste à juger les événements du passé selon notre propre grille de valeurs, indépendamment du contexte. « Comment ne pas s’inquiéter des dangers dont cette conception de l’Histoire est porteuse ? » note Daniel Lefeuvre.

« Falsifier l’histoire, c’est tromper les citoyens, c’est fausser leur jugement », dit-il en prenant pour exemple la conquête de l’Algérie, dans laquelle certains, dont le président algérien Bouteflika, voient rien moins que le prélude des chambres à gaz !

Daniel Lefeuvre rappelle la triviale réalité : après la prise d’Alger en 1830, les Français se cantonnent sur le littoral et concluent des traités avec les chefs de l’intérieur. Mais la guerre sainte lancée par Abd el-Kader en 1839 les entraîne dans une longue et difficile conquête.

L’historien en évoque les aspects sombres. Il rappelle ce que furent très précisément les « enfumades ». Il réévalue aussi les pertes des deux côtés en écornant au passage certaines évaluations fantaisistes.

Plus important encore, il rappelle, preuves à l’appui, que les horreurs de la guerre d’Algérie (comme des autres guerres coloniales) n’avaient hélas rien d’exceptionnel. Le mépris de l’ennemi était au moins aussi grand dans les troupes républicaines qui combattaient les Vendéens en 1793 ou dans les armées de Napoléon engagées en Espagne en 1808…

Les guerres coloniales n’anticipent en rien la Shoah. Elles reflètent les moeurs de leur époque et c’est déjà bien assez.

Exploitation
Je ne m’attarderai pas sur les chapitres que Daniel Lefeuvre consacre à l’économie coloniale.

Malgré la propagande distillée par les partis colonistes de la fin du XIXe siècle à l’Exposition coloniale de 1931, les colonies se révèlent un gouffre économique, commercial et financier et il n’y a guère que quelques affairistes liés aux lobbies coloniaux pour en tirer profit.

A la suite de l’historien Jacques Marseille (Empire colonial et capitalisme français. Histoire d’un divorce), Daniel Lefeuvre montre que les colonies n’ont rien apporté à l’économie française et ont plutôt bridé son dynamisme. Tout juste ont-elles permis l’enrichissement de quelques sociétés et affairistes protégés par le gouvernement.

La principale exportationde l’Algérie était le vin, concurrent des vins métropolitains, déjà en surproduction. L’Afrique noire n’arrivait à exporter tant bien que mal qu’un peu de coton et de denrées tropicales, à des coûts bien plus élevés que sur les marchés mondiaux. Même le phosphate du Maroc coûtait plus cher à la France que celui disponible ailleurs.

Retenons le mot d’un économiste belge du XIXe siècle, Gustave de Molinari : « De toutes les entreprises de l’État, la colonisation est celle qui coûte le plus cher et qui rapporte le moins ».

Stigmatisation
Daniel Lefeuvre réévalue la perception des indigènes par les colons. Que n’a-t-on écrit là-dessus ces dernières années, en redécouvrant les « zoos humains » d’il y a 100 ans, ces cirques où l’on venait se repaître de la vue des « sauvages » !

« Sauvages ? » Parlons-en. Ce qualificatif revient fréquemment au XIXe siècle dans la bouche et sous la plume des bourgeois qui évoquent les paysans de notre douce France. Les poncifs que l’on appliquait à l’époque coloniale aux habitants des colonies s’appliquaient aussi aux plus pauvres des Français.

Daniel Lefeuvre cite à ce propos l’oeuvre magistrale d’Eugen Weber : La fin des terroirs (1976). On peut y lire : « Un spécialiste de folklore musical, parcourant le pays de l’ouest de la Vendée jusqu’aux Pyrénées, compare la population locale à des enfants et des sauvages qui,  heureusement,  comme tous les peuples primitifs, montrent un goût prononcé du rythme »… Après cette lecture, il ne reste plus aux Vendéens et aux Pyrénéens (dont votre serviteur) qu’à rallier le clan des « indigènes de la République » !

À ceux qui aujourd’hui stigmatisent le comportement discriminatoire de la République à l’égard des immigrés et enfants d’immigrés, Daniel Lefeuvre offre un aperçu de l’accueil reçu en d’autres temps par les immigrants européens (Belges, Polonais, Italiens).

En août 1893, à Aigues-Mortes, la population fait la chasse aux immigrants italiens aux cris de : « Mort aux Christos ! » (Mort aux chrétiens !). Les malheureux sont roués de coups. On relève huit morts. La chronique rapporte ça et là d’autres incidents violents et souvent mortels…

Si l’on s’attarde sur les immigrants européens qui, au tournant du XXe siècle, se sont magnifiquement intégrés à la société française, on ne voit pas, et pour cause, ceux, en nombre équivalent, qui n’y ont pas réussi par le simple fait que, découragés par l’hostilité ambiante, ils sont rentrés au bercail.

Félicitons-nous que la situation actuelle n’ait rien de comparable à celle-là. A rebours des idées convenues, Daniel Lefeuvre considère que les immigrés originaires des anciennes colonies sont somme toute mieux accueillis et mieux intégrés que ne le furent les immigrés européens, prétendûment si proches des « Français de souche ».

L’historien craint en conclusion qu’à trop minimiser le processus d’intégration des Français originaires des anciennes colonies, on ne « persuade ces populations que la République s’est définitivement fermée à elles et qu’il leur faut donc chercher ailleurs les voies de leur réussite ».

La repentance pourrait en définitive réussir là où les colonistes et les racistes d’antan ont échoué, en enfermant les Français originaires des Antilles, d’Afrique du Nord ou d’Afrique noire dans un statut de victimes innocentes et de grands enfants irresponsables et en les convainquant qu’il leur est impossible d’en sortir par leur effort personnel !

Paralysés par le complexe victimaire, ils pourraient alors se détourner de la compétition sociale (« À quoi bon travailler à l’école, acquérir des diplômes et devenir un bon professionnel puisque je serai toujours marqué au fer rouge de la colonisation et de l’esclavage ? »). Ce renoncement marquerait le triomphe des bourgeois « repentants », tartuffes modernes, en facilitant à leurs rejetons la conquête des postes de commandement.

André Larané
Les cinq péchés capitaux des faux historiens
Daniel Lefeuvre recense cinq fautes méthodologiques majeures chez les « Repentants » et les prétendus historiens qui torturent le passé pour l’asservir à leurs présupposés idéologiques :

– l’absence de recul critique dans la reprise de citations isolées : le propos d’un excentrique ne reflète pas nécessairement l’état d’esprit de l’opinion publique,
– l’anachronisme : on assimile les faits de guerre pendant la conquête de l’Algérie à des crimes nazis sans voir qu’ils sont tout simplement de même nature que d’autres faits de guerre commis à la même époque et en d’autres lieux, y compris en Europe,
– la généralisation abusive : sur la base de quatre « enfumades » identifiées, on imagine que ce type d’action était banal pendant la conquête de l’Algérie,
– l’absence de comparaison : on déplore la condition déplorable des immigrés algériens en France après la Seconde Guerre mondiale sans voir qu’elle était en tous points semblable à celle des autres immigrants et de beaucoup de Français pauvres,
– la censure : on fait sciemment silence sur tous les faits qui pourraient contredire la thèse dominante ; ainsi attribue-t-on à la conquête la diminution de la population algérienne entre 1830 et 1870 sans parler de la crise frumentaire très grave qui a sévi en Algérie et au Maroc en 1865-1868.

Voir enfin:

The Spanish Inquisition
A Historical Revision
By Henry Kamen
Yale University Press

CHAPTER ONE

A SOCIETY OF BELIEVERS AND UNBELIEVERS
Asked if he believed in God, he said Yes, and asked what it meant to believe in God, he answered that it meant eating well, drinking well and getting up at ten o’clock in the morning.A textile worker of Reus (Catalonia), 1632
In the west: Portugal, a small but expanding society of under a million people, their energies directed to the sea and the first fruits of trade and colonisation in Asia. In the south, al-Andalus: a society of half a million farmers and silk-producers, Muslim in religion, proud remnants of a once dominant culture. To the centre and north: a Christian Spain of some six million souls, divided politically into the crown of Castile (with two-thirds of the territory of the peninsula and three-quarters of the population) and the crown of Aragon (made up of the realms of Valencia, Aragon and Catalonia). In the fifteenth century the Iberian peninsula remained on the fringe of Europe, a subcontinent that had been overrun by the Romans and the Arabs, offering to the curious visitor an exotic symbiosis of images: Romanesque churches and the splendid Gothic cathedral in Burgos, mediaeval synagogues in Toledo, the cool silence of the great mosque in Cordoba and the majesty of the Alhambra in Granada.

In mediaeval times it was a society of uneasy coexistence (convivencia), increasingly threatened by the advancing Christian reconquest of lands that had been Muslim since the Moorish invasions of the eighth century. For long periods, close contact between communities had led to a mutual tolerance among the three faiths of the peninsula: Christians, Muslims and Jews. Even when Christians went to war against the Moors, it was (a thirteenth-century writer argued) `neither because of the law [of Mohammed) nor because of the sect that they hold to’, but because of conflict over land. Christians lived under Muslim rule (as Mozarabes) and Muslims under Christian rule (as Mudejares). The different communities, occupying separate territories and therefore able to maintain distinct cultures, accepted the need to live together. Military alliances were made regardless of religion. St Ferdinand, king of Castile from 1230 to 1252, called himself `king of the three religions’, a singular claim in an increasingly intolerant age: it was the very period that saw the birth in Europe of the mediaeval papal Inquisition (c. 1232).

There had always been serious conflicts in mediaeval Spain, at both social and personal levels, between Mudejar and Christian villages, between Christian and Jewish neighbours. But the existence of a multi-cultural framework produced an extraordinary degree of mutual respect. This degree of coexistence was a unique feature of peninsular society, repeated perhaps only in the Hungarian territories of the Ottoman empire. Communities lived side by side and shared many aspects of language, culture, food and dress, consciously borrowing each other’s outlook and ideas. Where cultural groups were a minority they accepted fully that there was a persistent dark side to the picture. Their capacity to endure centuries of sporadic repression and to survive into early modern times under conditions of gross inequality, was based on a long apprenticeship.

The notion of a crusade was largely absent from the earlier periods of the Reconquest, and the communities of Spain survived in a relatively open society. At the height of the Reconquest it was possible for a Catalan philosopher, Ramon Llull (d. 1315), to compose a dialogue in Arabic in which the three characters were a Christian, a Muslim and a Jew. Political links between Christians and Muslims in the mediaeval epoch are exemplified by the most famous military hero of the time, the Cid (Arabic sayyid, lord). Celebrated in the Poem of the Cid written about 1140, his real name was Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar, a Castilian noble who in about 1081 transferred his services from the Christians to the Muslim ruler of Saragossa and, after several campaigns, ended his career as independent ruler of the Muslim city of Valencia, which he captured in 1094. Despite his identification with the Muslims, he came to be looked upon by Christians as their ideal warrior. In the later Reconquest, echoes of coexistence remained but the reality of conflict was more aggressive. The Christians cultivated the myth of the apostle St James (Santiago), whose body was alleged to have been discovered at Compostela; thereafter Santiago `Matamoros’ (the Moor-slayer) became a national patron saint. In al-Andalus, the invasion of militant Muslims from north Africa — the Almoravids in the late eleventh century; the Almohads in the late twelfth — embittered the struggle against Christians.

The tide, however, was turning against Islam. In 1212 a combined Christian force met the Almohads at Las Navas de Tolosa and shattered their power in the peninsula, By the mid-thirteenth century the Muslims retained only the kingdom of Granada. After its capture by the Christians (1085), Toledo immediately became the intellectual capital of Castile because of the transmission of Muslim and Jewish learning. The School of Translators of Toledo in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries rendered into Latin the great semitic treatises on philosophy, medicine, mathematics and alchemy. The works of Avicenna (Ibn Sina), al-Ghazali, Averroes (Ibn Rushd) and Maimonides filtered through to Christian scholars. Mudejar art spread into Castile. No attempt was made to convert minorities forcibly. But by the fourteenth century `it was no longer possible for Christians, Moors and Jews to live under the same roof, because the Christian now felt himself strong enough to break down the traditional custom of Spain whereby the Christian population made war and tilled the soil, the Moor built the houses, and the Jew presided over the enterprise as a fiscal agent and skilful technician’. This schematic picture is not far from the truth. Mudejares tended to be peasants or menial urban labourers; Jews for the most part kept to the big towns and to small trades; the Christian majority, while tolerating their religions, treated both minorities with disdain.

Mudejares were possibly the least affected by religious tension. They were numerically insignificant in Castile, and in the crown of Aragon lived separately in their own communities, so that friction was minimal. Jews, however, lived mostly in urban centres and were more vulnerable to outbreaks of violence. Civil war in both Castile and Aragon in the 1460s divided the country into numberless local areas of conflict and threatened to provoke anarchy. The accession of Ferdinand and Isabella to the throne in 1474 did not immediately bring peace, but gradually the powerful warlike nobles and prelates fell into line. Their belligerent spirit was redirected into wars of conquest in Granada and Naples. Of the two realms of Spain, Aragon had been the one with an imperial history, but Castile with its superior resources in men and money rapidly took over the leadership. The militant Reconquest spirit was reborn, after nearly two centuries of dormancy. It still retained much of its old chivalric spirit: in the Granada wars, the deeds of Rodrigo Ponce de Leon, Marquis of Cadiz, seemed to recall those of the Cid. But the age of chivalry was passing. The wars in Italy provoked bitter criticism of the barbarities of the Spanish soldiery, and in Granada the brutal enslavement of the entire population of Malaga after its capture in 1487 gave hint of a new savagery among the Christians.

Apparent continuity with the old Reconquest is therefore deceptive. Military idealism continued to be fed by chivalric novels, notably the Amadis de Gaula (1508), but beneath the superficial gloss of chivalry there burnt an ideological intolerance typified by the great conquests of Cardinal Cisneros in Africa (Mers-el-Kebir, 1505 and Oran, 1509), and Hernan Cortes in Tenochtitlan (1521). It is also significant that the new rulers of Spain were willing to pursue an intolerant policy regardless of its economic consequences. In regard to both the Jews and the Mudejares, Isabella was warned that pressure would produce economic disruption, but she was steeled in her resolve by Cisneros and the rigorists. Ferdinand, responding to protests by Barcelona, maintained that spiritual ideals were more important than material considerations about the economy. Though affirmation of religious motives cannot be accepted at face value, it appears that a `crusading’ spirit had replaced the possibility of convivencia, and exclusivism was beginning to triumph.

The communities of Christians, Jews and Muslims never lived together on equal terms; so-called convivencia was always a relationship between unequals. Within that inequality, the minorities played their roles while attempting to avoid conflicts. In fifteenth-century Murcia, the Muslims were an indispensable fund of labour in both town and country, and as such were protected by municipal laws. The Jews, for their part, made an essential contribution as artisans and small producers, in leather, jewellery and textiles. They were also important in tax administration and in medicine. In theory, both minorities were restricted to specified areas of the towns they lived in. In practice, the laws on separation were seldom enforced. In Valladolid at the same period, the Muslims increased in number and importance, chose their residence freely, owned houses, lands and vineyards. Though unequal in rights, the Valladolid Muslims were not marginalized. The tolerability of coexistence paved the way to mass conversion in 1502.

In community celebrations, all three faiths participated. In Murcia, Muslim musicians and jugglers were an integral part of Christian religious celebrations. In times of crisis the faiths necessarily collaborated. In 1470 in the town of Ucles, `a year of great drought, there were many processions of Christians as well as of Muslims and Jews, to pray for water …’ In such a community, there were some who saw no harm in participating with other faiths. `Hernan Sanchez Castro’, who was denounced for it twenty years later in Ucles, `set out from the church together with other Christians in the procession, and when they reached the square where the Jews were with the Torah he joined the procession of the Jews with their Torah and left the processions of the Christians’. Co-acceptance of the communities extended to acts of charity. Diego Gonzalez remembered that in Huete in the 1470s, when he was a poor orphan, as a Christian he received alms from `both Jews and Muslims, for we used to beg for alms from all of them, and received help from them as we did from the Christians’. The kindness he received from Jews, indeed, encouraged him to pick up a smattering of Hebrew from them. It also led him to assert that `the Jew can find salvation in his own faith just as the Christian can in his’ . There was, of course, always another side to the coexistence. It was in Ucles in 1491 that a number of Jewish citizens voluntarily gave testimony against Christians of Jewish origin. And Diego Gonzalez, twenty years later when he had become a priest, was arrested for his pro-Jewish tendencies and burnt as a heretic.

We can be certain of one thing. Spain was not, as often imagined, a society dominated exclusively by zealots. In the Mediterranean the confrontation of cultures was more constant than in northern Europe, but the certainty of faith was no stronger. Jews had the advantage of community solidarity, but under pressure from other cultures they also suffered the disadvantage of internal dissent over belief. The three faiths had coexisted long enough for many people to accept the validity of all three. `Who knows which is the better religion’, a Christian of Castile asked in 1501, `ours or those of the Muslims and the Jews?’

Though there were confusions of belief in the peninsula, there seems in late mediaeval times to have been no formal heresy, not even among Christians. But this did not imply that Spain was a society of convinced believers. In the mid-sixteenth century a friar lamented the ignorance and unbelief he had found throughout Castile, `not only in small hamlets and villages but even in cities and populous towns’. `Out of three hundred residents’, he affirmed, `you will find barely thirty who know what any ordinary Christian is obliged to know’. Religious practice among Christians was a free mixture of community traditions, superstitious folklore and imprecise dogmatic beliefs. Some writers went so far as to categorize popular religious practices as diabolic magic. It was a situation that Church leaders did very little to remedy. Everyday religion among Christians continued to embrace an immense range of cultural and devotional options. There are many parallels to the cases of the Catalan peasant who asserted in 1539 that `there is no heaven, purgatory or hell; at the end we all have to end up in the same place, the bad will go to the same place as the good and the good will go to the same place as the bad’; or of the other who stated in 1593 that `he does not believe in heaven or hell, and God feeds the Muslims and heretics just the same as he feeds the Christians’. When Christian warriors battled against Muslims, they shouted their convictions passionately. At home, or in the inn, or working in the fields, their opinions were often different. The bulk of surviving documentation gives us some key to this dual outlook, only, however, among Christians. In Soria in 1487, at a time when the final conquest of Granada was well under way, a resident commented that `the king is off to drive the Muslims out, when they haven’t done him any harm’. The Muslim can be saved in his faith just as the Christian can in his’, another is reported to have said. The inquisitors in 1490 in Cuenca were informed of a Christian who claimed chat `the good Jew and the good Muslim can, if they act correctly, go to heaven just like the good Christian’. There is little or nothing to tell us how Jews and Muslims thought, but every probability that they also accepted the need to make compromises with the other faiths of the peninsula.

Christians who wished to turn their backs on their own society often did so quite simply by embracing Islam. From the later Middle Ages to the eighteenth century, there were random cases of Spanish Christians who changed their faith in this way. The Moorish kingdom of Granada had a small community of renegade Christians. In Christian Spain it was not uncommon to find many of pro-Muslim sentiment. In 1486 the Inquisition of Saragossa tried a Christian `for saying that he was a Muslim, and for praying in the mosque like a Muslim’. Long after the epoch of convivencia had passed, many Spaniards retained at the back of their minds a feeling that their differences were not divisive. In the Granada countryside in the 1620s, a Christian woman of Muslim origin felt that `the Muslim can be saved in his faith as the Jew can in his’, a peasant felt that `everyone can find salvation in his own faith’, and another affirmed that `Jews who observe their law can be saved’. The attitude was frequent enough to be commonplace, and could be found in every corner of Spain.

The remarkable absence of formal `heresy’ in late mediaeval Spain may in part have been a consequence of its multiple cultures. The three faiths, even while respecting each other, attempted to maintain in some measure the purity of their own ideology. In times of crisis, as with the rabbis in 1492 or the Muslim alfaquis in 1609, they clung desperately to the uniqueness of their own truth. Christianity, for its part, remained so untarnished by formal heresy that the papal Inquisition, active in France, Germany and Italy, was never deemed necessary in mediaeval Castile and made only a token appearance in Aragon. In the penumbra of the three great faiths there were, it is true, a number of those who, whether through the indifferentism born of tolerance or the cynicism born of persecution, had no active belief in organized religion. But the virtual absence of organized heresy meant that though defections to other faiths were severely punished in Christian law, no systematic machinery was brought into existence to deal with non-believers or with those forced converts who had shaky belief. For decades, society continued to tolerate them, and the policy of burning practised elsewhere in Europe was little known in Spain.

All this was changed by the successful new Reconquest of Ferdinand and Isabella. It appears that the rulers, seeking to stabilize their power in both Castile and Aragon, where civil wars had created disorder in the 1470s, accepted an alliance with social forces that prepared the way for the elimination of a plural, open society. The crown accepted this policy because it seemed to ensure stability, but the new developments failed to bring about social unity, and the machinery of the Inquisition served only to intensify and deepen the shadow of conflict over Spain.

Voir par ailleurs:

Église et État : “Il ne faut pas caricaturer les Lumières !”
Interview Cyprien Mycinski

La Croix

07/11/2019

Dans un livre qui fera date, l’Église dans l’État, l’historienne de la France religieuse à l’époque janséniste change notre regard sur un siècle passionné de religion, mais où l’Église cède beaucoup de pouvoir.

D’un point de vue religieux, la France du XVIIIe siècle vit sous le régime du « gallicanisme ». Qu’est-ce que ce terme signifie ?

Il faut commencer par rappeler que, à l’époque, le mot n’existe pas : le néologisme a été forgé après la Révolution française. Au XVIIIe siècle, on parle des « libertés de l’Église gallicane ». Et cela renvoie à une formule de compromis : l’Église de France est reconnue comme pleinement catholique et soumise au pape sur le plan spirituel, tout en étant intégrée à l’État et soumise au roi sur le plan temporel. En ce sens, l’Église est dans l’État. Cela ne signifie pourtant pas que le roi est le chef de l’Église de France comme le roi d’Angleterre est à la tête de l’Église d’Angleterre. L’Église de France, elle, n’a jamais rompu avec le pape. C’est pour cette raison que le « gallicanisme » est très différent de l’anglicanisme. Ce compromis est néanmoins instable et très délicat à gérer. C’est tellement vrai que personne n’a essayé d’en donner une théorie. On s’en tient à quelques maximes qui vont donner lieu à des querelles d’interprétation récurrentes. L’idéal revendiqué par tous est celui d’un équilibre entre les deux souverainetés, chacune dans leur domaine. Mais dans les faits, c’est à des conflits répétés sur la délimitation de leurs territoires respectifs que l’on va assister tout au long du XVIIIe siècle.

L’Église de France, elle, n’a jamais rompu avec le pape. C’est pour cette raison que le « gallicanisme » est très différent de l’anglicanisme.

Pourquoi l’Église a-t-elle accepté cette absorption par l’État royal ?

Elle s’est faite très lentement. C’est sans doute ce qui explique que l’Église de France n’a pas vraiment mesuré ce qu’impliquait son absorption progressive par l’État. En 1561, très peu de temps avant que n’éclatent les guerres de Religion, une assemblée périodique du clergé français est constituée pour régler les rapports financiers entre l’Église et le roi. De fait, cette institution accepte de se soumettre au souverain. Mais, du côté de l’Église, elle est vue comme un moyen de peser sur le pouvoir royal, notamment dans la négociation de la contribution de l’Église au financement de l’État ou dans la lutte contre le protestantisme puis le jansénisme. En 1682, sous l’égide de Bossuet, l’Église gallicane accepte de se soumettre encore davantage. L’assemblée du clergé vote à cette date la déclaration des quatre articles par laquelle l’autorité du pape sur le clergé français est exclusivement réduite au domaine spirituel tandis que l’autorité du roi, elle, est posée comme « absolue ».

Faut-il alors considérer qu’au XVIIIe siècle l’Église est entièrement soumise au roi ?

En vérité, le roi « absolu » n’est pas si absolu que cela… Louis XV hésite beaucoup à imposer quoi que ce soit au clergé français. Il craint que celui-ci puisse devenir une force d’opposition. Il renonce par exemple à soumettre l’Église de France à une véritable imposition et accepte de maintenir le système du « don gratuit » par lequel l’Église définit elle-même ce qu’elle verse au budget de l’État. Finalement, le siècle entier se passe en controverses durant lesquelles on s’écharpe pour savoir jusqu’où doit s’exercer l’autorité de l’État sur l’Église ou, a contrario, quelles sont les « libertés » de l’Église de France dans l’État royal. Ces multiples controverses touchent à des problèmes précis qui peuvent nous paraître bizarres, comme la validité de la bulle Unigenitus concernant la répression des jansénistes ou le droit pour les clercs de refuser les sacrements à un individu. Parfois, elles portent sur des questions beaucoup plus lourdes, comme la propriété des biens du clergé ou encore le mariage des protestants… Mais, à chaque fois, l’enjeu est le même : s’affrontent ceux qui souhaitent que soit renforcée l’autorité de l’État sur l’Église et ceux qui veulent au contraire défendre une certaine autonomie de l’Église.

En vérité, les penseurs des Lumières ne sont pas aussi hostiles à la religion qu’on le dit.

Sur le plan religieux, on a l’habitude de voir le XVIIIe siècle comme un temps d’opposition entre les philosophes des Lumières et l’Église. À vous écouter, c’est donc un autre sujet qui aurait passionné et divisé les hommes de ce temps…

Il ne faut pas voir le siècle des Lumières de manière caricaturale ! On le présente trop facilement comme un siècle où s’affrontent de manière simpliste la raison des philosophes et le dogme de l’Église. En vérité, les penseurs des Lumières ne sont pas aussi hostiles à la religion qu’on le dit, et – surtout – le face-à-face de la raison et de la religion n’occupe pas les esprits autant que la question des relations qu’entretiennent les deux « souverainetés », c’est-à-dire l’autorité temporelle et l’autorité spirituelle. Lors de chaque controverse, des dizaines de plumitifs mais aussi les plus grands auteurs du temps prennent position. Montesquieu a été embarqué dans les discussions sur l’Unigenitus, Voltaire s’est exprimé sur la propriété des biens ecclésiastiques et Rousseau sur le mariage des protestants. La pensée des philosophes des Lumières s’est donc en partie forgée à l’occasion de ces disputes qui étaient pour eux loin d’être anodines.

Dans quelle mesure les idées des Lumières se sont-elles nourries de ces affrontements ?

L’histoire de ces controverses permet de lire à nouveaux frais l’héritage de la pensée du XVIIIe siècle. On a souvent tendance à considérer que les idées des Lumières sont nées dans les grands esprits des grands philosophes. En vérité, je me suis rendu compte que c’est à l’épreuve de questions très concrètes que ces idées ont commencé à se formuler. La tolérance, par exemple, se construit dans la polémique engagée à propos du mariage des protestants. Louis XIV avait décrété qu’il n’y avait plus de protestants en France et, dès lors, on ne pouvait officiellement enregistrer les mariages protestants. En conséquence, les enfants nés de ces couples étaient des bâtards, ce qui était un lourd handicap à cette époque. Tout au long du siècle, on se demanda donc comment traiter les protestants, s’il fallait les forcer à la conversion ou au contraire reconnaître les mariages clandestins qui les unissaient. C’est notamment dans ce contexte que l’idée de tolérance s’est construite. Elle n’est pas sortie tout armée d’un esprit brillant. Finalement, ce que ces controverses nous rappellent, c’est que l’intelligence est d’abord collective, qu’elle a besoin du débat.

Pour les hommes du XVIIIe siècle, que l’Église puisse être séparée de l’État est une idée qui n’est tout simplement pas pensable. 

Quelles conséquences ont eues ces controverses sur le regard porté sur l’Église ?

Tout au long du siècle, chaque fois que l’Église défend ses « libertés », on sent monter la peur de la voir se constituer en corps étranger à l’intérieur de l’État. Un certain anticléricalisme se renforce donc jusqu’à la Révolution. Ce qu’il est important de comprendre – et cela a été insuffisamment pointé par les historiens jusqu’à présent -, c’est que cet anticléricalisme des Lumières n’est donc pas seulement « philosophique » mais aussi « politique ». Bien sûr, certains philosophes s’attaquent aux « superstitions » que répand l’Église, mais on a aussi très peur qu’elle soit suffisamment puissante pour s’opposer à la politique de l’État royal et ainsi constituer un État dans l’État. On peut trouver là une des origines de la Constitution civile du clergé de 1790… Cette grande réforme révolutionnaire avait pour but de fusionner définitivement l’Église et l’État pour éviter que celle-là puisse avoir une quelconque autonomie vis-à-vis de celui-ci. Mais, cette fois, l’absorption de l’Église dans l’État alla trop loin et le pape – ainsi qu’une partie du clergé français – s’y opposa. En définitive, c’est sans doute l’échec de cette fusion organique qui conduira à penser la séparation de l’Église et de l’État que nous connaissons.

Les controverses que vous évoquez peuvent apparaître très lointaines, presque exotiques… Pourquoi vous y être intéressée ?

Commençons par une raison qui relève de mon travail d’historienne : j’ai écrit il y a 20 ans un livre sur le jansénisme À l’occasion de ce travail, un autre problème m’est apparu : celui, particulièrement embrouillé, du « gallicanisme ». J’ai donc essayé de le résoudre. Néanmoins, au-delà de cette explication personnelle, je crois aussi que l’histoire de ces controverses du XVIIIe siècle peut nous intéresser sur bien des points. D’abord, elle nous rappelle d’où nous venons. La séparation de l’Église et de l’État nous est une évidence, et nous avons même peine à imaginer qu’une société puisse s’organiser autrement. Pour les hommes du XVIIIe siècle, c’est l’inverse qui est vrai : que l’Église puisse être séparée de l’État est une idée qui n’est tout simplement pas pensable. L’histoire nous rappelle donc la relativité de nos conceptions de la politique, de la société… Mais ces controverses ont aussi une certaine actualité : le problème de savoir ce qui relève du spirituel et ce qui relève du temporel continue de nous occuper. Je remarque d’ailleurs que c’est toujours à propos de ce qui peut sembler des détails – comme le voile islamique – que nous nous affrontons sur cette question. En définitive, ces controverses du XVIIIe siècle ne sont peut-être pas si éloignées de nous que nous pourrions le croire…

Catherine Maire est historienne à l’EHESS, chargée de recherche au CNRS, grande spécialiste de l’histoire religieuse et intellectuelle de la France, en particulier du jansénisme. Elle vient de publier l’Église dans l’État. Politique et religion dans la France des Lumières (Gallimard).

Voir enfin:

Minorités religieuses

Histoire : “Les prisonniers étaient considérés comme des martyrs de la foi”

Entre le XVIe et le XVIIIe siècle, plusieurs minorités religieuses interdites ont fait l’objet d’enfermement en France, en Angleterre ou en Espagne. Natalia Muchnik, directrice d’études à l’EHESS, a comparé leur sort. Un travail novateur.

Les minorités religieuses ont été enfermées dans plusieurs pays d’Europe. Pourtant, en vous lisant, on est surpris de constater que cet enfermement ne s’accompagnait pas forcément d’une interdiction de pratiquer.

Le but était avant tout d’écarter les personnes concernées du reste de la société. Les conditions d’incarcération étaient non seulement très hétérogènes selon les ressources financières des détenus, mais surtout très différentes de celles des prisons contemporaines. Ceux qui étaient enfermés pour cause de foi ont ainsi pu développer des pratiques religieuses parfois distinctes de celles du dehors, et ce notamment parce qu’ils se trouvaient rassemblés en un même lieu alors qu’ils étaient d’ordinaire plus dispersés. La religion a dès lors pu servir d’appui aux prisonniers, pour tenir et faire groupe face aux autres détenus. Un phénomène que l’on peut observer dans les prisons contemporaines, où l’intensification du religieux est fréquente.

Vous avez étudié quatre minorités : les protestants français aux XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles, les récusants et crypto-catholiques dans l’Angleterre protestante à partir du milieu du XVIe siècle, les morisques musulmans et les marranes juifs dans l’Espagne inquisitoriale. Pourquoi ces quatre minorités ?

Ces populations n’ont pas été les seules à connaître les prisons en raison de leur foi. Mais elles présentent l’intérêt, dans une perspective comparatiste, de vivre dans des monarchies socioculturellement et politiquement proches (la France, l’Angleterre et l’Espagne). Les quatre minorités ont aussi des fondements cultuels relativement analogues et, soumises à une forte répression, entretiennent un rapport similaire à la clandestinité et un lien fort avec leurs diasporas respectives. En outre, nous disposons à leur sujet d’abondantes sources.

Le statut de détenu ne définissait pas tant une présence effective dans les geôles, un enfermement, donc, qu’une condition, celle de ne pas être juridiquement libre.

Vous démontrez que les prisons étaient très connectées à l’environnement social. Comment comprendre cette porosité des geôles ?

Cette porosité était en effet dans l’ensemble bien plus importante qu’elle ne l’est aujourd’hui. À l’époque, le statut de détenu ne définissait pas tant une présence effective dans les geôles, un enfermement, donc, qu’une condition, celle de ne pas être juridiquement libre : on pouvait être prisonnier sans être concrètement enfermé, ou du moins pas tout le temps. Au Moyen Âge déjà, on différenciait la « prison close » et la « prison ouverte », qui incluait des assignations à résidence. Il faut à ce titre souligner qu’il n’y avait pas, sauf exceptions, de bâtiments construits pour être des prisons jusqu’au XVIIIe siècle : on réutilisait les édifices existants, voire on louait des maisons particulières. Il faut distinguer, d’un côté, une porosité « conjoncturelle », pour les détenus les plus aisés ou certaines figures – comme les prêtres en Angleterre -, qui pouvaient obtenir des autorisations ponctuelles pour sortir plusieurs jours avec ou sans gardien, d’ordinaire contre rémunération et au bon vouloir des geôliers, qui étaient les maîtres en leurs royaumes. D’autre part, une porosité structurelle est inhérente aux dispositifs de l’enfermement dans l’Europe moderne. Ainsi le cas des prisons inquisitoriales en Espagne : alors que, dans les « prisons secrètes », les accusés reclus durant leur procès sont en principe isolés, dans les « prisons de la pénitence », les condamnés sortent pour travailler ou mendier durant la journée et rentrent le soir. En Angleterre, au XVIIIe siècle surtout, les détenus pour dettes en particulier pouvaient vivre à proximité des geôles tout en étant inscrits dans les registres de la prison, souvent surpeuplée.

Les détenus correspondaient-ils à un groupe social particulier ?

Non, le spectre social était beaucoup plus large que celui des détenus d’aujourd’hui, incluant des riches comme des pauvres, des anonymes comme des écrivains célèbres. De même, les femmes étaient proportionnellement plus nombreuses qu’aujourd’hui. Cela est particulièrement vrai pour les minorités étudiées. Il y avait ainsi une plus grande familiarité avec le monde de la prison, d’autant que les geôles étaient souvent au coeur des villes.

Et les enfants ?

Il était rare qu’on enferme les enfants avant l’adolescence. Ils étaient généralement envoyés dans des structures éducatives spécialisées ou dans des monastères, pour y être instruits et conformés à la religion dominante.

Ce n’est pas l’Église, mais l’autorité civile qui exécute à mort les condamnés lors des autodafés inquisitoriaux en Espagne. 

L’Église catholique semble privilégier la prison comme peine. Pourquoi ?

Parce que l’Église ne peut en principe pas faire couler le sang. Contrairement à ce qu’on pense parfois, par exemple, ce n’est pas l’Église, mais l’autorité civile qui exécute à mort les condamnés lors des autodafés inquisitoriaux en Espagne. En Angleterre, c’était le pouvoir royal qui enfermait les catholiques, en particulier lorsqu’ils faisaient du prosélytisme et/ou ne reconnaissaient pas le souverain comme chef de l’Église, au profit de l’autorité pontificale.

Peut-on parler de formation de communautés religieuses dans les prisons ?

Cela dépend des effectifs, évidemment, et des conditions de détention. Mais le prosélytisme à l’intérieur des geôles est attesté dans les quatre cas. Dans certains établissements londoniens, ou dans le sud-est de la France, par exemple à la tour de Constance, où furent recluses des femmes protestantes, de petites communautés liturgiques se sont formées, même si elles ne disposaient pas nécessairement des instruments du culte. À Londres, des messes ont même été célébrées dans les geôles, accueillant aussi des fidèles de l’extérieur. On cite souvent le cas où l’on avait mis à la disposition d’un prêtre une cellule réservée à la messe.

Les détenus étaient perçus comme des modèles de ferveur, de dévouement pour la foi et le signe de l’élection divine du groupe dans son entier. 

Les prisonniers avaient donc une influence pour les coreligionnaires du dehors ?

Oui, ils pouvaient jouer non seulement un rôle cultuel, on vient de le voir, mais aussi symbolique pour les communautés du dehors et, plus largement, pour leurs diasporas respectives. En effet, les détenus étaient considérés comme des martyrs de la foi et nombre de leurs correspondances étaient alors imprimées. Chez les chrétiens, on les rapprochait des premiers chrétiens ou encore de saint Paul en captivité. Ils étaient perçus comme des modèles de ferveur, de dévouement pour la foi et le signe de l’élection divine du groupe dans son entier. Cette dimension martyrologique se retrouve même chez les marranes, en terre ibérique, et suscitait une circulation de reliques, comme celle des restes des prêtres exécutés en Angleterre, par exemple.

Quel rôle joue cet héritage aujourd’hui pour les communautés étudiées, selon vous ?

En ce qui concerne les catholiques anglais, certains des collèges créés par les exilés en Europe, où cette culture du martyre était mise en valeur, subsistent. D’ailleurs, des prêtres enfermés et exécutés ont rapidement été béatifiés. En Angleterre, il y a des éléments rituels qui ne sont pas propres au milieu de la prison, mais à la situation de clandestinité. Le rosaire, par exemple, a pris une grande importance au moment de la clandestinité. C’était effectivement plus facile à dissimuler. On pourrait également citer le cas des protestants de France, où la mémoire des persécutions, celle des camisards emprisonnés, de l’expérience du Désert dans les Cévennes, est encore particulièrement vive et innerve l’histoire et l’identité communautaires.

À lire
Les Prisons de la foi. L’enfermement des minorités (XVIe-XVIIIe siècle), de Natalia Muchnik, Puf.

Pope cites French epic poem to “prove” Christianity is as violent as Islam

Jihad watch

“Pope Francis trotted out a scene from the 11th-century French epic poem La Chanson de Roland this week to prove Christians have tried to convert Muslims by the sword, just as Muslims have done to Christians.”

The Pope’s moral equivalence is obscene at best. He also stated: “Beware of the fundamentalist groups: everyone has his own.”

True, but no religion but Islam has a history of aggression and an imperative — supported by religious texts — to conquer the world and subjugate unbelievers as inferiors, while murdering those who leave the faith.

Nowhere in Christian tenets is there a command to conquer by the sword; however, this is prescribed in Islamic texts and law, and has been steadily followed in varying degrees for 1,400 years.

Christians also defended themselves against expansionary Islamic marauders from the 7th century onward, as the latter rampaged through the Middle East and Africa, murdering far more Christians than Christians killed Muslims in all the Crusades combined.

And they’re still doing it. Christians are facing genocide at the hands of Muslims in the Middle East and Africa; most of the world ignores this, including the Pope, who instead insists that “it’s not fair to identify Islam with violence.”

The Pope has been a powerful promoter of Islam, going so far as advance theological reforms in Catholic schools to promote a “common mission of peace” with Islam. He largely ignores the gross human rights violations against Christians, women, minorities and apostates that are justified by normative Islam. He has not called on the leaders of Islamic states and mainstream Islamic leaders to condemn the Islamic texts that sanction such abuses. Instead, he has stated that “Christianity and Islam have more in common than people think…and the two religions defend common values that are necessary for the future of civilization.”

“Hours before Pope Francis called for the abolition of capital punishment” last Friday, he warmly embraced the Grand Sheikh of al-Azhar, Ahmed el-Tayeb — the revered Islamic scholar and cleric who has endorsed jihad suicide attacks against Jews and wants converts to Christianity to be killed. Pope Francis and el-Tayeb early this year published “A Document On Human Fraternity for World Peace and Living Together.”

Then last month, Pope Francis installed new cardinals who “share his vision for social justice, rights of immigrants and dialogue with Islam.”

Regarding La Chanson de Roland, “the French themselves to cry foul, reproaching the pontiff both for besmirching one of their most beloved pieces of epic literature and for using a fictional narrative to illustrate a point about how Christians supposedly behave.”

Voir enfin:

Sir Ridley Scott, the Oscar-nominated director, was savaged by senior British academics last night over his forthcoming film which they say « distorts » the history of the Crusades to portray Arabs in a favourable light.

The £75 million film, which stars Orlando Bloom, Jeremy Irons and Liam Neeson, is described by the makers as being « historically accurate » and designed to be « a fascinating history lesson ».

Academics, however – including Professor Jonathan Riley-Smith, Britain’s leading authority on the Crusades – attacked the plot of Kingdom of Heaven, describing it as « rubbish », « ridiculous », « complete fiction » and « dangerous to Arab relations ».

The film, which began shooting last week in Spain, is set in the time of King Baldwin IV (1161-1185), leading up to the Battle of Hattin in 1187 when Saladin conquered Jerusalem for the Muslims.

The script depicts Baldwin’s brother-in-law, Guy de Lusignan, who succeeds him as King of Jerusalem, as « the arch-villain ». A further group, « the Brotherhood of Muslims, Jews and Christians », is introduced, promoting an image of cross-faith kinship.

« They were working together, » the film’s spokesman said. « It was a strong bond until the Knights Templar cause friction between them. »

The Knights Templar, the warrior monks, are portrayed as « the baddies » while Saladin, the Muslim leader, is a « a hero of the piece », Sir Ridley’s spokesman said. « At the end of our picture, our heroes defend the Muslims, which was historically correct. »

Prof Riley-Smith, who is Dixie Professor of Ecclesiastical History at Cambridge University, said the plot was « complete and utter nonsense ». He said that it relied on the romanticised view of the Crusades propagated by Sir Walter Scott in his book The Talisman, published in 1825 and now discredited by academics.

« It sounds absolute balls. It’s rubbish. It’s not historically accurate at all. They refer to The Talisman, which depicts the Muslims as sophisticated and civilised, and the Crusaders are all brutes and barbarians. It has nothing to do with reality. »

Prof Riley-Smith added: « Guy of Lusignan lost the Battle of Hattin against Saladin, yes, but he wasn’t any badder or better than anyone else. There was never a confraternity of Muslims, Jews and Christians. That is utter nonsense. »

Dr Jonathan Philips, a lecturer in history at London University and author of The Fourth Crusade and the Sack of Constantinople, agreed that the film relied on an outdated portrayal of the Crusades and could not be described as « a history lesson ».

He said: « The Templars as ‘baddies’ is only sustainable from the Muslim perspective, and ‘baddies’ is the wrong way to show it anyway. They are the biggest threat to the Muslims and many end up being killed because their sworn vocation is to defend the Holy Land. »

Dr Philips said that by venerating Saladin, who was largely ignored by Arab history until he was reinvented by romantic historians in the 19th century, Sir Ridley was following both Saddam Hussein and Hafez Assad, the former Syrian dictator. Both leaders commissioned huge portraits and statues of Saladin, who was actually a Kurd, to bolster Arab Muslim pride.

Prof Riley-Smith added that Sir Ridley’s efforts were misguided and pandered to Islamic fundamentalism. « It’s Osama bin Laden’s version of history. It will fuel the Islamic fundamentalists. »

Amin Maalouf, the French historian and author of The Crusades Through Arab Eyes, said: « It does not do any good to distort history, even if you believe you are distorting it in a good way. Cruelty was not on one side but on all. »

Sir Ridley’s spokesman said that the film portrays the Arabs in a positive light. « It’s trying to be fair and we hope that the Muslim world sees the rectification of history. »

The production team is using Loarre Castle in northern Spain and have built a replica of Jerusalem in Ouarzazate, in the Moroccan desert. Sir Ridley, 65, who was knighted in July last year, grew up in South Shields and rose to fame as director of Alien, starring Sigourney Weaver.

He followed with classics such as Blade Runner, Thelma and Louise, which won him an Oscar nomination in 1992, and in 2002 Black Hawk Down, told the story of the US military’s disastrous raid on Mogadishu. In 2001 his film Gladiator won five Oscars, but Sir Ridley lost out to Steven Soderbergh for Best Director.


11 septembre/18e: Des gens avaient fait quelque chose (While the Ilhan Omars of this world never miss an opportunity to spit on their adopted countries, thank God for Mitchell Zuckoff’s attempt to ‘delay the descent of 9/11 into the well of history’)

11 septembre, 2019

Image result for Nicholas Haros Jr.

Image result for Here's your something NYP coverImage result for George W bush Job approval ratings trend
Related imagehttp://2.bp.blogspot.com/-J5FqbfMis0E/TndH_ZSniVI/AAAAAAAAAZU/5hYzGzijR4o/s1600/IMG_1426.jpgCountries That Lost Citizens On 9/11
Image result for fall and rise zuckoff book cover
Il n’y a pas de plus grand amour que de donner sa vie pour ses amis. (…) Si le monde vous hait, sachez qu’il m’a haï avant vous. (…) S’ils m’ont persécuté, ils vous persécuteront aussi. Jésus (Jean 15: 13-20)
Let’s roll ! Todd Beamer
You’ve got to turn on evil,when it’s coming after you, you’ve gotta face it down … Neil Young (« Let’s roll, 2001)
[Beamer’s wife Lisa] was talking about how he always used to say that (« let’s roll ») with the kids when they’d go out and do something, that it’s what he said a lot when he had a job to do. And it’s just so poignant, and there’s no more of a legendary, heroic act than what those people did. With no promise of martyrdom, no promise of any reward anywhere for this, other than just knowing that you did the right thing. And not even having a chance to think about it or plan it or do anything — just a gut reaction that was heroic and ultimately cost them all their lives. What more can you say? It was just so obvious that somebody had to write something or do something. Neil Young
In the normal course of events, Presidents come to this chamber to report on the state of the Union. Tonight, no such report is needed. It has already been delivered by the American people. We have seen it in the courage of passengers, who rushed terrorists to save others on the ground — passengers like an exceptional man named Todd Beamer. And would you please help me to welcome his wife, Lisa Beamer, here tonight. George W. Bush
Et immédiatement, le centre sacrificiel se mit à générer des réactions habituelles : un sentiment d’unanimité et de deuil. […] Des phrases ont commencé à se dire comme « Nous sommes tous Américains » – un sentiment purement fictif pour la plupart d’entre nous. Ce fut étonnant de voir l’unité se former autour du centre sacré, rapidement nommé Ground Zero, une unité qui se concrétisera ensuite par un drapeau, une grande participation aux cérémonies religieuses, les chefs religieux soudainement pris au sérieux, des bougies, des lieux saints, des prières, tous les signes de la religion de la mort. […] Et puis il y avait le deuil. Comme nous aimons le deuil ! Cela nous donne bonne conscience, nous rend innocents. Voilà ce qu’Aristote voulait dire par katharsis, et qui a des échos profonds dans les racines sacrificielles de la tragédie dramatique. Autour du centre sacrificiel, les personnes présentes se sentent justifiées et moralement bonnes. Une fausse bonté qui soudainement les sort de leurs petites trahisons, leurs lâchetés, leur mauvaise conscience. James Alison
La révolte contre l’ethnocentrisme est une invention de l’Occident, introuvable en dehors. (…) À la différence de toutes les autres cultures, qui ont toujours été ethnocentriques tout de go et sans complexe, nous autres occidentaux sommes toujours simultanément nous-mêmes et notre propre ennemi. René Girard
L’erreur est toujours de raisonner dans les catégories de la « différence », alors que la racine de tous les conflits, c’est plutôt la « concurrence », la rivalité mimétique entre des êtres, des pays, des cultures. La concurrence, c’est-à-dire le désir d’imiter l’autre pour obtenir la même chose que lui, au besoin par la violence. Sans doute le terrorisme est-il lié à un monde « différent » du nôtre, mais ce qui suscite le terrorisme n’est pas dans cette « différence » qui l’éloigne le plus de nous et nous le rend inconcevable. Il est au contraire dans un désir exacerbé de convergence et de ressemblance. (…) Ce qui se vit aujourd’hui est une forme de rivalité mimétique à l’échelle planétaire. Lorsque j’ai lu les premiers documents de Ben Laden, constaté ses allusions aux bombes américaines tombées sur le Japon, je me suis senti d’emblée à un niveau qui est au-delà de l’islam, celui de la planète entière. Sous l’étiquette de l’islam, on trouve une volonté de rallier et de mobiliser tout un tiers-monde de frustrés et de victimes dans leurs rapports de rivalité mimétique avec l’Occident. Mais les tours détruites occupaient autant d’étrangers que d’Américains. Et par leur efficacité, par la sophistication des moyens employés, par la connaissance qu’ils avaient des Etats-Unis, par leurs conditions d’entraînement, les auteurs des attentats n’étaient-ils pas un peu américains ? On est en plein mimétisme.Ce sentiment n’est pas vrai des masses, mais des dirigeants. Sur le plan de la fortune personnelle, on sait qu’un homme comme Ben Laden n’a rien à envier à personne. Et combien de chefs de parti ou de faction sont dans cette situation intermédiaire, identique à la sienne. Regardez un Mirabeau au début de la Révolution française : il a un pied dans un camp et un pied dans l’autre, et il n’en vit que de manière plus aiguë son ressentiment. Aux Etats-Unis, des immigrés s’intègrent avec facilité, alors que d’autres, même si leur réussite est éclatante, vivent aussi dans un déchirement et un ressentiment permanents. Parce qu’ils sont ramenés à leur enfance, à des frustrations et des humiliations héritées du passé. Cette dimension est essentielle, en particulier chez des musulmans qui ont des traditions de fierté et un style de rapports individuels encore proche de la féodalité. (…) Cette concurrence mimétique, quand elle est malheureuse, ressort toujours, à un moment donné, sous une forme violente. A cet égard, c’est l’islam qui fournit aujourd’hui le ciment qu’on trouvait autrefois dans le marxisme.  René Girard
J’ai l’impression que beaucoup de gens ont oublié le 11 Septembre – pas complètement, mais ils l’ont réduit à une espèce de norme tacite. Quand j’ai donné cet entretien au Monde, l’opinion générale pensait qu’il s’agissait d’un événement inhabituel, nouveau, et incomparable. Aujourd’hui, je pense que beaucoup de gens seraient en désaccord avec cette remarque. Malheureusement, l’attitude des Américains face au 11 Septembre a été influencée par l’idéologie politique, à cause de la guerre en Irak. Le fait d’insister sur le 11 Septembre est devenu « « conservateur » et « alarmiste ». Ceux qui aimeraient mettre une fin immédiate à la guerre en Irak tendent donc à le minimiser. Cela dit, je ne veux pas dire qu’ils ont tort de vouloir terminer la guerre en Irak, mais avant de minimiser le 11 Septembre, ils devraient faire très attention et considérer la situation dans sa globalité. Aujourd’hui, cette tendance est très répandue, car les événements dont vous parlez – qui ont eu lieu après le 11 Septembre et qui en sont, en quelque sorte, de vagues réminiscences – sont incomparablement moins puissants et ont beaucoup moins de visibilité. Par conséquent, il y a tout le problème de l’interprétation : qu’est-ce que le 11 Septembre ? (…) je le vois comme un événement déterminant, et c’est très grave de le minimiser aujourd’hui. Le désir habituel d’être optimiste, de ne pas voir l’unicité de notre temps du point de vue de la violence, correspond à un désir futile et désespéré de penser notre temps comme la simple continuation de la violence du XXe siècle. Je pense, personnellement, que nous avons affaire à une nouvelle dimension qui est mondiale. Ce que le communisme avait tenté de faire, une guerre vraiment mondiale, est maintenant réalisé, c’est l’actualité. Minimiser le 11 Septembre, c’est ne pas vouloir voir l’importance de cette nouvelle dimension. (…)  [la guerre froide et le terrorisme islamiste] sont similaires dans la mesure où elles représentent une menace révolutionnaire, une menace globale. Mais la menace actuelle va au-delà de la politique, puisqu’elle comporte un aspect religieux. Ainsi, l’idée qu’il puisse y avoir un conflit plus total que celui conçu par les peuples totalitaires, comme l’Allemagne nazie, et qui puisse devenir en quelque sorte la propriété de l’islam, est tout simplement stupéfiante, tellement contraire à ce que tout le monde croyait sur la politique. Il faudrait beaucoup y travailler, car il n’y a pas de vraie réflexion sur la coexistence des autres religions, et en particulier du christianisme avec l’islam. Le problème religieux est plus radical dans la mesure où il dépasse les divisions idéologiques – que bien sûr, la plupart des intellectuels aujourd’hui ne sont pas prêts d’abandonner. En deçà de ces visions idéologiques, nos réflexions sur le 11 Septembre resteront superficielles. Nous devons réfléchir dans le contexte plus large de la dimension apocalyptique du christianisme. Celle-ci est une menace, car la survie même de la planète est en jeu. Notre planète est menacée par trois choses qui émanent de l’homme : la menace nucléaire, la menace écologique et la manipulation biologique de l’espèce humaine. L’idée que l’homme ne puisse pas maîtriser ses propres pouvoirs est aussi vraie dans le domaine biologique que dans le domaine militaire. C’est cette triple menace mondiale qui domine aujourd’hui. (…) Le terrorisme est une forme de guerre, et la guerre est la continuation de la politique par d’autres moyens. En ce sens, le terrorisme est politique. Mais le terrorisme est la seule forme possible de guerre face à la technologie. Les événements actuels en Irak le confirment. La supériorité de l’Occident, c’est sa technologie, et elle s’est révélée inutile en Irak. L’Occident s’est mis dans la pire des situations en déclarant qu’il transformerait l’Irak en une démocratie jeffersonienne ! C’est précisément ce qu’il ne peut pas faire. Il est impuissant face à l’islam car la division entre les sunnites et les chiites est infiniment plus importante. Alors même qu’ils combattent l’Occident, ils parviennent encore à lutter l’un contre l’autre. Pourquoi l’Occident devrait-il s’investir dans ce conflit interne à l’islam alors que nous ne parvenons même pas à en concevoir l’immense puissance au sein du monde islamique lui-même ? (…) Il s’agit de notre incompréhension du rôle de la religion, et de notre propre monde ; c’est ne pas comprendre que ce qui nous unit est très fragile. Lorsque nous évoquons nos principes démocratiques, parlons-nous de l’égalité et des élections, ou bien parlons-nous de capitalisme, de consommation, de libre échange, etc. ? Je pense que dans les années à venir, l’Occident sera mis à l’épreuve. Comment réagira-t-il : avec force ou faiblesse ? Se dissoudra-t-il ? Les occidentaux devraient se poser la question de savoir s’ils ont de vrais principes, et si ceux-ci sont chrétiens ou bien purement consuméristes. Le consumérisme n’a pas d’emprise sur ceux qui se livrent aux attentats suicides. L’Amérique devrait y réfléchir, car elle offre au monde ce que l’on considère de plus attrayant. Pourquoi cela ne fonctionne- t-il pas vraiment chez les musulmans ? Est-ce par ressentiment ou ont-ils, contre cela, un système de défense bien organisé ? Ou bien, leur perspective religieuse est-elle plus authentique et plus puissante ? Le vrai problème est là. (…) Je suis bien moins affirmatif que je ne l’étais au moment du 11 Septembre sur l’idée d’un ressentiment total. Je me souviens m’être emporté lors d’une rencontre à l’École Polytechnique lorsque je me suis mis d’accord avec Jean-Pierre Dupuy sur l’interprétation du ressentiment du monde musulman. Maintenant, je ne pense pas que cela suffise. Le ressentiment seul peut-il motiver cette capacité de mourir ainsi ? Le monde musulman pourrait-il vraiment être indifférent à la culture de consommation de masse ? Peut-être qu’il l’est. Je ne sais pas. Il serait sans doute excessif de leur attribuer une telle envie. Si les islamistes ont vraiment pour objectif la domination du monde, alors ils l’ont déjà dépassée. Nous ne savons pas si l’industrialisation rapide apparaîtra dans le monde musulman, ou s’ils tenteront de gagner sur la croissance démographique et la fascination qu’ils exercent. Il y a de plus en plus de conversions en Occident. La fascination de la violence y joue certainement un rôle. (…) Il y a là du ressentiment, évidemment. Et c’est ce qui a dû émouvoir ceux qui ont applaudi les terroristes, comme s’ils étaient dans un stade. C’est cela le ressentiment. C’est évident et indéniable. Mais est-ce qu’il représente l’unique force ? La force majeure ? Peut-il être l’unique cause des attentats suicides ? Je n’en suis pas sûr. La richesse accumulée en Occident, comparée au reste du monde, est un scandale, et le 11 Septembre n’est pas sans rapport avec ce fait. Si je ne veux donc pas complètement supprimer l’idée du ressentiment, il ne peut pas être l’unique explication. (…)  L’autre force serait religieuse. Allah est contre le consumérisme, etc. En réalité, le musulman pense que les rituels de prohibition religieuse sont une force qui maintient l’unité de la communauté, ce qui a totalement disparu ou qui est en déclin en Occident. Les gens en Occident ne sont motivés que par le consumérisme, les bons salaires, etc. Les musulmans disent : « leurs armes sont terriblement dangereuses, mais comme peuple, ils sont tellement faibles que leur civilisation peut être facilement détruite ». C’est ce qu’ils pensent et ils n’ont peut-être pas complètement tort. Il me semble qu’il y a quelque chose de juste dans ce propos. Finalement, je crois que la perspective chrétienne sur la violence surmontera tout, mais ce sera une épreuve importante. (…) Il faut faire attention à ne pas justifier le 11 Septembre en le qualifiant de sacrificiel. Je pense que Jean-Pierre Dupuy ne le dit pas. Il maintient une sorte de neutralité. Mais ce qu’il dit sur la nature sacrée de Ground Zero au World Trade Center est, je pense, parfaitement justifié. (…) Je pense que James Alison a raison de parler de la katharsis dans le contexte du 11 Septembre. La notion de katharsis est extrêmement importante. C’est un mot religieux. En réalité, cela veut dire « la purge » au sens de purification. Dans l’Église orthodoxe, par exemple, katharos veut dire purification. C’est le mot qui exprime l’effet positif de la religion. La purge est ce qui nous rend purs. C’est ce que la religion est censée faire, et ce qu’elle fait avec le sacrifice. Je considère l’utilisation du mot katharsis par Aristote comme parfaitement juste. Quand les gens condamnent la théorie mimétique, ils ne voient pas l’apport d’Aristote. Il ne semble parler que de tragédie, mais pourtant, le théâtre tragique traite du sacrifice comme un drame. On l’appelle d’ailleurs ‘l’ode de la chèvre’. Aristote est toujours conventionnel dans ses explications – conventionnel au sens positif. Un Grec très intelligent cherchant à justifier sa religion, utiliserait, je pense, le mot katharsis. Ainsi, ma réponse mettrait l’accent sur la katharsis au sens aristotélicien du terme. (…) pour le 11 Septembre, il y avait la télévision qui nous rendait présents à l’événement, et intensifiait ainsi l’expérience. L’événement était en direct, comme nous le disons en français. On ne savait pas ce qui allait advenir par la suite. Moi-même, j’ai vu le deuxième avion frapper le gratte-ciel, en direct. C’était comme un spectacle tragique, mais réel en même temps. Si nous ne l’avions pas vécu dans le sens le plus littéral, il n’aurait pas eu le même impact. Je pense que si j’avais écrit La Violence et le Sacré après le 11 Septembre, j’y aurais très probablement inclus cet événement. C’est l’événement qui rend possible une compréhension des événements contemporains, car il rend l’archaïque plus intelligible. Le 11 Septembre représente un étrange retour à l’archaïque à l’intérieur du sécularisme de notre temps. Il n’y a pas si longtemps, les gens auraient eu une réaction chrétienne vis-à-vis du 11 Septembre. Aujourd’hui, ils ont une réaction archaïque, qui augure mal de l’avenir. (…) L’avenir apocalyptique n’est pas quelque chose d’historique. C’est quelque chose de religieux sans lequel on ne peut pas vivre. C’est ce que les chrétiens actuels ne comprennent pas. Parce que, dans l’avenir apocalyptique, le bien et le mal sont mélangés de telle manière que d’un point de vue chrétien, on ne peut pas parler de pessimisme. Cela est tout simplement contenu dans le christianisme. Pour le comprendre, lisons la Première Lettre aux Corinthiens : si les puissants, c’est-à-dire les puissants de ce monde, avaient su ce qui arriverait, ils n’auraient jamais crucifié le Seigneur de la Gloire – car cela aurait signifié leur destruction (cf. 1 Co 2, 8). Car lorsque l’on crucifie le Seigneur de la Gloire, la magie des pouvoirs, qui est le mécanisme du bouc émissaire, est révélée. Montrer la crucifixion comme l’assassinat d’une victime innocente, c’est montrer le meurtre collectif et révéler ce phénomène mimétique. C’est finalement cette vérité qui entraîne les puissants à leur perte. Et toute l’histoire est simplement la réalisation de cette prophétie. Ceux qui prétendent que le christianisme est anarchiste ont un peu raison. Les chrétiens détruisent les pouvoirs de ce monde, car ils détruisent la légitimité de toute violence. Pour l’État, le christianisme est une force anarchique, surtout lorsqu’il retrouve sa puissance spirituelle d’autrefois. Ainsi, le conflit avec les musulmans est bien plus considérable que ce que croient les fondamentalistes. Les fondamentalistes pensent que l’apocalypse est la violence de Dieu. Alors qu’en lisant les chapitres apocalyptiques, on voit que l’apocalypse est la violence de l’homme déchaînée par la destruction des puissants, c’est-à-dire des États, comme nous le voyons en ce moment. (…) mais (…) à la fin, la force religieuse est du côté du Christ. Cependant, il semblerait que la vraie force religieuse soit du côté de la violence. (…) Lorsque les puissances seront vaincues, la violence deviendra telle que la fin arrivera. Si l’on suit les chapitres apocalyptiques, c’est bien cela qu’ils annoncent. Il y aura des révolutions et des guerres. Les États s’élèveront contre les États, les nations contre les nations. Cela reflète la violence. Voilà le pouvoir anarchique que nous avons maintenant, avec des forces capables de détruire le monde entier. On peut donc voir l’apparition de l’apocalypse d’une manière qui n’était pas possible auparavant. Au début du christianisme, l’apocalypse semblait magique : le monde va finir ; nous irons tous au paradis, et tout sera sauvé ! L’erreur des premiers chrétiens était de croire que l’apocalypse était toute proche. Les premiers textes chronologiques chrétiens sont les Lettres aux Thessaloniciens qui répondent à la question : pourquoi le monde continue-t-il alors qu’on en a annoncé la fin ? Paul dit qu’il y a quelque chose qui retient les pouvoirs, le katochos (quelque chose qui retient). L’interprétation la plus commune est qu’il s’agit de l’Empire romain. La crucifixion n’a pas encore dissout tout l’ordre. Si l’on consulte les chapitres du christianisme, ils décrivent quelque chose comme le chaos actuel, qui n’était pas présent au début de l’Empire romain. Comment le monde peut-il finir alors qu’il est tenu si fortement par les forces de l’ordre ? (…)  [La religion chrétienne], fondamentalement, c’est la religion qui annonce le monde à venir ; il n’est pas question de se battre pour ce monde. C’est le christianisme moderne qui oublie ses origines et sa vraie direction. L’apocalypse au début du christianisme était une promesse, pas une menace, car ils croyaient vraiment en un monde prochain. (…) Je suis pessimiste au sens actuel du terme. Mais en fait, je suis optimiste si l’on regarde le monde actuel qui confirme vraiment toutes les prédictions. On voit l’apocalypse s’étendre tous les jours : le pouvoir de détruire le monde, les armes de plus en plus fatales, et autres menaces qui se multiplient sous nos yeux. Nous croyons toujours que tous ces problèmes sont gérables par l’homme mais, dans une vision d’ensemble, c’est impossible. Ils ont une valeur quasi surnaturelle. Comme les fondamentalistes, beaucoup de lecteurs de l’Évangile reconnaissent la situation mondiale dans ces chapitres apocalyptiques. Mais les fondamentalistes croient que la violence ultime vient de Dieu, alors ils ne voient pas vraiment le rapport avec la situation actuelle – le rapport religieux. Cela montre combien ils sont peu chrétiens. La violence humaine, qui menace aujourd’hui le monde, est plus conforme au thème apocalyptique de l’Évangile qu’ils ne le pensent. (…) Par exemple, nous avons moins de violence privée. Comparé à aujourd’hui, si vous regardez les statistiques du XVIIIe siècle, c’est impressionnant de voir la violence qu’il y avait. (…) le mouvement pacifiste est totalement chrétien, qu’il l’avoue ou non. Mais en même temps, il y a un déferlement d’inventions technologiques qui ne sont plus retenues par aucune force culturelle. Jacques Maritain disait qu’il y a à la fois plus de bien et plus de mal dans le monde. Je suis d’accord avec lui. Au fond, le monde est en permanence plus chrétien et moins chrétien. Mais le monde est fondamentalement désorganisé par le christianisme. (…) la pensée de Marcel Gauchet résulte de toute l’interprétation moderne du christianisme. Nous disons que nous sommes les héritiers du christianisme, et que l’héritage du christianisme est l’humanisme. Cela est en partie vrai. Mais en même temps, Marcel Gauchet ne considère pas le monde dans sa globalité. On peut tout expliquer avec la théorie mimétique. Dans un monde qui paraît plus menaçant, il est certain que la religion reviendra. Le 11 Septembre est le début de cela, car lors de cette attaque, la technologie n’était pas utilisée à des fins humanistes mais à des fins radicales, métaphysico-religieuses non chrétiennes. Je trouve cela incroyable, car j’ai l’habitude d’observer les forces religieuses et humanistes ensemble, et non pas en opposition. Mais suite au 11 Septembre, j’ai eu l’impression que la religion archaïque revenait, avec l’islam, d’une manière extrêmement rigoureuse. L’islam a beaucoup d’aspects propres aux religions bibliques à l’exception de la compréhension de la violence comme un mal non pas divin mais humain. Il considère la violence comme totalement divine. C’est pour cela que l’opposition est plus significative qu’avec le communisme, qui est un humanisme même s’il est factice et erroné, et qu’il tourne à la terreur. Mais c’est toujours un humanisme. Et tout à coup, on revient à la religion, la religion archaïque – mais avec des armes modernes. Ce que le monde attend est le moment où les musulmans radicaux pourront d’une certaine manière se servir d’armes nucléaires. Il faut regarder le Pakistan, qui est une nation musulmane possédant des armes nucléaires et l’Iran qui tente de les développer. (…) [la Guerre Froide est] complètement dépassée (…) Et la rapidité avec laquelle elle a été dépassée est incroyable. L’Union Soviétique a montré qu’elle devenait plus humaine lorsqu’elle n’a pas tenté de forcer le blocus de Kennedy, et à partir de cet instant, elle n’a plus fait peur. Après Khrouchtchev on a eu rapidement besoin de Gorbatchev. Quand Gorbatchev est arrivé au pouvoir, les oppositions ne se trouvaient plus à l’intérieur de l’humanisme. Les communistes voulaient organiser le monde pour qu’il n’y ait plus de pauvres. Les capitalistes ont constaté que les pauvres n’avaient pas de poids. Les capitalistes l’ont emporté. [Et ce conflit sera plus dangereux parce qu’il ne s’agit plus d’une lutte au sein de l’humanisme] bien qu’ils n’aient pas les mêmes armes que l’Union Soviétique – du moins pas encore. Le monde change si rapidement. Cela dit, de plus en plus de gens en Occident verront la faiblesse de notre humanisme ; nous n’allons pas redevenir chrétiens, mais on fera plus attention au fait que la lutte se trouve entre le christianisme et l’islam, plus qu’entre l’islam et l’humanisme. (…) Avec l’islam je pense que l’opposition est totale. Dans l’islam, si l’on est violent, on est inévitablement l’instrument de Dieu. Cela veut donc dire que la violence apocalyptique vient de Dieu. Aux États-Unis, les fondamentalistes disent cela, mais les grandes églises ne le disent pas. Néanmoins, ils ne poussent pas suffisamment leur pensée pour dire que si la violence ne vient pas de Dieu, elle vient de l’homme, et que nous en sommes responsables. Nous acceptons de vivre sous la protection d’armes nucléaires. Cela a probablement été la plus grande erreur de l’Occident. Imaginez-vous les implications. (…) la dissuasion nucléaire. Mais il s’agit de faibles excuses. Nous croyons que la violence est garante de la paix. Mais cette hypothèse ne me paraît pas valable. Nous ne voulons pas aujourd’hui réfléchir à ce que signifie cette confiance dans la violence. [Après autre événement tel que le 11 Septembre] Je pense que les personnes deviendraient plus conscientes. Mais cela serait probablement comme la première attaque. Il y aurait une période de grande tension spirituelle et intellectuelle, suivie d’un lent relâchement. Quand les gens ne veulent pas voir, ils y arrivent. Je pense qu’il y aura des révolutions spirituelles et intellectuelles dans un avenir proche. Ce que je dis aujourd’hui semble complètement invraisemblable, et pourtant je pense que le 11 Septembre va devenir de plus en plus significatif.  (…) Il faut distinguer entre le sacrifice des autres et le sacrifice de soi. Le Christ dit au Père : « Vous ne vouliez ni holocauste, ni sacrifice ; moi je dis : “Me voici” » (cf. He 10, 6-7). Autrement dit, je préfère me sacrifier plutôt que de sacrifier l’autre. Mais cela doit toujours être nommé sacrifice. Lorsque nous utilisons le mot « sacrifice » dans nos langues modernes, c’est dans le sens chrétien. Dieu dit : « Si personne d’autre n’est assez bon pour se sacrifier lui plutôt que son frère, je le ferai. » Ainsi, je satisfais à la demande de Dieu envers l’homme. Je préfère mourir plutôt que tuer. Mais tous les autres hommes préfèrent tuer plutôt que mourir. (…)  Dans le christianisme, on ne se martyrise pas soi-même. On n’est pas volontaire pour se faire tuer. On se met dans une situation où le respect des préceptes de Dieu (tendre l’autre joue, etc.) peut nous faire tuer. Cela dit, on se fera tuer parce que les hommes veulent nous tuer, non pas parce qu’on s’est porté volontaire. Ce n’est pas comme la notion japonaise de kamikaze. La notion chrétienne signifie que l’on est prêt à mourir plutôt qu’à tuer. C’est bien l’attitude de la bonne prostituée face au jugement de Salomon. Elle dit : « Donnez l’enfant à mon ennemi plutôt que de le tuer. » Sacrifier son enfant serait comme se sacrifier elle-même, car en acceptant une sorte de mort, elle se sacrifie elle-même. Et lorsque Salomon dit qu’elle est la vraie mère, cela ne signifie pas qu’elle est la mère biologique, mais la mère selon l’esprit. Cette histoire se trouve dans le Premier Livre des Rois (3, 16-28), qui est, à certains égards, un livre assez violent. Mais il me semble qu’il n’y a pas de meilleur symbole préchrétien du sacrifice de soi par le Christ. (…) Je vois en cela le contraste du christianisme avec toutes les religions archaïques du sacrifice. Cela dit, la religion musulmane a beaucoup copié le christianisme et elle n’est donc pas ouvertement sacrificielle. Mais la religion musulmane n’a pas détruit le sacrifice de la religion archaïque comme l’a fait le christianisme. Bien des parties du monde musulman ont conservé le sacrifice prémusulman. (…) bien entendu. Il faut lire les romans de William Faulkner. Bien des gens croient que le sud des États-Unis est une incarnation du christianisme. Je dirais que le sud est sans doute la partie la moins chrétienne des États-Unis en termes d’esprit, bien qu’il en soit la plus chrétienne en termes de rituel. Il n’y a pas de doute que le christianisme médiéval était beaucoup plus proche du fondamentalisme actuel. Mais il y a beaucoup de manières de trahir une religion. En ce qui concerne le sud, cela est évident, car il y a un grand retour aux formes les plus archaïques de la religion. Il faut interpréter ces lynchages comme une forme d’acte religieux archaïque. (…) Le terme de « violence religieuse » est souvent employé d’une manière qui ne m’aide pas à résoudre les problèmes que je me pose, à savoir ceux d’un rapport à la violence en mouvement constant et également historique. (…) Je dirais que toute violence religieuse implique un degré d’archaïsme. Mais certains points sont très compliqués. Par exemple, lors de la première guerre mondiale, est-ce que les soldats qui acceptaient d’être mobilisés pour mourir pour leur pays, et beaucoup au nom du christianisme, avaient une attitude vraiment chrétienne ? Il y a là quelque chose qui est contraire au christianisme. Mais il y a aussi quelque chose de vrai. Cela ne supprime pas, à mon avis, le fait qu’il y a une histoire de la violence religieuse, et que les religions, surtout le christianisme, au fond, sont continuellement influencées par cette histoire, bien que son influence soit, le plus souvent, pervertie. René Girard
Des millions de Faisal Shahzad sont déstabilisés par un monde moderne qu’ils ne peuvent ni maîtriser ni rejeter. (…) Le jeune homme qui avait fait tous ses efforts pour acquérir la meilleure éducation que pouvait lui offrir l’Amérique avant de succomber à l’appel du jihad a fait place au plus atteint des schizophrènes. Les villes surpeuplées de l’Islam – de Karachi et Casablanca au Caire – et ces villes d’Europe et d’Amérique du Nord où la diaspora islamique est maintenant présente en force ont des multitudes incalculables d’hommes comme Faisal Shahzad. C’est une longue guerre crépusculaire, la lutte contre l’Islamisme radical. Nul vœu pieu, nulle stratégie de « gain des coeurs et des esprits », nulle grande campagne d’information n’en viendront facilement à bout. L’Amérique ne peut apaiser cette fureur accumulée. Ces hommes de nulle part – Shahzad Faisal, Malik Nidal Hasan, l’émir renégat né en Amérique Anwar Awlaki qui se terre actuellement au Yémen et ceux qui leur ressemblent – sont une race de combattants particulièrement dangereux dans ce nouveau genre de guerre. La modernité les attire et les ébranle à la fois. L’Amérique est tout en même temps l’objet de leurs rêves et le bouc émissaire sur lequel ils projettent leurs malignités les plus profondes. Fouad Ajami
Relire aujourd’hui les principaux textes consacrés à ces attentats par des philosophes de renom constitue une étrange expérience. De manière prévisible, on y rencontre élaborations sophistiquées, affirmations grandioses ou péremptoires, performances rhétoriques bluffantes. Malgré tout, avec le recul, on ne peut qu’être saisi par un décalage profond entre ces performances virtuoses et la réalité rampante du terrorisme mondialisé que nous vivons à présent quotidiennement. Au fil des ans, un écart frappant s’est creusé entre discours subtils et réalités grossières, propos éthérés et faits massifs. Le 11 septembre devait être nécessairement considéré comme une énigme. Le philosophe français Jacques Derrida affirmait qu’« on ne sait pas, on ne pense pas, on ne comprend pas, on ne veut pas comprendre ce qui s’est passé à ce moment-là ». Il fallait d’abord récuser les évidences, considérées comme clichés idéologiques ou manipulations médiatiques. Ne parler donc ni de d’acte de guerre, ni de haine de l’Occident, ni de volonté de détruire les libertés fondamentales. Dialoguant à propos du 11 septembre avec Jürgen Habermas, qui centrait alors son analyse principalement sur la politique de l’Europe, Derrida, pour comprendre l’événement, s’attardait sur la notion d’Ereignis (« événement », ou « avenance ») dans l’histoire de l’être selon Heidegger et finissait par proposer une « hospitalité sans condition ». « C’est eux qui l’on fait, mais c’est nous qui l’avons voulu » soutenait pour sa part le sociologue Jean Baudrillard, attribuant aux rêves suicidaires de l’Occident l’effondrement des tours et la fascination des images des attentats. Pour celui voulait mettre en lumière « l’esprit du terrorisme », les « vrais » responsables étaient donc, au choix, les Etats-Unis, l’hégémonie occidentale ou chacun d’entre nous… D’autres se demandèrent aussitôt « à qui profite le crime » et conclurent que ce ne pouvait être qu’à la CIA, préparant ainsi les théories du complot qui firent florès. Ce ne sont que quelques exemples. Une histoire des lectures philosophiques du 11 septembre reste à écrire. Elle montrerait combien anti-américanisme et anti-capitalisme ont empêché tant d’esprits affutés de voir la nature religieuse du nouveau terrorisme comme les singularités de la nouvelle guerre. S’y ajoutaient la volonté de n’être pas dupe et la défiance envers les propagandes, transformées en déni systématique des informations de base. Les philosophes ont évidemment pour rôle indispensable d’être critiques, donc de démonter préjugés et fausses évidences, mais n’ont-ils pas pour devoir de ne jamais faire l’impasse sur les faits ? Au lieu de mettre en cause l’empire américain, l’arrogance des tours, le règne des images, il fallait scruter l’islamisme politique, les usages inédits de la violence, l’art terroriste de la communication. Quelques-uns l’ont fait, en parlant dans le désert. Aujourd’hui, il est urgent d’analyser ce qu’impliquent les changements intervenus depuis le 11 septembre. Car ce ne sont plus des symboles, comme les Twin Towers ou le Pentagone, qui sont ciblés, mais n’importe qui vivant chez les « impies » – dans la rue, aux terrasses, au concert, à l’école…. Les terroristes ne sont plus des commandos organisés d’ingénieurs formés au pilotage pour transformer des Boeing en bombes, mais de petits délinquants autogérés, s’emparant d’un couteau de cuisine ou d’un camion. Pour en venir à bout, il va falloir rattraper, au plus vite, le temps perdu à penser à côté de la plaque. Roger-Pol Droit
Le Cair a été fondé après le 11 Septembre parce qu’ils ont pris acte du fait que des gens avaient fait quelque chose et que nous tous allions commencer à perdre accès à nos libertés civiles. Ilhan Omar
Je pense que c’est un produit des médias sensationnalistes. Vous avez ces extraits sonores, et ces mots, et tout le monde les prononce avec une telle intensité, car ça doit avoir une signification plus grande. Je me souviens quand j’étais à la fac, j’ai suivi un cours sur l’idéologie du terrorisme. A chaque fois que le professeur disait « Al-Qaeda », ses épaules se soulevaient. Ilhan Omar
I was 18 years old when that happened. I was in a classroom in college and I remember rushing home after being dismissed and getting home and seeing my father in complete horror as he sat in front of that TV. And I remember just feeling, like the world was ending. The events of 9/11 were life-changing, life-altering for all of us. My feeling around it is one of complete horror. None of us are ever going to forget that day and the trauma that we will always have to live with. Ilhan Omar
9/11 was an attack on all Americans. It was an attack on all of us. And I certainly could not understand the weight of the pain that the victims of the families of 9/11 must feel. But I think it is really important for us to make sure that we are not forgetting, right, the aftermath of what happened after 9/11. Many Americans found themselves now having their civil rights stripped from them. And so what I was speaking to was the fact that as a Muslim, not only was I suffering as an American who was attacked on that day, but the next day I woke up as my fellow Americans were now treating me a suspect. Ilhan Omar
This book is painful to read. Even with the passage of nearly 18 years, reliving modern America’s most terrible day hits an exposed nerve that you thought had been fully numbed, only to discover that the ache was merely in remission. In “Fall and Rise: The Story of 9/11,” Mitchell Zuckoff relives each minute of that morning in 2001 through the perspectives of those who endured the worst: passengers and crew members on the four planes turned into missiles by Islamist hijackers; innocents trapped in the burning twin towers and the Pentagon; rescue workers who struggled valiantly but futilely and, in many cases, fatally; people in Shanksville, Pa., on whom death rained from a clear sky. As much as anything, “Fall and Rise” is a quilt work of futures unrealized, from the woman about to tell her parents she was pregnant to the doctor hoping to build a kidney dialysis center, from the retired bookkeeper set to move in with her daughter to the college student with dreams of becoming a child psychologist. Zuckoff, a professor of narrative studies at Boston University and the author of several nonfiction books, relies on his own interviews with survivors, but also leans heavily on government studies, trial transcripts, books and documentaries long in the public realm. And so the overall picture that he shapes is not really new. But freshness of detail seems less his objective than preservation of memory — an attempt, as he says, “to delay the descent of 9/11 into the well of history.” By design, this narrative of close to 500 pages is not encyclopedic. Big Picture grandiosity — how Sept. 11 changed America and the world — has been left to others. The terrorism puppet master Osama bin Laden gets scant attention. Actions (and inactions) of President George W. Bush and his team merit only a few pages. Rudolph Giuliani, who made a lucrative life for himself after 9/11, earns glancing mention. Flawed communications systems that doomed hundreds of New York’s emergency responders are not explored with the kind of detail that can be found in, say, “102 Minutes,” a 2005 work by the New York Times journalists Jim Dwyer and Kevin Flynn. Rather, this book derives its power from its focus on individuals in the main unknown to the larger world, who managed to survive the ordeal or who lost their lives simply because they were unlucky. With journalistic rigor, Zuckoff acknowledges what he doesn’t know, for example how exactly each group of hijackers seized control of its plane. His language is largely unadorned; then again, embellishment is neither needed nor wanted. Many details are hard to take: the melted flesh, the pulverized bodies, the scorched lungs and, for sure, the revived memory of scores of desperate victims leaping from on high to escape the World Trade Center inferno. But there are also inspiring moments, like the grit shown by those aboard United Airlines Flight 93. It was the plane that never reached its target, crashing in Shanksville after passengers revolted against the hijackers. Phone messages that they left “formed a spoken tapestry of grace, warning, bravery, resolve and love.” Heroes abound, though not in the way that word is routinely used and abused. Heroism, as we see here, is often a product of necessity. Some may ask if this book, covering territory already well traveled, needed to be written. For those who lived through the horror, perhaps not. But a full generation has come of age with no memory of that day. It needs to hear anew what happened, and maybe learn that time, in fact, does not heal all wounds. Clyde Haberman
I teach really engaged journalism students. I’m not sure how the generation as a whole reacts to it. My students approach it with curiosity and a little bit of uncertainty because they didn’t experience it. They are well-read and aware of things, but for them it is a little like Pearl Harbor. They know who was involved and can cite numbers. They can say 3,000 dead, 9/11, four hijacked planes, 19 hijackers. They got the test questions down very well. They don’t have the human connection or that feeling for it that I wish they did. I hope that’s what my book can do. Mitchell Zuckoff
There is this entire generation who didn’t live through this, who don’t have any independent memories of what happened those days. Some members of that generation are going off to war to fight in Afghanistan — a war that started after this — and they don’t have any direct connection to it. Right now, other than Osama bin Laden, is there a single name that’s a household name associated with 9/11?. Names are news, and we connect to them, and that is what’s so important about this: before the time passes, before the people who I could talk to were gone, dead or just not available, to capture this as one story. (…) People do I think know to some extent what happened on Flight 93, the 40 heroes of 93, who rose up and fought back to try to save themselves and ultimately ended up saving untold numbers of people, either at the Capitol or the White House, was the destination. But there in Shanksville — and I tell the story largely through Terry Shaffer, who was the volunteer fire chief there, who had been planning for something his whole life, and he thought it might be a pile-up on the Pennsylvania Turnpike. And he races toward the scene expecting to find casualties, expecting to find people he can help. The story of the people in Shanksville and how they came together, and sort of embraced the families of the Flight 93 victims, is I think one of the most beautiful stories I’ve ever heard. (…) One of the advantages of a book almost 18 years after the event is so much of the material has become public, that all the FAA records of the flight altitudes almost on a second-by-second basis, as we’re approaching Shanksville, Pennsylvania, the transcript of the cockpit recorder — which was enormously valuable, where we have the terrorist pilots discussing what they’re doing with each other, ‘Should we put it into the ground?’ All of those different things, because that and the the trial of Zacarias Moussaoui in 2006 [the so-called 20th hijacker,] certainly a conspirator even though he didn’t get on one of the planes. All of that material became available, and it was a mountain of material. But for me, it was priceless. (…) It was too important not to. It becomes a responsibility when you realize that there are so many people who don’t have a human connection to this story — the way I think of it is sometimes, 9/11 is becoming a story reduced to numbers: 9 and 11, four planes, 19 hijackers, 3,000 people killed. But you don’t connect names to it. And I felt if I could do that, if I could give people the story as it unfolded through the people that they could connect to, then I would have done something worthwhile. Mitchell Zuckoff

A ceux pour qui à chaque fois qu’il est prononcé, le nom « Al-Qaeda » soulève les épaules …

En cette 18e commémoration de l’abomination islamiste du 11 septembre 2001 …

Où, après l’avoir minimisé drapée dans son hijab, une membre du Congrès américain nous joue [avant comme à son habitude de se rétracter quatre jours plus tard – mise à jour du 15.09.2019] les sanglots longs de l’automne

Comment ne pas saluer les efforts ô combien méritoires de l’auteur d’un récent livre réunissant l’ensemble des témoignages possibles de l’évènement …

Contre les ravages du temps et les faiblesses et dérives de la psychologie et de la mémoire humaines …

Où à l’instar de ce journaliste de la radio publique américaine NPR qui n’avait en tête comme noms liés au 11/9 hormis Ben Laden, que le nom honni de Mohamed Atta …

Un peuple américain qui au lendemain de la tragédie avait plébiscité leur président jusqu’au score de popularité proprement soviétique ou africain de 99% le traine à présent dans la boue …

Et où, le même peuple qui avait, entre mémoriaux, noms d’écoles ou de bâtiments publics, films, livres, chansons ou tee-shirts, fait un véritable triomphe aux véritables héros du jour et aux dernières paroles de leur leader Todd Beamer (« Let’s roll !« ) …

En est à présent, via l’antisémite de service du Congrès américain Ilhan Omar et heureusement sauf exceptions, à minimiser l’attentat le plus proprement diabolique de leur histoire ?

‘Fall And Rise’ Seeks To Capture 9/11 As ‘One Story’ — And Keep It From Fading
Jeremy Hobson
WBUR
April 29, 2019

« There is this entire generation who didn’t live through this, who don’t have any independent memories of what happened those days, » Zuckoff (@mitchellzuckoff) tells Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson. « Some members of that generation are going off to war to fight in Afghanistan — a war that started after this — and they don’t have any direct connection to it. »

One of the driving forces behind the book was an effort to tie 9/11 into a single narrative before it was too late, Zuckoff says — and to ensure the attacks don’t fade too far from the public consciousness.

« Right now, other than Osama bin Laden, is there a single name that’s a household name associated with 9/11? » he says. « Names are news, and we connect to them, and that is what’s so important about this: before the time passes, before the people who I could talk to were gone, dead or just not available, to capture this as one story. »

Interview Highlights

On starting the book with what happened in the days leading up to Sept. 11

« That was very much by design, to start the book actually on September 10th, because what Mohamed Atta, what Ziad Jarrah, what the other terrorists were doing, all these machinations: training to fly planes coming here, living in this country and coming closer and closer — the circle is tightening — to get them in a position doing trial runs and making this plan which took very little money, a lot of planning but very little money, very little overhead, if you will, and to position themselves where they could be here in Boston, they could go up to Portland, Maine, and be ready to do these events.

« It’s not entirely clear [why they started their journey from Portland.] One strong suspicion we have is that the trip to Portland would allow them to avoid some suspicion. If you had eight Arab men all arriving at Boston’s Logan Airport at the same exact time for the same flights, they thought this might avoid some of that. But that is one of those unanswerable questions. »

« The idea of turning [a plane] into a guided missile wasn’t, quite literally, on the radar for anyone. And that’s unfortunately so sadly why it was so effective. »

Mitchell Zuckoff

On whether all of the hijackers knew the full extent of what they were doing

« I think it’s clear that all 19 knew exactly what was being planned, because it was a very coordinated attack. What happened on each one of the four planes was quite similar, where at a trigger moment, the muscle hijackers — the guys who were not flying the plane — went into attack mode. All of them had discussed … the preparations for purifying themselves for what they understood would be their last day. »

On the hijackers’ use of Mace in the cabin so that it would be more difficult for passengers to thwart the attack

« The Mace is an open question. There was some discussion they had it. A lot of it was just the element of surprise, was the greatest thing, and they committed an act of violence almost on every plane. They immediately cut someone’s throat to make it clear that they meant business. They said they had a bomb, they herded — these were very lightly attended planes, it was a random Tuesday morning to most people — they herded everyone into the back. And they also understood that the flight attendants and the crews would know that there was a standard protocol: You negotiate with terrorists. You expect that they’re going to want to land somewhere and exchange passengers and money for their freedom, or for their political aims. This was not part of anyone’s script except the terrorists.

« The idea of turning [a plane] into a guided missile wasn’t, quite literally, on the radar for anyone. And that’s unfortunately so sadly why it was so effective. »

On how communication failures shaped the way Sept. 11 unfolded

« Communication failures were rampant that day on every level, and that’s where really, that’s the sort of ground zero, if you will, of the communications failures — that people were calling saying what was going on. The airlines knew about it. And then even when it did finally reach the FAA, they weren’t alerting the military. So planes are still taking off. Things are still happening that [are] allowing one after another of these hijackings. The communication failures, they’re rampant, they’re across everything in terms of the communication failures at the towers, communication failures even before it happened.

« A fact that always stayed with me was on 9/11, the FAA had a list, a no-fly list, of a dozen people on it. The State Department had a list, its tip-off terrorists list of 60,000 people it was watching. The director of airline security for the FAA didn’t even know that State Department list existed. »

« Communication failures were rampant that day on every level. »

Mitchell Zuckoff

On stories about passengers on the planes that have stuck with him

« There are so many. One is from … United Flight 175, the second plane that [crashed into the World Trade Center,] took off from from Boston’s Logan Airport. And on that plane was a fellow named Peter Hanson and his wife Sue Kim and their daughter Christine. Christine was 2 years old and she was the youngest person directly affected by 9/11.

« While they were approaching the South Tower and it was clear something terrible was happening, they knew it, Peter called his father Lee in Connecticut, and the two phone calls between Peter and Lee are so poignant. And I spent time with Lee and Eunice Hanson in their home, in Peter’s boyhood bedroom, talking about those. Peter was actually first telling his father, ‘Please call someone, let them know what’s happening.’ And then Peter is actually comforting his father on the phone, when his wife and daughter are there huddled next to him in the back of this plane that they understand is flying too low, is heading toward the Statue of Liberty and toward the World Trade Center. »

On people in the first tower to be hit thinking they didn’t need to evacuate

« They were being told not to evacuate in both the towers. Some people were being told, ‘It’s over in the other tower.’ People didn’t know what was happening. And when the plane cut through, it knocked out the telecommunication system within the building that would have allowed people down in the basement and in the first floor to communicate to them. So the confusion began immediately, and people — some of them stayed in place for well over an hour. They didn’t know there was a ticking clock for the survival of the building.

« I spoke to a number of the Port Authority police officers who were the dispatchers that day who took those calls. They haunted by them still. And they are recorded calls, so I can hear them, I can see the transcripts. They’re remarkable in that they’re trying to keep these people calm, they’re trying to hope for the best. But there is no way up, and there’s no way out. »

On « the miracle of Stairwell B »

« One group of firefighters was Ladder 6, it was a unit in New York led by a remarkable guy named Jay Jonas, and Jay Jonas was a fire captain and he had this team of guys, a half dozen guys, and they’re sent into the North Tower, and they’re going up and they’re walking stair by stair. And when the South Tower collapses, Jay realizes, ‘I gotta get my guys out of here, quick.’

« On the way down, they pause to help a woman, Josephine Harris, who has been injured, who was exhausted, who can’t go any farther. But they slow their exit to help Josephine, and as they’re going farther and farther down through the building to get to the lobby, the North Tower starts to collapse. They’re inside this center stairwell, and they just huddled together, hold on for dear life, and the building literally peels away around them, just keeping a few floors of Stairwell B — which is exactly where they are. And Jay realizes that having slowed to help Josephine ended up saving all of them, because had they been in the lobby, the lobby was completely destroyed. Had they been just outside, they would have been wiped out as well. So it truly was a miracle. »

On what unfolded in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, on 9/11

« People do I think know to some extent what happened on Flight 93, the 40 heroes of 93, who rose up and fought back to try to save themselves and ultimately ended up saving untold numbers of people, either at the Capitol or the White House, was the destination. But there in Shanksville — and I tell the story largely through Terry Shaffer, who was the volunteer fire chief there, who had been planning for something his whole life, and he thought it might be a pile-up on the Pennsylvania Turnpike. And he races toward the scene expecting to find casualties, expecting to find people he can help. The story of the people in Shanksville and how they came together, and sort of embraced the families of the Flight 93 victims, is I think one of the most beautiful stories I’ve ever heard. »

On the difficulties of determining what exactly was happening on the planes

« One of the advantages of a book almost 18 years after the event is so much of the material has become public, that all the FAA records of the flight altitudes almost on a second-by-second basis, as we’re approaching Shanksville, Pennsylvania, the transcript of the cockpit recorder — which was enormously valuable, where we have the terrorist pilots discussing what they’re doing with each other, ‘Should we put it into the ground?’ All of those different things, because that and the the trial of Zacarias Moussaoui in 2006 [the so-called 20th hijacker,] certainly a conspirator even though he didn’t get on one of the planes. All of that material became available, and it was a mountain of material. But for me, it was priceless. »

On why he wrote this book

« It was too important not to. It becomes a responsibility when you realize that there are so many people who don’t have a human connection to this story — the way I think of it is sometimes, 9/11 is becoming a story reduced to numbers: 9 and 11, four planes, 19 hijackers, 3,000 people killed. But you don’t connect names to it. And I felt if I could do that, if I could give people the story as it unfolded through the people that they could connect to, then I would have done something worthwhile. »

Book Excerpt: ‘Fall And Rise’

by Mitchell Zuckoff

Just after 9 a.m., inside her hilltop house in rural Stoystown, Pennsylvania, homemaker Linda Shepley watched her television in shock. The screen showed smoke billowing from a gash in the North Tower as Today show anchor Katie Couric interviewed an NBC producer who witnessed the crash of American Flight 11.

“You say that emergency vehicles are there?” Couric asked Elliott Walker by phone.

“Oh, my goodness!” Walker cried at 9:03 a.m. “Ah! Another one just hit!”

Linda watched the terror in her living room beside her husband, Jim, a Pennsylvania Department of Transportation manager, who’d taken the day off to trade in their old car. The Shepleys saw a grim-faced President Bush speak to the nation from Booker Elementary School in Sarasota, Florida. Then Couric interviewed a terrorism expert but interrupted him for a phone call with NBC military correspondent Jim Miklaszewski, who declared at 9:39 a.m., “Katie, I don’t want to alarm anybody right now, but apparently, it felt just a few moments ago like there was an explosion of some kind here at the Pentagon.”

From the home where they’d lived for nearly three decades, the Shepleys could have driven to Washington in time for lunch or to New York City for an afternoon movie. Yet as the political and financial capitals reeled, those big cities felt almost as far away as the caves of Afghanistan. Jim went to the garage, to clean out the car he still planned to trade in that day. Linda hurried to finish the laundry before she accompanied Jim to the dealership.

Forty-seven years old, with kind eyes and three grown sons, Linda loved the smell of clothes freshly dried by the crisp Allegheny mountain air. As ten o’clock approached, she filled a basket with wet laundry and carried it to the clothesline in her backyard, two grassy acres with unbroken views over rolling hills that stretched southeast toward the neighboring borough of Shanksville. As Linda lifted a wet T-shirt toward the line, she heard a loud thump-thump sound behind her, like a truck rumbling over a bridge. Startled, she glanced over her left shoulder and saw a large commercial passenger plane, its wings wobbling, rocking left and right, flying much too low in the bright blue sky.

As the plane passed overhead at high speed, Linda saw the jet was intact, with neither smoke nor flame coming from either engine. Linda made no connection between the plane’s strange behavior and the news she’d watched minutes earlier about hijacked airliners crashing into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Instead, she suspected that a mechanical problem had forced the plane low and wobbly, on a flight path over her house that she’d never before witnessed. Maybe, Linda thought, the pilot was signaling distress and searching for someplace to make an emergency landing. Linda worried that their local airstrip, Somerset County Airport, was far too small to handle such a big plane. And if that was the pilot’s destination, she thought, he or she was heading the wrong way.

Linda didn’t know the plane was United Flight 93, and she couldn’t imagine that minutes earlier the passengers and crew had taken a vote to fight back. Or that CeeCee Lyles, Jeremy Glick, Todd Beamer, Sandy Bradshaw, and others on board had shared that decision during emotional phone calls, or that the revolt was reaching its peak, or that the four hijackers had resolved to crash the plane short of their target to prevent the hostages from retaking control.

Linda tracked the jet as sunlight glinted off its metal skin. Its erratic flight pattern continued. The right wing dipped farther and farther. The left wing rose higher, until the plane was almost perpendicular with the earth, like a catamaran in high winds. Linda saw it start to turn and roll, flipping nearly upside down. Then the plane plunged, nosediving beyond a stand of hemlocks two miles from where Linda stood. As quickly as the jet disappeared, an orange fireball blossomed, accompanied by a thick mushroom cloud of dark smoke.

“Jim!” Linda screamed. “Call 9-1-1!”

Her husband burst outside, fearing that their neighbor’s Rottweiler mix had broken loose from its chain and attacked her.

“A big plane just crashed!” Linda yelled.

“A small plane,” Jim said skeptically, as he regained his bearings. “No, no, no, no. It was a big one. It was a big one! I saw the engines on the wings.”

Jim rushed inside and grabbed a phone.

Heartsick, still clutching the wet T-shirt, Linda stared toward the rising smoke. Soon she’d wonder whether, in the last seconds before the crash, any of the men and women on board saw her hanging laundry on this glorious late-summer day.


Excerpted from the book FALL AND RISE by Mitchell Zuckoff. Copyright © 2019 by Mitchell Zuckoff. Republished with permission of HarperCollins Publishers.

Voir aussi:

The Many Tragedies of 9/11
Clyde Haberman
The NYT
May 3, 2019

FALL AND RISE
The Story of 9/11
By Mitchell Zuckoff

This book is painful to read. Even with the passage of nearly 18 years, reliving modern America’s most terrible day hits an exposed nerve that you thought had been fully numbed, only to discover that the ache was merely in remission.

In “Fall and Rise: The Story of 9/11,” Mitchell Zuckoff relives each minute of that morning in 2001 through the perspectives of those who endured the worst: passengers and crew members on the four planes turned into missiles by Islamist hijackers; innocents trapped in the burning twin towers and the Pentagon; rescue workers who struggled valiantly but futilely and, in many cases, fatally; people in Shanksville, Pa., on whom death rained from a clear sky. As much as anything, “Fall and Rise” is a quilt work of futures unrealized, from the woman about to tell her parents she was pregnant to the doctor hoping to build a kidney dialysis center, from the retired bookkeeper set to move in with her daughter to the college student with dreams of becoming a child psychologist.

Zuckoff, a professor of narrative studies at Boston University and the author of several nonfiction books, relies on his own interviews with survivors, but also leans heavily on government studies, trial transcripts, books and documentaries long in the public realm. And so the overall picture that he shapes is not really new. But freshness of detail seems less his objective than preservation of memory — an attempt, as he says, “to delay the descent of 9/11 into the well of history.”

By design, this narrative of close to 500 pages is not encyclopedic. Big Picture grandiosity — how Sept. 11 changed America and the world — has been left to others. The terrorism puppet master Osama bin Laden gets scant attention. Actions (and inactions) of President George W. Bush and his team merit only a few pages. Rudolph Giuliani, who made a lucrative life for himself after 9/11, earns glancing mention. Flawed communications systems that doomed hundreds of New York’s emergency responders are not explored with the kind of detail that can be found in, say, “102 Minutes,” a 2005 work by the New York Times journalists Jim Dwyer and Kevin Flynn.

Rather, this book derives its power from its focus on individuals in the main unknown to the larger world, who managed to survive the ordeal or who lost their lives simply because they were unlucky. With journalistic rigor, Zuckoff acknowledges what he doesn’t know, for example how exactly each group of hijackers seized control of its plane. His language is largely unadorned; then again, embellishment is neither needed nor wanted.

Many details are hard to take: the melted flesh, the pulverized bodies, the scorched lungs and, for sure, the revived memory of scores of desperate victims leaping from on high to escape the World Trade Center inferno. But there are also inspiring moments, like the grit shown by those aboard United Airlines Flight 93. It was the plane that never reached its target, crashing in Shanksville after passengers revolted against the hijackers. Phone messages that they left “formed a spoken tapestry of grace, warning, bravery, resolve and love.”

Heroes abound, though not in the way that word is routinely used and abused. Heroism, as we see here, is often a product of necessity.

Some may ask if this book, covering territory already well traveled, needed to be written. For those who lived through the horror, perhaps not. But a full generation has come of age with no memory of that day. It needs to hear anew what happened, and maybe learn that time, in fact, does not heal all wounds.

Clyde Haberman, the former NYC columnist for The Times, is a contributing writer for the newspaper.

FALL AND RISE
The Story of 9/11
By Mitchell Zuckoff
589 pp. Harper/HarperCollins Publishers. $29.99.

Voir également:

 

When the first of the World Trade Center towers collapsed on September 11 2001, paramedic Moussa Diaz was among thousands of people engulfed in the cloud of smoke and debris that surged from the wreckage.

Asphyxiating in the toxic swirl around him, he fought the urge to give up, staggering on until he saw a spotlight wielded by a man with a white beard and long hair.

“Are you Jesus Christ?” Diaz asked, convinced he must already be dead. “No,” came the reply. “I’m a cameraman.”

Those who have been close to death often talk of how the experience played tricks on their mind, including the fleeting belief that they could not possibly have survived and must already be in the afterlife.

Yet as Mitchell Zuckoff notes in his new book about 9/11, little of the extraordinary individual testimony from that awful day has worked its way into the public memory.

The average person may recall what they were doing on 9/11, and perhaps the names of hijackers such as Mohamed Atta, but would likely struggle to name a single one of the 2,977 people who died.

“Of the nearly three thousand men, women, and children killed on 9/11, arguably none can be considered a household name,” Zuckoff writes. “The best ‘known’ victim might be the so-called Falling Man, photographed plummeting from the North Tower.”

This is not because the world sought to forget: merely that in the avalanche of events triggered by the atrocity – Afghanistan was invaded less than a month later – the voices of the day itself got buried in the sheer weight of news coverage.

With that in mind, Zuckoff, who covered the attacks for the Boston Globe, has produced this doorstopper of a reconstruction, aimed partly at younger generations who feel no “personal connection” to what happened. He notes that for some of his students at Boston University, where he now teaches journalism, it seems “as distant as World War I”.

Rather like the investigators who searched the mountains of rubble for victims’ personal effects, it is a mammoth undertaking. As well as interviews with Diaz and others, Zuckoff sifts through official archives, trials of terror suspects, and countless news reports. The stories of rescuers and survivors are interwoven with the poignant last words of victims, many of whom left only desperate voice messages as their planes hit the towers.

This, however, is not a print version of United 93, the Hollywood take on the “Let’s roll” passenger rebellion, which brought down one hijacked plane before it could hit the White House. Reluctant to use journalistic licence for a topic of such gravitas, Zuckoff sticks strictly to the known facts.

As a result, his account of the “Let’s roll” incident favours accuracy over drama, relying partly on the more fragmentary version of events preserved by the cockpit voice recorder. The sounds of a struggle, followed by the hijacker-turned-pilot screaming “Hey, hey, give it to me!” suggests passengers may have got as far as wrestling the joystick from his control. But Zuckoff leaves us to fill in many of the gaps for ourselves.

Far more vivid are the scenes inside the burning towers, where witnesses are still alive to recreate what they saw. A dead lobby guard sits melted to his desk by the fireball from the planes’ fuel. Women have hair clips melted into their skulls by the heat. One paramedic, reminded of his own daughter by the sight of a girl’s severed foot inside a pink trainer, looks skywards to clear his mind, only to see people jumping from the towers.

In all, about 200 people ended their lives that way, one killing a firefighter as they landed. Ernest Armstead, a fire department medic, recalls a harrowing conversation with one female jumper who was somehow still alive, despite being little more than a head on a crumpled torso. When she saw him place a black triage tag around her neck, indicating she was beyond help, she shouted: “I am not dead!”

For many rescuers, it was clear early on that the entire crash scene was beyond help. As they contemplate the 1,000ft climb to the blazing North Tower impact zone – the lifts are out of action – firefighter-farmer Gerry Nevins speaks for all his colleagues when he says: “We may not live through today.” They shake hands, then start climbing nonetheless. Father-of-two Nevins was among the 420 emergency workers to perish.

For all the heroism, it was also a day of failures, not least in imagining that terrorists might use planes as bombs in the first place. Air safety chiefs considered hijackings a thing of the past, leading to lax security procedures that allowed the hijackers to carry knives on board.

A plan to stage an exercise where terrorists flew a cargo plane into the UN’s New York HQ had been ruled out as too fanciful. Boasts that the Twin Towers could withstand airline crashes failed to consider the thousands of gallons of burning jet fuel, which weakened their steel cores and caused them to collapse.

This book is not an easy read: heartwarming in parts, horrific in others and studiously cautious in those areas where only the dead really know what happened.

But as a definitive “lest we forget” account, it will take some beating. For those too young to remember where they were on 9/11, and for all future generations too, it should be required reading.

Voir encore:

Mitchell Zuckoff on Writing His 9/11 Magnum Opus

Adam Vitcavage
The Millions
July 10, 2019

The seniors graduating from high school this year know what 9/11 is. They know four planes, two towers, 3,000-plus victims, 19 terrorists, Osama bin Laden. They know all of that because they were taught it in history classes. Because, to them, that’s all it is: history.

With each passing year, the terrorist attacks that happened on the bright blue morning of September 11, 2001 become more of a history lesson than a lived experience. This year, most high school seniors were born in 2001. Eighteen years later, they have the facts memorized, but often fail to understand the emotional and lived experience of that day.

Fall and Rise: The Story of 9/11, a new book by former Boston Globe reporter and current Boston University professor Mitchell Zuckoff, aims to fix that. Fall and Rise reports the facts, but Zuckoff also weaves the lives of people affected by 9/11 to create a narrative not frequently seen on cable news channels or in documentaries.

Fall and Rise shares stories about pilots, passengers, and aviation professionals linked to American Airlines Flights 11 and 77, and United Airlines Flights 93 and 175. He reveals stories about Mohammed Atta and other terrorists. Zuckoff also dives into the stories of New Yorkers and other Americans who experienced that day in different ways. The result is a woven story that puts the humanity back into a day the history books won’t forget.

I spoke with Zuckoff about what he was doing the day of the attacks, what followed, and how a Boston Globe feature published five days after the attacks turned into an essential book more than 6,000 days later.

The Millions: What was the day of September 11, 2001 like for you?

Mitchell Zuckoff: I was on book leave from the Boston Globe trying to write my first book. When the first plane went in, I didn’t think much of it. It could have been an accident. When the second plane went in, I ran to the phone and it was ringing as I got there. Globe editor Mark Morrow was on the other line and said my book leave was over.

He told me to come to the paper and it became apparent that I was going to be in what we call the control chair to write the lead story for that day. It became a matter of trying to figure out what was going on by taking feeds from several of my colleagues, working closely with the aviation reporter, Matthew Brelis, who took the byline with me. It was an intense and confusing day.

This was personal, on top of everything, because two of the planes took off about a mile from the Globe office at Logan International Airport.

TM: You mention the confusion. When did it become clear to you that it was a coordinated terrorist attack?

MZ: I think when the second plane went in. I was still home. When the first plane went in, we didn’t know what size it was. There was speculation that it was some sightseeing plane that got confused. Then there was no way, 17 minutes apart, that two planes were going to hit two towers accidentally. When I got in my car, we didn’t know about the flight heading to the Pentagon or United 93.

TM: What exactly were you looking for in real time during an event like this?

MZ: Really, what we do on any story. We were trying to answer the who, what, when, where, why, and how of it in as much detail as possible. I was just trying to process it all. My desk is an explosion of papers and printers and notes from reporters. We want it to come out so our readers can digest it in a meaningful way.

TM: I was in seventh grade and in Arizona at the time, so I had no clue what was going on. I was hours back—

MZ: That’s significant. Really significant. Folks on the West Coast, by the time they woke up, it was essentially over. People on the East Coast were watching the Today Show or running to CNN to watch it unfold. It’s a different experience.

TM: I remember it as my mother waking me up for school. She said something, and to this day I remember it as being “They’re attacking us.” I always second-guessed myself, but as you said it was something being reported.

MZ: That would have been a good thing to say.

TM: As the day continued to unfold, how much of a rush was it to finish the initial report out there?

MZ: The adrenaline is flying. We had a rolling deadline because we knew we had as many editions as we needed. The first probably left my hands at 6:00 p.m. I continued to write through the story as it continued to unfold. There were little details—little edits like finding better verbs—that continued to be changed until about 1:00 a.m. or 2:00 a.m.

You can’t unwind after that. You walk around the newsroom waiting until it comes off the presses. I needed to let the adrenaline leave because I knew I wouldn’t be able to sleep.

TM: Then that first week, and this may be a dumb question, but how much did the events consume your writing life?

MZ: Completely. I wrote the lead story again the next day. I came back in and it was understood I would do it again. The next day, on Thursday the 13th, I approached the editors with the idea that I could keep doing the leads, but I had an idea for a narrative I could have done for Sunday’s paper. I needed to dispatch some reporters to help me, but I pitched them to weave a narrative. I wanted to weave together six lives: three people on the first plane and three people from New York: one who got out, one who we didn’t know, and a first responder.

That consumed me all day Thursday and Friday reporting it with those reporters. Then writing it Friday into Saturday for the lead feature in the Sunday paper.

TM: That’s what became the backbone of Fall and Rise. But, at the time, you were already reporting the facts. What was it like going into the humanity of those affected less than a week after the attacks?

MZ: Satisfying in a really deep way. I felt, as much as I valued writing the news, I felt we could do something distinctive and lasting with this narrative. I think all of us—not just reporting the news, but consuming the news—all of us were so inundated with information.

I felt we needed to reflect on the emotion of the moment. By talking about the pilot John Oganowsky and the other folks I focused in on, I felt it could be a bit cathartic. We were all numb and in shock. But this could help.

TM: Did you talk to the people in the narrative or was it strictly the other reporters?

MZ: It was the reporters. I was focused on telling the story of Mohammad Atta. I gave myself that assignment. I was guiding my four teammates to some extent. If someone came up with an important detail or timestamp, I would ask the other reporters to follow up with questions about that particular moment to build around it. I didn’t talk to the families until much later.

TM: When was the first time you talked to survivors or the families of victims?

MZ: I talked to some back then. I was teamed up two weeks after the attacks with Michael Rezendes, who was on the Spotlight team, to write about the terrorists. So, at that point, I wasn’t talking a lot with the families—I did some in 2001 and 2002—but really my deep dive into the families didn’t start until five years ago when I really began working on this book.

TM: What did focusing on the terrorists do to you mentally and emotionally?

MZ: It took a lot out of me. We were really trying to instill the journalistic impartiality to it. But you can’t be objective about this sort of thing. We could be impartial. We couldn’t be exactly sure of who these guys were. We had their identities, but we were aware people use false identities or other’s identities. We had to enforce this impartiality to it. We had to be detached in our work even as we were grieving in our hearts.

TM: With the toll it takes, why continue to write about 9/11 after all these years?

MZ: Exactly that reason: because it does take a toll. The way I process things is to write about them. I didn’t really have a let down for months. I was focused on the work before letting the emotion in. It never really left me. I was still talking about this story to my students. I was still talking about this to my family. There are certain stories that will never leave, but I have to instill something of value into it. I wanted to write something that outlasts me.

TM: You’ve had books come out over the years that weren’t related to 9/11—most notably 13 Hours: The Inside Account of What Really Happened in Benghazi. This comes out nearly 18 years later. What was the process like throughout all these years?

MZ: I was not writing directly on Fall and Rise during those years. I was working on those other books and projects. It was on a back processor in my mind. The lede story from 9/11 hangs in my office at Boston University. It’s in the corner of my eye. I think it was always playing in the back of my mind.

Once I dove into it in 2014, it was all consuming. It was the deepest dive I have ever taken on a story. As much as I care about all of the work I’ve done, I kind of knew I would never tell a more important story than this. I had to respect the stories of the people telling me about the worst day of their lives. That responsibility was with me day and night for these past five years.

TM: What were the families’ responses to a reporter coming to ask about the worst day of their lives after all this time?

MZ: It amazed me because overwhelmingly people said yes. There were some who understood what I was doing, but told me they couldn’t go there again. They couldn’t revisit that day. The ones who said yes were amazing. I know I was tearing open a wound. A lot of the interviews go for hours and hours. There were moments of weeping and I have no problem acknowledging I did so along with them.

TM: These stories aren’t necessarily widely known and now they’re preserved in this book. It’s so important because now 9/11 may just seem like an event students study in textbooks. Eighteen years…your college freshmen were born the year it happened or the year after, I suppose. How does this generation react to it?

MZ: I teach really engaged journalism students. I’m not sure how the generation as a whole reacts to it. My students approach it with curiosity and a little bit of uncertainty because they didn’t experience it. They are well-read and aware of things, but for them it is a little like Pearl Harbor. They know who was involved and can cite numbers. They can say 3,000 dead, 9/11, four hijacked planes, 19 hijackers. They got the test questions down very well. They don’t have the human connection or that feeling for it that I wish they did. I hope that’s what my book can do.

Voir enfin:

Tweets racistes de Trump : qu’a vraiment dit Ilhan Omar sur Al-Qaeda et le 11 Septembre ?

Pauline Moullot
Libération
17 juillet 2019

Le président américain a accusé une élue démocrate d’origine somalienne de «bomber le torse» en pensant à l’organisation terroriste.

Question posée par Annie le 16/07/2019

Bonjour,

Nous avons reformulé votre question, qui était : «Quels ont été les propos d’Ilhan Omar sur Al-Qaeda et sur le 11 Septembre, que Trump a cités par sous-entendu dans sa conférence de presse ?»

Dans une nouvelle saillie raciste lundi 15 juillet, Donald Trump a accusé la députée démocrate Ilhan Omar, née en Somalie, d’encenser Al-Qaeda. Pour comprendre ce qu’il s’est passé, il faut rembobiner au dimanche 14 juillet. Ce jour-là, le président américain s’en prend, sans les nommer, à quatre élues démocrates, toutes issues de minorités, à la Chambre des représentants : Ilhan Omar, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Rashida Tlaib et Ayanna Pressley. Il les appelle notamment à «retourner dans leur pays». La première, réfugiée somalienne, est devenue avec Rashida Tlaib l’une des deux premières femmes musulmanes élues au Congrès en novembre. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez est la plus jeune représentante démocrate de l’histoire, et Ayanna Pressley, première élue afro-américaine au conseil municipal de Boston en 2009. Surnommées «The Squad» par la presse américaine, ces femmes non-blanches se sont démarquées par leur progressisme et leurs prises de position régulières contre la politique de Donald Trump sur l’immigration.

Le lendemain, le Président réitère ses injures racistes en conférence de presse, les appelant de nouveau à quitter les Etats-Unis. A ce moment-là, il assure qu’Ilhan Omar aurait défendu Al-Qaeda et les attentats du 11 Septembre.

A la question «que répondez-vous à ceux qui disent que vos tweets sont racistes ?», Trump rétorque ainsi : «Et bien, elles sont très malheureuses. Elles ne font que se plaindre à longueur de temps. Tout ce que je dis, c’est que si elles veulent partir, qu’elles partent. Elles peuvent partir. Je veux dire, je pense à Omar. Je ne sais pas, je ne l’ai jamais rencontrée. Je l’écoute parler d’Al-Qaeda. Al-Qaeda a tué beaucoup d’Américains. Et elle dit : « Vous pouvez bomber le torse, quand je pense à Al-Qaeda, je peux bomber le torse. » Quand elle parle des attentats du World Trade Center, elle dit « des gens ». Vous vous souvenez de ce fameux « des gens ». Ces personnes, à mon avis, détestent l’Amérique. Donc quand je les entends dire à quel point Al-Qaeda est merveilleux, quand je les entends parler de « ces gens » à propos du World Trade Center…»

Ses propos sur Al-Qaeda

Vous nous demandez ce qu’a vraiment dit Ilhan Omar à propos d’Al-Qaeda et du 11 septembre. L’équipe de Trump a indiqué à nos confrères américains de Politifact que le président faisait référence à deux déclarations d’Omar, largement reprises par les pro-Trump pour la décrédibiliser ces derniers mois.

La première remonte à 2013. Invitée sur une chaîne locale de Minneapolis, TwinCities PBS, Ilhan Omar commente les répercussions sur la communauté somalienne d’un attentat commis par les shebab somaliens au Kenya, affiliés à Al-Qaeda. Plusieurs extraits de cette interview de vingt-huit minutes ont été repris par ses opposants ces derniers mois. Elle ne parle pourtant pas une seule fois de bomber le torse en pensant à Al-Qaeda. Elle discute avec le présentateur du fait que l’on demande à la communauté somalienne aux Etats-Unis de condamner ces actes, et plus largement aux musulmans de condamner tous les actes terroristes. Elle parle alors de «cette supposition qui fait croire que nous sommes tous connectés à ces actes. […] La population générale doit comprendre qu’il y a une différence entre les personnes qui commettent ces actes diaboliques, car c’est un acte diabolique, et nous avons des gens diaboliques dans le monde. Et des gens normaux qui essaient de continuer à mener leur vie.» Elle parle ensuite du fait que les Somaliens sont les premières victimes des shebab et insiste : «Ces personnes exercent la terreur. Et toute leur idéologie est basée sur le fait de terroriser les communautés.»

La partie la plus détournée de l’interview intervient quand le présentateur l’interroge ensuite sur le fait que l’on conserve les noms arabes, sans les traduire, pour désigner les groupes terroristes. Ces noms, qui ont pourtant d’autres significations en arabe, «polluent notre langage quotidien», ajoute le présentateur. Là, Ilhan Omar acquiesce et répond : «Je pense que c’est un produit des médias sensationnalistes. Vous avez ces extraits sonores, et ces mots, et tout le monde les prononce avec une telle intensité, car ça doit avoir une signification plus grande. Je me souviens quand j’étais à la fac, j’ai suivi un cours sur l’idéologie du terrorisme. A chaque fois que le professeur disait « Al-Qaeda », ses épaules se soulevaient.» Ilhan Omar parle donc de la façon dont les médias évoquent les groupes terroristes, et explique comment cela se voit dans le langage corporel. Mais ne parle pas du tout de bomber le torse.

Ses propos sur le 11 Septembre

Enfin, les propos de Trump sur de supposées déclarations d’Ilhan Omar sur l’attentat du World Trade Center visent un discours prononcé par l’élue au Conseil des relations américano-islamiques (Cair) de Los Angeles, en mars. Le président américain avait alors publié sur Twitter une vidéo montrant les tours jumelles s’effondrer, avec une citation d’Ilhan Omar en arrière-plan. Que disait-elle exactement ? Expliquant que les musulmans étaient fatigués d’être considérés comme «des citoyens de seconde zone», elle ajoute : «Le Cair a été fondé après le 11 Septembre parce qu’ils ont pris acte du fait que des gens avaient fait quelque chose et que nous tous allions commencer à perdre accès à nos libertés civiles.» C’est ce terme «gens» qui lui a été reproché. Mais à aucun moment elle ne loue l’organisation terroriste.

Le Washington Post et Ilhan Omar ont fait remarquer que George W. Bush avait utilisé la même expression après les attentats de 2001. «Je vous entends, je vous entends. Et le reste du monde vous entend. Et les gens, ces gens qui ont fait tomber les tours, vont nous entendre bientôt».

Selon le New York Times, Ilhan Omar a qualifié les accusations de Trump de «ridicules». Toutes les élues démocrates ont répliqué lundi 15 juillet, en organisant une conférence de presse commune pour dénoncer le racisme du président américain. Mercredi, celui-ci s’est de nouveau emparé de son clavier pour assurer qu’il n’était pas raciste, en leur demandant de nouveau de quitter le pays.


Bouddhisme: Attention, une religion de paix peut en cacher une autre ! (After Islam’s jihadists, Burma’s ultra-nationalist monks are a tragic reminder that in times of crisis even the most peaceful of religious doctrines can turn homicidal)

8 juillet, 2019

Image result for swastika Buddhist Nazi

Je vous laisse la paix, je vous donne ma paix. Je ne vous donne pas comme le monde donne. Jésus (Jean 14: 27)
Ne croyez pas que je sois venu apporter la paix sur la terre; je ne suis pas venu apporter la paix, mais l’épée. Car je suis venu mettre la division entre l’homme et son père, entre la fille et sa mère, entre la belle-fille et sa belle-mère; et l’homme aura pour ennemis les gens de sa maison. Jésus (Matthieu 10 : 34-36)
Une nation s’élèvera contre une nation, et un royaume contre un royaume; il y aura de grands tremblements de terre, et, en divers lieux, des pestes et des famines; il y aura des phénomènes terribles, et de grands signes dans le ciel.(…) Il y aura des signes dans le soleil, dans la lune et dans les étoiles. Et sur la terre, il y aura de l’angoisse chez les nations qui ne sauront que faire, au bruit de la mer et des flots. Jésus (Luc 21: 10-25)
Ne prenez pas le mal à la légère en disant ‘il ne m’atteindra pas’. Même un pot d’eau finit par se remplir de gouttes de pluie. De même, l’innocent absorbant goutte par goutte finit par se remplir de mal. Gautama Bouddha
Comme une mère protègerait son unique enfant au risque de sa propre vie, cultivons un amour sans limite envers tous les êtres.  Que ces pensées d’amour infini imprègnent le monde tout entier, dessus, dessous, de toutes parts, sans obstacle, sans haine ni inimitié. Metta sutta (hymne de l’amour universel)
Le Bouddha se situe souvent au-delà du Bien et du Mal. Ses paroles devraient nous permettre de limiter les mécaniques du Mal. Texte lu par Bulle Ogier (Le Vénérable W)
Une croyance populaire dit que si on peut tuer un animal, on peut aussi tuer un homme. Nous, les bouddhistes, nous nous opposons au sacrifice des animaux. Texte par Bulle Ogier (Le Vénérable W)
Les événements qui se déroulent sous nos yeux sont à la fois naturels et culturels, c’est-à-dire qu’ils sont apocalyptiques. Jusqu’à présent, les textes de l’Apocalypse faisaient rire. Tout l’effort de la pensée moderne a été de séparer le culturel du naturel. La science consiste à montrer que les phénomènes culturels ne sont pas naturels et qu’on se trompe forcément si on mélange les tremblements de terre et les rumeurs de guerre, comme le fait le texte de l’Apocalypse. Mais, tout à coup, la science prend conscience que les activités de l’homme sont en train de détruire la nature. C’est la science qui revient à l’Apocalypse. René Girard
On a commencé avec la déconstruction du langage et on finit avec la déconstruction de l’être humain dans le laboratoire. (…) Elle est proposée par les mêmes qui d’un côté veulent prolonger la vie indéfiniment et nous disent de l’autre que le monde est surpeuplé. René Girard
Le christianisme (…) nous a fait passer de l’archaïsme à la modernité, en nous aidant à canaliser la violence autrement que par la mort.(…) En faisant d’un supplicié son Dieu, le christianisme va dénoncer le caractère inacceptable du sacrifice. Le Christ, fils de Dieu, innocent par essence, n’a-t-il pas dit – avec les prophètes juifs : « Je veux la miséricorde et non le sacrifice » ? En échange, il a promis le royaume de Dieu qui doit inaugurer l’ère de la réconciliation et la fin de la violence. La Passion inaugure ainsi un ordre inédit qui fonde les droits de l’homme, absolument inaliénables. (…) l’islam (…) ne supporte pas l’idée d’un Dieu crucifié, et donc le sacrifice ultime. Il prône la violence au nom de la guerre sainte et certains de ses fidèles recherchent le martyre en son nom. Archaïque ? Peut-être, mais l’est-il plus que notre société moderne hostile aux rites et de plus en plus soumise à la violence ? Jésus a-t-il échoué ? L’humanité a conservé de nombreux mécanismes sacrificiels. Il lui faut toujours tuer pour fonder, détruire pour créer, ce qui explique pour une part les génocides, les goulags et les holocaustes, le recours à l’arme nucléaire, et aujourd’hui le terrorisme. René Girard
L’éthique de la victime innocente remporte un succès si triomphal aujourd’hui dans les cultures qui sont tombées sous l’influence chrétienne que les actes de persécution ne peuvent être justifiés que par cette éthique, et même les chasseurs de sorcières indonésiens y ont aujourd’hui recours. La même force culturelle et spirituelle qui a joué un rôle si décisif dans la disparition du sacrifice humain est aujourd’hui en train de provoquer la disparition des rituels de sacrifice humain qui l’ont jadis remplacé. Tout cela semble être une bonne nouvelle, mais à condition que ceux qui comptaient sur ces ressources rituelles soient en mesure de les remplacer par des ressources religieuses durables d’un autre genre. Priver une société des ressources sacrificielles rudimentaires dont elle dépend sans lui proposer d’alternatives, c’est la plonger dans une crise qui la conduira presque certainement à la violence. Gil Bailie
L’avenir apocalyptique n’est pas quelque chose d’historique. C’est quelque chose de religieux sans lequel on ne peut pas vivre. C’est ce que les chrétiens actuels ne comprennent pas. Parce que, dans l’avenir apocalyptique, le bien et le mal sont mélangés de telle manière que d’un point de vue chrétien, on ne peut pas parler de pessimisme. Cela est tout simplement contenu dans le christianisme. Pour le comprendre, lisons la Première Lettre aux Corinthiens : si les puissants, c’est-à-dire les puissants de ce monde, avaient su ce qui arriverait, ils n’auraient jamais crucifié le Seigneur de la Gloire – car cela aurait signifié leur destruction (cf. 1 Co 2, 8). Car lorsque l’on crucifie le Seigneur de la Gloire, la magie des pouvoirs, qui est le mécanisme du bouc émissaire, est révélée. Montrer la crucifixion comme l’assassinat d’une victime innocente, c’est montrer le meurtre collectif et révéler ce phénomène mimétique. C’est finalement cette vérité qui entraîne les puissants à leur perte. Et toute l’histoire est simplement la réalisation de cette prophétie. Ceux qui prétendent que le christianisme est anarchiste ont un peu raison. Les chrétiens détruisent les pouvoirs de ce monde, car ils détruisent la légitimité de toute violence. Pour l’État, le christianisme est une force anarchique, surtout lorsqu’il retrouve sa puissance spirituelle d’autrefois. Ainsi, le conflit avec les musulmans est bien plus considérable que ce que croient les fondamentalistes. Les fondamentalistes pensent que l’apocalypse est la violence de Dieu. Alors qu’en lisant les chapitres apocalyptiques, on voit que l’apocalypse est la violence de l’homme déchaînée par la destruction des puissants, c’est-à-dire des États, comme nous le voyons en ce moment. Lorsque les puissances seront vaincues, la violence deviendra telle que la fin arrivera. Si l’on suit les chapitres apocalyptiques, c’est bien cela qu’ils annoncent. Il y aura des révolutions et des guerres. Les États s’élèveront contre les États, les nations contre les nations. Cela reflète la violence. Voilà le pouvoir anarchique que nous avons maintenant, avec des forces capables de détruire le monde entier. On peut donc voir l’apparition de l’apocalypse d’une manière qui n’était pas possible auparavant. Au début du christianisme, l’apocalypse semblait magique : le monde va finir ; nous irons tous au paradis, et tout sera sauvé ! L’erreur des premiers chrétiens était de croire que l’apocalypse était toute proche. Les premiers textes chronologiques chrétiens sont les Lettres aux Thessaloniciens qui répondent à la question : pourquoi le monde continue-t-il alors qu’on en a annoncé la fin ? Paul dit qu’il y a quelque chose qui retient les pouvoirs, le katochos (quelque chose qui retient). L’interprétation la plus commune est qu’il s’agit de l’Empire romain. La crucifixion n’a pas encore dissout tout l’ordre. Si l’on consulte les chapitres du christianisme, ils décrivent quelque chose comme le chaos actuel, qui n’était pas présent au début de l’Empire romain. (..) le monde actuel (…) confirme vraiment toutes les prédictions. On voit l’apocalypse s’étendre tous les jours : le pouvoir de détruire le monde, les armes de plus en plus fatales, et autres menaces qui se multiplient sous nos yeux. Nous croyons toujours que tous ces problèmes sont gérables par l’homme mais, dans une vision d’ensemble, c’est impossible. Ils ont une valeur quasi surnaturelle. Comme les fondamentalistes, beaucoup de lecteurs de l’Évangile reconnaissent la situation mondiale dans ces chapitres apocalyptiques. Mais les fondamentalistes croient que la violence ultime vient de Dieu, alors ils ne voient pas vraiment le rapport avec la situation actuelle – le rapport religieux. Cela montre combien ils sont peu chrétiens. La violence humaine, qui menace aujourd’hui le monde, est plus conforme au thème apocalyptique de l’Évangile qu’ils ne le pensent. René Girard
Les pays européens devraient accueillir ces réfugiés et leur fournir de l’éducation et des formations, l’objectif étant qu’ils rentrent chez eux avec des compétences particulières. Ils seront eux-mêmes mieux, je pense, dans leur propre pays. Mieux vaut garder l’Europe pour les Européens. Tenzyn Gyatso (Dalai Lama)
Les mosquées sont nos casernes, les coupoles nos casques, les minarets nos baïonnettes et les croyants nos soldats. Erdogan (1998)
En réalité, leurs mosquées ne sont pas des lieux de culte comme nos monastères. Ce sont des bases de guerre pour planifier des attaques contre les non-musulmans. J’ai deviné l’intention des musulmans qui est de convertir le monde entier à l’islam. D’ailleurs, on peut voir sur Youtube, quand les membres de l’EI décapitent un chrétien, ils montrent un doigt, c’est-à-dire qu’il doit y avoir un seul Dieu dans le monde. Du fait que les musulmans ls entrent et s’installent dans les pays d’Europe, ils envahissent le monde. Et les dirigeants comme Merkel et compagnie les acceptent sans tenir compte de l’avis du peuple. Aux USA, si le peuple veut rester en paix et en sécurité, il doit choisir Donald Trump. Ashin Wirathu
L’Hitler de Birmanie est bouddhiste et ses juifs sont les musulmans rohingyas. David Aaronovitch
Les caractéristiques des poissons-chats d’Afrique sont : ils grandissent très vite. Ils se reproduisent très vite aussi. Et puis ils sont violents. Ils mangent les membres de leur propre espèce et détruisent les ressources naturelles de leur environnement. Les musulmans sont exactement comme ces poissons. Ashin Wirathu
Si on peut tuer un animal, on peut tuer un homme. Ashin Wirathu
Une foule excitée peut devenir incontrôlable. Cela peut exploser. Ma Ba Tha intervient quand les « kalars » embêtent les bouddhistes. Une fois le problème réglé et les « kalars » sanctionnés, la foule se calme. Voilà le rôle de Ma BA TA. Ashin Wirathu
Nous ne ciblons pas délibérément les entreprises [musulmanes]. Ils tuent des animaux car ils pensent que cela les rend méritants. C’est la principale différence entre eux et nous. Kyaw Sein Win (Ma Ba Tha)
Les musulmans sont des fauteurs de troubles. Ils prétendent garder des couteaux dans leurs mosquées pour les sacrifices d’animaux, mais nous, nous savons qu’ils peuvent s’en servir à tout moment contre nous. Ti Ti Win (professeure de mathématiques, 55 ans)
Notre région est confrontée au risque de perdre son bétail. Les kalars ont déjà tué des milliers de vaches. Vous savez pourquoi ? Ils s’entraînent pour nous égorger ensuite. Pyinyeinda (moine d’Athoke)
En tant que bouddhiste, je m’oppose au massacre de bétail. Par conséquent, j’ai accepté les demandes des moines qui mènent cette campagne. Je les ai aidés à obtenir les licences des abattoirs. Thein Aung (chef du gouvernement de la région d’Ayeyarwady)
Lors de nos deux premières descentes, nous avons découvert que plus de vaches étaient tuées que ne l’autorise la loi. Nous avons donc fait pression sur les autorités municipales pour qu’elles mettent sur liste noire le propriétaire musulman. Elles ont fini par le faire et il a dû fermer son abattoir. Win Shwe
On ne peut plus acheter de bœuf dans toute la région d’Ayeyarwady. Si on veut du bœuf halal, il faut que quelqu’un le fasse venir de Rangoon. Restaurateur musulman de la ville de Kyaungon. David Aaronovitch
Il faut resituer ces discours dans le contexte planétaire, de la progression de l’islamophobie. Une idée s’est installée en Birmanie, selon laquelle le bouddhisme des origines s’inscrivait dans une aire géographique comprenant une large partie de l’Asie, de l’Afghanistan à la Malaisie, englobant l’Inde, et qu’il ne concerne plus aujourd’hui que l’Asie du Sud-Est et le Sri Lanka pour la branche du Theravada, du fait de la pression de l’Islam. Bénédicte Brac de la Perrière
Le groupe « 969 » fait partie de mouvements réactionnels liés à des problèmes identitaires. On a le sentiment d’être agressé par des marges, on réagit en se protégeant. C’est une manière de se définir contre l’autre. Le bouddhisme est dans ce cas une arme symbolique. Raphaël Logier (IEP d’Aix-en-Provence)
Face à la progression de l’islamophobie en Europe, aux États-Unis et ailleurs, le film rappelle que même la doctrine religieuse la plus pacifique risque, si elle est mal interprétée, d’être exploitée à des fins destructrices. The Hollywood reporter
Dès son origine, le bouddhisme insiste sur la compassion envers autrui : le premier bouddhisme, dit Theravâda, toujours présent en Asie du Sud-Est et au Sri Lanka, met l’accent sur une introspection personnelle qui doit permettre de comprendre la nature de nos rapports avec l’autre. Il n’y a pas de dogme fondamental, en dehors de quelques notions issues de l’hindouisme. Il n’existe pas non plus d’autorité ecclésiastique ultime. Ces deux traits font qu’il est de prime abord difficile de parler d’orthodoxie, et à plus forte raison de fondamentalisme bouddhique. Les bouddhismes, par nature pluriels, ont su accueillir en leur sein les doctrines les plus diverses. Plus tard, le bouddhisme Mahâyâna (« grand véhicule »), aujourd’hui répandu en Chine, en Corée, au Japon et au Viêtnam, prône la compassion pour tous les êtres, même les pires. Ce sentiment de communion est fondé sur la croyance en la transmigration des âmes, laquelle conduit les êtres à renaître en diverses destinées, humaines et non-humaines. Le Mahâyâna insiste sur la présence d’une nature de bouddha en tout être. Quant au bouddhisme Vajrayâna (ésotérique, tantrique), issu du Mahâyâna et aujourd’hui localisé au Tibet et en Mongolie, il offre une vision grandiose de l’univers tout entier, qui n’est autre que le corps du Bouddha cosmique. A l’époque contemporaine, compassion et tolérance sont devenues, en partie par la personne médiatique du dalaï-lama actuel, icône moderne du bouddhisme tibétain, l’image de marque même du bouddhisme dans son ensemble. Les penseurs bouddhistes ont rapidement élaboré des concepts propres à expliquer divers degrés de vérité. Le Bouddha lui-même, selon un enseignement ultérieurement synthétisé, notamment par le Mahâyâna, prêchait ainsi une vérité conventionnelle (accessible à tous), adaptée aux facultés limitées de ses auditeurs, réservant la vérité ultime à une élite spirituelle. Ce recours constant à des expédients salvifiques (upâya), balisant des voies différentes et plus ou moins difficiles d’accès au salut, rend le dogmatisme difficile, car tout dogme relève du domaine de la parole, donc de la vérité conventionnelle. Ces théories vont faciliter diverses formes de syncrétisme ou de synthèse, comme celles de Zhiyi (539-597) et de Guifeng Zongmi (780-841) en Chine, de Kûkai (774-835) au Japon, et de Tsong-kha-pa (1357-1419) au Tibet. Il s’agit généralement d’une sorte de syncrétisme militant, par lequel les cultes rivaux (religion bön au Tibet, confucianisme et taoïsme en Chine, shinto au Japon…) sont intégrés à un rang subalterne dans un système dont le point culminant est la doctrine de l’auteur. Ces élaborations aboutissent rapidement à faire du bouddhisme un polythéisme, qui assimile et mêle dans ses panthéons les dieux des religions qui lui préexistaient (de l’hindouisme, du bön, du taoïsme…). Au demeurant, la pratique n’a pas toujours été aussi harmonieuse que la théorie. (…) Mais c’est surtout en raison de son évolution historique que le bouddhisme est conduit à faire des accrocs à ses grands principes. Le principal écueil réside dans les rapports de cette religion avec les cultures qu’elle rencontre au cours de son expansion. L’attitude des bouddhistes envers les religions locales est souvent décrite comme un exemple classique de tolérance. Il s’agit en réalité d’une tentative de mainmise : les dieux indigènes les plus importants sont convertis, les autres sont rejetés dans les ténèbres extérieures, ravalés au rang de démons et, le cas échéant, soumis ou détruits par des rites appropriés. Certes, le processus est souvent représenté dans les sources bouddhiques comme une conversion volontaire des divinités locales. Mais la réalité est fréquemment toute autre, comme en témoignent certains mythes, qui suggèrent que le bouddhisme a parfois cherché à éradiquer les cultes locaux qui lui faisaient obstacle. C’est ainsi que le Tibet est « pacifié » au viiie siècle par le maître indien Padmasambhava, lorsque celui-ci soumet tous les « démons » locaux (en réalité, les anciens dieux) grâce à ses formidables pouvoirs. Un siècle auparavant, le premier roi bouddhique Trisong Detsen a déjà soumis les forces telluriques (énergies terrestres de nature « magique » qui influencent individus et habitats), symbolisées par une démone, dont le corps recouvrait tout le territoire tibétain, en « clouant » celle-ci au sol par des stûpas (monuments commémoratifs et souvent centres de pèlerinage) fichés aux douze points de son corps. Le temple du Jokhang à Lhasa, lieu saint du bouddhisme tibétain, serait le « pieu » enfoncé en la partie centrale du corps de la démone, son sexe. Ce symbolisme, décrivant la « conquête » bouddhique comme une sorte de soumission sexuelle, se retrouve dans un des mythes fondateurs du bouddhisme tantrique, la soumission du dieu Maheshvara par Vajrapâni, émanation terrifiante du bouddha cosmique Vairocana. Maheshvara est l’un des noms de Shiva, l’un des grands dieux de la mythologie hindoue. Ce dernier, ravalé par le bouddhisme au rang de démon, n’a commis d’autre crime que de se croire le Créateur, et de refuser de se soumettre à Vajrapâni, en qui il ne voit qu’un démon. Son arrogance lui vaut d’être piétiné à mort ou, selon un pieux euphémisme, « libéré », malgré la molle intercession du bouddha Vairocana pour freiner la fureur destructrice de son avatar Vajrapâni. Pris de peur, les autres démons (dieux hindous) se soumettent sans résistance. Dans une version encore plus violente, le dieu Rudra (autre forme de Shiva) est empalé par son redoutable adversaire. Le mythe de la soumission de Maheshvara se retrouve au Japon, même si, dans ce dernier pays, les choses se passent dans l’ensemble de manière moins violente. Certes, on voit ici aussi de nombreux récits de conversions plus ou moins forcées des dieux autochtnones. Mais bientôt, une solution plus élégante est trouvée, avec la théorie dite « essence et traces » (honji suijaku). Selon cette théorie, les dieux japonais (kami) ne sont que des « traces », des manifestations locales dont l’« essence » (honji) réside en des bouddhas indiens. Plus besoin de conversion, donc, puisque les kamis sont déjà des reflets des bouddhas. Paradoxalement, la notion d’absolu dégagée par la spéculation bouddhique va permettre aux théoriciens d’une nouvelle religion, le soi-disant « ancien » shinto, de remettre en question la synthèse bouddhique au nom d’une réforme purificatrice et nationaliste. A terme, ce fondamentalisme shinto mènera à la « révolution culturelle » de Meiji (1868-1873), au cours de laquelle le bouddhisme, dénoncé comme religion étrangère, verra une bonne partie de ses temples détruits ou confisqués. Jusqu’à la Seconde Guerre mondiale, la religion officielle japonaise réinvestit les mythes shintos et s’organise autour du culte de l’Empereur divinisé, descendant du plus important kami national, la déesse du Soleil. Par contre-coup, le bouddhisme à son tour se réfugie dans un purisme teinté de modernisme, qui rejette comme autant de « superstitions » les croyances locales. (…) En théorie, le principe de non-dualité si cher au bouddhisme Mahâyâna semble pourtant impliquer une égalité entre hommes et femmes. Dans la réalité monastique, les nonnes restent inférieures aux moines, et sont souvent réduites à des conditions d’existence précaires. (…) Le bouddhisme a par ailleurs longtemps imposé aux femmes toutes sortes de tabous. La misogynie la plus crue s’exprime dans certains textes bouddhiques qui décrivent la femme comme un être pervers, quasi démoniaque. Perçues comme foncièrement impures, les femmes étaient exclues des lieux sacrés, et ne pouvaient par exemple faire de pèlerinages en montagne. Pire encore, du fait de la pollution menstruelle et du sang versé lors de l’accouchement, elles étaient condamnées à tomber dans un enfer spécial, celui de l’Etang de Sang. Le clergé bouddhique offrait bien sûr un remède, en l’occurrence les rites, exécutés, moyennant redevances, par des prêtres. Car le bouddhisme, dans sa grande tolérance, est censé sauver même les êtres les plus vils… (…) Il faut enfin mentionner les luttes intestines qui opposent, au sein de la secte Tendai (tendance majoritaire du bouddhisme japonais du viiie au xiiie siècle), les factions du mont Hiei et du Miidera. A diverses reprises, les monastères des deux protagonistes sont détruits par les « moines-guerriers » du rival. Les raids périodiques de ces armées monacales sur la capitale, Kyôto, défrayent les chroniques médiévales. C’est seulement vers la fin du xvie siècle qu’un guerrier à bout de patience, Oda Nobunaga (1534-1582), décide de raser ces temples et de passer par le fil du sabre les fauteurs de troubles. (…) Avec la montée des nationalismes au xixe siècle, le bouddhisme s’est trouvé confronté à une tendance fondamentaliste. Certes, la chose n’était pas tout à fait nouvelle. Dans le Japon du xiiie siècle, lors des invasions mongoles (elles-mêmes légitimées par les maîtres bouddhiques de la cour de Kûbilaï Khân), les bouddhistes japonais invoquèrent les « vents divins » (kamikaze) qui détruisirent l’armada ennemie. Ils mirent également en avant la notion du Japon « terre des dieux » (shinkoku), qui prendra une importance cruciale dans le Japon impérialiste du xxe siècle. Durant la Seconde Guerre mondiale, les bouddhistes japonais devaient soutenir l’effort de guerre, mettant leur rhétorique au service de la mystique impériale. Même Daisetz T. Suzuki, le principal propagateur du zen en Occident, se fera le porte-parole de cette idéologie belliciste. Plus récemment, c’est à Sri Lanka que cet aspect agonistique a pris le dessus, avec la revendication d’indépendance de la minorité tamoule, qui a conduit depuis 1983 à de sanglants affrontements entre les ethnies sinhala et tamoule. Le discours des Sinhalas constitue l’exemple le plus approchant d’une apologie bouddhique de la guerre sainte. Certes, il s’agit d’un fondamentalisme un peu particulier, puisqu’il repose sur un groupe ethnique plutôt que sur un texte sacré. Il existe bien une autorité scripturaire, le Mahâvamsa, chronique mytho-historique où sont décrits les voyages magiques du Bouddha à Sri Lanka, ainsi que la lutte victorieuse du roi Duttaghâmanî contre les Damilas (Tamouls) au service du bouddhisme. Le Mahâvamsa sert ainsi de caution à la croyance selon laquelle l’île et son gouvernement ont traditionnellement été sinhalas et bouddhistes. C’est notamment dans ses pages qu’apparaît le terme de Dharma-dîpa (île de la Loi bouddhique). Il ne restait qu’un pas, vite franchi, pour faire de Sri Lanka la terre sacrée du bouddhisme, qu’il faut à tout prix défendre contre les infidèles. Ce fondamentalisme est avant tout une idéologie politique. Mentionnons pour finir un cas significatif, puisqu’il met en cause la personne même du dalaï-lama, le personnage qui personnifie aux yeux de la plupart l’image même de la tolérance bouddhique. Il s’agit du culte d’une divinité tantrique du nom de Dorje Shugden, esprit d’un ancien lama, rival du cinquième dalaï-lama, et assassiné par les partisans de celui-ci, adeptes des Gelugpa, au xviie siècle. Par un étrange retour des choses, cette divinité était devenue le protecteur de la secte des Gelugpa, et plus précisément de l’actuel Dalaï-Lama, jusqu’à ce que ce dernier, sur la base d’oracles délivrés par une autre divinité plus puissante, Pehar, en vienne à interdire son culte à ses disciples. Cette décision a suscité une levée de boucliers parmi les fidèles de Shugden, qui ont reproché au dalaï-lama son intolérance. Inutile de dire que les Chinois ont su exploiter cette querelle à toutes fins utiles de propagande. L’histoire a été portée sur les devants de la scène après le meurtre d’un partisan du dalaï-lama par un de ses rivaux, il y a quelques années. Par-delà les questions de personne et les dissensions politiques, ce fait divers souligne les relations toujours tendues entre les diverses sectes du bouddhisme tibétain. Même s’il ne saurait être question de nier l’existence au coeur du bouddhisme d’un idéal de paix et de tolérance, fondé sur de nombreux passages scripturaux, ceux-ci sont contrebalancés par d’autres sources selon lesquelles la violence et la guerre sont permises lorsque le Dharma bouddhique est menacé par des infidèles. Dans le Kalacakra-tantra par exemple, texte auquel se réfère souvent le dalaï-lama, les infidèles en question sont des musulmans qui menacent l’existence du royaume mythique de Shambhala. A ceux qui rêvent d’une tradition bouddhique monologique et apaisée, il convient d’opposer, par souci de vérité, cette part d’ombre. Bernard Faure
En Birmanie, où la population est majoritairement bouddhiste, la minorité musulmane représente environ 5 % des habitants. Dans le delta de l’Irrawaddy, les musulmans vivent essentiellement des activités liées aux abattoirs et au commerce du bœuf. Actuellement, les entreprises musulmanes sont la cible de l’islamophobie que propagent les extrémistes bouddhistes, dont la voix a beaucoup gagné en puissance avec l’ouverture politique de la Birmanie. Depuis fin 2013, une campagne soutenue par Ma Ba Tha [association birmane “pour la protection de la race et de la religion”, créée en juin 2013] a forcé à fermer des dizaines d’abattoirs et d’usines de transformation de viande tenus par des musulmans dans la région d’Ayeyarwady [région du sud de la Birmanie]. Des milliers de vaches ont été enlevées de force à leurs propriétaires musulmans. Les commerces de certains musulmans ont vu leurs revenus s’effondrer. Des documents officiels que nous avons obtenus et des entretiens avec des représentants de l’Etat révèlent que les hauts fonctionnaires soutiennent cette croisade. (…) En 2014, en raison de la pénurie de bétail et du renforcement des restrictions gouvernementales, les populations musulmanes du delta de l’Irrawaddy n’ont pas pu fêter l’Aïd el-Kébir, lors duquel des vaches sont sacrifiées selon la tradition islamique. Kyaw Sein Win, un porte-parole de Ma Ba Tha au siège de Rangoon, affirme que sauver des vies est un aspect central de la philosophie bouddhiste. “Nous ne ciblons pas délibérément les entreprises [musulmanes]. Ils tuent des animaux car ils pensent que cela les rend méritants. C’est la principale différence entre eux et nous”, a-t-il déclaré à Myanmar Now. L’appel à un boycott des entreprises musulmanes a reçu peu d’écho dans les villes, mais la campagne contre les sacrifices, qui repose sur l’aversion traditionnelle des bouddhistes pour l’abattage des vaches, a porté auprès des fidèles du delta de l’Irrawaddy. Dans cette région, cœur de la riziculture birmane, des dizaines de milliers de musulmans, pour la plupart commerçants en ville, vivent aux côtés d’environ six millions de riziculteurs, bouddhistes en majorité. Traditionnellement, les agriculteurs birmans utilisent les vaches et les bœufs comme animaux de trait. Ils ne les vendent aux abattoirs que pour gagner rapidement une importante somme d’argent, en vue d’un mariage ou pour payer un traitement médical. Ma Ba Tha n’a pas demandé aux agriculteurs de ne plus vendre leur bétail. Sa stratégie consiste à s’emparer des licences des abattoirs. En 2014, les moines radicaux du delta de l’Irrawaddy ont créé l’organisation Jivitadana Thetkal (“Sauver des vies”), qui appelle les monastères de la région à collecter chacun environ 100 dollars dans leur congrégation afin de permettre le rachat des licences. (…) Les moines bouddhistes radicaux ont prononcé des sermons enflammés dans les villages du delta pour propager l’idée que l’abattage de vaches constitue un affront au bouddhisme et participe de l’objectif musulman d’exterminer le bétail. (…) En 2014, le groupe a collecté environ 25 000 dollars grâce à des dons publics pour racheter six licences d’abattoirs, mais la plus chère de la ville restait inabordable. Pour atteindre leur objectif, ils ont décidé de prouver que l’abattoir ne respectait pas les quotas de sa licence. (….) Win Shwe et ses compagnons revendiquent également la saisie de plus de 4 000 animaux vivants dans le delta depuis début 2014. Beaucoup de ces bêtes ont ensuite été données à des agriculteurs pauvres de la région pour devenir des animaux de trait, à condition qu’ils s’engagent à ne pas les tuer ou les vendre. Au milieu de l’année 2014, selon des documents obtenus par Myanmar Now, des militants ont toutefois reçu l’accord des autorités pour mettre en œuvre un nouveau plan visant à envoyer le bétail saisi à des populations bouddhistes de Maungdaw, dans l’Etat d’Arakan, à environ 500 km au nord-ouest du delta de l’Irrawaddy. Cette localité très pauvre, la plus à l’ouest du pays, est située sur la frontière avec le Bangladesh. Les musulmans y sont plus nombreux que les bouddhistes. La frontière, que Ma Ba Tha se plaît à appeler “la porte occidentale” du pays, est sous le strict contrôle du gouvernement. Selon la presse, des centaines d’Arakanais qui vivaient dans l’est du Bangladesh se sont réinstallés de l’autre côté de la frontière depuis 2012. Les autorités birmanes ont envoyé les membres de cette ethnie bouddhiste vivre dans des “villages modèles” à Maungdaw, dans ce qui ressemble à une tentative d’accroître la population bouddhiste dans la zone. (…) Cette mesure avait pour but de “protéger la porte occidentale contre l’afflux de musulmans”, selon Win Shwe. “Sans cette porte occidentale, le territoire sera inondé de Bengalis [musulmans du Bangladesh]”, déclare Sein Aung dans un bureau richement décoré d’emblèmes nationalistes, dont des drapeaux portant des swastikas bouddhistes. Sean Turnell, professeur d’économie à l’université Macquarie de Sydney, en Australie, explique que le boycott qui touche les entreprises musulmanes nuit à l’image de la Birmanie sur la scène internationale, notamment auprès des investisseurs potentiels qui s’inquiètent de l’instabilité politique. (…) Devant son restaurant, une immense affiche est placardée : une vache y est représentée, accompagnée d’un verset à la gloire du rôle mythique de l’animal en tant que “mère” de l’humanité. Une image probablement posée par des sympathisants de Ma Ba Tha. La plupart des musulmans qui vivent dans le delta de l’Irrawaddy n’osent pas dénoncer la campagne de peur de subir des représailles de Ma Ba Tha. Myanmar Now
Those who believe that all Buddhists respect their religion’s core principles of peace and tolerance should take a look at The Venerable W (Le Venerable W), director Barbet Schroeder’s eye-opening chronicle of one Burmese monk’s long campaign of racism and violence against his country’s minority Muslim population. The third part in a “trilogy of evil” that began in 1974 with General Idi Amin Dada and continued in 2007 with a look at the controversial French lawyer Jacques Verges in Terror’s Advocate, this scathing portrait gets up close and personal with Ashin Wirathu, the self-appointed spiritual leader of Myanmar’s anti-Muslim crusade. Speaking openly to the camera, Wirathu propagates xenophobia and bigotry against a group that represents only a fraction of the local population, yet have been subject to decades of persecution by both the monk’s followers and the military-controlled Burmese government. The result has been hundreds of deaths, thousands of homes burned to the ground and tens of thousands of Muslims displaced — all of it in the name of a religion that asks, according to one translation of the Metta Sutta, to “cultivate boundless love to all that live in the whole universe.” (…) At a time when Islamophobia is on the rise in Europe, the U.S. and elsewhere, his film is a reminder that even the most peaceful of religious doctrines can, if twisted in the wrong way, be used as a veritable source of evil. (…) Wirathu operates out of the city of Mandalay, a third of whose inhabitants consist of monks or monks-in-training. In the late 90s he formed the “969” movement and began delivering racist sermons to his disciples, referring to Muslims as “kalars” (the equivalent of the n-word) and claiming they are a subspecies who don’t deserve Myanmar citizenship, that their businesses should be boycotted and that they should be banned from intermarriage with Buddhists. Although prejudice against the Rohingya Muslim community, which is based in the western part of Myanmar bordering Bangladesh, dates back to before Wirathu’s time, he has helped accelerate a campaign resulting in many, many deaths and the mass destruction of property. In order to fuel the fire, he often highlights incidents where Muslims have attacked Buddhists (in one case, the rape and murder of a woman), distributing propaganda videos on DVD and backing riots where Rohingyas are driven from their homes while the armed forces stand idly by. What’s especially disturbing about Schroeder’s inquiry is how, on one hand, Wirathu can be seen expounding the peaceful tenets of Buddhism to his followers, while on the other he preaches a holy war meant to ostracize — and indirectly, destroy — an entire segment of the population. The man himself sees no contradiction in the two, simply believing that Muslims are a lesser race unworthy of the basic human rights accorded to Buddhists. While the situation in Myanmar is particularly extreme, Schroeder reveals at one point how, even in a Western nation like France, the perception of Islam’s grip on society versus the reality of that grip is highly exaggerated. Terrorist attacks like those that occurred in Paris in 2015 only help to augment fears and nationalistic tendencies, which is why a candidate like Marine Le Pen was able to capture more than a third of the vote in France’s recent presidential runoff. The Burmese authorities have made some attempts to quell the tide of Islamophobic sentiment, banning the “969” group and jailing Wirathu for several years. But after his release, the popular monk managed to form a new movement, promoting a series of “protection of race and religion bills” that seem to be the first step toward a modern version of the Nuremberg Laws of Nazi Germany. One of those laws has already been enacted, while the government continues to persecute the Rohingyas throughout the land. (…) In a place where Buddhists currently represent more than 90 percent of the populace, it’s unthinkable how a religion that preaches so much love can, in this case, yield so much hate. The Hollywood reporter
Everyone knows that Buddhism is the religion of peace, love and understanding. So there’s something deeply wrong about a Buddhist monk who calmly spouts anti-Muslim hate speech and incites ethnic riots. The monk in question, an influential Burmese figure known as the Venerable Wirathu, is the subject of the powerful third and final installment of Swiss director Barbet Schroeder’s ‘Axis of Evil’ documentary trilogy, which began in 1974 with General Idi Amin Dada: A Self Portrait, and continued in 2007 with Terror’s Advocate, a portrait of controversial lawyer Jacques Vergès. It’s the shocking disjunct between his religion and the rabid nationalism of his sermons, writings and declarations that powers Schroeder’s conventional but nevertheless effective long hard stare into the eyes of intolerance. However, this is also a chilling corrective to accounts of Burma that paint its recent history simply as a fight between courageous pro-democracy forces led by Aung San Suu Kyi (by no means a heroine in this particular story) and a repressive military regime. In the era of Trump (Wirathu is a fan), Farage and Le Pen, it also shines timely light on the mechanisms of nationalistic rhetoric. (…) Draped in saffron robes, his face rarely betraying any emotion, Wirathu is presented partly through outtakes from an interview Schroeder filmed with him in the library of the Mandalay monastery which he heads. The ‘venerable’ monk talks openly about what he sees to be the Muslim threat to Buddhist purity, calmly spouting racial slurs about their breeding capacity, the rape of ‘our women’, animalistic nature and accumulation of wealth that carry terrifying echoes of Nazi anti-Semitic slurs. He repeats the same message to the young monks he teaches and to the crowds of followers who turn out to watch him preach on tacky makeshift stages amidst garlands of flowers and gilt Buddhas. Schroeder’s method at first is simply to dwell on the awful fascination of the ‘Fascist Buddhist’ paradox, with passages promoting the brotherhood of man from the religion’s sacred texts, voiced by veteran French actress Bulle Ogier, underlining the contradiction. Wirathu’s rise from provincial obscurity to ethnic rabble-rouser is then charted, mixing his own account with testimony from a mix of interviewees – who will include two Burmese Buddhist masters who have served prison time, like ‘W’, but for far more noble causes. Wirathu’s nine-year stretch for inciting ethnic hatred came after a spate of 2003 riots in his hometown of Kyaukse and elsewhere which involved lynchings and burnings of Muslim mosques, shops and houses. The mood of the film turns darker in its second half, when Wirathu returns with even greater vitriol to the campaign trail after his release in 2012. News and mobile phone footage captures some of the pogroms launched against Burma’s persecuted Rohingya Muslim minority, mostly in Rakhine state: a scene in which a Buddhist monk beats a Musilm to a pulp with a makeshift club is difficult to erase. By now we’ve worked out what the monk really is. Forget the robes: he’s a classic extremist politician, fanning tensions through the crudest of rhetoric (including a DVD restaging of the rape of a Buddhist girl produced under the aegis of his Ma Ba Tha nationalist movement), then visiting the affected regions to ‘restore order’ and guarantee security. Shot on the hoof, under the noses of a repressive regime, The Venerable W is a fine, stirring documentary about ethnic cleansing in action. Screen daily
Loin de l’image d’Epinal d’un bouddhiste éthéré et tolérant, la religion phare d’Asie est, dans des pays comme le Sri Lanka ou la Birmanie, sous l’influence grandissante de moines nationalistes aux sermons agressifs, notamment contre les musulmans. La semaine dernière, dernier exemple en date de violences intercommunautaires: des foules bouddhistes ont mené des émeutes anti-musulmanes ayant fait au moins trois morts au Sri Lanka. Non loin de là, en Birmanie, secouée par la crise des musulmans rohingyas, la figure de proue du nationalisme bouddhiste, le moine Wirathu, a renoué avec ses sermons enflammés. Il avait été interdit de prise de parole publique après s’être réjoui du meurtre d’un avocat musulman. Et en Thaïlande voisine, où le nationalisme bouddhiste est néanmoins bien moins fort, un moine a fait scandale après avoir appelé à incendier les mosquées. Pour Michael Jerryson, spécialiste des questions de religion à l’université américaine de Youngstown et auteur d’un récent livre sur bouddhisme et violence, cette religion n’échappe pas à la justification de la violence par des prétextes religieux. (…) Et la menace, selon ces bouddhistes soucieux de préserver la prédominance de leur religion dans leur pays, c’est l’islam. Et ce même si les musulmans y sont ultra-minoritaires, de l’ordre de quelques pour cent. La destruction des statues de bouddhas de Bamiyan par les talibans en Afghanistan a profondément marqué l’imaginaire bouddhiste. Et l’ambiance globale de « guerre contre le terrorisme » contribue à l’islamophobie, à laquelle l’Asie n’échappe pas. Même si les minorités musulmanes sont implantées depuis des générations dans ces pays, les moines bouddhistes nationalistes agitent la menace de taux de natalité très élevés (c’est le cas des Rohingyas de Birmanie) – qui à plus ou moins long terme conduiront à une supplantation démographique comme en Malaisie ou en Indonésie. En Birmanie, le moine Wirathu s’est fait le grand prêtre de ce complot musulman visant à éradiquer le bouddhisme – avec des discours si enflammés que sa page Facebook a été fermée. (…) Au SriLanka, les militants bouddhistes tentent eux aussi de s’affirmer politiquement, n’hésitant pas à prendre la tête de manifestations et à en découdre avec la police. Les Tigres tamouls n’étant plus considérés comme une menace depuis leur défaite en 2009, les musulmans, qui ne représentent que 10 % de la population, se sont retrouvés la cible des nationalistes bouddhistes. Figure de proue du mouvement BBS (pour « Buddhist force »), le moine srilankais Galagodaatte Gnanasara, libéré sous caution, est sous le coup de poursuites pour discours de haine et insulte au coran. (…) En Thaïlande, ce mouvement d’idée a moins prise, dans un pays où le clergé bouddhiste est globalement discrédité par des scandales de corruption et de détournements de donations. (…) Cela n’empêche pas les tensions, notamment autour de l’extrême-sud de la Thaïlande, en proie à une rébellion indépendantiste musulmane qui s’en est parfois pris à des moines. Mais cela n’a rien à voir avec ce qui se passe en Birmanie, où, si les moines ne prennent pas eux mêmes les armes, des groupes de civils influencés par leurs idées se forment. Les moines n’agissent pas directement mais « justifient les violences menées par d’autres, que ce soient des milices, des civils, la police ou l’armée », analyse Iselin Frydenlund, de l’Ecole de théologie de Norvège. En Birmanie par exemple, des milices bouddhistes sont accusés de s’être livrées à des exactions contre les Rohingyas lors de ce que l’ONU décrit comme une campagne d' »épuration ethnique », qui a poussé à l’exil au Bangladesh voisin de près de 700.000 Rohingyas. Le Point
Fasciné depuis toujours par le bouddhisme, cette « religion athée qui permet le pessimisme », il est allé en Birmanie, à la rencontre d’Ashin Wirathu. Auprès de ce bonze plein de haine zen qui appelle à l’extermination des populations musulmanes, il boucle sa trilogie du mal, entamée en 1974 avec Général Idi Amin Dada et poursuivie en 2007 avec L’Avocat de la terreur. Selon Barbet Schroeder, le thème du mal est «inépuisable, inséparable de l’humanité, particulièrement pour le 20e siècle sans parler du 21e qui a l’air de vouloir faire de la haine et du mensonge des sujets incontournables». Au terme d’un tournage difficile, dangereux, prématurément interrompu par une situation de plus en plus instable en Birmanie, le cinéaste ramène Le Vénérable W., un documentaire édifiant et terrifiant. Contrairement à son habitude, Barbet Schroeder ne s’est pas contenté de filmer l’agent du mal et de laisser le spectateur découvrir la réalité dans son effrayante nudité. Parce que la Birmanie est méconnue, lointaine, et que la situation politique y est terriblement instable, entre la junte, la présidente Aung San Suu Kyi aux positions ambiguës, les Rohingyas, la minorité musulmane et une centaine d’autres ethnies, le cinéaste a rencontré des journalistes, des moines désapprouvant la croisade de Wirathu. Il a aussi ressemblé des documents d’archives, reportages TV ou fichiers de téléphone portables. Dès 2001, Wirathu prononce de virulents sermons islamophobes. En 2003, suite à des émeutes musulmanes, il est condamné à 25 ans de prison, dont il sort en 2012, suite à une amnistie générale. A la tête du mouvement 969, interdit en 2013 et aussitôt remplacé par Ma Ba Tha, il incite à la haine, monte en épingle des faits divers, propage des fake news. Il affirme que les musulmans (4% de la population birmane) qui «se reproduisent comme des lapins» (slogan dans une manifestation) mettent en péril l’équilibre de la nation. Des foules de moines en robe safran défilent, chantent des chanson nationalistes, éructent de haine, incendient les mosquées et tabassent les gens à mort, pendant que l’armée regarde à côté… Les maisons brûlent par milliers,