Primaires républicaines: Et si les Américains avaient refusé de débarquer sur les plages de Normandie ? (World can’t afford America sitting out the rest of the 21st century, Rubio)

29 février, 2016
Apologizer in chief on DDay

Durant les années où Sidney [Poitier] n’a sorti aucun film. Disons en 1962 ou 1963, aucun Noir n’a protesté. Pourquoi ? Parce que nous avions d’autres choses plus importantes contre lesquelles nous lever. Nous étions trop occupés à être violés et lynchés pour nous soucier de qui gagnait le prix du meilleur réalisateur. Vous savez, quand votre grand-mère se balance à une branche d’arbre, le cadet de vos soucis est l’Oscar du meilleur court-métrage documentaire étranger. Chris Rock
Ce film a donné une voix aux survivants. Et l’Oscar amplifie cette voix, en espérant qu’elle devienne une chorale qui résonnera jusqu’au Vatican. Pape François, il est temps de protéger les enfants et de rétablir la foi. Michael Sugar
By going to Cuba while he is still in office, Mr. Obama is showing Havana that he will continue to make enough progress that it will be difficult for the next president to change course from restoring ties with Cuba — and he is proving to Congress that the president still has a lot of executive authority to change foreign policy. Pam Falk (CBS News)
Obama is selling out pro-democracy dissidents in Cuba to take one last contemptuous potshot at Congress. That’s certainly in line with the legacy that he’s building thus far in his presidency. Hot air
Ce n’est peut-être pas une bonne chose pour l’Amérique, mais une très bonne affaire pour CBS. Sérieusement, qui aurait pu espérer la campagne que nous avons actuellement ? L’argent continue d’affluer et c’est marrant (…) Je n’ai jamais vu quelque chose comme ça, et cette année va être très bonne pour nous. C’est terrible à dire mais continue Donald, continue ! Leslie Moonves (PDG de CBS)
Is there some rule that demands that only movie stars, investment bankers, and tech moguls, who live in houses of more than 5,000 square feet or fly on private jets, have earned the right to lecture hoi polloi on their bad habits that lead to global warming? Is barbecuing a steak worse than burning up 5 gallons of aviation fuel a minute?… To watch the Super Bowl, Oscar, or Grammy festivities is to receive a pop sermon from mansion-residing multimillionaires about just how unfair are the race, class, and gender biases of the world in which they somehow made fortunes. In Weimar America, that Will Smith has a 25,000 square-foot mansion, but not a 2016 Oscar nomination, is proof of endemic racism and deprivation. Victor Davis Hanson
Barack Obama is the Dr. Frankenstein of the supposed Trump monster. If a charismatic, Ivy League-educated, landmark president who entered office with unprecedented goodwill and both houses of Congress on his side could manage to wreck the Democratic Party while turning off 52 percent of the country, then many voters feel that a billionaire New York dealmaker could hardly do worse. If Obama had ruled from the center, dealt with the debt, addressed radical Islamic terrorism, dropped the politically correct euphemisms and pushed tax and entitlement reform rather than Obamacare, Trump might have little traction. A boring Hillary Clinton and a staid Jeb Bush would most likely be replaying the 1992 election between Bill Clinton and George H.W. Bush — with Trump as a watered-down version of third-party outsider Ross Perot. But America is in much worse shape than in 1992. And Obama has proved a far more divisive and incompetent president than George H.W. Bush. Little is more loathed by a majority of Americans than sanctimonious PC gobbledygook and its disciples in the media. And Trump claims to be PC’s symbolic antithesis. Making Machiavellian Mexico pay for a border fence or ejecting rude and interrupting Univision anchor Jorge Ramos from a press conference is no more absurd than allowing more than 300 sanctuary cities to ignore federal law by sheltering undocumented immigrants. Putting a hold on the immigration of Middle Eastern refugees is no more illiberal than welcoming into American communities tens of thousands of unvetted foreign nationals from terrorist-ridden Syria. In terms of messaging, is Trump’s crude bombast any more radical than Obama’s teleprompted scripts? Trump’s ridiculous view of Russian President Vladimir Putin as a sort of « Art of the Deal » geostrategic partner is no more silly than Obama insulting Putin as Russia gobbles up former Soviet republics with impunity. Obama callously dubbed his own grandmother a « typical white person, » introduced the nation to the racist and anti-Semitic rantings of the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, and petulantly wrote off small-town Pennsylvanians as near-Neanderthal « clingers. » Did Obama lower the bar for Trump’s disparagements? Certainly, Obama peddled a slogan, « hope and change, » that was as empty as Trump’s « make America great again. » (…) How does the establishment derail an out-of-control train for whom there are no gaffes, who has no fear of The New York Times, who offers no apologies for speaking what much of the country thinks — and who apparently needs neither money from Republicans nor politically correct approval from Democrats? Victor Davis Hanson
People wonder what accounts for the rise of Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders. Maybe the better question is how the Obama years could not have produced a Trump and Sanders. Both the Republican and, to a lesser extent, Democratic parties have elements now who want to pull down the temple. But for all the politicized agitation, both these movements, in power, would produce stasis—no change at all. Donald Trump would preside over a divided government or, as he has promised and un-promised, a trade war with China. Hillary or Bernie will enlarge the Obama economic regime. Either outcome guarantees four more years of at best 2% economic growth. That means more of the above. That means 18-year-olds voting for the first time this year will face historically weak job opportunities through 2020 at least. Under any of these three, an Americanized European social-welfare state will evolve because Washington—and this will include many “conservatives”—will answer still-rising popular anger with new income redistributions. And for years afterward, Barack Obama will stroll off the 18th green, smiling. Mission, finally, accomplished. Daniel Henninger
We’re in the midst of a rebellion. The bottom and middle are pushing against the top. It’s a throwing off of old claims and it’s been going on for a while, but we’re seeing it more sharply after New Hampshire. This is not politics as usual, which by its nature is full of surprise. There’s something deep, suggestive, even epochal about what’s happening now. I have thought for some time that there’s a kind of soft French Revolution going on in America, with the angry and blocked beginning to push hard against an oblivious elite. It is not only political. Yes, it is about the Democratic National Committee, that house of hacks, and about a Republican establishment owned by the donor class. But establishment journalism, which for eight months has been simultaneously at Donald Trump’s feet (“Of course you can call us on your cell from the bathtub for your Sunday show interview!”) and at his throat (“Trump supporters, many of whom are nativists and nationalists . . .”) is being rebelled against too. Their old standing as guides and gatekeepers? Gone, and not only because of multiplying platforms. (…) All this goes hand in hand with the general decline of America’s faith in its institutions. We feel less respect for almost all of them—the church, the professions, the presidency, the Supreme Court. The only formal national institution that continues to score high in terms of public respect (72% in the most recent Gallup poll) is the military (…) we are in a precarious position in the U.S. with so many of our institutions going down. Many of those pushing against the system have no idea how precarious it is or what they will be destroying. Those defending it don’t know how precarious its position is or even what they’re defending, or why. But people lose respect for a reason. (…) It’s said this is the year of anger but there’s a kind of grim practicality to Trump and Sanders supporters. They’re thinking: Let’s take a chance. Washington is incapable of reform or progress; it’s time to reach outside. Let’s take a chance on an old Brooklyn socialist. Let’s take a chance on the casino developer who talks on TV. In doing so, they accept a decline in traditional political standards. You don’t have to have a history of political effectiveness anymore; you don’t even have to have run for office! “You’re so weirdly outside the system, you may be what the system needs.” They are pouring their hope into uncertain vessels, and surely know it. Bernie Sanders is an actual radical: He would fundamentally change an economic system that imperfectly but for two centuries made America the wealthiest country in the history of the world. In the young his support is understandable: They have never been taught anything good about capitalism and in their lifetimes have seen it do nothing—nothing—to protect its own reputation. It is middle-aged Sanders supporters who are more interesting. They know what they’re turning their backs on. They know they’re throwing in the towel. My guess is they’re thinking something like: Don’t aim for great now, aim for safe. Terrorism, a world turning upside down, my kids won’t have it better—let’s just try to be safe, more communal. A shrewdness in Sanders and Trump backers: They share one faith in Washington, and that is in its ability to wear anything down. They think it will moderate Bernie, take the edges off Trump. For this reason they don’t see their choices as so radical. (…) The mainstream journalistic mantra is that the GOP is succumbing to nativism, nationalism and the culture of celebrity. That allows them to avoid taking seriously Mr. Trump’s issues: illegal immigration and Washington’s 15-year, bipartisan refusal to stop it; political correctness and how it is strangling a free people; and trade policies that have left the American working class displaced, adrift and denigrated. Mr. Trump’s popularity is propelled by those issues and enabled by his celebrity. (…) Mr. Trump is a clever man with his finger on the pulse, but his political future depends on two big questions. The first is: Is he at all a good man? Underneath the foul mouthed flamboyance is he in it for America? The second: Is he fully stable? He acts like a nut, calling people bimbos, flying off the handle with grievances. Is he mature, reliable? Is he at all a steady hand? Political professionals think these are side questions. “Let’s accuse him of not being conservative!” But they are the issue. Because America doesn’t deliberately elect people it thinks base, not to mention crazy. Peggy Noonan
Politicians have, since ancient Greece, lied, pandered, and whored. They have taken bribes, connived, and perjured themselves. But in recent times—in the United States, at any rate—there has never been any politician quite as openly debased and debauched as Donald Trump. Truman and Nixon could be vulgar, but they kept the cuss words for private use. Presidents have chewed out journalists, but which of them would have suggested that an elegant and intelligent woman asking a reasonable question was dripping menstrual blood? LBJ, Kennedy, and Clinton could all treat women as commodities to be used for their pleasure, but none went on the radio with the likes of Howard Stern to discuss the women they had bedded and the finer points of their anatomies. All politicians like the sound of their own names, but Roosevelt named the greatest dam in the United States after his defeated predecessor, Herbert Hoover. Can one doubt what Trump would have christened it? That otherwise sober people do not find Trump’s insults and insane demands outrageous (Mexico will have to pay for a wall! Japan will have to pay for protection!) says something about a larger moral and cultural collapse. His language is the language of the comments sections of once-great newspapers. Their editors know that the online versions of their publications attract the vicious, the bigoted, and the foulmouthed. But they keep those comments sections going in the hope of getting eyeballs on the page. (…) The current problem goes beyond excruciatingly bad manners. What we increasingly lack, and have lacked for some time, is a sense of the moral underpinning of republican (small r) government. Manners and morals maintain a free state as much as laws do, as Tocqueville observed long ago, and when a certain culture of virtue dies, so too does something of what makes democracy work. Old-fashioned words like integrity, selflessness, frugality, gravitas, and modesty rarely rate a mention in modern descriptions of the good life—is it surprising that they don’t come up in politics, either? (…) Trump’s rise is only one among many signs that something has gone profoundly amiss in our popular culture.It is related to the hysteria that has swept through many campuses, as students call for the suppression of various forms of free speech and the provision of “safe spaces” where they will not be challenged by ideas with which they disagree. The rise of Trump and the fall of free speech in academia are equal signs that we are losing the intellectual sturdiness and honesty without which a republic cannot thrive. (…) The rot is cultural. It is no coincidence that Trump was the star of a “reality” show. He is the beneficiary of an amoral celebrity culture devoid of all content save an omnipresent lubriciousness. He is a kind of male Kim Kardashian, and about as politically serious. In the context of culture, if not (yet) politics, he is unremarkable; the daily entertainments of today are both tawdry and self-consciously, corrosively ironic. Ours is an age when young people have become used to getting news, of a sort, from Jon Stewart and Steven Colbert, when an earlier generation watched Walter Cronkite and David Brinkley. It is the difference between giggling with young, sneering hipsters and listening to serious adults. Go to YouTube and look at old episodes of Profiles in Courage, if you can find them—a wildly successful television series based on the book nominally authored by John F. Kennedy, which celebrated an individual’s, often a politician’s, courage in standing alone against a crowd, even a crowd with whose politics the audience agreed. The show of comparable popularity today is House of Cards. Bill Clinton has said that he loves it. American culture is, in short, nastier, more nihilistic, and far less inhibited than ever before. It breeds alternating bouts of cynicism and hysteria, and now it has given us Trump. The Republican Party as we know it may die of Trump. If it does, it will have succumbed in part because many of its leaders chose not to fight for the Party of Lincoln, which is a set of ideas about how to govern a country, rather than an organization clawing for political and personal advantage. What is at stake, however, is something much more precious than even a great political party. To an extent unimaginable for a very long time, the moral keel of free government is showing cracks. It is not easy to discern how we shall mend them. Eliot Cohen
Three major have-not powers are seeking to overturn the post-Cold War status quo: Russia in Eastern Europe, China in East Asia, Iran in the Middle East. All are on the march. To say nothing of the Islamic State, now extending its reach from Afghanistan to West Africa. The international order built over decades by the United States is crumbling. In the face of which, what does Obama do? Go to Cuba. Yes, Cuba. A supreme strategic irrelevance so dear to Obama’s anti-anti-communist heart. The international order built over decades by the United States is crumbling. Is he at least going to celebrate progress in human rights and democracy — which Obama established last year as a precondition for any presidential visit? Of course not. When has Obama ever held to a red line? Indeed, since Obama began his “historic” normalization with Cuba, the repression has gotten worse. Last month, the regime arrested 1,414 political dissidents, the second-most ever recorded. No matter. Amid global disarray and American decline, Obama sticks to his cherished concerns: Cuba, Guantanamo (about which he gave a rare televised address this week), and, of course, climate change. Obama could not bestir himself to go to Paris in response to the various jihadi atrocities — sending Kerry instead “to share a big hug with Paris” (as Kerry explained) with James Taylor singing “You’ve Got a Friend” — but he did make an ostentatious three-day visit there for climate change. More Foreign Policy The Costs of Abandoning Messy Wars Vladimir Putin and Bashar al-Assad Are Running U.S. Syria Policy With Disasters Everywhere, It’s Time to Take Foreign Policy Seriously Again So why not go to Havana? Sure, the barbarians are at the gates and pushing hard knowing they will enjoy but eleven more months of minimal American resistance. But our passive president genuinely believes that such advances don’t really matter — that these disrupters are so on the wrong side of history, that their reaches for territory, power, victory are so 20th century. Of course, it mattered greatly to the quarter-million slaughtered in Syria and the millions more exiled. It feels all quite real to a dissolving Europe, an expanding China, a rising Iran, a metastasizing jihadism. Not to the visionary Obama, however. He sees far beyond such ephemera. He knows what really matters: climate change, Gitmo, and Cuba. With time running out, he wants these to be his legacy. Indeed, they will be. Charles Krauthammer
Donald Trump has rightly reminded us during his campaign that Americans are sick and tired of costly overseas interventions. But what Trump forgets is that too often the world does not always enjoy a clear choice between good and bad, wise and stupid. Often the dilemma is the terrible choice between ignoring mass murderer, as in Rwanda or Syria; bombing and leaving utter chaos, as in Libya; and removing monsters, then enduring the long ordeal of trying to leave something better, as in Afghanistan and Iraq. The choices are all awful. But the idea that America can bomb a rogue regime, leave and expect something better is pure fantasy. Victor Davis Hanson
The candidacy of Donald Trump is the open sewer of American conservatism. This Super Tuesday, polls show a plurality of GOP voters intend to dive right into it, like the boy in the “Slumdog Millionaire” toilet scene. And they’re not even holding their noses. In recent weeks, Mr. Trump has endorsed the Code Pink view of the Iraq War (Bush lied; people died). He has cited and embraced an aphorism of Benito Mussolini. (“It’s a very good quote,” Mr. Trump told NBC’s Chuck Todd.) He has refused to release his “very beautiful” tax returns. And he has taken his time disavowing the endorsement of onetime Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard David Duke—offering, by way of a transparently dishonest excuse, that “I know nothing about David Duke.” Mr. Trump left the Reform Party in 2000 after Mr. Duke joined it. None of this seems to have made the slightest dent in Mr. Trump’s popularity. If anything it has enhanced it. In the species of political pornography in which Mr. Trump trafficks, the naughtier the better. The more respectable opinion is scandalized by whatever pops out of the Donald’s mouth, the more his supporters cheer him for sticking it to the snobs and the scolds. The more Mr. Trump traduces the old established lines of decency, the more he affirms his supporters’ most shameless ideological instincts. Those instincts have moved beyond the usual fare of a wall with Mexico, a trade war with China, Mr. Trump’s proposed Muslim Exclusion Act, or his scurrilous insinuations about the constitutionality of Ted Cruz’s or Marco Rubio’s presidential bids. What too many of Mr. Trump’s supporters want is an American strongman, a president who will make the proverbial trains run on time. This is a refrain I hear over and over again from Trump supporters, who want to bring a businessman’s efficiency to the federal government. If that means breaking with a few democratic niceties, so be it. (…) Mr. Trump exemplifies a new political wave sweeping the globe—leaders coming to power through democratic means while avowing illiberal ends. Hungary’s Viktor Orban is another case in point, as is Turkey’s Recep Tayyip Erdogan. A Trump presidency—neutral between dictatorships and democracies, opposed to free trade, skeptical of traditional U.S. defense alliances, hostile to immigration—would mark the collapse of the entire architecture of the U.S.-led post-World War II global order. We’d be back to the 1930s, this time with an America Firster firmly in charge. That’s the future Mr. Trump offers whether his supporters realize it or not. Bill Buckley and the other great shapers of modern conservatism—Barry Goldwater and Ronald Reagan, Robert Bartley and Irving Kristol—articulated a conservatism that married economic dynamism to a prudent respect for tradition, patriotism and openness to the wider world. Trumpism is the opposite of this creed: moral gaucherie plus economic nationalism plus Know Nothingism. It is the return of the American Mercury, minus for now (but only for now) the all-but inevitable anti-Semitism. It would be terrible to think that the left was right about the right all these years. Nativist bigotries must not be allowed to become the animating spirit of the Republican Party. If Donald Trump becomes the candidate, he will not win the presidency, but he will help vindicate the left’s ugly indictment. It will be left to decent conservatives to pick up the pieces—and what’s left of the party. Bret Stephens
The many millions of Americans who are sick of being called racist, chauvinist, homophobic, privileged or extremist every time they breathe feel that in Trump they have found their voice. Then there is that gnawing sense that under Obama, America has been transformed from history’s greatest winner into history’s biggest sucker. (…) Trump’s continuous exposition on his superhuman deal-making talents speaks to this fear. Trump’s ability to viscerally connect to the deep-seated concerns of American voters and assuage them frees him from the normal campaign requirement of developing plans to accomplish his campaign promises. (…) Trump’s supporters don’t care that his economic policies contradict one another. They don’t care that his foreign policy declarations are a muddle of contradictions. They hate the establishment and they want to believe him. (…) Because he knows how to viscerally connect to the public, Trump will undoubtedly be a popular president. But since he has no clear philosophical or ideological underpinning, his policies will likely be inconsistent and opportunistic.(…) In this, a Trump presidency will be a stark contrast to Obama’s hyper-ideological tenure in office. So, too, his presidency will be a marked contrast to a similarly ideologically driven Clinton or Sanders administration, since both will more or less continue to enact Obama’s domestic and foreign policies. (…) Like Trump, Johnson is able to tap into deep-seated public dissatisfaction with the political and cultural elites and serve as a voice for the disaffected. (…) If Johnson is able to convince a majority of British voters to support an exit from the EU, then several other EU member states are likely to follow in Britain’s wake. The exit of states from the EU will cause a political and economic upheaval in Europe with repercussions far beyond its borders. Just as a Trump presidency will usher in an era of high turbulence and uncertainty in US economic and foreign policies, so a post-breakup EU and Western Europe will replace Brussels’ consistent policies with policies that are more varied, and unstable. (…) If Trump is elected president and if Britain leads the charge of nations out of the EU, then Israel can expect its relations with both the US and Europe to be marked by turbulence and uncertainty that can lead in a positive direction or a negative direction, or even to both directions at the same time. (…) Just as Trump has stated both that he will support Israel and be neutral toward Israel, so we can expect for Trump to stand by Israel one day and to rebuke it angrily, even brutally, the next day. (…) So, too, under Trump, the US may send forces to confront Iran one day, only to announce that Trump is embarking on negotiations to get a sweetheart deal with the ayatollahs the next. Or perhaps all of these things will happen simultaneously. Caroline Glick
Les États-Unis semblent ne plus vouloir se laisser absorber par des crises qui ne correspondent pas à leur vision nouvelle de leurs intérêts nationaux. À Washington, les partisans d’un retrait des zones considérées comme « non-stratégiques » impriment leur marque. S’expliquent sans doute ainsi plusieurs épisodes politiques récents, notamment la non-réplique par frappes face à l’utilisation des armes chimiques par le régime de Damas, quelles qu’aient été les déclarations faites auparavant. Les causes de cette attitude font penser qu’il s’agit d’une tendance assez durable. Elle se fonde sur la volonté parfaitement compréhensible de recentrer la politique étrangère américaine sur ce qui est perçu comme ses principaux intérêts, notamment économiques, qui se trouveraient désormais davantage en Asie. Cette évolution s’appuie probablement aussi sur la nouvelle donne énergétique – les États-Unis vont redevenir exportateurs nets d’hydrocarbures. Cela fait suite, j’en suis absolument convaincu puisque cela résulte de conversations que j’ai avec les dirigeants actuels, au lourd traumatisme des interventions en Irak et en Afghanistan, au coût humain et financier extrêmement lourd pour un résultat guère probant. Il faut ajouter à tous ces déterminants la tendance actuelle – ce n’est pas simplement le cas d’ailleurs en Amérique – plutôt « isolationniste » de son opinion publique. Ce choix, qui je le répète est parfaitement compréhensible de la part des dirigeants actuels américains, comporte, compte tenu du rôle majeur des États-Unis, de nombreuses conséquences. Personne n’a aujourd’hui la capacité de prendre le relai des Américains, en particulier sur le plan militaire. Un désengagement américain, compte tenu de la puissance des États-Unis, c’est un désengagement tout court. Ce qui peut laisser des crises majeures « livrées à elles-mêmes ». (…) Nous comprenons parfaitement la réticence américaine à envoyer de nouveau des troupes sur le terrain moyen-oriental. Dans bien des cas, nous jugerions une autre attitude contraire aux intérêts de la région comme aux nôtres. Il ne peut s’agir de cela. Ce dont il s’agit, c’est d’éviter le vide stratégique qui risque de se créer, notamment au Moyen-Orient, et qui est favorisé par la perception, de la part des acteurs, que la vraie priorité américaine se trouve désormais ailleurs. J’entends cette inquiétude chez plusieurs partenaires importants de la France, qui intègrent de plus en plus dans leurs calculs, dans leurs prévisions, dans leurs réflexions, l’hypothèse qu’ils sont ou qu’ils vont être livrés à eux-mêmes dans le traitement de crises qui sont pourtant d’intérêt global. Laurent Fabius (13 novembre 2013)
Kagan — the preeminent neoconservative scholar and author who made headlines when President Obama improbably cited his article on “The Myth of American Decline,” and again when his cover story for The New Republic critiquing Obama’s foreign policy zipped through the West Wing — has had a major influence on Rubio’s worldview. The former adviser to politicians from Jack Kemp to Mitt Romney to Hillary Clinton says he spoke with Rubio on and off during his first two years in office, and Rubio cited Kagan’s 2012 book The World America Made in his remarks at the Brookings Institution later that year. In the book, Kagan argues that world orders are transient, and that the world order that has been shaped by the United States since the end of World War II — defined by freedom, democracy, and capitalism — will crumble if American power wanes. But he also posits that the modern world order rests not on America’s cherished ideals — respect for individual rights and human dignity — but on economic and military power, and that its preservation requires bolstering America’s hard power. The National Review (2014)
There is no denying that a globally engaged America comes at a steep price. But the history of our still young nation is full of warnings that a lack of American engagement comes with an even higher price of its own. We only have to look at the bloody history of the twentieth century to see the price that America, and the world, pays when we ignore mounting problems. When we have listened to voices urging us to look inward, we have failed to meet threats growing abroad until it was almost too late. And now, we are on the verge of repeating that mistake once again. Other nations are not sitting idly by waiting for America to, as President Obama termed it, “nation build at home.” Many of our nation’s adversaries and rivals have been emboldened by our uncertain foreign policy. So as instability spreads and tyrants flourish, our allies want to know whether America can still be counted on to confront these common challenges. Whether we will continue to be a beacon to the rest of the world. Just last week I read a speech on this very topic. But it was not delivered by some American neoconservative commentator, but rather by the Foreign Minister of France. He said about us, and I quote the English translation, “Nobody can take over from the Americans, especially from a military point of view. Given the power of the United States, an American ‘disengagement’ – if this would be the proper way to qualify it – is a global disengagement, with the risk of letting major crises fester on their own.” End quote. We are often led to think that other nations are tired of the role America has played in global affairs. But in fact, it is the fear of a disengaged America that worries countries all over the world. (…) Some on both the left and the right try to portray our legacy as one of an aggressive tyrant constantly meddling in the world’s crises. But ask around the world and you’ll find that our past use of military might has a different legacy. Our legacy is a crumbled wall in Berlin. It’s the millions of Afghan children – including many girls – now able to attend school for the first time. It’s vibrant democracies and steadfast allies such as Germany, Japan and South Korea. Our legacy is that of a nation that for two centuries has planted its feet and pushed out against the walls of tyranny, oppression and injustice that constantly threaten to close in on the world, and has sought to replace these forces with the spread of liberty, free enterprise, and respect for human rights. (…) From his first days in office, President Obama has seemed unsure of the role that American power and principles should play around the world. He has failed to understand that in foreign policy, the timing and decisiveness of our actions matter almost as much as how we engage. The President has spoken about the need to shift American foreign policy away from the conflicts of the Middle East and place increased focus on Asia. But our foreign policy cannot be one that picks and chooses which regions to pay attention to and which to ignore. In fact, our standing as a world power depends on our ability to engage globally anywhere and at anytime our interests are at stake. (…) The results have been devastating. We are left with the high likelihood of the worst possible outcome: a divided Syria, with a pro-Iran murderous dictator in control of part of the country, and radical jihadists in control of much of the rest.  Our closest allies in the region are now openly questioning the value of our friendship. (…) The President’s failure to negotiate a security cooperation agreement with Iraq was yet another instance in which this administration ambled aimlessly through a situation that should have prompted careful strategic maneuvering. It ensured the return of Al Qaeda to Iraq and the creeping authoritarianism of a Maliki government increasingly in the sway of Tehran. And in Afghanistan, the White House has often shown a lack of commitment that has put at risk the very real gains we and the Afghans have made. Libya, Syria, Iraq and maybe soon Afghanistan are haunting examples of the sad and predictable results that have come when this administration has gotten the policy – and just as importantly – the timing wrong. (…) We should start by acknowledging the fact that a strong and engaged America has been a force of tremendous good in the world. This can be done easily by imagining the sort of world we would live in today had America sat out the 20th Century. Imagine if the beaches of Normandy were never touched by American boots. Imagine if our foreign aid had not helped alleviate many of the world’s worst crises. Imagine if nuclear proliferation had continued unfettered by U.S. influence. It is no exaggeration to say that the majority of the world’s democracies may not exist had America remained disengaged. Marco Rubio (20 nov. 2013)

Attention: un héritage peut en cacher un autre !

A l’heure où obsédé par son héritage et après avoir accordé l’arme nucléaire aux bouchers iraniens, le président Obama prépare, au mépris tant du Congrès de son propre pays que des dissidents cubains, son énième danse avec les dictateurs

Et où rien ne semble désormais capable d’arrêter le rouleau compresseur Trump tant la révolte d’une bonne partie du peuple américain est grande face au véritable accident industriel que s’est révélé être la présidence Obama …

Pendant que face à la formidable créature – entre soutien, pour le plus grand profit des médias qui prétendent s’en offusquer, d’un ancien leader du KKK et citations de Mussolini – du Dr. Obamastein, les deux derniers recours qui restent ne se sont toujours pas sérieusement attaqué à ses véritables vulnérabilités notamment sur le plan fiscal et surtout se refusent toujours à sacrifier leur ambition personnelle pour le bien de leur pays …

Et que contre le politiquement correct ambiant, des oscars si décriés viennent de remettre tant un pape si volontiers donneur de leçons que nos croisés noirs multimillionnaires de la diversité à leur place en récompensant par deux fois un film dénonçant la longue omerta sur la pédophilie de prêtres catholiques et un réalisateur mexicain

Comment ne pas repenser à un autre héritage celui-là oublié …

Que rappelaient il y a trois ans tant indirectement le ministre français des affaires étrangères Laurent Fabius

Qu’explicitement et à quelques jours de distance le futur candidat aux primaires républicaines Marco Rubio

Suite, entre l’Irak et la Syrie, aux deux des décisions les plus catastrophiques de l’actuelle Administration américaine …

A savoir celui de l’engagement américain du 20e siècle sans lequel le Monde libre actuel n’aurait pas été possible ?

Et donc comment ne pas voir aussi …

Tant pour rattraper ce qui peut l’être des dégâts des deux mandats Obama …

Que prévenir ceux d’une éventuelle et potentiellement tout aussi catastrophique présidence Trump …

La nécessité de la candidature de celui dont les meilleurs politologues américains du moment, comme l’ancien conseiller de Reagan Robert Kagan, pensent et disent le plus grand bien ?

Nov 20 2013
Rubio Delivers Major Foreign Policy Speech At AEI
Rubio: “Diplomacy, foreign assistance and military intervention are tools at our disposal. But foreign policy cannot be simply about tactics. It must be strategic, with a clear set of goals that guide us in deciding how to apply our influence. These goals should be to protect and defend our people, to promote liberty and human rights throughout the world, and to advance the enduring pursuit of peace for all mankind.”

U.S. Senator Marco Rubio
“Restoring Principle: A Foreign Policy Worthy of the American Dream”
Remarks As Prepared For Delivery
American Enterprise Institute
Washington, D.C.
November 20, 2013

Thank you very much to AEI for hosting me today. This Institute has been at the center of the debate about American foreign policy for decades, and the work your scholars produce on a daily basis has been a great help to me throughout my efforts on these issues in the United States Senate.

Like so many times before, our country is engaged in a robust debate about the future of America’s role in the world.

As we engage in this debate, those of us entrusted with a role in our government must remember that the nature and extent of our involvement abroad isn’t just some academic discussion. Our decisions directly impact each and every American, often in personal and profound ways.

Over the last twelve years, thousands have lost mothers, fathers, sons and daughters as part of our effort to defeat terrorism and bring freedom to Iraq and Afghanistan. And these sacrifices have left many Americans feeling understandably weary. The effort has taken longer and cost far more than expected, and we are heartbroken each time we learn the name of another brave American who will not return home.

Many are also discouraged by the news coming out of the Middle East. The disputes in this region seem to pit one bad actor against another, leaving us with doubts about whether we should pick a side at all. And despite the sacrifices we have made, America remains the target of hatred and anger in the Arab street.

Add to these concerns the fact that, for many Americans, a focus on other nations seems misplaced when there are so many problems at home. This leads many to question whether our government should spend time and resources on the freedom and security of someone an ocean away. After all, what do we gain from such involvement?

These are all understandable sentiments. And they have created an opening for voices that have long desired to disengage and isolate America from the world. Their rhetoric is more careful than the isolationists of the past. But their actions speak clearly. On issue after issue, these voices have used the increasing uncertainty abroad and the economic insecurity at home to argue that it’s best for America to stay on the sidelines.

There is no denying that a globally engaged America comes at a steep price. But the history of our still young nation is full of warnings that a lack of American engagement comes with an even higher price of its own.

We only have to look at the bloody history of the twentieth century to see the price that America, and the world, pays when we ignore mounting problems. When we have listened to voices urging us to look inward, we have failed to meet threats growing abroad until it was almost too late. And now, we are on the verge of repeating that mistake once again.

Other nations are not sitting idly by waiting for America to, as President Obama termed it, “nation build at home.” Many of our nation’s adversaries and rivals have been emboldened by our uncertain foreign policy.

So as instability spreads and tyrants flourish, our allies want to know whether America can still be counted on to confront these common challenges. Whether we will continue to be a beacon to the rest of the world.

Just last week I read a speech on this very topic. But it was not delivered by some American neoconservative commentator, but rather by the Foreign Minister of France. He said about us, and I quote the English translation, “Nobody can take over from the Americans, especially from a military point of view. Given the power of the United States, an American ‘disengagement’ – if this would be the proper way to qualify it – is a global disengagement, with the risk of letting major crises fester on their own.” End quote.

We are often led to think that other nations are tired of the role America has played in global affairs. But in fact, it is the fear of a disengaged America that worries countries all over the world.

Meanwhile, at home, foreign policy is too often covered in simplistic terms. Many only recognize two points of view: “doves”, who seek to isolate us from the world, participating in global events only when there is a direct physical threat to the safety of our homeland; and “hawks”, who believe we should use our mighty military strength to intervene in response to practically every crisis.

These labels are obsolete. They come from the world of the past.

The time has now come for a new vision for America’s role abroad- one that reflects the reality of the world we live in today.

It begins by being proud of what we have achieved as a nation. Some on both the left and the right try to portray our legacy as one of an aggressive tyrant constantly meddling in the world’s crises.

But ask around the world and you’ll find that our past use of military might has a different legacy. Our legacy is a crumbled wall in Berlin. It’s the millions of Afghan children – including many girls – now able to attend school for the first time. It’s vibrant democracies and steadfast allies such as Germany, Japan and South Korea.

Our legacy is that of a nation that for two centuries has planted its feet and pushed out against the walls of tyranny, oppression and injustice that constantly threaten to close in on the world, and has sought to replace these forces with the spread of liberty, free enterprise, and respect for human rights.

These principles are also advanced by other elements of American influence – those that don’t require any military might.

For example, consider the countless lives we’ve saved from the scourge of AIDS in Africa through the PEPFAR program. Or consider the economic mobility created by American trade and investment.

These accomplishments prove that, while military might may be our most eye-catching method of involvement abroad, it is far from being our most often utilized. In most cases, the decisive use of diplomacy, foreign assistance, and economic power are the most effective ways to achieve our interests and stop problems before they spiral into crises.

Our uses of these methods should vastly outnumber our uses of force. But force used with clear, achievable objectives must always remain a part of our foreign policy toolbox. Because, while we always prefer peace over conflict, sometimes our enemies choose differently.

Sometimes military engagement is our best option. And sometimes it’s our only option.

In those instances, it must be abundantly clear to both our allies and our adversaries that we will not hesitate to engage unparalleled military might on behalf of our security, the security of our allies and our interests around the world.

Diplomacy, foreign assistance and military intervention are tools at our disposal. But foreign policy cannot be simply about tactics. It must be strategic, with a clear set of goals that guide us in deciding how to apply our influence.

These goals should be to protect and defend our people, to promote liberty and human rights throughout the world, and to advance the enduring pursuit of peace for all mankind.

A strategic foreign policy vision based on these principles is what I hope to offer here today.

In order to do this, we must first admit that this administration lacks a clear strategic foreign policy.

From his first days in office, President Obama has seemed unsure of the role that American power and principles should play around the world. He has failed to understand that in foreign policy, the timing and decisiveness of our actions matter almost as much as how we engage.

The President has spoken about the need to shift American foreign policy away from the conflicts of the Middle East and place increased focus on Asia. But our foreign policy cannot be one that picks and chooses which regions to pay attention to and which to ignore. In fact, our standing as a world power depends on our ability to engage globally anywhere and at anytime our interests are at stake.

But this administration’s lack of an overriding vision of our role in the world has impeded our ability to do this effectively. And nowhere is this failure more evident than in the President’s handling of policy toward Central Asia and the Middle East.

For example, when he first took office, President Obama hoped that kind words would dissuade the regime in Tehran from its pursuit of nuclear weapons. And so in June of 2009, while Iranians were being gunned down by their rulers in the streets, the President hesitated to offer any words of support because he didn’t want to offend Iran’s leaders.

Also that summer, he waited for months before agreeing to provide our commanders in Afghanistan with the troops they requested. He also put a time limit on the surge of forces, which undermined our efforts and invited our enemies to wait us out. He seemed to regret the tough rhetoric of his campaign, when he promised day after day that Afghanistan was a “war we must win.”

In early 2011, when waves of peaceful protests began to sweep dictators from power across the region, this administration’s lack of a strategic foreign policy left it uncertain of how to respond.

When a peaceful revolution was met with brute force in Libya, the President hesitated for months before helping to overthrow the Qaddafi regime. And afterward, he provided almost no support to those Libyans who wanted to establish a representative, law-abiding government. As a result, chaos replaced tyranny and four Americans, including our ambassador, were murdered with impunity. And now Libya is becoming a safe haven for terrorists and a source of instability in the region.

The debacle in Syria also illustrates the cost of President Obama’s lack of a strategic foreign policy. More than two years ago, I urged the President to exercise American influence at a time when we clearly had the ability to shape the outcome of the Syrian war – not through military action, but by working with an opposition that was not yet dominated by an influx of Al Qaeda-linked extremists.

But it was only when Bashar al-Assad employed chemical weapons, blatantly crossing the President’s own red line, that the conflict finally got a measurable – though very small — response from the White House. But by then, it was too late.

Because he never took the time before to explain how and why the conflict in Syria should matter to America, he was unable to rally the nation to support military intervention. I voted against President Obama’s plan for military action because he had no strategy beyond symbolic missile strikes. Nor did he explain what would happen following these strikes, which were publicly promised to be “unbelievably small,” when Assad would inevitably emerge to boast that his regime had survived our use of force. Ultimately, the President was forced to abandon these plans and turn to Vladimir Putin to broker a solution.

The results have been devastating.

We are left with the high likelihood of the worst possible outcome: a divided Syria, with a pro-Iran murderous dictator in control of part of the country, and radical jihadists in control of much of the rest.  Our closest allies in the region are now openly questioning the value of our friendship.

Our best options now are to alleviate the strain on our allies in the region through additional humanitarian assistance, to explore other ways of pressuring the Assad regime with sanctions, to cut off financial flows to extremists in the opposition, and to see if we can still find moderate elements to train and equip.

The President’s failure to negotiate a security cooperation agreement with Iraq was yet another instance in which this administration ambled aimlessly through a situation that should have prompted careful strategic maneuvering. It ensured the return of Al Qaeda to Iraq and the creeping authoritarianism of a Maliki government increasingly in the sway of Tehran. And in Afghanistan, the White House has often shown a lack of commitment that has put at risk the very real gains we and the Afghans have made.

Libya, Syria, Iraq and maybe soon Afghanistan are haunting examples of the sad and predictable results that have come when this administration has gotten the policy – and just as importantly – the timing wrong.

Now, clearly we can’t undo what’s been done. But we need to ask ourselves, “What can we do about this going forward?”

We should start by acknowledging the fact that a strong and engaged America has been a force of tremendous good in the world. This can be done easily by imagining the sort of world we would live in today had America sat out the 20th Century.

Imagine if the beaches of Normandy were never touched by American boots. Imagine if our foreign aid had not helped alleviate many of the world’s worst crises. Imagine if nuclear proliferation had continued unfettered by U.S. influence. It is no exaggeration to say that the majority of the world’s democracies may not exist had America remained disengaged.

Next we must acknowledge that there are threats to America today that are just as dire, just as pressing as any we faced in the last century.

Guided by these two realities, we must construct a strategic foreign policy that keeps Americans safe, promotes our national interests, and remains true to our guiding principles of liberty and human rights.

Such a strategy must be based on the idea that our highest priority is the safety of the American people. That is why there is no more important use of our influence and power than to prevent rogue regimes and terrorist groups from acquiring weapons of mass destruction. If states with sinister intentions, or that are under the influence of extremist groups, were to acquire nuclear weapons, they would become largely immune to external pressure. And they would surely spark other nations to join this so-called “nuclear club.”

This new arms race would dramatically increase the chances of nuclear war and render most of our other foreign objectives meaningless.

Consider Iran’s desire to gain nuclear weapons and North Korea’s continued investment in its ballistic missile and nuclear programs. Both threaten regional and global stability, and of course the safety of billions around the world, including here in America.

When it comes to Iran, we should make no mistake: its leaders want nuclear weapons because they want to become the most dominant power in the Middle East.

Many in the region are looking to us for leadership. But too many of our allies and strategic partners see our foreign policy as a riddle and our actions as inconsistent with our rhetoric. They only see movements toward disengagement and feel that we’re overly eager to negotiate a deal with Iran.

We must demonstrate a willingness to maintain an unwavering position of strength in all talks, because Iran’s goal at the negotiating table has never been peace, but rather to win relief from sanctions without making irreversible concessions. We need to make absolutely clear to Iran’s leaders that sanctions will continue to increase until they agree to completely abandon any enrichment or reprocessing capability.  We must also remember that those sitting across the table from us, however modern they may seem, are the representatives of a brutal regime that continues its sponsorship of terrorism and deprives its people of their fundamental rights.

Another key to tackling the challenges posed by these nuclear rogues is maintaining an effective deterrent, not merely hoping that unilateral disarmament will lead the Irans or North Koreas of the world to follow our lead.  We should seek to establish flexible, adaptable groups of like-minded states to counter the threats posed by weapons of mass destruction, rather than solely relying on arms control agreements that are often not worth the paper they’re written on.

We must also address the threat posed by those regimes that may lack advanced capabilities, but that remain determined to undermine our strategic interests.

For example, we have seen the strong grip that anti-American sentiments have on some Latin American governments. Venezuela and Bolivia in particular have developed a troubling affinity for Iran. And Cuba was recently caught trafficking in weapons systems with North Korea in blatant violation of multiple UN Security Council Resolutions.

Despite these actions, the White House has remained passive as these nations and their anti-American allies assault the freedom of their own people and undermine the stability of their neighbors.

But this administration has shown more than just a reluctance to stand up to our enemies; it has also shown a reluctance to stand with our friends.

Look no further than Latin America to see examples of the benefits of rewarding our friends. Our support of our democratic allies in Colombia and Mexico are two examples of how patience and principles pay off.

We need to build on this progress by considering a new security agreement for the Western Hemisphere that includes our Canadian and Latin American partners and allows us to work together to solve the more difficult problems facing our region.

For instance, we should consider ways to expand cooperation among our security forces. This would enable us to better focus our efforts to stop illicit human, narcotics and weapons trafficking in the hemisphere.

On the energy front, the Western Hemisphere needs to establish itself as a democratic, peaceful and stable alternative to the Middle East. Approving the Keystone pipeline and authorizing the U.S.-Mexico Transboundary Agreement are good first steps. We should also continue to cultivate the shale revolution here in the United States and leverage it to increase our geopolitical presence.

We’ve seen that great things can be achieved when the United States partners with key allies. This lesson extends to Asia as well, where the bedrock of our interests in furthering peace, security, liberty and prosperity is our alliances with democratic governments.

This administration’s rhetorical focus on the Asian region is welcome. But as China rises and becomes increasingly assertive, many of its neighbors look to the United States’ handling of events in the Middle East – and the cuts to our defense budget – and remain unconvinced that America is going to be there if the going gets tough.

This is unfortunate, because there are real success stories in the region. Japan is a perennial reminder of how democracy and free enterprise can transform a foreign power from a dangerous adversary into a lasting friend. Now, the Abe government is examining ways in which Japan can use its military outside of narrow self-defense missions. We should wholeheartedly support these efforts.

Taiwan shows that traditional Chinese culture and democracy can coexist and even flourish.  We should explore ways to deepen our relationship with Taiwan through bilateral trade agreements and by working together on economic reforms so that they can eventually join the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Together with Japan, South Korea, Australia, India, and others, our goal is not to “contain” China. But rather to ensure that China’s rise remains peaceful.

We celebrate the fact that millions of people in China have emerged from generations of poverty into the middle class. We remain hopeful that China’s leaders would use their growing influence to engage as a responsible world power. But we cannot ignore their increasingly assertive and illegitimate territorial claims. And we cannot ignore the human rights violations that happen as a matter of state policy.

Our renewed focus on Asia does not need to come at the expense of our longstanding alliances in Europe. We can and must do both.

In Europe, we need to build on the expanding community of close American allies that are essential economic and strategic partners.  Key to this goal is ensuring that our efforts to engage with Russia do not undermine our allies, many of whom face threats from their much larger neighbor to the east.

We must establish a consistent willingness to speak out when the Russian government steps over the line, particularly with regard to human rights abuses.

This should be part of a broader initiative on America’s part to retain our legacy as the world’s leading defender of human rights. For all the progress we have made in promoting the dignity of every man, woman and child, there are still outrageous human rights abuses occurring in all parts of the world — yes, even here in America.

Consider modern day slavery in the form of human trafficking, which subjects the most vulnerable to a life of bondage and abuse. This is a problem that America must do more to combat, not just abroad but in our very own backyards. Modern day slavery exists in every state in America, including my home state of Florida.

Another human rights outrage that remains prevalent around the world is the systematic, often violent persecution of religious minorities. Christians in particular are increasingly targeted for persecution throughout the world. Protecting the rights of every person to worship in accordance with their faith must always be a clear priority of the United States, and that will require us to speak firmly to our adversaries and frankly to our friends.

Furthermore, when it comes to human rights and humanitarian causes, we must put our money where our mouth is by conditioning our foreign assistance to reflect our values and interests.

Consider the good that America has done to alleviate suffering in the Philippines after Typhoon Haiyan. Our nation is providing the Filipino people with desperately needed humanitarian assistance, and has deployed some of our men and women in uniform to assist with the effort. Our people are also demonstrating how the power of private charitable giving can be just as influential as our government aid dollars.

Also on the foreign aid front, I am currently working to ensure that our assistance to Egypt is conditioned so that it advances our long-term goal of a stable, democratic Egypt, something that will not be possible if we recklessly cut all assistance to that country.

For all the good that American foreign aid does, I believe there is an even clearer and bolder gift we can offer to the cause of human rights. And that is the spread of liberty.

America’s success in remaining a beacon for freedom has been due in part to our extensive public diplomacy efforts.

But we should continue to come up with creative ways to utilize new technologies that aid in the spread of news and information. Because ultimately, as we’ve seen with the Arab Spring, ease of communication and the spread of knowledge has proven a surefire way to spark the fire of liberty.

But tyrants know this, too. Cuba is a case in point.

They have successfully worked to restrict their people’s access to information in a variety of ways, including strictly controlling Internet access. We should transition our information programs from focusing only on content to focusing on access as well, particularly access that’s not subject to regime scrutiny.

In addition to easing the flow of knowledge and communication around the world, we need to ensure progress is made in easing the flow of commerce. Expanding free and fair trade will create job opportunities for our own people and will have a profound impact in lowering poverty abroad. Concluding TPP with our Asian partners and TTIP with Europe should both be top priorities given their potential to reinvigorate our alliances in key regions and spread economic opportunity at home.

Congress must avoid the false allure of protectionist policies. America’s economic might has always been linked to our openness. We can work to maintain this openness by extending access to our Visa Waiver Program to key allies such as South Korea, Poland, and others in Central Europe.

We must find ways to make the visa application process less burdensome for those wishing to travel and do business in the United States. For instance, many Brazilians are interested in visiting Florida’s tourist attractions, but take their business elsewhere due to onerous visa procedures. Simplifying this process would be a positive move toward friendly nations and a boon to our nation’s economy.

These proposals I’ve just discussed are investments in our future.  All are tools that can be utilized to prevent crises and, if necessary, respond once they occur. But sometimes, despite our best efforts, diplomacy and global engagement will fail to prevent or solve a threat to our security. And in those instances we need to have the world’s most advanced intelligence capabilities.

We must respond to the valid concerns of Americans who are alarmed by reports regarding their civil liberties, but we must distinguish these reasonable concerns from conspiracy theories sparked by Edward Snowden. This man is a traitor who has sought assistance and refuge from some of the world’s most notorious violators of liberty and human rights.

Our intelligence programs need to be carefully monitored and controlled.  But we do need them. Because terrorists don’t use carrier pigeons. They use cell phones and the Internet, adapting the latest technologies to aid their malign intent. We need to be prepared to intercept the messages of those who wish us harm, while not interfering in the affairs of ordinary citizens.

Those of us tasked with providing oversight to these programs, starting with the President, need to be honest with the American people about the daily threats that we face. We must explain why these programs, in a limited and carefully managed form, are necessary to protect the security of all Americans.

Similarly, our fiscal challenges at home have even caused some, including a few Republicans, to question why so much defense spending is necessary. I believe the Department of Defense, like any government agency, should be efficient and eliminate all waste from its budget. But the fact is that President Obama has been making dangerous cuts to the defense budget since entering office. Our uniformed military leaders and the past three Secretaries of Defense all agree that these cuts, when coupled with those imposed by sequestration, threaten military preparedness.

This would lead to the same problems we faced in the 90’s. These massive cuts will tempt our adversaries to test us, scare our allies, and leave America vulnerable to attack.

To lift the sequester we must find a real, lasting solution to the true cause of our growing national debt: the unsustainable path of important programs like Medicare and Social Security.

None of this will be easy. It will be tempting to think we can ignore chaos abroad and shift more resources to projects at home.

But America must not fail to recognize her vital role in the world.

During the 20th Century, our power, our influence and most importantly our example, has been the preeminent driver of the spread of liberty and peace throughout the globe.

But now we find ourselves in a new century. And voices in both parties argue that we can no longer afford to play this role. And that even if we could, it is not our place to do so.

But this is not a new argument. It is an old one. It is a failed one.

History has proven time and again that when a powerful nation loses or abandons its role in the world, it leaves behind a vacuum that other nations will rush to fill.

And so I ask you: if America stops leading, who will fill the vacuum we leave behind? Is there a candidate nation for this role that can offer the security and benevolence that America can? Is there any other nation we can trust to spread the values of liberty and peace and democracy? There is not.

In our hearts, Americans understand this. But we are tired from the conflicts of the last decade. We are frustrated that our efforts are so often unappreciated. And we wonder – with all the problems that need addressing here in America – why should we focus so much energy abroad?

The answer is that foreign policy is domestic policy. So much of what happens here at home is directly related to what is happening abroad.

When liberty and economic prosperity spread, they create markets for our products, visitors to our tourist destinations, partners for our businesses, investors for our ideas, and jobs for our people.

But when liberty is denied and economic desperation take root, it affects us here at home. It breeds radicalism and terror. It drives illegal immigration. It leads to humanitarian crises that we are compelled to address.

Many understand this. But we are made anxious by the polling and trends that show an increasingly skeptical public. It is important for those of us that share this vision for an active America to remember that we need to bring the American people with us. Americans, especially those outside this city, need their leaders to make a compelling case for the importance of international engagement.

This is important because, in the end, these successes abroad belong to the entirety of the American people. It is the American people who for generations have manned America’s military, defended our freedom and built our economic might. It is the American people who’ve engaged the world through private, charitable, and religious efforts, and have represented this country overseas in greater ways than any diplomat can hope to.

The darkness of tyranny and oppression always seems to spread with discouraging ease. Sadly, this darkness will always be a dominant force in our world. But we must never allow it to become the dominant force in our world.

We can do that. Because as we’ve seen, the light of liberty can drive this darkness away. It can illuminate the potential of a nation. It can brighten the stability of a region. It can reveal the hope of a lasting peace.

Every American can agree that the light of peace and liberty would benefit our world. But who will spread it if not America?

There is no other nation that can. And that is why, despite the challenges we face here at home, America must continue to hold this torch. America must continue to lead the way.

Voir aussi:

The Neocons Return

Eliana Johnson

October 6, 2014

Meet their 2016 candidate, Marco Rubio. The neocons are back. That is, at least in Marco Rubio’s world. The Florida senator and potential 2016 presidential candidate has, since his election in 2010, regularly consulted with and sought the advice of top neoconservative writers and policymakers, several of whom served in the administration of George W. Bush.

His loose circle of advisers includes former national-security adviser Stephen Hadley, former deputy national-security adviser Elliott Abrams, Brookings Institution scholar and former Reagan-administration aide Robert Kagan, Weekly Standard editor Bill Kristol, and former Missouri senator Jim Talent.

To this group, beating back the rising tide of non-interventionism in the Republican party is a top priority, and they consider Rubio a candidate, if not the candidate, capable of doing so. “I think it’s very important that any isolationist arguments be defeated well and be defeated early,” says a neoconservative foreign-policy expert who talks with Rubio frequently.

Russia’s incursion into Ukraine, a war in Israel, and the rise of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria have in the course of a few months made the American public, and especially Republican-primary voters, more hawkish. Some argue that these events have dimmed the prospects that Kentucky senator Rand Paul, who has carved out a niche for himself as the leading non-interventionist in the Republican party, could seize the nomination. Unquestionably, the crises have boosted Rubio’s stock.

“We’re in an international crisis of really significant proportions, the likes of which we haven’t seen in decades,” says the Brookings Institution’s Kagan. “We’ve all been very sympathetic to people worried about going crosswise with the Republican base, but I really think we’re past that. From my perspective, I’m only going to be interested in people who are willing to say the hard things.” For Kagan, that includes arguing for an increase in the defense budget and being frank both about the need to use force when necessary and about America’s role as the world’s preeminent power.

But it’s not just current events that have drawn serious foreign-policy thinkers to Rubio. Since his election four years ago, the first-term senator has consistently articulated a robust internationalist position closest to that of George W. Bush. His outside advisers say he impressed them from the beginning as somebody who took foreign affairs seriously; since then he has built up a record of accomplishment during his four years in the Senate, where he serves on the foreign-relations and intelligence committees.

The experts I spoke with made it clear they have not signed up with Rubio, and nearly all speak with, and speak highly of, other potential candidates. But it is Rubio who garners their highest praise.

“From very early on he was clearly someone who was deciding to take foreign policy seriously,” says Kagan, “I thought he spoke remarkably intelligently.”

Elliott Abrams first spoke with Rubio when he was running for the Senate in 2010. “We had a mutual friend who said to me, ‘He has no experience in the Middle East, but obviously it’s a big issue in Florida, would you be willing to talk to him?’” Abrams says. “We got on the phone, and he said, ‘Let’s do it this way: Let me tell you what I think about the Middle East, and then you tell me what I’ve left out that’s important and what I’ve got wrong.’” Rubio, Abrams says, didn’t have anything wrong. “I was really impressed,” he tells me. “I don’t think there are very many state politicians who could have, off the cuff, done a six-or-seven minute riff on the Middle East.”

Rubio’s disciplined and methodical approach to foreign policy — he has articulated his views over the past two years in several speeches around the world — presents a stark contrast, say multiple foreign-policy experts, to that of his tea-party colleague Ted Cruz. A Cruz adviser last week told National Journal that the Texas senator will almost certainly mount a presidential bid in 2016 and plans to run on a “foreign-policy platform.”

“Whereas Rubio clearly has some views that he has considered and articulated, my sense of Cruz is that he is much less formed by conviction,” says one foreign-policy expert who has met with both potential candidates. “His background was really more on the domestic side.”

Cruz has repeatedly said he embraces a Reaganite foreign policy. He made headlines in recent weeks for walking out of an event when a group of Arab Christians booed his vocal defense of Israel, and he has used his seat on the Armed Services Committee to travel abroad during his time in office. But those I spoke with were, across the board, unimpressed. They universally characterized his worldview as shallow, opportunistic, and ever shifting to where he perceives the base of the party to be.

A former senior Bush administration defense official criticized the Texas senator in particular for his failure, as a member of the Armed Services Committee, to advocate for raising the defense budget. “He’s basically not done anything that I’m aware of to put an end to the hemorrhaging in the Defense Department, so it rings a little hollow,” he says. “It’s one thing to posture, it’s another thing to have a consistent policy. That doesn’t mean he couldn’t develop one. I don’t want to write him up as a lost cause, but he has a long way to go before he could be considered on the same bar as Rubio, considered to have a coherent world view.”

Over the summer, Rubio was briefed on the findings of the National Defense Panel, led by former Missouri senator Jim Talent and former undersecretary of defense for policy Eric Edelman, and the senator used a major speech last month to sound the alarm about the recent cuts to the defense budget and argue for ramping it back up.

Kagan — the preeminent neoconservative scholar and author who made headlines when President Obama improbably cited his article on “The Myth of American Decline,” and again when his cover story for The New Republic critiquing Obama’s foreign policy zipped through the West Wing — has had a major influence on Rubio’s worldview.

The former adviser to politicians from Jack Kemp to Mitt Romney to Hillary Clinton says he spoke with Rubio on and off during his first two years in office, and Rubio cited Kagan’s 2012 book The World America Made in his remarks at the Brookings Institution later that year. In the book, Kagan argues that world orders are transient, and that the world order that has been shaped by the United States since the end of World War II — defined by freedom, democracy, and capitalism — will crumble if American power wanes. But he also posits that the modern world order rests not on America’s cherished ideals — respect for individual rights and human dignity — but on economic and military power, and that its preservation requires bolstering America’s hard power.

Rubio has echoed that view over the past two years. “We should start by acknowledging the fact that a strong and engaged America has been a force of tremendous good in the world,” Rubio said in Washington, D.C., last year. “This can be done easily by imagining the sort of world we would live in today had America sat out the 20th century.” He pushed back in December last year, in a speech he gave in London about the lasting importance of the transatlantic alliance, on those he described as “weary from decades of global engagement.” In Seoul, South Korea, a month later, he lamented that many in Congress are “increasingly skeptical about why America needs to remain so active in international affairs.”

Rubio’s views are strikingly similar to those that guided George W. Bush as he began navigating the post-9/11 world. “Foreign policy is domestic policy,” Rubio told an audience at the American Enterprise Institute in November of last year. “When liberty is denied and economic desperation take root, it affects us here at home. It breeds radicalism and terror. It drives illegal immigration. It leads to humanitarian crises that we are compelled to address.” It was Bush who in his 2002 National Security Strategy argued that “the distinction between domestic and foreign affairs is increasingly diminishing,” because “events beyond America’s borders have a greater impact inside them.”

The key difference, according to Kagan, is that Bush, who campaigned in 2000 on a platform of scaling back American involvement in the world, “had a revelation after September 11,” whereas Rubio comes by his position more organically.

However unfairly, Bush’s approach to foreign affairs has become inextricably associated with the invasion of Iraq, and few Republicans are willing to stand wholeheartedly behind it anymore. I asked a Rubio aide if the senator fears associating himself too closely with the Bush clan or with Bush’s foreign policy, and whether Rubio might be making himself vulnerable to an attack that a Rubio presidency would be George W. Bush’s third term. No, the aide replies, adding that “a lot of the foreign-policy issues that the next president is going to deal with are different than they were 20 years ago.”

Regardless, Rubio may indeed become vulnerable to the charge that he is another neocon like Bush, surrounded by some of the same people and informed by essentially the same views.

The day when Republican-primary voters go to the polls is still a long way off, but it feels as if a number of conservative foreign-policy thinkers have already cast their vote.

— Eliana Johnson is Washington editor of National Review.

 Voir encore:

Staring at the Conservative Gutter

Donald Trump gives credence to the left’s caricature of bigoted conservatives.

In the late 1950s, Bill Buckley decreed that nobody whose name appeared on the masthead of the American Mercury magazine would be published in the pages of National Review. The once-illustrious Mercury of H.L. Mencken had become a gutter of far-right anti-Semites. Buckley would not allow his magazine to be tainted by them.

The word for Buckley’s act is “lustration,” and for two generations it upheld the honor of the mainstream conservative movement. Liberals may have been fond of claiming that Republicans were all closet bigots and that tax cuts were a form of racial prejudice, but the accusation rang hollow because the evidence for it was so tendentious.

Not anymore. The candidacy of Donald Trump is the open sewer of American conservatism. This Super Tuesday, polls show a plurality of GOP voters intend to dive right into it, like the boy in the “Slumdog Millionaire” toilet scene. And they’re not even holding their noses.

In recent weeks, Mr. Trump has endorsed the Code Pink view of the Iraq War (Bush lied; people died). He has cited and embraced an aphorism of Benito Mussolini. (“It’s a very good quote,” Mr. Trump told NBC’s Chuck Todd.) He has refused to release his “very beautiful” tax returns. And he has taken his time disavowing the endorsement of onetime Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard David Duke—offering, by way of a transparently dishonest excuse, that “I know nothing about David Duke.” Mr. Trump left the Reform Party in 2000 after Mr. Duke joined it.

None of this seems to have made the slightest dent in Mr. Trump’s popularity. If anything it has enhanced it. In the species of political pornography in which Mr. Trump trafficks, the naughtier the better. The more respectable opinion is scandalized by whatever pops out of the Donald’s mouth, the more his supporters cheer him for sticking it to the snobs and the scolds. The more Mr. Trump traduces the old established lines of decency, the more he affirms his supporters’ most shameless ideological instincts.

Those instincts have moved beyond the usual fare of a wall with Mexico, a trade war with China, Mr. Trump’s proposed Muslim Exclusion Act, or his scurrilous insinuations about the constitutionality of Ted Cruz’s or Marco Rubio’s presidential bids.

What too many of Mr. Trump’s supporters want is an American strongman, a president who will make the proverbial trains run on time. This is a refrain I hear over and over again from Trump supporters, who want to bring a businessman’s efficiency to the federal government. If that means breaking with a few democratic niceties, so be it.

Mr. Trump is happy to indulge the taste. “I hear the Rickets [sic] family, who own the Chicago Cubs, are secretly spending $’s against me,” Mr. Trump tweeted Feb. 22 about the Ricketts family of T.D. Ameritrade fame. “They better be careful, they have a lot to hide!” What happens when Mr. Trump starts sending similar tweets as president? The question isn’t an idle one, since the candidate has also promised to “open up the libel laws” as president so he can more easily sue hostile journalists. Is trashing the First Amendment another plank in making America great again?

No wonder Mr. Trump earns such lavish praise not only from Mr. Duke or Vladimir Putin, but also from French ur-fascist Jean Marie Le Pen, who once described Nazi Germany’s gas chambers as “a detail of history” and now says that if he were American he’d vote for Mr. Trump, “may God protect him.” With the instinct of house flies, they recognize the familiar smell, and they want more of it.

Mr. Trump exemplifies a new political wave sweeping the globe—leaders coming to power through democratic means while avowing illiberal ends. Hungary’s Viktor Orban is another case in point, as is Turkey’s Recep Tayyip Erdogan. A Trump presidency—neutral between dictatorships and democracies, opposed to free trade, skeptical of traditional U.S. defense alliances, hostile to immigration—would mark the collapse of the entire architecture of the U.S.-led post-World War II global order. We’d be back to the 1930s, this time with an America Firster firmly in charge.

That’s the future Mr. Trump offers whether his supporters realize it or not. Bill Buckley and the other great shapers of modern conservatism—Barry Goldwater and Ronald Reagan, Robert Bartley and Irving Kristol—articulated a conservatism that married economic dynamism to a prudent respect for tradition, patriotism and openness to the wider world. Trumpism is the opposite of this creed: moral gaucherie plus economic nationalism plus Know Nothingism. It is the return of the American Mercury, minus for now (but only for now) the all-but inevitable anti-Semitism.

It would be terrible to think that the left was right about the right all these years. Nativist bigotries must not be allowed to become the animating spirit of the Republican Party. If Donald Trump becomes the candidate, he will not win the presidency, but he will help vindicate the left’s ugly indictment. It will be left to decent conservatives to pick up the pieces—and what’s left of the party.

Voir enfin:

Rubio Echoes Neoconservative Views in Foreign Policy Address

Nina Burleigh , Emily Cadei

Newsweek

On 5/14/15

Appearing before an elite foreign policy crowd in New York, Marco Rubio looked and sounded like the recipient of a Rotary Club scholarship reciting his essay—even leading off with a reference to JFK. “President Kennedy, like most presidents before and since, understood what our current president does not,” the Florida senator opened. “American strength is a means of preventing war, not promoting it. And that weakness, on the other hand, is the friend of danger and the enemy of peace.”

The youthful Republican with the muscular foreign policy appears to be the designated rehabilitator of the neoconservative philosophy, which took a beating after the Iraq War. Although he might be better called a neo-neocon, Rubio is willing to tweak the playbook to suit the times. He flip-flopped on Iraq, saying he wouldn’t have supported the invasion knowing the intelligence about weapons of mass destruction was bad. (In March, when asked on Fox, he supported it.)

Rubio has been burnishing his foreign policy credibility with a slot on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, showing up even at sparsely attended meetings. He has been outspoken on international human trafficking and relations with Latin America. In the midst of the Arab Spring, the rookie senator was an early supporter both of bombing Libya and arming Syria’s rebels. And with concerns about national security rising again—particularly among Republican voters—his neo-neocon views have helped him seize the spotlight and boosted his standing in the 2016 presidential campaign.

In New York on Wednesday, the senator called for more American leadership in an address to the Council on Foreign Relations. He made his case in both military and moral terms and denigrated former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s foreign policy as “a disaster.”

“Today, our nation faces a greater threat of terrorist attack than any time since September 11, 2001,” he wrote in an op-ed this week supporting the Patriot Act’s data collection programs. As a candidate, Rubio is reportedly close to receiving significant financial support from billionaire casino owner Sheldon Adelson, a leading GOP fundraiser and hawk.

In his speech at the Council on Foreign Relations, he presented “three pillars” that he said would be the foundations of his foreign policy if elected. He called for bigger military budgets and an extension of the Patriot Act’s bulk data collection program; support for America’s economic activity abroad, including the Trans-Pacific Partnership and a promise of military action to back up any challenges to American interests abroad; and third, “moral clarity to back up America’s core values”—a nice-sounding if vague goal that includes ensuring repressed minorities and women abroad know that America is aware of their suffering.

He painted the Obama administration’s foreign policy as weak and confused. Answering a question from the audience about Clinton’s record as secretary of state, Rubio charged that she had “misunderstood Putin,” waited too long and did too little on Libya, and had been “negligent” toward Latin America. He called her “the chief architect and spokesman of a foreign policy that will go down in history as a disaster.”

Rubio was a vocal presence on the Senate floor during last week’s Iran sanctions debate, trying to toughen a bill giving Congress the right to review any nuclear deal. His “poison pill” amendment—requiring Israel to recognize Israel as a condition of any agreement—failed, but it gave him a platform to prove his being simpatico with the hard-line leaders in the Jewish state. He’s also been speaking out about the need to reauthorize Section 215 of the Patriot Act, the part of the 2001 law used to authorize the National Security Agency’s controversial bulk collection of phone records, first exposed by Edward Snowden. There’s bipartisan support for reform of that law, and one of Rubio’s 2016 rivals, Senator Rand Paul, has promised to filibuster the reauthorization debate. But Rubio has strongly supported the spy agency.

After his speech, in an interview on stage with Charlie Rose, Rubio exhibited an easy but firm grasp of numerous international complexities, from the shifting national alliances and failed states in the Middle East, to Chinese claims to islands in the South China Sea, to Castro’s Cuba. He called Putin’s use of military might a fig leaf to cover that country’s failed economy.

He passed up a chance to criticize either the man who is likely to be his main foe in the crowded GOP primary, Jeb Bush, or his brother, President George W. Bush. Asked whether he would have invaded Iraq, knowing what we know now, that there were no weapons of mass destruction, Rubio said no—an answer that Jeb Bush couldn’t bring himself to utter earlier this week. Rubio managed to throw in a good word for W. too. “Not only would I not have been in favor of it, President Bush would not have been in favor of it,” he said.

Rubio tossed off a few dubious claims. One was charging that Obama is holding back on attacking ISIS to avoid challenging Iran. When Charlie Rose pointed out that American drones have reportedly killed two of the self-proclaimed caliphate top leaders, Rubio contended that the U.S. position against ISIS still hasn’t been aggressive enough.

The president, Rubio said, had always “viewed American engagement abroad as a cause of friction. The notion was that we had problems around the world because there were grievances against the United States because of something we had done,” he said. “Iran’s problem with America is not just grievance, it’s ideological. It’s their belief that they want to be a dominant power in and export their revolution.”

Rubio then repeated a contention he made previously—and for which the Washington Post awarded him “three Pinocchios”—that Obama didn’t “firmly support” Iranians who wanted democracy during the so-called Green Revolution of 2009, when Iran’s leaders rigged the election. In fact, Obama publicly criticized the Iranian electoral process. “Rubio appears to have created a cartoon version of the White House reaction to the Green Revolution,” the Washington Post commented when he first made the same claim.

An audience member asked whether his view of Iran matched that of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. “I view them as the same threat he does, but the difference is he lives a lot closer to them than I do.” Iran’s leaders have long publicly called for eliminating Israel, and Rubio noted that one of its leaders even issued a detailed tweet about how to accomplish that.

It was a measure of Rubio’s momentum (polls show his numbers up in Iowa, New Hampshire and nationally) and how seriously he is taken that the room was packed with big-name journalists and marquee foreign policy figures. Among those who lobbed questions at him were New York lawyer Zoë Baird, nominated by Bill Clinton for attorney general, but whose bid was withdrawn over unpaid nanny taxes, and conservative British author Niall Ferguson, who asked whether “radical Islam” is the ideological equivalent of the communist threat that Kennedy and Reagan faced.

Communism tried to create nation-states, Rubio replied, whereas radical Islam differs in that it can’t govern. “They do a terrible job of picking up the garbage, and providing services, but they are very brutal.” He said the key was to deny them safe havens—Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria and parts of Africa. “We cannot allow safe havens to emerge anywhere in the world…where these groups can set up camp and establish themselves,” Rubio said.

Journalists were not allowed to ask questions, but as Rubio was shaking hands, one asked him whether he had changed his mind on the Iraq War. Rubio ignored the repeated question, and retreated with a small entourage to a safe haven of his own, an anteroom near the stage.


Primaires américaines: Attention, un accident industriel pourrait en cacher un autre (Rage against the PC machine: After 8 years of Dr. Obamastein, are Americans ready to pour their hopes into another totally uncertain vessel ?)

26 février, 2016
Obamastein
TrumpRevolution
donald_trump_kim_kardashianTous les grands événements et personnages historiques se répètent pour ainsi dire deux fois […] la première fois comme tragédie, la seconde fois comme farce. Marx
The revolution will not be televised The revolution will not be brought to you by Xerox The revolution will put you in the driver’s seat
The revolution will be no re-run brothers; The revolution will be live …
Gil Scott-Heron
La femme serait vraiment l’égale de l’homme le jour où, à un poste important, on désignerait une femme incompétente. Françoise Giroud (Le Monde, 11.03.83)
After seizing a large segment of Iraq and Syria, beheading Western hostages on camera and slaughtering civilians in the heart of Paris, ISIS has eclipsed its extremist rival as the biggest brand in global jihad. But U.S. officials tell NBC News that al Qaeda — though its core in Pakistan has been degraded by years of CIA drone strikes — is now experiencing renewed strength through its affiliates, led by al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) in Yemen and the Nusra Front in Syria. (…) Both branches have expanded their territorial holdings over the last year amid civil wars. Russian air strikes against the Nusra Front, and CIA drone attacks on AQAP leaders, have set them back, but have not come close to destroying them. Al Qaeda has not managed to attack a Western target recently, but it continues to inspire plots. There is no evidence December’s mass shooting in San Bernardino, California was directed by al Qaeda, but Syed Rizwan Farook, who carried out the attack with his wife Tashfeen Malik, appears to have been radicalized by al Qaeda long before the rise of ISIS. He was a consumer of videos by al Qaeda’s Somalia affiliate and the AQAP preacher Anwar al Awlaki, court records show. Al Qaeda attacks on hotels in Burkina Faso in January and Mali in November, which together killed dozens of people, appeared to affirm the threat posed by the terror group’s Saharan branch, al Qaeda in the Islamic Magreb, or AQIM. (…) intelligence officials are also « concerned al Qaeda could reestablish a significant presence in Afghanistan and Pakistan, if regional counterterrorism pressure deceases. » In Yemen, AQAP has benefitted from the power vacuum created by the Houthi rebels’ uprising, and the air war on the Houthis by Saudi Arabia. « Jabhat al Nusra is a core component of the al Qaeda network and probably poses the most dangerous threat to the U.S. from al Qaeda in the coming years, » the Institute for the Study of War, a Washington think tank, said in a recent report. « Al Qaeda is pursuing phased, gradual, and sophisticated strategies that favor letting ISIS attract the attention — and attacks — of the West while it builds the human infrastructure to support and sustain major gains in the future and for the long term. » (…) Hoffman, who served as the CIA’s Scholar-in-Residence for Counterterrorism, calls Nusra « even more dangerous and capable than ISIS. » Al Qaeda is watching ISIS « take all the heat and absorb all the blows while al Qaeda quietly re-builds its military strength, » he said. NBC
The number of Cubans entering the United States nearly doubled last year, compared with the year before. That trend shows no signs of slowing. More Cubans are coming to the United States because they fear that a thaw in U.S.-Cuban relations will end a longstanding policy granting legal status to any Cuban national who reaches dry land in the United States. (…) Obama is headed to Havana on March 21, the first U.S. president to do so in 88 years. Cuellar supports the President’s efforts to improve relations between the two countries, but he hopes Obama addresses the migration issue while in Havana, as well as the lack of political freedoms on the island and other human rights issues. That’s a sentiment shared by many of the migrants waiting to see an immigration officer at the Laredo border crossing. « I hope he talks to the real people, » says Melian, the migrant waiting at the Laredo border crossing. « I hope he doesn’t allow himself to be fooled by the Castros as they fooled the world for many years. » CNN
Barack Obama is the Dr. Frankenstein of the supposed Trump monster. If a charismatic, Ivy League-educated, landmark president who entered office with unprecedented goodwill and both houses of Congress on his side could manage to wreck the Democratic Party while turning off 52 percent of the country, then many voters feel that a billionaire New York dealmaker could hardly do worse. If Obama had ruled from the center, dealt with the debt, addressed radical Islamic terrorism, dropped the politically correct euphemisms and pushed tax and entitlement reform rather than Obamacare, Trump might have little traction. A boring Hillary Clinton and a staid Jeb Bush would most likely be replaying the 1992 election between Bill Clinton and George H.W. Bush — with Trump as a watered-down version of third-party outsider Ross Perot. But America is in much worse shape than in 1992. And Obama has proved a far more divisive and incompetent president than George H.W. Bush. Little is more loathed by a majority of Americans than sanctimonious PC gobbledygook and its disciples in the media. And Trump claims to be PC’s symbolic antithesis. Making Machiavellian Mexico pay for a border fence or ejecting rude and interrupting Univision anchor Jorge Ramos from a press conference is no more absurd than allowing more than 300 sanctuary cities to ignore federal law by sheltering undocumented immigrants. Putting a hold on the immigration of Middle Eastern refugees is no more illiberal than welcoming into American communities tens of thousands of unvetted foreign nationals from terrorist-ridden Syria. In terms of messaging, is Trump’s crude bombast any more radical than Obama’s teleprompted scripts? Trump’s ridiculous view of Russian President Vladimir Putin as a sort of « Art of the Deal » geostrategic partner is no more silly than Obama insulting Putin as Russia gobbles up former Soviet republics with impunity. Obama callously dubbed his own grandmother a « typical white person, » introduced the nation to the racist and anti-Semitic rantings of the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, and petulantly wrote off small-town Pennsylvanians as near-Neanderthal « clingers. » Did Obama lower the bar for Trump’s disparagements? Certainly, Obama peddled a slogan, « hope and change, » that was as empty as Trump’s « make America great again. » (…) How does the establishment derail an out-of-control train for whom there are no gaffes, who has no fear of The New York Times, who offers no apologies for speaking what much of the country thinks — and who apparently needs neither money from Republicans nor politically correct approval from Democrats? Victor Davis Hanson
So what to do now? The Republicans’ creation will soon be let loose on the land, leaving to others the job the party failed to carry out. For this former Republican, and perhaps for others, the only choice will be to vote for Hillary Clinton. The party cannot be saved, but the country still can be. Robert Kagan
People wonder what accounts for the rise of Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders. Maybe the better question is how the Obama years could not have produced a Trump and Sanders. Both the Republican and, to a lesser extent, Democratic parties have elements now who want to pull down the temple. But for all the politicized agitation, both these movements, in power, would produce stasis—no change at all. Donald Trump would preside over a divided government or, as he has promised and un-promised, a trade war with China. Hillary or Bernie will enlarge the Obama economic regime. Either outcome guarantees four more years of at best 2% economic growth. That means more of the above. That means 18-year-olds voting for the first time this year will face historically weak job opportunities through 2020 at least. Under any of these three, an Americanized European social-welfare state will evolve because Washington—and this will include many “conservatives”—will answer still-rising popular anger with new income redistributions. And for years afterward, Barack Obama will stroll off the 18th green, smiling. Mission, finally, accomplished. Daniel Henninger
We’re in the midst of a rebellion. The bottom and middle are pushing against the top. It’s a throwing off of old claims and it’s been going on for a while, but we’re seeing it more sharply after New Hampshire. This is not politics as usual, which by its nature is full of surprise. There’s something deep, suggestive, even epochal about what’s happening now. I have thought for some time that there’s a kind of soft French Revolution going on in America, with the angry and blocked beginning to push hard against an oblivious elite. It is not only political. Yes, it is about the Democratic National Committee, that house of hacks, and about a Republican establishment owned by the donor class. But establishment journalism, which for eight months has been simultaneously at Donald Trump’s feet (“Of course you can call us on your cell from the bathtub for your Sunday show interview!”) and at his throat (“Trump supporters, many of whom are nativists and nationalists . . .”) is being rebelled against too. Their old standing as guides and gatekeepers? Gone, and not only because of multiplying platforms. (…) All this goes hand in hand with the general decline of America’s faith in its institutions. We feel less respect for almost all of them—the church, the professions, the presidency, the Supreme Court. The only formal national institution that continues to score high in terms of public respect (72% in the most recent Gallup poll) is the military (…) we are in a precarious position in the U.S. with so many of our institutions going down. Many of those pushing against the system have no idea how precarious it is or what they will be destroying. Those defending it don’t know how precarious its position is or even what they’re defending, or why. But people lose respect for a reason. (…) It’s said this is the year of anger but there’s a kind of grim practicality to Trump and Sanders supporters. They’re thinking: Let’s take a chance. Washington is incapable of reform or progress; it’s time to reach outside. Let’s take a chance on an old Brooklyn socialist. Let’s take a chance on the casino developer who talks on TV. In doing so, they accept a decline in traditional political standards. You don’t have to have a history of political effectiveness anymore; you don’t even have to have run for office! “You’re so weirdly outside the system, you may be what the system needs.” They are pouring their hope into uncertain vessels, and surely know it. Bernie Sanders is an actual radical: He would fundamentally change an economic system that imperfectly but for two centuries made America the wealthiest country in the history of the world. In the young his support is understandable: They have never been taught anything good about capitalism and in their lifetimes have seen it do nothing—nothing—to protect its own reputation. It is middle-aged Sanders supporters who are more interesting. They know what they’re turning their backs on. They know they’re throwing in the towel. My guess is they’re thinking something like: Don’t aim for great now, aim for safe. Terrorism, a world turning upside down, my kids won’t have it better—let’s just try to be safe, more communal. A shrewdness in Sanders and Trump backers: They share one faith in Washington, and that is in its ability to wear anything down. They think it will moderate Bernie, take the edges off Trump. For this reason they don’t see their choices as so radical. (…) The mainstream journalistic mantra is that the GOP is succumbing to nativism, nationalism and the culture of celebrity. That allows them to avoid taking seriously Mr. Trump’s issues: illegal immigration and Washington’s 15-year, bipartisan refusal to stop it; political correctness and how it is strangling a free people; and trade policies that have left the American working class displaced, adrift and denigrated. Mr. Trump’s popularity is propelled by those issues and enabled by his celebrity. (…) Mr. Trump is a clever man with his finger on the pulse, but his political future depends on two big questions. The first is: Is he at all a good man? Underneath the foul mouthed flamboyance is he in it for America? The second: Is he fully stable? He acts like a nut, calling people bimbos, flying off the handle with grievances. Is he mature, reliable? Is he at all a steady hand? Political professionals think these are side questions. “Let’s accuse him of not being conservative!” But they are the issue. Because America doesn’t deliberately elect people it thinks base, not to mention crazy. Peggy Noonan
But honestly, Donald Trump reminds me of the Kim Kardashian of politics – they’re both famous for being famous and the media plays along. Carly Fiorina
Politicians have, since ancient Greece, lied, pandered, and whored. They have taken bribes, connived, and perjured themselves. But in recent times—in the United States, at any rate—there has never been any politician quite as openly debased and debauched as Donald Trump. Truman and Nixon could be vulgar, but they kept the cuss words for private use. Presidents have chewed out journalists, but which of them would have suggested that an elegant and intelligent woman asking a reasonable question was dripping menstrual blood? LBJ, Kennedy, and Clinton could all treat women as commodities to be used for their pleasure, but none went on the radio with the likes of Howard Stern to discuss the women they had bedded and the finer points of their anatomies. All politicians like the sound of their own names, but Roosevelt named the greatest dam in the United States after his defeated predecessor, Herbert Hoover. Can one doubt what Trump would have christened it? That otherwise sober people do not find Trump’s insults and insane demands outrageous (Mexico will have to pay for a wall! Japan will have to pay for protection!) says something about a larger moral and cultural collapse. His language is the language of the comments sections of once-great newspapers. Their editors know that the online versions of their publications attract the vicious, the bigoted, and the foulmouthed. But they keep those comments sections going in the hope of getting eyeballs on the page. (…) The current problem goes beyond excruciatingly bad manners. What we increasingly lack, and have lacked for some time, is a sense of the moral underpinning of republican (small r) government. Manners and morals maintain a free state as much as laws do, as Tocqueville observed long ago, and when a certain culture of virtue dies, so too does something of what makes democracy work. Old-fashioned words like integrity, selflessness, frugality, gravitas, and modesty rarely rate a mention in modern descriptions of the good life—is it surprising that they don’t come up in politics, either? (…) Trump’s rise is only one among many signs that something has gone profoundly amiss in our popular culture.It is related to the hysteria that has swept through many campuses, as students call for the suppression of various forms of free speech and the provision of “safe spaces” where they will not be challenged by ideas with which they disagree. The rise of Trump and the fall of free speech in academia are equal signs that we are losing the intellectual sturdiness and honesty without which a republic cannot thrive. (…) The rot is cultural. It is no coincidence that Trump was the star of a “reality” show. He is the beneficiary of an amoral celebrity culture devoid of all content save an omnipresent lubriciousness. He is a kind of male Kim Kardashian, and about as politically serious. In the context of culture, if not (yet) politics, he is unremarkable; the daily entertainments of today are both tawdry and self-consciously, corrosively ironic. Ours is an age when young people have become used to getting news, of a sort, from Jon Stewart and Steven Colbert, when an earlier generation watched Walter Cronkite and David Brinkley. It is the difference between giggling with young, sneering hipsters and listening to serious adults. Go to YouTube and look at old episodes of Profiles in Courage, if you can find them—a wildly successful television series based on the book nominally authored by John F. Kennedy, which celebrated an individual’s, often a politician’s, courage in standing alone against a crowd, even a crowd with whose politics the audience agreed. The show of comparable popularity today is House of Cards. Bill Clinton has said that he loves it. American culture is, in short, nastier, more nihilistic, and far less inhibited than ever before. It breeds alternating bouts of cynicism and hysteria, and now it has given us Trump. The Republican Party as we know it may die of Trump. If it does, it will have succumbed in part because many of its leaders chose not to fight for the Party of Lincoln, which is a set of ideas about how to govern a country, rather than an organization clawing for political and personal advantage. What is at stake, however, is something much more precious than even a great political party. To an extent unimaginable for a very long time, the moral keel of free government is showing cracks. It is not easy to discern how we shall mend them. Eliot Cohen
Some explanations for Donald Trump’s success emphasize his focus on supposedly working-class issues – namely, immigration and trade – after a refusal by the GOP “establishment” to address them. When the Wall Street Journal condemns his “crude assessment of the economic relationship with China” and sneers that his “pander[ing] to his party’s nativist wing… may have endeared him to one or two radio talk show hosts” but will prove an electoral disaster, the editors only underscore the base-to-establishment gap. Except I just did that thing where I tell you the quote is about one person and it is really about someone else. Those criticisms were leveled by the Wall Street Journal, but in 2012, at Mitt Romney. From early in the primaries, Romney took the unheard-of stance that China cheated on trade and should be aggressively confronted. He even called for retaliatory tariffs against continued currency manipulation and intellectual property theft. Similarly, on immigration, Romney was far to the right by the standards of either the 2012 or 2016 GOP fields. While his use of the phrase “self-deportation” was certainly inartful, the position was similar to the one Ted Cruz has since staked out. (Though Cruz may have shifted bizarrely rightward in the last 24 hours.) He stood by it right through the general-election debates with President Obama. The post-2012 effort by the GOP to reposition itself on immigration was not an extension of the Romney approach, but rather a reaction. (…) The real difference is that Romney held himself each day to the highest standards of decency and felt keenly the burdens of leadership, while Trump is an entertainer committed to delivering whatever irrational blather of insults, threats, and lies will earn the most retweets. Sometimes the blather may take the form of a “policy” proposal like mass deportation or a ban on Muslims, but that is still part of the show – not a suggestion for how to run the country. (…) Yes he has “tapped into anger,” but let’s stop pretending it is a rational anger at problems ignored. (…) The sad irony is this: the intelligentsia’s confidence that Trump would fade was in fact a strong sign of their respect for the judgment of the Republican base. If you are looking for the people who truly disdained those voters, find the pundits who predicted from the beginning that this guy might actually win. Yet by flocking to him now, Trump voters are ensuring they will be a punchline –sometimes feared, but never respected – for years to come. Oren Cass
Si l’on regarde les élections américaines avec un regard français – et c’est ce que nous faisons tous malgré nous -, il représente le contrepoint parfait de ce que représentent les hommes politiques français. Et c’est pour cela que nous le soutenons. Il est un ovni pour la France. Il affiche sans honte son argent et affiche clairement ses idées. Concrètement, il n’a pas peur de renverser la table si besoin, ni de déplaire. On l’aime pour ce qu’il est, ou on le rejette entièrement. En plus de ses propos assumés, il a une véritable prestance, un charisme. Pour tout cela, il représente un électrochoc pour la vie politique française. En soutenant Donald Trump, nous revendiquons avant tout notre envie d’avoir un homme politique de cette trempe en France. (…) Nous ne soutenons pas Les Républicains, ni le Front national. Nous sommes avant tout des déçus de la politique telle qu’elle est pratiquée en France. On soutient Donald Trump pour changer cela. Mais la question n’est pas d’importer les États-Unis en France, il s’agit simplement de profiter de la montée de Donald Trump pour changer les choses chez nous. Les Français sont prêts à avoir un Trump à l’Élysée, j’en suis convaincu, mais il devra être assez solide pour ne pas renoncer à ses principes au nom d’une certaine bien pensance. Il ne doit pas avoir peur de mettre les pieds dans le plat. Vivien Hoch (porte-parole du comité de soutien de Donald Trump en France)
Il ne suffit pas, pour faire un bon président, d’effaroucher les bien-pensants, même si c’est une condition incontournable, ou d’avoir raison après tout le monde. Et puis est venue cette idée, peut-être devenue promesse depuis la publication de cet article, de ne plus laisser entrer les musulmans sur le sol des États-Unis. Je sais bien qu’il ne faut pas dire « les », il faut dire « des », j’ai compris la leçon. Oui, mais alors lesquels ? Telle est la question que Donald rétorque à nos indignations. Avant que des musulmans balancent des avions dans des tours ou que d’autres flinguent des handicapés, les uns comme les autres étaient de paisibles citoyens, des voisins sans histoires, des étudiants appréciés, ou des travailleurs honnêtes, car on ne peut, au pays de la troisième récidive et de la peine de mort, devenir terroriste après avoir fait carrière dans le banditisme. Comment faire, donc, pour distinguer les terroristes musulmans parmi les musulmans ? Et que faire si la mission s’avère impossible ? C’est en posant ces questions, que devrait se poser tout responsable politique qui s’est penché sur le vrai sens des mots « responsable » et « politique », que Donald est remonté dans mon estime. C’est en opposant à la liberté de circulation le principe de précaution (surtout utilisé pour nous empêcher de vivre libres, et qui pourrait bien, en l’occurrence, nous empêcher de mourir jeunes), qu’il est devenu mon candidat. La solution est radicale, entière, brutale, américaine et nous paraît folle, comme tout ce qui nous vient d’outre-Atlantique avec vingt ans d’avance, pour nous apparaître comme moderne, vingt ans après. Ainsi, les Américains ont fermé, au temps de la guerre froide, leur pays au communisme. On se souvient du maccarthysme et des questions risibles posées par les douaniers aux nouveaux arrivants, immigrés ou touristes : Appartenez-vous au crime organisé ? Êtes-vous membre du parti communiste ? Ils ont su, sous la réprobation du monde entier, éviter d’être contaminés par cette maladie du xxe siècle. Nous avons eu, en France et en Europe, une autre approche. Nous avons fait le pari que cette idéologie dangereuse et liberticide se dissoudrait dans la démocratie et dans l’économie de marché. Et nous avons gagné. Chez nous, il ne reste du communisme qu’un parti crépusculaire et folklorique, une curiosité européenne où se retrouvent des écrivains chics, idiots utiles du village souverainiste – utiles à qui, on se le demande ? On les lit avec bonheur quand ils ne parlent pas de politique. Mais alors deux questions se posent : le monde libre aura-t-il raison de l’islamisme comme il a eu raison du communisme ? Pouvons-nous attendre vingt ans pour le savoir ? Cyril Benassar
Three major have-not powers are seeking to overturn the post-Cold War status quo: Russia in Eastern Europe, China in East Asia, Iran in the Middle East. All are on the march. To say nothing of the Islamic State, now extending its reach from Afghanistan to West Africa. The international order built over decades by the United States is crumbling. In the face of which, what does Obama do? Go to Cuba. Yes, Cuba. A supreme strategic irrelevance so dear to Obama’s anti-anti-communist heart. The international order built over decades by the United States is crumbling. Is he at least going to celebrate progress in human rights and democracy — which Obama established last year as a precondition for any presidential visit? Of course not. When has Obama ever held to a red line? Indeed, since Obama began his “historic” normalization with Cuba, the repression has gotten worse. Last month, the regime arrested 1,414 political dissidents, the second-most ever recorded. No matter. Amid global disarray and American decline, Obama sticks to his cherished concerns: Cuba, Guantanamo (about which he gave a rare televised address this week), and, of course, climate change. Obama could not bestir himself to go to Paris in response to the various jihadi atrocities — sending Kerry instead “to share a big hug with Paris” (as Kerry explained) with James Taylor singing “You’ve Got a Friend” — but he did make an ostentatious three-day visit there for climate change. More Foreign Policy The Costs of Abandoning Messy Wars Vladimir Putin and Bashar al-Assad Are Running U.S. Syria Policy With Disasters Everywhere, It’s Time to Take Foreign Policy Seriously Again So why not go to Havana? Sure, the barbarians are at the gates and pushing hard knowing they will enjoy but eleven more months of minimal American resistance. But our passive president genuinely believes that such advances don’t really matter — that these disrupters are so on the wrong side of history, that their reaches for territory, power, victory are so 20th century. Of course, it mattered greatly to the quarter-million slaughtered in Syria and the millions more exiled. It feels all quite real to a dissolving Europe, an expanding China, a rising Iran, a metastasizing jihadism. Not to the visionary Obama, however. He sees far beyond such ephemera. He knows what really matters: climate change, Gitmo, and Cuba. With time running out, he wants these to be his legacy. Indeed, they will be. Charles Krauthammer
Donald Trump has rightly reminded us during his campaign that Americans are sick and tired of costly overseas interventions. But what Trump forgets is that too often the world does not always enjoy a clear choice between good and bad, wise and stupid. Often the dilemma is the terrible choice between ignoring mass murderer, as in Rwanda or Syria; bombing and leaving utter chaos, as in Libya; and removing monsters, then enduring the long ordeal of trying to leave something better, as in Afghanistan and Iraq. The choices are all awful. But the idea that America can bomb a rogue regime, leave and expect something better is pure fantasy. Victor Davis Hanson
The many millions of Americans who are sick of being called racist, chauvinist, homophobic, privileged or extremist every time they breathe feel that in Trump they have found their voice. Then there is that gnawing sense that under Obama, America has been transformed from history’s greatest winner into history’s biggest sucker. (…) Trump’s continuous exposition on his superhuman deal-making talents speaks to this fear. Trump’s ability to viscerally connect to the deep-seated concerns of American voters and assuage them frees him from the normal campaign requirement of developing plans to accomplish his campaign promises. (…) Trump’s supporters don’t care that his economic policies contradict one another. They don’t care that his foreign policy declarations are a muddle of contradictions. They hate the establishment and they want to believe him. (…) Because he knows how to viscerally connect to the public, Trump will undoubtedly be a popular president. But since he has no clear philosophical or ideological underpinning, his policies will likely be inconsistent and opportunistic.(…) In this, a Trump presidency will be a stark contrast to Obama’s hyper-ideological tenure in office. So, too, his presidency will be a marked contrast to a similarly ideologically driven Clinton or Sanders administration, since both will more or less continue to enact Obama’s domestic and foreign policies. (…) Like Trump, Johnson is able to tap into deep-seated public dissatisfaction with the political and cultural elites and serve as a voice for the disaffected. (…) If Johnson is able to convince a majority of British voters to support an exit from the EU, then several other EU member states are likely to follow in Britain’s wake. The exit of states from the EU will cause a political and economic upheaval in Europe with repercussions far beyond its borders. Just as a Trump presidency will usher in an era of high turbulence and uncertainty in US economic and foreign policies, so a post-breakup EU and Western Europe will replace Brussels’ consistent policies with policies that are more varied, and unstable. (…) If Trump is elected president and if Britain leads the charge of nations out of the EU, then Israel can expect its relations with both the US and Europe to be marked by turbulence and uncertainty that can lead in a positive direction or a negative direction, or even to both directions at the same time. (…) Just as Trump has stated both that he will support Israel and be neutral toward Israel, so we can expect for Trump to stand by Israel one day and to rebuke it angrily, even brutally, the next day. (…) So, too, under Trump, the US may send forces to confront Iran one day, only to announce that Trump is embarking on negotiations to get a sweetheart deal with the ayatollahs the next. Or perhaps all of these things will happen simultaneously. Caroline Glick

Attention: un accident industriel  pourrait en cacher un autre !

Alors qu’avec pas moins, entre la Russie, la Chine et l’Iran et sans compter les djiadistes, de trois menaces majeures à l’ordre post-guerre froide sous ses mandats …

L’un des probables pires présidents américains achève en cette dernière année qu’il lui reste à la Maison Blanche …

Entre promesses vides (Guantanamo) et visites à l’un ou l’autre dictateur de la planète (Cuba) …

La magistrale démonstration qu’un président noir pouvait être tout aussi mauvais qu’un président blanc …

Pendant que du côté républicain et notamment néoconservateur certains en sont même à menacer de voter démocrate

Comment ne pas voir …

Avec l’apparemment irrésistible et aussi rafraichissante qu’inquiétante ascension d’un champion de l’impolitiquement correct

Mais aussi des idées simples et des boniments comme Trump …

Et sans parler du plus rouge que rouge Sanders …

Le même risque de l’arrivée comme il y a huit ans …

D’un nouvel accident industriel à la tête du Monde libre?

State of the World: Year Eight of Barack Obama
Charles Krauthammer
National review
February 25, 2016

(1) In the South China Sea, on a speck of land of disputed sovereignty far from its borders, China has just installed anti-aircraft batteries and stationed fighter jets. This after China landed planes on an artificial island it created on another disputed island chain (the Spratlys, claimed by the Philippines, Malaysia, Taiwan, and Vietnam). These facilities now function as forward bases for Beijing to challenge seven decades of American naval dominance of the Pacific Rim. “China is clearly militarizing the South China Sea,” the commander of the U.S. Pacific Command told Congress on Tuesday. Its goal? “Hegemony in East Asia.”

(2) Syria. Russian intervention has turned the tide of war. Having rescued the Bashar al-Assad regime from collapse, relentless Russian bombing is destroying the rebel stronghold of Aleppo, Syria’s largest city, creating a massive new wave of refugees and demonstrating to the entire Middle East what a Great Power can achieve when it acts seriously. The U.S. response? Repeated pathetic attempts by Secretary of State John Kerry to propitiate Russia (and its ally, Iran) in one collapsed peace conference after another. On Sunday, he stepped out to announce yet another “provisional agreement in principle” on “a cessation of hostilities” that the CIA director, the defense secretary, and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs deem little more than a ruse.

(3) Ukraine. Having swallowed Crimea so thoroughly that no one even talks about it anymore, Russia continues to trample with impunity on the Minsk cease-fire agreements. Vladimir Putin is now again stirring the pot, intensifying the fighting, advancing his remorseless campaign to fracture and subordinate the Ukrainian state. Meanwhile, Obama still refuses to send the Ukrainians even defensive weapons.

(4) Iran. Last Thursday, Iran received its first shipment of S-300 anti-aircraft batteries from Russia, a major advance in developing immunity to any attack on its nuclear facilities. And it is negotiating an $8 billion arms deal with Russia that includes sophisticated combat aircraft. Like its ballistic missile tests, this conventional weapons shopping spree is a blatant violation of U.N. Security Council prohibitions. It was also a predictable — and predicted — consequence of the Iran nuclear deal that granted Iran $100 billion and normalized its relations with the world. The U.S. response? Words. Share article on Facebook share Tweet article tweet Unlike gravitational waves, today’s strategic situation is not hard to discern. Three major have-not powers are seeking to overturn the post-Cold War status quo: Russia in Eastern Europe, China in East Asia, Iran in the Middle East. All are on the march. To say nothing of the Islamic State, now extending its reach from Afghanistan to West Africa. The international order built over decades by the United States is crumbling. In the face of which, what does Obama do? Go to Cuba. Yes, Cuba. A supreme strategic irrelevance so dear to Obama’s anti-anti-communist heart. The international order built over decades by the United States is crumbling. Is he at least going to celebrate progress in human rights and democracy — which Obama established last year as a precondition for any presidential visit? Of course not. When has Obama ever held to a red line? Indeed, since Obama began his “historic” normalization with Cuba, the repression has gotten worse. Last month, the regime arrested 1,414 political dissidents, the second-most ever recorded. No matter. Amid global disarray and American decline, Obama sticks to his cherished concerns: Cuba, Guantanamo (about which he gave a rare televised address this week), and, of course, climate change.

Obama could not bestir himself to go to Paris in response to the various jihadi atrocities — sending Kerry instead “to share a big hug with Paris” (as Kerry explained) with James Taylor singing “You’ve Got a Friend” — but he did make an ostentatious three-day visit there for climate change. More Foreign Policy The Costs of Abandoning Messy Wars Vladimir Putin and Bashar al-Assad Are Running U.S. Syria Policy With Disasters Everywhere, It’s Time to Take Foreign Policy Seriously Again So why not go to Havana? Sure, the barbarians are at the gates and pushing hard knowing they will enjoy but eleven more months of minimal American resistance. But our passive president genuinely believes that such advances don’t really matter — that these disrupters are so on the wrong side of history, that their reaches for territory, power, victory are so 20th century. Of course, it mattered greatly to the quarter-million slaughtered in Syria and the millions more exiled. It feels all quite real to a dissolving Europe, an expanding China, a rising Iran, a metastasizing jihadism. Not to the visionary Obama, however. He sees far beyond such ephemera. He knows what really matters: climate change, Gitmo, and Cuba. With time running out, he wants these to be his legacy. Indeed, they will be.

Voir aussi:

The tough choices of overseas intervention
Victor Davis Hanson
Townhall
February 25, 2016

The United States has targeted a lot of rogues and their regimes in recent decades: Muammar Gadhafi, Saddam Hussein, Slobodan Milosevic, Mohamed Farrah Aidid, Manuel Noriega and the Taliban.

As a general rule over the last 100 years, any time the U.S. has bombed or intervened and then abruptly left the targeted country, chaos has followed. But when America has followed up its use of force with unpopular peacekeeping, sometimes American interventions have led to something better.

The belated entry of the United States into World War I saved the sinking Allied cause in 1917. Yet after the November 1918 armistice, the United States abruptly went home, washed its hands of Europe’s perennial squabbling and disarmed. A far bloodier World War II followed just two decades later.

It may have been wise or foolish for Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson to have intervened in Vietnam in 1963-1964 to try to save the beleaguered non-communist south. But after 10 years of hard fighting and a costly stalemate, it was nihilistic for America to abandon a viable South Vietnam to invading communist North Vietnam. Re-education camps, mass executions and boat people followed — along with more than 40 years of communist oppression.

The current presidential candidates are refighting the Iraq war of 2003. Yet the critical question 13 years later is not so much whether the United States should or should not have removed the genocidal Saddam Hussein, but whether our costly efforts at reconstruction ever offered any hope of a stable Iraq.

By 2011, Iraq certainly seemed viable. Only a few dozen American peacekeepers were killed in Iraq in 2011 — a total comparable to the number of U.S. soldiers who die in accidents in an average month.

The complete withdrawal of all U.S. troops in December 2011 abruptly turned what President Obama had dubbed a “sovereign, stable and self-reliant” Iraq — and what Vice President Joe Biden had called one of the administration’s “greatest achievements” — into a nightmarish wasteland.

Hillary Clinton bragged of the 2011 airstrikes in Libya and the eventual death of Gadhafi: “We came, we saw, he died.”

But destroying Gadhafi’s forces from the air and then abandoning Libya to terrorists and criminals only created an Islamic State recruiting ground. The Benghazi disaster was the nearly inevitable result of washing our hands of the disorder that we had helped to create.

In contrast, when the United States did not pack up and go home after its messy wars, our unpopular interventions often helped make life far better for all involved — and the U.S. and its allies more secure.

The United States inherited a mess in the Philippines in 1899 after the defeat of imperial Spain in the Spanish-American war. But after more than a decade of bloody counterinsurgency fighting, America finally birthed a Philippine national government that was given its independence after World War II.

President Harry Truman’s intervention to save South Korea from North Korean aggression quickly turned into a quagmire. Communist China soon launched a massive invasion into the Korean peninsula. By 1953 — at a cost of roughly 35,000 American lives, about eight times more U.S. fatalities than in Iraq — America had at least saved a viable South Korea.

President Eisenhower, facing re-election in 1956, resisted calls to pull American peacekeepers from the Demilitarized Zone and quit the detested “Truman’s war.”

More than 60 years after the U.S. saved South Korea, thousands of American peacekeepers still help protect a democratic and successful south from a nightmarish, totalitarian and nuclear north.

Some 60 million people died in World War II, a global war that the United States did not start and did not enter until 1941. Yet American power helped defeat the Axis aggressors.

Unlike the aftermath of World War I, the United States stayed on to help rebuild war-torn Europe and Asia after World War II. The Marshall Plan, the NATO alliance, the defeat of Soviet Union in the Cold War, the foundations of the later European Union, and Asian economic dynamism all followed — along with some 70 years of relative peace.

In 1999, President Clinton convinced the NATO alliance to bomb Serbia’s genocidal Slobodan Milosevic out of power and stop the mass killing in the Balkans. After Milosevic’s removal, only the presence of American-led NATO peacekeepers on the ground prevented another round of mass murder.

Donald Trump has rightly reminded us during his campaign that Americans are sick and tired of costly overseas interventions. But what Trump forgets is that too often the world does not always enjoy a clear choice between good and bad, wise and stupid. Often the dilemma is the terrible choice between ignoring mass murderer, as in Rwanda or Syria; bombing and leaving utter chaos, as in Libya; and removing monsters, then enduring the long ordeal of trying to leave something better, as in Afghanistan and Iraq.

The choices are all awful. But the idea that America can bomb a rogue regime, leave and expect something better is pure fantasy.

 Voir également:

Trump, the EU crack-up and Israel
What accounts for the billionaire populist’s success?
Caroline Glick
The Jerusalem Post
02/25/16

After his smashing back-to-back victories in the New Hampshire and South Carolina primaries and the Nevada caucuses, going into next week’s Super Tuesday contests in 12 states, Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump looks increasingly unbeatable.

What accounts for the billionaire populist’s success? And if Trump does become the next US president, what sort of leader will the former reality television star be? Trump is popular because he has a rare ability to channel the deep-seated frustrations that much of the American public harbors toward its political and cultural elites.

Trump’s presidential bid isn’t based on specific, defined economic or foreign policy platforms or plans. Indeed, it isn’t clear that he even has any.

Trump’s campaign is based on his capacity to resonate two deeply felt frustrations harbored by a large cross-section of American citizens.

As The Wall Street Journal’s Daniel Henninger explained recently, a very large group of Americans is frustrated – or enraged – by the intellectual and social terror exercised upon them by the commissars of political correctness.

Trump’s support levels rise each time he says something “politically incorrect.” His candidacy took off last summer when he promised to build a wall along the Mexican border. It rose again last November when, following the Islamic massacre in Paris, he said that if elected he will ban Muslim immigration to the US.

The many millions of Americans who are sick of being called racist, chauvinist, homophobic, privileged or extremist every time they breathe feel that in Trump they have found their voice.

Then there is that gnawing sense that under Obama, America has been transformed from history’s greatest winner into history’s biggest sucker.

Trump’s continuous exposition on his superhuman deal-making talents speaks to this fear.

Trump’s ability to viscerally connect to the deep-seated concerns of American voters and assuage them frees him from the normal campaign requirement of developing plans to accomplish his campaign promises.

Trump’s supporters don’t care that his economic policies contradict one another. They don’t care that his foreign policy declarations are a muddle of contradictions.

They hate the establishment and they want to believe him.

This then brings us to the question of how a president Donald Trump would govern.

Because he knows how to viscerally connect to the public, Trump will undoubtedly be a popular president. But since he has no clear philosophical or ideological underpinning, his policies will likely be inconsistent and opportunistic.

In this, a Trump presidency will be a stark contrast to Obama’s hyper-ideological tenure in office.

So, too, his presidency will be a marked contrast to a similarly ideologically driven Clinton or Sanders administration, since both will more or less continue to enact Obama’s domestic and foreign policies.

The US is far from the only country steeped in uncertainty and frustration today.

Today, the peoples of Western Europe are behaving much like the Americans in their increased rejection of the political and cultural elites. Like Trump’s growing band of supporters, Western Europeans are increasingly embracing populists.

Whether these leaders come from the Right or the Left, they all make a similar pledge to restore their nations to a previous glory.

These promises are based as well on a common rejection of the European Union. Like their voters, populist European politicians believe that the EU is a bureaucratic monstrosity that has pulverized and seeks to blot out their national characters while it seizes their national sovereignty.

Due to this growing popular opposition to the EU, establishment leaders throughout Western Europe find themselves fighting for their political survival. Whether their desire to exit the EU owes to its open borders policies in the face of massive Muslim immigration or to the euro debt crisis, with each passing month, the very concept of a unified Europe loses its appeal for more and more Europeans.

On June 23, this growing disenchantment is liable to bring about the beginning of the EU’s breakup. That day, British voters will determine whether or not the United Kingdom will remain in the EU.

Popular London Mayor and Conservative MP Boris Johnson is now leading the campaign calling for Britain to leave the EU against the will of Prime Minister David Cameron and the Conservative party establishment.

In recent days, several commentators have claimed that Johnson is Britain’s Donald Trump.

Like Trump, Johnson is able to tap into deep-seated public dissatisfaction with the political and cultural elites and serve as a voice for the disaffected.

If Johnson is able to convince a majority of British voters to support an exit from the EU, then several other EU member states are likely to follow in Britain’s wake.

The exit of states from the EU will cause a political and economic upheaval in Europe with repercussions far beyond its borders. Just as a Trump presidency will usher in an era of high turbulence and uncertainty in US economic and foreign policies, so a post-breakup EU and Western Europe will replace Brussels’ consistent policies with policies that are more varied, and unstable.

For Israel, instability is not necessarily a bad thing. For the past several years, we have consistently suffered under the stable, unswerving anti-Israel policies of both the EU and the Obama administration.

Our inability to influence these policies was brought home last week with the government’s announcement that it is renewing Israel’s diplomatic dialogue with the EU.

Following the EU’s announcement in November that it was implementing its bigoted, arguably unlawful labeling policy against Israeli goods produced beyond the 1949 armistice lines, the government announced that Israel was suspending its diplomatic dialogue with the EU. The government hoped that by forcing Europe to pay a diplomatic price for its hostility, Brussels would back down.

But as it turned out, the ban made no impact on the EU, whose only clear, consistent foreign policy is to oppose Israel. And so, last week, the government cried uncle and announced that it is reinstituting its diplomatic dialogue with the EU.

A senior official explained that Israel chose to end the dispute because it wished to avoid having the labeling policy used as an issue in the debate about the future of the EU. EU champions made it clear to Israeli officials that if the labeling issue wasn’t swept under the rug, then Israel would be liable to be blamed if EU member states opt to exit the union.

Clearly the government is right to seek to avoid having Israel used as an issue in the debates on the future of the EU. But then again, it is also clear that Israel’s foes – led by the likes of the Belgians – don’t need an excuse to attack us.

On the other hand, by backing down, Israel signaled to its European opponents that they can escalate their war against us with impunity.

Moreover, despite the threats of EU officials, it is fairly ridiculous to think that they future of the EU has anything to do with how Israel responds to its political war against us. The Europeans who wish to exit the EU, like those who wish to remain, feel the way they do because of issues that have little to do with Israel.

Beyond the narrow question of how to respond to the labeling assault, from Israel’s perspective, the rise of Trump like the rise of Johnson and the anti-EU forces in Europe indicates that in the coming years, both the US and Europe are likely to move in one of two directions – and Israel has to be prepared for both eventualities.

If the next US president is a Democrat, and if the EU remains intact, then Israel can expect for its relations with the US and the EU to remain in crisis mode for the foreseeable future.

If Trump is elected president and if Britain leads the charge of nations out of the EU, then Israel can expect its relations with both the US and Europe to be marked by turbulence and uncertainty that can lead in a positive direction or a negative direction, or even to both directions at the same time.

Just as Trump has stated both that he will support Israel and be neutral toward Israel, so we can expect for Trump to stand by Israel one day and to rebuke it angrily, even brutally, the next day.

So, too, under Trump, the US may send forces to confront Iran one day, only to announce that Trump is embarking on negotiations to get a sweetheart deal with the ayatollahs the next.

Or perhaps all of these things will happen simultaneously.

As for Europe, whereas the EU stalwarts will likely ratchet up their hostility toward Israel, and we may even see the likes of Sweden or Belgium cut off relations with us, states that leave the EU may be willing to vastly improve their bilateral relations with Israel diplomatically, economically and militarily.

Moreover, if the EU begins to break up, it is likely that the European economy will contract.

As Israel’s largest trading partner, a European recession will hurt Israel.

Whether Trump rises or falls, is defeated by a Republican rival or by a Democratic opponent, and whether or not the EU breaks apart or remains intact, Israel’s leaders need to prepare for the plausible scenarios of either prolonged crises in relations with the US, Europe or both, or turbulent relations that are unpredictable and subject to constant change with one or both of them.

Under these circumstances, the first conclusion that needs to be drawn is that now is not the time to expand our military dependence on the US. Consequently, Defense Minister Moshe Ya’alon should not conclude an agreement for expanded US security assistance to Israel for the next decade.

Beyond that, Israel needs to expand on the steps that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Foreign Ministry director-general Dore Gold are already taking to expand Israel’s network of alliances to Africa and Asia. Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta’s visit this week marked just the latest achievement of this vital project. Israel’s diplomatic opening to Asia and Africa needs to be matched by similar military and economic openings and expansions of ties.

In the final analysis, Trump’s rise in America and the rise of the populists in Europe is yet another indication of the West’s growing identity crisis fueled by its economic, social, military and cultural weakness. Israel needs to read the writing on the wall and act appropriately lest we become a casualty of that identity crisis.

Voir encore:

Trump, Sanders and the American Rebellion
As institutions lose respect, voters think: Let’s take a chance.
Peggy Noonan
The Wall Street Journal

Feb. 11, 2016
What is happening in American politics?

We’re in the midst of a rebellion. The bottom and middle are pushing against the top. It’s a throwing off of old claims and it’s been going on for a while, but we’re seeing it more sharply after New Hampshire. This is not politics as usual, which by its nature is full of surprise. There’s something deep, suggestive, even epochal about what’s happening now.

I have thought for some time that there’s a kind of soft French Revolution going on in America, with the angry and blocked beginning to push hard against an oblivious elite. It is not only political. Yes, it is about the Democratic National Committee, that house of hacks, and about a Republican establishment owned by the donor class. But establishment journalism, which for eight months has been simultaneously at Donald Trump’s feet (“Of course you can call us on your cell from the bathtub for your Sunday show interview!”) and at his throat (“Trump supporters, many of whom are nativists and nationalists . . .”) is being rebelled against too. Their old standing as guides and gatekeepers? Gone, and not only because of multiplying platforms. Gloria Steinem thought she owned feminism, thought she was feminism. She doesn’t and isn’t. The Clintons thought they owned the party—they don’t. Hedge-funders thought they owned the GOP. Too bad they forgot to buy the base!

All this goes hand in hand with the general decline of America’s faith in its institutions. We feel less respect for almost all of them—the church, the professions, the presidency, the Supreme Court. The only formal national institution that continues to score high in terms of public respect (72% in the most recent Gallup poll) is the military.

A few years ago I gave a lecture to a class at West Point, the text of which was: You are entering the only U.S. institution left standing. Your prime responsibility throughout your careers will be to keep it respected. I then told them about the Dreyfus case. They had not heard of it. I explained how that scandal rocked public faith in a previously exalted institution, the French army, doing it and France lasting damage. And so your personal integrity is of the utmost importance, I said, as day by day that integrity creates the integrity of the military. The cadets actually listened to that part.

I mention this to say we are in a precarious position in the U.S. with so many of our institutions going down. Many of those pushing against the system have no idea how precarious it is or what they will be destroying. Those defending it don’t know how precarious its position is or even what they’re defending, or why. But people lose respect for a reason.

To New Hampshire: The rejection of the establishment’s preferred candidates in both major parties is a big moment. It is also understandable, the result of 15 years of failed presidencies. It is a gesture of rebuke toward the political class—move aside.

It’s said this is the year of anger but there’s a kind of grim practicality to Trump and Sanders supporters. They’re thinking: Let’s take a chance. Washington is incapable of reform or progress; it’s time to reach outside. Let’s take a chance on an old Brooklyn socialist. Let’s take a chance on the casino developer who talks on TV.

In doing so, they accept a decline in traditional political standards. You don’t have to have a history of political effectiveness anymore; you don’t even have to have run for office! “You’re so weirdly outside the system, you may be what the system needs.”

They are pouring their hope into uncertain vessels, and surely know it. Bernie Sanders is an actual radical: He would fundamentally change an economic system that imperfectly but for two centuries made America the wealthiest country in the history of the world. In the young his support is understandable: They have never been taught anything good about capitalism and in their lifetimes have seen it do nothing—nothing—to protect its own reputation.

It is middle-aged Sanders supporters who are more interesting. They know what they’re turning their backs on. They know they’re throwing in the towel. My guess is they’re thinking something like: Don’t aim for great now, aim for safe. Terrorism, a world turning upside down, my kids won’t have it better—let’s just try to be safe, more communal.

A shrewdness in Sanders and Trump backers: They share one faith in Washington, and that is in its ability to wear anything down. They think it will moderate Bernie, take the edges off Trump. For thus reason they don’t see their choices as so radical.

As for Mr. Trump, it is not without meaning that his supporters have had eight months to measure the cost of satisfying their anger by voting for him. In New Hampshire, 35% of the electorate decided that for all his drama and uncertainty they would back him.

The mainstream journalistic mantra is that the GOP is succumbing to nativism, nationalism and the culture of celebrity. That allows them to avoid taking seriously Mr. Trump’s issues: illegal immigration and Washington’s 15-year, bipartisan refusal to stop it; political correctness and how it is strangling a free people; and trade policies that have left the American working class displaced, adrift and denigrated. Mr. Trump’s popularity is propelled by those issues and enabled by his celebrity.

In winning, Donald Trump threw over the GOP donor class. Political professionals don’t fully appreciate that, but normal Americans see it. They get that the guy with money just slapped silly the guys with money. Every hedge-fund billionaire donor should be blinking in pain. Some investment!

This leads me to Citizens United. Conservatives applauded that Supreme Court decision because it allowed Republicans to counter the effect of union money that goes to Democrats. But Citizens United gave the rich too much sway in the GOP. The party was better off when it relied on Main Street. It meant they had to talk to Main Street.

Mr. Trump is a clever man with his finger on the pulse, but his political future depends on two big questions. The first is: Is he at all a good man? Underneath the foul mouthed flamboyance is he in it for America? The second: Is he fully stable? He acts like a nut, calling people bimbos, flying off the handle with grievances. Is he mature, reliable? Is he at all a steady hand?

Political professionals think these are side questions. “Let’s accuse him of not being conservative!” But they are the issue. Because America doesn’t deliberately elect people it thinks base, not to mention crazy.

Anyway, we are in some kind of moment. Congratulations to the establishments of both parties for getting us here. They are the authors of the rebellion; they are a prime thing being rebelled against.

Connected to that, something I’ve noticed. In Washington there used to be a widespread cliché: “God protects drunks, children and the United States of America.” I’m in Washington a lot, and I’ve noticed no one says that anymore. They stopped 10 or 15 years ago. I wonder what that means.

2016 AND BEYOND
The Age of Trump
Eliot A. Cohen
February 26, 2016

At stake is something far more precious than the future of the Republican Party.

How on earth did this happen?  Some, like Robert Kagan, think it is solely the result of a prolonged self-poisoning of the Republican Party. A number of shrewd writers—David Frum, Tucker Carlson, Ben Domenech, Charles Murray, and Joel Kotkin being among the best—have probed deeper. Not surprisingly, they are all some flavor of conservative. On the liberal (or, as they say now, progressive) end of the spectrum the reaction has been chiefly one of smugness (“well, that’s what the Republicans are, we knew it all along”), schadenfreude (“pass the popcorn”), and chicken-counting (“now we can get a head start on Hillary’s first Inaugural”). Their insouciance will be stripped away if Trump becomes the nominee and turns his cunning, ferocity, and charm on an inept, boring politician trailing scandals as old as dubious investments with a 1,000 percent return and as fresh as a homebrew email server. He might lose. He might, however, very well tear her to pieces. Clearly, he relishes the prospect, because he despises the politicians he has bought over the years.

The conservative analysts offer a number of arguments—a shifting class structure, liberal overreach in social policy, existential anxiety about the advent of a robot-driven economy, the stagnation since the Great Recession, and more. They note (as most liberal commentators have yet to do) Trump’s formidable political skills, including a visceral instinct for detecting and exploiting vulnerability that has been the hallmark of many an authoritarian ruler. These insights are all to the point, but they do not capture one key element. Moral rot.

Politicians have, since ancient Greece, lied, pandered, and whored. They have taken bribes, connived, and perjured themselves. But in recent times—in the United States, at any rate—there has never been any politician quite as openly debased and debauched as Donald Trump. Truman and Nixon could be vulgar, but they kept the cuss words for private use. Presidents have chewed out journalists, but which of them would have suggested that an elegant and intelligent woman asking a reasonable question was dripping menstrual blood? LBJ, Kennedy, and Clinton could all treat women as commodities to be used for their pleasure, but none went on the radio with the likes of Howard Stern to discuss the women they had bedded and the finer points of their anatomies. All politicians like the sound of their own names, but Roosevelt named the greatest dam in the United States after his defeated predecessor, Herbert Hoover. Can one doubt what Trump would have christened it?

That otherwise sober people do not find Trump’s insults and insane demands outrageous (Mexico will have to pay for a wall! Japan will have to pay for protection!) says something about a larger moral and cultural collapse. His language is the language of the comments sections of once-great newspapers. Their editors know that the online versions of their publications attract the vicious, the bigoted, and the foulmouthed. But they keep those comments sections going in the hope of getting eyeballs on the page.

Winston Churchill recalls in his memoir how as a young man he came to terms with hypocrisy, discovering the “enormous and unquestionably helpful part that humbug plays in the social life of a great people.” Inconsistency between public virtue and private vice is not altogether a bad thing. No matter how nasty the realities are, maintaining respectable appearances, minding the civilities, and adhering to the conventions is part of what keeps civilization going.

The current problem goes beyond excruciatingly bad manners. What we increasingly lack, and have lacked for some time, is a sense of the moral underpinning of republican (small r) government. Manners and morals maintain a free state as much as laws do, as Tocqueville observed long ago, and when a certain culture of virtue dies, so too does something of what makes democracy work. Old-fashioned words like integrity, selflessness, frugality, gravitas, and modesty rarely rate a mention in modern descriptions of the good life—is it surprising that they don’t come up in politics, either?

William James, a pacifist who understood this point, argued in “The Moral Equivalent War” that “intrepidity, contempt of softness, surrender of private interest, obedience to command must still remain the rock upon which states are built—unless, indeed, we wish for dangerous reactions against commonwealths fit only for contempt.” Just so. Trump might have become a less upsetting figure if he had not wriggled through the clutches of the draft in the 1960s.

Trump’s rise is only one among many signs that something has gone profoundly amiss in our popular culture.It is related to the hysteria that has swept through many campuses, as students call for the suppression of various forms of free speech and the provision of “safe spaces” where they will not be challenged by ideas with which they disagree. The rise of Trump and the fall of free speech in academia are equal signs that we are losing the intellectual sturdiness and honesty without which a republic cannot thrive.

There are other traces of rot. They can be seen in the excuses that political leaders and experts have begun to make as they cozy up to Trump. Like French bureaucrats in the age of Vichy, or Italian aristocrats in the age of Mussolini, they are already saying things like: “I can make it less bad,” “He’s different in private,” “He has his good points,” “He is evolving,” and “Someone has to do the work of government.” Of course, some politicians—Chris Christie, that would be you—simply skip the pretense and indulge in spite or opportunism as the mood takes them.

This is not the first age in which politicians have taken morally disgraceful positions, even by the standards of their time. In the 1950s and 1960s there were flagrant bigots in Congress. But many of them were in other ways public spirited­—think Senator Richard Russell of Georgia, for example, who presided with dignity over the Senate Armed Services Committee for nearly two decades. Lyndon Johnson may not have opposed the evils of his time forthrightly, but he used the full extent of his wiliness to break through the institutionalized discrimination of the South. The villainy of today takes softer forms, but it is pervasive—politicians swallow their principles (such as they are) and endorse a candidate they despise, turn on a judge they once praised, denounce the opposition for behavior identical to their own, or press their branch’s prerogatives and rules to the Constitutional limit, and beyond.

The rot is cultural. It is no coincidence that Trump was the star of a “reality” show. He is the beneficiary of an amoral celebrity culture devoid of all content save an omnipresent lubriciousness. He is a kind of male Kim Kardashian, and about as politically serious. In the context of culture, if not (yet) politics, he is unremarkable; the daily entertainments of today are both tawdry and self-consciously, corrosively ironic. Ours is an age when young people have become used to getting news, of a sort, from Jon Stewart and Steven Colbert, when an earlier generation watched Walter Cronkite and David Brinkley. It is the difference between giggling with young, sneering hipsters and listening to serious adults. Go to YouTube and look at old episodes of Profiles in Courage, if you can find them—a wildly successful television series based on the book nominally authored by John F. Kennedy, which celebrated an individual’s, often a politician’s, courage in standing alone against a crowd, even a crowd with whose politics the audience agreed. The show of comparable popularity today is House of Cards. Bill Clinton has said that he loves it.

American culture is, in short, nastier, more nihilistic, and far less inhibited than ever before. It breeds alternating bouts of cynicism and hysteria, and now it has given us Trump.

The Republican Party as we know it may die of Trump. If it does, it will have succumbed in part because many of its leaders chose not to fight for the Party of Lincoln, which is a set of ideas about how to govern a country, rather than an organization clawing for political and personal advantage. What is at stake, however, is something much more precious than even a great political party. To an extent unimaginable for a very long time, the moral keel of free government is showing cracks. It is not easy to discern how we shall mend them.

Voir aussi:

Trump is the GOP’s Frankenstein monster. Now he’s strong enough to destroy the party.
Robert Kagan
The Washington Post
February 25
Robert Kagan is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and a contributing columnist for The Post.

When the plague descended on Thebes, Oedipus sent his brother-in-law to the Delphic oracle to discover the cause. Little did he realize that the crime for which Thebes was being punished was his own. Today’s Republican Party is our Oedipus. A plague has descended on the party in the form of the most successful demagogue-charlatan in the history of U.S. politics. The party searches desperately for the cause and the remedy without realizing that, like Oedipus, it is the party itself that brought on this plague. The party’s own political crimes are being punished in a bit of cosmic justice fit for a Greek tragedy.

Let’s be clear: Trump is no fluke. Nor is he hijacking the Republican Party or the conservative movement, if there is such a thing. He is, rather, the party’s creation, its Frankenstein monster, brought to life by the party, fed by the party and now made strong enough to destroy its maker. Was it not the party’s wild obstructionism — the repeated threats to shut down the government over policy and legislative disagreements; the persistent call for nullification of Supreme Court decisions; the insistence that compromise was betrayal; the internal coups against party leaders who refused to join the general demolition — that taught Republican voters that government, institutions, political traditions, party leadership and even parties themselves were things to be overthrown, evaded, ignored, insulted, laughed at? Was it not Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.), among many others, who set this tone and thereby cleared the way for someone even more irreverent, so that now, in a most unenjoyable irony, Cruz, along with the rest of the party, must fall to the purer version of himself, a less ideologically encumbered anarcho-revolutionary? This would not be the first revolution that devoured itself.

Then there was the party’s accommodation to and exploitation of the bigotry in its ranks. No, the majority of Republicans are not bigots. But they have certainly been enablers. Who began the attack on immigrants — legal and illegal — long before Trump arrived on the scene and made it his premier issue? Who was it who frightened Mitt Romney into selling his soul in 2012, talking of “self-deportation” to get himself right with the party’s anti-immigrant forces? Who was it who opposed any plausible means of dealing with the genuine problem of illegal immigration, forcing Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) to cower, abandon his principles — and his own immigration legislation — lest he be driven from the presidential race before it had even begun? It was not Trump. It was not even party yahoos. It was Republican Party pundits and intellectuals, trying to harness populist passions and perhaps deal a blow to any legislation for which President Obama might possibly claim even partial credit. What did Trump do but pick up where they left off, tapping the well-primed gusher of popular anger, xenophobia and, yes, bigotry that the party had already unleashed?

Then there was the Obama hatred, a racially tinged derangement syndrome that made any charge plausible and any opposition justified. Has the president done a poor job in many respects? Have his foreign policies, in particular, contributed to the fraying of the liberal world order that the United States created after World War II? Yes, and for these failures he has deserved criticism and principled opposition. But Republican and conservative criticism has taken an unusually dark and paranoid form. Instead of recommending plausible alternative strategies for the crisis in the Middle East, many Republicans have fallen back on a mindless Islamophobia, with suspicious intimations about the president’s personal allegiances.

Thus Obama is not only wrong but also anti-American, un-American, non-American, and his policies — though barely distinguishable from those of previous liberal Democrats such as Michael Dukakis or Mario Cuomo — are somehow representative of something subversive. How surprising was it that a man who began his recent political career by questioning Obama’s eligibility for office could leap to the front of the pack, willing and able to communicate with his followers by means of the dog-whistle disdain for “political correctness”?

We are supposed to believe that Trump’s legion of “angry” people are angry about wage stagnation. No, they are angry about all the things Republicans have told them to be angry about these past 7½ years, and it has been Trump’s good fortune to be the guy to sweep them up and become their standard-bearer. He is the Napoleon who has harvested the fruit of the Revolution.

There has been much second-guessing lately. Why didn’t party leaders stand up and try to stop Trump earlier, while there was still time? But how could they have? Trump was feeding off forces in the party they had helped nurture and that they hoped to ride into power. Some of those Republican leaders and pundits now calling for a counterrevolution against Trump were not so long ago welcoming his contribution to the debate. The politicians running against him and now facing oblivion were loath to attack him before because they feared alienating his supporters. Instead, they attacked one another, clawing at each other’s faces as they one by one slipped over the cliff. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie got his last deadly lick in just before he plummeted — at Trump? No, at Rubio. Jeb Bush spent millions upon millions in his hopeless race, but against whom? Not Trump.

So what to do now? The Republicans’ creation will soon be let loose on the land, leaving to others the job the party failed to carry out. For this former Republican, and perhaps for others, the only choice will be to vote for Hillary Clinton. The party cannot be saved, but the country still can be.

Voir de plus:

What If Trump Doesn’t Have Billions?
Jim Geraghty
National Review
February 25, 2016

There’s a good chance we’ll never see his tax returns. Why would Mitt Romney go on national television and declare, “I think we have good reason to believe that there’s a bombshell in Donald Trump’s taxes. Either he’s not anywhere near as wealthy as he says he is, or he hasn’t been paying the kind of taxes we would expect him to pay”? Since when does buttoned-down, white-bread Mitt Romney make audacious, provocative accusations?

Romney’s accusation might be a safe bet — if not to be verified, then to never be refuted. Just a few years ago, Trump refused to release un-redacted tax returns, even when it could help him win a $5 billion libel lawsuit against a New York Times reporter and author. If Trump was unwilling to release his returns in that circumstance, how likely is it that Trump will release them before Election Day?

Trump’s wealth is a key part of his public image, his status in the eyes of his fans, and his self-image. On July 15, Trump issued a statement declaring, “As of this date, Mr. Trump’s net worth is in excess of TEN BILLION DOLLARS.” (Capital letters in original.)

In October, Forbes magazine offered its own assessment of the mogul’s wealth, concluding, “After interviewing more than 80 sources and devoting unprecedented resources to valuing a single fortune, we’re going with a figure less than half that — $4.5 billion, albeit still the highest figure we’ve ever had for him.” They pointed out that in 2014, Trump’s organization provided documentation for cash and cash equivalents of $307 million. This year his team claimed to have $793 million in cash, but were unwilling to provide documentation.

Listing all the net-worth figures Trump has claimed over the years, Gawker compared them with the significantly smaller sums indicated by available financial information.

But the most glaring evidence supporting Romney’s insinuation comes from Trump’s 2007 libel lawsuit against New York Times reporter Tim O’Brien. In his book TrumpNation: The Art of Being The Donald, O’Brien wrote: Three people with direct knowledge of Donald’s finances, people who had worked closely with him for years, told me that they thought his net worth was somewhere between $150 million and $250 million. By anyone’s standards this still qualified Donald as comfortably wealthy, but none of these people thought he was remotely close to being a billionaire.

Trump contended that passage was a lie and damaged his reputation. Trump fought, lost in court, appealed, and lost again. If Trump’s fortune is multiple billions as he contends, one or two tax returns would have demonstrated the three sources were wildly off-base.

In a recent interview with National Review’s Ian Tuttle, O’Brien said, “The case dragged on for as long as it did because he wouldn’t comply with discovery requests. He wouldn’t turn over the tax returns, then the tax returns came in almost so completely redacted as to be useless.”

The New Jersey Superior Court in its decision offered a blistering rebuke to Trump, contending that there was no good reason to conclude that O’Brien’s sources were being dishonest:

O’Brien has certified that he re-interviewed his three confidential sources prior to publishing their net worth estimates, and he has produced notes of his meetings with them both in 2004 and in 2005. The notes are significant, in that they provide remarkably similar estimates of Trump’s net worth, thereby suggesting the accuracy of the information conveyed. Further, the accounts of the sources contain significant amounts of additional information that O’Brien was able to verify independently.

Even worse, the court concluded that Trump was an untrustworthy source for estimates of his own net worth: “It is indisputable that Trump’s estimates of his own worth changed substantially over time and thus failed to provide a reliable measure against which the accuracy of the information offered by the three confidential sources could be gauged.”

The three-judge panel essentially called the mogul a liar: “The materials that Trump claims to have provided to O’Brien were incomplete and unaudited, and did not contain accurate indications of Trump’s ownership interests in properties, his liabilities, and his revenues, present or future.”

The court even cited a 2000 Fortune article detailing past Trump financial exaggerations: That difficulty is compounded by Trump’s astonishing ability to prevaricate. No one’s saying Trump ought to be held to the same standards of truthfulness as everyone else; he is, after all, Donald Trump. But when Trump says he owns 10% of the Plaza hotel, understand that what he actually means is that he has the right to 10% of the profit if it’s ever sold. When he says he’s building a “90-story building” next to the U.N., he means a 72-story building that has extra-high ceilings. And when he says his casino company is the “largest employer in the state of New Jersey,” he actually means to say it is the eighth-largest. One of Trump’s central arguments was that any lower figure failed to correctly account for the financial value of the Trump “brand.” He contended under oath, “These statements . . . never included the value of the brand. And there are those who say the brand is very, very valuable.” The court rejected this contention: “As Trump’s accountants acknowledge in the 2004 Statement of Financial Condition, under generally accepted accounting principles, reputation is not considered a part of a person’s net worth.” More Donald Trump Trump’s Milquetoast Distancing from White Supremacists How to Stop Clinton and Trump Me ’n’ Chris O’Brien’s lawyers cited documents from Deutsche Bank in 2005; the bank was underwriting a $640 million construction loan it made to Trump’s Chicago condo and hotel project. Deutsche Bank estimated Trump’s net worth was $788 million. That year Trump told the New York Times he was worth $5 billion to $6 million. During the libel suit, Trump had 5 billion reasons to just show his full tax returns and prove the author’s estimate was wildly off base. But he did not. If he did not release un-redacted returns then, he isn’t likely to release un-redacted returns now. Romney’s accusation will remain unanswered and unrefuted . . . probably forever.

— Jim Geraghty is the senior political correspondent of National Review.

Voir de même:

Obama’s Legacy: Trump and Bernie
How could have Obama’s policies not have produced Trump and Sanders?
Daniel Henninger
The Wall Street Journal
Jan. 13, 2016

There is Barack Obama’s State of the Union and there is the state of the union anyone else can see.

The new year began with an underground nuclear-bomb test in North Korea, the worst first week for the Dow since 1897, and Iran forcing 10 U.S. sailors to their knees.

But the man delivering the State of the Union is “optimistic” because “unconditional love” will win.

Let’s get just one SotU venting out of the way before considering what Mr. Obama has wrought for his country and its politics as he turns into his final year.

It is beyond any conceivable pale that Mr. Obama would fail at least to note the 14 Americans gunned down in San Bernardino by committed Islamic terrorists, even as he stood there lecturing the country, at least three times, about not turning against others’ religion. In the past, he said, we have “turned toward God.” Ugh.

In fact, seven years of the Obama presidency have left the United States with a historically weak economy and a degraded national politics. The causal legacy of those two realities are— Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders.

Mr. Obama said in his speech that the economy is producing jobs, which is true, and that it is “peddling fiction” to say the U.S. economy “is in decline.” Really?

The U.S. economy’s average annual growth rate since World War II has been about 3%. In Mr. Obama’s seven years it has been about 2%. Some 65% of people think the U.S. is on the wrong track. You can discover a lot about the wrong track in that missing 1% of economic growth, Mr. Obama’s “new normal.”

The president is correct that the economy is creating jobs, but an alternative view would be that he has proven it is not possible to kill an economy with a GDP of $16 trillion.

Here’s what the new normal looks like. The gold standard of new job creation is business starts. Indeed, Mr. Obama said his new online tools “give an entrepreneur everything he or she needs to start a business in a single day.” Perhaps not everything.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the number of business establishments less than one year old rose steadily from 550,000 in 1997, peaked at about 650,000 in 2006, and then has gone straight down. The Kauffman Foundation’s 2015 entrepreneurship report puts startups in 2012 at just over 400,000.

The Brookings Institution in a 2014 report noted that since 2008 businesses closing annually have exceeded startups for the first time. Their yearly analysis dates to 1978.

That relative decline has a price. More businesses being born than dying is where real jobs come from, not the government tooth fairy. This data is a portrait of an economy losing its innate dynamism. That’s the real cause of “anger” in the U.S. electorate.

We’re supposed to believe that long-term “structural” factors are causing these shifts. Maybe. And if you want to wail about income disparity, go ahead. But if so, it is the president’s job to get impediments out of the way. Instead, this presidency has created them.

For example, Kauffman’s report also notes that the rate of entrepreneurship among people age 20-34—who hire employees like themselves, new breadwinners—began dropping fast in 2011. The president said Tuesday that ObamaCare would help new-business formation. It is doing the opposite. Millennials, assumed to be the Obama base, have entered adulthood to endure a decade of slow growth.

The leaders of Communist China lie awake at night worrying about creating 10 million new jobs every year to prevent a revolution. The elected leader of the U.S. lies awake every night thinking about jobs making . . . windmills and solar panels.

And we’ve got a revolution.

People wonder what accounts for the rise of Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders. Maybe the better question is how the Obama years could not have produced a Trump and Sanders.

Both the Republican and, to a lesser extent, Democratic parties have elements now who want to pull down the temple. But for all the politicized agitation, both these movements, in power, would produce stasis—no change at all.

Donald Trump would preside over a divided government or, as he has promised and un-promised, a trade war with China. Hillary or Bernie will enlarge the Obama economic regime. Either outcome guarantees four more years of at best 2% economic growth. That means more of the above. That means 18-year-olds voting for the first time this year will face historically weak job opportunities through 2020 at least.

Under any of these three, an Americanized European social-welfare state will evolve because Washington—and this will include many “conservatives”—will answer still-rising popular anger with new income redistributions.

And for years afterward, Barack Obama will stroll off the 18th green, smiling. Mission, finally, accomplished.

Voir également:

Trump Voters Are Angry, but Why?
Oren Cass
The National Review
February 23, 2016
Some explanations for Donald Trump’s success emphasize his focus on supposedly working-class issues – namely, immigration and trade – after a refusal by the GOP “establishment” to address them. When the Wall Street Journal condemns his “crude assessment of the economic relationship with China” and sneers that his “pander[ing] to his party’s nativist wing… may have endeared him to one or two radio talk show hosts” but will prove an electoral disaster, the editors only underscore the base-to-establishment gap.
Except I just did that thing where I tell you the quote is about one person and it is really about someone else. Those criticisms were leveled by the Wall Street Journal, but in 2012, at Mitt Romney.
From early in the primaries, Romney took the unheard-of stance that China cheated on trade and should be aggressively confronted. He even called for retaliatory tariffs against continued currency manipulation and intellectual property theft.
Similarly, on immigration, Romney was far to the right by the standards of either the 2012 or 2016 GOP fields. While his use of the phrase “self-deportation” was certainly inartful, the position was similar to the one Ted Cruz has since staked out. (Though Cruz may have shifted bizarrely rightward in the last 24 hours.) He stood by it right through the general-election debates with President Obama. The post-2012 effort by the GOP to reposition itself on immigration was not an extension of the Romney approach, but rather a reaction.
Trump’s unique resonance isn’t about some other policy issue either – for instance, Trump’s tax plan is far friendlier to the wealthiest households than was Romney’s. It can’t be about business background or governing experience. It can’t be about previously held, more liberal policy positions. And long before Trump rolled out “Make America Great Again,” Romney was traveling the country in a bus emblazoned with “Believe in America.” Indeed, as one columnist noted at the time, “Romney might have been tempted to use this slogan: ‘Let’s make America great again.’ But that was already used by Ronald Reagan in 1980.”
The real difference is that Romney held himself each day to the highest standards of decency and felt keenly the burdens of leadership, while Trump is an entertainer committed to delivering whatever irrational blather of insults, threats, and lies will earn the most retweets. Sometimes the blather may take the form of a “policy” proposal like mass deportation or a ban on Muslims, but that is still part of the show – not a suggestion for how to run the country.
The Trump phenomenon does not deserve elevation to the level of some reasonable response, needed movement, or well-earned comeuppance. It is best regarded as some combination of nihilistic joke and authoritarian fantasy. Yes he has “tapped into anger,” but let’s stop pretending it is a rational anger at problems ignored. Look at what is actually different about Trump, and ask what makes those things so popular.
The sad irony is this: the intelligentsia’s confidence that Trump would fade was in fact a strong sign of their respect for the judgment of the Republican base. If you are looking for the people who truly disdained those voters, find the pundits who predicted from the beginning that this guy might actually win. Yet by flocking to him now, Trump voters are ensuring they will be a punchline –sometimes feared, but never respected – for years to come.

Voir enfin:

Des soutiens de Donald Trump en France séduits par «un véritable discours de droite»
Yohan Blavignat
Le Figaro
2016/02/23

INTERVIEW – Le porte-parole du comité de soutien de Donald Trump en France, Vivien Hoch, témoigne au Figaro les raisons pour lesquelles il soutient le candidat républicain. Déçu de la vie politique française, il espère que les élections américaines changeront la droite française.

Les primaires américaines, prélude à l’élection présidentielle qui se déroulera le 8 novembre prochain outre-Atlantique, battent leur plein. Si, chez les démocrates, la concurrence est féroce entre les deux candidats Hillary Clinton et Bernie Sanders, du côté des républicains, Donald Trump caracole largement en tête. Le milliardaire a remporté trois consultations. Il est également en tête des intentions de vote dans la plupart des onze États qui participeront – côté républicain – au Super Tuesday, le 1er mars.

Si sa candidature semblait anecdotique il y a encore quelques mois, Donald Trump a réussi à inverser la tendance de manière spectaculaire, au point d’apparaître comme le successeur potentiel de Barack Obama à la Maison-Blanche. Ses propos controversés envers les migrants, les homosexuels ou encore ses prises de position contre l’avortement ont séduit les électeurs américains, mais également certains hommes politiques et citoyens français. Un comité de soutien a ainsi été fondé fin septembre 2015, lorsque la candidature de Trump n’en était qu’à ses balbutiements, par une dizaine de personnes, dont Vivien Hoch, qui est aussi le porte-parole du mouvement. Doctorant en philosophie, vice-président de l’association Chrétienté-Solidarité, directeur de la communication de l’Agrif (Alliance Générale contre le Racisme et pour le respect de l’Identité Française et chrétienne), «passionné de politique», il explique les raisons pour lesquelles ils soutiennent le candidat républicain, et livre une vision désenchantée de la politique française.

LE FIGARO – La candidature de Donald Trump aux États-Unis prend de plus en plus d’ampleur depuis plusieurs semaines. Ressentez-vous cette dynamique en France, où le candidat républicain est très critiqué?

Vivien Hoch. – Lorsque nous avons fondé ce comité, nous ne nous attendions pas à une telle mobilisation populaire autour de Donald Trump aux États-Unis. Tout a été très vite. Si nous étions une petite dizaine de membres au départ, nous comptons aujourd’hui une centaine de sympathisants qui nous écrivent régulièrement, et qui sont impliqués dans sa campagne. Parmi eux figurent notamment des Américains membres du parti républicain venus vivre en France. D’autres sont simplement des citoyens français qui s’intéressent à la politique et voient dans la candidature de Donald Trump une chance pour les États-Unis, mais aussi pour la France. Ils voient au-delà du Trump bashing qui a lieu dans les médias français. Je n’ai d’ailleurs jamais vu un candidat tant décrédibilisé. Il y a une réelle incompréhension, pourtant un candidat comme Marc Rubio n’est pas non plus un tendre.

Pourquoi soutenir un candidat très clivant comme Donald Trump qui défend une politique très dure vis-à-vis des migrants, de l’avortement ou des armes à feu?

Si l’on regarde les élections américaines avec un regard français – et c’est ce que nous faisons tous malgré nous -, il représente le contrepoint parfait de ce que représentent les hommes politiques français. Et c’est pour cela que nous le soutenons. Il est un ovni pour la France. Il affiche sans honte son argent et affiche clairement ses idées. Concrètement, il n’a pas peur de renverser la table si besoin, ni de déplaire. On l’aime pour ce qu’il est, ou on le rejette entièrement. En plus de ses propos assumés, il a une véritable prestance, un charisme. Pour tout cela, il représente un électrochoc pour la vie politique française. En soutenant Donald Trump, nous revendiquons avant tout notre envie d’avoir un homme politique de cette trempe en France.

Selon vous, il n’existe donc pas un Donald Trump français à l’heure actuelle?

À certains égards, il y a Jean-Marie Le Pen qui n’a pas peur de dire ce qu’il pense. Robert Ménard fait également la quasi-unanimité chez les soutiens de Donald Trump en ce qu’il représente un courant anti-système. Philippe de Villiers pourrait également s’en rapprocher.

Vous reconnaissez-vous dans un parti politique français?

Clairement, non. Nous ne soutenons pas Les Républicains, ni le Front national. Nous sommes avant tout des déçus de la politique telle qu’elle est pratiquée en France. On soutient Donald Trump pour changer cela. Mais la question n’est pas d’importer les États-Unis en France, il s’agit simplement de profiter de la montée de Donald Trump pour changer les choses chez nous. Les Français sont prêts à avoir un Trump à l’Élysée, j’en suis convaincu, mais il devra être assez solide pour ne pas renoncer à ses principes au nom d’une certaine bien pensance. Il ne doit pas avoir peur de mettre les pieds dans le plat.

Pensez-vous que s’il était élu président, l’arrivée de Donald Trump à la Maison-Blanche influerait sur la vie politique française?

Je le pense oui. Cela entraînerait un tremblement de terre chez nous. Les politiques pourraient enfin dire ce qu’ils pensent réellement et lâcher la bride. Actuellement, il y a une chappe de plomb morale au-dessus d’eux, notamment en raison du poids des médias, qui les empêche d’affirmer de réelles prises de position qui permettraient à la France d’avancer dans la bonne direction. Le plus important pour nous est qu’il ne devrait pas y avoir de sujets tabous en France, notamment en ce qui concerne l’avortement ou l’immigration.

N’avez-vous pas peur que s’il parvient à être élu président des États-Unis, Donald Trump ne puisse pas réaliser son programme, comme prédisent ceux qui le qualifient de «populiste» ou de «démagogue»?

Je ne peux pas savoir si Donald Trump réalisera son programme une fois arrivé à la Maison-Blanche. Je pense que s’il est élu, il y aura quand même des changements radicaux, notamment en matière de politique étrangère. Cela commencerait par un rapprochement avec la Russie de Vladimir Poutine, puis une véritable guerre contre l’État islamique. Quoiqu’il arrive je préfère voir un Donald Trump qui n’applique pas son programme à la Maison-Blanche, qu’une Hillary Clinton qui respecte ses engagements électoraux. Dans ce cas-là, c’en sera fini des États-Unis.

Voir également:

Votez Donald!

À islam radical, mesures radicales

Cyril Bennasar

Causeur

2 février 2016

En politique, j’ai pris l’habitude de me méfier de ceux qui rassurent l’opinion pour m’intéresser à ceux qui l’inquiètent. Souvent dans l’histoire de France, les visionnaires excentriques ont concentré les méfiances et les moqueries pendant que les gestionnaires à courte vue ramassaient les suffrages. On se souvient qu’en juin 1940, Pétain était plus acclamé que de Gaulle, qu’en 2002, Jacques Chirac mit le pays dans sa poche face à Jean-Marie Le Pen et, comme on n’apprend jamais rien, il se pourrait qu’en 2017, les mêmes trouilles et les mêmes paresses nous condamnent à perdre cinq longues années avec Alain Juppé. La tentation du centre est le recours des Français qui ne comprennent rien et qui ont peur de tout, de ceux qui préfèrent s’endormir avec Alain Duhamel plutôt que réfléchir avec Alain Finkielkraut.

Les Américains, qui ont de l’audace dans les gènes et le goût de l’aventure, placent aujourd’hui Donald Trump en tête dans les sondages pour l’investiture républicaine. Ça fait beaucoup rire au Petit Journal. C’est bon signe mais jusqu’à présent, ça ne suffisait pas à me convaincre que le type était taillé pour le job. Au début de sa campagne, je n’avais pas aimé toutes ses déclarations. Surtout celles qui généralisent. Même si je n’ai aucun mal à croire qu’un peuple venu du Sud sans qu’on l’ait invité soit surreprésenté dans les prisons pour des affaires de drogue, de crimes et de viols, on ne doit pas dire : « Les » Mexicains. Il faut dire : « Des » Mexicains.

Je n’avais pas aimé non plus ses propos à l’adresse d’Hillary Clinton, lui reprochant de n’avoir pas su satisfaire son mari. Il faut être ignorant pour avancer cela. Et grossier. Nous ne trompons pas nos femmes parce qu’elles ne réveillent plus nos désirs, mais parce que nous avons de l’audace dans les gènes et le goût de l’aventure.

Or l’ignorance et la grossièreté sont trop répandues pour faire sortir du lot un candidat à la candidature suprême, même pour celui qui ambitionnerait de ne devenir qu’un président normal. Quand on promet de « make América great again », on ne peut pas être so far away des grandes figures qui ont fait l’Amérique. Même sans états d’âme avec les Mexicains et sans retenue contre les Indiens, le cow-boy savait rester un gentleman. Jamais John Wayne n’aurait laissé une dame marcher dans la boue en descendant de la diligence. Évidemment, ni dans Alamo ni dans La Chevauchée fantastique, les femmes ne se présentent aux élections pour être shérif à la place du shérif. Mais ce n’est pas une raison pour perdre son sang-froid, et un futur président devrait savoir que l’héroïsme s’arrête là où l’égalité commence.

Le terroriste est souvent un ex-voisin modèle

Je n’avais pas aimé non plus sa critique des interventions militaires menées par ses prédécesseurs, en particulier les regrettés George Bush. Comme il est facile aujourd’hui de condamner ces idéalistes, qui ont surtout péché par excès d’occidentalo-morphisme, prêtant à ces populations des aspirations démocratiques, des soifs de liberté et des rêves de paix. Peut-être eût-il fallu ne remplir que la première partie des missions, en Afghanistan comme en Irak, en éliminant massivement tout ennemi avéré et, par précaution, supposé, et en renonçant à la seconde qui ambitionnait de faire des survivants des démocrates. Peut-être eût-il fallu entendre ce général russe qui, au xixe siècle disait déjà que « L’Afghanistan ne peut être conquis, et qu’il ne le mérite pas. » Mais qui donc avait prévu que, dans le monde arabe, les alternatives aux tyrannies se révéleraient bien pires que les régimes autoritaires abattus, et que les printemps libéreraient surtout les islamismes ? En tout cas, pas ceux qui aujourd’hui rivalisent de sévérité pour condamner les erreurs passées de leurs adversaires.

Voilà pourquoi j’étais réservé sur l’opportunité de donner le poste à Donald Trump car il ne suffit pas, pour faire un bon président, d’effaroucher les bien-pensants, même si c’est une condition incontournable, ou d’avoir raison après tout le monde. Et puis est venue cette idée, peut-être devenue promesse depuis la publication de cet article, de ne plus laisser entrer les musulmans sur le sol des États-Unis. Je sais bien qu’il ne faut pas dire « les », il faut dire « des », j’ai compris la leçon. Oui, mais alors lesquels ? Telle est la question que Donald rétorque à nos indignations. Avant que des musulmans balancent des avions dans des tours ou que d’autres flinguent des handicapés, les uns comme les autres étaient de paisibles citoyens, des voisins sans histoires, des étudiants appréciés, ou des travailleurs honnêtes, car on ne peut, au pays de la troisième récidive et de la peine de mort, devenir terroriste après avoir fait carrière dans le banditisme. Comment faire, donc, pour distinguer les terroristes musulmans parmi les musulmans ? Et que faire si la mission s’avère impossible ? C’est en posant ces questions, que devrait se poser tout responsable politique qui s’est penché sur le vrai sens des mots « responsable » et « politique », que Donald est remonté dans mon estime. C’est en opposant à la liberté de circulation le principe de précaution (surtout utilisé pour nous empêcher de vivre libres, et qui pourrait bien, en l’occurrence, nous empêcher de mourir jeunes), qu’il est devenu mon candidat.

Vers un maccarthysme antidjihad ?

La solution est radicale, entière, brutale, américaine et nous paraît folle, comme tout ce qui nous vient d’outre-Atlantique avec vingt ans d’avance, pour nous apparaître comme moderne, vingt ans après. Ainsi, les Américains ont fermé, au temps de la guerre froide, leur pays au communisme. On se souvient du maccarthysme et des questions risibles posées par les douaniers aux nouveaux arrivants, immigrés ou touristes : Appartenez-vous au crime organisé ? Êtes-vous membre du parti communiste ? Ils ont su, sous la réprobation du monde entier, éviter d’être contaminés par cette maladie du xxe siècle. Nous avons eu, en France et en Europe, une autre approche. Nous avons fait le pari que cette idéologie dangereuse et liberticide se dissoudrait dans la démocratie et dans l’économie de marché. Et nous avons gagné. Chez nous, il ne reste du communisme qu’un parti crépusculaire et folklorique, une curiosité européenne où se retrouvent des écrivains chics, idiots utiles du village souverainiste – utiles à qui, on se le demande ? On les lit avec bonheur quand ils ne parlent pas de politique.

Mais alors deux questions se posent : le monde libre aura-t-il raison de l’islamisme comme il a eu raison du communisme ? Pouvons-nous attendre vingt ans pour le savoir ?

Voir par ailleurs:

Al Qaeda Makes a Comeback
Ken Dilanian
NBC
Feb. 26, 201

Intelligence analysts paid close attention last month when al Qaeda’s master bombmaker, Ibrahim al Asiri — whose name tops U.S. kill lists — issued an audiotape from his hiding place.

The content was the usual anti-Saudi Arabian screed, sprinkled with threats against America — but the news was Asiri’s sudden willingness to join the terror group’s PR campaign. For years, the man who tried to take down planes with underwear and parcel bombs had laid low, as al Qaeda’s Yemen affiliate tried to protect him from U.S. drone strikes.

In 2016, however, a resurgent al Qaeda is emerging from the shadows. While ISIS has been soaking up headlines, its older sibling has been launching attacks and grabbing territory too, and U.S. intelligence officials tell NBC News they are increasingly concerned the older terror group is poised to build on its achievements.

« Al Qaeda affiliates are positioned to make gains in 2016, » James Clapper, the director of national intelligence, warned the House Intelligence Committee Thursday.

Because of those far-flung affiliates, al Qaeda « remains a serious threat to U.S. interests worldwide, » Lt. Gen. Vincent Stewart, the director of the Defense Intelligence Agency, told Congress recently.

FROM OCT. 19, 2015: Senior al Qaeda leader Sanafi al-Nasr killed in US airstrike1:19
After seizing a large segment of Iraq and Syria, beheading Western hostages on camera and slaughtering civilians in the heart of Paris, ISIS has eclipsed its extremist rival as the biggest brand in global jihad.

But U.S. officials tell NBC News that al Qaeda — though its core in Pakistan has been degraded by years of CIA drone strikes — is now experiencing renewed strength through its affiliates, led by al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) in Yemen and the Nusra Front in Syria. Clapper called the two groups al Qaeda’s « most capable » affiliates in his House testimony Thursday.

Both branches have expanded their territorial holdings over the last year amid civil wars. Russian air strikes against the Nusra Front, and CIA drone attacks on AQAP leaders, have set them back, but have not come close to destroying them.

Al Qaeda has not managed to attack a Western target recently, but it continues to inspire plots. There is no evidence December’s mass shooting in San Bernardino, California was directed by al Qaeda, but Syed Rizwan Farook, who carried out the attack with his wife Tashfeen Malik, appears to have been radicalized by al Qaeda long before the rise of ISIS. He was a consumer of videos by al Qaeda’s Somalia affiliate and the AQAP preacher Anwar al Awlaki, court records show.

Al Qaeda attacks on hotels in Burkina Faso in January and Mali in November, which together killed dozens of people, appeared to affirm the threat posed by the terror group’s Saharan branch, al Qaeda in the Islamic Magreb, or AQIM.

Stewart added that intelligence officials are also « concerned al Qaeda could reestablish a significant presence in Afghanistan and Pakistan, if regional counterterrorism pressure deceases. »

In Yemen, AQAP has benefitted from the power vacuum created by the Houthi rebels’ uprising, and the air war on the Houthis by Saudi Arabia.

AQAP last April seized the city of Mukalla, the capital of Hadramout province and a port city with a population of some 300,000. It looted a bank of more than $1 million in cash, U.S. officials said, and released 300 inmates from jail.

Since then, the group has expanded its territory in the provinces of Abyan and Shabwa, its traditional strongholds.

« AQAP’s expansion is unchecked because there is no one on the ground to put any pressure on the organization, » noted Geoffrey Johnsen, a Yemen expert. « What is left of Yemen’s military is too busy fighting other enemies to engage AQAP, and the Saudis are focused on rolling back the Houthis. In the midst of Yemen’s civil war, AQAP is able to pursue more territory and to plot, plan, and launch attacks. »

The CIA is watching closely. Jalal Bala’idi, a prominent AQAP field commander, was killed in an agency drone strike in February.

AQAP’s seizures of territory have « allowed them to operate more openly, have access to a port, and have access to other kinds of infrastructure that has certainly benefitted them, » a U.S. intelligence official told NBC News. At the same time, he said, the U.S. has « managed to remove many significant figures from the battlefield and keep AQAP somewhat at bay. »

Al Qaida’s Syrian affiliate gets less public attention than others. Western media reporting sometimes refers to the Nusra front as a Syrian rebel group, without mentioning that it’s part of the global terrorism organization.

But Nusra is as well-organized and disciplined as any al Qaeda affiliate, U.S. intelligence officials say. Although it is now focused on defeating Assad, its battle tested fighters could pose a risk to the West in the years ahead.

« Jabhat al Nusra is a core component of the al Qaeda network and probably poses the most dangerous threat to the U.S. from al Qaeda in the coming years, » the Institute for the Study of War, a Washington think tank, said in a recent report. « Al Qaeda is pursuing phased, gradual, and sophisticated strategies that favor letting ISIS attract the attention — and attacks — of the West while it builds the human infrastructure to support and sustain major gains in the future and for the long term. »

U.S. air strikes have set back a group of al Qaeda operatives in Syria known as the Khorasan Group, which embedded with Nusra while plotting attacks against the West, intelligence officials say.

But Nusra has trained a core of elite fighters, the ISW says. Georgetown terrorism expert Bruce Hoffman says Nusra has achieved Osama bin Laden’s goal of rebranding al Qaeda and moving away from a name that had lost its luster.

The group’s leader, Abu Mohammad al Julani, is hardly a household name in the West, but he is respected by his adversaries in American intelligence. He is believed to have been detained by the U.S. military in Iraq and released in 2008.

Hoffman, who served as the CIA’s Scholar-in-Residence for Counterterrorism, calls Nusra « even more dangerous and capable than ISIS. »

Al Qaeda is watching ISIS « take all the heat and absorb all the blows while al Qaeda quietly re-builds its military strength, » he said.


Désinformation: Le mensonge de Chirac sur l’Irak (Even Chirac thought Iraq had WMD’s: Trump’s serial invocations of the war are good reminders of just how mythical Iraq has now become)

25 février, 2016
ChirakWhere was this false courage of yours when the explosion in Beirut took place on 1983 AD (1403 A.H). You were turned into scattered pits and pieces at that time; 241 mainly marines solders were killed. And where was this courage of yours when two explosions made you to leave Aden in lees than twenty four hours! But your most disgraceful case was in Somalia; where- after vigorous propaganda about the power of the USA and its post cold war leadership of the new world order- you moved tens of thousands of international force, including twenty eight thousands American solders into Somalia. However, when tens of your solders were killed in minor battles and one American Pilot was dragged in the streets of Mogadishu you left the area carrying disappointment, humiliation, defeat and your dead with you. Clinton appeared in front of the whole world threatening and promising revenge, but these threats were merely a preparation for withdrawal. You have been disgraced by Allah and you withdrew; the extent of your impotence and weaknesses became very clear. It was a pleasure for the “heart” of every Muslim and a remedy to the “chests” of believing nations to see you defeated in the three Islamic cities of Beirut , Aden and Mogadishu. Osama bin Laden (Declaration of War against the Americans Occupying the Land of the Two Holy Places, Aug. 23, 1996)
Il n’y a pas de devoir plus important que de repousser les Américains hors de la terre sainte. La présence des forces militaires croisées des Etats-Unis est le danger le plus menaçant pour le plus grand pays producteur de pétrole au monde. Osama bin Laden
Si le monde nous dit d’abandonner toutes nos armes et de ne garder que des épées, nous le ferons… Mais s’ils gardent un fusil et qu’ils me disent de ne posséder qu’une épée, alors nous refuserons. Saddam Hussein
Il y a un problème, c’est la possession probable d’armes de destruction massive par un pays incontrôlable, l’Irak. La communauté internationale a raison de s’émouvoir de cette situation. Et elle a eu raison de décider qu’il fallait désarmer l’Irak. (…) Il faut laisser aux inspecteurs le temps de le faire. Jacques Chirac
Dans l’immédiat, notre attention doit se porter en priorité sur les domaines biologique et chimique. C’est là que nos présomptions vis-à-vis de l’Iraq sont les plus significatives : sur le chimique, nous avons des indices d’une capacité de production de VX et d’ypérite ; sur le biologique, nos indices portent sur la détention possible de stocks significatifs de bacille du charbon et de toxine botulique, et une éventuelle capacité de production.  Dominique De Villepin (05.02.03)
Les visées militaires du programme nucléaire iranien ne font plus de doute mais les possibilités de négociations avec le régime de Téhéran n’ont pas été épuisées. (…) De l’avis des experts, d’ici deux à trois ans, l’Iran pourrait être en possession d’une arme nucléaire. Rapport parlementaire français (17 décembre 2008)
Avec la fin de la guerre froide, nous ne faisons actuellement l’objet d’aucune menace directe de la part d’une puissance majeure. Mais la fin du monde bipolaire n’a pas fait disparaître les menaces contre la paix. Dans de nombreux pays se diffusent des idées radicales prônant la confrontation des civilisations, des cultures et des religions. Aujourd’hui, cette volonté de confrontation se traduit par des attentats odieux, qui viennent régulièrement nous rappeler que le fanatisme et l’intolérance mènent à toutes les folies. Demain, elle pourrait prendre d’autres formes, encore plus graves, impliquant des Etats. (…) Notre monde est également marqué par l’apparition d’affirmations de puissance qui reposent sur la possession d’armes nucléaires, biologiques ou chimiques. D’où la tentation de certains Etats de se doter de la puissance nucléaire, en contravention avec les traités. Des essais de missiles balistiques, dont la portée ne cesse d’augmenter, se multiplient partout dans le monde. C’est ce constat qui a conduit le Conseil de sécurité des Nations unies à reconnaître que la prolifération des armes de destruction massive, et de leurs vecteurs associés, constituait une menace pour la paix et la sécurité internationale. (…) Mais ce serait faire preuve d’angélisme que de croire que la prévention, seule, suffit à nous protéger. Pour être entendu, il faut aussi, lorsque c’est nécessaire, être capable de faire usage de la force. Nous devons donc disposer d’une capacité importante à intervenir en dehors de nos frontières, avec des moyens conventionnels, afin de soutenir ou de compléter cette stratégie. (…) La dissuasion nucléaire, je l’avais souligné au lendemain des attentats du 11 septembre 2001, n’est pas destinée à dissuader des terroristes fanatiques. Pour autant, les dirigeants d’Etats qui auraient recours à des moyens terroristes contre nous, tout comme ceux qui envisageraient d’utiliser, d’une manière ou d’une autre, des armes de destruction massive, doivent comprendre qu’ils s’exposeraient à une réponse ferme et adaptée de notre part. Cette réponse peut être conventionnelle. Elle peut aussi être d’une autre nature. (…) Nous sommes en mesure d’infliger des dommages de toute nature à une puissance majeure qui voudrait s’en prendre à des intérêts que nous jugerions vitaux. Contre une puissance régionale, notre choix n’est pas entre l’inaction et l’anéantissement. La flexibilité et la réactivité de nos forces stratégiques nous permettraient d’exercer notre réponse directement sur ses centres de pouvoir, sur sa capacité à agir. Toutes nos forces nucléaires ont été configurées en conséquence. C’est dans ce but que, par exemple, le nombre de têtes nucléaires a été réduit sur certains des missiles de nos sous-marins. Mais notre concept d’emploi des armes nucléaires reste bien le même. Il ne saurait, en aucun cas, être question d’utiliser des moyens nucléaires à des fins militaires lors d’un conflit. C’est dans cet esprit que les forces nucléaires sont fréquemment qualifiées « d’armes de non-emploi ». Cette formule ne doit cependant pas laisser planer le doute sur notre volonté et notre capacité à mettre en oeuvre nos armes nucléaires. La menace crédible de leur utilisation pèse en permanence sur les dirigeants animés d’intentions hostiles à notre égard. Elle est essentielle pour les ramener à la raison, leur faire prendre conscience du coût démesuré qu’auraient leurs actes, pour eux-mêmes et pour leurs Etats. Par ailleurs, nous nous réservons toujours le droit d’utiliser un ultime avertissement pour marquer notre détermination à protéger nos intérêts vitaux. Jacques Chirac (19.01.2006)
Dieu merci, l’Europe n’a pas encore atteint le stade où elle se retrouve  nue et sans défense dans le conflit iranien et où elle tremble devant les délires d’un ancien gardien de la révolution devenu fou. Merci, Monsieur le Président Chirac, d’avoir été aussi clair. (…) La France possède encore près de 300 têtes nucléaires dans son arsenal et dispose des engins de lancement les plus modernes pour envoyer ces armes sur n’importe quel point du globe. Ce potentiel de destruction n’a pas vocation à servir de musée, mais à effrayer d’éventuels agresseurs. L’Iran se contente pour l’instant d’agressions verbales – mais combien de temps le resteront-elles ? C’est une bonne chose que Chirac ait placé Téhéran dans sa ligne de mire nucléaire ». Die Presse (Autriche, 20.01.2006)
Un Jacques Chirac inédit a lancé hier un avertissement très dur et inhabituel contre les Etats terroristes. Ambassadeur du pacifisme, de la tempérance et de la mesure pendant la phase préliminaire à la guerre en Irak, et opposé à l’usage de la force contre le régime de Saddam Hussein, le président français change radicalement de terrain. Chirac n’a mentionné aucun Etat en particulier. Il a préféré l’abstraction et a bâti son discours sur la puissance nucléaire de la France, jusqu’ici symbole de la résistance pacifique et pacifiste à la ‘guerre contre le terrorisme’ menée par les Etats-Unis après le 11 septembre. Le président gaulois a rangé sa panoplie de pacifiste et déplié la carte du terrorisme international, considérée comme la feuille de route d’un avenir imprévisible. Et très changeant. ABC (Espagne, 20.01.2006)
Les Etats-Unis n’ont pas envahi l’Irak mais sont intervenus dans un conflit déjà en cours.  Kiron Skinner (conseillère à la sécurité du président Bush)
L’affaire Boidevaix-Mérimée est-elle l’arbre qui cache la forêt ? Certaines sources au Quai d’Orsay l’insinuent. « Il est impossible que Mérimée se soit mouillé pour une telle somme (156 000 dollars), qui n’est pas si importante au regard des risques encourus et des profits possibles », estime un diplomate qui a côtoyé l’ancien représentant de la France au Conseil de sécurité. « Nous sommes plusieurs à penser que les sommes en jeu sont en réalité colossales. » Olivier Weber (Le Point 01/12/05)
Those who still oppose war in Iraq think containment is an alternative — a middle way between all-out war and letting Saddam Hussein out of his box. They are wrong. Sanctions are inevitably the cornerstone of containment, and in Iraq, sanctions kill. In this case, containment is not an alternative to war. Containment is war: a slow, grinding war in which the only certainty is that hundreds of thousands of civilians will die. The Gulf War killed somewhere between 21,000 and 35,000 Iraqis, of whom between 1,000 and 5,000 were civilians. Based on Iraqi government figures, UNICEF estimates that containment kills roughly 5,000 Iraqi babies (children under 5 years of age) every month, or 60,000 per year. Other estimates are lower, but by any reasonable estimate containment kills about as many people every year as the Gulf War — and almost all the victims of containment are civilian, and two-thirds are children under 5. Each year of containment is a new Gulf War. (…) The sanctions exist only because Saddam Hussein has refused for 12 years to honor the terms of a cease-fire he himself signed. In any case, the United Nations and the United States allow Iraq to sell enough oil each month to meet the basic needs of Iraqi civilians. Hussein diverts these resources. Hussein murders the babies. (…) But … it is not the only cost of containment. Containment allows Saddam Hussein to control the political climate of the Middle East. If it serves his interest to provoke a crisis, he can shoot at U.S. planes. He can mobilize his troops near Kuwait. He can support terrorists and destabilize his neighbors. The United States must respond to these provocations. Worse, containment forces the United States to keep large conventional forces in Saudi Arabia and the rest of the region. That costs much more than money. The existence of al Qaeda, and the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, are part of the price the United States has paid to contain Saddam Hussein. Walter Russell Mead
Il est maintenant clair que les assurances données par Chirac ont joué un rôle crucial, persuadant Saddam Hussein de ne pas offrir les concessions qui auraient pu éviter une guerre et le changement de régime. Selon l’ex-vice président Tareq Aziz, s’exprimant depuis sa cellule devant des enquêteurs américains et irakiens, Saddam était convaincu que les Français, et dans une moindre mesure, les Russes allaient sauver son régime à la dernière minute. Amir Taheri
 Les inspecteurs n’ont jamais pu vérifier ce qu’il était advenu de 3,9 tonnes de VX (…) dont la production entre 1988 et 1990 a été reconnue par l’Irak. Bagdad a déclaré que les destructions avaient eu lieu en 1990 mais n’en a pas fourni de preuves. Thérèse Delpech
Comme l’exemple d’usage chimique contre les populations kurdes de 1987-1988 en avait apporté la preuve, ces armes avaient aussi un usage interne. Thérèse Delpech
L’Irak (…) pourrait être l’un des grands succès de cette administration. Joe Biden (10.02.10)
Nous croyons qu’une réussite, la démocratie en Irak peut devenir un modèle pour toute la région. Obama (12.12.11)
Nous ne savons toujours pas ce que l’Irak fait ou s’il a les matériaux nécessaires pour construire des armes nucléaires. Je ne suis pas belliqueux. Mais si nous décidons que nous avons besoin de frapper l’Irak à nouveau, il serait fou de ne pas mener la mission jusqu’à son terme. Si nous ne le faisons pas, nous aurons droit à une situation pire que tout: l’Irak restera une menace et aura plus de motivation que jamais pour nous attaquer. Donald Trump (2000)
Oui, je suppose que oui [j’étais en faveur d’une invasion de l’Irak]. J’aurais aimé que la première invasion se passe mieux. Donald Trump (Sept. 11, 2002)
[George W. Bush] doit faire quelque chose ou ne rien faire, parce peut-être qu’il est trop tôt et qu’il faut peut-être attendre les Nations unies, vous savez. Il subit une grosse pression. Je pense qu’il fait un très bon boulot. Donald Trump (2003)
Je suis le seul sur cette scène à avoir dit « N’allez pas en Irak. N’attaquez pas l’Irak ». Personne d’autre sur cette scène n’a dit ça. Et je l’ai dit haut et fort. Et j’étais dans le secteur privé. Je n’étais pas en politique, heureusement. Mais je l’ai dit, et je l’ai dit haut et fort: « Vous allez déstabiliser le Moyen-Orient ». C’est exactement ce qui s’est passé. Donald Trump (2015)
Nous laissons derrière nous un Etat souverain, stable, autosuffisant, avec une gouvernement représentatif qui a été élu par son peuple. Nous bâtissons un nouveau partenariat entre nos pays. Et nous terminons une guerre non avec une bataille filnale, mais avec une dernière marche du retour. C’est une réussite extraordinaire, qui a pris presque neuf ans. Et aujourd’hui nous nous souvenons de tout ce que vous avez fait pour le rendre possible. (…) Dur travail et sacrifice. Ces mots décrivent à peine le prix de cette guerre, et le courage des hommes et des femmes qui l’ont menée. Nous ne connaissons que trop bien le prix élevé de cette guerre. Plus d’1,5 million d’Américains ont servi en Irak. Plus de 30.000 Américains ont été blessés, et ce sont seulement les blessés dont les blessures sont visibles. Près de 4.500 Américains ont perdu la vie, dont 202 héros tombés au champ d’honneur venus d’ici, Fort Bragg. (…) Les dirigeants et les historiens continueront à analyser les leçons stratégiques de l’Irak. Et nos commandants prendront en compte des leçons durement apprises lors de campagnes militaires à l’avenir. Mais la leçon la plus importante que vous nous apprenez n’est pas une leçon en stratégie militaire, c’est une leçon sur le caractère de notre pays, car malgré toutes les difficultés auxquelles notre pays fait face, vous nous rappelez que rien n’est impossible pour les Américains lorsqu’ils sont solidaires. Obama (14.12.11)
Mr. Speaker, I do not think any Member of this body disagrees that Saddam Hussein is a tyrant, a murderer, and a man who has started two wars. He is clearly someone who cannot be trusted or believed. The question, Mr. Speaker, is not whether we like Saddam Hussein or not. The question is whether he represents an imminent threat to the American people and whether a unilateral invasion of Iraq will do more harm than good. Mr. Speaker, the front page of The Washington Post today reported that all relevant U.S. intelligence agencies now say, despite what we have heard from the White House, that « Saddam Hussein is unlikely to initiate a chemical or biological attack against the United States. » Even more importantly, our intelligence agencies say that should Saddam conclude that a U.S.-led attack could no longer be deterred, he might at that point launch a chemical or biological counterattack. In other words, there is more danger of an attack on the United States if we launch a precipitous invasion. (…) In my view, the U.S. must work with the United Nations to make certain within clearly defined timelines that the U.N. inspectors are allowed to do their jobs. These inspectors should undertake an unfettered search for Iraqi weapons of mass destruction and destroy them when found, pursuant to past U.N. resolutions. If Iraq resists inspection and elimination of stockpiled weapons, we should stand ready to assist the U.N. in forcing compliance. Bernie Sanders
President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt had told [general] Tommy Franks that Iraq had biological weapons and was certain to use them on our troops [but] Mubarak refused to make the allegation in public for fear of inciting the Arab street. (…) Prince Bandar of Saudi Arabia, the kingdom’s longtime ambassador to Washington and a friend of mine since dad’s presidency, came to the Oval Office and told me our allies in the Middle East wanted a decision. George W. Bush
Senior military officers and former Regime officials were uncertain about the existence of WMD during the sanctions period and the lead up to Operation Iraqi Freedom because Saddam sent mixed messages. Early on, Saddam sought to foster the impression with his generals that Iraq could resist a Coalition ground attack using WMD. Then, in a series of meetings in late 2002, Saddam appears to have reversed course and advised various groups of senior officers and officials that Iraq in fact did not have WMD. His admissions persuaded top commanders that they really would have to fight the United States without recourse to WMD. In March 2003, Saddam created further confusion when he implied to his ministers and senior officers that he had some kind of secret weapon. The CIA
Somewhat remarkably, given how adamantly Germany would oppose the war, the German Federal Intelligence Service held the bleakest view of all, arguing that Iraq might be able to build a nuclear weapon within three years. Israel, Russia, Britain, China, and even France held positions similar to that of the United States; France’s President Jacques Chirac told Time magazine last February, « There is a problem—the probable possession of weapons of mass destruction by an uncontrollable country, Iraq. The international community is right … in having decided Iraq should be disarmed. » In sum, no one doubted that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction. (…) Saddam’s behavior may have been driven by completely different considerations. (…) ever since the Iran-Iraq war WMD had been an important element of Saddam’s strength within Iraq. He used them against the Kurds in the late 1980s, and during the revolts that broke out after the Gulf War, he sent signals that he might use them against both the Kurds and the Shiites. He may have feared that if his internal adversaries realized that he no longer had the capability to use these weapons, they would try to move against him. In a similar vein, Saddam’s standing among the Sunni elites who constituted his power base was linked to a great extent to his having made Iraq a regional power—which the elites saw as a product of Iraq’s unconventional arsenal. Thus openly giving up his WMD could also have jeopardized his position with crucial supporters. (…) The war was not all bad. I do not believe that it was a strategic mistake, although the appalling handling of postwar planning was. There is no question that Saddam Hussein was a force for real instability in the Persian Gulf, and that his removal from power was a tremendous improvement. There is also no question that he was pure evil, and that he headed one of the most despicable regimes of the past fifty years. I am grateful that the United States no longer has to contend with the malign influence of Saddam’s Iraq in this economically irreplaceable and increasingly fragile part of the world; nor can I begrudge the Iraqi people one day of their freedom. What’s more, we should not forget that containment was failing. The shameful performance of the United Nations Security Council members (particularly France and Germany) in 2002-2003 was final proof that containment would not have lasted much longer; Saddam would eventually have reconstituted his WMD programs, although further in the future than we had thought. Kenneth M. Pollak
If Saddam rejects peace and we have to use force, our purpose is clear. We want to seriously diminish the threat posed by Iraq’s weapons-of-mass-destruction program. Bill Clinton (1998)
Iraq is a long way from [the USA], but what happens there matters a great deal here. For the risk that the leaders of a rogue state will use nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons against us or our allies is the greatest security threat we face. Secretary of State Madeline Albright (1998)
He will use those weapons of mass destruction again, as he has ten times since 1983. Sandy Berger (Clinton’s National Security Adviser, 1998)
Saddam Hussein has been engaged in the development of weapons-of-mass-destruction technology, which is a threat to countries in the region, and he has made a mockery of the weapons inspection process. Nancy Pelosi
There is no doubt that . . . Saddam Hussein has invigorated his weapons programs. Reports indicate that biological, chemical, and nuclear programs continue apace and may be back to pre-Gulf war status. In addition, Saddam continues to redefine delivery systems and is doubtless using the cover of a licit missile program to develop longer-range missiles that will threaten the United States and our allies. Sen. Bob Graham
Saddam Hussein is a tyrant and a threat to the peace and stability of the region. He has ignored the mandate of the United Nations, and is building weapons of mass destruction and the means of delivering them. Sen. Carl Levin
In the four years since the inspectors left, intelligence reports show that Saddam Hussein has worked to rebuild his chemical- and biological-weapons stock, his missile-delivery capability, and his nuclear program. He has also given aid, comfort, and sanctuary to terrorists, including al-Qaeda members. Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (October 2002)
There is unmistakable evidence that Saddam Hussein is working aggressively to develop nuclear weapons and will likely have nuclear weapons within the next five years. . . . We also should remember we have always underestimated the progress Saddam has made in development of weapons of mass destruction. Sen. Jay Rockefeller (vice chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee)
We know that [Saddam] has stored secret supplies of biological and chemical weapons throughout his country. Al Gore (September 2002)
Iraq’s search for weapons of mass destruction has proven impossible to deter, and we should assume that it will continue for as long as Saddam is in power. Al Gore (2002)
I will be voting to give the President of the United States the authority to use force—if necessary—to disarm Saddam Hussein because I believe that a deadly arsenal of weapons of mass destruction in his hands is a real and grave threat to our security. John Kerry (2002)
We have known for many years that Saddam Hussein is seeking and developing weapons of mass destruction. Sen. Ted Kennedy (2002)
The last UN weapons inspectors left Iraq in October of 1998. We are confident that Saddam Hussein retains some stockpiles of chemical and biological weapons, and that he has since embarked on a crash course to build up his chemical- and biological-warfare capabilities. Intelligence reports indicate that he is seeking nuclear weapons. Sen. Robert Byrd (2002)
Without further outside intervention, Iraq should be able to rebuild weapons and missile plants within a year [and] future military attacks may be required to diminish the arsenal again. (…) it is hard to negotiate with a tyrant who has no intention of honoring his commitments and who sees nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons as his country’s salvation. The New York Times
Of all the booby traps left behind by the Clinton administration, none is more dangerous—or more urgent—than the situation in Iraq. Over the last year, Mr. Clinton and his team quietly avoided dealing with, or calling attention to, the almost complete unraveling of a decade’s efforts to isolate the regime of Saddam Hussein and prevent it from rebuilding its weapons of mass destruction. That leaves President Bush to confront a dismaying panorama in the Persian Gulf [where] intelligence photos . . . show the reconstruction of factories long suspected of producing chemical and biological weapons. The Washington Post (January 2001)
Some have said we must not act until the threat is imminent. Since when have terrorists and tyrants announced their intentions, politely putting us on notice before they strike? If this threat is permitted to fully and suddenly emerge, all actions, all words, and all recriminations would come too late. Trusting in the sanity and restraint of Saddam Hussein is not a strategy, and it is not an option. George W. Bush (January 2003)
Although Saddam’s attitude to al-Qaida has not always been consistent, he has generally rejected suggestions of cooperation. Intelligence nonetheless indicates that … meetings have taken place between senior Iraqi representatives and senior al-Qaida operatives. Butler report (2002)
It is accepted by all parties that Iraqi officials visited Niger in 1999. The British government had intelligence from several different sources indicating that this visit was for the purpose of acquiring uranium. Since uranium constitutes almost three-quarters of Niger’s exports, the intelligence was credible. The evidence was not conclusive that Iraq actually purchased, as opposed to having sought, uranium, and the British government did not claim this. Butler report
I can’t tell you why the French, the Germans, the Brits, and us thought that most of the material, if not all of it, that we presented at the UN on 5 February 2003 was the truth. I can’t. I’ve wrestled with it. [But] when you see a satellite photograph of all the signs of the chemical-weapons ASP—Ammunition Supply Point—with chemical weapons, and you match all those signs with your matrix on what should show a chemical ASP, and they’re there, you have to conclude that it’s a chemical ASP, especially when you see the next satellite photograph which shows the UN inspectors wheeling in their white vehicles with black markings on them to that same ASP, and everything is changed, everything is clean. . . . But George [Tenet] was convinced, John McLaughlin [Tenet’s deputy] was convinced, that what we were presented [for Powell’s UN speech] was accurate. People say, well, INR dissented. That’s a bunch of bull. INR dissented that the nuclear program was up and running. That’s all INR dissented on. They were right there with the chems and the bios. Lawrence Wilkerson
I participated in a Washington meeting about Iraqi WMD. Those present included nearly twenty former inspectors from the United Nations Special Commission (UNSCOM), the force established in 1991 to oversee the elimination of WMD in Iraq. One of the senior people put a question to the group: did anyone in the room doubt that Iraq was currently operating a secret centrifuge plant? No one did. Three people added that they believed Iraq was also operating a secret calutron plant (a facility for separating uranium isotopes). Kenneth Pollack (National Security Council under Clinton, 2002)
Yet even stipulating—which I do only for the sake of argument—that no weapons of mass destruction existed in Iraq in the period leading up to the invasion, it defies all reason to think that Bush was lying when he asserted that they did. To lie means to say something one knows to be false. But it is as close to certainty as we can get that Bush believed in the truth of what he was saying about WMD in Iraq. How indeed could it have been otherwise? George Tenet, his own CIA director, assured him that the case was “a slam dunk.” This phrase would later become notorious, but in using it, Tenet had the backing of all fifteen agencies involved in gathering intelligence for the United States. (…) The intelligence agencies of Britain, Germany, Russia, China, Israel, and—yes—France all agreed with this judgment. And even Hans Blix—who headed the UN team of inspectors trying to determine whether Saddam had complied with the demands of the Security Council that he get rid of the weapons of mass destruction he was known to have had in the past—lent further credibility to the case in a report he issued only a few months before the invasion (…) So, once again, did the British, the French, and the Germans, all of whom signed on in advance to Secretary of State Colin Powell’s reading of the satellite photos he presented to the UN in the period leading up to the invasion. Norman Podhoretz
Throughout the Bush years, liberals repeated “Bush lied, people died” like a mantra. That slander wasn’t true then and it’s not anymore true now that it has resurfaced. There are many legitimate criticisms of the way the Bush Administration conducted the war in Iraq and even more of the way Obama threw away all the blood and treasure we spent there for the sake of politics, but you have to be malicious or just an imbecile at this point to accuse Bush of lying about WMDs. To begin with, numerous foreign intelligence agencies also believed that Saddam Hussein had an active WMD program. The « intelligence agencies of Germany, Israel, Russia, Britain, China and France » all believed Saddam had WMDs. CIA Director George Tenet also rather famously said that it was a “slam dunk” that there were weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. (…) Additionally, many prominent Democrats who had access to the same intelligence that George Bush did came to the same conclusion and said so publicly. If George W. Bush lied, then by default you have to also believe that Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton, Al Gore, John Kerry, John Edwards, Robert Byrd, Tom Daschle, Nancy Pelosi and Bernie Sanders also lied. Even Bernie Sanders, who opposed the war from the beginning, publicly said he believed that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction. (…) Given all of that, it’s no surprise that everyone from the head of the CIA to Bernie Sanders to the British thought that Saddam had WMDs; yet George W. Bush is the one who is accused of deliberately sending American soldiers to their deaths over a lie. No honest person can read all of this and STILL repeat the disgusting smear that George W. Bush lied about WMDs to get us into war in Iraq. John Hawkins
In October 2002, President Bush asked for the consent of Congress — unlike the Clinton resort to force in the Balkans and the later Obama bombing in Libya, both by executive action — before using arms to reify existing American policy. Both the Senate (with a majority of Democrats voting in favor) and the House overwhelmingly approved 23 writs calling for Saddam’s forced removal. The causes of action included Iraq’s violation of well over a dozen U.N. resolutions, Saddam’s harboring of international terrorists (including those who had tried and failed to blow up the World Trade Center in 1993), his plot to murder former president George H. W. Bush, his violations of no-fly zones, his bounties to suicide bombers on the West Bank, his genocidal policies against the Kurds and Marsh Arabs, and a host of other transgressions. Only a few of the causes of action were directly related to weapons of mass destruction. (…) No liberal supporters of the war ever alleged that the Bush administration had concocted WMD evidence ex nihilo in Iraq — and for four understandable reasons: one, the Clinton administration and the United Nations had already made the case about Saddam Hussein’s dangerous possession of WMD stockpiles; two, the CIA had briefed congressional leaders in September and October 2002 on WMD independently and autonomously from its White House briefings (a “slam-dunk case”), as CIA Director George Tenet, a Clinton appointee, later reiterated; three, WMD were only a small concern, at least in the congressional authorization for war, which for the most part dealt with Iraq’s support for terrorism in the post–9/11 climate, violation of the U.N. mandates, and serial genocidal violence directed at Iraq’s own people and neighboring countries; and, four, the invasion was initially successful and its results seemed to have justified it. (…) The surge engineered by General David Petraeus worked so well that Iraq was not much of an issue in the 2008 general election. President-elect Barack Obama entered office with a quiet Iraq. For example, about 60 American soldiers died in 2010 in combat-related operations in Iraq — or roughly 4 percent of all U.S. military deaths that year (1,485), the vast majority of these due to non-combat causes (motor-vehicle and training accidents, non-combat violence, suicide, drugs, illness, etc.). (…) No wonder, then, that Vice President Joe Biden in February 2010 claimed that Iraq was so successful that it might well become one of the administration’s “greatest achievements.” Obama himself was eager, given the apparent calm, to pull out all U.S. peacekeepers before the 2012 election. A mostly quiet Iraq, contrasted with the escalating violence in Afghanistan and the turmoil of the Arab Spring, apparently made that withdrawal possible — so much so that Obama declared: “We’re leaving behind a sovereign, stable, and self-reliant Iraq, with a representative government that was elected by its people.” (…) Predictably, the departure of several thousand U.S. peacekeepers from Iraq allowed the Shiite partisan Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki to renege on his promises of equitable treatment for all Iraqi factions. Iran sensed the void and sent in Shiite operatives. The extremism of the Arab Spring finally reached Iraq. ISIS was the new Islamic terrorist hydra head that replaced the al-Qaeda head, which had been lopped off in Iraq during the surge. Iraq went from “self-reliant” to being the nexus of Middle East unrest. All President Obama’s euphemisms for ISIS violence did not mask the reality of the disintegration of Iraq. (…) Had Eisenhower, in Obama-like worry over his 1956 reelection bid, yanked out all U.S. peacekeepers in December 1955, and blamed the resulting debacle on his Democratic predecessor (“Truman’s War”), while writing off the North Korean aggressors as jayvees, we can imagine a quick North Korean absorption of the South, with the sort of death and chaos we are now seeing in Iraq. (…) We can surely argue about Iraq, but we must not airbrush away facts. The mystery of the current Iraq fantasy is not that a prevaricating Donald Trump misrepresents the war in the fashion of Democratic senators and liberal pundits who once eagerly supported it, but that his Republican opponents so easily let him do it. Victor Davis Hanson

Attention: un mensonge peut en cacher un autre !

Services de renseignements américains, britanniques, russes, allemands, français et israéliens, inspecteurs internationaux en Irak, officiers de Saddam, Mubarak, Prince Bandar, Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton, Al Gore, John Kerry, John Edwards, Robert Byrd, Tom Daschle, Nancy Pelosi, Bernie Sanders …

A l’heure où, les mythes ont la vie dure, le candidat républicain Donald Trump entonne à son tour le refrain du prétendu mensonge de l’ancien président George W. Bush sur les ADM de Saddam à la veille de l’invasion américaine du printemps 2003 …

Et pour ceux qui, 13 ans après, n’ont toujours pas compris que la question n’était pas l’existence des ADM de Saddam, ce dont tout le monde – services de renseignements français et officiers de Saddam compris – étaient convaincus, mais la manière de traiter le problème …

Devinez qui, évoquant dans une interview à Time de février 2003 le « problème » de la « possession probable d’armes de destruction massive par l’Irak » et la nécessité, certes par la voie non-militaire des inspections, de le « désarmer » …

S’était joint à l’interminable liste desdits  » menteurs » …

Interview de M. Jacques Chirac, Président de la République, à « Time Magazine » du 16 février 2003, sur sa position en faveur de la poursuite des inspections en Irak, le rôle positif de la présence militaire américaine au Moyen Orient pour le désarmement irakien, les relations franco-américaines et la question d’une nouvelle résolution de l’ONU autorisant des frappes militaires contre l’Irak.

QUESTION – Est-ce que le rapport des inspecteurs, la semaine dernière, a marqué un tournant dans le débat sur l’Iraq ?

LE PRESIDENT – J’avais reçu dans les deux jours précédents une série de coups de téléphone de chefs d’Etat, membres du Conseil de sécurité ou d’ailleurs non membres du Conseil de sécurité. Et j’en avais tiré la conclusion que la recherche déterminée d’une solution au désarmement de l’Iraq par un processus pacifique était partagée par une majorité de responsables politiques.

QUESTION – En cas de guerre, quelles conséquences voyez-vous pour le Moyen Orient ?

LE PRESIDENT – Les conséquences d’une guerre seraient considérables : sur le plan humain, sur le plan politique, par une déstabilisation de l’ensemble de cette région. J’ajoute qu’il est très difficile d’expliquer que l’on va dépenser des sommes colossales pour faire la guerre alors qu’il y a peut-être une autre solution et que l’on ne peut pas assumer le minimum de responsabilité dans le domaine de l’aide au développement.

QUESTION – Pourquoi, plus que Tony BLAIR ou George BUSH, vous attendez-vous à des conséquences aussi graves ?

LE PRESIDENT – Simplement, je n’ai pas la même appréciation. Parmi les conséquences négatives de cette guerre, il y aurait une réaction de la part de l’opinion publique arabe et musulmane. A tort ou à raison, mais c’est un fait. Une guerre de cette nature ne peut pas ne pas donner une forte impulsion au terrorisme. Elle pourrait créer des vocations pour un grand nombre de petits BEN LADEN.

Les musulmans et les chrétiens ont beaucoup à se dire. Et ce n’est pas par la guerre qu’on favorisera ce dialogue. Je suis contre le choc des civilisations. Cela fait le jeu des intégristes.

Il y a un problème, c’est la possession probable d’armes de destruction massive par un pays incontrôlable, l’Iraq. La communauté internationale a raison de s’émouvoir de cette situation. Et elle a eu raison de décider qu’il fallait désarmer l’Iraq.

Alors, les inspections ont commencé. C’est naturellement un travail long et difficile. Il faut laisser aux inspecteurs le temps de le faire. Et, probablement, cela c’est la position de la France, renforcer leurs moyens, notamment leurs moyens d’observation aérienne. Pour le moment, rien ne permet de dire qu’elle ne marche pas.

QUESTION – Est-ce que la France ne se dérobe pas à ses responsabilités sur le plan militaire envers son plus vieil allié ?

LE PRESIDENT – La France n’est pas un pays pacifiste. Nous avons dans les Balkans plus de soldats que les Etats-Unis. La France n’est évidemment pas un pays anti-américain. Elle est profondément amie des Etats-Unis. Elle l’a toujours été. Et la France n’a pas pour vocation de soutenir un régime dictatorial, ni en Iraq, ni ailleurs.

Nous n’avons pas non plus de divergences de vues sur l’objectif : l’élimination des armes de destruction massive de Saddam HUSSEIN. Et, pour tout dire, si Saddam HUSSEIN pouvait disparaître, ce serait certainement le meilleur service qu’il pourrait rendre à son peuple et au monde. Mais nous pensons que cet objectif peut être atteint sans mettre en oeuvre une guerre.

QUESTION – Vous avez l’air de placer davantage la responsabilité sur les inspecteurs, pour qu’ils trouvent les armes, plutôt que sur Saddam HUSSEIN, pour qu’il déclare ce qu’il a ?

LE PRESIDENT – Y-a-t-il en Iraq des armes nucléaires ? Je ne le pense pas. Y-a-t-il d’autres armes de destruction massive ? C’est probable. Il faut donc les trouver et les détruire. Dans la situation où il est actuellement et contrôlé comme il l’est, est-ce que l’Iraq représente un danger important et immédiat pour la région ? Je ne le crois pas. Et donc, dans ces conditions, je préfère poursuivre sur la voie définie par le Conseil de sécurité. Puis, on verra.

QUESTION – Quelle circonstance pourrait justifier la guerre ?

LE PRESIDENT – C’est aux inspecteurs de faire rapport. On leur fait confiance. On leur a donné une mission et on leur fait confiance. S’il faut augmenter leurs moyens, on augmente leurs moyens. Donc, c’est à eux de venir dire un jour au Conseil : « nous avons gagné, c’est terminé, il n’y a plus d’armes de destruction massive », ou bien : « il est impossible pour nous de remplir la mission que vous nous avez donnée, nous nous heurtons à des mauvaises volontés et à des blocages de la part de l’Iraq ». Alors, le Conseil de sécurité serait fondé à délibérer sur ce rapport et à prendre sa décision. Et, dans cette hypothèse, la France n’exclut naturellement aucune option.

QUESTION – Mais, sans la coopération iraquienne, même 300 inspecteurs ne peuvent faire le travailà

LE PRESIDENT – Ça, il n’y a pas l’ombre d’un doute. Mais c’est aux inspecteurs de le dire. Moi, je fais simplement le pari qu’on peut obtenir de l’Iraq une plus grande coopération. Si je me trompe, il sera toujours temps d’en tirer les conséquences.

Quand un régime comme celui de Saddam se trouve pris entre la mort certaine et l’abandon de ses armes, il doit faire le bon choix. Mais je ne suis pas sûr qu’il le fera.

QUESTION – Si, aux Nations Unies, les Etats Unis venaient à présenter une résolution en faveur de la guerre, est-ce que la France utiliserait son droit de veto ?

LE PRESIDENT – J’estime qu’il n’y a pas de raison de faire une nouvelle résolution. Nous sommes dans le cadre de la résolution 1441, poursuivons. Je ne vois pas ce qu’une nouvelle résolution pourrait apporter de plus.

QUESTION – Certains vous accusent d’être animé par l’anti-américanisme ?

LE PRESIDENT – Je connais les Etats-Unis depuis longtemps, j’y suis allé souvent, j’y ai fait des études. J’ai été « fork-lift operator » pour Anheuser-Busch à Saint Louis, j’ai été « soda jerk » chez Howard Johnson. J’ai traversé dans tous les sens les Etats-Unis en auto-stop. J’ai été journaliste et j’ai écrit un article pour le « Times Picayune » de la Nouvelle Orleans qui est paru en une.

Je connais les Etats-Unis mieux peut-être que beaucoup de Français et, j’aime beaucoup les Etats-Unis. J’ai beaucoup de très bons amis là-bas. C’est un pays où je me sens bien. J’aime beaucoup la « junk food » et, chaque fois que je vais aux Etats-Unis, je reviens avec un nombre excessif de kilos.

J’ai toujours été un partisan, un supporter de la solidarité transatlantique. Quand j’entends dire que je suis un anti-américain, je suis triste. Je ne suis pas en colère. Mais je suis triste.

QUESTION – Pensez-vous que le fait que l’Amérique soit la seule superpuissance est un problème ?

LE PRESIDENT – Une société où il y a un seul puissant est toujours une société dangereuse et qui provoque des réactions. C’est pour cela que je suis pour un monde multipolaire dans lequel il est évident que l’Europe a sa place. De toute façon, le monde ne sera pas unipolaire. Dans les cinquante ans qui viennent, la Chine représentera une puissance considérable. Donc, le monde sera différent. Et donc, autant essayer de l’organiser dès maintenant. La solidarité transatlantique restera à la base de ce monde multipolaire de demain dans lequel l’Europe a un rôle à jouer.

QUESTION – Les tensions à cause de l’Iraq n’ont-elles pas empoisonné la relation transatlantique ?

LE PRESIDENT – Je le répète : il faut désarmer l’Iraq. Pour cela, l’Iraq doit faire plus qu’il ne le fait aujourd’hui. Si l’on désarme l’Irak, l’objectif recherché par les Américains sera atteint. Et si on le fait, il n’y a pas de doute sur le fait que ce sera dû en grande partie à la présence de l’armada américaine sur place. S’il n’y avait pas eu l’armée américaine, il n’est pas du tout évident que Saddam aurait accepté de jouer le jeu.

Si l’on va au terme des inspections, les Américains auront en fait gagné dans la mesure où c’est essentiellement grâce à la pression qu’ils auront exercée qu’on aura pu désarmer l’Iraq.

QUESTION – Vous ne pensez pas qu’il serait politiquement extrêmement difficile pour le Président BUSH de faire machine arrière sur la guerre ?

LE PRESIDENT – Je ne suis pas si sûr. Il aurait deux avantages s’il ramène ses soldats. Je me place dans la situation où les inspecteurs diraient : « Maintenant il n’y a plus rien », ce qui prendra encore un certain nombre de semaines. Si l’Iraq n’a pas coopéré et que les inspecteurs disent : « ça ne marche pas », cela pourrait signifier la guerre. Mais si l’Iraq est objectivement désarmé, ses armes de destruction massive éliminées, et que c’est vérifié par les inspecteurs, à ce moment-là, Monsieur BUSH pourra dire deux choses : premièrement,  » grâce à mon intervention, l’Iraq a été désarmé ». Et, deuxièmement, « je l’ai fait sans faire couler le sang ». Dans la vie d’un homme d’Etat, cela compte. Sans faire couler le sang.

QUESTION – Oui, mais Washington pourrait bien aller à la guerre malgré votre plan.

LE PRESIDENT – C’est leur responsabilité. Si jamais ils me demandaient mon conseil, ce n’est pas ce que je leur recommanderais.

Voir aussi:

Le gros mensonge de Donald Trump sur la guerre en Irak

Donald Trump lors d’un meeting organisé à Raleigh en Caroline du Nord le 4 décembre 2015 |REUTERS / Jonathan Drake

Le candidat à l’investiture républicaine affirme qu’il s’était opposé à l’intervention de 2003. Un récit que ne confirment pas vraiment ses propos de l’époque…

Depuis qu’il s’est lancé dans la course à la Maison Blanche, le milliardaire Donald Trump essaye de faire valoir son expertise en politique internationale en affirmant, entre autres, qu’il a toujours été opposé à la guerre en Irak, lancée en mars 2003. Par exemple, le 13 février dernier, lors d’un débat en Caroline du Sud, il a déclaré, face à ses concurrents:

«Je suis le seul sur cette scène à avoir dit « N’allez pas en Irak. N’attaquez pas l’Irak ». Personne d’autre sur cette scène n’a dit ça. Et je l’ai dit haut et fort. Et j’étais dans le secteur privé. Je n’étais pas en politique, heureusement. Mais je l’ai dit, et je l’ai dit haut et fort: « Vous allez déstabiliser le Moyen-Orient ». C’est exactement ce qui s’est passé.»

Son assurance a évidemment fait tiquer bon nombre de journalistes américains, qui ont décidé de fouiller dans le passé du candidat pour retrouver cette soi-disant déclaration prémonitoire. Et comme le montre le site Politifact et le Washington Post, les sources permettant d’étayer ses propos sont très maigres. Le 28 janvier 2003, quelques mois avant l’invasion, Trump était assez indécis sur le sujet devant les caméras de Fox News:

«[George W. Bush] doit faire quelque chose ou ne rien faire, parce peut-être qu’il est trop tôt et qu’il faut peut-être attendre les Nations unies, vous savez. Il subit une grosse pression. Je pense qu’il fait un très bon boulot.»

Une semaine après l’invasion, lors d’une soirée post-Oscars, au bras d’une mannequin qui allait devenir sa femme deux ans plus tard, il explique que la guerre pourrait poser problème, parce que «la guerre est un bordel». Mais quelques jours après, il estimera aussi que «le marché va grimper comme une roquette» avec ce conflit.

Ce n’est qu’un an et demi plus tard que l’homme d’affaires va se montrer très virulent envers une invasion devenue catastrophique. En août 2004, dans Esquire, il parle du «bordel dans lequel nous sommes» et affirme qu’il n’aurait pas géré le conflit de la sorte. Chez Larry King, trois mois plus tard, il dira encore: «Je ne crois pas que nous ayons pris la bonne décision en allant en Irak, vous savez, j’espère que l’on va s’en sortir.»

Jusque-là, rien à voir donc avec ses affirmations du 13 février dernier. Et puis Buzzfeed a retrouvé la trace d’une interview de Trump à l’automne 2002, au micro d’Howard Stern. Un an pile après les attentats du 11 septembre, le célèbre animateur lui demande s’il était en faveur d’une invasion de l’Irak. «Oui, je suppose que oui, avait-il alors répondu. J’aurais aimé que la première invasion [en 1991, ndlr] se passe mieux.»

Cette semaine, sur CNN, Anderson Cooper lui a logiquement demandé de réagir à cet extrait. «J’ai pu dire ça, a répondu Trump. Personne ne m’a demandé ça. Je n’étais pas en politique. C’était certainement la première fois que l’on me posait la question.»

Mais Buzzfeed a aussi ressorti un passage très politique de l’un des nombreux livres de l’homme d’affaires, The America We Deserve («L’Amérique que nous méritons»), publié en 2000:

«Nous ne savons toujours pas ce que l’Irak fait ou s’il a les matériaux nécessaires pour construire des armes nucléaires. Je ne suis pas belliqueux. Mais si nous décidons que nous avons besoin de frapper l’Irak à nouveau, il serait fou de ne pas mener la mission jusqu’à son terme. Si nous ne le faisons pas, nous aurons droit à une situation pire que tout: l’Irak restera une menace et aura plus de motivation que jamais pour nous attaquer.»

Difficile donc de comprendre la position de Donald Trump sur cette guerre très coûteuse pour les Etats-Unis. Mais il apparaît clair aujourd’hui que son discours soi-disant visionnaire ressemble à tout sauf à la vérité.

Flashback to 13 Years Ago: My Statement Opposing the Iraq War
Bernie Sanders

The Huffington Post

10/10/2015

Thirteen years ago, on October 9, 2002, I made the following statement on the floor of the House of Representatives:

Mr. Speaker, I thank my friend from New Jersey for yielding me this time.

Mr. Speaker, I do not think any Member of this body disagrees that Saddam Hussein is a tyrant, a murderer, and a man who has started two wars. He is clearly someone who cannot be trusted or believed. The question, Mr. Speaker, is not whether we like Saddam Hussein or not. The question is whether he represents an imminent threat to the American people and whether a unilateral invasion of Iraq will do more harm than good.

Mr. Speaker, the front page of The Washington Post today reported that all relevant U.S. intelligence agencies now say, despite what we have heard from the White House, that « Saddam Hussein is unlikely to initiate a chemical or biological attack against the United States. » Even more importantly, our intelligence agencies say that should Saddam conclude that a U.S.-led attack could no longer be deterred, he might at that point launch a chemical or biological counterattack. In other words, there is more danger of an attack on the United States if we launch a precipitous invasion.

Mr. Speaker, I do not know why the President feels, despite what our intelligence agencies are saying, that it is so important to pass a resolution of this magnitude this week and why it is necessary to go forward without the support of the United Nations and our major allies including those who are fighting side by side with us in the war on terrorism.

But I do feel that as a part of this process, the President is ignoring some of the most pressing economic issues affecting the well-being of ordinary Americans. There has been virtually no public discussion about the stock market’s loss of trillions of dollars over the last few years and that millions of Americans have seen the retirement benefits for which they have worked their entire lives disappear. When are we going to address that issue? This country today has a $340 billion trade deficit, and we have lost 10 percent of our manufacturing jobs in the last 4 years, 2 million decent-paying jobs. The average American worker today is working longer hours for lower wages than 25 years ago. When are we going to address that issue?

Mr. Speaker, poverty in this country is increasing and median family income is declining. Throughout this country family farmers are being driven off of the land; and veterans, the people who put their lives on the line to defend us, are unable to get the health care and other benefits they were promised because of government underfunding. When are we going to tackle these issues and many other important issues that are of such deep concern to Americans?

Mr. Speaker, in the brief time I have, let me give five reasons why I am opposed to giving the President a blank check to launch a unilateral invasion and occupation of Iraq and why I will vote against this resolution. One, I have not heard any estimates of how many young American men and women might die in such a war or how many tens of thousands of women and children in Iraq might also be killed. As a caring Nation, we should do everything we can to prevent the horrible suffering that a war will cause. War must be the last recourse in international relations, not the first. Second, I am deeply concerned about the precedent that a unilateral invasion of Iraq could establish in terms of international law and the role of the United Nations. If President Bush believes that the U.S. can go to war at any time against any nation, what moral or legal objection could our government raise if another country chose to do the same thing?

Third, the United States is now involved in a very difficult war against international terrorism as we learned tragically on September 11. We are opposed by Osama bin Laden and religious fanatics who are prepared to engage in a kind of warfare that we have never experienced before. I agree with Brent Scowcroft, Republican former National Security Advisor for President George Bush, Sr., who stated, « An attack on Iraq at this time would seriously jeopardize, if not destroy, the global counterterrorist campaign we have undertaken. »

Fourth, at a time when this country has a $6 trillion national debt and a growing deficit, we should be clear that a war and a long-term American occupation ofIraq could be extremely expensive.

Fifth, I am concerned about the problems of so-called unintended consequences. Who will govern Iraq when Saddam Hussein is removed and what role will the U.S. play in ensuing a civil war that could develop in that country? Will moderate governments in the region who have large Islamic fundamentalist populations be overthrown and replaced by extremists? Will the bloody conflict between Israel and the Palestinian Authority be exacerbated? And these are just a few of the questions that remain unanswered.

If a unilateral American invasion of Iraq is not the best approach, what should we do? In my view, the U.S. must work with the United Nations to make certain within clearly defined timelines that the U.N. inspectors are allowed to do their jobs. These inspectors should undertake an unfettered search for Iraqi weapons of mass destruction and destroy them when found, pursuant to past U.N. resolutions. If Iraq resists inspection and elimination of stockpiled weapons, we should stand ready to assist the U.N. in forcing compliance.

Voir également:

Iraq: The Real Story

Victor Davis Hanson

National Review

February 23, 2016

Donald Trump constantly brings up Iraq to remind voters that Jeb Bush supported his brother’s war, while Trump, alone of the Republican candidates, supposedly opposed it well before it started.

That is a flat-out lie. There is no evidence that Trump opposed the war before the March 20, 2003 invasion. Like most Americans, he supported the invasion and said just that very clearly in interviews. And like most Americans, Trump quickly turned on a once popular intervention — but only when the postwar occupation was beginning to cost too much in blood and treasure. Trump’s serial invocations of the war are good reminders of just how mythical Iraq has now become.

We need to recall a few facts. Bill Clinton bombed Iraq (Operation Desert Fox) on December 16 to 19, 1998, without prior congressional or U.N. approval. As Clinton put it at the time, our armed forces wanted “to attack Iraq’s nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons programs and its military capacity to threaten its neighbors. Their purpose is to protect the national interest of the United States, and indeed the interests of people throughout the Middle East and around the world. Saddam Hussein must not be allowed to threaten his neighbors or the world with nuclear arms, poison gas, or biological weapons.” At the time of Clinton’s warning about Iraq’s WMD capability, George W. Bush was a relatively obscure Texas governor.

Just weeks earlier, Clinton had signed the Iraq Liberation Act into law, after the legislation passed Congress on a House vote of 360 to 38 and the Senate unanimously. The act formally called for the removal of Saddam Hussein, a transition to democracy for Iraq, and a forced end to Saddam’s WMD program. As President Clinton had also warned when signing the act — long before the left-wing construction of neo-con bogeymen and “Bush lied, thousands died” sloganeering — without such an act, Saddam Hussein “will then conclude that he can go right on and do more to rebuild an arsenal of devastating destruction. And some day, some way, I guarantee you he’ll use the arsenal.” Clinton’s secretary of state, Madeleine Albright, often voiced warnings about Saddam’s aggression and his possession of deadly stocks of WMD (e.g., “Iraq is a long way from [here], but what happens there matters a great deal here. For the risks that the leaders of a rogue state will use nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons against us or our allies is the greatest security threat we face”). Indeed, most felt that the U.S. had been too lax in allowing Saddam to gas the Kurds when it might have prevented such mass murdering.

In October 2002, President Bush asked for the consent of Congress — unlike the Clinton resort to force in the Balkans and the later Obama bombing in Libya, both by executive action — before using arms to reify existing American policy. Both the Senate (with a majority of Democrats voting in favor) and the House overwhelmingly approved 23 writs calling for Saddam’s forced removal. The causes of action included Iraq’s violation of well over a dozen U.N. resolutions, Saddam’s harboring of international terrorists (including those who had tried and failed to blow up the World Trade Center in 1993), his plot to murder former president George H. W. Bush, his violations of no-fly zones, his bounties to suicide bombers on the West Bank, his genocidal policies against the Kurds and Marsh Arabs, and a host of other transgressions. Only a few of the causes of action were directly related to weapons of mass destruction.

Go back and review speeches on the floor of Congress in support of the Bush administration’s using force. Some of the most muscular were the arguments of Joe Biden, Hillary Clinton, John Kerry, Harry Reid, and Chuck Schumer. Pundits as diverse as Al Franken, Thomas Friedman, Nicholas Kristof, David Remnick, Andrew Sullivan, Matthew Yglesias, and Fareed Zakaria all wrote or spoke passionately about the need to remove the genocidal Saddam Hussein. All voiced their humanitarian concerns about finally stopping Saddam’s genocidal wars against the helpless. The New York Times estimated that 1 million had died violently because of Saddam’s governance. And all would soon damn those with whom they once agreed.

No liberal supporters of the war ever alleged that the Bush administration had concocted WMD evidence ex nihilo in Iraq — and for four understandable reasons: one, the Clinton administration and the United Nations had already made the case about Saddam Hussein’s dangerous possession of WMD stockpiles; two, the CIA had briefed congressional leaders in September and October 2002 on WMD independently and autonomously from its White House briefings (a “slam-dunk case”), as CIA Director George Tenet, a Clinton appointee, later reiterated; three, WMD were only a small concern, at least in the congressional authorization for war, which for the most part dealt with Iraq’s support for terrorism in the post–9/11 climate, violation of the U.N. mandates, and serial genocidal violence directed at Iraq’s own people and neighboring countries; and, four, the invasion was initially successful and its results seemed to have justified it.

The WMD issue was largely a postbellum mechanism of blaming conspiracies rather than anyone’s own judgment when violence flared. Did the disappearance of WMD stocks really nullify all 23 congressional writs?

Support for the invasion reached its apex not before the war but directly at its conclusion, when polls in April 2003 revealed approval ratings between 70 and 90 percent, owing to Saddam’s sudden downfall, the relatively rapid end to the fighting, and the avoidance of catastrophic American casualties.

In late April 2003, initial worry about the absence of WMD stockpiles was soon noted — after all, the 2004 presidential primaries were less than a year away — but largely dismissed, given that Congress had sanctioned the war on a variety of grounds that had nothing to do with WMD, and it was not clear where or how known stockpiles had mysteriously disappeared, after their prior demonstrable use by Saddam. (Did Clinton get them all in his 1998 Desert Fox campaign? Did Saddam himself stealthily destroy them? Did he send out false intelligence about them to create deterrence? Or were they moved to Syria — where WMD turned up later during the Obama “red-line” controversy?)

Only as the postwar violence spiked in June and July 2003 did the fallback position arise of having been cajoled by “bogus” intelligence and thus having been “misled” into going along with the “Bush and Cheney” agenda. Had the occupation gone as well as the initial war, missing WMD would have been noted in the context of there having been roughly 20 other writs for going into Iraq.

A veritable circus of opportunistic protestations followed as violence continued. Barack Obama — who had opposed the war in 2003 but, as an Illinois state senator, was not in a position to vote against it — predicated his 2008 presidential candidacy on pulling out all troops. As a senator in 2007, he opposed the surge. He predicted that it would not only fail, but also make things worse.

When the surge made things far better, Obama dropped most mentions of Iraq from his campaign website. He certainly never referred to his confessions during his Senate campaign of 2004 that he then had had no major disagreements with Bush’s policies during the postwar occupation (e.g., “There’s not much of a difference between my position on Iraq and George Bush’s position at this stage”). Nor did he recall that, also in 2004, he confessed to having no idea whether he would have voted for the war. (“I’m not privy to Senate intelligence reports. What would I have done? I don’t know.”) Obama seemed to suggest that the Senate had its own intelligence avenues apparently separate from the Bush–Chaney nexus.

The surge engineered by General David Petraeus worked so well that Iraq was not much of an issue in the 2008 general election. President-elect Barack Obama entered office with a quiet Iraq. For example, about 60 American soldiers died in 2010 in combat-related operations in Iraq — or roughly 4 percent of all U.S. military deaths that year (1,485), the vast majority of these due to non-combat causes (motor-vehicle and training accidents, non-combat violence, suicide, drugs, illness, etc.). Although Obama had once stated that Iraq was the unwise war (in comparison to the wise Afghan war that he supported during the 2008 campaign), the relative post-surge quiet had changed somewhat, for a third time, popular attitudes about the war. Indeed, Afghanistan by 2010 was the problematic conflict, Iraq the apparently successful occupation.

No wonder, then, that Vice President Joe Biden in February 2010 claimed that Iraq was so successful that it might well become one of the administration’s “greatest achievements.” Obama himself was eager, given the apparent calm, to pull out all U.S. peacekeepers before the 2012 election. A mostly quiet Iraq, contrasted with the escalating violence in Afghanistan and the turmoil of the Arab Spring, apparently made that withdrawal possible — so much so that Obama declared: “We’re leaving behind a sovereign, stable, and self-reliant Iraq, with a representative government that was elected by its people.”

Suddenly the Iraq War was no longer “Bush’s war.” Instead, it was referred to in terms of “we” — and was seen as a far preferable scenario to the violence in either Afghanistan or the newly bombed Libya.

Predictably, the departure of several thousand U.S. peacekeepers from Iraq allowed the Shiite partisan Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki to renege on his promises of equitable treatment for all Iraqi factions. Iran sensed the void and sent in Shiite operatives. The extremism of the Arab Spring finally reached Iraq. ISIS was the new Islamic terrorist hydra head that replaced the al-Qaeda head, which had been lopped off in Iraq during the surge.

Iraq went from “self-reliant” to being the nexus of Middle East unrest. All President Obama’s euphemisms for ISIS violence did not mask the reality of the disintegration of Iraq. WMD mysteriously reappeared as a national-security issue, but now in Assad’s Syria — and to such a degree that an anguished President Obama (“We have been very clear to the Assad regime . . . that a red line for us is we start seeing a whole bunch of chemical weapons moving around or being utilized. That would change my calculus. That would change my equation.”) himself threatened to bomb Assad if he dared re-employ WMD (Assad did, and we did not bomb him). No one asked how or where Assad had gained access to such plentiful chemical-weapon stocks — other than the administration’s later insistence that Syria’s use of chlorine gas did not really constitute WMD usage.

The truth is that, before Bush entered office, most Americans had been convinced by the Clinton administration and the Congress that Saddam Hussein was a danger that had to be addressed. Bush sent in troops because Clinton’s prior bombing, Saddam’s violations of U.N. resolutions, and over a decade of porous no-fly zones had left Americans fearing that Saddam was uncontainable. The invasion was brilliantly conducted, and polls and politics both revealed consensus on that point. Yet securing Iraq was poorly managed from summer 2003 until autumn 2007. And polls, two elections, and political reinventions certainly illustrated that fact as well.

It is legitimate to change opinions about a war or to rue a flawed occupation. But it is not ethical to deny prior positions or invent reasons why what once seemed prudent later seemed reckless.

Finally, Korea offers some bases for comparison and elucidation. Harry Truman sent in U.S. troop reinforcements in August 1950, in an optional war to stop Communist aggression and recreate deterrence in the region. He acted with the approval of the American public (near 80 percent approval), with U.N. sanction, and, at least in budgetary terms, with agreement from the U.S. Congress.

However, poor planning, ill-preparedness due to the rapid disarmament after World War II, the megalomania of General Douglas MacArthur, the November invasion by the Chinese Red Army, nuclear saber-rattling by the Soviet Union, and soaring U.S. casualties (by summer 1953 reaching over 36,000 deaths and over 130,000 wounded and missing) made the war a bloody quagmire and roundly detested — with over 50 percent disapproval. Even the genius of General Matthew Ridgway, who saved South Korea from ruin in a brilliant 100-day campaign in late 1950 and early 1951, could not regain solid public support for the intervention.

The Korean War may have saved millions of Koreans from a Stalinist nightmare, but it ruined the Truman administration (Truman left office in January 1953 with a 23 percent approval rating, far worse than George W. Bush’s departing 33 percent). Popular anger ensured the election of Republican Dwight David Eisenhower.

But despite all the opportunistic campaign rhetoric, the newly elected President Eisenhower more or less followed Truman’s policies. By July 1953 he had achieved an armistice. And by keeping sizable U.S. deployments of peacekeepers in place, he also ensured what would become a long evolution to democracy in South Korea and the country’s current dynamic economy. Had Eisenhower, in Obama-like worry over his 1956 reelection bid, yanked out all U.S. peacekeepers in December 1955, and blamed the resulting debacle on his Democratic predecessor (“Truman’s War”), while writing off the North Korean aggressors as jayvees, we can imagine a quick North Korean absorption of the South, with the sort of death and chaos we are now seeing in Iraq.

Korea today would be unified under the unhinged Kim Jong-un regime, with twice its present resources. Samsung and Kia would be pipedreams, and we would still be arguing over Truman’s folly, the futility of nation-building, the loss of Korea, and the needless sacrifice of 36,000 American lives. No one knows what effects a rapid U.S. flight in 1954 or 1955, the implosion of South Korea, and a Chinese–North Korean victory would have had on the larger course of the ongoing Cold War in Asia, especially in relationship to neighboring Japan and Taiwan. But we can imagine that the South China Sea in 1956 might have resembled something akin to the mess of the current Eastern Mediterranean.

We can surely argue about Iraq, but we must not airbrush away facts. The mystery of the current Iraq fantasy is not that a prevaricating Donald Trump misrepresents the war in the fashion of Democratic senators and liberal pundits who once eagerly supported it, but that his Republican opponents so easily let him do it.

— NRO contributor Victor Davis Hanson is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and the author, most recently, of The Savior Generals.

Voir aussi:

Who Is Lying About Iraq?

Norman Podhoretz

Commentary

November 23, 2005

Among the many distortions, misrepresentations, and outright falsifications that have emerged from the debate over Iraq, one in particular stands out above all others. This is the charge that George W. Bush misled us into an immoral and/or unnecessary war in Iraq by telling a series of lies that have now been definitively exposed.

What makes this charge so special is the amazing success it has enjoyed in getting itself established as a self-evident truth even though it has been refuted and discredited over and over again by evidence and argument alike. In this it resembles nothing so much as those animated cartoon characters who, after being flattened, blown up, or pushed over a cliff, always spring back to life with their bodies perfectly intact. Perhaps, like those cartoon characters, this allegation simply cannot be killed off, no matter what.

Nevertheless, I want to take one more shot at exposing it for the lie that it itself really is. Although doing so will require going over ground that I and many others have covered before, I hope that revisiting this well-trodden terrain may also serve to refresh memories that have grown dim, to clarify thoughts that have grown confused, and to revive outrage that has grown commensurately dulled.

The main “lie” that George W. Bush is accused of telling us is that Saddam Hussein possessed an arsenal of weapons of mass destruction, or WMD as they have invariably come to be called. From this followed the subsidiary “lie” that Iraq under Saddam’s regime posed a two-edged mortal threat. On the one hand, we were informed, there was a distinct (or even “imminent”) possibility that Saddam himself would use these weapons against us and/or our allies; and on the other hand, there was the still more dangerous possibility that he would supply them to terrorists like those who had already attacked us on 9/11 and to whom he was linked.

This entire scenario of purported deceit has been given a new lease on life by the indictment in late October of I. Lewis (Scooter) Libby, then chief of staff to Vice President Dick Cheney. Libby stands accused of making false statements to the FBI and of committing perjury in testifying before a grand jury that had been convened to find out who in the Bush administration had “outed” Valerie Plame, a CIA agent married to the retired ambassador Joseph C. Wilson, IV. The supposed purpose of leaking this classified information to the press was to retaliate against Wilson for having “debunked” (in his words) “the lies that led to war.”

Now, as it happens, Libby was not charged with having outed Plame but only with having lied about when and from whom he first learned that she worked for the CIA. Moreover, Patrick J. Fitzgerald, the special prosecutor who brought the indictment against him, made a point of emphasizing that

[t]his indictment is not about the war. This indictment is not about the propriety of the war. And people who believe fervently in the war effort, people who oppose it, people who have mixed feelings about it should not look to this indictment for any resolution of how they feel or any vindication of how they feel.

This is simply an indictment that says, in a national-security investigation about the compromise of a CIA officer’s identity that may have taken place in the context of a very heated debate over the war, whether some person—a person, Mr. Libby—lied or not.

No matter. Harry Reid, the Democratic leader in the Senate, spoke for a host of other opponents of the war in insisting that

[t]his case is bigger than the leak of classified information. It is about how the Bush White House manufactured and manipulated intelligence in order to bolster its case for the war in Iraq and to discredit anyone who dared to challenge the President.

Yet even stipulating—which I do only for the sake of argument—that no weapons of mass destruction existed in Iraq in the period leading up to the invasion, it defies all reason to think that Bush was lying when he asserted that they did. To lie means to say something one knows to be false. But it is as close to certainty as we can get that Bush believed in the truth of what he was saying about WMD in Iraq.

How indeed could it have been otherwise? George Tenet, his own CIA director, assured him that the case was “a slam dunk.” This phrase would later become notorious, but in using it, Tenet had the backing of all fifteen agencies involved in gathering intelligence for the United States. In the National Intelligence Estimate (NIE) of 2002, where their collective views were summarized, one of the conclusions offered with “high confidence” was that

Iraq is continuing, and in some areas expanding its chemical, biological, nuclear, and missile programs contrary to UN resolutions.

The intelligence agencies of Britain, Germany, Russia, China, Israel, and—yes—France all agreed with this judgment. And even Hans Blix—who headed the UN team of inspectors trying to determine whether Saddam had complied with the demands of the Security Council that he get rid of the weapons of mass destruction he was known to have had in the past—lent further credibility to the case in a report he issued only a few months before the invasion:

The discovery of a number of 122-mm chemical rocket warheads in a bunker at a storage depot 170 km southwest of Baghdad was much publicized. This was a relatively new bunker, and therefore the rockets must have been moved there in the past few years, at a time when Iraq should not have had such munitions. . . . They could also be the tip of a submerged iceberg. The discovery of a few rockets does not resolve but rather points to the issue of several thousands of chemical rockets that are unaccounted for.

Blix now claims that he was only being “cautious” here, but if, as he now also adds, the Bush administration “misled itself” in interpreting the evidence before it, he at the very least lent it a helping hand.

So, once again, did the British, the French, and the Germans, all of whom signed on in advance to Secretary of State Colin Powell’s reading of the satellite photos he presented to the UN in the period leading up to the invasion. Powell himself and his chief of staff, Lawrence Wilkerson, now feel that this speech was the low point of his tenure as Secretary of State. But Wilkerson (in the process of a vicious attack on the President, the Vice President, and the Secretary of Defense for getting us into Iraq) is forced to acknowledge that the Bush administration did not lack for company in interpreting the available evidence as it did:

I can’t tell you why the French, the Germans, the Brits, and us thought that most of the material, if not all of it, that we presented at the UN on 5 February 2003 was the truth. I can’t. I’ve wrestled with it. [But] when you see a satellite photograph of all the signs of the chemical-weapons ASP—Ammunition Supply Point—with chemical weapons, and you match all those signs with your matrix on what should show a chemical ASP, and they’re there, you have to conclude that it’s a chemical ASP, especially when you see the next satellite photograph which shows the UN inspectors wheeling in their white vehicles with black markings on them to that same ASP, and everything is changed, everything is clean. . . . But George [Tenet] was convinced, John McLaughlin [Tenet’s deputy] was convinced, that what we were presented [for Powell’s UN speech] was accurate.

Going on to shoot down a widespread impression, Wilkerson informs us that even the State Department’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research (INR) was convinced:

People say, well, INR dissented. That’s a bunch of bull. INR dissented that the nuclear program was up and running. That’s all INR dissented on. They were right there with the chems and the bios.

In explaining its dissent on Iraq’s nuclear program, the INR had, as stated in the NIE of 2002, expressed doubt about

Iraq’s efforts to acquire aluminum tubes [which are] central to the argument that Baghdad is reconstituting its nuclear-weapons program. . . . INR is not persuaded that the tubes in question are intended for use as centrifuge rotors . . . in Iraq’s nuclear-weapons program.

But, according to Wilkerson,

The French came in in the middle of my deliberations at the CIA and said, we have just spun aluminum tubes, and by God, we did it to this RPM, et cetera, et cetera, and it was all, you know, proof positive that the aluminum tubes were not for mortar casings or artillery casings, they were for centrifuges. Otherwise, why would you have such exquisite instruments?

In short, and whether or not it included the secret heart of Hans Blix, “the consensus of the intelligence community,” as Wilkerson puts it, “was overwhelming” in the period leading up to the invasion of Iraq that Saddam definitely had an arsenal of chemical and biological weapons, and that he was also in all probability well on the way to rebuilding the nuclear capability that the Israelis had damaged by bombing the Osirak reactor in 1981.

Additional confirmation of this latter point comes from Kenneth Pollack, who served in the National Security Council under Clinton. “In the late spring of 2002,” Pollack has written,

I participated in a Washington meeting about Iraqi WMD. Those present included nearly twenty former inspectors from the United Nations Special Commission (UNSCOM), the force established in 1991 to oversee the elimination of WMD in Iraq. One of the senior people put a question to the group: did anyone in the room doubt that Iraq was currently operating a secret centrifuge plant? No one did. Three people added that they believed Iraq was also operating a secret calutron plant (a facility for separating uranium isotopes).

No wonder, then, that another conclusion the NIE of 2002 reached with “high confidence” was that

Iraq could make a nuclear weapon in months to a year once it acquires sufficient weapons-grade fissile material.1

But the consensus on which Bush relied was not born in his own administration. In fact, it was first fully formed in the Clinton administration. Here is Clinton himself, speaking in 1998:

If Saddam rejects peace and we have to use force, our purpose is clear. We want to seriously diminish the threat posed by Iraq’s weapons-of-mass-destruction program.

Here is his Secretary of State Madeline Albright, also speaking in 1998:

Iraq is a long way from [the USA], but what happens there matters a great deal here. For the risk that the leaders of a rogue state will use nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons against us or our allies is the greatest security threat we face.

Here is Sandy Berger, Clinton’s National Security Adviser, who chimed in at the same time with this flat-out assertion about Saddam:

He will use those weapons of mass destruction again, as he has ten times since 1983.

Finally, Clinton’s Secretary of Defense, William Cohen, was so sure Saddam had stockpiles of WMD that he remained “absolutely convinced” of it even after our failure to find them in the wake of the invasion in March 2003.

Nor did leading Democrats in Congress entertain any doubts on this score. A few months after Clinton and his people made the statements I have just quoted, a group of Democratic Senators, including such liberals as Carl Levin, Tom Daschle, and John Kerry, urged the President

to take necessary actions (including, if appropriate, air and missile strikes on suspect Iraqi sites) to respond effectively to the threat posed by Iraq’s refusal to end its weapons-of-mass-destruction programs.

Nancy Pelosi, the future leader of the Democrats in the House, and then a member of the House Intelligence Committee, added her voice to the chorus:

Saddam Hussein has been engaged in the development of weapons-of-mass-destruction technology, which is a threat to countries in the region, and he has made a mockery of the weapons inspection process.

This Democratic drumbeat continued and even intensified when Bush succeeded Clinton in 2001, and it featured many who would later pretend to have been deceived by the Bush White House. In a letter to the new President, a number of Senators led by Bob Graham declared:

There is no doubt that . . . Saddam Hussein has invigorated his weapons programs. Reports indicate that biological, chemical, and nuclear programs continue apace and may be back to pre-Gulf war status. In addition, Saddam continues to redefine delivery systems and is doubtless using the cover of a licit missile program to develop longer-range missiles that will threaten the United States and our allies.

Senator Carl Levin also reaffirmed for Bush’s benefit what he had told Clinton some years earlier:

Saddam Hussein is a tyrant and a threat to the peace and stability of the region. He has ignored the mandate of the United Nations, and is building weapons of mass destruction and the means of delivering them.

Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton agreed, speaking in October 2002:

In the four years since the inspectors left, intelligence reports show that Saddam Hussein has worked to rebuild his chemical- and biological-weapons stock, his missile-delivery capability, and his nuclear program. He has also given aid, comfort, and sanctuary to terrorists, including al-Qaeda members.

Senator Jay Rockefeller, vice chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, agreed as well:

There is unmistakable evidence that Saddam Hussein is working aggressively to develop nuclear weapons and will likely have nuclear weapons within the next five years. . . . We also should remember we have always underestimated the progress Saddam has made in development of weapons of mass destruction.

Even more striking were the sentiments of Bush’s opponents in his two campaigns for the presidency. Thus Al Gore in September 2002:

We know that [Saddam] has stored secret supplies of biological and chemical weapons throughout his country.

And here is Gore again, in that same year:

Iraq’s search for weapons of mass destruction has proven impossible to deter, and we should assume that it will continue for as long as Saddam is in power.

Now to John Kerry, also speaking in 2002:

I will be voting to give the President of the United States the authority to use force—if necessary—to disarm Saddam Hussein because I believe that a deadly arsenal of weapons of mass destruction in his hands is a real and grave threat to our security.

Perhaps most startling of all, given the rhetoric that they would later employ against Bush after the invasion of Iraq, are statements made by Senators Ted Kennedy and Robert Byrd, also in 2002:

Kennedy: We have known for many years that Saddam Hussein is seeking and developing weapons of mass destruction.

Byrd: The last UN weapons inspectors left Iraq in October of 1998. We are confident that Saddam Hussein retains some stockpiles of chemical and biological weapons, and that he has since embarked on a crash course to build up his chemical- and biological-warfare capabilities. Intelligence reports indicate that he is seeking nuclear weapons.2

Liberal politicians like these were seconded by the mainstream media, in whose columns a very different tune would later be sung. For example, throughout the last two years of the Clinton administration, editorials in the New York Times repeatedly insisted that

without further outside intervention, Iraq should be able to rebuild weapons and missile plants within a year [and] future military attacks may be required to diminish the arsenal again.

The Times was also skeptical of negotiations, pointing out that it was

hard to negotiate with a tyrant who has no intention of honoring his commitments and who sees nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons as his country’s salvation.

So, too, the Washington Post, which greeted the inauguration of George W. Bush in January 2001 with the admonition that

[o]f all the booby traps left behind by the Clinton administration, none is more dangerous—or more urgent—than the situation in Iraq. Over the last year, Mr. Clinton and his team quietly avoided dealing with, or calling attention to, the almost complete unraveling of a decade’s efforts to isolate the regime of Saddam Hussein and prevent it from rebuilding its weapons of mass destruction. That leaves President Bush to confront a dismaying panorama in the Persian Gulf [where] intelligence photos . . . show the reconstruction of factories long suspected of producing chemical and biological weapons.3

All this should surely suffice to prove far beyond any even unreasonable doubt that Bush was telling what he believed to be the truth about Saddam’s stockpile of WMD. It also disposes of the fallback charge that Bush lied by exaggerating or hyping the intelligence presented to him. Why on earth would he have done so when the intelligence itself was so compelling that it convinced everyone who had direct access to it, and when hardly anyone in the world believed that Saddam had, as he claimed, complied with the sixteen resolutions of the Security Council demanding that he get rid of his weapons of mass destruction?

Another fallback charge is that Bush, operating mainly through Cheney, somehow forced the CIA into telling him what he wanted to hear. Yet in its report of 2004, the bipartisan Senate Intelligence Committee, while criticizing the CIA for relying on what in hindsight looked like weak or faulty intelligence, stated that it

did not find any evidence that administration officials attempted to coerce, influence, or pressure analysts to change their judgments related to Iraq’s weapons-of-mass-destruction capabilities.

The March 2005 report of the equally bipartisan Robb-Silberman commission, which investigated intelligence failures on Iraq, reached the same conclusion, finding

no evidence of political pressure to influence the intelligence community’s pre-war assessments of Iraq’s weapons programs. . . . [A]nalysts universally asserted that in no instance did political pressure cause them to skew or alter any of their analytical judgments.

Still, even many who believed that Saddam did possess WMD, and was ruthless enough to use them, accused Bush of telling a different sort of lie by characterizing the risk as “imminent.” But this, too, is false: Bush consistently rejected imminence as a justification for war.4 Thus, in the State of the Union address he delivered only three months after 9/11, Bush declared that he would “not wait on events while dangers gather” and that he would “not stand by, as peril draws closer and closer.” Then, in a speech at West Point six months later, he reiterated the same point: “If we wait for threats to materialize, we will have waited too long.” And as if that were not clear enough, he went out of his way in his State of the Union address in 2003 (that is, three months before the invasion), to bring up the word “imminent” itself precisely in order to repudiate it:

Some have said we must not act until the threat is imminent. Since when have terrorists and tyrants announced their intentions, politely putting us on notice before they strike? If this threat is permitted to fully and suddenly emerge, all actions, all words, and all recriminations would come too late. Trusting in the sanity and restraint of Saddam Hussein is not a strategy, and it is not an option.

What of the related charge that it was still another “lie” to suggest, as Bush and his people did, that a connection could be traced between Saddam Hussein and the al-Qaeda terrorists who had attacked us on 9/11? This charge was also rejected by the Senate Intelligence Committee. Contrary to how its findings were summarized in the mainstream media, the committee’s report explicitly concluded that al Qaeda did in fact have a cooperative, if informal, relationship with Iraqi agents working under Saddam. The report of the bipartisan 9/11 commission came to the same conclusion, as did a comparably independent British investigation conducted by Lord Butler, which pointed to “meetings . . . between senior Iraqi representatives and senior al-Qaeda operatives.”5

Which brings us to Joseph C. Wilson, IV and what to my mind wins the palm for the most disgraceful instance of all.

The story begins with the notorious sixteen words inserted—after, be it noted, much vetting by the CIA and the State Department—into Bush’s 2003 State of the Union address:

The British government has learned that Saddam Hussein recently sought significant quantities of uranium from Africa.

This is the “lie” Wilson bragged of having “debunked” after being sent by the CIA to Niger in 2002 to check out the intelligence it had received to that effect. Wilson would later angrily deny that his wife had recommended him for this mission, and would do his best to spread the impression that choosing him had been the Vice President’s idea. But Nicholas Kristof of the New York Times, through whom Wilson first planted this impression, was eventually forced to admit that “Cheney apparently didn’t know that Wilson had been dispatched.” (By the time Kristof grudgingly issued this retraction, Wilson himself, in characteristically shameless fashion, was denying that he had ever “said the Vice President sent me or ordered me sent.”) And as for his wife’s supposed non-role in his mission, here is what Valerie Plame Wilson wrote in a memo to her boss at the CIA:

My husband has good relations with the PM [the prime minister of Niger] and the former minister of mines . . . , both of whom could possibly shed light on this sort of activity.

More than a year after his return, with the help of Kristof, and also Walter Pincus of the Washington Post, and then through an op-ed piece in the Times under his own name, Wilson succeeded, probably beyond his wildest dreams, in setting off a political firestorm.

In response, the White House, no doubt hoping to prevent his allegation about the sixteen words from becoming a proxy for the charge that (in Wilson’s latest iteration of it) “lies and disinformation [were] used to justify the invasion of Iraq,” eventually acknowledged that the President’s statement “did not rise to the level of inclusion in the State of the Union address.” As might have been expected, however, this panicky response served to make things worse rather than better. And yet it was totally unnecessary—for the maddeningly simple reason that every single one of the sixteen words at issue was true.

That is, British intelligence had assured the CIA that Saddam Hussein had tried to buy enriched uranium from the African country of Niger. Furthermore—and notwithstanding the endlessly repeated assertion that this assurance has now been discredited—Britain’s independent Butler commission concluded that it was “well-founded.” The relevant passage is worth quoting at length:

a. It is accepted by all parties that Iraqi officials visited Niger in 1999.

b. The British government had intelligence from several different sources indicating that this visit was for the purpose of acquiring uranium. Since uranium constitutes almost three-quarters of Niger’s exports, the intelligence was credible.

c. The evidence was not conclusive that Iraq actually purchased, as opposed to having sought, uranium, and the British government did not claim this.

As if that were not enough to settle the matter, Wilson himself, far from challenging the British report when he was “debriefed” on his return from Niger (although challenging it is what he now never stops doing6), actually strengthened the CIA’s belief in its accuracy. From the Senate Intelligence Committee report:

He [the CIA reports officer] said he judged that the most important fact in the report [by Wilson] was that Niger officials admitted that the Iraqi delegation had traveled there in 1999, and that the Niger prime minister believed the Iraqis were interested in purchasing uranium.

And again:

The report on [Wilson’s] trip to Niger . . . did not change any analysts’ assessments of the Iraq-Niger uranium deal. For most analysts, the information in the report lent more credibility to the original CIA reports on the uranium deal.

This passage goes on to note that the State Department’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research—which (as we have already seen) did not believe that Saddam Hussein was trying to develop nuclear weapons—found support in Wilson’s report for its “assessment that Niger was unlikely to be willing or able to sell uranium to Iraq.” But if so, this, as the Butler report quoted above points out, would not mean that Iraq had not tried to buy it—which was the only claim made by British intelligence and then by Bush in the famous sixteen words.

The liar here, then, was not Bush but Wilson. And Wilson also lied when he told the Washington Post that he had unmasked as forgeries certain documents given to American intelligence (by whom it is not yet clear) that supposedly contained additional evidence of Saddam’s efforts to buy uranium from Niger. The documents did indeed turn out to be forgeries; but, according to the Butler report,

[t]he forged documents were not available to the British government at the time its assessment was made, and so the fact of the forgery does not undermine [that assessment].7

More damning yet to Wilson, the Senate Intelligence Committee discovered that he had never laid eyes on the documents in question:

[Wilson] also told committee staff that he was the source of a Washington Post article . . . which said, “among the envoy’s conclusions was that the documents may have been forged because ‘the dates were wrong and the names were wrong.’” Committee staff asked how the former ambassador could have come to the conclusion that the “dates were wrong and the names were wrong” when he had never seen the CIA reports and had no knowledge of what names and dates were in the reports.

To top all this off, just as Cheney had nothing to do with the choice of Wilson for the mission to Niger, neither was it true that, as Wilson “confirmed” for a credulous New Republic reporter, “the CIA circulated [his] report to the Vice President’s office,” thereby supposedly proving that Cheney and his staff “knew the Niger story was a flatout lie.” Yet—the mind reels—if Cheney had actually been briefed on Wilson’s oral report to the CIA (which he was not), he would, like the CIA itself, have been more inclined to believe that Saddam had tried to buy yellowcake uranium from Niger.

So much for the author of the best-selling and much acclaimed book whose title alone—The Politics of Truth: Inside the Lies that Led to War and Betrayed My Wife’s CIA Identity—has set a new record for chutzpah.

But there is worse. In his press conference on the indictment against Libby, Patrick Fitzgerald insisted that lying to federal investigators is a serious crime both because it is itself against the law and because, by sending them on endless wild-goose chases, it constitutes the even more serious crime of obstruction of justice. By those standards, Wilson—who has repeatedly made false statements about every aspect of his mission to Niger, including whose idea it was to send him and what he told the CIA upon his return; who was then shown up by the Senate Intelligence Committee as having lied about the forged documents; and whose mendacity has sent the whole country into a wild-goose chase after allegations that, the more they are refuted, the more they keep being repeated—is himself an excellent candidate for criminal prosecution.

And so long as we are hunting for liars in this area, let me suggest that we begin with the Democrats now proclaiming that they were duped, and that we then broaden out to all those who in their desperation to delegitimize the larger policy being tested in Iraq—the policy of making the Middle East safe for America by making it safe for democracy—have consistently used distortion, misrepresentation, and selective perception to vilify as immoral a bold and noble enterprise and to brand as an ignominious defeat what is proving itself more and more every day to be a victory of American arms and a vindication of American ideals.


NORMAN PODHORETZ is the editor-at-large of COMMENTARY and the author of ten books. The most recent, The Norman Podhoretz Reader, edited by Thomas L. Jeffers, appeared in 2004. His essays on the Bush Doctrine and Iraq, including “World War IV: How It Started, What It Means, and Why We Have to Win” (September 2004) and “The War Against World War IV” (February 2005), can be found by clicking here.


1 Hard as it is to believe, let alone to reconcile with his general position, Joseph C. Wilson, IV, in a speech he delivered three months after the invasion at the Education for Peace in Iraq Center, offhandedly made the following remark: “I remain of the view that we will find biological and chemical weapons and we may well find something that indicates that Saddam’s regime maintained an interest in nuclear weapons.”

2 Fuller versions of these and similar statements can be found at http://www.theconversationcafe.com/forums/archive/index.php/t-3134.htmland. Another source is http://www.rightwingnews.com/quotes/demsonwmds.php.

3 These and numerous other such quotations were assembled by Robert Kagan in a piece published in the Washington Post on October 25, 2005.

4 Whereas both John Edwards, later to become John Kerry’s running mate in 2004, and Jay Rockefeller, the ranking Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, actually did use the word in describing the threat posed by Saddam.

5 In early November, the Democrats on the Senate Intelligence Committee, who last year gave their unanimous assent to its report, were suddenly mounting a last-ditch effort to take it back on this issue (and others). But to judge from the material they had already begun leaking by November 7, when this article was going to press, the newest “Bush lied” case is as empty and dishonest as the one they themselves previously rejected.

6 Here is how he put it in a piece in the Los Angeles Times written in late October of this year to celebrate the indictment of Libby: “I knew that the statement in Bush’s speech . . . was not true. I knew it was false from my own investigative trip to Africa. . . . And I knew that the White House knew it.”

7 More extensive citations of the relevant passages from the Butler report can be found in postings by Daniel McKivergan at http://www.worldwidestandard.com. I have also drawn throughout on materials cited by the invaluable Stephen F. Hayes in the Weekly Standard.

Voir également:

Throughout the Bush years, liberals repeated “Bush lied, people died” like a mantra. That slander wasn’t true then and it’s not anymore true now that it has resurfaced. There are many legitimate criticisms of the way the Bush Administration conducted the war in Iraq and even more of the way Obama threw away all the blood and treasure we spent there for the sake of politics, but you have to be malicious or just an imbecile at this point to accuse Bush of lying about WMDs.

To begin with, numerous foreign intelligence agencies also believed that Saddam Hussein had an active WMD program. The « intelligence agencies of Germany, Israel, Russia, Britain, China and France«  all believed Saddam had WMDs. CIA Director George Tenet also rather famously said that it was a “slam dunk” that there were weapons of mass destruction in Iraq.

Incidentally, it’s hard to fault the CIA for their conclusions when even, “In private conversations that were intercepted by U.S. intelligence, Iraqi officials spoke as if Saddam continued to possess WMD. Even Iraqi generals believed he did. In the fall of 2002, the Iraqi military conducted exercises in chemical protective gear – but not because they thought the U.S.-led coalition was going to use chemical weapons.”

Additionally, many prominent Democrats who had access to the same intelligence that George Bush did came to the same conclusion and said so publicly. If George W. Bush lied, then by default you have to also believe that Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton, Al Gore, John Kerry, John Edwards, Robert Byrd, Tom Daschle, Nancy Pelosi and Bernie Sanders also lied. Some of them, like Hillary Clinton, even alleged that Saddam was working on nuclear weapons.

“In the four years since the inspectors left, intelligence reports show that Saddam Hussein has worked to rebuild his chemical and biological weapons stock, his missile delivery capability, and his nuclear program. He has also given aid, comfort, and sanctuary to terrorists, including Al Qaeda members, though there is apparently no evidence of his involvement in the terrible events of September 11, 2001. It is clear, however, that if left unchecked, Saddam Hussein will continue to increase his capacity to wage biological and chemical warfare, and will keep trying to develop nuclear weapons. Should he succeed in that endeavor, he could alter the political and security landscape of the Middle East, which as we know all too well affects American security.” — Hillary Clinton, October 10, 2002

Even Bernie Sanders, who opposed the war from the beginning, publicly said he believed that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction.

Mr. Speaker, the front page of The Washington Post today reported that all relevant U.S. intelligence agencies now say, despite what we have heard from the White House, that « Saddam Hussein is unlikely to initiate a chemical or biological attack against the United States. » Even more importantly, our intelligence agencies say that should Saddam conclude that a U.S.-led attack could no longer be deterred, he might at that point launch a chemical or biological counterattack. In other words, there is more danger of an attack on the United States if we launch a precipitous invasion.

You can’t blame Bernie and Hillary too much for thinking Iraq had WMDs because privately, even former weapons UN inspectors were saying the same thing.

Additional confirmation of this latter point comes from Kenneth Pollack, who served in the National Security Council under Clinton. “In the late spring of 2002,” Pollack has written,

I participated in a Washington meeting about Iraqi WMD. Those present included nearly twenty former inspectors from the United Nations Special Commission (UNSCOM), the force established in 1991 to oversee the elimination of WMD in Iraq. One of the senior people put a question to the group: did anyone in the room doubt that Iraq was currently operating a secret centrifuge plant? No one did.

Furthermore, as even the New York Times has been forced to admit, large numbers of pre-Gulf War WMDs have actually been found in Iraq.

From 2004 to 2011, American and American-trained Iraqi troops repeatedly encountered, and on at least six occasions were wounded by, chemical weapons remaining from years earlier in Saddam Hussein’s rule.

In all, American troops secretly reported finding roughly 5,000 chemical warheads, shells or aviation bombs, according to interviews with dozens of participants, Iraqi and American officials, and heavily redacted intelligence documents obtained under the Freedom of Information Act.

One of the reasons Saddam Hussein went to such great lengths to hide what he was doing was because he did have thousands of old WMDS stockpiled.  However, that wasn’t all there was to it. Even though the ultimate conclusion of the Iraqi Survey Group was that Saddam didn’t have an active WMD program, his hands were far from clean on the WMD front.

As David Kay noted in his report back in 2003,

…When Saddam had asked a senior military official in either 2001 or 2002 how long it would take to produce new chemical agent and weapons, he told ISG that after he consulted with CW experts in OMI he responded it would take six months for mustard.

Another senior Iraqi chemical weapons expert in responding to a request in mid-2002 from Uday Husayn for CW for the Fedayeen Saddam estimated that it would take two months to produce mustard and two years for Sarin.”

— “…(O)ne scientist confirmed that the production line…..could be switched to produce anthrax in one week if the seed stock were available.”

…With regard to Iraq’s nuclear program, the testimony we have obtained from Iraqi scientists and senior government officials should clear up any doubts about whether Saddam still wanted to obtain nuclear weapons.

They have told ISG that Saddam… remained firmly committed to acquiring nuclear weapons. These officials assert that Saddam would have resumed nuclear weapons development at some future point. Some indicated a resumption after Iraq was free of sanctions.”

“1. Saddam, at least as judged by those scientists and other insiders who worked in his military-industrial programs, had not given up his aspirations and intentions to continue to acquire weapons of mass destruction. Even those senior officials we have interviewed who claim no direct knowledge of any on-going prohibited activities readily acknowledge that Saddam intended to resume these programs whenever the external restrictions were removed. Several of these officials acknowledge receiving inquiries since 2000 from Saddam or his sons about how long it would take to either restart CW production or make available chemical weapons.”

The Duelfer report also noted that Saddam had every intention of making more WMDs.

“(S)ources indicate that M16 was planning to produce several CW agents including sulfur mustard, nitrogen mustard, and Sarin.”

In other words, it is true that no stockpiles of new WMDS were found and the people in the best position to know didn’t conclude the weapons were moved to Syria. However, had Saddam Hussein not been taken out, he would have still had stockpiles of old WMDs available and he had every intention of making more.

Given all of that, it’s no surprise that everyone from the head of the CIA to Bernie Sanders to the British thought that Saddam had WMDs; yet George W. Bush is the one who is accused of deliberately sending American soldiers to their deaths over a lie.

No honest person can read all of this and STILL repeat the disgusting smear that George W. Bush lied about WMDs to get us into war in Iraq.

Would you vote for Carly Fiorina in the 2016 presidential election?

Voir de plus:

Bush: Mubarak Informed US that Iraq Had Biological Weapons
Diaa Bekheet
VOA

November 10, 2010

Former U.S. President George W. Bush says Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak informed the U.S. that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction. He also spoke of other people who had influence on his decision to invade Iraq.

The revelation comes in Bush’s memoirs, Decision Points, in which he highlighted mistakes made during the Iraq war campaign, and the failure to find weapons of mass destruction in the country.

« President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt had told [general] Tommy Franks that Iraq had biological weapons and was certain to use them on our troops, » Bush revealed in his newly-released book.

The former president said Mubarak « refused to make the allegation in public for fear of inciting the Arab street. »

So far, the Egyptian government has issued no reaction to Bush’s claim.

Bush explained that the « intelligence from a Middle Eastern leader who knew [former Iraqi president] Saddam [Hussein] well had an impact on my thinking. »

« Just as there were risks to actions, there were risks to inaction as well, »  he wrote in Decision Points.

Bush says the diplomatic process drifted along, the pressure for action had been mounting. He says in early 2003, Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan told him the uncertainty was hurting the economy. There was also concern among America’s Middle East allies.

« Prince Bandar of Saudi Arabia, the kingdom’s longtime ambassador to Washington and a friend of mine since dad’s presidency, came to the Oval Office and told me our allies in the Middle East wanted a decision, » Bush explained.

Another person who had a deep impact on his war decision was holocaust survivor and Nobel Peace Prize recipient, Elie Wiesel.

« There was passion in his 74-year-old eyes when he compared Saddam Hussein’s brutality to the Nazi genocide, » the former president remembered.

« Mr. President, » Wiesel said, « You have a moral obligation to act against evil, » Bush wrote.

He also wrote about his reaction when WMDs were not found.

« No one was more shocked or angry than I was when we didn’t find the weapons [of mass destruction]. I had a sickening feeling every time I thought about it. I still do, » Bush said.

The former chief of state admits the fight in Iraq was more difficult than expected, but he believes the consequence of the American occupation was a chance for democracy to take root on the Persian Gulf.

In his book,  Bush revisits other controversial war decisions and defends them vigorously.  He says the war on Afghanistan [launched in October 2001 following the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks in America) was necessary to uproot al-Qaida and the Taliban.

Bush wrote: « History can debate the decisions I made, the policies I chose, and the tools I left behind. But there can be no debate about one fact: After the nightmare of September 11, America went seven and a half years without another successful terrorist attack on our soil. If I had to summarize my most meaningful accomplishment as president in one sentence, that would be it. »

The former president closes his memoirs by saying he’s comfortable knowing that history’s verdict on his presidency will come after he’s gone.

« Whatever the verdict on my presidency, I’m comfortable with the fact that I won’t be around to hear it. That’s a decision point only history will reach, » Bush wrote.

Decision Points was released in bookstores on November 9.

Voir de même:

Woodward: Tenet told Bush WMD case a ‘slam dunk’
Says Bush didn’t solicit Rumsfeld, Powell on going to war
CNN

April 19, 2004

WASHINGTON (CNN) — About two weeks before deciding to invade Iraq, President Bush was told by CIA Director George Tenet there was a « slam dunk case » that dictator Saddam Hussein had unconventional weapons, according to a new book by Washington Post journalist Bob Woodward.

That declaration was « very important » in his decision making, according to « Plan of Attack, » which is being excerpted this week in The Post.

Bush also made his decision to go to war without consulting Vice President Dick Cheney, Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld or Secretary of State Colin Powell, Woodward’s book says.

Powell was not even told until after the Saudi ambassador was allowed to review top-secret war plans in an effort to enlist his country’s support for the invasion, according to Woodward, who has written or co-written several best-selling books on Washington politics, including « All the President’s Men » with Carl Bernstein.

The book also reports that in the summer of 2002, $700 million was diverted from a congressional appropriation for the war in Afghanistan to develop a war plan for Iraq.

Woodward suggests the diversion may have been illegal, and that Congress was deliberately kept in the dark about what had been done.

Woodward talked about his book Sunday on CBS’s « 60 Minutes. »

The book is based on interviews with 75 people involved in planning for the war, including Bush, the only source who spoke for attribution.

Woodward quotes Bush as saying he did not feel the need to ask his principal advisers, including Cheney, Rumsfeld and Powell, whether they thought he ought to go to war because « I could tell what they thought. »

But he said he did discuss his thinking with Condoleezza Rice, his national security adviser.

« I didn’t need to ask them their opinion about Saddam Hussein. If you were sitting where I sit, you could be pretty clear. I think we’ve got an environment where people feel free to express themselves, » Bush is quoted as saying.

In the book, Woodward reports that on November 21, 2001 — about three months after the September 11 attacks and shortly after the Taliban regime crumbled in Afghanistan — Bush took Rumsfeld aside, ordered him to develop a war plan for Iraq and told him to keep it secret.

‘The best we’ve got?’
As the war planning progressed, on December 21, 2002, Tenet and his top deputy, John McLaughlin, went to the White House to brief Bush and Cheney on Iraq’s weapons of mass destruction, Woodward reports.

The president, unimpressed by the presentation of satellite photographs and intercepts, pressed Tenet and McLaughlin, saying their information would not « convince Joe Public » and asking Tenet, « This is the best we’ve got? » Woodward reports.

According to Woodward, Tenet reassured the president that « it’s a slam dunk case » that Saddam had weapons of mass destruction.

In his CBS interview, Woodward said he « asked the president about this, and he said it was very important to have the CIA director, ‘slam-dunk’ is as I interpreted it, a sure thing, guaranteed. »

About two weeks later, shortly after New Year’s Day 2003, Bush — frustrated with unfruitful U.N. weapons inspections — made up his mind to go to war after consulting with Rice, according to Woodward.

She urged him to act on his stated threat to take military action if Saddam did not provide a full accounting of his weapons of mass destruction, Woodward reports.

« If you’re going to carry out coercive diplomacy, you have to live with that decision, » Rice is quoted as telling Bush.

On « Face The Nation » Sunday, Rice insisted that Bush’s conversation with her in January did not amount to a decision to go to war, which she said wasn’t made until March when military strikes were ordered.

« Part of the relationship between a national security adviser and a president is that the president, in a sense, kind of thinks out loud, if I could put it that way, » she said.

Questions about Hans Blix
Woodward also reports that U.S. officials were skeptical about the weapons inspections because they were receiving intelligence information indicating that chief U.N. weapons inspector Hans Blix was not reporting everything he had uncovered and was not doing everything he said he was doing.

Some of the president’s top advisers thought Blix was a liar, according to the book.

Shortly after the meeting with Rice, Bush told Rumsfeld, « Look, we’re going to have to do this, I’m afraid, » according to the book.

Subsequently, on January 11, Rumsfeld, Cheney and Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Richard Myers met in Cheney’s office with Prince Bandar, the Saudi ambassador to the United States.

At that meeting, Myers showed Prince Bandar, the Saudi ambassador, a map labeled « top secret noforn, » meaning that it was not to be seen by any foreign national, Woodward told CBS.

The map outlined the U.S. battle plan for Iraq, which was to begin with an air attack, followed by land invasions moving north from Kuwait and south from Turkey, according to the book.

Myers said Sunday on CNN’s « Late Edition » that though he had not read Woodward’s book, he was familiar with the account of the meeting, and it was « basically correct. »

« At that time, we were looking for support of our allies and partners in the region. Saudi Arabia’s been a strategic partner in the region over a very long time, » he said.

Powell’s skepticism
Two days after the meeting with Bandar, on January 13, Bush met with Powell in the Oval Office to inform his chief diplomat that he had decided to go to war.

« You know you’re going to be owning this place? » Powell is reported as telling Bush, cautioning him that the United States would be assuming the responsibility for the postwar situation.

Bush told Powell that he understood the ramifications, Woodward said.

Despite his reservations about the policy, Powell told the president he would support him, deciding that it would be « an unthinkable act of disloyalty » to both Bush and U.S. troops to walk away at that point, according to Woodward.

In her interview with « Face The Nation, » Rice disputed the suggestion that Powell was kept less in the loop than the Saudi ambassador.

She said again that the decision to go to war did not take place until March, well after Bush had informed Powell of his intentions and after his U.N. presentation.

« The secretary of state was privy to all of the conversations with the president, all of the briefings for the president, » she said.

« It’s just not the proper impression that somehow Prince Bandar was in the know in a way that Secretary Powell was not. »

Voir enfin:

Spies, Lies, and Weapons: What Went Wrong

How could we have been so far off in our estimates of Saddam Hussein’s weapons programs? A leading Iraq expert and intelligence analyst in the Clinton Administration—whose book The Threatening Storm proved deeply influential in the run-up to the war—gives a detailed account of how and why we erred

Kenneth M. Pollack January/February 2004

Let’s start with one truth: last March, when the United States and its coalition partners invaded Iraq, the American public and much of the rest of the world believed that after Saddam Hussein’s regime sank, a vast flotsam of weapons of mass destruction would bob to the surface. That, of course, has not been the case. In the words of David Kay, the principal adviser to the Iraq Survey Group (ISG), an organization created late last spring to search for prohibited weaponry, « I think all of us who entered Iraq expected the job of actually discovering deployed weapons to be easier than it has turned out to be. » Many people are now asking very reasonable questions about why they were misled.

Democrats have typically accused the Bush Administration of exaggerating the threat posed by Iraq in order to justify an unnecessary war. Republicans have typically claimed that the fault lay with the CIA and the rest of the U.S. intelligence community, which they say overestimated the threat from Iraq—a claim that carries the unlikely implication that Bush’s team might not have opted for war if it had understood that Saddam was not as dangerous as he seemed.

Both sides appear to be at least partly right. The intelligence community did overestimate the scope and progress of Iraq’s WMD programs, although not to the extent that many people believe. The Administration stretched those estimates to make a case not only for going to war but for doing so at once, rather than taking the time to build regional and international support for military action.

This issue has some personal relevance for me. I began my career as a Persian Gulf military analyst at the CIA, where I saw an earlier generation of technical analysts mistakenly conclude that Saddam Hussein was much further away from having a nuclear weapon than the post-Gulf War inspections revealed. I later moved on to the National Security Council, where I served two tours, in 1995-1996 and 1999-2001. During the latter stint the intelligence community convinced me and the rest of the Clinton Administration that Saddam had reconstituted his WMD programs following the withdrawal of the UN inspectors, in 1998, and was only a matter of years away from having a nuclear weapon. In 2002 I wrote a book called Threatening Storm: The Case for Invading Iraq, in which I argued that because all our other options had failed, the United States would ultimately have to go to war to remove Saddam before he acquired a functioning nuclear weapon. Thus it was with more than a little interest that I pondered the question of why we didn’t find in Iraq what we were so certain we would.
What We Thought We Knew

The U.S. intelligence community’s belief that Saddam was aggressively pursuing weapons of mass destruction pre-dated Bush’s inauguration, and therefore cannot be attributed to political pressure. It was first advanced at the end of the 1990s, at a time when President Bill Clinton was trying to facilitate a peace agreement between Israel and the Palestinians and was hardly seeking assessments that the threat from Iraq was growing.

In congressional testimony in March of 2002 Robert Einhorn, Clinton’s assistant secretary of state for nonproliferation, summed up the intelligence community’s conclusions about Iraq at the end of the Clinton Administration:

« How close is the peril of Iraqi WMD? Today, or at most within a few months, Iraq could launch missile attacks with chemical or biological weapons against its neighbors (albeit attacks that would be ragged, inaccurate, and limited in size). Within four or five years it could have the capability to threaten most of the Middle East and parts of Europe with missiles armed with nuclear weapons containing fissile material produced indigenously—and to threaten U.S. territory with such weapons delivered by nonconventional means, such as commercial shipping containers. If it managed to get its hands on sufficient quantities of already produced fissile material, these threats could arrive much sooner. »

In October of 2002 the National Intelligence Council, the highest analytical body in the U.S. intelligence community, issued a classified National Intelligence Estimate on Iraq’s WMD, representing the consensus of the intelligence community. Although after the war some complained that the NIE had been a rush job, and that the NIC should have been more careful in its choice of language, in fact the report accurately reflected what intelligence analysts had been telling Clinton Administration officials like me for years in verbal briefings.

A declassified version of the 2002 NIE was released to the public in July of last year. Its principal conclusions:

« Iraq has continued its weapons of mass destruction (WMD) programs in defiance of UN resolutions and restrictions. Baghdad has chemical and biological weapons as well as missiles with ranges in excess of UN restrictions; if left unchecked, it probably will have a nuclear weapon during this decade. » (The classified version of the NIE gave an estimate of five to seven years.)

« Since inspections ended in 1998, Iraq has maintained its chemical weapons effort, energized its missile program, and invested more heavily in biological weapons; most analysts assess [that] Iraq is reconstituting its nuclear weapons program. »

« If Baghdad acquires sufficient weapons-grade fissile material from abroad, it could make a nuclear weapon within a year … Without such material from abroad, Iraq probably would not be able to make a weapon until the last half of the decade. »

« Baghdad has begun renewed production of chemical warfare agents, probably including mustard, sarin, cyclosarin, and VX … Saddam probably has stocked a few hundred metric tons of CW agents. »

« All key aspects—R&D, production, and weaponization—of Iraq’s offensive BW [biological warfare] program are active and most elements are larger and more advanced than they were before the Gulf war … Baghdad has established a large-scale, redundant, and concealed BW agent production capability, which includes mobile facilities; these facilities can evade detection, are highly survivable, and can exceed the production rates Iraq had prior to the Gulf war. »

U.S. government analysts were not alone in these views. In the late spring of 2002 I participated in a Washington meeting about Iraqi WMD. Those present included nearly twenty former inspectors from the United Nations Special Commission (UNSCOM), the force established in 1991 to oversee the elimination of WMD in Iraq. One of the senior people put a question to the group: Did anyone in the room doubt that Iraq was currently operating a secret centrifuge plant? No one did. Three people added that they believed Iraq was also operating a secret calutron plant (a facility for separating uranium isotopes).

Other nations’ intelligence services were similarly aligned with U.S. views. Somewhat remarkably, given how adamantly Germany would oppose the war, the German Federal Intelligence Service held the bleakest view of all, arguing that Iraq might be able to build a nuclear weapon within three years. Israel, Russia, Britain, China, and even France held positions similar to that of the United States; France’s President Jacques Chirac told Time magazine last February, « There is a problem—the probable possession of weapons of mass destruction by an uncontrollable country, Iraq. The international community is right … in having decided Iraq should be disarmed. » In sum, no one doubted that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction.

What We Think We Know Now

But it appears that Iraq may not have had any actual weapons of mass destruction. A number of caveats are in order. We do not yet have a complete picture of Iraq’s WMD programs. Initial U.S. efforts to seek out WMD caches were badly lacking: an American artillery unit that had too few people for the task and virtually no plan of action had been hastily assigned the mission. Not surprisingly, its efforts garnered little useful information. According to Judith Miller, a New York Times reporter who was embedded with the unit, by mid-June—nearly two months after the end of major combat operations—the United States had interviewed only thirteen out of hundreds of Iraqi scientists. Documents relating to the programs are known to have been destroyed. Much of Iraq is yet to be explored; as David Kay, of the Iraq Survey Group, which took over the search for WMD in June, told Congress, only ten of Iraq’s 130 major ammunition dumps had been thoroughly checked as of early October (the time of his testimony). Now that Saddam Hussein is in custody, it is possible that new information may be forthcoming, or that closemouthed Iraqis will offer fresh details.

Nevertheless, the preliminary findings of the ISG will probably not change dramatically, at least not in their broad contours. Kay summarized those findings in his October testimony.

Iraq had preserved some of its technological nuclear capability from before the Gulf War. However, no evidence suggested that Saddam had undertaken any significant steps after 1998 toward reconstituting the program to build nuclear weapons or to produce fissile material.

Little evidence surfaced that Iraq had continued to produce chemical weapons; only a minimal amount of clandestine research had been done on them. For instance, the production line at the Fallujah II facility (the plant that intelligence officers believed was Iraq’s principal site for making chlorine, an ingredient in some chemical-warfare agents) turned out to be in derelict condition and had not operated since the Gulf War. Nevertheless, Iraqi officials seemed to believe that they could convert existing civilian pharmaceutical plants to chemical-weapons production, and that Saddam was interested in their ability to do so.

Iraq made determined efforts to retain some capabilities for biological warfare. It maintained an undeclared network of laboratories and other facilities within the apparatus of its security services, and as Kay put it, « this clandestine capability was suitable for preserving BW expertise, BW-capable facilities, and continuing R&D—all key elements for maintaining a capability for resuming BW production. » To disguise its biological-warfare programs Baghdad had scientists working on overt projects that were closely related to proscribed activities.

Iraq seemed to have been most aggressive in pursuing proscribed missiles. In Kay’s words, « detainees and cooperative sources indicate that beginning in 2000 Saddam ordered the development of ballistic missiles with ranges of at least [240 miles] and up to [620 miles] and that measures to conceal these projects from [UN inspectors] were initiated in late 2002, ahead of the arrival of inspectors. » The Iraqis were also working on clustering liquid-fueled rocket engines in order to produce a longer-range missile, and were trying to convert certain surface-to-air missiles into surface-to-surface missiles with a range of 150 miles. Most troubling of all, the ISG uncovered evidence that from 1999 to 2002 Iraq had negotiated with North Korea to buy technology for No Dong missiles, which have a range of 800 miles.

Overall, these findings suggest that Iraq did retain prohibited WMD programs, but that those programs were not so extensive, advanced, or threatening as the National Intelligence Estimate maintained.

More-cautious analysts had argued that the NIE’s assessment that Iraq had large stockpiles of chemical and biological weapons was unlikely, because such munitions deteriorate rapidly and can be quickly produced in bulk if production lines and precursor agents are available (making stockpiles unnecessary as well as inefficient). These analysts instead believed that Iraq had a « just-in-time » production capability—that it could churn out these weapons as needed, using hidden or dual-use facilities. But not even this more conservative scenario was borne out by the ISG’s investigations. Sources told the group that Saddam and his son Uday had each, on separate occasions in 2001 and 2002, asked officials associated with Iraq’s chemical-warfare program how long it would take to produce chemical agents and weapons. One official reportedly told Saddam that it would take six months to produce mustard gas (among the easiest such agents to manufacture); another told Uday that it would take two months to produce mustard gas and two years to produce sarin (a simple nerve agent). The questions do not suggest the presence of large stockpiles. The answers do not support a just-in-time capability.

The ISG’s findings to date are most damning in the nuclear arena—as it happens, the segment of Iraq’s WMD program in which the initial findings are most likely to be correct, because nuclear-weapons production is extremely difficult to conceal. The perceived nuclear threat was always the most disturbing one. The U.S. intelligence community’s belief toward the end of the Clinton Administration that Iraq had reconstituted its nuclear program and was close to acquiring nuclear weapons led me and other Administration officials to support the idea of a full-scale invasion of Iraq, albeit not right away. The NIE’s judgment to the same effect was the real linchpin of the Bush Administration’s case for an invasion.

What we have found in Iraq since the invasion belies that judgment. Saddam did retain basic elements for a nuclear-weapons program and the desire to acquire such weapons at some point, but the program itself was dormant. Saddam had not ordered its resumption (although some reports suggest that he considered doing so in 2002). In all probability Iraq was considerably further from having a nuclear weapon than the five to seven years estimated in the classified version of the NIE.

The View From Baghdad

Figuring out why we overestimated Iraq’s WMD capabilities involves figuring out what the Iraqis, especially Saddam Hussein, were thinking and doing throughout the 1990s. The story starts right after the Gulf War. An Iraqi document that fell into the inspectors’ hands revealed that in April of 1991 a high-level Iraqi committee had ordered many of the country’s WMD activities to be hidden from UN inspectors, even though compliance with the inspections was a condition for the lifting of economic sanctions imposed after the invasion of Kuwait. The document was a report from a nuclear-weapons plant describing how it carried out this order. According to UNSCOM’s final report, « The facility was instructed to remove evidence of the true activities at the facility, evacuate documents to hide sites, make physical alterations to the site to hide its true purpose, develop cover stories, and conduct mock inspections to prepare for UN inspectors. »

A great deal of other information substantiates the idea that Saddam at first decided to try to keep a considerable portion of his WMD programs intact and hidden. His efforts probably included retaining some munitions, but mainly concerned production and research elements. In other words, Saddam did initially try to maintain a « just-in-time » capability. However, it became increasingly clear how difficult this would be. In the summer of 1991 inspectors tracked down and destroyed Saddam’s calutrons. Their discoveries may have convinced him that he would have to put his WMD programs on hold until after the sanctions were lifted—something he reportedly thought would happen within a matter of months.

But the inspectors proved more tenacious and the international community more steadfast than the Iraqis had expected. Accordingly, from June of 1991 to May of 1992 Iraq unilaterally destroyed parts of its WMD programs (as we know from subsequent Iraqi admissions). This action appears to have served two purposes: It got rid of unnecessary munitions and secondary equipment that the inspectors might have found, which would have constituted proof of Iraqi noncompliance. And it helped Baghdad conceal more-important elements of the programs, because the regime could point to the unilateral destructions as evidence of cooperation and could claim that even more material had been destroyed. (Since the fall of Baghdad scientists have told the ISG that key equipment was in fact diverted from these destructions and hidden.)

In 1995 matters changed. That August, Hussein Kamel, Saddam’s son-in-law and the head of Iraq’s WMD programs, defected to Jordan, prompting a panicked Baghdad to hurriedly turn over hundreds of thousands of pages of new documentation to the United Nations. According to the former chief UN weapons inspector Rolf Ekeus, Kamel’s statements and the Iraqi documents squared with what UNSCOM had been finding: although all actual weapons had been eliminated, either by the UN or in the earlier destructions, Iraq had preserved production and R&D programs. Although the Iraqis tried to withhold any highly incriminating documents from the UN (and, ridiculously, claimed that Kamel had been running the programs on his own, without anyone else’s knowledge), in their rush they overlooked several containing crucial information about previously concealed aspects of the nuclear and biological programs.

Other secrets were laid bare that same year. A U.S.-UN sting operation caught the Iraqis trying to smuggle 115 missile gyroscopes through Jordan. (UN inspectors later found other gyroscopes hidden at the bottom of the Tigris River.) Iraq was forced to admit to the existence of a facility to build Scud-missile engines, and to destroy a hidden plant for manufacturing modified Scud missiles. It was also forced to admit to having made much greater progress on its nuclear program before the Gulf War than it had previously acknowledged. Most important, it was forced to admit that a very large biological-weapons plant at al-Hakim, whose existence had been concealed from UN inspectors, had produced 500,000 liters of biological agents in 1989 and 1990, and that it was still functional in 1995. Three years after this confession Lieutenant General Amer al-Saadi, Saddam’s principal liaison with the UN, told inspectors that Iraq would offer no excuse or defense for having denied the existence of its biological-weapons program. He stated matter-of-factly that Iraq had made a political decision to conceal it.

Either late in 1995 or at some point in 1996 Saddam probably recognized that trying to retain his just-in-time capability had become counterproductive. The inspectors kept finding pieces of the programs, and each discovery pushed the lifting of the sanctions further into the future. It’s important to keep in mind several other events of this period. Saddam’s internal position was very shaky. He had faced disturbances in several of his most loyal Sunni tribes. In addition to Kamel, a number of high-ranking officials had defected to the West, including Saddam’s chief of military intelligence, Wafic Samarai. Coup plots abounded. In 1995 the Kurds smashed two Iraqi infantry brigades at Irbil, humiliating the Iraqi army. In 1996 Iraqi intelligence uncovered a CIA-backed coup attempt whose participants had penetrated some of Saddam’s most sensitive intelligence services. Iraq’s economy was suffocating under the sanctions, and inflation was rampant. Given this precarious situation, Saddam probably decided to scale back his WMD programs (with the likely exception of work on proscribed missiles, which could be concealed by Iraq’s permitted missile program) by destroying additional equipment, keeping the bare minimum needed to rebuild them at some point, in order to reduce the risk of further discoveries. This would have meant giving up the idea of just-in-time production capabilities and limiting his efforts to hiding documents and only key pieces of equipment. In short, Saddam switched from trying to hang on to the maximum production and research assets of his WMD programs to trying to keep only the minimum necessary to reconstitute the programs at some point after the sanctions had been lifted.

What Was Saddam Thinking?

Having decided to give up so much of his WMD capability, why didn’t Saddam change his behavior toward the UN inspectors and demonstrate a spirit of candor and cooperation? Even after 1996 the Iraqis took a confrontational posture toward UNSCOM, fighting to prevent inspectors from going where they wanted to go and seeing what they wanted to see. The governments of the world inferred from this defiance that Saddam was still not complying with the UN resolutions, and the sanctions therefore stayed in place.

The first and most obvious answer is that Saddam still had some things to hide, and was fearful of their discovery. Although he did unquestionably have some things to hide, this answer is not entirely satisfying. Iraq was able to conceal the minimized remnants of its WMD programs so well that UNSCOM found little incriminating evidence in 1997 and 1998. This early success should have given Saddam the confidence to begin to cooperate more fully with the UN resolutions. But throughout the period leading up to the war Saddam remained as obstinate as ever.

An alternative explanation, offered by Iraq’s former UN ambassador, Tariq Aziz, and other officials captured after last year’s war, goes like this: Saddam was pretending to have WMD in order to enhance his prestige among the other Arab nations. This explanation doesn’t ring completely true either. It is certainly the case that Saddam garnered a great deal of admiration from Arabs of many countries by appearing to have such weapons, and that he aspired to dominate the Arab world. But this theory assumes that he was willing to incur severe penalties for the UN’s belief that he still had WMD without reaping any tangible benefits from actually having them. If prestige had been more important to him than the lifting of the sanctions, it would have been more logical and more in keeping with his character to simply retain all his WMD capabilities.

Saddam’s behavior may have been driven by completely different considerations. Saddam has always evinced much greater concern for his internal position than for his external status. He has made any number of highly foolish foreign-policy decisions—for example, invading Kuwait and then deciding to stick around and fight the U.S.-led coalition—in response to domestic problems that he feared threatened his grip on power. The same forces may have been at work here; after all, ever since the Iran-Iraq war WMD had been an important element of Saddam’s strength within Iraq. He used them against the Kurds in the late 1980s, and during the revolts that broke out after the Gulf War, he sent signals that he might use them against both the Kurds and the Shiites. He may have feared that if his internal adversaries realized that he no longer had the capability to use these weapons, they would try to move against him. In a similar vein, Saddam’s standing among the Sunni elites who constituted his power base was linked to a great extent to his having made Iraq a regional power—which the elites saw as a product of Iraq’s unconventional arsenal. Thus openly giving up his WMD could also have jeopardized his position with crucial supporters.

Furthermore, Saddam may have felt trapped by his initial reckoning that he could fool the UN inspectors and that the sanctions would be short-lived. Because of this mistaken calculation he had subjected Iraq to terrible hardships. Suddenly cooperating with the inspectors would have meant admitting to both his opponents and his supporters that his course of action had been a mistake and that, having now given up most of his WMD programs, he had devastated Iraqi society for no reason.

This suggests that in 1995-1996 Saddam took one of his famous gambles—gambles that almost never worked out for him. He chose not to « come clean » and cooperate with the UN for fear that this would make him look weak to both his domestic enemies and his domestic allies, either of whom might then have moved against him. But he would try to greatly diminish the chances that UNSCOM would find more evidence of his continuing noncompliance by reducing his WMD programs to the bare minimum, in hopes that the absence of evidence would lead to the lifting of sanctions—something he desperately sought in 1996.

In other respects Saddam’s fortunes began to rise in 1996. Although the CIA-backed coup attempt may have signified internal weakness, the fact that Saddam snuffed it out, as he had many previous attempts, signified strength. Also, to avenge the Iraqi army’s 1995 defeat at Irbil, Saddam manipulated infighting among the Kurds so as to allow his Republican Guards to drive into the city, smash the Kurd defenders, and arrest several hundred CIA-backed rebels. As the historian Amatzia Baram has persuasively argued in his book Building Toward Crisis (1998), these successes made Saddam feel secure enough to swallow his pride and accept UN Resolution 986, the oil-for-food program, which he had previously rejected as an infringement on Iraqi sovereignty. Oil-for-food turned out to be an enormous boon for the Iraqi economy, and commodity prices fell quickly, stabilizing the dinar.

The oil-for-food program itself gave Saddam clout to apply toward the lifting of the sanctions. Under Resolution 986 Iraq could choose to whom it would sell its oil and from whom it would buy its food and medicine. Baghdad could therefore reward cooperative states with contracts. Not surprisingly, France and Russia regularly topped the list of Iraq’s oil-for-food partners. In addition, Iraq could set the prices—and since Saddam did not really care whether he was importing enough food and medicine for his people’s needs, he could sell oil on the cheap and buy food and medicine at inflated prices as additional payoff to friendly governments. He made it clear that he wanted his trading partners to ignore Iraqi smuggling and try to get the sanctions lifted.

By 1997 the international environment had changed markedly, in ways that probably convinced Saddam that he didn’t need to cooperate with the inspectors. The same international outcry—against the suffering inflicted by the Iraq sanctions—that prompted the United States to craft the oil-for-food deal was creating momentum for lifting the sanctions completely. At that point it was reasonable for Saddam to believe that in the not too distant future the sanctions either would be lifted or would be so undermined as to be effectively meaningless, and that he would never have to reveal the remaining elements of his WMD programs. Only in 2002, when the Bush Administration suddenly focused its attention on Iraq, would Saddam have had any reason to change this view. And then, according to a variety of Iraqi sources, he simply refused to believe that the Americans were serious and would actually invade.

Another explanation should be posited. This is the notion that Saddam did not order the program scaled down, but Iraqi scientists ensured that it did not progress and deceived Saddam into believing that it was much further along than it in fact was. Numerous Iraqi scientists have claimed that although Saddam ordered them to produce particular things for the WMD programs, they dragged their feet or found other ways to avoid delivering them. There is most likely a germ of truth to these stories: prevarication on the part of some Iraqi scientists may have helped to account for the modest state of Iraq’s WMD programs in 2003. But they probably form only a part of the explanation. Many of the accounts of scientists’ quietly thwarting Saddam are undoubtedly self-serving, concocted in the aftermath of his defeat. As we have heard time and again from Iraqi defectors, those who did not meet Saddam’s demands risked torture and murder for themselves and their families. We have consistently found that in Saddam’s Iraq very few people took that risk.

One last element may also have been at work all along: the possibility that Saddam genuinely feared that the inspections were a cover for a CIA campaign to overthrow or assassinate him. The Iraqis repeatedly cited this fear in denying UNSCOM access to certain « sensitive » sites—particularly palaces—that were associated with Saddam personally. The rest of the world assumed that it was merely an excuse to keep inspectors out of places that contained evidence of WMD programs. However, the Iraqis may have been telling the truth on this point (and the initial debriefing of Saddam lends some credence to this scenario). After all, as various sources have now disclosed, the United States did run a covert-action campaign against Saddam, starting in 1991, and U.S. intelligence did use UNSCOM operations (without UNSCOM’s knowledge) to gather intelligence for that campaign.

The Perils of Prediction

Everyone outside Iraq missed the 1995-1996 shift in Saddam’s strategy—that is, to scale back his WMD programs to minimize the odds of further discoveries—and assumed that Iraq’s earlier behavior was continuing more or less in a straight line. This misperception took on considerable weight in the following years.

Context is crucial to understanding any intelligence assessment. No matter how objective the analyst may be, he or she begins with a set of basic assumptions that create a broad perspective on an issue; this helps the analyst to sort through evidence.

The context for the 2002 NIE assessment of Iraq’s WMD programs began to take shape before the Gulf War. Prior to 1991 the intelligence communities in the United States and elsewhere believed that Iraq was at least five, and probably closer to ten, years away from acquiring a nuclear weapon. Of course, after the war we learned that in 1991 Iraq had been only six to twenty-four months away from having a workable nuclear weapon. This revelation stunned the analysts responsible for following the Iraqi nuclear program. The lessons they took from it were that Iraq was determined to acquire nuclear weapons and would go to any lengths to do so; that in pursuit of this goal Iraq was willing to use technology that Westerners considered crude and obsolete; that the Iraqis were superb at concealment and deception; and that inspections were inherently flawed—after all, there had been inspectors in Iraq prior to 1990, and they had been completely fooled.

These lessons were strongly reinforced by the revelation of Iraq’s attempts in the first four years after the war to preserve significant parts of its WMD programs. By about 1994 UNSCOM believed, incorrectly, that it had largely disarmed Iraq; its members were privately discussing switching its operations from active inspections to passive monitoring. Many intelligence analysts in the United States, Britain, and Israel disagreed with UNSCOM’s assessment, but they were hard-pressed to substantiate their suspicions—until Hussein Kamel’s defection, in 1995, and subsequent Iraqi admissions regarding the extent of deception. These developments came as a profound shock to the UN inspectors, who resolved that Iraq could never again be trusted. Thus, just when Iraq was in all likelihood giving up efforts to maintain its just-in-time production capability, the rest of the world became hardened in its conviction that Saddam would never abandon or even reduce his efforts to acquire WMD.

Another important contribution to the context is the continuation of Saddam’s hostility toward the inspectors. If anything, the Iraqis became even less accommodating over time. By 1998 they were physically harassing the inspectors—on one occasion firing two rocket-propelled grenades into an UNSCOM building in Baghdad, on another grabbing the controls of an UNSCOM helicopter in flight and nearly causing it to crash. Western intelligence agencies understandably took these actions to mean that nothing in Saddam’s weaponry plans had changed.

In December of 1998 the inspectors withdrew from the country. Their decision to do so came after Iraq announced, in August of that year, that it would no longer cooperate with them at all, and after repeated crises demonstrated that Baghdad’s announcement was not just bluster.

The end of the UN inspections appears in retrospect to have been a much greater problem than anyone recognized at the time. The inspectors had been the best source of information on Iraq and its WMD programs. UNSCOM had a large and highly capable cadre of weapons specialists who focused exclusively on Iraq. Many Western intelligence agencies, faced with other issues that demanded their resources, increasingly relied on UNSCOM’s data and assessments and did little to bolster their own (meager) capabilities in Iraq. And UNSCOM had something that American intelligence did not—physical access to Iraq. Without an embassy there it was very hard for U.S. case officers to penetrate the country.

The end of the inspections eliminated the single best means of vetting what information intelligence agencies could gather independently about Iraq. These agencies usually shared (in some form) new information or analyses about the WMD programs with UNSCOM. If a defector claimed that biological-weapons material was stored at a given site, inspectors would look for it. If satellite imagery indicated unusual activity at a particular location, inspectors would try to confirm it. Although Iraq’s counterintelligence efforts were formidable (UNSCOM estimated that only six of its roughly 250 inspections actually caught the Iraqis by surprise), UNSCOM was usually able to gauge, if only broadly, whether a source or a deduction was correct.

When the inspectors suddenly left, the various intelligence agencies were caught psychologically and organizationally off balance. Desperate for information on Iraq, they began to trust sources that they would previously have had UNSCOM vet. If a defector came out of Iraq after 1998, the CIA had to gauge his credibility by comparing his account with those of other defectors—who might be unreliable or just unproven—or by checking it against whatever they could glean from satellites and other indirect sources. With so little to go on, intelligence agencies believed many reports that now seem deeply suspect.

In the absence of hard evidence, the intelligence analysts tended to fall back on the underlying assumptions they had begun with. Those assumptions included the belief that Saddam was determined to preserve his extant WMD capabilities and acquire new ones. And now there were no weapons inspectors to hinder him. The inspectors had also been a moderating influence on Western intelligence agencies; the information they provided, and the mere fact of their presence in Iraq, helped those agencies stick to reasonable suppositions and keep unsubstantiated fears at bay. After 1998 many analysts increasingly entertained worst-case scenarios—scenarios that gradually became mainstream estimates.

Another element that contributed to faulty assessments before the 2003 invasion was Iraqi rhetoric. Imagine that you were a CIA analyst in June of 2000 and heard Saddam make the following statement: « If the world tells us to abandon all our weapons and keep only swords, we will do that. We will destroy all the weapons, if they destroy their weapons. But if they keep a rifle and then tell me that I have the right to possess only a sword, then we would say no. As long as the rifle has become a means to defend our country against anybody who may have designs against it, then we will try our best to acquire the rifle. » It would be very difficult not to interpret Saddam’s remarks as an announcement that he intended to reconstitute his WMD programs.

The final element in the context for our pre-invasion analysis involved discrepancies between how much WMD material went into Iraq and how much Iraq could prove it had destroyed. Before the Gulf War (and to a certain extent afterward) Baghdad imported enormous quantities of equipment and raw materials for WMD. The UN inspectors, with remarkable diligence, obtained virtually all the import figures, either from the Iraqis or from their suppliers. They then asked the Iraqis to either produce the materials or account for their destruction. In many cases the Iraqis could not. The difference between what they had imported and what they could account for was seen as important evidence of an ambitious clandestine WMD program. These are the numbers—of bombs, of liters of precursor chemicals, and so on—that the world regularly heard Bush Administration officials intone during the run-up to the 2003 war.

In hindsight there are legitimate reasons to question these numbers. According to David Kay, a number of Iraqi sources have told the ISG that some of the material that was unaccounted for was diverted from the unilateral destructions that took place from 1991 to 1996. However, it is not clear whether or not any of that material was destroyed later. And it is likely that some of the discrepancies between UNSCOM and Iraqi figures are no more than the result of sloppiness. Saddam’s Iraq was not exactly an efficient state, and many of his chief lieutenants were semi-literate thugs with no understanding of esoteric technical matters and little regard for how things should be done—their only concern was that Saddam’s demands be met.

The Politics of Persuasion

The intelligence community’s overestimation of Iraq’s WMD capability is only part of the story of why we went to war last year. The other part involves how the Bush Administration handled the intelligence. Throughout the spring and fall of 2002 and well into 2003 I received numerous complaints from friends and colleagues in the intelligence community, and from people in the policy community, about precisely that. According to them, many Administration officials reacted strongly, negatively, and aggressively when presented with information or analysis that contradicted what they already believed about Iraq. Many of these officials believed that Saddam Hussein was the source of virtually all the problems in the Middle East and was an imminent danger to the United States because of his perceived possession of weapons of mass destruction and support of terrorism. Many also believed that CIA analysts tended to be left-leaning cultural relativists who consistently downplayed threats to the United States. They believed that the Agency, not the Administration, was biased, and that they were acting simply to correct that bias.

Intelligence officers who presented analyses that were at odds with the pre-existing views of senior Administration officials were subjected to barrages of questions and requests for additional information. They were asked to justify their work sentence by sentence: « Why did you rely on this source and not this other piece of information? » « How does this conclusion square with this other point? » « Please explain the history of Iraq’s association with the organization you mention in this sentence. » Reportedly, the worst fights were those over sources. The Administration gave greatest credence to accounts that presented the most lurid picture of Iraqi activities. In many cases intelligence analysts were distrustful of those sources, or knew unequivocally that they were wrong. But when they said so, they were not heeded; instead they were beset with further questions about their own sources.

On many occasions Administration officials’ requests for additional information struck the analysts as being made merely to distract them from their primary mission. Some officials asked for extensive historical analyses—a hugely time-consuming undertaking, for which most intelligence analysts are not trained. Requests were constantly made for detailed analyses of newspaper articles that conformed to the views of Administration officials—pieces by conservative newspaper columnists such as Jim Hoagland, William Safire, and George F. Will. These columnists may be highly intelligent men, but they have no claim to superior insight into the workings of Iraq, or to any independent intelligence-collection capabilities.

Of course, no policymaker should accept intelligence estimates unquestioningly. While I was at the NSC, I regularly challenged analysts as to why they believed what they did. I asked for additional material and required them to do significant additional work. Any official who does less is derelict in his or her duty. However, at a certain point curiosity and diligence become a form of pressure. If your employer asks you every so often about your health and seems to take an appropriate interest in the answer, you probably feel that he or she is kind and considerate. If your employer asks you about your health every ten minutes, in highly detailed, probing questions, you may have a more nervous reaction.

As Seymour Hersh, among others, has reported, Bush Administration officials also took some actions that arguably crossed the line between rigorous oversight of the intelligence community and an attempt to manipulate intelligence. They set up their own shop in the Pentagon, called the Office of Special Plans, in order to sift through the information on Iraq themselves. To a great extent OSP personnel « cherry-picked » the intelligence they passed on, selecting reports that supported the Administration’s pre-existing position and ignoring all the rest.

Most problematic of all, the OSP often chose to believe reports that trained intelligence officers considered unreliable or downright false. In particular it gave great credence to reports from the Iraqi National Congress, whose leader was the Administration-backed Ahmed Chalabi. It is true that the intelligence community believed some of the material that came from the INC—but not most of it. (In retrospect, of course, it seems that even the intelligence professionals gave INC reporting more credence than it deserved.) One of the reasons the OSP generally believed Chalabi and the INC was that they were telling it what it wanted to hear—giving the OSP, in a kind of vicious circle, further incentive to trust these sources over differing, and ultimately more reliable, ones. Thus intelligence analysts spent huge amounts of time fighting bad information and trying to persuade Administration officials not to make policy decisions based on it. From my own experience I know that it is hard enough to figure out what the reliable evidence indicates—and vast battles are fought over that. To have to also fight over what is clearly bad information is a Sisyphean task.

The Bush officials who created the OSP gave its reports directly to those in the highest levels of government, often passing raw, unverified intelligence straight to the Cabinet level as gospel. Senior Administration officials made public statements based on these reports—reports that the larger intelligence community knew to be erroneous (for instance, that there was hard and fast evidence linking Iraq to al-Qaeda). Another problem arising from the machinations of the OSP is that whenever the principals of the National Security Council met with the President and his staff, two completely different versions of reality were on the table. The CIA, the State Department, and the uniformed military services would present one version, consistent with the perspective of intelligence and foreign-policy professionals, and the Office of the Secretary of Defense and the Office of the Vice President would present another, based on the perspective of the OSP. These views were too far apart to allow for compromise. As a result, the Administration found it difficult, if not impossible, to make certain important decisions. And it made some that were fatally flawed, including many relating to postwar planning, when the OSP’s view—that Saddam’s regime simultaneously was very threatening and could easily be replaced by a new government—prevailed.

For the most part, the problems discussed so far have more to do with the methods of Administration officials than with their motives, which were often misguided and dangerous, but were essentially well-intentioned. The one action for which I cannot hold Administration officials blameless is their distortion of intelligence estimates when making the public case for going to war.

As best I can tell, these officials were guilty not of lying but of creative omission. They discussed only those elements of intelligence estimates that served their cause. This was particularly apparent in regard to the time frame for Iraq’s acquisition of a nuclear weapon—the issue that most alarmed the American public and the rest of the world. Remember that the NIE said that Iraq was likely to have a nuclear weapon in five to seven years if it had to produce the fissile material indigenously, and that it might have one in less than a year if it could obtain the material from a foreign source. The intelligence community considered it highly unlikely that Iraq would be able to obtain weapons-grade material from a foreign source; it had been trying to do so for twenty-five years with no luck. However, time after time senior Administration officials discussed only the worst-case, and least likely, scenario, and failed to mention the intelligence community’s most likely scenario. Some examples:

In a radio address on September 14, 2002, President Bush warned, « Today Saddam Hussein has the scientists and infrastructure for a nuclear-weapons program, and has illicitly sought to purchase the equipment needed to enrich uranium for a nuclear weapon. Should his regime acquire fissile material, it would be able to build a nuclear weapon within a year. »

On October 7, 2002, the President told a group in Cincinnati, « If the Iraqi regime is able to produce, buy, or steal an amount of highly enriched uranium a little larger than a single softball, it could have a nuclear weapon in less than a year. »

On November 1, 2002, Undersecretary of State John Bolton told the Second Global Conference on Nuclear, Bio/Chem Terrorism, « We estimate that once Iraq acquires fissile material—whether from a foreign source or by securing the materials to build an indigenous fissile-material capability—it could fabricate a nuclear weapon within one year. »

Vice President Cheney said on NBC’s Meet the Press on September 14, 2003, « The judgment in the NIE was that if Saddam could acquire fissile material, weapons-grade material, that he would have a nuclear weapon within a few months to a year. That was the judgment of the intelligence community of the United States, and they had a high degree of confidence in it. »

None of these statements in itself was untrue. However, each told only a part of the story—the most sensational part. These statements all implied that the U.S. intelligence community believed that Saddam would have a nuclear weapon within a year unless the United States acted at once.

Some defenders of the Administration have reportedly countered that all it did was make the best possible case for war, playing a role similar to that of a defense attorney who is charged with presenting the best possible case for a client (even if the client is guilty). That is a false analogy. A defense attorney is responsible for presenting only one side of a dispute. The President is responsible for serving the entire nation. Only the Administration has access to all the information available to various agencies of the U.S. government—and withholding or downplaying some of that information for its own purposes is a betrayal of that responsibility.

What Is to Be Done?

What we have learned about Iraq’s WMD programs since the fall of Baghdad leads me to conclude that the case for war with Iraq was considerably weaker than I believed beforehand. Because of the consensus among American and foreign intelligence agencies, outside experts, and former UN weapons inspectors, I had been convinced that Iraq was only years away from having a nuclear weapon—probably only four or five years, as Robert Einhorn had testified. That estimate was clearly off, possibly by quite a bit. My reluctant conviction that war was our only option (although not at the time or in the manner in which the Bush Administration pursued it) was not entirely based on the nuclear threat, but that threat was the most important factor in it.

The war was not all bad. I do not believe that it was a strategic mistake, although the appalling handling of postwar planning was. There is no question that Saddam Hussein was a force for real instability in the Persian Gulf, and that his removal from power was a tremendous improvement. There is also no question that he was pure evil, and that he headed one of the most despicable regimes of the past fifty years. I am grateful that the United States no longer has to contend with the malign influence of Saddam’s Iraq in this economically irreplaceable and increasingly fragile part of the world; nor can I begrudge the Iraqi people one day of their freedom. What’s more, we should not forget that containment was failing. The shameful performance of the United Nations Security Council members (particularly France and Germany) in 2002-2003 was final proof that containment would not have lasted much longer; Saddam would eventually have reconstituted his WMD programs, although further in the future than we had thought. That said, the case for war—and for war sooner rather than later—was certainly less compelling than it appeared at the time. At the very least we should recognize that the Administration’s rush to war was reckless even on the basis of what we thought we knew in March of 2003. It appears even more reckless in light of what we know today.

The problems that led to our mistaken beliefs about the threat posed by Iraq’s weapons of mass destruction must be addressed immediately. Unfortunately, to some extent the problems are contradictory, and therefore the solutions may work against one another. For example, a remedy used in the past to address influence from the executive branch on the intelligence process has been to increase oversight of intelligence operations and analysis by Congress. However, in this instance increasing congressional oversight could have exacerbated another problem: the failure of the intelligence community to sufficiently challenge its own assumptions about Saddam’s strategy. The more that intelligence agencies must report to both Congress and the White House, the more they fear becoming a political football, and the more they will tone down their estimates, stick to mainstream judgments, and avoid taking controversial positions. Arguing that Iraq had minimized its WMD holdings after 1996 would have been a very controversial position indeed.

Some of the problems that led to our misunderstanding of Iraq’s WMD may be insoluble, at least by bureaucratic changes. The forms of pressure exerted on the intelligence community by the Bush Administration were perfectly legal; it would probably be impossible to regulate against them. Moreover, doing so could preclude useful and necessary questioning of intelligence analysts by Administration officials. Still, some fixes do suggest themselves.

In the future we as a nation must be willing to devote enough resources to intelligence so that we will always be able to sustain a large, aggressive program to collect all manner of information and a sophisticated analysis program on all high-priority issues. In retrospect, our over-reliance on UNSCOM inspectors lulled us into a false sense of security; this in turn contributed to our inflated estimates of Iraq’s WMD progress after 1998. Even though Iraq was a difficult environment for any intelligence service to operate in, and the CIA did devote substantial assets to it at all times, it would have made some difference if the Agency could have devoted still greater resources to it, even when that seemed redundant with UNSCOM’s missions.

Our failings in the WMD experience also argue for a more powerful and independent director of central intelligence. The DCI currently serves at the pleasure of the President, and although he is the nominal head of the entire intelligence community, in reality he does not have much authority over most of the intelligence agencies, whose budgets and personnel come largely from the Department of Defense. The United States could make the DCI position similar to that of the director of the FBI: the President would nominate a candidate who would then need to be confirmed by Congress, and who would serve a fixed term. And the DCI could be made the true head of intelligence, with control over the budgets and personnel of all the intelligence agencies. Many of the intelligence agencies that currently report to the Secretary of Defense, including the National Security Agency and the National Reconnaissance Office, to name just two, should instead report to the DCI. These changes would put the DCI in a stronger position to resist pressure from the executive branch (or Congress) and to protect his people from the same.

Strengthening the DCI and increasing his independence might make for smarter, bolder analysis. The less intelligence analysts have to worry that the DCI is going to take heat for unpopular if accurate judgments, the more willing they will be to make them. This is not a slur against DCI George Tenet, who I think handled the difficulties of his situation extraordinarily well. But it is a recognition that DCIs must not be put in the position that Tenet was forced into.

Another step worth considering is forbidding the CIA or anyone else in government from making any intelligence estimates public for five or ten years. As someone firmly committed to the concept of open government, who believes that the CIA has benefited from its efforts in the past decade to be more open to the public, I dislike the idea of greater secrecy. However, when intelligence estimates become public, they have a huge impact on the course of foreign-policy debates, and administrations therefore find themselves with a great incentive to make sure the Agency’s estimates support the Administration’s preferred policy. If such estimates were not made public, an administration would have little reason to try to influence them. The government could still produce white papers, but they should come from the State Department—the agency that is, after all, officially charged with public diplomacy.

Finally, the U.S. government must admit to the world that it was wrong about Iraq’s WMD and show that it is taking far-reaching action to correct the problems that led to this error. Iraq is not going to be the last foreign-policy challenge in which we must make choices based on ambiguous evidence. When the United States confronts future challenges, the exaggerated estimates of Iraq’s WMD will loom like an ugly shadow over the diplomatic discussions. Fairly or not, no foreigner trusts U.S. intelligence to get it right anymore, or trusts the Bush Administration to tell the truth. The only way that we can regain the world’s trust is to demonstrate that we understand our mistakes and have changed our ways.

Voir enfin:

« France Is Not a Pacifist Country »
James Graff and Bruce Crumley

Time

Feb. 16, 2003

On the question of Iraq, America’s oldest ally has turned into one of its principal adversaries, as Paris and Washington disagree about whether United Nations inspectors should be given more time to do their job. The French President doesn’t feel isolated. In fact, he told TIME in an exclusive interview in the Elysee Palace, he’s ready to offer some « friendly advice » to President Bush on how the American Chief Executive might honorably back away from the brink of war. Excerpts:Do last week’s U.N. inspectors’ reports mark a turning point in the debate over Iraq? In the preceding two days, I received phone calls from several heads of state, both members and nonmembers of the Security Council, and I came to the conclusion that a majority of world leaders share our determination to search for a peaceful solution to disarming Iraq.

If there is a war, what do you see as the consequences for the Middle East? The consequences of war would be considerable in human terms. In political terms, it would destabilize the entire region. It’s very difficult to explain that one is going to spend colossal sums of money to wage war when there may be another solution yet is unable to provide adequate aid to the developing world.

Why do you think fallout from a war would be so much graver than Tony Blair and George Bush seem to? I simply don’t analyze the situation as they do. Among the negative fallout would be inevitably a strong reaction from Arab and Islamic public opinion. It may not be justified, and it may be, but it’s a fact. A war of this kind cannot help giving a big lift to terrorism. It would create a large number of little bin Ladens. Muslims and Christians have a lot to say to one another, but war isn’t going to facilitate that dialogue. I’m against the clash of civilizations; that plays into the hands of extremists. There is a problem—the probable possession of weapons of mass destruction by an uncontrollable country, Iraq. The international community is right to be disturbed by this situation, and it’s right in having decided Iraq should be disarmed. The inspections began, and naturally it is a long and difficult job. We have to give the inspectors time to do it. And probably—and this is France’s view—we have to reinforce their capacities, especially those of aerial surveillance. For the moment, nothing allows us to say inspections don’t work.

Isn’t France ducking its military responsibilities to its oldest ally? France is not a pacifist country. We currently have more troops in the Balkans than the Americans. France is obviously not anti-American. It’s a true friend of the United States and always has been. It is not France’s role to support dictatorial regimes in Iraq or anywhere else. Nor do we have any differences over the goal of eliminating Saddam Hussein’s weapons of mass destruction. For that matter, if Saddam Hussein would only vanish, it would without a doubt be the biggest favor he could do for his people and for the world. But we think this goal can be reached without starting a war.

But you seem willing to put the onus on inspectors to find arms rather than on Saddam to declare what he’s got. Are there nuclear arms in Iraq? I don’t think so. Are there other weapons of mass destruction? That’s probable. We have to find and destroy them. In its current situation, does Iraq—controlled and inspected as it is—pose a clear and present danger to the region? I don’t believe so. Given that, I prefer to continue along the path laid out by the Security Council. Then we’ll see.

What evidence would justify war? It’s up to the inspectors to decide. We gave them our confidence. They were given a mission, and we trust them. If we have to give them greater means, we’ll do so. It’s up to them to come before the Security Council and say, « We won. It’s over. There are no more weapons of mass destruction, » or « It’s impossible for us to fulfill our mission. We’re coming up against Iraqi ill will and impediments. » At that point, the Security Council would have to discuss this report and decide what to do. In that case, France would naturally exclude no option.

But without Iraqi cooperation, even 300 inspectors can’t do the job. That’s correct, no doubt. But it’s up to the inspectors to say so. I’m betting that we can get Iraq to cooperate more. If I’m wrong, there will still be time to draw other conclusions. When a regime like Saddam’s finds itself caught between certain death and abandoning its arms, I think it will make the right choice. But I can’t be certain.

If the Americans were to bring a resolution for war before the U.N., would France use its veto? In my view, there’s no reason for a new resolution. We are in the framework of (U.N. Security Council Resolution) 1441, and let’s go on with it. I don’t see what any new resolution would add.

Some charge you are motivated by anti-Americanism. I’ve known the U.S. for a long time. I visit often, I’ve studied there, worked as a forklift operator for Anheuser-Busch in St. Louis and as a soda jerk at Howard Johnson’s. I’ve hitchhiked across the whole United States; I even worked as a journalist and wrote a story for the New Orleans Times-Picayune on the front page. I know the U.S. perhaps better than most French people, and I really like the United States. I’ve made many excellent friends there, I feel good there. I love junk food, and I always come home with a few extra pounds. I’ve always worked and supported transatlantic solidarity. When I hear people say that I’m anti-American, I’m sad—not angry, but really sad.

Do you think America’s role as the sole superpower is a problem? Any community with only one dominant power is always a dangerous one and provokes reactions. That’s why I favor a multipolar world, in which Europe obviously has its place. Anyway, the world will not be unipolar. Over the next 50 years, China will become a global power, and the world won’t be the same. So it’s time to start organizing. Transatlantic solidarity will remain the basis of the world order, in which Europe has its role to play.

Haven’t tensions over Iraq poisoned transatlantic relationships? I repeat: Iraq must be disarmed, and for that it must cooperate more than it does now. If we disarm Iraq, the goal set by the Americans will have been fulfilled. And if we do that, there can be no doubt that it will bex due in large part to the presence of American forces on the spot. If there hadn’t been U.S. soldiers present, Saddam might not have agreed to play the game. If we go through with the inspections, the Americans will have won, since it would essentially be thanks to the pressure they exercised that Iraq was disarmed.

Don’t you think it would be extremely difficult politically for President Bush to pull back from war? I’m not so sure about that. He would have two advantages if he brought his soldiers back. I’m talking about a situation, obviously, where the inspectors say now there’s nothing left, and that will take a certain number of weeks. If Iraq doesn’t cooperate and the inspectors say this isn’t working, it could be war. If Iraq is stripped of its weapons of mass destruction and that’s been verified by the inspectors, then Mr. Bush can say two things: first, « Thanks to my intervention, Iraq has been disarmed, » and second, « I achieved all that without spilling any blood. » In the life of a statesman, that counts—no blood spilled.

Yet Washington may well go to war despite your plan. That will be their responsibility. But if they were to ask me for my friendly advice, I would counsel against it.


Agressions de Cologne: Attention, une violence peut en cacher une autre (Guess why there were no New Year’s eve mass sex attacks in Paris)

21 février, 2016
plainte-contre-Fox-NewsBayonneSignS’il faut un village pour élever une femme, il faut aussi un village pour en abuser une. Faux proverbe africain
Turbans of the mind are disallowing and disavowing proper intellectual engagement with Islam. Aldous Huxley once defined an intellectual as someone who had found something in life more important than sex: a witty but inadequate definition, since it would make all impotent men and frigid women intellectuals. A better definition would be a freethinker, not in the narrow sense of someone who does not accept the dogmas of traditional religion, but in the wider sense of someone who has the will to find out, who exhibits rational doubt about prevailing intellectual fashions, and who is unafraid to apply critical thought to any subject. If the intellectual is really committed to the notion of truth and free inquiry, then he or she cannot stop the inquiring mind at the gates of any religion — let alone Islam. And yet, that is precisely what has happened with Islam, criticism of which in our present intellectual climate is taboo. (…) Said not only taught an entire generation of Arabs the wonderful art of self-pity (if only those wicked Zionists, imperialists and colonialists would leave us alone, we would be great, we would not have been humiliated, we would not be backward) but intimidated feeble Western academics, and even weaker, invariably leftish, intellectuals into accepting that any criticism of Islam was to be dismissed as orientalism, and hence invalid. But the first duty of the intellectual is to tell the truth. Truth is not much in fashion in this postmodern age when continental charlatans have infected Anglo-American intellectuals with the thought that objective knowledge is not only undesirable but unobtainable. I believe that to abandon the idea of truth not only leads to political fascism, but stops dead all intellectual inquiry. To give up the notion of truth means forsaking the goal of acquiring knowledge. But man, as Aristotle put it, by nature strives to know. Truth, science, intellectual inquiry and rationality are inextricably bound together. Relativism, and its illegitimate offspring, multiculturalism, are not conducive to the critical examination of Islam. Said wrote a polemical book, Orientalism (1978), whose pernicious influence is still felt in all departments of Islamic studies, where any critical discussion of Islam is ruled out a priori . For Said, orientalists are involved in an evil conspiracy to denigrate Islam, to maintain its people in a state of permanent subjugation and are a threat to Islam’s future. These orientalists are seeking knowledge of oriental peoples only in order to dominate them; most are in the service of imperialism. Said’s thesis was swallowed whole by Western intellectuals, since it accords well with the deep anti-Westernism of many of them. This anti-Westernism resurfaces regularly in Said’s prose, as it did in his comments in the Guardian after September 11th. The studied moral evasiveness, callousness and plain nastiness of Said’s article, with its refusal to condemn outright the attacks on America or show any sympathy for the victims or Americans, leave an unpleasant taste in the mouth of anyone whose moral sensibilities have not been blunted by political and Islamic correctness. In the face of all evidence, Said still argues that it was US foreign policy in the Middle East and elsewhere that brought about these attacks. Ibn Warraq
Nous avons toute la nuit pour violer vos femmes et les enfants, boire votre sang. Même si vous nous échappez aujourd’hui, nous reviendrons demain pour vous finir ! Nous sommes ici pour vous renvoyer à votre Dieu ! Islamiste algérien (cité par Nesroullah Yous, survivant du massacre de Bentalha, 1997)
Il lui fallait quatre filles par jour, vierges de préférence, révèle une chef rebelle que nous appellerons Dina. Et il tenait absolument à être filmé, il voulait que ses gardes, ses collaborateurs le voient. Souvent, il violait un garçon, une fille, tout en discutant avec son entourage. On a retrouvé des cassettes qui dépassent l’imagination… » Paris Match
Il s’agit avant tout d’une question de genre, d’hommes qui croient qu’ils peuvent faire ce qu’ils veulent de femmes vulnérables. Mais vous ne pouvez pas non plus faire l’impasse sur le facteur racial. C’est l’éléphant au milieu de la pièce. Nazir Afzal
Vous, les Blancs, vous entraînez vos filles à boire et à faire du sexe. Quand elles nous arrivent, elles sont parfaitement entraînées. Violeur pakistanais
L’Arabie Saoudite n’est rien d’autre qu’un Daesh qui a réussi. Éric Zemmour
Daesh noir, Daesh blanc. Le premier égorge, tue, lapide, coupe les mains, détruit le patrimoine de l’humanité, et déteste l’archéologie, la femme et l’étranger non musulman. Le second est mieux habillé et plus propre, mais il fait la même chose. L’Etat islamique et l’Arabie saoudite. Dans sa lutte contre le terrorisme, l’Occident mène la guerre contre l’un tout en serrant la main de l’autre. Mécanique du déni, et de son prix. On veut sauver la fameuse alliance stratégique avec l’Arabie saoudite tout en oubliant que ce royaume repose sur une autre alliance, avec un clergé religieux qui produit, rend légitime, répand, prêche et défend le wahhabisme, islamisme ultra-puritain dont se nourrit Daesh. (…)  L’Arabie saoudite est un Daesh qui a réussi. Le déni de l’Occident face à ce pays est frappant: on salue cette théocratie comme un allié et on fait mine de ne pas voir qu’elle est le principal mécène idéologique de la culture islamiste. Les nouvelles générations extrémistes du monde dit « arabe » ne sont pas nées djihadistes. Elles ont été biberonnées par la Fatwa Valley, espèce de Vatican islamiste avec une vaste industrie produisant théologiens, lois religieuses, livres et politiques éditoriales et médiatiques agressives. (…) Il faut vivre dans le monde musulman pour comprendre l’immense pouvoir de transformation des chaines TV religieuses sur la société par le biais de ses maillons faibles : les ménages, les femmes, les milieux ruraux. La culture islamiste est aujourd’hui généralisée dans beaucoup de pays — Algérie, Maroc, Tunisie, Libye, Egypte, Mali, Mauritanie. On y retrouve des milliers de journaux et des chaines de télévision islamistes (comme Echourouk et Iqra), ainsi que des clergés qui imposent leur vision unique du monde, de la tradition et des vêtements à la fois dans l’espace public, sur les textes de lois et sur les rites d’une société qu’ils considèrent comme contaminée. Il faut lire certains journaux islamistes et leurs réactions aux attaques de Paris. On y parle de l’Occident comme site de « pays impies »; les attentats sont la conséquence d’attaques contre l’Islam ; les musulmans et les arabes sont devenus les ennemis des laïcs et des juifs. On y joue sur l’affect de la question palestinienne, le viol de l’Irak et le souvenir du trauma colonial pour emballer les masses avec un discours messianique. Alors que ce discours impose son signifiant aux espaces sociaux, en haut, les pouvoirs politiques présentent leurs condoléances à la France et dénoncent un crime contre l’humanité. Une situation de schizophrénie totale, parallèle au déni de l’Occident face à l’Arabie Saoudite. Ceci laisse sceptique sur les déclarations tonitruantes des démocraties occidentales quant à la nécessité de lutter contre le terrorisme. Cette soi-disant guerre est myope car elle s’attaque à l’effet plutôt qu’à la cause. Daesh étant une culture avant d’être une milice, comment empêcher les générations futures de basculer dans le djihadisme alors qu’on n’a pas épuisé l’effet de la Fatwa Valley, de ses clergés, de sa culture et de son immense industrie éditoriale? Kamel Daoud
En moyenne, seuls 10% des viols commis en France font l’objet d’une plainte. On estime en moyenne que, chaque année, 84000 femmes de 18 à 75 ans sont victimes d’un viol ou d’une tentative. Portrait-robot du violeur (…) lorsque l’information était disponible, plus de la moitié d’entre eux (52%) sont de nationalité étrangère (sans précision sur le pays d’origine) et 44% sont sans emploi. Dans près de la moitié des cas (48%),ils étaient déjà connus des services de police dont 1/5 pour des infractions sexuelles. On dénombre 31% de victimes de nationalité étrangère, dont un tiers d’Européennes. La moitié de ces victimes (49%) a un emploi, avec une forte représentation de la catégorie cadres et professions intellectuelles supérieures. (…)  Les violeurs semblent profiter de la faiblesse de leurs proies puisque, sur les 513 victimes de viol pour lesquelles l’information était disponible, 255 étaient intoxiquées au moment des faits. Dans la très grande majorité des cas, il s’agit de consommation d’alcool. (…) Si l’on rapporte le nombre de faits déclarés à la population, on enregistre les taux les plus élevés dans les Ier, Xe et XIe arrondissement et les plus faibles dans les VIIe et XVe arrondissements. Au-delà de ces limites administratives, c’est dans le secteur Folie-Méricourt (XIe) et à proximité de la station de métro Belleville (Xe, XIXe, XXe) que l’on enregistre le plus grand nombre de viols commis. « Le quartier des Halles et l’axe boulevard de Sébastopol-quartier République présentent également une densité élevée de viols par rapport au reste du territoire parisien», ajoutent les auteurs qui citent également d’autres lieux: la gare du Nord, la gare Montparnasse, l’axe place de Clichy-place Pigalle et le boulevard Barbès. Sans surprise, on apprend que la plupart des viols sont commis la nuit (73%) et le week-end (40% de viols le samedi et le dimanche). L’étude indique que, dans la moitié des cas (49 %), les victimes entretenaient un lien (amical ou sentimental) avec l’agresseur. Ce chiffre peut paraître élevé, mais il est en deçà des statistiques globales selon lesquelles la victime connaît son agresseur dans 90 % des cas. Une différence qui s’explique sans doute par le fait que l’étude de l’ONDRP repose sur les faits déclarés aux autorités. (…) On constate enfin que, dans près de trois quarts des cas (74 %), les viols commis à Paris en 2013 et 2014 l’ont été dans des espaces privés, à commencer par les lieux d’habitation (57 %). Seuls 12 % ont été commis sur la voie publique. « Même s’il frappe l’opinion publique, le viol crapuleux n’est pas la norme », rappelle Me Moscovici. Le Parisien
L’accueil du réfugié, du demandeur d’asile qui fuit l’organisation Etat islamique ou les guerres récentes pèche en Occident par une surdose de naïveté : on voit, dans le réfugié, son statut, pas sa culture ; il est la victime qui recueille la projection de l’Occidental ou son sentiment de devoir humaniste ou de culpabilité. On voit le survivant et on oublie que le réfugié vient d’un piège culturel que résume surtout son rapport à Dieu et à la femme. En Occident, le réfugié ou l’immigré sauvera son corps mais ne va pas négocier sa culture avec autant de facilité, et cela, on l’oublie avec dédain. Sa culture est ce qui lui reste face au déracinement et au choc des nouvelles terres. Le rapport à la femme, fondamental pour la modernité de l’Occident, lui restera parfois incompréhensible pendant longtemps lorsqu’on parle de l’homme lambda. Il va donc en négocier les termes par peur, par compromis ou par volonté de garder « sa culture », mais cela changera très, très lentement. Il suffit de rien, du retour du grégaire ou d’un échec affectif pour que cela revienne avec la douleur. Les adoptions collectives ont ceci de naïf qu’elles se limitent à la bureaucratie et se dédouanent par la charité. Le réfugié est-il donc « sauvage » ? Non. Juste différent, et il ne suffit pas d’accueillir en donnant des papiers et un foyer collectif pour s’acquitter. Il faut offrir l’asile au corps mais aussi convaincre l’âme de changer. L’Autre vient de ce vaste univers douloureux et affreux que sont la misère sexuelle dans le monde arabo-musulman, le rapport malade à la femme, au corps et au désir. L’accueillir n’est pas le guérir. (…) C’est cette liberté que le réfugié, l’immigré, veut, désire mais n’assume pas. L’Occident est vu à travers le corps de la femme : la liberté de la femme est vue à travers la catégorie religieuse de la licence ou de la « vertu ». Le corps de la femme est vu non comme le lieu même de la liberté essentielle comme valeur en Occident, mais comme une décadence : on veut alors le réduire à la possession, ou au crime à « voiler ». La liberté de la femme en Occident n’est pas vue comme la raison de sa suprématie mais comme un caprice de son culte de la liberté. A Cologne, l’Occident (celui de bonne foi) réagit parce qu’on a touché à « l’essence » de sa modernité, là où l’agresseur n’a vu qu’un divertissement, un excès d’une nuit de fête et d’alcool peut-être. Cologne, lieu des fantasmes donc. Ceux travaillés des extrêmes droites qui crient à l’invasion barbare et ceux des agresseurs qui veulent le corps nu car c’est un corps « public » qui n’est propriété de personne. On n’a pas attendu d’identifier les coupables, parce que cela est à peine important dans les jeux d’images et de clichés. De l’autre côté, on ne comprend pas encore que l’asile n’est pas seulement avoir des « papiers » mais accepter le contrat social d’une modernité. (…) Le sexe est la plus grande misère dans le “monde d’Allah”. A tel point qu’il a donné naissance à ce porno-islamisme dont font discours les prêcheurs islamistes pour recruter leurs “fidèles” : descriptions d’un paradis plus proche du bordel que de la récompense pour gens pieux, fantasme des vierges pour les kamikazes, chasse aux corps dans les espaces publics, puritanisme des dictatures, voile et burqa. (…)  Cologne est-il le signe qu’il faut fermer les portes ou fermer les yeux ? Ni l’une ni l’autre solution. Fermer les portes conduira, un jour ou l’autre, à tirer par les fenêtres, et cela est un crime contre l’humanité. Mais fermer les yeux sur le long travail d’accueil et d’aide, et ce que cela signifie comme travail sur soi et sur les autres, est aussi un angélisme qui va tuer. Les réfugiés et les immigrés ne sont pas réductibles à la minorité d’une délinquance, mais cela pose le problème des « valeurs » à partager, à imposer, à défendre et à faire comprendre. Cela pose le problème de la responsabilité après l’accueil et qu’il faut assumer. Kamel Daoud
Les révolutions arabes de 2011 avaient enthousiasmé les opinions, mais depuis la passion est retombée. On a fini par découvrir à ces mouvements des imperfections, des laideurs. Par exemple, ils auront à peine touché aux idées, à la culture, à la religion ou aux codes sociaux, surtout ceux se rapportant au sexe. Révolution ne veut pas dire modernité. Les attaques contre des femmes occidentales par des migrants arabes à Cologne, en Allemagne, la veille du jour de l’an ont remis en mémoire le harcèlement que d’autres femmes avaient subi à Tahrir durant les beaux jours de la révolution. Un rappel qui a poussé l’Occident à comprendre que l’une des grandes misères d’une bonne partie du monde dit “arabe”, et du monde musulman en général, est son rapport maladif à la femme. Dans certains endroits, on la voile, on la lapide, on la tue ; au minimum, on lui reproche de semer le désordre dans la société idéale. En réponse, certains pays européens en sont venus à produire des guides de bonne conduite pour réfugiés et migrants. (…) Ces contradictions créent des tensions insupportables : le désir n’a pas d’issue ; le couple n’est plus un espace d’intimité, mais une préoccupation du groupe. Il en résulte une misère sexuelle qui mène à l’absurde ou l’hystérique. Ici aussi on espère vivre une histoire d’amour, mais on empêche la mécanique de la rencontre, de la séduction et du flirt en surveillant les femmes, en surinvestissant la question de leur virginité et en donnant des pouvoirs à la police des moeurs. On va même payer des chirurgiens pour réparer les hymens. Dans certaines terres d’Allah, la guerre à la femme et au couple prend des airs d’inquisition. L’été, en Algérie, des brigades de salafistes et de jeunes de quartier, enrôlés grâce au discours d’imams radicaux et de télé-islamistes, surveillent les corps, surtout ceux des baigneuses en maillot. Dans les espaces publics, la police harcèle les couples, y compris les mariés. Les jardins sont interdits aux promenades d’amoureux. Les bancs sont coupés en deux afin d’empêcher qu’on ne s’y assoit côte à côte. Résultat : on fantasme ailleurs, soit sur l’impudeur et la luxure de l’Occident, soit sur le paradis musulman et ses vierges. (…) Sur le plan vestimentaire, cela donne d’autres extrêmes: d’un côté, la burqa, le voile intégral orthodoxe ; de l’autre, le voile moutabaraj (“le voile qui dévoile”), qui assortit un foulard sur la tête d’un jean slim ou d’un pantalon moulant. Sur les plages, le burquini s’oppose au bikini.(…) Certains religieux lancent des fatwas grotesques: il est interdit de faire l’amour nu, les femmes n’ont pas le droit de toucher aux bananes, un homme ne peut rester seul avec une femme collègue que si elle est sa mère de lait et qu’il l’a tétée. (…) L’Occident s’est longtemps conforté dans l’exotisme ; celui-ci disculpe les différences. L’Orientalisme rend un peu normales les variations culturelles et excuse les dérives : Shéhérazade, le harem et la danse du voile ont dispensé certains de s’interroger sur les droits de la femme musulmane. Mais aujourd’hui, avec les derniers flux d’immigrés du Moyen-Orient et d’Afrique, le rapport pathologique que certains pays du monde arabe entretiennent avec la femme fait irruption en Europe. Ce qui avait été le spectacle dépaysant de terres lointaines prend les allures d’une confrontation culturelle sur le sol même de l’Occident. Une différence autrefois désamorcée par la distance et une impression de supériorité est devenue une menace immédiate. Le grand public en Occident découvre, dans la peur et l’agitation, que dans le monde musulman le sexe est malade et que cette maladie est en train de gagner ses propres terres. Kamel Daoud
Dans une tribune publiée par le journal Le Monde le 31 janvier 2016, le journaliste et écrivain Kamel Daoud propose d’analyser « ce qui s’est passé à Cologne la nuit de la Saint-Sylvestre ». Pourtant, en lieu et place d’une analyse, cet humaniste autoproclamé livre une série de lieux communs navrants sur les réfugiés originaires de pays musulmans. (…) Loin d’ouvrir sur le débat apaisé et approfondi que requiert la gravité des faits, l’argumentation de Daoud ne fait qu’alimenter les fantasmes islamophobes d’une partie croissante du public européen, sous le prétexte de refuser tout angélisme. (…) Certainement marqué par son expérience durant la guerre civile algérienne (1992-1999), Daoud ne s’embarrasse pas de nuances et fait des islamistes les promoteurs de cette logique de mort. En miroir de cette vision asociologique qui crée de toutes pièces un espace inexistant, l’Occident apparaît comme le foyer d’une modernité heureuse et émancipatrice. La réalité des multiples formes d’inégalité et de violences faites aux femmes en Europe et en Amérique du Nord n’est bien sûr pas évoquée. Cet essentialisme radical produit une géographie fantasmée qui oppose un monde de la soumission et de l’aliénation au monde de la libération et de l’éducation. (…) Psychologiser de la sorte les violences sexuelles est doublement problématique. D’une part, c’est effacer les conditions sociales, politiques et économiques qui favorisent ces actes (parlons de l’hébergement des réfugiés ou des conditions d’émigration qui encouragent la prédominance des jeunes hommes). D’autre part, cela contribue à produire l’image d’un flot de prédateurs sexuels potentiels, car tous atteints des mêmes maux psychologiques. Pegida n’en demandait pas tant. (…) C’est ainsi bien un projet disciplinaire, aux visées à la fois culturelles et psychologiques, qui se dessine. Des valeurs doivent être « imposées » à cette masse malade, à commencer par le respect des femmes. Ce projet est scandaleux, non pas seulement du fait de l’insupportable routine de la mission civilisatrice et de la supériorité des valeurs occidentales qu’il évoque. Au-delà de ce paternaliste colonial, il revient aussi à affirmer, contre « l’angélisme qui va tuer », que la culture déviante de cette masse de musulmans est un danger pour l’Europe. Il équivaut à conditionner l’accueil de personnes qui fuient la guerre et la dévastation. En cela, c’est un discours proprement anti-humaniste, quoi qu’en dise Daoud. Après d’autres écrivains algériens comme Rachid Boudjedra ou Boualem Sansal, Kamel Daoud intervient en tant qu’intellectuel laïque minoritaire dans son pays, en lutte quotidienne contre un puritanisme parfois violent. Dans le contexte européen, il épouse toutefois une islamophobie devenue majoritaire. Derrière son cas, nous nous alarmons de la tendance généralisée dans les sociétés européennes à racialiser ces violences sexuelles. (…) Face à l’ampleur de violences inédites, il faut sans aucun doute se pencher sur les faits, comme le suggère Kamel Daoud. Encore faudrait-il pouvoir le faire sans réactualiser les mêmes sempiternels clichés islamophobes. Le fond de l’air semble l’interdire. Collectif d’anthropologues, sociologues, journalistes et historiens
Cher Kamel, il y a quelques jours, une amie tunisienne m’a envoyé une tribune parue dans Le Monde. Ce texte portait la signature de plusieurs universitaires que je connais. Des universitaires un peu bien-pensants, c’est vrai, mais, quand même, des gens qui ne sont pas tes adversaires – qui ne devraient pas être tes adversaires. Le ton de la lettre m’a dérangé. Je n’aimais pas le style de dénonciation publique, un style qui me rappelait un peu le style gauche-soviétique-puritain. Et tu dois savoir qu’en tant qu’ami je ne signerai pas de telle lettre contre toi, bien que je ne partage pas du tout les opinions que tu as exprimées dans cet article, et par la suite, même plus férocement encore, me semble-t-il, dans la tribune du New York Times. Pour moi, c’est très difficile d’imaginer que tu pourrais vraiment croire ce que tu as écrit. Ce n’était pas le Kamel Daoud que je connais et dont j’ai fait le portrait dans un long article. Nous avons beaucoup parlé des problèmes de sexe dans le monde arabo-musulman quand j’étais à Oran. Mais nous avons aussi parlé des ambiguïtés de la « culture » (mot que je n’aime pas) ; par exemple, le fait que les femmes voilées sont parfois parmi les plus émancipées sexuellement. Dans tes écrits récents, c’est comme si toute l’ambiguïté dont nous avons tant discuté, et que, plus que personne, tu pourrais analyser dans toute sa nuance, a disparu. Tu l’as fait de plus dans des publications lues par des lecteurs occidentaux qui peuvent trouver dans ce que tu écris la confirmation de préjugés et d’idées fixes. Je ne dis pas que tu l’as fait exprès, ou même que tu joues le jeu des « impérialistes ». Non, je ne t’accuse de rien. Sauf de ne pas y penser, et de tomber dans des pièges étranges et peut-être dangereux. Je pense ici surtout à l’idée selon laquelle il y aurait un rapport direct entre les événements de Cologne et l’islamisme, voire l’« Islam » tout court. Je te rappelle qu’on a vu, il y a quelques années, des événements similaires, certes pas de la même ampleur, mais quand même, lors de la parade du Puerto Rican Day à New York. Les Portoricains qui ont alors molesté des femmes dans la rue n’étaient pas sous l’influence de l’Islam mais de l’alcool… Sans preuve que l’Islam agissait sur les esprits de ces hommes à Cologne, il me semble curieux de faire de telles propositions, et de suggérer que cette « maladie » menace l’Europe… Dans son livre La Maladie comme métaphore (Christian Bourgois, 2005), un ouvrage devenu un classique, Susan Sontag démontre que l’idée de « maladie » a une histoire pas très reluisante, souvent liée au fascisme. Les juifs, comme tu le sais, étaient considérés comme une espèce de maladie ; et les antisémites d’Europe, au XIXsiècle, à l’époque de l’émancipation, se sont montrés très préoccupés des coutumes sexuelles des juifs, et de la domination des hommes juifs sur les femmes… Les échos de cette obsession me mettent mal à l’aise. (…) Kamel, tu es tellement brillant, et tu es tendre, aussi, ça, je le sais. C’est à toi, et à toi seul, de décider comment tu veux t’engager dans la politique, mais je veux que tu saches que je m’inquiète pour toi, et j’espère que tu réfléchiras bien à tes positions… et que tu retourneras au mode d’expression qui, à mon avis, est ton meilleur genre : la littérature. J’espère que tu comprendras que je t’écris avec le sentiment de la plus profonde amitié. Adam Shatz
Nous vivons désormais une époque de sommations. Si on n’est pas d’un côté, on est de l’autre; le texte sur « Cologne », j’en avais écrit une partie, celle sur la femme, il y a des années. A l’époque, cela n’a fait réagir personne ou si peu. Aujourd’hui, l’époque a changé : des crispassions poussent à interpréter et l’interprétation pousse au procès. J’avais écrit cet article et celui du New York Times début janvier; leur succession dans le temps est donc un accident et pas un acharnement de ma part. J’avais écrit, poussé par la honte et la colère contre les miens, et parce que je vis dans ce pays, dans cette terre. J’y ai dit ma pensée et mon analyse sur un aspect que l’on ne peut cacher sous prétexte de « charité culturelle ». Je suis écrivain et je n’écris pas des thèses d’universitaires. C’est une émotion aussi. Que des universitaires pétitionnent contre moi aujourd’hui, pour ce texte, je trouve cela immoral parce qu’ils ne vivent pas ma chair, ni ma terre et que je trouve illégitime sinon scandaleux que certains me servent le verdict d’islamophobie à partir de la sécurité et des conforts des capitales de l’Occident et ses terrasses. Le tout servi en forme de procès stalinien et avec le préjugé du spécialiste : je sermonne un indigène parce que je parle mieux des intérêts des autres indigènes et post-décolonisés. Et au nom des deux mais avec mon nom. Et cela m’est intolérable comme posture. Je pense que cela reste immoral de m’offrir en pâture à la haine locale sous le verdict d’islamophobie qui sert aujourd’hui aussi d’inquisition. Je pense que c’est honteux de m’accuser de cela en restant bien loin de mon quotidien et celui des miens. (…) Ces pétitionnaires embusqués ne mesurent pas la conséquence de leurs actes et du tribunal sur la vie d’autrui. (…) Comme autrefois, l’écrivain venu du froid, aujourd’hui, l’écrivain venu du monde dit « arabe » est piégé, sommé, poussé dans le dos et repoussé. La surinterprétation le guette et les médias le harcèlent pour conforter qui une vision, qui un rejet et un déni. Le sort de la femme est lié à mon avenir, à l’avenir des miens. Le désir est malade dans nos terres et le corps est encerclé. Cela, on ne peut pas le nier et je dois le dire et le dénoncer. Mais je me retrouve soudainement responsable de ce qui va être lu selon les terres et les airs. Dénoncer la théocratie ambiante chez nous devient un argument d’islamophobe ailleurs. Est-ce ma faute ? En partie. Mais c’est aussi la faute de notre époque, son mal du siècle. C’est ce qui s’est passé pour la tribune sur « Cologne ». Je l’assume mais je me retrouve désolé pour ce à quoi elle peut servir comme déni et refus d’humanité de l’Autre. L’écrivain venu des terres d’Allah se retrouve aujourd’hui au centre de sollicitations médiatiques intolérables. Je n’y peux rien mais je peux m’en soustraire : par la prudence comme je l’ai cru, mais aussi par le silence comme je le choisis désormais. Je vais donc m’occuper de littérature et en cela tu as raison. J’arrête le journalisme sous peu. Kamel Daoud
C’est juste,  que je suis fatigué de tout ça. Je préfère me consacrer à la littérature. Franchement, je préfère écrire des livres, me reposer un petit peu parce que j’ai subi un ouragan pendant les deux dernières années. Et puis, j’ai aussi envie de réfléchir à mes positions et prendre du recul. C’est exactement ça. Ce n’est pas exclusivement lié à ma chronique parue dans le Monde. La décision mûrissait depuis un mois ou deux.  J’ai trop donné. J’ai fait énormément de chroniques depuis des années. Cela fait 20 ans. Et là je suis fatigué, j’ai besoin de repos. (…) Cela fait 20 ans que je subis ces pressions. Je suis arrivé au point où chaque fois que je reçois un prix, j’ai peur. Parce que nous sommes arrivés à une situation de sous culture et de paranoïa où  au lieu d’applaudir un algérien qui parvient à décrocher le prix du meilleur journaliste  en France de l’année, on lui tombe dessus. Je ne dis pas que tout le monde est comme ça. Je reçois beaucoup de soutien, beaucoup de gens très sympas  mais c’est juste que j’ai envie de me reposer. Je vous jure que faire une chronique pendant vingt ans, ce n’est pas évident. (…) Probablement que j’irai aux Etats-unis pour deux ou trois mois, mais je reviendrai. (…) Je déteste le rôle de l’intellectuel menacé. Je ne le supporte pas. On est tous menacé. On doit tous résister et chacun sait ce qu’il a à faire. Pour la précision, je ne m’attaque pas aux islamistes mais je me défends. Je ne suis pas un militant. J’ai une vie et je la défends.  Je le répète toujours à celui qui ne peut pas mourir à ma place, ne peut pas vivre à ma place. Je ne vois pas pourquoi ça serait à moi d’abdiquer avant les autres. J’ai dit ce que je pense. Maintenant je vais le dire autrement. J’ai envie d’écrire des romans. Ce n’est pas une démission. Ce n’est pas une lâcheté. Ce n’est pas une abdication. J’ai juste envie de changer de mode d’expression. Même si je quitte la presse, Kamel Daoud reste Kamel Daoud. Ce que je pense, je le dis. Je n’ai pas à baisser les yeux. Moi je n’ai tué personne. Que cela soit un islamiste ou encore un imbécile qui croit à la théorie du complot ou alors que je fais ça pour avoir les papiers. Non ! Moi je suis algérien. Je vis en Algérie. Je défends mes idées. Je défends ma façon de voir. Et je défends ma terre et mes enfants ! Les gens n’arrivent pas à croire qu’on puisse être différent et de bonne foi. Tout le monde croit que l’on fait quelque chose pour avoir les papiers, pour s’enrichir, vendre des livres. Je n’ai jamais été comme ça. Ceux qui me connaissent savent que je fonctionne comme ça. Kamel Daoud
Après avoir interrogé près de 300 personnes et visionné 590 heures de vidéos, le procureur de Cologne, Ulrich Bremer, révèle dans une interview à Die Welt que plus de 60% des agressions n’étaient pas à caractère sexuel mais bien des vols. Surtout, sur 58 agresseurs, 55 n’étaient pas des réfugiés. Ils sont pour la plupart Algériens et Marocains installés en Allemagne de longue date, ainsi que trois Allemands. On ne dénombre que deux réfugiés Syriens et un Irakien. (…) L’examen des faits montre aujourd’hui qu’il s’agit d’un problème systémique se posant dès que la foule envahit les rues et que l’alcool coule à flot. D’après le journal Libération, un viol aurait été commis à Cologne et nous savons que plus de 400 plaintes ont été déposées pour des agressions à caractère sexuel. Or l’an dernier, deux viols ont été commis lors des fêtes de Bayonne ainsi qu’un nombre inconnu d’agressions sexuelles. Au point que la mairie se sente obligée de rappeler publiquement lors des fêtes que le viol est un crime… En effet, les attouchements sexuels contre les femmes semblent faire partie des habitudes dans ce type de rassemblement sans que personne, sauf quelques associations féministes, ne s’en émeuve. Au point que le journal Sud Ouest puisse affirmer « qu’aucun incident majeur n’est venu endeuiller les fêtes » pour compléter deux lignes plus bas que trois viols ont été commis… Lors de l’édition 2015 des fêtes de Pampelune, 1656 plaintes ont été déposées (contre 2 047 en 2014), dont quatre pour agression sexuelle. Lors des fêtes de la bière à Munich, deux plaintes sont enregistrées en moyenne chaque année. Mais en 2002, c’est 13 viols qui ont été comptabilisés. Les associations locales estiment que le chiffre doit être multiplié par dix, les victimes ne portant généralement pas plainte. En conclusion, les événements de Cologne démontrent que, loin d’un fait divers lié à la présence de réfugiés particulièrement misogynes, les agressions sexuelles et les viols font partie d’une culture largement partagée et où l’alcool sert parfois de catalyseur. C’est donc à la domination masculine dans son ensemble qu’il faut s’en prendre. Pas seulement à la culture des autres. Patric Jean
Si une très large majorité de ceux qui croient et pratiquent l’islam en France sont tout à fait laïques dans leur manière de comprendre leur religion, une minorité ne l’est, elle, pas du tout et fait pression, de différentes manières, sur les institutions, sur la société, sur les autres musulmans, etc. pour voir reconnaître une certaine pratique de l’islam. Dans le sens d’une radicalisation jusqu’à l’islamisme politique et la contestation de la laïcité elle-même, des lois de la République (celle de 2004 à l’école par exemple). Le fait que ces revendications bénéficient d’un soutien, plus ou moins fort et pour des raisons diverses (instrumentalisation politique, combat dit post-colonial, combat contre la laïcité, combat commun contre la liberté de mœurs…), de la part de tout un tas de non musulmans au sein de la société française, en particulier au sein de ses élites, rend encore plus difficile l’intégration au commun républicain de cette minorité de la population de religion musulmane. Les torts sont donc partagés au regard de la situation actuelle: la pression de l’islamisme politique d’un côté, phénomène international, et les faiblesses ou les calculs au sein de certains milieux français qui conduisent à des formes de complaisance, d’accommodement voire de collaboration pure et simple. (…)  C’est un mécanisme assez classique que l’on a bien connu en Europe avec le totalitarisme, et les procès politiques qu’il entraînait. La haine qui peut alors être déversée sur celles et ceux qui dénoncent ces raccourcis et ces méthodes est impressionnante. Elle fait même parfois peur de ce qu’elle révèle chez certains. Que ces méthodes totalitaires soient utilisées par des militants islamistes, cela s’explique même si on peine à le comprendre. Qu’elles soient en revanche devenues monnaie courante dans le débat public en France, cela m’étonne davantage. Les attaques contre Elisabeth Badinter ou Kamel Daoud, ou encore contre Céline Pina ou Amine El Khatmi récemment, de la part de responsables d’institutions publiques, d’élus politiques, de journalistes ou de collègues universitaires à coup d’accusations d’islamophobie sont pour moi insupportables. Le terme lui-même n’est parfois même plus interrogé. Il est admis comme l’équivalent d’antisémitisme ou de racisme! Des colloques sont organisés sur l’islamophobie sans que le terme soit mis en question. Le CCIF, une association militante qui promeut l’islamisme politique, est même reçue officiellement par les autorités publiques au nom de ce combat contre l’islamophobie dont elle a, habilement, fait son objet. Ce sont des aveuglements et des renoncements qui en disent long et surtout qui risquent de coûter cher. C’est un processus de combat culturel pour l’hégémonie au sens gramscien auquel nous assistons. (…) C’est un chose étrange, décidément, que de penser qu’on peut convaincre quiconque du fait que le djihadisme et le terrorisme islamiste n’ont rien à voir avec l’islam. Les djihadistes, les terroristes qui se réclament de l’islam savent ce qu’ils font. (…) Au-delà, ce genre de propos qui veut détacher le djihadisme de l’islam entend aussi nier la continuité qu’il y a entre l’islamisme politique et le djihadisme, en expliquant notamment qu’il y aurait d’un côté un islamisme «quiétiste» par exemple et de l’autre une forme violente. Que l’on devrait discuter et s’accommoder de la première en combattant la seconde. Ce genre de distinction conduit à nier le caractère idéologique de l’entreprise islamiste, à vouloir à tout prix expliquer la violence terroriste par elle-même, de manière comparable à d’autres formes de violence terroriste. Or, ce que nous ont appris les travaux sur le totalitarisme, en particulier, c’est que l’usage et la légitimation de la violence à des fins politiques reposent sur un ensemble de considérations idéologiques préalables. Que l’origine de celles-ci soient un système de pensée lié à la race et à la nation, à la classe et à la révolution ou à la foi et à la réalisation de la volonté de dieu importe peu. Le mécanisme est le même, et il est chaque fois destructeur de l’humanité de l’homme. C’est aujourd’hui à un tel défi que nous sommes confrontés. Il est plus que regrettable, impardonnable, que des responsables politiques n’en prennent pas conscience et n’agissent pas en conséquence. Laurent Bouvet
Il faut souligner la faible présence de réfugiés syriens parmi les interpellés. Ceux qui ont connu la Syrie avant la guerre savent qu’on y voyait des femmes non voilées et des filles en minijupes, c’est-à-dire des chrétiennes. Les populations savaient cohabiter. Pour les jeunes fraîchement arrivés du Maghreb, cette coexistence est inconnue, et il n’y a pas besoin de concertation pour profiter d’une si extraordinaire aubaine : des jeunes femmes, de nuit, sans défense. Pour la plupart des musulmans du Pakistan ou du Maghreb, une femme dehors de nuit est une prostituée. Une femme maquillée est une provocation sexuelle. Une femme non voilée se désigne comme proie. Habituées de plus longue date que les Allemandes au contact des Maghrébins, les Françaises ont appris à faire profil bas, notamment à troquer la jupe contre le pantalon quand elles doivent traverser des espaces où les musulmans sont majoritaires. Les territoires perdus de la République furent d’abord des territoires perdus pour les femmes, tout un réseau de rues et de places non mixtes, même de jour, et des cafés dont nulle cliente n’ose jamais pousser la porte. Ceux qui découvrent avec « stupeur » le déchaînement des attouchements et des viols qui a marqué la nuit de la Saint-Sylvestre auraient pu se demander comment, en France, des espaces s’étaient progressivement vidés de celles qui auparavant y vivaient librement. La réponse est simple : par le même cocktail d’intimidation et de harcèlement, mais peu à peu, à bas bruit, et surtout sans qu’on le signale. Car c’est le contraire qui captait l’attention. Quand des jeunes des cités se voyaient interdire l’entrée en boîte de nuit, la presse a toujours accusé la stigmatisation de la jeunesse : on ne s’est guère interrogé sur les raisons qui poussaient les tenanciers à se priver d’une clientèle. La consigne de ne pas désespérer Billancourt fut relayée par celle de ne pas offenser le 9-3. Les femmes y ont perdu de leur liberté de mouvement et de leur assurance, dans l’indifférence générale. L’enfer de ce renfermement fut pavé de bonnes intentions. (…) Tous les responsables – intellectuels et journalistes, policiers et magistrats – ont constamment minimisé les « incidents », tétanisés par la peur de réactions racistes, qui du reste existent bel et bien, comme l’ont prouvé les manifestations néonazies de Dortmund. (…) Il paraît inutile d’entonner la rengaine de l’éducation : en France, où les populations maghrébines sont installées de longue date, et donc exposées au système éducatif commun, l’hostilité à la mixité est intacte. Elle ne l’est pas seulement chez les islamistes. Chez l’épicier arabe, le sympathique Djerbien ouvert tard le soir, on ne voit dans la boutique que le patron, ses frères ou ses cousins. Il n’y a pas d’épicière à la caisse. Fort heureusement, quelques individus peuvent s’émanciper des lois de l’appartenance, mais globalement le monde musulman juge que les femmes doivent être respectées, et pour cette raison soustraites aux regards. Nous jugeons que les femmes sont libres, et qu’elles font ce qu’elles veulent de leur corps. Claude Habib

Attention: une violence peut en cacher une autre !

A l’heure où se confirme la sur-représentation non de réfugiés syriens mais de jeunes fraîchement arrivés du Maghreb mis en cause dans les agressions contre des femmes du réveillon de Cologne

Et où pour avoir osé pointer, fort de son expérience algérienne et sa centaine de milliers de victimes comme de la fatwa sur sa tête,  le racisme caché du concept saïdien d’orientalisme, l’écrivain qui avait déjà défini l’Arabie saoudite comme « Daech qui a réussi », se voit, de part et d’autre de la Méditerrannée et même de l’Atlantique, taxé d’ « islamophobie » et de « paternalisme colonial » et poussé à l’abandon du journalisme

Pendant qu’après les écoles ou lieux de culte juifs, c’est sous protection policière ou militaire que vont au lycée nos enfants …

Et que l’on se souvient accessoirement de la véritable culture du viol qu’avait instaurée le feu dictateur libyen

Retour avec une tribune de l’universitaire français Claude Habib …

Sur  une autre violence plus progressive et à plus bas bruit …

Qui avec cependant le « même cocktail d’intimidation et de harcèlement » …

A réussi de fait à quasiment interdire à la gente féminine …

Nombre de nos espaces publics, créneaux horaires ou types de vêtements …

Les leçons d’un réveillon en Europe
Claude Habib (Essayiste et professeur de littérature à la Sorbonne Nouvelle)

Le Monde

30.01.2016

Il y a près de trois siècles, Montesquieu faisait débarquer en Europe des Persans – c’est-à-dire des Iraniens. Le jeune Rica se montrait à la fois charmé par la franchise des Parisiennes et sidéré par leur légèreté de mœurs. D’une plume allègre et caustique, il décrit les avantages et les inconvénients de cet autre rapport aux femmes qui est propre à l’Occident : laisser les femmes se gouverner.

Les graves événements survenus à la gare de Cologne et dans d’autres villes européennes montrent que le choc est toujours le même, quoique certains des nouveaux arrivants soient moins disposés à décrire et comparer qu’à faire main basse et violenter.

Des commentateurs ont avancé l’hypothèse d’une attaque concertée, en raison de la simultanéité des délits et des crimes. C’est absurde : les prétendues preuves d’une telle concertation se résument à des SMS ou à des rendez-vous sur les réseaux sociaux semblables à ceux que les jeunes échangent en fin de semaine pour aller à la pizzeria. La seule simultanéité, c’est la date du réveillon qui a jeté dans les rues des foules composites, et mis en présence des peuples pour qui la signification de la mixité n’est pas la même.

Il faut souligner la faible présence de réfugiés syriens parmi les interpellés. Ceux qui ont connu la Syrie avant la guerre savent qu’on y voyait des femmes non voilées et des filles en minijupes, c’est-à-dire des chrétiennes. Les populations savaient cohabiter.

Coexistence inconnue
Pour les jeunes fraîchement arrivés du Maghreb, cette coexistence est inconnue, et il n’y a pas besoin de concertation pour profiter d’une si extraordinaire aubaine : des jeunes femmes, de nuit, sans défense. Pour la plupart des musulmans du Pakistan ou du Maghreb, une femme dehors de nuit est une prostituée. Une femme maquillée est une provocation sexuelle. Une femme non voilée se désigne comme proie.

Habituées de plus longue date que les Allemandes au contact des Maghrébins, les Françaises ont appris à faire profil bas, notamment à troquer la jupe contre le pantalon quand elles doivent traverser des espaces où les musulmans sont majoritaires.

Les territoires perdus de la République furent d’abord des territoires perdus pour les femmes, tout un réseau de rues et de places non mixtes, même de jour, et des cafés dont nulle cliente n’ose jamais pousser la porte. Ceux qui découvrent avec « stupeur » le déchaînement des attouchements et des viols qui a marqué la nuit de la Saint-Sylvestre auraient pu se demander comment, en France, des espaces s’étaient progressivement vidés de celles qui auparavant y vivaient librement.

La réponse est simple : par le même cocktail d’intimidation et de harcèlement, mais peu à peu, à bas bruit, et surtout sans qu’on le signale. Car c’est le contraire qui captait l’attention.

Ne pas offenser le 9-3

Quand des jeunes des cités se voyaient interdire l’entrée en boîte de nuit, la presse a toujours accusé la stigmatisation de la jeunesse : on ne s’est guère interrogé sur les raisons qui poussaient les tenanciers à se priver d’une clientèle. La consigne de ne pas désespérer Billancourt fut relayée par celle de ne pas offenser le 9-3. Les femmes y ont perdu de leur liberté de mouvement et de leur assurance, dans l’indifférence générale. L’enfer de ce renfermement fut pavé de bonnes intentions.

La sous-information au sujet des violences subies par les femmes est la seule excuse de ceux qui découvrent aujourd’hui le problème. La politique de l’autruche n’est d’ailleurs pas une spécificité française. La police suédoise, confrontée aux mêmes conduites et aux mêmes crimes, dès avant la nuit du 31 décembre, avait pris le parti de dissimuler les faits, comme a tenté de le faire la police de Cologne.

Tous les responsables – intellectuels et journalistes, policiers et magistrats – ont constamment minimisé les « incidents », tétanisés par la peur de réactions racistes, qui du reste existent bel et bien, comme l’ont prouvé les manifestations néonazies de Dortmund. Que faire ?

Tolérance ou répression

Il paraît inutile d’entonner la rengaine de l’éducation : en France, où les populations maghrébines sont installées de longue date, et donc exposées au système éducatif commun, l’hostilité à la mixité est intacte. Elle ne l’est pas seulement chez les islamistes. Chez l’épicier arabe, le sympathique Djerbien ouvert tard le soir, on ne voit dans la boutique que le patron, ses frères ou ses cousins. Il n’y a pas d’épicière à la caisse.

Fort heureusement, quelques individus peuvent s’émanciper des lois de l’appartenance, mais globalement le monde musulman juge que les femmes doivent être respectées, et pour cette raison soustraites aux regards. Nous jugeons que les femmes sont libres, et qu’elles font ce qu’elles veulent de leur corps.

Devant une telle divergence, certains en appellent à la tolérance, et d’autres à la répression. En Autriche, Johanna Mikl-Leitner, la ministre de l’intérieur démocrate-chrétienne, a fièrement déclaré : « Une chose est sûre, nous ne laisserons pas, nous les femmes, notre liberté de mouvement dans l’espace public reculer du moindre millimètre. » Ce sont des rodomontades, car elle a déjà reculé.

Voir aussi:

Nuit de Cologne : « Kamel Daoud recycle les clichés orientalistes les plus éculés »

Collectif

Le Monde

11.02.2016

Dans une tribune publiée par le journal Le Monde le 31 janvier 2016, le journaliste et écrivain Kamel Daoud propose d’analyser « ce qui s’est passé à Cologne la nuit de la Saint-Sylvestre ». Pourtant, en lieu et place d’une analyse, cet humaniste autoproclamé livre une série de lieux communs navrants sur les réfugiés originaires de pays musulmans.

Tout en déclarant vouloir déconstruire les caricatures promues par « la droite et l’extrême droite », l’auteur recycle les clichés orientalistes les plus éculés, de l’islam religion de mort cher à Ernest Renan (1823-1892) à la psychologie des foules arabes de Gustave Le Bon (1841-1931). Loin d’ouvrir sur le débat apaisé et approfondi que requiert la gravité des faits, l’argumentation de Daoud ne fait qu’alimenter les fantasmes islamophobes d’une partie croissante du public européen, sous le prétexte de refuser tout angélisme.

Essentialisme

Le texte repose sur trois logiques qui, pour être typiques d’une approche culturaliste que de nombreux chercheurs critiquent depuis quarante ans, n’en restent pas moins dangereuses. Pour commencer, Daoud réduit dans ce texte un espace regroupant plus d’un milliard d’habitants et s’étendant sur plusieurs milliers de kilomètres à une entité homogène, définie par son seul rapport à la religion, « le monde d’Allah ». Tous les hommes y sont prisonniers de Dieu et leurs actes déterminés par un rapport pathologique à la sexualité. Le « monde d’Allah » est celui de la douleur et de la frustration.

Certainement marqué par son expérience durant la guerre civile algérienne (1992-1999), Daoud ne s’embarrasse pas de nuances et fait des islamistes les promoteurs de cette logique de mort. En miroir de cette vision asociologique qui crée de toutes pièces un espace inexistant, l’Occident apparaît comme le foyer d’une modernité heureuse et émancipatrice. La réalité des multiples formes d’inégalité et de violences faites aux femmes en Europe et en Amérique du Nord n’est bien sûr pas évoquée. Cet essentialisme radical produit une géographie fantasmée qui oppose un monde de la soumission et de l’aliénation au monde de la libération et de l’éducation.

Psychologisation

Kamel Daoud prétend en outre poser un diagnostic sur l’état psychologique des masses musulmanes. Ce faisant, il impute la responsabilité des violences sexuelles à des individus jugés déviants, tout en refusant à ces individus la moindre autonomie, puisque leurs actes sont entièrement déterminés par la religion.

Les musulmans apparaissent prisonniers des discours islamistes et réduits à un état de passivité suicidaire (ils sont « zombies » et « kamikazes »). C’est pourquoi selon Daoud, une fois arrivés en Europe, les réfugiés n’ont comme choix que le repli culturel face au déracinement. Et c’est alors que se produit immanquablement le « retour du grégaire », tourné contre la femme, à la fois objet de haine et de désir, et particulièrement contre la femme libérée.

Psychologiser de la sorte les violences sexuelles est doublement problématique. D’une part, c’est effacer les conditions sociales, politiques et économiques qui favorisent ces actes (parlons de l’hébergement des réfugiés ou des conditions d’émigration qui encouragent la prédominance des jeunes hommes). D’autre part, cela contribue à produire l’image d’un flot de prédateurs sexuels potentiels, car tous atteints des mêmes maux psychologiques. Pegida n’en demandait pas tant.

Discipline

« Le réfugié est-il donc sauvage ? », se demande Daoud. S’il répond par la négative, le seul fait de poser une telle question renforce l’idée d’une irréductible altérité. L’amalgame vient peser sur tous les demandeurs d’asile, assimilés à une masse exogène de frustrés et de morts-vivants. N’ayant rien à offrir collectivement aux sociétés occidentales, ils perdent dans le même temps le droit à revendiquer des parcours individuels, des expériences extrêmement diverses et riches.

Culturellement inadaptés et psychologiquement déviants, les réfugiés doivent avant toute chose être rééduqués. Car Daoud ne se contente pas de diagnostiquer, il franchit le pas en proposant une recette familière. Selon lui, il faut « offrir l’asile au corps mais aussi convaincre l’âme de changer ». C’est ainsi bien un projet disciplinaire, aux visées à la fois culturelles et psychologiques, qui se dessine. Des valeurs doivent être « imposées » à cette masse malade, à commencer par le respect des femmes.

Ce projet est scandaleux, non pas seulement du fait de l’insupportable routine de la mission civilisatrice et de la supériorité des valeurs occidentales qu’il évoque. Au-delà de ce paternaliste colonial, il revient aussi à affirmer, contre « l’angélisme qui va tuer », que la culture déviante de cette masse de musulmans est un danger pour l’Europe. Il équivaut à conditionner l’accueil de personnes qui fuient la guerre et la dévastation. En cela, c’est un discours proprement anti-humaniste, quoi qu’en dise Daoud.

De quoi Daoud est-il le nom ?

Après d’autres écrivains algériens comme Rachid Boudjedra ou Boualem Sansal, Kamel Daoud intervient en tant qu’intellectuel laïque minoritaire dans son pays, en lutte quotidienne contre un puritanisme parfois violent. Dans le contexte européen, il épouse toutefois une islamophobie devenue majoritaire. Derrière son cas, nous nous alarmons de la tendance généralisée dans les sociétés européennes à racialiser ces violences sexuelles.

Nous nous alarmons de la banalisation des discours racistes affublés des oripeaux d’une pensée humaniste qui ne s’est jamais si mal portée. Nous nous alarmons de voir un fait divers gravissime servir d’excuse à des propos et des projets gravissimes. Face à l’ampleur de violences inédites, il faut sans aucun doute se pencher sur les faits, comme le suggère Kamel Daoud. Encore faudrait-il pouvoir le faire sans réactualiser les mêmes sempiternels clichés islamophobes. Le fond de l’air semble l’interdire.

Noureddine Amara (historien), Joel Beinin (historien), Houda Ben Hamouda (historienne), Benoît Challand (sociologue), Jocelyne Dakhlia (historienne), Sonia Dayan-Herzbrun (sociologue), Muriam Haleh Davis (historienne), Giulia Fabbiano (anthropologue), Darcie Fontaine (historienne), David Theo Goldberg (philosophe), Ghassan Hage (anthropologue), Laleh Khalili (anthropologue), Tristan Leperlier (sociologue), Nadia Marzouki (politiste), Pascal Ménoret (anthropologue), Stéphanie Pouessel (anthropologue), Elizabeth Shakman Hurd (politiste), Thomas Serres (politiste), Seif Soudani (journaliste).

Voir également:

LETTRE D’ADAM SHATZ A KAMEL DAOUD : « C’est difficile d’imaginer que tu pourrais vraiment croire ce que tu as écrit »

Cher Kamel, il y a quelques jours, une amie tunisienne m’a envoyé une tribune parue dans Le Monde. Ce texte portait la signature de plusieurs universitaires que je connais. Des universitaires un peu bien-pensants, c’est vrai, mais, quand même, des gens qui ne sont pas tes adversaires – qui ne devraient pas être tes adversaires. Le ton de la lettre m’a dérangé. Je n’aimais pas le style de dénonciation publique, un style qui me rappelait un peu le style gauche-soviétique-puritain. Et tu dois savoir qu’en tant qu’ami je ne signerai pas de telle lettre contre toi, bien que je ne partage pas du tout les opinions que tu as exprimées dans cet article, et par la suite, même plus férocement encore, me semble-t-il, dans la tribune du New York Times.

Pour moi, c’est très difficile d’imaginer que tu pourrais vraiment croire ce que tu as écrit. Ce n’était pas le Kamel Daoud que je connais et dont j’ai fait le portrait dans un long article. Nous avons beaucoup parlé des problèmes de sexe dans le monde arabo-musulman quand j’étais à Oran. Mais nous avons aussi parlé des ambiguïtés de la « culture » (mot que je n’aime pas) ; par exemple, le fait que les femmes voilées sont parfois parmi les plus émancipées sexuellement. Dans tes écrits récents, c’est comme si toute l’ambiguïté dont nous avons tant discuté, et que, plus que personne, tu pourrais analyser dans toute sa nuance, a disparu. Tu l’as fait de plus dans des publications lues par des lecteurs occidentaux qui peuvent trouver dans ce que tu écris la confirmation de préjugés et d’idées fixes.

Je ne dis pas que tu l’as fait exprès, ou même que tu joues le jeu des « impérialistes ». Non, je ne t’accuse de rien. Sauf de ne pas y penser, et de tomber dans des pièges étranges et peut-être dangereux. Je pense ici surtout à l’idée selon laquelle il y aurait un rapport direct entre les événements de Cologne et l’islamisme, voire l’« Islam » tout court.

Je te rappelle qu’on a vu, il y a quelques années, des événements similaires, certes pas de la même ampleur, mais quand même, lors de la parade du Puerto Rican Day à New York. Les Portoricains qui ont alors molesté des femmes dans la rue n’étaient pas sous l’influence de l’Islam mais de l’alcool… Sans preuve que l’Islam agissait sur les esprits de ces hommes à Cologne, il me semble curieux de faire de telles propositions, et de suggérer que cette « maladie » menace l’Europe… Dans son livre La Maladie comme métaphore (Christian Bourgois, 2005), un ouvrage devenu un classique, Susan Sontag démontre que l’idée de « maladie » a une histoire pas très reluisante, souvent liée au fascisme. Les juifs, comme tu le sais, étaient considérés comme une espèce de maladie ; et les antisémites d’Europe, au XIXsiècle, à l’époque de l’émancipation, se sont montrés très préoccupés des coutumes sexuelles des juifs, et de la domination des hommes juifs sur les femmes… Les échos de cette obsession me mettent mal à l’aise.

Je ne dis pas qu’il ne faut pas parler de la question sexuelle dans le monde arabo-musulman. Bien sûr que non. Il y a beaucoup d’écrivains qui en ont parlé d’une façon révélatrice (la sociologue marocaine Fatima Mernissi, le poète syrien Adonis, même, quoi qu’un peu hystériquement, le poète algérien Rachid Boudjedra) et je sais de nos conversations, et de ton roman magistral, que tu as tout le talent nécessaire pour aborder ce sujet. Il n’y a pas beaucoup de personnes qui peuvent en parler avec une telle acuité. Mais après avoir réfléchi, et dans une forme qui va au-delà de la provocation, et des clichés.

Après avoir lu ta tribune, j’ai déjeuné avec une auteure égyptienne, une amie que tu aimerais bien, et elle me disait que ses jeunes amis au Caire sont tous bisexuels. C’est quelque chose de discret, bien sûr, mais ils vivent leur vie ; ils trouvent leurs orgasmes, même avant le mariage, ils sont créatifs, ils inventent une nouvelle vie pour eux-mêmes, et, qui sait, pour l’avenir de l’Egypte. Il n’y a pas d’espace pour cette réalité dans les articles que tu as publiés. Il n’y a que la « misère » – et la menace que représentent ces misérables qui sont actuellement réfugiés en Europe. Comme les juifs le disent pour leur Pâque (et ce que les Israéliens oublient en Palestine) : il faut toujours se souvenir que l’on a été étranger dans la terre d’Egypte.

Kamel, tu es tellement brillant, et tu es tendre, aussi, ça, je le sais. C’est à toi, et à toi seul, de décider comment tu veux t’engager dans la politique, mais je veux que tu saches que je m’inquiète pour toi, et j’espère que tu réfléchiras bien à tes positions… et que tu retourneras au mode d’expression qui, à mon avis, est ton meilleur genre : la littérature.

J’espère que tu comprendras que je t’écris avec le sentiment de la plus profonde amitié.

Voir de plus:

Cologne, lieu de fantasmes »
Kamel Daoud (Ecrivain)

Le Monde

31.01.2016

Que s’est-il passé à Cologne la nuit de la Saint-Sylvestre ? On peine à le savoir avec exactitude en lisant les comptes rendus, mais on sait – au moins – ce qui s’est passé dans les têtes. Celle des agresseurs, peut-être ; celle des Occidentaux, sûrement.

Fascinant résumé des jeux de fantasmes. Le « fait » en lui-même correspond on ne peut mieux au jeu d’images que l’Occidental se fait de l’« autre », le réfugié-immigré : angélisme, terreur, réactivation des peurs d’invasions barbares anciennes et base du binôme barbare-civilisé. Des immigrés accueillis s’attaquent à « nos » femmes, les agressent et les violent.

Cela correspond à l’idée que la droite et l’extrême droite ont toujours construite dans les discours contre l’accueil des réfugiés. Ces derniers sont assimilés aux agresseurs, même si l’on ne le sait pas encore avec certitude. Les coupables sont-ils des immigrés installés depuis longtemps ? Des réfugiés récents ? Des organisations criminelles ou de simples hooligans ? On n’attendra pas la réponse pour, déjà, délirer avec cohérence. Le « fait » a déjà réactivé le discours sur « doit-on accueillir ou s’enfermer ? » face à la misère du monde. Le fantasme n’a pas attendu les faits.

Le rapport à la femme
Angélisme aussi ? Oui. L’accueil du réfugié, du demandeur d’asile qui fuit l’organisation Etat islamique ou les guerres récentes pèche en Occident par une surdose de naïveté : on voit, dans le réfugié, son statut, pas sa culture ; il est la victime qui recueille la projection de l’Occidental ou son sentiment de devoir humaniste ou de culpabilité. On voit le survivant et on oublie que le réfugié vient d’un piège culturel que résume surtout son rapport à Dieu et à la femme.

En Occident, le réfugié ou l’immigré sauvera son corps mais ne va pas négocier sa culture avec autant de facilité, et cela, on l’oublie avec dédain. Sa culture est ce qui lui reste face au déracinement et au choc des nouvelles terres. Le rapport à la femme, fondamental pour la modernité de l’Occident, lui restera parfois incompréhensible pendant longtemps lorsqu’on parle de l’homme lambda.

Il va donc en négocier les termes par peur, par compromis ou par volonté de garder « sa culture », mais cela changera très, très lentement. Il suffit de rien, du retour du grégaire ou d’un échec affectif pour que cela revienne avec la douleur. Les adoptions collectives ont ceci de naïf qu’elles se limitent à la bureaucratie et se dédouanent par la charité.

Le réfugié est-il donc « sauvage » ? Non. Juste différent, et il ne suffit pas d’accueillir en donnant des papiers et un foyer collectif pour s’acquitter. Il faut offrir l’asile au corps mais aussi convaincre l’âme de changer. L’Autre vient de ce vaste univers douloureux et affreux que sont la misère sexuelle dans le monde arabo-musulman, le rapport malade à la femme, au corps et au désir. L’accueillir n’est pas le guérir.

« La femme étant donneuse de vie et la vie étant perte de temps, la femme devient la perte de l’âme »
Le rapport à la femme est le nœud gordien, le second dans le monde d’Allah. La femme est niée, refusée, tuée, voilée, enfermée ou possédée. Cela dénote un rapport trouble à l’imaginaire, au désir de vivre, à la création et à la liberté. La femme est le reflet de la vie que l’on ne veut pas admettre. Elle est l’incarnation du désir nécessaire et est donc coupable d’un crime affreux : la vie.

C’est une conviction partagée qui devient très visible chez l’islamiste par exemple. L’islamiste n’aime pas la vie. Pour lui, il s’agit d’une perte de temps avant l’éternité, d’une tentation, d’une fécondation inutile, d’un éloignement de Dieu et du ciel et d’un retard sur le rendez-vous de l’éternité. La vie est le produit d’une désobéissance et cette désobéissance est le produit d’une femme.

L’islamiste en veut à celle qui donne la vie, perpétue l’épreuve et qui l’a éloigné du paradis par un murmure malsain et qui incarne la distance entre lui et Dieu. La femme étant donneuse de vie et la vie étant perte de temps, la femme devient la perte de l’âme. L’islamiste est tout aussi angoissé par la femme parce qu’elle lui rappelle son corps à elle et son corps à lui.

La liberté que le réfugié désire mais n’assume pas
Le corps de la femme est le lieu public de la culture : il appartient à tous, pas à elle. Ecrit il y a quelques années à propos de la femme dans le monde dit arabe : « A qui appartient le corps d’une femme ? A sa nation, sa famille, son mari, son frère aîné, son quartier, les enfants de son quartier, son père et à l’Etat, la rue, ses ancêtres, sa culture nationale, ses interdits. A tous et à tout le monde, sauf à elle-même. Le corps de la femme est le lieu où elle perd sa possession et son identité. Dans son corps, la femme erre en invitée, soumise à la loi qui la possède et la dépossède d’elle-même, gardienne des valeurs des autres que les autres ne veulent pas endosser par [pour] leurs corps à eux. Le corps de la femme est son fardeau qu’elle porte sur son dos. Elle doit y défendre les frontières de tous, sauf les siennes. Elle joue l’honneur de tous, sauf le sien qui n’est pas à elle. Elle l’emporte donc comme un vêtement de tous, qui lui interdit d’être nue parce que cela suppose la mise à nu de l’autre et de son regard. »

« On voit, dans le réfugié, son statut, pas sa culture ; il est la victime. On voit le survivant et on oublie que le réfugié vient d’un piège culturel que résume surtout son rapport à Dieu et à la femme »
Une femme est femme pour tous, sauf pour elle-même. Son corps est un bien vacant pour tous et sa « malvie » à elle seule. Elle erre comme dans un bien d’autrui, un mal à elle seule. Elle ne peut pas y toucher sans se dévoiler, ni l’aimer sans passer par tous les autres de son monde, ni le partager sans l’émietter entre dix mille lois. Quand elle le dénude, elle expose le reste du monde et se retrouve attaquée parce qu’elle a mis à nu le monde et pas sa poitrine. Elle est enjeu, mais sans elle ; sacralité, mais sans respect de sa personne ; honneur pour tous, sauf le sien ; désir de tous, mais sans désir à elle. Le lieu où tous se rencontrent, mais en l’excluant elle. Passage de la vie qui lui interdit sa vie à elle.

C’est cette liberté que le réfugié, l’immigré, veut, désire mais n’assume pas. L’Occident est vu à travers le corps de la femme : la liberté de la femme est vue à travers la catégorie religieuse de la licence ou de la « vertu ». Le corps de la femme est vu non comme le lieu même de la liberté essentielle comme valeur en Occident, mais comme une décadence : on veut alors le réduire à la possession, ou au crime à « voiler ».

La liberté de la femme en Occident n’est pas vue comme la raison de sa suprématie mais comme un caprice de son culte de la liberté. A Cologne, l’Occident (celui de bonne foi) réagit parce qu’on a touché à « l’essence » de sa modernité, là où l’agresseur n’a vu qu’un divertissement, un excès d’une nuit de fête et d’alcool peut-être.

Cologne, lieu des fantasmes donc. Ceux travaillés des extrêmes droites qui crient à l’invasion barbare et ceux des agresseurs qui veulent le corps nu car c’est un corps « public » qui n’est propriété de personne. On n’a pas attendu d’identifier les coupables, parce que cela est à peine important dans les jeux d’images et de clichés. De l’autre côté, on ne comprend pas encore que l’asile n’est pas seulement avoir des « papiers » mais accepter le contrat social d’une modernité.

Le problème des « valeurs »
Le sexe est la plus grande misère dans le « monde d’Allah ». A tel point qu’il a donné naissance à ce porno-islamisme dont font discours les prêcheurs islamistes pour recruter leurs « fidèles » : descriptions d’un paradis plus proche du bordel que de la récompense pour gens pieux, fantasme des vierges pour les kamikazes, chasse aux corps dans les espaces publics, puritanisme des dictatures, voile et burka.

L’islamisme est un attentat contre le désir. Et ce désir ira, parfois, exploser en terre d’Occident, là où la liberté est si insolente. Car « chez nous », il n’a d’issue qu’après la mort et le jugement dernier. Un sursis qui fabrique du vivant un zombie, ou un kamikaze qui rêve de confondre la mort et l’orgasme, ou un frustré qui rêve d’aller en Europe pour échapper, dans l’errance, au piège social de sa lâcheté : je veux connaître une femme mais je refuse que ma sœur connaisse l’amour avec un homme.

Retour à la question de fond : Cologne est-il le signe qu’il faut fermer les portes ou fermer les yeux ? Ni l’une ni l’autre solution. Fermer les portes conduira, un jour ou l’autre, à tirer par les fenêtres, et cela est un crime contre l’humanité.

Mais fermer les yeux sur le long travail d’accueil et d’aide, et ce que cela signifie comme travail sur soi et sur les autres, est aussi un angélisme qui va tuer. Les réfugiés et les immigrés ne sont pas réductibles à la minorité d’une délinquance, mais cela pose le problème des « valeurs » à partager, à imposer, à défendre et à faire comprendre. Cela pose le problème de la responsabilité après l’accueil et qu’il faut assumer.

Kamel Daoud est un écrivain algérien. Il est notamment l’auteur de Meursault, contre-enquête (Actes Sud, 2014), Prix Goncourt du premier roman. Il est également chroniqueur au Quotidien d’Oran. Cet article a d’abord été publié en Italie dans le quotidien La Repubblica.

Voir encore:

La misère sexuelle du monde arabe
Kamel  Daoud

The New York Times

Feb. 12, 2016

ORAN, Algérie — Après Tahrir, Cologne. Après le square, le sexe. Les révolutions arabes de 2011 avaient enthousiasmé les opinions, mais depuis la passion est retombée. On a fini par découvrir à ces mouvements des imperfections, des laideurs. Par exemple, ils auront à peine touché aux idées, à la culture, à la religion ou aux codes sociaux, surtout ceux se rapportant au sexe. Révolution ne veut pas dire modernité.

Les attaques contre des femmes occidentales par des migrants arabes à Cologne, en Allemagne, la veille du jour de l’an ont remis en mémoire le harcèlement que d’autres femmes avaient subi à Tahrir durant les beaux jours de la révolution. Un rappel qui a poussé l’Occident à comprendre que l’une des grandes misères d’une bonne partie du monde dit “arabe”, et du monde musulman en général, est son rapport maladif à la femme. Dans certains endroits, on la voile, on la lapide, on la tue ; au minimum, on lui reproche de semer le désordre dans la société idéale. En réponse, certains pays européens en sont venus à produire des guides de bonne conduite pour réfugiés et migrants.

Le sexe est un tabou complexe. Dans des pays comme l’Algérie, la Tunisie, la Syrie ou le Yémen, il est le produit de la culture patriarcale du conservatisme ambiant, des nouveaux codes rigoristes des islamistes et des puritanismes discrets des divers socialismes de la région. Un bon mélange pour bloquer le désir, le culpabiliser et le pousser aux marges et à la clandestinité. On est très loin de la délicieuse licence des écrits de l’âge d’or musulman, comme “Le Jardin Parfumé” de Cheikh Nefzaoui, qui traitaient sans complexe d’érotisme et du Kamasutra.

Aujourd’hui le sexe est un énorme paradoxe dans de nombreux pays arabes : On fait comme s’il n’existait pas, mais il conditionne tous les non-dits. Nié, il pèse par son occultation. La femme a beau être voilée, elle est au centre de tous nos liens, tous nos échanges, toutes nos préoccupations.

La femme revient dans les discours quotidiens comme enjeu de virilité, d’honneur et de valeurs familiales. Dans certains pays, elle n’a accès à l’espace public que quand elle abdique son corps. La dévoiler serait dévoiler l’envie que l’islamiste, le conservateur et le jeune désoeuvré ressentent et veulent nier. Perçue comme source de déséquilibre — jupe courte, risque de séisme — elle n’est respectée que lorsque définie dans un rapport de propriété, comme épouse de X ou fille de Y.

Ces contradictions créent des tensions insupportables : le désir n’a pas d’issue ; le couple n’est plus un espace d’intimité, mais une préoccupation du groupe. Il en résulte une misère sexuelle qui mène à l’absurde ou l’hystérique. Ici aussi on espère vivre une histoire d’amour, mais on empêche la mécanique de la rencontre, de la séduction et du flirt en surveillant les femmes, en surinvestissant la question de leur virginité et en donnant des pouvoirs à la police des moeurs. On va même payer des chirurgiens pour réparer les hymens.

Dans certaines terres d’Allah, la guerre à la femme et au couple prend des airs d’inquisition. L’été, en Algérie, des brigades de salafistes et de jeunes de quartier, enrôlés grâce au discours d’imams radicaux et de télé-islamistes, surveillent les corps, surtout ceux des baigneuses en maillot. Dans les espaces publics, la police harcèle les couples, y compris les mariés. Les jardins sont interdits aux promenades d’amoureux. Les bancs sont coupés en deux afin d’empêcher qu’on ne s’y assoit côte à côte.

Résultat : on fantasme ailleurs, soit sur l’impudeur et la luxure de l’Occident, soit sur le paradis musulman et ses vierges.

Ce choix est d’ailleurs parfaitement incarné par l’offre des médias dans le monde musulman. A la télévision, alors que les théologiens font fureur, les chanteuses et danseuses libanaises de la “Silicone Valley” entretiennent le rêve d’un corps inaccessible et de sexe impossible. Sur le plan vestimentaire, cela donne d’autres extrêmes: d’un côté, la burqa, le voile intégral orthodoxe ; de l’autre, le voile moutabaraj (“le voile qui dévoile”), qui assortit un foulard sur la tête d’un jean slim ou d’un pantalon moulant. Sur les plages, le burquini s’oppose au bikini.

Les sexologues sont rares en terres musulmanes, et leurs conseils peu écoutés. Du coup, ce sont les islamistes qui de fait ont le monopole du discours sur le corps, le sexe et l’amour. Avec Internet et les théo-télévisions, ces propos ont pris des formes monstrueuses — un air de porno-islamisme. Certains religieux lancent des fatwas grotesques: il est interdit de faire l’amour nu, les femmes n’ont pas le droit de toucher aux bananes, un homme ne peut rester seul avec une femme collègue que si elle est sa mère de lait et qu’il l’a tétée.

Le sexe est partout.

Et surtout après la mort.

L’orgasme n’est accepté qu’après le mariage — mais soumis à des codes religieux qui le vident de désir — ou après la mort. Le paradis et ses vierges est un thème fétiche des prêcheurs, qui présentent ces délices d’outre-tombe comme une récompense aux habitants des terres de la misère sexuelle. Le kamikaze en rêve et se soumet à un raisonnement terrible et surréaliste: l’orgasme passe par la mort, pas par l’amour.

L’Occident s’est longtemps conforté dans l’exotisme ; celui-ci disculpe les différences. L’Orientalisme rend un peu normales les variations culturelles et excuse les dérives : Shéhérazade, le harem et la danse du voile ont dispensé certains de s’interroger sur les droits de la femme musulmane. Mais aujourd’hui, avec les derniers flux d’immigrés du Moyen-Orient et d’Afrique, le rapport pathologique que certains pays du monde arabe entretiennent avec la femme fait irruption en Europe.

Ce qui avait été le spectacle dépaysant de terres lointaines prend les allures d’une confrontation culturelle sur le sol même de l’Occident. Une différence autrefois désamorcée par la distance et une impression de supériorité est devenue une menace immédiate. Le grand public en Occident découvre, dans la peur et l’agitation, que dans le monde musulman le sexe est malade et que cette maladie est en train de gagner ses propres terres.

Kamel Daoud, chroniqueur au Quotidien d’Oran, est l’auteur de “Meursault, contre-enquête.”

Voir de même:

Lettre à un ami étranger
Kamel Daoud

Le Qotidien-Oran

Cher ami. J’ai lu avec attention ta lettre, bien sûr. Elle m’a touché par sa générosité et sa lucidité. Etrangement, ton propos est venu conforter ce que j’ai déjà pris comme décision ces jours, et avec les mêmes arguments. J’y ai surtout retenu l’expression de ton amitié tendre et complice malgré l’inquiétude.

Je voudrais cependant répondre encore. J’ai longtemps écrit avec le même esprit qui ne s’encombre pas des avis d’autrui quand ils sont dominants. Cela m’a donné une liberté de ton, un style peut-être mais aussi une liberté qui était insolence et irresponsabilité ou audace. Ou même naïveté. Certains aimaient cela, d’autres ne pouvaient l’accepter. J’ai taquiné les radicalités et j’ai essayé de défendre ma liberté face aux clichés dont j’avais horreur. J’ai essayé aussi de penser. Par l’article de presse ou la littérature. Pas seulement parce que je voulais réussir mais aussi parce que j’avais la terreur de vivre une vie sans sens. Le journalisme en Algérie, durant les années dures, m’avait assuré de vivre la métaphore de l’écrit, le mythe de l’expérience. J’ai donc écrit souvent, trop, avec fureur, colère et amusement. J’ai dit ce que je pensais du sort de la femme dans mon pays, de la liberté, de la religion et d’autres grandes questions qui peuvent nous mener à la conscience ou à l’abdication et l’intégrisme. Selon nos buts dans la vie.

Sauf qu’aujourd’hui, avec le succès médiatique, j’ai fini par comprendre deux ou trois choses.

D’abord que nous vivons désormais une époque de sommations. Si on n’est pas d’un côté, on est de l’autre; le texte sur « Cologne », j’en avais écrit une partie, celle sur la femme, il y a des années. A l’époque, cela n’a fait réagir personne ou si peu. Aujourd’hui, l’époque a changé : des crispassions poussent à interpréter et l’interprétation pousse au procès. J’avais écrit cet article et celui du New York Times début janvier; leur succession dans le temps est donc un accident et pas un acharnement de ma part. J’avais écrit, poussé par la honte et la colère contre les miens, et parce que je vis dans ce pays, dans cette terre. J’y ai dit ma pensée et mon analyse sur un aspect que l’on ne peut cacher sous prétexte de « charité culturelle ». Je suis écrivain et je n’écris pas des thèses d’universitaires. C’est une émotion aussi. Que des universitaires pétitionnent contre moi aujourd’hui, pour ce texte, je trouve cela immoral parce qu’ils ne vivent pas ma chair, ni ma terre et que je trouve illégitime sinon scandaleux que certains me servent le verdict d’islamophobie à partir de la sécurité et des conforts des capitales de l’Occident et ses terrasses. Le tout servi en forme de procès stalinien et avec le préjugé du spécialiste : je sermonne un indigène parce que je parle mieux des intérêts des autres indigènes et post-décolonisés. Et au nom des deux mais avec mon nom. Et cela m’est intolérable comme posture. Je pense que cela reste immoral de m’offrir en pâture à la haine locale sous le verdict d’islamophobie qui sert aujourd’hui aussi d’inquisition. Je pense que c’est honteux de m’accuser de cela en restant bien loin de mon quotidien et celui des miens.

L’islam est une belle religion selon l’homme qui la porte, mais j’aime que les religions soient un chemin vers un dieu et qu’y résonnent les pas d’un homme qui marche. Ces pétitionnaires embusqués ne mesurent pas la conséquence de leurs actes et du tribunal sur la vie d’autrui.

Cher ami.

J’ai compris aussi que l’époque est dure. Comme autrefois, l’écrivain venu du froid, aujourd’hui, l’écrivain venu du monde dit « arabe » est piégé, sommé, poussé dans le dos et repoussé. La surinterprétation le guette et les médias le harcèlent pour conforter qui une vision, qui un rejet et un déni. Le sort de la femme est lié à mon avenir, à l’avenir des miens. Le désir est malade dans nos terres et le corps est encerclé. Cela, on ne peut pas le nier et je dois le dire et le dénoncer. Mais je me retrouve soudainement responsable de ce qui va être lu selon les terres et les airs. Dénoncer la théocratie ambiante chez nous devient un argument d’islamophobe ailleurs. Est-ce ma faute ? En partie. Mais c’est aussi la faute de notre époque, son mal du siècle. C’est ce qui s’est passé pour la tribune sur « Cologne ». Je l’assume mais je me retrouve désolé pour ce à quoi elle peut servir comme déni et refus d’humanité de l’Autre. L’écrivain venu des terres d’Allah se retrouve aujourd’hui au centre de sollicitations médiatiques intolérables. Je n’y peux rien mais je peux m’en soustraire : par la prudence comme je l’ai cru, mais aussi par le silence comme je le choisis désormais.

Je vais donc m’occuper de littérature et en cela tu as raison. J’arrête le journalisme sous peu. Je vais aller écouter de arbres ou des cœurs. Lire. Restaurer en moi la confiance et la quiétude. Explorer. Non pas abdiquer, mais aller plus loin que le jeu de vagues et des médias. Je me résous à creuser et non déclamer.

J’ai pour ma terre l’affection du déchanté. Un amour secret et fort. Une passion. J’aime les miens et les cieux que j’essaye de déchiffrer dans les livres et avec l’œil la nuit. Je rêve de puissance, de souveraineté pour les miens, de conscience et de partage. Cela me déçoit de ne pas vivre ce rêve. Cela me met en colère ou me pousse au châtiment amoureux. Je ne hais pas les miens, ni l’homme en l’autre. Je n’insulte pas les raisons d’autrui. Mais j’exerce mon droit d’être libre. Ce droit a été mal interprété, sollicité, malmené ou jugé. Aujourd’hui, je veux aussi la liberté de faire autre chose. Mille excuses si j’ai déçu, un moment, ton amitié cher A… Et si je rends publique cette lettre aujourd’hui, avant de t’en parler, c’est parce qu’elle s’adresse aux gens affectueux, de bonne foi comme toi. Et surtout à toi. A Oran.

Voir aussi:

Le romancier et journaliste Kamel Daoud :«J’arrête le journalisme sous peu»
Le Temps d’Algérie

17 février 2016

Harcelé, critiqué, menacé… Kamel Daoud a tenu bon jusqu’à il y a deux jours. Dans sa chronique «Raïna Raïkoum» qui paraît sur le quotidien d’Oran, il a annoncé qu’il quittait la presse. «J’arrête le journalisme sous peu», a simplement écrit celui qui a été déclaré par la France meilleur journaliste de l’année. Une déclaration lourde de sens et de retombées. Kamel Daoud, tout le monde le connaît. Beaucoup sont fans alors que d’autres le haïssent, notamment les islamistes. Ces derniers brandissent contre lui une menace mort chaque fois qu’il leur oppose son talent à combattre la xénophobie et le terrorisme. Ce journaliste, chroniqueur depuis une vingtaine d’années, a enchaîné les prix et les distinctions. En retour, il s’est fait lyncher. Il en parle.

Le Temps d’Algérie : Est-ce qu’aujourd’hui vous craignez pour votre vie au point que vous décidiez de renoncez à votre métier, votre vocation première avant la littérature ?

Kamel Daoud : Non ! C’est juste,  que je suis fatigué de tout ça. Je préfère me consacrer à la littérature. Franchement, je préfère écrire des livres, me reposer un petit peu parce que j’ai subi un ouragan pendant les deux dernières années.
Et puis, j’ai aussi envie de réfléchir à mes positions et prendre du recul. C’est exactement ça. Ce n’est pas exclusivement lié à ma chronique parue dans le Monde. La décision mûrissait depuis un mois ou deux.  J’ai trop donné. J’ai fait énormément de chroniques depuis des années. Cela fait 20 ans. Et là je suis fatigué, j’ai besoin de repos.

Vous êtes devenu une personnalité incontournable des médias, pourtant vous abandonnez parce que des gens vous mettent la pression mais c’est l’essence même du  métier de journaliste ?

Cela fait 20 ans que je subis ces pressions. Je suis arrivé au point où chaque fois que je reçois un prix, j’ai peur.
Parce que nous sommes arrivés à une situation de sous culture et de paranoïa où  au lieu d’applaudir un algérien qui parvient à décrocher le prix du meilleur journaliste  en France de l’année, on lui tombe dessus. Je ne dis pas que tout le monde est comme ça. Je reçois beaucoup de soutien, beaucoup de gens très sympas  mais c’est juste que j’ai envie de me reposer. Je vous jure que faire une chronique pendant vingt ans, ce n’est pas évident.

Donc, vous ne démissionnez pas du Quotidien d’Oran, vous prenez juste un peu de recul. Vous avez peut-être le projet de vous installer aux Etats-Unis ?

Plusieurs mois. Beaucoup même.  Mais non, je n’ai pas envie de quitter l’Algérie.
Probablement que j’irais aux états-unis pour deux ou trois mois, mais je reviendrai.

Est-ce que votre mode de vie a changé ? Faites-vous plus attention quand vous sortez ? Est-ce que vous vous sentez au final plus menacé ?

Je déteste le rôle de l’intellectuel menacé. Je ne le supporte pas. On est tous menacé. On doit tous résister et chacun sait ce qu’il a à faire.
Pour la précision, je ne m’attaque pas aux islamistes mais je me défends. Je ne suis pas un militant. J’ai une vie et je la défends.  Je le répète toujours celui qui ne peut pas mourir à ma place, ne peut pas vivre à ma place. Je ne vois pas pourquoi ça serait à moi d’abdiquer avant les autres. J’ai dit ce que je pense. Maintenant je vais le dire autrement. J’ai envie d’écrire des romans. Ce n’est pas une démission. Ce n’est pas une lâcheté. Ce n’est pas une abdication. J’ai juste envie de changer de mode d’expression. Même si je quitte la presse, Kamel Daoud reste Kamel Daoud. Ce que je pense, je le dis. Je n’ai pas à baisser les yeux. Moi je n’ai tué personne.
Que cela soit un islamiste ou encore un imbécile qui croit à la théorie du complot ou alors que je fais ça pour avoir les papiers. Non !
Moi je suis algérien. Je vis en Algérie. Je défends mes idées. Je défends ma façon de voir. Et je défends ma terre et mes enfants !
Les gens n’arrivent pas à croire qu’on puisse être différent et de bonne foi.
Tout le monde croit que l’on fait quelque chose pour avoir les papiers, pour s’enrichir, vendre des livres. Je n’ai jamais été comme ça. Ceux qui me connaissent savent que je fonctionne comme ça.

Propos recueillis par
Samira Hadj Amar

Voir également:

Cologne, « islamophobie » : ce que révèle l’affaire Kamel Daoud

Alexandre Devecchio

Le Figaro

19/02/2016

Accusé d’islamophobie, le journaliste Kamel Daoud a décidé d’arrêter le journalisme. Pour Laurent Bouvet, ce terme sert avant tout à disqualifier et à mettre en accusation ceux qui émettent des critiques contre l’islamisme politique et ses alliés.

Laurent Bouvet est professeur de science politique à l’UVSQ-Paris Saclay. Son dernier ouvrage,L’insécurité culturelle, est paru chez Fayard.

LE FIGARO. – Après les agressions du Nouvel An à Cologne, l’écrivain et journaliste algérien Kamel Daoud n’avait pas hésité à pointer le tabou du sexe et du rapport à la femme dans le monde arabo-musulman.

Laurent BOUVET. – En effet, et c’était, avec d’autres, une contribution très intéressante sur les causalités possibles de cet événement inédit et sidérant. Une contribution venant de la part d’un homme dont la connaissance de la situation algérienne, et au-delà de la situation dans l’ensemble arabo-musulman, m’a toujours parue très fine et très juste.

Face aux accusations d’«islamophobie», il déclare arrêter le journalisme et s’en explique dans Le Quotidien d’Oran. Que révèle cette affaire?

On ne peut que déplorer et condamner ces accusations. Cela révèle d’abord une difficulté voire une impossibilité d’accepter la critique et le débat de la part de ceux qui les décrètent ou les utilisent. Ensuite, qu’il y a de la part de certains musulmans mais pas seulement, une lecture de l’islam univoque et qui voudrait s’imposer aux autres, ce qui me paraît, pour ce que j’en sais, tout à fait contraire à l’islam lui-même. Enfin, cela témoigne du risque, physique, permanent, pour des gens courageux comme Kamel Daoud comme on l’a vu pour beaucoup d’autres, jusqu’à la mort. Le fait qu’il cesse le journalisme est une perte sèche pour tout le monde, une atteinte au travail de mise à jour de la vérité, dans un pays et un monde qui en ont plus que jamais besoin.

Est-il désormais impossible d’aborder sereinement le sujet de l’islam en France? Comment en est-on arrivé là?

Nous ne connaissons pas, heureusement, les mêmes conditions que dans certains pays arabes et musulmans en matière de débat public, et d’expression sur l’islam. Mais la pression existe. A la fois de la part d’une frange extrémiste, radicalisée, dans l’islam, et surtout, de la part de tout un tas de gens, que ce soit dans l’université, dans certains milieux activistes politiques ou associatifs ou même, parfois, au coeur de certaines institutions publiques. Il n’apparaît pas possible de parler de l’islam et, surtout, ce qui me paraît plus important encore, de la place de cette religion dans la République, dans l’espace social et public, de la même manière que des autres, et de manière tout simplement laïque.

Cette dissymétrie vient d’abord d’une difficulté à l’intérieur de l’islam, dont nous n’avons pas, en tant que société sécularisée et laïcisée, à nous occuper. Ce n’est en effet pas à nous, non musulmans, de dire qui sont les bons et les mauvais musulmans, quelle est la bonne ou la mauvaise manière de pratiquer l’islam, etc. Personnellement, je n’en sais rien et je ne veux pas le savoir. La religion comme pratique et comme vérité de la foi si l’on veut ne m’intéresse pas. Là où tout ceci me concerne, nous concerne, c’est dans sa dimension sociale et politique. Une religion ne concerne pas en effet que les croyants, elle a des effets sociaux et induit des conséquences sur les mœurs, le droit, la politique… dans une société. Il en va de l’islam comme de toutes les religions dès lors qu’elles concernent un nombre significatif de gens au sein d’une société.

Or, le fait que l’islam soit à la fois une religion prosélyte et une religion qui implique un mode de vie particulier pour ses croyants conduit, dans une société où elle n’est pas majoritaire, à des tensions et des questions sur la manière dont elle peut s’articuler aux modes de vie de l’ensemble de la population non musulmane, et aussi à la liberté relative des musulmans de vivre plus ou moins en accord avec les préceptes de leur religion. C’est là que la difficulté de ne pas pouvoir se référer à une autorité incontestable, centrale et édictrice de principes clairs pour tous les musulmans fait défaut, évidemment. Les origines nationales variées et les pratiques différentes de l’islam des Français musulmans et des étrangers musulmans vivant en France impliquent des comportements et des attitudes très divers.

D’autant que si une très large majorité de ceux qui croient et pratiquent l’islam en France sont tout à fait laïques dans leur manière de comprendre leur religion, une minorité ne l’est, elle, pas du tout et fait pression, de différentes manières, sur les institutions, sur la société, sur les autres musulmans, etc. pour voir reconnaître une certaine pratique de l’islam. Dans le sens d’une radicalisation jusqu’à l’islamisme politique et la contestation de la laïcité elle-même, des lois de la République (celle de 2004 à l’école par exemple).

Le fait que ces revendications bénéficient d’un soutien, plus ou moins fort et pour des raisons diverses (instrumentalisation politique, combat dit post-colonial, combat contre la laïcité, combat commun contre la liberté de mœurs…), de la part de tout un tas de non musulmans au sein de la société française, en particulier au sein de ses élites, rend encore plus difficile l’intégration au commun républicain de cette minorité de la population de religion musulmane.

Les torts sont donc partagés au regard de la situation actuelle: la pression de l’islamisme politique d’un côté, phénomène international, et les faiblesses ou les calculs au sein de certains milieux français qui conduisent à des formes de complaisance, d’accommodement voire de collaboration pure et simple.

«Je pense que cela reste immoral de m’offrir en pâture à la haine locale sous le verdict d’islamophobie qui sert aujourd’hui aussi d’inquisition.», écrit Kamel Daoud. Le terme même d’ «islamophobie» est-il piégé?

Le terme islamophobie sert précisément d’arme à tous ces promoteurs de l’islamisme politique et à leurs alliés. Sous son aspect descriptif d’une réalité qui existe et qui doit être combattue avec vigueur, les paroles et les actes anti-musulmans, il sert avant tout à disqualifier et à mettre en accusation toutes celles et tous ceux qui émettent des critiques contre cet islamisme politique et ses alliés.

Et lorsqu’il est déconstruit, avec force, récemment encore par Elisabeth Badinter, ou par Kamel Daoud aujourd’hui, il se trouve toujours des militants zélés ou des idiots utiles de la cause islamiste pour les désigner comme coupables d’être anti-musulmans. C’est un mécanisme assez classique que l’on a bien connu en Europe avec le totalitarisme, et les procès politiques qu’il entraînait. La haine qui peut alors être déversée sur celles et ceux qui dénoncent ces raccourcis et ces méthodes est impressionnante. Elle fait même parfois peur de ce qu’elle révèle chez certains.

Que ces méthodes totalitaires soient utilisées par des militants islamistes, cela s’explique même si on peine à le comprendre. Qu’elles soient en revanche devenues monnaie courante dans le débat public en France, cela m’étonne davantage. Les attaques contre Elisabeth Badinter ou Kamel Daoud, ou encore contre Céline Pina ou Amine El Khatmi récemment, de la part de responsables d’institutions publiques, d’élus politiques, de journalistes ou de collègues universitaires à coup d’accusations d’islamophobie sont pour moi insupportables.

Le terme lui-même n’est parfois même plus interrogé. Il est admis comme l’équivalent d’antisémitisme ou de racisme! Des colloques sont organisés sur l’islamophobie sans que le terme soit mis en question. Le CCIF, une association militante qui promeut l’islamisme politique, est même reçue officiellement par les autorités publiques au nom de ce combat contre l’islamophobie dont elle a, habilement, fait son objet. Ce sont des aveuglements et des renoncements qui en disent long et surtout qui risquent de coûter cher. C’est un processus de combat culturel pour l’hégémonie au sens gramscien auquel nous assistons. Certains l’ont bien compris, d’autres non.

Le président de la République lui-même refuse d’employer le terme d’islamisme et prétend que le terrorisme djihadiste n’a rien à voir avec l’islam …

C’est un chose étrange, décidément, que de penser qu’on peut convaincre quiconque du fait que le djihadisme

et le terrorisme islamiste n’ont rien à voir avec l’islam. Les djihadistes, les terroristes qui se réclament de l’islam savent ce qu’ils font. Et comme il ne nous appartient pas de juger si c’est conforme ou non à telle ou telle conception de l’islam, cela n’a aucun intérêt de rentrer dans ces considérations.

D’ailleurs, nos concitoyens ne s’y laissent pas prendre. Chacun constate qu’il s’agit d’actes perpétrés au nom de l’islam sans pour autant faire un quelconque amalgame avec les musulmans dans leur immense majorité. La réaction des Français a été remarquable après les attaques de janvier et novembre 2015 en la matière: ni panique ni fuite en avant ni aucune forme d’accusation générale contre l’islam et les musulmans. Ce sont des risques et des fantasmes qu’entretiennent certains responsables politiques en particulier pour servir leurs intérêts. Cela n’a aucune réalité. Les actes antimusulmans existent bien évidemment, comme les actes antisémites d’ailleurs. Et il faut simplement les combattre avec détermination, sans les utiliser politiquement en lien avec les attentats terroristes.

Au-delà, ce genre de propos qui veut détacher le djihadisme de l’islam entend aussi nier la continuité qu’il y a entre l’islamisme politique et le djihadisme, en expliquant notamment qu’il y aurait d’un côté un islamisme «quiétiste» par exemple et de l’autre une forme violente. Que l’on devrait discuter et s’accommoder de la première en combattant la seconde. Ce genre de distinction conduit à nier le caractère idéologique de l’entreprise islamiste, à vouloir à tout prix expliquer la violence terroriste par elle-même, de manière comparable à d’autres formes de violence terroriste.

Or, ce que nous ont appris les travaux sur le totalitarisme, en particulier, c’est que l’usage et la légitimation de la violence à des fins politiques reposent sur un ensemble de considérations idéologiques préalables. Que l’origine de celles-ci soient un système de pensée lié à la race et à la nation, à la classe et à la révolution ou à la foi et à la réalisation de la volonté de dieu importe peu. Le mécanisme est le même, et il est chaque fois destructeur de l’humanité de l’homme. C’est aujourd’hui à un tel défi que nous sommes confrontés. Il est plus que regrettable, impardonnable, que des responsables politiques n’en prennent pas conscience et n’agissent pas en conséquence.

Voir encore:

Agressions sexuelles de Cologne: un renversement révélateur
14 févr. 2016
Patric JEAN
Le blog de Patric JEAN
Une interview du procureur de Cologne vient de révéler que les agressions de femmes lors du réveillon avaient été relatées un peu hâtivement par la presse internationale. Ces nouvelles révélations prouvent que les agressions sexuelles et les viols qui ont été commis ne sont que la partie visible de l’iceberg de la culture du viol, largement partagée entre toutes les communautés.

Malgré des demandes insistantes, j’avais refusé de relayer toute information à la suite des agressions de femmes lors de la nuit de la Saint-Sylvestre à Cologne. La recherche des faits précis buttait toujours sur les mêmes sources floues, des témoignages anonymes, des chiffres très différents d’un jour à l’autre. Il semblait nécessaire de prendre un peu de recul avant de commenter. D’autant que cet événement tombait trop bien pour une extrême droite qui y voyait la preuve que l’accueil des réfugiés syriens et irakiens était une erreur, voire le début d’une invasion. Comme l’a montré récemment Marine Le Pen, les droits des femmes peuvent servir de paravent hypocrite aux plus inavouables pensées racistes.

La première question qui se posait était celle de la comparaison avec d’autres événements afin de voir s’il s’agissait d’un fait exceptionnel ou bien si cette nuit figurait dans la longue liste des événements de foule où ces agressions sont nombreuses. Traiter le 31 décembre à Cologne comme un cas à part permettait de montrer du doigt (c’est une stratégie masculine inconsciente très banale) les « vrais machos », les « vrais dominants », ceux qui ne respectent pas les femmes. A savoir comme à chaque reprise: issus des catégories défavorisées et/ou les migrants. Cela permet d’affirmer par prétérition que les autres hommes sont « les bons », ceux qui respectent les femmes.

Or, voilà que les premières descriptions données par « des sources anonymes de la police allemande » (dont on connaît la proximité d’une bonne partie de ses membres avec l’extrême droite) se révèlent être fausses.

Après avoir interrogé près de 300 personnes et visionné 590 heures de vidéos, le procureur de Cologne, Ulrich Bremer, révèle dans une interview à Die Welt que plus de 60% des agressions n’étaient pas à caractère sexuel mais bien des vols. Surtout, sur 58 agresseurs, 55 n’étaient pas des réfugiés. Ils sont pour la plupart Algériens et Marocains installés en Allemagne de longue date, ainsi que trois Allemands. On ne dénombre que deux réfugiés Syriens et un Irakien.

Dans un second temps, sans doute suite aux réactions qu’aura provoqué son interview, le procureur Bremer ajoutera à la confusion en annonçant que les auteurs de violences « tombent le plus souvent dans la catégorie des réfugiés ». Sauf qu’il y range 57 Marocains et Algériens qui ne sont pas des « réfugiés » contrairement aux quatre Irakiens et trois Syriens.

Or, les agressions de la Saint-Sylvestre avaient provoqué une vague de contestation pour dénoncer la politique du gouvernement allemand face à l’arrivée des réfugiés syriens et irakiens. « Si des demandeurs d’asile ou des réfugiés se livrent à de telles agressions, il s’agit d’une éclatante trahison des valeurs de l’hospitalité et cela doit conduire à la fin immédiate de leur séjour en Allemagne », avait lancé Andreas Scheuer, secrétaire général de la CSU (parti conservateur bavarois). Dans les jours qui ont suivi, des Pakistanais et des Syriens avaient été sauvagement agressés dans les rues, en représailles. On avait aussi crié au complot de migrants s’organisant pour perpétrer leurs agressions coordonnées dans différentes villes du pays à la même heure… En France, le journal Le Monde titrait: « Les violences de Cologne révèlent la face cachée de l’immigration allemande ».

Manifestation de l’extrême droite contre les « réfugiés violeurs »

Il ne s’agit pas de minimiser les faits d’agressions sexuelles qui ont été commis. Au contraire. L’examen des faits montre aujourd’hui qu’il s’agit d’un problème systémique se posant dès que la foule envahit les rues et que l’alcool coule à flot. D’après le journal Libération, un viol aurait été commis à Cologne et nous savons que plus de 400 plaintes ont été déposées pour des agressions à caractère sexuel. Or l’an dernier, deux viols ont été commis lors des fêtes de Bayonne ainsi qu’un nombre inconnu d’agressions sexuelles. Au point que la mairie se sente obligée de rappeler publiquement lors des fêtes que le viol est un crime… En effet, les attouchements sexuels contre les femmes semblent faire partie des habitudes dans ce type de rassemblement sans que personne, sauf quelques associations féministes, ne s’en émeuve. Au point que le journal Sud Ouest puisse affirmer « qu’aucun incident majeur n’est venu endeuiller les fêtes » pour compléter deux lignes plus bas que trois viols ont été commis…

Fêtes de Bayonne

Lors de l’édition 2015 des fêtes de Pampelune, 1656 plaintes ont été déposées (contre 2 047 en 2014), dont quatre pour agression sexuelle. Lors des fêtes de la bière à Munich, deux plaintes sont enregistrées en moyenne chaque année. Mais en 2002, c’est 13 viols qui ont été comptabilisés. Les associations locales estiment que le chiffre doit être multiplié par dix, les victimes ne portant généralement pas plainte.

En conclusion, les événements de Cologne démontrent que, loin d’un fait divers lié à la présence de réfugiés particulièrement misogynes, les agressions sexuelles et les viols font partie d’une culture largement partagée et où l’alcool sert parfois de catalyseur. C’est donc à la domination masculine dans son ensemble qu’il faut s’en prendre. Pas seulement à la culture des autres.

Vaste tâche…

Voir enfin:

Left Media Migrant Rape Cover-Up: HuffPo, Indy, AND United Nations Claim Cologne Attackers ‘Not Refugees’, German Prosecutor: ‘Total Nonsense’

 Raheem Kassam and Liam Deacon

Mainstream media outlets have been blasted for peddling “total nonsense” today as left-wing newspapers coalesced to claim with one voice that “only three” of the suspects involved in Cologne’s mass migrant rape on New Year’s Eve were recent migrants or refugees.

Screen Shot 2016-02-15 at 16.17.55

The Indy’s false article

But Cologne’s prosecutor, Ulrich Bremer, has said that the claim is “total nonsense” after an interview with German paper Die Welt this weekend was misinterpreted and reported in a way that the left-wing outlets wanted, rather than what the truth was.

The Huffington Post, the Independent, the Metro, and Russia Today all jumped on clumsy reporting from liberal outlets on the European continent, going so far as to heavily editorialise their news copy on the issue.

The Huffington Post claimed: “two Syrians and one Iraqi had been detained by police as part of their inquiries, contrary to the hysteria caused by headlines which accused hordes of refugees of masterminding the assault,” while the Independent, which recently announced it was going “online only” due to a slump in newspaper sales, exclaimed: “Majority of suspects are of Algerian, Tunisian or Moroccan descent and none had recently arrived in Germany, police have reportedly said”.

The HuffPo’s tweets were titled: “The Facts Behind Cologne Sex Attacks Make Awkward Reading For Refugee-Bashers”.

But police said no such thing, with the Associated Press clarifying the statement from Bremer, who has clarified: “the overwhelming majority of persons fall into the general category of refugees.”

The papers are thought to have made the error because they do not understand the migrant crisis – thinking that only Syrians and Iraqis count as migrants or refugees, when an overwhelming number of Algerians and Moroccans had been named amongst the Cologne suspects.

But thousands of Algerians, Moroccans, Tunisians, and dozens of other nationalities have arrived in Europe since the migrant crisis began in earnest in early 2015.

And news outlets weren’t the only ones to fall for the shoddy reporting of Mr. Bremer’s comments. The “news” was seized upon by open borders campaigners, broadcasters, and even government agencies.

HuffPo’s Angry Tweets

Chief Communications & Spokesperson at the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) tweeted:

LBC’s James O’Brien said:

While Kenneth Roth, of Human Rights Watch, tweeted:

Sunny Hundal, a journalism lecturer at Kingston University currently being looked at by the Metropolitan Police for racist, anti-white tweets, said:

The Huffington Post‘s article was shared hundreds of times, while the Independent link was shared over 11,000 times. The Indy’s coverage also included a comment piece by Algerian Nabila Ramdani entitled: “Cologne sex assaults: Muslim rape myths fit a neo-Nazi agenda”.

The piece itself would likely make no sense either way, as Tunisian and Algerian migrants are just as likely to be Muslim as Iraqi or Syrians.

Ms. Ramdani writes for the Guardian, the Independent, London’s Evening Standard, the Mirror, the Telegraph, the Daily Mail, the Sunday Times, the New York Times and the BBC and Sky.

The media-wide mishap comes after it took Breitbart London to break the news of the mass Cologne rapes and theft on New Year’s Eve for the English speaking world. Since then, news outlets have rushed to play catch up, posting fake videos, and even blocking their own content in European countries.

Voir par ailleurs:

International
Kadhafi: violeur et obsédé sexuel
Valérie Trierweiler et Catherine Schwaab

Paris Match

17 septembre 2012

Dictateur pendant quarante-deux ans, le tyran se doublait d’un malade du sexe. Ses soldates et ses gardes qui faisaient la joie des photographes étaient en réalité des rabatteuses ou de la chair à consommer. Ses proies, il les faisait kidnapper dans leurs familles ou dans leurs écoles. Pour la première fois, certaines d’entre elles se sont confiées à la journaliste Annick Cojean qui en a tiré un livre choc. Et Paris Match a pu interviewer en exclusivité une chef rebelle qui raconte tout.

Le soldat doit mesurer 1,90 mètre et peser dans les 100 kilos. Il s’acharne, le pantalon baissé, sur un corps minuscule qui ne bouge plus au-dessous de lui. La petite semble morte. Il continue de s’enfoncer en elle avec une brutalité qu’on ne voit même pas dans les films pornos. Il a dû la tuer. Lui et ses camarades en uniforme la défoncent depuis trois jours. Elle a tellement saigné, a tellement été battue, cognée… Soudain, il semble s’apercevoir qu’il est en train de s’acharner sur un cadavre : « Elle est morte. » Près de lui, un chef libyen le rassure : « Finis… T’inquiète pas… » L’autre « finit », toujours avec la même violence.

Fin de la cassette. Il y en avait des centaines, des milliers. Inracontables. Dès l’éviction de Kadhafi, les insurgés en ont brûlé beaucoup. Il en ont trouvé dans toutes les résidences du tyran. Et l’acteur principal en était… Kadhafi. « Il lui fallait quatre filles par jour, vierges de préférence, révèle une chef rebelle que nous appellerons Dina. Et il tenait absolument à être filmé, il voulait que ses gardes, ses collaborateurs le voient. Souvent, il violait un garçon, une fille, tout en discutant avec son entourage. On a retrouvé des cassettes qui dépassent l’imagination… »

Cela, c’était en temps « normal ». Quand, au sommet de sa gloire, il était le « roi des rois » en Afrique, intervenant dans les conflits malien, libérien, tchadien, guinéen, congolais, centrafricain… se créant ainsi un réseau d’influence. Dictateur pervers, pendant plus de quarante ans, il a envoyé ses sbires dans les écoles, les fêtes et les mariages, quand il ne faisait pas les visites lui-même, afin de rabattre les préadolescentes mignonnes. On les enlevait à leurs familles et on les logeait dans les sous-sols humides et nauséabonds de Bab-al-Azizia, à la disposition du « Guide ». « Prépare-la moi ! » ordonnait-il à n’importe quelle heure du jour et de la nuit. Des matrones maquillaient ces gamines, leur faisait porter des strings et des nuisettes que ces ados effrayées n’avaient jamais vus de leur vie. Ensuite, elles les poussaient dans la chambre de « Papa Muammar » qui les déflorait, les battait, les faisait boire, fumer, sniffer, danser pour lui. Comme Soraya qui, sous pseudo, raconte tout à la journaliste Annick Cojean, elles ont été des dizaines, des centaines à se retrouver souillées à jamais, l’école interrompue pour toujours, accros, enrôlées comme soldates au service du chef suprême, ou mariées à un de ses bodyguards. « Très vite, cela s’est su, explique Dina. Alors, les familles, que dis-je, des tribus entières, ont fui le pays. » Car à la moindre résistance, les représailles retombaient sur les proches : père ou frère emprisonné, mère ou sœur violée, etc.

Les violences sexuelles comme arme de guerre… et de paix
Kadhafi ne se satisfaisait pas des enfants de ses sujets, ce malade se servait aussi dans son propre clan. Dina : « Une de ses belles-filles, épouse d’un de ses fils, nous a dit qu’elle avait plus souvent dû céder à son beau-père qu’assurer son devoir conjugal avec son mari. » Et c’est compter sans le droit de cuissage qu’il s’arrogeait pendant la plupart de ses voyages africains. La petite Soraya évoque « des beautés africaines impeccablement maquillées, qui croyaient juste aller saluer le Guide dans ses appartements, et en ressortaient la jupe déchirée et le teint brouillé ». Ce qu’elle ignorait, c’est le cadeau que Kadhafi réservait à ces épouses coopératives : valises de billets ou rivières de diamants. Il aidait les putschistes et les pachas corrompus de l’Afrique, et se servait en retour, côté femmes et côté soldats. On a vu que durant la révolution en 2011, ses mercenaires arrivaient d’une demi-douzaine de pays.

Dès les premières heures du soulèvement populaire, Kadhafi avait décrété que l’arme de guerre majeure contre les insurgés serait le viol des femmes. Il a ordonné de faire livrer par bateau de Dubai des montagnes de Viagra. Et la consigne était martelée non-stop : « Violez-les d’abord, toutes, les vieilles, les fillettes, comme les autres… Ensuite, tuez-les. » Sur une autre cassette, une petite de 10 ou 11 ans est violée devant son père. Et la malheureuse ne crie qu’une chose : « Papa, ne regarde pas, je t’en supplie ! » Insoutenable. Ils sont des milliers de rebelles à avoir reçu ces vidéos sur leurs portables, histoire de faire passer la menace : « Voilà ce qui vous attend. » Et de fait, quand, durant la révolution, Dina s’est rendue dans les camps de réfugiés à la frontière tunisienne, elle a découvert des dizaines d’histoires, de traumatismes quasi insurmontables, sans parler des blessures physiques, des déchirures, des hémorragies chez ces jeunes filles dont la terreur était d’être tombées enceintes.

Mais comment un tel monstre pouvait-il bénéficier de la protection de nos gouvernements occidentaux ? Dina : « Il y a eu beaucoup de tentatives de coups d’Etat durant ces quarante-deux ans. Mais le régime de Kadhafi tenait bon car il était protégé par les Occidentaux qui le trouvaient moins grave que les islamistes. » Selon elle, nos chefs d’Etat européens, américains savaient. Savaient quoi ? « Des esclaves sexuelles de Kadhafi m’ont dit que certains Occidentaux participaient… » On ne peut s’empêcher de se remémorer le « bunga-bunga » de Berlusconi qui fanfaronnait sur ses folles soirées avec le président Kadhafi. Dina : « Lui a participé à ces bacchanales de l’horreur. Les autres, on ne sait pas. »

Aujourd’hui, au bout de quarante-deux ans d’un règne destructeur pour le pays entier, tout est à reconstruire. A commencer par la parole car la honte est terrible dans les familles. Dina : « Beaucoup veulent nous faire taire. On n’a même pas le droit de donner des estimations chiffrées des victimes. Pendant la guerre, elles furent des milliers qui aidaient les insurgés : arrêtées, violées, violentées. Mais pour celles qui ont survécu, c’est souvent la loi du silence. » Deux étudiantes de Tripoli acceptent de rompre ce mutisme : « Capturées, nous avons été conduites, nues, dans une cellule de prison où nous étions 80, toutes nues, pour nous humilier. Un des gardes nous a désignées : “Emmenez ces deux-là au fils, ça lui fera un repas chaud !” Il parlait d’un des fils de Kadhafi (qui sera tué plus tard). Quant aux autres, elles étaient à la disposition de n’importe quel homme, soldat, garde qui passait par là. On n’avait presque rien à manger ni à boire. Certaines sont mortes de faiblesse, de froid, de leurs blessures… » Quand les rebelles victorieux ont commencé à libérer la ville, ils ont ouvert les prisons. Cette porte-là a résisté. « N’ouvrez pas ! Allez d’abord nous chercher des vêtements », criaient-elles affolées. La pudeur plus forte que le traumatisme.

C’est pourquoi Dina a créé un observatoire. « Il ne faut rester dans le déni ! Ce non-dit va pourrir notre vie. Les traces de ce porc vont rester gravées pendant des années. »


Juifs utiles: Plus de juifs, plus d’antisémitisme (Final solution: French essayist comes up with the ultimate solution to antisemitism)

20 février, 2016
Jewish Population in EuropeJewish Population in Europe
Anti-Semitism
Vous ne réfléchissez pas qu’il est dans votre intérêt qu’un seul homme meure pour le peuple, et que la nation entière ne périsse pas. Caïphe
Le peuple d’Israël est le premier, le seul peut-être de tous, qui ait cherché en soi-même la coupable origine de ses malheurs dans le monde. Au plus profond de chaque âme juive se cache ce même penchant à concevoir toute infortune comme un châtiment. Theodor Lessing
Les événements de l’histoire humaine, cette chaîne ininterrompue de changements fortuits du pouvoir et d’actions arbitraires, cet océan de sang, de fiel et de sueur serait insupportable si l’homme ne pouvait leur attribuer un sens. Il ne suffit pas pour lui d’assigner à chaque effet une cause, il lui faut donner un sens à chaque événement ; ainsi lorsqu’il dit  » à qui la faute ? », il a déjà émis un jugement moral. Même si les destins des peuples étaient fortuits et même si tout avait pu être autrement, l’homme n’en continuerait pas moins de chercher à interpréter l’événement au plan de la signification logique et de la valeur morale.  Ce besoin de conférer un sens, même à ce qui n’en a guère (c’est-à-dire une souffrance inexpliquée) intervient de deux manières : soit en faisant retomber la faute sur l’autre, soit en se déclarant soi-même coupable… Theodor Lessing
Tout le monde sait grosso modo ce qu’est un «bouc émissaire»: c’est une personne sur laquelle on fait retomber les torts des autres. Le bouc émissaire (synonyme approximatif: souffre-douleur) est un individu innocent sur lequel va s’acharner un groupe social pour s’exonérer de sa propre faute ou masquer son échec. Souvent faible ou dans l’incapacité de se rebeller, la victime endosse sans protester la responsabilité collective qu’on lui impute, acceptant comme on dit de «porter le chapeau». Il y dans l’Histoire des boucs émissaires célèbres. Dreyfus par exemple a joué ce rôle dans l’Affaire à laquelle il a été mêlé de force: on a fait rejaillir sur sa seule personne toute la haine qu’on éprouvait pour le peuple juif: c’était le «coupable idéal»… Ainsi le bouc émissaire est une «victime expiatoire», une personne qui paye pour toutes les autres: l’injustice étant à la base de cette élection/désignation, on ne souhaite à personne d’être pris pour le bouc émissaire d’un groupe social, quel qu’il soit (peuple, ethnie, entreprise, école, équipe, famille, secte). René Girard
Le peuple juif, ballotté d’expulsion en expulsion, est bien placé, certes, pour mettre les mythes en question et repérer plus vite que tant d’autres peuples les phénomènes victimaires dont il est souvent la victime. Il fait preuve d’une perspicacité exceptionnelle au sujet des foules persécutrices et de leur tendance à se polariser contre les étrangers, les isolés, les infirmes, les éclopés de toutes sortes. Cet avantage chèrement payé ne diminue en rien l’universalité de la vérité publique, il ne nous permet pas de tenir cette vérité pour relative. René Girard
Des « pieux » mensonges de Sartre pour ne pas désespérer Billancourt, couvrant ainsi les crimes communistes dont il devenait complice de fait… aux mensonges et falsifications de la meute anti-israélienne, couvrant ainsi les crimes terroristes arabo-islamistes dont ils se rendent complices, existe-il une différence de nature? (…) De quoi auraient l’air une Sallenave ou un Pascal Boniface ou encore une Leïla Shahid sans l’appoint d’un quelconque supplétif juif? David Dawidowicz
Le cas de Guy Sorman est révélateur, parce qu’il montre bien comment le rejet des origines conduit à douter de l’avenir d’Israël, et à remettre en cause le droit à l’existence de l’Etat juif. L’analyse du discours de Sorman et des autres « Alterjuifs » permet de comprendre la maladie qui atteint aujourd’hui une grande partie de l’establishment politique israélien : le refus d’assumer l’héritage national juif et la haine des origines »(…) Son livre Les Enfants de Rifaa 2, comporte un chapitre intitulé « Fin du peuple juif », dans lequel Sorman fait sienne l’idée de la disparition inéluctable de l’Etat d’Israël et du judaïsme tout entier. (…) Le point de départ de Sorman est la constatation de l’omniprésence de la question de la Palestine chez ses interlocuteurs musulmans (…) qui amène Sorman à s’interroger sur les causes du conflit israélo-arabe et sur les solutions à y apporter. Mais curieusement, alors même qu’il constate avec lucidité que le monde arabo-musulman « vit en fait dans l’attente de la disparition de l’Etat d’Israël », et qu’il ne se fait guère d’illusion sur la « solution andalouse », ce prétendu « âge d’or » des Juifs d’Andalousie que certains de ses interlocuteurs musulmans voudraient faire revivre en Palestine, sur les ruines de l’Etat d’Israël, Sorman ne développe pas son analyse par la revendication d’un nécessaire aggiornamento du monde musulman, sur ce point comme sur les autres précédemment abordés dans son livre. Et, loin d’encourager ses interlocuteurs musulmans à accepter le fait israélien, ce qui serait conforme à l’esprit général de son livre, Sorman en vient à faire siennes les conclusions de ceux-ci et à intérioriser le projet génocidaire du monde arabo-musulman envers Israël. (…) C’est au cours d’une visite dans la ville de Hébron, en l’an 2000, que Sorman a acquis la conviction que l’Etat d’Israël était une « erreur historique », et était voué à disparaître. (…) Cette description de l’arrivée au caveau des Patriarches à Hébron est pétrie de préjugés anti-israéliens, auxquels se mêle une hostilité visible au judaïsme. Tout d’abord, Sorman conteste le nom du tombeau d’Abraham, appellation consacrée de ce lieu depuis des générations. En mettant en doute la véracité de l’inhumation d’Abraham en ce lieu (rapportée par la Bible, dans le Livre de la Genèse), Sorman se conduit un peu comme un touriste béotien qui refuserait, en chaque endroit, d’accepter les traditions historiques et religieuses. Mais c’est contre la seule tradition juive qu’il dirige son scepticisme absolu. (…) Le chapitre des Enfants de Rifaa, intitulé « Fin du peuple juif » est, en réalité, antérieur au reste du livre. (…) l’ébauche de ce chapitre avait fait l’objet d’une tribune publiée dans Le Figaro du 24 décembre 2001. Dans cet article, intitulé « La survie d’Israël en question », Sorman envisageait l’hypothèse de la disparition de l’Etat juif, rayé de la carte par une bombe chimique ou nucléaire. « Ce scénario est réaliste » expliquait Sorman. « Il est probable que quelques Ben Laden l’ont en tête et que New York, ville juive autant que Tel Aviv, fût [sic] une répétition de ce nouvel holocauste possible ». Cette hypothèse l’amenait à s’interroger sur la survie du judaïsme tout entier, menacé de destruction physique en Israël et de disparition lente par assimilation en diaspora. Mais, loin de s’émouvoir de la possible disparition des Juifs, Sorman prétendait « envisageable » un monde sans Juifs, dans lequel subsisteraient, à titre de legs du judaïsme à l’humanité, le christianisme et l’islam, et aussi « l’ironie qui naît de l’exil ». « Peut-être leur œuvre est-elle achevée et les temps sont-ils mûrs pour qu’ils [les Juifs] nous quittent », concluait Sorman. C’est donc l’hypothèse d’une possible disparition de l’Etat d’Israël et du judaïsme de diaspora, d’abord envisagée dans cet article du Figaro, qui a fourni la trame au chapitre 11 des Enfants de Rifaa, intitulé « Fin du peuple juif » (sans point d’interrogation). (…) Sorman (…) choisit d’accepter froidement et sans le moindre regret la possibilité de la disparition de l’Etat d’Israël et du judaïsme tout entier (…) Dans son livre Les Enfants de Rifaa, Sorman va encore plus loin : il ne se contente pas d’envisager froidement la possibilité de la disparition du judaïsme, mais en fait la solution du « problème juif » : « il n’y a pas de bonne solution au fait d’être juif, hormis celle de cesser de l’être». L’attitude de Sorman rejoint celle d’autres juifs atteints de cette maladie très particulière, analysée par le philosophe Theodor Lessing : la haine de soi juive 11. Le cas le plus célèbre de cette pathologie est celui d’Otto Weininger, philosophe autrichien qui a résolu de manière radicale son « problème juif », d’abord en se faisant baptiser, puis en se suicidant à l’âge de vingt trois ans. Sorman, comme Weininger, considère le judaïsme comme un « problème » qu’il faut résoudre, de manière radicale. Il ne veut certes pas se suicider, étant attaché à sa propre vie, mais envisage avec sérénité la destruction de l’Etat d’Israël, qui ne lui apparaît pas comme un scandale (comme à Raymond Aron) mais comme la fin inéluctable de l’entreprise sioniste, vouée à l’échec dès l’origine. Cette conclusion n’est pas tant le fruit d’une réflexion indépendante sur la question juive (à laquelle Sorman ne s’est jamais, de son propre aveu, intéressé) que l’intériorisation du rejet d’Israël par ses interlocuteurs musulmans, rencontrés au cours de ses nombreux voyages. (…) Sorman justifie donc l’espoir de destruction de l’Etat juif, qu’il partage avec ses interlocuteurs musulmans « modérés ». Le raisonnement de Sorman peut se résumer ainsi : le conflit israélo-arabe est insoluble, puisque les musulmans, même modérés, n’accepteront jamais l’existence de l’Etat juif. Il vaut donc mieux que celui-ci disparaisse… Ce syllogisme ressemble à celui qui sous-tend l’attitude d’un Otto Weininger : puisque les antisémites ne m’accepteront jamais et me haïront toujours, il vaut mieux que je disparaisse. Weininger a choisi le suicide comme solution radicale de son « problème juif ». Sorman prône, quant à lui, la disparition d’Israël comme solution du conflit israélo-arabe. (…) L’idée que les Juifs auraient « achevé » leur œuvre et qu’ils pourraient donc disparaître évoque la conception chrétienne traditionnelle du Nouvel Israël ; mais le christianisme pré-conciliaire acceptait au moins que les Juifs subsistent en tant que témoins… Sorman, qui considère comme inéluctable (et même souhaitable) la disparition totale du judaïsme, est par contre convaincu qu’ « il restera toujours des musulmans ». Ainsi, son plaidoyer pour un islam moderne et éclairé prend un sens tout à fait different, au regard de ses positions radicales concernant Israël. Pour lui, l’émergence d’un islam éclairé n’implique absolument pas l’acceptation du fait israélien. (…) Sorman a beau jeu de prétendre que sa conception de la disparition nécessaire d’Israël relève de la spéculation intellectuelle, en écrivant que « Dieu seul sait si cette vision d’Apocalypse est excessive ou fondée »… Sa responsabilité d’intellectuel n’en est pas moins grande. En envisageant froidement la disparition des Juifs de la surface de la terre, Sorman apporte une caution inestimable à ceux qui œuvrent concrètement pour que cette « vision d’Apocalypse » devienne réalité. La thématique des Enfants de Rifaa est tout à fait significative de l’esprit du temps. Invoquer « l’islam des Lumières », faire preuve de compréhension envers les régimes musulmans les plus rétrogrades comme celui de l’Arabie Saoudite, et rejeter dans le même temps Israël du côté des ténèbres, tout en attendant sa prochaine disparition. Le discours d’un Sorman n’est pas sans conséquence : il sert, en effet, de légitimation aux volontés génocidaires des pires ennemis de l’Etat juif, et aux considérations de realpolitik des diplomates du Quai d’Orsay et des autres chancelleries occidentales, qui sont intimement persuadés, comme la majorité des interlocuteurs musulmans de Sorman, que l’Etat d’Israël est provisoire et qu’il aura bientôt disparu. Chaque époque a les intellectuels qu’elle mérite. En juin 1967, l’ombre d’Auschwitz, qui planait sur Israël, avait conduit de nombreux écrivains français, juifs et non juifs, à prendre la défense du petit Etat hébreu menacé de destruction. Quarante ans plus tard, il est beaucoup plus « tendance », pour un écrivain français, de célébrer « l’Islam des Lumières », de chanter les louanges de la charia, tout en prédisant la prochaine disparition d’Israël et des Juifs. P.I. Lurçat
D’abord à partir des années 2000, l’intégrisme islamique s’en est pris aux Français juifs qui jouissaient  jusqu’alors pleinement de leur appartenance à la nation française et de la protection dont peuvent se prévaloir tous les citoyens. La pression agressive que l’islamisme en France a fait peser sur eux, en toute impunité puisque l’origine du mal n’a jamais été mentionnée par nos dirigeants, a de facto scindée notre nation en deux. Ceux qui bénéficiaient de la protection de notre pays et ceux dont cette protection n’était plus totalement garantie dans les faits. Il s’agit donc d’une première dégradation infligée à notre pays, incapable de trouver en lui-même la volonté de défendre une partie de sa population dont la valeur symbolique est cependant très grande de par le pacte bicentenaire scellé entre la France, sa République et les juifs de notre pays. La France, première nation à leur reconnaître la pleine citoyenneté, tandis que ceux-ci  reconnaissaient et acceptaient pleinement leurs devoirs envers elle. Le symbole est d’autant plus fort que cette appartenance pleine et entière a donné à notre République, dès l’origine, un contenu concret au mot « Fraternité » de sa devise, ainsi que l’avait voulu Bonaparte, puis Napoléon. C’est cette Fraternité qui a été attaquée et mise à mal par les islamistes dans une presque totale   indifférence générale. Le symbole est également d’autant plus fort trois-quarts de siècle à peine après la trahison de Vichy, et alors que tout le monde avait dit « plus jamais ça ». Ainsi les Français juifs se retrouvèrent en première ligne dans l’affrontement que l’islam radical a déclenché contre notre pays. Tout en assouvissant leur passion hideuse antisémite, il s’agissait  de montrer que nous n’avons pas le courage de nos meilleures résolutions, que nous ne sommes pas à la hauteur de notre devise nationale, à la hauteur de notre histoire, que nous n’avons plus aucune valeur à défendre si ce n’est, chacun d’entre nous, sa propre vie, sa propre situation personnelle. Le contraire d’une nation rassemblée. Or, l’intégration du judaïsme à la France peut servir de modèle à l’intégration de l’islam à la France, et c’est ce modèle même que l’islamisme cherche à détruire. Puis, l’islam radical s’en est pris à ceux qui s’expriment, par le dessin avec Charlie, le cinéma avec Theo van Gogh, sans compter tous ceux qui ont été menacés de mort, des écrivains, des philosophes. Michel Houellebecq, avant de publier son dernier livre, l’a fait relire par des experts en radicalisme islamique pour s’assurer que sa vie ne sera pas trop menacée. L’intimidation et la menace se sont ainsi portées sur les voix capables d’exprimer les réalités que nos politiques feignaient de ne pas voir. Le front s’est donc ainsi étendu sur le champ de la parole et de la culture. Les attentats du Bataclan l’ont étendu à la population toute entière. Le déni commence à se dissiper partiellement, les politiques ne pouvant pas passer ces attentats par pertes et profits comme cela a été le cas avec Charlie. Néanmoins, ils peinent à en tirer toutes les conclusions. (…) Le contexte général est la montée mondiale de l’intégrisme islamique dans de nombreux pays à majorité ou à forte population musulmane, dont l’origine tient, au moins en partie, à l’idéologie wahhabite, au salafisme ou encore à celle des Frères musulmans qui se répandent par tout un réseau d’associations culturelles, de mosquées, de publications. L’état d’esprit de rejet de l’autre et de conquête qui en résulte chez les intégristes, n’a pas jusqu’alors rencontré la résistance nécessaire grâce à l’arme de la culpabilisation occidentale, à l’aide des complices de l’islamisme qui infusent la haine de soi depuis des décennies et à une grande lâcheté ou un grand désarroi de nos dirigeants.  (…) La notion de droits individuels qui tend à supplanter tout autre impératif collectif dans notre société a étendu le champ du droit au détriment du champ politique. C’est une tendance séculaire magistralement décrite par Jean-Claude Michéa dans un texte sur le libéralisme politique, de ses origines, à la fin des guerres de religions, jusqu’à aujourd’hui. Dès lors, il est de plus en plus difficile d’opposer des valeurs collectives à ce qui est présenté comme des revendications de droits individuels. Il suffit donc de présenter les revendications de l’islam politique comme étant de simples revendications de nouveaux droits individuels, tout en jouant sur toute une palette de sentiments que les intégristes musulmans connaissent parfaitement lorsqu’ils exercent leurs pressions sur nos édiles pour faire reculer le champ républicain, le champ national :  la culpabilité du représentant de la « puissance coloniale », la crainte de désordres éventuels que l’interlocuteur prétend pouvoir contrôler et calmer alors qu’il en est l’un des principaux organisateurs, le désir d’être réélu… (…) L’affaiblissement des élus et de tous les acteurs qui sont en première ligne est bien sûr aggravé par le discours général d’une partie des responsables politiques nationaux, de la presse parisienne et des radios et télévisions publiques et privées, ainsi que d’un grand nombre d’associations qu’elles relaient complaisamment. Certaines de ces associations dénigrent, dégradent, rabaissent tout ce que la France représente, toute prétention de sa part à une légitimité historique et politique et donc à représenter l’avenir. C’est le discours sur « la France rance ». Il devient dès lors de plus en plus difficile d’intégrer et d’assimiler à la nation des populations à qui l’on explique que leurs ancêtres ont été maltraités par une  France haineuse et dont les représentants d’aujourd’hui seraient les héritiers qui n’ont rien appris ni rien oublié. Les intégristes islamistes remplissent ainsi le champ politique abandonné par la France, et en repoussent progressivement les limites, en jouant donc sur la notion d’extension des droits individuels. Ce mouvement s’appuie sur l’habitude de notre société de toujours céder aux exigences de nouveaux droits individuels et sur la délégitimation de l’exigence du respect de valeurs collectives. Il s’appuie aussi sur le fait que le communautarisme tend, par construction, à amalgamer les individus à leur communauté supposée. Changer la règle pour une communauté donnée, dans l’esprit de certains de nos édiles, revient à donner des droits individuels à chacun de ses membres. Notre pays suit ainsi le chemin inverse qui avait été le sien lors de sa construction. La nation devient le cadre oppressif dont il faut se défaire pour recréer des communautés – des féodalités – émancipatrices de la nation. Pendant longtemps, l’islamisme violent, celui qui commet des attentats, celui qui tue, et l’intégrisme islamique ont évolué dans une relative indépendance l’un de l’autre. D’abord parce que l’islamisme violent, le djihadisme, n’existait pas chez nous. La montée de l’antisémitisme depuis les années 2000, la progression du communautarisme et le recul de la République ne sont ainsi pas la conséquence du djihadisme, mais du travail de sape constant de l’intégrisme islamique, du progrès de son discours et des progrès de la force de son emprise sur un nombre croissant de personnes. L’émergence du djihadisme est beaucoup plus récente, et on peut la faire remonter à Merah, même s’il y a eu de lâches et odieux  assassinats aux motivations antisémites auparavant, dont Ilan Halimi. Un objectif commun anime les intégristes musulmans et les djihadistes : l’extension de l’islam comme force politique supplantant la France républicaine, même si les méthodes sont différentes. Les discours des uns fournissent le substrat de la radicalisation des autres. Les djihadistes peuvent compter sur la complicité des intégristes, ou du moins de la partie la plus radicale d’entre eux, pour les cacher, les nourrir, les aider à mener une vie normale jusqu’au passage à l’acte, et leur fournir la logistique pour le faire. Sans cela, Salah Abdeslam aurait été arrêté depuis longtemps, alors que les polices belges et européennes continuent à le chercher. Il y a un continuum entre le simple rejet, la haine et la  radicalisation la plus extrémiste. Néanmoins, jusqu’alors, les deux phénomènes ont agi de manière relativement indépendante l’un de l’autre. Les menaces de mort dont une femme politique du Val d’Oise (Laurence Marchand-Taillade est secrétaire nationale du PRG, ndlr) est la cible annonce la convergence de leurs actions. Celle-ci a dénoncé la tenue d’un rassemblement de l’UOIF en présence de Tariq Ramadan. On peut trouver en effet dans ces rassemblements de nombreux intégristes aux discours incompatibles avec nos valeurs nationales et républicaines. Ces menaces djihadistes contre Laurence Marchand-Taillade annoncent ainsi que le djihadisme vient en support direct de l’intégrisme, en intimidant et en menaçant de faire taire ses opposants de manière définitive. Dorénavant, les personnes qui s’opposeront légalement et démocratiquement aux entreprises antidémocratiques, antirépublicaines et antifrançaises des intégristes tels que les Frères musulmans, feront l’objet des mêmes menaces de mort de la part des djihadistes, dont on sait qu’elles peuvent effectivement être mises à l’exécution. Cela rend la lutte contre l’islamisme radical, ainsi que le renforcement de notre détermination à défendre nos valeurs et nos institutions d’autant plus nécessaires et urgents. Robert Louis Norrès
In 1939, there were 16.6 million Jews worldwide, and a majority of them – 9.5 million, or 57% – lived in Europe, according to DellaPergola’s estimates. By the end of World War II, in 1945, the Jewish population of Europe had shrunk to 3.8 million, or 35% of the world’s 11 million Jews. About 6 million European Jews were killed during the Holocaust, according to common estimates. Since then, the global Jewish population – estimated by Pew Research at 14 million as of 2010 – has risen, but it is still smaller than it was before the Holocaust. And in the decades since 1945, the Jewish population in Europe has continued to decline. In 1960, it was about 3.2 million; by 1991, it fell to 2 million, according to DellaPergola’s estimates. Now, there are about 1.4 million Jews in Europe – just 10% of the world’s Jewish population, and 0.2% of Europe’s total population. Measuring Jewish populations, especially in places like Europe and the United States where Jews are a small minority, is fraught with difficulty. This is due to the complexity both of measuring small populations and of Jewish identity, which can be defined by ethnicity or religion. As a result, estimates vary, but Pew Research’s recent figures are similar to those reported by DellaPergola, one of the world’s leading experts on Jewish demography. In Eastern Europe, a once large and vibrant Jewish population has nearly disappeared. DellaPergola estimates that there were 3.4 million Jews in the European portions of the Soviet Union as of 1939. Many were killed in the Holocaust, and others moved to Israel or elsewhere. Today, a tiny fraction of the former Soviet republics’ population – an estimated 310,000 people – are Jews. Similar trends have occurred in Eastern European countries that were outside the USSR, including Poland, Hungary, Romania and several other nations. Collectively, they were home to about 4.7 million Jews in 1939, but now there are probably fewer than 100,000 Jews in all these countries combined. Much of the postwar decline has been a result of emigration to Israel, which declared its independence as a Jewish state in 1948. The Jewish population of Israel has grown from about half a million in 1945 to 5.6 million in 2010. But there are other possible factors in the decline of European Jewry, including intermarriage and cultural assimilation. Pew Research
Il faut savoir que le CCIF comptabilisait à l’époque comme «actes islamophobes» des faits aussi divers qu’une question posée à une jeune femme voilée lors d’un entretien à l’ANPE, des règlements de compte crapuleux, des vols relevant du simple droit commun, des propos jugés insultants et, beaucoup plus graves, des expulsions de prédicateurs violemment antisémites et appelant au djihad contre les infidèles et l’Occident, voire en lien avec des entreprises terroristes. (…) Je tiens ici à préciser que parmi les 806 actes antisémites constatés sur à peine 1 % de la population, il y a eu en 2015 quatre victimes juives massacrées à l’HyperCasher parce qu’elles étaient juives – et que la policière Clarissa Jean-Philippe a été abattue parce qu’elle était postée à proximité d’une synagogue et d’une école juive, ainsi que plusieurs agressions au couteau particulièrement graves, destinées à tuer et ayant entraîné des blessures sanglantes, portées dans la rue contre des concitoyens juifs parce que juifs. (…) Je pense d’ailleurs que l’on gagnerait en sérénité si, plutôt que se saisir de faits dont on ignore les causes et de les relayer dans tous les médias, on les considérait non pas en raison du nombre de plaintes déposées, mais après résultat d’enquêtes. Il faudrait analyser dans le détail les dates, les faits, les auteurs et les motivations. Peut-être conviendrait-il aussi d’étudier de près les menaces et les discours que des prédicateurs proches des courants fréristes, salafistes, wahhabites délivrent à leurs fidèles ou lancent contre des personnalités dont le seul tort est de s’exprimer. N’oublions jamais qu’être accusé d’être islamophobe tue. Isabelle Kersimon
« Dionysos contre le ‘crucifié’  » : la voici bien l’opposition. Ce n’est pas une différence quant au martyr – mais celui-ci a un sens différent. La vie même, son éternelle fécondité, son éternel retour, détermine le tourment, la destruction, la volonté d’anéantir pour Dionysos. Dans l’autre cas, la souffrance, le « crucifié » en tant qu’il est « innocent », sert d’argument contre cette vie, de formulation de sa condamnation.  (…) L’individu a été si bien pris au sérieux, si bien posé comme un absolu par le christianisme, qu’on ne pouvait plus le sacrifier : mais l’espèce ne survit que grâce aux sacrifices humains… La véritable philanthropie exige le sacrifice pour le bien de l’espèce – elle est dure, elle oblige à se dominer soi-même, parce qu’elle a besoin du sacrifice humain. Et cette pseudo-humanité qui s’institue christianisme, veut précisément imposer que personne ne soit sacrifié. Nietzsche
Dans sa dernière signification, l’émancipation juive consiste à émanciper l’humanité du judaïsme. Marx
Déposséder un peuple de l’homme qu’il célèbre comme le plus grand de ses fils est une tâche sans agrément et qu’on n’accomplit pas d’un cœur léger, surtout quand on appartient soi-même à ce peuple.  Freud
C’est la communauté juive qui détruit toujours cet ordre. Elle provoque constamment la révolte du faible contre le fort, de la bestialité contre l’intelligence, de la quantité contre qualité. Il a fallu quatorze siècles au christianisme pour atteindre le sommet de la sauvagerie et de la stupidité. Nous aurions donc tort de pécher par excès de confiance et proclamer notre victoire définitive sur le bolchevisme. Plus nous rendrons les Juifs incapables de nous nuire, plus nous nous protégerons de ce danger. Le Juif joue dans la nature le rôle d’un élément catalyseur. Un peuple débarrassé de ses Juifs retourne spontanément à l’ordre naturel. Adolf Hitler
Le coup le plus dur qui ait jamais frappé l’humanité fut l’avènement du christianisme. Le bolchevisme est un enfant illégitime du christianisme. Tous deux sont des inventions du Juif. C’est par le christianisme que le mensonge délibéré en matière de religion a été introduit dans le monde. Le bolchevisme pratique un mensonge de même nature quand il prétend apporter la liberté aux hommes, alors qu’en réalité il ne veut faire d’eux que des esclaves. Dans le monde antique, les relations entre les hommes et les dieux étaient fondées sur un respect instinctif. C’était un monde éclairé par l’idée de tolérance. Le christianisme fut la première croyance dans le monde à exterminer ses adversaires au nom de l’amour. Sa marque est l’intolérance.  Adolf Hitler (Libres propos sur la guerre et la paix recueillis sur l’ordre de Martin Bormann, 11-12 juillet 1941)
Le christianisme est une rébellion contre la loi naturelle, une protestation contre la nature. Poussé à sa logique extrême, le christianisme signifierait la culture systématique de l’échec humain. […] Mais il n’est pas question que le national-socialisme se mette un jour à singer la religion en établissant une forme de culte. Sa seule ambition doit être de construire scientifiquement une doctrine qui ne soit rien de plus qu’un hommage à la raison […] Il n’est donc pas opportun de nous lancer maintenant dans un combat avec les Églises. Le mieux est de laisser le christianisme mourir de mort naturelle. Une mort lente a quelque chose d’apaisant. Le dogme du christianisme s’effrite devant les progrès de la science. La religion devra faire de plus en plus de concessions. Les mythes se délabrent peu à peu. Il ne reste plus qu’à prouver que dans la nature il n’existe aucune frontière entre l’organique et l’inorganique. Quand la connaissance de l’univers se sera largement répandue, quand la plupart des hommes sauront que les étoiles ne sont pas des sources de lumière mais des mondes, peut-être des mondes habités comme le nôtre, alors la doctrine chrétienne sera convaincue d’absurdité […] Tout bien considéré, nous n’avons aucune raison de souhaiter que les Italiens et les Espagnols se libèrent de la drogue du christianisme. Soyons les seuls à être immunisés contre cette maladie. Adolf Hitler (Libres propos sur la guerre et la paix recueillis sur l’ordre de Martin Bormann, , 10-14 octobre 1941)
Il n’y avait qu’un seul juif honnête, et il s’est suicidé. Adolf Hitler
J’ai été allemand à un tel point que je ne m’en rends vraiment compte qu’aujourd’hui. Fritz Haber
On a peine à imaginer qu’une nation de fugitifs issus du peuple le plus longtemps persécuté dans l’histoire de l’humanité, ayant subi les pires humiliations et le pire mépris, soit capable de se transformer en deux générations en peuple dominateur et sûr de lui, et à l’exception d’une admirable minorité en peuple méprisant ayant satisfaction à humilier. Les juifs d’Israël, descendants des victimes d’un apartheid nommé ghetto, ghettoîsent les palestiniens. Les juifs qui furent humiliés, méprisés, persécutés, humilient, méprisent, persécutent les palestiniens. Les juifs qui furent victimes d’un ordre impitoyable imposent leur ordre impitoyable aux palestiniens. Les juifs victimes de l’inhumanité montrent une terrible inhumanité . Les juifs, boucs émissaires de tous les maux, ‹ bouc-émissarisent › Arafat et l’Autorité palestinienne, rendus responsables d’attentats qu’on les empêche d’empêcher. Edgar Morin
Pour moi, l’image correspondait à la réalité de la situation non seulement à Gaza, mais aussi en Cisjordanie. L’armée israélienne ripostait au soulèvement palestinien par l’utilisation massive de tirs à balles réelles. (…) Du 29 septembre à la fin octobre 2000, 118 Palestiniens sont morts, parmi eux 33 avaient moins de 18 ans. Onze Israéliens ont été tués, tous adultes. Charles Enderlin
A Gaza et dans les territoires occupés, ils ont [les meurtres de violées] représenté deux tiers des homicides » (…) Les femmes palestiniennes violées par les soldats israéliens sont systématiquement tuées par leur propre famille. Ici, le viol devient un crime de guerre, car les soldats israéliens agissent en parfaite connaissance de cause. Sara Daniel (Le Nouvel Observateur, le 8 novembre 2001)
Changez les noms. Mettez ici à la place d’Itzhak Shamir et de Menahem Begin, anciens terroristes promus chefs de gouvernement, quelques noms de Palestiniens emprisonnés ou pourchassés, et vous ne perdrez pas tout espoir de voir un jour la paix. Régis Debray
J’ai trouvé des minorités chrétiennes assaillies par la violence, par l’exode, la dénatalité, le chômage. Entre l’étau israélien et l’hostilité islamique, ils sont suspects pour tout le monde. L’Occident les lâche : trop arabes pour la droite et trop chrétiens pour la gauche. Ce sont pourtant eux qui ont modernisé le monde arabe. Au Xe siècle, ils ont traduit en arabe la culture grecque et au XXe, ils ont été à la pointe de la laïcisation. Ils ont joué un peu le même rôle que les Juifs en Occident au XIXe et subissent un antichristianisme qui rappelle l’antisémitisme d’antan. Et l’invasion américaine en Irak a empiré la donne, en provoquant l’exode massif des chrétiens assimilés à une cinquième colonne. M. Bush a pour ainsi dire islamisé à mort toute la région. (…) Il est grotesque et contre-productif de couper les ponts avec ces forces-là. Nous entretenons leur expansion. Les Américains bien sûr, mais aussi les Européens qui se cachent derrière eux. La religion prend la relève d’une faillite des mouvements laïcs, à laquelle nous avons contribué. (…) Je suis partagé entre mon admiration éthico-intellectuelle pour un formidable exploit de modernité laïque et suis rebuté par la remontée d’un nationalisme théologique qui fait revenir au premier plan l’archaïque et le tribal. Quand je vois des colons, francophones ou américains, arborer devant le mur des Lamentations I am a superjew et faire les fiers-à-bras en tee-shirt devant les Arabes, je suis consterné. (…) L’Europe paie largement l’Autorité palestinienne et ses 150 000 fonctionnaires. Elle finance aussi les infrastructures des Territoires, routes, écoles, hôpitaux. Israël les démolit régulièrement. L’Europe paie et se tait ! Elle aurait pu conditionner son aide à l’Autorité, qui soulage l’occupant, au respect des accords et du calendrier en Cisjordanie, où la colonisation continue de plus belle. L’Europe s’offre une bonne conscience avec de l’humanitaire. Pourtant, sortir de sa passivité serait servir les intérêts à long terme d’Israël. Mais l’Europe ne peut pas se distinguer de l’Amérique pour des raisons historiques : elle craint de se faire taxer d’antisémitisme. Régis Debray (2009)
Ils ont tout, c’est connu. Vous êtes passé par le centre-ville de Metz ? Toutes les bijouteries appartiennent aux juifs. On le sait, c’est tout. Vous n’avez qu’à lire les noms israéliens sur les enseignes. Vous avez regardé une ancienne carte de la Palestine et une d’aujourd’hui ? Ils ont tout colonisé. Maintenant c’est les bijouteries. Ils sont partout, sauf en Chine parce que c’est communiste. Tous les gouvernements sont juifs, même François Hollande. Le monde est dirigé par les francs-maçons et les francs-maçons sont tous juifs. Ce qui est certain c’est que l’argent injecté par les francs-maçons est donné à Israël. Sur le site des Illuminatis, le plus surveillé du monde, tout est écrit. (…) On se renseigne mais on ne trouve pas ces infos à la télévision parce qu’elle appartient aux juifs aussi. Si Patrick Poivre d’Arvor a été jeté de TF1 alors que tout le monde l’aimait bien, c’est parce qu’il a été critique envers Nicolas Sarkozy, qui est juif… (…)  Mais nous n’avons pas de potes juifs. Pourquoi ils viendraient ici ? Ils habitent tous dans des petits pavillons dans le centre, vers Queuleu. Ils ne naissent pas pauvres. Ici, pour eux, c’est un zoo, c’est pire que l’Irak. Peut-être que si j’habitais dans le centre, j’aurais des amis juifs, mais je ne crois pas, je n’ai pas envie. J’ai une haine profonde. Pour moi, c’est la pire des races. Je vous le dis du fond du cœur, mais je ne suis pas raciste, c’est un sentiment. Faut voir ce qu’ils font aux Palestiniens, les massacres et tout. Mais bon, on ne va pas dire que tous les juifs sont des monstres. Pourquoi vouloir réunir les juifs et les musulmans ? Tout ça c’est politique. Cela ne va rien changer. C’est en Palestine qu’il faut aller, pas en France. Karim
Ce sont les cerveaux du monde. Tous les tableaux qui sont exposés au centre Pompidou appartiennent à des juifs. A Metz, tous les avocats et les procureurs sont juifs. Ils sont tous hauts placés et ils ne nous laisseront jamais monter dans la société. « Ils ont aussi Coca-Cola. Regardez une bouteille de Coca-Cola, quand on met le logo à l’envers on peut lire : « Non à Allah, non au prophète ». C’est pour cela que les arabes ont inventé le « Mecca-cola ». Au McDo c’est pareil. Pour chaque menu acheté, un euro est reversé à l’armée israélienne. Les juifs, ils ont même coincé les Saoudiens. Ils ont inventé les voitures électriques pour éviter d’acheter leur pétrole. C’est connu. On se renseigne. (…) Si Mohamed Merah n’avait pas été tué par le Raid, le Mossad s’en serait chargé. Il serait venu avec des avions privés. Ali
It’s often claimed that there’s… no causal nexus between Israeli actions and anti-Semitism, that you can’t blame it on Israel, that there’s no connection between the… spikes in Israeli violence against Palestinians and the upticks in anti-Semitic violence. When in fact if you go through the evidence collected over many years, that’s exactly what the evidence does show: each time Israel launches another of its murderous assaults, anti-semitic incidents peak in Europe. And they’re often perpetrated by disaffected angry Muslim youth. If in recent times, a larger fraction of these incidents are violent, it’s the blowback from the brutish fanaticism currently plaguing the Arab Muslim world. Now if you’re really concerned about these spurts of anti-Semitism, and you want to contain them, then there are obvious things you can do. Israel can simply stop calling itself a Jewish state, so Jews wouldn’t have to bear the burden for its criminal actions. And … official Jewish organizations in the diaspora, they could cease defending Israel’s criminal actions so it won’t appear as if Israel when it carries out these actions is acting in the name of the Jewish people. Norman Finkelstein
Deborah E. Lipstadt makes far too little of the relationship between Israel’s policies in the West Bank and Gaza and growing anti-Semitism in Europe and beyond. The trend to which she alludes parallels the carnage in Gaza over the last five years, not to mention the perpetually stalled peace talks and the continuing occupation of the West Bank. As hope for a two-state solution fades and Palestinian casualties continue to mount, the best antidote to anti-Semitism would be for Israel’s patrons abroad to press the government of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu for final-status resolution to the Palestinian question. Rev. Bruce M. Shipman (Yale, Groton, Conn., Aug. 21, 2014)
Que le Président Nasser veuille ouvertement détruire un Etat membre des Nations Unies ne trouble pas la conscience délicate de Mme Nehru. Etacide, biensûr, n’est pas génocide. Et les Juifs français qui ont donné leur âme à tous les révolutionnaires noirs, bruns ou jaunes hurlent maintenant de douleur pendant que leurs amis hurlent à la mort. Je souffre comme eux, avec eux, quoi qu’ils aient dit ou fait, non parce que nous sommes devenus sionistes ou israéliens, mais parce que monte en nous un mouvement irrésistible de solidarité. Peu importe d’où il vient. Si les grandes puissances, selon le calcul froid de leurs intérêts, laissaient détruire le petit Etat qui n’est pas le mien, ce crime, modeste à l’échelle du nombre, m’enlèverait la force de vivre et je crois que des milliers et des milliers d’hommes auraient honte de l’humanité. Raymond Aron (Le Figaro littéraire, 4 juin 1967)
Parmi ce peuple, qui va se restreignant et se dissolvant, les citoyens de l’Etat d’Israël ne représentent à leur tour que la minorité d’une minorité. Si bien que ce qui est en jeu au Proche-Orient n’est pas tant le sort des Palestiniens que la disparition programmée d’Israël, comme Etat, comme peuple, comme porteur d’un message si message il y a. Au rebours des images, des violences, du bruit des armes et des commentaires dominants, à la mesure de l’histoire, le fort n’est donc pas celui que l’on croit et le faible n’est pas celui que l’on dit. Qu’est-ce en effet qu’une riposte israélienne aussi brutale soit-elle contre des Palestiniens que l’on qualifiera au choix de résistants ou terroristes? Au mieux du temps gagné. Mais à la mesure de l’histoire, pas même de l’histoire longue mais d’une génération, que pèsent trois millions d’Israéliens face à deux cents millions d’Arabes dont les Palestiniens ne constituent qu’une phalange avancée et militante. Les Palestiniens le savent et le monde arabe plus encore; à terme, le nombre l’emporte et la démographie sera probablement victorieuse sur toutes les stratégies et tous les pieux espoirs («processus») de paix. Quelle paix d’ailleurs?Imagine-t-on vraiment les Palestiniens et le monde arabe se satisfaisant d’un Etat-croupion, enclavé et non viable? L’Etat palestinien peut incarner l’espoir d’une élite locale en quête de reconnaissance internationale et de postes, mais en quoi le peuple palestinien y trouverait-il son compte, économique ou politique? L’aspiration ultime du monde arabo-musulman est de constituer la communauté des croyants sinon de l’islam tout entier mais au moins celle du monde arabe, une aspiration parfaitement légitime. Mais Israël n’y a pas sa place, la colonie juive est comme une encoche dans ce rêve; nulle surprise que ce songe arabe, légitime, répétons-le, ne conçoive pas Israël comme autre chose qu’un avatar de la colonisation franque; le royaume de Jérusalem dura un siècle, les Arabes se le rappellent. L’Israël moderne aurait-il déjà accompli la moitié de son parcours historique? Ou plus peut-être? Car il suffirait d’une bombe, une seule, chimique, nucléaire ou sale comme l’appellent aujourd’hui les stratèges pour qu’Israël soit rayé de la carte. Imaginons un instant l’équivalent de l’attentat du 11 septembre perpétré contre Tel-Aviv? Rien n’est moins simple désormais que de le concevoir puisque le précédent existe; les combustibles sont en libre circulation et le nombre des candidats au suicide à l’évidence plus que suffisant. Une bombe suffirait donc pour que disparaisse la plus grande part de la population d’Israël et que le reste fuit sans attendre son extermination finale. Ce scénario est réaliste; il est probable que quelques Ben Laden l’ont en tête et que New York, ville juive autant que Tel-Aviv, fut une répétition de ce nouvel holocauste possible. Que dirait alors le monde, ou «la communauté internationale?» Comme pour l’holocauste précédent, ils s’en repentiraient. Pourrait-on empêcher cela, le prévenir? On n’en prend pas le chemin puisque tout se passe, au niveau diplomatique et de l’opinion alimentée par les médias comme si une paix de type immobilier suffirait à mettre un terme à un conflit que l’on voudrait croire géographique mais qui est au moins métaphysique. La survie d’Israël et non pas celle des Palestiniens n’est pas véritablement prise en considération; elle supposerait d’ailleurs un accord non pas avec les seuls Palestiniens mais avec tous les Etats arabes environnants dont on ne voit pas qu’ils sont même sollicités pour respecter la survie d’Israël; au surplus, conclura-t-on jamais un traité respecté entre les arrière-pensées?. Juifs sans Israël?Si Israël disparaissait, il n’y aurait plus d’Israéliens. Resterait-il des juifs?La diaspora, avons-nous observé, est la condition historique quasi normale du peuple juif; n’a-t-il pas survécu deux mille ans en diaspora? Mais le monde a changé et les juifs aussi; aux Etats-Unis, en Europe, en Russie, en Argentine, les ultimes grandes communautés en exil, le taux des mariages mixtes évolue entre 50 et 70%; si les enfants de mères juives restent techniquement juifs si l’on peut dire, les enfants des hommes qui ne le sont pas cessent d’appartenir au peuple juif. (…) Imaginera-t-on un monde sans juifs? Pourquoi pas? Claude Lévi-Strauss interrogé sur cette perspective fit observer que les peuples disparus jonchent l’Histoire de l’humanité et qu’il s’en fallut de peu pour que les nazis ne réussissent leur pari d’extermination. Si les juifs disparaissaient, hors quelques sectes intégristes subsidiaires, qu’auraient-ils légué au monde? Le christianisme tout d’abord et aussi paradoxalement l’islam; sans les juifs, sans la Bible, pas de Christ, pas de Mahomet. Le judaïsme survivrait donc pour l’éternité prévisible chez ceux-là mêmes qui voudraient s’en défaire. Un autre legs aussi: l’ironie qui naît de l’exil. Parce que les juifs sont en exil, quel que soit le lieu où ils habitent, ils ont toujours porté sur le monde un regard distancié, qui éclaire leur humour insupportable et les théories qui en sont nées. Si tant de juifs ont interprété le monde autrement que du premier regard, de Freud à Marx, de Schomberg à Kandinsky, ce n’est pas du fait d’un génie particulier, mais parce qu’ils ont toujours occupé par rapport à ce monde une situation oblique. Ce décalage conduit à voir autrement ou à apercevoir une vérité qui porte au-delà de la réalité. Un monde sans juifs est-il envisageable? Il resterait alors le souvenir des juifs et une interprétation du monde qui n’eut pas été la même sans leur faculté de le décoder. Peut-être leur oeuvre est-elle achevée et les temps sont mûrs pour qu’ils nous quittent. Telle est du moins l’interrogation fondamentale que devrait susciter la fin possible d’Israël comme nation et celle de la diaspora qui va se dissolvant dans les étreintes conjugales. Cette jérémiade est-elle infondée? Dieu seul le sait. Guy Sorman
Où que l’on se trouve dans le monde musulman, quelle que soit la distance géographique qui sépare de la Palestine, la question surgit, même quand on voudrait l’éviter. Certes, plus on s’éloigne du monde arabe, vers le Bangladesh, Djakarta ou l’Afrique au sud du Sahara, les musulmans passent de l’engagement à l’inquiétude, de la posture à la rhétorique… Mais ne nions pas que, outre le Coran, les musulmans estiment avoir la Palestine en commun. (…) Certains événements minuscules ou cocasses modifient radicalement le regard que l’on porte sur le monde. Avant Hébron, je ne m’étais jamais trop interrogé sur l’Etat d’Israël : on ne peut penser à tout. Depuis Hébron j’ai une conviction bien ancrée : l’Etat d’Israël est une erreur historique, les Juifs n’avaient pas vocation à créer un Etat. (…) « Etes-vous juif ? » Au cours de ma déjà longue existence protégée d’intellectuel français né après l’Holocauste, cette question ne me fut jamais posée qu’une seule fois, sur un mode agressif. C’était en Palestine, en l’an 2000, à l’entrée de la ville d’Hébron… Le soldat était un Israélien d’origine éthiopienne : un Falacha, reconnu comme Juif en un temps où Israël manquait d’immigrés nouveaux pour meubler les bas échelons de la nation. Les Russes n’étaient pas encore arrivés !  (…) A l’entrée du tombeau dit d’Abraham, il me fallut à nouveau arbitrer entre les trois confessions issues de cet ancêtre… Je fus un instant tenté par l’islam chiite ; mon compagnon palestinien m’en dissuada. Je m’en retournai donc au judaïsme et empruntai le chemin réservé à ma race. A l’intérieur du sépulcre, chaque armée protégeait les siens . (…) il n’y a pas de bonne solution au fait d’être juif, hormis celle de cesser de l’être. (…) Pour ceux qui veulent bien écouter les Arabes, l’attente de la fin d’Israël, active ou contemplative, reflète une conviction profonde. Peu le disent, de crainte de passer pour des extrémistes ; tous le pensent plus ou moins confusément. Dans l’Egypte en paix avec Israël depuis plus de 20 ans, les plus tolérants font preuve de patience, tout en nourrissant l’espoir que leur pays ne sera pas impliqué dans la disparition d’Israël. (…) Les modérés à la manière de Hassan Hanafi se demandent pour quelle obscure raison les Juifs s’accrochent à ce lambeau de terre si inhospitalier, alors que le monde est si vaste et qu’un grand nombre d’Israéliens, en sus de leur passeport israélien, ont une nationalité en réserve : française, américaine, argentine, etc. On se le demande aussi. (…) Un monde sans Juifs est envisageable ; il y subsisterait le souvenir des Juifs, une interprétation du monde qui n’eût pas été possible sans leur faculté de le décoder. Peut-être leur œuvre est-elle achevée et les temps sont-ils mûrs pour qu’ils se dissolvent dans l’Occident ? (…) En revanche, il restera toujours des musulmans, Que cette vision d’Apocalypse sur la fin des Juifs soit excessive ou fondée, Dieu seul le sait. (…) La charia s’y applique : il arrive que l’on coupe en public la main d’un voleur ; certaines femmes adultères auraient été liquidées, sans témoins. Il faut s’en émouvoir, tout en sachant qu’en pratique ces châtiments publics sont rares, car les voleurs peu nombreux.  Guy Sorman (Les enfants de Rifaa)
Pour conclure sur une note moins optimiste, force est d’admettre que les nations semblent ne pas pouvoir se passer d’un bouc émissaire. Dans ce rôle tragique, l’Arabe n’a-t-il pas remplacé le Juif ? C’est envisageable et ceci invite à lutter contre l’islamophobie sans attendre une Shoah ou une affaire Dreyfus. Je ne néglige pas le “radicalisme islamique”, mais voila un tout autre sujet. Guy Sorman
On m’objectera, en France surtout, où la communauté juive est en majorité issue d’Afrique du Nord, que des Juifs sont victimes d’actes criminels. Rarissimes, ils sont commis par de jeunes Arabes qui reconstituent, dans leurs quartiers de Paris ou Marseille, le conflit israélo-palestinien. Or, on ne saurait confondre antisionisme et antisémitisme. L’antisionisme est fondé sur une situation réelle : les Palestiniens ne sont pas mythiques, leurs revendications non plus bien que difficiles à satisfaire. Guy Sorman

Bon sang, mais c’est bien sûr !

A l’heure où entre assimilation, pression antisémite et lâcheté ou déni de nos élites, la population juive mondiale semble se diriger vers une extinction naturelle

Et où, de Fabius à Sanders et hormis quelques derniers petits réduits de jeunes Arabes antisionistes, la place des juifs dans les plus hautes sphères ne semble plus faire problème …

Comment ne  pas voir l’évidence avec l’essayiste français et plus pur représentant du juif assimilé Guy Sorman ?

Le vieux rêve de l’extinction de l’antisémitisme est désormais à notre portée …

Puisqu’il ne dépend dorénavant plus… que de l’extinction du sionisme et de l’Etat d’Israël !

L’extinction de l’antisémitisme
Guy Sorman

L’Hebdo

19.02.2016

Bernie Sanders, candidat à la Maison Blanche, est juif : qui s’en soucie ? Nul n’en fait mention dans la campagne, les électeurs y sont indifférents. Ce n’aurait pas été le cas il y a une génération : rappelons que, jusque dans les années 1960, les universités américaines opposaient de fait un numerus clausus aux candidats juifs. En France, le nouveau président du Conseil constitutionnel, la plus haute instance juridique, Laurent Fabius, est d’origine juive : le fait est passé inaperçu. La nouvelle ministre de la Culture est juive : aurait-on imaginé cela au pays de l’affaire Dreyfus et du Maréchal Pétain, le collaborateur le plus enthousiaste du nazisme ? En Espagne, les descendants des Juifs expulsés en 1492, s’ils le demandent, peuvent retrouver leur nationalité d’origine. On m’objectera, en France surtout, où la communauté juive est en majorité issue d’Afrique du Nord, que des Juifs sont victimes d’actes criminels. Rarissimes, ils sont commis par de jeunes Arabes qui reconstituent, dans leurs quartiers de Paris ou Marseille, le conflit israélo-palestinien. Or, on ne saurait confondre antisionisme et antisémitisme.

L’antisionisme est fondé sur une situation réelle : les Palestiniens ne sont pas mythiques, leurs revendications non plus bien que difficiles à satisfaire. L’antisémitisme, lui, était entièrement mythique : le Juif n’était pas une personne réelle, mais une construction, mystique et politique. L’extermination des communautés juives, qui commence en France et en Allemagne aux environs de l’An Mille, puis dans le sillage des Croisades, débute presque toujours par une accusation de crime rituelle : un enfant chrétien aurait été égorgé pour que son sang soit mêlé à la confection du pain de la Pâque juive. Les ultimes pogroms, en Russie, au début du XXe siècle, démarrent encore sur ce mythe. Pendant mille ans, le Juif fut, en Occident, le bouc émissaire de référence qui explique mauvaises récoltes, crises économiques, faillites bancaires. Pendant mille ans, les Juifs supposés tous riches alors qu’ils vivent à peu près tous dans la misère, seront expulsés, massacrés, dépouillés de ce qu’ils ne possèdent pas. Et l’antisémitisme ordinaire se fonde sur l’accusation de “Déicide”, jusqu’à ce que le Concile Vatican II efface cette mention de l’office de Pâques. Ce caractère mythique de l’antisémitisme est attesté par l’absence de relation entre le nombre de Juifs et la virulence de l’antisémitisme : quand éclate l’affaire Dreyfus, ils ne sont pas soixante mille en France et occupent un rang médiocre dans la société. Dreyfus lui-même n’est qu’un modeste colonel. Lorsque Hitler prend le pouvoir en 1933, les Juifs en Allemagne ne sont pas cent mille. En Pologne, où subsiste aujourd’hui un modeste courant antisémite avec radio et journaux, les Juifs ont disparu : le Juif n’est pas nécessaire à l’antisémitisme.

Une nouvelle objection que l’on entend en France, reprise par la presse new-yorkaise aux aguets : 7 000 Juifs français émigreraient, chaque année, preuve que vivre Juif en France est insoutenable. Mais ce chiffre, 1% environ de la population juive, est trompeur car il mêle les exilés économiques – qui ne sont pas que Juifs – avec ceux qui, pour des raisons religieuses, souhaitent poursuivre leur vie en Israël.

Rendons-nous à l’évidence, le Juif n’est plus le bouc émissaire et c’est à peine s’il se distingue de la population non juive. Parce que les Juifs se sont intégrés ? Ceci n’est pas une explication, car les Juifs ont toujours manifesté un patriotisme étonnant partout où ils furent en exil : en 1914, mes ancêtres, juifs autrichiens, combattaient dans l’armée autrichienne et mes ancêtres russes dans l’armée du czar. Je n’avais pas encore d’ancêtres français, mais nul doute que, comme Dreyfus, ils se seraient précipités au front. Ce ne sont pas les Juifs qui ont changé, mais la société occidentale : la découverte de la Shoah en 1945, bien entendu, a révélé à jamais que l’antisémitisme était diabolique, mais ce n’est pas la seule explication de la fin de l’antisémitisme : il a d’ailleurs persisté en Pologne, dans la Russie stalinienne, voire dans la France de l’immédiat après-guerre : je peux en témoigner, certains de mes professeurs de lycée étant ouvertement antisémites. Je daterai plutôt la fin de l’antisémitisme du Procès Eichmann en 1961, qui révèle la médiocrité de cette idéologie. Cette “banalité du mal”, selon la philosophe Hannah Arendt, fait qu’aucun bureaucrate (“je suis un bureaucrate qui a obéi aux ordres”, se défend Eichmann), ni aucun intellectuel ne peut plus, après ce procès, se dire antisémite : l’antisémitisme, qui fut en Europe chez des intellectuels chrétiens à droite, anticapitalistes à gauche, une posture élégante, devient, après Eichmann, grotesque. Il s’en suit Vatican II, en 1962, déjà cité, dont l’influence reste fondamentale : l’Eglise est devenue sincèrement philosémite.

Pour ceux qui, en France, en Belgique, aux Pays-Bas, me considèrent trop optimiste, en raison d’attentats qui mêlent antisémitisme à l’ancienne et antisionisme contemporain, je réplique qu’en 1940, la police française avait déporté ma famille ; maintenant, elle la protège. Pour conclure sur une note moins optimiste, force est d’admettre que les nations semblent ne pas pouvoir se passer d’un bouc émissaire. Dans ce rôle tragique, l’Arabe n’a-t-il pas remplacé le Juif ? C’est envisageable et ceci invite à lutter contre l’islamophobie sans attendre une Shoah ou une affaire Dreyfus. Je ne néglige pas le “radicalisme islamique”, mais voila un tout autre sujet.

Voir aussi:

L’extinction de l’antisémitisme

Le Juif n’est plus le bouc émissaire des sociétés occidentales

Guy Sorman

Tribune juive

Bernie Sanders, candidat à la Maison Blanche, est juif : qui s’en soucie ? Nul n’en fait mention dans la campagne, les électeurs y sont indifférents. Ce n’aurait pas été le cas il y a une génération : rappelons que, jusque dans les années 1960, les universités américaines opposaient de fait un numerus clausus aux candidats juifs. En France, le nouveau président du Conseil constitutionnel, la plus haute instance juridique, Laurent Fabius, est d’origine juive : le fait est passé inaperçu. La nouvelle ministre de la Culture est juive : aurait-on imaginé cela au pays de l’affaire Dreyfus et du Maréchal Pétain, le collaborateur le plus enthousiaste du nazisme ? En Espagne, les descendants des Juifs expulsés en 1492, s’ils le demandent, peuvent retrouver leur nationalité d’origine. On m’objectera, en France surtout, où la communauté juive est en majorité issue d’Afrique du Nord, que des Juifs sont victimes d’actes criminels. Rarissimes, ils sont commis par de jeunes Arabes qui reconstituent, dans leurs quartiers de Paris ou Marseille, le conflit israélo-palestinien. Or, on ne saurait confondre antisionisme et antisémitisme.

L’antisionisme est fondé sur une situation réelle : les Palestiniens ne sont pas mythiques, leurs revendications non plus, bien que difficiles à satisfaire. L’antisémitisme, lui, était entièrement mythique : le Juif n’était pas une personne réelle, mais une construction, mystique et politique. L’extermination des communautés juives, qui commence en France et en Allemagne aux environs de l’An Mille, puis dans le sillage des Croisades, débute presque toujours par une accusation de crime rituelle : un enfant chrétien aurait été égorgé pour que son sang soit mêlé à la confection du pain de la Pâque juive. Les ultimes pogroms, en Russie, au début du XXe siècle, démarrent encore sur ce mythe. Pendant mille ans, le Juif fut, en Occident, le bouc émissaire de référence qui explique mauvaises récoltes, crises économiques, faillites bancaires. Pendant mille ans, les Juifs supposés tous riches alors qu’ils vivent à peu près tous dans la misère, seront expulsés, massacrés, dépouillés de ce qu’ils ne possèdent pas. Et l’antisémitisme ordinaire se fonde sur l’accusation de “déicide”, jusqu’à ce que le Concile Vatican II efface cette mention de l’office de Pâques. Ce caractère mythique de l’antisémitisme est attesté par l’absence de relation entre le nombre de Juifs et la virulence de l’antisémitisme : quand éclate l’affaire Dreyfus, ils ne sont pas soixante mille en France et occupent un rang médiocre dans la société. Dreyfus lui-même n’est qu’un modeste colonel. Lorsque Hitler prend le pouvoir en 1933, les Juifs en Allemagne ne sont pas cent mille. En Pologne, où subsiste aujourd’hui un modeste courant antisémite avec radio et journaux, les Juifs ont disparu : le Juif n’est pas nécessaire à l’antisémitisme.

Une nouvelle objection que l’on entend en France, reprise par la presse new-yorkaise aux aguets : 7 000 Juifs français émigreraient, chaque année, preuve que vivre juif en France est insoutenable. Mais ce chiffre, 1% environ de la population juive, est trompeur car il mêle les exilés économiques – qui ne sont pas que Juifs – avec ceux qui, pour des raisons religieuses, souhaitent poursuivre leur vie en Israël.

Rendons-nous à l’évidence, le Juif n’est plus le bouc émissaire et c’est à peine s’il se distingue de la population non juive. Parce que les Juifs se sont intégrés ? Ceci n’est pas une explication, car les Juifs ont toujours manifesté un patriotisme étonnant partout où ils furent en exil : en 1914, mes ancêtres, juifs autrichiens, combattaient dans l’armée autrichienne et mes ancêtres russes dans l’armée du tsar. Je n’avais pas encore d’ancêtres français, mais nul doute que, comme Dreyfus, ils se seraient précipités au front. Ce ne sont pas les Juifs qui ont changé, mais la société occidentale. La découverte de la Shoah en 1945, bien entendu, a révélé à jamais que l’antisémitisme était diabolique, mais ce n’est pas la seule explication de la fin de l’antisémitisme ; il a d’ailleurs persisté en Pologne, dans la Russie stalinienne, voire dans la France de l’immédiat après-guerre : je peux en témoigner, certains de mes professeurs de lycée étant ouvertement antisémites. Je daterai plutôt la fin de l’antisémitisme du Procès Eichmann en 1961, qui révèle la médiocrité de cette idéologie. Cette “banalité du mal”, selon la philosophe Hannah Arendt, fait qu’aucun bureaucrate (“je suis un bureaucrate qui a obéi aux ordres”, se défend Eichmann), ni aucun intellectuel ne peut plus, après ce procès, se dire antisémite : l’antisémitisme, qui fut en Europe chez des intellectuels chrétiens à droite, anticapitalistes à gauche, une posture élégante, devient, après Eichmann, grotesque. Il s’en suit Vatican II, en 1962, déjà cité, dont l’influence reste fondamentale : l’Église est devenue sincèrement philosémite.

Pour ceux qui, en France, en Belgique, aux Pays-Bas, me considèrent trop optimiste, en raison d’attentats qui mêlent antisémitisme à l’ancienne et antisionisme contemporain, je réplique qu’en 1940, la police française avait déporté ma famille ; maintenant, elle la protège. Pour conclure sur une note moins optimiste, force est d’admettre que les nations semblent ne pas pouvoir se passer d’un bouc émissaire. Dans ce rôle tragique, l’Arabe n’a-t-il pas remplacé le Juif ? C’est envisageable et ceci invite à lutter contre l’islamophobie sans attendre une Shoah ou une affaire Dreyfus. Je ne néglige pas le “radicalisme islamique”, mais voila un tout autre sujet.

Par Guy Sorman

Chroniqueur de la mondialisation et spécialiste de la Chine, Guy Sorman a enseigné l’économie à Sciences Po Paris et dans de nombreuses universités étrangères (Chine, USA, Russie et Argentine). Il est notamment l’auteur de « Le bonheur français », « Le progrès et ses ennemis », « Le Génie de l’Inde » ou « L’année du coq ».

Israel could reduce anti-Semitic violence by not calling itself the Jewish state, Finkelstein says

Philip Weiss
April 10, 2015

Last month at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, Norman Finkelstein gave a speech on “the new anti-semitism” to the Students for Justice in Palestine chapter. The speech contained a number of interesting ideas; let me summarize a few.

The most important one involves Zionism’s role in fostering anti-Semitism. Jewish organizations assert that there is no connection at all between Israel’s actions and anti-semitic activities; but the opposite is the case, Finkelstein said. And Israel and Jewish groups could do a lot to reduce anti-Semitism by disavowing Israel’s actions or disavowing that Israel is a Jewish state. Finkelstein:

It’s often claimed that there’s… no causal nexus between Israeli actions and anti-Semitism, that you can’t blame it on Israel, that there’s no connection between the… spikes in Israeli violence against Palestinians and the upticks in anti-Semitic violence. When in fact if you go through the evidence collected over many years, that’s exactly what the evidence does show: each time Israel launches another of its murderous assaults, anti-semitic incidents peak in Europe. And they’re often perpetrated by disaffected angry Muslim youth. If in recent times, a larger fraction of these incidents are violent, it’s the blowback from the brutish fanaticism currently plaguing the Arab Muslim world.

Now if you’re really concerned about these spurts of anti-Semitism, and you want to contain them, then there are obvious things you can do.
Number one, Israel can stop carrying out massacres….

Another thing is: Israel can simply stop calling itself a Jewish state, so Jews wouldn’t have to bear the burden for its criminal actions.

And the third thing is, official Jewish organizations in the diaspora, they could cease defending Israel’s criminal actions so it won’t appear as if Israel when it carries out these actions is acting in the name of the Jewish people.

The problem hasn’t been helped by the fact that Netanyahu “in a new phase of his megalomania” is calling himself the representative of the entire Jewish people.

When Muslim youths in Europe take him at his word, and they exact revenge on those whom he claims to represent, it might not be right, but it’s not surprising either.

That is a bracing and honest way to consider the attack on the kosher grocery in Paris. Notice that when Rev. Bruce Shipman said something far milder last summer during the Gaza massacre, he lost his job at Yale.

Finkelstein criticized a recent poll purporting to show that half of Britons hold anti-Semitic views. He scoffed at several of the indices of alleged anti-semitic attitudes. For instance, one measure is the view that Jews think that they are better than other people: 17 percent of Brits agreed with that characterization of Jews. Finkelstein says most Jews are anti-Semitic under that definition.

Between the spectacular success of Jews in the western world on the one hand, and the belief in a theological chosenness on the other, in fact most Jews themselves believe in their group superiority. That’s why Jews, present speaker included, like to kvell– that’s the Yiddish word for boast or brag– over the Jewish pedigree of 20 percent of Nobel laureates. I still remember as a child being very proud of the fact that the seminal figures of modernity, Marx, Einstein, and Freud, they were all Jewish…. If it were true that the belief that Jews think that they are superior is proof of anti-Semitism, the inexorable corollary would have to be that most Jews are anti-Semitic because they think they are better than other people.

These comments exactly mirror my own experience. And I’m glad that Finkelstein is talking about Jewish success, a central condition of Jewish life today. Far from being a liability, being Jewish brings “cachet,” he said, tapping people into “networks of privilege and power.” In western Europe, Canada, and the U.S., being Jewish “opens many doors and it closes none.” He cited Chelsea Clinton’s marriage, and observed that she had not slipped a rung on the social ladder by exchanging vows with a Jew.

Then there is the supposedly antisemitic belief that Jews are disproportionately represented in the media.

The fact of the matter is that even as the ADL– the Anti Defamation League– Abraham Foxman wrote in his book on the New Anti-Semitism, he says, yes it’s true Jews are proportionally overrepresented as a group in influential media, whether it be Hollywood, book publishing, opinion journals or newspapers…. but it has no cultural repercussions because he says if you’re in a position of power say in Hollywood, your only concern is the bottom line.

But that’s plainly not the case, Finkelstein said. There is surely a link between the overrepresentation of Jews in Hollywood and the omnipresence of the Holocaust as a cinematic concern, “putting all other human suffering in the shade.” He said there were 110 Holocaust films produced in the last three decades; but only 36 about slavery in the U.S. and the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki combined.

And why shouldn’t people conclude that there is a connection between who sits in seats of influence and the content they produce. We accept such arguments when it comes to race and gender, Finkelstein said:

It’s perfectly fair in liberal precincts – politically-correct liberal precincts – to say that white people as against people of color, they have too much power in the media. Or it’s perfectly correct to say, men as against women, they have too much power in the media. Because everybody understands that if you‘re a man against a woman… there’s going to be a kind of natural propensity to give unfair time to yourself, your group, your gender. So it’s perfectly fine to say that white people as against people of color have too much power in the media, or men as against women have too much power in the media. Why, then, does it become anti-Semitic to flag the overrepresentation of Jews in the media? (17:45 min)

I don’t think that anyone has expressed that idea more clearly.

Finkelstein went on to question how much discrimination Jews face. Being Jewish carries a stigma, he said, but it is less of a burden than other forms of social prejudice, say those against being fat, short, bald, or unattractive. These are all life’s “stigmata,” he said– “God’s roll of the dice”– and people have to learn to live with them.

The evidence offered that being Jewish invites discrimination or violence is laughable, he said. The correlation of incidents involving violence and Jews in the west is flimsy; and if being Jewish was a bar to opportunity, then why are there so many Jews at leading universities. Forty percent of the student bodies of Columbia and the University of Pennsylvania– and 2 percent of the overall population. Twenty to 25 percent at Yale, Harvard and Cornell, 13 percent at Princeton and Brown. “This is hardly evidence of anti-Semitism.”

In fact, anti-Semitism has been “vanquished,” he said, and is approaching zero; and Finkelstein said he thought the argument that Jews are actually being favored in admissions at Ivy League schools to the detriment of Asian-Americans is intriguing.

In the last part of his lecture Finkelstein engaged the charge that it is anti-Semitic to single Israel out when many other countries do bad or worse stuff. Finkelstein took the charge seriously and had a very good answer, chiefly involving the special character and longevity of the injustice in Palestine.

The Q-and-A was notable for a couple of comments. Finkelstein differed with Noam Chomsky over the role of the Israel lobby. He said that the lobby was the reason the U.S. supports the Israeli occupation of Palestine. The U.S. has “no stake in the occupation” and would “be euphoric” if Israel withdrew from the occupation.

Then there was Finkelstein’s defense of the two-state solution. I’ve often heard him defend it before, but what struck me as remarkable is that on the one hand he said that the two-state solution was what apartheid South Africa had hoped to achieve by creating the Bantustans, a solution that the world resisted successfully (something Ali Abunimah said many years ago); but on the other the two-state solution should be supported in Israel and Palestine because it reflects international law and world opinion.

Citing global political and public opinion on the question, Finkelstein asked, “What is the maximum, the maximum one could hope to extract?” A Palestinian state in 20 percent of historical Palestine, he said. “Name me one country in the world that supports one state,” he went on challengingly. Even the Greens and Sinn Fein support two states.

“It’s not politics in my opinion,” he said, to demand one state, given that context. “You are imposing a personal opinion on a conflict, as if your personal opinion had anything to do with it.”

Addressing the BDS movement, or boycott, divestment and sanctions, Finkelstein said it was failing a “selfless” Gandhian test in insisting on Palestinians’ rights but not respecting the “reciprocal obligations” to honor the rights of the antagonist. He referred here to the rights of Israelis to their state, which is recognized under international law. BDS has no position on Israeli rights, he said, and in fact “discards Israeli rights”– and that is not a winnable position. There is a tendency among BDS supporters to believe that BDS can liberate Palestine. He called this “a naïve and almost silly position,” and one that did not reflect the South Africa experience, where a mass movement liberated the country.

(I disagree with Finkelstein’s points here, as to one state being a political movement, as to there being no country that supports one state (Israel does), as to BDS’s respect for Israelis’ rights and the effectiveness of BDS; but I will leave the countering to others, or another time.)

Thanks to Annie Robbins for picking up the lecture, seizing on many of the ideas above, and preparing notes for me on it.

Voir encore:

Pew Report: European Jews Disappearing
With rising anti-Semitism, spotlight has shone on whether Europe’s Jews will stay or go. But actually, the Jewish population of Europe has been declining since World War II.
Haaretz

Feb 10, 2015

Pew report published Monday finds Jewish population in Europe is dwindling. Some Jewish leaders have been talking about a Jewish exodus from Europe in response to rising anti-Semitism and extremism.

But though events such as the increasing anti-Semitism during the summer’s Gaza war and the deadly attack on a kosher supermarket in Paris last month have focused the world’s attention on the issue, the truth is the Jewish population of Europe has been steadily declining since World War II, as a recent Pew report demonstrates.

The steepest drop, of course, was between 1939 and 1945, when 6 million Jews were killed in the Holocaust and the Jewish population went from 9.5 million to 3.8 million.

But that number has been steadily dropping over the past several decades, especially in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, according to the Pew Research Center’s Global Religious Landscape report of 2012 and research by Sergio DellaPergola of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Those data show that in 1960 the Jewish population of Europe dropped to 3.2 million, then to 2 million in 1991, the year the Soviet Union collapsed, and 1.4 million in 2010 – 10 percent of the world’s Jewish population and 0.2 percent of Europe’s total population.

Expect more to come: The past two years have seen a dramatic rise in Jewish immigration from France, and 2015 looks to be a banner year for the French Jewish exodus.

 Voir enfin:

February 9, 2015

The continuing decline of Europe’s Jewish population

It’s been seven decades since the end of the Holocaust, an event that decimated the Jewish population in Europe. In the years since then, the number of European Jews has continued to decline for a variety of reasons. And now, concerns over renewed anti-Semitism on the continent have prompted Jewish leaders to talk of a new “exodus” from the region.

There are still more than a million Jews living in Europe, according to 2010 Pew Research Center estimates. But that number has dropped significantly over the last several decades – most dramatically in Eastern Europe and the countries that make up the former Soviet Union, according to historical research by Sergio DellaPergola of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

In 1939, there were 16.6 million Jews worldwide, and a majority of them – 9.5 million, or 57% – lived in Europe, according to DellaPergola’s estimates. By the end of World War II, in 1945, the Jewish population of Europe had shrunk to 3.8 million, or 35% of the world’s 11 million Jews. About 6 million European Jews were killed during the Holocaust, according to common estimates.

Since then, the global Jewish population – estimated by Pew Research at 14 million as of 2010 – has risen, but it is still smaller than it was before the Holocaust. And in the decades since 1945, the Jewish population in Europe has continued to decline. In 1960, it was about 3.2 million; by 1991, it fell to 2 million, according to DellaPergola’s estimates. Now, there are about 1.4 million Jews in Europe – just 10% of the world’s Jewish population, and 0.2% of Europe’s total population.

Measuring Jewish populations, especially in places like Europe and the United States where Jews are a small minority, is fraught with difficulty. This is due to the complexity both of measuring small populations and of Jewish identity, which can be defined by ethnicity or religion. As a result, estimates vary, but Pew Research’s recent figures are similar to those reported by DellaPergola, one of the world’s leading experts on Jewish demography.

In Eastern Europe, a once large and vibrant Jewish population has nearly disappeared. DellaPergola estimates that there were 3.4 million Jews in the European portions of the Soviet Union as of 1939. Many were killed in the Holocaust, and others moved to Israel or elsewhere. Today, a tiny fraction of the former Soviet republics’ population – an estimated 310,000 people – are Jews.

Similar trends have occurred in Eastern European countries that were outside the USSR, including Poland, Hungary, Romania and several other nations. Collectively, they were home to about 4.7 million Jews in 1939, but now there are probably fewer than 100,000 Jews in all these countries combined.

Much of the postwar decline has been a result of emigration to Israel, which declared its independence as a Jewish state in 1948. The Jewish population of Israel has grown from about half a million in 1945 to 5.6 million in 2010. But there are other possible factors in the decline of European Jewry, including intermarriage and cultural assimilation.

In addition, Jewish populations have not decreased uniformly in every European country. For example, we estimate that there were about as many Jews in France as of 2010 (310,000) as DellaPergola estimates there were in 1939 (320,000), although recent reports have indicated a surge in Jewish emigration from France.

The United Kingdom also continues to have a significant Jewish population (about 280,000 in 2010, down from DellaPergola’s estimate of 345,000 in 1939). But a new report released this week found a record level of anti-Semitism in the U.K., with more than 1,000 anti-Semitic incidents recorded in 2014.

Voir de plus:

Derrière les menaces de mort contre Laurence Marchand-Taillade
La convergence des intégristes et des djihadistes?
Robert Louis Norrès
Chercheur, diplômé de l’ENS.
Causeur

19 février 2016

Pour Robert Louis Norrès, les menaces de mort dont la présidente de l’Observatoire de la laïcité du Val d’Oise est la cible, annonce «la convergence des actions des intégristes musulmans et des djihadistes».

La présidente de l’Observatoire de la laïcité du Val d’Oise Laurence Marchand-Taillade, a été menacée de mort après avoir dénoncé la tenue d’un rassemblement de l’UOIF, dont on connaît les accointances avec les Frères musulmans et en présence du putatif leader d’un prochain parti islamique de France, Tariq Ramadan. Après les attaques contre les juifs depuis 2000 environ, les menaces de morts contre Charlie et l’exécution de ces menaces, puis les attentats du Bataclan, une nouvelle étape a ainsi été franchie dans la montée en puissance de la terreur islamiste dans notre pays.

D’abord à partir des années 2000, l’intégrisme islamique s’en est pris aux Français juifs qui jouissaient  jusqu’alors pleinement de leur appartenance à la nation française et de la protection dont peuvent se prévaloir tous les citoyens. La pression agressive que l’islamisme en France a fait peser sur eux, en toute impunité puisque l’origine du mal n’a jamais été mentionnée par nos dirigeants, a de facto scindée notre nation en deux. Ceux qui bénéficiaient de la protection de notre pays et ceux dont cette protection n’était plus totalement garantie dans les faits. Il s’agit donc d’une première dégradation infligée à notre pays, incapable de trouver en lui-même la volonté de défendre une partie de sa population dont la valeur symbolique est cependant très grande de par le pacte bicentenaire scellé entre la France, sa République et les juifs de notre pays. La France, première nation à leur reconnaître la pleine citoyenneté, tandis que ceux-ci  reconnaissaient et acceptaient pleinement leurs devoirs envers elle. Le symbole est d’autant plus fort que cette appartenance pleine et entière a donné à notre République, dès l’origine, un contenu concret au mot « Fraternité » de sa devise, ainsi que l’avait voulu Bonaparte, puis Napoléon. C’est cette Fraternité qui a été attaquée et mise à mal par les islamistes dans une presque totale   indifférence générale. Le symbole est également d’autant plus fort trois-quarts de siècle à peine après la trahison de Vichy, et alors que tout le monde avait dit « plus jamais ça ». Ainsi les Français juifs se retrouvèrent en première ligne dans l’affrontement que l’islam radical a déclenché contre notre pays. Tout en assouvissant leur passion hideuse antisémite, il s’agissait  de montrer que nous n’avons pas le courage de nos meilleures résolutions, que nous ne sommes pas à la hauteur de notre devise nationale, à la hauteur de notre histoire, que nous n’avons plus aucune valeur à défendre si ce n’est, chacun d’entre nous, sa propre vie, sa propre situation personnelle. Le contraire d’une nation rassemblée. Or, l’intégration du judaïsme à la France peut servir de modèle à l’intégration de l’islam à la France, et c’est ce modèle même que l’islamisme cherche à détruire.

Le déni commence à se dissiper mais…
Puis, l’islam radical s’en est pris à ceux qui s’expriment, par le dessin avec Charlie, le cinéma avec Theo van Gogh, sans compter tous ceux qui ont été menacés de mort, des écrivains, des philosophes. Michel Houellebecq, avant de publier son dernier livre, l’a fait relire par des experts en radicalisme islamique pour s’assurer que sa vie ne sera pas trop menacée. L’intimidation et la menace se sont ainsi portées sur les voix capables d’exprimer les réalités que nos politiques feignaient de ne pas voir. Le front s’est donc ainsi étendu sur le champ de la parole et de la culture. Les attentats du Bataclan l’ont étendu à la population toute entière. Le déni commence à se dissiper partiellement, les politiques ne pouvant pas passer ces attentats par pertes et profits comme cela a été le cas avec Charlie. Néanmoins, ils peinent à en tirer toutes les conclusions.

Que s’est-il passé pendant ces quinze dernières années ? L’islam intégriste et conquérant a étendu son emprise sur le terrain, dans les esprits, dans les communes, en faisant croître les territoires perdus de la République, en conquérant de nouveaux territoires où il peut de plus en plus faire régner sa loi, et non plus celle de notre pays. L’islam radical qui frappe, qui tue, n’est en effet que le bras armé plus ou moins contrôlé ou incontrôlable de l’intégrisme islamique qui mène lui l’offensive non pas à coup de kalachnikovs mais de grignotages constants de nos institutions. L’infiltration intégriste se voit dans les communes où des maires sans courage et complaisants, ou peut-être tout simplement se sentant abandonnés, louent temporairement la paix civile en cédant devant les exigences intégristes. Il y a l’exemple bien connu des piscines. Mais il y a aussi tous ces quartiers où les fonctions régaliennes sont déléguées aux pires ennemis de notre République, pour le plus grand malheur des populations qui y vivent livrées aux plus entreprenants des leaders intégristes. Cette infiltration se voit également dans les écoles où l’autorité des professeurs est battue en brèche et où les contenus enseignés sont décriés ouvertement, et dans certaines entreprises publiques où par facilité on recrute des personnels intégristes pour apaiser les extrémistes des « cités ». La montée de la violence islamiste s’est donc accompagnée du déclin de notre République, de nos institutions et du soutien qu’elles apportent à tous ceux qui les servent en première ligne : les enseignants, les policiers, les médecins, les infirmières, les conducteurs de bus, les agents de l’électricité, tous ceux qui sur le terrain témoignent de l’existence de notre Etat. Ce déclin, voire cette reddition dans les territoires de conquête de l’islamisme, a été accompagné par un déclin général dans toute la société des valeurs collectives et de la confiance en ces valeurs qui auraient pu soutenir la résistance.

Les mécanismes de la montée en puissance de l’intégrisme
Quels ont été les mécanismes principaux de la montée en puissance de l’intégrisme islamique dans nos villes ? Le contexte général est la montée mondiale de l’intégrisme islamique dans de nombreux pays à majorité ou à forte population musulmane, dont l’origine tient, au moins en partie, à l’idéologie wahhabite, au salafisme ou encore à celle des Frères musulmans qui se répandent par tout un réseau d’associations culturelles, de mosquées, de publications. L’état d’esprit de rejet de l’autre et de conquête qui en résulte chez les intégristes, n’a pas jusqu’alors rencontré la résistance nécessaire grâce à l’arme de la culpabilisation occidentale, à l’aide des complices de l’islamisme qui infusent la haine de soi depuis des décennies et à une grande lâcheté ou un grand désarroi de nos dirigeants. Pour ce qui est des menaces proférées à l’égard de Laurence Marchand-Taillade, on peut se demander si les dénis du président de l’Observatoire de la laïcité (dont l’Observatoire de la laïcité du Val d’Oise n’est pas une émanation, ndlr), Jean-Louis Bianco, n’ont pas été interprétés comme un encouragement par les fanatiques qui voient toute faiblesse comme un appel à l’action.

Mais toutes ces pistes ne suffisent pas à expliquer cette montée en puissance de l’intégrisme islamique. La notion de droits individuels qui tend à supplanter tout autre impératif collectif dans notre société a étendu le champ du droit au détriment du champ politique. C’est une tendance séculaire magistralement décrite par Jean-Claude Michéa dans un texte sur le libéralisme politique, de ses origines, à la fin des guerres de religions, jusqu’à aujourd’hui. Dès lors, il est de plus en plus difficile d’opposer des valeurs collectives à ce qui est présenté comme des revendications de droits individuels. Il suffit donc de présenter les revendications de l’islam politique comme étant de simples revendications de nouveaux droits individuels, tout en jouant sur toute une palette de sentiments que les intégristes musulmans connaissent parfaitement lorsqu’ils exercent leurs pressions sur nos édiles pour faire reculer le champ républicain, le champ national :  la culpabilité du représentant de la « puissance coloniale », la crainte de désordres éventuels que l’interlocuteur prétend pouvoir contrôler et calmer alors qu’il en est l’un des principaux organisateurs, le désir d’être réélu…

L’affaiblissement des élus
L’affaiblissement des élus et de tous les acteurs qui sont en première ligne est bien sûr aggravé par le discours général d’une partie des responsables politiques nationaux, de la presse parisienne et des radios et télévisions publiques et privées, ainsi que d’un grand nombre d’associations qu’elles relaient complaisamment. Certaines de ces associations dénigrent, dégradent, rabaissent tout ce que la France représente, toute prétention de sa part à une légitimité historique et politique et donc à représenter l’avenir. C’est le discours sur « la France rance ». Il devient dès lors de plus en plus difficile d’intégrer et d’assimiler à la nation des populations à qui l’on explique que leurs ancêtres ont été maltraités par une  France haineuse et dont les représentants d’aujourd’hui seraient les héritiers qui n’ont rien appris ni rien oublié. Les intégristes islamistes remplissent ainsi le champ politique abandonné par la France, et en repoussent progressivement les limites, en jouant donc sur la notion d’extension des droits individuels. Ce mouvement s’appuie sur l’habitude de notre société de toujours céder aux exigences de nouveaux droits individuels et sur la délégitimation de l’exigence du respect de valeurs collectives. Il s’appuie aussi sur le fait que le communautarisme tend, par construction, à amalgamer les individus à leur communauté supposée. Changer la règle pour une communauté donnée, dans l’esprit de certains de nos édiles, revient à donner des droits individuels à chacun de ses membres. Notre pays suit ainsi le chemin inverse qui avait été le sien lors de sa construction. La nation devient le cadre oppressif dont il faut se défaire pour recréer des communautés – des féodalités – émancipatrices de la nation.

Pendant longtemps, l’islamisme violent, celui qui commet des attentats, celui qui tue, et l’intégrisme islamique ont évolué dans une relative indépendance l’un de l’autre. D’abord parce que l’islamisme violent, le djihadisme, n’existait pas chez nous. La montée de l’antisémitisme depuis les années 2000, la progression du communautarisme et le recul de la République ne sont ainsi pas la conséquence du djihadisme, mais du travail de sape constant de l’intégrisme islamique, du progrès de son discours et des progrès de la force de son emprise sur un nombre croissant de personnes. L’émergence du djihadisme est beaucoup plus récente, et on peut la faire remonter à Merah, même s’il y a eu de lâches et odieux  assassinats aux motivations antisémites auparavant, dont Ilan Halimi.

Extension de l’islam comme force politique
Un objectif commun anime les intégristes musulmans et les djihadistes : l’extension de l’islam comme force politique supplantant la France républicaine, même si les méthodes sont différentes. Les discours des uns fournissent le substrat de la radicalisation des autres. Les djihadistes peuvent compter sur la complicité des intégristes, ou du moins de la partie la plus radicale d’entre eux, pour les cacher, les nourrir, les aider à mener une vie normale jusqu’au passage à l’acte, et leur fournir la logistique pour le faire. Sans cela, Salah Abdeslam aurait été arrêté depuis longtemps, alors que les polices belges et européennes continuent à le chercher. Il y a un continuum entre le simple rejet, la haine et la  radicalisation la plus extrémiste. Néanmoins, jusqu’alors, les deux phénomènes ont agi de manière relativement indépendante l’un de l’autre.

Les menaces de mort dont une femme politique du Val d’Oise (Laurence Marchand-Taillade est secrétaire nationale du PRG, ndlr) est la cible annonce la convergence de leurs actions. Celle-ci a dénoncé la tenue d’un rassemblement de l’UOIF en présence de Tariq Ramadan. On peut trouver en effet dans ces rassemblements de nombreux intégristes aux discours incompatibles avec nos valeurs nationales et républicaines. Ces menaces djihadistes contre Laurence Marchand-Taillade annoncent ainsi que le djihadisme vient en support direct de l’intégrisme, en intimidant et en menaçant de faire taire ses opposants de manière définitive. Dorénavant, les personnes qui s’opposeront légalement et démocratiquement aux entreprises antidémocratiques, antirépublicaines et antifrançaises des intégristes tels que les Frères musulmans, feront l’objet des mêmes menaces de mort de la part des djihadistes, dont on sait qu’elles peuvent effectivement être mises à l’exécution. Cela rend la lutte contre l’islamisme radical, ainsi que le renforcement de notre détermination à défendre nos valeurs et nos institutions d’autant plus nécessaires et urgents.

Voir enfin:

« Islamophobie » : les chiffres du CCIF ne sont pas fiables
Alexandre Devecchio

Le Figaro

20/01/2016

FIGAROVOX/ ENTRETIEN – Bernard Cazeneuve a annoncé que les actes antimusulmans avait triplé cette année. Le Collectif contre l’islamophobie en France annonce des chiffres bien plus élevés. Le décryptage d’Isabelle Kersimon.

Isabelle Kersimon est journaliste. Elle est l’auteur de, Islamophobie: la contre-enquête (Plein Jour, 288p, 19€, octobre 2014).

Dans une interview au journal La Croix, Bernard Cazeneuve a annoncé les chiffres des actes antisémites, antimusulmans et antichrétiens pour l’année 2015. Les actes antimusulmans ont plus que triplé et s’établissent à «environ 400». Pourtant, le Collectif contre l’islamophobie en France (CCIF) évoque des chiffres bien plus élevés concernant les actes «islamophobes». Comment expliquez-vous un tel décalage? Comment ces chiffres sont-ils obtenus?

Isabelle Kersimon: Les chiffres du CCIF ne sont absolument pas fiables: son rôle est d’alimenter le sentiment de persécution des musulmans par les non-musulmans et de faire entériner le concept d’islamophobie pour imposer l’interdit de «diffamer les religions, surtout l’islam», ainsi que de faire abroger les lois de 2004 et 2010 sur le voile «islamique» à l’école et le voile intégral. J’ai étudié l’ensemble de leurs statistiques entre fin 2003 et 2012. Leurs rapports annuels étaient alors disponibles sur leur site, constitués de listes totalement imprécises, avec des doublons et des triplets visiblement comptabilisés pour autant d’actes «islamophobes». J’ai donc fait des recherches poussées sur chaque doléance, en me basant sur les informations fournies par le CCIF et en parvenant le plus souvent à les recouper avec des informations parues dans la presse régionale ou nationale, à partir d’un nom, d’une ville, d’un lieu ou d’une simple date. Au-delà de ce relevé précis qui permettait dans un premier temps d’établir un acte unique pour trois mentions, par exemple, j’ai voulu connaître les suites données: enquêtes de police, puis jugements.

Il faut savoir que le CCIF comptabilisait à l’époque comme «actes islamophobes» des faits aussi divers qu’une question posée à une jeune femme voilée lors d’un entretien à l’ANPE, des règlements de compte crapuleux, des vols relevant du simple droit commun, des propos jugés insultants et, beaucoup plus graves, des expulsions de prédicateurs violemment antisémites et appelant au djihad contre les infidèles et l’Occident, voire en lien avec des entreprises terroristes.

Les relevés du CCIF ne sont plus disponibles sur leur site. En revanche, il a conservé sa spécificité: délivrer de fausses informations, amplifier des phénomènes, accumuler des faits invérifiables. Agissant sur les réseaux sociaux en véritables commandos groupés, ses membres pratiquent ce que ReputatioLab appelle «cloudsurfing», contraignant ainsi les médias à se tourner vers eux et, de ce fait, à légitimer leur discours. À l’aide de hashtags affolants (#PerquisitionnezMoi, par exemple), ils mobilisent des comptes dont on ignore tout de la tangibilité dans le monde réel. La question se pose vraiment, car nombre de musulmans ne s’y retrouvent absolument pas et refusent cette instrumentalisation victimaire. À propos des perquisitions, le porte-parole du CCIF, Yasser Louati, a ainsi déclaré sur Al-Jazeera qu’elles consistaient en «raids brutaux» et humiliaient des «millions de musulmans»…

J’alerte depuis longtemps sur les manipulations statistiques du CCIF. L’exemple le plus frappant reste sans doute le faux meurtre «islamophobe» de Dreux sur un homme sortant d’une mosquée, Archane Anouar. L’enquête a montré que deux criminels ont été jugés en cour d’assises en mars 2011 et que l’un d’eux, Nassim Djellal, a été condamné à dix ans de prison pour violences volontaires ayant entraîné la mort, sans que le juge relève l’aggravation d’«islamophobie»… Il s’agissait d’une sordide affaire de règlement de compte. Deux jours après les attentats atroces de novembre, le CCIF a alerté sur le «tabassage» («islamophobe») de deux «passants d’origine maghrébine» lors d’une manifestation raciste à Pontivy. Yasser Louati déclare même sur Al Jazeera que la victime est tombée dans le coma. Un simple appel à la mairie de Pontivy m’a suffi pour, encore une fois, démonter l’imposture: lors d’un affrontement entre identitaires et antifascistes, un Pontivien d’origine antillaise a eu des dents cassées et une lèvre fendue…

Le ministère travaille avec le CFCM et comptabilise les plaintes reçues. D’où le décalage saisissant entre ces deux sources.

Le ministre de l’Intérieur fait état d’une diminution de 5% des «actes antisémites», qui restent cependant «à un niveau élevé, avec 806 actes constatés». Constater une diminution des actes antisémites, l’année de l’attentat contre l’HyperCasher, n’est-ce pas paradoxal? Ces actes sont-ils classés selon leur degré de gravité?

Non, la gravité des actes n’entre pas en considération dans la froideur statistique. Je tiens ici à préciser que parmi les 806 actes antisémites constatés sur à peine 1 % de la population, il y a eu en 2015 quatre victimes juives massacrées à l’HyperCasher parce qu’elles étaient juives – et que la policière Clarissa Jean-Philippe a été abattue parce qu’elle était postée à proximité d’une synagogue et d’une école juive, ainsi que plusieurs agressions au couteau particulièrement graves, destinées à tuer et ayant entraîné des blessures sanglantes, portées dans la rue contre des concitoyens juifs parce que juifs.

Les lieux de cultes et cimetières chrétiens, qui sont les plus nombreux en France, «ne sont pas épargnés avec 810 atteintes», soit une «hausse de 20%», a indiqué Bernard Cazeneuve. Les actes antichrétiens sont plus nombreux et moins médiatisés que les actes antimusulmans ou antisémites. Sans tomber dans la concurrence victimaire, a-t-on tendance à banaliser cette violence?

Le ministère ne minimise absolument pas les actes antichrétiens, ni ne les traite avec moins de sévérité.Le patrimoine cultuel chrétien est en effet celui qui est le plus touché en nombre par les dégradations. Il est aussi le plus important en nombre, en France. Encore une fois, il faudrait être en mesure de connaître le détail de chaque dégradation ou violence envers les personnes en raison de leur confession pour répondre correctement à une telle question. Je déplore que certains chrétiens versent en effet dans une forme de concurrence victimaire.S’exprime surtout la crainte d’être dépossédé non du nombre d’exactions, mais d’une part de son identité historique.Il est vrai que les médias, quant à eux, ne relaient pas en boucle sur le ton le plus offusqué les exactions antichrétiennes. Dans la logique qui est la mienne, je considère que c’est heureux car ces escalades médiatiques ne présagent rien de bon.

Quel que soit la réalité des chiffres, l’augmentation de ces actes n’est-elle pas préoccupante?

La crispation autour du fait religieux est indéniable en France et le manque crucial d’éducation est, pour moi, sans aucun doute à l’origine de nombre d’actes de vandalisme, voire de profanations. L’augmentation du nombre de profanations concerne les trois grands monothéismes et est, en effet, très préoccupante. Il faut cependant distinguer, à mon sens, ce qui relève de «traditions» d’extrême droite en général assez localisées – je n’ai pas encore décrypté les chiffres de 2015, mais entre 2003 et 2012, nombre de profanations de lieux de culte et de sépultures musulmans et juifs avaient eu lieu au même endroit et au même moment, et, pour ce qui concerne les lieux chrétiens, les actes motivés par des groupuscules satanistes. Cela dit, les inscriptions racistes sur les mosquées, les jets de chair porcine, les menaces adressées à des responsables musulmans et les dégradations spécifiquement antimusulmanes se sont en effet multipliées, surtout après les attentats de janvier, comme une réponse abjecte à l’horreur des massacres. La hausse a été moins forte après les attentats de novembre. Et c’est cela qu’il faut comprendre de toute urgence: ne pas céder à une tentation vengeresse en réponse aux tueries des djihadistes.

Je pense d’ailleurs que l’on gagnerait en sérénité si, plutôt que se saisir de faits dont on ignore les causes et de les relayer dans tous les médias, on les considérait non pas en raison du nombre de plaintes déposées, mais après résultat d’enquêtes. Il faudrait analyser dans le détail les dates, les faits, les auteurs et les motivations.

Peut-être conviendrait-il aussi d’étudier de près les menaces et les discours que des prédicateurs proches des courants fréristes, salafistes, wahhabites délivrent à leurs fidèles ou lancent contre des personnalités dont le seul tort est de s’exprimer. N’oublions jamais qu’être accusé d’être islamophobe tue.


Meurtre d’Ilan Halimi/10e: Arrêtez de nous embêter avec ce fait divers (Tortured and assassinated in France because he was Jewish: Ten years on, France still can’t seem to come to grips with its antisemitism)

13 février, 2016

GaucheFinkieilan – Spotlightquotes
Quiconque reçoit en mon nom un petit enfant comme celui-ci, me reçoit moi-même. Mais, si quelqu’un scandalisait un de ces petits qui croient en moi, il vaudrait mieux pour lui qu’on suspendît à son cou une meule de moulin, et qu’on le jetât au fond de la mer. Jésus (Matthieu 18: 6)
Ilan Jacques Halimi, torturé et assassiné en France parce qu’il était juif à l’âge de 23 ans. Pierre tombale d’Ilan Halimi à Jérusalem
S’il faut un village pour élever un gamin, il faut aussi un village pour en abuser un. Avocat arménien du film Spolight)
When you’re a poor kid from a poor family, religion counts for a lot. And when a priest pays attention to you it’s a big deal. He asks you to collect the hymnals or take out the trash, you feel special. It’s like God asking for help. And maybe it’s a little weird when he tells you a dirty joke but now you got a secret together so you go along. Then he shows you a porno mag, and you go along. And you go along, and you go along, until one day he asks you to jerk him off or give him a blow job. And so you go along with that too. Because you feel trapped. Because he has groomed you. How do you say no to God, right?  Phil Saviano (activiste dans Spotlight)
Tout le monde sait grosso modo ce qu’est un «bouc émissaire»: c’est une personne sur laquelle on fait retomber les torts des autres. Le bouc émissaire (synonyme approximatif: souffre-douleur) est un individu innocent sur lequel va s’acharner un groupe social pour s’exonérer de sa propre faute ou masquer son échec. Souvent faible ou dans l’incapacité de se rebeller, la victime endosse sans protester la responsabilité collective qu’on lui impute, acceptant comme on dit de «porter le chapeau». Il y dans l’Histoire des boucs émissaires célèbres. Dreyfus par exemple a joué ce rôle dans l’Affaire à laquelle il a été mêlé de force: on a fait rejaillir sur sa seule personne toute la haine qu’on éprouvait pour le peuple juif: c’était le «coupable idéal»… Ainsi le bouc émissaire est une «victime expiatoire», une personne qui paye pour toutes les autres: l’injustice étant à la base de cette élection/désignation, on ne souhaite à personne d’être pris pour le bouc émissaire d’un groupe social, quel qu’il soit (peuple, ethnie, entreprise, école, équipe, famille, secte). René Girard
Le peuple juif, ballotté d’expulsion en expulsion, est bien placé, certes, pour mettre les mythes en question et repérer plus vite que tant d’autres peuples les phénomènes victimaires dont il est souvent la victime. Il fait preuve d’une perspicacité exceptionnelle au sujet des foules persécutrices et de leur tendance à se polariser contre les étrangers, les isolés, les infirmes, les éclopés de toutes sortes. Cet avantage chèrement payé ne diminue en rien l’universalité de la vérité publique, il ne nous permet pas de tenir cette vérité pour relative. René Girard
Le judaïque et le chrétien passent pour trop obsédés (…) par les persécutions pour ne pas entretenir avec elles un rapport trouble qui suggère leur culpabilité. Pour appréhender le malentendu dans son énormité, il faut le transposer dans une affaire de victime injustement condamnée, une affaire si bien éclaircie désormais qu’elle exclut tout malentendu. À l’époque où le capitaine Dreyfus, condamné pour un crime qu’il n’avait pas commis, purgeait sa peine à l’autre bout du monde, d’un côté il y avait les « antidreyfusards » extrêmement nombreux et parfaitement sereins et satisfaits car ils tenaient leur victime collective et se félicitaient de la voir justement châtiée. De l’autre côté il y avait les défenseurs de Dreyfus, très peu nombreux d’abord et qui passèrent longtemps pour des traîtres patentés ou, au mieux, pour des mécontents professionnels, de véritables obsédés, toujours occupés à remâcher toutes sortes de griefs et de soupçons dont personne autour d’eux ne voyait le bien-fondé. On cherchait dans la morbidité personnelle ou dans les préjugés politiques la raison du comportement dreyfusard. En réalité, l’antidreyfusisme était un véritable mythe, une accusation fausse universellement confondue avec la vérité, entretenue par une contagion mimétique si surexcitée par le préjugé antisémite qu’aucun fait pendant des années ne parvint à l’ébranler. Ceux qui célèbrent l’« innocence » des mythes, leur joie de vivre, leur bonne santé et qui opposent tout cela au soupçon maladif de la Bible et des Évangiles commettent la même erreur, je pense, que ceux qui optaient hier pour l’antidreyfusisme contre le dreyfusisme. C’est bien ce que proclamait à l’époque un écrivain nommé Charles Péguy. Si les dreyfusards n’avaient pas combattu pour imposer leur point de vue, s’ils n’avaient pas souffert, au moins certains d’entre eux, pour la vérité, s’ils avaient admis, comme on le fait de nos jours, que le fait même de croire en une vérité absolue est le vrai péché contre l’esprit, Dreyfus n’aurait jamais été réhabilité, le mensonge aurait triomphé. Si on admire les mythes qui ne voient de victimes nulle part, et si on condamne la Bible et les Évangiles parce qu’au contraire ils en voient partout, on renouvelle l’illusion de ceux qui, à l’époque héroïque de l’Affaire, refusaient d’envisager la possibilité d’une erreur judiciaire. Les dreyfusards ont fait triompher à grand-peine une vérité aussi absolue, intransigeante et dogmatique que celle de Joseph dans son opposition à la violence mythologique. René Girard
Pour comprendre la question du bouc émissaire, il faut la comparer avec celle des boucs émissaires modernes. Ceux-ci sont très faciles à identifier, parce que notre société tout entière les a reconnus. Je pense, en particulier, à l’affaire Dreyfus. Dans ce dernier exemple, on a affaire à un véritable mythe, au sens où je l’entends, parce qu’il y a une victime innocente qui est condamnée par tout le monde, et d’une certaine manière transformée en personnage mythique. Le colonel Picquart et les premiers individus qui se sont élevés contre cette condamnation ont dû souffrir comme Dreyfus lui-même, être en quelque sorte martyrs, parce qu’ils se sont opposés non seulement à toutes les autorités, mais à une opinion publique qui était refermée mimétiquement sur elle-même. La vérité a néanmoins triomphé. Si dans cinq mille ans on retrouve les textes de l’affaire Dreyfus en vrac, les savants les étudieront ; si, ne sachant plus le français, ils se mettent à travailler statistiquement sur ces textes, ils y trouveront cent mille choses, toutes différentes, et en tireront des conclusions déconstructrices et très modernes, constatant qu’il y a des milliers d’interprétations de l’affaire Dreyfus et jugeant qu’elles se valent toutes, qu’elles ne sont ni vraies ni fausses. Ce ne sera pas vrai : en réalité, il n’y a que deux interprétations qui comptent, celle qui déclare la victime innocente et celle qui la dit coupable. La première est absolument vraie, et on ne peut pas la relativiser. La seconde est absolument fausse, et on ne peut pas relativiser sa fausseté. C’est ce qu’il faut dire aux étudiants à qui on apprend, aujourd’hui, que la vérité n’existe pas. René Girard
L’affaire des abus sexuels commis à Rotherham sur au moins 1 400 enfants est particulièrement choquante par son ampleur, mais aussi du fait de l’inaction des autorités. En cause : leur peur d’être accusées de racisme et leur tendance à dissimuler leurs défaillances. (…) Selon l’ancienne inspectrice des affaires sociales, au moins 1 400 enfants ont été victimes d’exploitation sexuelle entre 1997 et 2013. Nombre d’entre eux ont subi des viols à répétition de la part des membres de bandes dont les agissements étaient connus ou auraient dû l’être. Les enfants qui résistaient étaient battus. Ceux qui osaient parler était traités avec mépris par les adultes censés les protéger. (…) Personne à la mairie, dit-on, n’a osé dénoncer les bandes majoritairement asiatiques qui ont commis ces violences, de crainte d’être accusé de racisme. Force est de reconnaître que le racisme, même inconscient (tout comme le sexisme et l’homophobie), est aujourd’hui montré du doigt dans les services publics. Au point que beaucoup préfèrent fermer les yeux sur des viols d’enfants plutôt que de prendre le risque de subir ce type d’accusations. The Spectator
Spotlight is a fantastic film about the importance of “outsiders”, institutional corruption, thorough investigative journalism, and the dire consequences of inaction. Spotlight begins with the Boston Globe receiving a new Editor In Chief, Marty Baron, an awkward outsider (he’s Jewish, and not from Boston) who is viewed with suspicion by the staff. Marty tasks the Spotlight team to investigate a case of a Catholic priest who is allegedly a serial molester. The story snowballs gradually from there. Almost immediately the Spotlight team is hit with resistance within the Globe about their investigative methods and sources. The Catholic Church, an incredibly powerful institution in the city of Boston, uses all its might to dissuade Spotlight from continuing their research, but they steadfastly continue to investigate these allegations. The Catholic Church itself is portrayed in the film as a powerful, resourceful, and dangerous institution.  The Church has control and/or influence with nearly every major institution in the city of Boston. The “small-town” inclusiveness of the city only further allows the Church to abuse and misuse its power, while vigorously opposing or discrediting anyone who attempts to speak out. The Church even indirectly benefits from the shame of the victims and the parish pressuring them to keep silent. Mitchell Garabedian, an Armenian lawyer (another vital outsider standing against the Church) representing dozens of alleged victims, posits, “The Church thinks in centuries Mr. Rezendes, do you really think your paper has the resources to take this on?” As the Spotlight team traverses across the city of Boston in search of the truth, a church is often looming in the background, as if watching their every move. This is the behemoth the Spotlight team must defeat. (…) Their triumph reveals the corruption and gross negligence of not only the Catholic Church, but other powerful Boston institutions. Their efforts come at a high personal price as the investigation is emotionally draining on the reporters, all of whom were raised catholic. Each have their faith shattered by the investigation and are haunted by the results. Keaton’s reaction, in particular, toward the end of the film is utterly devastating. Its conclusion is as satisfying as it is tragic. It took two outsiders, one an Armenian lawyer, and the other a Jewish editor to get the ball rolling for the Spotlight team. Garabedian in particular is critical to their success and he illuminates the issue with a scathing indictment of Boston’s corruption, “If it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a village to abuse one.” (…) The final numbers revealed at the end will undoubtedly horrify you and leave you feeling depressed and angry. Why was this allowed to go on so long? Why did it take so long to uncover it? For Spotlight the answer is simple, no one wanted to look.  Steve Baqqi
The movie makes the case that it takes an outsider—like Baron, a Jewish editor new to a Catholic town, or the Armenian attorney (Stanley Tucci) making sure these cases actually go to trial—to enact change in a city as insular as Boston. A.A. Dowd
Spotlight (…) tells the story behind the story—how the paper uncovered the Catholic Church’s cover-up of a scandal that was hiding in plain sight, indeed, in the Globe’s own archives. Most films about journalism are cringe-worthy. Not this one. The film vividly documents what reporters do at their best. A story usually begins with a question. Something doesn’t make sense. Reporters begin with a premise and then gather facts that support or contradict their hypothesis. The best journalists follow those facts without “fear or favor,” as the New York Times, my former employer, likes to put it. Spotlight’s reporters slowly build their case with each new lurid revelation. Nothing comes easily. The film also lays bare the Catholic Church’s hold on Boston politics and the city’s deeply ingrained anti-Semitism and its xenophobic disdain for “outsiders.” It reveals the political and financial pressures imposed on the Globe and its investigative team by the Church and its powerful friends in a heavily Catholic city as the Globe’s Spotlight team starts to uncover the truth about decades of horrifying abuse, and the inadequacy of their own beliefs and assumptions. The Globe’s four-person team soon discovers, for instance, that its initial theory that pedophile priests are an anomaly—a few “rotten apples,” as the Church’s representatives and supporters repeatedly assure them—is wrong. Clips from the paper’s own “morgue,” where earlier stories yellowing with age are stored, show that the Globe had run a few modest stories years earlier about a priest accused of molesting several children. But the paper failed to follow up. The editors assumed, or wanted to believe, that this abuse was an isolated incident. Subsequent tips to reporters and editors were ignored. Spotlight’s reporters find that crucial documents have disappeared from court house files. This is Boston, after all, and Cardinal Bernard Law, then the head of the diocese, has friends everywhere. The team discovers that child abuse at the hands of God’s self-appointed disciples is no secret. In fact, it is widely known among Boston’s politicians, prosecutors, and other powerful parishioners who knew or suspected the prevalence of sexual crimes committed by priests against children but chose not to speak out. Their fear of spiritual and social excommunication allowed the abuse to fester. It takes a village to raise a child, observes Mitchell Garabedian, an irascible lawyer skillfully played by Stanley Tucci, who represents many of Boston’s child victims. And it takes the silence of a village to perpetuate such abuse. The film bravely acknowledges that the Globe itself was among those powerful institutions that did all too little for far too long. The Globe, having been purchased by the New York Times in 1993, beset by layoffs and declining subscribers and revenue, was focused on other news before it finally confronted the horrifying truth that it had declined to pursue for decades, while the number of shattered lives mounted. The decision to pursue the inquiry was made by the Globe’s chief editor, Martin Baron, who was a newcomer to Boston and who now heads the Washington Post. Brilliantly depicted by Liev Schreiber, Baron is a Florida native and not one of those Irish-American journalists who have most recently staffed the paper. Socially awkward, intellectually aloof, unmarried, uninterested in tickets to Red Sox games, Baron lacks the “people skills” that are crucial to advancement in most professional bureaucracies. He was the first Jew to head the paper. “So the new editor of the Boston Globe is an unmarried man of the Jewish faith who hates baseball?” Jim Sullivan, a lawyer who has represented priests, asks Walter “Robby” Robinson, editor of the Spotlight series, who is portrayed by Michael Keaton, an actor’s actor.(…) Baron’s outsider status, his Jewishness, is a natural target. Baron is not one of us, says Peter Conley (Paul Guilfoyle), who does the Church’s bidding. He reminds Robby over a drink at the Fairmont Hotel’s Oak Bar that people need the church, now more than ever. While neither the Church nor Cardinal Law (Len Cariou) who heads it in Boston is perfect, Conley acknowledges, why would the Globe risk destroying the faith of thousands of readers over a “few bad apples”? But neither Robby, who is deeply grounded in Boston, nor Baron, who has no familial stake in the community, is cowed. Conley tries driving a wedge between them. Baron is an outsider just “trying to make his mark,” he warns Robby. “He’ll be here for a few years and move on. Just like he did in New York and Miami,” he says. “Where you gonna go?” Baron is not the film’s only outsider. The most passionate member of the Spotlight team, Michael Rezendes (Mark Ruffalo), may hail from east Boston, but his family is Portuguese. Garabedian, the lawyer who has represented 86 local victims and one of Mark’s sources—is an Armenian. In a bar, they talk obliquely about how city insiders pressure outsiders to conform.(…) For decades, the victims’ stories cried out for public exposure. The Globe’s Spotlight team provided it. This understated, remarkable film documents that achievement. Tablet
J’ai trouvé fascinant de voir comment ce type, Marty Baron, qui vient de Miami, propose dès son premier jour au Boston Globe d’enquêter sur une possible tentative de l’Église catholique d’étouffer un scandale. C’était très audacieux de sa part. En outre, l’affaire Spotlight permettait de rendre un hommage appuyé à la tradition des grands reportages de la presse écrite. Ce qui m’inquiète énormément, c’est qu’il reste très peu de journalistes d’investigation aujourd’hui par rapport à il y a une quinzaine d’années. Grâce à ce film, je me suis dit qu’on allait pouvoir montrer l’impact du travail de fond de journalistes d’investigation aguerris. Qu’y a-t-il de plus important que le sort de nos enfants ? J’ai grandi dans le catholicisme, si bien que je connais bien l’institution, et que j’ai du respect et de l’admiration pour elle. Dans ce film, il ne s’agit pas d’éreinter l’Église, mais de se poser la question de savoir comment un tel phénomène peut se produire. L’Église s’est rendue coupable – et continue de le faire dans une certaine mesure – de violence institutionnelle, non seulement en comptant des violeurs d’enfants dans ses rangs, mais en étouffant leurs crimes. Comment ces actes épouvantables ont-ils pu être perpétrés pendant des décennies sans que quiconque ne proteste ? Tom McCarthy
That moment was probably the one moment where we took something that was not [precisely true] and we felt like we had the right to include it. To me, this is where the movie gets really compelling, because it certainly isn’t black and white. I think it raises the specter of just good reporters going after a bad institution, into more of a question of societal deference and complicity toward institutional or individual power. Intellectually, Josh and I really started to engage on a whole new level when we started to tap into that. Tom McCarthy (scénariste et réalisateur)
Robby, to my mind, is a hero. The whole, Why didn’t the paper get this earlier? — we sort of put that on Robby in the movie, because Robby is a symbol for us, the Everyman. In a lot of ways, he is our way in to the movie, and we wanted to turn it back on the viewer. Because to me, this is a collective failure, and it’s a question for all of us: Why didn’t we get this earlier? It’s noble in how he takes the blame for it, how he falls on his sword. I think we found that incredibly heroic, because that also was the interaction we had with him. Josh Singer (co-scénariste)
We’re reporters and we stumble around the dark a lot. We start out pretty damn ignorant, and we don’t even know how to ask the right questions until we sort of dig around for awhile. And the film shows that. The film shows that it’s sort of a two steps forward one step back approach. And by doing it that way, by having us uncover [our initial oversight], Tom makes it possible for a pretty large audience to confront something that they might otherwise avert their eyes to. Walter Robinson
The act is a terrible act, and the consequence is a terrible consequence, and there are a lot of folk who have suffered a great deal of pain and anguish. And that’s a source of profound pain and anguish for me and should be for the whole church. Any time that I made a decision, it was based upon a judgment that with the treatment that had been afforded and with the ongoing treatment and counseling that would be provided, that this person would not be [a] harm to others. I think we’ve come to appreciate and understand that whatever the assessment might be, the nature of some activity is such that it’s best that the person not be in a parish assignment. Cardinal Bernard Law (Nov 2, 2001)
Spotlight ignores the simple fact that years ago, Church officials acted time after time on the advice of trained « expert » psychologists from around the country when dealing with abusive priests. Secular psychologists played a major role in the entire Catholic Church abuse scandal, as these doctors repeatedly insisted to Church leaders that abusive priests were fit to return to ministry after receiving « treatment » under their care. Indeed, one of the leading psychologists in the country recommended to the Archdiocese of Boston in both 1989 and 1990 that – despite the notorious John Geoghan’s two-decade record of abuse – it was both « reasonable and therapeutic » to return Geoghan to active pastoral ministry including work « with children. » And it is not as if the Boston Globe could plead ignorance to the fact that the Church had for years been sending abusive priests to therapy and then returning them to ministry on the advice of prominent and credentialed doctors. As we reported earlier this year, back in 1992 – a full decade before the Globe unleashed its reporters against the Church – the Globe itself was enthusiastically promoting in its pages the psychological treatment of sex offenders, including priests – as « highly effective » and « dramatic. » The Globe knew that the Church’s practice of sending abusive priests off to treatment was not just some diabolical attempt to deflect responsibility and cover-up wrongdoing, but a genuine attempt to treat aberrant priests that was based on the best secular scientific advice of the day. Yet a mere ten years later, in 2002, the Globe acted in mock horror that the Church had employed such treatments. It bludgeoned the Church for doing in 1992 exactly what the Globe itself said it should be doing. The hypocrisy of the Globe is simply off the charts. And the issue of the Church’s use of these psychologists was not a surprise to the Globe when it actually interviewed Cardinal Bernard Law in November 2001, only two months before the Globe’s historic coverage: Reflecting on the most difficult issue of his tenure in Boston, Law said he is pained over the harm caused to Catholic youngsters and their families by clergy sexual misconduct, but that he always tried to prevent such abuse. The Media report
One of the film’s most important twists — one that even eluded the Globe — fell into the filmmakers’ laps by accident. [The following contains SPOILERS.] In Spotlight, which the pair co-wrote and McCarthy directed, the dramatic weight of the film is epitomized by a line from the crusading attorney played by Stanley Tucci: “If it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a village to abuse one.” The film asks the difficult question: Was everyone, including the media, too deferential to the Church while crimes were happening in their backyards? Late in the film, Robinson pressures one of his sources, a lawyer named Eric MacLeish (Billy Crudup), for information, and the slick attorney throws it back in his face: “I already sent you a list of names… years ago!” he says to Robinson and Pfeiffer. “I had 20 priests in Boston alone, but I couldn’t go after them without the press, so I sent you guys a list of names… and you buried it!” Except that exchange never actually happened. Nor did the scene where Pfeiffer searches the archives and brings the clipping of the December 1993 story to Robinson, proving MacLeish correct: it ran on B42 and didn’t include any of the priests’ names. And a later scene, where Robinson admits to his colleagues that he had been the Metro editor back in ‘93, accepting his role in not catching the story sooner, didn’t happen either. In reality, these sequences played out during the screenwriting process — when MacLeish told Singer and McCarthy. Though they already knew the main beats of the story they wanted to tell, they met with the Boston attorney — who’d represented numerous plaintiffs in complaints against the Church in the early 1990s — if only to help with casting. But not long into their chat, MacLeish dropped the bomb. “It was a little bit like the moment that’s in the movie: You had 20 priests’ [names] in Boston?” says Singer. “My reaction was quite similar to Rachel and Michael’s in that scene: That can’t possibly be true. Tom and I sort of looked at each other but didn’t say anything. But to double-check, I went back to the archives, and this article popped up, buried on page B42 [on the Metro section]. I was flabbergasted. I called Tom as soon as I got the article and said, ‘What do we do?’” They emailed Robinson the story, not knowing what to expect. Robinson responded quickly. “He owned up to it,” says Singer. “He had just taken over Metro and didn’t remember the story but, ‘This was on my watch and clearly we should’ve followed up on it.’ When we went to write the scene in the movie, we based it a lot on what Robby said there.” In the film, Keaton accepts his share of responsibility and asks his team, “Why didn’t we get it sooner?” And in real life, Robinson doesn’t dodge. “It happened on my watch and I’ll go to confession on it,” says Robinson, who recently returned to the Globe as an editor at large. “Like any journalist who’s been around this long, I’ve made my share of mistakes. But I have no memory of it. And if we’d found it in 2001, I don’t know if I would’ve had a memory of it then either. Looking at it from this vantage point 22 years later, I just have to scratch my head and wonder what happened. Should it have been played more prominently? In hindsight, based upon on what we later learned, yes, obviously.” For Singer and McCarthy, the revelation was a dramatic gift, even if they had to utilize some artistic license. “That moment was probably the one moment where we took something that was not [precisely true] and we felt like we had the right to include it,” says McCarthy. “To me, this is where the movie gets really compelling, because it certainly isn’t black and white. I think it raises the specter of just good reporters going after a bad institution, into more of a question of societal deference and complicity toward institutional or individual power. Intellectually, Josh and I really started to engage on a whole new level when we started to tap into that.” Because McCarthy and Singer had concluded from their research that the Globe was probably guilty of sins of omission, if not commission, when it came to its coverage of the Church in the early 1990s. (…) But if there was some editorial restraint, it was reflected by public opinion. “For the most part, [stories about clergy sex abuse were greeted with] disbelief,” says James Franklin, the Globe’s former religion reporter who wrote the December 1993 story that MacLeish cites in the film. “It was regarded as something extraordinary, as something obscene. There was always a suspicion that guys like me, guys like us, were sniping unfairly.” Matchan encountered the same resistance. “After I finished that magazine story, I thought, there’s so much more to say about this. I wanted to write a book about it,” she says. “So I contacted an agent, and she loved the idea. And I wrote a book proposal, she sent it out to a lot of publishing houses, and she got back these letters that just said, ‘This is a great proposal but nobody would ever read a book about sexual abuse by the clergy.’ That was the thinking in those days.” “Every archdiocese is in a city with a major paper — everybody missed this,” says Robinson. “Who can imagine that such an iconic institution could be responsible for causing such a devastating impact on the lives of thousands of children and covering it up? It’s almost beyond belief.” Even with the 1993 hiccups, it’s essential to note that the Boston Globe was the first to crack a scandal that reached far beyond Boston. As has been revealed in subsequent investigations around the world, Boston was not unique, and the Church has been forced to shell out billions in settlements to the victims of clergy sex abuse in other states and countries. “Robby, to my mind, is a hero,” says Singer. “The whole, Why didn’t the paper get this earlier? — we sort of put that on Robby in the movie, because Robby is a symbol for us, the Everyman. In a lot of ways, he is our way in to the movie, and we wanted to turn it back on the viewer. Because to me, this is a collective failure, and it’s a question for all of us: Why didn’t we get this earlier? It’s noble in how he takes the blame for it, how he falls on his sword. I think we found that incredibly heroic, because that also was the interaction we had with him.”  Robinson has been front and center in the film’s promotion, in part because the film captures his profession at its best, at a time in 2015 when most newspapers and media outlets are slashing staff and eliminating investigative reporting. “We’re reporters and we stumble around the dark a lot,” he says. “We start out pretty damn ignorant, and we don’t even know how to ask the right questions until we sort of dig around for awhile. And the film shows that. The film shows that it’s sort of a two steps forward one step back approach. And by doing it that way, by having us uncover [our initial oversight], Tom makes it possible for a pretty large audience to confront something that they might otherwise avert their eyes to.” Entertainment weekly
The monolithic power of the Catholic Church (until 2002) over civic, religious, and spiritual affairs in the city of Boston is chilling. It extended even into the Boston Globe where employees (many of whom were Catholic) simply knew you don’t take on the Catholic Church. They are even trained to believe that when the Catholic Church dismisses claims, they can’t possibly be true. It took an outside editor from New York to press the issue. (…) The kicker is that all the evidence was hiding in plain sight. Much is made of the fact that B.C. High (a Catholic Jesuit boys high school that some of the reporters themselves attended, maintained an infamous priest-coach molester on staff) is directly across the street from the Boston Globe building. Ironically, both the Catholic Church in Boston and the Boston Globe were at the height of their influence at the beginning of the new millennium, while a third character–the internet–is just becoming a serious player. (…) Very self-effacingly — and I would say unnecessarily and misplaced — the film blames The Globe itself in a big way for not reporting the story years earlier when lawyers and victims provided plenty of damning information that went ignored. Whatever culpability The Globe bears, they more than made up for it by compiling overwhelming, carefully-researched evidence that wouldn’t be just another isolated story that would get buried. “The Church” and Cardinal Law are distant, cold, uncaring shadows. The abusing priests are sick and distorted men — almost excused. The names Geoghan, Shanley and Talbot (among others) will conjure up ugly memories for all who lived at the heart of this nightmare or on its peripheries. (…) The faces and voices of the victims are given three-dimensional reality and the major focus. Even the heroic, crusading lawyer, Mitchell Garabedian — who insisted on bringing victims’ cases to the courts to expose the Church’s wrongdoing — is modestly underplayed. (…) Part of the initial incredulity of sectors of the public and the average Catholic in the pew to the Globe’s scoop was due to the Globe’s notorious anti-Catholicism since its very inception in 1872 (not unlike most of the old Boston WASP establishment). And many just didn’t believe that so many heinous crimes of this nature could have been so well hidden for so long. If it were true, surely we would have known? Surely we would have heard some rumors and gossip? Whoever did know something was silenced with hush money, or gave up when crushed by the power of the Church’s legal and “moral authority” arsenal and sway. But it didn’t take long for the undeniable, verifiable veracity of the charges to grip the city and the world. (…) There is precious little aftermath in the film, as it wraps up on the day the first big story is released (there were a total of 600 stories run relentlessly about the scandal for at least a year afterward in the Globe). A few words of Epilogue are given, and then we are left with a gaping wound of sadness. (…) Cardinal Law (…) in reality (…) was a magnetic, charismatic personality who had actually been a media favorite when he first came to Boston. (…) The one priest molester we see being interviewed begins to say that he was raped, but the thought was not continued. (The rest of that statistic is that it was discovered that some priests who molested children were molested by priests themselves when they were children. They grew up, become priests and continued the cycle.) (…) It’s just raw evil on display. Perhaps this is the best way for this particular film to handle this grave matter. Sexual abuse destroys hope. No soothing, reassuring sugar-coating or “Hollywood ending” in this film.(…) God is pretty much absent from the film. The one tragically poignant mention of God is from a male victim, now an adult, who says: “You don’t say no to God” (meaning when a priest propositioned him at twelve years old, the only right answer was “yes”). Again, perhaps this was the best way to handle “God” in this story that had nothing to do with a good God, and everything to do with bad men. The Church, although divinely instituted by Christ and guided by the Holy Spirit, is still human and sinful because of the free will of her members — even those who hold the authority. Thankfully, the sacraments and everything we need still operates through these men, regardless of their personal holiness. (…) “Spotlight” is an important film to see, even if you kept up and delved into these dark waters — as I did — when they first hit the shore. The restrained even-handedness of the storytelling is remarkable and will prevent it from being a “controversial” film. There’s a lot of dialogue in the film, but it’s never tedious. The narrative and the horror is in the information itself each time more is unearthed. Why should you see this film? To honor the victims, first of all, and second of all to understand how corruption — of any sort — works, in order to be vigilant and oppose it. NEVER AGAIN. Has ANY good come of all this sorrow? The suffering of the children, teens and their families has not been totally in vain. There is now a much greater awareness of the sexual abuse of minors all over the world, and new laws have been created to protect young people where there were none. (…) This problem is centuries old It’s not celibacy that is the problem, but a culture of secrecy brought about by a culture of absolute power absolute power corrupts absolutely (…) pedophiles automatically gravitate to wherever they have trusted access to children (seminaries, schools, sports teams, law enforcement, etc.) (…) anyone who reported behavior was threatened (get kicked out of seminary themselves, lose a job/position)silence=loyalty silence/playing the game=perks, advancement (…) it was keeping up appearances (bishops knew they could quash “problems,” abusers knew they would never get in trouble and would always be shielded: the perfect set-up) (…) toward the middle of the 20th century, psychiatrists and psychologists got involved (assessments, “treatment”) and kept giving the green light to put the priest back in ministry (bishops blindly “obeyed”) it wasn’t known that pedophilia is not “curable” (but it’s also not rocket science to see that a man abusing over and over and over and over again needs to be stopped, removed permanently) (…) the clergy sex abuse problems will continue unless there is courageous breaking with mentalities, cultures, habits, patterns, and cycles the presence of women in all (non-ordained) positions at all levels and places of Church life will help mitigate undisciplined male power (and male lack of empathy and sympathy) (…) child safety is everyone’s job, not just those in positions of authority. (…) Men do NOT want to be Superman or the Lone Ranger. They do NOT want to break ranks. Men are HORRIBLE at whistle-blowing. They are all about BAND OF BROTHERS. And this can be a good thing! Men are stronger together. They have each other’s backs. They can provide for and protect hearth and home better TOGETHER. The problem lies when they BAND TOGETHER FOR EVIL. To hide each other’s sins. To give each other a pass for their sins. Look the other way. Code of silence. Complete corruption. Whole cities run on this notion. But it doesn’t have to be that way. MEN NEED TO BAND TOGETHER FOR THE GOOD. Positive peer pressure. And call each other out when they need calling out. And always, always BAND TOGETHER FOR THE GOOD, NOT EVIL. Sr. Helena Burns
“If it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a village to abuse one,” is how one character here summarises the issues. This high-minded, well-intentioned movie, co-written and directed by Tom McCarthy, is about the Boston Globe’s investigative reporting team Spotlight, and its Pulitzer-winning campaign in 2001 to uncover widespread, systemic child abuse by Catholic priests in Massachusetts. The film shows that in the close-knit, clubbably loyal and very Catholic city of Boston, no one had any great interest in breaking the queasy, shame-ridden silence that made the church’s culture of abuse possible, and even tentatively suggests that the Globe itself was one of the Boston institutions affected. The paper had evidence of abuse 10 years before the campaign began, but somehow contrived to downplay and bury the story, and it took a new editor, both non-Boston and Jewish, to get things started. (…) What is interesting about this movie is that it reminds you that the “bad apple” theory of child abuse by priests was widely accepted until relatively recently. The team are stunned at the realisation that what they are working on is not like, say, a corruption case where there are more public officials on the take than they at first thought. It is a mass psychological dysfunction hidden in plain sight, which has stretched back decades or even centuries and will, unchecked, do precisely the same in the future. What McCarthy is saying in Spotlight is that threats never needed to be made. A word here, a drink there, a frown and a look on the golf course or at the charity ball, this was all that was needed to enforce a silence surrounding a transgression that most of the community could hardly believe existed anyway. It’s certainly a relevant issue in our unhappy, post-Yewtree times. The Guardian
L’étonnante enquête des quatre journalistes enquêteurs révèle ainsi l’incroyable développement tentaculaire d’un complot systémique sidérant. Boston est l’une des villes flambeaux du catholicisme, une institution puissante et totalement implanter dans l’ensemble de la ville et plus largement dans l’ensemble des États-Unis — comme le révèle le générique final du film listant les nombreuses villes américaines concernées par ce même scandale. Les méandres de cette affaire scandaleuse s’étendent donc à travers toutes les différentes sphères de la société de Boston, du système judiciaire au système éducatif. Et c’est aux journalistes de Spotlight de suivre ce jeu de pistes complexe pour dénouer l’effroyable vérité de l’affaire, résumée en ces mots par l’éditeur en chef du Boston Globe : « If it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a village to abuse one » (« s’il faut un village pour élever un enfant, il faut un village pour en maltraiter un »). L’accaparante complexité de l’affaire s’impose naturellement comme le sujet principal du film et éclipse toutes autres pistes narratives possibles : la vie privée des protagonistes, leur parcours émotionnel,  le doute conspirationniste, la crise du journalisme face à Internet et les nouvelles technologies 2.0, ou bien même l’impact historique et médiatique du 11 septembre… (…) Les cinéastes offrent ainsi au spectateur une compréhension plus juste et précise des tenants et aboutissants d’un complot effroyable, à l’échelle d’une société toute entière — et pas seulement à l’échelle américaine puisque de nombreuses villes en France et dans le monde sont citées à la fin du film. (…) Et même si de nombreux enjeux sont effleurés à travers le film — qu’ils soient moraux, sociaux, émotionnels, ou même spirituels —, une seule chose compte au final : l’implacable exposition de la vérité. Bulles de culture
Tout est vrai. L’enquête, publiée en 2001 par des journalistes du Boston Globe. Et le scandale qu’elle révéla. Durant des décennies, l’Eglise catholique locale a étouffé les abus sexuels perpétrés par des prêtres sur des enfants, et a systématiquement soustrait les coupables à la justice. Un phénomène à grande échelle : au moins un millier de victimes, rien que dans la région. Et une politique du silence qui s’étend bien ­au-delà du Massachusetts… « Spotlight » est le nom de l’équipe de journalistes qui, au bout de longs mois d’efforts, en dépit de toutes les pressions, a révélé la vérité. Ce qui lui a valu le prix Pulitzer. Le film est dopé à la même adrénaline, à la même ténacité citoyenne que son modèle évident, Les Hommes du Président, d’Alan J. Pakula, déjà basé sur un scoop historique, la révélation du scandale du Watergate par le Washington Post. Tout y est : l’effervescence en salle de rédaction, les impasses et les coups de théâtre, les résistances, les informateurs-clés. Manches retroussées, téléphone collé à l’oreille, les comédiens multiplient les morceaux de bravoure, les scènes électrisantes. Ils rivalisent d’aisance et de charisme en incarnant des figures diverses et passionnantes : Michael Keaton, vétéran de l’info, aux prises avec son propre milieu de grands bourgeois catholiques ; Liev Schreiber, rédac chef taiseux et déterminé ; Rachel McAdams, l’enquêtrice dont l’écoute et la délicatesse permettent toutes les confidences. Sans oublier Marc Ruffalo : en limier pugnace et impertinent, à la fois concentré et intense, il trouve l’un de ses plus beaux rôles. Subtils, ambigus — humains, en quelque sorte —, ces personnages ne sont pas des preux chevaliers au service du quatrième pouvoir. Ce sont des bosseurs. Le réalisateur Tom McCarthy (The Visitor, The Station Agent) a choisi, avant tout, de filmer leur travail, dans son aspect le plus quotidien et le plus endurant : une formidable mécanique de petits détails, de bouts de papier, de porte-à-porte et de méthodes différentes — l’un force les barrages, l’autre cultive ses relations. Cet hommage réaliste et vibrant à tous les chasseurs de vérité vient d’obtenir six nominations aux Oscars. Télérama
« Nous avions un projet d’attentat contre le Bataclan parce que les propriétaires sont juifs. » Cette phrase, glaçante au regard de la prise d’otages et du carnage qui aurait fait ce vendredi « une centaine de morts », selon des sources policières, a été prononcée dans les bureaux de la DCRI, en février 2011. Les services français interrogeaient alors des membres de « Jaish al-Islam », l’Armée de l’islam, soupçonnés de l’attentat qui a coûté la vie à une étudiante française au Caire en février 2009. Ils planifiaient un attentat en France et avaient donc pris pour cible la célèbre salle de spectacle parisienne. En 2007 et en 2008, le Bataclan avait déjà été sous la menace de groupes plus ou moins radicaux. En cause : la tenue régulière de conférences ou de galas d’organisations juives, notamment le « Magav », une unité de garde-frontières dépendant de la police d’Israël. En décembre 2008, alors qu’une opération de l’armée israélienne a lieu dans la bande de Gaza, les menaces autour du Bataclan se font plus précises. Sur le Web, une vidéo montrant un groupe d’une dizaine de jeunes, le visage masqué par des keffiehs, qui menacent les responsables du Bataclan à propos de l’organisation du gala annuel du Magav. À l’époque, Le Parisien y consacre un article sans que cette poignée de militants soit véritablement identifiée. Dans la foulée, ce meeting annuel sera reporté. (…) la presse israélienne rappelait que le groupe de rock Eagles of Death qui se produisait ce vendredi 13 au soir avait effectué une tournée en Israël. Le groupe avait alors dû faire face à plusieurs appels au boycott, ce qui ne les avait pas empêchés de s’y produire. Le Point
LES PRÉJUGÉS ANTISÉMITES SONT LARGEMENT RÉPANDUS AU SEIN DE LA POPULATION MUSULMANE, PLUS QUE CHEZ L’ENSEMBLE DES FRANÇAIS 51% des musulmans se déclarent d’accord avec au moins 5 des 8 stéréotypes testés 90% considèrent que les juifs sont très soudés entre eux » 74% que « les juifs ont beaucoup de pouvoir » 66% qu’« ils sont plus riches que la moyenne des Français » 67% qu’« ils sont trop présents dans les médias » 62% qu’« ils sont plus attachés à Israël qu’à la France » 26% qu’« ils sont plus intelligents que la moyenne » 29% qu’« ils ne sont pas vraiment des Français comme les autres » Sondage IPSOS-JDD
You are our first ambassadors. Be the ones who lead others, even the reticent, those who might not want to see the film,” Arcady told a crowd at the Paris preview for 24 Days. “Even those who say, ‘Oh la la, Ilan Halimi, that’s a fait divers [a petty news item], stop bothering us with that.’ And seeing the film you will understand that it is not a petty news item. And those who still think that today, they are the ones who really needed to be persuaded to come see the film. Alexandre Arcady
Dix ans plus tard, nous continuons à éprouver un remords collectif, celui d’avoir hésité à désigner par son nom la haine antisémite . (…) Derrière ce crime il y avait l’antisémitisme et la haine de l’autre. Le supplice d’Ilan Halimi annonçait à sa manière une série de gestes assassins : il annonçait les tueries de Mohamed Merah en 2012, la fusillade du musée juif de Bruxelles en 201 ou encore le drame de l’Hyper Cacher l’an dernier. Bernard Cazeneuve (ministre de l’Intérieur)
Malheureusement, les faits m’ont donné raison. Quand on aborde de façon critique la politique du gouvernement israélien ou encore les prises de position des intellectuels et institutions communautaires en France sur la question du conflit israélo-palestinien, on se met forcément un peu en danger. Il y a deux risques. Le premier est d’être accusé d’antisémitisme plus ou moins assumé. Cela a été le cas. J’ai été attaqué de façon scandaleuse par un journaliste, Frédéric Haziza, et par Julien Dray, dont on peut par ailleurs s’étonner qu’il soit encore élu au conseil régional d’Île-de-France au vu de l’ensemble de son œuvre et par rapport au désir de moralité qui semble gouverner dans les hautes sphères. Ceci étant, après cette polémique odieuse m’accusant de nier la dimension antisémite du meurtre d’Ilan Halimi, une pétition a été lancée et a recueilli plusieurs milliers de signatures sur le thème « Stop à la chasse aux sorcières ». Lorsque je regarde la liste des signataires et leur réputation morale, je suis réconforté. Le second risque, c’est le black-out. Les médias dans leur grande majorité n’ont pas voulu parler du livre et de ses thèses. La tentation chez beaucoup de mes collègues chercheurs et de nombreux journalistes consiste à considérer que ça divise l’opinion ou qu’il n’y a que des coups à prendre et qu’il est donc plus prudent de ne pas aborder ce sujet. Mais, en attendant, le débat continue, et parfois, de façon plus malsaine. D’ailleurs, je suis pris entre deux écueils, les ultras pro-israéliens m’accusent d’antisémitisme. Et lorsque, dans des débats un peu chauds, je m’élève contre l’utilisation du terme « entité sioniste » pour parler de l’État d’Israël, que je refuse la vision d’une presse contrôlée par les juifs ou que je dénonce Dieudonné, d’autres m’accusent d’être payé par les juifs. Il y a donc là un enjeu essentiel pour notre débat démocratique. Combattre l’antisémitisme mais refuser le chantage consistant à faire un amalgame entre critique politique du gouvernement israélien et antisémitisme. (…) Le discours des institutions juives ou des intellectuels communautaires, pour ne pas dire communautaristes, répète en boucle que l’antisémitisme est très fort en France, qu’il y a une « montée » de ce phénomène, et que la menace antisémite est plus importante et virulente que les autres formes de racisme. Il faudrait alors plus se mobiliser contre cette forme de racisme. Et, en annexe, ne pas critiquer le gouvernement israélien car cela alimenterait l’antisémitisme. Pour une grande partie de la population qui vit de nombreuses discriminations au quotidien, les Noirs et les Arabes, ce discours est vécu de façon assez douloureuse. Ils ont l’impression qu’on sous-estime les discriminations dont ils sont victimes et que certains doivent être plus protégés que d’autres. Il y a alors danger. Les études et les faits montrent que l’antisémitisme, même s’il n’a pas disparu, est nettement moins fort qu’il y a une ou deux générations en France. En même temps, chaque année au dîner du Crif, le président parle d’une montée de l’antisémitisme. En fait, le grand revirement est que l’antisémitisme est moins fort mais le soutien à Israël dans la population française l’est également. (…) La défense inconditionnelle de l’État d’Israël des institutions juives, quelle que soit son action ou sa politique, très rapidement reliée à la lutte contre l’antisémitisme contribue à faire peur aux juifs français. Cela vient poser une barrière entre juifs et non-juifs autour de cet enjeu du soutien à Israël. Cela est très dangereux. On voit, par exemple, sur quelles bases le Crif a décidé de ne plus inviter le Parti communiste à son dîner annuel. Que l’on me montre la moindre déclaration d’un dirigeant communiste qui verse dans l’antisémitisme. Par contre, on reproche aux communistes leur solidarité avec la cause palestinienne. Le Crif privilégie ainsi son soutien à Israël au détriment du combat contre l’antisémitisme. Tout en se disant en faveur d’un règlement pacifique, les institutions et les intellectuels communautaires pilonnent systématiquement ceux qui sont tout autant pour la paix mais qui estiment que le blocage de la situation provient plus de l’occupant que de l’occupé. Les institutions juives mettent en avant la lutte contre l’antisémitisme pour tétaniser toute expression politique contraire ou critique à l’égard du gouvernement israélien. Elle est directement taxée soit d’antisémitisme, soit de le nourrir en important le conflit du Proche-Orient. Cet argument est pour le moins paradoxal puisque ce sont les mêmes qui, sans cesse, appellent les juifs de France à démontrer une solidarité infaillible au gouvernement israélien. Ils sont donc très largement responsables de ce faux lien. (…) Il y a eu Mohamed Merah qui a tué des enfants parce qu’ils étaient juifs. Nous ne sommes pas à l’abri d’un tel acte terroriste qui, par définition, est incontrôlable et on ne peut pas nier l’existence d’un tel risque. Il y a eu aussi l’affaire Ilan Halimi, même si plus complexe, qui a une dimension antisémite mais qui ne peut pas se résumer uniquement à un acte antisémite. Mais, il n’y a pas de recrudescence d’agressions ou d’injures. Les actes antisémites, bien sûr toujours trop nombreux, représentent un nombre faible face à l’ensemble des actes violents répertoriés, dans la rue, à l’école, en milieu hospitalier, etc. Je donne à ce sujet des chiffres très précis. Nous vivons dans une société violente. Et puis, surtout, il y a beaucoup d’agressions racistes qui touchent d’autres catégories de populations. Les actes antimusulmans ou anti-Noirs sont très nombreux alors qu’ils ne semblent pas faire autant l’objet d’une vigoureuse dénonciation des médias ou des pouvoirs publics. Cela est largement ressenti. Les médias et les élus de la République font très souvent du « deux poids, deux mesures », aggravent un mal qu’ils disent vouloir combattre. (…) Je cite plusieurs exemples d’agressions d’autres communautés, pas seulement arabes, de faits graves pas ou peu médiatisés. Cela au final se retourne contre les juifs français car cela crée un sentiment d’être traité différemment. Il ne faut pas ignorer l’existence d’une nouvelle forme d’antisémitisme en banlieue aujourd’hui. Cela est dû plus à une forme de jalousie sociétale qu’à une haine raciale. Il y a le sentiment que l’on en fait plus pour les uns que pour les autres. Par ailleurs, le Crif joue à la fois un rôle de repoussoir et de modèle. Beaucoup de musulmans y voient la bonne méthode pour se faire entendre des pouvoirs publics et veulent faire pareil. Le risque est de se retrouver communauté contre communauté. Faire ce constat, ce n’est pas vouloir dresser les uns contre les autres. Je réclame au contraire l’égalité de traitement. La République doit considérer tous ses enfants de la même façon. Quels que soient l’histoire et les drames vécus précédemment, il n’y a pas de raison que certains soient plus protégés que les autres. Je remarque toutefois que l’on parle beaucoup plus des dégradations de mosquée, des agressions et des injures islamophobes. Une prise de conscience est en train de s’opérer dans les médias certainement liée à la pression populaire et aux réseaux sociaux. Pascal Boniface (mai 2004)
L’antisémitisme, répandu parmi les jeunes musulmans en Europe, possède des caractéristiques spécifiques qui le distinguent de la haine des Juifs présente au sein de la population générale, dans les sociétés qui les environnent. Pourtant, il existe aussi des points communs. De nombreuses affirmations passe-partout, concernant l’origine de l’antisémitisme musulman en Europe, sont sans fondement. Il n’existe, notamment, aucune preuve que cette attitude haineuse soit fortement influencée par la discrimination que les jeunes musulmans subissent dans les sociétés occidentales. (…) J’ai mené 117 entretiens auprès de jeunes musulmans, dont la moyenne d’âge était de 19 ans, à Paris, Berlin et Londres. La majorité a fait part de certains sentiments antisémites, avec plus ou moins de virulence. Ils expriment ouvertement leurs points de vue négatifs envers les Juifs. C’est souvent dit avec agressivité et parfois, ces prises de positions incluent des intentions de commettre des actes antisémites. (…) Beaucoup de jeunes auprès desquels j’ai enquêté, ont exprimé des stéréotypes antisémites « traditionnels ». Les théories de la Conspiration et les stéréotypes qui associent les Juifs à l’argent sont les plus fréquents. Les Juifs sont souvent réputés comme riches et avares. Ils ont aussi fréquemment perçus comme formant une même entité ayant, parce que Juifs, un intérêt commun malfaisant. Ces stéréotypes archétypaux renforcent une image négative et potentiellement menaçante « des Juifs », dans la mentalité de ces jeunes. (…) Habituellement, ils ne différencient absolument pas les Juifs des Israéliens. Ils utilisent leur perception du conflit au Moyen-Orient comme une justification de leur attitude globalement hostile envers les Juifs, y compris, bien sûr, envers les Juifs allemands, français et britanniques. Ils proclament souvent que les Juifs ont volé les terres des Arabes Palestiniens ou, alternativement, des Musulmans. C’est une assertion essentielle, pour eux, qui leur suffit à délégitimer l’Etat d’Israël, en tant que tel. L’expression « Les Juifs tuent des enfants » est aussi fréquemment entendue. C’est un argument qui sert de clé de voûte pour renforcer leur opinion qu’Israël est fondamentalement malfaisant. Puisqu’ils ne font aucune distinction entre les Israéliens et les Juifs en général, cela devient une preuve supplémentaire du « caractère foncièrement cruel » des Juifs. Et c’est aussi ce qui les rend particulièrement émotifs. (…) L’hypothèse d’une hostilité générale, et même éternelle entre les Musulmans (ou Arabes) et les Juifs est très répandue. C’est souvent exprimé dans des déclarations telles que : « Les Musulmans et les Juifs sont ennemis », ou, par conséquent : « Les Arabes détestent les Juifs ». Cela rend très difficile, pour des jeunes qui s’identifient fortement comme Musulmans ou Arabes, de prendre leurs distances à l’encontre d’une telle vision. (…) Nous savons que l’antisémitisme n’est jamais rationnel. Pourtant, certains jeunes musulmans n’essaient même pas de justifier leur attitude. Pour eux, si quelqu’un est Juif, c’est une raison suffisante pour qu’il suscite leur répugnance. Des déclarations formulées par les enquêtés, il ressort que les attitudes négatives envers les Juifs sont la norme au sein de leur environnement social. Il est effrayant de constater qu’un grand nombre d’entre eux expriment le désir d’attaquer physiquement les Juifs, lorsqu’ils en rencontrent dans leurs quartiers. (…) Certains d’entre eux racontent les actes antisémites commis dans leur environnement, et dont les auteurs n’ont jamais été pris. Plusieurs interviewés approuvent ces agressions. Parfaitement au courant du fait que d’autres, issus de leur milieu d’origine sociale, religieuse et ethnique, s’en prennent à des Juifs, ne font pas l’objet d’arrestation et n’ont pas clairement été condamnés, ne fait que renforcer la normalisation de la violence contre les Juifs dans leurs cercles de relations ». (…) Les différences entre les enquêtés des trois pays, concernant leurs points de vue antisémites, restent, de façon surprenante, extrêmement ténues. On perçoit quelques divergences dans leur argumentation. Les Musulmans allemands mentionnent que les Juifs contrôlent les médias et les manipulent dans l’unique but de dissimuler les supposées « atrocités » d’Israël. En France, les interviewés disent souvent que les Juifs jouent un rôle prédominant dans les médias nationaux et la télévision. Au Royaume-Uni, ils mentionnent principalement l’influence des Juifs dans les programmations américaines, aussi bien que dans l’industrie cinématographique qui provient des Etats-Unis. (…) Des non-Musulmans emploient, également, le mot “Juif” de façon péjorative, en Allemagne et en France. En Grande-Bretagne, ce phénomène est, généralement, moins perceptible, parmi les sondés musulmans, notamment. Certains jeunes musulmans affirment que c’est faux de prétendre que les Juifs auraient une vie meilleure en France que les Musulmans. Il est possible que cela découle du fait que les Juifs de France sont souvent plus visibles que ceux d’Allemagne et de Grande-Bretagne et, en outre, que de nombreux Juifs de France sont aussi des immigrés d’Afrique du Nord, ce qui alimentee un certain sentiment de concurrence à leur égard. (…) En Allemagne, certains individus interrogés emploient souvent des arguments particuliers qu’ils ont empruntés à la société dans son ensemble, tels que les remboursements et restitutions compensatrices, supposées trop élevées, versées à Israël, du fait de la Shoah. Un autre argument fréquemment proposé, auquel ils croient, est que les Juifs, à la lumière de la Shoah, « devraient être des gens bien meilleurs que les autres, alors qu’Israël incarnerait exactement l’inverse. (…) Pourtant, il existe, aussi, heureusement, de jeunes musulmans qui prennent leurs distances avec l’antisémitisme. Cela arrive, même s’ils ont d’abord été largement influencés par des points de vue antisémites, de la part de leurs amis, de leur famille et des médias. Cela prouve, une fois encore, qu’on ne devrait pas généraliser , dès qu’il s’agit de telle ou telle population ». (…) L’antisémitisme peut encore être renforcé [chez eux] en se référant à une attitude générale négative, portée par la communauté musulmane envers les Juifs. Les références au Coran ou aux Hadiths peuvent être utilisées avec, pour implication que D.ieu lui-même serait d’accord avec ce point de vue. Pourtant, on ne doit pas se laisser induire en erreur par la conclusion de sens commun, que l’antisémitisme musulman est le produit exclusif de la haine d’Israël, ou de l’antisémitisme occidental « classique », ou encore des enseignements de l’Islam, ou de leur identité musulmane. La réalité est bien plus complexe. Günther Jikeli
Juif et donc riche. C’est ainsi que les bourreaux d’Ilan Halimi ont justifié les vingt-quatre jours de torture qu’ils ont fait subir au jeune homme. Dix ans après la découverte de son corps, il reste pour sept Français sur dix le « symbole de ce à quoi peuvent conduire les préjugés sur les juifs », nous apprend une étude de l’Ifop* pour SOS Racisme et l’Union des étudiants juifs (UEJF) que nous dévoilons en exclusivité. Cette « affaire », dont 61 % des sondés disent qu’elle les a « beaucoup » touchés, n’a pourtant pas permis d’anéantir les stéréotypes dont elle a été l’emblème. L’étude démontre en effet qu’au-delà d’Internet où des torrents de haine antijuive se déversent, les préjugés antisémites ont la dent dure. 32 % estiment que les juifs se servent dans « leur propre intérêt » de leur statut de victime du nazisme, de même que de nombreux sondés admettent pour vraie l’idée de juifs plus riches que la moyenne (31 %), avec par exemple trop de pouvoir dans les médias (25 %). Le Parisien
*Le 13 février 2006, Ilan Halimi est retrouvé nu, bâillonné et menotté le long d’une voie ferrée de la banlieue parisienne. Vivant. Ou plutôt agonisant. Il mourra dans l’ambulance qui l’emmène vers l’hôpital. Cheveux tondus, traces de brûlures, plaies par arme blanche… son corps témoigne des sévices qu’il a subis pendant près de trois semaines dans la cave d’une barre HLM de la cité de Pierre-Plate où il a été séquestré par ceux qui seront surnommés le « gang des barbares » au cours de leur procès. Vingt-sept personnes seront poursuivies. A leur tête : Youssouf Fofana, le « cerveau » de la bande. C’est lui qui recrute les « geôliers » et « l’appât ». Lui aussi qui cible Ilan Halimi, qu’il choisit parce qu’il est « juif donc riche », selon ses préjugés antisémites, espérant extorquer une rançon à sa famille. Condamné en 2009 à la perpétuité avec vingt-deux ans de sûreté, Fofana a ajouté trois ans à sa peine en 2014, pour avoir agressé des surveillants de la prison de Condé-sur-Sarthe. Emma, elle, a été condamnée à neuf ans de prison. Elle est celle qui, le 21 janvier 2006, a attiré sa victime dans la cave qui lui servira de geôle et de lieu de torture. En janvier 2012, elle a retrouvé la liberté après six années passées en prison. Le Monde
Nous n’oublions rien de ceux qui ont commis l’irréparable, de ceux qui ont encouragé et ceux qui se sont tus. Porte-parole du collectif Haverim
Le discours des institutions juives ou des intellectuels communautaires, pour ne pas dire communautaristes, répète en boucle que l’antisémitisme est très fort en France, qu’il y a une « montée » de ce phénomène, et que la menace antisémite est plus importante et virulente que les autres formes de racisme. Il faudrait alors plus se mobiliser contre cette forme de racisme. Et, en annexe, ne pas critiquer le gouvernement israélien car cela alimenterait l’antisémitisme. Pour une grande partie de la population qui vit de nombreuses discriminations au quotidien, les Noirs et les Arabes, ce discours est vécu de façon assez douloureuse. Ils ont l’impression qu’on sous-estime les discriminations dont ils sont victimes et que certains doivent être plus protégés que d’autres. Il y a alors danger. Les études et les faits montrent que l’antisémitisme, même s’il n’a pas disparu, est nettement moins fort qu’il y a une ou deux générations en France. En même temps, chaque année au dîner du Crif, le président parle d’une montée de l’antisémitisme. En fait, le grand revirement est que l’antisémitisme est moins fort mais le soutien à Israël dans la population française l’est également. Pascal Boniface
J’ai, à titre personnel, un inconfort philosophique avec la place [que ce débat] a pris, parce que je pense qu’on ne traite pas le mal en l’expulsant de la communauté nationale. Le mal est partout. Déchoir de la nationalité est une solution dans un certain cas, et je vais y revenir, mais à la fin des fins, la responsabilité des gouvernants est de prévenir et de punir implacablement le mal et les actes terroristes. C’est cela notre devoir dans la communauté national. Emmanuel Macron
Je comprends et je respecte profondément les réflexions et les réactions sur ce sujet. Il faut répondre à trois exigences  : la protection des Français, le respect de l’engagement pris par le président de la République – l’autorité de l’Etat en dépend – et la cohésion nationale. C’est une mesure symboliquement importante  : elle donne un sens à ce que c’est que d’appartenir à la communauté nationale. (…) Je suis ministre de la République, donc pleinement solidaire de la politique gouvernementale. Emmanuel Macron
En interrogeant la pertinence du débat autour de la déchéance de nationalité, Emmanuel Macron acte le débat qui l’oppose à Manuel Valls sur l’identité de la gauche au pouvoir, et le refus de l’avènement d’une « gauche Finkielkraut ». Peut-on « recadrer » celui qui dit que « le mal est partout »? La réalité s’impose, et même un Premier ministre de la Ve République n’y peut rien. Quoi qu’il prétende. Quoi qu’il décrète. En cela, la sortie d’Emmanuel Macron en plein débat sur le projet de révision constitutionnelle fait date. Elle ne relève pas seulement de la petite polémique politique comme les aiment les commentateurs old school, les grands lecteurs du temps court, formés au culte de la petite phrase, mais bien au-delà en ce que d’un coup, elle synthétise le grand débat de la gauche contemporaine. (…) Le message est adressé à Manuel Valls, et à travers lui à une certaine idée de la gauche en mutation. Emmanuel Macron refuse la finkielkrautisation de la gauche, ou pire encore, sa zemmourisation. Il lance un appel à la raison, à la compréhension, à la refondation autour des valeurs qui fondent la gauche. Macron refuse l’avènement de la gauche Finkielkraut qui s’affichait en Une du Point la semaine passée. (…) Du point de vue de l’ancien élève de Paul Ricoeur, cela signifie qu’il faut comprendre pourquoi le mal nait. Aller aux racines. Comprendre non pour excuser, mais pour combattre. Là encore, l’invitation à incliner en faveur de l’action, toujours féconde, plutôt qu’à la réaction, toujours stérile, est patente. (..) il faut bien se garder de réduire l’affrontement Macron/Valls à la seule dimension de leurs personnes. Derrière ce choc, se profile l’affrontement des deux gauches modernes appelées à incarner l’avenir. L’enjeu n’est pas anodin. Ou bien la gauche se contente de s’adapter à l’air du temps que commande l’apparent succès des valeurs réactionnaires, portées par les bardes du déclinisme, et alors Manuel Valls est fondé à s’en aller écouter le discours d’Alain Finkielkraut lors de sa cérémonie de réception à l’Académie française, le tout en saluant ce « grand philosophe ». Si l’on en demeure là, cette défaite de la pensée de gauche lui promettrait, en cas de déroute en 2017, une longue cure d’opposition. Ou bien la gauche, nécessairement convertie à l’économie libérale, s’efforce de demeurer fidèle à l’héritage de Jaurès, Blum, Mendès France et Mitterrand, et elle continue de vouloir penser le monde, et toutes les formes de Mal qui le hantent, pour mieux le transformer. « Finkielkrautétiser » la gauche, ce serait acter que la guerre culturelle a été perdue. Macron questionne parce qu’il pense que c’est ainsi que la gauche en politique trouvera les réponses en elle, sans céder à la droitisation de l’époque. Cela peut heurter. Bousculer. Déranger. Confronter le temps politique du temps court au temps long. « En ce qui concerne les choses humaines, ne pas s’indigner mais comprendre. » Macron est un spinoziste en politique. Et c’est une démarche qui à la mérite d’être authentiquement de gauche. Et moderne. Et refondatrice pour un socialisme qui parait avoir arrêté de penser le monde depuis vingt ans. (…) Comme Macron le disait lui-même, dans le 1, en juillet dernier: « L’exigence du quotidien qui va avec la politique, c’est d’accepter le geste imparfait », et d’ajouter: « On bascule dans le temps politique en acceptant l’imperfection du moment ». Accepter l’imperfection, la comprendre, y compris pour comprendre le Mal et mieux le combattre. Macron est un bien-pensant, et il est moderne, il est donc la preuve que la gauche Finkielkraut n’a pas encore gagné. Bruno Roger-Petit
A large part of the Jewish community is convinced that the anti-Semitic dimension of Ilan Halimi’s murder has not been mentioned enough, while another large part of public opinion thinks this affair has been overexposed because of its anti-Semitic dimension and many parents ask themselves: ‘Would they have talked about this if the victim had been my son?’ Pascal Boniface (2014)
In January 2006, just weeks after riots had set aflame the troubled banlieues and housing projects throughout the country, a single horrific killing exposed an icy violence that was in its way even more shocking. Ilan Halimi, 23, was kidnapped by the self-styled “Gang of Barbarians” and tortured to death because he was Jewish and they thought his family or other Jews would pay for his freedom. And when 24 Days director Arcady describes Ilan Halimi as the first person murdered for being Jewish in France since the Second World War, it is lost on no one that he was not the last. During Mohamed Merah’s al Qaeda-inspired killing spree in 2012, the motorcycle-riding gunman slaughtered three children and a rabbi outside a Jewish school in Toulouse. Ruth Halimi (…) pleads with cops who keep insisting her son’s kidnapping is purely financially motivated and ignore the anti-Semitic undertones. “Why are you afraid of the truth?!” she cries, convinced the intent is more sinister and her son’s fate is sealed. The detectives are shown telling her that refusal to pay ultimately will protect her son because he’ll be valued as a bargaining chip. Hot on the heels of the November 2005 banlieue riots, tensions remained high. And a spectacularly embarrassing false alarm not long before that had clouded the authorities’ judgment. In the summer of 2004, a young woman told police she had been attacked by six young black and Arab men on a suburban Paris commuter train. She claimed the muggers tore her clothes and markered swastikas onto her bare stomach, cut a lock of her hair, and toppled her baby’s stroller. In a nation still riven with guilt over its WWII persecution of Jews, the incident sparked a swift political response from then-President Jacques Chirac. But days later the young woman recanted, eventually explaining she was just vying for her parents’ attention. In the event, the Gang of Barbarians eluded the 400 police officers assigned to the case until it was too late. Two dozen men and women would be convicted for their varying degrees of involvement. The gang’s 25-year-old ringleader, Youssouf Fofana, the French-born son of Ivorian immigrants, was captured on the run in Abidjan 10 days after he had stabbed Halimi, doused him with a flammable substance, set him alight, and left him for dead. The new film’s theatrical release goes some way toward repairing what many saw as an injustice. Both the 2009 trial and a 2010 appeal were held behind closed doors because some of the accused were minors at the time of the events. Halimi’s family and anti-racism groups had pled for public trials, citing their educational value. But one observer suggests the renewed media interest in Halimi’s case could itself spur resentment. In a new book on what he sees as France’s unhealthy tendency to internalize the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Pascal Boniface argues that anti-Semitism has in fact declined radically in France over recent decades. The director of France’s Institute of International and Strategic Relations suggests Jewish community leaders and the media risk a sort of public fatigue by interpreting anti-Semitic acts out of that context and out of proportion to crimes against other groups. He spotlights the Halimi case as an example of anti-Semitism overexposed to a counterproductive degree. The Daily Beast
“Don’t you see?” I plead with the police. “They contacted a rabbi because he’s a Jew. Don’t you recognize that this is an anti-Semitic act?” But the authorities will have none of it. (…) Ilan’s situation, we later learn, has taken a turn for the worse. The concierge of the building notifies the kidnappers that they will have to vacate the apartment. He has orders to paint it for the next tenant. Fofana returns to France from the Ivory Coast especially to transport Ilan somewhere else. Covered in a blanket, he is carried on the kidnappers’ shoulders to a nearby cellar. It is colder in there than in the flat. He is under the watch of ten guards between the ages of 17 and 23, most of them converts to Islam. They were promised the whole thing would take three days and they’d make some quick money. “I wanted to buy myself new clothes,” said one gang member during his interrogation. Now, they are annoyed. Ten days have passed and they are still stuck with Ilan, who bears the brunt of their frustration. They kick him and burn him with cigarettes, each one inventing a different kind of torture. “Even an animal isn’t treated that way,” the police later say. By now the police know that the man in charge is using a different Internet café each time. Four hundred men are mobilized to catch the perpetrator. To me, it is abundantly clear that this is an anti-Semitic act and that I should shout out the truth and alert the press. But I do what the police tell me. Around this time the local police stop a black man on the streets of Paris whose name is Youssouf Fofana. They have no idea about the kidnapping because it is all being handled secretly. They return his papers to him. How he must have laughed! How powerful he must have felt! (…) The owner of a cyber café alerts the police: the black man in the hood and gloves they are looking for has come back. The police recruit a nearby squad without giving them too many details other than that they must immediately go and arrest a black man at 9 Rue Poirier de Narcay. They have no idea how dangerous he is or how much is at stake. The six policemen rush off together, discretion—the most important factor in this operation—thrown to the wind. They are searching for Number 9 but there’s no address on the shop, only on a nearby building. Fofana, sitting at the window, has ample time to notice them and flee. By the time they realize their mistake Fofana is long gone. They chase him but it’s too late. Why wasn’t the situation explained to them properly? Why couldn’t road blocks have been set up to prevent Fofana’s escape? Why wasn’t his picture put in the newspapers? And why didn’t the police compare his image to the one that was already in their files for the past 13 years, for a host of infractions? (…) On February 13, at five o’clock in the morning, Ilan was first shaven, like six million other Jews, and flung into the forest by his torturers. He managed to take the mask off his eyes, and as Fofana later reported, look them straight in the eye. I am a human being, his eyes told them. He received a few knife stabs for that. Then, like many of the six million before him he was set on fire and burned alive, having been sprayed with a flammable substance. Then his tormentors left. When he was found guilty Fofana declared, “I killed a Jew, and for that I will go to Paradise.” It was raining that morning; Ilan managed to roll down on the leaves towards the highway. A black woman, a secretary like me, saw him lying by the side of the road, stopped her car and called the police. She accompanied him in the ambulance and did not leave his side. He was still alive in the ambulance but died on the way to the hospital. (…) “I have boxes and boxes of transcripts from the trial. When I started reading them I felt like throwing myself out the window. They enumerate in painstaking detail what they did to my child just to amuse themselves. When Fofana was asked in prison if he had a message for me he said, ‘Tell her that her son fought well.’ It was probably meant as a compliment in his twisted mind.” (…) “words are sometimes worse than weapons,” (…) “The popular French comedian, Dieudonné [which means ‘gift of God’], whose supposed humor drips with anti-Semitism and is enjoyed by millions of Frenchmen, has said things like, ‘The Germans should have finished the job in 1945.’ It’s words like these that incite violence and inspire incidents like Toulouse.” (…) I didn’t want him to lie in the same soil on which he was murdered. I wanted him to be buried in Israel immediately, but my children said they needed him close by so they could visit him every day. I also knew that one day Fofana will be released from prison, and I don’t want him to be able to come and spit on my son’s grave.” Ruth Halimi

Attention: un lynchage peut en cacher un autre !

Alors qu’il aura fallu dix ans et pas moins de trois tueries de masse, pour que le gouvernement français reconnaisse enfin son long aveuglement …

Sur la nature antisémite du sauvage assassinat du jeune juif Ilan Halimi par une bande de jeunes de la banlieue de Bagneux se faisant appeler « gang des barbares » sous la direction d’un franco-ivoirien mais avec la complicité plus ou moins active de tout un voisinage

Et qu’après avoir pendant des années, sans parler de la désinformation constante et systématique comme des emballements périodiques de nos médias, laissé crier dans nos rues mort aux juifs ou appels au boycott ou à la stigmatisation d’Israël …

Nos belles âmes continuent à nier l’évidente montée, pourtant confirmée par une récente étude, de l’antisémitisme et notamment de l’antisémitisme des populations d’origine musulmane en France …

Comment ne pas voir, de la part des mêmes beaux esprits, la nouvelle dénonciation de la prétendue finkielkrautisation de la société comme un énième lynchage d’un membre, lui aussi, de ce peuple qui depuis 3 000 ans prétend empêcher le monde de tourner en rond ?

Et ne pas être frappé à la lueur des analyses du regretté René Girard

Comme du vibrant « hommage aux chasseurs de vérité« , à l’initiative là aussi de deux « outsiders » (un rédacteur en chef juif et un avocat arménien), sorti tout récemment sur nos écrans, face à la longue complicité des autorités catholiques américaines mais aussi de toute une ville, psys laïcs compris, sur les abus sexuels de ses prêtres contre des centaines d’enfants …

Par la dimension ô combien collective que semblent invariablement prendre ce genre d’affaires …

Et par cette longue omerta et ces sempiternelles accusations de trahison ou d’obsession du complot qu’avaient eux aussi dû surmonter il y a plus d’une siècle …

Surtout quand ils étaient eux-mêmes juifs, protestants ou d’origine étrangère (Zola) les défenseurs de la vérité…

D’un certain capitaine Dreyfus ?

Dix ans après son assassinat, Bernard Cazeneuve rend hommage à Ilan Halimi
Le Monde.fr avec AFP

Lucie Soullier

13.02.2016

Ilan Halimi. Ce nom résonne depuis dix ans comme le symbole de l’horreur de l’antisémitisme en France. Mort parce que juif. Assassiné parce que juif. Torturé parce que juif. Une douleur inscrite jusque sur sa tombe, à Jérusalem :

« Ilan Jacques Halimi, torturé et assassiné en France parce qu’il était juif à l’âge de 23 ans. »
Bernard Cazeneuve, le ministre de l’intérieur, s’est rendu samedi 13 février à Bagneux pour lui rendre hommage lors d’une cérémonie qui a rassemblé le grand rabbin de France Haïm Korsia, le président du Consistoire central israélite de France, Joël Mergui, ainsi que de nombreux élus. Une cérémonie pour ne pas oublier ce que le jeune homme a enduré dans cette cité des Hauts-de-Seine, vingt-quatre jours durant.

« Dix ans plus tard, nous continuons à éprouver un remords collectif, celui d’avoir hésité à désigner par son nom la haine antisémite », a déclaré le ministre dans un auditorium de la ville après s’être recueilli dans le parc attenant, devant une stèle à la mémoire du jeune homme. Le drame, a estimé M. Cazeneuve devant environ 150 personnes, « annonçait à sa manière une série de gestes assassins » : les tueries de Mohamed Merah en 2012, la fusillade du musée juif de Bruxelles en 2014, le drame de l’Hyper Cacher l’an dernier. Mais aussi « la diffusion rampante » de l’antisémitisme, du racisme, du « mépris » et de la « haine de l’autre ». Et, « à sa manière, les attentats » de novembre.

« Gang des barbares »
Le 13 février 2006, Ilan Halimi est retrouvé nu, bâillonné et menotté le long d’une voie ferrée de la banlieue parisienne. Vivant. Ou plutôt agonisant. Il mourra dans l’ambulance qui l’emmène vers l’hôpital.

Cheveux tondus, traces de brûlures, plaies par arme blanche… son corps témoigne des sévices qu’il a subis pendant près de trois semaines dans la cave d’une barre HLM de la cité de Pierre-Plate où il a été séquestré par ceux qui seront surnommés le « gang des barbares » au cours de leur procès. Vingt-sept personnes seront poursuivies.

Lire le récit des geôliers lors du procès de 2006

A leur tête : Youssouf Fofana, le « cerveau » de la bande. C’est lui qui recrute les « geôliers » et « l’appât ». Lui aussi qui cible Ilan Halimi, qu’il choisit parce qu’il est « juif donc riche », selon ses préjugés antisémites, espérant extorquer une rançon à sa famille. Condamné en 2009 à la perpétuité avec vingt-deux ans de sûreté, Fofana a ajouté trois ans à sa peine en 2014, pour avoir agressé des surveillants de la prison de Condé-sur-Sarthe.

Emma, elle, a été condamnée à neuf ans de prison. Elle est celle qui, le 21 janvier 2006, a attiré sa victime dans la cave qui lui servira de geôle et de lieu de torture. En janvier 2012, elle a retrouvé la liberté après six années passées en prison. Elle n’avait alors que 23 ans. Le même âge qu’Ilan Halimi, lorsqu’elle l’a guidé à sa mort.

Hommages
Dix ans après, dans le jardin qui porte son nom, dans le 12e arrondissement de Paris où le jeune homme résidait, des centaines de personnes se sont rassemblées jeudi 11 février, à l’appel du collectif Haverim. En présence des sœurs de la victime, des textes « selon ses goûts » ont été lus, extraits de Si c’est un homme, de Primo Levi, La vie est belle, de Roberto Benigni, ou encore L’être ou pas, de Jean-Claude Grumberg.

Le porte-parole du collectif tenait à ce que ce rassemblement soit un « hymne à la vie ». Mais il voulait également rappeler que, dix ans après, personne n’a oublié.

« Nous n’oublions rien de ceux qui ont commis l’irréparable, de ceux qui ont encouragé et ceux qui se sont tus. »

Voir de même:

Déchéance de nationalité: Macron défie Valls et la « gauche Finkielkraut »
Bruno Roger-Petit
Challenges

10-02-2016

En interrogeant la pertinence du débat autour de la déchéance de nationalité, Emmanuel Macron acte le débat qui l’oppose à Manuel Valls sur l’identité de la gauche au pouvoir, et le refus de l’avènement d’une « gauche Finkielkraut ».

Peut-on « recadrer » celui qui dit que « le mal est partout »? La réalité s’impose, et même un Premier ministre de la Ve République n’y peut rien. Quoi qu’il prétende. Quoi qu’il décrète. En cela, la sortie d’Emmanuel Macron en plein débat sur le projet de révision constitutionnelle fait date. Elle ne relève pas seulement de la petite polémique politique comme les aiment les commentateurs old school, les grands lecteurs du temps court, formés au culte de la petite phrase, mais bien au-delà en ce que d’un coup, elle synthétise le grand débat de la gauche contemporaine.

Il faut donc lire et relire ce que dit Emmanuel Macron du grand débat du moment autour de la question de la déchéance de nationalité appliquée aux auteurs de crimes et délits terroristes portant atteinte aux intérêts de la Nation. Le ministre de l’Economie n’est pas dans la posture de l’instant. Ni dans le buzz. Ni dans la polémique destinée à nourrir une actualité réduite aux soubresauts des réseaux sociaux.

Donc, devant la Fondation France-Israël, Emmanuel Macron a livré le fond de sa pensée: « J’ai, à titre personnel, un inconfort philosophique avec la place [que ce débat] a pris, parce que je pense qu’on ne traite pas le mal en l’expulsant de la communauté nationale. Le mal est partout. Déchoir de la nationalité est une solution dans un certain cas, et je vais y revenir, mais à la fin des fins, la responsabilité des gouvernants est de prévenir et de punir implacablement le mal et les actes terroristes. C’est cela notre devoir dans la communauté nationale ».

Le message est adressé à Manuel Valls, et à travers lui à une certaine idée de la gauche en mutation. Emmanuel Macron refuse la finkielkrautisation de la gauche, ou pire encore, sa zemmourisation. Il lance un appel à la raison, à la compréhension, à la refondation autour des valeurs qui fondent la gauche. Macron refuse l’avènement de la gauche Finkielkraut qui s’affichait en Une du Point la semaine passée.

En premier lieu, Macron affirme que la gauche de gouvernement, confrontée au terrorisme, ne peut apporter pour seul réponse qu’un exorcisme vain. « On ne traite pas le mal en l’expulsant de la communauté nationale », dit-il. Comment ne pas reconnaitre qu’il s’agit là d’une évidence? Expulser les terroristes qui font la guerre à la France et aux Français est une décision symbolique, apparemment réparatrice, mais elle ne prévient pas l’apparition du mal. La décision peut procurer une forme d’apaisement de l’opinion, un temps, mais elle n’est pas la réponse ultime au Mal. C’est un exorcisme politique, teinté de juridisme, dont la portée symbolique emporte sa propre limite. Implicitement, Emmanuel Macron indique que le Mal nait du Mal, et qu’il convient de l’intégrer dans la représentation que l’on est amené à se faire, au pouvoir, de ce qu’est l’état de la société d’aujourd’hui.

Ne pas être otage de l’air du temps
Le ministre appelle la gauche à ne pas être réaction, mais action. Ne pas être otage de l’air du temps, qui commande, à travers les figures médiatiques de l’époque, les Finkielkraut et les Zemmour, au rejet qui engendre le rejet, qui lui-même engendre encore le rejet. L’exorcisme que représente la déchéance de nationalité est sans doute nécessaire, en certains cas, mais il ne saurait être suffisant. Pour Macron, la déchéance de nationalité est un moyen, mais en doit être en aucun cas une fin.

Il faut inverser la charge de la preuve. C’est Emmanuel Macron qui recadre ce que devrait être l’action de la gauche de gouvernement, et c’est en ce sens que les vallsistes, qui promettent au ministre de l’Economie un sort peu enviable, se trompent en pensant le recadrer en jouant les Capitan de comédie dans la salle des quatre colonnes de l’Assemblée nationale. On ne recadre pas celui qui cadre la Vérité.

« A la fin des fins, la responsabilité des gouvernants est de prévenir et de punir implacablement le mal et les actes terroristes », affirme Macron, second temps de son appel à en revenir aux valeurs de la gauche. Puisque l’exorcisme est insuffisant, il faut agir afin d’enrayer, contenir, anéantir le Mal avant même qu’il n’apparaisse.

Du point de vue de l’ancien élève de Paul Ricoeur, cela signifie qu’il faut comprendre pourquoi le mal nait. Aller aux racines. Comprendre non pour excuser, mais pour combattre. Là encore, l’invitation à incliner en faveur de l’action, toujours féconde, plutôt qu’à la réaction, toujours stérile, est patente.

En creux, une fois de plus, Macron s’oppose à Manuel Valls. Son appréhension des choses du Mal s’oppose à celle du Premier ministre qui disait il y a encore quelques semaines, au sujet des terroristes qui s’en prennent à la France et qui sont pour certains, ses enfants: « Pour ces ennemis qui s’en prennent à leurs compatriotes, qui déchirent ce contrat qui nous unit, il ne peut y avoir aucune explication qui vaille, car expliquer, c’est déjà vouloir un peu excuser. » Macron affirme l’exact contraire, surtout quand il énonce que le Mal est partout.

Le Mal, ce n’est pas seulement les terroristes, ce peut être aussi ceux qui, sous prétexte de le combattre, peuvent l’instrumentaliser dans le dessein de servir leur cause, tout aussi malsaine et nuisible. Comprendre, c’est aussi combattre signifie Macron, afin de mieux « prévenir et punir implacablement le mal et les actes terroristes ». Là où Valls se contente de punir, action, Macron ajoute qu’il faut prévenir, soient Action et réaction.

De ce qui précède, deux leçons peuvent être tirées.

L’affrontement de 2 gauches modernes
D’abord, Emmanuel Macron est bien plus à gauche que ce que le conformisme médiatique ambiant entretient. Sans aucun doute faut-il reconsidérer ce que le microcosme a édicté sur son compte à son sujet.

En outre, il faut bien se garder de réduire l’affrontement Macron/Valls à la seule dimension de leurs personnes. Derrière ce choc, se profile l’affrontement des deux gauches modernes appelées à incarner l’avenir. L’enjeu n’est pas anodin. Ou bien la gauche se contente de s’adapter à l’air du temps que commande l’apparent succès des valeurs réactionnaires, portées par les bardes du déclinisme, et alors Manuel Valls est fondé à s’en aller écouter le discours d’Alain Finkielkraut lors de sa cérémonie de réception à l’Académie française, le tout en saluant ce « grand philosophe ». Si l’on en demeure là, cette défaite de la pensée de gauche lui promettrait, en cas de déroute en 2017, une longue cure d’opposition.

Ou bien la gauche, nécessairement convertie à l’économie libérale, s’efforce de demeurer fidèle à l’héritage de Jaurès, Blum, Mendès France et Mitterrand, et elle continue de vouloir penser le monde, et toutes les formes de Mal qui le hantent, pour mieux le transformer.

« Finkielkrautétiser » la gauche, ce serait acter que la guerre culturelle a été perdue.

Macron questionne parce qu’il pense que c’est ainsi que la gauche en politique trouvera les réponses en elle, sans céder à la droitisation de l’époque. Cela peut heurter. Bousculer. Déranger. Confronter le temps politique du temps court au temps long.

« En ce qui concerne les choses humaines, ne pas s’indigner mais comprendre. » Macron est un spinoziste en politique. Et c’est une démarche qui à la mérite d’être authentiquement de gauche. Et moderne. Et refondatrice pour un socialisme qui parait avoir arrêté de penser le monde depuis vingt ans. Commentant le propos de Macron, un proche de Manuel Valls aurait promis de  « couper les couilles de ce petit con ». Est-ce bien digne de l’expression d’une pensée conforme à l’héritage socialiste?

Comme Macron le disait lui-même, dans le 1, en juillet dernier: « L’exigence du quotidien qui va avec la politique, c’est d’accepter le geste imparfait », et d’ajouter: « On bascule dans le temps politique en acceptant l’imperfection du moment ». Accepter l’imperfection, la comprendre, y compris pour comprendre le Mal et mieux le combattre. Macron est un bien-pensant, et il est moderne, il est donc la preuve que la gauche Finkielkraut n’a pas encore gagné.
Horror Story
04.28.14 11:45 AM ET
A Horror Story of True-Life Anti-Semitism in France
In 24 Days, opening this week in Paris, filmmaker Alexandre Arcady sets out to expose the motives and the meaning behind a savage crime.
It was a ghastly tragedy that rattled a nation and became a byword for anti-Semitism in France. In January 2006, just weeks after riots had set aflame the troubled banlieues and housing projects throughout the country, a single horrific killing exposed an icy violence that was in its way even more shocking. Ilan Halimi, 23, was kidnapped by the self-styled “Gang of Barbarians” and tortured to death because he was Jewish and they thought his family or other Jews would pay for his freedom.
Now eight years on, the story is coming to cinemas in France. Alexandre Arcady’s 24 Days: The Truth About the Ilan Halimi Affair opens Wednesday, the first of two French feature films on the case due out in 2014. And in a nation where Europe’s largest Jewish community is still reeling from the recent fight to censor a notorious comedian spewing anti-Semitic hate, it is bound to touch a nerve.
Indeed, in the wake of the controversy over the dubious humorist Dieudonné M’bala M’bala, which saw his stage shows banned in several French cities in January, the Jewish community has expressed concern that anti-Semitic acts, which were down 31 percent in France last year, could rise.

And when 24 Days director Arcady describes Ilan Halimi as the first person murdered for being Jewish in France since the Second World War, it is lost on no one that he was not the last. During Mohamed Merah’s al Qaeda-inspired killing spree in 2012, the motorcycle-riding gunman slaughtered three children and a rabbi outside a Jewish school in Toulouse.
The beginning of the end for Ilan Halimi came on a Friday night in January 2006. He had left his mother’s Paris home after a Shabbat meal to meet a girl at a café. A femme fatale in the truest sense, “Emma”—recruited as bait for Halimi—had first flirted with the affable mobile-phone salesman that very day in the shop where he worked on the Boulevard Voltaire.
She would lure him to a Paris suburb where the gang waited in ambush. They beat him, bound him and stashed him away in an apartment building in the projects. Halimi was held for 24 days, his eyes and face plastered in duct tape, first in a vacant flat, then in a basement boiler room with the building superintendent’s complicity.
When Halimi’s jailers tired of helping their captive relieve himself, they stopped feeding him. He was found barely alive in the woods near a commuter train line, still tied up, naked, and badly burned. He died before the ambulance reached the hospital.
Arcady’s 24 Days tells the story from the perspective of Halimi’s mother, Ruth, based on her 2009 memoir. Savage violence goes largely unseen in the film. Instead, audiences sink into the family’s nightmare: the oppressive barrage of rambling, invective-laced phone calls demanding ransom—more than 600 calls over the course of Halimi’s captivity.
Despite a last act every French viewer will know in advance, the film moves along like a thriller. It catalogues a massive but doomed police investigation through its agonizing near-misses and mistaken hunches.

Ruth Halimi (Zabou Breitman) pleads with cops who keep insisting her son’s kidnapping is purely financially motivated and ignore the anti-Semitic undertones. “Why are you afraid of the truth?!” she cries, convinced the intent is more sinister and her son’s fate is sealed. The detectives are shown telling her that refusal to pay ultimately will protect her son because he’ll be valued as a bargaining chip. Inside a Paris preview screening, a loud “Ha!” could be heard from a pair of audience members at the detectives’ onscreen naiveté.
In fairness, Arcady has put this misapprehension in context. Hot on the heels of the November 2005 banlieue riots, tensions remained high. And a spectacularly embarrassing false alarm not long before that had clouded the authorities’ judgment.
In the summer of 2004, a young woman told police she had been attacked by six young black and Arab men on a suburban Paris commuter train. She claimed the muggers tore her clothes and markered swastikas onto her bare stomach, cut a lock of her hair, and toppled her baby’s stroller. In a nation still riven with guilt over its WWII persecution of Jews, the incident sparked a swift political response from then-President Jacques Chirac. But days later the young woman recanted, eventually explaining she was just vying for her parents’ attention. (That case, too, became the subject of a feature film in 2009, The Girl on the Train, with Emilie Dequenne and Catherine Deneuve.)
In fact, the extent to which Halimi’s motley assailants acted out of anti-Semitism would remain a point of contention long after his body was found.
In the event, the Gang of Barbarians eluded the 400 police officers assigned to the case until it was too late. Two dozen men and women would be convicted for their varying degrees of involvement. The gang’s 25-year-old ringleader, Youssouf Fofana, the French-born son of Ivorian immigrants, was captured on the run in Abidjan 10 days after he had stabbed Halimi, doused him with a flammable substance, set him alight, and left him for dead.

In 2009, Fofana was convicted of murder, acts of torture and barbarity, with anti-Semitism an aggravating circumstance. He is serving life in prison with no possibility for parole for 22 years. (He has since been sentenced to several additional years for new crimes including attacking prison personnel and posting videos to YouTube spewing anti-Semitic hate and praising al Qaeda from his cell.)

The comedian Dieudonné was recently acquitted of disseminating a video in which he is shown deriding a “Jewish lobby” and calling for Fofana’s release from prison. A Paris court ruled it could not be proven that Dieudonné personally released the video in April 2010. It did not pronounce on the video’s content.
Prime Minister Manuel Valls, while still interior minister last October, visited the set of 24 Days during a scene filmed near the Sainte-Geneviève-des-Bois train station, where Halimi was found. In February, fresh from his very public showdown with Dieudonné, Valls told the Representative Council of Jewish Institutions in France at a dinner in Toulouse that he had seen the finished film. “If we do not stop these words that kill and that tear apart our society, there will be other Ilan Halimis,” he warned. President François Hollande held a private screening of 24 Days this month at the Elysée Palace.
The new film’s theatrical release goes some way toward repairing what many saw as an injustice. Both the 2009 trial and a 2010 appeal were held behind closed doors because some of the accused were minors at the time of the events. Halimi’s family and anti-racism groups had pled for public trials, citing their educational value.

A second film by director Richard Berry based on Morgan Sportès’s prizewinning novel Tout, Tout de Suite focuses on the assailants and is expected in September.
But one observer suggests the renewed media interest in Halimi’s case could itself spur resentment. In a new book on what he sees as France’s unhealthy tendency to internalize the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Pascal Boniface argues that anti-Semitism has in fact declined radically in France over recent decades. The director of France’s Institute of International and Strategic Relations suggests Jewish community leaders and the media risk a sort of public fatigue by interpreting anti-Semitic acts out of that context and out of proportion to crimes against other groups. He spotlights the Halimi case as an example of anti-Semitism overexposed to a counterproductive degree.
“We can wager in advance that the films’ release will benefit from media hype,” writes Boniface. “Will they find an audience beyond their community circles? That’s less sure. … A large part of the Jewish community is convinced that the anti-Semitic dimension of Ilan Halimi’s murder has not been mentioned enough, while another large part of public opinion thinks this affair has been overexposed because of its anti-Semitic dimension and many [non-Jewish] parents ask themselves: ‘Would they have talked about this if the victim had been my son?’”
One French journalist, Frédéric Haziza, author of a new book that deems Dieudonné a fascist guru, struck out at Boniface’s take on the Halimi case, calling him a “sorcerer’s apprentice of hate” and an anti-Semitism denier. In turn, a wide palette of French notables responded in Boniface’s defense with a petition rejecting a “climate of McCarthyism” that has collected more than 5,000 signatures. Suffice it to say, eight years after the Halimi atrocity, the case still inflames opinion.
“You are our first ambassadors. Be the ones who lead others, even the reticent, those who might not want to see the film,” Arcady told a crowd at the Paris preview for 24 Days. “Even those who say, ‘Oh la la, Ilan Halimi, that’s a fait divers [a petty news item], stop bothering us with that.’ And seeing the film you will understand that it is not a petty news item. And those who still think that today, they are the ones who really needed to be persuaded to come see the film.”
It opens in France on Wednesday.

Voir aussi:

The Shocking Murder of Ilan Halimi
In 2006 a young Parisian Jew was kidnapped and brutally murdered because he was Jewish. French authorities initially refused to believe it was a hate crime.
by Deborah Freund
Facebook126TwitterEmailMore76
This article originally appeared in Ami Magazine.

Little did Ilan Halimi know that day that the customer walking into the cellphone store where he worked as a salesman would be the agent of his death. The young woman looked around at the merchandise, asked questions and engaged him in friendly conversation. They hit it off so well that before leaving, she asked Ilan for his phone number.

The next evening Ilan received a call from his new acquaintance, inviting him out for a drink. Only 23 years old, Ilan had no suspicions. He was ambushed by a gang of thugs, held prisoner in an apartment in the Bagneux neighborhood of Paris for 24 days and tortured until they finally abandoned him in a forest. When Ilan was found, he had burns over 80% of his body. He was the first French Jew murdered after WWII simply because he was Jewish.

His mother, Ruth Halimi, agreed to meet me in the recently-dubbed Ilan Halimi Gardens, a pocket-sized oasis of green on a busy street in the 12th arrondissement.

A small woman, she has dark eyes set in a determined, pale face. “This is where Ilan used to play as a child,” she says. “I come here often.”

Her voice is melodious, the kind of voice associated more with a mother singing a lullaby than with an outspoken firebrand courageously confronting the French people about the poison brewing in their midst.

“I’m a woman who naturally shies away from crowds and doesn’t like being in limelight. But the Almighty said no, I have a different plan for you, and He gave me an extra measure of courage to be able to speak out in public. I’ve spoken in Washington, Brussels, Paris and Israel, with a strength I didn’t know I possessed.”

I ask her to tell me about her son.

“Ilan was my only son. He had a smile that lit up his face. The house became alive the minute he stepped into it. Ilan loved people deeply. He was curious and outgoing. He was such a star at his bar mitzvah…

“Ilan’s father and I parted when Ilan was two years old,” she continues. “As a consequence, he always tried to be the man of the house. I raised him and my two daughters single-handedly, with little financial means but with love in abundance. I often wonder if that’s why he was so trustful of people. Ilan profoundly believed that people are good, and he was killed for it.

“Helping other people came naturally to him. His first job was in a real estate office. One day a poor Muslim woman came in looking for an apartment. She was having great difficulty finding one. Ilan did some research and found her a flat. Two days later she returned in despair. When the French landlord had seen her Muslim name on the lease he had refused to sign it. Ilan picked up the phone and gave him a piece of his mind, accusing him of racism. The man signed the contract. When Ilan was murdered…”

Her voice trails, her energy sapped. “I found an envelope in my mailbox containing a 100 euro note. It was from the Muslim woman. ‘Madame,’ it said. ‘How can I even begin to express my feelings of horror at what happened to your son?’”

“Please,” I steel myself before asking. “Can you walk me through what happened?”

January 20, 2006
It’s a regular Friday, and I’m on my way home from work. Passing by a store I see a pair of shoes in a style that I know Ilan would like, with a buckle. I stop to purchase them. They are final sale, neither exchangeable nor refundable. I then do some shopping for our Shabbat meal. Even though I am not Orthodox, the Shabbat meal is something I will not give up for any price. It’s the only time of the week we get to all sit peacefully around a beautifully set table. When I reach our building I glance up to see if Ilan is at the window. He usually looks out for me and runs down the stairs to help me bring up the packages. Ilan sings the Kiddush. My children were bought up in the Jewish tradition and know all the Jewish prayers. After we wash, Ilan cuts the challah and distributes it. We wish each other Shabbat Shalom. Dinner is over by 9:00 p.m.

A while later I hear Ilan answering the telephone in his room. I will later learn that that was the fateful call from his new acquaintance inviting him out. I see him putting on his windbreaker. I don’t like it when he goes out on Shabbat and he knows it. “Don’t be angry, Maman,” he says, an apologetic smile playing on his lips. As if having a premonition that this would be the last time I would ever see him, I try to keep him from leaving. “You didn’t try on your new shoes,” I remind him. He gives me a hug. “Tomorrow,” he says, and clatters down the stairs.

The shoes are still lying untouched in their box.

January 21
The nightmare starts the following day when we realize that Ilan hasn’t come home. None of his friends have heard from him either. I’m reading a story to Noa, my granddaughter, when I hear my daughters’ piercing screams in the next room. They’re looking at a photo of Ilan on the computer screen that has just been sent by email. My son’s face is covered with black tape, and there’s a pistol pointed at his temple. “We are holding Ilan,” the email reads. “We are demanding 450,000 euros for his release.”

“You have 20 minutes to bring the money. If you contact the police, we will kill him.”
A phone call ensues. A young man speaking French with a heavy African accent says, “You have 20 minutes to bring the money. If you contact the police, we will kill him.” My two daughters, each holding one of my hands, drag me down the stairs to the police station. Didier, Ilan’s father, is already there, having received the same phone call.

The police try to figure out why Ilan was targeted. None of us can pay the sum of 450,000 euros. I’m a secretary. Ilan earns 1,200 euro a month. His father doesn’t have any money either. Our profile certainly doesn’t mark us as a target for kidnappers. The police search our house and confiscate Ilan’s computer. Again and again they imply that Ilan was involved in drugs. Again and again I vigorously deny it. I know my son. They are sullying his name. Must I fight the police as well as his abductors?

“Don’t give in to them,” the police warn us. “If you play by their rules, they will only increase their demands.” It is important, they explain, to keep up a steady dialogue with the kidnappers to give the authorities time to unravel his whereabouts. For Ilan’s own safety, they insist, his disappearance must be kept secret.

January 22
The next morning there’s another phone call, a request for 100,000 euros followed by a string of curses and insults. It sounds like the ranting of a lunatic. The police decide that I’m too emotional and cannot be counted on to control myself over the phone. From now on Didier, Ilan’s father, will be the only one answering their calls. But Didier doesn’t have much self-control either, so every word he utters to the madman will henceforth be directed by two professional negotiators and a criminal psychologist. “You have to be strong,” she says to him. “Do not lose your temper.” I feel powerless. I’ve raised three children on my own. Why am I now so helpless? What am I doing in the hands of these men?

January 23
A new email: “Tomorrow at 11:00 a.m. you are to assemble ten people, each of whom has a valid ID and a laptop computer with WiFi.” They want to do a money transfer over the Internet, and they need ten people because the maximum amount that can be transferred is 10,000 euro per person. The police realize that there will be no movie-style exchange of an attaché case filled with money for the hostage’s release. They instruct us to email them back that we simply don’t have that much money. We do as they say. We have no choice but to trust their decision.

January 24
A profile of the kidnapper gradually emerges: He is an African man calling from the Ivory Coast who speaks a primitive French slang. The police are convinced that they are dealing with an experienced, organized band. They have no idea that the kidnapper is really a 26-year-old male of African descent who was born in France. Indeed, Youssouf Fofana, a petty criminal with an extensive record, has already served time for armed robbery, theft and resisting arrest. In fact, his face has often been featured on wanted posters. Who could fathom that it was only a single madman vacationing in the Ivory Coast in anticipation of the expected ransom, while his makeshift gang guarded their prisoner?

We sit around the phone, not daring to move, afraid to miss a call. We are getting 40 phone calls a day—680 in total. Each day we are subjected to abusive diatribes and threats, but never a clear proposition.

Five other men have previously been approached, the investigators inform us, by different youngsters. None of them took the bait, except for one whose screams caught the attention of a neighbor who alerted the police. He was found on the front steps of a building with 86 bruises on his body.

Each of the five men was Jewish.

“Can’t you see what’s really going on?” I beg the police. “Ilan has been kidnapped because he’s a Jew.
A new phone call, this time with only a repetition of Arabic chants. A Muslim police officer confirms that these are recitations from the Koran.

The next call is in French: “We want a down payment of 50,000 euros.” Didier repeats what the psychologist whispers to him: “I don’t have the money.”

“Then get it from the Jewish community,” the man answers before the receiver is slammed down.

“Can’t you see what’s really going on?” I beg the police. “Ilan has been kidnapped because he’s a Jew. It’s the typical anti-Semitic approach: Jews are rich and clannish. They’ll cough up the money because they stick to each other.”

A new knot has formed in my stomach. If my son has been kidnapped because he’s a Jew, he will never be released so easily.

“Promise me that you will bring him home!” I beg the two policemen sleeping in my living room. “Madame,” they assure me, “we are doing everything in our power.” I know they are. But the last kidnapping in France was in 1978, when the Baron Empain was abducted and eventually liberated by his captors. Unlike countries where kidnappings are frequent, the French have little experience with such matters. “Don’t worry,” they tell me. “Kidnappers kidnap to get someone thing out of it, not to kill their victims.”

Today Didier got two dozen more phone calls demanding the ransom. The man on the line is clearly nervous. The police suspect that Ilan is dead and want to see a photo as proof that he’s still alive. They also hope to catch the kidnapper posting the picture in a cyber café, where there are security cameras. The photo finally arrives: it’s Ilan, with a long cut on his cheek. The page is adorned with colorful balloons; they are having fun. It is zero degrees outside. We later learn that Ilan was lying on the floor of an unheated apartment during this time, “tied like a mummy,” as one of the gang members described it, his face completely covered with tape except for a hole to insert a straw. He is barely kept nourished; just enough so he won’t die. They are also keeping him silent, hitting him when he groans. He’s being held in an 11-story building, in an apartment that has been vacant since January 16. The concierge has received 1,500 euros for his silence. In exchange, the gang may use the empty flat until it is rented out. None of the neighbors report their comings and goings. No one hears anything.

It isn’t far from where I live.

January 25
More phone calls. Fofana insists on a money transfer. The police do not give in. Didier is instructed to stop answering the phone. “We want to force the kidnappers to alter their demands.” Fourteen phone calls go unanswered. Violent insults are left on the answering machine. We stand there listening, helpless. The psychologist congratulates Didier each time he doesn’t pick up the receiver. She uses her skills to manipulate the kidnappers, but also to manage Didier as she sees fit.

My daughters, Deborah and Eve, resolve to spread the word about Ilan’s kidnapping in the hope that media attention will somehow help. The police think differently. They are firm: We are to tell people that Ilan is fine and merely on vacation. I am to return to work. Everything must seem as normal as possible. I do as I am instructed. I go back to work and discuss the weather. I put on a pleasant face, as I am told that Ilan’s life depends on it. I think of other people who have disappeared, their photos on the walls of every post office and in every window. Why can’t the same be done for Ilan ? Why am I obeying the police rather than following the dictates of my heart?

January 28
This time Fofana’s tone is urgent: “I want to release Ilan,” he says. “Let’s negotiate an agreement.” An email follows: “I cannot control my people anymore. They are going to harm him. You must respond quickly.”

Again the police order Didier not to answer the phone. They are convinced that our silence will force Fofana to agree to an exchange. The result is an entire night of incessant phone messages on his machine, warning him that they’re going to dump Ilan in the forest. The police refuse to budge.

Shabbat arrives. Without Ilan. Every night I have the same dream, of heavy stone doors being closed in my face. All I have left is prayer. I pray that the young woman who lured Ilan to his captors will have a change of heart and lead the police to him. I pray to have news of my son. I am petrified that they will act on their threat but the phone has stopped ringing. The two policemen in my house have become like family. They eat with us, accompany me to the supermarket. For long hours I speak to them about Ilan. How happy I was when he was born after two daughters.

January 29
Rabbi Thierry Zinni in Paris receives three messages from the kidnappers. We do not know each other but he is Jewish; that is enough for them. “A Jew has been kidnapped,” the message says, and directs him to where he will find a video tape. The rabbi takes it seriously and immediately contacts the police.

“They contacted a rabbi because he’s a Jew. Don’t you recognize that this is an anti-Semitic act?”
Ilan’s voice is on the tape; it is very feeble. From the photos I know that his eyes and face are taped. “I am Jewish,” he says. “Please, please help me. Maman,” he breaks into a sob. “Help me! Do not abandon me.” To hear my son beg for his life is beyond suffering. Then I hear a thump and Ilan groans; he has been hit.

“Don’t you see?” I plead with the police. “They contacted a rabbi because he’s a Jew. Don’t you recognize that this is an anti-Semitic act?” But the authorities will have none of it.

January 30
Ilan’s situation, we later learn, has taken a turn for the worse. The concierge of the building notifies the kidnappers that they will have to vacate the apartment. He has orders to paint it for the next tenant. Fofana returns to France from the Ivory Coast especially to transport Ilan somewhere else. Covered in a blanket, he is carried on the kidnappers’ shoulders to a nearby cellar. It is colder in there than in the flat. He is under the watch of ten guards between the ages of 17 and 23, most of them converts to Islam. They were promised the whole thing would take three days and they’d make some quick money. “I wanted to buy myself new clothes,” said one gang member during his interrogation. Now, they are annoyed. Ten days have passed and they are still stuck with Ilan, who bears the brunt of their frustration. They kick him and burn him with cigarettes, each one inventing a different kind of torture. “Even an animal isn’t treated that way,” the police later say.

By now the police know that the man in charge is using a different Internet café each time. Four hundred men are mobilized to catch the perpetrator. To me, it is abundantly clear that this is an anti-Semitic act and that I should shout out the truth and alert the press. But I do what the police tell me.

Around this time the local police stop a black man on the streets of Paris whose name is Youssouf Fofana. They have no idea about the kidnapping because it is all being handled secretly. They return his papers to him. How he must have laughed! How powerful he must have felt!

February 2
The owner of a cyber café alerts the police: the black man in the hood and gloves they are looking for has come back. The police recruit a nearby squad without giving them too many details other than that they must immediately go and arrest a black man at 9 Rue Poirier de Narcay. They have no idea how dangerous he is or how much is at stake. The six policemen rush off together, discretion—the most important factor in this operation—thrown to the wind. They are searching for Number 9 but there’s no address on the shop, only on a nearby building. Fofana, sitting at the window, has ample time to notice them and flee. By the time they realize their mistake Fofana is long gone. They chase him but it’s too late. Why wasn’t the situation explained to them properly? Why couldn’t road blocks have been set up to prevent Fofana’s escape? Why wasn’t his picture put in the newspapers? And why didn’t the police compare his image to the one that was already in their files for the past 13 years, for a host of infractions?

These are questions with which I torment myself daily.

February 6
After three days without any communication the emails begin again. The police decide to pay the ransom. One hundred thousand euros are photographed and put into an attaché case that is given to Didier. The whole area where the meeting will take place is under surveillance. But the encounter doesn’t take place as planned; the kidnappers fail to show up. Instead, they call Didier and give him another address in Chatelet, a 30-minute ride away. When he arrives there, with the police discreetly observing the proceedings, he receives a new directive: “Send 5,000 euros via Union Transfer now and take a train to Brussels.” This time he has had enough and hangs up the phone.

Seventeen days have now passed without any results. We are totally drained and at our wits’ end. A new stream of phone calls is directed to the police. They don’t answer.

Then the phone calls stop.

February 13
That night I feel a strong force hurl my bed against the wall and I wake up. “Something happened to Ilan! I’m sure of it!” I tell the policemen in my living room. Of course, they think it’s only the ranting of a hysterical woman. It was five a.m. They say that a mother knows. I checked it out later. On February 13, at five o’clock in the morning, Ilan was first shaven, like six million other Jews, and flung into the forest by his torturers. He managed to take the mask off his eyes, and as Fofana later reported, look them straight in the eye. I am a human being, his eyes told them. He received a few knife stabs for that. Then, like many of the six million before him he was set on fire and burned alive, having been sprayed with a flammable substance. Then his tormentors left.

When he was found guilty Fofana declared, “I killed a Jew, and for that I will go to Paradise.”
It was raining that morning; Ilan managed to roll down on the leaves towards the highway. A black woman, a secretary like me, saw him lying by the side of the road, stopped her car and called the police. She accompanied him in the ambulance and did not leave his side. He was still alive in the ambulance but died on the way to the hospital. I console myself that my son died hearing a soothing voice.

When he was found guilty Fofana declared, “I killed a Jew, and for that I will go to Paradise.” The police publicly admit to the press that it was an anti-Semitic crime.
“Why did you write your book, 24 Days, which chronicles Ilan’s kidnapping?” I want to know. “How did you have the courage to immerse yourself in what must have been such unbearable pain?”

“I couldn’t allow his murder to evaporate, to simply disappear like yesterday’s news,” she explains. “The idea was intolerable. I had to leave a permanent testament to my son.

Ilan’s funeral

“Of course it was very difficult,” she continues. “I have boxes and boxes of transcripts from the trial. When I started reading them I felt like throwing myself out the window. They enumerate in painstaking detail what they did to my child just to amuse themselves. When Fofana was asked in prison if he had a message for me he said, ‘Tell her that her son fought well.’ It was probably meant as a compliment in his twisted mind.”

“The murder of Ilan Halimi has been publicly declared an act of anti-Semitism. When you speak in public, what is your message to the French people?” I ask.

“I tell them that words are sometimes worse than weapons,” she replies. “The popular French comedian, Dieudonné [which means ‘gift of God’], whose supposed humor drips with anti-Semitism and is enjoyed by millions of Frenchmen, has said things like, ‘The Germans should have finished the job in 1945.’ It’s words like these that incite violence and inspire incidents like Toulouse.”

“Have you ever considered leaving France?” I inquire.

“Yes. My youngest daughter made aliyah and is happy in Israel. She is urging me to join her. But at the moment, with the pension I have, I cannot afford it. I also have grandchildren here to whom I am very attached. But I do not plan on remaining here forever. One day when my daughter in Israel marries and has a family, I too shall leave.”

“Why did you have Ilan’s remains reinterred in Israel?”

“Because I didn’t want him to lie in the same soil on which he was murdered. I wanted him to be buried in Israel immediately, but my children said they needed him close by so they could visit him every day. I also knew that one day Fofana will be released from prison, and I don’t want him to be able to come and spit on my son’s grave.”

This article originally appeared in Ami Magazine.

Voir encore:

Emmanuel Macron : « Il y a du mal à l’intérieur de notre société »
Propos recueillis par Arnaud Leparmentier, Cédric Pietralunga et Thomas Wieder

Le Monde

06.01.2016

Dans un entretien au Monde, le ministre de l’économie Emmanuel Macron explique qu’il faut « donner plus de place à ceux qui sont en dehors du système et de sortir de l’entre-soi ».

Après le 13 novembre, vous avez dit, ce que Manuel Valls n’a pas apprécié, que la France avait « une part de responsabilité » dans le « terreau » qui a enfanté le terrorisme…

Quand j’ai dit ça, ce n’était ni pour justifier ni pour excuser, mais parce que je pense qu’il faut tenir un discours adulte à nos concitoyens. Il y a bien sûr une menace terroriste extérieure, mais il y a des terroristes français et donc du mal à l’intérieur de notre société. Notre responsabilité, c’est de protéger et de punir de manière implacable, d’avoir une politique sécuritaire très forte, mais c’est aussi de prévenir et regarder cette réalité en face.

Ce «  néototalitarisme terroriste  » qui prospère aux confins de l’islamisme religieux, pourquoi pénètre-t-il nos sociétés  ? Une forme d’anomie s’est installée au cœur de celle-ci, une anomie qui procède d’une perte de repères chez des individus qui n’ont plus de perspectives familiales, professionnelles… Attention, je ne dis pas que c’est parce qu’on n’a pas de diplôme qu’on devient djihadiste   : il y a bien sûr une part de trajectoire individuelle. Mais il y a aussi une part de responsabilité collective et, après ce que nous avons vécu en  2015, nous devons aussi répondre à ce désespoir-là. Pour moi, la clé de la recomposition politique est là, dans le fait de donner plus de place à ceux qui sont en dehors du système et de sortir de l’entre-soi.

Faut-il une forme d’unité nationale ?

Ce que nos concitoyens veulent, c’est un discours de vérité et des politiques courageuses. Il ne faut pas penser qu’on peut atteindre cela par des combinaisons. Si c’est la condition pour mener des politiques neuves et répondre aux difficultés de notre pays, cela peut se concevoir. Mais si c’est une finalité en soi, ce sera un nouvel artifice. Nous n’avons pas un système parlementaire qui conduise à des grandes coalitions comme en Allemagne mais un système présidentiel qui fait que les grandes coalitions se conduisent au moment de l’échéance présidentielle.

François Hollande doit-il construire une grande coalition pour 2017 sur le thème de la France unie ?

Ce n’est pas mon rôle de le dire. Beaucoup l’ont tenté. Même Nicolas Sarkozy en 2007 à travers certaines nominations. Est-ce que cela a eu un impact ? La France est un peuple politique beaucoup plus intelligent que les élites ne le pensent. L’unité nationale doit venir d’un choix populaire, d’une mobilisation des énergies davantage que d’une combinaison d’appareils.

Quelle est votre position sur la déchéance de nationalité ?

Je comprends et je respecte profondément les réflexions et les réactions sur ce sujet. Il faut répondre à trois exigences  : la protection des Français, le respect de l’engagement pris par le président de la République – l’autorité de l’Etat en dépend – et la cohésion nationale. C’est une mesure symboliquement importante  : elle donne un sens à ce que c’est que d’appartenir à la communauté nationale.

Vous voteriez cette mesure ?

Je suis ministre de la République, donc pleinement solidaire de la politique gouvernementale.

Voir de plus:

Entretien avec Pascal Boniface

Entretien réalisé par 
Pierre Chaillan
L’Humanité
16 Mai, 2014

Spécialiste de géopolitique, président de l’Institut de relations internationales et stratégiques (Iris), Pascal Boniface lance un véritable débat arguant que « La République doit considérer tous ses enfants de la même façon »

En publiant 
 »la France malade du conflit israélo-palestinien », Pascal Boniface affirme ses craintes de voir s’ériger des barrières séparant différentes communautés dans notre pays rejoignent sa compréhension de l’Europe et du monde.

Dans la France malade du conflit israélo-palestinien (1), vous vous interrogez sur le fait de revenir sur cette question. Pourquoi?

Pascal Boniface. Malheureusement, les faits m’ont donné raison. Quand on aborde de façon critique la politique du gouvernement israélien ou encore les prises de position des intellectuels et institutions communautaires en France sur la question du conflit israélo-palestinien, on se met forcément un peu en danger. Il y a deux risques. Le premier est d’être accusé d’antisémitisme plus ou moins assumé. Cela a été le cas. J’ai été attaqué de façon scandaleuse par un journaliste, Frédéric Haziza, et par Julien Dray, dont on peut par ailleurs s’étonner qu’il soit encore élu au conseil régional d’Île-de-France au vu de l’ensemble de son œuvre et par rapport au désir de moralité qui semble gouverner dans les hautes sphères. Ceci étant, après cette polémique odieuse m’accusant de nier la dimension antisémite du meurtre d’Ilan Halimi, une pétition a été lancée et a recueilli plusieurs milliers de signatures sur le thème « Stop à la chasse aux sorcières » (2). Lorsque je regarde la liste des signataires et leur réputation morale, je suis réconforté. Le second risque, c’est le black-out. Les médias dans leur grande majorité n’ont pas voulu parler du livre et de ses thèses. La tentation chez beaucoup de mes collègues chercheurs et de nombreux journalistes consiste à considérer que ça divise l’opinion ou qu’il n’y a que des coups à prendre et qu’il est donc plus prudent de ne pas aborder ce sujet. Mais, en attendant, le débat continue, et parfois, de façon plus malsaine. D’ailleurs, je suis pris entre deux écueils, les ultras pro-israéliens m’accusent d’antisémitisme. Et lorsque, dans des débats un peu chauds, je m’élève contre l’utilisation du terme « entité sioniste » pour parler de l’État d’Israël, que je refuse la vision d’une presse contrôlée par les juifs ou que je dénonce Dieudonné, d’autres m’accusent d’être payé par les juifs. Il y a donc là un enjeu essentiel pour notre débat démocratique. Combattre l’antisémitisme mais refuser le chantage consistant à faire un amalgame entre critique politique du gouvernement israélien et antisémitisme.

Est-ce au point de tirer la sonnette d’alarme sur l’état de la société française ?

Pascal Boniface. Oui. Il y a un décalage extrêmement fort entre les élites politiques et médiatiques très prudentes et l’opinion de la rue vindicative sur la question. La prudence et 
la pusillanimité des uns, pour ne pas dire l’absence de courage, conduisent d’une certaine manière à l’extrémisme des autres. La société française perd des deux côtés. Il faut vraiment aborder cette question, en parler très ouvertement et franchement. Plus on en discutera de manière sereine et de façon ouverte et plus on évitera les dérives.

Vous mettez en garde contre le communautarisme. À quoi faites-vous allusion ?

Pascal Boniface. Le discours des institutions juives ou des intellectuels communautaires, pour ne pas dire communautaristes, répète en boucle que l’antisémitisme est très fort en France, qu’il y a une « montée » de ce phénomène, et que la menace antisémite est plus importante et virulente que les autres formes de racisme. Il faudrait alors plus se mobiliser contre cette forme de racisme. Et, en annexe, ne pas critiquer le gouvernement israélien car cela alimenterait l’antisémitisme. Pour une grande partie de la population qui vit de nombreuses discriminations au quotidien, les Noirs et les Arabes, ce discours est vécu de façon assez douloureuse. Ils ont l’impression qu’on sous-estime les discriminations dont ils sont victimes et que certains doivent être plus protégés que d’autres. Il y a alors danger. Les études et les faits montrent que l’antisémitisme, même s’il n’a pas disparu, est nettement moins fort qu’il y a une ou deux générations en France. En même temps, chaque année au dîner du Crif, le président parle d’une montée de l’antisémitisme. En fait, le grand revirement est que l’antisémitisme est moins fort mais le soutien à Israël dans la population française l’est également.

Vous regrettez une instrumentalisation de la lutte contre l’antisémitisme à des fins géopolitiques. Comment cela se traduit-il ?

Pascal Boniface. La défense inconditionnelle de l’État d’Israël des institutions juives, quelle que soit son action ou sa politique, très rapidement reliée à la lutte contre l’antisémitisme contribue à faire peur aux juifs français. Cela vient poser une barrière entre juifs et non-juifs autour de cet enjeu du soutien à Israël. Cela est très dangereux. On voit, par exemple, sur quelles bases le Crif a décidé de ne plus inviter le Parti communiste à son dîner annuel. Que l’on me montre la moindre déclaration d’un dirigeant communiste qui verse dans l’antisémitisme. Par contre, on reproche aux communistes leur solidarité avec la cause palestinienne. Le Crif privilégie ainsi son soutien à Israël au détriment du combat contre l’antisémitisme. Tout en se disant en faveur d’un règlement pacifique, les institutions et les intellectuels communautaires pilonnent systématiquement ceux qui sont tout autant pour la paix mais qui estiment que le blocage de la situation provient plus de l’occupant que de l’occupé. Les institutions juives mettent en avant la lutte contre l’antisémitisme pour tétaniser toute expression politique contraire ou critique à l’égard du gouvernement israélien. Elle est directement taxée soit d’antisémitisme, soit de le nourrir en important le conflit du Proche-Orient. Cet argument est pour le moins paradoxal puisque ce sont les mêmes qui, sans cesse, appellent les juifs de France à démontrer une solidarité infaillible au gouvernement israélien. Ils sont donc très largement responsables de ce faux lien.

Pourtant n’assiste-t-on pas à une recrudescence des actes antisémites les plus violents ?

Pascal Boniface. Il y a eu Mohamed Merah qui a tué des enfants parce qu’ils étaient juifs. Nous ne sommes pas à l’abri d’un tel acte terroriste qui, par définition, est incontrôlable et on ne peut pas nier l’existence d’un tel risque. Il y a eu aussi l’affaire Ilan Halimi, même si plus complexe, qui a une dimension antisémite mais qui ne peut pas se résumer uniquement à un acte antisémite. Mais, il n’y a pas de recrudescence d’agressions ou d’injures. Les actes antisémites, bien sûr toujours trop nombreux, représentent un nombre faible face à l’ensemble des actes violents répertoriés, dans la rue, à l’école, en milieu hospitalier, etc. Je donne à ce sujet des chiffres très précis. Nous vivons dans une société violente. Et puis, surtout, il y a beaucoup d’agressions racistes qui touchent d’autres catégories de populations. Les actes antimusulmans ou anti-Noirs sont très nombreux alors qu’ils ne semblent pas faire autant l’objet d’une vigoureuse dénonciation des médias ou des pouvoirs publics. Cela est largement ressenti. Les médias et les élus de la République font très souvent du « deux poids, deux mesures », aggravent un mal qu’ils disent vouloir combattre.

Faut-il y voir un péril pour la République ?

Pascal Boniface. Je cite plusieurs exemples d’agressions d’autres communautés, pas seulement arabes, de faits graves pas ou peu médiatisés. Cela au final se retourne contre les juifs français car cela crée un sentiment d’être traité différemment. Il ne faut pas ignorer l’existence d’une nouvelle forme d’antisémitisme en banlieue aujourd’hui. Cela est dû plus à une forme de jalousie sociétale qu’à une haine raciale. Il y a le sentiment que l’on en fait plus pour les uns que pour les autres. Par ailleurs, le Crif joue à la fois un rôle de repoussoir et de modèle. Beaucoup de musulmans y voient la bonne méthode pour se faire entendre des pouvoirs publics et veulent faire pareil. Le risque est de se retrouver communauté contre communauté. Faire ce constat, ce n’est pas vouloir dresser les uns contre les autres. Je réclame au contraire l’égalité de traitement. La République doit considérer tous ses enfants de la même façon. Quels que soient l’histoire et les drames vécus précédemment, il n’y a pas de raison que certains soient plus protégés que les autres. Je remarque toutefois que l’on parle beaucoup plus des dégradations de mosquée, des agressions et des injures islamophobes. Une prise de conscience est en train de s’opérer dans les médias certainement liée à la pression populaire et aux réseaux sociaux.

Vous présidez l’Iris et êtes de ce fait attentif à l’actualité du monde. À quelques jours des élections européennes et au regard de l’actualité ukrainienne, quel est l’enjeu stratégique pour l’UE ?

Pascal Boniface. Les élections vont être probablement marquées par un fort taux d’abstention 
et par des débats qui portent plus sur la politique intérieure de chaque pays que sur l’Europe. Il y a cet effet de ciseau entre un Parlement européen qui est de plus en plus important en termes de pouvoir et de détermination de politiques européennes et des citoyens français qui croient de moins en moins en l’Europe et dans sa capacité 
à impulser une direction. L’exemple de l’Ukraine montre qu’il y a encore un appétit d’Europe en dehors des frontières de l’Union européenne et une fatigue à l’intérieur. Pourquoi ? Parce que les choses sont mal présentées. Est-ce l’UE qui impose des règles d’austérité injustes ? Le système de santé est malmené en Grèce afin de faire des économies demandées par l’UE. Mais c’est bien le gouvernement grec qui décide de ne pas imposer l’Église orthodoxe ou les armateurs et de faire peser l’effort sur les citoyens. La décision est nationale. Sur la crise ukrainienne, l’Europe a réussi une médiation extrêmement positive entre le gouvernement 
et l’opposition ukrainienne en parvenant à l’accord du 21 février. Cet accord n’a pas ensuite été respecté et l’Europe n’en a pas tenu compte. S’il avait été mis 
en œuvre, il aurait pourtant évité la crise survenue. L’Europe n’a pas suffisamment confiance dans ses capacités d’acteur global et n’a pas conscience du poids qu’elle représente.

Jusqu’à se retrouver maintenant à la remorque de la position américaine ?

Pascal Boniface. Oui, clairement. Elle n’a pas suivi les États-Unis sur la nature des sanctions mais l’impulsion première a été donnée par les Américains et s’est appuyée sur leurs plus fidèles alliés en Europe. En réalité, le tournant a été manqué 
il y a deux décennies lorsque la fin du monde bipolaire n’a pas été gérée de façon satisfaisante. Gorbatchev a fait des efforts extraordinaires pour construire un monde nouveau en permettant aux Nations unies de jouer pleinement leur rôle. 
De leur côté, les Américains ont parlé eux d’un nouvel ordre mondial en se félicitant d’avoir gagné la guerre froide. Ils ont privilégié la tentative 
de la construction d’un monde unipolaire sur la possibilité de construire un monde basé sur la sécurité collective bâtie sur l’effort de tous. Du coup, on n’a toujours pas reconstruit un nouvel ordre mondial.

Votre grille de lecture de la société et du monde semble suivre une même logique ?

Pascal Boniface. Vous avez parfaitement raison. Il y a une matrice commune : respecter les autres, prendre le point de vue de l’autre en considération et surtout éviter d’humilier les autres car c’est une source première de violence et de rejet. Il s’agit de respecter les individus à l’échelle de la société ou les peuples au niveau mondial. L’information circule tellement aujourd’hui que l’on ne peut pas baser une relation sur le mépris et la négation de l’autre. C’est non seulement moralement indéfendable, mais c’est politiquement dangereux.

Des questions stratégiques à la géopolitique du sport. 
Pascal Boniface a écrit une cinquantaine d’ouvrages, alternant essais et livres pédagogiques sur les questions stratégiques, traitant de la politique extérieure de la France, des questions nucléaires, de la sécurité européenne, 
du conflit du Proche-Orient et de ses répercussions sur la société française et sur les rapports de forces internationaux, ainsi que du rôle du sport dans les questions internationales. Son dernier ouvrage, Géopolitique du sport, vient 
de paraître aux éditions Armand Colin.

1) Éditios Salvador. 222 pages. 19,5 euros

(2)

Voir par ailleurs:

Perceptions et attentes de la population juive : le rapport à l’autre et aux minorités
31 Janvier 2016

Le dispositif d’enquête dont les principaux enseignements sont présentés ci-après a été conduit par l’Institut Ipsos à la demande de la Fondation du Judaïsme Français. Ce dispositif d’études s’articule autour de trois volets.
Document associé :

[COMPLEMENT] Afin de mieux appréhender les résultats d’une étude approfondie et comportant de nombreux volets, nous mettons à votre disposition l’analyse de l’ensemble des données par Chantal Bordes (CNRS), Dominique Schnapper (EHESS), Brice Teinturier (IPSOS), Etienne Mercier (IPSOS).

Note de synthèse longuepdf 1.15 MB
Le premier volet concerne l’ensemble de la population française : nous avons interrogé 1005 personnes constituant un échantillon représentatif de la population française âgée de 18 ans et plus (méthode des quotas). L’enquête a été réalisée par internet du 15 au 24 juillet 2014.

Le second concerne les personnes se considérant comme juives : après avoir réalisé 45 entretiens qualitatifs d’environ 2h auprès de juifs (45) dont des responsables communautaires (15) en région parisienne, à Toulouse et Strasbourg, Ipsos a réalisé une étude quantitative auprès de 313 personnes.
Il n’existe pas de définition satisfaisante de qui est juif et qui ne l’est pas. Il n’existe pas non plus de statistiques permettant d’appliquer des quotas. La méthode utilisée a été celle de l’autodéfinition par les personnes elles-mêmes. Est juif celui ou celle qui se considère comme tel. A partir de plusieurs dizaines de milliers de panélistes interrogés, on a ainsi pu extraire un échantillon de 313 personnes se déclarant comme juif ou juive, auquel le questionnaire a été administré du 24 février au 8 juin 2015. Cette méthode a l’avantage de limiter les biais que l’on rencontre lors de recrutement « dans la rue » ou à proximité de lieux de culte

Le troisième concerne les personnes se considérant comme musulmanes. Pour les mêmes raisons, il a été procédé exactement de la même façon que pour les répondants juifs. Un échantillon de 500 personnes se déclarant musulman/musulmane extrait de notre Acces Panel a ainsi été interrogé du 24 février au 9 mars 2015.

LES FRANÇAIS PESSIMISTES EN CE QUI CONCERNE LE FUTUR DU PAYS ET LEUR PROPRE AVENIR

Pour comprendre la force de la crise de confiance généralisée, il convient de garder à l’esprit qu’elle s’est aussi individualisée. De ce point de vue, il n’y a pas un pessimisme collectif et un optimisme individuel mais un pessimisme collectif massif qui se double d’un pessimisme individuel important.

79% sont aujourd’hui persuadés que la France est en déclin
61% déclarent qu’en pensant à leur avenir, celui-ci leur apparaît « bouché »

UNE CRISE DE CONFIANCE GÉNÉRALISÉE QUI S’EXPRIME PAR DES CRITIQUES FORTES À L’ÉGARD DE « L’AUTRE »

Ce pessimisme s’accompagne d’une relation de défiance à l’égard d’autrui (les immigrés, les chômeurs).

66% des Français estiment que « Dans la vie, on ne peut pas faire confiance à la plupart des gens »
54% des Français considèrent que « L’immigration n’est pas une source d’enrichissement pour la France »,
53% qu’on « en fait plus pour aider les immigrés que les Français »
39% affirment que ce n’est pas « la pauvreté qui est la principale cause d’insécurité, c’est l’immigration ».
49% que « les chômeurs ne font pas de réels efforts pour trouver du travail »
30% estiment qu’« une réaction raciste peut se justifier ».

UN REPLI SUR SOI, LE SENTIMENT FRÉQUENT D’ASSISTER À UN CHOC DES RELIGIONS ET D’ÊTRE DEVENUS MINORITAIRES

Ces opinions s’inscrivent dans un climat de forte défiance vis-à-vis des religions et de leur capacité à coexister entre elles.

53% estiment que « l’intégrisme religieux est un phénomène développé en France »
44% estiment qu’« en France les différentes religions coexistent plutôt bien entre elles »
23% disent avoir même assisté à des comportements agressifs ou à des violences liées à la religion et que les victimes de ces agressions étaient majoritairement de leur propre confession
Les Français estiment en moyenne que 31% de la population globale est musulmane et considèrent même que les catholiques sont aujourd’hui minoritaires (seulement 49% de la population d’ensemble).
Les mesures en faveur des minorités religieuses sont presque toutes rejetées, surtout quand elles touchent à l’école, symbole fort de la laïcité : 63% sont opposés à « la mise en place de menus spécifiques dans les cantines scolaires pour les élèves de confession juive et musulmane », 71% sont défavorables à « la mise en place de dérogations permettant aux élèves de s’absenter les jours de fêtes religieuses non prévus dans le calendrier » et 74% sont contre « la possibilité pour des mères portant le voile d’accompagner leurs enfants lors des sorties scolaires ».
En revanche, 53% sont favorables « à la construction de mosquées pour que les personnes de confession musulmane puissent exercer leur culte plus facilement ».

DES MÉCANISMES TRÈS VARIABLES DE TOLÉRANCE ET D’INTOLÉRANCE : LES JUIFS SONT TRÈS MAJORITAIREMENT PERÇUS COMME BIEN INTÉGRÉS, CONTRAIREMENT AUX ROMS, AUX MUSULMANS ET AUX MAGHRÉBINS

Si l’on sait que les périodes de crise favorisent les sentiments d’hostilité à l’égard des minorités, des étrangers, en un mot des « autres », les réactions à l’égard des différents groupes montrent que les sentiments d’hostilité ne portent pas en priorité sur les juifs mais sur les Roms, les musulmans et les Maghrébins :

80% des Français considèrent que la grande majorité des Roms est mal intégrée
Seuls 29% des Français estiment que la majorité des personnes de confession musulmane est bien intégrée, 44% pensent qu’une moitié est bien intégrée, l’autre non et 27% considèrent que la majorité d’entre eux est mal intégrée).
89% des Français qui pensent que les musulmans sont mal intégrés estiment que « c’est parce qu’ils se sont repliés sur eux-mêmes et qu’ils refusent de s’ouvrir sur la société » contre 11% qui estiment que « c’est la société qui a poussé ces personnes à se replier sur elles-mêmes en les rejetant »)

LES PRÉJUGÉS ANTISÉMITES SONT FORTEMENT RÉPANDUS AU SEIN DE LA POPULATION FRANÇAISE ET TRANSCENDENT TOUS LES CRITÈRES SOCIODÉMOGRAPHIQUES ET POLITIQUES

Indéniablement, la diffusion des stéréotypes antisémites est forte au sein de la population française.

91% considèrent que « les juifs sont très soudés entre eux »
56% que « les juifs ont beaucoup de pouvoir »
56% qu’« ils sont plus riches que la moyenne des Français »
53% qu’« ils sont plus attachés à Israël qu’à la France »
41% qu’ «ils sont trop présents dans les médias »
25% qu’ «ils sont plus intelligents que la moyenne »
24% qu’ «ils ne sont pas vraiment des Français comme les autres »
13% qu’  « il y a un peu trop de juifs en France »
Au total, c’est plus du tiers de la population (36%) qui se dit d’accord avec au moins 5 des 8 stéréotypes testés.

Les ouvriers sont légèrement plus nombreux à être dans la catégorie de ceux qui se disent d’accord avec au moins 5 stéréotypes (42%), mais les professions intermédiaires (28%) et les cadres (32%) sont également très présents. De même, si les titulaires d’un diplôme inférieur au bac sont plus nombreux que les autres à se dire d’accord avec au moins 5 des stéréotypes testés (46%), c’est aussi le cas de 32% des bacheliers, de 23% des titulaires d’une licence/maîtrise et de 35% des diplômés d’une grande école ou d’un doctorat.

LES PRÉJUGÉS ANTISÉMITES SONT LARGEMENT RÉPANDUS AU SEIN DE LA POPULATION MUSULMANE, PLUS QUE CHEZ L’ENSEMBLE DES FRANÇAIS

51% des musulmans se déclarent d’accord avec au moins 5 des 8 stéréotypes testés

90% considèrent que les juifs sont très soudés entre eux »
74% que « les juifs ont beaucoup de pouvoir »
66% qu’« ils sont plus riches que la moyenne des Français »
67% qu’« ils sont trop présents dans les médias »
62% qu’« ils sont plus attachés à Israël qu’à la France »
26% qu’« ils sont plus intelligents que la moyenne »
29% qu’« ils ne sont pas vraiment des Français comme les autres »

UN ANTISÉMITISME PERÇU PAR LES JUIFS COMME ÉTANT EN FORTE PROGRESSION ET QUI EST DEVENU LEUR PRINCIPALE PRÉOCCUPATION…

La perception de leur situation en tant que juif a profondément évolué au cours des dernières années : la crainte de la montée de l’antisémitisme a laissé la place chez bon nombre d’entre eux à une angoisse réactivée régulièrement par les actes terroristes et les tueries qui se sont succédé.

92% des juifs estiment que l’antisémitisme a augmenté (dont 67% disent « beaucoup »)
Ils considèrent que l’antisémitisme progresse d’abord et avant tout chez les musulmans (91% dont 61% estiment qu’il s’est « beaucoup » renforcé ces 5 dernières années) mais ont aussi le sentiment que la situation se détériore au sein de la population française dans son ensemble (77% pensent qu’il a augmenté au global).
L’antisémitisme (67%), le terrorisme (50%), et l’intégrisme religieux sont les principales craintes des juifs, loin devant le chômage (23%), ou le pouvoir d’achat (27%) à rebours de la population française dont ce sont les principales préoccupations.

…AUQUEL S’AJOUTE UN SENTIMENT D’INSÉCURITÉ VÉCU « PERSONNELLEMENT »

L’idée que les juifs ne sont plus en sécurité sur le territoire français s’est largement diffusée, y compris auprès des responsables communautaires. Dans le même temps, les juifs ont le sentiment d’assister à une libération de la parole antisémite concomitante à un sentiment d’insécurité vécu personnellement.

45% disent avoir subi personnellement des remarques ou des insultes antisémites au cours de l’année parce qu’ils étaient juifs et 71% ont un ou plusieurs proches qui en aurait aussi été victime.
31% disent avoir un proche qui a été agressé physiquement au cours de l’année parce qu’il était juif
76% des juifs interrogés considèrent qu’il est difficile d’être juif aujourd’hui en France.
Plus de 6 juifs sur 10 éprouvent des craintes importantes pour leur sécurité (69%) et pour la possibilité d’exercer leur religion sereinement (63%)
45%  ont tendance à faire attention à ne pas montrer qu’ils sont juifs

DES CONDAMNATIONS JUGÉES INSUFFISANTES, UNE ATTENTE TRÈS FORTE DE PRISE DE PAROLE DE LA PART DES POLITIQUES

Dans ce contexte, les juifs interviewés se montrent de moins en moins rassurés par la solidité des remparts traditionnels à l’antisémitisme (la République, les intellectuels, les représentants communautaire juifs et musulmans, la société dans son ensemble).

Face à l’ensemble des actes terroristes et des exactions commises à l’encontre de juifs, il semble qu’il y ait au sein de la conscience des interviewés un premier « crime originel », celui d’Ilan Halimi. La très grande majorité des juifs considèrent que la plupart des acteurs de la société ont insuffisamment réagi :

Les musulmans et le Front National d’abord (respectivement 83% et 80% des interviewés considèrent qu’ils ne l’ont pas fait assez) mais aussi la gauche française et notamment EELV (77%), le Front de Gauche (77%) et le PS (62%).
L’UMP est moins critiquée même si plus d’un juif sur deux considère que sa réaction n’a pas été à la hauteur (53%). Au-delà, c’est aussi l’ensemble de la société française qui est critiquée pour l’insuffisance de sa réaction (69%).
Le gouvernement et le président de la République d’une part, les médias de l’autre, sont les seuls acteurs à être considérés par une courte majorité de juifs comme ayant suffisamment réagi (respectivement 54% et 52%).
Les réactions du gouvernement et du Président de la République sont presque toujours perçues comme celles qui ont été les plus fortes. C’est plus spécifiquement le cas pour la tuerie de l’hyper-casher (87% des juifs estiment que les réactions ont été suffisantes), celle de Toulouse (71%) et, comme l’a montré l’enquête qualitative, les propos tenus par Dieudonné et Alain Soral. La parole politique, lorsqu’elle est prise, est donc repérée et s’avère fondamentale…

… tout comme l’absence de condamnation forte lors d’évènements antisémites. C’est notamment le cas lors de la tuerie du musée juif de Bruxelles, où 51% seulement des juifs considèrent que l’exécutif a « suffisamment réagi », et plus encore lors des manifestations anti-israéliennes de juillet 2014 dans les rue de Paris durant lesquelles des commerces tenus par des juifs ont été vandalisés et des manifestants ont crié « Mort aux juifs ! » : 36% seulement des juifs estiment que le Gouvernement a alors suffisamment réagi.

DES RÉFLEXIONS TRÈS AVANCÉES SUR UN POSSIBLE DÉPART HORS DE FRANCE POUR UN JUIF SUR QUATRE

Face à un niveau d’angoisse et d’anxiété très élevé chez beaucoup de juifs, le départ devient plus qu’une tentation. Pour près d’un quart des juifs, c’est désormais une option.

61% estiment que les juifs sont plus en sécurité en Israël qu’en France (contre 37% qui disent en France).
54% des juifs envisagent un départ vers Israël ou vers un autre pays.
26% disent qu’il s’agit d’une option qu’ils étudient sérieusement.
Pour ceux qui « envisagent » ce départ, c’est d’abord à cause de « l’accumulation des attentats et des meurtres dont ont été victimes un certain nombre de juifs » (67%). Mais aussi en raison de « la progression de l’islamisme radical au sein d’une partie de la population musulmane » (56%), de « l’absence de réaction de la société française face à l’antisémitisme » (31%) et de la persistance des stéréotypes antisémites (29%) devant la libération de la parole antisémite (24%).

[Mise à jour du 3/02/2016] Nous avons supprimé le logo « EHESS » (Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales), c’est en effet comme conseillère scientifique et spécialiste de ces questions, que Dominique Schnapper (Directrice d’études à l’EHESS) est intervenue sur cette étude.

Voir de même:

Dix ans après la mort d’Ilan Halimi, un sondage que nous révélons montre que les préjugés antijuifs demeurent.

Le Parisien

12 février 2016

Les préjugés restent tenaces

Juif et donc riche. C’est ainsi que les bourreaux d’Ilan Halimi ont justifié les vingt-quatre jours de torture qu’ils ont fait subir au jeune homme. Dix ans après la découverte de son corps, il reste pour sept Français sur dix le « symbole de ce à quoi peuvent conduire les préjugés sur les juifs », nous apprend une étude de l’Ifop* pour SOS Racisme et l’Union des étudiants juifs (UEJF) que nous dévoilons en exclusivité. Cette « affaire », dont 61 % des sondés disent qu’elle les a « beaucoup » touchés, n’a pourtant pas permis d’anéantir les stéréotypes dont elle a été l’emblème. L’étude démontre en effet qu’au-delà d’Internet où des torrents de haine antijuive se déversent, les préjugés antisémites ont la dent dure.

32 % estiment que les juifs se servent dans « leur propre intérêt » de leur statut de victime du nazisme, de même que de nombreux sondés admettent pour vraie l’idée de juifs plus riches que la moyenne (31 %), avec par exemple trop de pouvoir dans les médias (25 %). « Le préjugé devient un véritable problème quand il engendre une violence envers l’autre ou un rejet de celui-ci, commente Dominique Sopo, le président de SOS Racisme. Ce qui est inquiétant est que notre sondage révèle que contrairement aux idées reçues les préjugés antisémites ne concernent pas que les jeunes. Ils prennent même de l’ampleur chez les plus de 25 ans. » « Nous sommes dans la situation paradoxale où les Français disent ressentir de l’empathie pour les juifs alors que 40 % des actes racistes concernent ce 1 % de la population, rappelle Sacha Reingewirtz, le président de l’UEJF. L’affaire Ilan Halimi montre que le travail de pédagogie, d’enseignement et de transmission doit être amplifié. Déconstruire les préjugés sur les Juifs, les musulmans, les homos… est la seule manière de pouvoir coexister. » * Etude menée en ligne du 3 au 5 février auprès de 1 468 personnes

Voir aussi:

Spotlight (2015)
Steve Baqqi

Epsilon reviews

December 28, 2015

The sexual abuse scandal in the Boston Catholic Church rocked much of the world when it was revealed by The Boston Globe in 2002. Spotlight dramatizes how the investigative team exposed this scandal. The term “spotlight” refers to the team of reporters at the Boston Globe who investigates an issue or topic in depth for months, thereby shining a “spotlight” on the previously unknown. This Spotlight team was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for their efforts depicted in the film. Spotlight is a fantastic film about the importance of “outsiders”, institutional corruption, thorough investigative journalism, and the dire consequences of inaction.

Spotlight begins with the Boston Globe receiving a new Editor In Chief, Marty Baron, an awkward outsider (he’s Jewish, and not from Boston) who is viewed with suspicion by the staff. Marty tasks the Spotlight team to investigate a case of a Catholic priest who is allegedly a serial molester. The story snowballs gradually from there. Almost immediately the Spotlight team is hit with resistance within the Globe about their investigative methods and sources. The Catholic Church, an incredibly powerful institution in the city of Boston, uses all its might to dissuade Spotlight from continuing their research, but they steadfastly continue to investigate these allegations.

The Catholic Church itself is portrayed in the film as a powerful, resourceful, and dangerous institution.  The Church has control and/or influence with nearly every major institution in the city of Boston. The “small-town” inclusiveness of the city only further allows the Church to abuse and misuse its power, while vigorously opposing or discrediting anyone who attempts to speak out. The Church even indirectly benefits from the shame of the victims and the parish pressuring them to keep silent. Mitchell Garabedian, an Armenian Lawyer (another vital outsider standing against the Church) representing dozens of alleged victims, posits, “The Church thinks in centuries Mr. Rezendes, do you really think your paper has the resources to take this on?” As the Spotlight team traverses across the city of Boston in search of the truth, a church is often looming in the background, as if watching their every move. This is the behemoth the Spotlight team must defeat.

Spotlight is directed and edited with an unpretentious simplicity that allows us to focus on the team and their investigative efforts. This simplicity is what gives the film’s raw look into the massive corruption a lasting impact. Furthermore, the film’s muted palette, and haunting ambient theme, gives a serious and somber backdrop to its grave subject matter. The Spotlight team of Mike Rezendes (Mark Ruffalo), Walter ‘Robby’ Robinson (Michael Keaton), Sacha Pfeiffer (Rachel McAdams), and Matt Carroll (Brian d’Arcy James) are hardworking, driven reporters. Their investigative reporting is never dull as they uncover an astonishing amount of facts and disturbing details. Their triumph reveals the corruption and gross negligence of not only the Catholic Church, but other powerful Boston institutions. Their efforts come at a high personal price as the investigation is emotionally draining on the reporters, all of whom were raised catholic. Each have their faith shattered by the investigation and are haunted by the results. Keaton’s reaction, in particular, toward the end of the film is utterly devastating. Its conclusion is as satisfying as it is tragic.

It took two outsiders, one an Armenian lawyer, and the other a Jewish editor to get the ball rolling for the Spotlight team. Garabedian in particular is critical to their success and he illuminates the issue with a scathing indictment of Boston’s corruption, “If it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a village to abuse one.” Black Mass could learn a lot from Spotlight in how to depict institutional corruption in Boston. The final numbers revealed at the end will undoubtedly horrify you and leave you feeling depressed and angry. Why was this allowed to go on so long? Why did it take so long to uncover it? For Spotlight the answer is simple, no one wanted to look.

TLDR: A deeply depressing and unsettling film about marrow deep corruption in the city of Boston and the investigation that brought the Catholic Church’s sexual abuse scandal to light-4/5 Stars

Voir encore:

Spotlight

Jesse Cataldo

Slant

November 2, 2015

Boston may be a major American city, but as described in Tom McCarthy’s Spotlight, it’s still a small town at heart. With a populace that skews nearly 50 percent Catholic, the conventions of this metaphorical village are organized under the jurisdiction of the church, which provides the clearest point of connection for immigrants old and new. Such insularity fosters tight-knit communities and deep ancestral roots, but it has its downsides, specifically regarding the exclusion of outsiders, as one Armenian character notes to another of Portuguese extraction. Even more insidiously, this environment encourages a private approach to community housekeeping, assuring that problems will be handled internally, and secrets will remain underground.

Based on the events leading up to the 2001 sex abuse scandal that rocked the Roman Catholic Church, Spotlight patiently charts the gradual development from rumors and whispers to a full-blown revelation of years of astonishing exploitation. As the film imagines, it’s the singular character of the town, particularly its reliance on the moral authority of religious officials, that allowed dozens of pedophiles to remain at work, with the diocese shuffling them around the city once their crimes came to light, lying to parishioners, and offering scads of hush money. The task of revealing this rotten system falls to The Boston Globe, itself already in crisis, what with the arrival of Marty Baron (Liev Schrieber) as executive editor, appearing to herald greater control by the paper’s parent corporation with a salvo of buyouts and layoffs.

A Jewish transplant from Florida, backed by the big-city pedigree of The New York Times, Baron is a classic interloper, a singularly focused workaholic unburdened by the constraints of social niceties, who doesn’t play golf or know the catechism. This makes him the perfect person to spearhead the exposé, which seems to strike at the heart of everything the city holds dear.

His motives are contrasted against the more sensitive demands of Walter Robinson (Michael Keaton), whose award-winning Spotlight team, charged with the production of lengthy investigative pieces, handles the burden of the journalistic work. A native son with a strong local pedigree, Robinson has to weigh the needs of his community against the ethical demands of a journalist, while making similar decisions for his reporters, namely the dangerously obsessive Michael Rezendes (Mark Ruffalo) and the blandly proficient Sacha Pfeiffer (Rachel McAdams), each of whom seems poised to suffer serious emotional damage from the production and fallout of the articles.

Spotlight entertains such weighty concerns while also spinning a masterfully paced potboiler. A familiar tale of scrappy underdogs taking on a secretive institution, it complicates that dynamic by having its protagonists operating under the auspices of a monolithic corporation, which many Bostonites are concerned intends to strip away the distinctiveness of their hometown paper, all while nosily digging into local matters and airing dirty laundry.

It devotes too much time delivering information to establish a convincing visual foundation for its account.
This is a complex film about moving past clannish parochial designations, one which ends up assigning the burden of guilt upon an entire populace for looking the other way, none of them quite aware of the scale of the problem they were avoiding. In tackling this mass culpability, the film also confronts the degradation of individuality which also occurs as communities stretch past their traditional limits and out into the ethereal fabric of the internet, as city papers become assets of global conglomerates, and local flavor turns into a surface characteristic rather than an essential quality of a place.

But the biggest downside to this approach is that, burdened with the telling of this expansive story, the film devotes too much time delivering information to establish a convincing visual foundation for its account, aside from a few ominous shots of church structures literally looming over everything. Full of reserved tracking shots and walk-and-talk exposition dumps, Spotlight seems submissively constructed around the contours of its voluminous dialogue, a feat of informational cinema that’s equally thrilling and overwhelming.

McCarthy has yet to emerge as a director with any noticeable style. With Spotlight, he pulls off his biggest and most consistently conceived production yet, but the lack of a personal imprint leaves the film feeling a bit too much like a modern companion to All the President’s Men, though one that doesn’t match that film’s sharp stylistic sense or its aura of era-defining importance. Achieving the latter would be a tall task, but Pakula’s classic managed to match its timely narrative with an equally virtuosic lens for telling its story. By modeling its structure so closely after the format of its predecessor, Spotlight only draws closer attention to its lack of scope and ambition.

For a film so concerned with portraying the special character of a city, its unique workings, rites, and rituals, Spotlight never conveys much local color beyond some respectably rendered accents, and a specifically intense level of Catholic influence, what with the church inextricably ingrained in the very fabric of the town. In this atmosphere, the individual characters, specifically the reporters embroiled in the investigation, feel less like fully conceived humans than personifications of different narrative concerns, each tasked with a specific type of reaction to the mounting chain of shocking disclosures.

In a final postscript that plays like a bit of caustic black humor, the film lists off a compilation of communities that experienced their own molestation scandals in the wake of Boston’s reckoning, information which occupies several title cards and encompasses untold thousands of horrible incidents. This one city, as it turns out, wasn’t so unique after all.

Voir de même:

Catholic Movie Reviews: Spotlight
Sr. Helena Burns, FSP
R
MPAA Rating

Life Teen Rating
Is It Cool?: Excellence in Filmmaking
“Spotlight” is the recounting of the “Spotlight” team of intrepid investigative reporters at the Boston Globe who broke the Catholic Church’s clergy sex abuse story in January 2002 — mainly concerning the Archdiocese of Boston.

This is a story that had to be told, and the filmmakers have done a capable and responsible job.

For starters, this is not a Church-bashing film even though it easily could have been. It’s an accurate, stark, almost understated presentation. It’s rated “R” simply and appropriately for subject matter. Just enough of the horrific details of cases are disclosed in the film, the rest is hinted at discreetly.

NOT ENTERTAINMENT
“Spotlight” is not a pseudo-documentary, nor is it juicy, sensational, exploitative entertainment. It is what I would call an “information film.” The acting, too, is muted: none of the big name actors shine. The excellent cast seem to be humbly striving only to serve the story.

Is it hard to watch? Yes, of course. The tone is somber, dreary and somewhat suffocating — as it should be. The monolithic power of the Catholic Church (until 2002) over civic, religious, and spiritual affairs in the city of Boston is chilling. It extended even into the Boston Globe where employees (many of whom were Catholic) simply knew you don’t take on the Catholic Church. They are even trained to believe that when the Catholic Church dismisses claims, they can’t possibly be true. It took an outside editor from New York to press the issue.

What’s it Saying?: Message of the Movie
MAGNITUDE
The timeline unfolds without much fanfare. Little by little, the magnitude of the number of priests, victims, and the span of years and cover-ups becomes clearer. Since we, the audience, presumably know the sordid story and outcome, there are few surprises and no real highs, lows or even serious crisis points.

The kicker is that all the evidence was hiding in plain sight. Much is made of the fact that B.C. High (a Catholic Jesuit boys high school that some of the reporters themselves attended, maintained an infamous priest-coach molester on staff) is directly across the street from the Boston Globe building.

Ironically, both the Catholic Church in Boston and the Boston Globe were at the height of their influence at the beginning of the new millennium, while a third character–the internet–is just becoming a serious player.

WHO’S TO BLAME?
Very self-effacingly — and I would say unnecessarily and misplaced — the film blames The Globe itself in a big way for not reporting the story years earlier when lawyers and victims provided plenty of damning information that went ignored. Whatever culpability The Globe bears, they more than made up for it by compiling overwhelming, carefully-researched evidence that wouldn’t be just another isolated story that would get buried. “The Church” and Cardinal Law are distant, cold, uncaring shadows. The abusing priests are sick and distorted men — almost excused. The names Geoghan, Shanley and Talbot (among others) will conjure up ugly memories for all who lived at the heart of this nightmare or on its peripheries.

FOCUS ON THE VICTIMS
The faces and voices of the victims are given three-dimensional reality and the major focus. Even the heroic, crusading lawyer, Mitchell Garabedian — who insisted on bringing victims’ cases to the courts to expose the Church’s wrongdoing — is modestly underplayed.

DENIAL
Part of the initial incredulity of sectors of the public and the average Catholic in the pew to the Globe’s scoop was due to the Globe’s notorious anti-Catholicism since its very inception in 1872 (not unlike most of the old Boston WASP establishment). And many just didn’t believe that so many heinous crimes of this nature could have been so well hidden for so long. If it were true, surely we would have known? Surely we would have heard some rumors and gossip? Whoever did know something was silenced with hush money, or gave up when crushed by the power of the Church’s legal and “moral authority” arsenal and sway. But it didn’t take long for the undeniable, verifiable veracity of the charges to grip the city and the world.

NO AFTERMATH
There is precious little aftermath in the film, as it wraps up on the day the first big story is released (there were a total of 600 stories run relentlessly about the scandal for at least a year afterward in the Globe). A few words of Epilogue are given, and then we are left with a gaping wound of sadness.

THREE FLAWS
As I see it, three minor drawbacks to the film are:

1) They got Cardinal Law a bit wrong. They made him a much older man (he was only 68 in 2001) with a hint of an Irish accent (Wha?). They made him a rather flat — although bold — stereotypical bureaucratic figure, when in reality he was a magnetic, charismatic personality who had actually been a media favorite when he first came to Boston.

2) The feeble, brief explanations given for the (unfettered) abuse were screaming to be explored and were even contradictory.

“Celibacy is the issue. It creates a culture of secrecy.” Really?? So if one attempts to practice (priestly) celibacy they have a good chance of being/becoming a depraved, predatory pedophile? And how are celibacy and secrecy related? This makes no sense. And sadly, most sex abusers of children? Married men.
Another reason given is that some of the priests were “psycho-sexually stunted at the level of a 12-year-old” — which may be very true, but that does not make one an automatic repeat child molester. The one priest molester we see being interviewed begins to say that he was raped, but the thought was not continued. (The rest of that statistic is that it was discovered that some priests who molested children were molested by priests themselves when they were children. They grew up, become priests and continued the cycle.)

3) I would like to have seen some rage in the film. Some of the rage that I felt and still feel in the pit of my stomach. Perhaps the filmmakers are leaving that up to us, the audience.

The Good, The Bad, The Ugly: Morality in the Movie
NO HOPE
There does not seem to be any hope put forth in this film. Not about healing for victims or reform for the Church. But maybe that was not a part of the film’s scope. Maybe there is no way to find the silver lining here. There is also hardly any insight into the root causes of this terrible state of affairs. It’s just raw evil on display. Perhaps this is the best way for this particular film to handle this grave matter. Sexual abuse destroys hope. No soothing, reassuring sugar-coating or “Hollywood ending” in this film.

THERE IS HOPE
But of course, there is hope. Although sexual abuse (and spiritual-sexual abuse) takes a deep, deep toll, and a certain proportion of the victims tragically committed suicide, emotional healing is always a possibility.

NO GOD
There is hardly any mention of God in this film. No angry questioning of “Why did God allow this?!” or “Where was God?!” or “How could purported men of God do this?” or “This has destroyed my faith in God!” There is only mention of “devout Catholics” and those who “go to church” or “don’t go to church.” There didn’t even need to be a distinction made between a good God and bad men who represent God (and are doing a terrible job at it) because God is pretty much absent from the film. The one tragically poignant mention of God is from a male victim, now an adult, who says: “You don’t say no to God” (meaning when a priest propositioned him at twelve years old, the only right answer was “yes”). Again, perhaps this was the best way to handle “God” in this story that had nothing to do with a good God, and everything to do with bad men.

The Church, although divinely instituted by Christ and guided by the Holy Spirit, is still human and sinful because of the free will of her members — even those who hold the authority. Thankfully, the sacraments and everything we need still operates through these men, regardless of their personal holiness.

SEE THIS IMPORTANT FILM
“Spotlight” is an important film to see, even if you kept up and delved into these dark waters — as I did — when they first hit the shore. The restrained even-handedness of the storytelling is remarkable and will prevent it from being a “controversial” film. There’s a lot of dialogue in the film, but it’s never tedious. The narrative and the horror is in the information itself each time more is unearthed.

Why should you see this film? To honor the victims, first of all, and second of all to understand how corruption — of any sort — works, in order to be vigilant and oppose it. NEVER AGAIN.

Has ANY good come of all this sorrow? The suffering of the children, teens and their families has not been totally in vain. There is now a much greater awareness of the sexual abuse of minors all over the world, and new laws have been created to protect young people where there were none.

OTHER STUFF:

SO WHAT ARE THE REAL ROOTS / REASONS / CAUSES FOR THIS HORRIFYING TRAVESTY?

This problem is centuries old
It’s not celibacy that is the problem, but a culture of secrecy brought about by a culture of absolute power
absolute power corrupts absolutely
abuse of power is not an inevitability, it’s a choice
unbridled male chauvinistic power is insensitive to women, children and the vulnerable
pedophiles automatically gravitate to wherever they have trusted access to children (seminaries, schools, sports teams, law enforcement, etc.)
seminaries did not do good screening of candidates
anyone who reported behavior was threatened (get kicked out of seminary themselves, lose a job/position)silence=loyalty
silence/playing the game=perks, advancement
it was a numbers game (to have lots of priests)
it was keeping up appearances (bishops knew they could quash “problems,” abusers knew they would never get in trouble and would always be shielded: the perfect set-up)
it was keeping up appearances (“not on my watch”)
toward the middle of the 20th century, psychiatrists and psychologists got involved (assessments, “treatment”) and kept giving the green light to put the priest back in ministry (bishops blindly “obeyed”)
it wasn’t known that pedophilia is not “curable” (but it’s also not rocket science to see that a man abusing over and over and over and over again needs to be stopped, removed permanently)
gross blindness and ignorant cluelessness what sexual abuse does to a child/teen
careerism, clericalism, wrong priorities
evil and sin
SOLUTIONS?

the clergy sex abuse problems will continue unless there is courageous breaking with mentalities, cultures, habits, patterns, and cycles
the presence of women in all (non-ordained) positions at all levels and places of Church life will help mitigate undisciplined male power (and male lack of empathy and sympathy)
following preventative and protective protocols for child safety immediately and unilaterally
child safety is everyone’s job, not just those in positions of authority
stringent screening/dismissals at seminary level
thorough training in human sexuality for seminarians (including THEOLOGY OF THE BODY)
a deep prayer life, spiritual direction in seminary
priestly spirituality
normal, healthy relationships with laypeople, families, women of God
priestly fraternity, camaraderie, seminary follow-up, oversight by and relationship with bishop
bishop accountability (Pope Francis is putting this in place)
availability: doing ministry where needed (while maintaining healthful lifestyle, self-care and avoiding burnout)
pouring oneself out as a spiritual father (love and zeal for the Bride [the Church] and the world) conquers loneliness

That’s Right. I Said It: Reviewer Comments
When the shocking news broke, it was the only time in my life — since my conversion at 15 — that I wanted to leave the Catholic Church and run screaming to the hills. A close friend even accused me: “You’re a nun–you knew!” But I didn’t. Nobody knew. Or very, very few people knew. I agonized for months over it. I couldn’t understand. I thought priests and bishops were the good guys! I thought they wanted to protect and help people! I just couldn’t figure it out. And then — through my study of Theology of the Body — I got a powerful insight: Men do NOT want to be Superman or the Lone Ranger. They do NOT want to break ranks. Men are HORRIBLE at whistle-blowing. They are all about BAND OF BROTHERS. And this can be a good thing! Men are stronger together. They have each other’s backs. They can provide for and protect hearth and home better TOGETHER. The problem lies when they BAND TOGETHER FOR EVIL. To hide each other’s sins. To give each other a pass for their sins. Look the other way. Code of silence. Complete corruption. Whole cities run on this notion. But it doesn’t have to be that way. MEN NEED TO BAND TOGETHER FOR THE GOOD. Positive peer pressure. And call each other out when they need calling out. So, guys? Join some good guy thing to do charitable works together, pray together or just hang out together. Do your secret handshakes. Knock yourselves out. Live by the “10 Commandments of Chivalry“ (except the “have no mercy on the infidel” part). And always, always BAND TOGETHER FOR THE GOOD, NOT EVIL.

Voir également:

Spotlight (2015), au cœur d’un complot
Emilio M.

Bulles de culture

2016-01-24

Spotlight de Tom McCarthy nous plonge dans les méandres d’un effroyable complot, autant véridique qu’inadmissible. Pour mener l’enquête, un casting de marque, avec en tête Michael Keaton, Mark Ruffalo, Rachel McAdams et Liev Schrieber. Un hommage efficace à l’un des derniers fleurons du journalisme d’investigation d’une époque révolue. Spotlight est un coup de cœur de Bulles de Culture !

Synopsis :
Été 2001. À peine nommé rédacteur en chef du Boston Globe, Marty Baron (Liev Schreiber) missionne les journalistes d’investigation de l’équipe Spotlight, dirigée par Walter “Robby” Robinson (Michael Keaton), pour enquêter sur un curé accusé de pédophilie. L’affaire est grave puisque le prêtre aurait violé des dizaines de jeunes paroissiens en l’espace de trente ans…

Dans les règles du genre

Spotlight est un pur film de journalisme d’investigation, dans la lignée directe du cultissime Les hommes du Président d’Alan J. Pakula. Tout comme son prédécesseur, Spotlight reconstitue avec fidélité une enquête journalistique bien réelle mettant à jour un complot d’une ampleur effroyable.

Pour y parvenir, le film respecte les codes du genre et privilégie l’authenticité. L’image du chef opérateur Masanobu Takayanagi — qui s’est prêté au même style d’exercice sur le film True Story (2015) Rupert Goold — favorise une simplicité esthétique naturaliste.

Une sobriété qui va de pair avec la mise en scène discrète de Tom McCarthy et qui apporte en plus une fluidité esthétique dans son découpage et ses mouvements de caméra invisible, le tout au service de la narration. Un effort bien nécessaire du fait de la complexité de l’intrigue et des nombreuses pistes qu’elle explore.

Il en va de même pour la musique de Spotlight, composé par l’incontournable Howard Shore. Omniprésente tout au long du film, la partition du célèbre compositeur est éminemment cinématographique, tout en restant subtile et discrète. La musique renforce ainsi la fluidité de la narration et apporte avec élégance une cohésion supplémentaire au récit.

L’imposant casting hollywoodien apporte enfin la dernière touche d’authenticité au film, avec Michael Keaton et Mark Ruffalo en tête. Les deux acteurs ont en effet collaboré étroitement avec les deux journalistes qu’ils interprètent dans le film, Walter Robinson et Michael Rezendes — qui seront d’ailleurs les premiers bluffés par la prestation des acteurs, troublante de réalisme.

Tous ses efforts mis en œuvre au service des différents aspects du film servent au final un seul but bien précis : rapporter avec véracité et clarté le développement effarant d’une enquête historique sans précédent.

Une enquête fascinante

Lorsque l’équipe de Spotlight débute son enquête, un seul prêtre pédophile est concerné. Et ce qui interpelle les journalistes du Boston Globe, c’est le fait que le prêtre en question ait pu récidiver impunément en changeant de paroisse au fil des ans. Mais à mesure que l’enquête avance, l’affaire va rapidement prendre des proportions hallucinantes pour finir par mettre à jour pas moins de 87 prêtres pédophiles rien que dans la région de Boston.

L’étonnante enquête des quatre journalistes enquêteurs révèle ainsi l’incroyable développement tentaculaire d’un complot systémique sidérant. Boston est l’une des villes flambeaux du catholicisme, une institution puissante et totalement implanter dans l’ensemble de la ville et plus largement dans l’ensemble des États-Unis — comme le révèle le générique final du film listant les nombreuses villes américaines concernées par ce même scandale.

Les méandres de cette affaire scandaleuse s’étendent donc à travers toutes les différentes sphères de la société de Boston, du système judiciaire au système éducatif. Et c’est aux journalistes de Spotlight de suivre ce jeu de pistes complexe pour dénouer l’effroyable vérité de l’affaire, résumée en ces mots par l’éditeur en chef du Boston Globe : « If it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a village to abuse one » (« s’il faut un village pour élever un enfant, il faut un village pour en maltraiter un »).

L’implacable exposition de la vérité

L’accaparante complexité de l’affaire s’impose naturellement comme le sujet principal du film et éclipse toutes autres pistes narratives possibles : la vie privée des protagonistes, leur parcours émotionnel,  le doute conspirationniste, la crise du journalisme face à Internet et les nouvelles technologies 2.0, ou bien même l’impact historique et médiatique du 11 septembre… Tant de thèmes pertinents et parallèles au récit qui ne sont qu’effleurés par le scénario, entièrement focalisé sur l’enquête.

On pourrait regretter ce manque de profondeur, mais Tom McCarthy et son co-scénariste Josh Singer (À la maison blanche, Le cinquième pouvoir) sont bien conscients des limites du format long-métrage. En gardant l’investigation journalistique comme fil narratif exclusif de Spotlight, ils permettent le récit limpide de cette enquête obsédante et tentaculaire.

Les cinéastes offrent ainsi au spectateur une compréhension plus juste et précise des tenants et aboutissants d’un complot effroyable, à l’échelle d’une société toute entière — et pas seulement à l’échelle américaine puisque de nombreuses villes en France et dans le monde sont citées à la fin du film.

Spotlight s’évertue à coller à la réalité de l’enquête et des faits avec une sobre éloquence cinématographique. Une efficacité mise au service de la narration qui submerge le spectateur dans les différentes sphères sociales de Boston, mais sans jamais se perdre dans l’enquête qui avance avec limpidité du début à la fin.

Et même si de nombreux enjeux sont effleurés à travers le film — qu’ils soient moraux, sociaux, émotionnels, ou même spirituels —, une seule chose compte au final : l’implacable exposition de la vérité.

Voir encore:

Fact Checker: More Ways That ‘Spotlight’ Got It Wrong [w/ Addendum, 12/5/15]
TheMediaReport.com

November 30, 2015
Shining the light on ‘Spotlight’
In addition to the instances we have already reported, here are some other ways that the Hollywood movie Spotlight has misled the public about the sex abuse scandal in Boston:

1. A key scene in the film features the Globe’s Walter Robinson threatening Boston Church-suing lawyer Roderick MacLeish to cooperate with the paper’s investigation. MacLeish wrote in a Facebook post that in truth the event « never occurred » and, in fact, he « welcomed » the meeting with Robinson.

2. Another scene features the Globe’s Sacha Pfeiffer claiming that abuse victims « have to sign confidentiality agreements to get monetary settlements, » implying that the Church forced these agreements upon victims. In truth, as we have reported before, it was the other way around. Embarrassed by what had happened to them, it was the victims who sought secrecy from the Church.

3. In another scene, Robinson asks MacLeish if he ever followed up with the cases he settled to ensure that abusive priests were taken out of ministry. MacLeish’s uncomfortable silence to Robinson’s question implies that he didn’t. In fact, it was MacLeish himself who told the Globe back in December 1993 that the Archdiocese had removed 20 accused priests from active ministry. (In addition, MacLeish at the time « credited the Catholic Archdiocese of Boston with taking prompt action on the accusations. »)

4. The film portrays Globe staffer Steve Kurkjian as being dismissive of the Globe’s pursuit of the Church abuse story. In fact, Kurkjian did some of the reporting on the Spotlight Team investigation. So reckless is this portrayal that even the Globe’s own Kevin Cullen has now written, « Kurkjian, a journalistic icon, is owed an apology. »

5. The film portrays a meeting in 2001 about abuse at Boston College High School between Globe staffers and administrators as being confrontational in nature. In truth, not only did the meeting not take place until 2002, it was indeed cordial. Even the Globe itself at the time praised the high school’s swift and transparent handling of its crisis in an opinion article.

6. The film features a scene with the Globe’s Spotlight Team acting astonished when learning about a report issued to bishops in 1985 that had foreseen the scope of the abuse crisis. In truth, the paper already wrote about the report back in 1990 and 1991, and the report itself was the subject of a front-page article in the Globe in July 1992.

[ADDENDUM, 12/5/15:]

7. Hollywood entertainment magazine Entertainment Weekly exposes at least three more fictitious scenes! Check it out:

« Late in the film, [Globe columnist Walter] Robinson pressures one of his sources, a lawyer named Eric MacLeish (Billy Crudup), for information, and the slick attorney throws it back in his face: ‘I already sent you a list of names … years ago!’ he says to Robinson and [the Globe’s Sacha] Pfeiffer. ‘I had 20 priests in Boston alone, but I couldn’t go after them without the press, so I sent you guys a list of names … and you buried it!’

« Except that exchange never actually happened. Nor did the scene where Pfeiffer searches the archives and brings the clipping of the December 1993 story to Robinson, proving MacLeish correct: it ran on B42 and didn’t include any of the priests’ names. And a later scene, where Robinson admits to his colleagues that he had been the Metro editor back in ’93, accepting his role in not catching the story sooner, didn’t happen either. »

Voir également:

Movies

Spotlight players confront the clue that became the movie’s key twist
Co-writers Josh Singer and Tom McCarthy stumbled upon the overlooked ’93 ‘Globe’ report

Jeff Labrecque

EW

November 23 2015

Josh Singer and Tom McCarthy weren’t necessarily digging for a scoop while researching the 2002 Boston Globe exposé of the Catholic Church sex-abuse scandal for the screenplay that would become Spotlight. After all, they were already standing on the shoulders of giants – the Globe’s Spotlight team of investigative journalists had won the Pulitzer Prize for their series of articles that revealed how the Boston archdiocese, led by Cardinal Bernard Law, had shielded predator priests for more than three decades, shuffling them to different parishes when they molested children and shelling out millions to victims in confidential settlements.

Not only had the Globe published an official book documenting the Spotlight team’s findings, Betrayal, but all their articles, including the more than 600 stories published in 2002 — leading to Law’s resignation — were available online. Plus, the screenwriters had access to many of the Globe’s key people, including those depicted in the film: Walter “Robby” Robinson (Michael Keaton), Mike Rezendes (Mark Ruffalo), Sacha Pfeiffer (Rachel McAdams), Matt Carroll (Brian d’Arcy James), Ben Bradlee Jr. (John Slattery), and Marty Baron (Liev Schreiber).

But one of the film’s most important twists — one that even eluded the Globe — fell into the filmmakers’ laps by accident. [The following contains SPOILERS.] In Spotlight, which the pair co-wrote and McCarthy directed, the dramatic weight of the film is epitomized by a line from the crusading attorney played by Stanley Tucci: “If it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a village to abuse one.” The film asks the difficult question: Was everyone, including the media, too deferential to the Church while crimes were happening in their backyards?

Late in the film, Robinson pressures one of his sources, a lawyer named Eric MacLeish (Billy Crudup), for information, and the slick attorney throws it back in his face: “I already sent you a list of names… years ago!” he says to Robinson and Pfeiffer. “I had 20 priests in Boston alone, but I couldn’t go after them without the press, so I sent you guys a list of names… and you buried it!”

Except that exchange never actually happened. Nor did the scene where Pfeiffer searches the archives and brings the clipping of the December 1993 story to Robinson, proving MacLeish correct: it ran on B42 and didn’t include any of the priests’ names. And a later scene, where Robinson admits to his colleagues that he had been the Metro editor back in ‘93, accepting his role in not catching the story sooner, didn’t happen either.

In reality, these sequences played out during the screenwriting process — when MacLeish told Singer and McCarthy. Though they already knew the main beats of the story they wanted to tell, they met with the Boston attorney — who’d represented numerous plaintiffs in complaints against the Church in the early 1990s — if only to help with casting. But not long into their chat, MacLeish dropped the bomb. “It was a little bit like the moment that’s in the movie: You had 20 priests’ [names] in Boston?” says Singer. “My reaction was quite similar to Rachel and Michael’s in that scene: That can’t possibly be true. Tom and I sort of looked at each other but didn’t say anything. But to double-check, I went back to the archives, and this article popped up, buried on page B42 [on the Metro section]. I was flabbergasted. I called Tom as soon as I got the article and said, ‘What do we do?’”

They emailed Robinson the story, not knowing what to expect. Robinson responded quickly. “He owned up to it,” says Singer. “He had just taken over Metro and didn’t remember the story but, ‘This was on my watch and clearly we should’ve followed up on it.’ When we went to write the scene in the movie, we based it a lot on what Robby said there.”

In the film, Keaton accepts his share of responsibility and asks his team, “Why didn’t we get it sooner?” And in real life, Robinson doesn’t dodge. “It happened on my watch and I’ll go to confession on it,” says Robinson, who recently returned to the Globe as an editor at large. “Like any journalist who’s been around this long, I’ve made my share of mistakes. But I have no memory of it. And if we’d found it in 2001, I don’t know if I would’ve had a memory of it then either. Looking at it from this vantage point 22 years later, I just have to scratch my head and wonder what happened. Should it have been played more prominently? In hindsight, based upon on what we later learned, yes, obviously.”

For Singer and McCarthy, the revelation was a dramatic gift, even if they had to utilize some artistic license. “That moment was probably the one moment where we took something that was not [precisely true] and we felt like we had the right to include it,” says McCarthy. “To me, this is where the movie gets really compelling, because it certainly isn’t black and white. I think it raises the specter of just good reporters going after a bad institution, into more of a question of societal deference and complicity toward institutional or individual power. Intellectually, Josh and I really started to engage on a whole new level when we started to tap into that.”

Because McCarthy and Singer had concluded from their research that the Globe was probably guilty of sins of omission, if not commission, when it came to its coverage of the Church in the early 1990s. The December 1993 story plays a pivotal role in the film, but the filmmakers were already paddling in that general direction. In fact, before MacLeish spilled his secret, the film was more focused on an August 1993 article than ran in the Globe’s Sunday magazine.

Back then, Boston was riveted by the case against Rev. James Porter, who was ultimately sentenced to 18-20 years for abusing dozens of children in multiple parishes. Though Porter had worked in the Fall River archdiocese, south of Boston, Cardinal Law became a loud critic of the media’s coverage, and in particular, what was being printed by the Globe. In May 1993, Law lashed out, saying, “The papers like to focus on the faults of a few. … We deplore that. The good and dedicated people who serve the church deserve better than what they have been getting day in and day out in the media. … We call down God’s power on our business leaders, and political leaders and community leaders. By all means we call down God’s power on the media, particularly the Globe.” In a coincidence that even Hollywood wouldn’t dare make up, one of the Globe’s top editors broke his leg and almost died the very next week.

But even if Law didn’t have a direct channel to God, he was the most powerful Catholic in the United States, with access to the White House and absolute credibility with his constituency of Roman Catholics – who made up 53 percent of the Globe’s readership and were not eager to believe that its Church may be responsible for protecting degenerate clerics. Ande Zellman edited the Sunday magazine story, written by Linda Matchan, and the reaction to their story at the Globe was immediate — as Schreiber’s Marty Baron would say, “from the top-down.”

“It certainly created a lot of waves internally,” Zellman says. “I think there was a level of institutional courtesy towards the Church. The coverage after that was scarce.”

But if there was some editorial restraint, it was reflected by public opinion. “For the most part, [stories about clergy sex abuse were greeted with] disbelief,” says James Franklin, the Globe’s former religion reporter who wrote the December 1993 story that MacLeish cites in the film. “It was regarded as something extraordinary, as something obscene. There was always a suspicion that guys like me, guys like us, were sniping unfairly.”

Matchan encountered the same resistance. “After I finished that magazine story, I thought, there’s so much more to say about this. I wanted to write a book about it,” she says. “So I contacted an agent, and she loved the idea. And I wrote a book proposal, she sent it out to a lot of publishing houses, and she got back these letters that just said, ‘This is a great proposal but nobody would ever read a book about sexual abuse by the clergy.’ That was the thinking in those days.”

“Every archdiocese is in a city with a major paper — everybody missed this,” says Robinson. “Who can imagine that such an iconic institution could be responsible for causing such a devastating impact on the lives of thousands of children and covering it up? It’s almost beyond belief.”

Even with the 1993 hiccups, it’s essential to note that the Boston Globe was the first to crack a scandal that reached far beyond Boston. As has been revealed in subsequent investigations around the world, Boston was not unique, and the Church has been forced to shell out billions in settlements to the victims of clergy sex abuse in other states and countries. “Robby, to my mind, is a hero,” says Singer. “The whole, Why didn’t the paper get this earlier? — we sort of put that on Robby in the movie, because Robby is a symbol for us, the Everyman. In a lot of ways, he is our way in to the movie, and we wanted to turn it back on the viewer. Because to me, this is a collective failure, and it’s a question for all of us: Why didn’t we get this earlier? It’s noble in how he takes the blame for it, how he falls on his sword. I think we found that incredibly heroic, because that also was the interaction we had with him.”

Robinson has been front and center in the film’s promotion, in part because the film captures his profession at its best, at a time in 2015 when most newspapers and media outlets are slashing staff and eliminating investigative reporting. “We’re reporters and we stumble around the dark a lot,” he says. “We start out pretty damn ignorant, and we don’t even know how to ask the right questions until we sort of dig around for awhile. And the film shows that. The film shows that it’s sort of a two steps forward one step back approach. And by doing it that way, by having us uncover [our initial oversight], Tom makes it possible for a pretty large audience to confront something that they might otherwise avert their eyes to.”

Voir de plus:

‘Spotlight’ Neglects to Mention the Boston Globe’s Own Long History of Rank Hypocrisy on the Issue of the Sexual Abuse of Minors
TheMediaReport.com

November 30, 2015
Shining the light on ‘Spotlight’
While the Hollywood movie Spotlight portrays editors and writers at the Boston Globe wringing their hands over the potential story of abuse by Catholic priests, the film conveniently neglects to mention the Globe’s own long history of looking the other way when it comes to the issue of sex abuse of minors in other institutions.

In fact, the Globe even has a long history of supporting advocates of child sex.

The Globe’s long history which Spotlight forgot

To take but just a few of the many examples, and as we have chronicled here, the Globe has previously:

given a high-profile platform to the co-founder of the North American Man/Boy Love Association (NAMBLA), which promotes sex with children;
routinely celebrated entertainment celebrities who have committed child abuse crimes, including Roman Polanski, Peter Yarrow, and Paula Poundstone;
once endorsed a Congressman for reelection even after he admitted to repeatedly plying booze and having sex with a high-school-aged page;
repeatedly touted a « sexologist » who spoke favorably of incest between fathers and daughters;
repeatedly ignored or mitigated rampant sex abuse and cover-ups in Boston Public Schools (1, 2, 3, 4);
and more.

Between its incessant hypocrisy and its long history of anti-Catholicism, one could fill a book. And indeed that book is Sins of the Press: The Untold Story of The Boston Globe’s Reporting on Sex Abuse in the Catholic Church by TheMediaReport.com’s own Dave Pierre.

Sins of the Press chronicles many more instances of the Globe’s hypocrisy when it comes to the sexual abuse of children.

Voir de même:

‘Cardinal Law Knew of Abuse and Did Nothing’? Actually, Cardinal Law Did Exactly As He Was Told To Do By Psychologists
November 30, 2015 By TheMediaReport.com
Shining the light on ‘Spotlight’
A mantra running throughout the movie Spotlight is that Cardinal Law and the Catholic Church « did nothing » when confronted with knowledge of abusive priests.

However, as is frequently the case with Hollywood, the truth is an entirely different matter.

Hollywood vs. the truth

Spotlight ignores the simple fact that years ago, Church officials acted time after time on the advice of trained « expert » psychologists from around the country when dealing with abusive priests. Secular psychologists played a major role in the entire Catholic Church abuse scandal, as these doctors repeatedly insisted to Church leaders that abusive priests were fit to return to ministry after receiving « treatment » under their care.

Indeed, one of the leading psychologists in the country recommended to the Archdiocese of Boston in both 1989 and 1990 that – despite the notorious John Geoghan’s two-decade record of abuse – it was both « reasonable and therapeutic » to return Geoghan to active pastoral ministry including work « with children. »

And it is not as if the Boston Globe could plead ignorance to the fact that the Church had for years been sending abusive priests to therapy and then returning them to ministry on the advice of prominent and credentialed doctors. As we reported earlier this year, back in 1992 – a full decade before the Globe unleashed its reporters against the Church – the Globe itself was enthusiastically promoting in its pages the psychological treatment of sex offenders, including priests – as « highly effective » and « dramatic. »

The Globe knew that the Church’s practice of sending abusive priests off to treatment was not just some diabolical attempt to deflect responsibility and cover-up wrongdoing, but a genuine attempt to treat aberrant priests that was based on the best secular scientific advice of the day.

The Globe’s feigned outrage

Yet a mere ten years later, in 2002, the Globe acted in mock horror that the Church had employed such treatments. It bludgeoned the Church for doing in 1992 exactly what the Globe itself said it should be doing. The hypocrisy of the Globe is simply off the charts.

And the issue of the Church’s use of these psychologists was not a surprise to the Globe when it actually interviewed Cardinal Bernard Law in November 2001, only two months before the Globe’s historic coverage:

Reflecting on the most difficult issue of his tenure in Boston, Law said he is pained over the harm caused to Catholic youngsters and their families by clergy sexual misconduct, but that he always tried to prevent such abuse.

« The act is a terrible act, and the consequence is a terrible consequence, and there are a lot of folk who have suffered a great deal of pain and anguish. And that’s a source of profound pain and anguish for me and should be for the whole church, » he said.

« Any time that I made a decision, it was based upon a judgment that with the treatment that had been afforded and with the ongoing treatment and counseling that would be provided, that this person would not be [a] harm to others. »

Law said the current policy, which bars child-abusers from ever having a job that involves contact with children, is good, but that he wished he knew when he started that pedophilia is essentially incurable.

« I think we’ve come to appreciate and understand that whatever the assessment might be, the nature of some activity is such that it’s best that the person not be in a parish assignment, » he said.

Not that we’re surprised, but the fact that the Church relied on the best psychologists of the day in deciding what to do with abusive priests was completely left out of Spotlight. Instead, the film repeatedly falsely claims that Cardinal Law « did nothing » or « did shit. »

But now you know the truth.

Voir encore:

Spotlight review – Catholic church child abuse film decently tells an awful story
3 / 5 stars
Mark Ruffalo, Michael Keaton and Rachel McAdams star as Boston Globe reporters investigating accusations against priests in Tom McCarthy’s worthy, well-intentioned journalism drama

‘Never hits the heights of passion but capably and decently tells an important story’ … Michael Keaton and Mark Ruffalo in Spotlight
Peter Bradshaw

The Guardian

3 September 2015

“If it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a village to abuse one,” is how one character here summarises the issues. This high-minded, well-intentioned movie, co-written and directed by Tom McCarthy, is about the Boston Globe’s investigative reporting team Spotlight, and its Pulitzer-winning campaign in 2001 to uncover widespread, systemic child abuse by Catholic priests in Massachusetts.

The film shows that in the close-knit, clubbably loyal and very Catholic city of Boston, no one had any great interest in breaking the queasy, shame-ridden silence that made the church’s culture of abuse possible, and even tentatively suggests that the Globe itself was one of the Boston institutions affected. The paper had evidence of abuse 10 years before the campaign began, but somehow contrived to downplay and bury the story, and it took a new editor, both non-Boston and Jewish, to get things started.

Spotlight has a few inevitable journo cliches: male reporters are dishevelled mavericks who don’t need to keep the same hours as everyone else, doing a fair bit of shouting and desk-thumping. There is much cheeky machismo on the subjects of poker and sports, and they somehow never need to do the boring grind of sitting down and writing stuff on computers. But this is a movie that is honourably concerned to avoid sensationalism and to avoid the bad taste involved in implying that journalists, and not the child abuse survivors, are the really important people here. So there is something cautious, even occasionally plodding, in its dramatic pace.

We keep hearing about how the church is going to come after reporters who dare to challenge its authority – but this never really happens, and there is none of the paranoia of a picture like Alan J Pakula’s All the President’s Men (1976) or Michael Mann’s The Insider (1999). Yet McCarthy keeps the narrative motor running, and there are some very good scenes, chiefly the extraordinary moment when Rachel McAdams’s reporter doorsteps a smilingly hospitable retired priest and asks him, flat-out, if he has ever molested a child. The resulting scene had me on the edge of my seat.

Mark Ruffalo is chief reporter Michael Rezendes; McAdams is his colleague Sacha Pfeiffer. Michael Keaton plays the careworn and distracted Spotlight editor Robby Robinson – an interesting comparison with his performance as the journalist nearing breakdown in Ron Howard’s The Paper (1994) – and John Slattery plays the section chief Ben Bradlee Jr, son of the great man himself, although Watergate is not mentioned. Liev Schreiber plays the new broom editor Marty Baron who quietly insists on the investigation from day one.

Soon, the team discover that the smoothie lawyer Eric MacLeish (Billy Crudup) who has been handling victim cases until now has effectively been part of the cover-up, managing a system whereby cases are settled privately and complainants silently bought off with cash payments, of which MacLeigh takes his cut. Rezendes approaches another lawyer, testy advocate Mitch Garabedian (Stanley Tucci), who has been doggedly working for a serious action to be contested in open court.

There are smoking-gun documents proving that church high-ups knew all about the problem and covered it up, Mitch says, but these documents are legally sealed and the Spotlight team must find a way of putting them on the record. Their problems are made even worse when 9/11 comes along, putting every other story in the shade and allowing the Catholic cardinal to make morale-boosting public statements calling for calm and courage.

What is interesting about this movie is that it reminds you that the “bad apple” theory of child abuse by priests was widely accepted until relatively recently. The team are stunned at the realisation that what they are working on is not like, say, a corruption case where there are more public officials on the take than they at first thought. It is a mass psychological dysfunction hidden in plain sight, which has stretched back decades or even centuries and will, unchecked, do precisely the same in the future.

What McCarthy is saying in Spotlight is that threats never needed to be made. A word here, a drink there, a frown and a look on the golf course or at the charity ball, this was all that was needed to enforce a silence surrounding a transgression that most of the community could hardly believe existed anyway. It’s certainly a relevant issue in our unhappy, post-Yewtree times. Spotlight never hits the heights of passion, but capably and decently tells an important story.

Voir aussi:

Film
‘Spotlight’ Shows a Community at Its Worst, and Journalism at Its Best
The vivid new feature film starring Michael Keaton dramatizes the Boston Globe’s real-life uncovering of sex abuse by Catholic priests

Judith Miller

Tablet

November 5, 2015

Spotlight is powerful docudrama about how the Boston Globe’s investigative team, known as “spotlight,” exposed priests in the Boston Catholic diocese who had sexually abused Boston children for decades. Written by Thomas McCarthy and Josh Singer, directed by McCarthy, and exquisitely acted, the film tells the story behind the story—how the paper uncovered the Catholic Church’s cover-up of a scandal that was hiding in plain sight, indeed, in the Globe’s own archives.

Most films about journalism are cringe-worthy. Not this one. The film vividly documents what reporters do at their best. A story usually begins with a question. Something doesn’t make sense. Reporters begin with a premise and then gather facts that support or contradict their hypothesis. The best journalists follow those facts without “fear or favor,” as the New York Times, my former employer, likes to put it. Spotlight’s reporters slowly build their case with each new lurid revelation. Nothing comes easily.

The film also lays bare the Catholic Church’s hold on Boston politics and the city’s deeply ingrained anti-Semitism and its xenophobic disdain for “outsiders.” It reveals the political and financial pressures imposed on the Globe and its investigative team by the Church and its powerful friends in a heavily Catholic city as the Globe’s Spotlight team starts to uncover the truth about decades of horrifying abuse, and the inadequacy of their own beliefs and assumptions.

The Globe’s four-person team soon discovers, for instance, that its initial theory that pedophile priests are an anomaly—a few “rotten apples,” as the Church’s representatives and supporters repeatedly assure them—is wrong. Clips from the paper’s own “morgue,” where earlier stories yellowing with age are stored, show that the Globe had run a few modest stories years earlier about a priest accused of molesting several children. But the paper failed to follow up. The editors assumed, or wanted to believe, that this abuse was an isolated incident. Subsequent tips to reporters and editors were ignored. Spotlight’s reporters find that crucial documents have disappeared from court house files. This is Boston, after all, and Cardinal Bernard Law, then the head of the diocese, has friends everywhere.

The team discovers that child abuse at the hands of God’s self-appointed disciples is no secret. In fact, it is widely known among Boston’s politicians, prosecutors, and other powerful parishioners who knew or suspected the prevalence of sexual crimes committed by priests against children but chose not to speak out. Their fear of spiritual and social excommunication allowed the abuse to fester. It takes a village to raise a child, observes Mitchell Garabedian, an irascible lawyer skillfully played by Stanley Tucci, who represents many of Boston’s child victims. And it takes the silence of a village to perpetuate such abuse.

The film bravely acknowledges that the Globe itself was among those powerful institutions that did all too little for far too long. The Globe, having been purchased by the New York Times in 1993, beset by layoffs and declining subscribers and revenue, was focused on other news before it finally confronted the horrifying truth that it had declined to pursue for decades, while the number of shattered lives mounted.

***

The decision to pursue the inquiry was made by the Globe’s chief editor, Martin Baron, who was a newcomer to Boston and who now heads the Washington Post. Brilliantly depicted by Liev Schreiber, Baron is a Florida native and not one of those Irish-American journalists who have most recently staffed the paper. Socially awkward, intellectually aloof, unmarried, uninterested in tickets to Red Sox games, Baron lacks the “people skills” that are crucial to advancement in most professional bureaucracies. He was the first Jew to head the paper. “So the new editor of the Boston Globe is an unmarried man of the Jewish faith who hates baseball?” Jim Sullivan, a lawyer who has represented priests, asks Walter “Robby” Robinson, editor of the Spotlight series, who is portrayed by Michael Keaton, an actor’s actor.

When Baron suggests using the Freedom of Information Act to unseal documents related to the victims’ law suits, Richard Gilman, the paper’s understated, Brooks Brothers-clad publisher, is alarmed. “You want to sue the Catholic Church?” he asks. Baron persists, even when Gilman reminds him that the Church “will fight us hard on this” and that 52 percent of the Globe’s subscribers are Catholic.

When it becomes clear that Robby intends to publish Spotlight’s shocking findings, prominent Bostonians and friends try to persuade him and other senior Globe editors to kill the series. Baron’s outsider status, his Jewishness, is a natural target. Baron is not one of us, says Peter Conley (Paul Guilfoyle), who does the Church’s bidding. He reminds Robby over a drink at the Fairmont Hotel’s Oak Bar that people need the church, now more than ever. While neither the Church nor Cardinal Law (Len Cariou) who heads it in Boston is perfect, Conley acknowledges, why would the Globe risk destroying the faith of thousands of readers over a “few bad apples”? But neither Robby, who is deeply grounded in Boston, nor Baron, who has no familial stake in the community, is cowed. Conley tries driving a wedge between them. Baron is an outsider just “trying to make his mark,” he warns Robby. “He’ll be here for a few years and move on. Just like he did in New York and Miami,” he says. “Where you gonna go?”

Baron is not the film’s only outsider. The most passionate member of the Spotlight team, Michael Rezendes (Mark Ruffalo), may hail from east Boston, but his family is Portuguese. Garabedian, the lawyer who has represented 86 local victims and one of Mark’s sources—is an Armenian. In a bar, they talk obliquely about how city insiders pressure outsiders to conform. Over time, Rezendes understands that Garabedian’s gruffness and hostility are partly the result of having watched the Church hide its priests’ crimes with the connivance of the city’s leading institutions for far too long. Garabedian knows what it means to battle Boston’s powerbrokers. He initially doubts that Rezendes will pursue the story.

As the Globe reporters slowly, methodically uncover the depressing scale of the abuse, pressure not to publish grows. As the team finds dozens of cases that have been quietly settled between victims and the Church, the Spotlight reporters jettison their premise that the Vatican was simply trying to deal compassionately with a few fallen priests. The story expands. So does the team, from four to eight reporters. Baron wants them to expose not only the horrific sexual crimes of the priests, most of whom have been moved to other parishes where they continue molesting children, or to treatment centers on “sick leave,” but the Catholic Church’s role in effectively condoning the abuses.

Proving the Church’s complicity, however, turns out to be even more complex and time-consuming. For a while, a far more all-consuming story—the Sept. 11 attacks on New York and Washington in which many Bostonians died—demand the team’s attention.

***

Spotlight is a process movie. In less-gifted hands, it would risk being dull, or worse, a romanticized version of journalism’s ostensible nobility. But this movie is unlike Truth, the newly released film about the bungled CBS broadcast shortly before the 2004 presidential election aiming to show that former President George W. Bush got preferential treatment to enter the National Guard to avoid the draft and was AWOL during much of his service. Starring Robert Redford as Dan Rather, and Cate Blanchett as Mary Mapes, his talented, long-time producer, the film is based on Mapes’ book and portrays her and three others who were fired by CBS, and Dan Rather, who was prematurely retired as CBS’s anchor, as martyrs to the truth and the victims of evil corporate forces in search of White House favors. But the memos upon which Mapes and her team relied could not be authenticated, and the source who produced them changed his account of how he had obtained them after the broadcast aired, which is every reporter’s and producer’s worst nightmare. But the film downplays the team’s mistakes. Not surprisingly, CBS—which took cinematic heat in 1999 for The Insider, a powerful film about the network’s suppression of a whistle-blower’s claims about tobacco and cancer until the information had been reported elsewhere—has blasted Truth as fiction and declined to run ads for the film on its network.

Under Tom McCarthy’s wise direction, Spotlight suffers from no such hype or false notes. There is no stirring, melodramatic sound track, no confrontations or emotional “gotcha” confessions by priests, no actual scenes of sexual molestation. There are no meetings in dark, underground garages as in All the President’s Men, the highly praised 1976 film about Bob Woodward’s and Carl Bernstein’s dogged exposure of the Watergate scandal in the Washington Post that toppled President Richard Nixon. Spotlight faithfully portrays the painstaking work of investigative reporters who corroborate tips, hunches, and weigh the accounts of often flawed or self-serving sources.

Some of the script’s most powerful moments are the victims’ accounts of their sexual and psychological torment. At first, the reporters question why victims of such abuse call themselves “survivors.” One such victim-turned-advocate, a twitchy, prematurely aging activist named Phil Saviano (played by Neal Huff), explains to the reporters that priests often target vulnerable kids from poor backgrounds. Sexual abuse by priests, he says, robs children not just of their innocence, but their faith. “When you’re a poor kid from a poor family, religion counts for a lot,” he tells Robby and his reporter Sacha Pfeiffer, (Rachel McAdams). “And when a priest pays attention to you it’s a big deal. He asks you to collect the hymnals or take out the trash, you feel special. It’s like God asking for help. And maybe it’s a little weird when he tells you a dirty joke but now you got a secret together so you go along. Then he shows you a porno mag, and you go along. And you go along, and you go along, until one day he asks you to jerk him off or give him a blow job. And so you go along with that too. Because you feel trapped. Because he has groomed you. How do you say no to God, right?”

Spotlight’s understated hero, investigative chief “Robby” Robinson, is a lapsed Catholic. So are many of the team’s other reporters. Some are afraid to tell their families the target of their investigation. Doors are often slammed shut on them. Their calls to sources start early and end late; some of their marriages dissolve. They battle editors over whether and when to publish what they know. Waiting too long risks being beaten on the story; publishing too soon risks reducing their impact by enabling the Church to pick apart or discredit the specific examples of abuse the team has identified and documented. What Baron wants to describe, and Robby senses he is right, is not just a pattern of pedophilia among the faith’s spiritual guardians, but the Church’s role in hiding its priests’ crimes and therefore in perpetuating the damage. He seeks to indict the Church as a criminal system. But his determination to hold out for the bigger story with greater impact infuriates Michael Rezendes, who argues for disclosing what the team knows as soon as the information is confirmed and thus stop the abuse. Robby’s and Marty Baron’s wiser instincts prevail, but this is not an easy call.

Spotlight’s exhaustive investigation ultimately disclosed allegations of sexual abuse of children, male and female alike, by some 249 priests and brothers within the Boston Archdiocese alone. The reporters identified more than 1,000 survivors. In late 2002, Cardinal Law resigned his post in Boston. He was reassigned to the Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore in Rome, among the Church’s most prestigious posts.

For decades, the victims’ stories cried out for public exposure. The Globe’s Spotlight team provided it. This understated, remarkable film documents that achievement.

Voir enfin:

13 janvier 2015 – Discours
Discours du Premier ministre à l’Assemblée nationale en hommage aux victimes des attentats
« Il y a quelque chose qui nous a tous renforcé, après ces évènements, et après les marches de cette fin de semaine. Je crois que nous le sentons tous, c’est plus que jamais la fierté d’être français. Ne l’oublions jamais ! »

Monsieur le Président,
Mesdames, messieurs les ministres,
Madame, Messieurs les présidents de groupe,
Mesdames, messieurs les députés.

Monsieur le Président, vous l’avez dit, ainsi que chacun des orateurs, avec force et sobriété, en trois jours, oui en trois jours 17 vies ont été emportées par la barbarie.

Les terroristes ont tué, assassiné des journalistes, des policiers, des Français juifs, des salariés. Les terroristes ont tué des personnes connues ou des anonymes, dans leur diversité d’origine, d’opinion et de croyance. Et c’est toute la communauté nationale que l’on a touchée. Oui, c’est la France qu’on a touché au cœur.

Les soutiens, la solidarité, venus du monde entier, de la presse, partout, des citoyens qui ont manifesté dans de nombreuses capitales, des chefs d’Etat et de gouvernements, tous ces soutiens ne s’y sont pas trompés ; c’est bien l’esprit de la France, sa lumière, son message universel que l’on a voulu abattre. Mais la France est debout. Elle est là, elle est toujours présente.

A la suite des obsèques de ce matin à Jérusalem, de la cérémonie éprouvante, belle, patriotique, à la Préfecture de Police de Paris, en présence du chef de l’Etat, à quelques heures ou de jours d’obsèques pour chacune des victimes, dans l’intimité familiale, je veux, comme chacun d’entre vous, rendre, à nouveau, l’hommage de la Nation à toutes les victimes. Et la Marseillaise, tout à l’heure, qui a éclaté, dans cet hémicycle, était aussi une magnifique réponse, un magnifique message aux blessés, aux familles qui sont dans une peine immense, inconsolable, à leurs proches, à leurs confrères, je veux dire à mon tour une nouvelle fois notre compassion et notre soutien.

Le Président de la République l’a dit ce matin avec des mots forts, personnels : « la France se tient et se tiendra à leurs côtés ».

Dans l’épreuve, vous l’avez rappelé, notre peuple s’est rassemblé, dès mercredi. Il a marché partout dans la dignité, la fraternité, pour crier son attachement à la liberté, et pour dire un « non » implacable au terrorisme, à l’intolérance, à l’antisémitisme, au racisme. Et aussi au fond, à toute forme de résignation et d’indifférence.

Ces rassemblements, vous le soulignez monsieur le président de l’Assemblée, sont la plus belle des réponses. Dimanche, avec les chefs d’Etat et de gouvernement étrangers, avec l’ancien président de la République, avec les anciens Premiers ministres, avec les responsables politiques et les forces vives de ce pays, avec le peuple français, nous avons dit – et avec quelle force – notre unité. Et Paris était la capitale universelle de la liberté et de la tolérance.

Le peuple Français, une fois encore, a été à la hauteur de son histoire. Mais, c’est aussi, pour nous tous sur ces bancs, vous l’avez dit, un message de très grande responsabilité. Etre à la hauteur de la situation est une exigence immense. Nous devons aux Français d’être vigilants quant aux mots que nous employons et à l’image que nous donnons. Bien sûr la démocratie, que l’on a voulu abattre, ce sont les débats, les confrontations. Ils sont nécessaires, indispensables à sa vitalité, et ils reprendront, c’est normal.

Loin de moi l’idée de déposer, après ces événements, la moindre chape de plomb sur notre débat démocratique, et vous ne le permettrez pas, de toute façon. Mais, mais nous devons être capables, collectivement, de garder les yeux rivés sur l’intérêt général, et d’être à la hauteur, dans une situation qui est déjà difficile, sur le plan économique, parce que notre pays aussi est fracturé depuis longtemps, parce qu’il y a eu des événements graves, on les oublie aujourd’hui, même s’ils n’avaient pas de lien entre eux, qui ont frappé les esprits à la fin de l’année, à Joué-Lès-Tours, à Dijon et à Nantes. Nous devons être à la hauteur de l’attente, de l’exigence du message des Français.

Je veux, Mesdames et Messieurs les députés, en notre nom à tous, saluer – et le mot est faible – le très grand professionnalisme, l’abnégation, la bravoure de toutes nos forces de l’ordre – policiers, gendarmes, unités d’élite.

En trois jours, les forces de sécurité, souvent au péril de leur vie, ont mené un travail remarquable d’investigation, sous l’autorité du parquet antiterroriste, traquant les individus recherchés, travaillant sur les filières, interrogeant les entourages, afin de mettre hors d’état de nuire, le plus vite possible, ces trois terroristes.

Monsieur le ministre de l’Intérieur, cher Bernard CAZENEUVE, je veux vous remercier aussi. Vous avez non seulement trouvé les mots justes, mais j’ai pu le voir à chaque heure, vous étiez concentré sur cet objectif.

Autour du Président de la République, avec vous aussi madame la garde des Sceaux, nous avons été pleinement mobilisés pour faire face à ces moments si difficiles pour la patrie. Et pour prendre les décisions graves qui s’imposaient.

Mesdames, Messieurs les députés, à aucun moment nous ne devons baisser la garde. Et je veux dire, avec gravité, à la représentation nationale et à travers vous à nos concitoyens, que non seulement la menace globale est toujours présente, mais que, liés aux actes de la semaine dernière, des risques sérieux et très élevés demeurent : ceux liés à d’éventuels complices, ou encore ceux émanant de réseaux, de donneurs d’ordres du terrorisme international, de cyberattaques. Les menaces perpétrées à l’encontre de la France en sont malheureusement la preuve.

Je vous dois cette vérité, et nous devons cette vérité aux Français. Pour y faire face, partout sur le territoire, des militaires, des gendarmes, des policiers sont mobilisés. Les renforts de soldats affectés, en tout, près de 10. 000 – et je vous en remercie monsieur le ministre de la Défense -, et c’est sans précédent, permettent un niveau d’engagement massif, plus de 122 000 personnels assurent la protection permanente des points sensibles et de l’espace public. Les renforts militaires serviront et servent en priorité à la protection des écoles confessionnelles juives, des synagogues, et de mosquées.

Madame, Messieurs les présidents, après le temps de l’émotion et du recueillement – et il n’est pas fini – vient le temps de la lucidité et de l’action.

Sommes-nous en guerre ? La question a, en réalité peu d’importance, car les terroristes djihadistes en nous frappant trois jours consécutifs y ont apporté, une nouvelle fois, la plus cruelle des réponses.

Avec détermination, avec sang–froid, la République va apporter la plus forte des réponses au terrorisme, la fermeté implacable dans le respect de ce que nous sommes, un Etat de droit.

Le gouvernement vient devant vous avec la volonté d’écouter et d’examiner toutes les réponses possibles, techniques, règlementaires, législatives, budgétaires, monsieur le président JACOB. A une situation exceptionnelle doivent répondre des mesures exceptionnelles. Mais je le dis aussi avec la même force : jamais des mesures d’exception qui dérogeraient aux principes du droit et des valeurs.

La meilleure des réponses au terrorisme qui veut précisément briser ce que nous sommes, c’est-à-dire une grande démocratie, c’est le droit, c’est la démocratie, c’est la liberté et c’est le peuple français.

A cette menace terroriste, la République apporte et apportera des réponses sur son sol national. Elle en apportera aussi là où les groupes terroristes s’organisent pour nous attaquer, pour nous menacer, nos intérêts comme nos concitoyens.

C’est pour cela que le Président de la République a décidé d’engager nos forces au Mali, un 11 janvier. Le 11 janvier 2013, jour où d’ailleurs tombait notre premier soldat dans ce conflit, Damien BOITEUX. Et d’ailleurs la même nuit, monsieur le ministre de la Défense, trois membres de nos services tombaient en Somalie.

Le président de la République a décidé cet engagement pour venir en aide à un pays ami, le Mali, menacé de désintégration par des groupes terroristes ; le Mali, pays musulman.

Le président de la République a décidé de renforcer notre présence aux côtés de nos alliés africains avec l’opération Barkhane. C’est un gros effort qu’assume la France, au nom notamment de l’Europe et de ses intérêts stratégiques. Un effort coûteux. La solidarité de l’Europe elle doit être dans la rue, elle doit être aussi dans les budgets à nos côtés. Un effort impérieux. Et quelle belle image de voir dimanche dernier, coude à coude le chef de l’Etat, des chefs de gouvernement, le président de la République et le Président malien, Ibrahim Boubacar KEÏTA. Là aussi c’était la meilleure des réponses pour dire que nous ne menons pas une guerre de religion, mais que nous menons, oui, un combat pour la tolérance, la laïcité, la démocratie, la liberté et les Etats souverains, ce que les peuples doivent se choisir.

Oui, nous nous battons ensemble et nous continuons de nous battre sans relâche.

C’est cette même volonté, curieuse concordance liée au calendrier, que nous exprimerons tout à l’heure en votant le prolongement de l’engagement de nos forces en Irak. C’est là aussi notre riposte claire et ferme, je m’exprimerai ici même dans un instant, le ministre des Affaires étrangères le fera au Sénat. C’est là aussi notre riposte contre le terrorisme, et nous devons avoir pour nos soldats engagés, sur les théâtres d’opération extérieurs, à des milliers de kilomètres d’ici, un profond respect et une grande gratitude.

La menace est aussi intérieure. Je l’ai également rappelé souvent à cette tribune.

Et face à la tragédie qui vient de se dérouler, s’interroger est toujours légitime et nécessaire. Nous devons apporter des réponses aux victimes, à leurs familles, aux parlementaires, aux Français. Il faut le faire avec détermination, sérénité, sans jamais céder à la précipitation. Et je ferai mienne la formule du président LEROUX : « il n’y a pas de leçon à donner, il n’y a que des leçons à tirer ».

Le Parlement a déjà voté deux lois anti terroristes encore il y a quelques semaines à une très large majorité, les décrets d’application sont en cours de publication. Le Parlement s’est déjà saisi des questions relatives aux filières djihadistes.

Ici-même, à l’Assemblée nationale, le 3 décembre dernier, vous avez créé une commission d’enquête sur la surveillance des filières et des individus djihadistes. Le président, Monsieur Éric CIOTTI, travaille étroitement avec le rapporteur, Monsieur Patrick MENNUCCI.

Au Sénat, depuis le mois d’octobre, il existe une commission d’enquête sur l’organisation et les moyens de la lutte contre les réseaux djihadistes en France et en Europe. Plusieurs membres du gouvernement ont déjà été auditionnés. Les travaux doivent se poursuivre et je sais que le ministre de l’Intérieur est particulièrement attentif à ces travaux. Il a d’ailleurs déjà rencontré hier les groupes et les parlementaires qui travaillent sur ces questions.

Le gouvernement, monsieur le président de l’Assemblée nationale, Madame, Messieurs les présidents de groupe, est à la disposition du Parlement. Sur tous ces sujets, ou sur d’autres que nous avons déjà examinés, et je pense à la question épineuse particulièrement complexe, mais qu’il faut traiter encore avec plus de détermination, qui est celle des trafics d’armes dans nos quartiers.

Je tiens à saluer, là aussi, le travail de nos services de renseignement : DGSI, DGSE, Service du renseignement territorial. A saluer aussi la justice antiterroriste. La tâche de ces femmes, de ces hommes est par essence discrète et immensément délicate. Ils font face à un défi sans précèdent, à un phénomène protéiforme, mouvant qui se dissimule aussi ; et parce qu’ils savent travailler ensemble ils obtiennent des résultats.

A cinq reprises, en deux ans, ils ont permis de neutraliser des groupes terroristes susceptibles de passer à l’acte.

En France, comme dans l’ensemble des pays européens, les personnes qui se reconnaissent dans le djihadisme international ont fortement augmenté en 2014. Dès l’examen de la loi antiterroriste, en décembre 2012, j’ai dit qu’il y avait en France des dizaines de MERAH potentiels. Le temps a confirmé, dramatiquement et implacablement, ce diagnostic.

Sans renforcement très significatif des moyens humains et matériels, les services de renseignement intérieur pourraient se trouver débordés. On dépasse désormais 1 250 individus pour les seules filières irako-syriennes. Sans jamais négliger les autres théâtres d’opération, les autres menaces, celles des autres groupes terroristes au Sahel, au Yémen, dans la corne de l’Afrique, et dans la zone afghano-pakistanaise.

Nous affecterons donc les moyens nécessaires pour tenir compte de cette nouvelle donne. En matière de sécurité, les moyens humains sont en effet essentiels. Nous l’avons mis en pratique depuis 2012. En 2013, sur la base des enseignements des tueries de Montauban et de Toulouse et des propositions formulées par la mission URVOAS-VERCHERE, une profonde réforme de nos services de renseignement a été accomplie avec la transformation de la Direction centrale du Renseignement intérieur en Direction générale de la Sécurité intérieure. La création de 432 emplois à la DGSI a été programmée. Ils doivent permettre de renforcer les compétences et de diversifier les recrutements : informaticiens, analystes, chercheurs ou interprètes. 130 sont déjà pourvus. Nous avons aussi amélioré la coopération entre les services intérieurs et extérieurs et également renforcé, même s’il faut encore faire davantage, nos échanges avec les services étrangers, à la suite de l’initiative que j’ai pu prendre il y a deux ans avec les ministres européens et notamment avec la ministre belge, Joëlle MILQUET puisque son pays est également confronté à ce problème là. Initiative que Bernard CAZENEUVE a prolongée encore avec la réunion de nombreux ministres de l’Intérieur Place Beauvau. Mais il faut aller plus loin, et j’ai demandé au ministre de l’Intérieur de m’adresser dans les huit jours des propositions de renforcement. Elles devront notamment concerner Internet et les réseaux sociaux qui sont plus que jamais utilisés pour l’embrigadement, la mise en contact, et l’acquisition de techniques permettant de passer à l’acte.

Nous sommes aussi l’une des dernières démocraties occidentales à ne pas disposer d’une cadre légal cohérent pour l’action des services de renseignement. Ce qui pose un double problème. Un travail important a été fourni par la mission d’information sur l’évaluation du cadre juridique des services de renseignement, présidée par Jean-Jacques URVOAS en 2013. Un prochain projet de loi quasiment prêt visera à donner aux services tous les moyens juridiques pour accomplir leurs missions, tout en respectant les grands principes républicains de protection des libertés publiques et individuelles, ce texte de loi qui sera sans aucun doute enrichi par vos travaux doit être, c’est ma conviction, adopté le plus rapidement possible.

Au cours de l’année, nous lancerons également la surveillance des déplacements aériens des personnes suspectes d’activités criminelles. C’est le système PNR. La plateforme de contrôle française sera opérationnelle dès septembre 2015. Il reste à mettre en place un dispositif similaire au niveau européen. J’appelle de manière solennelle ici dans cette enceinte le Parlement européen à prendre enfin toute la mesure de ces enjeux, et de voter, comme nous le lui demandons depuis deux ans avec l’ensemble des gouvernements, à adopter ce dispositif qui est indispensable : nous ne pouvons plus perdre de temps !

Mesdames et Messieurs, les phénomènes de radicalisation sont présents sur l’ensemble du territoire. Il faut donc agir partout. Le plan d’action adopté en avril dernier a permis de renouveler l’approche administrative et préventive. La plateforme de signalement est particulièrement sollicitée par les familles. Elle a permis d’éviter de nombreux départs.

Les préfets, en lien avec les collectivités territoriales qui doivent être associées à ces démarches, mettent progressivement en place des dispositifs de suivi et de réinsertion des personnes radicalisées. Là encore, j’ai demandé au ministre de l’Intérieur en lien avec d’autres membres du gouvernement concerné par ces sujets de m’indiquer les moyens nécessaires pour amplifier ces actions.

Les phénomènes de radicalisation se développent, nous le savons, vous l’avez dit, en prison. Ce n’est pas nouveau ! L’administration pénitentiaire renforce d’ailleurs l’action de ses services de renseignement en lien étroit avec le ministère de l’Intérieur. Il faut, là aussi, accroître nos efforts. Dans nos prisons, des imans, comme des aumôniers de tous les cultes interviennent. C’est normal ! Mais il faut un cadre clair à cette d’intervention. Il nous faut aussi parvenir à une réelle professionnalisation. Enfin, avant la fin de l’année, sur la base de l’expérience menée depuis cet automne à la prison de Fresnes, la surveillance des détenus considérés comme radicalisés sera organisée dans des quartiers spécifiques créés au sein d’établissements pénitentiaires.

Une formation de haut niveau sera dispensée aussi aux services de la protection judiciaire de la jeunesse. Comprendre le parcours de radicalisation d’un jeune est toujours complexe. Nous savons la facilité avec laquelle certains jeunes délinquants de droit commun basculent dans des processus de radicalisation et le passage de la délinquance de droit commun à la radicalisation et au terrorisme est un phénomène que nous avons décrit à maintes reprises ici dans les travaux de l’Assemblée nationale. Mais nous devons savoir prendre les mesures adaptées qui s’imposent. Il faut, certes, accompagner, aider, suivre de nombreux mineurs menacés par cette radicalisation. Il faut aussi prendre acte de la nécessité de créer, au sein de la direction de la PJJ, une unité de renseignement, à l’instar de ce qui est fait dans l’administration pénitentiaire. Pour tous ces axes de travail, mais aussi pour répondre aux besoins du parquet anti-terroriste, j’ai demandé à la Garde des Sceaux de me faire des propositions également dans les jours qui viennent.

Mesdames et Messieurs, la lutte contre le terrorisme demande une vigilance de chaque instant. Nous devons pouvoir connaître en permanence l’ensemble des terroristes condamnés, connaitre leur lieu de vie, contrôler leur présence ou leur absence.

J’ai demandé aux ministres de l’Intérieur et de la Justice d’étudier les conditions juridiques de mise en place d’un nouveau fichier. Il obligera les personnes condamnées à des faits de terrorisme ou ayant intégré des groupes de combat terroristes à déclarer leur domicile et à se soumettre à des obligations de contrôle. De telles dispositions existent déjà pour d’autres formes de délinquance à risque élevé de récidive. Nous devons l’appliquer en matière d’engagement terroriste, toujours sous le contrôle strict du juge.

Mesdames et Messieurs, toutes ces propositions – et il y en aura d’autres, je n’en doute pas et n’en doutez pas – avant leur mise en œuvre et application, feront l’objet d’une consultation ou d’une présentation au Parlement au-delà bien sûr des textes législatifs.

Mesdames et Messieurs les députés, les épreuves tragiques que nous venons de traverser nous marquent, marquent notre pays et marquent notre conscience. Mais nous devons être capables de poser rapidement à chaque fois un diagnostic lucide aussi sur l’état de notre société, sur ses urgences. Ce sont des débats que nous aurons l’occasion évidemment de mener.

Je vais en dire quelques mots, en m’excusant de prendre plus de temps que nécessaire à ce qui était prévu.

Le premier sujet qu’il faut aborder clairement, c’est la lutte contre l’antisémitisme.

L’histoire nous l’a montré, le réveil de l’antisémitisme, c’est le symptôme d’une crise de la démocratie, d’une crise de la République. C’est pour cela qu’il faut y répondre avec force. Après Ilan HALIMI, en 2006, après les crimes de Toulouse, les actes antisémites connaissent en France une progression insupportable. Il y a les paroles, les insultes, les gestes, les attaques ignobles, comme à Créteil il y a quelques semaines qui, je l’ai rappelé ici dans cet hémicycle, n’ont pas soulevé l’indignation qui était attendue par nos compatriotes juifs dans le pays. Il y a cette inquiétude immense, cette peur que nous avons les uns et les autres sentie, palpée samedi dans la foule devant cet HYPER CACHER porte de Vincennes ou à la synagogue de la Victoire dimanche soir. Comment accepter qu’en France, terre d’émancipation des juifs, il y a deux siècles, mais qui fut aussi, il y a 70 ans, l’une des terres de son martyre, comment peut-on accepter que l’on puisse entendre dans nos rues crier « mort aux juifs » ? Comment peut-on accepter les actes que je viens de rappeler ? Comment peut-on accepter que des Français soient assassinés par ce qu’ils sont juifs ? Comment peut-on accepter que des compatriotes ou qu’un citoyen tunisien, que son père avait envoyé en France pour qu’il soit protégé alors qu’il va acheter son pain pour le Shabbat, meurt parce qu’il est juif ? Ce n’est pas acceptable et à la communauté nationale qui peut-être n’a pas suffisamment réagi, à nos compatriotes français juifs, je leur dis que cette fois-ci, nous ne pouvons pas l’accepter, que nous devons là aussi nous rebeller et en posant le vrai diagnostic. Il y a un antisémitisme que l’on dit historique remontant du fond des siècles mais il y a surtout ce nouvel antisémitisme qui est né dans nos quartiers, sur fond d’Internet, de paraboles, de misère, sur fond des détestations de l’Etat d’Israël, et qui prône la haine du juif et de tous les juifs. Il faut le dire, il faut poser les mots pour combattre cet antisémitisme inacceptable !

Et comme j’ai eu l’occasion de le dire, comme la ministre Ségolène ROYAL l’a dit ce matin à Jérusalem, comme Claude LANZMANN l’a écrit dans une magnifique tribune dans Le Monde, oui, disons-le à la face du monde : sans les juifs de France, la France ne serait plus la France. Et ce message, c’est à nous tous de le clamer haut et fort. Nous ne l’avons pas dit ! Nous ne nous sommes pas assez indignés ! Et comment accepter que, dans certains établissements, collèges ou lycées, on ne puisse pas enseigner ce qu’est la Shoah ? Comment on peut accepter qu’un gamin de 7 ou 8 ans dise à son enseignant quand il lui pose la question « quel est ton ennemi ? » et qu’il lui répond « c’est le juif » ? Quand on s’attaque aux juifs de France, on s’attaque à la France et on s’attaque à la conscience universelle, ne l’oublions jamais !

Et quelle terrible coïncidence, quel affront que de voir un récidiviste de la haine tenir son spectacle dans des salles bondées au moment même où, samedi soir, la Nation, Porte de Vincennes, se recueillait. Ne laissons jamais passer ces faits et que la justice soit implacable à l’égard de ces prédicateurs de la haine ! Je le dis avec force ici à la tribune de l’Assemblée nationale !

Et allons jusqu’au bout du débat. Allons jusqu’au bout du débat, Mesdames et Messieurs les députés, quand quelqu’un s’interroge, un jeune, un citoyen ou un jeune, et qu’il vient me dire à moi ou à la ministre de l’Education nationale « mais je ne comprends pas, cet humoriste, lui, vous voulez le faire taire et les journalistes de Charlie Hebdo, vous les montez au pinacle » mais il y a une différence fondamentale et c’est cette bataille que nous devons gagner, celle de la pédagogie auprès de notre jeunesse, il y a une différence fondamentale entre la liberté d’impertinence – le blasphème n’est pas dans notre droit, il ne le sera jamais – il y a une différence fondamentale entre cette liberté et l’antisémitisme, le racisme, l’apologie du terrorisme, le négationnisme qui sont des délits, qui sont de crimes et que la justice devra sans doute punir avec encore plus de sévérité.

L’autre urgence, c’est de protéger nos compatriotes musulmans. Ils sont, eux aussi, inquiets. Des actes antimusulmans inadmissibles, intolérables, se sont à nouveau produits ces derniers jours. Là aussi, s’attaquer à une mosquée, à une église, à un lieu de culte, profaner un cimetière, c’est une offense à nos valeurs. Et le préfet LATRON a en charge à la demande du ministre de l’Intérieur en lien avec tous les préfets de faire en sorte que la protection de tous les lieux de culte soit assurée. L’Islam est la deuxième religion de France. Elle a toute sa place en France. Et notre défi, pas en France, mais dans le monde, c’est de faire cette démonstration : la République, la laïcité, l’égalité hommes / femmes sont compatibles avec toutes les religions sur le sol national qui acceptent les principes et les valeurs de la République. Mais cette République doit faire preuve de la plus grande fermeté, de la plus grande intransigeance, face à ceux qui tentent, au nom de l’Islam, d’imposer une chape de plomb sur des quartiers, de faire régner leur ordre sur fond de trafics et sur fond de radicalisme religieux, un ordre dans lequel l’homme domine la femme, où la foi, oui madame la présidente POMPILI, vous avez eu raison de le rappeler, l’emporterait sur la raison.

J’avais ici, devant cette Assemblée, il y a quelques mois, évoqué les insuffisances et les échecs de trente ans de politique d’intégration. Mais, en effet, quand de vrais ghettos urbains se forment, où l’on n’est plus qu’entre soi, où l’on ne prône que le repli,