Hagiographie: On ne peut comprendre la gauche si on ne comprend pas qu’elle est une religion (God is great and Chavez is his new prophet)

31 mars, 2014
https://i0.wp.com/www.docspopuli.org/images/07_0821_120.jpg
Cesar-Chavez-Mural
https://i1.wp.com/img.lib.msu.edu/chavez/grapes.jpghttps://ffbsccn.files.wordpress.com/2010/02/grapes-of-wrath.jpghttps://jcdurbant.files.wordpress.com/2014/03/cfc43-lhnbattlehymnoftherepublic.jpg
caesarchavezfilmJe les ai foulés dans ma colère, Je les ai écrasés dans ma fureur; Leur sang a jailli sur mes vêtements, Et j’ai souillé tous mes habits. Car un jour de vengeance était dans mon coeur (…) J’ai foulé des peuples dans ma colère, Je les ai rendus ivres dans ma fureur, Et j’ai répandu leur sang sur la terre. Esaïe 63: 3-6
Et l’ange jeta sa faucille sur la terre. Et il vendangea la vigne de la terre, et jeta la vendange dans la grande cuve de la colère de Dieu. Et la cuve fut foulée hors de la ville; et du sang sortit de la cuve, jusqu’aux mors des chevaux, sur une étendue de mille six cents stades. Apocalypse 14: 19-20
Mes yeux ont vu la gloire de la venue du Seigneur; Il piétine le vignoble où sont gardés les raisins de la colère; Il a libéré la foudre fatidique de sa terrible et rapide épée; Sa vérité est en marche. (…) Dans la beauté des lys Christ est né de l’autre côté de l’océan, Avec dans sa poitrine la gloire qui nous transfigure vous et moi; Comme il est mort pour rendre les hommes saints, mourons pour rendre les hommes libres; Tandis que Dieu est en marche. Julia Ward Howe (1861)
La colère commence à luire dans les yeux de ceux qui ont faim. Dans l’âme des gens, les raisins de la colère se gonflent et mûrissent, annonçant les vendanges prochaines. John Steinbeck (1939)
On ne peut comprendre la gauche si on ne comprend pas que le gauchisme est une religion. Dennis Prager
You cannot understand the Left if you do not understand that leftism is a religion. It is not God-based (some left-wing Christians’ and Jews’ claims notwithstanding), but otherwise it has every characteristic of a religion. The most blatant of those characteristics is dogma. People who believe in leftism have as many dogmas as the most fundamentalist Christian. One of them is material equality as the preeminent moral goal. Another is the villainy of corporations. The bigger the corporation, the greater the villainy. Thus, instead of the devil, the Left has Big Pharma, Big Tobacco, Big Oil, the “military-industrial complex,” and the like. Meanwhile, Big Labor, Big Trial Lawyers, and — of course — Big Government are left-wing angels. And why is that? Why, to be specific, does the Left fear big corporations but not big government? The answer is dogma — a belief system that transcends reason. No rational person can deny that big governments have caused almost all the great evils of the last century, arguably the bloodiest in history. Who killed the 20 to 30 million Soviet citizens in the Gulag Archipelago — big government or big business? Hint: There were no private businesses in the Soviet Union. Who deliberately caused 75 million Chinese to starve to death — big government or big business? Hint: See previous hint. Did Coca-Cola kill 5 million Ukrainians? Did Big Oil slaughter a quarter of the Cambodian population? Would there have been a Holocaust without the huge Nazi state? Whatever bad things big corporations have done is dwarfed by the monstrous crimes — the mass enslavement of people, the deprivation of the most basic human rights, not to mention the mass murder and torture and genocide — committed by big governments. (…) Religious Christians and Jews also have some irrational beliefs, but their irrationality is overwhelmingly confined to theological matters; and these theological irrationalities have no deleterious impact on religious Jews’ and Christians’ ability to see the world rationally and morally. Few religious Jews or Christians believe that big corporations are in any way analogous to big government in terms of evil done. And the few who do are leftists. That the Left demonizes Big Pharma, for instance, is an example of this dogmatism. America’s pharmaceutical companies have saved millions of lives, including millions of leftists’ lives. And I do not doubt that in order to increase profits they have not always played by the rules. But to demonize big pharmaceutical companies while lionizing big government, big labor unions, and big tort-law firms is to stand morality on its head. There is yet another reason to fear big government far more than big corporations. ExxonMobil has no police force, no IRS, no ability to arrest you, no ability to shut you up, and certainly no ability to kill you. ExxonMobil can’t knock on your door in the middle of the night and legally take you away. Apple Computer cannot take your money away without your consent, and it runs no prisons. The government does all of these things. Of course, the Left will respond that government also does good and that corporations and capitalists are, by their very nature, “greedy.” To which the rational response is that, of course, government also does good. But so do the vast majority of corporations, private citizens, church groups, and myriad voluntary associations. On the other hand, only big government can do anything approaching the monstrous evils of the last century. As for greed: Between hunger for money and hunger for power, the latter is incomparably more frightening. It is noteworthy that none of the twentieth century’s monsters — Lenin, Hitler, Stalin, Mao — were preoccupied with material gain. They loved power much more than money. And that is why the Left is much more frightening than the Right. It craves power. Dennis Prager
On Cesar Chavez Day, we celebrate one of America’s greatest champions for social justice. Raised into the life of a migrant farm worker, he toiled alongside men, women, and children who performed daily, backbreaking labor for meager pay and in deplorable conditions. They were exposed to dangerous pesticides and denied the most basic protections, including minimum wages, health care, and access to drinking water. Cesar Chavez devoted his life to correcting these injustices, to reminding us that every job has dignity, every life has value, and everyone — no matter who you are, what you look like, or where you come from — should have the chance to get ahead. After returning from naval service during World War II, Cesar Chavez fought for freedom in American agricultural fields. Alongside Dolores Huerta, he founded the United Farm Workers, and through decades of tireless organizing, even in the face of intractable opposition, he grew a movement to advance « La Causa » across the country. In 1966, he led a march that began in Delano, California, with a handful of activists and ended in Sacramento with a crowd 10,000 strong. A grape boycott eventually drew 17 million supporters nationwide, forcing growers to accept some of the first farm worker contracts in history. A generation of organizers rose to carry that legacy forward. The values Cesar Chavez lived by guide us still. As we push to fix a broken immigration system, protect the right to unionize, advance social justice for young men of color, and build ladders of opportunity for every American to climb, we recall his resilience through setbacks, his refusal to scale back his dreams. When we organize against income inequality and fight to raise the minimum wage — because no one who works full time should have to live in poverty — we draw strength from his vision and example. Throughout his lifelong struggle, Cesar Chavez never forgot who he was fighting for. « What [the growers] don’t know, » he said, « is that it’s not bananas or grapes or lettuce. It’s people. » Today, let us honor Cesar Chavez and those who marched with him by meeting our obligations to one another. I encourage Americans to make this a national day of service and education by speaking out, organizing, and participating in service projects to improve lives in their communities. Let us remember that when we lift each other up, when we speak with one voice, we have the power to build a better world. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim March 31, 2014, as Cesar Chavez Day. I call upon all Americans to observe this day with appropriate service, community, and education programs to honor Cesar Chavez’s enduring legacy. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-eighth day of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand fourteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-eighth. Barack Obama
His face is on a U.S. postage stamp. Countless statues, murals, libraries, schools, parks and streets are named after him — he even has his own national monument. He was on the cover of Time magazine in 1969. A naval ship was named after him. The man even has his own Google Doodle and Apple ad. Yet his footprint in American history is widely unknown and that’s exactly the reason why actor-turned-director Diego Luna decided to produce a movie about his life. CNN
Sorel, for whom religion was important, drew a comparison between the Christian and the socialist revolutionary. The Christian’s life is transformed because he accepts the myth that Christ will one day return and usher in the end of time; the revolutionary socialist’s life is transformed because he accepts the myth that one day socialism will triumph, and justice for all will prevail. What mattered for Sorel, in both cases, is not the scientific truth or falsity of the myth believed in, but what believing in the myth does to the lives of those who have accepted it, and who refuse to be daunted by the repeated failure of their apocalyptic expectations. How many times have Christians in the last two thousand years been convinced that the Second Coming was at hand, only to be bitterly disappointed — yet none of these disappointments was ever enough to keep them from holding on to their great myth. So, too, Sorel argued, the myth of socialism will continue to have power, despite the various failures of socialist experiments, so long as there are revolutionaries who are unwilling to relinquish their great myth. That is why he rejected scientific socialism — if it was merely science, it lacked the power of a religion to change individual’s lives. Thus for Sorel there was “an…analogy between religion and the revolutionary Socialism which aims at the apprenticeship, preparation, and even the reconstruction of the individual — a gigantic task. Lee Harris

En cette Journée César Chavez tout récemment proclamée par Notre Grand Timonier Obama …

Lancée, comme il se doit, par ses images saintes made in Hollywood

Bienvenue au dernier saint de nos amis de la gauche américaine !

The Left’s Misplaced Concern
The Left craves power not money, and that makes it much more frightening.
Dennis Prager
National review on line
May 22, 2012

You cannot understand the Left if you do not understand that leftism is a religion. It is not God-based (some left-wing Christians’ and Jews’ claims notwithstanding), but otherwise it has every characteristic of a religion. The most blatant of those characteristics is dogma. People who believe in leftism have as many dogmas as the most fundamentalist Christian.

One of them is material equality as the preeminent moral goal. Another is the villainy of corporations. The bigger the corporation, the greater the villainy. Thus, instead of the devil, the Left has Big Pharma, Big Tobacco, Big Oil, the “military-industrial complex,” and the like. Meanwhile, Big Labor, Big Trial Lawyers, and — of course — Big Government are left-wing angels.

And why is that? Why, to be specific, does the Left fear big corporations but not big government?

The answer is dogma — a belief system that transcends reason. No rational person can deny that big governments have caused almost all the great evils of the last century, arguably the bloodiest in history. Who killed the 20 to 30 million Soviet citizens in the Gulag Archipelago — big government or big business? Hint: There were no private businesses in the Soviet Union. Who deliberately caused 75 million Chinese to starve to death — big government or big business? Hint: See previous hint. Did Coca-Cola kill 5 million Ukrainians? Did Big Oil slaughter a quarter of the Cambodian population? Would there have been a Holocaust without the huge Nazi state?

Whatever bad things big corporations have done is dwarfed by the monstrous crimes — the mass enslavement of people, the deprivation of the most basic human rights, not to mention the mass murder and torture and genocide — committed by big governments.

How can anyone who thinks rationally believe that big corporations rather than big governments pose the greatest threat to humanity? The answer is that it takes a mind distorted by leftist dogma. If there is another explanation, I do not know what it is.

Religious Christians and Jews also have some irrational beliefs, but their irrationality is overwhelmingly confined to theological matters; and these theological irrationalities have no deleterious impact on religious Jews’ and Christians’ ability to see the world rationally and morally. Few religious Jews or Christians believe that big corporations are in any way analogous to big government in terms of evil done. And the few who do are leftists.

That the Left demonizes Big Pharma, for instance, is an example of this dogmatism. America’s pharmaceutical companies have saved millions of lives, including millions of leftists’ lives. And I do not doubt that in order to increase profits they have not always played by the rules. But to demonize big pharmaceutical companies while lionizing big government, big labor unions, and big tort-law firms is to stand morality on its head.

There is yet another reason to fear big government far more than big corporations. ExxonMobil has no police force, no IRS, no ability to arrest you, no ability to shut you up, and certainly no ability to kill you. ExxonMobil can’t knock on your door in the middle of the night and legally take you away. Apple Computer cannot take your money away without your consent, and it runs no prisons. The government does all of these things.

Of course, the Left will respond that government also does good and that corporations and capitalists are, by their very nature, “greedy.”

To which the rational response is that, of course, government also does good. But so do the vast majority of corporations, private citizens, church groups, and myriad voluntary associations. On the other hand, only big government can do anything approaching the monstrous evils of the last century.

As for greed: Between hunger for money and hunger for power, the latter is incomparably more frightening. It is noteworthy that none of the twentieth century’s monsters — Lenin, Hitler, Stalin, Mao — were preoccupied with material gain. They loved power much more than money.

And that is why the Left is much more frightening than the Right. It craves power.

— Dennis Prager, a nationally syndicated columnist and radio talk-show host, is author of Still the Best Hope: Why the World Needs American Values to Triumph. He may be contacted through his website, dennisprager.com.

Voir aussi:

The iconic UFW

Another myth. I opened my Easter Sunday Google browser and did not find a Christian icon on the page, but instead a (badly done) romantic rendition of a youthful Cesar Chavez, apparently our age’s version of a politically correct divinity.

Yet I wondered whether the midlevel Googilites who post these politically hip images knew all that much about Chavez. I grant in this age that they saw no reason to emphasize Christianity on its most holy day. But there is, after all, Miriam Pawel’s 2010 biography of Chavez still readily accessible[10], and a new essay about him in The Atlantic[11] — both written by sympathetic authors who nonetheless are not quite the usual garden-variety hagiographers. To suggest something other than sainthood is heresy in these parts, as I have discovered since the publication of Mexifornia a decade ago.

I grew up in the cauldron of farm-labor disputes. Small farms like ours largely escaped the violence, because there were five of us kids to do the work in summer and after school, and our friends welcomed the chance to buck boxes or help out propping trees or thinning plums. Hired help was rare and a matter of a few days of hiring 20 or so locals for the fall raisin harvest. But the epic table grape fights were not far away in Parlier, Reedley, and down the 99 in Delano. I offer a few impressions, some of them politically incorrect.

First, give Chavez his due. Farmworkers today are more akin to supposedly non-skilled (actually there is a skill required to pruning and picking) labor elsewhere, with roughly the same protective regulations as the food worker or landscaper. That was not true in 1965. Conservatives will argue that the market corrected the abuse (e.g., competition for ever scarcer workers) and ensured overtime, accessible toilets, and the end to hand-held hoes; liberals will credit Chavez — or fear of Chavez.

But that said, Chavez was not quite the icon we see in the grainy videos walking the vineyards withRobert Kennedy[12]. Perhaps confrontation was inevitable, but the labor organizing around here was hardly non-violent. Secondary boycotts were illegal, but that did not stop picketers from yelling and cursing as you exited the local Safeway with a bag of Emperor grapes. There were the constant union fights with bigger family growers (the 500 acre and above sort), as often demonstrators rushed into fields to mix it up with so-called scabs. Teamsters fought the UAW. The latter often worked with the immigration service to hunt down and deport illegals. The former bused in toughs to crack heads. After-hours UFW vandalism, as in the slashed tire and chain-sawed tree mode, was common.

The politics were explicable by one common theme: Cesar Chavez disliked small farmers and labor contractors[13], and preferred agribusiness and the idea of a huge union. Otherwise, there were simply too many incongruities in an agrarian checkerboard landscape for him to handle — as if the UAW would have had to deal with an auto industry scattered among thousands of small family-owned factories.

For Chavez, the ideal was a vast, simple us/them, 24/7 fight, albeit beneath an angelic veneer of Catholic suffering. In contrast, small farmers were not rich and hardly cut-out caricatures of grasping exploitation. Too many were unapologetic Armenians, Japanese (cf. the Nisei Farmers League), Portuguese, and Mexican-Americans to guarantee the necessary white/brown binary. Many had their own histories of racism, from the Armenian genocide to the Japanese internment, and had no white guilt of the Kennedy sort. I cannot imagine a tougher adversary than a Japanese, Armenian, or Punjabi farmer, perched on his own tractor or irrigating his 60 acres — entirely self-created, entirely unapologetic about his achievement, entirely committed to the idea that no one is going to threaten his existence.

The local labor contractors were not villains, but mostly residents who employed their relatives and knew well the 40-acre and 100-acre farmers they served. When there were slow times on the farm, I picked peaches for two summers for a Selma labor contractor, whose kids I went to school with. He was hardly a sellout. The crusty, hard-bitten small farmers (“don’t bruise that fruit,” “you missed three peaches up there on that limb,” “you stopped before it was quite noon”) who monitored personally the orchards we picked looked no different from the men on ladders.

In contrast, Chavez preferred the south and west Central Valley of huge corporate agribusiness. Rich and powerful, these great captains had the ability by fiat to institute labor agreements across hundreds of thousands of acres of farmland. Chavez’s organizing forte was at home in a Tulare, Delano, Shafter, Mendota or Tranquility, not a Reedley, Kingsburg or Selma. In those days, the former were mostly pyramidal societies of a few corporate kingpins with an underclass of agricultural laborers, the latter were mixed societies in which Mexican-Americans were already ascendant and starting to join the broader middle class of Armenians, Japanese, and Punjabis.

Chavez was to be a Walter Reuther or George Meany, a make-or-breaker who sat across from a land baron, cut a deal for his vast following, and then assumed national stature as he doled out union patronage and quid-pro-quo political endorsements. In that vision, as a 1950s labor magnate Chavez largely failed — but not because agribusiness did not cave in to him. Indeed, it saw the UFW and Chavez as the simple cost of doing business, a tolerable write-off necessary to making all the bad press, vandalism, and violence go away.

Instead, the UFW imploded by its own insider and familial favoritism, corruption, and, to be frank, lunatic paranoia. The millions of dollars Chavez deducted for pension funds often vanished. Legions of relatives (for a vestigial experience of the inner sanctum, I suggest a visit to the national shrine southeast of Bakersfield) staffed the union administration. There were daily rumors of financial malfeasance, mostly in the sense of farmworkers belatedly discovering that their union deductions did not lead to promised healthcare or pensions.

Most hagiographies ignore Chavez’s eerie alliance with the unhinged Synanon bunch. In these parts, they had opened a foothill retreat of some sort above Woodlake, not far from here. (I visited the ramshackle Badger enclave once with my mother [I suppose as her informal « security, »], who was invited as a superior court judge to be introduced to their new anti-drug program in their hopes that county officials might save millions of dollars by sentencing supposedly non-violent heroin addicts to Synanon recovery treatments. Needless to say, she smiled, met the creepy “group,” looked around the place, and we left rather quickly, and that was that.)

I don’t think that the Google headliners remember that Charles Dederich[14] (of rattlesnake-in-the-mailbox and “Don’t mess with us. You can get killed, dead” fame) was a sort of model for Chavez, who tried to introduce the wacko-bird Synanon Game to his own UFW hierarchy. No matter, deification of Chavez is now de rigeur; the young generation who idolizes him has almost no knowledge of the man, his life, or his beliefs. It is enough that Bobby Kennedy used to fly into these parts, walk for a few well-filmed hours, and fly out.

When I went to UC Santa Cruz in September of 1971, I remember as a fool picking a box of Thompson seedless grapes from our farm to take along, and soon being met by a dorm delegation of rich kids from Pacific Palisades and Palos Verdes (a favorite magnet area for Santa Cruz in those days) who ordered me not to eat my own grapes on my own campus in my own room. Soon I had about four good friends who not only enjoyed them, but enjoyed eating them in front of those who did not (to the extent I remember these student moralists, and can collate old faces with names in the annual alumni news, most are now high-ups and executives in the entertainment industry). Victor Davis Hanson

Voir encore:

The study of history demands nuanced thinking

Miriam Pawel

Austin American-Statesman
7-17-09

[Pawel is the author of the forthcoming book ‘The Union of Their Dreams — Power, Hope and Struggle in Cesar Chavez’s Farm Worker Movement.’]

Cesar Chavez was not a saint. He was, at times, a stubborn authoritarian bully, a fanatical control freak, a wily fighter who manufactured enemies and scapegoats, a mystical vegetarian who healed with his hands, and a union president who wanted his members to value sacrifice above higher wages.

He was also a brilliant, inspirational leader who changed thousands of lives as he built the first successful union for farmworkers, a consummate strategist singularly committed to his vision of helping the poor — a vision that even those close to him sometimes misunderstood.

That one man embodies such complexity and contradictions should be a key lesson underlying any history curriculum: Students should learn to think in shades of gray, to see heroes as real people, and to reject the dogma of black and white.

That sort of nuanced thinking appears largely absent from the debate over whether Cesar Chavez should be taught in Texas schools. Two of the six reviewers appointed to assess Texas’ social studies curriculum recently deemed Chavez an inappropriate role model whose contributions and stature have been overstated. Their critiques suggested he should be excised, not glorified. Their opponents pounced on the comments in an ongoing ideological and political dispute that clearly is far more sweeping than Chavez’s proper place in the classroom.

But the debate over Chavez and how his story is taught exemplifies the dangers of oversimplification and the absence of critical thinking.

His supporters are at fault as well as his detractors. For years, they have mythologized Chavez and fiercely fended off efforts to portray him in less than purely heroic terms. The hagiography only detracts from his very real, remarkable accomplishments. In an era when Mexican Americans were regarded as good for nothing more than the most back-breaking labor, Chavez mobilized public support and forced agribusiness to recognize the rights of farmworkers. His movement brought farmworkers dignity and self-respect, as well as better wages and working conditions. In California, he pushed through what remains today the most pro-labor law in the country, the only one granting farmworkers the right to organize and petition for union elections.

Chavez’s legacy can be seen in the work of a generation of activists and community organizers who joined the farmworker crusade during the 1960s and ’70s, a movement that transformed their lives. They, in turn, have gone on to effect change across the country, most recently playing key roles in the Obama presidential campaign.

The decline of the union Chavez founded and the ultimate failure of the United Farm Workers to achieve lasting change in the fields of California — much less expand into a national union — is part of the Chavez legacy, too. Chavez himself played a role in that precipitous decline, and students of history should not follow his example and blame the failures solely on outside forces and scapegoats.

Chavez, an avid reader of history, preserved an extraordinary record of his own movement: For years, he ordered that all documents, tapes and pictures be sent to the Walter P. Reuther Library at Wayne State University in Detroit, the nation’s preeminent labor archive. Chavez told people he wanted the history of his movement to be saved and studied — warts and all.

Those lessons should be taught in classrooms everywhere. – See more at: http://hnn.us/article/107517#sthash.NSesFPOF.dpuf

Voir encore:

Amid Chants of ‘¡Huelga!,’ an Embodiment of Hope
Hero Worship Abounds in ‘Cesar Chavez’

A. O. Scott

The NYT

MARCH 27, 2014

“Cesar Chavez,” directed by Diego Luna, is a well-cast, well-intentioned movie that falls into the trap that often awaits film biographies of brave and widely admired individuals. The movie is so intent on reminding viewers of its subject’s heroism that it struggles to make him an interesting, three-dimensional person, and it tells his story as a series of dramatic bullet points, punctuated by black-and-white footage, some real, some simulated, of historical events.

In spite of these shortcomings, Mr. Luna’s reconstruction of the emergence of the United Farm Workers organization in the 1960s unfolds with unusual urgency and timeliness. After a rushed beginning — in which we see Chavez (Michael Peña) arguing in a Los Angeles office and moving his family to Delano, a central California town, before we fully grasp his motives — we settle in for a long, sometimes violent struggle between the workers and the growers. Attempted strikes are met with intimidation and brutality, from the local sheriff and hired goons, and Chavez and his allies (notably Dolores Huerta, played by Rosario Dawson) come up with new tactics, including a public fast, a march from Delano to Sacramento and a consumer boycott of grapes.

As is customary in movies like this, we see the toll that the hero’s commitment takes on his family life. His wife, Helen (America Ferrera), is a steadfast ally, but there is tension between Chavez and his oldest son, Fernando (the only one of the couple’s eight children with more than an incidental presence on screen). Fernando (Eli Vargas) endures racist bullying at school and suffers from his father’s frequent absences. Their scenes together are more functional than heartfelt, fulfilling the requirement of allowing the audience a glimpse at the private life of a public figure.

We also venture into the household of one of Chavez’s main antagonists, a landowner named Bogdonovich, played with sly, dry understatement by John Malkovich. He is determined to break the incipient union, and the fight between the two men and their organizations becomes a national political issue. Senator Robert F. Kennedy (Jack Holmes) takes the side of the workers, while the interests of the growers are publicly defended by Ronald Reagan, shown in an archival video clip describing the grape boycott as immoral, and Richard Nixon. Parts of “Cesar Chavez” are as rousing as an old folk song, with chants of “¡Huelga!” and “¡Sí, se puede!” ringing through the theater. Although it ends, as such works usually do, on a note of triumph, the film, whose screenplay is by Keir Pearson and Timothy J. Sexton, does not present history as a closed book. Movies about men and women who fought for social change — “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom” is a recent example — treat them less as the radicals they were than as embodiments of hope, reconciliation and consensus.

Though Cesar Chavez, who died in 1993, has been honored and celebrated, the problems he addressed have hardly faded away. The rights of immigrants and the wages and working conditions of those who pick, process and transport food are still live and contentious political issues.

And if you read between the lines of Mr. Luna’s earnest, clumsy film, you find not just a history lesson but an argument. The success of the farm workers depended on the strength of labor unions, both in the United States and overseas, and the existence of political parties able to draw on that power. What the film struggles to depict, committed as it is to the conventions of hagiography, is the long and complex work of organizing people to defend their own interests. You are invited to admire what Cesar Chavez did, but it may be more vital to understand how he did it.

“Cesar Chavez” is rated PG-13 (Parents strongly cautioned). Strong language and scenes of bloody class struggle.

Voir encore:

The Madness of Cesar Chavez
A new biography of the icon shows that saints should be judged guilty until proved innocent.
Caitlin Flanagan
The Atlantic
Jun 13 2011,

Once a year, in the San Joaquin Valley in Central California, something spectacular happens. It lasts only a couple of weeks, and it’s hard to catch, because the timing depends on so many variables. But if you’re patient, and if you check the weather reports from Fresno and Tulare counties obsessively during the late winter and early spring, and if you are also willing, on very little notice, to drop everything and make the unglamorous drive up (or down) to that part of the state, you will see something unforgettable. During a couple of otherworldly weeks, the tens of thousands of fruit trees planted there burst into blossom, and your eye can see nothing, on either side of those rutted farm roads, but clouds of pink and white and yellow. Harvest time is months away, the brutal summer heat is still unimaginable, and in those cool, deserted orchards, you find only the buzzing of bees, the perfumed air, and the endless canopy of color.

I have spent the past year thinking a lot about the San Joaquin Valley, because I have been trying to come to terms with the life and legacy of Cesar Chavez, whose United Farm Workers movement—born in a hard little valley town called Delano—played a large role in my California childhood. I spent the year trying, with increasing frustration, to square my vision of him, and of his movement, with one writer’s thorough and unflinching reassessment of them. Beginning five years ago, with a series of shocking articles in the Los Angeles Times, and culminating now in one of the most important recent books on California history, Miriam Pawel has undertaken a thankless task: telling a complicated and in many ways shattering truth. That her book has been so quietly received is not owing to a waning interest in the remarkable man at its center. Streets and schools and libraries are still being named for Chavez in California; his long-ago rallying cry of “Sí, se puede” remains so evocative of ideas about justice and the collective power of the downtrodden that Barack Obama adopted it for his presidential campaign. No, the silence greeting the first book to come to terms with Chavez’s legacy arises from the human tendency to be stubborn and romantic and (if the case requires it) willfully ignorant in defending the heroes we’ve chosen for ourselves. That silence also attests to the way Chavez touched those of us who had any involvement with him, because the full legacy has to include his singular and almost mystical way of eliciting not just fealty but a kind of awe. Something cultlike always clung to the Chavez operation, and so while I was pained to learn in Pawel’s book of Chavez’s enthrallment with an actual cult—with all the attendant paranoia and madness—that development makes sense.

In the face of Pawel’s book, I felt compelled to visit the places where Chavez lived and worked, although it’s hard to tempt anyone to join you on a road trip to somewhere as bereft of tourist attractions as the San Joaquin Valley. But one night in late February, I got a break: someone who’d just driven down from Fresno told me that the trees were almost in bloom, and that was all I needed. I took my 13-year-old son, Conor, out of school for a couple of days so we could drive up the 99 and have a look. I was thinking of some things I wanted to show him, and some I wanted to see for myself. It would be “experiential learning”; it would be a sentimental journey. At times it would be a covert operation.

One Saturday night, when I was 9 or 10 years old, my parents left the dishes in the sink and dashed out the driveway for their weekend treat: movie night. But not half an hour later—just enough time for the round trip from our house in the Berkeley Hills to the United Artists theater down on Shattuck—they were right back home again, my mother hanging up her coat with a sigh, and my father slamming himself angrily into a chair in front of The Bob Newhart Show.

What happened?

“Strike,” he said bitterly.

One of the absolute rules of our household, so essential to our identity that it was never even explained in words, was that a picket line didn’t mean “maybe.” A picket line meant “closed.” This rule wasn’t a point of honor or a means of forging solidarity with the common man, someone my father hoped to encounter only in literature. It came from a way of understanding the world, from the fierce belief that the world was divided between workers and owners. The latter group was always, always trying to exploit the former, which—however improbably, given my professor father’s position in life—was who we were.

In the history of human enterprise, there can have been no more benevolent employer than the University of California in the 1960s and ’70s, yet to hear my father and his English-department pals talk about the place, you would have thought they were working at the Triangle shirtwaist factory. Not buying a movie ticket if the ushers were striking meant that if the shit really came down, and the regents tried to make full professors teach Middlemarch seminars over summer vacation, the ushers would be there for you. As a child, I burned brightly with the justice of these concepts, and while other children were watching Speed Racer or learning Chinese jump rope, I spent a lot of my free time working for the United Farm Workers.

Everything about the UFW and its struggle was right-sized for a girl: it involved fruits and vegetables, it concerned the most elementary concepts of right and wrong, it was something you could do with your mom, and most of your organizing could be conducted just outside the grocery store, which meant you could always duck inside for a Tootsie Pop. The cement apron outside a grocery store, where one is often accosted—in a manner both winsome and bullying—by teams of Brownies pressing their cookies on you, was once my barricade and my bully pulpit.

Of course, it had all started with Mom. Somewhere along the way, she had met Cesar Chavez, or at least attended a rally where he had spoken, and that was it. Like almost everyone else who ever encountered him, she was spellbound. “This wonderful, wonderful man,” she would call him, and off we went to collect clothes for the farmworkers’ children, and to sell red-and-black UFW buttons and collect signatures. It was our thing: we loved each other, we loved doing little projects, we had oceans of free time (has anyone in the history of the world had more free time than mid-century housewives and their children?), and we were both constitutionally suited to causes that required grudge-holding and troublemaking and making things better for people in need. Most of all, though, we loved Cesar.

In those heady, early days of the United Farm Workers, in the time of the great five-year grape strike that started in 1965, no reporter, not even the most ironic among them, failed to remark upon, if not come under, Chavez’s sway. “The Messianic quality about him,” observed John Gregory Dunne in his brilliant 1967 book, Delano, “is suggested by his voice, which is mesmerizing—soft, perfectly modulated, pleasantly accented.” Peter Matthiessen’s book-length profile of Chavez, which consumed two issues of The New Yorker in the summer of 1969, reported: “He is the least boastful man I have ever met.” Yet within this self-conscious and mannered presentation of inarticulate deference was an ability to shape both a romantic vision and a strategic plan. Never since then has so great a gift been used for so small a cause. In six months, he took a distinctly regional movement and blasted it into national, and then international, fame.

The ranchers underestimated Chavez,” a stunned local observer of the historic Delano grape strike told Dunne; “they thought he was just another dumb Mex.” Such a sentiment fueled opinions of Chavez, not just among the valley’s grape growers—hardworking men, none of them rich by any means—but among many of his most powerful admirers, although they spoke in very different terms. Chavez’s followers—among them mainline Protestants, socially conscious Jews, Berkeley kids, white radicals who were increasingly rootless as the civil-rights movement transformed into the black-power movement—saw him as a profoundly good man. But they also understood him as a kind of idiot savant, a noble peasant who had risen from the agony of stoop labor and was mysteriously instilled with the principles and tactics of union organizing. In fact he’d been a passionate and tireless student of labor relations for a decade before founding the UFW, handpicked to organize Mexican Americans for the Community Service Organization, a local outfit under the auspices of no less a personage than Saul Alinsky, who knew Chavez well and would advise him during the grape strike. From Alinsky, and from Fred Ross, the CSO founder, Chavez learned the essential tactic of organizing: the person-by-person, block-by-block building of a coalition, no matter how long it took, sitting with one worker at a time, hour after hour, until the tide of solidarity is so high, no employer can defeat it.

Chavez, like all the great ’60s figures, was a man of immense personal style. For a hundred reasons—some cynical, some not—he and Robert Kennedy were drawn to each other. The Kennedy name had immense appeal to the workers Chavez was trying to cultivate; countless Mexican households displayed photographs of JFK, whose assassination they understood as a Catholic martyrdom rather than an act of political gun violence. In turn, Chavez’s cause offered Robert Kennedy a chance to stand with oppressed workers in a way that would not immediately inflame his family’s core constituency, among them working-class Irish Americans who felt no enchantment with the civil-rights causes that RFK increasingly embraced. The Hispanic situation was different. At the time of the grape strike, Mexican American immigration was not on anyone’s political radar. The overwhelming majority of California’s population was white, and the idea that Mexican workers would compete for anyone’s good job was unheard-of. The San Joaquin Valley farms—and the worker exploitation they had historically engendered—were associated more closely with the mistreatment of white Okies during the Great Depression than with the plight of any immigrant population.

Kennedy—his mind, like Chavez’s, always on the political promise of a great photograph—flew up to Delano in March 1968, when Chavez broke his 25-day fast, which he had undertaken not as a hunger strike, but as penance for some incidents of UFW violence. In a Mass held outside the union gas station where Chavez had fasted, the two were photographed, sitting next to Chavez’s wife and his mantilla-wearing mother, taking Communion together (“Senator, this is probably the most ridiculous request I ever made in my life,” said a desperate cameraman who’d missed the shot; “but would you mind giving him a piece of bread?”). Three months later, RFK was shot in Los Angeles, and a second hagiographic photograph was taken of the leader with a Mexican American. A young busboy named Juan Romero cradled the dying senator in his arms, his white kitchen jacket and dark, pleading eyes lending the picture an urgency at once tragic and political: The Third of May recast in a hotel kitchen. The United Farm Workers began to seem like Kennedy’s great unfinished business. The family firm might have preferred that grieving for Bobby take the form of reconsidering Teddy’s political possibilities, but in fact much of it was channeled, instead, into boycotting grapes.

That historic grape boycott eventually ended with a rousing success: three-year union contracts binding the Delano growers and the farmworkers. After that, the movement drifted out of my life and consciousness, as it did—I now realize—for millions of other people. I remember clearly the night my mother remarked (in a guarded way) to my father that the union had now switched its boycott from grapes to … lettuce. “Lettuce?” he squawked, and then burst out in mean laughter. I got the joke. What was Chavez going to do now, boycott each of California’s agricultural products, one at a time for five years each? We’d be way into the 21st century by the time they got around to zucchini. And besides, things were changing—in the world, in Berkeley, and (in particular, I thought) at the Flanagans’. Things that had appeared revolutionary and appealing in the ’60s were becoming weird or ugly in the ’70s. People began turning inward. My father, stalwart Vietnam War protester and tear-gasee, turned his concern to writing an endless historical novel about 18th-century Ireland. My mother stopped worrying so much about the liberation of other people and cut herself into the deal: she left her card table outside the Berkeley Co-op and went back to work. I too found other pursuits. Sitting in my room with the cat and listening over and over to Carly Simon’s No Secrets album—while staring with Talmudic concentration at its braless cover picture—was at least as absorbing as shaking the Huelga can and fretting about Mexican children’s vaccination schedules had once been. Everyone sort of moved on.

I didn’t really give any thought to the UFW again until the night of my mother’s death. At the end of that terrible day, when my sister and I returned from the hospital to our parents’ house, we looked through the papers on my mother’s kitchen desk, and there among the envelopes from the many, many charities she supported (she sent each an immediate albeit very small check) was one bearing a logo I hadn’t seen in years: the familiar black-and-red Huelga eagle. I smiled and took it home with me. I wrote a letter to the UFW, telling about my mom and enclosing a check, and suddenly I was back.

Re-upping with the 21st-century United Farm Workers was fantastic. The scope of my efforts was so much larger than before (they encouraged me to e-blast their regular updates to everyone in my address book, which of course I did) and the work so, so much less arduous—no sitting around in parking lots haranguing people about grapes. I never got off my keister. Plus, every time a new UFW e-mail arrived—the logo blinking, in a very new-millennium way, “Donate now!”—and I saw the pictures of farmworkers doing stoop labor in the fields, and the stirring photographs of Cesar Chavez, I felt close to my lost mother and connected to her: here I am, Mom, still doing our bit for the union.

And then one morning a few years later, I stepped out onto the front porch in my bathrobe, picked up the Los Angeles Times, and saw a headline: “Farmworkers Reap Little as Union Strays From Its Roots.” It was the first article in a four-part series by a Times reporter named Miriam Pawel, and from the opening paragraph, I was horrified.

I learned that while the UFW brand still carried a lot of weight in people’s minds—enough to have built a pension plan of $100 million in assets but with only a few thousand retirees who qualified—the union had very few contracts with California growers, the organization was rife with Chavez nepotism, and the many UFW-funded business ventures even included an apartment complex in California built with non-union labor. I took this news personally. I felt ashamed that I had forwarded so many e-mails to so many friends, all in the service, somehow, of keeping my mother’s memory and good works alive, and all to the ultimate benefit—as it turned out—not of the workers in the fields (whose lives were in some ways worse than they had been in the ’60s), but rather of a large, shadowy, and now morally questionable organization. But at least, I told myself, none of this has in any way impugned Cesar himself: he’d been dead more than a decade before the series was published. His own legacy was unblighted.

Or so it seemed, until my editor sent me a copy of The Union of Their Dreams, Pawel’s exhaustively researched, by turns sympathetic and deeply shocking, investigation of Chavez and his movement, and in particular of eight of the people who worked most closely with him. Through her in-depth interviews with these figures—among them a prominent attorney who led the UFW legal department, a minister who was one of Chavez’s closest advisers, and a young farmworker who had dedicated his life to the cause—Pawel describes the reality of the movement, not just during the well-studied and victorious period that made it famous, but during its long, painful transformation to what it is today. Her story of one man and his movement is a story of how the ’60s became the ’70s.

To understand Chavez, you have to understand that he was grafting together two life philosophies that were, at best, an idiosyncratic pairing. One was grounded in union-organizing techniques that go back to the Wobblies; the other emanated directly from the mystical Roman Catholicism that flourishes in Mexico and Central America and that Chavez ardently followed. He didn’t conduct “hunger strikes”; he fasted penitentially. He didn’t lead “protest marches”; he organized peregrinations in which his followers—some crawling on their knees—arrayed themselves behind the crucifix and effigies of the Virgin of Guadalupe. His desire was not to lift workers into the middle class, but to bind them to one another in the decency of sacrificial poverty. He envisioned the little patch of dirt in Delano—the “Forty Acres” that the UFW had acquired in 1966 and that is now a National Historic Landmark—as a place where workers could build shrines, pray, and rest in the shade of the saplings they had tended together while singing. Like most ’60s radicals—of whatever stripe—he vastly overestimated the appeal of hard times and simple living; he was not the only Californian of the time to promote the idea of a Poor People’s Union, but as everyone from the Symbionese Liberation Army to the Black Panthers would discover, nobody actually wants to be poor. With this Christ-like and infinitely suffering approach to some worldly matters, Chavez also practiced the take-no-prisoners, balls-out tactics of a Chicago organizer. One of his strategies during the lettuce strike was causing deportations: he would alert the immigration authorities to the presence of undocumented (and therefore scab) workers and get them sent back to Mexico. As the ’70s wore on, all of this—the fevered Catholicism and the brutal union tactics—coalesced into a gospel with fewer and fewer believers. He moved his central command from the Forty Acres, where he was in constant contact with workers and their families—and thus with the realities and needs of their lives—and took up residence in a weird new headquarters.

Located in the remote foothills of the Tehachapi Mountains, the compound Chavez would call La Paz centered on a moldering and abandoned tuberculosis hospital and its equally ravaged outbuildings. In the best tradition of charismatic leaders left alone with their handpicked top command, he became unhinged. This little-known turn of events provides the compelling final third of Pawel’s book. She describes how Chavez, the master spellbinder, himself fell under the spell of a sinister cult leader, Charles Dederich, the founder of Synanon, which began as a tough-love drug-treatment program and became—in Pawel’s gentle locution—“an alternative lifestyle community.” Chavez visited Dederich’s compound in the Sierras (where women routinely had their heads shaved as a sign of obedience) and was impressed. Pawel writes:

Chavez envied Synanon’s efficient operation. The cars all ran, the campus was immaculate, the organization never struggled for money.

He was also taken with a Synanon practice called “The Game,” in which people were put in the center of a small arena and accused of disloyalty and incompetence while a crowd watched their humiliation. Chavez brought the Game back to La Paz and began to use it on his followers, among them some of the UFW’s most dedicated volunteers. In a vast purge, he exiled or fired many of them, leaving wounds that remain tender to this day. He began to hold the actual farmworkers in contempt: “Every time we look at them,” he said during a tape-recorded meeting at La Paz, “they want more money. Like pigs, you know. Here we’re slaving, and we’re starving and the goddamn workers don’t give a shit about anything.”

Chavez seemed to have gone around the bend. He decided to start a new religious order. He flew to Manila during martial law in 1977 and was officially hosted by Ferdinand Marcos, whose regime he praised, to the horror and loud indignation of human-rights advocates around the world.

By the time of Chavez’s death, the powerful tide of union contracts for California farmworkers, which the grape strike had seemed to augur, had slowed to the merest trickle. As a young man, Chavez had set out to secure decent wages and working conditions for California’s migrant workers; anyone taking a car trip through the “Salad Bowl of the World” can see that for the most part, these workers have neither.

For decades, Chavez has been almost an abstraction, a collection of gestures and images (the halting speech, the plaid shirt, the eagerness to perform penance for the smallest transgressions) suggesting more an icon than a human being. Here in California, Chavez has reached civic sainthood. Indeed, you can trace a good many of the giants among the state’s shifting pantheon by looking at the history of one of my former elementary schools. When Berkeley became the first city in the United States to integrate its school system without a court order, my white friends and I were bused to an institution in the heart of the black ghetto called Columbus School. In the fullness of time, its name was changed to Rosa Parks School; the irony of busing white kids to a school named for Rosa Parks never seemed fully unintentional to me. Now this school has a strong YouTube presence for the videos of its Cesar Chavez Day play, an annual event in which bilingual first-graders dressed as Mexican farmworkers carry Sí, Se Puede signs and sing “De Colores.” The implication is that just as Columbus and Parks made their mark on America, so did Chavez make his lasting mark on California.

In fact, no one could be more irrelevant to the California of today, and particularly to its poor, Hispanic immigrant population, than Chavez. He linked improvement of workers’ lives to a limitation on the bottomless labor pool, but today, low-wage, marginalized, and exploited workers from Mexico and Central America number not in the tens of thousands, as in the ’60s, but in the millions. Globalization is the epitome of capitalism, and nowhere is it more alive than in California. When I was a child in the ’60s, professional-class families did not have a variety of Hispanic workers—maids, nannies, gardeners—toiling in and around their households. Most faculty wives in Berkeley had a once-a-week “cleaning lady,” but those women were blacks, not Latinas. A few of the posher families had gardeners, but those men were Japanese, and they were employed for their expertise in cultivating California plants, not for their willingness to “mow, blow, and go.”

Growing up here when I did meant believing your state was the most blessed place in the world. We were certain—both those who lived in the Republican, Beach Boys paradises of Southern California and those who lived in the liberal enclaves of Berkeley and Santa Monica—that our state would always be able to take care of its citizens. The working class would be transformed (by dint of the aerospace industry and the sunny climate) into the most comfortable middle class in the world, with backyard swimming pools and self-starting barbecue grills for everyone. The poor would be taken care of, too, whether that meant boycotting grapes, or opening libraries until every rough neighborhood had books (and Reading Lady volunteers) for everyone.

But all of that is gone now.

The state is broken, bankrupt, mean. The schools are a misery, and the once-famous parks are so crowded on weekends that you might as well not go, unless you arrive at first light to stake your claim. The vision of civic improvement has given way to self-service and consumer indulgence. Where the mighty Berkeley Co-op once stood on Shattuck and Cedar—where I once rattled the can for Chavez, as shoppers (each one a part owner) went in to buy no-frills, honestly purveyed, and often unappealing food—is now a specialty market of the Whole Foods variety, with an endless olive bar and a hundred cheeses.

When I took my boy up the state to visit Cesar’s old haunts, we drove into the Tehachapi Mountains to see the compound at La Paz, now home to the controversial National Farm Workers Service Center, which sits on a war chest of millions of dollars. The place was largely deserted and very spooky. In Delano, the famous Forty Acres, site of the cooperative gas station and of Chavez’s 25-day fast, was bleak and unvisited. We found a crust of old snow on Chavez’s grave in Keene, and a cold wind in Delano. We spent the night in Fresno, and my hopes even for the Blossom Trail were low. But we followed the 99 down to Fowler, tacked east toward Sanger, and then, without warning, there we were.

“Stop the car,” Conor said, and although I am usually loath to walk a farmer’s land without permission, we had to step out into that cloud of pale color. We found ourselves in an Arthur Rackham illustration: the boughs bending over our heads were heavy with white blossoms, the ground was covered in moss that was in places deep green and in others brown, like worn velvet. I kept turning back to make sure the car was still in sight, but then I gave up my last hesitation and we pushed deeper and deeper into the orchard, until all we could see were the trees. At 65 degrees, the air felt chilly enough for a couple of Californians to keep their sweaters on. In harvest season, the temperature will climb to over 100 degrees many days, and the rubbed velvet of the spring will have given way to a choking dust. Almost none of the workers breathing it will have a union contract, few will be here legally, and the deals they strike with growers will hinge on only one factor: how many other desperate people need work. California agriculture has always had a dark side. But—whether you’re eating a ripe piece of fruit in your kitchen or standing in a fairy-tale field of blossoms on a cool spring morning—forgetting about all of that is so blessedly easy. Chavez shunned nothing more fervently than the easy way; and nothing makes me feel further away from the passions and certainty of my youth than my eagerness, now, to take it.
Caitlin Flanagan’s book Girl Land will be published in January 2012.

Voir enfin:

Why the ‘Cesar Chavez’ biopic matters now
Cindy Y. Rodriguez
CNN
March 28, 2014

New York (CNN) — Cesar Chavez is something of a national icon.

His face is on a U.S. postage stamp. Countless statues, murals, libraries, schools, parks and streets are named after him — he even has his own national monument. He was on the cover of Time magazine in 1969. A naval ship was named after him. The man even has his own Google Doodle and Apple ad.

Yet his footprint in American history is widely unknown and that’s exactly the reason why actor-turned-director Diego Luna decided to produce a movie about his life.

« I was really surprised that there wasn’t already a film out about Chavez’s life, so that’s why I spent the past four years making this and hope the country will join me in celebrating his life and work, » Diego Luna said during Tuesday’s screening of « Cesar Chavez: An American Hero » in New York. The movie opens nationwide on Friday.

After seeing farm workers harvesting the country’s food unable to afford feeding their own families — let alone the deplorable working conditions they faced — Chavez decided to act.

He and Dolores Huerta co-founded what’s now known as the United Farm Workers. They became the first to successfully organize farm workers while being completely committed to nonviolence.

Without Chavez, California’s farm workers wouldn’t have fair wages, lunch breaks and access to toilets or clean water in the fields. Not to mention public awareness about the dangers of pesticides to farm workers and helping outlaw the short-handled hoe. Despite widespread knowledge of its dangers, this tool damaged farm workers’ backs.

His civil rights activism has been compared to that of Martin Luther King Jr. and Mahatma Gandhi.

Difficult conditions in America’s fields

But as the film successfully highlights Chavez’s accomplishments, viewers will also be confronted with an uncomfortable truth about who picks their food and under what conditions.

Unfortunately, Chavez’s successes don’t cross state lines.

States such as New York, where farm workers face long hours without any overtime pay or a day of rest, are of concern for human rights activist Kerry Kennedy, president of the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights.

The Kennedys have been supporters of the UFW since Sen. Robert Kennedy broke bread with Chavez during the last day of his fast against violence in 1968.

« New York is 37 years behind California. Farm workers here can be fired if they tried collective bargaining, » Kennedy said after the « Cesar Chavez » screening. « We need a Cesar Chavez. »

California is still the only state where farm workers have the right to organize.

Kennedy is urging the passing of the Farmworkers Fair Labor Practices Act, which would give farm workers the right to one day of rest each week, time-and-a-half pay for work past an eight-hour day, as well as unemployment, workers’ compensation and disability insurance.

It’s not just New York. Farm workers across the country face hardship. In Michigan’s blueberry fields, there’s a great deal of child labor, Rodriguez said.

« Because they’re paid by piece-rate, it puts a lot of stress on all family members to chip in. Plus, families work under one Social Security number because about 80% of the farm worker population is undocumented, » Rodriguez added.

That’s why the UFW and major grower associations worked closely with the Senate’s immigration reform bill to include special provisions that would give farm workers legal status if they continued to work in agriculture.

« Farm workers shouldn’t struggle so much to feed their own families, and we can be part of that change, » Luna said.

A national holiday in honor Chavez?

To help facilitate that change, Luna and the film’s cast — Michael Peña as Chavez, America Ferrera as his wife, Helen, and Rosario Dawson as labor leader Dolores Huerta — have been trekking all over the country promoting the film and a petition to make Chavez’s birthday on March 31 a national holiday.

« We aren’t pushing Cesar Chavez Day just to give people a day off. It’s to give people a ‘day on’ because we have a responsibility to provide service to our communities, » United Farm Workers president Arturo Rodriguez told CNN.

In 2008, President Barack Obama showed his support for the national holiday and even borrowed the United Farm Workers famous chant « Si Se Puede!’ — coined by Dolores Huerta — during his first presidential campaign.

Obama endorsed it again in 2012, when he created a national monument to honor Chavez, but the resolution still has to be passed by Congress to be recognized as a national holiday.

Right now, Cesar Chavez Day is recognized only in California, Texas and Colorado.
Political activist Dolores Huerta Political activist Dolores Huerta

Huerta, 83, is still going strong in her activism and has also helped promote the film. She said she wishes the film could have included more history, but she knows it’s impossible.

« There were so many important lessons in the film. All the sacrifices Cesar and his wife, Helen, had to make and the obstacles we had to face against the police and judges. We even had people that were killed in the movement but we were still able to organize, » Huerta said.

Actor Tony Plana, who attending the New York screening, knew the late Chavez and credited him with the launch of his acting career. Plana, known for his role as the father on ABC’s « Ugly Betty » TV series, said his first acting gig was in the UFW’s theatrical troupe educating and helping raising farm workers’ awareness about their work conditions.

« I’ve waited more than 35 years for this film to be made, and I can’t tell you how honored I am to finally see it happen, » Plana told CNN.

It’s not that there wasn’t interest in making the biopic before: Hollywood studios and directors have approached the Chavez family in the past, but the family kept turning them down, mainly for two reasons.

« Well, first Cesar didn’t want to spend the time making the film because there was so much work to do, and he was hesitant on being singled out because there were so many others that contributed to the UFW’s success, » said Rodriguez.

It wasn’t until Luna came around and asked the Chavez family how they felt the movie should be made that the green light was given. But when it came time to getting the funding to produce the film, Hollywood was not willing.

« Hopefully this film will send a message to Hollywood that our [Latino] stories need to be portrayed in cinema, » Luna added.

« Latinos go to the movies more than anyone else, but we’re the least represented on screen. It doesn’t make any sense, » Dawson told CNN.

In 2012, Hispanics represented 18% of the movie-going population but accounted for 25% of all movies seen, according to Nielsen National Research Group.

« I hope young people use the power of social media to help spread the word about social change, » Dawson said.

« There is power in being a consumer and boycotting. If we want more as a community, we need to speak up. »


Contes de fées: Cachez cette violence que je ne saurai voir (Looking back at the disturbing origins of fairy tales)

30 mars, 2014
8th plague (locusts)"Jews caused the disease by poisoning the wells"
Cupid and Psyche (Giuseppe Maria Crespi)
Titania with donkey-faced Bottom (Midsummer's night dream, Johann Heinrich Füssli)
Pig King (Crane)
Pig King (Anne Anderson)

Beauty and the Beast

Petrus Gonsalvus, by anonymoushttps://i2.wp.com/www.jcbourdais.net/journal/images_journal/fontana/anton1.jpg
Qu’est-ce qui est plus nuisible qu’aucun vice ? La compassion active pour tous les ratés et les faibles — le christianisme… Nietzsche
Le christianisme entend venir à bout des fauves : sa méthode consiste à les rendre malades — l’affaiblissement est la recette chrétienne de l’ apprivoisement, de la « civilisation ». Nietzsche
Le christianisme, c’est le mensonge dangereux d’un univers sans victime. Nietzsche
Les contes ont été relégués à la chambre d’enfants comme on relègue à la salle de jeux les meubles médiocres ou démodés, principalement du fait que les adultes n’en veulent pas et qu’il leur est égal qu’ils soient maltraités. JRR Tolkien
Peut-on imaginer personnage littéraire plus désagréable que le Dieu de l’Ancien Testament? Jaloux et en étant fier; obsédé de l’autorité, mesquin, injuste et impitoyable; vengeur et sanguinaire tenant de l’épuration ethnique; tyrannique, misogyne, homophobe, raciste, infanticide, génocidaire, fillicide, pestilentiel, mégalomane, sadomasochiste et capricieusement diabolique. Richard Dawkins
Dans certains des Psaumes l’esprit de haine nous frappe au visage comme la chaleur d’une fournaise. Dans d’autres cas, le même esprit cesse d’être effrayant mais c’est pour devenir (aux yeux de l’homme moderne) presque comique par sa naïveté. (…) Si nous excusons les poètes des Psaumes sous prétexte qu’ils n’étaient pas chrétiens, nous devrions pouvoir montrer que les auteurs païens expriment le même genre de choses et pire encore (….) Je peux trouver en eux de la lascivité, une bonne dose d’insensibilité brutale, une froide cruauté qui va de soi pour eux, mais certainement pas cette fureur ou cette profusion de haine…. La première impression que l’on en retire est que les Juifs étaient bien plus vindicatifs et acerbes que les païens. CS Lewis 
Il y a une quantité incroyable de violence dans des pièces telles que Médée ou les Bacchantes, dans la tradition dionysiaque dans son ensemble qui est centrée sur le lynchage. L’Iliade n’est rien d’autre qu’une chaîne d’actes de vengeance ; mais ce que C. S. Lewis et Nietzsche disent sur cette question est sans doute vrai si le problème est défini de la façon qu’ils le définissent il, à savoir en termes non pas de pure quantité de violence exposée mais de l’intensité de la rancoeur ou du ressentiment. (…) Même si les Bacchantes d’Euripide ne sont pas loin de prendre la défense de la victime, en fin de compte elles ne le font pas. Le lynchage du roi Penthée de la propre main de sa mère et de ses sœurs est horrible certes, mais pas mauvais; il est justifié. Le  roi Penthée est coupable de s’immiscer dans les rituels religieux des Bacchantes, coupable de s’opposer au dieu Dionysos lui-même. René Girard
On dit que les Psaumes de la Bible sont violents, mais qui s’exprime dans les psaumes, sinon les victimes des violences des mythes : “Les taureaux de Balaam m’encerclent et vont me lyncher”? Les Psaumes sont comme une fourrure magnifique de l’extérieur, mais qui, une fois retournée, laisse découvrir une peau sanglante. Ils sont typiques de la violence qui pèse sur l’homme et du recours que celui-ci trouve dans son Dieu. René Girard
De nombreux commentateurs veulent aujourd’hui montrer que, loin d’être non violente, la Bible est vraiment pleine de violence. En un sens, ils ont raison. La représentation de la violence dans la Bible est énorme et plus vive, plus évocatrice, que dans la mythologie même grecque. (…) Il est une chose que j’apprécie dans le refus contemporain de cautionner la violence biblique, quelque chose de rafraîchissant et de stimulant, une capacité d’indignation qui, à quelques exceptions près, manque dans la recherche et l’exégèse religieuse classiques. (…) Une fois que nous nous rendons compte que nous avons à faire au même phénomène social dans la Bible que la mythologie, à savoir la foule hystérique qui ne se calmera pas tant qu’elle n’aura pas lynché une victime, nous ne pouvons manquer de prendre conscience du fait de la grande singularité biblique, même de son caractère unique. (…) Dans la mythologie, la violence collective est toujours représentée à partir du point de vue de l’agresseur et donc on n’entend jamais les victimes elles-mêmes. On ne les entend jamais se lamenter sur leur triste sort et maudire leurs persécuteurs comme ils le font dans les Psaumes. Tout est raconté du point de vue des bourreaux. (…) Pas étonnant que les mythes grecs, les épopées grecques et les tragédies grecques sont toutes sereines, harmonieuses et non perturbées. (…) Pour moi, les Psaumes racontent la même histoire de base que les mythes mais retournée, pour ainsi dire. (…) Les Psaumes d’exécration ou de malédiction sont les premiers textes dans l’histoire qui permettent aux victimes, à jamais réduites au silence dans la mythologie, d’avoir une voix qui leur soit propre. (…) Ces victimes ressentent exactement la même chose que Job. Il faut décrire le livre de Job, je crois, comme un psaume considérablement élargi de malédiction. Si Job était un mythe, nous aurions seulement le point de vue des amis. (…) La critique actuelle de la violence dans la Bible ne soupçonne pas que la violence représentée dans la Bible peut être aussi dans les évènements derrière la mythologie, bien qu’invisible parce qu’elle est non représentée. La Bible est le premier texte à représenter la victimisation du point de vue de la victime, et c’est cette représentation qui est responsable, en fin de compte, de notre propre sensibilité supérieure à la violence. Ce n’est pas le fait de notre intelligence supérieure ou de notre sensibilité. Le fait qu’aujourd’hui nous pouvons passer jugement sur ces textes pour leur violence est un mystère. Personne d’autre n’a jamais fait cela dans le passé. C’est pour des raisons bibliques, paradoxalement, que nous critiquons la Bible. (…) Alors que dans le mythe, nous apprenons le lynchage de la bouche des persécuteurs qui soutiennent qu’ils ont bien fait de lyncher leurs victimes, dans la Bible nous entendons la voix des victimes elles-mêmes qui ne voient nullement le lynchage comme une chose agréable et nous disent en des mots extrêmement violents, des mots qui reflètent une réalité violente qui est aussi à l’origine de la mythologie, mais qui restant invisible, déforme notre compréhension générale de la littérature païenne et de la mythologie. René Girard
Ceux qui considèrent l’hébraïsme et le christianisme comme des religions du bouc émissaire parce qu’elles le rendent visible font comme s’ils punissaient l’ambassadeur en raison du message qu’il apporte. René Girard
Aujourd’hui on repère les boucs émissaires dans l’Angleterre victorienne et on ne les repère plus dans les sociétés archaïques. C’est défendu. René Girard
Au XIXe siècle, les spécialistes de religion comparée insistaient beaucoup sur les similitudes spectaculaires entre la Bible et les mythes du monde entier. Et ils conclurent trop vite que la Bible était un recueil de mythes identiques à tous les autres. Etant des « positivistes » et percevant un peu partout une plus ou moins grande ressemblance entre les données qu’ils étudiaient, ils ne notèrent aucune différence réelle entre la Bible et le reste. Un seul penseur a perçu cette différence cruciale : il s’agit de Friedrich Nietzsche. Dans la pensée de Nietzsche, du moins dans sa phase tardive, la dichotomie entre maîtres et esclaves doit d’abord se comprendre comme une opposition entre, d’un côté, les religions mythiques, qui expriment le point de vue des persécuteurs et considèrent toutes les victimes comme sacrifiables, et d’autre part la Bible et surtout les Evangiles, qui « calomnient » et sapent à la base les religions du premier groupe – et, en réalité, toutes les autres religions, car les Evangiles dénoncent l’injustice qu’il y a, dans tous les cas de figure, à sacrifier une victime innocente. (…) Il convient de voir dans les Ecritures judéo-chrétiennes la première révélation complète du pouvoir structurant de la victimisation dans les religions païennes ; quant au problème de la valeur anthropologique de ces Ecritures, il peut et doit être étudié comme un problème purement scientifique, la question étant de savoir si, oui ou non, les mythes deviennent intelligibles, comme je le crois, dès lors qu’on les interprète comme les traces plus ou moins lointaines d’épisodes de persécution mal compris. (…) Et pourtant, y a-t-il quelque chose qui soit plus naturel aux chercheurs que de traiter des textes similaires de façon similaire, ne serait-ce que pour voir ce que cela donne ? Un tabou inaperçu pèse sur ce type d’étude comparative. Les tabous les plus forts sont toujours invisibles. Comme tous les tabous puissants, celui-ci est antireligieux, c’est-à-dire, au fond, de nature religieuse. A partir de la Renaissance, les intellectuels modernes ont remplacé les Ecritures judéo-chrétiennes par les cultures anciennes. Puis, l’humanisme de Rousseau et de ses successeurs a glorifié à l’excès les cultures primitives et s’est également détourné de la Bible. Si la lecture que je propose est acceptée, notre vieux système de valeurs universitaires, fondé sur l’élévation des cultures non bibliques aux dépens de la Bible, va devenir indéfendable. Il deviendra clair que le véritable travail de démythification marche avec la mythologie, mais pas avec la Bible, car la Bible elle-même fait déjà ce travail. La Bible en est même l’inventeur : elle a été la première à remplacer la structure victimaire de la mythologie par un thème de victimisation qui révèle le mensonge de la mythologie. René Girard
Biblical reenactments are theatrical and very violent. Parents need to know that The Bible contains lots of violent and bloody scenes, including beatings, drownings, and the murdering of infants and adults. It also features a very lengthy and graphic reenactment of a crucifixion. Adultery is discussed; and men are often shown shirtless and in loin cloths and occasionally women are shown undressed (but no real nudity). Wine is sometimes consumed during religious ceremonies and over meals. All of this is offered in context, but it may be too intense for younger and/or sensitive viewers. Common sense media
From the Egyptian standpoint the departure of the Hebrews from Egypt was actually a justifiable expulsion. The main sources are the writings of Manetho and Apion, which are summarized and refuted in Josephus’s work Against Apion . . . Manetho was an Egyptian priest in Heliopolis. Apion was an Egyptian who wrote in Greek and played a prominent role in Egyptian cultural and political life. His account of the Exodus was used in an attack on the claims and rights of Alexandrian Jews . . . [T]he Hellenistic-Egyptian version of the Exodus may be summarized as follows: The Egyptians faced a major crisis precipitated by a group of people suffering from various diseases. For fear the disease would spread or something worse would happen, this motley lot was assembled and expelled from the country. Under the leadership of a certain Moses, these people were dispatched; they constituted themselves then as a religious and national unity. They finally settled in Jerusalem and became the ancestors of the Jews. James G. Williams
René Girard has changed the way that I interpret violence in the Bible, and, indirectly, in movies. Girard calls the Bible a “text in travail.” In other words, the Bible is a text that struggles with its own violence. Part of that struggle is its mere reflection of human violence, but where the Bible is unique in human history is that it challenges its own violence. While many stories in the Bible merely reflect human violence, other stories in the Bible reveal that violence will only lead to our own destruction and that God never demands violence. Girard writes that the Bible’s travail against its own violence and against a violent view of God “is not a chronologically progressive process, but a struggle that advances and retreats. I see the Gospels as the climactic achievement of that trend”. Girard claims that the Sermon on the Mount is one of those major advancements in the Bible, because in it Jesus “shows us a God who is alien to all violence and who wishes in consequence to see humanity abandon violence”, but Girard also points to the Joseph story as another major advancement. Indeed, you only need to finish reading the first book of the Bible for evidence that the Bible is a “text in travail.” Yes, in Genesis you will find all the violence mentioned above, but if you read to the end, you will discover the Joseph story – a story that provides the only true answer to the problem of violence. It’s a familiar story, so I won’t go into much detail. Joseph’s father loves him more than his 11 brothers, which makes his brothers jealous. Filled with jealousy, Joseph’s 11 brothers violently unite against him. As they leave him for dead in a pit, one brother suggests that they spare Joseph’s life and sell him as a slave. Joseph, now a slave, arrives in Egypt where he thrives and becomes Pharaoh’s right-hand man. Years later there is a famine and his brothers come to Egypt looking for help. They meet Joseph, who recognizes his brothers, but his brothers don’t recognize him. At this point in the story, Joseph held all the power. He could have responded to his brothers’ request by continuing the cycle of violence. It would be a mere reflection of human violence if Joseph said, “Remember when you planned to kill me, but then sold me as a slave? Well, I spent years in jail, and now you will too!” But that’s not how Joseph responds. Rather, Joseph reveals the only way out of violence by responding to his brothers with compassion and forgiveness. Many Christians have seen Joseph as a Christ-like figure. Indeed, Jesus responded to violence in the same way Joseph did. While hanging on the cross, Jesus prayed for his persecutors to be forgiven, “Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do.” Then, in the resurrection, Jesus only offered words of peace to those who betrayed him. Why is there so much violence in the Bible? Because human history shows that we have a tendency to be violent. Yet violence is not inevitable. As the Bible struggles with its own violence, it also reveals that forgiveness is the only solution to cycles of revenge. So, when it comes to storytelling, whether in the Bible or in movies, our concern shouldn’t be whether or not there is violence. Our concern should be whether these stories merely reflect human violence, or whether these stories are in travail against human violence. Good stories are like the Joseph and Jesus stories. They transform our identity away from violence and into an identity of forgiveness. That, I would offer, is the litmus test for any good story. Adam Ericksen
La Dysneyfication (sic) des contes depuis soixante-dix ans a insidieusement installé dans notre esprit l’image d’un monde simple où des gens beaux combattent des méchants plutôt laids et doivent faire face à des obstacles apparemment insurmontables dans leur quête d’une vie heureuse, aidés qu’ils sont par M. ou Mme (ou plus vraisemblablement SAS) Juste ; un monde où le bien triomphe toujours et où il n’est pas de meilleur mariage que ceux construits sur la grandeur d’un royaume.  David Barnett 

Cachez cette violence que je ne saurai voir  !

Expulsion de tout un peuple suite à des calamités naturelles ou imaginaires attribuées à un Dieu libérateur, sacrifice de jeunes filles vouées à la dévoration d’un monstre d’abord divinisé puis humanisé par l’amour …

A l’heure où un chroniqueur égyptien réclame des dommages et intérêts pour les plaies

Et où la chaine franco-allemande Arte revient sur l’histoire d’un homme atteint du syndrome rarissime de l’hypertrichose ayant pu inspirer le célèbre conte de mesdames de Villeneuve et de Beaumont (La Belle et la bête), aboutissement d’une longue liste de reprises historiques (d’Apulée et d’Ovide à Shakespeare, Satarapola et Grimm) …

Pendant qu’aux Etats-Unis, une mini-série sur la Bible se voit déconseillée aux enfants de moins de 14 ans

Comment ne pas s’étonner, avec René Girard, de cet étrange refus de nos historiens de voir dans les mythes les traces de persécution et de violences notamment anti-juives qu’ils repèrent si aisément dans les textes de notre propre Moyen-Age en quête de boucs émissaires face aux dévastations de la Peste noire ?

Mais comment aussi s’expliquer, au-delà  des habituelles édulcorations de nos psychanalystes et des scénaristes des studios Disney, ce non moins étrange aveuglement de nos folkloristes devant des contes de fées qui ne sont manifestement autres eux aussi que « les traces plus ou moins lointaines d’épisodes de persécution mal compris » ?

Faut-il interdire les Contes de Grimm aux enfants?
Bibliobs

21-10-2009

Les Anglais aiment les fées, les monstres et les légendes. Ils aiment aussi beaucoup en parler. La semaine dernière, après leur avoir demandé si une traduction peut améliorer un livre, le «Guardian» a même proposé le thème des contes de fées aux blogueurs de la section Books.

Chez BibliObs, on s’est beaucoup amusé à lire la prose de David Barnett, qui s’est attelé à creuser la difficile question de la violence dans les contes pour enfants. D’après lui,en effet :

« La Dysneyfication (sic) des contes depuis soixante-dix ans a insidieusement installé dans notre esprit l’image d’un monde simple où des gens beaux combattent des méchants plutôt laids et doivent faire face à des obstacles apparemment insurmontables dans leur quête d’une vie heureuse, aidés qu’ils sont par M. ou Mme (ou plus vraisemblablement SAS) Juste ; un monde où le bien triomphe toujours et où il n’est pas de meilleur mariage que ceux construits sur la grandeur d’un royaume ». (Qui a dit que l’écriture anglaise n’était pas grandiloquente?)

Pour Barnett, le monde de l’Oncle Walt est dessiné pour les enfants, alors que les Contes des Frères Grimm (1) dépeignent un monde sombre fait de forêts effrayantes où des méfaits encore plus sombres seraient commis, et sans être jamais punis…

Pour mieux s’en expliquer, ce jeune auteur du nord-est de la Grande-Bretagne cite un passage particulièrement sanglant extrait du « Fiancé voleur » :

« La bande arrive à la maison avec une jeune fille qu’ils ont enlevée. Complètement ivres, ils n’entendent pas ses cris et ses plaintes. Ils lui donnent du vin à boire, trois pleins verres. Un de blanc, un de rouge et un de jaune pour lui crever le cœur. Et là, ils lui ôtent sa fine robe, l’allongent sur la table et découpent son joli corps en petits morceaux puis versent du sel dessus. »

Les Frères Grimm, qui ont recueilli les contes de la bouche de plusieurs informateurs, en fait surtout des informatrices – Dorothea Viehmann, qui a fourni à elle seule plus de trente textes du recueil, et les filles des familles Hassenpflug, Wild et Haxthausen – s’étaient d’ailleurs opposés au titre que leur éditeur proposait, « Contes pour les enfants et la maison », comme le rappelle Heinz Rölleke, le grand spécialiste allemand des contes de Grimm dans une interview accordée à nos confrères d’Arte il y a quelques années :

« Jacob Grimm était convaincu qu’on ne pouvait « servir deux maîtres à la fois », qu’il n’était donc pas possible de rendre et commenter les textes correctement tout en les édulcorant pour en faire un livre pour enfants. Mais il finit par accepter, à contrecœur. Le grand écart est parfaitement réussi : au fil des éditions, Wilhelm Grimm, le frère cadet, a adapté les textes au goût des enfants, sans leur ôter de leur substance. C’était le seul moyen de faire de ce livre un succès mondial. »

David Barnett ne dit pas autre chose : pour lui, les contes sont d’abord « des histoires pour les adultes ». Mais il préfère citer J.R.R. Tolkien et son essai de 1938, « Du conte de fées », où l’auteur préféré des geeks de tous horizons nous signale que l’association entre les contes de fées et les enfants est un « un accident de notre histoire domestique » qui a fait que les contes ont été « relégués à la chambre d’enfants comme on relègue à la salle de jeux les meubles médiocres ou démodés, principalement du fait que les adultes n’en veulent pas et qu’il leur est égal qu’ils soient maltraités ».

(On en saura plus sur cet essai, en se rendant à cette adresse, grâce au travail de Laurent Femenias, directeur d’école en Côte-d’Or et fan d’Iron Maiden…)

Les livres pour enfants ne sont pas du tout faits pour les enfants. Mais pour Barnett, ce n’est pas un problème. Car, nous dit-il dans sa langue un rien emphatique, « ils aident à donner aux enfants le sens de la fantaisie qui est vital pour naviguer dans la forêt souvent sombre et dense de la vie adulte ».

Fantaisie dont Tolkien parlait aussi dans son essai, en disant que contrairement aux idées reçues elle « est fondée sur la dure reconnaissance du fait que les choses sont telles dans le monde qu’elles paraissent sous le soleil ; une reconnaissance du fait, mais non un esclavage à son égard ». Bien dit.

Une citation encore, de G.K. Chesterton (dont la page Wikipedia est passionnante), qu’un lecteur anglais de Barnett partage généreusement dans les commentaires de l’article :

« Les contes de fées ne disent pas aux enfants que les dragons existent. Les enfants savent déjà que les dragons existent. Les contes de fées disent aux enfants qu’on peut tuer les dragons. »

Et on sait qu’en la matière, les Anglais sont à l’avant-garde : leur saint patron est même le tueur de dragons le plus célèbre au monde.

Voir également:

Il était une fois
La véritable histoire des contes de fées
Lisa Melia
l’Express
21/03/2011

La Journée mondiale des contes qui a lieu ce dimanche est une occasion de célébrer un genre littéraire universel.

« Il était une fois… » les contes. Récits merveilleux qui divertissent chaque génération d’enfants, les contes d’aujourd’hui n’ont pourtant rien à voir avec leurs ancêtres moyenâgeux. « Les premières traces de contes datent du 12e siècle environ, explique Catherine Velay-Vallantin, maître de conférence à l’EHESS et auteur d’une Histoire des contes. Les prédicateurs franciscains et dominicains les utilisaient notamment pour illustrer leurs prêches. » Mais ce sont surtout les conteurs qui font vivre la tradition. Ils vont de foyer en foyer pour raconter des histoires et rassembler près du feu les parents et les enfants, divertissant les premiers et effrayant les seconds. Dès cette époque, trois exigences caractérisent le conte, qui demeure une tradition orale: concision narrative, inventivité esthétique, et logique. Il faudra attendre Charles Perrault au XVIIe siècle pour voir l’émergence d’un genre littéraire spécifique.

La vie est cruelle

Les versions originales sont bien plus violentes que leurs transpositions actuelles. « Le soleil, la lune et Thalie, le récit à l’origine de la Belle au bois dormant, remonte au 14e siècle, raconte Catherine Velay-Vallantin. Pour résumer, c’est l’histoire d’un viol. Le prince est déjà marié et viole la princesse dans son sommeil. Elle donne naissance à des jumeaux qui, cherchant son sein, suce son doigt et retire l’écharde qui la maintenait endormie. Elle se réveille alors et constate l’ampleur du désastre. » Les contes, à l’époque, se finissent souvent mal et sont empreints de violence, en écho à l’existence difficile des paysans. Ils confirment que la vie est cruelle. « Il existe quand même des contes pour enfants », tempère la chercheuse. Le conteur s’adapte à son public et ne choisit pas toujours la version la plus tragique. Les contes de « randonnées » ont un but didactique : apprendre à compter aux enfants. « Ils enseignent la logique », résume Catherine Velay-Vallantin.

Un premier adoucissement des histoires se produit avec Charles Perrault, au public bourgeois, qui commence à s’inquiéter des répercussions sur les enfants. Exclu de la Petite Académie par Colbert, Perrault connaît de sérieuses difficultés financières. Il écrit pour revenir à Versailles et choisit délibérément les versions les plus édulcorées pour répondre aux exigences morales de l’Eglise. « Charles Perrault est considéré aujourd’hui comme un bon père de famille, s’amuse Catherine Velay-Vallantin, alors que c’était un carriériste, et certainement pas un pédagogue. » En leur temps, les ouvrages de Perrault et ceux des frères Grimm ont rencontré un succès phénoménal. Presque autant lu que la Bible, ils ont été traduits et diffusés dans toute l’Europe.

Le monde de la recherche s’est penché sur leur richesse et continue à le faire. Du psychanalyste Bruno Bettelheim au sociologue Jack Zypes, en passant par les revues d’universitaires telles que La Grande Oreille. On peut être chercheur et avoir su garder son âme d’enfant.

Voir encore:

The Dark Side of the Grimm Fairy Tales
Jesse Greenspan
History
September 17, 2013

Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm’s collection of folktales contains some of the best-known children’s characters in literary history, from Snow White and Rapunzel to Cinderella and Little Red Riding Hood. Yet the brothers originally filled their book, which became known as “Grimm’s Fairy Tales,” with gruesome scenes that wouldn’t be out of place in an R-rated movie. The Grimms never even set out to entertain kids. The first edition of “Grimm’s Fairy Tales” was scholarly in tone, with many footnotes and no illustrations. Only later, as children became their main audience, did they take out some of the more adult content. Their stories were then further sanitized as they were adapted by Walt Disney and others. As the 150th anniversary of Jacob’s death approaches—he passed away on September 20, 1863, about four years after Wilhelm—check out some of the surprisingly dark themes that appear in the Grimms’ work.

1. Premarital sex
In the original version of “Rapunzel,” published in 1812, a prince impregnates the title character after the two spend many days together living in “joy and pleasure.” “Hans Dumm,” meanwhile, is about a man who impregnates a princess simply by wishing it, and in “The Frog King” a princess spends the night with her suitor once he turns into a handsome bachelor. The Grimms stripped the sex scenes from later versions of “Rapunzel” and “The Frog King” and eliminated “Hans Dumm” entirely.
But hidden sexual innuendos in “Grimm’s Fairy Tales” remained, according to psychoanalysts, including Sigmund Freud and Erich Fromm, who examined the book in the 20th century.

2. Graphic violence
Although the brothers Grimm toned down the sex in later editions of their work, they actually ramped up the violence. A particularly horrific incident occurs in “The Robber Bridegroom,” when some bandits drag a maiden into their underground hideout, force her to drink wine until her heart bursts, rip off her clothes and then hack her body into pieces. Other tales have similarly gory episodes. In “Cinderella” the evil stepsisters cut off their toes and heels trying to make the slipper fit and later have their eyes pecked out by doves; in “The Six Swans” an evil mother-in-law is burned at the stake; in “The Goose Maid” a false bride is stripped naked, thrown into a barrel filled with nails and dragged through the streets; and in “Snow White” the wicked queen dies after being forced to dance in red-hot iron shoes. Even the love stories contain violence. The princess in “The Frog King” turns her amphibian companion into a human not by kissing it, but instead by hurling it against a wall in frustration.

3. Child abuse
Even more shockingly, much of the violence in “Grimm’s Fairy Tales” is directed at children. Snow White is just 7 years old when the huntsman takes her into the forest with orders to bring back her liver and lungs. In “The Juniper Tree” a woman decapitates her stepson as he bends down to get an apple. She then chops up his body, cooks him in a stew and serves it to her husband, who enjoys the meal so much he asks for seconds. Snow White eventually wins the day, as does the boy in “The Juniper Tree,” who is brought back to life. But not every child in the Grimms’ book is so lucky. The title character in “Frau Trude” turns a disobedient girl into a block of wood and tosses her into a fire. And in “The Stubborn Child” a youngster dies after God lets him become sick.

4. Anti-Semitism
The Grimms gathered over 200 tales for their collection, three of which contained Jewish characters. In “The Jew in the Brambles” the protagonist happily torments a Jew by forcing him to dance in a thicket of thorns. He also insults the Jew, calling him a “dirty dog,” among other things. Later on, a judge doubts that a Jew would ever voluntarily give away money. The Jew in the story turns out to be a thief and is hanged. In “The Good Bargain” a Jewish man is likewise portrayed as a penny-pinching swindler. During the Third Reich, the Nazis adopted the Grimms’ tales for propaganda purposes. They claimed, for instance, that Little Red Riding Hood symbolized the German people suffering at the hands of the Jewish wolf, and that Cinderella’s Aryan purity distinguished her from her mongrel stepsisters.

5. Incest
In “All-Kinds-of-Fur” a king promises his dying wife that he will only remarry if his new bride is as beautiful as her. Unfortunately, no such woman exists in the whole world except his daughter, who ends up escaping his clutches by fleeing into the wilderness. While interviewing sources, the Grimms likewise heard versions of a different story–“The Girl Without Hands”–with an incestuous father. Nonetheless, in all editions of their book they recast this father as the devil.

6. Wicked mothers
Evil stepparents are a dime a dozen in fairy tales, but the Grimms originally included some evil biological mothers as well. In the 1812 version of “Hansel and Gretel,” a wife persuades her husband to abandon their children in the woods because they don’t have enough food to feed them. Snow White also has an evil mother, who at first wishes for and then become infuriated by her daughter’s beauty. The Grimms turned both of these characters into stepmothers in subsequent editions, and mothers have essentially remained off the hook ever since in the retelling of these stories.

Voir aussi:

Un chroniqueur égyptien : L’Egypte doit intenter un procès à Israël pour les dix plaies ; à la Turquie pour l’occupation ottomane ; à la France pour l’invasion napoléonienne et à la Grande-Bretagne pour le colonialisme
Memri No. 5686
Mars 20, 2014

Dans un article paru le 11 mars 2014 dans le quotidien égyptien Al-Yawm Al-Sabi, le chroniqueur égyptien Ahmad Al-Gamal, qui écrit également pour Al-Ahram et Al-Masri Al-Yawm, estime qu’il faudrait intenter un procès à Israël, la Turquie, la Grande-Bretagne et la France pour les dommages que tous ces pays ont causés à l’Egypte depuis les temps bibliques jusqu’au 20ème siècle. Selon lui, Israël devrait être poursuivi pour les dommages causés par les dix plaies d’Egypte (décrites dans la Bible) et pour les matériaux précieux utilisés par les Israélites pour construire le Saint Tabernacle dans le désert ; la Turquie devrait rendre des comptes pour avoir envahi l’Egypte à l’époque ottomane, recruté des artisans égyptiens à la construction de projets à Istanbul, avoir volé des antiquités, des manuscrits et des livres, et avoir comploté avec les sionistes contre l’Egypte dans les années 1950 et 1960. Quant à la France, elle doit payer des indemnités pour l’invasion de Napoléon à la fin du 18ème siècle et la campagne de Suez en 1956 ; et enfin, la Grande-Bretagne doit payer pour 72 ans d’occupation, au cours desquels l’Egypte a subi vols et usurpation.

Voir par ailleurs:

The Bible and Movies and Violence – Oh My!
Adam Ericksen
God’s Politics Blog
06-26-2013

This Thursday I’ll be interviewing Gareth Higgins on the Raven Foundation’s Voices of Peace radio show. Gareth is the founder of the very popular Wild Goose Festival. If you attend this summer, you will meet Raven friend James Alison, who will talk about his latest project, Jesus the Forgiving Victim: Listening to the Unheard Voice. Gareth is also a film critic and analyzes films from a Christian point of view on his website God Is Not Elsewhere. He wrote a book called How Movies Helped Save My Soul and, with Jett Loe, he is the co-host of Film Talk, an award-winning Internet radio show of cinema reviews and interviews. Since we are in the heat of the summer movie season, I’ll be talking with Gareth about both the Wild Goose Festival and his passion for religion and films.

Before talking with Gareth, I’d like to ask this: Do movies and the Bible have anything in common? Fill in the blank with either the word “Bible” or “movies” and you will be asking a familiar question:

Why is there so much violence in the _____?

Whenever I hear someone lament that kids these days need to read their Bibles, I tell them that the Bible should be rated R for violence, nudity, rape, drug deals, and even genocide – and that’s just in the first book! Of course, as a youth pastor, I’ve found that the best way to get kids interested in the Bible is to tell them that if someone made it into a movie, it would be rated R.

The Bible and movies tell stories. Gareth points out the importance of stories in his article “It’s the Movies’ Fault/It’s not the Movies’ Fault” in which he brilliantly states that, “we could benefit from recognizing that the relationship between storytelling and the formation of human identity is crucial.” Indeed, the stories we tell are crucial to the formation of human identity, but the Bible and movies tell stories that are permeated with violence. So, the question becomes, how do we make sense of those violent stories in terms of human identity?

René Girard has changed the way that I interpret violence in the Bible, and, indirectly, in movies. Girard calls the Bible a “text in travail.” In other words, the Bible is a text that struggles with its own violence. Part of that struggle is its mere reflection of human violence, but where the Bible is unique in human history is that it challenges its own violence. While many stories in the Bible merely reflect human violence, other stories in the Bible reveal that violence will only lead to our own destruction and that God never demands violence. Girard writes that the Bible’s travail against its own violence and against a violent view of God “is not a chronologically progressive process, but a struggle that advances and retreats. I see the Gospels as the climactic achievement of that trend” (Violent Origins, 141).

Girard claims that the Sermon on the Mount is one of those major advancements in the Bible, because in it Jesus “shows us a God who is alien to all violence and who wishes in consequence to see humanity abandon violence” (Things Hidden Since the Foundation of the World, 183), but Girard also points to the Joseph story as another major advancement. Indeed, you only need to finish reading the first book of the Bible for evidence that the Bible is a “text in travail.” Yes, in Genesis you will find all the violence mentioned above, but if you read to the end, you will discover the Joseph story – a story that provides the only true answer to the problem of violence.

It’s a familiar story, so I won’t go into much detail. Joseph’s father loves him more than his 11 brothers, which makes his brothers jealous. Filled with jealousy, Joseph’s 11 brothers violently unite against him. As they leave him for dead in a pit, one brother suggests that they spare Joseph’s life and sell him as a slave. Joseph, now a slave, arrives in Egypt where he thrives and becomes Pharaoh’s right-hand man. Years later there is a famine and his brothers come to Egypt looking for help. They meet Joseph, who recognizes his brothers, but his brothers don’t recognize him. At this point in the story, Joseph held all the power. He could have responded to his brothers’ request by continuing the cycle of violence. It would be a mere reflection of human violence if Joseph said, “Remember when you planned to kill me, but then sold me as a slave? Well, I spent years in jail, and now you will too!” But that’s not how Joseph responds. Rather, Joseph reveals the only way out of violence by responding to his brothers with compassion and forgiveness.

Many Christians have seen Joseph as a Christ-like figure. Indeed, Jesus responded to violence in the same way Joseph did. While hanging on the cross, Jesus prayed for his persecutors to be forgiven, “Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do.” Then, in the resurrection, Jesus only offered words of peace to those who betrayed him.

Why is there so much violence in the Bible? Because human history shows that we have a tendency to be violent. Yet violence is not inevitable. As the Bible struggles with its own violence, it also reveals that forgiveness is the only solution to cycles of revenge.

So, when it comes to storytelling, whether in the Bible or in movies, our concern shouldn’t be whether or not there is violence. Our concern should be whether these stories merely reflect human violence, or whether these stories are in travail against human violence. Good stories are like the Joseph and Jesus stories. They transform our identity away from violence and into an identity of forgiveness. That, I would offer, is the litmus test for any good story.

Adam Ericksen blogs at the Raven Foundation, where he uses mimetic theory to provide social commentary on religion, politics, and pop culture. Follow Adam on Twitter @adamericksen.

Egyptian Columnist: Egypt Should Sue Israel For The Ten Plagues, Turkey For The Ottoman Occupation, France For The Napoleonic Invasion, And Britain For Colonialism
Memri
Special Dispatch No. 5686
March 20, 2014

In a March 11, 2014 article in the Egyptian daily Al-Yawm Al-Sabi’, Egyptian columnist Ahmad Al-Gamal, who also writes for Al-Ahram and Al-Masri Al-Yawm, advocated suing Israel, Turkey, Britain, and France for damages they caused Egypt from biblical times until the 20th century. Israel, he said, should be sued for the damage caused by the Ten Plagues and for the precious materials used by the Israelites to build the Holy Tabernacle in the desert, and Turkey should pay damages for invading Egypt in the Ottoman period, for drafting Egyptian artisans to build projects in Istanbul, for stealing antiquities, manuscripts, and books, and for plotting with the Zionists against Egypt during the 1950s and 1960s. As for France, it must pay compensation for Napoleon’s invasion at the close of the 18th century and for the 1956 Suez Campaign, and Britain must pay for 72 years of occupation, during which Egypt was subjected to theft and robbery.

The following are excerpts from the article:[1]

Sue Israel For The Egyptian Gold And Silver The Israelites Took

« I tirelessly reiterate my demand to utilize all measures of the law and of customary law, and all ethical principles, to receive compensation for what the Israelis, Turks, French and English took from us. And if you ask me whether the Turks can be placed in the same category as [the Israelis, French and English], I will reply: Yes, absolutely. Erdogan, and his party, stream and orientation, are just as dangerous to Egypt and Arabism as the Zionists and imperialists. Had the [Turks] been in our place, and had we done to them what they did to us, they wouldn’t have left us alone for a moment without demanding their right many times over.

« We want compensation for the [Ten] Plagues that were inflicted upon [us] as a result of the curses that the Jews’ ancient forefathers [cast] upon our ancient forefathers, who did not deserve to pay for the mistake that Egypt’s ruler at the time, Pharaoh as the Torah calls him, committed. For what is written in the Torah proves that it was Pharaoh who oppressed the Children of Israel, rather than the Egyptian people. [But] they inflicted upon us the plague of locusts that didn’t leave anything behind them; the plague that transformed the Nile’s waters into blood, so nobody could drink of them for a long time; the plague of darkness that kept the world dark day and night; the plague of frogs; and the plague of the killing of the firstborn, namely every first offspring born to woman or beast, and so on.

« We want compensation for the gold, silver, copper, precious stones, fabrics, hides and lumber, and for [all] animal meat, hair, hides and wool, and for other materials that I will mention [below], when quoting the language of the Torah. All these are materials that the Jews used in their rituals. These are resources that cannot be found among desert wanderers unless they took them before their departure… »

Later in the article Al-Gamal wrote: « The stories of the Holy Scriptures state that the Israelites set off from the [Nile] valley at night and went to the Sinai Peninsula. This is known to be a desert, were there is no use for large quantities of gold, silver, precious stones, meats, oils, fabrics and the like. Therefore it is clear that the Israelites took all these things from Egypt before they left. Chapter 25 of Exodus, on the [Israelites’] departure [from Egypt], states: ‘The Lord said to Moses: Tell the Israelites to bring me an offering… These are the offerings you are to receive from them: gold, silver and bronze; blue, purple and scarlet yarn and fine linen; goat hair; ram skins dyed red and another type of durable leather; acacia wood; olive oil for the light; spices for the anointing oil and for the fragrant incense; and onyx stones and other gems to be mounted on the ephod and breastpiece. Then have them make a sanctuary for me, and I will dwell among them. Make this tabernacle and all its furnishings exactly like the pattern I will show you. Have them make an ark of acacia wood, two and a half cubits long, a cubit and a half wide, and a cubit and a half high. Overlay it with pure gold, both inside and out, and make a gold molding around it. Cast four gold rings for it and fasten them to its four feet, with two rings on one side and two rings on the other [Exodus 25:1-12]’…

« [Exodus 38:24 states]: ‘The total amount of the gold from the wave offering used for all the work on the sanctuary was 29 talents and 730 shekels, according to the sanctuary shekel…’

« I call upon everyone with an interest in Torah studies to instruct us on a scientific basis what is the [precise] meaning of the word ‘talent.’ How many grams is it currently worth, what was the weight of the sheqel during those days, especially as it was made out of solid pure gold and pure silver… »

Turkey Must Compensate Egypt For The Backwardness They Inflicted Upon It

About Turkey, Al-Gamal wrote: « As for the Turks, we must demand [from them] adequate compensation for the economic, social, cultural, intellectual and political backwardness that their presence in our midst imposed upon us, for the world during those centuries [i.e., during the Ottoman period] made tremendous progress in all areas. We want compensation from the Turks for the invasion of our country and for the attendant oppression and aggression, and for taking all our human capital: scholars, builders, tentmakers, carpenters, coal miners, blacksmiths and all skilled artisans and forcing them to go to Istanbul to build palaces, mosques, and the like. We also want compensation for the antiquities plundered by the Turks, and especially for some relics of the Prophet and for stolen manuscripts and books. This theft and plunder lasted for centuries, from the beginning of the 16th century until the early 20th century.

« Likewise, we want compensation from the Turks for damaging the Egyptian psyche through their racism and haughtiness, their contempt for Egypt and the Egyptians, and their disgraceful treatment of the peasant as someone who [merely] plows, sows and reaps – although the harvest from the sweat of his brow filled the stomachs of the indolent Ottomans. We also want damages for the Turkish-Zionist plot hatched during the 1950s and 1960s, when Egypt led the Arab and global liberation movement and opposed the plans of the imperialist alliance, [an alliance] in which Turkey and the Hebrew state constituted vital components. »

The British Owe Egypt Damages For 72 Years Of Occupation, The French For Napoleon’s Invasion

« Moving on to modern history, we must grab the Zionists, the French and the British by the throat in order to take the damages that are due us for Napoleon’s invasion and for the Franco-Anglo-Zionist plots against Egypt in 1956, in 1967 and also in 1973, because the British took part in preventing [Egypt] from realizing the fruits of its stupendous victory. We want compensation for 72 years of British occupation that imposed backwardness and dependency upon us, stole the resources of our country, drove a wedge between the sons of the homeland and turned [the members of] one social stratum into [British] agents who took no pity on the Egyptian poor… »

Al-Gamal concluded: « We have nothing to lose, let us sue [Turkish Premier Recep Tayyip] Erdogan, [Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin] Netanyahu, [British Prime Minister, David] Cameron, and others who stole from us and played a role in what befell us for generations. »

Endnotes:

[1] Al-Yawm Al-Sabi’ (Egypt), March 11, 2014.
The Middle East Media Research Institute (MEMRI) is an independent, non-profit organization providing translations of the Middle East media and original analysis and research on developments in the region. Copies of articles and documents cited, as well as background information, are available on request.
MEMRI holds copyrights on all translations. Materials may only be used with proper attribution.

The Middle East Media Research Institute
P.O. Box 27837, Washington, DC 20038-7837
Phone: [202] 955-9070 Fax: [202] 955-9077 E-Mail: memri@memri.org
Search previous MEMRI publications at our website: http://www.memri.org

 


Bons baisers de Russie: Les affaires humaines ont leurs marées (Back to the future: who laughed when Romney said Russia was our No.1 foe ?)

26 mars, 2014
movie-poster-from-russia-with-love

Les affaires humaines ont leurs marées, qui, saisies au moment du flux, conduisent à la fortune ; l’occasion manquée, tout le voyage de la vie se poursuit au milieu des bas-fonds et des misères. En ce moment, la mer est pleine et nous sommes à flot : il faut prendre le courant tandis qu’il nous est favorable, ou perdre toutes nos chances. Shakespeare (Jules César, IV, 3)
Un des grands problèmes de la Russie – et plus encore de la Chine – est que, contrairement aux camps de concentration hitlériens, les leurs n’ont jamais été libérés et qu’il n’y a eu aucun tribunal de Nuremberg pour juger les crimes commis. Thérèse Delpech
Les dirigeants européens et américains espèrent que les tyrans et les autocrates du monde vont disparaître tout seuls. Mais les dinosaures comme Vladimir Poutine, Hugo Chávez et les ayatollahs iraniens ne vont pas s’effacer comme cela. Ils ne doivent leur survie qu’au manque de courage des chefs du Monde libre. Garry Kasparov
La politique de « redémarrage » des relations russo-américaines proposée par le président Obama a été interprétée à Moscou comme l’indice de la prise de conscience par les Américains de leur faiblesse, et par conséquent comme une invitation à Moscou de pousser ses pions (…) Le contrat d’achat des Mistrals présente un triple avantage: d’abord, la Russie acquiert des armements de haute technologie sans avoir à faire l’effort de les développer elle-même ; deuxièmement, elle réduit à néant la solidarité atlantique et la solidarité européenne ; troisièmement, elle accélère la vassalisation du deuxième grand pays européen après l’Allemagne. Un expert russe a récemment comparé cette politique à celle de la Chine face aux Etats-Unis : selon lui, à Washington le lobby pro-chinois intéressé aux affaires avec la Chine est devenu si puissant que les Etats-Unis sont désormais incapables de s’opposer à Pékin; la même chose est déjà vraie pour l’Allemagne face à la Russie et elle le sera pour la France après la signature du contrat sur les Mistrals. (…) Aujourd’hui, Moscou (…) se pose en rempart de la civilisation « du Nord », ce qui ne manque pas de sel quand on se souvient avec quelle persévérance Moscou a défendu le programme nucléaire iranien, contribuant grandement à l’émergence de cette « menace » du Sud, et avec quel enthousiasme elle célébrait, il y a un an encore, le naufrage de la civilisation occidentale. (…) On l’a vu dans les années 1930, la présence d’un Etat revanchard sur le continent européen peut réduire à néant toutes les tentatives de fonder un ordre international sur le droit et l’arbitrage. Françoise Thom
President Barack Obama defended the American invasion of Iraq Wednesday in a high-profile speech to address the Russian takeover of Crimea. Russian officials, Obama noted, have pointed to the U.S. invasion and occupation of Iraq as an example of  « Western hypocrisy. » Obama struggled, however, in his attempt to defend the legality of the invasion. The war was unsanctioned by the United Nations, and many experts assert it violated any standard reading of international law. But, argued Obama, at least the U.S. tried to make it legal. « America sought to work within the international system, » Obama said, referencing an attempt to gain U.N. approval for the invasion — an effort that later proved to be founded on flawed, misleading and cherry-picked intelligence. The man who delivered the presentation to the U.N., then-Secretary of State Colin Powell, has repeatedly called it a « blot » on his record.  Obama, in his speech, noted his own opposition to the war, but went on to defend its mission. »We did not claim or annex Iraq’s territory. We did not grab its resources for our own gain, » Obama argued. The Huffington Post
La destruction de l’URSS fut la plus grande catastrophe géopolitique du siècle. Poutine (2005)
C’est ma dernière élection. Après mon élection, j’aurai davantage de flexibilité. Obama (2012)
Aujourd’hui, c’est la Russie et pas l’Iran ou la Corée du Nord qui est l’ennemi géopolitique des Etats-Unis (…). Elle ne soutient que les pires régimes du monde. (…) Sur l’arène internationale, la Russie n’est pas un personnage amical. Le fait que le président américain veut plus de souplesse dans les relations avec la Russie est un signe alarmant (…). La Russie est sans aucun doute notre ennemi géopolitique numéro un. La Corée du Nord et l’Iran posent également assez de problèmes, mais ces terribles régimes poursuivent leur chemin, et nous allons à l’Onu pour les arrêter. Et si le président syrien tue ses propres citoyens, nous allons également à l’Onu, et qui monte alors au créneau pour défendre ces régimes? C’est toujours la Russie, souvent soutenue par la Chine. Romney
Gouverneur Romney, je suis content que vous reconnaissiez qu’Al-Qaida représente une menace, parce qu’il y a encore quelques mois, lorsqu’on vous a demandé quelle était la plus grande menace stratégique pour l’Amérique, vous avez répondu la Russie, et pas Al-Qaida. Mais, vous savez, la guerre froide est finie depuis plus de vingt ans. Quand il s’agit de notre politique étrangère, vous semblez vouloir revenir aux politiques des années 1980, tout comme aux politiques sociales des années 1950 et aux politiques économiques des années 1920… Vous déclarez ne pas vouloir reproduire ce qui s’est passé en Irak. Mais il y a quelques semaines à peine, vous avez déclaré qu’il faudrait des troupes en Irak, maintenant. Barack Hussein Obama
Pour en revenir à la Russie, j’ai certes déclaré que c’était un ennemi stratégique mais, dans le même paragraphe, j’ai aussi dit que l’Iran était la plus grande menace pour notre sécurité nationale. La Russie continue de nous affronter aux Nations unies, encore et encore. J’ai la vue claire à ce sujet. Je ne vais pas chausser des lunettes roses quand il s’agit de la Russie ou de Poutine. Et je ne vais certainement pas lui dire que je serai plus souple après mon élection. Après l’élection, j’aurai encore plus de cran. Pour l’Irak, vous et moi sommes d’accord sur le fait que je crois qu’il faudrait un accord sur un statut pour les forces américaines. Mitt Romney
Nous avons connu d’autres crises en Europe ces dernières années: les Balkans dans les années 90, la Géorgie en 2008. Mais il s’agit là de la plus grave menace à la sécurité et à la stabilité de l’Europe depuis la fin de la Guerre froide. … On ne sait plus si la Russie est un partenaire ou un adversaire. Anders Fogh Rasmussen (secrétaire général de l’Otan)
Ce que Romney a dit sur la menace russe était en plein dans le mille. Cela a été amplement démontré en Ukraine, en Syrie et également en Russie. Nile Gardiner
Why, across the world, are America’s hands so tied? A large part of the answer is our leader’s terrible timing. In virtually every foreign-affairs crisis we have faced these past five years, there was a point when America had good choices and good options. There was a juncture when America had the potential to influence events. But we failed to act at the propitious point; that moment having passed, we were left without acceptable options. In foreign affairs as in life, there is, as Shakespeare had it, « a tide in the affairs of men which, taken at the flood leads on to fortune. Omitted, all the voyage of their life is bound in shallows and in miseries. Mitt Romney

Retour vers le futur ?

Alors où (avant d’autres nations comme la Moldavie ou l’Argentine ?) l’ours russe vient de ne faire qu’une bouchée d’une partie d’un pays dont nous nous étions engagés à protéger l’intégrité …

 Et en ce deuxième anniversaire (jour pour jour) de cette fameuse interview de Mitt Romney sur CNN qui avait tant fait rire nos prétendus spécialistes …

Pendant qu’entre deux fourriers du terrorisme saoudien ou qatari, le Pays autoproclamé des droits de l’homme et donneur de leçons si prodigue envers ledit Poutine, déroule à nouveau le tapis rouge pour les bouchers toujours impunis de Tiananmen

Comment ne pas repenser à ces paroles désormais prophétiques du candidat républicain sur cette Russie de Poutine …

Qui vient de confirmer, deux ans plus tard, qu’elle « ne soutient que les pires régimes du monde » et qu’elle est bien « sans aucun doute notre ennemi géopolitique numéro un » ?

Et sur ce président américain qui pourrait bien se révéler l’un des pires (et plus naïfs) présidents de l’histoire …

Et qui, réduit à défendre onze ans après la guerre du pétrole de son prédécesseur qu’il avait tant condamnée, n’a apparemment toujours pas compris comme le rappelle Romney citant Shakespeare que « les affaires humaines avaient leurs marées » ?

The Price of Failed Leadership
The President’s failure to act when action was possible has diminished respect for the U.S. and made troubles worse.
Mitt Romney
March 17, 2014

Why are there no good choices? From Crimea to North Korea, from Syria to Egypt, and from Iraq to Afghanistan, America apparently has no good options. If possession is nine-tenths of the law, Russia owns Crimea and all we can do is sanction and disinvite—and wring our hands.

Iran is following North Korea’s nuclear path, but it seems that we can only entreat Iran to sign the same kind of agreement North Korea once signed, undoubtedly with the same result.

Our tough talk about a red line in Syria prompted Vladimir Putin’s sleight of hand, leaving the chemicals and killings much as they were. We say Bashar Assad must go, but aligning with his al Qaeda-backed opposition is an unacceptable option.

And how can it be that Iraq and Afghanistan each refused to sign the status-of-forces agreement with us—with the very nation that shed the blood of thousands of our bravest for them?

Why, across the world, are America’s hands so tied?

A large part of the answer is our leader’s terrible timing. In virtually every foreign-affairs crisis we have faced these past five years, there was a point when America had good choices and good options. There was a juncture when America had the potential to influence events. But we failed to act at the propitious point; that moment having passed, we were left without acceptable options. In foreign affairs as in life, there is, as Shakespeare had it, « a tide in the affairs of men which, taken at the flood leads on to fortune. Omitted, all the voyage of their life is bound in shallows and in miseries. »

When protests in Ukraine grew and violence ensued, it was surely evident to people in the intelligence community—and to the White House—that President Putin might try to take advantage of the situation to capture Crimea, or more. That was the time to talk with our global allies about punishments and sanctions, to secure their solidarity, and to communicate these to the Russian president. These steps, plus assurances that we would not exclude Russia from its base in Sevastopol or threaten its influence in Kiev, might have dissuaded him from invasion.

Months before the rebellion began in Syria in 2011, a foreign leader I met with predicted that Assad would soon fall from power. Surely the White House saw what this observer saw. As the rebellion erupted, the time was ripe for us to bring together moderate leaders who would have been easy enough for us to identify, to assure the Alawites that they would have a future post-Assad, and to see that the rebels were well armed.

The advent of the Arab Spring may or may not have been foreseen by our intelligence community, but after Tunisia, it was predictable that Egypt might also become engulfed. At that point, pushing our friend Hosni Mubarak to take rapid and bold steps toward reform, as did Jordan’s king, might well have saved lives and preserved the U.S.-Egypt alliance.

The time for securing the status-of-forces signatures from leaders in Iraq and Afghanistan was before we announced in 2011 our troop-withdrawal timeline, not after it. In negotiations, you get something when the person across the table wants something from you, not after you have already given it away.

Able leaders anticipate events, prepare for them, and act in time to shape them. My career in business and politics has exposed me to scores of people in leadership positions, only a few of whom actually have these qualities. Some simply cannot envision the future and are thus unpleasantly surprised when it arrives. Some simply hope for the best. Others succumb to analysis paralysis, weighing trends and forecasts and choices beyond the time of opportunity.

President Obama and Secretary of State Clinton traveled the world in pursuit of their promise to reset relations and to build friendships across the globe. Their failure has been painfully evident: It is hard to name even a single country that has more respect and admiration for America today than when President Obama took office, and now Russia is in Ukraine. Part of their failure, I submit, is due to their failure to act when action was possible, and needed.

A chastened president and Secretary of State Kerry, a year into his job, can yet succeed, and for the country’s sake, must succeed. Timing is of the essence.

Mr. Romney is the former governor of Massachusetts and the 2012 Republican nominee for president.

Voir aussi:

2 years ago
Romney not worried about Santorum, labels Russia No. 1 ‘foe’
Ashley Killough

CNN

March 26th, 2012

(CNN) – Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney said Monday he was unfazed by recent ramped-up rhetoric coming from his opponent Rick Santorum.

« I’m not going to worry too much about what Rick is saying these days, » Romney said on CNN’s « The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer. » « I know when you’re falling further and further behind, you get a little more animated. »

– Follow the Ticker on Twitter: @PoliticalTicker

Santorum made headlines Sunday when he claimed Romney would be the « worst » Republican candidate to match up against President Barack Obama in the general election, based on the issue of health care reform.

The former Massachusetts governor, he argued, would be poorly armed in a fight against the president after signing off on a health care law in the Bay State that critics now label a « blueprint » for the controversial federal health care legislation passed in 2010.

Romney argues, however, that he would attempt to repeal the Affordable Care Act as president, saying states should have the right to regulate health care laws, not Washington.

« It’s a power grab by the federal government. It violates the 10th Amendment. It violates the economic principles and economy freedom in this country, » Romney said on CNN. « It needs to be repealed. »

The candidate also blasted Obama over a private conversation caught by microphone with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, in which the president said he could be more flexible on the missile defense system in Europe after the election.

Romney joined other top Republicans in slamming the president over the remark on Monday and for making backroom deals with a country that Romney called America’s « Number One geopolitical foe. »

“Who is it that always stands up with the world’s worst actors? It’s always Russia, typically with China alongside. In terms of a geopolitical foe, a nation that’s on the Security Council, and as of course a massive nuclear power, Russia is the geopolitical foe. The idea that our president is planning on doing something with them that he’s not willing to tell the American people before the election is something I find very, very alarming,” Romney said.

The White House hopeful also opened up about how he spent some recent time-off from the campaign trail, saying he went to watch « The Hunger Games » with his grandchildren over the weekend.

« I read serious books, but every now and then I read just for fun, » Romney said, talking about how he read the book before seeing the movie. « That was weekend fun, so it was nice to see a flick for the first time in a long time. »

Voir encore:

Après la Crimée, Poutine va-t-il annexer une partie de la Moldavie?

Olivier Philippe-Viela

L’Express

26/03/2014

Après le rattachement de la Crimée à la Russie, Vladimir Poutine pourrait tenter d’absorber d’autres régions russophones, comme la Transnistrie, en Moldavie. Les explications du politologue Florent Parmentier.

Les velléités séparatistes de la Transnistrie en Moldavie pourraient faire le jeu de Moscou. Cette région moldave, autoproclamée indépendante en 1992, mais sans être reconnue par la communauté internationale, compte 550 000 habitants. Composé pour un tiers de russophones, un tiers de roumanophones et le reste d’ukrainiens, la République moldave du Dniestr (son nom officiel) a déjà demandé son rattachement à la Russie en 2006.

La Transnistrie peut-elle faire sécession comme la Crimée et conforter Vladimir Poutine dans son projet expansionniste? L’Express a posé la question à Florent Parmentier, responsable pédagogique à l’IEP de Paris et spécialiste de la Moldavie.

La Russie peut-elle annexer la Transnistrie comme elle a absorbé la Crimée?

La Transnistrie demande depuis 20 ans son rattachement à la Russie. Lors d’un référendum en 2006, non reconnu par l’Union européenne, 97% des votants avaient formulé ce souhait. Si le résultat est soviétique, il est évident qu’une majorité de la population souhaite faire partie de la Russie. Pour les Moldaves, la Transnistrie est déjà quasiment perdue. Ce qui ne veut pas dire que les Russes vont l’annexer. On ne peut pas exclure cette possibilité radicale, mais Moscou souhaite plutôt favoriser l’indépendance de cette région et s’appuyer dessus pour mettre un pied en Moldavie.

Celle-ci pense que l’unique moyen de retenir la Transnistrie est de présenter l’image la plus attractive possible. Il faut savoir que ce pays est en bonne santé économique par rapport à ses voisins. En 2013, sa croissance était de 8,9%. Le pouvoir moldave est pro-européen, prudent vis-à-vis de la Russie et soutien officiel de l’Ukraine par la voix de son Premier ministre Iurie Leanca.

Que cherche Vladimir Poutine en s’appropriant les anciens satellites soviétiques?

Le président russe veut intimider l’Occident. Il a une idéologie expansionniste. Pour Poutine, il s’agit d’un projet économique et géopolitique: le développement de l’Union douanière, calquée sur les frontières de l’ex-URSS. Dans son esprit, l’Ukraine aurait dû en faire partie. Cependant elle lui a échappé. La Crimée n’était pas sa priorité, mais il a voulu marquer le coup.

D’autres régions russophones souhaitent-elles être affiliées à la Fédération de Russie?

La Crimée est définitivement perdue pour l’Ukraine.

La Gagaouzie par exemple, district autonome au Sud de la Moldavie, a voté pour rejoindre l’Union douanière voulue par Vladimir Poutine à l’Est. Cette région russophile s’affirme ainsi par rapport au pouvoir central et conforte le projet économique de la Russie. En Ukraine, l’enjeu c’est le Sud et l’Est du pays. Les nouvelles autorités ukrainiennes ont eu un comportement pragmatique et intelligent, notamment sur l’usage de la langue russe, qui reste tolérée. En revanche, il semble évident que la Crimée est définitivement perdue pour l’Ukraine

Voir enfin:

Verbatim : le troisième débat Obama-Romney en intégralité

Le Monde

23.10.2012

Le dernier débat opposant le président sortant démocrate, Barack Obama, à son concurrent républicain, Mitt Romney, lundi 22 octobre, à l’université Lynn de Boca Raton (Floride), était consacré à la politique internationale. « Le Monde » en publie les principaux extraits :

Bob Schieffer : Ce soir, c’est le 50e anniversaire de la nuit où le président Kennedy a annoncé au monde que l’Union soviétique avait installé des missiles nucléaires à Cuba, peut-être le moment où nous avons été le plus proche d’un conflit nucléaire. Cela nous rappelle que chaque président doit faire face à des menaces inattendues à la sécurité nationale en provenance de l’extérieur.

La première partie [de ce débat] concerne le défi que représentent les changements au Proche Orient et les nouveaux visages du terrorisme. A propos des évènements de Libye, la controverse continue. Quatre Américains sont morts, dont l’ambassadeur. Des questions demeurent. Gouverneur Romney, vous avez déclaré que c’était un exemple du délitement de la politique américaine au Proche-Orient…

M. Romney : Les changements au Moyen-Orient sont évidemment un sujet de grande préoccupation, en particulier pour l’Amérique. Avec le Printemps arabe, un grand espoir de changement s’est fait jour, vers plus de modération, de participation des femmes à la vie publique, de progrès économiques. Au lieu de cela, les pays ont connu d’inquiétants évènements les uns après les autres. En Syrie, bien sûr, 30 000 civils ont été tués par l’armée régulière. En Libye, il y a eu une attaque – terroriste, je pense que c’est attesté maintenant – contre nos ressortissants et quatre sont morts. Nos pensées vont vers eux.

Des membres d’Al-Qaida se sont emparés du nord du Mali. L’Egypte a élu un frère musulman [à la présidence]. Nous assistons en fait à un renversement assez dramatique des espoirs que nous avions fondé pour cette région. Bien sûr, la plus grande menace reste l’Iran, quatre ans plus proche de son objectif nucléaire. Je félicite le président d’avoir éliminé Oussama Ben Laden et de s’en être pris aux dirigeants d’Al-Qaida.

Mais, pour sortir de ce marasme, nous allons devoir mettre sur pied une stratégie large et solide à même d’aider le monde musulman ainsi que d’autres parties du monde à rejeter cette radicalisation violente et extrémiste. Ce n’est pas le cas actuellement.

Al-Qaida ne se cache pas. Ce groupe déjà présent dans une douzaine de pays représente une grave menace pour nos amis, le monde, l’Amérique, à long terme, et il nous faut une stratégie complète pour lutter contre ce type d’extrémisme.

M. Obama : Ma première mission en tant que commandant en chef, c’est de garantir la sécurité des Américains. Nous avons mis fin à la guerre en Irak et recentré notre attention sur ceux qui nous ont attaqué le 11 septembre 2001. Et le chef d’Al-Qaida a été éliminé.

De plus, nous sommes en mesure de mener une transition responsable en Afghanistan, en veillant à ce que les Afghans assurent leur propre sécurité. Cela nous permet de reconstruire des alliances et de nous faire des amis à travers le monde afin de combattre les menaces futures. Concernant la Libye, lorsque j’ai reçu la nouvelle, je me suis immédiatement assuré que nous faisions tout notre possible pour mettre en sécurité les Américains qui étaient encore sur place ; que nous ferions la lumière sur ce qui s’était passé ; et, le plus important, que nous allions trouver et juger ceux qui avaient tué des Américains. Et c’est exactement ce que nous allons faire.

Mais revenons sur ce qui s’est passé en Libye. Gardez à l’esprit que les Américains ont pris la tête d’une coalition internationale qui, sans envoyer de troupes sur le terrain et pour un coût inférieur à deux semaines de présence en Irak, a libéré un pays qui vivait sous le joug d’une dictature depuis 40 ans. Nous l’avons débarrassé d’un despote qui avait tué des Américains, et, malgré la tragédie de Benghazi, des dizaines de milliers de Libyens ont défilé en proclamant leur amitié pour l’Amérique. Nous les soutenons.

Nous devons en profiter pour pousser notre avantage. Gouverneur Romney, je suis content que vous reconnaissiez que nous avons traqué Al-Qaida avec succès, mais je dois vous dire que votre stratégie est éculée et peu à même de garantir la sécurité des Américains ou de construire l’avenir du Moyen-Orient.

M. Romney : Ma stratégie est claire, traquer les méchants, mettre tout en œuvre pour les arrêter, et les faire disparaître du paysage. Mais ma stratégie est plus large. L’aspect principal sera d’aider le monde musulman à être en mesure de rejeter l’extrémisme.

Nous ne voulons pas d’un nouvel Irak, ni d’un nouvel Afghanistan. Ce n’est pas la bonne voie pour nous. Il nous faut bien sûr traquer les dirigeants de tous ces groupes djihadistes anti-Américains, mais aussi aider le monde musulman. Comment faire ? Un groupe d’intellectuels arabes s’est rassemblé, à l’initiative de l’ONU, pour déterminer comment nous pouvions aider le monde à se débarrasser de ces terroristes. Ils ont conclu qu’il fallait développer l’économie. Nous devrions nous assurer que notre aide financière directe, ainsi que celle de nos amis, aille dans ce sens.

Ensuite, une meilleure éducation. Puis la parité. Et enfin, des systèmes législatifs. Nous devons aider ces pays à créer des sociétés civiles.

Mais ce qu’il s’est passé au cours des deux dernières années d’agitation et de chaos croissant au Moyent-Orient, c’est qu’Al-Qaida s’y est engouffré, ainsi que d’autres groupes djihadistes. Et ils sont maintenant bien implantés dans beaucoup de pays de la région. Les progrès en Libye sont notables, malgré cette terrible tragédie.

Mais, juste à côté, il y a l’Egypte. La Libye, c’est 6 millions d’habitants, l’Egypte 80. Nous voulons nous assurer que les progrès concernent toute la région. Mais, avec le nord du Mali aux mains d’Al-Qaida, la Syrie toujours dirigée par Assad qui assassine son peuple, et bien sûr l’Iran en voie de fabriquer de la bombe atomique, la région reste agitée.

M. Obama : Gouverneur Romney, je suis content que vous reconnaissiez qu’Al-Qaida représente une menace, parce qu’il y a encore quelques mois, lorsqu’on vous a demandé quelle était la plus grande menace stratégique pour l’Amérique, vous avez répondu la Russie, et pas Al-Qaida. Mais, vous savez, la guerre froide est finie depuis plus de vingt ans.

Quand il s’agit de notre politique étrangère, vous semblez vouloir revenir aux politiques des années 1980, tout comme aux politiques sociales des années 1950 et aux politiques économiques des années 1920…

Vous déclarez ne pas vouloir reproduire ce qui s’est passé en Irak. Mais il y a quelques semaines à peine, vous avez déclaré qu’il faudrait des troupes en Irak, maintenant. Et, même si je sais bien que vous n’avez jamais été en position de faire réellement de la politique étrangère, chaque fois que vous avez fait une proposition, vous vous êtes trompé. Ainsi, malgré l’absence d’armes de destruction massive, vous étiez favorable à la guerre en Irak.

Vous avez dit que nous devrions avoir encore des troupes en Irak aujourd’hui. Et que nous ne devrions pas passer de traités nucléaires avec la Russie malgré le vote favorable de 71 sénateurs, démocrates et républicains. Vous avez d’abord déclaré qu’il ne fallait pas d’agenda de retrait en Afghanistan, puis dit qu’il en fallait un. Maintenant vous oscillez entre « peut-être » et « ça dépend », ce qui signifie non seulement que vous aviez tort mais que vous avez envoyé des messages confus à nos troupes et à nos alliés.

Nous devons affirmer notre leadership au Proche-Orient, et pas mener une politique erronée et imprudente. Malheureusement, c’est ce genre de politique que vous avez proposé pendant votre campagne.

M. Romney : Je ne suis bien sûr pas d’accord avec ce que le président vient de dire. Et m’attaquer ne constitue pas un programme ni ne permet de parler du Moyen-Orient et de la façon d’aider la région à rejeter le terrorisme et à endiguer l’agitation croissante et la confusion.

Pour en revenir à la Russie, j’ai certes déclaré que c’était un ennemi stratégique mais, dans le même paragraphe, j’ai aussi dit que l’Iran était la plus grande menace pour notre sécurité nationale. La Russie continue de nous affronter aux Nations unies, encore et encore. J’ai la vue claire à ce sujet. Je ne vais pas chausser des lunettes roses quand il s’agit de la Russie ou de Poutine. Et je ne vais certainement pas lui dire que je serai plus souple après mon élection. Après l’élection, j’aurai encore plus de cran. Pour l’Irak, vous et moi sommes d’accord sur le fait que je crois qu’il faudrait un accord sur un statut pour les forces américaines.

M. Obama : Ce que je n’aurais pas fait, c’est laisser 10 000 soldats en Irak qui nous entraveraient. Ce qui ne nous aiderait certainement pas dans la région.

M. Romney : Je suis désolé, mais le président s’est employé à obtenir un statut pour les forces américaines, et j’étais d’accord avec cela, et j’ai dit qu’il faudrait que nous laissions un certain nombre de soldats là-bas. C’était une initiative avec laquelle j’étais d’accord…

M. Obama : Gouverneur…

M. Romney : C’était votre position, vous pensiez qu’il fallait laisser 5 000 soldats, et j’étais d’accord. Je pensais qu’il en fallait même plus mais vous savez quoi ? Nous n’en avons plus du tout !

M. Obama : Ecoutez, vous vous êtes déclaré pour le maintien de troupes combattantes en Irak il y a seulement quelques semaines… au cours d’un discours important.

M. Romney : Non, j’avais alors précisé que vous aviez échoué à obtenir un accord sur un statut pour les forces américaines à l’issue de la guerre.

M. Obama : Vous devez vous montrer clair, à la fois pour nos alliés et nos ennemis. Vous avez fait un discours il y a quelques semaines au cours duquel vous avez déclaré que vous pensiez que nous devrions avoir encore des soldats en Irak. Ce n’est pas vraiment la bonne façon d’affronter les enjeux de la région.

Il est évident que nous ne pouvons pas affronter tous les enjeux de façon militaire. Et ce que j’ai fait pendant ma présidence et continuerai à faire, c’est d’abord m’assurer que ces pays soutiennent nos efforts contre le terrorisme ; qu’ils veillent à notre intérêt pour la sécurité d’Israël, car c’est notre plus fidèle allié dans la région ; qu’ils protègent les minorités religieuses et les femmes, car ces pays ne peuvent se développer si seulement une moitié de la population y contribue ; que nous développions leurs économies. Mais nous devons reconnaître que nous ne pouvons plus faire de construction nationale dans ces régions. Une partie du leadership américain est de veiller à ce que nous construisions d’abord notre pays. Cela nous aidera à garder le type de leadership dont nous avons besoin.

M. Schieffer : La guerre en Syrie s’est propagée au Liban. (…) M. le Président, cela fait plus d’un an que vous avez dit à Bachar Al-Assad de partir. Depuis, 30 000 Syriens ont été tués. Il y a 300 000 réfugiés. La guerre continue. Il est toujours au pouvoir. Devons-nous revoir notre politique pour trouver une meilleure façon d’influencer la situation ? Est-ce possible ?

M. Obama : Nous avons mobilisé la communauté internationale pour dire à Assad de partir. Nous avons pris des sanctions contre ce gouvernement. Nous l’avons isolé. Nous avons fourni de l’aide humanitaire et aidé l’opposition à s’organiser et nous veillons particulièrement à mobiliser les forces modérées à l’intérieur de la Syrie. En dernier ressort, c’est aux Syriens de choisir leur avenir. Nous faisons tout en consultation avec nos partenaires dans la région, y compris Israël (…), la Turquie et d’autres pays de la région directement concernés.

Ce que nous voyons en Syrie est poignant et c’est pourquoi nous faisons tout pour aider l’opposition. Mais, s’engager militairement est une mesure grave et nous devons être certains de savoir qui nous aidons, que nous ne mettons pas des armes entre les mains de gens qui pourraient au final se retourner contre nous ou nos alliés dans la région.

Je suis certain que les jours d’Assad sont comptés. Mais, nous ne pouvons pas simplement suggérer, comme l’a fait le gouverneur Romney, que donner des armes, par exemple, à l’opposition syrienne est une proposition anodine qui peut nous apporter la sécurité à long terme.

M. Romney : (…) La Syrie est le seul allié de l’Iran dans le monde arabe. C’est leur ouverture sur la mer. Leur voie pour armer le Hezbollah au Liban, qui menace notre allié, Israël. Que la Syrie dépose Assad est notre priorité. Deuxièmement, avoir un gouvernement responsable à sa place est crucial. Finalement, nous ne voulons pas nous engager militairement. Nous ne voulons pas être entraînés dans un conflit militaire.

Nous devons travailler par l’intermédiaire de nos partenaires et avec nos ressources pour identifier les parties responsables en Syrie, les organiser, les réunir sous la forme d’un gouvernement ou, du moins, d’un conseil qui puisse diriger la Syrie. Et nous devons nous assurer qu’ils ont les armes nécessaires pour se défendre. Nous devons nous assurer que ces armes ne tombent pas entre de mauvaises mains. Car ces armes pourraient être utilisées contre nous. Nous devons coordonner nos efforts avec nos alliés, surtout Israël.

Les Saoudiens, les Qataris et les Turcs (…) veulent travailler avec nous. Nous devons travailler à construire un leadership en Syrie (…). Je pense qu’Assad doit partir. Je pense qu’il va partir. Nous devons nous assurer de tisser des liens d’amitié avec les gens qui le remplaceront, afin que, dans les années à venir, la Syrie soit un ami et un interlocuteur responsable au Moyen-Orient. C’est une opportunité cruciale pour les Etats-Unis.

Depuis un an, nous avons vu le président nous dire d’abord « Laissons faire les Nations unies ». Puis Kofi Annan disant qu’il y aurait un cessez-le-feu. Ca n’a pas fonctionné. On s’est alors tourné vers les Russes pour voir ce qu’ils pourraient faire. On doit avoir le leadership là-bas, pas sur le terrain avec l’armée.

M. Obama : Nous avons le leadership. Nous avons organisé les Amis de la Syrie. Nous organisons l’aide humanitaire et le soutien à l’opposition. Et nous nous assurons d’aider ceux qui seront nos amis et ceux de nos alliés dans la région à long terme.

Prenez l’exemple de la Libye, qui éclaire la façon dont nous opérons nos choix. En allant là-bas, nous avons été capables de stopper immédiatement les massacres, du fait des circonstances uniques et de la coalition que nous avons aidé à organiser. Nous nous sommes assurés que Mouammar Kadhafi ne resterait pas.

A votre crédit, gouverneur, vous avez soutenu l’intervention en Libye et la coalition que nous avons organisée. Mais, au moment où il fallait s’assurer que Kadhafi ne reste pas au pouvoir, qu’il soit capturé, gouverneur, vous avez dit que la mission se transformait, qu’elle cafouillait. Imaginez que nous nous soyons retirés à ce moment. Mouammar Kadhafi avait plus de sang américain sur les mains qu’Oussama Ben Laden. Nous voulions finir le travail et c’est ce pourquoi les Libyens nous ont soutenu. Nous avons fait cela de façon réfléchie, prudente, en nous assurant de savoir à qui nous avions à faire, que les forces modérées sur le terrain travailleraient avec nous. Nous devons prendre la même direction ferme, réfléchie en Syrie. Ce que nous faisons.

M. Schieffer : Gouverneur, feriez-vous davantage que l’administration [Obama] en imposant, par exemple, des zones d’exclusion aérienne en Syrie ?

M. Romney : Je ne veux pas que notre armée s’engage en Syrie. (…) Ça ne va pas être nécessaire. Avec nos partenaires dans la région, nous avons suffisamment de moyens pour soutenir ces groupes. Cela dure depuis un an. L’Amérique aurait du imposer son leadership. Nous aurions du imposer notre leadership, pas militairement, mais un rôle dirigeant au niveau organisationnel, gouvernemental, pour réunir les parties et trouver des interlocuteurs responsables.

Les sources de renseignement indiquent que les insurgés sont très divisés. Ils ne se sont pas entendus. Ils n’ont pas formé de groupe uni, de conseil. Ça doit être fait. L’Amérique peut aider à cela. Et nous devons nous assurer qu’ils disposent des armes nécessaires pour se débarrasser d’Assad.

M. Obama : (…) Le gouverneur Romney n’avance pas d’idées différentes. Parce que nous faisons exactement ce qu’il faut pour tenter de promouvoir un leadership syrien modéré et une transition effective pour qu’Assad parte. C’est le type de leadership dont nous avons fait preuve et que nous continuerons à avoir.

M. Schieffer : Pendant la crise égyptienne, vous êtes arrivé à la conclusion qu’il était temps pour le président Moubarak de partir. (…) Certains au sein de votre administration ont pensé que nous aurions peut-être du attendre un peu pour cela. Avez-vous des regrets ?

M. Obama : Non, je n’en ai pas car je crois que l’Amérique doit se tenir du côté de la démocratie. (…)

J’ai aussi dit que maintenant que l’Egypte a un gouvernement démocratiquement élu, elle doit prendre ses responsabilités pour protéger les minorités religieuses. Nous avons exercé une pression sur eux pour cela, pour que les droits des femmes soient reconnus, ce qui est crucial dans la région. Ces pays ne peuvent se développer si les jeunes femmes ne reçoivent pas l’éducation dont elles ont besoin. Ils doivent respecter le traité avec Israël. C’est une ligne rouge pour nous car il en va non seulement de la sécurité d’Israël mais aussi de la nôtre. Ils doivent coopérer avec nous en matière de contreterrorisme. Nous allons les aider à développer leur économie car le succès de la révolution pour les Egyptiens et le monde est que les jeunes gens qui ont manifesté voient des opportunités s’offrir à eux. (…)

M. Romney : (…) J’aurais espéré qu’on ait une meilleure vision pour l’avenir. J’aurais espéré, au début du mandat du président et même avant cela, que l’on ait identifié cette énergie et cette passion croissante pour la liberté dans cette partie du monde et que l’on ait agit plus agressivement avec notre ami et d’autres amis de la région pour voir une transition vers une forme de gouvernement plus représentative, de sorte que la situation n’explose pas de cette façon. Une fois que ça avait explosé, j’ai ressenti la même chose que le président, ces voix pour la liberté et les rues d’Egypte, des gens qui en appelaient à nos valeurs. Le président Moubarak a fait des choses qui étaient inimaginables et l’idée qu’il écrase son peuple ne pouvait être tolérée.

La mission qui doit être la nôtre au Moyen-Orient – et plus largement – est de s’assurer que le monde est en paix. (…) Nous voulons que les peuples profitent de la vie et qu’ils aient un avenir radieux et prospère, non pas qu’ils soient en guerre. C’est notre objectif. La responsabilité du respect des valeurs de paix revient à l’Amérique. Nous n’avons pas demandé cela. Mais c’est un honneur pour nous. (…)

M. Schieffer : Quelle est la place de l’Amérique dans le monde ? Comment chacun de vous voit-il notre rôle dans le monde ?

M. Romney : Je suis pleinement convaincu que l’Amérique a la responsabilité et le privilège de défendre la liberté et de promouvoir des principes qui rendent le monde plus pacifique. Ces principes comprennent les droits de l’homme, la dignité humaine, la libre entreprise, la liberté d’expression, les élections. Parce que quand il y a des élections, les gens ont tendance à voter en faveur de la paix. Ils ne votent pas pour la guerre.

Nous savons qu’il y a des zones de conflit dans le monde. Nous voulons, dans la mesure du possible, arrêter ces conflits. Mais pour être en mesure de remplir notre rôle dans le monde, l’Amérique doit être forte. Et pour ça il faut que nous renforcions notre économie ici, chez nous. (…)

Nous devons aussi renforcer notre capacité militaire sur le long terme. Nous ne savons pas ce que l’avenir nous réserve. Nous prenons aujourd’hui des décisions dans le domaine militaire qui se heurteront à des réalités que nous ne pouvons pas encore imaginer. Dans les débats de l’année 2000, il n’y avait par exemple pas un mot sur le terrorisme. Un an plus tard, nous avions le 11-Septembre. Nous devons donc prendre des décisions dans l’incertitude et cela implique d’avoir une capacité militaire forte. Je ne couperai pas les budgets militaires.

Nous devons aussi soutenir nos alliés. Je pense que les tensions qui ont existé entre Israël et les Etats-Unis n’étaient pas opportunes. Je pense aussi que retirer notre programme de missiles défensifs de Pologne de la façon dont nous l’avons fait était également inopportun, dans la mesure où cela a troublé les liens existant entre nous.

Enfin, en ce qui concerne le respect de nos principes, quand les étudiants sont sortis dans les rues de Téhéran et que le peuple a manifesté en Iran, que la révolution verte a débuté, le silence du président a été une grave erreur. Nous devons respecter nos principes, soutenir nos alliés, maintenir un effort militaire et soutenir notre économie.

M. Obama : L’Amérique demeure la nation indispensable dans le monde. Le monde a besoin d’une Amérique forte et elle est plus forte aujourd’hui que quand je suis arrivé au pouvoir il y a quatre ans. Parce que nous avons terminé la guerre en Irak, nous avons pu nous concentrer sur la menace terroriste et sur l’amorce d’un processus de transition en Afghanistan. Cela nous a aussi permis de relancer des alliances et des partenariats qui avaient été négligés pendant une décennie.

Gouverneur Romney, nos alliances n’ont jamais été aussi fortes. En Asie, en Europe, en Afrique, en Israël, avec qui nous avons une coopération inédite dans les secteurs militaires et du renseignement, notamment en ce qui concerne la menace iranienne. (…)

Le gouverneur Romney plaide pour une réduction d’impôts de 5 000 milliards de dollars, et dit qu’il y parviendra en réduisant les prélèvements. Bon, en termes mathématiques ça ne fonctionne pas mais il continue à affirmer qu’il va le faire… Il veut en plus augmenter les dépenses militaires de 2 000 milliards, ce que notre armée ne demande même pas.
Sachez que nos dépenses militaires ont cru tous les ans depuis que je suis au pouvoir. Nous dépensons plus que le total cumulé des dix nations suivantes : Chine, Russie, France, Grande-Bretagne… Les dix.

Nous avons travaillé avec les chefs militaires pour réfléchir à ce dont nous avons besoin pour assurer notre sécurité dans le futur. Quand on parle de capacités militaires, il ne s’agit pas uniquement de questions de budget, mais aussi de capacités. Nous devons réfléchir à la cybersécurité. Nous devons parler de l’espace. C’est ce à quoi le budget sert, mais il doit être guidé par une stratégie, pas par des considérations politiques.

M. Romney : Notre marine est vétuste… Notre flotte est aujourd’hui la plus petite que nous ayons eue depuis 1917. L’état-major de la marine affirme qu’il a besoin de 313 navires pour remplir ses missions. Nous sommes en-dessous de 285 et on s’approchera des 200 si nous continuons dans cette voie. C’est inacceptable. Notre aviation est la plus vétuste et la moins pléthorique depuis sa création en 1947.

Depuis Franklin D. Roosevelt, nous avons toujours eu la doctrine qui consistait à dire que nous pouvions nous battre sur deux fronts en même temps. Maintenant ce n’est plus qu’un seul front. Il s’agit là de la plus importante responsabilité du président des Etats-Unis : garantir la sécurité du peuple américain. (…)

M. Obama : Je crois que le gouverneur Romney n’a pas pris assez de temps pour examiner comment fonctionne notre armée. Vous avez mentionné la marine, par exemple, et le fait qu’elle ait moins de vaisseaux qu’en 1916. Bien, gouverneur… Nous avons aussi moins de chevaux et de baïonnettes, parce que la nature de nos engagements militaires a changé. Nous avons ces choses appelées porte-avions, sur lesquels les avions atterrissent… Nous avons ces bateaux qui vont sous l’eau, les sous-marins nucléaires. (…)

M. Schieffer : Gouverneur, nous connaissons la position du président sur le sujet. Quelle est votre position sur l’utilisation des drones ?

M. Romney : Je crois que nous devons utiliser tous les moyens nécessaires pour éliminer les gens qui représentent une menace pour nous ou nos amis à travers le monde. Il est bien connu que les drones sont utilisés pour des frappes aériennes et je soutiens pleinement cela. Je crois que le président a eu raison d’accroître l’utilisation de cette technologie.

Mais je voudrais aussi souligner que nous devons faire plus que simplement pourchasser les meneurs et tuer les méchants, aussi important que ce soit. Nous avons besoin d’une stratégie beaucoup plus large et efficace pour contribuer à éradiquer le terrorisme et l’extrémisme islamiste. Nous n’avons pas fait cela. Nous en parlons beaucoup mais lisez les rapports écrits depuis quatre ans : l’Iran est-il plus proche de posséder la bombe ? Oui. Le Moyen-Orient est-il en proie à l’agitation ? Oui. Est-ce qu’Al-Qaida est à genoux ? Non. Est-ce qu’Israël et les Palestiniens sont plus proches d’un accord de paix ? Non, ils ne se sont pas parlés depuis deux ans.

M. Schieffer : J’aimerais que l’on passe au sujet suivant : les lignes rouges, Israël et l’Iran.

M. Obama : Tout d’abord, Israël est un véritable ami. C’est notre plus grand allié dans la région. Et si Israël est attaqué, l’Amérique se tiendra à ses côtés. J’ai été très clair sur ce point pendant ma présidence et c’est pourquoi nous avons forgé avec Israël la plus forte coopération de l’histoire entre nos deux pays, militaire comme dans le renseignement. Cette semaine, très précisément, nous allons avoir les plus importantes manœuvres militaires communes de l’histoire.

S’agissant de l’Iran, aussi longtemps que je serai président des Etats-Unis, l’Iran n’aura pas l’arme nucléaire. J’ai été clair quand j’ai pris mes fonctions. Nous avons mis sur pied la plus forte coalition et pris les sanctions les plus dures de l’histoire contre l’Iran, et elles paralysent leur économie. La monnaie a chuté de 80%. Leur production de pétrole a baissé au plus bas niveau atteint lors de la guerre contre l’Irak il y a 20 ans. Leur économie est totalement désorganisée. Nous avons fait cela parce qu’un Iran nucléarisé est une menace pour notre sécurité intérieure et pour celle d’Israël. Nous ne pouvons pas prendre le risque d’une course aux armements dans la région la plus instable du monde. L’Iran soutient le terrorisme et il est inacceptable qu’il puisse fournir de la technologie nucléaire à des acteurs non-étatiques. Il déclare vouloir rayer Israël de la carte. L’Iran a aujourd’hui le choix : se tourner vers la diplomatie et mettre un terme à son programme nucléaire, ou bien se retrouver face à un monde uni et un président des Etats-Unis, moi, qui gardera toutes les options ouvertes.

Le gouverneur Romney, pendant sa campagne, a souvent dit qu’il faudrait adopter des actions militaires anticipées. Je crois que ce serait une erreur. Lorsque j’expose de jeunes hommes et de jeunes femmes au danger, je ne le fais qu’en dernier recours.

M. Romney : Tout d’abord, je veux souligner la même chose que le président, si je suis élu, quand je serai élu, nous serons aux côtés d’Israël. Et si Israël est attaqué, il aura notre soutien, pas seulement diplomatique mais aussi militaire.

Ensuite, s’agissant de l’Iran, un Iran nucléaire est inacceptable pour les Etats-Unis. Que l’Iran puisse avoir des armes nucléaires qui pourraient être utilisées pour nous attaquer ou pour nous menacer est un danger, pas seulement pour nos amis. Il est également essentiel de comprendre ce que doit être notre mission face à l’Iran, le dissuader d’avoir l’arme atomique par des moyens pacifiques et diplomatiques, et des sanctions sévères que j’ai appelées de mes vœux il y a cinq ans lorsque j’étais en Israël, au cours de la conférence de Herzliya [sur la sécurité]. J’avais présenté à cette occasion sept mesures dont ces sanctions sévères étaient la première. Cela marche. Et c’est bien de pouvoir en disposer aujourd’hui. Je souhaiterais les renforcer. Que les pétroliers qui transportent du pétrole iranien ne puissent accéder à nos ports. Je crois que l’Union européenne serait d’accord avec nous sur ce point. Pas seulement les bateaux, mais aussi les compagnies, les personnes qui font commerce de ce pétrole. Je prendrais des mesures d’isolement diplomatique, je ferais en sorte qu’Ahmadinejad soit inculpé selon la convention sur le génocide. Ses mots sont une incitation au génocide et je voudrais l’inculper pour cela. Je ferais également en sorte que les diplomates [iraniens] soient traités comme des parias dans le monde entier, tout comme nous l’avions fait pour les diplomates de l’apartheid de l’Afrique du sud. Il faut augmenter les pressions. Une action militaire serait le dernier recours, qui ne pourrait être examinée qu’après avoir épuisé toutes les autres options.

M. Obama : En Iran, il y a des gens qui aspirent à une vie meilleure comme les peuples du monde entier. Nous espérons que leurs dirigeants prendront la bonne décision et arrêteront leur programme. Cela prend du temps. Nous avons commencé dès notre arrivée aux responsabilités et c’était très important pour nous que tous les pays participent, même des pays comme la Russie et la Chine – ce qui montre combien nous avons restauré la crédibilité et la force des Etats-Unis dans le monde. Il ne s’agit pas seulement de nos propres sanctions, en place depuis longtemps, mais nous avons besoin que tout le monde s’associe à cette pression sur l’Iran. Dernière chose, le temps presse. Nous n’allons pas permettre à l’Iran de s’engager perpétuellement dans des négociations qui ne mènent nulle part. J’ai été très clair auprès d’eux. Grâce à la coopération que nous avons avec les services de renseignement de nombreux pays, y compris Israël, nous saurons quand ils seront capables atteindre le seuil au-delà duquel nous ne pourrons plus intervenir. Le temps presse.

M. Romney : Depuis le début, je crois que l’un des problèmes que nous avons avec l’Iran est qu’il a observé cette administration et estimé qu’elle n’était pas aussi ferme qu’il aurait fallu. Les Iraniens ont vu de la faiblesse là où ils attendaient de la force. Je dis cela parce que le président, il y a quatre ans, avait dit au cours de sa campagne qu’il rencontrerait au cours de la première année de son mandat les pires dirigeants du monde, qu’il s’assiérait à la table de Chavez et de Kim Jong-il, avec Castro et le président Ahmadinejad d’Iran. Lorsque le président a commencé ce que j’ai appelé son voyage d’excuses, je crois qu’ils l’ont regardé et qu’ils y ont vu de la faiblesse. Quand les dissidents ont marché dans les rues de Téhéran, pendant la révolution verte [de 2009], avec des panneaux proclamant : « Est-ce que l’Amérique est avec nous ? » et que le président est resté silencieux, ils l’ont enregistré aussi. Tout comme ils ont noté lorsque le président a déclaré qu’il prendrait ses distances vis-à-vis d’Israël.

M. Obama : Rien de ce qu’a dit le gouverneur Romney n’est exact, à commencer par cette idée de voyage d’excuses. C’est sans doute le plus gros bobard de la campagne. Pour ce qui est de renforcer les sanctions, nous avons mis sur pied les plus efficaces, les plus dures, et pendant que nous nous coordonnions avec une coalition internationale pour s’assurer de leur effectivité, vous continuiez à invertir dans une société pétrolière chinoise en affaire avec le secteur pétrolier iranien. Je laisserai donc le peuple américain juger qui sera le plus efficace et le plus crédible. S’agissant de la révolution iranienne, j’ai été très clair vis-à-vis des activités meurtrières qui ont eu lieu, contraires au droit international. Quand j’ai pris mes fonctions, le monde était divisé. L’Iran était renaissant. Il est aujourd’hui au plus bas, économiquement, stratégiquement, militairement.

M. Romney : Pendant quatre ans, la perspective d’un Iran nucléaire s’est rapprochée, nous n’aurions pas dû gaspiller ce temps que le pays a utilisé pour faire tourner les centrifugeuses. M. le président, quand vous avez fait ce que j’appelle ce voyage d’excuses au Moyen-Orient, vous êtes allé en Egypte, en Arabie saoudite, en Turquie et en Irak, mais vous avez évité Israël, notre allié le plus proche dans la région. Dans ces pays, vous avez dit que l’Amérique avait été méprisante, qu’elle leur avait parfois dicté leur conduite. M. le président, l’Amérique n’a pas fait cela, elle a libéré des pays de leurs dictateurs.

M. Obama : Mon premier voyage a été pour nos troupes. Et quand je me suis rendu en Israël en tant que candidat, [en 2008] je n’ai pas rencontré de donateurs, je n’ai pas assisté à une collecte de fonds [de campagne]. Je suis allé à Yad Vashem, le musée de l’Holocauste, pour me souvenir de la nature du Mal et de notre lien avec Israël qui ne pourra jamais se briser. Je me suis rendu à la ville frontière de Sderot qui a été sous le feu des missiles tirés par le Hamas. La question centrale, à ce stade, est la suivante : qui sera crédible pour toutes les parties concernées ? Elles peuvent regarder mon bilan pour ce qui est des sanctions contre l’Iran, de la lutte contre le terrorisme, du soutien à la démocratie, aux droits des femmes et aux minorités religieuses.

M. Schieffer : Et si le premier ministre d’Israël vous appelle au téléphone pour vous dire :  » nos bombardiers sont en route, nous allons bombarder l’Iran «  ?

M. Romney : N’entrons pas dans de telles hypothèses. Notre relation avec Israël, ma relation personnelle avec le premier ministre d’Israël, est telle que nous ne recevrions pas un tel appel. C’est une chose dont nous aurions discuté et nous l’aurions évaluée minutieusement avant.

Mais revenons aux propos du président selon qui les choses ne vont pas mal. Je regarde ce qui se passe dans le monde et je vois l’Iran qui s’est rapproché pendant quatre ans de la bombe, la vague de violence, de tumulte et de chaos qui a déferlé sur le Moyen-Orient, les djihadistes qui se renforcent. Je vois la Syrie et 30 000 civils morts. Assad toujours au pouvoir.

Notre déficit commercial avec la Chine, plus profond d’année en année. Je regarde partout dans le monde et j’ai l’impression que vous ne voyez pas la Corée du Nord exporter sa technologie nucléaire. La Russie qui dit qu’elle ne va plus suivre [l’accord sur la réduction des arsenaux] Nunn-Lugar. Et qui se retire de cet accord que nous avions passé avec elle. Je ne vois pas notre influence grandir mais refluer, en partie pour l’incapacité du président à s’occuper de notre économie, en partie pour notre renoncement dans notre engagement dans notre armée, en partie pour les troubles avec Israël.

M. Obama : Gouverneur, le problème avec vous c’est que sur de nombreux sujets, le Moyen-Orient, l’Afghanistan, l’Irak, l’Iran, vous êtes partout et nulle part. Je me réjouis que vous approuviez aujourd’hui notre politique de pressions diplomatiques avec la possibilité de discussions bilatérales avec les Iraniens pour qu’ils mettent un terme à leur programme nucléaire. Mais il y a quelques années, vous n’en vouliez pas. De même, vous vous êtes opposé initialement à un calendrier [de retrait] pour l’Afghanistan et maintenant vous y êtes favorable. De même avec l’Irak, vous aviez dit qu’il fallait en finir avec cette guerre, puis vous avez déclaré que nous aurions dû garder sur place 20 000 soldats. De même, vous aviez dit que s’attaquer à Kadhafi était un sacré défi.

Au sujet d’Oussama Ben Laden, vous avez dit que tout président prendrait cette décision mais, en 2008, vous disiez que nous ne devrions pas remuer ciel et terre pour un seul homme. Et vous avez dit qu’on aurait dû demander la permission au Pakistan. Si nous avions fait cela, nous ne l’aurions jamais eue. Et ça valait la peine de remuer ciel et terre pour l’avoir. Après que nous avons tué Ben Laden, je me suis rendu à Ground Zero pour une commémoration. J’ai parlé à une jeune fille qui avait quatre ans le 11 septembre. Elle avait eu sa dernière conversation avec son père qui était dans les tours jumelles et qui lui avait dit « je t’aime et je serai toujours là auprès de toi ». Pendant dix ans, cet appel téléphonique l’a hantée. Et elle m’a dit : « En finir avec Ben Laden me permet de faire mon deuil ». Faire ces choses là, c’est envoyer un message au monde et dire à cette personne que l’on n’a pas oublié son père. Ces décisions ne sont pas toujours populaires, elles ne sont généralement pas testées auprès de l’opinion publique. Et au sein de mon propre parti, y compris le vice-président, certains ont eu le même genre de critiques que vous. Mais le peuple américain comprend que je regarde ce qui doit être fait pour assurer sa sécurité, pour faire avancer nos intérêts et que je tranche.

M. Schieffer : Les Etats-Unis doivent transférer la gestion de la sécurité en Afghanistan au gouvernement afghan en 2014. Si je comprends bien notre politique, nous retirerons alors nos forces de combat, laisserons une plus petite force américaine en Afghanistan en charge de la formation. Que faisons-nous si au moment où arrive la date limite, les Afghans sont incapables de gérer leur sécurité ? Partons-nous quand même ?

M. Romney : Nous en aurons terminé en 2014 et quand je serais président, nous ferons en sorte de ramener nos troupes d’ici à la fin 2014. (…)

Nous avons observé des progrès ces dernières années. L’augmentation des troupes au sol a été une réussite et le programme de formation avance à grands pas. Les Forces de sécurité afghanes sont désormais nombreuses : 350 000 soldats sont prêts à être mobilisés pour assurer la sécurité et nous serons en mesure de procéder à ce transfert d’ici à la fin 2014. Nos soldats rentreront à la maison à ce moment-là.

Dans le même temps, nous surveillerons la situation au Pakistan car ce qui s’y passera aura un impact majeur sur le succès de l’Afghanistan. Je dis cela car je sais que beaucoup de gens préféreraient juste s’en frotter les mains et partir. Je ne dis pas cela de vous, M. le président, mais de certaines personnes dans notre pays qui pensent que le Pakistan se comporte bien avec nous et que nous devons en partir. Le Pakistan est important pour la région, pour le monde et nous, car il détient 100 ogives nucléaires et s’empresse d’en construire davantage. Il en aura bientôt plus que la Grande-Bretagne. Il accueille également le réseau Haqqani et les Talibans. Un Pakistan qui tombe en lambeaux, qui devient un Etat défaillant, poserait un extrême danger à l’Afghanistan et à nous. Nous allons donc continuer à aider le Pakistan à avoir un gouvernement plus stable et à reconstruire sa relation à nous. (…)

M. Obama : Quand j’ai commencé mon mandat, nous étions toujours enlisés en Irak et l’Afghanistan était à la dérive depuis une décennie. On a mis fin à la guerre en Irak, recentré notre attention sur l’Afghanistan et avons augmenté les troupes sur le terrain. (…) Nous avons aujourd’hui rempli beaucoup des objectifs qui nous ont amené là-bas. Mais, nous avons en partie oublié pourquoi nous y sommes allés. Nous y sommes allés parce que des gens là-bas étaient responsables de la mort de 3 000 Américains. Nous avons décimé les têtes d’Al-Qaida dans les régions frontalières entre l’Afghanistan et le Pakistan. Nous avons alors commencé à construire les forces afghanes. Nous pouvons aujourd’hui amorcer notre retrait, car rien ne justifie que des Américains doivent mourir alors que des Afghans sont parfaitement capables de défendre leur pays.

Cette transition doit avoir lieu de façon responsable. Nous sommes restés là-bas longtemps et nous devons nous assurer que nous et nos partenaires dans la coalition se retirent de façon responsable et en donnant aux Afghans ce dont ils ont besoin.

Mais, je pense que les Américains reconnaissent qu’après une décennie de guerre il est temps de construire notre nation ici. Nous pouvons désormais affecter certaines ressources pour, par exemple, permettre aux Américains de retrouver du travail, notamment nos vétérans, reconstruire nos routes, nos ponts, nos écoles, nous assurer que nos vétérans obtiennent les soins dont ils ont besoin en terme de troubles post-traumatiques et de blessures cérébrales traumatiques, de s’assurer que les diplômes dont ils ont besoin pour avoir un bon travail existent. (…)

M. Schieffer : Le général Allen, notre commandant en Afghanistan, a dit que des Américains meurent encore du fait de groupes soutenus par le Pakistan. Nous savons que le Pakistan a arrêté le médecin qui nous a aidé à attraper Oussama Ben Laden. Il fournit encore un refuge aux terroristes et pourtant nous continuons à donner des milliards de dollars au Pakistan. Le moment est-il venu de couper les ponts avec le Pakistan ?

M. Romney : Non, le temps n’est pas venu de couper les ponts avec une nation qui a plus de 100 ogives nucléaires et qui est sur le point de doubler son arsenal à tout moment ; un pays qui vit sous de sérieuses menaces de groupes terroristes, comme je l’ai dit, les Talibans, le réseau Haqqani. (…) C’est une zone importante du monde pour nous. Le Pakistan est techniquement un allié, même si il ne se comporte pas vraiment comme un allié actuellement. Il y a du travail. Je ne blâme pas l’administration pour les relations tendues que nous avons avec le Pakistan. On a du aller là-bas pour capturer Oussama Ben Laden. C’était la chose à faire. Ça les a énervé (…) Nous allons devoir travailler avec les gens au Pakistan pour les aider à agir de façon plus responsable qu’ils ne le font. C’est important pour eux. C’est important pour les ogives nucléaires.  C’est important pour le succès de l’Afghanistan.

Au Pakistan, il y a un important groupe de Pachtouns qui sont Talibans. Ils vont s’empresser d’entrer en Afghanistan quand nous partirons. C’est pourquoi les Forces de sécurité afghanes ont tant de travail pour être en mesure de les combattre. Nous devons admettre que nous ne pouvons pas partir comme cela du Pakistan. Mais, nous devons nous assurer que si nous les aidons, ce sera en échange de progrès sur des questions qui en feront une société civile.

M. Schieffer : Passons au chapitre suivant, qui est particulièrement important. Il s’agit de la Chine et des défis qu’elle pose à l’Amérique…

M. Obama : La Chine est à la fois un adversaire et un partenaire potentiel au sein de la communauté internationale, si elle respecte les règles. Dès mon arrivée au pouvoir j’ai insisté sur le fait que la Chine devait jouer avec les mêmes règles que tout le monde.

Je sais que des Américains ont vu leur emploi partir à l’étranger ; j’ai vu des entreprises et des travailleurs qui ne pouvaient commercer sur un pied d’égalité. C’est pourquoi j’ai mis en place une équipe chargée de surveiller les tricheurs dans le domaine du commerce international. C’est pourquoi nous avons porté plus d’affaires en justice que l’administration précédente en deux mandats.

M. Romney : Sur certains plans, la Chine a des intérêts tout à fait semblables aux nôtres : ils veulent un monde stable. Ils ne veulent pas la guerre. Ils ne veulent pas du protectionnisme. Ils ne veulent pas voir le monde sombrer dans le chaos parce qu’ils ont des produits à vendre, des gens à mettre au travail – environ 20 000 – ou plutôt 20 millions – de personnes qui quittent la campagne chaque année pour rejoindre les villes. La Chine peut donc être notre partenaire. Nous n’avons pas besoin de faire d’elle notre adversaire, si elle agit de façon responsable. (…)

Nous allons nous assurer que nos relations commerciales avec la Chine nous soient profitables. J’ai vu année après année des entreprises fermer et des gens perdre leur travail parce que la Chine ne respecte pas les règles, notamment en maintenant à un niveau artificiellement bas le niveau de leur monnaie. Ce qui baisse le prix de leurs produits et rend les nôtres non compétitifs. Cela doit cesser. C’est pourquoi le jour même de mon entrée en fonction, je les accuserai de manipuler leur monnaie. Ils violent la propriété intellectuelle et volent nos brevets, nos technologies. Ils piratent nos ordinateurs et contrefont nos productions.

M. Obama : Gouverneur Romney, vous êtes très au fait de la question des emplois qui partent à l’étranger parce vous avez investi dans des entreprises qui délocalisaient… Vous avez ce droit, c’est comme ça que le marché fonctionne. Mais j’ai fait un pari différent : celui des travailleurs américains. Si nous vous avions écouté sur l’industrie automobile, nous serions en train d’acheter des voitures aux Chinois au lieu de leur en vendre.

Grâce au travail que nous avons déjà accompli, nos exportations vers la Chine ont doublé depuis que je suis arrivé au pouvoir, et la convertibilité entre les deux monnaies est la plus avantageuse pour nos exportations depuis 1993.
Nous croyons que la Chine peut être un partenaire mais nous envoyons aussi un signal clair : les Etats-Unis sont une puissance du Pacifique ; nous allons être présents dans cette zone.


Droits de l’homme: Contre la dictature du vêtement, salopes de tous les pays unissez vous ! (Why can we be arrested for being naked in the street ? NY erotic photographer turns human rights activist)

23 mars, 2014
http://blogs.elpais.com/.a/6a00d8341bfb1653ef016763d31e46970b-pi
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/b/be/Duchamp_LargeGlass.jpg
https://i0.wp.com/darkroom.baltimoresun.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/AFP_Getty-513178632.jpg
EricaSimoneEricaSimoneArrestIls se partagent mes vêtements, ils tirent au sort ma tunique. Psaumes 22: 18
Les soldats, après avoir crucifié Jésus, prirent ses vêtements, et ils en firent quatre parts, une part pour chaque soldat. Ils prirent aussi sa tunique, qui était sans couture, d’un seul tissu depuis le haut jusqu’en bas. Et ils dirent entre eux:Ne la déchirons pas, mais tirons au sort à qui elle sera. Cela arriva afin que s’accomplît cette parole de l’Écriture: Ils se sont partagé mes vêtements, Et ils ont tiré au sort ma tunique. Jean (19: 23-24)
Dans un entretien (…), Duchamp révèle que cette « mariée » est un concept qui prend sa source dans un stand de fête foraine de province : les jeunes gens devaient envoyer des projectiles sur une représentation de femme en robe de mariée afin de la déshabiller, ses atours ne tenant qu’à un fil. Wikipedia (La Mariée mise à nu par ses célibataires, même, Marcel Duchamp, 1923)
Le grand verre a été qualifié de machine d’amour, mais c’est en fait une machine de souffrance. Ses compartiments supérieurs et inférieurs sont séparés les uns des autres pour toujours par un horizon désigné comme « habits de la mariée ». La mariée est suspendue, peut-être à une corde, dans une cage isolée, ou crucifiée. Les célibataires restent au-dessous, à gauche avec la seule possibilité d’une masturbation fiévreuse, angoissée. Janis Mink
J’ai résumé L’Étranger, il y a longtemps, par une phrase dont je reconnais qu’elle est très paradoxale : “Dans notre société tout homme qui ne pleure pas à l’enterrement de sa mère risque d’être condamné à mort.” Je voulais dire seulement que le héros du livre est condamné parce qu’il ne joue pas le jeu. En ce sens, il est étranger à la société où il vit, où il erre, en marge, dans les faubourgs de la vie privée, solitaire, sensuelle. (…) On ne se tromperait donc pas beaucoup en lisant, dans L’Étranger, l’histoire d’un homme qui, sans aucune attitude héroïque, accepte de mourir pour la vérité. Il m’est arrivé de dire aussi, et toujours paradoxalement, que j’avais essayé de figurer, dans mon personnage, le seul Christ que nous méritions. Camus (préface américaine à L’Etranger)
Le thème du poète maudit né dans une société marchande (…) s’est durci dans un préjugé qui finit par vouloir qu’on ne puisse être un grand artiste que contre la société de son temps, quelle qu’elle soit. Légitime à l’origine quand il affirmait qu’un artiste véritable ne pouvait composer avec le monde de l’argent, le principe est devenu faux lorsqu’on en a tiré qu’un artiste ne pouvait s’affirmer qu’en étant contre toute chose en général. Albert Camus
Depuis que l’ordre religieux est ébranlé – comme le christianisme le fut sous la Réforme – les vices ne sont pas seuls à se trouver libérés. Certes les vices sont libérés et ils errent à l’aventure et ils font des ravages. Mais les vertus aussi sont libérées et elles errent, plus farouches encore, et elles font des ravages plus terribles encore. Le monde moderne est envahi des veilles vertus chrétiennes devenues folles. Les vertus sont devenues folles pour avoir été isolées les unes des autres, contraintes à errer chacune en sa solitude. Chesterton
Personne ne nous fera croire que l’appareil judiciaire d’un Etat moderne prend réellement pour objet l’extermination des petits bureaucrates qui s’adonnent au café au lait, aux films de Fernandel et aux passades amoureuses avec la secrétaire du patron. René Girard
Il faut se souvenir que le nazisme s’est lui-même présenté comme une lutte contre la violence: c’est en se posant en victime du traité de Versailles que Hitler a gagné son pouvoir. Et le communisme lui aussi s’est présenté comme une défense des victimes. Désormais, c’est donc seulement au nom de la lutte contre la violence qu’on peut commettre la violence. René Girard
L’inauguration majestueuse de l’ère « post-chrétienne » est une plaisanterie. Nous sommes dans un ultra-christianisme caricatural qui essaie d’échapper à l’orbite judéo-chrétienne en « radicalisant » le souci des victimes dans un sens antichrétien. (…) Jusqu’au nazisme, le judaïsme était la victime préférentielle de ce système de bouc émissaire. Le christianisme ne venait qu’en second lieu. Depuis l’Holocauste , en revanche, on n’ose plus s’en prendre au judaïsme, et le christianisme est promu au rang de bouc émissaire numéro un. (…) Le mouvement antichrétien le plus puissant est celui qui réassume et « radicalise » le souci des victimes pour le paganiser. (…) Comme les Eglises chrétiennes ont pris conscience tardivement de leurs manquements à la charité, de leur connivence avec l’ordre établi, dans le monde d’hier et d’aujourd’hui, elles sont particulièrement vulnérables au chantage permanent auquel le néopaganisme contemporain les soumet. René Girard
La société du spectacle, [selon] Roger Caillois qui analyse la dimension ludique dans la culture (…), c’est la dimension inoffensive de la cérémonie primitive. Autrement dit lorsqu’on est privé du mythe, les paroles sacrées qui donnent aux œuvres pouvoir sur la réalité, le rite se réduit à un ensemble réglés d’actes désormais inefficaces qui aboutissent finalement à un pur jeu, loedos. Il donne un exemple qui est extraordinaire, il dit qu’au fond les gens qui jouent au football aujourd’hui, qui lancent un ballon en l’air ne font que répéter sur un mode ludique, jocus, ou loedos, société du spectacle, les grands mythes anciens de la naissance du soleil dans les sociétés où le sacré avait encore une valeur. (…) Nous vivons sur l’idée de Malraux – l’art, c’est ce qui reste quand la religion a disparu. Jean Clair
Le gros problème des rapports entre les sexes aujourd’hui, c’est qu’il y a des contresens, de la part des hommes en particulier, sur ce que veut dire le vêtement des femmes. Beaucoup d’études consacrées aux affaires de viol ont montré que les hommes voient comme des provocations des attitudes qui sont en fait en conformité avec une mode vestimentaire. Très souvent, les femmes elles-mêmes condamnent les femmes violées au prétexte qu' » elles l’ont bien cherché « .  Pierre Bourdieu
Tout le monde dénonce les normes de silhouette imposées par les médias et elles perdurent étrangement, pourtant certains journalistes des pages société des magazines féminins sont excédés par les dossiers régime sortant systématiquement avant l’été et essaient de s’y opposer. Pourquoi? Les normes obligatoires sont de moins en moins nombreuses, tout est mis en flottement, les gens sont complètement perdus et angoissés et ils n’ont qu’une demande, surtout adressée aux médias: qu’est-ce qui est bien?, qu’est-ce qui est mal? Ou version plus soft: comment font les autres ? La plage est une usine à fabriquer le mot “normal”. C’est celui qui revient le plus fréquemment, jusqu’à la définition d’un beau sein normal. Mais la catégorie la plus intéressante est celle du “trop beau” sein (le mot a été employé), qui dans d’autres contextes a des avantages évidents, mais qui sur la plage, parce qu’il accroche trop le regard, provoque chez la personne qui le possède une moindre liberté de mouvement parce que le regard glisse moins. Cet exemple illustre la fabrication d’une norme par les gens. Ce n’est ni une norme explicite ni une norme obligatoire, on peut en sortir, mais quand on en sort, sur la plage par exemple, on subit le poids des regards. (…) Enlever le haut rend la drague plus difficile. Les hommes doivent montrer qu’ils savent se tenir. Jean-Claude Kauffmann
Nous revendiquons nos atours de filles de joie, notre propension à montrer nos genoux, nos bas résilles et nos oripeaux polissons, car la révolution se fera en talons!  Yagg (collectif de lesbiennes)
I like to wear tops that show my cleavage and show off my ladies. If that makes me a slut, then I’m a slut. Anne Watson (organiser, Australian Sex Party)
I’m proud to be a slut too, it’s all about “inner sexual confidence”.  Katherine Feeney (journaliste)
Aujourd’hui ce que nous faisons c’est SE RÉ-APPROPRIER le mot “salope”. En REPRENANT le mot salope nous lui ENLEVONS SA FORCE. Les gays ont repris le mot ‘queer’, et bravo à eux. Aujourd’hui les femmes et les hommes de Melbourne reprennent à leur compte le mot SALOPE. Leslie Cannold
While I support all efforts to challenge violence against women in all its manifestations – my blog is a witness to the global level of that violence – I hesitate to join the marching ranks. I welcome any confrontation with those who would blame the victim in rape. No woman deserves rape or invites sexual assault. I support the basic intention of the march. But I fear it has become more about the right to be ‘a slut’ than about the right to be free from violence. (…) Is it about mocking and sending up, or owning and embracing? Some organisers and supporters say it’s about reclaiming the word slut, using it as a term of empowerment for women. Some say it’s satire, a send-up, a mockery, about emptying the word of its power by making fun of it. (…) Using slut as the flagship word for this new movement puts women in danger through giving men even more license to think about women in a way that suits them, and not as targets of violence and terrible social discrimination. (…) The men chanting “We Love sluts!” don’t seem to be picking up on any satire. Why would they? Porn culture reinforces the idea that all women are sluts. Slut walks marginalise women and girls who want to protest violence against women but do not want ‘own’ or represent the word ‘slut’. I fear mainstreaming the term even further will increase harassment of women and girls because ‘slut’ will be seen as some kind of compliment. (…) The men who are responding to this message are not getting the irony at all … Men want women to be sluts and now they’re buying in. Gail Dines
As teachers who travel around the country speaking about sexual violence, pornography and feminism, we hear stories from women students who feel intense pressure to be sexually available « on demand ». These students have grown up in a culture in which hypersexualized images of young women are commonplace and where hardcore porn is the major form of sex education for young men. They have been told over and over that in order to be valued in such a culture, they must look and act like sluts, while not being labeled slut because the label has dire consequences including being blamed for rape, depression, anxiety, eating disorders, and self-mutilation. Gail Dines and Wendy J Murphy
Depuis longtemps, les prostituées de rues se déguisent en pute pour bien expliquer: le rimmel, les bas-résilles, c’est moi qui vend la marchandise, j’annonce la couleur, laissez la petite secrétaire ou la mère de famille qui fait ses courses.  On savait à quoi s’en tenir.  Mais les marchands de fringues, de musique, de régimes et de cosmétiques ont su convaincre les femmes qu’être un objet était valorisant.  Et que montrer son piercing au nombril était chouette, que le string qui dépasse, la jarretière du bas auto-fixant, la bretelle de soutien-gorge était chouette et libérée.  Bref, la femme marchandise était conquérante, adulée, victorieuse. Et devenait l’étalon. Comme on imposait le voile dans d’autres pays et d’autres cultures, on imposait (moins brutalement mais plus sournoisement, certes) en modèle l’échancré, le transparent, le push-up, le moulant, le fendu, l’épilé, le siliconé. Ce sont ces fausses putes, les « salopes » médiatiques, de Madonna à Britney Spears en passant par Beyoncé qui, en vendant leur cul moulé et gigotant à longueur de vidéo clip ont promu la femme hypersexualisée, libertine et aguicheuse. Et fière de l’être.  « Dior j’adore » nous dit une bouche entr’ouverte et transpirante.  Le Perrier jaillit sur un corps bronzé, et la miss Wonderbra nous dit de la regarder dans les yeux.  La Saint Valentin, une débauche (sans jeu de mot) de peaux montrées pour vendre de la lingerie.  (…) Vous avez vu comment s’habillent les présentatrices télé?  Karine Lemarchand, Melissa Theuriau, Daphné Roulié, Anne-Sophie-Lapix, et des dizaines d’autres ont été choisie pour leur Q. S. (Quotient sexuel) AVANT leur QI.  Normal, sinon elles se feraient zapper entre les pubs qui montrent des filles sublimes.  Forum-doctissimo
“Why can we be arrested for being naked in the street, when as human beings, we are born naked?” I can understand that it would be socially unacceptable or morally discouraged, but for it to be in some cases prohibited by law…? This all seemed quite bizarre and really more so a violation of human rights. Erica Simone
There were a few times when I would manage to capture a wonderful image, but I was out of focus or some element in the photograph didn’t work. Overall, despite the technical challenges, I was quite lucky. In some cases, yes, I definitely needed the cooperation of other people in the photograph to capture what I wanted, but most of them were done guerilla-style. (…) The project is not about performance, but about photography. I didn’t feel that I was performing when producing the photos, but rather, just trying to capture an iconic image. I was never nude for that long, typically 20-30 seconds, and the whole time I focused on the other side of the camera, not the people watching or what’s going on in the street. My goal is to go in, get the shot, and quickly move away from the crime scene. It’s about the end image, not the moment in itself. (…) No actually, no one has ever overtly expressed discontent or being offended during my shoots. Most people laugh or applaud. I don’t think my physique or intentions are offensive to most people. Had I run around a church or a playground in my birthday suit—it would probably be a different story.(…)  Possibly, if I had been very out of shape, the collection could have been even more popular, because people would have been even more shocked: “How could this person possibly feel comfortable running around naked?” This brings up other questions such as “Why would one person feel more or less comfortable being naked just because of the way they look?” Some models are extremely insecure, the same way some overweight people are nudists. I don’t think one has anything to do with the other. (…) Of course I would love to eventually be financially secure enough to be able to lead a stable life with the ability to make certain choices and as anyone, I would love for my work to be successful for my own sense of accomplishment. But more importantly, if I could use my skills and social position to make a difference and to help people, then this drive would make much more sense and have much more of an impact. I am a lot more motivated to make a difference than to be a famous photographer for its own sake, so hopefully they’ll go hand in hand. (…) but I don’t think it takes a supermodel to get where you want in life. I do often use my feminine “powers” to get the pictures I want. Of course, I’ve found myself flirting with an old man to get his picture or batting my eye-lashes to get past authorities. As a woman, I think it’s a God-given right to use those charms! While men have their advantages, women have theirs and I feel it is fair game to rock what you have. (…)  I’m not too worried about what dealers and collectors want from artists. I’m only interested in what I want to do, since that’s what makes me happy. I don’t see why I wouldn’t be able to develop a style fully regardless, if that’s what I wanted to do. For me, it’s all experiment and experience and as long as I keep learning and producing more and more interesting work, while paying rent, that’s all that matters for me. Erica Simone
Nue York: Self-Portraits of a Bare Urban Citizen est né d’une interrogation à propos des vêtements et de leur importance dans la société d’aujourd’hui. La mode et les habits que nous portons valent comme un langage : ils nous permettent de dresser un portrait silencieux de qui nous sommes et de qui nous voulons être, offrant à la société une impression de nous-mêmes — quelle qu’elle puisse être. La mode tend aussi à nous différencier et à nous placer dans des catégories sociales variées, ainsi qu’à traduire un certain état d’esprit ou un sentiment particulier. Cet outil est assez précieux pour la société et comme la plupart des gens, j’utilise mes vêtements comme une manière de définir ma propre image. Dans une ville comme New York, l’industrie de la mode a un impact massif : les gens ont tendance à être très concernés par leur apparence et ce qu’elle traduit en termes sociaux, ce que j’ai pu constater quand j’ai photographié la Fashion Week il y a quelques années. Comme j’observais cette assemblée de gens très conscients d’eux-mêmes, plus intéressés par les soldes à Barney’s que par les sans-abri sur lesquels ils butaient dans la rue, j’ai commencé à me demander : « Comment serait le monde si nous étions tous nus ? Que se passerait-il si nous n’avions pas nos vêtements pour définir qui nous voulons être ou comment nous voulons nous sentir en tant qu’individus ? Si nous ne pouvions représenter notre statut social pour être traités comme nous le désirons par les autres ? Si tout ce que nous avions, c’était nos corps ? »Ces questions ont soulevé de nombreux problèmes et ces problèmes à leur tour de nouvelles questions. De là est né mon projet photographique. Armée de mon trépied et d’une bonne dose d’adrénaline, j’ai parcouru les rues nue, pour découvrir ce que serait une journée typique à New York dans ces conditions.  Erica Simone
Je ne me considère pas comme une nudiste ou une exhibitionniste, mais comme une artiste qui pose des questions à la société. Me sentant bien dans ma peau, la nudité ne me semble pas quelque chose d’effrayant. Le corps relève de l’essence humaine, animale. Que certains aient l’esprit puritain au point d’être offensés par un corps nu constitue, à mes yeux, un mystère. Certes, je conçois que la nudité ne se prête pas à toutes les situations, et que certains pourraient l’utiliser de manière malveillante. Pour autant, le fait que la loi nous interdise d’être nu en public, c’est-à-dire d’évoluer dans l’état le plus primitif et naturel qui soit, cela me rend folle. La nudité n’a jamais tué personne. Ce n’est pas le cas des armes à feu qui, elles, sont autorisées aux États-Unis. Dans ce pays, posséder un pistolet est bien plus acceptable que d’être nu en dehors de sa salle de bain ! (…) S’habiller, c’est s’exprimer. À sa seule tenue, on peut déterminer si un individu est riche, s’il est « cool » ou non, s’il a du goût, s’il est propre sur lui, si c’est un homme d’affaires, un voyou… Ainsi la société met-elle des étiquettes sur les gens. De ce fait, je m’interroge : comment serait la vie sans vêtements ? Comment interpréterions-nous la vision d’autrui ? Comment sélectionnerions-nous nos amis sans les repères fournis par les styles vestimentaires ? Traiterait-on les gens différemment ? La façon dont on jauge habituellement nos semblables s’effondrerait. Peut-être que l’on deviendrait plus attentif au regard de la personne qui est en face de nous, à l’énergie qu’elle dégage. Peut-être que l’on deviendrait plus intuitif. Qui sait ? (…) Je partage probablement un certain nombre de choses avec beaucoup de groupes militants, qu’ils soient féministes ou humanistes. « Nue York » soulève inévitablement la question du féminisme. Cela dit, je n’ai pas conçu le projet sous cet angle. Il s’agit avant tout d’interroger les gens en tant qu’êtres humains. Si mes photos poussent les spectateurs à se poser des questions sur le rôle des vêtements dans notre société, ou si la série sert de point de départ à d’autres réflexions, alors je considérerai ma mission comme réussie. Erica Simone
Erica Simone est née à Knoxville, Tennessee. Après avoir passé sa vie entre Los Angeles, Paris et New York, Erica photographie la jungle de New York. Ses images sont publiées dans de nombreux magazines inernationaux tels que National Geographic, PHOTO, the Daily News, El Mundo, La Repubblica, Whitewall Magazine, PDN et beaucoup d’autres… L’Oeil de la photographie
Vous êtes photographe? Peintre? Vous êtes en panne d’inspiration? Mettez du sein et de la fesse dans vos oeuvres!!! Ca marche à coup sur car c’est immanquablement relayé par les médias! diabolodenfer méphisto
Comment sélectionnerait-on nos amis ? J’ai bien une petite idée… Les mal foutus seraient peut-être bien seuls... Gaëlle Rosier
« Ce projet n’est pas à proprement parler quelque chose de facile à mener, mais j’apprécie les montées d’adrénaline. » dixit notre belle photographe En tout cas, plus agréable à regarder que l’urinoir de notre Marcel national. On peut lui proposer de faire cela sur la place Tahrir en Egypte. Là, elle aurait sûrement une overdose d’adrénaline ! gerald B
Question soft : Elle laisse son soutif pendant les séances d’UV ou elle est partie en vacances au Qatar ? Bernard Palux
Des photos de femmes se baladant à poil en ville, comme ici, ce n’est pas ce qui manque, et depuis longtemps. Mais, ce n’est pas correct, pas féministe, c’est immoral, car elles ont le culot de prétendre y trouver du plaisir. Shocking. Impossible à entendre dans ce 21e siècle où la presse meanstream prétend nier la différence des sexes. Il y a certainement un horrible mâle derrière tout ça. En revanche, en enfumant ces nouveaux moralisateurs avec un discours pseudo politique, ça devient soudain révolutionnaire. Et les bobos peuvent regarder tranquillement des photos de cul sans se cacher. Décidément, la Com a des ressources insoupçonnées. andro mede

L’érotisme serait-il ce qui reste quand l’art a disparu ?

A l’heure où, armée de ses seuls seins nus et d’une tronçonneuse, une dissidente réussit à venir à bout d’une croix de bois commémorant les victimes du génocide ukrainien

Et où, de Toronto à Boston et Melbourne et de Paris à Londres et Amsterdam, nos salopes bravent l’enfer de nos rues pour réhabiliter plus de 2 000 ans d’expérience accumulée du « plus vieux métier du monde » …

Le Pays autoproclamé des droits de l’homme va-t-il devoir accorder l’asile politique et un nouveau timbre

A l’autoportraitiste érotique Erica Simone qui, armée elle aussi de sa seule irréprochable plastique et d’un évident sens de l’autopromotion, se dévoue corps et âme à la défense des droits de l’homme (?) dans la jungle puritaine de Manhattan ?

PHOTOS. Nue à New York contre la dictature du vêtement

Cyril Bonnet

Le Nouvel Observateur

22-03-2014

En tenue d’Ève dans la Grosse Pomme. Tel est le programme de « Nue York », série d’autoportraits dans lesquels la photographe professionnelle Erica Simone se promène dans le plus simple appareil au sein de célèbre ville américaine.

Ne la qualifiez pas d’exhibitionniste ! Cette photographe éclectique et aguerrie, passée par plusieurs continents et de prestigieuses publications, revendique une démarche artistique et a quelques messages à faire passer. Sur l’illégalité de la nudité qui la « rend folle », d’une part ; sur le carcan social dans lequel les vêtements enferment leurs propriétaires, d’autre part. En fil rouge, une même volonté de susciter la réflexion à travers des images ludiques et inattendues. Interview.

Comment se déroule une séance photo type pour la série « Nue York » ?

– Je passe beaucoup de temps à me promener en ville avec un ami pour trouver des scènes intéressantes, propices à des scénarios et des situations qui permettent de s’amuser. Il y a ensuite une longue phase d’élaboration de la composition de l’image, puis d’attente de l’instant décisif. Lorsqu’il survient, j’enlève mes vêtements et on commence à prendre les photos. En tout, je ne reste nue qu’une ou deux minutes. Trois si j’estime qu’il faut reprendre une autre série de clichés.

Quelles sont les réactions des passants ?

– Il arrive qu’ils ne me remarquent même pas. Sinon, je ne reçois que des réactions positives. Les gens rient, applaudissent, ou encore s’exclament : « Only in New York ! » (« Uniquement à New York ! ») Je n’ai jamais eu de problème. Et je fais de mon mieux pour éviter la police. Ce projet n’est pas à proprement parler quelque chose de facile à mener, mais j’apprécie les montées d’adrénaline.

Quel message souhaitez-vous diffuser ?

– Je ne me considère pas comme une nudiste ou une exhibitionniste, mais comme une artiste qui pose des questions à la société. Me sentant bien dans ma peau, la nudité ne me semble pas quelque chose d’effrayant. Le corps relève de l’essence humaine, animale. Que certains aient l’esprit puritain au point d’être offensés par un corps nu constitue, à mes yeux, un mystère.

Certes, je conçois que la nudité ne se prête pas à toutes les situations, et que certains pourraient l’utiliser de manière malveillante. Pour autant, le fait que la loi nous interdise d’être nu en public, c’est-à-dire d’évoluer dans l’état le plus primitif et naturel qui soit, cela me rend folle. La nudité n’a jamais tué personne. Ce n’est pas le cas des armes à feu qui, elles, sont autorisées aux États-Unis. Dans ce pays, posséder un pistolet est bien plus acceptable que d’être nu en dehors de sa salle de bain !

Vous pointez également la valeur sociale des choix vestimentaires.

– S’habiller, c’est s’exprimer. À sa seule tenue, on peut déterminer si un individu est riche, s’il est « cool » ou non, s’il a du goût, s’il est propre sur lui, si c’est un homme d’affaires, un voyou… Ainsi la société met-elle des étiquettes sur les gens.

De ce fait, je m’interroge : comment serait la vie sans vêtements ? Comment interpréterions-nous la vision d’autrui ? Comment sélectionnerions-nous nos amis sans les repères fournis par les styles vestimentaires ? Traiterait-on les gens différemment ? La façon dont on jauge habituellement nos semblables s’effondrerait. Peut-être que l’on deviendrait plus attentif au regard de la personne qui est en face de nous, à l’énergie qu’elle dégage. Peut-être que l’on deviendrait plus intuitif. Qui sait ?

Vos photos servent un message particulier. D’autres personnes, comme les Femen, utilisent la nudité en lieu public à des fins politiques. Vous trouvez-vous des points communs avec elles ?

– Je partage probablement un certain nombre de choses avec beaucoup de groupes militants, qu’ils soient féministes ou humanistes. « Nue York » soulève inévitablement la question du féminisme. Cela dit, je n’ai pas conçu le projet sous cet angle. Il s’agit avant tout d’interroger les gens en tant qu’êtres humains. Si mes photos poussent les spectateurs à se poser des questions sur le rôle des vêtements dans notre société, ou si la série sert de point de départ à d’autres réflexions, alors je considérerai ma mission comme réussie.

Propos recueillis par Cyril Bonnet – Le Nouvel Observateur

Crédit photos : Erica Simone. Voir son site web.

Voir aussi:

Experiment and Experience: Peter Weiss Interviews Erica Simone

Peter Weiss

NY Arts

Peter Weiss: You have a very energetic personality; you seem very confident and secure. Am I reading it right and to what do you attribute that security?

Erica Simone: Yes, I like to think of myself as being confident and secure (most of the time). We do only have one life, one body, and one mind, so why waste time feeling bad about our failures or ourselves? All we can attempt is to improve what we don’t like or to just be accepting of it. And if you aren’t secure, it’s important to at least appear so. I think without it, people stop trusting you and you stop intriguing people.

PW: You travel light and alone at times when you work, both here and abroad. Would you describe yourself as a risk taker or adventurer in your artistic pursuit? Do you see a difference?

ES: I definitely identify with being an adventurer. I love to explore new territories and I love challenges, there is no fun in staying safe. I’m somewhat of a risk taker, but you won’t typically find me running into a flaming house … unless to save a soul.

PW: What sacrifices do you make in pursuit of your art? What has been your greatest victory? What is your greatest missed opportunity or photo? Do you have a favorite piece and why? Are there pieces that are staged and should be declared as such or have you allowed confusion? Have you ever felt guilty about an image you have taken? Has it ever seen the light of day?

ES: I don’t tend to think of the sacrifices I make as being “sacrifices,” but more so just experiences. In my nude project, I gave up the privacy of my own body, but it’s not in any way a sacrifice to me. I would never part with anything I couldn’t stand losing. I am passionate about my work, but if I hadn’t been comfortable giving that up, I would have never done it.

In the Nue York series, I’d say the greatest victory was probably the subway shot. With the constant movement of the passengers, it took quite a while for the composition of the photograph to fall the way I wanted it to and then I only had 1 subway stop to capture it. By that time, I had already traveled from the West Village to the Bronx!

There were a few times when I would manage to capture a wonderful image, but I was out of focus or some element in the photograph didn’t work. Overall, despite the technical challenges, I was quite lucky.

In some cases, yes, I definitely needed the cooperation of other people in the photograph to capture what I wanted, but most of them were done guerilla-style.

I’ve never felt guilt towards an image. I’ve felt insecure, sure, but I think that just goes hand in hand with being the model. We can’t always happy about the way we look in photographs. I know I’m not.

PW: Do you consider the shooting of the “Bare Urban Citizen” collection interventionist/ performance art?

ES: The project is not about performance, but about photography. I didn’t feel that I was performing when producing the photos, but rather, just trying to capture an iconic image. I was never nude for that long, typically 20-30 seconds, and the whole time I focused on the other side of the camera, not the people watching or what’s going on in the street. My goal is to go in, get the shot, and quickly move away from the crime scene. It’s about the end image, not the moment in itself.

PW: Have you ever found yourself in a situation where your act of taking pictures has offended the passersby or the subject? If so, did you continue despite the protests? If so what was your rational? During the Urban Nude, what gave you the idea? What are you saying with this collection? If you weren’t as pretty as you are, would that have impacted this collection?

ES: No actually, no one has ever overtly expressed discontent or being offended during my shoots. Most people laugh or applaud. I don’t think my physique or intentions are offensive to most people. Had I run around a church or a playground in my birthday suit—it would probably be a different story.

The collection contemplates the use of clothing and fashion in society. We tend to first judge or analyze others by how they look on the outside, the same way we tend to act or feel differently depending on what we are wearing. I produced this series after asking myself certain questions: “What would life be like if we didn’t have clothing to express ourselves?” “How would we perceive or judge others, on what basis?” “How would we feel with our bodies, would we be more or less secure?” “What would the environment look like?”

Thank you. I have no idea if the collection would have had more or less of an impact. Possibly, if I had been very out of shape, the collection could have been even more popular, because people would have been even more shocked: “How could this person possibly feel comfortable running around naked?” This brings up other questions such as “Why would one person feel more or less comfortable being naked just because of the way they look?” Some models are extremely insecure, the same way some overweight people are nudists. I don’t think one has anything to do with the other.

PW: Does fame and fortune motivate you or are you an artist for artist sake?

ES: Of course I would love to eventually be financially secure enough to be able to lead a stable life with the ability to make certain choices and as anyone, I would love for my work to be successful for my own sense of accomplishment. But more importantly, if I could use my skills and social position to make a difference and to help people, then this drive would make much more sense and have much more of an impact. I am a lot more motivated to make a difference than to be a famous photographer for its own sake, so hopefully they’ll go hand in hand.

PW: Where does your ego fit into your career?

ES: My ego comes and goes—a constant battle. I accept my flaws, as hard as it can be sometimes, but I also know that no one is perfect. We are all different, traveling on different journeys. All I can hope for is to keep moving forward, to keep learning and to keep making progress.

PW: You are very attractive young woman. How does this affect your entree in your photography? Do you use your feminine charms to get your pictures? How far will you go?

ES: Thank you, but I don’t think it takes a supermodel to get where you want in life. I do often use my feminine “powers” to get the pictures I want. Of course, I’ve found myself flirting with an old man to get his picture or batting my eye-lashes to get past authorities. As a woman, I think it’s a God-given right to use those charms! While men have their advantages, women have theirs and I feel it is fair game to rock what you have.

PW: As a photographer you have a very diverse body of work. The categories listed on your web site includes, portraits, people, travel, photo-journalism, self portraits, personal work, fashion, and beauty. What does your selection of subject matter say about you as a person, artist and professional photographer?

ES: I like producing a variety of work. My creative ADD introduces me to a diversity of subjects, which makes my job more exciting. I like exploring new ideas and concepts and I love a good challenge, so taking on new work is always something I have fun with. I’m not sure I’ll ever want to specialize in a certain area, there are too many interesting things to take pictures of; I want to take them all!

PW: Dealers and collectors expect from the professional artist a cohesive recognizable body of work. This work should fit a particular genre. As you know this allows dealers a sharper target in which to market an artist’s work. It could be argued that if your creative spectrum is too broad, you can’t develop a style fully and you risk losing the focus of you subject matter and continuity. How do you feel this established criteria affects your work from a professional and creative perspective?

ES: I’m not too worried about what dealers and collectors want from artists. I’m only interested in what I want to do, since that’s what makes me happy. I don’t see why I wouldn’t be able to develop a style fully regardless, if that’s what I wanted to do. For me, it’s all experiment and experience and as long as I keep learning and producing more and more interesting work, while paying rent, that’s all that matters for me.

Voir également:

Naked ambition: Photographer lays herself bare in nude poses on the streets of NYC

Rachel Quigley

The Daily Mail

28 March 2011

Photographers are often said to bare their souls through their pictures.

But Parisian Erica Simone has taken this to the next level by literally laying herself bare – she has photographed herself in nothing but her birthday suit on the streets of New York.

The 25-year-old has turned doing daily routines in the city to works of art simply by removing her clothes.

And Miss Simone made the daring decision to step out from behind the camera and go au naturel in a series of self-portraits taken in and around the Big Apple.

Speaking to MailOnline she said: ‘At first it was like, « Can I really do this? » I was into the idea, but I didn’t totally have the [nerve] to do it – I’m not totally an exhibitionist.

‘But I managed to do it on my first day of shooting in the West Village and I didn’t even get arrested.

‘I think that was just a combination of good timing and luck, and it is not as if I just spent the whole day walking around naked. I was fully clothed until I was ready to take the shot.’

‘It’s not about sex. It’s crazy that it’s illegal to be naked. The whole process was really liberating and it made me feel freer and more comfortable in my own skin and not be ashamed of my body.’

Once Erica got the idea for the exhibit, she decided to step out from behind the camera and do a number of self portraits in the nude, sometimes wearing only a variety of accessories, performing mundane activities

In the pictures, she rides the subway, checks out library books and shovels the snow on the sidewalk outside her apartment – all in the nude.

The 20 shots are part of Simone’s new exhibit Nue York: Self-Portraits of a Bare Urban Citizen, which opens next month at the Dash Gallery in Tribeca.

Miss Simone said the inspiration for the exhibition came to her during Fashion Week two years ago.

She said: ‘I was sitting around thinking about fashion and what would we be if we were naked and what if we didn’t have fashion to show who we were, our status, how much money we had, all these things.

‘Then I got the photographic idea of shooting people naked in the street, but just doing regular things, not especially posing, or being naked, but doing whatever.’

The pretty 25-year-old said she was not sure if she herself could go through with it but was intrigued by the challenge of staging the shots – which she took using a remote sensor – and stripping down to her birthday suit.

She said the general public were very accepting of her nudity and she did not have any bad experiences while doing it.

‘Most people were laughing, smiling or applauding and cheering. They seemed OK with it,’ she said. ‘The most challenging one was on the subway. I had to ride the whole way from West 14th Street to the end of the line to get the right shot.

‘The only person I told was the guy next to me as he had to hold my coat. But by the time some people even found out about it, I was clothed again.’

Miss Simone also said she has come a long way from the first shot to where she is now.

‘The first few times I was so nervous and I guess innocent about everything, and yeah it was scary a bit as well,’ she said.

‘But now I don’t care about being naked. I am more concerned about getting the shot right rather than worrying about being naked or what people in the streets are thinking.’

Voir encore:

Artist Statement

Nue York: Self-Portraits of a Bare Urban Citizen

As once an Angeleno in Paris, and now a Parisian in New York, really my mind is stuck in the stars. Photography has become a true passion and within it, a never-ending drive to try and challenge everything, even if it means getting naked in the freezing snow…

“Nue York: Self-Portraits of a Bare Urban Citizen” bloomed from an initial questioning about clothing and its importance in society today. Fashion and what we wear act as a language: they allow us to silently portray who we are or want to be, offering society an impression on us – whatever that may be. Fashion also tends to segregate and place us into various social categories as well as communicate a certain mood or particular feeling. This tool is quite precious to civil society and as most people, I organically use clothing as a way of portraying my own image. However, in a city like New York, the fashion industry has a massive impact: people tend to be very concerned with appearance and the materialistic side of it, which became very real while I was photographing Fashion Week a few years back.

As I watched an image-absorbed union of people care more about the sales at Barney’s than the homeless people they step over on the street, I began to ponder: “What would the world feel like naked? What if we didn’t have clothing to portray who we want to be or feel as individuals? What if we couldn’t show off our social status to deserve the treatment we wanted from others? What if all we had were our bodies?” These questions raised many various issues and these issues raised many various questions.

From there, my photographic project was born. With a tripod and a couple ounces of adrenaline, I took to the streets bare to see what a typical New York day would be like. At first, I wasn’t so sure what was going to happen or what was going to come of it all, but as the collection progressed, more and more issues became aware to me. For example: “Why can we be arrested for being naked in the street, when as human beings, we are born naked?” I can understand that it would be socially unacceptable or morally discouraged, but for it to be in some cases prohibited by law…? This all seemed quite bizarre and really more so a violation of human rights.

Another question that arose was that of sexuality. “Is nudity inherently sexual or is nudity just a part of being human? Why does society typically equate nudity to sex? And how does the variety of body types come into equation when asking that question?” Each person’s answer is different.

To clarify, I’m not an exhibitionist or a nudist – I’m an artist looking to humorously poke at some interesting thoughts about society and question who we are and portray as human beings. It’s now up to the viewer to answer those questions, as he/she likes.

From Houston to Hudson and from Bowery to the Bronx, photographing Manhattan has never been such a rush….


Irak: Ah, le bon vieux temps de Saddam! (Bagdad worst: Guess who’s got the curse of Google auto-complete this year ?)

23 mars, 2014
https://i2.wp.com/www.iranchamber.com/history/articles/images/saddam_baathist_propaganda.jpghttps://i1.wp.com/planetgroupentertainment.squarespace.com/storage/SaddamHussein.jpgJe pense (qu’il s’agit d’une guerre civile, ndlr), étant donné le niveau de violence, de meurtres, d’amertume, et la façon dont les forces se dressent les unes contres les autres. Il y a quelques années, lorsqu’il y avait une lutte au Liban ou ailleurs, on appelait cela une guerre civile. C’est bien pire. Ils avaient un dictateur brutal, mais ils avaient leurs rues, ils pouvaient sortir, leurs enfants pouvaient aller à l’école et en revenir sans que leurs parents ne se demandent ‘Vais-je revoir mon enfant ?’ (…) Les choses n’ont pas marché comme ils (les Etats-Unis et leurs alliés, ndlr) l’espéraient et il est essentiel d’avoir un regard critique  (…)  le gouvernement irakien n’a pas été capable de mettre la violence sous contrôle. (…) En tant que secrétaire général, j’ai fais tout ce que j’ai pu. Kofi Annan
Si du temps de Saddam Hussein, le chômage sévissait déjà et l’eau et d’électricité manquaient, les problèmes étaient d’une moindre ampleur et mieux gérés. La sécurité, elle, s’est totalement détériorée depuis l’invasion de l’Irak, menée en 2003 par une coalition conduite par les Etats-Unis. Pourtant, Bagdad a une histoire glorieuse. Construite en 762 sur les rives du Tigre par le calife abbasside Abou Jaafar al-Mansour, la ville a depuis joué un rôle central dans le monde arabo-musulman. Au 20e siècle, Bagdad était le brillant exemple d’une ville arabe moderne avec certaines des meilleurs universités et musées de la région, une élite bien formée, un centre culturel dynamique et un système de santé haut de gamme. Son aéroport international était un modèle pour la région et la ville a connu la naissance de l’Opep, le cartel des pays exportateurs de pétrole. La ville abritait en outre une population de différentes confessions: musulmans, chrétiens, juifs et autres. « Bagdad représentait le centre économique de l’Etat abbasside », souligne Issam al-Faili, professeur d’histoire politique à l’université Moustansiriyah, un établissement vieux de huit siècles. Il rappelle qu’elle a « servi de base à la conquête de régions voisines pour élargir l’influence de l’islam ». »Elle était une capitale du monde », dit, avec fierté, l’universitaire, qui admet qu' »aujourd’hui, elle est devenue l’une des villes les plus misérables de la planète ». AFP
Every expat I know here is mystified by that data. I’d be hard-pressed to find an expat (not a lot of them around admittedly) who believes that’s the case, apart from the prisoners of the Green Zone — the embassy people, U.N. staff and others who can’t actually get out into the city. Jane Arraf (freelance journalist)
The Iraqi capital has beaten out 222 other locations to be named the city with the lowest quality of life for expats in the entire world. Baghdad is so bad, according to Mercer, that companies should pay people a considerable amount extra to live there. As Hannibal explained to me, companies would likely have to pay an employee an extra 35-40 percent on top of their base salary as compensation for the poor quality of life in Iraq – that some companies might go as high as 50 percent in cash or other services. Worse still, Baghdad is a persistent worst offender in Mercer’s data, gradually falling down the rankings since 2001 and ranking last since 2004. It’s even acquired the curse of Google Auto-complete: Type « Baghdad Worst » into the search engine, and « Baghdad worst place to live » and « Baghdad worst city » appear. The Washington Post
Political instability, high crime levels, and elevated air pollution are a few factors that can be detrimental to the daily lives of expatriate employees their families and local residents. To ensure that compensation packages reflect the local environment appropriately, employers need a clear picture of the quality of living in the cities where they operate. In a world economy that is becoming more globalised, cities beyond the traditional financial and business centres are working to improve their quality of living so they can attract more foreign companies. This year’s survey recognises so-called ‘second tier’ or ‘emerging’ cites and points to a few examples from around the world These cities have been investing massively in their infrastructure and attracting foreign direct investments by providing incentives such as tax, housing, or entry facilities. Emerging cities will become major players that traditional financial centres and capital cities will have to compete with. European cities enjoy a high overall quality of living compared to those in other regions. Healthcare, infrastructure, and recreational facilities are generally of a very high standard. Political stability and relatively low crime levels enable expatriates to feel safe and secure in most locations. The region has seen few changes in living standards over the last year. Several cities in Central and South America are still attractive to expatriates due to their relatively stable political environments, improving infrastructure, and pleasant climate. But many locations remain challenging due to natural disasters, such as hurricanes often hitting the region, as well as local economic inequality and high crime rates. Companies placing their workers on expatriate assignments in these locations must ensure that hardship allowances reflect the lower levels of quality of living. The Middle East and especially Africa remain one of the most challenging regions for multinational organisations and expatriates. Regional instability and disruptive political events, including civil unrest, lack of infrastructure and natural disasters such as flooding, keep the quality of living from improving in many of its cities. However, some cities that might not have been very attractive to foreign companies are making efforts to attract them. Slagin Parakatil (Senior Researcher at Mercer)
The abysmal Iraq results forecast what could happen in Afghanistan, where U.S. taxpayers have so far spent $90 billion in reconstruction projects during a 12-year military campaign that is slated to end, for the most part, in 2014. Shortly after the March 2003 invasion, Congress set up a $2.4 billion fund to help ease the sting of war for Iraqis. It aimed to rebuild Iraq’s water and electricity systems; provide food, health care and governance for its people; and take care of those who were forced from their homes in the fighting. Less than six months later, President George W. Bush asked for $20 billion more to further stabilize Iraq and help turn it into an ally that could gain economic independence and reap global investments. To date, the U.S. has spent more than $60 billion in reconstruction grants to help Iraq get back on its feet after the country was broken by more than two decades of war, sanctions and dictatorship. That works out to about $15 million a day. And yet Iraq’s government is rife with corruption and infighting. Baghdad’s streets are still cowed by near-daily deadly bombings. A quarter of the country’s 31 million population lives in poverty, and few have reliable electricity and clean water. Overall, including all military and diplomatic costs and other aid, the U.S. has spent at least $767 billion since the American-led invasion, according to the Congressional Budget Office. National Priorities Project, a U.S. research group that analyzes federal data, estimated the cost at $811 billion, noting that some funds are still being spent on ongoing projects. Sen. Susan Collins, a member of the Senate committee that oversees U.S. funding, said the Bush administration should have agreed to give the reconstruction money to Iraq as a loan in 2003 instead as an outright gift. « It’s been an extraordinarily disappointing effort and, largely, a failed program, » Collins, R-Maine, said in an interview Tuesday. « I believe, had the money been structured as a loan in the first place, that we would have seen a far more responsible approach to how the money was used, and lower levels of corruption in far fewer ways. » (…) Army Chief of Staff Ray Odierno, who was the top U.S. military commander in Iraq from 2008 to 2010, said, « It would have been better to hold off spending large sums of money » until the country stabilized. About a third of the $60 billion was spent to train and equip Iraqi security forces, which had to be rebuilt after the U.S.-led Coalition Provisional Authority disbanded Saddam’s army in 2003. Today, Iraqi forces have varying successes in safekeeping the public and only limited ability to secure their land, air and sea borders. The report also cites Defense Secretary Leon Panetta as saying that the 2011 withdrawal of American troops from Iraq weakened U.S. influence in Baghdad. Panetta has since left office: Former Sen. Chuck Hagel took over the defense job last week. Washington is eyeing a similar military drawdown next year in Afghanistan, where U.S. taxpayers have spent $90 billion so far on rebuilding projects. The Afghanistan effort risks falling into the same problems that mired Iraq if oversight isn’t coordinated better. In Iraq, officials were too eager to build in the middle of a civil war, and too often raced ahead without solid plans or back-up plans, the report concluded. CBS news

Oubliez Damas ! Oubliez Grozny ! (sans parler de Tbilisi ou bientôt Kiev ?)

A l’heure où, après les dérives catastrophiques des années Bush, une Russie reconnaissante se réjouit du retour au bercail de sa province perdue de Crimée …

Et où sort le classement mondial des villes pour la qualité de vie par le leader mondial du conseil en ressources humaines Mercer Consulting Group …

(Vienne,  Vancouver, Pointe-à-Pitre, Singapour, Auckland, Port-Louis et Dubai contre Tbilisi, Mexico, Port-au-Prince, Dushanbe, Bangui et Bagdad) …

Comment, avec l’agence de presse nationale française AFP, ne pas être scandalisé de ce que le cowboy Bush a fait de la cité arabe modèle de Saddam

Qui, entre sa guerre et ses milliards (60 milliards de dollars de reconstruction, 800 avec la guerre !), se retrouve onze ans après… pire ville du monde ?

Jadis cité arabe modèle, Bagdad devient la pire ville au monde

Le Nouvel Observateur

AFPPar Salam FARAJ | AFP

21 mars 2014

Cité modèle dans le monde arabe jusqu’aux années 1970, Bagdad est devenue, après des décennies de conflits, la pire ville au monde en matière de qualité de vie.

La capitale irakienne -édifiée sur les rives du Tigre il y a 1.250 ans et jadis un centre intellectuel, économique et politique de renommée mondiale- est arrivée en 223e et dernière position du classement 2014 sur la qualité de vie, établi par le leader mondial du conseil en ressources humaines Mercer Consulting Group.

Ce classement tient compte de l’environnement social, politique et économique de la ville, qui compte 8,5 millions d’habitants, ainsi que des critères relatifs à la santé et l’éducation.

Et à Bagdad, les habitants doivent faire face à une multitude de problèmes: attentats quasi-quotidiens, pénurie d’électricité et d’eau potable, mauvais système d?égouts, embouteillages réguliers et taux de chômage élevé.

Si du temps de Saddam Hussein, le chômage sévissait déjà et l’eau et d’électricité manquaient, les problèmes étaient d’une moindre ampleur et mieux gérés.

La sécurité, elle, s’est totalement détériorée depuis l’invasion de l’Irak, menée en 2003 par une coalition conduite par les Etats-Unis.

« Nous vivons dans des casernes », se plaint Hamid al-Daraji, un vendeur, en évoquant les nombreux points de contrôle, les murs en béton anti-explosion et le déploiement massif des forces de sécurité.

« Riches et pauvres partagent la même souffrance », ajoute-t-il. « Le riche peut être à tout moment la cible d’une attaque à l’explosif, d’un rapt ou d’un assassinat, tout comme le pauvre ».

Pourtant, Bagdad a une histoire glorieuse.

Construite en 762 sur les rives du Tigre par le calife abbasside Abou Jaafar al-Mansour, la ville a depuis joué un rôle central dans le monde arabo-musulman.

Au 20e siècle, Bagdad était le brillant exemple d’une ville arabe moderne avec certaines des meilleurs universités et musées de la région, une élite bien formée, un centre culturel dynamique et un système de santé haut de gamme.

Son aéroport international était un modèle pour la région et la ville a connu la naissance de l’Opep, le cartel des pays exportateurs de pétrole.

La ville abritait en outre une population de différentes confessions: musulmans, chrétiens, juifs et autres.

« Bagdad représentait le centre économique de l’Etat abbasside », souligne Issam al-Faili, professeur d’histoire politique à l’université Moustansiriyah, un établissement vieux de huit siècles.

Il rappelle qu’elle a « servi de base à la conquête de régions voisines pour élargir l’influence de l’islam ».

– ‘Bagdad, la belle, en ruines’ –

« Elle était une capitale du monde », dit, avec fierté, l’universitaire, qui admet qu' »aujourd’hui, elle est devenue l’une des villes les plus misérables de la planète ».

L’Irak connaît depuis un an une recrudescence des violences, alimentées par le ressentiment de la minorité sunnite face au gouvernement dominé par les chiites, et par le conflit en Syrie voisine. Depuis le début 2014, plus de 1.900 personnes ont été tuées.

Face aux violences, les forces de sécurité installent de nouveaux points de contrôle, qui pullulent déjà à Bagdad, et imposent des restrictions au trafic routier. Des murs massifs en béton, conçus pour résister à l’impact des explosions, divisent des quartiers confessionnellement mixtes.

Certains tentent de nettoyer et d’embellir la ville mais reconnaissent la difficulté de la mission.

« Les gouvernements successifs n’ont pas travaillé pour développer Bagdad », regrette Amir al-Chalabi, chef d’une ONG, la Humanitarian Construction Organisation, qui mène campagne pour améliorer les services de base dans la ville.

« La nuit, elle se transforme en une ville fantôme car elle manque d’éclairage », note-t-il.

Des câbles électriques pendent dans les rues où des particuliers gérant de générateurs fournissent, contre rémunération, du courant électrique, compensant ainsi les défaillances du réseau public. Et en raison du réseau limité des égouts, les rues de la capitale sont inondées dès les premières pluies.

Et malgré une économie en forte croissance grâce au pétrole, en pleine reprise, ce secteur n’est pas générateur d’emplois pour enrayer le taux de chômage dans le pays, y compris dans la capitale.

« Les problèmes de Bagdad sont innombrables. Bagdad la belle est aujourd’hui en ruines », se lamente Hamid al-Daraji.

Voir aussi:

Why do people choose to live in the ‘worst city in the world?’

Adam Taylor

The Washington Post

February 26 2014

Human resources consulting firm Mercer recently crunched the numbers on dozens of factors about life for an expatriate. The aim? To calculate exactly how much extra international firms should be willing to pay their employees when asking them to move to undesirable locations.(While Mercer wouldn’t release the precise data, Ed Hannibal, a global mobility leader at the company, said that factors involved included such concerns as security, infrastructure and the availability of international goods).

While the data has its practical uses, it has another, more viral, function too: Ranking the « best » and « worst » cities for quality of life in the entire world.

For example, it turns out that expats asked to move to Austria are pretty lucky: Vienna ranked top of the list for expats, followed by Zurich, Auckland, Munich and Vancouver. For all of these cities, Hannibal told me, quality of life was so good that companies were recommended to not pay employees there any hardship costs at all.

But down at the other end of the scale, it’s a different story. According to Mercer, companies should be willing to pay top dollar for some cities, and none more so than Baghdad.

Yes, the Iraqi capital has beaten out 222 other locations to be named the city with the lowest quality of life for expats in the entire world.

Baghdad is so bad, according to Mercer, that companies should pay people a considerable amount extra to live there. As Hannibal explained to me, companies would likely have to pay an employee an extra 35-40 percent on top of their base salary as compensation for the poor quality of life in Iraq – that some companies might go as high as 50 percent in cash or other services. Worse still, Baghdad is a persistent worst offender in Mercer’s data, gradually falling down the rankings since 2001 and ranking last since 2004. It’s even acquired the curse of Google Auto-complete: Type « Baghdad Worst » into the search engine, and « Baghdad worst place to live » and « Baghdad worst city » appear.

Could a bustling city of 6 million people really be the worst city in the world? To get a better perspective on it, I reached out to a few Baghdad expats, people who, unlike most Iraqis, made a choice to live in Iraq. Surprisingly, most seemed to be aware that they were apparently living in the worst place they could live.

« I know exactly which survey you mean, » said one person who has lived in Baghdad for five years and asked not to be named. « I have often thought of that survey when I take the direct Austrian air flight from Baghdad to Vienna, thereby going from the worst city to the best city in the world in a matter of a few hours. »

Others, however, were quick to argue that the poll didn’t reflect the Baghdad they knew. « Every expat I know here is mystified by that data, » said Jane Arraf, a freelance journalist who has spent many years in the city. « I’d be hard-pressed to find an expat (not a lot of them around admittedly) who believes that’s the case, apart from the prisoners of the Green Zone — the embassy people, U.N. staff and others who can’t actually get out into the city. »

It seems obvious, of course, that Baghdad is a more dangerous place than Vienna: More than 1,000 people were killed in attacks last month, for example. And surely luxury goods would be easier to find in a Western city (when I asked one Baghdad resident about the availability of international goods, they e-mailed back: « hahahahahahahaha »).

« In a sense, almost anything an Iraqi could want can be obtained, » Raoul Henri Alcala, a private businessman who has lived in the city for 10 years explains, « although often at a high price that also often includes payments to facilitators that can best be described as blatant corruption. »

Alcala, who once worked for the Iraqi government and now runs his own consulting firm, lives in the « Green Zone » and says that while his choice of location is safer than the outside city (the « Red Zone »), his location provides its own difficulties. « Shops do exist in the Zone selling food, beverages, pharmaceuticals and minor comfort items, » Alcala says. « Everything else has to be purchased outside, and can be brought into the Zone only after a laborious written authorization is requested and received. » Popular restaurants, markets and liquor stores outside the Green Zone have become targets for terror attacks, according to Alcala.

Alcala says that he has never lived in a city with a comparable « level of uncertainty and difficulty. » There do appear to be rivals, however, for Baghdad’s « worst city » crown. In the Mercer data, it narrowly beats out Bangui in the Central African Republic, Port-Au-Prince in Haiti, N’Djamena in Chad and Sana’a in Yemen. Plus, there are more than 223 cities on Earth. It’s plausible that one of these unlisted locations is « worse » than Baghdad (and, for what it’s worth, rival data from the Economist Intelligence Unit states that Damascus was the worst place in the world to live).

Baghdad’s place at the bottom of the list is a little more depressing when you consider that much of the lack of infrastructure and chaotic security situation can at least partially be blamed on eight years of U.S.-led war (the U.S. government has spent $60 billion in civilian reconstruction to be fair, though much of it is thought to have been wasted). That weight must affect some expats in Baghdad: One told me that she « felt a sense of responsibility to clean up the mess that George Bush made. » On the other hand, others explained that the potential for personal remuneration was likely a serious motive for many expats.

Ultimately, people who choose to live in a place like Baghdad probably do so for a complicated set of reasons. As Arraf puts it, there are two types of people in the world: The « you couldn’t pay me enough to do this » types, and the « I can’t believe I’m getting paid to do this » types. The latter should probably ignore Mercer’s data.

Voir enfin:

Baghdad Now World’s Worst City

AlJazeerah.net

3-3-4

Baghdad has been rated the world’s worst city to live in.

A new study by a UK research company puts the occupied Iraqi capital last of 215 cities it profiled throughout the world.

Mercer Human Resource Consulting based its overall quality of life survey on political, social, economic and environmental factors, as well as personal safety, health, education, transport and other public services.

It was compiled to help governments and major companies to place employees on international assignments.

The study, released on Monday, said Baghdad is now the world’s least attractive city for expatriates.

Top Swiss cities

Placed 213th out of 215 cities last year, Baghdad’s rating has dropped due to ongoing concerns over security and the city’s precarious infrastructure.

The survey revealed that Zurich and Geneva are the world’s top-rated urban centres.

The rating takes into account the cities’ schools, where standards of education are now considered among the best in the world.

Cities in Europe, New Zealand, and Australia continue to dominate the top of the rankings.

Vienna shares third place with Vancouver, while Auckland, Bern, Copenhagen, Frankfurt and Sydney are joint fifth.

US cities slide

However, US cities have slipped in the rankings this year as tighter restrictions have been imposed on entry to the country.

Several US cities now also have to deal with increased security checks as a result of the « war on terror ».

Meanwhile, other poor-scoring cities for overall quality of life include Bangui in the Central African Republic, and Brazzaville and Pointe Noire in Congo.

Mercer senior researcher Slagin Parakatil said: « The threat of terrorism in the Middle East and the political and economic turmoil in African countries has increased the disparity between cities at the top and the bottom end of the rankings. »

Voir encore:

Much of $60B from U.S. to rebuild Iraq wasted, special auditor’s final report to Congress shows

CBS news

APMarch 6, 2013

WASHINGTON Ten years and $60 billion in American taxpayer funds later, Iraq is still so unstable and broken that even its leaders question whether U.S. efforts to rebuild the war-torn nation were worth the cost.

In his final report to Congress, Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction Stuart Bowen’s conclusion was all too clear: Since the invasion a decade ago this month, the U.S. has spent too much money in Iraq for too few results.

The reconstruction effort « grew to a size much larger than was ever anticipated, » Bowen told The Associated Press in a preview of his last audit of U.S. funds spent in Iraq, to be released Wednesday. « Not enough was accomplished for the size of the funds expended. »

In interviews with Bowen, Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki said the U.S. funding « could have brought great change in Iraq » but fell short too often. « There was misspending of money, » said al-Maliki, a Shiite Muslim whose sect makes up about 60 percent of Iraq’s population.

Iraqi Parliament Speaker Osama al-Nujaifi, the country’s top Sunni Muslim official, told auditors that the rebuilding efforts « had unfavorable outcomes in general. »

« You think if you throw money at a problem, you can fix it, » Kurdish government official Qubad Talabani, son of Iraqi president Jalal Talabani, told auditors. « It was just not strategic thinking. »

The abysmal Iraq results forecast what could happen in Afghanistan, where U.S. taxpayers have so far spent $90 billion in reconstruction projects during a 12-year military campaign that is slated to end, for the most part, in 2014.

Shortly after the March 2003 invasion, Congress set up a $2.4 billion fund to help ease the sting of war for Iraqis. It aimed to rebuild Iraq’s water and electricity systems; provide food, health care and governance for its people; and take care of those who were forced from their homes in the fighting. Less than six months later, President George W. Bush asked for $20 billion more to further stabilize Iraq and help turn it into an ally that could gain economic independence and reap global investments.

To date, the U.S. has spent more than $60 billion in reconstruction grants to help Iraq get back on its feet after the country was broken by more than two decades of war, sanctions and dictatorship. That works out to about $15 million a day.

And yet Iraq’s government is rife with corruption and infighting. Baghdad’s streets are still cowed by near-daily deadly bombings. A quarter of the country’s 31 million population lives in poverty, and few have reliable electricity and clean water.

Overall, including all military and diplomatic costs and other aid, the U.S. has spent at least $767 billion since the American-led invasion, according to the Congressional Budget Office. National Priorities Project, a U.S. research group that analyzes federal data, estimated the cost at $811 billion, noting that some funds are still being spent on ongoing projects.

Sen. Susan Collins, a member of the Senate committee that oversees U.S. funding, said the Bush administration should have agreed to give the reconstruction money to Iraq as a loan in 2003 instead as an outright gift.

« It’s been an extraordinarily disappointing effort and, largely, a failed program, » Collins, R-Maine, said in an interview Tuesday. « I believe, had the money been structured as a loan in the first place, that we would have seen a far more responsible approach to how the money was used, and lower levels of corruption in far fewer ways. »

In numerous interviews with Iraqi and U.S. officials, and though multiple examples of thwarted or defrauded projects, Bowen’s report laid bare a trail of waste, including:

–In Iraq’s eastern Diyala province, a crossroads for Shiite militias, Sunni insurgents and Kurdish squatters, the U.S. began building a 3,600-bed prison in 2004 but abandoned the project after three years to flee a surge in violence. The half-completed Khan Bani Sa’ad Correctional Facility cost American taxpayers $40 million but sits in rubble, and Iraqi Justice Ministry officials say they have no plans to ever finish or use it.

–Subcontractors for Anham LLC, based in Vienna, Va., overcharged the U.S. government thousands of dollars for supplies, including $900 for a control switch valued at $7.05 and $80 for a piece of pipe that costs $1.41. Anham was hired to maintain and operate warehouses and supply centers near Baghdad’s international airport and the Persian Gulf port at Umm Qasr.

–A $108 million wastewater treatment center in the city of Fallujah, a former al Qaeda stronghold in western Iraq, will have taken eight years longer to build than planned when it is completed in 2014 and will only service 9,000 homes. Iraqi officials must provide an additional $87 million to hook up most of the rest of the city, or 25,000 additional homes.

–After blowing up the al-Fatah bridge in north-central Iraq during the invasion and severing a crucial oil and gas pipeline, U.S. officials decided to try to rebuild the pipeline under the Tigris River, at a cost of $75 million. A geological study predicted the project might fail, and it did: Eventually, the bridge and pipelines were repaired at an additional cost of $29 million.

–A widespread ring of fraud led by a former U.S. Army officer resulted in tens of millions of dollars in kickbacks and the criminal convictions of 22 people connected to government contracts for bottled water and other supplies at the Iraqi reconstruction program’s headquarters at Camp Arifjan, Kuwait.

In too many cases, Bowen concluded, U.S. officials did not consult with Iraqis closely or deeply enough to determine what reconstruction projects were really needed or, in some cases, wanted. As a result, Iraqis took limited interest in the work, often walking away from half-finished programs, refusing to pay their share, or failing to maintain completed projects once they were handed over.

Deputy Prime Minister Hussain al-Shahristani, a Shiite, described the projects as well intentioned, but poorly prepared and inadequately supervised.

The missed opportunities were not lost on at least 15 senior State and Defense department officials interviewed in the report, including ambassadors and generals, who were directly involved in rebuilding Iraq.

One key lesson learned in Iraq, Deputy Secretary of State William Burns told auditors, is that the U.S. cannot expect to « do it all and do it our way. We must share the burden better multilaterally and engage the host country constantly on what is truly needed. »

Army Chief of Staff Ray Odierno, who was the top U.S. military commander in Iraq from 2008 to 2010, said, « It would have been better to hold off spending large sums of money » until the country stabilized.

About a third of the $60 billion was spent to train and equip Iraqi security forces, which had to be rebuilt after the U.S.-led Coalition Provisional Authority disbanded Saddam’s army in 2003. Today, Iraqi forces have varying successes in safekeeping the public and only limited ability to secure their land, air and sea borders.

The report also cites Defense Secretary Leon Panetta as saying that the 2011 withdrawal of American troops from Iraq weakened U.S. influence in Baghdad. Panetta has since left office: Former Sen. Chuck Hagel took over the defense job last week. Washington is eyeing a similar military drawdown next year in Afghanistan, where U.S. taxpayers have spent $90 billion so far on rebuilding projects.

The Afghanistan effort risks falling into the same problems that mired Iraq if oversight isn’t coordinated better. In Iraq, officials were too eager to build in the middle of a civil war, and too often raced ahead without solid plans or back-up plans, the report concluded.

Most of the work was done in piecemeal fashion, as no single government agency had responsibility for all of the money spent. The State Department, for example, was supposed to oversee reconstruction strategy starting in 2004, but controlled only about 10 percent of the money at stake. The Defense Department paid for the vast majority of the projects — 75 percent.

Voir par ailleurs:

2014 Quality of Living worldwide city rankings – Mercer survey

United States , New York

Publication date: 19 February 2014


Vienna is the city with the world’s best quality of living, according to the Mercer 2014 Quality of Living rankings, in which European cities dominate. Zurich and Auckland follow in second and third place, respectively. Munich is in fourth place, followed by Vancouver, which is also the highest-ranking city in North America. Ranking 25 globally, Singapore is the highest-ranking Asian city, whereas Dubai (73) ranks first across Middle East and Africa. The city of Pointe-à-Pitre (69), Guadeloupe, takes the top spot for Central and South America.

Mercer conducts its Quality of Living survey annually to help multinational companies and other employers compensate employees fairly when placing them on international assignments. Two common incentives include a quality-of-living allowance and a mobility premium. A quality-of-living or “hardship” allowance compensates for a decrease in the quality of living between home and host locations, whereas a mobility premium simply compensates for the inconvenience of being uprooted and having to work in another country. Mercer’s Quality of Living reports provide valuable information and hardship premium recommendations for over 460 cities throughout the world, the ranking covers 223 of these cities.

Political instability, high crime levels, and elevated air pollution are a few factors that can be detrimental to the daily lives of expatriate employees their families and local residents. To ensure that compensation packages reflect the local environment appropriately, employers need a clear picture of the quality of living in the cities where they operate,” said Slagin Parakatil, Senior Researcher at Mercer.

Mr Parakatil added: “In a world economy that is becoming more globalised, cities beyond the traditional financial and business centres are working to improve their quality of living so they can attract more foreign companies. This year’s survey recognises so-called ‘second tier’ or ‘emerging’ cites and points to a few examples from around the world These cities have been investing massively in their infrastructure and attracting foreign direct investments by providing incentives such as tax, housing, or entry facilities. Emerging cities will become major players that traditional financial centres and capital cities will have to compete with.”

Europe

Vienna is the highest-ranking city globally. In Europe, it is followed by Zurich (2), Munich (4), Düsseldorf (6), and Frankfurt (7). “European cities enjoy a high overall quality of living compared to those in other regions. Healthcare, infrastructure, and recreational facilities are generally of a very high standard. Political stability and relatively low crime levels enable expatriates to feel safe and secure in most locations. The region has seen few changes in living standards over the last year,” said Mr Parakatil.

Ranking 191 overall, Tbilisi, Georgia, is the lowest-ranking city in Europe. It continues to improve in its quality of living, mainly due to a growing availability of consumer goods, improving internal stability, and developing infrastructure. Other cities on the lower end of Europe’s ranking include: Minsk (189), Belarus; Yerevan (180), Armenia; Tirana (179), Albania; and St Petersburg (168), Russia. Ranking 107, Wroclaw, Poland, is an emerging European city. Since Poland’s accession to the European Union, Wroclaw has witnessed tangible economic growth, partly due to its talent pool, improved infrastructure, and foreign and internal direct investments. The EU named Wroclaw as a European Capital of Culture for 2016.

Americas

Canadian cities dominate North America’s top-five list. Ranking fifth globally, Vancouver tops the regional list, followed by Ottawa (14), Toronto (15), Montreal (23), and San Francisco (27). The region’s lowest-ranking city is Mexico City (122), preceded by four US cities: Detroit (70), St. Louis (67), Houston (66), and Miami (65). Mr Parakatil commented: “On the whole, North American cities offer a high quality of living and are attractive working destinations for companies and their expatriates. A wide range of consumer goods are available, and infrastructures, including recreational provisions, are excellent.

In Central and South America, the quality of living varies substantially. Pointe-à-Pitre (69), Guadeloupe, is the region’s highest-ranked city, followed by San Juan (72), Montevideo (77), Buenos Aires (81), and Santiago (93). Manaus (125), Brazil, has been identified as an example of an emerging city in this region due to its major industrial centre which has seen the creation of the “Free Economic Zone of Manaus,” an area with administrative autonomy giving Manaus a competitive advantage over other cities in the region. This zone has attracted talent from other cities and regions, with several multinational companies already settled in the area and more expected to arrive in the near future.

Several cities in Central and South America are still attractive to expatriates due to their relatively stable political environments, improving infrastructure, and pleasant climate,” said Mr Parakatil. “But many locations remain challenging due to natural disasters, such as hurricanes often hitting the region, as well as local economic inequality and high crime rates. Companies placing their workers on expatriate assignments in these locations must ensure that hardship allowances reflect the lower levels of quality of living.

Asia Pacific

Singapore (25) has the highest quality of living in Asia, followed by four Japanese cities: Tokyo (43), Kobe (47), Yokohama (49), and Osaka (57). Dushanbe (209), Tajikistan, is the lowest-ranking city in the region. Mr Parakatil commented: “Asia has a bigger range of quality-of-living standard amongst its cities than any other region. For many cities, such as those in South Korea, the quality of living is continually improving. But for others, such as some in China, issues like pervasive poor air pollution are eroding their quality of living.

With their considerable growth in the last decade, many second-tier Asian cities are starting to emerge as important places of business for multinational companies. Examples include Cheonan (98), South Korea, which is strategically located in an area where several technology companies have operations. Over the past decades, Pune (139), India has developed into an education hub and home to IT, other high-tech industries, and automobile manufacturing. The city of Xian (141), China has also witnessed some major developments, such as the establishment of an “Economic and Technological Development Zone” to attract foreign investments. The city is also host to various financial services, consulting, and computer services.

Elsewhere, New Zealand and Australian cities rank high on the list for quality of living, with Auckland and Sydney ranking 3 and 10, respectively.

Middle East and Africa

With a global rank of 73, Dubai is the highest-ranked city in the Middle East and Africa region. It is followed by Abu Dhabi (78), UAE; Port Louis (82), Mauritius; and Durban (85) and Cape Town (90), South Africa. Durban has been identified as an example of an emerging city in this region, due to the growth of its manufacturing industries and the increasing importance of the shipping port. Generally, though, this region dominates the lower end of the quality of living ranking, with five out of the bottom six cities; Baghdad (223) has the lowest overall ranking.

The Middle East and especially Africa remain one of the most challenging regions for multinational organisations and expatriates. Regional instability and disruptive political events, including civil unrest, lack of infrastructure and natural disasters such as flooding, keep the quality of living from improving in many of its cities. However, some cities that might not have been very attractive to foreign companies are making efforts to attract them,” said Mr Parakatil.

Notes for Editors

Mercer produces worldwide quality-of-living rankings annually from its most recent Worldwide Quality of Living Surveys. Individual reports are produced for each city surveyed. Comparative quality-of-living indexes between a base city and a host city are available, as are multiple-city comparisons. Details are available from Mercer Client Services in Warsaw, at +48 22 434 5383 or at www.mercer.com/qualityofliving.

The data was largely collected between September and November 2013, and will be updated regularly to take account of changing circumstances. In particular, the assessments will be revised to reflect significant political, economic, and environmental developments.

Expatriates in difficult locations: Determining appropriate allowances and incentives

Companies need to be able to determine their expatriate compensation packages rationally, consistently and systematically. Providing incentives to reward and recognise the efforts that employees and their families make when taking on international assignments remains a typical practice, particularly for difficult locations. Two common incentives include a quality-of-living allowance and a mobility premium:

  • A quality-of-living or “hardship” allowance compensates for a decrease in the quality of living between home and host locations.
  • A mobility premium simply compensates for the inconvenience of being uprooted and having to work in another country.

A quality-of-living allowance is typically location-related, while a mobility premium is usually independent of the host location. Some multinational companies combine these premiums, but the vast majority provides them separately.

Quality of Living: City benchmarking

Mercer also helps municipalities assess factors that can improve their quality of living rankings. In a global environment, employers have many choices as to where to deploy their mobile employees and set up new business. A city’s quality of living standards can be an important variable for employers to consider.

Leaders in many cities want to understand the specific factors that affect their residents’ quality of living and address those issues that lower their city’s overall quality-of-living ranking. Mercer advises municipalities through a holistic approach that addresses their goals of progressing towards excellence, and attracting multinational companies and globally mobile talent by improving the elements that are measured in its Quality of Living survey.

Mercer hardship allowance recommendations

Mercer evaluates local living conditions in more than 460 cities it surveys worldwide. Living conditions are analysed according to 39 factors, grouped in 10 categories:

  • Political and social environment (political stability, crime, law enforcement, etc.)
  • Economic environment (currency exchange regulations, banking services)
  • Socio-cultural environment (media availability and censorship, limitations on personal freedom)
  • Medical and health considerations (medical supplies and services, infectious diseases, sewage, waste disposal, air pollution, etc)
  • Schools and education (standards and availability of international schools)
  • Public services and transportation (electricity, water, public transportation, traffic congestion, etc)
  • Recreation (restaurants, theatres, cinemas, sports and leisure, etc)
  • Consumer goods (availability of food/daily consumption items, cars, etc)
  • Housing (rental housing, household appliances, furniture, maintenance services)
  • Natural environment (climate, record of natural disasters)

The scores attributed to each factor, which are weighted to reflect their importance to expatriates, allow for objective city-to-city comparisons. The result is a quality of living index that compares relative differences between any two locations evaluated. For the indices to be used effectively, Mercer has created a grid that allows users to link the resulting index to a quality of living allowance amount by recommending a percentage value in relation to the index.

Voir enfin:

The 10 worst cities in the world to live in

The Economist

Friday 30 August 2013

Damascus in Syria is the worst city in the world to live in, according to The Economist Intelligence Unit’s Global Liveability Ranking.

Cities across the world are awarded scores depending on lifestyle challenges faced by the people living there. Each city is scored on its stability, healthcare, culture and environment, education and infrastructure.

Since the Arab Spring in 2011, Syria has been plagued with destruction and violence as rebels fight government forces. The country has been left battle-scarred with around 2 million people fleeing from country, while Damascus has been the source of much recent tension.

Other cities that have made it onto worst cities the list include Dhaka in Bangladesh and Lagos in Nigeria. Third worst city to live in was Port Moresby in Papa New Guinea, surprisingly Melbourne and Sydney in neighbouring nation Australia were ranked in the top 10 cities in the world to live in.

Click here to see the top 10 cities in the world

2. Dhaka, Bangladesh: The country has faced controversy recently after a garment factory collapsed killing over 1,000 people

2. Dhaka in Bangladesh: The country has faced controversy recently after a garment factory collapsed killing over 1,000 people

3. Moresby, Papa New Guinea: Despite recent growth, most people live in extreme poverty

3. Moresby, Papa New Guinea: Despite recent growth, most people live in extreme poverty

4. Lagos, Nigeria: The city rated poorly in The Economist Intelligence Unit's report and was awarded the lowest score for stability in the bottom 10 countries to live in

4. Lagos, Nigeria: The city rated poorly in The Economist Intelligence Unit’s report and was awarded the lowest score for stability

5. Harare, Zimbabwe: With the continuing economic and political crises that face the country, Harare is the fifth worst city to live in.

5. Harare, Zimbabwe: With the continuing economic and political crises that face the country, Harare is the fifth worst city to live in.  

6. Algiers, Algeria: While it rates more highly for its stability, there are terrorist groups that are active in the city. While conflict and natural disasters have left the old town in ruins

6. Algiers, Algeria: While it rates more highly for its stability, there are terrorist groups that are active in the city

7. Karachi, Pakistan: Violence linked to terrorism and high homicide rates makes this city one of the worst places in the world to live in

7. Karachi, Pakistan: Violence linked to terrorism and high homicide rates makes this city one of the worst places in the world to live in  

8. Tripoli, Libya: Since the Arab Spring in 2011 there has been violence and protests in the city

8. Tripoli, Libya: Since the Arab Spring in 2011 there has been violence and protests in the city

9. Douala, Cameroon: Despite being the richest city in the whole of Central Africa, Douala has scored the lowest for health care in the bottom 10 cities

9. Douala, Cameroon: Despite being the richest city in the whole of Central Africa, Douala has scored the lowest for health care in the bottom 10 cities

10. Tehran, Iran: While the city rates highly on health care and education, Tehran did not score so well on infrastructure.

10. Tehran, Iran: While the city rates highly on health care and education, Tehran did not score so well on infrastructure.


Ecoutes: Avec Hollande, la Stasi, c’est maintenant ! (Yes, we can tap your phones, too: After Obama administration, France’s socialists pull an NSA phone-tap trick on their opponents)

22 mars, 2014
https://i2.wp.com/21stcenturywire.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/2013-05-01-Obama-Wiretapping.pnghttps://scontent-b-ams.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/t1.0-9/148840_4080342903973_1657063545_n.jpgMa propre ville de Chicago a compté parmi les villes à la politique locale la plus corrompue de l’histoire américaine, du népotisme institutionnalisé aux élections douteuses. Barack Obama (Nairobi, Kenya, 2006)
La vérité, c’est tout simplement que le pouvoir socialiste ne tombera pas comme un fruit mûr. Et ceux qui laissent entendre que nous pouvons, c’est-à-dire nous la droite, revenir au pouvoir dans les mois qui viennent, ou même dans les deux années qui viennent se trompent, et trompent les Français. François Hollande (France inter, 1983)
J’ai appris hier avec stupéfaction et colère les aveux de Jérôme Cahuzac devant les juges. Il a trompé les plus hautes autorités du pays: le chef de l’Etat, le chef du gouvernement, le Parlement et à travers lui tous les Français. (…) J’affirme ici que Jérôme Cahuzac n’a bénéficié d’aucune protection autre que celle de la présomption d’innocence et il a quitté le gouvernement à ma demande dès l’ouverture d’une information judiciaire. François Hollande (3 avril 2013)
Nous avons les preuves que le président a été parfaitement informé le 15 (…) Le 18, Edwy Plenel informe l’Elysée qu’ils ont toutes les preuves. Et Edwy Plenel est un ami personnel du président, ils ont même écrit un bouquin ensemble. (…)  je dis que le président, entre le 4 et le 18 décembre, a l’ensemble des informations lui permettant de se rendre compte que des preuves graves – selon lesquelles Jérôme Cahuzac détenait un compte en Suisse – existent.  Charles de Courson (président UDI de la commission Cahuzac)

 

Je vous l’assure : à l’instant où je l’ai appris, j’ai mis toute mon énergie pour faire en sorte que ce problème soit réglé. (…) Je peux vous affirmer que je n’étais au courant de rien à propos de ce rapport de l’inspection générale des services fiscaux avant qu’il n’y ait des fuites dans la presse. Barack Obama (16 mai 2013)
Beaucoup, à gauche comme à droite, soupçonnent Yves Bertrand d’avoir été la pièce maîtresse d’un cabinet noir piloté par Dominique de Villepin au service de Jacques Chirac. En essayant d’étouffer certaines affaires ou au contraire en soufflant sur les braises, YB aurait protégé l’ancien président de la République et déstabilisé ses ennemis ou concurrents. (…) Autres courroies de transmission entre l’Elysée et Yves Bertrand : Philippe Massoni, successivement préfet de police de Paris et chargé de mission pour les questions de sécurité auprès de Chirac à l’Elysée. (…) Dans les carnets secrets, on découvre l’ampleur des moyens déployés pour mettre hors jeu Charles Pasqua et Lionel Jospin dans la course à la présidentielle de 2002. Dès janvier 2000, le Premier ministre et son entourage (jusqu’à sa cousine germaine) font l’objet d’un véritable acharnement. La vie privée de chacun est passée à la loupe. (…) Nicolas Sarkozy n’a pas été épargné. Y compris lorsqu’il était ministre de l’Intérieur. Dès qu’il le pourra, Sarkozy se débarrassera d’ailleurs de l’inoxydable Bertrand-qui avait résisté à huit ministres de l’Intérieur et deux cohabitations-en l’exilant, en janvier 2004, à l’Inspection générale de l’administration. (…) Yves Bertrand est un pur produit de la vieille école RG. Celle d’une police politique qui n’hésitait pas à regarder par les trous de serrure. Cheveux poivre et sel tirant sur le blanc, à 64 ans, l’homme qui ressemble plus à un habitué des thés dansants qu’à un James Bond a commencé sa carrière sous le ministre de l’Intérieur Raymond Marcellin en faisant la chasse aux gauchistes. Ce qui ne l’empêchera pas d’être nommé à la tête des RG en 1992 par les socialistes.(…) Bertrand a su devancer les demandes inavouables des politiques de droite comme de gauche tout en leur faisant comprendre qu’il pouvait devenir leur pire fléau. (…) Pour faire la sale besogne, le patron des RG pouvait compter sur une poignée de fonctionnaires dévoués dont les noms apparaissent régulièrement dans ses carnets. On y croise aussi des barbouzes et quelques journalistes affidés, qui sont parfois rémunérés, comme le montrent les sommes d’argent en regard de certains noms. La presse, Yves Bertrand la fréquente assidûment. Chaque jour, il déjeune avec un journaliste ou en reçoit un dans son bureau. Certains le voient entre une et trois fois par mois. Les carnets secrets sont un effarant voyage sous les jupes de la République. On pourrait en sourire si ce travail de basse police n’avait parfois brisé des carrières, faussé le jeu démocratique et même détruit des vies. Le Point
François Hollande (…) a été élevé chez les frères De 4 à 11 ans, Hollande est élève chez les Frères des écoles chrétiennes Saint Jean-Baptiste de La Salle à Rouen. Son père était d’extrême droite George, qui dirige une clinique ORL, a été candidat malheureux en 1959 et en 1965 aux élections municipales de Rouen, sur une liste d’extrême droite. Il soutient l’avocat Jean-Louis Tixier-Vignancour, ancien camelot du roi, croix-de-feu. Il a affiché des sympathie pro-OAS et déteste le général de Gaulle. « Georges, en 1944, a été mobilisé quelques mois et garde de cette période une certaine fidélité au maréchal Pétain », écrit Raffy. La mère de François Hollande se sent, elle, proche de la gauche. (…) A 14 ans, il déménage de Rouen vers Neuilly-sur-Seine. Au lycée Pasteur, il compte parmi ses bons copains de classe Christian Clavier et Thierry Lhermitte. En première, Gérard Jugnot et Michel Blanc rejoindront la classe. Quand ils montent une troupe lycéenne, Hollande ne les suit pas. Il est trop sérieux pour cela. La troupe deviendra « Le Splendid ». Hollande, avec un autre choix, aurait peut-être terminé dans « Les Bronzés »… (…) Il entre à l’Elysée comme conseiller fantôme de Jacques Attali En mai 1981, Jacques Attali, sherpa de Mitterrand pour les sommets internationaux, a droit à deux conseillers officiels, des quadras rémunérés sur le budget de l’Elysée, Jean-Louis Bianco et Pierre Morel ; et à deux conseillers officieux : de jeunes hauts fonctionnaires rémunérés par leurs corps d’origine, tribunal administratif et Cour des comptes : Ségolène Royal et François Hollande. (…) Il se fait passer pour Caton, auteur d’un pamphlet téléguidé En 1983, Hollande a 29 ans, il est directeur de cabinet de Max Gallo, porte-parole du gouvernement de Pierre Mauroy. Mitterrand a une idée machiavélique : faire écrire un pamphlet par un prétendu leader de droite, mais qui se cacherait derrière un pseudonyme, Caton, et qui en réalité discréditerait la droite. Le journaliste André Bercoff accepte de tenir la plume ; le livre s’appelle ‘De la reconquête’. Pour ne pas qu’on reconnaisse Bercoff, Hollande accepte de prêter sa voix pour une interview de ‘Caton’ à France Inter. Rue 89
Sous la présidence Bush, Obama avait dénoncé comme un scandale un programme de collecte d’informations bien plus limité, qui permettait à la NSA d’espionner sans mandat judiciaire les conversations exclusivement vers l’étranger (et non au sein même des Etats-Unis) d’individus suspectés de terrorisme. Voir le même homme politique, devenu président, justifier la collecte systématique d’informations sur l’ensemble des citoyens américains montre son hypocrisie et son absence de principes. Or, aussi curieux que cela paraisse, lorsqu’un homme qui a démontré qu’il a ce type de caractère vous explique qu’il ne vous veut aucun mal, il n’est pas toujours universellement cru. (…) Pour le dire autrement, s’il fallait vraiment admettre que l’Etat rassemble toutes les informations sur les conversations téléphoniques et l’activité Internet des individus, beaucoup d’Américains auraient préféré que ce pouvoir ne soit pas donné à une équipe qui a utilisé les services fiscaux pour affaiblir ses opposants politiques ; placé sous écoute des dizaines de journalistes et les parents d’au moins l’un d’entre eux ; et fait envoyer en prison, sous un prétexte, l’auteur innocent d’une vidéo Youtube dont le président avait fait le bouc émissaire de sa propre inaction lors de l’attaque meurtrière d’un consulat américain. Sébastien Castellion
Il s’agit d’une information judiciaire traitée par des magistrats du siège (…) Il s’agit de juges du siège indépendants sans relation avec la Chancellerie et par conséquent la réponse est très claire, je n’avais pas l’information avant. Christiane Taubira
A l’occasion des révélations du Monde. Manuel Vals
Si on n’a rien à cacher, il n’y a pas de problème à être écouté. Benoît Hamon
On me met sur écoute en septembre 2013 pour des faits supposés de corruption qui auraient été commis en 2007! On le fait, non parce que l’on dispose d’indices, mais parce que l’on espère en trouver. Aujourd’hui encore, toute personne qui me téléphone doit savoir qu’elle sera écoutée. Vous lisez bien. Ce n’est pas un extrait du merveilleux film La Vie des autres sur l’Allemagne de l’Est et les activités de la Stasi. Il ne s’agit pas des agissements de tel dictateur dans le monde à l’endroit de ses opposants. Il s’agit de la France. Suis-je en droit de m’interroger sur ce qui est fait de la retranscription de mes conversations? Je sais, la ministre de la Justice n’était pas au courant, malgré tous les rapports qu’elle a demandés et reçus. Le ministre de l’Intérieur n’était pas au courant, malgré les dizaines de policiers affectés à ma seule situation. De qui se moque-t-on? Nicolas Sarkozy

Attention: une police politique peut en cacher une autre !

Après l’Administration Obama, qui, après avoir tant critiqué son prédécesseur pour ses actions prétendument liberticides, lance le fisc sur ses opposants politiques et met sur écoute ses journalistes et la planète entière chefs d’Etat amis compris …

Et au-delà du cas particulier d’un ancien président et héritier d’une génération d’hommes politiques qui, entre la Mairie de Paris et la direction de l’Etat, sera l’une des plus corrompues de l’histoire …

Comment ne pas voir l’incroyable gémellité avec un gouvernement Hollande qui non content d’avoir imposé l’aberration du mariage homosexuel avant plus tard l’adoption et les mères porteuses pour tous …

Multiplie les mensonges d’Etat et fait à présent écouter, à l’instar de la véritable petite Stasi que les RG supprimés par son successeur avait été notamment pour les années Chirac, les adversaires politiques qu’il avait tant fustigés pour atteintes supposées aux libertés publiques et pour leurs frasques ?

Nicolas Sarkozy : «Ce que je veux dire aux Français»

Nicolas Sarkozy

Nicolas Sarkozy en appelle aux «principes sacré de notre République».

Le Figaro

20/03/2014

«J’ai longuement hésité avant de prendre la parole. D’abord, parce que je sais qu’il existe des sujets prioritaires pour nos compatriotes, à commencer par l’explosion du chômage. Ensuite, parce que, depuis deux ans, je me suis tenu à la décision de silence et de retrait que j’avais annoncée au soir du second tour de l’élection présidentielle de 2012. Contrairement à ce qui s’écrit quotidiennement, je n’éprouve nul désir de m’impliquer aujourd’hui dans la vie politique de notre pays. Je ne suis animé par aucune velléité de revanche et ne ressens nulle amertume à l’endroit des Français qui m’ont fait l’immense honneur de me confier, durant cinq ans, les rênes de notre pays. J’ai par ailleurs trop conscience des peines, des souffrances et des inquiétudes qu’endurent chaque jour tant de nos compatriotes pour ne pas mesurer la chance qui m’a si souvent accompagné tout au long de ma vie. Cette réalité mêlée à mon tempérament fait qu’aussi loin que je m’en souvienne je n’ai jamais aimé me plaindre. À 59 ans, il est sans doute trop tard pour changer. En tout cas, sur ce point…

Et pourtant, je crois qu’il est aujourd’hui de mon devoir de rompre ce silence. Si je le fais, c’est parce que des principes sacrés de notre République sont foulés aux pieds avec une violence inédite et une absence de scrupule sans précédent. Si je le fais par le moyen de l’écrit et non celui de l’image, c’est parce que je veux susciter la réflexion et non l’émotion.

Qui aurait pu imaginer que, dans la France de 2014, le droit au respect de la vie privée serait bafoué par des écoutes téléphoniques? Le droit au secret des conversations entre un avocat et son client volontairement ignoré? La proportionnalité de la réponse pénale, au regard de la qualité des faits supposés, violée? La présomption d’innocence désacralisée? La calomnie érigée en méthode de gouvernement? La justice de la République instrumentalisée par des fuites opportunément manipulées?

Que chacun réfléchisse à ce bref inventaire car demain il pourra, à son tour, être concerné. C’est de moi qu’il s’agit aujourd’hui. Je ne suis pas une victime. Je peux me défendre. Je peux en appeler au bon sens des Français, de gauche comme de droite. Tous n’auront pas et n’ont pas cette chance.

Ancien président de la République, je suis devenu un citoyen comme les autres. C’est la règle démocratique. Qui d’ailleurs pourrait prétendre que je l’ai, si peu que cela soit, enfreinte? En vingt mois, j’ai subi quatre perquisitions qui ont mobilisé trois juges et quatorze policiers. J’ai été interrogé durant vingt-trois heures parce que l’on me suspectait d’avoir profité de la faiblesse d’une vieille dame! Des milliers d’articles rédigés à charge ont été publiés. Sur le sujet, que reste-t-il de cette boue complaisamment répandue? Rien, si ce n’est une décision de non-lieu après que toutes les investigations possibles ont été engagées. J’ai eu envie de crier: «Tout cela pour cela.» Mais je n’ai rien dit au nom du devoir que me créent les responsabilités qui furent les miennes. J’ai tout accepté, confiant dans la justice et surtout dans la vérité.

Et que dire de la prétendue affaire Karachi où, après des années d’enquête, les magistrats ont fini par découvrir que je n’y avais, au final, assumé aucune responsabilité. Là aussi, cela n’a pas empêché des centaines d’articles à charge.

Puis l’on s’est aperçu que j’avais été le seul de tous les candidats à avoir dépassé, durant la campagne présidentielle de 2012, les montants de dépenses autorisés! De ce fait, je fus reconnu fautif d’un dépassement de 2,1 %. La sanction fut, pour la première fois dans l’histoire de la République, la suppression de 100 % des financements publics. Le 9 juillet 2013, il nous a fallu rembourser 11,3 millions d’euros, dont j’étais caution à titre personnel. Grâce aux soutiens de 137.000 Français et à la mobilisation de ma famille politique, ce fut réalisé en deux mois. Comment leur dire mon immense reconnaissance? Cette fois encore, je n’ai rien dit. J’ai tout accepté.

Sans l’ombre d’une preuve et contre toute évidence, me voici accusé d’avoir fait financer ma campagne de 2007 par M. Kadhafi. On a parlé d’un virement de 50 millions d’euros! Un détail… Après des mois d’enquête, des dizaines de commissions rogatoires, la justice n’a trouvé ni virement, ni banque de départ, ni banque d’arrivée. Toute l’accusation repose sur les témoignages «crédibles» du fils de M. Kadhafi et de son entourage, sans doute une référence morale, et de celui de M. Takieddine, dont on connaît aujourd’hui le passif judiciaire.

J’ai déposé plainte contre Mediapart pour faux et usage de faux à la suite de la publication d’un faux grossier. Ma plainte a paru suffisamment crédible pour que ses dirigeants soient placés par la justice sous statut de témoin assisté.

Le simple bon sens devrait amener à considérer que la guerre que nous avons conduite en Libye a duré dix mois. Durant cette période, si M. Kadhafi avait eu le moindre document à utiliser contre moi, pourquoi ne l’a-t-il pas fait, alors même que j’étais le chef de la coalition contre lui?

Or voici que j’apprends par la presse que tous mes téléphones sont écoutés depuis maintenant huit mois. Les policiers n’ignorent donc rien de mes conversations intimes avec ma femme, mes enfants, mes proches. Les juges entendent les discussions que j’ai avec les responsables politiques français et étrangers. Les conversations avec mon avocat ont été enregistrées sans la moindre gêne. L’ensemble fait l’objet de retranscriptions écrites dont on imagine aisément qui en sont les destinataires!

Ajoutant l’illégalité à l’illégalité, on n’hésite pas à publier des extraits tronqués et mensongers de ces mêmes enregistrements. Qui a donné ces documents alors même qu’aucun avocat n’a accès à la procédure? Les seuls détenteurs en sont les juges ou les policiers… Sont-ils au-dessus des lois sur le secret de l’instruction?

On me met sur écoute en septembre 2013 pour des faits supposés de corruption qui auraient été commis en 2007! On le fait, non parce que l’on dispose d’indices, mais parce que l’on espère en trouver. Aujourd’hui encore, toute personne qui me téléphone doit savoir qu’elle sera écoutée. Vous lisez bien. Ce n’est pas un extrait du merveilleux film La Vie des autres sur l’Allemagne de l’Est et les activités de la Stasi. Il ne s’agit pas des agissements de tel dictateur dans le monde à l’endroit de ses opposants. Il s’agit de la France.

Suis-je en droit de m’interroger sur ce qui est fait de la retranscription de mes conversations? Je sais, la ministre de la Justice n’était pas au courant, malgré tous les rapports qu’elle a demandés et reçus. Le ministre de l’Intérieur n’était pas au courant, malgré les dizaines de policiers affectés à ma seule situation. De qui se moque-t-on? On pourrait en rire s’il ne s’agissait de principes républicains si fondamentaux. Décidément, la France des droits de l’homme a bien changé…

Heureusement, des milliers d’avocats, quelles que soient leurs sensibilités, ont décidé que trop, c’était trop. Avec le bâtonnier à leur tête, ils veulent faire entendre cette vérité qu’un avocat dans l’exercice de ses fonctions doit être protégé de la même manière qu’un journaliste. Dans la République, on n’écoute pas les journalistes, pas davantage que les avocats dans l’exercice de leurs fonctions!

Mais cela n’est pas tout. Mon propre avocat se trouve accusé d’avoir abusé de son influence auprès de notre juridiction suprême. Cette fois, fini de rire, car c’est à pleurer d’indignation. Son «crime»: être l’ami depuis trente ans d’un avocat général à la Cour de cassation, un des plus fameux juristes de France, à qui il a demandé des avis sur la meilleure stratégie de défense pour son client. Le problème, c’est que le client, c’est moi. Alors «le conseil» devient un «trafic d’influence» supposé. Peu importe que ce magistrat ne puisse exercer la moindre influence sur une chambre criminelle dans laquelle il ne siège pas. Détail, encore, que le gouvernement monégasque ait solennellement déclaré qu’il n’y avait jamais eu la moindre intervention. Dérisoire, le fait que le poste, auquel ce magistrat postulait pour après sa retraite, ait été pourvu un mois avant qu’il ait pensé à en signaler l’existence à mon avocat.

Tout ceci ne résiste pas à l’évidence. Eh bien, cela n’a pas empêché trois juges et vingt policiers de multiplier les perquisitions aux domiciles et au bureau de mon avocat, quatorze heures durant! Après avoir démonté sa machine à laver et exigé, qu’au moment de sa douche, à 6 h 30 du matin, il laissât la porte ouverte. La juge en charge est repartie avec ses téléphones. Dois-je considérer comme une anecdote le fait que cette magistrate soit membre du Syndicat de la magistrature? Ce syndicat désormais célèbre pour avoir affiché dans ses locaux le tristement fameux «mur des cons», où j’occupe une place de choix! Dois-je considérer qu’il s’agit d’un exercice serein et impartial de la justice? Augmenterai-je la gravité de mon cas en informant mes lecteurs que l’un des juges qui enquêtent sur le prétendu financement Kadhafi est celui-là même qui a signé, en juin 2012, l’appel des quatre-vingt-deux juges d’instruction, dont le ciblage de ma personne et de ma politique est transparent? Au moins dois-je être tranquillisé sur la clarté des opinions politiques d’un magistrat dont le devoir est pourtant d’enquêter à charge et à décharge. Pour la charge, je crois que l’on peut être confiant, mais pour la décharge… Quel justiciable voudrait connaître une situation semblable?

Et pourtant, envers et contre tout, je garde confiance dans l’institution judiciaire, dans l’impartialité de l’immense majorité des juges, dans la capacité de la justice à ne pas se laisser instrumentaliser.

Mon propos n’est pas de me plaindre. Je ne demande à personne de s’apitoyer sur mon sort. Ce texte est un appel à la conscience, aux convictions, aux principes de tous ceux qui croient en la République.

Aux Français qui n’ont pas voté pour moi, je demande d’oublier mon cas personnel et de penser à la République et à la France. Au nom de leurs propres convictions, peuvent-ils accepter ces violations répétées de nos principes les plus chers?

À ceux qui me sont attachés, je veux dire que je n’ai jamais trahi leur confiance. J’accepte tous les combats à condition qu’ils soient loyaux. Je refuse que la vie politique française ne fasse place qu’aux coups tordus et aux manipulations grossières.

Je veux affirmer que je n’ai jamais demandé à être au-dessus des lois, mais que je ne peux accepter d’être en dessous de celles-ci.

Enfin, à tous ceux qui auraient à redouter mon retour, qu’ils soient assurés que la meilleure façon de l’éviter serait que je puisse vivre ma vie simplement, tranquillement… au fond, comme un citoyen «normal»!»

Voir aussi:

Ces métiers indispensables qui n’existeraient plus sans secret professionnel

Habitués aux violations perpétuelles du secret de l’instruction, on aurait tendance à oublier que les secrets sont nécessaires dans certaines professions.

Atlantico

15 mars 2014

Atlantico : Suite à la révélation par Le Monde des écoutes de Nicolas Sarkozy et de son avocat, Me Herzog, le ministre délégué de l’Economie sociale et solidaire, Benoît Hamon, a déclaré « quand on a rien à se reprocher, ce n’est pas grave d’être sur écoute ». Avoir un secret est-il devenu répréhensible ? Cela ne revient-il pas à assimiler le secret au mensonge ?

Françoise Gouzvinski : Ce n’est pas parce qu’on a un corps sculptural qu’on ouvre sa salle de bain à tout le monde… qu’on y soit nu ou pas d’ailleurs. On garde des choses pour soi pour avoir un lieu intime, à soi, qui permet d’être et de penser librement (Arendt : « le moi pensant vit toujours caché » (Hannah Arendt. La vie de l’esprit. Paris, P.U.F.1992. p.190) ou encore P. Aulagnier : « se préserver le droit et la possibilité de créer des pensées et plus simplement de penser, exige que l’on s’arroge celui de choisir les pensées que l’on communique et celles que l’on garde secrètes: c’est là une condition vitale (c’est l’auteur qui souligne) pour le fonctionnement du Je » (P. Aulagnier. Un interprète en quête de sens. p 229).

En l’espèce ce qui est en cause est la confiance attribuée au médium support de la transmission de l’information : téléphone, Internet ou dossiers papiers, etc. dont la démocratie, mais aussi la société devrait garantir qu’ils sont, selon les termes de J. P. Chrétien Goni des supports à « verrous de dévoilement contrôlé » (Goni-Chrétien : Le système du secret, Observations sur la pratique généralisée du secret. Paris EPE, Le Groupe familial, n°19, 1996). Tout montre que ce n’est pas « toujours » le cas (cf. paradigme du « risque » traité chez Ulrich Beck « La société du risque »). On vit alors, à juste titre, la surprise de ne pas se trouver seul (ou à deux) dans la salle de bain, comme une effraction. Donc avoir des choses secrètes et savoir les garder n’est pas répréhensible, au contraire, c’est un gage d’intelligence. Je suis convaincue que Monsieur Hamon le sait. Ce qui est grave et sérieux par contre c’est d’être mis sur écoute à son insu ; c’est pourquoi seule la justice peut décider d’une procédure qui prive le citoyen concerné de son droit à l’information.

Pour votre seconde question qui est plus morale – cela nécessiterait en soi un développement sur la notion du Vrai, mais aussi de la Honte – il faut savoir que depuis la nuit des temps, le fait de détenir un secret excite la curiosité. Encore si personne ne sait que vous avez un secret, cela pourra mettre quelques lustres avant qu’on ne le découvre, l’explore, le sonde… Mais si, comme c’est le cas pour la politique, votre fonction vous amène nécessairement à en faire (des secrets), l’effet paranoïaque alentour est décuplé. On suspecte celui qui a un secret ; on spécule, on fantasme… on a très probablement un peu peur. Vous l’avez vu jusqu’à présent je n’ai pas abordé la question du contenu du secret. Je vous parle de l’enveloppe, mais non de ce qu’il y a dedans. Alors le contenu qu’il soit vrai ou faux, louable ou répréhensible, c’est une autre question. Il y a des tas de gens qui conservent des secrets peut-être faux, répréhensibles il n’en demeure pas moins que cela peut être leur droit du moment qu’ils ne sont pas contraints par la loi à les dévoiler. Par contre que certaines personnes soient plus habiles (perverses ?) à dissimuler, cela ne fait aucun doute. Le droit au respect de la vie privée, comme le droit au secret professionnel sont des droits qui sont là pour protéger probablement ceux ou celles qui n’ont pas forcément les capacités à garder pour eux, à penser, à trouver des solutions, à élaborer tout seul.

Didier Martz : Au préalable, la notion de secret est particulièrement galvaudée. Le secret, à l’origine, c’est ce que personne ne peut connaître ou ne doit connaître. C’est la réalité profonde, énigmatique de quelqu’un, son intimité qui rend la relation possible. Le secret est pour ainsi dire sacré.

Aujourd’hui on appelle « secret » le fait de détenir une information et de la garder secrète. Evidemment, on passe assez facilement dans le champ de la morale : reproche, mensonge et au « quand on n’a rien à se reprocher ! » La question est d’abord politique et juridique à savoir est-ce que les citoyens ont le droit de savoir ou non, d’être éclairé pour exercer leur citoyenneté ? Et par conséquent, quels sont les contre-pouvoirs chargés d’apporter ces lumières ? Médias, chercheurs, juristes…

Certains métiers nécessitent d’être garants de pouvoir garder des secrets : avocats, journalistes, médecins etc. Ces métiers pourraient-ils exister sans secret ? Pourquoi ?

Françoise Gouzvinski : Le secret professionnel garantit l’usager c’est-à-dire celui qui confie son information au professionnel et ne saurait protéger une profession. Il appartient aux professionnels de ne pas révéler ce qu’on leur a confié. En l’occurrence il n’est pas nécessaire de se « retrancher » derrière le secret professionnel mais seulement de ne pas dire en usant de celui-ci. Savoir faire usage sans faire mention évite bien des polémiques. (C’est un droit codifié à l’article 226.13 et 14 du Nouveau Code de Procédure pénale). Notons que la réforme du Code de procédure pénale a supprimé la liste des professionnels soumis au secret professionnel et généralisé l’obligation de secret professionnel en ces termes : « La révélation d’une information à caractère secret par une personne qui en est dépositaire soit par état ou par profession, soit en raison d’une fonction ou d’une mission temporaire, est punie etc. »).

L’hypothèse de la possibilité d’existence de ces métiers sans le droit au secret professionnel est caduque puisque qui songerait à se confier s’il n’était pas a priori garanti que sa confidence ne soit gardée. La question philosophique est de savoir si, en la matière, l’amitié qui n’exclut pas l’assistance et les conseils reprendrait du galon.

Didier Martz : Le secret des sources est indispensable à leur exercice et fait partie de leur déontologie. A ne pas confondre avec le partage de l’information notamment avec ceux qui sont directement concernés : le médecin doit partagé l’information avec son patient, l’avocat avec son client, les médias avec ses lecteurs.

Le politique est lui sous un autre régime d’où la nécessité de contre-pouvoirs.

De quoi le secret est-il garant dans ces cas-là ?

Françoise Gouzvinski : Il est le garant que la personne qui a confié à… un professionnel en l’occurrence, reste détenteur de l’usage de ce qu’il a confié, et donc conserve sa subjectivité. La personne qui a recours à un professionnel pour penser ensemble un événement difficile à traiter en soi, acquiert le discernement et conserve le pouvoir de choisir à qui et comment elle souhaitera le « médiatiser » à quelqu’un d’autres, ou quelques autres éventuellement. Il appartient au professionnel d’être garant de l’étanchéité des lieux où sont confiés ou échangés des propos.

Didier Martz : De l’exercice de ces métiers. Sinon on est dans un régime totalitaire.

Quelles relations secret et démocratie entretiennent-ils ? Peut-on dire que la possibilité du secret est inhérente à la démocratie ?

Françoise Gouzvinski : On se rapprochera pour approfondir cette relation avec grand intérêt aux rapports « Transparence et secrets » (“Transparences et secrets” Etudes et documents – La Documentation Voltaire N° 47, 1995) produits par les travaux de la CADA (Commission d’accès aux documents administratifs). Voilà le tableau qu’il présente :

Il paraît évident que, pour ne pas vivre dans une société totalitaire et poussant à la délation, le respect de la vie privée est un fondement de la démocratie (voir aussi G. Simmel dans « Secret et sociétés secrètes »). L’Etat même s’il tend vers la transparence du fonctionnement publique conserve toujours des zones de fonctionnement secrètes, déclarées ou non, comme le citoyen. Pour que se joue la démocratie il faut que le droit de poser des questions reste actif. La démocratie doit garantir le respect du droit pour tous, mais chacun ou chacune peut être interrogé par la Justice. Les efforts réalisés depuis les années 80 vont dans l’appropriation par le citoyen de droits analogues visant à lui permettre à lui aussi d’interroger le fonctionnement publique.

Attention au sophisme. Le secret est inhérent au totalitarisme, et on le voit sur ce tableau aux sociétés traditionnelles presque plus qu’aux sociétés démocratiques libérales. Au passage cela permet de remiser la remarque de Monsieur Hamon au sein d’une société « innocente », euphémisme pour parler des sociétés sans Etat.

Didier Martz : Au prétexte de démocratie, on veut rendre tout transparent, tout exposable. On est allé même chez certains hommes ou femmes politiques déclarer qu’on avait un vélo ! C’est comme dit Debray devenu le règne de l’obscène. Et la mort de la démocratie. La transparence est devenue le leit-motiv de la postmodernité : on avoue tout partout, partout on se repend, on s’expose publiquement aux jugements du troupeau.

Quels risques prend-on à établir une distinction entre bons et mauvais secrets ? Quelqu’un peut-il seulement en décider ?

Françoise Gouzvinski : Un Secret (une information à caractère secret) obéit selon J. P. Chrétien-Goni à une double logique ; une tendance à l’enfouissement, une tendance à la propagation. Tenter de garder secret et le mouvement insidieux et lent agira dans le sens d’une révélation ; décider de dire, de révéler et l’oubli viendra faire œuvre. Je le répète, cette double logique autour d’un même événement ou propos, œuvre quelque soit sa qualité. Le droit français a fort bien négocié la question du bon ou mauvais secret, donnant quelques rares exceptions au « droit au secret » au moins jusqu’en ce début de siècle. Les mauvais secrets commencent à être listés de façon de plus en plus importantes dès lors que la société devient sécuritaire et que tout ou presque peut être qualifié de menace. Plus une société allonge la liste et distingue en lieu et place de ses sujets ce qui est « on à garder » de ce qui est « mauvais » et justifie d’être dévoilé, plus elle augmente son pouvoir d’aliénation sur les individus, et se rapproche d’un modèle anti-démocratique. A la question de savoir si quelqu’un peut en décider, il faut bien reconnaître que les lois font autorité et que le débat public est le cadre de leur exercice, de leurs mises en critique, en tensions et de leurs évolutions. Si la société tend à être confiante dans ses institutions elle devrait n’avoir besoin que de très peu de gardes fous pour que chaque individu, quelque soit son identité, se sente protégé. Les médias participent de ce travail et je vais vous étonner, mais je demeure assez confiante.

Didier Martz : A supposer qu’il y a une instance, un groupe, une commission… que sais-je encore possédant les dits secrets et en charge de décréter ceux qui sont bons ou non et par conséquent publiables ou non.

La question est à mettre en rapport avec la notion de vérité et la façon dont elle s’établit. Il n’y a pas de vérité en soi, ni de secret bon ou mauvais en soi. Elle se construit continûment via le débat démocratique notamment.

Propos recueillis par Marianne Mura


Filières du Vatican: Attention des Monuments men peuvent en cacher d’autres (Ratlines: Looking back at the other Monuments men)

19 mars, 2014

https://i2.wp.com/berlinfilmjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/The-Monuments-Men.jpg

https://i0.wp.com/www.concordatwatch.eu/Users/X890/X890_727_CWPavelicwithFranciscans.jpghttps://i2.wp.com/www.angelismarriti.it/images/ratlines-byLoftusAarons.jpghttps://i1.wp.com/fallschirmjager.net/books/TheRealOdessa.jpghttps://i2.wp.com/images.indiebound.com/994/181/9780312181994.jpghttps://i1.wp.com/static.lexpress.fr/assets/359/poster_183999.jpgRien actuellement n’empêche plus la voix du pape de se faire entendre. Il me semble que les horreurs sans nom et sans précédent dans l’Histoire commises par l’Allemagne nazie auraient mérité une protestation solennelle du vicaire du Christ. Il semble qu’une cérémonie expiatoire quelconque, se renouvelant chaque année, aurait été une satisfaction donnée à la conscience publique… Nous avons eu beau prêter l’oreille, nous n’avons entendu que de faibles et vagues gémissements. (…) C’est ce sang dans l’affreux silence du Vatican qui étouffe tous les chrétiens. La voix d’Abel ne finira-t-elle pas par se faire entendre ? Paul Claudel (lettre à Jacques Maritain, ambassadeur de France auprès du Saint-Siège, 13 décembre 1945)
C’est de ce long, troublant et douloureux silence qu’il est devenu urgent de parler. Non pour l’interpréter à la seule lueur de la polémique antichrétienne. Non pour en conclure qu’il était d’approbation ou de complicité tacite : tout prouve exactement le contraire. Comme il est devenu d’usage, on soupçonne le pape actuel des pires intentions – sans jamais préciser lesquelles – lorsqu’il franchit une étape dans le lent processus qui pourrait mener à la béatification de Pie XII. On lui refuse le crédit d’une pensée et d’une action qui s’élèvent au-dessus des calculs et se tiennent sans coup férir dans leur sphère propre : religieuse, spirituelle. Les si fortes paroles de Claudel et de Maritain ne nous engagent pas sur la voie d’un procès d’intention dont l’acte d’accusation serait écrit d’avance. En revanche, elles jugent et condamnent sans aucune ambiguïté, avec une force qui dépasse toute polémique, le silence coupable – et non pas la culpabilité silencieuse – de Pie XII. Ce faisant, elles interrogent en toute conscience la réelle héroïcité des vertus du pontife. Le péché par omission est le dernier que le fidèle catholique avoue dans l’acte de contrition. Il n’est pas le moindre. Tout ce que j’aurais pu faire et dire, que je n’ai pas fait, pas dit, remettant à plus tard, à jamais, le bien qu’il m’est commandé d’aimer et de servir. De ne pas trahir. Omettre le bien, se soustraire à ce service, ouvre donc l’espace immense et sombre d’un manquement majeur. Un espace qui ne peut pas être occulté par des motifs contingents, des excuses fallacieuses. Un espace qui n’est étranger à personne, pas même au pape. Patrick Kéchichian
Nous devons conserver une espèce de réservoir moral dans lequel nous pourrons puiser à l’avenir. Krunoslav Draganavic
À l’époque il se produisait à Nuremberg quelque chose que personnellement je considérais comme une honte et une malheureuse leçon pour le futur de l’humanité. J’acquis la certitude que le peuple argentin aussi considérait le procès de Nuremberg comme une honte, indigne des vainqueurs, qui se conduisaient comme s’ils n’avaient pas vaincu. Maintenant nous réalisons [que les Alliés] méritaient de perdre la guerre. Juan Peron
Les contacts de Pavelic sont si élevés et sa situation actuelle si compromettante pour le Vatican, que toute extradition du sujet déstabiliserait fortement l’Église catholique. Rapport des services de renseignement militaire américains (12 septembre 1947)
Le pape François joue la carte de l’ouverture. Le Point
Les travaux d’une commission d’enquête argentine ad hoc semblent montrer au contraire que les dignitaires du Vatican (au premier rang desquels le sous-secrétaire d’état Montini, futur pape Paul VI) n’ont jamais encouragé ces exfiltrations, voire ont eu l’occasion d’y manifester leur opposition. L’Église catholique aurait simplement été, comme la Croix-Rouge, tellement submergée par les flux massifs de réfugiés qu’elle n’aurait pu procéder qu’à des enquêtes sommaires, aisément contournées par les anciens dignitaires nazis. Ce défaut de vigilance aurait d’ailleurs également profité à de nombreux espions soviétiques. Wikipedia
Washington and Bonn failed to act on the information or hand it to the Israelis because they believed it did not serve their interests in the cold war struggle. In fact, the unexpected reappearance of the architect of the « final solution » in a glass box in a Jerusalem court threatened to be an embarrassment, turning global attention to all the former Nazis the Americans and Germans had recruited in the name of anti-communism. Historians say Britain and other western powers probably did the same, but they have not published the evidence. The CIA has. Under heavy congressional pressure, the agency has been persuaded to declassify 27,000 unedited pages about American dealings with former Nazis in postwar Europe. (…) It was not just a question of bureaucratic inertia. There were good reasons not to go hunting for Eichmann. In Bonn, the immediate fear was what Eichmann would say about Hans Globke, who had also worked in the Nazis’ Jewish affairs department, drafting the Nuremberg laws, designed to isolate Jews from the rest of society in the Third Reich. While Eichmann had gone on the run, Globke stayed behind and prospered. By 1960 he was Chancellor Konrad Adenauer’s national security adviser. « The West Germans were extremely concerned apparently about how the East Germans and Soviet bloc in general might make use of what Eichmann would say about Hans Globke, » Mr Naftali said. It was not just a West German concern. Globke was the main point of contact between the Bonn government, the CIA and Nato. « Globke was a timebomb for Nato, » Mr Naftali said. At the request of the West Germans, the CIA even managed to persuade Life magazine to delete any reference to Globke from Eichmann’s memoirs, which it had bought from the family. But it was not just Globke. When Eichmann was captured the CIA combed files it had captured from the Nazis to find information that might be useful to the Israeli prosecution. The results caused near panic among the CIA’s leadership because, unknown to the junior staff who had looked through the files, a few of Eichmann’s accomplices being investigated had been CIA « assets ». An urgent memo was sent to CIA investigators urging caution and pointing out that if Moscow discovered these ex-Nazis had been working for the Americans that would make those agents « very vulnerable ». Meanwhile, some of the CIA’s German agents were beginning to panic. One of them, Otto Albrecht von Bolschwing – who also had worked with Eichmann in the Jewish affairs department and was later Heinrich Himmler’s representative in Romania – frantically asked his old CIA case officer for help. After the war Bolschwing had been recruited by the Gehlen Organisation, the prototype German intelligence agency set up by the Americans under Reinhard Gehlen, who had run military intelligence on the eastern front under the Nazis. « US army intelligence accepted Reinhard Gehlen’s offer to furnish alleged expertise on the Red army – and was bilked by the many mass murderers he hired, » said Robert Wolfe, a historian at the US national archives. Alongside the Gehlen Organisation, US intelligence had set up « stay-behind networks » in West Germany, who were supposed to stay put in the event of a Soviet invasion and transmit intelligence from behind enemy lines. Those networks were also riddled with ex-Nazis who had horrendous records. One of the networks, codenamed Kibitz-15, was run by a former German army officer, Lieutenant Colonel Walter Kopp, who was described by his own American handlers as an « unreconstructed Nazi ». Most of the networks were dismantled in the early 1950s when it was realised what an embarrassment they might prove. (…) The new documents make clear the great irony behind the US recruitment of ex-Nazis: for all the moral compromises involved, it was a complete failure in intelligence terms. The Nazis were terrible spies. (…) « The files show time and again that these people were more trouble than they were worth, » Mr Naftali said. « The unreconstructed Nazis were always out for themselves, and they were using the west’s lack of information about the Soviet Union to exploit it. » The lesson would be well learned by young CIA case officers today. « Threats change rapidly, and it’s always exiles and former government elements who are the first to come running to us saying – we understand this threat. We have seen it with Iraqi exiles. No doubt we’re seeing it now with Iranian exiles. We have to be smart and we have to know who we are really dealing with. » The Guardian
J’ai enquêté personnellement sur Draganovic qui m’a dit qu’il faisait rapport à Montini, a souligné Gowen. Ce dernier a rapporté qu’à un certain moment, Montini apprit, apparemment du chef de l’antenne de l’OSS à Rome, James Angleton, qui entretenait des relations avec Montini et le Vatican, sur les recherches menées par Gowen. Montini se plaignit de Gowen à ses supérieurs et l’accusa d’avoir violé l’immunité vaticane en ayant entré dans des bâtiments appartenant à l’Église, comme le collège croate, et d’y avoir enquêté. Le but de cette plainte était de gêner l’enquête. Dans son témoignage, Gowen déclara également que Draganovic aida les Oustachis à blanchir les trésors volés avec l’aide de la Banque du Vatican : cet argent fut utilisé pour supporter financièrement ses activités religieuses, mais également pour fournir des fonds en vue de l’exfiltration des chefs Oustachis au travers de la filière. Haaretz
Jonathan Levy and Tom Easton are representing elderly Serb, Jewish and Ukrainian survivors of atrocities committed by the Nazi puppet regime in Croatia, the Ustashe, in a class action lawsuit against the Vatican Bank and the monastic Franciscan Order. Wartime intelligence documents have suggested Ustashe leaders took loot, including gold, silver and jewelry seized from their victims, to the Vatican at the end of the war. There the assets were allegedly used to help finance an escape route – the « ratline » – for Nazis trying to escape Europe, according to the Simon Wiesenthal Center, which tracks Nazi war criminals. The Vatican has consistently denied the allegations, while declining to open its unpublished wartime archives despite appeals from Jewish and other groups. The Swiss National Bank, suspected of acting as a depository for stolen Ustashe loot, has also been named as a defendant in the class action lawsuit, and the lawyers are awaiting a judge’s order allowing the case against the Swiss to proceed. Levy said it was hoped the District Court in San Francisco would order the release of more than 250 documents from files dealing with one Krunoslav Draganavic, a Croatian priest who helped run the « ratline. » Some files had been released as early as the 1980s, when Nazi war criminal Klaus Barbie stood trial in France. But a core of others remained withheld on « national security » grounds, he said. Levy said Draganavic was alleged to have worked at various times for the intelligence services of Croatia, the Vatican, the Soviet Union, Yugoslavia, Britain and the U.S. The lawyers said in a statement they believed « the withheld documents, most well over 40 years old are highly embarrassing to the Americans, the British, and Vatican. » (…) Parallel to the counterintelligence unit, other American army intelligence units, and mainly the Office of Strategic Services (OSS, from which the CIA developed) and British intelligence were engaged in contradictory actions. They made contact with Nazis and with the Ustashe people and enlisted them in their service as agents, collaborators and informers, with the intention of forming a front against the Soviet spread into Eastern Europe and the Balkans. Haaretz

Attention: des Monuments men peuvent en cacher d’autres !

A l’heure où après l’accident industriel de l’Obamamanie, nos médias en mal de copie repartent pour un tour avec le premier anniversaire de l’entrée en fonction du nouveau parangon d’ouverture argentin du Vatican …

Et où via le film Monument men, le monde redécouvre l’ampleur du pillage nazi des trésors culturels de l’Europe  …

Qui se souvient d’un autre « sauvetage » à peu près au même moment mais autrement plus sinistre ?

Et qui s’étonne du long silence radio (bientôt 70 ans !) dudit Vatican (comme d’ailleurs des habituelles banques suisses ou des services secrets américains et britanniques – ou français dans le cas du Grand Moufti de Jérusalem et dont on se souvient de l’embarras lors de la capture d’Eichmann par les Israéliens) sur ces mystérieuses archives que l’on continue de refuser d’ouvrir aux victimes de certains des plus grands criminels de l’histoire ?

Ces Eichmann, Mengele, Barbie et autres Priebke, Heim et Pavelic à qui, via notamment certains dignitaires catholiques tels que le prêtre croate Krunoslav Draganovic ou le prêtre autrichien pro-nazi Alois Hudal et sur fond de guerre froide commençante (mais, au-delà de la désinformation soviétique, probablement à l’insu d’un Pie XII et d’un sous-secrétaire d’état Montini et futur pape Paul VI dépassés), le Vatican fournira faux papiers et soutanes …

Mais aussi caches et blanchiment pour leurs butins de guerre en vue de financer leurs réseaux d’exfiltration vers l’Amérique latine (avec en première ligne l’Argentine péroniste) et le Moyen-Orient …

Les fameuses filières dites « rat lines » en anglais ou enfléchures en français, du nom de ces échelles de cordage qui servaient aux marins – mais aussi aux rats – d’ultime refuge au moment où coulait leur navire ?

Tied up in the Rat Lines

Yossi Melman

Haaretz

Jan. 15, 2006

It is possible that within a short time a court in the United States will prohibit the publication of the account before us. In the meantime, Haaretz has obtained the testimony given last month by William Gowen, a former intelligence officer in the United States Army, at a federal court in San Francisco. The testimony contains historical and political explosives. It links Giovanni Battista Montini, who later became Pope Paul VI, to the theft of property of Jewish, Serb, Russian, Ukrainian and Roma victims during World War II in Yugoslavia. Many studies and stories have already been written about the thundering silence of Pope Pius XII, who reigned in the Vatican during World War II. Now the former intelligence officer’s testimony has revealed that after the war, Montini, who during the war served as the Vatican’s deputy secretary of state under the pope, helped hide and launder property that had been stolen from, among others, Jews and was involved in the sheltering and smuggling of Croatian war criminals, such as the leader of the Ustashe movement, Ante Pavelic.

The smuggling and hiding of Croatian war criminals was part of the extensive network known as the Rat Lines. Senior officials at the Vatican were involved in hiding and smuggling Nazi war criminals and their collaborators so they would not be arrested and tried. Hundreds of war criminals were provided with church and Red Cross papers that enabled them to hide in safe houses and then flee from Europe, mainly to the Middle East and South America. Among them were Klaus Barbie (« the butcher of Lyon »), Adolf Eichmann, Dr. Josef Mengele and Franz Stengel, the commander of the Treblinka death camp.

The Vatican network was also used by leaders of the Ustashe – the nationalist Croatian Catholic movement that was active in Croatia and collaborated with the Nazi occupation. « The Reverend Dr. Prof. Krunoslav Draganovic seemed to be in cooperation with the Ustasha network. And he was given a Vatican assignment as the apostolic visitator for Croatians, which meant he reported directly to Monsignor Giovanni Battista Montini, » states an American document based on a report from the Italian police; the document was recently placed in evidence at the court in San Francisco where Gowen testified.

The leaders of the Ustashe headed by Pavelic are the ones who stole the victims’ property: art and jewelry – silver and mostly gold. After the war they fled with the treasure and laundered it with the help of Vatican institutions. According to Gowen’s testimony, Montini, who in 1964 became the first pope to visit the State of Israel, was also involved in the Vatican’s help in laundering the wealth.

Still terrified

In 1999 a suit was filed at a court in San Franciso against the Vatican Bank (Institute for Religious Works) and against the Franciscan order, the Croatian Liberation Movement (the Ustashe), the National Bank of Switzerland and others. The suit was filed by Jewish, Ukrainian, Serb and Roma survivors, as well as relatives of victims and various organizations that together represent 300,000 World War II victims. The plaintiffs demanded accounting and restitution.

One of the lawyers representing the plaintiffs is Jonathan Levy. « Many of the plaintiffs have been reluctant to be pictured, after all these years, » says Levy. « Many are still terrified of the Ustashe, the Serbs particularly. Unlike the Nazi Party, the Ustashe still exist and have a party headquarters in Zagreb. »

The Ustashe was founded in 1929 as a Croatian nationalist movement with a deep connection to Catholicism. From the day it was founded the movement made its aim the establishment of an independent Croatian state and declared to fight the monarchy in Yugoslavia. The movement was banned and its founders, Pavelic and Gustav Percec (who was later murdered at Pavelic’s orders) were condemned to death in their absence. The Ustashe was linked to the assassination of Yugoslav King Alexander and French foreign minister Louis Barthou in Marseilles in 1934.

Upon the occupation of Yugoslavia, the German Nazis and the Italian Fascists formed an « independent » state in Croatia, which was basically a Nazi puppet state. Pavelic was appointed poglovnik, the leader of the country. He hastened to meet with Hitler and allied himself with the Fuehrer. When Hitler invaded the Soviet Union, Pavelic sent Ustashe units to fight alongside the Nazis and then joined the declaration of war against the United States. Ustashe leaders declared they would slaughter a third of the Serb population in Croatia, deport a third and convert the remaining third from Orthodoxy to Roman Catholicism. Anyone who refused to convert was murdered.

Immediately upon the establishment of its puppet government, the Ustashe set up militias and gangs that slaughtered Serbs, Jews, Romas and their political foes. Catholic priests, some of them Franciscans, also participated in the acts of slaughter. The cruelty of the Ustashe was so great that even the commander of the German army in Yugoslavia complained.

Himmler of the Balkans

Under the leadership of Pavelic’s right-hand man Andrija Artukovic, who earned the nickname « the Himmler of the Balkans, » the Ustashe set up concentration camps, most notably at Jasenovac. According to various estimates, about 100,000 people were murdered at the camp, among them tens of thousands of Jews (it is interesting to note that some of the heads of the Ustashe were married to Jewish women). Throughout Croatia about 700,000 people were murdered. The partisans, led by the Croat Communist Josip Broz Tito, and the Chetniks – Nationalist Serb royalists – fought the Ustashe.

After the war, Pavelic and other Ustashe heads fled to Austria and, with the help of the British intelligence and their friends in the Vatican, found refuge in Italy. They hid in Vatican monasteries and were provided with false documents that gave them a new identity. Secret documents that were disclosed at the court in San Francisco show that at the end of the war, British intelligence took Pavelic under its wing and allowed him and a convoy of 10 trucks that carried the stolen treasure to travel to the British occupation zone in Austria. The British did this with the intention of using him as a counterweight to the Communist takeover in Yugoslavia.

The Ustashe brought the treasure convoy to Rome, where they put it into the hands of the Croatian ambassador to the Vatican, Rev. Krunoslav Draganovic. Draganovic also saw to hiding Pavelic and his aides in Vatican institutions and safe houses in Rome. American military intelligence located Pavelic’s hiding place. But according to a secret document Gowen wrote in July 1947, that was submitted to the court, Gowen’s unit received the instruction: « Hands off » Pavelic.

This was an order from the American Embassy, stressed Gowen in his testimony. It is also stated in the document, which is classified as top secret, that Pavelic, via his contacts with Draganovic, was receiving Vatican protection. From Italy, Pavelic was smuggled on the Rat Lines to Argentina, where he served as a security adviser to president Juan Peron (Peron granted entry visas to 34,000 Croats, many of them associated with the Ustashe and Nazi supporters).

In 1957 there was an attempt to assassinate him, in which he was wounded. The operation was attributed to Tito’s Yugoslav intelligence, although the possibility that this was an attempt at revenge by a Chetnik activist was not dismissed. Pavelic had to leave Argentina and found refuge with the Spanish dictator Franco. Two years later, in 1959, he died as a result of complications caused by the wound. The Ustashe has continued to exist over the years and until the 1980s its operatives were involved in acts of terror against diplomats and other Yugoslav targets abroad.

Montini complains

The suit filed at the court in San Francisco is based on earlier investigations and reports from American government agencies, the Simon Wiesenthal Center and committees of historians who researched the matter of the Jewish property in Swiss banks. The case was preceded by successful legal battles by attorney Levy and his colleagues against the CIA and the American Army to obtain secret documents. The defendants, on their part, led by the Vatican Bank and the Franciscan order and others, deny the charges against them and made every effort to have the charges dismissed. So far, the court has rejected these efforts outright and determined that the deliberations would continue. But the defendants are tenacious and now they are demanding that publication of Gowen’s testimony be prohibited.

After the end of the war Gowen served as a special agent, meaning an investigations officer in the Rome detachment of American counter-intelligence. This unit’s role was to track down, among others, Italian Fascists, Nazi war criminals and their collaborators, including the Ustashe leaders (Gowen said another mission included, at the request of British intelligence, surveillance of Irgun and Lehi activists). The code name for the unit’s actions was « Operation Circle. »

Parallel to the counterintelligence unit, other American army intelligence units, and mainly the Office of Strategic Services (OSS, from which the CIA developed) and British intelligence were engaged in contradictory actions. They made contact with Nazis and with the Ustashe people and enlisted them in their service as agents, collaborators and informers, with the intention of forming a front against the Soviet spread into Eastern Europe and the Balkans. « To try and find Pavelic you had to discover how the Ustashe network in Italy was constituted, how it operated, what were its bases, » testified Gowen.

A key person in the Pontifical Croatian college was Rev. Draganovic, the Croatian ambassador to the Vatican. Draganovic and the college issued false papers to Croatian war criminals, among them Pavelic and Artukovic. « I personally investigated Draganovic – who told me he was reporting to Montini, » emphasized Gowen.

Gowen related that at a certain stage Montini learned, apparently from the head of the OSS unit in Rome, James Angleton, who nurtured relations with Montini and the Vatican, of the investigation Gowen’s unit was conducting. Montini complained about Gowen to his superiors and accused him of having violated the Vatican’s immunity by having entered church buildings, such as the Croatian college, and conducting searches there. The aim of the complaint was to interfere with the investigation.

In his testimony, Gowen also stated that Draganovic helped the Ustashe launder the stolen treasure with the help of the Vatican Bank: This money was used to fund its religious activities, but also to fund the escape of Ustashe leaders on the Rat Line.

Voir aussi:

Nazi-Era Victims Demand Army, CIA Release Documents on Vatican

Patrick Goodenough

CNS news

July 7, 2008

(CNSNews.com) – Two California attorneys have filed a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit in a bid to have the U.S. Army and CIA release documents relating to alleged Vatican collaboration with Nazi-allied fascists in the wartime Balkans.

The Army’s decision earlier this year to withhold more than 250 documents, some at the request of the CIA, was in violation of the Nazi War Crimes Disclosure Act, the lawyers contended in their complaint.

Jonathan Levy and Tom Easton are representing elderly Serb, Jewish and Ukrainian survivors of atrocities committed by the Nazi puppet regime in Croatia, the Ustashe, in a class action lawsuit against the Vatican Bank and the monastic Franciscan Order.

Wartime intelligence documents have suggested Ustashe leaders took loot, including gold, silver and jewelry seized from their victims, to the Vatican at the end of the war.

There the assets were allegedly used to help finance an escape route – the « ratline » – for Nazis trying to escape Europe, according to the Simon Wiesenthal Center, which tracks Nazi war criminals.

The Vatican has consistently denied the allegations, while declining to open its unpublished wartime archives despite appeals from Jewish and other groups.

The Swiss National Bank, suspected of acting as a depository for stolen Ustashe loot, has also been named as a defendant in the class action lawsuit, and the lawyers are awaiting a judge’s order allowing the case against the Swiss to proceed.

Levy said it was hoped the District Court in San Francisco would order the release of more than 250 documents from files dealing with one Krunoslav Draganavic, a Croatian priest who helped run the « ratline. »

Some files had been released as early as the 1980s, when Nazi war criminal Klaus Barbie stood trial in France. But a core of others remained withheld on « national security » grounds, he said.

Levy said Draganavic was alleged to have worked at various times for the intelligence services of Croatia, the Vatican, the Soviet Union, Yugoslavia, Britain and the U.S.

The lawyers said in a statement they believed « the withheld documents, most well over 40 years old are highly embarrassing to the Americans, the British, and Vatican. »

Among those Holocaust researchers say escaped via the « ratline » between 1945 and the late 1950s was Ustashe leader Ante Pavelic, who made his way to Latin America using papers allegedly provided by the Vatican, and disguised as a priest.

Barbie, known as « the butcher of Lyon, » was another reported beneficiary of the « ratline, » escaping to Bolivia. It has long been alleged the U.S. used him as an anti-communist agent after the war. A 1983 Justice Department investigation concluded that the U.S. had no relationship with Barbie since he left Europe in 1951.

Barbie was eventually deported to France in 1983, jailed for life several years later for crimes against humanity, and died in prison in 1991.

Another suspected user of the « ratline » was Adolf Eichmann, one of the architects of Hitler’s « final solution. » He was abducted from Argentina by Mossad agents in 1960, convicted at the end of a marathon trial in Israel, and hanged in 1962.

Between 700,000 and 900,000 people died at the hands of the Ustashe regime, which also participated in the systematic Nazi looting of occupied Ukraine.

Voir également:

Why Israel’s capture of Eichmann caused panic at the CIA

Information that could have led to Nazi war criminal was kept under wraps

Julian Borger in Washington

The Guardian

8 June 2006

On May 23 1960, when Israeli prime minister David Ben-Gurion announced to the Knesset that « Adolf Eichmann, one of the greatest Nazi war criminals, is in Israeli custody », US and West German intelligence services reacted to the stunning news not with joy but alarm.

Newly declassified CIA documents show the Americans and the German BND knew Eichmann was hiding in Argentina at least two years before Israeli agents snatched him from the streets of Buenos Aires on his way back from work. They knew how long he had been in the country and had a rough idea of the alias the Nazi fugitive was using there, Klement.

Even though German intelligence had misspelled it as Clemens, it was a crucial clue. The Mossad effort to track Eichmann had been suspended at the time because it had failed to discover his pseudonym. They were ultimately tipped off by a German official disgusted at his government’s failure to bring the war criminal to justice.

Embarrassment

Washington and Bonn failed to act on the information or hand it to the Israelis because they believed it did not serve their interests in the cold war struggle. In fact, the unexpected reappearance of the architect of the « final solution » in a glass box in a Jerusalem court threatened to be an embarrassment, turning global attention to all the former Nazis the Americans and Germans had recruited in the name of anti-communism.

Historians say Britain and other western powers probably did the same, but they have not published the evidence. The CIA has. Under heavy congressional pressure, the agency has been persuaded to declassify 27,000 unedited pages about American dealings with former Nazis in postwar Europe.

One of the most startling of those documents is a CIA memo dated March 19 1958, from the station chief in Munich to headquarters, noting that German intelligence (codenamed Upswing) had that month passed on a list of high-ranking former Nazis and their whereabouts. Eichmann was third on the list. The memo passed on a rumour that he was in Jerusalem « despite the fact that he was responsible for mass extermination of Jews », but also states, matter-of-factly: « He is reported to have lived in Argentina under the alias Clemens since 1952. »

There is no record of a follow-up in the CIA to this tip-off. The reason was, according to Timothy Naftali, a US historian who has reviewed the freshly-declassified archive, it was no longer the CIA’s job to hunt down Nazis. « It just wasn’t US policy to go looking for war criminals. It wasn’t British policy either for that matter. It was left to the West Germans … and this is further evidence of the low priority the Germans gave to hunting down war criminals. »

It was not just a question of bureaucratic inertia. There were good reasons not to go hunting for Eichmann. In Bonn, the immediate fear was what Eichmann would say about Hans Globke, who had also worked in the Nazis’ Jewish affairs department, drafting the Nuremberg laws, designed to isolate Jews from the rest of society in the Third Reich. While Eichmann had gone on the run, Globke stayed behind and prospered. By 1960 he was Chancellor Konrad Adenauer’s national security adviser.

« The West Germans were extremely concerned apparently about how the East Germans and Soviet bloc in general might make use of what Eichmann would say about Hans Globke, » Mr Naftali said.

It was not just a West German concern. Globke was the main point of contact between the Bonn government, the CIA and Nato. « Globke was a timebomb for Nato, » Mr Naftali said. At the request of the West Germans, the CIA even managed to persuade Life magazine to delete any reference to Globke from Eichmann’s memoirs, which it had bought from the family.

But it was not just Globke. When Eichmann was captured the CIA combed files it had captured from the Nazis to find information that might be useful to the Israeli prosecution. The results caused near panic among the CIA’s leadership because, unknown to the junior staff who had looked through the files, a few of Eichmann’s accomplices being investigated had been CIA « assets ».

An urgent memo was sent to CIA investigators urging caution and pointing out that if Moscow discovered these ex-Nazis had been working for the Americans that would make those agents « very vulnerable ».

Meanwhile, some of the CIA’s German agents were beginning to panic. One of them, Otto Albrecht von Bolschwing – who also had worked with Eichmann in the Jewish affairs department and was later Heinrich Himmler’s representative in Romania – frantically asked his old CIA case officer for help.

After the war Bolschwing had been recruited by the Gehlen Organisation, the prototype German intelligence agency set up by the Americans under Reinhard Gehlen, who had run military intelligence on the eastern front under the Nazis. « US army intelligence accepted Reinhard Gehlen’s offer to furnish alleged expertise on the Red army – and was bilked by the many mass murderers he hired, » said Robert Wolfe, a historian at the US national archives.

‘Unreconstructed’

Alongside the Gehlen Organisation, US intelligence had set up « stay-behind networks » in West Germany, who were supposed to stay put in the event of a Soviet invasion and transmit intelligence from behind enemy lines. Those networks were also riddled with ex-Nazis who had horrendous records.

One of the networks, codenamed Kibitz-15, was run by a former German army officer, Lieutenant Colonel Walter Kopp, who was described by his own American handlers as an « unreconstructed Nazi ».

Most of the networks were dismantled in the early 1950s when it was realised what an embarrassment they might prove.

« The present furore in western Germany over the resurgence of the Nazi or neo-Nazi groups is a fair example – in miniature – of what we would be faced with, » CIA headquarters wrote in an April 1953 memo.The new documents make clear the great irony behind the US recruitment of ex-Nazis: for all the moral compromises involved, it was a complete failure in intelligence terms. The Nazis were terrible spies.

« Subject is immature and has a personality not suited to clandestine activities, » the CIA file on one of the stay-behind agents said sniffily. « His main faults are his lack of regard for money and his attraction to members of the opposite sex. »

Those were the least of their flaws as would-be anti-communist agents. They had not risen in the Nazi ranks because of their respect for facts. They were ideologues with a keen sense of self-preservation.

« The files show time and again that these people were more trouble than they were worth, » Mr Naftali said. « The unreconstructed Nazis were always out for themselves, and they were using the west’s lack of information about the Soviet Union to exploit it. »

The lesson would be well learned by young CIA case officers today.

« Threats change rapidly, and it’s always exiles and former government elements who are the first to come running to us saying – we understand this threat. We have seen it with Iraqi exiles. No doubt we’re seeing it now with Iranian exiles. We have to be smart and we have to know who we are really dealing with. »

Protected Nazis

Adolf Eichmann The SS colonel who organised the final solution was so enthusiastic about his work that he carried on even after Heinrich Himmler had called a halt. He was captured by US troops but escaped to Argentina. Israeli agents tracked him down in 1960 and he was hanged in 1962.

Hans Globke A Nazi functionary working with Eichmann in the Jewish Affairs department who helped draft the laws stripping Jews of rights. After the war he rose to become one of the most powerful figures in the government. As national security advisor to Chancellor Konrad Adenauer, he was the main liaison with the CIA and Nato.

Reinhard Gehlen A major general in the Wehrmacht who was head of intelligence-gathering on the eastern front. He sold his supposed inside knowledge of the Soviet Union to the Americans who made him head of West German intelligence, an organisation he led until 1968.

Voir encore:

Le long péché par omission de Pie XII

Patrick Kéchichian

Le Monde

29.12.2009

A propos de l’attitude de Pie XII durant la guerre, face à la Shoah qui avait lieu presque sous ses yeux (et ceux des puissances alliées) au coeur de la Vieille Europe chrétienne, les historiens s’affrontent. Tous les documents ne sont pas encore accessibles. Il est urgent qu’ils le deviennent. Ce à quoi le Saint-Siège ne s’oppose pas, que l’on sache, invoquant simplement la nécessité d’un « délai technique » pour « le classement et la mise en ordre d’une masse énorme de documents », selon les déclarations de Federico Lombardi, directeur de la salle de presse du Vatican, le 23 décembre. Il semblerait naturel et intellectuellement digne que le procès de canonisation n’aille pas plus vite que le complet dévoilement des archives.

La très diplomatique prudence de Pie XII permit-elle de sauver plus de juifs que ne l’auraient fait des interventions directes ? Les témoignages ne manquent pas, y compris du côté juif, qui attestent de gestes multiples et ponctuels. Par ailleurs, une chose est sûre : aucune complaisance idéologique avec le paganisme nazi ne peut être imputée au Saint-Père. Rappelons simplement, parmi d’autres paroles, son message de Noël 1942 évoquant les « centaines de milliers de personnes, qui, sans aucune faute de leur part, et parfois uniquement pour des raisons de nationalité ou de race, sont destinées à la mort ou à une extinction progressive ».

De même, six mois plus tard, devant le collège des cardinaux, il parle des « supplications anxieuses de tous ceux qui, à cause de leur nationalité ou de leur race, sont parfois livrés, même sans faute de leur part, à des mesures d’extermination ». Mais il ajoute (nous sommes donc en juin 1943) : « Toute parole de notre part, toute allusion publique devrait être sérieusement pesée et mesurée, dans l’intérêt même de ceux qui souffrent, pour ne pas rendre leur situation encore plus grave et insupportable. » Ce propos qui sonne si mal à notre oreille introduit directement à l’autre aspect de la question.

Pour y répondre, je laisserai la parole à un homme peu soupçonnable de la moindre inimitié à l’égard de la papauté ou d’esprit de querelle face aux faits et gestes du magistère romain. Paul Claudel, le 13 décembre 1945, écrivit à Jacques Maritain, alors ambassadeur de France auprès du Saint-Siège – ce document et ses commentaires furent publié par les Cahiers Jacques Maritain, n° 52, 2006. « Je pense souvent à vous et à la mission si importante et si difficile que vous remplissez auprès de Sa Sainteté. Rien actuellement n’empêche plus la voix du pape de se faire entendre. Il me semble que les horreurs sans nom et sans précédent dans l’Histoire commises par l’Allemagne nazie auraient mérité une protestation solennelle du vicaire du Christ. Il semble qu’une cérémonie expiatoire quelconque, se renouvelant chaque année, aurait été une satisfaction donnée à la conscience publique… Nous avons eu beau prêter l’oreille, nous n’avons entendu que de faibles et vagues gémissements. »

Puis, faisant référence à l’Apocalypse, il parle du sang des « 6 millions (de juifs) massacrés » et conclut par ces mots : « C’est ce sang dans l’affreux silence du Vatican qui étouffe tous les chrétiens. La voix d’Abel ne finira-t-elle pas par se faire entendre ? » Peut-on imaginer plus claire prise de position ?

Jacques Maritain, dont la réflexion sur l’antisémitisme s’est approfondie au cours des années 1930, était lui-même intervenu, dès 1942, pour obtenir de Pie XII une encyclique « qui délivrerait beaucoup d’âmes angoissées et scandalisées ». Il avait même proposé, la même année, de faire du Yom Kippour un jour de prière pour les chrétiens en faveur des juifs persécutés. L’on sait que toutes ces démarches restèrent lettre morte.

C’est de ce long, troublant et douloureux silence qu’il est devenu urgent de parler. Non pour l’interpréter à la seule lueur de la polémique antichrétienne. Non pour en conclure qu’il était d’approbation ou de complicité tacite : tout prouve exactement le contraire.

Comme il est devenu d’usage, on soupçonne le pape actuel des pires intentions – sans jamais préciser lesquelles – lorsqu’il franchit une étape dans le lent processus qui pourrait mener à la béatification de Pie XII. On lui refuse le crédit d’une pensée et d’une action qui s’élèvent au-dessus des calculs et se tiennent sans coup férir dans leur sphère propre : religieuse, spirituelle.

Les si fortes paroles de Claudel et de Maritain ne nous engagent pas sur la voie d’un procès d’intention dont l’acte d’accusation serait écrit d’avance. En revanche, elles jugent et condamnent sans aucune ambiguïté, avec une force qui dépasse toute polémique, le silence coupable – et non pas la culpabilité silencieuse – de Pie XII. Ce faisant, elles interrogent en toute conscience la réelle héroïcité des vertus du pontife.

Le péché par omission est le dernier que le fidèle catholique avoue dans l’acte de contrition. Il n’est pas le moindre. Tout ce que j’aurais pu faire et dire, que je n’ai pas fait, pas dit, remettant à plus tard, à jamais, le bien qu’il m’est commandé d’aimer et de servir. De ne pas trahir. Omettre le bien, se soustraire à ce service, ouvre donc l’espace immense et sombre d’un manquement majeur. Un espace qui ne peut pas être occulté par des motifs contingents, des excuses fallacieuses. Un espace qui n’est étranger à personne, pas même au pape.

Patrick Kéchichian, auteur de Petit éloge du catholicisme (Gallimard, 130 p. 2 €), ancien collaborateur du Monde des livres.

L’Eglise catholique face au génocide

Marc Riglet

Lire

05/07/2012

Spécialiste des relations judéo-chrétiennes, l’auteur revoit la position de l’Eglise vis-à-vis des Juifs.

Quelle fut l’attitude de l’Eglise romaine, des années 1930 jusqu’à la fin de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, envers les Juifs persécutés ? Quelles positions de principe adopta-t-elle par rapport au fascisme en général et au national-socialisme en particulier et quelle politique fut conduite, par le Vatican, avec l’Allemagne nazie ? L’antijudaïsme chrétien s’accommoda-t-il de l’antisémitisme racialiste moderne ou bien y a-t-il eu entre l’un et l’autre solution de continuité ? Quel jugement, enfin, convient-il de porter sur la personnalité et les actions de Pie XII qui, de la nonciature à Berlin dans les années 1930 au trône de saint Pierre pendant la guerre, joua le tout premier rôle et commanda l’essentiel des réponses à ces questions ?

Dans les années 1960, la pièce de Rolf Hochhuth, Le Vicaire, qui dénonçait sans ménagement les silences du pape face aux persécutions des Juifs, avait provoqué une vive polémique. Les travaux historiques conduits depuis, les réflexions menées au sein même de l’Eglise romaine, l’aggiornamento de Vatican II revisitant et déplorant l’antijudaïsme traditionnel, et puis, surtout, les déclarations de repentance de nombreuses autorités ecclésiales semblaient avoir établi solidement le « jugement de l’Histoire ». Non seulement Pie XII était bien resté silencieux face au martyre juif, mais sa position ambiguë sur l’antisémitisme rendait ce silence coupable. Or, voici que ce constat est à nouveau discuté. Menahem Macina, éminent spécialiste des relations judéo-chrétiennes, s’en émeut dans un excellent livre où la richesse de la documentation le dispute au caractère serré de l’argumentation. Et comment ne pas être sensible, avec lui, à ce qu’il peut y avoir d’indécent dans l’entreprise de « révision hagiographique de l’attitude de Pie XII envers les Juifs » ? Elle s’explique dans le projet, bien avancé, de béatifier ce pontife et culmine même, chez certains, dans la proposition de conférer à Pie XII la qualité de « Juste des Nations » dont Israël honore ceux qui, dans les épreuves, ont aidé le peuple juif.

Menahem Macina reprend toutes les pièces du dossier. Ses conclusions sont sévères mais justes. Pie XII, tout attaché à la défense de son Eglise, a manqué, vis-à-vis des Juifs, de la troisième vertu théologale : la charité. Ce serait la force de l’Eglise catholique que de le reconnaître et de s’en tenir là… une fois pour toutes.

LA CAVALE DES MAUDITS

Conan Eric

L’Express

12/08/1993

A la fin des années 40, fuyant l’épuration, des centaines de Français débarquent à Buenos Aires. Dans cette ville qui leur rappelle Paris, on n’est pas trop regardant sur leur passé. Et ils ne risquent pas d’en être extradés. Certains s’y referont une vie de notable. D’autres végéteront. Quelques-uns y sont encore. Beaucoup sont rentrés. Récit d’une débandade.

Il y a ceux qui sont restés et ceux qui sont repartis. La plupart sont restés. Souvent jusqu’à leur mort, au terme d’une seconde vie, paisible et confortable. Très loin de leur éternel sujet de discussion, de passion et de ressentiment: la France. Cette France qui les a fait fuir. Et qui les a perdus. Personne n’a tenu la chronique de cet exil silencieux: à la fin des années 40, des centaines de Français ont débarqué à Buenos Aires, redoutant la justice de la Libération, ou désireux de s’y soustraire lorsqu’elle s’était déjà prononcée.

L’exil argentin reste une tradition française. Plusieurs générations de proscrits ont échoué ici: communards, anarchistes, juifs fuyant Vichy, collaborateurs, soldats de l’OAS. Jean-Michel Boucheron, le député socialiste ripou, constitue le dernier arrivage de marque… Ce tropisme s’explique d’abord par l’absence de convention d’extradition entre la France et l’Argentine, qui rend la sérénité à beaucoup de fuyards. De plus, Buenos Aires, véritable cité européenne, rassure avec ses immenses quartiers copiés sur Paris, Madrid ou Bruxelles, et sa population comme sa gastronomie offrent un agréable échantillon des silhouettes et traditions du Vieux Continent. La vie y fut longtemps facile, et les Français, très bien accueillis. D’autant plus que la tradition locale veut que l’on n’importune jamais les migrants sur les raisons qui ont pu les pousser à faire subitement des milliers de kilomètres pour s’établir dans un pays qu’ils ne connaissent pas…

A leur arrivée, beaucoup de ces Français de l’épuration tiennent cependant à s’expliquer, en donnant une version retouchée des événements qui les ont conduits à quitter la France: ils sont résistants, mais, à cause de De Gaulle, le Parti communiste a pris le pouvoir et fait la chasse aux vrais patriotes. En danger de mort, il leur a fallu fuir… Version peu discutée dans une Argentine péroniste qui croit alors à l’imminence d’une troisième guerre mondiale… Ils viennent de Suisse, d’Italie ou d’Espagne, pays refuges où beaucoup ont attendu de connaître leur jugement par contumace avant de décider d’aller voir ailleurs. Certains débarquent à Buenos Aires avec femme et enfants, comme ces notables de province engagés tardivement dans la folie meurtrière de la Milice de 1944. Beaucoup ont dû tout abandonner. Le clivage se fait vite entre ceux qui ont de l’argent, facile à faire fructifier en Argentine, et ceux qui n’ont rien. Ces derniers, souvent, commencent par trimer comme dockers sur le port avant de trouver mieux. Mgr Barrère, évêque de Tucuman et proche de l’Action française, fut secourable pour certains. Mais, entre eux, il n’y eut jamais de réelle solidarité, sauf peut-être au sein de l’importante tribu des anciens journalistes de « Je suis partout »: Charles Lesca, directeur de l’hebdomadaire, condamné à mort par contumace en mai 1947, avait la double nationalité française et argentine et une petite fortune héritée d’un père négociant dans la viande à Buenos Aires. Mais il est mort dès 1948, immédiatement après son arrivée.

Un petit groupe de nostalgiques essaya pourtant de maintenir l’ambiance de l’ex- « nouvelle Europe ». Dans le quartier Belgrano, une association, la Casa Europa (la « Maison Europe »), dirigée par Radu Guenea, ancien ambassadeur de Roumanie à Madrid, leur permettait de se retrouver: Français, Allemands, Roumains, Italiens, Croates, Belges, Hongrois se réunissaient et suivaient à travers la presse étrangère les développements de la guerre froide en Europe. Ils avaient choisi pour quartier général la brasserie Adam’s, près du port, où les soirées se prolongeaient souvent fort tard, dans la gaieté et la bonne humeur. Il s’agissait alors moins de nostalgie que d’espoir: la troisième guerre mondiale leur semblait une hypothèse sensée, et son déclenchement leur aurait permis de revenir en Europe participer au combat final contre le communisme. Espoir que la plupart perdent définitivement après la fin de la crise de Corée, en 1953. Les manifestations collectives chez Adam’s deviennent moins régulières. « J’ai vite compris qu’il fallait s’en sortir tout seul, précise un ancien Waffen SS français. Continuer chez Adam’s, c’était la meilleure façon de se faire remarquer. Et, à cette époque, c’était encore dangereux. »

Car, dans ces années d’après guerre, l’ambassade de France demeure active, comme le raconte un ancien membre des services spéciaux auprès de l’attaché militaire: « Nous devions repérer ceux qui arrivaient et établir des rapports sur leur identité, leur comportement et leurs activités. Selon leur ?calibre?, plusieurs devaient faire l’objet d’une élimination physique. C’était la tâche de commandos qui, sur la base de nos renseignements, agissaient de façon autonome. Certains sont même venus spécialement de France. Le travail était difficile, car il ne fallait absolument pas éveiller les soupçons des Argentins, très sourcilleux sur leur souveraineté et leur hospitalité. Beaucoup d’opérations ont ainsi échoué au dernier moment. » Une dizaine de Français ont finalement été « neutralisés » sans bruit et sans éclat: morts naturelles apparentes et surtout accidents divers.

ÉPURATION SECRÈTE

Jean de Vaugelas, l’un des principaux chefs de la Milice, est l’une des plus célèbres victimes de cette épuration secrète. Cité par Laval à l’ordre de la Nation le 8 juillet 1944 (« commandant de la Franc-Garde permanente de la Milice française. Chef milicien de très grande classe »), cet aristocrate, ancien officier d’aviation monarchiste, fut un temps le responsable de l’école des cadres de la Milice à Uriage (Isère), avant de prendre la tête de l’une des unités les plus redoutées de la Franc-Garde (la Milice armée), appelée à intervenir contre les maquis les plus importants. Il dirigea ainsi les 600 miliciens accompagnant les 5 000 Allemands qui détruisirent le maquis des Glières en mars 1944. Le mois suivant, il est chargé des opérations de maintien de l’ordre qui sèmeront la terreur dans la région de Limoges. Puis dans des maquis du Massif central. Lorsque la débâcle se précise, il n’hésite pas, le 10 août 1944, à rejoindre en avion plus de 1 000 miliciens encerclés par le maquis autour de Limoges, pour en organiser l’évacuation, avant de partir avec la division Charlemagne comme chef d’état-major. Prisonnier des Soviétiques en Lituanie, il s’échappe en compagnie du chef milicien Jean Bassompierre, et, avec lui, traverse la Lituanie et l’Allemagne pour rejoindre l’Italie. Là, ils sont trahis. Bassompierre sera arrêté (puis fusillé en France), tandis que Vaugelas s’échappe à nouveau et parvient à gagner Buenos Aires en 1948 avec un passeport de la Croix-Rouge. Son périple s’arrête brusquement en 1954, à Mendoza, région viticole, où il est devenu administrateur des Caves franco-argentines: il est exécuté dans une mise en scène d’accident de voiture.

Cette vindicte cesse au cours des années 50, l’ambassade se bornant encore pendant quelques années à « suggérer » aux entreprises françaises implantées en Argentine de ne pas employer quelques compatriotes en situation irrégulière. Et le consulat, à rappeler de temps en temps à certains membres de la communauté française au lendemain de dîners mondains: « Quand vous invitez le consul, évitez les condamnés à mort! »

Que peut faire un exilé politique en Argentine? Entre ceux qui n’ont jamais pu imaginer changer d’activité et ceux qui ont réussi une reconversion radicale, les nuances sont nombreuses. D’autant plus que d’aucuns ont développé de nouvelles compétences tout en conservant leurs anciennes obsessions (1).

Parmi les premiers s’impose d’abord le célèbre Dewoitine: il a passé sa vie à construire des avions. Pour les Français, les Allemands, les Espagnols. Et les Argentins. L’un des plus grands créateurs français d’avions de l’entre-deux-guerres avec Henry Potez et Marcel Bloch (Dassault), Emile Dewoitine, fondateur des usines aéronautiques de Toulouse (2) et père du D 520 (le dernier chasseur que la France put opposer aux Messerschmitt en 1940), avait mis pendant l’Occupation ses talents au service de la firme allemande Arado, en dirigeant, à Paris, un bureau d’études de 200 employés (dont une partie venait des usines de Toulouse). A la même époque, il travailla également pour l’Espagne et le Japon. Lorsqu’il est recherché, à la Libération, pour « intelligence avec l’ennemi » et « atteinte à la sûreté extérieure de l’Etat », il se trouve depuis longtemps en Espagne. Et en Argentine quand, le 9 février 1948, la cour de justice de la Seine le condamne par contumace à vingt ans de travaux forcés, à l’indignité nationale à vie et à la confiscation de ses biens. Il n’a pas perdu de temps: dès son arrivée à Buenos Aires, en mai 1946, il s’est attelé à la construction du premier avion à réaction argentin! Le prototype du Pulqui (la Flèche) a volé le 9 août 1947: grâce à lui, l’Argentine péroniste est le cinquième pays au monde à posséder un avion à réaction. Le retentissement est énorme, y compris dans les couloirs du ministère de l’Air à Paris. Mais Dewoitine, qui a créé sa société, Dewoitine Aviacion, et fait venir de Toulouse une dizaine de spécialistes français pour passer à la phase industrielle, sera évincé par l’ingénieur allemand Kurt Tank (ancien ingénieur de la Luftwaffe, créateur du célèbre Focke-Wulf 190), qui, venu en Argentine avec une cinquantaine de techniciens allemands, mettra au point le Pulqui II. Dépité, Emile Dewoitine écrit à son ami Charles Lindbergh pour proposer ses services aux Etats-Unis. Indésirable, il se voit refuser le visa d’entrée. Il vivote en mettant au point un avion de tourisme pour les aéro-clubs argentins (El Boyero), avant de partir, en 1951, offrir ses services en Uruguay. En vain. Il revient alors en Espagne pour répondre à un appel d’offres du ministère de l’Air concernant un avion d’entraînement. Il se fait à nouveau devancer par un avionneur allemand, cette fois-ci le grand Willy Messerschmitt en personne!

RETOUR NÉGOCIÉ

Les lois d’amnistie étant votées, il peut envisager de rentrer en France et négocie son retour: cinq ans après sa condamnation, il est acquitté au cours d’un procès express – le commissaire du gouvernement abandonne l’accusation, et l’on n’entend même pas les témoins. Mais Emile Dewoitine pousse le bouchon un peu loin et agace ses protecteurs en réclamant la restitution de ses bénéfices acquis illicitement sous l’Occupation… Très vite, il offre ses services à son ancien concurrent Marcel Dassault, qui refuse de le recevoir en déclarant que « Dewoitine n’est plus dans le coup »… Il tente ensuite sa chance au Japon. Sans résultat. Vexé, il retourne en Argentine et s’installe en Patagonie pour y créer un élevage de 8 000 moutons et se livrer à son plaisir favori: la pêche. Il se retire dans les années 60 à Montreux, en Suisse, puis à Toulouse, où, à la fin des années 60, les milieux de l’aérospatiale lui accordent sa place d’ancêtre fondateur de l’aéronautique française. Il ne manque plus un Salon de l’aéronautique à Toulouse (il sera même un jour assis à dîner à la droite de Pierre Messmer, ministre des Armées… et ancien des Forces françaises libres). Il est invité à l’un des premiers vols à mach 2 du Concorde (mais refuse de participer à un vol inaugural d’Airbus, par rancune envers son responsable, Henri Ziegler, ancien ingénieur du ministère de l’Air ayant rallié la France libre…). L’année de sa mort, la promotion 1977 de l’école d’apprentissage de Toulouse porte son nom.

Même obstination professionnelle chez l’ex-conseiller d’Etat Jean-Pierre Ingrand. L’obsession du service de l’Etat l’avait conduit sous l’Occupation à administrer envers et contre tout. En exil, il n’eut qu’une passion: l’administration, et il est mort en décembre dernier président de l’Alliance française de Buenos Aires. Représentant du ministère de l’Intérieur à Paris, auprès de Fernand de Brinon, de juillet 1940 à janvier 1944, il avait, à moins de 40 ans, les 48 préfets de la zone nord sous son contrôle. Ce rôle d’intermédiaire entre le ministre de l’Intérieur et l’autorité militaire allemande (avec pouvoir de négociation politique) l’a amené à jouer un rôle essentiel, en août 1941, dans la mise en place de la Section spéciale de Paris, tribunal d’exception qui renia le principe de non-rétroactivité des lois. Prévoyant son sort, il se cache à la Libération. Dénoncé, arrêté, mis en liberté provisoire, il préfère s’échapper en Suisse avant son procès, qui a lieu en 1948 (voir L’Express du 8 août 1991). Puis en Argentine, où, grâce à un ami inspecteur des Finances, il devient administrateur de la Compagnie financière de Santa Fe, avant d’investir dans l’agriculture et la faïence. Tout en se consacrant vite au développement spectaculaire de l’Alliance française: en vingt ans, il en fait le plus beau fleuron au monde, avec plus de 30 000 élèves et une multitude de succursales dans tout le pays. Situation dont ne profitèrent guère les autres exilés: « Il était hors de question d’aller demander de l’aide à Ingrand, cette marionnette de Laval, ce suppôt de l’ordre bourgeois de Vichy! » explique un ancien de « Je suis partout ». Seul rappel du passé pour l’ancien délégué de Pierre Pucheu en zone occupée: lors de la visite du général de Gaulle au cours de son grand périple en Amérique latine, en octobre 1964, Christian Margerie, ambassadeur de France en Argentine, le convoque et lui demande, « pour éviter tout incident », de ne pas participer aux cérémonies et d’aller prendre quelques jours de vacances, par exemple au Brésil… Refus de l’ancien conseiller d’Etat révoqué en 1944: il est chez lui à Buenos Aires, il est chez lui à l’Alliance française. De plus, il a connu de Gaulle à Bordeaux, en juin 1940, lorsque celui-ci était sous-secrétaire d’Etat à la Guerre dans le gouvernement Reynaud, et il est curieux des retrouvailles. Tout se passera bien, le Général se contentant de lui envoyer une apostrophe très gaullienne: « Alors, Ingrand, ça marche, l’Alliance française, à Buenos Aires? »…

L’esprit de continuité peut aller jusqu’à l’absurdité, comme chez Olier Mordrel, ancien chef du Parti national breton (PNB) allié avec les nazis: il passa une partie de ses années d’exil, au fin fond de l’Amérique du Sud, à réinventer une langue pure à partir du breton de la Renaissance pour remplacer le dialecte parlé, qu’il jugeait trop vulgaire… Architecte, cet autonomiste bretonnant présente la particularité d’avoir été condamné à mort deux fois, en mai 1940 et en 1946. En août 1939, il avait envoyé de Berlin un manifeste proclamant la neutralité de la Bretagne et appelant les Bretons à la désertion. Avant de revenir au pays avec les nazis, qui offraient, selon lui, aux « êtres supérieurs » qu’étaient le marin et le paysan bretons la chance historique d’être enfin libérés de l’ « exploitation du capitalisme juif et français ». Ses illusions de parti et d’Etat bretons ne prendront que la forme sanglante, en 1943, d’une Milice régionale (la « Milice Perrot ») et se termineront par l’épisode pathétique du protocole signé le… 15 février 1945, sur le lac de Constance, avec Jacques Doriot (autoproclamé chef de l’Etat français), qui le désigne comme gouverneur en exil d’une Bretagne enfin reconnue en tant qu’Etat associé à la France… Mordrel débarque à Buenos Aires en juin 1948 et rachète, à un ancien nazi, un hôtel à Cordoba. Ses études linguistiques, étendues aux langues celtiques, et quelques correspondances avec des Bretons occupent une grande partie de ses vingt-trois ans d’exil. Il part pour l’Espagne en 1969, en attendant la mesure de grâce qui lui permettra de rentrer en Bretagne en 1971. Après avoir tenté de renouer avec le mouvement régionaliste breton (qui préfère ne pas utiliser la culture phénoménale de cet encombrant ancêtre), il s’occupera un temps d’une crêperie, avant de mourir en 1985.

Quelques-uns en sont réduits à exploiter le seul atout qui reste à un exilé: sa langue. Comme Philippe Darnand, qui donna pendant longtemps des cours de français à l’Alliance française. Fils du chef de la Milice, Joseph Darnand, et lui-même ancien membre de l’Avant-garde (les jeunes de la Milice qui montaient la garde à Sigmaringen, le château sur le Danube où s’était réfugié en 1944 le gouvernement de Pétain), il s’était enfui en Italie, où il travailla comme speaker à Radio-Vatican. Après l’exécution de son père, en 1945, et sur les conseils de Jean de Vaugelas, il se rend avec sa mère en Argentine, à Tucuman, où il enseigne le français. Mal à l’aise dans le pays, il décide, à 28 ans, de passer son bac, entreprend des études et quitte l’Argentine en 1960, avec un diplôme d’ingénieur, pour aller travailler en Allemagne, à Cologne, où il trouve une place chez Hoechst grâce à un ami allemand de son père, ancien secrétaire de l’ambassade du Reich à Paris.

LE CAS LE VIGAN

La langue française fut également le gagne-pain de quelques acteurs. Maurice Rémy, membre du PPF, qui joua un rôle important dans le film de propagande « Forces occultes » et animait des sketchs politiques dans l’émission « Au rythme du temps » sur Radio-Paris, trouva du travail dans les émissions en langue française de « La Voix de l’Argentine ». En compagnie d’une autre ancienne de Radio-Paris, Lola Robert. Mais le cas le plus célèbre – et le plus paradoxal – reste celui de Robert Le Vigan. Car le ténébreux interprète du « Quai des Brumes » et de « Goupi Mains rouges », recyclé dans les émissions de propagande de Radio-Paris et auteur d’un délire antisémite digne de Céline (dont il était l’ami et qu’il accompagnera à Sigmaringen), n’a pas fui l’épuration: il ne s’est exilé qu’après avoir été condamné, en 1946, à dix ans de travaux forcés. Libéré en 1949, et se heurtant au boycottage du cinéma français, il part tenter sa chance en Espagne, puis en Angleterre. En vain. En Argentine, deux essais tourneront court, et il doit vite se contenter de donner des cours de français et de diction, à Tandil, à quelques centaines de kilomètres de Buenos Aires, où il traîne péniblement sa silhouette, avec sa cape et son épée, ruminant sa hantise de la victoire prochaine du communisme. Confronté à de coûteux problèmes de santé, il survivra difficilement jusqu’à sa mort, en 1972, grâce à l’aide financière de quelques bienfaiteurs parisiens: Pierre Fresnay, Madeleine Renaud, Jean-Louis Barrault, Maurice Ronet, Fernand Ledoux et Arletty (qui lui rendit visite en 1966).

Les véritables reconversions sont plus ou moins spectaculaires. Beaucoup d’anciens responsables de la Milice ont simplement troqué un statut de notable de province en France contre celui de notable de la Pampa. C’est le cas de X., ancien ingénieur de Centrale, industriel, responsable de la Milice dans le Sud-Ouest, qui réussit à organiser la fuite de la Milice de Toulouse par la vallée du Rhône en août 1944, avant de diriger le bataillon des 500 derniers « soldats » de l’Etat français à Sigmaringen. Arrivé en Argentine via l’Italie, il rentra en France dans les années 60. Ou du Dr Y., ancien chef de la Milice de Limoges, mêlé au pillage et au massacre de Magnac-Laval (Haute-Vienne) le 8 juillet 1944, mais surtout célèbre grâce à sa femme, milicienne exubérante et surexcitée, qui participait aux opérations sanglantes des francs-gardes et aimait à répéter publiquement qu’il lui fallait un « sac à main en peau de maquisard ».

Parmi les reconversions plus originales, celle d’Henri Queyrat mérite d’être citée. Délégué du PPF de Jacques Doriot pour toute l’Afrique du Nord, il retourne clandestinement en Tunisie après le débarquement des Alliés, en novembre 1942, pour former, en 1943, un réseau d’espionnage allemand. Nommé ensuite secrétaire fédéral du PPF de la Seine, il crée, en mars 1944, les « Groupes d’action du PPF », formés par les Allemands à Taverny (Val-d’Oise), spécialistes de la chasse aux résistants, aux réfractaires au STO, aux juifs, et réputés pour leurs chantages et leurs pillages. Engagé dans la Waffen SS en mai 1944, il sera condamné à mort par contumace. En Argentine, il effectue divers travaux pour les éditions Larousse, rédige le journal de la Chambre de commerce franco-argentine et travaille plusieurs années comme journaliste à l’AFP (où il sera remplacé par Jean Dumazeau, un ancien milicien du Nord), avant de se consacrer à sa nouvelle passion: l’oenologie. Devenu l’un des meilleurs spécialistes des vins argentins, il sera, jusqu’à sa mort, récente, le conseiller très écouté de plusieurs caves de Mendoza (qui sont encore loin d’atteindre la qualité de la production chilienne). Et l’auteur, chez Hachette, de très bons livres de référence sur les vins (et les fromages) argentins.

La confrérie tumultueuse des anciens de « L’Action française », de « Je suis partout » ou du « Cri du peuple » (le quotidien du PPF de Doriot) arriva en force à la fin des années 40. Il y avait notamment là Pierre Daye, ancien grand reporter du « Soir » de Bruxelles et correspondant belge de « Je suis partout » depuis 1932, tout en étant député et président du groupe rexiste au Parlement de Bruxelles. Condamné à mort en 1946, il fut professeur de littérature française à l’université de La Plata, avant de mourir en 1960.

Georges Guilbaud, ancien marxiste ayant intégré le PPF, dont il devint le responsable en Tunisie, dirigeait le quotidien « Tunis-Journal », organe du collaborationnisme en Tunisie. Venu en France après le débarquement allié de 1942, il est chargé par Pierre Laval d’organiser la Milice en zone nord. Il tentera d’en faire un organe unique, en essayant en vain d’y faire fusionner toutes les organisations collaborationnistes. Au début très actif, à Buenos Aires, au sein du groupe des nostalgiques de la brasserie Adam’s, il se lança, au milieu des années 50, dans les activités financières, où il excellait, en travaillant avec la maison de change Piano. Gagnant beaucoup d’argent, il devint administrateur d’un célèbre palace de Buenos Aires, avant de partir, dans les années 60, exercer ses talents financiers en Suisse.

Contrairement aux Flamands et aux Allemands, rares furent les Français qui se passionnèrent pour la politique locale. Mais il y eut quelques exceptions sérieuses. Comme W., ancien militant de l’Action française rallié au PPF et journaliste hyperactif (chroniqueur à « Je suis partout », au « Cri du peuple » et l’un des chroniqueurs du « Radio-Journal » de Radio-Paris). Violemment antivichyste (il sera interné trois mois sur ordre de Laval, avant d’être libéré sur pression allemande), il termine la guerre en s’enrôlant dans la brigade SS Wallonie, dont la croisade s’arrête en 1945 devant Cracovie. Parvenu en Suisse, il y attend de connaître sa condamnation par contumace à perpétuité, en 1948, et part pour Buenos Aires, où il débarque avec 50 francs en poche. Il se plonge alors dans les subtilités du péronisme et fait la connaissance de Victor Paz Estenssoro, chef du Mouvement national révolutionnaire (MNR), parti de la gauche nationaliste bolivienne en exil à Buenos Aires, dont il devient un actif conseiller politique. Lorsque Victor Paz Estenssoro conquiert la présidence de la République de Bolivie, en 1952, W. le suit au palais Quemado, où il occupe pendant trois ans les fonctions de conseiller officiel, avant que sa femme, qui supporte mal La Paz, le contraigne à revenir à Buenos Aires. Il entame alors une carrière alimentaire de publicitaire, tout en restant passionné par la politique argentine. Dans les années 70, il participe à « Segunda Repùblica », revue de Marcello Sorrendo, vieux nationaliste maurrassien et l’un des pères spirituels des Montoneros, péronistes dissidents d’extrême gauche passés à la guérilla.

Même passion politique chez Jacques de Mahieu, professeur de philosophie, ancien de l’Action française, où il fut le théoricien du maurrassisme social et du corporatisme. Ayant terminé la guerre dans les rangs de la division Charlemagne, il arrive en 1946 avec sa famille à Buenos Aires. Devenu professeur polyvalent (économie, français, ethnographie) à l’université de Cuyo et directeur de l’Institut d’études et de recherche du marché, il publie de nombreux ouvrages sur le syndicalisme, les problèmes sociaux et le corporatisme. Il eut son heure de gloire pendant la période des gouvernements militaires à partir de 1966, quand il devint le maître à penser sur les questions sociale et syndicale auprès des jeunes profs de droit et de sciences politiques proches des militaires. Il est resté très lié avec un autre intellectuel, William Gueydan de Roussel, philosophe germaniste engagé dans la lutte contre la maçonnerie, cofondateur du Cercle aryen de Paris, avec Paul Chack, et président du Cercle d’études judéo-maçonniques, dont le principal objectif était de prouver l’origine juive de la maçonnerie. Etabli à El Bolson, Gueydan de Roussel mit son érudition bibliographique au service de la Bibliothèque nationale de Buenos Aires.

LES VIKINGS, DIEUX INCAS

Mais Jacques de Mahieu est également connu en France comme auteur à succès de la collection Les énigmes de l’Univers, chez Robert Laffont. Dans « L’Agonie du dieu Soleil », publié en 1974, il prétend révéler que l’Amérique du Sud a été découverte par des Vikings. Il avait monté à la fin des années 60 des expéditions d’ethnographie au Paraguay et retrouvé, à la frontière du Brésil, des fresques représentant de grands gaillards blonds, pour lui incontestablement « de race aryenne ». Il échafauda une théorie selon laquelle le continent aurait été découvert au xe siècle par les Vikings, qui auraient civilisé les Indiens et fondé l’Empire inca, dont ils devinrent les « dieux blancs ». Les actuels Guayakis seraient, d’après cette théorie, leurs derniers représentants, malheureusement « dégénérés par

métissage ».

Quelques exilés n’ont pas connu les bonheurs d’une seconde vie parce qu’ils n’ont pas supporté l’Argentine et sont rentrés le plus tôt possible. Il y eut deux vagues de retours: dans les années 50, après les lois d’amnistie de 1951 et de 1953, et au milieu des années 70, grâce à la prescription des poursuites. Ainsi Henri Lèbre, qui fut à la fois directeur du « Cri du peuple » et l’un des dirigeants de « Je suis partout », journaux dans lesquels il s’insurgeait contre la mollesse de la politique antijuive de Vichy (statut des juifs et aryanisation), qu’il qualifiait de « solution dérisoire ». Arrivé en Argentine en 1947 avec un passeport de la Croix-Rouge, après sa condamnation à mort par contumace en France, il ne s’adapte pas au pays et repart très vite pour le Portugal, où il attend la loi d’amnistie qui lui permet de rentrer en France dans les années 50, afin de reprendre du service à « Rivarol » et à « Spectacle du monde ». A la même période quitte également Buenos Aires Pierre Villette, cofondateur de « Je suis partout », membre du PPF et journaliste au « Cri du peuple », qui avait terminé sa carrière de journaliste engagé à Radio-Patrie, à Sigmaringen, et au « Petit Parisien », publié à Constance, à la fin de 1944, avant d’être condamné à mort par contumace en 1947. Marc Augier, journaliste à l’hebdomadaire « La Gerbe », ancien de la LVF et de la division Charlemagne, réfugié à Mendoza, aidera un temps l’armée argentine à organiser des expériences de résistance au froid en zone montagneuse, avant de rentrer en France, dans les années 50, pour entamer une seconde carrière d’écrivain et de chroniqueur dans la presse d’extrême droite, sous le pseudonyme de Saint-Loup. C’est plus tard, au tout début des années 70, qu’Henri Janières regagne la France. Ancien de « Paris-Soir » et de « Notre combat », organe oeuvrant pour « une France socialiste dans l’Europe nouvelle », ce dandy obsessionnel occupa à Buenos Aires la place enviée de correspondant du « Monde » de 1961 à 1969, tout en étant très proche de l’ambassade de Syrie. Autre personnage particulièrement affecté par le mal du pays: Simon Sabiani, le célèbre maire PPF de Marseille et véritable empereur de l’agglomération, mise en coupe réglée pendant l’Occupation au profit de ses hommes de main du clan corse de Simon Mema et de la pègre de Carbone et Spirito. Condamné à mort par contumace et réfugié à Rome, ce personnage célèbre pour son goût du luxe et de l’opulence s’est retrouvé dans une petite pension de famille de Buenos Aires, vivotant en travaillant dans une agence immobilière. Ne supportant plus de vivre si loin de sa vieille mère corse, il vint s’installer en 1952 à Barcelone, où les fervents sabianistes venaient le voir en car de Marseille et d’où il fit quelques voyages clandestins en Corse pour voir sa mère. A sa mort, en 1956, des centaines de personnes assistèrent à son enterrement dans le petit cimetière de Casamaccioli, près de Corte.

Les passions sont retombées depuis longtemps chez la plupart des exilés restés sur place et encore vivants. « De temps en temps, on a eu des bouffées de chaleur, comme les femmes de 40 ans, précise un ancien de ?Je suis partout?, au moment de la guerre d’Algérie, quand on a paniqué l’ambassade de France en lui faisant croire que s’était créé un ?Comité Algérie française? à Buenos Aires, puis en Mai 68, quand les jeunes de Paris ont failli foutre en l’air de Gaulle. Mais c’est tout. Et c’est bien fini. » Aujourd’hui, la plupart viennent régulièrement passer des vacances en France. « Les Français vivent bien, c’est un beau pays, bien tenu, et vous avez un bon président de la République, qui vous a enfin débarrassés des communistes », conclut un ancien SS français.

(1) Nous avons préservé l’anonymat des personnes encore vivantes que nous avons mentionnées.

(2) Voir Emmanuel Chadeau, « Histoire de l’industrie aéronautique en France, 1900-1950 », Fayard.

PHOTOS:

ÉMILE DEWOITINE

Le célèbre avionneur au service des Allemands, puis de Peron (ci-dessus, dans son bureau à Buenos Aires); rentrera à Toulouse dans les années 60 (ci-contre, chez lui, en 1977, l’année de sa mort).

JEAN-PIERRE INGRAND

Délégué du ministre de l’Intérieur à Paris (ci-dessus, dans son bureau), auprès des autorités allemandes, entre 1940 et 1944. Meurt à Buenos Aires en décembre dernier, où il dirigeait l’Alliance française (ci-contre).

ROBERT LE VIGAN

L’interprète de « Quai des Brumes » (ci-contre, avant la guerre) sera condamné

(ci-dessous, pendant son procès) pour avoir animé les émissions de propagande de Radio-Paris. Vivotera de leçons de français en Argentine (ci-dessus), où il mourra en 1972.

HENRI QUEYRAT

Responsable au PPF de Doriot (ci-dessus, tenant une réunion salle Wagram en avril 1944), engagé dans la Waffen SS, condamné à mort, il s’enfuit en Argentine. Après quelques années à l’AFP, il se lance dans l’oenologie à Mendoza (en haut) et publie des livres de référence sur le vin (ci-contre).

PIERRE DAYE

Journaliste à « Je suis partout », député belge d’extrême droite (au centre sur la photo, en 1944). Condamné à mort, il enseignera la littérature française à l’université de La Plata. Meurt en 1960.

GEORGES GUILBAUD

Chargé par Laval d’organiser la Milice en zone nord (ici, lors d’une conférence au théâtre des Ambassadeurs, à Paris, en mars 1944), il fera ensuite fortune en Argentine, puis en Suisse.

JACQUES DE MAHIEU

Intellectuel de l’Action française, théoricien du corporatisme social, il débarque en 1946 à Buenos Aires. Professeur d’université, influent auprès des militaires argentins en matière sociale, il se rend célèbre en Europe pour ses thèses ethnologiques, publiées chez Laffont (ci-contre): selon lui, l’Amérique du Sud aurait été découverte par les Vikings, fondateurs de l’Empire inca.

HENRI LÈBRE

Directeur du « Cri du peuple », le journal de Doriot, condamné à mort. Court séjour en Argentine, puis amnistie et retour à Paris dans les années 50. Il rejoint les rédactions de « Rivarol » et de « Spectacle du monde ».

SIMON SABIANI

Maire de Marseille, qu’il se partagea avec les célèbres gangsters Carbone (à sa gauche, ci-dessus) et Spirito; proche de Doriot (ci-contre, à la droite du chef du PPF). Condamné à mort, s’installa à Barcelone après un exil malheureux en Argentine.

Background Report on Krunoslav Draganovic

The Pavelic papers

This is a follow-up report to Counter-Intelligence Corps Agent Robert Clayton Mudd’s earlier report in which he indicated that the Monastery of San Girolamo was acting as a haven for Ustase fugitives, and that he had run an agent into the network smuggling accused Ustase war criminals out of Croatia. Mudd appeared earlier to be suspicious that Ustase agents had infiltrated legitimate networks to help refugees, rather than that these networks themselves had been set up in order to smuggle out hunted Ustase officials. His conclusions in Paragraph 15 remain unchallenged to this day. This is an improved copy of the document originally published here, found among the CIA papers on Krunoslav Draganovic.

HEADQUARTERS

COUNTER INTELLIGENCE CORPS

ALLIED FORCES HEADQUARTERS

APO 512

February 12, 1947

SUMMARY OF INFORMATION

SUBJECT: Father Krunoslav DRAGANOVIC,

RE: PAST Background and PRESENT Activity.

1. Fr. Krunoslav DRAGANOVIC is a Croatian Catholic priest in the Monastery of San Geronimo [sic – here and below], 132 Via Tomacelli. ROME. This man has for some time now been associated with Ustashi elements in Italy and, while in many instances it is hard to distinguish the activity of the Church from the activity of one man whose personal convictions might lie along a certain line, it is fairly evident in the case of Fr. DRAGANOVIC that his sponsorship of the Ustashi cause stems from a deep-rooted conviction that the ideas espoused by this arch-nationalist organization, half logical, half lunatic, are basically sound concepts.

2. Fr. DRAGANOVIC is a native of TRAVNIK where he finished his elementary and secondary school. Shortly after this he went to SARAJEVO to study theology and philosophy. Here he fell under the personal magnetism of Dr. Ivan SARIC, archbishop of SARAJEVO, whose particular interest he soon became and after graduation he was sent to ROME under the auspices of Dr. SARIC who had some good connections in the Vatican.

3. Having completed his studies at ROME where he majored in ethnology and Balkan affairs he returned to SARAJEVO where he held various political offices, all of a minor importance. Shortly after the formation of the Independent State of Croatia under Ante PAVELIC in April 1941 DRAGANOVIC became one of the leading figures in the Bureau of Colonization. In the middle of 1943 however he became involved in a disagreement over the relative merits of the younger Eugen KVATERNIK, whom he called a « madman and a lunatic », and he left Croatia and returned to ROME.

4. According to a reliable informant it is believed that this departure of DRAGANOVIC from Croatia to Italy is a classic example of « kicking a man upstairs » inasmuch as it is fairly well established that the leaders of the Independent State of Croatia expected the prelate, through his good connections in the Vatican, to be instrumental in working out the orientation of Croatia towards the West rather than the East. These same leaders, being occidental-minded and knowing full well that Croatia’s militant Catholocism [sic] made her a « natural » in such a deal, relied on DRAGANOVIC to assist them in their aims. He was eminently unsuccessful.

5. DRAGANOVIC has a brother still in ZAGREB who is a member of the Napredak Co., who recently was ignored in the elections to determine the members of the Board of Directors. He has another brother, whereabouts unknown, who was a member of the Croatian Embassy in BERLIN. He is in touch with his brother, ZVONKO, in ZAGREB but not with KRESO, whsoe [sic] whereabouts are not definetly [sic] known although he has been reported in the British zone in Germany.

6. About a year ago DRAGANOVIC is alleged in some circles to have somewhat denounced his now ardent pro-Ustashi sentiments during a conference of Croats in ROME. Having been accused by a certain Dr. KLJAKOVIC (apparently a member of the Croat Peasant Party) of being in very close contact with only Ustashi emogrees [sic] DRAGANOVIC is said to have replied that if working for an independent Croatia meant being an Ustasha then « I am an Ustasha ». « However, » he added, « I disassociate myself from all other attributes of the Ustashi. »

7. With this aim in view DRAGANOVIC is working with the Ustashi and also with some leftovers of the Croat Peasant Party in exile. When Milan PRIBANIC, erstwhile Commandant of the Guard of Vlado MACEK, appeared in ROME, he immediately contacted him and thus made his aims and purposes clear to MACEK.

8. Many of the more prominent Ustashi war criminals and Quislings are living in ROME illegally, many of them under false names. Their cells are still maintained, their papers still published, and their intelligence agencies still in operation. All this activity seems to stem from the Vatican, through the Monastary of San Geronimo to Fermo, the chief Croat Camp in Italy. Chief among the intelligence operatives in the Monastery of San Geronimo appear to be Dr. DRAGANOVIC and Monsignor MADJARAC.

9. The main messenger between the Vatican, the Monastary and Fermo is an Ustasha student by the name of BRISKI. BRISKI was interned in the 209 POW Camp at AFRAGOLA and was with the Ustashi Cabinet members when their escape was organized from there. His physical description is as follows: 25 years old, medium height, black hair, seen mostly without a hat. Has very bad teeth in upper and lower jaw. Appears to be very wise.

10. This Agent managed to run a counter-operative into this Monastary to find out if possible if the internal setup of the place was as had been alleged, namely that it was honeycombed with cells of Ustashi operatives. This was established and several things more but operations were stopped abruptly when it became too dangerous for the counter-intelligence agent in the Monastary. The following facts were ascertained:

11. In order to enter this Monastary one must submit to a personal search for weapons and identification documents, must answer questions as to where he is from, who he is, whom he knows, what is purpose is in the visit, and how he heard about the fact that there were Croats in the Monastary. All doors from one room to another are locked and those that are not have an armed guard in front of them and a pass-word is necessary to go from one room to another. The whole area is guarded by armed Ustashi youths in civilian clothes and the Ustashi salute is exchanged continually.

12. It was further established that the following prominent ex-Ustashi Ministers are either living in the monastery, or living in the Vatican and attending meetings several times a week at San Girolamo:

1. Ivan DEVCIC, Lt. Colonel

2. VRANCIC, Dr. Vjekoslav, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs.

3. TOTH, Dr. Dragutin, Minister of Croat State Treasury.

4. SUSIC, Lovro, Minister of Corporations in Croatian Quisling Government

5. STARCEVIC, Dr. Mile, Croat Minister of Education.

6. RUPCIC, General Dragutin, General of Ustashi Air Force.

7. PERIC, Djordje, Serbian Minster of Propaganda under NEDIC.

8. PECNIKAR, Vilko – Ustasha General and CO of Ustashi Gendarmerie

9. MARKOVIC, Josip, Minister of Transport in Pavelic Government.

10. KREN, Vladimir – Commander-in-Chief of the Croat Air Force.

13. While this « Croat », directed by this Agent to try to penetrate the Croat intelligence network, was inside the Monastary he personally heard a conversation ensue between this Monsignor MADJERAC and Dr. SUSIC, who, at the time of the conversation, was in the Vatican library. He also heard a conversation between two of the Ustashi in the monastary which established the fact that a brother of Dr. PERIC runs a hotel in ROME, and that often this hotel is visited at night for the purpose of holding important Ustahi [sic] conferences. The money for the purchase of the hotel was given this man by his brother, Dr. PERIC.

14. It was further established that these Croats travel back and forth from the Vatican several times a week in a car with a chauffeur whose license plate bears the two initials CD, « Corpo Diplomatico ». It issues forth from the Vatican and discharges its passengers inside the Monastary of San Geronimo. Subject to diplomatic immunity it is impossible to stop the car and discover who are its passengers.

15. DRAGANOVIC’s sponsorship of these Croat Qusilings definetly [sic] links him up with the plan of the Vatican to shield these ex-Ustashi nationalists until such time as they are able to procure for them the proper documents to enable them to go to South America. The Vatican, undoubtedly banking on the strong anti-Communist feelings of these men, is endeavoring to infiltrate them into South America in any way possible to counteract the spread of Red doctrine. It has been reliably reported, for example that Dr. VRANCIC has already gone to South America and that Ante PAVELIC and General KREN are scheduled for an early departure to South America through Spain. All these operations are said to have been negotiated by DRAGANOVIC because of his influence in the Vatican.

16. This agent will continue to make an effort to keep abreast of the situation in this area and also to advise G-2 of any new plans or changes of operations on the part of DRAGANOVIC and his satellites.

[signed]

ROBERT CLAYTON MUDD,

SPECIAL AGENT, CIC DISTRIBUTION:

AC of S, G-2, AFHQ (2)

Chief, CIC, AFHQ (1)

File (1)

:: filing information ::

Title: Background Report on Krunoslav Draganovic

Source: CIA, declassified September 12, 1983

Date: February 12, 1947 Added: March 15, 2003

Voir enfin:

Peron’s Nazi Ties

How the European fascist sensibility found new roots and new life in the South Atlantic region

Mark Falcoff

Time

November 9, 1998

Since the 1930s, the political culture of Argentina has been afflicted by periodic spasms of covert violence, secrecy and denial. As in the case of Vichy France, memory can be an inconvenience or an embarrassment; faced with incidents that require explanation, too many Argentines instinctively reach for the words borron y cuenta nueva (Let’s forget it all and start over with a clean slate). As a result, even today nobody knows exactly how many people disappeared during the « dirty war » against subversion (1976-83), nor the number of victims in the left-wing guerrilla violence that preceded it. The 1992 and 1994 bombings of the Israeli embassy in Buenos Aires and the city’s Jewish center, causing the loss of 115 lives, remain unsolved. Even events far more remote have had to wait decades for elucidation.

One of the most important of those events is Argentina’s vaunted neutrality in World War II, a posture it maintained long after other American republics broke off relations with the Axis. Only since the country’s return to democracy in 1983 has the real story of Argentina’s covert alignment with the Axis finally begun to emerge. A commission to investigate the activities of Nazism in Argentina, appointed by President Carlos Menem and assisted by an international team of scholars, started work last July. A preliminary report is expected in mid-November, when the scholars meet in Buenos Aires, and a final report a year later.

At issue here is not merely a matter of diplomatic taste. Throughout the war, Argentina was regarded by U.S. diplomats and the U.S. media as the regional headquarters for Nazi espionage. After 1945, reports kept cropping up in the U.S. press that Argentina was the final redoubt of important Nazis and their European collaborators, a point dramatically brought home as late as 1960 by the capture and forcible removal to Israeli justice of Adolf Eichmann, principal director of the « final solution. »

Over the years, these allegations seemed at least superficially credible in light of the emergence in 1946 of Colonel Juan Peron as the leader of a defiant, nationalist Argentina. Though in practice the Peron regime resembled hardly at all the defeated European fascist dictatorships, Peron made no secret of his sympathy for the defeated Axis powers.

Argentina’s and Peron’s apparent preference for the Axis, and particularly for Nazi Germany, has muddied the country’s relations with the Anglo-Saxon powers and poisoned its domestic politics. Anti-Peronists have often used the term Nazi (or Pero-Nazi) a bit too freely in attempting to discredit their opponents–not just Peron but also the administration of President Ramon S. Castillo (1940-43), who preceded him. Indeed, Argentina’s 1946 elections, the first of three in which Peron was elected to the presidency, were, as much as anything else, a plebiscite on the credibility of such accusations. In recent years, the Canadian scholar Ronald Newton, in his masterly The « Nazi Menace » in Argentina, 1931-47 (Stanford), has suggested that much of the Nazi-fascist menace in Argentina was an invention of British intelligence, fearful of the loss of historic markets in that country to the U.S. after the war, and therefore desirous of straining relations between Buenos Aires and Washington.

Far in advance of the final report of President Menem’s commission (of which Newton is a member), that theory has now been refuted in an extraordinary piece of investigative reporting–also a major breakthrough in historical scholarship–by Uki Goni, whose Peron and the Germans has just been published in Buenos Aires. In this book the author, who also works as a local correspondent for TIME, establishes that, for all the hyperbole, Washington’s darkest suspicions were if anything greatly understated. For one thing, Goni demonstrates that the Castillo administration, and particularly the Argentine Foreign Ministry, was honeycombed with Nazi sympathizers as early as 1942–so much so that it is difficult to see why any of the most anxious partisans of neutrality, such as found in the secret lodges of the Argentine army, felt the need to overthrow the government at all!

Voir par ailleurs:

Qui étaient les «Monuments Men»?

Métro

11/03/2014

CINEMA – Le film «Monuments Men» et le livre qui l’a inspiré racontent l’histoire d’une poignée de soldats britanniques et américains chargés de sauver le patrimoine culturel…

Basée sur des faits réels. C’est une histoire passionnante et méconnue que relate le film Monuments Men, tiré du livre éponyme de Robert M. Edsel. Après s’être installé à Florence, cet homme d’affaires texan explique à 20 Minutes qu’il avait commencé à s’intéresser à l’art: «Je me suis demandé comment, lors de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, qui a causé la mort de 65 millions de personnes, tant d’œuvres d’art avaient pu survivre et surtout qui les avaient sauvées.» Soit, en Europe, lors de la fin officielle des hostilités le 8 mai 1945, une soixantaine de personnes, engagés dans la section des Monuments, des Beaux-Arts et des Archives.

De la préservation à l’enquête

En 1944, les Monuments Men débarquent en France avec le souci de préserver le patrimoine, «d’éviter que les Etats-Unis et la Grande-Bretagne détruisent les musées et les œuvres d’art, en bombardant les sites culturels». Au fur et à mesure, les Monuments Men découvrent que les œuvres d’art, issues d’institutions ou propriétés de particuliers, ont été dérobées en masse par les Nazis. Hitler avait pour projet de bâtir son «Führermuseum», un musée gigantesque, à Linz, en Autriche. «En progressant vers Paris, ils se sont aperçus de l’extension du pillage. De leur mission de préservation du patrimoine, ils sont passés, comme des détectives, à la recherche des œuvres d’art.» Parmi celles-ci, L’Autel de Gand, chef-d’œuvre de la peinture des primitifs flamands ou encore La Madone de Bruges, sculptée par Michel-Ange.

Mettre la main sur ces trésors

Alors que la date de la fin de la guerre reste encore inconnue, s’engage une course contre la montre pour mettre la main sur ces trésors, acheminés vers l’Est, comme vers l’extravagant château de Neuschwanstein, en Bavière, ou vers les mines de sel de Altaussee (Autriche) ou de Heilbronn (en Allemagne). Dans cette dernière a travaillé Harry Ettlinger, 88 ans, qui avait fui l’Allemagne pour les Etats-Unis, avant de s’engager dans l’armée. L’ex-Monuments Men se rappelle pour 20 Minutes: «A 18 ans, j’étais le boss juif, rigole-t-il. Je dirigeais les mineurs, je localisais les boîtes, identifiables grâce au nom des institutions marquées dessus, et vérifiais leurs contenus. Par les ascenseurs, on les emmenait aux camions. C’est là qu’on a retrouvé les caisses contenant les vitraux de la cathédrale de Strasbourg»… Aujourd’hui encore, des œuvres dérobées par les Nazis réapparaissent, comme celles découvertes à Munich en 2012. «Mais des centaines de milliers manquent toujours», déplore Robert M. Edsel.

Une reconnaissance pour Rose Valland

L’essayiste conserve l’amertume d’une critique en France au sujet de son livre, intitulée «Pillages et approximations». Il espère toutefois que le rôle de Rose Valland, attachée de conservation au musée du Jeu de Paume pendant l’Occupation, qui a aidé les Monuments Men, sera davantage considéré. «Elle n’a jamais eu en France la reconnaissance qu’elle méritait.» L’héritage des Monuments Men a permis selon lui de largement influencer la rédaction par l’Unesco de «la Convention pour la protection des biens culturels en cas de conflit armé» datant de 1954. Mais leur idéal semble s’être tari. Il déplore que les Américains aient oublié de s’en inspirer en bombardant des sites historiques, pendant la Guerre d’Irak en 2003.

« Monuments Men » : Cate Blanchett incarne une résistante française oubliée

Stéphanie Trouiilard

France 24

05/03/2014

En écrivant sur Rose Valland, une résistante qui permit de sauver des œuvres d’arts volées par les nazis, la sénatrice Corinne Bouchoux était loin d’imaginer son livre porté à l’écran. C’est pourtant chose faite avec le film « Monuments Men ».

« La boucle est bouclée ! Mission accomplie ! Je suis plutôt contente. » Corinne Bouchoux a du mal à cacher son excitation. Il y a quelques jours, la sénatrice Europe Écologie-Les Verts (EELV) a été personnellement invitée à assister à l’avant-première parisienne du dernier film de Georges Clooney « Monuments Men ». Très émue, l’élue du Maine et Loire a pu voir sur grand écran le fruit d’un long travail. Dans cette superproduction, l’actrice australienne Cate Blanchett redonne vie à la résistante Rose Valland, à laquelle Corinne Bouchoux a consacré une biographie. « Si on m’avait dit un jour que mon livre, qui n’a intéressé personne pendant des années et que j’ai fait dans une solitude totale, pourrait inspirer un film, je ne l’aurais pas cru ! ».

Un coup de fil d’Hollywood

En 2006, en effet, son ouvrage « Rose Valland, la résistance au musée » sort dans une relative discrétion. Le livre est imprimé à seulement 2 000 exemplaires. « Après des années de recherches, j’étais très contente de l’avoir publié. Mais ensuite, j’ai estimé qu’une page de ma vie s’était tournée et je ne m’en suis plus occupée. On me sollicitait juste pour des conférences », raconte Corinne Bouchoux, interviewée par FRANCE 24 dans son petit bureau du Sénat . « Mais un jour, il y a un peu plus de cinq ans, un monsieur avec un fort accent américain m’a appelée pour me dire qu’il voulait racheter les droits de mon livre pour en faire un film à Hollywood. »

Incrédule, la sénatrice croit d’abord à une plaisanterie. Mais au bout du fil, son interlocuteur est des plus sérieux : Robert Edsel est un ancien homme d’affaires texan reconverti dans l’histoire de l’art. Passionné par la Seconde Guerre mondiale, ce riche américain a regroupé dans un livre, aujourd’hui porté à l’écran par Georges Clooney, les mémoires des Monuments Men, ces soldats alliés chargés de récupérer les œuvres d’art volées par les nazis. « Il s’est aperçu qu’en France, il y avait eu très peu de recherches sur ce sujet. Il a juste trouvé mon livre sur Rose Valland, précise Corinne Bouchoux. Il a fait un chèque de 7 500 euros à mon éditeur pour racheter les droits. Il l’a fait traduire et il le vend même aujourd’hui sur son site comme un produit dérivé du film ».

Rose Valland, une résistante de l’ombre

Il faut dire que le parcours de Rose Valland est indissociable de celui des Monuments Men. Tombée dans l’oubli, cette femme originaire d’une famille modeste de l’Isère a pourtant joué un rôle essentiel auprès de ces soldats pour sauver les chefs d’œuvre spoliés durant le conflit. Attachée de conservation au musée du Jeu de Paume, à l’époque le centre de triage des tableaux et des sculptures promis au musée d’Hitler à Linz en Autriche ou encore à la collection personnelle d’Hermann Goering, cette spécialiste de l’histoire de l’art a été un témoin privilégié du pillage nazi. « Pendant l’occupation, elle a été une véritable espionne, notant tous les tableaux qui partaient, avec leur destination. Elle a informé la résistance française et ensuite les Américains afin qu’ils évitent de bombarder certaines caches. Si son cahier n’était pas arrivé entre de bonnes mains, tout cela aurait été perdu », insiste la sénatrice.

Le long-métrage « Monuments Men » se concentre précisément sur ce travail de l’ombre et sur les risques encourus par Rose Valland. Son personnage, joué par Cate Blanchett sous le nom de Claire Simone, fournit de précieux renseignements au soldat américain James Granger (incarné par Matt Damon) pour l’aider à identifier les endroits où les nazis stockaient les œuvres réquisitionnées.

Le film tait toutefois une large partie de sa vie. « Elle aurait pu avoir un rôle plus consistant, car le film s’arrête en 1945 alors que Rose Valland est restée en Allemagne jusqu’en 1954 », regrette Corinne Bouchoux. Au lendemain de la capitulation allemande, poursuit la sénatrice, la résistante a en effet pris une décision courageuse. Devenue capitaine de l’armée française, elle parcourt pendant de longues années – et en uniforme – les ruines du Troisième Reich pour retrouver les œuvres d’arts emportées par les Allemands. « Grâce à elle, 70 000 œuvres sont revenues en France, où sont enregistrées 100 000 réclamations. À l’époque, elle était aussi une négociatrice souterraine pour les diplomates, une sorte de sherpa lorsqu’étaient entamés des pourparlers. Elle s’est ainsi déplacée une quarantaine de fois en zone soviétique pour voir ce que les Russes avaient récupérés. Ce n’était pas facile car ils considéraient qu’ils pouvaient bien tout garder étant donné tout ce qu’on leur avait pris. Elle a ainsi joué un rôle crucial pendant et après la guerre. »

Devenue conservatrice des musées nationaux en 1952 et décorée des titres les plus prestigieux (Chevalier de la Légion d’honneur, Médaille de la Résistance, Médaille de la Liberté en 1948, et Officier de l’Ordre du Mérite de la République fédérale d’Allemagne), Rose Valland a ensuite passé le reste de sa vie dans l’anonymat le plus total. « On l’a mise dans un placard quand elle est rentrée en France. On lui a confié une nouvelle mission, celle de défendre le patrimoine français en cas de troisième guerre mondiale. Elle était la madame sécurité des musées français », poursuit Corinne Bouchoux. « Mais elle n’a jamais accepté qu’on lui dise que c’était terminé. Elle était obsédée par le sujet. Elle a travaillé jusqu’à sa mort [En 1980, NDLR], elle voulait retrouver un propriétaire pour chaque tableau volé par les nazis et renouer le fil de l’histoire ».

Pour sa biographe, Rose Valland est finalement tombée dans l’oubli pour plusieurs raisons : « D’abord, c’était une femme, et dans ce pays, on préfère les héros masculins. Elle était aussi issue d’un milieu modeste, loin du sérail culturel. Et elle était également homosexuelle. Elle a vécu avec la même compagne, mais pendant longtemps on l’a prise pour une vieille fille acariâtre, alors qu’elle ne l’était pas du tout. Elle était juste discrète. Enfin, elle était aussi au courant d’un certain nombre de scandales et d’abus. Personne n’avait intérêt à ce qu’elle les révèle ».

Soixante-dix ans après son engagement héroïque, le film « Monuments Men » lui rend enfin honneur. Mais l’action de Rose Valland est loin d’être une page révolue de l’histoire. Dans les musées nationaux français, 2 000 œuvres issues de la spoliation (appelées MNR) n’ont toujours pas retrouvé leurs propriétaires. À l’image de son illustre aînée, Corinne Bouchoux en a fait un combat personnel. Rapporteuse d’une commission sur le sujet au Sénat, elle souhaite que la France donne réellement aux ayants droit des propriétaires juifs les moyens de retrouver leurs trésors culturels et que l’État ne se contente plus d’attendre qu’ils se manifestent. Elle préconise la création d’une cellule de recherches. « Si on ne peut pas les identifier, il faut au moins qu’on soit au clair sur ces tableaux. Je ne veux plus qu’aucun musée français n’achète une œuvre alors qu’il y a un doute sur son passé », assène-t-elle.

Pour faciliter ce travail, un site Internet portant le nom de Rose Valland a été créé par le ministère de la Culture. Il permet notamment de consulter le répertoire des MNR en dépôt dans les musées français ou de se documenter sur le sujet. Mais ce bel hommage ne satisfait pas encore pleinement Corinne Bouchoux : « Je trouve cela anormal qu’il n’y ait pas dans tous les musées une plaque avec son nom et sa photo. J’espère que cela va arriver. Que Rose Valland soit aussi méconnue m’a toujours semblé être une injustice. J’ai juste voulu la réparer ». Sur les écrans le 12 mars, le film « Monuments Men », va aussi contribuer à lui redonner sa juste place dans l’Histoire.


France/USA: Sous les pavés des bonnes intentions, l’enfer socialiste (Where PC meets overweening government power, a terrible politics is born)

16 mars, 2014
https://i1.wp.com/www.weeklystandard.com/sites/all/files/imagecache/cover-small/magazines/coverimages/v19-27.Mar24.Cover_.jpgThere is nothing to drive a population rightward like the softening of its putatively conservative party. Most people in any society would like to be considered easy-going and accommodating. They will say the proper, tolerant things as long as they are confident someone else is willing to endure the social stigma of being the humorless keeper of order. When people lose confidence there is anyone more conservative hiding in the woodwork, they reluctantly take on the embarrassing job of expressing conservative thoughts themselves. That is what happened with the Tea Party. (…) About a year ago, though, the Manif pour Tous movement began to harden. Cast adrift from the French political system with no weapon but their numbers and their good intentions, by turns ignored and calumniated by an unpopular but steely government, certain marchers began to see the beautiful soul of Frigide Barjot as more of a liability than an asset. She was frozen out of her leadership position, replaced by Ludovine de la Rochère, an officer of the Jérôme-Lejeune Foundation. At the March 2013 demonstration of the Manif pour Tous, the one that drew 1.4 million people and ran for miles down the Avenue de la Grande Armée, police blocked the route. A group of marchers tried to end-run a police blockade and enter the Champs-Élysées, a nonauthorized parade route, to the chagrin of Barjot and some of the movement’s more orderly leaders. A businesswoman named Béatrice Bourges backed the marchers. (…) The French government has been speaking about sexual matters almost nonstop for two years now without ever giving a satisfactory explanation of its philosophy. So incoherent has Hollande been that many commentators assume he has chosen sex and gender arbitrarily, as a means of diverting attention from his economic-policy failures, or, more ambitiously, following a Leninist strategy of sowing confusion in the public. Compare him with Barack Obama. The president has backed gay marriage on the grounds that marriage is such a noble institution that it ought to be opened to everybody—a grounds that, while debatable, is also perfectly straightforward. Hollande appears bizarre by contrast. He married neither Ségolène Royal, the mother of his four children, nor Valérie Trierweiler, the journalist whom he publicly acknowledged as his companion in 2010. Nor has he announced any plans to marry Julie Gayet, the actress for whom he evicted Trierweiler from the Elysée Palace. He has shown himself willing to risk civil strife over an institution he does not believe in in the first place. (…) Political correctness came late to France, but the country has made up for lost time. France is now at the nadir of politically correct Zhdanovism, the stage America reached in about 1991, when Anita Hill accused Clarence Thomas of harassment at his Supreme Court confirmation hearing, Antioch College required lovers making passes at one another to obtain verbal or written consent at each “base,” people said things such as “differently abled,” and elementary schools raised the consciousness of children by forcing them to read Heather Has Two Mommies. Yet PC has acquired institutional redoubts in France that it never did in the United States, and it now appears almost invincible. This may have to do with France’s Jacobin tradition, which centralizes everything governmental and discourages wiggle room. Right now the Ministry of Education is conducting a monomaniacal campaign to persuade schoolchildren that there is no difference whatsoever between boys and girls, other than the ones they have been taught by a sexist culture. The ministry aims to fight centuries of sexism and bigotry through a kind of counter-brainwashing: giving girls trucks and balls, boys bottles and dolls, and turning Little Red Riding Hood into a boy. So much for Vive la différence. Opponents call such teachings la théorie du genre, or gender theory. In February, conservative UMP leader Jean-François Copé publicly criticized a list of books that were either required or suggested for use in schools. It was a bold move, a real coup, and might have had more effect on French voters had not the UMP already introduced a certain amount of gender theory to the schools under Sarkozy. The books Copé publicized included Does Miss Zazie Have a Peepee?, Daddy Wears a Dress, and Everybody’s Naked!, which contained vivid pictures of children and adults (“The babysitter is naked,” “The policeman is naked,” “The teacher is naked”) and promptly rose to number one on Amazon’s French website. Two things turned the controversy over théorie du genre into a scandal. The first is that education minister Peillon and his associates claimed there was no such thing. Peillon professed himself “absolutely against” gender theory; he was just for teaching children about the interchangeability of the sexes at ever-younger ages. “You mustn’t confuse it with gender studies,” said women’s rights minister Najat Vallaud-Belkacem. “What they’re teaching [kids] is the values of the republic,” said finance minister Pierre Moscovici, “those of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.” They were, it turns out, taking their voters for dummies. The conservative television gadfly Éric Zemmour claimed that what was being taught came not from child psychology but from gay political activism. The new school materials were “carbon copies” of activist documents, he said, and he began to produce them: a plan to have the national railways “educate against homophobia,” memos from the Socialist party group Homosexuality and Socialism, last year’s government “Teychenné Report” on “LGBT-phobic Discrimination in Schools.” The théorie du genre was the principle on which the government had been legislating in practice for the past two years—why on earth wouldn’t they avow it? If you accept that sexuality is chosen, not given, then there’s no shame in taking steps to broaden the options on a child’s sexual menu. It was obvious to everyone except the government that this new vision of the Rights of Man was precisely what parents did not accept. Normally in such circumstances, confronted with dug-in resistance, the government would adopt a more-in-sorrow-than-in-anger tone and explain that the country was changing. It was getting more diverse. Our schoolbooks had to be opened to a greater variety of people. .  .  . But apparently there was a limit to diversity. In the weekly Marianne, the journalist Éric Conan noted a striking omission in this dynamic, multicultural time. “The Ministry of Education and the editors,” he wrote, “have carefully avoided Mohammed Has Two Daddies or Fadela Has Two Mommies.” (…) One of the mysteries of contemporary French political life is that the government has institutions for combating race prejudice patterned on American ones—but without having perpetrated slavery, Jim Crow, lynching, or any of the historic misdeeds that made the corresponding American remedies necessary. The political action group SOS Racisme was founded in the mid-1980s at the urging of President Mitterrand, just after his root-and-branch reforms had led the country into an economic collapse. It was what we would call an “Astroturf” group, a top-down movement designed by leaders to be passed off as grassroots. The first leader of SOS Racisme, Harlem Désir, is now the chairman of the Socialist party. A few people at the time, most forcefully the sociologist Paul Yonnet, suggested that the campaign against racism was a bizarre priority for France, having more to do with Mitterrand’s political needs than with France’s historic responsibility. (…) As communism once did, the French antiracism movement is producing renegades. Ex-Communists often took the menace of communism more seriously than they had taken the promise in their more credulous days; their exposure to both sides of certain arguments often gave them a more profound sense of ideological battles than their contemporaries on either side. (…) In a way that no one seems willing to acknowledge, Muslim politics is a key to Belghoul’s power. Although the JRE is small, it is one of those small things with the potential to bring an entire political coalition crashing down—in a U.S. context, imagine the Democratic party if its hold on the black vote were threatened. Hollande’s government was able to ignore the mostly Catholic Manif pour Tous, no matter how large its marches got, because he had never had and did not need the votes of devout Catholics. Muslims are a different story: In the first round of the last presidential election, 57 percent voted for Hollande, versus only 7 percent for Sarkozy. What is more, their power is magnified (and that of Catholics reduced) by a system meant to respect the rights of “minorities.” Should a silent majority of Catholics, by making common cause with Muslims, gain access to the same right to be heard, they will have picked the lock that has kept them out of politics since the 1990s. (…) All Western countries are becoming less politically free, but France is doing so at a faster rate than most. The government has many tools for enforcing conformity. Twitter is capable of suppressing tweets at the request of governments in certain extreme cases, the website Atlantico reported in February, and last year, of 352 such requests worldwide, 306 came from France. Valls, the justice minister, has looked into banning Bourges’s French Spring group. The activist group Collectifdom sued the director Nicolas Bedos for opinions expressed in a magazine column that it considered an assault on “the honor of the Antilles.” These are tip-of-the-iceberg cases. And consider what happened when Valls lectured the philosopher Alain Finkielkraut on the TV talk show Des paroles et des actes in February about France’s sterling record of welcoming the uprooted—Valls’s own family from Catalonia under Franco, Finkielkraut’s from Poland and Auschwitz. Finkielkraut agreed, but said that that didn’t entitle France to ignore those of French stock—the so-called français de souche. For having used that expression (and for having expressed the worry that France was turning into “the Soviet Union of antiracism”), Finkielkraut found himself in legal trouble—two high-ranking members of the Socialist party called for a sitting of the Conseil Supérieur de l’Audiovisuel, a rough French equivalent of the FCC. It is a bad sign that, when the ruling party clashes with freedom of expression in this way, the media tend to take the side of the ruling party. Le Monde’s newly active blog section has covered the popular movement against théorie du genre not as a clash of political opinions but as an epidemic of intox, or collective insanity. In column after column, the paper of the ruling class mocks people who are utterly shut out of decision-making for their attempts, necessarily based on partial information, to make sense of the mandates imposed on them. There is little attempt to address the large kernel of truth in what they say, no attempt to address directly the question of whether teachers indeed are imposing on their children an ideology about sexual matters. And there is no acknowledgment whatsoever that parents could ever have a legitimate interest in what their children are taught about sex in school. There are only restatements of the government viewpoint and worries about the mental health of its opponents. (…)  A country whose intellectual and political leaders do not distinguish between Dieudonné and Élisabeth Lévy will have a hard time either disciplining extremists or accepting constructive criticism from any quarter. France has, through political correctness, maneuvered itself into a bad position. In rough times, people fall back on what they have—savings, family, faith, various things that no decent government feels entitled to violate. What France is doing in the name of equal citizenship is ripping up every last refuge and source of identity people have. Its political leaders have met legitimate popular opposition to their plans not just with punishment but with ridicule, ostracism, and exclusion. Many of its intellectual leaders have fallen into line behind the politicians. For now, France’s leaders have managed to insulate some of their wilder schemes from popular complaint. It would be a mistake to consider that a triumph in any but the very short term. Christopher Caldwell

Mariage homosexuel, adoption pour homosexuels, théorie du genre à l’école, non-repect de la liberté d’expression …

A l’heure où, pour dénoncer les turpitudes de leurs prédécesseurs, ceux qui nous servent actuellement de dirigeants se permettent à présent eux aussi les mensonges les plus éhontés …

Pendant que, de l’autre côté de l’Atlantique, la francisation semble avancer à grand pas …

Comment ne pas voir avec le magazine de droite américain The Weekly standard …

Ce zèle de nouveau converti  avec lequel une France ayant découvert sur le tard le politiquement correct se rattrape actuellement …

Mais surtout, avec le risque de se couper un jour durablement de la population, cette étrange convergence de dirigeants et d’élites intellectuelles des deux côtés de l’Atlantique, toujours plus fermés aux problèmes réels de ladite population ?

French Undressing

Where PC meets overweening government power, a terrible politics is born

Christopher Caldwell

The Weekly Standard

March 24, 2014

Paris

On a bright Wednesday afternoon in late February a bunch of French Muslims gathered in an upstairs room at the Café du Pont Neuf on the Seine. They had summoned a group of Internet journalists before whom they intended to lay out a few grievances. Their leader, Farida Belghoul, a 55-year-old Frenchwoman of Algerian Kabyle background, is a veteran of the movement that, back in the 1980s, sought to rally North African immigrants’ children (known as beurs) behind Socialist president François Mitterrand. Belghoul was the eloquent and camera-friendly voice of the so-called Second March of the Beurs in 1984, but she drifted from view after that. She has spent the intervening years teaching, writing novels, making films, studying, and, most recently, living in Egypt. Journalists who have written about ethnicity, immigration, and left-wing politics in decades past retain a vague memory of her name.

Those who have reacquainted themselves with Belghoul in recent months have been shocked to see what has become of this onetime hope of socialism. She has seen a few things. She has drawn closer to God. And she has become the sworn enemy of the French Ministry of Education’s ideas about what children should be taught about sex. In the audience at the café, silhouetted against the windows that face across the Seine toward the towers of the Conciergerie, there were women in headscarves. But the speakers sitting at Belghoul’s side included leaders of Christian organizations, conservative politicians, a priest, and a former member of Nicolas Sarkozy’s cabinet. Many of them until quite recently thought of Muslim immigration as a menace to the Republic. All were there to pay their respects to a woman who, for now at least, has become one of the most important right-wing leaders in France.

An embitterment has entered French politics under the presidency of François Hollande, the first Socialist to run France since the last century. Voters chose Hollande in 2012 as a way of administering a slap to the brassy martinet Sarkozy, but Hollande’s popularity has fallen steadily since. The economy is flat. Hollande’s advisers—mostly people of retirement age—keep scolding the public about how they ought to work harder. The Red Bonnets, a movement of protest against the green taxes that are hitting farmers hard, have been on the march in Brittany. Economic inequality has worsened, and the Paris economist Thomas Piketty—whose new book on inequality has made bestseller lists—took to the pages of the daily Libération to describe Hollande as a “serial bumbler.” Hollande is his party’s most prominent champion of French involvement in the 28-nation superstructure of the European Union, at a time when a majority (58 percent) of Frenchmen want less of it. The country’s unemployment rate is over 10 percent, and Hollande’s approval ratings have fallen into the teens. Never in recent decades has a Western European leader been less popular.

It is not usually fruitful to compare foreign leaders with American presidents, but there is a reason Hollande hit it off so well with President Obama on his state visit last month. Both have a mild manner that is an inestimable asset when the leader of the party that likes to shake things up is courting swing voters. Both, though, are ideological adventurers, with a reverence towards what the university utopians in their party dream up, even if they are not dreamers themselves. But Obama has trump cards Hollande lacks: a reserve currency, an empire, a vast army. He also has Republican opponents who have restrained him from nominating too many Van Joneses and Debo Adegbiles. Hollande has had the personal good fortune, and the political bad fortune, to get the allies he has wished for. He has wound up beholden to the Europe-Écologie party (EELV), which is too radical for most French voters’ tastes.

It was partly at the EELV’s suggestion that Hollande went out on a limb last winter and legalized gay marriage. It was a mistake. The law has been more ferociously resisted in France than in any Western country. As with President Obama’s health care reform, the passage of the law has done nothing to settle the argument over it. The protests have continued. The problem, it is clear, was not just the law itself but also the spirit in which it was offered. “It’s a reform of society,” said justice minister Christiane Taubira in late 2012, “and you could even say a reform of civilization.” That remark, and others like it, awakened a section of political France that had been slumbering for decades—the Catholic part, the traditionalist part, the sort of people who have five kids, favor cardigans over hoodies, and can describe France as the “eldest daughter of the church” without snickering.

Unmitigated Gaul

It is hard to say what made Catholics in France more hostile to gay marriage than those in other countries. Perhaps they have been so long at a distance from power that they have not acquired the habit of political negotiation and compromise. One factor in the resistance is certainly the incentive gay marriage offers to irregular adoption. French people are uneasy about mixing up money values and human values. Surrogate motherhood is still not legal; in fact, one sees it likened to the slave trade in certain newspapers, although legal activists have sought to ease restraints on the practice.

Gay marriage in France is called mariage pour tous, “marriage for everybody.” The mostly church-inspired movement against it is called la manif pour tous, “the demonstration for everybody,” manifestation being the French for a political march or protest. After all, everybody used to be Catholic. In the spring of 1984, several hundred thousand marchers convinced François Mitterrand to withdraw his project of absorbing the country’s Catholic schools into the state system.

This was what the anti-gay-marriage protesters had in mind. The main voice of the marches when they started was Frigide Barjot, a gifted and gentle eccentric who had been growing more and more serious about her Catholic faith for a decade. Barjot was an admirer of Pope Benedict XVI. She wrote interesting memoirs, was married to the comic writer Basile de Koch (his name and hers are pseudonyms), and had even made racy music videos. She had (and retains) many gay friends, and she appeared not to have a milligram of ill-will in her body. (“Who am I to judge?” she often says, quoting the present pope.) She was good on TV and the Internet, a person of integrity, living poor as a church mouse with her husband and children in an apartment in a modest block near the Eiffel Tower. (The left-leaning city government of Paris has begun proceedings to kick them out of it; when I visited, it was crammed with dress racks and piled high with cardboard boxes.)

Barjot described gay couples as a blessing for France and even backed civil unions for them; she insisted only that every child was the product of a mother and a father and deserved to be raised that way. The universe of people ready to sign on to these views turned out to be vast. It ranged from the lay Catholic bloggers of Salon Beige to the Jérôme-Lejeune Foundation (which campaigns for those with Down syndrome) to former housing minister Christine Boutin’s pro-life group Alliance Vita. That is leaving aside Muslims, Jews, the “fundamentalist” Catholics who reject Vatican II, and those who reject gay marriage for reasons that are nonreligious.

By last winter, the Manif pour Tous showed itself capable of drawing millions—1.4 million showed up for its event in Paris in March 2013, almost double the turnout of the biggest marches in 1984. It was stunning—most polls put Mass attendance in France at around 5 percent, and Catholics themselves had come to think they were dying out. Many Catholics describe the spirit of the Manif pour Tous in exactly the same terms gays did when they began protesting after the Stonewall riots of 1969—they were shocked to discover how many people there were who felt just as they did. Some even described them as “Catholic Pride days.”

Just as Scott Brown’s election to a Massachusetts Senate seat in 2010 was assumed to signal the end of President Obama’s health reforms, these marches should have meant the end of gay marriage in France. The constitution of the Fifth Republic turns the French presidency into an elective monarchy, which was fine in 1958 when it was designed for Charles de Gaulle. But it has proved a bad fit for anybody who cannot write on his résumé: “Saved the nation in World War II.” France doesn’t have midterm elections (although the approaching municipal elections will permit the public to send a signal). It has little local ability to temper the will of the capital. What it does have, especially since 1968, is a virtually constitutional role for street protests. If you can put enough people in the street to protest a government action, the government will back down. No one understands that better than the 59-year-old Hollande, who was mentored by his party’s soixante-huitards, or ’68ers. Mitterrand had to let Catholics keep their schools in 1984. Chirac had to abandon budget cuts in 1995 and a youth jobs program in 2006.

That didn’t happen last time. The anti-gay-marriage protests of 2012 and 2013 drew record crowds, and yet the government didn’t relent. In fact, it dug in. The number of arrests at Manif pour Tous parades was high. In recent days, a Russian student has told reporters that police offered her help obtaining citizenship in exchange for spying on the movement. “The government saw it as a sign of their own virtue to have these people marching against them,” said one non-Catholic sympathizer of Frigide Barjot. If this really was a reform of civilization, then those families marching in the streets were the new civilization’s enemies.

Cold front

Oppponents often describe the social-issues protesters as being on the “extreme right” or even a “French equivalent of the Tea Party,” both of them labels that get applied to whatever force the political class is most eager to exclude. These epithets were not ones that the broad, pious, native-French upper-middle class would have chosen as descriptions of itself. In fact, these people seem to have no political allies at all—either in the center of French politics or on the extremes. The Gaullist UMP, the closest French equivalent to the U.S. Republican party, is no place for “values voters.” Sarkozy talked a good game to them but left them no less disappointed than the rest of his coalition of followers. His housing minister, Christine Boutin, the only outspoken pro-life politician in the party, has now left the party, gravitating to Christian Democracy and the world of Farida Belghoul. The party’s candidate for mayor of Paris, the yuppie ex-Sarkozy spokesperson Nathalie Kosciusko-Morizet, not only distrusts the Manif pour Tous but has demanded recantation from any candidate in her party who ever expressed the slightest sympathy for it. This included Hélène Delsol, whom Kosciusko-Morizet dropped from her list of candidates, allegedly for her links to a centrist candidate. Conservatives often speak of the political establishment as the “UMPS”—a jamming-together of the party acronyms of the Gaullists and the Socialists.

There is nothing to drive a population rightward like the softening of its putatively conservative party. Most people in any society would like to be considered easy-going and accommodating. They will say the proper, tolerant things as long as they are confident someone else is willing to endure the social stigma of being the humorless keeper of order. When people lose confidence there is anyone more conservative hiding in the woodwork, they reluctantly take on the embarrassing job of expressing conservative thoughts themselves. That is what happened with the Tea Party.

And it is part of the explanation for why the rightist National Front (FN)—which, while democratic in its conduct, has for decades spoken with fascist overtones—has gained popularity in recent years, and why 40 percent of the UMP are ready to form alliances with it, according to an IFOP poll. Purged of its anti-Semitic and some of its anti-immigrant elements by its new leader, Marine Le Pen, it is leading the polls for the upcoming European elections. But the FN never rallied to the Manif pour Tous. Some attribute this coldness to Le Pen’s excess of caution, others to a reluctance to offend the Front’s gay supporters and members. Whatever the reason, these were not the Manif’s people. The National Front’s rank and file opposed gay adoption, but only by 56 percent to 37, not far from the views of the French public at large.

About a year ago, though, the Manif pour Tous movement began to harden. Cast adrift from the French political system with no weapon but their numbers and their good intentions, by turns ignored and calumniated by an unpopular but steely government, certain marchers began to see the beautiful soul of Frigide Barjot as more of a liability than an asset. She was frozen out of her leadership position, replaced by Ludovine de la Rochère, an officer of the Jérôme-Lejeune Foundation. At the March 2013 demonstration of the Manif pour Tous, the one that drew 1.4 million people and ran for miles down the Avenue de la Grande Armée, police blocked the route. A group of marchers tried to end-run a police blockade and enter the Champs-Élysées, a nonauthorized parade route, to the chagrin of Barjot and some of the movement’s more orderly leaders. A businesswoman named Béatrice Bourges backed the marchers.

That was the beginning of Bourges’s explicitly political movement Printemps Français. The name, which means “French spring,” betrays an assumption, perhaps, that France is not much freer than the countries of the Arab world, where Bourges was born. Bourges wants to remove Hollande from office under the little-known Article 68 of the constitution for extreme dereliction of duty. She has not been specific about whether he most deserves ousting for his economic, his immigration, or his gender rights policies, nor has she been particular about whose company she travels in. In late January she organized a Day of Rage. The 17,000 people who gathered in the Place de la Bastille were not Frigide Barjot’s live-and-let-live types. There was a bit of humor. One held a sign reading “We want a state that is transparent, not a state of ‘trans’ parents.” But there was other stuff as well. “Jews!” read one placard. “France does not belong to you!”

M’Bad news

There have been incidents like this for at least 15 years in France, but they have tended to look like mere dérapages, moments when somebody loses his head and does something stupid. No longer. What seemed even two or three years ago to be only a serious potential problem has emerged as a present danger. There now exists an identifiable constituency for anti-Semitism in France. It is not necessarily broad, but it is not just a few fringe individuals, either. It is what you could call a “market.” Dieudonné M’bala M’bala, a gifted and sometimes riotously funny comic of Cameroonian descent and pronounced left-wing views, began to attack Israel and Zionism at the turn of the century, just after the second intifada and the September 11 attacks. Since then his ideology has evolved in a Farrakhanite direction and beyond. The literary scholar Robert Faurisson, France’s highest-profile denier of the Shoah, as the Holocaust is known, participated in one of Dieu-donné’s onstage routines in a striped Auschwitz-style suit. Dieudonné sings a bouncy song called “Shoah-nanas” (a homonym for “Hot Pineapple”), complete with a dance. In December he said of one of his journalistic critics, “When I hear him talk, Patrick Cohen, I think .  .  . you know .  .  . the gas chambers .  .  . too bad .  .  .”

Dieudonné’s defenders often say he is not anti-Semitic, only “anti-system.” But at times like now, when France’s “system” seems bent on dismantling its old institutions and adapting its culture to the cyber-economy, the system has suited Dieudonné fairly well. He churns out homemade videos that get millions of hits on his theater’s website, on YouTube, and on EgalitéetReconciliation.fr. This last is the brainchild of Alain Soral, a bestselling underground author, the brother of a famous Swiss actress, and an inspired provocateur. In one sense he resembles the television commentator Glenn Beck, an apostle of autodidacticism who offers his presumably angry viewers long reading lists with which to arm themselves intellectually—in Soral’s case, an interesting mix of left and right that includes Kropotkin, Ezra Pound, the contemporary economist Satyajit Das, the Dréyfusard Bernard Lazare, and the Marxist philosopher Pierre Clouscard. But whereas Beck’s books are mostly attacks on Woodrow Wilson or New Deal statism, many of Soral’s favorites question the whole modern order, and would have been found congenial by French fascists in the 1930s. He, too, spends a good deal of his energy thinking about Zionism. He has moved from Communism to the National Front to what he calls a “national socialism à la française.”

At the turn of the year, word spread that Dieudonné was about to take a particularly rebarbative show on tour. Interior minister Manuel Valls—the Socialist party’s only public figure with a reputation for being tough on crime—decided to come down on him like a ton of bricks. Valls sought to have the show banned before it even opened. When the city of Nantes, the first stop on the tour, refused to ban it, on the grounds that this would constitute prior restraint, the Conseil d’État—a sort of supreme court that operates out of the country’s executive branch—overruled it. Tax authorities raided Dieudonné’s house.

The public’s response was nothing like what the government might have anticipated. Valls, who had started the week as the most popular politician in France, saw his approval ratings plummet. The French pollster BVA showed his approval among young people, who are disproportionately of immigrant background, falling from 61 percent to 37 percent. It may be that they were unnerved by the government’s weakness—the realization that it required the entire disciplinary apparatus of the state to constrain one Afro-French vaudevillian. On the other hand, they may have been unnerved by the government’s presumption. France’s tools for disciplining opinion have been so wantonly overused that many who sincerely deplored Dieudonné’s views may have felt they had less to lose from his opinions than from giving the state more means of control.

In such a context, though, the Day of Rage alarmed even the government’s most vocal opponents. They saw it as a pointless squandering of the Manif movement’s hard-earned reputation for constructive engagement, and a foolish opening, intentional or not, to extremists. The Figaro columnist Ivan Rioufol, usually a slashing opponent of political correctness and conformism, called the demonstration “the example not to follow” and faulted Bourges for failing to distance herself from the wackos a protest movement inevitably draws. Bourges said afterwards that she hadn’t seen the worst offending placards during the march. Rioufol had been used by the mainstream media, she said, adding: “The people are almost pre-revolutionary.” She insisted that channeling people’s rage was not the same thing as violence. What she didn’t do was apologize.

In this she sounded a bit like the Ukrainian boxer and political activist (and now presidential candidate) Wladimir Klitschko, who, when asked by the Guardian in January whether it bothered him to protest alongside the occasionally anti-Semitic extremist Oleh Tyahnybok, replied: “In order to land a punch, you need to bring your fingers together into a fist. We need to join all of our forces together. That is the only way that we can win.” In other words, no, it didn’t bother him. There are suddenly a lot of people talking and thinking this way in France. In forming political alliances, the extremism of one’s allies is becoming a second-order consideration.

A week after the Day of Rage, the Manif pour Tous held a much larger, much milder demonstration, amid threats from Valls that there would be a massive police reaction to any excesses. The following day, the Hollande government withdrew a law on the family that would have eased adoption rules and given new rights to stepparents. This occasioned another “day of rage” against Hollande, this one coming from his own party’s left wing. Was it the quiet, decent side or the unsavory side of French conservatism that had brought about this reversal? Was it the gentle Christians or the fuming radicals? Both sides claimed the credit.

Everybody’s naked

The French government has been speaking about sexual matters almost nonstop for two years now without ever giving a satisfactory explanation of its philosophy. So incoherent has Hollande been that many commentators assume he has chosen sex and gender arbitrarily, as a means of diverting attention from his economic-policy failures, or, more ambitiously, following a Leninist strategy of sowing confusion in the public. Compare him with Barack Obama. The president has backed gay marriage on the grounds that marriage is such a noble institution that it ought to be opened to everybody—a grounds that, while debatable, is also perfectly straightforward. Hollande appears bizarre by contrast. He married neither Ségolène Royal, the mother of his four children, nor Valérie Trierweiler, the journalist whom he publicly acknowledged as his companion in 2010. Nor has he announced any plans to marry Julie Gayet, the actress for whom he evicted Trierweiler from the Elysée Palace. He has shown himself willing to risk civil strife over an institution he does not believe in in the first place.

(A question that has interested French observers somewhat more is how the chubby 59-year-old has had such success as a .  .  . a .  .  . you could almost call him a sexagenarian. French women tend to explain it with reference to Hollande’s sense of humor, which is legendary in political circles. Une femme qui rit, runs the French proverb, est à moitié dans ton lit. If you can make a woman laugh, you’ve got her halfway into bed.)

On the eve of Hollande’s visit to the Vatican in January, which came just days after his household reshuffle, 120,000 Catholics wrote an online petition to Pope Francis, asking him to raise a long list of grievances with their president: a 1993 law against “hindering an abortion,” which has been used against antiabortion protesters and carries a prison sentence of up to two years; the desecration of churches by the Pussy Riot-style Ukrainian feminist group Femen; and the stated wish of the minister of education, Vincent Peillon, to “free the student of all determinisms.” This last bit of bureaucratic mumbo jumbo may not sound like much. But it is what drew those enraged Catholics and Muslims to the room over the Café du Pont Neuf in February.

Political correctness came late to France, but the country has made up for lost time. France is now at the nadir of politically correct Zhdanovism, the stage America reached in about 1991, when Anita Hill accused Clarence Thomas of harassment at his Supreme Court confirmation hearing, Antioch College required lovers making passes at one another to obtain verbal or written consent at each “base,” people said things such as “differently abled,” and elementary schools raised the consciousness of children by forcing them to read Heather Has Two Mommies.

Yet PC has acquired institutional redoubts in France that it never did in the United States, and it now appears almost invincible. This may have to do with France’s Jacobin tradition, which centralizes everything governmental and discourages wiggle room. Right now the Ministry of Education is conducting a monomaniacal campaign to persuade schoolchildren that there is no difference whatsoever between boys and girls, other than the ones they have been taught by a sexist culture. The ministry aims to fight centuries of sexism and bigotry through a kind of counter-brainwashing: giving girls trucks and balls, boys bottles and dolls, and turning Little Red Riding Hood into a boy. So much for Vive la différence.

Opponents call such teachings la théorie du genre, or gender theory. In February, conservative UMP leader Jean-François Copé publicly criticized a list of books that were either required or suggested for use in schools. It was a bold move, a real coup, and might have had more effect on French voters had not the UMP already introduced a certain amount of gender theory to the schools under Sarkozy. The books Copé publicized included Does Miss Zazie Have a Peepee?, Daddy Wears a Dress, and Everybody’s Naked!, which contained vivid pictures of children and adults (“The babysitter is naked,” “The policeman is naked,” “The teacher is naked”) and promptly rose to number one on Amazon’s French website.

Two things turned the controversy over théorie du genre into a scandal. The first is that education minister Peillon and his associates claimed there was no such thing. Peillon professed himself “absolutely against” gender theory; he was just for teaching children about the interchangeability of the sexes at ever-younger ages. “You mustn’t confuse it with gender studies,” said women’s rights minister Najat Vallaud-Belkacem. “What they’re teaching [kids] is the values of the republic,” said finance minister Pierre Moscovici, “those of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.” They were, it turns out, taking their voters for dummies. The conservative television gadfly Éric Zemmour claimed that what was being taught came not from child psychology but from gay political activism. The new school materials were “carbon copies” of activist documents, he said, and he began to produce them: a plan to have the national railways “educate against homophobia,” memos from the Socialist party group Homosexuality and Socialism, last year’s government “Teychenné Report” on “LGBT-phobic Discrimination in Schools.”

The théorie du genre was the principle on which the government had been legislating in practice for the past two years—why on earth wouldn’t they avow it? If you accept that sexuality is chosen, not given, then there’s no shame in taking steps to broaden the options on a child’s sexual menu. It was obvious to everyone except the government that this new vision of the Rights of Man was precisely what parents did not accept. Normally in such circumstances, confronted with dug-in resistance, the government would adopt a more-in-sorrow-than-in-anger tone and explain that the country was changing. It was getting more diverse. Our schoolbooks had to be opened to a greater variety of people. .  .  . But apparently there was a limit to diversity. In the weekly Marianne, the journalist Éric Conan noted a striking omission in this dynamic, multicultural time. “The Ministry of Education and the editors,” he wrote, “have carefully avoided Mohammed Has Two Daddies or Fadela Has Two Mommies.”

That is where Farida Belghoul came in.

Path of Middle East resistance

Belghoul is a heroine of French antiracism. It is an odd-sounding role. One of the mysteries of contemporary French political life is that the government has institutions for combating race prejudice patterned on American ones—but without having perpetrated slavery, Jim Crow, lynching, or any of the historic misdeeds that made the corresponding American remedies necessary. The political action group SOS Racisme was founded in the mid-1980s at the urging of President Mitterrand, just after his root-and-branch reforms had led the country into an economic collapse. It was what we would call an “Astroturf” group, a top-down movement designed by leaders to be passed off as grassroots. The first leader of SOS Racisme, Harlem Désir, is now the chairman of the Socialist party. A few people at the time, most forcefully the sociologist Paul Yonnet, suggested that the campaign against racism was a bizarre priority for France, having more to do with Mitterrand’s political needs than with France’s historic responsibility.

More people think this now, and Belghoul is one of them. As communism once did, the French antiracism movement is producing renegades. Ex-Communists often took the menace of communism more seriously than they had taken the promise in their more credulous days; their exposure to both sides of certain arguments often gave them a more profound sense of ideological battles than their contemporaries on either side.

On a Sunday afternoon in February, Belghoul ex-plained her beliefs over sugar cookies in the sunny living room of her house a train ride into the modest banlieues (or suburbs) northwest of Paris. Fighting for the rights of second-generation North Africans in France made up a big part of her early life. Belghoul herself spent three uneventful years in the Communist party starting at age 17. She considers it a passing enthusiasm of little importance, but she retains from somewhere a gift for dialectics and wounding political invective. Taking the government literally in its insistence that there is no difference between a man and a woman, she calls the beautiful Najat Vallaud-Belkacem “Monsieur” and Vincent Peillon “Madame”—when she is not calling him the “minister of re-education.”

Belghoul studied at the Sorbonne and read a lot of history, philosophy, and literature. She marched with the groups that would eventually be swallowed up in SOS Racisme and spent the early 1990s working for Radio Beur. She now believes the antiracist movement was about securing the votes of the heavily Arab banlieues, not about solving their problems—particularly illiteracy, an obsession for her. On a personal level, too, she felt used and discarded. After leaving Radio Beur she disappeared off the Socialist party’s radar screen.

Belghoul sees a common thread between the anti-racism movements of the 1980s and gender theory: Both are means, in her view, of “destroying the basis of people’s identity.” Confusing children about their sexuality is just another way to break them of their ability to think clearly (déstructurer la pensée is her phrase), to make them more pliant before the state. Belghoul homeschooled her children, something that is easier to do in France than one might assume. Her response to the government’s gender theory has been to organize a movement of journées de retrait de l’école (JRE), when large numbers of parents keep their children home from school. To keep the government from organizing against the parents, she does not announce these days in advance. By February, the movement had spread to a hundred schools.

Obviously, antiracism aims explicitly to make native French people feel ashamed of their prejudices. For Belghoul it threatened the identity of minorities, too, including her own. In the 1980s, SOS Racisme and the Union of Jewish Students of France promoted a Jewish-Arab dialogue. This was an “illegitimate debate” in Belghoul’s view. “It was as if we were living in the Middle East,” she says. Many conservative Jews have made the same complaint—that the requirements of left-wing identity politics turned French Jews from citizens like anyone else into something they had not been in generations: a “minority.” The focus of Muslims’ attention on Israel is similarly the result of politicians’ need to blame someone other than France for the difficulties of French Muslims. There is a lot of truth in this.

But Belghoul has made many of these points on Soral’s EgalitéetReconciliation.fr—a website that few people visit for its sensitivity to the plight of the Jews. You don’t have to press her to get her views on why she has consented to be interviewed there—enough people have raised it with her that she anticipates the question. “You’ll see me alongside anyone who speaks out for the banning of gender theory in school,” she says, “even if I am in total disagreement with the rest of their opinions. We need to set priorities. Today’s attacks on the family put the future of our society at risk. When that goes, I don’t see what’s left. So we need to set aside—and maybe this is an instance of grace—all our quarrels, even those that seem most important to us, in order that the sacred priority of defending childhood may win out.” It is a very good answer. Whether it is a satisfactory one depends on whether you share Belghoul’s view of the seriousness of the threat to France’s children.

Belghoul is always talking about grace. She shouted a doggerel version of Romans 5:20 (La grâce est toujours là / Là où le péché sera / Là où le péché abonde / La grâce surabonde) at a television interviewer named Saïd on the network OummaTV in February. Anyone who thinks this way is bound to see Catholics and Muslims as involved in the same struggle—“même combat,” as French political activists are fond of saying. Almost all of the Christians who stood up at her press conference at the Café du Pont Neuf, from Christine Boutin to Béatrice Bourges to Alain Escada (of the Catholic fundamentalist Civitas movement), described themselves as converts of a sort—to the view that those who want to make France more Muslim and those who want to make it more Christian are not necessarily at odds.

One thing Belghoul says again and again is: “France is a Christian country.” It is a description that would have made sense any time between St. Irenaeus’ tenure as bishop of Lyon, less than a century after the death of Jesus, and a generation ago. But today Christianity has eroded in France in two ways. First, people have stopped going to Mass. Second, immigration has brought France its large and fast-growing Muslim minority. Two dozen young Frenchmen have been killed fighting with the Islamist rebels in Syria, and hundreds more are there now, according to the Ministry of the Interior.

In a way that no one seems willing to acknowledge, Muslim politics is a key to Belghoul’s power. Although the JRE is small, it is one of those small things with the potential to bring an entire political coalition crashing down—in a U.S. context, imagine the Democratic party if its hold on the black vote were threatened. Hollande’s government was able to ignore the mostly Catholic Manif pour Tous, no matter how large its marches got, because he had never had and did not need the votes of devout Catholics. Muslims are a different story: In the first round of the last presidential election, 57 percent voted for Hollande, versus only 7 percent for Sarkozy. What is more, their power is magnified (and that of Catholics reduced) by a system meant to respect the rights of “minorities.” Should a silent majority of Catholics, by making common cause with Muslims, gain access to the same right to be heard, they will have picked the lock that has kept them out of politics since the 1990s.

Peillon has called the JRE “an insult to the Ministry of Education and to teachers” and threatened to summon any parents who keep their children out of school. “There is a certain number of extremists who have decided to lie and to scare parents,” he told the press recently. “All we are trying to do in school is teach the values of the Republic and, thus, respect between men and women. I call on all the manipulators, all the sowers of trouble and strife, to stop.”

And that does not exhaust the government’s means of imposing its plans on schools.

Defending the sexbox

Alll Western countries are becoming less politically free, but France is doing so at a faster rate than most. The government has many tools for enforcing conformity. Twitter is capable of suppressing tweets at the request of governments in certain extreme cases, the website Atlantico reported in February, and last year, of 352 such requests worldwide, 306 came from France. Valls, the justice minister, has looked into banning Bourges’s French Spring group. The activist group Collectifdom sued the director Nicolas Bedos for opinions expressed in a magazine column that it considered an assault on “the honor of the Antilles.” These are tip-of-the-iceberg cases.

And consider what happened when Valls lectured the philosopher Alain Finkielkraut on the TV talk show Des paroles et des actes in February about France’s sterling record of welcoming the uprooted—Valls’s own family from Catalonia under Franco, Finkielkraut’s from Poland and Auschwitz. Finkielkraut agreed, but said that that didn’t entitle France to ignore those of French stock—the so-called français de souche. For having used that expression (and for having expressed the worry that France was turning into “the Soviet Union of antiracism”), Finkielkraut found himself in legal trouble—two high-ranking members of the Socialist party called for a sitting of the Conseil Supérieur de l’Audiovisuel, a rough French equivalent of the FCC.

It is a bad sign that, when the ruling party clashes with freedom of expression in this way, the media tend to take the side of the ruling party. Le Monde’s newly active blog section has covered the popular movement against théorie du genre not as a clash of political opinions but as an epidemic of intox, or collective insanity. In column after column, the paper of the ruling class mocks people who are utterly shut out of decision-making for their attempts, necessarily based on partial information, to make sense of the mandates imposed on them. There is little attempt to address the large kernel of truth in what they say, no attempt to address directly the question of whether teachers indeed are imposing on their children an ideology about sexual matters. And there is no acknowledgment whatsoever that parents could ever have a legitimate interest in what their children are taught about sex in school. There are only restatements of the government viewpoint and worries about the mental health of its opponents.

Le Monde, for instance, notes that there is a rumor about children having to play with toy sex organs. False! “It’s probable that this rumor comes from Switzerland, where in the canton of Basel, sex-education teachers actually have at their disposal a ‘sexbox’ containing fabric stuffed sexual organs.” Le Monde’s blog linked to the left-wing site rue89 (recently bought by Le Monde), where a Swiss sexologist described the anti-gender-theory parents as groupuscules, or “splinter groups.” Parents, of course, are always groupuscules, usually consisting of two people, sometimes of one. The assumption here seems to be that parents are entitled to speak on their children’s behalf only as part of some nationwide patriotic front.

Probably the most interesting magazine in France now is the monthly Causeur, edited by Élisabeth Lévy, who has opened its columns to the best journalists, historians, and philosophers of left and right. Last month Lévy and her colleague Gil Mihaely interviewed Dieudonné. It was a hostile and highly enlightening conversation, Causeur having been more relentless than most French publications in attacking his (and others’) anti-Semitism over the past several years. But Bruno Roger-Petit of the Nouvel Observateur (also owned by Le Monde) saw interviewing Dieudonné as tantamount to endorsing him. He wrote of Lévy: “When you share the same goals—fighting ‘political correctness’—you wind up understanding one another.” So “fighting political correctness” (a fairly good synonym for “freedom of speech”) and Dieudonné’s kind of anti-Semitism are cast as virtual synonyms. Roger-Petit may well be interested in constraining Dieudonné. But he sounds less interested in constraining Dieudonné than in making sure that orthodox intellectuals not give up an iota of the professional advantage that political correctness affords them over independent thinkers like Lévy. A country whose intellectual and political leaders do not distinguish between Dieudonné and Élisabeth Lévy will have a hard time either disciplining extremists or accepting constructive criticism from any quarter.

France has, through political correctness, maneuvered itself into a bad position. In rough times, people fall back on what they have—savings, family, faith, various things that no decent government feels entitled to violate. What France is doing in the name of equal citizenship is ripping up every last refuge and source of identity people have. Its political leaders have met legitimate popular opposition to their plans not just with punishment but with ridicule, ostracism, and exclusion. Many of its intellectual leaders have fallen into line behind the politicians. For now, France’s leaders have managed to insulate some of their wilder schemes from popular complaint. It would be a mistake to consider that a triumph in any but the very short term.

Christopher Caldwell is a senior editor at The Weekly Standard and the author of Reflections on the Revolution in Europe: Immigration, Islam, and the West.

Voir aussi:

Anthony Weiner and the Frenchification of America

Richard Cohen

The Washington Post

May 23, 2013

Say what you will about Anthony Weiner — and I have — he is a stereotype buster. Until he announced this week that he would run for New York City mayor, it was still possible for anyone, particularly the French, to talk of American provincialism when it comes to sex and compare it to French sophistication, the prime example of that being François Mitterrand, president of the republic from 1981 to 1995. In addition to running the country and what was left of a once-vast colonial empire, Mitterrand kept a mistress with whom he fathered a daughter, Mazarine. This, not a baguette, was supposedly the essence of France.

Now, though, things have changed. Weiner is running for mayor only about two years after he was forced to quit Congress after tweeting pictures of himself in his undies to women across the county, none of whom he had met and some of whom might have been Republicans. The uproar over what he had done — he calls it a “mistake” — and his hounding from Congress fits very nicely with the old American stereotype about sex, but not his attempted comeback. Now we have become Frenchest of nations, and Weiner is running second in the polls — maybe on account of name recognition, maybe on account of recognition recognition.

Okay. We are talking New York. The front-runner is Christine Quinn, a lesbian who recently admitted to having been an alcoholic and bulimic. Another contender is Bill de Blasio, who is white and is married to Chirlane McCray, a black woman who in 1979 wrote an article for “Essence Magazine” entitled “I Am A Lesbian.” Presumably, she is now bisexual. Her husband should sweep the biracial bisexual vote, but only — because this is New York — if he is anti-police. On the other hand, Rudy Giuliani, who is definitely pro-police, opened his private life to public inspection back in 2000 when he ran — briefly — for the senate. He had had, like almost everyone, an affair.

Yes, New York is different — “The Bronx is up but the Battery’s down.” Still, take a look at South Carolina, not all that long ago a secessionist state. (You think I forgot?) There, Mark Sanford was elected this month to Congress after admitting an extra-marital affair while governor and disappearing from office. (He said he had gone hiking on the Appalachian Trail.) Like Weiner, he had to resign from everything while he was condemned, censored and ridiculed. But the voters, as opposed to the politicians, are more, well, French in their approach to such matters and cared more about Sanford’s loathing of taxes than his love for his once-mistress.

And then we come to David Vitter. He won re-election to the Senate from Louisiana in 2010 after being identified three years earlier as a client of a Washington, D.C., prostitution service. Without even Googling it, I can tell you that Vitter said he made a mistake and begged forgiveness. He also said the usual things about God. None of that matters. What matter is that he did a sex thing — and got away with it.

The most storied extramarital affair (or whatever) in American history has to be Bill Clinton’s whatever with Monica Lewinsky. He survived the attempt to oust him from office and left the presidency with highest ratings of any president since World War II. I have no doubt he could win election to any office in the country, including the presidency. (Okay, maybe not.)

As for the French, they are becoming more American. Dominique Strauss-Kahn was clearly relying on his country’s laissez-faire attitude toward sexual matters when he got caught giving a hotel maid an inappropriate tip and later admitting to a rambunctious sex life that had nothing to do with his wife. Not only did that abort Kahn’s political career — at least for now — but his extremely sophisticated wife divorced him. How thoroughly American of her!

Given the Frenchification of America — and given the dreariness of the mayoralty field in New York — Weiner might well win. He already has a $5 million war chest, but his chest, as we all know, is the least of him.

(I couldn’t help myself.)

The Frenchification of America

Onan Coca

Eagle rising

19 September 2013

In France being a jeweler is tough work – Christine Boquet, president of the union of jewelers and watchmakers, says that « The number of jewelry store robberies has been climbing for years. There’s one robbery a day in France… This creates enormous stress for the merchants. They live with this fear and insecurity every day. »

Earlier this summer, a lone gunman was able to get away with $136 million dollars worth of jewelry in the resort town of Cannes. Just last week in Paris, thieves drove an SUV into a store and stole $2.7 million dollars in goods. With one robbery a day happening in the country, and amounts like this being made off with… it’s enough to ruin a businessman.

Let all of that sink in as we learn the story of 67-year-old jeweler Stephan Turk. Turk is a jeweler in the city of Nice on France’s southern coast. A few days ago he was accosted by a thief in his store. As the thief made his escape, Turk pulled a gun and shot the man three times, killing him. An accomplice escaped on motorcycle. Now Turk is being brought up on charges of murder for the killing of the teenage criminal.

The prosecutor who is facing backlash from an angry public had this to say, « After he was threatened, the jeweler grabbed his firearm, moved toward the metal shutters, crouched and fired three times. He said he fired twice to immobilize the scooter and a third time he fired because he said he felt threatened… I’m convinced that he fired to kill his aggressor. When he fired, his life was no longer in danger.”

From the recounting of the story, I think the Prosecutor has the facts right, but the emotion wrong. The loss of millions or even thousands of dollars could be enough to drive a small businessman out of work. A crime like this could have a huge impact on the future of not just the business owner but the man’s family and employees as well. This is just one reason that in America, private property has always been sacrosanct… well, until very recently that is.

In the past couple of weeks we have seen a father in New Mexico charged with beating a man who was naked spying outside of his daughter’s window, and a Texas carjacking victim facing possible charges after killing his attacker. We must be careful to avoid the Frenchification of our justice system – our legal system is blind, but it is not stupid. Prosecutors and grand juries have the ability to look at the facts of the case and understand that in extreme situations, anything can happen. If a man or woman is accosted with a gun, then it is the criminal who has just turned the situation into a game of life or death. When the victim responds with deadly force, even if we outside observers believe the danger has passed… their psychic and emotional state must be taken into account.

Was deadly force necessary in the French jewelry heist? Maybe not, but the jeweler should not have to pay the penalty for the thief’s violent crime. No one would have lost their life that day, had the thief not attacked the jeweler. When we become confused about justice our entire social structure is put at risk.

Read more at http://eaglerising.com/1832/frenchification-america/#jSjTwR0jw5D4lRvL.99


Papauté: Après l’obamamanie, voici la papomanie ! (Esquire’s best dressed man of 2013 celebrates first year in office)

13 mars, 2014
 https://i2.wp.com/www.courrierinternational.com/files/imagecache/article_ul/2014/hebdos/1215/UNES/1215-RollingStone.jpghttps://i0.wp.com/cdn.spectator.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Pope-Idol-v3_SE_v2-393x413.jpg
https://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/t1/1966881_4057303968014_779553176_n.jpg
Nous vivons dans un système international injuste, au centre duquel trône l’argent-roi. (…) C’est une culture du jetable, qui rejette les jeunes comme les vieux. Dans certains pays d’Europe, […] toute une génération de jeunes gens est privée de la dignité que procure le travail. Pape François
Dans ce contexte, certains défendent encore les théories de la “rechute favorable”, qui supposent que chaque croissance économique, favorisée par le libre marché, réussit à produire en soi une plus grande équité et inclusion sociale dans le monde. Cette opinion, qui n’a jamais été confirmée par les faits, exprime une confiance grossière et naïve dans la bonté de ceux qui détiennent le pouvoir économique et dans les mécanismes sacralisés du système économique dominant. En même temps, les exclus continuent à attendre. Pour pouvoir soutenir un style de vie  qui exclut les autres, ou pour pouvoir s’enthousiasmer avec cet idéal égoïste, on a développé une mondialisation de l’indifférence. Presque sans nous en apercevoir, nous devenons incapables d’éprouver de la compassion devant le cri de douleur des autres, nous ne pleurons plus devant le drame des autres, leur prêter attention ne nous intéresse pas, comme si tout nous était une responsabilité étrangère qui n’est pas de notre ressort. La culture du bien-être nous anesthésie et nous perdons notre calme si le marché offre quelque chose que nous n’avons pas encore acheté, tandis que toutes ces vies brisées par manque de possibilités nous semblent un simple spectacle qui ne nous trouble en aucune façon. Non à la nouvelle idolâtrie de l’argent. Une des causes de cette situation se trouve dans la relation que nous avons établie avec l’argent, puisque nous acceptons paisiblement sa prédominance sur nous et sur nos sociétés. La crise financière que nous traversons nous fait oublier qu’elle a à son origine une crise anthropologique profonde : la négation du primat de l’être humain ! Nous avons créé de nouvelles idoles. L’adoration de l’antique veau d’or (cf. Ex 32, 1-35) a trouvé une nouvelle et impitoyable version dans le fétichisme de l’argent et dans la dictature de l’économie sans visage et sans un but véritablement humain. (…) Alors que les gains d’un petit nombre s’accroissent exponentiellement, ceux de la majorité se situent de façon toujours plus éloignée du bien-être de cette heureuse minorité. Ce déséquilibre procède d’idéologies qui défendent l’autonomie absolue des marchés et la spéculation financière. Par conséquent, ils nient le droit de contrôle des États chargés de veiller à la préservation du bien commun. Une nouvelle tyrannie invisible s’instaure, parfois virtuelle, qui impose ses lois et ses règles, de façon unilatérale et impla­cable. Pape François
Francis continues to talk about his wish for a “poor church”, a “church for the poor”. But lately he has spoken out on “greed” and “inequality”, social maladies due to “neoliberalism” and “unfettered capitalism”. If this is the direction in which he is going, one must worry about his view of the world. How does he understand it? Specifically, has he understood the basic fact: Capitalism has been most successful in producing sustained economic growth. And that it is this growth which has been most effective in greatly reducing poverty? Just where is there “unfettered capitalism” in the world today? It is in China. Since the economic reforms that began in 1979 China has been the clearest example of “unfettered capitalism” (or, if you will, of the “neoliberal Washington Consensus”). It is still “fettered” by the bulky presence of inefficient state-owned enterprises, debris of the socialist past, with privileged access to capital and government favors. Nevertheless the capitalist engine has been roaring on, the private sector of the economy that does not have to worry about the “fetters” imposed on it in Western democratic countries—an expensive welfare state, laws and regulations that inhibit growth, and free labor unions. And it is this capitalist sector of the Chinese economy that has lifted millions of people from degrading poverty to a decent level of material life. The Chinese regime is appalling in many ways, but not because of failure to deal with poverty. Does Francis understand any of this? Greed is a moral flaw that exists in any economic system. And inequality is not of great concern to most people; they are concerned about the quality of their own lives and the prospects for the future of their children, rather than the income or wealth of people across town (that concern is called envy, which, if I recall correctly, is also a sin). Peter Berger
Revenons sur l’analogie avec Obama. Comme Francois, le président américain a été une figure télégénique succédant à un prédécesseur impopulaire avec la promesse d’un changement radical. Comme Francois, il est passé incroyablement vite à la notoriété mondiale, avec une histoire personnelle compliquée pouvant être lue de plusieurs manières. Et comme Francois, il a inspiré un consensus presque étrange parmi les commentateurs. Les médias influents ont décidé qu’il était essentiellement un gars bien qu’ils ont jugé par la suite sur ses intentions et non sur ses réalisations, blamant largement ses échecs sur ses ennemis et l’appuyant à chaque fois qu’il en avait le plus besoin. Francois n’est pas, bien sûr, le nouvel Obama, mais il jouit de la même relation enchantée  avec les journalistes. Oui, la lune de miel se terminera, comme elle l’a fait avec le président, mais cela ressemble au début d’un long mariage heureux. (…) De toute évidence, les journalistes ont aussi un intérêt économique à poursuivre leur idylle avec le François fantasmagorique : les articles sur ce sujet se vendent bien. Après tout, il a été la personnalité la plus débattue sur Internet l’année dernière. Si l’on met en ligne une jolie photo de lui en train d’embrasser un enfant, ou si l’on arrive à se faire un selfie [autoportrait pris au téléphone portable] avec de jeunes admirateurs du pape au Vatican, le nombre de pages vues grimpe en flèche. François est devenu l’un des produits les plus vendeurs en ligne. Aucun blogueur ne voudrait casser le marché. Rush Limbaugh, conservateur américain et présentateur de radio, a accusé le pontife de prôner “un marxisme pur et dur”. De toute évidence, on avait affaire à un nouvel avatar du François fantasmagorique. Sous François, l’Eglise s’engage résolument à mettre en œuvre ce que les théologiens appellent “l’option préférentielle pour les pauvres”. Mais pour choisir cette option, l’Eglise doit courtiser les plus riches. Par exemple, quelques multimillionnaires généreux financent la plupart des initiatives catholiques en Angleterre et au pays de Galles. Il suffirait que l’un d’entre eux soit rebuté par l’image “marxiste” de François pour que l’Eglise soit en difficulté. Cet homme de 77 ans sait qu’il doit faire aboutir rapidement les réformes financières lancées par son prédécesseur Benoît XVI, remanier la curie romaine, imposer des normes mondiales rigoureuses sur la conduite à tenir face aux affaires de sévices sexuels commis par des prêtres, continuer à prôner la paix en Syrie, inviter les Israéliens et les Palestiniens à négocier pendant sa visite en Terre sainte, et superviser un synode marqué par les controverses, qui pourrait revoir la position de l’Eglise en ce qui concerne les catholiques divorcés et remariés. Entre-temps, le François fantasmagorique va supprimer des dogmes, attiser la lutte des classes et influencer les tendances de la mode masculine. Mais ne tombez pas dans le panneau : tout cela est une illusion tout aussi entretenue par les médias que l’idée selon laquelle l’Eglise catholique serait obsédée par le sexe et l’argent. Ce qui compte, ce sont les paroles et les actes du vrai François. Et cela devrait être plus intéressant que les inventions, même les plus captivantes. The Spectator

Après l’obamamanie, voici la papomanie !

Couverture de Rolling Stone, encensement par le Guardian (« nouveau héros évident de la gauche” pour remplacer remplacer les posters défraîchis d’Obama “sur les murs des chambres d’étudiants de par le monde”), personne de l’année à la fois du magazine d’information Time et du magazine homosexuel américain The Advocate, homme le mieux habillé de l’année pour Esquire, personnalité la plus débattue sur Internet …

Alors que, de Rolling Stone au Guardian et de Time à Esquire et à l’Advocate, la nouvelle idole de nos éditorialistes fait les couvertures de la presse de gauche bien-pensante …

Comment ne pas voir, en ce premier anniversaire de son élection et avec l’une des rares voix discordantes, la même image largement fantasmée qui nous avait été faite d’un certain messie noir et plus rapide prix Nobel de la paix de l’histoire?

VATICAN François l’illusionniste

Tolérant, progressiste, voire marxiste, le pape François est la nouvelle idole des éditorialistes de la gauche bien-pensante. Une image qui doit beaucoup à leur imagination, selon l’hebdomadaire conservateur.

The Spectator (extraits)

Luke Coppen

1I février 2014

Le 31 décembre 2013, les médias ont reçu une dépêche stupéfiante. Le Vatican démentait officiellement que le pape François ait l’intention d’abolir le péché. On aurait dit un canular, mais ce n’en était pas un. Qui avait poussé le Vatican à publier un commentaire sur quelque chose d’aussi improbable ? Il s’avère que c’est l’un des plus éminents journalistes d’Italie : Eugenio Scalfari, cofondateur du journal de gauche La Repubblica Son article s’intitulait “La Révolution de François : il a aboli le péché”.

Pourquoi un journaliste, et a fortiori un analyste aussi prestigieux que Scalfari, se serait-il imaginé que le pape avait jeté aux orties l’un des principes fondamentaux de la théologie chrétienne ? Eh bien, depuis son entrée en fonctions, l’année dernière, François a été promu au rang de superstar de la gauche libérale [libérale au sens anglo-saxon, c’est-à-dire réformiste]. Ses origines modestes (il a été videur), son aversion pour la pompe vaticane (il prépare lui-même ses spaghettis) et sa volonté de mettre en avant l’engagement de l’Eglise en faveur des pauvres a amené les gens de gauche, et même des athées comme ce Scalfari, à le croire aussi étranger qu’eux aux dogmes de l’Eglise. Autrement dit, ils pensent que le pape n’est pas catholique. L’année dernière, presque tous les commentateurs orientés à gauche sont tombés sous le charme de ce jésuite laveur de pieds. Article après article, ils projetaient leurs rêves les plus fous sur François.

En novembre, Jonathan Freedland, journaliste au Guardian, annonçait que François était “le nouveau héros évident de la gauche”. Pour lui, les portraits du souverain pontife devaient remplacer les posters défraîchis d’Obama “sur les murs des chambres d’étudiants de par le monde”. Quelques jours plus tard, François prononçait une homélie dénonçant ce qu’il appelait “le progressisme adolescent”. Mais les gens ne voient et n’entendent que ce qu’ils veulent et personne n’a rien remarqué.

Voilà comment on en est venu à faire du pape une idole de la gauche. Dès qu’il se montre fidèle à la doctrine catholique, ses fans de gauche font la sourde oreille. En décembre, le plus vieux magazine gay des Etats-Unis, The Advocate, a salué en François son homme de l’année, du fait de la compassion qu’il a exprimée envers les homosexuels. Ce n’était guère révolutionnaire : l’article 2358 du catéchisme de l’Eglise catholique appelle à traiter les gays “avec respect, compassion et sensibilité”. En se contentant de réaffirmer un enseignement catholique, François est devenu un héros. La palme de la glorification absurde revient aux journalistes d’Esquire, qui sont arrivés à faire passer pour l’homme le mieux habillé de l’année en 2013 une personnalité portant la même tenue tous les jours.

Certains experts ont remarqué le gouffre existant entre le François fantasmagorique, figure née de l’imagination de la gauche, et l’actuel occupant du trône de saint Pierre. James Bloodworth, rédacteur du blog politique Left Foot Forward, a récemment appelé ses pairs à tempérer leurs ardeurs. “Les positions du pape François sur la plupart des sujets ont de quoi faire dresser les cheveux sur la tête de n’importe quelle personne de gauche, écrit-il. Au lieu de cela, article après article, des journalistes dont on pourrait attendre un peu plus de vigilance nous servent la même guimauve.”

La remarque de Bloodworth annonce-t-elle un réveil des laïques ? Pendant un certain temps, il a paru inévitable que les fans du nouveau pape comprennent qu’il n’était pas sur le point de donner sa bénédiction aux femmes prêtres, à l’usage du préservatif, au mariage gay ou à l’avortement, et qu’ils se retournent alors contre lui. Or cela paraît peu probable. Maintenant qu’ils ont inventé le François fantasmagorique, ses sympathisants de gauche ne vont peut-être plus jamais vouloir tuer leur création.

De toute évidence, les journalistes ont aussi un intérêt économique à poursuivre leur idylle avec le François fantasmagorique : les articles sur ce sujet se vendent bien. Après tout, il a été la personnalité la plus débattue sur Internet l’année dernière. Si l’on met en ligne une jolie photo de lui en train d’embrasser un enfant, ou si l’on arrive à se faire un selfie [autoportrait pris au téléphone portable] avec de jeunes admirateurs du pape au Vatican, le nombre de pages vues grimpe en flèche. François est devenu l’un des produits les plus vendeurs en ligne. Aucun blogueur ne voudrait casser le marché.

Rush Limbaugh, conservateur américain et présentateur de radio, a accusé le pontife de prôner “un marxisme pur et dur”. De toute évidence, on avait affaire à un nouvel avatar du François fantasmagorique. Sous François, l’Eglise s’engage résolument à mettre en œuvre ce que les théologiens appellent “l’option préférentielle pour les pauvres”. Mais pour choisir cette option, l’Eglise doit courtiser les plus riches. Par exemple, quelques multimillionnaires généreux financent la plupart des initiatives catholiques en Angleterre et au pays de Galles. Il suffirait que l’un d’entre eux soit rebuté par l’image “marxiste” de François pour que l’Eglise soit en difficulté.

Cet homme de 77 ans sait qu’il doit faire aboutir rapidement les réformes financières lancées par son prédécesseur Benoît XVI, remanier la curie romaine, imposer des normes mondiales rigoureuses sur la conduite à tenir face aux affaires de sévices sexuels commis par des prêtres, continuer à prôner la paix en Syrie, inviter les Israéliens et les Palestiniens à négocier pendant sa visite en Terre sainte, et superviser un synode marqué par les controverses, qui pourrait revoir la position de l’Eglise en ce qui concerne les catholiques divorcés et remariés.

Entre-temps, le François fantasmagorique va supprimer des dogmes, attiser la lutte des classes et influencer les tendances de la mode masculine. Mais ne tombez pas dans le panneau : tout cela est une illusion tout aussi entretenue par les médias que l’idée selon laquelle l’Eglise catholique serait obsédée par le sexe et l’argent. Ce qui compte, ce sont les paroles et les actes du vrai François. Et cela devrait être plus intéressant que les inventions, même les plus captivantes.

Voir aussi:

Sorry — but Pope Francis is no liberal

Trendy commentators have fallen in love with a pope of their own invention

Luke Coppen

11 January 2014

On the last day of 2013, one of the weirdest religious stories for ages appeared on the news wires. The Vatican had officially denied that Pope Francis intended to abolish sin. It sounded like a spoof, but wasn’t. Who had goaded the Vatican into commenting on something so improbable? It turned out to be one of Italy’s most distinguished journalists: Eugenio Scalfari, co-founder of the left-wing newspaper La Repubblica, who had published an article entitled ‘Francis’s Revolution: he has abolished sin’.

Why would anyone, let alone a very highly regarded thinker and writer like Scalfari, believe the Pope had done away with such a basic tenet of Christian theology? Well, since he took charge last year, Francis has been made into a superstar of the liberal left. His humble background (he is a former bouncer), his dislike for the trappings of office (he cooks his own spaghetti) and his emphasis on the church’s concern for the poor has made liberals, even atheists like Scalfari, suppose that he is as hostile to church dogma as they are. They assume, in other words, that the Pope isn’t Catholic. Last year few left-leaning commentators could resist falling for the foot-washing Jesuit from Buenos Aires. In column after column they projected their deepest hopes on to Francis — he is, they think, the man who will finally bring enlightened liberal values to the Catholic church.

In November Guardian writer Jonathan Freedland argued that Francis was ‘the obvious new hero of the left’ and that portraits of the Supreme Pontiff should replace fading Obama posters on ‘the walls of the world’s student bedrooms’. Just days later Francis preached a homily denouncing what he called ‘adolescent progressivism’, but people see and hear what they want to, so no one took any notice of that.

That is how the Pope has come to be spun as a left-liberal idol. Whenever he proves himself loyal to Catholic teaching — denouncing abortion, for instance, or saying that same-sex marriage is an ‘anthropological regression’ — his liberal fan base turns a deaf ear. Last month America’s oldest gay magazine, the Advocate, hailed Francis as its person of the year because of the compassion he had expressed towards homosexuals. It was hardly a revolution: Article 2358 of the Catholic church’s catechism calls for gay people to be treated with ‘respect, compassion and sensitivity’. In simply restating Catholic teaching, however, Francis was hailed as a hero. When a Maltese bishop said the Pope had told him he was ‘shocked’ by the idea of gay adoption, that barely made a splash. Time magazine, too, made Francis person of the year, hailing him for his ‘rejection of Church dogma’ — as if he had declared that from now on there would be two rather than three Persons of the Holy Trinity. But for cockeyed lionisation of Francis it would be hard to beat the editors of Esquire, who somehow managed to convince themselves that a figure who wears the same outfit every day was the best dressed man of 2013.

Some pundits have noticed the gulf between what you might call the Fantasy Francis — the figure conjured up by liberal imagination — and the actual occupant of the Chair of St Peter. James Bloodworth, editor of the political blog Left Foot Forward, recently urged his journalistic allies to show some restraint. ‘Pope Francis’s position on most issues should make the hair of every liberal curl,’ he wrote. ‘Instead we get article after article of saccharine from people who really should know better.’

Is Bloodworth’s remark a sign of a coming secular backlash against the new Pope? For a while, it seemed inevitable that the new Pope’s fans would come to realise he is not about to bless women bishops, condom use, gay marriage and abortion — and then they would turn on him. Now, that seems unlikely. Having invented the Fantasy Francis, his liberal well-wishers may never want to kill off their creation.

Consider the Obama analogy. Like Francis, the US president was a telegenic figure who followed an unpopular predecessor with a promise of radical change. Like Francis, he rose to worldwide prominence with incredible speed, bringing a complicated personal history that could be read in multiple ways. And like Francis, he inspired an almost eerie consensus among the commentariat. The most influential media outlets decided he was essentially a decent guy and judged him thereafter on his intentions rather than his achievements, blamed his failures largely on his enemies and backed him whenever he needed it most. Francis is not, of course, the new Obama, but he enjoys the same charmed relationship with journalists. Yes, the honeymoon will end, as it did with the president, but this looks like the start of a happy, lifelong marriage.

There’s only one case I can think of in which the media would turn on Francis: in the unlikely event that his private character were dramatically at odds with his public persona. He would have to be caught, say, building a death ray in the Vatican Gardens. (Even then some outlets would present it in the best possible light: ‘Pope Francis develops radical cure for human suffering.’)

Journalists also have a clear economic motive for sticking with the Fantasy Francis narrative: people will pay to read about it. After all, he was the most discussed person on the internet last year. Post a cute photo of him hugging a child, or posing for a ‘selfie’ with young admirers in the Vatican, and you’ll see a satisfying spike in page views. Francis has become one of the world’s most reliable online commodities. What sensible hack would want to threaten that?

Actually, Pope Francis has already survived a secular backlash. Barely an hour after he first appeared on the balcony above St Peter’s Square last March, the editor of the Guardian tweeted: ‘Was Pope Francis an accessory to murder and false imprisonment?’ The answer was ‘no’, of course. But allegations about Francis’s behaviour during Argentina’s Dirty War featured in bulletins for the next 24 hours, before fizzling out. The backlash lasted one entire news cycle. The idea of a left-wing pope, who had come to tear down the temple he inherited, turned out to be a far better story.

Perhaps the real challenge for the Pope this year will come from a different quarter. In his first apostolic exhortation, Evangelii Gaudium, Francis criticised ‘trickle-down theories which assume that economic growth, encouraged by a free market, will inevitably succeed in bringing about greater justice’. In classic Vatican style, that was a mistranslation of the original Spanish, which rejected the theory that ‘economic growth, encouraged by a free market alone’, would ensure more justice.

Such nuances didn’t concern the American conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh, who accused the Pontiff of espousing ‘pure Marxism’. Clearly this was just another version of the Fantasy Francis — a misapprehension of the man and his message that the Catholic hierarchy has done little to correct. But there is a price to be paid in allowing such myths to grow — a price that may have been paid, for example, by the Archdiocese of New York, which may have lost a seven-figure donation. According to Ken Langone, who is trying to raise $180 million to restore the city’s Catholic cathedral, one potential donor said he was so offended by the Pope’s alleged comments that he was reluctant to chip in.

Under Francis, the church is deeply committed to what theologians call ‘the preferential option for the poor’. But in order to opt for the poor, the church has to court the super-rich. A few generous multi-millionaires, for example, fund most of the major Catholic initiatives in England and Wales (including a significant part of Benedict XVI’s state visit in 2010). If just one of them was put off by the distorted ‘Marxist’ image of Francis, the church here would be in trouble.

Of course if those who caricature the church as bigoted and uncaring are forced to take a second look, then Pope Francis can claim he is doing his job. Cardinal Timothy Dolan, archbishop of New York, says that Roman Catholicism had been ‘out-marketed’ by its Hollywood critics — but now Pope Francis is changing the tone, without changing the substance.

But while the Pontiff has succeeded in appealing to those outside the church, his boldness has upset some within it. The Vatican analyst John Allen describes this as the Pope’s ‘older son problem’ — a reference to the parable of the Prodigal Son, in which the faithful brother gripes when his father welcomes back the wayward one. Allen writes that ‘Francis basically has killed the fatted calf for the prodigal sons and daughters of the postmodern world, reaching out to gays, women, non-believers, and virtually every other constituency inside and outside the church that has felt alienated.’ But some Catholics feel Francis is taking their loyalty for granted. ‘In the Gospel parable,’ Allen notes, ‘the father eventually notices his older son’s resentment and pulls him aside to assure him: “Everything I have is yours.” At some stage, Pope Francis may need to have such a moment with his own older sons (and daughters).’

You might think: why bother? The Pope should be focused on reaching out to the alienated, rather than on tending his followers’ wounded egos and stressing that he has not come to tear down Catholic teaching. But Francis needs an eager workforce if he is to realise his beautiful vision of the church as ‘a field hospital after battle’.

Catholics are having just as much trouble as everyone else distinguishing the real Francis. Just last week a devout, well–informed laywoman asked me if it was true that Francis had denied the existence of hell. It turned out that the Pope had overturned 2,000 years of Christian teaching at the end of the ‘Third Vatican Council’ — as reported exclusively by the ‘largely satirical’ blog Diversity Chronicle.

The true Francis will be moving fast throughout this year. The 77-year-old knows he must quickly finish the financial reforms launched by his predecessor Benedict XVI, overhaul the Roman Curia (which liberals and conservatives agree is in desperate need of reform), impose rigorous global norms on the handling of clerical sex abuse cases, continue to press for peace in Syria, nudge Israelis and Palestinians closer to an agreement during his Holy Land visit and oversee a contentious synod of bishops that could shift the Church’s approach to divorced and remarried Catholics.

Meanwhile, the Fantasy Francis will continue to throw out dogmas, agitate for class war and set trends in men’s fashion. But don’t be fooled: this is as much of a media-driven illusion as the idea that the Catholic church is obsessed by sex and money. What matters is what the real Francis says and does. And that should be more interesting than even the most gripping invention.

Luke Coppen is editor of the Catholic Herald.

Le Pape s’attaque à la « tyrannie » des marchés

Giulietta Gamberini

La Tribune

26/11/2013

Le capitalisme débridé est « une nouvelle tyrannie » selon le Pape François qui, dans un texte publié mardi, invite les leaders du monde entier à lutter contre la pauvreté et les inégalités croissantes.

Depuis son élection en mars, le Pape François avait déjà ponctué ses sermons de critiques contre l’économie capitaliste. Dans sa première exhortation apostolique, appelée Evangelii Gaudium (La joie de l’Evangile) et rendue publique ce mardi, il dessine nettement sa vision économique et sociale et appelle à l’action l’Eglise comme les leaders politiques. L’inégalité sociale y figure notamment comme l’une des questions tenant le plus à cœur au nouveau pontife, qui exhorte à une révision radicale du système économique et financier.

Non à une économie de l’exclusion

« Certains défendent encore les théories de la « rechute favorable », qui supposent que chaque croissance économique, favorisée par le libre marché, réussit à produire en soi une plus grande équité et inclusion sociale dans le monde. Cette opinion, qui n’a jamais été confirmée par les faits, exprime une confiance grossière et naïve dans la bonté de ceux qui détiennent le pouvoir économique et dans les mécanismes sacralisés du système économique dominant ».

Les intérêts du « marché divinisé » sont transformés en règle absolue, condamne le Pape, produisant un système inégalitaire où les exclus, pire que les exploités, deviennent des « déchets ».

« Il n’est pas possible que le fait qu’une personne âgée réduite à vivre dans la rue meure de froid ne soit pas une nouvelle, tandis que la baisse de deux points en bourse en soit une. »

Contre l’économie de l’exclusion et de la disparité sociale, le chef de l’Eglise va jusqu’à invoquer le cinquième commandement du décalogue chrétien « Tu ne tueras point » puisque, souligne-t-il, un tel système finit aussi par tuer.

Non à la nouvelle idolâtrie de l’argent

« La crise financière que nous traversons nous fait oublier qu’elle a à son origine une crise anthropologique profonde : la négation du primat de l’être humain ! »

Le Pape regrette surtout que les objectifs humanistes de l’économie soient perdus de vue et que l’être humain soit réduit à l’un seul de ses besoins : la consommation. La négation du droit de contrôle des Etats, chargés de préserver le bien commun, par la « nouvelle tyrannie invisible », « parfois virtuelle », de l’autonomie absolue des marchés et de la spéculation financière y est pour beaucoup selon le Pape, qui pointe aussi la corruption et l’évasion fiscale.

« Une réforme financière qui n’ignore pas l’éthique demanderait un changement vigoureux d’attitude de la part des dirigeants politiques, que j’exhorte à affronter ce défi avec détermination et avec clairvoyance, sans ignorer, naturellement, la spécificité de chaque contexte. »

Le pontife invite notamment à revenir à une économie et à une finance humanistes ainsi qu’à la solidarité désintéressée.

Non à la disparité sociale qui engendre la violence

« Quand la société – locale, nationale ou mondiale – abandonne dans la périphérie une partie d’elle-même, il n’y a ni programmes politiques, ni forces de l’ordre ou d’intelligence qui puissent assurer sans fin la tranquillité ».

Le Pape François met en garde contre la violence sociale, qui ne pourra jamais être éradiquée, au niveau national comme mondial, tant que l’exclusion et la disparité sociales persistent, empêchant tout développement durable et pacifique.

« Les revendications sociales qui ont un rapport avec la distribution des revenus, l’intégration sociale des pauvres et les droits humains ne peuvent pas être étouffées sous prétexte de construire un consensus de bureau ou une paix éphémère, pour une minorité heureuse ».

Une paix sociale obtenue par l’imposition serait fausse selon le suprême pasteur de l’Eglise, la dignité humaine et le bien commun se situant au-dessus de la tranquillité des catégories privilégiées.

Oui à une redistribution des revenus

« La croissance dans l’équité exige quelque chose de plus que la croissance économique, bien qu’elle la suppose ; elle demande des décisions, des programmes, des mécanismes et des processus spécifiquement orientés vers une meilleure distribution des revenus, la création d’opportunités d’emplois, une promotion intégrale des pauvres qui dépasse le simple assistanat »

Les plans d’assistance ne peuvent plus représenter que des solutions provisoires selon le Pape, qui appelle les gouvernants comme le pouvoir financier à agir pour assurer à tous les citoyens un travail digne, une instruction et une assistance sanitaire.

« L’économie, comme le dit le mot lui-même, devrait être l’art d’atteindre une administration adéquate de la maison commune, qui est le monde entier. »

Les conséquences que toute action économique d’envergure produit sur la totalité de la planète invitent les gouvernements à assumer leur responsabilité commune, rappelle le pontife.

Mais l’Eglise aussi, souligne le Pape, doit profondément se rénover et reprendre contact avec la réalité sociale, notamment la hiérarchie du Vatican.

Evangelii Gaudium

Cette fois, c’est sûr : le pape François est socialiste

Clément Guillou

Rue89

27/11/2013

Le pape François n’est pas encore marxiste, même s’il a déclaré il y a peu que les hommes étaient des esclaves devant « se libérer des structures économiques et sociales qui nous réduisent en esclavage ».

Mais depuis l’exhortation apostolique publiée mardi par le Vatican, on peut affirmer sans crainte que le pape François est farouchement antilibéral et même… socialiste.

Il est des passages encore plus révolutionnaires dans ce premier texte majeur du pontificat de François, à en croire les journalistes accrédités au Vatican, mais celui-ci m’intéresse davantage.

Dès le chapitre 2, il se lance dans une longue diatribe contre le modèle économique « qui tue ». Extraits :

« De même que le commandement de “ne pas tuer” pose une limite claire pour assurer la valeur de la vie humaine, aujourd’hui, nous devons dire “non à une économie de l’exclusion et de la disparité sociale”. Une telle économie tue. »

Notre confiance en la bonté des puissants

Le pape François s’en prend ensuite à la théorie libérale du « trickle down [l’expression employée dans la version anglaise, d’ordinaire traduite par “ruissellement”, ici par “rechute favorable”, ndlr] ».

Cette théorie économique, qui stipule que les revenus des plus riches contribuent indirectement à enrichir les plus pauvres, a justifié l’action de Margaret Thatcher et Ronald Reagan et les libéraux la considèrent encore comme valable :

« Dans ce contexte, certains défendent encore les théories de la “rechute favorable”, qui supposent que chaque croissance économique, favorisée par le libre marché, réussit à produire en soi une plus grande équité et inclusion sociale dans le monde.

Cette opinion, qui n’a jamais été confirmée par les faits, exprime une confiance grossière et naïve dans la bonté de ceux qui détiennent le pouvoir économique et dans les mécanismes sacralisés du système économique dominant. En même temps, les exclus continuent à attendre. »

Puisqu’on ne peut pas faire confiance au marché ni à ceux qui détiennent le pouvoir économique pour enrichir les plus pauvres, il faut revenir à plus d’Etat. L’air de rien, le pape explique que ce sont la régulation économique et la redistribution des richesses qui peuvent diminuer l’exclusion, pas la charité :

« Ce déséquilibre procède d’idéologies qui défendent l’autonomie absolue des marchés et la spéculation financière. Par conséquent, ils nient le droit de contrôle des Etats chargés de veiller à la préservation du bien commun. Une nouvelle tyrannie invisible s’instaure, parfois virtuelle, qui impose ses lois et ses règles, de façon unilatérale et implacable. »

« L’argent doit servir, non pas gouverner ! »

Et puis tant qu’à faire, François recommande aussi d’abandonner l’austérité et le dogme des 3% de déficit :

« De plus, la dette et ses intérêts éloignent les pays des possibilités praticables par leur économie et les citoyens de leur pouvoir d’achat réel. S’ajoutent à tout cela une corruption ramifiée et une évasion fiscale égoïste qui ont atteint des dimensions mondiales. »

Conclusion :

« Une réforme financière qui n’ignore pas l’éthique demanderait un changement vigoureux d’attitude de la part des dirigeants politiques, que j’exhorte à affronter ce défi avec détermination et avec clairvoyance, sans ignorer, naturellement, la spécificité de chaque contexte. L’argent doit servir et non pas gouverner ! »

De l’anticommunisme à l’anticapitalisme

Bien sûr, le Vatican délivre de plus en plus souvent des messages économiques depuis la crise financière de 2008, allant même jusqu’à proposer ses solutions pour la régulation.

Mais François semble leur accorder une importance primordiale, qualifiant le chômage des jeunes et la solitude des personnes âgées de « plus grandes afflictions du monde actuellement ».

Farouchement anticommuniste, Jean-Paul II avait défendu le rôle du marché et la propriété privée, tout en mettant en garde contre les leurres de la société de consommation et en insistant sur l’importance d’apporter un cadre législatif et éthique strict respectueux de la liberté humaine.

Benoît XVI, lui, « semblait critiquer autant l’Etat que le marché ; François oriente considérablement son propos, pour dire que le marché a bien plus de pouvoir que l’Etat », observe un professeur de théologie interrogé par le Wall Street Journal.

La journaliste de The Atlantic Heather Horn, qui maîtrise mieux que moi son histoire de l’économie, y voit beaucoup de rapprochements avec les thèses de l’économiste hongrois Karl Polanyi, adepte d’un socialisme démocratique :

au lieu que ce soit le marché qui aide les gens à vivre mieux, ce sont les gens qui s’adaptent au marché ;

nos problèmes [la Première Guerre mondiale pour Polanyi, la crise actuelle pour François, ndlr] viennent du fait que le marché est au cœur de l’économie, et non l’homme ;

la théorie du marché absolument libre, déconnecté de la société, « détruirait physiquement l’homme et transformerait son environnement en monde sauvage », écrivait Polanyi, tandis que le pape note que « dans ce système, qui tend à tout phagocyter dans le but d’accroître les bénéfices, tout ce qui est fragile, comme l’environnement, reste sans défense ».

Le passage de l’anticommunisme à l’anticapitalisme, raconté par The Atlantic, doit évidemment se lire à l’aune des ravages de l’une et l’autre doctrine. Il n’en reste pas moins que, pour le Vatican, c’est une sacrée évolution.

Is Liberation theology resurgent ?

Two German Cardinals, and a Peruvian Dominican

Peter Berger

The American interest

December 4, 2013

The British Catholic journal The Tablet (which I have found to be a reliable and balanced source for what goes on in the Roman world) carried a story in its November 23, 2013, issue by Christa Pongratz-Lippitt, its correspondent in Germany. Titled “Mueller vs. Marx: Clash of the Titans”, the story reports on a public disagreement between Cardinal Gerhard Mueller, the head of the Vatican’s Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF), and Cardinal Reinhard Marx, Archbishop of Munich, president of the European Bishops’ Conference and recent appointee to Pope Francis’ eight-member advisory Council of Cardinals. Whether these two men merit the label “titans” will not be immediately clear to non-Catholics; it will be to those who look to Rome for criteria for what is important: The CDF (which was headed by Benedict XVI before his elevation to the papacy) is the Church’s watchdog for doctrinal orthodoxy; Munich is the largest German diocese.

The disagreement is over the issue of whether divorced Catholics should continue to be barred from receiving communion, as canon law presently mandates. Mueller takes a hardline position on this: Appeals to “mercy” must not override this affirmation of the indissolubility of marriage. Marx, very much in tune with recent remarks by Pope Francis, has said that the issue should not be considered as closed. If there is a list of intra-Catholic issues that outsiders could not care about less, this probably heads the list. I have not thought about it, and I will hardly do so in the future: Catholics should be left alone to decide whom they admit to their sacramental commensality. But something else caught my attention: What Mueller and Marx have in common despite their doctrinal differences: an affinity with the teachings of Gustavo Gutierrez. That is a matter that everyone, Catholic or non-Catholic, with an interest in public policy should care about very much.

Gustavo Gutierrez was born in Lima, Peru, in 1928. A Dominican priest, he ministered to poor people in the slums. He also had higher education in his own country and in Europe, and is still on the faculty of Notre Dame in the US. In 1971 he published his enormously influential book, A Theology of Liberation, which became the founding document for the theological school of that name; Gutierrez is rightly seen as a founder of the school, which became a movement. He also advocated the so-called “preferential option for the poor” (“la opcion preferencial para los pobres”), which proposed that the Church should pay primary attention to the interests of the poor. It became the slogan for the Catholic left in Latin America and beyond, and was solemnly agreed upon at the conference of Latin American bishops (CELAM) in Medellin, Colombia, in 1968. Rome was from the beginning skeptical about the movement, not for its concern for the poor, but for its adoption of a Marxist interpretation of the contemporary world—“unjust social structures” equated with capitalism—and for the advocacy by some of its followers for class struggle and socialist revolution. The CDF, under then Cardinal Ratzinger, criticized Liberation Theology in 1984 and 1986. I don’t know how far Gutierrez himself endorsed the more radical versions of his theology, but he certainly became an idol for those who did.

Strange as this may seem, what the two cardinals in the Tablet story have in common is, precisely, sympathy with the ideas of Gustavo Gutierrez. Mueller met the latter on a visit to Lima, where he was impressed by his encounters with the “poorest of the poor”. He has repeatedly visited Peru and maintained his relationship with Gutierrez. He has not directly embraced Liberation Theology, but he has started the process toward the sanctification of Oscar Romero, the Archbishop of San Salvador who was assassinated by a right-wing death squad in 1980 and has become an object of veneration by the Catholic left. Marx has published a tongue-in-cheek letter to his namesake Karl, saying that the latter’s ideas have been rejected too broadly. He has sharply criticized “neoliberalism” and “turbo-capitalism”. Most interestingly, he has co-authored a book with Gutierrez! [I have not read this book. I spend some time reading things for my blog, but I’m afraid there are limits.] I understand that this book develops the core idea of Liberation Theology—the “solidarity with the poor”. Marx is apparently a folksy character; he enjoys attending the annual Munich Beer Festival, guzzling that beverage to the ear-shattering sound of Bavarian folk music. [Speaking as a Viennese, this doesn’t necessarily endear him to me.]

What emerges here is the possibility of an axis between theological conservatism and political leftism. Is this where the Catholic Church is heading?

A few months ago I wrote a post on this blog, asking whether the pontificate of Francis I heralds a new opening for Liberation Theology. I cautiously suggested that this may not be the case, though the jury is still out. Francis’ identification with the poor is not necessarily linked to leftist ideology. Even the “preferential option”, understood as a general moral rather than specifically political orientation, is hardly surprising in any follower of Jesus of Nazareth.

There is evidence that Francis showed little if any sympathy for Liberation Theology in his native Argentina. Then as now, he showed personal identification with the most marginal people in society—it is not accidental that as pope he chose the name of the saint known as “poverello” (“the little poor one”). So far, so good. So far, I don’t feel compelled to retract my earlier assessment of the present papacy. But I’m getting a bit worried.

Presumably worrisome: In September 2013 Francis received Gustavo Gutierrez in a private audience. A sign of personal favor? Or a move to avoid criticisms by conservatives? Or another attempt to draw back into the Church a constituency on the left with grievances? (After all, there has been a long campaign to reconcile the papacy with the right-wing critics of Vatican II.) Francis continues to talk about his wish for a “poor church”, a “church for the poor”. But lately he has spoken out on “greed” and “inequality”, social maladies due to “neoliberalism” and “unfettered capitalism”. If this is the direction in which he is going, one must worry about his view of the world. How does he understand it? Specifically, has he understood the basic fact: Capitalism has been most successful in producing sustained economic growth. And that it is this growth which has been most effective in greatly reducing poverty? Just where is there “unfettered capitalism” in the world today? It is in China. Since the economic reforms that began in 1979 China has been the clearest example of “unfettered capitalism” (or, if you will, of the “neoliberal Washington Consensus”). It is still “fettered” by the bulky presence of inefficient state-owned enterprises, debris of the socialist past, with privileged access to capital and government favors. Nevertheless the capitalist engine has been roaring on, the private sector of the economy that does not have to worry about the “fetters” imposed on it in Western democratic countries—an expensive welfare state, laws and regulations that inhibit growth, and free labor unions. And it is this capitalist sector of the Chinese economy that has lifted millions of people from degrading poverty to a decent level of material life. The Chinese regime is appalling in many ways, but not because of failure to deal with poverty. Does Francis understand any of this? Greed is a moral flaw that exists in any economic system. And inequality is not of great concern to most people; they are concerned about the quality of their own lives and the prospects for the future of their children, rather than the income or wealth of people across town (that concern is called envy, which, if I recall correctly, is also a sin).

I continue to think that Francis’ view of the world is to the right of the Liberation Theology movement. But the papacy is very much a “bully pulpit”. If the Pope continues to make leftist noises, he will give encouragement to the leftist wave that has (predictably) risen as a result of the economic crises of the last five years. These certainly are cause for reform of the capitalist economy, especially its financial industry, but not for a return to the poverty-enhancing policies of socialist utopianism. As far as I know, the agency called “Iustitia et Pax” (“Justice and Peace”) has been a niche of leftist ideas in the complex bureaucracy of the Vatican. It would be very unfortunate if Francis, wittingly or not, caused this niche to expand.

Voir aussi:

The Denominational Imperative

Peter Berger

The American interest

November 20, 2013

On November 11, 2013, Religion News Service reprinted an Associated Press story by Gillian Flaccus on the development of “atheist mega-churches”. These have the rather revealing name “Sunday Assemblies” (perhaps an allusion to the Pentecostal Assemblies of God—in the hope of emulating the success of the latter?). The story described a recent gathering of this type in Los Angeles: “It looked like a typical Sunday morning at any mega-church. Several hundred people, including families with small children, packed in for more than an hour of rousing music, an inspirational talk and some quiet reflection. The only thing missing was God.” Apparently there now are similar “churches” in other US locations. The movement (if it can be called that) began in Britain earlier this year, founded by Sanderson Jones and Pippa Evans, two prominent comedians (I am not making this up). The pair is currently on a fundraising tour in America and Australia.

The AP story links this development to the growth of the “nones” in the US—that is, people who say “none” when asked for their religious affiliation in a survey. A recent study by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life (a major center for religious demography) found that 20% of Americans fall under that category. But, as the story makes clear, it would be a mistake to understand all these people to be atheists. A majority of them believes in God and says that they are “spiritual but not religious”. All one can say with confidence is that these are individuals who have not found a religious community that they like. Decided atheists are a very small minority in this country, and a shrinking one worldwide. And I would think that most in this group are better described as agnostics (they don’t know whether God exists) rather than atheists (those who claim to know that he doesn’t). I further think that the recent flurry of avowed atheists writing bestselling books or suing government agencies on First Amendment grounds should not be seen as a great cultural wave, in America or anywhere else (let them just dream of competing with the mighty tsunami of Pentecostal Christianity sweeping over much of our planet).

How then is one to understand the phenomenon described in the story? I think there are two ways of understanding it. First, there is the lingering notion of Sunday morning as a festive ceremony of the entire family. This notion has deep cultural roots in Christian-majority countries (even if, especially in Europe, this notion is rooted in nostalgia rather than piety). Many people who would not be comfortable participating in an overtly Christian worship service still feel that something vaguely resembling it would be a good program to attend once a week, preferably en famille. Thus a Unitarian was once described as someone who doesn’t play golf and must find something else to do on Sunday morning. This atheist gathering in Los Angeles is following a classic American pattern originally inspired by Protestant piety—lay people being sociable in a church (or in this case quasi-church) setting. They are on their best behavior, exhibiting the prototypical “Protestant smile”. This smile has long ago migrated from its original religious location to grace the faces of Catholics, Jews and adherents of more exotic faiths. It has become a sacrament of American civility. It would be a grave error to call it “superficial” or “false”. Far be it from me to begrudge atheists their replication of it.

However, there is a more important aspect to the aforementioned phenomenon: Every community of value, religious or otherwise, becomes a denomination in America. Atheists, as they want public recognition, begin to exhibit the characteristics of a religious denomination: They form national organizations, they hold conferences, they establish local branches (“churches”, in common parlance) which hold Sunday morning services—and they want to have atheist chaplains in universities and the military. As good Americans, they litigate to protect their constitutional rights. And they smile while they are doing all these things.

As far as I know, the term “denomination” is an innovation of American English. In classical sociology of religion, in the early 20th-entury writings of Max Weber and Ernst Troeltsch, religious institutions were described as coming in two types: the “church”, a large body open to the society into which an individual is born, and the ”sect”, a smaller group set aside from the society which an individual chooses to join. The historian Richard Niebuhr, in 1929, published a book that has become a classic, The Social Sources of Denominationalism. It is a very rich account of religious history, but among many other contributions, Niebuhr argued that America has produced a third type of religious institutions—the denomination—which has some qualities derived from both the Weber-Troeltsch types: It is a large body not isolated from society, but it is also a voluntary association which individuals chose to join. It can also be described as a church which, in fact if not theologically, accepts the right of other churches to exist. This distinctive institution, I would propose, is the result of a social and a political fact. The denomination is an institutional formation seeking to adapt to pluralism—the largely peaceful coexistence of diverse religious communities in the same society. The denomination is protected in a pluralist situation by the political and legal guarantee of religious freedom. Pluralism is the product of powerful forces of modernity—urbanization, migration, mass literacy and education; it can exist without religious freedom, but the latter clearly enhances it. While Niebuhr was right in seeing the denomination as primarily an American invention, it has now become globalized—because pluralism has become a global fact. The worldwide explosion of Pentecostalism, which I mentioned before, is a prime example of global pluralism—ever splitting off into an exuberant variety of groupings.

The British sociologist David Martin has written about what he called the “Amsterdam-London-Boston axis”—that offspring of the Protestant Reformation that did not eventuate in state churches—the free churches, all voluntary associations, which played an enormous role in the British colonies in North America and came to full fruition in the United States. This form of Protestantism has pluralism in its sociological DNA. One could say that it has a built-in denominational imperative: “Go forth and multiply”. American Protestant history is one of churches splitting apart, merging, splitting apart again. Churches have divided over doctrinal differences, ethnic or regional ones, or because of moral or political differences. Almost all Protestant churches split over the issue of slavery in the 19th century, as they divide now over what I call issues south of the navel. American Lutheranism was for a long time split into ethnically defined synods, though this has now been replaced by basic doctrinal disagreements. Roman Catholicism has been protected from Protestant denominationalism by its centralized hierarchy, but it has become “Protestantized” in a different way: Against its deepest ecclesiological instincts, it has become de facto a voluntary association—with the result that its lay people have become vocally uppity. Even American Jews have organized in at least four denominations. (Joke: An American Jew stranded on a desert island built two synagogues, one in which he goes to pray, the other in which he would not be found dead), Muslims, Buddhists, Hindus in America have all fallen into the denominational pattern. The same pattern appears in secular movements (for example, the various “denominations” of American psychotherapy). Even witches have managed to create a denomination, Wiccan (I understand that they want the right to appoint chaplains for hospitals or in the military). Why should atheists be an exception?

The First Amendment is the icon invoked by all denominations in America. But its basic legal principle is reflected in everyday American mores. When I came to America as a young man, someone told me: “If you don’t want to do something, just say that it’s against your religion”. I had difficulty imagining a situation in which I could plausibly use this recommendation. I asked: “But won’t they ask what my religion is?” The response: “They wouldn’t dare.”

Voir également:

BERGER (Peter L.), ed., The Desecularization of the World, Resurgent Religion and World Politics

Grand Rapids, Eerdmans, 1999, 135 p.

Sébastien Fath

p. 71-73

Référence(s) :

BERGER (Peter L.), ed., The Desecularization of the World, Resurgent Religion and World Politics, Grand Rapids, Eerdmans, 1999, 135 p.

Cet ouvrage collectif, au titre provoquant, est le résultat d’une commande. Il répond au souhait de la Greve Foundation (alors présidée par John Kitzer), relayé par le Foreign Policy Institute de la John Hopkins University, d’inventorier (et d’expliquer) les nombreux phénomènes de vitalité religieuse sur la scène politique mondiale. C’est l’Ethic and Public Policy Center (présidé par Elliott Abrams, Washington D.C.) qui fut chargé de répondre à cette demande, ce dont il s’acquitta en confiant la tâche à P.L.B. et à une équipe de conférenciers. Ce livre, qui regroupe les différentes contributions rassemblées à l’initiative de Berger, défend une thèse : celle, non pas de la « désécularisation » du monde (contrairement au titre), mais du maintien vigoureux du religieux « traditionnel » sur la scène publique de très nombreux pays. Cette hypothèse est essentiellement présentée, et théorisée, par P.L.B. lui-même, dans une ample introduction.

D’après P.L.B., le monde d’aujourd’hui est « aussi furieusement religieux que toujours » (p. 2). Ce qui vaut à l’auteur un rapide mea culpa. dans la mesure où il s’est montré, par le passé, l’un des partisans les plus pénétrants de la théorie de la sécularisation, qu’il considère aujourd’hui comme globalement erronée. En effet, l’idée que la modernisation de la société conduise nécessairement au déclin de la religion dans l’espace public et dans la sphère individuelle s’est, d’après lui, avérée « fausse » (p. 3), les faits montrant au contraire une permanence vigoureuse (et parfois même un développement) du rôle des religions dans les sociétés humaines. Cette permanence n’a pas été uniforme : reprenant les hypothèses développées notamment par Roger Fink et Rodney Stark, il souligne que les religions qui ont cherché à s’aligner sur les valeurs de la modernité ont globalement « échoué », tandis que celles qui ont maintenu un « supernaturalisme réactionnaire » ont largement prospéré (p. 4). Partout, l’A. constate la vitalité des mouvements religieux « conservateurs, orthodoxes ou traditionalistes » (p. 6). Le choix d’une ligne catholique conservatrice par Jean-Paul II, la montée en puissance du protestantisme évangélique aux États-Unis, les succès du judaïsme orthodoxe (aussi bien en Israël que dans la diaspora), l’impact impressionnant de l’islamisme relèvent de ce phénomène, observable aussi dans l’hindouisme et le bouddhisme. En dépit de grandes différences, tous ces mouvements auraient pour point commun une posture « religieuse sans ambiguïté », et une démarche, « pour le moins », de « contre-sécularisation » (p. 6). L’essor de l’islam et celui du protestantisme évangélique constituent, pour l’A., les exemples les plus remarquables de cette « contre-sécularisation » (on est tenté de le suivre en partie sur ce point). Tous deux manifestent un dynamisme conversionniste considérable, même si celui de l’islam s’exprime surtout dans des pays déjà musulmans, ou comprenant d’importantes minorités musulmanes (comme en Europe), alors que le protestantisme évangélique connaîtrait un développement mondial, dans des pays où « ce type de religion était auparavant inconnu ou très marginal » (p. 9).

L’A. voit deux exceptions apparentes à la thèse de la « désécularisation » (sic). D’une part, l’Europe, aux taux de pratique religieuse très faibles. D’autre part, l’existence d’une « subculture internationale composée d’individus dotés d’une éducation occidentale supérieure » dont les contenus sont, « en effet sécularisés » (p. 10). Cette subculture, dominante dans les milieux médiatiques, académiques, politiques, constituerait une « élite globalisée », qui tenterait d’imposer ses normes (fondée sur les idéaux des Lumières) par le biais des médias et des institutions universitaires. P.L.B. n’hésite pas à critiquer (non sans humour) le « vase clos » relatif d’universitaires favorables au postulat de la sécularisation, mais incapables de prendre la mesure du décalage entre leur « monde » et celui des populations dont ils sont supposés analyser le rapport à la religion. Opérant un exercice radical de décentrage, il n’hésite pas à affirmer que cette « subculture » des élites occidentales sécularisées (à laquelle les universitaires participent) constitue, tout compte fait, une anomalie beaucoup plus étonnante que tel ou tel phénomène de radicalisme religieux. De ce fait, « l’Université de Chicago est un terrain beaucoup plus intéressant pour la sociologie des religions que les écoles islamiques de Qom » ! (p. 12) Les théories de la « dernière digue », défendues par ceux qui cherchent à sauver l’hypothèse de la sécularisation linéaire (les musulmans et les évangéliques constitueraient d’ultimes « digues » religieuses face à la marée de la sécularisation) ne tiennent pas, selon l’A. Il considère comme aberrante l’hypothèse selon laquelle « des mollah iraniens, des prédicateurs pentecôtistes, et des lamas tibétains penseront tous – et agiront – comme des professeurs de littérature dans les universités américaines » (p. 12). Cependant, il souligne la variété des relations à la modernité, qui peuvent aller d’une attitude « anti-moderne » (qui caractériserait selon lui l’islam) à une valorisation de la démocratie et de l’individu (qui caractériserait, d’après P.L.B., le courant évangélique). Quelles que soient les stratégies d’adaptation, les religions conservent une part essentielle dans les « affaires du monde » (p. 14), que ce soit sur le terrain politique, économique, social, humanitaire, tant il apparaît évident, pour l’A., que le sentiment religieux (et sa traduction intramondaine) constitue « un trait pérenne de l’humanité » (p. 13).

Les chapitres suivants (de moindre portée) proposent ensuite quelques éclairages partiels à partir de terrains spécifiques. La contribution de George Weigel (pp. 19 à 36) s’attache essentiellement à mettre en perspective l’impact de la pensée de Jean-Paul II (minutieusement exposée). Au passage, l’A. montre qu’à l’image de Léon XIII à la fin du XIXe siècle, le pape présente la vérité catholique comme une vérité « publique » (p. 25), bonne pour tous et pas seulement pour les catholiques. Mais il souligne en même temps (et c’est là un apport majeur) que sa posture apparaît désormais comme « post-Constantinienne » (p. 32). En d’autres termes, sans pour autant vouloir revenir au temps des catacombes (une sous-culture de repli), le catholicisme de l’an 2000 et de demain entend tenir une distance critique (qui n’a pas toujours été adoptée par le passé) face aux pouvoirs politiques. En clair, il s’agit de la fin d’un modèle moniste qui, en catholicisme, a longtemps voulu associer le politique et l’Église dans un modèle englobant. Cette analyse en terme de différenciation partielle des sphères, on le voit, ne paraît guère s’accorder avec l’hypothèse d’une « désécularisation » du monde : à la lumière de contributions comme celles de Weigel, on voit bien qu’une approche plus nuancée s’impose, une réelle vigueur religieuse n’étant pas incompatible avec certains phénomènes de sécularisation. C’est au même type de conclusion que parvient David Martin (pp. 37-49) dans son analyse du renouveau évangélique en protestantisme. En dépit d’un essor très significatif des Églises de type évangélique dans le monde, ces dernières lui paraissent surtout défendre « le rôle de commentateurs influents au sein d’une société pluraliste » (p. 48). L’idée d’une « société chrétienne », d’une Jérusalem évangélique terrestre a globalement décliné tout au long de l’époque contemporaine. Opposant lui aussi l’inspiration pluraliste et démocratique du courant évangélique à la perspective plus moniste de l’islam (p. 49), il considère donc, comme George Weigel, qu’une forme de « différenciation des sphères » (qui constitue une des caractéristiques fortes de la modernité sécularisée) joue à plein dans son terrain d’étude. La contribution de Jonathan Sacks (très engagé idéologiquement) développe ensuite la question de l’identité juive en modernité (pp. 51-63). Concluant sur le fait que les juifs survivront non par le nombre, mais « par la qualité et la force de la foi juive » (p. 63), il paraît déplorer, en attendant, le degré de sécularisation trop important qu’il constate en judaïsme, rapportant cette anecdote éclairante de Shlomo Carlebach en visite sur les campus américains : « je demande aux étudiants ce qu’ils sont. Si quelqu’un se lève et dit, « je suis un Catholique », je sais que c’est un Catholique. Si quelqu’un dit. « Je suis un Protestant », je sais que c’est un Protestant. Si quelqu’un se lève et dit, « Je suis seulement un être-humain », je sais que c’est un Juif » (p. 60). Il ne s’agit pas là, à proprement parler, d’un langage religieux identitaire, « désécularisé »… Là encore, le contenu de la contribution paraît apporter de sérieuses réserves à l’hypothèse liminaire défendue par P.L.B.

Grace Davie, quant à elle, semble davantage se situer dans cet axe. Dans son analyse de l’Europe, possible « exception qui confirme la règle » (pp. 65-83), elle s’attache minutieusement à montrer, qu’après tout, les Européens ne sont peut-être pas moins religieux, mais différemment religieux que les citoyens d’autres parties du monde. Appuyée principalement sur une analyse très fine des résultats de l’Enquête Européenne sur les valeurs, elle confirme à la fois le diagnostic d’une « déprise » de la religion sur les populations, et le maintien d’une demande religieuse « hors institution ». Elle précise aussi très opportunément que les données quantitatives disponibles sur la pratique religieuse en Europe ne sont pas assez étoffées, dans leur échantillonnage, pour rendre compte des minorités religieuses (comme le judaïsme, l’islam, l’hindouisme, les « nouveaux mouvements religieux »). Or, il est essentiel, selon elle, de tenir compte de ces minorités, qui font globalement preuve d’un réel dynamisme religieux. La prise en considération, d’autre part, des taux de pratique toujours élevés aux États-Unis l’invite, au contraire de Steve Bruce dont la thèse est présentée entre les pages 74 et 77, à considérer l’Europe comme l’exception occidentale… qui confirme la règle d’un vigoureux maintien du religieux en modernité. Se référant aux travaux de José Casanova, elle attribue ce particularisme européen aux liens séculaires entre l’Eglise et l’État. S’appuyant ensuite sur les analyses de Danièle Hervieu-Léger, elle souligne le « paradoxe de la modernité » européenne (p. 80), qui corrode les mémoires collectives (amnésie) mais ouvre de nouveaux espaces utopiques que seule la religion peut remplir. Sa conclusion laisse ouverte la question d’une poursuite, ou non, du recul du religieux eu Europe. Les dernières contributions (Tu Weiming sur la Chine, pp. 85-101, et Abdullahi A. An-Na’im sur l’islam (pp. 103-121) n’apportent pas d’éléments décisifs, tout en soulignant qu’en Chine comme dans l’espace islamique, le religieux s’avère plutôt plus présent aujourd’hui qu’il y a quelques décennies.

Dépourvu de conclusion, l’ouvrage laisse un goût d’inachevé : la thèse suggérée dans le titre (la « désécularisation ») n’y aura pas été démontrée, et les contributions, à l’orientation parfois plus confessionnelle que scientifique, suggèrent une interprétation nuancée de la réalité : réaffirmations religieuses parfois (Chine, essor de l’islam et du protestantisme évangélique), certes, mais aussi déclin continu du rôle social des Églises (dans le cas européen), sur fond de multiples négociations avec la modernité où une sécularisation interne des religions s’observe parfois (option pour un modèle « post-constantinien » en catholicisme, valorisation accrue du pluralisme chez les évangéliques). Au bout du compte, l’ouvrage dirigé par P.L.B. soulève plus de questions qu’il n’en résoud. Peut-être était-ce, au fond, son objectif ?

Référence papier

Sébastien Fath, « BERGER (Peter L.), ed., The Desecularization of the World, Resurgent Religion and World Politics », Archives de sciences sociales des religions, 112 | 2000, 71-73.

Référence électronique

Sébastien Fath, « BERGER (Peter L.), ed., The Desecularization of the World, Resurgent Religion and World Politics », Archives de sciences sociales des religions [En ligne], 112 | octobre-décembre 2000, document 112.6, mis en ligne le 19 août 2009, consulté le 08 décembre 2013. URL : http://assr.revues.org/20264

Stephens: Obama’s Envy Problem

Inequality is a problem when the rich get richer at the expense of the poor.

That’s not happening in America.

Dec. 30, 2013

By BRET STEPHENS

As he came to the end of his awful year Barack Obama gave an awful speech. The president thinks America has inequality issues. What it has—what he has—is an envy problem.

I’ll get to the point in a moment, but first a word about the speech’s awfulness. To illustrate the evils of income inequality, the president said this:

« Ordinary folks can’t write massive campaign checks or hire high-priced lobbyists and lawyers to secure policies that tilt the playing field in their favor at everyone else’s expense. And so people get the bad taste that the system is rigged, and that increases cynicism and polarization, and it decreases the political participation that is a requisite part of our system of self-government. »

This is coming from the man who signs legislation, such as Dodd-Frank, that only high-priced lawyers can understand; who, according to the Guardian newspaper, has spent much of 2013 on a « record-breaking fundraising spree, » making « 30 separate visits to wealthy donors, » at « more than twice the rate of the president’s two-term predecessors. »

In my last column, comparing Jane Fonda with Pope Francis, I wrote that liberalism was haunted by its hypocrisy. Consider Mr. Obama’s campaign-finance pieties as Exhibit B.

Now about inequality. In 1835 Alexis de Tocqueville noticed what might be called the paradox of equality: As social conditions become more equal, the more people resent the inequalities that remain.

« Democratic institutions awaken and foster a passion for equality which they can never entirely satisfy, » Tocqueville wrote. « This complete equality eludes the grasp of the people at the very moment they think they have grasped it . . . the people are excited in the pursuit of an advantage, which is more precious because it is not sufficiently remote to be unknown or sufficiently near to be enjoyed. »

One result: « Democratic institutions strongly tend to promote the feeling of envy. » Another: « A depraved taste for equality, which impels the weak to attempt to lower the powerful to

http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304591604579290350851300782 1/3/2014

Bret Stephens: Obama’s Envy Problem – WSJ.com Page 2 of 3

Alexis de Tocqueville (1805-59) saw the dark side of the politics of equality. Corbis

expense of the poor.

their own level and reduces men to prefer equality in slavery to inequality with freedom. »

That is the background by which the current hand-wringing over inequality must be judged. Inequality is not a problem simply because the rich get richer faster than the poor get richer. It’s a problem only when the rich get richer at the

Mr. Obama tried to prove that in his speech, comparing present-day income with that halcyon year of 1979: « The top 10 percent no longer takes in one-third of our income—it now takes half, » he said, suggesting that the rich are eating a larger share of the national pie. « Whereas in the past, the average CEO made about 20 to 30 times the income of the average worker, today’s CEO now makes 273 times more. And meanwhile, a family in the top one percent has a net worth 288 times higher than the typical family, which is a record for this country. »

Here is a factual error, marred by an analytical error, compounded by a moral error. It’s the top 20% that take in just over half of aggregate income, according to the Census Bureau, not the top 10%. That figure is essentially unchanged since the mid-1990s, when Bill Clinton was president. And it isn’t dramatically different from 1979, when the top fifth took in 44% of aggregate income.

Besides which, so what? In 1979 the mean household income of the bottom 20% was $4,006. By 2012, it was $11,490. That’s an increase of 186%. For the middle class, the increase was 211%. For the top fifth it’s 320%. The richer have outpaced the poorer in growing their incomes, just as runners will outpace joggers who will, in turn, outpace walkers. But, as James Taylor might say, the walking man walks.

As it is, to whom except the envious should it matter that the boss now makes a lot more, provided you, too, also make more? Class-consciousness has always been a fact of American life, but rarely is it about how the poor, or even the middle class, feel toward the very rich. It has been about how the professional class—lawyers, journalists, administrators, academics—feel toward the financial class. It’s what Volvo America thinks about S-class America.

That idiot you knew freshman year, always fondling a lacrosse stick, before he became the head of his fraternity—his bonus last year was how much?

The moral greatness of capitalism rests in the fact that it is the only economic system where one person’s gain can be another’s also—where Steve Jobs’s billions are his shareholders’ thousands. Capitalism cultivates a sense of admiration where envy would otherwise rule in a zero-sum economic system. It’s what, for the past 60 years, has blunted the democratic tendency toward envy in the U.S. and distinguished its free-market democracy from the social democracies of Europe. It’s what draws people to this country.

Somewhere in the rubble of Mr. Obama’s musings on inequality there was a better speech on economic mobility. Then again, under Mr. Obama the median income of the poorest Americans has declined in absolute terms, to $11,490 in 2012 from $11,552 in 2009, at the height of the recession. Chalk it up as another instance of Mr. Obama being the cause of the very problems he aspires to address.

Le pape François se défend d’être marxiste

Jean-Marie Guénois

Le Figaro

15/12/2013

«Je le répète, je ne me suis pas exprimé en technicien, mais selon la doctrine sociale de l’Église», a rappelé le pape François.

Après ses diatribes contre le libéralisme, le souverain pontife a précisé ses positions économiques dans une interview à La Stampa.

Le pape François n’est pas «marxiste». Il a dû le préciser explicitement dimanche dans une interview exclusive accordée au quotidien italien La Stampa en réponse à une vague d’accusations venues des États-Unis qui ont suivi l’Exhortation apostolique publiée le 26 novembre où François avait effectivement instruit un procès en règle contre l’économie libérale qui «tue». On apprend également dans cet entretien son opposition aux femmes «cardinal» et sa prudence sur l’évolution de l’Église en faveur des divorcés remariés.

Rush Limbaugh, un animateur de radio américain, avait en effet fustigé l’exhortation apostolique intitulée La Joie de l’Évangile, la qualifiant de… «marxisme pur». Stuart Varney, de la chaîne Fox News, y avait vu du «néo-socialisme». Jonathon Moseley, membre du Tea Party, avait renchéri: «Jésus n’était pas un socialiste!» En France, Clément Guillou titrait sa chronique sur le site Rue 89: «Cette fois, c’est sûr, le pape François est socialiste».

Mais la polémique s’est à ce point enflammée outre-Atlantique, y compris dans les milieux catholiques, étonnés par les positions économiques du Pape, que François a dû préciser sa pensée par cet entretien avec le journaliste Andréa Tornielli, l’un des vaticanistes italiens les plus en vue. «L’idéologie marxiste est erronée, lui confie le pape François, mais dans ma vie j’ai rencontré de nombreux marxistes qui étaient des gens bien.»

«  Une des causes de cette situation se trouve dans la relation que nous avons établie avec l’argent, puisque nous acceptons paisiblement sa prédominance sur nous et sur nos sociétés»

Extrait de l’exhortation apostolique

En fait, le passage de l’exhortation apostolique qui a mis le feu aux poudres a été la critique du Pape contre la théorie de la «rechute favorable» (en anglais «trickle down», expression mieux traduite en français par «théorie du ruissellement»): «Certains défendent encore les théories de la “rechute favorable”, écrivait François, qui supposent que chaque croissance économique, favorisée par le libre marché, réussit à produire en soi une plus grande équité et inclusion sociale dans le monde. Cette opinion, qui n’a jamais été confirmée par les faits, exprime une confiance grossière et naïve dans la bonté de ceux qui détiennent le pouvoir économique et dans les mécanismes sacralisés du système économique dominant. Mais, pendant ce temps, les exclus continuent à attendre.»

Le Pape ajoutait, dans ce même chapitre: «Une des causes de cette situation se trouve dans la relation que nous avons établie avec l’argent, puisque nous acceptons paisiblement sa prédominance sur nous et sur nos sociétés. La crise financière que nous traversons nous fait oublier qu’elle a, à son origine, une crise anthropologique profonde: la négation du primat de l’être humain! Nous avons créé de nouvelles idoles. L’adoration de l’antique veau d’or a trouvé une nouvelle et impitoyable version dans le fétichisme de l’argent et dans la dictature de l’économie sans visage et sans un but véritablement humain.»

Prônant un renforcement de l’État dans le contrôle de l’économie, le Pape concluait: «Alors que les gains d’un petit nombre s’accroissent exponentiellement, ceux de la majorité se situent de façon toujours plus éloignée du bien-être de cette heureuse minorité. Ce déséquilibre procède d’idéologies qui défendent l’autonomie absolue des marchés et la spéculation financière. Par conséquent, ils nient le droit de contrôle des États chargés de veiller à la préservation du bien commun. Une nouvelle tyrannie invisible s’instaure, parfois virtuelle, qui impose ses lois et ses règles, de façon unilatérale et impla­cable.»

Des propos d’une fermeté inédite dans la bouche d’un pape – car la doc­trine sociale de l’Église a toujours défendu la responsabilité personnelle et la liberté d’entreprise – qui ont alors suscité une incompréhension certaine, car plusieurs observateurs nord-américains ont reconnu là les thèses de l’écono­miste hongrois d’inspiration socialiste Karl Polanyi (1886-1964).

D’où cette mise au point du Pape dans l’interview de La Stampa: «Il n’y a rien dans l’exhortation apostolique qui ne soit dans la doctrine sociale de l’Église. Je ne me suis pas exprimé d’un point de vue technique, mais j’ai cherché à présenter une photographie de ce qui se passe. L’unique citation spécifique est celle de la théorie de la “rechute favorable”, selon laquelle toute croissance économique, favorisée par le libre marché, réussit à produire, par elle-même, une meilleure équité et inclusion sociale dans le monde. Soit la promesse que quand le verre serait rempli, il déborderait, et les pauvres alors en profiteraient. Mais quand il est plein, le verre, comme par magie, s’agrandit et jamais rien n’en sort pour les pauvres. Ce fut là ma seule référence à une théorie spécifique. Je le répète, je ne me suis pas exprimé en technicien mais selon la doctrine sociale de l’Église. Cela ne signifie pas être marxiste.»

Voir par ailleurs:

Le pape François, un an au Vatican : une révolution en trompe-l’oeil ?

Le Plus-Nouvelobs

14-03-2014

Jean-Marcel Bouguereau

éditorialiste

LE PLUS. Premier pape argentin de l’histoire, le pape François a fêté, jeudi 13 mars, le premier anniversaire de son élection au Vatican. Porteur de nombreuses attentes de réformes et d’ouverture, celui qui a succédé à Benoît XVI est-il à la hauteur ? Notre éditorialiste Jean-Marcel Bouguereau dresse un premier bilan.

Édité par Sébastien Billard

Le pape François pourrait en remontrer à l’autre François (Hollande) : en un an, il a réussi à changer beaucoup de choses dans cette institution par nature conservatrice, l’Église. C’est le magazine « Rolling-Stone » qui titrait à propos de lui : « Les temps changent ».

On a beaucoup parlé de son style de vie, de sa simplicité, jusqu’à son refus de porter les traditionnels escarpins rouges, préférant rappeler son cordonnier argentin pour réparer ses vieilles chaussures. Il a bouleversé par son exemple les habitudes de la Curie romaine, en instaurant au Vatican une humilité qui n’était plus de mise chez ces prélats confits dans leurs ors et leurs brocards.

Transparence financière et gestes d’ouverture

Même si cela a beaucoup contribué à sa popularité, l’essentiel n’est pas là. Premier pape non européen, premier pape jésuite, premier pape de la mondialisation, il a montré sa volonté de réformer la toute-puissante Curie.

Son super ministère des finances va coiffer la fameuse banque du Vatican où il a commencé à faire le ménage : plus aucun laïc ne peut y ouvrir de compte ce qui, jusque-là, permettait à certains mafieux de blanchir au Vatican l’argent de trafics de drogue. Une transparence financière qui ne plait guère aux parrains de la mafia calabraise, qui lui auraient adressé des menaces de mort.

Il a multiplié les gestes de compréhension envers les homosexuels et envers les athées, demandant « l’ouverture et la miséricorde vis-à-vis des personnes divorcées, homosexuelles ou encore des femmes qui ont subi un avortement ».

Mais sa volonté, selon la formule de Kierkegaard, « de remettre un peu de christianisme dans la chrétienté », ne plait pas à tout le monde. Le Tea Party américain n’a-t-il pas dénoncé en lui un « marxiste » et même, horresco referens, un « libéral », c’est à dire une sorte de gauchiste !

Pensez donc ! Un homme qui parle de la différence entre pêcheurs et corrompus, qui dit « qui suis-je pour juger un gay qui cherche Dieu ? », qui critique une société qui fait de l’argent une idole !

Se transformer pour continuer à exister

Mais parce qu’il prépare lui-même ses spaghettis et qu’il s’échappe clandestinement du Vatican les soirs de grand froid pour visiter des SDF romains, faut-il, comme certains, en faire une nouvelle idole de la gauche dont les posters viendraient remplacer ceux de Guevara ?

Ce pape reste pape. Dans ses goûts cinématographiques figurent le néoréalisme italien, Fellini, Rossellini et « Le Guépard » de Visconti où l’on trouve cette phrase tirée du roman de Lampedusa « Il faut que tout change pour que rien ne change ».

Dans cette période du risorgimento (« Renaissance ») où l’aristocratie ne meurt pas mais se transforme, on peut trouver une analogie avec la situation d’une Église qui doit impérativement se transformer pour continuer à exister.

Voir encore:

Eglise : jusqu’où veut aller le pape François sur les dossiers sensibles ?

Marie Lemonnier

Le Nouvel Observateur

13-03-2014

La place des femmes et des laïcs, l’homosexualité, la réforme de la Curie… Le successeur de Benoît XVI amènera-t-il le renouveau ?

Elu il y a un an, le 13 mars 2013, après la renonciation de Benoît XVI, souverain pontife pris dans les tourments du Vatileaks, Jorge Mario Bergoglio, 77 ans, a été désigné par ses pairs pour opérer la réforme nécessaire de l’appareil catholique. Avec ses prises de paroles, parfois tranchées, parfois ambiguës, et les premières décisions de sa première année de gouvernance, le pape argentin a ouvert plusieurs grands chantiers qui laissent entrevoir une forte volonté de renouveau, sans néanmoins toucher aux fondamentaux de la doctrine dont les papes sont les héritiers autant que les garants. Jusqu’où veut-il aller et jusqu’où pourra-t-il mener l’Eglise ?

1 La réforme de la Curie

Après le Vatileaks, les cardinaux électeurs ont clairement demandé au nouveau successeur de Pierre d’opérer un nettoyage et une rationalisation de la Curie romaine. Il s’agit d’une part d’alléger la structure, dans laquelle les dicastères (équivalent de ministères) se sont accumulés ces dernières décennies, mais aussi d’en changer la perspective. Au lieu de la laisser prospérer au-dessus des évêques comme un super-gouvernement tout puissant, François souhaite lui confier le rôle de médiateur entre les épiscopats et le pape. L’objectif ? Qu’elle soit véritablement au service des pasteurs de l’Eglise universelle et des Eglises locales. Une manière de faire vivre la collégialité, maître-mot de Vatican II que souhaite mettre en application Bergoglio, comme on le voit également à travers son usage du synode qui est l’occasion pour les évêques du monde entier de prendre part à la décision mais aussi avec la création de ce conseil permanent de 8 cardinaux venus des cinq continents, surnommé le G8 ou le C8, chargé de l’aider dans sa réforme de la Curie.

François veut ainsi que l’Eglise ne soit plus une monarchie absolue mais un organe de participation autour du pape, qui reste néanmoins seul détenteur de l’autorité. Etranger à l’institution romaine sur laquelle il porte un regard critique voire sévère, le pape argentin n’hésite pas à fustiger les querelles de pouvoir en son sein, les habitudes de cour et tous ceux qui s’y « prennent pour des dieux ». Il semble ainsi très déterminé à remplir sa mission. A cette fin, une nouvelle Constitution apostolique doit être écrite pour remplacer celle de Jean-Paul II appelée Pastor Bonus, en vigueur depuis 1988. Le père Lombardi, porte-parole du Saint-Siège, a déjà tenté de modérer les impatiences en avertissant qu’elle ne verrait pas le jour avant 2015.

2 La gestion et la transparence des finances

« Je veux une Eglise pauvre au service des pauvres », martèle le pape François. En créant fin février un « Secrétariat pour l’économie » (un super ministère aux pouvoirs étendus sur le Saint-Siège et l’Etat du Vatican), dirigé par le cardinal australien Pell, qui fait déjà partie des hommes forts du G8 du pape, ainsi qu’un « Conseil pour l’économie » ayant autorité pour contrôler toutes les instances vaticanes, le pape François donne enfin les premiers signes concrets de la réforme institutionnelle.

C’est comme s’il avait créé la Cour des comptes et l’Inspection des finances en même temps ! », souligne l’historien de la papauté Philippe Levillain.

Des bilans financiers seront rendus publics et les procédures moins bureaucratiques. Autre nouveauté, pour assurer une meilleure transparence, ce Conseil pour l’économie (CE) sera composé de 8 prélats mais aussi de 7 laïcs (dont le Français Jean-Baptiste de Franssu, patron de la société Incipit). C’est la première fois que des laïcs entrent ainsi dans une institution curiale. Enfin, le CE sera coordonné par l’archevêque de Munich et tout nouveau président de la Conférence épiscopale allemande Reinhard Marx, également auteur d’un livre intitulé… « Le Capital ». Ca ne s’invente pas.

Même si aucune décision n’a encore été prise concernant la très critiquée et opaque banque du Vatican, la commission chargée de sa réforme poursuit ses travaux et devrait faire des annonces courant avril. Plus de la moitié des 19.000 comptes de l’IOR (Institut pour les Œuvres de religion) a été contrôlée ; un millier a été fermé et moins d’une centaine de comptes suspects fait l’objet d’investigations plus approfondies. « Tout va changer dans la gestion économico-administrative du Saint-Siège », promet ainsi le site Vatican Insider.

3 La place des femmes et des laïcs

La femme « peut et doit être plus présente dans les lieux de décision de l’Eglise », affirme le Saint-Père dans le « Corriere della Sera » du 5 mars, laissant ainsi espérer que des femmes puissent être à l’avenir nommées à la tête de dicastères. Le pape faisait toutefois observer qu’il s’agit là d’une « promotion de type fonctionnel » qui ne fait guère « avancer les choses ». Il a également plusieurs fois exprimé sa volonté de promouvoir une « théologie de la femme » qui laisse dubitatif sur les réelles avancées à attendre sur le sujet. Surtout, il n’a pas caché qu’il n’ordonnera pas de femmes prêtres. Quant à nommer une femme Cardinal ? « D’où est sortie cette blague ? », a-t-il tout bonnement écarté dans « la Stampa » du 15 décembre.

Le pape ne dit rien, en revanche, sur l’ordination éventuelle d’hommes mariés. Cela peut-il faire partie des non-dits où les lignes peuvent bouger ?

Si le cardinal Oscar Rodriguez Maradiaga, coordinateur du conseil des huit cardinaux chargé de la réforme, a émis l’idée de mettre un « couple marié » à la tête du Conseil pontifical pour la famille, l’hypothèse paraît là aussi douteuse. D’autant que ce Conseil pontifical pourrait se voir fondu dans un ensemble plus large. En revanche, une véritable Congrégation pour les laïcs pourrait voir le jour.

4 Les homosexuels

Si une personne est gay et cherche le Seigneur et qu’elle est de bonne volonté, mais qui suis-je pour la juger ? »

Lancée dans l’avion qui le ramenait du Brésil en juillet 2013, cette phrase est peut-être la plus connue et la plus commentée du pape François. Du moins dans sa version tronquée : « Qui suis-je pour juger ? ». Et décontextualisée. En effet, le pape répondait à une question précise, qui portait sur Mgr Battista Ricca, le prélat qu’il venait de nommer comme conseiller pour la réforme de la banque du Vatican et dont l’homosexualité venait d’être révélée dans les médias italiens. La phrase lui valut néanmoins les honneurs de la célèbre revue LGBT américaine Advocate et a été accueillie comme une phrase symbolique de la bienveillance papale. En invitant les pasteurs à mieux « accompagner » les homosexuels, François prône ainsi une Église qui « considère la personne » avant de « condamner ».

« La pensée de l’Eglise, nous la connaissons et je suis fils de l’Eglise, mais il n’est pas nécessaire d’en parler en permanence. Les enseignements, tant dogmatiques que moraux, ne sont pas tous équivalents, déclare Bergoglio. Nous devons donc trouver un nouvel équilibre, autrement l’édifice moral de l’Eglise risque lui aussi de s’écrouler comme un château de cartes, de perdre la fraîcheur et le parfum de l’Evangile ».

Même s’il souhaite étudier les raisons pour lesquelles des Etats ont pu adopter des unions civiles, le pape rappelle que le mariage est « l’union d’un homme et d’une femme ».

5 La famille et la question des divorcés-remariés

La question des divorcés remariés, très attendue par l’opinion publique, est une source de crispations actuellement au Vatican. On l’a vu dernièrement au consistoire préparatoire au synode sur la famille qui s’est tenu les 20 et 21 février à Rome et dont le cardinal français Paul Poupard redoutait qu’il se termine en « guerre civile ». « Les confrontations fraternelles et ouvertes font grandir la pensée théologique et pastorale. De ceci je n’ai pas peur, plutôt je le cherche »¸ a cependant assuré le pape François.

« Je crois que ce temps est celui de la miséricorde », avait-il déclaré au retour des JMJ de Rio. Ce qui ne veut pas dire suppression de l’interdiction pour eux de communier. Le « non » a été formulé par le préfet de la congrégation pour la doctrine de la foi, Mgr Gerhard L. Müller. Le pape argentin a néanmoins donné des signes d’espoir et d’ouverture, en choisissant le cardinal théologien Walter Kasper pour ouvrir le consistoire.

Dans son discours inaugural, ce dernier, connu pour ses positions progressistes, a en effet émis l’idée d’un « nouveau développement » concernant l’épineuse question des divorcés remariés, suggérant que la pratique actuelle serait « contre-productive ». Le cardinal propose ainsi des solutions vers un sacrement de pénitence. Cette voie ne serait cependant pas une solution générale mais s’adresserait au petit nombre de ceux qui seraient sincèrement intéressé par les sacrements. Des pistes de réflexion qualifiées de « théologie sereine » par le pape François qui défend par ailleurs la famille traditionnelle si « maltraitée, dépréciée », mais « plan lumineux de Dieu ».

La question n’est pas celle de changer la doctrine mais d’aller en profondeur et faire en sorte que la pastorale tienne compte des situations et de ce qu’il est possible de faire pour les personnes », a-t-il tenu à préciser dans sa dernière interview du 5 mars tout en saluant le « génie prophétique de Paul VI », auteur de l’encyclique Humanae Vitae qui fermait la question de la contraception.

Prudent, le pape François veut donc replacer la morale à sa « juste place » sans rien lâcher sur la doctrine. Ayant choisi le mode de la collégialité sous la forme de deux synodes en 2014 et 2015, aucune conclusion ne devrait voir le jour avant la fin des travaux ecclésiastiques.


Transport aérien: Quand l’avion était encore un plaisir (Back to the time when sex did sell seats)

13 mars, 2014
https://i1.wp.com/static03.mediaite.com/thejanedough/uploads/gallery/flight-attendent-vintage-ads/American%20Airlines.jpg
https://i1.wp.com/stuffo.ddmcdn.com/stuffmomnevertoldyou/wp-content/uploads/sites/86/2013/12/fly-me-jo.jpghttps://i0.wp.com/www.grayflannelsuit.net/retrotisements/travel/southwest-airlines-jul-1979-ad.jpghttp://www.trbimg.com/img-51951985/turbine/chi-history-stewardesses-flight-attendants-201-010/600https://i2.wp.com/i.haymarket.net.au/News/PRESS%20AD%2012x20_CT.jpghttp://thisisnotadvertising.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/lyar-direct2.jpghttps://jcdurbant.files.wordpress.com/2014/03/8b36e-lynxjet1.jpg
https://i1.wp.com/9bytz.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/Vintage-Airline-Ads-2.jpghttps://www.ryanair.com/img/calendar/front.jpghttps://i0.wp.com/notaniche.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/08/pacific-airlines-ad.jpg https://i1.wp.com/www.panam.com/media/blog/PanAmABCBanner.jpgThe other truly transforming business invention of the first quarter of the century, besides the car, was the airplane–another industry whose plainly brilliant future would have caused investors to salivate. So I went back to check out aircraft manufacturers and found that in the 1919-39 period, there were about 300 companies, only a handful still breathing today. Among the planes made then–we must have been the Silicon Valley of that age–were both the Nebraska and the Omaha, two aircraft that even the most loyal Nebraskan no longer relies upon. Move on to failures of airlines. Here’s a list of 129 airlines that in the past 20 years filed for bankruptcy. Continental was smart enough to make that list twice. As of 1992, in fact–though the picture would have improved since then–the money that had been made since the dawn of aviation by all of this country’s airline companies was zero. Absolutely zero. Sizing all this up, I like to think that if I’d been at Kitty Hawk in 1903 when Orville Wright took off, I would have been farsighted enough, and public-spirited enough–I owed this to future capitalists–to shoot him down. I mean, Karl Marx couldn’t have done as much damage to capitalists as Orville did. Warren Buffett
Airlines have created value for their customers but not that much for their owners: the profit margin after 1970 has been only 0.1 per cent. Three in four airlines are privately owned but investors have more profitable alternatives. Airlines tend to put blame for poor results on external factors, such as high fuel prices, terrorist attacks or airport charges. However, the industry is in chronic disequilibrium with permanent overcapacity. Overcapacity is caused by many factors, including government policies and ease of acquiring new aircrafts (often with export credit guarantees by governments). This is reinforced by the obsession of airlines for higher market shares, often leading to falling yields. Passenger load factors have markedly risen during recent years, but at the expense of collapsing fares. ILO
Amotz Zahavi (1975), de l’Université de Tel Aviv, a trouvé que la valeur de certains ornements liés à la compétition sexuelle chez les animaux dépend de leur impact sur les chances de survie de leur porteur. L’idée est simple : une gazelle qui perd de l’énergie en faisant des bonds alors qu’elle est poursuivie par un lion n’est pas folle, elle prouve qu’elle a les moyens de le faire. Plus elle saute haut, plus ça lui coûte (de l’énergie) et plus elle prouve sa valeur. La sanction est directe : qu’elle se surestime et elle sera dévorée. C’est comme le Handicap (“Hand in Cap” = “Main au Chapeau”) de certains sports : seuls les meilleurs peuvent se permettre de gagner en s’imposant des contraintes supplémentaires et cette preuve aura d’autant plus de valeur qu’elle sera coûteuse. L’application est générale et les exemples sont innombrables : rouler en Rolls plutôt qu’en Golf prouve qu’on a les moyens de dépenser au delà de l’utilitaire (le coût ici est financier) et tout le marché du luxe bénéficie de ce besoin de “costly display” (c’est le terme). Le “costly display” a aussi été cité pour expliquer la mode de la minceur dans les pays riches, le bikini et la mode sexy, la poignée de main (prise de risque en l’éloignant de l’épée), le sourire honnête (…) et… la fortune des médecins urgentistes ! Neuromonaco
La compétition sexuelle est à l’intérieur de chaque sexe et l’habillement sert aux femmes d’abord à se positionner entre elles, le regard des hommes n’étant qu’un moyen dans cette guerre (…) Les mannequins Haute Couture ont des corps et des visages beaucoup plus masculins que les mannequins lingerie et les “pornstars” : en fait elles ressemblent à des garçons adolescents (…) La préférence des hommes pour des femmes plus ou moins “pulpeuses” est directement influencée par leur situation économique perçue : les plus riches préfèrent les plus minces (…) Les hommes ne privilégient la beauté du visage que pour des relations à long terme. Neuromonaco
De nombreuses études (…) montrent qu’il y a un lien entre la situation de séduction et l’achat de produits liés au statut : c’est l’affichage du statut (le “display”) pour montrer qu’on a suffisamment de ressources disponibles pour se permettre d’en dépenser sur des produits inutiles (encore le Handicap de Zahavi). L’effet est plus fort chez les célibataires pour les achats d’impulsion et Griskevicius et ses collègues (2011) ont même trouvé que le sex-ratio avait un impact direct : plus il y a d’hommes en concurrence, plus l’effet display sera marqué. Neuromonaco
According to one 1990 study by researchers at SUNY Binghamton and the University of the Witwatersrand (…) compliments from men were generally accepted, especially by female recipients, but « compliments from women are met with a response type other than acceptance »: as a threat. Men often see compliments as « face-threatening acts, » or acts intended to embarrass or patronize, the study authors found. What was meant as a nicety could be seen as a way to assert control. (…) Being the arbiter of someone’s attractiveness can be interpreted as an expression of masculinity that women are not traditionally expected to adopt. Further, it is possible that a good portion of men don’t want to be essentially « treated like women, » as their masculinity is dependent on being above the judgments women are often subjected to. (…) In life as well as in art, a man’s focus on his own appearance can be perceived as detracting from his perceived masculinity in the eyes of male reviewers. In her book, Extra-Ordinary Men: White Heterosexual Masculinity in Contemporary Popular Cinema, Nicola Rehling points out that in the movie Gladiator, Maximus had a muscular build but was not sexualized on-screen. In the movie Troy, meanwhile, Brad Pitt’s Achilles was practically groomed for the enjoyment of straight female and gay male viewers. Crowe’s body was not nearly as exposed as Pitt’s was throughout the movie. Rehling writes, « In the majority of reviews of the film, Brad Pitt was compared unfavorably with Crowe, with many expressing disappointment that he failed to import the primal masculinity that was such a big box office attraction in Gladiator. The adulation of Crowe’s Maximus would seem to articulate a desire for an undiluted, corporeal, physical male presence. » The consequences for women giving men compliments are also different than those for men giving women compliments. In a 2006 study from Williamette University’s College of Liberal Arts, researchers Christopher Parisi and Peter Wogan found that college-aged men were generally given compliments on skills, while women were given compliments on their looks. Parisi and Wogan also found that women felt the need to be cautious when complimenting men on their appearance because they didn’t want to be « too forward » or attract « unwanted attention. » That fear is supported by a 2008 study, conducted in Australia by Griffith University, which hypothesized that men are more likely to interpret or misinterpret female compliments as seductive or flirtatious than women are male compliments. Who knew complimenting could be so complicated? The Atlantic
Les plus belles hôtesses de Ryanair font monter la température en cabine. Eddie Wilson (directeur des ressources humaines de Ryanair)
Ces uniformes sont vraiment très serrés et ne sont tout simplement pas pratiques du tout pour le travail physique que nous avons à faire. Hôtesse Qantas
Les hôtesses de l’air ont de 20 à 60 ans et beaucoup d’entre elles, notamment les plus âgées, ne souhaitent pas porter d’uniformes trop moulants. Nous aimions les anciens uniformes créés par Peter Morrissey. Ceux-là ils étaient vraiment confortables. Hôtesse Qantas
Nous sommes préoccupées car nous pensons que cet uniforme pourrait causer des problèmes à bord, y compris du harcèlement sexuel. La compagnie aérienne explique que cet uniforme sert à attirer plus de clients, mais cela montre qu’elle considère la femme comme une marchandise …la priorité numéro un ne devrait pas être de raccourcir les tenues mais d’augmenter la sécurité. Syndicat d’hôtesses de l’air japonaises
Je ne pourrais pas me concentrer sur mon travail parce que je serais toujours en train de me demander si on ne me regarde pas. Hôtesse japonaise

Ah, le bon vieux temps quand l’avion était encore un plaisir !

Paréos hawaiiens, kimonos japonais, mini-jupes suisses, brunes chevelures espagnoles …

A l’heure où, entre le prix du pétrole, les coûts induits toujours plus élevés de la sécurité post-11/9 (alors qu’on est toujours sans nouvelles d’un avion malaisien mystérieusement disparu des écrans radar) et l’arrivée de nouveaux concurrents à bas coût (calendrier de charmecaritatif – compris!), les compagnies aériennes dont la profitabilité sur 40 ans n’a jamais dépassé les 0, 1% rivalisent d’astuces pour attirer les passagers (jusqu’à transformer l’intérieur de leurs avions en supports publicitaires) …

Et où, accusant leur compagnie d’utiliser leurs corps comme des marchandises, un syndicat d’hôtesses de l’air japonaises refuse, après leurs homologues australiennes l’an dernier, de porter leur nouvel uniforme pour cause de risque de harcèlement sexuel …

Pendant qu’une des compagnies aériennes mythiques des années 60 se voyait récemment célébrer dans une série à  son nom à la télévision américaine …

Et que pour ses 70 ans, notre Catherine Deneuve nationale  reprend du service en lingerie fine et stilettos pour un magazine américain

Retour avec les archives du magazine américain The Atlantic …

Sur ces temps encore innocents où, avant les campagnes ouvertement sexuelles avec noms des hôtesses sur le nez des avions et badges suggestifs des années 70, hot pants et cuissardes ou petits carnets pour les numéros des hôtesses à la Fly me  (fantasmes récemment repris, fausse compagnie aérienne comprise, par le fabricant australien de déodorants pour hommes Lynx/Axe) …

Et, sauf exceptions régionales, avant le sérieux et professionalisme actuel …

Les stratégies sexuelles des compagnies aériennes, centrées sur une clientèle d’affaires majoritairement masculine et donc leur personnel féminin, rivalisaient en subtilité pour vendre leurs sièges …

‘Sex Sells Seats’: Magazine Airline Ads, 1959–79

From kimono-clad Japanese hostesses to miniskirted Swiss brunettes, companies have a long history of using women to sell air travel. Some examples from The Atlantic‘s archives.
The Atlantic
Dec 22 2013

These days, air travel is anything but sexy. TSA pat-downs, inflatable neck pillows, reruns of CBS sitcoms—it can get pretty grim at 35,000 feet.

There was a time, however, when flying was both the literal and figurative height of sexiness. “The good old days,” Mark Gerchick calls them wryly in the January/February Atlantic. “When travelers were ‘mad men’ and flight attendants were ‘sexy stews,’ when the ‘sex sells seats’ mantra drove some carriers to adorn ‘trolley dollies’ in hot pants and go-go boots.”

While air travel ads printed in The Atlantic in those days were a little more… buttoned up (than, say, this 1972 Southwest Airlines commercial), it’s clear the “sexy skies” gimmick was an advertising boon. The campaigns were wildly misogynistic, hopelessly fantastical, and maybe a little bit racist. But sell seats they did, from Narita to O’Hare. Gathered below are 10 such “sex sells seats” ads plucked from The Atlantic archives. (Click any ad to view a larger version.)


February 1968

British Overseas Airways Corporation “takes good care of you.” (By putting gyrating hula dancers front and center.)


February 1959

KLM: The premiere airline for tag-along wives and their crestfallen husbands.


May 1961

Japan Air Lines masters the art of marketing orientalism, ensuring flyers that the only “real desire” of its “kimono-clad stewardesses” is “to serve.”


July 1970

This Iberia Airlines ad bravely defies ethnic stereotypes by promising travelers a veritable rainbow of stewardess hair colorings: “blondes from Barcelona, redheads from Cádiz,” and for the traditional Hispanophile, “a liberal helping of the beautiful brunettes you pictured us having.”


October 1966

Swissair promises “lakeside cafes, casinos, nightclubs,” and—most prominently of all—“friendly natives.”


July 1971

This Japan Air Lines ad delivers a particularly cringe-worthy line: “She is our pride. And your joy.”


August 1966

Not looking for love? Never fly Alitalia.


February 1979

South African Airways offers one for the ladies: When Alec hits on you, he’s not being polite. “Merely sincere.”


February 1959

Japan Air Lines does it again, demonstrating just how well-versed its “fairest” of the fair stewardesses are in the womanly arts.


November 1970

Kris from Delta is “resourceful, alert, efficient, confident, and sociable.” But, most important, PRETTY.

Voir aussi:

Travel January/February 2014

A Brief History of the Mile High Club

Air travel hasn’t quite lost all its romance.

Mark Gerchick

The Atlantic

Dec 22 2013

Only true aviation geeks are likely to celebrate, or even notice, the milestone being celebrated this year in the history of aviation: the debut, a century ago, of the autopilot. In June 1914, at a historic aeronautical-safety competition in Paris, a 21-year-old American daredevil pilot-inventor named Lawrence Burst Sperry stunned the aviation world by using the instrument to keep a biplane flying straight and level along the Seine. According to his biographer, William Wyatt Davenport, Sperry stood on a wing as the plane, in effect, flew itself—a feat that won him the event’s $10,000 prize.

By eliminating the need for taxing “hand flying” on long journeys, and thereby reducing pilot fatigue, Sperry’s autopilot ultimately made flying much safer. But it had another, less obvious benefit. It freed up pilots to do other things with their hands—and bodies. The brilliant young Sperry himself soon grasped the possibilities. Legend has it that in late November 1916, while piloting a Curtiss Flying Boat C‑2 some 500 feet above the coast of Long Island, he used his instrument to administer a novel kind of flying lesson to one Cynthia Polk (whose husband was driving an ambulance in war-torn France). During their airborne antics, however, the two unwittingly managed to bump and disengage the autopilot, sending their plane into Great South Bay, where they were rescued, both stark naked, by duck hunters. A gallant Sperry explained that the force of the crash had stripped both fliers of all their clothing, but that didn’t stop a skeptical New York tabloid from running the famous headline “Aerial Petting Ends in Wetting.” For his caper, Sperry is generally considered the founder of the Mile High Club, a cohort that loosely includes all those who have ever “done it” in flight (though precisely what constitutes “it” remains a lurking definitional issue).

“Flying,” the 1930s stunt pilot Pancho Barnes is often quoted as saying, “makes me feel like a sex maniac in a whorehouse with a stack of $20 bills.” Today’s overcrowded, underfed, overstressed airline passengers, consigned to travel in “just a bloody bus with wings” as Ryanair CEO Michael O’Leary puts it, are unlikely to share that enthusiasm. It’s all the more remarkable, then, that airborne sex remains on the bucket list of plenty of passengers, at least male ones. A “Sex Census” published in 2011 by the condom maker Trojan found that 33 percent of American men aspire to have sex on an airplane. (The top locale for women: a beach.) Similarly, nearly a third of the Brits who responded to a 2010 TripAdvisor poll said they wanted to try in-flight sex.

A lot of U.S. fliers may have already acted out that fantasy. In a global survey of more than 300,000 adults conducted in 2005 by the condom maker Durex, 2 percent of respondents worldwide (and 4 percent of American respondents) claimed to have had sex on an airplane. A 2010 survey commissioned by Sensis Condoms (when did condom makers become avid pollsters?) found a similar incidence of in-flight sex (3 percent) among its respondents. Assuming that about 100 million Americans have traveled by air, and discounting for lying braggarts, if even only 1 percent of them have indulged, then that’s a million or so Mile Highers.

Less-than-scientific anecdotes abound too. When Virgin Atlantic installed diaper-changing tables aboard its new Airbus A340-600 long-haul jets, in 2002, it wasn’t just mothers and children who found them useful. Within weeks, according to the airline, the tables were destroyed by “those determined to join the Mile High Club.” That said, the airline’s founder, the billionaire bad boy Sir Richard Branson, has waxed nostalgic about a tryst he had at age 19 in a Laker Airways lavatory (“It was every man’s dream”). Almost 20 years ago, Singapore Airlines, for its part, reported that a third of its cases of “unruly behavior” involved in-flight sex.

For the airlines, the “sexy skies” are all about marketing the fantasy. Actual in-flight sex is the last thing they want to deal with, especially since 9/11, when the preferred cabin ambience has become no-fun, no-drama—a shift more self-protective than puritanical. Is it just love, or is that couple huddled together in their seats trying to ignite explosive-filled sneakers? Even a visit to the bathroom can trigger a full-bore fighter-jet scramble, as it did on the 10th anniversary of 9/11, when a pair of F‑16s shadowed a Frontier flight until it landed in Detroit after two passengers made for the lavatory at the same time. Cabin crews working chock-full flights now also have no time, much less the inclination, to play chaperone.

Almost perversely, as the reality of today’s air travel for the ordinary coach passenger moves from bearable to downright nasty, reviving the lost “romance” of flying makes marketing sense. Branson, the master marketer, beckons passengers to “get lucky” when they fly Virgin America jets outfitted with seat-back touch screens that let you send “an in-flight cocktail to that friendly stranger in seat 4A.” After all, if you’re busy punching your video screen to chat up some “friendly stranger,” you’re not griping about an airline’s $7.50 snack pack. And when Singapore Airlines proudly unveiled for global media its super-jumbo double-decker Airbus A380 jet, the hype was all about the glories of its 12 ultra-costly first-class “suites.” Combine two of the private pods (about $10,000 each for the round trip from New York to Frankfurt), and you can share a legit double bed, shown in publicity photos strewn with rose petals, alongside a gold tray holding an open bottle of Dom Pérignon and two half-full champagne flutes. What are you supposed to think? Then there’s Air New Zealand’s “Skycouch” (three adjacent coach seats that can be transformed into a flat, bed-like surface), popularly known as “cuddle class.” It comes with the coy admonition to “just keep your clothes on thanks!”

“Flying,” said the 1930s stunt pilot Pancho Barnes, “makes me feel like a sex maniac in a whorehouse with a stack of $20 bills.”

Could we return to the good old days when travelers were “mad men” and flight attendants were “sexy stews,” when the “sex sells seats” mantra drove some carriers to adorn “trolley dollies” in hot pants and go-go boots and to offer “executive” (men-only) flights between Chicago and New York? Not likely, at least in the United States, where women constitute more than 40 percent of frequent fliers and half of international air travelers, and make most travel-buying decisions. How many of these women are really looking to “get lucky” on their next flight? Being hit on by an unseen stranger while buckled into a seat at 35,000 feet, online commenters have complained, is at best “a little creepy” and at worst like being trapped in a “mile high stalker club.”

For those moved by the marketing, or otherwise compelled to act out the mile-high fantasy (Freud posited that the fantasy of flight itself has “infantile erotic roots”), there’s a better solution than flying commercial: your own plane. Think Playboy’s Big Bunny, a 1970s-era DC‑9 jet outfitted as a “party pit,” complete with a fur-covered oval bed, a shower, and a discotheque, all presided over by flight attendants (“Jet Bunnies”) in black-leather mini-jumpsuits: “Imagine Studio 54 with wings,” enthused a Playboy feature. That particular icon supposedly now resides, dismantled, in a small city in Mexico, but some air-charter services offer hour-long jaunts for adventurous couples wanting to live out the dream, or at least spice up their relationships. These outfits come and go, with names like Erotic Airways and Flamingo Air, but typically they equip their small Pipers or Cessnas with a mattress (in lieu of the customary four or six seats), overfly scenic spots like Cincinnati or western Georgia, and throw in a bottle of not-quite-vintage bubbly, all for about $500.

The sheets—no joke—are yours to take home as souvenirs.

Mark Gerchick, a former chief counsel for the Federal Aviation Administration, is the author of Full Upright and Locked Position.

Voir également:

Les hôtesses de Skymark Airlines dénoncent leurs robes trop courtes

AFP agence

Le Figaro

11/03/2014

La compagnie japonaise à bas coût a prévu pour son personnel de cabine un nouvel uniforme qui doit attirer davantage de clients. Le syndicat des hôtesses craint surtout les incivilités.

Skymark Airlines a peut-être pensé que petit prix pour le client rimait avec petite robe pour les hôtesses… Erreur: un syndicat de personnel navigant ne décolère pas contre un nouvel uniforme qui dévoile jusqu’aux cuisses. «Nous sommes préoccupées car nous pensons que cet uniforme pourrait causer des problèmes à bord, y compris du harcèlement sexuel», ont protesté les hôtesses à travers leur fédération de personnel de cabine.

«La compagnie aérienne explique que cet uniforme sert à attirer plus de clients, mais cela montre qu’elle considère la femme comme une marchandise», poursuit le syndicat selon lequel la priorité numéro un ne devrait pas être de raccourcir les tenues mais d’augmenter la sécurité. Skymark envisage de faire porter cette robe courte moulante qui couvre tout juste les fesses à l’occasion du vol intérieur inaugural de son premier Airbus A330 en mai prochain.

«Nous n’imposerons par l’uniforme aux hôtesses qui refuseraient de le porter», a déclaré récemment le président de Skymark, Shinichi Nishikubo, tout en regrettant que cette initiative vestimentaire ait été présentée «d’une façon déformée». Sur le site du syndicat, une hôtesse affirme «qu’elle ne pourrait pas se concentrer sur son travail parce qu’elle serait toujours en train de se demander si on ne la regarde pas», avec la crainte de photos prises par des mobiles et de mains baladeuses.

Voir aussi:

Les uniformes « trop serrés » de Miranda Kerr

Catherine Delvaux

7 sur 7

12/12/13

L’ex Ange de Victoria Secret a servi de modèle pour les nouveaux uniformes des hôtesses de l’air de Qantas Airlines. « L’uniforme va vraiment bien à Miranda Kerr, mais malheureusement nous ne lui ressemblons pas toutes », regrette une employée australienne.

Réalisés par Martin Grant sur base des mensurations parfaites du mannequin australien, les nouveaux uniformes de Qantas Airlines ont été présentés en septembre dernier et seront portés par les 12.000 hôtesses dès aujourd’hui. Mais ils ne plaisent pas à toutes. « Ces uniformes sont vraiment très serrés et ne sont tout simplement pas pratiques du tout pour le travail physique que nous avons à faire », se plaint d’une des employées sur le site News.com.au.

« Les hôtesses de l’air ont de 20 à 60 ans et beaucoup d’entre elles, notamment les plus âgées, ne souhaitent pas porter d’uniformes trop moulants. Nous aimions les anciens uniformes créés par Peter Morrissey. Ceux-là ils étaient vraiment confortables », ajoute une autre hôtesse mécontente. Un porte-parole d’une association rassure: « Nous avons demandé à Qantas de modifier un peu l’uniforme pour répondre aux plaintes des hôtesses. »

Voir encore:

Ryanair : le calendrier qui fait jaser

Amélie Gautier

le 14 décembre 2007

Présenté par la compagnie low cost comme le « calendrier 2008 le plus chaud », il met en scène ses hôtesses dans des poses osées. Du pur sexisme, selon des associations.En janvier, Julia assise dans le cockpit met le doigt sur l’un des nombreux boutons du tableau de bord, simplement vêtue d’un maillot de bain et de la casquette de pilote. En temps normal, la jeune femme assure la liaison vers Düsseldorf. Pas timorée pour un sou, en février, Jaroslava en bikini blanc se repose dans le creux d’un réacteur. Habituellement, la jolie brune travaille sur l’avion pour Rome. En avril, Nicola, hôtesse au sol à Londres montre, sifflet dans la bouche et tête ingénue, comment gonfler son gilet de sauvetage en cas de crash…. Et c’est comme ça douze mois durant sur le calendrier de Ryanair, baptisé Girls of Ryanair 2008.

Assurément très coquin mais aussi très malin de la part de la compagnie aérienne à bas tarifs d’Europe, qui fait parler d’elle tout en faisant sa B.A. : tous les bénéfices de la vente, 7 euros pièce, sont destinés à une œuvre de bienfaisance : l’association caritative Angels Quest, qui se charge de trouver des solutions d’hébergement provisoire pour des enfants atteints d’un handicap, afin de soulager leurs proches. Jusqu’à présent, 7 000 exemplaires – sur 10 000 – ont été vendus.

« Une atteinte à la dignité des femmes travailleuses »

« Quand nous avons lancé l’idée de mettre en scène des membres de l’équipage pour la bonne cause, 100 personnes se sont portées candidates, explique Peter Sherrard, de Ryanair. 12 ont été sélectionnées ». « Les plus belles hôtesses de Ryanair font monter la température en cabine », affirme le directeur des ressources humaines de Ryanair, Eddie Wilson, cité sur le site internet de la compagnie.

En tout cas, en voyant ces nymphes les mains dans le cambouis, le sang d’une association espagnole de consommateur n’a fait qu’un tour : Facua a ainsi accusé cette semaine la compagnie irlandaise d’utiliser ses hôtesses de l’air comme « des outils publicitaires ». Ce calendrier porte « atteinte à la dignité des femmes travailleuses en général et des hôtesses de l’air en particulier, en représentant des images stéréotypées de cette profession contre lesquelles on lutte depuis des années », a affirmé Facua.

Sexiste le calendrier ? Peter Sherrard de rétorquer : « On défend juste le droit des femmes à enlever leurs vêtements ». La dernière page montre une hôtesse dans un coin de l’avion, sourire pincé, peau fripée et maillot de bain fleuri, cette femme un peu défraîchie comparée aux donzelles précédentes est censée incarnée une hôtesse de Aer Lingus… Le principal concurrent de Ryanair, qu’elle a longtemps convoité jusqu’au « non » de Bruxelles. Charity business !

Love & Sexe : les métiers où on se fait le plus draguer

Valérie, hôtesse de l’air, 28 ans

Cosmopolitan

La dernière fois qu’on vous a draguée ?

L’an passé, sur un vol Paris-San Francisco. L’homme en question voyageait en Business. Pas un playboy, mais un quinqua plutôt classe qui parlait bien de son métier.

Il bossait chez Calvin Klein et, entre un café et une mignonnette de Baileys, m’a proposé de me faire envoyer le dernier parfum. Naïve, sur la passerelle, j’ai lâché ma carte de visite.

Sur la sienne, en échange, j’ai pu lire «?RDV à mon Novotel ??». Berk.

Pourquoi votre métier fait fantasmer ?

L’image de Natacha hôtesse de l’air tient bon. Et puis, il y a le prestige sexy de l’uniforme, du tailleur au foulard (exit le calot, par contre).

On sent les regards durant notre show sur les consignes de sécurité. On s’en amuse même, parfois.

Vous vous y attendiez ?

J’imaginais pire. Pas de la part des passagers, mais plutôt du personnel de bord.

Aujourd’hui, les escales sont plus courtes – quatre jours maxi – et la rotation des équipages ultra rapide. Moins le temps de se laisser séduire par le pilote !

Tactiques des garçons ?

Souvent affligeantes : le soda renversé dans la travée centrale, obligée d’éponger… en tailleur, la boucle de ceinture introuvable… Le must : un homme m’a même demandé de border sa couverture.

Comment vous vous défendez ?

Quand tu es hôtesse, tu dois faire preuve de diplomatie. Surtout sur un long-courrier. Donc, je réponds «?Non, merci?» sur le même ton et avec le même sourire que quand je propose «?Thé ou café ??».

Voir par ailleurs:

Le sexe ne fait pas vendre…

Jean-François Dortier

Sciences humaines

Décembre 2005

Prenez plusieurs groupes de personnes. Placez-les devant un téléviseur. A l’un des groupes, on montre une émission avec du sexe, à un autre de la violence ; un troisième regardera une émission familiale du type « Les animaux les plus drôles ». Interrompez alors chaque programme par quelques spots publicitaires. Puis demandez aux personnes de se souvenir des noms et des marques qu’ils ont vus. C’est le groupe « émission familiale » qui s’en souviendra le mieux. Moins perturbé par les scènes « chaudes », leur esprit est plus disponible. Répétez plusieurs fois pour vous assurer du fait. Et voilà : la démonstration est établie. Les publicités liées à des programmes télévisés de sexe ou de violence ont moins d’effets que celles qui sont associées à des programmes familiaux. L’expérience était simple. Elle a été réalisée par Brad Bushman de l’université du Michigan et publiée dans une récente livraison de Psychological Science. Conclusion : s’il est connu que le sexe ou la violence font grimper l’Audimat et si l’Audimat fait monter les recettes publicitaires, cela ne veut pas dire que le sexe ou la violence font vendre. CQFD.

Voir aussi:

6: Pourquoi le sexe vend ? (et quoi et à qui…)

Philippe Gouillou

December 12, 2011

Faut-il toujours mettre la photo d’une femme sexy pour vendre ? A voir les pubs on pourrait le croire, mais en fait si le sexe a bien un effet puissant, il est plus subtil que ça.

1. Pourquoi le sexe vend ? (et quoi et à qui…)

Tout le monde ne travaille pas dans le secteur de la pornographie et le sexe n’est pas le sujet principal des pensées des hommes (pas même celui des femmes), pourtant il est, de plus en plus semble-t-il, le support principal des publicités. Pourquoi ?

De nombreuses études (ex : Janssens et al., 2011 ; Sundie et al., 2011 ; Wilson et al., 2004) montrent qu’il y a un lien entre la situation de séduction et l’achat de produits liés au statut : c’est l’affichage du statut (le “display”) pour montrer qu’on a suffisamment de ressources disponibles pour se permettre d’en dépenser sur des produits inutiles (encore le Handicap de Zahavi). L’effet est plus fort chez les célibataires pour les achats d’impulsion et Griskevicius et ses collègues (2011) ont même trouvé que le sex-ratio avait un impact direct : plus il y a d’hommes en concurrence, plus l’effet display sera marqué.

Et pour les femmes ?

Griskevicius et al. (2007) ont trouvé le même effet chez les femmes mais moins brutal et pas sur le même type de dépense, elles donneront surtout à des causes et chercheront à aider, comme le montre le graphique :

En fait, ce qui influence le mode de consommation des femmes est leur position dans le cycle menstruel : en période d’ovulation elles dépenseront plus pour des produits liés à leur apparence (Durante et al., 2010).Un message sexuel est donc un priming efficace pour activer chez la cible les programmes de séduction (et notamment ce display), ceux-ci montrant des différences sexuelles marquées. C’est un Priming plus direct que la simple beauté qui provoque donc plus directement les mêmes effets.

Application pratique

Si vos produits correspondent, une publicité directement sexuelle sera particulièrement efficace, sinon le risque est grand que la cible n’en garde qu’une désagréable impression d’overdose (certes, vous pouvez encore espérer que quelques féministes augmenteront gratuitement votre notoriété mais ça ne durera pas : elles finiront pas le remarquer !)

Photo : Campagne Diesel 2010 (“Sex Sells* / *Unfortunately we sell jeans”) présentée sur BlogoPub : “Diesel Sex Sells : du sexe et des jeans par Nono – le 3 février 2010″

2. Photo : Top Model, le prochain métier remplacé par des ordinateurs

Photomontage 20 minutes

La dernière campagne H&M Suède a fait beaucoup de bruit : elle n’utilise plus que le visage des mannequins, collés sur des corps en plastique retouchés par ordinateur. 20 minutes traduit le journal suédois Aftonbladet :

«Ce ne sont pas de véritables corps. On prend des photos des vêtements sur un mannequin (en plastique, ndr), et ensuite, l’apparence humaine est générée par un programme informatique»

La beauté correspond à des critères et n’est pas que dans l’oeil de celui qui regarde (la page d’Evopsy la plus citée sur les sites féminins) et cela fait longtemps que les robots peuvent noter tout seul la beauté d’une femme mais deux choix de H&M pour cette campagne sont à noter :

H&M a choisi de garder des visages réels

H&M n’a fait aucune distinction régionale pour la forme du corps

Pour l’instant les seules critiques semblent être les (classiques) accusations d’incitation à l’anorexie mais j’imagine que le point 2 ci-dessus sera aussi très vite récupéré.

En fait le vrai jeu est maintenant de se demander combien de temps encore les visages réels seront utilisés et quand les femmes pourront vraiment être remplacées par de (parfaits) robots.

Pour rappel :

La compétition sexuelle est à l’intérieur de chaque sexe et l’habillement sert aux femmes d’abord à se positionner entre elles, le regard des hommes n’étant qu’un moyen dans cette guerre

Les mannequins Haute Couture ont des corps et des visages beaucoup plus masculins que les mannequins lingerie et les “pornstars” : en fait elles ressemblent à des garçons adolescents

La préférence des hommes pour des femmes plus ou moins “pulpeuses” est directement influencée par leur situation économique perçue : les plus riches préfèrent les plus minces (Herbert, 2010)

Les hommes ne privilégient la beauté du visage que pour des relations à long terme (Confer et al. , 2010 : synthèse sur Evopsy)

Application pratique

Si vous voulez utiliser le même genre de technique, assurez-vous de faire appel à d’excellents infographistes pour ne pas souffrir des deux risques célèbres : le “désastre photoshop” direct (exemples : Photoshop Disaster) et peut-être la “Vallée dérangeante” (“Uncanny Valley”) découverte par Masahiro Mori dès 1970, qui hypothétise que la “presque-ressemblance” humaine des robots fait (très) peur.

Ou alors attendez un tout petit peu : Karsch & Forsyth (2011) ont développé un impressionnant programme d’incrustation d’images (fixes et animées) accessible à tous après seulement 10mn de formation (voir leur vidéo de présentation). A ce rythme d’évolution, les infographistes seront les suivants sur la liste à être remplacés par des ordinateurs…

Photo et liens : 20 minutes : “Quand H&M copie-colle de vrais visages sur des corps générés par ordinateur” (06/12/2011)

3. Nouveau : La mesure du fauxtoshoppage

Hasard du calendrier ou pas, une toute nouvelle étude (Kee & Farid, 2011) propose une méthode pratique pour mesurer la quantité de retouche d’une photo (voir quelques exemples d’avant/après), ses auteurs souhaitant que leur note soit publiée à côté des photos retouchée en tant qu’avertissement (exactement comme pour les marges d’erreur des sondages). Cela permettrait peut-être de répondre à une demande extrêmement fréquente : que la compétition sexuelle soit plus “loyale” (j’avais vu à la TV une femme maquillée et beaucoup refaite se plaindre du “manque d’honnêteté des hommes”…)

Il me semble cependant que ne s’intéresser qu’au fauxtoshoppage est beaucoup trop restrictif : il faudrait bien sûr étendre cette méthode à la chirurgie esthétique et surtout, par souci d’équité, noter aussi le degré d’embelllissement des reportages sur les hommes ayant réussi économiquement…

Articles cités :

Confer, J. C., Perilloux, C., & Buss, D. M. (2010). More than just a pretty face: men’s priority shifts toward bodily attractiveness in short-term versus long-term mating contexts. Evolution and Human Behavior, 31(5), 5. doi:10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2010.04.002

Durante, K. M., Griskevicius, V., Hill, S. E., Perilloux, C., & Li, N. P. (2010). Ovulation, Female Competition, and Product Choice: Hormonal Influences on Consumer Behavior. Journal of Consumer Research, 37(April), 100827095129016-000. doi:10.1086/656575

Griskevicius, V., Tybur, J. M., Sundie, J. M., Cialdini, R. B., Miller, G. F., & Kenrick, D. T. (2007). Blatant benevolence and conspicuous consumption: when romantic motives elicit strategic costly signals. Journal of personality and social psychology, 93(1), 85-102. doi:10.1037/0022-3514.93.1.85

Griskevicius, V., Tybur, J. M., Ackerman, J. M., Delton, A. W., Robertson, T. E., & White, A. E. (2011). The financial consequences of too many men: Sex ratio effects on saving, borrowing, and spending. Journal of personality and social psychology. doi:10.1037/a0024761

Herbert, W. (2010). Do poor and hungry men prefer heavier women? Do rich and full guys like skinny girls? On Second Thought: Outsmarting Your Mind’s Hard-Wired Habits (p. 304). Crown. Retrieved from http://www.amazon.com/Second-Thought-Outsmarting-Hard-Wired-Habits/dp/0307461637

Janssens, K., Pandelaere, M., Van Den Bergh, B., Millet, K., Lens, I., & Roe, K. (2011). Can buy me love: Mate attraction goals lead to perceptual readiness for status products. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 47(1), 1-35. Elsevier Inc. doi:10.1016/j.jesp.2010.08.009

Karsch, K., & Forsyth, D. (2011). Rendering Synthetic Objects into Legacy Photographs. Proceedings of ACM SIGGRAPH ASIA (Vol. 30). Retrieved from http://kevinkarsch.com/publications/sa11.html

Kee, E., & Farid, H. (2011). A perceptual metric for photo retouching. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2011, 1-6. doi:10.1073/pnas.1110747108

Mori, M. (1970). The Uncanny Valley. Energy, 7(4), 33–35. Retrieved from http://www.movingimages.info/digitalmedia/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/MorUnc.pdf

Sundie, J. M. J. M., Kenrick, D. T. D. T., Griskevicius, V., Tybur, J. M. J. M., Vohs, K. D. K. D., & Beal, D. J. D. J. (2011). Peacocks, Porsches, and Thorstein Veblen: Conspicuous consumption as a sexual signaling system. Journal of personality and social psychology, 100(4), 664. American Psychological Association. doi:10.1037/a0021669

Wilson, M., & Daly, M. (2004). Do pretty women inspire men to discount the future? Proceedings. Biological sciences / The Royal Society, 271 Suppl, S177-9. doi:10.1098/rsbl.2003.0134

Gallery: Sexy flight attendant uniforms of the past

Whither the years of « charm farms, » little black books, hot pants and go-go boots? Come along with us for a groovy trip in time and style

Max Kim

CNN

18 July, 2012

Southwest Airlines flight attendants in the 1970s

Southwest Airlines’ motto in the 1970s is said to have been « sex sells seats, » and flight attendants were dressed to fit the bill. Widely known as « The Love Airline, » Southwest resisted hiring males until after losing a class action lawsuit in 1980.

Flying used to be so sexy.

Back in the days when passengers had to walk across the tarmac to board a plane, they were greeted by « air hostesses » arrayed in knee-high boots, short skirts and white gloves.

In 1971, the now-defunct U.S.-based National Airlines ran a saucy and suggestive ad that featured a flight attendant named Cheryl, smiling affably and accompanied by the seductive slogan, “I’m Cheryl. Fly me.”

There was another one, this time with Jo.

Business reportedly jumped 23 percent, despite accusations of sexism.

Along with National Airlines’ advertising campaign (American Airlines may have given them a run for their money), Eastern Airlines encouraged flirting with stewardesses by handing out little black books to male passengers for storing phone numbers.

Flight attendants were trained at « charm farms » to maximize their feminine sex appeal and a book depicting the golden age of travel by two « adventurous » former flight attendants entitled « Coffee, Tea or Me? » further stoked the flames of the fantasy of flying.

The airline industry has since gone through some major overhauls.

Airlines have adopted a gender-neutral professionalism, austere security measures and the ever-widening gaps between the luxury seat and the cramped budget one.

Societal norms have changed for the better — it’s hard to imagine some of the outfits pictured here ever being approved.

Still, it’s interesting to recall the fashion ethos of yesteryear.

Lowe Hunt for Lynx Body Spray: The Lynx Jet Project

November 3, 2011

Author:

An essential ingredient of experimentation is not always knowing where things will lead you. In 2005 Lynx came up with a new marketing story to up the ante on it’s “sex appeal” image. In Australia, the launch of the fictitious airline LynxJet combined familiar features of air traval with elements of male fantasy including racy in -flight entertainment such as pillow fighting, spanking and mud wrestling. When Lynx tried to get the airline off the ground for real, with sexy Lynx air stewardesses, the high-flying fantasy of a private luxury jet came crashing to earth when it was grounded by the Australian Aviation Authority.

The Brief
Lynx (Axe globally) is a male targeted bodyspray with an irreverent brand personality that is focused around public, playful fantasies. Lynx’s problem was that guys 17-25yrs were dropping out of the brand because they perceived it to be for their younger brother. Lynx needed to actively engage 17-25yrs males

The Media Strategy
The first overseas trip (without parents) is an AUSTRALIAN rite of passage. It represents the move into adulthood and is associated with freedom, including sexual freedom. It starts when they get on the plane – the mile-high club is within reach (in their dreams!)
To feed this fantasy, we created an airline – LYNXJET. Our strategy was to BEHAVE EXACTLY LIKE AN AIRLINE in media targeting young males. This integrated campaign incorporated an actual branded airplane (the LynxJet), real life air hostesses (Mostesses), a mock check-in service online and other airline-style communication. Young guys believed their fantasies had become reality!

The Idea
Two distinct phases:
1/ CREATE THE MYTH: a plane was re-branded LynxJet; viral launched the ultimate mile high fantasy club; there was signage at check-in counters; locker/seat/ticket advertising; sampling girls (“Mostesses”) acted like air-hostesses and became walking billboards.


Human Moving Billboards, otherwise known as LYNXjet Mostess. On the streets of Australian cities, in bars and at the airport, you couldn’t miss them. They were flirting, they were handing out their business cards and guys fell at their feet. The boys would leave messages, SMSs and go to the website to fulfill their fantasy of an airline that never was. The Mile High Club Lounge travelled from city to city creating a live LYNXjet experience. Guys could get a massage, have their picture taken with a Mostess and then download it off the web. The Human Moving Billboards were designed to drive guys to the web and register for the Mile High Club. In total over 658,000 unique visits, 11,500 Mile High Club registratations, the airline was dicussed on weblogs globally along with significant coverage on TV current affairs shows and in the press which was calculated at almost a half a million dollars of free advertising.

2/ FEED THE MYTH: A playful edge was added to traditional airline infrastructure: we created a website (www.lynxjet.com) and mobile ‘Mile High Club’ lounge. Then we imitated traditional airline advertising, with messaging targeting males.
We copied airline behavior to fuel the fantasy and surround the target. We launched with TV in the World Cup Qualifier, crashing Qantas’s ‘airline’ exclusivity. We created content on targeted radio (e.g. interviews with ‘Mostesses’). Newspapers messaged Lynxjet prices.

Online, we created a mock booking system & we staged a recruitment drive for “Mostesses” on employment sites. We delivered an airline experience by taking a mobile ‘Mile High Club Lounge’ to the streets.

The Results
Controversy is a measure of success! The plane was pulled due to a threatened strike by actual cabin crew! Brand share jumped to 84.5% – an all time high! The measure ‘is a sexy brand’ increased by 10%. Over 658,000 unique page views (27% of the target!).

Anthony Toovey, Unilever’s Senior Brand Manager responsible for Lynx says,“In Lynx Jet we have the opportunity to make the fantasies that have always been a core part of the Lynx brand, come to life. This is a ground-breaking activation for Unilever globally and we’re enormously proud of it.”

Advertising Agency: Lowe Hunt, Sidney
Creative Director: Adam Lance
Direct Creative Director: Peter Bidenko
Copywriter:  Michael Canning
Art Director: Simone Brandse
Year: 2005
Grand Prix Media Lions
 5 Gold Lion (Media, Promo and Direct)
2 Bronze Lion for the Campaign (Film & Outdoor)

Voir enfin:

Why Men Can’t Take Compliments

Casey Quinlan

The Atlantic

December 18, 2013

Recently, a date said to me, « You haven’t given me any compliments yet. I’ve complimented you plenty of times. »

It made me think about how rare it is for a man to openly express a desire to be praised for his looks and question why I didn’t compliment men on their looks more often. When I Googled, « men given compliments on appearance, » Google suggested I try, « Men give compliments on appearance. »

The concept of women complimenting men on their appearance can still seem foreign. Men are often portrayed as using compliments as a social tool, but do they themselves want to be applauded for their physical attributes?

In wanting to be praised for his looks, it would appear my date falls into a minority, according to one 1990 study by researchers at SUNY Binghamton and the University of the Witwatersrand, which concluded that compliments from men were generally accepted, especially by female recipients, but « compliments from women are met with a response type other than acceptance »: as a threat.

Men often see compliments as « face-threatening acts, » or acts intended to embarrass or patronize, the study authors found. What was meant as a nicety could be seen as a way to assert control.

When it comes to compliments from their own sex, men often regard appearance-based praise as a come-on. In her 2003 book, Sociolinguistics: The Essential Readings, Christina Bratt Paulston writes that for heterosexual men, « to compliment another man on his hair, his clothes, or his body is an extremely face-threatening thing to do, both for the speaker and the hearer. »

In the book The Psychology of Love, Michele Antoinette Paludi points out that stepping outside of gender roles can reduce attraction between partners.

« Current research indicates that gender-atypical qualities are often turn-offs in intimate relationships … Women also experienced social costs for atypical gender behavior … both men who were passive and women who were assertive were evaluated as significantly less socially attractive by men than women who did not engage in self-promoting behaviors. »

Being the arbiter of someone’s attractiveness can be interpreted as an expression of masculinity that women are not traditionally expected to adopt. Further, it is possible that a good portion of men don’t want to be essentially « treated like women, » as their masculinity is dependent on being above the judgments women are often subjected to.

Men are also more reluctant to express behaviors such as envy, according to the 2012 book, Gender, Culture and Consumer Behavior, which suggests that men hesitate to display “low-agency” emotions such as anxiety, vulnerability and jealousy.

In life as well as in art, a man’s focus on his own appearance can be perceived as detracting from his perceived masculinity in the eyes of male reviewers. In her book, Extra-Ordinary Men: White Heterosexual Masculinity in Contemporary Popular Cinema, Nicola Rehling points out that in the movie Gladiator, Maximus had a muscular build but was not sexualized on-screen. In the movie Troy, meanwhile, Brad Pitt’s Achilles was practically groomed for the enjoyment of straight female and gay male viewers. Crowe’s body was not nearly as exposed as Pitt’s was throughout the movie.

Rehling writes, « In the majority of reviews of the film, Brad Pitt was compared unfavorably with Crowe, with many expressing disappointment that he failed to import the primal masculinity that was such a big box office attraction in Gladiator. The adulation of Crowe’s Maximus would seem to articulate a desire for an undiluted, corporeal, physical male presence. »

The consequences for women giving men compliments are also different than those for men giving women compliments. In a 2006 study from Williamette University’s College of Liberal Arts, researchers Christopher Parisi and Peter Wogan found that college-aged men were generally given compliments on skills, while women were given compliments on their looks. Parisi and Wogan also found that women felt the need to be cautious when complimenting men on their appearance because they didn’t want to be « too forward » or attract « unwanted attention. »

That fear is supported by a 2008 study, conducted in Australia by Griffith University, which hypothesized that men are more likely to interpret or misinterpret female compliments as seductive or flirtatious than women are male compliments.

Who knew complimenting could be so complicated? Perhaps if we better understand the social norms behind compliments, women and men alike could begin to feel more comfortable praising each other in a non-sexual way, and to not expect anything in return.

http://jezebel.com/older-men-with-whom-we-would-go-to-bed-1485844445?utm_campaign=socialflow_jezebel_facebook&utm_source=jezebel_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow

Voir par ailleurs:

Pan Am: When air travel was sexy
Melissa Whitworth dons her girdle to welcome a new retro-glam series from the US.
Melissa Whitworth
16 Nov 2011

Inside a warehouse in Brooklyn, New York, stands a vintage Boeing 707. A bell rings, someone shouts “turbulence” and a cast of actors dressed in immaculate Sixties costumes jiggle about as if the stationary plane has encountered some rough air.

This is the set of Pan Am, the latest retro-flavoured television drama to arrive from the United States, which starts on BBC Two this week. Like Mad Men before it, the series, which follows the lives of four Pan Am stewardesses as they travel the world, is set in the Sixties: the first season takes place in 1963.

Christina Ricci plays Maggie, a stewardess who compromises her bohemian ideals to wear the Pan Am uniform – a girdle was mandatory and the women were weighed regularly and admonished for any gains – to see the world.
“I think the Sixties is a really visually beautiful period. It’s gorgeous to watch,” says Ricci, during a break between scenes.
What sets Pan Am apart from Mad Men is its romanticised view of the period it depicts. While Mad Men’s plot lines highlight racism, anti-Semitism and wanton sexual harassment, Pan Am chooses instead to airbrush the Sixties. “I was aware of how misogynistic this period was,” says Ricci, 31. “And we don’t deal as harshly with that as some other shows do.”

As one American critic wrote when the series first aired in the US, “When the present isn’t very promising, and the future seems tapered and uncertain, the past acquires an enviable lustre.”

Nancy Hult Ganis, one of the show’s producers, was a Pan Am stewardess from 1969 to 1976 and is the in-house adviser on the precise details of air travel in the Jet Age. Passengers really were served seven-course meals, including turtle soup and caviar. Stewardesses were encouraged to interact with their charges, playing chess and cards with them.

Ganis also says that many of the storylines are taken from real life, including one that sees stewardess Kate (Kelli Garner) become a low-level CIA operative.

“It became known later that many [Pan Am] station managers around the world were somehow connected to the CIA. It was the perfect cover. Pan Am flew into Russia in the Fifties even though there were no official routes there until 1968.”

Pan Am is the latest American drama to focus not only on the Sixties but what The New Yorker recently identified as “the rise of the American female and the demise of the American male”.

Ricci believes there is still some way to go to eradicate misogyny. “We have just got a lot better about not writing these things down and handing out rules. It’s less overt,” she says. “The Sixties was definitely a very misogynistic time: women were not treated as equals.

“I love watching Mad Men,” she adds, “but that doesn’t mean I want to live in it.”

Voir encore:

Stewardess chic is a flight of fantasy – with a weight limit
From the retro glamour of the Sixties to Carole Middleton, air hostesses still fascinate. So will the new BBC drama series take off?
Hannah Betts
The Telegraph

16 Nov 2011

As a teenager at my staunchly academic girls’ grammar school, the daughter in our anachronistic French textbook boasted one ambition: to be a starched, suited and scarfed airline stewardess, à la the heroines of Pan Am, the airline that is the basis of a new drama series that starts on BBC Two tonight.

Back in the mid-Eighties, how we despised young Marie-Claude for the sexist sappiness of her ambition. Miss Bertillon waxed lyrical about the glamour, the jet-setting, the familiar platitude about seeing the world. While her brother, Philippe, the chauvinist cochon, satirised her inability to fit the job’s weight requirements. Role model for a group of gymslip-feminists the wannabe Gallic trolley dolly was not.
But, then, we had so much opportunity: with book learning came expectations regarding equality, education, economic and sexual independence. If we wanted to see the world, we would InterRail as casually as today’s youth accrue bucket-shop flights.

Originating some 20 years earlier, Marie-Claude was simply following the route to success of many a small-town girl. Among them have been several prime minister’s wives: Lyudmila Putina, wife of Vladimir Putin, Sara Netanyahu, wife of Benjamin, and Annita Keating, estranged wife of Paul. Others ensnared the rich: Irina, the second Mrs Abramovich, say; Alex Best, wife of George; Daylesford Organic supremo Lady Carole Bamford, and – most notoriously and most upwardly mobile – Mrs Carole “doors-to-manual” Middleton.

Time was when airline stewardesses were the girls most likely to succeed, by merit of being the girl with whom men would most like to succeed. These geishas of the air may have theoretically catered to both genders, but business flying meant businessmen, and their attendants, were schooled in the art of being the perfect mistress/wife. Accordingly, they learned how to mix cocktails, select wine, serve food and generally make their male passengers comfortable in the subservience-with-a-smile manner of a Fifties marital manual. As actor Robert Vaughn sighed in the BBC documentary Come Fly with Me (The Story of Pan Am): “I just remember the girls. They couldn’t do enough for you.”

The frisky addition was, of course, that these hostesses encouraged not only uxoriousness, but sexual fantasy, being – by contractual obligation – slim, single, under 30 and provocatively uniform-clad. “Fly me,” cooed the sirens in the jet age’s innuendo-laden adverts, encouraging mile-high fantasies everywhere. Air Singapore still trades off the beguilements of its Singapore Girls, albeit said campaigns exploit Orientalism as much as they do sexism. Fancy dress shops are awash with “naughty” stewardess uniforms, a guise that Britney Spears made her bottom-wiggling own in the mile-high-themed video for her hit single Toxic.

Pan Am, the TV series, relishes the full fetishism implied in this particular fantasy of flight. Hair is snipped to a regulation bounce, hats jauntily angled, white gloves pristinely laundered, bottoms pertly pattable, and every girl equipped with the compulsory Revlon Persian Melon smile. In the first episode, there is a weigh-in, a tweaking-based girdle inspection and a scandal over a snagged pair of stockings. As Mary Quant confessed in Come Fly with Me, passengers felt under equal pressure to scrub up: “You kind of dressed up to get on an aeroplane… It was glamorous. It was wonderful.”

Fashion is already experiencing a retro, besuited moment, in which such niceties do not seem entirely out of place. Indeed, modish Singapore-based label Raoul has based its current collection specifically on the Pan Am uniforms of the Sixties and Seventies: brisk blouses, A-line skirts and practical, across-the-body bags. Meanwhile, retailers are leaping on the bandwagon to flog their more traditional wares as “Pan Am-inspired” (thank you, John Lewis). Doubtless, the elevation of Carole Middleton’s daughter to spick-and-span poster girl/future Queen also has something to do with this, but neat-and-nippy suits, silk scarves, sensible courts and flesh-coloured hose are suddenly feeling minxily dapper rather than no-hopedly naff.

However, a TV series cannot flourish by fashion fix alone, and, for many of us, there will be something more than a tad depressing about American television’s fixation with a time when men were martini-swigging men, and women were resolutely second-class citizens. While Mad Men may have shown the struggle of our grandmothers’ generation to be accepted on equal terms, Pan Am lies back and thinks of (flying towards) England. Nevertheless, both celebrate a culture in which a pointy brassiere was more useful to a girl than a pointy head.

Why are conservative periods the only ones that attract producers’ interest? A suffragette drama could still feature frocks (in green, white and violet to symbolise Give Women Votes), a land girl mini-series could go big on headscarves and carmine pouts. However, at least in both we would be celebrating a situation in which women were more than Valiumed, barefoot and pregnant, or mile-high hot stuff.

Or why not opt for later in the history of the hostess? Female flight attendants were at the forefront of Seventies gender campaigning. American activist group Stewardesses for Women’s Rights objected to company discrimination and sexist advertising that encouraged a culture of harassment, carrying many cases to court. Under pressure, the industry went on to drop its age, marriage and – finally – weight restrictions. Hostesses were routinely grounded without pay when their weight exceeded what the airline deemed appropriate.

“Flight attendant”, or “cabin crew” are now deemed more acceptable terms than the servile “stewardess” or “hostess”. Indeed, in the wake of September 11, 2001, society’s image of said flight attendant radically altered again. The selfless heroism of the women who battled to protect passengers and provided vital information about the hijackings is a matter of public record. Today, staff are trained to be physically robust and to take the offensive under attack rather than obeying commands. The passive and compliant trolley dolly has been forever grounded.

Yet a testosterone tang of sexism still lingers around ritzier air travel. When I have been fortunate enough to be flown business class, it frequently has the atmosphere of a gentlemen’s club. I have been asked whether I am “off to a wedding”, “a model” or a “pop star”. I regret to add that – more than once – mention has been made of the mile-high club, as if I may be travelling purely for the sexual entertainment of said male passenger. One regretted having taking a sleeping pill, because otherwise he could have had intercourse with me. That such an act might require consent did not appear to have occurred to him.

The “retro glamour” – for which read antiquated gender stereotypes – played out in Pan Am seems unlikely to improve the situation for the female flier, be she a customer, or one of the industry’s goddesses of the skies.

Voir enfin:

The high life of the air hostess? Hardly
Today’s trolley dollies face abuse – and even violence – from passengers during the summer exodus. Sally Williams investigates
Sally Williams
Teh Telegraph

30 Jul 2011

School’s out, the holidays are here, and Maria Selwick, 28, smiles with relief, thinking, thank God, that’s over. For three years, she worked as an air hostess for a budget airline company, flying to holiday destinations around Europe, and summer turned every day into a living hell.
“The kids and babies scream because their ears are hurting. People get annoyed. Kids kick the back of chairs and run up and down the cabin. It’s just a nightmare,” she says.
“People on board aircraft turn into animals. They boil into sudden shouting if you suggest the ‘hand’ luggage is too big for the locker. They get drunk, leave dirty nappies on the seat. Once we were landing and couldn’t let a woman into the lavatory so she pulled down her pants and did a wee in the galley.”
All the time, she had to recall her most important guideline: Be polite. She had no choice but to roll a trolley through this bedlam because a large portion of her pay depended on how much alcohol she sold.
How life has changed. Back in the 1960s when the jet age was just beginning, air stewardesses had an aura of glamour. It meant flying to tremendously exotic places, meeting lots of people. They wore hats and white gloves; handed out warm bread rolls from a basket.

Libbie Escolme-Schmidt, a former flight attendant who wrote Glamour in the Skies: The Golden Age of the Air Stewardess, remembers escorting passengers to their seats and folding their coats – “and this was in the economy cabin!”

Then, in 1989, the liberalisation of air routes in Europe heralded a boom in budget air travel. The democratic years began. Last year 211 million of us passed through UK airports – a 100-fold increase since 1950. But it’s often a bumpy ride. In 2008-09, the Civil Aviation Authority received 3,529 reports of “disruptive” behaviour on board aircraft. These included 796 reports of passengers arguing with crew, 983 reports of passengers disobeying crew, and 106 who turned violent.

This isn’t to say that the cabin crew don’t flip, too. Frequent-flier blogs ring with tales of “flight attendant rage”. Last year, Steven Slater, a JetBlue attendant, finally decided he’d had enough on the tarmac of Kennedy International Airport. After an argument with a passenger who stood up to fetch his luggage too soon, he launched a four-letter zinger through the public address system, grabbed a beer from the drinks trolley and slid down the emergency chute.

So what’s going on? “The passenger clientele has changed dramatically,” says Judith Osborne, 47, who recently retired after spending 25 years working for such airlines as Dan Air and British Airways. “When I first started it was the elite few and then it was families on package holidays. Now you’ve got the people who are generally 18 to 25.” By which she means drunk quite a lot of the time.

“About seven years ago, I was on a flight to Ibiza, lots of drinking on board, and this couple who’d never met just got together in the loo. There was a queue outside and a passenger said, ‘Someone’s been in there a long time.’ ”

When the couple came out, she took things in hand. “I did a passenger announcement,” she recalls. “I said, ‘Could everyone applaud the couple coming out of the toilet. They’ve just joined the Mile High Club.’ The passengers all applauded and the couple looked embarrassed. In the early days it never happened. I’ve now come across it nine times.”

“It is extremes of human nature writ large in a tiny space,” explains Imogen Edwards-Jones, author of Air Babylon, an exposé of life in the sky. In an aeroplane, she says, you are sealed off from the outside, cocooned in another world. “It’s like when you go through the revolving door of a five-star hotel – normal rules no longer apply. People think they are perfectly entitled to be rude to the air hostess, have sex with the person next to them, and drink everything going.”

She thinks bad behaviour is cabin-specific. “There’s more sexual activity in first class. You are given a bed and for some reason people think it’s more private than it actually is. And it can be quite weird if you end up sleeping next to your boss in a confined space after three glasses of wine – which is basically a bottle, because one drink in the air is worth three on the ground.”

People in economy, on the other hand, are just aggressive, says Edwards-Jones. “I think passengers behaved better when you could smoke. You’ve had a stressful journey there, you’ve had to take your shoes off, your belt off, everyone has searched you. You are more cramped because they pile more people in and you are fed with too much alcohol. Then the person in front of you decides to put their chair back and you’re eating your food under your chin.”

“We’re demeaned and demoted,” agrees Phillip Hodson, a fellow of the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy. “So we’re already irritated, bolshie and desperate to get our full rights in regards of the ticket we’ve paid for. And we perceive the poor flight attendants as enforcing the class division. They draw that curtain to hide us from our betters.”

But we also “eroticise” air travel, he says – “we’re in a flying phallus!” – more specifically the flight attendants themselves. After all, Ralph Fiennes had sex with an Australian stewardess on flight QF123 from Darwin to Mumbai. And Ashley Cole was recently revealed to have slept with air hostess Kerry Meades.

“I heard lots of stories of businessmen hitting on the hostesses,” confirms Edwards-Jones. This is partly because advertising campaigns have always played up their sexual allure. In the 1970s, the motto of Southwest Airlines of Texas was “sex sells seats”. Hotpants were part of the uniform. At the same time, another US airline, the now-defunct National Airlines, ran a famous ad with a pouting stewardess proclaiming, “I’m Cheryl. Fly me.”

To be fair, it wasn’t just companies. Coffee, Tea or Me?, the alleged memoirs of two fictitious stewardesses, published in 1967, launched three sequels, a TV film – and a million male fantasies.

“There’s a great deal of bending over, so it’s a question of cleavage and bottom, I’m afraid,” says Hodson. “But the men are also chosen for their looks, and there’s a market for that. You’ve got somebody serving you and it engenders fantasies.”

Because, of course, we now live in a different era. People have realised that those with a Y chromosome are equally able to serve drinks and stow luggage.

But still stewardesses must look a certain way. “If your hair is longer than your collar you have to wear it up,” says one. “If your ponytail is longer than six inches you have to wear it in a French pleat. You always have to wear high heels.” Even budget airlines, which make cabin crew buy their own uniforms (usually around £300), dictate the colour of tights. “Hazelnut,” says Selwick.

But the job has definitely changed. Rising oil prices, commercial pressure, heightened security and budget cuts mean the whole reason for pushing trolleys through different time zones at 35,000 feet – namely, actually seeing the world – has gone. A trip to Venice, say, is followed almost immediately by the trip home again. “We used to have two whole days in Nairobi and you were free to go off on safari,” remembers one stewardess. “Now it’s a night stop in a cheap hotel.”

“Air hostesses used to be glamorous,” agrees Edwards-Jones. “Now they wear an orange bib and people chuck rubbish at them as they walk up and down the aisle.”

*Some names have been changed

Voir enfin:

Now that was the high life: The ex-Pan Am hostesses recall life at the airline as new drama recreates golden age of flying

Barbara Mcmahon
The Daily Mail

5 October 2011

Sheila Riley will never forget the moment the jaw-droppingly handsome man flashed her a dazzling smile and politely asked: ‘You wouldn’t care to join me for dinner, would you? I hate eating alone.’

The invitation came from movie star Paul Newman and the only reason Sheila hesitated was because she was meant to be working.

It was the summer of 1963 and British-born Sheila was a Pan Am air hostess. She was accustomed to meeting famous passengers, but nothing prepared her for the meal she shared at 35,000ft with one of greatest film heart-throbs of all time.

Newman had already set hearts fluttering when he boarded the plane, quietly storing his bag in the overhead locker before settling into seat 2F in the first-class cabin.

‘I took his coat to hang it up and offered him a drink,’ says Sheila. ‘I was all of a dither, even though I tried not to show it.

‘He was devastatingly good-looking and I had him all to myself because I was the only hostess working first-class that day.’

Sheila had to seek the permission of the captain before taking a seat opposite Newman to share a meal of caviar, lobster and profiteroles, washed down with Dom Perignon champagne.

‘I wasn’t meant to drink alcohol on duty, so I swigged my champagne out of a coffee cup so no one would notice,’ says Sheila.

Despite his fame and good looks, Newman didn’t flirt with 25-year-old Sheila. Instead he spoke about his joy at being a husband and father.

‘He was the perfect gentleman. He was happily married to Joanne Woodward and it was obvious how in love he was. It was so refreshing to hear a man talk about his wife in such a loving way,’ says Sheila.

Glamorous: The stars of Pan Am, set to be screened on the BBC this autumn

‘He wanted to know all about me and the places I had travelled to. It was a couple of years after he’d made The Hustler and he was a big star. He said he envied me my freedom.

‘After 45 minutes I said I had better get back to work. He thanked me for my company and settled down for a snooze before landing.’

Sheila was a stewardess during the golden age of flying when service always came with a dazzling smile.

Pan Am, a TV series to be screened by the BBC this autumn, captures that glamorous heyday. The show takes a romanticised look at the lives and loves of the handsome pilots and beautiful air stewardesses who travelled the world seeking adventure and romance.

In their smart, sky-blue uniforms and pillbox hats, Pan Am air hostesses were the envy of women the world over.

‘It wasn’t a job, it was a lifestyle,’ says Sheila. ‘We shopped for gloves and shoes in Rome, perfume in Paris, pearls in Tokyo and had our clothes made in Hong Kong.

‘We had a knees-up on every stop-over — the first thing we would do on landing was buy bottles of gin.’

Now based in New York, 73-year-old glamorous grandmother Sheila was born in Bolton. She started working for the U.S. airline in 1960 at the age of 22 — one of only three applicants out of 2,000 to make the grade in that round of hiring.

She applied out of a spirit of adventure. ‘All my friends were getting engaged and married, but I didn’t want to do that. When I saw an advert for the job, I knew it was my escape route,’ she says.

It is a sentiment shared by Bronwen Roberts, also now in her 70s. Brought up in Porthmadog, she was heading for a staid life as a teacher when she applied to Pan Am in 1958.

The jobs were so coveted that both women became mini-celebrities in their home towns and appeared in the local press. ‘Now she’s to be an air girl!’ exclaimed a headline in Bronwen’s local newspaper.

They were flown first-class to New York on Pan Am flights to start their new lives. Training for the coveted winged badge was rigorous — it included being dumped in the ocean and having to swim to a life-raft. But mostly it was about learning the art of serving the lucky passengers who could afford to fly in that era.

Golden age: Pan Am recreates the time when air travel was the height of glamour

Meals in first-class were provided by the famous Maxim’s restaurant in Paris: seven-course affairs presented on fine china and table linens.

For this, they earned £80 a month — a small fortune in those days and far more than a teacher or secretary.

Such privilege came at a price: Pan Am girls were subject to a beauty inspection before each flight.

‘When you checked in for work you’d go into the office and there would be a grooming supervisor on duty all the time,’ says Bronwen.

‘She could say « Your hair’s too straggly » or « You’ve put on weight » and send you home until you fixed it.  We all tried to conform and look our best because none of us wanted to be grounded.’

All the stewardesses were given a long list of grooming requirements in the flight service manual they had to follow at all times. Everyone wore the tailored blue two-piece Pan Am uniform, designed by Don Loper of Hollywood, along with a crisp white blouse. Underwear had to be a white bra, full slip, girdle and stockings.

There was even regulation make-up: Revlon’s Persian Melon lipstick and matching nail polish. Charles Revlon was on the Pan Am board of directors.

Sky high ratings: Pan Am stars American actress Christina Ricci as a stewardess
‘If you were caught wearing, say, blue eye-shadow or scarlet lipstick you were told to wipe it off because they wanted us to look natural and wholesome,’ says Sheila.

You had to be single. Married, divorced or separated women were banned. These petty rules seem laughable today, but Pan Am cabin crew in the Sixties thought it was a small price to pay for the freedom to travel abroad, still a relatively rare experience for most people.

Pan American World Airways — as the airline was officially known — was unique among airlines in that it focused on international flights. Celebrities flocked to fly on its Clippers, as its planes were known.

Bronwen remembers The Stratocruiser, which had a spiral staircase leading down to a bar, a bridal suite up front and pull-down beds for passengers.

On one occasion in 1961, she was on board a 707, one of the early jets, when Sir Winston Churchill flew back from New York to London after cruising in the Caribbean with Aristotle Onassis.

The Greek ship-owner had bought out the entire first-class section of the aircraft for the former prime minister and his entourage, which included his private secretary, two nurses, a bodyguard — and a budgerigar.

‘We were waiting at the top of the steps to greet Sir Winston when a bodyguard came on board carrying a little bird in a cage,’ says Bronwen.

‘It turns out Onassis had bought Sir Winston the budgie as a present. It was called Byron and chirped throughout the whole flight, which was rather annoying.

‘Sir Winston ploughed his way through lobster thermidor and roast beef and drank several glasses of Chateau Lafite Rothschild. He followed that up with cognac and smoked two cigars — everyone smoked on flights in those days.’

Bronwen remembers Churchill as being ‘absolutely delightful’ and also recalls the cleaners rushing on to the plane after he disembarked in London, searching the ashtrays for his cigar butts as souvenirs.

Though nothing tops her dinner with Paul Newman, Sheila met many celebrities during her time. She looked after David Niven on a flight to the South of France.

‘He was so charming and impeccably dressed,’ she says.

‘He came to join me at the back of first-class and said: « Let’s play a game. » For about 15 minutes we had to match the faces of all the passengers to imaginary dogs. So a lady with curly hair looked like a poodle and a man who was scowling looked like a boxer. I laughed  so much I thought I might get  in trouble.’

Peter Sellers and his then wife Britt Ekland were on another flight. ‘This was just after he had appeared as an Indian doctor in The Millionairess with Sophia Loren and I complimented him on his accent. For the rest of the flight, he spoke to me in an Indian accent and kept wobbling his head. He had us all in stitches,’ says Sheila.

But not every celebrity was as entertaining. According to the former stewardesses, Bing Crosby was ‘a miserable so and so’ while Joan Crawford, whose husband was on the Pan Am board, travelled with her own coolbox containing Pepsi and vodka.

‘To be blunt, she was a complete lush,’ says Sheila. ‘She started downing the booze from the minute she boarded.’

Predictably, Warren Beatty flirted with every stewardess he laid eyes on. ‘He hung around the galley all night on one New York to London flight,’ says Bronwen.

‘He was chasing a very pretty German stewardess, asking her what she was doing when she got to London and if she wanted to go out with him.

‘When she said she had a boyfriend, he wasn’t in the least discouraged — he just went on to the next stewardess.

‘He worked his way through all of us, but we knew his reputation and weren’t going to fall for it.’

Romance, of course, played a huge part in the lives of Pan Am stewardesses.

‘We had these long trips when we would be away with the same crew for 21 or 24 days,’ says Bronwen. ‘We’d be in romantic places such as Hong Kong or Istanbul, so romance — and affairs — were inevitable. The captains were nicknamed Sky Gods and that’s how we regarded them. They were rugged, virile, attractive men so, of course, we flirted outrageously. If you caught the eye of a captain, it was a feather in your cap.’

Sheila’s love life flourished when she was a Pan Am stewardess.

‘We were the supermodels of the day and every important man wanted a Pan Am stewardess on his arm, so we didn’t go short of offers,’ she says.

American-born Anne Sweeney, who worked for Pan Am from 1964 to 1975, says: ‘I remember walking as a group through airports and crowds would part to let us through.

‘Little girls would come up to me and say: « I’m going to be like you when I grow up. »‘

However, the airline went out of business in 1991. The downing of Flight 103 over Lockerbie by terrorists was a contributing factor, but bad management, rising fuel prices, the introduction of costly 747s and competition on international routes also played a part.

Today, many former Pan Am stewardesses are members of World Wings International, a philanthropic organisation that raises money for charity. They meet regularly at destinations around the world to do good deeds and remember the glory days.

‘We were a kind of sisterhood,’ says Sheila. ‘And we really did have the best job in the world.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2045365/Pan-Am-Former-hostesses-recall-life-airline-new-TV-airs-US.html#ixzz3Mngd8OPZ
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook


%d blogueurs aiment cette page :