Conflit israelo-palestinien: On ne peut pas faire la paix avec un pays qui n’a pas le droit a l’existence (The more we continue speaking about Zionism only as a European movement that rose in response to European anti-Semitism, the more we feed the anti-Zionist narrative which depicts Israel as a Western colonialist project)

21 août, 2018

The Second Intifada brought the right back to power and nearly destroyed the Israeli left, something the international community still hasn’t internalized. Today our political debate isn’t between the right and the left anymore, but between the right and the center. The Labor Party, the founding party of Israel, is no longer capable of winning an election. That’s all a consequence of the Second Intifada, whose impact on my generation of Israelis was similar to the impact of 1947-48 on the founding generation of Israelis: It convinced us that there was no possibility for finding partners for partition among the current Palestinian leadership. (…) The Jewish people is divided into two camps. One is defending the Israeli narrative, the other is fighting for peace. The argument of this book is that the two are related: Peace won’t happen so long as our narrative is negated by the other side. You can’t make peace with a country that has no right to exist. (…) I live in the Middle East. I look around at my borders. I see Hezbollah, Hamas, Iranian Revolutionary Guards. I see a Palestinian national movement that still doesn’t accept the Jewish people’s right to define ourselves as a nation, as a people — and that’s true for all parts of the Palestinian national movement, from Fatah through Hamas. I don’t know any Israeli who’s optimistic about the immediate future. (…) If anything, we’re most likely heading toward war in the coming period, because of Iran’s growing military presence on our northern border. But at the same time we’re also seeing an unimagined shift in parts of the Arab world in attitudes toward Israel, thanks to a shared fear of an imperial Iran. Who would have imagined even two years ago that Saudi Arabia would be reaching out to Israel? This is the one unintended positive outcome of the disastrous Iranian deal: It brought the Sunnis and the Israelis together, against the deal. So we may well be heading toward war and peace simultaneously. This creates openings for us to tell our story. (…) In my writing and lecturing, going back to the 1990s Oslo years, I’ve warned about the delusions of a one-way peace process. My public life has been devoted to upholding what I consider an essential realism about Israel’s dilemma – that we can’t permanently rule another people but also can’t make peace with a Palestinian national movement that denies our right to exist as a sovereign nation. Now the Middle East is radically changing – we don’t yet know how. But we need to be smart and flexible in our approach. We need a combination of the openness of the left and the wariness of the right. That is what I would call a centrist sensibility. My experience in teaching Judaism and Jewish identity to Muslim American leaders over the last six years has taught me that the Muslim world generally doesn’t understand the relationship in Judaism between religion, peoplehood, land, and national sovereignty. The elements that we take for granted in our identity are almost entirely misunderstood in the Muslim world, where Jews are seen as a religious minority, rather than as a people with a religious identity, which is how Jews have traditionally seen themselves. (…) The notion that Judaism is more than a religion is a revelation to Muslims. That a Jew can be an atheist seems to Muslims inconceivable. If you’re a Muslim, or for that matter a Christian, you can’t be an atheist. So Judaism works differently than the other monotheistic faiths, because of the foundational identity of peoplehood. What does it mean that we’re a particularist faith rather than a universalist faith? Christianity and Islam believe that in the end of time everyone will be Christian or Muslim. Jews never imagined remaking humanity in our literal image. We believe that we have a universal goal that we’re working toward, which is the manifestation of the Divine Presence for all of humanity. That’s the vision of Isaiah: We’re a “peoplehood strategy” for a universal goal. (…) We’re marking 70 years of Israel’s existence – and also 70 years of siege and delegitimization against Israel. Zionism’s great and irreversible achievement is to have re-indigenized the Jewish people in this land. We’re here to stay – and so are our neighbors. Can we begin the long and painful process of finding a new language in which we can speak about the conflict and about a solution? (…) Like most Israelis, I don’t believe a Palestinian state can be created anytime soon. The most likely result of creating a Palestinian state now would be a Hamas takeover, creating another hostile entity on our border – our most sensitive border. With one Arab country after another self-destructing, we need to proceed with extreme caution. My model for how the Jewish people should interact with our neighbors comes from the biblical patriarch, Jacob. When Jacob was facing his brother Esau, and he wasn’t sure whether Esau was coming in peace or in war, Jacob divided his camp into two. One camp brought gifts, and the other camp was armed. (…) There is no Palestinian leader I can see who can or would give us what we minimally need for a deal, and that’s agreeing to confine Palestinian “right of return” to a Palestinian state. In the absence of that concession, there can be no deal. So I’m writing for the long term. (…) The more we continue speaking about Zionism only as a European movement that rose in response to European anti-Semitism, the more we feed the anti-Zionist narrative which depicts Israel as a Western colonialist project. If we keep relying on the Holocaust to justify Israel’s existence, we leave ourselves open to accusation that the Palestinians and the Arab world paid the price for what Europe did to the Jews. The narrative that we need to start telling is much more nuanced and more faithful to what Israel actually is. It’s a narrative that needs to take into account that, yes, while political Zionism did rise in Eastern Europe as an attempt to try to prevent the disaster we now call the Holocaust, in fact Zionism largely failed to save the Jews of Europe – but it did succeed in saving the Jews of the Middle East. Can you imagine if there were still large Jewish communities in Aleppo, in Sana’a, in Baghdad, in Benghazi? (…) Look at the fate of almost every minority in the Middle East today. What would the fate of the Jews of Syria or Iraq have been if they’d stayed? The notion that Zionism ruined the lives of the Jews of the Middle East is a 20th century story told by Israel’s enemies. The story we need to tell in the 21st century is: Thank God that Zionism extracted the Jews from societies that were going to implode 60-70 years later. It’s only in the last few years that we can fully appreciate Zionism’s rescue mission of the Jewish communities of this region. (…) Another example of how the old 20th century narrative does us a deep disservice is how we downplay the Zionism of longing. Zionism was the meeting point between need and longing. We have told the story of the Zionism of need. But we’ve neglected the story of the Zionism of longing. We’ve half-forgotten the story of how we managed to preserve the centrality of the land of Israel in Jewish consciousness, in every corner of the globe where Jews lived. It’s one of the most astonishing stories in human history. This book tries to retell the story of the Zionism of longing. That’s a story we need to tell our neighbors. It’s also a story we need to tell ourselves. (…) The exile didn’t end in 1948, with the creation of the state, but only in 1989, with the fall of the Soviet empire. With the fall of Communism, there were no longer large Jewish communities that were forcibly denied the right to emigrate, the right to choose between life in the Diaspora or Israel. Since 1989, almost every Jew now has that choice, for the first time in 2,000 years. There is no exile anymore. I not only celebrate our national rebirth, but also thriving Jewish communities around the world. We’re a very strange people. We lived with the centrality of the land of Israel in our consciousness, in our faith, and yet we lived as a people outside the land for most of our history. So diaspora is no less a part of us than homeland. To be a healthy people, we need a creative tension between these two parts of our being. Still, I wonder whether Jewish life in Europe is sustainable anymore. We’re being hit from so many directions there – the Islamists, the far left, the far right – that we may be seeing the last generation of European Jewry. The post-Holocaust European Jewish rebirth was a brave experiment, an act of trust in the new Europe. I fear that that experiment has failed. (…) One of my nightmares – Israelis have a list – is the disintegration of the American Jewish-Israeli relationship. We’re not there yet, but we seem to be heading that way. To some extent the tensions between our two communities are an unavoidable function of geography. American Jews live in the safest, most accepting diaspora in history, and we live in the most dangerous region on the planet. And so each community has developed a strategy that makes sense for its geography. American Jews have become flexible and open to their environment. Israelis have become the toughest kid on the block. Our dilemma is that the tactics we need to use to keep ourselves relatively safe in the Middle East are undermining our moral credibility among many American Jews, and that’s a different kind of strategic threat. My fear is that each community will take on the attributes of its geographical circumstances. That we will become brutal, and American Jews will become what my father, a Holocaust survivor, used to call “stupid Jews” – Jews who have forgotten the instincts of survival. (…) What can help American Jews and Israelis get to a more mature relationship – a relationship among Jewish grown-ups – is to remember that we live in one of the most interesting and fateful moments in Jewish history. Most of the dreams and fears of our ancestors have been fulfilled. For 2,000 years, Jews carried two great dreams and one great fear. The two dreams were that we would return home, or that we would find safe refuge outside our homeland. And the great fear was that the hatred against us would reach a tipping point and our non-Jewish neighbors would finally destroy us. Those dreams and that nightmare were realized before we were born. The only great dream that hasn’t yet happened is the coming of the messiah, and of course some Jews argue that we’re now in the messianic era. We live in a moment of profound confusion in Jewish life. That confusion is an entirely appropriate response to the reality we’ve inherited. I see our greatest challenge as understanding and re-adapting our story to these radically changed circumstances. What does it mean when some of the most significant elements of our story have been fulfilled? What do we do with that? What is our purpose in the world as a people? My intuition is that we have something urgent to say to the world about survival This is the first time in history that humanity has the ability to destroy itself. The Jewish people is history’s great survivor. Our job is to figure out what is the Jewish wisdom we need to share with the world. But for that to happen, we need to start seriously thinking about the meaning of our story. Yossi Klein Halevi

New book coincides with storm over incendiary Abbas comments

Who we are, why we’re here: Israeli author explains Zionism to the Palestinians

We’re rightly outraged by enemy attacks on our legitimacy, says Yossi Klein Halevi. But we’ve never bothered to tell them our story. Hence his ‘Letters to My Palestinian Neighbor’

The Jerusalem-based author and journalist spent 11 years writing his previous book, “Like Dreamers” — which told the story of Israel’s evolution after the Six Day War through the lives of seven paratroopers who fought to reunite Jerusalem. By contrast, Klein Halevi says, “Letters” spilled out of him in what felt like 11 weeks. It was a book waiting to be written, he believes, a book he had spent his 35 years in Israel — half the lifespan of the modern Jewish state — preparing to write.

Its goal is nothing less than to explain to our Palestinian neighbors — some of whom he can literally see out of the window of his home in northern Jerusalem’s French Hill neighborhood — who we Jews are and what we are doing here. With Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas working assiduously to delegitimize the Jews’ presence here, the imperative could hardly be more pressing.

In an earlier book, “At the Entrance to the Garden of Eden,” Klein Halevi spent time with Christians and, far more dramatically, with Muslims in the Holy Land, listening, learning and trying to understand them. With this new book, he hopes that they will listen to him.

Unprecedentedly, however, Klein Halevi, 64, does not envisage this volume as a one-way street. His declared goal is for the book, with its chapter-letters, to prompt a dialogue with these Palestinian neighbors of ours. Therefore, it is being translated into Arabic. It will be made available online — on The Times Of Israel’s Arabic website – for free downloading. The author hopes that Palestinians and others across the Arab and Muslim world will respond to it. If they write, he promises, he will respond in kind — initiating an ongoing conversation, enabling our conflicted sides to better understand each other, and, thus, one day, perhaps even to accept and live peaceably alongside each other.

Klein Halevi takes pains to emphasize that he comes from the political right, that he is no naive believer in the possibilities of peace in the foreseeable future. But buoyed by his experiences in recent years heading a remarkable program at Jerusalem’s Hartman Institute that teaches visiting groups of American Muslim leaders about Judaism and Israel, he rejects the idea that the Arab world “hates us and always will hate us” as self-defeating, especially when he feels we Israeli Jews have made no real effort to tell our story to them.

 

Hence the book. Hence the weight of responsibility.

But that’s not all.

Despite the title and the key imperative of explaining Judaism and Zionism to our neighbors, Klein Halevi says he’s also written this book for us — for us Jews and Zionists who, he believes, have lost sight of central elements of our own story. We do ourselves and our cause a terrible disservice, he argues, by misrepresenting modern Israel as a story founded in European Jewry and the Holocaust; in fact Zionism patently failed to save European Jewry. What we should be internalizing, and explaining to others, is the unique fulfillment of what he calls the “Zionism of longing” — the “half-forgotten story of how we managed to preserve the centrality of the land of Israel in Jewish consciousness, in every corner of the globe where Jews lived” for thousands of years. “It’s one of the most astonishing stories in human history.”

I’ve known Yossi Klein Halevi for most of his 35 years in Israel, worked with him as a journalist, documented his groundbreaking Muslim Leadership Initiative at Hartman, interviewed him numerous times. He is one of the most articulate of thinkers, and one of the most insightful, graceful and careful of writers. What follows here is a transcript of a conversation we had in his Hartman office a few days ago, before he set off to the US to begin promoting this book.

Reading over our interview, I’m struck by the wisdom in almost every answer he offers to my questions, and by the originality of much of what he says — formulations that seem so necessary and obvious once you’ve read them, but that others have not managed to produce before.

As you’ll see high up in our conversation, two of his previous books were cursed by poor timing. Given those dark precedents, and given the immense potential benefit of Klein Halevi’s “Letters” for Palestinians, Israelis and anybody else who seeks a wiser, better world, one has to hope that this new book is blessed.

The Times of Israel: The book is due to come out when?

Yossi Klein Halevi: May 15.

And the Jerusalem embassy of the United States opens on?

May 14!

Okay, and this is a fortuitous set of circumstances, you think, or underlines why the book is so important, or…?

My mother-in-law said I should give the world fair warning before I publish another book. (Laughs)

Remind us: Because your book about your teenage membership in the Jewish Defense League came out around the time of the Rabin assassination…

“Memoirs of a Jewish Extremist,” my first book, came out two days after the Rabin assassination. My second book, “At the Entrance to the Garden of Eden,” which was about a journey I took into Islam and Christianity, came out on September 11, 2001. My last book, “Like Dreamers,” managed to avoid historic disasters.

Your second book presumably informed this new book, and maybe gave you the confidence to write it. And then there’s your work with Imam Abdullah Antepli and the Muslim Leadership Initiative at the Hartman Institute. Did that work give you the confidence that this book would not be a condescending and ignorant outreach to your Palestinian neighbor?

I see this book as a kind of sequel to the book I wrote about my journey into Palestinian Islam. That happened in the late ’90s, just before the Second Intifada, when it was still physically and emotionally possible to make that kind of journey. I spent a year in Palestinian society, listening to people’s stories, trying to see the conflict as much as possible through their eyes. And trying to experience something of Muslim devotional life, because that’s what interested me as a religious Jew, to see whether we could create a shared language for reconciliation that drew on our religious traditions.

This book is a belated sequel, almost two decades later. A lot has happened in the interim – especially the Second Intifada, which transformed Israeli society. The wound of the Second Intifada wasn’t just that we got the worst wave of terrorism in our history, but that the terrorism followed two Israeli offers for Palestinian statehood. And that shut me down, exhausted my capacity for outreach to the other side.

The Second Intifada brought the right back to power and nearly destroyed the Israeli left, something the international community still hasn’t internalized. Today our political debate isn’t between the right and the left anymore, but between the right and the center. The Labor Party, the founding party of Israel, is no longer capable of winning an election. That’s all a consequence of the Second Intifada, whose impact on my generation of Israelis was similar to the impact of 1947-48 on the founding generation of Israelis: It convinced us that there was no possibility for finding partners for partition among the current Palestinian leadership.

Presumably after writing your second book, you became deeply disillusioned with the chance of peace, because of the Second Intifada and all that has since played out. So does this book represent some kind of tentative revival of optimism, or would that be too strong a word?

This book isn’t about optimism or pessimism but an attempt to explain the Jewish and Israeli story to our neighbors – why the Jewish people never gave up its claim to this land even from afar, why I left my home in New York City in 1982 to move here. In my previous book I tried to listen to my neighbors. In this book I’m asking my neighbors to listen to me.

In all these years of conflict, no Israeli writer has written directly to our Palestinian neighbors, and to the Arab and Muslim worlds generally, explaining who we are and why we’re here

In all these years of conflict, no Israeli writer has written directly to our Palestinian neighbors, and to the Arab and Muslim worlds generally, explaining who we are and why we’re here. We defend our story to the whole world, but we don’t bother explaining ourselves to our neighbors. We’re rightly outraged by the daily attacks on our history and legitimacy that fill the Palestinian media and the Arab world’s media. But we’ve never tried to tell them our story.

This book combines the two commitments of my life: explaining and defending the Jewish narrative, and seeking partners in the Muslim world. The Jewish people is divided into two camps. One is defending the Israeli narrative, the other is fighting for peace. The argument of this book is that the two are related: Peace won’t happen so long as our narrative is negated by the other side. You can’t make peace with a country that has no right to exist.

Does this book not mark you out as some kind of inveterate optimist? That after all those years when you were too battered by reality, the optimism has resurfaced?

I live in the Middle East. I look around at my borders. I see Hezbollah, Hamas, Iranian Revolutionary Guards. I see a Palestinian national movement that still doesn’t accept the Jewish people’s right to define ourselves as a nation, as a people — and that’s true for all parts of the Palestinian national movement, from Fatah through Hamas. I don’t know any Israeli who’s optimistic about the immediate future.

We may well be heading toward war and peace simultaneously

If anything, we’re most likely heading toward war in the coming period, because of Iran’s growing military presence on our northern border. But at the same time we’re also seeing an unimagined shift in parts of the Arab world in attitudes toward Israel, thanks to a shared fear of an imperial Iran. Who would have imagined even two years ago that Saudi Arabia would be reaching out to Israel? This is the one unintended positive outcome of the disastrous Iranian deal: It brought the Sunnis and the Israelis together, against the deal. So we may well be heading toward war and peace simultaneously. This creates openings for us to tell our story.

In my writing and lecturing, going back to the 1990s Oslo years, I’ve warned about the delusions of a one-way peace process. My public life has been devoted to upholding what I consider an essential realism about Israel’s dilemma – that we can’t permanently rule another people but also can’t make peace with a Palestinian national movement that denies our right to exist as a sovereign nation.

Now the Middle East is radically changing – we don’t yet know how. But we need to be smart and flexible in our approach. We need a combination of the openness of the left and the wariness of the right. That is what I would call a centrist sensibility.

My experience in teaching Judaism and Jewish identity to Muslim American leaders over the last six years has taught me that the Muslim world generally doesn’t understand the relationship in Judaism between religion, peoplehood, land, and national sovereignty. The elements that we take for granted in our identity are almost entirely misunderstood in the Muslim world, where Jews are seen as a religious minority, rather than as a people with a religious identity, which is how Jews have traditionally seen themselves.

My book tries to explain the elements of Jewish identity, what our 4,000-year story means to me. This is my personal take on our story. As a Jewish writer living in a time when our story is under growing assault, I felt it was my responsibility to try to offer a Jewish and Israeli narrative.

The notion that Judaism is more than a religion is a revelation to Muslims. That a Jew can be an atheist seems to Muslims inconceivable. If you’re a Muslim, or for that matter a Christian, you can’t be an atheist. So Judaism works differently than the other monotheistic faiths, because of the foundational identity of peoplehood.

What does it mean that we’re a particularist faith rather than a universalist faith? Christianity and Islam believe that in the end of time everyone will be Christian or Muslim. Jews never imagined remaking humanity in our literal image. We believe that we have a universal goal that we’re working toward, which is the manifestation of the Divine Presence for all of humanity. That’s the vision of Isaiah: We’re a “peoplehood strategy” for a universal goal.

This lack of understanding of Jewish identity has direct bearing on the Muslim rejection of the legitimacy of Israel, the expression of the Jewish people’s national aspirations.

The elements of our identity that we take for granted are exactly what we need to explain about ourselves: Who are we? What is our relationship to this land? What does it mean that we maintained a kind of vicarious indigenousness with this land through 2,000 years of exile? What is Zionism? What is the relationship between Zionism and Judaism? Why are we the only people in history that managed, after thousands of years, to return to its land? In short: What is our story? And for me, the essence of Judaism is its story. I would define the Jews as a story we tell ourselves about who we think we are.

Our current prime minister and maybe some of his predecessors, however politely, would deride that approach. Netanyahu would say, you can explain until you’re blue in the face, and you can strive for morality, which is a lovely thing, but the only reason that we have survived, and the only way we will survive, is by being strong and exuding strength. It’s not about having them understand our narrative. It is about projecting strength. Sadat only made peace because he didn’t defeat us in the 1973 war…

I would agree with everything you’ve said except one word — “only.” The basis for our survival in the Middle East is our ability to defend ourselves. Beyond that, though, how are we going to navigate our relationships with those in the Arab world who may be prepared, for whatever reasons, to reexamine their relationships with us?

This notion of “they hate us and always will hate us,” when we haven’t made any real effort to explain our story, strikes me as self-defeating

For us to sit back and say, What’s the point in bothering to explain ourselves to our neighbors? They will never understand us” – it goes against what I’ve learned teaching American Muslims. This notion of “they hate us and always will hate us,” when we haven’t made any real effort to explain our story, strikes me as self-defeating.

So your book is directed not only at your Palestinian neighbors but the Arab world, the region, ideally?

Very much so. The book is being translated into Arabic. As you know, it will be put online — on The Times of Israel’s Arabic website – for free downloading, and that should be ready around the time that we release the book in English. And I am inviting Palestinians, Arabs, Muslims to respond. I will have somebody translating letters that come in response, and I will do my best to respond. I’ve already begun showing the book to Palestinians and getting written responses. If the responses are interesting enough, I may publish the exchanges as a sequel.

And I will try to bring this to Arab media, to start the first public conversation between an Israeli writer and our neighbors about who we are, why we see ourselves as indigenous to this land, and what is our shared future in the region.

Did you ever think about doing a program, similar to the one you do for American Muslim leaders, for Palestinian Muslim leaders?

Outside of my window, on the edge of my neighborhood in French Hill, is the separation barrier – a wall. That wall is both concrete and metaphorical. In the State of Israel, there are many efforts to bring together Jewish and Arab Israelis, but beyond that, it’s hard to initiate Palestinian-Israeli engagement on any level, let alone create a program for Palestinians that will teach Judaism and Jewish identity. We are occupying the Palestinians, while their national movement doesn’t accept our right to exist. I’d be delighted to do a program like that. But that is certainly premature.

In a way, the ideal version of this book would be a joint book, by an Israeli and a Palestinian author. You write about two states for two narratives. Yours is one of the narratives. Would you want to be able, five years from now, to publish the second edition of this, which is actually the two narratives?

I initially wanted to do a joint book, and I had a few Palestinian partners in mind. In the end I decided against it. I felt the need to have my own space to tell our story, to counter the assault on our narrative. What is happening to us in the twenty-first century is that the Jewish story of the twentieth century is being turned into its opposite – not a story of courage and faith and persistence but of evil. And so I needed to tell our story on its own, as a first step.

But I see this book as only a first step – an opening to a project that will be a conversation with our neighbors. In order to start a conversation, I needed to set out my beliefs: This is who I am. This is why I live in Israel. This is why my people returned home. This is how mainstream Israelis understand what happened here in 1948, in 1967, in 2000. And I needed to say that on its own, without being engaged at least initially in a debate or even a dialogue. All that will hopefully follow.

And where does this project go five years from now?

I’m open to taking this in any direction. Maybe there won’t be any substantive response and this will go nowhere. But I sense that this is a conducive time to test the waters.

We’re marking 70 years of Israel’s existence – and also 70 years of siege and delegitimization against Israel. Zionism’s great and irreversible achievement is to have re-indigenized the Jewish people in this land. We’re here to stay – and so are our neighbors. Can we begin the long and painful process of finding a new language in which we can speak about the conflict and about a solution?

Where does leadership fit into the context in which you wrote this book? Essentially it’s an indictment of failed leadership — on the other side, I would say.

On both sides. On the Palestinian side, the failure has been consistent, since the conflict began. There is no national movement that I can think of, anywhere, that has rejected more offers for statehood than the Palestinian leadership.

On our side, I fault our current leadership for not continuing the policy of previous governments, which was to state without equivocation to the Palestinians: We’re serious about a deal, if you are. A Palestinian state is a standing, ongoing offer, and we’re not going to undermine it by expanding settlement building into areas that we say, in principle, would be part of that state, whenever conditions make that possible.

Like most Israelis, I don’t believe a Palestinian state can be created anytime soon. The most likely result of creating a Palestinian state now would be a Hamas takeover, creating another hostile entity on our border – our most sensitive border. With one Arab country after another self-destructing, we need to proceed with extreme caution.

My model for how the Jewish people should interact with our neighbors comes from the biblical patriarch, Jacob. When Jacob was facing his brother Esau, and he wasn’t sure whether Esau was coming in peace or in war, Jacob divided his camp into two. One camp brought gifts, and the other camp was armed

But we also need to not take steps that will prevent the possibility of a two-state solution. And we need to make efforts to strengthen the Palestinian economy, to reach out to the wider region to involve Arab countries in an eventual arrangement.

My model for how the Jewish people should interact with our neighbors comes from the biblical patriarch, Jacob. When Jacob was facing his brother Esau, and he wasn’t sure whether Esau was coming in peace or in war, Jacob divided his camp into two. One camp brought gifts, and the other camp was armed.

Our relationship with the Muslim world is going to largely determine the physical safety of the Jewish people in the 21st century. It’s astonishing to me that we haven’t seriously begun to think about how do we live with 1.7 billion Muslims. Are there people in the Muslim world who might be open to a new kind of relationship with us? Shouldn’t we be exploring that possibility?

You write: “Israelis need to recognize the deep pain we’ve caused in pursuing our security needs…”

I’ve tried to create a language for reconciliation with our neighbors that centrist Israelis like myself can feel comfortable with. I have forced myself to go past my anger and resentment that is the legacy of the Second Intifada, and to try again to see my neighbors.

What I learned during the Second Intifada was how not to see them. I look at the hill outside my window every day — Palestinian villages on the hill just beyond the wall. I taught myself to see over them, to the desert view past them. That was an emotional protection during the years of suicide bombings. Without forgetting the bitter lessons that we learned during those years, without forgoing the deep necessity for wariness and self-protection, I am trying to teach myself how to see again, trying to teach myself how to be empathetic with my neighbors’ suffering, without sacrificing the integrity of my Israeli narrative.

I understand why Palestinians hang maps without Israel, because my internal map doesn’t have the word “Palestine”

This book is an attempt to explain how Israelis experience this conflict, how I experience this conflict, why I think peace hasn’t happened, and yet, why I still believe in the need for a two-state solution, as bad as that solution is.

My starting point in thinking conceptually about our conflict with the Palestinians is the same as the settlers’: All the land between the river and the sea belongs to us, by right. But I also acknowledge that there’s another people between the river and the sea that believes that all of this land is theirs. I understand why Palestinians hang maps without Israel, because my internal map doesn’t have the word “Palestine.”

My question to all of us, Israelis and Palestinians, is: What is our endpoint? We share maximalist claims to the whole land. But if the maximalist claim is a starting point and not the endpoint, then we can talk.

Partition has been on the table almost from the beginning of this conflict. It is not a good solution. Creating two states in this one little land – it’s a nightmare for both peoples. But the alternative – a one-state solution in which Israelis and Palestinians devour each other – seems to me worse.

If there’s going to be a two-state solution, it has to come from a place where both sides understand that the other has sacrificed something essential in its historic claim. For Israel to give up Judea and Samaria is an amputation. I grew up on the right. As a teenager I wore a necklace with a silver map of the whole land of Israel according to the old Revisionist Zionist plan – both banks of the Jordan River. That’s my emotional legacy.

If you look at the dynamic of how peace has been made in this country, so far it has only been the right that has succeeded in withdrawing from territory. That’s because the public trusts the right — not only for security reasons, but for emotional and historic reasons. If I’m going to have a prime minister who will cede territory, I want that leader to say, I’m giving up something that belongs to me. Before I celebrate peace, I will mourn the loss of parts of my homeland.

Being very practical, then, do you think that Israel’s current prime minister would be prepared to make that amputation?

 

I once would have replied with a cautious yes. Netanyahu was never an ideological right-winger. At crucial moments in our history, the most important divide politically hasn’t been between left and right, but between the pragmatic right and the ideological or religious right.

The great threat to the religious right has always come from the pragmatic right. Think of Menachem Begin in Sinai and Ariel Sharon in Gaza. The settlers have been wary of Netanyahu too, and for good reason.

But the political tragedy of Netanyahu — there are other Netanyahu tragedies — is his failure to fashion a pragmatic right in his image. On his watch, large parts of Likud have turned hard right. If he would try to enter into a substantive peace process, much of his party would revolt. And so no, I don’t think he can do it, even if he wanted to.

The bigger “but,” of course, which is why you wrote the book, is with whom would he be entering a peace process?

There is no Palestinian leader I can see who can or would give us what we minimally need for a deal, and that’s agreeing to confine Palestinian “right of return” to a Palestinian state. In the absence of that concession, there can be no deal. So I’m writing for the long term.

Aren’t you writing to try and create a climate in which…?

I’m trying to model a Jewish conversation with Palestinians that is both empathic toward their suffering and affirming of our story.

I’ve written this book because this is the story I had to tell. And I hope there’ll be people on the other side who will hear it. What the results will be… You write and let it go.

One of the bittersweet experiences of writing a book is that as soon as it appears, it’s no longer yours. You sit with this creation in the privacy of your room, nobody sees it, and you can imagine all kinds of outcomes. But as soon as you release the book, it doesn’t belong to you anymore. I almost never go back to my other books. They’re strangers to me in a certain way. Every so often somebody will tell me something that they’ve read in one of the books, and I’ll say, Oh yeah, that was a good line! (Laughs.)

 

Writing this book was an interesting experience. “Like Dreamers” took me 11 years. This feels like it was written in 11 weeks … It’s a much shorter book. I call this the Twitter version of “Like Dreamers,” which was a very long book. I never imagined that I could just sit down and write a book quickly, but this one poured out. I couldn’t keep up with it. I’ve never had that writing experience before. I’m a very slow and plodding writer. So, in a way, this book wrote itself.

But in another sense, I’ve been writing this book for years. Along with celebrating the 70th anniversary of the state I’m marking a personal milestone — my thirty-fifth anniversary of moving to Israel, which is to say that I’ve lived in Israel for half the life of the state. This book really took me thirty-five years to write.

Thirty-five years of living in Israel.

Unbelievable. When I first came I thought I’d missed the story – the rest would be anti-climactic. Looking back on the Israeli roller-coaster of the last 35 years, that seems pretty funny.

What have you learned about our story?

One thing I’ve learned is that we’re telling ourselves and the world an outdated story. We’re still speaking about Israel as essentially a European Jewish story. Zionism begins in response to the pogroms and culminates in the Holocaust, which leads to the creation of Israel. That story already became obsolete to a great extent when Israel became a Mizrahi-majority state, which happened in the 1950s.

We’re just beginning culturally to absorb that fact. And it’s time for us to absorb that in our narrative as well.

Zionism largely failed to save the Jews of Europe – but it did succeed in saving the Jews of the Middle East

The more we continue speaking about Zionism only as a European movement that rose in response to European anti-Semitism, the more we feed the anti-Zionist narrative which depicts Israel as a Western colonialist project. If we keep relying on the Holocaust to justify Israel’s existence, we leave ourselves open to accusation that the Palestinians and the Arab world paid the price for what Europe did to the Jews.

The narrative that we need to start telling is much more nuanced and more faithful to what Israel actually is. It’s a narrative that needs to take into account that, yes, while political Zionism did rise in Eastern Europe as an attempt to try to prevent the disaster we now call the Holocaust, in fact Zionism largely failed to save the Jews of Europe – but it did succeed in saving the Jews of the Middle East. Can you imagine if there were still large Jewish communities in Aleppo, in Sana’a, in Baghdad, in Benghazi?

Let me play devil’s advocate: Yes, but they only became threatened because of this foreign, colonial enterprise called Israel, planted in the midst of the Middle East.

Look at the fate of almost every minority in the Middle East today. What would the fate of the Jews of Syria or Iraq have been if they’d stayed? The notion that Zionism ruined the lives of the Jews of the Middle East is a 20th century story told by Israel’s enemies. The story we need to tell in the 21st century is: Thank God that Zionism extracted the Jews from societies that were going to implode 60-70 years later. It’s only in the last few years that we can fully appreciate Zionism’s rescue mission of the Jewish communities of this region.

We’ve half-forgotten the story of how we managed to preserve the centrality of the land of Israel in Jewish consciousness, in every corner of the globe where Jews lived. It’s one of the most astonishing stories in human history

Another example of how the old 20th century narrative does us a deep disservice is how we downplay the Zionism of longing. Zionism was the meeting point between need and longing. We have told the story of the Zionism of need. But we’ve neglected the story of the Zionism of longing. We’ve half-forgotten the story of how we managed to preserve the centrality of the land of Israel in Jewish consciousness, in every corner of the globe where Jews lived. It’s one of the most astonishing stories in human history. This book tries to retell the story of the Zionism of longing. That’s a story we need to tell our neighbors. It’s also a story we need to tell ourselves.

Do you think Zionism’s salvation role is over now? Or when you look at parts of Europe and maybe even America…?

I hope it’s over. I hope that Jews will come to Israel not because they’re fleeing persecution or threat but because they want to join the most amazing experiment in Jewish history, which is the recreation of a people after two thousand years of dispersion and shattering.

The exile didn’t end in 1948, with the creation of the state, but only in 1989, with the fall of the Soviet empire. With the fall of Communism, there were no longer large Jewish communities that were forcibly denied the right to emigrate, the right to choose between life in the Diaspora or Israel. Since 1989, almost every Jew now has that choice, for the first time in 2,000 years. There is no exile anymore.

I not only celebrate our national rebirth, but also thriving Jewish communities around the world. We’re a very strange people. We lived with the centrality of the land of Israel in our consciousness, in our faith, and yet we lived as a people outside the land for most of our history. So diaspora is no less a part of us than homeland. To be a healthy people, we need a creative tension between these two parts of our being.

Still, I wonder whether Jewish life in Europe is sustainable anymore. We’re being hit from so many directions there – the Islamists, the far left, the far right – that we may be seeing the last generation of European Jewry. The post-Holocaust European Jewish rebirth was a brave experiment, an act of trust in the new Europe. I fear that that experiment has failed.

And the United States?

One of my nightmares – Israelis have a list – is the disintegration of the American Jewish-Israeli relationship. We’re not there yet, but we seem to be heading that way.

Our dilemma is that the tactics we need to use to keep ourselves relatively safe in the Middle East are undermining our moral credibility among many American Jews, and that’s a different kind of strategic threat

To some extent the tensions between our two communities are an unavoidable function of geography. American Jews live in the safest, most accepting diaspora in history, and we live in the most dangerous region on the planet. And so each community has developed a strategy that makes sense for its geography. American Jews have become flexible and open to their environment. Israelis have become the toughest kid on the block. Our dilemma is that the tactics we need to use to keep ourselves relatively safe in the Middle East are undermining our moral credibility among many American Jews, and that’s a different kind of strategic threat.

My fear is that each community will take on the attributes of its geographical circumstances. That we will become brutal, and American Jews will become what my father, a Holocaust survivor, used to call “stupid Jews” – Jews who have forgotten the instincts of survival. I think my father, who died many years ago, would have been appalled by Netanyahu’s cynical manipulation of desperate African asylum seekers. And I don’t have to imagine what he would have said about those American Jews who have publicly sided with Linda Sarsour. Why is it so hard for some Jews to understand that decency and self-preservation aren’t mutually exclusive?

One of the reasons I sit at the Hartman Institute is because I am committed – unconditionally – to the American Jewish-Israeli relationship. Sometimes I get furious at American Jews, just as they get furious at us. During the Iran deal, which I see as an existential threat to Israel, I was so angry at American Jews for failing to stop it that I wrote an op-ed essentially saying what some American Jews have been saying to Israel: I’ve had it with you, I can’t continue this relationship. Fortunately I never published it, and my fit passed.

Each side can find lots of reasons to be disappointed with the other. But I don’t have any other Jewish people. We need to stop obsessing only on the failures of each community and also celebrate each community’s remarkable achievements. The emergence of either American Jewry or the State of Israel would have been enough to change Jewish life for centuries. The simultaneous emergence of these two great Jewish experiments is unprecedented in Jewish history.

What can help American Jews and Israelis get to a more mature relationship – a relationship among Jewish grown-ups – is to remember that we live in one of the most interesting and fateful moments in Jewish history. Most of the dreams and fears of our ancestors have been fulfilled. For 2,000 years, Jews carried two great dreams and one great fear. The two dreams were that we would return home, or that we would find safe refuge outside our homeland. And the great fear was that the hatred against us would reach a tipping point and our non-Jewish neighbors would finally destroy us. Those dreams and that nightmare were realized before we were born.

The only great dream that hasn’t yet happened is the coming of the messiah, and of course some Jews argue that we’re now in the messianic era. We live in a moment of profound confusion in Jewish life. That confusion is an entirely appropriate response to the reality we’ve inherited. I see our greatest challenge as understanding and re-adapting our story to these radically changed circumstances.

What does it mean when some of the most significant elements of our story have been fulfilled? What do we do with that? What is our purpose in the world as a people? My intuition is that we have something urgent to say to the world about survival.

This is the first time in history that humanity has the ability to destroy itself. The Jewish people is history’s great survivor. Our job is to figure out what is the Jewish wisdom we need to share with the world. But for that to happen, we need to start seriously thinking about the meaning of our story.

Publicités

14 juillet/229e: De la Bastille au goulag (Looking back at Charles Krauthammer’s reflections on the revolution in France)

14 juillet, 2018

The Whore of Babylon (Hans Burgkmair the Elder, 1523)The Fireside angel (Max Ernst, 1937)

Liberty leading the people (Yue Minjun, 1996)
Puis je vis monter de la mer une bête qui avait dix cornes et sept têtes, et sur ses cornes dix diadèmes, et sur ses têtes des noms de blasphème. La bête que je vis était semblable à un léopard; ses pieds étaient comme ceux d’un ours, et sa gueule comme une gueule de lion. Le dragon lui donna sa puissance, et son trône, et une grande autorité. Et je vis l’une de ses têtes comme blessée à mort; mais sa blessure mortelle fut guérie. Et toute la terre était dans l’admiration derrière la bête. Et ils adorèrent le dragon, parce qu’il avait donné l’autorité à la bête; ils adorèrent la bête, en disant: Qui est semblable à la bête, et qui peut combattre contre elle? Et il lui fut donné une bouche qui proférait des paroles arrogantes et des blasphèmes; et il lui fut donné le pouvoir d’agir pendant quarante-deux mois. Et elle ouvrit sa bouche pour proférer des blasphèmes contre Dieu, pour blasphémer son nom, et son tabernacle, et ceux qui habitent dans le ciel. Et il lui fut donné de faire la guerre aux saints, et de les vaincre. Et il lui fut donné autorité sur toute tribu, tout peuple, toute langue, et toute nation. Et tous les habitants de la terre l’adoreront, ceux dont le nom n’a pas été écrit dès la fondation du monde dans le livre de vie de l’agneau qui a été immolé. Si quelqu’un a des oreilles, qu’il entende! Apocalypse 13: 1-7
Et je vis une femme assise sur une bête écarlate, pleine de noms de blasphème, ayant sept têtes et dix cornes. Cette femme était vêtue de pourpre et d’écarlate, et parée d’or, de pierres précieuses et de perles. Elle tenait dans sa main une coupe d’or, remplie d’abominations et des impuretés de sa prostitution. Sur son front était écrit un nom, un mystère: Babylone la grande, la mère des impudiques et des abominations de la terre. Et je vis cette femme ivre du sang des saints et du sang des témoins de Jésus. Apocalypse 17: 2-6
Une nation ne se régénère que dans un bain de sang. Saint Just
L’arbre de la liberté doit être revivifié de temps en temps par le sang des patriotes et des tyrans. Jefferson
Qu’un sang impur abreuve nos sillons … La Marseillaise
La guillotine n’était qu’un épouvantail qui brisait la résistance active. Cela ne nous suffit pas. (…) Nous ne devons pas seulement « épouvanter » les capitalistes, c’est-à-dire leur faire sentir la toute-puissance de l’Etat prolétarien et leur faire oublier l’idée d’une résistance active contre lui. Nous devons briser aussi leur résistance passive, incontestablement plus dangereuse et plus nuisible encore. Nous ne devons pas seulement briser toute résistance, quelle qu’elle soit. Nous devons encore obliger les gens à travailler dans le cadre de la nouvelle organisation de l’Etat. Lénine
La reine appartient à plusieurs catégories victimaires préférentielles; elle n’est pas seulement reine mais étrangère. Son origine autrichienne revient sans cesse dans les accusations populaires. Le tribunal qui la condamne est très fortement influencé par la foule parisienne. Notre premier stéréotype est également présent: on retrouve dans la révolution tous les traits caractéristiques des grandes crises qui favorisent les persécutions collectives. (…) Je ne prétends pas que cette façon de penser doive se substituer partout à nos idées sur la Révolution française. Elle n’en éclaire pas moins d’un jour intéressant une accusation souvent passée sous silence mais qui figure explicitement au procès de la reine, celui d’avoir commis un inceste avec son fils. René Girard
Le communisme, c’est le nazisme, le mensonge en plus. Jean-François Revel
Il est malheureux que le Moyen-Orient ait rencontré pour la première fois la modernité occidentale à travers les échos de la Révolution française. Progressistes, égalitaristes et opposés à l’Eglise, Robespierre et les jacobins étaient des héros à même d’inspirer les radicaux arabes. Les modèles ultérieurs — Italie mussolinienne, Allemagne nazie, Union soviétique — furent encore plus désastreux. Ce qui rend l’entreprise terroriste des islamistes aussi dangereuse, ce n’est pas tant la haine religieuse qu’ils puisent dans des textes anciens — souvent au prix de distorsions grossières —, mais la synthèse qu’ils font entre fanatisme religieux et idéologie moderne. Ian Buruma et Avishai Margalit
En dépit du fait que tous les historiens sérieux, fussent-ils ardemment républicains, conviennent que la Révolution française pose un problème, l’imagerie officielle, celle des manuels scolaires du primaire et du secondaire, celle de la télévision, montre les événements de 1789 et des années suivantes comme le moment fondateur de notre société, en gommant tout ce qu’on veut cacher : la Terreur, la persécution religieuse, la dictature d’une minorité, le vandalisme artistique, etc. Aujourd’hui, on loue 1789 en reniant 1793. On veut bien de la Déclaration des Droits de l’homme, mais pas de la Loi des suspects. Mais comment démêler 1789 de 1793, quand on sait que le phénomène terroriste commence dès 1789 ? (…) L’idée de base du Livre noir de la Révolution est de montrer cette face de la réalité qui n’est jamais montrée, et rappeler qu’il y a toujours eu une opposition à la Révolution française, mais sans trahir l’Histoire. Qu’on le veuille ou non, qu’on l’aime ou non, la Révolution, c’est un pan de l’Histoire de la France et des Français. On ne l’effacera pas: au moins faut-il la comprendre. Jean Sévillia
The painting which I did after the defeat of the Republicans was L’ange du foyer (Fireside angel). This is, of course, an ironic title for a clumsy figure devastating everything that gets in its way. At the time, this was my impression of what was happening in the world, and I think I was right. Max Ernst (1948)
The war began in July 1936, when General Francisco- Franco led a revolt against the Spanish Republic. The Spanish Left had won a parliamentary majority but was unable to restrain those among them who were deter-mined that their turn in power should be used to destroy the Right. Franco’s revolt became a civil war, and Franco received the support of Mussolini’s Italy and Hitler’s Germany, which went so far as to send troops — using the Spanish war to try out new weapons and tactics. The Republicans were supported by volunteers from all over the world, as well as by Stalin’s Soviet Union. Horrifying and sadistic atrocities were committed by both sides After Franco’s victory the German painter Max Ernst created his spectral L’ange du foyer (Fireside angel), an apocalyptic monster bursting with destructive energy, a King-Kong-like Angel of Death spreading fear and terror. All art
The people now armed themselves with such weapons as they could find in armourer shops & privated houses, and with bludgeons, & were roaming all night through all parts of the city without any decided & practicable object. The next day the states press on the King to send away the troops, to permit the Bourgeois of Paris to arm for the preservation of order in the city, & offer to send a deputation from their body to tranquilize them. He refuses all their propositions. A committee of magistrates & electors of the city are appointed, by their bodies, to take upon them its government. The mob, now openly joined by the French guards, force the prisons of St. Lazare, release all the prisoners, & take a great store of corn, which they carry to the corn market. Here they get some arms, & the French guards begin to to form & train them. The City committee determine to raise 48,000 Bourgeois, or rather to restrain their numbers to 48,000, On the 16th they send one of their numbers (Monsieur de Corny whom we knew in America) to the Hotel des Invalides to ask arms for their Garde Bourgeoise. He was followed by, or he found there, a great mob. The Governor of the Invalids came out & represented the impossibility of his delivering arms without the orders of those from whom he received them. De Corny advised the people then to retire, retired himself, & the people took possession of the arms. It was remarkable that not only the invalids themselves made no opposition, but that a body of 5000 foreign troops, encamped with 400 yards, never stirred. Monsieur De Corny and five others were then sent to ask arms of Monsieur de Launai, Governor of the Bastille. They found a great collection of people already before the place, & they immediately planted a flag of truce, which was answered by a like flag hoisted on the parapet. The depositition prevailed on the people to fall back a little, advanced themselves to make their demand of the Governor. & in that instant a discharge from the Bastille killed 4 people of those nearest to the deputies. The deputies retired, the people rushed against the place, and almost in an instant were in possession of a fortification, defended by 100 men, of infinite strength, which in other times had stood several regular sieges & had never been taken. How they got in, has as yet been impossible to discover. Those, who pretend to have been of the party tell so many different stories as to destroy the credit of them all. They took all the arms, discharged the prisoners & such of the garrison as were not killed in the first moment of fury, carried the Governor and Lieutenant Governor to the Greve (the place of public execution) cut off their heads, & sent them through the city in triumph to the Palais royal… I have the honor to be with great esteem & respect, Sir, your most obedient and most humble servant. Thomas Jefferson (lettre à John Jay, 19 juillet 1789)
Les journées les plus décisives de la Révolution française sont contenues, sont impliquées dans ce premier fait qui les enveloppe : le 14 juillet 1789. Et voilà pourquoi aussi c’est la vraie date révolutionnaire, celle qui fait tressaillir la France ! On comprend que ce jour-là notre Nouveau Testament nous a été donné et que tout doit en découler. Léon Gambetta (14 juillet 1872)
Les légitimistes s’évertuent alors à démonter le mythe du 14 Juillet, à le réduire à l’expression violente d’une foule (pas du peuple) assoiffée de sang (les meurtres des derniers défenseurs de la Bastille malgré la promesse de protection) allant jusqu’au sacrilège du cadavre (des têtes dont celle du gouverneur Launay parcourant Paris plantée au bout d’une pique) (…) la Bastille n’était pas un bagne, occupée qu’elle était par quelques prisonniers sans envergure, elle n’était pas la forteresse du pouvoir royal absolu tourné contre le peuple à travers l’instrumentalisation des canons, elle n’était pas la forteresse à partir de laquelle la reconquête de la ville pouvait être envisagée puisqu’elle n’était défendue que par quelques soldats qui du reste se sont rendus en fin d’après-midi. Le mythe de la prise de la Bastille tombe de lui-même pour les monarchistes et même plus il est une création politique construisant artificiellement le mythe du peuple s’émancipant, plus encore il apparaît comme annonciateur de la Terreur, justifiant les surnoms de « saturnales républicaines », de « fête de l’assassinat »… Pierrick Hervé
Dans les grandes démocraties du monde, la Grande-Bretagne, l’Allemagne, les Etats-unis, le Canada, les fêtes nationales se fêtent sans défilé militaire. Ce sont les dictatures qui font les défilés militaires. C’est l’URSS, c’est la Chine, c’est l’Iran; ce sont des pays non démocratiques. Et la France est l’une des seules démocraties à organiser sa fête nationale autour d’un défilé militaire: ça n’a aucune justification même historique. Sylvain Garel (élu vert de Paris, 02.07.10)
Le défilé du 14 Juillet tel que nous le connaissons aujourd’hui n’a été instauré qu’en 1880, grâce à un vote de l’Assemblée nationale faisant du 14 juillet le jour de la Fête nationale française. La jeune IIIe République cherche à créer un imaginaire républicain commun pour souder le régime, après des décennies d’instabilité (Directoire, Consulat, premier et second Empire, IIe République …). C’est dans la même période que la Marseillaise sera adoptée comme hymne national. La date a pourtant fait polémique au sein de l’hémicycle. Pouvait-on adopter comme acte fondateur de la Nation la sanglante prise de la Bastille? Les conservateurs s’y opposent. Le rapporteur de la loi, Benjamin Raspail, propose alors une autre date : le 14 juillet 1790, jour de la Fête de la Fédération. Le premier anniversaire de la prise de la Bastille avait été célébré à Paris par le défilé sur le Champ-de-Mars de milliers de «fédérés», députés et délégués venus de toute la France. Louis XVI avait prêté serment à la Nation, et avait juré de protéger la Constitution. (…) Convaincue, l’Assemblée nationale a donc adopté le 14 Juillet comme Fête nationale, mais sans préciser si elle se réfèrait à 1789 ou 1790. (…) La IIIe République est née en 1870 après la défaite de l’Empereur Napoléon III à Sedan contre la Prusse. La France y a perdu l’Alsace et la Lorraine, ce qui sera vécu comme un traumatisme national. Dix ans après la défaite, le régime veut montrer que le pays s’est redressé. Jules Ferry, Léon Gambetta et Léon Say remettent aux militaires défilant à Longchamp de nouveaux drapeaux et étendards, remplaçant ceux de 1870. L’armée est valorisée comme protectrice de la Nation et de la République. Hautement symbolique, ce premier défilé du 14 Juillet permet également de montrer à l’opinion nationale et internationale le redressement militaire de la France, qui compte bien reconquérir les territoires perdus. Le caractère militaire du 14 Juillet est définitivement acquis lors du «Défilé de la victoire» de 1919 sur les Champs-Elysées. Le Figaro (16.07.11)
The line from from the Bastille to the gulag is not straight, but the connection is unmistakable. Modern totalitarianism has its roots in 1789. Indeed, the French Revolution was such a model for future revolutions that it redefined the word. That is why 1776 has long been treated as a kind of pseudo-revolution, as Irving Kristol pointed out in a prescient essay written during America’s confused and embarrassed bicentennial celebration of 1776. The American Revolution was utterly lacking in the messianic, bloody-minded idealism of the French. It rearranged the constitutional furniture. Its revolutionary leaders died in their own beds. What kind of a revolution was that?” The French Revolution failed …. because it tried to create the impossible: a regime both of liberty and of “patriotic” state power. The history of the revolution is proof that these goals are incompatible. The American Revolution succeeded because it chose one, liberty. The Russian Revolution became deranged when it chose the other, state power. The French Revolution, to its credit and sorrow, wanted both. (T)heir revolution, with its glamour and influence, did not only popularize, it deified revolution. There are large parts of the world where even today the worst brutality and arbitrariness are justified by the mere invocation of the word revolution – without reference to any other human value. For the Chinese authorities to shoot a dissident in the back of the head, they have only to show that he is a “counterrevolutionary.” The fate then, of all messianic revolution – revolution, that is, on the French model – is that in the end it can justify itself and its crimes only by reference to itself. In Saint-Just’s famous formulation: “The Republic consists in the extermination of everything that opposes it.” This brutal circularity of logic is properly called not revolution but nihilism. Charles Krauthammer (1989)
Attention: une fête peut en cacher une autre !
En ces temps désormais dits post-modernes et post-historiques …
Où sous le poids du progressisme le plus échevelé et d’une réalité migratoire proprement apocalyptique …
Les idées de nation et de patriotisme sont passés de gros mots à fictions objectives …
Et en ce jour où entre défilé militaire soviétique et débauche de drapeaux nationaux en d’autres temps proscrits …
Nous Français ne savons plus très bien ce que nous sommes censés fêter …
Comment ne pas repenser …
A ces fortes paroles du chroniqueur américain qui vient tout juste de disparaitre Charles Krauthammer
Rappelant lors du bicentenaire de la Révolution française …
La longue filiation pressentie dès 1937 par le peintre allemand Marx Ernst
Mais déjà prophétisée 2 000 ans plus tôt par l’Apocalypse …
Et hélas bien confirmée par l’histoire depuis …
Entre la Bastille et le goulag ?

A FAILED REVOLUTION
Charles Krauthammer
The Washington Post
July 14, 1989

Two hundred years ago today a mob stormed the Bastille and freed its seven prisoners: four forgers, two lunatics and an aristocrat imprisoned at his family’s request for « libertinism. » It might have been eight had not the Marquis de Sade — whose cell contained a desk, a wardrobe, a dressing table, tapestries, mattresses, velvet cushions, a collection of hats, three kinds of fragrances, night lamps and 133 books — left a week earlier.

When the battle was lost, the governor of the Bastille, a minor functionary named Bernard-Rene’ de Launay, could have detonated a mountain of gunpowder, destroying himself, the mob, and much of the surrounding faubourg Saint-Antoine. He chose instead to surrender. His reward was to be paraded through the street and cut down with knives and pistol shots. A pastry cook named Desnot, declining a sword, sawed off his head with a pocket knife. For the French Revolution, it was downhill from there on.

Now, after 200 years, the French themselves seem finally to be coming to terms with that reality. There is a tentativeness to this week’s bicentennial celebration that suggests that French enthusiasm for the revolution has tempered. This circumspection stems from two decades of revisionist scholarship that stresses the reformist impulses of the ancien regime and the murderous impulses of the revolutionary regime that followed.

Simon Schama’s « Citizens » is but the culmination of this trend. But the receptivity to such revisionism stems from something deeper: the death of doctrinaire socialism, which in France had long claimed direct descent from the revolution. Disillusion at the savage failure of the revolutions in our time — Russian, Chinese, Cuban, Vietnamese — has allowed reconsideration of the event that was father to them all. One might say that romance with revolution died with Solzhenitsyn.

The line from the Bastille to the gulag is not straight, but the connection is unmistakable. Modern totalitarianism has its roots in 1789. « The spirit of the French Revolution has always been present in the social life of our country, » said Gorbachev during his visit to France last week. Few attempts at ingratiation have been more true or more damning.

Indeed, the French Revolution was such a model for future revolutions that it redefined the word. That is why 1776 has long been treated as a kind of pseudo-revolution, as Irving Kristol pointed out in a prescient essay written during America’s confused and embarrassed bicentennial celebration of 1976. The American Revolution was utterly lacking in the messianic, bloody-minded idealism of the French. It rearranged the constitutional furniture. Its revolutionary leaders died in their own beds. What kind of revolution was that? Thirteen years later, Kristol’s answer has become conventional wisdom: a successful revolution, perhaps the only successful revolution of our time.

The French Revolution failed, argues Schama, because it tried to create the impossible: a regime both of liberty and of « patriotic » state power. The history of the revolution is proof that these goals are incompatible. The American Revolution succeeded because it chose one, liberty. The Russian Revolution became deranged when it chose the other, state power. The French Revolution, to its credit and sorrow, wanted both.

Its great virtue was to have loosed the idea of liberty upon Europe. Its great vice was to have created the model, the monster, of the mobilized militarized state — revolutionary France invented universal conscription, that scourge of the 20th century only now beginning to wither away.

The French cannot be blamed for everything, alas, but their revolution, with its glamour and influence, did not only popularize, it deified revolution. There are large parts of the world where even today the worst brutality and arbitrariness are justified by the mere invocation of the word revolution — without reference to any other human value. For the Chinese authorities to shoot a dissident in the back of the head, they have only to show that he is a « counterrevolutionary. » In Cuba, Gen. Arnaldo Ochoa Sanchez, erstwhile hero of the revolution, is condemned to death in a show trial and upon receiving his sentence confesses his sins and declares that at his execution his « last thought would be of Fidel and of the great revolution. »

The fate, then, of all messianic revolution — revolution, that is, on the French model — is that in the end it can justify itself and its crimes only by reference to itself. In Saint-Just’s famous formulation: « The Republic consists in the extermination of everything that opposes it. » This brutal circularity of logic is properly called not revolution but nihilism.

Voir par ailleurs:

The French Revolution

Quartz

July 14, 2018

Bloody beginnings and a long legacy


July 14 marks the 229th anniversary of the Storming of the Bastille and the symbolic start of the French Revolution. The bloody revolt toppled the 200-year-old Bourbon dynasty, and ushered in a radical new government, reshaping European history forever.

The French Revolution brought the world the terror of the guillotine and the ravages of the Napoleonic Wars. But in its radical reimagining of society, it swept away the conventions and structures that had governed France since the end of the Roman era, and introduced systems based on the enlightenment principles of reason and science.

Some of those ideas persist to this day—like the metric system, which emerged from the National Assembly’s desire to standardize weights and measures. Other, equally ambitious ideas, like the Republican calendar—with 10 months and 10-day weeks—somehow failed to catch on. More enduring were the radical concepts of the innate rights of men and women that run throughout western systems of law, philosophy, and political theory.

So on this Bastille Day, pop open the champagne, spread the brie thick, and run a kilometer or deux to celebrate two centuries of liberté, égalité, and fraternité.

By the digits

693: Deputies, out of the 745 in the National Assembly, who voted to convict King Louis XVI of treason on January 15, 1793. None voted to acquit. He was beheaded six days later.

16,594: Death sentences given to counter-revolutionaries during the Reign of Terror of 1793-94.

300,000: Estimated total number of French aristocrats, or 1% of the population, in 1789.

800: Estimated different standards for weights and measures in France before the introduction of the metric system.

100: Seconds in the metric minute, used for 17 months during the French Revolution.

7: Countries that don’t use the metric system as the official system of weights and measures. (Myanmar, Liberia, Palau, Micronesia, Samoa, the Marshall Islands, and the United States.)

fun fact!

Interstate 19 in Arizona is the only stretch of federal highway in the US to use kilometers exclusively. The signs, initially part of a pilot program by the Carter Administration to introduce the metric system, have been kept in place in part because the local tourism industry wants them to greet visitors from Mexico.

Brief history

The metric system


1215: The Magna Carta declares that there should be national standards for the measurement of wine, beer, and cloth.

1678: Anglican clergyman and philosopher John Wilkins publishes An Essay towards a Real Character, and a Philosophical Language, which proposes a universal language and system of measurement, based on units of 10.

1790: The National Assembly of France drafts a committee to establish a new standard for weights and measures that would be valid “for all people, for all time,” in the words of mathematician (and revolutionary) Marquis de Condorcet.

1799: The distance of the meter—named after metron, the Greek word for measure—is fixed at 1/10,000,000 of the length between the North Pole and the Equator, arrived at after two French surveyors spent six years measuring the distance between Dunkirk and Barcelona, which was used to calculate the longer distance. A platinum bar officially one meter long is cast.

1840: The metric system becomes compulsory in France.

1875: Seventeen nations (including the US) sign the Treaty of the Meter, creating international bodies to standardize weights and measurements worldwide, according to the metric system.

1975: US president Gerald Ford signs the Metric Conversion Act, declaring the metric system the preferred (but voluntary) system and establishing the US Metric Board, to speed America’s conversion.

1982: US president Ronald Reagan dismantles the Metric Board.

1999: Mars Climate Orbiter, a $328 million satellite, disintegrates over Mars because software produced by Lockheed Martin, the contractor, generated numbers in the English system instead of the metric system, as specified by its agreement with NASA.

The rights of women


When the revolutionaries of France wrote about égalité, few, if any, extended that right to women. One observer across the English Channel, however, saw that the principles of the revolution applied to women as well as men.

Mary Wollstonecraft—a British author who established herself when few women earned a living by writing—wrote A Vindication of the Rights of Women in 1791 in response to Edmund Burke’s Reflections on the French Revolution. While Burke argued the revolution would fail because society was inherently traditional and hierarchical, Wollstonecraft made the case not only for the rights of men, but for women as well—a radical position at the end of the 18th century.

In his book Emile, or On Education, Enlightenment philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau wrote that women should be educated only to the extent they could serve men. But Wollstonecraft argued that women “ought to cherish a nobler ambition, and by their abilities and virtues exact respect.” Women, she wrote, deserved the same opportunities as men, and should be able to earn a living and support themselves with dignity.

Wollstonecraft, the mother of Frankenstein author Mary Shelley, had a messy personal life, which was used to discredit her ideas in the 19th century. But her ideas inspired writers from Jane Austen to Virginia Woolf, and suffragists like Elizabeth Cady Stanton. By the 20th century, Wollstonecraft was rightly regarded as a pioneering feminist.

Giphy
Pop quiz

Which is not another name for the guillotine?

Scottish MaidenHalifax GibbetNational RazorUrsula’s Cleaver

If your inbox doesn’t support this quiz, find the solution at bottom of email.
save the date!

How to make time


The Republican Calendar was one of the more radical innovations of the revolution. Born out of a desire to wipe the slate of clean of aristocratic and religious references and start history afresh, the new calendar began on the autumn solstice of September 22, 1792, or 1 Vendemiaire I, the day the new Republic was proclaimed.

Instead of the seven-day week of the Bible, the Republican Calendar was based on the 10-day week, with the tenth day, decadi, devoted to rest and play. There were 10 months, each three weeks long, with five special days (or six, in a leap year) devoted to celebrations used to round out the year to 365 days. Those days bore names such as the Fête de la Vertu (Celebration of Virtues) and Fête de l’Opinion (Celebration of Convictions).

The calendar was designed by a committee that included mathematicians, astronomers, and poets, who based the naming of days and months after the agricultural cycle, and borrowed heavily from Latin. The winter months, for example, became Nivôse (snowy), Pluviôse (rainy), and Ventôse (windy). Each day also got a name—360 in all—replacing the Catholic convention of each day bearing the name of a saint. The fifth, 15th, and 25th days of each month were named after farm animals (bull, ram, duck), the 10th and 20th were named after farm implements (rakes, spades), while the rest were named after trees, fruits, vegetables and herbs. According to one modern calculation, today is 25 Messidor CCXXVI, named for the Guinea hen. (There’s a Twitter account that will help you keep up.)

As you might expect, there were problems. Starting each year on the autumnal equinox proved tricky, since the timing of astronomical events can vary and leap days had to be inserted to even things up, confusing everyone. Farm workers, the ostensible heroes the calendar celebrated, hated having a day off every 10 days instead of every seven. So 12 years after its introduction, it was abolished by Napoleon in 1806.

Giphy
Quotable

“Long usage of the Gregorian calendar has filled the people’s memory with a considerable number of images that they have long revered, and which today remain the source of their religious errors. It is therefore necessary to replace these visions of ignorance with the realities of reason, and this sacerdotal prestige with nature’s truth.”

— Committee to draft a new calendar

Watch this!

The French Revolution’s decimal time wasn’t the last attempt to rationalize timekeeping. A more recent effort was Swatch Internet Time in 1998. Part of a (not very successful) marketing campaign for a new line of watches, the system divided the 24-hour day into 1,000 “.beats” (yes, with a period—trés moderne).

The time, which was displayed on Swatches alongside boring old Gregorian time, was given as @416, which would be read as 416 beats after midnight, or 4am. Since it was the same all over the world, it was touted as being a new way of telling time that negated the need for translating pesky time zones.


Iran: La syrianisation a commencé (Death to farmers: As in Syria, water mismanagement and massive corruption could finally tip the balance against the Iranian regime)

2 juillet, 2018

 En plein cœur du lit de la mythique Zayandeh rud, la rivière qui a donné naissance à l'ancienne cité d'Ispahan. (Yann Leymarie)

Station d’approvisionnement en eau dans un village non loin de Khasab (Sultanat d’Oman), dans le détroit d’Ormuz, face à l’Iran, le 1er mai 2008 | REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah
Où est passée notre rivière? Slogan de paysans iraniens
Mort aux paysans ! Vivent les oppresseurs ! Slogan (ironique) de manifestants paysans iraniens
Ce n’est pas toujours en allant de mal en pis que l’on tombe en révolution. Il arrive le plus souvent qu’un peuple qui avait supporté sans se plaindre, et comme s’il ne les sentait pas, les lois les plus accablantes, les rejette violemment dès que le poids s’en allège. Le régime qu’une révolution détruit vaut presque toujours mieux que celui qui l’avait immédiatement précédé, et l’expérience apprend que le moment le plus dangereux pour un mauvais gouvernement est d’ordinaire celui il commence à se réformer. Il n’y a qu’un grand génie qui puisse sauver un prince qui entreprend de soulager ses sujets après une oppression longue. Le mal qu’on souffrait patiemment comme inévitable semble insupportable dès qu’on conçoit l’idée de s’y soustraire. Tout ce qu’on ôte alors des abus semble mieux découvrir ce qui en reste et en rend le sentiment plus cuisant : le mal est devenu moindre, il est vrai, mais la sensibilité est plus vive. La féodalité dans toute sa puissance n’avait pas inspiré aux Français autant de haine qu’au moment elle allait disparaître. Les plus petits coups de l’arbitraire de Louis XVI paraissaient plus difficiles à supporter que tout le despotisme de Louis XIV. Le court emprisonnement de Beaumarchais produisit plus d’émotion dans Paris que les dragonnades. Tocqueville (L’ancien régime et la révolution, 1856)
La révolution à plus de chances de se produire quand une période prolongée de progrès économiques et sociaux est suivie par une courte période de retournement aigu, devant laquelle le fossé entre les attentes et les gratifications s’élargit rapidement, devenant intolérable. La frustration qui en résulte, dès lors qu’elle s’étend largement dans la société, cherche des modes d’expression dans l’action violente. James Chowning Davies
De nombreux sociologues contemporains reprennent cette analyse de Tocqueville, en expliquant les conflits sociaux par la frustration résultant de l’écart croissant « entre ce que les gens désirent et ce qu’ils ont ». Pour Ted Gurr (Why men rebel, 1970), la révolution de 1917 serait due au contraste entre les attentes suscitées par les progrès accomplis depuis les années 1880 et la situation réelle de la paysannerie, du prolétariat naissant ou de l’intelligentsia. Pour James Davies (Toward a theory of Revolution, 1962), le concept de frustration relative trouvé chez Tocqueville a une plus grande portée que celui de frustration absolue attribué à Marx; il explique en effet que les révoltes naissent rarement dans les populations écrasées de misère mais chez ceux qui relèvent la tête et réalisent ce qui leur manque car ils ont plus. (…) Les grands conflits sociaux ou les changements révolutionnaires s’expliquent donc moins par des mécontentements à propos de grandes inégalités que par des sentiments « relatifs » basés sur des différences minimes, ou réduites par l’égalisation des conditions. Jean-Pierre Delas
Une opposition classique met en vis-à-vis la lecture marxienne, selon laquelle la dégradation des conditions de vie agirait comme facteur déterminant et explicatif des soulèvements révolutionnaires, à celle de Tocqueville, pour qui, au contraire, l’amélioration des situations économiques serait à l’origine des évènements révolutionnaires. James Chowning Davies, sociologue américain, tente une synthèse des deux points de vue dans un modèle associant l’idée d’une genèse progressive (liée à l’amélioration des conditions de vie sur plusieurs décennies) d’aspirations sociales longtemps contenues et la thèse des frustrations surgissant plus brutalement à l’occasion de retournements de conjonctures. Le modèle psycho-sociologique de James C. Davies (« Toward A Theory of Revolution » …) tente d’expliquer les renversements de régimes politiques par l’augmentation soudaine d’un écart entre les attentes de populations motivées par des progrès économiques et les satisfactions réelles brutalement réduites par un retournement de conjoncture économique (ex. : mauvaises récoltes, récession économique…) ou politique (ex. : répression brutale, défaite militaire…). (…) James C. Davies schématise sa théorie par une courbe devenue fameuse, dite « courbe de Davies » formant comme un « J » Inversé (…), qui pointe la période « t2 » comme début probable de la dynamique révolutionnaire. La première étude James C. Davies porte sur la rébellion conduite par Thomas W. Dorr – dite « Rébellion Dorr » – au milieu du 19e siècle à Rhode Island dans le nord-est des Etats-Unis. Durant la première moitié du 19e siècle l’industrie du textile se développe et prospère, attirant vers la ville des populations rurales jusqu’en 1835/1840 quand s’amorce une période déclin. La Rebellion Dorr, en 1841/1842 fut durement réprimée. A partir de cette étude de cas, l’auteur construit sont modèle et l’utiliser pour interpréter la Révolution française de 1789, la révolution du Mexique de 1911, la révolution russe de 1917, le coup d’état nassérien de 1952. L’exemple de la révolution russe lui permet de montrer que l’écart est d’autant plus fort que des progrès économiques importants marquèrent le XIXe siècle : à partir du milieu du 19e siècle les serfs s’émancipèrent, l’exode rural entraîna une processus d’urbanisation, le nombre d’ouvriers travaillant en usine augmenta en leur apportant des salaires supérieurs à ce qu’ils gagnaient comme paysans et des conditions de vie également améliorées. Ainsi la période allant de 1861 à 1905 peut être considérée comme celle d’une progression des aspirations sociales jusqu’à une conjoncture de frustrations qui intervient au début du XXe siècle dans différents groupes sociaux : intelligentsia choquée par la répression brutale des manifestations de 1905, paysannerie affectée par les effets des réformes et par une succession de mauvaises récoltes, armée humiliée par la défaite dans la guerre contre le Japon. La détresse et la famine qui affectent la majorité de la population pendant la Première Guerre mondiale achèvent d’agréger ces frustrations de préparer ainsi la révolution de 1917. Jérome Valluy
Many of the wars of this century were about oil, but wars of the next century will be about water. Ismail Serageldin (former World Bank vice-president of the World Bank, 1995)
La légitimité et la crédibilité d’un régime politique ne s’apprécie pas qu’à la seule aune du vote populaire, mais également à celle de sa capacité à assurer le bien être de son peuple et d’œuvrer pour l’intérêt national dans le respect des droits de l’homme. Un pouvoir qui ne puisse satisfaire cette double exigence est aussi digne de confiance qu’un gouvernement d’occupation, c’est hélas, Monsieur Khamenei, le cas de l’Iran de ces trente dernières années. (…) Il n’existe, de par le monde, qu’une poignée de régimes ayant privé leurs peuples aussi bien des droits humains fondamentaux que conduit leurs pays à la faillite économique. Il n’est donc pas étonnant de compter parmi vos rares pays alliés la Syrie, le Soudan ou la Corée du Nord. Reza Pahlavi
The uprising, once again showed that overthrowing theocracy in Iran is a national demand. Prince Reza Pahlavi
Le monde entier comprend que le bon peuple d’Iran veut un changement, et qu’à part le vaste pouvoir militaire des Etats-Unis, le peuple iranien est ce que ses dirigeants craignent le plus. Donald Trump
Les régimes oppresseurs ne peuvent perdurer à jamais, et le jour viendra où le peuple iranien fera face à un choix. Le monde regarde ! Donald Trump
L’Iran échoue à tous les niveaux, malgré le très mauvais accord passé avec le gouvernement Obama. Le grand peuple iranien est réprimé depuis des années. Il a faim de nourriture et de liberté. La richesse de l’Iran est confisquée, comme les droits de l’homme. Il est temps que ça change. Donald Trump
Les Iraniens courageux affluent dans les rues en quête de liberté, de justice et de droits fondamentaux qui leur ont été refusés pendant des décennies. Le régime cruel de l’Iran gaspille des dizaines de milliards de dollars pour répandre la haine au lieu de les investir dans la construction d’hôpitaux et d’écoles. Tenant compte de cela, il n’est pas étonnant de voir les mères et les pères descendre dans les rues. Le régime iranien est terrifié de son propre peuple. C’est d’ailleurs pour cela qu’il emprisonne les étudiants et interdit l’accès aux médias sociaux. Cependant, je suis sûr que la peur ne triomphera pas, et cela grâce au peuple iranien qui est intelligent, sophistiqué et fier. Aujourd’hui, le peuple iranien risque tout pour la liberté, mais malheureusement, de nombreux gouvernements européens regardent en silence alors que de jeunes Iraniens héroïques sont battus dans les rues. Ce n’est pas juste. Pour ma part, je ne resterai pas silencieux. Ce régime essaie désespérément de semer la haine entre nous, mais il échouera. Lorsque le régime tombera enfin, les Iraniens et les Israéliens seront à nouveau de grands amis. Je souhaite au peuple iranien du succès dans sa noble quête de liberté. Benjamin Netanyahou
What’s called drought is more often the mismanagement of water. And this lack of water has disrupted people’s income. Varzaneh journalist
Towns and villages around Isfahan have been hit so hard by drought and water diversion that they have emptied out and people who lived there have moved. Nobody pays any attention to them. And people close to Rouhani told me the government didn’t even know such a situation existed and there were so many grievances. Hadi Ghaemi (Center for Human Rights in Iran)
Farmers accuse local politicians of allowing water to be diverted from their areas in return for bribes. While the nationwide protests in December and January stemmed from anger over high prices and alleged corruption, in rural areas, lack of access to water was also a major cause, analysts say. In Syria, drought was one of the causes of anti-government protests which broke out in 2011 and led to civil war, making the Iranian drought particularly sensitive. Approximately 97 percent of the country is experiencing drought to some degree, according to the Islamic Republic of Iran Meteorological Organization. Rights groups say it has driven many people from their homes. A United Nations report last year noted, “Water shortages are acute; agricultural livelihoods no longer sufficient. With few other options, many people have left, choosing uncertain futures as migrants in search of work.” In early January, protests in the town of Qahderijan, some 10 km (6 miles) west of Isfahan, quickly turned violent as security forces opened fire on crowds, killing at least five people, according to activists. One of the dead was a farmer, CHRI said, and locals said water rights were the main grievance. Hassan Kamran, a parliamentarian from Isfahan, publicly criticised energy minister Reza Ardakanian this month, accusing him of not properly implementing a water distribution law. “The security and intelligence forces shouldn’t investigate our farmers. The water rights are theirs,” he told a parliamentary session. In early March, Ardakanian set up a working group comprising four ministers and two presidential deputies to deal with the crisis. Since the January protests, Rouhani has repeatedly said the government will do what it can to address grievances. But there is no quick fix for deeply rooted environmental issues like drought, observers say. Reuters
According to the agreement, Kuwait will get 900 million litres of water daily, Shaikh Ahmad said, without providing the financial details of the agreement. Earlier reports have said the project foresees building a pipeline to channel water from the Karun and Karkheh rivers in southwestern Iran to Kuwait at a cost of $2 billion. The Kuwaiti minister said the project is « vital » for Kuwait and is classified as « one of the highly important strategic projects ». Al Jazeera (2003)
Les médias sont rares à s’intéresser à la question, mais l’Iran fait face à une grande catastrophe, sauf si des mesures techniques sont immédiatement prises: la pénurie d’eau devient dramatique. L’Occident se polarise sur le programme nucléaire ou sur le maintien des sanctions économiques contre l’Iran mais élude le problème de l’eau, qui risque d’entraîner une agitation sociale en Iran avec pour conséquence une migration des populations. Pour camoufler la véritable rupture avec le gouvernement, les contestations sont pour l’instant étouffées dans les grandes villes. (…) Le problème ne date pas d’aujourd’hui puisque des mises en garde ont été publiées dès 2014. (…) En cause: l’absence d’investissements depuis plusieurs années dans les infrastructures des réseaux de distribution d’eau potable alors que la sécheresse sévit dans le pays et que plusieurs rivières iraniennes se sont asséchées. La seule mesure prise par les autorités consiste à rationner l’eau dans la capitale de huit millions d’habitants, avec pour conséquence les nombreuses protestations qui se sont élevées contre les coupures d’eau. (…) Il y a bien sûr des raisons climatiques qui expliquent cette pénurie mais les négligences du pouvoir sont immenses. Par manque d’eau, seules 12% des terres (19 millions d’hectares) sont exploitées pour l’agriculture alors que l’ensemble des terres arables est évalué à 162 millions d’hectares. Or, si des solutions techniques évoluées ne sont pas mises en place, la quantité d’eau n’augmentera pas dans les années à venir alors que le pays connaît une croissance démographique et une urbanisation accélérée. Par ailleurs, l’Iran n’a pas été économe de son eau. À force de pompages désordonnés, son sous-sol s’est vidé et la pluie n’est pas suffisamment abondante pour remplir les nappes souterraines. De nombreux puits ont été creusés illégalement par les Iraniens malgré une eau puisée polluée. L’agriculture iranienne n’est plus suffisante pour permettre une indépendance alimentaire vis-à-vis de l’étranger. À peine 40% des eaux usées sont traitées tandis que le reste est déversé dans les lacs et les rivières, aggravant la pollution. Par ailleurs, les sanctions ont aggravé la disponibilité de produits chimiques pour les installations d’eau. (…) Mais au lieu de prendre des mesures structurelles, le gouvernement a usé de l’arme du rationnement. Eshagh Jahanguiri, le premier vice-président, a prévenu: «Il y aura d’abord des coupures d’eau et, ensuite, des amendes pour les gros consommateurs.» C’est la meilleure manière de se mettre à dos la population qui menace le régime. Et pourtant l’Iran avait beaucoup appris d’Israël mais il a préféré choisir la rupture totale pour des motifs purement idéologiques. En raison de son climat semi-désertique, Israël avait beaucoup souffert d’un manque d’eau, même si certaines années les pluies ont été, par exception, abondantes. L’angoisse de la pénurie d’eau a poussé Israël à mettre en œuvre les techniques de dessalement de l’eau de mer parce que les risques de guerre à cause de l’eau grandissaient. Il s’est fondé sur les éléments qui ont conduit à la Guerre des Six Jours. La décision des Arabes et de l’Union soviétique de se livrer à un chantage avec les eaux du Jourdain ont créé la dynamique qui a conduit à la guerre en 1967. Régler les problèmes de l’eau, c’est éloigner les risques de guerre. Les gouvernements israéliens, avec l’aide de l’entreprise française Veolia, ont créé quatre usines de dessalement durant ces dix dernières années et une cinquième doit être mise en service à la fin de cette année 2015. La production couvrira 70% de l’eau consommée par les ménages israéliens. Par ailleurs, les efforts de traitement de 90% des eaux de récupération ont donné un coup de fouet à l’agriculture israélienne, qui a bénéficié d’une quantité d’eau presque illimitée provenant du recyclage des eaux usées. La plus grande usine mondiale de dessalement, par osmose inverse, a vu le jour en 2013 à Sorek. Elle est devenue la vitrine technologique d’Israël pour de nombreux pays du monde. Alors certains se mettent à rêver. (…) Israël en tant que plus gros producteur mondial d’eau désalinisée pourrait apporter son expertise à l’Iran dans le traitement de l’eau de mer. Israël s’était trouvé dans une situation comparable, avec 60% du pays occupé par le désert. Or, aujourd’hui, il dispose d’un trop-plein d’eau, qui lui permet, d’une part, de développer ses cultures de fruits et légumes à l’exportation pour plusieurs milliards de dollars et, d’autre part, d’exporter son eau en Jordanie, à Gaza et en Cisjordanie. La coopération n’est pas un leurre puisqu’elle a déjà existé jusqu’à la révolution islamique de 1979 avec des projets d’eau en Iran conçus et gérés par les Israéliens. Le Shah avait conscience de ce problème et, en 1960, il avait demandé de l’aide à la FAO (Organisation des Nations unies pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture), qui lui a envoyé trois experts israéliens. Ces ingénieurs ont alors prôné le creusement de puits et ont parallèlement enseigné aux agriculteurs iraniens la technique pour augmenter les rendements tout en consommant moins d’eau. Il a alors fait appel aux hydrologues et aux ingénieurs de l’eau de l’université de Ben Gourion, dans le Néguev, qui travaillèrent en Iran depuis 1962 pour ensuite quitter le pays in extremis par le dernier vol direct Téhéran-Tel Aviv en 1979. Les experts israéliens étaient intervenus dans la province de Qazvin dès 1962 après le tremblement de terre qui avait fait 12.000 morts et détruit tout le réseau de tunnels d’eau. (…) Les Iraniens ont alors collaboré sans complexes avec les Israéliens, qui ont formé pendant dix-sept ans des hydrologues iraniens. Longtemps après la Révolution, ils ont gardé d’excellentes relations avec les techniciens iraniens, dont beaucoup, d’ailleurs, se sont exilés, ce qui explique leur absence aujourd’hui en Iran. Jacques Benillouche
Où est passée notre rivière ?

Pour ceux qui n’ont toujours qu’Israël et que le nucléaire à la bouche …

Et qui s’étonnent de voir se soulever
Après 40 ans de corruption et de mauvaise gestion …
Des paysans iraniens ruinés par la pénurie d’eau …
Pendant qu’outre leur gaz et leur pétrole, leurs dirigeants bradent au plus offrant pour remplir leurs poches …
Comme au Koweit voisin depuis 15 ans 900 millions de litres d’eau par jour
Comment ne pas voir le scénario syrien qui s’annonce …
Pour un régime qui tout occupé à ses jeux géopolitiques en Syrie/Irak ou contre Israël …
S’obstine à refuser de voir comme son homologue de Damas avant lui …
La catastrophe depuis longtemps annoncée ?

Pour l’Iran, l’essentiel n’est pas le nucléaire mais l’eau

Régler les problèmes de l’eau, c’est éloigner les risques de guerre. Notamment en passant par une collaboration (renouvelée) entre l’Iran et Israël.

Les médias sont rares à s’intéresser à la question, mais l’Iran fait face à une grande catastrophe, sauf si des mesures techniques sont immédiatement prises: la pénurie d’eau devient dramatique. L’Occident se polarise sur le programme nucléaire ou sur le maintien des sanctions économiques contre l’Iran mais élude le problème de l’eau, qui risque d’entraîner une agitation sociale en Iran avec pour conséquence une migration des populations. Pour camoufler la véritable rupture avec le gouvernement, les contestations sont pour l’instant étouffées dans les grandes villes.

Infrastructures insuffisantes

Les dirigeants, à tous les échelons, prennent au sérieux la pénurie d’eau. Le Guide suprême lui-même s’en inquiète car aucune mesure concrète n’est pour l’instant planifiée. Le problème ne date pas d’aujourd’hui puisque des mises en garde ont été publiées dès 2014. En février 2015, l’adjoint du ministre de l’Énergie, Hamid-Reza Janbaz, a reconnu que «les villes de Bandar-Abbas [au sud], Sanandaj [à l’ouest] et Kerman [au sud-est] ainsi que 547 villes et villages à travers le pays sont confrontés à un problème de manque d’eau». En cause: l’absence d’investissements depuis plusieurs années dans les infrastructures des réseaux de distribution d’eau potable alors que la sécheresse sévit dans le pays et que plusieurs rivières iraniennes se sont asséchées.

La seule mesure prise par les autorités consiste à rationner l’eau dans la capitale de huit millions d’habitants, avec pour conséquence les nombreuses protestations qui se sont élevées contre les coupures d’eau. Le conseiller militaire de Khamenei, Rahim Safavi, a précisé que «des projets étaient en préparation pour échanger avec le Tadjikistan de l’eau contre le pétrole. Les crises de l’eau et de l’énergie sont étroitement liées avec la sécurité nationale et la défense». Mais il s’agit de mesures temporaires purement externes au pays. Le directeur de l’administration chargée de la gestion de l’eau potable et des eaux usées de la ville de Téhéran a prévenu, le 14 août, que les réserves d’eaux disponibles dans les barrages pouvaient seulement satisfaire les besoins des habitants de la capitale pendant un mois. Cinq barrages de la province de Khorasan sont totalement à sec, privant d’eau beaucoup de villes. Pour les mollahs, le problème de l’eau est devenu une question de sécurité d’État.

Nappes phréatiques vides

Il y a bien sûr des raisons climatiques qui expliquent cette pénurie mais les négligences du pouvoir sont immenses. Par manque d’eau, seules 12% des terres (19 millions d’hectares) sont exploitées pour l’agriculture alors que l’ensemble des terres arables est évalué à 162 millions d’hectares. Or, si des solutions techniques évoluées ne sont pas mises en place, la quantité d’eau n’augmentera pas dans les années à venir alors que le pays connaît une croissance démographique et une urbanisation accélérée.

Pour les mollahs, le problème de l’eau est devenu une question de sécurité d’État

Par ailleurs, l’Iran n’a pas été économe de son eau. À force de pompages désordonnés, son sous-sol s’est vidé et la pluie n’est pas suffisamment abondante pour remplir les nappes souterraines. De nombreux puits ont été creusés illégalement par les Iraniens malgré une eau puisée polluée. L’agriculture iranienne n’est plus suffisante pour permettre une indépendance alimentaire vis-à-vis de l’étranger. À peine 40% des eaux usées sont traitées tandis que le reste est déversé dans les lacs et les rivières, aggravant la pollution. Par ailleurs, les sanctions ont aggravé la disponibilité de produits chimiques pour les installations d’eau.

Isa Kalantari, l’un des conseillers du président Rohani, avait mis en garde les dirigeants iraniens contre les conséquences d’une pénurie d’eau sur la population de 75 millions d’habitants. Cet expert, agronome de formation, avait réussi à sensibiliser les gouvernements dont il a fait partie en tant que ministre de l’Agriculture de 1989 à 1997 sous la présidence de Rafsandjani et de 1997 à 2001 sous le président Mohammad Khatami. Il a bien fait comprendre que le régime jouait gros et qu’il pouvait tomber sur cette question parce qu’elle était minimisée face au problème du nucléaire. Mais au lieu de prendre des mesures structurelles, le gouvernement a usé de l’arme du rationnement. Eshagh Jahanguiri, le premier vice-président, a prévenu: «Il y aura d’abord des coupures d’eau et, ensuite, des amendes pour les gros consommateurs.» C’est la meilleure manière de se mettre à dos la population qui menace le régime.

Iran partenaire d’Israël

Et pourtant l’Iran avait beaucoup appris d’Israël mais il a préféré choisir la rupture totale pour des motifs purement idéologiques. En raison de son climat semi-désertique, Israël avait beaucoup souffert d’un manque d’eau, même si certaines années les pluies ont été, par exception, abondantes. L’angoisse de la pénurie d’eau a poussé Israël à mettre en œuvre les techniques de dessalement de l’eau de mer parce que les risques de guerre à cause de l’eau grandissaient. Il s’est fondé sur les éléments qui ont conduit à la Guerre des Six Jours. La décision des Arabes et de l’Union soviétique de se livrer à un chantage avec les eaux du Jourdain ont créé la dynamique qui a conduit à la guerre en 1967. Régler les problèmes de l’eau, c’est éloigner les risques de guerre.

Les gouvernements israéliens, avec l’aide de l’entreprise française Veolia, ont créé quatre usines de dessalement durant ces dix dernières années et une cinquième doit être mise en service à la fin de cette année 2015. La production couvrira 70% de l’eau consommée par les ménages israéliens. Par ailleurs, les efforts de traitement de 90% des eaux de récupération ont donné un coup de fouet à l’agriculture israélienne, qui a bénéficié d’une quantité d’eau presque illimitée provenant du recyclage des eaux usées. La plus grande usine mondiale de dessalement, par osmose inverse, a vu le jour en 2013 à Sorek. Elle est devenue la vitrine technologique d’Israël pour de nombreux pays du monde.

Les Israéliens ont formé pendant dix-sept ans des hydrologues iraniens

Alors certains se mettent à rêver. À présent que le problème du nucléaire est réglé pour au moins dix ans, Israël en tant que plus gros producteur mondial d’eau désalinisée pourrait apporter son expertise à l’Iran dans le traitement de l’eau de mer. Israël s’était trouvé dans une situation comparable, avec 60% du pays occupé par le désert. Or, aujourd’hui, il dispose d’un trop-plein d’eau, qui lui permet, d’une part, de développer ses cultures de fruits et légumes à l’exportation pour plusieurs milliards de dollars et, d’autre part, d’exporter son eau en Jordanie, à Gaza et en Cisjordanie.

La collaboration entre l’Iran et Israël sur le problème de l’eau est une question de volonté nouvelle malgré les antagonismes politiques car elle a déjà fonctionné dans le passé. Le côté commercial ne serait pas le seul soulevé. Sur le plan politique, cette nouvelle coopération pourrait rassurer les Israéliens face au projet nucléaire de l’Iran et satisferait les États-Unis, qui cherchent d’une part à réduire l’influence des pays arabes en réintroduisant l’Iran dans le concert des Nations et d’autre part à mettre fin à l’isolement d’Israël. Pour les États-Unis, l’Iran n’est plus l’ennemi; il a été remplacé par Daech et ses troupes sanguinaires.

Une expérience sous le Shah

La coopération n’est pas un leurre puisqu’elle a déjà existé jusqu’à la révolution islamique de 1979 avec des projets d’eau en Iran conçus et gérés par les Israéliens. Le Shah avait conscience de ce problème et, en 1960, il avait demandé de l’aide à la FAO (Organisation des Nations unies pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture), qui lui a envoyé trois experts israéliens. Ces ingénieurs ont alors prôné le creusement de puits et ont parallèlement enseigné aux agriculteurs iraniens la technique pour augmenter les rendements tout en consommant moins d’eau. Il a alors fait appel aux hydrologues et aux ingénieurs de l’eau de l’université de Ben Gourion, dans le Néguev, qui travaillèrent en Iran depuis 1962 pour ensuite quitter le pays in extremis par le dernier vol direct Téhéran-Tel Aviv en 1979.

Les experts israéliens étaient intervenus dans la province de Qazvin dès 1962 après le tremblement de terre qui avait fait 12.000 morts et détruit tout le réseau de tunnels d’eau. Au Moyen Âge, Qazvin était surnommée la «ville aux réservoirs d’eau». Sur la centaine de réservoirs d’eau (Ab anbar), seulement dix survivent aujourd’hui, Qazvin était le grenier de Téhéran mais la catastrophe avait laissé les agriculteurs sans eau. Les Iraniens ont alors collaboré sans complexes avec les Israéliens, qui ont formé pendant dix-sept ans des hydrologues iraniens. Longtemps après la Révolution, ils ont gardé d’excellentes relations avec les techniciens iraniens, dont beaucoup, d’ailleurs, se sont exilés, ce qui explique leur absence aujourd’hui en Iran.

Filière des eaux lacunaires

Malgré la richesse tirée de son pétrole, l’Iran n’a jamais investi pour former de bons professionnels de l’eau et ceux qui ont été en contact avec les Israéliens avaient une formation très insuffisante pour faire de bons techniciens. Ils avaient besoin au préalable d’une formation en mathématiques avancée, en géologie, en hydrologie et en chimie. Les Israéliens avaient progressivement comblé ces lacunes et ils avaient tellement passé de temps à Qazvin que les commerçants avaient fini par apprendre l’hébreu pour faciliter les contacts et le commerce. Immédiatement après la Guerre de Six Jours, le Shah avait fait l’honneur d’une visite à Qazvin pour rencontrer et remercier les Israéliens pour leur excellent travail. Il avait par la suite préconisé l’envoi de militaires et de scientifiques iraniens en Israël pour apprendre les techniques avancées. Mais, signe annonciateur des futures relations, les Israéliens avaient été introduits dans tous les milieux sauf dans les milieux religieux. Les ordres venaient de Khomeiny en exil, qui avait besoin du soutien de Yasser Arafat pour sa conquête du pouvoir.

Malgré la richesse tirée de son pétrole, l’Iran n’a jamais investi pour former de bons professionnels de l’eau

L’expérience iranienne avait permis à Israël de commercialiser ses techniques de pointe en créant le groupe Tahal (planification de l’eau pour Israël), spécialisé dans le traitement de l’eau et devenu rapidement une multinationale. Cette société avait ensuite hérité d’un contrat complémentaire consistant à distribuer du gaz dans les appartements de la deuxième grande ville d’Iran, Machhad. Mékorot, la compagnie israélienne des eaux, avait obtenu de son côté le contrat pour le percement et l’installation de conduites d’eau en Iran tandis que le constructeur Solel Boneh avait été chargé de la réalisation de barrages. Toute la filière des eaux était sous la responsabilité israélienne mais elle n’a pas survécu à leur départ.

En effet, durant l’année 1968, la société gouvernementale israélienne, IDE, avait construit trente-six petites unités de dessalement d’eau de mer sur commande des forces aériennes iraniennes. Le hasard a voulu que les Iraniens contactent en 2007 l’un des dirigeants d’IDE, à une foire commerciale en Europe, pour chercher une ouverture avec sa société. Ils lui avaient précisé que les unités de dessalement construites par les Israéliens avaient vieilli et qu’ils n’avaient pas réussi à les reconstruire, sous-entendu qu’ils étaient prêts à trouver un nouvel accord si les véritables maîtres-d’œuvre apparaissaient masqués. Ils avouaient en fait que l’Iran avait perdu cette technicité enseignée par les Israéliens, d’une part parce que les experts avaient fui le pays et, d’autre part, parce que d’autres avaient été exécutés pour des raisons obscures, sous accusation de complicité avec les sionistes.

L’industrie de l’eau en Iran a subi un coup irréversible, qui a créé la pénurie. Les Iraniens peuvent toujours trouver des solutions temporaires touchant uniquement la population et pénalisant leur agriculture. Mais si les dirigeaient iraniens choisissaient le pragmatisme en s’adressant au spécialiste mondial qui a transformé la pénurie en excédent, alors ils sauveraient leur régime dans leur intérêt et celui de leur population. Mais il faudrait pour cela des mollahs courageux et pragmatiques qui cesseraient de vouer aux gémonies l’État juif. Seul le problème crucial de l’eau pourrait réconcilier les deux ennemis irréductibles.

Voir aussi:

La crise de l’eau en Iran : tensions sociales et impasses économiques (1/2)
Jonathan Piron

Les Clés du Moyen-orient

14/03/2018

Jonathan Piron est historien et politologue. Conseiller au sein d’Etopia, centre de recherche basé à Bruxelles, il y suit les enjeux liés à l’Iran.

L’Iran est aujourd’hui frappé par une série de dégradations environnementales, aux répercussions potentiellement déstabilisatrices. Parmi différents éléments, la question de l’accès à l’eau occupe un rôle central. Les pénuries dans les irrigations des terres agricoles, la diminution des nappes phréatiques et des zones humides, la déforestation et la désertification sont les principaux défis. Cette situation problématique s’aggraverait avec les effets des changements climatiques. La réduction des précipitations et l’élévation des températures pourraient rendre certaines régions inhabitables, entraînant une hausse des flux migratoires. Les conséquences en seraient un accroissement des tensions sociales et économiques voire politiques à l’échelle du pays.

Comprendre ces dynamiques en cours permet d’éclairer, sous un autre jour, les mutations actuelles en Iran. Cette approche se déclinera en quatre points, autour des causes et des impacts de cet épuisement des ressources en eau, suivi des réactions tant sociales que politiques.

1. Un épuisement généralisé des ressources en eau

Dans un premier temps, il est nécessaire de définir ce que l’on entend par « crises » de l’eau. Le Département des affaires économiques et sociales du Secrétariat général des Nations unies définit la rareté de l’eau comme étant « le point auquel l’impact de tous les utilisateurs affecte l’approvisionnement ou la qualité de l’eau selon les arrangements institutionnels existants dans la mesure où la demande de tous les secteurs ne peut être pleinement satisfaite (1) ». La pénurie d’eau peut être due à des phénomènes naturels ou humains voire une conjonction de ces deux facteurs. Parmi les facteurs humains affectant son accès figurent la distribution inégale de l’eau mais aussi le gaspillage, la pollution et une mauvaise gouvernance. Enfin, les changements climatiques ont une nouvelle influence sur ces ressources, plaçant un nombre croissant de régions dans une situation de manque parfois chronique.

L’Iran cumule plusieurs de ces causes. Sa situation géographique rend déjà le pays fragile par rapport à la disponibilité de ces ressources. Qualifié d’aride et semi-aride, l’Iran se caractérise par des précipitations annuelles variées : alors que la moyenne des précipitations est de 50mm par an sur le plateau central, certaines régions autour de la mer Caspienne affichent un taux de 1600mm par an. Avec une moyenne annuelle de 250mm, pour une moyenne mondiale de 860mm, l’Iran subit, en outre, différents autres phénomènes tels que l’évapotranspiration, empêchant une partie des eaux de pluie de descendre dans le sol.

Les changements climatiques affectent ces stocks d’eau disponibles, via un accroissement des températures et une diminution des précipitations. Au cours des 50 dernières années, le pays a fait face à 10 sécheresses sévères dont celle de 2001-2004 a eu de profonds impacts au sein de différents secteurs économiques. Sous le poids du réchauffement climatique, la récurrence de ces phénomènes tendrait à s’accroître. Rien qu’en 2017, près de 96% de la superficie totale de l’Iran aurait souffert de différents niveaux de sécheresse prolongée, selon le responsable de la gestion des sécheresses et des crises à l’Organisation météorologique iranienne (2). Les prévisions pour la prochaine décennie ne sont guère optimistes. Plusieurs projections semblent montrer qu’à moyen terme, en Iran, les précipitations continueraient à décroître alors que la température, de son côté, connaîtrait une tendance à la hausse, accroissant la fréquence des périodes de sécheresses.

Cette situation s’aggrave sous le poids de la surconsommation et de l’absence d’une gouvernance efficace dans la distribution de l’eau. Cette surconsommation, particulièrement problématique, est aussi bien individuelle que collective. Elle trouve une partie de ses origines dans la forte augmentation de la population iranienne en quarante ans. De 37 millions d’habitants en 1979, celle-ci est passée à près de 83 millions d’habitants en 2016. Cette hausse a d’autant plus réduit la quantité d’eau disponible par personne que les habitudes de consommation se sont accrues de leur côté. La consommation du pays est ainsi passée de 100 millions de m³ par an en 1979 à 11 milliards de m³ en 2014. Reportée par habitant, la moyenne de consommation était, en 2016, de 250 litres par personne par jour, avec une pointe à 400 litres par personne par jour à Téhéran.

Un secteur est particulièrement pointé du doigt : celui lié au milieu agricole. Ce dernier, à lui seul, exploite 90 % des ressources hydriques. Cette disproportion résulte d’un sous-investissement et d’un manque de stratégie sectorielle. En vue d’asseoir l’auto-suffisance du pays, une politique de subsides inadaptés, notamment envers les fertilisants, a dramatiquement endommagé nombre de terres arables. De plus, face à la hausse du prix de l’énergie, de nombreux agriculteurs n’ont eu d’autres choix que de recourir à des pompages illégaux, à la fois pour diminuer leurs frais mais également pour dégager de nouveaux accès face au tarissement de leurs nappes phréatiques. Les stocks d’eau restants se retrouvent confrontés à une pression accrue, échappant au contrôle des autorités publiques. Les zones asséchées sont finalement abandonnées, contribuant au processus de désertification. Cet assèchement des terres trouve une autre origine dans différents grands projets de constructions hydrauliques menés depuis les années 1990 et 2000. La construction frénétique de barrages a accéléré l’assèchement des rivières et des zones humides telles que marais, landes et lagunes dont le rôle écologique est pourtant important. En 2015, pas moins de 647 de ces ouvrages d’art étaient en service en Iran, dont l’utilité est aujourd’hui remise en question au regard de ces conséquences. Enfin, différents projets industriels ont gravement saccagé les rivières et nappes phréatiques de diverses régions. Dans le Lorestan, des rejets provenant d’installations minières ont pollué plusieurs sources irriguant des terres agricoles tandis que sur la rivière Karun, ces rejets ont rendu toxique une importante partie du cours d’eau.

2. Les conséquences : déstabilisations locales et migrations environnementales

Les conséquences de ces différentes perturbations sont lourdes. En 50 ans, l’Iran a épuisé 70 % des capacités aquifères de ses ressources souterraines. Sur les 32 provinces de la République islamique, 13 sont dans une situation critique. À l’est, dans la province de Kerman, 1 455 villages sur 2 064 ont vu les capacités de leurs réservoirs descendre sous le seuil du volume nécessaire à la population. En 2015, 541 villages de la province dépendaient d’un approvisionnement d’eau assuré par des camions citernes. Les économies locales et régionales en sortent directement affectées. Toujours dans l’est, des cultures comme celle de la pistache ou du safran souffrent de profonds problèmes d’irrigation. Les principaux lacs et rivières du pays sont tout autant mis à rude épreuve. Le lac Orumiyeh, un des plus grands lacs salés du Moyen-Orient, situé dans le nord-ouest de l’Iran, a quasiment disparu. Dans la province de Fars, la construction de barrages sur les rivières Pulvar et Kor afin d’irriguer les terres arides, a contribué à l’assèchement des lacs de Tashk et de Kâftar.

Confrontées à ces situations problématiques, de nombreuses communautés d’habitants n’ont souvent d’autres choix que de migrer, face à l’effondrement à la fois environnemental et économique. Les villages de moins de 100 habitants, parmi les plus vulnérables, se vident de leurs habitants, comme dans le sud du Khorasan. Dans la province de l’Azerbaïdjan, dans le nord-ouest de l’Iran, 3 millions d’habitants seraient susceptibles de quitter leur région suite à l’assèchement du lac Orumiyeh. Ces migrations environnementales intensifient l’exode rural vers les villes moyennes du pays, déjà soumises à un fort afflux de nouveaux habitants. Les migrants n’ont d’autres choix que de s’installer dans les banlieues des villes moyennes, saturées par un étalement urbain non coordonné. Pauvreté, chômage, manque d’accès aux services publics finissent par déstabiliser encore plus des couches sociales fragiles qui s’enfoncent dans le cercle vicieux de la précarité.

Enfin, à ce tableau doit s’ajouter un autre facteur, exogène. Les différents conflits dans la région, tel que le conflit afghan, ont eu à leur tour des conséquences néfastes sur les ressources en eau en Iran. Le lac Hamoun, à cheval sur la frontière irano-afghane, s’est retrouvé asséché suite aux conflits entourant le contrôle de l’Helmand, qui l’alimente depuis l’Afghanistan. Le recul des berges a entraîné des pertes d’emplois importantes pour les pécheurs et les familles de la région, ainsi que la disparition d’une faune et d’une flore stabilisant le biotope local. 800 villages aux alentours du lac ont ainsi été confrontés à un déplacement d’une partie de leurs habitants.

Notes :
(1) Water scarcity, in International Decade for Action « Water for life » 2005-2015, New York, United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, 2014, [en ligne], http://www.un.org/waterforlifedecade/scarcity.shtml.
(2) « 96% of Iran experiencing prolonged drought : official » in Tehran Times, Téhéran, 8 janvier 2018, [en ligne], http://www.tehrantimes.com/news/420112/96-of-Iran-experiencing-prolonged-drought-official.

La crise de l’eau en Iran : tensions sociales et impasses économiques (2/2)

Jonathan Piron

Les Clés du Moyen-orient

14/03/2018

Jonathan Piron est historien et politologue. Conseiller au sein d’Etopia, centre de recherche basé à Bruxelles, il y suit les enjeux liés à l’Iran.

3. Mobilisations et contestations

Face à cet épuisement généralisé des ressources en eau, différentes mobilisations sociales se sont organisées pour tenter de dégager des solutions et interpeller les autorités. Des dynamiques traditionnelles ont refait surface, comme à Birjand dans le Khorasan, au début de l’année 2018, où une prière de la pluie a rassemblé plusieurs centaines de personnes appelant à la clémence de la providence face à la sécheresse en cours. Au-delà de ces mobilisations traditionnelles, d’autres modes de conscientisations se sont développés au cours des dernières années. Une forme nouvelle d’activisme, centré sur les enjeux environnementaux, est apparue en Iran depuis les années nonante, renforcée ces dernières années par l’ouverture que la présidence Rouhani a laissée aux associations et ONG diverses.

Ces différents groupes peuvent se décliner suivant deux catégories d’actions : la conscientisation du grand public face aux enjeux écologiques, d’une part, et l’action de lobbying, d’autre part, destiné à porter des demandes de réformes principalement au niveau local. Pour parvenir à porter ces actions, les réseaux sociaux se sont révélés être des outils utiles aux différents mouvements, via des plates-formes numériques telles que Facebook, Instagram, Twitter ou Telegram. Des groupes tels que Une goutte d’eau (Yek ghatreh ab) et Traces d’eau (Seda-ye pa-ye ab) sont ainsi spécialement dédiés aux enjeux hydriques. D’autres canaux, plus génériques, comme La voix du peuple (Seda-ye mardom) sur Telegram servent aussi de lieux d’échanges d’images et d’informations sur les sécheresses et le manque d’accès à l’eau. La presse joue également, de son côté, un rôle de diffuseur d’informations important. Loin d’être un tabou, la question environnementale fait l’objet de reportages et débats, aussi bien écrits que radiodiffusés. Des magazines spécialisés n’hésitent pas à s’emparer de la question, à l’image de Femmes d’aujourd’hui (Zanan-e Emrouz) via un focus sur le rôle que les femmes peuvent jouer dans de nouveaux modes de gestions efficaces.

À ces mobilisations pacifiques doivent s’ajouter des périodes de contestations remettant ouvertement en question l’autorité publique. Depuis plusieurs années, le nombre de manifestations dénonçant les carences et crises environnementales ne cesse de croître dans le pays. Touchant l’ensemble de l’Iran, ces manifestations rassemblent aussi bien des agriculteurs dénonçant l’absence de redistribution efficace d’eau pour les cultures (comme à Ramshir, Rafsanjan, Ispahan, Rabor, etc.) que des citoyens faisant part de leurs protestations face à la pollution des cours d’eau (comme à Ahvaz, Yasooj, Sarkhoon, Orumiah, etc.). En général non-violentes, ces manifestations rassemblant en moyenne une centaine de personnes, insistent sur l’importance de l’eau en tant qu’outil non seulement économique mais également en tant que droit dont l’accès doit être garanti à tous.

Certains événements prennent cependant plus d’ampleur. En février 2017, à Ahvaz, dans le sud-ouest du pays, la conjonction de coupures de courants, de tempêtes de poussières et de mauvaise gestion des ressources en eau a entraîné une série de protestations populaires s’étalant sur plusieurs jours. Ville d’un peu plus d’un million d’habitants, bordée par la seule rivière navigable d’Iran, le Karun, Ahvaz rassemble les différents éléments déstabilisant les écosystèmes iraniens. Profondément affectée par les périodes de sécheresse, la ville et sa région subissent les effets d’une construction de barrages mal planifiée, ayant provoqué l’assèchement des marais locaux, ce qui a augmenté le niveau de particules de poussière dans l’air jusqu’à atteindre des niveaux records. Conjugué au phénomène des tempêtes de poussières, ces facteurs ont entraîné une détérioration progressive des ressources en eau de la région ainsi qu’un accroissement de la pollution pour les sources restantes. Ces différentes tensions dues aux questions liées à l’eau pourraient également avoir alimenté les manifestations ayant secoué l’Iran en décembre 2017 et janvier 2018. Même si l’enjeu économique occupait la première place dans les récriminations des manifestants, les différentes cités touchées par ces rassemblements sont aussi celles faisant face à divers problèmes environnementaux, dont ceux liés à un approvisionnement correct en eau.

Plusieurs sondages réalisés début 2018 ont montré l’importance que revêt, pour nombre d’Iraniens, une prise en compte correcte des enjeux environnementaux, aussi bien en ce qui concerne un meilleur accès à l’eau que dans le cadre de la lutte contre la pollution ou du soutien aux agriculteurs en difficulté. Néanmoins, la défense de l’environnement reste un activisme encore difficile en Iran. Le pouvoir en place soutient peu les organisations environnementales. Celles-ci disposent de faibles moyens et ne reçoivent qu’un maigre écho de la part des autorités. En outre, les arrestations de militants environnementaux ne sont pas rares et peuvent avoir des conséquences tragiques comme avec le décès de Kavous Seyed Emami, environnementaliste renommé, mort en prison dans des circonstances floues en février 2018.

4. Quelle prise de conscience politique ?

Le régime iranien est cependant conscient des enjeux en cours. Déjà, la Constitution de la République islamique reprend plusieurs éléments en faveur de l’environnement. Les articles 45, 48 et 50 soutiennent que les éléments naturels doivent bénéficier au bien public. L’article 50, de son côté, met en avant le principe même de protection de l’environnement (1). Ensuite, loin d’être un tabou, cette crise environnementale fait l’objet de débats et d’interpellations dans les différents cercles du pouvoir, du Parlement (Majles) aux think-tanks proches de la présidence comme le Centre d’études stratégiques. Durant la précédente campagne présidentielle de 2017, plusieurs candidats pointaient la mauvaise gouvernance, l’exploitation effrénée des ressources et le manque d’entretien des plans d’eau comme étant les principales causes de ces dégradations. Le sommet du pouvoir insiste de son côté sur l’importance de ces questions. En 2015, dans une directive adressée à la présidence, au moment du Sommet climat de Paris, le guide de la Révolution, Ali Khamenei, insistait sur la nécessité de gérer les changements climatiques et les menaces environnementales telles que la désertification, en particulier la pollution par les poussières et la sécheresse.

Néanmoins, la politique du pouvoir en place se caractérise par une série de pratiques particulièrement dommageables pour les ressources en eau. Sous la présidence Ahmadinejad, malgré plusieurs aides accordées aux couches les plus précaires, les constructions industrielles endommageant les nappes phréatiques n’ont guère cessé. De son côté, la présidence Rouhani s’est caractérisée par la volonté de relancer avant tout la croissance économique, au risque de fragiliser à nouveau des espaces déjà menacés.

En outre, le régime manque non seulement de moyens mais peut-être surtout d’une vision stratégique concernant son avenir environnemental. À la différence de nombreux autres États, la République islamique ne dispose pas d’un Ministère de l’Environnement à part entière. Le Département de l’Environnement, sous l’autorité du Président de la République, pèse peu face à d’autres puissants ministères tels que celui du pétrole. L’administration est aussi faiblement efficace dans la poursuite des comportements polluants réalisés par certaines entreprises. Enfin, les luttes intestines entre différents départements traitant les questions économiques et environnementales ainsi que la corruption finissent par rendre inopérantes des mesures pourtant indispensables. Insistant prioritairement sur des investissements internationaux, notamment dans la promotion de l’énergie verte, les différents responsables iraniens semblent rétifs à promouvoir d’autres modes de gouvernance ou à engager une politique environnementale systémique, permettant une approche suffisamment efficace que pour répondre aux dégradations en cours. La crise de l’eau n’est, en effet, pas la seule crise environnementale à laquelle doit faire face le pays. D’autres phénomènes tels que l’accroissement des tempêtes de poussière, la déforestation et la pollution de l’air contribuent à plonger l’Iran dans une crise profonde. Cette conjonction de différents phénomènes complique à la fois la coordination des politiques à mettre en place tout en accroissant les tensions sur les ressources et milieux naturels du pays.

5. Un avenir incertain ?

L’Iran se retrouve confronté à de nombreuses incertitudes quant à ses moyens et à ses capacités à sortir de cette crise profonde. Le débat qui se pose aujourd’hui est celui de la sécurité environnementale présente et à venir. Un signe positif est la prise de conscience qui semble dorénavant acquise au vu de l’essor de mouvements sensibilisant à ces questions ainsi qu’aux différentes manifestations en cours. Loin d’être uniquement centré sur la question de l’accès aux ressources, ces débats touchent d’autres questions telles que celles liées aux emplois locaux et à la lutte contre les inégalités.

Des solutions existent autour de différentes politiques à soutenir et mettre en place. Tout d’abord via des investissements massifs tout d’abord dans des techniques agricoles plus responsables ainsi que dans la restauration des capacités hydriques des lacs et rivières. Les mécanismes de micro-crédits ainsi que la promotion de bonnes pratiques auprès des milieux agricoles sont une autre voie à suivre. Des expériences pilotes d’agriculture durable sont ainsi menées dans certaines régions du pays, dont les résultats semblent prometteurs (2). La valorisation du système des Qanats est aussi une autre piste. Galeries souterraines ancestrales acheminant les eaux des nappes phréatiques vers les zones à irriguer, les Qanats sont un système toujours en activité et reposant sur une gouvernance laissée aux mains des agriculteurs. Représentant encore 9 % du système d’extraction souterrain iranien, les 32.000 Qanats représentent donc aussi un potentiel pouvant aider à la sécurité hydrique de l’Iran. Enfin, une meilleure coopération internationale est une dernière voie à approfondir, autour d’une « diplomatie de l’eau » dont les effets positifs s’étendraient au-delà des seules frontières nationales.

La résolution de ces crises ne pourra passer par une approche unique. Seule une vision basée sur des politiques multiples, à différents niveaux, sera à même de répondre aux enjeux à court et moyen termes.

Lire la partie 1 : La crise de l’eau en Iran : tensions sociales et impasses économiques (1/2)

Notes :
(1) Qanun-e asasi-ye Djomhouri-ye Eslami-ye Iran, Téhéran, Islamic Parliament Research Center, [en ligne], http://rc.majlis.ir/fa/content/iran_constitution. Pour une version en français : La Constitution de la République Islamique d’Iran, Téhéran, Alhoda, 2010, [en ligne], http://www.imam-khomeini.com/web1/uploads/constitution.pdf.
(2) Tamara Kummer, Sustainable Agriculture Around Lake Parishan, New York, United Nations Development Programme, 2016, [en ligne], URL : http://www.ir.undp.org/content/iran/en/home/ourwork/Environment_sustainable_development/impacting_lives/env_success/.

 Voir aussi:

En Iran, la problématique de la gestion de l’eau devient une urgence

Les noms des personnes interrogées ont été modifiées afin de protéger leur identité. La problématique de l’eau est une question qui est prise très au sérieux en Iran, tout comme elle l’est dans l’ensemble de la région du Moyen-Orient et d’Asie Centrale.

Depuis plusieurs décennies et la Révolution de 1979, la République Islamique d’Iran est en proie à de nombreux challenges économiques et politiques majeurs. Entre négociations sur le nucléaire, crises géopolitiques en Syrie et au Yémen et manifestations pour les droits de l’Homme et de la Femme à l’intérieur du pays, le gouvernement d’Hassan Rohani a les bras plutôt chargés ces derniers temps. Cependant le pays est aussi confronté à un adversaire très silencieux mais absolument redoutable : le climat. De Kashan à Chiraz, nous avons visité plusieurs lieux en Iran à quelques jours du Norouz, le Nouvel An perse (célébrant l’arrivée du Printemps entre le 20 et le 21 mars), afin de constater les dégâts causés sur les ressources en eau du pays. Entre changement climatique, sanctions internationales, exploitation agricole critiquable, explosion démographique et gestion de l’eau déraisonnée, l’Iran est pour la première fois face à un adversaire qu’il ne peut plus combattre seul. Dans une région où la plupart les relations sont déjà très tendues sur la question de l’eau, il se pourrait bien que l’Iran apporte également son petit grain de sel dans les mois à venir.

Un système millénaire à la source de la gestion de l’eau

Si la question de l’eau fut souvent au cœur des histoires persanes, elle n’en fut pas toujours le problème. En effet, la civilisation perse a très souvent été à la pointe des avancées techniques et architecturales pour permettre une gestion raisonnée et adaptée de cette ressource très demandée. Déclarés patrimoine mondial par l’UNESCO en 2016, les qanats sont des réseaux souterrains vieux de 2700 ans pour certains permettant encore la diffusion des réseaux d’eau par les voies souterraines. Cependant l’explosion démographique et les besoins en agriculture ne permet plus à ces systèmes de fournir assez d’eau pour toutes les nouvelles demandes.

À Kashan, le lieu de fabrication de la très renommée eau de rose, les maisons possèdent des étages souterrains pour atteindre les sources d’eau souterraines plus facilement. De nombreux producteurs d’eau de rose utilisaient donc un moulin naturellement actionné par le débit de la rivière pour écraser les pétales de roses. Aujourd’hui la fabrication doit se faire artificiellement, comme nous l’explique Ardashir :

Le moulin a fonctionné avec l’eau de la source souterraine pendant plus de 100 ans, mais depuis 8 ans il n’y a plus assez de débit. C’est une architecture de plusieurs centaines d’années qui est mise en péril.

“L’eau est utilisée en en priorité pour l’agriculture, mais ils ne savent pas comment s’en servir”

Kaveh Madani est un expert environnemental au London Imperial College. Interrogé en plein milieu du lit asséché de la Zayandeh rud par la réalisatrice Gelareh Darabi et Al Jazeera, il est catégorique,  pour lui,  l’Homme est le premier responsable :

Je ne dis pas que la nature n’a pas d’effet sur cela mais nous avons épuisé l’eau en amont et c’est tout ce qu’il nous reste.

Cette situation de crise prend racine autour de trois problématiques majeures :

1. Une hausse rapide de la population : L’Iran est passé de 37 millions d’habitants en 1979 à plus de 80 millions en 2016 suite aux politiques gouvernementales pour booster la natalité. Après des années de vasectomies gratuites pour mettre un frein à l’explosion des naissances, l’Ayatollah Ali Khamenei se dit depuis prêt et voir le pays dépasser la barre des 150 millions d’habitants.

2. Un système agricole inadapté et improductif : Pendant longtemps le système agricole du pays fut l’un des piliers de la vie iranienne et notamment lors de la guerre avec l’Irak ; aujourd’hui c’est l’une des causes majeures de la pénurie en eau puisqu’elle utilise 92% des réserves en eau fraîche souterraine et n’obtient qu’un taux de rendement de 30%, soit moitié moins que la moyenne mondiale. Un point de vue défendu par Cyrus, vendeur de tapis au souk d’Ispahan :

La rivière a besoin d’eau et de neige, seulement aucune d’elles n’est venue. L’hiver est très sec. Et de toute façon, l’agriculture et les industries sont les priorités, il n’y a plus assez d’eau pour ouvrir la rivière.

Et partagé à Chiraz par Darius, le père de Xerxès :

L’eau est utilisée en en priorité pour l’agriculture, mais ils ne savent pas comment s’en servir. Ils noient les champs et l’eau s’évapore, c’est une perte énorme.

A l’extérieur de la ville, on retrouve en effet de nombreuses cultures de riz disséminées à travers celles de colza. La situation est ubuesque, il fait quasiment 25° dehors, le soleil est au zénith et l’on peut clairement observer des rizières baignant dans l’eau. Nous demandons donc à Xerxès de nous expliquer :

Même si la culture du riz est interdite par la loi ici, le gouvernement ne peut pas ou ne veut pas intervenir car la situation économique est déjà très mauvaise et le peuple doit survivre.

Dans une période délicate sur le plan politique et économique, le gouvernement iranien détourne donc le regard pour éviter d’envenimer une situation sociale déjà très tendue et ce, tout en faisant la promotion de cultures moins gourmandes en eau.

3. La mauvaise gestion de l’eau de manière générale :

Beaucoup de personnes ont des jardins privés autour de Chiraz. Quelques centaines de mètres carrés avec une construction et une piscine. C’est désormais illégal d’avoir une piscine sans permis et ces derniers ne sont plus délivrés ces temps-ci.

La phrase de Xerxès est symptomatique de la relation des Iraniens avec l’or bleu. Le pays a continué à utiliser ces ressources en eau sans se soucier de l’impact sur le long terme. Interrogée par Al Monitor, Claudia Sadoff, directrice générale de l’International Water Management Institute, explique ainsi que:

 90% de la population et de la production économique du pays se situent dans des zones de fortes, voire très fortes, contraintes en eau.

« Un jour le sol rejettera de l’eau salée et ce sera alors un véritable désastre »

Depuis début mars, les manifestations d’agriculteurs se succèdent à Ispahan, avec pour slogan une question simple : où est passée notre rivière ? Ces fermiers sont au chômage technique car il n’y a plus assez d’eau dans le réservoir pour satisfaire l’intégralité des demandes.
Et si le gouvernement annonçait sa volonté d’ouvrir Zayandeh rud pour le Nouvel An perse, les habitants n’étaient pas dupes. Cambyses, un jeune retraité, commentait laconiquement la main sur la télécommande et les yeux rivés sur les images de la manifestation du 9 mars :

Je ne pense pas (qu’ils pourront ouvrir la rivière), le réservoir est trop bas.

Il ne s’était pas trompé,  le lit de la rivière était toujours aussi aride le 20 Mars.

La situation à Ispahan est à l’image de la crise environnementale et sociale dans laquelle est plongée l’ensemble du pays ces dernières années, entre disparition des zones humides, assèchement des lacs et désertification de masse. À Chiraz, c’est le lac Maharloo qui sert de baromètre comme nous l’explique Xerxès :

Vous ne pouvez pas toujours juger les ressources en eaux par le débit de la rivière mais plus par sa destination finale. Nous les évaluons en fonction de la couleur du lac : s’il a une couleur « eau » alors c’est bon, s’il est rose (la couleur du sel et des autres minéraux) ce n’est pas bon signe.

Et lorsqu’on lui demande la couleur actuelle du lac à la fin de la saison des pluies, la réponse est directe :

Rose (rires)

Mais pour Darius, son père, le vrai risque est à prévoir sur le long terme :

C’est simple. Le sol ici repose sur des strates de sel, un jour il rejettera de l’eau salée et ce sera alors un véritable désastre.

« On a besoin d’aide »

Aujourd’hui le pays ne peut plus gérer la situation par lui-même et le risque de sécheresse devient extrêmement inquiétant, comme le montre la simulation ci-dessous :

Le pays ne possède pas les compétences nécessaires pour gérer la problématique de l’eau convenablement et la mise en place des sanctions est toujours un frein supplémentaire majeur. Alors qu’une crise financière nationale est toujours probable en Iran, il est particulièrement compliqué pour les donateurs internationaux de venir soutenir le gouvernement dans ses projets environnementaux. Si la Russie s’est toutefois présentée en 2015 pour permettre la recherche de nouvelles sources d’eau dans les zones désertiques, les experts demeurent sceptiques. En effet, plus que la pénurie de stocks d’eau, c’est bien la mauvaise gestion de la ressource qui apparaît comme la véritable source du problème.

Pour Darius, c’est un véritable appel au secours dont il est question :

On a besoin d’aide.

Voir également:

Kuwait to tap Iranian water

Kuwait and its Gulf neighbour Iran will sign an agreement at the weekend to supply the desert emirate with fresh water through a pipeline, Kuwait’s energy minister has said.

« I will lead a high-level delegation to Iran next week to sign an agreement for supplying Kuwait with fresh water from Iran, » Shaikh Ahmad Fahd al-Sabah said, quoted by the KUNA news agency on Tuesday.

KUNA said the visit would take place on Saturday.

The two countries signed a memorandum of understanding on the issue in January during a visit by Kuwait’s prime minister, Shaikh Sabah al-Ahmad al-Sabah, who was then the foreign minister.

According to the agreement, Kuwait will get 900 million litres of water daily, Shaikh Ahmad said, without providing the financial details of the agreement.

Earlier reports have said the project foresees building a pipeline to channel water from the Karun and Karkheh rivers in southwestern Iran to Kuwait at a cost of $2 billion.

Vital project

The Kuwaiti minister said the project is « vital » for Kuwait and is classified as « one of the highly important strategic projects. »

Negotiations between Tehran and Kuwait City on the project began more than two years ago, when former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein was still in power.

According to initial plans, the pipeline will extend 330km across Iranian territory and then via a 210km pipeline under the Gulf to Kuwait, thus avoiding Iraqi territory.

Kuwait depends almost entirely on sea water desalination for its fresh water requirements which is sold to consumers at heavily subsidised prices.  The oil-rich emirate produces around 1.3 billion litres of desalinated water daily and consumes almost all of it.

The two countries are also locked in negotiations for exporting natural gas to Kuwait after signing a memorandum of understanding in January.

SOURCE: AFP


Gaza: Quand la condamnation tourne à l’incitation (Behind the smoke and mirrors, guess who’s abetting Hamas’s carefully planned and orchestrated military operation to break through the border of a sovereign state and commit mass murder in the communities beyond using their own civilians as cover ?)

19 mai, 2018
Malheur à ceux qui appellent le mal bien, et le bien mal, qui changent les ténèbres en lumière, et la lumière en ténèbres, qui changent l’amertume en douceur, et la douceur en amertume! Esaïe 5: 20
« Dionysos contre le « crucifié » : la voici bien l’opposition. Ce n’est pas une différence quant au martyr – mais celui-ci a un sens différent. La vie même, son éternelle fécondité, son éternel retour, détermine le tourment, la destruction, la volonté d’anéantir pour Dionysos. Dans l’autre cas, la souffrance, le « crucifié » en tant qu’il est « innocent », sert d’argument contre cette vie, de formulation de sa condamnation.  (…) L’individu a été si bien pris au sérieux, si bien posé comme un absolu par le christianisme, qu’on ne pouvait plus le sacrifier : mais l’espèce ne survit que grâce aux sacrifices humains… La véritable philanthropie exige le sacrifice pour le bien de l’espèce – elle est dure, elle oblige à se dominer soi-même, parce qu’elle a besoin du sacrifice humain. Et cette pseudo-humanité qui s’institue christianisme, veut précisément imposer que personne ne soit sacrifié. Nietzsche
Où est Dieu? cria-t-il, je vais vous le dire! Nous l’avons tué – vous et moi! Nous tous sommes ses meurtriers! Mais comment avons-nous fait cela? Comment avons-nous pu vider la mer? Qui nous a donné l’éponge pour effacer l’horizon tout entier? Dieu est mort! (…) Et c’est nous qui l’avons tué ! (…) Ce que le monde avait possédé jusqu’alors de plus sacré et de plus puissant a perdu son sang sous nos couteaux (…) Quelles solennités expiatoires, quels jeux sacrés nous faudra-t-il inventer? Nietzsche
Le christianisme est une rébellion contre la loi naturelle, une protestation contre la nature. Poussé à sa logique extrême, le christianisme signifierait la culture systématique de l’échec humain. […] Mais il n’est pas question que le national-socialisme se mette un jour à singer la religion en établissant une forme de culte. Sa seule ambition doit être de construire scientifiquement une doctrine qui ne soit rien de plus qu’un hommage à la raison […] Il n’est donc pas opportun de nous lancer maintenant dans un combat avec les Églises. Le mieux est de laisser le christianisme mourir de mort naturelle. Une mort lente a quelque chose d’apaisant. Le dogme du christianisme s’effrite devant les progrès de la science. La religion devra faire de plus en plus de concessions. Les mythes se délabrent peu à peu. Il ne reste plus qu’à prouver que dans la nature il n’existe aucune frontière entre l’organique et l’inorganique. Quand la connaissance de l’univers se sera largement répandue, quand la plupart des hommes sauront que les étoiles ne sont pas des sources de lumière mais des mondes, peut-être des mondes habités comme le nôtre, alors la doctrine chrétienne sera convaincue d’absurdité […] Tout bien considéré, nous n’avons aucune raison de souhaiter que les Italiens et les Espagnols se libèrent de la drogue du christianisme. Soyons les seuls à être immunisés contre cette maladie. Adolf Hitler
Nous avons constaté que le sport était la religion moderne du monde occidental. Nous savions que les publics anglais et américain assis devant leur poste de télévision ne regarderaient pas un programme exposant le sort des Palestiniens s’il y avait une manifestation sportive sur une autre chaîne. Nous avons donc décidé de nous servir des Jeux olympiques, cérémonie la plus sacrée de cette religion, pour obliger le monde à faire attention à nous. Nous avons offert des sacrifices humains à vos dieux du sport et de la télévision et ils ont répondu à nos prières. Terroriste palestinien (Jeux olympiques de Munich, 1972)
La même force culturelle et spirituelle qui a joué un rôle si décisif dans la disparition du sacrifice humain est aujourd’hui en train de provoquer la disparition des rituels de sacrifice humain qui l’ont jadis remplacé. Tout cela semble être une bonne nouvelle, mais à condition que ceux qui comptaient sur ces ressources rituelles soient en mesure de les remplacer par des ressources religieuses durables d’un autre genre. Priver une société des ressources sacrificielles rudimentaires dont elle dépend sans lui proposer d’alternatives, c’est la plonger dans une crise qui la conduira presque certainement à la violence. Gil Bailie
More ink equals more blood,  newspaper coverage of terrorist incidents leads directly to more attacks. It’s a macabre example of win-win in what economists call a « common-interest game. Both the media and terrorists benefit from terrorist incidents. Terrorists get free publicity for themselves and their cause. The media, meanwhile, make money « as reports of terror attacks increase newspaper sales and the number of television viewers. Bruno S. Frey et Dominic Rohner
Amidst the national mourning for the many innocent lives lost in these senseless shooting sprees, it is critical not to overreact and overrespond to the menacing acts of a few. It is, of course, of little comfort to those families and communities impacted in Santa Fe as well as Parkland, Florida, and Benton, Kentucky, but this is not routine. Schools are not under siege. Rather, this more likely reflects a short-term contagion effect in which angry dispirited youngsters are inspired by others whose violent outbursts serve as fodder for national attention. That should subside once we stop obsessing over the risk. History provides an important lesson about how crime contagions arise and eventually play themselves out. Over the five-year time span from 1997 through 2001, America witnessed seven multiple-fatality school rampages with a combined 32 killed and 85 others injured, more such incidents and casualties than during the past five years. (…) Many observers have expressed concern for the excessive attention given to mass shooters of today and the deadliest of yesteryear. CNN’s Anderson Cooper has campaigned against naming names of mass shooters, and 147 criminologists, sociologists, psychologists and other human-behavior experts recently signed on to an open letter urging the media not to identify mass shooters or display their photos. While I appreciate the concern for name and visual identification of mass shooters for fear of inspiring copycats as well as to avoid insult to the memory of those they slaughtered, names and faces are not the problem. It is the excessive detail — too much information — about the killers, their writings, and their backgrounds that unnecessarily humanizes them. We come to know more about them — their interests and their disappointments — than we do about our next door neighbors. Too often the line is crossed between news reporting and celebrity watch. At the same time, we focus far too much on records. We constantly are reminded that some shooting is the largest in a particular state over a given number of years, as if that really matters. Would the massacre be any less tragic if it didn’t exceed the death toll of some prior incident? Moreover, we are treated to published lists of the largest mass shootings in modern US history. For whatever purpose we maintain records, they are there to be broken and can challenge a bitter and suicidal assailant to outgun his violent role models. Although the spirited advocacy of students around the country regarding gun control is to be applauded, we need to keep some perspective about the risk. Slogans like, “I want to go to my graduation, not to my grave,” are powerful, yet hyperbolic. As often said, even one death is one too many, and we need to take the necessary steps to protect children, including expanded funding for school teachers and school psychologists. Still, despite the occasional tragedy, our schools are safe, safer than they have been for decades. James Alan Fox (Northeastern University)
Hélas les morts ne sont que d’un seul côté. Benoit Hamon
A Gaza et dans les territoires occupés, ils ont [les meurtres de violées] représenté deux tiers des homicides » (…) Les femmes palestiniennes violées par les soldats israéliens sont systématiquement tuées par leur propre famille. Ici, le viol devient un crime de guerre, car les soldats israéliens agissent en parfaite connaissance de cause. Sara Daniel (Le Nouvel Observateur, le 8 novembre 2001)
Dans le numéro 1931 du Nouvel Observateur, daté du 8 novembre 2001, Sara Daniel a publié un reportage sur le « crime d’honneur » en Jordanie. Dans son texte, elle révélait qu’à Gaza et dans les territoires occupés, les crimes dits d’honneur qui consistent pour des pères ou des frères à abattre les femmes jugées légères représentaient une part importante des homicides. Le texte publié, en raison d’un défaut de guillemets et de la suppression de deux phrases dans la transmission, laissait penser que son auteur faisait sienne l’accusation selon laquelle il arrivait à des soldats israéliens de commettre un viol en sachant, de plus, que les femmes violées allaient être tuées. Il n’en était évidemment rien et Sara Daniel, actuellement en reportage en Afghanistan, fait savoir qu’elle déplore très vivement cette erreur qui a gravement dénaturé sa pensée. Une mise au point de Sara Daniel (Le Nouvel Observateur, le 15 novembre 2001)
Pendant qu’une petite fille palestinienne mourait d’avoir inhalé des gaz lacrymogènes à Gaza, à Jérusalem, à moins d’une heure et demie de là par la route, on sablait le champagne, lundi, pour fêter le déménagement de l’ambassade américaine. Malgré les snipers israéliens, les Gazaouis auront donc continué à se presser devant la clôture de séparation de cette prison maudite et à ciel ouvert que représente l’enclave de Gaza, honte d’Israël et de la communauté internationale, pour achever la « Marche du grand retour », entamée le 30 mars et censée se conclure ce 15 mai. Une marche pour réclamer les terres perdues au moment de la création d’Israël, il y a soixante-dix ans, mais surtout la fin du blocus israélo-égyptien qui étouffe Gaza. Au cours de ce lundi noir, 59 personnes ont été tuées, et plus de 2.400 ont été blessées par balles. Encore une fois le conflit israélo-palestinien a joué la guerre des images, au cours de ce jour si symbolique. Les Israéliens fêtaient les 70 ans de la naissance de leur Etat, le miracle de son existence, l’incroyable longévité de ce confetti minuscule entouré de nations hostiles. Les Palestiniens commémoraient, eux, leur « catastrophe », leur Nakba, qui les a poussés sur les routes de l’exil, dans l’indifférence d’une communauté internationale lassée par un conflit interminable, happée par d’autres hécatombes plus pressantes. C’est avec cette Marche que les Gazaouis ont tenté de revenir sur la carte des préoccupations mondiales et de rappeler leur agonie à un monde qui les oublie. Pendant ce temps, Israéliens, Américains, Saoudiens et Egyptiens célèbrent leur alliance sur le dos de ces vaincus de l’histoire, les pressant d’accepter un accord, ce que Donald Trump a appelé le « deal ultime », dont les contours sont encore flous mais dont on peut être certain qu’il entérinerait leur déroute. Mais pourquoi les Israéliens ont-ils cédé à cette violence inouïe et inutile alors que, de leur aveu même, le vrai sujet de leurs inquiétudes était le front du Nord avec le Hezbollah et l’Iran ? Est-ce l’hubris des vainqueurs ? En tout cas, Israël n’a pas entendu l’avertissement de Houda Naim, députée du Hamas. (…) Alors, les manifestants ont-ils été manipulés par leurs organisations politiques ? La question est obscène lorsque que la marche, commencée il y a six semaines, a déjà fait plus de 100 morts. Bien sûr, le Hamas, débordé par cette manifestation civile et pacifique, a rejoint le mouvement. A-t-il encouragé les Gazaouis à provoquer les soldats israéliens, les conduisant à une mort certaine ? Peut-être, et le gouvernement israélien l’affirmera. Mais cela ne suffirait pas à expliquer la détermination d’une population excédée, désespérée par ses conditions d’existence. Ce qui vient de se passer à Gaza est un rappel à l’ordre, tragique, à une communauté internationale qui a abandonné ce peuple palestinien à la brutalité israélienne, à l’incurie de ses dirigeants engagés dans une guerre fratricide, à ses alliés arabes historiquement défaillants, à son sort dont nous portons tous la responsabilité. Sara Daniel
En novembre 2004, des civils ivoiriens et des soldats français de la Force Licorne se sont opposés durant quatre jours à Abidjan dans des affrontements qui ont fait des dizaines de morts et de blessés. À la suite d’une mission d’enquête sur le terrain, Amnesty International a recueilli des informations indiquant que les forces françaises ont, à certaines occasions, fait un usage excessif et disproportionné de la force alors qu’elles se trouvaient face à des manifestants qui ne représentaient pas une menace directe pour leurs vies ou la vie de tiers. Amnesty international (26.10.05)
Des tirs sont partis sur nos forces depuis les derniers étages de l’hôtel ivoire de la grande tour que nous n’occupions pas et depuis la foule. Dans ces conditions nos unités ont été amenées à faire des tirs de sommation et à forcer le passage en évitant bien évidemment de faire des morts et des blessés parmi les manifestants. Mais je répète encore une fois les premiers tirs n’ont pas été de notre fait. Général Poncet (Canal Plus 90 minutes 14.02.05)
Nous avons effectivement été amenés à tirer, des tirs en légitime défense et en riposte par rapport aux tireurs qui nous tiraient dessus. Colonel Gérard Dubois (porte-parole de l’état-major français, le 15 novembre 2004)
On n’arrivait pas à éloigner cette foule qui, de plus en plus était débordante. Sur ma gauche, trois de nos véhicules étaient déjà immergés dans la foule. Un manifestant grimpe sur un de mes chars et arme la mitrailleuse 7-62. Un de mes hommes fait un tir d’intimidation dans sa direction ; l’individu redescend aussitôt du blindé. Le coup de feu déclenche une fusillade. L’ensemble de mes hommes fait des tirs uniquement d’intimidation ». (…) seuls les COS auraient visé certains manifestants avec leurs armes non létales. (…) Mes hommes n’ont pu faire cela. Nous n’avions pas les armes pour infliger de telles blessures. Si nous avions tiré au canon dans la foule, ça aurait été le massacre. Colonel Destremau (Libération, 10.12.04)
In a surreal split-screen moment, the Israeli prime minister, Binyamin Netanyahu, was exulting over the opening of America’s embassy in Jerusalem, calling it a “great day for peace”. It is surely right to hold Israel, the strong side, to high standards. But Palestinian parties, though weak, are also to blame. Every state has a right to defend its borders. To judge by the numbers, Israel’s army may well have used excessive force. But any firm conclusion requires an independent assessment of what happened, where and when. The Israelis sometimes used non-lethal means, such as tear-gas dropped from drones. But then snipers went to work with bullets. What changed? Mixed in with protesters, it seems, were an unknown number of Hamas attackers seeking to breach the fence. What threat did they pose? Any fair judgment depends on the details. Just as important is the broader political question. The fence between Gaza and Israel is no ordinary border. Gaza is a prison, not a state. Measuring 365 square kilometres and home to 2m people, it is one of the most crowded and miserable places on Earth. It is short of medicine, power and other essentials. The tap water is undrinkable; untreated sewage is pumped into the sea. Gaza already has one of the world’s highest jobless rates, at 44%. The scene of three wars between Hamas and Israel since 2007, it is always on the point of eruption. Many hands are guilty for this tragedy. Israel insists that the strip is not its problem, having withdrawn its forces in 2005. But it still controls Gaza from land, sea and air. Any Palestinian, even a farmer, coming within 300 metres of the fence is liable to be shot. Israel restricts the goods that get in. Only a tiny number of Palestinians can get out for, say, medical treatment. Israeli generals have long warned against letting the economy collapse. Mr Netanyahu usually ignores them. Egypt also contributes to the misery. The Rafah crossing to Sinai, another escape valve, was open to goods and people for just 17 days in the first four months of this year. And Fatah, which administers the PA and parts of the West Bank, has withheld salaries for civil servants working for the PA in Gaza, limited shipments of necessities, such as drugs and baby milk, and cut payments to Israel for Gaza’s electricity. Hamas bears much of the blame, too. It all but destroyed the Oslo peace accords through its campaign of suicide-bombings in the 1990s and 2000s. Having driven the Israelis out of Gaza, it won a general election in 2006 and, after a brief civil war, expelled Fatah from the strip in 2007. It has misruled Gaza ever since, proving corrupt, oppressive and incompetent. It stores its weapons in civilian sites, including mosques and schools, making them targets. Cement that might be used for reconstruction is diverted to build underground tunnels to attack Israel. Hamas all but admitted it was not up to governing when it agreed to hand many administrative tasks to the PA last year as part of a reconciliation deal with Fatah. But the pact collapsed because Hamas is not prepared to give up its weapons. Israel, Egypt and the PA cannot just lock away the Palestinians in Gaza in the hope that Hamas will be overthrown. Only when Gazans live more freely might they think of getting rid of their rulers. Much more can be done to ease Gazans’ plight without endangering Israel’s security. But no lasting solution is possible until the question of Palestine is solved, too. Mr Netanyahu has long resisted the idea of a Palestinian state—and has kept building settlements on occupied land. It is hard to convince Israelis to change. As Israel marks its 70th birthday, the economy is booming. By “managing” the conflict, rather than trying to end it, Mr Netanyahu has kept Palestinian violence in check while giving nothing away. When violence flares Israel’s image suffers, but not much. The Trump administration supports it. And Arab states seeking an ally against a rising Iran have never had better relations with it. Israel is wrong to stop seeking a deal. And Mr Trump is wrong to prejudge the status of Jerusalem. But Palestinians have made it easy for Israel to claim that there is “no partner for peace”, divided as they are between a tired nationalist Fatah that cannot deliver peace, and an Islamist Hamas that refuses to do so. Palestinians desperately need new leaders. Fatah must renew itself through long-overdue elections. And Hamas must realise that its rockets damage Palestinian dreams of statehood more than they hurt Israel. For all their talk of non-violence, Hamas’s leaders have not abandoned the idea of “armed struggle” to destroy Israel. They refuse to give up their guns, or fully embrace a two-state solution; they speak vaguely of a long-term “truce”. With this week’s protests, Hamas’s leaders boasted of freeing a “wild tiger”. They found that Israel can be even more ferocious. If Hamas gave up its weapons, it would open the way for a rapprochement with Fatah. If it accepted Israel’s right to exist, it would expose Israel’s current unwillingness to allow a Palestinian state. If Palestinians marched peacefully, without guns and explosives, they would take the moral high ground. In short, if Palestinians want Israel to stop throttling them, they must first convince Israelis it is safe to let go. The Economist
Salah al-Bardaouil, haut responsable du Hamas, a déclaré à une télévision palestinienne que 50 des 62 Palestiniens tués lundi mais aussi mardi appartenaient au mouvement islamiste. « Cinquante des martyrs (des morts) étaient du Hamas, et 12 faisaient partie du reste de la population », a-t-il dit, interrogé sur les critiques selon lesquelles le Hamas tirait profit de la mobilisation. « Comment le Hamas pourrait-il récolter les fruits (du mouvement) alors qu’il a payé un prix aussi élevé », a-t-il demandé. Il n’a pas fourni de détails sur l’appartenance de ces Palestiniens à la branche armée ou politique du Hamas, ni sur les circonstances dans lesquelles ils avaient été tués. Salah al-Bardaouil « dévoile la vérité », a tweeté un porte-parole du gouvernement israélien, Ofir Gendelman, « ce n’était pas une manifestation pacifique, mais une opération du Hamas ». « Nous avons les mêmes chiffres », a lancé de son côté le Premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahu, avertissant que son pays continuerait « à se défendre par tous les moyens nécessaires ». Un porte-parole du Hamas, Fawzy Barhoum, et un autre haut responsable, Bassem Naim, se sont gardés de confirmer les informations de M. Bardaouil. Le Hamas paie les funérailles de tous, « qu’ils soient membres ou supporters du Hamas, ou pas », a dit M. Barhoum. Il est « naturel de voir de nombreux membres ou supporters du Hamas » à une telle manifestation, a dit M. Naim, en faisant référence à la forte présence du Hamas dans toutes les couches de la société. Ceux qui ont été tués « participaient pacifiquement » au mouvement, a-t-il assuré. Sur la chaîne de télévision Al-Jazeera, l’homme fort du Hamas, Yahya Sinouar, a prévenu: « si le blocus (israélien à Gaza) continue, nous n’hésiterons pas à recourir à la résistance militaire ». La Libre Belgique
The world now demands that Jerusalem account for every bullet fired at the demonstrators, without offering a single practical alternative for dealing with the crisis. But where is the outrage that Hamas kept urging Palestinians to move toward the fence, having been amply forewarned by Israel of the mortal risk? Or that protest organizers encouraged women to lead the charges on the fence because, as The Times’s Declan Walsh reported, “Israeli soldiers might be less likely to fire on women”? Or that Palestinian children as young as 7 were dispatched to try to breach the fence? Or that the protests ended after Israel warned Hamas’s leaders, whose preferred hide-outs include Gaza’s hospital, that their own lives were at risk? Elsewhere in the world, this sort of behavior would be called reckless endangerment. It would be condemned as self-destructive, cowardly and almost bottomlessly cynical. The mystery of Middle East politics is why Palestinians have so long been exempted from these ordinary moral judgments. How do so many so-called progressives now find themselves in objective sympathy with the murderers, misogynists and homophobes of Hamas? Why don’t they note that, by Hamas’s own admission, some 50 of the 62 protesters killed on Monday were members of Hamas? Why do they begrudge Israel the right to defend itself behind the very borders they’ve been clamoring for years for Israelis to get behind? Why is nothing expected of Palestinians, and everything forgiven, while everything is expected of Israelis, and nothing forgiven? That’s a question to which one can easily guess the answer. In the meantime, it’s worth considering the harm Western indulgence has done to Palestinian aspirations. No decent Palestinian society can emerge from the culture of victimhood, violence and fatalism symbolized by these protests. No worthy Palestinian government can emerge if the international community continues to indulge the corrupt, anti-Semitic autocrats of the Palestinian Authority or fails to condemn and sanction the despotic killers of Hamas. And no Palestinian economy will ever flourish through repeated acts of self-harm and destructive provocation. Bret Stephens
The protests on Monday were not about President Donald Trump moving the U.S. Embassy to Jerusalem, and have in fact been occurring weekly on the Gaza border since March. They are part of what the demonstrators have dubbed “The Great March of Return”—return, that is, to what is now Israel. (The Monday demonstration was scheduled months ago to coincide with Nakba Day, an annual occasion of protest; it was later moved up 24 hours to grab some of the media attention devoted to the embassy.) The fact that these long-standing Palestinian protests were mischaracterized by many in the media as simply a response to Trump obscured two disquieting realities: First, that the world has largely dismissed the genuine plight of Palestinians in Gaza, only bothering to pay attention to it when it could be tenuously connected to Trump. Second, that many Palestinians do not simply desire their own state and an end to the occupation and settlements that began in 1967, but an end to the Jewish state that began in 1948. (…) Hamas, which controls the Gaza Strip, is an authoritarian, theocratic regime that has called for Jewish genocide in its charter, murdered scores of Israeli civilians, repressed Palestinian women, and harshly persecuted religious and sexual minorities. It is a designated terrorist group by the United States, Canada, and the European Union. (…) Whether it has been spending its manpower and millions of dollars on subterranean attack tunnels into Israel—including under United Nations schools for Gaza’s children—or launching repeated messianic military operations against Israel, the terrorist group has consistently prioritized the deaths of Israelis over the lives of its Palestinian brethren. (…) Hamas manipulated many of these demonstrators into unwittingly rushing the Israeli border fence under false pretenses in order to produce injuries and fatalities. As the New York Times reported, “After midday prayers, clerics and leaders of militant factions in Gaza, led by Hamas, urged thousands of worshipers to join the protests. The fence had already been breached, they said falsely, claiming Palestinians were flooding into Israel.” Similarly, the Washington Post recounted how “organizers urged protesters over loudspeakers to burst through the fence, telling them Israeli soldiers were fleeing their positions, even as they were reinforcing them.” Hamas has also publicly acknowledged deliberately using peaceful civilians at the protests as cover and cannon fodder for their military operations. “When we talk about ‘peaceful resistance,’ we are deceiving the public,” Hamas co-founder Mahmoud al-Zahar told an interviewer. “This is peaceful resistance bolstered by a military force and by security agencies.” (…) Widely circulated Arabic instructions on Facebook directed protesters to “bring a knife, dagger, or gun if available” and to breach the Israeli border and kidnap civilians. (The posts have now been removed by Facebook for inciting violence but a cached copy can be viewed here.) Hamas further incentivized violence by providing payments to those injured and the families of those killed. Both Hamas and the Islamic Jihad terror group have since claimed many of those killed as their own operatives and posted photos of them in uniform. On Wednesday, Hamas Political Bureau member Salah Al-Bardawil announced that 50 of the 62 fatalities were Hamas members. (…) as the BBC’s Julia MacFarlane recalled from her time covering Gaza, any public dissent against Hamas is perilous: “A boy I met in Gaza during the 2014 war was dragged from his bed at midnight, had his kneecaps shot off in a square and was told next time it would be axes—for an anti-Hamas Facebook post.” The group has publicly executed those it deems “collaborators” and broken up rare protests with gunfire. Likewise, Gazans cannot “vote Hamas out” because Hamas has not permitted elections since it won them and took power in 2006. The group fares poorly in the polls today, but Gazans have no recourse for expressing their dissatisfaction. Protesting Israel, however, is an outlet for frustration encouraged by Hamas. (…) In that regard, Hamas has worked to increase chaos and casualties stemming from the protests by allowing rioters to repeatedly set fire to the Kerem Shalom crossing, Gaza’s main avenue for international and humanitarian aid, and by turning back trucks of needed food and supplies from Israel. (…) despite the claims of viral tweets and the Hamas-run Gaza Health Ministry that were initially parroted by some in the media, Israel did not actually kill an 8-month old baby with tear gas. The Gazan doctor who treated her told the Associated Press that she died from a preexisting heart condition, a fact belatedly picked up by the New York Times and Los Angeles Times. Yair Rosenberg
On the night of May 14, … headlines suggested a causation: The U.S. opens an embassy and hence people get killed. But the causation is faulty: Gazans were killed last week, when the United States had not yet opened its embassy. Gazans were killed for a simple reason: Ignoring warnings, thousands of them decided to get too close to the Israeli border.one must begin with the obvious: The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) has no interest in having more Gazans killed, yet its mission is not to save Gazans’ lives. Its mission — remember, the IDF is a military serving a country — is to defeat an enemy. And in the case of Gaza this past week, the meaning of this was preventing unauthorized, possibly dangerous people from crossing the fence separating Israel from the Gaza Strip. Of course, any bloodshed is regretful. Yet to achieve its objectives, the IDF had to use lethal force. Circumstances on the ground dictate using such measures. The winds made tear gas ineffective. The proximity of the border made it essential to stop Gazan demonstrators from getting too close, lest thousands of them flood the fence, thus forcing the IDF to use even more lethal means. Leaflets warned them not to go near the fence. Media outlets were used to clarify that consequences could be dire. Hence, an unbiased, sincere newspaper headline should have said, “More than 50 killed in Gaza while Hamas leaders ignored warnings.” So, yes, Jerusalem celebrated while Gaza burned. Not because Gaza burned. And, yes, the U.S. moved its embassy while Gaza burned. But this is not what made Gaza burn. It all comes down to legitimacy. Having embassies move to Jerusalem, Israel’s capital, is about legitimacy. Letting Israel keep the integrity of its borders is about legitimacy. President Donald Trump gained the respect and appreciation of Israelis because of his no-nonsense acceptance of a reality, and because of his no-nonsense rejection of delegitimization masqueraded as policy differences. A legitimate country is allowed to defend its border. A legitimate country is allowed to choose its capital. Shmuel Rosner
Hamas understood early that the civilian death toll was driving international outrage at Israel, and that this, not I.E.D.s or ambushes, was the most important weapon in its arsenal. Early in that war, I complied with Hamas censorship in the form of a threat to one of our Gaza reporters and cut a key detail from an article: that Hamas fighters were disguised as civilians and were being counted as civilians in the death toll. The bureau chief later wrote that printing the truth after the threat to the reporter would have meant “jeopardizing his life.” Nonetheless, we used that same casualty toll throughout the conflict and never mentioned the manipulation. (…) Hamas understood that Western news outlets wanted a simple story about villains and victims and would stick to that script, whether because of ideological sympathy, coercion or ignorance. The press could be trusted to present dead human beings not as victims of the terrorist group that controls their lives, or of a tragic confluence of events, but of an unwarranted Israeli slaughter. The willingness of reporters to cooperate with that script gave Hamas the incentive to keep using it. (…) The next step in the evolution of this tactic was visible in Monday’s awful events. If the most effective weapon in a military campaign is pictures of civilian casualties, Hamas seems to have concluded, there’s no need for a campaign at all. All you need to do is get people killed on camera. The way to do this in Gaza, in the absence of any Israeli soldiers inside the territory, is to try to cross the Israeli border, which everyone understands is defended with lethal force and is easy to film. (…) About 40,000 people answered a call to show up. Many of them, some armed, rushed the border fence. Many Israelis, myself included, were horrified to see the number of fatalities reach 60. (…) Most Western viewers experienced these events through a visual storytelling tool: a split screen. On one side was the opening of the American embassy in Jerusalem in the presence of Ivanka Trump, evangelical Christian allies of the White House and Israel’s current political leadership — an event many here found curious and distant from our national life. On the other side was the terrible violence in the desperately poor and isolated territory. The juxtaposition was disturbing. (…) The attempts to breach the Gaza fence, which Palestinians call the March of Return, began in March and have the stated goal of erasing the border as a step toward erasing Israel. A central organizer, the Hamas leader Yehya Sinwar, exhorted participants on camera in Arabic to “tear out the hearts” of Israelis. But on Monday the enterprise was rebranded as a protest against the embassy opening, with which it was meticulously timed to coincide. The split screen, and the idea that people were dying in Gaza because of Donald Trump, was what Hamas was looking for. (…) The press coverage on Monday was a major Hamas success in a war whose battlefield isn’t really Gaza, but the brains of foreign audiences (…) Israeli soldiers facing Gaza have no good choices. They can warn people off with tear gas or rubber bullets, which are often inaccurate and ineffective, and if that doesn’t work, they can use live fire. Or they can hold their fire to spare lives and allow a breach, in which case thousands of people will surge into Israel, some of whom — the soldiers won’t know which — will be armed fighters. (On Wednesday a Hamas leader, Salah Bardawil, told a Hamas TV station that 50 of the dead were Hamas members. The militant group Islamic Jihad claimed three others.) If such a breach occurs, the death toll will be higher. And Hamas’s tactic, having proved itself, would likely be repeated by Israel’s enemies on its borders with Syria and Lebanon. (…) Knowledgeable people can debate the best way to deal with this threat. Could a different response have reduced the death toll? Or would a more aggressive response deter further actions of this kind and save lives in the long run? What are the open-fire orders on the India-Pakistan border, for example? Is there something Israel could have done to defuse things beforehand? These are good questions. But anyone following the response abroad saw that this wasn’t what was being discussed. As is often the case where Israel is concerned, things quickly became hysterical and divorced from the events themselves. Turkey’s president called it “genocide.” A writer for The New Yorker took the opportunity to tweet some of her thoughts about “whiteness and Zionism,” part of an odd trend that reads America’s racial and social problems into a Middle Eastern society 6,000 miles away. The sicknesses of the social media age — the disdain for expertise and the idea that other people are not just wrong but villainous — have crept into the worldview of people who should know better. For someone looking out from here, that’s the real split-screen effect: On one side, a complicated human tragedy in a corner of a region spinning out of control. On the other, a venomous and simplistic story, a symptom of these venomous and simplistic times. Matti Friedman
Depuis le 30 mars, le Hamas organise des violences à grande échelle à la frontière de Gaza et d’Israël. Ces embrasements majeurs ont généralement lieu le vendredi à la fin des prières dans les mosquées ; des actions concertées mobilisant des foules de 40 000 personnes ont été constatées dans cinq zones séparées le long de la frontière. Des violences et diverses actions agressives, y compris des actes de nature terroristes avec explosifs et armes à feu, ont également eu lieu à d’autres moments au cours de cette période. Le Hamas avait prévu une culmination de la violence le 14 ou le 15 mai 2018. Le 15 est la date à laquelle ils commémorent le 70ème anniversaire de la « Nakba » (« Catastrophe ») qui a eu lieu au lendemain de la création de l’Etat d’Israël. Mais une recrudescence de violence a été constatée le 14, jour de l’inauguration de la nouvelle ambassade américaine à Jérusalem. La violence a donc culminé les 14 et 15, deux jours qui coïncident avec la Nakba et l’inauguration de l’ambassade américaine, mais qui marquent aussi le début du mois de Ramadan, une période où la violence augmente au Moyen-Orient et ailleurs. Le Hamas avait prévu de mobiliser jusqu’à 200 000 personnes à la frontière de Gaza, soit un doublement et plus du nombre de manifestants constatés les années précédentes. Le Hamas semblait également déterminé à inciter à un niveau de violence jamais atteint auparavant, avec des pénétrations significatives de la barrière frontalière. Face à de tels projets, il est étonnant que les chiffres en pertes humaines ne soient pas plus élevés parmi les Palestiniens. (…) La violence à Gaza a été orchestrée sous la bannière prétexte de la « Grande marche du retour », une façon d’attirer l’attention sur ce droit au retour dans leurs foyers d’origine que les dirigeants palestiniens promettent à leur peuple. L’intention affichée n’était pas de manifester, mais de franchir en masse la frontière et de cheminer par milliers à travers l’État d’Israël. L’affirmation du « droit de retour » ne vise pas à l’exercice d’un tel « droit », lequel est fortement contesté et doit faire l’objet de négociations sur le statut définitif. Il s’inscrit dans une politique arabe de longue date destinée à éliminer l’Etat d’Israël, un projet à l’encontre duquel le gouvernement israélien s’inscrit de manière non moins systématique. Le véritable objectif de la violence du Hamas est de poursuivre sa stratégie de longue date de création et d’intensification de l’indignation internationale, de la diffamation, de l’isolement et de la criminalisation de l’État d’Israël et de ses fonctionnaires. Cette stratégie passe par la mise en scène de situations qui obligent Tsahal à réagir avec une force meurtrière qui les place aussitôt en position de tortionnaires qui tuent et blessent des civils palestiniens « innocents ». (…) Toutes ces tactiques ont pour particularité d’utiliser des boucliers humains palestiniens – des civils, des femmes et des enfants de préférence, forcés ou volontaires, présents toutes les fois que des attaques sont lancées ou commandées ; des civils présents au côté des combattants, à proximité des dépôts d’armes et de munitions. Toute riposte militaire israélienne engendre des dommages collatéraux chez les civils. Dans certains cas, notamment à l’occasion de la vague de violence actuelle, le Hamas présente ses combattants comme des civils innocents ; de nombreux faux incidents ont été mis en scène et filmés pour faire état de civils tués et blessés par les forces israéliennes ; des scènes de violence filmées ailleurs, notamment en Syrie, ont été présentés comme des violences commises contre les Palestiniens. (…) Les cibles visées – dirigeants politiques de pays tiers, organisations internationales (ONU, UE), groupes de défense des droits de l’homme et médias – n’admettent pas que l’on réponde par la force à des manifestations faussement pacifiques qu’ils sont tentés d’assimiler aux manifestations réellement pacifiques qui ont lieu dans leurs propres villes. (…) Ces manifestations sont en réalité des opérations militaires soigneusement planifiées et orchestrées. Des foules de civils auxquelles se mêlent des groupes de combattants sont rassemblées aux frontières. Combattants et civils ont pour mission de s’approcher de la clôture et de la briser. Des milliers de pneus ont été incendiés pour créer des écrans de fumée afin de dissimuler leurs mouvements en direction de la clôture (et sans grande efficacité, ils ont utilisé des miroirs pour aveugler les observateurs de la FDI et les tireurs d’élite). Les pneus enflammés et les cocktails Molotov ont également été utilisés pour briser la clôture dont certains éléments, à divers endroits, sont en en bois. Le vendredi 4 mai, environ 10 000 Palestiniens ont participé à des manifestations violentes le long de la frontière et des centaines d’émeutiers ont vandalisé et incendié la partie palestinienne de Kerem Shalom, point de passage des convois humanitaires. Ils ont endommagé des canalisations de gaz et de carburant qui partent d’Israël en direction de la bande de Gaza. Ce raid contre Kerem Shalom a eu lieu à deux reprises le 4 mai. Le même jour, deux tentatives d’infiltration ont été déjouées par les troupes de Tsahal à deux endroits différents. Trois des infiltrés ont été tués par les soldats des FDI qui défendaient la frontière. Dans certains cas, les infiltrés ont été arrêtés. Le Hamas et ses miliciens ont utilisé des grappins, des cordes, des pinces coupantes et d’autres outils pour briser la clôture. Ils ont utilisé des drones, de puissants lance-pierres capables de tuer et blesser gravement des soldats, des armes à feu, des grenades à main et des engins explosifs improvisés, à la fois pour tuer des soldats israéliens et pour passer à travers la clôture. Des cerfs-volants ont été lâchés par-dessus la frontière de Gaza afin d’incendier les cultures et l’herbe du côté israélien dans le but de causer des dommages économiques mais aussi pour tuer et mutiler. Cela peut sembler une arme primitive et même risible, mais le 4 mai, les Palestiniens avaient préparé des centaines de bombes incendiaires volantes pour les déployer en essaim en Israël, afin d’exploiter au mieux une vague de chaleur intense. (…) Jusqu’à présent, le Hamas n’a pas réussi de percée significative à travers la clôture. S’ils y arrivaient, il faut s’attendre à ce que des milliers de Gazaouis se déversent par ces brèches parmi lesquels des terroristes armés tenteraient d’atteindre les villages israéliens pour y commettre des assassinats de masse et des enlèvements. Le Hamas a tenté d’ouvrir une brèche au point-frontière le plus proche du kibboutz Nahal Oz, objectif qui pourrait être atteint en 5 minutes ou moins par des hommes armés prêts à tuer. Dans ce scénario, ou des terroristes armés sont indiscernables de civils non armés, qui eux-mêmes représentent une menace physique, il est difficile de voir comment les FDI pourraient éviter d’infliger de lourdes pertes pour défendre leur territoire et de leur population. (…) Compte tenu de leur expérience des violences passées, les FDI ont adopté une réponse graduée. Ils ont largué des milliers de tracts et ont utilisé les SMS, les médias sociaux, les appels téléphoniques et les émissions de radio pour informer les habitants de Gaza et leur demander de ne pas se rassembler à la frontière ni de s’approcher de la barrière. Ils ont contacté les propriétaires de compagnies de bus de Gaza et leur ont demandé de ne transporter personne à la frontière. La coercition exercée par le Hamas à l’encontre de la population civile a rendu ces tentatives de dissuasion inutiles. Les FDI ont alors utilisé des gaz lacrymogènes pour disperser les foules qui approchaient de trop près la clôture. Dans un effort innovant pour atteindre à plus de précision et d’efficacité, des drones ont parfois été utilisés pour disperser les gaz lacrymogènes. Mais, les gaz lacrymogènes ont une efficacité limitée dans le temps, sont sensibles aux sautes de vent, et leur impact est également réduit quand la population ciblée sait comment en atténuer les effets les plus graves. Ensuite, les forces de Tsahal ont utilisé des coups de semonce, des balles tirées au-dessus des têtes. Enfin, seulement lorsque c’était absolument nécessaire (selon leurs règles d’engagement), des munitions à balles ont été tirées dans le but de neutraliser plutôt que de tuer. Bien que tirer pour tuer eut pu passer pour une riposte légale dans certains cas, les FDI soutiennent que même dans ce cas, ils n’ont tiré que pour encapaciter (sauf dans les cas où ils avaient affaire à une attaque de type militaire, comme des tirs contre les forces de Tsahal). (…) Israël estime que 80% des personnes tuées étaient des terroristes ou des sympathisants actifs. Le prix – en vies humaines, en souffrance et réprobation de l’opinion publique internationale – a sans aucun doute été élevé ; mais la barrière n’a pas été pénétrée de manière significative et un prix encore plus élevé a donc été évité. (…) Aujourd’hui, le droit international admet l’usage de munitions réelles face à une menace sérieuse de mort ou de blessure, et quand aucun autre moyen ne permet d’y faire face. Il n’y a aucune exigence que la menace soit « immédiate » – une telle force peut être utilisée quand elle apparait « imminente »; c’est-à-dire au moment où une action agressive doit être empêchée avant qu’elle ne mute en menace immédiate. La réalité est que, dans les conditions créées délibérément par le Hamas, il n’existait aucune étape intermédiaire efficace pour éviter de tirer sur les manifestants les plus menaçants. Si ces personnes (qu’on peut difficilement appeler de simples « manifestants ») avaient été autorisées à atteindre la barrière, le risque vital serait passé d’imminent à immédiat ; il n’aurait pu être évité qu’en infligeant des pertes beaucoup plus grandes, comme il a été mentionné précédemment. Ceux qui soutiennent que Tsahal n’aurait pas dû tirer à des balles réelles, exigent en fait que des dizaines de milliers d’émeutiers violents (et parmi eux, des terroristes) soient laissés libres de faire irruption en territoire israélien. Il aurait fallu attendre avant d’agir que des civils, des forces de sécurité et des biens matériels soient en danger, alors qu’une riposte précise et ciblée contre les individus les plus menaçants a permis d’éviter à ce scénario catastrophique de devenir réalité. Certains ont également soutenu qu’ils n’existe aucune preuve de « manifestant » porteur d’une arme à feu. Ils ne comprennent pas que ce type de conflit n’oppose pas des soldats en uniforme qui s’affrontent ouvertement et en armes sur un champ de bataille. Dans ce contexte, les armes à feu ne sont pas nécessaires pour présenter une menace. En fait, c’est même le contraire compte tenu des objectifs et du mode de fonctionnement. Leurs armes sont des pinces coupantes, des grappins, des cordes, des écrans de fumée, du feu et des explosifs cachés. (…) – les armes ne surgissant qu’une fois l’objectif de pénétration massive atteint. Un soldat qui attendrait de voir une arme à feu pour tirer signerait son propre arrêt de mort, et celui des civils qu’il ou elle a pour mission de protéger. (…) Quand le chef d’état-major dit qu’il positionne « 100 tireurs d’élite à la frontière », il ne fait que verbaliser son devoir légal de défendre son pays ; il ne faut y voir aucun aveu d’une intention d’outrepasser l’usage légal de la force. Certains groupes de défense des droits de l’homme (y compris à nouveau HRW) et nombre de journalistes ont critiqué l’usage de la force par l’armée israélienne au motif qu’aucun soldat n’a été blessé. Ils en ont publiquement conclu que la riposte de Tsahal avait été « disproportionnée ». Comme cela arrive souvent quand de soi-disant experts commentent les opérations militaires occidentales, les réalités des opérations de sécurité et les impératifs légaux sont mal compris – quand ils ne sont pas déformés -. En effet, il n’est pas nécessaire d’afficher une blessure pour démontrer l’existence d’une menace réelle. Le fait que les soldats de Tsahal n’aient pas été grièvement blessés démontre seulement leur professionnalisme militaire, et non l’absence de menace. Il a également été affirmé qu’en l’absence de conflit armé, l’usage de la force à Gaza est régi par la charte internationale des droits de l’homme et non par les lois régissant les conflits militaires. Il s’agit là d’une interprétation erronée : toute la bande de Gaza est une zone de guerre définie comme telle par l’agression armée de longue date du Hamas contre l’Etat d’Israël. Par conséquent, dans cette situation, les deux types de loi sont applicables, en fonction des circonstances précises. Il est licite pour Tsahal de combattre et de tuer tout combattant ennemi identifié comme tel, n’importe où dans la bande de Gaza conformément aux lois de la guerre, que cet ennemi soit en uniforme ou non, armé ou non, représentant ou non une menace imminente, attaquant ou fuyant. Dans la pratique cependant, il apparait que face à des émeutes violentes, les FDI ont agi en supposant que tous les acteurs sur le terrain étaient des civils (contre lesquels il n’est pas nécessaire de recourir à la force létale au premier recours) à moins que l’évidence démontre le contraire. (…) Toutes ces fausses critiques de l’action israélienne, ainsi que les menaces d’enquêtes internationales, de renvoi d’Israël devant la CPI et de recours à une juridiction universelle contre les responsables israéliens impliqués dans cette situation, font le jeu du Hamas. Ils valident l’utilisation de boucliers humains et la stratégie du Hamas d’obliger au meurtre de leurs propres civils. Les implications débordent largement ce conflit. Comme l’ont démontré de précédents épisodes de violence, les réactions internationales de ce type, y compris une condamnation injuste, généralisent ces tactiques et augmentent le nombre de morts parmi les civils innocents dans le monde entier. (…) La nouvelle tactique du Hamas a eu beaucoup de succès en dressant contre Israël des personnalités de la communauté internationale et en endommageant sa réputation. Il est probable que les effets continueront à se faire sentir longtemps après la fin de cette vague de violence. Richard Kemp

Attention: une effroyable imposture peut en cacher une autre !

En ces temps étranges où l’on voit des manipulations et des complots partout …

Et où à coup d’images juxtaposées nos médiasfaussaires notoires compris – et nos belles âmes rivalisent d’ingéniosité …

Pour noircir – jusqu’à regretter qu’il n’ait pas de morts de son côté – le seul pays que vous savez et son actuel et rare défenseur à la Maison Blanche …

Pendant que dans l’enthousiasme d’un « succès » médiatique aussi inespéré mais aussi la menace directe de frappes directes sur leurs bunkers dissimulés sous les hôpitaux de Gaza …

Les cyniques tireurs de ficelle du Hamas peuvent se payer le luxe de lever temporairement la mobilisation de leur chair à canon …

Et de révéler – en arabe pour motiver les troupes et ne pas trop effrayer leurs nombreux idiots utiles occidentaux – une partie même de la réalité de leur prétendues manifestations pacifiques …

Comment ne pas s’étonner …

Avec le colonel à la retraite britannique Richard Kemp …

Et l’un des rares militaires occidentaux à oser mettre, contrairement à tous les autres qui se taisent ou laissent dire n’importe quoi, ses compétences de professionnel au service de la vérité …

Du peu d’intérêt que semble soulever chez nos apprentis conspirationnistes …

L’effroyable – et bien réelle – imposture à laquelle se prêtent contre le seul Etat israélien nos médias et autres bonnes âmes des organisations internationales …

Mais aussi, sans compter l’effet directement incitatif, qui n’est pas sans rappeler tant d’autres phénomènes de nature mimétique comme les fusillades scolaires, de l’intérêt médiatique et de la présence des caméras elles-mêmes …

La proprement criminelle incitation, augmentant d’autant à chaque fois le nombre des victimes collatérales, …

Qu’une telle unanimité d’injustes condamnations ne peut que générer ?

Fumée et miroirs : six semaines de violence à la frontière de Gaza
Richard Kemp
Gatestone institute
14 mai 2018
Traduction du texte original: Smoke & Mirrors: Six Weeks of Violence on the Gaza Border

Depuis le 30 mars, le Hamas organise des violences à grande échelle à la frontière de Gaza et d’Israël. Ces embrasements majeurs ont généralement lieu le vendredi à la fin des prières dans les mosquées ; des actions concertées mobilisant des foules de 40 000 personnes ont été constatées dans cinq zones séparées le long de la frontière. Des violences et diverses actions agressives, y compris des actes de nature terroristes avec explosifs et armes à feu, ont également eu lieu à d’autres moments au cours de cette période.

Une tempête parfaite

Le Hamas avait prévu une culmination de la violence le 14 ou le 15 mai 2018. Le 15 est la date à laquelle ils commémorent le 70ème anniversaire de la « Nakba » (« Catastrophe ») qui a eu lieu au lendemain de la création de l’Etat d’Israël. Mais une recrudescence de violence a été constatée le 14, jour de l’inauguration de la nouvelle ambassade américaine à Jérusalem. La violence a donc culminé les 14 et 15, deux jours qui coïncident avec la Nakba et l’inauguration de l’ambassade américaine, mais qui marquent aussi le début du mois de Ramadan, une période où la violence augmente au Moyen-Orient et ailleurs.

Le Hamas avait prévu de mobiliser jusqu’à 200 000 personnes à la frontière de Gaza, soit un doublement et plus du nombre de manifestants constatés les années précédentes. Le Hamas semblait également déterminé à inciter à un niveau de violence jamais atteint auparavant, avec des pénétrations significatives de la barrière frontalière. Face à de tels projets, il est étonnant que les chiffres en pertes humaines ne soient pas plus élevés parmi les Palestiniens.

Outre la zone frontalière, les Palestiniens ont prévu de mener des actions violentes à la même période, à Jérusalem et en Cisjordanie. Bien que le 15 mai soit considéré comme le point culminant de six semaines de violence à la frontière de Gaza, les Palestiniens ont fait savoir qu’ils entendaient maintenir un niveau de violence frontalière élevé tout au long du mois de Ramadan.

Prétexte et réalité

La violence à Gaza a été orchestrée sous la bannière prétexte de la « Grande marche du retour », une façon d’attirer l’attention sur ce droit au retour dans leurs foyers d’origine que les dirigeants palestiniens promettent à leur peuple. L’intention affichée n’était pas de manifester, mais de franchir en masse la frontière et de cheminer par milliers à travers l’État d’Israël.

L’affirmation du « droit de retour » ne vise pas à l’exercice d’un tel « droit », lequel est fortement contesté et doit faire l’objet de négociations sur le statut définitif. Il s’inscrit dans une politique arabe de longue date destinée à éliminer l’Etat d’Israël, un projet à l’encontre duquel le gouvernement israélien s’inscrit de manière non moins systématique.

Le véritable objectif de la violence du Hamas est de poursuivre sa stratégie de longue date de création et d’intensification de l’indignation internationale, de la diffamation, de l’isolement et de la criminalisation de l’État d’Israël et de ses fonctionnaires. Cette stratégie passe par la mise en scène de situations qui obligent Tsahal à réagir avec une force meurtrière qui les place aussitôt en position de tortionnaires qui tuent et blessent des civils palestiniens « innocents ».

Les tactiques terroristes du Hamas

Dans le cadre de cette stratégie, le Hamas a mis au point différentes tactiques, qui passent par des tirs de roquettes depuis Gaza sur les villes israéliennes et la construction de tunnels d’attaque sophistiqués qui débouchent au-delà de la frontière, à proximité de villages israéliens voisins. Toutes ces tactiques ont pour particularité d’utiliser des boucliers humains palestiniens – des civils, des femmes et des enfants de préférence, forcés ou volontaires, présents toutes les fois que des attaques sont lancées ou commandées ; des civils présents au côté des combattants, à proximité des dépôts d’armes et de munitions. Toute riposte militaire israélienne engendre des dommages collatéraux chez les civils.

Dans certains cas, notamment à l’occasion de la vague de violence actuelle, le Hamas présente ses combattants comme des civils innocents ; de nombreux faux incidents ont été mis en scène et filmés pour faire état de civils tués et blessés par les forces israéliennes ; des scènes de violence filmées ailleurs, notamment en Syrie, ont été présentés comme des violences commises contre les Palestiniens.

Même stratégie, nouvelles tactiques

Après les roquettes et les tunnels d’attaque utilisés dans trois conflits majeurs (2008-2009, 2012 et 2014), sans oublier plusieurs incidents mineurs, de nouvelles tactiques ont été mises au point qui ont toutes le même objectif fondamental. Les « manifestations » à grande échelle combinées à des actions agressives sont destinées à provoquer une réaction israélienne qui conduit à tuer et à blesser les civils de Gaza, malgré les efforts énergiques des FDI (Forces de défense d’Israël) pour réduire les pertes civiles.

Cette nouvelle tactique s’avère plus efficace que les roquettes et les tunnels d’attaque. Les cibles visées – dirigeants politiques de pays tiers, organisations internationales (ONU, UE), groupes de défense des droits de l’homme et médias – n’admettent pas que l’on réponde par la force à des manifestations faussement pacifiques qu’ils sont tentés d’assimiler aux manifestations réellement pacifiques qui ont lieu dans leurs propres villes.

Comme à leur habitude, ces cibles-là se montrent toujours disposées à se laisser leurrer par ce stratagème. Depuis le début de cette vague de violence, des condamnations véhémentes ont été émises par l’ONU, l’UE et la CPI ; mais aussi plusieurs gouvernements et organisations des droits de l’homme, notamment Amnesty International et Human Rights Watch ; sans parler de nombreux journaux et stations de radio. Leurs protestations incluent des demandes d’enquête internationale sur les allégations de meurtres illégaux ainsi que des accusations de violation du droit humanitaire international et des droits de l’homme par les FDI.

Les tactiques du Hamas sur le terrain

Ces manifestations sont en réalité des opérations militaires soigneusement planifiées et orchestrées. Des foules de civils auxquelles se mêlent des groupes de combattants sont rassemblées aux frontières. Combattants et civils ont pour mission de s’approcher de la clôture et de la briser. Des milliers de pneus ont été incendiés pour créer des écrans de fumée afin de dissimuler leurs mouvements en direction de la clôture (et sans grande efficacité, ils ont utilisé des miroirs pour aveugler les observateurs de la FDI et les tireurs d’élite). Les pneus enflammés et les cocktails Molotov ont également été utilisés pour briser la clôture dont certains éléments, à divers endroits, sont en en bois.

Le vendredi 4 mai, environ 10 000 Palestiniens ont participé à des manifestations violentes le long de la frontière et des centaines d’émeutiers ont vandalisé et incendié la partie palestinienne de Kerem Shalom, point de passage des convois humanitaires. Ils ont endommagé des canalisations de gaz et de carburant qui partent d’Israël en direction de la bande de Gaza. Ce raid contre Kerem Shalom a eu lieu à deux reprises le 4 mai. Le même jour, deux tentatives d’infiltration ont été déjoues par les troupes de Tsahal à deux endroits différents. Trois des infiltrés ont été tués par les soldats des FDI qui défendaient la frontière. Dans certains cas, les infiltrés ont été arrêtés.

Le Hamas et ses miliciens ont utilisé des grappins, des cordes, des pinces coupantes et d’autres outils pour briser la clôture. Ils ont utilisé des drones, de puissants lance-pierres capables de tuer et blesser gravement des soldats, des armes à feu, des grenades à main et des engins explosifs improvisés, à la fois pour tuer des soldats israéliens et pour passer à travers la clôture.

Cerfs-volants et ballons incendiaires

Des cerfs-volants ont été lâchés par-dessus la frontière de Gaza afin d’incendier les cultures et l’herbe du côté israélien dans le but de causer des dommages économiques mais aussi pour tuer et mutiler. Cela peut sembler une arme primitive et même risible, mais le 4 mai, les Palestiniens avaient préparé des centaines de bombes incendiaires volantes pour les déployer en essaim en Israël, afin d’exploiter au mieux une vague de chaleur intense. Seules des conditions de vent défavorables ont empêché le déploiement de ces cerfs-volants empêchant ainsi des dommages sérieux potentiels.

Dans plusieurs cas, les cerfs-volants en feu ont provoqué des incendies. Ainsi, le 16 avril, un champ de blé a été incendié côté israélien. Le 2 mai, un cerf-volant incendiaire parti de Gaza a provoqué un incendie majeur dans la forêt de Be’eri dévastant de vastes zones boisées. Dix équipes de pompiers ont été nécessaires pour juguler l’incendie. Des ballons incendiaires ont également été utilisés par le Hamas, notamment le 7 mai, l’un d’eux a réussi à incendier un champ de blé près de la forêt de Be’eri. Israël évalue à plusieurs millions de shekels, les dommages économiques résultants des incendies causés par les cerfs-volants et les ballons.

Si le Hamas a traversé

Jusqu’à présent, le Hamas n’a pas réussi de percée significative à travers la clôture. S’ils y arrivaient, il faut s’attendre à ce que des milliers de Gazaouis se déversent par ces brèches parmi lesquels des terroristes armés tenteraient d’atteindre les villages israéliens pour y commettre des assassinats de masse et des enlèvements.

Le Hamas a tenté d’ouvrir une brèche au point-frontière le plus proche du kibboutz Nahal Oz, objectif qui pourrait être atteint en 5 minutes ou moins par des hommes armés prêts à tuer.

Dans ce scénario, ou des terroristes armés sont indiscernables de civils non armés, qui eux-mêmes représentent une menace physique, il est difficile de voir comment les FDI pourraient éviter d’infliger de lourdes pertes pour défendre leur territoire et de leur population.

Forces de défense d’Israel (IDF) : une risposte graduée

Les FDI ont été obligées d’agir avec une grande fermeté – pour empêcher toute pénétration – y compris à l’aide de tirs réels (qui ont parfois été meurtriers) et malgré une condamnation internationale lourde et inévitable.

Compte tenu de leur expérience des violences passées, les FDI ont adopté une réponse graduée. Ils ont largué des milliers de tracts et ont utilisé les SMS, les médias sociaux, les appels téléphoniques et les émissions de radio pour informer les habitants de Gaza et leur demander de ne pas se rassembler à la frontière ni de s’approcher de la barrière. Ils ont contacté les propriétaires de compagnies de bus de Gaza et leur ont demandé de ne transporter personne à la frontière.

La coercition exercée par le Hamas à l’encontre de la population civile a rendu ces tentatives de dissuasion inutiles. Les FDI ont alors utilisé des gaz lacrymogènes pour disperser les foules qui approchaient de trop près la clôture. Dans un effort innovant pour atteindre à plus de précision et d’efficacité, des drones ont parfois été utilisés pour disperser les gaz lacrymogènes. Mais, les gaz lacrymogènes ont une efficacité limitée dans le temps, sont sensibles aux sautes de vent, et leur impact est également réduit quand la population ciblée sait comment en atténuer les effets les plus graves.

Ensuite, les forces de Tsahal ont utilisé des coups de semonce, des balles tirées au-dessus des têtes. Enfin, seulement lorsque c’était absolument nécessaire (selon leurs règles d’engagement), des munitions à balles ont été tirées dans le but de neutraliser plutôt que de tuer. Bien que tirer pour tuer eut pu passer pour une riposte légale dans certains cas, les FDI soutiennent que même dans ce cas, ils n’ont tiré que pour encapaciter (sauf dans les cas où ils avaient affaire à une attaque de type militaire, comme des tirs contre les forces de Tsahal). Dans tous les cas, les forces de Tsahal fonctionnent selon des procédures opérationnelles standard, rédigées en fonction des circonstances et compilées en collaboration avec diverses autorités des FDI.

Néanmoins, ces échanges de tirs ont généré des morts et de nombreux blessés. Les autorités palestiniennes affirment qu’une cinquantaine de personnes ont été tuées jusqu’à présent et que plusieurs centaines d’autres ont été blessées. Israël estime que 80% des personnes tuées étaient des terroristes ou des sympathisants actifs. Le prix – en vies humaines, en souffrance et réprobation de l’opinion publique internationale – a sans aucun doute été élevé ; mais la barrière n’a pas été pénétrée de manière significative et un prix encore plus élevé a donc été évité.

Condamnation internationale, aucune solution

Beaucoup ont estimé qu’Israël n’aurait pas dû répondre comme il l’a fait à la menace. Mladenov, envoyé des Nations Unies au Moyen-Orient, a jugé la riposte d’Israël « scandaleuse ». Le Haut-Commissaire des Nations Unies aux droits de l’homme, Zeid Ra’ad al-Hussein, a condamné l’usage d’une « force excessive ». Le Procureur de la Cour pénale internationale, Fatou Bensouda, a affirmé que « la violence contre les civils – dans une situation comme celle qui prévaut à Gaza – pourrait constituer un crime au regard du Statut de Rome de la CPI ».

Pourtant, en dépit de leurs condamnations, aucun de ces fonctionnaires et experts, n’a été en mesure de proposer une riposte adaptée viable pour empêcher le franchissement violent des frontières israéliennes.

Certains affirment que les troupes israéliennes ont fait un usage de la force disproportionné en tirant à balles réelles sur des manifestants qui ne menaçaient personne. L’UE a ainsi exprimé son inquiétude sur l’utilisation de balles réelles par les forces de sécurité israéliennes. Mais les soi-disant « manifestants » représentaient une menace vitale réelle.

Aujourd’hui, le droit international admet l’usage de munitions réelles face à une menace sérieuse de mort ou de blessure, et quand aucun autre moyen ne permet d’y faire face. Il n’y a aucune exigence que la menace soit « immédiate » – une telle force peut être utilisée quand elle apparait « imminente »; c’est-à-dire au moment où une action agressive doit être empêchée avant qu’elle ne mute en menace immédiate.

La réalité est que, dans les conditions créées délibérément par le Hamas, il n’existait aucune étape intermédiaire efficace pour éviter de tirer sur les manifestants les plus menaçants. Si ces personnes (qu’on peut difficilement appeler de simples « manifestants ») avaient été autorisées à atteindre la barrière, le risque vital serait passé d’imminent à immédiat ; il n’aurait pu être évité qu’en infligeant des pertes beaucoup plus grandes, comme il a été mentionné précédemment.

Échec de la compréhension par la communauté internationale

Ceux qui soutiennent que Tsahal n’aurait pas dû tirer à des balles réelles, exigent en fait que des dizaines de milliers d’émeutiers violents (et parmi eux, des terroristes) soient laissés libres de faire irruption en territoire israélien. Il aurait fallu attendre avant d’agir que des civils, des forces de sécurité et des biens matériels soient en danger, alors qu’une riposte précise et ciblée contre les individus les plus menaçants a permis d’éviter à ce scénario catastrophique de devenir réalité.

Certains ont également soutenu qu’ils n’existe aucune preuve de « manifestant » porteur d’une arme à feu. Ils ne comprennent pas que ce type de conflit n’oppose pas des soldats en uniforme qui s’affrontent ouvertement et en armes sur un champ de bataille. Dans ce contexte, les armes à feu ne sont pas nécessaires pour présenter une menace. En fait, c’est même le contraire compte tenu des objectifs et du mode de fonctionnement. Leurs armes sont des pinces coupantes, des grappins, des cordes, des écrans de fumée, du feu et des explosifs cachés.

Le Hamas a passé des années et dépensé des millions de dollars à creuser des tunnels d’attaque souterrains pour tenter d’entrer en Israël – une menace sérieuse qui implique des pelles, pas des armes à feu. Tout en continuant à creuser des tunnels, ils ont agi au grand jour mais fondus au sein d’une population civile utilisée couverture – les armes ne surgissant qu’une fois l’objectif de pénétration massive atteint. Un soldat qui attendrait de voir une arme à feu pour tirer signerait son propre arrêt de mort, et celui des civils qu’il ou elle a pour mission de protéger.

Des critiques ont été formulées (en particulier par Human Rights Watch) à l’encontre de responsables israéliens qui auraient sciemment accordé leur feu vert aux agissements illégaux des soldats. Par exemple, HRW cite comme preuve certains commentaires publics du chef d’état-major de Tsahal, du porte-parole du Premier ministre et du ministre de la Défense.

Il ne leur est sans doute pas venu à l’esprit que ces fonctionnaires exercent leur autorité par des canaux de communication privés et non à travers des médias publics. Par ailleurs, leurs commentaires ne sont pas des instructions aux troupes mais des avertissements lancés aux civils de Gaza pour réduire le niveau de violence et apaiser les craintes légitimes des Israéliens vivant en zone frontalière. Quand le chef d’état-major dit qu’il positionne « 100 tireurs d’élite à la frontière », il ne fait que verbaliser son devoir légal de défendre son pays ; il ne faut y voir aucun aveu d’une intention d’outrepasser l’usage légal de la force.

Certains groupes de défense des droits de l’homme (y compris à nouveau HRW) et nombre de journalistes ont critiqué l’usage de la force par l’armée israélienne au motif qu’aucun soldat n’a été blessé. Ils en ont publiquement conclu que la riposte de Tsahal avait été « disproportionnée ». Comme cela arrive souvent quand de soi-disant experts commentent les opérations militaires occidentales, les réalités des opérations de sécurité et les impératifs légaux sont mal compris – quand ils ne sont pas déformés -. En effet, il n’est pas nécessaire d’afficher une blessure pour démontrer l’existence d’une menace réelle. Le fait que les soldats de Tsahal n’aient pas été grièvement blessés démontre seulement leur professionnalisme militaire, et non l’absence de menace.

Il a également été affirmé qu’en l’absence de conflit armé, l’usage de la force à Gaza est régi par la charte internationale des droits de l’homme et non par les lois régissant les conflits militaires. Il s’agit là d’une interprétation erronée : toute la bande de Gaza est une zone de guerre définie comme telle par l’agression armée de longue date du Hamas contre l’Etat d’Israël. Par conséquent, dans cette situation, les deux types de loi sont applicables, en fonction des circonstances précises.

Il est licite pour Tsahal de combattre et de tuer tout combattant ennemi identifié comme tel, n’importe où dans la bande de Gaza conformément aux lois de la guerre, que cet ennemi soit en uniforme ou non, armé ou non, représentant ou non une menace imminente, attaquant ou fuyant. Dans la pratique cependant, il apparait que face à des émeutes violentes, les FDI ont agi en supposant que tous les acteurs sur le terrain étaient des civils (contre lesquels il n’est pas nécessaire de recourir à la force létale au premier recours) à moins que l’évidence démontre le contraire.

Faire le jeu du Hamas

Nombreux aussi ont été ceux qui ont affirmé que le gouvernement israélien a refusé de mener une enquête officielle sur les décès survenus. Encore une fois l’assertion est complètement fausse. Les Israéliens ont déclaré qu’ils examineraient les incidents sur la base de leur système juridique, lequel jouit d’un respect unanime au plan international. En revanche, le gouvernement israélien a explicitement refusé une enquête internationale, tout comme les Etats-Unis, le Royaume-Uni ou toute autre démocratie occidentale l’aurait fait dans la même situation.

Toutes ces fausses critiques de l’action israélienne, ainsi que les menaces d’enquêtes internationales, de renvoi d’Israël devant la CPI et de recours à une juridiction universelle contre les responsables israéliens impliqués dans cette situation, font le jeu du Hamas. Ils valident l’utilisation de boucliers humains et la stratégie du Hamas d’obliger au meurtre de leurs propres civils. Les implications débordent largement ce conflit. Comme l’ont démontré de précédents épisodes de violence, les réactions internationales de ce type, y compris une condamnation injuste, généralisent ces tactiques et augmentent le nombre de morts parmi les civils innocents dans le monde entier.

Plus de violence à venir ?

Cette campagne du Hamas peut entraîner des pertes massives dans la population palestinienne. Il est non moins probable que la condamnation des médias, des organisations internationales et des groupes de défense des droits de l’homme va se généraliser. Ceux qui ont un agenda anti-américain et anti-israélien lieront inévitablement cette violence à la décision du président Trump d’ouvrir l’ambassade américaine à Jérusalem.

Action future

La nouvelle tactique du Hamas a eu beaucoup de succès en dressant contre Israël des personnalités de la communauté internationale et en endommageant sa réputation. Il est probable que les effets continueront à se faire sentir longtemps après la fin de cette vague de violence.

Il faut s’attendre à des condamnations supplémentaires de la part d’acteurs internationaux, tels que les divers organismes des Nations Unies, ainsi que des rapports spécifiques produits par des rapporteurs spéciaux des Nations Unies. Des tentatives d’inciter le Procureur de la CPI à examiner ces incidents auront lieu, ainsi que des initiatives de procédures judiciaires lancées par différents États (en utilisant la « compétence universelle ») pour tenter de diffamer et même d’arrêter des responsables militaires et des politiciens israéliens.

Inévitablement, le Hamas et d’autres groupes palestiniens vont renouveler cette tactique à l’avenir. Pour atténuer cela, Israël se prépare à renforcer la frontière de Gaza pour rendre toute tentative de pénétration plus difficile sans recourir à la force létale. (Ils travaillent déjà sur une barrière souterraine pour empêcher la pénétration par effet tunnel.) Cependant, il s’agit d’un projet à long terme et la possibilité d’étanchéifier la frontière au point de la rendre impénétrable demande à être clarifiée.

En outre, Tsahal porte aujourd’hui une attention accrue aux armes non létales. Mais en dépit d’importantes recherches menées au plan international, aucun système viable et efficace ne peut fonctionner dans de telles circonstances.

Les amis et alliés d’Israël peuvent agir pour contrer la propagande anti-israélienne du Hamas, et faire pression sur les dirigeants politiques, les groupes de défense des droits de l’homme, les organisations internationales et les médias pour éviter une fausse condamnation d’Israël ; il faut également lutter contre les réclamations d’une action internationale comme d’une enquête unilatérale des Nations Unies et ses résolutions. Un tel rejet, de préférence accompagné d’une forte condamnation de la tactique violente du Hamas, pourrait contribuer à décourager l’utilisation de tels plans d’action. Bien entendu, face à un agenda anti-israélien aussi profondément enraciné, de telles recommandations sont plus faciles à formuler qu’à mettre en pratique.

Le colonel Richard Kemp commandait les forces britanniques en Irlande du Nord, en Afghanistan, en Irak et dans les Balkans. Cette analyse a été publiée à l’origine sur le site Web de HIGH LEVEL MILITARY GROUP. Elle est reproduite ici avec l’aimable autorisation de l’auteur.

Voir aussi:

Falling for Hamas’s Split-Screen Fallacy

Matti Friedman

Mr. Friedman, a journalist, is the author of the memoir “Pumpkinflowers: A Soldier’s Story of a Forgotten War.”

JERUSALEM — During my years in the international press here in Israel, long before the bloody events of this week, I came to respect Hamas for its keen ability to tell a story.

At the end of 2008 I was a desk editor, a local hire in The Associated Press’s Jerusalem bureau, during the first serious round of violence in Gaza after Hamas took it over the year before. That conflict was grimly similar to the American campaign in Iraq, in which a modern military fought in crowded urban confines against fighters concealed among civilians. Hamas understood early that the civilian death toll was driving international outrage at Israel, and that this, not I.E.D.s or ambushes, was the most important weapon in its arsenal.

Early in that war, I complied with Hamas censorship in the form of a threat to one of our Gaza reporters and cut a key detail from an article: that Hamas fighters were disguised as civilians and were being counted as civilians in the death toll. The bureau chief later wrote that printing the truth after the threat to the reporter would have meant “jeopardizing his life.” Nonetheless, we used that same casualty toll throughout the conflict and never mentioned the manipulation.

Hamas understood that Western news outlets wanted a simple story about villains and victims and would stick to that script, whether because of ideological sympathy, coercion or ignorance. The press could be trusted to present dead human beings not as victims of the terrorist group that controls their lives, or of a tragic confluence of events, but of an unwarranted Israeli slaughter. The willingness of reporters to cooperate with that script gave Hamas the incentive to keep using it.

The next step in the evolution of this tactic was visible in Monday’s awful events. If the most effective weapon in a military campaign is pictures of civilian casualties, Hamas seems to have concluded, there’s no need for a campaign at all. All you need to do is get people killed on camera. The way to do this in Gaza, in the absence of any Israeli soldiers inside the territory, is to try to cross the Israeli border, which everyone understands is defended with lethal force and is easy to film.

About 40,000 people answered a call to show up. Many of them, some armed, rushed the border fence. Many Israelis, myself included, were horrified to see the number of fatalities reach 60.

Most Western viewers experienced these events through a visual storytelling tool: a split screen. On one side was the opening of the American embassy in Jerusalem in the presence of Ivanka Trump, evangelical Christian allies of the White House and Israel’s current political leadership — an event many here found curious and distant from our national life. On the other side was the terrible violence in the desperately poor and isolated territory. The juxtaposition was disturbing.

The attempts to breach the Gaza fence, which Palestinians call the March of Return, began in March and have the stated goal of erasing the border as a step toward erasing Israel. A central organizer, the Hamas leader Yehya Sinwar, exhorted participants on camera in Arabic to “tear out the hearts” of Israelis. But on Monday the enterprise was rebranded as a protest against the embassy opening, with which it was meticulously timed to coincide. The split screen, and the idea that people were dying in Gaza because of Donald Trump, was what Hamas was looking for.

The press coverage on Monday was a major Hamas success in a war whose battlefield isn’t really Gaza, but the brains of foreign audiences.

Israeli soldiers facing Gaza have no good choices. They can warn people off with tear gas or rubber bullets, which are often inaccurate and ineffective, and if that doesn’t work, they can use live fire. Or they can hold their fire to spare lives and allow a breach, in which case thousands of people will surge into Israel, some of whom — the soldiers won’t know which — will be armed fighters. (On Wednesday a Hamas leader, Salah Bardawil, told a Hamas TV station that 50 of the dead were Hamas members. The militant group Islamic Jihad claimed three others.) If such a breach occurs, the death toll will be higher. And Hamas’s tactic, having proved itself, would likely be repeated by Israel’s enemies on its borders with Syria and Lebanon.

Knowledgeable people can debate the best way to deal with this threat. Could a different response have reduced the death toll? Or would a more aggressive response deter further actions of this kind and save lives in the long run? What are the open-fire orders on the India-Pakistan border, for example? Is there something Israel could have done to defuse things beforehand?

These are good questions. But anyone following the response abroad saw that this wasn’t what was being discussed. As is often the case where Israel is concerned, things quickly became hysterical and divorced from the events themselves. Turkey’s president called it “genocide.” A writer for The New Yorker took the opportunity to tweet some of her thoughts about “whiteness and Zionism,” part of an odd trend that reads America’s racial and social problems into a Middle Eastern society 6,000 miles away. The sicknesses of the social media age — the disdain for expertise and the idea that other people are not just wrong but villainous — have crept into the worldview of people who should know better.

For someone looking out from here, that’s the real split-screen effect: On one side, a complicated human tragedy in a corner of a region spinning out of control. On the other, a venomous and simplistic story, a symptom of these venomous and simplistic times.

Voir encore:

The cacophony that accompanies every upsurge in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict can make it seem impossible for outsiders to sort out the facts. Recent events in Gaza are no exception. The shrillest voices on each side are already offering their own mutually exclusive narratives that acknowledge some realities while scrupulously avoiding others.

But while certain facts about Gaza may be inconvenient for the loudest partisans on either side, they should not be inconvenient to the rest of us.

To that end, here are 13 complicated, messy, true things about what has been happening in Gaza. They do not conform to one political narrative or another, and they do not attempt to conclusively apportion all blame. Try, as best you can, to hold them all in your mind at the same time.

1. The protests on Monday were not about President Donald Trump moving the U.S. Embassy to Jerusalem, and have in fact been occurring weekly on the Gaza border since March. They are part of what the demonstrators have dubbed “The Great March of Return”—return, that is, to what is now Israel. (The Monday demonstration was scheduled months ago to coincide with Nakba Day, an annual occasion of protest; it was later moved up 24 hours to grab some of the media attention devoted to the embassy.) The fact that these long-standing Palestinian protests were mischaracterized by many in the media as simply a response to Trump obscured two disquieting realities: First, that the world has largely dismissed the genuine plight of Palestinians in Gaza, only bothering to pay attention to it when it could be tenuously connected to Trump. Second, that many Palestinians do not simply desire their own state and an end to the occupation and settlements that began in 1967, but an end to the Jewish state that began in 1948.

2. The Israeli blockade of Gaza goes well beyond what is necessary for Israel’s security, and in many cases can be capricious and self-defeating. Import and export restrictions on food and produce have seesawed over the years, with what is permitted one year forbidden the next, making it difficult for Gazan farmers to plan for the future. Restrictions on movement between Gaza, the West Bank, and beyond can be similarly overbroad, preventing not simply potential terrorist operatives from traveling, but families and students. In one of the more infamous instances, the U.S. State Department was forced to withdraw all Fulbright awards to students in Gaza after Israel did not grant them permission to leave. Today, official policy bars Gazans from traveling abroad unless they commit to not returning for a full year. It is past time that these issues be addressed, as outlined in part in a new letter from several prominent senators, including Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren.

3. Hamas, which controls the Gaza Strip, is an authoritarian, theocratic regime that has called for Jewish genocide in its charter, murdered scores of Israeli civilians, repressed Palestinian women, and harshly persecuted religious and sexual minorities. It is a designated terrorist group by the United States, Canada, and the European Union.

4. The overbearing Israeli blockade has helped impoverish Gaza. So has Hamas’s utter failure to govern and provide for the basic needs of the enclave’s people. Whether it has been spending its manpower and millions of dollars on subterranean attack tunnels into Israel—including under United Nations schools for Gaza’s children—or launching repeated messianic military operations against Israel, the terrorist group has consistently prioritized the deaths of Israelis over the lives of its Palestinian brethren.

5. Many of the thousands of protesters on the Gaza border, both on Monday and in weeks previous, were peaceful and unarmed, as anyone looking at the photos and videos of the gatherings can see.

6. Hamas manipulated many of these demonstrators into unwittingly rushing the Israeli border fence under false pretenses in order to produce injuries and fatalities. As the New York Times reported, “After midday prayers, clerics and leaders of militant factions in Gaza, led by Hamas, urged thousands of worshipers to join the protests. The fence had already been breached, they said falsely, claiming Palestinians were flooding into Israel.” Similarly, the Washington Post recounted how “organizers urged protesters over loudspeakers to burst through the fence, telling them Israeli soldiers were fleeing their positions, even as they were reinforcing them.” Hamas has also publicly acknowledged deliberately using peaceful civilians at the protests as cover and cannon fodder for their military operations. “When we talk about ‘peaceful resistance,’ we are deceiving the public,” Hamas co-founder Mahmoud al-Zahar told an interviewer. “This is peaceful resistance bolstered by a military force and by security agencies.”

7. A significant number of the protesters were armed, which is how they did things like this:

Widely circulated Arabic instructions on Facebook directed protesters to “bring a knife, dagger, or gun if available” and to breach the Israeli border and kidnap civilians. (The posts have now been removed by Facebook for inciting violence but a cached copy can be viewed here.) Hamas further incentivized violence by providing payments to those injured and the families of those killed. Both Hamas and the Islamic Jihad terror group have since claimed many of those killed as their own operatives and posted photos of them in uniform. On Wednesday, Hamas Political Bureau member Salah Al-Bardawil announced that 50 of the 62 fatalities were Hamas members.

Contrary to certain Israeli talking points, however, these facts do not automatically justify any particular Israeli response or every Palestinian casualty or injury. They simply establish the reality of the threat.

8. It is facile to argue that Gazans should be protesting Hamas and its misrule instead of Israel. One, it is not a binary choice, as both actors have contributed to Gaza’s misery. Two, as the BBC’s Julia MacFarlane recalled from her time covering Gaza, any public dissent against Hamas is perilous: “A boy I met in Gaza during the 2014 war was dragged from his bed at midnight, had his kneecaps shot off in a square and was told next time it would be axes—for an anti-Hamas Facebook post.” The group has publicly executed those it deems “collaborators” and broken up rare protests with gunfire. Likewise, Gazans cannot “vote Hamas out” because Hamas has not permitted elections since it won them and took power in 2006. The group fares poorly in the polls today, but Gazans have no recourse for expressing their dissatisfaction. Protesting Israel, however, is an outlet for frustration encouraged by Hamas.

9. In that regard, Hamas has worked to increase chaos and casualties stemming from the protests by allowing rioters to repeatedly set fire to the Kerem Shalom crossing, Gaza’s main avenue for international and humanitarian aid, and by turning back trucks of needed food and supplies from Israel.

10. A lot of what you’re seeing on social media about what is transpiring in Gaza isn’t actually true. For instance, a video of a Palestinian “martyr” allegedly moving under his shroud that is circulating in pro-Israel circles is actually a 4-year old clip from Egypt. Likewise, despite the claims of viral tweets and the Hamas-run Gaza Health Ministry that were initially parroted by some in the media, Israel did not actually kill an 8-month old baby with tear gas. The Gazan doctor who treated her told the Associated Press that she died from a preexisting heart condition, a fact belatedly picked up by the New York Times and Los Angeles Times. In the era of fake news, readers should be especially vigilant about resharing unconfirmed content simply because it confirms their biases.

11. There are constructive solutions to Gaza’s problems that would alleviate the plight of its Palestinian population while assuaging the security concerns of Israelis. However, these useful proposals do not go viral like angry tweets ranting about how Palestinians are all de facto terrorists or Israelis are the new Nazis, which is one reason why you probably have never heard of them.

12. A truly independent, respected inquiry into Israel’s tactics and rules of engagement in Gaza is necessary to ensure any abuses are punished and create internationally recognized guidelines for how Israel and other state actors should deal with these situations on their borders. The United Nations, which annually condemns Israel in its General Assembly and Human Rights Council more than all other countries combined, and whose notorious bias against Israel was famously condemned by Obama ambassador to the U.N., Samantha Power, clearly lacks the credibility to administer such an inquiry. Between America, Canada, and Europe, however, it should be possible to create one.

13. But because the entire debate around Israel’s conduct has been framed by absolutists who insist either that Israel is utterly blameless or that Israel is wantonly massacring random Palestinians for sport, a reasonable inquiry into what it did correctly and what it did not is unlikely to happen.

***

You can help support Tablet’s unique brand of Jewish journalism. Click here to donate today.

Voir également:

Jerusalem Celebrates, Gaza Burns

On the night of May 14, the leading headline of The Washington Post said, “More than 50 killed in Gaza protests as U.S. opens its new embassy in Jerusalem.” Headlines of other newspapers were not much different.

There is no doubt the headlines were factually accurate. But so would a headline saying, “More than 50 killed in Gaza as the moon was a waning crescent,” or “More than 50 killed in Gaza as Arambulo named co-anchor of NBC4’s ‘Today in LA.’ ” Were they unbiased? Not quite. They suggested a causation: The U.S. opens an embassy and hence people get killed. But the causation is faulty: Gazans were killed last week, when the United States had not yet opened its embassy. Gazans were killed for a simple reason: Ignoring warnings, thousands of them decided to get too close to the Israeli border.

There are arguments one could make against President Donald Trump’s decision to move the American embassy to Jerusalem. People in Gaza getting killed is not one of them. A country such as the United States, a country such as Israel, cannot curb strategic decisions because of inconveniences such as demonstrations. Small things can be postponed to prevent anger. Small decisions can be altered to avoid violent incidents. But not important, historic moves.

At the end of this week, no matter the final tally of Gazans getting hurt, only one event will be counted as “historic.” The opening of a U.S. embassy in Jerusalem is a historic decision of great symbolic significance. Lives lost for no good reason in Gaza — as saddening as it is — is routine. Eleven years ago, on  May 16, 2007, I wrote this about Gaza: “The Gaza Strip is burning, drifting into chaos, turning into hell — and nobody seems to have a way out of this mess. Dozens of people were killed in Gaza in the last couple of weeks, the victims of lawlessness and power struggles between clans and families, gangsters and militias.” Sounds familiar? I assume it does. This is what routine looks like. This is what disregard for human life feels like. And that was 11 years to the week before a U.S. embassy was moved to Jerusalem.

Why were so many lives lost in Gaza? To give a straight answer, one must begin with the obvious: The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) has no interest in having more Gazans killed, yet its mission is not to save Gazans’ lives. Its mission — remember, the IDF is a military serving a country — is to defeat an enemy. And in the case of Gaza this past week, the meaning of this was preventing unauthorized, possibly dangerous people from crossing the fence separating Israel from the Gaza Strip.

As this column was written, the afternoon of May 15, the IDF had achieved its objective: No one was able to cross the border into Israel. The price was high. It was high for the Palestinians. Israel will get its unfair share of criticism from people who have nothing to offer but words of condemnation. This was also to be expected. And also to be ignored. Again, not because criticism means nothing, but rather because there are things of higher importance to worry about. Such as not letting unauthorized hostile people cross into Israel.

Of course, any bloodshed is regretful. Yet to achieve its objectives, the IDF had to use lethal force. Circumstances on the ground dictate using such measures. The winds made tear gas ineffective. The proximity of the border made it essential to stop Gazan demonstrators from getting too close, lest thousands of them flood the fence, thus forcing the IDF to use even more lethal means. Leaflets warned them not to go near the fence. Media outlets were used to clarify that consequences could be dire. Hence, an unbiased, sincere newspaper headline should have said, “More than 50 killed in Gaza while Hamas leaders ignored warnings.”

So, yes, Jerusalem celebrated while Gaza burned. Not because Gaza burned. And, yes, the U.S. moved its embassy while Gaza burned. But this is not what made Gaza burn.

It all comes down to legitimacy. Having embassies move to Jerusalem, Israel’s capital, is about legitimacy. Letting Israel keep the integrity of its borders is about legitimacy. President Donald Trump gained the respect and appreciation of Israelis because of his no-nonsense acceptance of a reality, and because of his no-nonsense rejection of delegitimization masqueraded as policy differences. A legitimate country is allowed to defend its border. A legitimate country is allowed to choose its capital.

Gaza’s Miseries Have Palestinian Authors
Bret Stephens

The New York Times
May 16, 2018

For the third time in two weeks, Palestinians in the Gaza Strip have set fire to the Kerem Shalom border crossing, through which they get medicine, fuel and other humanitarian essentials from Israel. Soon we’ll surely hear a great deal about the misery of Gaza. Try not to forget that the authors of that misery are also the presumptive victims.

There’s a pattern here — harm yourself, blame the other — and it deserves to be highlighted amid the torrent of morally blind, historically illiterate criticism to which Israelis are subjected every time they defend themselves against violent Palestinian attack.

In 1970, Israel set up an industrial zone along the border with Gaza to promote economic cooperation and provide Palestinians with jobs. It had to be shut down in 2004 amid multiple terrorist attacks that left 11 Israelis dead.

In 2005, Jewish-American donors forked over $14 million dollars to pay for greenhouses that had been used by Israeli settlers until the government of Ariel Sharon withdrew from the Strip. Palestinians looted dozens of the greenhouses almost immediately upon Israel’s exit.

In 2007, Hamas took control of Gaza in a bloody coup against its rivals in the Fatah faction. Since then, Hamas, Islamic Jihad and other terrorist groups in the Strip have fired nearly 10,000 rockets and mortars from Gaza into Israel — all the while denouncing an economic “blockade” that is Israel’s refusal to feed the mouth that bites it. (Egypt and the Palestinian Authority also participate in the same blockade, to zero international censure.)

In 2014 Israel discovered that Hamas had built 32 tunnels under the Gaza border to kidnap or kill Israelis. “The average tunnel requires 350 truckloads of construction supplies,” The Wall Street Journal reported, “enough to build 86 homes, seven mosques, six schools or 19 medical clinics.” Estimated cost of tunnels: $90 million.

Want to understand why Gaza is so poor? See above.

Which brings us to the grotesque spectacle along Gaza’s border over the past several weeks, in which thousands of Palestinians have tried to breach the fence and force their way into Israel, often at the cost of their lives. What is the ostensible purpose of what Palestinians call “the Great Return March”?

That’s no mystery. This week, The Times published an op-ed by Ahmed Abu Artema, one of the organizers of the march. “We are intent on continuing our struggle until Israel recognizes our right to return to our homes and land from which we were expelled,” he writes, referring to homes and land within Israel’s original borders.

His objection isn’t to the “occupation” as usually defined by Western liberals, namely Israel’s acquisition of territories following the 1967 Six Day War. It’s to the existence of Israel itself. Sympathize with him all you like, but at least notice that his politics demand the elimination of the Jewish state.

Notice, also, the old pattern at work: Avow and pursue Israel’s destruction, then plead for pity and aid when your plans lead to ruin.

The world now demands that Jerusalem account for every bullet fired at the demonstrators, without offering a single practical alternative for dealing with the crisis.

But where is the outrage that Hamas kept urging Palestinians to move toward the fence, having been amply forewarned by Israel of the mortal risk? Or that protest organizers encouraged women to lead the charges on the fence because, as The Times’s Declan Walsh reported, “Israeli soldiers might be less likely to fire on women”? Or that Palestinian children as young as 7 were dispatched to try to breach the fence? Or that the protests ended after Israel warned Hamas’s leaders, whose preferred hide-outs include Gaza’s hospital, that their own lives were at risk?

Elsewhere in the world, this sort of behavior would be called reckless endangerment. It would be condemned as self-destructive, cowardly and almost bottomlessly cynical.

The mystery of Middle East politics is why Palestinians have so long been exempted from these ordinary moral judgments. How do so many so-called progressives now find themselves in objective sympathy with the murderers, misogynists and homophobes of Hamas? Why don’t they note that, by Hamas’s own admission, some 50 of the 62 protesters killed on Monday were members of Hamas? Why do they begrudge Israel the right to defend itself behind the very borders they’ve been clamoring for years for Israelis to get behind?

Why is nothing expected of Palestinians, and everything forgiven, while everything is expected of Israelis, and nothing forgiven?

That’s a question to which one can easily guess the answer. In the meantime, it’s worth considering the harm Western indulgence has done to Palestinian aspirations.

No decent Palestinian society can emerge from the culture of victimhood, violence and fatalism symbolized by these protests. No worthy Palestinian government can emerge if the international community continues to indulge the corrupt, anti-Semitic autocrats of the Palestinian Authority or fails to condemn and sanction the despotic killers of Hamas. And no Palestinian economy will ever flourish through repeated acts of self-harm and destructive provocation.

If Palestinians want to build a worthy, proud and prosperous nation, they could do worse than try to learn from the one next door. That begins by forswearing forever their attempts to destroy it.

For the third time in two weeks, Palestinians in the Gaza Strip have set fire to the Kerem Shalom border crossing, through which they get medicine, fuel and other humanitarian essentials from Israel. Soon we’ll surely hear a great deal about the misery of Gaza. Try not to forget that the authors of that misery are also the presumptive victims.

There’s a pattern here — harm yourself, blame the other — and it deserves to be highlighted amid the torrent of morally blind, historically illiterate criticism to which Israelis are subjected every time they defend themselves against violent Palestinian attack.

In 1970, Israel set up an industrial zone along the border with Gaza to promote economic cooperation and provide Palestinians with jobs. It had to be shut down in 2004 amid multiple terrorist attacks that left 11 Israelis dead.

In 2005, Jewish-American donors forked over $14 million dollars to pay for greenhouses that had been used by Israeli settlers until the government of Ariel Sharon withdrew from the Strip. Palestinians looted dozens of the greenhouses almost immediately upon Israel’s exit.

Notice, also, the old pattern at work: Avow and pursue Israel’s destruction, then plead for pity and aid when your plans lead to ruin.

The world now demands that Jerusalem account for every bullet fired at the demonstrators, without offering a single practical alternative for dealing with the crisis.

But where is the outrage that Hamas kept urging Palestinians to move toward the fence, having been amply forewarned by Israel of the mortal risk? Or that protest organizers encouraged women to lead the charges on the fence because, as The Times’s Declan Walsh reported, “Israeli soldiers might be less likely to fire on women”? Or that Palestinian children as young as 7 were dispatched to try to breach the fence? Or that the protests ended after Israel warned Hamas’s leaders, whose preferred hide-outs include Gaza’s hospital, that their own lives were at risk?

Elsewhere in the world, this sort of behavior would be called reckless endangerment. It would be condemned as self-destructive, cowardly and almost bottomlessly cynical.

The mystery of Middle East politics is why Palestinians have so long been exempted from these ordinary moral judgments. How do so many so-called progressives now find themselves in objective sympathy with the murderers, misogynists and homophobes of Hamas? Why don’t they note that, by Hamas’s own admission, some 50 of the 62 protesters killed on Monday were members of Hamas? Why do they begrudge Israel the right to defend itself behind the very borders they’ve been clamoring for years for Israelis to get behind?

Why is nothing expected of Palestinians, and everything forgiven, while everything is expected of Israelis, and nothing forgiven?

That’s a question to which one can easily guess the answer. In the meantime, it’s worth considering the harm Western indulgence has done to Palestinian aspirations.

No decent Palestinian society can emerge from the culture of victimhood, violence and fatalism symbolized by these protests. No worthy Palestinian government can emerge if the international community continues to indulge the corrupt, anti-Semitic autocrats of the Palestinian Authority or fails to condemn and sanction the despotic killers of Hamas. And no Palestinian economy will ever flourish through repeated acts of self-harm and destructive provocation.

If Palestinians want to build a worthy, proud and prosperous nation, they could do worse than try to learn from the one next door. That begins by forswearing forever their attempts to destroy it.

Voir par ailleurs:

Un haut responsable du Hamas a affirmé mercredi que la très grande majorité des Palestiniens tués cette semaine lors de manifestations et heurts avec l’armée israélienne dans la bande de Gaza appartenaient au mouvement islamiste, qui dirige l’enclave.

L’armée et le gouvernement israéliens, confrontés à une vague de réprobation après la mort de 59 Palestiniens sous des tirs israéliens lundi, se sont saisis de ces propos pour contester le caractère pacifique des évènements et maintenir que ceux-ci étaient orchestrés par le Hamas.

Des milliers de Palestiniens ont débuté le 30 mars dans la bande de Gaza un mouvement de plus de six semaines contre le blocus israélien et pour le droit des Palestiniens à revenir sur les terres qu’ils ont fuies ou dont ils ont été chassés à la création d’Israël en 1948.

Les violences de lundi ont coïncidé avec l’inauguration controversée à Jérusalem de la nouvelle ambassade américaine, démarche qui a rompu avec des décennies de consensus international.

Le Guatemala a également inauguré mercredi à Jérusalem sa nouvelle ambassade en Israël, s’attirant la colère de la direction palestinienne qui a accusé le gouvernement guatémaltèque de se placer du côté des « crimes de guerre israéliens ».

« Agression israélienne »

Les violences à Gaza lundi, journée la plus meurtrière du conflit israélo-palestinien depuis 2014, ont continué à susciter l’inquiétude ou la colère à l’étranger.

Le pape François s’est dit « très préoccupé par l’escalade des tensions en Terre Sainte » et le président russe Vladimir Poutine a appelé à « renoncer à la violence ». Les ministres arabes des Affaires étrangères devaient tenir jeudi au Caire une réunion extraordinaire sur « l’agression israélienne contre le peuple palestinien ».

La tension est retombée dans la bande de Gaza à la veille du ramadan, le mois de jeûne musulman, mais la situation demeure hautement volatile.

Des chars israéliens ont frappé plusieurs positions du Hamas dans la bande de Gaza, en réponse à des tirs d’armes à feu, a dit notamment l’armée.

Le Hamas a dit soutenir la mobilisation, tout en assurant qu’elle émanait de la société civile et qu’elle était pacifique.

L’armée israélienne accuse de son côté le Hamas, qu’il considère comme « terroriste », de s’être servi du mouvement pour mêler à la foule des hommes armés ou disposer des engins explosifs le long de frontière.

Elle assure n’avoir fait que défendre les frontières, ses soldats et les civils contre une éventuelle infiltration de Palestiniens susceptibles de s’attaquer aux populations riveraines de l’enclave ou de prendre un otage.

Après la mort par balles des Palestiniens, Israël s’est retrouvé en butte aux condamnations et aux appels à une enquête indépendante.

Dans ce contexte, Salah al-Bardaouil, haut responsable du Hamas, a déclaré à une télévision palestinienne que 50 des 62 Palestiniens tués lundi mais aussi mardi appartenaient au mouvement islamiste.

La vérité « dévoilée »

« Cinquante des martyrs (des morts) étaient du Hamas, et 12 faisaient partie du reste de la population », a-t-il dit, interrogé sur les critiques selon lesquelles le Hamas tirait profit de la mobilisation. « Comment le Hamas pourrait-il récolter les fruits (du mouvement) alors qu’il a payé un prix aussi élevé », a-t-il demandé.

Il n’a pas fourni de détails sur l’appartenance de ces Palestiniens à la branche armée ou politique du Hamas, ni sur les circonstances dans lesquelles ils avaient été tués.

Salah al-Bardaouil « dévoile la vérité », a tweeté un porte-parole du gouvernement israélien, Ofir Gendelman, « ce n’était pas une manifestation pacifique, mais une opération du Hamas ».

« Nous avons les mêmes chiffres », a lancé de son côté le Premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahu, avertissant que son pays continuerait « à se défendre par tous les moyens nécessaires ».

Un porte-parole du Hamas, Fawzy Barhoum, et un autre haut responsable, Bassem Naim, se sont gardés de confirmer les informations de M. Bardaouil. Le Hamas paie les funérailles de tous, « qu’ils soient membres ou supporters du Hamas, ou pas », a dit M. Barhoum.

Il est « naturel de voir de nombreux membres ou supporters du Hamas » à une telle manifestation, a dit M. Naim, en faisant référence à la forte présence du Hamas dans toutes les couches de la société. Ceux qui ont été tués « participaient pacifiquement » au mouvement, a-t-il assuré.

Sur la chaîne de télévision Al-Jazeera, l’homme fort du Hamas, Yahya Sinouar, a prévenu: « si le blocus (israélien à Gaza) continue, nous n’hésiterons pas à recourir à la résistance militaire ».

Voir de même:

Gaza, le massacre des oubliés

EDITO. Ce qui vient de se passer à Gaza est un rappel à l’ordre, tragique, à une communauté internationale qui a abandonné le peuple palestinien.

Sara Daniel

Pendant qu’une petite fille palestinienne mourait d’avoir inhalé des gaz lacrymogènes à Gaza, à Jérusalem, à moins d’une heure et demie de là par la route, on sablait le champagne, lundi, pour fêter le déménagement de l’ambassade américaine.

Malgré les snipers israéliens, les Gazaouis auront donc continué à se presser devant la clôture de séparation de cette prison maudite et à ciel ouvert que représente l’enclave de Gaza, honte d’Israël et de la communauté internationale, pour achever la « Marche du grand retour », entamée le 30 mars et censée se conclure ce 15 mai. Une marche pour réclamer les terres perdues au moment de la création d’Israël, il y a soixante-dix ans, mais surtout la fin du blocus israélo-égyptien qui étouffe Gaza.

Au cours de ce lundi noir, 59 personnes ont été tuées, et plus de 2.400 ont été blessées par balles.

Une violence inouïe et inutile

Encore une fois le conflit israélo-palestinien a joué la guerre des images, au cours de ce jour si symbolique. Les Israéliens fêtaient les 70 ans de la naissance de leur Etat, le miracle de son existence, l’incroyable longévité de ce confetti minuscule entouré de nations hostiles. Les Palestiniens commémoraient, eux, leur « catastrophe », leur Nakba, qui les a poussés sur les routes de l’exil, dans l’indifférence d’une communauté internationale lassée par un conflit interminable, happée par d’autres hécatombes plus pressantes.

C’est avec cette Marche que les Gazaouis ont tenté de revenir sur la carte des préoccupations mondiales et de rappeler leur agonie à un monde qui les oublie. Pendant ce temps, Israéliens, Américains, Saoudiens et Egyptiens célèbrent leur alliance sur le dos de ces vaincus de l’histoire, les pressant d’accepter un accord, ce que Donald Trump a appelé le « deal ultime », dont les contours sont encore flous mais dont on peut être certain qu’il entérinerait leur déroute.

Mais pourquoi les Israéliens ont-ils cédé à cette violence inouïe et inutile alors que, de leur aveu même, le vrai sujet de leurs inquiétudes était le front du Nord avec le Hezbollah et l’Iran ? Est-ce l’hubris des vainqueurs ? En tout cas, Israël n’a pas entendu l’avertissement de Houda Naim, députée du Hamas.

« Nous considérons que ces marches pacifiques sont aujourd’hui le meilleur moyen d’atteindre les points faibles de notre ennemi », disait-elle au début du mouvement.

Une population excédée, désespérée

Dans le même esprit que les campagnes BDS qui prônent le boycott de produits israéliens, la nouvelle génération de militants a pensé que c’était par cette approche non violente dans la filiation de Gandhi que la cause palestinienne aurait une chance de revenir sur le devant de la scène internationale.

Alors, les manifestants ont-ils été manipulés par leurs organisations politiques ? La question est obscène lorsque que la marche, commencée il y a six semaines, a déjà fait plus de 100 morts. Bien sûr, le Hamas, débordé par cette manifestation civile et pacifique, a rejoint le mouvement. A-t-il encouragé les Gazaouis à provoquer les soldats israéliens, les conduisant à une mort certaine ? Peut-être, et le gouvernement israélien l’affirmera. Mais cela ne suffirait pas à expliquer la détermination d’une population excédée, désespérée par ses conditions d’existence. Ce qui vient de se passer à Gaza est un rappel à l’ordre, tragique, à une communauté internationale qui a abandonné ce peuple palestinien à la brutalité israélienne, à l’incurie de ses dirigeants engagés dans une guerre fratricide, à ses alliés arabes historiquement défaillants, à son sort dont nous portons tous la responsabilité.

Voir enfin:

Danger in overreacting to Santa Fe school shooting

School shootings, however horrific, are not the new normal. Santa Fe killings are part of a bloody contagion that will pass.

James Alan Fox

USA Today

May 18, 2018

Today’s ghastly shooting at a high school in Santa Fe, Texas, claiming the lives of at least 10 victims, has many Americans, including President Trump, wondering when and how the carnage will cease. Coming on the heels of two other multiple fatality school massacres earlier this year, it is no wonder that many are seeing this type of random gun violence as the “new normal.”

Amidst the national mourning for the many innocent lives lost in these senseless shooting sprees, it is critical not to overreact and overrespond to the menacing acts of a few. It is, of course, of little comfort to those families and communities impacted in Santa Fe as well as Parkland, Florida, and Benton, Kentucky, but this is not routine. Schools are not under siege. Rather, this more likely reflects a short-term contagion effect in which angry dispirited youngsters are inspired by others whose violent outbursts serve as fodder for national attention. That should subside once we stop obsessing over the risk.

History provides an important lesson about how crime contagions arise and eventually play themselves out. Over the five-year time span from 1997 through 2001, America witnessed seven multiple-fatality school rampages with a combined 32 killed and 85 others injured, more such incidents and casualties than during the past five years.

Following the March 2001 massacre at a high school in Santee, California, the venerable Dan Rather declared school shootings an “epidemic.” Then, after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack on America, the nation turned its attention to a very different kind of threat, and the school shooting “epidemic” disappeared.

Summertime will soon bring a natural break to the heightened concern over school shootings. Hopefully, come September, we can deal with the underlying issues facing alienated adolescents who seek to follow in the bloody footsteps of their undeserving heroes, without inadvertently fueling the contagion of bloodshed.

Many observers have expressed concern for the excessive attention given to mass shooters of today and the deadliest of yesteryear. CNN’s Anderson Cooper has campaigned against naming names of mass shooters, and 147 criminologists, sociologists, psychologists and other human-behavior experts recently signed on to an open letter urging the media not to identify mass shooters or display their photos.

While I appreciate the concern for name and visual identification of mass shooters for fear of inspiring copycats as well as to avoid insult to the memory of those they slaughtered, names and faces are not the problem. It is the excessive detail — too much information — about the killers, their writings, and their backgrounds that unnecessarily humanizes them. We come to know more about them — their interests and their disappointments — than we do about our next door neighbors. Too often the line is crossed between news reporting and celebrity watch.

At the same time, we focus far too much on records. We constantly are reminded that some shooting is the largest in a particular state over a given number of years, as if that really matters. Would the massacre be any less tragic if it didn’t exceed the death toll of some prior incident? Moreover, we are treated to published lists of the largest mass shootings in modern US history. For whatever purpose we maintain records, they are there to be broken and can challenge a bitter and suicidal assailant to outgun his violent role models.

Although the spirited advocacy of students around the country regarding gun control is to be applauded, we need to keep some perspective about the risk. Slogans like, “I want to go to my graduation, not to my grave,” are powerful, yet hyperbolic.

As often said, even one death is one too many, and we need to take the necessary steps to protect children, including expanded funding for school teachers and school psychologists. Still, despite the occasional tragedy, our schools are safe, safer than they have been for decades.

James Alan Fox is the Lipman Professor of Criminology, Law and Public Policy at Northeastern University, a member of USA TODAY’s Board of Contributors and co-author of Extreme Killing: Understanding Serial and Mass Murder.


« Marche du retour »: The show must go on (From Gaza to Iran, it’s all smoke and mirrors, stupid !)

9 mai, 2018

 

Le président de l'Autorité palestinienne Mahmoud Abbas devant le Parlement européen à Bruxelles, le 23 juin 2016. (Crédit : AFP/John Thys)
Au coeur de l’accord iranien, il y avait un énorme mythe selon laquelle un régime meurtrier ne cherchait qu’un programme pacifique d’énergie nucléaire. Aujourd’hui nous avons la preuve définitive que la promesse iranienne était un mensonge. Le futur de l’Iran appartient à son peuple et les Iraniens méritent une nation qui rende justice à leurs rêves, qui honore leur histoire. (…) Nous n’allons pas laisser un régime qui scande « Mort à l’Amérique » avoir accès aux armes les plus meurtrières sur terre. Donald Trump
La paix ne peut être obtenue où la violence est récompensée. Donald Trump
Un écran de fumée désigne, dans le domaine militaire, une tactique utilisée afin de masquer la position exacte d’unités à l’ennemi, par l’émission d’une fumée dense. Cette dernière peut-être naturelle mais est le plus souvent produite artificiellement à partir de grenades fumigènes (composées notamment d’acide chlorosulfurique). Certains véhicules blindés, en général des chars, disposent de lance-grenades spécifiquement conçus à cet effet, mais utilisent surtout l’injection de carburant Diesel dans l’échappement de leur moteur pour produire des écrans de fumée pouvant atteindre 400 m de long et persister plusieurs minutes. Par exemple, le T-72 soviétique injecte dix litres de carburant à la minute pour créer ses écrans de fumée. Dans les temps anciens, des simples feux de broussailles bien nourris suffisaient parfois à faire l’affaire.Wikipedia
More ink equals more blood, newspaper coverage of terrorist incidents leads directly to more attacks. It’s a macabre example of win-win in what economists call a « common-interest game. Both the media and terrorists benefit from terrorist incidents. Terrorists get free publicity for themselves and their cause. The media, meanwhile, make money « as reports of terror attacks increase newspaper sales and the number of television viewers. Bruno S. Frey and Dominic Rohner
Nous avons constaté que le sport était la religion moderne du monde occidental. Nous savions que les publics anglais et américain assis devant leur poste de télévision ne regarderaient pas un programme exposant le sort des Palestiniens s’il y avait une manifestation sportive sur une autre chaîne. Nous avons donc décidé de nous servir des Jeux olympiques, cérémonie la plus sacrée de cette religion, pour obliger le monde à faire attention à nous. Nous avons offert des sacrifices humains à vos dieux du sport et de la télévision et ils ont répondu à nos prières. Terroriste palestinien (Jeux olympiques de Munich, 1972)
Les Israéliens ne savent pas que le peuple palestinien a progressé dans ses recherches sur la mort. Il a développé une industrie de la mort qu’affectionnent toutes nos femmes, tous nos enfants, tous nos vieillards et tous nos combattants. Ainsi, nous avons formé un bouclier humain grâce aux femmes et aux enfants pour dire à l’ennemi sioniste que nous tenons à la mort autant qu’il tient à la vie. Fathi Hammad (responsable du Hamas, mars 2008)
Je n’ai pas l’intention de cesser de payer les familles des martyrs prisonniers, même si cela me coûte mon siège. Je continuerai à les payer jusqu’à mon dernier jour. Mahmoud Abbas
 Récemment, un certain nombre de rabbins en Israël ont tenu des propos clairs, demandant à leur gouvernement d’empoisonner l’eau pour tuer les Palestiniens. Mahmoud Abbas
Après qu’il soit devenu évident que les déclarations supposées d’un rabbin, relayées par de nombreux médias, se sont révélées sans fondement, le président Mahmoud Abbas a affirmé qu’il n’avait pas pour intention de s’en prendre au judaïsme ou de blesser le peuple juif à travers le monde. Communiqué Autorité palestinienne
Du XIe siècle jusqu’à l’Holocauste qui s’est produit en Allemagne, les juifs vivant en Europe de l’ouest et de l’est ont été la cible de massacres tous les 10 ou 15 ans. Mais pourquoi est-ce arrivé ? Ils disent: « parce que nous sommes juifs » (…) L’hostilité contre les juifs n’est pas due à leur religion, mais plutôt à leur fonction sociale, leurs fonctions sociales liées aux banques et intérêts. Mahmoud Abbas
Si mes propos devant le Conseil national palestinien ont offensé des gens, en particulier des gens de confession juive, je leur présente mes excuses. Je voudrais assurer à tous que telle n’était pas mon intention et réaffirmer mon respect total pour la religion juive, ainsi que pour toutes les religions monothéistes. Je voudrais renouveler notre condamnation de longue date de l’Holocauste, le crime le plus odieux de l’histoire, et exprimer notre compassion envers ses victimes. Mahmoud Abbas
J’espère que les journalistes diront qu’il s’agit de la seule démocratie pluraliste du Moyen-Orient, un pays libre, un pays sûr. Un pays normal, comme la France ou l’Italie. Il n’y a aucune ville dans le monde qui s’appelle Jérusalem-Ouest. Il n’y a pas de Paris-Ouest ou de Rome-Ouest. La course part de la ville de Jérusalem, donc on écrit « Jérusalem » sur la carte. Sylvan Adams
Amer anniversaire. Israël a fêté mercredi son 70e anniversaire en brandissant sa puissance militaire et son improbable réussite économique face aux menaces régionales renouvelées et aux incertitudes intérieures. Après s’être recueillis depuis mardi à la mémoire de leurs compatriotes tués au service de leur pays ou dans des attentats, les Israéliens ont entamé mercredi soir les célébrations marquant la création de leur Etat proclamé le 14 mai 1948, mais fêté en ce moment en fonction du calendrier hébraïque. (…) Israël agite régulièrement le spectre d’une attaque de l’Iran, son ennemi juré. La crainte d’un tel acte d’hostilité, à la manière de l’offensive surprise d’une coalition arabe lors des célébrations de Yom Kippour en 1973, a été attisée par un raid le 9 avril contre une base aérienne en Syrie, imputé à Israël par le régime de Bachar al-Assad et ses alliés iranien et russe. Mais en février, Israël a admis pour la première fois avoir frappé des cibles iraniennes après l’intrusion d’un drone iranien dans son espace aérien. C’était la première confrontation ouvertement déclarée entre Israël et l’Iran en Syrie. Israël martèle qu’il ne permettra pas à l’Iran de s’enraciner militairement en Syrie voisine. Les journaux israéliens ont publié mercredi des éléments spécifiques sur la présence en Syrie des Gardiens de la révolution, unité d’élite iranienne. La publication de photos satellite de bases aériennes et d’appareils civils soupçonnés de décharger des armes, de cartes et même de noms de responsables militaires iraniens constitue un avertissement, convenaient les commentateurs militaires: Israël sait où et qui frapper en cas d’attaque. (…) Avec plus de 8,8 millions d’habitants, la population a décuplé depuis 1948, selon les statistiques officielles. La croissance s’est affichée à 4,1% au quatrième trimestre 2017. Le pays revendique une douzaine de prix Nobel. Cependant, Israël accuse parmi les plus fortes inégalités des pays développés. L’avenir du Premier ministre, englué dans les affaires de corruption présumée, est incertain. S’agissant du conflit israélo-palestinien, une solution a rarement paru plus lointaine. L’anniversaire d’Israël coïncide avec «la marche du retour», mouvement organisé depuis le 30 mars dans la bande de Gaza, territoire palestinien soumis au blocus israélien. Après bientôt trois semaines de violences le long de la frontière qui ont fait 34 morts palestiniens, de nouvelles manifestations sont attendues vendredi. Le ministère israélien de la Défense a annoncé qu’un «puissant engin explosif», apparemment destiné à un attentat lors des fêtes israéliennes, avait été découvert dans un camion palestinien intercepté à un point de passage entre la Cisjordanie occupée et Israël. Libération
Le Giro d’Italia débute ce vendredi de Jérusalem, offrant à l’Etat hébreu son premier événement sportif d’envergure. Tracé qui esquive les Territoires palestiniens, équipes qui hésitent à s’engager, soupçons d’enveloppes d’argent… les autorités ont éteint toutes les critiques pour en faire une vitrine. Libération
Le monde a basculé ce 8 mai 2018. Rien n’y a fait. Ni les câlins d’Emmanuel Macron. Ni les menaces du président iranien. Ni les assurances des patrons de la CIA et de l’AIEA. Donald Trump a tranché : sous le prétexte non prouvé que l’Iran ne le respecte pas, i l retire les Etats-Unis de l’accord nucléaire signé le 14 juillet 2015. Une folle décision aux conséquences considérables. Après la dénonciation de celui de Paris sur le climat, voici l’abandon unilatéral d’un autre accord qui a été négocié par les grandes puissances pendant plus de dix ans. L’Amérique devient donc, à l’évidence, un « rogue state » – un Etat voyou qui ne respecte pas ses engagements internationaux et ment une fois encore ouvertement au monde. L’invasion de l’Irak n’était donc pas une exception malheureuse : Washington n’incarne plus l’ordre international mais le désordre.  Si l’on en doutait encore, le monde dit libre n’a plus de leader crédible ni même de grand frère. Ce qui va troubler un peu plus encore les opinions publiques et les classes dirigeantes occidentales. Puisque l’Iran en est l’un des plus gros producteurs et qu’il va être empêché d’en vendre, le prix du pétrole, déjà à 70 dollars le baril, va probablement exploser, ce qui risque de ralentir voire de stopper la croissance mondiale – et donc celle de la France.
D’ailleurs, de tous les pays occidentaux, la France est celui qui a le plus à perdre d’un retour des sanctions américaines – directes et indirectes. L’Iran a, en effet, passé commandes de 100 Airbus pour 19 milliards de dollars et a signé un gigantesque contrat avec Total pour l’exploitation du champ South Pars 11. Or Trump a choisi la version la plus dure : interdire de nouveau à toute compagnie traitant avec Téhéran de faire du business aux Etats-Unis. Pour continuer à commercer sur le marché américain, Airbus et Total devront donc renoncer à ces deals juteux. L’Obs
Of all the arguments for the Trump administration to honor the nuclear deal with Iran, none was more risible than the claim that we gave our word as a country to keep it. The Obama administration refused to submit the deal to Congress as a treaty, knowing it would never get two-thirds of the Senate to go along. Just 21 percent of Americans approved of the deal at the time it went through, against 49 percent who did not, according to a Pew poll. The agreement “passed” on the strength of a 42-vote Democratic filibuster, against bipartisan, majority opposition. “The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (J.C.P.O.A.) is not a treaty or an executive agreement, and it is not a signed document,” Julia Frifield, then the assistant secretary of state for legislative affairs, wrote then-Representative Mike Pompeo in November 2015 (…) In the weeks leading to Tuesday’s announcement, some of the same people who previously claimed the deal was the best we could possibly hope for suddenly became inventive in proposing means to fix it. This involved suggesting side deals between Washington and European capitals to impose stiffer penalties on Tehran for its continued testing of ballistic missiles — more than 20 since the deal came into effect — and its increasingly aggressive regional behavior. But the problem with this approach is that it only treats symptoms of a problem for which the J.C.P.O.A. is itself a major cause. The deal weakened U.N. prohibitions on Iran’s testing of ballistic missiles, which cannot be reversed without Russian and Chinese consent. That won’t happen. The easing of sanctions also gave Tehran additional financial means with which to fund its depredations in Syria and its militant proxies in Yemen, Lebanon and elsewhere. Any effort to counter Iran on the ground in these places would mean fighting the very forces we are effectively feeding. Why not just stop the feeding? Apologists for the deal answer that the price is worth paying because Iran has put on hold much of its production of nuclear fuel for the next several years. Yet even now Iran is under looser nuclear strictures than North Korea, and would have been allowed to enrich as much material as it liked once the deal expired. That’s nuts. Apologists also claim that, with Trump’s decision, Tehran will simply restart its enrichment activities on an industrial scale. Maybe it will, forcing a crisis that could end with U.S. or Israeli strikes on Iran’s nuclear sites. But that would be stupid, something the regime emphatically isn’t. More likely, it will take symbolic steps to restart enrichment, thereby implying a threat without making good on it. What the regime wants is a renegotiation, not a reckoning. (…) Even with the sanctions relief, the Iranian economy hangs by a thread: The Wall Street Journal on Sunday reported “hundreds of recent outbreaks of labor unrest in Iran, an indication of deepening discord over the nation’s economic troubles.” This week, the rial hit a record low of 67,800 to the dollar; one member of the Iranian Parliament estimated $30 billion of capital outflows in recent months. That’s real money for a country whose gross domestic product barely matches that of Boston. The regime might calculate that a strategy of confrontation with the West could whip up useful nationalist fervors. But it would have to tread carefully: Ordinary Iranians are already furious that their government has squandered the proceeds of the nuclear deal on propping up the Assad regime. The conditions that led to the so-called Green movement of 2009 are there once again. Nor will it help Iran if it tries to start a war with Israel and comes out badly bloodied. (…) Trump’s courageous decision to withdraw from the nuclear deal will clarify the stakes for Tehran. Now we’ll see whether the administration is capable of following through. Bret Stephens
Hello ! Welcome to the show ! Al Jazeera
It was supposed to be a peaceful day. But as then. Unarmed protesters marched towards the border fence, Israeli soldiers opened fire. Al Jazeera journalist
We will continue to sacrifice the blood of our children. Hamas leader
All impure Jews are dogs. They should be burned. They are dirty. Palestinian woman
Je crois dans la volonté d’un peuple. Ce qui m’inspire, c’est la destruction du mur de Berlin. On ne veut pas mourir. Notre message est pacifique, on ne veut jeter personne à la mer. Si les Israéliens nous tuent, ce sera leur crime. Ahmed Abou Irtema
Nous préférons mourir dans notre pays plutôt qu’en mer, comme les réfugiés syriens, ou enfermés à Gaza ou dans les camps au Liban. Moïn Abou Okal (ministère de l’intérieur de Gaza et membre du comité de pilotage de la marche)
 Les gens sont plein de fureur et de colère, dit  On n’a pris aucune décision pour pousser des centaines de milliers de personnes vers la frontière. On veut que cela reste une manifestation pacifique. Mais il n’y a ni négociations avec Israël ni réconciliation entre factions. Il faut laisser les gens s’exprimer. Ghazi Hamad (responsable des relations internationales du Hamas)
Le cauchemar israélien se résume en une image : celle de dizaines de milliers de manifestants non armés, avançant vers la frontière, pour réclamer leur sortie de la prison à ciel ouvert qu’est Gaza. Les responsables sécuritaires israéliens ont averti : tout franchissement illégal sera considéré comme une menace. Plusieurs alertes sérieuses ont eu lieu ces derniers jours, des individus ayant passé la clôture trop aisément. L’armée, qui craint l’enfouissement d’engins explosifs, a prévu d’employer des drones pour larguer des canettes de gaz lacrymogène. (…) En présentant les manifestants comme des personnes achetées, manipulées ou dangereuses, Israël réduit l’événement de vendredi à une question sécuritaire. Il prive ainsi les Gazaouis de leur intégrité comme sujets politiques, de leur capacité à formuler des espérances et à se mobiliser pour les défendre. Or, l’initiative de ce mouvement n’est pas du tout le fruit de délibérations au bureau politique du Hamas, qui gouverne la bande de Gaza depuis 2007. Le mouvement islamiste, affaibli et isolé, soutient comme les autres factions cette mobilisation, y compris par des moyens logistiques, parce qu’il y voit une façon de mettre enfin Israël sous pression. L’idée originelle, c’est Ahmed Abou Irtema qui la revendique. C’était juste après l’annonce de la reconnaissance unilatérale de Jérusalem comme capitale d’Israël par Donald Trump, le 6 décembre 2017. La réconciliation entre le Hamas et le Fatah du président Mahmoud Abbas était dans l’impasse. La situation humanitaire, plus dramatique que jamais. Ce journaliste de 33 ans, père de quatre garçons, a évoqué l’idée, sur Facebook, d’un vaste rassemblement pacifique. (…) Le jeune homme, comme les autres activistes, ne parle pas d’un Etat palestinien, mais de leurs droits historiques sur des terrains précisément délimités. (…) Ils invoquent l’article 11 de la résolution 194, adoptée par les Nations unies (ONU) à la fin de 1948, sur le droit des réfugiés à retourner chez eux ou à obtenir compensation. (…) de son côté Moïn Abou Okal, fonctionnaire au ministère de l’intérieur et membre du comité de pilotage (…) affirme que les manifestants ne tenteront de pénétrer en Israël que le 15 mai. Le Monde
Depuis deux semaines le Hamas et autres organisations terroristes ont repris à leur compte ce qu’ils veulent faire passer pour un soulèvement populaire «pacifiste». Une fois de plus, le détournement du vocabulaire est habile car ces manifestations à plusieurs couches – l’une pacifique et bon enfant, servant de couverture aux multiples tentatives de destruction de la barrière de séparation entre Gaza et Israël, d’enlèvement de soldats, et d’attentats terroristes heureusement avortés – voudraient promouvoir un «droit au retour» à l’intérieur d’Israël des descendants de descendants de «réfugiés». (…) Voici que des milliers de civils, hommes, femmes, enfants, se massent à proximité des zones tampons établies en bordure de la barrière de sécurité israélienne, dans une ambiance de kermesse destinée à nous faire croire qu’il s’agit là de manifestations au sens démocratique du terme. Voici, également, que des milliers de pneus sont enflammés, dégageant une fumée noirâtre visible depuis les satellites, dans le but d’aveugler les forces de sécurité israéliennes qui ont pourtant prévenu: aucun franchissement sauvage de la barrière-frontière ne sera toléré. Toute tentative sera stoppée par des tirs à balle réelle – ce qui, n’en déplaise à beaucoup, est absolument légal dans toute buffer zone entre entités ennemies. À cette annonce, les dirigeants du Hamas ont dû jubiler! Eux qui jouent gagnant-gagnant dans une stratégie impliquant l’utilisation de leurs civils comme boucliers humains, puisqu’il s’agit surtout d’une guerre d’influence, n’en espéraient pas autant. Dès lors ils allaient enfin pouvoir de nouveau compter leurs morts comme autant de victoires médiatiques. Et cela – au grand dam des Israéliens – s’est déroulé exactement comme prévu. Au moment où paraissent ces lignes, Gaza pleure plus de trente morts et les hôpitaux sont débordés par le nombre de blessés – même si les chiffres sont sujets à caution puisque seulement fournis par le Hamas. Pour une fois, cependant, le Hamas s’est piégé lui-même, en publiant avec fierté l’identité de la majorité des victimes qui, de toute évidence appartiennent à ses troupes. C’est le cas du journaliste Yasser Mourtaja dont le double rôle de correspondant de presse et d’officier salarié du Hamas a également été dévoilé.Mais aurait-il été possible pour Israël d’avoir recours à d’autres moyens? L’alignement de snipers parallèlement à l’utilisation de procédés antiémeutes, était-il vraiment indispensable? Imaginons, un instant, que, dans les semaines à venir, comme annoncé par le dirigeant de l’organisation terroriste, Yahya Sinwar, la «marche du retour» permette à ses militants de détruire les barrières, tandis que des milliers de manifestants, femmes et enfants poussés en première ligne, se ruent à l’intérieur d’Israël, bravant non plus les tirs ciblés des soldats entraînés mais la riposte massive d’un peuple paniqué? En menaçant d’avoir recours à des mesures extrêmes, et en tenant cet engagement, Israël ne fait que dissuader et empêcher le développement d’un cauchemar humanitaire dont les dirigeants du Hamas, acculés économiquement et politiquement, pourraient se régaler. Contrairement aux images promues par d’autres abus du vocabulaire, Gaza n’est pas une «prison à ciel ouvert» mais une bande de 360 km² relativement surpeuplée, où vivent également nombre de millionnaires dans des villas fastueuses côtoyant des quartiers miséreux. Chaque jour, environ 1 500 à 2 500 tonnes d’aide humanitaire et de biens de consommation sont autorisés à passer la frontière par le gouvernement israélien. Plusieurs programmes permettent aux habitants de Gaza de se faire soigner dans les hôpitaux de Tel Aviv et de Haïfa. Un projet d’île portuaire sécurisée est à l’étude à Jérusalem, et des tonnes de fruits et légumes sont régulièrement achetés aux paysans gazaouis par les réseaux de distribution alimentaires israéliens. L’Égypte contrôle toute la partie sud et fait souvent montre de beaucoup plus de rigueur qu’Israël pour protéger sa frontière, sachant que le Hamas est issu des Frères Musulmans, organisation interdite par le gouvernement de Abdel Fatah Al Sissi.Mais Gaza souffre, en effet, et même terriblement! Gaza souffre du fait que le Hamas détourne la majorité des fonds destinés à sa population pour creuser des tunnels et se construire une armée dont le seul but, ouvertement déclaré dans sa charte, est d’oblitérer Israël et d’exterminer ses habitants. Gaza souffre des promesses d’aide financière non tenues par les pays Arabes et qui se chiffrent en milliards de dollars. Gaza souffre de n’avoir que trois heures d’électricité par jour, car les terroristes du Hamas ont envoyé une roquette sur la principale centrale pendant le dernier conflit et l’Autorité Palestinienne, de son côté, refuse de payer les factures correspondant à son alimentation, espérant de la sorte provoquer une crise qui conduira à la perte de pouvoir de son concurrent. Gaza souffre d’un taux de chômage de plus de 50 %, après que ses habitants, dans l’euphorie du départ des Juifs, aient saccagé et détruit les serres à légumes et les manufactures construites par Israël et donc jugées «impures» selon les théories islamistes qui les ont conduits, ne l’oublions pas non plus, à voter massivement pour le Hamas. Gaza souffre enfin de ces détournements du vocabulaire, de ces concepts esthétiques manichéens conçus au détriment des êtres, qui empêchent les hommes de conscience de comprendre le cœur du problème et sont forcés de penser qu’Israël est l’unique cause du malheur de ses habitants.C’est pour cela qu’il faut, une fois de plus, clamer quelques faits incontournables. Israël ne peut faire la paix avec une organisation terroriste vouée à sa disparition. Les habitants de Gaza seraient libres de circuler et de se construire un avenir à l’instant même où ils renonceraient à la disparition de leur voisin. Le Hamas et autres organisations terroristes savent qu’ils peuvent compter sur la sympathie des Nations unies et de nombre d’ONG à prétention humanitaire et ne se privent donc pas d’exploiter la population qu’ils détiennent en otage puisqu’ils savent qu’Israël sera systématiquement condamné à leur place. Pierre Rehov
Welcome to the parade for the return – the latest big show organized by Hamas. Every day between 10,000 and 30,000 Muslim Arabs will participate in this smoke screen operation. Pierre Rehov
I shot the video because I observed many times first hand how Palestinians build their propaganda and I strongly believe that no peace will be possible as long as international media believe their narrative instead of seeing the facts. Hamas knows that it can count on the international community when it launches initiatives such as those ‘peaceful protests’ which have claimed too many lives already, while Israel has no choice but to defend its borders. Pierre Rehov
Behind the Smoke Screen, which was shot in recent weeks by two Palestinian cameramen who work with Rehov on a regular basis, went viral and was published by many pro-Israel organizations. The short movie then goes on to show shocking images of children being dragged to the front lines of the clashes as human shields and disturbing footage of animal cruelty. It shows the contradictory tone of Palestinian leaders speaking in English in front of an international audience versus speaking in Arabic to their own people. It shows the health and environmental risk of the burning tire protests and then asks rhetorically: « Where are the ecologist protests? »It shows Hamas’ goals of crossing the border and carrying out attacks, and, if all else fails, trying to provoke soldiers, hoping for a stray bullet and making the front pages of international newspapers. Jerusalem Post
Pour ceux qui croyaient encore que les écrans ou rideaux de fumée étaient une tactique militaire
Infiltration de terroristes armés, sabotage de la barrière de sécurité, destruction de champs israéliens via l’envoi de cerf-volants enflammés, torture et incinération d’animaux, boucliers humains de femmes et d’enfants, miroirs, écran de fumée …
A l’heure où après avoir le mensonge de 70 ans du refus des ambassades étrangères à Jérusalem …
Et l’imposture entre une accusation d’empoisonnement de puits sous les ovations du Parlement européen et une justification de l’antisémitisme européen sous celles de son propre parlement …
D’un président d’une Autorité palestinienne et auteur enfin reconnu d’une thèse négationniste sur le génocide juif …
Le va-t-en-guerre de la Maison blanche vient, entre – excusez du peu – le retour nord-coréen à la table des négociations, la libération de trois otages américains et avec 57% le plus haut taux d’optimisme national depuis 13 ans, d’éventer la supercherie de 40 ans du programme prétendument pacifique …
D’un régime qui, sous couvert d’un accord jamais avalisé par le Congrès américain mais soutenu par les quislings et gros intérêts économiques européens et entre deux « Mort à l’Amérique ! » et menaces de rayement de la carte d’Israël, multiplie les essais balistiques et du Yemen au Liban met le Moyen-Orient à feu et à sang …
Pendant qu’entre dénonciation de son 70e anniversaire et médisance sur la première venue d’un grand évènement sportif dans la seule démocratie du Moyen-Orient …
Nos médias rivalisent dans la mauvaise foi et la désinformation
Bienvenue au grand barnum de la « Marche du retour » !
Cet incroyable de mélange de fête de l’Huma et kermesse bon enfant …
Qui monopolise depuis six semaines nos écrans et les unes de nos journaux …
Et qui comme le montre l’excellent petit documentaire du réalisateur franco-israélien Pierre Rehov
Se révèle être un petit joyau de propagande et de prestidigitation …
Miroirs et écrans de fumée compris …
Des maitres-illusionistes du Hamas et de nos médias !

WATCH: Exclusive footage from inside Gaza reveals true face of protests

« Hamas knows that it can count on the international community when it launches initiatives such as those ‘peaceful protests’ which have claimed too many lives already. »

Juliane Helmhold
The Jerusalem Post
May 7, 2018 13:13

The short movie Behind the Smoke Screen by filmmaker Pierre Rehov shows exclusive images from inside the Gaza Strip, aimed at changing the international perception of the ongoing six-week protests dubbed the « Great March of Return » by Hamas.

« I shot the video because I observed many times first hand how Palestinians build their propaganda and I strongly believe that no peace will be possible as long as international media believe their narrative instead of seeing the facts, » the French filmmaker told The Jerusalem Post.

« Hamas knows that it can count on the international community when it launches initiatives such as those ‘peaceful protests’ which have claimed too many lives already, while Israel has no choice but to defend its borders. »

Rehov, who also writes regularly for the French daily Le Figaro, has been producing documentaries about the Arab-Israeli conflict for 18 years, many of which have aired on Israeli media outlets, including The Road to Jenin, debunking Mohammad Bakri’s claim of a massacre in Jenin, War Crimes in Gaza, demonstrating Hamas’ use of civilians as human shields and Beyond Deception Strategy, exploring the plight of minorities inside Israel and how BDS is hurting Palestinians.

Behind the Smoke Screen, which was shot in recent weeks by two Palestinian cameramen who work with Rehov on a regular basis, went viral and was published by many pro-Israel organizations.Behind The Smoke Screen (Pierre Rehov/Youtube)

« Welcome to the parade for the return – the latest big show organized by Hamas. Every day between 10,000 and 30,000 Muslim Arabs will participate in this smoke screen operation, » the video introduces the subject matter in the opening remarks.

The short movie then goes on to show shocking images of children being dragged to the front lines of the clashes as human shields and disturbing footage of animal cruelty.

It shows the contradictory tone of Palestinian leaders speaking in English in front of an international audience versus speaking in Arabic to their own people.

It shows the health and environmental risk of the burning tire protests and then asks rhetorically: « Where are the ecologist protests? »

It shows Hamas’ goals of crossing the border and carrying out attacks, and, if all else fails, trying to provoke soldiers, hoping for a stray bullet and making the front pages of international newspapers.

« I want to present facts, and one image is worth 1000 words, » the filmmaker emphasized.

Voir aussi:

Pierre Rehov : un autre regard sur Gaza

Pierre Rehov
Le Figaro
20/04/2018

FIGAROVOX/TRIBUNE – Le reporter Pierre Rehov s’attaque, dans une tribune, à la grille de lecture dominante dans les médias français des événements actuels à Gaza. Selon lui, la réponse d’Israël est proportionnée à la menace terroriste que représentent les agissements du Hamas.

Pierre Rehov est reporter, écrivain et réalisateur de documentaires, dont le dernier, «Unveiling Jérusalem», retrace l’histoire de la ville trois fois sainte.

Les organisations islamistes qui s’attaquent à Israël ont toujours eu le sens du vocabulaire dans leur communication avec l’Occident. Convaincus à juste titre que peu parmi nous sont capables, ou même intéressés, de décrypter leurs discours d’origine révélateur de leurs véritables intentions, ils nous arrosent depuis des décennies de concepts erronés, tout en puisant à la source de notre propre histoire les termes qui nous feront réagir dans le sens qui leur sera favorable. C’est ainsi que sont nés, au fil des ans, des terminologies acceptées par tous, y compris, il faut le dire, en Israël même.

Prenons par exemple le mot «occupation». Le Hamas, organisation terroriste qui règne sur la bande de Gaza depuis qu’Israël a retiré ses troupes et déraciné plus de 10 000 Juifs tout en laissant les infrastructures qui auraient permis aux Gazaouites de développer une véritable économie indépendante, continue à se lamenter du «fait» que l’État Juif occupe des terres appartenant «de toute éternité au Peuple Palestinien». Il s’agit là, évidemment, d’un faux car les droits éventuels des Palestiniens ne sauraient être réalisés en niant ceux des Juifs sur leur terre ancestrale.

Le terme «occupation» étant associé de triste mémoire à l’Histoire européenne, lorsqu’un lecteur, mal informé, se le voit asséner à longueur d’année par les médias les ONG et les politiciens, la première image qui lui vient est évidemment celle de la botte allemande martelant au pas de l’oie le pavé parisien ou bruxellois.

Cette répétition infligée tout autant qu’acceptée d’un terme erroné a pour but d’occulter un fait essentiel, gravé dans l’Histoire: selon la loi internationale, ces territoires dits «occupés» ne sont que «disputés». Car, afin d’occuper une terre, encore eût-il fallu qu’elle appartînt à un pays reconnu au moment de sa conquête. La «Palestine», renommée ainsi par l’Empereur Hadrien en 127 pour humilier les Juifs après leur seconde révolte contre l’empire romain, n’était qu’une région de l’empire Ottoman jusqu’à la défaite des Turcs en 1917. Ce sont les pays Arabes dans leur globalité qui, en rejetant le plan de partition de l’ONU en 1947, ont empêché la naissance d’une «nation palestinienne» dont on ne retrouve aucune trace dans l’histoire jusqu’à sa mise au goût du jour, en 1964, par Nasser et le KGB.

Depuis deux semaines le Hamas et autres organisations terroristes ont repris à leur compte ce qu’ils veulent faire passer pour un soulèvement populaire « pacifiste ».

Lorsqu’à l’issue d’une guerre défensive, Israël a «pris» la Cisjordanie et Gaza en 1967, ces deux territoires avaient déjà été conquis par la Jordanie et l’Égypte. Ce qui nous conduit à remettre en question une autre révision sémantique. Pourquoi des terres qui, pendant des siècles, se sont appelées Judée-Samarie deviendraient-elles, tout à coup, Cisjordanie ou Rive Occidentale, de par la seule volonté du pays qui les a envahies en 1948 avant d’en expulser tous les Juifs dans l’indifférence générale? Serait-ce pour effacer le simple fait que la Judée… est le berceau du judaïsme?

Mais revenons à Gaza.

Depuis deux semaines le Hamas et autres organisations terroristes ont repris à leur compte ce qu’ils veulent faire passer pour un soulèvement populaire «pacifiste». Une fois de plus, le détournement du vocabulaire est habile car ces manifestations à plusieurs couches – l’une pacifique et bon enfant, servant de couverture aux multiples tentatives de destruction de la barrière de séparation entre Gaza et Israël, d’enlèvement de soldats, et d’attentats terroristes heureusement avortés – voudraient promouvoir un «droit au retour» à l’intérieur d’Israël des descendants de descendants de «réfugiés».

J’ai déjà abondamment écrit, y compris dans ces pages, sur cette aberration tragique perpétuée au profit de l’UNWRA, une agence onusienne empêchant, dans sa forme actuelle, l’établissement et le développement des Arabes de Palestine sur leurs terres d’accueil. Je n’y reviendrai que par une phrase. Pourquoi un enfant, né à côté de Ramallah ou à Gaza, de parents nés au même endroit, ou pire encore, né à Brooklyn ou à Stockholm de parents immigrés, serait-il considéré comme «réfugié» – comme c’est le cas dans les statistiques de l’UNRWA – si un enfant Juif né à Tel Aviv, de parents nés à Bagdad, Damas ou Tripoli, et chassés entre 1948 et 1974 n’a jamais bénéficié du même statut?

Mais voici que des bus affrétés par le Hamas et la Jihad Islamique, et décorés de clés géantes et de noms enluminés de villages disparus censés symboliser ce «droit au retour» au sein d’un pays honni, viennent cueillir chaque vendredi devant les mosquées et les écoles de Gaza une population manipulée, prête aux derniers sacrifices afin de répondre à des mots d’ordre cyniques ou désuets.

Voici que des milliers de civils, hommes, femmes, enfants, se massent à proximité des zones tampons établies en bordure de la barrière de sécurité israélienne, dans une ambiance de kermesse destinée à nous faire croire qu’il s’agit là de manifestations au sens démocratique du terme.

Voici, également, que des milliers de pneus sont enflammés, dégageant une fumée noirâtre visible depuis les satellites, dans le but d’aveugler les forces de sécurité israéliennes qui ont pourtant prévenu: aucun franchissement sauvage de la barrière-frontière ne sera toléré. Toute tentative sera stoppée par des tirs à balle réelle – ce qui, n’en déplaise à beaucoup, est absolument légal dans toute buffer zone entre entités ennemies.

À cette annonce, les dirigeants du Hamas ont dû jubiler! Eux qui jouent gagnant-gagnant dans une stratégie impliquant l’utilisation de leurs civils comme boucliers humains, puisqu’il s’agit surtout d’une guerre d’influence, n’en espéraient pas autant. Dès lors ils allaient enfin pouvoir de nouveau compter leurs morts comme autant de victoires médiatiques. Et cela – au grand dam des Israéliens – s’est déroulé exactement comme prévu. Au moment où paraissent ces lignes, Gaza pleure plus de trente morts et les hôpitaux sont débordés par le nombre de blessés – même si les chiffres sont sujets à caution puisque seulement fournis par le Hamas.

En menaçant d’avoir recours à des mesures extrêmes, Israël ne fait que dissuader et empêcher le développement d’un cauchemar humanitaire.

Pour une fois, cependant, le Hamas s’est piégé lui-même, en publiant avec fierté l’identité de la majorité des victimes qui, de toute évidence appartiennent à ses troupes. C’est le cas du journaliste Yasser Mourtaja dont le double rôle de correspondant de presse et d’officier salarié du Hamas a également été dévoilé .

Mais aurait-il été possible pour Israël d’avoir recours à d’autres moyens? L’alignement de snipers parallèlement à l’utilisation de procédés antiémeutes, était-il vraiment indispensable?

Imaginons, un instant, que, dans les semaines à venir, comme annoncé par le dirigeant de l’organisation terroriste, Yahya Sinwar, la «marche du retour» permette à ses militants de détruire les barrières, tandis que des milliers de manifestants, femmes et enfants poussés en première ligne, se ruent à l’intérieur d’Israël, bravant non plus les tirs ciblés des soldats entraînés mais la riposte massive d’un peuple paniqué?

En menaçant d’avoir recours à des mesures extrêmes, et en tenant cet engagement, Israël ne fait que dissuader et empêcher le développement d’un cauchemar humanitaire dont les dirigeants du Hamas, acculés économiquement et politiquement, pourraient se régaler.

Contrairement aux images promues par d’autres abus du vocabulaire, Gaza n’est pas une «prison à ciel ouvert» mais une bande de 360 km² relativement surpeuplée, où vivent également nombre de millionnaires dans des villas fastueuses côtoyant des quartiers miséreux.

Chaque jour, environ 1 500 à 2 500 tonnes d’aide humanitaire et de biens de consommation sont autorisés à passer la frontière par le gouvernement israélien. Plusieurs programmes permettent aux habitants de Gaza de se faire soigner dans les hôpitaux de Tel Aviv et de Haïfa.

Un projet d’île portuaire sécurisée est à l’étude à Jérusalem, et des tonnes de fruits et légumes sont régulièrement achetés aux paysans gazaouis par les réseaux de distribution alimentaires israéliens.

L’Égypte contrôle toute la partie sud et fait souvent montre de beaucoup plus de rigueur qu’Israël pour protéger sa frontière, sachant que le Hamas est issu des Frères Musulmans, organisation interdite par le gouvernement de Abdel Fatah Al Sissi.

Mais Gaza souffre, en effet, et même terriblement!

Gaza souffre du fait que le Hamas détourne la majorité des fonds destinés à sa population pour creuser des tunnels et se construire une armée dont le seul but, ouvertement déclaré dans sa charte, est d’oblitérer Israël et d’exterminer ses habitants.

Gaza souffre des promesses d’aide financière non tenues par les pays Arabes et qui se chiffrent en milliards de dollars.

Gaza souffre de n’avoir que trois heures d’électricité par jour, car les terroristes du Hamas ont envoyé une roquette sur la principale centrale pendant le dernier conflit et l’Autorité Palestinienne, de son côté, refuse de payer les factures correspondant à son alimentation, espérant de la sorte provoquer une crise qui conduira à la perte de pouvoir de son concurrent.

Gaza souffre d’un taux de chômage de plus de 50 %, après que ses habitants, dans l’euphorie du départ des Juifs, aient saccagé et détruit les serres à légumes et les manufactures construites par Israël et donc jugées «impures» selon les théories islamistes qui les ont conduits, ne l’oublions pas non plus, à voter massivement pour le Hamas.

Israël ne peut faire la paix avec une organisation terroriste vouée à sa disparition.

Gaza souffre enfin de ces détournements du vocabulaire, de ces concepts esthétiques manichéens conçus au détriment des êtres, qui empêchent les hommes de conscience de comprendre le cœur du problème et sont forcés de penser qu’Israël est l’unique cause du malheur de ses habitants.

C’est pour cela qu’il faut, une fois de plus, clamer quelques faits incontournables.

Israël ne peut faire la paix avec une organisation terroriste vouée à sa disparition.

Les habitants de Gaza seraient libres de circuler et de se construire un avenir à l’instant même où ils renonceraient à la disparition de leur voisin.

Le Hamas et autres organisations terroristes savent qu’ils peuvent compter sur la sympathie des Nations unies et de nombre d’ONG à prétention humanitaire et ne se privent donc pas d’exploiter la population qu’ils détiennent en otage puisqu’ils savent qu’Israël sera systématiquement condamné à leur place.

J’en veux, pour exemple, une anecdote affligeante.

En septembre 2017, une organisation regroupant des femmes arabes et israéliennes a organisé une marche en Cisjordanie (Judée-Samarie). Aucun parent n’aurait pu être indifférent aux images de ces mères juives et arabes qui avouent leur quête d’un avenir meilleur pour leurs enfants. Durant la marche, aucun pneu brûlé, pas de lancement de pierres ou de cocktails Molotov, aucune tentative d’envahir Israël, aucun propos haineux. Tout le contraire. C’était une authentique manifestation pacifique.

Seulement, le Hamas a immédiatement condamné la marche en déclarant que «la normalisation est une arme israélienne».

L’ONU, de son côté, n’a pas cru bon promouvoir l’initiative. Pourquoi l’aurait-elle fait?

Il est davantage dans sa tradition, et certainement plus politiquement correct de condamner Israël pour ses «excès» en matière défensive tandis que le Moyen Orient, faute d’une vision honnête, bascule progressivement dans un conflit généralisé.

Voir encore:

Protestations sous haute tension prévues le long de la bande de Gaza

Vendredi, cinq zones, toutes situées à au moins 700 mètres de la clôture, doivent accueillir les Gazaouis du nord au sud de la bande.

Piotr Smolar (Bande de Gaza, envoyé spécial)

Le Monde

Le décor est planté. Le vent puissant éparpille les émanations de gaz lacrymogène. Les sardines empêchent les tentes de s’envoler. On est à la veille du grand jour à Gaza, celui craint par Israël depuis des semaines.

En ce jeudi 29 mars, deux cents jeunes viennent faire leurs repérages près du poste frontière fermé de Karni, en claquettes ou pieds nus. Perchés sur des monticules de sable, ou bien s’avançant vers les soldats israéliens qui veillent à quelques centaines de mètres derrière la clôture, ils semblent leur lancer un avertissement muet.

Le 30 mars est coché de longue date dans le calendrier palestinien : c’est le jour de la Terre, en mémoire de la confiscation de terres arabes en Galilée, en 1976, et des six manifestants tués à l’époque. Mais cette année, il marque surtout le début d’un mouvement à la force et aux développements imprévisibles, intitulé la « marche du retour ».

« Un tournant »

Cette marche doit culminer le 15 mai, jour de la Nakba (la grande « catastrophe » que fut l’expulsion de centaines de milliers de Palestiniens lors de la création d’Israël). Il s’agit d’un appel à des manifestations pacifiques massives pour réclamer le retour vers les terres perdues. Et ce alors que l’Etat hébreu, soutenu par Washington, souhaite une restriction drastique de la définition du réfugié palestinien.

Vendredi, cinq zones ouvertes, toutes situées à au moins 700 mètres de la clôture, doivent accueillir les Gazaouis du nord au sud de la bande, de Jabaliya jusqu’à Rafah. Des mariages seront célébrés, des concerts et des danses organisés. On y parlera aussi politique, blessures familiales, droits historiques. Pour Bassem Naïm, haut responsable du Hamas :

« Ce rassemblement est un tournant. Malgré les divisions entre factions, malgré la politique américaine, nous pouvons être une nouvelle fois créatifs pour relancer la question palestinienne. Israël peut facilement s’en tirer dans un conflit militaire, contre les Palestiniens ou au niveau régional. Mais c’est un tigre de papier. Il est acculé face à la perspective d’une foule pacifique réclamant le respect de ses droits. »

Mélange de fébrilité et d’intoxication

« Acculé », le mot est excessif. Mais, depuis le début de la semaine, dans un mélange de fébrilité et d’intoxication, les autorités israéliennes n’ont cessé de dramatiser les enjeux de cette journée. Les compagnies de bus à Gaza ont reçu des coups de fil intimidants pour qu’elles ne transportent pas les manifestants. Le ministère des affaires étrangères a diffusé à ses ambassades des éléments de langage pour décrédibiliser l’événement. Il s’agirait d’une « campagne dangereuse et préméditée » par le Hamas, qui y consacrerait « plus de dix millions de dollars [plus de 8 millions d’euros] », notamment pour rémunérer les manifestants.

Du côté militaire, le chef d’état-major, Gadi Eizenkot, a averti dans la presse que « plus de cent snipers » seraient déployés le long de la clôture de sécurité frontalière, en plus des unités supplémentaires mobilisées pour l’occasion.

Il s’agit de justifier par avance l’usage possible de la violence, allant de moyens de dispersion classiques jusqu’aux balles réelles. Le cauchemar israélien se résume en une image : celle de dizaines de milliers de manifestants non armés, avançant vers la frontière, pour réclamer leur sortie de la prison à ciel ouvert qu’est Gaza.

Plusieurs alertes sérieuses

Les responsables sécuritaires israéliens ont averti : tout franchissement illégal sera considéré comme une menace. Plusieurs alertes sérieuses ont eu lieu ces derniers jours, des individus ayant passé la clôture trop aisément. L’armée, qui craint l’enfouissement d’engins explosifs, a prévu d’employer des drones pour larguer des canettes de gaz lacrymogène. Quant aux soldats, ils n’hésiteront pas à tirer à balles réelles si des Palestiniens se rapprochent. Huit personnes ont été ainsi tuées en décembre 2017.

En présentant les manifestants comme des personnes achetées, manipulées ou dangereuses, Israël réduit l’événement de vendredi à une question sécuritaire. Il prive ainsi les Gazaouis de leur intégrité comme sujets politiques, de leur capacité à formuler des espérances et à se mobiliser pour les défendre.

Or, l’initiative de ce mouvement n’est pas du tout le fruit de délibérations au bureau politique du Hamas, qui gouverne la bande de Gaza depuis 2007. Le mouvement islamiste, affaibli et isolé, soutient comme les autres factions cette mobilisation, y compris par des moyens logistiques, parce qu’il y voit une façon de mettre enfin Israël sous pression.

L’idée d’un vaste rassemblement pacifique

L’idée originelle, c’est Ahmed Abou Irtema qui la revendique. C’était juste après l’annonce de la reconnaissance unilatérale de Jérusalem comme capitale d’Israël par Donald Trump, le 6 décembre 2017. La réconciliation entre le Hamas et le Fatah du président Mahmoud Abbas était dans l’impasse. La situation humanitaire, plus dramatique que jamais.

Ce journaliste de 33 ans, père de quatre garçons, a évoqué l’idée, sur Facebook, d’un vaste rassemblement pacifique. « Il y a eu énormément de réactions, les associations se sont emparées de la proposition, puis les factions. Un comité de pilotage a vu le jour. »

Ahmed Abou Irtema a une vision, celle d’une foule marchant un jour – pas vendredi – vers ses anciennes terres :

« Je crois dans la volonté d’un peuple. Ce qui m’inspire, c’est la destruction du mur de Berlin. On ne veut pas mourir. Notre message est pacifique, on ne veut jeter personne à la mer. Si les Israéliens nous tuent, ce sera leur crime. »

Le jeune homme, comme les autres activistes, ne parle pas d’un Etat palestinien, mais de leurs droits historiques sur des terrains précisément délimités.

« Les gens sont plein de fureur et de colère »

Qu’ils aient peu de chance d’obtenir gain de cause ne les interroge pas. Ils invoquent l’article 11 de la résolution 194, adoptée par les Nations unies (ONU) à la fin de 1948, sur le droit des réfugiés à retourner chez eux ou à obtenir compensation.

« Nous préférons mourir dans notre pays plutôt qu’en mer, comme les réfugiés syriens, ou enfermés à Gaza ou dans les camps au Liban », explique de son côté Moïn Abou Okal, fonctionnaire au ministère de l’intérieur et membre du comité de pilotage.

Ce dernier affirme que les manifestants ne tenteront de pénétrer en Israël que le 15 mai. La vérité est que rien n’est écrit. Tout dépendra de la force de la mobilisation et de l’ampleur de la réaction israélienne. « Les gens sont plein de fureur et de colère, dit Ghazi Hamad, responsable des relations internationales du Hamas. On n’a pris aucune décision pour pousser des centaines de milliers de personnes vers la frontière. On veut que cela reste une manifestation pacifique. Mais il n’y a ni négociations avec Israël ni réconciliation entre factions. Il faut laisser les gens s’exprimer. »

A l’aube du vendredi 30 mars, un Palestinien a été tué par une frappe israélienne avant le rassemblement prévu à Gaza.

Voir également:

Trump annonce le retrait des Etats-Unis de l’accord nucléaire iranien

Le président américain a promis de « graves » conséquences à l’Iran s’il se dote de la bombe nucléaire ; l’Iran mérite un « meilleur gouvernement »

Le président américain Donald Trump a annoncé mardi le retrait des Etats-Unis de l’accord sur le nucléaire iranien, qu’il a qualifié de « désastreux », et le rétablissement des sanctions contre Téhéran.

« J’annonce aujourd’hui que les Etats-Unis vont se retirer de l’accord nucléaire iranien », a-t-il déclaré dans une allocution télévisée depuis la Maison Blanche.

Trump a démarré son discours par ces mots :

« Aujourd’hui, je veux informer les Américains de nos efforts afin d’empêcher l’Iran d’acquérir l’arme nucléaire. Le régime iranien est le principal sponsor étatique de la terreur. Il exporte de dangereux missiles, alimente les conflits à travers le Moyen-Orient et soutient des groupes terroristes alliés et des milices comme le Hezbollah, le Hamas, les Talibans et Al-Qaïda. Au fil des années, l’Iran et ses mandataires ont bombardé des militaires et des installations américaines [et ont commis une série d’autres attaques contre les Américains et les intérêts américains]. »

« Le régime iranien a financé son long règne de chaos et de terreur en pillant la richesse de son peuple. Aucune mesure prise par le régime n’a été plus dangereuse que sa poursuite vers le nucléaire et ses efforts pour l’obtenir. »

Dans son discours, Trump a déclaré :

« En théorie, le soi-disant accord concernant l’Iran était censé protéger les Etats-Unis et leurs alliés de la folie d’une bombe nucléaire iranienne – une arme qui ne ferait que mettre en péril la survie du régime iranien.

« En fait, l’accord a permis à l’Iran de continuer à enrichir de l’uranium et, au fil du temps, d’atteindre un point de rupture en terme de nucléaire. Il a bénéficié de la levée de sanctions paralysantes en échange de très faibles efforts sur son activité nucléaire. Aucune autre limite n’a été fixé concernant ses autres activités malfaisantes.

« En d’autres termes, au moment où les Etats-Unis disposaient d’un maximum de pouvoir, cet accord désastreux a apporté à ce régime – et c’est un régime de terreur – plusieurs milliards de dollars, dont une partie en espèces, ce qui représente un grand embarras pour moi en tant que citoyen et pour tous les citoyens des Etats-Unis. Un accord plus constructif aurait facilement pu être conclu à ce moment-là. »

Voici les principaux extraits de sa déclaration à la Maison Blanche.

Retrait

« J’annonce aujourd’hui que les Etats-Unis vont se retirer de l’accord nucléaire iranien ».

« Le fait est que c’est un accord horrible et partial qui n’aurait jamais dû être conclu. Il n’a pas apporté le calme. Il n’a pas apporté la paix. Et il ne le fera jamais ».

Sanctions

« Dans quelques instants, je vais signer un ordre présidentiel pour commencer à rétablir les sanctions américaines liées au programme nucléaire du régime iranien. Nous allons instituer le plus haut niveau de sanctions économiques ».

Et « tout pays qui aidera l’Iran dans sa quête d’armes nucléaires pourrait aussi être fortement sanctionné par les Etats-Unis ».

Le conseiller à la sécurité nationale, John Bolton, a de son côté indiqué que le rétablissement des sanctions américaines était effectif immédiatement pour les nouveaux contrats et que les entreprises étrangères auraient quelques mois pour « sortir » d’Iran.

Le Trésor américain a lui fait savoir que les sanctions concernant les anciens contrats conclus en Iran entreraient en vigueur après une période de transition de 90 à 180 jours.

« Vraie solution »

« Alors que nous sortons de l’accord iranien, nous travaillerons avec nos alliés pour trouver une vraie solution complète et durable à la menace nucléaire iranienne. Cela comprendra des efforts pour éliminer la menace du programme de missiles balistiques (de l’Iran), pour stopper ses activités terroristes à travers le monde et pour bloquer ses activités menaçantes à travers le Moyen-Orient ».

« Nous n’allons pas laisser un régime qui scande +Mort à l’Amérique+ avoir accès aux armes les plus meurtrières sur terre ».

« Mais le fait est qu’ils vont vouloir conclure un accord nouveau et durable, un accord qui bénéficierait à tout l’Iran et au peuple iranien. Quand ils (seront prêts), je serai prêt et bien disposé. De belles choses peuvent arriver à l’Iran ».

« Preuve »

« Au coeur de l’accord iranien, il y avait un énorme mythe selon laquelle un régime meurtrier ne cherchait qu’un programme pacifique d’énergie nucléaire. Aujourd’hui nous avons la preuve définitive que la promesse iranienne était un mensonge ».

Régime contre peuple

« Le futur de l’Iran appartient à son peuple » et les Iraniens « méritent une nation qui rende justice à leurs rêves, qui honore leur histoire ».

« Le régime iranien est le principal sponsor étatique de la terreur ». « Il soutient des terroristes et des milices comme le Hezbollah, le Hamas, les talibans et Al-Qaïda ».

L’ancien président américain Barack Obama a qualifié mardi de « grave erreur » la décision de Donald Trump de retirer les Etats-Unis de l’accord sur le nucléaire iranien, jugeant que ce dernier « fonctionne » et est dans l’intérêt de Washington.

« Je pense que la décision de mettre le JCPOA en danger sans aucune violation de l’accord de la part des Iraniens est une grave erreur, » a indiqué l’ex-président américain, très discret depuis son départ de la Maison Blanche, dans un communiqué au ton particulièrement ferme.

Voir de même:

Donald Trump furieux contre Mahmoud Abbas suite à un « mensonge »

 
Des sources palestiniennes ont réfuté cette publication

Le président américain Donald Trump aurait fustigé le président de l’Autorité palestinienne, Mahmoud Abbas, lors de leur réunion à Bethléem, rapporte dimanche Channel 2.

Selon la chaîne, citant des sources israéliennes, Trump aurait « crié » sur Abbas, car ce dernier lui aurait « menti ».

« Vous m’avez menti à Washington lorsque vous avez parlé de l’engagement pour la paix, mais les Israéliens m’ont montré que vous étiez personnellement responsable de l’incitation », aurait déclaré Trump.

Les sources palestiniennes ont cependant contredit la publication de Channel 2, affirmant que la rencontre entre les deux dirigeants avait été calme.

Dans son discours après la réunion avec Abbas, Trump a insisté sur le fait que « la paix ne peut être obtenue où la violence est récompensée ». Une déclaration considérée comme une critique du financement de l’Autorité palestinienne destiné aux familles de terroristes emprisonnés ou tués.

Ce rapport intervient alors que le président américain a affirmé hier que les deux parties sont prêtes à « parvenir à la paix ».

Le président de l’Autorité palestinienne, Mahmoud Abbas, « m’a assuré qu’il est prêt à faire la paix avec Israël, et je le crois », a déclaré Trump ajoutant que Benyamin Netanyahou a de son coté « assuré qu’il était prêt à parvenir à la paix ».

Voir encore:

Territoires palestiniens: Abbas s’excuse après ses propos jugés antisémites

Ses propos ont fait l’objet de vives critiques dans le monde entier ces derniers jours. En début de semaine, dans un discours prononcé devant des représentants de l’Organisation de libération de la Palestine, Mahmoud Abbas avait estimé que les massacres dont les juifs avaient été victimes en Europe, et notamment l’Holocauste, étaient dus au « comportement social » des juifs et non à leur religion. Il évoquait notamment leurs activités bancaires. Des propos largement condamnés sur la scène internationale par les dirigeants israéliens, par les Etats-Unis, l’Union européenne, l’ONU et la France notamment.

De notre correspondant à Jérusalem,  Guilhem Delteil

Finalement, ce vendredi, le président de l’Autorité palestinienne a décidé de présenter ses excuses. Depuis mardi soir, les critiques se succédaient et les mots employés étaient parfois très forts. Le coordinateur de l’ONU pour le processus de paix avait condamné des propos « inacceptables ». Il s’agissait pour lui de « certaines des insultes antisémites les plus méprisantes ». Quant au Premier ministre israélien, il estimait pour sa part que « un négationniste reste un négationniste » et il disait souhaiter voir « disparaître » Mahmoud Abbas.

Face à ce tollé, le président de l’Autorité palestinienne n’a d’abord rien dit. Puis après deux jours de silence, ce vendredi, il a choisi de s’excuser. « Si des gens ont été offensés par ma déclaration (…), spécialement des personnes de confession juive, je leur présente mes excuses », écrit Mahmoud Abbas dans un communiqué. « Je réitère mon entier respect pour la foi juive et les autres religions monothéistes », poursuit-il.

Le président de l’Autorité palestinienne se défend de tout antisémitisme. « Nous le condamnons sous toutes ses formes » assure-t-il. Il tient également à « réitérer », dit-il, sa « condamnation de longue date de l’Holocauste » qu’il qualifie de « crime le plus odieux de l’Histoire ».

Voir de même:

Abbas revient sur ses propos relatifs aux rabbins voulant “empoisonner” les puits palestiniens

Après avoir été accusé de diffamation, le dirigeant de l’AP rétracte son affirmation “sans fondement”, et ajoute ne pas avoir voulu “offenser le peuple juif”

Le président du parlement européen Martin Schulz (à droite) avec le président de l’Autorité palestinienne Mahmoud Abbas au parlement de l’Union européenne à Bruxelles, le 23 juin 2016. (Crédit : AFP/John Thys)

Le président de l’Autorité palestinienne (AP) Mahmoud Abbas a retiré samedi ses propos concernant des rabbins ayant appelé à empoisonné l’eau des Palestiniens, disant qu’il n’avait pas eu l’intention d’offenser les juifs, après qu’Israël et des organisations juives ont affirmé qu’il faisait la promotion de tropes diffamatoires et antisémites.

« Après qu’il soit devenu évident que les déclarations supposées d’un rabbin, relayées par de nombreux médias, se sont révélées sans fondement, le président Mahmoud Abbas a affirmé qu’il n’avait pas pour intention de s’en prendre au judaïsme ou de blesser le peuple juif à travers le monde », a déclaré son bureau dans un communiqué.

Pendant un discours prononcé devant le Parlement de l’Union européenne à Bruxelles jeudi, Abbas avait affirmé que les accusations d’incitations [à la violence] palestiniennes étaient injustes puisque « les Israéliens le font aussi… Certains rabbins en Israël ont dit très clairement à leur gouvernement que notre eau devait être empoisonnée afin de tuer des Palestiniens. »

Un article publié en juin dans la presse turque affirmait qu’un rabbin avait fait un tel appel, mais l’histoire s’était rapidement révélée fausse.

Son bureau a déclaré qu’il « rejetait toutes les accusations formulées à son encontre et à celle du peuple palestinien d’offense au judaïsme. [Il] a également condamné toutes les accusations d’antisémitisme. »

En revanche, Abbas n’a pas retiré son affirmation, également prononcée pendant son discours devant le Parlement européen, que le terrorisme mondial serait éradiqué si Israël se retirait de Cisjordanie et de Jérusalem Est.

Israël a dénoncé jeudi Abbas, le qualifiant de colporteur de mensonges, le bureau du Premier ministre déclarant qu’il « a montré son vrai visage », et qu’il « ment quand il affirme que ses mains sont tendues vers la paix. »

Le Premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahu avait accusé jeudi Abbas de « propager des diffamations au parlement européen ».

« Israël attend le jour où Abbas cessera de colporter des mensonges et d’inciter [à la haine contre Israël]. D’ici là, Israël continuera à se défendre contre les incitations palestiniennes, qui alimentent le terrorisme », pouvait-on lire dans le communiqué du bureau du Premier ministre.

Le Conseil représentatif des institutions juives de France (CRIF), vitrine politique de la première communauté juive d’Europe, avait accusé vendredi Abbas de « propager les caricatures anti juives d’autrefois […] dont on sait qu’elles nourrissent la haine antisémite ».

Voir de plus:

« Jusqu’à son dernier jour », Abbas payera les « familles des martyrs prisonniers »

 Le président de l’Autorité palestinienne a rendu hommage aux efforts déployés par Donald Trump

Le président de l’Autorité palestinienne, Mahmoud Abbas, a déclaré jeudi qu’il ne renoncera pas aux salaires reversés aux terroristes et aux familles des terroristes ayant été emprisonnés en Israël pour avoir mené des attentats, ou ayant tenté de tuer des Israéliens.

« Je n’ai pas l’intention de cesser de payer les familles des martyrs prisonniers, même si cela me coûte mon siège. Je continuerai à les payer jusqu’à mon dernier jour », a déclaré M. Abbas, d’après les médias israéliens.

Le financement par l’Autorité palestinienne de subventions pour les familles des terroristes est un point de discorde entre les Palestiniens et l’administration Trump. Pendant sa visite dans la région plus tôt cette année, le président des Etats-Unis avait souligné que son pays ne tolérerait pas ces rétributions.

Cette déclaration du président de l’AP survient alors que des émissaires américains conduits par Jared Kushner, proche conseiller du président américain, ont rencontré à nouveau cette semaine les dirigeants israéliens et palestiniens.

Après avoir rencontré des responsables saoudiens, émiratis, qataris, jordaniens et égyptiens, la délégation américaine a été reçue jeudi par Benyamin Netanyahou et a rencontré le président de l’Autorité palestinienne Mahmoud Abbas à Ramallah.

M. Trump « est déterminé à parvenir à une solution qui apportera la prospérité et la paix à tout le monde dans cette zone », a déclaré Jared Kushner, au début de ses entretiens avec le Premier ministre israélien à Tel-Aviv, selon une vidéo diffusée par l’ambassade américaine.

Le bureau de Benyamin Netanyahou a qualifié les discussions de « constructives et de substantielles » sans autre détail, indiquant qu’elles allaient se poursuivre « dans les prochaines semaines » et remerciant le président américain « pour son ferme soutien à Israël ».

Le président Abbas a pour sa part rendu hommage aux efforts déployés par Donald Trump et a affirmé que « cette délégation (américaine) œuvre pour la paix ». « Nous savons que c’est difficile et compliqué mais ce n’est pas impossible », a-t-il fait savoir.

(Avec agence)

Voir par ailleurs:

Israël a fêté mercredi son 70e anniversaire en brandissant sa puissance militaire et son improbable réussite économique face aux menaces régionales renouvelées et aux incertitudes intérieures.

Après s’être recueillis depuis mardi à la mémoire de leurs compatriotes tués au service de leur pays ou dans des attentats, les Israéliens ont entamé mercredi soir les célébrations marquant la création de leur Etat proclamé le 14 mai 1948, mais fêté en ce moment en fonction du calendrier hébraïque.

Lors d’une cérémonie à Jérusalem, le Premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahu a salué ce qu’il a appelé les «vrais germes de la paix» qui selon lui commençaient à pousser parmi certains pays arabes.

Il n’a pas donné plus de détails mais des signes de réchauffement, tout particulièrement avec Ryad, ont été récemment enregistrés, alors qu’Israël comme le royaume saoudien voit en l’Iran une grave menace.

Israël agite régulièrement le spectre d’une attaque de l’Iran, son ennemi juré.

La crainte d’un tel acte d’hostilité, à la manière de l’offensive surprise d’une coalition arabe lors des célébrations de Yom Kippour en 1973, a été attisée par un raid le 9 avril contre une base aérienne en Syrie, imputé à Israël par le régime de Bachar al-Assad et ses alliés iranien et russe.

Ali Akbar Velayati, conseiller du guide suprême iranien, l’ayatollah Ali Khamenei, a promis que cette attaque ne resterait «pas sans réponse».

Depuis le début de la guerre en Syrie en 2011, des dizaines de frappes à distance dans ce pays sont attribuées à Israël, qui se garde communément de les confirmer ou démentir. Elles visent des positions syriennes et des convois d’armes au Hezbollah libanais, qui comme l’Iran et la Russie, aide militairement le régime Assad.

– Les «conseils» de Lieberman –

Mais en février, Israël a admis pour la première fois avoir frappé des cibles iraniennes après l’intrusion d’un drone iranien dans son espace aérien. C’était la première confrontation ouvertement déclarée entre Israël et l’Iran en Syrie.

Israël martèle qu’il ne permettra pas à l’Iran de s’enraciner militairement en Syrie voisine.

Les journaux israéliens ont publié mercredi des éléments spécifiques sur la présence en Syrie des Gardiens de la révolution, unité d’élite iranienne.

La publication de photos satellite de bases aériennes et d’appareils civils soupçonnés de décharger des armes, de cartes et même de noms de responsables militaires iraniens constitue un avertissement, convenaient les commentateurs militaires: Israël sait où et qui frapper en cas d’attaque.

L’armée a décidé par précaution de renoncer à envoyer des chasseurs F-15 à des manœuvres prévues en mai aux Etats-Unis, a rapporté la radio militaire.

Sans évoquer une menace iranienne immédiate, le ministre de la Défense Avigdor Lieberman a prévenu: «Nous ne cherchons pas l’aventure», mais «je conseille à nos voisins au nord (Liban et Syrie) et au sud (bande de Gaza) de tenir sérieusement compte» de la détermination à défendre Israël.

– «Forteresse» –

Le 70e anniversaire est l’occasion pour Israël de célébrer le «miracle» de son existence, sa force militaire, la prospérité de la «nation start-up» et son modèle démocratique.

Avec plus de 8,8 millions d’habitants, la population a décuplé depuis 1948, selon les statistiques officielles. La croissance s’est affichée à 4,1% au quatrième trimestre 2017. Le pays revendique une douzaine de prix Nobel.

Cependant, Israël accuse parmi les plus fortes inégalités des pays développés. L’avenir du Premier ministre, englué dans les affaires de corruption présumée, est incertain.

S’agissant du conflit israélo-palestinien, une solution a rarement paru plus lointaine.

L’anniversaire d’Israël coïncide avec «la marche du retour», mouvement organisé depuis le 30 mars dans la bande de Gaza, territoire palestinien soumis au blocus israélien. Après bientôt trois semaines de violences le long de la frontière qui ont fait 34 morts palestiniens, de nouvelles manifestations sont attendues vendredi.

Le ministère israélien de la Défense a annoncé qu’un «puissant engin explosif», apparemment destiné à un attentat lors des fêtes israéliennes, avait été découvert dans un camion palestinien intercepté à un point de passage entre la Cisjordanie occupée et Israël.

«Israël a été établi pour que le peuple juif, qui ne s’est presque jamais senti chez soi nulle part au monde, ait enfin un foyer», a déclaré l’écrivain David Grossman lors d’une cérémonie mardi soir à Tel-Aviv troublée par des militants de droite protestant contre la présence de familles palestiniennes.

«Aujourd’hui, après 70 ans de réussites étonnantes dans tant de domaines, Israël, avec toute sa force, est peut-être une forteresse. Mais ce n’est toujours pas un foyer. Les Israéliens n’auront pas de foyer tant que les Palestiniens n’auront pas le leur».

Cyclisme

Giro : Israël, braquet à l’italienne

Le Giro d’Italia débute ce vendredi de Jérusalem, offrant à l’Etat hébreu son premier événement sportif d’envergure. Tracé qui esquive les Territoires palestiniens, équipes qui hésitent à s’engager, soupçons d’enveloppes d’argent… les autorités ont éteint toutes les critiques pour en faire une vitrine.

Pierre Carrey et Guillaume Gendron, correspondant à Tel-Aviv

Plus de doute, avec Benyamin Nétanyahou qui fait des acrobaties à vélo, le départ du Tour d’Italie (Giro d’Italia) de Jérusalem ce vendredi est bien une affaire politique. «Il faut que je m’entraîne», plaisante le Premier ministre dans une vidéo diffusée fin avril sur les réseaux sociaux où on le voit enfourcher un VTT bleu avec casque et costume-cravate. Etonnamment agile pour ses 68 ans, «Bibi» (en réalité, sa doublure) accomplit le tour d’un rond-point sur la roue arrière… Et exhorte l’équipe d’Israel Cycling Academy, dont deux coureurs sur les huit engagés sont israéliens : «Je vais vous aider à gagner !»

Le big start («grand départ») du Giro à Jérusalem est un big deal pour Israël. Trois jours de course : un contre-la-montre de 9,7 km dans les quartiers ouest de la ville «trois fois sainte», une étape de 167 km reliant le port de Haïfa, au nord, avec les plages de Tel-Aviv et enfin 226 km de canyons désertiques entre Beer Sheva et la station balnéaire d’Eilat, au bord de la mer Rouge, à la pointe sud du pays. Le tracé s’arrête à la «ligne verte» et évite soigneusement les Territoires palestiniens ainsi que la Vieille Ville de Jérusalem (mais longera cependant ses murs) et sa partie Est, dont l’annexion par Israël en 1980 n’a jamais été acceptée par la communauté internationale. En principe donc, pas de plans d’hélico des toits rouges des colonies de Cisjordanie ou du mur de séparation…

Cet événement d’envergure (évalué à 120 millions de shekels, soit 27 millions d’euros, l’équivalent de la somme dépensée mi-avril par l’Etat hébreu pour fêter ses 70 ans) est tout à la fois le premier départ d’un grand tour cycliste hors d’Europe, l’une des plus grandes manifestations sportives ou culturelles jamais organisées en Israël et potentiellement l’événement le plus sécurisé de son histoire (protégé par 6 000 policiers et agents privés). Plus encore que les funérailles d’Yitzhak Rabin, le Premier ministre assassiné en 1995. Question retombées, le gouvernement espère une hausse du tourisme grâce à une audience de la course complètement fantasmée, évaluée à un milliard de téléspectateurs.

De son côté, la société italienne RCS Sport, organisatrice de l’épreuve, entend tenir le Giro, simple «événement sportif», «à l’écart de toute discussion politique». Le consul général d’Italie à Tel-Aviv appuyait ces propos lundi, tout en répétant son attachement à l’antienne de la communauté internationale, soit la solution à deux Etats. A l’inverse, le milliardaire Sylvan Adams, qui a attiré le Giro à Jérusalem, envoie valser cette supposée neutralité et annonce la couleur : «On va contourner les médias traditionnels en s’adressant directement aux fans de sport qui n’en ont rien à faire du conflit et veulent juste admirer nos beaux paysages.»

«Un pays normal»

Ce riche héritier canadien de 59 ans s’est installé en Israël en 2016. Une alyah autant motivée par une fibre sioniste proclamée à tout instant que par une certaine affinité avec la fiscalité israélienne : le magnat de l’immobilier a fait sa valise en s’acquittant d’un redressement de 64 millions d’euros auprès du Trésor québécois. Depuis son arrivée, Adams, six fois champion cycliste canadien chez les vétérans, a décidé de financer une école de vélo, une équipe de deuxième division mondiale – celle que rencontre Nétanyahou dans la vidéo -, la construction d’un vélodrome olympique à Tel-Aviv et, point d’orgue, une grande partie du départ du Giro. Un programme supposé transformer Israël en nation de vélo, ce qu’elle n’était pas jusque-là, mais aussi destiné à soutenir l’effort de communication national, soit une version cycliste de l’hasbara (terme hébraïque signifiant «explication» et «propagande»).

Face à la presse, à Tel-Aviv, Sylvan Adams a dicté fin avril les éléments de langage : «J’espère que les journalistes diront qu’il s’agit de la seule démocratie pluraliste du Moyen-Orient, un pays libre, un pays sûr. Un pays normal, comme la France ou l’Italie.» Normal, il faut le dire vite. Lors de la présentation du tracé à Milan, fin 2017, l’emploi de l’appellation «Jérusalem-Ouest» avait suscité la fureur d’Israël, qui avait obtenu gain de cause (suscitant, en retour, l’indignation des Palestiniens). Désormais, sur les documents officiels, la distinction n’est plus faite. «Il n’y a aucune ville dans le monde qui s’appelle Jérusalem-Ouest, s’agace Adams. Il n’y a pas de Paris-Ouest ou de Rome-Ouest. La course part de la ville de Jérusalem, donc on écrit « Jérusalem » sur la carte.» Représentant de RCS en Israël, Daniel Benaim va dans le même sens : «Quand les hélicoptères vont filmer Jérusalem, ils vont filmer la beauté du tout, on ne va pas diviser la ville !»

Le mouvement propalestinien BDS («Boycott, désinvestissement, sanctions») accuse l’épreuve de «normaliser l’occupation» israélienne, en utilisant des images du Dôme du Rocher ou de la porte de Damas, symboles palestiniens de la Vieille Ville. Haussement d’épaules côté organisateurs. Benaim : «Le BDS a essayé de faire du bruit en Italie, mais ça ne prend pas. Nous sommes heureux de dire qu’il y a une participation totale des équipes.» Deux groupes sportifs ont néanmoins hésité à s’engager, Bahrain-Merida et le Team UAE (Emirats arabes unis), tous deux dirigés par des managers italiens mais financés par des pétromonarchies du Golfe, qui ne reconnaissent pas officiellement Israël. Elles seront finalement au départ. «Les équipes n’ont pas le choix, rappelle le patron d’une formation concurrente. Quand nous avons appris que le Tour d’Italie partait de Jérusalem [peu après les remous causés par la reconnaissance de la ville comme capitale israélienne par Donald Trump, ndlr], nous nous sommes demandé comment on osait envoyer nos coureurs dans cette zone instable. Hélas, les équipes WorldTour [première division mondiale] sont tenues de participer à toutes les épreuves du calendrier. C’est une règle à changer dans un futur proche pour éviter de subir ces parcours absurdes.»

En façade, le milieu du vélo s’attache à éteindre les controverses. Fabio Aru, coureur originaire de Sardaigne, membre du Team UAE qui aurait pu déclarer forfait, sur Sportfair.it : «On m’a demandé si j’avais peur. Au contraire, je suis enthousiaste […]. Le sport peut aider à réconcilier les peuples.» Le Néerlandais Tom Dumoulin (Team Sunweb), vainqueur sortant du Giro, sur Cyclingnews.com : «Je ne suis pas du genre à me mêler de politique ; je suis cycliste. Si une course démarre d’Israël, on doit être au départ.»

Prime secrète

En off, plusieurs concurrents expriment leurs craintes. Pas tant d’être pris pour cible (d’ailleurs, le dispositif de sécurité était en apparence allégé aux abords de leurs hôtels jeudi) mais inquiets de l’effort physique supplémentaire à consentir. Entre les quatre heures de vol retour qui vont entamer leur récupération lundi (direction la Sicile) et la chaleur attendue dimanche dans le désert. Daniel Benaim rejette : «Je les ai vu monter des cols en Sardaigne sous 36 degrés…» Le silence gêné du peloton s’explique peut-être par la récurrence des courses dans des environnements climatiques et politiques discutables. En particulier à Dubaï et Abou Dhabi, où RCS Sport met sur pied des épreuves, ou encore au Qatar qui fut de 2002 à 2016 le terrain de jeu d’Amaury Sport Organisation, propriétaire du Tour de France. Mais il est aussi possible que cette discrétion soit tenue par des arrangements financiers.

La tête d’affiche de l’épreuve, le Britannique Chris Froome (Team Sky, lire ci-contre) aurait ainsi empoché de 1,4 à 2 millions d’euros de prime de participation selon plusieurs médias spécialisés. Menacé de sanctions pour un contrôle positif, le quadruple vainqueur de la Grande Boucle est accueilli à bras ouverts par des organisateurs misant sur sa notoriété. Théoriquement interdite par l’Union cycliste internationale (les coureurs étant rémunérés par leur équipe et non par les patrons d’épreuves), la pratique s’est banalisée. RCS est ainsi soupçonné d’avoir versé, en 2009, de 1 à 3 millions d’euros à Lance Armstrong, directement ou par l’intermédiaire de sa fondation contre le cancer. Par ailleurs, Libération a appris que l’organisateur italien gonfle depuis des années les frais de participation des équipes pour les inciter à aligner leurs stars sur le Giro.

RCS nie toute prime secrète. Ce qui pourrait laisser penser que, si chèque il y a, il a été signé par les Israéliens. Très excité, Sylvan Adams annonçait : «On espère avoir Froome, même si ça coûte cher. C’est comme faire jouer Messi dans sa ville, sauf que là on l’a pour trois jours avec notre beau pays en toile de fond et pas juste un stade anonyme.» Les images doivent être belles à tout prix. Même celles affichant un optimisme forcé (ou naïf), peu raccord avec l’enlisement actuel du processus de paix. Interrogé par le site Insidethegames.biz, le président de l’UCI, le Français David Lappartient veut y croire : «Espérons que le cyclisme permette de promouvoir la paix, comme les JO l’ont fait en Corée.»


Chris Froome, favori des soupçons

«Je n’ai rien fait de mal.» Christopher Froome va bouffer toujours les mêmes questions et répandre toujours la même odeur de petit scandale au long des 3 600 km du Tour d’Italie qui s’élance de Jérusalem ce vendredi. Le Britannique s’attaque à un exploit jamais vu, hors Eddy Merckx et Bernard Hinault : remporter trois grands tours d’affilée. S’il enlève l’épreuve italienne fin mai, Froome signerait un triplé après le Tour de France (en juillet) et celui d’Espagne (en septembre). A moins qu’il perde tout : le leader de l’équipe Sky est accusé d’abus médicamenteux – pour ne pas dire de dopage -, depuis que des doses élevées de salbutamol ont été retrouvées dans ses urines le 7 septembre. Il avance la prise de ventoline pour soigner son asthme et réussit pour le moment à gagner du temps avec ses avocats. Mais Froome devrait tôt ou tard être sanctionné. Donc certainement, si on s’en réfère au cas d’Alberto Contador en 2012, perdre le bénéfice de sa victoire au Tour d’Espagne. Et celle, peut-être à venir, au Tour d’Italie. Dès lors, pourquoi courir le Giro ? Froome le sait : le public retient les victoires acquises sur le terrain et oublie lorsqu’elles sont effacées a posteriori. Et puis, il y a cette histoire de prime de participation secrète que Froome aurait perçue de la part des organisateurs, pour lesquels le scandale constitue manifestement un argument marketing. P.C.

Voir aussi:

A Courageous Trump Call on a Lousy Iran Deal

Bret Stephens
New York Times

May 8, 2018

Of all the arguments for the Trump administration to honor the nuclear deal with Iran, none was more risible than the claim that we gave our word as a country to keep it.

“Our”?

The Obama administration refused to submit the deal to Congress as a treaty, knowing it would never get two-thirds of the Senate to go along. Just 21 percent of Americans approved of the deal at the time it went through, against 49 percent who did not, according to a Pew poll. The agreement “passed” on the strength of a 42-vote Democratic filibuster, against bipartisan, majority opposition.

“The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (J.C.P.O.A.) is not a treaty or an executive agreement, and it is not a signed document,” Julia Frifield, then the assistant secretary of state for legislative affairs, wrote then-Representative Mike Pompeo in November 2015, referring to the deal by its formal name. It’s questionable whether the deal has any legal force at all.

Build on political sand; get washed away by the next electoral wave. Such was the fate of the ill-judged and ill-founded J.C.P.O.A., which Donald Trump killed on Tuesday by refusing to again waive sanctions on the Islamic Republic. He was absolutely right to do so — assuming, that is, serious thought has been given to what comes next.

In the weeks leading to Tuesday’s announcement, some of the same people who previously claimed the deal was the best we could possibly hope for suddenly became inventive in proposing means to fix it. This involved suggesting side deals between Washington and European capitals to impose stiffer penalties on Tehran for its continued testing of ballistic missiles — more than 20 since the deal came into effect — and its increasingly aggressive regional behavior.

But the problem with this approach is that it only treats symptoms of a problem for which the J.C.P.O.A. is itself a major cause. The deal weakened U.N. prohibitions on Iran’s testing of ballistic missiles, which cannot be reversed without Russian and Chinese consent. That won’t happen.

The easing of sanctions also gave Tehran additional financial means with which to fund its depredations in Syria and its militant proxies in Yemen, Lebanon and elsewhere. Any effort to counter Iran on the ground in these places would mean fighting the very forces we are effectively feeding. Why not just stop the feeding?

Apologists for the deal answer that the price is worth paying because Iran has put on hold much of its production of nuclear fuel for the next several years. Yet even now Iran is under looser nuclear strictures than North Korea, and would have been allowed to enrich as much material as it liked once the deal expired. That’s nuts.

Apologists also claim that, with Trump’s decision, Tehran will simply restart its enrichment activities on an industrial scale. Maybe it will, forcing a crisis that could end with U.S. or Israeli strikes on Iran’s nuclear sites. But that would be stupid, something the regime emphatically isn’t. More likely, it will take symbolic steps to restart enrichment, thereby implying a threat without making good on it. What the regime wants is a renegotiation, not a reckoning.

Why? Even with the sanctions relief, the Iranian economy hangs by a thread: The Wall Street Journal on Sundayreported “hundreds of recent outbreaks of labor unrest in Iran, an indication of deepening discord over the nation’s economic troubles.” This week, the rial hit a record low of 67,800 to the dollar; one member of the Iranian Parliament estimated $30 billion of capital outflows in recent months. That’s real money for a country whose gross domestic product barely matches that of Boston.

The regime might calculate that a strategy of confrontation with the West could whip up useful nationalist fervors. But it would have to tread carefully: Ordinary Iranians are already furious that their government has squandered the proceeds of the nuclear deal on propping up the Assad regime. The conditions that led to the so-called Green movement of 2009 are there once again. Nor will it help Iran if it tries to start a war with Israel and comes out badly bloodied.

All this means the administration is in a strong position to negotiate a viable deal. But it missed an opportunity last month when it failed to deliver a crippling blow to Bashar al-Assad, Iran’s puppet in Syria, for his use of chemical weapons. Trump’s appeals in his speech to the Iranian people also sounded hollow from a president who isn’t exactly a tribune of liberalism and has disdained human rights as a tool of U.S. diplomacy. And the U.S. will need to mend fences with its European partners to pursue a coordinated diplomatic approach.

The goal is to put Iran’s rulers to a fundamental choice. They can opt to have a functioning economy, free of sanctions and open to investment, at the price of permanently, verifiably and irreversibly forgoing a nuclear option and abandoning their support for terrorists. Or they can pursue their nuclear ambitions at the cost of economic ruin and possible war. But they are no longer entitled to Barack Obama’s sweetheart deal of getting sanctions lifted first, retaining their nuclear options for later, and sponsoring terrorism throughout.

Trump’s courageous decision to withdraw from the nuclear deal will clarify the stakes for Tehran. Now we’ll see whether the administration is capable of following through.

Voir également:

Trump now needs to bring Iran’s economy to its knees

President Trump’s declaration Tuesday that he would exit the 2015 Iran nuclear deal was more than just a fulfillment of a campaign promise; it was a much-needed shift in US foreign policy. The message to the world: The era of appeasement is over.

The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action was among the worst deals negotiated in modern times. In exchange for the suspension of America’s toughest economic sanctions, Iran needed only freeze its nuclear program for a limited amount of time — keeping its nuclear capabilities on standby while perfecting its missile arsenal, increasing support to terrorism and expanding its military footprint throughout the Middle East.By withdrawing from the agreement, Trump unshackled America’s most powerful economic weapons and restored US leverage to push back on the entire range of Iran’s malign activities. Trump must now implement a new strategy that forces Iran to withdraw from Syria and Yemen, verifiably and irreversibly dismantle its nuclear and missile programs, end its sponsorship of terrorism and improve its human-rights record.

Sustained political warfare, robust military deterrence and maximum economic pressure will all be necessary. Pressure will build steadily as our re-imposed sanctions take hold.

Under the laws passed by Congress before the nuclear deal, banks throughout the world risk losing their access to the US financial system if they do business with the Central Bank of Iran or in connection with Iran’s energy, shipping, shipbuilding and port sectors. Companies providing insurance and re-insurance for Iran-connected projects face US sanctions as well, as do gold and silver dealers to Iran.

Iran will see its oil-export revenue decline as importers are forced to significantly reduce their purchases. Worse than anything for the regime, Iran’s foreign-held reserves will be on lock-down. Money paid by its oil customers must sit in foreign escrow accounts. Banks that allow Iran to repatriate, transfer or convert these payments to other currencies face the full measure of US financial sanctions.

What happens to a country that is cut off from hard currency and faces declining export revenues? In 2013, we saw the result: a balance-of-payments crisis. What happens, however, when these sanctions are imposed amid a raging liquidity crisis while the Iranian currency is in free-fall and the regime is drawing down its foreign-exchange reserves? The Trump administration is hoping for a situation that makes the mullahs choose between economic collapse and wide-ranging behavioral change.

The strategy just might work, but it’ll take a lot more than just re-imposing sanctions to succeed. Sanctions are only effective if they are enforced. The sooner the Trump administration identifies a sanctions-evading bank and cuts it off from the international financial system, the sooner a global chilling effect will amplify the impact of American sanctions. The same goes for underwriters and gold-traders.

Beyond enforcement, the Trump administration will need key allies to fully implement this pressure campaign. The Saudis, under attack by Iranian missiles from Yemen, should be a willing partner in the effort to drive down Iran’s oil exports — ensuring Saudi production increases to replace Iranian contracts and stabilize the market. Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Bahrain should also combine their market leverage to force European and Asian investors to choose between doing business in their countries or doing business in Iran.Trump will also need Europeans to act on one key issue which, given their opposition to his withdrawal from the deal, may present a diplomatic challenge. Under US law, the president may impose sanctions on secure financial messaging services — like the Brussels-based SWIFT service — if they provide access to the Central Bank of Iran or other blacklisted Iranian banks.

In 2012, when Congress first proposed the idea, the European Union ordered SWIFT to disconnect Iranian banks, which closed a major loophole in US sanctions. Now that Trump has left the deal, SWIFT must once again disconnect Iran’s central bank. If SWIFT refuses, Trump should consider imposing sanctions on the group’s board of directors.

Trump’s Iran pivot from appeasement to pressure offers America the best chance to fundamentally change Iranian behavior and improve our national security. If his administration implements the strategy effectively, the Iranian regime will have a choice: meet America’s demands or face economic collapse.

Richard Goldberg, an architect of congressionally enacted sanctions against Iran, is a senior adviser at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies.

Voir encore:

Trump annonce le retrait des Etats-Unis de l’accord nucléaire iranien

OLJ/Agences
08/05/2018

Donald Trump a annoncé mardi soir  le retrait des Etats-Unis de l’accord nucléaire iranien au risque d’ouvrir une période de vives tensions avec ses alliés européens et d’incertitudes quant aux ambitions atomiques de Téhéran.

Quinze mois après son arrivée au pouvoir, le 45e président des Etats-Unis a décidé, comme il l’avait promis en campagne, de sortir de cet accord emblématique conclu en 2015 par son prédécesseur démocrate Barack Obama après 21 mois de négociations acharnées. « J’annonce aujourd’hui que les Etats-Unis vont se retirer de l’accord nucléaire iranien », a-t-il déclaré dans une allocution télévisée depuis la Maison Blanche, annonçant le rétablissement des sanctions contre la République islamique qui avaient été levées en contrepartie de l’engagement pris par l’Iran de ne pas se doter de l’arme nucléaire. Le locataire de la Maison Blanche n’a donné aucune précision sur la nature des sanctions qui seraient rétablies et à quelle échéance mais il a mis en garde: « tout pays qui aidera l’Iran dans sa quête d’armes nucléaires pourrait aussi être fortement sanctionné par les Etats-Unis ».
Dénonçant avec force cet accord « désastreux », il a assuré avoir la « preuve » que le régime iranien avait menti sur ses activités nucléaires.

Un peu plus tard, le département du Trésor américain a précisé que les Etats-Unis allaient rétablir une large palette de sanctions concernant l’Iran à l’issue de périodes transitoires de 90 et 180 jours, qui viseront notamment le secteur pétrolier iranien ainsi que les transactions en dollar avec la banque centrale du pays. Dans un communiqué et un document publiés sur son site internet, le Trésor précise que le rétablissement des sanctions concerne également les exportations aéronautiques vers l’Iran, le commerce de métaux avec ce pays ainsi que toute tentative de Téhéran d’obtenir des dollars US.

(Lire aussi : Derrière l’accord nucléaire, l’influence de l’Iran en question)

Son allocution était très attendue au Moyen-Orient où beaucoup redoutent une escalade avec la République islamique mais aussi de l’autre côté de planète, en Corée du Nord, à l’approche du sommet entre Donald Trump et Kim Jong Un sur la dénucléarisation de la péninsule. A ce sujet, le chef de la Maison Blanche a également indiqué que le secrétaire d’Etat américain Mike Pompeo arrivera en Corée du Nord d’ici « une heure » pour préparer le sommet entre Donald Trump et Kim Jong Un. « En ce moment même, le secrétaire Pompeo est en route vers la Corée du Nord pour préparer ma future rencontre avec Kim Jong Un », a-t-il déclaré. « On en saura bientôt plus » sur le sort des trois prisonniers américains, a-t-il ajouté.

Réactions

L’Iran souhaite continuer à respecter l’accord de 2015 sur son programme nucléaire, après l’annonce de la décision de Donald Trump, a réagi le président iranien, Hassan Rohani. « Si nous atteignons les objectifs de l’accord en coopération avec les autres parties prenantes de cet accord, il restera en vigueur  (…). En sortant de l’accord, l’Amérique a officiellement sabordé son engagement concernant un traité international », a dit le président iranien dans une allocution télévisée. »J’ai donn é pour consigne au ministère des Affaires étrangères de négocier avec les pays européens, la Chine et la Russie dans les semaines à venir. Si, au bout de cette courte période, nous concluons que nous pouvons pleinement bénéficier de l’accord avec la coopération de tous les pays, l’accord restera en vigueur », a-t-il continué.
M. Rohani a ajouté que Téhéran était prêt à reprendre ses activités nucléaires si les intérêts iraniens n’étaient pas garantis par un nouvel accord après des consultations avec les autres parties signataires du « Plan d’action global conjoint » (JCPOA) de 2015.

La Syrie a également « condamné avec force » l’annonce du retrait des Etats-Unis, affirmant sa « totale solidarité » avec Téhéran et sa confiance dans la capacité de l’Iran à surmonter l’impact de la « position agressive » de Washington.

Le Premier ministre israélien Benjamin Netanyahu a, pour sa part, dit « soutenir totalement » la décision « courageuse » du président américain. « Israël soutient totalement la décision courageuse prise aujourd’hui par le président Trump de rejeter le désastreux accord nucléaire » avec la République islamique, a dit M. Netanyahu en direct sur la télévision publique dans la foulée de la déclaration de M. Trump.

L’Arabie saoudite a également salué mardi soir la décision de Donald Trump de rétablir les sanctions contre l’Iran et de dénoncer l’accord de 2015 sur le programme nucléaire de Téhéran, a fait savoir la télévision saoudienne. Les Emirats arabes unis et Bahreïn, alliés de l’Arabie saoudite dans le Golfe, ont emboîté le pas à Riyad en saluant par la voix de leur ministère des Affaires étrangères la décision de M. Trump. Bahreïn accueille la 5e flotte américaine.

La France, l’Allemagne et le Royaume-Uni « regrettent » la décision américaine de se retirer de l’accord sur le programme nucléaire iranien conclu en 2015, a, de son côté, réagi Emmanuel Macron sur Twitter, évoquant sa volonté de travailler collectivement à un « cadre plus large » sur ce dossier. « Le régime international de lutte contre la prolifération nucléaire est en jeu », a estimé le chef de l’Etat français, qui s’était entretenu au téléphone avec la chancelière allemande Angela Merkel et la Première ministre britannique Theresa May à 19h30 heure de Paris, peu avant la prise de parole de Donald Trump. « Nous travaillerons collectivement à un cadre plus large, couvrant l’activité nucléaire, la période après 2025, les missiles balistiques et la stabilité au Moyen-Orient, en particulier en Syrie, au Yémen et en Irak », a-t-il ajouté, toujours sur Twitter.

Un peu plus tard, la cheffe de la diplomatie européenne Federica Mogherini a déclaré, depuis Rome, que l’UE est « déterminée à préserver » l’accord nucléaire iranien. L’accord de Vienne de 2015 « répond à son objectif qui est de garantir que l’Iran ne développe pas des armes nucléaires, l’Union européenne est déterminée à le préserver », a insisté Mme Mogherini, lors d’une brève déclaration à la représentation de la Commission européenne à Rome, en se disant « particulièrement inquiète » de l’annonce de nouvelles sanctions américaines contre Téhéran..

Le secrétaire général de l’ONU, Antonio Guterres, a, quant à lui, appelé les six autres signataires de l’accord sur le nucléaire iranien « à respecter pleinement leurs engagements », après le retrait des Etats-Unis. « Je suis profondément préoccupé par l’annonce du retrait des Etats-Unis de l’accord JCPOA (en référence à l’acronyme en anglais ndlr) et de la reprise de sanctions américaines », a aussi souligné le patron des Nations unies dans un communiqué.

Le porte-parole de la présidence turque Ibrahim Kalin a, de son côté, estimé que « le retrait unilatéral des Etats-Unis de l’accord sur le nucléaire est une décision qui va causer de l’instabilité et de nouveaux conflits ». « La Turquie va continuer de s’opposer avec détermination à tous types d’armes nucléaires », a ajouté le porte-parole de Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

Le ministère russe des Affaires étrangères a, pour sa part, déclaré que la Russie est « profondément déçue » par la décision du président américain.
« Nous sommes extrêmement inquiets que les Etats-Unis agissent contre l’avis de la plupart des Etats (…) en violant grossièrement les normes du droit international », selon le texte.  Selon Moscou, cette décision de Donald Trump « est une nouvelle preuve de l’incapacité de Washington de négocier » et les « griefs américains concernant l’activité nucléaire légitime de l’Iran ne servent qu’à régler les comptes politiques » avec Téhéran.

Quelles répercussions?

A l’exception des Etats-Unis, tous les signataires ont défendu jusqu’au bout ce compromis qu’ils jugent « historique », soulignant que l’Agence internationale de l’énergie atomique (AIEA) a régulièrement certifié le respect par Téhéran des termes du texte censé garantir le caractère non militaire de son programme nucléaire. En contrepartie des engagements pris par Téhéran, Washington a suspendu ses sanctions liées au programme nucléaire iranien. Mais la loi américaine impose au président de se prononcer sur le renouvellement de cette suspension tous les 120 ou 180 jours, selon le type de mesures punitives. Certaines suspensions arrivent à échéance samedi, mais le gros d’entre elles restent en théorie en vigueur jusqu’à mi-juillet.

Dès mardi soir, le nouvel ambassadeur américain en Allemagne a écrit, sur Twitter, que les entreprises allemandes devraient immédiatement cesser leurs activités en Iran. Le président américain Donald Trump « a dit que les sanctions allaient viser des secteurs critiques de l’économie de l’Iran. Les entreprises allemandes faisant des affaires en Iran devraient cesser leurs opérations immédiatement », a commenté Richard Grenell qui a pris ses fonctions hier.

Airbus a, de son côté, annoncé qu’il allait examiner la décision prise par Donald Trump avant de réagir. « Nous analysons attentivement cette annonce et évaluerons les prochaines étapes en cohérence avec nos politiques internes et dans le respect complet des sanctions et des règles de contrôle des exportations », a dit le responsable de la communication d’Airbus, Rainer Ohler. « Cela prendra du temps », a-t-il ajouté. Un peu plus tard, le secrétaire américain au Trésor, Steve Mnuchin, annonçait que les Etats-Unis allaient retirer à Airbus et à Boeing les autorisations de vendre des avions de ligne à l’Iran.

En janvier, l’ancien magnat de l’immobilier avait lancé un ultimatum aux Européens, leur donnant jusqu’au 12 mai pour « durcir » sur plusieurs points ce texte signé par Téhéran et les grandes puissances (Etats-Unis, Chine, Russie, France, Royaume-Uni, Allemagne). En ligne de mire: les inspections de l’AIEA; la levée progressive, à partir de 2025, de certaines restrictions aux activités nucléaires iraniennes, qui en font selon lui une sorte de bombe à retardement; mais aussi le fait qu’il ne s’attaque pas directement au programme de missiles balistiques de Téhéran ni à son rôle jugé « déstabilisateur » dans plusieurs pays du Moyen-Orient (Syrie, Yémen, Liban…).

L’annonce de mardi va avoir des répercussions encore difficiles à prédire. Les Européens ont fait savoir qu’ils comptent rester dans l’accord quoi qu’il advienne. Mais que vont faire les Iraniens?
Pour l’instant, Téhéran, où cohabitent des ultraconservateurs autour du guide suprême Ali Khamenei et des dirigeants plus modérés autour du président Hassan Rohani, ont soufflé le chaud et le froid.
La République islamique a menacé de quitter à son tour l’accord de 2015, de relancer et accélérer le programme nucléaire, mais a aussi laissé entendre qu’elle pourrait y rester si les Européens pallient l’absence américaine.

Voir de plus:

Accord sur le nucléaire iranien : 10 conséquences de la (folle) décision de Trump

Le monde a basculé le 8 mai 2018, avec la sortie des Etats-Unis de l’accord sur le nucléaire iranien. Voici ce qui risque de se passer maintenant.

Vincent Jauvert

Le monde a basculé ce 8 mai 2018.

Rien n’y a fait. Ni les câlins d’Emmanuel Macron. Ni les menaces du président iranien. Ni les assurances des patrons de la CIA et de l’AIEA. Donald Trump a tranché : sous le prétexte non prouvé que l’Iran ne le respecte pas, il retire les Etats-Unis de l’accord nucléaire signé le 14 juillet 2015. Une folle décision aux conséquences considérables.

  1. Après la dénonciation de celui de Paris sur le climat, voici l’abandon unilatéral d’un autre accord qui a été négocié par les grandes puissances pendant plus de dix ans. L’Amérique devient donc, à l’évidence, un « rogue state » – un Etat voyou qui ne respecte pas ses engagements internationaux et ment une fois encore ouvertement au monde. L’invasion de l’Irak n’était donc pas une exception malheureuse : Washington n’incarne plus l’ordre international mais le désordre.
  2. Si l’on en doutait encore, le monde dit libre n’a plus de leader crédible ni même de grand frère. Ce qui va troubler un peu plus encore les opinions publiques et les classes dirigeantes occidentales.
  3. Puisque l’Iran en est l’un des plus gros producteurs et qu’il va être empêché d’en vendre, le prix du pétrole, déjà à 70 dollars le baril, va probablement exploser, ce qui risque de ralentir voire de stopper la croissance mondiale – et donc celle de la France.
  4. D’ailleurs, de tous les pays occidentaux, la France est celui qui a le plus à perdre d’un retour des sanctions américaines – directes et indirectes. L’Iran a, en effet, passé commandes de 100 Airbus pour 19 milliards de dollars et a signé un gigantesque contrat avec Total pour l’exploitation du champ South Pars 11. Or Trump a choisi la version la plus dure : interdire de nouveau à toute compagnie traitant avec Téhéran de faire du business aux Etats-Unis. Pour continuer à commercer sur le marché américain, Airbus et Total devront donc renoncer à ces deals juteux.
  5. En Iran, le président « réformateur » Rohani, qui avait défendu bec et ongles l’accord en promettant des retombées économiques mirifiques pour son pays et accepté, par cet accord, que son pays démonte les deux tiers de ses centrifugeuses et se sépare de 98% de son uranium enrichi, est humilié. Tandis que le clan des « durs » pavoise.
  6. L’accord dénoncé, l’Iran va donc probablement relancer au plus vite son programme nucléaire militaire en commençant par réassembler les centrifugeuses et les faire tourner dans un bunker enterré très profondément.
  7. Ce qui devrait être le déclencheur d’une course folle à l’armement atomique dans tout le Moyen-Orient. L’Arabie saoudite, grâce au Pakistan, et la Turquie, grâce à son développement économique, ne voudront pas être dépassées par l’Iran et voudront, donc, devenir elles aussi des puissances nucléaires. Si bien qu’Emmanuel Macron a eu raison d’évoquer « un risque de guerre » (dans le « Spiegel » samedi dernier) si les Etats-Unis se retiraient de l’accord. De fait, le risque est grand que cette dénonciation unilatérale, alliée à un retour en force des « conservateurs » à Téhéran, ne précipite un affrontement militaire de grande envergure entre Israël et l’Iran – affrontement qui a déjà commencé à bas bruit, ces dernières semaines, par les frappes de Tsahal contre des bases du Hezbollah en Syrie.
  8. La milice chiite pro-iranienne qui vient de remporter les élections législatives au Liban pourrait profiter de cette victoire électorale inattendue et du retrait unilatéral américain – gros de menaces militaires – pour attaquer le nord d’Israël.
  9. Et, ainsi soutenu politiquement par le président américain, le gouvernement israélien pourrait décider de frapper ce qui reste des installations nucléaires iraniennes, ainsi qu’il l’avait sérieusement envisagé plusieurs fois avant l’accord de 2015. Autrement dit, la seule question est peut-être désormais de savoir lequel des deux pays, l’Iran ou Israël, va lancer la vaste offensive en premier. A moins que les Etats-Unis ne décident de frapper eux-mêmes « préventivement » la République islamique, avec les conséquences géopolitiques que l’on n’ose imaginer. Vous croyez cela impossible ? N’oubliez pas que Donald Trump vient de se choisir un nouveau conseiller à la sécurité. Il s’agit d’un certain John Bolton, un néoconservateur qui milite depuis le 11-Septembre pour que les Etats-Unis renversent le « régime des mollahs »…
  10. Evidemment, cette décision de Trump éloigne un peu plus encore l’espoir d’un règlement politique du conflit syrien. Et augmente les risques sur le terrain d’affrontements militaires entre milices iraniennes et soldats occidentaux – dont les forces spéciales françaises.

     Voir enfin:

    Remarks by President Trump on the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action

    My fellow Americans: Today, I want to update the world on our efforts to prevent Iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon.

    The Iranian regime is the leading state sponsor of terror. It exports dangerous missiles, fuels conflicts across the Middle East, and supports terrorist proxies and militias such as Hezbollah, Hamas, the Taliban, and al Qaeda.

    Over the years, Iran and its proxies have bombed American embassies and military installations, murdered hundreds of American servicemembers, and kidnapped, imprisoned, and tortured American citizens. The Iranian regime has funded its long reign of chaos and terror by plundering the wealth of its own people.

    No action taken by the regime has been more dangerous than its pursuit of nuclear weapons and the means of delivering them.

    In 2015, the previous administration joined with other nations in a deal regarding Iran’s nuclear program. This agreement was known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA.

    In theory, the so-called “Iran deal” was supposed to protect the United States and our allies from the lunacy of an Iranian nuclear bomb, a weapon that will only endanger the survival of the Iranian regime. In fact, the deal allowed Iran to continue enriching uranium and, over time, reach the brink of a nuclear breakout.

    The deal lifted crippling economic sanctions on Iran in exchange for very weak limits on the regime’s nuclear activity, and no limits at all on its other malign behavior, including its sinister activities in Syria, Yemen, and other places all around the world.

    In other words, at the point when the United States had maximum leverage, this disastrous deal gave this regime — and it’s a regime of great terror — many billions of dollars, some of it in actual cash — a great embarrassment to me as a citizen and to all citizens of the United States.

    A constructive deal could easily have been struck at the time, but it wasn’t. At the heart of the Iran deal was a giant fiction that a murderous regime desired only a peaceful nuclear energy program.

    Today, we have definitive proof that this Iranian promise was a lie. Last week, Israel published intelligence documents long concealed by Iran, conclusively showing the Iranian regime and its history of pursuing nuclear weapons.

    The fact is this was a horrible, one-sided deal that should have never, ever been made. It didn’t bring calm, it didn’t bring peace, and it never will.

    In the years since the deal was reached, Iran’s military budget has grown by almost 40 percent, while its economy is doing very badly. After the sanctions were lifted, the dictatorship used its new funds to build nuclear-capable missiles, support terrorism, and cause havoc throughout the Middle East and beyond.

    The agreement was so poorly negotiated that even if Iran fully complies, the regime can still be on the verge of a nuclear breakout in just a short period of time. The deal’s sunset provisions are totally unacceptable. If I allowed this deal to stand, there would soon be a nuclear arms race in the Middle East. Everyone would want their weapons ready by the time Iran had theirs.

    Making matters worse, the deal’s inspection provisions lack adequate mechanisms to prevent, detect, and punish cheating, and don’t even have the unqualified right to inspect many important locations, including military facilities.

    Not only does the deal fail to halt Iran’s nuclear ambitions, but it also fails to address the regime’s development of ballistic missiles that could deliver nuclear warheads.

    Finally, the deal does nothing to constrain Iran’s destabilizing activities, including its support for terrorism. Since the agreement, Iran’s bloody ambitions have grown only more brazen.

    In light of these glaring flaws, I announced last October that the Iran deal must either be renegotiated or terminated.

    Three months later, on January 12th, I repeated these conditions. I made clear that if the deal could not be fixed, the United States would no longer be a party to the agreement.

    Over the past few months, we have engaged extensively with our allies and partners around the world, including France, Germany, and the United Kingdom. We have also consulted with our friends from across the Middle East. We are unified in our understanding of the threat and in our conviction that Iran must never acquire a nuclear weapon.

    After these consultations, it is clear to me that we cannot prevent an Iranian nuclear bomb under the decaying and rotten structure of the current agreement.

    The Iran deal is defective at its core. If we do nothing, we know exactly what will happen. In just a short period of time, the world’s leading state sponsor of terror will be on the cusp of acquiring the world’s most dangerous weapons.

    Therefore, I am announcing today that the United States will withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal.

    In a few moments, I will sign a presidential memorandum to begin reinstating U.S. nuclear sanctions on the Iranian regime. We will be instituting the highest level of economic sanction. Any nation that helps Iran in its quest for nuclear weapons could also be strongly sanctioned by the United States.

    America will not be held hostage to nuclear blackmail. We will not allow American cities to be threatened with destruction. And we will not allow a regime that chants “Death to America” to gain access to the most deadly weapons on Earth.

    Today’s action sends a critical message: The United States no longer makes empty threats. When I make promises, I keep them. In fact, at this very moment, Secretary Pompeo is on his way to North Korea in preparation for my upcoming meeting with Kim Jong-un. Plans are being made. Relationships are building. Hopefully, a deal will happen and, with the help of China, South Korea, and Japan, a future of great prosperity and security can be achieved for everyone.

    As we exit the Iran deal, we will be working with our allies to find a real, comprehensive, and lasting solution to the Iranian nuclear threat. This will include efforts to eliminate the threat of Iran’s ballistic missile program; to stop its terrorist activities worldwide; and to block its menacing activity across the Middle East. In the meantime, powerful sanctions will go into full effect. If the regime continues its nuclear aspirations, it will have bigger problems than it has ever had before.

    Finally, I want to deliver a message to the long-suffering people of Iran: The people of America stand with you. It has now been almost 40 years since this dictatorship seized power and took a proud nation hostage. Most of Iran’s 80 million citizens have sadly never known an Iran that prospered in peace with its neighbors and commanded the admiration of the world.

    But the future of Iran belongs to its people. They are the rightful heirs to a rich culture and an ancient land. And they deserve a nation that does justice to their dreams, honor to their history, and glory to God.

    Iran’s leaders will naturally say that they refuse to negotiate a new deal; they refuse. And that’s fine. I’d probably say the same thing if I was in their position. But the fact is they are going to want to make a new and lasting deal, one that benefits all of Iran and the Iranian people. When they do, I am ready, willing, and able.

    Great things can happen for Iran, and great things can happen for the peace and stability that we all want in the Middle East.

    There has been enough suffering, death, and destruction. Let it end now.

    Thank you. God bless you. Thank you.


Terrorisme: Cet islam qui tue (Unsafe at any speed: why after decades and tens of thousands of wrongful deaths and injuries should we let Islam Inc. brazenly play on with our safety ?)

24 mars, 2018
/terrorism map
Il n’y a pas de plus grand amour que de donner sa vie pour ses amis. Jésus (Jean 15: 13)
Je suis avec vous : affermissez donc les croyants. Je vais jeter l’effroi dans les coeurs des mécréants. Frappez donc au-dessus des cous et frappez-les sur tous les bouts des doigts. Ce, parce qu’ils ont désobéi à Allah et à Son messager. Le Coran (8: 12-13)
La condition préalable à tout dialogue est que chacun soit honnête avec sa tradition. (…) les chrétiens ont repris tel quel le corpus de la Bible hébraïque. Saint Paul parle de ” greffe” du christianisme sur le judaïsme, ce qui est une façon de ne pas nier celui-ci . (…) Dans l’islam, le corpus biblique est, au contraire, totalement remanié pour lui faire dire tout autre chose que son sens initial (…) La récupération sous forme de torsion ne respecte pas le texte originel sur lequel, malgré tout, le Coran s’appuie. René Girard
Dans la foi musulmane, il y a un aspect simple, brut, pratique qui a facilité sa diffusion et transformé la vie d’un grand nombre de peuples à l’état tribal en les ouvrant au monothéisme juif modifié par le christianisme. Mais il lui manque l’essentiel du christianisme : la croix. Comme le christianisme, l’islam réhabilite la victime innocente, mais il le fait de manière guerrière. La croix, c’est le contraire, c’est la fin des mythes violents et archaïques. René Girard
L’erreur est toujours de raisonner dans les catégories de la « différence », alors que la racine de tous les conflits, c’est plutôt la « concurrence », la rivalité mimétique entre des êtres, des pays, des cultures. La concurrence, c’est-à-dire le désir d’imiter l’autre pour obtenir la même chose que lui, au besoin par la violence. Sans doute le terrorisme est-il lié à un monde « différent » du nôtre, mais ce qui suscite le terrorisme n’est pas dans cette « différence » qui l’éloigne le plus de nous et nous le rend inconcevable. Il est au contraire dans un désir exacerbé de convergence et de ressemblance. (…) Ce qui se vit aujourd’hui est une forme de rivalité mimétique à l’échelle planétaire. Lorsque j’ai lu les premiers documents de Ben Laden, constaté ses allusions aux bombes américaines tombées sur le Japon, je me suis senti d’emblée à un niveau qui est au-delà de l’islam, celui de la planète entière. Sous l’étiquette de l’islam, on trouve une volonté de rallier et de mobiliser tout un tiers-monde de frustrés et de victimes dans leurs rapports de rivalité mimétique avec l’Occident. Mais les tours détruites occupaient autant d’étrangers que d’Américains. Et par leur efficacité, par la sophistication des moyens employés, par la connaissance qu’ils avaient des Etats-Unis, par leurs conditions d’entraînement, les auteurs des attentats n’étaient-ils pas un peu américains ? On est en plein mimétisme.Ce sentiment n’est pas vrai des masses, mais des dirigeants. Sur le plan de la fortune personnelle, on sait qu’un homme comme Ben Laden n’a rien à envier à personne. Et combien de chefs de parti ou de faction sont dans cette situation intermédiaire, identique à la sienne. Regardez un Mirabeau au début de la Révolution française : il a un pied dans un camp et un pied dans l’autre, et il n’en vit que de manière plus aiguë son ressentiment. Aux Etats-Unis, des immigrés s’intègrent avec facilité, alors que d’autres, même si leur réussite est éclatante, vivent aussi dans un déchirement et un ressentiment permanents. Parce qu’ils sont ramenés à leur enfance, à des frustrations et des humiliations héritées du passé. Cette dimension est essentielle, en particulier chez des musulmans qui ont des traditions de fierté et un style de rapports individuels encore proche de la féodalité. (…) Cette concurrence mimétique, quand elle est malheureuse, ressort toujours, à un moment donné, sous une forme violente. A cet égard, c’est l’islam qui fournit aujourd’hui le ciment qu’on trouvait autrefois dans le marxismeRené Girard
Aujourd’hui, en Occident, nous faisons montre d’une certaine réticence à engager toute notre force militaire dans une guerre pour ne pas être taxés d’impérialisme; nous hésitons même à garantir nos frontières pour ne pas paraitre racistes. Ne voulant non plus paraitre xénophobes, nous faisons, également, preuve d’une réticence certaine à demander l’assimilation des nouveaux immigrés. Nous souffrons de voir l’enseignement donner la primauté à la civilisation occidentale : foin de la suprématie! L’Occident, de nos jours, vit sur la défensive, et, pour assurer la légitimité de ses sociétés actuelles, doit constamment se dissocier des péchés de son passé, tels le racisme, l’exploitation économique, l’impérialisme, etc. Son manque d’assurance empêche l’Ouest de voir les Palestiniens tels qu’ils sont. Il vaut mieux les voir tels qu’ils se présentent eux-mêmes, en peuple « occupé », privé de sa souveraineté et de sa simple dignité humaine par un pays de colonisateurs occidentaux et blancs. L’Occident ne voulant pas être qualifié de raciste, ne s’oppose donc pas à cette caractérisation « néo-coloniale ». Notre problème d’Occidentaux se comprend et s’explique : nous ne voulons pas perdre plus de notre autorité morale. Nous choisissons donc de fermer les yeux et d’ignorer par exemple que ce ne sont pas des doléances légitimes qui poussent les Palestiniens ainsi qu’une grande partie du Moyen-Orient au militantisme et à la guerre, mais bien un sentiment d’infériorité intériorisé. Que les Palestiniens se trouvent comblés en devenant une nation souveraine et indépendante avec une capacité nucléaire en sus, cela ne les empêchera pas de se réveiller le lendemain toujours hantés par ce sentiment d’infériorité. Que ce soit pour le meilleur ou pour le pire, l’homme s’évalue maintenant par sa modernité. Et la haine est le moyen le plus rapide pour masquer son infériorité. Le problème, « ce sont les autres et pas moi! ». Victimisé, j’atteins une grandeur morale et humaine. Peu importe l’intelligence et la modernité de mon ennemi, à moi l’innocence qui caractérise les victimes. Même pauvre, mes mains restent propres. Mon sous- développement et ma pauvreté témoignent de ma supériorité morale, alors que la richesse de mon ennemi est la preuve de son inhumanité. En d’autres termes, ma haine remplace mon amour-propre. Ce qui expliquerait pourquoi Yasser Arafat a rejeté l’offre d’Ehud Barak à « Camp David » en l’an 2000, alors que ce dernier offrait au premier plus de 90% des exigences des Palestiniens. Accepter cette offre aurait signifié renoncer à la haine, à sa consolation et à sa signification profonde. Les Palestiniens et par extension, la plupart des Musulmans auraient été forcés de se confronter à leur infériorité à l’égard de la modernité. Arafat savait fort bien que, sans la haine vis à vis des Juifs, le monde musulman perdrait la cohésion qui le définit. Il a donc dit non à la paix. Que ce soit dans les banlieues de Paris et de Londres, à Kaboul ou Karachi, dans le quartier du Queens à New York ou bien à Gaza, cette réticence du monde musulman, cette attirance pour les consolations qu’offre la haine, représentent l’un des plus graves problèmes du monde actuel. Si le monde musulman ne peut se définir par sa ferveur pour la haine, celle-ci est bien devenue sa drogue, son opium qui le console de sa concurrence avec l’Occident, un Occident qui, impuissant face à ce problème difficile à résoudre, ne trouve rien de mieux que de réprimander Israël en le prenant comme bouc-émissaire. Ainsi s’exprime notre propre vulnérabilité. Shelby Steele
Avec l’aide de Dieu, ce sommet marquera le début de la fin pour ceux qui pratiquent la terreur et répandent leur vile croyance. Les leaders religieux doivent être très clairs là-dessus: la barbarie n’apportera aucune gloire, l’adoration du mal ne vous apportera aucune dignité. Si vous choisissez le chemin de la terreur, votre vie sera vide, votre vie sera courte et votre âme sera condamnée à l’enfer. Chaque pays de cette région a un devoir absolu de s’assurer que les terroristes ne trouvent aucun abri sur leur sol. Cela veut dire affronter honnêtement la crise de l’extrémisme islamique et les groupes terroristes islamiques qu’il inspire. Et cela veut dire aussi se dresser ensemble contre le meurtre d’innocents musulmans, l’oppression des femmes, la persécution des juifs, et le massacre des chrétiens. Un meilleur futur n’est possible que si vos nations se débarrassent du terrorisme et des extrémistes. Jetez les dehors. Jetez-les hors de vos lieux de culte. Jetez-les hors de vos communautés. Jetez-les hors de vos terres saintes, et jetez-les hors de cette terre. Donald Trump
As the six-week trial revealed, the Palestinian Authority provided backing for terrorists—and continues to do so today. Palestinian military and intelligence officials, Mr. Yalowitz calculated, spend $50 million a year to keep terrorists on the payroll while they are held in Israeli jails. The Palestinian government also awards “martyr payments” to the families of suicide bombers. Monday’s verdict comes as something of a vindication for the family of Leon Klinghoffer, the wheelchair-bound American who in 1985 was murdered by Palestine Liberation Organization terrorists aboard the hijacked Italian cruise liner Achille Lauro. The Klinghoffer family filed a lawsuit, but U.S. federal courts had no jurisdiction over acts of terrorism outside the country. The case was dropped, and the PLO settled with the Klinghoffers out of court for an undisclosed sum in 1997. The 1992 Anti-Terrorism Act provides federal courts “with an explicit grant of jurisdiction over international terrorism” and a private right of action for “any national of the United States injured in his or her person, property, or business by reason of an act of international terrorism.” The act also has the virtue of allowing American citizens to assign blame for supporting terrorism, even if politicians are reluctant to do so. Jessica Kasmer-Jacob
Les événements dont nous sommes témoins sont la conséquence prévisible de décennies de propagande, d’une part, et de laxisme, de l’autre. Un affrontement est imminent à l’échelle mondiale. L’avancée rapide des mouvements terroristes, qui tuent dans des buts à la fois politiques et religieux, est en train de provoquer des vocations chez un nombre effarant de jeunes. Chaque attentat procure aux islamistes une publicité effrénée qui fait rêver beaucoup d’adolescents, partout dans le monde. Qui peut leur faire comprendre qu’ils sont exploités quand ils acceptent de se transformer en bombes humaines? (…) En 2005, un ancien directeur de la CIA évaluait les sommes dépensées par l’Arabie saoudite en prosélytisme wahhabite dans le monde, à 90 milliards de dollars. Ceci, sans compter l’argent versé à des organisations terroristes, comme celle de Ben Laden à ses débuts, ou celui utilisé pour tenter de déstabiliser d’autres pays, influer sur leurs élections et acheter leurs politiciens. Ce n’est pas grand-chose pour la dynastie saoudienne, qui exporte, chaque jour, 10 millions de barils de pétrole brut. Cela lui procurait 1,5 milliard de dollars par jour quand le baril était à 150 dollars (en 2014). Maintenant que le baril est à 50 dollars, elle encaisse 500 millions par jour. Et elle laisse le peuple saoudien dans la pauvreté. Depuis les années 2000, d’autres pays financent l’islamisme dans le monde, notamment le Qatar qui tire d’énormes revenus de l’exportation de son gaz naturel. (…) Les islamistes, comme Ben Laden et Baghdadi, sont francs et vous montrent le couteau. Les islamistes «polis» enveloppent des lames de rasoir dans des gâteaux à la crème. (…) Daech a promis de faire du Vatican une mosquée, de prendre la Maison-Blanche et de remplir de sang les rues de Paris et de Londres. Pour atteindre ce but, tous les moyens sont bons. L’immigration illégale en masse est, peut-être, l’un de ces moyens. Les islamistes «polis» disent aussi qu’ils prendront l’Europe, par la conquête démographique et les conversions. Mais dans quelle mesure ces conversions sont-elles volontaires, quand on sait la pression morale et financière qui s’exerce dans certains quartiers? Des dons appelés «aumônes» sont offerts aux convertis, aux prédicateurs et aux femmes qui acceptent de se voiler. Il n’y a pas de liberté quand il y a de l’argent. Il n’y en a pas non plus quand il y a une propagande phénoménale, surtout sur les réseaux sociaux. Lina Murr Nehmé
Daesh noir, Daesh blanc. Le premier égorge, tue, lapide, coupe les mains, détruit le patrimoine de l’humanité, et déteste l’archéologie, la femme et l’étranger non musulman. Le second est mieux habillé et plus propre, mais il fait la même chose. L’Etat islamique et l’Arabie saoudite. Dans sa lutte contre le terrorisme, l’Occident mène la guerre contre l’un tout en serrant la main de l’autre. Mécanique du déni, et de son prix. On veut sauver la fameuse alliance stratégique avec l’Arabie saoudite tout en oubliant que ce royaume repose sur une autre alliance, avec un clergé religieux qui produit, rend légitime, répand, prêche et défend le wahhabisme, islamisme ultra-puritain dont se nourrit Daesh. (…)  L’Arabie saoudite est un Daesh qui a réussi. Le déni de l’Occident face à ce pays est frappant: on salue cette théocratie comme un allié et on fait mine de ne pas voir qu’elle est le principal mécène idéologique de la culture islamiste. Les nouvelles générations extrémistes du monde dit « arabe » ne sont pas nées djihadistes. Elles ont été biberonnées par la Fatwa Valley, espèce de Vatican islamiste avec une vaste industrie produisant théologiens, lois religieuses, livres et politiques éditoriales et médiatiques agressives. (…) Il faut vivre dans le monde musulman pour comprendre l’immense pouvoir de transformation des chaines TV religieuses sur la société par le biais de ses maillons faibles : les ménages, les femmes, les milieux ruraux. La culture islamiste est aujourd’hui généralisée dans beaucoup de pays — Algérie, Maroc, Tunisie, Libye, Egypte, Mali, Mauritanie. On y retrouve des milliers de journaux et des chaines de télévision islamistes (comme Echourouk et Iqra), ainsi que des clergés qui imposent leur vision unique du monde, de la tradition et des vêtements à la fois dans l’espace public, sur les textes de lois et sur les rites d’une société qu’ils considèrent comme contaminée. Il faut lire certains journaux islamistes et leurs réactions aux attaques de Paris. On y parle de l’Occident comme site de « pays impies »; les attentats sont la conséquence d’attaques contre l’Islam ; les musulmans et les arabes sont devenus les ennemis des laïcs et des juifs. On y joue sur l’affect de la question palestinienne, le viol de l’Irak et le souvenir du trauma colonial pour emballer les masses avec un discours messianique. Alors que ce discours impose son signifiant aux espaces sociaux, en haut, les pouvoirs politiques présentent leurs condoléances à la France et dénoncent un crime contre l’humanité. Une situation de schizophrénie totale, parallèle au déni de l’Occident face à l’Arabie Saoudite. Ceci laisse sceptique sur les déclarations tonitruantes des démocraties occidentales quant à la nécessité de lutter contre le terrorisme. Cette soi-disant guerre est myope car elle s’attaque à l’effet plutôt qu’à la cause. Daesh étant une culture avant d’être une milice, comment empêcher les générations futures de basculer dans le djihadisme alors qu’on n’a pas épuisé l’effet de la Fatwa Valley, de ses clergés, de sa culture et de son immense industrie éditoriale?  Kamel Daoud
Présider la République, c’est ne pas inviter les dictateurs en grand appareil à Paris. François Hollande (janvier 2012, Le Bourget)
Without TV coverage, the revolutions would never have assumed such proportions. When people followed the revolutions, to what extent did they use the Internet, versus the extent to which they watched them on the TV channels, which gave them continuous coverage? Clearly, there is no comparison…The best proof [of the impact of] the TV channels is that any popular activity that they do not cover, in any country, will die before it can get off the ground. Some Arab countries are currently seeing… protests and the beginnings of a revolution, but these [events] are not getting the necessary TV coverage, because of the focus on the escalating revolution in Libya. As a result, [these protests] will not gain much momentum… but will fade away and be forgotten. Some might argue that the images broadcast on the satellite channels were often taken from the Internet. That is true, but had the [channels] not repeatedly aired these images, their impact would have remained limited. I have yet to hear any [protesters]… complain of insufficient coverage of their activity on the Internet or on Facebook. But [some protesters are] very angry at the satellite channels, which, they claim, are not giving their activity the necessary media coverage… It is [the satellite channels] that truly fuel the revolutions – with image and sound, which remain more powerful than any other weapon… It is no exaggeration to say that one TV report on a certain country has an impact equal to that of all the websites visited by all the Arabs put together – so much so that [activists] have sometimes said, ‘Let’s postpone our protest, because some satellite channel is busy covering another revolution’…  Al-Sharq (Qatar,  March 13, 2011)
J’ai été très impressionnée par l’ouverture de ce pays. Par l’accueil, aussi, sans a priori. J’ai été frappée par l’ouverture, encore une fois, j’insiste, du Qatar.  Ségolène Royal
Les Occidentaux devraient respecter pleinement la dignité de l’Iran et reconnaître son droit souverain à maîtriser la technologie nucléaire civile. Des négociations réussies entre Européens et Iraniens renforceraient la position de l’Europe et de l’Iran sur la scène internationale… C’est inimaginable que l’on soit dans une telle nasse, dans une telle impasse. Il est de l’intérêt de tous de sortir de cette crise. Il faut négocier. J’ai dit aux Iraniens que si on sortait de cette situation, un boulevard allait s’ouvrir entre l’Iran et la France et l’Europe. Jack Lang (sep. 2006)
Quels sont les grands leaders du monde aujourd’hui ? Le président Xi, le président Poutine – on peut être d’accord ou pas, mais c’est un leader –, le grand prince Mohammed Ben Salman. Et que seraient aujourd’hui les Emirats sans le leadership de MBZ ? (…)  Ce matin, j’ai rencontré le prince héritier MBZ. Est-ce que vous croyez qu’on construit un pays comme ça, en deux ans ? Ici, en cinquante ans, vous avez construit un des pays les plus modernes qui soient. La question du leadership est centrale. La réussite du modèle émirien est sans doute l’exemple le plus important pour nous, pour l’ensemble du monde. J’ai été le chef de l’Etat qui a signé le contrat du Louvre à Abou Dhabi. J’y ai mis toute mon énergie. MBZ y a mis toute sa vision. On a mis dix ans ! En allant vite ! Sauf que MBZ est toujours là… Et moi ça fait six ans que je suis parti.  Nicolas Sarkozy


Islam: pourquoi les constructeurs peuvent encore jouer tranquillement avec notre sécurité

Au lendemain d’un énième attentat islamique

Et la mort ce matin d’un énième véritable héros

Mais surtout après un bilan qui depuis les années 70 dépasse les 20 000 morts et les 50 000 blessés …

Comment ne pas se poser la seule question qui vaille …

A savoir …

Et si à coup de centaines de procès à la Nader

On attaquait enfin la famille Saoud et leurs petits camarades du golfe

Comme de l’autre côté leurs ennemis perses …

Pour défaut majeur de conception et de fabrication …

Pour le produit frelaté

Qu’en toute connaissance de cause et depuis des décennies …

Ils continuent à déverser à coup de milliards (de nos dollars du pétrole) sur le reste du monde ?

Startling maps show every terrorist attack worldwide over the last 20 years

On October 31, New York saw the deadliest terrorist attack since September 11, 2001, when 29-year-old Sayfullo Saipov drove a truck down a bike lane, killing eight people and injuring more than a dozen.With fears of attacks around the world at a high, Carnegie Mellon researchers teamed up with Robert Muggah, a global security expert and director of the think tank Igarapé Institute, to visualize terror risks from a bird’s-eye view.

Together, they created Earth TimeLapse, an interactive platform that relies on data from the Global Terrorism Database to create maps of how many terrorism-related deaths occur annually worldwide. The larger the red circle, the more deaths in a given attack.

The project mapped attacks between 1997 and 2016 — here’s what 20 years of that data looks like.

1997: Suicide bombings in Israel killed more than a dozen people and injured more than 150. Bombings also took place in Sri Lanka and Egypt. A shooting took place in India, killing 23 and injuring 31.

1997: Suicide bombings in Israel killed more than a dozen people and injured more than 150. Bombings also took place in Sri Lanka and Egypt. A shooting took place in India, killing 23 and injuring 31. Earth TimeLapse

1998: The greatest losses of life due to terrorist activity came in Kenya and Tanzania. Members of Al-Qaeda bombed two US embassies, killing more than 200 and injuring over 4,000.

1998: The greatest losses of life due to terrorist activity came in Kenya and Tanzania. Members of Al-Qaeda bombed two US embassies, killing more than 200 and injuring over 4,000. Earth TimeLapse

1999: The worst activity occurred in the southwestern Dagestan region in Russia, just west of Kazakhstan. A series of bombings struck apartment buildings, killing nearly 300 and injuring more than 1,000. Debates still swirl about whether Chechen separatists carried out the attacks, or whether the Russian government staged them to foster support for electing Vladimir Putin.

1999: The worst activity occurred in the southwestern Dagestan region in Russia, just west of Kazakhstan. A series of bombings struck apartment buildings, killing nearly 300 and injuring more than 1,000. Debates still swirl about whether Chechen separatists carried out the attacks, or whether the Russian government staged them to foster support for electing Vladimir Putin. Earth TimeLapse

2000: The turn of the millennium was a relatively peaceful year. The world made it until December 30 before the first major attack: a wave of bombings in the Philippines that killed 22 and injured roughly 100.

2000: The turn of the millennium was a relatively peaceful year. The world made it until December 30 before the first major attack: a wave of bombings in the Philippines that killed 22 and injured roughly 100. Earth TimeLapse

2001: September 11, 2001 marked the US’ greatest loss of life from a foreign attack in the country’s history. More than 2,700 people were killed in the attacks on New York City’s Twin Towers. About 300 of those were firefighters and emergency responders.

2001: September 11, 2001 marked the US' greatest loss of life from a foreign attack in the country's history. More than 2,700 people were killed in the attacks on New York City's Twin Towers. About 300 of those were firefighters and emergency responders. Earth TimeLapse

2002: The year saw a consistent bundle of activity in Israel and South America. Sniper attacks in the mid-Atlantic region of the US killed 17 people and injured 10.

2002: The year saw a consistent bundle of activity in Israel and South America. Sniper attacks in the mid-Atlantic region of the US killed 17 people and injured 10. Earth TimeLapse

2003: Bombings spiked somewhat as attacks took place in Russia, Morocco, and Israel. As the Iraq War began, suicide bombings started to become more common around the country.

2003: Bombings spiked somewhat as attacks took place in Russia, Morocco, and Israel. As the Iraq War began, suicide bombings started to become more common around the country. Earth TimeLapse

2004: In March, the world witnessed the Madrid train bombings, which killed nearly 200 people and injured over 2,000. Attacks also proliferated in Iraq and Pakistan. The Taliban and Al-Qaeda were responsible for many of the attacks in Europe and the Middle East at this time.

2004: In March, the world witnessed the Madrid train bombings, which killed nearly 200 people and injured over 2,000. Attacks also proliferated in Iraq and Pakistan. The Taliban and Al-Qaeda were responsible for many of the attacks in Europe and the Middle East at this time. Earth TimeLapse

2005: Early in the year, the Iraqi city of Hillah experienced a devastating car bombing that took 127 lives and injured hundreds more. Later that July, four suicide bombers blew up a London bus. It killed more than 50 people and injured 700.

2005: Early in the year, the Iraqi city of Hillah experienced a devastating car bombing that took 127 lives and injured hundreds more. Later that July, four suicide bombers blew up a London bus. It killed more than 50 people and injured 700. Earth TimeLapse

2006: Unrest in the Middle East continued to produce monthly terror attacks in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. In July, pressure-cooker bombs on a Mumbai train led to hundreds of deaths and injuries.

2006: Unrest in the Middle East continued to produce monthly terror attacks in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. In July, pressure-cooker bombs on a Mumbai train led to hundreds of deaths and injuries. Earth TimeLapse

2007: Dual bombings in outdoor Iraqi markets took place in the first two months of the year. Then in August, a series of car-bomb attacks killed 800 people and injured 1,500. It’s the second-deadliest terror attack behind September 11.

2007: Dual bombings in outdoor Iraqi markets took place in the first two months of the year. Then in August, a series of car-bomb attacks killed 800 people and injured 1,500. It's the second-deadliest terror attack behind September 11. Earth TimeLapse

2008: A coordinated series of shootings took place in Mumbai in late November. Hundreds were killed and injured. Some terrorists relied on guns, while others planted an estimated eight bombs around the city.

2008: A coordinated series of shootings took place in Mumbai in late November. Hundreds were killed and injured. Some terrorists relied on guns, while others planted an estimated eight bombs around the city. Earth TimeLapse

2009: The first half of the year saw relatively little activity, but in the second half, Iraq and India fell victim to suicide bombings and shootings. Car bombings killed hundreds in Iraq and Pakistan in October of that year.

2009: The first half of the year saw relatively little activity, but in the second half, Iraq and India fell victim to suicide bombings and shootings. Car bombings killed hundreds in Iraq and Pakistan in October of that year. Earth TimeLapse

2010: The worst activity occurred in Pakistan, due primarily to suicide bombings. More than 500 people were injured over a span of three days in September, all due to bombings.

2010: The worst activity occurred in Pakistan, due primarily to suicide bombings. More than 500 people were injured over a span of three days in September, all due to bombings. Earth TimeLapse

2011: A particularly bloody year. Pakistan and India made up the bulk of the terrorist activity, while east Africa and South America also faced conflict.

2011: A particularly bloody year. Pakistan and India made up the bulk of the terrorist activity, while east Africa and South America also faced conflict. Earth TimeLapse

2012: With the Iraq War mostly over, new sources of conflict crossed the western border into Syria. Damascus and Aleppo became hotbeds for terrorist activity.

2012: With the Iraq War mostly over, new sources of conflict crossed the western border into Syria. Damascus and Aleppo became hotbeds for terrorist activity. Earth TimeLapse

2013: Conflict intensified in these Middle Eastern countries, with car bombings in Damascus in February claiming roughly 80 lives and injuring 250 people. The Boston Marathon bombings in April killed five and wounded more than 200.

2013: Conflict intensified in these Middle Eastern countries, with car bombings in Damascus in February claiming roughly 80 lives and injuring 250 people. The Boston Marathon bombings in April killed five and wounded more than 200. Earth TimeLapse

2014: Boko Haram attacks in Nigeria led to the deaths of more than 200 people and an unknown number of injuries in March, as well as hundreds more throughout the rest of the year. ISIS continued to ravage Syria and Iraq.

2014: Boko Haram attacks in Nigeria led to the deaths of more than 200 people and an unknown number of injuries in March, as well as hundreds more throughout the rest of the year. ISIS continued to ravage Syria and Iraq. Earth TimeLapse

2015: Unrest in Nigeria and Cameroon led to thousands of deaths when Boko Haram forces opened fire on civilians. Bombings in Turkey and Yemen also produced hundreds of deaths. In December, shooters claiming allegiance with the Islamic State killed a dozen people and wounded two dozen in San Bernardino, California.

2015: Unrest in Nigeria and Cameroon led to thousands of deaths when Boko Haram forces opened fire on civilians. Bombings in Turkey and Yemen also produced hundreds of deaths. In December, shooters claiming allegiance with the Islamic State killed a dozen people and wounded two dozen in San Bernardino, California. Earth TimeLapse

2016: More than 75% of the year’s attacks took place in 10 countries, including Iraq, Afghanistan, and India. Smaller attacks took place in Nice, France, Orlando, Florida, and New York City.

2016: More than 75% of the year's attacks took place in 10 countries, including Iraq, Afghanistan, and India. Smaller attacks took place in Nice, France, Orlando, Florida, and New York City. Earth TimeLapse

 Voir aussi:

Économie

General Motors: pourquoi les constructeurs peuvent encore jouer tranquillement avec notre sécurité

Et pourquoi il faut que ça cesse.

Un problème de conception d’un modèle automobile de General Motors provoque des dizaines d’accidents de la route et de nombreux décès. Arguant que l’entreprise n’a pas corrigé un défaut dont elle connaissait l’existence, des avocats intentent plus de cent procès au constructeur automobile. GM contre-attaque en engageant des enquêteurs pour mettre en cause les motivations de ses détracteurs. Les politiques et les médias finissent par s’intéresser de plus près à l’affaire. Au final, le dirigeant de GM finit par s’excuser au nom de son entreprise.

Si cette histoire vous donne comme une impression de déjà-lu, c’est sans doute parce que la presse a récemment parlé d’une affaire semblable. En réalité, cette histoire remonte à 1965, date de parution de Ces voitures qui tuent, de Ralph Nader. L’ouvrage accusait General Motors de vendre en toute connaissance de cause des voitures Corvairs dangereuses –et accusait l’industrie automobile dans son ensemble de préférer les profits à la sécurité de ses clients.

Près de cinquante ans ont passé. Pourquoi les Etats-Unis ont toujours du mal à garantir l’absence de dangerosité des véhicules conçus par les constructeurs automobiles? Et pourquoi en sommes-nous encore réduit à nous demander si les organismes de régulation prennent au sérieux leur mission de protection de la santé publique? En 1966, le mouvement des consommateurs a –peu après son apparition– convaincu le Congrès de voter le National Highway Safety and Transportation Act. Il s’agissait de corriger une partie des abus évoqués dans l’ouvrage de Nader.

Les routes suédoises, bien moins mortelles que les routes américaines

Au fil des décennies suivantes, la sécurité automobile s’est améliorée; aux Etats-Unis, le nombre des décès liés à l’automobile a chuté (de 25,9 pour 100.000 personnes en 1966 à 10,8 en 2012). Ces chiffres indiquent clairement qu’une nouvelle réglementation peut sauver des vies. Mais d’autres pays ont fait bien mieux. Selon le dernier rapport de l’International Transport Forum, organisation de surveillance de la sécurité routière mondiale, le taux d’accidents mortels de la circulation est trois fois plus élevé aux Etats-Unis qu’en Suède –un pays qui a fait de la sécurité automobile une priorité. Si les Etats-Unis avaient égalé les taux suédois, il y aurait eu 20.000 morts de moins sur les routes en 2011.

En France, en 2011, le taux était de 6,09 contre 3,4 en Suède et 10,4 aux Etats-Unis

Seulement, voilà: depuis son apparition, l’industrie automobile américaine s’est opposée à la réglementation, n’a pas jugé bon de révéler plusieurs problèmes, et a refusé de corriger les problèmes lorsque ces derniers ont été détectés.

General Motors a récemment rappelé 1,6 million de Chevrolet Cobalt (entre autres modèles de petite taille) afin de procéder à des réparations. En cause: un problème du commutateur d’allumage, qui aurait été à l’origine d’au moins douze morts. Le constructeur connaissait l’existence du problème –ainsi que celle d’autres anomalies– et ce depuis 2004, soit avant la sortie de la toute première Cobalt.

Le 17 mars 2014, Marry Barra, directrice générale de GM, s’est exprimée en ces termes:

«Dans le cas présent, nos processus internes ont connu un problème des plus graves; des évènements terribles en ont résulté.»

General Motors a par ailleurs rappelé 1,33 million de SUV: les airbags ne s’ouvraient pas lors des collisions. Selon une étude, les problèmes d’airbags de GM pourraient avoir contribué à la mort de 300 personnes entre 2003 et 2012. Les problèmes de sécurité ne sont pas l’apanage de GM. Toyota a récemment accepté de débourser 1,2 milliard de dollars pour mettre fin à une enquête criminelle concernant un problème d’accélération soudaines de ses véhicules.

Voilà cinquante ans qu’un –trop– grand nombre de chefs d’entreprises (automobile, alimentation, produits pharmaceutiques, armes à feu, entre autres secteurs) choisissent de suivre la voie tracée par l’industrie du tabac. Ils remettent en doute la validité des éléments de preuve qui justifient la mise en place de nouvelles réglementations. Ils exagèrent les coûts économiques de produits plus sûrs. Grâce à leur poids politique et financier, ils viennent à bout des politiques de santé publique et font en sorte que les organismes chargés de faire respecter la réglementation demeurent sous-financés. Ce sont là des comportements tellement banalisés qu’ils ne paraissent plus immoraux ou criminels, mais simplement inévitables.

Le refus de légiférer est mortel

Pour ce qui est de l’industrie automobile, le refus de respecter la réglementation a provoqué des morts, des maladies et des blessures qui auraient pu être évitées. Des années 1960 aux années 1980, les constructeurs se sont tout d’abord opposés à la mise en place de ceintures de sécurité, d’airbags de freins de meilleure facture et de meilleures normes d’émission. Pendant plus de quinze ans, les constructeurs américains ont réussi à faire obstacle à la réglementation imposant la mise en place d’airbags ou de ceintures de sécurité à fermeture automatique dans leurs automobiles.

Ce n’est qu’en 1986 que la Cour suprême a ordonné à la National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) de mettre en œuvre ces directives. Selon une étude publiée en 1988, ce retard aurait joué un rôle dans au moins 40.000 morts et un million de blessures et handicaps –soit par là même un coût de 17 milliards de dollars à la société.

Le refus d’appliquer la réglementation peut également tuer indirectement. Selon un récent rapport de l’Organisation mondiale de la santé, le nombre de morts dues à la pollution dans le monde est deux fois plus élevé qu’on ne le pensait. Et ce notamment en raison du rôle joué par de la pollution de l’air dans la mortalité d’origine cardiovasculaire. Aux Etats-Unis, l’automobile est l’une des principales sources de pollution, et les constructeurs américains refusent ou retardent la mise en place de normes d’émissions plus strictes.

Vous n’entendrez aucun dirigeant d’entreprise affirmer qu’il vaut mieux gagner de l’argent que sauver des vies humaines, mais leur action parlent pour eux. Les communicants des grands patrons semblent s’être passé le mot: lorsqu’un secret gênant est découvert, la stratégie est toujours la même: le PDG s’excuse platement et rapidement pour limiter au plus vite les dégâts. Mais accepter de voir les grandes sociétés et leurs alliés disposer d’un droit de veto sur les politiques de santé publique, c’est empêcher la prévention de nombreux décès, maladies et blessures sur le territoire américain.

Lors des récentes audiences consacrées à GM, le Congrès américain a eu raison de chercher à savoir qui (chez GM et à la NHTSA) savait quoi –et à quel moment ils l’ont appris. Mais il serait encore plus significatif de renforcer l’implication du gouvernement dans la protection de la santé publique –histoire de ne pas avoir à souffrir de ces problèmes pour cinquante années supplémentaires.

Le Congrès pourrait commencer par permettre à la NHTSA de faire correctement son travail, en lui allouant les ressources nécessaires. Pour 2014, cet organisme a reçu 10% de moins que la somme qu’il avait demandée. Le Congrès devrait également contrôler la mise en application des règles de sécurité par les organismes concernés, et le faire régulièrement –pas seulement lorsque l’existence d’un problème est révélée. Par ailleurs, lorsqu’il est prouvé qu’un dirigeant d’entreprise automobile a caché l’existence d’une anomalie, l’organisme chargé de la sécurité routière devrait être en mesure de le tenir responsable des morts et des décès qui en ont résulté. Au civil comme au pénal.

Nicholas Freudenberg

Traduit par Jean-Clément Nau

Voir enfin:

Profit Above Safety

 Slate
April 1, 2014

 

A design problem in a General Motors car contributes to dozens of automobile crashes and numerous deaths. Charging that the company failed to correct a known defect, lawyers file more than 100 lawsuits against the company. GM responds by hiring investigators to question the motives of its critics. Eventually, as congressional and media scrutiny increase, the head of GM apologizes for the company’s behavior. Sound familiar? You may have been reading about such a case over the past month. But actually, this story is from 1965 when Ralph Nader published Unsafe at Any Speed, a book that charged General Motors with knowingly selling unsafe Corvairs and the auto industry as a whole with putting profit above safety.

Now almost 50 years later, why is the United States still struggling to ensure that cars companies make safe cars? And why must we still question whether regulatory agencies take their mandate to protect public health seriously? In 1966, the emerging consumer movement persuaded Congress to pass the National Highway Safety and Transportation Act to correct some of the abuses Nader had documented. In the decades since, car safety has improved, with United States motor vehicle death rates falling from 25.9 per 100,000 people in 1966 to 10.8 per 100,000 in 2012. This is a clear indication that regulations save lives. But other nations have done much better. According to the latest report from the International Transport Forum, a body that monitors global road safety, the auto death rate in the United States is more than three times higher than the rate in Sweden, a country that has made auto safety a priority. If the United States had achieved Sweden’s rate, in 2011 more than 20,000 U.S. automobile deaths would have been averted.

Since its inception, however, the auto industry has resisted regulation, failed to disclose problems, and refused to correct problems when they were detected. In the past few weeks, General Motors has recalled 1.6 million Cobalts and other small cars to repair defective ignition switches that have been associated with at least 12 deaths. The company had first learned of this and other defects a decade ago—in 2004, before the first Cobalt was released. On March 17th, Mary Barra, the chief executive of GM, observed, “Something went very wrong in our processes in this instance, and terrible things happened.”

In a separate action, General Motors has recalled 1.33 million sports utility vehicles because air bags failed to deploy after crashes. Another review of GM air bag failures from 2003 to 2012 found that they may have contributed to more than 300 deaths. GM is not alone in its safety problems. Toyota recently agreed to pay $1.2 billion to settle federal criminal charges related to sudden acceleration of its vehicles.

For the past 50 years, too many corporate leaders in the auto industry as well as in the food, pharmaceutical, firearms, and other industries have chosen to follow the playbook written by the tobacco industry. They have challenged the evidence justifying regulation, exaggerated the economic costs of safer products, and used their political and financial clout to defeat public health policies and underfund the agencies charged with enforcement. These behaviors have become so normalized they seem inevitable rather than immoral or criminal.

In the case of the auto industry, resistance to regulation has caused preventable deaths, illnesses, and injuries. From the 1960s through the 1980s, the automobile industry initially opposed standard seatbelts, airbags, better brakes, and better emission standards. For more than 15 years, the U.S. auto industry successfully opposed regulations to require either airbags or automatically closing seat belts in automobiles. Finally, in 1986, the Supreme Court ordered the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration to implement the rules. A 1988 study estimated this delay contributed to at least 40,000 deaths and 1 million injuries at a cost to society of more than $17 billion. The auto industry’s resistance to regulation kills people indirectly as well. Earlier this week, the World Health Organization released a report showing that global deaths from air pollution were twice as high as previously thought, largely through air pollution’s role in in cardiovascular deaths. In the United States, automobiles are a primary source of air pollution, and the auto industry has long opposed or delayed stricter emission standards.

No corporate executives will say publicly that they prefer profits to preventing deaths, even though their actions prove otherwise. The damage control advice of the day seems to be to encourage CEOs to make rapid and profuse apologies for corporate cover-ups after they are disclosed. But as long as the public tolerates allowing corporations and their allies to have veto power over public health policy, our nation will continue to experience preventable deaths and avoidable illness and injuries. In the hearings into GM this week, Congress is correct to pursue who in GM and the NHTSA knew what when. But the deeper task should be to strengthen the visible hand of government in protecting public health so we aren’t still facing this issue 50 years from now. As a first step, Congress should provide the highway safety agency with the resources needed to meet its mandates fully; in 2014, the agency received 10 percent less than it requested. Congress should also monitor agency enforcement of safety standards regularly, not just when defects are publicly disclosed. In addition, the safety agency should hold auto executives who fail to disclose defects criminally as well as civilly liable for the resulting deaths and injuries.


Guerre froide 2.0: C’est la lutte finale, imbécile ! (Resisting the Antichrist: In Russian eyes, a new theological struggle pits a godless, materialistic and decadent postmodern West against the rest of the world’s defence of traditional religion and values led by a thermonuclear saber-rattling Putin regime)

21 mars, 2018

Russian President Vladimir Putin, accompanied by Patriarch of Russia Kirill and Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev, visits the New Jerusalem Orthodox Monastery outside Moscow (November 15, 2017)

Ne croyez pas que je sois venu apporter la paix sur la terre; je ne suis pas venu apporter la paix, mais l’épée. Car je suis venu mettre la division entre l’homme et son père, entre la fille et sa mère, entre la belle-fille et sa belle-mère; et l’homme aura pour ennemis les gens de sa maison. Jésus (Matthieu 10 : 34-36)
Depuis que l’ordre religieux est ébranlé – comme le christianisme le fut sous la Réforme – les vices ne sont pas seuls à se trouver libérés. Certes les vices sont libérés et ils errent à l’aventure et ils font des ravages. Mais les vertus aussi sont libérées et elles errent, plus farouches encore, et elles font des ravages plus terribles encore. Le monde moderne est envahi des veilles vertus chrétiennes devenues folles. Les vertus sont devenues folles pour avoir été isolées les unes des autres, contraintes à errer chacune en sa solitude.  G.K. Chesterton
Tout se disloque. Le centre ne peut tenir. L’anarchie se déchaîne sur le monde Comme une mer noircie de sang : partout On noie les saints élans de l’innocence …Sûrement que quelque révélation, c’est pour bientôt … Sûrement que la Seconde Venue, c’est pour bientôt. La Seconde Venue ! A peine dits ces mots, Une image, immense, du Spiritus Mundi Trouble ma vue : quelque part dans les sables du désert, Une forme avec corps de lion et tête d’homme Et l’oeil nul et impitoyable comme un soleil Se meut, à cuisses lentes, tandis qu’autour Tournoient les ombres d’une colère d’oiseaux… La ténèbre, à nouveau ; mais je sais, maintenant, Que vingt siècles d’un sommeil de pierre, exaspérés Par un bruit de berceau, tournent au cauchemar, – Et quelle bête brute, revenue l’heure, Traîne la patte vers Bethléem, pour naître enfin ? Yeats (1919)
La Raison sera remplacée par la Révélation. À la place de la Loi rationnelle et des vérités objectives perceptibles par quiconque prendra les mesures nécessaires de discipline intellectuelle, et la même pour tous, la Connaissance dégénérera en une pagaille de visions subjectives (…) Des cosmogonies complètes seront créées à partir d’un quelconque ressentiment personnel refoulé, des épopées entières écrites dans des langues privées, les barbouillages d’écoliers placés plus haut que les plus grands chefs-d’œuvre. L’Idéalisme sera remplacé par le Matérialisme. La vie après la mort sera un repas de fête éternelle où tous les invités auront 20 ans … La Justice sera remplacée par la Pitié comme vertu cardinale humaine, et toute crainte de représailles disparaîtra … La Nouvelle Aristocratie sera composée exclusivement d’ermites, clochards et invalides permanents. Le Diamant brut, la Prostituée Phtisique, le bandit qui est bon pour sa mère, la jeune fille épileptique qui a le chic avec les animaux seront les héros et héroïnes du Nouvel Age, quand le général, l’homme d’État, et le philosophe seront devenus la cible de chaque farce et satire. Hérode (Pour le temps présent, oratorio de Noël, W. H. Auden, 1944)
Just over 50 years ago, the poet W.H. Auden achieved what all writers envy: making a prophecy that would come true. It is embedded in a long work called For the Time Being, where Herod muses about the distasteful task of massacring the Innocents. He doesn’t want to, because he is at heart a liberal. But still, he predicts, if that Child is allowed to get away, « Reason will be replaced by Revelation. Instead of Rational Law, objective truths perceptible to any who will undergo the necessary intellectual discipline, Knowledge will degenerate into a riot of subjective visions . . . Whole cosmogonies will be created out of some forgotten personal resentment, complete epics written in private languages, the daubs of schoolchildren ranked above the greatest masterpieces. Idealism will be replaced by Materialism. Life after death will be an eternal dinner party where all the guests are 20 years old . . . Justice will be replaced by Pity as the cardinal human virtue, and all fear of retribution will vanish . . . The New Aristocracy will consist exclusively of hermits, bums and permanent invalids. The Rough Diamond, the Consumptive Whore, the bandit who is good to his mother, the epileptic girl who has a way with animals will be the heroes and heroines of the New Age, when the general, the statesman, and the philosopher have become the butt of every farce and satire. »What Herod saw was America in the late 1980s and early ’90s, right down to that dire phrase « New Age. »(…) Americans are obsessed with the recognition, praise and, when necessary, the manufacture of victims, whose one common feature is that they have been denied parity with that Blond Beast of the sentimental imagination, the heterosexual, middle-class white male. The range of victims available 10 years ago — blacks, Chicanos, Indians, women, homosexuals — has now expanded to include every permutation of the halt, the blind and the short, or, to put it correctly, the vertically challenged. (…) Since our newfound sensitivity decrees that only the victim shall be the hero, the white American male starts bawling for victim status too. (…) European man, once the hero of the conquest of the Americas, now becomes its demon; and the victims, who cannot be brought back to life, are sanctified. On either side of the divide between Euro and native, historians stand ready with tarbrush and gold leaf, and instead of the wicked old stereotypes, we have a whole outfit of equally misleading new ones. Our predecessors made a hero of Christopher Columbus. To Europeans and white Americans in 1892, he was Manifest Destiny in tights, whereas a current PC book like Kirkpatrick Sale’s The Conquest of Paradise makes him more like Hitler in a caravel, landing like a virus among the innocent people of the New World. Robert Hughes (24.06.2001)
La vérité biblique sur le penchant universel à la violence a été tenue à l’écart par un puissant processus de refoulement. (…) La vérité fut reportée sur les juifs, sur Adam et la génération de la fin du monde. (…) La représentation théologique de l’adoucissement de la colère de Dieu par l’acte d’expiation du Fils constituait un compromis entre les assertions du Nouveau Testament sur l’amour divin sans limites et celles sur les fantasmes présents en chacun. (…) Même si la vérité biblique a été de nouveau  obscurcie sur de nombreux points, (…) dénaturée en partie, elle n’a jamais été totalement falsifiée par les Églises. Elle a traversé l’histoire et agit comme un levain. Même l’Aufklärung critique contre le christianisme qui a pris ses armes et les prend toujours en grande partie dans le sombre arsenal de l’histoire de l’Eglise, n’a jamais pu se détacher entièrement de l’inspiration chrétienne véritable, et par des détours embrouillés et compliqués, elle a porté la critique originelle des prophètes dans les domaines sans cesse nouveaux de l’existence humaine. Les critiques d’un Kant, d’un Feuerbach, d’un Marx, d’un Nietzsche et d’un Freud – pour ne prendre que quelques uns parmi les plus importants – se situent dans une dépendance non dite par rapport à l’impulsion prophétique. Raymund Schwager
An advertent and sustained foreign policy uses a different part of the brain from the one engaged by horrifying images. If Americans had seen the battles of the Wilderness and Cold Harbor on TV screens in 1864, if they had witnessed the meat-grinding carnage of Ulysses Grant’s warmaking, then public opinion would have demanded an end to the Civil War, and the Union might well have split into two countries, one of them farmed by black slaves. (…) The Americans have ventured into Somalia in a sort of surreal confusion, first impersonating Mother Teresa and now John Wayne. it would help to clarify that self-image, for to do so would clarify the mission, and then to recast the rhetoric of the enterprise. Lance Morrow (1993
In recent years, skewering the politically correct and the political correctness of those mocking political correctness has become a thriving journalistic enterprise. One of the more interesting examples of the genre was a cover-story essay by Robert Hughes, which appeared in the February 3, 1992, edition of Time magazine. The essay was entitled “The Fraying of America.”  In it, Hughes cast a cold eye on the American social landscape, and his assessment was summarized in the article’s subtitle: “When a nation’s diversity breaks into factions, demagogues rush in, false issues cloud debate, and everybody has a grievance.” “Like others, Hughes found himself puzzling over how and why the status of ‘victim’ had become the seal of moral rectitude in American society. He began his essay by quoting a passage from W. H. Auden’s Christmas oratorio, For the Time Being. The lines he quoted were ones in which King Herod ruminates over whether the threat to civilization posed by the birth of Christ is serious enough to warrant murdering all the male children in one region of the empire. (The historical Herod may have been a vulgar and conniving Roman sycophant, but Auden’s Herod, let’s not forget, is watching the rough beast of the twentieth century slouching toward Bethlehem.) Weighing all the factors, Herod decides that the Christ child must be destroyed, even if to do so innocents must be slaughtered. For, he argues in the passage that Hughes quoted, should the Child survive: Reason will be replaced by Revelation . . . . Justice will be replaced by Pity as the cardinal virtue, and all fear of retribution will vanish . . . . The New Aristocracy will consist exclusively of hermits, bums and permanent invalids. The Rough Diamond, the Consumptive Whore, the bandit who is good to his mother, the epileptic girl who has a way with animals will be the heroes and heroines of the New Age, when the general, the statesman, and the philosopher have become the butt of every farce and satire. “Hughes quoted this passage from Auden in order to point out that Auden’s prophecy had come true. As Auden’s Herod had predicted, American society was awash in what Hughes termed the “all-pervasive claim to victimhood.” He noted that in virtually all the contemporary social, political, or moral debates, both sides were either claiming to be victims or claiming to speak on their behalf. It was clear to Hughes, however, that this was not a symptom of a moral victory over our scapegoating impulses. There can be no victims without victimizers. Even though virtually everyone seemed to be claiming the status of victim, the claims could be sustained only if some of the claims could be denied. (At this point, things become even murkier, for in the topsy-turvy world of victimology, a claimant denied can easily be mistaken for a victim scorned, the result being that denying someone’s claim to victim status can have the same effect as granting it.) Nevertheless, the algebraic equation of victimhood requires victimizers, and so, for purely logical reasons, some claims have to be denied. Some, in Hughes’s words, would have to remain “the butt of every farce and satire.” Hughes argued that all those who claim victim status share one thing in common, “they have been denied parity with that Blond Beast of the sentimental imagination, the heterosexual, middle-class, white male.” “Hughes realized that a hardy strain of envy and resentment toward this one, lone nonvictim continued to play an important role in the squabbles over who would be granted victim status. Those whose status as victim was secure were glaring at this last nonvictim with something of the vigilante’s narrow squint. Understandably, the culprit was anxious to remove his blemish. “Since our new found sensitivity decrees that only the victim shall be the hero,” Hughes wrote, “the white American male starts bawling for victim status too.” Gil Bailie
The gospel revelation gradually destroys the ability to sacralize and valorize violence of any kind, even for Americans in pursuit of the good. (…) At the heart of the cultural world in which we live, and into whose orbit the whole world is being gradually drawn, is a surreal confusion. The impossible Mother Teresa-John Wayne antinomy Times correspondent (Lance) Morrow discerned in America’s humanitarian 1992 Somali operation is simply a contemporary manifestation of the tension that for centuries has hounded those cultures under biblical influence. Gil Bailie
L’erreur est toujours de raisonner dans les catégories de la « différence », alors que la racine de tous les conflits, c’est plutôt la « concurrence », la rivalité mimétique entre des êtres, des pays, des cultures. La concurrence, c’est-à-dire le désir d’imiter l’autre pour obtenir la même chose que lui, au besoin par la violence. Sans doute le terrorisme est-il lié à un monde « différent » du nôtre, mais ce qui suscite le terrorisme n’est pas dans cette « différence » qui l’éloigne le plus de nous et nous le rend inconcevable. Il est au contraire dans un désir exacerbé de convergence et de ressemblance. (…) Ce qui se vit aujourd’hui est une forme de rivalité mimétique à l’échelle planétaire. Lorsque j’ai lu les premiers documents de Ben Laden, constaté ses allusions aux bombes américaines tombées sur le Japon, je me suis senti d’emblée à un niveau qui est au-delà de l’islam, celui de la planète entière. Sous l’étiquette de l’islam, on trouve une volonté de rallier et de mobiliser tout un tiers-monde de frustrés et de victimes dans leurs rapports de rivalité mimétique avec l’Occident. Mais les tours détruites occupaient autant d’étrangers que d’Américains. Et par leur efficacité, par la sophistication des moyens employés, par la connaissance qu’ils avaient des Etats-Unis, par leurs conditions d’entraînement, les auteurs des attentats n’étaient-ils pas un peu américains ? On est en plein mimétisme.Ce sentiment n’est pas vrai des masses, mais des dirigeants. Sur le plan de la fortune personnelle, on sait qu’un homme comme Ben Laden n’a rien à envier à personne. Et combien de chefs de parti ou de faction sont dans cette situation intermédiaire, identique à la sienne. Regardez un Mirabeau au début de la Révolution française : il a un pied dans un camp et un pied dans l’autre, et il n’en vit que de manière plus aiguë son ressentiment. Aux Etats-Unis, des immigrés s’intègrent avec facilité, alors que d’autres, même si leur réussite est éclatante, vivent aussi dans un déchirement et un ressentiment permanents. Parce qu’ils sont ramenés à leur enfance, à des frustrations et des humiliations héritées du passé. Cette dimension est essentielle, en particulier chez des musulmans qui ont des traditions de fierté et un style de rapports individuels encore proche de la féodalité. (…) Cette concurrence mimétique, quand elle est malheureuse, ressort toujours, à un moment donné, sous une forme violente. A cet égard, c’est l’islam qui fournit aujourd’hui le ciment qu’on trouvait autrefois dans le marxismeRené Girard
Notre monde est de plus en plus imprégné par cette vérité évangélique de l’innocence des victimes. L’attention qu’on porte aux victimes a commencé au Moyen Age, avec l’invention de l’hôpital. L’Hôtel-Dieu, comme on disait, accueillait toutes les victimes, indépendamment de leur origine. Les sociétés primitives n’étaient pas inhumaines, mais elles n’avaient d’attention que pour leurs membres. Le monde moderne a inventé la « victime inconnue », comme on dirait aujourd’hui le « soldat inconnu ». Le christianisme peut maintenant continuer à s’étendre même sans la loi, car ses grandes percées intellectuelles et morales, notre souci des victimes et notre attention à ne pas nous fabriquer de boucs émissaires, ont fait de nous des chrétiens qui s’ignorent. René Girard
L’inauguration majestueuse de l’ère « post-chrétienne » est une plaisanterie. Nous sommes dans un ultra-christianisme caricatural qui essaie d’échapper à l’orbite judéo-chrétienne en « radicalisant » le souci des victimes dans un sens antichrétien. (…) Jusqu’au nazisme, le judaïsme était la victime préférentielle de ce système de bouc émissaire. Le christianisme ne venait qu’en second lieu. Depuis l’Holocauste, en revanche, on n’ose plus s’en prendre au judaïsme, et le christianisme est promu au rang de bouc émissaire numéro un. René Girard
Les événements qui se déroulent sous nos yeux sont à la fois naturels et culturels, c’est-à-dire qu’ils sont apocalyptiques. Jusqu’à présent, les textes de l’Apocalypse faisaient rire. Tout l’effort de la pensée moderne a été de séparer le culturel du naturel. La science consiste à montrer que les phénomènes culturels ne sont pas naturels et qu’on se trompe forcément si on mélange les tremblements de terre et les rumeurs de guerre, comme le fait le texte de l’Apocalypse. Mais, tout à coup, la science prend conscience que les activités de l’homme sont en train de détruire la nature. C’est la science qui revient à l’Apocalypse. René Girard
La religion doit être historicisée : elle fait des hommes des êtres qui restent toujours violents mais qui deviennent plus subtils, moins spectaculaires, moins proches de la bête et des formes sacrificielles comme le sacrifice humain. Il se pourrait qu’il y ait un christianisme historique qui soit une nécessité historique. Après deux mille ans de christianisme historique, il semble que nous soyons aujourd’hui à une période charnière – soit qui ouvre sur l’Apocalypse directement, soit qui nous prépare une période de compréhension plus grande et de trahison plus subtile du christianisme. (…) Oui, pour moi l’Apocalypse c’est la fin de l’histoire. (…) L’Apocalypse, c’est l’arrivée du royaume de Dieu. Mais on peut penser qu’il y a des « petites ou des demi-apocalypses » ou des crises c’est-à-dire des périodes intermédiaires… (…) Il faut prendre très au sérieux les textes apocalyptiques. Nous ne savons pas si nous sommes à la fin du monde, mais nous sommes dans une période-charnière. Je pense que toutes les grandes expériences chrétiennes des époques-charnières sont inévitablement apocalyptiques dans la mesure où elles rencontrent l’incompréhension des hommes et le fait que cette incompréhension d’une certaine manière est toujours fatale. Je dis qu’elle est toujours fatale, mais en même temps elle ne l’est jamais parce que Dieu reprend toujours les choses et toujours pardonne. (…) Je me souviens d’un journal dans lequel il y avait deux articles juxtaposés. Le premier se moquait de l’Apocalypse d’une certaine façon ; le second était aussi apocalyptique que possible. Le contact de ces deux textes qui se faisaient face et qui dans le même temps se donnaient comme n’ayant aucun rapport l’un avec l’autre avait quelque chose de fascinant. (…) Nous sommes encore proches de cette période des grandes expositions internationales qui regardait de façon utopique la mondialisation comme l’Exposition de Londres – la « Fameuse » dont parle Dostoievski, les expositions de Paris… Plus on s’approche de la vraie mondialisation plus on s’aperçoit que la non-différence ce n’est pas du tout la paix parmi les hommes mais ce peut être la rivalité mimétique la plus extravagante. On était encore dans cette idée selon laquelle on vivait dans le même monde : on n’est plus séparé par rien de ce qui séparait les hommes auparavant donc c’est forcément le paradis. Ce que voulait la Révolution française. Après la nuit du 4 août, plus de problème ! (…) L’Amérique connaît bien cela. Il est évident que la non-différence de classe ne tarit pas les rivalités mais les excite à mort avec tout ce qu’il y a de bon et de mortel dans ce phénomène. (…)  il n’y a plus de sacrifice et donc les hommes sont exposés à la violence et il n’y a plus que deux choix : soit on préfère subir la violence soit on cherche à l’infliger à autrui. Le Christ veut nous dire entre autres choses : il vaut mieux subir la violence (c’est le sacrifice de soi) que de l’infliger à autrui. Si Dieu refuse le sacrifice, il est évident qu’il nous demande la non-violence qui empêchera l’Apocalypse. René Girard
L’avenir apocalyptique n’est pas quelque chose d’historique. C’est quelque chose de religieux sans lequel on ne peut pas vivre. C’est ce que les chrétiens actuels ne comprennent pas. Parce que, dans l’avenir apocalyptique, le bien et le mal sont mélangés de telle manière que d’un point de vue chrétien, on ne peut pas parler de pessimisme. Cela est tout simplement contenu dans le christianisme. Pour le comprendre, lisons la Première Lettre aux Corinthiens : si les puissants, c’est-à-dire les puissants de ce monde, avaient su ce qui arriverait, ils n’auraient jamais crucifié le Seigneur de la Gloire – car cela aurait signifié leur destruction (cf. 1 Co 2, 8). Car lorsque l’on crucifie le Seigneur de la Gloire, la magie des pouvoirs, qui est le mécanisme du bouc émissaire, est révélée. Montrer la crucifixion comme l’assassinat d’une victime innocente, c’est montrer le meurtre collectif et révéler ce phénomène mimétique. C’est finalement cette vérité qui entraîne les puissants à leur perte. Et toute l’histoire est simplement la réalisation de cette prophétie. Ceux qui prétendent que le christianisme est anarchiste ont un peu raison. Les chrétiens détruisent les pouvoirs de ce monde, car ils détruisent la légitimité de toute violence. Pour l’État, le christianisme est une force anarchique, surtout lorsqu’il retrouve sa puissance spirituelle d’autrefois. Ainsi, le conflit avec les musulmans est bien plus considérable que ce que croient les fondamentalistes. Les fondamentalistes pensent que l’apocalypse est la violence de Dieu. Alors qu’en lisant les chapitres apocalyptiques, on voit que l’apocalypse est la violence de l’homme déchaînée par la destruction des puissants, c’est-à-dire des États, comme nous le voyons en ce moment. Lorsque les puissances seront vaincues, la violence deviendra telle que la fin arrivera. Si l’on suit les chapitres apocalyptiques, c’est bien cela qu’ils annoncent. Il y aura des révolutions et des guerres. Les États s’élèveront contre les États, les nations contre les nations. Cela reflète la violence. Voilà le pouvoir anarchique que nous avons maintenant, avec des forces capables de détruire le monde entier. On peut donc voir l’apparition de l’apocalypse d’une manière qui n’était pas possible auparavant. Au début du christianisme, l’apocalypse semblait magique : le monde va finir ; nous irons tous au paradis, et tout sera sauvé ! L’erreur des premiers chrétiens était de croire que l’apocalypse était toute proche. Les premiers textes chronologiques chrétiens sont les Lettres aux Thessaloniciens qui répondent à la question : pourquoi le monde continue-t-il alors qu’on en a annoncé la fin ? Paul dit qu’il y a quelque chose qui retient les pouvoirs, le katochos (quelque chose qui retient). L’interprétation la plus commune est qu’il s’agit de l’Empire romain. La crucifixion n’a pas encore dissout tout l’ordre. Si l’on consulte les chapitres du christianisme, ils décrivent quelque chose comme le chaos actuel, qui n’était pas présent au début de l’Empire romain. (..) le monde actuel (…) confirme vraiment toutes les prédictions. On voit l’apocalypse s’étendre tous les jours : le pouvoir de détruire le monde, les armes de plus en plus fatales, et autres menaces qui se multiplient sous nos yeux. Nous croyons toujours que tous ces problèmes sont gérables par l’homme mais, dans une vision d’ensemble, c’est impossible. Ils ont une valeur quasi surnaturelle. Comme les fondamentalistes, beaucoup de lecteurs de l’Évangile reconnaissent la situation mondiale dans ces chapitres apocalyptiques. Mais les fondamentalistes croient que la violence ultime vient de Dieu, alors ils ne voient pas vraiment le rapport avec la situation actuelle – le rapport religieux. Cela montre combien ils sont peu chrétiens. La violence humaine, qui menace aujourd’hui le monde, est plus conforme au thème apocalyptique de l’Évangile qu’ils ne le pensent. René Girard
Dans le monde actuel, beaucoup de choses correspondent au climat des grands textes apocalyptiques du Nouveau Testament, en particulier Matthieu et Marc. Il y est fait mention du phénomène principal du mimétisme, qui est la lutte des doubles : ville contre ville, province contre province… Ce sont toujours les doubles qui se battent et leur bagarre n’a aucun sens puisque c’est la même chose des deux côtés. Aujourd’hui, il ne semble rien de plus urgent à la Chine que de rattraper les Etats-Unis sur tous les plans et en particulier sur le nombre d’autoroutes ou la production de véhicules automobiles. Vous imaginez les conséquences ? Il est bien évident que la production économique et les performances des entreprises mettent en jeu la rivalité. Clausewitz le disait déjà en 1820 : il n’y a rien qui ressemble plus à la guerre que le commerce. Souvent les chrétiens s’arrêtent à une interprétation eschatologique des textes de l’Apocalypse. Il s’agirait d’un événement supranaturel… Rien n’est plus faux ! Au chapitre 16 de Matthieu, les juifs demandent à Jésus un signe. « Mais, vous savez les lire, les signes, leur répond-t-il. Vous regardez la couleur du ciel le soir et vous savez deviner le temps qu’il fera demain. » Autrement dit, l’Apocalypse, c’est naturel. L’Apocalypse n’est pas du tout divine. Ce sont les hommes qui font l’Apocalypse. René Girard
Quels sont les grands leaders du monde aujourd’hui ? Le président Xi, le président Poutine – on peut être d’accord ou pas, mais c’est un leader –, le grand prince Mohammed Ben Salman. Et que seraient aujourd’hui les Emirats sans le leadership de MBZ ? (…) Quel est le problème des démocraties ? C’est que les démocraties ont pu devenir des démocraties avec de grands leaders : de Gaulle, Churchill… Mais les démocraties détruisent tous les leaderships. C’est un grand sujet, ce n’est pas un sujet anecdotique ! Comment peut-on avoir une vision à dix, quinze ou vingt ans, et en même temps avoir un rythme électoral aux Etats-Unis tous les quatre ans ? Les démocraties sont devenues un champ de bataille, où chaque heure est utilisée par tout le monde, réseaux sociaux et autres, pour détruire celui qui est en place. Comment voulez-vous avoir une vision de long terme pour un pays ? C’est ce qui fait que, aujourd’hui, les grands leaders du monde sont issus de pays qui ne sont pas de grandes démocraties. (…) C’est une formidable bonne nouvelle que la Chine assume ses responsabilités internationales. On assiste à un changement de la politique chinoise comme jamais on n’en a connu avant. Jamais. La Chine, c’est quand même le pays qui a construit la Grande Muraille pour se protéger des barbares qui étaient de l’autre côté : nous. « One Road, One Belt »,  c’est un changement colossal ! Tout d’un coup, la Chine décomplexée dit : “Je pars à la conquête du monde.” Alors est-ce que c’est pour des raisons éducatives, politiques, économiques : peu importe.  (…) Le président Xi considère que deux mandats de cinq ans, dix ans, c’est pas assez. Il a raison ! Le mandat du président américain, en vérité c’est pas quatre ans, c’est deux ans : un an pour apprendre le job, un an pour préparer la réélection. Donc vous comparez le président chinois qui a une vision pour son pays et qui dit : “Dix ans, c’est pas assez”, au président américain qui a en vérité deux ans. Mais qui parierait beaucoup sur la réélection de Trump ? Ce matin, j’ai rencontré le prince héritier MBZ. Est-ce que vous croyez qu’on construit un pays comme ça, en deux ans ? Ici, en cinquante ans, vous avez construit un des pays les plus modernes qui soient. La question du leadership est centrale. La réussite du modèle émirien est sans doute l’exemple le plus important pour nous, pour l’ensemble du monde. J’ai été le chef de l’Etat qui a signé le contrat du Louvre à Abou Dhabi. J’y ai mis toute mon énergie. MBZ y a mis toute sa vision. On a mis dix ans ! En allant vite ! Sauf que MBZ est toujours là… Et moi ça fait six ans que je suis parti. (…) La question doit être posée comme ça : est-ce qu’on a besoin de la Russie ou pas ? Ma réponse est oui ! La Russie, c’est le pays à la plus grande superficie du monde. Qui peut dire qu’on ne doit pas parler avec eux ? Quelle est cette idée folle ? Je n’avais pas tout à fait compris dans l’administration Obama pourquoi Poutine et la Russie étaient devenus le principal adversaire. Y a-t-il un risque que la Russie envahisse d’autres pays ? Je n’y crois pas. La Russie doit perdre environ un demi-million d’habitants par an, sur le territoire le plus grand du monde. Est-ce que vous avez déjà vu des pays qui n’arrivent pas à occuper toute leur surface aller envahir des pays à côté ? Sur l’Ukraine, je pense que l’affaire n’a pas été bien gérée depuis le début et qu’il y avait moyen de faire mieux. Poutine est un homme prévisible, avec qui on peut parler et qui respecte la force. Nicolas Sarkozy
One must be blind not to see the approach of the terrible moments of history about which the Apostle and Evangelist John the Theologian spoke in his Revelation. Patriarch Kirill
We believe that Putin is the best and the only leader [for Russia]… He is trying to make Russia the state where Christians can live and can save their souls for eternal life. Konstantin Malofeev
Simply said, the Antichrist will not come before there will not be anymore supporters [of Orthodoxy]… What is the coming of Antichrist? It is secularism. It is modernization. Westernization. Materialism. Scientific development. The concept of progress. Putin is exactly the figure who is resisting the Antichrist on earth. Aleksandr Dugin
Thank God we live in a country where political correctness has not reached the point of absurdity. Andrei Konchalovsky
If the world were saved from demonic constructions such as the United States, it would be easier for everyone to live. And one of these days it will happen. n. Russian commander
Putin understands that there is no empire without Ukraine. The first move, I think, is Ukraine. But I don’t exclude a military attack in the Far East. They want to distract American attention, prolong the front of confrontation in order to create a favorable situation for aggression in Europe. If you look at the map, Russia is always helping the enemies of America: deep ties to North Korea, involvement in Afghanistan and Syria, backing Iran, and so on. Antoni Macierewicz (Poland’s defense minister)
Vladimir Putin’s propaganda machine has two overarching goals.  First, the Russian people must believe the Kremlin version of domestic and world events (…) that Russia is a super power in a hostile world (…) Second, Kremlin propaganda must discredit Western democracy as dysfunctional and inferior to Russia’s managed “democracy.” Kremlin propaganda has largely failed in this regard. Russians consider their government corrupt, remote from the people, interested in preserving power rather than performing its duties, and lying about the true state of affairs. Nevertheless, Putin’s approval ratings remain high in the absence of rivals, who have fled the country, been indicted, or murdered. Putin, in fact, bases his legitimacy on high approval ratings. To counter the Russian people’s sense that they have no say in how they are governed, Kremlin propagandists must sell the story that Western democracies have it worse. Downtrodden Americans, they say, face poverty, hunger, racial and ethnic discrimination, unemployment, and they are governed by corrupt, inept, greedy, dysfunctional, and feuding politicians who sell out to the highest bidder on Wall Street or in Silicon Valley. This brings us to how the ballyhooed Russian meddling in the 2016 U.S. election has given Putin a gift that keeps on giving—a paralyzed federal government, incapable of compromise, in which a significant portion of the governing class questions the legitimacy of a new president. Russia routinely meddles in the politics of other countries. Despite denials, the Kremlin contributes to pro-Russian political parties throughout the world, gathers compromising information, hacks into email accounts, offers lucrative contracts to foreign businesses, and circulates false news. Given this history, U.S. authorities should not have been surprised by Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential race. To date, Special Counsel Robert Mueller has indicted thirteen Russian “internet trolls,” who sowed discord on social media by posting inflammatory, distorted, slanted, and false information promoting the Russian narrative of a deeply divided electorate and a discredited American electoral system. Mueller’s indictment identifies the Internet Research Agency (IRA) of St. Petersburg as the nerve center of Russia’s trolling operations. Although putatively owned by a private Russian oligarch close to Putin, there is little doubt that the IRA is a mouthpiece of the Kremlin. The existence and activities of the IRA have been known since 2014. It employs hundreds of hackers and writers divided into geographical sections. It is not the sole source of Russian trolling, but it is the most important. Those American politicians and pundits, like Congressman Jerry Nagler and columnist Thomas Friedman, who label Russian intervention an act of warfare on par with Pearl Harbor or 9/11must attribute supernatural powers to Putin’s trolls. After all, the Mueller investigation revealed that Russia spent no more than a few million dollars on its election-meddling versus the over two billion dollars spent by the presidential candidates alone. The IRA’s St. Petersburg America desk constituted some 90 persons. Their social media posts accounted for an infinitesimal portion of social media political traffic and much of this came after the election. (…) that Western democracies, American democracy especially, are rotten, corrupt, and hapless is a cornerstone of the Kremlin narrative. As the Mueller indictment concludes: The stated goal of the Russian operation was “spreading distrust towards candidates and the political system in general.” The Russian trolls, according to the Mueller indictment, used a number of techniques to achieve this end. They encouraged fringe candidates. They tried to ally with disaffected religious, ethnic, and nationalist groups. They discredited the candidate they thought most likely to win. Once the winner was known, they immediately moved to discredit him. (…) The dozen ill-informed operatives indicted by Mueller held poorly attended rallies, had to be educated about red and blue states, and spent their limited funds in uncontested states. It would be almost crazy to believe that such Russian intervention could have made a difference. Why, then, do so many Americans believe that Russia was instrumental in throwing the election to Donald Trump? It may be that some of the President’s opponents actually believe this narrative. But there’s another explanation, too: Russian intervention provides opportunistic politicians and pundits a useful excuse for paralyzing the incoming government of a gutter-fighter President from a show business and construction background with no political experience. In their view, such a person should not be allowed to govern. Hence the paralysis, dysfunction, and chaos of American democracy—long claimed by Russian propagandists—is on its way to becoming reality. What a windfall for Putin and his oligarchs. Paul R. Gregory
Ivan Ilyin, came to imagine a Russian Christian fascism. Born in 1883, he finished a dissertation on God’s worldly failure just before the Russian Revolution of 1917. Expelled from his homeland in 1922 by the Soviet power he despised, he embraced the cause of Benito Mussolini and completed an apology for political violence in 1925. In German and Swiss exile, he wrote in the 1920s and 1930s for White Russian exiles who had fled after defeat in the Russian civil war, and in the 1940s and 1950s for future Russians who would see the end of the Soviet power. (…) For the young Ilyin, writing before the Revolution, law embodied the hope that Russians would partake in a universal consciousness that would allow Russia to create a modern state. For the mature, counter-revolutionary Ilyin, a particular consciousness (“heart” or “soul,” not “mind”) permitted Russians to experience the arbitrary claims of power as law. Though he died forgotten, in 1954, Ilyin’s work was revived after collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, and guides the men who rule Russia today. (…) Because Ilyin found ways to present the failure of the rule of law as Russian virtue, Russian kleptocrats use his ideas to portray economic inequality as national innocence. In the last few years, Vladimir Putin has also used some of Ilyin’s more specific ideas about geopolitics in his effort translate the task of Russian politics from the pursuit of reform at home to the export of virtue abroad. By transforming international politics into a discussion of “spiritual threats,” Ilyin’s works have helped Russian elites to portray the Ukraine, Europe, and the United States as existential dangers to Russia. (…) Ilyin used the word Spirit (Dukh) to describe the inspiration of fascists. The fascist seizure of power, he wrote, was an “act of salvation.” The fascist is the true redeemer, since he grasps that it is the enemy who must be sacrificed. Ilyin took from Mussolini the concept of a “chivalrous sacrifice” that fascists make in the blood of others. (Speaking of the Holocaust in 1943, Heinrich Himmler would praise his SS-men in just these terms.) (…) What seemed to trouble Ilyin most was that Italians and not Russians had invented fascism: “Why did the Italians succeed where we failed?” Writing of the future of Russian fascism in 1927, he tried to establish Russian primacy by considering the White resistance to the Bolsheviks as the pre-history of the fascist movement as a whole. The White movement had also been “deeper and broader” than fascism because it had preserved a connection to religion and the need for totality. Ilyin proclaimed to “my White brothers, the fascists” that a minority must seize power in Russia. The time would come. The “White Spirit” was eternal. (…) “The fact of the matter,” wrote Ilyin, “is that fascism is a redemptive excess of patriotic arbitrariness.” Arbitrariness (proizvol), a central concept in all modern Russian political discussions, was the bugbear of all Russian reformers seeking improvement through law. Now proizvol was patriotic. The word for “redemptive” (spasytelnii), is another central Russian concept. It is the adjective Russian Orthodox Christians might apply to the sacrifice of Christ on Calvary, the death of the One for the salvation of the many. Ilyin uses it to mean the murder of outsiders so that the nation could undertake a project of total politics that might later redeem a lost God. In one sentence, two universal concepts, law and Christianity, are undone. A spirit of lawlessness replaces the spirit of the law; a spirit of murder replaces a spirit of mercy. (…) Writing in Russian for Russian émigrés, Ilyin was quick to praise Hitler’s seizure of power in 1933. Hitler did well, in Ilyin’s opinion, to have the rule of law suspended after the Reichstag Fire of February 1933. Ilyin presented Hitler, like Mussolini, as a Leader from beyond history whose mission was entirely defensive. “A reaction to Bolshevism had to come,” wrote Ilyin, “and it came.” European civilization had been sentenced to death, but “so long as Mussolini is leading Italy and Hitler is leading Germany, European culture has a stay of execution.” Nazis embodied a “Spirit” (Dukh) that Russians must share. According to Ilyin, Nazis were right to boycott Jewish businesses and blame Jews as a collectivity for the evils that had befallen Germany. Above all, Ilyin wanted to persuade Russians and other Europeans that Hitler was right to treat Jews as agents of Bolshevism. This “Judeobolshevik” idea, as Ilyin understood, was the ideological connection between the Whites and the Nazis. The claim that Jews were Bolsheviks and Bolsheviks were Jews was White propaganda during the Russian Civil War. Of course, most communists were not Jews, and the overwhelming majority of Jews had nothing to do with communism. The conflation of the two groups was not an error or an exaggeration, but rather a transformation of traditional religious prejudices into instruments of national unity. Judeobolshevism appealed to the superstitious belief of Orthodox Christian peasants that Jews guarded the border between the realms of good and evil. It shifted this conviction to modern politics, portraying revolution as hell and Jews as its gatekeepers. As in Ilyin’s philosophy, God was weak, Satan was dominant, and the weapons of hell were modern ideas in the world. (…) As the 1930s passed, Ilyin began to doubt that Nazi Germany was advancing the cause of Russian fascism. This was natural, since Hitler regarded Russians as subhumans, and Germany supported European fascists only insofar as they were useful to the specific Nazi cause. Ilyin began to caution Russian Whites about Nazis, and came under suspicion from the German government. He lost his job and, in 1938, left Germany for Switzerland. He remained faithful, however, to his conviction that the White movement was anterior to Italian fascism and German National Socialism. In time, Russians would demonstrate a superior fascism. (…) World War II (…) was a confusing moment for both communists and their enemies, since the conflict began after the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany reached an agreement known as the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact. (…) as the Wehrmacht invaded the Soviet Union (…) Ilyin (…) wrote of the German invasion of the USSR as a “judgment on Bolshevism.” After the Soviet victory at Stalingrad in February 1943, when it became clear that Germany would likely lose the war, Ilyin changed his position again. Then, and in the years to follow, he would present the war as one of a series of Western attacks on Russian virtue. Russian innocence was becoming one of Ilyin’s great themes. As a concept, it completed Ilyin’s fascist theory: the world was corrupt; it needed redemption from a nation capable of total politics; that nation was unsoiled Russia. As he aged, Ilyin dwelled on the Russian past, not as history, but as a cyclical myth of native virtue defended from external penetration. Russia was an immaculate empire, always under attack from all sides. A small territory around Moscow became the Russian Empire, the largest country of all time, without ever attacking anyone. Even as it expanded, Russia was the victim, because Europeans did not understand the profound virtue it was defending by taking more land. In Ilyin’s words, Russia has been subject to unceasing “continental blockade,” and so its entire past was one of “self-defense.” And so, “the Russian nation, since its full conversion to Christianity, can count nearly one thousand years of historical suffering.” (…) Democratic elections institutionalized the evil notion of individuality. “The principle of democracy,” Ilyin wrote, “was the irresponsible human atom.” Counting votes was to falsely accept “the mechanical and arithmetical understanding of politics.” It followed that “we must reject blind faith in the number of votes and its political significance.” Public voting with signed ballots will allow Russians to surrender their individuality. Elections were a ritual of submission of Russians before their Leader. (…) Russia today is a media-heavy authoritarian kleptocracy, not the religious totalitarian entity that Ilyin imagined. And yet, his concepts do help lift the obscurity from some of the more interesting aspects of Russian politics. Vladimir Putin, to take a very important example, is a post-Soviet politician who emerged from the realm of fiction. Since it is he who brought Ilyin’s ideas into high politics, his rise to power is part of Ilyin’s story as well. (…) In the early 2000s, Putin maintained that Russia could become some kind of rule-of-law state. Instead, he succeeded in bringing economic crime within the Russian state, transforming general corruption into official kleptocracy. Once the state became the center of crime, the rule of law became incoherent, inequality entrenched, and reform unthinkable. Another political story was needed. Because Putin’s victory over Russia’s oligarchs also meant control over their television stations, new media instruments were at hand. The Western trend towards infotainment was brought to its logical conclusion in Russia, generating an alternative reality meant to generate faith in Russian virtue but cynicism about facts. This transformation was engineered by Vladislav Surkov, the genius of Russian propaganda. He oversaw a striking move toward the world as Ilyin imagined it, a dark and confusing realm given shape only by Russian innocence. With the financial and media resources under control, Putin needed only, in the nice Russian term, to add the “spiritual resource.” And so, beginning in 2005, Putin began to rehabilitate Ilyin as a Kremlin court philosopher. (…) If Russia could not become a rule-of-law state, it would seek to destroy neighbors that had succeeded in doing so or that aspired to do so. Echoing one of the most notorious proclamations of the Nazi legal thinker Carl Schmitt, Ilyin wrote that politics “is the art of identifying and neutralizing the enemy.” In the second decade of the twenty-first century, Putin’s promises were not about law in Russia, but about the defeat of a hyper-legal neighboring entity. The European Union, the largest economy in the world and Russia’s most important economic partner, is grounded on the assumption that international legal agreements provide the basis for fruitful cooperation among rule-of-law states. (…) Putin predicted that Eurasia would overcome the European Union and bring its members into a larger entity that would extend “from Lisbon to Vladivostok.” (…) Modifying Ilyin’s views about Russian innocence ever so slightly, Russian leaders could see the Soviet Union not as a foreign imposition upon Russia, as Ilyin had, but rather as Russia itself, and so virtuous despite appearances. Any faults of the Soviet system became necessary Russian reactions to the prior hostility of the West. Questions about the influence of ideas in politics are very difficult to answer, and it would be needlessly bold to make of Ilyin’s writings the pillar of the Russian system. For one thing, Ilyin’s vast body of work admits multiple interpretations. (…) And yet, most often in the Russia of the second decade of the twenty-first century, it is Ilyin’s ideas that to seem to satisfy political needs and to fill rhetorical gaps, to provide the “spiritual resource” for the kleptocratic state machine. (…) Russia’s 2012 law on “foreign agents,” passed right after Putin’s return to the office of the presidency, well represents Ilyin’s attitude to civil society. Ilyin believed that Russia’s “White Spirit” should animate the fascists of Europe; since 2013, the Kremlin has provided financial and propaganda support to European parties of the populist and extreme right. The Russian campaign against the “decadence” of the European Union, initiated in 2013, is in accord with Ilyin’s worldview. (…) Putin first submitted to years of shirtless fur-and-feather photoshoots, then divorced his wife, then blamed the European Union for Russian homosexuality. Ilyin sexualized what he experienced as foreign threats. Jazz, for example, was a plot to induce premature ejaculation. When Ukrainians began in late 2013 to assemble in favor of a European future for their country, the Russian media raised the specter of a “homodictatorship.” (…) Putin justified Russia’s attempt to draw Ukraine towards Eurasia by Ilyin’s “organic model” that made of Russia and Ukraine “one people. » Timothy Snyder
The last two weeks have witnessed the upending of the European order and the close of the post-Cold War era. With his invasion of Crimea and the instant absorption of the strategic peninsula, Vladimir Putin has shown that he will not play by the West’s rules. The “end of history” is at an end—we’re now seeing the onset of Cold War 2.0. What’s on the Kremlin’s mind was made clear by Putin’s fire-breathing speech to the Duma announcing the annexation of Crimea, which blended retrograde Russian nationalism with a generous helping of messianism on behalf of his fellow Slavs, alongside the KGB-speak that Putin is so fond of. If you enjoy mystical references to Orthodox saints of two millennia past accompanied by warnings about a Western fifth column and “national traitors,” this was the speech for you. Putin confirmed the worst fears of Ukrainians who think they should have their own country. But his ambitions go well beyond Ukraine: By explicitly linking Russian ethnicity with membership in the Russian Federation, Putin has challenged the post-Soviet order writ large. For years, I studied Russia as a counterintelligence officer for the National Security Agency, and at times I feel like I’m seeing history in reverse. The Kremlin is a fiercely revisionist power, seeking to change the status quo by various forms of force. This will soon involve NATO members in the Baltics directly, as well as Poland and Romania indirectly. Longstanding Russian acumen in what I term Special War, an amalgam of espionage, subversion and terrorism by spies and special operatives, is already known to Russia’s neighbors and can be expected to increase. In truth, Putin set Russia on a course for Cold War 2.0 as far back as 2007, and perhaps earlier; Western counterintelligence noted major upswings in aggressive Russian espionage and subversion against NATO members as far back as 2006.The brief Georgia war of August 2008, which made clear that the Kremlin was perfectly comfortable with using force in the post-Soviet space, ought to have served as a bigger wake-up call for the West. John R. Schindler (2014)
Ever since Moscow’s Little Green Men seized Crimea in early 2014, we’ve been in a new Cold War with Russia. To the consternation of wishful-thinkers, as Vladimir Putin’s confrontation with the West has become transparent, the reality of what I termed Cold War 2.0 almost four years ago has grown difficult to deny. Since the Kremlin’s revanchism is driving this conflict, we’re in it whether we want to be or not. Europe is the central front  in Cold War 2.0, thanks to geography and history. Putin’s war on, and in, Ukraine continues on low boil, while the Russian military regularly delivers provocations—a too-close warship here, an aircraft buzz there—all along NATO’s eastern frontier, sending an aggressive message. Major military exercises like September’s Zapad mega-wargame demonstrate Putin’s seriousness about confronting the Atlantic Alliance. (…)  However, Kremlin provocations extend far beyond the former Soviet Union (…) This assessment sounds alarmist at first, particularly the mention of possible aggression in the Far East, but Western intelligence agencies that track Russian moves have been thinking along similar lines—though they seldom say so in public. Therefore, it’s worth taking a brief look at what Putin’s up to, and where. Russia’s footprint on the North Korean crisis is impossible to miss, and since that’s the world’s most dangerous strategic predicament at present, Moscow’s less-than-helpful role merits attention. Although Beijing is clearly exasperated by the unhinged antics of its semi-client regime in Pyongyang, Moscow seems perfectly pleased with the hazardous games played by North Korea. And why not? Pyongyang creates strategic confusion for the Americans, which the Kremlin always enjoys. Russian military and intelligence support to the increasingly isolated Kim regime is an open secret, while Putin’s sanctions-beating lifelines to Pyongyang are public and deeply annoying for both Beijing and Washington. Although Moscow is no more eager to see all-out war on the Korean peninsula than the Chinese or Americans, keeping the nasty Kim regime in place frustrates and distracts the Pentagon, which is Russia’s real aim here. Not to mention that backing North Korea is viewed in the Kremlin as payback for NATO’s “meddling” in Ukraine. A similar pattern can be detected in Afghanistan, where American-led forces are in their sixteenth year of a seemingly endless counterinsurgency against the Taliban—and it’s not going well. Therefore, Moscow has been giving clandestine support to the Taliban. A few months back, the U.S. military command in Afghanistan admitted that Russian arms were reaching the Taliban. That clandestine Kremlin assistance is costing lives is increasingly obvious. Russian aid has reached Taliban “special” units that launch attacks on Afghan military bases. A recent spate of Taliban assaults on Afghan forces, including nighttime raids, has inflicted unexpected casualties on American allies. Of concern to the Pentagon, Taliban fighters equipped with Russian-made night vision gear have been ambushing Afghan military and police with lethal effects. It seems only a matter of time before American troops are killed by Russian-equipped Taliban special operators. While the Kremlin is in truth no fonder of the Taliban than the West is, this spoiler strategy is inflicting pain on the Americans and our clients in Kabul, which is all the Russians seek here. Not to mention that payback against us in Afghanistan, three decades after U.S. clandestine aid killed and wounded thousands of Soviet troops in that country, must be delicious for Moscow, where revenge has always constituted a rational strategic motivation. However, the real fight is in the heart of the Middle East, where Russia and its Iranian allies are fundamentally transforming the region at high cost in blood. Together, Moscow and Tehran are challenging the American-constructed security system that’s an ailing holdover from the last Cold War. Even recent cooperation between America’s two clients, Israel and Saudi Arabia, appears insufficient to turn back the rising Russian-Iranian tide across the Middle East. We only have ourselves to blame for this. Putin has taken full advantage of the blank check written by Barack Obama in September 2013 when our president backed away from his “red line” in Syria, in effect outsourcing that country and its terrible civil war to the Kremlin. As I predicted at the time, the strategic consequences of Obama’s decision have been grave, making Putin the new Middle East power-broker—a message that was missed only in Washington think-tanks. For his part, Donald Trump has been only too willing to let his Russian counterpart and would-be buddy do whatever he likes in Syria, Iraq, and elsewhere. Moscow’s military intervention in the Middle East, begun under Obama, continues to flourish and shows no signs of abating. The balance of power in this vital region has shifted decisively from Washington to Moscow at appalling cost in human life, though none of that troubled President Obama very much, and it seems to trouble his successor not one bit. It would be naïve to think Putin restricts his poking to the Eastern Hemisphere. Closer to our home, the bear’s paw-prints are easily detectable. Take Venezuela, the Bolivarian dictatorship and economic basket-case that’s barely a viable country at all anymore, between currency collapse and serious food shortages. Russian money is keeping this anti-American regime afloat, and last week Moscow’s refinancing of $3.15 billion it’s owed by Caracas gives the flat-broke country a bit of financial breathing room. Without Russia, Venezuela would likely implode, and it’s worth considering whether the Bolivarian regime is actually Putin’s newest satellite state. Although sanctions and low oil prices have diminished the Kremlin’s largess toward anti-Americans all over the globe, the prospect of having a loyal (because utterly dependent) client so close to the United States seems too good for Putin to pass up. Then there’s Cuba, Moscow’s “fraternal ally” from the last Cold War, and apparently the second one too. Just 90 miles from Key West, Cuba has long served as a reliable base for Russian provocations against us, and nothing’s changed. Russian economic aid to that impoverished island is back, after falling off after 1991, and the Kremlin has begun to reopen its military and spy bases in the country, which were shuttered after the Soviet collapse. Western intelligence has detected a Kremlin hand behind the recent rash of sonic attacks on American and Canadian diplomats in Cuba. While Havana flatly denies that anything untoward has occurred, two dozen U.S. diplomats in the country have suffered serious health problems due to this mysterious problem, which remains officially unexplained. However, it’s known that the KGB experimented with sonic weapons, while an attack of this sophistication is widely considered to be beyond the technical abilities of Cuban intelligence. (….) In all, this amounts to a worldwide Russian effort to push back against what’s left of American hegemony. Since Moscow lacks the ability to directly counter NATO and the U.S. militarily, the Russians are provoking and prodding where they can with the techniques of Special War: it’s what the Kremlin does best. This should be considered a spoiler strategy, a strategy of tension—what left-wing Italians in the 1970s termed la strategia della tensione. Vladimir Putin seeks to expand Russian power on the cheap while causing problems for America and our allies wherever he can—without direct military confrontation. John Schindler
One of the more interesting aspects of Cold War 2.0 is the ideological struggle between the postmodern West and Russia—a struggle that most Westerners deny even exists. there is an undeniable ideological struggle between Vladimir Putin’s neo-traditionalist Russia and the post-modern West—one that prominent Russians talk about all the time. In the Kremlin’s imagination, this fight pits the godless, materialistic, doomed 21st century West, too lazy to even reproduce, against a tough, reborn Russia that was forged in the murderous fire of 74 years of Bolshevism. The yawning gap between Russian and Western values can be partly explained by the fact that Communism shielded the former from the West’s vast cultural shifts since the 1960s. Living under the Old Left provided protection against the New Left. As a result, Russians are living in our past and find current Western ways incomprehensible and even contemptible. Take the reaction to America’s present panic about sexual harassment, which is felling celebrities and politicians left and right. In Moscow, this looks like madness, punishing powerful men for doing what powerful men have always done. Their late-night TV uses our sex panic as a punchline, proof that Americans are weak and feminized, held hostage to radical ideology. There is an undeniable theological aspect to this Russian contempt for post-modern Western values. The Russian Orthodox Church, which isn’t exactly state-controlled but is tightly linked to the Kremlin, regularly denounces the godless West and its sins—homosexuality and feminism especially. Orthodox clerics regularly castigate our “Satanic” ways as an example of what Russia must repel if it wants to survive the 21st century. Denouncing the West as godless and decadent is a venerable tradition in Russian Orthodoxy with deep historical roots, and it’s been reborn after Communism with gusto. Patriarch Kirill, the head of the ROC, frequently breathes fire on post-modern Western ways, and a couple weeks back he shared them with John Huntsman, the newly arrived American ambassador in Moscow, in an awkward meet-and-greet that turned into a theology lecture. Simply put, Kirill explained, America today is doing to itself what the Bolsheviks did to Russia: forcing a godless, secular ideology onto society. “Christian values are being destroyed… The West is abandoning God, but Russia is not abandoning God, like the majority of people in the world. That means the distance between our values is increasing,” he stated bluntly. Kirill’s insistence that America and the West are the outliers here, with Russia and most of the world on the side of traditional religion and values, is an important point that merits pondering. The traditionalist nature of Putinism, always present, has grown more intense in recent years as the Kremlin has sought to enshrine an official ideology as confrontation with the West has grown. Whatever Vladimir Putin may actually believe, he has played the public role of an Orthodox believer quite effectively. He has cultivated senior ROC clerics, who provide regime-endorsing soundbites as needed, and the church gives Putin legitimacy in the eyes of average Russians, who aren’t especially religious in terms of church-going, yet they see an Orthodox identity as reassuring and plausible in Communism’s wake. Putin has returned the church’s affection, stating that Russia’s “spiritual shield”—meaning Orthodoxy—is as important to the country’s security as its nuclear shield. In turn, Orthodox leaders portray Putin’s as a God-given figure, divinely sent to bring the country back to faith and great-power status out of the wreckage of atheistic Bolshevism. (…) Recently, Putin has played up the Orthodox nationalist message in a series of public events. He visited Mount Athos, Greece’s famous Holy Mountain, in May 2016 in a pilgrimage of sorts. It was shown live, with great fanfare, in wall-to-wall coverage on Tsargrad TV, and Putin was treated by the monks there more like a visiting Byzantine emperor than as the Russian president. This month, Putin was present for the grand reopening of the New Jerusalem Monastery outside Moscow, a sprawling 17th century complex that was destroyed by the Nazis in World War II and was rebuilt from the ground up over the past decade at great expense. It did not go unnoticed that the monastery was originally constructed to glorify the Third Rome idea, the centuries-old religious myth that Moscow is the sole successor to Rome and Byzantium, which has long served as a driver of Russian nationalism and imperialism. Then, last week, Patriarch Kirill warned of coming Armageddon. (…) Adding that the world’s end is in the hands of humanity, and something that Russians and all nations must stop, Krill warned of Earth imminently “slipping into the abyss of the end of history.” These are the comments of a top cleric, not the Ministry of Defense, but it should be noted that the Russian military is now practicing for global thermonuclear war in a manner it hasn’t done since the last Cold War. Last month, in an apparent continuation of September’s Zapad mega-wargame, Russia’s strategic nuclear forces conducted a huge exercise that involved Putin himself. This exercise involved all three “legs” of Russia’s nuclear triad: land-based ballistic missiles, long-range bombers, and submarines with ballistic missiles. In all, several cruise missiles were fired while three ballistic missiles were launched—and Putin personally gave the launch orders. This is a rare move, not to mention a violation of our nuclear treaties with the Kremlin, and Moscow was sending a hard-to-miss message. (…) It would be a mistake to directly lump nuclear exercises in with apocalyptic messages from leading Kremlin ideologues. However, it’s hardly encouraging that the Putin regime is pushing propaganda about planetary end-times while indulging in saber-rattling nuclear wargames for the first time in decades. Whatever else this aggressive Moscow messaging means, none of it bodes well for peace. John Schindler

Religions de tous pays, unissez vous !

Au lendemain d’un nouveau triomphe électoral du Chaisier musical en chef  de la sainte Russie …

Dont la participation et le score rien de moins qu’africains ou même soviétiques …

En font rêver plus d’un notre Sarkozy national en tête ….

Dans un Occident ne s’étant toujours pas remis du vide stratégique et des folies migratoires laissés par l’ère Obama-Merkel…

Comment ne pas voir …

Avec l’ex-expert de la NSA John Schindler

La lutte proprement théologique qui se profile …

Derrière la convergence des revanchismes tant russe que chinois ou musulman …

Et sous la menace d’une probablement inévitable invasion démographique africaine de l’Europe …

Entre sous l’étendard d’une Amérique en proie aux pires dérives du politiquement correct …

La décadence postmoderne d’un Occident désormais livré au plus crasse du matérialisme et de la déchristianisation ….

Et sous la houlette d’un régime poutinien multipliant entre inaugurations ou visites de lieux saints orthodoxes les démonstrations de force y compris chimiques ou thermonucléaires

Un reste du monde défendant la religion et les valeurs traditionnelles abandonnées par ledit Occident ?

Russia Conducts Nuclear Exercises Amid Orthodox End-Times Talk

One of the more interesting aspects of Cold War 2.0 is the ideological struggle between the postmodern West and Russia—a struggle that most Westerners deny even exists. President Barack Obama, after Moscow seized Crimea in early 2014, pronounced that there was nothing big afoot: “After all, unlike the Soviet Union, Russia leads no bloc of nations, no global ideology.”

Obama’s statement was wrong then, and it’s even more wrong now. As I’ve explained, there is an undeniable ideological struggle between Vladimir Putin’s neo-traditionalist Russia and the post-modern West—one that prominent Russians talk about all the time. In the Kremlin’s imagination, this fight pits the godless, materialistic, doomed 21st century West, too lazy to even reproduce, against a tough, reborn Russia that was forged in the murderous fire of 74 years of Bolshevism.

The yawning gap between Russian and Western values can be partly explained by the fact that Communism shielded the former from the West’s vast cultural shifts since the 1960s. Living under the Old Left provided protection against the New Left. As a result, Russians are living in our past and find current Western ways incomprehensible and even contemptible.

Take the reaction to America’s present panic about sexual harassment, which is felling celebrities and politicians left and right. In Moscow, this looks like madness, punishing powerful men for doing what powerful men have always done. Their late-night TV uses our sex panic as a punchline, proof that Americans are weak and feminized, held hostage to radical ideology. Andrei Konchalovsky, one of Russia’s top film directors (including some Hollywood hits), expressed his view plainly: “Thank God we live in a country where political correctness has not reached the point of absurdity.”

There is an undeniable theological aspect to this Russian contempt for post-modern Western values. The Russian Orthodox Church, which isn’t exactly state-controlled but is tightly linked to the Kremlin, regularly denounces the godless West and its sins—homosexuality and feminism especially. Orthodox clerics regularly castigate our “Satanic” ways as an example of what Russia must repel if it wants to survive the 21st century.

Denouncing the West as godless and decadent is a venerable tradition in Russian Orthodoxy with deep historical roots, and it’s been reborn after Communism with gusto. Patriarch Kirill, the head of the ROC, frequently breathes fire on post-modern Western ways, and a couple weeks back he shared them with John Huntsman, the newly arrived American ambassador in Moscow, in an awkward meet-and-greet that turned into a theology lecture.

Simply put, Kirill explained, America today is doing to itself what the Bolsheviks did to Russia: forcing a godless, secular ideology onto society. “Christian values are being destroyed… The West is abandoning God, but Russia is not abandoning God, like the majority of people in the world. That means the distance between our values is increasing,” he stated bluntly. Kirill’s insistence that America and the West are the outliers here, with Russia and most of the world on the side of traditional religion and values, is an important point that merits pondering.

The traditionalist nature of Putinism, always present, has grown more intense in recent years as the Kremlin has sought to enshrine an official ideology as confrontation with the West has grown. Whatever Vladimir Putin may actually believe, he has played the public role of an Orthodox believer quite effectively. He has cultivated senior ROC clerics, who provide regime-endorsing soundbites as needed, and the church gives Putin legitimacy in the eyes of average Russians, who aren’t especially religious in terms of church-going, yet they see an Orthodox identity as reassuring and plausible in Communism’s wake.

Putin has returned the church’s affection, stating that Russia’s “spiritual shield”—meaning Orthodoxy—is as important to the country’s security as its nuclear shield. In turn, Orthodox leaders portray Putin’s as a God-given figure, divinely sent to bring the country back to faith and great-power status out of the wreckage of atheistic Bolshevism.

Prominent here is Konstantin Malofeev, a hedge-fund billionaire turned militant Orthodox nationalist, who created Tsargrad TV, a 24-hour cable new network, to push those values to the public. Malofeev, like the Blues Brothers, thinks he’s on a mission from God, and his network is basically the Russian Fox News, if FNC focused on theology and mystical nationalism instead of blonde newsreaders.

Malofeev’s affection for Russia’s president and his system is clear: “We believe that Putin is the best and the only leader [for Russia]… He is trying to make Russia the state where Christians can live and can save their souls for eternal life.” While the deeply Eastern nature of Orthodoxy means it has little appeal for Western Christians, there’s no doubt that Kremlin messaging is reaching some, especially American Evangelicals, whom Moscow sees as potential allies abroad.

The notorious gadfly Aleksandr Dugin goes further: “Simply said, the Antichrist will not come before there will not be anymore supporters [of Orthodoxy]… What is the coming of Antichrist? It is secularism. It is modernization. Westernization. Materialism. Scientific development. The concept of progress.” He added that Putin is “exactly” the figure who is resisting the Antichrist on earth.

Dugin, it should be noted, isn’t some random flake or religious nut, he’s a Big Idea thinker who’s taken somewhat seriously in the Kremlin, although his real role seems to be Moscow’s ambassador-at-large to the Western far-right. He is close to the Russian security services and he runs a website that pushes his hardline Orthodox nationalist message in several languages, including English. Its name comes from the Greek word for “he who resists the Antichrist.”

Recently, Putin has played up the Orthodox nationalist message in a series of public events. He visited Mount Athos, Greece’s famous Holy Mountain, in May 2016 in a pilgrimage of sorts. It was shown live, with great fanfare, in wall-to-wall coverage on Tsargrad TV, and Putin was treated by the monks there more like a visiting Byzantine emperor than as the Russian president.

This month, Putin was present for the grand reopening of the New Jerusalem Monastery outside Moscow, a sprawling 17th century complex that was destroyed by the Nazis in World War II and was rebuilt from the ground up over the past decade at great expense. It did not go unnoticed that the monastery was originally constructed to glorify the Third Rome idea, the centuries-old religious myth that Moscow is the sole successor to Rome and Byzantium, which has long served as a driver of Russian nationalism and imperialism.

Then, last week, Patriarch Kirill warned of coming Armageddon. After a service at Moscow’s Christ the Savior Cathedral, he made a stunning statement: “One must be blind not to see the approach of the terrible moments of history about which the Apostle and Evangelist John the Theologian spoke in his Revelation.” Adding that the world’s end is in the hands of humanity, and something that Russians and all nations must stop, Krill warned of Earth imminently “slipping into the abyss of the end of history.”

These are the comments of a top cleric, not the Ministry of Defense, but it should be noted that the Russian military is now practicing for global thermonuclear war in a manner it hasn’t done since the last Cold War. Last month, in an apparent continuation of September’s Zapad mega-wargame, Russia’s strategic nuclear forces conducted a huge exercise that involved Putin himself. This exercise involved all three “legs” of Russia’s nuclear triad: land-based ballistic missiles, long-range bombers, and submarines with ballistic missiles. In all, several cruise missiles were fired while three ballistic missiles were launched—and Putin personally gave the launch orders.

This is a rare move, not to mention a violation of our nuclear treaties with the Kremlin, and Moscow was sending a hard-to-miss message. As Real Clear Defense reports, “The most striking thing about the exercise was that it was announced at all and that President Putin was characterized as ‘overseeing’ it and ordering the missile launches. This exercise was conducted in a sensitive period in U.S.-Russian relations. Russia did not have to announce the exercise. It has previously staged major strategic nuclear exercises without announcing them.”

It would be a mistake to directly lump nuclear exercises in with apocalyptic messages from leading Kremlin ideologues. However, it’s hardly encouraging that the Putin regime is pushing propaganda about planetary end-times while indulging in saber-rattling nuclear wargames for the first time in decades. Whatever else this aggressive Moscow messaging means, none of it bodes well for peace.

John Schindler is a security expert and former National Security Agency analyst and counterintelligence officer. A specialist in espionage and terrorism, he’s also been a Navy officer and a War College professor. He’s published four books and is on Twitter at @20committee. 

Voir aussi:

Putin’s Strategy of Global Tension

Ever since Moscow’s Little Green Men seized Crimea in early 2014, we’ve been in a new Cold War with Russia. To the consternation of wishful-thinkers, as Vladimir Putin’s confrontation with the West has become transparent, the reality of what I termed Cold War 2.0 almost four years ago has grown difficult to deny. Since the Kremlin’s revanchism is driving this conflict, we’re in it whether we want to be or not.

Europe is the central front in Cold War 2.0, thanks to geography and history. Putin’s war on, and in, Ukraine continues on low boil, while the Russian military regularly delivers provocations—a too-close warship here, an aircraft buzz there—all along NATO’s eastern frontier, sending an aggressive message. Major military exercises like September’s Zapad mega-wargame demonstrate Putin’s seriousness about confronting the Atlantic Alliance.

What Putin wants was the subject of my recent interview with Antoni Macierewicz, Poland’s plain-spoken defense minister. What the Kremlin boss seeks, he explained, is restoration of the Russian empire, to which Ukraine (or at least most of it) belonged for centuries. “Putin understands that there is no empire without Ukraine,” he added.

However, Kremlin provocations extend far beyond the former Soviet Union, as Macierewicz elaborated:

The first move, I think, is Ukraine. But I don’t exclude a military attack in the Far East. They want to distract American attention, prolong the front of confrontation in order to create a favorable situation for aggression in Europe. If you look at the map, Russia is always helping the enemies of America: deep ties to North Korea, involvement in Afghanistan and Syria, backing Iran, and so on.

This assessment sounds alarmist at first, particularly the mention of possible aggression in the Far East, but Western intelligence agencies that track Russian moves have been thinking along similar lines—though they seldom say so in public. Therefore, it’s worth taking a brief look at what Putin’s up to, and where.

Russia’s footprint on the North Korean crisis is impossible to miss, and since that’s the world’s most dangerous strategic predicament at present, Moscow’s less-than-helpful role merits attention. Although Beijing is clearly exasperated by the unhinged antics of its semi-client regime in Pyongyang, Moscow seems perfectly pleased with the hazardous games played by North Korea.

And why not? Pyongyang creates strategic confusion for the Americans, which the Kremlin always enjoys. Russian military and intelligence support to the increasingly isolated Kim regime is an open secret, while Putin’s sanctions-beating lifelines to Pyongyang are public and deeply annoying for both Beijing and Washington. Although Moscow is no more eager to see all-out war on the Korean peninsula than the Chinese or Americans, keeping the nasty Kim regime in place frustrates and distracts the Pentagon, which is Russia’s real aim here. Not to mention that backing North Korea is viewed in the Kremlin as payback for NATO’s “meddling” in Ukraine.

A similar pattern can be detected in Afghanistan, where American-led forces are in their sixteenth year of a seemingly endless counterinsurgency against the Taliban—and it’s not going well. Therefore, Moscow has been giving clandestine support to the Taliban. A few months back, the U.S. military command in Afghanistan admitted that Russian arms were reaching the Taliban. That clandestine Kremlin assistance is costing lives is increasingly obvious. Russian aid has reached Taliban “special” units that launch attacks on Afghan military bases.

A recent spate of Taliban assaults on Afghan forces, including nighttime raids, has inflicted unexpected casualties on American allies. Of concern to the Pentagon, Taliban fighters equipped with Russian-made night vision gear have been ambushing Afghan military and police with lethal effects. It seems only a matter of time before American troops are killed by Russian-equipped Taliban special operators.

While the Kremlin is in truth no fonder of the Taliban than the West is, this spoiler strategy is inflicting pain on the Americans and our clients in Kabul, which is all the Russians seek here. Not to mention that payback against us in Afghanistan, three decades after U.S. clandestine aid killed and wounded thousands of Soviet troops in that country, must be delicious for Moscow, where revenge has always constituted a rational strategic motivation.

However, the real fight is in the heart of the Middle East, where Russia and its Iranian allies are fundamentally transforming the region at high cost in blood. Together, Moscow and Tehran are challenging the American-constructed security system that’s an ailing holdover from the last Cold War. Even recent cooperation between America’s two clients, Israel and Saudi Arabia, appears insufficient to turn back the rising Russian-Iranian tide across the Middle East.

We only have ourselves to blame for this. Putin has taken full advantage of the blank check written by Barack Obama in September 2013 when our president backed away from his “red line” in Syria, in effect outsourcing that country and its terrible civil war to the Kremlin. As I predicted at the time, the strategic consequences of Obama’s decision have been grave, making Putin the new Middle East power-broker—a message that was missed only in Washington think-tanks.

For his part, Donald Trump has been only too willing to let his Russian counterpart and would-be buddy do whatever he likes in Syria, Iraq, and elsewhere. Moscow’s military intervention in the Middle East, begun under Obama, continues to flourish and shows no signs of abating. The balance of power in this vital region has shifted decisively from Washington to Moscow at appalling cost in human life, though none of that troubled President Obama very much, and it seems to trouble his successor not one bit.

It would be naïve to think Putin restricts his poking to the Eastern Hemisphere. Closer to our home, the bear’s paw-prints are easily detectable. Take Venezuela, the Bolivarian dictatorship and economic basket-case that’s barely a viable country at all anymore, between currency collapse and serious food shortages. Russian money is keeping this anti-American regime afloat, and last week Moscow’s refinancing of $3.15 billion it’s owed by Caracas gives the flat-broke country a bit of financial breathing room. Without Russia, Venezuela would likely implode, and it’s worth considering whether the Bolivarian regime is actually Putin’s newest satellite state. Although sanctions and low oil prices have diminished the Kremlin’s largess toward anti-Americans all over the globe, the prospect of having a loyal (because utterly dependent) client so close to the United States seems too good for Putin to pass up.

Then there’s Cuba, Moscow’s “fraternal ally” from the last Cold War, and apparently the second one too. Just 90 miles from Key West, Cuba has long served as a reliable base for Russian provocations against us, and nothing’s changed. Russian economic aid to that impoverished island is back, after falling off after 1991, and the Kremlin has begun to reopen its military and spy bases in the country, which were shuttered after the Soviet collapse.

Western intelligence has detected a Kremlin hand behind the recent rash of sonic attacks on American and Canadian diplomats in Cuba. While Havana flatly denies that anything untoward has occurred, two dozen U.S. diplomats in the country have suffered serious health problems due to this mysterious problem, which remains officially unexplained. However, it’s known that the KGB experimented with sonic weapons, while an attack of this sophistication is widely considered to be beyond the technical abilities of Cuban intelligence. “Of course it was the Russians,” explained a senior NATO security official to me recently about this strange case. “We have no real doubt of that.”

In all, this amounts to a worldwide Russian effort to push back against what’s left of American hegemony. Since Moscow lacks the ability to directly counter NATO and the U.S. militarily, the Russians are provoking and prodding where they can with the techniques of Special War: it’s what the Kremlin does best. This should be considered a spoiler strategy, a strategy of tension—what left-wing Italians in the 1970s termed la strategia della tensione.

Vladimir Putin seeks to expand Russian power on the cheap while causing problems for America and our allies wherever he can—without direct military confrontation. So far, the Kremlin seems to be playing its rather poor hand well at the tables of global power, and Putin’s strategy of tension shows no signs of abating. Although the Trump White House is paying no attention to this new reality, the Pentagon and our Intelligence Community certainly are.

John Schindler is a security expert and former National Security Agency analyst and counterintelligence officer. A specialist in espionage and terrorism, he’s also been a Navy officer and a War College professor. He’s published four books and is on Twitter at @20committee. 

Voir également:

How to Win Cold War 2.0

To beat Vladimir Putin, we’re going to have to be a little more like him.

The last two weeks have witnessed the upending of the European order and the close of the post-Cold War era. With his invasion of Crimea and the instant absorption of the strategic peninsula, Vladimir Putin has shown that he will not play by the West’s rules. The “end of history” is at an end—we’re now seeing the onset of Cold War 2.0.

What’s on the Kremlin’s mind was made clear by Putin’s fire-breathing speech to the Duma announcing the annexation of Crimea, which blended retrograde Russian nationalism with a generous helping of messianism on behalf of his fellow Slavs, alongside the KGB-speak that Putin is so fond of. If you enjoy mystical references to Orthodox saints of two millennia past accompanied by warnings about a Western fifth column and “national traitors,” this was the speech for you.

Putin confirmed the worst fears of Ukrainians who think they should have their own country. But his ambitions go well beyond Ukraine: By explicitly linking Russian ethnicity with membership in the Russian Federation, Putin has challenged the post-Soviet order writ large.

For years, I studied Russia as a counterintelligence officer for the National Security Agency, and at times I feel like I’m seeing history in reverse. The Kremlin is a fiercely revisionist power, seeking to change the status quo by various forms of force. This will soon involve NATO members in the Baltics directly, as well as Poland and Romania indirectly. Longstanding Russian acumen in what I term Special War, an amalgam of espionage, subversion and terrorism by spies and special operatives, is already known to Russia’s neighbors and can be expected to increase.

In truth, Putin set Russia on a course for Cold War 2.0 as far back as 2007, and perhaps earlier; Western counterintelligence noted major upswings in aggressive Russian espionage and subversion against NATO members as far back as 2006.The brief Georgia war of August 2008, which made clear that the Kremlin was perfectly comfortable with using force in the post-Soviet space, ought to have served as a bigger wake-up call for the West.

John R. Schindler is professor of national security affairs at the Naval War College and a former National Security Agency counterintelligence officer. The views expressed here are his own.
Voir de même:

Avec Zapad 2017, la Russie se prépare « pour une grande guerre », dit un responsable militaire de l’Otan

Le général tchèque Petr Pavel, le président du comité militaire de l’Otan, ne passe pour être alarmiste. Ainsi, en juin 2016, lors d’une audition devant la commission sénatoriale des Affaires étrangères et des Forces armées, il avait estimé que la Russie « ne présentait pas une menace imminente » tout n’écartant pas la volonté de son président, Vladimir Poutine, de défier l’Alliance atlantique.

« Des intérêts communs existent entre l’Alliance, l’Union européenne, nos propres pays et la Russie. Nous devons accepter que la Russie puisse être un concurrent, un compétiteur, un adversaire, un pair ou un partenaire – voire tout cela en même temps. […] Cette complexité est une réalité de notre environnement stratégique contemporain » et cela « demande une approche pratique et sophistiquée qui prend en compte le fait que la Russie veut devenir un partenaire mondial et acquérir un pouvoir mondial », avait ainsi expliqué le général Pavel aux sénateurs français.

Cela étant, l’exercice Zapad 2017 qui, mené conjointement par les forces russes et biélorusses, vient de débuter, préoccupe depuis plusieurs mois les responsables de l’Otan, dans la mesure où ces manoeuvres se déroulent dans l’enclave russe de Kaliningrad et en Biélorussie, à deux pas du passage dit de Suwalki qui est le seul accès terrestre reliant les pays baltes aux autres pays de l’Alliance et de l’Union européenne.

Or, il est reproché à la Russie de manquer de transparence au sujet de cet exercice, qui vise à simuler l’infiltration de « groupes extrémistes » en Biélorussie et à Kaliningrad pour y commettre des actes terroristes à des fins de déstabilisation.

Officiellement, Zapad 2017 mobilise environ 13.000 soldats. Mais selon le secrétaire général de l’Otan, Jens Stoltenberg, il y a « toutes les raisons de croire que le nombre de troupes sera substantiellement plus élevé que ce qui a été annoncé ». En outre, certains estiment qu’il servira de prétexte aux forces russes pour laisser des matériels en Biélorussie en vue d’une utilisation future.

Les manoeuvres Zapad-2017 « sont désignées pour nous provoquer, pour tester nos défenses et c’est pour cela que nous devons être forts », a ainsi affirmé, le 10 septembre, Michael Fallon, le ministre britannique de la Défense.

« La Russie est capable de manipuler les chiffres avec une grande aisance, c’est pourquoi elle ne veut pas d’observateurs étrangers. Mais 12.700 soldats annoncés pour des manoeuvres stratégiques, c’est ridicule », a commenté Alexandre Golts, un expert militaire russe indépendant, cité par l’AFP.

Ce manque de transparence de la Russie, qui ne s’inscrit pas dans l’esprit du Document de Vienne de l’OSCE [Organisation pour la sécurité et la coopération en Europe, ndlr], est un sujet de préoccupation pour le général Pavel, même s’il a rencontré, il y a deux semaines, le chef d’état-major des armées russes, le général Valery Gerasimov, pour évoquer cet exercice.

« Ce que nous voyons est une préparation sérieuse pour une grande guerre », a en effet dit le général tchèque lors d’un entretien donné le 16 septembre à l’Associated Press, en marge d’une réunion du comité militaire de l’Otan en Albanie. « Lorsque nous regardons uniquement l’exercice qui est présenté par la Russie, il ne devrait pas y avoir d’inquiétude. Mais quand on regarde la situation dans son ensemble, nous devons nous inquiéter parce que la Russie n’est pas transparente », a-t-il ajouté.

Le premier sujet de préoccupation du général Pavel porte sur le niveau des effectifs engagés dans l’exercice Zapad 2017. Selon lui, ils pourraient atteindre 70.000 soldats, voire 100.000.

« Nous avons une forte concentration de troupes dans les pays baltes. Nous avons une forte concentration de troupes en mer Noire. E le risque d’un incident peut être assez élevé en raison d’une erreur humaine ou d’une panne technologique », a souligné le général Pavel. « Nous devons être sûrs qu’un tel incident involontaire n’entraînera pas de conflit », a-t-il insisté.

Cela étant, la Biélorussie a annoncé, le 16 septembre, avoir invité des représentants de 7 pays (Lettonie, Lituanie, Estonie, Pologne, Suède, Norvège et d’Ukraine) pour observer les exercices de Zapad 2017 qui auront lieu sur son territoire. Il s’agit ainsi de répondre au « désir de développer la coopération et la bonne entente entre voisins, ainsi que les principes de réciprocité, d’ouverture et de transparence », a fait valoir le ministère biélorusse de la Défense. Jusqu’à présent, Moscou n’avait autorisé la venue que de trois oberservateurs de l’Otan, uniquement lors de la journée organisée pour les « visiteurs ».

Voir de plus:

Paul R. Gregory
Hoover
March 21, 2018

Vladimir Putin’s propaganda machine has two overarching goals.

First, the Russian people must believe the Kremlin version of domestic and world events. In this regard, the agents of Russian “information technology” have succeeded. Polls show that Russians believe that Russia is a super power in a hostile world; that there are no Russian troops in Ukraine; that Crimea voluntarily joined Russia; and that a Ukrainian fighter shot down Malaysian Airlines flight MH17.

Second, Kremlin propaganda must discredit Western democracy as dysfunctional and inferior to Russia’s managed “democracy.” Kremlin propaganda has largely failed in this regard. Russians consider their government corrupt, remote from the people, interested in preserving power rather than performing its duties, and lying about the true state of affairs. Nevertheless, Putin’s approval ratings remain high in the absence of rivals, who have fled the country, been indicted, or murdered.

Putin, in fact, bases his legitimacy on high approval ratings. To counter the Russian people’s sense that they have no say in how they are governed, Kremlin propagandists must sell the story that Western democracies have it worse. Downtrodden Americans, they say, face poverty, hunger, racial and ethnic discrimination, unemployment, and they are governed by corrupt, inept, greedy, dysfunctional, and feuding politicians who sell out to the highest bidder on Wall Street or in Silicon Valley.

This brings us to how the ballyhooed Russian meddling in the 2016 U.S. election has given Putin a gift that keeps on giving—a paralyzed federal government, incapable of compromise, in which a significant portion of the governing class questions the legitimacy of a new president.

Russia routinely meddles in the politics of other countries. Despite denials, the Kremlin contributes to pro-Russian political parties throughout the world, gathers compromising information, hacks into email accounts, offers lucrative contracts to foreign businesses, and circulates false news. Given this history, U.S. authorities should not have been surprised by Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential race.

To date, Special Counsel Robert Mueller has indicted thirteen Russian “internet trolls,” who sowed discord on social media by posting inflammatory, distorted, slanted, and false information promoting the Russian narrative of a deeply divided electorate and a discredited American electoral system. Mueller’s indictment identifies the Internet Research Agency (IRA) of St. Petersburg as the nerve center of Russia’s trolling operations. Although putatively owned by a private Russian oligarch close to Putin, there is little doubt that the IRA is a mouthpiece of the Kremlin. The existence and activities of the IRA have been known since 2014. It employs hundreds of hackers and writers divided into geographical sections. It is not the sole source of Russian trolling, but it is the most important.

Those American politicians and pundits, like Congressman Jerry Nagler and columnist Thomas Friedman, who label Russian intervention an act of warfare on par with Pearl Harbor or 9/11must attribute supernatural powers to Putin’s trolls. After all, the Mueller investigation revealed that Russia spent no more than a few million dollars on its election-meddling versus the over two billion dollars spent by the presidential candidates alone. The IRA’s St. Petersburg America desk constituted some 90 persons. Their social media posts accounted for an infinitesimal portion of social media political traffic and much of this came after the election.

Despite such evidence, Gerald F. Seib, a columnist for the Wall Street Journal, declares himself “frightened” by Russia’s “sophisticated and sustained effort to use technology, social media manipulation, and traditional covert measures to disrupt America’s political system.”

But a closer look at such trolls reveals a different picture. Over the past five years, Russian trolls have regularly attacked my articles at Forbes.com. Given the number of attacks and their organized nature, I suspect most came directly from the IRA.  The Kremlin clearly has not liked my posts on Russian domestic politics, the country’s faltering petro-economy, political assassinations, and foreign military intervention. What I encountered in the comments section of my pieces was an army of scripted trolls engaging in primitive invective and heavy doses of ad hominem blasts. These amateurs did not seem up to the monumental task for which they are now credited—of changing the course of American political history.

My trolls used the same clandestine social media techniques as those identified by Mueller in his indictments. They posted through leased servers with moving IP addresses. They assumed Anglo-Saxon (Jeff, RussM, Dave, John), exotic (Sadr Ewr, Er Ren), and computer generated (Hweits, Aij) monikers. Those with Anglo-Saxon names asserted they were Americans, even ex-Marines. They used provably false identities: One “Stanley Ford,” identifying himself as a graduate student at Stanford, expressed his dismay at my “shallow” Stanford economics seminar. But there is no such graduate student at Stanford and I had given no such seminar.

Other trolls, such as “Andrey,” wrote sometimes incomprehensible English: “Dear PAUL, can we badly know English language, but only one thing I want to say, YOU understand—Fack You.” (Russians have no English “u” sound in their alphabet.) Such “Andreys” were subsequently replaced by experienced trolls, such as “Jeff” and “RussM,” with an occasional guest rant by “Aij,” whose favorite topic was “filthy Jewish bankers.” My most prolific troll, “Jeff,” posted at times almost fifty comments per column. One troll appeared in person to pester me at a panel discussion in the Bay area. One volunteered that I am a fictional person. Another offered to drop by my office for a personal chat. For obvious reasons, I did not accept.

Troll “John’s” tirade is a classic ad hominem smear: “Gregory’s inane, badly written propaganda articles never had one original thought, just parroting what he could grab on the Internet. Gregory is a pitiful Nazi moron.”

My trolls made heavy use of moral equivalence. Did the U.S. not attack Iraq and did its police not gun down black teenagers in Missouri? Yes, Russia may be aiding the rebels in Syria and Ukraine, but are not American troops and CIA operatives swarming all over Ukraine? Yes, the shooting down of MH17 was a tragedy, but did not the United States down an Iranian passenger jet in 1988?

The “denying the obvious” technique is illustrated by three videos circulated by Russian trolls on the Internet and Russian TV. Each featured a wounded man lying in an east Ukrainian hospital bed. In one video, he claimed to be a heroic surgeon. In the second, he was a disillusioned neo-fascist financier. In the third video, the bandaged man declared himself an innocent bystander. The problem, I pointed out, was that each video featured the same Russian actor but in different roles. Unfazed, my trolls “saw no contradictions” until one of Russia’s main TV channels (NTV) declared that the versatile actor was mentally ill. When it comes to Ukraine, the official IRA line has been that the Russian tanks, radar, missile launchers, and the like were purchased at used weapon shops by the “patriots” fighting the neo-Nazis and extremists sent from Kiev. When I pointed out the inanity of this proposition, one troll’s unedited response read: “everything he (Gregory) says at the beginning is nothing BUT LIES! russia did not give the east ANYTHING.”

In a botched false-flag operation, trolls claimed that “Ukrainian” extremists fled in panic after firing on a separatist checkpoint, conveniently leaving behind a vast cache of Nazi regalia (plus “snipers’ diapers”). The video of the Nazi cache, however, is dated to the day before the alleged attack, according to the camera time code. My expose of the snipers’ diapers incident brought forth reinforcement from new trolls, who wanted to debate time zones and now to impute the time of day from the length of shadows.

My clashes with IRA trolls over Ukraine can seem at times comical, but they are dead serious. The trolls are pushing a strictly coordinated narrative both to the Russian people and to foreign audiences that Ukraine is an illegitimate state and that the United States and NATO are the aggressors.

Indeed, that Western democracies, American democracy especially, are rotten, corrupt, and hapless is a cornerstone of the Kremlin narrative. As the Mueller indictment concludes: The stated goal of the Russian operation was “spreading distrust towards candidates and the political system in general.” The Russian trolls, according to the Mueller indictment, used a number of techniques to achieve this end. They encouraged fringe candidates. They tried to ally with disaffected religious, ethnic, and nationalist groups. They discredited the candidate they thought most likely to win. Once the winner was known, they immediately moved to discredit him.

As noted above, the Russian people are largely on board with the IRA’s narrative. Why? The average Russian family gets its news from the major state networks, which offer topflight entertainment before and after news of the day. Russia’s trolls stand ready to swat down any unfavorable social media. Alternative messages have little hope of penetrating the Russian heartland.

Although the trolls are succeeding at home, Russian propaganda has had little effect on foreign audiences. Public opinion worldwide shows a negative opinion of Russia and Putin, according to Pew Research. But if Russian trolls cannot sway Western public opinion, how could they have influenced the outcome of the biggest game of all—a U.S. presidential election? The dozen ill-informed operatives indicted by Mueller held poorly attended rallies, had to be educated about red and blue states, and spent their limited funds in uncontested states. It would be almost crazy to believe that such Russian intervention could have made a difference.

Why, then, do so many Americans believe that Russia was instrumental in throwing the election to Donald Trump? It may be that some of the President’s opponents actually believe this narrative. But there’s another explanation, too: Russian intervention provides opportunistic politicians and pundits a useful excuse for paralyzing the incoming government of a gutter-fighter President from a show business and construction background with no political experience. In their view, such a person should not be allowed to govern. Hence the paralysis, dysfunction, and chaos of American democracy—long claimed by Russian propagandists—is on its way to becoming reality. What a windfall for Putin and his oligarchs.

Voir encore:

A Abou Dhabi, Sarkozy fait l’éloge des hommes forts

L’ancien président français regrette que « les démocraties détruisent tous les leaderships ».

Le Monde

Ces confidences peuvent paraître étonnantes de la part d’un ancien président français. Samedi 3 mars, lors du forum « Ideas Week-end » organisée à Abou Dhabi, la capitale des Emirats arabes unis, Nicolas Sarkozy a livré ses jugements sur l’état du monde, en maniant la provocation. A l’instar du site d’information Buzzfeed, Le Monde s’est procuré l’enregistrement de son intervention. Morceaux choisis.

  • Leadership et démocratie

« Quels sont les grands leaders du monde aujourd’hui ? Le président Xi, le président Poutine – on peut être d’accord ou pas, mais c’est un leader –, le grand prince Mohammed Ben Salman [d’Arabie saoudite]. Et que seraient aujourd’hui les Emirats sans le leadership de MBZ [Mohammed Ben Zayed] ?

Quel est le problème des démocraties ? C’est que les démocraties ont pu devenir des démocraties avec de grands leaders : de Gaulle, Churchill… Mais les démocraties détruisent tous les leaderships. C’est un grand sujet, ce n’est pas un sujet anecdotique ! Comment peut-on avoir une vision à dix, quinze ou vingt ans, et en même temps avoir un rythme électoral aux Etats-Unis tous les quatre ans ? Les démocraties sont devenues un champ de bataille, où chaque heure est utilisée par tout le monde, réseaux sociaux et autres, pour détruire celui qui est en place. Comment voulez-vous avoir une vision de long terme pour un pays ? C’est ce qui fait que, aujourd’hui, les grands leaders du monde sont issus de pays qui ne sont pas de grandes démocraties. »

  • La Chine

« C’est une formidable bonne nouvelle que la Chine assume ses responsabilités internationales. On assiste à un changement de la politique chinoise comme jamais on n’en a connu avant. Jamais. La Chine, c’est quand même le pays qui a construit la Grande Muraille pour se protéger des barbares qui étaient de l’autre côté : nous. « One Road, One Belt » [le projet de « nouvelles routes de la soie » du pouvoir chinois] : c’est un changement colossal ! Tout d’un coup, la Chine décomplexée dit : “Je pars à la conquête du monde.” Alors est-ce que c’est pour des raisons éducatives, politiques, économiques : peu importe. »

  • Xi président à vie

« Le président Xi considère que deux mandats de cinq ans, dix ans, c’est pas assez. Il a raison ! Le mandat du président américain, en vérité c’est pas quatre ans, c’est deux ans : un an pour apprendre le job, un an pour préparer la réélection. Donc vous comparez le président chinois qui a une vision pour son pays et qui dit : “Dix ans, c’est pas assez”, au président américain qui a en vérité deux ans. Mais qui parierait beaucoup sur la réélection de Trump ? Ce matin, j’ai rencontré le prince héritier MBZ. Est-ce que vous croyez qu’on construit un pays comme ça, en deux ans ? Ici, en cinquante ans, vous avez construit un des pays les plus modernes qui soient. La question du leadership est centrale. La réussite du modèle émirien est sans doute l’exemple le plus important pour nous, pour l’ensemble du monde. J’ai été le chef de l’Etat qui a signé le contrat du Louvre à Abou Dhabi. J’y ai mis toute mon énergie. MBZ y a mis toute sa vision. On a mis dix ans ! En allant vite ! Sauf que MBZ est toujours là… Et moi ça fait six ans que je suis parti. »

  • Comment traiter avec la Russie ?

« La question doit être posée comme ça : est-ce qu’on a besoin de la Russie ou pas ? Ma réponse est oui ! La Russie, c’est le pays à la plus grande superficie du monde. Qui peut dire qu’on ne doit pas parler avec eux ? Quelle est cette idée folle ? Je n’avais pas tout à fait compris dans l’administration Obama pourquoi Poutine et la Russie étaient devenus le principal adversaire. Y a-t-il un risque que la Russie envahisse d’autres pays ? Je n’y crois pas. La Russie doit perdre environ un demi-million d’habitants par an, sur le territoire le plus grand du monde. Est-ce que vous avez déjà vu des pays qui n’arrivent pas à occuper toute leur surface aller envahir des pays à côté ? Sur l’Ukraine, je pense que l’affaire n’a pas été bien gérée depuis le début et qu’il y avait moyen de faire mieux. Poutine est un homme prévisible, avec qui on peut parler et qui respecte la force. »

  • Le défi du populisme

« D’abord pour moi, M. Orban en Hongrie [le premier ministre], c’est pas un populiste. Mais là où il y a un grand leader, il n’y a pas de populisme ! Où est le populisme en Chine ? Où est le populisme ici ? Où est le populisme en Russie ? Où est le populisme en Arabie saoudite ? Si le grand leader quitte la table, les leaders populistes prennent la place. Parce que la polémique ne détruit pas le leader populiste, la polémique détruit le leader démocratique.

La seule solution, ce n’est pas de combattre le populisme, ça n’a pas de sens, c’est d’écouter ce que dit le peuple. Que dit le peuple ? L’Europe est à 12 kilomètres de l’Afrique par le détroit de Gibraltar. En trente ans, l’Afrique va passer d’un milliard d’habitants à 2,3 milliards. Le seul Nigeria, vous m’entendez, le Nigeria, dans trente ans, aura plus d’habitants que les Etats-Unis. Le peuple dit : “On ne peut pas accueillir toute l’immigration qui vient d’Afrique.” Et c’est vrai.

Il ne s’agit pas de supprimer l’immigration. Mais dans trente ans, il y aura 500 millions d’Européens, et 2,3 milliards d’Africains. Si l’Afrique ne se développe pas, l’Europe explosera. Ce n’est pas un sujet populiste, c’est un sujet tout court. »

Voir enfin:
Ivan Ilyin, Putin’s Philosopher of Russian Fascism

Timothy Snyder
The NY Reviw of books
March 16, 2018

This is an expanded version of Timothy Snyder’s essay “God Is a Russian” in the April 5, 2018 issue of The New York Review.


“The fact of the matter is that fascism is a redemptive excess of patriotic arbitrariness.”

—Ivan Ilyin, 1927

“My prayer is like a sword. And my sword is like a prayer.”

—Ivan Ilyin, 1927

“Politics is the art of identifying and neutralizing the enemy.”

—Ivan Ilyin, 1948

The Russian looked Satan in the eye, put God on the psychoanalyst’s couch, and understood that his nation could redeem the world. An agonized God told the Russian a story of failure. In the beginning was the Word, purity and perfection, and the Word was God. But then God made a youthful mistake. He created the world to complete himself, but instead soiled himself, and hid in shame. God’s, not Adam’s, was the original sin, the release of the imperfect. Once people were in the world, they apprehended facts and experienced feelings that could not be reassembled to what had been God’s mind. Each individual thought or passion deepened the hold of Satan on the world.

And so the Russian, a philosopher, understood history as a disgrace. Nothing that had happened since creation was of significance. The world was a meaningless farrago of fragments. The more humans sought to understand it, the more sinful it became. Modern society, with its pluralism and its civil society, deepened the flaws of the world and kept God in his exile. God’s one hope was that a righteous nation would follow a Leader into political totality, and thereby begin a repair of the world that might in turn redeem the divine. Because the unifying principle of the Word was the only good in the universe, any means that might bring about its return were justified.

Thus this Russian philosopher, whose name was Ivan Ilyin, came to imagine a Russian Christian fascism. Born in 1883, he finished a dissertation on God’s worldly failure just before the Russian Revolution of 1917. Expelled from his homeland in 1922 by the Soviet power he despised, he embraced the cause of Benito Mussolini and completed an apology for political violence in 1925. In German and Swiss exile, he wrote in the 1920s and 1930s for White Russian exiles who had fled after defeat in the Russian civil war, and in the 1940s and 1950s for future Russians who would see the end of the Soviet power.

A tireless worker, Ilyin produced about twenty books in Russian, and another twenty in German. Some of his work has a rambling and commonsensical character, and it is easy to find tensions and contradictions. One current of thought that is coherent over the decades, however, is his metaphysical and moral justification for political totalitarianism, which he expressed in practical outlines for a fascist state. A crucial concept was “law” or “legal consciousness” (pravosoznanie). For the young Ilyin, writing before the Revolution, law embodied the hope that Russians would partake in a universal consciousness that would allow Russia to create a modern state. For the mature, counter-revolutionary Ilyin, a particular consciousness (“heart” or “soul,” not “mind”) permitted Russians to experience the arbitrary claims of power as law. Though he died forgotten, in 1954, Ilyin’s work was revived after collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, and guides the men who rule Russia today.

The Russian Federation of the early twenty-first century is a new country, formed in 1991 from the territory of the Russian republic of the Soviet Union. It is smaller than the old Russian Empire, and separated from it in time by the intervening seven decades of Soviet history. Yet the Russian Federation of today does resemble the Russian Empire of Ilyin’s youth in one crucial respect: it has not established the rule of law as the principle of government. The trajectory in Ilyin’s understanding of law, from hopeful universalism to arbitrary nationalism, was followed in the discourse of Russian politicians, including Vladimir Putin. Because Ilyin found ways to present the failure of the rule of law as Russian virtue, Russian kleptocrats use his ideas to portray economic inequality as national innocence. In the last few years, Vladimir Putin has also used some of Ilyin’s more specific ideas about geopolitics in his effort translate the task of Russian politics from the pursuit of reform at home to the export of virtue abroad. By transforming international politics into a discussion of “spiritual threats,” Ilyin’s works have helped Russian elites to portray the Ukraine, Europe, and the United States as existential dangers to Russia.

*

Ivan Ilyin was a philosopher who confronted Russian problems with German thinkers. This was typical of the time and place. He was child of the Silver Age, the late empire of the Romanov dynasty. His father was a Russian nobleman, his mother a German Protestant who had converted to Orthodoxy. As a student at Moscow between 1901 and 1906, Ilyin’s real subject was philosophy, which meant the ethical thought of Immanuel Kant (1724–1804). For the neo-Kantians, who then held sway in universities across Europe as well as in Russia, humans differed from the rest of creation by a capacity for reason that permitted meaningful choices. Humans could then freely submit to law, since they could grasp and accept its spirit.

Law was then the great object of desire of the Russian thinking classes. Russian students of law, perhaps more than their European colleagues, could see it as a source of political transformation. Law seemed to offer the antidote to the ancient Russian problem of proizvol, of arbitrary rule by autocratic tsars. Even as a hopeful young man, however, Ilyin struggled to see the Russian people as the creatures of reason Kant imagined. He waited expectantly for a grand revolt that would hasten the education of the Russian masses. When the Russo-Japanese War created conditions for a revolution in 1905, Ilyin defended the right to free assembly. With his girlfriend, Natalia Vokach, he translated a German anarchist pamphlet into Russian. The tsar was forced to concede a new constitution in 1906, which created a new Russian parliament. Though chosen in a way that guaranteed the power of the empire’s landed classes, the parliament had the authority to legislate. The tsar dismissed parliament twice, and then illegally changed the electoral system to ensure that it was even more conservative. It was impossible to see the new constitution as having brought the rule of law to Russia.

Employed to teach law by the university in 1909, Ilyin published a beautiful article in both Russian (1910) and German (1912) on the conceptual differences between law and power. Yet how to make law functional in practice and resonant in life? Kant seemed to leave open a gap between the spirit of law and the reality of autocracy. G.W.F. Hegel (1770–1831), however, offered hope by proposing that this and other painful tensions would be resolved by time. History, as a hopeful Ilyin read Hegel, was the gradual penetration of Spirit (Geist) into the world. Each age transcended the previous one and brought a crisis that promised the next one. The beastly masses will come to resemble the enlightened friends, ardors of daily life will yield to political order.

The philosopher who understands this message becomes the vehicle of Spirit, always a tempting prospect. Like other Russian intellectuals of his own and previous generations, the young Ilyin was drawn to Hegel, and in 1912 proclaimed a “Hegelian renaissance.” Yet, just as the immense Russian peasantry had given him second thoughts about the ease of communicating law to Russian society, so his experience of modern urban life left him doubtful that historical change was only a matter of Spirit. He found Russians, even those of his own class and milieu in Moscow, to be disgustingly corporeal. In arguments about philosophy and politics in the 1910s, he accused his opponents of “sexual perversion.”

In 1913, Ilyin worried that perversion was a national Russian syndrome, and proposed Sigmund Freud (1856–1939) as Russia’s savior. In Ilyin’s reading of Freud, civilization arose from a collective agreement to suppress basic drives. The individual paid a psychological price for sacrifice of his nature to culture. Only through long consultations on the couch of the psychoanalyst could unconscious experience surface into awareness. Psychoanalysis therefore offered a very different portrait of thought than did the Hegelian philosophy that Ilyin was then studying. Even as Ilyin was preparing his dissertation on Hegel, he offered himself as the pioneer of Russia’s national psychotherapy, travelling with Natalia to Vienna in May 1914 for sessions with Freud. Thus the outbreak of World War I found Ilyin in Vienna, the capital of the Habsburg monarchy, now one of Russia’s enemies.

“My inner Germans,” Ilyin wrote to a friend in 1915, “trouble me more than the outer Germans,” the German and Habsburg realms making war against the Russian Empire. The “inner German” who helped Ilyin to master the others was the philosopher Edmund Husserl, with whom he had studied in Göttingen in 1911. Husserl (1859–1938), the founder of the school of thought known as phenomenology, tried to describe the method by which the philosopher thinks himself into the world. The philosopher sought to forget his own personality and prior assumptions, and tried to experience a subject on its own terms. As Ilyin put it, the philosopher must mentally possess (perezhit’) the object of inquiry until he attains self-evident and exhaustive clarity (ochevidnost).

Husserl’s method was simplified by Ilyin into a “philosophical act” whereby the philosopher can still the universe and anything in it—other philosophers, the world, God— by stilling his own mind. Like an Orthodox believer contemplating an icon, Ilyin believed (in contrast to Husserl) that he could see a metaphysical reality through a physical one. As he wrote his dissertation about Hegel, he perceived the divine subject in a philosophical text, and fixed it in place. Hegel meant God when he wrote Spirit, concluded Ilyin, and Hegel was wrong to see motion in history. God could not realize himself in the world, since the substance of God was irreconcilably different from the substance of the world. Hegel could not show that every fact was connected to a principle, that every accident was part of a design, that every detail was part of a whole, and so on. God had initiated history and then been blocked from further influence.

Ilyin was quite typical of Russian intellectuals in his rapid and enthusiastic embrace of contradictory German ideas. In his dissertation he was able, thanks to his own very specific understanding of Husserl, to bring some order to his “inner Germans.” Kant had suggested the initial problem for a Russian political thinker: how to establish the rule of law. Hegel had seemed to provide a solution, a Spirit advancing through history. Freud had redefined Russia’s problem as sexual rather than spiritual. Husserl allowed Ilyin to transfer the responsibility for political failure and sexual unease to God. Philosophy meant the contemplation that allowed contact with God and began God’s cure. The philosopher had taken control and all was in view: other philosophers, the world, God. Yet, even after contact was made with the divine, history continued, “the current of events” continued to flow.

Indeed, even as Ilyin contemplated God, men were killing and dying by the millions on battlefields across Europe. Ilyin was writing his dissertation as the Russian Empire gained and then lost territory on the Eastern Front of World War I. In February 1917, the tsarist regime was replaced by a new constitutional order. The new government tottered as it continued a costly war. That April, Germany sent Vladimir Lenin to Russia in a sealed train, and his Bolsheviks carried out a second revolution in November, promising land to peasants and peace to all. Ilyin was meanwhile trying to assemble the committee so he could defend his dissertation. By the time he did so, in 1918, the Bolsheviks were in power, their Red Army was fighting a civil war, and the Cheka was defending revolution through terror.

World War I gave revolutionaries their chance, and so opened the way for counter-revolutionaries as well. Throughout Europe, men of the far right saw the Bolshevik Revolution as a certain kind of opportunity; and the drama of revolution and counter-revolution was played out, with different outcomes, in Germany, Hungary, and Italy. Nowhere was the conflict so long, bloody, and passionate as in the lands of the former Russian Empire, where civil war lasted for years, brought famine and pogroms, and cost about as many lives as World War I itself. In Europe in general, but in Russia in particular, the terrible loss of life, the seemingly endless strife, and the fall of empire brought a certain plausibility to ideas that might otherwise have remained unknown or seemed irrelevant. Without the war, Leninism would likely be a footnote in the history of Marxist thought; without Lenin’s revolution, Ilyin might not have drawn right-wing political conclusions from his dissertation.

Lenin and Ilyin did not know each other, but their encounter in revolution and counter-revolution was nevertheless uncanny. Lenin’s patronymic was “Ilyich” and he wrote under the pseudonym “Ilyin,” and the real Ilyin reviewed some of that pseudonymous work. When Ilyin was arrested by the Cheka as an opponent of the revolution, Lenin intervened on his behalf as a gesture of respect for Ilyin’s philosophical work. The intellectual interaction between the two men, which began in 1917 and continues in Russia today, began from a common appreciation of Hegel’s promise of totality. Both men interpreted Hegel in radical ways, agreeing with one another on important points such as the need to destroy the middle classes, disagreeing about the final form of the classless community.

Lenin accepted with Hegel that history was a story of progress through conflict. As a Marxist, he believed that the conflict was between social classes: the bourgeoisie that owned property and the proletariat that enabled profits. Lenin added to Marxism the proposal that the working class, though formed by capitalism and destined to seize its achievements, needed guidance from a disciplined party that understood the rules of history. In 1917, Lenin went so far as to claim that the people who knew the rules of history also knew when to break them— by beginning a socialist revolution in the Russian Empire, where capitalism was weak and the working class tiny. Yet Lenin never doubted that there was a good human nature, trapped by historical conditions, and therefore subject to release by historical action.

Marxists such as Lenin were atheists. They thought that by Spirit, Hegel meant God or some other theological notion, and replaced Spirit with society. Ilyin was not a typical Christian, but he believed in God. Ilyin agreed with Marxists that Hegel meant God, and argued that Hegel’s God had created a ruined world. For Marxists, private property served the function of an original sin, and its dissolution would release the good in man. For Ilyin, God’s act of creation was itself the original sin. There was never a good moment in history, and no intrinsic good in humans. The Marxists were right to hate the middle classes, and indeed did not hate them enough. Middle-class “civil society” entrenches plural interests that confound hopes for an “overpowering national organization” that God needs. Because the middle classes block God, they must be swept away by a classless national community. But there is no historical tendency, no historical group, that will perform this labor. The grand transformation from Satanic individuality to divine totality must begin somewhere beyond history.

According to Ilyin, liberation would arise not from understanding history, but from eliminating it. Since the earthly was corrupt and the divine unattainable, political rescue would come from the realm of fiction. In 1917, Ilyin was still hopeful that Russia might become a state ruled by law. Lenin’s revolution ensured that Ilyin henceforth regarded his own philosophical ideas as political. Bolshevism had proven that God’s world was as flawed as Ilyin had maintained. What Ilyin would call “the abyss of atheism” of the new regime was the final confirmation of the flaws of world, and of the power of modern ideas to reinforce them.

After he departed Russia, Ilyin would maintain that humanity needed heroes, outsized characters from beyond history, capable of willing themselves to power. In his dissertation, this politics was implicit in the longing for a missing totality and the suggestion that the nation might begin its restoration. It was an ideology awaiting a form and a name.

*

Ilyin left Russia in 1922, the year the Soviet Union was founded. His imagination was soon captured by Benito Mussolini’s March on Rome, the coup d’état that brought the world’s first fascist regime. Ilyin was convinced that bold gestures by bold men could begin to undo the flawed character of existence. He visited Italy and published admiring articles about Il Duce while he was writing his book, On the Use of Violence to Resist Evil (1925). If Ilyin’s dissertation had laid groundwork for a metaphysical defense of fascism, this book was a justification of an emerging system. The dissertation described the lost totality unleashed by an unwitting God; second book explained the limits of the teachings of God’s Son. Having understood the trauma of God, Ilyin now “looked Satan in the eye.”

Thus famous teachings of Jesus, as rendered in the Gospel of Mark, take on unexpected meanings in Ilyin’s interpretations. “Judge not,” says Jesus, “that ye not be judged.” That famous appeal to reflection continues:

For with what judgment ye judge, ye shall be judged: and with what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again. And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother’s eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye? Or how wilt thou say to thy brother, Let me pull out the mote out of thine eye; and, behold, a beam is in thine own eye? Thou hypocrite, first cast out the beam out of thine own eye; and then shalt thou see clearly to cast out the mote out of thy brother’s eye.

For Ilyin, these were the words of a failed God with a doomed Son. In fact, a righteous man did not reflect upon his own deeds or attempt to see the perspective of another; he contemplated, recognized absolute good and evil, and named the enemies to be destroyed. The proper interpretation of the “judge not” passage was that every day was judgment day, and that men would be judged for not killing God’s enemies when they had the chance. In God’s absence, Ilyin determined who those enemies were.

Perhaps Jesus’ most remembered commandment is to love one’s enemy, from the Gospel of Matthew: “Ye have heard that it hath been said, An eye for an eye, and a tooth for a tooth: But I say unto you, That ye resist not evil: but whosoever shall smite thee on thy right cheek, turn to him the other also.” Ilyin maintained that the opposite was meant. Properly understood, love meant totality. It did not matter whether one individual tries to love another individual. The individual only loved if he was totally subsumed in the community. To be immersed in such love was to struggle “against the enemies of the divine order on earth.” Christianity actually meant the call of the right-seeing philosopher to apply decisive violence in the name of love. Anyone who failed to accept this logic was himself an agent of Satan: “He who opposes the chivalrous struggle against the devil is himself the devil.”

Thus theology becomes politics. The democracies did not oppose Bolshevism, but enabled it, and must be destroyed. The only way to prevent the spread of evil was to crush middle classes, eradicate their civil society, and transform their individualist and universalist understanding of law into a consciousness of national submission. Bolshevism was no antidote to the disease of the middle classes, but rather the full irruption of their disease. Soviet and European governments must be swept away by violent coups d’état.

Ilyin used the word Spirit (Dukh) to describe the inspiration of fascists. The fascist seizure of power, he wrote, was an “act of salvation.” The fascist is the true redeemer, since he grasps that it is the enemy who must be sacrificed. Ilyin took from Mussolini the concept of a “chivalrous sacrifice” that fascists make in the blood of others. (Speaking of the Holocaust in 1943, Heinrich Himmler would praise his SS-men in just these terms.)

Ilyin understood his role as a Russian intellectual as the propagation of fascist ideas in a particular Russian idiom. In a poem in the first number of a journal he edited between 1927 and 1930, he provided the appropriate lapidary motto: “My prayer is like a sword. And my sword is like a prayer.” Ilyin dedicated his huge 1925 book On the Use of Violence to Resist Evil to the Whites, the men who had resisted the Bolshevik Revolution. It was meant as a guide to their future.

What seemed to trouble Ilyin most was that Italians and not Russians had invented fascism: “Why did the Italians succeed where we failed?” Writing of the future of Russian fascism in 1927, he tried to establish Russian primacy by considering the White resistance to the Bolsheviks as the pre-history of the fascist movement as a whole. The White movement had also been “deeper and broader” than fascism because it had preserved a connection to religion and the need for totality. Ilyin proclaimed to “my White brothers, the fascists” that a minority must seize power in Russia. The time would come. The “White Spirit” was eternal.

Ilyin’s proclamation of a fascist future for Russia in the 1920s was the absolute negation of his hopes in the 1910s that Russia might become a rule-of-law state. “The fact of the matter,” wrote Ilyin, “is that fascism is a redemptive excess of patriotic arbitrariness.” Arbitrariness (proizvol), a central concept in all modern Russian political discussions, was the bugbear of all Russian reformers seeking improvement through law. Now proizvol was patriotic. The word for “redemptive” (spasytelnii), is another central Russian concept. It is the adjective Russian Orthodox Christians might apply to the sacrifice of Christ on Calvary, the death of the One for the salvation of the many. Ilyin uses it to mean the murder of outsiders so that the nation could undertake a project of total politics that might later redeem a lost God.

In one sentence, two universal concepts, law and Christianity, are undone. A spirit of lawlessness replaces the spirit of the law; a spirit of murder replaces a spirit of mercy.

*

Although Ilyin was inspired by fascist Italy, his home as a political refugee between 1922 and 1938 was Germany. As an employee of the Russian Scholarly Institute (Russisches Wissenschaftliches Institut), he was an academic civil servant. It was from Berlin that he observed the succession struggle after Lenin’s death that brought Joseph Stalin to power. He then followed Stalin’s attempt to transform the political victory of the Bolsheviks into a social revolution. In 1933, Ilyin published a long book, in German, on the famine brought by the collectivization of Soviet agriculture.

Writing in Russian for Russian émigrés, Ilyin was quick to praise Hitler’s seizure of power in 1933. Hitler did well, in Ilyin’s opinion, to have the rule of law suspended after the Reichstag Fire of February 1933. Ilyin presented Hitler, like Mussolini, as a Leader from beyond history whose mission was entirely defensive. “A reaction to Bolshevism had to come,” wrote Ilyin, “and it came.” European civilization had been sentenced to death, but “so long as Mussolini is leading Italy and Hitler is leading Germany, European culture has a stay of execution.” Nazis embodied a “Spirit” (Dukh) that Russians must share.

According to Ilyin, Nazis were right to boycott Jewish businesses and blame Jews as a collectivity for the evils that had befallen Germany. Above all, Ilyin wanted to persuade Russians and other Europeans that Hitler was right to treat Jews as agents of Bolshevism. This “Judeobolshevik” idea, as Ilyin understood, was the ideological connection between the Whites and the Nazis. The claim that Jews were Bolsheviks and Bolsheviks were Jews was White propaganda during the Russian Civil War. Of course, most communists were not Jews, and the overwhelming majority of Jews had nothing to do with communism. The conflation of the two groups was not an error or an exaggeration, but rather a transformation of traditional religious prejudices into instruments of national unity. Judeobolshevism appealed to the superstitious belief of Orthodox Christian peasants that Jews guarded the border between the realms of good and evil. It shifted this conviction to modern politics, portraying revolution as hell and Jews as its gatekeepers. As in Ilyin’s philosophy, God was weak, Satan was dominant, and the weapons of hell were modern ideas in the world.

During and after the Russian Civil War, some of the Whites had fled to Germany as refugees. Some brought with them the foundational text of modern antisemitism, the fictional “Protocols of the Elders of Zion,” and many others the conviction that a global Jewish conspiracy was responsible for their defeat. White Judeobolshevism, arriving in Germany in 1919 and 1920, completed the education of Adolf Hitler as an antisemite. Until that moment, Hitler had presented the enemy of Germany as Jewish capitalism. Once convinced that Jews were responsible for both capitalism and communism, Hitler could take the final step and conclude, as he did in Mein Kampf, that Jews were the source of all ideas that threatened the German people. In this important respect, Hitler was indeed a pupil of the Russian White movement. Ilyin, the main White ideologist, wanted the world to know that Hitler was right.

As the 1930s passed, Ilyin began to doubt that Nazi Germany was advancing the cause of Russian fascism. This was natural, since Hitler regarded Russians as subhumans, and Germany supported European fascists only insofar as they were useful to the specific Nazi cause. Ilyin began to caution Russian Whites about Nazis, and came under suspicion from the German government. He lost his job and, in 1938, left Germany for Switzerland. He remained faithful, however, to his conviction that the White movement was anterior to Italian fascism and German National Socialism. In time, Russians would demonstrate a superior fascism.

*

From a safe Swiss vantage point near Zurich, Ilyin observed the outbreak of World War II. It was a confusing moment for both communists and their enemies, since the conflict began after the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany reached an agreement known as the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact. Its secret protocol, which divided East European territories between the two powers, was an alliance in all but name. In September 1939, both Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union invaded Poland, their armies meeting in the middle. Ilyin believed that the Nazi-Soviet alliance would not last, since Stalin would betray Hitler. In 1941, the reverse took place, as the Wehrmacht invaded the Soviet Union. Though Ilyin harbored reservations about the Nazis, he wrote of the German invasion of the USSR as a “judgment on Bolshevism.” After the Soviet victory at Stalingrad in February 1943, when it became clear that Germany would likely lose the war, Ilyin changed his position again. Then, and in the years to follow, he would present the war as one of a series of Western attacks on Russian virtue.

Russian innocence was becoming one of Ilyin’s great themes. As a concept, it completed Ilyin’s fascist theory: the world was corrupt; it needed redemption from a nation capable of total politics; that nation was unsoiled Russia. As he aged, Ilyin dwelled on the Russian past, not as history, but as a cyclical myth of native virtue defended from external penetration. Russia was an immaculate empire, always under attack from all sides. A small territory around Moscow became the Russian Empire, the largest country of all time, without ever attacking anyone. Even as it expanded, Russia was the victim, because Europeans did not understand the profound virtue it was defending by taking more land. In Ilyin’s words, Russia has been subject to unceasing “continental blockade,” and so its entire past was one of “self-defense.” And so, “the Russian nation, since its full conversion to Christianity, can count nearly one thousand years of historical suffering.”

Although Ilyin wrote hundreds of tedious pages along these lines, he also made clear that it did not matter what had actually happened or what Russians actually did. That was meaningless history, those were mere facts. The truth about a nation, wrote Ilyin, was “pure and objective” regardless of the evidence, and the Russian truth was invisible and ineffable Godliness. Russia was not a country with individuals and institutions, even should it so appear, but an immortal living creature. “Russia is an organism of nature and the soul,” it was a “living organism,” a “living organic unity,” and so on. Ilyin wrote of “Ukrainians” within quotation marks, since in his view they were a part of the Russian organism. Ilyin was obsessed by the fear that people in the West would not understand this, and saw any mention of Ukraine as an attack on Russia. Because Russia is an organism, it “cannot be divided, only dissected.”

Ilyin’s conception of Russia’s political return to God required the abandonment not only of individuality and plurality, but also of humanity. The fascist language of organic unity, discredited by the war, remained central to Ilyin. In general, his thinking was not really altered by the war. He did not reject fascism, as did most of its prewar advocates, although he now did distinguish between what he regarded as better and worse forms of fascism. He did not partake in the general shift of European politics to the left, nor in the rehabilitation of democracy. Perhaps most importantly, he did not recognize that the age of European colonialism was passing. He saw Franco’s Spain and Salazar’s Portugal, then far-flung empires ruled by right-wing authoritarian regimes, as exemplary.

World War II was not a “judgment on Bolshevism,” as Ilyin had imagined in 1941. Instead, the Red Army had emerged triumphant in 1945, Soviet borders had been extended west, and a new outer empire of replicate regimes had been established in Eastern Europe. The simple passage of time made it impossible to imagine in the 1940s, as Ilyin had in the 1920s, the members of the White emigration might someday return to power in Russia. Now he was writing their eulogies rather than their ideologies. What was needed instead was a blueprint for a post-Soviet Russia that would be legible in the future. Ilyin set about composing a number of constitutional proposals, as well as a shorter set of political essays. These last, published as Our tasks (Nashi zadachi), began his intellectual revival in post-Soviet Russia.

These postwar recommendations bear an unmistakable resemblance to prewar fascist systems, and are consistent with the metaphysical and ethical legitimations of fascism present in Ilyin’s major works. The “national dictator,” predicted Ilyin, would spring from somewhere beyond history, from some fictional realm. This Leader (Gosudar’) must be “sufficiently manly,” like Mussolini. The note of fragile masculinity is hard to overlook. “Power comes all by itself,” declared Ilyin, “to the strong man.” People would bow before “the living organ of Russia.” The Leader “hardens himself in just and manly service.”

In Ilyin’s scheme, this Leader would be personally and totally responsible for every aspect of political life, as chief executive, chief legislator, chief justice, and commander of the military. His executive power is unlimited. Any “political selection” should take place “on a formally undemocratic basis.” Democratic elections institutionalized the evil notion of individuality. “The principle of democracy,” Ilyin wrote, “was the irresponsible human atom.” Counting votes was to falsely accept “the mechanical and arithmetical understanding of politics.” It followed that “we must reject blind faith in the number of votes and its political significance.” Public voting with signed ballots will allow Russians to surrender their individuality. Elections were a ritual of submission of Russians before their Leader.

The problem with prewar fascism, according to Ilyin, had been the one-party state. That was one party too many. Russia should be a zero-party state, in that no party should control the state or exercise any influence on the course of events. A party represents only a segment of society, and segmentation is what is to be avoided. Parties can exist, but only as traps for the ambitious or as elements of the ritual of electoral subservience. (Members of Putin’s party were sent the article that makes this point in 2014.) The same goes for civil society: it should exist as a simulacrum. Russians should be allowed to pursue hobbies and the like, but only within the framework of a total corporate structure that included all social organizations. The middle classes must be at the very bottom of the corporate structure, bearing the weight of the entire system. They are the producers and consumers of facts and feelings in a system where the purpose is to overcome factuality and sensuality.

“Freedom for Russia,” as Ilyin understood it (in a text selectively quoted by Putin in 2014), would not mean freedom for Russians as individuals, but rather freedom for Russians to understand themselves as parts of a whole. The political system must generate, as Ilyin clarified, “the organic-spiritual unity of the government with the people, and the people with the government.” The first step back toward the Word would be “the metaphysical identity of all people of the same nation.” The “the evil nature of the ‘sensual’” could be banished, and “the empirical variety of human beings” itself could be overcome.

*

Russia today is a media-heavy authoritarian kleptocracy, not the religious totalitarian entity that Ilyin imagined. And yet, his concepts do help lift the obscurity from some of the more interesting aspects of Russian politics. Vladimir Putin, to take a very important example, is a post-Soviet politician who emerged from the realm of fiction. Since it is he who brought Ilyin’s ideas into high politics, his rise to power is part of Ilyin’s story as well.

Putin was an unknown when he was selected by post-Soviet Russia’s first president, Boris Yeltsin, to be prime minister in 1999. Putin was chosen by political casting call. Yeltsin’s intimates, carrying out what they called “Operation Successor,” asked themselves who the most popular character in Russian television was. Polling showed that this was the hero of a 1970s program, a Soviet spy who spoke German. This fit Putin, a former KGB officer who had served in East Germany. Right after he was appointed prime minister by Yeltsin in September 1999, Putin gained his reputation through a bloodier fiction. When apartment buildings in Russian cities began to explode, Putin blamed Muslims and began a war in Chechnya. Contemporary evidence suggests that the bombs might have been planted by Russia’s own security organization, the FSB. Putin was elected president in 2000, and served until 2008.

In the early 2000s, Putin maintained that Russia could become some kind of rule-of-law state. Instead, he succeeded in bringing economic crime within the Russian state, transforming general corruption into official kleptocracy. Once the state became the center of crime, the rule of law became incoherent, inequality entrenched, and reform unthinkable. Another political story was needed. Because Putin’s victory over Russia’s oligarchs also meant control over their television stations, new media instruments were at hand. The Western trend towards infotainment was brought to its logical conclusion in Russia, generating an alternative reality meant to generate faith in Russian virtue but cynicism about facts. This transformation was engineered by Vladislav Surkov, the genius of Russian propaganda. He oversaw a striking move toward the world as Ilyin imagined it, a dark and confusing realm given shape only by Russian innocence. With the financial and media resources under control, Putin needed only, in the nice Russian term, to add the “spiritual resource.” And so, beginning in 2005, Putin began to rehabilitate Ilyin as a Kremlin court philosopher.

That year, Putin began to cite Ilyin in his addresses to the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation, and arranged for the reinterment of Ilyin’s remains in Russia. Then Surkov began to cite Ilyin. The propagandist accepted Ilyin’s idea that “Russian culture is the contemplation of the whole,” and summarizes his own work as the creation of a narrative of an innocent Russia surrounded by permanent hostility. Surkov’s enmity toward factuality is as deep as Ilyin’s, and like Ilyin, he tends to find theological grounds for it. Dmitry Medvedev, the leader of Putin’s political party, recommended Ilyin’s books to Russia’s youth. Ilyin began to figure in the speeches of the leaders of Russia’s tame opposition parties, the communists and the (confusingly-named, extreme-right) Liberal Democrats. These last few years, Ilyin has been cited by the head of the constitutional court, by the foreign minister, and by patriarchs of the Russian Orthodox Church.

After a four-year intermission between 2008 and 2012, during which Putin served as prime minister and allowed Medvedev to be president, Putin returned to the highest office. If Putin came to power in 2000 as hero from the realm of fiction, he returned in 2012 as the destroyer of the rule of law. In a minor key, the Russia of Putin’s time had repeated the drama of the Russia of Ilyin’s time. The hopes of Russian liberals for a rule-of-law state were again disappointed. Ilyin, who had transformed that failure into fascism the first time around, now had his moment. His arguments helped Putin transform the failure of his first period in office, the inability to introduce of the rule of law, into the promise for a second period in office, the confirmation of Russian virtue. If Russia could not become a rule-of-law state, it would seek to destroy neighbors that had succeeded in doing so or that aspired to do so. Echoing one of the most notorious proclamations of the Nazi legal thinker Carl Schmitt, Ilyin wrote that politics “is the art of identifying and neutralizing the enemy.” In the second decade of the twenty-first century, Putin’s promises were not about law in Russia, but about the defeat of a hyper-legal neighboring entity.

The European Union, the largest economy in the world and Russia’s most important economic partner, is grounded on the assumption that international legal agreements provide the basis for fruitful cooperation among rule-of-law states. In late 2011 and early 2012, Putin made public a new ideology, based in Ilyin, defining Russia in opposition to this model of Europe. In an article in Izvestiia on October 3, 2011, Putin announced a rival Eurasian Union that would unite states that had failed to establish the rule of law. In Nezavisimaia Gazeta on January 23, 2012, Putin, citing Ilyin, presented integration among states as a matter of virtue rather than achievement. The rule of law was not a universal aspiration, but part of an alien Western civilization; Russian culture, meanwhile, united Russia with post-Soviet states such as Ukraine. In a third article, in Moskovskie Novosti on February 27, 2012, Putin drew the political conclusions. Ilyin had imagined that “Russia as a spiritual organism served not only all the Orthodox nations and not only all of the nations of the Eurasian landmass, but all the nations of the world.” Putin predicted that Eurasia would overcome the European Union and bring its members into a larger entity that would extend “from Lisbon to Vladivostok.”

Putin’s offensive against the rule of law began with the manner of his reaccession to the office of president of the Russian Federation. The foundation of any rule-of-law state is a principle of succession, the set of rules that allow one person to succeed another in office in a manner that confirms rather than destroys the system. The way that Putin returned to power in 2012 destroyed any possibility that such a principle could function in Russia in any foreseeable future. He assumed the office of president, with a parliamentary majority, thanks to presidential and parliamentary elections that were ostentatiously faked, during protests whose participants he condemned as foreign agents.

In depriving Russia of any accepted means by which he might be succeeded by someone else and the Russian parliament controlled by another party but his, Putin was following Ilyin’s recommendation. Elections had become a ritual, and those who thought otherwise were portrayed by a formidable state media as traitors. Sitting in a radio station with the fascist writer Alexander Prokhanov as Russians protested electoral fraud, Putin mused about what Ivan Ilyin would have to say about the state of Russia. “Can we say,” asked Putin rhetorically, “that our country has fully recovered and healed after the dramatic events that have occurred to us after the Soviet Union collapsed, and that we now have a strong, healthy state? No, of course she is still quite ill; but here we must recall Ivan Ilyin: ‘Yes, our country is still sick, but we did not flee from the bed of our sick mother.’”

The fact that Putin cited Ilyin in this setting is very suggestive, and that he knew this phrase suggests extensive reading. Be that as it may, the way that he cited it seems strange. Ilyin was expelled from the Soviet Union by the Cheka—the institution that was the predecessor of Putin’s employer, the KGB. For Ilyin, it was the foundation of the USSR, not its dissolution, that was the Russian sickness. As Ilyin told his Cheka interrogator at the time: “I consider Soviet power to be an inevitable historical outcome of the great social and spiritual disease which has been growing in Russia for several centuries.” Ilyin thought that KGB officers (of whom Putin was one) should be forbidden from entering politics after the end of the Soviet Union. Ilyin dreamed his whole life of a Soviet collapse.

Putin’s reinterment of Ilyin’s remains was a mystical release from this contradiction. Ilyin had been expelled from Russia by the Soviet security service; his corpse was reburied alongside the remains of its victims. Putin had Ilyin’s corpse interred at a monastery where the NKVD, the heir to the Cheka and the predecessor of the KGB, had interred the ashes of thousands of Soviet citizens executed in the Great Terror. When Putin later visited the site to lay flowers on Ilyin’s grave, he was in the company of an Orthodox monk who saw the NKVD executioners as Russian patriots and therefore good men. At the time of the reburial, the head of the Russian Orthodox Church was a man who had previously served the KGB as an agent. After all, Ilyin’s justification for mass murder was the same as that of the Bolsheviks: the defense of an absolute good. As critics of his second book in the 1920s put it, Ilyin was a “Chekist for God.” He was reburied as such, with all possible honors conferred by the Chekists and by the men of God—and by the men of God who were Chekists, and by the Chekists who were men of God.

Ilyin was returned, body and soul, to the Russia he had been forced to leave. And that very return, in its inattention to contradiction, in its disregard of fact, was the purest expression of respect for his legacy. To be sure, Ilyin opposed the Soviet system. Yet, once the USSR ceased to exist in 1991, it was history—and the past, for Ilyin, was nothing but cognitive raw material for a literature of eternal virtue. Modifying Ilyin’s views about Russian innocence ever so slightly, Russian leaders could see the Soviet Union not as a foreign imposition upon Russia, as Ilyin had, but rather as Russia itself, and so virtuous despite appearances. Any faults of the Soviet system became necessary Russian reactions to the prior hostility of the West.

*

Questions about the influence of ideas in politics are very difficult to answer, and it would be needlessly bold to make of Ilyin’s writings the pillar of the Russian system. For one thing, Ilyin’s vast body of work admits multiple interpretations. As with Martin Heidegger, another student of Husserl who supported Hitler, it is reasonable to ask how closely a man’s political support of fascism relates to a philosopher’s work. Within Russia itself, Ilyin is not the only native source of fascist ideas to be cited with approval by Vladimir Putin; Lev Gumilev is another. Contemporary Russian fascists who now rove through the public space, such as Aleksander Prokhanov and Aleksander Dugin, represent distinct traditions. It is Dugin, for example, who made the idea of “Eurasia” popular in Russia, and his references are German Nazis and postwar West European fascists. And yet, most often in the Russia of the second decade of the twenty-first century, it is Ilyin’s ideas that to seem to satisfy political needs and to fill rhetorical gaps, to provide the “spiritual resource” for the kleptocratic state machine. In 2017, when the Russian state had so much difficulty commemorating the centenary of the Bolshevik Revolution, Ilyin was advanced as its heroic opponent. In a television drama about the revolution, he decried the evil of promising social advancement to Russians.

Russian policies certainly recall Ilyin’s recommendations. Russia’s 2012 law on “foreign agents,” passed right after Putin’s return to the office of the presidency, well represents Ilyin’s attitude to civil society. Ilyin believed that Russia’s “White Spirit” should animate the fascists of Europe; since 2013, the Kremlin has provided financial and propaganda support to European parties of the populist and extreme right. The Russian campaign against the “decadence” of the European Union, initiated in 2013, is in accord with Ilyin’s worldview. Ilyin’s scholarly effort followed his personal projection of sexual anxiety to others. First, Ilyin called Russia homosexual, then underwent therapy with his girlfriend, then blamed God. Putin first submitted to years of shirtless fur-and-feather photoshoots, then divorced his wife, then blamed the European Union for Russian homosexuality. Ilyin sexualized what he experienced as foreign threats. Jazz, for example, was a plot to induce premature ejaculation. When Ukrainians began in late 2013 to assemble in favor of a European future for their country, the Russian media raised the specter of a “homodictatorship.”

The case for Ilyin’s influence is perhaps easiest to make with respect to Russia’s new orientation toward Ukraine. Ukraine, like the Russian Federation, is a new country, formed from the territory of a Soviet republic in 1991. After Russia, it was the second-most populous republic of the Soviet Union, and it has a long border with Russia to the east and north as well as with European Union members to the west. For the first two decades after the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Russian-Ukrainian relations were defined by both sides according to international law, with Russian lawyers always insistent on very traditional concepts such as sovereignty and territorial integrity. When Putin returned to power in 2012, legalism gave way to colonialism. Since 2012, Russian policy toward Ukraine has been made on the basis of first principles, and those principles have been Ilyin’s. Putin’s Eurasian Union, a plan he announced with the help of Ilyin’s ideas, presupposed that Ukraine would join. Putin justified Russia’s attempt to draw Ukraine towards Eurasia by Ilyin’s “organic model” that made of Russia and Ukraine “one people.”

Ilyin’s idea of a Russian organism including Ukraine clashed with the more prosaic Ukrainian notion of reforming the Ukrainian state. In Ukraine in 2013, the European Union was a subject of domestic political debate, and was generally popular. An association agreement between Ukraine and the European Union was seen as a way to address the major local problem, the weakness of the rule of law. Through threats and promises, Putin was able in November 2013 to induce the Ukrainian president, Viktor Yanukovych, not to sign the association agreement, which had already been negotiated. This brought young Ukrainians to the street to demonstrate in favor the agreement. When the Ukrainian government (urged on and assisted by Russia) used violence, hundreds of thousands of Ukrainian citizens assembled in Kyiv’s Independence Square. Their main postulate, as surveys showed at the time, was the rule of law. After a sniper massacre that left more than one hundred Ukrainians dead, Yanukovych fled to Russia. His main adviser, Paul Manafort, was next seen working as Donald Trump’s campaign manager.

By the time Yanukovych fled to Russia, Russian troops had already been mobilized for the invasion of Ukraine. As Russian troops entered Ukraine in February 2014, Russian civilizational rhetoric (of which Ilyin was a major source) captured the imagination of many Western observers. In the first half of 2014, the issues debated were whether or not Ukraine was or was not part of Russian culture, or whether Russian myths about the past were somehow a reason to invade a neighboring sovereign state. In accepting the way that Ilyin put the question, as a matter of civilization rather than law, Western observers missed the stakes of the conflict for Europe and the United States. Considering the Russian invasion of Ukraine as a clash of cultures was to render it distant and colorful and obscure; seeing it as an element of a larger assault on the rule of law would have been to realize that Western institutions were in peril. To accept the civilizational framing was also to overlook the basic issue of inequality. What pro-European Ukrainians wanted was to avoid Russian-style kleptocracy. What Putin needed was to demonstrate that such efforts were fruitless.

Ilyin’s arguments were everywhere as Russian troops entered Ukraine multiple times in 2014. As soldiers received their mobilization orders for the invasion of the Ukraine’s Crimean province in January 2014, all of Russia’s high-ranking bureaucrats and regional governors were sent a copy of Ilyin’s Our Tasks. After Russian troops occupied Crimea and the Russian parliament voted for annexation, Putin cited Ilyin again as justification. The Russian commander sent to oversee the second major movement of Russian troops into Ukraine, to the southeastern provinces of Donetsk and Luhansk in summer 2014, described the war’s final goal in terms that Ilyin would have understood: “If the world were saved from demonic constructions such as the United States, it would be easier for everyone to live. And one of these days it will happen.”

Anyone following Russian politics could see in early 2016 that the Russian elite preferred Donald Trump to become the Republican nominee for president and then to defeat Hillary Clinton in the general election. In the spring of that year, Russian military intelligence was boasting of an effort to help Trump win. In the Russian assault on American democracy that followed, the main weapon was falsehood. Donald Trump is another masculinity-challenged kleptocrat from the realm of fiction, in his case that of reality television. His campaign was helped by the elaborate untruths that Russia distributed about his opponent. In office, Trump imitates Putin in his pursuit of political post-truth: first filling the public sphere with lies, then blaming the institutions whose purpose is to seek facts, and finally rejoicing in the resulting confusion. Russian assistance to Trump weakened American trust in the institutions that Russia has been unable to build. Such trust was already in decline, thanks to America’s own media culture and growing inequality.

Ilyin meant to be the prophet of our age, the post-Soviet age, and perhaps he is. His disbelief in this world allows politics to take place in a fictional one. He made of lawlessness a virtue so pure as to be invisible, and so absolute as to demand the destruction of the West. He shows us how fragile masculinity generates enemies, how perverted Christianity rejects Jesus, how economic inequality imitates innocence, and how fascist ideas flow into the postmodern. This is no longer just Russian philosophy. It is now American life.


%d blogueurs aiment cette page :