Mépris de classe: Qui veut être traité de déplorable ou de Dupont Lajoie ? (Jaws for sharks: 40 years of hollywoodization and they put you in the basket of racist deplorables and bitter clingers)

25 octobre, 2018

Deliverance Poster

Résultat de recherche d'images pour "Deliverance film poster"
Easy Rider (Special Edition) (Sous-titres français)Résultat de recherche d'images pour "Easy Rider film poster rednecks"
https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/cinemorgue/images/d/de/Dupont_Lajoie_film_Boisset.jpg/revision/latest/scale-to-width-down/352?cb=20160919175315
Résultat de recherche d'images pour "Dupont lajoie film poster"
Résultat de recherche d'images pour "Les Deschiens affiche"
Ainsi les derniers seront les premiers et les premiers seront les derniers. Jésus (Matthieu 20: 16)
The line it is drawn, the curse it is cast. The slow one now will later be fast as the present now will later be past. The order is rapidly fadin’ and the first one now will later be last for the times they are a-changin. Bob Dylan
Un peuple connait, aime et défend toujours plus ses moeurs que ses lois. Montesquieu
Aux États-Unis, les plus opulents citoyens ont bien soin de ne point s’isoler du peuple ; au contraire, ils s’en rapprochent sans cesse, ils l’écoutent volontiers et lui parlent tous les jours. Alexis de Tocqueville
Deliverance did for them what Jaws, another well-known movie, would later do for sharks. Daniel Roper (North Georgia Journal)
Depuis que la gauche a adopté l’économie de marché, il ne lui reste qu’une chose à faire pour garder sa posture de gauche : lutter contre un fascisme qui n’existe pas. Pasolini
J’ai résumé L’Étranger, il y a longtemps, par une phrase dont je reconnais qu’elle est très paradoxale : “Dans notre société tout homme qui ne pleure pas à l’enterrement de sa mère risque d’être condamné à mort.” Je voulais dire seulement que le héros du livre est condamné parce qu’il ne joue pas le jeu. En ce sens, il est étranger à la société où il vit, où il erre, en marge, dans les faubourgs de la vie privée, solitaire, sensuelle. Et c’est pourquoi des lecteurs ont été tentés de le considérer comme une épave. On aura cependant une idée plus exacte du personnage, plus conforme en tout cas aux intentions de son auteur, si l’on se demande en quoi Meursault ne joue pas le jeu. La réponse est simple : il refuse de mentir.  (…) Meursault, pour moi, n’est donc pas une épave, mais un homme pauvre et nu, amoureux du soleil qui ne laisse pas d’ombres. Loin qu’il soit privé de toute sensibilité, une passion profonde parce que tenace, l’anime : la passion de l’absolu et de la vérité. Il s’agit d’une vérité encore négative, la vérité d’être et de sentir, mais sans laquelle nulle conquête sur soi et sur le monde ne sera jamais possible. On ne se tromperait donc pas beaucoup en lisant, dans L’Étranger, l’histoire d’un homme qui, sans aucune attitude héroïque, accepte de mourir pour la vérité. Il m’est arrivé de dire aussi, et toujours paradoxalement, que j’avais essayé de figurer, dans mon personnage, le seul Christ que nous méritions. On comprendra, après mes explications, que je l’aie dit sans aucune intention de blasphème et seulement avec l’affection un peu ironique qu’un artiste a le droit d’éprouver à l’égard des personnages de sa création. Camus (préface américaine à L’Etranger)
Le thème du poète maudit né dans une société marchande (…) s’est durci dans un préjugé qui finit par vouloir qu’on ne puisse être un grand artiste que contre la société de son temps, quelle qu’elle soit. Légitime à l’origine quand il affirmait qu’un artiste véritable ne pouvait composer avec le monde de l’argent, le principe est devenu faux lorsqu’on en a tiré qu’un artiste ne pouvait s’affirmer qu’en étant contre toute chose en général. Albert Camus
Personne ne nous fera croire que l’appareil judiciaire d’un Etat moderne prend réellement pour objet l’extermination des petits bureaucrates qui s’adonnent au café au lait, aux films de Fernandel et aux passades amoureuses avec la secrétaire du patron. René Girard
What I take to be the film’s statement (upper case). This has to do with the threat that people like the nonconforming Wyatt and Billy represent to the ordinary, self-righteous, inhibited folk that are the Real America. Wyatt and Billy, says the lawyer, represent freedom; ergo, says the film, they must be destroyed. If there is any irony in this supposition, I was unable to detect it in the screenplay written by Fonda, Hopper and Terry Southern. Wyatt and Billy don’t seem particularly free, not if the only way they can face the world is through a grass curtain. As written and played, they are lumps of gentle clay, vacuous, romantic symbols, dressed in cycle drag. The NYT (1969)
Since Easy Rider is the film that is said finally to separate the men from the boys – at a time when the generation gap has placed a stigma on being a man – I want to point out that those who make heroes of Wyatt and Billy (played by Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper) have a reasonably acrid dose to swallow at the start of the picture. Wyatt and Billy (names borrowed from the fumigated memory of the two outlaws of the Old West) make the bankroll on which they hope to live a life of easy-riding freedom by smuggling a considerable quantity of heroin across from Mexico and selling it to a nutty looking addict in a goon-chauffered Rolls Royce. Pulling off one big job and thereafter living in virtuous indolence is a fairly common dream of criminals, and dope peddling is a particularly unappetizing way of doing it. Is it thought O.K. on the other side of the gap, to buy freedom at that price? If so, grooving youth has a wealth of conscience to spend. (…) Wyatt and Billy are presented as attractive and enviable; gentle, courteous, peaceable, sliding through the heroic Western landscape on their luxurious touring motorcycles (with the swag hidden in one of the gas tanks). It is true that they come to a bloody end, gunned down by a couple of Southern rednecks for their long hair. But it is not retribution; indeed, they might have passed safely if the cretins in the pickup truck had realized that they were big traders on holiday. (…) The hate is that of Fonda, Hopper and Southern, they hate the element in American life that tries to destroy anyone who fails to conform, who demands to ride free. And it is quite right that they should. But Wyatt and Billy are more rigidly conformist, their life more narrowly obsessive than that of any broker’s clerk on the nine to five. The Nation (2008)
 Easy Rider (1969) is the late 1960s « road film » tale of a search for freedom (or the illusion of freedom) in a conformist and corrupt America, in the midst of paranoia, bigotry and violence. Released in the year of the Woodstock concert, and made in a year of two tragic assassinations (Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King), the Vietnam War buildup and Nixon’s election, the tone of this ‘alternative’ film is remarkably downbeat and bleak, reflecting the collapse of the idealistic 60s. Easy Rider, one of the first films of its kind, was a ritualistic experience and viewed (often repeatedly) by youthful audiences in the late 1960s as a reflection of their realistic hopes of liberation and fears of the Establishment. The iconographic, ‘buddy’ film, actually minimal in terms of its artistic merit and plot, is both memorialized as an image of the popular and historical culture of the time and a story of a contemporary but apocalyptic journey by two self-righteous, drug-fueled, anti-hero (or outlaw) bikers eastward through the American Southwest. Their trip to Mardi Gras in New Orleans takes them through limitless, untouched landscapes (icons such as Monument Valley), various towns, a hippie commune, and a graveyard (with hookers), but also through areas where local residents are increasingly narrow-minded and hateful of their long-haired freedom and use of drugs. The film’s title refers to their rootlessness and ride to make « easy » money; it is also slang for a pimp who makes his livelihood off the earnings of a prostitute. However, the film’s original title was The Loners. [The names of the two main characters, Wyatt and Billy, suggest the two memorable Western outlaws Wyatt Earp and Billy the Kid – or ‘Wild Bill’ Hickcock. Rather than traveling westward on horses as the frontiersmen did, the two modern-day cowboys travel eastward from Los Angeles – the end of the traditional frontier – on decorated Harley-Davidson choppers on an epic journey into the unknown for the ‘American dream’.] According to slogans on promotional posters, they were on a search: A man went looking for America and couldn’t find it anywhere… Their costumes combine traditional patriotic symbols with emblems of loneliness, criminality and alienation – the American flag, cowboy decorations, long-hair, and drugs. (…) Easy Rider surprisingly, was an extremely successful, low-budget (under $400,000), counter-cultural, independent film for the alternative youth/cult market – one of the first of its kind that was an enormous financial success, grossing $40 million worldwide. Its story contained sex, drugs, casual violence, a sacrificial tale (with a shocking, unhappy ending), and a pulsating rock and roll soundtrack reinforcing or commenting on the film’s themes. Groups that participated musically included Steppenwolf, Jimi Hendrix, The Band and Bob Dylan. The pop cultural, mini-revolutionary film was also a reflection of the « New Hollywood, » and the first blockbuster hit from a new wave of Hollywood directors (e.g., Francis Ford Coppola, Peter Bogdanovich, and Martin Scorsese) that would break with a number of Hollywood conventions. It had little background or historical development of characters, a lack of typical heroes, uneven pacing, jump cuts and flash-forward transitions between scenes, an improvisational style and mood of acting and dialogue, background rock ‘n’ roll music to complement the narrative, and the equation of motorbikes with freedom on the road rather than with delinquent behaviors. However, its idyllic view of life and example of personal film-making was overshadowed by the self-absorbent, drug-induced, erratic behavior of the filmmakers, chronicled in Peter Biskind’s tell-all Easy Riders, Raging Bulls: How the Sex-Drugs-and Rock ‘N Roll Generation Saved Hollywood (1999). And the influential film led to a flurry of equally self-indulgent, anti-Establishment themed films by inferior filmmakers, who overused some of the film’s technical tricks and exploited the growing teen-aged market for easy profits. (…) Death seems to be the only freedom or means to escape from the system in America where alternative lifestyles and idealism are despised as too challenging or free. The romance of the American highway is turned menacing and deadly. Filmsite
Nous qui vivons dans les régions côtières des villes bleues, nous lisons plus de livres et nous allons plus souvent au théâtre que ceux qui vivent au fin fond du pays. Nous sommes à la fois plus sophistiqués et plus cosmopolites – parlez-nous de nos voyages scolaires en Chine et en Provence ou, par exemple, de notre intérêt pour le bouddhisme. Mais par pitié, ne nous demandez pas à quoi ressemble la vie dans l’Amérique rouge. Nous n’en savons rien. Nous ne savons pas qui sont Tim LaHaye et Jerry B. Jenkins. […] Nous ne savons pas ce que peut bien dire James Dobson dans son émission de radio écoutée par des millions d’auditeurs. Nous ne savons rien de Reba et Travis. […] Nous sommes très peu nombreux à savoir ce qui se passe à Branson dans le Missouri, même si cette ville reçoit quelque sept millions de touristes par an; pas plus que nous ne pouvons nommer ne serait-ce que cinq pilotes de stock-car. […] Nous ne savons pas tirer au fusil ni même en nettoyer un, ni reconnaître le grade d’un officier rien qu’à son insigne. Quant à savoir à quoi ressemble une graine de soja poussée dans un champ… David Brooks
Vous allez dans certaines petites villes de Pennsylvanie où, comme ans beaucoup de petites villes du Middle West, les emplois ont disparu depuis maintenant 25 ans et n’ont été remplacés par rien d’autre (…) Et il n’est pas surprenant qu’ils deviennent pleins d’amertume, qu’ils s’accrochent aux armes à feu ou à la religion, ou à leur antipathie pour ceux qui ne sont pas comme eux, ou encore à un sentiment d’hostilité envers les immigrants. Barack Hussein Obama (2008)
Part of the reason that our politics seems so tough right now, and facts and science and argument does not seem to be winning the day all the time, is because we’re hard-wired not to always think clearly when we’re scared. Barack Obama
I do think that when you combine that demographic change with all the economic stresses that people have been going through because of the financial crisis, because of technology, because of globalization, the fact that wages and incomes have been flatlining for some time, and that particularly blue-collar men have had a lot of trouble in this new economy, where they are no longer getting the same bargain that they got when they were going to a factory and able to support their families on a single paycheck. You combine those things, and it means that there is going to be potential anger, frustration, fear. Some of it justified, but just misdirected. I think somebody like Mr. Trump is taking advantage of that. That’s what he’s exploiting during the course of his campaign. Barack Hussein Obama
Pour généraliser, en gros, vous pouvez placer la moitié des partisans de Trump dans ce que j’appelle le panier des pitoyables. Les racistes, sexistes, homophobes, xénophobes, islamophobes. A vous de choisir. Hillary Clinton (2016)
My mother is not watching. She said she doesn’t watch white award shows because you guys don’t thank Jesus enough. That’s true. The only white people that thank Jesus are Republicans and ex-crackheads. Michael Che
Rire général, même chez les sans-dents. François Hollande
Dans les sociétés dans mes dossiers, il y a la société Gad : il y a dans cet abattoir une majorité de femmes, il y en a qui sont pour beaucoup illettrées ! On leur explique qu’elles n’ont plus d’avenir à Gad et qu’elles doivent aller travailler à 60 km ! Ces gens n’ont pas le permis ! On va leur dire quoi ? Il faut payer 1.500 euros et attendre un an ? Voilà, ça ce sont des réformes du quotidien, qui créent de la mobilité, de l’activité ! Emmanuel Macron
On ne va pas s’allier avec le FN, c’est un parti de primates. Il est hors de question de discuter avec des primates. Claude Goasguen (UMP, Paris, 2011)
Ne laissez pas la grande primate de l’extrême goitre prendre le mouchoir … François Morel (France inter)
Pendant toutes les années du mitterrandisme, nous n’avons jamais été face à une menace fasciste, donc tout antifascisme n’était que du théâtre. Nous avons été face à un parti, le Front National, qui était un parti d’extrême droite, un parti populiste aussi, à sa façon, mais nous n’avons jamais été dans une situation de menace fasciste, et même pas face à un parti fasciste. D’abord le procès en fascisme à l’égard de Nicolas Sarkozy est à la fois absurde et scandaleux. Je suis profondément attaché à l’identité nationale et je crois même ressentir et savoir ce qu’elle est, en tout cas pour moi. L’identité nationale, c’est notre bien commun, c’est une langue, c’est une histoire, c’est une mémoire, ce qui n’est pas exactement la même chose, c’est une culture, c’est-à-dire une littérature, des arts, la philo, les philosophies. Et puis, c’est une organisation politique avec ses principes et ses lois. Quand on vit en France, j’ajouterai : l’identité nationale, c’est aussi un art de vivre, peut-être, que cette identité nationale. Je crois profondément que les nations existent, existent encore, et en France, ce qui est frappant, c’est que nous sommes à la fois attachés à la multiplicité des expressions qui font notre nation, et à la singularité de notre propre nation. Et donc ce que je me dis, c’est que s’il y a aujourd’hui une crise de l’identité, crise de l’identité à travers notamment des institutions qui l’exprimaient, la représentaient, c’est peut-être parce qu’il y a une crise de la tradition, une crise de la transmission. Il faut que nous rappelions les éléments essentiels de notre identité nationale parce que si nous doutons de notre identité nationale, nous aurons évidemment beaucoup plus de mal à intégrer. Lionel Jospin (France Culture, 29.09.07)
You often hear men say, “Why don’t they just leave?” [. . .] And I ask them, how many of you seen the movie Deliverance? And every man will raise his hand. And I’ll say, what’s the one scene you remember in Deliverance? And every man here knows exactly what scene to think of. And I’ll say, “After those guys tied that one guy in that tree and raped him, man raped him, in that film. Why didn’t the guy go to the sheriff? What would you have done? “Well, I’d go back home get my gun. I’d come back and find him.” Why wouldn’t you go to the sheriff? Why? Well, the reason why is they are ashamed. They are embarrassed. I say, why do you think so many women that get raped, so many don’t report it? They don’t want to get raped again by the system. Joe Biden
After the election, in liberal, urban America, one often heard Trump’s win described as the revenge of the yahoos in flyover country, fueled by their angry “isms” and “ias”: racism, anti-Semitism, nativism, homophobia, Islamophobia, and so on. Many liberals consoled themselves that Trump’s victory was the last hurrah of bigoted, Republican white America, soon to be swept away by vast forces beyond its control, such as global migration and the cultural transformation of America into something far from the Founders’ vision. As insurance, though, furious progressives also renewed calls to abolish the Electoral College, advocating for a constitutional amendment that would turn presidential elections into national plebiscites. Direct presidential voting would shift power to heavily urbanized areas—why waste time trying to reach more dispersed voters in less populated rural states?—and thus institutionalize the greater economic and cultural clout of the metropolitan blue-chip universities, the big banks, Wall Street, Silicon Valley, New York–Washington media, and Hollywood, Democrat-voting all. Barack Obama’s two electoral victories deluded the Democrats into thinking that it was politically wise to jettison their old blue-collar appeal to the working classes, mostly living outside the cities these days, in favor of an identity politics of a new multicultural, urban America. Yet Trump’s success represented more than simply a triumph of rural whites over multiracial urbanites. More ominously for liberals, it also suggested that a growing minority of blacks and Hispanics might be sympathetic with a “country” mind-set that rejects urban progressive elitism. For some minorities, sincerity and directness might be preferable to sloganeering by wealthy white urban progressives, who often seem more worried about assuaging their own guilt than about genuinely understanding people of different colors. Trump’s election underscored two other liberal miscalculations. First, Obama’s progressive agenda and cultural elitism prevailed not because of their ideological merits, as liberals believed, but because of his great appeal to urban minorities in 2008 and 2012, who voted in solidarity for the youthful first African-American president in numbers never seen before. That fealty wasn’t automatically transferable to liberal white candidates, including the multimillionaire 69-year-old Hillary Clinton. Obama had previously lost most of America’s red counties, but not by enough to keep him from winning two presidential elections, with sizable urban populations in Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio, and Pennsylvania turning out to vote for the most left-wing presidential candidate since George McGovern. Second, rural America hadn’t fully raised its electoral head in anger in 2008 and 2012 because it didn’t see the Republican antidotes to Obama’s progressive internationalism as much better than the original malady. Socially moderate establishmentarians like the open-borders-supporting John McCain or wealthy businessman Mitt Romney didn’t resonate with the spirit of rural America—at least not enough to persuade millions to come to the polls instead of sitting the elections out. Trump connected with these rural voters with far greater success than liberals anticipated. Urban minorities failed in 2016 to vote en bloc, in their Obama-level numbers; and rural Americans, enthused by Trump, increased their turnout, so that even a shrinking American countryside still had enough clout to win. What is insufficiently understood is why a hurting rural America favored the urban, superrich Trump in 2016 and, more generally, tends to vote more conservative than liberal. Ostensibly, the answer is clear: an embittered red-state America has found itself left behind by elite-driven globalization, battered by unfettered trade and high-tech dislocations in the economy. In some of the most despairing counties, rural life has become a mirror image of the inner city, ravaged by drug use, criminality, and hopelessness. Yet if muscular work has seen a decline in its relative monetary worth, it has not necessarily lost its importance. After all, the elite in Washington and Menlo Park appreciate the fresh grapes and arugula that they purchase at Whole Foods. Someone mined the granite used in their expensive kitchen counters and cut the timber for their hardwood floors. The fuel in their hybrid cars continues to come from refined oil. The city remains as dependent on this elemental stuff—typically produced outside the suburbs and cities—as it always was. The two Palo Altoans at Starbucks might have forgotten that their overpriced homes included two-by-fours, circuit breakers, and four-inch sewer pipes, but somebody somewhere made those things and brought them into their world. In the twenty-first century, though, the exploitation of natural resources and the manufacturing of products are more easily outsourced than are the arts of finance, insurance, investments, higher education, entertainment, popular culture, and high technology, immaterial sectors typically pursued within metropolitan contexts and supercharged by the demands of increasingly affluent global consumers. A vast government sector, mostly urban, is likewise largely impervious to the leveling effects of a globalized economy, even as its exorbitant cost and extended regulatory reach make the outsourcing of material production more likely. Asian steel may have devastated Youngstown, but Chinese dumping had no immediate effect on the flourishing government enclaves in Washington, Maryland, and Virginia, filled with well-paid knowledge workers. Globalization, big government, and metastasizing regulations have enriched the American coasts, in other words, while damaging much of the nation’s interior. Few major political leaders before Trump seemed to care. He hammered home the point that elites rarely experienced the negative consequences of their own ideologies. New York Times columnists celebrating a “flat” world have yet to find themselves flattened by Chinese writers willing to write for a fraction of their per-word rate. Tenured Harvard professors hymning praise to global progressive culture don’t suddenly discover their positions drawn and quartered into four part-time lecturer positions. And senators and bureaucrats in Washington face no risk of having their roles usurped by low-wage Vietnamese politicians. Trump quickly discovered that millions of Americans were irate that the costs and benefits of our new economic reality were so unevenly distributed. As the nation became more urban and its wealth soared, the old Democratic commitment from the Roosevelt era to much of rural America—construction of water projects, rail, highways, land banks, and universities; deference to traditional values; and Grapes of Wrath–like empathy—has largely been forgotten. A confident, upbeat urban America promoted its ever more radical culture without worrying much about its effects on a mostly distant and silent small-town other. In 2008, gay marriage and women in combat were opposed, at least rhetorically, by both Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton in their respective presidential campaigns. By 2016, mere skepticism on these issues was viewed by urban elites as reactionary ignorance. In other words, it was bad enough that rural America was getting left behind economically; adding insult to injury, elite America (which is Democrat America) openly caricatured rural citizens’ traditional views and tried to force its own values on them. Lena Dunham’s loud sexual politics and Beyoncé’s uncritical evocation of the Black Panthers resonated in blue cities and on the coasts, not in the heartland. Only in today’s bifurcated America could billion-dollar sports conglomerates fail to sense that second-string San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick’s protests of the national anthem would turn off a sizable percentage of the National Football League’s viewing audience, which is disproportionately conservative and middle American. These cultural themes, too, Trump addressed forcefully. In classical literature, patriotism and civic militarism were always closely linked with farming and country life. In the twenty-first century, this is still true. The incubator of the U.S. officer corps is red-state America. “Make America Great Again” reverberated in the pro-military countryside because it emphasized an exceptionalism at odds with the Left’s embrace of global values. Residents in Indiana and Wisconsin were unimpressed with the Democrats’ growing embrace of European-style “soft power,” socialism, and statism—all the more so in an age of European constitutional, financial, and immigration sclerosis. Trump’s slogan unabashedly expressed American individualism; Clinton’s “Stronger Together” gave off a whiff of European socialist solidarity. Trump, the billionaire Manhattanite wheeler-dealer, made an unlikely agrarian, true; but he came across during his presidential run as a clear advocate of old-style material jobs, praising vocational training and clearly enjoying his encounters with middle-American homemakers, welders, and carpenters. Trump talked more on the campaign about those who built his hotels than those who financed them. He could point to the fact that he made stuff, unlike Clinton, who got rich without any obvious profession other than leveraging her office. Give the thrice-married, orange-tanned, and dyed-haired Trump credit for his political savvy in promising to restore to the dispossessed of the Rust Belt their old jobs and to give back to farmers their diverted irrigation water, and for assuring small towns that arriving new Americans henceforth would be legal—and that, over time, they would become similar to their hosts in language, custom, and behavior. Ironically, part of Trump’s attraction for red-state America was his posture as a coastal-elite insider—but now enlisted on the side of the rustics. A guy who had built hotels all over the world, and understood how much money was made and lost through foreign investment, offered to put such expertise in the service of the heartland—against the supposed currency devaluers, trade cheats, and freeloaders of Europe, China, and Japan. Trump’s appeal to the interior had partly to do with his politically incorrect forthrightness. Each time Trump supposedly blundered in attacking a sacred cow—sloppily deprecating national hero John McCain’s wartime captivity or nastily attacking Fox superstar Megyn Kelly for her supposed unfairness—the coastal media wrote him off as a vulgar loser. Not Trump’s base. Seventy-five percent of his supporters polled that his crude pronouncements didn’t bother them. As one grape farmer told me after the Access Hollywood hot-mike recordings of Trump making sexually vulgar remarks had come to light, “Who cares? I’d take Trump on his worst day better than Hillary on her best.” Apparently red-state America was so sick of empty word-mongering that it appreciated Trump’s candor, even when it was sometimes inaccurate, crude, or cruel. Outside California and New York City and other elite blue areas, for example, foreigners who sneak into the country and reside here illegally are still “illegal aliens,” not “undocumented migrants,” a blue-state term that masks the truth of their actions. Trump’s Queens accent and frequent use of superlatives—“tremendous,” “fantastic,” “awesome”—weren’t viewed by red-state America as a sign of an impoverished vocabulary but proof that a few blunt words can capture reality. To the rural mind, verbal gymnastics reveal dishonest politicians, biased journalists, and conniving bureaucrats, who must hide what they really do and who they really are. Think of the arrogant condescension of Jonathan Gruber, one of the architects of the disastrous Obamacare law, who admitted that the bill was written deliberately in a “tortured way” to mislead the “stupid” American voter. To paraphrase Cicero on his preference for the direct Plato over the obscure Pythagoreans, rural Americans would have preferred to be wrong with the blunt-talking Trump than to be right with the mush-mouthed Hillary Clinton. One reason that Trump may have outperformed both McCain and Romney with minority voters was that they appreciated how much the way he spoke rankled condescending white urban liberals. Poorer, less cosmopolitan, rural people can also experience a sense of inferiority when they venture into the city, unlike smug urbanites visiting red-state America. The rural folk expect to be seen as deplorables, irredeemables, and clingers by city folk. My countryside neighbors do not wish to hear anything about Stanford University, where I work—except if by chance I note that Stanford people tend to be condescending and pompous, confirming my neighbors’ suspicions about city dwellers. And just as the urban poor have always had their tribunes, so, too, have rural residents flocked to an Andrew Jackson or a William Jennings Bryan, politicians who enjoyed getting back at the urban classes for perceived slights. The more Trump drew the hatred of PBS, NPR, ABC, NBC, CBS, the elite press, the universities, the foundations, and Hollywood, the more he triumphed in red-state America. Indeed, one irony of the 2016 election is that identity politics became a lethal boomerang for progressives. After years of seeing America reduced to a binary universe, with culpable white Christian males encircled by ascendant noble minorities, gays, feminists, and atheists—usually led by courageous white-male progressive crusaders—red-state America decided that two could play the identity-politics game. In 2016, rural folk did silently in the voting booth what urban America had done to them so publicly in countless sitcoms, movies, and political campaigns. In sum, Donald Trump captured the twenty-first-century malaise of a rural America left behind by globalized coastal elites and largely ignored by the establishments of both political parties. Central to Trump’s electoral success, too, were age-old rural habits and values that tend to make the interior broadly conservative. That a New York billionaire almost alone grasped how red-state America truly thought, talked, and acted, and adjusted his message and style accordingly, will remain one of the astonishing ironies of American political history. Victor Davis Hanson
Né à Detroit dans les années 1950, j’ai grandi dans une famille où personne n’avait fréquenté l’université. Lorsque j’ai obtenu une bourse pour l’université du Michi­gan, j’ai été confronté à un snobisme de gauche qui méprisait la classe ouvrière, son attache­ment à la famille, la religion. Cette gauche caviar a suscité chez moi une forte réaction. Mark Lilla
Une des nombreuses leçons à tirer de la présidentielle américaine et de son résultat détestable, c’est qu’il faut clore l’ère de la gauche « diversitaire ». Hillary Clinton n’a jamais été aussi excellente et stimulante que lorsqu’elle évoquait l’engagement des États-Unis dans les affaires du monde et en quoi il est lié à notre conception de la démocratie. En revanche, dès qu’il s’agissait de politique intérieure, elle n’avait plus la même hauteur de vue et tendait à verser dans le discours de la diversité, en en appelant explicitement à l’électorat noir, latino, féminin et LGBT (lesbiennes, gays, bisexuels et trans). Elle a commis là une erreur stratégique. Tant qu’à mentionner des groupes aux États-Unis, mieux vaut les mentionner tous. Autrement, ceux que l’on a oubliés s’en aperçoivent et se sentent exclus. C’est exactement ce qui s’est passé avec les Blancs des classes populaires et les personnes à fortes convictions religieuses. Pas moins des deux tiers des électeurs blancs non diplômés du supérieur ont voté pour Donald Trump, de même que plus de 80 % des évangéliques blancs. (…) l’obsession de la diversité à l’école et dans la presse a produit à gauche une génération de narcissiques, ignorant le sort des personnes n’appartenant pas aux groupes auxquels ils s’identifient, et indifférents à la nécessité d’être à l’écoute des Américains de toutes conditions. Dès leur plus jeune âge, nos enfants sont incités à parler de leur identité individuelle, avant même d’en avoir une. Au moment où ils entrent à l’université, beaucoup pensent que le discours politique se réduit au discours de la diversité, et on est consterné de voir qu’ils n’ont pas d’avis sur des questions aussi éternelles que les classes sociales, la guerre, l’économie et le bien commun. L’enseignement de l’histoire dans les écoles secondaires en est grandement responsable, car les programmes adoptés plaquent sur le passé le discours actuel de l’identité et donnent une vision déformée des grandes forces et des grands personnages qui ont façonné notre pays (les conquêtes du mouvement pour les droits des femmes, par exemple, sont réelles et importantes, mais on ne peut les comprendre qu’à la lumière des accomplissements des Pères fondateurs, qui ont établi un système de gouvernement fondé sur la garantie des droits). Quand les jeunes entrent à l’université, ils sont incités à rester centrés sur eux-mêmes par les associations étudiantes, par les professeurs ainsi que par les membres de l’administration qui sont employés à plein temps pour gérer les « questions de diversité » et leur donner encore plus d’importance. La chaîne Fox News et d’autres médias de droite adorent railler la « folie des campus » autour de ces questions, et il y a le plus souvent de quoi. Cela fait le jeu des démagogues populistes qui cherchent à délégitimer le savoir aux yeux de ceux qui n’ont jamais mis les pieds sur un campus. Comment expliquer à l’électeur moyen qu’il y a censément urgence morale à accorder aux étudiants le droit de choisir le pronom personnel par lequel ils veulent être désignés ? Comment ne pas rigoler avec ces électeurs quand on apprend qu’un farceur de l’université du Michigan a demandé à se faire appeler « Sa majesté » ? Cette sensibilité à la diversité sur les campus a déteint sur les médias de gauche, et pas qu’un peu. L’embauche de femmes et de membres des minorités au titre de la discrimination positive dans la presse écrite et l’audiovisuel est une formidable avancée sociale – et cela a même transformé le visage des médias de droite. Mais cela a aussi contribué à donner le sentiment, surtout aux jeunes journalistes et rédacteurs en chef, qu’en traitant de l’identité ils avaient accompli leur travail. (…) Combien de fois, par exemple, nous ressert-on le sujet sur le « premier ou la première X à faire Y » ? La fascination pour les questions d’identité se retrouve même dans la couverture de l’actualité internationale qui est, hélas, une denrée rare. Il peut être intéressant de lire un article sur le sort des personnes transgenre en Égypte, par exemple, mais cela ne contribue en rien à informer les Américains sur les puissants courants politiques et religieux qui détermineront l’avenir de l’Égypte et, indirectement, celui de notre pays. (…) Mais c’est au niveau de la stratégie électorale que l’échec de la gauche diversitaire a été le plus spectaculaire, comme nous venons de le constater. En temps normal, la politique nationale n’est pas axée sur ce qui nous différencie mais sur ce qui nous unit. Et nous choisissons pour la conduire la personne qui aura le mieux su nous parler de notre destin collectif. Ronald Reagan a été habile à cela, quoiqu’on pense de sa vision. Bill Clinton aussi, qui a pris exemple sur Reagan. Il s’est emparé du Parti démocrate en marginalisant son aile sensible aux questions d’identité, a concentré son énergie sur des mesures de politique intérieure susceptibles de bénéficier à l’ensemble de la population (comme l’assurance-maladie) et défini le rôle des États-Unis dans le monde d’après la chute du mur de Berlin. En poste pour deux mandats, il a ainsi été en mesure d’en faire beaucoup pour différentes catégories d’électeurs membres de la coalition démocrate. La politique de la différence est essentiellement expressive et non persuasive. Voilà pourquoi elle ne fait jamais gagner des élections – mais peut en faire perdre. L’intérêt récent, quasi ethnologique, des médias pour l’homme blanc en colère en dit autant sur l’état de la gauche américaine que sur cette figure tant vilipendée et, jusqu’ici, dédaignée. Pour la gauche, une lecture commode de la récente élection présidentielle consisterait à dire que Donald Trump a gagné parce qu’il a réussi à transformer un désavantage économique en colère raciste – c’est la thèse du whitelash, du retour de bâton de l’électorat blanc. C’est une lecture commode parce qu’elle conforte un sentiment de supériorité morale et permet à la gauche de faire la sourde oreille à ce que ces électeurs ont dit être leur principale préoccupation. Cette lecture alimente aussi le fantasme selon lequel la droite républicaine serait condamnée à terme à l’extinction démographique – autrement dit, que la gauche n’a qu’à attendre que le pays lui tombe tout cuit dans l’assiette. Le pourcentage étonnamment élevé du vote latino qui est allé à M. Trump est là pour nous rappeler que plus des groupes ethniques sont établis depuis longtemps aux États-Unis, moins leur comportement électoral est homogène. Enfin, la thèse du whitelash est commode parce qu’elle disculpe la gauche de ne pas avoir vu que son obsession de la diversité incitait les Américains blancs, ruraux, croyants, à se concevoir comme un groupe défavorisé dont l’identité est menacée ou bafouée. Ces personnes ne réagissent pas contre la réalité d’une Amérique multiculturelle (en réalité, elles ont tendance à vivre dans des régions où la population est homogène). Elles réagissent contre l’omniprésence du discours de l’identité, ce qu’elles appellent le « politiquement correct ». La gauche ferait bien de garder à l’esprit que le Ku Klux Klan est le plus ancien mouvement identitaire de la vie politique américaine, et qu’il existe toujours. Quand on joue au jeu de l’identité, il faut s’attendre à perdre. Il nous faut une gauche postdiversitaire, qui s’inspire des succès passés de la gauche prédiversitaire. Cette gauche-là s’attacherait à élargir sa base en s’adressant aux Américains en leur qualité d’Américains et en privilégiant les questions qui concernent une vaste majorité d’entre eux. Elle parlerait à la nation en tant que nation de citoyens qui sont tous dans le même bateau et doivent se serrer les coudes. Pour ce qui est des questions plus étroites et symboliquement très chargées qui risquent de faire fuir des électeurs potentiels, notamment celles qui touchent à la sexualité et à la religion, cette gauche-là procéderait doucement, avec tact et sens de la mesure. Les enseignants acquis à cette gauche-là se recentreraient sur la principale responsabilité politique qui est la leur dans une démocratie : former des citoyens engagés qui connaissent leur système politique ainsi que les grandes forces et les principaux événements de leur histoire. Cette gauche postdiversitaire rappellerait également que la démocratie n’est pas qu’une affaire de droits ; elle confère aussi des devoirs à ses citoyens, par exemple le devoir de s’informer et celui de voter. Une presse de gauche postdiversitaire commencerait par s’informer sur les régions du pays dont elle a fait peu de cas, et sur les questions qui les préoccupent, notamment la religion. Et elle s’acquitterait avec sérieux de sa responsabilité d’informer les Américains sur les grandes forces qui régissent les relations internationales. J’ai été invité il y a quelques années à un congrès syndical en Floride pour parler du célèbre discours du président Franklin D. Roosevelt de 1941 sur les quatre libertés. La salle était bondée de représentants de sections locales – hommes, femmes, Noirs, Blanc, Latinos. Nous avons commencé par chanter l’hymne national puis nous nous sommes assis pour écouter un enregistrement du discours de Roosevelt. J’observais la diversité des visages dans l’assistance et j’étais frappé de voir à quel point ces personnes si différentes étaient concentrées sur ce qui les rassemblait. Et, en entendant Roosevelt invoquer d’une voix vibrante la liberté d’expression, la liberté de culte, la liberté de vivre à l’abri du besoin et la liberté de vivre à l’abri de la peur – des libertés qu’il réclamait « partout dans le monde » – cela m’a rappelé quels étaient les vrais fondements de la gauche américaine moderne. Mark Lilla
Dix jours à peine après l’élection de Trump, Lilla publie une tribune dans le New York Times, où il étrille la célébration univoque de la diversité par l’élite intellectuelle progressiste comme principale cause de sa défaite face à Trump. «Ces dernières années, la gauche américaine a cédé, à propos des identités ethniques, de genre et de sexualité, à une sorte d’hystérie collective qui a faussé son message au point de l’empêcher de devenir une force fédératrice capable de gouverner […], estime-t-il. Une des nombreuses leçons à tirer de la présidentielle américaine et de son résultat détestable, c’est qu’il faut clore l’ère de la gauche diversitaire.» De cette diatribe à succès, l’universitaire a fait un livre tout aussi polémique, The Once and Future Liberal. After Identity Politics, dont la traduction française vient d’être publiée sous le titre la Gauche identitaire. L’Amérique en miettes (Stock). Un ouvrage provocateur destiné à sonner l’alerte contre le «tournant identitaire» pris par le Parti démocrate sous l’influence des «idéologues de campus», «ces militants qui ne savent plus parler que de leur différence.» «Une vision politique large a été remplacée par une pseudo-politique et une rhétorique typiquement américaine du moi sensible qui lutte pour être reconnu», développe Lilla. Dans son viseur : les mouvements féministes, gays, indigènes ou afro comme Black Lives Matter («le meilleur moyen de ne pas construire de solidarité»). Bref, tout ce qui est minoritaire et qui s’exprime à coups d’occupation de places publiques, de pétitions et de tribunes dans les journaux est fautif à ses yeux d’avoir fragmenté la gauche américaine. L’essayiste situe l’origine de cette «dérive» idéologique au début des années 70, lorsque la Nouvelle Gauche interprète «à l’envers» la formule «le privé est politique», considérant que tout acte politique n’est rien d’autre qu’une activité personnelle. Ce «culte de l’identité» et des «particularismes» issus de la révolution culturelle et morale des Sixties a convergé avec les révolutions économiques sous l’ère Reagan pour devenir «l’idéologie dominante.» «La politique identitaire, c’est du reaganisme pour gauchiste», résume cet adepte de la «punchline» idéologico-politique. Intellectuel au profil hybride, combattant à la fois la pensée conservatrice et la pensée progressiste, Lilla agace plus à gauche qu’à droite où sa dénonciation de «l’idéologie de la diversité», de «ses limites» et «ses dangers» est perçue comme l’expression ultime d’un identitarisme masculin blanc. Positionnement transgressif qu’on ferait volontiers graviter du côté de la «nouvelle réaction», ce qu’il réfute. (…) L’essai de Lilla peut se lire comme un avertissement lancé à la gauche intellectuelle française, aujourd’hui divisée entre «républicanistes» et « décoloniaux ». Libération
Notre situation est parfaitement paradoxale. Jamais les ennemis de l’Union européenne n’ont eu à ce point le sentiment de toucher au but, de presque en voir la fin, et cependant jamais, je le crois, les peuples d’Europe n’ont été plus sérieusement, plus gravement attachés à l’Union. Quel malentendu! Voilà bien l’un des plus fâcheux résultats de notre incapacité à discuter, de notre nouvelle inclination pour la simplification à outrance des points de vue. L’hypothèse d’un repli nationaliste procède d’une erreur d’interprétation. Il n’y a pas de demande de repli nationaliste, mais une demande de protection, de régulation politique, de contrôle du cours des choses. C’est une demande de puissance publique qui ne heurte pas l’idée européenne. C’est en refusant de répondre à cette demande éminemment légitime et recevable que l’Union finira par conduire les Européens à revenir, la mort dans l’âme, au dogme nationaliste. (…) Trump marque le retour d’une figure classique mais oubliée chez nous, celle de l’homme d’État qui n’a d’intérêt que pour son pays. Il assume une politique de puissance. (…) [ souligner le clivage avec l’Europe de l’Est] C’est un risque politique, sur le plan national comme sur le plan européen. (…) La double défaite signifierait a posteriori l’imprudence du pari et pèserait sur les deux niveaux, européen et national en affaiblissant dangereusement le président. (…) Du côté des gouvernements, cessons de surjouer l’opposition frontale. (…) nous devons accepter cet attachement viscéral des Européens à leur patrimoine immatériel, leur manière de vivre, leur souveraineté, parfois si récente ou retrouvée depuis si peu et si chèrement payée. Dominique Reynié
Ce qui est nouveau, c’est d’abord que la bourgeoisie a le visage de l’ouverture et de la bienveillance. Elle a trouvé un truc génial : plutôt que de parler de « loi du marché », elle dit « société ouverte », « ouverture à l’Autre » et liberté de choisir… Les Rougon-Macquart sont déguisés en hipsters. Ils sont tous très cools, ils aiment l’Autre. Mieux : ils ne cessent de critiquer le système, « la finance », les « paradis fiscaux ». On appelle cela la rebellocratie. C’est un discours imparable : on ne peut pas s’opposer à des gens bienveillants et ouverts aux autres ! Mais derrière cette posture, il y a le brouillage de classes, et la fin de la classe moyenne. La classe moyenne telle qu’on l’a connue, celle des Trente Glorieuses, qui a profité de l’intégration économique, d’une ascension sociale conjuguée à une intégration politique et culturelle, n’existe plus même si, pour des raisons politiques, culturelles et anthropologiques, on continue de la faire vivre par le discours et les représentations. (…) C’est aussi une conséquence de la non-intégration économique. Aujourd’hui, quand on regarde les chiffres – notamment le dernier rapport sur les inégalités territoriales publié en juillet dernier –, on constate une hyper-concentration de l’emploi dans les grands centres urbains et une désertification de ce même emploi partout ailleurs. Et cette tendance ne cesse de s’accélérer ! Or, face à cette situation, ce même rapport préconise seulement de continuer vers encore plus de métropolisation et de mondialisation pour permettre un peu de redistribution. Aujourd’hui, et c’est une grande nouveauté, il y a une majorité qui, sans être « pauvre » ni faire les poubelles, n’est plus intégrée à la machine économique et ne vit plus là où se crée la richesse. Notre système économique nécessite essentiellement des cadres et n’a donc plus besoin de ces millions d’ouvriers, d’employés et de paysans. La mondialisation aboutit à une division internationale du travail : cadres, ingénieurs et bac+5 dans les pays du Nord, ouvriers, contremaîtres et employés là où le coût du travail est moindre. La mondialisation s’est donc faite sur le dos des anciennes classes moyennes, sans qu’on le leur dise ! Ces catégories sociales sont éjectées du marché du travail et éloignées des poumons économiques. Cependant, cette« France périphérique » représente quand même 60 % de la population. (…) Ce phénomène présent en France, en Europe et aux États-Unis a des répercussions politiques : les scores du FN se gonflent à mesure que la classe moyenne décroît car il est aujourd’hui le parti de ces « superflus invisibles » déclassés de l’ancienne classe moyenne. (…) Toucher 100 % d’un groupe ou d’un territoire est impossible. Mais j’insiste sur le fait que les classes populaires (jeunes, actifs, retraités) restent majoritaires en France. La France périphérique, c’est 60 % de la population. Elle ne se résume pas aux zones rurales identifiées par l’Insee, qui représentent 20 %. Je décris un continuum entre les habitants des petites villes et des zones rurales qui vivent avec en moyenne au maximum le revenu médian et n’arrivent pas à boucler leurs fins de mois. Face à eux, et sans eux, dans les quinze plus grandes aires urbaines, le système marche parfaitement. Le marché de l’emploi y est désormais polarisé. Dans les grandes métropoles il faut d’une part beaucoup de cadres, de travailleurs très qualifiés, et de l’autre des immigrés pour les emplois subalternes dans le BTP, la restauration ou le ménage. Ainsi les immigrés permettent-ils à la nouvelle bourgeoisie de maintenir son niveau de vie en ayant une nounou et des restaurants pas trop chers. (…) Il n’y a aucun complot mais le fait, logique, que la classe supérieure soutient un système dont elle bénéficie – c’est ça, la « main invisible du marché» ! Et aujourd’hui, elle a un nom plus sympathique : la « société ouverte ». Mais je ne pense pas qu’aux bobos. Globalement, on trouve dans les métropoles tous ceux qui profitent de la mondialisation, qu’ils votent Mélenchon ou Juppé ! D’ailleurs, la gauche votera Juppé. C’est pour cela que je ne parle ni de gauche, ni de droite, ni d’élites, mais de « la France d’en haut », de tous ceux qui bénéficient peu ou prou du système et y sont intégrés, ainsi que des gens aux statuts protégés : les cadres de la fonction publique ou les retraités aisés. Tout ce monde fait un bloc d’environ 30 ou 35 %, qui vit là où la richesse se crée. Et c’est la raison pour laquelle le système tient si bien. (…) La France périphérique connaît une phase de sédentarisation. Aujourd’hui, la majorité des Français vivent dans le département où ils sont nés, dans les territoires de la France périphérique il s’agit de plus de 60 % de la population. C’est pourquoi quand une usine ferme – comme Alstom à Belfort –, une espèce de rage désespérée s’empare des habitants. Les gens deviennent dingues parce qu’ils savent que pour eux « il n’y a pas d’alternative » ! Le discours libéral répond : « Il n’y a qu’à bouger ! » Mais pour aller où ? Vous allez vendre votre baraque et déménager à Paris ou à Bordeaux quand vous êtes licencié par ArcelorMittal ou par les abattoirs Gad ? Avec quel argent ? Des logiques foncières, sociales, culturelles et économiques se superposent pour rendre cette mobilité quasi impossible. Et on le voit : autrefois, les vieux restaient ou revenaient au village pour leur retraite. Aujourd’hui, la pyramide des âges de la France périphérique se normalise. Jeunes, actifs, retraités, tous sont logés à la même enseigne. La mobilité pour tous est un mythe. Les jeunes qui bougent, vont dans les métropoles et à l’étranger sont en majorité issus des couches supérieures. Pour les autres ce sera la sédentarisation. Autrefois, les emplois publics permettaient de maintenir un semblant d’équilibre économique et proposaient quelques débouchés aux populations. Seulement, en plus de la mondialisation et donc de la désindustrialisation, ces territoires ont subi la retraite de l’État. (…) Même si l’on installe 20 % de logements sociaux partout dans les grandes métropoles, cela reste une goutte d’eau par rapport au parc privé « social de fait » qui existait à une époque. Les ouvriers, autrefois, n’habitaient pas dans des bâtiments sociaux, mais dans de petits logements, ils étaient locataires, voire propriétaires, dans le parc privé à Paris ou à Lyon. C’est le marché qui crée les conditions de la présence des gens et non pas le logement social. Aujourd’hui, ce parc privé « social de fait » s’est gentrifié et accueille des catégories supérieures. Quant au parc social, il est devenu la piste d’atterrissage des flux migratoires. Si l’on regarde la carte de l’immigration, la dynamique principale se situe dans le Grand Ouest, et ce n’est pas dans les villages que les immigrés s’installent, mais dans les quartiers de logements sociaux de Rennes, de Brest ou de Nantes. (…) In fine, il y a aussi un rejet du multiculturalisme. Les gens n’ont pas envie d’aller vivre dans les derniers territoires des grandes villes ouverts aux catégories populaires : les banlieues et les quartiers à logements sociaux qui accueillent et concentrent les flux migratoires. Christophe Guilluy
La société ouverte (…), c’est la grande fake news de la mondialisation. Quand on regarde les choses de près, les gens qui vendent le plus la société ouverte sont ceux qui vivent dans le plus grand grégarisme social, ceux qui contournent le plus la carte scolaire, ceux qui vivent dans l’entre-soi et qui font des choix résidentiels qui leur permettent à la fin de tenir le discours de la société ouverte puisque de toute façon, ils ont, eux, les moyens de la frontière invisible. Et précisément, ce qui est à l’inverse la situation des catégories modestes, c’est qu’elles n’ont pas les moyens de la frontière invisible. Ca n’en fait pas des xénophobes ou des gens qui sont absolument contre l’autre. Ca fait simplement des gens qui veulent qu’un Etat régule. Christophe Guilluy
Que nous dit Christophe Guilluy ? Que la scission est aujourd’hui consommée entre une élite déconnectée et une classe populaire précarisée. Et que la classe moyenne, qu’il définit comme « une classe majoritaire dans laquelle tout le monde était intégré, de l’ouvrier au cadre », est un champ de ruines. Ce dernier point est affirmé, répété, martelé, « implosion d’un modèle qui n’intègre plus les classes populaires, qui constituaient, hier, le socle de la classe moyenne occidentale et en portait les valeurs ». Dès lors, les groupes sociaux en présence « ne font plus société ». C’est là le sens du titre, « No Society », reprise qui n’a rien d’innocente d’un aphorisme de feu la Première ministre britannique Margaret Thatcher – déjà responsable du célèbre Tina, « There is no alternative » –, dont la politique néolibérale agressive, véritable plan de casse sociale dans les années 1980, définit toujours le modèle outre-Manche. Guilluy se fait lanceur d’alerte. Il constate, à l’instar de l’économiste Thomas Piketty, dont il cite les travaux à plusieurs reprises, le fossé toujours plus large qui sépare les catégories les plus aisées, des classes défavorisées. Une situation qui induit une nouvelle géographie sociale et politique. Et explique, selon lui, l’insécurité culturelle s’ajoutant à l’insécurité sociale, la vague populiste qui balaie la France, la Grande-Bretagne, l’Italie, l’Allemagne, les États-Unis et aujourd’hui le Brésil. Pour l’auteur, comme pour d’autres analystes, l’élection de Trump n’est pas un accident, mais l’aboutissement d’un processus que les élites, drapées dans « un mépris de classe », auraient voulu renvoyer aux marges. Ce qui fâche politiques, chefs d’entreprise et médias ? Cette propension à mettre tout le monde dans le même sac, tous complices de défendre, « au nom du bien commun », une idéologie néolibérale jugée destructrice. Et de masquer les vrais problèmes à l’aide d’éléments de langage. Guilluy conspue les 0,1 %, ces superpuissances économiques, tentées par l’anarcho-capitalisme, qui siphonnent les richesses mondiales. Tout comme il rejette la métropolisation des territoires, encouragée par l’Europe, qui tend à concentrer les créations d’emplois dans les zones urbaines, alors même que les classes populaires en sont rejetées par le coût du logement et une fiscalité dissuasive. Effondrement du modèle intégrateur, ascenseur social en berne… Cette France à qui on demande de traverser la rue attend vainement, selon lui, que le feu repasse au vert pour elle. Guilluy la crédite cependant d’un « soft power », capacité, amplifiée par les réseaux sociaux, à remettre sur la table les sujets qui fâchent, ceux-là mêmes que les élites aimeraient conserver sous le tapis. Une donnée que les tribuns populistes, de droite comme de gauche, ont bien intégrée, s’en faisant complaisamment chambre d’écho. Sud Ouest
The slide in his popularity – Macron is now more unpopular than his predecessor, François Hollande, at the same stage – is a dire warning to “globalists”. It comes at a time when Trump’s popularity among his voters is relatively stable by comparison and the American economy is growing. Macron’s fate could have far-reaching consequences for Europe’s political future. What makes the contrast between Trump’s and Macron’s fortunes so striking is that the two presidents have so much in common. Both found electoral success by breaking free of their own side: Macron from the left and Trump from mainstream Republicanism; they both moved beyond the old left-right divide. Both realised that we were seeing the disappearance of the old western middle class. Both grasped that, for the first time in history, the working people who make up the solid base of the lower middle classes live, for the most part, in regions that now generate the fewest jobs. It is in the small or middling towns and vast stretches of farmland that skilled workers, the low-waged, small farmers and the self-employed are concentrated. These are the regions in which the future of western democracy will be decided. But the similarities end there. While Trump was elected by people in the heartlands of the American rustbelt states, Macron built his electoral momentum in the big globalised cities. While the French president is aware that social ties are weakening in the regions, he believes that the solution is to speed up reform to bring the country into line with the requirements of the global economy. Trump, by contrast, concluded that globalisation was the problem, and that the economic model it is based on would have to be reined in (through protectionism, limits on free trade agreements, controls on immigration, and spending on vast public infrastructure building) to create jobs in the deindustrialised parts of the US. It could be said that to some extent both presidents are implementing the policies they were elected to pursue. Yet, while Trump’s voters seem satisfied, Macron’s appear frustrated. Why is there such a difference? This has as much to do with the kind of voters involved as the way the two presidents operate politically. Trump speaks to voters who constitute a continuum, that of the old middle class. It is a body of voters with clearly expressed demands – most call for the creation of jobs, but they also want the preservation of their social and cultural model. Macron’s problem, on the other hand, is that his electorate consists of different elements that are hard to keep together. The idea that Macron was elected just by the big city “winners” isn’t accurate: he also attracted the support of many older voters who are not especially receptive to the economic and societal changes the president’s revolution demands.This holds true throughout Europe. Those who support globalisation often tend to forget a vital fact: the people who vote for them aren’t just the ones on the winning side in the globalisation stakes or part of the new, cool bourgeoisie in Paris, London or New York, but are a much more heterogeneous group, many of whom are sceptical about the effects of globalisation. In France, for example, most of Macron’s support came in the first instance from the ranks of pensioners and public sector workers who had been largely shielded from the effects of globalisation. (…) These developments are an illustration of the political difficulty that Europe’s globalising class now finds itself in. From Angela Merkel to Macron, the advocates of globalisation are now relying on voters who cling to a social model that held sway during the three decades of postwar economic growth. Thus their determination to accelerate the adaptation of western societies to globalisation automatically condemns them to political unpopularity. Locked away in their metropolitan citadels, they fail to see that their electoral programmes no longer meet the concerns of more than a tiny minority of the population – or worse, of their own voters. They are on the wrong track if they think that the “deplorables” in the deindustrialised states of the US or the struggling regions of France will soon die out. Throughout the west, people in “peripheral” regions still make up the bulk of the population. Like it or not, these areas continue to represent the electoral heartlands of western democracies. Christophe Guilluy
La focalisation sur le « problème des banlieues » fait oublier un fait majeur : 61 % de la population française vit aujourd’hui hors des grandes agglomérations. Les classes populaires se concentrent dorénavant dans les espaces périphériques : villes petites et moyennes, certains espaces périurbains et la France rurale. En outre, les banlieues sensibles ne sont nullement « abandonnées » par l’État. Comme l’a établi le sociologue Dominique Lorrain, les investissements publics dans le quartier des Hautes Noues à Villiers-sur-Marne (Val-de-Marne) sont mille fois supérieurs à ceux consentis en faveur d’un quartier modeste de la périphérie de Verdun (Meuse), qui n’a jamais attiré l’attention des médias. Pourtant, le revenu moyen par habitant de ce quartier de Villiers-sur-Marne est de 20 % supérieur à celui de Verdun. Bien sûr, c’est un exemple extrême. Il reste que, à l’échelle de la France, 85 % des ménages pauvres (qui gagnent moins de 993 € par mois, soit moins de 60 % du salaire médian, NDLR) ne vivent pas dans les quartiers « sensibles ». Si l’on retient le critère du PIB, la Seine-Saint-Denis est plus aisée que la Meuse ou l’Ariège. Le 93 n’est pas un espace de relégation, mais le cœur de l’aire parisienne. (…)  En se désindustrialisant, les grandes villes ont besoin de beaucoup moins d’employés et d’ouvriers mais de davantage de cadres. C’est ce qu’on appelle la gentrification des grandes villes, symbolisée par la figure du fameux « bobo », partisan de l’ouverture dans tous les domaines. Confrontées à la flambée des prix dans le parc privé, les catégories populaires, pour leur part, cherchent des logements en dehors des grandes agglomérations. En outre, l’immobilier social, dernier parc accessible aux catégories populaires de ces métropoles, s’est spécialisé dans l’accueil des populations immigrées. Les catégories populaires d’origine européenne et qui sont éligibles au parc social s’efforcent d’éviter les quartiers où les HLM sont nombreux. Elles préfèrent déménager en grande banlieue, dans les petites villes ou les zones rurales pour accéder à la propriété et acquérir un pavillon. On assiste ainsi à l’émergence de « villes monde » très inégalitaires où se concentrent à la fois cadres et catégories populaires issues de l’immigration récente. Ce phénomène n’est pas limité à Paris. Il se constate dans toutes les agglomérations de France (Lyon, Bordeaux, Nantes, Lille, Grenoble), hormis Marseille. (…) On a du mal à formuler certains faits en France. Dans le vocabulaire de la politique de la ville, « classes moyennes » signifie en réalité « population d’origine européenne ». Or les HLM ne font plus coexister ces deux populations. L’immigration récente, pour l’essentiel familiale, s’est concentrée dans les quartiers de logements sociaux des grandes agglomérations, notamment les moins valorisés. Les derniers rapports de l’observatoire national des zones urbaines sensibles (ZUS) montrent qu’aujourd’hui 52 % des habitants des ZUS sont immigrés, chiffre qui atteint 64 % en Île-de-France. Cette spécialisation tend à se renforcer. La fin de la mixité dans les HLM n’est pas imputable aux bailleurs sociaux, qui font souvent beaucoup d’efforts. Mais on ne peut pas forcer des personnes qui ne le souhaitent pas à vivre ensemble. L’étalement urbain se poursuit parce que les habitants veulent se séparer, même si ça les fragilise économiquement. Par ailleurs, dans les territoires où se côtoient populations d’origine européenne et populations d’immigration extra-européenne, la fin du modèle assimilationniste suscite beaucoup d’inquiétudes. L’autre ne devient plus soi. Une société multiculturelle émerge. Minorités et majorités sont désormais relatives. (…)  ces personnes habitent là où on produit les deux tiers du PIB du pays et où se crée l’essentiel des emplois, c’est-à-dire dans les métropoles. Une petite bourgeoisie issue de l’immigration maghrébine et africaine est ainsi apparue. Dans les ZUS, il existe une vraie mobilité géographique et sociale : les gens arrivent et partent. Ces quartiers servent de sas entre le Nord et le Sud. Ce constat ruine l’image misérabiliste d’une banlieue ghetto où seraient parqués des habitants condamnés à la pauvreté. À bien des égards, la politique de la ville est donc un grand succès. Les seuls phénomènes actuels d’ascension sociale dans les milieux populaires se constatent dans les catégories immigrées des métropoles. Cadres ou immigrés, tous les habitants des grandes agglomérations tirent bénéfice d’y vivre – chacun à leur échelle. En Grande-Bretagne, en 2013, le secrétaire d’État chargé des Universités et de la Science de l’époque, David Willetts, s’est même déclaré favorable à une politique de discrimination positive en faveur des jeunes hommes blancs de la « working class » car leur taux d’accès à l’université s’est effondré et est inférieur à celui des enfants d’immigrés. (…) Le problème social et politique majeur de la France, c’est que, pour la première fois depuis la révolution industrielle, la majeure partie des catégories populaires ne vit plus là où se crée la richesse. Au XIXe siècle, lors de la révolution industrielle, on a fait venir les paysans dans les grandes villes pour travailler en usine. Aujourd’hui, on les fait repartir à la « campagne ». C’est un retour en arrière de deux siècles. Le projet économique du pays, tourné vers la mondialisation, n’a plus besoin des catégories populaires, en quelque sorte. (…) L’absence d’intégration économique des catégories modestes explique le paradoxe français : un pays qui redistribue beaucoup de ses richesses mais dont une majorité d’habitants considèrent à juste titre qu’ils sont de plus en plus fragiles et déclassés. (…) Les catégories populaires qui vivent dans ces territoires sont d’autant plus attachées à leur environnement local qu’elles sont, en quelque sorte, assignées à résidence. Elles réagissent en portant une grande attention à ce que j’appelle le «village» : sa maison, son quartier, son territoire, son identité culturelle, qui représentent un capital social. La contre-société s’affirme aussi dans le domaine des valeurs. La France périphérique est attachée à l’ordre républicain, réservée envers les réformes de société et critique sur l’assistanat. L’accusation de «populisme» ne l’émeut guère. Elle ne supporte plus aucune forme de tutorat – ni politique, ni intellectuel – de la part de ceux qui se croient «éclairés». (…) Il devient très difficile de fédérer et de satisfaire tous les électorats à la fois. Dans un monde parfait, il faudrait pouvoir combiner le libéralisme économique et culturel dans les agglomérations et le protectionnisme, le refus du multiculturalisme et l’attachement aux valeurs traditionnelles dans la France périphérique. Mais c’est utopique. C’est pourquoi ces deux France décrivent les nouvelles fractures politiques, présentes et à venir. Christophe Guilluy
Les pays de l’OCDE, et plus encore les démocraties occidentales, répondent pleinement au projet que la Dame de fer appelait de ses vœux. Partout, trente ans de mondialisation ont agi comme une concasseuse du pacte social issu de l’après-guerre. La fin de la classe moyenne occidentale est actée. Et pas seulement en France. Les poussées de populisme aux Etats-Unis, en Italie, et jusqu’en Suède, où le modèle scandinave de la social-démocratie n’est désormais plus qu’une sorte de zombie, en sont les manifestations les plus évidentes. Personne n’ose dire que la fête est finie. On se rassure comme on peut. Le monde académique, le monde politique et médiatique, chacun constate la montée des inégalités, s’inquiète de la hausse de la dette, de celle du chômage, mais se rassure avec quelques points de croissance, et soutient que l’enjeu se résume à la question de l’adaptabilité. Pas celle du monde d’en haut. Les gagnants de la mondialisation, eux, sont parfaitement adaptés à ce monde qu’ils ont contribué à forger. Non, c’est aux anciennes classes moyennes éclatées, reléguées, que s’adresse cette injonction d’adaptation à ce nouveau monde. Parce que, cahin-caha, cela marche, nos économies produisent des inégalités, mais aussi plus de richesses. Mais faire du PIB, ça ne suffit pas à faire société. (…) Election de Trump, Brexit, arrivée au pouvoir d’une coalition improbable liant les héritiers de la Ligue du Nord à ceux d’une partie de l’extrême gauche en Italie. De même qu’il y a une France périphérique, il y a une Amérique périphérique, un Royaume-Uni périphérique, etc. La périphérie, c’est, pour faire simple, ces territoires autour des villes-mondes, rien de moins que le reste du pays. L’agglomération parisienne, le Grand-Londres, les grandes villes côtières américaines, sont autant de territoires parfaitement en phase avec la mondialisation, des sortes de Singapour. Sauf que, contrairement à cette cité-Etat, ces territoires disposent d’un hinterland, d’une périphérie. L’explosion du prix de l’immobilier est la traduction la plus visible de cette communauté de destin de ces citadelles où se concentrent la richesse, les emplois à haute valeur ajoutée, où le capital culturel et financier s’accumule. Cette partition est la traduction spatiale de la notion de ruissellement des richesses du haut vers le bas, des premiers de cordée vers les autres. Dans ce modèle, la richesse créée dans les citadelles doit redescendre vers la périphérie. Trente ans de ce régime n’ont pas laissé nos sociétés intactes. Ce sont d’abord les ouvriers et les agriculteurs qui ont été abandonnés sur le chemin, puis les employés, et c’est maintenant au tour des jeunes diplômés d’être fragilisés. Les plans sociaux ne concernent plus seulement l’industrie mais les services, et même les banques… Dans les territoires de cette France périphérique, la dynamique dépressive joue à plein : à l’effondrement industriel succède celui des emplois présentiels lequel provoque une crise du commerce dans les petites villes et les villes moyennes. Les gens aux Etats-Unis ou ailleurs ne se sont pas réveillés un beau matin pour se tourner vers le populisme. Non, ils ont fait un diagnostic, une analyse rationnelle : est-ce que ça marche pour eux ou pas. Et, rationnellement, ils n’ont pas trouvé leur compte. Et pas que du point de vue économique. S’il y a une exception française, c’est la victoire d’Emmanuel Macron, quand partout ailleurs les populistes semblent devoir l’emporter. (…) Emmanuel Macron est le candidat du front bourgeois. A Paris, il n’est pas anodin que les soutiens de François Fillon et les partisans de La Manif pour tous du XVIe arrondissement aient voté à 87,3 % pour le candidat du libéralisme culturel, et que leurs homologues bobos du XXe arrondissement, contempteurs de la finance internationale, aient voté à 90 % pour un banquier d’affaires. Mais cela ne fait pas une majorité. Si Emmanuel Macron l’a emporté, c’est qu’il a reçu le soutien de la frange encore protégée de la société française que sont les retraités et les fonctionnaires. Deux populations qui ont lourdement souffert au Royaume-Uni par exemple, comme l’a traduit leur vote pro-Brexit. Et c’est bien là le drame qui se noue en France. Car, parmi les derniers recours dont dispose la technocratie au pouvoir pour aller toujours plus avant vers cette fameuse adaptation, c’est bien de faire les poches des retraités et des fonctionnaires. Emmanuel Macron applique donc méticuleusement ce programme. Il semble récemment pris de vertige par le risque encouru pour les prochaines élections, comme le montre sa courbe de popularité, laquelle se trouve sous celle de François Hollande à la même période de leur quinquennat. Un autre levier, déjà mis en branle par Margaret Thatcher puis par les gouvernements du New Labour de Tony Blair, est la fin de l’universalité de la redistribution et la concentration de la redistribution. Sous couvert de faire plus juste, et surtout de réduire les transferts sociaux, on réduit encore le nombre de professeurs, mais on divise les classes de ZEP en deux, on limite l’accès des classes populaires aux HLM pour concentrer ce patrimoine vers les franges les plus pauvres, et parfois non solvables. De quoi fragiliser le modèle de financement du logement social en France, déjà mis à mal par les dernières réformes, et ouvrir la porte à sa privatisation, comme ce fut le cas dans l’Angleterre thatchérienne. (…) Partout en Europe, dans un contexte de flux migratoire intensifié, ce ciblage des politiques publiques vers les plus pauvres – mais qui est le plus pauvre justement, si ce n’est celui qui vient d’arriver d’un territoire dix fois moins riche ? – provoque inexorablement un rejet de ce qui reste encore du modèle social redistributif par ceux qui en ont le plus besoin et pour le plus grand intérêt de la classe dominante. C’est là que se noue la double insécurité économique et culturelle. Face au démantèlement de l’Etat-providence, à la volonté de privatiser, les classes populaires mettent en avant leur demande de préserver le bien commun comme les services publics. Face à la dérégulation, la dénationalisation, elles réclament un cadre national, plus sûr moyen de défendre le bien commun. Face à l’injonction de l’hypermobilité, à laquelle elles n’ont de toute façon pas accès, elles ont inventé un monde populaire sédentaire, ce qui se traduit également par une économie plus durable. Face à la constitution d’un monde où s’impose l’indistinction culturelle, elles aspirent à la préservation d’un capital culturel protecteur. Souverainisme, protectionnisme, préservation des services publics, sensibilité aux inégalités, régulation des flux migratoires, sont autant de thématiques qui, de Tel-Aviv à Alger, de Detroit à Milan, dessinent un commun des classes populaires dans le monde. Ce soft power des classes populaires fait parfois sortir de leurs gonds les parangons de la mondialisation heureuse. Hillary Clinton en sait quelque chose. Elle n’a non seulement pas compris la demande de protection des classes populaires de la Rust Belt, mais, en plus, elle les a traités de « déplorables ». Qui veut être traité de déplorable ou, de ce côté-ci de l’Atlantique, de Dupont Lajoie ? L’appartenance à la classe moyenne n’est pas seulement définie par un seuil de revenus ou un travail d’entomologiste des populations de l’Insee. C’est aussi et avant tout un sentiment de porter les valeurs majoritaires et d’être dans la roue des classes dominantes du point de vue culturel et économique. Placées au centre de l’échiquier, ces catégories étaient des références culturelles pour les classes dominantes, comme pour les nouveaux arrivants, les classes populaires immigrées. En trente ans, les classes moyennes sont passées du modèle à suivre, l’American ou l’European way of life, au statut de losers. Il y a mieux comme référents pour servir de modèle d’assimilation. Qui veut ressembler à un plouc, un déplorable… ? Personne. Pas même les nouveaux arrivants. L’ostracisation des classes populaires par la classe dominante occidentale, pensée pour discréditer toute contestation du modèle économique mondialisé – être contre, c’est ne pas être sérieux – a, en outre, largement participé à l’effondrement des modèles d’intégration et in fine à la paranoïa identitaire. L’asociété s’est ainsi imposée partout : crise de la représentation politique, citadéllisation de la bourgeoisie, communautarisation. Qui peut dès lors s’étonner que nos systèmes d’organisation politique, la démocratie, soient en danger ? Christophe Guilluy
En 2016, Hillary Clinton traitait les électeurs de son opposant républicain, c’est-à-dire l’ancienne classe moyenne américaine déclassée, de « déplorables ». Au-delà du mépris de classe que sous-tend une expression qui rappelle celle de l’ancien président français François Hollande qui traitait de « sans-dents » les ouvriers ou employés précarisés, ces insultes (d’autant plus symboliques qu’elles étaient de la gauche) illustrent un long processus d’ostracisation d’une classe moyenne devenue inutile.  (…) Depuis des décennies, la représentation d’une classe moyenne triomphante laisse peu à peu la place à des représentations toujours plus négatives des catégories populaires et l’ensemble du monde d’en haut participe à cette entreprise. Le monde du cinéma, de la télévision, de la presse et de l’université se charge efficacement de ce travail de déconstruction pour produire en seulement quelques décennies la figure répulsive de catégories populaires inadaptées, racistes et souvent proches de la débilité. (…) Des rednecks dégénérés du film « Deliverance » au beauf raciste de Dupont Lajoie, la figure du « déplorable » s’est imposée dès les années 1970 dans le cinéma. La télévision n’est pas en reste. En France, les années 1980 seront marquées par l’émergence de Canal +, quintessence de ll’idéologie libérale-libertaire dominante. (…) De la série « Les Deschiens », à la marionnette débilitante de Johnny Hallyday des Guignols de l’info, c’est en réalité toute la production audiovisuelle qui donne libre cours à son mépris de classe. Christophe Guilluy
Étant donné l’état de fragilisation sociale de la classe moyenne majoritaire française, tout est possible. Sur les plans géographique, culturel et social, il existe bien des points communs entre les situations françaises et américaines, à commencer par le déclassement de la classe moyenne. C’est « l’Amérique périphérique » qui a voté Trump, celle des territoires désindustrialisés et ruraux qui est aussi celle des ouvriers, employés, travailleurs indépendants ou paysans. Ceux qui étaient hier au cœur de la machine économique en sont aujourd’hui bannis. Le parallèle avec la situation américaine existe aussi sur le plan culturel, nous avons adopté un modèle économique mondialisé. Fort logiquement, nous devons affronter les conséquences de ce modèle économique mondialisé : l’ouvrier – hier à gauche –, le paysan – hier à droite –, l’employé – à gauche et à droite – ont aujourd’hui une perception commune des effets de la mondialisation et rompent avec ceux qui n’ont pas su les protéger. La France est en train de devenir une société américaine, il n’y a aucune raison pour que l’on échappe aux effets indésirables du modèle. (…) Dans l’ensemble des pays développés, le modèle mondialisé produit la même contestation. Elle émane des mêmes territoires (Amérique périphérique, France périphérique, Angleterre périphérique… ) et de catégories qui constituaient hier la classe moyenne, largement perdue de vue par le monde d’en haut. (…) la perception que des catégories dominantes – journalistes en tête – ont des classes populaires se réduit à leur champ de vision immédiat. Je m’explique : ce qui reste aujourd’hui de classes populaires dans les grandes métropoles sont les classes populaires immigrées qui vivent dans les banlieues c’est-à-dire les minorités : en France elles sont issues de l’immigration maghrébine et africaine, aux États-Unis plutôt blacks et latinos. Les classes supérieures, qui sont les seules à pouvoir vivre au cœur des grandes métropoles, là où se concentrent aussi les minorités, n’ont comme perception du pauvre que ces quartiers ethnicisés, les ghettos et banlieues… Tout le reste a disparu des représentations. Aujourd’hui, 59 % des ménages pauvres, 60 % des chômeurs et 66 % des classes populaires vivent dans la « France périphérique », celle des petites villes, des villes moyennes et des espaces ruraux. (…) Faire passer les classes moyennes et populaires pour « réactionnaires », « fascisées », « pétinisées » est très pratique. Cela permet d’éviter de se poser des questions cruciales. Lorsque l’on diagnostique quelqu’un comme fasciste, la priorité devient de le rééduquer, pas de s’interroger sur l’organisation économique du territoire où il vit. L’antifascisme est une arme de classe. Pasolini expliquait déjà dans ses Écrits corsaires que depuis que la gauche a adopté l’économie de marché, il ne lui reste qu’une chose à faire pour garder sa posture de gauche : lutter contre un fascisme qui n’existe pas. C’est exactement ce qui est en train de se passer. (…) Il y a un mépris de classe presque inconscient véhiculé par les médias, le cinéma, les politiques, c’est énorme. On l’a vu pour l’élection de Trump comme pour le Brexit, seule une opinion est présentée comme bonne ou souhaitable. On disait que gagner une élection sans relais politique ou médiatique était impossible, Trump nous a prouvé qu’au contraire, c’était faux. Ce qui compte, c’est la réalité des gens depuis leur point de vue à eux. Nous sommes à un moment très particulier de désaffiliation politique et culturel des classes populaires, c’est vrai dans la France périphérique, mais aussi dans les banlieues où les milieux populaires cherchent à préserver ce qui leur reste : un capital social et culturel protecteur qui permet l’entraide et le lien social. Cette volonté explique les logiques séparatistes au sein même des milieux modestes. Une dynamique, qui n’interdit pas la cohabitation, et qui répond à la volonté de ne pas devenir minoritaire. (…) La bourgeoisie d’aujourd’hui a bien compris qu’il était inutile de s’opposer frontalement au peuple. C’est là qu’intervient le « brouillage de classe », un phénomène, qui permet de ne pas avoir à assumer sa position. Entretenue du bobo à Steve Jobs, l’idéologie du cool encourage l’ouverture et la diversité, en apparence. Le discours de l’ouverture à l’autre permet de maintenir la bourgeoisie dans une posture de supériorité morale sans remettre en cause sa position de classe (ce qui permet au bobo qui contourne la carte scolaire, et qui a donc la même demande de mise à distance de l’autre que le prolétaire qui vote FN, de condamner le rejet de l’autre). Le discours de bienveillance avec les minorités offre ainsi une caution sociale à la nouvelle bourgeoisie qui n’est en réalité ni diverse ni ouverte : les milieux sociaux qui prônent le plus d’ouverture à l’autre font parallèlement preuve d’un grégarisme social et d’un entre-soi inégalé. (…) Nous, terre des lumières et patrie des droits de l’homme, avons choisi le modèle libéral mondialisé sans ses effets sociétaux : multiculturalisme et renforcement des caommunautarismes. Or, en la matière, nous n’avons pas fait mieux que les autres pays. (…) Le FN n’est pas le bon indicateur, les gens n’attendent pas les discours politiques ou les analyses d’en haut pour se déterminer. Les classes populaires font un diagnostic des effets de plusieurs décennies d’adaptation aux normes de l’économie mondiale et utilisent des candidats ou des référendums, ce fut le cas en 2005, pour l’exprimer. Christophe Guilluy
La réalisation [de « Dupont Lajoie »] ne se fit pas sans difficultés. Le film s’inspire en partie de la vague de meurtres racistes commis dans le sud de la France au début des années 1970, notamment à Marseille durant l’été 1973, mais également d’un fait divers réel s’étant déroulé à Grasse. Le sujet est encore très sensible dans le Var où Boisset souhaite tourner. Ses autorisations de tournage sont souvent retirées, et l’agressivité reste présente autour de l’équipe. (…) Le groupe extrémiste Charles Martel (qui a été notamment l’auteur d’un attentat à la bombe à Marseille en 1973) menace l’équipe de Boisset. Le camping, principal lieu de tournage, est caillassé, et reçoit même des grenades et des cocktails Molotov. Les figurants devant jouer les Maghrébins ne trouvent pas de logement, et l’acteur Mohamed Zinet est même agressé par un groupe de quatre personnes ; hospitalisé, il ne reprendra pas le tournage. Les figurants « blancs », bien que connaissant le scénario, auraient troqué leurs accessoires contre de vrais gourdins, supposant que leurs homologues maghrébins ont quelque chose à se reprocher. La censure veut l’interdire aux moins de seize ans, sauf si Boisset accepte trois coupes : une scène de dialogue, et deux plans (les images où l’on voit le sexe d’Isabelle Huppert, et celui où la tête de la victime de la ratonnade heurte le pavé). Boisset accepte sans sourciller : les plans n’existent pas dans le film, les scènes n’étant que suggérées par la mise en scène. Le film sort dans les salles en février 1975. Mal accueilli par ceux qui ne voulaient voir que l’aspect polémique du sujet, il est parfois soumis au refus des exploitants de salle, qui refusent de le diffuser, comme le patron du cinéma Pathé de la place Clichy, qui craint que le public arabe attiré par le film ne fasse fuir ses « habitués ». Les salles connaissent également des échauffourées à la sortie des séances. Ce film fut aussi un grand succès public, et l’œuvre la plus importante d’Yves Boisset. Il proposait une peinture sans complaisance de gens ordinaires, qui collectivement se laissent gagner par la haine raciste. Caricature et réalisme s’y confondent sans qu’il soit possible de les démêler. La qualité de la distribution assura le succès du film : Carmet en meurtrier lâche et raciste, Lanoux en fier à bras, beauf et ancien d’Algérie, des acteurs généralement sympathiques Marielle, Peyrelon, interprétant avec justesse des personnages aussi odieux qu’ordinaires, archétypes du fameux « Français moyen ». L’animation et jeu Intercamping animé par Léo Tartaffione (Jean-Pierre Marielle) était largement inspirée de l’émission télévisée Intervilles, le nom lui-même de Léo Tartaffione rappelant celui de Léon Zitrone. Wikipedia
Les Deschiens ont un style très personnel et reconnaissable : décor minimaliste (fond de couleur unie, très peu voire aucun élément de mobilier), costumes au kitsch volontaire (vêtements surannés, couleurs démodées, matières bon marché), cadrage immuable (séquences réalisées en plan fixe et en plan séquence). Les dialogues, en langage courant voire relâché, font surgir l’absurde dans le quotidien de personnages incarnant un certain bon sens populaire, mais dont l’ignorance ou l’étroitesse d’esprit vire souvent au burlesque. Les Deschiens font un usage comique des accents régionaux, chaque comédien représentant les stéréotypes d’une région. Ainsi, François Morel et Olivier Saladin représentent la Normandie (Orne pour François Morel et Seine-Maritime pour Olivier Saladin), Bruno Lochet la Sarthe, Philippe Duquesne le Nord-Pas-de-Calais, et Yolande Moreau la Belgique. M. Morel : c’est le personnage principal de la série. Il est extrêmement rationnel, attaché à la vie quotidienne, et n’entend jamais utiliser la technologie moderne. C’est le stéréotype du Français « moyen » et il est hermétique à la culture (principalement aux livres). M. Saladin : c’est un ami de M. Morel avec lequel il discute de toutes sortes de sujets. Il est la plupart du temps dans l’ombre de M. Morel et il cherche toujours à exprimer ses idées, bien qu’il ait du mal à les faire clairement comprendre. Yolande : la femme de M. Morel. Elle suit souvent les préceptes de son mari sur l’éducation de leurs enfants. Elle représente elle aussi un stéréotype : celui de la femme au foyer inculte. Olivier : le fils de M. Morel et de Yolande. Il essaye sans cesse de se cultiver en lisant des ouvrages de littérature classique (Gide, Yourcenar…) au grand dam de ses parents qui l’obligent à avoir des activités moins intellectuelles. Atmen « Atemen » Kelif : c’est « l’arabe de service » qui se fait maltraiter verbalement et physiquement par M. Morel et M. Duquesne. (…) Les auteurs des Deschiens ont été accusés de brocarder la France d’en-bas. François Morel a dit ne pas comprendre qu’on les ait en partie tenus responsables de l’échec de Lionel Jospin en 2002 parce qu’ils auraient « déculpabilisé la gauche bobo enfin autorisée à se moquer des pauvres ». Il attribue ce malentendu à leur réussite qui entraîne des commentaires mettant davantage en avant la portée politique de leurs sketchs que l’aspect humoristique. Gérard Guégan reproche aux Deschiens (et à « l’humour Canal+ » de cette époque) de rendre grotesque par la parodie une seule classe sociale : les ouvriers. Toutefois, les acteurs défendent une démarche théâtrale qui ne vise pas à stigmatiser les « petites gens », bien plutôt, à travers un miroir déformant, à nous renvoyer tous à l’aspect dérisoire de notre vie. Wikipedia
An old man with a straw hat and work shirt appeared at Lewis’ window, talking in. He looked like a hillbilly in some badly cast movie, a character actor too much in character to be believed. I wondered where the excitement was that intrigued Lewis so much; everything in Oree was sleepy and hookwormy and ugly, and most of all, inconsequential. Nobody worth a damn could ever come from such a place. (…) There is always something wrong with people in the country, I thought. In the comparatively few times I had ever been in the rural South I had been struck by the number of missing fingers. Offhand, I had counted around twenty, at least. There had also been several people with some form of crippling or twisting illness, and some blind or one-eyed. No adequate medical treatment maybe. But there was something else. You’d think that farming was a healthy life, with fresh air and fresh food and plenty of exercise, but I never saw a farmer who didn’t have something wrong with him, and most of the time obviously wrong. The catching of an arm in a tractor park somewhere off in the middle of a field where nothing happened but that the sun blazed back more fiercely down the open mouth of one’s screams. And so many snakebites deep in the woods as one stepped over a rotten log, so many domestic animals suddenly turning and crushing one against the splintering side of a barn stall. I wanted none of it, and I didn’t want to be around where it happened either. But I was there, and there was no way for me to escape, except by water, from the country of nine-fingered people. James Dickey
They’re buildin’ a dam across the Cahulawassee River. They’re gonna flood a whole valley, Bobby (…) Dammit, they’re drownin’ the river…Just about the last wild, untamed, unpolluted, unf–ked up river in the South. Don’t you understand what I’m sayin’?…They’re gonna stop the river up. There ain’t gonna be no more river. There’s just gonna be a big, dead lake…You just push a little more power into Atlanta, a little more air-conditioners for your smug little suburb, and you know what’s gonna happen? We’re gonna rape this whole god-damned landscape. We’re gonna rape it. (…) We didn’t lose it – we sold it. Lewis Medlock (principal protagoniste de Delivrance)
 These are the men. Nothing very unusual about them. Suburban guys like you or your neighbor. Nothing very unusual about them until they decided to spend one weekend canoeing down the Cahulawassee River. Ed Gentry – he runs an art service, his wife Martha has a boy Dean. Lewis Medlock has real estate interests, talks about resettling in New Zealand or Uruguay. Drew Ballinger – he’s sales supervisor for a soft drink company. Bobby Trippe – bachelor, insurance and mutual funds. These are the men who decided not to play golf that weekend. Instead, they sought the river. Bande-annonce de Deliverance
Deliverance (1972) is British director John Boorman’s gripping, absorbing action-adventure film about four suburban Atlanta businessmen friends who encounter disaster in a summer weekend’s river-canoeing trip. It was one of the first films with the theme of city-dwellers against the powerful forces of nature. The exciting box-office hit, most remembered for its inspired banjo duel and the brutal, violent action (and sodomy scene), was based on James Dickey’s adaptation of his own 1970 best-selling novel (his first) of the same name – he contributed the screenplay and acted in a minor part as the town sheriff. (…) The increasingly claustrophobic, downbeat film, shot in linear sequence along forty miles of a treacherous river, has been looked upon as a philosophical or mythical allegory of man’s psychological and grueling physical journey against adversity. It came during the 70s decade when many other conspiracy or corruption-related films were made with misgivings, paranoia or questioning of various societal institutions or subject areas, such as the media (i.e., Dog Day Afternoon (1975), Network (1976)), politics (i.e., The Parallax View (1974), All the President’s Men (1976)), science (i.e., Capricorn One (1977), Coma (1978), The China Syndrome (1979)), and various parts of the US itself (i.e., Race with the Devil (1975), The Hills Have Eyes (1977), and later Southern Comfort (1981)). A group of urban dwellers test their manhood and courage, totally vulnerable in the alien wild, and pit themselves against the hostile violence of nature. At times, however, they are attracted to nature, and exhilarated and joyful about their experiences in the wild. (Director Boorman pursued the same complex eco-message theme of man vs. nature in other films, including Zardoz (1973) and The Emerald Forest (1985).) As they progress further and further along in uncharted territory down the rapids, the men ‘rape’ the untouched, virginal wilderness as they are themselves violated by the pristine wilderness and its degenerate, inbred backwoods inhabitants. Survivalist skills come to the forefront when civilized standards of decency and logic fail. (…) The river is the potent personification of the complex, natural forces that propel men further and further along their paths. It tests their personal values, exhibiting the conflict between country and city, and accentuates what has been hidden or unrealized in civilized society. The adventurers vainly seek to be ‘delivered’ from the evil in their own hearts, and as in typical horror films, confront other-worldly forces in the deep woods. The flooding of the region after the completion of a dam construction project alludes to the purification and cleansing of the sins of the world by the Great Flood. The film was also interpreted as an allegory of the US’ involvement in the Vietnam War – as the men (the US military) intruded into a foreign world (Southeast Asia), and found it was raped or confronted by wild forces it couldn’t understand or control.The film opens with voice-overs of the main characters discussing the « vanishing wilderness » and the corruption of modern civilization, while the credits play over views of the flooding of one of the last untamed stretches of land, and the imminent wiping out of the entire Cahulawassee River and the small town of Aintry. (…) They leave behind their business jobs and civilized values for their « last chance » to go back to unspoiled nature for a weekend of canoeing, hunting, and fishing, in northern Georgia’s scenic Appalachian wilderness. (…) More threatening than the untamed river are two evil, violent, primitive, degenerate and hostile mountain men, a gay hillbilly (Bill McKinney) and a grizzly, toothless man (Herbert « Cowboy » Coward) armed with a 12 gauge double-barreled shotgun who suddenly appear from the woods and confront the intruders. [The wilderness isn’t populated with romantic survivalists or enobled, heroic characters as in adventure stories, but sadistic brutes.] The two inexperienced, naive adventurers, assuming that the menacing backwoodsmen (who are harrassing them) are hiding a still to manufacture bootleg whiskey, promise not to tell anyone where it is located. Even away from his urban citified element, Ed maintains an inappropriate decorum of decency and ineffectually calls the animalistic rednecks ‘gentlemen’ (…) At shotgun point, in a nightmarish and frightening sequence, the two sexually-perverted rustics viciously target them. They order them up into the woods where they tie Ed (with his own belt) to a tree. The mountain man sexually humiliates Bobby – the chubby-faced, defenseless intruder into his territory. (…) Returning home, Ed is ‘delivered’ from the malevolent horrors of nature and reunited with his wife (Belinda Beatty) and son (Charlie Boorman, the director’s son who played a major role in The Emerald Forest (1985)). The final frightening image is of Ed, snapping awake next to his wife from a vivid nightmare of his journey. He is fearfully haunted by a white, bony hand (of the murdered Mountain Man) rising above the surface of the water of the newly-flooded wilderness. The man’s stiff, outstretched hand – pointing nowhere – serves as a signpost. Ed lies back in his wife’s arms – unable to rest and experience ‘deliverance’ from his recurring nightmare of their experience with extreme violence. Filmsite
And we all know what happens to funny city people in rural Georgia. Jon Stewart (The Daily Show)
We were portrayed as ignorant, backward, scary, deviant, redneck hillbillies. That stuck with us through all these years and in fact that was probably furthest from the truth. These people up here are a very caring, lovely people.  There are lots of people in Rabun County that would be just as happy if they never heard the word, ‘Deliverance’ again. Stanley “Butch” Darnell  (Rabun County Commissioner)
Dickey’s novel created for readers an Appalachia that served as the site of a collective ‘nightmare,’ to use a term adopted by several of Dickey’s reviewers. The rape of city men by leering ‘hicks,’ central to the novel… became almost synonymous with popular conceptions of the mountain South. (…) Dickey preferred to claim that he grew up in the mountains. He attributed his blustery aggressiveness to his ‘North Georgia folk heritage’ and averred, ‘My people are all hillbillies. I’m only second-generation city.’” [But] though Dickey’s ancestors had indeed lived in mountainous Fannin County, Georgia, they were not the plain folks he made them out to be. He failed to acknowledge that they were slaveholders and among the largest landowners and wealthiest residents of the county. Dickey’s romantic — and racist — vision of Appalachia as a place apart stayed with him his entire life. (…) The consequences of fictional representation have never been more powerful for the imagination of mountainness — or perhaps even for southernness, ruralness, and ‘primitiveness’ more generically — than in the case of ‘Deliverance. (…) Indeed, it would be difficult to overstate the thoroughness with which ‘Deliverance,’ transformed by Dickey and director John Boorman into a film classic, has imbricated itself into Americans’ understanding and worldview. From the ubiquitous rendition of the ‘Dueling Banjos’ theme song to allude to danger from hicks to bumper stickers for tourists reading, ‘Paddle faster, I hear banjoes,’ the novel and film have created artifacts that many of us encounter on an almost weekly basis. (…) Southern hopes for self-promotion were evident at the film’s premiere in Atlanta. “Dickey leaned over to say to Jimmy Carter, then the governor: ‘Ain’t no junior league movie is it, Governor?’ ‘It’s pretty rough,’ Carter agreed, ‘but it’s good for Georgia.’ Carter paused. ‘It’s good for Georgia. I hope.’” Emily Satterwhite
The release of “Deliverance” was, without question, a difficult time for rural Southerners. The mountaineers of “Deliverance” were “crippled misfits and savage sodomizers of the North Georgia wilderness” who terrorize the foursome of Atlanta canoeists who simply want to run the rapids of the fictitious Cahulawassee River. Indisputably the most influential film of the modern era in shaping national perceptions of southern mountaineers and rural life in general, Deliverance’s portrayal of degenerate, imbecilic, and sexually voracious predators bred fear into several generations of Americans.  As film scholar Pat Arnow only partly facetiously argued in 1991, the film ‘is still the greatest incentive for many non-Southerners to stay on the Interstate.’” (…) The film’s infamous scenes of sodomy at gunpoint and of a retarded albino boy lustily playing his banjo became such instantly recognizable shorthand for demeaning references to rural poor whites that comedians needed to say only ‘squeal like a pig’ or hum the opening notes of the film’s guitar banjo duet to gain an immediate visceral reaction from a studio audience. (…) To (the character) Lewis (and Dickey), the mountain folk’s very backwardness and social isolation has allowed them to retain a physical and mental toughness and to preserve a code of commitment to family and kin that has long ago been lost in the rush to a commodified existence. Lewis praised the ‘values’ passed down from father to son. But all of that meaning appeared to be lost in the film. Instead, Hollywood was much more interested in the horrific tale and captivating adventure of traveling down a North Georgia river being chased by crazed hillbillies. (…) Resentment grew even while the film was being made. As word of how the mountaineers were being portrayed spread, (James Dickey’s son) Christopher Dickey, who was staying with his family in a low-budget motel and had more contact with the local residents acting or working on the set than did Boorman and the lead actors staying in chalets at a nearby golf resort, began to fear for his safety. Shaped by a century of media depictions of brutally violent mountaineers, he worried that some ‘real mountain men’ with ‘real guns’ might ‘teach some of these movie people a lesson.’” Anthony Harkins (Western Kentucky University)
The movie, « Deliverance, » made tourist dollars flow into the area, but there was one memorable, horrifying male rape scene that lasted a little more than four minutes, but has lasted 40 years inside the hearts and minds of the people who live here. Locals say the film painted the county’s residents as deviant, uneducated mountain folk. (…) But despite any negative stereotypes, the Rabun County Convention and Visitor’s Bureau says more than a quarter-million people flock to the area each year to shoot the same rapids they saw come to life on the big screen. (…) County officials say tourism brings in $42 million a year in revenue, which makes for a huge surplus for a county whose operating budget is about $17 million. These days, the county has an 80% high school graduation rate, and its average home price is more than $300,000. (…) The area has become a playground for high-end homeowners with lakefront property in the multimillion-dollar range on places like Lake Burton, which has 62 miles of shoreline. (…) Indeed, downtown shops and art galleries convey an image far from anything portrayed in the 1972 film. Jeanne Kronsoble (…) said (…) « When people build houses and they come here, they need art on their walls. » But despite this prosperity, the 40-year pain has managed to hang on, because so many people saw a fictional film. « There are lots of people in Rabun County that would be just as happy if they never heard the word, ‘Deliverance’ again, » Darnell said. CNN
The portrait of mountain people as toothless, sexual deviants in a “country of nine-fingered people” was too much for many Southerners to accept. (…) By the time director John Boorman brought “Deliverance” to the big screen in 1972 starring Burt Reynolds as Lewis and Jon Voight as Ed, the damage to the South’s reputation was in full force. (…) Ironically, the movie’s most memorable line, “Squeal like a pig!” was never a part of the book. It was allegedly improvised by the actor during filming. But the South wanted to still promote Dickey, an accomplished Atlanta author, so articles in the Columbia Record and other South Carolina and Georgia newspapers frequently featured Dickey’s novel. The film version of “Deliverance” was also honored at the Atlanta film festival. (…) Although many people in the region still bristle at the movie’s portrayal of locals as ignorant hillbillies, there were some major benefits to the book and film. (…) Both helped create the more than $20 million rafting and outdoor sports industry along the Chattooga River in North Georgia. In 2012, the national media descended on Rabun County again when reporters quickly learned the film’s 40th anniversary was going to be celebrated during the Chattooga River Festival. (…) The Rabun County Convention and Visitor’s Bureau also pointed out that tourism brings in more than $42 million a year in revenue, which makes for a huge surplus for a county whose operating budget was about $17 million at the time. (…) “It is hard to believe that 40 years have passed since this movie first brought fame to the Northeast Georgia Mountains,” Tanya Jacobson-Smith wrote on the grill’s website promoting the festival. “Much has happened over the years here in Rabun County Georgia and around the world. Some good, some bad. Some still believe the movie was a poor portrayal of this county and it’s people. Other’s believe it is at least part of what has helped this region survive.” (…) “When ‘Deliverance’ was released in 1972, it was for many outside the community their first introduction to the beauty of the Blue Ridge Mountains, and the ways of the people living and working in their shadow,” she wrote. “Many of us (myself included) saw the breathtaking beauty of this area for the first time via the big screen. We caught a glimpse into the lives of the people who inhabit this place, some good and some not so good. There are those who believe that ‘Deliverance’ made the mountain people seem ‘backwards, uneducated, scary, and even deviant.’ I believe there were also many who, like myself, saw a people of great strength, caring and compassion. A community knit together by hardship, sharing and caring for each other and willing to help anyone who came along. (…) Most importantly ‘Deliverance’ introduced the world to the natural beauty of this mountain region, the unforgettable sounds of the Appalachian music and the wild excitement of river rafting. Drawn here by what they saw on the big screen, tourists flocked to the area to see and experience for themselves the good things they had seen in the movie. (…) “Forty years later, people from all over the world still come to this area to experience the beauty and simplicity of mountain living,” she wrote. “It is here in these beautiful mountains that ‘strangers’ find a vibrant community of lifelong residents and newcomers, working together to maintain a quality of life that has been lost in much of today’s world.” (…) But there was also some growing pains. Thousands of “suburbanites” flocked to the river in search of whitewater thrills and exhibited what author Anthony Harkins calls “the Deliverance syndrome.” These individuals showed the “same lack of respect and reverence for the river that the characters in the film had displayed,” Harkins wrote, adding “to the shame of local guides, some even would make pig squeals when they reached the section of the river where the rape scene had been filmed.” Some of those individuals paid a price. “Seventeen people drowned on the river between 1972 and 1975, most with excessive blood-alcohol levels, until new regulations were imposed when the river was officially designated Wild and Scenic in 1974,” Harkins wrote. Stacey Edson
Since its release, [Deliverance] has provoked passionate critiques, inspired different analyses, and has become a cult phenomenon. The imagery, stereotypes, and symbols produced by the film still inform popular perceptions of the US South, even by those who have never actually watched it. (…) The “rise of the Sunbelt” brought Dixie economic and political power, creating a need for the reconfiguration of the traditional North vs. South identity dynamic. World War II government defense spending led to an impressive economic development of the region. The New South economy and the migration of people and jobs below the Mason-Dixon line produced rapid urbanization and industrialization, contributing to the rise of education and income levels and an upheaval to the system of racial segregation. (…) If the 1970s delivered films and television series that presented southern white working-class men as charming rebels, it also solidified the image of a degenerate « race » of underclass southern whites, marking the rise of the redneck nightmare movie. (…) According to The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, “Deliverance has powerfully shaped national perceptions of Appalachia, the South, and indeed all people and places perceived as ‘backwoods.’” It has done so, in no small part, by ushering in a host of similar films inaugurating a new subgenre in Hollywood and independent US cinema. (…) It has been spoofed, parodied, and referenced in countless movies, TV shows, and cartoons since its release. Furthermore, references to the film still serve as shorthand for poor white (especially southern) backwardness and degeneracy. (…) Deliverance seems to be a curse and a blessing to everyone and everything involved with it. It brought money and tourism to the region, but it also caused ecological problems and the death of several people who tried to emulate the film’s stars. It brought James Dickey fame and fortune but, according to his son, it also caused great personal and emotional damage to him and his family. It simultaneously popularized and stigmatized banjo music. And it helped create a fascination with (and prejudices against) poor, rural southern whites. Maybe that is quite fitting for a story that seemed to condemn while being inescapably part of a complicated moment in American history. Isabel Machado

Attention: un racisme peut en cacher un autre !

A l’heure où se déchaine, à la mesure de ses désormais indéniables succès en matière d’emploi et même de popularité, la véritable hystérie collective contre l’idiot du village de la Maison blanche …

Et où de ce côte-ci de l’Atlantique n’en finit pas de plonger, à la mesure de la déconvenue des retraités et fonctionnaires jusqu’ici protégés de la mondialisation à qui il devait son élection, la popularité du dernier défenseur du progressisme et de l’ouverture …

Pendant que nos valeureux journalistes découvrent des décennies après les faits l’islamisation de la société française

Retour après la conquête de l’espace sans drapeau et à l’instar du film américain de 1972 « Deliverance » (trois ans après déjà les victimes hippies de la vindicte « redneck » d' »Easy Rider« ) …

Ou de leurs avatars français comme « Dupont Lajoie » ou les Deschiens  à la télévision …

Sur ces décennies de délégitimation des classes populaires que rappelle dans son dernier livre le géographe français Christophe Guilluy …

Auxquelles nous devons, sur fond d’un évident mépris de classe, tant les tristement fameux « aigris accros aux armes et à la religion » d’un Obama que le « panier de déplorables » d’une Hillary Clinton ….

Ou plus près de chez nous les « sans-dents » d’un François Hollande et les « illettrés » d’un Emmanuel Macron …

Avec bien sûr, sur fond de migration massive et hors contrôle, les conséquences tant sur la sécurité culturelle que l’assimilation des nouveaux arrivants …

Mais que, signe de ce nouveau « soft power » des oubliés de la mondialisation amplifié par les réseaux sociaux et les nouveaux tribuns du populisme dont parle Guilluy, les élites semblent avoir de plus en plus de mal à conserver sous le tapis …

The Impact of “Deliverance”

Stacey Eidson
Metro spirit
April 15, 2015

Long before moviegoers watched in horror as actor Ned Beatty was forced to strip off his clothes and told to “squeal like a pig” during a film set in the rural mountains of North Georgia, there was the novel by Atlanta writer and poet James Dickey that started it all.

It’s been 45 years since “Deliverance” first hit the book shelves across this nation, but the profound impact that the tale of four suburban men canoeing down the dangerous rapids of a remote Georgia river and encountering a pair of deranged mountain men can still be felt today.

When the book was first released back in April of 1970, the reaction was definitely mixed, to say the least. Most critics praised the adventurous tale, describing the novel as “riveting entertainment” or a “monument to tall stories.”

The New York Times called the book a “double-clutching whopper” of a story that was a “weekend athlete’s nightmare.”

“Four men decide to paddle two canoes down the rapids of a river in northern Georgia to get one last look at pure wilderness before the river is dammed up and ‘the real estate people get hold of it,’” the New York Times book review stated in 1970.

But to the shock of the reader, the whitewater adventure turns into a struggle for survival when the character Bobby Trippe is brutally sodomized by a mountain man while his friend Ed Gentry is tied to a nearby tree.

“In the middle of the second day of the outing, two of the campers pull over to the riverbank for a rest,” the New York Times wrote in 1970. “Out of the woods wander two scrofulous hillbillies with a shotgun, and proceed to assault the campers with a casual brutality that leaves the reader squirming.

“It’s a bad situation inside an impossible one wrapped up in a hopeless one, with rapids crashing along between sheer cliffs and bullets zinging down from overhead. A most dangerous game.”

The New Republic described “Deliverance” as a powerful book that readers would not soon forget.

“I wondered where the excitement was that intrigued Lewis so much; everything in Oree was sleepy and hookwormy and ugly, and most of all, inconsequential. Nobody worth a damn could ever come from such a place.”

“How a man acts when shot by an arrow, what it feels like to scale a cliff or to capsize, the ironic psychology of fear,” The New Republic review stated. “These things are conveyed with remarkable descriptive writing.”

But the Southern Review probably said it best by stating that “Deliverance” touched on the basic “questions that haunt modern urban man.”

The book spent 26 weeks on the New York Times best-selling hardback list, and 16 weeks on that newspaper’s paperback list.

Within two years, it had achieved its eighth printing and sold almost 2 million copies.

The novel was having an immediate impact on the image of northern Georgia, according to the book, “Dear Appalachia: Readers, Identity, and Popular Fiction since 1878” by author Emily Satterwhite.

“Dickey’s novel created for readers an Appalachia that served as the site of a collective ‘nightmare,’ to use a term adopted by several of Dickey’s reviewers,” Satterwhite wrote. “The rape of city men by leering ‘hicks,’ central to the novel… became almost synonymous with popular conceptions of the mountain South.”

The book is a tall tale written by a man raised in a wealthy neighborhood in Atlanta, who both loved and feared the mountains of North Georgia, according to Satterwhite.

“Dickey’s father, James II, was a lawyer who loved hunting and cockfighting; his North Georgia farm served as a refuge from his wife, her family inheritance and the Buckhead mansion and servants that her wealth afforded them even in the depths of the Great Depression,” Satterwhite wrote, adding that James Dickey, like his father, was also uncomfortable with his family’s wealth. “Dickey preferred to claim that he grew up in the mountains. He attributed his blustery aggressiveness to his ‘North Georgia folk heritage’ and averred, ‘My people are all hillbillies. I’m only second-generation city.’”

But that was far from the truth.

“Though Dickey’s ancestors had indeed lived in mountainous Fannin County, Georgia, they were not the plain folks he made them out to be,” Satterwhite wrote. “He failed to acknowledge that they were slaveholders and among the largest landowners and wealthiest residents of the county. Dickey’s romantic — and racist — vision of Appalachia as a place apart stayed with him his entire life.”

Dickey’s conflicting feeling about these so-called “mountain people” of North Georgia is evident in many of the conversations between two of the novel’s main characters, graphic artist Ed Gentry and outdoor survivalist Lewis Medlock.

In the beginning of the book, Lewis attempts to describe to Ed, the narrator of the novel and the character who is generally believed to be loosely based on Dickey himself, what makes the mountains of northern Georgia so special.

Lewis insists that there “may be something important in the hills.”

But Ed quickly fires back, “I don’t mind going down a few rapids with you and drinking a little whiskey by a campfire. But I don’t give a fiddler’s f*** about those hills.”

Lewis continues to try to persuade Ed by telling him about a recent trip he took with another friend, Shad Mackey, who got lost in these very same mountains.

“I happened to look around, and there was a fellow standing there looking at me,” Lewis said. “‘What you want, boy down around here?’ he said. He was skinny, and had on overall pants and a white shirt with the sleeves rolled up. I told him I was going down the river with another guy, and that I was waiting for Shad to show up.”

The man who stepped out of the woods was a moonshiner who, to Lewis’ surprise, offered to help.

“‘You say you got a man back up there hunting with a bow and arrow. Does he know what’s up there?’ he asked me. ‘No,’ I said. ‘It’s rougher than a night in jail in south Georgia,’ he said, ‘and I know what I’m talking about. You have any idea whereabouts he is?’ I said no, ‘just up that way someplace, the last time I saw him.’”

What happened next opened Lewis’ eyes to these mountain people, he told Ed.

“The fellow stood up and went over to his boy, who was about fifteen. He talked to him for a while, and then came about halfway back to me before he turned around and said, ‘Son, go find that man.’

“The boy didn’t say a thing. He went and got a flashlight and an old single-shot twenty-two. He picked up a handful of bullets from a box and put them in his pocket. He called his dog, and then he just faded away.”

Several hours later, the boy returned with Shad, who had broken his leg. When Lewis finishes his story, it’s obvious the tale means very little to Ed.

“That fellow wasn’t commanding his son against his will,” Lewis said. “The boy just knew what to do. He walked out into the dark.”

Ed quickly asks, “So?”

“So, we’re lesser men, Ed,” Lewis said. “I’m sorry, but we are.”

“From the ubiquitous rendition of the ‘Dueling Banjos’ theme song to allude to danger from hicks to bumper stickers for tourists reading, ‘Paddle faster, I hear banjoes,’ the novel and film have created artifacts that many of us encounter on an almost weekly basis.”

When the pair reaches the fictitious mountain town of Oree, Georgia, in the novel, Ed is clearly even less impressed.

“An old man with a straw hat and work shirt appeared at Lewis’ window, talking in. He looked like a hillbilly in some badly cast movie, a character actor too much in character to be believed. I wondered where the excitement was that intrigued Lewis so much; everything in Oree was sleepy and hookwormy and ugly, and most of all, inconsequential. Nobody worth a damn could ever come from such a place.”

As Lewis continues to negotiate with the mountain men, Ed becomes even more harsh in his description of Oree and its residents.

“There is always something wrong with people in the country, I thought. In the comparatively few times I had ever been in the rural South I had been struck by the number of missing fingers. Offhand, I had counted around twenty, at least. There had also been several people with some form of crippling or twisting illness, and some blind or one-eyed. No adequate medical treatment maybe. But there was something else. You’d think that farming was a healthy life, with fresh air and fresh food and plenty of exercise, but I never saw a farmer who didn’t have something wrong with him, and most of the time obviously wrong.

“The catching of an arm in a tractor park somewhere off in the middle of a field where nothing happened but that the sun blazed back more fiercely down the open mouth of one’s screams. And so many snakebites deep in the woods as one stepped over a rotten log, so many domestic animals suddenly turning and crushing one against the splintering side of a barn stall. I wanted none of it, and I didn’t want to be around where it happened either. But I was there, and there was no way for me to escape, except by water, from the country of nine-fingered people.”

The South Squeals Like a Pig

The portrait of mountain people as toothless, sexual deviants in a “country of nine-fingered people” was too much for many Southerners to accept.

“The consequences of fictional representation have never been more powerful for the imagination of mountainness — or perhaps even for southernness, ruralness, and ‘primitiveness’ more generically — than in the case of ‘Deliverance,’” Satterwhite wrote.

By the time director John Boorman brought “Deliverance” to the big screen in 1972 starring Burt Reynolds as Lewis and Jon Voight as Ed, the damage to the South’s reputation was in full force.

The movie, which was primarily filmed in Rabun County in North Georgia during the summer of 1971, grossed about $6.5 million in its first year and was considered a great success at home and internationally.

“Indeed, it would be difficult to overstate the thoroughness with which ‘Deliverance,’ transformed by Dickey and director John Boorman into a film classic, has imbricated itself into Americans’ understanding and worldview,” Satterwhite wrote. “From the ubiquitous rendition of the ‘Dueling Banjos’ theme song to allude to danger from hicks to bumper stickers for tourists reading, ‘Paddle faster, I hear banjoes,’ the novel and film have created artifacts that many of us encounter on an almost weekly basis.”

Ironically, the movie’s most memorable line, “Squeal like a pig!” was never a part of the book. It was allegedly improvised by the actor during filming.

But the South wanted to still promote Dickey, an accomplished Atlanta author, so articles in the Columbia Record and other South Carolina and Georgia newspapers frequently featured Dickey’s novel. The film version of “Deliverance” was also honored at the Atlanta film festival.

“Southern hopes for self-promotion were evident at the film’s premiere in Atlanta,” Satterhite wrote. “Dickey leaned over to say to Jimmy Carter, then the governor: ‘Ain’t no junior league movie is it, Governor?’ ‘It’s pretty rough,’ Carter agreed, ‘but it’s good for Georgia.’ Carter paused. ‘It’s good for Georgia. I hope.’”

However, the success of “Deliverance” had such an impact on the Peach State, Carter decided to create a state film office in 1973 to ensure Georgia kept landing movie roles.

As a result, the film and video industry has contributed more than $5 billion to the state’s economy since the Georgia Film Commission was established.

But the release of “Deliverance” was, without question, a difficult time for rural Southerners, wrote Western Kentucky University professor Anthony Harkins, author of “Hillbilly: A Cultural History of an American Icon.”

The mountaineers of “Deliverance” were “crippled misfits and savage sodomizers of the North Georgia wilderness” who terrorize the foursome of Atlanta canoeists who simply want to run the rapids of the fictitious Cahulawassee River.

“Indisputably the most influential film of the modern era in shaping national perceptions of southern mountaineers and rural life in general, Deliverance’s portrayal of degenerate, imbecilic, and sexually voracious predators bred fear into several generations of Americans,” Harkins wrote. “As film scholar Pat Arnow only partly facetiously argued in 1991, the film ‘is still the greatest incentive for many non-Southerners to stay on the Interstate.’”

“As film scholar Pat Arnow only partly facetiously argued in 1991, the film ‘is still the greatest incentive for many non-Southerners to stay on the Interstate.’”

In fact, Harkins points out that Daniel Roper of the North Georgia Journal described the movie’s devastating local effect as “Deliverance did for them [North Georgians] what ‘Jaws’ did for sharks.”

“The film’s infamous scenes of sodomy at gunpoint and of a retarded albino boy lustily playing his banjo became such instantly recognizable shorthand for demeaning references to rural poor whites that comedians needed to say only ‘squeal like a pig’ or hum the opening notes of the film’s guitar banjo duet to gain an immediate visceral reaction from a studio audience,” Harkins writes.

Harkins believes that’s not at all what Dickey intended in writing both the book and the movie’s screenplay.

“To (the character) Lewis (and Dickey), the mountain folk’s very backwardness and social isolation has allowed them to retain a physical and mental toughness and to preserve a code of commitment to family and kin that has long ago been lost in the rush to a commodified existence,” Harkins wrote. “Lewis praised the ‘values’ passed down from father to son.”

But all of that meaning appeared to be lost in the film, Harkins wrote. Instead, Hollywood was much more interested in the horrific tale and captivating adventure of traveling down a North Georgia river being chased by crazed hillbillies.

The film was about the shock and fear of such an incident in the rural mountains that enthralled moviegoers.

“The film explicitly portrays Lewis (Burt Reynolds) shooting the rapist through the back with an arrow and the man’s shocked expression as he sees the blood smeared projectile protruding from his chest just before he dies violently,” Harkins wrote.

Surprisingly, Dickey seemed to thoroughly enjoy that scene in the film during the movie’s New York premiere, Harkins writes.

“Known for his outrageous antics and drunken public appearances, (Dickey) is said to have shouted out in the crowded theater, ‘Kill the son of a bitch!’ at the moment Lewis aims his fatal arrow,” Harkins wrote. “And then ‘Hot damn’ once the arrow found its mark.”

Many years later, Ned Beatty, the actor in the famous rape scene wrote an editorial for the New York Times called “Suppose Men Feared Rape.”

“‘Squeal like a pig.’ How many times has that been shouted, said or whispered to me since then?” wrote Beatty, who, according to Atlanta’s Creative Loafing would reply, “When was the last time you got kicked by an old man?”

Beatty wrote the editorial amid the outcry of 1989’s high-profile Central Park jogger rape case, and offered his experience with the snide catcalls, Creative Loafing reported.

“Somewhere between their shouts and my threats lies a kernel of truth about how men feel about rape,” he wrote. “My guess is, we want to be distanced from it. Our last choice would be to identify with the victim. If we felt we could truly be victims of rape, that fear would be a better deterrent than the death penalty.”

The Shock in Rabun County, Georgia

The rape of Ned Beatty’s character was easily the most memorable scene in the film, and, needless to say, many of the residents in Rabun County who were interviewed after the movie was released were less than thrilled.

“Resentment grew even while the film was being made,” Harkins wrote. “As word of how the mountaineers were being portrayed spread, (James Dickey’s son) Christopher Dickey, who was staying with his family in a low-budget motel and had more contact with the local residents acting or working on the set than did Boorman and the lead actors staying in chalets at a nearby golf resort, began to fear for his safety. Shaped by a century of media depictions of brutally violent mountaineers, he worried that some ‘real mountain men’ with ‘real guns’ might ‘teach some of these movie people a lesson.’”

Although many people in the region still bristle at the movie’s portrayal of locals as ignorant hillbillies, there were some major benefits to the book and film.

“That river doesn’t care about you. It’ll knock your brains out. Most of the people going up there don’t know about whitewater rivers. They are just out for a lark, just like those characters in ‘Deliverance.’ They wouldn’t have gone up there if I hadn’t written the book.”

Both helped create the more than $20 million rafting and outdoor sports industry along the Chattooga River in North Georgia.

In 2012, the national media descended on Rabun County again when reporters quickly learned the film’s 40th anniversary was going to be celebrated during the Chattooga River Festival.

“The movie, ‘Deliverance’ made tourist dollars flow into the area, but there was one memorable, horrifying male rape scene that lasted a little more than four minutes, but has lasted 40 years inside the hearts and minds of the people who live here,” CNN reported in 2012.

Rabun County Commissioner Stanley “Butch” Darnell told the media he was disgusted by the way the region was depicted in the film.

“We were portrayed as ignorant, backward, scary, deviant, redneck hillbillies,” he told CNN. “That stuck with us through all these years and in fact that was probably furthest from the truth. These people up here are a very caring, lovely people.”

“There are lots of people in Rabun County that would be just as happy if they never heard the word, ‘Deliverance’ again,” he added.

The news media interviewed everyone, including Rabun County resident Billy Redden, who as a teen was asked to play the “Banjo boy” in the film.

“I don’t think it should bother them. I think they just need to start realizing that it’s just a movie,” Redden, who still lives in Rabun County and works at Walmart, told CNN in 2012. “It’s not like it’s real.”

The Rabun County Convention and Visitor’s Bureau also pointed out that tourism brings in more than $42 million a year in revenue, which makes for a huge surplus for a county whose operating budget was about $17 million at the time.

Several local businesses embraced the 2012 festival including the owners of the Tallulah Gorge Grill.

The Tallulah Gorge is the very gorge that Jon Voight climbed out of near the end of the 1972 film and the owners of the Tallulah Gorge Grill wanted to celebrate that milestone.

“It is hard to believe that 40 years have passed since this movie first brought fame to the Northeast Georgia Mountains,” Tanya Jacobson-Smith wrote on the grill’s website promoting the festival. “Much has happened over the years here in Rabun County Georgia and around the world. Some good, some bad. Some still believe the movie was a poor portrayal of this county and it’s people. Other’s believe it is at least part of what has helped this region survive.”

Both thoughts are justified, Jacobson-Smith wrote.

“When ‘Deliverance’ was released in 1972, it was for many outside the community their first introduction to the beauty of the Blue Ridge Mountains, and the ways of the people living and working in their shadow,” she wrote. “Many of us (myself included) saw the breathtaking beauty of this area for the first time via the big screen. We caught a glimpse into the lives of the people who inhabit this place, some good and some not so good. There are those who believe that ‘Deliverance’ made the mountain people seem ‘backwards, uneducated, scary, and even deviant.’ I believe there were also many who, like myself, saw a people of great strength, caring and compassion. A community knit together by hardship, sharing and caring for each other and willing to help anyone who came along.”

She wrote that, as in any community, if people look hard enough and thoroughly examine its residents, they will find some bad, but most often they will find “a greater good that outshines the bad.”

“That is certainly the case here in the Northeast Georgia Mountains,” she wrote. “Most importantly ‘Deliverance’ introduced the world to the natural beauty of this mountain region, the unforgettable sounds of the Appalachian music and the wild excitement of river rafting. Drawn here by what they saw on the big screen, tourists flocked to the area to see and experience for themselves the good things they had seen in the movie.”

As a result, tourists filled hotels and campgrounds to capacity, tasted the local fare in restaurants and cafes and discovered the thrill of swimming in, or paddling on, the state’s beautiful rivers and lakes.

“Forty years later, people from all over the world still come to this area to experience the beauty and simplicity of mountain living,” she wrote. “It is here in these beautiful mountains that ‘strangers’ find a vibrant community of lifelong residents and newcomers, working together to maintain a quality of life that has been lost in much of today’s world.”

Over the years, Rabun County and surrounding North Georgia communities have embraced these changes. Some parts of the area have become a playground for high-end homeowners with multi-million-dollar lakefront property.

But there was also some growing pains.

Thousands of “suburbanites” flocked to the river in search of whitewater thrills and exhibited what author Anthony Harkins calls “the Deliverance syndrome.”

These individuals showed the “same lack of respect and reverence for the river that the characters in the film had displayed,” Harkins wrote, adding “to the shame of local guides, some even would make pig squeals when they reached the section of the river where the rape scene had been filmed.”

Some of those individuals paid a price.

“Seventeen people drowned on the river between 1972 and 1975, most with excessive blood-alcohol levels, until new regulations were imposed when the river was officially designated Wild and Scenic in 1974,” Harkins wrote.

Ironically, some people like to point out that “Deliverance” author James Dickey tried to warn people prior to his death in 1997 about their need to respect the rivers located in the mountains of North Georgia.

“That river doesn’t care about you. It’ll knock your brains out,” Dickey told the Associated Press in 1973. “Most of the people going up there don’t know about whitewater rivers. They are just out for a lark, just like those characters in ‘Deliverance.’ They wouldn’t have gone up there if I hadn’t written the book. There’s nothing I can do about it. I can’t patrol the river. But it just makes me feel awful.”

Voir aussi:

40 years later, ‘Deliverance’ still draws tourists, stereotypes
Rich Phillips
CNN
June 23, 2012

One look at the landscape and you know why people come here — running white water, along a portion of the Appalachian Trail.

This is Rabun County, Georgia. It was the residents’ own best-kept secret until the world discovered it by way of a 1972 movie.

The movie, « Deliverance, » made tourist dollars flow into the area, but there was one memorable, horrifying male rape scene that lasted a little more than four minutes, but has lasted 40 years inside the hearts and minds of the people who live here.
Locals say the film painted the county’s residents as deviant, uneducated mountain folk.
« We were portrayed as ignorant, backward, scary, deviant, redneck hillbillies, » said Rabun County Commissioner Stanley « Butch » Darnell.
« That stuck with us through all these years and in fact that was probably furthest from the truth. These people up here are a very caring, lovely people. »
This weekend, the film’s 40th anniversary will be celebrated at the Chattooga River Festival. A re-release of the iconic film on Blu-ray by Warner Home Video will play at the local drive-in on Saturday.
The film tells the story of four big-city guys who take a drive up to northern Georgia to canoe the white water of the Chattooga River that separates Georgia from South Carolina. It’s remembered for the dueling banjo scene at the beginning of the film, where one man, played by Ronnie Cox, plays a duet with a local teen, who is portrayed as inbred and mentally challenged.
« Dueling banjos, of course, was iconic, but then there’s the rape scene, too, » Cox said. « And for a lot of people it became a tough pill to swallow.
« Some people, I think they missed the artistic essence of it (the film), the value of it. »
But it’s the rape scene that seems to dominate any conversation about the film.
« You were in the middle of the Bible Belt, the biggest thing we had gong back then is we had square dancing at the Mountain City Playhouse, » said Darnell, the county commissioner.
But many people, like Billy Redden, say the local folks should put this behind them. The 40th anniversary means a lot to him. He’s 56 now, but 40 years ago, he was a student who was asked to play the « Banjo boy » after the film’s producers found him on a visit to his high school.
« I don’t think it should bother them. I think they just need to start realizing that it’s just a movie. It’s not like it’s real, » said Redden, who still lives in Rabun County.
But despite any negative stereotypes, the Rabun County Convention and Visitor’s Bureau says more than a quarter-million people flock to the area each year to shoot the same rapids they saw come to life on the big screen.
« It essentially started the white-water rafting industry in the Southeast,  » said Larry Mashburn, who owns Southeastern Expeditions, a rafting company.
County officials say tourism brings in $42 million a year in revenue, which makes for a huge surplus for a county whose operating budget is about $17 million. These days, the county has an 80% high school graduation rate, and its average home price is more than $300,000.
« It’s allowed us to do things with our education system, with all these different services that we offer, we could not have offered, » Darnell said.
The area has become a playground for high-end homeowners with lakefront property in the multimillion-dollar range on places like Lake Burton, which has 62 miles of shoreline.
« Once people come to Rabun County, they don’t want to leave, » said Debra Butler, a real estate agent. « This is a lifestyle that you have here. It’s a way of life. ‘Deliverance’ depicts a backwoods, inbred kind of community. That is not Rabun County. »
Indeed, downtown shops and art galleries convey an image far from anything portrayed in the 1972 film. Jeanne Kronsoble’s Main Street Gallery in Clayton shows off a wide range of contemporary folk artists, many self-taught. She’s been open for 28 years.
« I became interested in contemporary folk art because of the things I’d seen up here, » she said. « When people build houses and they come here, they need art on their walls. »
Most believe « Deliverance » got it all started.
But despite this prosperity, the 40-year pain has managed to hang on, because so many people saw a fictional film. « There are lots of people in Rabun County that would be just as happy if they never heard the word, ‘Deliverance’ again, » Darnell said.
Voir également:

Revisiting Deliverance
The Sunbelt South, the 1970s Masculinity Crisis, and the Emergence of the Redneck Nightmare Genre
Isabel Machado
June 19, 2017

1Introduction

On May 1, 2013, Vice President Joe Biden delivered the keynote speech at the Voices Against Violence event in Washington, D.C. Even though the VP had written the 1994 Violence Against Women Act, and therefore had the authority to speak about the subject, he decided to add a clumsy personal touch to his address:

You often hear men say, “Why don’t they just leave?” [. . .] And I ask them, how many of you seen the movie Deliverance? And every man will raise his hand. And I’ll say, what’s the one scene you remember in Deliverance? And every man here knows exactly what scene to think of. And I’ll say, “After those guys tied that one guy in that tree and raped him, man raped him, in that film. Why didn’t the guy go to the sheriff? What would you have done? “Well, I’d go back home get my gun. I’d come back and find him.” Why wouldn’t you go to the sheriff? Why? Well, the reason why is they are ashamed. They are embarrassed. I say, why do you think so many women that get raped, so many don’t report it? They don’t want to get raped again by the system.1

The plot of Deliverance (1972) is relatively simple and so familiar that the vice president of the United States used it as shorthand to convey the humiliation and horror of sexual assault in the celebration of the anniversary of an institution dedicated to help victims of domestic abuse. (In the film, four middle-class suburban men paddle down the Cahulawassee River to explore the Georgia Mountains’ wilderness before it is flooded by the construction of a dam. Their adventure turns into a nightmare when they come across two “inbred hillbillies” and one of the canoeists is violently raped. In order to survive the southern “heart of darkness,” the suburbanites must give in to their primal instincts and break a series of laws and moral codes.) But what exactly does Vice Pres. Biden’s reference to the film mean? Is Deliverance a story about survivalism? An ecological cautionary tale? An allegory of the rise of the Sunbelt? A thinly veiled homoerotic fantasy?

Since its release, the film has provoked passionate critiques, inspired different analyses, and has become a cult phenomenon. The imagery, stereotypes, and symbols produced by the film still inform popular perceptions of the US South, even by those who have never actually watched it. Readings of Deliverance have tended to privilege one particular interpretation, failing to fully grasp its relevance. The movie is a rich cultural text that provides historians with multiple ways to analyze the South, particularly concepts such as southern identity and masculinity.

What makes a film an important, iconic, cultural text? It is not simply a matter of popularity at the moment of its release. Deliverance premiered in New York on July 30, 1972, and was quite successful that year, but so were Deep Throat and What’s Up Doc? And it did not even closely approach the box office numbers achieved by The Godfather. The Blaxsploitation classic Super Fly (1972) premiered the same week and, by August 9, had made $145,000. Deliverance earned almost a third of that, making $45,023.2 The initial Variety review described it as a “heavy” and uneven version of a novel that would “divide audiences, making promotion a major challenge” for Warner Brothers.3 The two New York Times critics who reviewed Deliverance appear to have watched different films. Although Vincent Canby had some kind words about the film’s cinematography and performances, he calls it a “an action melodrama that doesn’t trust its action to speak louder than words.” Stephen Farber, however, saw an “uncompromising adventure movie” that “also happens to be the most stunning piece of moviemaking released this year.”4

This essay argues that an important cultural text needs to fulfill three criteria: 1) It reinforces or reworks ideas, images, and stereotypes of the past. 2) It captures the sociocultural spirit and anxieties of the present. And 3) it leaves a legacy that informs future representations. Deliverance accomplishes all of those. It dialogues with past representations of underclass white southerners; reflects and questions the historical moment in which it was produced and consumed; and, to this day, affects the way the region and its inhabitants are perceived and depicted. It can be read as a reflection of the reconfiguration of southern identity during the rise of the Sunbelt, but also as an expression of the perceived masculinity crisis of the 1970s. In addition, although other, more positive images of working-class white southerners were also emerging in the 1970s, the “ redneck nightmare” trope popularized by Deliverance became iconic and enduring.5

In general, studies of the South in film tend to either focus on a specific period and analyze how a particular set of films represent certain views or ideas, or to survey a larger time frame and show how images and perceptions have changed.6 This article proposes instead to analyze a single film, trying to glean from it the sociocultural climate of the period in which it was produced and consumed. Yet, it also connects Deliverance with past stereotypes, archetypes, and discourses, while considering how it affected future representations of underclass white southerners. It is not the objective of this study, however, to argue that this was the only portrayal of the South in celluloid in that period. Other contemporary texts presented very different images of the region.7

2The South as “Other”

In his seminal 1985 article about horror movies, film critic Robin Wood discusses how “the Other” in those texts has to be rejected and eliminated or rendered safe by assimilation. Wood contends that Otherness “functions not simply as something external to the culture or to the self, but also as what is repressed (but never destroyed) in the self and projected outwards in order to be hated and disowned.”8 He uses the depictions of Native Americans and white settlers in classical Westerns as examples of this process. Yet, strong parallels also exist in relation to representations of the South.

Scholars from different disciplines have demonstrated how the South and southerners have played the fundamental role of the “Other” in the establishment of an elevated national identity. Historian James Cobb has pointed out that the tendency to compare South and North “and to see the latter as the normative standard for the entire nation” can be dated at least as far back as to the earliest days of US independence.9 Geographer David R Jansson sees this process as “internal orientalism.”10 Film critic Godfrey Cheshire places Hollywood in the role of colonizer, while Southern Cultures editor Larry Griffin argues that there are as many different “Americas” as there are “Souths,” therefore, we need to question why a particular paradigm is chosen and think about the implications of that choice.11 In “The Quest for the Central Theme in Southern History,” David L. Smiley, suggests: “Perhaps a more fruitful question for students of the American South would be not what the South is or has been, but why the idea of the South began, and how it came to be accepted as axiomatic among Americans.”12 The same advice can also be applied to analyses of representations of Dixie in popular culture.

The stigmatization of a group as “the Other” always implies a relation of power.13 The negotiation of power in Deliverance happens not only on an interregional level, but also between classes. The new, educated, and “redeemed” Sunbelt white South needed to construct its own “Other.” In the post–civil rights era, African Americans, the other “Others,” seemed to be off limits. Hence, what better demographic group to serve this function than the historically stigmatized poor white southerners?14

3The Exoticization of “Poor White Trash”

They are “crackers,” “hillbillies,” and especially “rednecks,”‑all pejoratives bestowed by representatives of a long succession of southern hegemonies, then consumed and broadcast by Yankees who share hegemonic understanding and control communications media.15

Poor white trash, not a nickel in my jeans
Poor white trash, don’t know what lovin’ means
Poor white trash, never had no fun
Poor white trash, ain’t got no one.
In the swamp I live, in the swamp I die.
For poor white trash no one will cry.
16

Underclass southern whites complicate our understanding of US racial dynamics by challenging two important concepts: white supremacy and white privilege. The novel Deliverance describes the North Georgia region as “the country of the nine-fingered people.”17 James Dickey’s son, Christopher, says that this is “because there’s so much inbreeding and so many bad accidents (in the region) that everybody’s missing something.”18 In the film’s DVD audio commentary, director John Boorman notes that the people he encountered in the Georgia Mountains were “all hillbillies” whose “notorious” inbreeding he maladroitly explains: “The reason, I discovered up there, is that these are the descendants of white people who married Indians, and they were then ostracized by the Indians and the whites, and so they had to turn in on themselves, and this strange, hostile, inward-looking group grew up around that history. And you can see, in some of those people’s faces, traces of the Indian.”19 Although it is unclear where the director got this information, he is inadvertently employing the same rationale used to stigmatize and oppress underclass white southerners in the past.

Even prior to the Civil War, abolitionists and proslavery groups portrayed poor southern whites as people outside of a respectable white society.20 Both Harriet Beecher Stowe’s A Key to Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1854) and white supremacist Daniel R. Hundley’s Social Relations in Our Southern States (1860) have chapters entitled “Poor White Trash.” Stowe believed that slavery not only corrupted the “black working classes,” but also produced “a poor white population as degraded and brutal as ever existed in any of the most crowded districts of Europe.” She notes that this “inconceivably brutal” group of whites resemble “some blind, savage monster, which, when aroused, tramples heedlessly over everything in its way.”21Hundley sees underclass southern whites as the “laziest two-legged animals that walk erect on the face of the Earth” whose appearance was: lank, lean, angular, and bony, with . . . sallow complexion, awkward manners, and a natural stupidity or dullness of intellect that almost surpasses belief.”22 The focus on the appearance of poor whites is indicative of the association between poverty and physical deformity and the tendency to see poor whites as practically an inferior race. This rationale allowed southerners to ignore the structural barriers to upward mobility in a slave society. Hunley blames “bad blood” and not the “peculiar institution” for the degeneracy of poor whites.23

In 1926 Arthur H. Estabrook and Ivan E. McDougle published Mongrel Virginians: The Win Tribe, which examined a mixed-population group in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Western Virginia, not all that far from Deliverance country.24 According to Eastabrook and McDougle, “the white folks look down on them, as do the negroes, and this, with their dark skin color, has caused segregation from the general community.”25 As we have seen, Deliverance director John Boorman gave a similar explanation to the strange appearance of the people he used as extras in his film.

The general acceptance of eugenics laws and involuntary sterilization in the early twentieth century informed public perception of poor whites as potentially dangerous.26 Yet, the stigmatization of underclass whites also had some relatively positive outcomes. In 1909 John D. Rockefeller Sr. granted $1,000,000 to the creation of the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission for the Eradication of Hookworm Disease. Although they did not necessarily represent underclass southern whites negatively, hookworm crusaders provided one more instance in which this group of people would be perceived as a socially marginal “Other.”27 During the New Deal, another benevolent stereotype of underclass white southerners captured the country’s imagination as Rexford Tugwell instructed Roy Striker “to tell people about the lower third‑how ill-fed, ill-clothed and ill-housed they are.”28 In the hands of talented Farm Securities Administration (FSA) photographers like Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, and Arthur Rothstein, southern tenants and sharecroppers were transformed into icons of New Deal populism, but the headlines accompanying the powerful images highlighted their exoticism: “Poverty’s Prisoners,” “Uncensored Views of Sharecroppers’ Misery,” or “Is This America?”29

Social realism in the US was not only manifested in the FSA photographs. The Depression also generated socially engaged literature, also known as “sharecropper realism,” which offered dignified depictions of southern sharecroppers.30 At the same time, however, poor southern whites were popularized by a different set of novels: the Southern Gothic literary tradition, which influenced the perception of poor white southerners not only on the printed page, but also on movie screens.31 It can be argued that the work of Flannery O’Connor, Erskine Caldwell, William Faulkner, Carson McCullers, among others, provided a more direct antecedent for the redneck nightmare genre.

These images, archetypes, and stereotypes, some dating back to the nineteenth century, have served as a template for the haunting images of the mountain people in Deliverance. The “creepy banjo boy” played by Billy Redden provides one of the most iconic images of the film. The scene is praised in the Variety review as a “very touching banjo and giutar [sic] duet between [Ronnie] Cox and a retarded.”32 According to J. W. Williamson, some of the local people “felt queasy about the filming of Mrs. Webb’s retarded granddaughter and the use of Billy Redden, who played the inbred banjoist.”33 Redden was a special-education student at the time of the shooting who would later enjoy the status of a local celebrity, having his picture taken with tourists and even resuming his “Hollywood career” three decades later by making a cameo playing banjo on Tim Burton’s Big Fish (2003).34 Much has been said about the “authenticity” of the scene, but little attention has been paid to the fact that the character is described in a second draft of film’s screenplay as “probably a half-wit, likely from a family inbred to the point of imbecility and Albinism.”35 Redden’s “face was powdered and his head was shaven for the part” to accentuate his exoticism.36 In the audio commentary over the scene with Mrs. Webb and her grandchild, director John Boorman states: “Look at this character now, this woman, look, the way they live there, that was just absolutely how it was. No set up in any way. It was just us peering through a window with a camera.”37 He ignores the process of pre-production that selected people and locations that fit the screenplay’s descriptions, the ideas and ambiance the filmmakers wanted to convey, and their assumptions about underclass rural southerners.

Ellen Glasgow criticized the Southern Gothic School for its exclusive focus on negative aspects of life in the South and for presenting its Gothic elements as pseudo-realism.38 Similar criticism has been made of Deliverance’s portrayal of the Georgia mountain folk. Former mayor of Clayton, Georgia, Edward Cannon Norton, told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution in 1990 that he “despises Deliverance” for the way it depicted his people, noting the film is “too filthy” and it “pictures us as a sorry lot of people.” S. K. Graham, who wrote the article quoting Mr. Norton, also notes that the film “played to every stereotype the mountaineers have tried to live down.”39

4A Sunbelt Allegory?

The “rise of the Sunbelt” brought Dixie economic and political power, creating a need for the reconfiguration of the traditional North vs. South identity dynamic. World War II government defense spending led to an impressive economic development of the region. The New South economy and the migration of people and jobs below the Mason-Dixon line produced rapid urbanization and industrialization, contributing to the rise of education and income levels and an upheaval to the system of racial segregation.40

Nevertheless, as Bruce J. Schulman has argued, the process that transformed the US South from the Cotton Belt to the Sunbelt did not affect the whole section equally: the Sunbelt had its “shadows.” In the decades that produced this drastic change, the coexistence of extreme poverty and prosperity led commentators to criticize the moniker.41 Federal intervention, Schulman notes, “ignited growth at the top,” neglecting “the poverty smoldering at the bottom.” Southern politicians and elites used their influence and supported federal programs for industrial development and agricultural subsidies, while opposing welfare programs.42 Therefore, the Sunbelt did not shine equally to everyone. In the 1970s as the New South reconstructed the image of a region “too busy to hate,” uneducated, underclass whites represented an unredeemed link to the section’s troublesome past. As Christopher Dickey notes, Deliverance “played with the tension between the new South and the old South. The new South was Atlanta. The old South up in the mountains was a whole different world. You didn’t have to drive far to hit it.”43

Jimmy Carter’s inauguration seemed to affirm the acceptance of the New South into the national fold.44 In 1976, the year Carter took office, a captivating representation of the southern redneck conquered the nation when Burt Reynolds’s Bo “Bandit” Darville charmed audiences in Smokey and the Bandit and a number of subsequent “Good Ol’ Boy” movies. Yet, Reynolds’s charming outlaws were not the only images of working-class white southern masculinity to emerge in that decade. If the 1970s delivered films and television series that presented southern white working-class men as charming rebels, it also solidified the image of a degenerate “race” of underclass southern whites, marking the rise of the redneck nightmare movie. Unlike previous films that associated southern evilness with racism, redneck nightmare films generally ignored the social context in which these terrifying “natives” exist. There is no reason why they are the way they are, and their deviance appears to be something congenital or fostered by the evil environment they inhabit. Early prototypes of the subgenre include the adaptation of William Faulkner’s Sanctuary (1931), The Story of Temple Drake (1933) and the exploitation cult classic Two Thousand Maniacs! (1964). The subgenre is solidified in the 1970s with films such as Easy Rider (1969), Deliverance (1972), Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974), Macon County Line (1974), and Southern Comfort (1981).

Derek Nystrom argues that Hollywood’s white working-class southern men in the 1970s can only be understood in the context of the Sunbelt industrialization and urbanization. Nystrom analyzes the “move from redneck to the good ole boy” in representations of white working-class southern masculinity, placing Deliverance as a precursor to what he calls the “southern cycle” or as “an allegory of the Sunbelt’s rise.”45 Along with the transfer of economic and political power to the region, the rise of the Sunbelt also meant a shift from the unionized North to the antiunion South, a process that also contributed to the rise of the New Right. According to Nystrom, the role of class identity in the film’s “allegorical structure” must be considered in order to fully understand “the social history” of its production, identifying Deliverance as a key part of the period’s “larger cultural rearticulation of the South.” His analysis explains the “good ol’ boy” movies, but by placing Deliverance as an anomaly he obscures the film’s true legacy. Boorman’s film actually engendered a host of similar texts, affecting the way that poor southern whites are portrayed and represented.

Deliverance is a complex text, created by skillful artists, which complicates any easy reading of it as just a product of Sunbelt sociocultural angst. Although it has undoubtedly contributed to the stigmatization of underclass southern whites, it refuses to make the suburbanite protagonists the heroes of the story. The film’s opening sequence makes it very clear who attacks first. Lewis (Burt Reynolds) tells his companions that after the dam is built “there ain’t gon’ be no more river. There’s just gonna be a big, dead lake. . . . You just push a little more power into Atlanta, a little more air-conditioners for your smug little suburb, and you know what’s gonna happen? We’re gonna rape this whole god-damned landscape.46 We’re gonna rape it.” It can be argued, then, that the suburban Sunbelt is violating the wilderness and the “savage locals” are only retaliating. The plot also does not make it clear if the canoers’ actions are based on actual threat. Nevertheless, by producing the ultimate emasculating humiliation in the harrowing homosexual rape scene, the film essentially justifies any act of violence committed by its protagonists. When Christopher asked his father why was that scene in the story, James Dickey replied he “had to put the moral weight of murder on the suburbanites.”47

Although Deliverance refuses to have straightforward heroes and villains, the film’s publicity material clearly establishes with whom the audience should identify. Here is how the theatrical trailer introduces the characters: “These are the men, nothing very unusual about them. Suburban guys like you or your neighbor. Nothing very unusual about them until they decided to spend one weekend canoeing down the Cahulawassee River. . . . These are the men who decided not to play golf that weekend. Instead they sought the river.”48 Although the trailer proposes a more generically suburban identity for the protagonists, the film does not shy away from their “southerness.” A few years before the symbol had been reconfigured to symbolize carefree rebelliousness in good ol’ boy movies and television series, Lewis drives a car with a Confederate flag license plate. The trailer emphasizes the canoers’ middle-class suburban identity and contrasts them with the local rednecks, but it also makes it very clear that these are “men,” these are “guys.”

5Anxieties Over Masculinity

A few weeks after the film’s release, Life published an article about Jon Voight’s participation in Deliverance. The article has four images of the actor on the set. One larger, dominant image shows Voight climbing a cliff and describes the actor’s “nerve” to shoot the scene without a double. The smaller, central, picture shows him and Reynolds wrestling in the river and discusses their on-screen rivalry, noting how both men “pride themselves in being athletic.” The image on the lower right side shows “a dramatic white-water scene from the film.” The other small image, however, seems slightly out of place. It is a photo of Voight “relaxing with Marcheline Bertrand, the gentle, storybook pretty girl” he had recently married.49 Marcheline’s lovely, peaceful smile contrasts with the other images of intense male action. She is there to comfort her man. She presents no threat to his masculinity. And she is obviously not a part of the men’s sphere. If after some unforeseeable catastrophe that article were the only surviving artifact left of the 1970s, future investigators would have a hard time guessing that women were agitating for equality and against the patriarchy in the 1970s.50

Suburbanization and a pattern of domesticated consumer-oriented masculinity emerged by the 1950s, spawning the notion that US masculinity was in crisis. The social movements of the 1960s intensified that process, and by the 1970s a rhetoric proposing the emasculation of the white male was consolidated.51 The three cores of masculine identity‑breadwinning, soldiering, and heterosexuality‑were no longer guaranteed.52 Women started to gain prominence in the public sphere and to demand equal rights.53 As Steve Estes notes, the civil rights and Black Power movements defied the exclusion of African American males “from claiming their stake in American manhood.”54 The Gay Liberation movement defied heterosexual normalcy, counterculture challenged moral standards and family “values,” and the antiwar movement questioned the military service.55

These radical changes inspired the emergence of scientific, academic, and popular literature trying to deal with the perceived emasculation of American men. Magazines catering to this distressed male audience grew popular in the 1970s. A good example of this rhetoric in action is the advertisement for the revamped TRUE magazine: “One word describes the new TRUE magazine: MACHO. The honest-to-God American MAN deserves a magazine sans naked cuties, Dr. Spock philosophies, foppish, gutless ‘unisex’ pap, and platform shoes.” The ad advocates for the liberation the American male from the “sterile couches of pedantic psychiatrists” and from “the frivolous skirts of libbers.”56 In 1974 Ann Steinmann and David J. Fox published The Male Dilemma: How to Survive the Sexual Revolution. The book tries to find solutions for the crisis faced by American men in a rapidly changing society, in which for every gain made by women, “there is a corresponding loss of male power and prestige.”57 Sexual ambivalence, the authors argued, was affecting every aspect of men’s lives. Steinmann and Fox denounced the “highly mechanized, highly specialized society of the midcentury” in which males’ physical strength, individual expression, and moral codes are not appreciated, compromising their manhood.58 Furthermore, they contend, this world in which “the once clear-cut distinctions that separated men from women in their sexual and social roles have began to blur and break down” was not only detrimental to men. It caused constant marital conflict, venereal disease epidemics, “soaring” divorce and illegitimacy rates, and “the less identifiable atmosphere of object love, of sex for sex’s sake.”59

Deliverance is a crucial text to consider these issues, not only because of the onscreen story, but also because of how it was promoted, discussed, and criticized upon its release. Much of the film’s publicity revolved around the personalities of the men involved in its production. The set of Deliverance was a man’s world. According to Christopher Dickey, “It was like the whole film was becoming some kind of macho gamble in which each man had to prove he could take the risks the characters were running.”60 In promotional materials and interviews, cast members often complimented each other’s manly attributes: There are constant praises to Burt Reynolds’ physicality, Jon Voight’s courage and focus, and director John Boorman’s pushing them all to their limits. James Dickey’s persona also provided an important subtext for the film’s reception. Part suburbanite, part rugged outdoorsman, he was, according various commentators, a combination of the four protagonists’ qualities and defects. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution refers to him as “an almost mythical macho man in the Hemingway mold.”61 While describing the men involved in the picture, the documentary promo for the film’s release exudes testosterone. Dickey is as a man who “leaves his imprint on everything, and everybody he meets.” An accomplished college professor, he is “one of the major American poets of his generation” but also someone who has a “striking physical presence,” with the authority conferred by personal experience to write about “raging white water in a frail canoe, or hunting deer with a bow and arrow in the wilderness.” In the promo, Boorman compliments Reynolds’s “magnificent physique” and Dickey raves about the cast: “All I can say about these actors, Burt Reynolds and Jon Voight, and Ned Beatty and Ronny Cox is that every one of them’s got more guts than a burglar.” Even the film’s production is portrayed as a battle of wills between two powerful dominant males: the director and the author/screenwriter. Boorman describes his relationship with Dickey as “turbulent,” but boasts that he maintained his ground: “I can say that I went fifteen rounds with a champ and I’m still on my feet.”62 There were even rumors that they actually engaged in a fistfight that left the director with a broken nose and minus four teeth.63 The intense level of competition and conflict resolution through homosocial bonding was an important subtext in both the film’s plot and publicity.

In the 1970s, Joan Mellen assessed gender in US cinema with two influential books: Women and Their Sexuality in the New Film (1974) and Big Bad Wolves: Masculinity in the American Cinema (1977). Her work shows how Deliverance was already considered an important text for understanding gender and sexuality shortly after its release. Mellen sees the disappearance of women from 1970s films as a punishment for their new demands and gains and as a reflection of “the belief that a relationship of equals would lead to male impotence.”64 Ultimately she reads the film through a logic of repressed homosexual desire, saying that rape scene was “exciting because it evoked an act they would willingly perform on each other were they not so repressed and alienated by the false accouterments of civilization.”65 Yet, the assumption that class and location affect men’s ability to express their sexual desires is latent in her analysis. Mellen mentions “cultures where male physical feeling does not impair masculine identity” without providing any concrete examples, but also describes the suburbanites’ attackers as “two rural degenerates, men primitive enough to act out those forbidden sexual impulses ‘civilized’ men like our heroes deflect into more acceptable manifestations such as hunting and contact sports.”66 Interestingly, she does not mention the regional identity of the characters, talking about them in terms of archetypes of American masculinity or in psychoanalytical terms by interpreting the story as a reflection of repressed desires projected into the “ghoulish hillbillies” (or the men’s “id”), concluding that the film is a “Freudian fable of the dangers of our instinctual life.” Robert Armour provides a similar reading in “Deliverance: Four Variations of the American Adam” (1973), noting that violence of nature and raw sexual instincts are familiar to the “hillbillies,” for whom “sexual acts satisfy natural urges, whether they are committed with a man, woman, cousin, or pig.”67 The film worked so well because for contemporary readers and critics, the role of the “exotic southern Other” was confined to the rural, underclass whites, which meant they could identify with the Atlanta suburbanites.

Stephen Farber’s reading of Deliverance’s depiction of masculinity contrasts sharply with Mellen’s. The New York Times critic sees it as “a devastating critique of machismo.” He compares Deliverance to Sam Peckinpah’s Straw Dogs (1971), noting that “the heroes of both movies are decent, rather fastidious men forced to confront the violent nature in themselves.” Yet, he argues that whereas Peckinpah “clings to the code of the Old West, implying that in a savage world a baptism of blood is the first step to becoming a man,” Boorman makes “a sardonic comment against the sportsman mystique.” Farber concludes that Deliverance “is a major work, important for the artistic vision it brings to the urgent question of understanding and redefining masculinity.”68 Although Farber and Mellen have different opinions about the movie and come to different conclusions about its representation of masculinity, they both reveal how the film resonated with 1970s audiences and critics trying to deal with a “masculinity crisis.”

6The Legacy

Trying to establish a film’s popularity through box office figures and reviews alone can be tricky. It is possible to establish if it was widely seen or favorably reviewed, but that does not necessarily tell us who related to the film or how. What makes Deliverance such a relevant text is that it helped establish a subgenre (and a few tropes) in US cinema; it had a lasting impact on the people, the region, and even objects related to it; and it still serves as shorthand for poor white, and especially southern, scary backwardness and degeneracy.

Deliverance premiered on August 11, 1972, at the Atlanta International Film Festival. At 2:00 p.m. the following day a “Deliverance Seminar” was held.69 The Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s review was not exactly raving. Howell Raines called it a “peacock of a movie‑beautiful and proud, but rendered faintly ridiculous by an inflated sense of its own importance.” Raines praised the film’s action and photography, but was less impressed by its philosophical pretention. Nevertheless, he calls it the “most anxiously awaited film here since Gone with the Wind,” noting that more than 1,750 tickets were sold for its first local showing.70 Georgia’s governor, Jimmy Carter, along with the Atlanta’s vice mayor, Maynard Jackson, attended the screening. Also in attendance were James Dickey, Burt Reynolds (who came in a Playboy private airplane), and Hollywood director Otto Preminger. Reynolds was made honorary citizen of Atlanta at the event.71 Deliverance received the festival’s top award, the Golden Phoenix Best of the Festival prize. It also grabbed Best Director, Best Actor (Jon Voight), Best Supporting Actor (Ned Beatty), and Best Editor (Tom Priest).72 It then set in motion four decades of film production in Georgia. For the fiscal year of 2011 alone, the impact of that industry for the state’s economy was $2.4 billion.73 The movie made Burt Reynolds a bankable star, rescued Jon Voight’s career, and introduced two great theater performers to the movie screen: Ned Beatty and Ronny Cox.

Despite all that success, according to Christopher Dickey, “the book appeared in the stores in the summer of 1970 and quickly became a bestseller. The next summer, it was made into a movie with Jon Voight and Burt Reynolds. And after that, nothing good was the same.”74 Deliverance has left an ambiguous legacy to the region it made infamous. Environmental historian Timothy Silver notes that the film’s success “spawned a boom in tourism that inevitably led to overdevelopment, pollution, and a host of other environmental problems within the Chattooga watershed.”75 Only 7,600 people had floated down the Chattooga River in 1972. That number almost tripled the following year and reached an astounding 67,784 in 1989.76 The death of twenty-two rafters following the film’s release made the US Forest Services heighten safety restrictions in the area, but rafting has become the cornerstone of the region’s tourism industry.

Doug Woodward, a technical advisor on the set, who later founded Southeastern Expedition, notes that there was some strife in the relationship between cast and crew and the locals. He recalls that when the film’s producers returned to a previously selected location, the owner of the property told them, “I just read the book and you’re not shooting that filthy story on my place!”77 The Rabun County Board of Commissioners, Stan Darnell, had mixed feelings about the film. Referring to the infamous rape scene he remarks: “Everybody up here was kind of up in arms. They didn’t expect that one scene to be in there. But we got the rafting industry, and quite a few other movies came here and helped real estate, and other businesses around.”78 An Atlanta Journal-Constitution piece celebrating the twentieth anniversary of the novel explored this ambiguous legacy, noting that the movie had a positive effect on the region’s economy, boosting its tourism and putting it on the map for future film productions, while stigmatizing the local population. George Reynolds, a folklorist and music teacher who worked in the area, contends that the film affected the way that the people of the region perceived themselves, and how they “perceived the way the world sees them.”79

According to The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, “Deliverance has powerfully shaped national perceptions of Appalachia, the South, and indeed all people and places perceived as ‘backwoods.’”80 It has done so, in no small part, by ushering in a host of similar films inaugurating a new subgenre in Hollywood and independent US cinema.81 Although the redneck nightmare subgenre has antecedents that go as far back as the 1930s, it can be argued that Deliverance established its “semantic and syntactic” elements.82 It has been spoofed, parodied, and referenced in countless movies, TV shows, and cartoons since its release.

Furthermore, references to the film still serve as shorthand for poor white (especially southern) backwardness and degeneracy. On September 18, 2013, The Daily Show presented a sketch about a land dispute on the Georgia-Tennessee border. The clichéd piece interviewed “ignorant hillbillies” and ridiculed them for a quick laugh. When “reporter” Al Madrigal makes a silly Honey Boo Boo joke, one of the interviewees, Dade County, Georgia, executive chairman Ted Rumley tells him the issue is not “something to joke about.” The segment then cuts to five seconds of Deliverance footage with the voice over: “And we all know what happens to funny city people in rural Georgia.” No context is given. No introduction is made. Five seconds of the movie are enough to provide the joke’s punch line.83

One of the most interesting anecdotes about the film’s international appeal comes from anthropologist Jim Birckhead, who studies popular media and minority group identity, focusing on both Appalachia and Aboriginal Australia. Birckhead watched a play in the Australian Outback that had a vignette about southern snake handling, performed by the Wagga Wagga theater company. When the cast and crew realized that he was a “specialist” on the topic, they asked him if snake handlers are “inbred like Deliverance.” After inquiring where the play’s director and cast got information to build their characters, he finds out that they did not find actual literature on Holiness people, but rather relied on media representation of mountain people, especially Deliverance, which “conjured up for them lurid images of bizarre, grotesque, inbred ‘hillbillies.’”84

Deliverance seems to be a curse and a blessing to everyone and everything involved with it. It brought money and tourism to the region, but it also caused ecological problems and the death of several people who tried to emulate the film’s stars. It brought James Dickey fame and fortune but, according to his son, it also caused great personal and emotional damage to him and his family. It simultaneously popularized and stigmatized banjo music.85 And it helped create a fascination with (and prejudices against) poor, rural southern whites. Maybe that is quite fitting for a story that seemed to condemn while being inescapably part of a complicated moment in American history. President Jimmy Carter, who was the governor of the state made infamous by the feature summarized it well: “It’s pretty rough. But it’s good for Georgia . . . I hope.”86

A short documentary film on Deliverance from 1972, which includes footage of James Dickey and John Boorman discussing the film. Directed by Ronald Saland, written by Jay Anson, photographed by Marcel Brockman and Morris Cruodo, and edited by Welater Hess. A Professional Films/Robbins Nest Production

Isabel Machado is a Brazilian historian currently living in Monterrey, Mexico, while writing her PhD dissertation for the University of Memphis. Her two master’s‑in history (University of South Alabama) and film studies (University of Iowa)‑provided her the interdisciplinary lens through which she approaches cultural history. Her current research uses Mardi Gras as a vehicle for understanding social and cultural changes in Mobile, Alabama, in the second half of the twentieth century. On her breaks from academic work she directed documentaries that also explored her fascination with, and affection for, the US South, where she lived for most of the thirteen years she spent in the United States. Her film Rootsy Hip: Hip-Hop Alabama Folk (2009) is a portrait of struggling musicians in Mobile, Alabama, and a meditation on what it means to be a white young man who makes quintessentially African American music in the South. Grand Fugue on the Art of Gumbo (2011) uses Eugene Walter’s radio broadcasts as narration and takes a peek at the ingredients that compose the Gulf Coast and its signature cuisine.

Notes

  • A Portuguese version of this article will be published simultaneously by the academic journal O Olha da Historia (Brazil).
    1. “Dueling Banjos: Joe Biden Talks about ‘Man Rape’ in Deliverance.” Filmed May 2013. YouTube video, 1:36. Posted May 2013. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BSszgkaWMwY.
    2. “50 Top‑Grossing Films [Week ending August 9].” Variety, August 16, 1972, 11. It should be noted that even though Deliverance was released five days earlier, while Super Fly opened in two theaters, Deliverance was screened in only one that first week. “‘Fat City’ Fat Start 31G; ‘Deliverance’ Delivers Big First Days in NY; Nixon Spoof, Self‑Sold, Watched,” Variety, August 2, 1972, 8.
    3. “Deliverance,” Variety, July 19, 1972, 14.
    4. Stephen Farber, “Deliverance‑How It Delivers,” New York Times, August 20, 1972.
    5. “Redneck nightmare” films are those in which a person, or a group of people, travel to or through the US South and have dreadful things done to them by monstrous “natives.” For more on the definition and contextualization of the redneck nightmare subgenre/cycle see: Isabel Machado dos Santos Wildberger, “The Redneck Nightmare Film Genre: How and Why the South of Moonshine and Inbred Maniacs Replaced the South of Moonlight and Magnolias in Popular Imagination” (MA Thesis, University of South Alabama, 2013).
    6. For studies that follow the former approach, see Allison Graham, Framing the South: Hollywood, Television, and Race during the Civil Rights Struggle (Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press, 2001), Karen L. Cox, Dreaming of Dixie: How the South Was Created in American Popular Culture (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2011), and articles in Deborah E. Barker and Kathryn McKee eds., American Cinema and the Southern Imaginary (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2011). For examples of the latter, see Edward Campbell Jr., The Celluloid South: Hollywood and the Southern Myth (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1981), Warren French, ed., The South and Film (Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1981), Jack Temple Kirby, Media‑Made Dixie: The South in the American Imagination (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1978), Larry Langman and David Ebner, eds., Hollywood’s Image of the South: A Century of Southern Films (Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 2001).
    7. Peter Applebome has contended that the country, and Hollywood in particular, “has Ping‑Ponged between views of the South as a hellhole of poverty, torment, and depravity and as an American Eden of tradition, strength, and grace.” This is an interesting analogy, but only if we disregard the fact that negative and positive images of the section tend to historically coexist rather that alternate. Tara McPherson might be closer to the mark when she notes that there seems to be a recurring “cultural schizophrenia about the South” in popular culture. See Peter Applebome, Dixie Rising: How the South Is Shaping American Values, Politics, and Culture (San Diego: Harcourt Brace, 1997), 11; Tara McPherson, Reconstructing Dixie: Race, Gender, and Nostalgia in the Imagined South (Durham: Duke University Press, 2003) 3.
    8. Robin Wood, “An Introduction to the American Horror Film,” in Movies and Methods Volume II, ed. Bill Nichols (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1985), 199.
    9. James C. Cobb, Away Down South: A History of Southern Identity (New York: Oxford University Press, 2005), 4.
    10. David R. Jansson, “Internal Orientalism in America: W. J. Cash’s The Mind of the South and the Spatial Construction of American National Identity,” Political Geography, vol. 22 (March 2003), 293‑316.
    11. Larry J. Griffin, “Southern Distinctiveness, Yet Again, or, Why America Still Needs the South,” Southern Cultures 6, no. 3 (2000): 47‑72. 68.
    12. David L Smiley, “The Quest for the Central Theme in Southern History,” in The New South, volume 2 of Major Problems in the History of the American South: Documents and Essays, ed. Paul D. Escott et al. (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1999), 18.
    13. J. F. Staszak, “Other/Otherness,” in International Encyclopedia of Human Geography, eds. Rob Kitchin and Nigel Thrift (Oxford: Elsevier, 2009), 43‑44.
    14. See Matt Wray, Not Quite White: White Trash and the Boundaries of Whiteness (Durham: Duke University Press, 2006).
    15. Jack Temple Kirby, The Countercultural South (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1995), 56.
    16. This song is from the re‑edited version of the film Bayou, directed by Harold Daniels (1957). In 1961 the movie was revamped with more nudity and violence along with a prologue featuring a banjo player singing this tune. This new version was re‑baptized Poor White Trash. See https://youtu.be/H2ZFPW5Cm6s.
    17. James Dickey, Deliverance (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1970), 56.
    18. Christopher Dickey, Summer of Deliverance (New York: Touchstone, 1999), 164.
    19. John Boorman, audio commentary, Deliverance, directed by John Boorman (1972; Burbank, CA: Warner Home Video, 2007), DVD.
    20. Wray, Not Quite White, 48.
    21. Harriet Beecher Stowe, The Key to Uncle Tom’s Cabin (London: Clarke, Beeton, and Co., 1853), 365, 368.
    22. Daniel Robinson Hundley, Social Relations in Our Southern States (New York: Henry B. Price, 1860), 264
    23. Hunley contends that unlike the noble Cavaliers, the “thrifty Middle classes,” or “useful Yeomanry,” the poor white trash were descended from the “paupers and convicts whom Great Britain sent over to her faithful Virginia,” and of “indentured servants who were transported in great numbers from the mother country, or who followed their masters, the Cavaliers and Huguenots.” See Hundley, 264–65.
    24. Arthur H. Estabrook and Ivan E. McDougle, Mongrel Virginians: The Win Tribe (Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins Co., 1926).
    25. Wray, Not Quite White, 82
    26. Mongrel Virginians denunciation of the “degenerative” nature of interracial families helped justify stricter antimiscegenation marriage legislation, such as the Virginia Racial Integrity Act (1924), throughout the South. Interracial marriage had already been outlawed in Virginia since 1691, but what the new act added was a definition of whiteness. For more on this subject, see Gregory Michael Dorr, “Racial Integrity Laws of the 1920s,” in Encyclopedia Virginia, ed. Brendan Wolfe (Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, 2011), http://www.EncyclopediaVirginia.org/Racial_Integrity_Laws_of_the_1920s.
    27. By the turn of the twentieth century, there were estimates that least 40 percent of southerners, mostly poor whites, were infected with the hookworm parasite. See Thomas Waisley, “Public Health Programs in Early Twentieth-Century Louisiana,” Louisiana History: The Journal of the Louisiana Historical Association, 41, no. 1 (Winter, 2000), 41; William J. Cooper and Thomas E. Terril, The American South: A History, vol. 2, rev. ed. (New York: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2009), 613.
    28. Tugwell was the director of the Resettlement Administration at the Information Division of the Agricultural Adjustment Administration, and Striker was chief of the Historical Section of the Information Division of the Resettlement Administration. See Richard D. MacCann, The People’s Films: A Political History of US Government Motion Pictures (New York: Hastings House Publishers, 1973), 60.
    29. Stuart Kidd, “FSA Photographers and the Southern Underclass, 1935–1943,” in Reading Southern Poverty Between the Wars, 1918–1939, ed. Richard Godden and Martin Crawford (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2006).
    30. It includes works such as Edith Summers Kelly’s Weeds (1923) and Henry Kroll’s The Cabin in the Cotton (1931). See Jack Temple Kirby, The Countercultural South (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1995).
    31. O’Connor’s work only had one major feature adaptation, John Huston’s Wise Blood (1979), but there were several adaptations of Faulkner’s fiction. The work of Erskine Caldwell has arguably generated some of the greatest sources of poor white southerner stereotypes. Two contemporary adaptations of well-known novels, directed by the same acclaimed Hollywood director, provide a good example of the impact of the southern gothic tradition of the portrayal of underclass southern whites. The Grapes of Wrath (1940) and Tobacco Road (1941) were both directed by John Ford, but the representations of the Joads and the Lesters could not be more contrasting; while the Okie family is dignified, the Georgia sharecroppers are a collection of hillbilly stereotypes.
    32. “Deliverance,” Variety, July 19, 1972, 14.
    33. J. W. Williamson, Hillbillyland: What the Movies Did to the Mountains and What the Mountains Did to the Movies (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1995), 195.
    34. Redden was also featured in a number of fortieth anniversary articles on Deliverance. See Rich Philips, “40 years later, Deliverance still draws tourists, stereotypes,” CNN.com, June 22, 2012, http://www.cnn.com/2012/06/22/us/deliverance-40-years/index.html?iref=allsearch; Charles Bethea, “Mountain Men: An Oral History of Deliverance,” Atlanta Magazine, September 01, 2011, http://www.atlantamagazine.com/great-reads/deliverance/.
    35. James Dickey, Deliverance, Screenplay Second Draft (January 11, 1971), 13. http://www.dailyscript.com/scripts/deliverance.pdf.
    36. S. Keith Graham, “Twenty Years after Deliverance: A Tale of a Mixed Blessing for Rabun County,” Atlanta Journal-Constitution, March 18, 1990, M4.
    37. Deliverance, directed by John Boorman (1972; Burbank, CA: Warner Home Video, 2007), DVD.
    38. Ellen Glasgow, “Heroes and Monsters,” Saturday Review of Literature, May 4, 1934, 4.
    39. Graham, M4.
    40. Robert P. Steed, Lawrence W. Moreland, and Tod A. Baker, eds., The Disappearing South? Studies in Regional Change and Continuity (Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1990), 125.
    41. See Bruce J. Schulman, From Cotton South to Sunbelt: Federal Policy, Economic Development, and the Transformation of the South, 19381980 (New York: Oxford University Press, 1991) and Randall M. Miller and George E. Pozzetta, Shades of the Sunbelt: Essays on Ethnicity, Race, and the Urban South (New York: Greenwood Press, 1988).
    42. Schulman, From Cotton South to Sunbelt, 180.
    43. Christopher Dickey, Summer of Deliverance, 170.
    44. Jack Temple Kirby relates Carter’s political success to “the redemption of the white masses from pity and from racism.” See Kirby, Media-Made Dixie: The South in the American Imagination, 170.
    45. Derek Nystrom, Hard Hats, Rednecks, and Macho Men: Class in 1970s American Cinema (New York: Oxford University Press, 2009), 57.
    46. This association of the landscape with a violated body mirrors a previous scene in the screenplay (which did not make it to the final film), where Lewis calls Atlanta “that old whore.” See Deliverance, Boorman, and James Dickey, Deliverance, Screenplay Second Draft.
    47. Christopher Dickey, Summer of Deliverance, 180.
    48. Deliverance Theatrical Trailer, in Deliverance, Boorman.
    49. Joan Downs, “Ascent of a Reluctant Winner,” Life, August 15, 1972, 44.
    50. As an interesting side note: The same issue has an article about chess champion Bobby Fischer with the subhead, “The news from Reyjavik is that the Big Bad Wolf of chess has turned into Little Red Riding Hood.” See Brad Darrach, “Can This Be Bobby Fischer?,” Life, August 15, 1972, 42.
    51. K. Michael Prince, “Neoconfederates in the Basement: The League of the South and the Crusade against Southern Emasculation,” in White Masculinity in the Recent South, ed. Trent Watts (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2008), 235.
    52. Robert O. Self shows how the shift from “breadwinner liberalism” to “breadwinner conservatism,” a reaction to the gains made by nonwhites, women, and gay men and lesbians, would lead to a discourse of the defense of family values that would fuel the rise of the New Right and Religious Right. See Robert O. Self, All in the Family: The Realignment of American Democracy Since the 1960s (New York: Hill and Wang, 2012).
    53. Michael Kimmel, Manhood in America: A Cultural History (New York: Free Press, 1996), 262.
    54. Steve Estes shows that the relationship between white southern masculinity and sexual control was manifested in their violence against black men, which usually had sexual undertones, and that challenges to segregation also fueled male anxieties. See Steve Estes, “A Question of Honor: Masculinity and Massive Resistance to Integration” in White Masculinity in the Recent South, ed. Trent Watts (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2008), 111.
    55. See Kimmel, Manhood in America; Self, All in the Family.
    56. Kimmel, Manhood in America, 332n29.
    57. Ann Steinmann and David J. Fox, The Male Dilemma: How to Survive the Sexual Revolution (New York: Jason Aronson, 1974), ix.
    58. Steinmann and Fox, The Male Dilemma, 6.
    59. Steinmann and Fox, The Male Dilemma, 9.
    60. Christopher Dickey, Summer of Deliverance, 182.
    61. Graham, “Twenty Years after Deliverance.”
    62. Ronald Saland, The Dangerous World of Deliverance (short promo documentary,1972), in Deliverance, Boorman.
    63. Oliver Lyttelton, “5 Things You Might Not Know about Deliverance, Released 40 Years Ago Today,” Indiewire, July 30, 2012, http://blogs.indiewire.com/theplaylist/5-things-you-might-not-know-about-deliverance-released-40-years-ago-today-20120730.
    64. Joan Mellen, Big Bad Wolves: Masculinity in American Film (New York: Pantheon, 1977), 311.
    65. Mellen, Big Bad Wolves, 320
    66. Mellen, Big Bad Wolves, 318
    67. Robert Armour, “Deliverance: Four Variations of the American Adam,” Literature Film Quarterly 1, no. 3 (July 1973), 280–82.
    68. Farber, “Deliverance—How It Delivers.”
    69. Advertising for the festival on Atlanta Journal-Constitution, August 11, 1972.
    70. Howel Raines, “Deliverance—A Too-Proud Peacock,” Atlanta Journal-Constitution, August 20, 1972, 8-F.
    71. Sam Lucchese, “Burt Reynolds, Mister Nude, Flies to Atlanta (On Playboy’s Plane),” Variety, August 16, 1972, 7.
    72. It was also nominated for three Academy Awards: Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Film Editor in the 45th Annual Academy Awards (1973). Sam Lucchese, “Deliverance is Mostest of Bestest at Atlanta; Sounder and Tyson, Too,” Variety, August 23, 1972, 7. Scott Cain, “Deliverance Wins Top festival Prize,” Atlanta Journal-Constitution, August 20, 1972.
    73. Bethea, “Mountain Men.”
    74. Christopher Dickey, Summer of Deliverance, 14.
    75. Timothy Silver, “The Deliverance Factor,” Environmental History 12, no. 2 (April 2007), 371.
    76. Graham, “Twenty Years after Deliverance.”
    77. Bethea, “Mountain Men.”
    78. Bethea, “Mountain Men.”
    79. Graham, “Twenty Years after Deliverance.”
    80. Emily Satterwhite, “Deliverance,” in Media, vol. 18 of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, ed. Allison Graham and Sharon Monteith, (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press), 233.
    81. See Wildberger, “The Redneck Nightmare Genre.”
    82. For film scholar Rick Altman, the analysis of a film genre is only complete once we consider both its semantic (iconic codes) and syntactic (narrative construction) elements. See Rick Altman, Film/Genre (London, BFI, 1999).
    83. “Georgia vs. Tennessee,” The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, September 18, 2013, http://www.cc.com/video-clips/4txix4/the-daily-show-with-jon-stewart-georgia-vs–tennessee.
    84. Jim Birkhead, “On Snakes and People,” in Images of the South: Constructing a Regional Culture on Film and Video, ed. Karl G. Heider (Athens: University of Georgia Press), 1993.
    85. Timothy Silver noted that on a visit to favorite breakfast stop in the Appalachian Mountains he spotted T-shirts for sale that read, “Paddle faster. I think I hear banjo music.” Different versions of the T-shirt can also be easily found online. See Silver, “The Deliverance Factor.”
    86. Satterwhite, “Deliverance.”

Voir encore:

40 years later, ‘Deliverance’ causes mixed feelings in Georgia
Cory Welles
Market place
August 22, 2012

Tess Vigeland: When big movies are filmed in small towns, they can pour money into the local economy. Crews need to be fed, housed, moved about and entertained. Productions need extras, and every once in awhile a local gets cast in a speaking part. Some movies even leave a footprint long after the cameras are gone. Santa Barbara Wine Country saw a huge influx of tourists after « Sideways. »

But not every production leaves a sweet taste in locals’ mouths. Film producer Cory Welles and director Kevin Walker decided to make a documentary about one such movie, and the people it portrayed. Cory filed this story about her own film, « The Deliverance of Rabun County. »


Cory Welles: The folks in Rabun County, Ga., put on the Chattooga River Festival this past June to encourage people to visit and take care of their river. But it wasn’t the moonshine tastin’ or banjo pickin’ that got me out to this lush, green mountainous part of the state. It was “Deliverance.”

The movie was shot on and around the Chattooga 40 years ago this year, and they were using that as the hook for the festival.  What Sarah Gillespie and others who helped put the event together didn’t count on was how it would split the community.

Sarah Gillespie: We had a commissioners meeting, and someone stood up and was very emotional — very real feelings — and said that the movie had ruined her life.

I heard stories of people being passed up for jobs because they came from Rabun County. And those negative images have been reinforced by 40 years of “Deliverance” jokes.

But not everyone around has bad feelings about “Deliverance.” And that includes Billy Redden, the backwoods-looking boy who played Dueling Banjos with Ronny Cox in the film. Billy’s 55 years old now, and he says “Deliverance” was the best thing that ever happened to him. But that doesn’t mean he saw much money from it.

Billy Redden: I’d like to have all the money I thought I’d make from this movie. I wouldn’t be working at Walmart right now. And I’m struggling really hard to make ends meet.

Billy didn’t make alot from “Deliverance,” but Rabun County did. Before the movie came out, the number of people who visited the Chattooga was in the hundreds. Afterwards, it was in the tens of thousands. Rafting is now a $20 million industry here and tourism is the area’s number one source of revenue.  So you can understand why the organizers of the Chattooga River Festival decided to highlight the film.

But you can also understand the objections.

Tammy Whitmire: A lot of people tried to talk me into supporting this and so they justified it and said, « Tammy, but it’s making money, it’s tourism, it’s bringing people to the county, why does it matter how they get here? »

Tammy Whitmire is a county official who’s lived in the area since she was nine and married a man whose family has been here for 15 generations. But she refused to support the Chatooga River Festival because of “Deliverance.”

Whitmire: As long as they get here and spend their money, and my thought to that particularly is, you know you’re gonna sell what are you selling, to get those few dollars? Is it worth a few dollars? For people around the world to think that’s what we are here? No. Or for me, it is not worth it.

But it’s more than just a few dollars. Then-governor Jimmy Carter established a film commission in Georgia after “Deliverance” came out.  And since then, the state’s become one of the top five production destinations in the U.S. And it’s not just movie money that’s been drawn to this part of the state, it’s people with money. These days, million-dollar vacation homes line the shores of the area’s lakes.

You can understand why city-folk might want to have a place in these parts. The Chattooga is beautiful — unbelievably beautiful. On a raft ride down the river, our guide pointed to a tree-lined bank and said “That’s where the rape scene was filmed!” And 40 years after “Deliverance” hit theaters, that’s still the issue: Can this gorgeous river and the disturbing scenes that were filmed here ever be separated? Do they need to be?

Sarah Gillespie: “Deliverance” is a significant part of our history, good or bad. It’s a significant part of the river’s history.  It was filmed here. Stereotypes are stereotypes — they’re in every single movie that you’ll see in your life.

For what it’s worth, my partner Kevin and I found the stereotypes to be anything but true. We met so many great people in Rabun County — especially Billy Redden, the “banjo boy.”

Redden: We’re not a bad people up here, we’re a loving people. Rabun County is a pretty good town. It’s peaceful, not a lot of crime going on, just a real peaceful town. Everybody pretty much gets along with everybody.

I’m Cory Welles for Marketplace.

Voir de plus:

Deliverance (1972)

Background

Deliverance (1972) is British director John Boorman’s gripping, absorbing action-adventure film about four suburban Atlanta businessmen friends who encounter disaster in a summer weekend’s river-canoeing trip. It was one of the first films with the theme of city-dwellers against the powerful forces of nature.

The exciting box-office hit, most remembered for its inspired banjo duel and the brutal, violent action (and sodomy scene), was based on James Dickey’s adaptation of his own 1970 best-selling novel (his first) of the same name – he contributed the screenplay and acted in a minor part as the town sheriff.

The stark, uncompromising film was nominated for three Academy Awards (Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Film Editing), but went away Oscar-less. The beautifully-photographed film, shot entirely on location (in northern Georgia’s Rabun County that is bisected by the Chattooga River), was the least-nominated film among the other Best Picture nominees. Ex-stuntman Burt Reynolds took the role of bow-and-arrow expert Lewis after it was turned down by James Stewart, Marlon Brando, and Henry Fonda on account of its on-location hazards.

The increasingly claustrophobic, downbeat film, shot in linear sequence along forty miles of a treacherous river, has been looked upon as a philosophical or mythical allegory of man’s psychological and grueling physical journey against adversity. It came during the 70s decade when many other conspiracy or corruption-related films were made with misgivings, paranoia or questioning of various societal institutions or subject areas, such as the media (i.e., Dog Day Afternoon (1975), Network (1976)), politics (i.e., The Parallax View (1974), All the President’s Men (1976)), science (i.e., Capricorn One (1977), Coma (1978), The China Syndrome (1979)), and various parts of the US itself (i.e., Race with the Devil (1975), The Hills Have Eyes (1977), and later Southern Comfort (1981)).

A group of urban dwellers test their manhood and courage, totally vulnerable in the alien wild, and pit themselves against the hostile violence of nature. At times, however, they are attracted to nature, and exhilarated and joyful about their experiences in the wild. (Director Boorman pursued the same complex eco-message theme of man vs. nature in other films, including Zardoz (1973) and The Emerald Forest (1985).) As they progress further and further along in uncharted territory down the rapids, the men ‘rape’ the untouched, virginal wilderness as they are themselves violated by the pristine wilderness and its degenerate, inbred backwoods inhabitants. Survivalist skills come to the forefront when civilized standards of decency and logic fail.

The film’s taglines were tantalizing:

      • « This is the weekend they didn’t play golf. »
      • « Where does the camping trip end…and the nightmare begin…? »
      • « What did happen on the Cahulawassee River?

The river is the potent personification of the complex, natural forces that propel men further and further along their paths. It tests their personal values, exhibiting the conflict between country and city, and accentuates what has been hidden or unrealized in civilized society. The adventurers vainly seek to be ‘delivered’ from the evil in their own hearts, and as in typical horror films, confront other-worldly forces in the deep woods. The flooding of the region after the completion of a dam construction project alludes to the purification and cleansing of the sins of the world by the Great Flood. The film was also interpreted as an allegory of the US’ involvement in the Vietnam War – as the men (the US military) intruded into a foreign world (Southeast Asia), and found it was raped or confronted by wild forces it couldn’t understand or control.

The Story


The film opens with voice-overs of the main characters discussing the « vanishing wilderness » and the corruption of modern civilization, while the credits play over views of the flooding of one of the last untamed stretches of land, and the imminent wiping out of the entire Cahulawassee River and the small town of Aintry.

[The film’s trailer provides details about the foursome: « These are the men. Nothing very unusual about them. Suburban guys like you or your neighbor. Nothing very unusual about them until they decided to spend one weekend canoeing down the Cahulawassee River. Ed Gentry – he runs an art service, his wife Martha has a boy Dean. Lewis Medlock has real estate interests, talks about resettling in New Zealand or Uruguay. Drew Ballinger – he’s sales supervisor for a soft drink company. Bobby Trippe – bachelor, insurance and mutual funds. These are the men who decided not to play golf that weekend. Instead, they sought the river. »]

The four characters include:

      • Lewis Medlock (Burt Reynolds), a bow-hunter and avowed, macho survivalist and outdoorsman
      • Bobby Trippe (Ned Beatty in his film debut), an overweight insurance salesman
      • Drew Ballinger (Ronny Cox in his film debut), a guitar player and sales supervisor
      • Ed Gentry (Jon Voight, a star actor due to his appearance in Midnight Cowboy (1969)), married, runs an art service

Lewis lectures his friends and anxiously bemoans the dam construction that will soon destroy the (‘damned’ or ‘dammed’) Cahulawassee River and town. He urges his friends to take a ride down the river before a man-made lake will forever flood it:

…because they’re buildin’ a dam across the Cahulawassee River. They’re gonna flood a whole valley, Bobby, that’s why. Dammit, they’re drownin’ the river…Just about the last wild, untamed, unpolluted, unf–ked up river in the South. Don’t you understand what I’m sayin’?…They’re gonna stop the river up. There ain’t gonna be no more river. There’s just gonna be a big, dead lake…You just push a little more power into Atlanta, a little more air-conditioners for your smug little suburb, and you know what’s gonna happen? We’re gonna rape this whole god-damned landscape. We’re gonna rape it.

His friends Bobby, Ed, and Drew label Lewis’ views as « extremist. » In voice-over, Lewis coaxes his three, soft city-slicker friends to join him for a weekend canoe trip down the Cahulawassee River – to pit themselves against the US wilderness. (The film’s major poster declared: « This is the weekend they didn’t play golf. ») They leave behind their business jobs and civilized values for their « last chance » to go back to unspoiled nature for a weekend of canoeing, hunting, and fishing, in northern Georgia’s scenic Appalachian wilderness.

Their two cars, Lewis’ International Scout 4 x 4 and Drew’s station wagon with canoes strapped on top, drive into the hillbilly wilderness to their odyssey’s starting point:

We’re gonna leave Friday, from Atlanta. I’m gonna have you back in your little suburban house in time to see the football game on Sunday afternoon. I know you’ll be back in time to see the pom-pom girls at halftime ’cause I know that’s all you care about…Yeah, there’s some people up there that ain’t never seen a town before, no bigger than Aintry anyway. And then those woods are real deep. The river’s inaccessible except at a couple of points…This is the last chance we got to see this river. You just wait till you feel that white-water under you, Bobby…I’ll have you in the water in an hour.

The first view of the city-dwelling buddies in the film occurs when the vehicles pull into a junk-littered, backwoods area that appears « evacuated already. » The men reveal more of their believable personalities by their reactions to the community of mountain folk they meet in this first scene:

      • the virile, dark-haired, dare-devil, savvy, somewhat repulsive leader Lewis (a patch on his jacket identifies him as the Co-captain of a skydiving group
      • the chubby-overweight, comical, middle-class salesman Bobby
      • the soft-spoken, decent, liberal and intellectually-minded, gentle, guitar-strumming Drew
      • and the thoughtful, complex, timid, mild-mannered, pipe-smoking, curious Ed

From behind a dilapidated, squalid shanty building, the first primitive hillbilly emerges, suspicious that they are from the power company. Lewis asks the old mountain man (Ed Ramey) about hiring him to drive their two cars to a point downstream at their landing point of Aintry:

Lewis: We want somebody to drive ’em down to Aintry for us.
Man: Hell, you’re crazy.
Lewis: No s–t. Hey, fill that one up with gas, huh, OK?

As the mountain man pumps gas, Bobby ridicules the strange man’s repulsive look:

Say, mister, I love the way you wear that hat.

He is told: « You don’t know nuthin’. » Possible drivers are suggested to Lewis for hire: « You might get the Griner Brothers…They live back over that way. »

One of the film’s highlights is a lively, captivating banjo duel of bluegrass music, « Dueling Banjos » (actual title « Feudin’ Banjos » – arranged and played by Eric Weissberg with guitarist Steve Mandell). [The song was authored by Arthur « Guitar Boogie » Smith in the 50s, and copyrighted by the Combine Music Corp.] Drew begins by playing chords on his guitar. A deformed, retarded, albino hillbilly youngster (Billy Redden) (on banjo) appears on the porch and answers him. Under his breath, Bobby criticizes the cretinous hillbilly boy: « Talk about genetic deficiencies. Isn’t that pitiful? » From behind him, one of the backwoods folks asks: « Who’s pickin’ a banjo here? » The impromptu song is played as a rousing challenge between the two. Toward its furious ending, Drew admits to the grinning boy: « I’m lost. » When Drew, seen as a suspicious stranger, compliments the moon-faced winner when they are done – « God damn, you play a mean banjo, » the mute, inbred, half-witted boy resumes his stony stare, turns his head sharply, and refuses to shake hands with the interloping foreigner. Drew is obviously disappointed that the boy ignores him.

As Lewis drives to the nearby Griner Bros. garage, he ridicules Bobby’s means of making a living – insurance sales, thereby tempting fate: « I’ve never been insured in my life. I don’t believe in insurance. There’s no risk. » In an edgy, volatile encounter, Lewis bargains firmly with one of the grimy, poverty-stricken Griner brothers (Seamon Glass and Randall Deal) to have them drive their vehicles to Aintry for $40 – and receives a second ominous warning about the hazardous river:

Griner: Canoe trip?
Lewis: That’s right, a canoe trip.
Griner: What the hell you wanna go f–k around with that river for?
Lewis: Because it’s there.
Griner: It’s there all right. You get in there and can’t get out, you’re gonna wish it wasn’t.

Ed fears that they have pushed too hard: « Listen, Lewis, let’s go back to town and play golf…Lewis, don’t play games with these people. » With Ed as his passenger, Lewis races his Bronco against the Griner’s pickup truck to the river’s launch point a few miles away through the dense woods – in his station wagon, Drew follows at a safe distance behind with Bobby. The reflections of leaves from the colorful canopy above shrouds and obscures a clear view of Ed and Lewis through the windshield – the jostling ride frightens Ed: « Lewis, you son-of-a-bitch, why do we have to go so god-damned fast?…Lewis, you’re gonna kill us both, you son-of-a-bitch, before we ever see any water. » When they reach the peaceful water’s edge, Lewis philosophically contemplates the view:

Sometimes you have to lose yourself before you can find anything…A couple more months, she’ll all be gone…from Aintry on up. One big dead lake.

They finally venture onto the river in two canoes: Drew with Ed, and Bobby with Lewis. Through the trees, they are observed at the water’s edge by the Griners – inhabitants of the area before ‘civilization’ took over. The neophyte canoers are unsure of their direction:

Bobby: Which way are we goin’, this way or that?
Lewis: I think, uh, downstream would be a good idea, don’t you? Drew – you and Bobby see some rocks, you yell out now, right?…
Bobby: Lewis, is this the way you get your rocks off?

At first, their encounter with the river and nature is peaceful and tranquil as they paddle along – on a sunny day. Above them on a cross-walk bridge high above the placid river, the banjo-playing lad silently but intently watches them – the camera shooting from Drew’s perspective. Before the first of many, increasingly-exciting sequences on the water, Lewis stands upright in the canoe and announces: « This gonna be fun! » They confront the twisting and turning white-water rapids of the swift-moving Chattooga River. They are exuberant and euphoric after victoriously navigating the challenging but not overwhelming wild-flowing water – under Lewis’ expert instruction. Bobby is thrilled about shooting the rapids:

That’s the best – the second best sensation I ever felt.

But Ed isn’t as certain: « Damn, I thought we bought the farm there, for a while. » Lewis reminisces about how it must have been for the original pioneers, while Bobby foolishes thinks they’ve masterfully beaten the river:

Lewis: The first explorers saw this country, saw it just like us.
Drew: I can imagine how they felt.
Bobby: Yeah, we beat it, didn’t we? Did we beat that?
Lewis: You don’t beat it. You don’t beat this river.

With a high-powered bow-and-arrow fishing rod, Lewis takes aim at a fish, misses and then warns:

Machines are gonna fail and the system’s gonna fail…then, survival. Who has the ability to survive? That’s the game – survive.

Lewis remarks that the mild-mannered, secure-in-life Ed has all the comforts of civilization, but does he know how to survive in the wild like a man? His implication to his companion is that only the strong survive:

Ed: Well, the system’s done all right by me.
Lewis: Oh yeah. You gotta nice job, you gotta a nice house, a nice wife, a nice kid.
Ed: You make that sound rather s–tty, Lewis.
Lewis: Why do you go on these trips with me, Ed?
Ed: I like my life, Lewis.
Lewis: Yeah, but why do you go on these trips with me?
Ed: You know, sometimes I wonder about that.

The comrades camp at night by the river’s edge, setting up tents, sitting around a campfire, listening to Drew’s guitar playing, drinking beer, and roasting a fish that Lewis has speared. Bobby expresses some appreciation for the virgin river and the wilderness surrounding it:

Bobby: It’s true, Lewis, what you said. There’s somethin’ in the woods and in the water that we have lost in the city.
Lewis: We didn’t lose it. We sold it.
Bobby: Well, I’ll say one thing for the system – the system did produce the air-mattress. Or as it’s better known among we camping types the instant broad. And if you fellows will excuse me, I’m gonna go be mean to my air mattress.

Tension is heightened when Lewis senses « something or someone » in the blackness of the night around them. The three tenderfoots criticize Lewis’ affinity to nature as he disappears to investigate: « He wants to be one with nature and he can’t hack it. » Ed drunkenly philosophizes about their isolation from the world:

No matter what disasters may occur in other parts of the world, or what petty little problems arise…, no one can find us up here.

The next morning after rising early, Ed takes his bow and arrow and stalks a deer – emulating his buddy. But his hands tremble at the moment of the arrow’s release toward a live animal, and the shot veers into a tree trunk. Drew sensitively comments: « I don’t understand how anyone could shoot an animal. » Ed later explains his reason for faltering: « I lost control psychologically. » No longer intoxicated by the thrill of the outdoors, Bobby complains about his mosquito bites: « I got eaten alive last night. My bites have got bites…I’m a salesman, Ed. » Further down the river, Ed and Bobby become separated from the other two behind them. They pull their canoe out of the river when they decide to rest in the thick wilderness next to it.

More threatening than the untamed river are two evil, violent, primitive, degenerate and hostile mountain men, a gay hillbilly (Bill McKinney) and a grizzly, toothless man (Herbert « Cowboy » Coward) armed with a 12 gauge double-barreled shotgun who suddenly appear from the woods and confront the intruders. [The wilderness isn’t populated with romantic survivalists or enobled, heroic characters as in adventure stories, but sadistic brutes.] The two inexperienced, naive adventurers, assuming that the menacing backwoodsmen (who are harrassing them) are hiding a still to manufacture bootleg whiskey, promise not to tell anyone where it is located. Even away from his urban citified element, Ed maintains an inappropriate decorum of decency and ineffectually calls the animalistic rednecks ‘gentlemen’:

Mountain Man: What the hell you think you’re doin’?
Ed: Headin’ down river. A little canoe trip, headin’ for Aintry.
Mountain Man: Aintry?
Bobby: Sure, this river only runs one way, captain, haven’t you heard?
Mountain Man: You ain’t never gonna get down to Ain-.
Ed: Well, why not?
Mountain Man: ‘Cause. This river don’t go to Aintry. You done taken a wrong turn. See uh, this here river don’t go nowhere near Aintry.
Bobby: Where does it go, then?
Mountain Man: Boy, you are a lost one, ain’t ya?
Bobby: Well, hell, I guess this river comes out somewhere, don’t it? That’s where we’re goin’. Somewhere. Look, we don’t want any trouble here.
Ed: If you gentlemen have a still near here, hell, that’s fine with us.
Bobby: Why sure. We’d never tell anybody where it is. You know somethin’, you’re right, we’re lost. We don’t know where in the hell we are.
Toothless Man: A still?
Bobby: Right, yeah. You’re makin’ some whiskey up here. We’ll buy some from ya, we could use it, couldn’t we?
Mountain Man: Do you know what you’re talkin’ about?
Ed: We don’t know what we’re talkin’ about, honestly we don’t.
Mountain Man: No, no. You said somethin’ about makin’ whiskey, right? Isn’t that what you said?
Ed: We don’t know what you’re doin’ and we don’t care. That’s none of our business.
Mountain Man: That’s right. It’s none of your god-damned business, right.
Ed: We got quite a long journey ahead of us, gentlemen.
Toothless Man: Hold it. You ain’t goin’ no damn wheres.
Ed: This is ridiculous.
Toothless Man: Hold it, or I’ll blow your guts out all over these woods.
Ed: Gentlemen, we can talk this thing over. What is it you require of us?


At shotgun point, in a nightmarish and frightening sequence, the two sexually-perverted rustics viciously target them. They order them up into the woods where they tie Ed (with his own belt) to a tree. The mountain man sexually humiliates Bobby – the chubby-faced, defenseless intruder into his territory. He forces the fat salesman to first strip down to his underwear.

After a degrading roll around in the dirt and up a steep, leaf-strewn hillside while fondling and groping his prey, the mountain man/rapist makes Bobby squeal like a female sow before sodomizing him. Strapped against a tree, Ed helplessly watches in horror:

Mountain Man: Now, let’s you just drop them pants.
Bobby: Drop?
Mountain Man: Just take ’em right off.
Bobby: I-I mean, what’s this all about?
Toothless Man: Don’t say anything, just do it.
Mountain Man: Just drop ’em, boy! (To Ed – at knifepoint) You ever had your balls cut off, you f–kin’ ape?
Bobby: Lord.
Mountain Man: Look at there, that’s sharp. I bet it’d shave a hair.
Toothless Man: Why don’t ya try it and see?
Bobby: Lord, lord. Deliver us from all.
Toothless Man (To Bobby): Pull off that little ol’ bitty shirt there, too. (To Mountain Man) Did he bleed?
Mountain Man: He bled. (To Bobby) Them panties, take ’em off. (After attacking him) Get up, boy. Come on, get on up there.
Bobby: No, no, no. Oh, no. No. Don’t.
Mountain Man: Hey boy. You look just like a hog.
Bobby: Don’t, don’t.
Mountain Man: Just like a hog. Come here, piggy, piggy, piggy. (Holding Bobby’s nose as he straddled him from behind) Come on, piggy, come on, piggy, come on, piggy, give me a ride, a ride. Hey, boy. Get up and give me a ride.
Bobby: All right.
Mountain Man: Get up and give me a ride, boy.
Bobby: All right. All right.
Mountain Man: Get up! Get up there!
Bobby: All right. (His underwear was pulled off) Oh no, no!
Mountain Man: Looks like we got us a sow here, instead of a boar.
Bobby: Don’t. Don’t.
Mountain Man: What’s the matter, boy? I bet you can squeal. I bet you can squeal like a pig. Let’s squeal. Squeal now. Squeal. (Bobby’s ear was pulled)
Bobby: Wheeeeeeeeeeeeeee!
Mountain Man: Squeal. Squeal louder. Louder. Louder, louder. Louder! Louder! Louder! Get down now, boy. There, get them britches down. That’s that. You can do better than that, boy. You can do better than that. Come on, squeal. Squeal.

Lewis and Drew silently paddle up and come upon the scene of brutalization. Meanwhile, the Toothless Man (with a bare-gummed sneer on his face) prepares to order Ed to perform fellatio upon him at gunpoint: « He’s got a real purty mouth, ain’t he? » With his bow and arrow, Lewis shoots and kills the Mountain Man with one arrow that is shot through his back and protrudes from his chest. The Toothless Man drops his shotgun and scurries away into the woods, as the Mountain Man staggers around with the arrow through his body – and then falls dead.

Nervously and dramatically, the outsider-tourists argue about what to do next – should they report the killing to the authorities or submerge the evidence in the ground?

Lewis: What are we gonna do with him?
Drew: There’s not but one thing to do. Take the body down to Aintry. Turn it over to the Highway Patrol. Tell ’em what happened.
Lewis: Tell ’em what exactly?
Drew: Just what happened. This is justifiable homicide if anything is. They were sexually assaulting two members of our party at gunpoint. Like you said, there was nothin’ else we could do.
Ed: Is he alive?
Lewis: Not now. Well, let’s get our heads together. (To vengeful Bobby) Come on now, let’s not do anything foolish. Does anybody know anything about the law?
Drew: Look, I-I was on jury duty once. It wasn’t a murder trial.
Lewis: A murder trial? Well, I don’t know the technical word for it, Drew, but I know this. You take this man down out of the mountains and turn him over to the Sheriff, there’s gonna be a trial all right, a trial by jury.
Drew: So what?
Lewis: We killed a man, Drew. Shot him in the back – a mountain man, a cracker. It gives us somethin’ to consider.
Drew: All right, consider it, we’re listenin’.
Lewis: S–t, all these people are related. I’d be god-damned if I’m gonna come back up here and stand trial with this man’s aunt and his uncle, maybe his momma and his daddy sittin’ in the jury box. What do you think, Bobby? (Bobby rushes at the corpse, but is restrained) How about you, Ed?
Ed: I don’t know. I really don’t know.
Drew: Now you listen, Lewis. I don’t know what you got in mind, but if you try to conceal this body, you’re settin’ yourself up for a murder charge. Now that much law I do know! This ain’t one of your f–kin’ games. You killed somebody. There he is!
Lewis: I see him, Drew. That’s right, I killed somebody. But you’re wrong if you don’t see this as a game…Dammit, we can get out of this thing without any questions asked. We get connected up with that body and the law, this thing gonna be hangin’ over us the rest of our lives. We gotta get rid of that guy!…Anywhere, everywhere, nowhere.
Drew: How do you know that other guy hasn’t already gone for the police?
Lewis: And what in the hell is he gonna tell ’em, Drew, what he did to Bobby?
Drew: Now why couldn’t he go get some other mountain men? Now why isn’t he gonna do that? You look around you, Lewis. He could be out there anywhere, watchin’ us right now. We ain’t gonna be so god-damned hard to follow draggin’ a corpse.
Lewis: You let me worry about that, Drew. You let me take care of that. You know what’s gonna be here? Right here? A lake – as far as you can see hundreds of feet deep. Hundreds of feet deep. Did you ever look out over a lake, think about something buried underneath it? Buried underneath it. Man, that’s about as buried as you can get.
Drew: Well, I am tellin’ you, Lewis, I don’t want any part of it.
Lewis: Well, you are part of it!
Drew: IT IS A MATTER OF THE LAW!
Lewis: The law? Ha! The law?! What law?! Where’s the law, Drew? Huh? You believe in democracy, don’t ya?
Drew: Yes, I do.
Lewis: Well then, we’ll take a vote. I’ll stand by it and so will you.

Under stress, the normal demeanor of the urban professionals becomes more primal and crazed. Drew persuasively argues that they must take the body with them and lawfully report the incident as self-defense (a « justifiable homicide ») to the police. Drew is outvoted when the decent, pipe-smoking Ed casts the decisive vote in the ‘democratic’ process – a consequential vote that Drew calls « the most important decision of your whole life…We’re gonna have to live with this for the rest of our lives. » Lewis’ viewpoint eventually wins out with Ed’s collaboration – they decide to bury the man without reporting the incident (fearing the vengeful local residents wouldn’t accept their explanation and would be antagonistic toward them in a local trial). They expect that the waters of the future dam site would keep the corpse a secret and cover up their own awful crime. They add another dead creature to the soon-to-be dead wilderness.

To prepare for the burial, Lewis pulls the arrow out of the chest of Bobby’s attacker. The foursome awkwardly carry the body to a chosen gravesite. In a frenzy, they dig a grave with their bare hands, animalistically scratching and clawing with their hands. The gravediggers place the Mountain Man and the shotgun in the shallow grave, but the body’s stubborn, outstretched arm won’t willingly remain buried under the soft earth.

In haste, the panicked quartet anxiously race to their canoes to « paddle on down to Aintry to get the cars and go home. » As they descend and approach more frightening rapids downriver, Drew has neglected to put on his lifejacket. He rises, shakes his dazed head, loses his balance, topples and pitches (or falls) forward into the rough water in some noisy, churned-up rapids and disappears under the surface – he doesn’t resurface. Ed’s wooden canoe hits a large boulder, capsizes, and splinters into two pieces. The second canoe collides with it and also capsizes. All of the men are catapulted and spilled into a vicious set of cascading water and carried downstream in the frothy white foam. Lewis suffers an excruciatingly-painful right thighbone compound fracture when he strikes some underwater rocks – he cries out: « My leg’s broke. » With viscera (bone and flesh) hanging out of his pant’s leg where the wound was sustained, Lewis conjectures that « Drew was shot » by « that toothless bastard. » Clutching his leg and screaming in agony, Lewis finds refuge on some jagged rocks on the shoreline next to the river where high cliffs overlook them. Drew’s damaged guitar floats by in the water, as Ed vainly calls out for his companion – his voice echoes throughout the gorge’s canyons.

They paranoically suspect that they are the targets of gunshots, fired by the murdered man’s buddy poised high atop the towering cliff above them (« he’s right up there »). Ed surmises that they are retaliatory targets: « He’s gonna try and kill us, too. If he killed Drew, he’s gonna have to kill us. » The three are trapped in a gorge, feeling like sitting ducks [filmed at Tallulah Gorge]. Now they are compelled to play the deadly ‘game’ of survival. Ed yells at the group’s self-proclaimed leader who has suffered a debilitating fate:

Ed: What are we gonna do, Lewis? You’re the guy with the answers. What the hell do we do now?
Lewis: Now you get to play the game.
Ed: Lewis, you’re wrong.

Bobby is reduced to a fearful, whimpering weakling, and Lewis is so seriously injured that his leg must be splinted with a canoe paddle. Alone, Ed must provide active leadership and guide his friends to safety and civilization. He becomes changed forever by the struggle to survive in the malevolent, backwoods world. In a daring scene, he scales the face of the sheer rock cliff within the gorge in the darkness, with a bow and arrow on his back, to end the threat of a rifleman that he suspects shot Drew. Hanging precariously, he glances at his wallet’s picture of his wife and child – but they slip from his grasp. He fears: « God damn it, you’re never gonna get out of this gorge alive! »

Exhausted by the torturous climb, he falls asleep at the top, waking to the early morning light and a silhouetted glimpse of an unidentified mountaineer with a Winchester Model 1892 lever-action repeating rifle. He presumes the figure is the toothless man bent on revenge. Ed’s hands shake as he aims his bow and arrow. At the same instant the arrow releases, he slips on the rocks and painfully falls on his side onto one of his own arrows – it pierces his side. It first looks like he has missed his target. The hillbilly with the rifle staggers over to shoot his wounded attacker from point-blank range, but then falls dead from the arrow protruding through his neck.

Ed frantically searches inside the man’s mouth to identify him but remains uncertain whether he is the toothless man. He hurls both his bow and the man’s shotgun into the river far below, and then slowly lowers the corpse down the gorge’s cliff face at the end of a rope. When he uses the rope to rappel down the cliff, the line snaps and he is tossed into the river with the corpse. He is almost drowned under the surface when he becomes entangled with both the line and the clinging dead man. To hide any possible clues of the unknown killer, he later weights down the body with rocks and sinks it into the river.

The three finish their journey (with the seriously-wounded Lewis lying on the floor of the canoe). They locate Drew’s lifeless, drowned body along the way, lodged against a boulder and a fallen tree with his disfigured arm twisted behind his head. They scour his body for evidence of bullet wounds [whether he was shot or not remains uncertain], and then are also compelled to dispose of his weighted body at the bottom of the river:

Bobby: What are you going to do with Drew?
Ed: If a bullet made this, there are people who can tell.
Bobby: Oh God, there’s no end to it. I didn’t really know him.
Ed: Drew was a good husband to his wife Linda and you were a wonderful father to your boys, Drew – Jimmie and Billie Ray. And if we come through this, I promise to do all I can for ’em. He was the best of us.
Bobby: Amen.

In the final, jostling leg of the journey, the sides of their aluminum canoe scrape and crash against the rocks, causing severe pain for the incapacitated Lewis. At last, they return to civilization at Aintry, marked by junked cars at the river’s edge. Bobby is jubilant at the sight of rusted hulks of cars:

We made it. We made it, Ed. We made it. We’re back, Ed.

Tenaciously insistent that they all have the same story, Ed manufactures an explanatory alibi for their entire weekend:

Ed: Everything happened right here. Lewis broke his leg in those rapids there, and Drew drowned here.
Bobby: No, nothin’ happened here.
Ed: Bobby, listen to me. We got to stop them from lookin’ up river. It’s important that we get together on this thing. Do you understand?…We’re not out of this yet.

At Aintry, Ed is stunned to discover that the Griner brothers delivered their cars as they had arranged. After phoning for help, both Lewis and Ed are taken away in an ambulance for medical attention. Even the simplest signs of civilization (paper tissues and hot water) are appreciated by Ed who is obviously overwhelmed by his experience. In a local boarding house where they are placed by country lawmen, Bobby and Ed are served a home-cooked meal that includes corn, and a conversation about « the darndest-looking cucumber you ever seen. »

But they do not tell the local law officers what has really happened to them, and deny having any encounters with hillbillies. Bobby is worried that their story isn’t holding together: « We’re in trouble. They don’t believe us. » Even though Bobby claims he « told ’em like we said, » Ed doesn’t believe that his cowardly pal is telling the truth. Their story (that both Lewis’ broken leg and Drew’s drowning occurred at the end of the trip) contradicts the discovery of their shattered wooden canoe upstream. At the river’s edge, a skeptical Deputy Queen (Macon McCalman) and suspicious Aintry County Sheriff Ed Bullard (James Dickey) report a missing hunter in the woods (related by marriage to Deputy Queen) from a couple of days earlier, but the officials have no proof and « nothin’ to hold them for. » The Sheriff knowingly responds with an omen of their gruesome secrets:

Let’s just wait and see what comes out of the river.

As Ed and Bobby are driven back into town to the County Memorial Hospital to visit Lewis, the taxicab driver (Pete Ware) confirms their own guilt-ridden hopes:

All this land’s gonna be covered with water. Best thing ever happened to this town.

To their relief, when Lewis regains consciousness in the hospital, he confirms their story by claiming: « I don’t remember nuthin’. Nuthin' ». Before they leave Aintry, the smiling, omniscient Sheriff asks a few more biting questions and then offers home-grown advice:

Sheriff: How come you all end up with four life jackets?
Bobby: Didn’t we have an extra one?
Ed: No, Drew wasn’t wearin’ his.
Sheriff: Well, how come he wasn’t wearin’ it?
Ed: I don’t know.
Sheriff: Don’t ever do nothin’ like this again. Don’t come back up here.
Bobby: You don’t have to worry about that, Sheriff.
Sheriff: I’d kinda like to see this town die peaceful.

Ed and Bobby agree to not see each other for a while. Returning home, Ed is ‘delivered’ from the malevolent horrors of nature and reunited with his wife (Belinda Beatty) and son (Charlie Boorman, the director’s son who played a major role in The Emerald Forest (1985)).

The final frightening image is of Ed, snapping awake next to his wife from a vivid nightmare of his journey. He is fearfully haunted by a white, bony hand (of the murdered Mountain Man) rising above the surface of the water of the newly-flooded wilderness. The man’s stiff, outstretched hand – pointing nowhere – serves as a signpost. Ed lies back in his wife’s arms – unable to rest and experience ‘deliverance’ from his recurring nightmare of their experience with extreme violence.

Voir enfin:

Easy Rider (1969)

Easy Rider (1969) is the late 1960s « road film » tale of a search for freedom (or the illusion of freedom) in a conformist and corrupt America, in the midst of paranoia, bigotry and violence. Released in the year of the Woodstock concert, and made in a year of two tragic assassinations (Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King), the Vietnam War buildup and Nixon’s election, the tone of this ‘alternative’ film is remarkably downbeat and bleak, reflecting the collapse of the idealistic 60s. Easy Rider, one of the first films of its kind, was a ritualistic experience and viewed (often repeatedly) by youthful audiences in the late 1960s as a reflection of their realistic hopes of liberation and fears of the Establishment.

The iconographic, ‘buddy’ film, actually minimal in terms of its artistic merit and plot, is both memorialized as an image of the popular and historical culture of the time and a story of a contemporary but apocalyptic journey by two self-righteous, drug-fueled, anti-hero (or outlaw) bikers eastward through the American Southwest. Their trip to Mardi Gras in New Orleans takes them through limitless, untouched landscapes (icons such as Monument Valley), various towns, a hippie commune, and a graveyard (with hookers), but also through areas where local residents are increasingly narrow-minded and hateful of their long-haired freedom and use of drugs. The film’s title refers to their rootlessness and ride to make « easy » money; it is also slang for a pimp who makes his livelihood off the earnings of a prostitute. However, the film’s original title was The Loners.

[The names of the two main characters, Wyatt and Billy, suggest the two memorable Western outlaws Wyatt Earp and Billy the Kid – or ‘Wild Bill’ Hickcock. Rather than traveling westward on horses as the frontiersmen did, the two modern-day cowboys travel eastward from Los Angeles – the end of the traditional frontier – on decorated Harley-Davidson choppers on an epic journey into the unknown for the ‘American dream’.]

According to slogans on promotional posters, they were on a search:

A man went looking for America and couldn’t find it anywhere…

Their costumes combine traditional patriotic symbols with emblems of loneliness, criminality and alienation – the American flag, cowboy decorations, long-hair, and drugs.

Both Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper co-starred, Fonda produced, and 32 year old Hopper directed (his first effort). [It was produced by B.B.S. (formed by Bob Rafelson – the director of Five Easy Pieces (1970), Bert Schneider, and Steve Blauner), already known for the groundbreaking, surrealistic Head (1968), a cult masterpiece that starred the Monkees (from the popular TV series) and was co-written by unemployed actor Jack Nicholson.] Fonda (as lead actor), Hopper (as uncredited second unit director), and Jack Nicholson (as screenwriter) had participated in director Roger Corman’s low-budget, definitive LSD film The Trip (1967) a few years earlier. And Fonda had also starred in Roger Corman’s and American International’s ground-breaking The Wild Angels (1966) – a biker’s tale about the ‘Hell’s Angels’. The first scenes to be shot were on grainy 16 mm. in New Orleans (during Mardi Gras) on a budget of $12,000, afterwards followed by funds for a total budget of $380,000.

This follow-up film to The Wild Angels (1966) premiered at the 1969 Cannes Film Festival and won the festival’s award for the Best Film by a new director. The film received two Academy Award nominations: Best Original Screenplay (co-authored by Peter Fonda, Dennis Hopper, and Terry Southern – known previously for scripting Stanley Kubrick’s Dr. Strangelove, or… (1964)), and Best Supporting Actor for Jack Nicholson in one of his earlier, widely-praised roles as a drunken young lawyer.

Easy Rider surprisingly, was an extremely successful, low-budget (under $400,000), counter-cultural, independent film for the alternative youth/cult market – one of the first of its kind that was an enormous financial success, grossing $40 million worldwide. Its story contained sex, drugs, casual violence, a sacrificial tale (with a shocking, unhappy ending), and a pulsating rock and roll soundtrack reinforcing or commenting on the film’s themes. Groups that participated musically included Steppenwolf, Jimi Hendrix, The Band and Bob Dylan.

The pop cultural, mini-revolutionary film was also a reflection of the « New Hollywood, » and the first blockbuster hit from a new wave of Hollywood directors (e.g., Francis Ford Coppola, Peter Bogdanovich, and Martin Scorsese) that would break with a number of Hollywood conventions. It had little background or historical development of characters, a lack of typical heroes, uneven pacing, jump cuts and flash-forward transitions between scenes, an improvisational style and mood of acting and dialogue, background rock ‘n’ roll music to complement the narrative, and the equation of motorbikes with freedom on the road rather than with delinquent behaviors.

However, its idyllic view of life and example of personal film-making was overshadowed by the self-absorbent, drug-induced, erratic behavior of the filmmakers, chronicled in Peter Biskind’s tell-all Easy Riders, Raging Bulls: How the Sex-Drugs-and Rock ‘N Roll Generation Saved Hollywood (1999). And the influential film led to a flurry of equally self-indulgent, anti-Establishment themed films by inferior filmmakers, who overused some of the film’s technical tricks and exploited the growing teen-aged market for easy profits. Hopper’s success with this film gave him the greenlight from Universal Pictures (and $850,000) for his next project The Last Movie (1971) which ended up being a colossal failure, due in part to reports of drug-induced orgies during filming, and its year-long editing process (delayed by alleged use of psychedelic drugs for ‘inspiration’).

The Story


One morning, two free-wheeling, long-haired, social misfits/dropouts/hippies ride up to La Contenta Bar, south of the border in Mexico. With Jesus (Antonio Mendoza), they walk around the side of the bar through an auto-wrecking dump yard. After Jesus scoops out a small amount of white powder (cocaine) onto a mirror, they both sniff the dope. In Spanish, the thinner, calmer one chuckles: « Si pura vida (Yes, it’s pure life.) » Then, he hands a packet of money to Jesus who thumbs through it and smiles. The two bikers, who have presumably orchestrated the decision to buy the cocaine in Mexico, are given cases of the powder in the drug deal.

Before the film cuts to the next scene, the loud noise of a jet engine plays on the soundtrack. In the next scene of their dope deal, they are now in California where they have smuggled the drugs for sale to a dealer. The two are on an airport road next to the touch down point of jet planes at Los Angeles International Airport – the sound of approaching planes is excruciatingly loud. A Rolls Royce pulls into the frame with their Connection (Phil Spector, the famous rock and roll producer in a cameo role). While testing the white powder in the front seat of their white pickup truck, the Connection ducks every time a plane lands. In exchange for the drugs, the Bodyguard (Mac Mashourian) gives a large quantity of cash to one of the bikers in the front seat of the Rolls. The drug deal is finalized to the tune of Steppenwolf’s « The Pusher, » a song which is overtly against hard-drug pushers and dealing.

You know I smoked a lot of grass
Oh Lord, I popped a lot of pills
But I’ve never touched nothin’
That my spirit could kill
You know I’ve seen a lot of people walkin’ round
With tombstones in their eyes
But the pusher don’t care
Aw, if you live or if you die
God damn the Pusher
God damn, hey I say the Pusher
I said God damn, God damn the Pusher man.

With the stash of money they’ve made from selling drugs, they have financed their trip, including the purchase of high-handled motorcycles. One of them rolls up the banknotes and stuffs them into a long plastic tube that will be inserted snake-like into the tear-drop shaped gas tank of his stars-and-stripes decorated motorcycle. The two part-time drug dealers are:

  • a cool and introspective « Captain America » Wyatt (Peter Fonda) on a gleaming, silver-chromed low-riding bike with a ‘stars-and-stripes’ tear-drop gas tank, wearing a tight leather pants held at the waist by a round belt-buckle and a black leather jacket with an American flag emblazoned on the back; also with a ‘stars-and-stripes’ helmet
  • mustached and shaggy, long-haired Billy the Kid (Dennis Hopper), with a tan-colored bush hat, fringed buckskin jacket, shades, and an Indian necklace of animals’ teeth

Wyatt casts off his wristwatch to the ground, a literal and symbolic flourish that shows his new-found freedom and rejection of time constraints in modern society. As they take to the open road on their motorcycles, cross the Colorado River and pass through unspoiled buttes and sand-colored deserts, the credits begin to scroll, accompanied by the sound of the popular song by Steppenwolf: « Born To Be Wild. » It is the start of a beautiful adventure as they travel through memorable landscapes of America’s natural beauty, accompanied by the pounding of rock music.

Get your motor runnin’
Head out on the highway
Lookin’ for adventure
And whatever comes our way

Chorus 1
Yeah, darlin’ gonna make it happen
Take the world in a love embrace
Fire all of the guns at once and
Explode into space.

I like smoke and lightnin’
Heavy metal thunder
Racin’ with the wind
And the feelin’ that I’m under
Repeat of Chorus 1

Chorus 2
Like a true nature’s child
We were born, born to be wild
We can climb so high
I never wanna die.
Born to Be Wild
Born to Be Wild…

That evening, they are immediately rebuffed at a motel when they ask for a room – presumably because of their long hair, general unkempt and far-out appearance. The manager flashes the NO Vacancy sign at them. They camp out on the first leg of their cross-country odyssey to New Orleans, hoping to arrive there before the Mardi Gras celebration.

In the first of a number of campfire scenes, there is time for discussion and for short snatches of dialogue to illuminate the characters and themes of the film. In front of an open fire, Billy sings of his materialistic dreams:

I’m goin’ down to Mardi Gras
I’m gonna get me a Mardi Gras queen…

In contrast, Wyatt smokes on a joint and seems withdrawn and remote to Billy: « You’re pulling inside man. You’re getting a little distance tonight. » Wyatt explains that he is tired: « Yeah, well, I’m just getting my thing together. » The next morning, Wyatt wakens first, and explores a deserted, broken-down shed, and a drawer on the ground with a rusted compass and a withered piece of paper inside. He also looks at a frayed booklet with pages blown by the breeze.

They stop at a horse ranch to repair Wyatt’s flat tire on his bike – in symbolic, parallel juxtaposition – to a rancher who is shoeing his horse nearby. Although the loud sounding motorcycle makes the horses skittish, the rancher (Warren Finnerty), not intimidated by their odd appearance, admires Wyatt’s « good-looking machine. » Wyatt and Billy are invited to join the ranchhouse family (the rancher, his Mexican wife, and his many Mexican-American children) for an outdoor meal at the long dinner table. Wyatt respectfully compliments the rancher on his simple life of hard work, approves his self-sustaining piece of land (« nice spread »), and then clarifies his profound thoughts on his own attraction to the man’s commitment to building a comfortable life for his family – an embodiment of freedom and responsibility:

You’ve got a nice place. It’s not every man that can live off the land, you know. You do your own thing in your own time. You should be proud.

Soon restless and impatient with the domestic scene, they are on their way again through a wooded, mountainous area, while The Byrds’ « Wasn’t Born to Follow » plays on the soundtrack. Wyatt picks up a Stranger/hitchhiker (Luke Askew) and they ride up to an Enco gas station [at Sacred Mountain] to fill their tanks. Billy, who is paranoid and terrified of losing their one opportunistic chance at the good life, is nervous about having the Stranger help fill the tanks:

Billy: Hey man, everything that we ever dreamed of is in that teardrop gas tank – and you got a stranger over there pourin’ gasoline all over it. Man, all he’s got to do is turn and look over into it, man, and he can see that…
Wyatt: He won’t know what it is, man. He won’t know what it is. Don’t worry, Billy. Everything’s all right.

After filling both tanks, Wyatt holds out a bill, looking for someone to pay, but the hitchhiker dismisses him: « That’s all taken care of. » Wyatt is pleased: « I like that. » [There may be some pre-arranged payment scheme that the hitchhiker has with the owner of the gas station, but that is only speculation.] As they pull out onto the highway, the last shot cuts to the gas station building, where a poor Mexican girl looks out the window.

As they ride through more open desert terrain and the golden sun begins to set over Monument Valley, the Band’s « The Weight » is heard on the soundtrack:

I pulled into Nazareth, was feelin’ ’bout half-past dead
I just need some place, where I can lay my head
Hey Mister, can you tell me, where a man might find a bed
He just grinned and shook my hand, and ‘no’ was all he said
Take a load off, Fanny, take a load for free
Take a load off, Fanny, yeah, and you put the load right on me
I picked up my bag, I went lookin’ for a place to hide
Then I saw Carmen and the devil, walkin’ side by side
I said ‘Hey, Carmen, come on let’s go downtown’
She said, ‘I gotta go, but my friend can stick around’…

When night falls, they must camp again, choosing an ancient Pueblo Indian rock ruins. In the film’s second campfire scene, their figures are silhouetted against a beautiful Southwest sunset of many hues. They have a week left to get to New Orleans and the Mardi Gras. The evasive Stranger, whom they are taking to his commune, enigmatically reveals he was originally from the repression of the city:

It doesn’t make any difference what city. All cities are alike. That’s why I’m out here now…cause I’m from the city, a long way from the city – and that’s where I want to be right now.

The Stranger reprimands Billy for disrespecting the Indian graves directly underneath them: « The people this place belongs to are buried right under you. You could be a trifle polite…It’s a small thing to ask. » When Wyatt asks: « You ever want to be somebody else? », the Stranger replies: « I’d like to try Porky Pig. » Wyatt answers his own question: « I never wanted to be anybody else. »

The next day, the Stranger leads them to his New Mexico commune where hippies are gathered outside the buildings. The commune is the typical 60s embodiment of idealized dreams – another alternative style of living quite different from the world of the rancher. The bikers are immediately drawn into the commune without fear or prejudice – their dress and mode of speaking are at one with the counter-cultural commune. The Stranger is relieved to be home – he hugs and kisses one of the women and washes his face in a washbasin. Billy plays ‘cowboys and Indians’ with the hippie children, yelling: « Bang bang » as he exchanges imaginary gunfire with them. Foreshadowing future events, Billy cries out: « Pow, pow, pow. Ppttwanng. You can’t hit me, I’m invisible. I’m invisible. » But a big glob of mud hits him in the middle of his chest – an ominous foreshadowing.

Inside the barn/kitchen area of the commune building, Sarah (Sabrina Scharf) « raps » with the Stranger, concerned about more visitors and the burden they place on the hippie commune. The promise of Paradise in the commune is a lost dream:

We just can’t take anymore, Stranger. Just too many people dropping in. Oh, I’m not talking about you and your friends, you know that. And like the week before, Susan dropped in with twelve people from Easter City. She wanted to take ten pounds of rice with her…Well naturally, we had to say no…So she gets all up tight and she breaks out some hash – and she won’t give us any. Oh, and…that’s not all. The next morning, they went outside to start their bus and they couldn’t get it started…

A mime troupe in the commune has « gone down to the hot springs to bathe. » Joanne (Sandy Wyeth), one of the younger hippie girls, reads an interpretation from the I Ching and asks Lisa (Luana Anders) for help in understanding the passage:

Starting brings misfortune. Per-serverance brings danger. Not every demand for change in the existing order should be heeded. On the other hand, repeated and well-founded complaints should not fail to a hearing.

The members of the mime troupe return and interrupt the proceedings. Their self-conscious leader theatrically takes the role of the Devil:

Hear ye, hear ye, hear ye. We’ve come to play for our dinner. Or should I say, stay for our dinner. Or even slay for our dinner…We’ve come to drink your wine, taste your food and take pleasure in your women.

Sarah grabs the Devil and pulls him out of the kitchen – she gestures for the rest of the troupe to leave so she can prepare dinner [the women are delegated to do all the cooking!]. The barefooted Stranger walks across a dirt field and explains how the touchy-feely commune is life-affirming but barely surviving – commune members (would-be hippie farmers) are sowing seeds on unplowed, barren, sandy ground:

You see, what happened here is these people got here late in the summer. Too late to plant. But the weather was beautiful and it was easy livin’, and everything was fine. And then came that winter. There were forty or fifty of them here living in this one-room place down here. Nothing to eat – starvin’. Out by the side of the road lookin’ for dead horses…Anything they could get ahold of. Now there’s – there’s eighteen or twenty of them left and they’re city kids. Look at them. But they’re getting this crop in. They’re gonna stay here until it’s harvested. That’s the whole thing.

Wyatt asks: « You get much rain here, man? » Billy and Wyatt predict opposite outcomes for the stoned-out labors of the workers. Wyatt admires the brave determination of the inhabitants:

Billy: This is nothing but sand, man. They ain’t gonna make it, man. They ain’t gonna grow anything here.
Wyatt: They’re gonna make it. Dig, man. They’re gonna make it.

In one of the film’s more memorable scenes, the blessing before the meal, the camera begins a 360 degree pan around on the varied faces of a circle of people holding hands together inside the commune. The camera returns to Jack (Robert Walker, Jr.) who leads the group in an Eastern-style religious blessing for the meal, thanking God for « a place to make a stand »:

We have planted our seeds. We ask that our efforts be worthy to produce simple food for our simple taste. We ask that our efforts be rewarded. And we thank you for the food we eat from other hands – that we may share it with our fellow man and be even more generous when it is from our own. Thank you for a place to make a stand. (Amen.)

While the dance troupe, the Gorilla Theatre, entertains outdoors during the meal on a makeshift stage by singing « Does Your Hair Hang Low, » Lisa, who has taken a liking to Wyatt, sits with him against a rock. She opens by asking: « Are you an Aquarius? » Wyatt shakes his head. Then she guesses right: « Pisces. » Uneasy in the commune, Billy is not permitted to join a group including the Stranger and Sarah – one of the group holds a cross out in front of Billy and turns him away. The Stranger asks: « Who sent ya? » Billy, who is distrustful and confused by the commune’s values and unable to see any pay-off, turns back and walks over to Wyatt:

Whew. Man, look, I gotta get out of here, man. Now we – we got things we want to do, man, like – I just – uh – I gotta get out of here, man.

In exchange for the food they have eaten, Wyatt and Billy give Lisa and her friend Sarah a lift on their bikes « over across the canyon » to the hot springs. « I Wasn’t Born to Follow » by The Byrds is again heard as the group of four walk along the bank of a stream and then shed their clothes for a skinny-dip together in a rock grotto.

Back at the commune just before they leave, the Stranger solemnly offers Wyatt a small square object, a tab of acid (LSD): « When you get to the right place, with the right people, quarter this. You know, this could be the right place. The time’s running out. » Wyatt wants to stay in the idyllic setting, but Billy is impatient and restless and insists that they leave. Both drifters finally decide that they need to keep moving. Although Wyatt might stay and develop a relationship with Lisa, he realizes time is running out for them and they are compelled to continue their journey: « Yeah, I’m, I’m hip about time. But I just gotta go. »

Along the way, they soon find themselves in the middle of a parade composed of red-uniformed band members and majorettes marching down the main street of Las Vegas, New Mexico. A revolving red light on the top of a police car signals them to pull over. They are thrown in jail for crashing the parade and « paradin’ without a permit. » Billy objects vehemently as the jail cell door is closed on him:

You gotta be kidding. I mean, you know who this is, man? This is Captain America. I’m Billy. Hey, we’re headliners baby. We played every fair in this part of the country. I mean, for top dollar, too!

A star-patterned symbol drawn on the cell wall reads: « I LOVE GOD » among other graffiti drawings and inscribed names. Bill calls his captors: « Weirdo hicks. » A colorful white plaster plaque reads: « Jesus Christ – the same yesterday, to-day and forever. »

In an adjoining cell and lying on a cot, they meet a genial, drunken ACLU Southern lawyer, George Hanson (Jack Nicholson, in the role that made him famous). He is moaning to himself about his aching head and sleeping off a hangover: « All right now, George – what are you gonna do now? I mean, you promised these people now. You promised these people – and you promised these people and – . » George’s activist ambitions in the community have been derailed by his drinking problem. Although they’re « in the same cage here, » George, experienced with the ACLU, the rule of law, and reconciliation between opposing groups, will function as their redemption because counter-culturalists Billy and Wyatt appear scruffy and foreign-looking to the red-neck townspeople:

Well, you boys don’t look like you’re from this part of the country. You’re lucky I’m here to see that you don’t get into anything…Well, they got this here – see – uh – scissor-happy ‘Beautify America’ thing goin’ on around here. They’re tryin’ to make everybody look like Yul Brynner. They used – uh – rusty razor blades on the last two long-hairs that they brought in here and I wasn’t here to protect them. You see – uh – I’m – uh – I’m a lawyer. Done a lot of work for the A. C. L. U.

George, a synthesizing combination of liberal and conservative ideals who has been able to transcend his parochial surroundings, assures them that they can get out of jail and find freedom with his political connections – if they « haven’t killed anybody – at least nobody white. » For just $25 dollars, they are set free. After Wyatt thanks George with the words: « very groovy, » George turns toward the guards and repeats the phrase: « Very groovy. Very groovy. See there. I bet nobody ever said that to you. » A binge drinker, George appears to be a frequent visitor to the jail and knows all the guards very well. Regarded as a fellow good-ol-boy by the guards, he is able to keep his rowdy behavior a secret from his disappointed father (he is the son of a wealthy, powerful, influential figure).

Outside while looking at their « super-machines, » George toasts the day with a bottle of Jim Beam, accompanied by his elbow flapping on his side like a chicken:

Here’s to the first of the day, fellas. To ol’ D. H. Lawrence. Nik-nik-nik-f-f-f-Indians!

George is also interested in saving himself by escaping from the small town and joining them on their two to three day ride to New Orleans: « I must’ve started off to Mardi Gras six or seven times. Never got further than the state line. » He shows them a business card from his wallet that the Governor of Louisiana once gave him that eventually directs them to hedonistic, self-interested pleasures at a legendary whore house:

‘Madame Tinkertoy’s House of Blue Lights. Corner of Bourbon and Toulouse, New Orleans, Louisiana.’ Now this is supposed to be the finest whorehouse in the South. These ain’t no pork chops. These are U. S. Prime.

George presents the most unforgettable image of the film after he tells them: « Oh, oh, I’ve got a helmet. I’ve got a beauty. » He is grinning from ear to ear, wearing a gold football helmet with a blue center stripe, and riding on the back of Wyatt’s motorcycle, as « If You Want to Be A Bird » (by The Holy Modal Rounders) plays on the soundtrack. George sits up and flaps his arms.

Around the campfire that night, [the third campfire scene in the film and the first of two campfire scenes with George], George – wearing a ‘M’ letter sweater (another symbol of his traditional scholastic leanings, along with the football helmet) – takes another drink and again flaps his arms: « Nik, nik, nik, nik – Fire! » They turn George on to marijuana (« grass ») and he is soon encouraged to inhale a joint for the first time in his life after sniffing at it and expressing his doubts about lighting it up:

You- you mean marijuana. Lord have mercy, is that what that is? Well, let me see that. Mmmmm-mmm. Mmmm….I-I-I couldn’t do that. I mean, I’ve got enough problems with the – with the booze and all. I mean, uh, I – I can’t afford to get hooked…it-it-it leads to harder stuff.

Thinking it has « a real nice, uh, taste to it, » George gets high. In a hilarious conversation, his marijuana smoking prompts him to espouse his belief in aliens and UFOs:

That was a UFO, beamin’ back at ya. Me and Eric Heisman was down in Mexico two weeks ago – we seen forty of ’em flying in formation. They-they-they’ve got bases all over the world now, you know. They’ve been coming here ever since nineteen forty-six – when the scientists first started bouncin’ radar beams off of the moon. And they have been livin’ and workin’ among us in vast quantities ever since. The government knows all about ’em.

George describes more of his « crackpot idea » to Billy about how aliens from the planet Venus (from a « more highly evolved » society without war, money, or political leaders) have already landed on Earth. They don’t reveal themselves as living and working people because they are indistinguishable from normal human beings. Their mission is to help « people in all walks of life » to evolve into a higher destiny. In his theory, the US government leaders have repressed information about the extraterrestrials who represent the status quo:

Well, they are people, just like us – from within our own solar system. Except that their society is more highly evolved. I mean, they don’t have no wars, they got no monetary system, they don’t have any leaders, because, I mean, each man is a leader. I mean, each man – because of their technology, they are able to feed, clothe, house, and transport themselves equally – and with no effort…Why don’t they reveal themselves to us is because if they did it would cause a general panic. Now, I mean, we still have leaders upon whom we rely for the release of this information. These leaders have decided to repress this information because of the tremendous shock that it would cause to our antiquated systems. Now, the result of this has been that the Venutians have contacted people in all walks of life – all walks of life. (He laughs) Yes. It-it-it would be a devastatin’ blow to our antiquated systems – so now the Venutians are meeting with people in all walks of life – in an advisory capacity. For once man will have a god-like control over his own destiny. He will have a chance to transcend and to evolve with some equality for all.

They decide to save the rest of the joint for the next morning, as Wyatt advises: « It gives you a whole new way of looking at the day. »

The next morning, they continue on their trip and wind up entering a rural cafe/diner in a small Southern town, as three songs play on the soundtrack:

  • Don’t Bogart Me (by the Fraternity of Man)
  • If Six Was Nine (by the Jimi Hendrix Experience)
  • Let’s Turkey Trot (by Little Eva) – the selection on the jukebox in the diner

Local rednecks at one of the cafe’s booths look up at the non-conformist intruders, as the Deputy Sheriff (Arnold Hess, Jr.) rhetorically asks: « What the hell is this? Troublemakers? » His construction-site booth mate with a yellow cap, Cat Man (Hayward Robillard) adds: « You name it – I’ll throw rocks at it, Sheriff. » Teenage girls at the next booth are excited by the strangers in a different way, particularly for George: « Oh, I like the one in the red shirt with the suspenders » and for Wyatt: « Mmmm-mmm, the white shirt for me » and « look at the one with the black pants on. » In response to the attention, George and Billy make funny noises with their tongues and say: « Poontang! »

The dialogue between the Sheriff and Cat Man despises and ridicules the bikers’ long hair with crude insults:

Cat Man: Check that joker with the long hair.
Deputy: I checked him already. Looks like we might have to bring him up to the Hilton before it’s all over with.
Cat Man: Ha! I think she’s cute.
Deputy: Isn’t she, though. I guess we’d put him in the women’s cell, don’t you reckon?
Cat Man: Oh, I think we ought to put ’em in a cage and charge a little admission to see ’em.

Overhearing their ill-natured comments, George gracefully sighs at the two good ol’ boys: « Those are what is known as ‘country witticisms.’ One of the girls boldly suggests asking the bikers to take them for a ride and then is dared to « go ahead. » Other customers are also threatened and make loud asides about their appearance, insulting them as « weirdo degenerates » – the local townfolk are fearful of something they don’t understand:

Customer 1: You know, I thought at first that bunch over there, their mothers had maybe been frightened by a bunch of gorillas, but now I think they were caught.
Customer 2: I know one of them’s Alley-oop – I think. From the beads on him.
Customer 4: Well, one of them darned sure is not Oola.
Customer 1: Look like a bunch of refugees from a gorilla love-in.
Customer 2: A gorilla couldn’t love that.
Customer 1: Nor could a mother.
Customer 3: I’d love to mate him up with one of those black wenches out there.
Customer 4: Oh, now I don’t know about that.
Customer 3: Well, that’s about as low as they come. I’ll tell ya…Man, they’re green.
Customer 4: No, they’re not green, they’re white.
Customer 3: White? Huh!
Customer 4: Uh-huh.
Customer 3: Man, you’re color blind. I just gotta say that…
Customer 1: I don’t know. I thought most jails were built for humanity, and that won’t quite qualify.
Customer 2: I wonder where they got those wigs from.
Customer 1: They probably grew ’em. It looks like they’re standin’ in fertilizer. Nothin’ else would grow on ’em…
Customer 3: I saw two of them one time. They were just kissin’ away. Two males. Just think of it.

Feeling threatened by the « Yankee queers » and their alternative, non-conformist lifestyle, the narrow-minded Deputy and Cat Man suggest eliminating them:

Deputy: What’cha think we ought to do with ’em?
Cat Man: I don’t damn know, but I don’t think they’ll make the parish line.

George quickly loses his hungry appetite and Wyatt rises to « split » – the waitress has refused to serve them anyway. The teenage girls follow them outside and gather around to ask for a ride, but Billy changes his mind when he notices the Deputy peering out the cafe window at them – « the Man is at the window. »

At their next campsite around a campfire (because hotels and motels won’t accept them), the film’s fourth campfire scene, George (in a conversation with Billy) expresses the prophetic theme of the film – their threat to the Establishment and to Americans who are hypocritical about life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

In his famous « this used to be a helluva good country » speech, George articulates the real reason for the hostility and resentment that they generate. Billy’s notion is that their non-conformist mode of dress and long hair spark intolerance. But lawyer George philosophizes that they represent something much deeper and more fearful – freedom, unconventionality, and experimentation in a materialistic, capitalistic society:

George: You know, this used to be a helluva good country. I can’t understand what’s gone wrong with it.
Billy: Huh. Man, everybody got chicken, that’s what happened, man. Hey, we can’t even get into like, uh, second-rate hotel, I mean, a second-rate motel. You dig? They think we’re gonna cut their throat or something, man. They’re scared, man.
George: Oh, they’re not scared of you. They’re scared of what you represent to ’em.
Billy: Hey man. All we represent to them, man, is somebody needs a haircut.
George: Oh no. What you represent to them is freedom.
Billy: What the hell’s wrong with freedom, man? That’s what it’s all about.
George: Oh yeah, that’s right, that’s what it’s all about, all right. But talkin’ about it and bein’ it – that’s two different things. I mean, it’s real hard to be free when you are bought and sold in the marketplace. ‘Course, don’t ever tell anybody that they’re not free ’cause then they’re gonna get real busy killin’ and maimin’ to prove to you that they are. Oh yeah, they gonna talk to you, and talk to you, and talk to you about individual freedom, but they see a free individual, it’s gonna scare ’em.
Billy: Mmmm, well, that don’t make ’em runnin’ scared.
George: No, it makes ’em dangerous.

George ends his confident words of wisdom with another flap of the arm and « nik, nik, nik, nik, nik, nik, nik – Swamp. » After they settle down in their sleeping bags, unidentified men [presumably the men from the cafe] ambush and attack them and beat them with baseball bats in the dark. Billy and Wyatt are both bloodied and bruised, but George has been clubbed to death. [Ironically, George as a lawyer from a rich family shared more in common with his local assassins than either Billy or Wyatt, but he is the one who is murdered.] Billy goes through George’s wallet, wondering what to do « with his stuff. » They find some money, his driver’s license, and his card to a New Orleans brothel: « He ain’t gonna be usin’ that. » As homage to their departed friend/companion, they immediately travel on.

The next scene abruptly finds them in a New Orleans restaurant, where they are served a fancy meal with wine (as the soundtrack plays « Kyrie Eleison » by The Electric Prunes). Thinking they’ll « go there for one drink » because George « would have wanted us to, » Billy and Wyatt make their way to the House of Blue Lights, the brothel/whorehouse – a place of institutionalized love that George dreamed of visiting. The interior of the whorehouse is decorated with sexual and religious paintings and with an ornate ceiling and chandelier. The salon has a few prostitutes seated on couchs, a pimp, a Madame, and a golden-haired woman who dances on a table. After snuggling and being entertained, Billy gets smashed and enjoys spending their drug money. Remote and out of touch, Wyatt stares off into space postulating: « If God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent him. » Wyatt looks up to an inscription on the wall which reads: « Death only closes a man’s reputation and determines it as good or bad. »

There is a momentary, quick flash forward – an aerial shot of a fire burning alongside a highway – it is the final image of the film – Wyatt’s motorcycle burns beside the road.

The Madame brings in two hookers, Mary (Toni Basil), a dark-haired woman who accompanies Wyatt, and Karen (Karen Black), the « tall one » who joins Billy. With the two prostitutes, they wander through the crowded Mardi Gras celebration in the streets, where there are large floats and revellers are singing and parading in costumes. (« When the Saints Go Marching In » plays in the background.) As the group moves down the street, Wyatt comes upon a dead dog lying at the curb – they stoop down to it.

Then, the bonded quartet enter a cemetery, a place of institutionalized death, where they all split the packet of the hallucinogenic drug LSD, given them earlier by the Stranger. Although the drug experience promises peace and enlightenment, the acid trip is a sacrament of confusion and disillusion.

A girl’s voice repeatedly recites religious creeds during the sequence:

I believe in God, Father Almighty, Creator of heaven and earth…Was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended into hell – the third day, he arose again from the dead. He ascended into heaven, to sitteth at the right hand of God – the Father Almighty. Creator of heaven and earth. I believe in God, Father Almighty, creator of heaven and earth. And in Jesus Christ – his only son, Our Lord. Received Holy Ghost. Born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried….Blessed art Thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of Thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us now…

Their drug trip/experience is a disjointed, distorted, purposely chaotic sequence of images, painful memories and sounds. Wyatt overlaps the creed with his own crude ramblings and eventually ends up sobbing: « Oh Mother why didn’t you tell me? Why didn’t anybody tell me anything?…What are you doing to me now?…Shut up!…How could you make me hate you so?…Oh God, I hate you so much. » Both women take off their clothes and pose nude in the cemetery while Wyatt embraces one of the marble statues. They frolic throughout the crypts, but ultimately they all share a sour, bad trip together. Both Mary and Karen scream and sob: « I’m going to die. I’m dead…Do you understand?…Oh dear God, please let it be. Please help me conceive a child…I’m right out here out of my head…Please God, let me out of here. I want to get out of here…You know what I mean…You wanted me…You wanted me ugly didn’t you? I know you johns – I know you johns. »

Toward the end of their restless, nomadic odyssey, they leave New Orleans and ride on eastward to Florida, accompanied by « Flash, Bam, Pow » by The Electric Flag.

At another campfire, the fifth and final campire scene [in the last scene before the film’s climax], Wyatt and Billy exchange deep thoughts about the freedom they have found on their journey pursuing the big drug score – « the big money. » Their rootless, drifting pursuit of the American dream and the promise of sex, drugs, and rock ‘n’ roll has been questionably successful, dissatisfying, transitory and elusive. Billy is unaware of the cost of their trip to his own soul. Wyatt believes there may have been another less destructive, less diversionary, more spiritually fulfilling way to search for their freedom rather than selling hard drugs, taking to the road and being sidetracked, and wasting their lives:

Billy (gleefully greedy): We’ve done it. We’ve done it. We’re rich. Wyatt. (Laughs) Yeah, man. (Laughs) Yeah. Clearly, we did it, man we did it. We did it. Huh. We’re rich, man. We’re retired in Florida, now, mister. (Chuckles) Whew.
Wyatt (introspectively): You know, Billy? We blew it.
Billy: What? Huh? Wha-wha-wha- That’s what it’s all about, man. I mean, like you know – I mean, you go for the big money, man, and then you’re free. You dig? (Laughs)
Wyatt: We blew it. Good night, man.

On the road again the next morning to the sound of « It’s Alright Ma (I’m Only Bleeding) » (Bob Dylan’s tune sung by Roger McGuinn of the Byrds), they travel through more landscapes of America, scenes which reflect the regional diversity of the country and creeping industrial pollution.

The ending of the film is remarkably bleak, cynical and fatalistic. On one of the last stretches of roadside where American industry has not yet sprawled, two armed rednecks in a small pickup truck think they’ll have some fun with the two bikers:

Driver: Hey, Roy, look at them ginks!
Roy: Pull alongside, we’ll scare the hell out of ’em.

Roy reaches back and takes down his mounted shotgun from the back of the cab and aims it out the window at Billy:

Want me to blow your brains out? (Billy obscenely gestures with his ‘finger’) Why don’t you get a haircut?

A sudden shot-gun blasts Billy in the stomach and he is mortally wounded. His bike rolls and skids down the road. Wyatt stops and turns back toward Billy to help him:

Billy: Oh my God! (He gags)
Wyatt: Oh my God! I’m going for help Billy.
Billy: I got ’em. I’m gonna get ’em. (He sobs and moans)…Man, I-I’m gonna get ’em. Where are they now?

Middle America’s hatred for the long-haired cyclists is shown in the film’s famous ending. When Wyatt speeds down the road to seek help for his dying friend, the rednecks turn around and drive toward him – gunfire again blasts through the window and Wyatt’s bike flies through the air. [Significantly, Wyatt’s dead body doesn’t appear in the final scene.] The closing image (of the earlier flash-forward) is an aerial shot floating upwards above his motorcycle which is burning in flames by the side of the road. Death seems to be the only freedom or means to escape from the system in America where alternative lifestyles and idealism are despised as too challenging or free. The romance of the American highway is turned menacing and deadly.

The words of Ballad of Easy Rider (by Roger McGuinn of The Byrds) are heard under the rolling credits. The uneasy aerial camera shot pulls back on the winding river alongside the highway. The river – which extends to the hazy horizon – is the final image of the film before a fade-out to black. The ballad is about a man who only wanted to be free like the flowing river amidst America’s natural landscape:

The river flows, it flows to the sea
Wherever that river goes, that’s where I want to be
Flow river flow, let your waters wash down
Take me from this road to some other town
All I wanted was to be free
And that’s the way it turned out to be…

Voir par ailleurs:

« No Society » : l’essai au vitriol signé Christophe Guilluy
Le géographe prédit la fin de la classe moyenne occidentale. Et la poussée de vagues populistes générées par le système qui prétend la combattre
Philippe Belhache
Sud Ouest
25/10/2018

Faut-il brûler « No Society » ? La question se poserait presque, tant les réactions au brûlot de Christophe Guilluy sont parfois extrêmes, entre admiration béate et rejet affecté, récupération politique ou entreprise de décrédibilisation. L’auteur célébré de « La France périphérique », qui ouvrait sur une nouvelle appréhension de la société française, est aujourd’hui conspué par ceux qui l’ont jadis adoré. L’homme agace, il dérange. Il le sait, il en joue, brouille les cartes en refusant de débattre dans les colonnes de gauche du quotidien « Libération », répondant par ailleurs aux questions du pure player de droite Atlantico, alors même qu’il endosse le rôle de David face à ce Goliath protéiforme que représentent, pour lui, les élites.

L’homme agace, il dérange. Il le sait, il en joue, brouille les cartes

Christophe Guilluy est géographe. Mais son propos est ici tout autre. « No Society », ouvrage radical, volontiers polémiste, est sans ambiguïté un essai politique. Ce qui conduit les exégètes à s’interroger sur ses intentions. D’autant que ses travaux – qui ont permis de modéliser la montée du vote populiste en France sur la base du concept de France périphérique – sont récupérés par la quasi-totalité du champ politique, chacun en tirant les conclusions qui l’arrangent. À commencer par les mouvements d’extrême droite, qui y trouvent résonance à leurs théories, mais aussi à leur obsession complotiste.

Affirmé, répété, martelé

Que nous dit Christophe Guilluy ? Que la scission est aujourd’hui consommée entre une élite déconnectée et une classe populaire précarisée. Et que la classe moyenne, qu’il définit comme « une classe majoritaire dans laquelle tout le monde était intégré, de l’ouvrier au cadre », est un champ de ruines. Ce dernier point est affirmé, répété, martelé, « implosion d’un modèle qui n’intègre plus les classes populaires, qui constituaient, hier, le socle de la classe moyenne occidentale et en portait les valeurs».

Dès lors, les groupes sociaux en présence « ne font plus société ». C’est là le sens du titre, « No Society », reprise qui n’a rien d’innocente d’un aphorisme de feu la Première ministre britannique Margaret Thatcher – déjà responsable du célèbre Tina, « There is no alternative » –, dont la politique néolibérale agressive, véritable plan de casse sociale dans les années 1980, définit toujours le modèle outre-Manche.

Une nouvelle géographie

Guilluy se fait lanceur d’alerte. Il constate, à l’instar de l’économiste Thomas Piketty, dont il cite les travaux à plusieurs reprises, le fossé toujours plus large qui sépare les catégories les plus aisées, des classes défavorisées. Une situation qui induit une nouvelle géographie sociale et politique. Et explique, selon lui, l’insécurité culturelle s’ajoutant à l’insécurité sociale, la vague populiste qui balaie la France, la Grande-Bretagne, l’Italie, l’Allemagne, les États-Unis et aujourd’hui le Brésil. Pour l’auteur, comme pour d’autres analystes, l’élection de Trump n’est pas un accident, mais l’aboutissement d’un processus que les élites, drapées dans « un mépris de classe », auraient voulu renvoyer aux marges.

Ce qui fâche politiques, chefs d’entreprise et médias ? Cette propension à mettre tout le monde dans le même sac, tous complices de défendre, « au nom du bien commun », une idéologie néolibérale jugée destructrice. Et de masquer les vrais problèmes à l’aide d’éléments de langage. Guilluy conspue les 0,1 %, ces superpuissances économiques, tentées par l’anarcho-capitalisme, qui siphonnent les richesses mondiales. Tout comme il rejette la métropolisation des territoires, encouragée par l’Europe, qui tend à concentrer les créations d’emplois dans les zones urbaines, alors même que les classes populaires en sont rejetées par le coût du logement et une fiscalité dissuasive.

Effondrement du modèle intégrateur, ascenseur social en berne… Cette France à qui on demande de traverser la rue attend vainement, selon lui, que le feu repasse au vert pour elle. Guilluy la crédite cependant d’un « soft power », capacité, amplifiée par les réseaux sociaux, à remettre sur la table les sujets qui fâchent, ceux-là mêmes que les élites aimeraient conserver sous le tapis. Une donnée que les tribuns populistes, de droite comme de gauche, ont bien intégrée, s’en faisant complaisamment chambre d’écho.

« No Society. La fin de la classe moyenne occidentale », de Christophe Guilluy, éd. Flammarion, 240 p., 18 €.

Voir encore:

Trump’s poll ratings are better than Macron’s, after a year. Why?

The Guardian

A little over a year after coming to power, Emmanuel Macron is turning out to be just another run-of-the-mill disappointing French president. Like his predecessors, he has seen his popularity nosedive among his political base. This “Jupiter”, who embodied newness, youth and modernity, is now bogged down in forced reshuffles and goings-on that look very much like old-fashioned political manoeuvrings. Worse, despite claiming he would lead France to become the “start-up nation”, economic performance is poor. Growth is stagnant, unemployment isn’t falling and poverty is taking a firm hold. The disappointment is all the more acute because of the expectations Macron raised among those who rejected populism in favour of a candidate who both stood for good sense and could run the economy.

This turn of events isn’t just worrying for Macron, it’s worrying for those in Europe’s pro-globalisation camp who placed their faith in him to halt the wave of populism sweeping the western world. For them, after the twin shocks of the UK’s Brexit vote and Donald Trump’s election in the United States, Macron simply must succeed. The slide in his popularity – Macron is now more unpopular than his predecessor, François Hollande, at the same stage – is a dire warning to “globalists”. It comes at a time when Trump’s popularity among his voters is relatively stable by comparison and the American economy is growing. Macron’s fate could have far-reaching consequences for Europe’s political future.

What makes the contrast between Trump’s and Macron’s fortunes so striking is that the two presidents have so much in common. Both found electoral success by breaking free of their own side: Macron from the left and Trump from mainstream Republicanism; they both moved beyond the old left-right divide. Both realised that we were seeing the disappearance of the old western middle class.

Both grasped that, for the first time in history, the working people who make up the solid base of the lower middle classes live, for the most part, in regions that now generate the fewest jobs. It is in the small or middling towns and vast stretches of farmland that skilled workers, the low-waged, small farmers and the self-employed are concentrated. These are the regions in which the future of western democracy will be decided.

But the similarities end there. While Trump was elected by people in the heartlands of the American rustbelt states, Macron built his electoral momentum in the big globalised cities. While the French president is aware that social ties are weakening in the regions, he believes that the solution is to speed up reform to bring the country into line with the requirements of the global economy. Trump, by contrast, concluded that globalisation was the problem, and that the economic model it is based on would have to be reined in (through protectionism, limits on free trade agreements, controls on immigration, and spending on vast public infrastructure building) to create jobs in the deindustrialised parts of the US.

It could be said that to some extent both presidents are implementing the policies they were elected to pursue. Yet, while Trump’s voters seem satisfied, Macron’s appear frustrated. Why is there such a difference? This has as much to do with the kind of voters involved as the way the two presidents operate politically.

Trump speaks to voters who constitute a continuum, that of the old middle class. It is a body of voters with clearly expressed demands – most call for the creation of jobs, but they also want the preservation of their social and cultural model. Macron’s problem, on the other hand, is that his electorate consists of different elements that are hard to keep together.

The idea that Macron was elected just by the big city “winners” isn’t accurate: he also attracted the support of many older voters who are not especially receptive to the economic and societal changes the president’s revolution demands.This holds true throughout Europe. Those who support globalisation often tend to forget a vital fact: the people who vote for them aren’t just the ones on the winning side in the globalisation stakes or part of the new, cool bourgeoisie in Paris, London or New York, but are a much more heterogeneous group, many of whom are sceptical about the effects of globalisation. In France, for example, most of Macron’s support came in the first instance from the ranks of pensioners and public sector workers who had been largely shielded from the effects of globalisation.

They may dislike populism, but that doesn’t mean they have been won round to globalisation. It is among pensioners that the president’s popularity has fallen most dramatically over recent months. The Benalla scandal, when a presidential bodyguard beat up a leftwing protester, has tarnished his image. But Macron’s ratings were damaged much more by the first round of reforms he embarked on. These measures include an additional tax burden on pensioners and an overhaul of the rights of public sector workers.

So, while Trump appears to be delivering what his voters want, Macron is pushing through more and more measures that go against the wishes of his.

These developments are an illustration of the political difficulty that Europe’s globalising class now finds itself in. From Angela Merkel to Macron, the advocates of globalisation are now relying on voters who cling to a social model that held sway during the three decades of postwar economic growth. Thus their determination to accelerate the adaptation of western societies to globalisation automatically condemns them to political unpopularity. Locked away in their metropolitan citadels, they fail to see that their electoral programmes no longer meet the concerns of more than a tiny minority of the population – or worse, of their own voters.

They are on the wrong track if they think that the “deplorables” in the deindustrialised states of the US or the struggling regions of France will soon die out. Throughout the west, people in “peripheral” regions still make up the bulk of the population. Like it or not, these areas continue to represent the electoral heartlands of western democracies. By ignoring them, those who promote global economic solutions are deliberately shunning any meaningful involvement in politics. They limit themselves to supporting and managing implementation of the globalised economic model. With opinion polarising as it is now, such political passivity is suicidal. In France, voters are looking to President Macron to show that he can drive the political agenda, not just be a supporting actor to a movement that only benefits a minority. Macron promised to lead a “revolution” (the title of the book setting out his programme) but that has to be done through, and with, the forgotten regions of France – in other words through society itself.

Christophe Guilluy is the author of Twilight of the Elites: Prosperity, Periphery and the Future of France

Voir de plus:

Mark Lilla, procureur de la gauche multiculturelle
L’historien américain s’attire les foudres des démocrates aux Etats-Unis en dénonçant l’«idéologie de la diversité». Portrait d’une figure transgressive de la vie intellectuelle outre-Atlantique.
Simon Blin
Libération
11 octobre 2018

Bientôt deux ans après la défaite de Hillary Clinton face à Donald Trump, l’heure est au réglement de compte chez les démocrates américains, où le deuil de l’ère Obama semble encore lourd à porter. Une phase de reconstruction intellectuelle et politique dans laquelle Mark Lilla, historien des idées et professeur à Columbia University, détonne par l’âpreté de son propos, nettement plus conservateur que celui de ses congénères opposants à Trump classés à gauche – citons, entre autres, l’historien Timothy Snyder, le journaliste Ta-Nehisi Coates ou le politologue Yascha Mounk.

Dix jours à peine après l’élection de Trump, Lilla publie une tribune dans le New York Times, où il étrille la célébration univoque de la diversité par l’élite intellectuelle progressiste comme principale cause de sa défaite face à Trump. «Ces dernières années, la gauche américaine a cédé, à propos des identités ethniques, de genre et de sexualité, à une sorte d’hystérie collective qui a faussé son message au point de l’empêcher de devenir une force fédératrice capable de gouverner […], estime-t-il. Une des nombreuses leçons à tirer de la présidentielle américaine et de son résultat détestable, c’est qu’il faut clore l’ère de la gauche diversitaire.»

«Dérive».
De cette diatribe à succès, l’universitaire a fait un livre tout aussi polémique, The Once and Future Liberal. After Identity Politics, dont la traduction française vient d’être publiée sous le titre la Gauche identitaire. L’Amérique en miettes (Stock). Un ouvrage provocateur destiné à sonner l’alerte contre le «tournant identitaire» pris par le Parti démocrate sous l’influence des «idéologues de campus», «ces militants qui ne savent plus parler que de leur différence.» «Une vision politique large a été remplacée par une pseudo-politique et une rhétorique typiquement américaine du moi sensible qui lutte pour être reconnu», développe Lilla. Dans son viseur : les mouvements féministes, gays, indigènes ou afro comme Black Lives Matter («le meilleur moyen de ne pas construire de solidarité»). Bref, tout ce qui est minoritaire et qui s’exprime à coups d’occupation de places publiques, de pétitions et de tribunes dans les journaux est fautif à ses yeux d’avoir fragmenté la gauche américaine.

L’essayiste situe l’origine de cette «dérive» idéologique au début des années 70, lorsque la Nouvelle Gauche interprète «à l’envers» la formule «le privé est politique», considérant que tout acte politique n’est rien d’autre qu’une activité personnelle. Ce «culte de l’identité» et des «particularismes» issus de la révolution culturelle et morale des Sixties a convergé avec les révolutions économiques sous l’ère Reagan pour devenir «l’idéologie dominante.» «La politique identitaire, c’est du reaganisme pour gauchiste», résume cet adepte de la «punchline» idéologico-politique.

Intellectuel au profil hybride, combattant à la fois la pensée conservatrice et la pensée progressiste, Lilla agace plus à gauche qu’à droite où sa dénonciation de «l’idéologie de la diversité», de «ses limites» et «ses dangers» est perçue comme l’expression ultime d’un identitarisme masculin blanc. Positionnement transgressif qu’on ferait volontiers graviter du côté de la «nouvelle réaction», ce qu’il réfute.

A Paris, loin de la tempête médiatique new-yorkaise, chez son éditeur au cœur du Quartier latin, costume bleu marine d’intello-worldwide en promo et lunettes noires cerclées posées sur un visage imberbe, il se définit comme «liberal, centrist» (un «modéré de gauche», dirait-on en France). On lit aussi dans le New Yorker «démocrate à col bleu», ces «travailleurs» d’ateliers, usiniers et ouvriers du Midwest, frappés de plein fouet par la crise économique et oubliés par le Parti démocrate durant la présidentielle de 2016. Refusant toute étiquette, il revendique une «posture républicaine» et «universaliste», rêvant pour son pays d’un républicanisme à la française, intransigeant et farouchement laïque. De ce point de vue là, Mark Lilla est l’anti-Joan Scott, son homologue américaine, elle aussi francophile, dont le dernier livre la Religion de la laïcité (Flammarion) épingle a contrario l’utilisation «évolutive, opportuniste et de circonstance» de ce concept en France au nom de l’égalité entre les sexes.

Champ.
L’essai de Lilla peut se lire comme un avertissement lancé à la gauche intellectuelle française, aujourd’hui divisée entre «républicanistes» et «décoloniaux». Un signal à prendre au sérieux de la part d’une sommité académique qui connaît bien la France. Entre 1988 et 1990, le chercheur pose ses valises à Paris, où il fait la rencontre du cercle universitaire entourant François Furet, alors directeur du Centre d’études sociologiques et politiques Raymond-Aron. Décidément bien inspiré par la critique de la modernité, il publie en 1994 New French Thought. Political Philosophy, un recueil de textes consacré à la nouvelle pensée française façonnée par Marcel Gauchet, Luc Ferry ou Alain Renaut.

Plus globalement, Lilla est connu dans le champ intellectuel pour le regard neuf qu’il porte sur la pensée européenne. En 1993, son essai sur Giambattista Vico, G.B. Vico. The Making of an Antimodern, lui offre ses premières bribes de notoriété. «Lilla a pris le contre-pied des travaux de l’époque sur Vico, se souvient Alain Pons, spécialiste du philosophe italien, rencontré à Paris au début des années 90. Contrairement à la conception dominante qui place Vico dans la lignée d’un idéalisme hégélien, il a su déceler chez lui un fond à contre-courant des Lumières. Lecture inédite.»

Celui qui contribue à faire connaître Michel Houellebecq outre-Atlantique, «un écrivain qui dit la vérité sur la réalité», tient ce rôle d’entremetteur entre les deux continents. «C’est sa grande force, pointe le politologue et ex-compagnon de route parisien Philippe Raynaud. Contrairement à ses compatriotes, il ne s’intéresse pas exclusivement à ce qui est anglo-saxon. Il a sur la France un regard compréhensif.» Seule ombre au tableau de ses amitiés franco-américaines, une relation contrariée avec le philosophe Pierre Manent, qui a refusé poliment de répondre à nos questions. Leur lien se serait distendu après que Lilla a critiqué ses positions catholiques conservatrices dans la New York Review of Books. Quand ce n’est pas à son goût, ami ou pas, Lilla allume. «C’est un esprit indépendant, témoigne l’historien Marcel Gauchet, autre membre du centre Aron. Ce qui n’est pas forcément bien vu dans les milieux universitaires.»

Si son livre a reçu un accueil chaleureux dans la presse française, l’américaniste Denis Lacorne craint qu’il ne soit «mal lu, donc mal compris»,même s’il reconnaît à Lilla quelques «prises de positions musclées». Quitte à frôler l’injure à son propre public. Comme lorsqu’il dit que les étudiants de gauche s’intéressent plus à leur nombril qu’au reste du monde. «Une insulte à ses étudiants ? Je ne pense pas, réagit Lacorne. Lilla fait état d’une certaine difficulté de l’enseignement aux Etats-Unis. En retour, c’est lui qu’on traite de supremaciste blanc !»

Mark Lilla est blanc, il a 62 ans. Né à Detroit, père ouvrier chez Chevrolet et mère infirmière. Installée près de la frontière avec le Canada, sa famille est à l’entendre «un îlot progressiste» au milieu d’«un océan d’ouvriers blancs racistes.» Voir la classe ouvrière des années 60 sombrer dans sa version white trash pré-Trump lui fait dire : «Le racisme, je le connais mieux que mes étudiants noirs et pour la plupart tous bourgeois.» Pour payer ses études, Lilla fait éboueur «à l’arrière du camion-poubelle». Il obtient une bourse de l’université du Michigan et s’envole pour Harvard. Son entrée dans l’élite universitaire coïncide avec la fin de son époque «Jesus Freak», «ces hippies qui lisaient la Bible au lieu de fumer des joints». Sa rencontre avec le sociologue Daniel Bell, en 1979, le délivre pour de bon de l’emprise de la religion. «J’émergeais tout juste des brumes du fanatisme pentecôtiste, qui avait assombri mon adolescence, écrit-il en 2011 dans le trimestriel conservateur Commentaire […]. J’ai appris que ce que les convertis cherchent dans la foi est la chaleur.»

Autorité
A la longue, Lilla montre des occurrences biograhiques le baladant plus du côté des conservateurs que des réseaux intellectuels progressistes. C’est bien de cette facette et de son nouvel habit de pamphlétaire dont il est question depuis la parution de son essai. Le polémiste se serait-il substitué au chercheur à l’autorité planétaire ? «Il est ni plus ni moins polémique qu’avant, corrige Raynaud. Ce n’est pas un livre polémique mais un livre sur lequel on polémique. Mark Lilla se situe entièrement à l’intérieur de la gauche. Il veut son retour aux affaires en 2020.» L’intéressé assure que son essai est un «rappel à l’ordre» pour «renouer avec l’ambition d’un avenir commun.» On voudrait déclarer la guerre des gauches, qu’on ne s’y prendrait pas autrement.

Voir enfin:

Dominique Reynié : « Il n’y a pas de demande de repli nationaliste, mais de protection »

Alain Barluet

INTERVIEW – Professeur des universités à Sciences Po, directeur général de la Fondation pour l’innovation politique, Dominique ­Reynié analyse pour Le Figaro les frac­tures européennes.

LE FIGARO.- L’Europe est-elle aujourd’hui menacée d’implosion par les nationalismes?

Dominique REYNIÉ.- Notre situation est parfaitement paradoxale. Jamais les ennemis de l’Union européenne n’ont eu à ce point le sentiment de toucher au but, de presque en voir la fin, et cependant jamais, je le crois, les peuples d’Europe n’ont été plus sérieusement, plus gravement attachés à l’Union. Quel malentendu! Voilà bien l’un des plus fâcheux résultats de notre incapacité à discuter, de notre nouvelle inclination pour la simplification à outrance des points de vue. L’hypothèse d’un repli nationaliste procède d’une erreur d’interprétation.

Il n’y a pas de demande de repli nationaliste, mais une demande de protection, de régulation politique, de contrôle du cours des choses. C’est une demande de puissance publique qui ne heurte pas l’idée européenne. C’est en refusant de répondre à cette demande éminemment légitime et recevable que l’Union finira par conduire les Européens à revenir, la mort dans l’âme, au dogme nationaliste.

Quelles sont les principales causes des fractures européennes actuelles?

Il existe bien sûr des causes particulières à chacune de nos nations. Mais les causes communes dominent et c’est l’autre face du paradoxe, puisque ces causes, en tant qu’elles sont continentales, qu’elles nous sont communes, devraient nous fournir la matière d’un nouveau grand dessein européen. Considérons ici notre crise démographique. Chaque année, il y a en Europe plus de décès que de naissances. Pas une nation du continent n’est épargnée par ce terrible déficit. Les conséquences sont immenses, sur nos capacités économiques, scientifiques, militaires, sur nos budgets, etc.

Notre crise démographique est-elle la réponse des peuples européens à la question de leur rôle dans la nouvelle histoire? Ce ne sont pas les États qui font des enfants. Et ce n’est pas à coups d’incitations fiscales ou de médailles nationales que nous corrigerons cela. À l’échelle de l’histoire, il n’y a pas de plus pure démonstration de force que la démographie. On peut refuser le multiculturalisme, mais que vaut une culture nationale qui n’engendre plus de vivants? Notre perte de vitalité dans un monde bouillonnant est l’une des grandes causes du malaise européen, des peuples et de leurs États.

«Nous devons accepter cet attachement viscéral des Européens à leur patrimoine immatériel, leur manière de vivre, leur souveraineté, parfois si récente ou retrouvée depuis si peu et si chèrement payée»

Quel rôle a joué Trump?

Les Européens observent Trump. Ils ne l’aiment pas, mais ils le comprennent. Ils voient un chef d’État qui affirme la primauté de son pays et de son peuple. Trump marque le retour d’une figure classique mais oubliée chez nous, celle de l’homme d’État qui n’a d’intérêt que pour son pays. Il assume une politique de puissance. On verra ses résultats. Mais on ne doute pas que cette politique le conduirait à sacrifier l’intérêt européen s’il le fallait, et même les intérêts du monde. L’abandon des accords de Paris sur le climat a été une réussite de ce point de vue: c’est l’affirmation éclatante du retour à une politique égoïste sans fard. C’est la réponse à un monde que les démocraties ne dominent plus.

Les Européens regardent Trump comme ils regardent Xi Jinping: impossible de les aimer puisqu’ils sont redoutables et qu’ils jettent sur nous des regards de prédateurs. C’est bel et bien conscients de cela, de la faiblesse de leurs moyens s’ils avaient l’idée d’agir séparément, que les Européens restent attachés à l’Union, notre dernière condition pour survivre dans la grande bataille des politiques de puissance qui a commencé. Les Américains font ce qu’ils ont à faire pour eux-mêmes. À nous, les Européens, de faire ce qu’il nous revient de faire pour nous-mêmes, voilà ce que cherchent à dire aujourd’hui les Européens.

Macron a-t-il raison de souligner le clivage avec l’Europe de l’Est?

C’est un risque politique, sur le plan national comme sur le plan européen. Le risque peut être gagnant si le vote populiste, qui menace l’Union, amorce un reflux lors des élections européennes. À ce jour, ce n’est pas le plus probable. Mais on peut obtenir un résultat combinant une défaite européenne et une victoire nationale, si la liste LaREM termine en tête. La double défaite signifierait a posteriori l’imprudence du pari et pèserait sur les deux niveaux, européen et national en affaiblissant dangereusement le président.

Quelles pistes pour «réduire» les fractures européennes?

Du côté des gouvernements, cessons de surjouer l’opposition frontale. Elle est spectaculaire, médiatique, elle frappe les esprits. Autant l’Europe, avec son langage hermétique et ses représentants extraterritorialisés, ne sait jamais expliquer les bénéfices qu’elle permet pourtant, autant elle met en scène avec brio ses disputes. Les effets sont désastreux. Hélas, le retour de la modération n’aura pas lieu avant les européennes, ces excès étant supposés favoriser la mobilisation des bataillons électoraux. Il y a une impérieuse nécessité à mieux se comprendre. Orban et ses amis doivent comprendre que le respect des principes et des procédures qui fondent l’État de droit démocratique est au cœur du projet politique européen, il n’est pas négociable. Mais nous aussi nous devons accepter cet attachement viscéral des Européens à leur patrimoine immatériel, leur manière de vivre, leur souveraineté, parfois si récente ou retrouvée depuis si peu et si chèrement payée.

Publicités

« Zoos humains »: Arte invente la théorie du complot pour tous (It’s domination and racism, stupid ! – From commercial ethnological to colonial and missionary exhibitions, looking back at the very problematic indiscriminate use of the concept of the “human zoo”)

30 septembre, 2018

bal negre

Poster of an ethnological exposition in 1885 (picture-alliance/akg-images)

dawnraffelbookcover9780399175749.jpg

Theodor Wonja Michael's parents (Familie Michael)

Malheur à vous, scribes et pharisiens hypocrites! parce que vous bâtissez les tombeaux des prophètes et ornez les sépulcres des justes, et que vous dites: Si nous avions vécu du temps de nos pères, nous ne nous serions pas joints à eux pour répandre le sang des prophètes. Vous témoignez ainsi contre vous-mêmes que vous êtes les fils de ceux qui ont tué les prophètes. Jésus (Matthieu 23: 29-31)
Ne croyez pas que je sois venu apporter la paix sur la terre; je ne suis pas venu apporter la paix, mais l’épée. Car je suis venu mettre la division entre l’homme et son père, entre la fille et sa mère, entre la belle-fille et sa belle-mère; et l’homme aura pour ennemis les gens de sa maison. Jésus (Matthieu 10 : 34-36)
Il n’y a plus ni Juif ni Grec, il n’y a plus ni esclave ni libre, il n’y a plus ni homme ni femme; car tous vous êtes un en Jésus Christ. Paul (Galates 3: 28)
Je pense qu’il y a plus de barbarie à manger un homme vivant qu’à le manger mort, à déchirer par tourments et par géhennes un corps encore plein de sentiment, le faire rôtir par le menu, le faire mordre et meurtrir aux chiens et aux pourceaux (comme nous l’avons non seulement lu, mais vu de fraîche mémoire, non entre des ennemis anciens, mais entre des voisins et concitoyens, et, qui pis est, sous prétexte de piété et de religion), que de le rôtir et manger après qu’il est trépassé. Il ne faut pas juger à l’aune de nos critères. (…) Je trouve… qu’il n’y a rien de barbare et de sauvage en cette nation, à ce qu’on m’en a rapporté, sinon que chacun appelle barbarie ce qui n’est pas de son usage. (…) Leur guerre est toute noble et généreuse, et a autant d’excuse et de beauté que cette maladie humaine en peut recevoir ; elle n’a d’autre fondement parmi eux que la seule jalousie de la vertu… Ils ne demandent à leurs prisonniers autre rançon que la confession et reconnaissance d’être vaincus ; mais il ne s’en trouve pas un, en tout un siècle, qui n’aime mieux la mort que de relâcher, ni par contenance, ni de parole, un seul point d’une grandeur de courage invincible ; il ne s’en voit aucun qui n’aime mieux être tué et mangé, que de requérir seulement de ne l’être pas. Ils les traitent en toute liberté, afin que la vie leur soit d’autant plus chère ; et les entretiennent communément des menaces de leur mort future, des tourments qu’ils y auront à souffrir, des apprêts qu’on dresse pour cet effet, du détranchement de leurs membres et du festin qui se fera à leurs dépens. Tout cela se fait pour cette seule fin d’arracher de leur bouche parole molle ou rabaissée, ou de leur donner envie de s’enfuir, pour gagner cet avantage de les avoir épouvantés, et d’avoir fait force à leur constance. Car aussi, à le bien prendre, c’est en ce seul point que consiste la vraie victoire. Montaigne
Etrange destinée, étrange préférence que celle de l’ethnographe, sinon de l’anthropologue, qui s’intéresse aux hommes des antipodes plutôt qu’à ses compatriotes, aux superstitions et aux mœurs les plus déconcertantes plutôt qu’aux siennes, comme si je ne sais quelle pudeur ou prudence l’en dissuadait au départ. Si je n’étais pas convaincu que les lumières de la psychanalyse sont fort douteuses, je me demanderais quel ressentiment se trouve sublimé dans cette fascination du lointain, étant bien entendu que refoulement et sublimation, loin d’entraîner de ma part quelque condamnation ou condescendance, me paraissent dans la plupart des cas authentiquement créateurs. (…) Peut-être cette sympathie fondamentale, indispensable pour le sérieux même du travail de l’ethnographe, celui-ci n’a-t-il aucun mal à l’acquérir. Il souffre plutôt d’un défaut symétrique de l’hostilité vulgaire que je relevais il y a un instant. Dès le début, Hérodote n’est pas avare d’éloges pour les Scythes, ni Tacite pour les Germains, dont il oppose complaisamment les vertus à la corruption impériale. Quoique évoque du Chiapas, Las Casas me semble plus occupé à défendre les Indiens qu’à les convertir. Il compare leur civilisation avec celle de l’antiquité gréco-latine et lui donne l’avantage. Les idoles, selon lui, résultent de l’obligation de recourir à des symboles communs à tous les fidèles. Quant aux sacrifices humains, explique-t-il, il ne convient pas de s’y opposer par la force, car ils témoignent de la grande et sincère piété des Mexicains qui, dans l’ignorance où ils se trouvent de la crucifixion du Sauveur, sont bien obligés de lui inventer un équivalent qui n’en soit pas indigne. Je ne pense pas que l’esprit missionnaire explique entièrement un parti-pris de compréhension, que rien ne rebute. La croyance au bon sauvage est peut-être congénitale de l’ethnologie. (…) Nous avons eu les oreilles rebattues de la sagesse des Chinois, inventant la poudre sans s’en servir que pour les feux d’artifice. Certes. Mais, d’une part l’Occident a connu lui aussi la poudre sans longtemps l’employer pour la guerre. Au IXe siècle, le Livre des Feux, de Marcus Graecus en contient déjà la formule ; il faudra attendre plusieurs centaines d’années pour son utilisation militaire, très exactement jusqu’à l’invention de la bombarde, qui permet d’en exploiter la puissance de déflagration. Quant aux Chinois, dès qu’ils ont connu les canons, ils en ont été acheteurs très empressés, avant qu’ils n’en fabriquent eux-mêmes, d’abord avec l’aide d’ingénieurs européens. Dans l’Afrique contemporaine, seule la pauvreté ralentit le remplacement du pilon par les appareils ménagers fabriqués à Saint-Étienne ou à Milan. Mais la misère n’interdit pas l’invasion des récipients en plastique au détriment des poteries et des vanneries traditionnelles. Les plus élégantes des coquettes Foulbé se vêtent de cotonnades imprimées venues des Pays-Bas ou du Japon. Le même phénomène se produit d’ailleurs de façon encore plus accélérée dans la civilisation scientifique et industrielle, béate d’admiration devant toute mécanique nouvelle et ordinateur à clignotants. (…) Je déplore autant qu’un autre la disparition progressive d’un tel capital d’art, de finesse, d’harmonie. Mais je suis tout aussi impuissant contre les avantages du béton et de l’électricité. Je ne me sens d’ailleurs pas le courage d’expliquer leur privilège à ceux qui en manquent. (…) Les indigènes ne se résignent pas à demeurer objets d’études et de musées, parfois habitants de réserves où l’on s’ingénie à les protéger du progrès. Étudiants, boursiers, ouvriers transplantés, ils n’ajoutent guère foi à l’éloquence des tentateurs, car ils en savent peu qui abandonnent leur civilisation pour cet état sauvage qu’ils louent avec effusion. Ils n’ignorent pas que ces savants sont venus les étudier avec sympathie, compréhension, admiration, qu’ils ont partagé leur vie. Mais la rancune leur suggère que leurs hôtes passagers étaient là d’abord pour écrire une thèse, pour conquérir un diplôme, puisqu’ils sont retournés enseigner à leurs élèves les coutumes étranges, « primitives », qu’ils avaient observées, et qu’ils ont retrouvé là-bas du même coup auto, téléphone, chauffage central, réfrigérateur, les mille commodités que la technique traîne après soi. Dès lors, comment ne pas être exaspéré d’entendre ces bons apôtres vanter les conditions de félicité rustique, d’équilibre et de sagesse simple que garantit l’analphabétisme ? Éveillées à des ambitions neuves, les générations qui étudient et qui naguère étaient étudiées, n’écoutent pas sans sarcasme ces discours flatteurs où ils croient reconnaître l’accent attendri des riches, quand ils expliquent aux pauvres que l’argent ne fait pas le bonheur, – encore moins, sans doute, ne le font les ressources de la civilisation industrielle. À d’autres. Roger Caillois (1974)
Le monde moderne n’est pas mauvais : à certains égards, il est bien trop bon. Il est rempli de vertus féroces et gâchées. Lorsqu’un dispositif religieux est brisé (comme le fut le christianisme pendant la Réforme), ce ne sont pas seulement les vices qui sont libérés. Les vices sont en effet libérés, et ils errent de par le monde en faisant des ravages ; mais les vertus le sont aussi, et elles errent plus férocement encore en faisant des ravages plus terribles. Le monde moderne est saturé des vieilles vertus chrétiennes virant à la folie.  G.K. Chesterton
L’inauguration majestueuse de l’ère « post-chrétienne » est une plaisanterie. Nous sommes dans un ultra-christianisme caricatural qui essaie d’échapper à l’orbite judéo-chrétienne en « radicalisant » le souci des victimes dans un sens antichrétien. René Girard
Nous sommes encore proches de cette période des grandes expositions internationales qui regardait de façon utopique la mondialisation comme l’Exposition de Londres – la « Fameuse » dont parle Dostoievski, les expositions de Paris… Plus on s’approche de la vraie mondialisation plus on s’aperçoit que la non-différence ce n’est pas du tout la paix parmi les hommes mais ce peut être la rivalité mimétique la plus extravagante. On était encore dans cette idée selon laquelle on vivait dans le même monde: on n’est plus séparé par rien de ce qui séparait les hommes auparavant donc c’est forcément le paradis. Ce que voulait la Révolution française. Après la nuit du 4 août, plus de problème ! René Girard
Nous sommes entrés dans un mouvement qui est de l’ordre du religieux. Entrés dans la mécanique du sacrilège : la victime, dans nos sociétés, est entourée de l’aura du sacré. Du coup, l’écriture de l’histoire, la recherche universitaire, se retrouvent soumises à l’appréciation du législateur et du juge comme, autrefois, à celle de la Sorbonne ecclésiastique. Françoise Chandernagor
Malgré le titre général, en effet, dès l’article 1, seules la traite transatlantique et la traite qui, dans l’océan Indien, amena des Africains à l’île Maurice et à la Réunion sont considérées comme « crime contre l’humanité ». Ni la traite et l’esclavage arabes, ni la traite interafricaine, pourtant très importants et plus étalés dans le temps puisque certains ont duré jusque dans les années 1980 (au Mali et en Mauritanie par exemple), ne sont concernés. Le crime contre l’humanité qu’est l’esclavage est réduit, par la loi Taubira, à l’esclavage imposé par les Européens et à la traite transatlantique. (…) Faute d’avoir le droit de voter, comme les Parlements étrangers, des « résolutions », des voeux, bref des bonnes paroles, le Parlement français, lorsqu’il veut consoler ou faire plaisir, ne peut le faire que par la loi. (…) On a l’impression que la France se pose en gardienne de la mémoire universelle et qu’elle se repent, même à la place d’autrui, de tous les péchés du passé. Je ne sais si c’est la marque d’un orgueil excessif ou d’une excessive humilité mais, en tout cas, c’est excessif ! […] Ces lois, déjà votées ou proposées au Parlement, sont dangereuses parce qu’elles violent le droit et, parfois, l’histoire. La plupart d’entre elles, déjà, violent délibérément la Constitution, en particulier ses articles 34 et 37. (…) les parlementaires savent qu’ils violent la Constitution mais ils n’en ont cure. Pourquoi ? Parce que l’organe chargé de veiller au respect de la Constitution par le Parlement, c’est le Conseil constitutionnel. Or, qui peut le saisir ? Ni vous, ni moi : aucun citoyen, ni groupe de citoyens, aucun juge même, ne peut saisir le Conseil constitutionnel, et lui-même ne peut pas s’autosaisir. Il ne peut être saisi que par le président de la République, le Premier ministre, les présidents des Assemblées ou 60 députés. (…) La liberté d’expression, c’est fragile, récent, et ce n’est pas total : il est nécessaire de pouvoir punir, le cas échéant, la diffamation et les injures raciales, les incitations à la haine, l’atteinte à la mémoire des morts, etc. Tout cela, dans la loi sur la presse de 1881 modifiée, était poursuivi et puni bien avant les lois mémorielles. Françoise Chandernagor
La tendance à légiférer sur le passé (…) est née des procédures lancées, dans les années 1970, contre d’anciens nazis et collaborateurs ayant participé à l’extermination des juifs. Celles-ci utilisaient pour la première fois l’imprescriptibilité des crimes contre l’humanité, votée en 1964. Elles devaient aboutir aux procès Barbie, Touvier et Papon. (…) L’innovation juridique des « procès pour la mémoire » se justifiait, certes, par l’importance et la singularité du génocide des juifs, dont la signification n’est apparue que deux générations plus tard. Elle exprimait cependant un changement radical dans la place que nos sociétés assignent à l’histoire, dont on n’a pas fini de prendre la mesure. Ces procès ont soulevé la question de savoir si, un demi-siècle après, les juges étaient toujours « contemporains » des faits incriminés. Ils ont montré à quel point la culture de la mémoire avait pris le pas, non seulement sur les politiques de l’oubli qui émergent après une guerre ou une guerre civile, afin de permettre une reconstruction, mais aussi sur la connaissance historique elle-même. L’illusion est ici de croire que la « mémoire » fabrique de l’identité sociale, qu’elle donne accès à la connaissance. Comment peut-on se souvenir de ce que l’on ignore, les historiens ayant précisément pour fonction, non de « remémorer » des faits, des acteurs, des processus du passé, mais bien de les établir ? Dans le cas du génocide des juifs, dans celui des Arméniens ou dans le cas de la guerre d’Algérie, encore pouvons-nous avoir le sentiment que ces faits appartiennent toujours au temps présent — que l’on soit ou non favorable aux « repentances ». L’identification reste possible de victimes précises, directes ou indirectes, et de bourreaux singuliers, individus ou Etats, à qui l’on peut demander réparation. Mais comment peut-on prétendre agir de la même manière sur des faits vieux de plusieurs siècles ? Comment penser sérieusement que l’on peut « réparer » les dommages causés par la traite négrière « à partir du XVe siècle » de la même manière que les crimes nazis, dont certains bourreaux habitent encore au coin de la rue ? (…) Pourquoi (…) promulguer une loi à seule fin rétroactive s’il n’y a aucune possibilité d’identifier des bourreaux, encore moins de les traîner devant un tribunal ? Pourquoi devons-nous être à ce point tributaires d’un passé qui nous est aussi étranger ? Pourquoi cette volonté d’abolir la distance temporelle et de proclamer que les crimes d’il y a quatre siècles ont des effets encore opérants ? Pourquoi cette réduction de l’histoire à la seule dimension criminelle et mortifère ? Et comment croire que les valeurs de notre temps sont à ce point estimables qu’elles puissent ainsi s’appliquer à tout ce qui nous a précédés ? En réalité, la plupart de ces initiatives relèvent de la surenchère politique. Elles sont la conséquence de la place que la plupart des pays démocratiques ont accordée au souvenir de la Shoah, érigé en symbole universel de la lutte contre toutes les formes de racisme. A l’évidence, le caractère universel de la démarche échappe à beaucoup. La mémoire de la Shoah est ainsi devenue un modèle jalousé, donc, à la fois, récusé et imitable : d’où l’urgence de recourir à la notion anachronique de crime contre l’humanité pour des faits vieux de trois ou quatre cents ans. Le passé n’est ici qu’un substitut, une construction artificielle — et dangereuse —, puisque le groupe n’est plus défini par une filiation passée ou une condition sociale présente, mais par un lien « historique » élaboré après coup, pour isoler une nouvelle catégorie à offrir à la compassion publique. Enfin, cette faiblesse s’exprime, une fois de plus, par un recours paradoxal à l’Etat, voie habituelle, en France, pour donner consistance à une « communauté » au sein de la nation. Sommé d’assumer tous les méfaits du passé, l’Etat se retrouve en même temps source du crime et source de rédemption. Outre la contradiction, cette « continuité » semble dire que l’histoire ne serait qu’un bloc, la diversité et l’évolution des hommes et des idées, une simple vue de l’esprit, et l’Etat, le seul garant d’une nouvelle histoire officielle « vertueuse ». C’est là une conception pour le moins réactionnaire de la liberté et du progrès. Henry Rousso
La loi (…) « portant reconnaissance de la nation et contribution nationale en faveur des Français rapatriés » risque, surtout en ses articles 1 et 4, de relancer une polémique dans laquelle les historiens ne se reconnaîtront guère. En officialisant le point de vue de groupes de mémoire liés à la colonisation, elle risque de générer en retour des simplismes symétriques, émanant de groupes de mémoire antagonistes, dont l' »histoire officielle » , telle que l’envisage cette loi, fait des exclus de l’histoire. Car, si les injonctions « colonialophiles » de la loi ne sont pas recevables, le discours victimisant ordinaire ne l’est pas davantage, ne serait-ce que parce qu’il permet commodément de mettre le mouchoir sur tant d’autres ignominies, actuelles ou anciennes, et qui ne sont pas forcément du ressort originel de l’impérialisme ou de ses formes historiques passées comme le(s) colonialisme(s). L’étude scientifique du passé ne peut se faire sous la coupe d’une victimisation et d’un culpabilisme corollaire. De ce point de vue, les débordements émotionnels portés par les »indigènes de la République » ne sont pas de mise. Des êtres humains ne sont pas responsables des ignominies commises par leurs ancêtres ­ – ou alors il faudrait que les Allemands continuent éternellement à payer leur épisode nazi. C’est une chose d’analyser, par exemple, les « zoos humains » de la colonisation. C’en est une autre que de confondre dans la commisération culpabilisante le « divers historique », lequel ne se réduit pas à des clichés médiatiquement martelés. Si la colonisation fut ressentie par les colonisés dans le rejet et la douleur, elle fut aussi vécue par certains dans l’ouverture, pour le modèle de société qu’elle offrait pour sortir de l’étouffoir communautaire. (…)Les historiens doivent travailler à reconstruire les faits et à les porter à la connaissance du public. Or ces faits établissent que la traite des esclaves, dans laquelle des Européens ont été impliqués (et encore, pas eux seuls), a porté sur environ 11 millions de personnes (27,5 % des 40 millions d’esclaves déportés), et que les trafiquants arabes s’y sont taillé la part du lion : la »traite orientale » fut responsable de la déportation de 17 millions de personnes (42,5 % d’entre eux) et la traite « interne » effectuée à l’intérieur de l’Afrique, porta, elle, sur 12 millions (30 %). Cela, ni Dieudonné ni les « Indigènes » , dans leur texte victimisant à sens unique, ne le disent ­ – même si, à l’évidence, la traite européenne fut plus concentrée dans le temps et plus rentable en termes de nombre de déportés par an. (…) L’historien ne se reconnaît pas dans l’affrontement des mémoires. Pour lui, elles ne sont que des documents historiques, à traiter comme tels. Il ne se reconnaît pas dans l’anachronisme, qui veut tout arrimer au passé ; il ne se reconnaît pas dans le manichéisme, qu’il provienne de la »nostalgérie » électoraliste vulgaire qui a présidé à la loi du 23 février 2005, ou qu’il provienne des simplismes symétriques qui surfent sur les duretés du présent pour emboucher les trompettes agressives d’un ressentiment déconnecté de son objet réel. Gilbert Meynier
The enigmatic showman Martin Couney showcased premature babies in incubators to early 20th century crowds on the Coney Island and Atlantic City boardwalks, and at expositions across the United States. A Prussian-born immigrant based on the East coast, Couney had no medical degree but called himself a physician, and his self-promoting carnival-barking incubator display exhibits actually ended up saving the lives of about 7,000 premature babies. These tiny infants would have died without Couney’s theatrics, but instead they grew into adulthood, had children, grandchildren, great grandchildren and lived into their 70s, 80s, and 90s. This extraordinary story reveals a great deal about neonatology, and about life. (…) Drawing on extraordinary archival research as well as interviews, [Raffel’s] narrative is enhanced by her own reflections as she balanced her shock over how Couney saved these premature infants and also managed to make a living by displaying them like little freaks to the vast crowds who came to see them. Couney’s work with premature infants began in Europe as a carnival barker at an incubator exposition. It was there he fell in love with preemies and met his head nurse Louise Recht. Still, even allowing for his evident affection, making the preemies incubation a public show seems exploitative. But was it? In the 21st century, hospital incubators and NICUs are taken for granted, but over a hundred years ago, incubators were rarely used in hospitals, and sometimes they did far more harm than good.  Premature infants often went blind because of too much oxygen pumped into the incubators (Raffel notes that Stevie Wonder, himself a preemie, lost his sight this way). Yet the preemies Couney and his nurses — his wife Maye, his daughter Hildegard, and lead nurse Louise, known in the show as “Madame Recht” — cared for retained their vision. The reason? Couney was worried enough about this problem to use incubators developed by M. Alexandre Lion in France, which regulated oxygen flow. Today it is widely accept that every baby – premature or ones born to term – should be saved.  Not so in Couney’s time. Preemies were referred to as “weaklings,” and even some doctors believed their lives were not worth saving. While Raffel’s tale is inspiring, it is also horrific. She does not shy away from people like Dr. Harry Haiselden who, unlike Couney, was an actual M.D., but “denied lifesaving treatment to infants he deemed ‘defective,’ deliberately watching them die even when they could have lived.” (…) True, he was a showman, and during most of his career, he earned a good living from his incubator babies show, but Couney, an elegant man who fluently spoke German, French and English, didn’t exploit his preemies (Hildegard was a preemie too).  He gave them a chance at the lives they might not have been allowed to live. Couney used his showmanship to support all of this life-saving. He put on shows for boardwalk crowds, but he also, despite not having a medical degree, maintained his incubators according to high medical standards. In many ways, Couney’s practices were incredibly advanced. Babies were fed with breast milk exclusively, nurses provided loving touches frequently, and the babies were held, changed and bathed. (…) Yet the efforts of Dr. Couney’s his nurses went largely ignored by the medical profession and were only mentioned once in a medical journal. As Raffel writes in her book’s final page, “There is nothing at his  grave to indicate that [Martin Couney] did anything of note.” The same goes for Maye, Louise and Hildegard. Louise’s name was misspelled on her shared tombstone (Louise’s remains are interred in another family’s crypt), and Hildegard, whose remains are interred with Louise’s, did not even have her own name engraved on the shared tombstone. With the exception of Chicago’s Dr. Julius Hess, who is considered the father of neonatology, the majority of the medical establishment patronized and excluded Couney. Hess, though, respected Couney’s work and built on it with his own scientific approach and research; in the preface to his book Premature and Congenitally Diseased Infants, Hess acknowledges Couney “‘for his many helpful suggestions in the preparation of the material for this book.’” But Couney cared more about the babies than professional respect. His was a single-minded focus: even when it financially devastated him to do so, he persisted, so his preemies could live. National Book Review
Carl Hagenbeck had the idea to open zoos that weren’t only filled with animals, but also people. People were excited to discover humans from abroad: Before television and color photography were available, it was their only way to see them. Anne Dreesbach
The main feature of these multiform varieties of public show, which became widespread in late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century Europe and the United States, was the live presence of individuals who were considered “primitive”. Whilst these native peoples sometimes gave demonstrations of their skills or produced manufactures for the audience, more often their role was simply as exhibits, to display their bodies and gestures, their different and singular condition. In this article, the three main forms of modern ethnic show (commercial, colonial and missionary) will be presented, together with a warning about the inadequacy of categorising all such spectacles under the label of “human zoos”, a term which has become common in both academic and media circles in recent years. Luis A. Sánchez-Gómez
Between the 29th of November 2011 and the 3rd of June 2012, the Quai de Branly Museum in Paris displayed an extraordinary exhibition, with the eye-catching title Exhibitions. L’invention du sauvage, which had a considerable social and media impact. Its “scientific curators” were the historian Pascal Blanchard and the museum’s curator Nanette Jacomijn Snoep, with Guadalupe-born former footballer Lilian Thuram acting as “commissioner general”. A popular sportsman, Thuram is also known in France for his staunch social and political commitment. The exhibition was the culmination (although probably not the end point) of a successful project which had started in Marseille in 2001 with the conference entitled Mémoire colonial: zoos humains? Corps Exotiques, corps enfermés, corps mesurés. Over time, successive publications of the papers presented at that first meeting have given rise to a genuine publishing saga, thus far including three French editions, one in Italian, one in English and another in German. This remarkable repertoire is completed by the impressive catalogue of the exhibition. All of the book titles (with the exception of the catalogue) make reference to “human zoos” as their object of study, although in none of them are the words followed by a question mark, as was the case at the Marseille conference. This would seem to define “human zoos” as a well-documented phenomenon, the essence of which has been well-established. Most significantly, despite reiterating the concept, neither the catalogue of the exhibition, nor the texts drawn up by the exhibit’s editorial authorities, provide a precise definition of what a human zoo is understood to be. Nevertheless, the editors seem to accept the concept as being applicable to all of the various forms of public show featured in the exhibition, all of which seem to have been designed with a shared contempt for and exclusion of the “other”. Therefore, the label “human zoo” implicitly applies to a variety of shows whose common aim was the public display of human beings, with the sole purpose of showing their peculiar morphological or ethnic condition. Both the typology of the events and the condition of the individuals shown vary widely: ranging from the (generally individual) presentation of persons with crippling pathologies (exotic or more often domestic freaks or “human monsters”) to singular physical conditions (giants, dwarves or extremely obese individuals) or the display of individuals, families or groups of exotic peoples or savages, arrived or more usually brought, from distant colonies. The purpose of the 2001 conference had been to present the available information about such shows, to encourage their study from an academic perspective and, most importantly, to publicly denounce these material and symbolic contexts of domination and stigmatisation, which would have had a prominent role in the complex and dense animalisation mechanisms of the colonised peoples by the “civilized West”. A scientific and editorial project guided by such intentions could not fail to draw widespread support from academic, social and journalistic quarters. Reviews of the original 2002 text and successive editions have, for the most part, been very positive, and praise for what was certainly an extraordinary exhibition (the one of 2012) has been even more unanimous. However, most commentators have limited their remarks to praising the important anti-racist content and criticisms of the colonial legacy, which are common to both undertakings. Only a few authors have drawn attention to certain conceptual and interpretative problems with the presumed object of study, the “human zoos”, problems which would undermine the project’s solidity. (…) Although the public display of human beings can be traced far back in history in many different contexts (war, funerals and sacred contexts, prisons, fairs, etc…) the configuration and expansion of different varieties of ethnic shows are closely and directly linked to two historical phenomena which lie at the very basis of modernity: exhibitions and colonialism. The former began to appear at national contests and competitions (both industrial and agricultural). These were organised in some European countries in the second half of the eighteenth century, but it was only in the century that followed that they acquired new and shocking material and symbolic dimensions, in the shape of the international or universal exhibition.The key date was 1851, when the Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of All Nations was held in London. The triumph of the London event, its rapid and continuing success in France and the increasing participation (which will be outlined) of indigenous peoples from the colonies, paved the way from the 1880s for a new exhibition model: the colonial exhibition (whether official or private, national or international) which almost always featured the presence of indigenous human beings. However, less spectacular exhibitions had already been organised on a smaller scale for many years, since about the mid-nineteenth century. Some of these were truly impressive events, which in some cases also featured native peoples. These were the early missionary (or ethnological-missionary) exhibitions, which initially were mainly British and Protestant, but later also Catholic. Finally, the unsophisticated ethnological exhibitions which had been typical in England (particularly in London) in the early-nineteenth century, underwent a gradual transformation from the middle of the century, which saw them develop into the most popular form of commercial ethnological exhibition. These changes were initially influenced by the famous US circus impresario P.T. Barnum’s human exhibitions. Later on, from 1874, Barnum’s displays were successfully reinterpreted (through the incorporation of wild animals and groups of exotic individuals) by Carl Hagenbeck.The second factor which was decisive in shaping the modern ethnic show was imperial colonialism, which gathered in momentum from the 1870s. The propagandising effect of imperialism was facilitated by two emerging scientific disciplines, physical anthropology and ethnology, which propagated colonial images and mystifications amid the metropolitan population. This, coupled with robust new levels of consumerism amongst the bourgeoisie and the upper strata of the working classes, had a greater impact upon our subject than the economic and geostrategic consequences of imperialism overseas. In fact, the new context of geopolitical, scientific and economic expansion turned the formerly “mysterious savages” into a relatively accessible object of study for certain sections of society. Regardless of how much was written about their exotic ways of life, or strange religious beliefs, the public always wanted more: seeking participation in more “intense” and “true” encounters and to feel part of that network of forces (political, economic, military, academic and religious) that ruled even the farthest corners of the world and its most primitive inhabitants.It was precisely the convergence of this web of interests and opportunities within the new exhibition universe that had already consolidated by the end of the 1870s, and which was to become the defining factor in the transition. From the older, popular model of human exhibitions which had dominated so far, we see a reduction in the numbers of exhibitions of isolated individuals classified as strange, monstrous or simply exotic, in favour of adequately-staged displays of families and groups of peoples considered savage or primitive, authentic living examples of humanity from a bygone age. Of course, this new interest, this new desire to see and feel the “other” was fostered not only by exhibition impresarios, but by industrialists and merchants who traded in the colonies, by colonial administrators and missionary societies. In turn, the process was driven forward by the strongly positive reaction of the public, who asked for more: more exoticism, more colonial products, more civilising missions, more conversions, more native populations submitted to the white man’s power; ultimately, more spectacle. Despite the differences that can be observed within the catalogue of exhibitions, their success hinged to a great extent upon a single factor: the representation or display of human beings labelled as exotic or savage, which today strikes us as unsettling and distasteful. It can therefore be of little surprise that most, if not all, of the visitors to the Quai de Branly Museum exhibiton of 2012 reacted to the ethnic shows with a fundamental question: how was it possible that such repulsive shows had been organised? Although many would simply respond with two words, domination and racism, the question is certainly more complex. In order to provide an answer, the content and meanings of the three main models or varieties of the modern ethnic show –commercial ethnological exhibitions, colonial exhibitions and missionary exhibitions– will be studied. (…) The opposition that missionary societies encountered at nineteenth-century international exhibitions encouraged them to organise events of their own. The first autonomous missionary events were Protestant and possibly took place prior to 1851. In any case, this has been confirmed as the year that the Methodist Wesleyan Missionary Society organised a missionary exhibition (which took place at the same time as the International Exhibition). Small in size and very simple in structure, it was held for only two days during the month of June, although it provided the extraordinary opportunity to see and acquire shells, corals and varied ethnographic materials (including idols) from Tonga and Fiji. The exhibition’s aim was very specific: to make a profit from ticket sales and the materials exhibited and to seek general support for the missionary enterprise.Whether or not they were directly influenced by the international event of 1851, the modest British missionary exhibitions of the mid-nineteenth century began to evolve rapidly from the 1870s, reaching truly spectacular proportions in the first third of the twentieth century. This enormous success was due to a particular set of circumstances which were not true for the Catholic sphere. Firstly, the exhibits were a fantastic source of propaganda, and furthermore, they generated a direct and immediate cash income. This is significant considering that Protestant church societies and committees neither depended upon, nor were linked to (at least not directly or officially) civil administration and almost all revenue came from the personal contributions of the faithful. Secondly, because Protestants organised their own events, there was no reason for them to participate in the official colonial exhibitions, with which the Catholic missions became repeatedly involved once the old prejudices of government had fallen away by the later years of the nineteenth century. In this way, evangelical communities were able to maintain their independence from the imperial enterprise, yet in a manner that did not preclude them from collaborating with it whenever it was in their interests to do so.However, whether Catholic or Protestant, the main characteristic of the missionary exhibitions in the timeframe of the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century, was their ethnological intent. The ethnographic objects of converted peoples (and of those who had yet to be converted) were noteworthy for their exoticism and rarity, and became a true magnet for audiences. They were also supposedly irrefutable proof of the “backward” and even “depraved” nature of such peoples, who had to be liberated by the redemptive missions which all Christians were expected to support spiritually and financially. But as tastes changed and the public began to lose interest, the exhibitions started to grow in size and complexity, and increasingly began to feature new attractions, such as dioramas and sculptures of native groups. Finally, the most sophisticated of them began to include the natives themselves as part of the show. It must be said that, but for rare exceptions, these were not exhibitions in the style of the famous German Völkerschauen or British ethnological exhibitions, but mere performances; in fact, the “guests” had already been baptized, were Christians, and allegedly willing to collaborate with their benefactors.Whilst the Protestant churches (British and North American alike) produced representations of indigenous peoples with the greatest frequency and intensity, it was (as far as we know) the (Italian) Catholic Church that had the dubious honour of being the first to display natives at a missionary exhibition, and did so in a clearly savagist and rudimentary fashion, which could even be described as brutal. This occurred in the religious section of the Italian-American Exhibition of Genoa in 1892. As a shocking addition to the usual ethnographic and missionary collections, seven natives were exhibited in front of the audience: four Fuegians and three Mapuches of both sexes (children, young and fully-grown adults) brought from America by missionaries. The Fuegians, who were dressed only in skins and armed with bows and arrows, spent their time inside a hut made from branches which had been built in the garden of the pavilion housing the missionary exhibition. The Mapuches were two young girls and a man; the three of them lived inside another hut, where they made handicrafts under the watchful eye of their keepers.The exhibition appears to have been a great success, but it must have been evident that the model was too simple in concept, and inhumanitarian in its approach to the indigenous people present. In fact, whilst subsequent exhibitions also featured a native presence (always Christianised) at the invitation of the clergy, the Catholic Church never again fell into such a rough presentation and representation of the obsolete and savage way of life of its converted. To provide an illustration of those times, now happily overcome by the missionary enterprise, Catholic congregations resorted to dioramas and sculptures, some of which were of superb technical and artistic quality.Although the Catholic Church may have organised the first live missionary exhibition, it should not be forgotten that they joined the exhibitional sphere much later than the evangelical churches. Also, a considerable number of their displays were associated with colonial events, something that the Protestant churches avoided. (…) Whilst it was the reformed churches that most readily incorporated native participation, they seemed to do so in a more sensitive and less brutalised manner than the Genoese Catholic Exhibition of 1892. (…) The exhibition model at these early-twentieth century Protestant events was very similar to the colonial model. Native villages were reconstructed and ethnographic collections were presented, alongside examples of local flora and fauna, and of course, an abundance of information about missionary work, in which its evangelising, educational, medical and welfare aspects were presented. Some of these were equally as attractive to the audience (irrespective of their religious beliefs) as contemporary colonial or commercial exhibitions. However, it may be noted that the participation of Christianised natives took a radically different form from those of the colonial and commercial world. Those who were most capable and had a good command of English served as guides in the sections corresponding to their places of origin, a task that they tended to carry out in traditional clothing. More frequently these new Christians assumed roles with less responsibility, such as the manufacture of handicrafts, the sale of exotic objects or the recreation of certain aspects of their previous way of life. The organisers justified their presence by claiming that they were merely actors, representing their now-forgotten savage way of life. This may very well have been the case. At the Protestant exhibitions of the 1920s and 1930s, the presence of indigens became progressively less common until it eventually disappeared. This notwithstanding, the organisers came to benefit from a living resource which complemented displays of ethnographic materials whilst being more attractive to the audience than the usual dioramas. This was a theatrical representation of the native way of life (combined with scenes of missionary interaction) by white volunteers (both men and women) who were duly made up and in some cases appeared alongside real natives. Some of these performances were short, but others consisted of several acts and featured dozens of characters on stage. Regardless of their form, these spectacles were inherent to almost any British and North American exhibition, although much less frequent in continental Europe.Since the 1960s, the Christian missionary exhibition (both Protestant and Catholic) has been conducted along very different lines from those which have been discussed here. All direct or indirect associations with colonialism have been definitively given up; it has broken with racial or ethnological interpretations of converted peoples, and strongly defends its reputed autonomy from any political groups or interests, without forgetting that the essence of evangelisation is to maximize the visibility of its educational and charitable work among the most disadvantaged. (…)The three most important categories of modern ethnic show –commercial ethnological exhibitions, colonial exhibitions and missionary exhibitions– have been examined. All three resorted, to varying degrees, to the exhibition of exotic human beings in order to capture the attention of their audience, and, ultimately, to achieve certain goals: be they success in business and personal enrichment, social, political or financial backing for the colonial enterprise, or support for missionary work. Whilst on occasion they coincided at the same point in time and within the same context of representation, the uniqueness of each form of exhibition has been emphasised. However, this does not mean that they are completely separate phenomena, or that their representation of exotic “otherness” is homogeneous.Missionary exhibitions displayed perhaps the most singular traits due to their spiritual vision. However, it is clear that many made a determined effort to produce direct, visual and emotional spectacles and some, in so doing, resorted to representations of natives which were very similar to those of colonial exhibitions. Can we speak then, of a convergence of designs and interests? I honestly do not think so. At many colonial exhibitions, organisers showed a clear intention to portray natives as fearsome, savage individuals (sometimes even describing them as cannibals) who somehow needed to be subjugated. Peoples who were considered, to a lesser or greater extent, to be civilised were also displayed (as at the interwar exhibitions). However, the purpose of this was often to publicise the success of the colonial enterprise in its campaign for “the domestication of the savage”, rather than to present a message of humanitarianism or universal fraternity. Missionary exhibitions provided information and material examples of the former way of life of the converted, in which natives demonstrated that they had abandoned their savage condition and participated in the exhibition for the greater glory of the evangelising mission. Moreover, they also became living evidence that something much more transcendent than any civilising process was taking place: that once they had been baptised, anyone, no matter how wild they had once been, could become part of the same universal Christian family.It is certainly true that the shows that the audiences enjoyed at all of these exhibitions (whether missionary, colonial or even commercial) were very similar. Yet in the case of the former, the act of exhibition took place in a significantly more humanitarian context than in the others. And while it is evident that indigenous cultures and peoples were clearly manipulated in their representation at missionary exhibitions, this did not mean that the exhibited native was merely a passive element in the game. And there is something more. The dominating and spectacular qualities present in almost all missionary exhibitions should not let us forget one last factor which was essential to their conception, their development and even their longevity: Christian faith. Without Christian faith there would have been no missionary exhibitions, and had anything similar been organised, it would not have had the same meaning. It was essential that authentic Christian faith existed within the ecclesiastical hierarchy and within those responsible for congregations, missionary societies and committees. But the faith that really made the exhibitions possible was the faith of the missionaries, of others who were involved in their implementation and, of course, of those who visited. Although it was never recognised as such, this was perhaps an uncritical faith, complacent in its acceptance of the ways in which human diversity was represented and with ethical values that occasionally came close to the limits of Christian morality. But it was a faith nonetheless, a faith which intensified and grew with each exhibition, which surely fuelled both Christian religiosity (Catholic and Protestant alike) and at least several years of missionary enterprise, years crucial for the imperialist expansionism of the West. It is an objective fact that the display of human beings at commercial and colonial shows was always much more explicit and degrading than at any missionary exhibition. To state what has just been proposed more bluntly: missionary exhibitions were not “human zoos”. However, it is less clear whether the remaining categories: are commercial and colonial exhibitions worthy of this assertion (human zoos), or were they polymorphic ethnic shows of a much greater complexity?The principal analytical obstacle to the use of the term “human zoo” is that it makes an immediate and direct association between all of these acts and contexts and the idea of a nineteenth-century zoo. The images of caged animals, growling and howling, may cause admiration, but also disgust; they may sometimes inspire tenderness, but are mainly something to be avoided and feared due to their savage and bestial condition. This was definitely the case for the organisers of the scientific and editorial project cited at the beginning of this article, so it can be no surprise that Carl Hagenbeck’s joint exhibitions of exotic animals and peoples were chosen as the frame of reference for human zoos. Although the authors state in the first edition that “the human zoo is not the exhibition of savagery but its construction” [“le zoo humain n’est pas l’exhibition de la sauvagerie, mais la construction de celle-ci”], the problem, as Blanckaert (2002) points out, is that this alleged construction or exhibitional structure was not present at most of the exhibitions under scrutiny, nor (and this is an added of mine) at those shown at the Exhibitions. Indeed, the expression “human zoo” establishes a model which does not fit with the meagre number of exhibitions of exotic individuals from the sixteenth, seventeenth or eighteenth centuries, nor with that of Saartjie Baartmann (the Hottentot Venus) of the early nineteenth century, much less with the freak shows of the twentieth century. Furthermore, this model can neither be compared to most of the nineteenth-century British human ethnological exhibitions, nor to most of the native villages of the colonial exhibitions, nor to the Wild West show of Buffalo Bill, let alone to the ruralist-traditionalist villages which were set up at many national and international exhibitions until the interwar period. Ultimately, their connection with many wandering “black villages” or “native villages” exhibited by impresarios at the end of the nineteenth century could also be disputed. Moreover, many of the shows organised by Hagenbeck number amongst the most professional in the exhibitional universe. The fact that they were held in zoos should not automatically imply that the circumstances in which they took place were more brutal or exploitative than those of any of the other ethnic shows.It is evident from all the shows which have been discussed, that the differential racial condition of the persons exhibited not only formed the basis of their exhibition, but may also have fostered and even founded racist reactions and attitudes held by the public. However, there are many other factors (political, economic and even aesthetic) which come into play and have barely been considered, which could be seen as encouraging admiration of the displays of bodies, gestures, skills, creations and knowledge which were seen as both exotic and seductive.In fact, the indiscriminate use of the very successful concept of “human zoo” generates two fundamental problems. Firstly it impedes our “true” knowledge of the object of study itself, that is, of the very varied ethnic shows which it intends to catalogue, given the great diversity of contexts, formats, persons in charge, objectives and materialisations that such enterprises have to offer. Secondly, the image of the zoo inevitably recreates the idea of an exhibition which is purely animalistic, where the only relationship is that which exists between exhibitor and exhibited: the complete domination of the latter (irrational beasts) by the former (rational beings). If we accept that the exhibited are treated merely as as more-or-less worthy animals, the consequences are twofold: a logical rejection of such shows past, present and future, and the visualization of the exhibited as passive victims of racism and capitalism in the West. It is therefore of no surprise that the research barely considers the role that these individuals may have played, the extent to which their participation in the show was voluntary and the interests which may have moved some of them to take part in these shows. Ultimately, no evaluation has been made of how these shows may have provided “opportunity contexts” for the exhibited, whether as commercial, colonial or missionary exhibitis. Whilst it is true that the exhibited peoples’ own voice is the hardest to record in any of these shows, greater effort could have been made in identifying and mapping them, as, when this happens, the results obtained are truly interesting. Before we conclude, it must be said that the proposed analysis does not intend to soften or justify the phenomenon of the ethnic show. Even in the least dramatic and exploitative cases it is evident that the essence of these shows was a marked inequality, in which every supposed “context of interaction” established a dichotomous relationship between black and white, North and South, colonisers and colonised, and ultimately, between dominators and dominated. My intention has been to propose a more-or-less classifying and clarifying approach to this varied world of human exhibitions, to make a basic inventory of their forms of representation and to determine which are the essential traits that define them, without losing sight of the contingent factors which they rely upon. Luis A. Sánchez-Gómez
Une théorie du complot (on parle aussi de conspirationnisme ou de complotisme) est un récit pseudo-scientifique, interprétant des faits réels comme étant le résultat de l’action d’un groupe caché, qui agirait secrètement et illégalement pour modifier le cours des événements en sa faveur, et au détriment de l’intérêt public. Incapable de faire la démonstration rigoureuse de ce qu’elle avance, la théorie du complot accuse ceux qui la remettent en cause d’être les complices de ce groupe caché. Elle contribue à semer la confusion, la désinformation, et la haine contre les individus ou groupes d’individus qu’elle stigmatise. (…) Derrière chaque actualité ayant des causes accidentelles ou naturelles (mort ou suicide d’une personnalité, crash d’avion, catastrophe naturelle, crise économique…), la théorie du complot cherche un ou des organisateurs secrets (gouvernement, communauté juive, francs-maçons…) qui auraient manipulé les événements dans l’ombre pour servir leurs intérêts : l’explication rationnelle ne suffit jamais. Et même si les événements ont une cause intentionnelle et des acteurs évidents (attentat, assassinat, révolution, guerre, coup d’État…), la théorie du complot va chercher à démontrer que cela a en réalité profité à un AUTRE groupe caché. C’est la méthode du bouc émissaire. (…) La théorie du complot voit les indices de celui-ci partout où vous ne les voyez pas, comme si les comploteurs laissaient volontairement des traces, visibles des seuls « initiés ». Messages cachés sur des paquets de cigarettes, visage du diable aperçu dans la fumée du World Trade Center, parcours de la manifestation Charlie Hebdo qui dessinerait la carte d’Israël… Tout devient prétexte à interprétation, sans preuve autre que l’imagination de celui qui croit découvrir ces symboles cachés. Comme le disait une série célèbre : « I want to believe ! » (…) La théorie du complot a le doute sélectif : elle critique systématiquement l’information émanant des autorités publiques ou scientifiques, tout en s’appuyant sur des certitudes ou des paroles « d’experts » qu’elle refuse de questionner. De même, pour expliquer un événement, elle monte en épingle des éléments secondaires en leur conférant une importance qu’ils n’ont pas, tout en écartant les éléments susceptibles de contrarier la thèse du complot. Son doute est à géométrie variable. (…) La théorie du complot tend à mélanger des faits et des spéculations sans distinguer entre les deux. Dans les « explications » qu’elle apporte aux événements, des éléments parfaitement avérés sont noués avec des éléments inexacts ou non vérifiés, invérifiables, voire carrément mensongers. Mais le fait qu’une argumentation ait des parties exactes n’a jamais suffi à la rendre dans son ensemble exacte !   (…) C’est une technique rhétorique qui vise à intimider celui qui y est confronté : il s’agit de le submerger par une série d’arguments empruntés à des champs très diversifiés de la connaissance, pour remplacer la qualité de l’argumentation par la quantité des (fausses) preuves. Histoire, géopolitique, physique, biologie… toutes les sciences sont convoquées – bien entendu, jamais de façon rigoureuse. Il s’agit de créer l’impression que, parmi tous les arguments avancés, « tout ne peut pas être faux », qu’ »il n’y a pas de fumée sans feu » (…) Incapables (et pour cause !) d’apporter la preuve définitive de ce qu’elle avance, la théorie du complot renverse la situation, en exigeant de ceux qui ne la partagent pas de prouver qu’ils ont raison. Mais comment démontrer que quelque chose qui n’existe pas… n’existe pas ? Un peu comme si on vous demandait de prouver que le Père Noël n’est pas réel. (…) A force de multiplier les procédés expliqués ci-dessus, les théories du complot peuvent être totalement incohérentes, recourant à des arguments qui ne peuvent tenir ensemble dans un même cadre logique, qui s’excluent mutuellement. Au fond, une seule chose importe : répéter, faute de pouvoir le démontrer, qu’on nous ment, qu’on nous cache quelque chose. #OnTeManipule !
Hoax[es], rumeurs, photos ou vidéos truquées… les fausses informations abondent sur internet. Parfois la désinformation va plus loin, et prend la forme de pseudo-théories à l’apparence scientifique qui vous mettent en garde : « On te manipule ! » A en croire ces « théoriciens » du complot, États, institutions et médias déploieraient des efforts systématiques pour tromper et manipuler les citoyens. Il faudrait ne croire personne… sauf ceux qui portent ces thèses complotistes ! Étrange, non ? Et si ceux qui dénoncent la manipulation étaient eux-mêmes en train de nous manipuler ? Oui, #OnTeManipule quand on invente des complots, quand on désigne des boucs émissaires, et quand on demande d’y croire, sans aucune preuve. Découvrez les bons réflexes à avoir pour garder son sens critique et prendre du recul par rapport aux informations qui circulent. On te manipule
Peintures, sculptures, affiches, cartes postales, films, photographies, moulages, dioramas, maquettes et costumes donnent un aperçu de l’étendue de ce phénomène et du succès de cette industrie du spectacle exotique qui a fasciné plus d’un milliard de visiteurs de 1800 à 1958 et a concerné près de 35 000 figurants dans le monde. À travers un vaste panorama composé de près de 600 oeuvres et de nombreuses projections de films d’archives, l’exposition montre comment ces spectacles, à la fois outil de propagande, objet scientifique et source de divertissement, ont formé le regard de l’Occident et profondément influencé la manière dont est appréhendé l’Autre depuis près de cinq siècles. L’exposition explore les frontières parfois ténues entre exotiques et monstres, science et voyeurisme, exhibition et spectacle, et questionne le visiteur sur ses propres préjugés dans le monde d’aujourd’hui. Si ces exhibitions disparaissent progressivement dans les années 30, elles auront alors accompli leur oeuvre : créer une frontière entre les exhibés et les visiteurs. Une frontière dont on peut se demander si elle existe toujours ? Musée du quai Branly
Pendant plus d’un siècle, les grandes puissances colonisatrices ont exhibé comme des bêtes sauvages des êtres humains arrachés à leur terre natale. Retracée dans ce passionnant documentaire, cette « pratique » a servi bien des intérêts. Ils se nomment Petite Capeline, Tambo, Moliko, Ota Benga, Marius Kaloïe et Jean Thiam. Fuégienne de Patagonie, Aborigène d’Australie, Kali’na de Guyane, Pygmée du Congo, Kanak de Nouvelle-Calédonie, ces six-là, comme 35 000 autres entre 1810 et 1940, ont été arrachés à leur terre lointaine pour répondre à la curiosité d’un public en mal d’exotisme, dans les grandes métropoles occidentales. Présentés comme des monstres de foire, voire comme des cannibales, exhibés dans de véritables zoos humains, ils ont été source de distraction pour plus d’un milliard et demi d’Européens et d’Américains, venus les découvrir en famille au cirque ou dans des villages indigènes reconstitués, lors des grandes expositions universelles et coloniales. S’appuyant sur de riches archives (photos, films, journaux…) ainsi que sur le témoignage inédit des descendants de plusieurs de ces exhibés involontaires, Pascal Blanchard et Bruno Victor-Pujebet restituent le phénomène des exhibitions ethnographiques dans leur contexte historique, de l’émergence à l’essor des grands empires coloniaux. Ponctué d’éclairages de spécialistes et d’universitaires, parmi lesquels l’anthropologue Gilles Boëtsch (CNRS, Dakar) et les historiens Benjamin Stora, Sandrine Lemaire et Fanny Robles, leur passionnant récit permet d’appréhender la façon dont nos sociétés se sont construites en fabriquant, lors de grandes fêtes populaires, une représentation stéréotypée du « sauvage ». Et comment, succédant au racisme scientifique des débuts, a pu s’instituer un racisme populaire légitimant la domination des grandes puissances sur les autres peuples du monde. Arte
On assiste au passage progressif d’un racisme scientifique à un racisme populaire, un passage qui n’est ni lié à la littérature ni au cinéma, puisque celui-ci n’existe pas encore, mais à la culture populaire, avec des spectateurs qu vont au zoo pour se divertir, sans le sentiment d’être idéologisés, manipulés. Pascal Blanchard
On payait pour voir des êtres hors norme, le frisson de la dangerosité faisait partie du spectacle. (… ) Imaginez ici des pirogues, un décorum de village lacustre wolof. Tout était fait pour donner au public l’illusion de voir le sauvage dans son biotope. C’est d’ailleurs dans ce décor factice que les frères Lumière tourneront leur douzième film, Baignade de nègres, comme s’ils étaient en Afrique… Pour le visiteur, cette représentation caricaturale du monde et de l’autre était perçue comme la réalité. (…) Ces articles et ces photos contribuent alors à la propagation de clichés et d’idées reçues sur le “sauvage”. Autant de représentations qui légitiment l’ordre colonial, popularisent la théorie et la hiérarchie des races, le concept de peuples “inférieurs” qu’il convient de faire entrer dans la lumière de la civilisation. (…) Ici, vous aviez la grande esplanade des exhibitions humaines. Celle-là même où avaient été placés les Fuégiens de Patagonie en 1881. Sur les photos que nous avons pu retrouver, on voit qu’ils sont installés sur une planche, en hauteur, sans doute à cause du froid et de l’humidité. Ils étaient arrivés en plein mois d’octobre et n’étaient quasiment pas vêtus. Beaucoup avaient attrapé des maladies pulmonaires. (…) Ils étaient enterrés sur place, dans le cimetière du zoo, au même rang que les animaux. Dans certains cas, les corps étaient envoyés à l’Institut médico-légal ou à la Société d’anthropologie de Paris, où le public payait pour assister à leur dissection. (…) Même pour les spécialistes, ce pan de l’histoire coloniale était considéré com­me un élément secondaire. (…) Il a fallu six mois pour obtenir l’autorisation de réaliser quelques séquences à l’intérieur du jardin, et nous ne l’avons eue que parce que nous avons menacé de filmer à travers les grilles… Pascal Blanchard
Grâce à l’historien Pascal Blanchard, que j’ai rencontré lors d’un colloque, à l’époque où je jouais à Barcelone. Après notre rencontre, il m’a envoyé un livre sur le sujet, et c’est comme ça que j’ai appris à connaître un peu mieux cette histoire des « zoos humains ». Une histoire extrêmement violente, dont les enjeux m’intéressent car elle permet de comprendre d’où vient le racisme, de saisir qu’il est lié à un conditionnement historique. (…) Les zoos humains sont le reflet d’un rapport de domination, celui de l’Occident sur le reste du monde. La domination de celui qui détient le pouvoir économique et militaire, et qui l’utilise pour que d’autres personnes, dominées, venues d’Asie, d’Océanie, d’Afrique, soient montrées comme des animaux dans des espaces clos, au nom notamment de la couleur de leur peau. (…) Ces exhibitions ont attiré des millions de spectateurs et ont ancré dans leur tête l’idée d’une hiérarchie entre les personnes, entre les prétendues « races » – la race blanche étant considérée comme supérieure. Les mécanismes de domination qui existent dans nos sociétés se sont construits petit à petit. La plupart des gens sont devenus racistes sans le savoir, ils ont été éduqués dans ce sens-là. Après avoir visité ces zoos humains, les populations occidentales étaient confortées dans l’idée qu’elles étaient supérieures, qu’elles incarnaient la « civilisation » face à des «  sauvages ». Lorsque je préparais l’exposition au Quai Branly, en 2011, je me suis rendu à Hambourg. Là-bas, sur le portail d’entrée du zoo, une sculpture représente des animaux et des hommes, mis au même niveau. C’est d’une violence totale. Mais cela permet aussi de comprendre pourquoi certains sont aujourd’hui encore dans le rejet de l’autre. Il reste des séquelles de ce passé, les barrières existent toujours dans nos sociétés. Comment ne pas penser à ces enclos quand on voit les murs qui se construisent autour de l’Europe ou aux Etats-Unis ? Les zoos humains permettent de nous éclairer sur ce que nous vivons aujourd’hui. (…) Mais ce n’est pas seulement l’évocation des zoos humains qui pose problème, c’est le passé en général. Ce passé lié à de la violence, au fait de s’accaparer des biens d’autrui. Mais, ce passé-là, nous devons nous l’approprier car il raconte l’histoire du monde actuel. Le regarder en face doit nous permettre de nous éclairer sur ce que nous sommes en train de vivre, pour essayer de choisir un futur différent. Dans nos sociétés, la chose la plus importante est-elle le profit, le fait de s’octroyer le bien des autres pour s’enrichir ? C’est important de se poser ces questions-là aujourd’hui. (…) Ces manifestations racistes dont vous parlez viennent directement des zoos humains. De cette histoire. Les gens ont été éduqués ainsi. Les cultures dans lesquelles il y a eu des zoos humains gardent ce complexe de supériorité, conscient ou inconscient, sur les autres cultures. Pour progresser, il faut savoir faire preuve d’autocritique. Dans le sport de haut niveau, c’est essentiel. Cela vaut aussi pour la société. Mais nos sociétés, françaises, européennes, portent très peu de critiques sur elles-mêmes. Très souvent, les gens ne veulent pas critiquer leur propre culture. Il n’y a pas si longtemps encore, l’Europe était persuadée d’être le phare de l’univers. Les zoos humains sont liés à l’histoire coloniale. Les gens ont souvent tendance à croire qu’après la colonisation il y a eu l’égalité. Mais non, il y a une culture de la domination qui perdure. Notre système économique ne fait-il pas en sorte qu’une minorité, qui vit bien, exploite une majorité, qui vit mal ? (…) Avant toute chose, je pense qu’il faut connaître notre passé pour mieux comprendre ce que nous vivons aujourd’hui. Pourquoi certaines personnes ne veulent-elles pas connaître cette histoire, de quoi ont-elles peur ? Le plus beau cadeau que l’on puisse faire à une société, c’est de lui apprendre à connaître son histoire. Il n’y a que sur des bases solides que l’on peut construire un présent et un futur solides. Lilian Thuram
Entre 1877 et 1937, des millions de Parisiens se bousculèrent ici, à la lisière du bois de Boulogne, pour assister au spectacle exotique de Nubiens, Sénégalais, Kali’nas, Fuégiens, Lapons exposés devant le public parés de leurs attributs « authentiques » (lances, peaux de bêtes, pirogues, masques, bijoux…). On se pressait pour voir les « sauvages », des hommes, des femmes et des enfants souvent parqués derrière des grillages ou des barreaux, comme les animaux qui faisaient jusqu’alors la réputation du Jardin zoologique d’acclimatation. D’étranges étrangers, supposés non civilisés et potentiellement menaçants, à l’image de ces Kanaks présentés comme des cannibales et exhibés… dans la fosse aux ours. (…) Lorsque le directeur du Jardin d’acclimatation, le naturaliste Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, organise les tout premiers « spectacles ethnologiques » en 1877 avec des Nubiens et des Esquimaux, il est en quête de nouvelles attractions pour remettre à flot son établissement. Quelques mois plus tôt, à Hambourg, un certain Carl Hagenbeck, marchand d’animaux sauvages, a connu un succès phénoménal en présentant une troupe de Lapons. Au bois de Boulogne, le premier ethnic show fait courir les foules. La fréquentation du jardin double, pour atteindre un million de visiteurs en un an. Certains dimanches, plus de soixante-dix mille personnes se pressent dans les allées. C’est le début d’une mode qui va gagner le monde entier, d’expositions coloniales en expositions universelles. Trente-cinq mille individus seront ainsi exhibés, attirant près d’un milliard et demi de curieux de l’Allemagne aux Etats-Unis, de la Grande-Bretagne au Japon. Pour le promeneur de 2018, impossible de deviner ce passé sinistre derrière les contours ripolinés du parc d’attractions. Les bâtiments de l’époque ont été démolis. Quant aux villages exotiques qui servaient de cadre aux « indigènes », ils étaient éphémères, un ailleurs succédant à un autre. Mais Pascal Blanchard, qui a compulsé des kilos d’images d’archives, n’a aucun mal à en faire ressurgir le souvenir face à ce paisible plan d’eau où patientent des barques (…) Une réalité dont on pouvait conserver le souvenir en s’offrant, après le show, ses produits dérivés, cartes postales, gravures ou coquillages samoans signés de la main des indigènes. Les exhibitions coloniales font le bonheur des anthropologues, qui se bousculent chaque matin avant l’arrivée du public et payent pour pouvoir observer et examiner les « spécimens », publiant ensuite des articles dans les revues les plus sérieuses. S’inspirant des clichés anthropométriques de la police, le photographe Roland Bonaparte constitue, lui, un catalogue de plusieurs milliers d’images « ethnographiques », dans lequel puiseront des générations de scientifiques. (…) Nombre d’exhibés sont ainsi morts dans les zoos humains. On estime entre trente-deux et trente-quatre le nombre de ceux qui auraient péri au Jardin d’acclimatation. » L’acte de décès était déposé à la mairie de Neuilly, mais les morts n’avaient le plus souvent pas de nom. C’est à la lettre « F » comme Fuégienne que les chercheurs ont retrouvé, sur les registres, la trace d’une fillette de 2 ans morte peu après son arrivée à Paris. Une des pièces du puzzle qu’il a fallu patiemment assembler pour reconstituer la mémoire des zoos humains, longtemps ignorée de tous. (…) Aujourd’hui encore, le sujet reste sensible, y compris pour la direction du Jardin d’acclimatation (géré par le groupe LVMH), comme l’a constaté Pascal Blanchard lors du tournage de son documentaire (…) En 2013, au terme d’un combat de cinq ans, les historiens, soutenus par Didier Daeninckx, Lilian Thuram et des élus du Conseil de Paris, ont obtenu que soit posée au Jardin d’acclimatation une plaque commémorative faisant état de ce qu’avaient été les « zoos humains », « symboles d’une autre époque où l’autre avait été regardé comme un “animal” en Occident ». Mais le visiteur doit avoir l’œil bien ouvert pour remarquer la discrète inscription un peu cachée dans les herbes, à l’extérieur de l’enceinte du jardin… Comme le signe d’un passé refoulé qui peine encore à atteindre la lumière. Télérama
Après l’antisémitismeArte invente le conspirationnisme pour tous !

« Grandes puissances colonisatrices »,  « exhibés comme des bêtes sauvages »,  « êtres humains arrachés à leur terre natale », « servi bien des intérêts », « curiosité d’un public en mal d’exotisme », « présentés comme des monstres de foire, voire comme des cannibales, « véritables zoos humains », « théâtre de cruauté », « exhibés involontaires », « représentation stéréotypée du ‘sauvage' », « racisme scientifique », « racisme populaire légitimant la domination des grandes puissances sur les autres peuples du monde », « voyages dans wagons à bestiaux », « histoire inventée de toutes pièces » et « mise en scène pour promouvoir la hiérarchisation des races et justifier la colonisation du monde », « page sombre de notre histoire », « séquelles toujours vivaces » …

Au lendemain, après l’exposition du Quai Branly de 2011, de la diffusion d’un nouveau documentaire sur les « zoos humains » …

Où, à grands coups d’anachronismes et de raccourcis entre le narrateur de couleur de rigueur (le joueur de football guadeloupéen Lilian Thuram sautant allégrement des « zoos humains » aux cris de singe des hooligans des stades de football ou aux actuelles barrières de sécurité contre l’immigration llégale « Comment ne pas penser à ces enclos quand on voit les murs qui se construisent autour de l’Europe ou aux Etats-Unis ? »), la musique angoissante et les appels incessants à l’indignation, l’on nous déploie tout l’arsenal juridico-victimaire de l’histoire à la sauce tribunal de l’histoire …

Où faisant fi de toutes causes accidentelles ou naturelles (maladies, mort ou suicide), plus aucun fait ne peut être que le « résultat de l’action d’un groupe caché » au détriment de l’intérêt de populations qui ne peuvent autres que victimes …

Où la mise en épingle de certains éléments (colonisation, suprémacisme blanc) éclipse systématiquement tout élément susceptible de contrarier la thèse présentée (comme, au-delà par exemple de l’incohérence d’hommes âpres au gain censés mettre inconsidérément en danger à l’instar des esclavagistes dont l’on tient tant à les rapprocher la vie d’exhibés ramenés à grand frais d’Afrique ou de Nouvelle-Calédonie, les « exhibitions » non commerciales à fins humanitaires comme par exemple celles des sociétés missionnaires chrétiennes, l’implication ou la volonté, sans compter ceux qui décidèrent de rester en Europe et y compris à s’y marier avec des Européennes, de membres du groupe « victime » eux-mêmes comme le riche recruteur sénégalais Jean Thiam ou la danseuse nue au tutu de bananes du Bal nègre et future tenancière du « zoo humain » de Milandes présentant à la planète entière sa tribu arc en ciel recomposée d’enfants de toutes les races et ethnies du monde devient comme par enchantement « déconstructrice » de la facticité du mythe du sauvage) …

Où, écartant toute possibilité de véritable curiosité autre que morbide ou raciste (quel racisme attribuer à l’exhibition préalable et même parallèle des « monstres » blancs des « freak shows », dont le cas certes singulier du Dr. autoproclamé Couney sauvant ainsi des milliers de bébés incubés ? ou qui des actuels parcs ethnographiques ou de tourisme industriel où des artisans blancs dument costumés rejouent pour les visiteurs les gestes de leurs aïeux supposés ?), l’on impute invariablement les pires motivations aux méchants colons ou public voués de ce fait à l’exécration publique …

Comment ne pas reconnaitre, dans cette énième tentative d’absolution du péché originel de collusion de l’ethnologie avec l’ordre colonial, nombre des ingrédients des théories du complot que dénonce le site gouvernemental « #On te manipule »

Sauf que bien sûr on n’est plus cette fois dans la vulgaire théorie du complot ….

Mais – c’est pour une bonne cause (« Plus jamais ça ! ») – la théorie du complot vertueuse ?

Dans ce jardin, il y avait un “zoo humain”
Virginie Félix
Télérama
29/09/2018

Au Jardin d’acclimatation, de 1877 à 1937, on a parqué et exhibé des êtres humains venus d’ailleurs. L’historien Pascal Blanchard cosigne pour Arte un documentaire remarquable sur ces “zoos humains”, théâtres de cruauté. Et revient sur les lieux où le racisme s’exprimait sans vergogne. A voir samedi 29 septembre, 20h50.

Neuilly ronronne sous le soleil de septembre. En ce mardi de fin d’été, on pénètre dans les allées du Jardin d’acclimatation comme dans une parenthèse enchantée. Des haut-parleurs crachotent une mélodie guillerette, les brumisateurs nimbent l’air d’un brouillard vaporeux et quelques bambins tournicotent devant les manèges. Mais, au milieu des voix d’enfants, celle de l’historien Pascal Blanchard vient jeter une ombre sur ce décor insouciant. Pour le chercheur, qui nous guide ce matin-là parmi les carrousels et les autos tamponneuses, la féerie du parc d’attractions cache une autre histoire, plus ancienne, aussi sombre que méconnue. Celle des zoos humains, ces « exhibitions ethnographiques » qui attirèrent les foules sur les pelouses du Jardin d’acclimatation à l’orée du XXe siècle, et auxquels il vient de consacrer, avec Bruno Victor-Pujebet, un magistral documentaire pour Arte.

On se pressait pour voir les “sauvages” 

Entre 1877 et 1937, des millions de Parisiens se bousculèrent ici, à la lisière du bois de Boulogne, pour assister au spectacle exotique de Nubiens, Sénégalais, Kali’nas, Fuégiens, Lapons exposés devant le public parés de leurs attributs « authentiques » (lances, peaux de bêtes, pirogues, masques, bijoux…). On se pressait pour voir les « sauvages », des hommes, des femmes et des enfants souvent parqués derrière des grillages ou des barreaux, comme les animaux qui faisaient jusqu’alors la réputation du Jardin zoologique d’acclimatation. D’étranges étrangers, supposés non civilisés et potentiellement menaçants, à l’image de ces Kanaks présentés comme des cannibales et exhibés… dans la fosse aux ours. « On payait pour voir des êtres hors norme, le frisson de la dangerosité faisait partie du spectacle », explique l’historien.

Une mode qui va gagner le monde entier

Lorsque le directeur du Jardin d’acclimatation, le naturaliste Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, organise les tout premiers « spectacles ethnologiques » en 1877 avec des Nubiens et des Esquimaux, il est en quête de nouvelles attractions pour remettre à flot son établissement. Quelques mois plus tôt, à Hambourg, un certain Carl Hagenbeck, marchand d’animaux sauvages, a connu un succès phénoménal en présentant une troupe de Lapons. Au bois de Boulogne, le premier ethnic show fait courir les foules. La fréquentation du jardin double, pour atteindre un million de visiteurs en un an. Certains dimanches, plus de soixante-dix mille personnes se pressent dans les allées. C’est le début d’une mode qui va gagner le monde entier, d’expositions coloniales en expositions universelles. Trente-cinq mille individus seront ainsi exhibés, attirant près d’un milliard et demi de curieux de l’Allemagne aux Etats-Unis, de la Grande-Bretagne au Japon.

L’illusion de voir l’“indigène” dans son biotope

Pour le promeneur de 2018, impossible de deviner ce passé sinistre derrière les contours ripolinés du parc d’attractions. Les bâtiments de l’époque ont été démolis. Quant aux villages exotiques qui servaient de cadre aux « indigènes », ils étaient éphémères, un ailleurs succédant à un autre. Mais Pascal Blanchard, qui a compulsé des kilos d’images d’archives, n’a aucun mal à en faire ressurgir le souvenir face à ce paisible plan d’eau où patientent des barques : « Imaginez ici des pirogues, un décorum de village lacustre wolof. Tout était fait pour donner au public l’illusion de voir le sauvage dans son biotope. C’est d’ailleurs dans ce décor factice que les frères Lumière tourneront leur douzième film, Baignade de nègres, comme s’ils étaient en Afrique… Pour le visiteur, cette représentation caricaturale du monde et de l’autre était perçue comme la réalité. » Une réalité dont on pouvait conserver le souvenir en s’offrant, après le show, ses produits dérivés, cartes postales, gravures ou coquillages samoans signés de la main des indigènes.

La légitimation de l’ordre colonial 

Les exhibitions coloniales font le bonheur des anthropologues, qui se bousculent chaque matin avant l’arrivée du public et payent pour pouvoir observer et examiner les « spécimens », publiant ensuite des articles dans les revues les plus sérieuses. S’inspirant des clichés anthropométriques de la police, le photographe Roland Bonaparte constitue, lui, un catalogue de plusieurs milliers d’images « ethnographiques », dans lequel puiseront des générations de scientifiques. « Ces articles et ces photos contribuent alors à la propagation de clichés et d’idées reçues sur le “sauvage”. Autant de représentations qui légitiment l’ordre colonial, popularisent la théorie et la hiérarchie des races, le concept de peuples “inférieurs” qu’il convient de faire entrer dans la lumière de la civilisation. »

Au pied de la Fondation Vuitton, Pascal Blanchard désigne une large pelouse. « Ici, vous aviez la grande esplanade des exhibitions humaines. Celle-là même où avaient été placés les Fuégiens de Patagonie en 1881. Sur les photos que nous avons pu retrouver, on voit qu’ils sont installés sur une planche, en hauteur, sans doute à cause du froid et de l’humidité. Ils étaient arrivés en plein mois d’octobre et n’étaient quasiment pas vêtus. Beaucoup avaient attrapé des maladies pulmonaires. »

Les morts, enterrés sur place, n’avaient le plus souvent pas de nom

Nombre d’exhibés sont ainsi morts dans les zoos humains. On estime entre trente-deux et trente-quatre le nombre de ceux qui auraient péri au Jardin d’acclimatation. « Ils étaient enterrés sur place, dans le cimetière du zoo, au même rang que les animaux. Dans certains cas, les corps étaient envoyés à l’Institut médico-légal ou à la Société d’anthropologie de Paris, où le public payait pour assister à leur dissection. » L’acte de décès était déposé à la mairie de Neuilly, mais les morts n’avaient le plus souvent pas de nom. C’est à la lettre « F » comme Fuégienne que les chercheurs ont retrouvé, sur les registres, la trace d’une fillette de 2 ans morte peu après son arrivée à Paris. Une des pièces du puzzle qu’il a fallu patiemment assembler pour reconstituer la mémoire des zoos humains, longtemps ignorée de tous. « Même pour les spécialistes, ce pan de l’histoire coloniale était considéré com­me un élément secondaire. » Aujourd’hui encore, le sujet reste sensible, y compris pour la direction du Jardin d’acclimatation (géré par le groupe LVMH), comme l’a constaté Pascal Blanchard lors du tournage de son documentaire : « Il a fallu six mois pour obtenir l’autorisation de réaliser quelques séquences à l’intérieur du jardin, et nous ne l’avons eue que parce que nous avons menacé de filmer à travers les grilles… »

En 2013, au terme d’un combat de cinq ans, les historiens, soutenus par Didier Daeninckx, Lilian Thuram et des élus du Conseil de Paris, ont obtenu que soit posée au Jardin d’acclimatation une plaque commémorative faisant état de ce qu’avaient été les « zoos humains », « symboles d’une autre époque où l’autre avait été regardé comme un “animal” en Occident ». Mais le visiteur doit avoir l’œil bien ouvert pour remarquer la discrète inscription un peu cachée dans les herbes, à l’extérieur de l’enceinte du jardin… Comme le signe d’un passé refoulé qui peine encore à atteindre la lumière.


on aime passionnément Sauvages, au coeur des zoos humains, samedi 29 septembre, 20h50, Arte.

Voir aussi:

Lilian Thuram : “Les zoos humains permettent de comprendre d’où vient le racisme »
Virginie Félix
Télérama
29/09/2018

Engagé dans la lutte contre le racisme, l’ancien footballeur a été le commissaire d’une exposition consacrée aux zoos humains au musée du Quai Branly. Il évoque cette page sombre de notre histoire, et ses séquelles toujours vivaces, à l’occasion d’un documentaire coup de poing diffusé sur Arte.

Depuis qu’il a raccroché les crampons, l’ex-défenseur de l’équipe de France Lilian Thuram joue les attaquants sur le terrain de la lutte contre le racisme. En 2011, il fut le commissaire d’une exposition consacrée aux « zoos humains » organisée au musée du Quai Branly, mettant en lumière la violence de ces exhibitions de « sauvages » qui firent courir les foules dans le monde entier à la fin du XIXe et au début du XXe siècle. Alors qu’Arte consacre cette semaine un documentaire coup de poing à cette page d’histoire méconnue (Sauvages, au cœur des zoos humains), le footballeur devenu « passeur » explique pourquoi il est essentiel de mettre en lumière un passé qui dérange pour mieux en tirer les leçons.

Comment avez-vous découvert l’histoire des « zoos humains » ?
Grâce à l’historien Pascal Blanchard, que j’ai rencontré lors d’un colloque, à l’époque où je jouais à Barcelone. Après notre rencontre, il m’a envoyé un livre sur le sujet, et c’est comme ça que j’ai appris à connaître un peu mieux cette histoire des « zoos humains ». Une histoire extrêmement violente, dont les enjeux m’intéressent car elle permet de comprendre d’où vient le racisme, de saisir qu’il est lié à un conditionnement historique.

Qu’est-ce qui peut expliquer que certaines personnes se retrouvent ainsi exhibées dans des zoos, et que d’autres soient des visiteurs, de l’autre côté des barrières ?
Les zoos humains sont le reflet d’un rapport de domination, celui de l’Occident sur le reste du monde. La domination de celui qui détient le pouvoir économique et militaire, et qui l’utilise pour que d’autres personnes, dominées, venues d’Asie, d’Océanie, d’Afrique, soient montrées comme des animaux dans des espaces clos, au nom notamment de la couleur de leur peau.

“Les zoos humains permettent de nous éclairer sur ce que nous vivons aujourd’hui.”

Comment les zoos humains ont-ils participé à la fabrication d’un racisme populaire ?
Ces exhibitions ont attiré des millions de spectateurs et ont ancré dans leur tête l’idée d’une hiérarchie entre les personnes, entre les prétendues « races » – la race blanche étant considérée comme supérieure. Les mécanismes de domination qui existent dans nos sociétés se sont construits petit à petit. La plupart des gens sont devenus racistes sans le savoir, ils ont été éduqués dans ce sens-là. Après avoir visité ces zoos humains, les populations occidentales étaient confortées dans l’idée qu’elles étaient supérieures, qu’elles incarnaient la « civilisation » face à des «  sauvages ».

Lorsque je préparais l’exposition au Quai Branly, en 2011, je me suis rendu à Hambourg. Là-bas, sur le portail d’entrée du zoo, une sculpture représente des animaux et des hommes, mis au même niveau. C’est d’une violence totale. Mais cela permet aussi de comprendre pourquoi certains sont aujourd’hui encore dans le rejet de l’autre. Il reste des séquelles de ce passé, les barrières existent toujours dans nos sociétés. Comment ne pas penser à ces enclos quand on voit les murs qui se construisent autour de l’Europe ou aux Etats-Unis ? Les zoos humains permettent de nous éclairer sur ce que nous vivons aujourd’hui.

Avez-vous le sentiment que c’est aujourd’hui un sujet tabou, difficile à aborder ?Effectivement. Mais ce n’est pas seulement l’évocation des zoos humains qui pose problème, c’est le passé en général. Ce passé lié à de la violence, au fait de s’accaparer des biens d’autrui. Mais, ce passé-là, nous devons nous l’approprier car il raconte l’histoire du monde actuel. Le regarder en face doit nous permettre de nous éclairer sur ce que nous sommes en train de vivre, pour essayer de choisir un futur différent. Dans nos sociétés, la chose la plus importante est-elle le profit, le fait de s’octroyer le bien des autres pour s’enrichir ? C’est important de se poser ces questions-là aujourd’hui.

“Les gens ne veulent pas critiquer leur propre culture. Il n’y a pas si longtemps encore, l’Europe était persuadée d’être le phare de l’univers.”

Ce racisme populaire, en tant que footballeur, vous avez pu le voir s’exprimer dans les stades, par exemple à travers ces cris de singe des hooligans  ?
Ces manifestations racistes dont vous parlez viennent directement des zoos humains. De cette histoire. Les gens ont été éduqués ainsi. Les cultures dans lesquelles il y a eu des zoos humains gardent ce complexe de supériorité, conscient ou inconscient, sur les autres cultures.

Pour progresser, il faut savoir faire preuve d’autocritique. Dans le sport de haut niveau, c’est essentiel. Cela vaut aussi pour la société. Mais nos sociétés, françaises, européennes, portent très peu de critiques sur elles-mêmes. Très souvent, les gens ne veulent pas critiquer leur propre culture. Il n’y a pas si longtemps encore, l’Europe était persuadée d’être le phare de l’univers. Les zoos humains sont liés à l’histoire coloniale.

Les gens ont souvent tendance à croire qu’après la colonisation il y a eu l’égalité. Mais non, il y a une culture de la domination qui perdure. Notre système économique ne fait-il pas en sorte qu’une minorité, qui vit bien, exploite une majorité, qui vit mal ?

Le message que vous voulez faire passer est un message de réconciliation plutôt que de culpabilisation ?
Avant toute chose, je pense qu’il faut connaître notre passé pour mieux comprendre ce que nous vivons aujourd’hui. Pourquoi certaines personnes ne veulent-elles pas connaître cette histoire, de quoi ont-elles peur ? Le plus beau cadeau que l’on puisse faire à une société, c’est de lui apprendre à connaître son histoire. Il n’y a que sur des bases solides que l’on peut construire un présent et un futur solides.


on aime passionnément Sauvages, au cœur des zoos humains, samedi 29 septembre, à 20h50, sur Arte.

Voir de plus:

Exemple à suivre La fondation Lilian Thuram. Éducation contre le racisme

Lilian Thuram

D’origine guadeloupéenne, Lilian Thuram a mené une carrière prestigieuse de footballeur de haut niveau (Champion du monde 1998, Champion d’Europe 2000), il détient le record de sélections en équipe de France masculine. Il est membre du Haut conseil à l’intégration et du collectif antiraciste « Devoirs de mémoires ».

Si la Fondation Lilian Thuram-Education contre le racisme [1][1] Cf. site internet de la Fondation : www.thuram.org existe, c’est avant tout le fruit d’une rencontre à Barcelone, lorsque j’étais footballeur professionnel. Invité chez le Consul de France, je rencontrai un publicitaire espagnol qui me demanda ce que j’aimerais faire après le football. Je lui répondis : « changer le monde ». Il sourit et me dit : « vous le pensez parce que vous êtes jeune, c’est une tâche difficile, impossible ». Un débat s’ensuivit.

Il m’interroge sur ma vision des choses. Je lui explique que, pour moi, le racisme perdure parce qu’on n’a jamais pris le temps de déconstruire son mécanisme, que c’est avant tout une invention de l’homme. Toute forme de racisme est une construction sociale. Nous portons toutes et tous des lunettes culturelles : nous ne regardons jamais l’autre de façon innocente. Nous sommes marqués par l’éducation reçue, par nos religions, l’histoire racontée dans notre propre pays. Quelques jours après, cet homme me téléphone pour me dire que je l’ai convaincu, qu’il souhaite me rencontrer pour me faire part de son expérience professionnelle et m’aider dans cette tâche. Il me convainc de créer une fondation, ce que je fais en mars 2008, en Espagne, où je réside alors.

Du « boche » à l’« arabe »

Vous et moi, nous sommes conditionnés ; aujourd’hui, notre propre imaginaire est avant tout le fruit de notre éducation – parentale, scolaire, environnementale – et, pour toute analyse, nous faisons appel à notre connaissance et à nos croyances. Pour essayer de vous expliquer l’impact des croyances collectives, je vais vous raconter deux histoires. Un jour, parlant de « Mes étoiles noires »[2][2] Lilian Thuram, « Mes étoiles noires, de Lucy à Barack… à une pharmacienne, elle me dit que ses parents normands avaient vu pour la première fois un homme noir en 1944, durant le débarquement. Elle me dit aussi que pendant toute son enfance, son adolescence et sa vie d’adulte, elle avait été conditionnée à détester les « boches », et ce n’est que par la réflexion et la compréhension de cette histoire, qu’elle avait pu comprendre que tous les Allemands n’étaient pas méchants et, surtout, que les Allemands nés après cette guerre n’étaient pas responsables de ce qui s’était passé avant eux. Une autre histoire, celle de « Papy Dédé » : il a vingt ans quand on l’envoie faire la guerre en Algérie. Il explique qu’on l’a conditionné à détester l’« arabe ». Aujourd’hui il ne se dit pas Français, il se dit Homme du monde, car, selon lui, la France lui a menti.

« Les noirs sont forts en sport »

Le conditionnement se fait par la répétition. Répétée mille fois, une bêtise, quelle qu’elle soit, devient une vérité. Les scientifiques du XIXe siècle, les politiques, les intellectuels, les sociétés du spectacle, ont prétendu qu’il y avait plusieurs races ; aujourd’hui, tous les scientifiques sont d’accord pour affirmer qu’il n’y a qu’une espèce, l’Homo sapiens. Pourtant en 2010, les enfants, conditionnés par l’imaginaire collectif, disent qu’il existe une race noire, une jaune, une blanche, une rouge. A la question : « puisque vous pensez qu’il existe plusieurs races, quelles sont les qualités de chacune ? », ils répondent que « les Noirs sont plus forts en sport ». Est-ce anodin ? Sachant que dans notre imaginaire collectif, le corps est dissocié de l’esprit, si les noirs sont plus forts en sport, ils sont aussi moins intelligents. Mais n’est-ce pas compréhensible quand vous savez que c’est à l’école, par le biais de l’esclavage, de l’apartheid et de la colonisation que 80 % de la population française a entendu parler pour la première fois des Noirs ? Ne sommes-nous pas conditionnés de façon inconsciente à voir les personnes de couleur noire comme inférieures ?

Retour à Socrate

L’antisémitisme, par exemple, est d’abord une construction intellectuelle ; on a diabolisé les personnes de religion juive, on leur a attribué des caractéristiques précises à certaines époques de l’Histoire. Un autre exemple concerne les Amérindiens : les Espagnols débarquant aux Amériques avaient en tête tous les préjugés des Européens sur les autres peuples, ils les voyaient comme inférieurs, et c’est pour cela que toutes les entreprises de colonisation et d’esclavagisme ont été présentées comme autant d’œuvres civilisatrices. On prétend civiliser des personnes qui ne le sont pas ; dès lors, dans cette non-civilisation, se retrouve la construction d’une non-humanité de l’autre.

La Fondation veut expliquer avec insistance que le racisme n’est pas un phénomène naturel, c’est un phénomène intellectuel et culturel qui peut être éradiqué en profondeur. Mais cette éradication demande une vigilance car, dans toute société, il y a des tensions identitaires. Pourtant une idée simple pourrait nous aider dans cette éducation contre le racisme : « connais-toi toi-même », selon l’injonction de Socrate. Ce qui singularise notre espèce, c’est cette capacité exceptionnelle d’apprentissage : nous sommes programmés pour apprendre, ce qui explique l’origine de la diversité culturelle et pourquoi chaque être humain peut acquérir n’importe quelle culture. Cette idée doit être absolument développée dans tout discours sur la diversité humaine.

Ils sont ce qu’on leur a appris à être

La couleur de la peau d’une personne, son apparence physique n’ont rien à voir avec la langue qu’elle parle, la religion qu’elle pratique, les valeurs et les systèmes politiques qu’elle défend, ce qu’elle aime ou déteste.

C’est cette idée, pourtant simple, qu’un certain nombre de personnes ne comprend pas ou dont elles n’ont tout simplement pas conscience. Elles sont souvent essentialistes : elles croient, plus ou moins confusément, qu’une « nature physique » est reliée substantiellement à une « nature culturelle ». Elles naturalisent la culture. Un exemple de la version la plus radicale de cette croyance a été produit par l’idéologie nazie. Les racistes naturalisent la culture, comme le misogyne naturalise la femme (sa nature fait que sa place est déterminée), comme les homophobes naturalisent l’homosexualité (on naît homosexuel). C’est donc cette connexion « culture/nature » qu’il faut déconstruire.

Ce qu’il faut expliquer aux enfants, c’est qu’ils sont des constructions sociales et culturelles, qu’ils intègrent des modes de pensée, de façon consciente comme inconsciente, qu’ils sont bourrés de traits culturels qui n’ont rien à voir avec leurs patrimoines génétiques ni avec leur apparence physique. Ils sont ce qu’on leur a appris à être. Le problème fondamental du racisme est qu’il y a trop de personnes qui n’acceptent pas cette idée… Ils n’acceptent pas ou ne comprennent pas que les humains sont construits par d’autres humains.

Heureuse diversité

Nous devons apprendre vraiment à nous connaître nous-mêmes en tant qu’espèce, car nous sommes capables d’apprendre n’importe quoi, le pire comme le meilleur. Nous sommes très sensibles au conditionnement et avons, par nature, du mal à admettre que nous en sommes victimes et à accepter d’en changer. Nous sommes tous persuadés que nous détenons la Vérité. C’est ce qui explique que nous soyons parfois intolérants.

Fort heureusement, le côté positif de notre spécificité est de pouvoir « bricoler » ce qu’on apprend de nos semblables, d’où les changements culturels. Les femmes et les hommes d’aujourd’hui n’ont rien à voir avec celles et ceux qui vivaient il y a quatre ou cinq générations ; nos ancêtres du Moyen Âge ne comprendraient rien au monde dans lequel nous vivons aujourd’hui. On voudrait nous faire croire que nous vivons une période de régression du vivre ensemble, mais heureusement c’est tout le contraire : dans l’inconscient collectif, la diversité n’a jamais été aussi présente.

Les enfants d’abord

Avant tout, j’aime aller régulièrement à la rencontre des enfants, dans les écoles principalement, pour les écouter et les interroger, m’inspirer de leurs expériences. La première grande action de la fondation a été la publication en janvier dernier de « Mes étoiles noires ». Nous avons préparé pour la mi-octobre un outil pédagogique multimédia pour les enseignants de CM1-CM2 et leurs élèves. Ce sera une proposition de contribution à l’éducation contre le racisme sous la forme de deux DVD et d’un livret. Il sera envoyé gratuitement à tous les enseignants qui en feront la demande, le moment venu. La troisième grande action est une exposition consacrée aux exhibitions, qui, entre 1880 et 1931, ont vu défiler près d’un milliard d’occidentaux devant 40 000 « indigènes » montrés dans des « zoos humains ». L’exposition aura lieu au musée du quai Branly, de fin novembre 2011 à mai 2012. Elle participera à la déconstruction du racisme dans nos imaginaires. Elle voyagera ensuite en Espagne, en Allemagne et en Suisse, puis, nous l’espérons, en Angleterre et aux Etats-Unis.

Notes

[1]

Cf. site internet de la Fondation : www.thuram.org

[2]

Lilian Thuram, « Mes étoiles noires, de Lucy à Barack Obama », Editions Philippe Rey, 2010.

[3]

Avec le soutien de la banque CASDEN, de la MGEN (Mutuelle Générale de l’Education Nationale) et la Fondation du FC Barcelone.

Voir encore:

Human Zoos or Ethnic Shows? Essence and contingency in Living Ethnological Exhibitons
Luis A. Sánchez-Gómez
Facultad de Geografía e Historia, Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain
Culture & History Digital Journal
Dec. 22, 2013

INTRODUCTION

Between the 29th of November 2011 and the 3rd of June 2012, the Quai de Branly Museum in Paris displayed an extraordinary exhibition, with the eye-catching title Exhibitions. L’invention du sauvage, which had a considerable social and media impact. Its “scientific curators” were the historian Pascal Blanchard and the museum’s curator Nanette Jacomijn Snoep, with Guadalupe-born former footballer Lilian Thuram acting as “commissioner general”. A popular sportsman, Thuram is also known in France for his staunch social and political commitment. The exhibition was the culmination (although probably not the end point) of a successful project which had started in Marseille in 2001 with the conference entitled Mémoire colonial: zoos humains? Corps Exotiques, corps enfermés, corps mesurés. Over time, successive publications of the papers presented at that first meeting have given rise to a genuine publishing saga, thus far including three French editions (Bancel et al., 2002, 2004; Blanchard et al., 2011), one in Italian (Lemaire et al., 2003), one in English (Blanchard et al., 2008) and another in German (Blanchard et al., 2012). This remarkable repertoire is completed by the impressive catalogue of the exhibition (Blanchard; Boëtsch y Snoep, 2011). All of the book titles (with the exception of the catalogue) make reference to “human zoos” as their object of study, although in none of them are the words followed by a question mark, as was the case at the Marseille conference. This would seem to define “human zoos” as a well-documented phenomenon, the essence of which has been well-established. Most significantly, despite reiterating the concept, neither the catalogue of the exhibition, nor the texts drawn up by the exhibit’s editorial authorities, provide a precise definition of what a human zoo is understood to be. Nevertheless, the editors seem to accept the concept as being applicable to all of the various forms of public show featured in the exhibition, all of which seem to have been designed with a shared contempt for and exclusion of the “other”. Therefore, the label “human zoo” implicitly applies to a variety of shows whose common aim was the public display of human beings, with the sole purpose of showing their peculiar morphological or ethnic condition. Both the typology of the events and the condition of the individuals shown vary widely: ranging from the (generally individual) presentation of persons with crippling pathologies (exotic or more often domestic freaks or “human monsters”) to singular physical conditions (giants, dwarves or extremely obese individuals) or the display of individuals, families or groups of exotic peoples or savages, arrived or more usually brought, from distant colonies.[1]The purpose of the 2001 conference had been to present the available information about such shows, to encourage their study from an academic perspective and, most importantly, to publicly denounce these material and symbolic contexts of domination and stigmatisation, which would have had a prominent role in the complex and dense animalisation mechanisms of the colonised peoples by the “civilized West”. A scientific and editorial project guided by such intentions could not fail to draw widespread support from academic, social and journalistic quarters. Reviews of the original 2002 text and successive editions have, for the most part, been very positive, and praise for what was certainly an extraordinary exhibition (the one of 2012) has been even more unanimous.[2] However, most commentators have limited their remarks to praising the important anti-racist content and criticisms of the colonial legacy, which are common to both undertakings. Only a few authors have drawn attention to certain conceptual and interpretative problems with the presumed object of study, the “human zoos”, problems which would undermine the project’s solidity (Blanckaert, 2002; Jennings, 2005; Liauzu, 2005: 10; Parsons, 2010; McLean, 2012). Problems which may arise from the indiscriminate use of the concept of the “human zoo” will be discussed in detail at the end of this article.Firstly, however, a revision of the complex historical process underlying the polymorphic phenomenon of the living exhibition and its configurations will provide the background for more detailed study. This will consist of an outline of three groups which, in my view, are the most relevant exhibition categories. Although the public display of human beings can be traced far back in history in many different contexts (war, funerals and sacred contexts, prisons, fairs, etc…) the configuration and expansion of different varieties of ethnic shows are closely and directly linked to two historical phenomena which lie at the very basis of modernity: exhibitions and colonialism. The former began to appear at national contests and competitions (both industrial and agricultural). These were organised in some European countries in the second half of the eighteenth century, but it was only in the century that followed that they acquired new and shocking material and symbolic dimensions, in the shape of the international or universal exhibition.The key date was 1851, when the Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of All Nations was held in London. The triumph of the London event, its rapid and continuing success in France and the increasing participation (which will be outlined) of indigenous peoples from the colonies, paved the way from the 1880s for a new exhibition model: the colonial exhibition (whether official or private, national or international) which almost always featured the presence of indigenous human beings. However, less spectacular exhibitions had already been organised on a smaller scale for many years, since about the mid-nineteenth century. Some of these were truly impressive events, which in some cases also featured native peoples. These were the early missionary (or ethnological-missionary) exhibitions, which initially were mainly British and Protestant, but later also Catholic.[3] Finally, the unsophisticated ethnological exhibitions which had been typical in England (particularly in London) in the early-nineteenth century, underwent a gradual transformation from the middle of the century, which saw them develop into the most popular form of commercial ethnological exhibition. These changes were initially influenced by the famous US circus impresario P.T. Barnum’s human exhibitions. Later on, from 1874, Barnum’s displays were successfully reinterpreted (through the incorporation of wild animals and groups of exotic individuals) by Carl Hagenbeck.The second factor which was decisive in shaping the modern ethnic show was imperial colonialism, which gathered in momentum from the 1870s. The propagandising effect of imperialism was facilitated by two emerging scientific disciplines, physical anthropology and ethnology, which propagated colonial images and mystifications amid the metropolitan population. This, coupled with robust new levels of consumerism amongst the bourgeoisie and the upper strata of the working classes, had a greater impact upon our subject than the economic and geostrategic consequences of imperialism overseas. In fact, the new context of geopolitical, scientific and economic expansion turned the formerly “mysterious savages” into a relatively accessible object of study for certain sections of society. Regardless of how much was written about their exotic ways of life, or strange religious beliefs, the public always wanted more: seeking participation in more “intense” and “true” encounters and to feel part of that network of forces (political, economic, military, academic and religious) that ruled even the farthest corners of the world and its most primitive inhabitants.It was precisely the convergence of this web of interests and opportunities within the new exhibition universe that had already consolidated by the end of the 1870s, and which was to become the defining factor in the transition. From the older, popular model of human exhibitions which had dominated so far, we see a reduction in the numbers of exhibitions of isolated individuals classified as strange, monstrous or simply exotic, in favour of adequately-staged displays of families and groups of peoples considered savage or primitive, authentic living examples of humanity from a bygone age. Of course, this new interest, this new desire to see and feel the “other” was fostered not only by exhibition impresarios, but by industrialists and merchants who traded in the colonies, by colonial administrators and missionary societies. In turn, the process was driven forward by the strongly positive reaction of the public, who asked for more: more exoticism, more colonial products, more civilising missions, more conversions, more native populations submitted to the white man’s power; ultimately, more spectacle.Despite the differences that can be observed within the catalogue of exhibitions, their success hinged to a great extent upon a single factor: the representation or display of human beings labelled as exotic or savage, which today strikes us as unsettling and distasteful. It can therefore be of little surprise that most, if not all, of the visitors to the Quai de Branly Museum exhibiton of 2012 reacted to the ethnic shows with a fundamental question: how was it possible that such repulsive shows had been organised? Although many would simply respond with two words, domination and racism, the question is certainly more complex. In order to provide an answer, the content and meanings of the three main models or varieties of the modern ethnic show –commercial ethnological exhibitions, colonial exhibitions and missionary exhibitions– will be studied.

ETHNOLOGICAL COMMERCIAL EXHIBITIONS: LEISURE, BUSINESS AND ANTHROPOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Commercial ethnological exhibitions were managed by private entrepreneurs, who very often acted as de facto owners of the individuals they exhibited. With the seemingly-noble purpose of bringing the inhabitants of exotic and faraway lands closer to the public and placing them under the scrutiny of anthropologists and scholarly minds, these individuals organised events with a rather carnival-like air, whose sole purpose was very simple: to make money. Such exhibitions were held more frequently than their colonial equivalents, which they predated and for which they served as an inspiration. In fact, in some countries where (overseas) colonial expansion was delayed or minimal –such as Germany (Thode-Arora, 1989; Kosok y Jamin, 1992; Klös, 2000; Dreesbach, 2005; Nagel, 2010), Austria (Schwarz, 2001) or Switzerland (Staehelin, 1993; Minder, 2008)– and even in some former colonies –such as Brazil (Sánchez-Arteaga and El-Hani, 2010)– they were regular and popular events and could still be seen in some places as late as the 1950s. Even in the case of overseas superpowers, commercial exhibitions were held more regularly than the strictly-colonial variety, although it is true that they sometimes overlapped and can be difficult to distinguish from one another. This was the case in France (Bergougniou, Clignet and David, 2001; David, s.d.) and to an even greater extent in Great Britain, with London becoming a privileged place to experience them throughout the nineteenth century (Qureshi, 2011).Almost all of these exhibitions attracted their audiences with a clever combination of racial spectacle, erotism and a few drops of anthropological science, although there was no single recipe for a successful show. Dances, leaps, chants, shouts, and the blood of sacrificed animals were the fundamental components of these events, although they were also part of colonial exhibitions. All of these acts, these strange and unusual rituals, were as incomprehensible as they were exciting; as shocking as they were repulsive to the civilised citizens of “advanced” Europe. It is unsurprising that spectators were prepared to pay the price of admission, which was not cheap, in order to gain access to such extraordinary sights as these “authentic savages”. Over time, the need to attract increasingly demanding audiences, who quickly became used to seeing “blacks and savages” of all kinds in a variety of settings, challenged the entrepreneurs to provide ever more compelling spectacles.For decades the most admired shows on European soil were organised by Carl Hagenbeck (1844–1913), a businessman from Hamburg who was a seasoned wild animal showman (Ames, 2008). His greatest success was founded on a truly spectacular innovation: the simultaneous exhibition in one space (a zoo or other outdoor enclosure) of wild animals and a group of natives, both supposedly from the same territory, in a setting that recreated the environment of their place of origin. The first exhibition of this type, organised in 1874, was a great success, despite the relatively low level of exoticism of the individuals displayed: a group of Sami (Lap) men and women accompanied by some reindeer. Whilst not all of Hagenbeck’s highly successful shows (of which there were over 50 in total) relied upon the juxtaposition of humans and animals, all presented a racial spectacle of exotic peoples typically displayed against a backdrop of huts, plants and domestic ware, and included indigenous groups from the distant territories of Africa, the Arctic, India, Ceylon, and Southeast Asia. For many scholars Hagenbeck’s Völkerschauen or Völkerausstellungen constituted the paradigmatic example of a human zoo, which is also accepted by the French historians who organised the project under the same name. They tended to combine displays of people and animals and took place in zoos, so the analogy could not be clearer. Furthermore, the performances of the exhibited peoples were limited to songs, dances and rituals, and for the most part their activities consisted of little more than day-to-day tasks and activities. Therefore, little importance was attached to their knowledge or skills, but rather to the scrutiny of their gestures, their distinctive bodies and behaviours, which were invariably exotic but not always wild.However, despite their obvious racial and largely-racist components, Hagenbeck’s shows cannot be simply dismissed as human zoos. As an entrepreneur, the German’s objective was obviously to profit from the display of animals and people alike, and yet we cannot conclude that the humans were reduced to the status of animals. In fact, the natives were always employed and seem to have received fair treatment. Likewise, their display was based upon a premise of exoticism rather than savagery, in which key ideas of difference, faraway lands and adventure were ultimately exalted. Hagenbeck’s employees were apparently healthy; sometimes slender, as were the Ethiopians, or even athletic, like the Sudanese. In some instances (for example, with people from India and Ceylon) their greatest appeal was their almost-fantastic exoticism, with their rich costumes and ritual gestures being regarded as remarkable and sophisticated.Nevertheless, on many other occasions, people were displayed for their distinctiveness and supposed primitivism, as was the case on the dramatic tour of the Inuit Abraham Ulrikab and his family, from the Labrador Peninsula, all of whom fell ill and died on their journey due to a lack of appropriate vaccination. This is undoubtedly one of the best-documented commercial exhibitions, not because of an abundance of details concerning its organisation, but owing to the existence of several letters and a brief diary written by Ulrikab himself (Lutz, 2005). As can easily be imagined, it is absolutely exceptional to find information originating from one of the very individuals who featured in an ethnic show; not an alleged oral testimony collected by a third party, but their own actual voice. The vast majority of such people did not know the language of their exhibitors and, even if they knew enough to communicate, it is highly unlikely that they would have been able to write in it. All of this, coupled with the fact that the documents have been preserved and remain accessible, is almost a miracle.However, in spite the tragic fate of Ulrikab and his family, other contemporary ethnic shows were far more exploitative and brutal. This was the case with several exhibitions that toured Europe towards the end of the 1870s, whose victims included Fuegians, Inuits, primitive Africans (especially Bushmen and Pygmies) or Australian aboriginal peoples. Some were complex and relatively sophisticated and included the recreation of native villages; in others, the entrepreneur simply portrayed his workers with their traditional clothes and weapons, emphasising their supposedly primitive condition. Slightly less dramatic than these, but more racially stigmatising than Hagenbeck’s shows, were the exhibitions held at the Jardin d’Aclimatation in Paris, between 1877 and the First World War. A highly-lucrative business camouflaged beneath a halo of anthropological scientifism, the exhibitions were organised by the director of the Jardin himself, the naturalist Albert Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire (Coutancier and Barthe, 1995; Mason, 2001: 19–54; David, n.d.; Schneider, 2002; Báez y Mason, 2006). This purported scientific and educational institution enjoyed the attention of French anthropologists for a time; however, after 1886, the Anthropological Society in Paris distanced itself from something that was little more than it appeared to be: a spectacle for popular recreation which was hard to justify from an ethical point of view. In the case of many private enterprises from the 1870s and 1880s, in particular, shows can be described as moving away from notions of fantasy, adventure and exotism and towards the most brutal forms of exploitation. However, despite what has been said about France, Qureshi (2011: 278–279) highlights the role that ethnologists and anthropologists (and their study societies) played in Great Britain in approving commercial exhibitions of this sort. This enabled exhibitions to claim legitimacy as spaces for scientific research, visitor education and, of course, the advancement of the colonial enterprise.Leaving aside the displays of isolated individuals in theatres, exhibition halls, or fairgrounds (where the alleged “savage” sometimes proved to be a fraud), photographs and surviving information about the aforementioned commercial ethnological shows speak volumes about the relations which existed between the exhibitors and the exhibited. In nearly all cases the impresario was a European or North American, who wielded almost absolute control over the lives of their “workers”. Formal contracts did exist and legal control became increasingly widespread, especially in Great Britain, (Qureshi, 2011: 273) as the nineteenth century progressed. It is also evident, nevertheless, that this contractual relationship could not mask the dominating, exploitative and almost penitentiary conditions of the bonds created. Whether Inuit, Bushmen, Australians, Pygmies, Samoans or Fuegians, it is hard to accept that all contracted peoples were aware of the implications of this legal binding with their employer. Whilst most were not captured or kidnapped (although this was documented on more than one occasion) it is reasonable to be skeptical about the voluntary nature of the commercial relationship. Moreover, those very same contracts (which they were probably unable to understand in the first place) committed the natives to conditions of travel, work and accommodation which were not always satisfactory. Very often their lives could be described as confined, not only when performances were taking place, but also when they were over. Exhibited individuals were very rarely given leave to move freely around the towns that the exhibitions visited.The exploitative and inhuman aspects of some of these spectacles were particularly flagrant when they included children, who either formed part of the initial contingent of people, or swelled the ranks of the group when they were born on tour. On the one hand, the more primitive the peoples exhibited were, the more brutal their exhibition became and the circumstances in which it took place grew more painful. Conversely, conditions seemed to improve, albeit only to a limited extent, when individuals belonged to an ethnic group which was more “evolved”, “prouder”, held warrior status, or belonged to a local elite. This was true of certain African groups who were particularly resistant to colonial domination, with the Ashanti being a case in point. In spite of this, their subordinate position did not change.There was, however, a certain type of commercial show in which the relations between the employer and the employees went beyond the merely commercial. More professionalised shows often required natives to demonstrate skills and give performances that would appeal to the audience. This was the case in some (of the more serious and elaborate) circus contexts and dramatised spectacles, the most notable of which was the acclaimed Wild West show. Directed by William Frederick Cody (1846–1917), the famous Buffalo Bill, the show featured cowboys, Mexicans, and members of various Native American ethnic groups (Kasson, 2000). This attraction, and many others that followed in the wake of its success, could be considered the predecessors of present-day theme park shows. Many of the shows which continued to endure during the interwar period were in some measure similar to those of the nineteenth century, although they were unable to match the popularity of yesteryear. Whilst the stages were still set with reproduction native villages, as had been the case in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century, the exhibition and presentation of natives acquired a more fair-like and circus-like character, which harked back to the spectacles of the early-nineteenth century. Although it seems contradictory, colonial exhibitions at this time were in fact much larger and more numerous, as we shall see in the following section. It was precisely then, in the mid-1930s, that Nazi Germany, a very modern country with the most intensely-racist government, produced an ethnic show which illustrates the complexity of the human zoo phenomenon. The Deutsche Afrika-Schau (German African Show) provides an excellent example of the peculiar game which was played between owners, employees and public administrators, concerning the display of exotic human beings. The show, a striking and an incongruous fusion of variety spectacle and Völkerschau, toured several German towns between 1935 and 1940 (Lewerenz, 2006). Originally a private and strictly commercial business, it soon became a peculiar semi-official event in which African and Samoan men and women, resident in Germany, were legally employed to take part. Complicated and unstable after its Nazification, the show aimed to facilitate the racial control of its participants while serving as a mechanism of ideological indoctrination and colonial propaganda. Incapable of profiting from the show, the Nazi regime would eventually abolish it.After the Second World War, ethnic shows entered a phase of obvious decline. They were no longer of interest as a platform for the wild and exotic, mainly due to increasing competition from new and more accessible channels of entertainment, ranging from cinema to the beginnings of overseas tourism within Europe and beyond. While the occasional spectacle tried to profit from the ancient curiosity about the morbid and the unusual as late as the 1950s and even the 1960s, they were little more than crude and clumsy representations, which generated little interest among the public. Nowadays, as before, there are still contexts and spaces in which unique persons are portrayed, whether this is related to ethnicity or any other factor. These spectacles often fall into the category of artistic performances or take the banal form of reality TV.

COLONIAL EXHIBITIONS: LEISURE, BUSINESS AND INDOCTRINATION
This category of exhibition was organised by either public administrations or private institutions linked to colonial enterprise, and very often featured some degree of collaboration between the two. The main aim of these events was to exhibit official colonial projects and private initiatives managed by entrepreneurs and colonial settlers, which were supposedly intended to bring the wealth and well-being of the metropolis to the colonies. The presentation also carried an educational message, intended not only to reinforce the “national-colonial conscience” among its citizens, but also to project a powerful image of the metropolis to competing powers abroad. Faced with the likelihood that such content would prove rather unexciting and potentially boring for visitors, the organisers resorted to various additions which were considered more attractive and engaging. Firstly they devised a museum of sorts, in which ethnographic materials of the colonised peoples: their traditional dress, day-to-day objects, idols and weapons, were exhibited. These exotic and unusual pieces did draw the interest of the public, but, fearing that this would not be sufficient, the organisers knew that they could potentially sell thousands of tickets by offering the live display of indigenous peoples. If the exhibition was official, the natives constituted the ideal means by which to deliver the colonial message to the masses. In the case of private exhibitions, they were seen as the fastest and safest way to guarantee a show’s financial success.Raw materials and a variety of other objects (including ethnographic exhibitions) from the colonies were already placed on show at the Great Exhibition of 1851 in London. These items were accompanied by a number of individuals originating from the same territories, either as visitors or as participants in the relevant section of the exhibition. However, such people cannot be considered as exhibits themselves; neither can similar colonial visitors at the Paris (1855) or London (1862) exhibitions; nor the Paris (1867) and (1878) exhibitions, which featured important colonial sections. It was only at the start of the 1880s that Europeans were able to enjoy the first colonial exhibitions proper, whether autonomous or connected (albeit with an identity and an entity of their own) to a universal or international exhibition. It could be argued that the Amsterdam International Colonial and Export Exhibition of 1883 acted as a letter of introduction for this model of event (Bloembergen, 2006), and it was quickly followed by the London Colonial and Indian Exhibition of 1886 (Mathur, 2000) and, to a lesser though important extent, by the Madrid Philippines Exhibition of 1887 (Sánchez-Gómez, 2003). All three housed reproductions of native villages and exhibited dozens of individuals brought from the colonies. This was precisely what attracted the thousands of people who packed the venues. Such success would not have been possible by simply assembling a display of historical documents, photographs or ethnographic materials, no matter how exotic.Thereafter, colonial exhibitions (almost all of which featured the live presence of native peoples) multiplied, whether they were autonomous or connected with national or international exhibitions. In France many municipalities and chambers of commerce began to organise their own exhibits, some of which (such as the Lyon Exhibition of 1894) were theoretically international in scope, although some of the most impressive exhibits held in the country were the colonial sections of the Paris Universal Exhibition of 1889 (Palermo, 2003; Tran, 2007; Wyss, 2010) and 1900 (Wilson, 1991; Mabire, 2000; Geppert, 2010: 62–100). Equally successful were the colonial sections of the Belgian exhibitions of the last quarter of the nineteenth century, which displayed the products and peoples of what was called the Congo Independent State (later the Belgian Congo), which until 1908 was a personal possession of King Leopold II. The most remarkable was probably the 1897 Tervuren Exhibition, an annex of the Brussels International Exposition of the same year (Wynants, 1997; Küster, 2006). In Germany, one of the European capitals of commercial ethnological shows, several colonial exhibitions were orchestrated as the overseas empire was being built between 1884 and 1918. Among them, the Erste Deutsche Kolonialausstellung or First German Colonial Exhibition, which was organised as a complement to the great Berlin Gewerbeausstellung (Industrial Exhibition) of 1896, was particularly successful (Arnold, 1995; Richter, 1995; Heyden, 2002).As far as the United States was concerned, the country’s late but impetuous arrival as a world power was almost immediately heralded by the phenomenon of the World’s Fair, and the respective colonial sections (Rydell, 1984 y 1993; Rydell, Findling y Pelle, 2000). Whilst a stunning variety of ethnic performances were already on show at the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair, it was at Omaha, (1898) Buffalo, (1901) and above all at the 1904 Saint Louis Exhibition, that hundreds of natives were enthusiastically displayed with the purpose of publicising and gathering support for the complex and “heavy” civilising task (“The White Man’s Burden”) that the North American nation had to undertake in its new overseas possessions (Kramer, 1999; Parezo y Fowler, 2007).In principle, those natives who took part in the live section of a colonial exhibition did so of their own accord, whether they were allegedly savage or civilised individuals, and regardless of whether the show had been organised through concessions to private company owners or those who indirectly depended on public agencies. Although neither violence nor kidnapping has been recorded, it is highly unlikely that most of the natives who took up the invitation were fully aware of its implications: again, the great distances they had to travel, the discomforts they would endure and the situations in which they would be involved upon arrival in the metropolis.Until the early-twentieth century, the sole purpose of native exhibitions was to attract an audience and to show, with the exemplar of a “real” image, the inferior condition of the colonised peoples and the need to continue the civilising mission in the faraway lands from which they came. In all cases their living conditions in the metropolis were unlikely to differ greatly from those of the participants in purely commercial shows: usually residing inside the exhibition venue, they were rarely free to leave without the express permission of their supervisors. However, it must be said that conditions were considerably better for the individuals exhibited when the shows were organised by government agencies, who always ensured that formal contracts were signed, and were probably unlikely to house people in the truly gruesome conditions present in some domains of the private sector. In some cases, added circumstances can be inferred which reveal a clear interest in “doing things properly”, by developing an ethical and responsible show, no matter how impossible this was in practice. Perhaps the clearest example of this kind of event is the Philippines Exhibition which was organized in Madrid in 1887.The most striking feature of this exhibition was its stated educational purpose, to present a sample of the ethnic and social diversity of the archipelago. Other colonial exhibitions attempted to do the same, but in this case the intentions of the Spanish appeared to be more authentic and credible. Of course the aim was not to provide a lesson in island ethnography, but to prove the extent to which the Catholic Church had managed to convert the native population, and to show where savage tribes still existed. Representing the latter were, among others, several Tinguian and Bontoc persons (generically known as Igorots by the Spanish) and an Aeta person, referred to as a Negrito. Several Muslim men and women from Mindanao and the Joló (Sulu) archipelago (known to the Spanish as Moros or “Moors”) also took part in the exhibition, not because they were considered savages but on account of their pagan and unredeemed condition. Finally, as an example of the benefits of the colonial enterprise, Christian Filipinos (both men and women) were invited to demonstrate their artistic skill and craftsmanship and to sell their artisan products from various structures within the venue. All were legally employed and received regular payment until their return to the Philippines, which was very unusual for an exhibition at that time.However, despite the “good intentions” of the administration, an obvious hierarchy can be inferred from the spatial pattern through which the Filipino presence in Madrid was organised. Individuals considered savage lived inside the exhibit enclosure and were under permanent control; they could visit the city but always in a scheduled and closely-directed way. Muslims, however, did not live inside the park, but in boarding houses and inns. Their movements were also restricted, but this was justified on the basis of their limited knowledge of their surroundings. Christians also lodged at inns, and although they did enjoy a certain autonomy, their status as “special guests” imposed a number of official commitments and the compulsory attendance of events. Such differences became even more obvious, especially for the audience, not just because the savages lived inside the ranchería or native village, where they were exhibited, but also because their only purpose was to dance, gesture, eat and display their half-naked bodies. Muslims were not exhibited, nor did they have a clear or specific task to perform beyond merely “representing”. Christian men and women (cigar makers and artisans) simply performed their professional tasks in front of the audience, and were expected to complete a given timetable and workload as would any other worker.In the light of the above, it may be concluded that the Philippines Exhibition of 1887 (specifically the live exhibition section) was conducted in a manner which questions the simplistic concept of a human zoo that many historians apply to these spectacles. Although there were certain similarities with commercial shows, we must admit that the Spanish government made considerable efforts to ensure that the exhibition, and above all the participation of the Filipinos, was carried out in a relatively dignified fashion. It must be reiterated that this is not intended to project a benevolent image of nineteenth-century Spanish colonialism. The position of some of the exhibited, especially those considered savages, was not only subordinate but almost subhuman (almost being the key word), in spite of the fact that they received due payment and were relatively well fed. Moreover, we cannot forget that three of the participants (a Carolino man and woman, and a Muslim woman) died from diseases which were directly related to the conditions of their stay on the exhibition premises.As the twentieth century advanced, colonial shows changed their direction and content, although it was some time before these changes took effect. The years prior to the First World War saw several national colonial exhibitions (Marseille and Paris in 1906; London in 1911),[4] two binational exhibitions (London, 1908 and 1910)[5] and a trinational (London, 1909),[6] which became benchmarks for exhibition organisers during the interwar years. The early twentieth century also saw several national colonial sections, wich had varying degrees of impact, in three universal exhibitions organised in Belgium: Liège (1905), Brussels (1910) and Ghent (1913) and in several exhibitions organised in three different Italian cities, although none of these included a native section.[7] However, it was during the 1920s and 1930s that a true eclosion of national and international exhibitions, whose main focus was colonial or which included important colonial elements, occurred.[8] The time was not only ripe for ostentatious reasons, but also because the tension originated by certain European powers, especially Italy, encouraged a vindication of overseas colonies through the propaganda that was deployed at these events.For all these reasons, and in addition to many other minor events, national colonial exhibitions were staged in Marseille (1922), Wembley (1924–25),[9] Stuttgart (1928),[10] Koln (1934), Oporto (1934), Freiburg im Breisgau (1935), Como (1937),[11] Glasgow (1938),[12] Dresden (1939), Vienna (1940) and Naples (1940).[13] At an international colonial level, the most important was the 1931 Parisian Exposition Coloniale Internationale et des Pays d’Outre Mer. In addition, although they were not specialised international colonial exhibitions, outstanding and relevant colonial sections could be found at the Turin National Exhibition of 1928, the Iberian-American Exhibition of 1929, the Brussels Universal Exhibition of 1935, the Paris International Exhibition of 1937 and the Lisbon National Exhibition of 1940.At most of these events, a revised perspective of overseas territories was projected. Although, with some exceptions, metropolises continued to import indigenous peoples and persisted in presenting them as exotic, the focus was now shifted on to the results of the civilising process, as opposed to strident representations of savagery. This meant that it was no longer necessary for exhibited peoples to live at the exhibition venue. The aim was now to show the most attractive side of empire, and displays of the skills of its inhabitants, such as singing or dancing continued, albeit in a more serious, professional fashion. In principle, natives taking part in these exhibitions could move around more freely; in addition, they were all employed as any other professional or worker would be. However, once again the ethnic factor came into play, materialising under many different guises. For example, at the at the Paris Exhibition of 1931, people who belonged to “oriental civilisations” appeared at liberty to move around the venue, they were not put on display, and devoted their time to the activities for which they had been contracted (such as traditional songs and dances, handicrafts or sale of products). Once their working day was completed, they were free to visit the exhibition or travel around Paris. However, the same could not be said for the Guineans arriving at the Seville Ibero-American Exhibition of 1929, where they were clearly depicted in a savagist context, similar to the way in which Africans had been displayed in colonial and even commercial exhibitions in the nineteenth century (Sánchez-Gómez, 2006).Another interwar colonial exhibition which was unable to free itself from nineteenth-century stereotypes was the one held in Oporto in 1934, which included several living villages inhabited by natives, children included (Serén, 2001). Their presence in the city and the fact that they were displayed and lived within the same exhibition space was something that neither the press nor contemporary politicians saw fit to criticise. In fact it was the pretos (black African men) and especially pretas (black African women) who were the main attraction for thousands of visitors who thronged to the event, which was probably related to the fact that all the natives were bare-chested. Interestingly, the Catholic Church did not take offense, perhaps interpreting the women shown as being merely “black savages” who had little to do with chaste Portuguese women. Of course they had no objections to the exhibition of human beings either.Two interwar exhibitions (Seville and Oporto) have been cited as examples where the management of indigenous participants markedly resembled the practices of the nineteenth century. However, this should not imply that other events refrained from the (more or less) sophisticated manipulation of the native presence. The most significant example was the Parisian International Colonial Exhibition of 1931.[14] Some historians highlight the fact that the general organiser, Marshall Lyautey, managed to impose his criterion that the exhibition should not include displays of the traditional “black villages” or “indigenous villages” inhabited by natives. Although it is true that the official (French and International) sections did not include this feature,[15] there can be little doubt that this was a gigantic ethnic spectacle, where hundreds of native peoples (who were present in the city as artists, artisans or simply as guests) were exhibited and manipulated as a source of propaganda of the highest order for the colonial enterprise. This is just one more example, although a particularly significant one, of the multi-faceted character that ethnic shows acquired. It is difficult to define these simply on the basis of their brutality or “animal” characteristics, their closeness to Hagenbeck’s Völkerschauen or the anthropological exhibitions that were organised at the Jardin d’Acclimatation in late-nineteenth century Paris.The last major European colonial exhibition took place in the anachronistic Belgian Congo section of the Brussels Universal Exhibition of 1958, the first to be held after the Second World War.[16] In principle, its contents were organised around a discourse which defended the moral values of interracial fraternity and which set out to convince both Belgian society and the Congolese that Belgians were only in Congo to civilise, and not to exploit. In order to prove the authenticity of this discourse, the organisers went to great pains to avoid the jingoistic exoticism which had characterised most colonial exhibits thus far. In accordance with this, the event did not include the traditional, demeaning spectacle of natives living within the exhibition space. However, it did include an exotic section, where several dozen Congolese artisans demonstrated their skills to the audience and sold the products manufactured there in a context which was intended to be purely commercial. Unfortunately, the good will of the organisers was betrayed by an element of the public, who could not help confronting the Africans in a manner reminiscent of their grandparents back in 1897. This resulted in the artisans abruptly leaving the exhibition for Congo after being shocked by the insolence and bad manners of some of the visitors.The Congolese presence in Brussels was not limited to these artisans: almost seven hundred Africans arrived, two hundred of which were tourists who had been invited with the specific purpose of visiting the exhibition. Most of them were members of the “Association of African Middle Classes”, that is, they were part of the “evolved elite”. The remaining figures were made up of people who were carrying out some sort of task in the colonial section of the exhibition, whether as specialised workers, dancers, guides or as assistants in the various sections, perhaps including some members of the Public Force, made up of natives. The presence in Brussels of the tourists, in particular, was part of a policy of association, which, according to the organisers, was intended to prepare “the Congolese population for the complete realisation of their human destiny.” The Belgian population, in turn, would have the chance to become better acquainted with these people through a “direct, personal and free contact with the civilised Congolese” (Delhalle, 1985: 44). Neither this specific measure nor any others taken to bring blacks and whites closer seem to have had any practical effect whatsoever. In fact, although the Congolese visitors were cared for relatively well (although not without differences or setbacks), their movements during their stay in Brussels were under constant scrutiny, to prevent them from being “contaminated” by the “bad habits” of the metropolitan citizens.Despite everything mentioned thus far, or perhaps even because of it, the 1958 exhibition was an enormous public success, on a par with the colonial events of the past. This time, as before, it was predicated on a largely negative image of the Congolese population. Barely any critical voices were heard against the exhibiting model or the abuses of the colonial system, not even from the political left. Finally, as with earlier colonial exhibitions, it is obvious that what was shown in Brussels had little to do with the reality of life in Congo. In fact, as the exhibition closed down, in October 1958, Patrice Lumumba founded the Congolese National Movement. On the 11th of January of 1959, repression of the struggles for independence escalated into the bloody killings of Léopoldville, the colonial capital. Barely one year later, on the 30th of June 1960, Belgium formally acknowledged the independence of the new Democratic Republic of Congo; two years later Rwanda and Burundi followed.
MISSIONARY EXHIBITIONS: DOMINATION, FAITH AND SPECTACLE
The excitement that exhibitions generated in the second half of the nineteenth century provoked reactions from many quarters, including Christian churches. Of course, the event which shook Protestant propagandist sensibilities the hardest (as Protestants were the first to take part in the exhibition game) was the 1851 London Exhibition. However, the interest which both the Anglican Church and many evangelical denominations expressed in participating in this great event was initially met with hesitation and even rejection by the organisers (Cantor, 2011). Finally their participation was accepted, but only two missionary societies were authorised to officially become an integral part of the exhibition, and they could only do so as editors of printed religious works.The problems that were documented in London in 1851 continued to affect events organised throughout the rest of the century; in fact, the presence of the Christian churches was permitted on only two occasions, both in Paris, at the exhibitions of 1867 and 1900. At the first of these, it was only Protestant organisations that participated, as the Catholic Church did not yet recognise the importance of such an event as an exhibitional showcase. By the time of the second, which was the last great exhibition of the nineteenth century and one of the most grandiose of all time, the situation had changed dramatically; both Protestants and Catholics participated and the latter (the French Church, to be precise) did so with greater success than its Protestant counterpart.[18]The opposition that missionary societies encountered at nineteenth-century international exhibitions encouraged them to organise events of their own. The first autonomous missionary events were Protestant and possibly took place prior to 1851. In any case, this has been confirmed as the year that the Methodist Wesleyan Missionary Society organised a missionary exhibition (which took place at the same time as the International Exhibition). Small in size and very simple in structure, it was held for only two days during the month of June, although it provided the extraordinary opportunity to see and acquire shells, corals and varied ethnographic materials (including idols) from Tonga and Fiji.[19] The exhibition’s aim was very specific: to make a profit from ticket sales and the materials exhibited and to seek general support for the missionary enterprise.Whether or not they were directly influenced by the international event of 1851, the modest British missionary exhibitions of the mid-nineteenth century began to evolve rapidly from the 1870s, reaching truly spectacular proportions in the first third of the twentieth century. This enormous success was due to a particular set of circumstances which were not true for the Catholic sphere. Firstly, the exhibits were a fantastic source of propaganda, and furthermore, they generated a direct and immediate cash income. This is significant considering that Protestant church societies and committees neither depended upon, nor were linked to (at least not directly or officially) civil administration and almost all revenue came from the personal contributions of the faithful. Secondly, because Protestants organised their own events, there was no reason for them to participate in the official colonial exhibitions, with which the Catholic missions became repeatedly involved once the old prejudices of government had fallen away by the later years of the nineteenth century. In this way, evangelical communities were able to maintain their independence from the imperial enterprise, yet in a manner that did not preclude them from collaborating with it whenever it was in their interests to do so.However, whether Catholic or Protestant, the main characteristic of the missionary exhibitions in the timeframe of the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century, was their ethnological intent (Sánchez-Gómez, 2013). The ethnographic objects of converted peoples (and of those who had yet to be converted) were noteworthy for their exoticism and rarity, and became a true magnet for audiences. They were also supposedly irrefutable proof of the “backward” and even “depraved” nature of such peoples, who had to be liberated by the redemptive missions which all Christians were expected to support spiritually and financially. But as tastes changed and the public began to lose interest, the exhibitions started to grow in size and complexity, and increasingly began to feature new attractions, such as dioramas and sculptures of native groups. Finally, the most sophisticated of them began to include the natives themselves as part of the show. It must be said that, but for rare exceptions, these were not exhibitions in the style of the famous German Völkerschauen or British ethnological exhibitions, but mere performances; in fact, the “guests” had already been baptized, were Christians, and allegedly willing to collaborate with their benefactors.Whilst the Protestant churches (British and North American alike) produced representations of indigenous peoples with the greatest frequency and intensity, it was (as far as we know) the (Italian) Catholic Church that had the dubious honour of being the first to display natives at a missionary exhibition, and did so in a clearly savagist and rudimentary fashion, which could even be described as brutal. This occurred in the religious section of the Italian-American Exhibition of Genoa in 1892 (Bottaro, 1984; Perrone, n.d.). As a shocking addition to the usual ethnographic and missionary collections, seven natives were exhibited in front of the audience: four Fuegians and three Mapuches of both sexes (children, young and fully-grown adults) brought from America by missionaries. The Fuegians, who were dressed only in skins and armed with bows and arrows, spent their time inside a hut made from branches which had been built in the garden of the pavilion housing the missionary exhibition. The Mapuches were two young girls and a man; the three of them lived inside another hut, where they made handicrafts under the watchful eye of their keepers.The exhibition appears to have been a great success, but it must have been evident that the model was too simple in concept, and inhumanitarian in its approach to the indigenous people present. In fact, whilst subsequent exhibitions also featured a native presence (always Christianised) at the invitation of the clergy, the Catholic Church never again fell into such a rough presentation and representation of the obsolete and savage way of life of its converted. To provide an illustration of those times, now happily overcome by the missionary enterprise, Catholic congregations resorted to dioramas and sculptures, some of which were of superb technical and artistic quality.Although the Catholic Church may have organised the first live missionary exhibition, it should not be forgotten that they joined the exhibitional sphere much later than the evangelical churches. Also, a considerable number of their displays were associated with colonial events, something that the Protestant churches avoided. This happened, for example, at the colonial exhibitions of Lyon (1894), Berlin 1896 (although this also involved Protestant churches) and Brussels-Tervuren (1897), as well as at the National Exhibition of 1898 in Turin. Years later, the great colonial (national and international) exhibitions of the interwar period continued to receive the enthusiastic and uncritical participation of Catholic missions (although some, as in 1931, included Protestant missions too). The most remarkable examples were the Iberian-American Exhibition of Seville in 1929, the International Exhibitions held at Amberes (1930) and Paris (1931), and the Oporto (1934) and Lisbon (1937 and 1940) National Exhibitions.[20] This colonial-missionary association did not prevent the Catholic Church from organising its own autonomous exhibitions, through which it tried to emulate and even surpass its more experienced Protestant counterpart. Their belated effort culminated in two of the most spectacular Christian missionary exhibitions of all time: the Vatican Missionary Exhibition of 1925 and the Barcelona Missionary Exhibition of 1929, which was associated with the great international show of that year (Sánchez-Gómez, 2007 and 2006). Although both events documented native nuns and priests as visitors, no humans were exhibited. Again, dioramas and groups of sculptures were featured, representing both religious figures and indigenous peoples. Let us return to the Protestant world. Whilst it was the reformed churches that most readily incorporated native participation, they seemed to do so in a more sensitive and less brutalised manner than the Genoese Catholic Exhibition of 1892. We know of their presence at the first North American exhibitions: one of which was held at the Ecumenical Conference on Foreign Missions, celebrated in New York in 1909 and, most significantly, at the great interdenominational The World in Boston Exhibition, in 1911 (Hasinoff, 2011). Native participation has also been recorded at the two most important British contemporary exhibitions: The Orient in London (held by the London Missionary Society in 1908) and Africa in the East (organised by the Church Missionary Society in 1909). Both exhibitions toured a number of British towns until the late 1920s, although for the most part without indigenous participation (Coombes, 1994; Cheang, 2006–2007).[21] However, the most spectacular Protestant exhibition, with hundreds of natives, dozens of stands, countless parades, theatrical performances, the latest thrill rides and exotic animals on display, was the gigantic Centenary Exhibition of American Methodist Missions, celebrated in Columbus in 1919 and popularly known as the Methodist’s World Fair (Anderson, 2006).The exhibition model at these early-twentieth century Protestant events was very similar to the colonial model. Native villages were reconstructed and ethnographic collections were presented, alongside examples of local flora and fauna, and of course, an abundance of information about missionary work, in which its evangelising, educational, medical and welfare aspects were presented. Some of these were equally as attractive to the audience (irrespective of their religious beliefs) as contemporary colonial or commercial exhibitions. However, it may be noted that the participation of Christianised natives took a radically different form from those of the colonial and commercial world. Those who were most capable and had a good command of English served as guides in the sections corresponding to their places of origin, a task that they tended to carry out in traditional clothing. More frequently these new Christians assumed roles with less responsibility, such as the manufacture of handicrafts, the sale of exotic objects or the recreation of certain aspects of their previous way of life. The organisers justified their presence by claiming that they were merely actors, representing their now-forgotten savage way of life. This may very well have been the case.At the Protestant exhibitions of the 1920s and 1930s, the presence of indigens became progressively less common until it eventually disappeared. This notwithstanding, the organisers came to benefit from a living resource which complemented displays of ethnographic materials whilst being more attractive to the audience than the usual dioramas. This was a theatrical representation of the native way of life (combined with scenes of missionary interaction) by white volunteers (both men and women) who were duly made up and in some cases appeared alongside real natives. Some of these performances were short, but others consisted of several acts and featured dozens of characters on stage. Regardless of their form, these spectacles were inherent to almost any British and North American exhibition, although much less frequent in continental Europe.Since the 1960s, the Christian missionary exhibition (both Protestant and Catholic) has been conducted along very different lines from those which have been discussed here. All direct or indirect associations with colonialism have been definitively given up; it has broken with racial or ethnological interpretations of converted peoples, and strongly defends its reputed autonomy from any political groups or interests, without forgetting that the essence of evangelisation is to maximize the visibility of its educational and charitable work among the most disadvantaged.
FINAL WORD
The three most important categories of modern ethnic show –commercial ethnological exhibitions, colonial exhibitions and missionary exhibitions– have been examined. All three resorted, to varying degrees, to the exhibition of exotic human beings in order to capture the attention of their audience, and, ultimately, to achieve certain goals: be they success in business and personal enrichment, social, political or financial backing for the colonial enterprise, or support for missionary work. Whilst on occasion they coincided at the same point in time and within the same context of representation, the uniqueness of each form of exhibition has been emphasised. However, this does not mean that they are completely separate phenomena, or that their representation of exotic “otherness” is homogeneous.Missionary exhibitions displayed perhaps the most singular traits due to their spiritual vision. However, it is clear that many made a determined effort to produce direct, visual and emotional spectacles and some, in so doing, resorted to representations of natives which were very similar to those of colonial exhibitions. Can we speak then, of a convergence of designs and interests? I honestly do not think so. At many colonial exhibitions, organisers showed a clear intention to portray natives as fearsome, savage individuals (sometimes even describing them as cannibals) who somehow needed to be subjugated. Peoples who were considered, to a lesser or greater extent, to be civilised were also displayed (as at the interwar exhibitions). However, the purpose of this was often to publicise the success of the colonial enterprise in its campaign for “the domestication of the savage”, rather than to present a message of humanitarianism or universal fraternity. Missionary exhibitions provided information and material examples of the former way of life of the converted, in which natives demonstrated that they had abandoned their savage condition and participated in the exhibition for the greater glory of the evangelising mission. Moreover, they also became living evidence that something much more transcendent than any civilising process was taking place: that once they had been baptised, anyone, no matter how wild they had once been, could become part of the same universal Christian family.It is certainly true that the shows that the audiences enjoyed at all of these exhibitions (whether missionary, colonial or even commercial) were very similar. Yet in the case of the former, the act of exhibition took place in a significantly more humanitarian context than in the others. And while it is evident that indigenous cultures and peoples were clearly manipulated in their representation at missionary exhibitions, this did not mean that the exhibited native was merely a passive element in the game. And there is something more. The dominating and spectacular qualities present in almost all missionary exhibitions should not let us forget one last factor which was essential to their conception, their development and even their longevity: Christian faith. Without Christian faith there would have been no missionary exhibitions, and had anything similar been organised, it would not have had the same meaning. It was essential that authentic Christian faith existed within the ecclesiastical hierarchy and within those responsible for congregations, missionary societies and committees. But the faith that really made the exhibitions possible was the faith of the missionaries, of others who were involved in their implementation and, of course, of those who visited. Although it was never recognised as such, this was perhaps an uncritical faith, complacent in its acceptance of the ways in which human diversity was represented and with ethical values that occasionally came close to the limits of Christian morality. But it was a faith nonetheless, a faith which intensified and grew with each exhibition, which surely fuelled both Christian religiosity (Catholic and Protestant alike) and at least several years of missionary enterprise, years crucial for the imperialist expansionism of the West. It is an objective fact that the display of human beings at commercial and colonial shows was always much more explicit and degrading than at any missionary exhibition. To state what has just been proposed more bluntly: missionary exhibitions were not “human zoos”. However, it is less clear whether the remaining categories: are commercial and colonial exhibitions worthy of this assertion (human zoos), or were they polymorphic ethnic shows of a much greater complexity?The principal analytical obstacle to the use of the term “human zoo” is that it makes an immediate and direct association between all of these acts and contexts and the idea of a nineteenth-century zoo. The images of caged animals, growling and howling, may cause admiration, but also disgust; they may sometimes inspire tenderness, but are mainly something to be avoided and feared due to their savage and bestial condition. This was definitely the case for the organisers of the scientific and editorial project cited at the beginning of this article, so it can be no surprise that Carl Hagenbeck’s joint exhibitions of exotic animals and peoples were chosen as the frame of reference for human zoos. Although the authors state in the first edition that “the human zoo is not the exhibition of savagery but its construction” [“le zoo humain n’est pas l’exhibition de la sauvagerie, mais la construction de celle-ci”] (Bancel et al., 2002: 17), the problem, as Blanckaert (2002) points out, is that this alleged construction or exhibitional structure was not present at most of the exhibitions under scrutiny, nor (and this is an added of mine) at those shown at the Exhibitions. L’invention du sauvage exhibit.Indeed, the expression “human zoo” establishes a model which does not fit with the meagre number of exhibitions of exotic individuals from the sixteenth, seventeenth or eighteenth centuries, nor with that of Saartjie Baartmann (the Hottentot Venus) of the early nineteenth century, much less with the freak shows of the twentieth century. Furthermore, this model can neither be compared to most of the nineteenth-century British human ethnological exhibitions, nor to most of the native villages of the colonial exhibitions, nor to the Wild West show of Buffalo Bill, let alone to the ruralist-traditionalist villages which were set up at many national and international exhibitions until the interwar period. Ultimately, their connection with many wandering “black villages” or “native villages” exhibited by impresarios at the end of the nineteenth century could also be disputed. Moreover, many of the shows organised by Hagenbeck number amongst the most professional in the exhibitional universe. The fact that they were held in zoos should not automatically imply that the circumstances in which they took place were more brutal or exploitative than those of any of the other ethnic shows.It is evident from all the shows which have been discussed, that the differential racial condition of the persons exhibited not only formed the basis of their exhibition, but may also have fostered and even founded racist reactions and attitudes held by the public. However, there are many other factors (political, economic and even aesthetic) which come into play and have barely been considered, which could be seen as encouraging admiration of the displays of bodies, gestures, skills, creations and knowledge which were seen as both exotic and seductive.In fact, the indiscriminate use of the very successful concept of “human zoo” generates two fundamental problems. Firstly it impedes our “true” knowledge of the object of study itself, that is, of the very varied ethnic shows which it intends to catalogue, given the great diversity of contexts, formats, persons in charge, objectives and materialisations that such enterprises have to offer. Secondly, the image of the zoo inevitably recreates the idea of an exhibition which is purely animalistic, where the only relationship is that which exists between exhibitor and exhibited: the complete domination of the latter (irrational beasts) by the former (rational beings). If we accept that the exhibited are treated merely as as more-or-less worthy animals, the consequences are twofold: a logical rejection of such shows past, present and future, and the visualization of the exhibited as passive victims of racism and capitalism in the West. It is therefore of no surprise that the research barely considers the role that these individuals may have played, the extent to which their participation in the show was voluntary and the interests which may have moved some of them to take part in these shows. Ultimately, no evaluation has been made of how these shows may have provided “opportunity contexts” for the exhibited, whether as commercial, colonial or missionary exhibitis. Whilst it is true that the exhibited peoples’ own voice is the hardest to record in any of these shows, greater effort could have been made in identifying and mapping them, as, when this happens, the results obtained are truly interesting (Dreesbach, 2005: 78).Before we conclude, it must be said that the proposed analysis does not intend to soften or justify the phenomenon of the ethnic show. Even in the least dramatic and exploitative cases it is evident that the essence of these shows was a marked inequality, in which every supposed “context of interaction” established a dichotomous relationship between black and white, North and South, colonisers and colonised, and ultimately, between dominators and dominated. My intention has been to propose a more-or-less classifying and clarifying approach to this varied world of human exhibitions, to make a basic inventory of their forms of representation and to determine which are the essential traits that define them, without losing sight of the contingent factors which they rely upon.

NOTES

ABSTRACT
The aim of this article is to study the living ethnological exhibitions. The main feature of these multiform varieties of public show, which became widespread in late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century Europe and the United States, was the live presence of individuals who were considered “primitive”. Whilst these native peoples sometimes gave demonstrations of their skills or produced manufactures for the audience, more often their role was simply as exhibits, to display their bodies and gestures, their different and singular condition. In this article, the three main forms of modern ethnic show (commercial, colonial and missionary) will be presented, together with a warning about the inadequacy of categorising all such spectacles under the label of “human zoos”, a term which has become common in both academic and media circles in recent years.Figure 8.   Postcard from the Deutsche Colonial-Ausstellung, Gewerbe Ausstellung (German Colonial Exhibition, Industrial Exhibition, Berlin 1896). Historische Bildpostkarten, Universität Osnabrück, Sammlung Prof. Dr. S. Giesbrecht (http://www.bildpostkarten.uni-osnabrueck.de).

[1]In order to avoid loading the text through the excessive use of punctuation marks, I have decided not to put words as blacks, savages or primitives in inverted commas; but by no means does this mean my acceptance of their contemporary racist connotations.

[2]Apart from its magnificent catalogue, the contents of the exhibition are also available online: http://www.quaibranly.fr/uploads/tx_gayafeespacepresse/MQB_DP_Exhibitions_01.pdf [accessed 13/November/2012].

[3]Missionary exhibitions are not an integral part of the repertoire of exhibitions studied as part of the French project on “Human zoos”, nor do they appear at the great Quai de Branly exhibition of 2012.

[4]The Marseille and Paris exhibitions competed with each other. The Festival of Empire was organised in London to celebrate the coronation of George V, thus also being known as the Coronation Exhibition. For more information about these and other British colonial exhibitions, or exhibitions which had important colonial sections, organised between 1890 and 1914, see Coombes (1994: 85–108) and Mackenzie (2008).

[5]These were the Franco-British exhibition (1908) and the Japan-British Exhibition (1910); although their contents were not exclusively colonial these do make up an important part of the exhibitions. They are both private and run by the successful show businessman Imre Kiralfy. For the former, see Coombes (1994: 187–213), Leymarie (2009) and Geppert (2010: 101–133); and for the latter, Mutsu (2001).
[6]This was the International Imperial Exhibition, where the Great Britain, France and Russia took part, although other countries also had a minor presence. It was organized by the businessman Imre Kiralfy.
[7]The exhibition fever of those years even hit Japan, where colonial and anthropological exhibitions were organized in Osaka (1903) and Tokyo (1913). These showed Ainu peoples and persons from the newly incorporated territories of the Japanese Empire (Siddle, 1996; Nanta, 2011).
[8]For a good summary of the extensive colonial propaganda movement which spread around Europe during the interwar period (with detailed references to the exhibitions) see Stanard (2009).
[9]British Empire Exhibition.
[10]After its defeat in the Great War, the 119 Versailles Treaty article specified that Germany should give up all its overseas territories. Therefore, whenever exhibitions were celebrated during the interwar period Germany lacked any possessions whatsoever. Thus, German competitions mentioned (including Vienna) were nothing but mere patriotic exhibitions of colonial revisionism, which were celebrated during the Weimar Republic and reached their heyday in the Nazi era.
[11]This was the Mostra Coloniale Celebrativa della Vittoria Imperiale, a propagandist national-colonial exhibition of a strong rationalist character.
[12]This was the British Empire Exhibition.
[13]This was the grandiose Prima (and unique) mostra triennale delle Terre Italiane d’Oltremare, which was to be celebrated between the 9 of May and the 15 of October 1940, and which was suspended after a month owing to Mussolini’s declaration of war on France and Great Britain. See Kivelitz (1999: 162–171), Abbattista and Labanca (2008), Vargaftig (2010) and, more specifically, Dore (1992).
[14]The available literature on the exhibition of 1931 is very abundant. A very brief selection of titles could include the following: Ageron (1984), Blévis et al. (2008), Exposition Coloniale (2006), Hodeir and Pierre (1991), L’ Estoile (2007), Lebovics (2008) and Morton (2000).
[15]However, the organization of two purely commercial ethnological exhibitions was authorized.
[16]On the Congolese section of the 1958 Brussels exhibition, the works of Cornelis (2005), Halen (1995), and Stanard (2005 and 2011) can be used as references.
[17]The territory of Rwanda-Urundi (former German colony of Rwanda and Burundi) was administered as a trusteeship by Belgium from 1924, on accepting a League of Nations mandate which was renewed through the UN after the end of the Second World War.
[18]For the encounters and disagreements between Christian exhibitions and Universal exhibitions during the nineteenth century, see Sánchez-Gómez (2011).
[19]The New-Zealander (Auckland), 22 October 1851. Available at http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast [accessed 3/April/2009].
[20]This was the Historical Exhibition of Occupation (1937) and the Exhibition of the Portuguese World (1940); For the Catholic Church’s participation in these events, see Sánchez-Gómez (2009).
[21]The presence of natives has not been recorded at Protestant exhibitions celebrated in France, Sweden, Switzerland or Germany during those years.

REFERENCES


Abbattista, Guido and Labanca, Nicola (2008) “Living ethnological and colonial exhibitions in liberal and fascist Italy”. In Human Zoos. Science and spectacle in the age of colonial empires, edited by Blanchard, P. et al., Liverpool University Press, Liverpool, pp. 341–352.
Ageron, Charles-Robert (1984) “L’Exposition Coloniale de 1931: Mythe républicaine ou mythe impérial?” In Les lieux de mémoire, edited by Nora, Pierre, Gallimard, Paris, I, pp. 561–591.
Ames, Eric (2008) Carl Hagenbeck’s Empire of Entertainments. University of Washington Press, Washington.
Anderson, Christopher J. (2006) “The world is our parish: remembering the 1919 Protestant missionary fair”. International Bulletin of Missionary Research (October) http://www.thefreelibrary.com/The world is our parish: remembering the 1919 Protestant missionary…-a0153692261. [accessed 11/October/2013]
Arnold, Stefan (1995) “Propaganda mit Menschen aus Übersee. Kolonialausstellungen in Deutschland 1896 bis 1940”. In Kolonialausstellungen. Begegnungen mit Afrika?, edited by Debusmann, Robert and Riesz, János, IKO-Verlag für interkulturelle Kommunikation, Frankfurt, pp. 1–24.
Báez, Christian and Mason, Peter (2006) Zoológicos humanos: Fotografías de fueguinos y mapuche en el Jardin d’Acclimatation de París, siglo XIX. Pehuén Editores, Providencia, Santiago.
Bancel, Nicolas; Blanchard, P.; Böetsch, G.; Derro, É. and Lemaire, S. (editors), (2002) Zoos humains. De la Vénus hottentote aux reality shows (XIXe et XXe siècles). Éditions La Decouverte, Paris.
Bancel, Nicolas; Blanchard, P.; Böetsch, G.; Derro, É. and Lemaire, S. (editors), (2004) Zoos humains. Au temps des exhibitions humains. Éditions La Découverte, Paris.
Bergougniou, Jean-Michel; Clignet, Rémi and David, Philippe (2001) “Villages noirs” et autres visiteurs africains et malgaches en France et en Europe (1870–1940). Éditions Karthala, Paris.
Blanchard, Pascal; Bancel, N.; Boëtsch, G.; Deroo, E.; Lemaire, S. and Forsdick, Ch. (editors), (2008), Human Zoos. Science and spectacle in the age of colonial empires. Liverpool University Press, Liverpool.
Blanchard, Pascal; Bancel, N.; Boëtsch, G.; Deroo, E. and Lemaire, S. (editors), (2011), Zoos humains et exhibitions coloniales. 150 ans d’inventions de l’Autre. La Découverte, Paris.
Blanchard, Pascal; Boëtsch, Gilles and Snoep, Nanette J. (editors), (2011) Exhibitions. L’invention du sauvage. Actes Sud and Musée du Quai Branly, Paris.
Blanchard, Pascal; Bancel, N.; Boëtsch, G.; Deroo, E. and Lemaire, S. (editors), (2012) MenschenZoos. Schaufenster der Unmenschlichkeit. Les éditions du Crieur Public, Hamburg.
Blanckaert, Claude (2002) “Spectacles ethniques et culture de masse au temps des colonies”. Revue d’Histoire des Sciences Humaines, 7: 223–232. http://dx.doi.org/10.3917/rhsh.007.0223
Blévis, Laure et al. (editors), (2008) 1931: Les étrangers au temps de l’Exposition coloniale. Editions Gallimard and Cité nationale de l’histoire de l’inmigration, Paris.
Bloembergen, Marieke (2006) Colonial Spectacles: The Netherlands and the Dutch East Indies at the World Exhibitions, 1880–1931. Singapore University Press, Singapore.
Bottaro, Mario (1984) Genova 1892 e le celebrazione colombiane. Francesco Pirella Editore, Genoa.
Cantor, Geoffrey (2011) Religion and the Great Exhibition of 1851. Oxford University Press, Oxford. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199596676.001.0001
Cheang, Sarah (2006–07) “Our Missionary Wembley: China, Local Community and the British Missionary Empire, 1901–1924”. East Asian History, 32–33: 177–198.
Considine, John J. (1925) The Vatican Mission Exposition: A Window on the World. The MacMillan Company, New York.
Coombes, Annie E. (1994) Reinventing Africa: Museums, Material Culture and Popular Imagination. Yale University Press, New Haven and London.
Cornelis, Sabine (2005) “Le colonisateur satisfait, ou le Conggo représenté en Belgique (1897–1958)”. In La mémoire du Congo. Le temps colonial, edited by Vellut, J-L, Musée Royal de l’Afrique centrale, Éditions Snoeck, Tervuren and Gand, pp. 159–169.
Coutancier, Benoît and Barthe, Christine (1995) “Au Jardin d’Acclimatation: représentations de l’autre (1877–1890)”. In L’Autre et Nous: “Scènes et Types”. Anthropologues et historiens devant les représentations des populations colonisées, des “ethnies”, des “tribus” et des “races” depuis les conquêtes coloniales, edited by Blanchard, Pascal; Blanchoin, S.; Bancel, N.; Böetsch, G. and Gerbeau, H., SYROS and ACHAC, Paris, pp. 145–150.
David, Philippe (n.d.) 55 ans d’exhibitions zoo-ethnologiques au Jardin d’Acclimatation. Available at http://www.jardindacclimatation.fr/article/le-jardin-vu-par. [accessed 24/July/2012]
Delhalle, Philippe (1985) “Convaincre par le fait: Les expositions universelles en tant qu’instruments de la propagande coloniale belge”. In Zaïre. Cent ans de regards belges 1885–1985, Coopération pour l’Education et la Culture, Brussels, pp. 41–45.
Dore, Gianni (1992) “Ideologia coloniale e senso comune etnografico nella mostra delle terre italiane d’oltremare”. In L’Africa in vetrina: Storie di musei e di esposizioni coloniali in Italia, edited by Labanca, N., Pagus, Paese, pp. 47–65.
Dreesbach, Anne (2005) Gezähmte Wilde. Die Zurschaustellung “exotischer” Menschen in Deutschland 1870–1940. Campus Verlag, Frankfurt and New York.
Exposition Coloniale (2006) L’Exposition Coloniale. 75 ans après, regards sur l’Exposition Coloniale de 1931. Paris, Mairie de Paris 12e. Available at http://www.paris.fr/portail/viewmultimediadocument?multimediadocument-id = 20543 [accessed 8/November/2006].
Geppert, Alexander C. T. (2010) Fleeting Cities: Imperial Expositions in Fin-de-Siècle Europe. Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke. http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/9780230281837
Guardiola, Juan (2006) El imaginario colonial. Fotografía en Filipinas durante el periodo español 1860–1898. Barcelona, National Museum of the Philippines, Sociedad Estatal para la Acción Cultural Exterior de España, Casa Asia
Halen, Pierre (1995) “La représentation du Congo à l’Exposition Universelle de Bruxelles (1958). A propos d’une désignation identitaire”. In Kolonialausstellungen. Begegnungen mit Afrika?, edited by Debusmann, Robert and Riesz, János, IKO-Verlag für interkulturelle Kommunikation, Frankfurt, pp. 75–102.
Hasinoff, Erin L. (2011) Faith in Objects. American Missionary Expositions in the Early Twentieth Century. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/9780230339729
Heyden, Ulrich van der (2002) “Die Kolonial- und die Transvaal-Ausstellung 1896/97”. In Kolonialmetropole Berlin. Eine Spurensuche, edited by Heyden, U. van der and Zeller, J., Berlin Edition, Berlin, pp. 135–142.
Hodeir, Catherine and Pierre, Michel (1991) 1931. La mémoire du siècle. L’Exposition Coloniale. Éditions Complexe, Brussels.
Jennings, Eric T. (2005) “Visions and Representations of the French Empire”. The Journal of Modern History, 77: 701–721. http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/497721
Kasson, Joy S. (2000) Buffalo Bill’s Wild West: Celebrity, Memory, and Popular History. Hill and Wang, New York.
Kivelitz, Christoph (1999) Die Propagandaausstellung in europäischen Diktaturen. Konfrontation und Vergleich: Nationalsozialismus, italienischer Faschismus und UdSSR der Stalinzeit. Verlag Dr. Dieter Winkler, Bochum.
Klös, Ursula (2000) “Völkerschauen im Zoo Berlin zwischen 1878 und 1952”. Bongo. Beiträge sur Tiergärtnerei und Jahresberichte aus dem Zoo Berlin, 30: 33–82.
Kosok, Lisa und Jamin, Mathilde (editors), (1992) Viel Vergnügen. Öffentliche Lustbarkeiten im Ruhrgebiet der Jahrhundertwende. Eine Ausstellung des Ruhrlandmuseums der Stadt Essen, 25. Oktober 1992 bis 12. April 1993. Ruhrlandmuseums der Stadt Essen, Essen.
Kramer, Paul A. (1999) “Making concessions: race and empire revisited at the Philippine Exposition, St. Louis, 1901–1905”. Radical History Review, 73: 74–114.
Küster, Bärbel (2006) “Zwischen Ästhetik, Politik und Ethnographie: Die Präsentation des Belgischen Kongo auf der Weltausstellung Brüssel-Tervuren 1897”. In Die Schau des Fremden: Ausstellungskonzepte zwischen Kunst, Kommerz und Wissenschaft, edited by Grewe, Cordula, Franz Steiner Verlag, Stuttgart, pp. 95–118.
Lebovics, Herman (2008) “The Zoos of the Exposition Coloniale Internationale, Paris 1931”. In Human Zoos. Science and spectacle in the age of colonial empires, edited by P. Blanchard et al. Liverpool University Press, liverpool, pp. 369–376.
Lemaire, Sandrine; Blanchard, P.; Bancel, N.; Boëtsch, G. and Deroo, E. (editors), (2003) Zoo umani. Dalla Venere ottentota ai reality show. Ombre corte, Verona.
L’Estoile, Benoît de (2007) Le gout des autres. De l’Exposition Coloniale aux arts premiers. Flammarion, Paris.
Lewerenz, Susann (2006) Die Deutsche Afrika-Schau (1935–1940): Rassismus, Kolonialrevisionismus und postkoloniale Auseinandersetzungen im nationalsozialistischen Deutschland. Peter Lang, Frankfurt.
Leymarie, Michel (2009) “Les pavillons coloniaux à l’Exposition franco-britannique de 1908”. Synergies Royaume-Uni et Irlande, 2: 69–79.
Liauzu, Claude (2005) “Les historiens saisis par les guerres de mémoires coloniales”, Revue d’histoire moderne et contemporaine, 52 (4bis): 99–109.
Lutz, Hartmut (editor), (2005) The Diary of Abraham Ulrikab. Text and Context. University of Ottawa Press, Ottawa.
Mabire, Jean-Christophe (editor), (2000) L’Exposition Universelle de 1900. L’Harmattan, Paris.
Mackenzie, John M. (2008) “The Imperial Exhibitions of Great Britain”. In Human Zoos. Science and spectacle in the age of colonial empires, edited by Blanchard, P. et al., Liverpool University Press, Liverpool, pp. 259–268.
Mason, Peter (2001) The Live of Images. Reaktion Books, London.
Mathur, Saloni (2000) “Living Ethnological Exhibits: The Case of 1886”. Cultural Anthropology, 15 (4): 492–524. http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/can.2000.15.4.492
McLean, Ian (2012) “Reinventing the Savage”. Third Text, 26 (5): 599–613. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09528822.2012.712769
Minder, Patrick (2008) “Human Zoos in Switzerland”. In Human Zoos. Science and spectacle in the age of colonial empires, edited by Blanchard, P. et al., Liverpool University Press, Liverpool, pp. 328–340.
Möhle, Heiko (n.d.) “Betreuung, Erfassung, Kontrolle – Afrikaner in Deutschland und die ‘Deutsche Gesellschaft für Eingeborenenkunde’ (1884–1945)”. berliner-postkolonial. Available at http://www.berlin-postkolonial.de/cms/index.php?option = com_content&view = article&id = 38:martin-luther-strasse-97&catid = 20:tempelhof-schoeneberg [accessed 10/October/2012].
Morton, Patricia A. (2000) Hybrid modernities: architecture and representation at the 1931 Colonial Exposition, Paris. The MIT Press, Cambridge, Ma.
Nagel, Stefan (2010) Schaubuden. Geschichte und Erscheinungsformen. Münster. Available at http://www.schaubuden.de [accessed 29/April/2010].
Nanta, Arnaud (2011) “Les expositions coloniales et la hiérarchie des peuples dans le Japon moderne”. In Zoos humains et exhibitions coloniales. 150 ans d’inventions de l’Autre, edited by Blanchard, P. et al., La Découverte, Paris, pp. 373–384.
Palermo, Lynn E. (2003) “Identity under construction: Representing the colonies at the Paris Exposition Universelle of 1889”. In The color of liberty: Histories of race in France edited by Peabody, Sue and Tyler, Stovall, Duke University Press, Durham, pp. 285–300.
Parezo, Nancy J. and Fowler, Don D. (2007) Anthropology Goes to the Fair: The 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition. University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln and London.
Parsons, Thad (2010) [Review of] “Pascal Blanchard, Nicolas Bancel, Gilles Boëtsch, Éric Deroo and Sandrine Lemaire (eds), Teresa Bridgeman (trans.), Human Zoos: Science and Spectacle in the Age of Colonial Empires, Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2008, paperback £19.95, pp. X + 445.” Museum and Society, 8 (3): 215–216. Available at http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/museumstudies/museumsociety/volumes/volume8 [accesed 11/October/2013].
Perrone, Michele (n.d.) “Esposizione Italo-Americana Genova 1892. Celebrativa del IV centenario della scoperta dell’ America”. Available at http://www.lanternafil.it/Public/Expo92/Esposizione.htm [accessed 26/October/2007].
Qureshi, Sadiah (2011) Peoples on Parade: Exhibitions, Empire, and Anthropology in Nineteenth-century Britain. Chicago University Press, Chicago. http://dx.doi.org/10.7208/chicago/9780226700984.001.0001
Richter, Roland (1995) “Die erste Deutsche Kolonialsusstellung 1896. Der ‘Amtliche Bericht’ in historischer Perspektive”. In Kolonialausstellungen. Begegnungen mit Afrika?, edited by Debusmann, Robert and Riesz, János, IKO-Verlag für interkulturelle Kommunikation, Frankfurt, pp. 25–42.
Rydell, Robert W. (1984) All the world’s a fair: visions of Empire at American International Expositions, 1876–1916. University of Chicago Press, Chicago.
Rydell, Robert W. (1993) World of fairs. The century-of-progress expositions. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago.
Rydell, Robert W.; Findling, J. E. and Pelle, K. D. (2000) Fair America: World’s fairs in the United States. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington DC.
Sánchez-Arteaga, Juanma and El-Hani, Charbel Niño (2010) “Physical anthropology and the description of the ‘savage’ in the Brazilian Anthropological Exhibition of 1882”. História, Ciências, Saúde – Manguinhos, 17 (2): 399–414. http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0104-59702010000200008
Sánchez-Gómez, Luis Á. (2003) Un imperio en la vitrina: el colonialismo español en el Pacífico y la Exposición de Filipinas de 1887. Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Madrid.
Sánchez-Gómez, Luis Á. (2006) “Martirologio, etnología y espectáculo: la Exposición Misional Española de Barcelona (1929–1930)”. Revista de Dialectología y Tradiciones Populares, LXI (1): 63–102.
Sánchez-Gómez, Luis Á. (2007) “Por la Etnología hacia Dios: la Exposición Misional Vaticana de 1925”, Revista de Dialectología y Tradiciones Populares, LXII (2): 63–107.
Sánchez-Gómez, Luis Á. (2009) “Imperial faith and catholic missions in the grand exhibitions of the Estado Novo”. Análise Social, 193: 671–692.
Sánchez-Gómez, Luis Á. (2011) “Imperialismo, fe y espectáculo: la participación de las Iglesias cristianas en las exposiciones coloniales y universales del siglo XIX”. Hispania. Revista Española de Historia, 237: 153–180.
Sánchez-Gómez, Luis Á. (2013) Dominación, fe y espectáculo: Las exposiciones misionales y coloniales en la era del imperialismo moderno (1851–1958). Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Madrid.
Schneider, William H. (2002) “Les expositions ethnographiques du Jardin zoologique d’acclimatation”. In Zoos humains. XIXe et XXe siècles, edited by Bancel, N. et al., Éditions La Decouverte, Paris, pp. 72–80.
Schwarz, Werner M. (2001) Anthropologische Spektakel: Zur Schaustellung “exotischer” Menschen, Wien 1870–1910. Turia und Kant, Vienna.
[Serén, Maria do Carmo] (2001) A Porta do Meio. A Exposição Colonial de 1934. Fotografias da Casa Alvão. Ministério da Cultura, Centro Portugués de Fotografia, Porto.
Siddle, Richard (1996) Race, Resistance and the Ainu of Japan. Routledge, London and New York.
Staehelin, Balthasar (1993) Völkerschauen im Zoologischen Garten Basel 1879–1935. Basler Afrika Bibliographien, Basel.
Stanard, Matthew G. (2005) “‘Bilan du monde pour un monde plus deshumanisé’: The 1958 Brussels World’s Fair and Belgian perceptions of the Congo”. European History Quarterly, 35 (2): 267–298. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0265691405051467
Stanard, Matthew G. (2009) “Interwar Pro-Empire Propaganda and European Colonial Culture: Toward a Comparative Research Agenda”. Journal of Contemporary History, 44 (I): 27–48. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022009408098645
Stanard, Matthew G. (2011) Selling the Congo. A History of European Pro-Empire Propaganda and the Making of Belgian Imperialism. University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln and London.
Thode-Arora, Hilke (1989) Für fünfzig Pfennig um die Welt. Die Hagenbeckschen Völkerschauen, Campus Verlag, Frankfurt and New York.
Tran, Van Troi (2007) “L’éphémère dans l’éphémère. La domestication des colonies à l’Exposition universelle de 1889”. Ethnologies, 29 (1–2): 143–169. http://dx.doi.org/10.7202/018748ar
Vargaftig, Nadia (2010) “Les expositions coloniales sous Salazar et Mussolini (1930–1940)”. Vingtième Siècle. Revue d’histoire, 108: 39–53.
Wilson, Michael (1991) “Consuming History: The Nation, the Past and the Commodity at l’Exposition Universelle de 1900”. American Journal of Semiotics, 8 (4): 131–154. http://dx.doi.org/10.5840/ajs1991848
Wynants, Maurits (1997) Des Ducs de Brabant aux villages Congolais. Tervuren et l’Exposition Coloniale 1897. Musée Royal de l’Afrique Centrale, Tervuren.
Wyss, Beat (2010) Bilder von der Globalisierung. Die Weltausstellung von Paris 1889, Insel Verlag, Franfurkt.

Voir aussi:

Human zoos: When people were the exhibits
Annika Zeitler
Dw.com
10.03.2017

From the German Empire through the 1930s, humans were locked up and exhibited in zoos. These racist « ethnological expositions » remain a traumatizing experience for Theodor Wonja Michael.

« We went throughout Europe with circuses, and I was always traveling – from Paris to Riga, from Berne to Bucharest via Warsaw, » remembers Theodor Wonja Michael. He is the youngest son of a Cameroonian who left the then German colony at the turn of the century to live in the German Empire.

« We danced and performed along with fire-eaters and fakirs. I began hating taking part in these human zoos very early on, » says the now 92-year-old. For several years, did stopped talking about that period in his life. Then in 2013, Theodor Wonja Michael wrote about his and his family’s story in the book « Deutsch sein und schwarz dazu » (Being German and also Black).

Traveling with a human zoo

Theodor Wonja Michael’s father moved with his family from Cameroon to Europe at the end of the 19th century. In Berlin, he quickly realized that he wouldn’t be allowed to do normal jobs. The only available way of making a living was through ethnological expositions, also called human zoos.

At the time, performers of a human zoo would tour through Europe just like rock bands today. They were scheduled to do several presentations a day while visitors would gawk at them.

« In some cases, the performers had contracts, but they didn’t know what it meant to be part of Europe’s ethnological expositions, » says historian Anne Dreesbach. Most of them were homesick; some died because they didn’t manage to get vaccinated. That’s how an Inuit family, which was part of an exhibition, died of smallpox after shows in Hamburg and Berlin in 1880. Another group of Sioux Indians died of vertigo, measles and pneumonia.

Carl Hagenbeck’s exposition of ‘exotics’

A 1927 photo of Carl Hagenbeck, surrounded by the Somalians he put in a Hamburg zoo

Up until the 1930s, there were some 400 human zoos in Germany.

The first big ethnological exposition was organized in 1874 by a wild animal merchant from Hamburg, Carl Hagenbeck. « He had the idea to open zoos that weren’t only filled with animals, but also people. People were excited to discover humans from abroad: Before television and color photography were available, it was their only way to see them, » explains Anne Dreesbach, who published a book on the history of human zoos in Germany a few year ago.

An illusion of travel

The concept already existed in the early modern age, when European explorers brought back people from the new areas they had traveled to. Carl Hagenbeck took this one step further, staging the exhibitions to make them more attractive: Laplanders would appear accompanied by reindeer, Egyptians would ride camels in front of cardboard pyramids, Fuegians would be living in huts and had bones as accessories in their hair. « Carl Hagenbeck sold visitors an illusion of world travel with his human zoos, » says historian Hilke Thode-Arora from Munich’s ethnological museum.

How Theodor Wonja Michael experienced racism in Germany

« In these ethnological expositions, we embodied Europeans perception of ‘Africans’ in the 1920s and 30s – uneducated savages wearing raffia skirts, » explains Theodor Wonja Michael. He still remembers how strangers would stroke his curled hair: « They would smell me to check if I was real and talked to me in broken German or with signs. »

Hordes of visitors

Theodor Wonja Michael’s family was torn apart after the death of his mother, who was a German seamstress from East Prussia. A court determined that the father couldn’t properly raise his four children, and operators of a human zoo officially became the young Theodor’s foster parents in the 1920s. « Their only interest in us was for our labor, » explains Michael.

All four children were taken on by different operators of ethnological expositions and had to present and sell « a typical African lifestyle » for a curious public, like their father had done previously. For Theodor Wonja Michael, it was torture.

Just like fans want to see stars up close today, visitors at the time wanted to see Fuegians, Eskimos or Samoans. When one group decided to stay hidden in their hut during the last presentation of a day in a Berlin zoo in November 1881, thousands of visitors protested by pushing down fences and walls and destroying banks. « This shows what these expositions subconsciously triggered in people, » says Dreesbach.

Theodor Wonja Michael was nine years old when his father died in 1934, aged 55. He only has very few memories of him left. From his siblings’ stories, he knows that his father worked as an extra on silent films at the beginning of the 1920s. The whole family was brought with him to the studio and also hired as extras because they were viewed as « typically African. »

Several human zoos stopped running after the end of World War I. Hagenbeck organized his last show of « exotic people » in 1931 – but that didn’t end discrimination.

Theodor Wonja Michael’s book is available in German under the title, « Deutsch sein und Schwarz dazu. Erinnerungen eines Afro-Deutschen » (Being German and also Black. Memoires of an Afro-German).

Voir de même:

REVIEW: The Strange Tale of a Coney Island ‘Doctor’ Who Saved 7,000 Babies

The Strange Case of Dr. Couney: How a Mysterious European Showman Saved Thousands of American Babies by Dawn Raffel (Blue Rider Press, 284 pp.)

By Laura Durnell

The National Book Review

8.15. 2018

With a couturier’s skill, Dawn Raffel’s The Strange Case of Dr. Couney: How a Mysterious European Showman Saved Thousands of American Babies threads facts and education into a dramatic and highly unusual narrative.  The enigmatic showman Martin Couney showcased premature babies in incubators to early 20th century crowds on the Coney Island and Atlantic City boardwalks, and at expositions across the United States. A Prussian-born immigrant based on the East coast, Couney had no medical degree but called himself a physician, and his self-promoting carnival-barking incubator display exhibits actually ended up saving the lives of about 7,000 premature babies. These tiny infants would have died without Couney’s theatrics, but instead they grew into adulthood, had children, grandchildren, great grandchildren and lived into their 70s, 80s, and 90s. This extraordinary story reveals a great deal about neonatology, and about life.

Raffel, a journalist, memoirist and short story writer, brings her literary sensibilities and great curiosity, to Couney’s fascinating tale. Drawing on extraordinary archival research as well as interviews, her narrative is enhanced by her own reflections as she balanced her shock over how Couney saved these premature infants and also managed to make a living by displaying them like little freaks to the vast crowds who came to see them. Couney’s work with premature infants began in Europe as a carnival barker at an incubator exposition. It was there he fell in love with preemies and met his head nurse Louise Recht. Still, even allowing for his evident affection, making the preemies incubation a public show seems exploitative.

But was it? In the 21st century, hospital incubators and NICUs are taken for granted, but over a hundred years ago, incubators were rarely used in hospitals, and sometimes they did far more harm than good.  Premature infants often went blind because of too much oxygen pumped into the incubators (Raffel notes that Stevie Wonder, himself a preemie, lost his sight this way). Yet the preemies Couney and his nurses — his wife Maye, his daughter Hildegard, and lead nurse Louise, known in the show as “Madame Recht” — cared for retained their vision. The reason? Couney was worried enough about this problem to use incubators developed by M. Alexandre Lion in France, which regulated oxygen flow.

Today it is widely accept that every baby – premature or ones born to term – should be saved.  Not so in Couney’s time. Preemies were referred to as “weaklings,” and even some doctors believed their lives were not worth saving. While Raffel’s tale is inspiring, it is also horrific. She does not shy away from people like Dr. Harry Haiselden who, unlike Couney, was an actual M.D., but “denied lifesaving treatment to infants he deemed ‘defective,’ deliberately watching them die even when they could have lived.”

Haiselden’s behavior and philosophy did not develop in a vacuum. Nazi Germany’s shadow looms large in Raffel’s book. Just as they did with America’s Jim Crow laws, Raffel acknowledges the Nazis took America’s late nineteenth and early twentieth century fascination with eugenics and applied it to monstrous ends in the T4 euthanasia program and the Holocaust. To better understand Haiselden’s attitude, Raffel explains the role eugenics played throughout Couney’s lifetime. She dispassionately explains the theory of eugenics, how its propaganda worked and how belief in eugenics manifested itself in 20th century America.

Ultimately, Couney’s compassion, advocacy, resilience, and careful maintenance of his self-created narrative to the public rose above this ignorant cruelty. True, he was a showman, and during most of his career, he earned a good living from his incubator babies show, but Couney, an elegant man who fluently spoke German, French and English, didn’t exploit his preemies (Hildegard was a preemie too).  He gave them a chance at the lives they might not have been allowed to live. Couney used his showmanship to support all of this life-saving. He put on shows for boardwalk crowds, but he also, despite not having a medical degree, maintained his incubators according to high medical standards.

In many ways, Couney’s practices were incredibly advanced. Babies were fed with breast milk exclusively, nurses provided loving touches frequently, and the babies were held, changed and bathed. “Every two hours, those who could suckle were carried upstairs on a tiny elevator and fed by breast by wet nurses who lived in the building,” Raffel writes.  “The rest got the funneled spoon.”

Yet the efforts of Dr. Couney’s his nurses went largely ignored by the medical profession and were only mentioned once in a medical journal. As Raffel writes in her book’s final page, “There is nothing at his  grave to indicate that [Martin Couney] did anything of note.” The same goes for Maye, Louise and Hildegard. Louise’s name was misspelled on her shared tombstone (Louise’s remains are interred in another family’s crypt), and Hildegard, whose remains are interred with Louise’s, did not even have her own name engraved on the shared tombstone.

With the exception of Chicago’s Dr. Julius Hess, who is considered the father of neonatology, the majority of the medical establishment patronized and excluded Couney. Hess, though, respected Couney’s work and built on it with his own scientific approach and research; in the preface to his book Premature and Congenitally Diseased Infants, Hess acknowledges Couney “‘for his many helpful suggestions in the preparation of the material for this book.’” But Couney cared more about the babies than professional respect. His was a single-minded focus: even when it financially devastated him to do so, he persisted, so his preemies could live.

A Talmud verse Raffel cites early in her book sums up Martin Couney: “If one saves a single life, it is as if one has saved the world.” The Strange Case of Dr. Couney gives Couney his due as a remarkable human being who used his promotional ability for the betterment of premature infants, and for, 7,000 times over, saving the world.


Laura Durnell’s work has appeared in The Huffington Post, Fifth Wednesday Journal, Room, The Antigonish Review, Women’s Media Center, Garnet News, others. She currently teaches at DePaul University, tutors at Wilbur Wright College, one of the City Colleges of Chicago, and is working on her first novel. Twitter handle:  @lauradurnell

Voir par ailleurs:

On te manipule

Une Théorie du complot, c’est quoi ?

Youtubeur cagoulé Une théorie du complot (on parle aussi de conspirationnisme ou de complotisme) est un récit pseudo-scientifique, interprétant des faits réels comme étant le résultat de l’action d’un groupe caché, qui agirait secrètement et illégalement pour modifier le cours des événements en sa faveur, et au détriment de l’intérêt public. Incapable de faire la démonstration rigoureuse de ce qu’elle avance, la théorie du complot accuse ceux qui la remettent en cause d’être les complices de ce groupe caché. Elle contribue à semer la confusion, la désinformation, et la haine contre les individus ou groupes d’individus qu’elle stigmatise.Les 7 commandements de la théorie du complot

1. Derrière chaque événement un organisateur caché tu inventeras

Bureau national des complotsDerrière chaque actualité ayant des causes accidentelles ou naturelles (mort ou suicide d’une personnalité, crash d’avion, catastrophe naturelle, crise économique…), la théorie du complot cherche un ou des organisateurs secrets (gouvernement, communauté juive, francs-maçons…) qui auraient manipulé les événements dans l’ombre pour servir leurs intérêts : l’explication rationnelle ne suffit jamais. Et même si les événements ont une cause intentionnelle et des acteurs évidents (attentat, assassinat, révolution, guerre, coup d’État…), la théorie du complot va chercher à démontrer que cela a en réalité profité à un AUTRE groupe caché. C’est la méthode du bouc émissaire.

2. Des signes du complot partout tu verras

Signe du complot La théorie du complot voit les indices de celui-ci partout où vous ne les voyez pas, comme si les comploteurs laissaient volontairement des traces, visibles des seuls « initiés ». Messages cachés sur des paquets de cigarettes, visage du diable aperçu dans la fumée du World Trade Center, parcours de la manifestation Charlie Hebdo qui dessinerait la carte d’Israël… Tout devient prétexte à interprétation, sans preuve autre que l’imagination de celui qui croit découvrir ces symboles cachés. Comme le disait une série célèbre : « I want to believe ! »

3. L’esprit critique tu auras… mais pas pour tout

La théorie du complot a le doute sélectif : elle critique systématiquement l’information émanant des autorités publiques ou scientifiques, tout en s’appuyant sur des certitudes ou des paroles « d’experts » qu’elle refuse de questionner. De même, pour expliquer un événement, elle monte en épingle des éléments secondaires en leur conférant une importance qu’ils n’ont pas, tout en écartant les éléments susceptibles de contrarier la thèse du complot. Son doute est à géométrie variable.

4. Le vrai et le faux tu mélangeras

Affiche "i want to believe"La théorie du complot tend à mélanger des faits et des spéculations sans distinguer entre les deux. Dans les « explications » qu’elle apporte aux événements, des éléments parfaitement avérés sont noués avec des éléments inexacts ou non vérifiés, invérifiables, voire carrément mensongers. Mais le fait qu’une argumentation ait des parties exactes n’a jamais suffi à la rendre dans son ensemble exacte !

5. Le « millefeuille argumentatif » tu pratiqueras

C’est une technique rhétorique qui vise à intimider celui qui y est confronté : il s’agit de le submerger par une série d’arguments empruntés à des champs très diversifiés de la connaissance, pour remplacer la qualité de l’argumentation par la quantité des (fausses) preuves. Histoire, géopolitique, physique, biologie… toutes les sciences sont convoquées – bien entendu, jamais de façon rigoureuse. Il s’agit de créer l’impression que, parmi tous les arguments avancés, « tout ne peut pas être faux », qu’ »il n’y a pas de fumée sans feu ».

6. La charge de la preuve tu inverseras

ILivre sur "la vérité"ncapables (et pour cause !) d’apporter la preuve définitive de ce qu’elle avance, la théorie du complot renverse la situation, en exigeant de ceux qui ne la partagent pas de prouver qu’ils ont raison. Mais comment démontrer que quelque chose qui n’existe pas… n’existe pas ? Un peu comme si on vous demandait de prouver que le Père Noël n’est pas réel.

7. La cohérence tu oublieras

A force de multiplier les procédés expliqués ci-dessus, les théories du complot peuvent être totalement incohérentes, recourant à des arguments qui ne peuvent tenir ensemble dans un même cadre logique, qui s’excluent mutuellement. Au fond, une seule chose importe : répéter, faute de pouvoir le démontrer, qu’on nous ment, qu’on nous cache quelque chose. #OnTeManipule !

Voir enfin:

« Le clip de Nick Conrad illustre la montée de la haine raciale en France »
Céline Pina
Le Figaro
28/09/2018

FIGAROVOX/TRIBUNE – Réagissant au clip du rappeur Nick Conrad appelant à massacrer des «Blancs», Céline Pina assure que cet épisode n’est que la partie visible d’une idéologie raciste de plus en plus violente, prenant les «Blancs» pour cible.

Ancienne élue locale, Céline Pina est essayiste et militante. Elle avait dénoncé en 2015 le salon de «la femme musulmane» de Pontoise et a récemment publié Silence Coupable (éd. Kero, 2016). Avec Fatiha Boutjalhat, elle est la fondatrice de Viv(r)e la République, mouvement citoyen laïque et républicain, appelant à lutter contre tous les totalitarismes et pour la promotion de l’indispensable universalité des valeurs républicaines.


«Je rentre dans des crèches, je tue des bébés blancs,

attrapez-les vite et pendez leurs parents

Écartelez-les pour passer le temps

Divertir les enfants noirs de tout âge, petits et grands.

Fouettez-les fort, faites-le franchement,

Que ça pue la mort, que ça pisse le sang»

Si vous pensez que l’État islamique donne maintenant ses ordres en rimes laborieuses ou que la nouvelle mode est de semer la haine et de lancer des appels au meurtre en chanson, c’est, d’après l’auteur de ce texte, que vous êtes plein de préjugés racistes. Certes tuer des enfants dans les écoles ou les crèches est bien un mot d’ordre que les terroristes islamistes ont lancé, certes le clip de ce rappeur appelle au meurtre de masse des Blancs, mais, selon ses défenseurs, il s’agit d’Art, de création, d’amour incompris. En fait, être choqués par ces paroles, témoignerait d’un refus collectif de prendre conscience de nos fautes et de celles de nos pères et serait un effet de notre racisme ontologique puisque le rappeur explique avoir voulu «inverser les rôles, (…) le système, de manière à ce que Blancs comme noirs puissent se rendre compte de la situation.». Son clip serait «une fiction qui montre des choses qui sont vraiment arrivées au peuple noir.». Rappelons qu’il s’agit ici de montrer des actes de torture, d’humiliation puis l’exécution d’un homme blanc, le tout filmé avec une jouissance sadique.

Au regard de la ligne de défense du rappeur on peut constater d’abord que s’il chante la haine, c’est qu’il la porte en lui. Il la légitime d’ailleurs par l’histoire. Dans son imaginaire et sa représentation du monde, tuer des «blancs» est une œuvre de justice pour un «noir» puisqu’il ne ferait que remettre les compteurs de l’histoire à zéro et venger les souffrances de son peuple, victime de l’esclavage. Sauf que pour raisonner ainsi il faut être profondément inculte et ne pas craindre la falsification historique. L’historien Olivier Petré-Grenouilleau a travaillé sur l’histoire des traites négrières. À l’époque il fut violemment attaqué car son travail déconstruisait un discours idéologique visant à réduire l’esclavage à la seule histoire de l’oppression de l’homme blanc sur l’homme noir. Or la réalité est bien plus diverse. Il y eut trois types de traite: la traite africaine, celle où des noirs capturaient et vendaient des esclaves noirs, on estime cette traite à 14 millions de personnes déportées. La traite arabo-musulmane où les marchands arabes capturaient et vendaient des esclaves noirs, celle-ci a concerné 17 millions d’individus et avait une particularité notable, la castration systématique de tous les hommes. Enfin la traite transatlantique, celle des «blancs», qui a concerné 11 millions d’individus.

Au vu de ce triste constat, nul ne peut pavoiser. Aucune couleur de peau ne peut revendiquer un quelconque avantage moral sur l’autre. En revanche, ce sont les Européens qui ont aboli les premiers l’esclavage, à l’issue d’un travail intellectuel et politique amorcé durant Les Lumières, qui changèrent la conception de l’homme et de la société. Grâce au concept d’égale dignité de l’être humain, il devenait impossible pour un homme d’en posséder un autre. Cette idée d’égalité est une construction, une représentation, une vision de l’homme et du monde qui rendit l’esclavage illégitime. En Europe, cette situation perdure car elle est liée à une perception du monde sur laquelle nous nous efforçons d’appuyer nos lois et nos mœurs. En Afrique et en Orient, l’esclavage existe encore (souvenez-vous des images du marché d’esclaves en Libye) et le combat pour l’abolir complètement est très discret, alors que la mémoire de l’esclavage, en Occident, finie par être instrumentalisée à des fins politiques douteuses. L’esclavage n’intéresse les idéologues gauchistes que pour faire le procès du blanc et justifier tous les passages à l’acte. Ce qui ne sert ni la connaissance historique, ni la lutte contre les discriminations.

Quant à l’excuse par l’art, mobilisée pour donner un boulevard à la haine et censurer ceux qui s’en indignent, elle a pour corollaire le droit de juger et de rejeter du spectateur. Elle a également pour limite l’appel au meurtre. Souvenez-vous de la radio Mille collines au Rwanda. Un bien joli nom pour une entreprise génocidaire. A coup d’appels enflammés et de texte haineux auquel celui-ci n’a rien à envier, elle sema sciemment la détestation et la mort. Et elle fut entendue. Largement.

C’est ce que fait à son niveau ce rappeur. Car son délire ne lui appartient pas en propre. Il relaie une logique, un discours de haine et un projet politique qui a été forgé d’abord aux États-Unis et qui revient ici porté par le PIR (Parti des Indigènes de la République), par l’extrême-gauche et par leurs alliés islamistes. Ce discours de haine raciale est légitimé et s’installe dans nos représentations car cette idéologie trouve des relais politiques et intellectuels. Elle se développe même au sein des universités à travers l’imposture du champ des études post-coloniales, où l’on préfère souvent former des activistes politiques, plutôt que s’astreindre à l’aride rigueur de la démarche scientifique. Ce discours est porté politiquement dans les banlieues où il construit les représentations des jeunes, il est accueilli dans les médias mainstream où les lectures raciales de la société se développent de plus en plus. Cette dérive violente est nourrie par un travail politique mené par des forces identifiables et il porte ses fruits: oui, il y a bien un racisme «anti-blancs» qui se développe dans les banlieues. Oui, on peut se faire agresser pour le seul crime d’être «blanc». Oui, la montée de la haine raciale aujourd’hui participe aux passages à l’acte et à l’explosion de la soi-disant violence gratuite.

Mais cela, une partie du système médiatique le nie, participant aussi à la légitimation de ceux qui font monter les tensions raciales. Imaginons juste qu’un chanteur ait chanté les mêmes horreurs à propos des noirs. Croyez-vous que la presse lui aurait ouvert ses colonnes pour qu’il se justifie? N’eût-il été immédiatement mis au ban par ses pairs? Quand les bien-pensants réclament qu’Eric Zemmour soit interdit d’antenne, alors que sa sortie ridicule n’a rien à voir de près ni de loin avec un appel au meurtre, ils sont curieusement muets quand il s’agit d’un rappeur pourtant indéfendable sur le fond et qui, lui, lance des appels à la haine.

Pire encore, pour ne pas avoir à se positionner sur des sujets épineux, ils vont jusqu’à nier la réalité. C’est Dominique Sopo, président de SOS Racisme, qui refuse de voir monter la haine raciale érigée en posture politique et estime que le racisme anti-blanc n’est qu’une invention de l’extrême-droite. Même son de cloche chez le député France insoumise Eric Cocquerel. En cela, la justification du rappeur qui prétend «inverser», mettre le blanc à la place du noir et évoque un clip copié sur le passage d’un film américain où deux membres du Klu Klux Klan font subir les mêmes atrocités à un homme noir, est calibrée pour fermer la bouche à ceux qui confondent gauche et repentance. Et cela marche. Pourtant le raisonnement sous-tendu par cette référence est stupide: les membres du KKK appartiennent à une idéologie particulière. Ils ne sont pas des références, ni des modèles, encore moins des exemples. Ils font honte à leurs concitoyens et leurs idées politiques sont combattues et rejetées. Ils ne représentent pas les «blancs». Leur donner une telle portée symbolique, c’est un peu comme confondre nazi et allemand ou islamistes et musulmans.

Quant à l’ultime provocation du rappeur, le fait que d’après lui, si on creuse un peu, derrière le couplet «pendez les blancs», c’est de l’amour que l’on entend, nous avons déjà eu droit à ce salmigondis stupide quand Houria Bouteldja a tenté de défendre son livre raciste: «les Blancs, les Juifs et nous». Et s’il fallait une preuve de ce que ce rappeur pense vraiment, la phrase de Malcom X qui clôt son clip nous le rappelle: «Le prix pour faire que les autres respectent vos droits humains est la mort.». Une phrase qui ne peut être entendue par les jeunes que comme un appel au meurtre dans le contexte du clip. Pire, même, qui voit dans le fait de donner la mort, la marque de ceux qui savent se faire respecter. Phrase toute aussi terrible et impressionnante que fausse: le prix pour faire que les autres respectent vos droits est la reconnaissance de l’égale dignité des êtres humains, la fraternité qui naît du partage de cette condition humaine et les devoirs qu’elle nous donne les uns envers les autres. Et la couleur de la peau n’a aucune importance dans cette histoire-là.


Yom Kippour/5779: Attention, un Grand Pardon peut en cacher un autre (Yokes and chains: How much more mass immigration will the West have to endure to atone for its historical wrongs ?)

19 septembre, 2018
Et le bouc sur lequel est tombé le sort pour Azazel sera placé vivant devant l’Éternel, afin qu’il serve à faire l’expiation et qu’il soit lâché dans le désert pour Azazel. (…) Car en ce jour on fera l’expiation pour vous, afin de vous purifier: vous serez purifiés de tous vos péchés devant l’Éternel. Ce sera pour vous un sabbat, un jour de repos, et vous humilierez vos âmes. C’est une loi perpétuelle. Lévitique 16:10-31
Parce qu’aujourd’hui, chez les juifs, c’est le Kippour. Aujourd’hui dans le monde entier, tous les juifs, ils pardonnent à ceux qui leur ont fait du mal. Tous les juifs, sauf un. Moi. Moi, je pardonne pas. Raymond Bettoun
Le monde moderne n’est pas mauvais : à certains égards, il est bien trop bon. Il est rempli de vertus féroces et gâchées. Lorsqu’un dispositif religieux est brisé (comme le fut le christianisme pendant la Réforme), ce ne sont pas seulement les vices qui sont libérés. Les vices sont en effet libérés, et ils errent de par le monde en faisant des ravages ; mais les vertus le sont aussi, et elles errent plus férocement encore en faisant des ravages plus terribles. Le monde moderne est saturé des vieilles vertus chrétiennes virant à la folie.  G.K. Chesterton
Aujourd’hui on repère les boucs émissaires dans l’Angleterre victorienne et on ne les repère plus dans les sociétés archaïques. C’est défendu. René Girard
L’inauguration majestueuse de l’ère « post-chrétienne » est une plaisanterie. Nous sommes dans un ultra-christianisme caricatural qui essaie d’échapper à l’orbite judéo-chrétienne en « radicalisant » le souci des victimes dans un sens antichrétien. (…) Jusqu’au nazisme, le judaïsme était la victime préférentielle de ce système de bouc émissaire. Le christianisme ne venait qu’en second lieu. Depuis l’Holocauste, en revanche, on n’ose plus s’en prendre au judaïsme, et le christianisme est promu au rang de bouc émissaire numéro un. René Girard
Nous sommes entrés dans un mouvement qui est de l’ordre du religieux. Entrés dans la mécanique du sacrilège : la victime, dans nos sociétés, est entourée de l’aura du sacré. Du coup, l’écriture de l’histoire, la recherche universitaire, se retrouvent soumises à l’appréciation du législateur et du juge comme, autrefois, à celle de la Sorbonne ecclésiastique. Françoise Chandernagor
Malgré le titre général, en effet, dès l’article 1, seules la traite transatlantique et la traite qui, dans l’océan Indien, amena des Africains à l’île Maurice et à la Réunion sont considérées comme « crime contre l’humanité ». Ni la traite et l’esclavage arabes, ni la traite interafricaine, pourtant très importants et plus étalés dans le temps puisque certains ont duré jusque dans les années 1980 (au Mali et en Mauritanie par exemple), ne sont concernés. Le crime contre l’humanité qu’est l’esclavage est réduit, par la loi Taubira, à l’esclavage imposé par les Européens et à la traite transatlantique. (…) Faute d’avoir le droit de voter, comme les Parlements étrangers, des « résolutions », des voeux, bref des bonnes paroles, le Parlement français, lorsqu’il veut consoler ou faire plaisir, ne peut le faire que par la loi. (…) On a l’impression que la France se pose en gardienne de la mémoire universelle et qu’elle se repent, même à la place d’autrui, de tous les péchés du passé. Je ne sais si c’est la marque d’un orgueil excessif ou d’une excessive humilité mais, en tout cas, c’est excessif ! […] Ces lois, déjà votées ou proposées au Parlement, sont dangereuses parce qu’elles violent le droit et, parfois, l’histoire. La plupart d’entre elles, déjà, violent délibérément la Constitution, en particulier ses articles 34 et 37. (…) les parlementaires savent qu’ils violent la Constitution mais ils n’en ont cure. Pourquoi ? Parce que l’organe chargé de veiller au respect de la Constitution par le Parlement, c’est le Conseil constitutionnel. Or, qui peut le saisir ? Ni vous, ni moi : aucun citoyen, ni groupe de citoyens, aucun juge même, ne peut saisir le Conseil constitutionnel, et lui-même ne peut pas s’autosaisir. Il ne peut être saisi que par le président de la République, le Premier ministre, les présidents des Assemblées ou 60 députés. (…) La liberté d’expression, c’est fragile, récent, et ce n’est pas total : il est nécessaire de pouvoir punir, le cas échéant, la diffamation et les injures raciales, les incitations à la haine, l’atteinte à la mémoire des morts, etc. Tout cela, dans la loi sur la presse de 1881 modifiée, était poursuivi et puni bien avant les lois mémorielles. Françoise Chandernagor
Les « traites d’exportation » des Noirs hors d’Afrique remontent au VIIe siècle de notre ère, avec la constitution d’un vaste empire musulman qui est esclavagiste, comme la plupart des sociétés de l’époque. Comme on ne peut réduire un musulman en servitude, on répond par l’importation d’esclaves venant d’Asie, d’Europe centrale et d’Afrique subsaharienne. Olivier Pétré-Grenouilleau
A la différence de l’islam, le christianisme n’a pas entériné l’esclavage. Mais, comme il ne comportait aucune règle d’organisation sociale, il ne l’a pas non plus interdit. Pourtant, l’idée d’une égalité de tous les hommes en Dieu dont était porteur le christianisme a joué contre l’esclavage, qui disparaît de France avant l’an mil. Cependant, il ressurgit au XVIIe siècle aux Antilles françaises, bien que la législation royale y prescrive l’emploi d’une main-d’oeuvre libre venue de France. L’importation des premiers esclaves noirs, achetés à des Hollandais, se fait illégalement. Jean-Louis Harouel
Jusqu’ici – mais la vulgate perdure – les synthèses à propos de l’Afrique se limitaient ordinairement à une seule traite: la traite européenne atlantique entre l’Afrique et les Amériques, du XVe siècle à la première partie du XIXe siècle. En fait, jusqu’à la seconde moitié du de ce siècle puisque l’abolition ne met pas fin à la traite qui se poursuit illégalement. Or, le trafic ne s’est borné ni à ces quatre siècles convenus ni à l’Atlantique. La traite des Africains noirs a été pratiquée dans l’Antiquité et au Moyen Age; elle s’est prolongée jusqu’au XXe siècle et se manifeste encore sous divers avatars en ce début de XXIe siècle; elle s’est étendue à l’océan indien et au-delà; elle a été le fait non seulement des Européens, mais des Arabes et des Africains eux-mêmes. Pourtant, le programme de « La Route de l’esclave », élaboré par l’UNESCO et qui visait à briser le silence historique et scientifique observé sur la traite, véhicule, pour des raisons idéologiques (sous la pression des représentants du monde et des états africains), les mêmes distorsions. En effet, l’emploi du singulier (« La Route ») exclut de la reconnaissance et de la construction mémorielle aussi bien la traite interne à l’Afrique, la plus occultée, que les routes transsaharienne et orientale et montre à quel point l’histoire des traites est aujourd’hui un enjeu politique, en raison principalement des réparations que seul le Nord, parmi les régions impliquées, se devrait de verser. Roger Botte
On peut parler aujourd’hui d’invasion arabe. C’est un fait social. Combien d’invasions l’Europe a connu tout au long de son histoire ! Elle a toujours su se surmonter elle-même, aller de l’avant pour se trouver ensuite comme agrandie par l’échange entre les cultures. Pape François
Le Parlement européen a approuvé, le 12 septembre 2018, par 448 contre 197 (avec 48 abstentions), le rapport de l’eurodéputée Sargentini constatant des « risques graves » de violation des « valeurs » de l’Union, selon les termes des articles 2 et 7 du Traité sur l’Union européenne. C’est le début d’une longue procédure qui pourrait, comme dans le cas de la Pologne le 20 décembre dernier, aboutir à l’adoption de sanctions (suspension des droits de vote) pour la Hongrie. (…) Toutefois (…) il est possible que les européistes aient remporté une victoire à la Pyrrhus. Au lendemain du vote, c’est toute l’Europe du groupe de Višegrad (V4) qui risque de se considérer comme mise à l’index. La Pologne, déjà visée en décembre dernier par la procédure de l’article 7, la Tchéquie et la Slovaquie ne peuvent que se solidariser avec la Hongrie au sein du V4. Et la coalition de gouvernement en Autriche ÖVP-FPÖ visée par l’article 7 en 1999 peut elle aussi, à terme, bloquer le processus. Mais surtout, ce revers au Parlement de Strasbourg consacre a contrario le leadership de la Hongrie en étendard d’un mouvement profond sur les échiquiers politiques nationaux qui dépasse le cadres de l’Europe centrale et orientale, comme en témoigne les convergences avec la Ligue de Salvini en Italie ou les Démocrates Suédois à Stockholm. (…) À Varsovie et à Rome, à Stockholm et à Athènes, la Hongrie peut maintenant fédérer tous ceux dénoncent les décisions de l’UE concernant la répartition obligatoire des réfugiés, tous ceux qui prétendent défendre l’identité de l’Europe contre l’islam et tous ceux qui promeuvent un retour des souverainetés nationales. Ce vote peut être le point de départ d’un nouvel élan pour la construction européenne. Il peut aussi devenir l’événement fondateur d’un leadership orbanien dans les opinions publiques des États membres. The Conversation
Dans ce livre, Douglas Murray analyse la situation actuelle de l’Europe dont son attitude à l’égard des migrations n’est que l’un des symptômes d’une fatigue d’être et d’un refus de persévérer dans son être. Advienne que pourra ! « Le Monde arrive en Europe précisément au moment où l’Europe a perdu de vue ce qu’elle est ». Ce qui aurait pu réussir dans une Europe sûre et fière d’elle-même, ne le peut pas dans une Europe blasée et finissante. L’Europe exalte aujourd’hui le respect, la tolérance et la diversité. Toutes les cultures sont les bienvenues sauf la sienne. « C’est comme si certains des fondements les plus indiscutables de la civilisation occidentale devenaient négociables… comme si le passé était à prendre », nous dit Douglas Murray. Seuls semblent échapper à celle langueur morbide et masochiste les anciens pays de la sphère soviétique. Peut-être que l’expérience totalitaire si proche les a vaccinés contre l’oubli de soi. Ils ont retrouvé leur identité et ne sont pas prêts à y renoncer. Peut-être gardent-ils le sens d’une cohésion nationale qui leur a permis d’émerger de la tutelle soviétique, dont les Européens de l’Ouest n’ont gardé qu’un vague souvenir. Peut-être ont-ils échappé au complexe de culpabilité dont l’Europe de l’Ouest se délecte et sont-ils trop contents d’avoir survécu au soviétisme pour se voir voler leur destin. Cette attitude classée à droite par l’Europe occidentale est vue, à l’Est, comme une attitude de survie, y compris à gauche comme en témoigne Robert Fico, le Premier ministre de gauche slovaque : «  j’ai le sentiment que, nous, en Europe, sommes en train de commettre un suicide rituel… L’islam n’a pas sa place en Slovaquie. Les migrants changent l’identité de notre pays. Nous ne voulons pas que l’identité de notre pays change. » (2016) Il y a un orgueil à se présenter comme les seuls vraiment méchants de la planète. Tout ce qui arrive, l’Europe en est responsable directement ou indirectement. Comme avant lui Pascal Bruckner, Douglas Murray brocarde l’auto-intoxication des Européens à la repentance. Les gens s’en imbibent, nous dit-il, parce qu’ils aiment ça. Ça leur procure élévation et exaltation. Ça leur donne de l’importance. Supportant tout le mal, la mission de rédemption de l’humanité leur revient. Ils s’autoproclament les représentants des vivants et des morts. Douglas Murray cite le cas d’Andrews Hawkins, un directeur de théâtre britannique qui, en 2006, au mi-temps de sa vie, se découvrit être le descendant d’un marchand d’esclaves du 16ème siècle. Pour se laver de la faute de son aïeul, il participa, avec d’autres dans le même cas originaires de divers pays, à une manifestation organisée dans le stade de Banjul en Gambie. Les participants enchainés, qui portaient des tee-shirts sur lesquels était inscrit « So Sorry », pleurèrent à genoux, s’excusèrent, avant d’être libérés de leurs chaines par  le Vice-Président  gambien. « Happy end », mais cette manie occidentale de l’auto-flagellation, si elle procure un sentiment pervers d’accomplissement, inspire du mépris à ceux qui n’en souffrent pas et les incitent à en jouer et à se dédouaner de leurs mauvaises actions. Pourquoi disputer aux Occidentaux ce mauvais rôle. Douglas Murray raconte une blague de Yasser Arafat qui fit bien rire l’assistance, alors qu’on lui annonçait l’arrivée d’une délégation américaine. Un journaliste présent lui demanda ce que venaient faire les Américains. Arafat lui répondit que la délégation américaine passait par là à l’occasion d’une tournée d’excuses à propos des croisades ! Cette attitude occidentale facilite le report sur les pays occidentaux de la responsabilité de crimes dont ils sont les victimes. Ce fut le cas avec le 11 septembre. Les thèses négationnistes fleurirent, alors qu’on se demandait aux États-Unis qu’est-ce qu’on avait bien pu faire pour mériter cela. Cette exclusivité dans le mal que les Occidentaux s’arrogent ruissèle jusques et y compris au niveau individuel. Après avoir été violé chez lui par un Somalien en avril 2016, un politicien norvégien, Karsten Nordal Hauken, exprima dans la presse la culpabilité qui était la sienne d’avoir privé ce pauvre Somalien, en le dénonçant, de sa vie en Norvège et renvoyé ainsi à un avenir incertain en Somalie. Comme l’explique Douglas Murray, si les masochistes ont toujours existé, célébrer une telle attitude comme une vertu est la recette pour fabriquer « une forte concentration de masochistes ». « Seuls les Européens sont contents de s’auto-dénigrer sur un marché international de sadiques ». Les dirigeants les moins fréquentables sont tellement habitués à notre autodénigrement qu’ils y voient un encouragement. En septembre 2015, le président Rouhani a eu le culot de faire la leçon aux Hongrois sur leur manque de générosité dans la crise des réfugiés. Que dire alors de la richissime Arabie saoudite qui a refusé de prêter les 100 000 tentes climatisées qui servent habituellement lors du pèlerinage et n’a accueilli aucun Syrien, alors qu’elle offrait de construire 200 mosquées en Allemagne ? La posture du salaud éternel, dans laquelle se complait l’Europe, la désarme complètement pour comprendre les assauts de violence dont elle fait l’objet et fonctionne comme une incitation. Beaucoup d’Européens, ce fut le cas d’Angela Merkel, ont cru voir, dans la crise migratoire de 2015, une mise au défi de laver le passé : « Le monde voit dans l’Allemagne une terre d’espoir et d’opportunités. Et ce ne fut pas toujours le cas » (A. Merkel, 31 août 2015). N’était-ce pas là l’occasion d’une rédemption de l’Allemagne qu’il ne fallait pas manquer ?  Douglas Murray décrit ces comités d’accueils enthousiastes qui ressemblaient à ceux que l’on réservait jusque là aux équipes de football victorieuses ou à des combattants rentrant de la guerre. Les analogies avec la période nazie fabriquent à peu de frais des héros. Lorsque la crise migratoire de 2015 survient il n’y a pas de frontière entre le Danemark et la Suède. Il suffisait donc de prendre le train pour passer d’un pays à l’autre. Pourtant, il s’est trouvé une jeune politicienne danoise de 24 ans – Annika Hom Nielsen – pour transporter à bord de son yacht, en écho à l’évacuation des juifs en 1943, des migrants qui préféraient la Suède au Danemark mais qui, pourtant, ne risquaient pas leur vie en restant au Danemark. Si beaucoup de pays expient l’expérience nazie, d’autres expient leur passé colonial. C’est ainsi que l’Australie a instauré le « National Sorry Day » en 1998. En 2008, les excuses du Premier ministre Kevin Rudd aux aborigènes furent suivies de celles du Premier ministre canadien aux peuples indigènes. Aux États-Unis, plusieurs villes américaines ont rebaptisé « Colombus Day » en « Indigenous People Day ». Comme l’écrit Douglas Murray, il n’y a rien de mal à faire des excuses, même si tous ceux à qui elles s’adressent sont morts. Mais, cette célébration de la culpabilité « transforme les sentiments patriotiques en honte ou à tout le moins, en sentiments profondément mitigés ». Si l’Europe doit expier ses crimes passés, pourquoi ne pas exiger de même de la Turquie ? Si la diversité est si extraordinaire, pourquoi la réserver à l’Europe et ne pas l’imposer à, disons, l’Arabie saoudite ? Où sont les démonstrations de culpabilité des Mongols pour la cruauté de leurs ascendants ? « il y a peu de crimes intellectuels en Europe pires que la généralisation et l’essentialisation d’un autre groupe dans le monde».  Mais le contraire n’est pas vrai. Il n’y a rien de mal à généraliser les pathologies européennes, et les Européens ne s’en privent pas eux-mêmes. Michèle Tribalat

Attention: un Grand Pardon peut en cacher un autre !

En cette journée pénitentielle de l’Expiation

Où pour s’assurer un bon nouveau départ dix jours après leur Nouvel An, nos amis juifs font en quelque sorte leur examen de conscience pour l’année précédente …

Comment ne pas repenser …

A cette institution qui donna au monde le terme et la théorie pour débusquer l’un des phénomènes les plus prégnants de notre modernité …

Mais aussi ne pas s’inquiéter …

De ces étranges perversions des vertus judéo-chrétiennes dont le monde moderne est décidément devenu si friand …

D’un Occcident et d’une Europe qui …

A l’image de ces processions de nouveaux flagellants

Qui des Etats-unis et du Royaume-Uni refont à l’envers le tristement fameux voyage de la seule traite atlantique

Pour, chaines aux pieds et jougs autour du cou, demander pardon – cherchez l’erreur ! – aux actuels descendants des esclavagistes africains

N’ont pas de mots assez durs pour fustiger les erreurs de leur propre passé …

Mais aussi, entre leurs classes populaires et les pays tout récemment délivrés du joug communiste, ces peuples …

Qui devant la véritable invasion migratoire qui leur est imposée, ne veulent tout simplement pas mourir ?

Film follows Camano Island family’s effort to atone
Krista J. Kapralos
Herald
February 19, 2008

“So sorry.”

Members of the Lienau family of Camano Island have walked hundreds of miles, over the course of four years and on four continents, to say those words.

Sometimes, there is more explanation:

“I want to apologize on behalf of the United States for the enslavement of African children,” Jacob Lienau said in 2006, when he was just 14 years old, in a stadium in Gambia.

“We’re apologizing for the legacy of the slave trade, particularly where Christians were involved,” Shari Lienau, mother of nine children, said at a Martin Luther King Jr. Day march in Everett that same year.

“I wanted to say I was sorry,” Anna Lienau said two years ago, when she was 12 years old and saving money to travel to Africa to apologize.

But most often, there are just the two simple words, and sometimes they’re not even spoken. When Michael and Shari Lienau and their children march, they wear black T-shirts with “So Sorry” emblazoned in white block letters.

It was in 2004 that filmmaker Michael Lienau and his family first joined Lifeline Expedition, an England-based organization dedicated, for the past seven years, to traveling the world and apologizing for the part of white Europeans and Americans in the African slave trade. The expedition has attracted a loyal group concerned with the long-term effects of slavery on relations among whites and blacks. In historic slave ports in the United States, South America, Caribbean islands, Great Britain and Africa, members of the group, including several Lienau children, allow themselves to be chained and yoked together in a jarring acknowledgment of the practice of human trade.

Michael Lienau documented many of the Lifeline Expedition’s trips and recently completed production on “Yokes and Chains: A Journey to Forgiveness and Freedom.”

The documentary will be shown Wednesday at Everett Community College as part of Black History Month.

Reporter Krista J. Kapralos: 425-339-3422 or kkapralos@heraldnet.com.

See the documentary

“Yokes and Chains: A Journey to Forgiveness and Freedom,” a documentary by Camano Island filmmaker Michael Lienau, is scheduled for 11 a.m. Wednesday at the Parks Building at Everett Community College, at 2000 Tower St., Everett.

To see a trailer for the documentary, go to http://www.yokesandchains.com. To read a 2006 Herald article on the Lienau family and the Lifeline Expedition and see photographs, go to http://www.heraldnet.com/article/20060521/NEWS01/605210777.

Voir aussi:

‘My ancestor traded in human misery’
Mario Cacciottolo
BBC News

Sorry is often said to be the hardest word but Andrew Hawkins felt compelled to apologise to a crowd of thousands of Africans.

His regret was not for his own actions but offered on behalf of his ancestor, who traded in African slaves 444 years ago.

Sir John Hawkins was a 16th Century English shipbuilder, merchant, pirate and slave trader.

He first captured natives of Sierra Leone in 1562 and sold them in the Caribbean. His cousin was Sir Francis Drake, who joined him on expeditions.

Hawkins is famed for reconstructing the design of English ships in the 1580s and commanded part of the fleet which repelled the Spanish Armada in 1588.

‘Family joke’

But it was his drive to acquire and sell African slaves which prompted Hawkins’s distant relation to take his own journey to that continent several centuries later.

Andrew Hawkins, of Liskeard, Cornwall, is a 37-year-old married father-of-three who runs a youth theatre company and claims to be the sailor’s descendant.

« It had always been part of the verbal history of our family, that we were related to Sir John Hawkins.

« It was a standing joke in the family that we had a pirate in the family.

« When I was a child I was quite pleased to learn of this family link and in Plymouth John Hawkins is a bit of a local hero.

« His picture used to be up in a subway there, along with Plymouth heroes. As a boy I used to be pleased to see it and to think I was related to him. »

‘Unjustifiable’

But in 2000 Andrew’s perspective was forever altered when he learned the truth about his ancestor.

« I heard David Pott, from the Lifeline Expedition, speak in 2000 and he mentioned how Hawkins was the first English slave trader.

« It was a bit of a shock and it really challenged me, particularly because Hawkins named his ships things like Jesus of Lubeck and the Grace of God.

SIR JOHN HAWKINS

Born Plymouth, 1535
Cousin of Sir Francis Drake
Famed for voyages to West Africa and South America
Trades slaves in the Caribbean in 1562, beginning England’s participation in slave trade
Helped fight the Spanish Armada in 1588 (Photo: National Maritime Museum)
« That really offended me, particularly the latter name. God’s grace has nothing to do with being chained up in the hold of a ship, lying in your own excrement for several months.

« So often things are done in the name of God that are horrific for mankind and I think God would consider what Sir John Hawkins did to be an abomination.

« It’s quite shocking that he could think it was justifiable. »

Andrew says slavery was never justifiable, even in the 16th Century, when people often say society « didn’t know any different ».

He says: « We don’t try to justify the Jewish Holocaust but this was an African Holocaust.

« We have to face our history and our own personal consequences. I went to show people that I didn’t think what happened was right and not everybody thought it was acceptable. »

Andrew and his fellow members from the Lifeline Expedition made their apology at The International Roots Festival, held in the Gambia in June.

This event, which runs for several weeks, encourages Africans to discover their ancestral identity.

Crowd hushed

The group of 27 spoke up at a football stadium in the capital Banjul, at the end of the festival’s opening ceremony.

They made their way to the stadium by walking through the streets laden in yokes and chains, before eventually speaking their words of atonement.

They included people from European nations such as England, France and Germany but there were also representatives from Jamaica, Barbados, Mali, the Ivory Coast and Sierra Leone.

The apologists walked to the stadium in chains and yokes
« Black people came to apologise because black people sold black people to Europeans, » Andrew said.

Andrew estimates the 25,000-capacity stadium was about two-thirds full, with delegates from African nations, Gambian vice-president, Isatou Njie-Saidy, and Rita Marley, widow of reggae legend Bob Marley, among the crowd.

He says: « The crowd died down to a hush. Some were looking at us, others were reading through their programmes to work out what we were doing.

« One lady at the front must have realised because she started applauding, then everyone did the same.

« That was a moving moment, because I wasn’t sure if they would be happy to see us. »

Multi-lingual apology

The group apologised in French, German and English – the languages of the nations responsible for much of the African slave trade.

It’s never too late to say you’re sorry

Andrew Hawkins
The apology had not been rehearsed. Andrew said: « It’s hard to remember what I said. I did say that as a member of the Hawkins family I did not accept what had happened was right.

« I said the slave trade was an abomination to God and I had come to ask the African people for their forgiveness. »

‘Emotional responses’

Vice-president Njie-Saidy joined them on stage and, in an impromptu speech, said she was « touched » by the apology before coming forward to help the group out of their chains.

Andrew says: « I was really overwhelmed with her generosity because she chose to forgive us, which is a very powerful thing.

« Afterwards people came on to the pitch to talk to us and there were some very emotional responses. »

But does Andrew really believe it was worth apologising for events that happened more than four centuries ago, on behalf of a relative who is so very distant?

« Yes. It’s never too late to say you’re sorry, » he said.

Voir également:

The March of the Abolitionists
Can reconciliation and forgiveness be achieved by wearing the yokes and chains of imprisonment? The abolition marchers believe their 250-mile walk will go at least some way toward promoting a greater understanding of our role in the slave trade.

Campaigners call it ‘an act of apology’ and as such, the March of the Abolitionists is being billed as the first major public event to mark the 200th anniversary of the Abolition of the Slave Trade Act.

Image: Lifeline Expedition website
Beginning in Hull on Friday 2nd March, hundreds of people will don yokes and chains and attempt the 250-mile journey from Humberside to London – the gruelling route taken by enslaved Africans during the period of the Atlantic Slave Trade.

Marching through the county
The abolition marchers’ route will link up sites throughout the country that played a significant role in the slave trade in the United Kingdom.

In Cambridgeshire, these include Wisbech, the birthplace of abolitionist Thomas Clarkson; Cambridge, where both Clarkson and William Wilberforce were educated; and Soham, where the African abolitionist Olaudah Equiano was married.

You’re welcome to walk with the marchers as they pass through your part of the county.

Route details
Monday 12th March – Holbeach to Wisbech
Tuesday 13th March – Wisbech to Wimblington
Wednesday 14th March – Wimblington to Sutton
Thursday 15th March – Sutton to Soham
Friday 16th March – Soham to Cambridge
Saturday 17th March – Cambridge to Royston
Sunday 18th March – Royston (rest day)
Monday 19th March – Royston to Buntingford
The march will culminate in an Anglican Apology event in Greenwich on Saturday 24th March.

Why and who?
The March of the Abolitionists is an initiative of the Lifeline Expedition in partnership with Anti-Slavery International, CARE, Church Mission Society, the Equiano Society, Northumbria Community, Peaceworks, USPG, Wilberforce 2007 (Hull) and Youth With A Mission. The march is also associated with the Set All Free and Stop the Traffik coalitions.

Image: Lifeline Expedition website
Marchers include a number of children aged between five and 15, two of whom will occasionally wear the yokes and chains.  The organisers stress that these children are aged 12 and 15 and have chosen to wear the yokes after seeing pictures of enslaved children.

The march of the Abolitionists aims to bring about an apology for the slave trade, and especially the role of the Church, and so help people deal with its legacy; to raise greater awareness of the true history of both slavery and abolition; remember and celebrate the work of both the black and white abolitionists; and promote greater understanding, reconciliation and forgiveness.


Harcèlement en ligne: Les journalistes ne devraient jamais oublier la responsabilité sociale qu’ils ont (As colonialism-themed bar learns colonialism will only yield to greater violence, cyberbullied journalist recalls the media’s social responsibility)

3 août, 2018

 


"Concerning Violence", un documentaire de Göran Hugo Olsson, © Happiness distribution
trump-targetPresque aucun des fidèles ne se retenait de s’esclaffer, et ils avaient l’air d’une bande d’anthropophages chez qui une blessure faite à un blanc a réveillé le goût du sang. Car l’instinct d’imitation et l’absence de courage gouvernent les sociétés comme les foules. Et tout le monde rit de quelqu’un dont on voit se moquer, quitte à le vénérer dix ans plus tard dans un cercle où il est admiré. C’est de la même façon que le peuple chasse ou acclame les rois. Marcel Proust
Pour qu’il y ait cette unanimité dans les deux sens, un mimétisme de foule doit chaque fois jouer. Les membres de la communauté s’influencent réciproquement, ils s’imitent les uns les autres dans l’adulation fanatique puis dans l’hostilité plus fanatique encore. René Girard
L’inauguration majestueuse de l’ère « post-chrétienne » est une plaisanterie. Nous sommes dans un ultra-christianisme caricatural qui essaie d’échapper à l’orbite judéo-chrétienne en « radicalisant » le souci des victimes dans un sens antichrétien. (…) Jusqu’au nazisme, le judaïsme était la victime préférentielle de ce système de bouc émissaire. Le christianisme ne venait qu’en second lieu. Depuis l’Holocauste, en revanche, on n’ose plus s’en prendre au judaïsme, et le christianisme est promu au rang de bouc émissaire numéro un. René Girard
Le colonialisme n’est pas une machine à penser, n’est pas un corps doué de raison. Il est la violence à l’état de nature et ne peut s’incliner que devant une plus grande violence. Frantz Fanon
La violence du colonisé, avons-nous dit, unifie le peuple. De par sa structure en effet, le colonialisme est séparatiste et régionaliste. Le colonialisme ne se contente pas de constater l’existence de tribus, il les renforce, les différencie. Le système colonial alimente les chefferies et réactive les vieilles confréries maraboutiques. La violence dans sa pratique est totalisante, nationale. De ce fait, elle comporte dans son intimité la liquidation du régionalisme et du tribalisme. Aussi les partis nationalistes se montrent-ils particulièrement impitoyables avec les caïds et les chefs coutumiers. La liquidation des caïds et des chefs est un préalable à l’unification du peuple. Frantz Fanon
Abattre un Européen, c’est faire d’une pierre deux coups, supprimer en même temps un oppresseur et un opprimé ; restent un homme mort et un homme libre. Sartre (préface des « Damnés de la terre » de Franz Fanon, 1961)
Je voulais surtout sortir de la spéculation – à l’époque, les livres de Franz Fanon, notamment Les damnés de la terre, étaient à la mode et ils me paraissaient à la fois faux et dangereux. Pierre Bourdieu
Ce que Fanon dit ne correspond à rien. Il est même dangereux de faire croire aux Algériens ce qu’il leur dit. Cela les conduirait à une utopie. Et je pense que ces personnes [Sartre et Fanon] ont leur part de responsabilité dans ce que l’Algérie est devenue, parce qu’ils ont raconté des histoires aux Algériens, qui ne connaissaient souvent pas mieux leur pays que les Français qui en parlaient. C’est pourquoi les Algériens ont continué à avoir une vision illusoire, utopique et irréaliste de l’Algérie (…). Du fait de cette irresponsabilité, les textes de Fanon et de Sartre ont quelque chose de terrifiant. Il fallait être mégalomane pour se croire autorisés à dire de telles absurdités. Pierre Bourdieu
« Concerning Violence » interroge les spectateurs sur le monde actuel, car le colonialisme est une donne fondamentale de la construction de l’Occident. Il s’agit d’une sorte d’essai filmique en 9 chapitres rythmé par la voix de Lauryn Hill. La chanteuse des Fugees, connue pour son engagement politique, a prêté sa voix à Frantz Fanon, en citant des extraits de ses textes. Des entretiens et des archives nous replongent dans l’Afrique d’avant la décolonisation, plus particulièrement au Mozambique et en Angola. Le réalisateur a tenté d’illustrer les propos de l’essayiste martiniquais avec des images tournées par des cinéastes lors des luttes socialistes anti-impérialistes en Afrique. La décolonisation s’est souvent faite dans le sang, avec des guerres d’indépendances menées avec passion par les anciennes colonies. C’est aussi cette violence de la colonisation, qui permet d’expliquer les tensions dans les pays concernés. A travers ce film, le réalisateur a voulu aussi montrer l’écho que pouvait donner les propos de Fanon aux problèmes actuels de nos sociétés. La violence y est encore présente, tout comme elle l’était dans la période de colonisation et la quête à l’indépendance. N’y a-t-il pas une sorte d’hypocrisie entre les valeurs humanistes de l’Occident et cette colonisation violente qui a donné le monde actuel ? France info Martinique
La colonisation est un crime contre l’humanité. Emmanuel Macron
Le truc qu’ont ces joueurs en commun, c’est que si vous retracez leur histoire, leurs ancêtres ont tous appris à parler français de la même manière. Ils ont tous quelque chose en commun. Si on se demande pourquoi leur familles ont commencé à parler français et qu’on remonte leur histoire on comprend vite pourquoi. Trevor Noah
C’est un moment génial de l’histoire de France. Toute la communauté issue de l’immigration adhère complètement à la position de la France. Tout d’un coup, il y a une espèce de ferment. Profitons de cet espace de francitude nouvelle. Jean-Louis Borloo (ministre délégué à la Ville, avril 2003)
Venez, on fait un autodafé du Nouvel Obs avec leur dossier “antisémite” de merde. Medhi Meklat (décembre 2002)
J’espère qu’on m’accordera le crédit de la fiction. Ce personnage [de Marcelin Deschamps] n’a pu exister que sur Twitter parce que c’était justement l’endroit de la fiction. (…) C’était un travail littéraire, artistique, on peut parler de travail sur l’horreur, en fait. Mehdi Meklat
Nous sommes le Grand Remplacement. Sûrement pas celui que les fous peuvent fantasmer. Nous sommes un grand remplacement naturel, celui d’une génération face aux « autres », du cycle de la vie. Nous sommes le présent. Nous sommes le Grand Remplacement d’un système archaïque, qui ne nous parle plus et qui ne nous a jamais considéré comme ses enfants. Nous sommes radicaux dans nos idées : nous irons au bout de la beauté. Nous écrirons quand vous voudrez qu’on se taise, et nous nous battrons quand vous aurez décidé qu’il est l’heure qu’on s’endorme. Nous reprendrons notre place, prise par ceux qu’on autorise à penser. Nous ne voulons parler qu’en NOTRE nom. De NOS gouts et de NOS couleurs. Nous sommes le Grand Remplacement d’une génération qui s’active sur Internet pour contrer les coups bas. D’artistes, seul au front, pour porter tous les combats. De révoltés d’une société qui ne sait plus se regarder dans les yeux et écouter les coeurs qui se battent. (…) Nous n’avions pas peur de créer des réactions puisque nous n’avions été que cela jusqu’ici : il fallait réagir aux approximations et aux humiliations diverses. Tous les jours, nous devions entendre « islam » à la télévision. Nous devions accepter « les débats » qui n’allaient nulle part ailleurs. Nous devions comprendre que « l’islamophobie » n’existait pas et que certains hommes politiques voulaient radier les musulmans de l’espace public. D’ailleurs, nous devions éviter de dire « musulman » pour ne pas effrayer les effarouchés. Téléramadan est né de ces frustrations. De ces « analyses » qui n’apportaient aucune réflexion à longueur de journaux. De ces chaines de télé qui comblaient le vide par l’hostilité. De ces mots qu’on lançait comme des bombes pour faire sursauter les âmes. (…) Il est temps de grand-remplacer ce présent qui nous oppresse, qui nous divise. Nous voulons grand-remplacer le désespoir par un idéal : l’écoute et la réflexion. Téléramadan n’est pas une démarche militante. C’est une démarche politique qui passe par la littérature, le regard et la poésie. Laissez-nous la naïveté de dire qu’on est les potes de personne, mais les frères de tout le monde. Bismillah. [Au nom de Dieu] Mouloud Achour, Mehdi Meklat et Badroudine Saïd Abdallah
Depuis le temps qu’on lutte et espère le grand remplacement de la vieille France Bravo Meklat et Badrou ! Edouard Louis
Sur France Inter, ils ont longtemps relayé la voix des oubliés des banlieues. Dix ans après les émeutes de Clichy-sous-Bois, les jeunes reporters du Bondy Blog nous bousculent par leur ton libre et combatif. Ils sont les invités de “Télérama” cette semaine. Télérama
Mise à jour : Que savions nous des tweets de Mehdi Meklat lorsque nous l’avons interviewé, avec son compère Badroudine, en octobre 2015 ? En aucun cas, nous n’avions eu connaissance de ses messages antisémites, homophobes et racistes, récemment ressurgis des tréfonds de Twitter. Sinon, nous ne l’aurions pas cautionné. Cela va sans dire. Alors pourquoi le préciser ? Parce qu’au regard de ce qu’on sait aujourd’hui, une remarque, publiée dans cet entretien vieux d’un an et demi, prête malheureusement à confusion : « vous participez au bruit ambiant, disions-nous, en publiant sur Twitter des blagues parfois limites »… Sous le pseudonyme de Marcelin Deschamps, Mehdi Meklat postait en effet des plaisanteries en cascade. Beaucoup étaient très drôles, mais d’autres étaient lestées d’une provocation aux franges de l’agressivité, ou d’une pointe de misogynie potache. C’est à cela que nous faisions allusion en parlant de « blagues limite ». A rien d’autre. Avons-nous à l’époque manqué de prudence ? Nous aurions pu passer des heures, voire des jours, à fouiller parmi ses dizaines de milliers de tweets déjà publiés, afin de vérifier qu’il ne s’y trouvait rien d’inacceptable. Mais pourquoi l’aurions-nous fait ? Tout, alors, dans sa production professionnelle (chroniques radio, documentaire, livre), témoignait au contraire d’un esprit d’ouverture qui nous a touchés. En octobre 2015, à nos yeux, Mehdi Meklat n’était absolument pas suspect d’intolérance. Découvrir aujourd’hui ses tweets haineux fut un choc pour nombre de nos lecteurs. Pour nous aussi. Ils sont aux antipodes des valeurs que Télérama défend numéro après numéro, depuis plus de soixante ans. Télérama
« La tolérance devient un crime lorsqu’elle s’étend au mal », écrit Thomas Mann dans La Montagne magique. Meh­di Meklat n’a pas seulement été toléré, il a été porté au pinacle par les organes du gauchisme culturel. Ceux-ci l’avaient élevé au rang de chantre ­semi-officiel de la «  culture de banlieue  ». Soit, pour eux, un mélange de cynisme roublard et de vulgarité ; la banalisation de l’insulte et de la menace ; le sens du «  respect  » dû au plus fort, au plus menaçant, au plus dangereux ; le mépris des femmes et des faibles, la haine des homosexuels. Bref, le côté «  racaille  » dans lequel ces journalistes à faible niveau culturel imaginent reconnaître les héritiers de la bohème antibourgeoise d’antan. Et qui sait  ? Une nouvelle avant-garde pleine de promesses. Il y avait un créneau. De petits malins dotés d’un fort sens du marketing se sont engouffrés dans la brèche. Ils ont compris qu’il y avait des places à prendre dans les médias pour peu que l’on puisse étaler une origine outre-­méditerranéenne et que l’on se conforme aux stéréotypes construits par le gauchisme culturel : «  racaille  », mais politisé. De la gauche qu’il faut. Pas celle qui a hérité des Lumières le goût de la raison droite et du savoir qui émancipe. Non, la gauche branchouille qui a métamorphosé l’antiracisme en multiculturalisme ; l’indifférence envers les origines et les couleurs de peau en autant d’«  identités  » reposant étrangement sur des détails anatomiques ; l’émancipation envers les origines en assignations identitaires. Une gauche aussi into­lérante et violente que ce «  fascisme  » dont elle ne cesse de poursuivre le fantôme. (…) Depuis longtemps, un certain nombre d’intellectuels, comme Pierre-André Taguieff, Alain Finkielkraut ou Georges Bensoussan, tentent de mettre en garde contre un des aspects les plus exécrables de cette soi-disant «  culture de banlieue  » : le racisme, l’antisémitisme. Mais leurs voix étaient couvertes, leurs propos dénoncés, quand ils n’étaient pas traînés en justice, comme Bensoussan et Pascal Bruckner, pour avoir dit que le roi est nu. (…) Il est entendu que, en Europe, en France, le racisme ne saurait provenir que de la société d’accueil. Du côté de l’immigration, il est convenu qu’on en est indemne et qu’on «  lutte pour ses droits  ». En outre, la théorie de la «  convergence des luttes  » implique que les combats des femmes, des homosexuels et des minorités ethniques se recoupent et se conjuguent, sous la direction éclairée d’une extrême gauche qui a trouvé dans ces «  minorités  » son prolétariat de substitution. (…) Mehdi Meklat avait franchi à une vitesse accélérée tous les échelons de la notoriété médiatique : rond de serviette chez Pascale Clark à France Inter, couverture de Télérama avec son compère Badrou («  les révoltés du Bondy Blog  »), «  textes  » publiés aux éditions du Seuil, adoubement par Christiane Taubira, qui a accepté de poser en couverture des Inrocks avec les deux compères sans se renseigner plus avant sur eux. Cette carrière fulgurante vient de dérailler alors qu’elle semblait toucher au sommet. Invité à La Grande Librairie sur France 5, l’«  enfant prodigue de Bondy  » est démasqué pour ses dizaines de milliers de tweets. Le dessinateur Joann Sfar et la journaliste Eugénie Bastié ont lancé une alerte : le héraut de la culture de banlieue avait tweeté des milliers de messages injurieux, menaçants, antisémites. Sous un pseudonyme – Marcelin Deschamps, que bien des gens connaissaient –, il avait appelé à tuer Charb et la rédaction de Charlie Hebdo, à «  enfoncer un violon dans le cul de madame Valls  », à «  enfoncer des ampoules brûlantes dans le cul de Brigitte Bardot. Jusqu’à ce qu’elle vomisse du sang  ». Il appelait à «  casser les jambes  » d’Alain Finkiel­kraut. Ajoutant : «  J’opte pour l’effet béquille pour Finkielkraut, car ainsi il pourra être immobilisé et souffrir dans l’indifférence générale.  » Il a tweeté : «  Sarkozy = la synagogue = les juifs = shalom = oui, mon fils = l’argent.  » Et «  LES BLANCS VOUS DEVEZ MOURIR ASAP  » (pour as soon as possible – dès que possible). On en est là  ? Oui, on en est là. Lentement mais sûrement, le niveau de tolérance envers les intolérants avait monté. La cote d’alerte était atteinte et nous ne l’avions pas vue. Si l’affaire Meklat pouvait au moins servir d’avertissement… Comme on le sait de triste expérience, le sort réservé aux juifs, dans toutes les sociétés, est comparable à ces canaris que les mineurs emportaient dans les mines de charbon. Le canari succombe par asphyxie avant que les mineurs aient pris conscience de la présence de gaz dans la galerie. Lorsque, dans une société donnée, la vie, pour les juifs, devient difficile ou dangereuse, c’est qu’elle est malade et menacée. C’est pourquoi il faut refuser absolument la banalisation de l’anti­judaïsme. Brice Couturier
Lors du traditionnel dîner des correspondants de la Maison Blanche à Washington (…) algré le contexte très formel et la présence de centaines d’invités, journalistes et politiques de tous bords, la comédienne de 32 ans, qui participe d’ordinaire au « Daily Show » de Trevor Noah (…) a (…) étrillé le président américain dans son discours. Seule représentante de l’administration Trump, la porte-parole Sarah Huckabee Sanders en a aussi pris pour son grade et c’est ce qui fait polémique. « Je vous adore dans le rôle de Tante Lydia dans La Servante écarlate », a balancé Michelle Wolf, en référence à ce personnage de matrone sadique interprétée par la sexagénaire Ann Dowd dans la série télévisée d’anticipation. Avant de la comparer au personnage de principal de « La Case de l’oncle Tom », controversé de nos jours car vu comme un esclave complice de ses maîtres… Un peu plus tard, elle s’est moquée de la porte-parole en lançant : « Elle brûle les faits pour s’en faire du fard à paupières » ! Le Parisien
J’ai été expulsée d’un restaurant ! Hier soir, la propriétaire du Red Hen à Lexington, en Virginie, m’a demandé de partir parce que je travaillais pour @POTUS (le président des Etats-Unis, ndlr) et je suis partie poliment. Ses actions en disent beaucoup plus sur elle que sur moi. Je fais toujours de mon mieux pour traiter les gens, y compris ceux avec qui je ne suis pas d’accord, respectueusement et je continuerai à le faire. Sarah Sanders (porte-parole de la Maison blanche)
La porte-parole de la Maison-Blanche va bénéficier d’une protection officielle. Selon CNN, qui invoque deux sources distinctes, Sarah Sanders sera protégée à son domicile dès ce mercredi par le « Secret service ». La durée de cette protection n’est pas spécifiée. Le « Secret service » assure habituellement la protection du président des États-Unis, du vice-président, de leurs familles, des anciens présidents, de la Maison-Blanche et des autres résidences officielles. Les collaborateurs des présidents ne sont en principe pas protégés à leur porte. A l’origine de cette décision, la déconvenue dont Sarah Sanders a été l’objet et qui a fait polémique aux Etats-Unis. Vendredi soir, la « press secretary » de Donald Trump et son mari ont été priés de quitter le restaurant où ils comptaient dîner. La restauratrice et son personnel, opposés à la politique migratoire du président, notamment la séparation des familles de migrants lors de leur entrée clandestine sur le sol américain, les ont priés de sortir. Le Parisien
I was asked to leave because I worked for President Trump. We are allowed to disagree but we should be able to do so freely and without fear of harm, and this goes for all people regardless of politics. Healthy debate on ideas and political philosophy is important, but the calls for harassment and push for any Trump supporter to avoid the public is unacceptable. Sarah Sanders (porte-parole de la Maison Blanche)
“La Première Plantation” est un cocktail-bar né de l’imagination de deux barmen passionnés, Gabriel Desvallées et Matthieu Henry. Ce nouvel établissement idéal pour une soirée conviviale a ouvert cet été au croisement des rues Bossuet et Professeur Weill. Pas encore trentenaires, les deux compères se sont croisés au cours de leurs carrières déjà bien remplies. C’est d’une rencontre avec la ville de Berlin qu’est née leur envie d’ouvrir leur établissement. Un lieu décontracté à l’ambiance tropicale où l’on déguste des cocktails maison d’après des recettes originales à base d’ingrédients rares, avec une carte qui évolue au rythme des saisons. La maison propose une sélection de vins, bières et cocktails sans alcool. Le Progrès
Envie de déguster un cocktail dans un endroit authentique et différent ? La Première Plantation saura vous satisfaire… (…) Ce bar à cocktails est un endroit vivant avec une atmosphère plutôt industrielle et végétale à la fois. Un mix surprenant où les clients seront accueillis chaleureusement et dans une ambiance assez funky ! (…) Les deux entrepreneurs, Gabriel Desvallées et Matthieu Henry sont des habitués du domaine de la restauration. Sachez que ces professionnels ne vous décevront pas car, avant de se lancer dans La Première Plantation, ils ont participé à plusieurs concours en agitant leurs shakers préférés ! Gabriel Desvallées a été à la 3ème place nationale au trophée du bar en 2014, quant à Matthieu Henry, il est le vainqueur France et finaliste monde à la Bacardi Legacy en 2016. La Première Plantation est un endroit jeune, dynamique, à l’image des deux jeunes hommes. Ils sauront vous faire voyager à travers le décor décalé de leur bar et grâce à leur cocktails. Fourniresto
Une oasis tropicale où la nature a tous les droits ; Un bar sans chichis, magnifique mais à la cool ; on aime la déco tropico-industrielle, qui réussit le pari d’être belle, moderne et pas cliché. Inside-lyon
Chaleur, douceur des îles, parfum des Caraïbes et cocktails au rhum. Plutôt que de parcourir des milliers de kilomètres jusqu’au bout du monde, on vous propose un dépaysant voyage à seulement quelques stations de métro. Prochain arrêt : La Première Plantation. (…) a décidé de changer la rue Bossuet en une majestueuse jungle tropicalo-industrielle. Dans une déco réussie et envoûtante chargée de plantes et arbres exotiques du sol au plafond, La Première Plantation (LPP) est avant tout un bonheur pour les yeux. D’un côté, une luxuriante verdure nous plonge au fin fond de la forêt tropicale. De l’autre, des lampes suspendues et des tuyaux de cuivre créent une ambiance industrielle feutrée dans laquelle se perdre des heures durant. Pour sublimer cette déco de folie, LPP invite ses clients à déguster une immense et succulente carte de cocktails rares. (…) Avec un tel nom, l’adresse se devait de faire honneur à l’alcool le plus exotique qui soit : le rhum. Originaires du monde entier ou faits maison, les rhums made in LPP se dégustent à toutes les sauces. (…) Alors enfilez votre chemisette à fleurs, enfilez vos claquettes (sans chaussettes, pour l’amour du ciel…) et offrez-vous un voyage supersonique à La Première Plantation, ce petit morceau de Bahamas où les cocktails sont encore meilleurs. Le Bonbon
In 2016, Henry was the French representative at Bacardi Legacy; Desvallees came with him to Berlin, where Henry was to highlight his cocktail “The Epicurean.” They discovered the Monkey Bar at the 25hours Hotel, looking out over the Zoo, which would be the starting point of their inspiration for the new bar.(…)  La Première Plantation. The bar is a tribute to their common passion, rum, and a demonstration of their skills and prowess in a classical bar scene largely dominated by two personalities: Marc Bonneton, winner of Bacardi Legacy in 2011, and owner of L’Antiquaire and Redwood, and Arnaud Gosset, the musician barman, owner of Soda Bar, Monkey Club and Casa Jaguar. (…) But it hasn’t all been easy. They’ve had their fair share of hurdles so far, too: “We had to be tenacious to get the funding of our bar because we take the place of a hostess bar. A sulphurous reputation that must now be forgotten.” Such an unseemly beginning could be a sign of greater things to come – after all, the now successful Tiki bar Dirty Dick opened in an old brothel on rue Frochot, in the infamous Paris district of Pigalle. La Première Plantation will be the second Lyon bar specializing in rum after Redwood. The bar is marked by the identity of these audacious owners but also by the new codes of the French bar today: entrepreneurship, creativity, freedom, audacity and aestheticism. (…) It’s still a bit difficult to imagine the décor of this “street bar” with immaculate walls, but the architectural plans show a creative combination. Like a highly exotic trip without the kitsch side of the tiki bar: a real indoor jungle mixing palm trees and hanging succulent plants will contrast with rough walls and exposed beams, giving an industrial feel. “Here, the jungle takes precedence over the city in a colonial spirit of the eighteenth century,” the pair explain. The design is being overseen by Desvallees’s father, an architect. All in all, it’s a totally new concept and atmosphere, which reflects the creativity of a new generation of bartenders operating outside the Parisian landscape. Mixology
Mon nom, La Première Plantation, est une référence aux plantations de canne à sucre (le rhum en est issu) dans les colonies françaises. Je cherche à retranscrire l’esprit colonial, un esprit à la cool, une époque où l’on savait recevoir. (…)[cool] Dans l’esprit, oui, carrément, ça représente une période sympathique, il y avait du travail à cette époque accueillante. (…) [et la partie esclaves] Ah, on a mis quelques photos dans les toilettes. Gabriel Desvallées
Nous faisons suite à l’article posté le 12 septembre 2017 sur Le Petit Bulletin signé par madame Julie Hainaut. Si nous acceptons les critiques constructives sur notre travail, en revanche cet article appelle de notre part les observations suivantes. Nous sommes ouverts depuis le 21 août 2017, il s’agit de notre première affaire.  Notre volonté a été d’ouvrir un bar à cocktails, un lieu d’échanges, de partages, convivial autour du rhum, sa culture et son histoire.  Contrairement à ce que a été retranscrit dans l’article, notre établissement n’a jamais eu la volonté de faire une quelconque apologie de la période colonialiste, période que nous condamnons. Le nom « Première Plantation » est une référence aux plantations de canne à sucre dont le rhum est issu. Ce nom fait également référence au fait que cette ouverture est une première pour nous, une première plante, notre premier établissement. Le mot plantation n’a dans notre esprit aucune connotation péjorative. S’agissant des photos dans les toilettes, ce sont d’anciennes gravures du 18e et 19e siècles de bouteilles de rhum, d’une maison victorienne et d’un champ de production d’ananas, ce qui n’a rien d’offensant envers quiconque. Notre bar à cocktails est un hommage à la culture du rhum et à la culture caribéenne. En conclusion, nous ne pouvons que déplorer que ce quiproquo manifeste entre la journaliste et nous-mêmes l’ai conduite à rédiger un article dont les conséquences sont aujourd’hui gravement préjudiciables pour nous tant sur le plan professionnel que personnel. Nous espérons que ces explications dissiperons ce regrettable malentendu. Henry Matthieu et Gabriel Desvallees (La Première Plantation)
Notre métier c’est le cocktail, nous ne possédons pas un doctorat en Histoire, nous avons donc un gros manque de connaissances à ce niveau là. Nous sommes désolés (…) et n’avons aucune nostalgie de cette période là. (…) Il n’y a pas de photographies d’esclaves, simplement celle d’une maison blanche victorienne, et celle d’un champ d’ananas. (…) le nom du bar va être changé afin de « partir sur des bases saines. (…) Nous sommes les victimes dans cette histoire. Henry Matthieu et Gabriel Desvallees (La Première Plantation)
Les faits rapportés dans l’article ne sont pas, comme j’ai pu le lire, « le fruit de l’imagination de la journaliste qui veut nuire personnellement au lieu » mais bien des faits, justement. (…) Je n’approuve en aucun cas l’appel à la violence envers les propriétaires du lieu. (…) L’interview a été enregistrée. Les propos de l’article sont avérés. Il n’y a aucune volonté de nuire, simplement celle de rapporter des faits et de vérifier l’info, l’essence même de mon métier. (…) Les photos aujourd’hui affichées dans ces fameuses toilettes ne montrent pas d’esclaves. Celle le jour de ma venue, si. Mais la question n’est pas là. La réponse « On a mis des photos dans les toilettes » à la question « Et les esclaves ? » suffit à poser les choses. Julie Hainaut
Si la France se targue d’être le « pays des Droits de l’Homme », force est de constater qu’elle abrite encore en son sein une certaine nostalgie pour des temps coloniaux qui – faut-il le rappeler ? – furent tissés d’atrocités, de crimes contre l’humanité, de pillages et de barbarie. C’est en effet avec horreur, tristesse et déception que nous découvrions ce 12 septembre l’entretien promotionnel donné au Petit Bulletin par Gabriel Desvallées et Matthieu Henry, les propriétaires du bar La Première Plantation. Dans l’établissement nouvellement ouvert, l’article nous décrit deux hommes déterminés à « retranscrire l’esprit colonial, un esprit à la cool, une époque où l’on savait recevoir, […] une période sympathique [où] il y avait du travail ». Nous, des Raciné.e.s, qui sommes issus des migrations mais aussi de quatre siècles d’esclavage, nous, citoyens et enfants des départements français, sommes outrés de constater un tel mépris pour la dignité humaine la plus fondamentale. Par delà les déclarations outrancières des propriétaires, nous affirmons que le modèle d’affaires d’une entreprise qui s’attribue gratuitement, à des fins promotionnelles et décoratives, l’histoire douloureuse de siècles d’oppression, d’exploitation, de sévices et d’humiliations est inacceptable. En faisant de cette histoire leur fonds de commerce, MM. Desvallées et Henry ont décidé d’exploiter ce qui pourrait au mieux être qualifié de négationnisme et, plus raisonnablement, d’apologie de crime contre l’humanité. Au titre de la loi du 21 mai 2001 tendant à la reconnaissance de la traite et de l’esclavage en tant que crime contre l’humanité et de la loi du 29 juillet 1881 sur la liberté de presse, Chapitre IV, Paragraphe 1er, articles 23 et 24, nous rappelons que MM. Desvallées et Henry pourraient être condamnés à hauteur de 45000€ d’amende et cinq ans d’emprisonnement. Pour que ce crime cesse, nous exigeons la fermeture immédiate de La Première Plantation. Collectif Desracinées
Nous sommes à la fois consterné·e·s, en colère et, paradoxalement, désabusé·e·s. Ces propos sont aussi choquants qu’ils sont communs, malheureusement (…) Quant aux personnes qui, comme le prétendent les gérants, ignorent tout de la période coloniale, c’est une preuve de plus que le racisme de notre société est si ancré que l’on se permet d’ignorer des siècles d’histoire et de maintenir la mémoire de peuples entiers dans l’oubli. Collectif Desracinées
La Première Plantation est un bar à cocktails qui a ouvert cet été dans le sixième arrondissement. Une dizaine d’articles de la presse généraliste ou spécialisée a célébré cette ouverture, sans interroger les gérants sur le choix du nom du lieu. Le 12 septembre, une journaliste du Petit Bulletin qui écrit sur les nouveaux lieux « branchés » a questionné les gérants qui ont alors tenu des propos racistes surréalistes en expliquant qu’il souhaitait rappeler l’esprit colonial, « un esprit à la cool », « une époque où l’on savait recevoir »… Certain.es pensaient naïvement que les références au « temps béni des colonies » ou aux « bienfaits de la colonisation » et autres célébrations du « ya bon banania » appartenaient à un temps révolu ou à une autre génération ayant directement participé à la colonisation. Gabriel Desvallées et Matthieu Henry, jeunes trentenaires branchés nous rappellent le contraire. Ces jeunes gens branchés ont choisi de faire du colonialisme la base de leur stratégie commerciale. Ils viennent d’ouvrir un bar à cocktails au 22 rue Professeur Weill, dans le sixième arrondissement de Lyon. Ils l’ont baptisé La Première Plantation. (…) « une référence aux plantations de canne à sucre (le rhum en est issu) dans les colonies françaises » (…) « l’esprit colonial, un esprit à la cool, une époque où l’on savait recevoir. » On vomit à la lecture de ces propos racistes, qui nient l’esclavage et les violences intrinsèques du rapport colonial infligées par les grandes puissances européennes aux peuples des pays colonisés. On pourrait donc, au bénéfice du doute, penser à l’ignorance des gérants du bar, mais pourtant ce n’est pas fini car ils surenchérissent, entre clichés, mépris et racisme. (…) « une période sympathique, il y avait du travail à cette époque accueillante. » (…) [l’esclavage] « Ah, on a mis quelques photos dans les toilettes. » (…) L’indécence de ces propos est inqualifiable. Et leur violence rend inutile le moindre commentaire. Tout comme le font certains avec l’utilisation du Blackface pour faire rire, La Première Plantation appuie sa communication sur une idéologie fondée sur les clichés racistes. Ceux-ci sont tournés en dérision et même promus par cet établissement dont la démarche commerciale se conjugue avec une vision politique rance et réactionnaire, niant à la fois l’horreur historique de cette période et balayant d’un revers de main toutes les luttes d’esclaves ayant amené à sa fin. En 2017, les gérants d’un bar branché poussent ainsi le cynisme au point de faire de l’apologie du colonialisme et du mépris des ravages de l’esclavage des preuves de leur « coolitude ». De la rencontre du capitalisme hype et du racisme le plus bas du front ne peuvent naître que des horreurs, et elles font peur à voir. On s’inquiète aussi que plusieurs médias se soient fait écho de l’ouverture du lieu, sans rien n’avoir trouvé à redire à ce choix commercial choquant. (…) Nous terminerons à l’adresse des patrons de ce bar qui n’ont rien compris à l’histoire par une citation de Franz Fanon : « Le colonialisme n’est pas une machine à penser, n’est pas un corps doué de raison. Il est la violence à l’état de nature et ne peut s’incliner que devant une plus grande violence. » Rebellyon
While it would have been nice to keep my branding and have an accurate descriptor of the cuisine, I recognize that this is taking the focus off of what I want to do with food. My mission in opening this restaurant is to celebrate the wonderful multi-cultural aspects of food in a beautiful and multi-cultural part of Portland: my hometown, and a city that I love. Highlighting historical recipes and the development of dishes through the light of different countries and their relationships with England was a personal journey for me, after living in Asia and being immersed in a large population of English Expats for 20 years. As I have said, I love history and historic recipes, how food has developed and changed over time, and have developed many of these recipes in conjunction with the people I worked with from all over Asia and England to get them exactly right. So I’m hoping the new name, BORC, is a fun name to represent this concept. It is an acronym for British Overseas Restaurant Corporation and a tongue-in-cheek reference to the precursor to British Airways: BOAC, on which many Expatriates traveled. I’m sincerely hoping that this name change will allow us to focus on serving great food in a warm and positive environment. Sally Krantz
Before it even opened, Saffron Colonial on North Williams caused controversy when many in the Portland community accused it of glorifying colonialism, and now, owner Sally Krantz tells Eater she will change the name of her bakery and restaurant to BORC, which stands for British Overseas Restaurant Corporation. The new name is a play on British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC), a former British airline. Two protests have been held at the restaurant formerly named Saffron Colonial, and among the recommendations presented by protestors were that Saffron Colonial change its name and remove all references to plantations from its menus. (…) When Eater asked Krantz whether the restaurant had removed all « colonial » and « plantation » references, Krantz said it had, adding that the words had each appeared only once at the restaurant: once on a chalk sign, and once on a cocktail menu. She says the chalkboard was erased prior to the protest and the cocktail menu was erased in response to the first protest, while the protesters were in the restaurant. Since the Saffron Colonial controversy became public, Ristretto Roasters, who had been the restaurant’s coffee supplier and also sold Saffron Colonial baked goods in its cafes, severed ties with the bakery. Other local companies have been reported to have withheld or stopped distributing their goods to Saffron Colonial, including Steven Smith Teamaker and Ex Novo Brewing. Eater
A new bar in Lyon, France, is drawing anger for its nostalgic use of French colonialism (and its attendant atrocities, including slavery) as a theme. La Première Plantation (“The First Plantation” in English) opened recently in the city’s wealthy and predominantly white sixth arrondissement. Various elements of the bar invoke French colonial activity in the Caribbean, from images of slaves in the bathrooms, to drinks with names like “Trader’s Punch.” The bar’s name references French sugar cane plantations — colonies like Saint-Domingue (now Haiti) were major producers of sugar, and from the mid-1600s, relied heavily on slaves for production and trade of sugar. Official descriptions of the bar say that “you’re not in the heart of Lyon, you’re in a new neighborhood: the Jungle District.”) The bar started drawing negative attention after an article from local journalist Julie Hainaut, who wrote that she found the owners’ explanations of the bar’s concept to be “questionable.” Speaking to Hainaut, owners Gabriel Desvallées and Matthieu Henry said “[they] wanted to revive the colonial spirit, a spirit of coolness, and a time when people really knew how to entertain.” Hainaut wrote that she thought she had misheard (“I thought someone had drugged my cocktail”), and sought clarification by asking if colonialism was “cool.” The owners replied, “In its spirit, yes, it was a nice period.” She then asked about the role that slaves played in French colonization. The owners noted in response that there were pictures of slaves in the bar’s bathrooms. The backlash was swift. The bar’s Facebook (now deactivated) was inundated with negative reviews, and a local anti-racism collective Le Collectif des Raciné-e-s demanded the immediate closure of the bar, launching a petition that now counts thousands of signatures. The petition states that “colonial times were rife with atrocities, crimes against humanity, looting and barbarism… this period should in no way be described as ‘cool’ and used for commercial gain in a ‘trendy’ bar.” The owners wrote a response to the criticism on Facebook, saying that they never intended to be apologists for colonization, and that “the word plantation has no negative connotations in our minds.” (…) Speaking to another local publication, Henry said the bar would change its name in response to the backlash, although with no mention of whether the theme would change. This isn’t the first time an establishment has settled for some sort of colonial theme: in 2016, a Portland bakery-restaurant, Saffron Colonial, faced a similar response, although it arguably didn’t delve into the theme quite so heavily (that is, no pictures of slaves in the bathrooms). Similarly, that restaurant tried to deflect criticism by changing its name to British Overseas Restaurant Corporation, or BORC. Eater
La question de la portée des violences coloniales ainsi que celles des guerres d’indépendance dans l’après, une fois que la colonie s’est défait du joug pesant sur elle parfois depuis des dizaines d’années, comme dans le cas algérien, est couramment appréhendée sur le modèle du traumatisme psychologique, fondant une description en trois temps : traumatisme, oubli, résurgence. Pourtant, la transposition de ce schéma à l’échelle collective interroge : en quoi, pourquoi et comment une société y répondrait-elle ? L’analyse fine de la mémoire de certains événements – comme celle de la répression sauvage de la mobilisation des Algériens à Paris, le 17 octobre 1961 – plaide au contraire pour une approche privilégiant des mécanismes d’ordre socio-politique : la dispersion des groupes ayant vécu cette histoire, leur subalternité dans la société où ils vivaient, la confiscation de la parole par un pouvoir usant politiquement de l’histoire ou encore le confinement du souvenir de la répression dans des groupes ultra-minoritaires, à l’extrême gauche de l’échiquier politique, ont été les facteurs de l’absence de l’événement sur la place publique pendant une trentaine d’années avant que le mouvement antiraciste s’en empare, l’inclue dans son argumentaire et le fasse resurgir à la faveur de son combat contre l’extrême droite. C’est donc à une histoire des usages politiques du passé et à une sociologie des témoins porteurs du souvenir que j’appelle, en tant qu’historienne. À l’échelle de la Cité, il y a occultation volontaire plus qu’oubli, entretien d’une mémoire souterraine plus que refoulement, combat pour la reconnaissance plus que résurgence. Laissons aux spécialistes de la psyché le soin des consciences et des inconscients individuels blessés pour aller, au titre des sciences humaines et sociales, vers un travail collectif de connaissance et de remémoration du passé dans un objectif clair d’éducation citoyenne. Sylvie Thénault
L’article que nous avons publié mardi sur notre site, évoquant le bar La Nouvelle Plantation, a interpellé plusieurs de nos lecteurs, scandalisés par certains des propos tenus par les interviewés. L’ampleur prise par le bad buzz et les insultes voire menaces physiques envers les patrons du lieu qui en découlent nous amènent à revenir sur ce sujet. L’article en question, rédigé par Julie Hainaut, correspond à des faits : elle s’est rendue sur place, s’est présentée en tant que journaliste du Petit Bulletin et les propos cités, enregistrés, ont été prononcés lors de l’interview. Il ne s’agit pas ici de réfuter l’information initiale : nous assumons pleinement notre travail de journaliste et cet article. Pour reprendre une citation fort connue d’Albert Londres, il est de notre devoir de porter la plume dans la plaie. Faire de la période coloniale un argument de communication, c’est une plaie qu’il fallait mettre à jour.  Nous sommes retournés (Sébastien Broquet, rédacteur en chef du journal) voir les deux gérants de La Première Plantation, Gabriel Desvallées et Matthieu Henry, ce jeudi matin. Pour discuter, de nouveau, de leurs propos et de leur positionnement. Nous avons rencontré deux personnes abattues, conscientes de la maladresse totale des propos cités, mais réfutant – et nous les croyons totalement après cette rencontre – tout racisme ou toute ambiguïté de leur part sur l’esclavage. Aucun d’eux n’est raciste ou soupçonné de complaisance envers l’esclavage. Les propos tenus lors de l’interview publiée mardi et le positionnement de leur lieu sont visiblement la conséquence d’une méconnaissance de cette période de l’Histoire, de légèreté sans doute quand à leurs recherches sur cette époque, dont ils ont voulu mettre en valeur l’esthétique par leur décoration et surtout, leur passion : le rhum. Nous avons aussi vu les photographies affichées dans les toilettes : contrairement à ce qui est déclaré dans l’interview par eux-mêmes (et retranscrit par nous), nous n’avons pas vu ce matin de photos d’esclaves mais deux clichés encadrés : une maison de maître victorienne et un champ d’ananas. Dépassés par la maladresse de leur propos, ils ne méritent certainement pas la violence du traitement qui leur est infligé aujourd’hui. Il était de notre devoir de journaliste d’écrire ce malaise ressenti par l’utilisation d’éléments évoquant l’époque coloniale pour décrire leur bar et son ambiance. Manipuler ces références à une époque douloureuse de l’histoire de France était pour le moins malvenu d’autant que le sujet est sensible et aujourd’hui débattu au plus haut niveau : le Président de la République lui-même l’a clairement exprimé avant l’été (…) Les réseaux sociaux ont transformé cette information en vindicte populaire contre La Première Plantation : c’est indéfendable. Sébastien Broquet
Tout démarre avec une chronique publiée dans le Petit Bulletin, hebdo culturel/loisirs (par ailleurs partenaire de Rue89Lyon), intitulée « La Première Plantation, ou l’art de se planter ». Dans sa rubrique dédiée aux restos et bons spots, il n’y a habituellement que des plans recommandés par la rédac. Après sa visite, la journaliste sort estomaquée de son entrevue avec les néo-entrepreneurs. Ce ne sont pas les cocktails au rhum qui ne passent pas, mais les propos du duo. Elle retranscrit leur projet dans les citations attribuées à l’un des deux patrons (…) Après les échanges traditionnels avec la rédaction en chef, qu’impose le circuit de tout article de presse, il est décidé de publier le papier. Mais la désinvolture avec laquelle les barmen ont répondu choque et sont repris dans la presse en ligne. De grosses salves de critiques mais aussi d’insultes, telles que le web sait les multiplier, sont écrites notamment sur la page Facebook de la Première plantation (elle a été complètement supprimée depuis). Des menaces pleuvent également. Le débat passe par moult circonvolutions : « oui mais les cocktails sont-ils bons ? » ; « comment ça, l’assiette végé n’est pas assez copieuse ? », etc. La journaliste, qui collabore en tant que pigiste avec le Petit Bulletin, n’est pas épargnée : elle est accusée de façon lapidaire et violente de vouloir nuire personnellement au lieu ou encore tout simplement de mentir. Après un rendez-vous avec le rédacteur en chef, les patrons du bar se fendent d’un droit de réponse, sans tellement de fioritures ni plus d’explications sur le fond  (…) Les jeunes barmen continuent de patauger, en parlant d’ « invitation au voyage et à l’exotisme ». Avant de déplorer, évidemment, « les conséquences […] préjudiciables [pour eux] tant sur le plan professionnel que personnel ». Le rédacteur en chef du Petit Bulletin fait, en introduction du droit de réponse, cette analyse : « Les propos tenus lors de l’interview publiée mardi et le positionnement de leur lieu sont visiblement la conséquence d’une méconnaissance de cette période de l’Histoire, de légèreté sans doute quand à leurs recherches sur cette époque. » Pas racistes, les petits gars, mais juste ignorants. Reste que la polémique ne désenfle pas, s’amplifie même avec les partages sur les réseaux sociaux. Les soutiens du bar sont parfois des personnes se présentant le bras levé ou tenant eux-mêmes des propos racistes, ce qui dessert encore la volonté des tenanciers de ne pas passer pour des défenseurs du colonialisme. La journaliste et le rédacteur en chef trouvent leurs soutiens mais voient aussi leur travail descendu en flèche, devant assurer le service anti-trolls (qu’il ne faut pas nourrir, on le sait) très chronophage. Depuis la parution de l’article sur La Première Plantation hier, des centaines de commentaires inondent les réseaux sociaux. La chroniqueuse parvient à conserver son calme et à tenter de donner des explications, toujours via les réseaux sociaux : Une pétition a finalement été lancée par le collectif Des Raciné.e.s contre « l’apologie de l’esclavagisme à Lyon », pointant directement le bar, et a recueilli en quelques heures, ce vendredi matin, plus de 3300 signatures. Le bar la Première Plantation a certes fait parler de lui mais s’est en effet bien planté. Dalya Daoud
« Ce nouvel établissement idéal pour une soirée conviviale a ouvert cet été », écrivait le 11 septembre Le Progrès, à propos d’un nouveau bar lyonnais, « La Première Plantation ». Une première publicité plutôt élogieuse pour ce bar à cocktails du 6e arrondissement de la ville, qui a ouvert ses portes le 21 août. Mais entre temps, un autre article a été publié dans Le Petit Bulletin de Lyon, offrant une bien moins bonne publicité au bar. La journaliste qui a écrit l’article en question cite les deux créateurs du lieu racontant comment le nom du bar a été choisi. « Mon nom, La Première Plantation, est une référence aux plantations de canne à sucre (le rhum en est issu) dans les colonies françaises. Je cherche à retranscrire l’esprit colonial, un esprit à la cool, une époque où l’on savait recevoir », expliquent-t-ils face à la journaliste qui dit être « restée interdite » et lui demande, « indignée », « c’était cool, la colonisation? » Réponse: « Dans l’esprit, oui, carrément, ça représente une période sympathique, il y avait du travail à cette époque accueillante ». Et de préciser que des photos d’esclaves sont affichées dans les toilettes. Les propos n’ont pas manqué de scandaliser sur les réseaux sociaux, qui accusent le bar de faire l’apologie de la colonisation et de l’esclavage. (…) Les gérants ont répondu aux critiques ce jeudi sur Facebook, expliquant n’avoir « jamais eu la volonté de faire une quelconque apologie de la période colonialiste, période que nous condamnons ». Ils précisent que « le mot plantation n’a dans notre esprit aucune connotation péjorative » ou encore que « notre bar à cocktails est un hommage à la culture du rhum et à la culture caribéenne ». (…) Contacté par Le HuffPost, Matthieu Henry, l’un des deux créateurs du lieu, regrette cette polémique et ne cautionne pas tous les dires de la journaliste. « Nous n’avons pas voulu dire ces choses-là dans ce sens-là. Nous ne voulons en aucun cas faire l’apologie de l’esclavage mais de celle du rhum, de la culture caraïbéenne », précise-t-il. Par le « à la cool » cité dans l’article du Petit Bulletin, il voulait « parler du bar, du service, de notre attitude ». Il dément aussi que des photos d’esclaves soient affichées dans les toilettes. « Il s’agit de gravures de bouteilles de rhum, de champs d’ananas », ajoute-t-il. Huffington Post
« L’esprit colonial, un esprit à la cool, une époque où l’on savait recevoir ». Le bar à cocktail lyonnais « La Première plantation » est accusé de faire l’apologie de l’esclavage après des propos rapportés par une journaliste. (…) « La Première Plantation ». Sur le coup, on a pensé à une blague un peu douteuse, voire carrément déplacée… Mais non, c’est bien comme ça que des barmans du 6e arrondissement de Lyon ont décidé d’appeler leur nouveau bar à cocktails en « référence aux plantations de canne à sucre dans les colonies françaises. Je cherche à retranscrire l’esprit colonial, un esprit à la cool, une époque où l’on savait recevoir », expliquent les deux gérants dans un article du Petit Bulletin paru mardi 12 septembre. S’ensuit un dialogue surréaliste : alors que la journaliste demande des explications concernant la qualification de « cool », les gérants assument : « Dans l’esprit, oui, carrément, ça représente une période sympathique, il y avait du travail à cette époque accueillante. » Quid des esclaves et des atrocités commis à leur égard ? « On a mis quelques photos dans les toilettes ». Des propos qui laissent paraître une nostalgie du temps des colonies, tout en s’en servant comme argument marketing. Face aux vives réactions déclenchées sur la toile, la journaliste à l’origine de l’article a tenu à préciser, via Twitter, que les propos rapportés sont bel et bien authentiques : «Les faits rapportés dans l’article ne sont pas, comme j’ai pu le lire, ‘le fruit de l’imagination de la journaliste qui veut nuire personnellement au lieu’ mais bien des faits, justement. Je n’approuve en aucun cas l’appel à la violence envers les propriétaires du lieu ». Elle précise aussi avoir bien vu les photos en question dans les toilettes. Contactés par Les Inrockuptibles, les gérants de La Première Plantation fustigent « le manque de bon sens de la journaliste qui nous [leur] a posé des questions à 19h, en plein moment de rush ». « Nous écoutions à peine les questions car nous devions servir les clients en même temps », expliquent-ils avant d’ajouter : »Notre métier c’est le cocktail, nous ne possédons pas un doctorat en Histoire, nous avons donc un gros manque de connaissances à ce niveau là ». Tous deux se disent « désolés » de la tournure qu’a pris cette polémique et assurent n’avoir « aucune nostalgie de cette période là ». Concernant les photographies disposées dans les toilettes ils expliquent : « Il n’y a pas de photographies d’esclaves, simplement celle d’une maison blanche victorienne, et celle d’un champ d’ananas ». Ils nous assurent que le nom du bar va être changé afin de « partir sur des bases saines ». Et concluent par : « Nous sommes les victimes dans cette histoire ». De son côté la journaliste confirme avoir bien vu des photos d’esclaves, et assure que l’interview a été enregistrée. A la suite de la publication de l’article, le collectif des Raciné.e.s, une association féministe et décoloniale lyonnaise, a lancé une pétition en ligne (signée par 3 500 personnes à l’heure où nous écrivons ces lignes), notamment co-signée par la journaliste Amandine Gay, la créatrice de Paye ta Shnek Anaïs Bourdet, le youtubeur Usul, ou encore les journalistes Sihame Assbague, et Johanna Luyssen (Libération). (…) Contacté par Les Inrockuptibles, le collectifdes Raciné.e.s se dit « à la fois consterné·e·s, en colère et, paradoxalement, désabusé·e·s ». (…) De son côté, Le Petit Bulletin a publié ce jeudi soir une mise au point et a laissé un droit de réponse aux gérants de « La Première Plantation ». Les Inrocks
L’enjeu, c’est de faire savoir qu’il y a des vrais gens d’un côté et de l’autre du clavier. Lorsque Nadia Daam reçoit des menaces de mort, cela n’a rien de virtuel pour elle. Et cela n’aura rien de virtuel non plus pour ses harceleurs, lorsqu’ils seront en chair et en os à la barre du tribunal. C’est la fin du virtuel et l’irruption du réel. Eric Morain
Le harcèlement en ligne est un phénomène qui se propage à l’échelle mondiale et qui constitue aujourd’hui l’une des pires menaces contre la liberté de la presse. On découvre que les guerres de l’information ne sont pas menées seulement entre pays sur le plan international mais que les prédateurs du journalisme mettent en place des armées de trolls pour traquer et affaiblir tous ceux qui recherchent honnêtement les faits. Ces despotes laissent leurs mercenaires cibler les journalistes et leur tirer dessus à balles réelles sur le terrain virtuel comme d’autres le font sur les terrains de guerre. Christophe Deloire (Reporters sans frontières)
Nous demandons à ce qu’une enquête approfondie soit menée sur les menaces en ligne reçues par Julie Hainaut. Au moment où les autorités légifèrent sur les violences sexistes et sexuelles parmi lesquelles figure le cyber-harcèlement, il est fondamental qu’elles prennent la mesure de la gravité de cette nouvelle menace qui pèse sur les journalistes. Les campagnes d’insultes, les menaces, la diffusion d’informations personnelles détournées dans l’objectif de nuire… toutes ces cabales en ligne ont pour objectif de faire taire les journalistes. Elodie Vialle (RSF)
Alors que s’ouvre mardi le procès de deux cyber-harceleurs de la journaliste française Nadia Daam, Reporters sans frontières (RSF) regrette que la plupart des cas de harcèlement en ligne de journalistes ne donnent lieu à aucune poursuite judiciaire. Une condamnation « juste mais ferme ». C’est ce que réclame la journaliste française Nadia Daam à l’encontre des deux cyber-harceleurs poursuivis parmi les sept identifiés, ce mardi 5 juin devant le tribunal correctionnel de Paris. En novembre dernier, la journaliste avait porté plainte après avoir été victime de menaces en ligne à la suite de l’une de ses chroniques sur Europe1, dans laquelle elle dénonçait les méthodes de trolls. (…) Si RSF salue la tenue de ce procès, l’organisation rappelle que d’autres journalistes attendent toujours qu’une suite judiciaire soit donnée à leur affaire. C’est le cas de Julie Hainaut. En septembre dernier, la journaliste lyonnaise se retrouve plongée au coeur d’une tempête médiatique d’une violence inouïe pour avoir rapporté et désapprouvé, dans le petit Bulletin de Lyon, les propos néo-colonialistes des tenanciers d’un nouveau bar, “la première plantation”. “Je suis inondée d’insultes et de menaces. Ils “cherchent mon adresse”[…] Je respire difficilement, je dors peu. J’ai peur”, témoigne-t-elle dans Libération. Elle reçoit alors un courrier de soutien du ministre de l’Intérieur Gérard Collomb et porte plainte à trois reprises. Depuis, plus rien. “Je ne me sens pas écoutée”, témoigne la journaliste qui a reçu en mars de nouvelles menaces. Et a dû porter plainte de nouveau. (…) RSF observe de plus en plus de cas de cyber-harcèlement. Un phénomène qui existe dans quasiment tous les pays et touche prioritairement les femmes journalistes et les journalistes d’investigation. RSF a ainsi récemment appelé les autorités indiennes à protéger Rana Ayyub, une journaliste d’investigation indienne victime de campagnes de harcèlement en ligne menées par les armées de trolls du Premier ministre indien Narendra Modi. RSF
Jeudi 26 juillet, Reporters Sans Frontières a publié un rapport intitulé « Harcèlement en ligne des journalistes : quand les trolls lancent l’assaut ». Celui-ci entendait, comme son nom l’indique, alerter sur les « trolls » usant d’injures et de menaces vis-à-vis des gens de la profession. Mais il avait aussi et surtout pour objet de dénoncer les Etats ayant une politique peu amène vis-à-vis du concept de liberté de la presse, en analysant plus spécifiquement leurs stratégies informatiques. (…) En revanche, on ne manquera pas de sourire devant les stratégies humoristiques mises en œuvre par les rédacteurs du rapport pour discréditer ceux qui n’ont pas leurs faveurs : par exemple, Donald Trump, évoqué dans un hasardeux photomontage page 17, voyant Hassan Rohani, Vladimir Poutine, Xi Jinping et Nicolas Maduro le congratuler pour ses déclarations sur les médias. En légende, on lit : « ‘Bravo Donald !’ : les prédateurs de la liberté de la presse saluent les efforts de Donald Trump pour dénigrer les journalistes ». La coalition des méchants despotes contre la presse libre et indépendante, c’est un peu gros, mais après tout, on ne s’offusquera pas : c’est de bonne guerre. Plus pernicieuse est la confusion volontaire faite entre les journalistes et les militants droits-de-l’hommistes. La figure du journaliste, censé être là pour informer ses concitoyens sur ce qui se passe autour d’eux, se mêle dans une brume évanescente à l’idée romancée du courageux justicier luttant contre la dictature. Le rapport de RSF n’a pas manqué d’être diffusé immédiatement par la presse. On a ainsi vu proliférer jeudi des articles parfaitement interchangeables, reprenant avec une unanimité confondante les différents points qui avaient été résumés dans une dépêche AFP. Tous les grands médias se sont ainsi saisis du sujet du cyberharcèlement des confrères, notamment quand il s’agit de consœurs. Découvre-t-on la lune ? Pas chez Causeur, où la polémique sur le Manifeste des 343 salauds contre la pénalisation des clients de prostituées avait provoqué une polémique pas toujours civilisée. Ainsi, le site « 343 connards » recensait les noms et les photos (mais pas les adresses, il y a des bottins pour ça) des méchants pétitionnaires et fournissait même un kit d’injures prêt à l’emploi sur Twitter. Il n’y avait plus qu’à cliquer sur leur photo pour que les individus incriminés reçoivent ce message lyrique : « Salut XXX, aucune femme n’est ta pute, connard!».Au rythme de plusieurs dizaines de tweets par jour, est-ce du harcèlement ? Les auteurs de ce site qualifieraient sans doute plutôt leur geste d’ « initiative citoyenne », nimbés de leurs certitudes de militants féministes. Tout comme, à l’époque, les médias qui relayaient l’adresse du site d’insultes, comme pour inviter à passer y faire un tour. Des médias qui montrent aujourd’hui une si touchante résolution à dénoncer, à la suite de RSF, le cyberharcèlement lorsqu’il touche des journalistes… innocents. Gabrielle Périer (Causeur)
Forcément, les propos ont fait le tour du web. Sur la base de cet article, sont tombées des centaines de réactions outrées, dénonçant une « audace crasse », une « apologie de l’esclavagisme », une « horreur déprimante ». La page Facebook du lieu, qui a dû fermer depuis, a reçu un torrent d’insultes ou de commentaire négatifs. Des collectifs se sont aussi emparés de l’histoire, y voyant « une nouvelle manière de décomplexer la #négrophobie tout en faisant autrement l’apologie de la colonisation et de l’esclavage-négrier-occidentalo-chrétien ».  Le collectif Des Racinés a lancé une pétition, demandant la fermeture du lieu. « En faisant de cette histoire leur fond de commerce, les gérants ont décidé d’exploiter ce qui pourrait au mieux être qualifié de négationnisme et, plus raisonnablement, d’apologie de crime contre l’humanité », estime-il.  Ont aussi fleuri des appels à la violence contre les deux gérants. Devant la tempête, d’autres tentent de raison garder. Et de tenter de discerner le vrai du faux. Comme Romain Blachier, élu local, qui a décidé de se « faire son idée par moi-même ».  Après entrevue, il penche pour l’ignorance des deux patrons, il est vrai, particulièrement malheureuse lorsqu’on se lance dans une affaire comme celle-là. « Ils m’ont confirmé être opposés au colonialisme, condamner tout racisme et ont sans doute été un peu maladroits et pas très au fait de l’Histoire tragique du colonialisme », écrit l’élu sur Facebook. Ont-ils eux-mêmes été dépassés par l’ampleur du bad buzz qu’ils ont contribué à créer ? En tout cas, ils condamnent les réactions disproportionnées. Deux jours après, les journalistes du Petit bulletin ont mis en ligne un nouvel article, de mise au point.  Le rédacteur en chef explique être retourné dans le café pour s’expliquer. « Il ne s’agit pas ici de réfuter l’information initiale », précisent les journalistes sur leur site. « Nous assumons pleinement notre travail de journaliste et cet article […]. Faire de la période coloniale un argument de communication, c’est une plaie qu’il fallait mettre à jour. » Et détaillent leur entrevue avec les deux gérants : « Nous avons rencontré deux personnes abattues, conscientes de la maladresse totale des propos cités, mais réfutant – et nous les croyons totalement après cette rencontre – tout racisme ou toute ambiguïté de leur part sur l’esclavage. Aucun d’eux n’est raciste ou soupçonné de complaisance envers l’esclavage », précise le Petit bulletin. Pour eux, le diagnostic est formel : « Les propos tenus lors de l’interview publiée mardi et le positionnement de leur lieu sont visiblement la conséquence d’une méconnaissance de cette période de l’Histoire, de légèreté sans doute quant à leurs recherches sur cette époque, dont ils ont voulu mettre en valeur l’esthétique par leur décoration et surtout, leur passion : le rhum. » Précision, aussi, sur les »photos d’esclaves » dans les toilettes mentionnées par les barmans, que les journalistes ont retranscrit : les journalistes sont allés voir, et « n’ont pas vu de photos d’esclaves mais deux clichés encadrés : une maison de maître victorienne et un champ d’ananas », reconnaissent les journalistes. Qui plaident donc pour la clémence envers les deux gérants : « Dépassés par la maladresse de leur propos, ils ne méritent certainement pas la violence du traitement qui leur est infligé aujourd’hui. Il était de notre devoir de journaliste d’écrire ce malaise ressenti par l’utilisation d’éléments évoquant l’époque coloniale pour décrire leur bar et son ambiance », mais « les réseaux sociaux ont transformé cette information en vindicte populaire contre La Première Plantation : c’est indéfendable. » LCI
Julie Hainaut, qui chronique entre autres l’ouverture de nouveaux spots dans la ville, avait pointé l’attitude désinvolte de jeunes patrons d’un bar à rhum qui estimaient que l’esthétique de la colonisation était « plutôt cool ». Les tenanciers du lieu s’en étaient alors pris plein la figure et, depuis, ils ont tenté de faire amende honorable ; pendant ce temps, Julie Hainaut est quant à elle devenue la cible d’attaques de la part d’internautes racistes et/ou d’écervelés oisifs, de harceleurs. Un site clairement revendiqué « super-raciste », intitulé democratieparticipative, s’est montré le plus virulent. On trouve sur cette plateforme hébergée en dehors de la France une multitude d’articles injurieux et répréhensibles pénalement. Ceux qui concernent Julie Hainaut n’ont de cesse de ré-apparaître. Au climax, le conseiller spécial de Gérard Collomb -ministre dont personne ne peut ignorer l’origine lyonnaise– avait joint Rue89Lyon pour expliquer que l’affaire était prise très au sérieux. Le procureur de la République de Lyon n’a pas su de quoi il retournait lorsque nous l’avions joint. La DILCRAH (Délégation Interministérielle à la Lutte Contre le Racisme, l’Antisémitisme et la Haine anti-LGBT) a aussi été informée, mais semble tourner autour de sa propre impuissance. Julie Hainaut est régulièrement contactée par des personnes harcelées sur le web, lui demandant conseil ou aide. Ces derniers temps, elle voit aussi un entourage plus ou moins proche, las ou inquiet, lui demander de « lâcher l’affaire ». Dalya Daoud
Je me suis retrouvée au cœur d’une tempête numérique et médiatique d’une violence inouïe. Très vite, une quinzaine de médias ont relayé l’information, avec parfois des titres bien plus accrocheurs qu’informatifs, et parfois des propos déformés qui n’avaient au final plus beaucoup de rapport avec l’article initial. Au risque de me répéter, les mots ont un sens. Sur les réseaux sociaux, les simples commentaires sont devenus des appels à la haine. Contre les barmen d’abord, ce que je désapprouve fermement, bien évidemment. Contre moi ensuite. Le 16 septembre, le site néonazi démocratieparticipative.biz publie un article intitulé «Lyon : une pute à nègres féministe veut détruire un bar à rhum « colonialiste », mobilisation !». Vient alors le temps des mots dénués de sens. Parce qu’à un moment, leur en donner, c’est leur faire trop d’honneur. Les fines plumes du site évoquent la «vaginocratie négrophile», me qualifient – entre autres – de «grosse pute», «vermine», «putain à nègre hystérique», «femelle négrophile», «hyène puante» et appellent à inonder mon fil Twitter et ma boîte mail, en dévoilant des photos volées, le tout illustré – entre autres – par une vidéo de Goebbels et un GIF d’Hitler. Je dépose immédiatement une plainte pour injure publique et diffamation. Je suis inondée d’insultes et de menaces. Ils «cherchent mon adresse». Je complète ma plainte pour harcèlement. Je respire difficilement, je dors peu, j’ai peur. «Il ne faut pas le dire, Julie, sinon ils ont gagné». Tant pis, je le dis. J’ai peur. Un élan de soutien émerge sur Twitter. Ça fait du bien. Le site est signalé sur Pharos (la Plateforme d’harmonisation, d’analyse, de recoupement et d’orientation des signalements du ministère de l’Intérieur) et ferme. Puis renaît. Deux autres articles sont publiés. Il est désormais question de ma «négrophilie pathologique». Et c’est reparti. «Hyène terroriste», «pue-la-pisse», «prostituée». Vous en voulez encore ? J’en ai en stock. «Obsédée par les nègres», «serpillière à foutre africain». J’ai la nausée. Je complète néanmoins une nouvelle fois ma plainte, j’y dépose de nouvelles pièces, de nouveaux mots. Le site est signalé une nouvelle fois sur Pharos mais réapparaît par intermittence. Savoir de quoi l’esthétisation de la période coloniale est le symptôme ne fait pas partie de mon domaine de compétence. Mais je sais que les mots ont un sens. Entre autres parce qu’ils provoquent des émotions. Et on sous-estime bien trop souvent leur haut pouvoir en nitroglycérine. Depuis une semaine, certains m’ont réconfortée, d’autres m’ont outrageusement blessée. J’ai vu des personnes applaudir, ravies de ce ramassis sexiste, raciste, diffamatoire et injurieux menaçant la liberté d’expression et mon intégrité physique tout en appelant à la violence sous fond d’apologie du nazisme. Tous ces mots pour mes mots à moi. Enfin, surtout leurs mots à eux. C’était assourdissant, tous ces mots. Pour tenir bon, j’ai dû très vite apprendre à vider de leur sens ceux qui m’écorchent et à voir toute la force que me confèrent ceux, mille fois plus nombreux, que m’adressent des inconnus en soutien. Les mots ont un sens. Et c’est avec justesse qu’ils se doivent d’être choisis. Parce que des petits mots tout bêtes peuvent devenir de grosses blessures. Ces mots sur la partie la moins glorieuse de notre histoire, celle durant laquelle l’on enchaînait des humains, on les mutilait et pillait leur pays. Ou ces mots pour me décrire. Des mots d’une violence misogyne inouïe. Des mots tout sales et humiliants, pour se venger de celle qui les rapporte. Un peu de respect pour les mots. Ils sont puissants. Et dans ce flot d’insultes et de menaces de mort, le pouvoir des mots gentils m’est apparu comme une bouée de sauvetage. Merci pour vos mots, en réaction aux miens. J’ai appris que le meilleur est mille fois plus puissant que le pire. Mes batteries sont rechargées. Au boulot. Julie Hainaut
J’ai reçu un mail avec les sempiternelles « sale pute à nègre » et « traitresse à ta race », une dose de « on sait qui tu es et où tu vis, tu vas passer les années à venir la peur au ventre », et un charmant « Sieg Heil » (salut fasciste) en conclusion. C’était juste avant de me rendre à Grenoble pour recevoir le prix « Coup de cœur du jury » et participer à la table ronde sur les discours haineux sur les réseaux sociaux. Je n’avais pas eu de mails aussi violents depuis quelques mois – les insultes et injures sont plus fréquentes, elles, mais les menaces de mort ou de viols sont assez sporadiques. Et malgré ce que j’ai pu entendre, non, ça n’a rien de virtuel. Le harcèlement numérique n’est pas virtuel. Il est réel. Et ses effets sont très concrets. Le cyberharcèlement est aussi violent qu’un coup de poing. (…) Ça a été très violent, même si, là, je suis sortie du cœur de la tempête. Ce qui a été presque plus pénible à vivre, ce sont les gens qui m’ont dit que je devais m’y attendre, ou que j’avais provoqué, ou que j’aurais dû m’abstenir. Pire, ceux qui pensent que je l’ai fait exprès pour faire le buzz. C’est le même mécanisme que dire à une victime de viol que c’est sa faute parce qu’elle porte une jupe. J’ai rencontré des journalistes spécialisés sur le cyberharcèlement, qui m’ont beaucoup aidée à sortir de ce mécanisme de culpabilité, à accepter que dans ce cas-ci, j’étais bel et bien une victime et que je n’avais rien à me reprocher. Ce victim-blaming est insupportable. La victime n’est jamais responsable, ni de son harcèlement, ni de son agression. (…) combien de fois ai-je entendu cette phrase « Tu es passée à autre chose j’espère ? ». Je sais que ça ne part pas d’un mauvais sentiment mais je ne vois pas très bien le but. Nous sommes dans une société où tout va vite, une indignation succède à une autre, un buzz efface le précédent. Mais derrière ces histoires, il y a des humains. Et des sentiments, ça ne se zappe pas. Et puis cette injonction à « passer à autre chose (et vite si possible) » suggère que si je n’y arrive pas, je stagne, je reste coincée. En vérité je refuse de me résigner, je refuse de passer outre les propos sexistes, racistes, diffamatoires, injurieux, menaçant la liberté d’expression et mon intégrité physique tout en appelant à la violence sous fond d’apologie du nazisme et des crimes de réduction en esclavage. Je refuse que ça passe comme ça. Je poursuivrai ces personnes jusqu’au bout, peu importe le temps que cela prendra. Refuser de « sortir de cette histoire » ne signifie pas « ne plus vivre ». Refuser de « sortir de cette histoire », c’est avant tout vouloir que justice soit faite. Pour l’instant, c’est seule, avec mon avocat, et sur fonds propres, que je mène ce combat intervenu dans un cadre professionnel. (…) Dès le début j’ai été soutenue par le SNJ (Syndicat National des Journalistes), de nombreux médias, mais pas tous, hélas. Certains ont créé des titres alléchants. D’autres ont publié des informations erronées sans les vérifier – ce qui est pourtant l’essence même de notre métier –, ce qui a contribué à la vague de haine que j’ai subie. Les journalistes ne devraient jamais oublier la responsabilité sociale qu’ils ont. Nous pouvons faire et défaire, sublimer ou abîmer. Sans déontologie ni éthique personnelle, nous pouvons être dangereux. Cet épisode m’aura en tout cas appris que pour beaucoup d’internautes, il est plus acceptable de tenir des propos racistes que de les dénoncer. (…) J’ai déposé trois plaintes contre X pour injures publiques, diffamation et harcèlement en septembre, et une plainte pour menaces de mort il y a quelques jours. Je souhaite que le site ferme, bien évidemment. Mais je sais bien que s’il ferme demain, il rouvrira après-demain. Le plus important est de retrouver le ou les auteurs. Les plaintes sont toujours au stade d’enquête. C’est long. (…) J’ai fait mon enquête. J’ai vérifié et recoupé les infos, j’ai fait une veille sur les réseaux sociaux. Toutes les informations ont été fournies à la police, au Procureur de Lyon, au ministère de l’Intérieur et à la DILCRAH [Délégation Interministérielle à la Lutte Contre le Racisme, l’Antisémitisme et la Haine anti-LGBT, ndlr]. Au-delà de mon cas, qui n’en est qu’un parmi tant d’autres – le site s’acharne sur tout type de personnes, d’inconnus à Omar Sy en passant par Jeremstar ou Aurélien Enthoven –, je considère que c’est une affaire dont devrait s’emparer la sphère politique. (…) J’ai encore reçu un mail la semaine dernière d’une victime complètement perdue, que l’on menace de mort, qui aurait déposé plainte, écrit au ministère de l’Intérieur, contacté des associations… en vain. Il s’est dit « humilié une seconde fois par ce silence ». Je le comprends. (…) Lutter contre la cyberhaine sur internet est effectivement une bonne chose. Mettre en place des amendes contre les réseaux sociaux ne retirant pas de propos haineux sous vingt-quatre heures comme en Allemagne le serait aussi. La fermeture des comptes posant problème aussi. Eduquer contre les préjugés, aussi. Mais il ne faut pas oublier le volet répression. Ces mesures ont été évoquées récemment, nous n’avons pas de recul pour voir si elles fonctionneront. Ce qui est certain, c’est que je constate qu’après six mois, le site « Democratie participartive » existe toujours, les personnes ayant alerté sur le sujet ne sont pas entendues, et le ou les auteurs n’ont pas été inquiétés. Le harcèlement sur Internet est un fléau. Un fléau qui touche particulièrement les femmes, un rapport de l’ONU l’a dit en 2015, un rapport d’Amnesty vient de le rappeler. Et au début de l’année, le Haut Conseil à l’égalité entre les femmes et les hommes a remis un rapport accablant montrant que 73% sont victimes de violences en ligne. C’est un problème politique. Ça n’est pas aux victimes de se battre seules. (…) Lors de mes quatre plaintes, je ne me suis pas sentie écoutée à chaque fois. On m’a demandé ce qu’était Twitter. Quand j’ai parlé de « cyberharcèlement », je n’ai pas vraiment eu l’impression d’avoir été comprise. Je pense que la police n’est pas assez sensibilisée aux violences psychologiques, notamment via les réseaux sociaux. Encore une fois, elles sont numériques. Pas virtuelles. Et la violence psychologique est tout aussi inacceptable que la violence physique. Julie Hainaut

Attention: un harcèlement peut en cacher un autre !

En ces temps étranges où, pour tenter de juguler les forces que par leur imprudence et manque de jugement ils ont eux-mêmes déchainées …

Nos gouvernants multiplient, entre suppression du mot racisme de la constitution et criminalisation du harcèlement de rue ou de la désinformation sur les réseaux sociaux, les mesures aussi dérisoires les unes que les autres …

Pendant qu’entre deux appels à l’assassinat du président de l’autre côté de l’Atlantique, une porte-parole de la Maison Blanche se voit ridiculisée au Diner de la presse étrangère, expulsée d’un restaurant et peut-être pour la première fois dans l’histoire américaine, contrainte à une protection policière

Et qu’un humoriste métis sud-africain s’attribue en tant qu’Africain la Coupe du monde des Bleus tout en l’assignant dans la phrase d’après au colonialisme français

A l’heure où, malgré ou peut-être à cause de l’été et non sans rappeler la tristement fameuse chasse à l’homme anti-Fillon d’il y a deux ans, le feuilleton Benalla continue plus fort que jamais …

Et où l’association Reporters sans frontières pointe avec raison les ravages, entre militarisation étatique et agrégation spontanée de trolls, du cyberharcèlement des journalistes

Comment ne pas repenser …

A la fameuse formule de Proust sur la facilité avec laquelle la moindre blessure peut réveiller le goût du sang et la bande d’anthropophages qui, instinct d’imitation et absence de courage aidant, sommeillent dans notre société en général et en chacun de nous en particulier …

Que ce soit, d’un emballement à l’autre, pour aduler nos Mehdi Meklat appelant à « l’autodafé du Nouvel Obs avec leur dossier “antisémite” de merde » …

Ou lyncher nos Benalla et, derrière lui et après l’adulation qui l’a porté comme on sait au pouvoir, le président qu’il servait ?

Et surtout qui prend la peine de rappeler avec la journaliste lyonnaise Julie Hainaut …

Derrière l’inacceptable cyberharcèlement dont elle a été victime l’an dernier pour avoir relevé les problèmes éthiques que soulevait l’ouverture d’un bar à rhum (« La première plantation ») tentant de surfer sur la vogue de la décoration coloniale

Le lot tout aussi invraisemblable d’accusations d’apologie de l’esclavage et du colonialisme – jusqu’à l’invocation des appels au meurtre d’un Fanon – dont elle s’était bien malgré elle fait l’involontaire complice contre ces derniers pour leur maladresse finalement vite reconnue et réparée (rebaptisé L’Artchimiste) …

Et donc en fait la responsabilité sociale des journalistes qu’oublie tant de ses collègues ?

« Le cyberharcèlement est aussi violent qu’un coup de poing »
Entretien / Son article publié dans un journal culturel lyonnais avait suscité une véritable tempête. Médiatisée d’abord puis silencieuse avec le temps, cette bourrasque n’est pas finie ni moins violente aujourd’hui pour la journaliste
Dalya Daoud
Rue89Lyon
04/04/2018

Julie Hainaut, qui chronique entre autres l’ouverture de nouveaux spots dans la ville, avait pointé l’attitude désinvolte de jeunes patrons d’un bar à rhum qui estimaient que l’esthétique de la colonisation était « plutôt cool ».

Les tenanciers du lieu s’en étaient alors pris plein la figure et, depuis, ils ont tenté de faire amende honorable ; pendant ce temps, Julie Hainaut est quant à elle devenue la cible d’attaques de la part d’internautes racistes et/ou d’écervelés oisifs, de harceleurs. Un site clairement revendiqué « super-raciste », intitulé democratieparticipative, s’est montré le plus virulent.

On trouve sur cette plateforme hébergée en dehors de la France une multitude d’articles injurieux et répréhensibles pénalement. Ceux qui concernent Julie Hainaut n’ont de cesse de ré-apparaître.

Au climax, le conseiller spécial de Gérard Collomb -ministre dont personne ne peut ignorer l’origine lyonnaise– avait joint Rue89Lyon pour expliquer que l’affaire était prise très au sérieux. Le procureur de la République de Lyon n’a pas su de quoi il retournait lorsque nous l’avions joint. La DILCRAH (Délégation Interministérielle à la Lutte Contre le Racisme, l’Antisémitisme et la Haine anti-LGBT) a aussi été informée, mais semble tourner autour de sa propre impuissance.

Julie Hainaut est régulièrement contactée par des personnes harcelées sur le web, lui demandant conseil ou aide. Ces derniers temps, elle voit aussi un entourage plus ou moins proche, las ou inquiet, lui demander de « lâcher l’affaire ».

« Sale pute à nègre, on sait qui tu es et où tu vis, tu vas passer les années à venir la peur au ventre »

Rue89Lyon : Le club de la presse de Grenoble vous a remis ce vendredi 23 mars un prix pour votre tribune publiée dans Libération, sur le cyberharcèlement. Le matin-même, vous avez reçu un mail de menaces particulièrement violent, dont l’expéditeur est sans doute rattaché au site néonazi « democratie participative ».  Cela signifie-t-il qu’il surveille toujours tout ce qui peut vous concerner ?

Julie Hainaut : J’ai reçu un mail avec les sempiternelles « sale pute à nègre » et « traitresse à ta race », une dose de « on sait qui tu es et où tu vis, tu vas passer les années à venir la peur au ventre », et un charmant « Sieg Heil » (salut fasciste) en conclusion.

C’était juste avant de me rendre à Grenoble pour recevoir le prix « Coup de cœur du jury » et participer à la table ronde sur les discours haineux sur les réseaux sociaux.

Je n’avais pas eu de mails aussi violents depuis quelques mois – les insultes et injures sont plus fréquentes, elles, mais les menaces de mort ou de viols sont assez sporadiques.

Et malgré ce que j’ai pu entendre, non, ça n’a rien de virtuel. Le harcèlement numérique n’est pas virtuel. Il est réel. Et ses effets sont très concrets. Le cyberharcèlement est aussi violent qu’un coup de poing.

« Le victim-blaming est insupportable. La victime n’est responsable ni de son harcèlement, ni de son agression »

Quel est l’impact aujourd’hui de ce type de pressions sur vous ?

Ça a été très violent, même si, là, je suis sortie du cœur de la tempête. Ce qui a été presque plus pénible à vivre, ce sont les gens qui m’ont dit que je devais m’y attendre, ou que j’avais provoqué, ou que j’aurais dû m’abstenir. Pire, ceux qui pensent que je l’ai fait exprès pour faire le buzz. C’est le même mécanisme que dire à une victime de viol que c’est sa faute parce qu’elle porte une jupe.

J’ai rencontré des journalistes spécialisés sur le cyberharcèlement, qui m’ont beaucoup aidée à sortir de ce mécanisme de culpabilité, à accepter que dans ce cas-ci, j’étais bel et bien une victime et que je n’avais rien à me reprocher.

Ce victim-blaming est insupportable. La victime n’est jamais responsable, ni de son harcèlement, ni de son agression.

« Refuser de « sortir de cette histoire », c’est avant tout vouloir que justice soit faite »

On vous enjoint souvent de « sortir de cette histoire ».

Oui, combien de fois ai-je entendu cette phrase « Tu es passée à autre chose j’espère ? ». Je sais que ça ne part pas d’un mauvais sentiment mais je ne vois pas très bien le but. Nous sommes dans une société où tout va vite, une indignation succède à une autre, un buzz efface le précédent. Mais derrière ces histoires, il y a des humains. Et des sentiments, ça ne se zappe pas.

Et puis cette injonction à « passer à autre chose (et vite si possible) » suggère que si je n’y arrive pas, je stagne, je reste coincée.

En vérité je refuse de me résigner, je refuse de passer outre les propos sexistes, racistes, diffamatoires, injurieux, menaçant la liberté d’expression et mon intégrité physique tout en appelant à la violence sous fond d’apologie du nazisme et des crimes de réduction en esclavage. Je refuse que ça passe comme ça.

Je poursuivrai ces personnes jusqu’au bout, peu importe le temps que cela prendra. Refuser de « sortir de cette histoire » ne signifie pas « ne plus vivre ».

Refuser de « sortir de cette histoire », c’est avant tout vouloir que justice soit faite. Pour l’instant, c’est seule, avec mon avocat, et sur fonds propres, que je mène ce combat intervenu dans un cadre professionnel.

Est-ce que le prix que vous avez reçu est important pour vous ?

Oui, clairement, et je tiens d’ailleurs à remercier le Club de la presse de Grenoble. Ça fait du bien de sentir que ma profession, mes confrères et consœurs sont à mes côtés et conscients du problème.

Dès le début j’ai été soutenue par le SNJ (Syndicat National des Journalistes), de nombreux médias, mais pas tous, hélas. Certains ont créé des titres alléchants. D’autres ont publié des informations erronées sans les vérifier – ce qui est pourtant l’essence même de notre métier –, ce qui a contribué à la vague de haine que j’ai subie.

Les journalistes ne devraient jamais oublier la responsabilité sociale qu’ils ont. Nous pouvons faire et défaire, sublimer ou abîmer. Sans déontologie ni éthique personnelle, nous pouvons être dangereux. Cet épisode m’aura en tout cas appris que pour beaucoup d’internautes, il est plus acceptable de tenir des propos racistes que de les dénoncer.

Depuis six mois, vous avez subi des attaques de la part d’activistes racistes, des menaces et des pressions directes ; vous avez tout tenté pour que le site pourvoyeur de ces propos répréhensibles ferme, en vain. Vous avez déposé quatre plaintes, que concernent-elles exactement et sur quel calendrier ?

J’ai déposé trois plaintes contre X pour injures publiques, diffamation et harcèlement en septembre, et une plainte pour menaces de mort il y a quelques jours. Je souhaite que le site ferme, bien évidemment. Mais je sais bien que s’il ferme demain, il rouvrira après-demain.

Le plus important est de retrouver le ou les auteurs. Les plaintes sont toujours au stade d’enquête. C’est long.

Vous avez remonté les sources pour tenter de trouver qui se cache derrière ce site néonazi : expliquez-nous ce que vous avez découvert.

J’ai fait mon enquête. J’ai vérifié et recoupé les infos, j’ai fait une veille sur les réseaux sociaux. Toutes les informations ont été fournies à la police, au Procureur de Lyon, au ministère de l’Intérieur et à la DILCRAH [Délégation Interministérielle à la Lutte Contre le Racisme, l’Antisémitisme et la Haine anti-LGBT, ndlr].

Au-delà de mon cas, qui n’en est qu’un parmi tant d’autres – le site s’acharne sur tout type de personnes, d’inconnus à Omar Sy en passant par Jeremstar ou Aurélien Enthoven –, je considère que c’est une affaire dont devrait s’emparer la sphère politique.

Vous avez été contactée par un conseiller de Gérard Collomb, ministre de l’Intérieur, au lendemain des articles diffamatoires et injurieux publiés par ce site ; cela a-t-il abouti à d’autres échanges depuis ?

Effectivement, nous avons échangé en septembre suite au début du cyberharcèlement. Depuis, rien. Ce n’est pas faute d’avoir essayé de le recontacter en octobre, novembre et décembre, pour l’informer notamment de mails reçus par des personnes ayant également fait l’objet de menaces par le biais de ce site, se sentant isolées, démunies, et me demandant de l’aide.

J’ai encore reçu un mail la semaine dernière d’une victime complètement perdue, que l’on menace de mort, qui aurait déposé plainte, écrit au ministère de l’Intérieur, contacté des associations… en vain. Il s’est dit « humilié une seconde fois par ce silence ». Je le comprends.

« Ils m’ont dit prendre l’affaire au sérieux. J’ai envie de les croire. Mais j’attends les actes »

Vous avez été plus récemment reçue par un membre de la DILCRAH. Quelle a été la teneur des échanges et est-ce que vous en ressortez satisfaite ? Cette délégation vous semble-t-elle dotée de ressources suffisantes et à la hauteur de l’opération de communication qui a accompagné son lancement ?

J’ai interpellé Frédéric Potier, délégué interministériel à la lutte contre le racisme, l’antisémitisme et la haine anti-LGBT (DILCRAH) sur Twitter, suite à l’un de ses tweets concernant le fameux site néonazi.

J’ai ensuite été reçue à Paris par Donatien Le Vaillant, le conseiller pour la justice et les relations internationales de la DILCRAH. Ils m’ont dit prendre l’affaire au sérieux. J’ai envie de les croire. Mais j’attends les actes.

« Le harcèlement sur Internet est un fléau qui touche particulièrement les femmes »

Les annonces politiques relatives à la lutte contre le cyberharcèlement et le racisme propagé notamment via le web ont été nombreuses ces dernières semaines. Avez-vous le sentiment qu’elles reflètent une réalité et un investissement concret, pensez-vous avoir été entendue ?

Lutter contre la cyberhaine sur internet est effectivement une bonne chose. Mettre en place des amendes contre les réseaux sociaux ne retirant pas de propos haineux sous vingt-quatre heures comme en Allemagne le serait aussi. La fermeture des comptes posant problème aussi. Eduquer contre les préjugés, aussi.

Mais il ne faut pas oublier le volet répression. Ces mesures ont été évoquées récemment, nous n’avons pas de recul pour voir si elles fonctionneront. Ce qui est certain, c’est que je constate qu’après six mois, le site « Democratie participartive » existe toujours, les personnes ayant alerté sur le sujet ne sont pas entendues, et le ou les auteurs n’ont pas été inquiétés.

Le harcèlement sur Internet est un fléau. Un fléau qui touche particulièrement les femmes, un rapport de l’ONU l’a dit en 2015, un rapport d’Amnesty vient de le rappeler. Et au début de l’année, le Haut Conseil à l’égalité entre les femmes et les hommes a remis un rapport accablant montrant que 73% sont victimes de violences en ligne.

C’est un problème politique. Ça n’est pas aux victimes de se battre seules.

« La police n’est pas assez sensibilisée aux violences psychologiques, notamment via les réseaux sociaux »

Vous êtes retournée au commissariat à l’issue du dernier mail de menace de mort, datant d’il y a quelques jours. Pensez-vous que les agents soient formés ?

Lors de mes quatre plaintes, je ne me suis pas sentie écoutée à chaque fois. On m’a demandé ce qu’était Twitter. Quand j’ai parlé de « cyberharcèlement », je n’ai pas vraiment eu l’impression d’avoir été comprise.

Je pense que la police n’est pas assez sensibilisée aux violences psychologiques, notamment via les réseaux sociaux. Encore une fois, elles sont numériques. Pas virtuelles.

Et la violence psychologique est tout aussi inacceptable que la violence physique.

Voir aussi:

Cyberharcèlement : les mots ont un sens

Pour avoir rapporté les propos choquants sur l’époque coloniale des propriétaires d’un bar lyonnais, la journaliste Julie Hainaut a été harcelée, insultée et menacée sur Internet. Elle revient sur l’affaire et les mots, de soutien ou violents, qu’elle a reçus et entendus
Julie Hainaut
Libération

 

Depuis une semaine, j’en ai lu, des mots. Des beaux, des moches, des violents. J’ai été fascinée, mais aussi pétrifiée, par tous ces gens qui ont un avis sur tout, surtout sur celui des autres. Ceux qui jugent sans chercher l’information à la source. Ceux qui confondent presse et publicité, liberté d’expression et libération de la parole, déontologie et conséquentialisme, devoir d’information et droit de se taire.

Je m’appelle Julie Hainaut, je suis journaliste freelance depuis dix ans. Je travaille pour divers médias, dont le Petit Bulletin, un hebdomadaire culturel lyonnais.

Le 12 septembre paraissait mon article intitulé «La Première plantation, ou l’art de se planter», dans lequel je m’indignais des propos des patrons d’un bar à cocktails. Dans ce lieu, dont le nom fait «référence aux plantations de canne à sucre dans les colonies françaises», les patrons affirment «chercher à retranscrire l’esprit colonial, un esprit à la cool, une époque où l’on savait recevoir, une période sympathique où il y avait du travail». Les mots ont un sens. Pas besoin d’être journaliste pour le savoir.

Ces mots prononcés avec légèreté – et enregistrés sur bande-son avec le consentement des intéressés – sur ce qu’il convient d’appeler un crime contre l’humanité m’ont heurtée. Beaucoup. J’ai d’abord cru à un humour un peu gras ou un manque de connaissance, mais après plusieurs perches lancées, ils me confirment le sérieux de leurs propos lorsque j’évoque la partie «esclave» de la colonisation. «Ah, on a mis quelques photos de gens dans les toilettes», me disent-ils. Certes.

J’ai réécouté l’interview dix fois. Puis je l’ai retranscrite et j’ai exprimé ma désapprobation dans mon papier, de la même manière que je l’ai fait pendant l’interview. Mon article provoquera ensuite un véritable tollé. Les propriétaires ont souhaité avoir un droit de réponse, qu’ils ont bien évidemment obtenu. «Contrairement à ce qui a été retranscrit dans l’article, notre établissement n’a jamais eu la volonté de faire une quelconque apologie de la période colonialiste, période que nous condamnons.»

«L’affaire» aurait pu s’arrêter là. Mais non. Sur les réseaux sociaux, la façon dont l’interview s’est déroulée sera réécrite. Je serais venue en plein service, sournoisement, poser des questions auxquelles ils n’ont pu répondre avec attention parce qu’ils étaient occupés à faire leur boulot. J’ai beau préciser – et donc me justifier d’avoir retranscrit des faits, l’essence même de mon métier – être venue avant l’affluence et que l’interview a bien été enregistrée, l’engrenage continue. De nombreuses associations, dont le CRAN (Conseil représentatif des associations noires), condamnent fermement ces propos. Mais beaucoup d’internautes semblent penser qu’il est plus acceptable de les tenir que de les dénoncer.

Je ne suis pas l’Elise Lucet de la tapenade, l’Albert Londres du gin tonic, la Florence Aubenas de l’espuma. Avec la casquette du Petit Bulletin, je ne traque pas le scoop, je ne dénonce pas des injustices. Je viens – en toute indépendance – mettre en lumière des endroits de ma ville où l’on consomme (du boire, du manger, du vêtement, de la culture). Et pourtant, cette semaine, je me suis retrouvée au cœur d’une tempête numérique et médiatique d’une violence inouïe.

Très vite, une quinzaine de médias ont relayé l’information, avec parfois des titres bien plus accrocheurs qu’informatifs, et parfois des propos déformés qui n’avaient au final plus beaucoup de rapport avec l’article initial. Au risque de me répéter, les mots ont un sens. Sur les réseaux sociaux, les simples commentaires sont devenus des appels à la haine. Contre les barmen d’abord, ce que je désapprouve fermement, bien évidemment. Contre moi ensuite.

Le 16 septembre, le site néonazi démocratieparticipative.biz publie un article intitulé «Lyon : une pute à nègres féministe veut détruire un bar à rhum « colonialiste », mobilisation !». Vient alors le temps des mots dénués de sens. Parce qu’à un moment, leur en donner, c’est leur faire trop d’honneur. Les fines plumes du site évoquent la «vaginocratie négrophile», me qualifient – entre autres – de «grosse pute», «vermine», «putain à nègre hystérique», «femelle négrophile», «hyène puante» et appellent à inonder mon fil Twitter et ma boîte mail, en dévoilant des photos volées, le tout illustré – entre autres – par une vidéo de Goebbels et un GIF d’Hitler. Je dépose immédiatement une plainte pour injure publique et diffamation. Je suis inondée d’insultes et de menaces. Ils «cherchent mon adresse». Je complète ma plainte pour harcèlement. Je respire difficilement, je dors peu, j’ai peur. «Il ne faut pas le dire, Julie, sinon ils ont gagné». Tant pis, je le dis. J’ai peur.

Un élan de soutien émerge sur Twitter. Ça fait du bien. Le site est signalé sur Pharos (la Plateforme d’harmonisation, d’analyse, de recoupement et d’orientation des signalements du ministère de l’Intérieur) et ferme. Puis renaît. Deux autres articles sont publiés. Il est désormais question de ma «négrophilie pathologique». Et c’est reparti. «Hyène terroriste», «pue-la-pisse», «prostituée». Vous en voulez encore ? J’en ai en stock. «Obsédée par les nègres», «serpillière à foutre africain». J’ai la nausée. Je complète néanmoins une nouvelle fois ma plainte, j’y dépose de nouvelles pièces, de nouveaux mots. Le site est signalé une nouvelle fois sur Pharos mais réapparaît par intermittence.

Savoir de quoi l’esthétisation de la période coloniale est le symptôme ne fait pas partie de mon domaine de compétence. Mais je sais que les mots ont un sens. Entre autres parce qu’ils provoquent des émotions. Et on sous-estime bien trop souvent leur haut pouvoir en nitroglycérine. Depuis une semaine, certains m’ont réconfortée, d’autres m’ont outrageusement blessée. J’ai vu des personnes applaudir, ravies de ce ramassis sexiste, raciste, diffamatoire et injurieux menaçant la liberté d’expression et mon intégrité physique tout en appelant à la violence sous fond d’apologie du nazisme. Tous ces mots pour mes mots à moi. Enfin, surtout leurs mots à eux. C’était assourdissant, tous ces mots. Pour tenir bon, j’ai dû très vite apprendre à vider de leur sens ceux qui m’écorchent et à voir toute la force que me confèrent ceux, mille fois plus nombreux, que m’adressent des inconnus en soutien.

Les mots ont un sens. Et c’est avec justesse qu’ils se doivent d’être choisis. Parce que des petits mots tout bêtes peuvent devenir de grosses blessures. Ces mots sur la partie la moins glorieuse de notre histoire, celle durant laquelle l’on enchaînait des humains, on les mutilait et pillait leur pays. Ou ces mots pour me décrire. Des mots d’une violence misogyne inouïe. Des mots tout sales et humiliants, pour se venger de celle qui les rapporte. Un peu de respect pour les mots. Ils sont puissants. Et dans ce flot d’insultes et de menaces de mort, le pouvoir des mots gentils m’est apparu comme une bouée de sauvetage. Merci pour vos mots, en réaction aux miens. J’ai appris que le meilleur est mille fois plus puissant que le pire. Mes batteries sont rechargées. Au boulot.

 

Le cyberharcèlement des journalistes existe, « Causeur » l’a rencontré!
Reporters sans Frontières découvre la lune
Gabrielle Périer
Causeur
1 août 2018

Jeudi 26 juillet, Reporters Sans Frontières a publié un rapport intitulé « Harcèlement en ligne des journalistes : quand les trolls lancent l’assaut ». Celui-ci entendait, comme son nom l’indique, alerter sur les « trolls » usant d’injures et de menaces vis-à-vis des gens de la profession. Mais il avait aussi et surtout pour objet de dénoncer les Etats ayant une politique peu amène vis-à-vis du concept de liberté de la presse, en analysant plus spécifiquement leurs stratégies informatiques.

Armées de trolls et fake news

Même si ce rapport ne nous apprend pas grand-chose de fondamentalement nouveau, quelques points peuvent néanmoins renseigner le citoyen curieux. S’il tombe souvent dans une empathie psychologisante isolant des cas particuliers sans qu’une démonstration générale ne soit faite, on y lit cependant des développements intéressants sur le phénomène des « armées de trolls », équipes employées par certains Etats, comme la Chine ou l’Iran, pour propager des « fake news » et soutenir des idées sur les réseaux sociaux. Le raisonnement est poursuivi par un éclairage utile sur la façon dont se diffusent les informations sur Internet.

En revanche, on ne manquera pas de sourire devant les stratégies humoristiques mises en œuvre par les rédacteurs du rapport pour discréditer ceux qui n’ont pas leurs faveurs : par exemple, Donald Trump, évoqué dans un hasardeux photomontage page 17, voyant Hassan Rohani, Vladimir Poutine, Xi Jinping et Nicolas Maduro le congratuler pour ses déclarations sur les médias. En légende, on lit : « ‘Bravo Donald !’ : les prédateurs de la liberté de la presse saluent les efforts de Donald Trump pour dénigrer les journalistes ». La coalition des méchants despotes contre la presse libre et indépendante, c’est un peu gros, mais après tout, on ne s’offusquera pas : c’est de bonne guerre.

Journaliste ou militant?

Plus pernicieuse est la confusion volontaire faite entre les journalistes et les militants droits-de-l’hommistes. La figure du journaliste, censé être là pour informer ses concitoyens sur ce qui se passe autour d’eux, se mêle dans une brume évanescente à l’idée romancée du courageux justicier luttant contre la dictature. Un exemple parmi tant d’autres : page 9, on lit dans un encadré : « Au Pakistan, où 68% des journalistes ont été victimes de harcèlement en ligne, des femmes activistes et des féministes sont trollées et désignées comme étant des agents occidentaux ». On comprend ainsi que le journaliste, selon RSF, est investi d’une mission morale : propager les valeurs de liberté, de démocratie et de respect des droits humains. Tout comme les membres de Reporters Sans Frontières eux-mêmes d’ailleurs, qui n’hésitent pas à formuler des recommandations, au contenu si vague qu’il en est complètement venteux, aux Etats, aux institutions internationales et aux médias, dans la tradition prétentieuse de ce type d’ONG.Harceler des « salauds » en toute impunité : la horde contre Causeur

Le rapport de RSF n’a pas manqué d’être diffusé immédiatement par la presse. On a ainsi vu proliférer jeudi des articles parfaitement interchangeables, reprenant avec une unanimité confondante les différents points qui avaient été résumés dans une dépêche AFP. Tous les grands médias se sont ainsi saisis du sujet du cyberharcèlement des confrères, notamment quand il s’agit de consœurs. Découvre-t-on la lune ? Pas chez Causeur, où la polémique sur le Manifeste des 343 salauds contre la pénalisation des clients de prostituées avait provoqué une polémique pas toujours civilisée. Ainsi, le site « 343 connards » recensait les noms et les photos (mais pas les adresses, il y a des bottins pour ça) des méchants pétitionnaires et fournissait même un kit d’injures prêt à l’emploi sur Twitter. Il n’y avait plus qu’à cliquer sur leur photo pour que les individus incriminés reçoivent ce message lyrique : « Salut XXX, aucune femme n’est ta pute, connard!».

Au rythme de plusieurs dizaines de tweets par jour, est-ce du harcèlement ? Les auteurs de ce site qualifieraient sans doute plutôt leur geste d’ « initiative citoyenne », nimbés de leurs certitudes de militants féministes. Tout comme, à l’époque, les médias qui relayaient l’adresse du site d’insultes, comme pour inviter à passer y faire un tour. Des médias qui montrent aujourd’hui une si touchante résolution à dénoncer, à la suite de RSF, le cyberharcèlement lorsqu’il touche des journalistes… innocents.

Voir également:

RSF publie son rapport “Harcèlement en ligne des journalistes : quand les trolls lancent l’assaut”

RSF
26 juillet 2018
Dans son nouveau rapport, Reporters sans frontières (RSF) révèle l’ampleur d’une nouvelle menace qui pèse sur les journalistes : le cyberharcèlement perpétré massivement par des armées de trolls, individus isolés ou mercenaires à la solde d’Etats autoritaires.

LIRE LE RAPPORT sur le harcèlement en ligne

Reporters sans frontières publie, ce 26 juillet, son nouveau rapport intitulé “Harcèlement en ligne des journalistes : quand les trolls lancent l’assaut”, dans lequel l’organisation s’alarme de l’ampleur d’une nouvelle menace qui pèse sur la liberté de la presse : le harcèlement en ligne massif des journalistes.

Leurs auteurs ? De simples “haters”, individus ou communautés d’individus dissimulés derrière leur écran, ou des mercenaires de l’information en ligne, véritables “armées de trolls” mises en place par des régimes autoritaires.

Dans les deux cas, l’objectif est le même : faire taire ces journalistes dont les propos dérangent, quitte à user de méthodes d’une rare violence. Pendant des mois, RSF a documenté ces nouvelles attaques en ligne et analysé le mode opératoire de ces prédateurs de la liberté de la presse qui ont su utiliser les nouvelles technologies pour mieux étendre leur modèle répressif.

“Le harcèlement en ligne est un phénomène qui se propage à l’échelle mondiale et qui constitue aujourd’hui l’une des pires menaces contre la liberté de la presse, déclare Christophe Deloire, secrétaire général de Reporters sans frontières. On découvre que les guerres de l’information ne sont pas menées seulement entre pays sur le plan international mais que les prédateurs du journalisme mettent en place des armées de trolls pour traquer et affaiblir tous ceux qui recherchent honnêtement les faits. Ces despotes laissent leurs mercenaires cibler les journalistes et leur tirer dessus à balles réelles sur le terrain virtuel comme d’autres le font sur les terrains de guerre.”

Ce que révèle le rapport de RSF :

  • Difficile d’établir le lien direct entre les cabales en ligne à l’encontre des journalistes et les Etats. RSF a enquêté et documenté des cas de harcèlement en ligne de journalistes dans 32 pays, révélant ainsi des campagnes de haine orchestrées par des régimes autoritaires ou répressifs comme en Chine, en Russie, en Inde, en Turquie, au Vietnam, en Iran, en Algérie, etc.
  • RSF analyse et met en lumière le mode opératoire des Etats prédateurs de la liberté de la presse qui orchestrent ces attaques en ligne contre les journalistes en trois étapes :
  1. désinformation : le contenu journalistique est noyé sur les réseaux sociaux sous un flot de fausses nouvelles et de contenus en faveur du régime,
  2. amplification : ces contenus sont valorisés artificiellement via des commentateurs payés par les Etats pour laisser des messages sur les réseaux sociaux, ou bien via des programmes informatiques qui rediffusent automatiquement le contenu, les bots
  3. intimidation : les journalistes sont pris pour cibles personnellement, insultés et menacés de mort, pour les discréditer et les faire taire.
  • Les violentes campagnes de cyberharcèlement sont également lancées par des communautés d’individus ou des groupes politiques dans des pays dits démocratiques – au Mexique notamment, voire même dans des pays très bien notés au Classement mondial de la liberté de la presse, comme la Suède ou la Finlande.
  • Les conséquences sont parfois dramatiques : la plupart des journalistes victimes de cyberharcèlement interrogés par RSF sont pour beaucoup contraints à l’auto-censure face à cette vague de violence dont ils n’avaient pas imaginé l’ampleur.
  • En Inde par exemple, Rana Ayyub est la cible des soutiens du régime, les Yoddhas de Narendra Modi, qui attaquent la journaliste pour ses enquêtes sur l’accession au pouvoir du Premier ministre indien : “On m’a traitée de prostituée. Mon visage a été apposé à la photo d’un corps nu et la photo de ma mère a été prise sur mon compte Instagram et ‘photoshoppée’ de toutes les manières possibles.”
  • Aux Philippines, la journaliste Maria Ressa est également attaquée par les trolls, alors que le média qu’elle dirige, Rappler, doit faire face à un acharnement judiciaire. Depuis l’élection de Rodrigo Duterte à la présidence en 2016, les journalistes philippins qui mènent, comme elle, des enquêtes indépendantes sur le pouvoir sont constamment pris pour cible.
  • En France, deux individus ont été condamnés début juillet à six mois de prison avec sursis et 2000 euros d’amende pour avoir menacé en ligne la journaliste Nadia Daam. Un troisième, qui l’a menacée de mort à la suite du procès, a également été condamné à six mois de prison avec sursis.
  • Face à constat, Reporters sans frontières formule 25 recommandations envers les Etats, la communauté internationale, les plateformes, les médias et les annonceurs pour une meilleure prise en compte de ces nouvelles menaces numériques. RSF propose également dans son rapport un tutoriel intitulé “Journalistes : comment faire face aux armées de trolls”, dans lequel l’organisation rappelle les bonnes pratiques en matière de sécurité numérique.
Voir de même:
Procès des harceleurs présumés de Nadia Daam : le cyber-harcèlement à l’encontre des journalistes ne doit pas rester impuni
RSF
4 juin 2018
Alors que s’ouvre mardi le procès de deux cyber-harceleurs de la journaliste française Nadia Daam, Reporters sans frontières (RSF) regrette que la plupart des cas de harcèlement en ligne de journalistes ne donnent lieu à aucune poursuite judiciaire. Une condamnation « juste mais ferme ». C’est ce que réclame la journaliste française Nadia Daam à l’encontre des deux cyber-harceleurs poursuivis parmi les sept identifiés, ce mardi 5 juin devant le tribunal correctionnel de Paris. En novembre dernier, la journaliste avait porté plainte après avoir été victime de menaces en ligne à la suite de l’une de ses chroniques sur Europe1, dans laquelle elle dénonçait les méthodes de trolls. “L’enjeu, c’est de faire savoir qu’il y a des vrais gens d’un côté et de l’autre du clavier. Lorsque Nadia Daam reçoit des menaces de mort, cela n’a rien de virtuel pour elle. Et cela n’aura rien de virtuel non plus pour ses harceleurs, lorsqu’ils seront en chair et en os à la barre du tribunal. C’est la fin du virtuel et l’irruption du réel”, affirme à RSF son avocat, Eric Morain.

Des cabales en ligne destinées à museler les journalistes

Si RSF salue la tenue de ce procès, l’organisation rappelle que d’autres journalistes attendent toujours qu’une suite judiciaire soit donnée à leur affaire. C’est le cas de Julie Hainaut. En septembre dernier, la journaliste lyonnaise se retrouve plongée au coeur d’une tempête médiatique d’une violence inouïe pour avoir rapporté et désapprouvé, dans le petit Bulletin de Lyon, les propos néo-colonialistes des tenanciers d’un nouveau bar, “la première plantation”. “Je suis inondée d’insultes et de menaces. Ils “cherchent mon adresse”[…] Je respire difficilement, je dors peu. J’ai peur”, témoigne-t-elle dans Libération. Elle reçoit alors un courrier de soutien du ministre de l’Intérieur Gérard Collomb et porte plainte à trois reprises. Depuis, plus rien. “Je ne me sens pas écoutée”, témoigne la journaliste qui a reçu en mars de nouvelles menaces. Et a dû porter plainte de nouveau.

“Nous demandons à ce qu’une enquête approfondie soit menée sur les menaces en ligne reçues par Julie Hainaut, déclare Elodie Vialle, responsable du Bureau Journalisme et Technologie de RSF. Au moment où les autorités légifèrent sur les violences sexistes et sexuelles parmi lesquelles figure le cyber-harcèlement, il est fondamental qu’elles prennent la mesure de la gravité de cette nouvelle menace qui pèse sur les journalistes. Les campagnes d’insultes, les menaces, la diffusion d’informations personnelles détournées dans l’objectif de nuire… toutes ces cabales en ligne ont pour objectif de faire taire les journalistes.”

RSF observe de plus en plus de cas de cyber-harcèlement. Un phénomène qui existe dans quasiment tous les pays et touche prioritairement les femmes journalistes et les journalistes d’investigation. RSF a ainsi récemment appelé les autorités indiennes à protéger Rana Ayyub, une journaliste d’investigation indienne victime de campagnes de harcèlement en ligne menées par les armées de trolls du Premier ministre indien Narendra Modi.

Voir de plus:

« L’esprit colonial, un esprit à la cool » : les gérants d’un bar lyonnais se défendent de faire l’apologie du colonialisme

BAD BUZZ – Visiblement, il s’agissait plutôt d’une énorme maladresse. Mais les deux gérants d’un bar appelé la Première plantation, située à Lyon, ont été vivement critiqués, accusées de faire l’apologie de l’esclavagisme, après des propos sur « l’esprit colonial ».
LCI

15 sept. 2017

L’histoire avait pourtant bien commencé. Ouverture d’un bar à cocktails, tourné vers le rhum, dans un quartier branché de Lyon. Une déco de bois brut, un esprit récup’, des supers cocktails. C’est d’ailleurs ce qui était mis en avant dans les magazines liftstyle qui ont parlé de la Première plantation à son ouverture. « La Première plantation, le bar à cocktail qui va te faire voyager très loin », titrait ainsi Le Bonbon. Carrément emballé : « Dans une déco réussie et envoûtante chargée de plantes et arbres exotiques du sol au plafond, La Première Plantation (LPP) est avant tout un bonheur pour les yeux », raconte le journaliste. Qui loue la « déco de folie », la « carte de cocktails rare », et n’hésite pas : « La Première Plantation, c’est un petit morceau de Bahamas où les cocktails sont encore meilleurs. » Le Progrès, quotidien local, est plus mesuré mais lui aussi bien conquis : « Un lieu décontracté à l’ambiance tropicale où l’on déguste des cocktails maison d’après des recettes originales à base d’ingrédients rares ».

Mais c’est un article paru ce mardi dans un guide de sorties locales, Le Petit bulletin, qui a déclenché la tornade. Intitulé « La Première Plantation ou l’art de se planter », la journaliste y raconte l’échange qu’elle a eu avec les jeunes gérants. Echange qui depuis a fait le tour du web. « Mon nom, La Première Plantation, est une référence aux plantations de canne à sucre (le rhum en est issu) dans les colonies françaises. Je cherche à retranscrire l’esprit colonial, un esprit à la cool, une époque où l’on savait recevoir », rapporte la journaliste dans son article.

Elle raconte encore, pas sûre d’avoir bien entendue, avoir demandé : « C’était cool, la colonisation ? » Ce à quoi les gérants ont répondu : « Dans l’esprit, oui, carrément, ça représente une période sympathique, il y avait du travail à cette époque accueillante. » Elle s’est indignée : « Et la partie esclaves, là-dedans ? » Référence à la traite des Noirs dans les Antilles à laquelle le gérant répond benoîtement : « Ah, on a mis quelques photos dans les toilettes. »

Réactions en chaîne
Forcément, les propos ont fait le tour du web. Sur la base de cet article, sont tombées des centaines de réactions outrées, dénonçant une « audace crasse », une « apologie de l’esclavagisme », une « horreur déprimante ». La page Facebook du lieu, qui a dû fermer depuis, a reçu un torrent d’insultes ou de commentaire négatifs. Des collectifs se sont aussi emparés de l’histoire, y voyant « une nouvelle manière de décomplexer la #négrophobie tout en faisant autrement l’apologie de la colonisation et de l’esclavage-négrier-occidentalo-chrétien ».  Le collectif Des Racinés a lancé une pétition, demandant la fermeture du lieu. « En faisant de cette histoire leur fond de commerce, les gérants ont décidé d’exploiter ce qui pourrait au mieux être qualifié de négationnisme et, plus raisonnablement, d’apologie de crime contre l’humanité », estime-il.  Ont aussi fleuri des appels à la violence contre les deux gérants.

Devant la tempête, d’autres tentent de raison garder. Et de tenter de discerner le vrai du faux. Comme Romain Blachier, élu local, qui a décidé de se « faire son idée par moi-même ».  Après entrevue, il penche pour l’ignorance des deux patrons, il est vrai, particulièrement malheureuse lorsqu’on se lance dans une affaire comme celle-là. « Ils m’ont confirmé être opposés au colonialisme, condamner tout racisme et ont sans doute été un peu maladroits et pas très au fait de l’Histoire tragique du colonialisme », écrit l’élu sur Facebook.

Ont-ils eux-mêmes été dépassés par l’ampleur du bad buzz qu’ils ont contribué à créer ? En tout cas, ils condamnent les réactions disproportionnées. Deux jours après, les journalistes du Petit bulletin ont mis en ligne un nouvel article, de mise au point.  Le rédacteur en chef explique être retourné dans le café pour s’expliquer. « Il ne s’agit pas ici de réfuter l’information initiale », précisent les journalistes sur leur site. « Nous assumons pleinement notre travail de journaliste et cet article […]. Faire de la période coloniale un argument de communication, c’est une plaie qu’il fallait mettre à jour. » Et détaillent leur entrevue avec les deux gérants : « Nous avons rencontré deux personnes abattues, conscientes de la maladresse totale des propos cités, mais réfutant – et nous les croyons totalement après cette rencontre – tout racisme ou toute ambiguïté de leur part sur l’esclavage. Aucun d’eux n’est raciste ou soupçonné de complaisance envers l’esclavage », précise le Petit bulletin.

Pour eux, le diagnostic est formel : « Les propos tenus lors de l’interview publiée mardi et le positionnement de leur lieu sont visiblement la conséquence d’une méconnaissance de cette période de l’Histoire, de légèreté sans doute quant à leurs recherches sur cette époque, dont ils ont voulu mettre en valeur l’esthétique par leur décoration et surtout, leur passion : le rhum. » Précision, aussi, sur les »photos d’esclaves » dans les toilettes mentionnées par les barmans, que les journalistes ont retranscrit : les journalistes sont allés voir, et « n’ont pas vu de photos d’esclaves mais deux clichés encadrés : une maison de maître victorienne et un champ d’ananas », reconnaissent les journalistes. Qui plaident donc pour la clémence envers les deux gérants : « Dépassés par la maladresse de leur propos, ils ne méritent certainement pas la violence du traitement qui leur est infligé aujourd’hui. Il était de notre devoir de journaliste d’écrire ce malaise ressenti par l’utilisation d’éléments évoquant l’époque coloniale pour décrire leur bar et son ambiance », mais « les réseaux sociaux ont transformé cette information en vindicte populaire contre La Première Plantation : c’est indéfendable. »

 

Voir encore:

Retour sur la polémique autour du bar lyonnais accusé de faire l’apologie de l’esclavage

Fanny Marlier
Les Inrocks
15/09/17
« L’esprit colonial, un esprit à la cool, une époque où l’on savait recevoir ». Le bar à cocktail lyonnais « La Première plantation » est accusé de faire l’apologie de l’esclavage après des propos rapportés par une journaliste. On fait le point sur la polémique.

« La Première Plantation ». Sur le coup, on a pensé à une blague un peu douteuse, voire carrément déplacée… Mais non, c’est bien comme ça que des barmans du 6e arrondissement de Lyon ont décidé d’appeler leur nouveau bar à cocktails en « référence aux plantations de canne à sucre dans les colonies françaises. Je cherche à retranscrire l’esprit colonial, un esprit à la cool, une époque où l’on savait recevoir », expliquent les deux gérants dans un article du Petit Bulletin paru mardi 12 septembre.

S’ensuit un dialogue surréaliste : alors que la journaliste demande des explications concernant la qualification de « cool », les gérants assument : « Dans l’esprit, oui, carrément, ça représente une période sympathique, il y avait du travail à cette époque accueillante. » Quid des esclaves et des atrocités commis à leur égard ? « On a mis quelques photos dans les toilettes ». Des propos qui laissent paraître une nostalgie du temps des colonies, tout en s’en servant comme argument marketing.

« Nous écoutions à peine les questions »

Face aux vives réactions déclenchées sur la toile, la journaliste à l’origine de l’article a tenu à préciser, via Twitter, que les propos rapportés sont bel et bien authentiques :

«Les faits rapportés dans l’article ne sont pas, comme j’ai pu le lire, ‘le fruit de l’imagination de la journaliste qui veut nuire personnellement au lieu’ mais bien des faits, justement. Je n’approuve en aucun cas l’appel à la violence envers les propriétaires du lieu ».

Elle précise aussi avoir bien vu les photos en question dans les toilettes.

Contactés par Les Inrockuptibles, les gérants de La Première Plantation fustigent « le manque de bon sens de la journaliste qui nous [leur] a posé des questions à 19h, en plein moment de rush ». « Nous écoutions à peine les questions car nous devions servir les clients en même temps », expliquent-ils avant d’ajouter :« Notre métier c’est le cocktail, nous ne possédons pas un doctorat en Histoire, nous avons donc un gros manque de connaissances à ce niveau là ». Tous deux se disent « désolés » de la tournure qu’a pris cette polémique et assurent n’avoir « aucune nostalgie de cette période là ».

Concernant les photographies disposées dans les toilettes ils expliquent : « Il n’y a pas de photographies d’esclaves, simplement celle d’une maison blanche victorienne, et celle d’un champ d’ananas ». Ils nous assurent que le nom du bar va être changé afin de « partir sur des bases saines ». Et concluent par : « Nous sommes les victimes dans cette histoire ».

De son côté la journaliste confirme avoir bien vu des photos d’esclaves, et assure que l’interview a été enregistrée.

« Négationnisme » et « apologie de crime contre l’humanité »

A la suite de la publication de l’article, le collectif des Raciné.e.s, une association féministe et décoloniale lyonnaise, a lancé une pétition en ligne (signée par 3 500 personnes à l’heure où nous écrivons ces lignes), notamment co-signée par la journaliste Amandine Gay, la créatrice de Paye ta Shnek Anaïs Bourdet, le youtubeur Usul, ou encore les journalistes Sihame Assbague, et Johanna Luyssen (Libération).

«Nous, des Raciné.e.s, qui sommes issus des migrations mais aussi de quatre siècles d’esclavage, nous, citoyens et enfants des départements français, sommes outrés de constater un tel mépris pour la dignité humaine la plus fondamentale. Par delà les déclarations outrancières des propriétaires, nous affirmons que le modèle d’affaires d’une entreprise qui s’attribue gratuitement, à des fins promotionnelles et décoratives, l’histoire douloureuse de siècles d’oppression, d’exploitation, de sévices et d’humiliations est inacceptable », dénoncent les signataires qui soulignent également l’exploitation de « ce qui pourrait au mieux être qualifié de négationnisme et, plus raisonnablement, d’apologie de crime contre l’humanité ».

Contacté par Les Inrockuptibles, le collectifdes Raciné.e.s se dit « à la fois consterné·e·s, en colère et, paradoxalement, désabusé·e·s ». Il ajoute :

«Ces propos sont aussi choquants qu’ils sont communs, malheureusement (…) Quant aux personnes qui, comme le prétendent les gérants, ignorent tout de la période coloniale, c’est une preuve de plus que le racisme de notre société est si ancré que l’on se permet d’ignorer des siècles d’histoire et de maintenir la mémoire de peuples entiers dans l’oubli.»

De son côté, Le Petit Bulletin a publié ce jeudi soir une mise au point et a laissé un droit de réponse aux gérants de « La Première Plantation » :

«Dépassés par la maladresse de leur propos, ils ne méritent certainement pas la violence du traitement qui leur est infligé aujourd’hui. Il était de notre devoir de journaliste d’écrire ce malaise ressenti par l’utilisation d’éléments évoquant l’époque coloniale pour décrire leur bar et son ambiance. Manipuler ces références à une époque douloureuse de l’histoire de France était pour le moins malvenu d’autant que le sujet est sensible et aujourd’hui débattu au plus haut niveau (…)»

Voir encore:

Polémique autour d’un bar lyonnais, « La Première Plantation », accusé de faire l’apologie de l’esclavage
« L’esprit colonial, un esprit à la cool, une époque où l’on savait recevoir
Marine Le Breton
Huffington Post
14/09/2017

POLÉMIQUE – « Ce nouvel établissement idéal pour une soirée conviviale a ouvert cet été », écrivait le 11 septembre Le Progrès, à propos d’un nouveau bar lyonnais, « La Première Plantation« . Une première publicité plutôt élogieuse pour ce bar à cocktails du 6e arrondissement de la ville, qui a ouvert ses portes le 21 août.

Mais entre temps, un autre article a été publié dans Le Petit Bulletin de Lyon, offrant une bien moins bonne publicité au bar.

La journaliste qui a écrit l’article en question cite les deux créateurs du lieu racontant comment le nom du bar a été choisi. « Mon nom, La Première Plantation, est une référence aux plantations de canne à sucre (le rhum en est issu) dans les colonies françaises. Je cherche à retranscrire l’esprit colonial, un esprit à la cool, une époque où l’on savait recevoir », expliquent-t-ils face à la journaliste qui dit être « restée interdite » et lui demande, « indignée », « c’était cool, la colonisation? » Réponse: « Dans l’esprit, oui, carrément, ça représente une période sympathique, il y avait du travail à cette époque accueillante ». Et de préciser que des photos d’esclaves sont affichées dans les toilettes.

Les propos n’ont pas manqué de scandaliser sur les réseaux sociaux, qui accusent le bar de faire l’apologie de la colonisation et de l’esclavage.

Amandine Gay, La réalisatrice du documentaire « Ouvrir la voix », qui donne la parole aux femmes noires, a notamment fait toute une série de tweets pour dénoncer ces propos.

Une pétition dénonçant « l’apologie de l’esclavagisme » a également été lancée sur le site Change.org par Le Collectif Des Raciné.e.s.

La journaliste, devant les centaines de commentaires en réactions aux propos des créateurs du lieu, a tenu a préciser ce jeudi 14 septembre que les propos cités dans son article sont bel et bien authentiques:

Plusieurs internautes, ainsi que Le Progrès, soulignent que les avis ont été supprimés de la page Facebook du bar depuis.

Les gérants ont répondu aux critiques ce jeudi sur Facebook, expliquant n’avoir « jamais eu la volonté de faire une quelconque apologie de la période colonialiste, période que nous condamnons ». Ils précisent que « le mot plantation n’a dans notre esprit aucune connotation péjorative » ou encore que « notre bar à cocktails est un hommage à la culture du rhum et à la culture caribéenne ». Au HuffPost, ils affirment que ce post sera publié dans Le Petit Bulletin, annoté par le directeur de la rédaction qui s’est rendu sur les lieux.

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Flapremiereplantation%2Fposts%2F275219106324041&width=500

Contacté par Le HuffPost, Matthieu Henry, l’un des deux créateurs du lieu, regrette cette polémique et ne cautionne pas tous les dires de la journaliste. « Nous n’avons pas voulu dire ces choses-là dans ce sens-là. Nous ne voulons en aucun cas faire l’apologie de l’esclavage mais de celle du rhum, de la culture caraïbéenne », précise-t-il. Par le « à la cool » cité dans l’article du Petit Bulletin, il voulait « parler du bar, du service, de notre attitude ». Il dément aussi que des photos d’esclaves soient affichées dans les toilettes. « Il s’agit de gravures de bouteilles de rhum, de champs d’ananas », ajoute-t-il.

Voir aussi:

La Première Plantation est un bar à cocktails qui a ouvert cet été dans le sixième arrondissement. Une dizaine d’articles de la presse généraliste ou spécialisée a célébré cette ouverture, sans interroger les gérants sur le choix du nom du lieu. Le 12 septembre, une journaliste du Petit Bulletin qui écrit sur les nouveaux lieux « branchés » a questionné les gérants qui ont alors tenu des propos racistes surréalistes en expliquant qu’il souhaitait rappeler l’esprit colonial, « un esprit à la cool », « une époque où l’on savait recevoir »…

Certain.es pensaient naïvement que les références au « temps béni des colonies » ou aux « bienfaits de la colonisation » et autres célébrations du « ya bon banania » appartenaient à un temps révolu ou à une autre génération ayant directement participé à la colonisation. Gabriel Desvallées et Matthieu Henry, jeunes trentenaires branchés nous rappellent le contraire.

Ces jeunes gens branchés ont choisi de faire du colonialisme la base de leur stratégie commerciale. Ils viennent d’ouvrir un bar à cocktails au 22 rue Professeur Weill, dans le sixième arrondissement de Lyon. Ils l’ont baptisé La Première Plantation. Pourquoi ? C’est Le Petit Bulletin qui le révèle dans un article intitulé « La Première Plantation, ou l’art de se planter ». Voici ce qu’ils ont confié à la rédactrice :

Mon nom, La Première Plantation, est une référence aux plantations de canne à sucre (le rhum en est issu) dans les colonies françaises. Je cherche à retranscrire l’esprit colonial, un esprit à la cool, une époque où l’on savait recevoir.

On vomit à la lecture de ces propos racistes, qui nient l’esclavage et les violences intrinsèques du rapport colonial infligées par les grandes puissances européennes aux peuples des pays colonisés.
On pourrait donc, au bénéfice du doute, penser à l’ignorance des gérants du bar, mais pourtant ce n’est pas fini car ils surenchérissent, entre clichés, mépris et racisme. La rédactrice du Petit Bulletin écrit ainsi :

Peut-être avais-je mal entendu, finalement. (…) Non. Il a persévéré. « C’était cool, la colonisation ? » me suis-je indignée. « Dans l’esprit, oui, carrément, ça représente une période sympathique, il y avait du travail à cette époque accueillante. » Je me suis offusquée : « et la partie esclaves, là-dedans ? ». « Ah, on a mis quelques photos dans les toilettes. » m’a-t-il rétorqué.

Pour ceux et celles qui douteraient de la réalité de ces propos, la journaliste les a confirmé sur twitter :

PNG - 244.1 ko

L’indécence de ces propos est inqualifiable. Et leur violence rend inutile le moindre commentaire. Tout comme le font certain avec l’utilisation du Blackface pour faire rire, La Première Plantation appuie sa communication sur une idéologie fondée sur les clichés racistes. Ceux-ci sont tournées en dérision et même promus par cet établissement dont la démarche commerciale se conjugue avec une vision politique rance et réactionnaire, niant à la fois l’horreur historique de cette période et balayant d’un revers de main toutes les luttes d’esclaves ayant amené à sa fin.

JPEG - 58.6 ko
La colonisation en réalité

En 2017, les gérants d’un bar branché poussent ainsi le cynisme au point de faire de l’apologie du colonialisme et du mépris des ravages de l’esclavage des preuves de leur « coolitude ». De la rencontre du capitalisme hype et du racisme le plus bas du front ne peuvent naître que des horreurs, et elles font peur à voir.

On s’inquiète aussi que plusieurs médias se soient fait écho de l’ouverture du lieu, sans rien n’avoir trouvé à redire à ce choix commercial choquant. Petite revue de presse :

Fourniresto, le 21 août : « Ils sauront vous faire voyager à travers le décor décalé de leur bar et grâce à leur cocktails. »

- Inside-lyon, le 24 août : « une oasis tropicale où la nature a tous les droits ; Un bar sans chichis, magnifique mais à la cool ; on aime la déco tropico-industrielle, qui réussit le pari d’être belle, moderne et pas cliché »

- Mixology (en anglais), le 16 août : « Like a highly exotic trip without the kitsch side of the tiki bar : a real indoor jungle mixing palm trees and hanging succulent plants will contrast with rough walls and exposed beams, giving an industrial feel »

- Le Progrès, le 11 septembre : « idéal pour une soirée conviviale ».

Tous ces propos s’entendent donc à condition d’être blanc et raciste, sans doute…

Nous terminerons à l’adresse des patrons de ce bar qui n’ont rien compris à l’histoire par une citation de Franz Fanon :

« Le colonialisme n’est pas une machine à penser, n’est pas un corps doué de raison. Il est la violence à l’état de nature et ne peut s’incliner que devant une plus grande violence. » [1]

Notes

[1Les Damnés de la Terre (1961), Frantz Fanon, éd. La Découverte poche, 2002, p. 61

Voir également:

L’« esprit cool » de la colonisation ou la pire stratégie marketing d’un bar lyonnais

Se démarquer de ses concurrents avec un style bien à soi, un objectif pour tout commerce cherchant à se faire connaître. La Première Plantation, bar à cocktails lyonnais ouvert cet été dans le 6e arrondissement à Lyon, vient de faire les frais de son positionnement : distiller un esprit colonial pour vendre du rhum, car la période selon eux était « à la cool » et « accueillante ».

Dalya Daoud
Rue89Lyon
15/09/2017

Tout démarre avec une chronique publiée dans le Petit Bulletin, hebdo culturel/loisirs (par ailleurs partenaire de Rue89Lyon), intitulée « La Première Plantation, ou l’art de se planter ». Dans sa rubrique dédiée aux restos et bons spots, il n’y a habituellement que des plans recommandés par la rédac.

Après sa visite, la journaliste sort estomaquée de son entrevue avec les néo-entrepreneurs. Ce ne sont pas les cocktails au rhum qui ne passent pas, mais les propos du duo.

Elle retranscrit leur projet dans les citations attribuées à l’un des deux patrons :

« Mon nom, La Première Plantation, est une référence aux plantations de canne à sucre (le rhum en est issu) dans les colonies françaises. Je cherche à retranscrire l’esprit colonial, un esprit à la cool, une époque où l’on savait recevoir. »

La journaliste s’étrangle :

« Je suis restée interdite,  j’ai cru qu’il avait ajouté de la drogue dans l’un des cocktails, j’ai repris mes esprits et j’ai creusé. Peut-être avais-je mal entendu, finalement. Peut-être avait-il prononcé « l’esprit commercial » et que la chute de la pression atmosphérique dans l’avion avait eu raison de mon ouïe.

Non. Il a persévéré. « C’était cool, la colonisation ? » me suis-je indignée. « Dans l’esprit, oui, carrément, ça représente une période sympathique, il y avait du travail à cette époque accueillante. » Je me suis offusquée : « et la partie esclaves, là-dedans ? ».« Ah, on a mis quelques photos dans les toilettes. » m’a-t-il rétorqué.

« Invitation au voyage et à l’exotisme »

Après les échanges traditionnels avec la rédaction en chef, qu’impose le circuit de tout article de presse, il est décidé de publier le papier. Mais la désinvolture avec laquelle les barmen ont répondu choque et sont repris dans la presse en ligne.

De grosses salves de critiques mais aussi d’insultes, telles que le web sait les multiplier, sont écrites notamment sur la page Facebook de la Première plantation (elle a été complètement supprimée depuis). Des menaces pleuvent également. Le débat passe par moult circonvolutions : « oui mais les cocktails sont-ils bons ? » ; « comment ça, l’assiette végé n’est pas assez copieuse ? », etc.

La journaliste, qui collabore en tant que pigiste avec le Petit Bulletin, n’est pas épargnée : elle est accusée de façon lapidaire et violente de vouloir nuire personnellement au lieu ou encore tout simplement de mentir.

Après un rendez-vous avec le rédacteur en chef, les patrons du bar se fendent d’un droit de réponse, sans tellement de fioritures ni plus d’explications sur le fond :

« Notre volonté a été d’ouvrir un bar à cocktails, un lieu d’échanges, de partages, convivial autour du rhum, sa culture et son histoire.

Contrairement à ce que a été retranscrit dans l’article, notre établissement n’a jamais eu la volonté de faire une quelconque apologie de la période colonialiste, période que nous condamnons. Le nom « Première Plantation » est une référence aux plantations de canne à sucre dont le rhum est issu.

Ce nom fait également référence au fait que cette ouverture est une première pour nous, une première plante, notre premier établissement. Le mot plantation n’a dans notre esprit aucune connotation péjorative. »

Les jeunes barmen continuent de patauger, en parlant d’ « invitation au voyage et à l’exotisme ». Avant de déplorer, évidemment, « les conséquences […] préjudiciables [pour eux] tant sur le plan professionnel que personnel ».

« Une méconnaissance de cette période de l’Histoire »

Le rédacteur en chef du Petit Bulletin fait, en introduction du droit de réponse, cette analyse :

« Les propos tenus lors de l’interview publiée mardi et le positionnement de leur lieu sont visiblement la conséquence d’une méconnaissance de cette période de l’Histoire, de légèreté sans doute quand à leurs recherches sur cette époque. »

Pas racistes, les petits gars, mais juste ignorants. Reste que la polémique ne désenfle pas, s’amplifie même avec les partages sur les réseaux sociaux. Les soutiens du bar sont parfois des personnes se présentant le bras levé ou tenant eux-mêmes des propos racistes, ce qui dessert encore la volonté des tenanciers de ne pas passer pour des défenseurs du colonialisme.

La journaliste et le rédacteur en chef trouvent leurs soutiens mais voient aussi leur travail descendu en flèche, devant assurer le service anti-trolls (qu’il ne faut pas nourrir, on le sait) très chronophage.

Depuis la parution de l’article sur La Première Plantation hier, des centaines de commentaires inondent les réseaux sociaux. La chroniqueuse parvient à conserver son calme et à tenter de donner des explications, toujours via les réseaux sociaux :

« – Les faits rapportés dans l’article ne sont pas, comme j’ai pu le lire, « le fruit de l’imagination de la journaliste qui veut nuire personnellement au lieu » mais bien des faits, justement.

– Je n’approuve en aucun cas l’appel à la violence envers les propriétaires du lieu. »

Puis encore :

« – L’interview a été enregistrée. Les propos de l’article sont avérés. Il n’y a aucune volonté de nuire, simplement celle de rapporter des faits et de vérifier l’info, l’essence même de mon métier.

– Les photos aujourd’hui affichées dans ces fameuses toilettes ne montrent pas d’esclaves. Celle le jour de ma venue, si. Mais la question n’est pas là. La réponse « On a mis des photos dans les toilettes » à la question « Et les esclaves ? » suffit à poser les choses. »

Une pétition a finalement été lancée par le collectif Des Raciné.e.s contre « l’apologie de l’esclavagisme à Lyon », pointant directement le bar, et a recueilli en quelques heures, ce vendredi matin, plus de 3300 signatures. Le bar la Première Plantation a certes fait parler de lui mais s’est en effet bien planté.

Voir de même:

La Première Plantation, ou l’art de se planter
Ne jamais se fier aux apparences : c’est ce qu’on retiendra de ce nouveau bar à cocktails spécialisé dans le rhum.
Julie Hainaut
Le Petit Bulletin
12 septembre 2017

Elle avait pourtant bien commencé, cette histoire. Lui et moi, on était fait pour s’entendre, c’était couru d’avance. Je rentrais de vacances, la tête dans les nuages, il était là, frais et dispo, prêt à me faire atterrir et revenir à la réalité en douceur.

Dès l’entrée, il m’avait séduite à coup de déco brute esprit récup’, de cocktails détonnants – le LPP Swizzle et The Epicurian sont idéaux pour contrer la canicule ou récupérer d’un jet lag –, et de mixtures improbables – la liqueur Falernum réalisée à partir de clous de girofles et de café, entre autres, est exquise.

L’assiette veggie (15 € pour trois artichauts marinés, cinq olives, deux grammes de courgettes marinées, une cuillère à café de houmous, une autre de tapenade) m’avait déçue, mais il avait su me réconforter : « les produits viennent d’Italie, la qualité est top » avait-il alors précisé, sous la houlette de ses deux créateurs, Gabriel Desvallées et Matthieu Henry.

Mais l’histoire s’est compliquée. Il disait avoir choisi de s’installer « dans un arrondissement underground. » Le 6e, underground, vraiment ? Il entendait imposer une ambiance de « jungle, là où les plantes prennent le dessus sur la ville ». À peine cinq se couraient après. Je n’ai rien dit, j’ai voulu laisser sa chance au produit.

Puis il a commencé à tenir des propos douteux.

« Mon nom, La Première Plantation, est une référence aux plantations de canne à sucre (le rhum en est issu) dans les colonies françaises. Je cherche à retranscrire l’esprit colonial, un esprit à la cool, une époque où l’on savait recevoir. »

Je suis restée interdite,  j’ai cru qu’il avait ajouté de la drogue dans l’un des cocktails, j’ai repris mes esprits et j’ai creusé. Peut-être avais-je mal entendu, finalement. Peut-être avait-il prononcé « l’esprit commercial » et que la chute de la pression atmosphérique dans l’avion avait eu raison de mon ouïe. Non. Il a persévéré. « C’était cool, la colonisation ? » me suis-je indignée. « Dans l’esprit, oui, carrément, ça représente une période sympathique, il y avait du travail à cette époque accueillante. » Je me suis offusquée : « et la partie esclaves, là-dedans ? ». « Ah, on a mis quelques photos dans les toilettes. » m’a-t-il rétorqué.

Des gouttes ont commencé à couler le long de mon visage – ce n’était pas la canicule mais un mélange de colère et de stupeur. J’ai quand même vérifié s’il n’y avait pas de caméra cachée – mon rédac chef est taquin –, il n’y en avait pas, j’ai payé, je suis allée me changer les idées à grand renfort de pintes et d’amis sur les quais, et je suis rentrée, la gorge nouée. Cette histoire qui avait si bien commencé avec des cocktails savoureux s’est mal terminée.

Voir de plus:

La Première Plantation
Droit de Réponse
Le Petit Bulletin
14 septembre 2017

Nous faisons suite à l’article posté le 12 septembre 2017 sur Le Petit Bulletin signé par madame Julie Hainaut.

Si nous acceptons les critiques constructives sur notre travail, en revanche cet article appelle de notre part les observations suivantes.

Nous sommes ouverts depuis le 21 août 2017, il s’agit de notre première affaire.

Notre volonté a été d’ouvrir un bar à cocktails, un lieu d’échanges, de partages, convivial autour du rhum, sa culture et son histoire.

Contrairement à ce que a été retranscrit dans l’article, notre établissement n’a jamais eu la volonté de faire une quelconque apologie de la période colonialiste, période que nous condamnons.

Le nom « Première Plantation » est une référence aux plantations de canne à sucre dont le rhum est issu.

Ce nom fait également référence au fait que cette ouverture est une première pour nous, une première plante, notre premier établissement.

Le mot plantation n’a dans notre esprit aucune connotation péjorative.

Henry Matthieu et Gabriel Desvallees, La Première Plantation
Voir encore:

Colonialism-Themed Bar in France Stokes Outrage

Backlash to La Première Plantation has been swift

A new bar in Lyon, France, is drawing anger for its nostalgic use of French colonialism (and its attendant atrocities, including slavery) as a theme.

La Première Plantation (“The First Plantation” in English) opened recently in the city’s wealthy and predominantly white sixth arrondissement. Various elements of the bar invoke French colonial activity in the Caribbean, from images of slaves in the bathrooms, to drinks with names like “Trader’s Punch.” The bar’s name references French sugar cane plantations — colonies like Saint-Domingue (now Haiti) were major producers of sugar, and from the mid-1600s, relied heavily on slaves for production and trade of sugar. Official descriptions of the bar say that “you’re not in the heart of Lyon, you’re in a new neighborhood: the Jungle District.”)

The bar started drawing negative attention after an article from local journalist Julie Hainaut, who wrote that she found the owners’ explanations of the bar’s concept to be “questionable.”

Speaking to Hainaut, owners Gabriel Desvallées and Matthieu Henry said “[they] wanted to revive the colonial spirit, a spirit of coolness, and a time when people really knew how to entertain.”

Hainaut wrote that she thought she had misheard (“I thought someone had drugged my cocktail”), and sought clarification by asking if colonialism was “cool.” The owners replied, “In its spirit, yes, it was a nice period.”

She then asked about the role that slaves played in French colonization. The owners noted in response that there were pictures of slaves in the bar’s bathrooms.

The backlash was swift. The bar’s Facebook (now deactivated) was inundated with negative reviews, and a local anti-racism collective Le Collectif des Raciné-e-s demanded the immediate closure of the bar, launching a petition that now counts thousands of signatures. The petition states that “colonial times were rife with atrocities, crimes against humanity, looting and barbarism… this period should in no way be described as ‘cool’ and used for commercial gain in a ‘trendy’ bar.”

The owners wrote a response to the criticism on Facebook, saying that they never intended to be apologists for colonization, and that “the word plantation has no negative connotations in our minds.” Henry spoke to the Huffington Post’s French edition, saying he refused to validate Hainaut’s report on the bar, implying that he had been quoted out of context.

Speaking to another local publication, Henry said the bar would change its name in response to the backlash, although with no mention of whether the theme would change.

This isn’t the first time an establishment has settled for some sort of colonial theme: in 2016, a Portland bakery-restaurant, Saffron Colonial, faced a similar response, although it arguably didn’t delve into the theme quite so heavily (that is, no pictures of slaves in the bathrooms). Similarly, that restaurant tried to deflect criticism by changing its name to British Overseas Restaurant Corporation, or BORC.

Voir de plus:

Controversial Colonial-Themed Restaurant Changes Name

Saffron Colonial is officially renamed British Overseas Restaurant Corporation

Before it even opened, Saffron Colonial on North Williams caused controversy when many in the Portland community accused it of glorifying colonialism, and now, owner Sally Krantz tells Eater she will change the name of her bakery and restaurant to BORC, which stands for British Overseas Restaurant Corporation. The new name is a play on British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC), a former British airline.

Two protests have been held at the restaurant formerly named Saffron Colonial, and among the recommendations presented by protestors were that Saffron Colonial change its name and remove all references to plantations from its menus.

In an email sent to Eater, Krantz explained why she made the name change:

While it would have been nice to keep my branding and have an accurate descriptor of the cuisine, I recognize that this is taking the focus off of what I want to do with food. My mission in opening this restaurant is to celebrate the wonderful multi-cultural aspects of food in a beautiful and multi-cultural part of Portland: my hometown, and a city that I love.

Highlighting historical recipes and the development of dishes through the light of different countries and their relationships with England was a personal journey for me, after living in Asia and being immersed in a large population of English Expats for 20 years. As I have said, I love history and historic recipes, how food has developed and changed over time, and have developed many of these recipes in conjunction with the people I worked with from all over Asia and England to get them exactly right.

So I’m hoping the new name, BORC, is a fun name to represent this concept. It is an acronym for British Overseas Restaurant Corporation and a tongue-in-cheek reference to the precursor to British Airways: BOAC, on which many Expatriates traveled. I’m sincerely hoping that this name change will allow us to focus on serving great food in a warm and positive environment.

When Eater asked Krantz whether the restaurant had removed all « colonial » and « plantation » references, Krantz said it had, adding that the words had each appeared only once at the restaurant: once on a chalk sign, and once on a cocktail menu. She says the chalkboard was erased prior to the protest and the cocktail menu was erased in response to the first protest, while the protesters were in the restaurant.

Since the Saffron Colonial controversy became public, Ristretto Roasters, who had been the restaurant’s coffee supplier and also sold Saffron Colonial baked goods in its cafes, severed ties with the bakery. Other local companies have been reported to have withheld or stopped distributing their goods to Saffron Colonial, including Steven Smith Teamaker and Ex Novo Brewing.

Voir encore:

Sylvie Thénault sur les violences coloniales : « Allons vers un travail collectif de connaissance du passé »

Sylvie Thénault est une historienne française spécialiste de la Guerre d’Algérie.
Penser le post-colonialisme
« Les écritures post-coloniales » se déroule du vendredi 2 au samedi 3 février 2018 au Théâtre National Populaire. Deux soirées pour penser le post-colonialisme en faisant dialoguer la littérature, l’histoire, la musique et la poésie.
Un événement organisé par la Villa Gillet avec le Théâtre National Populaire, l’Ambassade des Pays-Bas en France, le Fonds des lettres néerlandaises et Flanders Literature.
Tout le programme est ici.

La question de la portée des violences coloniales ainsi que celles des guerres d’indépendance dans l’après, une fois que la colonie s’est défait du joug pesant sur elle parfois depuis des dizaines d’années, comme dans le cas algérien, est couramment appréhendée sur le modèle du traumatisme psychologique, fondant une description en trois temps : traumatisme, oubli, résurgence.

Pourtant, la transposition de ce schéma à l’échelle collective interroge : en quoi, pourquoi et comment une société y répondrait-elle ?

L’analyse fine de la mémoire de certains événements – comme celle de la répression sauvage de la mobilisation des Algériens à Paris, le 17 octobre 1961 – plaide au contraire pour une approche privilégiant des mécanismes d’ordre socio-politique : la dispersion des groupes ayant vécu cette histoire, leur subalternité dans la société où ils vivaient, la confiscation de la parole par un pouvoir usant politiquement de l’histoire ou encore le confinement du souvenir de la répression dans des groupes ultra-minoritaires, à l’extrême gauche de l’échiquier politique, ont été les facteurs de l’absence de l’événement sur la place publique pendant une trentaine d’années avant que le mouvement antiraciste s’en empare, l’inclue dans son argumentaire et le fasse resurgir à la faveur de son combat contre l’extrême droite.

« Laissons aux spécialistes de la psyché le soin des consciences et des inconscients individuels blessés »

Sylvie Thénault, une spécialiste de la Guerre d’Algérie
Née en 1969, cette historienne française est agrégée d’histoire et directrice de recherche au CNRS, spécialiste de la guerre d’indépendance algérienne. Ses travaux portent sur le droit et la répression légale pendant la guerre d’indépendance algérienne. Elle a en particulier étudié des mesures ponctuelles, comme les couvre-feux en région parisienne et les camps d’internement français entre 1954 et 1962.

C’est donc à une histoire des usages politiques du passé et à une sociologie des témoins porteurs du souvenir que j’appelle, en tant qu’historienne. À l’échelle de la Cité, il y a occultation volontaire plus qu’oubli, entretien d’une mémoire souterraine plus que refoulement, combat pour la reconnaissance plus que résurgence.

Laissons aux spécialistes de la psyché le soin des consciences et des inconscients individuels blessés pour aller, au titre des sciences humaines et sociales, vers un travail collectif de connaissance et de remémoration du passé dans un objectif clair d’éducation citoyenne.

Voir enfin:

Le Martiniquais Frantz Fanon inspire un réalisateur suédois
« Les damnés de la terre » de Frantz Fanon est en filigrane de Concerning Violence, ce documentaire de Göran Hugo Olsson, qui s’est interrogé sur l’histoire des peuples africains pour accéder à l’indépendance. Un documentaire à voir actuellement à Madiana, Schoelcher.
Fabrice Théodose
France info Martinique
16/01/2015

« Concerning Violence » interroge les spectateurs sur le monde actuel, car le colonialisme est une donne fondamentale de la construction de l’Occident. Il s’agit d’une sorte d’essai filmique en 9 chapitres rythmé par la voix de Lauryn Hill. La chanteuse des Fugees, connue pour son engagement politique, a prêté sa voix à Frantz Fanon, en citant des extraits de ses textes.

Des entretiens et des archives nous replongent dans l’Afrique d’avant la décolonisation, plus particulièrement au Mozambique et en Angola. Le réalisateur a tenté d’illustrer les propos de l’essayiste martiniquais avec des images tournées par des cinéastes lors des luttes socialistes anti-impérialistes en Afrique.

Violence et décolonisation

« Le colonialisme n’est pas une machine à penser, n’est pas un corps doué de raison. Il est la violence à l’état de nature et ne peut s’incliner que devant une plus grande violence » (Franz Fanon, Les Damnés de la Terre, 1961).

La décolonisation s’est souvent faite dans le sang, avec des guerres d’indépendances menées avec passion par les anciennes colonies. C’est aussi cette violence de la colonisation, qui permet d’expliquer les tensions dans les pays concernés.

A travers ce film, le réalisateur a voulu aussi montrer l’écho que pouvait donner les propos de Fanon aux problèmes actuels de nos sociétés. La violence y est encore présente, tout comme elle l’était dans la période de colonisation et la quête à l’indépendance. N’y a-t-il pas une sorte d’hypocrisie entre les valeurs humanistes de l’Occident et cette colonisation violente qui a donné le monde actuel ?

« Concerning Violence » de Göran Hugo Olsson, lundi 19 janvier à Madiana, à 19h30

Voir parallèlement:

Harcèlement de rue: «Les policiers savent très bien que cette loi est purement inapplicable!»
Etienne Campion
Le Figaro
31/07/2018

FIGAROVOX/ENTRETIEN – Fonctionnaire de police et déléguée syndicale de l’Unité SGP Police, Linda Kebbab fait entendre le point de vue des forces de l’ordre sur le projet de loi de Marlène Schiappa qui prévoit de punir d’amendes l’outrage sexiste. Elle dénonce une loi inapplicable qui relève de la communication.

Linda Kebbab est déléguée nationale de l’Unité SGP Police. Elle a contribué cette année au numéro hors-série d’«Actu Police»: Femmes flics, héroïnes nationales<
FIGAROVOX.- Le secrétaire d’État à l’Égalité entre les femmes et les hommes, Marlène Schiappa, prévoit l’application de la loi de «lutte contre les violences sexistes et sexuelles» dès l’automne, rendant le harcèlement de rue verbalisable. En tant que représentante des forces de l’ordre, êtes-vous favorable à cette loi, et est-elle applicable?

Linda KEBBAB.- Favorables à une loi pour défendre les femmes dans l’espace public, nous le sommes évidemment dans le principe, c’est une noble cause. D’ailleurs, avant que le ministère de l’Intérieur s’engage dans le label «Égalité professionnelle entre les femmes et les hommes», notre organisation syndicale était sur le sujet depuis longtemps: nous avons par exemple sorti un numéro d’«ActuPolice» à l’attention des femmes policières mettant en avant les difficultés rencontrées au sein des forces de l’ordre en matière de discrimination. Donc c’est évidemment un sujet qui nous touche et pour lequel on s’estime précurseurs, bien avant le ministère de l’Intérieur et le gouvernement…

En revanche, la façon dont le problème a été abordé nous trouble particulièrement et nous sommes très pessimistes quant à l’application de cette loi dans l’espace public.

D’abord parce qu’il s’agit d’une contravention et non pas d’un délit. Le délit peut être rapporté et donner lieu à l’ouverture d’une enquête judiciaire: chacun peut rapporter les faits pour un délit dont il a été témoin ou victime. Ce qui n’est pas le cas pour une contravention.

Croire qu’on pourra mettre en place une police du flagrant délit pour ce genre de contraventions est totalement utopique.

Pour une contravention, il faut que l’agent de police ait constaté de ses propres yeux l’infraction, et qu’un citoyen la rapporte aux autorités ne changera rien. Aller dire à un agent de police qu’on s’est fait insulter ou harceler revient ainsi à lui rapporter qu’un chauffard a grillé un feu rouge: il sera d’accord pour dire que c’est mal, mais sans flagrant délit il ne pourra rien faire, hormis vous répondre qu’il n’a rien constaté. Car la contravention nécessite une constatation. Et en matière d’outrage sexiste, il est peu probable que les policiers déjà submergés – allons-nous devoir rallonger leurs journées? – puissent rester planqués au coin d’une rue ou patrouiller à pied dans l’attente de constater, et ce dans le plus grand des hasards, un outrage sexiste en flagrant délit. Croire qu’on pourra mettre en place une police du flagrant délit pour ce genre de contraventions est totalement utopique. Et les femmes ne pourront de toute façon pas saisir les policiers puisqu’il s’agit d’une contravention…

Comment les policiers perçoivent-ils ce potentiel nouveau rôle d’appréhension et de discernement de ce qui est, ou n’est pas, du harcèlement?

Les policiers disent tous qu’il s’agit d’une loi faite pour communiquer, totalement inapplicable, même si bien sûr ils ont conscience du problème et qu’ils ont l’habitude d’être sollicités pour cela. Mais c’est justement parce qu’ils ont conscience de ces réalités grâce au contact du terrain qu’ils considèrent que l’arrivée de cette loi relève de la pure communication: les policiers savent très bien qu’elle est purement inapplicable, ils ne l’affirment pas par plaisir! Et de toute façon, sauf si par hasard quelques cas ponctuels fonctionnent, ce n’est pas cela qui changera la société! Les policiers ont conscience que cette contravention ne modifiera en rien les rouages de la société et considèrent, de toute façon, que ce n’est pas à eux de le faire. Ce n’est en effet pas à eux de faire de la prévention et de l’admonestation – car si cette loi passe il s’agira bien pour les policiers de sermonner les dragueurs de rue… Les moyens n’ont pas été mis en amont dans l’éducation et la prévention et on nous demande à nous policiers d’expliquer à un homme comment il doit se comporter avec une femme!

C’est une question de société pour laquelle on n’a pas trouvé de réponses et qu’on demande à la police de régler !

Ce n’est pas aux policiers de faire de la pédagogie?

En effet, ce n’est pas leur travail. Et, de toute façon, même si nous le voulions, nous n’aurions pas les moyens pour le faire. Si on estime qu’il s’agit d’une vraie cause nationale, il aurait fallu en faire un délit pour permettre aux victimes de se plaindre et de vraiment pouvoir déposer plainte pour mesurer l’impact psychologique et les potentiels jours d’ITT afin de lancer des procédures judiciaires.

Et ce qui sera considéré comme du harcèlement chez certaines femmes ne le sera pas chez d’autres…

C’est une question de société pour laquelle on n’a pas trouvé de réponses et qu’on demande à la police de régler! On peut trouver scandaleux la «Tribune des cent femmes» et le droit d’importuner, mais si aujourd’hui une femme se fait siffler dans la rue et qu’un policier intervient, à quel moment la contravention devra être constatée? Quand l’homme aura répondu à la liste exhaustive des sifflements établis par le gouvernement? Mais comment fera-t-on si la jeune fille dit que c’est une drague qu’elle accepte? Le policier se trouvera en porte-à-faux… Ce n’est pas à un policier de résoudre des problèmes de société! Et les contraventions, qui sont des éléments objectifs (feu rouge grillé, tapage nocturne…), tiennent à des faits réprimés par la société dont on n’a pas à discuter. Tandis qu’un sifflement ou une remarque peuvent être acceptés par certaines femmes: ce n’est pas à un policier de le verbaliser.

Selon vous et au vu de votre expérience de terrain, comment faire pour lutter en profondeur contre le problème de la sécurité des femmes dans l’espace public?

C’est une question qui renvoie à l’éducation et à la prévention. Or, jamais dans cette loi il n’a été question de mesures éducatives et de prévention auprès des hommes. Les stages de sanctions complémentaires ne suffiront pas, et les policiers ne peuvent travailler que s’il y a une véritable œuvre de prévention en amont, ce qui n’est pas le cas. D’autant plus qu’ils ne peuvent dénoncer des pratiques qui sont à l’ordre du jour seulement depuis «#metoo»: on ne peut pas leur demander de devenir manichéens quant à des outrages qui n’étaient pas perçus comme tels il y a encore quelques mois.

L’« outrage sexiste » et les « regards appuyés » : il faudrait un policier à chaque coin de rue, c’est parfaitement utopique…

Par ailleurs, souvent dans les outrages sexistes, dès lors que la jeune fille se rebiffe, elle devient victime de violence. Comme pour le cas récent de Marie Laguerre, qui a eu raison de faire preuve de courage. Tout comme elle a eu aussi raison de dire que même les femmes policières sont victimes d’outrages, nous le constatons également à notre échelle. Il faut par ailleurs rappeler que dans le cas de cette femme qui a été agressée, si la police était intervenue et que l’homme avait été interpellé, cette affaire aurait pu rester à l’échelle de la contravention et être traitée entre les tapages nocturnes et les excès de vitesse… Elle est devenue un délit parce que l’homme, en lançant un cendrier au visage de Marie Laguerre, a fait usage d’une arme par destination. Ce qui a donné lieu à une circonstance aggravante.

Il est donc primordial que, au-delà des sifflements et des remarques de rue, le gouvernement prenne en compte la circonstance aggravante en fonction du genre de la personne atteinte. Car un homme qui frappe une femme aujourd’hui ne pâtit pas de circonstance aggravante, sauf lorsque c’est sa concubine.

On fait beaucoup de bruit pour des contraventions, mais la grosse erreur du gouvernement est d’être complètement passé à côté de cette question des circonstances aggravantes en fonction de l’appartenance à un genre, et de ne même pas y avoir songé.

Nous n’avons pas été entendus, hormis quelques invitations symboliques, le gouvernement ne prend absolument pas en compte le terrain et se contente de communiquer par des lois inapplicables. L’«outrage sexiste» et les «regards appuyés»: il faudrait un policier à chaque coin de rue, c’est parfaitement utopique…

La loi sur les fake news : vaine, liberticide ou utile ?

La proposition de loi, voulue par Macron et portée par les députés LREM, arrive devant l’Assemblée. Les avis sont souvent tranchés sur son utilité.

Thierry Noisette

Les députés lois examinent, à partir de ce jeudi 7 juin, en séance publique les deux propositions de loi « anti-fake news » (leur appellation officielle est « lutte contre les fausses informations »).

Il s’agit en fait d’un projet de loi maquillé en propositions, puisque l’on sait qu’il a été voulu par le président de la République et préparé au ministère de la Culture, même s’il est présenté formellement par des députés LREM.

Un texte examiné en accéléré

Lors de ses vœux à la presse, le 3 janvier, Emmanuel Macron déclarait : « En période électorale, en cas de propagation d’une fausse nouvelle, il sera possible de saisir le juge à travers une nouvelle action en référé. »

Le gouvernement ayant engagé la procédure accélérée sur ces deux textes (proposition de loi organique n° 772 et proposition de loi n° 799), ils ne feront donc l’objet que d’une seule lecture à l’Assemblée puis au Sénat.

Ce projet a suscité de nombreuses réactions, souvent critiques. Deux reproches sont fréquemment adressés aux deux textes : ils ajoutent encore une loi alors qu’il existe déjà dans le droit français un délit de diffusion de fausses nouvelles (article 27 de la loi de 1881 sur la liberté de la presse), et ils vont confier à un juge, en procédure d’urgence, la tâche de déterminer si une nouvelle est fausse ou non.

Lors de l’audition de la ministre de la Culture, Françoise Nyssen, mardi 22 mai par les députés, rapporte Euractiv, le député Nouvelle Gauche Hervé Saulignac s’est inquiété : « Comment un juge en 48 heures peut-il qualifier une information ? […] Va-t-on remettre en cause le secret des sources ? »

« Un concept fourre-tout »

La rapporteure pour la commission des lois, Naïma Moutchou, a annoncé que des précisions seraient apportées au texte au travers d’amendements notamment pour définir clairement le terme de « fausse information ».

Nicolas Vanderbiest, animateur du blog Reputatio Lab, qui analyse les crises et l’e-réputation sur les réseaux sociaux, était très critique lors de l’annonce présidentielle, sur le terme même de fake news :

« C’est un mot qui ne devrait même pas exister. C’est un concept fourre-tout qui a le sens qu’on lui donne. Est-ce une rumeur ? Une fausse information ? Une opération de déstabilisation comme on a pu en voir pendant l’élection présidentielle ? »

Et il ajoutait sur son blog : « Il n’y a aucun accord sur la définition de fake news, ce mot étant une coquille vide. Ensuite parce que la réalité des fake news ne peut être combattue uniquement par une loi. Le parallèle avec le piratage est criant. C’est illégal, mais tout le monde le pratique. »

« Liberticide, démagogique »

L’avocat Emmanuel Pierrat, le 4 mars sur BFMTV (à 16h30), mettait en avant l’ancienneté des textes existants (la loi du 27 juillet 1849, article 4, interdisait déjà « la publication ou reproduction, faite de mauvaise foi, de nouvelles fausses, de pièces fabriquées, falsifiées, ou mensongèrement attribuées à des tiers, lorsque ces nouvelles ou pièces seront de nature à troubler la paix publique ») :

« Il y a déjà en droit français presque 400 textes qui encadrent la liberté d’expression. […] Depuis 1850, il existe un délit de fausses nouvelles en France. Quelle est l’utilité de créer un délit de fake news qui ressemble peu ou prou au délit de fausses nouvelles ? […] On rend le juge responsable de dire la vérité, et en urgence. […] C’est une loi liberticide, démagogique, qui ne servira à rien. »

Après l’annonce présidentielle de janvier, la présidente du Syndicat de la magistrature, Katia Dubreuil, déclarait à « Libération » : « Il ne paraît pas du tout évident de vérifier ce qui relève ou non de la fausse information dans le cadre de l’urgence. »

Les actuelles propositions de loi sur les fake news ont cependant une spécificité, celle de viser les périodes préélectorales et électorales (en imposant aux plateformes « des obligations de transparence renforcées en vue de permettre » aux autorités de détecter des campagnes de déstabilisation par la diffusion de fausses informations, et aux internautes de connaître l’annonceur des contenus sponsorisés.

« Ne pas ouvrir la boîte de Pandore »

Interrogé début mai par « le Nouveau Magazine littéraire », Pierre Haski, président de Reporters sans frontières et chroniqueur à « l’Obs », déclarait :

« Qu’un Etat veuille protéger son débat public d’une ingérence étrangère cachée ne me choque pas. Durant la campagne électorale américaine, 126 millions d’Américains ont été exposés à des contenus sponsorisés achetés par la Russie sans apparaître comme tel mais sous un prête-nom. Cela pose un grave problème démocratique dans la mesure où il y a manipulation d’un processus électoral. Si l’Etat français veut imposer un encadrement et une transparence de ces pratiques, je n’y suis pas opposé sur le principe. Mais il faudra être extrêmement vigilant sur la formulation d’un tel texte de loi pour ne pas ouvrir la boîte de Pandore. »

Lorsque « le Monde » retrace l’histoire de la loi de 1881 sur la liberté de la presse et de sa répression des fausses nouvelles, il cite l’historien de la presse Patrick Eveno. Ce dernier note qu’en pratique, les poursuites contre les journaux accusés d’avoir publié des fausses nouvelles furent très rares :

« Il faut montrer qu’il y a eu une intention de ­publier une fausse nouvelle et faire le lien entre celle-ci et un trouble à la paix publique, ce qui est très compliqué. Si bien que le délit de fausse nouvelle a été peu invoqué par les parquets. Mais il l’a été pendant la guerre d’Algérie. En termes de droit, le juge est démuni : produire des fausses nouvelles afin de convaincre les gens de voter pour Macron ou Le Pen ne trouble pas la paix publique. »

Alors, inutile ou comblant un réel vide juridique ? Limité ou dangereux pour la liberté de la presse ? Les débats à l’Assemblée et au Sénat ne manqueront pas d’intérêt pour tenter de répondre à ces interrogations.

Et les réseaux sociaux ?

Reste aussi à savoir si ces textes ont une chance de répondre au défi du partage de fausses nouvelles sur les réseaux sociaux : en mars, le sociologue spécialiste d’Internet Antonio Casilli le relevait dans « l’Obs » :

« Les modèles économiques des plateformes numériques ne favorisent pas tant la militance spontanée émanant de la base d’un parti, que des campagnes de propagande et de dénigrement montées de toute pièce. » « Les grands médias sociaux jouent un rôle extrêmement ambigu dans cette économie du clic. D’une part, Facebook et Google s’engagent depuis 2016 dans des remaniements réguliers de leurs algorithmes de référencement et de ciblage publicitaire afin de corriger les biais qui ont permis aux fake news de se répandre et ils s’adonnent depuis toujours à des ‘purges’ de faux profils, voire proscrivent les utilisateurs ayant recours aux plateformes de crowdturfing. Mais, d’autre part, le réseau de Mark Zuckerberg semble fonctionner grâce à des mécanismes d’achat de visibilité qui entretiennent de nombreuses similitudes avec le fonctionnement des usines à faux clics. »

Voir également:

Sur Twitter, les fake news se propagent beaucoup plus vite que la vérité

Elles se diffusent beaucoup plus rapidement et touchent davantage de gens : trois chercheurs du MIT décortiquent le mécanisme de propagation des fausses nouvelles.

Jean-Paul Fritz

L’ère Trump est celle des « fake news », mais peu d’éléments scientifiques étaient jusqu’à présent disponibles sur la manière dont elles se propagent. Aujourd’hui, trois chercheurs du Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Soroush Vosoughi, Deb Roy et Sinan Aral, réparent ce manque en publiant une étude à grande échelle sur la diffusion des fausses nouvelles, ce que l’on désigne souvent par l’anglicisme « fake news ».

Dans cette étude, parue jeudi soir dans le magazine « Science », ces spécialistes des interactions homme-machine et de l’analyse des mécanismes des réseaux sociaux ont décortiqué la transmission de l’information, révélant des éléments pour le moins surprenants.

Après l’attentat de Boston

A l’origine de cette étude, un constat effectué par Soroush Vosoughi lors de l’attentat du marathon de Boston en avril 2013. « Twitter est devenu notre source principale d’informations », explique le chercheur. « J’ai réalisé qu’une bonne partie de ce que je lisais sur les réseaux sociaux était des rumeurs, des fausses nouvelles. » Avec son professeur de l’époque et d’autres collègues, il a commencé à étudier la propagation des nouvelles, vraies et fausses.

Dans l’étude publiée ce jeudi, plutôt que de se focaliser sur le chemin suivi par quelques événements significatifs, les chercheurs ont misé sur la quantité pour déterminer, indépendamment des thèmes véhiculés, ce qui pouvait différencier la propagation d’une fausse nouvelle par rapport à une vraie ou même une « mixte », une nouvelle comportant des éléments vrais et des éléments faux.

« Même si les expressions ‘fake news’ et ‘désinformation’ impliquent également une distorsion volontaire de la vérité, nous ne prétendons rien sur les intentions des pourvoyeurs des informations que nous avons analysées. Nous concentrons plutôt notre attention sur la véracité et sur les histoires qui ont été vérifiées comme vraies ou fausses, » avertissent les auteurs de l’étude.

Des rumeurs en cascade

Le mécanisme de diffusion d’une nouvelle sur les réseaux sociaux est organisé en « cascades ». Une cascade débute lorsqu’un utilisateur va diffuser une information, vraie ou fausse. Cette information sera ensuite reprise par d’autres utilisateurs dans une sorte d’effet boule de neige. Mais une même nouvelle peut faire l’objet de plusieurs cascades, lorsque des utilisateurs différents vont de manière indépendante commencer à diffuser la même information ou rumeur.

Par exemple, si je découvre une information intéressante sur un site et que j’en tweete le lien (ou que je le partage sur une autre plateforme), je démarre une cascade sur cette information qui va éventuellement provoquer des retweets qui eux-mêmes déclencheront d’autres retweets. Mais d’autres personnes peuvent avoir également tweeté le même lien de leur côté, déclenchant des cascades séparées.

Pour chaque cascade, les chercheurs ont notamment déterminé la profondeur (nombre de retweets par d’autres utilisateurs depuis l’origine), la taille (le nombre d’utilisateurs impliqués dans la cascade), la largeur (nombre maximum d’utilisateurs à un moment donné)…

« Plus loin, plus vite, plus largement »

Les auteurs de l’étude ont pu constater que les fausses nouvelles sont diffusées « significativement plus loin, plus vite, plus profondément et plus largement que la vérité dans toutes les catégories d’information ».

Pour une même cascade, les fausses informations ont ainsi touché beaucoup plus de personnes que les vraies. « Alors que la vérité est rarement diffusée à plus de 1.000 personnes, le top 1% des cascades de fausses nouvelles touche généralement entre 1.000 et 100.000 personnes », précise l’étude. Le constat est que beaucoup plus de personnes retweetent des informations fausses que la vérité. C’est cette diffusion virale, qui ne passe pas par les canaux habituels de transmission verticale d’informations, qui va faire la différence.

Les fausses nouvelles auraient ainsi 70% de chances supplémentaires d’être retweetées que les véritables informations, et par un beaucoup plus grand nombre d’utilisateurs uniques.

La diffusion des fausses nouvelles est également rapide : « Il faut à la vérité à peu près six fois plus longtemps que la fausseté pour toucher 1.500 personnes », expliquent les scientifiques.

Les informations (vraies ou fausses) les plus diffusées appartiennent en premier à la catégorie politique. Viennent ensuite les légendes urbaines, les affaires, le terrorisme, la science, les loisirs et les catastrophes naturelles.  Ce n’est pas vraiment une surprise, mais les fake news politiques sont celles qui touchent le plus de monde et sont les plus virales : « Elles touchent 20.000 personnes en trois fois moins de temps qu’il en faut à une vraie nouvelle pour en toucher 10.000. »

Les influenceurs et les robots n’y sont pour rien

On pourrait croire que des influenceurs sont à l’origine de la propagation large et rapide des fausses nouvelles, mais il n’en est rien. Ce ne sont pas ceux qui ont le plus d’abonnés à leur fil Twitter, qui postent le plus souvent ou qui sont « vérifiés » qui expliquent ce mouvement, au contraire. Ceux qui diffusent les fausses nouvelles ont moins de « followers », suivent moins de personnes et sont moins actifs (et moins vérifiés).

Les robots, ces programmes automatisés qui font du retweet à la chaîne, sont aussi souvent suspectés. L’étude montre qu’ils n’y sont pas pour grand-chose. Les trois chercheurs ont identifié les « bots » et ont effectué des analyses avec et sans eux sans que cela ne change les résultats : « Les fausses nouvelles se diffusent plus loin, plus vite, plus profondément et plus largement que la vérité parce que les humains, et pas les robots, ont plus de chances de les répandre », affirme l’étude. Le terreau des fake news, ce serait donc monsieur et madame-tout-le-monde…

Les fausses nouvelles plus originales que les vraies ?

En modélisant les probabilités d’être retweeté, les auteurs ont donc découvert que les fausses informations avaient 70% de chances supplémentaires d’être retweetées que la vérité. Pourquoi un tel écart ? La réponse pourrait être « l’originalité ». « La nouveauté attire l’attention, contribue à une prise de décision productive et encourage le partage de l’information parce que la nouveauté met à jour notre compréhension du monde, » décryptent les auteurs.

Ils ont ainsi analysé les différences entre les tweets auxquels était exposé un échantillon d’utilisateurs avant qu’ils ne diffusent une information. En comparaison, « les fausses nouvelles étaient, de manière significative, plus originales que la vérité, en exhibant une unicité d’information nettement plus importante ».

« Les fausses nouvelles sont plus originales, et les gens ont plus de chances de partager des informations originales », explique Sinan Aral. Sur les réseaux sociaux, les personnes qui sont les premières à diffuser une information jusque-là inconnue attirent l’attention. Ils « semblent être au courant ». Même si l’information en question se révèle fausse.

Pour les auteurs, « même si nous ne pouvons pas affirmer que l’originalité provoque les retweets ou que la nouveauté est la seule raison pour laquelle les fausses nouvelles sont retweetées plus souvent, nous avons découvert que les fausses nouvelles sont plus novatrices et que cette information originale a plus de chances d’être retweetée ».

Ils ont également étudié les émotions associées aux fausses nouvelles (déterminées par le vocabulaire des utilisateurs qui les rediffusaient). Surprise et dégoût étaient en tête chez les fake news, alors que les véritables informations inspiraient davantage de tristesse, d’anticipation, de joie et de confiance. Pour les trois chercheurs, « les émotions exprimées en réponse aux fausses informations pourraient éclairer des facteurs additionnels, en plus de la nouveauté, qui inspirent les gens à partager des fausses nouvelles ».

Que faire contre les fake news ?

Si elle a pour ambition de décortiquer certains mécanismes de la diffusion des fake news, l’étude du MIT n’offre pas de solutions miracle. « Il faut davantage de recherches sur les explications comportementales des différences de diffusion entre les vraies et fausses nouvelles », admettent les auteurs. « Comprendre comment les fausses nouvelles se diffusent est la première étape pour les contenir. »

Pour Vosoughi, Roy et Aral, les résultats de leur étude donnent cependant une piste importante : il faut s’occuper du comportement des utilisateurs, alors que « s’il s’agissait juste de robots, nous aurions eu besoin d’une solution technologique ».

« Si des personnes diffusent volontairement des fausses nouvelles alors que d’autres le font sans le savoir, le phénomène est double et nécessite de multiples tactiques pour y répondre », suggère Soroush Vosoughi. 

En tant qu’utilisateur, on peut également appliquer une solution de bon sens suggérée par Deb Roy : « Réfléchir avant de retweeter. »

Une étude à grande échelle

Soroush Vosoughi, Deb Roy et Sinan Aral ont étudié la manière dont des nouvelles, fausses et vraies, ont été diffusées sur Twitter entre 2006 et 2017. Ils ont analysé le parcours de 126.000 d’entre elles, rediffusées plus de 4,5 millions de fois par 3 millions de personnes.

Pour déterminer si les nouvelles étaient vraies ou fausses, les trois chercheurs ont fait appel à six organisations indépendantes spécialisées dans le fact-checking. Le résultat est ce que certains qualifient déjà comme « la plus grande étude longitudinale [suivie dans le temps] jamais réalisée sur la diffusion des fausses nouvelles en ligne ».

Le but avoué des trois chercheurs est de répondre aux « deux des questions scientifiques les plus importantes : comment la vérité et la fausseté se diffusent de manière différente, et quels facteurs du jugement humain expliquent ces différences ».

Voir encore:

Washington : la comédienne anti-Trump en a-t-elle trop fait ?

Michelle Wolf a fait un discours très mordant lors du traditionnel dîner des correspondants de la Maison-Blanche.

Le Parisien
30 avril 2018

« Comme dit une star porno lorsqu’elle se met au lit avec Trump, finissons-en au plus vite ! » C’est ainsi que Michelle Wolf a commencé son discours, samedi, lors du traditionnel dîner des correspondants de la Maison Blanche à Washington.

Comme l’année dernière, Donald Trump avait rompu avec la tradition en refusant de participer à ce rituel où son administration est toujours plus ou moins vilipendée.

Malgré le contexte très formel et la présence de centaines d’invités, journalistes et politiques de tous bords, la comédienne de 32 ans, qui participe d’ordinaire au « Daily Show » de Trevor Noah, n’avait rien perdu de son mordant. Bien au contraire. Elle a donc étrillé le président américain dans son discours.

« Elle brûle les faits pour s’en faire du fard à paupières »

Seule représentante de l’administration Trump, la porte-parole Sarah Huckabee Sanders en a aussi pris pour son grade et c’est ce qui fait polémique. « Je vous adore dans le rôle de Tante Lydia dans La Servante écarlate », a balancé Michelle Wolf, en référence à ce personnage de matrone sadique interprétée par la sexagénaire Ann Dowd dans la série télévisée d’anticipation. Avant de la comparer au personnage de principal de « La Case de l’oncle Tom », controversé de nos jours car vu comme un esclave complice de ses maîtres…

Un peu plus tard, elle s’est moquée de la porte-parole en lançant : « Elle brûle les faits pour s’en faire du fard à paupières » !

« Une honte »

Selon des commentateurs, la comédienne serait allée un peu trop loin dans la « mise en boîte ». Même si certains ont trouvé cela « courageux », d’autres, pas tendres avec l’administration Trump, ont trouvé ces plaisanteries « pas drôles, voire méchantes ou insultantes ».

« J’ai complimenté son sens du maquillage, au contraire ! » a plaisanté la comédienne sur Twitter, répondant à ses critiques. Elle s’est permis également de répondre d’un « merci ! » au prédécesseur de Sarah Sanders, Sean Spicer qui avait écrit que ce discours était « une honte ».

Voir également:

Etats-Unis : un restaurant refuse de servir sa porte-parole, Donald Trump se venge sur Twitter

PERSONA NON GRATA – Par les temps qui courent, il ne fait pas bon travailler pour Donald Trump. Sarah Sanders, la porte-parole de la Maison-Blanche en a fait les frais vendredi en se faisant virer d’un restaurant où elle devait dîner. Ce qui a valu, lundi, un tweet matinal fracassant du président américain.
Virginie Fauroux
LCI
25 juin 2018

« J’ai été expulsée d’un restaurant ! ». Scandale outre-Atlantique, en pleine polémique sur la gestion de la crise migratoire, la porte-parole de la Maison blanche a indiqué qu’un restaurant de l’Etat de Virginie dans lequel elle souhaitait dîner vendredi soir avait refusé de la servir au motif qu’elle travaillait pour Donald Trump.

« Hier soir, la propriétaire du Red Hen à Lexington, en Virginie, m’a demandé de partir parce que je travaillais pour @POTUS (le président des Etats-Unis, ndlr) et je suis partie poliment », a expliqué Sarah Sanders sur son compte Twitter samedi matin. « Ses actions en disent beaucoup plus sur elle que sur moi. Je fais toujours de mon mieux pour traiter les gens, y compris ceux avec qui je ne suis pas d’accord, respectueusement et je continuerai à le faire », a-t-elle ajouté.

Trump en colère

Comme le rapporte CBS News, l’incident a été révélé sur Facebook par un homme affirmant être un employé de l’établissement, qui a précisé dans son message avoir servi Sarah Sanders « lors d’une durée totale de deux minutes ». Ce post a été tweeté par Brennan Gilmore, le directeur exécutif du groupe environnemental Clean Virginia.

La propriétaire du restaurant, Stéphanie Wilkinson, a confirmé l’information au Washington Post et expliqué qu’elle ne regrettait pas sa décision : « Je ne suis pas une grande fan de la confrontation », a-t-elle déclaré. « Mais il est grand temps dans notre démocratie que les gens prennent des mesures, même inconfortables, pour défendre leur moralité. J’aurais refait la même chose », a-t-elle poursuivi. « Nous pensons juste qu’il y a des moments où il faut être fidèle à ses convictions ».

La mésaventure de sa porte-parole a suscité la colère de Donald Trump, qui s’est vengé lundi dans un tweet, comme il en a l’habitude. « Le restaurant Red Hend devrait se concentrer sur le nettoyage de ses verrières, portes et fenêtres crasseux plutôt que de refuser de servir une personne bien comme Sarah Huckabee Sanders. J’avais une règle, si un restaurant est dégoûtant de l’extérieur, il l’est à l’intérieur ».

Voir enfin:

Politique migratoire de Trump : sa porte-parole protégée par le Secret service

Vendredi 22 juin, Sarah Sanders avait été congédiée d’un restaurant à cause des idées et de la politique de son patron.
J.Cl.
Le Parisien
27 juin 2018

Cinq jours après sa mésaventure du week-end, la porte-parole de la Maison-Blanche va bénéficier d’une protection officielle. Selon CNN, qui invoque deux sources distinctes, Sarah Sanders sera protégée à son domicile dès ce mercredi par le « Secret service ». La durée de cette protection n’est pas spécifiée.

Le « Secret service » assure habituellement la protection du président des États-Unis, du vice-président, de leurs familles, des anciens présidents, de la Maison-Blanche et des autres résidences officielles. Les collaborateurs des présidents ne sont en principe pas protégés à leur porte.

A l’origine de cette décision, la déconvenue dont Sarah Sanders a été l’objet et qui a fait polémique aux Etats-Unis. Vendredi soir, la « press secretary » de Donald Trump et son mari ont été priés de quitter le restaurant où ils comptaient dîner. La restauratrice et son personnel, opposés à la politique migratoire du président, notamment la séparation des familles de migrants lors de leur entrée clandestine sur le sol américain, les ont priés de sortir. Trump avait pris la défense de Sanders dans un tweet rageur.


La Rose blanche/75e: Après la tragédie, la farce (75 years after the WWII anti-nazi student group, Hollywood’s joke of an anti-sexual harassment movement picks up the white rose symbol)

26 février, 2018
Hans et Sophie Scholl et leur ami Christoph ProbstHegel fait remarquer quelque part que, dans l’histoire universelle, les grands faits et les grands personnages se produisent, pour ainsi dire, deux fois. Il a oublié d’ajouter : la première fois comme tragédie, la seconde comme farce. Marx
Depuis que l’ordre religieux est ébranlé – comme le christianisme le fut sous la Réforme – les vices ne sont pas seuls à se trouver libérés. Certes les vices sont libérés et ils errent à l’aventure et ils font des ravages. Mais les vertus aussi sont libérées et elles errent, plus farouches encore, et elles font des ravages plus terribles encore. Le monde moderne est envahi des veilles vertus chrétiennes devenues folles. Les vertus sont devenues folles pour avoir été isolées les unes des autres, contraintes à errer chacune en sa solitude.  G.K. Chesterton
L’inauguration majestueuse de l’ère « post-chrétienne » est une plaisanterie. Nous sommes dans un ultra-christianisme caricatural qui essaie d’échapper à l’orbite judéo-chrétienne en « radicalisant » le souci des victimes dans un sens antichrétien. (…) Jusqu’au nazisme, le judaïsme était la victime préférentielle de ce système de bouc émissaire. Le christianisme ne venait qu’en second lieu. Depuis l’Holocauste, en revanche, on n’ose plus s’en prendre au judaïsme, et le christianisme est promu au rang de bouc émissaire numéro un. René Girard
La Rose blanche (en allemand Die Weiße Rose) est le nom d’un groupe de résistants allemands, fondé en juin 1942, pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale, et composé de quelques étudiants et de leurs proches. Ce nom aurait été choisi par Hans Scholl en référence à la romance de Clemens Brentano (Les Romances du Rosaire, 1852), ou au roman de B. Traven La Rose blanche (1929). Ce groupe a été arrêté en février 1943 par la Gestapo et ses membres ont été exécutés. Wikipedia
We choose the white rose because historically it stands for hope, peace, sympathy and resistance. Voices in Entertainment
 The colour white, of course, represents peace, but it is also has history in the women’s movement. White was one of the trio of colours adopted by the suffragette movement, along with green and purple; white stood for purity. Hillary Clinton’s white pantsuit, which she wore to accept the nomination as Democratic candidate for the 2016 election, was seen making a feminist statement. The Guardian
When he landed in New Delhi last Saturday, Trudeau was greeted on the tarmac, not by the Prime Minister or Foreign Minister but by the junior minister for agriculture and farmers’ welfare. Other world leaders, including Barack Obama and Benjamin Netanyahu, have been given a personal welcome by Narendra Modi. Prime Minister Modi, a savvy social media user, failed even to note Trudeau’s arrival on Twitter, though on the same day he found time to tweet about plans to unveil a new shipping container terminal. He did not acknowledge Trudeau until five days later and only met him the day before the Canadian PM and his family were to return home. Why were the Indians so frosty in their reception? They suspect Trudeau’s government of private sympathy for the Khalistani separatist movement, which wants to form a breakaway Sikh state in Punjab. Thankfully, Trudeau didn’t do anything to inflame those suspicions. Well, unless you count inviting a notorious Khalistani separatist to a reception. And then to dinner. With the Prime Minister. Not just any separatist, either. Jaspal Atwal is a former member of the International Sikh Youth Federation, proscribed as a terror group in both India and Canada, and was convicted of the attempted assassination of Indian cabinet minister Malkiat Singh Sidhu. Best of all, he even got a photo taken with Trudeau’s wife Sophie. But there were still a few Indians unoffended by the image-obsessed Canadian PM and he quickly remedied that. He turned up for one event in a gaudy golden kurta, churidars and chappals. At another, he broke into the traditional Bhaṅgṛā dance only to stop midway through when no one else joined in. Only after the local press pointed out that this was a little condescending and a lot tacky was Justin-ji finally photographed wearing a suit. It was less like a state visit and more like a weeklong audition for the next Sanjay Leela Bhansali movie. Here was Justin Trudeau, the progressive’s progressive, up to his pagṛi in cultural appropriation. At least he achieved his goal of bringing Indians and Canadians closer together: both have spent the past week cringing at this spectacle of well-meaning minstrelsy. I want to like Justin Trudeau. I really do. He’s a centrist liberal in an age where neither the adjective nor the noun is doing very well. Trump to his south, Brexit and Corbyn across the water, Putin beyond that: Trudeau should be a hero for liberal democrats. Instead, from his Eid Mubarak socks at Toronto Pride to his preference for ‘peoplekind’ over ‘mankind’, Trudeau presents like an alt-right parody of liberalism. He’s gender-neutral pronouns. He’s avocado toast and flaxseed soy smoothies. He’s safe spaces and checked privileges. Trudeau is a cuck. And all that would be fine. In fact, it would be a hoot to have a liberal standard-bearer who could troll the 4chan pale males in their overvaped, undersexed basements. But far from an icon for the middle ground, Trudeau is the sort of right-on relativist who gives liberals a bad name. He has spoken of his ‘admiration’ for China’s dictatorship for ‘allowing them to turn their economy around on a dime’. He called Fidel Castro ‘larger than life’ and ‘a remarkable leader’ who showed ‘tremendous dedication and love for the Cuban people’. Trudeau’s government refused to accept the Islamic State’s ethnic cleansing of the Yazidis was a genocide until the UN formally recognised it as such. In 2016 he issued a statement on Holocaust Remembrance Day that neglected to mention Jewish victims of the Shoah and the following year unveiled a memorial plaque with the same omission. Trudeau’s problem is that he always agrees with the last good intention he encountered. He seems to have picked up his political philosophy from Saturday morning cartoons: by your powers combined, I am Captain Snowflake. There is no spine of policy, no political compass, no vision beyond the next group hug or national apology. The centre ground needs a champion and instead it got an inspirational quote calendar with abs. Trudeau’s not a Grit, he’s pure mush. The Spectator
On y voit comment pousse sous nos yeux, non pas un simple fascisme local, mais un racisme proche du nazisme à ses débuts. Comme toute idéologie, le racisme allemand, lui aussi, avait évolué, et, à l’origine, il ne s’en était pris qu’aux droits de l’homme et du citoyen des juifs. Il est possible que sans la seconde guerre mondiale, le « problème juif » se serait soldé par une émigration « volontaire » des juifs des territoires sous contrôle allemand. Après tout, pratiquement tous les juifs d’Allemagne et d’Autriche ont pu sortir à temps. Il n’est pas exclu que pour certains à droite, le même sort puisse être réservé aux Palestiniens. Il faudrait seulement qu’une occasion se présente, une bonne guerre par exemple, accompagnée d’une révolution en Jordanie, qui permettrait de refouler vers l’Est une majeure partie des habitants de la Cisjordanie occupée. Les Smotrich et les Zohar, disons-le bien, n’entendent pas s’attaquer physiquement aux Palestiniens, à condition, bien entendu, que ces derniers acceptent sans résistance l’hégémonie juive. Ils refusent simplement de reconnaître leurs droits de l’homme, leur droit à la liberté et à l’indépendance. Dans le même ordre d’idées, d’ores et déjà, en cas d’annexion officielle des territoires occupés, eux et leurs partis politiques annoncent sans complexe qu’ils refuseront aux Palestiniens la nationalité israélienne, y compris, évidemment, le droit de vote. En ce qui concerne la majorité au pouvoir, les Palestiniens sont condamnés pour l’éternité au statut de population occupée. La raison en est simple et clairement énoncée : les Arabes ne sont pas juifs, c’est pourquoi ils n’ont pas le droit de prétendre à la propriété d’une partie quelconque de la terre promise au peuple juif. Pour Smotrich, Shaked et Zohar, un juif de Brooklyn, qui n’a peut-être jamais mis les pieds sur cette terre, en est le propriétaire légitime, mais l’Arabe, qui y est né, comme ses ancêtres avant lui, est un étranger dont la présence est acceptée uniquement par la bonne volonté des juifs et leur humanité. Le Palestinien, nous dit Zohar, « n’a pas le droit à l’autodétermination car il n’est pas le propriétaire du sol. Je le veux comme résident et ceci du fait de mon honnêteté, il est né ici, il vit ici, je ne lui dirai pas de s’en aller. Je regrette de le dire mais [les Palestiniens] souffrent d’une lacune majeure : ils ne sont pas nés juifs ». Ce qui signifie que même si les Palestiniens décidaient de se convertir, commençaient à se faire pousser des papillotes et à étudier la Torah et le Talmud, cela ne leur servirait à rien. Pas plus qu’aux Soudanais et Erythréens et leurs enfants, qui sont israéliens à tous égards – langue, culture, socialisation. Il en était de même chez les nazis. Ensuite vient l’apartheid, qui, selon la plupart des « penseurs » de la droite, pourrait, sous certaines conditions, s’appliquer également aux Arabes citoyens israéliens depuis la fondation de l’Etat. Pour notre malheur, beaucoup d’Israéliens, qui ont honte de tant de leurs élus et honnissent leurs idées, pour toutes sortes de raisons, continuent à voter pour la droite. Zeev Sternhell
The central complaint of Netanyahu’s critics is that he has failed to make good on the promise of his 2009 speech at Bar-Ilan University, where he claimed to accept the principle of a Palestinian state. Subsidiary charges include his refusal to halt settlement construction or give former Palestinian Prime Minister Salam Fayyad a sufficient political boost. It should go without saying that a Palestinian state is a terrific idea in principle — assuming, that is, that it resembles the United Arab Emirates. But Israelis have no reason to believe that it will look like anything except the way Gaza does today: militant, despotic, desperate and aggressive. Netanyahu’s foreign critics are demanding that he replicate on a large scale what has failed catastrophically on a smaller scale. It’s an absurd ask. It’s also strange that the same people who insist that Israel help create a Palestinian state in order to remain a democracy seem so indifferent to the views of that democracy. Israel’s political left was not destroyed by Netanyahu. It was obliterated one Palestinian suicide bombing, rocket salvo, tunnel attack and rejected statehood offer at a time. Bibi’s long tenure of office is the consequence, not the cause, of this. Specifically, it is the consequence of Israel’s internalization of the two great lessons of the past 30 years. First, that separation from the Palestinians is essential — in the long term. Second, that peace with the Palestinians is impossible — in the short term. The result is a policy that amounts to a type of indefinite holding pattern, with Israel circling a runway it knows it cannot yet land on even as it fears running out of gas. The risks here are obvious. But it’s hard to imagine any other sort of approach, which is why any successor to Netanyahu will have to pursue essentially identical policies — policies whose chief art will consist in fending off false promises of salvation. There’s a long Jewish history of this. For all of his flaws, few have done it as well as Bibi, which is why he has endured, and will probably continue to do so. Bret Stephens
Un Israélien qui compare Israël au « nazisme des débuts », voilà qui ne peut qu’enchanter, du Monde à France Inter, de Mediapart au Muslim Post. D’autant plus que Zeev Sternhell a l’avantage de conférer une pseudo-scientificité à deux grandes causes, la détestation de la France et la haine d’Israël – quel autre sentiment peut inspirer un pays en voie de nazification ? En effet, avant de devenir le savant utile de l’antisionisme extrême gauchiste européen, Sternhell s’est rendu célèbre avec Ni droite, ni gauche, publié en 1983, une analyse du fascisme français qui est à peu près partout et toujours prête à resurgir, thèse assez proche de celle de L’idéologie française de BHL, paru deux ans plus tôt, et recyclée depuis en mépris du populo et de ses idées nauséabondes. Bref, avec Shlomo Sand, l’historien qui considère que le peuple juif est un mythe, et quelques autres, Sternhell fait partie des Israéliens fréquentables. Et pour les sites islamistes il est le « bon juif » idéal. Ce qui est marrant, c’est que, même concernant le fascisme français, Shlomo Sand lui conteste la qualité d’historien. De fait, outre qu’elle est abjecte, sa comparaison est idiote car elle oublie un léger détail : il n’y avait pas, en 1930, de conflit entre les Juifs et l’Allemagne, ni de Juifs souhaitant bruyamment la disparition de l’Allemagne ou célébrant la mort de petites filles allemandes. Le plus écœurant, c’est la gourmandise avec laquelle notre radio publique s’est jetée sur cette bonne feuille. En dépit d’une actualité chargée, sur France Culture, on lui a accordé l’honneur des titres, honneur inédit pour un texte de cette nature. Emportée par son élan – ou son inconscient-, la journaliste a annoncé : « Un intellectuel israélien compare Israël au nazisme des années 1940. » Sternhell, et c’est déjà dingue, parle du nazisme des débuts. Celui des années 1940, c’est celui de la fin – de l’extermination. Peu importent ces distinctions, nombre de journalistes, imbus de leurs grands sentiments et de leur méconnaissance totale du dossier, étaient trop heureux de trouver, sous une plume israélienne, cette confirmation de tous les poncifs qu’ils ont en tête. (…) Surtout, tout occupé qu’il est à déceler les germes de nazisme chez ses concitoyens, Sternhell oublie de porter son regard un peu plus loin. S’il l’avait fait, il aurait pu entendre et voir des expressions beaucoup plus inquiétantes du nationalisme trempé dans l’antisémitisme le plus crasse, expressions qui vont jusqu’au poignard, à la roquette, sans oublier la volonté de destruction tranquillement assumée dans des mosquées ou des salles de classe. Ajoutons qu’en Israël, Sternhell et les autres ont pignon sur rue et c’est très bien. S’il y a des partisans de la paix avec Israël dans le monde arabe, ils rasent les murs, ou sont menacés de mort. Et dans les pays arabes, il n’y a pas de question juive. S’il avait vu tout cela, Sternhell aurait compris que la volonté de conserver une majorité juive ne révèle nullement une haine raciale. La plupart des Israéliens le savent, sans majorité juive, il n’y a plus d’Etat juif. Fin du sionisme, chapitre clos. C’est d’ailleurs ce souci qui devrait conduire le gouvernement israélien à rechercher une séparation négociée avec les Palestiniens, qu’ils soient ou pas (et ils ne le sont pas) les partenaires idéaux. Oui, l’occupation qui pourrit la vie des Palestiniens opère un travail de sape souterrain dans la société israélienne. Mais le danger, pour Israël, n’est pas de sombrer dans le nazisme. Il est de perdre le sens de la pluralité – et de finir par ressembler à ses voisins. Elisabeth Lévy
 Attention: une rose blanche peut en cacher une autre !

Au lendemain du 75e anniversaire de la décapitation du groupe de résistance d’étudiants antinazis dit de la Rose blanche

Et la reprise du même symbole par Hollywood et le monde de la chanson pour symboliser sa lutte contre le harcèlement sexuel …
Pendant que déguisé en acteur de Bollywood, la véritable caricature de progressisme qui sert actuellement de premier ministre à nos pauvres amis canadiens achevait de ridiculiser son pays sur la scène internationale …
Et qu’oubliant qu’il n’y avait pas dans les années 30 de « Juifs souhaitant bruyamment la disparition de l’Allemagne ou célébrant la mort de petites filles allemandes », un historien israélien qui compare Israël au « nazisme des débuts » se voit gratifié d’une tribune du Monde
Comment ne pas repenser …
Pour qualifier cette étrange époque que nous vivons entre « Génération Flocon de neige » et « idées chrétiennes devenues folles » …
Au fameux mot de Marx sur la répétition tragi-comique, par son premier président et dernier monarque de la nation française de neveu, du coup d’État du 18 brumaire par Napoléon un demi-siècle après ?

Zeev Sternhell, savant utile de l’antisionisme
L’historien israélien a comparé l’Etat hébreu au « nazisme à ses débuts »…
Elisabeth Lévy
Causeur
20 février 2018

Un Israélien qui compare Israël au « nazisme des débuts », voilà qui ne peut qu’enchanter, du Monde à France Inter, de Mediapart au Muslim Post. D’autant plus que Zeev Sternhell a l’avantage de conférer une  pseudo-scientificité à deux grandes causes, la détestation de la France et la haine d’Israël – quel autre sentiment peut inspirer un pays en voie de nazification ? En effet, avant de devenir le savant utile de l’antisionisme extrême gauchiste européen, Sternhell s’est rendu célèbre avec Ni droite, ni gauche, publié en 1983, une analyse du fascisme français qui est à peu près partout et toujours prête à resurgir, thèse assez proche de celle de L’idéologie française de BHL, paru deux ans plus tôt, et recyclée depuis en mépris du populo et de ses idées nauséabondes.

Sternhell, leur « bon juif » idéal

Bref, avec Shlomo Sand, l’historien qui considère que le peuple juif est un mythe, et quelques autres, Sternhell fait partie des Israéliens fréquentables. Et pour les sites islamistes il est le « bon juif » idéal. Ce qui est marrant, c’est que, même concernant le fascisme français, Shlomo Sand lui conteste la qualité d’historien. De fait, outre qu’elle est abjecte, sa comparaison est idiote car elle oublie un léger détail : il n’y avait pas, en 1930, de conflit entre les Juifs et l’Allemagne, ni de Juifs souhaitant bruyamment la disparition de l’Allemagne ou célébrant la mort de petites filles allemandes.

Le plus écœurant, c’est la gourmandise avec laquelle notre radio publique s’est jetée sur cette bonne feuille. En dépit d’une actualité chargée, sur